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Sample records for application ultrafast mri

  1. Clinical application ultrafast MRI to the sleep apnea syndrome, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suto, Yuji; Nakamura, Kiyoshi; Kato, Terumi

    1992-01-01

    To evaluate the site of obstruction within upper airway, we observed the Turbo-fast low angle shot (FLASH) imaging, in 10 patients with sleep apnea syndrome (SAS) during wakefulness and sleep. After intravenous injection of Gd-DTPA (0.1 mmol/kg), sequential images of pharyngeal portion were obtained in midline sagittal section. An imaging protocol was 1.13s per image with a 1s delay between images, for a total of 30s. Then sequential images were displayed in a cine on C. R. T.. In eight patients, upper airway obstructions were present during sleep, while narrowings were present in four cases during awake. The sites of obstruction were located at the velopharynx exclusively in three cases, velopharynx plus glosspharynx in three cases, velopharynx plus glosspharynx in one case. Velopharynx plus hypopharynx in one case, respectively. It was concluded that ultrafast MRI had an important role in evaluating the sites of obstruction within upper airway in patients with SAS. (author)

  2. Functional MRI of the patellofemoral joint: comparison of ultrafast MRI, motion-triggered cine MRI and static MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhle, C. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany); Brossmann, J. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany); Melchert, U.H. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany); Schroeder, C. [Radiologische Abt., Universitaets-Kinderklinik, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, Kiel (Germany); Boer, R. de [Philips Medical Systems, Best (Netherlands); Spielmann, R.P. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany); Heller, M. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    To evaluate the feasibility and usefulness of ultrafast MRI (u), patellar tracking from 30 of flexion to knee extension (0 ) was analysed and compared with motion-triggered cine MRI (m) and a static MRI technique (s). The different imaging methods were compared in respect of the patellofemoral relationship, the examination time and image quality. Eight healthy subjects and four patients (in total 18 joints) with patellar subluxation or luxation were examined. Significant differences between the static MRI series without quadriceps contraction and the functional MRI studies (motion-triggered cine MRI and ultrafast MRI) were found for the patellar tilt angle. In the dynamic joint studies there was no statistical difference of the regression coefficients between the motion-triggered cine MRI studies and the ultrafast MRI studies. The findings of the functional MRI studies compared with the static MRI images were significantly different for the lateralisation of the patella, expressed by the lateral patellar displacement and bisect offset. No significant differences in patellar lateralisation were found between motion-triggered cine MRI and ultrafast MRI. Ultrafast MRI was superior to motion-triggered cine MRI in terms of the reduction in imaging time and improvement of the image quality. (orig.)

  3. Functional MRI of the patellofemoral joint: comparison of ultrafast MRI, motion-triggered cine MRI and static MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhle, C.; Brossmann, J.; Melchert, U.H.; Schroeder, C.; Boer, R. de; Spielmann, R.P.; Heller, M.

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and usefulness of ultrafast MRI (u), patellar tracking from 30 of flexion to knee extension (0 ) was analysed and compared with motion-triggered cine MRI (m) and a static MRI technique (s). The different imaging methods were compared in respect of the patellofemoral relationship, the examination time and image quality. Eight healthy subjects and four patients (in total 18 joints) with patellar subluxation or luxation were examined. Significant differences between the static MRI series without quadriceps contraction and the functional MRI studies (motion-triggered cine MRI and ultrafast MRI) were found for the patellar tilt angle. In the dynamic joint studies there was no statistical difference of the regression coefficients between the motion-triggered cine MRI studies and the ultrafast MRI studies. The findings of the functional MRI studies compared with the static MRI images were significantly different for the lateralisation of the patella, expressed by the lateral patellar displacement and bisect offset. No significant differences in patellar lateralisation were found between motion-triggered cine MRI and ultrafast MRI. Ultrafast MRI was superior to motion-triggered cine MRI in terms of the reduction in imaging time and improvement of the image quality. (orig.)

  4. Diagnostic value of ultrafast fetal MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoisa, Daniela; De Luca, Silvina E.; Florenzano, Nestor V.; Mondello, Eduardo J.; Eyheremendy, Eduardo; Heinen, Fernando; Margulies, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze cases of fetal pathology evaluated by Ultra Fast MR sequences. Material and methods: 12 patients (2nd. and 3rd. trimester of pregnancy) have been studied by obstetric US and MR. Results: In our series we found intestinal duplication cyst, ureteropelvic junction obstruction and multicystic dysplastic kidney, esophageal atresia, acardia, anencephalic syndrome, semilobar holoprosencephaly, congenital diafragmatic hernia, cystic adenomatoid malformation, onphalocele and several scoliosis, duodenal stenosis, cervical teratoma and uretral atresia. In 8/12 cases (66%) MRI provide additional information as compared to US. Conclusion: The Ultra Fast MR sequences allows the evaluation of patients in the second and third trimester of pregnancy without sedation. It should be considered as a complementary method of the US to confirm fetal anomalies. The information provided by MRI is useful in planning adequate therapeutic decisions. (author)

  5. Quantitative ultra-fast MRI of HPMC swelling and dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ya Ying; Hughes, L P; Gladden, L F; Mantle, M D

    2010-08-01

    For the first time quantitative Rapid Acquisition with Relaxation Enhancement (RARE) based ultra-fast two-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging has been used to follow the dissolution of hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose (HPMC) in water. Quantitative maps of absolute water concentration, spin-spin relaxation times and water self-diffusion coefficient are obtained at a spatial resolution of 469 microm in less than 3 min each. These maps allow the dynamic development of the medium release rate HPMC/water system to be followed. It is demonstrated that the evolution of the gel layer and, in particular, the gradient in water concentration across it, is significantly different when comparing the quantitative RARE sequence with a standard (nonquantitative) implementation of RARE. The total gel thickness in the axial direction grows faster than that in the radial direction and that the dry core initially expands anisotropically. Additionally, while HPMC absorbs a large amount of water during the dissolution process, the concentration gradient of water within the gel layer is relatively small. For the first time MRI evidence is presented for a transition swollen glassy layer which resides between the outer edge of the dry tablet core and the inner edge of the gel layer. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association

  6. Ultrafast pulse lasers jump to macro applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griebel, Martin; Lutze, Walter; Scheller, Torsten

    2016-03-01

    Ultrafast Lasers have been proven for several micro applications, e.g. stent cutting, for many years. Within its development of applications Jenoptik has started to use ultrafast lasers in macro applications in the automotive industry. The JenLas D2.fs-lasers with power output control via AOM is an ideal tool for closed loop controlled material processing. Jenoptik enhanced his well established sensor controlled laser weakening process for airbag covers to a new level. The patented process enables new materials using this kind of technology. One of the most sensitive cover materials is genuine leather. As a natural product it is extremely inhomogeneous and sensitive for any type of thermal load. The combination of femtosecond pulse ablation and closed loop control by multiple sensor array opens the door to a new quality level of defined weakening. Due to the fact, that the beam is directed by scanning equipment the process can be split in multiple cycles additionally reducing the local energy input. The development used the 5W model as well as the latest 10W release of JenLas D2.fs and achieved amazing processing speeds which directly fulfilled the requirements of the automotive industry. Having in mind that the average cycle time of automotive processes is about 60s, trials had been done of processing weakening lines in genuine leather of 1.2mm thickness. Parameters had been about 15 cycles with 300mm/s respectively resulting in an average speed of 20mm/s and a cycle time even below 60s. First samples had already given into functional and aging tests and passed successfully.

  7. Generalized INverse imaging (GIN): ultrafast fMRI with physiological noise correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyacioğlu, Rasim; Barth, Markus

    2013-10-01

    An ultrafast functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technique, called generalized inverse imaging (GIN), is proposed, which combines inverse imaging with a phase constraint-leading to a less underdetermined reconstruction-and physiological noise correction. A single 3D echo planar imaging (EPI) prescan is sufficient to obtain the necessary coil sensitivity information and reference images that are used to reconstruct standard images, so that standard analysis methods are applicable. A moving dots stimulus paradigm was chosen to assess the performance of GIN. We find that the spatial localization of activation for GIN is comparable to an EPI protocol and that maximum z-scores increase significantly. The high temporal resolution of GIN (50 ms) and the acquisition of the phase information enable unaliased sampling and regression of physiological signals. Using the phase time courses obtained from the 32 channels of the receiver coils as nuisance regressors in a general linear model results in significant improvement of the functional activation, rendering the acquisition of external physiological signals unnecessary. The proposed physiological noise correction can in principle be used for other fMRI protocols, such as simultaneous multislice acquisitions, which acquire the phase information sufficiently fast and sample physiological signals unaliased. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Novel applications of quantitative MRI for the fetal brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clouchoux, Cedric [Children' s National Medical Center, Division of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, Washington, DC (United States); Limperopoulos, Catherine [Children' s National Medical Center, Division of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, Washington, DC (United States); McGill University, McConnell Brain Imaging Center, Montreal Neurological Institute, Montreal (Canada); McGill University, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Montreal (Canada); Children' s National Medical Center, Division of Fetal and Transitional Medicine, Washington, DC (United States)

    2012-01-15

    The advent of ultrafast MRI acquisitions is offering vital insights into the critical maturational events that occur throughout pregnancy. Concurrent with the ongoing enhancement of ultrafast imaging has been the development of innovative image-processing techniques that are enabling us to capture and quantify the exuberant growth, and organizational and remodeling processes that occur during fetal brain development. This paper provides an overview of the role of advanced neuroimaging techniques to study in vivo brain maturation and explores the application of a range of new quantitative imaging biomarkers that can be used clinically to monitor high-risk pregnancies. (orig.)

  9. Radiomics for ultrafast dynamic contrast-enhanced breast MRI in the diagnosis of breast cancer: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drukker, Karen; Anderson, Rachel; Edwards, Alexandra; Papaioannou, John; Pineda, Fred; Abe, Hiroyuke; Karzcmar, Gregory; Giger, Maryellen L.

    2018-02-01

    Radiomics for dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) breast MRI have shown promise in the diagnosis of breast cancer as applied to conventional DCE-MRI protocols. Here, we investigate the potential of using such radiomic features in the diagnosis of breast cancer applied on ultrafast breast MRI in which images are acquired every few seconds. The dataset consisted of 64 lesions (33 malignant and 31 benign) imaged with both `conventional' and ultrafast DCE-MRI. After automated lesion segmentation in each image sequence, we calculated 38 radiomic features categorized as describing size, shape, margin, enhancement-texture, kinetics, and enhancement variance kinetics. For each feature, we calculated the 95% confidence interval of the area under the ROC curve (AUC) to determine whether the performance of each feature in the task of distinguishing between malignant and benign lesions was better than random guessing. Subsequently, we assessed performance of radiomic signatures in 10-fold cross-validation repeated 10 times using a support vector machine with as input all the features as well as features by category. We found that many of the features remained useful (AUC>0.5) for the ultrafast protocol, with the exception of some features, e.g., those designed for latephase kinetics such as the washout rate. For ultrafast MRI, the radiomics enhancement-texture signature achieved the best performance, which was comparable to that of the kinetics signature for `conventional' DCE-MRI, both achieving AUC values of 0.71. Radiomic developed for `conventional' DCE-MRI shows promise for translation to the ultrafast protocol, where enhancement texture appears to play a dominant role.

  10. Performance of Ultrafast DCE-MRI for Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Aritrick; He, Dianning; Fan, Xiaobing; Wang, Shiyang; Szasz, Teodora; Yousuf, Ambereen; Pineda, Federico; Antic, Tatjana; Mathew, Melvy; Karczmar, Gregory S; Oto, Aytekin

    2018-03-01

    This study aimed to test high temporal resolution dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for different zones of the prostate and evaluate its performance in the diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa). Determine whether the addition of ultrafast DCE-MRI improves the performance of multiparametric MRI. Patients (n = 20) with pathologically confirmed PCa underwent preoperative 3T MRI with T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted, and high temporal resolution (~2.2 seconds) DCE-MRI using gadoterate meglumine (Guerbet, Bloomington, IN) without an endorectal coil. DCE-MRI data were analyzed by fitting signal intensity with an empirical mathematical model to obtain parameters: percent signal enhancement, enhancement rate (α), washout rate (β), initial enhancement slope, and enhancement start time along with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and T2 values. Regions of interests were placed on sites of prostatectomy verified malignancy (n = 46) and normal tissue (n = 71) from different zones. Cancer (α = 6.45 ± 4.71 s -1 , β = 0.067 ± 0.042 s -1 , slope = 3.78 ± 1.90 s -1 ) showed significantly (P <.05) faster signal enhancement and washout rates than normal tissue (α = 3.0 ± 2.1 s -1 , β = 0.034 ± 0.050 s -1 , slope = 1.9 ± 1.4 s -1 ), but showed similar percentage signal enhancement and enhancement start time. Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed area under the curve for DCE parameters was comparable to ADC and T2 in the peripheral (DCE 0.67-0.82, ADC 0.80, T2 0.89) and transition zones (DCE 0.61-0.72, ADC 0.69, T2 0.75), but higher in the central zone (DCE 0.79-0.88, ADC 0.45, T2 0.45) and anterior fibromuscular stroma (DCE 0.86-0.89, ADC 0.35, T2 0.12). Importantly, combining DCE with ADC and T2 increased area under the curve by ~30%, further improving the diagnostic accuracy of PCa detection. Quantitative parameters from empirical mathematical model fits to ultrafast

  11. Time to enhancement derived from ultrafast breast MRI as a novel parameter to discriminate benign from malignant breast lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mus, Roel D.; Borelli, Cristina; Bult, Peter; Weiland, Elisabeth; Karssemeijer, Nico; Barentsz, Jelle O.; Gubern-Mérida, Albert; Platel, Bram; Mann, Ritse M.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • New view-sharing sequences (e.g. TWIST) enable ultrafast dynamic breast MRI. • TWIST sequences accurately characterize the inflow of contrast in breast lesions. • TTE evaluation allows breast lesion classification with very high accuracy. • The use of TTE significantly increases the specificity of breast MRI. • TWIST imaging may increase the potential of breast MRI as screening tool. - Abstract: Objectives: To investigate time to enhancement (TTE) as novel dynamic parameter for lesion classification in breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: In this retrospective study, 157 women with 195 enhancing abnormalities (99 malignant and 96 benign) were included. All patients underwent a bi-temporal MRI protocol that included ultrafast time-resolved angiography with stochastic trajectory (TWIST) acquisitions (1.0 × 0.9 × 2.5 mm, temporal resolution 4.32 s), during the inflow of contrast agent. TTE derived from TWIST series and relative enhancement versus time curve type derived from volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) series were assessed and combined with basic morphological information to differentiate benign from malignant lesions. Receiver operating characteristic analysis and kappa statistics were applied. Results: TTE had a significantly better discriminative ability than curve type (p < 0.001 and p = 0.026 for reader 1 and 2, respectively). Including morphology, sensitivity of TWIST and VIBE assessment was equivalent (p = 0.549 and p = 0.344, respectively). Specificity and diagnostic accuracy were significantly higher for TWIST than for VIBE assessment (p < 0.001). Inter-reader agreement in differentiating malignant from benign lesions was almost perfect for TWIST evaluation (κ = 0.86) and substantial for conventional assessment (κ = 0.75). Conclusions: TTE derived from ultrafast TWIST acquisitions is a valuable parameter that allows robust differentiation between malignant and benign breast lesions with high

  12. Time to enhancement derived from ultrafast breast MRI as a novel parameter to discriminate benign from malignant breast lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mus, Roel D., E-mail: aroel.mus@radboudumc.nl [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Medical Center, Geert Grooteplein Zuid 10, 6525GA Nijmegen (Netherlands); Borelli, Cristina, E-mail: cristinaborelli@hotmail.it [Department of Radiology, Scientific Institute “Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza” Hospital, Viale Cappuccini 1, 71013, San Giovanni Rotondo, Foggia (Italy); Department of Radiology, Radboud University Medical Center (internal address 766), Geert Grooteplein Zuid 10, 6525GA Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bult, Peter, E-mail: peter.bult@radboudumc.nl [Department of Pathology, Radboud University Medical Center, Geert Grooteplein Zuid 10, 6525GA Nijmegen (Netherlands); Weiland, Elisabeth, E-mail: elisabeth.weiland@siemens.com [Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen (Germany); Karssemeijer, Nico, E-mail: nico.karssemeijer@radboudumc.nl [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Medical Center, Geert Grooteplein Zuid 10, 6525GA Nijmegen (Netherlands); Barentsz, Jelle O., E-mail: jelle.barentsz@radboudumc.nl [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Medical Center, Geert Grooteplein Zuid 10, 6525GA Nijmegen (Netherlands); Gubern-Mérida, Albert, E-mail: albert.gubernmerida@radboudumc.nl [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Medical Center, Geert Grooteplein Zuid 10, 6525GA Nijmegen (Netherlands); Platel, Bram, E-mail: bram.platel@radboudumc.nl [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Medical Center, Geert Grooteplein Zuid 10, 6525GA Nijmegen (Netherlands); Mann, Ritse M., E-mail: ritse.mann@radboudumc.nl [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Medical Center, Geert Grooteplein Zuid 10, 6525GA Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • New view-sharing sequences (e.g. TWIST) enable ultrafast dynamic breast MRI. • TWIST sequences accurately characterize the inflow of contrast in breast lesions. • TTE evaluation allows breast lesion classification with very high accuracy. • The use of TTE significantly increases the specificity of breast MRI. • TWIST imaging may increase the potential of breast MRI as screening tool. - Abstract: Objectives: To investigate time to enhancement (TTE) as novel dynamic parameter for lesion classification in breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: In this retrospective study, 157 women with 195 enhancing abnormalities (99 malignant and 96 benign) were included. All patients underwent a bi-temporal MRI protocol that included ultrafast time-resolved angiography with stochastic trajectory (TWIST) acquisitions (1.0 × 0.9 × 2.5 mm, temporal resolution 4.32 s), during the inflow of contrast agent. TTE derived from TWIST series and relative enhancement versus time curve type derived from volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) series were assessed and combined with basic morphological information to differentiate benign from malignant lesions. Receiver operating characteristic analysis and kappa statistics were applied. Results: TTE had a significantly better discriminative ability than curve type (p < 0.001 and p = 0.026 for reader 1 and 2, respectively). Including morphology, sensitivity of TWIST and VIBE assessment was equivalent (p = 0.549 and p = 0.344, respectively). Specificity and diagnostic accuracy were significantly higher for TWIST than for VIBE assessment (p < 0.001). Inter-reader agreement in differentiating malignant from benign lesions was almost perfect for TWIST evaluation (κ = 0.86) and substantial for conventional assessment (κ = 0.75). Conclusions: TTE derived from ultrafast TWIST acquisitions is a valuable parameter that allows robust differentiation between malignant and benign breast lesions with high

  13. Clinical application of functional MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniwaki, Takayuki

    2010-01-01

    Described is the present state of clinical application of fMRI in the preoperative assessment of brain tumors, and plasticity in and pathophysiology of central diseases. For the tumor resection, fMRI is useful for risk assessment of postoperative nerve dysfunction, for selection of the patient rather suitable for brain mapping at the invasive surgery than at the pre-operation and for guidance of the operation itself. Preoperative fMRI alone can neither distinguish the regions of the primary and secondary functions nor exhibit the relation between the tumor and white matter fibers but there are compensatory means for these drawbacks. Benefit of preoperative fMRI has not yet been based on the evidence on double blind trials. Combination of fMRI imaging and electroencephalography (EEG) finding has shown that, in generalized epilepsy, extensive and stimulated activation occurs in both frontal/occipital regions and in thalamus area, respectively, and that the concomitant lowered activities are conceivably the reflection of burst discharge in normal brain functions. Plasticity in the human brain has been demonstrated by fMRI in cerebral vascular diseases, multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Pathogenesis of Parkinson disease and depression has been better understood by fMRI investigations revealing regions with elevated and reduced activities. Studies of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder have shown similar change of activities with functional reductions of the right dorsolateral frontal anterior area and of dorsal frontal cingulate gyrus, together with stimulated wider regions to given tasks. As above, fMRI has greatly contributed to our understanding of diseases of central nervous system and is to be expected to expand wider in this field. (T.T.)

  14. Cascaded nonlinearities for ultrafast nonlinear optical science and applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten

    the cascading nonlinearity is investigated in detail, especially with focus on femtosecond energetic laser pulses being subjected to this nonlinear response. Analytical, numerical and experimental results are used to understand the cascading interaction and applications are demonstrated. The defocusing soliton...... observations with analogies in fiber optics are observed numerically and experimentally, including soliton self-compression, soliton-induced resonant radiation, supercontinuum generation, optical wavebreaking and shock-front formation. All this happens despite no waveguide being present, thanks...... is of particular interest here, since it is quite unique and provides the solution to a number of standing challenges in the ultrafast nonlinear optics community. It solves the problem of catastrophic focusing and formation of a filaments in bulk glasses, which even under controlled circumstances is limited...

  15. Textural analysis of early-phase spatiotemporal changes in contrast enhancement of breast lesions imaged with an ultrafast DCE-MRI protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milenkovic, J.; Dalmis, M.U.; Zgajnar, J.; Platel, B.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: New ultrafast view-sharing sequences have enabled breast dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) to be performed at high spatial and temporal resolution. The aim of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic potential of textural features that quantify the

  16. TU-AB-BRA-09: A Novel Method of Generating Ultrafast Volumetric Cine MRI (VC-MRI) Using Prior 4D-MRI and On-Board Phase-Skipped Encoding Acquisition for Radiotherapy Target Localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C; Yin, F; Harris, W; Cai, J; Chang, Z; Ren, L

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a technique generating ultrafast on-board VC-MRI using prior 4D-MRI and on-board phase-skipped encoding k-space acquisition for real-time 3D target tracking of liver and lung radiotherapy. Methods: The end-of-expiration (EOE) volume in 4D-MRI acquired during the simulation was selected as the prior volume. 3 major respiratory deformation patterns were extracted through the principal component analysis of the deformation field maps (DFMs) generated between EOE and all other phases. The on-board VC-MRI at each instant was considered as a deformation of the prior volume, and the deformation was modeled as a linear combination of the extracted 3 major deformation patterns. To solve the weighting coefficients of the 3 major patterns, a 2D slice was extracted from VC-MRI volume to match with the 2D on-board sampling data, which was generated by 8-fold phase skipped-encoding k-space acquisition (i.e., sample 1 phase-encoding line out of every 8 lines) to achieve an ultrafast 16–24 volumes/s frame rate. The method was evaluated using XCAT digital phantom to simulate lung cancer patients. The 3D volume of end-ofinhalation (EOI) phase at the treatment day was used as ground-truth onboard VC-MRI with simulated changes in 1) breathing amplitude and 2) breathing amplitude/phase change from the simulation day. A liver cancer patient case was evaluated for in-vivo feasibility demonstration. Results: The comparison between ground truth and estimated on-board VC-MRI shows good agreements. In XCAT study with changed breathing amplitude, the volume-percent-difference(VPD) between ground-truth and estimated tumor volumes at EOI was 6.28% and the Center-of-Mass-Shift(COMS) was 0.82mm; with changed breathing amplitude and phase, the VPD was 8.50% and the COMS was 0.54mm. The study of liver patient case also demonstrated a promising in vivo feasibility of the proposed method Conclusion: Preliminary results suggest the feasibility to estimate ultrafast VC-MRI for on

  17. TU-AB-BRA-09: A Novel Method of Generating Ultrafast Volumetric Cine MRI (VC-MRI) Using Prior 4D-MRI and On-Board Phase-Skipped Encoding Acquisition for Radiotherapy Target Localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, C; Yin, F; Harris, W; Cai, J; Chang, Z; Ren, L [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a technique generating ultrafast on-board VC-MRI using prior 4D-MRI and on-board phase-skipped encoding k-space acquisition for real-time 3D target tracking of liver and lung radiotherapy. Methods: The end-of-expiration (EOE) volume in 4D-MRI acquired during the simulation was selected as the prior volume. 3 major respiratory deformation patterns were extracted through the principal component analysis of the deformation field maps (DFMs) generated between EOE and all other phases. The on-board VC-MRI at each instant was considered as a deformation of the prior volume, and the deformation was modeled as a linear combination of the extracted 3 major deformation patterns. To solve the weighting coefficients of the 3 major patterns, a 2D slice was extracted from VC-MRI volume to match with the 2D on-board sampling data, which was generated by 8-fold phase skipped-encoding k-space acquisition (i.e., sample 1 phase-encoding line out of every 8 lines) to achieve an ultrafast 16–24 volumes/s frame rate. The method was evaluated using XCAT digital phantom to simulate lung cancer patients. The 3D volume of end-ofinhalation (EOI) phase at the treatment day was used as ground-truth onboard VC-MRI with simulated changes in 1) breathing amplitude and 2) breathing amplitude/phase change from the simulation day. A liver cancer patient case was evaluated for in-vivo feasibility demonstration. Results: The comparison between ground truth and estimated on-board VC-MRI shows good agreements. In XCAT study with changed breathing amplitude, the volume-percent-difference(VPD) between ground-truth and estimated tumor volumes at EOI was 6.28% and the Center-of-Mass-Shift(COMS) was 0.82mm; with changed breathing amplitude and phase, the VPD was 8.50% and the COMS was 0.54mm. The study of liver patient case also demonstrated a promising in vivo feasibility of the proposed method Conclusion: Preliminary results suggest the feasibility to estimate ultrafast VC-MRI for on

  18. Ultrafast Laser-Based Spectroscopy and Sensing: Applications in LIBS, CARS, and THz Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy-Hoppa, Megan R.; Miragliotta, Joseph; Osiander, Robert; Burnett, Jennifer; Dikmelik, Yamac; McEnnis, Caroline; Spicer, James B.

    2010-01-01

    Ultrafast pulsed lasers find application in a range of spectroscopy and sensing techniques including laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), coherent Raman spectroscopy, and terahertz (THz) spectroscopy. Whether based on absorption or emission processes, the characteristics of these techniques are heavily influenced by the use of ultrafast pulses in the signal generation process. Depending on the energy of the pulses used, the essential laser interaction process can primarily involve lattice vibrations, molecular rotations, or a combination of excited states produced by laser heating. While some of these techniques are currently confined to sensing at close ranges, others can be implemented for remote spectroscopic sensing owing principally to the laser pulse duration. We present a review of ultrafast laser-based spectroscopy techniques and discuss the use of these techniques to current and potential chemical and environmental sensing applications. PMID:22399883

  19. Ultrafast Laser-Based Spectroscopy and Sensing: Applications in LIBS, CARS, and THz Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan R. Leahy-Hoppa

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafast pulsed lasers find application in a range of spectroscopy and sensing techniques including laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS, coherent Raman spectroscopy, and terahertz (THz spectroscopy. Whether based on absorption or emission processes, the characteristics of these techniques are heavily influenced by the use of ultrafast pulses in the signal generation process. Depending on the energy of the pulses used, the essential laser interaction process can primarily involve lattice vibrations, molecular rotations, or a combination of excited states produced by laser heating. While some of these techniques are currently confined to sensing at close ranges, others can be implemented for remote spectroscopic sensing owing principally to the laser pulse duration. We present a review of ultrafast laser-based spectroscopy techniques and discuss the use of these techniques to current and potential chemical and environmental sensing applications.

  20. fMRI. Basics and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulmer, Stephan; Jansen, Olav (eds.) [University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Inst. of Neuroradiology, Neurocenter

    2010-07-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) and the basic method of BOLD imaging were introduced in 1993 by Seiji Ogawa. From very basic experiments, fMRI has evolved into a clinical application for daily routine brain imaging. There have been various improvements in both the imaging technique as such as well as in the statistical analysis. In this volume, experts in the field share their knowledge and point out possible technical barriers and problems explaining how to solve them. Starting from the very basics on the origin of the BOLD signal, the book covers technical issues, anatomical landmarks, presurgical applications, and special issues in various clinical fields. Other modalities for brain mapping such as PET, TMS, and MEG are also compared with fMRI. This book is intended to give a state-of-the-art overview and to serve as a reference and guide for clinical applications of fMRI. (orig.)

  1. Ultrafast and ultrasensitive dielectric liquids/mixtures: Basic measurements and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christophorou, L.G.; Faidas, H.; McCorkle, D.L.; Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN

    1989-01-01

    Basic properties of cryogenic and room temperature dielectric liquids/mixtures with high electron yields (under irradiation by ionizing particles) and high excess electron drift velocities are discussed. A number of ultrafast and ultrasensitive liquid media -- appropriate for possible use in liquid-filled radiation detectors and other applications -- are identified. 44 refs., 12 figs

  2. PET/MRI for neurologic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catana, Ciprian; Drzezga, Alexander; Heiss, Wolf-Dieter; Rosen, Bruce R

    2012-12-01

    PET and MRI provide complementary information in the study of the human brain. Simultaneous PET/MRI data acquisition allows the spatial and temporal correlation of the measured signals, creating opportunities impossible to realize using stand-alone instruments. This paper reviews the methodologic improvements and potential neurologic and psychiatric applications of this novel technology. We first present methods for improving the performance and information content of each modality by using the information provided by the other technique. On the PET side, we discuss methods that use the simultaneously acquired MRI data to improve the PET data quantification. On the MRI side, we present how improved PET quantification can be used to validate several MRI techniques. Finally, we describe promising research, translational, and clinical applications that can benefit from these advanced tools.

  3. Ultrafast THz saturable absorption in doped semiconductors at room temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turchinovich, Dmitry; Hoffmann, M. V.

    2011-01-01

    Ultrafast Phenomena XVII presents the latest advances in ultrafast science, including both ultrafast optical technology and the study of ultrafast phenomena. It covers picosecond, femtosecond and attosecond processes relevant to applications in physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering. Ultraf...

  4. Initial experience of oculodynamic MRI using ultrafast T2-weighted imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanitame, Keizo; Kaichi, Yoko; Nakamura, Yuko

    2013-01-01

    We designed cine MRI protocol using sequential static half-Fourier single-shot rapid acquisition with relaxation enhancement (RARE) images with the subjects staring at the series of targets in front of their eyes. This technique was applied to three healthy volunteers and four patients with ocular motility disorders, including blow-out fracture, globe restriction due to a large posterior staphyloma, neurogenic strabismus (convergence disorder), and intraocular adhesion. In the volunteers, smooth movements of their visual foci and extraocular muscles were observed. In the patients, the ocular movement disturbances were demonstrated. Oculodynamic MRI provides functional information in cases of diplopia. (author)

  5. PET/MRI. Methodology and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrio, Ignasi [Autonomous Univ. of Barcelona, Hospital Sant Pau (Spain). Dept. Medicina Nuclear; Ros, Pablo (ed.) [Univ. Hospitals Case, Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2014-04-01

    Provides detailed information on the methodology and equipment of MRI-PET. Covers a wide range of clinical applications in oncology, cardiology, and neurology. Written by an international group of experts in MRI and PET. PET/MRI is an exciting novel diagnostic imaging modality that combines the precise anatomic and physiologic information provided by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the molecular data obtained with positron emission tomography (PET). PET/MRI offers the promise of a simplified work flow, reduced radiation, whole-body imaging with superior soft tissue contrast, and time of flight physiologic information. It has been described as the pathway to molecular imaging in medicine. In compiling this textbook, the editors have brought together a truly international group of experts in MRI and PET. The book is divided into two parts. The first part covers methodology and equipment and comprises chapters on basic molecular medicine, development of specific contrast agents, MR attenuation and validation, quantitative MRI and PET motion correction, and technical implications for both MRI and PET. The second part of the book focuses on clinical applications in oncology, cardiology, and neurology. Imaging of major neoplasms, including lymphomas and tumors of the breast, prostate, and head and neck, is covered in individual chapters. Further chapters address functional and metabolic cardiovascular examinations and major central nervous system applications such as brain tumors and dementias. Risks, safety aspects, and healthcare costs and impacts are also discussed. This book will be of interest to all radiologists and nuclear medicine physicians who wish to learn more about the latest developments in this important emerging imaging modality and its applications.

  6. The effect of ultrafast fiber laser application on the bond strength of resin cement to titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, Sabit Melih; Korkmaz, Fatih Mehmet; Caglar, Ipek Satıroglu; Duymus, Zeynep Yeşil; Turgut, Sedanur; Bagis, Elif Arslan

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of ultrafast fiber laser treatment on the bond strength between titanium and resin cement. A total of 60 pure titanium discs (15 mm × 2 mm) were divided into six test groups (n = 10) according to the surface treatment used: group (1) control, machining; group (2) grinding with a diamond bur; group (3) ultrafast fiber laser application; group (4) resorbable blast media (RBM) application; group (5) electro-erosion with copper; and group (6) sandblasting. After surface treatments, resin cements were applied to the treated titanium surfaces. Shear bond strength testing of the samples was performed with a universal testing machine after storing in distilled water at 37 °C for 24 h. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD post hoc test were used to analyse the data (P < 0.05). The highest bond strength values were observed in the laser application group, while the lowest values were observed in the grinding group. Sandblasting and laser application resulted in significantly higher bond strengths than control treatment (P < 0.05). Ultrafast fiber laser treatment and sandblasting may improve the bond strength between resin cement and titanium.

  7. Novel Aspects of Materials Processing by Ultrafast Lasers: From Electronic to Biological and Cultural Heritage Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fotakis, C; Zorba, V; Stratakis, E; Athanassiou, A; Tzanetakis, P; Zergioti, I; Papagoglou, D G; Sambani, K; Filippidis, G; Farsari, M; Pouli, V; Bounos, G; Georgiou, S

    2007-01-01

    Materials processing by ultrafast lasers offers several distinct possibilities for micro/nano scale applications. This is due to the unique characteristics of the laser-matter interactions involved, when sub-picosecond pulses are employed. Prospects arising will be discussed in the context of surface and in bulk laser induced modifications. In particular, examples of diverse applications including the development and functionalization of laser engineered surfaces, the laser transfer of biomolecules and the functionalization of 3D structures constructed by three-photon stereolithography will be presented. Furthermore, the removal of molecular substrates by ultrafast laser ablation will be discussed with emphasis placed on assessing the photochemical changes induced in the remaining bulk material. The results indicate that in femtosecond laser processing of organic materials, besides the well acknowledged morphological advantages, a second fundamental factor responsible for its success pertains to the selective chemical effects. This is crucial for the laser cleaning of sensitive painted artworks

  8. Advanced flow MRI: emerging techniques and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markl, M.; Schnell, S.; Wu, C.; Bollache, E.; Jarvis, K.; Barker, A.J.; Robinson, J.D.; Rigsby, C.K.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques provide non-invasive and non-ionising methods for the highly accurate anatomical depiction of the heart and vessels throughout the cardiac cycle. In addition, the intrinsic sensitivity of MRI to motion offers the unique ability to acquire spatially registered blood flow simultaneously with the morphological data, within a single measurement. In clinical routine, flow MRI is typically accomplished using methods that resolve two spatial dimensions in individual planes and encode the time-resolved velocity in one principal direction, typically oriented perpendicular to the two-dimensional (2D) section. This review describes recently developed advanced MRI flow techniques, which allow for more comprehensive evaluation of blood flow characteristics, such as real-time flow imaging, 2D multiple-venc phase contrast MRI, four-dimensional (4D) flow MRI, quantification of complex haemodynamic properties, and highly accelerated flow imaging. Emerging techniques and novel applications are explored. In addition, applications of these new techniques for the improved evaluation of cardiovascular (aorta, pulmonary arteries, congenital heart disease, atrial fibrillation, coronary arteries) as well as cerebrovascular disease (intra-cranial arteries and veins) are presented.

  9. Ultrafast bold fMRI using single-shot spin-echo echo planar imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boujraf Said

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The choice of imaging parameters for functional MRI can have an impact on the accuracy of functional localization by affecting the image quality and the degree of blood oxygenation-dependent (BOLD contrast achieved. By improving sampling efficiency, parallel acquisition techniques such as sensitivity encoding (SENSE have been used to shorten readout trains in single-shot (SS echo planar imaging (EPI. This has been applied to susceptibility artifact reduction and improving spatial resolution. SENSE together with single-shot spin-echo (SS-SE imaging may also reduce off-resonance artifacts. The goal of this work was to investigate the BOLD response of a SENSE-adapted SE-EPI on a three Tesla scanner. Whole-brain fMRI studies of seven healthy right hand-dominant volunteers were carried out in a three Tesla scanner. fMRI was performed using an SS-SE EPI sequence with SENSE. The data was processed using statistical parametric mapping. Both, group and individual subject data analyses were performed. Individual average percentage and maximal percentage signal changes attributed to the BOLD effect in M1 were calculated for all the subjects as a function of echo time. Corresponding activation maps and the sizes of the activated clusters were also calculated. Our results show that susceptibility artifacts were reduced with the use of SENSE; and the acquired BOLD images were free of the typical quadrature artifacts of SS-EPI. Such measures are crucial at high field strengths. SS SE-EPI with SENSE offers further benefits in this regard and is more specific for oxygenation changes in the microvasculature bed. Functional brain activity can be investigated with the help of single-shot spin echo EPI using SENSE at high magnetic fields.

  10. Ultrafast-laser-inscribed 3D integrated photonics: challenges and emerging applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gross S.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery that tightly focused femtosecond laser pulses can induce a highly localised and permanent refractive index modification in a large number of transparent dielectrics, the technique of ultrafast laser inscription has received great attention from a wide range of applications. In particular, the capability to create three-dimensional optical waveguide circuits has opened up new opportunities for integrated photonics that would not have been possible with traditional planar fabrication techniques because it enables full access to the many degrees of freedom in a photon. This paper reviews the basic techniques and technological challenges of 3D integrated photonics fabricated using ultrafast laser inscription as well as reviews the most recent progress in the fields of astrophotonics, optical communication, quantum photonics, emulation of quantum systems, optofluidics and sensing.

  11. Compressed sensing and the reconstruction of ultrafast 2D NMR data: Principles and biomolecular applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrot, Yoav; Frydman, Lucio

    2011-04-01

    A topic of active investigation in 2D NMR relates to the minimum number of scans required for acquiring this kind of spectra, particularly when these are dictated by sampling rather than by sensitivity considerations. Reductions in this minimum number of scans have been achieved by departing from the regular sampling used to monitor the indirect domain, and relying instead on non-uniform sampling and iterative reconstruction algorithms. Alternatively, so-called "ultrafast" methods can compress the minimum number of scans involved in 2D NMR all the way to a minimum number of one, by spatially encoding the indirect domain information and subsequently recovering it via oscillating field gradients. Given ultrafast NMR's simultaneous recording of the indirect- and direct-domain data, this experiment couples the spectral constraints of these orthogonal domains - often calling for the use of strong acquisition gradients and large filter widths to fulfill the desired bandwidth and resolution demands along all spectral dimensions. This study discusses a way to alleviate these demands, and thereby enhance the method's performance and applicability, by combining spatial encoding with iterative reconstruction approaches. Examples of these new principles are given based on the compressed-sensed reconstruction of biomolecular 2D HSQC ultrafast NMR data, an approach that we show enables a decrease of the gradient strengths demanded in this type of experiments by up to 80%. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Ultra-fast speech comprehension in blind subjects engages primary visual cortex, fusiform gyrus, and pulvinar – a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Individuals suffering from vision loss of a peripheral origin may learn to understand spoken language at a rate of up to about 22 syllables (syl) per second - exceeding by far the maximum performance level of normal-sighted listeners (ca. 8 syl/s). To further elucidate the brain mechanisms underlying this extraordinary skill, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was performed in blind subjects of varying ultra-fast speech comprehension capabilities and sighted individuals while listening to sentence utterances of a moderately fast (8 syl/s) or ultra-fast (16 syl/s) syllabic rate. Results Besides left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), bilateral posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) and left supplementary motor area (SMA), blind people highly proficient in ultra-fast speech perception showed significant hemodynamic activation of right-hemispheric primary visual cortex (V1), contralateral fusiform gyrus (FG), and bilateral pulvinar (Pv). Conclusions Presumably, FG supports the left-hemispheric perisylvian “language network”, i.e., IFG and superior temporal lobe, during the (segmental) sequencing of verbal utterances whereas the collaboration of bilateral pulvinar, right auditory cortex, and ipsilateral V1 implements a signal-driven timing mechanism related to syllabic (suprasegmental) modulation of the speech signal. These data structures, conveyed via left SMA to the perisylvian “language zones”, might facilitate – under time-critical conditions – the consolidation of linguistic information at the level of verbal working memory. PMID:23879896

  13. Diffusion tensor MRI: clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meli, Francisco; Romero, Carlos; Carpintiero, Silvina; Salvatico, Rosana; Lambre, Hector; Vila, Jose

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the usefulness of diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI) on different neurological diseases, and to know if this technique shows additional information than conventional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Materials and method: Eight patients, with neurological diseases (five patients with brain tumors, one with multiple sclerosis (MS), one with variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) and the other with delayed CO intoxication were evaluated. A MR scanner of 1.5 T was used and conventional sequences and DTI with twenty-five directions were done. Quantitative maps were gotten, where the fractional anisotropy (FA) through regions of interest (ROIs) in specific anatomic area were quantified (i.e.: internal and external capsules, frontal and temporal bundles, corpus fibers). Results: In the patients with brain tumors, there was a decrease of FA on intra and peritumoral fibers. Some of them had a disruption in their pattern. In patients with MS and CO intoxication, partial interruption along white matter bundles was demonstrated. However, a 'mismatch' between the findings of FLAIR, Diffusion-weighted images (DWI) and DTI, in the case of CO intoxication, was seen. Conclusions: DTI gave more information compared to conventional sequences about ultrastructural brain tissue in almost all the diseases above mentioned. Therefore, there is a work in progress about DTI acquisition, to evaluate a new technique, called tractography. (author)

  14. Ultrafast Switching Superjunction MOSFETs for Single Phase PFC Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernandez Botella, Juan Carlos; Petersen, Lars Press; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a guide on characterizing state-of-the-art silicon superjunction (SJ) devices in the 600V range for single phase power factor correction (PFC) applications. The characterization procedure is based on a minimally inductive double pulse tester (DPT) with a very low intrusive...... current measurement method, which enables reaching the switching speed limits of these devices. Due to the intrinsic low and non-linear capacitances in vertical SJ MOSFETs, special attention needs to be paid to the gate drive design to minimize oscillations and limit the maximum at turn off. This paper...

  15. Pharmaceutical applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, J Craig; Bowtell, Richard W; Mäder, Karsten; Melia, Colin D

    2005-06-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful imaging modality that provides internal images of materials and living organisms on a microscopic and macroscopic scale. It is non-invasive and non-destructive, and one of very few techniques that can observe internal events inside undisturbed specimens in situ. It is versatile, as a wide range of NMR modalities can be accessed, and 2D and 3D imaging can be undertaken. Despite widespread use and major advances in clinical MRI, it has seen limited application in the pharmaceutical sciences. In vitro studies have focussed on drug release mechanisms in polymeric delivery systems, but isolated studies of bioadhesion, tablet properties, and extrusion and mixing processes illustrate the wider potential. Perhaps the greatest potential however, lies in investigations of pharmaceuticals in vivo, where pilot human and animal studies have demonstrated we can obtain unique insights into the behaviour of gastrointestinal, topical, colloidal, and targeted drug delivery systems.

  16. Fast and ultrafast MR-imaging of the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulthess, G.K. von; Davis, C.P.; Debatin, J.F.; McKinnon, G.C.

    1995-01-01

    MRI has been hampered by long image acquisition times. This combined with its non-realtime nature and the limited spatial resolution has made it difficult to extend MRT to the study of small cardiac structures. Recent technical improvements have made breath-held or realtime MRI feasible and thus laid the foundations for further applications in the field of cardiovascular imaging, notably MR coronary angiography, imaging of cardiac valve leaflets, as well as firstpass perfusion studies. Moreover ultrafast MR techniques may eventually replace conventional data acquisition strategies and thus drastically increase patient throughput by shortening acquisition time. This article provides an overview of the technical advances in MRI and their application to the cardiovascular system and discusses possibilities of combined ultrafast and interventional strategies. (orig.) [de

  17. MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeter, Aileen; Rudin, Markus; Gianolio, Eliana

    2017-01-01

    This chapter discusses principles of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and MRI followed by a survey on the major classes of MRI contrast agents (CA), their modes of action, and some of the most significative applications. The two more established classes of MRI-CA are represented by paramagnetic...... been attained that markedly increase the number and typology of systems with CEST properties. Currently much attention is also devoted to hyperpolarized molecules that display a sensitivity enhancement sufficient for their direct exploitation for the formation of the MR image. A real breakthrough...

  18. PET/MRI for Neurological Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catana, Ciprian; Drzezga, Alexander; Heiss, Wolf-Dieter; Rosen, Bruce R.

    2013-01-01

    PET and MRI provide complementary information in the study of the human brain. Simultaneous PET/MR data acquisition allows the spatial and temporal correlation of the measured signals, opening up opportunities impossible to realize using stand-alone instruments. This paper reviews the methodological improvements and potential neurological and psychiatric applications of this novel technology. We first present methods for improving the performance and information content of each modality by using the information provided by the other technique. On the PET side, we discuss methods that use the simultaneously acquired MR data to improve the PET data quantification. On the MR side, we present how improved PET quantification could be used to validate a number of MR techniques. Finally, we describe promising research, translational and clinical applications that could benefit from these advanced tools. PMID:23143086

  19. Sixteenth International Conference on Ultrafast Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Corkum, Paul; Nelson, Keith A; Riedle, Eberhard; Schoenlein, Robert W; Ultrafast Phenomena XVI

    2009-01-01

    Ultrafast Phenomena XVI presents the latest advances in ultrafast science, including both ultrafast optical technology and the study of ultrafast phenomena. It covers picosecond, femtosecond and attosecond processes relevant to applications in physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering. Ultrafast technology has a profound impact in a wide range of applications, amongst them biomedical imaging, chemical dynamics, frequency standards, material processing, and ultrahigh speed communications. This book summarizes the results presented at the 16th International Conference on Ultrafast Phenomena and provides an up-to-date view of this important and rapidly advancing field.

  20. PREFACE: Ultrafast biophotonics Ultrafast biophotonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Min; Reid, Derryck; Ben-Yakar, Adela

    2010-08-01

    The use of light to explore biology can be traced to the first observations of tissue made with early microscopes in the mid-seventeenth century, and has today evolved into the discipline which we now know as biophotonics. This field encompasses a diverse range of activities, each of which shares the common theme of exploiting the interaction of light with biological material. With the rapid advancement of ultrafast optical technologies over the last few decades, ultrafast lasers have increasingly found applications in biophotonics, to the extent that the distinctive new field of ultrafast biophotonics has now emerged, where robust turnkey ultrafast laser systems are facilitating cutting-edge studies in the life sciences to take place in everyday laboratories. The broad spectral bandwidths, precision timing resolution, low coherence and high peak powers of ultrafast optical pulses provide unique opportunities for imaging and manipulating biological systems. Time-resolved studies of bio-molecular dynamics exploit the short pulse durations from such lasers, while other applications such as optical coherence tomography benefit from the broad optical bandwidths possible by using super-continuum generation and additionally allowing for high speed imaging with speeds as high as 47 000 scans per second. Continuing progress in laser-system technology is accelerating the adoption of ultrafast techniques across the life sciences, both in research laboratories and in clinical applications, such as laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) eye surgery. Revolutionizing the field of optical microscopy, two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy has enabled higher spatial resolution with improved depth penetration into biological specimens. Advantages of this nonlinear optical process include: reduced photo-interactions, allowing for extensive imaging time periods; simultaneously exciting multiple fluorescent molecules with only one excitation wavelength; and

  1. Fourteenth International Conference on Ultrafast Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Kobayashi, Takayoshi; Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Nelson, Keith A; Silvestri, Sandro; Ultrafast Phenomena XIV

    2005-01-01

    Ultrafast Phenomena XIV presents the latest advances in ultrafast science, including ultrafast laser and measurement technology as well as studies of ultrafast phenomena. Pico-, femto-, and atosecond processes relevant in physics, chemistry, biology and engineering are presented. Ultrafast technology is now having a profound impact within a wide range of applications, among them imaging, material diagnostics, and transformation and high-speed optoelectronics. This book summarizes results presented at the 14th Ultrafast Phenomena Conference and reviews the state of the art in this important and rapidly advancing field.

  2. Functional MRI in children: clinical and research applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leach, James L.; Holland, Scott K.

    2010-01-01

    Functional MRI has become a critical research tool for evaluating brain function and developmental trajectories in children. Its clinical use in children is becoming more common. This presentation will review the basic underlying physiologic and technical aspects of fMRI, review research applications that have direct clinical relevance, and outline the current clinical uses of this technology. (orig.)

  3. Development and application of PET-MRI image fusion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Jianhua; Zhao Jinhua; Qiao Wenli

    2011-01-01

    The emerging and growing in popularity of PET-CT scanner brings us the convenience and cognizes the advantages such as diagnosis, staging, curative effect evaluation and prognosis for malignant tumor. And the PET-MRI installing maybe a new upsurge when the machine gradually mature, because of the MRI examination without the radiation exposure and with the higher soft tissue resolution. This paper summarized the developing course of image fusion technology and some researches of clinical application about PET-MRI at present, in order to help people to understand the functions and know its wide application of the upcoming new instrument, mainly focuses the application on the central nervous system and some soft tissue lesions. And before PET-MRI popularization, people can still carry out some researches of various image fusion and clinical application on the current equipment. (authors)

  4. fMRI. Basics and clinical applications. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulmer, Stephan [Medizinisch Radiologisces Institut (MRI), Zuerich (Switzerland); Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Inst. fuer Neuroradiologie; Jansen, Olav (eds.) [Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Inst. fuer Neuroradiologie

    2013-11-01

    State of the art overview of fMRI. Covers technical issues, methods of statistical analysis, and the full range of clinical applications. Revised and expanded edition including discussion of novel aspects of analysis and further important applications. Includes comparisons with other brain mapping techniques and discussion of potential combined uses. Since functional MRI (fMRI) and the basic method of BOLD imaging were introduced in 1993 by Seiji Ogawa, fMRI has evolved into an invaluable clinical tool for routine brain imaging, and there have been substantial improvements in both the imaging technique itself and the associated statistical analysis. This book provides a state of the art overview of fMRI and its use in clinical practice. Experts in the field share their knowledge and explain how to overcome diverse potential technical barriers and problems. Starting from the very basics on the origin of the BOLD signal, the book covers technical issues, anatomical landmarks, the full range of clinical applications, methods of statistical analysis, and special issues in various clinical fields. Comparisons are made with other brain mapping techniques, such as DTI, PET, TMS, EEG, and MEG, and their combined use with fMRI is also discussed. Since the first edition, original chapters have been updated and new chapters added, covering both novel aspects of analysis and further important clinical applications.

  5. Multilayer-WS2:ferroelectric composite for ultrafast tunable metamaterial-induced transparency applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoyu; Yang, Jinghuan; Hu, Xiaoyong; Zhu, Yu; Yang, Hong; Gong, Qihuang

    2015-08-01

    An ultrafast and low-power all-optical tunable metamaterial-induced transparency is realized, using polycrystalline barium titanate doped gold nanoparticles and multilayer tungsten disulfide microsheets as nonlinear optical materials. Large nonlinearity enhancement is obtained associated with quantum confinement effect, local-field effect, and reinforced interaction between light and multilayer tungsten disulfide. Low threshold pump intensity of 20 MW/cm2 is achieved. An ultrafast response time of 85 ps is maintained because of fast carrier relaxation dynamics in nanoscale crystal grains of polycrystalline barium titanate. This may be useful for the study of integrated photonic devices based on two-dimensional materials.

  6. Multilayer-WS2:ferroelectric composite for ultrafast tunable metamaterial-induced transparency applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Xiaoyu; Yang, Jinghuan; Zhu, Yu; Yang, Hong; Hu, Xiaoyong; Gong, Qihuang

    2015-01-01

    An ultrafast and low-power all-optical tunable metamaterial-induced transparency is realized, using polycrystalline barium titanate doped gold nanoparticles and multilayer tungsten disulfide microsheets as nonlinear optical materials. Large nonlinearity enhancement is obtained associated with quantum confinement effect, local-field effect, and reinforced interaction between light and multilayer tungsten disulfide. Low threshold pump intensity of 20 MW/cm 2 is achieved. An ultrafast response time of 85 ps is maintained because of fast carrier relaxation dynamics in nanoscale crystal grains of polycrystalline barium titanate. This may be useful for the study of integrated photonic devices based on two-dimensional materials

  7. Ultrafast nonlinear optics

    CERN Document Server

    Leburn, Christopher; Reid, Derryck

    2013-01-01

    The field of ultrafast nonlinear optics is broad and multidisciplinary, and encompasses areas concerned with both the generation and measurement of ultrashort pulses of light, as well as those concerned with the applications of such pulses. Ultrashort pulses are extreme events – both in terms of their durations, and also the high peak powers which their short durations can facilitate. These extreme properties make them powerful experiment tools. On one hand, their ultrashort durations facilitate the probing and manipulation of matter on incredibly short timescales. On the other, their ultrashort durations can facilitate high peak powers which can drive highly nonlinear light-matter interaction processes. Ultrafast Nonlinear Optics covers a complete range of topics, both applied and fundamental in nature, within the area of ultrafast nonlinear optics. Chapters 1 to 4 are concerned with the generation and measurement of ultrashort pulses. Chapters 5 to 7 are concerned with fundamental applications of ultrasho...

  8. Application of functional MRI in breast diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Yun; Liu Shiyuan; Wang Chenguang; Tao Xiaofeng; Wang Jinlin; Wang Jian

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the value of functional MRI in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of breast diseases. Methods: Sixty-five patients with 68 lesions were enrolled in this study. Conventional T 1 WI and T 2 WI scan, dynamic contrast enhanced MRI, diffusion weighted imaging and 1 H single voxel MR spectroscopy were performed consequently. All lesions were verified by pathology, including 4 cases of breast adenosis, 22 fibroadenomas, 2 chronic inflammations, 3 cysts, 33 infitrating ductal carcinomas, 1 intraductal carcinoma and 3 cystosarcoma phyllodes tumors. Morphological features, maximum enhancement ratio, time-intensity curve, apparent diffusion coefficient and Choline peak were analyzed. Results: The detection rates of T 1 WI and T 2 WI were 14.7% (n=10) and 51.5% (n=35). The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy of dynamic contrast enhanced MRI for the malignant tumor were 94. 6%, 71.4% and 76.5% respectively. Retrospective study showed that diffusion weighted imaging, with the b value from 800 s/mm 2 to 1000 s/mm 2 , could be used to differentiate various types of breast lesions. 1 H signal voxel spectroscopy had a sensitivity of 51.4%, specificity of 82.6%, and accuracy of 67.6% for the malignent. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy could reach 97.3%, 90.0% and 92.6% respectively by combining conventional scan, dynamic contrast enhanced MRI and MR spectroscopy. Conclusion: Functional MRI, with high sensitivity, specificity and accuracy, can be used widely in the diagnosis of malignant breast lesions. (authors)

  9. Applications of cerebral MRI in neonatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prayer, D.

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic resonance tomography (MRT) has become the most important method in the workup of infantile cerebral complications after primary sonography. Cerebral MR examination and image interpretation during the infantile period require extensive knowledge of morphological manifestations, their pathophysiological background, and frequency. The choice of imaging parameters and image interpretation is demonstrated in infarctions and hemorrhages of the mature and immature brain. A review of the main differential diagnoses is also given. The relevance of MR spectroscopy and fetal MRI is discussed. (orig.) [de

  10. Textural analysis of early-phase spatiotemporal changes in contrast enhancement of breast lesions imaged with an ultrafast DCE-MRI protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milenković, Jana; Dalmış, Mehmet Ufuk; Žgajnar, Janez; Platel, Bram

    2017-09-01

    New ultrafast view-sharing sequences have enabled breast dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) to be performed at high spatial and temporal resolution. The aim of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic potential of textural features that quantify the spatiotemporal changes of the contrast-agent uptake in computer-aided diagnosis of malignant and benign breast lesions imaged with high spatial and temporal resolution DCE-MRI. The proposed approach is based on the textural analysis quantifying the spatial variation of six dynamic features of the early-phase contrast-agent uptake of a lesion's largest cross-sectional area. The textural analysis is performed by means of the second-order gray-level co-occurrence matrix, gray-level run-length matrix and gray-level difference matrix. This yields 35 textural features to quantify the spatial variation of each of the six dynamic features, providing a feature set of 210 features in total. The proposed feature set is evaluated based on receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis in a cross-validation scheme for random forests (RF) and two support vector machine classifiers, with linear and radial basis function (RBF) kernel. Evaluation is done on a dataset with 154 breast lesions (83 malignant and 71 benign) and compared to a previous approach based on 3D morphological features and the average and standard deviation of the same dynamic features over the entire lesion volume as well as their average for the smaller region of the strongest uptake rate. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) obtained by the proposed approach with the RF classifier was 0.8997, which was significantly higher (P = 0.0198) than the performance achieved by the previous approach (AUC = 0.8704) on the same dataset. Similarly, the proposed approach obtained a significantly higher result for both SVM classifiers with RBF (P = 0.0096) and linear kernel (P = 0.0417) obtaining AUC of 0.8876 and 0.8548, respectively

  11. Triaxial fiber optic magnetic field sensor for MRI applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filograno, Massimo L.; Pisco, Marco; Catalano, Angelo; Forte, Ernesto; Aiello, Marco; Soricelli, Andrea; Davino, Daniele; Visone, Ciro; Cutolo, Antonello; Cusano, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we report a fiber-optic triaxial magnetic field sensor, based on Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBGs) integrated with giant magnetostrictive material, the Terfenol-D. The realized sensor has been designed and engineered for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) applications. A full magneto-optical characterization of the triaxial sensing probe has been carried out, providing the complex relationship among the FBGs wavelength shift and the applied magnetostatic field vector. Finally, the developed fiber optic sensors have been arranged in a sensor network composed of 20 triaxial sensors for mapping the magnetic field distribution in a MRI-room at a diagnostic center in Naples (SDN), equipped with Positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) instrumentation. Experimental results reveal that the proposed sensor network can be efficiently used in MRI centers for performing quality assurance tests, paving the way for novel integrated tools to measure the magnetic dose accumulated day by day by MRI operators.

  12. Functional MRI in human motor control studies and clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toma, Keiichiro

    2002-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been a useful tool for the noninvasive mapping of brain function associated with various motor and cognitive tasks. Because fMRI is based on the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) effect, it does not directly record neural activity. With the fMRI technique, distinguishing BOLD signals creased by cortical projection neurons from those created by intracortical neurons appears to be difficult. Two major experimental designs are used in fMRI studies: block designs and event-related designs. Block-designed fMRI presupposes the steady state of regional cerebral blood flow and has been applied to examinations of brain activation caused by tasks requiring sustained or repetitive movements. By contrast, the more recently developed event-related fMRI with time resolution of a few seconds allows the mapping of brain activation associated with a single movement according to the transient aspects of the hemodynamic response. Increasing evidence suggests that multiple motor areas are engaged in a networked manner to execute various motor acts. In order to understand functional brain maps, it is important that one understands sequential and parallel organizations of anatomical connections between multiple motor areas. In fMRI studies of complex motor tasks, elementary parameters such as movement length, force, velocity, acceleration and frequency should be controlled, because inconsistency in those parameters may alter the extent and intensity of motor cortical activation, confounding interpretation of the findings obtained. In addition to initiation of movements, termination of movements plays an important role in the successful achievement of complex movements. Brain areas exclusively related to the termination of movements have been, for the first time, uncovered with an event-related fMRI technique. We propose the application of fMRI to the elucidation of the pathophysiology of movement disorders, particularly dystonia

  13. Functional MRI in human motor control studies and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toma, Keiichiro [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine; Nakai, Toshiharu [Inst. of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been a useful tool for the noninvasive mapping of brain function associated with various motor and cognitive tasks. Because fMRI is based on the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) effect, it does not directly record neural activity. With the fMRI technique, distinguishing BOLD signals creased by cortical projection neurons from those created by intracortical neurons appears to be difficult. Two major experimental designs are used in fMRI studies: block designs and event-related designs. Block-designed fMRI presupposes the steady state of regional cerebral blood flow and has been applied to examinations of brain activation caused by tasks requiring sustained or repetitive movements. By contrast, the more recently developed event-related fMRI with time resolution of a few seconds allows the mapping of brain activation associated with a single movement according to the transient aspects of the hemodynamic response. Increasing evidence suggests that multiple motor areas are engaged in a networked manner to execute various motor acts. In order to understand functional brain maps, it is important that one understands sequential and parallel organizations of anatomical connections between multiple motor areas. In fMRI studies of complex motor tasks, elementary parameters such as movement length, force, velocity, acceleration and frequency should be controlled, because inconsistency in those parameters may alter the extent and intensity of motor cortical activation, confounding interpretation of the findings obtained. In addition to initiation of movements, termination of movements plays an important role in the successful achievement of complex movements. Brain areas exclusively related to the termination of movements have been, for the first time, uncovered with an event-related fMRI technique. We propose the application of fMRI to the elucidation of the pathophysiology of movement disorders, particularly dystonia

  14. Ultrafast T2-weighted single shot spin-echo sequences: applications on abdominal and pelvic pathologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.; Martin, C.; Falco, J.; Esteban, L.

    1999-01-01

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences that obtain all the data using a sole excitation pulse of 90 degree centigrade, filling the K space in a single repetition time (TR) is known as snap shot or single shot (SS). The SS sequence based on the rapid acquisition with relaxation enhancement (SS-RARE) method, designed by Hening (1) and a variation of it with a half-Fourier reconstruction (SS-HF-RARE (HASTEL)) (2, 3) are capable of obtaining high contrast images in T2, in very short times, that oscillate between one to several seconds. The clinical application of these sequences to abdominal and pelvic pathologies is increasing, providing and improvement in the contrast resolution, but also in the spatial resolution, with a high relation signal/noise ratio, high contrast and absence of movement artifacts. (Author)

  15. Clinical applications of 7 T MRI in the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolk, Anja G. van der; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Zwanenburg, Jaco J.M.; Visser, Fredy; Luijten, Peter R.

    2013-01-01

    This review illustrates current applications and possible future directions of 7 Tesla (7 T) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in the field of brain MRI, in clinical studies as well as clinical practice. With its higher signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) compared to lower field strengths, high resolution, contrast-rich images can be obtained of diverse pathologies, like multiple sclerosis (MS), brain tumours, aging-related changes and cerebrovascular diseases. In some of these diseases, additional pathophysiological information can be gained compared to lower field strengths. Because of clear depiction of small anatomical details, and higher lesion conspicuousness, earlier diagnosis and start of treatment of brain diseases may become possible. Furthermore, additional insight into the pathogenesis of brain diseases obtained with 7 T MRI could be the basis for new treatment developments. However, imaging at high field comes with several limitations, like inhomogeneous transmit fields, a higher specific absorption rate (SAR) and, currently, extensive contraindications for patient scanning. Future studies will be aimed at assessing the advantages and disadvantages of 7 T MRI over lower field strengths in light of clinical applications, specifically the additional diagnostic and prognostic value of 7 T MRI

  16. Clinical applications of 7 T MRI in the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolk, Anja G. van der, E-mail: A.G.vanderKolk@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Postbox 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Hendrikse, Jeroen, E-mail: J.Hendrikse@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Postbox 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Zwanenburg, Jaco J.M., E-mail: J.J.M.Zwanenburg@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Postbox 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Image Sciences Institute, University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands); Visser, Fredy, E-mail: F.Visser-2@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Postbox 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Philips Healthcare, Best (Netherlands); Luijten, Peter R., E-mail: P.Luijten@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Postbox 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2013-05-15

    This review illustrates current applications and possible future directions of 7 Tesla (7 T) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in the field of brain MRI, in clinical studies as well as clinical practice. With its higher signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) compared to lower field strengths, high resolution, contrast-rich images can be obtained of diverse pathologies, like multiple sclerosis (MS), brain tumours, aging-related changes and cerebrovascular diseases. In some of these diseases, additional pathophysiological information can be gained compared to lower field strengths. Because of clear depiction of small anatomical details, and higher lesion conspicuousness, earlier diagnosis and start of treatment of brain diseases may become possible. Furthermore, additional insight into the pathogenesis of brain diseases obtained with 7 T MRI could be the basis for new treatment developments. However, imaging at high field comes with several limitations, like inhomogeneous transmit fields, a higher specific absorption rate (SAR) and, currently, extensive contraindications for patient scanning. Future studies will be aimed at assessing the advantages and disadvantages of 7 T MRI over lower field strengths in light of clinical applications, specifically the additional diagnostic and prognostic value of 7 T MRI.

  17. GPU accelerated FDTD solver and its application in MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, J; Liu, F; Jin, J; Mason, D G; Crozier, S

    2010-01-01

    The finite difference time domain (FDTD) method is a popular technique for computational electromagnetics (CEM). The large computational power often required, however, has been a limiting factor for its applications. In this paper, we will present a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based parallel FDTD solver and its successful application to the investigation of a novel B1 shimming scheme for high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The optimized shimming scheme exhibits considerably improved transmit B(1) profiles. The GPU implementation dramatically shortened the runtime of FDTD simulation of electromagnetic field compared with its CPU counterpart. The acceleration in runtime has made such investigation possible, and will pave the way for other studies of large-scale computational electromagnetic problems in modern MRI which were previously impractical.

  18. 1H CSA parameters by ultrafast MAS NMR: Measurement and applications to structure refinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, Habeeba K; Cresswell, Rosalie; Iuga, Dinu; Titman, Jeremy J

    2017-10-01

    A 1 H anisotropic-isotropic chemical shift correlation experiment which employs symmetry-based recoupling sequences to reintroduce the chemical shift anisotropy in ν 1 and ultrafast MAS to resolve 1 H sites in ν 2 is described. This experiment is used to measure 1 H shift parameters for L-ascorbic acid, a compound with a relatively complex hydrogen-bonding network in the solid. The 1 H CSAs of hydrogen-bonded sites with resolved isotropic shifts can be extracted directly from the recoupled lineshapes. In combination with DFT calculations, hydrogen positions in crystal structures obtained from X-ray and neutron diffraction are refined by comparison with simulations of the full two-dimensional NMR spectrum. The improved resolution afforded by the second dimension allows even unresolved hydrogen-bonded sites 1 H to be assigned and their shift parameters to be obtained. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Ultrafast gated intensifier design for laser fusion x-ray framing applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.H.; Wiedwald, J.D.; Kalibjian, R.; Thomas, S.W.; Cook, W.M.

    1983-01-01

    A major challenge for laser fusion is the study of the symmetry and the hydrodynamic stability of imploding fuel capsules. Streaked x-radiography, in one space and one time dimension, does not provide sufficient information. Two (spatial) dimensional frames of 10 to 100 ps duration are required with good image quality, minimum geometrical distortion (approximately 1%), dynamic range greater than 1000 and greater than 200 x 200 pixels. A gated transmission line imager (TLI) can meet these requirements with frame times between 30 and 100 ps. An instrument of this type is now being developed. Progress on this instrument including theory of operation, ultrafast pulse generation and propagation, component integration, and high resolution phosphor screen development are presented

  20. Transrectal ultrasound applicator for prostate heating monitored using MRI thermometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Nadine Barrie; Buchanan, Mark T.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: For potential localized hyperthermia treatment of tumors within the prostate, an ultrasound applicator consisting entirely of nonmagnetic materials for use with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been developed and tested on muscle tissue ex vivo and in vivo. Methods and Materials: A partial-cylindrical intracavitary transducer consisting of 16 elements in a 4 x 4 pattern was constructed. It produced a radially propagating acoustic pressure field. Each element of this array (1.5 x 0.75 cm), operating at 1.5 MHz, could be separately powered to produce a desired energy deposition pattern within a target volume. Spatial and temporal temperature elevations were determined using the temperature-dependent proton resonant frequency (PRF) shift and phase subtraction of MR images acquired during ultrasonic heating. Four rabbits were exposed to the ultrasound to raise the local tissue temperature to 45 deg. C for 25 minutes. Six experiments compared thermocouple temperature results to PRF shift temperature results. Results: The tests showed that the multi-element ultrasound applicator was MRI-compatible and allowed imaging during sonication. The induced temperature distribution could be controlled by monitoring the RF power to each transducer element. Therapeutic temperature elevations were easily achieved in vivo at power levels that were about 16% of the maximum system power. From the six thermocouple experiments, comparison between the thermocouple temperature and the PRF temperature yielded an average error of 0.34 ± 0.36 deg. C. Conclusions: The MRI-compatible intracavitary applicator and driving system was able to control the ultrasound field and temperature pattern in vivo. MRI thermometry using the PRF shift can provide adequate temperature accuracy and stability for controlling the temperature distribution

  1. WE-B-210-02: The Advent of Ultrafast Imaging in Biomedical Ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanter, M.

    2015-01-01

    spatial and temporal resolution compared to fMRI. Combined with contrast agents, our group demonstrated that Ultrafast Ultrasound Localization could provide a first in vivo and non invasive imaging modality at microscopic scales deep into organs. Many of these ultrafast modes should lead to major improvements in ultrasound screening, diagnosis, and therapeutic monitoring. Learning Objectives: Achieve familiarity with recent advances in ultrafast ultrasound imaging technology. Develop an understanding of potential applications of ultrafast ultrasound imaging for diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring. Dr. Tanter is a co-founder of Supersonic Imagine,a French company positioned in the field of medical ultrasound imaging and therapy

  2. WE-B-210-02: The Advent of Ultrafast Imaging in Biomedical Ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanter, M. [Laboratoire Ondes et Acoustique (France)

    2015-06-15

    spatial and temporal resolution compared to fMRI. Combined with contrast agents, our group demonstrated that Ultrafast Ultrasound Localization could provide a first in vivo and non invasive imaging modality at microscopic scales deep into organs. Many of these ultrafast modes should lead to major improvements in ultrasound screening, diagnosis, and therapeutic monitoring. Learning Objectives: Achieve familiarity with recent advances in ultrafast ultrasound imaging technology. Develop an understanding of potential applications of ultrafast ultrasound imaging for diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring. Dr. Tanter is a co-founder of Supersonic Imagine,a French company positioned in the field of medical ultrasound imaging and therapy.

  3. MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the room. Pins, hairpins, metal zippers, and similar metallic items can distort the images. Removable dental work ... an MRI can cause heart pacemakers and other implants not to work as well. The magnets can ...

  4. Ultrafast biophotonics

    CERN Document Server

    Vasa, P

    2016-01-01

    This book presents emerging contemporary optical techniques of ultrafast science which have opened entirely new vistas for probing biological entities and processes. The spectrum reaches from time-resolved imaging and multiphoton microscopy to cancer therapy and studies of DNA damage. The book displays interdisciplinary research at the interface of physics and biology. Emerging topics on the horizon are also discussed, like the use of squeezed light, frequency combs and terahertz imaging as the possibility of mimicking biological systems. The book is written in a manner to make it readily accessible to researchers, postgraduate biologists, chemists, engineers, and physicists and students of optics, biomedical optics, photonics and biotechnology.

  5. Application of An Avalanche Photodiode in Synchrotron-Based Ultra-fast X-Radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheong, S.-K.; Liu Jinyuan; Wang Jin; Powell, Christopher F.

    2004-01-01

    A possibility of using avalanche photodiode has been investigated while operated in current or continuous wave mode to accommodate high-intensity synchrotron x-ray beams in an ultra-fast x-radiography. To achieve a time resolution of 1 μs or better in a time-resolved x-radiograhic experiment, the entire time-sequence of the APD response to the pulsed synchrotron x-ray beam is recorded with time resolution of 1-2 ns. We have characterized the APD detector in the continuous wave mode to reveal its linearity, signal to noise ratio, and the time response with various circuit configurations. We have demonstrated that signal-to-noise ratio better than 1000 can be achieved, which is limited only by Poisson statistics. These detectors, coupled with finely focused x-rays, have been used to study structure and dynamics of supersonic fuel sprays with 50 μm-spatial resolution and μs-temporal resolution in the region close to an injection nozzle

  6. Application of low field intensity joint MRI in ankle injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhenyu; Wang Wei

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To observe the diagnostic value of the low field intensity joint magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in traumatic ankles. Methods: Through a retrospective examination and collection of 50 cases with complete information and checked by arthroscope or/and operated from Jan 2007 to Jun 2010, the diagnostic value ligament of the ankle joint, bone contusion,occult fracture, talus cartilage, and tendon could be evaluated. Cases of fracture for which could be diagnosed by X rays and CT were not included in this research. Results: The special low field intensity joint MRI had a high diagnostic sensitivity of 88.9% to ligamentum talofibulare anterius, but was only 50% sensitive to ligamentum calcaneofibulare. Its sensitivity to injury of ligamentum deltoideum and distal tibiofibular syndesmosis was up to 100%. Tendon injury, bone contusion and occult fracture could be exactly diagnosed. Its total sensitivity on talus cartilage traumatism was 70.6%. Its diagnosis sensitivity to talus cartilage traumatism at the 3rd-5th period by Mintz was 90%, with a lower one of 42.9% at the 1st-2nd period. Talus cartilage traumatism could be exactly predicted by osseous tissue dropsy below cartilage. Conclusion: The special low field intensity joint MRI is highly applicable to the diagnosis on ankle joint traumatism and facilitates clinical treatment. (authors)

  7. Ultrafast photophysics of pi-conjugated polymers for organic light emitting diode applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olejnik, Ella

    In this work we used the pump-probe photomodulation (PM) spectroscopy technique to measure the transient PM spectrum and decay kinetics in various pi -- conjugated polymers (PCPs) films and blends. Using two ultrafast laser systems, we covered a broad spectral range from 0.25 -- 2.5 eV in the time domain from 200 fs to 1 ns with 150 fs time resolution. We also used continuous wave (CW) photomodulation spectroscopy, photoluminescence (PL), electro-absorption and doping-induced absorption to study the photoexcitations and other optical properties of PCPs and guest/ host blends. In particular we studied two different types of Poly(thienylenevinylene) polymer derivatives. One polymer type is the ordered regio-regular (RR) and regio-random (RRa) -- PTV in which the dark exciton, 2Ag is the lowest excited state. In these polymers the photoexcited exciton shows very fast decay kinetics due to the internal conversion to the dark exciton, which results in weak PL emission; thus these two polymers are non-luminescent. The other PTV derivative is the imide -- PTV which is more luminescent due to the proximity of 1Bu and 2Ag states, that results in longer decay kinetics and a difference between the calculated value of the QEPL (9%) and the measured one (1%). We also demonstrate transient strain spectroscopy in RR -- PTV thin films, where the ultrafast energy release associated with the exciton decay gives rise to substantial static and dynamic strains in the film that dramatically influences the film's transient PM response. We also study the photophysics of poly(dioctyloxy) phenylenevinylene polymer with different isotopes, where we substituted hydrogen (H-polymer) by deuterium (D-polymer), and 12C by 13C isotopes. From the transient decay kinetics measurements we found that the exciton recombination in DOO -- PPV consists of two processes. These are: intrinsic monomolecular, and exciton-exciton annihilation (bimolecular). In the D -- polymer, different probe frequencies of

  8. Ultra-fast DNA-based multiplex convection PCR method for meat species identification with possible on-site applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kyung-Young; Hwang, Hyun Jin; Kim, Jeong Hee

    2017-08-15

    The aim of this study was to develop an ultra-fast molecular detection method for meat identification using convection Palm polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The mitochondrial cytochrome b (Cyt b) gene was used as a target gene. Amplicon size was designed to be different for beef, lamb, and pork. When these primer sets were used, each species-specific set specifically detected the target meat species in singleplex and multiplex modes in a 24min PCR run. The detection limit was 1pg of DNA for each meat species. The convection PCR method could detect as low as 1% of meat adulteration. The stability of the assay was confirmed using thermal processed meats. We also showed that direct PCR can be successfully performed with mixed meats and food samples. These results suggest that the developed assay may be useful in the authentication of meats and meat products in laboratory and rapid on-site applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Proton- and x-ray beams generated by ultra-fast CO2 lasers for medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorelsky, Igor; Polyanskiy, Mikhail; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Shkolnikov, Peter; Najmudin, Zulfikar; Palmer, Charlotte A. J.; Dover, Nicholas P.; Oliva, Piernicola; Carpinelli, Massimo

    2011-05-01

    Recent progress in using picosecond CO2 lasers for Thomson scattering and ion-acceleration experiments underlines their potentials for enabling secondary radiation- and particle- sources. These experiments capitalize on certain advantages of long-wavelength CO2 lasers, such as higher number of photons per energy unit, and favorable scaling of the electrons' ponderomotive energy and critical plasma density. The high-flux x-ray bursts produced by Thomson scattering of the CO2 laser off a counter-propagating electron beam enabled high-contrast, time-resolved imaging of biological objects in the picosecond time frame. In different experiments, the laser, focused on a hydrogen jet, generated monoenergetic proton beams via the radiation-pressure mechanism. The strong power-scaling of this regime promises realization of proton beams suitable for laser-driven proton cancer therapy after upgrading the CO2 laser to sub-PW peak power. This planned improvement includes optimizing the 10-μm ultra-short pulse generation, assuring higher amplification in the CO2 gas under combined isotopic- and power-broadening effects, and shortening the postamplification pulse to a few laser cycles (150-200 fs) via chirping and compression. These developments will move us closer to practical applications of ultra-fast CO2 lasers in medicine and other areas.

  10. Comparison of arterial input functions measured from ultra-fast dynamic contrast enhanced MRI and dynamic contrast enhanced computed tomography in prostate cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shiyang; Lu, Zhengfeng; Fan, Xiaobing; Medved, Milica; Jiang, Xia; Sammet, Steffen; Yousuf, Ambereen; Pineda, Federico; Oto, Aytekin; Karczmar, Gregory S.

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of arterial input functions (AIFs) measured from dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI following a low dose of contrast media injection. The AIFs measured from DCE computed tomography (CT) were used as ‘gold standard’. A total of twenty patients received CT and MRI scans on the same day. Patients received 120 ml Iohexol in DCE-CT and a low dose of (0.015 mM kg-1) of gadobenate dimeglumine in DCE-MRI. The AIFs were measured in the iliac artery and normalized to the CT and MRI contrast agent doses. To correct for different temporal resolution and sampling periods of CT and MRI, an empirical mathematical model (EMM) was used to fit the AIFs first. Then numerical AIFs (AIFCT and AIFMRI) were calculated based on fitting parameters. The AIFMRI was convolved with a ‘contrast agent injection’ function (AIFMRICON ) to correct for the difference between MRI and CT contrast agent injection times (~1.5 s versus 30 s). The results show that the EMMs accurately fitted AIFs measured from CT and MRI. There was no significant difference (p  >  0.05) between the maximum peak amplitude of AIFs from CT (22.1  ±  4.1 mM/dose) and MRI after convolution (22.3  ±  5.2 mM/dose). The shapes of the AIFCT and AIFMRICON were very similar. Our results demonstrated that AIFs can be accurately measured by MRI following low dose contrast agent injection.

  11. Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Semiconductor Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borri, Paola; Langbein, Wolfgang; Hvam, Jørn Marcher

    1999-01-01

    In this work we present an experimental technique for investigating ultrafast carrier dynamics in semiconductor optical amplifiers at room temperature. These dynamics, influenced by carrier heating, spectral hole-burning and two-photon absorption, are very important for device applications in inf...

  12. Dendrimer-based Macromolecular MRI Contrast Agents: Characteristics and Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisataka Kobayashi

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous macromolecular MRI contrast agents prepared employing relatively simple chemistry may be readily available that can provide sufficient enhancement for multiple applications. These agents operate using a ~100-fold lower concentration of gadolinium ions in comparison to the necessary concentration of iodine employed in CT imaging. Herein, we describe some of the general potential directions of macromolecular MRI contrast agents using our recently reported families of dendrimer-based agents as examples. Changes in molecular size altered the route of excretion. Smaller-sized contrast agents less than 60 kDa molecular weight were excreted through the kidney resulting in these agents being potentially suitable as functional renal contrast agents. Hydrophilic and larger-sized contrast agents were found better suited for use as blood pool contrast agents. Hydrophobic variants formed with polypropylenimine diaminobutane dendrimer cores created liver contrast agents. Larger hydrophilic agents are useful for lymphatic imaging. Finally, contrast agents conjugated with either monoclonal antibodies or with avidin are able to function as tumor-specific contrast agents, which also might be employed as therapeutic drugs for either gadolinium neutron capture therapy or in conjunction with radioimmunotherapy.

  13. Application of IQWorks for quality assurance in MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazakerley, J.; Moores, B.; Brunt, J.; Reilly, A.; Brunt, J.

    2012-01-01

    Recent developments have made available free software tools that would expedite local quality assurance (QA) in MR imaging, incorporating nationally established methodology. Several free software packages for DICOM image analysis have been reviewed, specifically considering the availability of the analysis tools that are required to analyse MRI QA images, based on methodology described in the UK national guidance provided by the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM). IQWorks emerged as the most suitable software. Key advantages are provided by its analysis tree functionality which facilitates user-implementation (without the need for further programming) of automated or partially automated analysis schemes incorporating the IPEM methodology. Aspects of the analysis tree include automated ROI positioning relative to the position of a detected edge, and production of results as PDF reports. Results are presented here specifically for the analysis of SNR although the techniques employed are applicable to more general image quality parameters. Results were produced using images from actual scanners (various models), and compared with those obtained from other sources including propriety manufacturer software and other image analysis software. The use of analysis trees in IQWorks was found to provide faster image analysis which is automated without relying on manual placement. The conclusion was made that software tools which have recently become freely available, expedite development of local MRI QA incorporating nationally established methodology. (authors)

  14. Radiation induced currents in MRI RF coils: application to linac/MRI integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, B.; Fallone, B. G.; Rathee, S.

    2010-02-01

    The integration of medical linear accelerators (linac) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems is advancing the current state of image-guided radiotherapy. The MRI in these integrated units will provide real-time, accurate tumor locations for radiotherapy treatment, thus decreasing geometric margins around tumors and reducing normal tissue damage. In the real-time operation of these integrated systems, the radiofrequency (RF) coils of MRI will be irradiated with radiation pulses from the linac. The effect of pulsed radiation on MRI radio frequency (RF) coils is not known and must be studied. The instantaneous radiation induced current (RIC) in two different MRI RF coils were measured and presented. The frequency spectra of the induced currents were calculated. Some basic characterization of the RIC was also done: isolation of the RF coil component responsible for RIC, dependence of RIC on dose rate, and effect of wax buildup placed on coil on RIC. Both the time and frequency characteristics of the RIC were seen to vary with the MRI RF coil used. The copper windings of the RF coils were isolated as the main source of RIC. A linear dependence on dose rate was seen. The RIC was decreased with wax buildup, suggesting an electronic disequilibrium as the cause of RIC. This study shows a measurable RIC present in MRI RF coils. This unwanted current could be possibly detrimental to the signal to noise ratio in MRI and produce image artifacts.

  15. Imaging brain microstructure with diffusion MRI: practicality and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Daniel C; Dyrby, Tim B; Nilsson, Markus; Zhang, Hui

    2017-11-29

    This article gives an overview of microstructure imaging of the brain with diffusion MRI and reviews the state of the art. The microstructure-imaging paradigm aims to estimate and map microscopic properties of tissue using a model that links these properties to the voxel scale MR signal. Imaging techniques of this type are just starting to make the transition from the technical research domain to wide application in biomedical studies. We focus here on the practicalities of both implementing such techniques and using them in applications. Specifically, the article summarizes the relevant aspects of brain microanatomy and the range of diffusion-weighted MR measurements that provide sensitivity to them. It then reviews the evolution of mathematical and computational models that relate the diffusion MR signal to brain tissue microstructure, as well as the expanding areas of application. Next we focus on practicalities of designing a working microstructure imaging technique: model selection, experiment design, parameter estimation, validation, and the pipeline of development of this class of technique. The article concludes with some future perspectives on opportunities in this topic and expectations on how the field will evolve in the short-to-medium term. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Inventory of MRI applications and workers exposed to MRI-related electromagnetic fields in the Netherlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaap, Kristel; Christopher-De Vries, Yvette; Slottje, Pauline; Kromhout, Hans, E-mail: h.kromhout@uu.nl

    2013-12-01

    Objective: This study aims to characterise and quantify the population that is occupationally exposed to electromagnetic fields (EMF) from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices and to identify factors that determine the probability and type of exposure. Materials and methods: A questionnaire survey was used to collect information about scanners, procedures, historical developments and employees working with or near MRI scanners in clinical and research MRI departments in the Netherlands. Results: Data were obtained from 145 MRI departments. A rapid increase in the use of MRI and field strength of the scanners was observed and quantified. The strongest magnets were employed by academic hospitals and research departments. Approximately 7000 individuals were reported to be working inside an MRI scanner room and were thus considered to have high probability of occupational exposure to static magnetic fields (SMF). Fifty-four per cent was exposed to SMF at least one day per month. The largest occupationally exposed group were radiographers (n ∼ 1700). Nine per cent of the 7000 involved workers were regularly present inside a scanner room during image acquisition, when exposure to additional types of EMF is considered a possibility. This practice was most prevalent among workers involved in scanning animals. Conclusion: The data illustrate recent trends and historical developments in magnetic resonance imaging and provide an extensive characterisation of the occupationally exposed population. A considerable number of workers are potentially exposed to MRI-related EMF. Type and frequency of potential exposure depend on the job performed, as well as the type of workplace.

  17. Fetal MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prayer, D.; Brugger, P.C.

    2004-01-01

    New, ultrafast sequences have made it possible to obtain MR images of the fetus without maternal sedation or immobilization of the fetus itself. While fetal MRI began as an adjunct to ultrasound, it has now been shown that MRI can provide additional information that may change prognosis, the management of pregnancy, or the treatment of the newborn child. It is of particular value in the assessment of malformations of the central nervous system. The steady development and adaptation of MR-sequences to the needs of fetal imaging has led to new indications that can support prognostic and therapeutic decisions. (orig.)

  18. Fetal MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prayer, D.; Brugger, P.C. [University Hospital of Vienna (Austria). Division of Neuroradiology

    2004-07-01

    New, ultrafast sequences have made it possible to obtain MR images of the fetus without maternal sedation or immobilization of the fetus itself. While fetal MRI began as an adjunct to ultrasound, it has now been shown that MRI can provide additional information that may change prognosis, the management of pregnancy, or the treatment of the newborn child. It is of particular value in the assessment of malformations of the central nervous system. The steady development and adaptation of MR-sequences to the needs of fetal imaging has led to new indications that can support prognostic and therapeutic decisions. (orig.)

  19. Fast MR imaging and ultrafast MR imaging of fetal central nervous system abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shakudo, Miyuki; Manabe, Takao; Murata, Katsuko; Matsuo, Ryoichi; Oda, Junro [Osaka City General Hospital (Japan); Inoue, Yuichi; Mochizuki, Kunizo; Yamada, Ryusaku

    2001-12-01

    The aims of this study were two: to compare the efficacy of fast MRI (breath-hold fast spin-echo T2-weighted and fast gradient-echo T1-weighted sequence) and ultrafast MRI (half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo sequence) in evaluation of fetal central nervous system (CNS) abnormalities at late gestational age, and to compare the capability of fast MRI and ultrafast MRI to assess fetal CNS abnormalities with that of prenatal ultrasonography (US). Forty-nine women with fetuses at gestational ages of 26-39 weeks underwent fast MRI (29 patients) or ultrafast MRI (20 patients). In detection of motion artifact, visualization of the lateral and 4th ventricles, and differentiation between gray and white matter in cerebral hemispheres, ultrafast MRI was significantly superior to fast MRI (p<0.0001, Mann-Whitney U test). In 25 of 43 cases, US and MR diagnoses were the same and consistent with postnatal diagnosis. In 10 of 43 cases, MRI demonstrated findings additional to or different from those of US, and MR findings were confirmed postnatally. MRI, particularly ultrafast MRI, is useful for demonstrating CNS abnormalities in situations in which US is suggestive but not definitive. (author)

  20. Evaluation of Artifacts and Distortions of Titanium Applicators on 3.0-Tesla MRI: Feasibility of Titanium Applicators in MRI-Guided Brachytherapy for Gynecological Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yusung; Muruganandham, Manickam; Modrick, Joseph M.; Bayouth, John E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to characterize the levels of artifacts and distortions of titanium applicators on 3.0-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: Fletcher-Suit-Delclos-style tandem and ovoids (T and O) and tandem and ring applicator (T and R) were examined. The quality assurance (QA) phantoms for each applicator were designed and filled with copper sulphate solution (1.5 g/l). The artifacts were quantified with the registration of corresponding computed tomography (CT) images. A favorable MR sequence was searched in terms of artifacts. Using the sequence, the artifacts were determined. The geometric distortions induced by the applicators were quantified through each registration of CT and MRI without applicators. The artifacts of T and O were also evaluated on in vivo MRI datasets of 5 patients. Results: T1-weighted MRI with 1-mm slice thickness was found as a favorable MR sequence. Applying the sequence, the artifacts at the tandem tip of T and O and T and R were determined as 1.5 ± 0.5 mm in a superior direction in phantom studies. In the ovoids of T and O, we found artifacts less than 1.5 ± 0.5 mm. The artifacts of a T and O tandem in vivo were found as less than 2.6 ± 1.3 mm on T1-weighted MRI, whereas less than 6.9 ± 3.4 mm on T2-weighted MRI. No more than 1.2 ± 0.6 mm (3.0 ± 1.5 mm) of distortions, due to a titanium applicator, were measured on T1-weighted MRI (T2-). Conclusion: In 3.0-Tesla MRI, we found the artifact widths at the tip of tandem were less than 1.5 ± 0.5 mm for both T and O and T and R when using T1-weighted MRI in phantom studies. However, exclusive 3.0-Tesla MRI-guided brachytherapy planning with a titanium applicator should be cautiously implemented.

  1. Diffusion microscopist simulator - The development and application of a Monte Carlo simulation system for diffusion MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, C.H.

    2011-09-01

    Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) has made a significant breakthrough in neurological disorders and brain research thanks to its exquisite sensitivity to tissue cyto-architecture. However, as the water diffusion process in neuronal tissues is a complex biophysical phenomena at molecular scale, it is difficult to infer tissue microscopic characteristics on a voxel scale from dMRI data. The major methodological contribution of this thesis is the development of an integrated and generic Monte Carlo simulation framework, 'Diffusion Microscopist Simulator' (DMS), which has the capacity to create 3D biological tissue models of various shapes and properties, as well as to synthesize dMRI data for a large variety of MRI methods, pulse sequence design and parameters. DMS aims at bridging the gap between the elementary diffusion processes occurring at a micrometric scale and the resulting diffusion signal measured at millimetric scale, providing better insights into the features observed in dMRI, as well as offering ground-truth information for optimization and validation of dMRI acquisition protocols for different applications. We have verified the performance and validity of DMS through various benchmark experiments, and applied to address particular research topics in dMRI. Based on DMS, there are two major application contributions in this thesis. First, we use DMS to investigate the impact of finite diffusion gradient pulse duration (delta) on fibre orientation estimation in dMRI. We propose that current practice of using long delta, which is enforced by the hardware limitation of clinical MRI scanners, is actually beneficial for mapping fibre orientations, even though it violates the underlying assumption made in q-space theory. Second, we employ DMS to investigate the feasibility of estimating axon radius using a clinical MRI system. The results suggest that the algorithm for mapping the direct microstructures is applicable to dMRI data acquired from

  2. Inventory of MRI applications and workers exposed to MRI-related electromagnetic fields in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaap, Kristel; Christopher-De Vries, Yvette; Slottje, Pauline; Kromhout, Hans

    2013-12-01

    This study aims to characterise and quantify the population that is occupationally exposed to electromagnetic fields (EMF) from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices and to identify factors that determine the probability and type of exposure. A questionnaire survey was used to collect information about scanners, procedures, historical developments and employees working with or near MRI scanners in clinical and research MRI departments in the Netherlands. Data were obtained from 145 MRI departments. A rapid increase in the use of MRI and field strength of the scanners was observed and quantified. The strongest magnets were employed by academic hospitals and research departments. Approximately 7000 individuals were reported to be working inside an MRI scanner room and were thus considered to have high probability of occupational exposure to static magnetic fields (SMF). Fifty-four per cent was exposed to SMF at least one day per month. The largest occupationally exposed group were radiographers (n ~ 1700). Nine per cent of the 7000 involved workers were regularly present inside a scanner room during image acquisition, when exposure to additional types of EMF is considered a possibility. This practice was most prevalent among workers involved in scanning animals. The data illustrate recent trends and historical developments in magnetic resonance imaging and provide an extensive characterisation of the occupationally exposed population. A considerable number of workers are potentially exposed to MRI-related EMF. Type and frequency of potential exposure depend on the job performed, as well as the type of workplace. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. The application of MRI in gluteal muscle contracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Tao; You Yuhua; Sun Jing; Cheng Kebin; Liu Wei; Qu Hui

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the MRI findings and its diagnostic value in gluteal muscle contracture (GMC). Methods: Eleven clinic or operation confirmed GMC patients were examined by plain X-ray and MRI. Conventional T 1 WI and T 2 WI MR imaging were performed and FFE-T 2 WI (fast field echo-T 2 WI) was also scanned. CT scan was conducted in 5 cases. Results: 11 GMC patients were all diagnosed by MRI. Conventional T 1 WI and T 2 WI could only show the atrophy of gluteal muscles, while FFE-T 2 WI could directly show the fibrous band of gluteal muscle and its fascia, and the fibrous band appeared as low signal intensity on FFE-T 2 WI sequence. Conclusions: MRI is the efficient modality in imaging the fibrous band for GMC patients, and FFE-T 2 WI is the most valuable sequence. MRI is very helpful in the diagnosis and treatment of GMC

  4. Ex vivo assessment of polyol coated-iron oxide nanoparticles for MRI diagnosis applications: toxicological and MRI contrast enhancement effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomati-Miguel, Oscar; Miguel-Sancho, Nuria; Abasolo, Ibane; Candiota, Ana Paula; Roca, Alejandro G.; Acosta, Milena; Schwartz, Simó; Arus, Carles; Marquina, Clara; Martinez, Gema; Santamaria, Jesus

    2014-03-01

    Polyol synthesis is a promising method to obtain directly pharmaceutical grade colloidal dispersion of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs). Here, we study the biocompatibility and performance as T2-MRI contrast agents (CAs) of high quality magnetic colloidal dispersions (average hydrodynamic aggregate diameter of 16-27 nm) consisting of polyol-synthesized SPIONs (5 nm in mean particle size) coated with triethylene glycol (TEG) chains (TEG-SPIONs), which were subsequently functionalized to carboxyl-terminated meso-2-3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) coated-iron oxide nanoparticles (DMSA-SPIONs). Standard MTT assays on HeLa, U87MG, and HepG2 cells revealed that colloidal dispersions of TEG-coated iron oxide nanoparticles did not induce any loss of cell viability after 3 days incubation with dose concentrations below 50 μg Fe/ml. However, after these nanoparticles were functionalized with DMSA molecules, an increase on their cytotoxicity was observed, so that particles bearing free terminal carboxyl groups on their surface were not cytotoxic only at low concentrations (MRI studies in mice indicated that both types of coated-iron oxide nanoparticles produced higher negative T2-MRI contrast enhancement than that measured for a similar commercial T2-MRI CAs consisting in dextran-coated ultra-small iron oxide nanoparticles (Ferumoxtran-10). In conclusion, the above attributes make both types of as synthesized coated-iron oxide nanoparticles, but especially DMSA-SPIONs, promising candidates as T2-MRI CAs for nanoparticle-enhanced MRI diagnosis applications.

  5. Fano resonance control in a photonic crystal structure and its application to ultrafast switching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Yi; Heuck, Mikkel; Hu, Hao

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a photonic crystal structure that allows easy and robust control of the Fano spectrum. Its operation relies on controlling the amplitude of light propagating along one of the light paths in the structure from which the Fano resonance is obtained. Short-pulse dynamic ...... reshaping effect of the nonlinear Fano transfer function. As an example, we present a system application of a Fano structure, demonstrating its advantages by the experimental realiza- tion of 10 Gbit/s all-optical modulation with optical control power less than 1mW.......We experimentally demonstrate a photonic crystal structure that allows easy and robust control of the Fano spectrum. Its operation relies on controlling the amplitude of light propagating along one of the light paths in the structure from which the Fano resonance is obtained. Short-pulse dynamic...

  6. Application of ultra-fast high-resolution gated-image intensifiers to laser fusion studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lieber, A.J.; Benjamin, R.F.; Sutphin, H.D.; McCall, G.H.

    1975-01-01

    Gated-image intensifiers for fast framing have found high utility in laser-target interaction studies. X-ray pinhole camera photographs which can record asymmetries of laser-target interactions have been instrumental in further system design. High-resolution high-speed x-ray images of laser irradiated targets are formed using pinhole optics and electronically amplified by proximity focused channelplate intensifiers before being recorded on film. Spectral resolution is obtained by filtering. In these applications shutter duration is determined by source duration. Electronic gating serves to reduce background thereby enhancing signal-to-noise ratio. Cameras are used to view the self light of the interaction but may also be used for shadowgraphs. Sources for shadowgraphs may be sequenced to obtain a series of pictures with effective rates of 10 10 frame/s. Multiple aperatures have been used to obtain stereo x-ray views, yielding three dimensional information about the interactions. (author)

  7. Spectrally selective molecular doped solids: spectroscopy, photophysics and their application to ultrafast optical pulse processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galaup, Jean-Pierre

    2005-01-01

    The persistent spectral hole-burning (PSHB) phenomenon observed in molecular doped polymers cooled down to liquid helium temperatures allows the engraving of spectral structures in the inhomogeneous absorption profile of the material. This phenomenon known since 1974 has became a fruitful field for the study of the intimacy of complex molecular systems in the solid state, revealing high-resolution spectroscopy, photophysics, photochemistry and dynamics of molecular doped amorphous media, organic as well as inorganic. A PSHB molecular doped solid can be programmed in spectral domain and therefore, it can be converted in an optical processor capable to achieve user-defined optical functions. Some aspects of this field are illustrated in the present paper. An application is presented where a naphthalocyanine doped polymer film is used in a demonstrative experiment to prove that temporal aberration free re-compression of ultra-short light pulses is feasible. Perspectives for the coherent control of light fields or photochemical processes are also evoked

  8. Spatial distortion in MRI with application to stereotactic neurosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, P.S.

    1999-05-01

    The aim of this work was to implement a thorough method for quantifying the errors introduced to frame-based neurosurgical stereotactic procedures by the use of MRI. Chang and Fitzpatrick's reversed gradient distortion correction method was used, in combination with a phantom, to measure these errors. Spatial distortion in MR images of between 1 mm and 2 mm was measured. Further analysis showed that this typically introduced an additional error in the coordinate of the actual treatment point of 0.7 mm. The implications of this are discussed. The main source of distortion in the MR images used for stereotaxis was found to be the head ring. A comparison between imaging sequences and MR scanners revealed that the spatial distortion depends mainly on the bandwidth per pixel of the sequence rather than other differences in the imaging sequences. By comparison with a phase map distortion correction technique, the imaging parameters required to allow successful distortion correction with the reversed gradient method were identified. The most important was the use of full Fourier spin echo acquisitions. The reversed gradient correction method was applied to two contemporary EPI techniques. Considerable improvement was seen in the production of ADC maps after the images had been corrected for distortion. The method also was shown to be valid in application to BOLD fMRl data. (author)

  9. Clinical application of functional MRI for chronic epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woermann, F.G.; Labudda, K.

    2010-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is frequently used in the presurgical diagnostic procedure of epilepsy patients, in particular for lateralization of speech and memory and for localization of the primary motor cortex to delineate the epileptogenic lesion from eloquent brain areas. fMRI is one of the non-invasive procedures in the presurgical diagnostic process, together with medical history, seizure semiology, neurological examination, interictal and ictal EEG, structural MRI, video EEG monitoring and neuropsychology. This diagnostic sequence leads either to the decision for or against elective epilepsy surgery or to the decision to proceed with invasive diagnostic techniques (Wada test, intra-operative or extra-operative cortical stimulation). It is difficult to evaluate the contribution of the fMRI test in isolation to the validity of the entire diagnostic sequence. Complications such as memory loss and aphasia in temporal lobe resections or paresis after frontal lobe resections are rare and rarely of disastrous extent. This further complicates the evaluation of the clinical relevance of fMRI as a predictive tool. In this article studies which investigated the concordance between fMRI and other diagnostic gold standards will be presented as well as the association between presurgical fMRI and postsurgical morbidity. (orig.) [de

  10. Superradiant terahertz sources and their applications in accelerator diagnostics and ultra-fast science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Bertram

    2017-04-28

    The terahertz (THz) frequency range lies between the frequency range of radio and infrared. The exact limits are not well defined and depend on the scientific community. The most recent ''2017 Terahertz Science and Technology Roadmap'' sets the THz frequency range to between 0.1 and 30 THz. The development of suitable detectors, detection techniques, and sources for this frequency range has seen tremendous progress over the past decade. The arrival of commercial femtosecond (fs) laser systems has enabled new, background-free THz time domain spectroscopy, and both laser-driven and accelerator-driven THz sources are currently producing pulse energies in the μJ, and even mJ, range. This thesis describes the characterization of a new class of accelerator-based light sources, which open up opportunities to provide a unique combination of high pulse energies and high repetition rates. The foreseen applications of these types of sources, coined ''superradiant THz sources'', lie in the area of time-resolved (nonlinear) spectroscopy. One of the first results of this thesis is the observation that the THz pulses from the prototype facility TELBE exhibit large pulse-to-pulse fluctuations in arrivaltime and intensity. These types of instabilities render the intended applications of TELBE for real-world nonlinear THz spectroscopy experiments impossible. As part of this thesis a pulse resolved data acquisition and analysis scheme has therefore been devised which enables the correction of these instabilities and now allows performance of time-resolved THz spectroscopy measurements with sub-30 femtosecond (fs) (FHWM) time resolution with excellent dynamic range up to 106. The thesis is organized as follows: the first chapter introduces the fundamental principles and techniques utilized in this work. The second chapter presents the results, starting with the diagnostic developments, followed by a thorough characterization of the THz source

  11. New MRI technologies. Diffusion MRI and its application to functional neuroimaging and analyses of white matter integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Tetsuo

    2010-01-01

    Described is the technological aspect of MRI, MR diffusion-weighted imaging (MR-DWI), principles of its measurement and application for imaging the cerebral function and for aiding the quantitative diagnosis of brain diseases. The author explains the principle of MR imaging process; diffusion properties of water molecules, MR-DWI based on them and DW-fMRI of the brain; MR-diffusion tensor imaging (MR-DTI), its analysis and color acquisition, and tracking of white matter nerve fibers; analysis of white matter lesions by the tracking; and the new tracking method at the chiasm of nerve fascicles. The usual fMRI reflects the blood oxygen level depending (BOLD) signals whereas recently attracted DW-fMRI, the volume changes of nerve cells concomitant to nerve activation accompanying apparent changes of water diffusion coefficients in and out of cells which occur faster than BOLD signs, resulting in higher resolution of time and space. However, DWI requires the higher intensity of static magnetic field like 3T. MR-DTI acquires the anisotropic diffusion of water molecules using MR-DWI technique with application of 6 or more motion probing gradients, thus makes it possible to track the running directions of nerve fibers and capillary vessels, and is proposed to be a useful mean of specific fiber tracking in the white matter when displayed by 3 different colors exhibiting the directions like the right/left (x axis, red), anterior/posterior (y, green) and upper/lower (z, blue) sides of head. Recently, MR-DWI and MR-DTI have been found usable for pathogenic studies of brain diseases such as dementia. Tensor anisotropy is apparently lowered at the chiasm of nerve fascicles, the cause of tracking error, for which authors have developed a new method using the similarity of directional vector, not of tensor, before and behind the chiasm. As exemplified, MRI technology is further advancing even at present. (T.T.)

  12. APPLICATION OF MRI IN THE DIAGNOSTICS OF M. MASSETER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Dimova-Gabrovska

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a non-invasive diagnostic method which can provide detailed images of organs and structures of the human body. The purpose of this review is to explore and introduce the diagnostic capabilities of MRI in imaging m. masseter in conditions of norm and pathology. The material of the review is information of 20 literary sources selected from 530, found by keywordsfromJanuary to April 2017. The information about MRI imaging of the normal anatomy of m. masseter and the most common findings in muscle - muscle hypertrophy, inflammatory changes, vascular malformations, intramuscular hemangioma, cysticercosis and changes after radiotherapy was analyzed. In conclusion, the diagnostic capabilities of MRI of masseter muscle – both in the conditions of norm and pathology were confirmed. The method is considered to be reliable, objective, non-invasive and accurate.

  13. MO-FG-207-03: Maximizing the Utility of Integrated PET/MRI in Clinical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behr, S. [University of California (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The use of integrated PET/MRI systems in clinical applications can best benefit from understanding their technological advances and limitations. The currently available clinical PET/MRI systems have their own characteristics. Thorough analyses of existing technical data and evaluation of necessary performance metrics for quality assurances could be conducted to optimize application-specific PET/MRI protocols. This Symposium will focus on technical advances and limitations of clinical PET/MRI systems, and how this exciting imaging modality can be utilized in applications that can benefit from both PET and MRI. Learning Objectives: To understand the technological advances of clinical PET/MRI systems To correctly identify clinical applications that can benefit from PET/MRI To understand ongoing work to further improve the current PET/MRI technology Floris Jansen is a GE Healthcare employee.

  14. MO-FG-207-03: Maximizing the Utility of Integrated PET/MRI in Clinical Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behr, S.

    2015-01-01

    The use of integrated PET/MRI systems in clinical applications can best benefit from understanding their technological advances and limitations. The currently available clinical PET/MRI systems have their own characteristics. Thorough analyses of existing technical data and evaluation of necessary performance metrics for quality assurances could be conducted to optimize application-specific PET/MRI protocols. This Symposium will focus on technical advances and limitations of clinical PET/MRI systems, and how this exciting imaging modality can be utilized in applications that can benefit from both PET and MRI. Learning Objectives: To understand the technological advances of clinical PET/MRI systems To correctly identify clinical applications that can benefit from PET/MRI To understand ongoing work to further improve the current PET/MRI technology Floris Jansen is a GE Healthcare employee

  15. TH-F-202-02: Current Applications of MRI in Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, G.

    2016-01-01

    MRI has excellent soft tissue contrast and can provide both anatomical and physiological information. It is becoming increasingly important in radiation therapy for treatment planning, image-guided radiation therapy, and treatment assessment. It is critically important at this time point to educate and update our medical physicists about MRI to prepare for the upcoming surge of MRI applications in radiation therapy. This session will review important basics of MR physics, pulse sequence designs, and current radiotherapy application, as well as showcase exciting new developments in MRI that can be potentially useful in radiation therapy. Learning Objectives: To learn basics of MR physics and understand the differences between various pulse sequences To review current applications of MRI in radiation therapy.To discuss recent MRI advances for future MRI guided radiation therapy Partly supported by NIH (1R21CA165384).; W. Miller, Research supported in part by Siemens Healthcare; G. Li, My clinical research is in part supported by NIH U54CA137788. I have a collaborative research project with Philips Healthcare.; J. Cai, jing cai

  16. TH-F-202-02: Current Applications of MRI in Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, G. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (United States)

    2016-06-15

    MRI has excellent soft tissue contrast and can provide both anatomical and physiological information. It is becoming increasingly important in radiation therapy for treatment planning, image-guided radiation therapy, and treatment assessment. It is critically important at this time point to educate and update our medical physicists about MRI to prepare for the upcoming surge of MRI applications in radiation therapy. This session will review important basics of MR physics, pulse sequence designs, and current radiotherapy application, as well as showcase exciting new developments in MRI that can be potentially useful in radiation therapy. Learning Objectives: To learn basics of MR physics and understand the differences between various pulse sequences To review current applications of MRI in radiation therapy.To discuss recent MRI advances for future MRI guided radiation therapy Partly supported by NIH (1R21CA165384).; W. Miller, Research supported in part by Siemens Healthcare; G. Li, My clinical research is in part supported by NIH U54CA137788. I have a collaborative research project with Philips Healthcare.; J. Cai, jing cai.

  17. Clinical application of MRI to fetal central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guangbing; Chen Liguang; Ma Yuxiang; Liu Wen; Lin Xiangtao; Shi Hao; Yang Zhenzhen; Qu Jun

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore the value of MRI on fetal central nervous system. Methods: Twenty-four women with complicated pregnancies, aged from 22 to 32 years (average 27 years) and with gestation from 23-39 weeks (average 30 weeks) were studied with a 1.5T superconductive MR unit within 24 hours after ultrasound studies. T 2 -weighted MR imaging was performed using HASTE and T 1 -weighted MR imaging was using FLASH. Comparison of the diagnosis of MRI and ultrasound were done with autopsy or postnatal follow-up MRI. Results: Of the 24 cases, 24 fetus were found. The fetal brain, gyrus, sulcus, corpus callosum, thalamus, cerebellum, brain stem, and spinal cord were shown more clearly on MR T 2 -weighted images. T 1 -weighted images were not as good as T 2 -weighted images. Twenty-seven lesions were visualized by ultrasound and thirty-one by MRI in these twenty-four fetuses. By MRI study, two cases were conformed their ultrasound diagnosis, ten cases were completed their ultrasound diagnosis, and twelve cases were made the same diagnosis as ultrasound. Conclusion: MR has advantages in displaying fetal central nervous system anatomy over ultrasound, the quality of MR images is not affected by maternal somatotype, volume of amniotic fluid, fetal skull and the pelvic skeleton of pregnant women. Based on ultrasound, MR imaging is a valuable complement to sonography in difficult cases, it can conforming, completing, even more correcting the diagnosis made by ultrasound. (authors)

  18. WE-EF-BRD-04: MR in the OR: The Growth and Applications of MRI for Interventional Radiology and Surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahrig, R. [Stanford University (United States)

    2015-06-15

    MRI-guided treatment is a growing area of medicine, particularly in radiotherapy and surgery. The exquisite soft tissue anatomic contrast offered by MRI, along with functional imaging, makes the use of MRI during therapeutic procedures very attractive. Challenging the utility of MRI in the therapy room are many issues including the physics of MRI and the impact on the environment and therapeutic instruments, the impact of the room and instruments on the MRI; safety, space, design and cost. In this session, the applications and challenges of MRI-guided treatment will be described. The session format is: Past, present and future: MRI-guided radiotherapy from 2005 to 2025: Jan Lagendijk Battling Maxwell’s equations: Physics challenges and solutions for hybrid MRI systems: Paul Keall I want it now!: Advances in MRI acquisition, reconstruction and the use of priors to enable fast anatomic and physiologic imaging to inform guidance and adaptation decisions: Yanle Hu MR in the OR: The growth and applications of MRI for interventional radiology and surgery: Rebecca Fahrig Learning Objectives: To understand the history and trajectory of MRI-guided radiotherapy To understand the challenges of integrating MR imaging systems with linear accelerators To understand the latest in fast MRI methods to enable the visualisation of anatomy and physiology on radiotherapy treatment timescales To understand the growing role and challenges of MRI for image-guided surgical procedures My disclosures are publicly available and updated at: http://sydney.edu.au/medicine/radiation-physics/about-us/disclosures.php.

  19. Reconstruction of MRI/CT compatible ring and tandem applicators in CT or MRI images used for treatment planning in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surendran, N.; Kim, Hayeon; Beriwal, Sushil; Saiful Huq, M.

    2008-01-01

    Brachytherapy (BT) plays a crucial role in the management of invasive cervix cancer from stage I to IV. Intracavitary techniques are based on afterloading devices, with different types of applicators. CT and/or MRI compatible applicators allow a sectional image based approach with a better assessment of gross tumour volume (GTV) and definition and delineation of target volume (CTV) compared to traditional approaches. To evaluate reconstruction of MRI/CT compatible ring and tandem applicators in 3D CT or MRI images used for treatment planning in Brachytherapy

  20. Quantitative and Visual Assessments toward Potential Sub-mSv or Ultrafast FDG PET Using High-Sensitivity TOF PET in PET/MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, Spencer C; Bahroos, Emma; Hawkins, Randall A; Nardo, Lorenzo; Ravanfar, Vahid; Capbarat, Emily V; Seo, Youngho

    2018-06-01

    Newer high-performance time-of-flight (TOF) positron emission tomography (PET) systems have the capability to preserve diagnostic image quality with low count density, while maintaining a high raw photon detection sensitivity that would allow for a reduction in injected dose or rapid data acquisition. To assess this, we performed quantitative and visual assessments of the PET images acquired using a highly sensitive (23.3 cps/kBq) large field of view (25-cm axial) silicon photomultiplier (SiPM)-based TOF PET (400-ps timing resolution) integrated with 3 T-MRI in comparison to PET images acquired on non-TOF PET/x-ray computed tomography (CT) systems. Whole-body 2-deoxy-2-[ 18 F]fluoro-D-glucose ([ 18 F]FDG) PET/CT was acquired for 15 patients followed by whole body PET/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with an average injected dose of 325 ± 84 MBq. The PET list mode data from PET/MRI were reconstructed using full datasets (4 min/bed) and reduced datasets (2, 1, 0.5, and 0.25 min/bed). Qualitative assessment between PET/CT and PET/MR images were made. A Likert-type scale between 1 and 5, 1 for non-diagnostic, 3 equivalent to PET/CT, and 5 superior quality, was used. Maximum and mean standardized uptake values (SUV max and SUV mean ) of normal tissues and lesions detected were measured and compared. Mean visual assessment scores were 3.54 ± 0.32, 3.62 ± 0.38, and 3.69 ± 0.35 for the brain and 3.05 ± 0.49, 3.71 ± 0.45, and 4.14 ± 0.44 for the whole-body maximum intensity projections (MIPs) for 1, 2, and 4 min/bed PET/MR images, respectively. The SUV mean values for normal tissues were lower and statistically significant for images acquired at 4, 2, 1, 0.5, and 0.25 min/bed on the PET/MR, with values of - 18 ± 28 % (p PET/MR datasets. High-sensitivity TOF PET showed comparable but still better visual image quality even at a much reduced activity in comparison to lower-sensitivity non-TOF PET. Our data translates to a seven times

  1. Application of basic physics principles to clinical neuroradiology: differentiating artifacts from true pathology on MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakky, Michael; Pandey, Shilpa; Kwak, Ellie; Jara, Hernan; Erbay, Sami H

    2013-08-01

    This article outlines artifactual findings commonly encountered in neuroradiologic MRI studies and offers clues to differentiate them from true pathology on the basis of their physical properties. Basic MR physics concepts are used to shed light on the causes of these artifacts. MRI is one of the most commonly used techniques in neuroradiology. Unfortunately, MRI is prone to image distortion and artifacts that can be difficult to identify. Using the provided case illustrations, practical clues, and relevant physical applications, radiologists may devise algorithms to troubleshoot these artifacts.

  2. Image quality transfer and applications in diffusion MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexander, Daniel C.; Zikic, Darko; Ghosh, Aurobrata

    2017-01-01

    and the uniquely rich diffusion MRI data set from the human connectome project (HCP). Results highlight potential benefits of IQT in both brain connectivity mapping and microstructure imaging. In brain connectivity mapping, IQT reveals, from standard data sets, thin connection pathways that tractography normally...

  3. Application of calibrated fMRI in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajoie, Isabelle; Nugent, Scott; Debacker, Clément; Dyson, Kenneth; Tancredi, Felipe B; Badhwar, AmanPreet; Belleville, Sylvie; Deschaintre, Yan; Bellec, Pierre; Doyon, Julien; Bocti, Christian; Gauthier, Serge; Arnold, Douglas; Kergoat, Marie-Jeanne; Chertkow, Howard; Monchi, Oury; Hoge, Richard D

    2017-01-01

    Calibrated fMRI based on arterial spin-labeling (ASL) and blood oxygen-dependent contrast (BOLD), combined with periods of hypercapnia and hyperoxia, can provide information on cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR), resting blood flow (CBF), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF), and resting oxidative metabolism (CMRO 2 ). Vascular and metabolic integrity are believed to be affected in Alzheimer's disease (AD), thus, the use of calibrated fMRI in AD may help understand the disease and monitor therapeutic responses in future clinical trials. In the present work, we applied a calibrated fMRI approach referred to as Quantitative O2 (QUO2) in a cohort of probable AD dementia and age-matched control participants. The resulting CBF, OEF and CMRO 2 values fell within the range from previous studies using positron emission tomography (PET) with 15 O labeling. Moreover, the typical parietotemporal pattern of hypoperfusion and hypometabolism in AD was observed, especially in the precuneus, a particularly vulnerable region. We detected no deficit in frontal CBF, nor in whole grey matter CVR, which supports the hypothesis that the effects observed were associated specifically with AD rather than generalized vascular disease. Some key pitfalls affecting both ASL and BOLD methods were encountered, such as prolonged arterial transit times (particularly in the occipital lobe), the presence of susceptibility artifacts obscuring medial temporal regions, and the challenges associated with the hypercapnic manipulation in AD patients and elderly participants. The present results are encouraging and demonstrate the promise of calibrated fMRI measurements as potential biomarkers in AD. Although CMRO 2 can be imaged with 15 O PET, the QUO2 method uses more widely available imaging infrastructure, avoids exposure to ionizing radiation, and integrates with other MRI-based measures of brain structure and function.

  4. Application of calibrated fMRI in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Lajoie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Calibrated fMRI based on arterial spin-labeling (ASL and blood oxygen-dependent contrast (BOLD, combined with periods of hypercapnia and hyperoxia, can provide information on cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR, resting blood flow (CBF, oxygen extraction fraction (OEF, and resting oxidative metabolism (CMRO2. Vascular and metabolic integrity are believed to be affected in Alzheimer's disease (AD, thus, the use of calibrated fMRI in AD may help understand the disease and monitor therapeutic responses in future clinical trials. In the present work, we applied a calibrated fMRI approach referred to as Quantitative O2 (QUO2 in a cohort of probable AD dementia and age-matched control participants. The resulting CBF, OEF and CMRO2 values fell within the range from previous studies using positron emission tomography (PET with 15O labeling. Moreover, the typical parietotemporal pattern of hypoperfusion and hypometabolism in AD was observed, especially in the precuneus, a particularly vulnerable region. We detected no deficit in frontal CBF, nor in whole grey matter CVR, which supports the hypothesis that the effects observed were associated specifically with AD rather than generalized vascular disease. Some key pitfalls affecting both ASL and BOLD methods were encountered, such as prolonged arterial transit times (particularly in the occipital lobe, the presence of susceptibility artifacts obscuring medial temporal regions, and the challenges associated with the hypercapnic manipulation in AD patients and elderly participants. The present results are encouraging and demonstrate the promise of calibrated fMRI measurements as potential biomarkers in AD. Although CMRO2 can be imaged with 15O PET, the QUO2 method uses more widely available imaging infrastructure, avoids exposure to ionizing radiation, and integrates with other MRI-based measures of brain structure and function.

  5. [Clinical evaluation of female pelvic tumors : Application fields of integrated PET/MRI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grueneisen, J; Umutlu, L

    2016-07-01

    Integrated positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning has recently become established in clinical imaging. Various studies have demonstrated the great potential of this new hybrid imaging procedure for applications in the field of oncology and the diagnostics of inflammatory processes. With initial studies demonstrating the feasibility and high diagnostic potential of PET/MRI comparable to PET-computed tomography (CT), the focus of future studies should be on the identification of application fields with a potential diagnostic benefit of PET/MRI over other established diagnostic tools. Both MRI and PET/CT are widely used in the diagnostic algorithms for malignancies of the female pelvis. A simultaneous acquisition of PET and MRI data within a single examination provides complementary information which can be used for a more comprehensive evaluation of the primary tumor as well as for whole body staging. Therefore, the aim of this article is to outline potential clinical applications of integrated PET/MRI for the diagnostic work-up of primary or recurrent gynecological neoplasms of the female pelvis.

  6. Requirements to MRI and MRS data to be applicable for radiation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torresin, A.; Brambilla, M.; Colombo, P.; Minella, M.; Monti, A.; Moscato, A.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) use for Radiotherapy planning began in the 1980 and is still developing today. MRI is now an important morphological and functional imaging able to open new diagnostic and planning scenario. As new technologies become more complex, their best clinical application often becomes very difficult. The intent of this paper is to highlight methods and requirements necessary to apply MRI in radiation treatments. The concept of image is still in progress, following the evolution of human body knowledge. Many different methods to get diagnostic information of a tumour will be acquired; MRI images will be more and more important in the next future. The combination of information from complementary imaging modalities is expected to have a great benefit in cancer treatment. This fact is particularly relevant for target definition, which remains, one of the most important sources of error in Radiotherapy. Anatomical imaging with CT and MRI produces different gross tumour volumes. Functional imaging with modalities such as MRI and PET will generally reveal an even different volume. Thus a decision has to be taken about how to combine such information in clinical applications. The solutions of these new problems are 'in progress' and a lot of researches in clinical applications are in discussion

  7. Simple and ultra-fast recognition and quantitation of compounded monoclonal antibodies: Application to flow injection analysis combined to UV spectroscopy and matching method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaccoulet, E; Schweitzer-Chaput, A; Toussaint, B; Prognon, P; Caudron, E

    2018-09-01

    Compounding of monoclonal antibody (mAbs) constantly increases in hospital. Quality control (QC) of the compounded mAbs based on quantification and identification is required to prevent potential errors and fast method is needed to manage outpatient chemotherapy administration. A simple and ultra-fast (less than 30 s) method using flow injection analysis associated to least square matching method issued from the analyzer software was performed and evaluated for the routine hospital QC of three compounded mAbs: bevacizumab, infliximab and rituximab. The method was evaluated through qualitative and quantitative parameters. Preliminary analysis of the UV absorption and second derivative spectra of the mAbs allowed us to adapt analytical conditions according to the therapeutic range of the mAbs. In terms of quantitative QC, linearity, accuracy and precision were assessed as specified in ICH guidelines. Very satisfactory recovery was achieved and the RSD (%) of the intermediate precision were less than 1.1%. Qualitative analytical parameters were also evaluated in terms of specificity, sensitivity and global precision through a matrix of confusion. Results showed to be concentration and mAbs dependant and excellent (100%) specificity and sensitivity were reached within specific concentration range. Finally, routine application on "real life" samples (n = 209) from different batch of the three mAbs complied with the specifications of the quality control i.e. excellent identification (100%) and ± 15% of targeting concentration belonging to the calibration range. The successful use of the combination of second derivative spectroscopy and partial least square matching method demonstrated the interest of FIA for the ultra-fast QC of mAbs after compounding using matching method. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Hemodynamic measurement using four-dimensional phase-contrast MRI: Quantification of hemodynamic parameters and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Ho Jin; Lee, Sang Joon [POSTECH Biotech Center, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Guk Bae; Kweon, Ji Hoon; Kim, Young Hak; Lee, Deok Hee; Yang, Dong Hyun; KIm, Nam Kug [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    Recent improvements have been made to the use of time-resolved, three-dimensional phase-contrast (PC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is also named four-dimensional (4D) PC-MRI or 4D flow MRI, in the investigation of spatial and temporal variations in hemodynamic features in cardiovascular blood flow. The present article reviews the principle and analytical procedures of 4D PC-MRI. Various fluid dynamic biomarkers for possible clinical usage are also described, including wall shear stress, turbulent kinetic energy, and relative pressure. Lastly, this article provides an overview of the clinical applications of 4D PC-MRI in various cardiovascular regions.

  9. Hemodynamic Measurement Using Four-Dimensional Phase-Contrast MRI: Quantification of Hemodynamic Parameters and Clinical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Hojin [POSTECH Biotech Center, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 37673 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Guk Bae [Asan Institute of Life Science, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of); Kweon, Jihoon [Department of Cardiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Joon [POSTECH Biotech Center, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 37673 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 37673 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young-Hak [Department of Cardiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Deok Hee; Yang, Dong Hyun [Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Namkug [Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Convergence Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Recent improvements have been made to the use of time-resolved, three-dimensional phase-contrast (PC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is also named four-dimensional (4D) PC-MRI or 4D flow MRI, in the investigation of spatial and temporal variations in hemodynamic features in cardiovascular blood flow. The present article reviews the principle and analytical procedures of 4D PC-MRI. Various fluid dynamic biomarkers for possible clinical usage are also described, including wall shear stress, turbulent kinetic energy, and relative pressure. Lastly, this article provides an overview of the clinical applications of 4D PC-MRI in various cardiovascular regions.

  10. Applications of cardiac MRI in pediatric heart diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao Xiaojuan; Zeng Jinjin; Sun Jihang; Cheng Hua; Yin Guangheng

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the value of magnetic resonance imaging in pediatric heart diseases. Methods: Ninety-seven cases received cardiac MR scanning in this present study. The age range was 2 day to 13 years including 62 boys and 35 girls, the median age was 6 years. They were performed on h 5 T scanner with cardiac phased-array coil and VCG. Results: Eighty-five of the 97 cases were positive. Those positive findings included cardiomyopathy in 41 cases, congenital heart disease in 20 cases, constrictive pericarditis in 4 cases, pericardiac effusions with or without other cardiovascular diseases in 17 cases, cardiac tumor in 2 cases,thrombus in 3 cases and in 5 other cases. Conclusion: Cardiac MRI is an excellent imaging modality for the anatomical and functional abnormalities of pediatric heart diseases. (authors)

  11. Ultra-Fast Microwave Synthesis of ZnO Nanorods on Cellulose Substrates for UV Sensor Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Pimentel

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, tracing and Whatman papers were used as substrates to grow zinc oxide (ZnO nanostructures. Cellulose-based substrates are cost-efficient, highly sensitive and environmentally friendly. ZnO nanostructures with hexagonal structure were synthesized by hydrothermal under microwave irradiation using an ultrafast approach, that is, a fixed synthesis time of 10 min. The effect of synthesis temperature on ZnO nanostructures was investigated from 70 to 130 °C. An Ultra Violet (UV/Ozone treatment directly to the ZnO seed layer prior to microwave assisted synthesis revealed expressive differences regarding formation of the ZnO nanostructures. Structural characterization of the microwave synthesized materials was carried out by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD. The optical characterization has also been performed. The time resolved photocurrent of the devices in response to the UV turn on/off was investigated and it has been observed that the ZnO nanorod arrays grown on Whatman paper substrate present a responsivity 3 times superior than the ones grown on tracing paper. By using ZnO nanorods, the surface area-to-volume ratio will increase and will improve the sensor sensibility, making these types of materials good candidates for low cost and disposable UV sensors. The sensors were exposed to bending tests, proving their high stability, flexibility and adaptability to different surfaces.

  12. Current stage of fMRI applications in newborns and children during the first year of life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boecker, H.; Scheef, L.; Jankowski, J.; Zimmermann, N.; Born, M.; Heep, A.

    2008-01-01

    Currently, a paradigm shift towards expanded early use of cranial MRI in newborns at risk and infants in the first year of life can be observed in neonatology. Beyond clinical MRI applications, there is progressive use of functional MRI (fMRI) in this age group. On the one hand, fMRI allows monitoring of functional developmental processes depending on maturational stage; on the other hand, this technique may provide the basis for early detection of pathophysiological processes as a prerequisite for functionally guided therapeutic interventions. This article provides a comprehensive review of current fMRI applications in neonates and infants during the first year of life and focuses on the associated methodological issues (e.g. signal physiology, sedation, safety aspects). (orig.)

  13. Ultrafast Desorption by Impulsive Vibrational Excitation (DIVE). Applications in laser surgery, mass spectrometry and towards ultimate limits in biodiagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, Ling

    2015-07-01

    The prospects for minimally invasive surgery, spatial imaging with mass spectrometry and rapid high throughput biodiagnosis require new means of tissue incision and biomolecule extraction with conserved molecular structure. Towards this aim, a laser ablation process is utilized in this dissertation, which is capable of performing precise tissue incision with minimal collateral damage and extracting intact biological entities with conserved biological functions. The method is based on the recently developed Picosecond Infrared Laser (PIRL) designed to excite selectively the water vibrational modes under the condition of ultrafast Desorption by Impulsive Vibrational Excitation (DIVE). The basic concept is that the selectively excited water molecules act as propellant to ablate whole biological complexes into the plume, faster than any thermal deleterious effect or fragmentation that would mask molecular identities.The PIRL ablation under DIVE condition is applied for the first time to six types of ocular tissues, rendering precise and minimally invasive incisions in a well-controlled and reproducible way. An eminent demonstration is the contact-free and applanation-free corneal trephination with the PIRL. Mass spectrometry and other analytical techniques show that great abundance of proteins with various molecular weights are extracted from the tissue by the PIRL ablation, and that fragmentation or other chemical alternation does not occur to the proteins in the ablation plume. With various microscope imaging and biochemical analysis methods, nano-scale single protein molecules, viruses and cells in the ablation plume are found to be morphologically and functionally identical to their corresponding controls. The PIRL ablation provides a new means to push the frontiers of laser surgery in ophthalmology and can be applied to resolve chemical activities in situ and in vivo. The most important finding is the conserved nature of the extracted biological entities

  14. Ultrafast Desorption by Impulsive Vibrational Excitation (DIVE). Applications in laser surgery, mass spectrometry and towards ultimate limits in biodiagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Ling

    2015-07-15

    The prospects for minimally invasive surgery, spatial imaging with mass spectrometry and rapid high throughput biodiagnosis require new means of tissue incision and biomolecule extraction with conserved molecular structure. Towards this aim, a laser ablation process is utilized in this dissertation, which is capable of performing precise tissue incision with minimal collateral damage and extracting intact biological entities with conserved biological functions. The method is based on the recently developed Picosecond Infrared Laser (PIRL) designed to excite selectively the water vibrational modes under the condition of ultrafast Desorption by Impulsive Vibrational Excitation (DIVE). The basic concept is that the selectively excited water molecules act as propellant to ablate whole biological complexes into the plume, faster than any thermal deleterious effect or fragmentation that would mask molecular identities.The PIRL ablation under DIVE condition is applied for the first time to six types of ocular tissues, rendering precise and minimally invasive incisions in a well-controlled and reproducible way. An eminent demonstration is the contact-free and applanation-free corneal trephination with the PIRL. Mass spectrometry and other analytical techniques show that great abundance of proteins with various molecular weights are extracted from the tissue by the PIRL ablation, and that fragmentation or other chemical alternation does not occur to the proteins in the ablation plume. With various microscope imaging and biochemical analysis methods, nano-scale single protein molecules, viruses and cells in the ablation plume are found to be morphologically and functionally identical to their corresponding controls. The PIRL ablation provides a new means to push the frontiers of laser surgery in ophthalmology and can be applied to resolve chemical activities in situ and in vivo. The most important finding is the conserved nature of the extracted biological entities

  15. Tissue-Based MRI Intensity Standardization: Application to Multicentric Datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Robitaille

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Intensity standardization in MRI aims at correcting scanner-dependent intensity variations. Existing simple and robust techniques aim at matching the input image histogram onto a standard, while we think that standardization should aim at matching spatially corresponding tissue intensities. In this study, we present a novel automatic technique, called STI for STandardization of Intensities, which not only shares the simplicity and robustness of histogram-matching techniques, but also incorporates tissue spatial intensity information. STI uses joint intensity histograms to determine intensity correspondence in each tissue between the input and standard images. We compared STI to an existing histogram-matching technique on two multicentric datasets, Pilot E-ADNI and ADNI, by measuring the intensity error with respect to the standard image after performing nonlinear registration. The Pilot E-ADNI dataset consisted in 3 subjects each scanned in 7 different sites. The ADNI dataset consisted in 795 subjects scanned in more than 50 different sites. STI was superior to the histogram-matching technique, showing significantly better intensity matching for the brain white matter with respect to the standard image.

  16. Ultrafast gas switching experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frost, C.A.; Martin, T.H.; Patterson, P.E.; Rinehart, L.F.; Rohwein, G.J.; Roose, L.D.; Aurand, J.F.; Buttram, M.T.

    1993-01-01

    We describe recent experiments which studied the physics of ultrafast gas breakdown under the extreme overvoltages which occur when a high pressure gas switch is pulse charged to hundreds of kV in 1 ns or less. The highly overvolted peaking gaps produce powerful electromagnetic pulses with risetimes Khz at > 100 kV/m E field

  17. Perspective: Ultrafast magnetism and THz spintronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walowski, Jakob; Münzenberg, Markus [Institut für Physik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität Greifswald, 17489 Greifswald (Germany)

    2016-10-14

    This year the discovery of femtosecond demagnetization by laser pulses is 20 years old. For the first time, this milestone work by Bigot and coworkers gave insight directly into the time scales of microscopic interactions that connect the spin and electron system. While intense discussions in the field were fueled by the complexity of the processes in the past, it now became evident that it is a puzzle of many different parts. Rather than providing an overview that has been presented in previous reviews on ultrafast processes in ferromagnets, this perspective will show that with our current depth of knowledge the first applications are developed: THz spintronics and all-optical spin manipulation are becoming more and more feasible. The aim of this perspective is to point out where we can connect the different puzzle pieces of understanding gathered over 20 years to develop novel applications. Based on many observations in a large number of experiments. Differences in the theoretical models arise from the localized and delocalized nature of ferromagnetism. Transport effects are intrinsically non-local in spintronic devices and at interfaces. We review the need for multiscale modeling to address the processes starting from electronic excitation of the spin system on the picometer length scale and sub-femtosecond time scale, to spin wave generation, and towards the modeling of ultrafast phase transitions that altogether determine the response time of the ferromagnetic system. Today, our current understanding gives rise to the first usage of ultrafast spin physics for ultrafast magnetism control: THz spintronic devices. This makes the field of ultrafast spin-dynamics an emerging topic open for many researchers right now.

  18. Perspective: Ultrafast magnetism and THz spintronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walowski, Jakob; Münzenberg, Markus

    2016-01-01

    This year the discovery of femtosecond demagnetization by laser pulses is 20 years old. For the first time, this milestone work by Bigot and coworkers gave insight directly into the time scales of microscopic interactions that connect the spin and electron system. While intense discussions in the field were fueled by the complexity of the processes in the past, it now became evident that it is a puzzle of many different parts. Rather than providing an overview that has been presented in previous reviews on ultrafast processes in ferromagnets, this perspective will show that with our current depth of knowledge the first applications are developed: THz spintronics and all-optical spin manipulation are becoming more and more feasible. The aim of this perspective is to point out where we can connect the different puzzle pieces of understanding gathered over 20 years to develop novel applications. Based on many observations in a large number of experiments. Differences in the theoretical models arise from the localized and delocalized nature of ferromagnetism. Transport effects are intrinsically non-local in spintronic devices and at interfaces. We review the need for multiscale modeling to address the processes starting from electronic excitation of the spin system on the picometer length scale and sub-femtosecond time scale, to spin wave generation, and towards the modeling of ultrafast phase transitions that altogether determine the response time of the ferromagnetic system. Today, our current understanding gives rise to the first usage of ultrafast spin physics for ultrafast magnetism control: THz spintronic devices. This makes the field of ultrafast spin-dynamics an emerging topic open for many researchers right now.

  19. The application of functional MRI in evaluating ischemic injuries of lower limb skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Caifeng; Gu Jianping

    2011-01-01

    The ischemic injury of lower limb skeletal muscle is caused by various reasons that lead to limb arterial blood flow insufficiency and subsequent muscle tissue hypoxia. Exact and correct evaluation of the ischemic degree of the skeletal muscle is very important for the physicians to guide the clinical treatment, to assess the therapeutic effect and to judge the prognosis. With the development and updating of scanning hardware and software, together with the use of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI), blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), etc. the application of MRI has been dramatically expanded both in clinical practice and scientific researches. Nowadays, functional MRI can accurately reflect the physiological structures and pathologic changes in detail. This article aims mainly to make a comprehensive review about the application of these techniques in assessing the ischemic injuries of lower limb skeletal muscle. (authors)

  20. [Non-medical applications for brain MRI: Ethical considerations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrazin, S; Fagot-Largeault, A; Leboyer, M; Houenou, J

    2015-04-01

    The recent neuroimaging techniques offer the possibility to better understand complex cognitive processes that are involved in mental disorders and thus have become cornerstone tools for research in psychiatry. The performances of functional magnetic resonance imaging are not limited to medical research and are used in non-medical fields. These recent applications represent new challenges for bioethics. In this article we aim at discussing the new ethical issues raised by the applications of the latest neuroimaging technologies to non-medical fields. We included a selection of peer-reviewed English medical articles after a search on NCBI Pubmed database and Google scholar from 2000 to 2013. We screened bibliographical tables for supplementary references. Websites of governmental French institutions implicated in ethical questions were also screened for governmental reports. Findings of brain areas supporting emotional responses and regulation have been used for marketing research, also called neuromarketing. The discovery of different brain activation patterns in antisocial disorder has led to changes in forensic psychiatry with the use of imaging techniques with unproven validity. Automated classification algorithms and multivariate statistical analyses of brain images have been applied to brain-reading techniques, aiming at predicting unconscious neural processes in humans. We finally report the current position of the French legislation recently revised and discuss the technical limits of such techniques. In the near future, brain imaging could find clinical applications in psychiatry as diagnostic or predictive tools. However, the latest advances in brain imaging are also used in non-scientific fields raising key ethical questions. Involvement of neuroscientists, psychiatrists, physicians but also of citizens in neuroethics discussions is crucial to challenge the risk of unregulated uses of brain imaging. Copyright © 2014 L’Encéphale, Paris. Published by

  1. Hepatobiliary contrast agents for contrast-enhanced MRI of the liver: properties, clinical development and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimer, Peter; Schneider, Guenter; Schima, Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    Hepatobiliary contrast agents with uptake into hepatocytes followed by variable biliary excretion represent a unique class of cell-specific MR contrast agents. Two hepatobiliary contrast agents, mangafodipir trisodium and gadobenate dimeglumine, are already clinically approved. A third hepatobiliary contrast agent, Gd-EOB-DTPA, is under consideration. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview on the properties, clinical development and application of these three hepatobiliary contrast agents. Bolus injectable paramagnetic hepatobiliary contrast agents combine established features of extracellular agents with the advantages of hepatocyte specificity. The detection and characterisation of focal liver disease appears to be improved compared to unenhanced MRI, MRI with unspecific contrast agents and contrast-enhanced CT. To decrease the total time spent by a patient in the MR scanner, it is advisable to administer the agent immediately after acquisition of unenhanced T1-w MRI. After infusion or bolus injection (with dynamic FS-T1-w 2D or 3D GRE) of the contrast agent, moderately and heavily T2w images are acquired. Post-contrast T1-w MRI is started upon completion of T2-w MRI for mangafodipir trisodium and Gd-EOB-DTPA as early as 20 min following injection, while gadobenate dimeglumine scans are obtained >60 min following injection. Post-contrast acquisition techniques with near isotropic 3D pulse sequences with fat saturation parallel the technical progress made by MSCT combined with an unparalleled improvement in tumour-liver contrast. The individual decision that hepatobiliary contrast agent one uses is partly based on personal preferences. No comparative studies have been conducted comparing the advantages or disadvantages of all three agents directly against each other. (orig.)

  2. Ultrafast surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Emily L; Brandt, Nathaniel C; Cassabaum, Alyssa A; Frontiera, Renee R

    2015-08-07

    Ultrafast surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) with pico- and femtosecond time resolution has the ability to elucidate the mechanisms by which plasmons mediate chemical reactions. Here we review three important technological advances in these new methodologies, and discuss their prospects for applications in areas including plasmon-induced chemistry and sensing at very low limits of detection. Surface enhancement, arising from plasmonic materials, has been successfully incorporated with stimulated Raman techniques such as femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS). These techniques are capable of time-resolved measurement on the femtosecond and picosecond time scale and can be used to follow the dynamics of molecules reacting near plasmonic surfaces. We discuss the potential application of ultrafast SERS techniques to probe plasmon-mediated processes, such as H2 dissociation and solar steam production. Additionally, we discuss the possibilities for high sensitivity SERS sensing using these stimulated Raman spectroscopies.

  3. Assessment of brain perfusion with MRI: methodology and application to acute stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grandin, C.B.

    2003-01-01

    We review the methodology of brain perfusion measurements with MRI and their application to acute stroke, with particular emphasis on the work awarded by the 6th Lucien Appel Prize for Neuroradiology. The application of the indicator dilution theory to the dynamic susceptibility-weighted bolus-tracking method is explained, as is the approach to obtaining quantitative measurements of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and volume (CBV). Our contribution to methodological developments, such as CBV measurement with the frequency-shifted burst sequence, development of the PRESTO sequence, comparison of different deconvolution methods and of spin- and gradient-echo sequences, and the validation of MRI measurements against positron emission tomography is summarised. The pathophysiology of brain ischaemia and the role of neuroimaging in the setting of acute stroke are reviewed, with an introduction to the concepts of ischaemic penumbra and diffusion/perfusion mismatch. Our work on the determination of absolute CBF and CBV thresholds for predicting the area of infarct growth, identification of the best perfusion parameters (relative or absolute) for predicting the area of infarct growth and the role of MR angiography is also summarised. We conclude that MRI is a very powerful way to assess brain perfusion and that its use might help in selecting patients who will benefit most from treatment such as thrombolysis. (orig.)

  4. Optical Detection in Ultrafast Short Wavelength Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fullagar, Wilfred K.; Hall, Chris J.

    2010-01-01

    A new approach to coherent detection of ionising radiation is briefly motivated and recounted. The approach involves optical scattering of coherent light fields by colour centres in transparent solids. It has significant potential for diffractive imaging applications that require high detection dynamic range from pulsed high brilliance short wavelength sources. It also motivates new incarnations of Bragg's X-ray microscope for pump-probe studies of ultrafast molecular structure-dynamics.

  5. Ultrafast magnetization dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Woodford, Simon

    2008-01-01

    This thesis addresses ultrafast magnetization dynamics from a theoretical perspective. The manipulation of magnetization using the inverse Faraday effect has been studied, as well as magnetic relaxation processes in quantum dots. The inverse Faraday effect – the generation of a magnetic field by nonresonant, circularly polarized light – offers the possibility to control and reverse magnetization on a timescale of a few hundred femtoseconds. This is important both for the technological advant...

  6. Accuracy of applicator tip reconstruction in MRI-guided interstitial 192Ir-high-dose-rate brachytherapy of liver tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wybranski, Christian; Eberhardt, Benjamin; Fischbach, Katharina; Fischbach, Frank; Walke, Mathias; Hass, Peter; Röhl, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Kosiek, Ortrud; Kaiser, Mandy; Pech, Maciej; Lüdemann, Lutz; Ricke, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the reconstruction accuracy of brachytherapy (BT) applicators tips in vitro and in vivo in MRI-guided 192 Ir-high-dose-rate (HDR)-BT of inoperable liver tumors. Materials and methods: Reconstruction accuracy of plastic BT applicators, visualized by nitinol inserts, was assessed in MRI phantom measurements and in MRI 192 Ir-HDR-BT treatment planning datasets of 45 patients employing CT co-registration and vector decomposition. Conspicuity, short-term dislocation, and reconstruction errors were assessed in the clinical data. The clinical effect of applicator reconstruction accuracy was determined in follow-up MRI data. Results: Applicator reconstruction accuracy was 1.6 ± 0.5 mm in the phantom measurements. In the clinical MRI datasets applicator conspicuity was rated good/optimal in ⩾72% of cases. 16/129 applicators showed not time dependent deviation in between MRI/CT acquisition (p > 0.1). Reconstruction accuracy was 5.5 ± 2.8 mm, and the average image co-registration error was 3.1 ± 0.9 mm. Vector decomposition revealed no preferred direction of reconstruction errors. In the follow-up data deviation of planned dose distribution and irradiation effect was 6.9 ± 3.3 mm matching the mean co-registration error (6.5 ± 2.5 mm; p > 0.1). Conclusion: Applicator reconstruction accuracy in vitro conforms to AAPM TG 56 standard. Nitinol-inserts are feasible for applicator visualization and yield good conspicuity in MRI treatment planning data. No preferred direction of reconstruction errors were found in vivo

  7. Iron oxide nanoparticles stabilized with a bilayer of oleic acid for magnetic hyperthermia and MRI applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Paula I.P. [i3N/CENIMAT, Department of Materials Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, Campus de Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Laia, César A.T. [Laboratório Associado para a Química Verde (LAQV), REQUIMTE, Departamento de Química, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Carvalho, Alexandra [i3N/CENIMAT, Department of Materials Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, Campus de Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Pereira, Laura C.J.; Coutinho, Joana T. [C2TN, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Estrada Nacional 10, ao km 139,7, 2695-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal); Ferreira, Isabel M.M., E-mail: imf@fct.unl.pt [i3N/CENIMAT, Department of Materials Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, Campus de Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Novo, Carlos M.M. [Instituto de Higiene e Medicina Tropical, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, IHMT/UNL, 1349-008 Lisboa (Portugal); Borges, João Paulo, E-mail: jpb@fct.unl.pt [i3N/CENIMAT, Department of Materials Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, Campus de Caparica, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were stabilized with oleic acid. • Maximum stabilization was achieved at neutral pH. • Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic hyperthermia applications were tested. • The produced nanoparticles are viable for both biomedical applications. - Abstract: Iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, IONPs) are promising candidates for several biomedical applications such as magnetic hyperthermia and as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, their colloidal stability in physiological conditions hinders their application requiring the use of biocompatible surfactant agents. The present investigation focuses on obtaining highly stable IONPs, stabilized by the presence of an oleic acid bilayer. Critical aspects such as oleic acid concentration and pH were optimized to ensure maximum stability. NPs composed of an iron oxide core with an average diameter of 9 nm measured using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) form agglomerates with an hydrodynamic diameter of around 170 nm when dispersed in water in the presence of an oleic acid bilayer, remaining stable (zeta potential of −120 mV). Magnetic hyperthermia and the relaxivities measurements show high efficiency at neutral pH which enables their use for both magnetic hyperthermia and MRI.

  8. Cryogenics free production of hyperpolarized 129Xe and 83Kr for biomedical MRI applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes-Riley, Theodore; Six, Joseph S.; Lilburn, David M. L.; Stupic, Karl F.; Dorkes, Alan C.; Shaw, Dominick E.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    As an alternative to cryogenic gas handling, hyperpolarized (hp) gas mixtures were extracted directly from the spin exchange optical pumping (SEOP) process through expansion followed by compression to ambient pressure for biomedical MRI applications. The omission of cryogenic gas separation generally requires the usage of high xenon or krypton concentrations at low SEOP gas pressures to generate hp 129Xe or hp 83Kr with sufficient MR signal intensity for imaging applications. Two different extraction schemes for the hp gasses were explored with focus on the preservation of the nuclear spin polarization. It was found that an extraction scheme based on an inflatable, pressure controlled balloon is sufficient for hp 129Xe handling, while 83Kr can efficiently be extracted through a single cycle piston pump. The extraction methods were tested for ex vivo MRI applications with excised rat lungs. Precise mixing of the hp gases with oxygen, which may be of interest for potential in vivo applications, was accomplished during the extraction process using a piston pump. The 83Kr bulk gas phase T1 relaxation in the mixtures containing more than approximately 1% O2 was found to be slower than that of 129Xe in corresponding mixtures. The experimental setup also facilitated 129Xe T1 relaxation measurements as a function of O2 concentration within excised lungs.

  9. Iron oxide nanoparticles stabilized with a bilayer of oleic acid for magnetic hyperthermia and MRI applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, Paula I.P.; Laia, César A.T.; Carvalho, Alexandra; Pereira, Laura C.J.; Coutinho, Joana T.; Ferreira, Isabel M.M.; Novo, Carlos M.M.; Borges, João Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were stabilized with oleic acid. • Maximum stabilization was achieved at neutral pH. • Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic hyperthermia applications were tested. • The produced nanoparticles are viable for both biomedical applications. - Abstract: Iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe_3O_4, IONPs) are promising candidates for several biomedical applications such as magnetic hyperthermia and as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, their colloidal stability in physiological conditions hinders their application requiring the use of biocompatible surfactant agents. The present investigation focuses on obtaining highly stable IONPs, stabilized by the presence of an oleic acid bilayer. Critical aspects such as oleic acid concentration and pH were optimized to ensure maximum stability. NPs composed of an iron oxide core with an average diameter of 9 nm measured using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) form agglomerates with an hydrodynamic diameter of around 170 nm when dispersed in water in the presence of an oleic acid bilayer, remaining stable (zeta potential of −120 mV). Magnetic hyperthermia and the relaxivities measurements show high efficiency at neutral pH which enables their use for both magnetic hyperthermia and MRI.

  10. Acceleration of cardiovascular MRI using parallel imaging: basic principles, practical considerations, clinical applications and future directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niendorf, T.; Sodickson, D.

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CVMR) imaging has proven to be of clinical value for non-invasive diagnostic imaging of cardiovascular diseases. CVMR requires rapid imaging; however, the speed of conventional MRI is fundamentally limited due to its sequential approach to image acquisition, in which data points are collected one after the other in the presence of sequentially-applied magnetic field gradients and radiofrequency coils to acquire multiple data points simultaneously, and thereby to increase imaging speed and efficiency beyond the limits of purely gradient-based approaches. The resulting improvements in imaging speed can be used in various ways, including shortening long examinations, improving spatial resolution and anatomic coverage, improving temporal resolution, enhancing image quality, overcoming physiological constraints, detecting and correcting for physiologic motion, and streamlining work flow. Examples of these strategies will be provided in this review, after some of the fundamentals of parallel imaging methods now in use for cardiovascular MRI are outlined. The emphasis will rest upon basic principles and clinical state-of-the art cardiovascular MRI applications. In addition, practical aspects such as signal-to-noise ratio considerations, tailored parallel imaging protocols and potential artifacts will be discussed, and current trends and future directions will be explored. (orig.)

  11. A wavelet-based regularized reconstruction algorithm for SENSE parallel MRI with applications to neuroimaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaari, L.; Pesquet, J.Ch.; Chaari, L.; Ciuciu, Ph.; Benazza-Benyahia, A.

    2011-01-01

    To reduce scanning time and/or improve spatial/temporal resolution in some Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) applications, parallel MRI acquisition techniques with multiple coils acquisition have emerged since the early 1990's as powerful imaging methods that allow a faster acquisition process. In these techniques, the full FOV image has to be reconstructed from the resulting acquired under sampled k-space data. To this end, several reconstruction techniques have been proposed such as the widely-used Sensitivity Encoding (SENSE) method. However, the reconstructed image generally presents artifacts when perturbations occur in both the measured data and the estimated coil sensitivity profiles. In this paper, we aim at achieving accurate image reconstruction under degraded experimental conditions (low magnetic field and high reduction factor), in which neither the SENSE method nor the Tikhonov regularization in the image domain give convincing results. To this end, we present a novel method for SENSE-based reconstruction which proceeds with regularization in the complex wavelet domain by promoting sparsity. The proposed approach relies on a fast algorithm that enables the minimization of regularized non-differentiable criteria including more general penalties than a classical l 1 term. To further enhance the reconstructed image quality, local convex constraints are added to the regularization process. In vivo human brain experiments carried out on Gradient-Echo (GRE) anatomical and Echo Planar Imaging (EPI) functional MRI data at 1.5 T indicate that our algorithm provides reconstructed images with reduced artifacts for high reduction factors. (authors)

  12. Imaging of postthalamic visual fiber tracts by anisotropic diffusion weighted MRI and diffusion tensor imaging: principles and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinges, Marcus H.T.; Schoth, Felix; Coenen, Volker A.; Krings, Timo

    2004-01-01

    Diffusion weighted MRI offers the possibility to study the course of the cerebral white matter tracts. In the present manuscript, the basics, the technique and the limitations of diffusion tensor imaging and anisotropic diffusion weighted MRI are presented and their applications in various neurological and neurosurgical diseases are discussed with special emphasis on the visual system. A special focus is laid on the combination of fiber tract imaging, anatomical imaging and functional MRI for presurgical planning and intraoperative neuronavigation of lesions near the visual system

  13. Application of probabilistically weighted graphs to image-based diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease using diffusion MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryam, Syeda; McCrackin, Laura; Crowley, Mark; Rathi, Yogesh; Michailovich, Oleg

    2017-03-01

    The world's aging population has given rise to an increasing awareness towards neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimers Disease (AD). Treatment options for AD are currently limited, but it is believed that future success depends on our ability to detect the onset of the disease in its early stages. The most frequently used tools for this include neuropsychological assessments, along with genetic, proteomic, and image-based diagnosis. Recently, the applicability of Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging (dMRI) analysis for early diagnosis of AD has also been reported. The sensitivity of dMRI to the microstructural organization of cerebral tissue makes it particularly well-suited to detecting changes which are known to occur in the early stages of AD. Existing dMRI approaches can be divided into two broad categories: region-based and tract-based. In this work, we propose a new approach, which extends region-based approaches to the simultaneous characterization of multiple brain regions. Given a predefined set of features derived from dMRI data, we compute the probabilistic distances between different brain regions and treat the resulting connectivity pattern as an undirected, fully-connected graph. The characteristics of this graph are then used as markers to discriminate between AD subjects and normal controls (NC). Although in this preliminary work we omit subjects in the prodromal stage of AD, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), our method demonstrates perfect separability between AD and NC subject groups with substantial margin, and thus holds promise for fine-grained stratification of NC, MCI and AD populations.

  14. Spectral embedding based active contour (SEAC): application to breast lesion segmentation on DCE-MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agner, Shannon C.; Xu, Jun; Rosen, Mark; Karthigeyan, Sudha; Englander, Sarah; Madabhushi, Anant

    2011-03-01

    Spectral embedding (SE), a graph-based manifold learning method, has previously been shown to be useful in high dimensional data classification. In this work, we present a novel SE based active contour (SEAC) segmentation scheme and demonstrate its applications in lesion segmentation on breast dynamic contrast enhance magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). In this work, we employ SE on DCE-MRI on a per voxel basis to embed the high dimensional time series intensity vector into a reduced dimensional space, where the reduced embedding space is characterized by the principal eigenvectors. The orthogonal eigenvector-based data representation allows for computation of strong tensor gradients in the spectrally embedded space and also yields improved region statistics that serve as optimal stopping criteria for SEAC. We demonstrate both analytically and empirically that the tensor gradients in the spectrally embedded space are stronger than the corresponding gradients in the original grayscale intensity space. On a total of 50 breast DCE-MRI studies, SEAC yielded a mean absolute difference (MAD) of 3.2+/-2.1 pixels and mean Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) of 0.74+/-0.13 compared to manual ground truth segmentation. An active contour in conjunction with fuzzy c-means (FCM+AC), a commonly used segmentation method for breast DCE-MRI, produced a corresponding MAD of 7.2+/-7.4 pixels and mean DSC of 0.58+/-0.32. In conjunction with a set of 6 quantitative morphological features automatically extracted from the SEAC derived lesion boundary, a support vector machine (SVM) classifier yielded an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.73, for discriminating between 10 benign and 30 malignant lesions; the corresponding SVM classifier with the FCM+AC derived morphological features yielded an AUC of 0.65.

  15. Progress in ultrafast intense laser science XIII

    CERN Document Server

    III, Wendell; Paulus, Gerhard

    2017-01-01

    This thirteenth volume covers a broad range of topics from this interdisciplinary research field, focusing on atoms, molecules, and clusters interacting in intense laser field and high-order harmonics generation and their applications. The PUILS series delivers up-to-date reviews of progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science, the interdisciplinary research field spanning atomic and molecular physics, molecular science, and optical science, which has been stimulated by the recent developments in ultrafast laser technologies. Each volume compiles peer-reviewed articles authored by researchers at the forefront of each their own subfields of UILS. Every chapter opens with an overview of the topics to be discussed, so that researchers unfamiliar to the subfield, as well as graduate students, can grasp the importance and attractions of the research topic at hand; these are followed by reports of cutting-edge discoveries.   .

  16. Progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science VIII

    CERN Document Server

    Nisoli, Mauro; Hill, Wendell; III, III

    2012-01-01

    The PUILS series delivers up-to-date reviews of progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science, a newly emerging interdisciplinary research field spanning atomic and molecular physics, molecular science and optical science which has been stimulated by the recent developments in ultrafast laser technologies. Each volume compiles peer-reviewed articles authored by researchers at the forefront of each their own subfields of UILS. Every chapter opens with an overview of the topics to be discussed, so that researchers unfamiliar to the subfield as well as graduate students can grasp the importance and attractions of the research topic at hand. These are followed by reports of cutting-edge discoveries. This eighth volume covers a broad range of topics from this interdisciplinary research field, focusing on molecules interacting with ultrashort and intense laser fields, advanced technologies for the characterization of ultrashort laser pulses and their applications, laser plasma formation and laser acceleration.

  17. Progress in ultrafast intense laser science XII

    CERN Document Server

    Roso, Luis; Li, Ruxin; Mathur, Deepak; Normand, Didier

    2015-01-01

    This  volume covers a broad range of topics focusing on atoms, molecules, and clusters interacting in intense laser field, laser induced filamentation, and laser plasma interaction and application. The PUILS series delivers up-to-date reviews of progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science, a newly emerging interdisciplinary research field spanning atomic and molecular physics, molecular science, and optical science, which has been stimulated by the recent developments in ultrafast laser technologies. Each volume compiles peer-reviewed articles authored by researchers at the forefront of each their own subfields of UILS. Every chapter opens with an overview of the topics to be discussed, so that researchers unfamiliar to the subfield, as well as graduate students, can grasp the importance and attractions of the research topic at hand; these are followed by reports of cutting-edge discoveries. .

  18. New ultrafast X-ray sources and their applications. Coherent ultrashort X UV emission by harmonic generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salieres, P.; Le deroff, L.; Hergott, J.F.; Merdji, H.; Carre, B.

    2000-01-01

    By focusing an intense short-pulse laser into a rare gas jet, high-order harmonics of the laser frequency are generated. Considerable progress have been made in the last few years, with the observation of harmonic orders higher that 200, extending the emission down to 3 nm. Besides its fundamental interest, this XUV emission represents a new source with unique properties of coherence and ultrashort (femtosecond) duration. A growing number of applications are reported, ranging from atomic and molecular spectroscopy to solid-state and plasma physics. (authors)

  19. Highly directional transurethral ultrasound applicators with rotational control for MRI-guided prostatic thermal therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Anthony B [Thermal Therapy Research Group, UCSF Radiation Oncology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Diederich, Chris J [Thermal Therapy Research Group, UCSF Radiation Oncology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Nau, William H [Thermal Therapy Research Group, UCSF Radiation Oncology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Gill, Harcharan [Department of Urology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Bouley, Donna M [Department of Comparative Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Daniel, Bruce [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Rieke, Viola [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Butts, R Kim [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Sommer, Graham [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2004-01-21

    Transurethral ultrasound applicators with highly directional energy deposition and rotational control were investigated for precise treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and adenocarcinoma of the prostate (CaP). Two types of catheter-based applicators were fabricated, using either sectored tubular (3.5 mm OD x 10 mm) or planar transducers (3.5 mm x 10 mm). They were constructed to be MRI compatible, minimally invasive and allow for manual rotation of the transducer array within a 10 mm cooling balloon. In vivo evaluations of the applicators were performed in canine prostates (n 3) using MRI guidance (0.5 T interventional magnet). MR temperature imaging (MRTI) utilizing the proton resonance frequency shift method was used to acquire multiple-slice temperature overlays in real time for monitoring and guiding the thermal treatments. Post-treatment T1-weighted contrast-enhanced imaging and triphenyl tetrazolium chloride stained tissue sections were used to define regions of tissue coagulation. Single sonications with the tubular applicator ) produced coagulated zones covering a wedge of the prostate extending from 1-2 mm outside the urethra to the outer boundary of the gland (16 mm radial coagulation). Single sonications with the planar applicator (15-20 W, 10 min, {approx}8 MHz) generated thermal lesions of {approx}30 extending to the prostate boundary. Multiple sequential sonications (sweeping) of a planar applicator (12 W with eight rotations of 30 each) demonstrated controllable coagulation of a 270 contiguous section of the prostate extending to the capsule boundary. The feasibility of using highly directional transurethral ultrasound applicators with rotational capabilities to selectively coagulate regions of the prostate while monitoring and controlling the treatments with MRTI was demonstrated in this study.

  20. The application of MRI and MRS in psychiatry and performance evaluation of magnetic field homogeneity in MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hua Hsuan

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is a safe non-invasive tool to study the physiological mechanisms of the human brain. MRS has the capability to provide the information regarding neurochemicals in brains of patients with neuropsychiatric disorders. Therefore, to produce measurable and interpretable information in MRI and MRS, a quality control (QC) program is required. Magnetic field homogeneity (MFH) is an important factor for QC when the volume sizes and neurochemical levels are quantified. Poor main (B0) MFH leads to artifacts, signal losses and broadened line widths. The American College of Radiology's (ACR) MRI QC manual mandates annual checks of MFH, suggesting tests using spectral line widths (FWHM) and phase-difference (Deltaϕ) maps. A new method, dubbed the bandwidth-difference (DeltaBW) method, is proposed along with a prototype phantom for determining MFH. The DeltaBW method is compared with standard methods and has also been tested in different model MRI systems from various manufacturers. Direct comparisons of the data obtained using the DeltaBW method demonstrated good agreement with data obtained using the linewidth method and the frequency map data provided by one MRI system manufacturer. As a result, the DeltaBW method produces measurements of MFH at various Diameter Sphere Volume (DSV) values that can be obtained from a single set of phantom images. The conclusion of the study is that the accuracy of DeltaBW B0 homogeneity measurements of MFH is comparable to the other methods tested while the ease of measurement in practical clinical setting is considerably improved.

  1. Ultrafast responses of dipolar and V-shaped dipicolinate derivatives with potential applications in the labeling of biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaochuan; Liu, Siyuan; Liu, Dajun; Wang, Guiqiu; Xiao, Haibo

    2016-02-01

    A dipolar dipicolinate derivative, trans-dimethyl-4-[4'-(N,N-diphenylamino)-styry1]-pyridin-2,6-dicarboxylate (P-1), and a P-1based V-shaped compound, {4-[(E)-2-(2,6-dimethoxycarbonylpyridin-4-yl) vinyl]}-N-phenyl-N-{4-[(E)-2-(2,6-dimethoxycarbonylpyridin-4-yl)vinylphenyl]}aniline (P-2), with intense two-photon fluorescence emission properties were systematically investigated by using steady-state absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, open-aperture Z-scans, and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPF). The two-photon absorption cross-section of the V-shaped compound P-2 in tetrahydrofuran (THF) was determined to be 208 GM, which represents a 6.5-fold enhancement compared with its dipolar counterpart P-1 (32 GM). Extension of the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) in the V-shaped dipicolinate derivative has been suggested as the mechanism of enhancement. The excited state dynamics from transient absorption spectroscopy were analyzed and discussed. The formation and relaxation lifetimes of the ICT state for these dipicolinate derivatives in THF solutions were found to be several picoseconds and several hundred picoseconds, respectively. The results show an increased ICT character of the V-shaped compound and a potential application for this compound in two-photon fluorescence imaging fields.

  2. Ultrafast responses of dipolar and V-shaped dipicolinate derivatives with potential applications in the labeling of biomolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaochuan Wang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A dipolar dipicolinate derivative, trans-dimethyl-4-[4′-(N,N-diphenylamino-styry1]-pyridin-2,6-dicarboxylate (P-1, and a P-1based V-shaped compound, {4-[(E-2-(2,6-dimethoxycarbonylpyridin-4-yl vinyl]}-N-phenyl-N-{4-[(E-2-(2,6-dimethoxycarbonylpyridin-4-ylvinylphenyl]}aniline (P-2, with intense two-photon fluorescence emission properties were systematically investigated by using steady-state absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, open-aperture Z-scans, and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPF. The two-photon absorption cross-section of the V-shaped compound P-2 in tetrahydrofuran (THF was determined to be 208 GM, which represents a 6.5-fold enhancement compared with its dipolar counterpart P-1 (32 GM. Extension of the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT in the V-shaped dipicolinate derivative has been suggested as the mechanism of enhancement. The excited state dynamics from transient absorption spectroscopy were analyzed and discussed. The formation and relaxation lifetimes of the ICT state for these dipicolinate derivatives in THF solutions were found to be several picoseconds and several hundred picoseconds, respectively. The results show an increased ICT character of the V-shaped compound and a potential application for this compound in two-photon fluorescence imaging fields.

  3. Ultrafast Dynamics of Quantum-Dot Semiconductor Optical Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poel, Mike van der; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2007-01-01

    We report on a series of experiments on the dynamical properties of quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers. We show how the amplifier responds to one or several ultrafast (170 fs) pulses in rapid succession and our results demonstrate applicability and ultimate limitations to application...

  4. MRI-guided therapeutic ultrasound: Temperature feedback control for extracorporeal and endoluminal applicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomir, Rares

    2005-09-01

    Therapeutic ultrasound is a mini-invasive and promising tool for in situ ablation of non-resectable tumors in uterus, breast, esophagus, kidney, liver, etc. Extracorporeal, endoluminal, and interstitial applicators have been successfully tested to date. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the only available technique providing non-invasive temperature mapping, together with excellent contrast of soft tissue. Coupling of these two technologies offers the advantage of both: (1) on line spatial guidance to the target region, and (2) thermal dose control during the treatment. This talk will provide an overview of the author's experience with automatic, active feedback control of the temperature evolution in tissues, which has been demonstrated with MRI compatible extracorporeal transducers (focused beam) or endoluminal applicators (plane waves). The feedback loop is based on fast switching capabilities of the driving electronics and real time data transfer out of the MR scanner. Precision of temperature control was typically better than 1°C. This approach is expected to improve the efficacy of the treatment (complete tumor ablation) and the thermal security of the critical regions crossed by the acoustic beam. It also permits one to reach an under-lethal heating regime for local drug delivery using thermosensitive liposomes or gene expression control based on hsp promoters.

  5. Quantum modeling of ultrafast photoinduced charge separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozzi, Carlo Andrea; Troiani, Filippo; Tavernelli, Ivano

    2018-01-01

    Phenomena involving electron transfer are ubiquitous in nature, photosynthesis and enzymes or protein activity being prominent examples. Their deep understanding thus represents a mandatory scientific goal. Moreover, controlling the separation of photogenerated charges is a crucial prerequisite in many applicative contexts, including quantum electronics, photo-electrochemical water splitting, photocatalytic dye degradation, and energy conversion. In particular, photoinduced charge separation is the pivotal step driving the storage of sun light into electrical or chemical energy. If properly mastered, these processes may also allow us to achieve a better command of information storage at the nanoscale, as required for the development of molecular electronics, optical switching, or quantum technologies, amongst others. In this Topical Review we survey recent progress in the understanding of ultrafast charge separation from photoexcited states. We report the state-of-the-art of the observation and theoretical description of charge separation phenomena in the ultrafast regime mainly focusing on molecular- and nano-sized solar energy conversion systems. In particular, we examine different proposed mechanisms driving ultrafast charge dynamics, with particular regard to the role of quantum coherence and electron-nuclear coupling, and link experimental observations to theoretical approaches based either on model Hamiltonians or on first principles simulations.

  6. Progress in ultrafast laser processing and future prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugioka, Koji

    2017-03-01

    The unique characteristics of ultrafast lasers have rapidly revolutionized materials processing after their first demonstration in 1987. The ultrashort pulse width of the laser suppresses heat diffusion to the surroundings of the processed region, which minimizes the formation of a heat-affected zone and thereby enables ultrahigh precision micro- and nanofabrication of various materials. In addition, the extremely high peak intensity can induce nonlinear multiphoton absorption, which extends the diversity of materials that can be processed to transparent materials such as glass. Nonlinear multiphoton absorption enables three-dimensional (3D) micro- and nanofabrication by irradiation with tightly focused femtosecond laser pulses inside transparent materials. Thus, ultrafast lasers are currently widely used for both fundamental research and practical applications. This review presents progress in ultrafast laser processing, including micromachining, surface micro- and nanostructuring, nanoablation, and 3D and volume processing. Advanced technologies that promise to enhance the performance of ultrafast laser processing, such as hybrid additive and subtractive processing, and shaped beam processing are discussed. Commercial and industrial applications of ultrafast laser processing are also introduced. Finally, future prospects of the technology are given with a summary.

  7. Ultrafast scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botkin, D.A. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    I have developed an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope (USTM) based on uniting stroboscopic methods of ultrafast optics and scanned probe microscopy to obtain nanometer spatial resolution and sub-picosecond temporal resolution. USTM increases the achievable time resolution of a STM by more than 6 orders of magnitude; this should enable exploration of mesoscopic and nanometer size systems on time scales corresponding to the period or decay of fundamental excitations. USTM consists of a photoconductive switch with subpicosecond response time in series with the tip of a STM. An optical pulse from a modelocked laser activates the switch to create a gate for the tunneling current, while a second laser pulse on the sample initiates a dynamic process which affects the tunneling current. By sending a large sequence of identical pulse pairs and measuring the average tunnel current as a function of the relative time delay between the pulses in each pair, one can map the time evolution of the surface process. USTM was used to measure the broadband response of the STM`s atomic size tunnel barrier in frequencies from tens to hundreds of GHz. The USTM signal amplitude decays linearly with the tunnel junction conductance, so the spatial resolution of the time-resolved signal is comparable to that of a conventional STM. Geometrical capacitance of the junction does not appear to play an important role in the measurement, but a capacitive effect intimately related to tunneling contributes to the measured signals and may limit the ultimate resolution of the USTM.

  8. Ultrafast Graphene Photonics and Optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-14

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2017-0032 Ultrafast Graphene Photonics and Optoelectronics Kuang-Hsiung Wu National Chiao Tung University Final Report 04/14/2017...DATES COVERED (From - To) 18 Apr 2013 to 17 Apr 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ultrafast Graphene Photonics and Optoelectronics 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Final Report for AOARD Grant FA2386-13-1-4022 “Ultrafast Graphene Photonics and Optoelectronics” Date May 23th, 2016

  9. 9th International Symposium on Ultrafast Processes in Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Silvestri, S; Denardo, G

    1996-01-01

    This volume is a collection of papers presented at the Ninth International Symposium on "Ultrafast Processes in Spectroscopy" (UPS '95) held at the International Centre for Theo­ retical Physics (ICTP), Trieste (Italy), October 30 -November 3, 1995. These meetings have become recognized as the major forum in Europe for discussion of new work in this rapidly moving field. The UPS'95 Conference in Trieste brought together a multidisciplinary group of researchers sharing common interests in the generation of ultrashort optical pulses and their application to studies of ultrafast phenomena in physics, chemistry, material science, electronics, and biology. It was attended by approximately 250 participants from 20 countries and the five-day program comprises more than 200 papers. The progress of both technology and applications in the field of ultrafast processes during these last years is truly remarkable. The advent of all solid state femtosecond lasers and the extension of laser wavelengths by frequency convers...

  10. Ultrafast Optical Signal Processing with Bragg Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yikun Liu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The phase, amplitude, speed, and polarization, in addition to many other properties of light, can be modulated by photonic Bragg structures. In conjunction with nonlinearity and quantum effects, a variety of ensuing micro- or nano-photonic applications can be realized. This paper reviews various optical phenomena in several exemplary 1D Bragg gratings. Important examples are resonantly absorbing photonic structures, chirped Bragg grating, and cholesteric liquid crystals; their unique operation capabilities and key issues are considered in detail. These Bragg structures are expected to be used in wide-spread applications involving light field modulations, especially in the rapidly advancing field of ultrafast optical signal processing.

  11. New Applications of Ultrafast Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1999-01-01

    Dephasing processes in the optical transitions in low-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures are studied by a novel technique involving a speckle analysis of the secondary emission after a short-pulse resonant excitation. The results are compared with more conventional transient four-wave mixin...

  12. A computational atlas of the hippocampal formation using ex vivo, ultra-high resolution MRI: Application to adaptive segmentation of in vivo MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, Juan Eugenio; Augustinack, Jean C; Nguyen, Khoa; Player, Christopher M; Player, Allison; Wright, Michelle; Roy, Nicole; Frosch, Matthew P; McKee, Ann C; Wald, Lawrence L; Fischl, Bruce; Van Leemput, Koen

    2015-07-15

    Automated analysis of MRI data of the subregions of the hippocampus requires computational atlases built at a higher resolution than those that are typically used in current neuroimaging studies. Here we describe the construction of a statistical atlas of the hippocampal formation at the subregion level using ultra-high resolution, ex vivo MRI. Fifteen autopsy samples were scanned at 0.13 mm isotropic resolution (on average) using customized hardware. The images were manually segmented into 13 different hippocampal substructures using a protocol specifically designed for this study; precise delineations were made possible by the extraordinary resolution of the scans. In addition to the subregions, manual annotations for neighboring structures (e.g., amygdala, cortex) were obtained from a separate dataset of in vivo, T1-weighted MRI scans of the whole brain (1mm resolution). The manual labels from the in vivo and ex vivo data were combined into a single computational atlas of the hippocampal formation with a novel atlas building algorithm based on Bayesian inference. The resulting atlas can be used to automatically segment the hippocampal subregions in structural MRI images, using an algorithm that can analyze multimodal data and adapt to variations in MRI contrast due to differences in acquisition hardware or pulse sequences. The applicability of the atlas, which we are releasing as part of FreeSurfer (version 6.0), is demonstrated with experiments on three different publicly available datasets with different types of MRI contrast. The results show that the atlas and companion segmentation method: 1) can segment T1 and T2 images, as well as their combination, 2) replicate findings on mild cognitive impairment based on high-resolution T2 data, and 3) can discriminate between Alzheimer's disease subjects and elderly controls with 88% accuracy in standard resolution (1mm) T1 data, significantly outperforming the atlas in FreeSurfer version 5.3 (86% accuracy) and

  13. Conception and synthesis of new molecular cages for xenon MRI applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delacour, L.

    2011-01-01

    Non-invasive proton magnetic resonance imaging ( 1 H MRI) is a powerful clinical tool for the detection of numerous diseases. Although MRI contrast agents are often used to improve diagnostic specificity, this technique has limited applications in molecular imaging because of its inherently low sensitivity when compared to nuclear medicine or fluorescence imaging. Laser-polarized 129 Xe NMR spectroscopy is a promising tool to circumvent sensitivity limitations. Indeed, optical pumping increases the nuclear spin polarization of xenon by several orders of magnitude (10 4 to 10 5 ), thus small amounts of gas dissolved in biological tissues (blood, lungs...) can be rapidly detected with an excellent signal-to-noise ratio. In addition, the high polarizability of the xenon electron cloud, which induces a very high sensitivity to its environment, makes this nucleus very attractive for molecular imaging. Detection of biomolecules can be achieved by biosensors, which encapsulate xenon atoms in molecular cages that have been functionalized to bind the desired biological target. Cage molecules such as cryptophanes have high affinity for xenon and thus appear as ideal candidates for its encapsulation. During this PhD thesis we worked on the synthesis and the functionalization of new cryptophanes. (author) [fr

  14. Resting-State fMRI in MS: General Concepts and Brief Overview of Its Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Sbardella

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain functional connectivity (FC is defined as the coherence in the activity between cerebral areas under a task or in the resting-state (RS. By applying functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, RS FC shows several patterns which define RS brain networks (RSNs involved in specific functions, because brain function is known to depend not only on the activity within individual regions, but also on the functional interaction of different areas across the whole brain. Region-of-interest analysis and independent component analysis are the two most commonly applied methods for RS investigation. Multiple sclerosis (MS is characterized by multiple lesions mainly affecting the white matter, determining both structural and functional disconnection between various areas of the central nervous system. The study of RS FC in MS is mainly aimed at understanding alterations in the intrinsic functional architecture of the brain and their role in disease progression and clinical impairment. In this paper, we will examine the results obtained by the application of RS fMRI in different multiple sclerosis (MS phenotypes and the correlations of FC changes with clinical features in this pathology. The knowledge of RS FC changes may represent a substantial step forward in the MS research field, both for clinical and therapeutic purposes.

  15. Placenta accreta: MRI antenatal diagnosis and surgical correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, T P; Li, K C

    1998-01-01

    We describe a case of a placenta previa accreta that was diagnosed antenatally by MRI with subsequent surgical confirmation. We show the advantages of ultrafast MRI single shot (SS) fast spin echo (FSE) techniques for accurate diagnosis with minimal scan time and fetal motion artifacts.

  16. Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging With Cascaded Dual-Polarity Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Guo, Yuexin; Lee, Wei-Ning

    2018-04-01

    Ultrafast ultrasound imaging using plane or diverging waves, instead of focused beams, has advanced greatly the development of novel ultrasound imaging methods for evaluating tissue functions beyond anatomical information. However, the sonographic signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of ultrafast imaging remains limited due to the lack of transmission focusing, and thus insufficient acoustic energy delivery. We hereby propose a new ultrafast ultrasound imaging methodology with cascaded dual-polarity waves (CDWs), which consists of a pulse train with positive and negative polarities. A new coding scheme and a corresponding linear decoding process were thereby designed to obtain the recovered signals with increased amplitude, thus increasing the SNR without sacrificing the frame rate. The newly designed CDW ultrafast ultrasound imaging technique achieved higher quality B-mode images than coherent plane-wave compounding (CPWC) and multiplane wave (MW) imaging in a calibration phantom, ex vivo pork belly, and in vivo human back muscle. CDW imaging shows a significant improvement in the SNR (10.71 dB versus CPWC and 7.62 dB versus MW), penetration depth (36.94% versus CPWC and 35.14% versus MW), and contrast ratio in deep regions (5.97 dB versus CPWC and 5.05 dB versus MW) without compromising other image quality metrics, such as spatial resolution and frame rate. The enhanced image qualities and ultrafast frame rates offered by CDW imaging beget great potential for various novel imaging applications.

  17. MRI Based Localisation and Quantification of Abscesses following Experimental S. aureus Intravenous Challenge: Application to Vaccine Evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth R Allen

    Full Text Available To develop and validate a sensitive and specific method of abscess enumeration and quantification in a preclinical model of Staphylococcus aureus infection.S. aureus infected murine kidneys were fixed in paraformaldehyde, impregnated with gadolinium, and embedded in agar blocks, which were subjected to 3D magnetic resonance microscopy on a 9.4T MRI scanner. Image analysis techniques were developed, which could identify and quantify abscesses. The result of this imaging was compared with histological examination. The impact of a S. aureus Sortase A vaccination regime was assessed using the technique.Up to 32 murine kidneys could be imaged in a single MRI run, yielding images with voxels of about 25 μm3. S. aureus abscesses could be readily identified in blinded analyses of the kidneys after 3 days of infection, with low inter-observer variability. Comparison with histological sections shows a striking correlation between the two techniques: all presumptive abscesses identified by MRI were confirmed histologically, and histology identified no abscesses not evident on MRI. In view of this, simulations were performed assuming that both MRI reconstruction, and histology examining all sections of the tissue, were fully sensitive and specific at abscess detection. This simulation showed that MRI provided more sensitive and precise estimates of abscess numbers and volume than histology, unless at least 5 histological sections are taken through the long axis of the kidney. We used the MRI technique described to investigate the impact of a S. aureus Sortase A vaccine.Post mortem MRI scanning of large batches of fixed organs has application in the preclinical assessment of S. aureus vaccines.

  18. Heart MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetic resonance imaging - cardiac; Magnetic resonance imaging - heart; Nuclear magnetic resonance - cardiac; NMR - cardiac; MRI of the heart; Cardiomyopathy - MRI; Heart failure - MRI; Congenital heart disease - MRI

  19. Edge-augmented Fourier partial sums with applications to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larriva-Latt, Jade; Morrison, Angela; Radgowski, Alison; Tobin, Joseph; Iwen, Mark; Viswanathan, Aditya

    2017-08-01

    Certain applications such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) require the reconstruction of functions from Fourier spectral data. When the underlying functions are piecewise-smooth, standard Fourier approximation methods suffer from the Gibbs phenomenon - with associated oscillatory artifacts in the vicinity of edges and an overall reduced order of convergence in the approximation. This paper proposes an edge-augmented Fourier reconstruction procedure which uses only the first few Fourier coefficients of an underlying piecewise-smooth function to accurately estimate jump information and then incorporate it into a Fourier partial sum approximation. We provide both theoretical and empirical results showing the improved accuracy of the proposed method, as well as comparisons demonstrating superior performance over existing state-of-the-art sparse optimization-based methods.

  20. Diffusion-Weighted MRI for the Assessment of Liver Fibrosis: Principles and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Palmucci

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of an early identification of hepatic fibrosis has been emphasized, in order to start therapy and obtain fibrosis regression. Biopsy is the gold-standard method for the assessment of liver fibrosis in chronic liver diseases, but it is limited by complications, interobserver variability, and sampling errors. Several noninvasive methods have been recently introduced into clinical routine, in order to detect liver fibrosis early. One of the most diffuse approaches is represented by diffusion-weighted liver MRI. In this review, the main technical principles are briefly reported in order to explain the rationale for clinical applications. In addition, roles of apparent diffusion coefficient, intravoxel incoherent motion, and relative apparent diffusion coefficient are also reported, showing their advantages and limits.

  1. All-optical temporal integration of ultrafast pulse waveforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yongwoo; Ahn, Tae-Jung; Dai, Yitang; Yao, Jianping; Azaña, José

    2008-10-27

    An ultrafast all-optical temporal integrator is experimentally demonstrated. The demonstrated integrator is based on a very simple and practical solution only requiring the use of a widely available all-fiber passive component, namely a reflection uniform fiber Bragg grating (FBG). This design allows overcoming the severe speed (bandwidth) limitations of the previously demonstrated photonic integrator designs. We demonstrate temporal integration of a variety of ultrafast optical waveforms, including Gaussian, odd-symmetry Hermite Gaussian, and (odd-)symmetry double pulses, with temporal features as fast as ~6-ps, which is about one order of magnitude faster than in previous photonic integration demonstrations. The developed device is potentially interesting for a multitude of applications in all-optical computing and information processing, ultrahigh-speed optical communications, ultrafast pulse (de-)coding, shaping and metrology.

  2. The Science and Applications of Ultrafast, Ultraintense Lasers: Opportunities in science and technology using the brightest light known to man. A report on the SAUUL workshop held June 17-19, 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todd Ditmire; Louis DiMauro

    2002-01-01

    This report is the result of a workshop held during June 17-19, 2002 in Washington, DC where many of the leaders in the field met to assess the scientific opportunities presented by research with ultrafast pulse, ultrahigh intensity lasers. This workshop and report were supported by the Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Science (BES), the Office of Fusion Energy Science (OFES), the National Nuclear Security Agency Office of Defense Programs (NNSA DP) and the National Science Foundation Division of Physics (NSF). The workshop highlighted many exciting research areas using ultrahigh intensity lasers, ranging from plasma physics and fusion energy to astrophysics to ultrafast chemistry to structural biology. Recent progress in high intensity laser technology has made possible applications with light pulses unthinkable only ten years ago. Spectacular advances are now possible with the newest generation of petawatt lasers (lasers with peak power of one quadrillion watts) and unprecedented temporal structure. The central finding of the workshop and this report is that ultra-high intensity laser research offers a wide range of exciting opportunities, and that the continued growth and current leadership of the USA in this field should be aggressively maintained. This report isolates five areas where opportunities for major breakthroughs exist with ultrafast, ultraintense lasers (UUL): Fusion energy using UULs to ignite an inertial fusion capsule; Compact, high gradient particle accelerators; Ultrafast x-ray generation and time resolved structural studies of solids and molecules; The creation of extreme states of matter and their application to puzzles in astrophysics; and The generation of attosecond bursts of radiation and the study of electron dynamics. After assessing the state of these areas, this report has come to four central conclusions: (1) Science studied with UULs is presently one of the fastest growing subfields of basic and applied research in the

  3. Ultrafast disk lasers and amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Dirk H.; Kleinbauer, Jochen; Bauer, Dominik; Wolf, Martin; Tan, Chuong; Gebs, Raphael; Budnicki, Aleksander; Wagenblast, Philipp; Weiler, Sascha

    2012-03-01

    Disk lasers with multi-kW continuous wave (CW) output power are widely used in manufacturing, primarily for cutting and welding applications, notably in the automotive industry. The ytterbium disk technology combines high power (average and/or peak power), excellent beam quality, high efficiency, and high reliability with low investment and operating costs. Fundamental mode picosecond disk lasers are well established in micro machining at high throughput and perfect precision. Following the world's first market introduction of industrial grade 50 W picosecond lasers (TruMicro 5050) at the Photonics West 2008, the second generation of the TruMicro series 5000 now provides twice the average power (100 W at 1030 nm, or 60 W frequency doubled, green output) at a significantly reduced footprint. Mode-locked disk oscillators achieve by far the highest average power of any unamplified lasers, significantly exceeding the 100 W level in laboratory set-ups. With robust long resonators their multi-microjoule pulse energies begin to compete with typical ultrafast amplifiers. In addition, significant interest in disk technology has recently come from the extreme light laser community, aiming for ultra-high peak powers of petawatts and beyond.

  4. Recent applications of UHF-MRI in the study of human brain function and structure : a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Zwaag, W.; Schäfer, Andreas; Marques, José P; Turner, R.; Trampel, Robert

    The increased availability of ultra-high-field (UHF) MRI has led to its application in a wide range of neuroimaging studies, which are showing promise in transforming fundamental approaches to human neuroscience. This review presents recent work on structural and functional brain imaging, at 7 T and

  5. Direct observation of the ultrafast electron transfer process in a polymer/fullerene blend

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cerullo, G.; Lanzani, G.; Silvestri, S. De; Brabec, Ch.J.; Zerza, G.; Sariciftci, N.S.; Hummelen, J.C.

    2000-01-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer in organic molecules is an extensively investigated topic both because of fundamental interest in the photophysics and for applications to artificial photosynthesis. Highly efficient ultrafast electron transfer from photoexcited conjugated polymers to C60 has been

  6. Evaluating contextual processing in diffusion MRI: application to optic radiation reconstruction for epilepsy surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal M W Tax

    Full Text Available Diffusion MRI and tractography allow for investigation of the architectural configuration of white matter in vivo, offering new avenues for applications like presurgical planning. Despite the promising outlook, there are many pitfalls that complicate its use for (clinical application. Amongst these are inaccuracies in the geometry of the diffusion profiles on which tractography is based, and poor alignment with neighboring profiles. Recently developed contextual processing techniques, including enhancement and well-posed geometric sharpening, have shown to result in sharper and better aligned diffusion profiles. However, the research that has been conducted up to now is mainly of theoretical nature, and so far these techniques have only been evaluated by visual inspection of the diffusion profiles. In this work, the method is evaluated in a clinically relevant application: the reconstruction of the optic radiation for epilepsy surgery. For this evaluation we have developed a framework in which we incorporate a novel scoring procedure for individual pathways. We demonstrate that, using enhancement and sharpening, the extraction of an anatomically plausible reconstruction of the optic radiation from a large amount of probabilistic pathways is greatly improved in three healthy controls, where currently used methods fail to do so. Furthermore, challenging reconstructions of the optic radiation in three epilepsy surgery candidates with extensive brain lesions demonstrate that it is beneficial to integrate these methods in surgical planning.

  7. White Paper: Interventional MRI: Current Status and Potential for Development Considering Economic Perspectives, Part 1: General Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkhausen, Jörg; Kahn, Thomas; Krombach, Gabriele A; Kuhl, Christiane K; Lotz, Joachim; Maintz, David; Ricke, Jens; Schönberg, Stefan O; Vogl, Thomas J; Wacker, Frank K

    2017-07-01

    Background  MRI is attractive for the guiding and monitoring of interventional procedures due to its high intrinsic soft tissue contrast and the possibility to measure physiologic parameters like flow and cardiac function. Method  The current status of interventional MRI for the clinical routine was analyzed. Results  The effort needed for the development of MR-safe monitoring systems and instruments initially resulted in the application of interventional MRI only for procedures that could not be performed by other means. Accordingly, biopsy of lesions in the breast, which are not detectable by other modalities, has been performed under MRI guidance for decades. Currently, biopsies of the prostate under MRI guidance are established in a similar fashion. At many sites blind biopsy has already been replaced by MR-guided biopsy or at least by the fusion of MR images with ultrasound. Cardiovascular interventions are performed at several centers for ablation as a treatment for atrial fibrillation. Conclusion  Interventional MRI has been established in the clinical routine for a variety of indications. Broader application can be expected in the clinical routine in the future owing to the multiple advantages compared to other techniques. Key points   · Due to the significant technical effort, MR-guided interventions are only recommended in the long term for regions in which MRI either facilitates or greatly improves the intervention.. · Breast biopsy of otherwise undetectable target lesions has long been established in the clinical routine. Prostate biopsy is currently being introduced in the clinical routine for similar reasons. Other methods such as MR-guided focused ultrasound for the treatment of uterine fibroids or tumor ablation of metastases represent alternative methods and are offered in many places.. · Endovascular MR-guided interventions offer advantages for a number of indications and have already been clinically established for the treatment of

  8. Turbulent Kinetic Energy Measurement Using Phase Contrast MRI for Estimating the Post-Stenotic Pressure Drop: In Vitro Validation and Clinical Application.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojin Ha

    Full Text Available Although the measurement of turbulence kinetic energy (TKE by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has been introduced as an alternative index for quantifying energy loss through the cardiac valve, experimental verification and clinical application of this parameter are still required.The goal of this study is to verify MRI measurements of TKE by using a phantom stenosis with particle image velocimetry (PIV as the reference standard. In addition, the feasibility of measuring TKE with MRI is explored.MRI measurements of TKE through a phantom stenosis was performed by using clinical 3T MRI scanner. The MRI measurements were verified experimentally by using PIV as the reference standard. In vivo application of MRI-driven TKE was explored in seven patients with aortic valve disease and one healthy volunteer. Transvalvular gradients measured by MRI and echocardiography were compared.MRI and PIV measurements of TKE are consistent for turbulent flow (0.666 400. The turbulence pressure drop correlates strongly with total TKE (R2 = 0.986. However, in vivo measurements of TKE are not consistent with the transvalvular pressure gradient estimated by echocardiography.These results suggest that TKE measurement via MRI may provide a potential benefit as an energy-loss index to characterize blood flow through the aortic valve. However, further clinical studies are necessary to reach definitive conclusions regarding this technique.

  9. Significance of the pseudo capsule on MRI of renal neoplasms and its potential application for local staging: a retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Catherine S.R.; El Ghali, Sofiane; Buy, Xavier; Lindner, Veronique; Lang, Herve; Saussine, Christian; Jacqmin, Didier

    2005-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the role of MRI in showing a pseudocapsule for local staging of renal tumors, and its potential application to select patients for partial surgery. Materials And Methods. Eighty tumors (73 renal cell carcinomas [RCCs] and seven oncocytomas)were preoperatively evaluated by MRI. MRI findings were assessed with a special focus on perinephric fat and pseudocapsule. Correlations were performed with pathologic staging after surgery. Results. At pathology, a pseudocapsule was recognized in 79 cases. Twenty- three RCC were staged pT3a (21 clear cell; two papillary). MR images exhibited a pseudocapsule in 90% of cases as a hypointense rim surrounding the tumor on T2-weighted images. MRI findings concerning isolated analysis of the pseudocapsule for differentiating stage T1/T2 from T3a were densitivity: 86%, 50%; specificity: 95%, 92%; positive predictive value: 95%, 33%; negative predictive value: 88%, 92%; and accuracy: 93%, 89%, for clear cell and papillary types, respectively. For stage T3a, with both abnormalities of the pseudocapsule and perirenal fat, Results were, for overall RCC sensitivity: 84%; specificity: 95%; positive predictive value: 91%; negative predictive value: 91%; and accuracy: 91%. Conclusion. The identification of the pseudocapsule offers an additional value for local staging by MRI. The presence of an intact pseudocapsule is a sign of lack of perinephric fat invasion. It is more likely to predict that the tumor can be removed by partial surgery. (author)

  10. MRI-only lesions: application of diffusion-weighted imaging obviates unnecessary MR-guided breast biopsies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spick, Claudio; Pinker-Domenig, Katja; Helbich, Thomas H.; Baltzer, Pascal A. [Medical University of Vienna (AKH), General Hospital Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of Molecular and Gender Imaging, Wien (Austria); Rudas, Margaretha [Medical University of Vienna (AKH), Clinical Institute of Pathology, Wien (Austria)

    2014-06-15

    To assess if the application of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) obviates unnecessary MR-guided biopsies in suspicious breast lesions visible only on contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI). This institutional review board (IRB)-approved, retrospective, single-centre study included 101 patients (mean age, 49.5; SD 13.9 years) who underwent additional DWI at 1.5 T prior to MRI-guided biopsy of 104 lesions classified as suspicious for malignancy and visible on CE-MRI only. An experienced radiologist, blinded to histopathologic and follow-up results, measured apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values obtained from DWI. Diagnostic accuracy was investigated using receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis. Histopathology revealed 20 malignant and 84 benign lesions. Lesions were masses in 61 (15 malignant, 24.6 %) and non-masses in 43 cases (five malignant, 11.6 %). Mean ADC values were 1.53 ± 0.38 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s in benign lesions and 1.06 ± 0.27 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s in malignant lesions. ROC analysis revealed exclusively benign lesions if ADC values were greater than 1.58 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s. As a consequence, 29 false-positive biopsies (34.5 %) could have been avoided without any false-negative findings. Both in mass and in non-mass lesions, rule-in and rule-out criteria were identified using flexible ADC thresholds based on ROC analysis. Additional application of DWI in breast lesions visible only on MRI can avoid false-positive, MR-guided biopsies. Thus, DWI should be an integral part of breast MRI protocols. (orig.)

  11. FY1995 report on the novel methods for magnetic resonance imaging; 1995 nendo senshin MRI gazoka shuho no kiso kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop new 2-dimensional ultrafast MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) methods for the Image Guided Cancer Therapy (IGT) and the non-invasive clinical diagnosis. We have developed two MRI methods. They can reconstruct a two dimensional image by only a RF excitation and slow changing of gradient fields. This paper describes theoretically how to apply the RF wave and the gradient in x, y and z direction, respectively. Echo signals are acquired under multi-frequency resonance. The frequency bandwidth of the RF wave adjusts the field of view (FOV) of the imaging plane. Biological effects of the applied RF wave was evaluated by the brain microdialysis. In animal experiments, these was not significant change of neurotransmitters subject to the RF wave. From these theoretical and experimental results, these MRI methods are applicable to IGT and the clinical diagnosis for the cancer and other diseases. (NEDO)

  12. State-Space Analysis of Granger-Geweke Causality Measures with Application to fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solo, Victor

    2016-05-01

    The recent interest in the dynamics of networks and the advent, across a range of applications, of measuring modalities that operate on different temporal scales have put the spotlight on some significant gaps in the theory of multivariate time series. Fundamental to the description of network dynamics is the direction of interaction between nodes, accompanied by a measure of the strength of such interactions. Granger causality and its associated frequency domain strength measures (GEMs) (due to Geweke) provide a framework for the formulation and analysis of these issues. In pursuing this setup, three significant unresolved issues emerge. First, computing GEMs involves computing submodels of vector time series models, for which reliable methods do not exist. Second, the impact of filtering on GEMs has never been definitively established. Third, the impact of downsampling on GEMs has never been established. In this work, using state-space methods, we resolve all these issues and illustrate the results with some simulations. Our analysis is motivated by some problems in (fMRI) brain imaging, to which we apply it, but it is of general applicability.

  13. The application of PET/MRI in pancreatic neoplasms%PET/MRI在胰腺肿瘤中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李旭东; 林晓珠

    2018-01-01

    PET/MRI是一种将PET和MRI融合的新型影像诊断技术,其整合了PET提供的人体生理代谢、分子信息和MRI提供的功能及解剖形态信息.相较于CT,MRI具有更高的软组织对比度,可多参数成像,且无辐射.PET/MRI在胰腺癌病灶检测、 术前分期和预后评估方面优于PET/CT.68Ga标记的生长抑素受体显像剂PET/MRI能够提高胰腺神经内分泌肿瘤的检测和诊断能力.新型显像剂的研发和应用能够提高胰腺肿瘤PET/MRI的特异性和精准性.就PET/MRI在胰腺癌的诊断、分期及疗效监测的应用价值及其对胰腺神经内分泌肿瘤的研究进展予以综述.%PET/MRI is a new medical imaging technology that can obtain hybrid images of PET and MRI simultane-ously,which integrates human physiological metabolism and molecular information from PET with functional and anatomical information from MRI.MRI has many advantages compared with computed tomography (CT),such as better soft tissue contrast, multiple parameters and no radiation.Researches showed that PET/MRI is superior to PET/CT in the detection, preoperative staging and prognosis of pancreatic cancers. PET/MRI using Somatostatin(SST) receptor with 68-Gallium (68Ga)-labeled can enhance the detection and diagnosis of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. The application of newly developed contrast media can improve specificity and accuracy of PET/MRI in diagnosing pancreatic tumors.In this paper, the values of PET/MRI in di-agnosis, staging and evaluating therapeutic effect in pancreatic cancer and progress of PET/MRI researches in pancreatic neu-roendocrine tumors were reviewed.

  14. Clinical applications of functional MRI at 1.0 T: motor and language studies in healthy subjects and patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papke, K.; Hellmann, T.; Renger, B.; Schuierer, G.; Reimer, P.; Morgenroth, C.; Knecht, S.

    1999-01-01

    In this article we describe clinical applications of functional MRI (fMRI) at 1.0 T. All experiments were performed on a commercially available 1.0-T system (Magnetom Impact Expert, Siemens AG, Erlangen, Germany) using a blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD)-sensitive multi-slice EPI technique (TE 66 ms, 4 mm slice thickness, 210 mm field of view, 64 x 64 acquisition matrix). Different paradigms for localization of the motor cortex and for language lateralization were tested in healthy subjects and patients. Methodological considerations concerning the development of the paradigms are also described. In all healthy subjects, motor activation elicited BOLD signal changes in the sensorimotor cortex, permitting identification of primary motor and sensory cortical areas. Furthermore, focal activation of different cortical areas by a language task was possible in 6 of 10 subjects. Nineteen motor studies were performed in 18 patients with supratentorial lesions, in most cases prior to neurosurgical procedures. In 14 studies, fMRI results demonstrated the localization of the motor hand areas relative to the lesion. The results proved valuable for preoperative planning and contributed to therapeutical decisions. We conclude that functional MRI for clinically relevant applications, such as localization of motor and language function, is feasible even at a field strength of 1.0 T without dedicated equipment. (orig.)

  15. Novel methods and applications of NMR and MRI. Low-power RF excitation and hyperpolarized Xenon-129

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amor, Nadia

    2012-01-01

    Since their discovery in the middle of the last century, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) have become an important and very versatile tool in industry, medicine, and basic research. The aim of this work is to explore possible improvements and new applications of NMR methods. First, a recently introduced excitation NMR pulse sequence, termed Frank sequence excitation, which allows for significant reduction of rf-excitation power, is systematically analyzed and compared to conventional NMR in detail. Furthermore, its feasibility for MRI is investigated and advantages as well as drawbacks in comparison to standard MRI are discussed. The second part focuses on new biomedical applications of hyperpolarized (HP) 129 Xe which not only offers a signal enhancement of several orders of magnitude but also provides new contrast mechanisms. A setup for continuous dissolution of HP 129 Xe gas into blood and other fluids is optimized and analyzed quantitatively by NMR and MRI. On the basis of these results, blood-dissolved HP 129 Xe is used to investigate blood-gas dynamics, as well as the rheological behavior of blood.

  16. Novel methods and applications of NMR and MRI. Low-power RF excitation and hyperpolarized Xenon-129

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amor, Nadia

    2012-07-01

    Since their discovery in the middle of the last century, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) have become an important and very versatile tool in industry, medicine, and basic research. The aim of this work is to explore possible improvements and new applications of NMR methods. First, a recently introduced excitation NMR pulse sequence, termed Frank sequence excitation, which allows for significant reduction of rf-excitation power, is systematically analyzed and compared to conventional NMR in detail. Furthermore, its feasibility for MRI is investigated and advantages as well as drawbacks in comparison to standard MRI are discussed. The second part focuses on new biomedical applications of hyperpolarized (HP) {sup 129}Xe which not only offers a signal enhancement of several orders of magnitude but also provides new contrast mechanisms. A setup for continuous dissolution of HP {sup 129}Xe gas into blood and other fluids is optimized and analyzed quantitatively by NMR and MRI. On the basis of these results, blood-dissolved HP {sup 129}Xe is used to investigate blood-gas dynamics, as well as the rheological behavior of blood.

  17. Application of Quantitative MRI for Brain Tissue Segmentation at 1.5 T and 3.0 T Field Strengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Janne; Blystad, Ida; Engström, Maria; Warntjes, Jan B. M.; Lundberg, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background Brain tissue segmentation of white matter (WM), grey matter (GM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are important in neuroradiological applications. Quantitative Mri (qMRI) allows segmentation based on physical tissue properties, and the dependencies on MR scanner settings are removed. Brain tissue groups into clusters in the three dimensional space formed by the qMRI parameters R1, R2 and PD, and partial volume voxels are intermediate in this space. The qMRI parameters, however, depend on the main magnetic field strength. Therefore, longitudinal studies can be seriously limited by system upgrades. The aim of this work was to apply one recently described brain tissue segmentation method, based on qMRI, at both 1.5 T and 3.0 T field strengths, and to investigate similarities and differences. Methods In vivo qMRI measurements were performed on 10 healthy subjects using both 1.5 T and 3.0 T MR scanners. The brain tissue segmentation method was applied for both 1.5 T and 3.0 T and volumes of WM, GM, CSF and brain parenchymal fraction (BPF) were calculated on both field strengths. Repeatability was calculated for each scanner and a General Linear Model was used to examine the effect of field strength. Voxel-wise t-tests were also performed to evaluate regional differences. Results Statistically significant differences were found between 1.5 T and 3.0 T for WM, GM, CSF and BPF (p3.0 T. The mean differences between 1.5 T and 3.0 T were -66 mL WM, 40 mL GM, 29 mL CSF and -1.99% BPF. Voxel-wise t-tests revealed regional differences of WM and GM in deep brain structures, cerebellum and brain stem. Conclusions Most of the brain was identically classified at the two field strengths, although some regional differences were observed. PMID:24066153

  18. A new concept of a unified parameter management, experiment control, and data analysis in fMRI: application to real-time fMRI at 3T and 7T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollmann, M; Mönch, T; Mulla-Osman, S; Tempelmann, C; Stadler, J; Bernarding, J

    2008-10-30

    In functional MRI (fMRI) complex experiments and applications require increasingly complex parameter handling as the experimental setup usually consists of separated soft- and hardware systems. Advanced real-time applications such as neurofeedback-based training or brain computer interfaces (BCIs) may even require adaptive changes of the paradigms and experimental setup during the measurement. This would be facilitated by an automated management of the overall workflow and a control of the communication between all experimental components. We realized a concept based on an XML software framework called Experiment Description Language (EDL). All parameters relevant for real-time data acquisition, real-time fMRI (rtfMRI) statistical data analysis, stimulus presentation, and activation processing are stored in one central EDL file, and processed during the experiment. A usability study comparing the central EDL parameter management with traditional approaches showed an improvement of the complete experimental handling. Based on this concept, a feasibility study realizing a dynamic rtfMRI-based brain computer interface showed that the developed system in combination with EDL was able to reliably detect and evaluate activation patterns in real-time. The implementation of a centrally controlled communication between the subsystems involved in the rtfMRI experiments reduced potential inconsistencies, and will open new applications for adaptive BCIs.

  19. MR neurography with multiplanar reconstruction of 3D MRI datasets: an anatomical study and clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freund, Wolfgang; Aschoff, Andrik J.; Stuber, Gregor; Schmitz, Bernd; Brinkmann, Alexander; Wagner, Florian; Dinse, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Extracranial MR neurography has so far mainly been used with 2D datasets. We investigated the use of 3D datasets for peripheral neurography of the sciatic nerve. A total of 40 thighs (20 healthy volunteers) were examined with a coronally oriented magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient echo sequence with isotropic voxels of 1 x 1 x 1 mm and a field of view of 500 mm. Anatomical landmarks were palpated and marked with MRI markers. After MR scanning, the sciatic nerve was identified by two readers independently in the resulting 3D dataset. In every volunteer, the sciatic nerve could be identified bilaterally over the whole length of the thigh, even in areas of close contact to isointense muscles. The landmark of the greater trochanter was falsely palpated by 2.2 cm, and the knee joint by 1 cm. The mean distance between the bifurcation of the sciatic nerve and the knee-joint gap was 6 cm (±1.8 cm). The mean results of the two readers differed by 1-6%. With the described method of MR neurography, the sciatic nerve was depicted reliably and objectively in great anatomical detail over the whole length of the thigh. Important anatomical information can be obtained. The clinical applications of MR neurography for the brachial plexus and lumbosacral plexus/sciatic nerve are discussed. (orig.)

  20. A primal–dual hybrid gradient method for nonlinear operators with applications to MRI

    KAUST Repository

    Valkonen, Tuomo

    2014-05-01

    We study the solution of minimax problems min xmax yG(x) + K(x), y - F*(y) in finite-dimensional Hilbert spaces. The functionals G and F* we assume to be convex, but the operator K we allow to be nonlinear. We formulate a natural extension of the modified primal-dual hybrid gradient method, originally for linear K, due to Chambolle and Pock. We prove the local convergence of the method, provided various technical conditions are satisfied. These include in particular the Aubin property of the inverse of a monotone operator at the solution. Of particular interest to us is the case arising from Tikhonov type regularization of inverse problems with nonlinear forward operators. Mainly we are interested in total variation and second-order total generalized variation priors. For such problems, we show that our general local convergence result holds when the noise level of the data f is low, and the regularization parameter α is correspondingly small. We verify the numerical performance of the method by applying it to problems from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in chemical engineering and medicine. The specific applications are in diffusion tensor imaging and MR velocity imaging. These numerical studies show very promising performance. © 2014 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  1. Application of the McDonald MRI criteria in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ling Ling; Sitoh, Yih Yian; Chong, June; See, Siew Ju; Umapathi, Thirugnanam N; Lim, Shih Hui; Ong, Benjamin

    2007-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the sensitivity of McDonald's magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) criteria for the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) in a group of Asian patients diagnosed with clinically definite MS, based on lesion characterisation on MRI scans. Forty-nine patients from 3 major neurological institutions were classified as having Asian- or Western-type MS based on clinical assessment. Each MRI scan was reviewed by 2 neuroradiologists for the presence and characteristics of brain and spinal lesions. The McDonald's MRI criteria were then applied and its sensitivity evaluated. Nine patients were excluded, leaving 34 females and 6 males who were dominantly Chinese (90%), with a mean age of 36.2 years. The MRI brain and spinal findings were detailed and tabulated. Statistically significant differences (P McDonald's MRI criteria were found between our Asian- and Western-type MS patients. The diagnostic yield of McDonald's MRI criteria increased by 20% when we substituted a cord for a brain lesion, and applied the substitution for enhancing cord lesions as well. The diagnosis is more likely to be made when using McDonald MRI criteria based on brain findings, in a patient who presents clinically with Western-type MS. The provision for substitution of "one brain for a spinal lesion" is helpful in Asian-type MS, where there is preponderance of spinal lesion load. Our findings suggest that minor modifications in the interpretation of McDonald's MRI criteria have significant impact on the diagnosis in patients clinically presenting as Asian-type MS, with potential bearing on their subsequent management.

  2. Resolution improvement of brain PET images using prior information from MRI: clinical application on refractory epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva-Rodríguez, Jesus; Tsoumpas, Charalampos; Aguiar, Pablo; Cortes, Julia; Urdaneta, Jesus Lopez

    2015-01-01

    An important counterpart of clinical Positron Emission Tomography (PET) for early diagnosis of neurological diseases is its low resolution. This is particularly important when evaluating diseases related to small hypometabolisms such as epilepsy. The last years, new hybrid systems combining PET with Magnetic Resonance (MR) has been increasingly used for several different clinical applications. One of the advantages of MR is the production of high spatial resolution images and a potential application of PET-MR imaging is the improvement of PET resolution using MR information. A potential advantage of resolution recovery of PET images is the enhancement of contrast delivering at the same time better detectability of small lesions or hypometabolic areas and more accurate quantification over these areas. Recently, Shidahara et al (2009) proposed a new method using wavelet transforms in order to produce PET images with higher resolution. We optimised Shidahara’s method (SFS-RR) to take into account possible shortcomings on the particular clinical datasets, and applied it to a group of patients diagnosed with refractory epilepsy. FDG-PET and MRI images were acquired sequentially and then co-registered using software tools. A complete evaluation of the PET/MR images was performed before and after the correction, including different parameters related with PET quantification, such as atlas-based metabolism asymmetry coefficients and Statistical Parametric Mapping results comparing to a database of 87 healthy subjects. Furthermore, an experienced physician analyzed the results of non-corrected and corrected images in order to evaluate improvements of detectability on a visual inspection. Clinical outcome was used as a gold standard. SFS-RR demonstrated to have a positive impact on clinical diagnosis of small hypometabolisms. New lesions were detected providing additional clinically relevant information on the visual inspection. SPM sensitivity for the detection of small

  3. Resolution improvement of brain PET images using prior information from MRI: clinical application on refractory epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva-Rodríguez, Jesus [Instituto de Investigaciones Sanitarias (IDIS), Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Tsoumpas, Charalampos [University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); Aguiar, Pablo; Cortes, Julia [Nuclear Medicine Department, University Hospital (CHUS), Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Urdaneta, Jesus Lopez [Instituto de Investigaciones Sanitarias (IDIS), Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2015-05-18

    An important counterpart of clinical Positron Emission Tomography (PET) for early diagnosis of neurological diseases is its low resolution. This is particularly important when evaluating diseases related to small hypometabolisms such as epilepsy. The last years, new hybrid systems combining PET with Magnetic Resonance (MR) has been increasingly used for several different clinical applications. One of the advantages of MR is the production of high spatial resolution images and a potential application of PET-MR imaging is the improvement of PET resolution using MR information. A potential advantage of resolution recovery of PET images is the enhancement of contrast delivering at the same time better detectability of small lesions or hypometabolic areas and more accurate quantification over these areas. Recently, Shidahara et al (2009) proposed a new method using wavelet transforms in order to produce PET images with higher resolution. We optimised Shidahara’s method (SFS-RR) to take into account possible shortcomings on the particular clinical datasets, and applied it to a group of patients diagnosed with refractory epilepsy. FDG-PET and MRI images were acquired sequentially and then co-registered using software tools. A complete evaluation of the PET/MR images was performed before and after the correction, including different parameters related with PET quantification, such as atlas-based metabolism asymmetry coefficients and Statistical Parametric Mapping results comparing to a database of 87 healthy subjects. Furthermore, an experienced physician analyzed the results of non-corrected and corrected images in order to evaluate improvements of detectability on a visual inspection. Clinical outcome was used as a gold standard. SFS-RR demonstrated to have a positive impact on clinical diagnosis of small hypometabolisms. New lesions were detected providing additional clinically relevant information on the visual inspection. SPM sensitivity for the detection of small

  4. Pelvic MRI application to the dosimetric analysis in Brachytherapy of Uterine Cervix Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, S. J.; Chung, W. K.; Nah, B. K.

    1997-01-01

    Before we report the results of curative radiotherapy in cervix cancer patients, we review the significance and safety of our dose specification methods in the brachytherapy system to have the insight of the potential predictive value of doses at specific points. We analyze the 45 cases of cervix cancer patients treated with intracavitary brachytherapy. In the lateral simulation film we draw the isodose curve and observe the absorbed dose rate of point A, the reference point of bladder(SBD) and rectum(SRD). In the sagittal view of pelvic MRI film we demarcate the tumor volume(TV) and determine whether the prescription dose curve of point A covers the tumor volume adequately by drawing the isodose curve as correctly as possible. Also we estimate the maximum point dose of bladder (MBD) and rectum (MRD) and calculate the inclusion area where the absorbed dose rate is higher than that of point A in the bladder (HBV) and rectum (HRV), respectively. Of forty-five cases, the isodose curve of point A seems to cover tumor volume optimally in only 24 (53%). The optimal tumor coverage seems to be associated not with the stage of the disease but with the tumor volume. There is no statistically significant association between SBD/SRD and MBD/MRD, respectively. SRD has statistically significant association with HBV and HRV. Our current treatment calculation methods seem to have the defect in the aspects of the nonoptimal coverage of the bulky tumor and the inappropriate estimation of bladder dose. We therefore need to modify the applicator geometry to optimize the dose distribution at the position of lower tandem source. Also it appears that the position of the bladder in relation to the applicators needs to be defined individually to define 'hot spots'. (author)

  5. Ultrafast Microscopy of Energy and Charge Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Libai

    The frontier in solar energy research now lies in learning how to integrate functional entities across multiple length scales to create optimal devices. Advancing the field requires transformative experimental tools that probe energy transfer processes from the nano to the meso lengthscales. To address this challenge, we aim to understand multi-scale energy transport across both multiple length and time scales, coupling simultaneous high spatial, structural, and temporal resolution. In my talk, I will focus on our recent progress on visualization of exciton and charge transport in solar energy harvesting materials from the nano to mesoscale employing ultrafast optical nanoscopy. With approaches that combine spatial and temporal resolutions, we have recently revealed a new singlet-mediated triplet transport mechanism in certain singlet fission materials. This work demonstrates a new triplet exciton transport mechanism leading to favorable long-range triplet exciton diffusion on the picosecond and nanosecond timescales for solar cell applications. We have also performed a direct measurement of carrier transport in space and in time by mapping carrier density with simultaneous ultrafast time resolution and 50 nm spatial precision in perovskite thin films using transient absorption microscopy. These results directly visualize long-range carrier transport of 220nm in 2 ns for solution-processed polycrystalline CH3NH3PbI3 thin films. The spatially and temporally resolved measurements reported here underscore the importance of the local morphology and establish an important first step towards discerning the underlying transport properties of perovskite materials.

  6. T2 mapping of muscle activity using ultrafast imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawara, Noriyuki; Nitta, Osamu; Kuruma, Hironobu; Niitsu, Mamoru; Itoh, Akiyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Measuring exercise-induced muscle activity is essential in sports medicine. Previous studies proposed measuring transverse relaxation time (T 2 ) using muscle functional magnetic resonance imaging (mfMRI) to map muscle activity. However, mfMRI uses a spin-echo (SE) sequence that requires several minutes for acquisition. We evaluated the feasibility of T 2 mapping of muscle activity using ultrafast imaging, called fast-acquired mfMRI (fast-mfMRI), to reduce image acquisition time. The current method uses 2 pulse sequences, spin-echo echo-planar imaging (SE-EPI) and true fast imaging with steady precession (TrueFISP). SE-EPI images are used to calculate T 2 , and TrueFISP images are used to obtain morphological information. The functional image is produced by subtracting the image of muscle activity obtained using T 2 at rest from that produced after exercise. Final fast-mfMRI images are produced by fusing the functional images with the morphologic images. Ten subjects repeated ankle plantar flexion 200 times. In the fused images, the areas of activated muscle in the fast-mfMRI and SE-EPI images were identical. The geometric location of the fast-mfMRI did not differ between the morphologic and functional images. Morphological and functional information from fast-mfMRI can be applied to the human trunk, which requires limited scan duration. The difference obtained by subtracting T 2 at rest from T 2 after exercise can be used as a functional image of muscle activity. (author)

  7. Ultrafast vibrations of gold nanorings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelf, T; Tanaka, Y; Matsuda, O

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the vibrational modes of gold nanorings on a silica substrate with an ultrafast optical technique. By comparison with numerical simulations, we identify several resonances in the gigahertz range associated with axially symmetric deformations of the nanoring and substrate. We...

  8. Ultrafast spectroscopy of biological photoreceptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kennis, J.T.M.; Groot, M.L.

    2007-01-01

    We review recent new insights on reaction dynamics of photoreceptors proteins gained from ultrafast spectroscopy. In Blue Light sensing Using FAD (BLUF) domains, a hydrogen-bond rearrangement around the flavin chromophore proceeds through a radical-pair mechanism, by which light-induced electron and

  9. Ultrafast vibrations of gold nanorings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelf, T; Tanaka, Y; Matsuda, O

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the vibrational modes of gold nanorings on a silica substrate with an ultrafast optical technique. By comparison with numerical simulations, we identify several resonances in the gigahertz range associated with axially symmetric deformations of the nanoring and substrate. We elucid...

  10. Multicentre treatment planning study of MRI-guided brachytherapy for cervical cancer: Comparison between tandem-ovoid applicator users

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomden, Christel N.; Leeuw, Astrid A.C. de; Van Limbergen, Erik; Brabandere, Marisol de; Nulens, An; Nout, Remi A.; Laman, Mirjam; Ketelaars, Martijn; Lutgens, Ludovicus; Reniers, Brigitte; Jürgenliemk-Schulz, Ina Maria

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: To compare MRI-guided treatment planning approaches between four centres that use tandem-ovoid applicators. Material and methods: Four centres generated three treatment plans for four patients: standard, optimised intracavitary, and optimised intracavitary/interstitial. Prescribed D90 High-Risk CTV (HR-CTV) was 85 Gy EQD2 (external-beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy), while the D 2cc OAR limit was 90 Gy EQD2 for bladder and 75 Gy EQD2 for rectum, sigmoid, and bowel, respectively. DVH-parameters, source loading patterns and spatial dose distributions of the three treatment plans were compared. Results: The standard plans of the different centres were comparable with respect to the D90 HR-CTV, but differed in OAR doses. MRI-guided intracavitary optimisation resulted in organ sparing and smaller variation in DVH parameters between the centres. Adding interstitial needles led to target dose escalation while respecting the OAR constraints. However, substantial differences in relative weights of the applicator parts resulted in an increased variation in DVH parameters and locations of high dose regions. Conclusions: MRI-guided brachytherapy treatment planning optimisation provides the possibility to increase the dose to the HR-CTV and spare the OARs. Depending on the degree of conformity the centres make different choices in relative weighting of applicator parts, leading to different dose distributions

  11. Application of dispersive solid-phase extraction and ultra-fast liquid chromatography-tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry in food additive residue analysis of red wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Hong; Zhao, Yong-Gang; Shen, Hao-Yu; Jin, Mi-Cong

    2012-11-09

    A novel and effective dispersive solid-phase extraction (dSPE) procedure with rapid magnetic separation using ethylenediamine-functionalized magnetic polymer as an adsorbent was developed. The new procedure had excellent clean-up ability for the selective removal of the matrix in red wine. An accurate, simple, and rapid analytical method using ultra-fast liquid chromatography-tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry (UFLC-MS/MS) for the simultaneous determination of nine food additives (i.e., acesulfame, saccharin, sodium cyclamate, aspartame, benzoic acid, sorbic acid, stevioside, dehydroacetic acid, and neotame) in red wine was also used and validated. Recoveries ranging from 78.5% to 99.2% with relative standard deviations ranging from 0.46% to 6.3% were obtained using the new method. All target compounds showed good linearities in the tested range with correlation coefficients (r) higher than 0.9993. The limits of quantification for the nine food additives were between 0.10 μg/L and 50.0 μg/L. The proposed dSPE-UFLC-MS/MS method was successfully applied in the food-safety risk monitoring of real red wine in Zhejiang Province, China. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Totally Accessible MRI A User's Guide to Principles, Technology, and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lipton, Michael L

    2008-01-01

    This is a practical guide that offers a lucid introduction to the principles of MRI physics. The author, recognized in the imaging community for his exceptional teaching methods and lectures, has written an easy to understand text. Each chapter explains the "why" and "how" behind MRI physics. Readers will understand how altering MRI parameters will have many different consequences for image quality and the speed in which images are generated. Practical topics, selected for their value to clinical practice, include progressive changes in key MRI parameters, imaging time, and signal to noise ratio. A wealth of high quality illustrations, complemented by concise text, enables readers to gain a thorough understanding of the subject without requiring prior in-depth knowledge

  13. Cost Analysis of MRI Services in Iran: An Application of Activity Based Costing Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayati, Mohsen; Mahboub Ahari, Alireza; Badakhshan, Abbas; Gholipour, Mahin; Joulaei, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Considerable development of MRI technology in diagnostic imaging, high cost of MRI technology and controversial issues concerning official charges (tariffs) have been the main motivations to define and implement this study. The present study aimed to calculate the unit-cost of MRI services using activity-based costing (ABC) as a modern cost accounting system and to fairly compare calculated unit-costs with official charges (tariffs). We included both direct and indirect costs of MRI services delivered in fiscal year 2011 in Shiraz Shahid Faghihi hospital. Direct allocation method was used for distribution of overhead costs. We used micro-costing approach to calculate unit-cost of all different MRI services. Clinical cost data were retrieved from the hospital registering system. Straight-line method was used for depreciation cost estimation. To cope with uncertainty and to increase the robustness of study results, unit costs of 33 MRI services was calculated in terms of two scenarios. Total annual cost of MRI activity center (AC) was calculated at USD 400,746 and USD 532,104 based on first and second scenarios, respectively. Ten percent of the total cost was allocated from supportive departments. The annual variable costs of MRI center were calculated at USD 295,904. Capital costs measured at USD 104,842 and USD 236, 200 resulted from the first and second scenario, respectively. Existing tariffs for more than half of MRI services were above the calculated costs. As a public hospital, there are considerable limitations in both financial and administrative databases of Shahid Faghihi hospital. Labor cost has the greatest share of total annual cost of Shahid Faghihi hospital. The gap between unit costs and tariffs implies that the claim for extra budget from health providers may not be relevant for all services delivered by the studied MRI center. With some adjustments, ABC could be implemented in MRI centers. With the settlement of a reliable cost accounting system

  14. Cost Analysis of MRI Services in Iran: An Application of Activity Based Costing Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayati, Mohsen; Mahboub Ahari, Alireza; Badakhshan, Abbas; Gholipour, Mahin; Joulaei, Hassan

    2015-10-01

    Considerable development of MRI technology in diagnostic imaging, high cost of MRI technology and controversial issues concerning official charges (tariffs) have been the main motivations to define and implement this study. The present study aimed to calculate the unit-cost of MRI services using activity-based costing (ABC) as a modern cost accounting system and to fairly compare calculated unit-costs with official charges (tariffs). We included both direct and indirect costs of MRI services delivered in fiscal year 2011 in Shiraz Shahid Faghihi hospital. Direct allocation method was used for distribution of overhead costs. We used micro-costing approach to calculate unit-cost of all different MRI services. Clinical cost data were retrieved from the hospital registering system. Straight-line method was used for depreciation cost estimation. To cope with uncertainty and to increase the robustness of study results, unit costs of 33 MRI services was calculated in terms of two scenarios. Total annual cost of MRI activity center (AC) was calculated at USD 400,746 and USD 532,104 based on first and second scenarios, respectively. Ten percent of the total cost was allocated from supportive departments. The annual variable costs of MRI center were calculated at USD 295,904. Capital costs measured at USD 104,842 and USD 236, 200 resulted from the first and second scenario, respectively. Existing tariffs for more than half of MRI services were above the calculated costs. As a public hospital, there are considerable limitations in both financial and administrative databases of Shahid Faghihi hospital. Labor cost has the greatest share of total annual cost of Shahid Faghihi hospital. The gap between unit costs and tariffs implies that the claim for extra budget from health providers may not be relevant for all services delivered by the studied MRI center. With some adjustments, ABC could be implemented in MRI centers. With the settlement of a reliable cost accounting system

  15. The Application of MRI for Depiction of Subtle Blood Brain Barrier Disruption in Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    David Israeli, David Tanne, Dianne Daniels, David Last, Ran Shneor, David Guez, Efrat Landau, Yiftach Roth, Aharon Ocherashvilli, Mati Bakon, Chen Hoffman, Amit Weinberg, Talila Volk, Yael Mardor

    2011-01-01

    The development of imaging methodologies for detecting blood-brain-barrier (BBB) disruption may help predict stroke patient's propensity to develop hemorrhagic complications following reperfusion. We have developed a delayed contrast extravasation MRI-based methodology enabling real-time depiction of subtle BBB abnormalities in humans with high sensitivity to BBB disruption and high spatial resolution. The increased sensitivity to subtle BBB disruption is obtained by acquiring T1-weighted MRI...

  16. The Application of MRI for Depiction of Subtle Blood Brain Barrier Disruption in Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Israeli, David; Tanne, David; Daniels, Dianne; Last, David; Shneor, Ran; Guez, David; Landau, Efrat; Roth, Yiftach; Ocherashvilli, Aharon; Bakon, Mati; Hoffman, Chen; Weinberg, Amit; Volk, Talila; Mardor, Yael

    2010-01-01

    The development of imaging methodologies for detecting blood-brain-barrier (BBB) disruption may help predict stroke patient's propensity to develop hemorrhagic complications following reperfusion. We have developed a delayed contrast extravasation MRI-based methodology enabling real-time depiction of subtle BBB abnormalities in humans with high sensitivity to BBB disruption and high spatial resolution. The increased sensitivity to subtle BBB disruption is obtained by acquiring T1-weighted MRI...

  17. Machine learning classification with confidence: application of transductive conformal predictors to MRI-based diagnostic and prognostic markers in depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouretdinov, Ilia; Costafreda, Sergi G; Gammerman, Alexander; Chervonenkis, Alexey; Vovk, Vladimir; Vapnik, Vladimir; Fu, Cynthia H Y

    2011-05-15

    There is rapidly accumulating evidence that the application of machine learning classification to neuroimaging measurements may be valuable for the development of diagnostic and prognostic prediction tools in psychiatry. However, current methods do not produce a measure of the reliability of the predictions. Knowing the risk of the error associated with a given prediction is essential for the development of neuroimaging-based clinical tools. We propose a general probabilistic classification method to produce measures of confidence for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. We describe the application of transductive conformal predictor (TCP) to MRI images. TCP generates the most likely prediction and a valid measure of confidence, as well as the set of all possible predictions for a given confidence level. We present the theoretical motivation for TCP, and we have applied TCP to structural and functional MRI data in patients and healthy controls to investigate diagnostic and prognostic prediction in depression. We verify that TCP predictions are as accurate as those obtained with more standard machine learning methods, such as support vector machine, while providing the additional benefit of a valid measure of confidence for each prediction. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Functional and molecular imaging with MRI: potential applications in paediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthurs, Owen J.; Gallagher, Ferdia A.

    2011-01-01

    MRI is a very versatile tool for noninvasive imaging and it is particularly attractive as an imaging technique in paediatric patients given the absence of ionizing radiation. Recent advances in the field of MRI have enabled tissue function to be probed noninvasively, and increasingly MRI is being used to assess cellular and molecular processes. For example, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI has been used to assess tissue vascularity, diffusion-weighted imaging can quantify molecular movements of water in tissue compartments and MR spectroscopy provides a quantitative assessment of metabolite levels. A number of targeted contrast agents have been developed that bind specifically to receptors on the vascular endothelium or cell surface and there are several MR methods for labelling cells and tracking cellular movements. Hyperpolarization techniques have the capability of massively increasing the sensitivity of MRI and these have been used to image tissue pH, successful response to drug treatment as well as imaging the microstructure of the lungs. Although there are many challenges to be overcome before these techniques can be translated into routine paediatric imaging, they could potentially be used to aid diagnosis, predict disease outcome, target biopsies and determine treatment response noninvasively. (orig.)

  19. An MRI-based technique for assessment of lower extremity deformities - reproducibility, accuracy, and clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinterwimmer, Stefan; Graichen, Heiko; Vogl, Thomas J.; Abolmaali, Nasreddin

    2008-01-01

    The hypothesis of this study was that length, torsion, and axis of a leg phantom can be measured accurately and reproducibly by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and that this can be applied to patients with leg deformities. Two phantoms and 30 patients (genu varum, n=15; genu valgum, n=15) were investigated using an optimized MRI technique. Reference measurements were performed with a micrometer screw and a goniometer. Patient leg length and axis were compared with long radiographs in bipedal stance. Intra- and interobserver reproducibility and accuracy were calculated using the mean absolute difference (MAD) and the 95% confidence interval. In patients, comparisons were done using a paired Student's t-test. MAD, intraobserver MAD, and interobserver MAD were 0.03, 0.03, 0.04 mm (length); 0.98, 1.2, 0.98 (torsion); and 0.18, 0.23, 0.22 (axis), respectively. In patients, leg length was underestimated by MRI (-2.4 ± 0.7%; 1.9±0.7 cm; P 0.05), while it was significantly underestimated in valgus knees (-3.6 ± 2.8 ; P<0.05). The phantom study revealed that leg length, torsion, and axis can be measured accurately and reproducibly by MRI. Although underestimation of leg length and HKA in valgus knees occurred, this optimized MRI technique can be applied to patients with leg deformities. (orig.)

  20. Ultrafast MR Imaging in Pediatric Neuroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.K.; Smith, J.T.; Wilkinson, I.D.; Griffiths, P.D.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the diagnostic information obtained from ultrafast MR imaging with standard MR imaging techniques in pediatric neuroradiology. The goal was to judge whether ultrafast methods can be used to replace standard methods and reduce the need for sedation or general anesthesia as a result of the considerably shorter scan times. Material and Methods: Our prospective study involved 125 patients. Routine clinical imaging was performed along with two ultrafast methods. Single shot fast spin echo (SSFSE) was used to give T2-weighted images and an echo planar imaging (EPI) sequence to provide a T1-weighted images. The ultrafast images were presented to an experienced neuro radiologist who was also given the information present on the initial referral card. These reports based on the ultrafast images were then compared with the formal radiologic report made solely on the basis of the standard imaging. Results: The overall sensitivity and specificity for ultrafast imaging when compared to the reference standard were 78% and 98% with positive and negative predictive values of 98% and 76%. Pathologies characterized by small areas of subtle T2 prolongation were difficult or impossible to see on the ultrafast images but otherwise they provided reliable information. Conclusions: This paper demonstrates that ultrafast MR imaging can diagnose many pediatric intracranial abnormalities as well as standard methods. Anatomic resolution limits its capacity to define subtle developmental anomalies and contrast resolution limitations of the ultrafast methods reduce the detection of pathology characterized by subtle T2 prolongation

  1. Ultrafast optical ranging using microresonator soliton frequency combs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trocha, P.; Karpov, M.; Ganin, D.; Pfeiffer, M. H. P.; Kordts, A.; Wolf, S.; Krockenberger, J.; Marin-Palomo, P.; Weimann, C.; Randel, S.; Freude, W.; Kippenberg, T. J.; Koos, C.

    2018-02-01

    Light detection and ranging is widely used in science and industry. Over the past decade, optical frequency combs were shown to offer advantages in optical ranging, enabling fast distance acquisition with high accuracy. Driven by emerging high-volume applications such as industrial sensing, drone navigation, or autonomous driving, there is now a growing demand for compact ranging systems. Here, we show that soliton Kerr comb generation in integrated silicon nitride microresonators provides a route to high-performance chip-scale ranging systems. We demonstrate dual-comb distance measurements with Allan deviations down to 12 nanometers at averaging times of 13 microseconds along with ultrafast ranging at acquisition rates of 100 megahertz, allowing for in-flight sampling of gun projectiles moving at 150 meters per second. Combining integrated soliton-comb ranging systems with chip-scale nanophotonic phased arrays could enable compact ultrafast ranging systems for emerging mass applications.

  2. Ultrafast dynamics and laser action of organic semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Vardeny, Zeev Valy

    2009-01-01

    Spurred on by extensive research in recent years, organic semiconductors are now used in an array of areas, such as organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), photovoltaics, and other optoelectronics. In all of these novel applications, the photoexcitations in organic semiconductors play a vital role. Exploring the early stages of photoexcitations that follow photon absorption, Ultrafast Dynamics and Laser Action of Organic Semiconductors presents the latest research investigations on photoexcitation ultrafast dynamics and laser action in pi-conjugated polymer films, solutions, and microcavities.In the first few chapters, the book examines the interplay of charge (polarons) and neutral (excitons) photoexcitations in pi-conjugated polymers, oligomers, and molecular crystals in the time domain of 100 fs-2 ns. Summarizing the state of the art in lasing, the final chapters introduce the phenomenon of laser action in organics and cover the latest optoelectronic applications that use lasing based on a variety of caviti...

  3. Application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique on monitoring flower bud differentiation of tulip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Haojun; Yang Hongguang; Han Hongbin; Sun Xiaomei

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used for observing morphogenesis process in the living specimen situation of tulip flower buds. Through a comparison of different MRI imaging formation technique (longitudinal relaxation-T1WI, transverse relaxation time weighted imaging-T2WI, proton density weighted imaging-PDWI), seeking for an accurate and practical MRI technique to observe tulip bulb and differentiation period of flower bud. The results showed that in the demonstration of the morphological characters as well as morphogenesis process of flower bud differentiation, the T1WI was completely consistent with the results of rough slice, PDWI and T1WI also had obviously higher map quality than the T2WI (P<0.05). It is indicated that the magnetic resonance imaging technique could monitor the development of flower bud differentiation in vivo. (authors)

  4. Physical parameters for the application of MRI. Restrictions due to physiological consequences and guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frese, G.; Hebrank, F.X.; Renz, W.; Storch, T.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: The standards and regulations concerning the protection of patients and operator staff within the context of MRI are compiled. Resulting consequences regarding physical parameters are evaluated. Material and methods: The static magnetic field, heating effects caused by RF-fields and acoustical noise are outlined. The actual boundaries of these parameters are compared against the relevant published standards. Peripheral stimulation limits due to pulsed gradient fields have been determined in a new clinical study. Results: Many parameters recommended for the normal operating mode are already exceeded during routine MRI. Referring to our clinical study, we found that limits recommended in the MRI relevant standards are unnecessarily conservative and can actually be doubled. (orig./AJ) [de

  5. Ultrafast Thermal Transport at Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cahill, David [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States); Murphy, Catherine [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States); Martin, Lane [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States)

    2014-10-21

    Our research program on Ultrafast Thermal Transport at Interfaces advanced understanding of the mesoscale science of heat conduction. At the length and time scales of atoms and atomic motions, energy is transported by interactions between single-particle and collective excitations. At macroscopic scales, entropy, temperature, and heat are the governing concepts. Key gaps in fundamental knowledge appear at the transitions between these two regimes. The transport of thermal energy at interfaces plays a pivotal role in these scientific issues. Measurements of heat transport with ultrafast time resolution are needed because picoseconds are the fundamental scales where the lack of equilibrium between various thermal excitations becomes a important factor in the transport physics. A critical aspect of our work has been the development of experimental methods and model systems that enabled more precise and sensitive investigations of nanoscale thermal transport.

  6. Two-dimensional materials for ultrafast lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Fengqiu

    2017-01-01

    As the fundamental optical properties and novel photophysics of graphene and related two-dimensional (2D) crystals are being extensively investigated and revealed, a range of potential applications in optical and optoelectronic devices have been proposed and demonstrated. Of the many possibilities, the use of 2D materials as broadband, cost-effective and versatile ultrafast optical switches (or saturable absorbers) for short-pulsed lasers constitutes a rapidly developing field with not only a good number of publications, but also a promising prospect for commercial exploitation. This review primarily focuses on the recent development of pulsed lasers based on several representative 2D materials. The comparative advantages of these materials are discussed, and challenges to practical exploitation, which represent good future directions of research, are laid out. (paper)

  7. A novel nitroreductase-enhanced MRI contrast agent and its potential application in bacterial imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Liu

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Nitroreductases (NTRs are known to be able to metabolize nitro-substituted compounds in the presence of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH as an electron donor. NTRs are present in a wide range of bacterial genera and, to a lesser extent, in eukaryotes hypoxic tumour cells and tumorous tissues, which makes it an appropriate biomarker for an imaging target to detect the hypoxic status of cancer cells and potential bacterial infections. To evaluate the specific activation level of NTR, great efforts have been devoted to the development of fluorescent probes to detect NTR activities using fluorogenic methods to probe its behaviour in a cellular context; however, NTR-responsive MRI contrast agents are still by far underexplored. In this study, para-nitrobenzyl substituted T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agent Gd-DOTA-PNB (probe 1 has been designed and explored for the possible detection of NTR. Our experimental results show that probe 1 could serve as an MRI-enhanced contrast agent for monitoring NTR activity. The in vitro response and mechanism of the NTR catalysed reduction of probe 1 have been investigated through LC–MS and MRI. Para-nitrobenzyl substituted probe 1 was catalytically reduced by NTR to the intermediate para-aminobenzyl substituted probe which then underwent a rearrangement elimination reaction to Gd-DOTA, generating the enhanced T1-weighted MR imaging. Further, LC–MS and MRI studies of living Escherichia coli have confirmed the NTR activity detection ability of probe 1 at a cellular level. This method may potentially be used for the diagnosis of bacterial infections. KEY WORDS: Nitroreductase, MRI contrast agent, Smart imaging probes, Bacterial imaging, Bacterial infection

  8. Ultrafast optical switching in three-dimensional photonic crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Mazurenko, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    The rapidly expanding research on photonic crystals is driven by potential applications in all-optical switches, optical computers, low-threshold lasers, and holographic data storage. The performance of such devices might surpass the speed of traditional electronics by several orders of magnitude and may result in a true revolution in nanotechnology. The heart of such devices would likely be an optical switching element. This thesis analyzes different regimes of ultrafast all-optical switchin...

  9. Ultrafast comparison of personal genomes

    OpenAIRE

    Mauldin, Denise; Hood, Leroy; Robinson, Max; Glusman, Gustavo

    2017-01-01

    We present an ultra-fast method for comparing personal genomes. We transform the standard genome representation (lists of variants relative to a reference) into 'genome fingerprints' that can be readily compared across sequencing technologies and reference versions. Because of their reduced size, computation on the genome fingerprints is fast and requires little memory. This enables scaling up a variety of important genome analyses, including quantifying relatedness, recognizing duplicative s...

  10. Ultra-fast low-angle rapid acquisition and relaxation enhancement (UFLARE) in patients with epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksson, S.H.; Symms, M.R.; Woermann, F.G.; Kendall, B.; Stevens, J.M.; Stepney, A.; Barker, G.J.; Niendorf, T.

    2001-01-01

    MRI is an important diagnostic tool in patients with epilepsy, but patient motion during long scans may result in image artefacts. We studied the utility of an ultra-fast MR sequence in patients with epilepsy. Ultra-fast low-angle rapid acquisition and relaxation enhancement (UFLARE) images were acquired for 100 consecutive patients and nine control subjects. Scans were compared with routine T2-weighted spin echo images for signal-to-noise ratio, contrast, and conspicuity, followed by a blind review of lesion detectability. UFLARE scans were also acquired for 15 patients who moved during conventional scans. All UFLARE scans had lower signal-to-noise ratios and lower contrast than the T2-weighted images. Compared with T1- and T2-weighted, PD and FLAIR images, 86% of hippocampal sclerosis (HS), 92% of large but only 24% of small white-matter lesions were detected on the blind review of the UFLARE images. Reduced motion artefacts were seen on the UFLARE images in all 15 patients who moved during the conventional scans, and in three patients UFLARE was the only sequence we were able to obtain. Despite the lower lesion detectability for smaller lesions, the use of an ultra-fast MRI sequence such as UFLARE may be very useful in patients who are not able to co-operate during conventional MRI examinations, if a general anaesthetic is to be avoided. (orig.)

  11. Clinical application of MRI-respiratory gating technology in the evaluation of children with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Guohui; Teng, Yaoshu; Zhu, Jin; Zhu, Darong; Yang, Bin; Hu, Linping; Chen, Manman; Fu, Xiao

    2018-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the clinical application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-respiratory gating technology for assessing illness severity in children with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS).MRI-respiratory gating technology was used to scan the nasopharyngeal cavities of 51 children diagnosed with OSAHS during 6 respiratory phases. Correlations between the ratio of the area of the adenoid to the area of the nasopalatine pharyngeal cavity (Sa/Snp), with the main indexes of polysomnography (PSG), were analyzed. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve and Kappa analysis were used to determine the diagnostic accuracy of Sa/Snp in pediatric OSAHS.The Sa/Snp was positively correlated with the apnea hypopnea index (AHI) (P children. Consistency analysis with the AHI showed a diagnosis accordance rate of 96.0% in severe pediatric OSAHS and 96.2% in slight-moderate pediatric OSAHS (Kappa = 0.922, P children with adenoidal hypertrophy was greatest at the end-expiration phase during sleep. The end-expiratory Sa/Snp obtained by a combination of MRI and respiratory gating technology has potential as an important imaging index for diagnosing and evaluating severity in pediatric OSAHS.

  12. Advanced approach for intraoperative MRI guidance and potential benefit for neurosurgical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busse, Harald; Schmitgen, Arno; Trantakis, Christos; Schober, Ralf; Kahn, Thomas; Moche, Michael

    2006-07-01

    To present an advanced approach for intraoperative image guidance in an open 0.5 T MRI and to evaluate its effectiveness for neurosurgical interventions by comparison with a dynamic scan-guided localization technique. The built-in scan guidance mode relied on successive interactive MRI scans. The additional advanced mode provided real-time navigation based on reformatted high-quality, intraoperatively acquired MR reference data, allowed multimodal image fusion, and used the successive scans of the built-in mode for quick verification of the position only. Analysis involved tumor resections and biopsies in either scan guidance (N = 36) or advanced mode (N = 59) by the same three neurosurgeons. Technical, surgical, and workflow aspects were compared. The image quality and hand-eye coordination of the advanced approach were improved. While the average extent of resection, neurologic outcome after functional MRI (fMRI) integration, and diagnostic yield appeared to be slightly better under advanced guidance, particularly for the main surgeon, statistical analysis revealed no significant differences. Resection times were comparable, while biopsies took around 30 minutes longer. The presented approach is safe and provides more detailed images and higher navigation speed at the expense of actuality. The surgical outcome achieved with advanced guidance is (at least) as good as that obtained with dynamic scan guidance. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Application of stereological methods to estimate post-mortem brain surface area using 3T MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furlong, Carolyn; García-Fiñana, Marta; Puddephat, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The Cavalieri and Vertical Sections methods of design based stereology were applied in combination with 3 tesla (i.e. 3T) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to estimate cortical and subcortical volume, area of the pial surface, area of the grey-white matter boundary, and thickness of the cerebral...

  14. The application of MRI for depiction of subtle blood brain barrier disruption in stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israeli, David; Tanne, David; Daniels, Dianne; Last, David; Shneor, Ran; Guez, David; Landau, Efrat; Roth, Yiftach; Ocherashvilli, Aharon; Bakon, Mati; Hoffman, Chen; Weinberg, Amit; Volk, Talila; Mardor, Yael

    2010-12-26

    The development of imaging methodologies for detecting blood-brain-barrier (BBB) disruption may help predict stroke patient's propensity to develop hemorrhagic complications following reperfusion. We have developed a delayed contrast extravasation MRI-based methodology enabling real-time depiction of subtle BBB abnormalities in humans with high sensitivity to BBB disruption and high spatial resolution. The increased sensitivity to subtle BBB disruption is obtained by acquiring T1-weighted MRI at relatively long delays (~15 minutes) after contrast injection and subtracting from them images acquired immediately after contrast administration. In addition, the relatively long delays allow for acquisition of high resolution images resulting in high resolution BBB disruption maps. The sensitivity is further increased by image preprocessing with corrections for intensity variations and with whole body (rigid+elastic) registration. Since only two separate time points are required, the time between the two acquisitions can be used for acquiring routine clinical data, keeping the total imaging time to a minimum. A proof of concept study was performed in 34 patients with ischemic stroke and 2 patients with brain metastases undergoing high resolution T1-weighted MRI acquired at 3 time points after contrast injection. The MR images were pre-processed and subtracted to produce BBB disruption maps. BBB maps of patients with brain metastases and ischemic stroke presented different patterns of BBB opening. The significant advantage of the long extravasation time was demonstrated by a dynamic-contrast-enhancement study performed continuously for 18 min. The high sensitivity of our methodology enabled depiction of clear BBB disruption in 27% of the stroke patients who did not have abnormalities on conventional contrast-enhanced MRI. In 36% of the patients, who had abnormalities detectable by conventional MRI, the BBB disruption volumes were significantly larger in the maps than in

  15. Clinical application of functional MRI for chronic epilepsy; Klinischer Einsatz der funktionellen MRT bei chronischer Epilepsie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woermann, F.G.; Labudda, K. [Krankenhaus Mara, Epilepsiezentrum Bethel, Abteilung fuer Magentresonanztomographie, Bielefeld (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is frequently used in the presurgical diagnostic procedure of epilepsy patients, in particular for lateralization of speech and memory and for localization of the primary motor cortex to delineate the epileptogenic lesion from eloquent brain areas. fMRI is one of the non-invasive procedures in the presurgical diagnostic process, together with medical history, seizure semiology, neurological examination, interictal and ictal EEG, structural MRI, video EEG monitoring and neuropsychology. This diagnostic sequence leads either to the decision for or against elective epilepsy surgery or to the decision to proceed with invasive diagnostic techniques (Wada test, intra-operative or extra-operative cortical stimulation). It is difficult to evaluate the contribution of the fMRI test in isolation to the validity of the entire diagnostic sequence. Complications such as memory loss and aphasia in temporal lobe resections or paresis after frontal lobe resections are rare and rarely of disastrous extent. This further complicates the evaluation of the clinical relevance of fMRI as a predictive tool. In this article studies which investigated the concordance between fMRI and other diagnostic gold standards will be presented as well as the association between presurgical fMRI and postsurgical morbidity. (orig.) [German] Die funktionelle Magnetresonanztomographie (fMRT) wird im Rahmen der Epilepsiediagnostik vor epilepsiechirurgischen Eingriffen insbesondere zur Lateralisation von Sprache und Gedaechtnis und zur Lokalisation der Zentralregion eingesetzt, um den eloquenten Kortex von der epilepsieverursachenden, chirurgisch zugaenglichen Laesion abzugrenzen. Dabei ist die fMRT Teil einer Sequenz nichtinvasiver klinischer Tests (Anamnese, Anfall-Semiologie, neurologischer Status, interiktales und iktales EEG, strukturelles MRT, Video-EEG-Monitoring, Neuropsychologie). Das Ergebnis dieser Sequenz ist die Entscheidung fuer oder gegen einen

  16. Self-supervised, mobile-application based cognitive training of auditory attention: A behavioral and fMRI evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef J. Bless

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence of the validity of collecting data in natural settings using smartphone applications has opened new possibilities for psychological assessment, treatment, and research. In this study we explored the feasibility and effectiveness of using a mobile application for self-supervised training of auditory attention. In addition, we investigated the neural underpinnings of the training procedure with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, as well as possible transfer effects to untrained cognitive interference tasks. Subjects in the training group performed the training task on an iPod touch two times a day (morning/evening for three weeks; subjects in the control group received no training, but were tested at the same time interval as the training group. Behavioral responses were measured before and after the training period in both groups, together with measures of task-related neural activations by fMRI. The results showed an expected performance increase after training that corresponded to activation decreases in brain regions associated with selective auditory processing (left posterior temporal gyrus and executive functions (right middle frontal gyrus, indicating more efficient processing in task-related neural networks after training. Our study suggests that cognitive training delivered via mobile applications is feasible and improves the ability to focus attention with corresponding effects on neural plasticity. Future research should focus on the clinical benefits of mobile cognitive training. Limitations of the study are discussed including reduced experimental control and lack of transfer effects.

  17. Ultrafast Hierarchical OTDM/WDM Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideyuki Sotobayashi

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafast hierarchical OTDM/WDM network is proposed for the future core-network. We review its enabling technologies: C- and L-wavelength-band generation, OTDM-WDM mutual multiplexing format conversions, and ultrafast OTDM wavelengthband conversions.

  18. Avant-Garde Ultrafast Laser Writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazansky P. G.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafast laser processing of transparent materials reveals new phenomena. Reviewed, are recent demonstrations of 5D optical memory, vortex polarization and Airy beam converters employing self-assembled nanostructuring, ultrafast laser calligraphy and polarization writing control using pulses with tilted front.

  19. Progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science Volume V

    CERN Document Server

    Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Ledingham, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    The PUILS series delivers up-to-date reviews of progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science, a newly emerging interdisciplinary research field spanning atomic and molecular physics, molecular science, and optical science, which has been stimulated by the recent developments in ultrafast laser technologies. Each volume compiles peer-reviewed articles authored by researchers at the forefront of each their own subfields of UILS. Every chapter opens with an overview of the topics to be discussed, so that researchers unfamiliar to the subfield, as well as graduate students, can grasp the importance and attractions of the research topic at hand; these are followed by reports of cutting-edge discoveries. This fifth volume covers a broad range of topics from this interdisciplinary research field, focusing on coherent responses of gaseous and condensed matter to ultrashort intense laser pulses, propagation of intense laser pulses, and laser-plasma interaction and its applications.

  20. Precision machining of pig intestine using ultrafast laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Rainer J.; Góra, Wojciech S.; Carter, Richard M.; Gunadi, Sonny; Jayne, David; Hand, Duncan P.; Shephard, Jonathan D.

    2015-07-01

    Endoluminal surgery for the treatment of early stage colorectal cancer is typically based on electrocautery tools which imply restrictions on precision and the risk of harm through collateral thermal damage to the healthy tissue. As a potential alternative to mitigate these drawbacks we present laser machining of pig intestine by means of picosecond laser pulses. The high intensities of an ultrafast laser enable nonlinear absorption processes and a predominantly nonthermal ablation regime. Laser ablation results of square cavities with comparable thickness to early stage colorectal cancers are presented for a wavelength of 1030 nm using an industrial picosecond laser. The corresponding histology sections exhibit only minimal collateral damage to the surrounding tissue. The depth of the ablation can be controlled precisely by means of the pulse energy. Overall, the application of ultrafast lasers to ablate pig intestine enables significantly improved precision and reduced thermal damage to the surrounding tissue compared to conventional techniques.

  1. Ultrafast Science Opportunities with Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DURR, HERMANN; Wang, X.J., ed.

    2016-04-28

    X-rays and electrons are two of the most fundamental probes of matter. When the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the world’s first x-ray free electron laser, began operation in 2009, it transformed ultrafast science with the ability to generate laser-like x-ray pulses from the manipulation of relativistic electron beams. This document describes a similar future transformation. In Transmission Electron Microscopy, ultrafast relativistic (MeV energy) electron pulses can achieve unsurpassed spatial and temporal resolution. Ultrafast temporal resolution will be the next frontier in electron microscopy and can ideally complement ultrafast x-ray science done with free electron lasers. This document describes the Grand Challenge science opportunities in chemistry, material science, physics and biology that arise from an MeV ultrafast electron diffraction & microscopy facility, especially when coupled with linac-based intense THz and X-ray pump capabilities.

  2. SU-E-T-661: Quantitative MRI Assessment of a Novel Direction-Modulated Brachytherapy Tandem Applicator for Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soliman, A; Elzibak, A; Fatemi, A; Safigholi, H; Leung, E; Ravi, A; Song, W [Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Han, D [Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To quantitatively evaluate the MR image quality of a novel direction modulated brachytherapy (DMBT) tandem applicator for cervical cancer, using the clinical MRI scanning protocol for image guided brachytherapy. Methods: The tungsten alloy-based applicator was placed in a water phantom and clinical imaging protocol was performed. Axial images were acquired using 2D turbo-spin echo (TSE) T2-weighted sequence on a 1.5T GE 450w MR scanner and an 8-channel body coil. As multi-channel receiver coil was used, inhomogeneities in the B1 receive field must be considered before performing the quantification process. Therefore the applicator was removed from the phantom and the whole imaging session was performed again for the water phantom with the same parameters. Images from the two scans were then subtracted, resulting in a difference image that only shows the applicator with its surrounding magnetic susceptibility dipole artifact. Line profiles were drawn and plotted on the difference image at various angles and locations along the tandem. Full width at half maximum (FWHM) was measured at all the line profiles to quantify the extent of the artifact. Additionally, the extent of the artifact along the diameter of the tandem was measured at various angles and locations. Results: After removing the background inhomogeneities of the receiver coil, FWHM of the tandem measured 5.75 ± 0.35 mm (the physical tandem diameter is 5.4 mm). The average extent of the artifacts along the diameter of the tandem measured is 2.14 ± 0.56 mm. In contrast to CT imaging of the same applicator (not shown here), the tandem can be easily identified without additional correction algorithms. Conclusion: This work demonstrated that the novel DMBT tandem applicator has minimal susceptibility artifact in T2-weighted images employed in clinical practice for MRI-guided brachytherapy of cervical cancer.

  3. Discrete decoding based ultrafast multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Zhiliang; Lin, Liangjie; Ye, Qimiao; Li, Jing; Cai, Shuhui; Chen, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy constitutes an important and powerful tool in analyzing chemical and biological systems. However, the abundant 3D information arrives at the expense of long acquisition times lasting hours or even days. Therefore, there has been a continuous interest in developing techniques to accelerate recordings of 3D NMR spectra, among which the ultrafast spatiotemporal encoding technique supplies impressive acquisition speed by compressing a multidimensional spectrum in a single scan. However, it tends to suffer from tradeoffs among spectral widths in different dimensions, which deteriorates in cases of NMR spectroscopy with more dimensions. In this study, the discrete decoding is proposed to liberate the ultrafast technique from tradeoffs among spectral widths in different dimensions by focusing decoding on signal-bearing sites. For verifying its feasibility and effectiveness, we utilized the method to generate two different types of 3D spectra. The proposed method is also applicable to cases with more than three dimensions, which, based on the experimental results, may widen applications of the ultrafast technique

  4. Discrete decoding based ultrafast multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhiliang; Lin, Liangjie; Ye, Qimiao; Li, Jing; Cai, Shuhui; Chen, Zhong

    2015-07-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy constitutes an important and powerful tool in analyzing chemical and biological systems. However, the abundant 3D information arrives at the expense of long acquisition times lasting hours or even days. Therefore, there has been a continuous interest in developing techniques to accelerate recordings of 3D NMR spectra, among which the ultrafast spatiotemporal encoding technique supplies impressive acquisition speed by compressing a multidimensional spectrum in a single scan. However, it tends to suffer from tradeoffs among spectral widths in different dimensions, which deteriorates in cases of NMR spectroscopy with more dimensions. In this study, the discrete decoding is proposed to liberate the ultrafast technique from tradeoffs among spectral widths in different dimensions by focusing decoding on signal-bearing sites. For verifying its feasibility and effectiveness, we utilized the method to generate two different types of 3D spectra. The proposed method is also applicable to cases with more than three dimensions, which, based on the experimental results, may widen applications of the ultrafast technique.

  5. Cutting-Edge High-Power Ultrafast Thin Disk Oscillators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Südmeyer

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A growing number of applications in science and industry are currently pushing the development of ultrafast laser technologies that enable high average powers. SESAM modelocked thin disk lasers (TDLs currently achieve higher pulse energies and average powers than any other ultrafast oscillator technology, making them excellent candidates in this goal. Recently, 275 W of average power with a pulse duration of 583 fs were demonstrated, which represents the highest average power so far demonstrated from an ultrafast oscillator. In terms of pulse energy, TDLs reach more than 40 μJ pulses directly from the oscillator. In addition, another major milestone was recently achieved, with the demonstration of a TDL with nearly bandwidth-limited 96-fs long pulses. The progress achieved in terms of pulse duration of such sources enabled the first measurement of the carrier-envelope offset frequency of a modelocked TDL, which is the first key step towards full stabilization of such a source. We will present the key elements that enabled these latest results, as well as an outlook towards the next scaling steps in average power, pulse energy and pulse duration of such sources. These cutting-edge sources will enable exciting new applications, and open the door to further extending the current performance milestones.

  6. Tracking Ultrafast Carrier Dynamics in Single Semiconductor Nanowire Heterostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor A.J.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available An understanding of non-equilibrium carrier dynamics in silicon (Si nanowires (NWs and NW heterostructures is very important due to their many nanophotonic and nanoelectronics applications. Here, we describe the first measurements of ultrafast carrier dynamics and diffusion in single heterostructured Si nanowires, obtained using ultrafast optical microscopy. By isolating individual nanowires, we avoid complications resulting from the broad size and alignment distribution in nanowire ensembles, allowing us to directly probe ultrafast carrier dynamics in these quasi-one-dimensional systems. Spatially-resolved pump-probe spectroscopy demonstrates the influence of surface-mediated mechanisms on carrier dynamics in a single NW, while polarization-resolved femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy reveals a clear anisotropy in carrier lifetimes measured parallel and perpendicular to the NW axis, due to density-dependent Auger recombination. Furthermore, separating the pump and probe spots along the NW axis enabled us to track space and time dependent carrier diffusion in radial and axial NW heterostructures. These results enable us to reveal the influence of radial and axial interfaces on carrier dynamics and charge transport in these quasi-one-dimensional nanosystems, which can then be used to tailor carrier relaxation in a single nanowire heterostructure for a given application.

  7. OASIS is Automated Statistical Inference for Segmentation, with applications to multiple sclerosis lesion segmentation in MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Elizabeth M; Shinohara, Russell T; Shiee, Navid; Mateen, Farrah J; Chudgar, Avni A; Cuzzocreo, Jennifer L; Calabresi, Peter A; Pham, Dzung L; Reich, Daniel S; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to detect lesions in the brains of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and is essential for diagnosing the disease and monitoring its progression. In practice, lesion load is often quantified by either manual or semi-automated segmentation of MRI, which is time-consuming, costly, and associated with large inter- and intra-observer variability. We propose OASIS is Automated Statistical Inference for Segmentation (OASIS), an automated statistical method for segmenting MS lesions in MRI studies. We use logistic regression models incorporating multiple MRI modalities to estimate voxel-level probabilities of lesion presence. Intensity-normalized T1-weighted, T2-weighted, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and proton density volumes from 131 MRI studies (98 MS subjects, 33 healthy subjects) with manual lesion segmentations were used to train and validate our model. Within this set, OASIS detected lesions with a partial area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for clinically relevant false positive rates of 1% and below of 0.59% (95% CI; [0.50%, 0.67%]) at the voxel level. An experienced MS neuroradiologist compared these segmentations to those produced by LesionTOADS, an image segmentation software that provides segmentation of both lesions and normal brain structures. For lesions, OASIS out-performed LesionTOADS in 74% (95% CI: [65%, 82%]) of cases for the 98 MS subjects. To further validate the method, we applied OASIS to 169 MRI studies acquired at a separate center. The neuroradiologist again compared the OASIS segmentations to those from LesionTOADS. For lesions, OASIS ranked higher than LesionTOADS in 77% (95% CI: [71%, 83%]) of cases. For a randomly selected subset of 50 of these studies, one additional radiologist and one neurologist also scored the images. Within this set, the neuroradiologist ranked OASIS higher than LesionTOADS in 76% (95% CI: [64%, 88%]) of cases, the neurologist 66% (95% CI: [52%, 78

  8. Graph theoretical analysis and application of fMRI-based brain network in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Xue-na

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD, a progressive neurodegenerative disease, is clinically characterized by impaired memory and many other cognitive functions. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the disease are not thoroughly understood. In recent years, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI as well as advanced graph theory based network analysis approach, several studies of patients with AD suggested abnormal topological organization in both global and regional properties of functional brain networks, specifically, as demonstrated by a loss of small-world network characteristics. These studies provide novel insights into the pathophysiological mechanisms of AD and could be helpful in developing imaging biomarkers for disease diagnosis. In this paper we introduce the essential concepts of complex brain networks theory, and review recent advances of the study on human functional brain networks in AD, especially focusing on the graph theoretical analysis of small-world network based on fMRI. We also propound the existent problems and research orientation.

  9. Clinical application of fMRI: Activation of the motor cortex in an LIS patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, H.; Popp, C.A.; Song, A.W.; Kennedy, P.R.

    1999-01-01

    Patients suffering from the Locked-in Syndrome are completely paralyzed over their entire body, while their brain retains full consciousness. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a method applied to identify those areas of the brain where activities of neurons indicate motor performance, and which might be electronically stimulated and used for controlling electronic aids expressing intended movements of the patient. (orig./CB) [de

  10. Analysing E-Services and Mobile Applications with Companied Conjoint Analysis and fMRI Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Heinonen, Jarmo

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has shown that neuromarketing and conjoint analysis have been used in many areas of consumer research, and to provide for further understanding of consumer behaviour. Together these two methods may reveal more information about hidden desires, expectations and restrains of consumers’ brain. This paper attempts to examine these two research methods together as a companied analysis. More specifically this study utilizes fMRI and conjoint analysis is a tool for analysing consum...

  11. [Clinical application of MRI histogram in evaluation of muscle fatty infiltration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Y M; Du, J; Li, W Z; Wang, Z X; Zhang, W; Xiao, J X; Yuan, Y

    2016-10-18

    To describe a method based on analysis of the histogram of intensity values produced from the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for quantifying the degree of fatty infiltration. The study included 25 patients with dystrophinopathy. All the subjects underwent muscle MRI test at thigh level. The histogram M values of 250 muscles adjusted for subcutaneous fat, representing the degree of fatty infiltration, were compared with the expert visual reading using the modified Mercuri scale. There was a significant positive correlation between the histogram M values and the scores of visual reading (r=0.854, Phistogram M values was similar to that of visual reading and results in literature. The histogram M values had stronger correlations with the clinical data than the scores of visual reading as follows: the correlations with age (r=0.730, Phistogram M values analysis had better repeatability than visual reading with the interclass correlation coefficient was 0.998 (95% CI: 0.997-0.998, PHistogram M values analysis of MRI with the advantages of repeatability and objectivity can be used to evaluate the degree of muscle fatty infiltration.

  12. Flow MRI simulation in complex 3D geometries: Application to the cerebral venous network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Alexandre; Salmon, Stéphanie; Baruthio, Joseph; Delbany, Maya; Durand, Emmanuel

    2018-02-05

    Develop and evaluate a complete tool to include 3D fluid flows in MRI simulation, leveraging from existing software. Simulation of MR spin flow motion is of high interest in the study of flow artifacts and angiography. However, at present, only a few simulators include this option and most are restricted to static tissue imaging. An extension of JEMRIS, one of the most advanced high performance open-source simulation platforms to date, was developed. The implementation of a Lagrangian description of the flow allows simulating any MR experiment, including both static tissues and complex flow data from computational fluid dynamics. Simulations of simple flow models are compared with real experiments on a physical flow phantom. A realistic simulation of 3D flow MRI on the cerebral venous network is also carried out. Simulations and real experiments are in good agreement. The generality of the framework is illustrated in 2D and 3D with some common flow artifacts (misregistration and inflow enhancement) and with the three main angiographic techniques: phase contrast velocimetry (PC), time-of-flight, and contrast-enhanced imaging MRA. The framework provides a versatile and reusable tool for the simulation of any MRI experiment including physiological fluids and arbitrarily complex flow motion. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  13. Gadodiamide injection for enhancement of MRI in the CNS. Applications, dose, field and time dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aakeson, P

    1996-10-01

    Gadodiamide injection was comparable to Gd-DTPA with regard to both safety and diagnostic efficiency in the central nervous system. The contrast effect of Gd contrast agents is higher at 1.5 T than at 0.3 T both in phantoms and patients with a maximum ratio (signal lesion/signal grey matter) more than 50% higher at 1.5 T. To achieve high contrast effect, heavily T1-weighted images are important. Prolonging the TR from 400 ms to 600 ms reduced the ratio by 15-45% depending on concentration. The effective time window for imaging of BBB (Blood-Brain Barrier) damage is between 2-5 and 25-30 minutes after injection and several scans can be performed without loss of enhancement. To provide maximum detectability of BBB damage in patients, higher doses of Gd contrast media should be useful, especially at low field strengths, as the doses used clinically today do not utilize the maximum contrast effect. High-dose (0.3 mmol/kg b.w.) contrast enhanced MRI (0.3 T) with Gadodiamide injection allowed detection of significantly more and smaller metastases (i.e. BBB damage) than standard dose (0.1 mmol/kg b.w.) High dose contrast-enhanced MRI (0.3 T) did not increase the diagnostic information for the evaluation of patients with failed back surgery syndrome compared to standard dose MRI. 55 refs, 9 figs, 10 tabs.

  14. Preclinical MRI and NMR Bio-markers of Alzheimer's Disease: Concepts and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhenain, M. [CEA, DSV, I2BM, SHFJ, F-91401 Orsay (France); Dhenain, M. [CNRS, URA 2210, F-91401 Orsay (France); Dhenain, M. [CEA, DSV, I2BM, Neurospin, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette(France)

    2008-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease is an important social and economic issue for our societies. The development of therapeutics against this severe dementia requires assessing the effects of new drugs in animal models thanks to dedicated bio-markers. This review first overviews Alzheimer's disease and its models as well as the concept of bio-markers. It then focuses on MRI and NMR bio-markers of Alzheimer's disease in animals. Anatomical markers such as atrophy and angiography are useful to phenotype newly developed models of Alzheimer's disease, even if the alterations in these animals are not as severe as in humans. Amyloid plaques imaging is a promising marker of the pathology in animals, and is a rapidly evolving field of MRI. Functional methods such as perfusion and diffusion imaging or spectroscopy are able to detect alterations in transgenic mice mimicking Alzheimer and also to show similar alterations than in humans. They can thus be good translational markers of the disease. Manganese-Enhanced MRI shows a reduction of neuronal transportation in transgenic models of Alzheimer and it allows monitoring improvements induced by treatments of the disease. It is thus a promising bio-marker of the pathology in animals. (authors)

  15. Gadodiamide injection for enhancement of MRI in the CNS. Applications, dose, field and time dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aakeson, P.

    1996-01-01

    Gadodiamide injection was comparable to Gd-DTPA with regard to both safety and diagnostic efficiency in the central nervous system. The contrast effect of Gd contrast agents is higher at 1.5 T than at 0.3 T both in phantoms and patients with a maximum ratio (signal lesion/signal grey matter) more than 50% higher at 1.5 T. To achieve high contrast effect, heavily T1-weighted images are important. Prolonging the TR from 400 ms to 600 ms reduced the ratio by 15-45% depending on concentration. The effective time window for imaging of BBB (Blood-Brain Barrier) damage is between 2-5 and 25-30 minutes after injection and several scans can be performed without loss of enhancement. To provide maximum detectability of BBB damage in patients, higher doses of Gd contrast media should be useful, especially at low field strengths, as the doses used clinically today do not utilize the maximum contrast effect. High-dose (0.3 mmol/kg b.w.) contrast enhanced MRI (0.3 T) with Gadodiamide injection allowed detection of significantly more and smaller metastases (i.e. BBB damage) than standard dose (0.1 mmol/kg b.w.) High dose contrast-enhanced MRI (0.3 T) did not increase the diagnostic information for the evaluation of patients with failed back surgery syndrome compared to standard dose MRI. 55 refs, 9 figs, 10 tabs

  16. Preclinical MRI and NMR Bio-markers of Alzheimer's Disease: Concepts and Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhenain, M.; Dhenain, M.; Dhenain, M.

    2008-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is an important social and economic issue for our societies. The development of therapeutics against this severe dementia requires assessing the effects of new drugs in animal models thanks to dedicated bio-markers. This review first overviews Alzheimer's disease and its models as well as the concept of bio-markers. It then focuses on MRI and NMR bio-markers of Alzheimer's disease in animals. Anatomical markers such as atrophy and angiography are useful to phenotype newly developed models of Alzheimer's disease, even if the alterations in these animals are not as severe as in humans. Amyloid plaques imaging is a promising marker of the pathology in animals, and is a rapidly evolving field of MRI. Functional methods such as perfusion and diffusion imaging or spectroscopy are able to detect alterations in transgenic mice mimicking Alzheimer and also to show similar alterations than in humans. They can thus be good translational markers of the disease. Manganese-Enhanced MRI shows a reduction of neuronal transportation in transgenic models of Alzheimer and it allows monitoring improvements induced by treatments of the disease. It is thus a promising bio-marker of the pathology in animals. (authors)

  17. Ultrafast infrared vibrational spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Fayer, Michael D

    2013-01-01

    The past ten years or so have seen the introduction of multidimensional methods into infrared and optical spectroscopy. The technology of multidimensional spectroscopy is developing rapidly and its applications are spreading to biology and materials science. Edited by a recognized leader in the field and with contributions from top researchers, including experimentalists and theoreticians, this book presents the latest research methods and results and will serve as an excellent resource for other researchers.

  18. Intensified CCD for ultrafast diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, J.; Tripp, G.; Coleman, L.

    1978-01-01

    Many of the present laser fusion diagnostics are recorded on either ultrafast streak cameras or on oscilloscopes. For those experiments in which a large volume of data is accumulated, direct computer processing of the information becomes important. We describe an approach which uses a RCA 52501 back-thinned CCD sensor to obtain direct electron readouts for both the streak camera and the CRT. Performance of the 100 GHz streak camera and the 4 GHz CRT are presented. Design parameters and computer interfacing for both systems are described in detail

  19. Compression of Ultrafast Laser Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Copyright 2003, AIP Publishing LLC. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.1611998.) When designing the pulse shaper, the laser beam must completely fill the...for the design of future versions of this device. The easiest way to align the pulse shaper is to use the laser beam that will be shaped, without...Afterward, an ultrafast thin beam splitter is placed into the system after the diameter of the laser beam is reduced; this is done to monitor the beam

  20. MRI of neonatal encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khong, P.L.; Lam, B.C.C.; Tung, H.K.S.; Wong, V.; Chan, F.L.; Ooi, G.C.

    2003-01-01

    We present the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in neonatal encephalopathy, including hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy, perinatal/neonatal stroke, metabolic encephalopathy from inborn errors of metabolism, congenital central nervous system infections and birth trauma. The applications of advanced MRI techniques, such as diffusion-weighted imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy are emphasized

  1. MRI assessment program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-05-01

    Usage, cost and efficacy data from the MRI Assessment Program to 30 March 1988 is presented, as a continuation of an earlier analysis. Analysis has been performed on data from 8565 examinations relating to 7997 patients at 4 hospitals. MRI was used mainly for examination of the head and spine. Some details of the follow up studies being conducted on selected patients and disease categories are given. A consensus statement is included which summaries the view of the Technical Committee on the potential applications of MRI in Australia. The MRI unit quench incident at Royal Adelaide Hospital is described. Refs., 10 figs., tabs

  2. Simple and robust generation of ultrafast laser pulse trains using polarization-independent parallel-aligned thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Andong; Jiang, Lan; Li, Xiaowei; Wang, Zhi; Du, Kun; Lu, Yongfeng

    2018-05-01

    Ultrafast laser pulse temporal shaping has been widely applied in various important applications such as laser materials processing, coherent control of chemical reactions, and ultrafast imaging. However, temporal pulse shaping has been limited to only-in-lab technique due to the high cost, low damage threshold, and polarization dependence. Herein we propose a novel design of ultrafast laser pulse train generation device, which consists of multiple polarization-independent parallel-aligned thin films. Various pulse trains with controllable temporal profile can be generated flexibly by multi-reflections within the splitting films. Compared with other pulse train generation techniques, this method has advantages of compact structure, low cost, high damage threshold and polarization independence. These advantages endow it with high potential for broad utilization in ultrafast applications.

  3. Ultrafast photoinduced charge separation in metal-semiconductor nanohybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongin, Denis; Shaviv, Ehud; Maioli, Paolo; Crut, Aurélien; Banin, Uri; Del Fatti, Natalia; Vallée, Fabrice

    2012-08-28

    Hybrid nano-objects formed by two or more disparate materials are among the most promising and versatile nanosystems. A key parameter in their properties is interaction between their components. In this context we have investigated ultrafast charge separation in semiconductor-metal nanohybrids using a model system of gold-tipped CdS nanorods in a matchstick architecture. Experiments are performed using an optical time-resolved pump-probe technique, exciting either the semiconductor or the metal component of the particles, and probing the light-induced change of their optical response. Electron-hole pairs photoexcited in the semiconductor part of the nanohybrids are shown to undergo rapid charge separation with the electron transferred to the metal part on a sub-20 fs time scale. This ultrafast gold charging leads to a transient red-shift and broadening of the metal surface plasmon resonance, in agreement with results for free clusters but in contrast to observation for static charging of gold nanoparticles in liquid environments. Quantitative comparison with a theoretical model is in excellent agreement with the experimental results, confirming photoexcitation of one electron-hole pair per nanohybrid followed by ultrafast charge separation. The results also point to the utilization of such metal-semiconductor nanohybrids in light-harvesting applications and in photocatalysis.

  4. High speed fluorescence imaging with compressed ultrafast photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, J. V.; Mason, J. D.; Beier, H. T.; Bixler, J. N.

    2017-02-01

    Fluorescent lifetime imaging is an optical technique that facilitates imaging molecular interactions and cellular functions. Because the excited lifetime of a fluorophore is sensitive to its local microenvironment,1, 2 measurement of fluorescent lifetimes can be used to accurately detect regional changes in temperature, pH, and ion concentration. However, typical state of the art fluorescent lifetime methods are severely limited when it comes to acquisition time (on the order of seconds to minutes) and video rate imaging. Here we show that compressed ultrafast photography (CUP) can be used in conjunction with fluorescent lifetime imaging to overcome these acquisition rate limitations. Frame rates up to one hundred billion frames per second have been demonstrated with compressed ultrafast photography using a streak camera.3 These rates are achieved by encoding time in the spatial direction with a pseudo-random binary pattern. The time domain information is then reconstructed using a compressed sensing algorithm, resulting in a cube of data (x,y,t) for each readout image. Thus, application of compressed ultrafast photography will allow us to acquire an entire fluorescent lifetime image with a single laser pulse. Using a streak camera with a high-speed CMOS camera, acquisition rates of 100 frames per second can be achieved, which will significantly enhance our ability to quantitatively measure complex biological events with high spatial and temporal resolution. In particular, we will demonstrate the ability of this technique to do single-shot fluorescent lifetime imaging of cells and microspheres.

  5. Advanced Instrumentation for Ultrafast Science at the LCLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berrah, Nora [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2015-10-13

    This grant supported a Single Investigator and Small Group Research (SISGR) application to enable multi-user research in Ultrafast Science using the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the world’s first hard x-ray free electron laser (FEL) which lased for the first time at 1.5 Å on April 20, 2009. The goal of our proposal was to enable a New Era of Science by requesting funds to purchase and build Advanced Instrumentation for Ultrafast Science (AIUS), to utilize the intense, short x-ray pulses produced by the LCLS. The proposed instrumentation will allow peer review selected users to probe the ultrasmall and capture the ultrafast. These tools will expand on the investment already made in the construction of the light source and its instrumentation in both the LCLS and LUSI projects. The AIUS will provide researchers in the AMO, Chemical, Biological and Condensed Matter communities with greater flexibility in defining their scientific agenda at the LCLS. The proposed instrumentation will complement and significantly augment the present AMO instrument (funded through the LCLS project) through detectors and capabilities not included in the initial suite of instrumentation at the facility. We have built all of the instrumentations and they have been utilized by scientists. Please see report attached.

  6. Ultra-Fast Image Reconstruction of Tomosynthesis Mammography Using GPU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arefan, D; Talebpour, A; Ahmadinejhad, N; Kamali Asl, A

    2015-06-01

    Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) is a technology that creates three dimensional (3D) images of breast tissue. Tomosynthesis mammography detects lesions that are not detectable with other imaging systems. If image reconstruction time is in the order of seconds, we can use Tomosynthesis systems to perform Tomosynthesis-guided Interventional procedures. This research has been designed to study ultra-fast image reconstruction technique for Tomosynthesis Mammography systems using Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). At first, projections of Tomosynthesis mammography have been simulated. In order to produce Tomosynthesis projections, it has been designed a 3D breast phantom from empirical data. It is based on MRI data in its natural form. Then, projections have been created from 3D breast phantom. The image reconstruction algorithm based on FBP was programmed with C++ language in two methods using central processing unit (CPU) card and the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). It calculated the time of image reconstruction in two kinds of programming (using CPU and GPU).

  7. An improved cylindrical FDTD method and its application to field-tissue interaction study in MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Jieru; Liu, Feng; Xia, Ling; Shao, Tingting; Mason, David G; Crozier, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a three dimensional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) scheme in cylindrical coordinates with an improved algorithm for accommodating the numerical singularity associated with the polar axis. The regularization of this singularity problem is entirely based on Ampere's law. The proposed algorithm has been detailed and verified against a problem with a known solution obtained from a commercial electromagnetic simulation package. The numerical scheme is also illustrated by modeling high-frequency RF field-human body interactions in MRI. The results demonstrate the accuracy and capability of the proposed algorithm.

  8. White Paper: Interventional MRI: Current Status and Potential for Development Considering Economic Perspectives, Part 2: Liver and Other Applications in Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkhausen, Jörg; Kahn, Thomas; Krombach, Gabriele A; Kuhl, Christiane K; Lotz, Joachim; Maintz, David; Ricke, Jens; Schönberg, Stefan O; Vogl, Thomas J; Wacker, Frank K

    2017-11-01

    Background  MRI is attractive for guiding and monitoring interventional procedures due to its high intrinsic soft tissue contrast and the possibility to measure flow and cardiac function. Methods  Technical solutions have been developed for all procedural steps including imaging guidance, MR-safe catheters and instruments and patient monitoring. This has led to widening of the clinical applications. Interventional MRI is becoming increasingly important for the treatment of patients suffering from malignant diseases. The detectability of masses and consequently their accessibility for biopsy is higher, compared to other modalities, due to the high intrinsic soft tissue contrast of MRI. Temperature-dependent sequences allow for minimally invasive and tissue-sparing ablation (A-0 ablation). Conclusion  Interventional MRI has become established in the clinical routine for a variety of indications, including biopsies and tumor ablation. Since the economic requirement of covering costs by reimbursement is met and interventional MRI decreases the mortality and morbidity of interventional procedures, broader application of interventional MRI can be expected in the clinical routine in the future. Key points   · Particularly for the treatment of oncological patients, interventional MRI is superior to other methods with respect to minimal invasiveness and tissue protection due to the ability to exactly determine tumor borders and to visualize and control the size of the ablation area on the basis of MR temperature measurement.. · Due to the better visualization of targets and the effects of ablation in tissue, interventional MRI can lower the mortality and morbidity associated with these interventions for many indications.. · The complex comparison of costs and reimbursement shows that this application can be performed in a cost-covering manner and broader application can be expected in the future.. Citation Format · Barkhausen J, Kahn T, Krombach GA et

  9. Optimal structure of particles-based superparamagnetic microrobots: application to MRI guided targeted drug therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellal, Lyès; Belharet, Karim; Folio, David; Ferreira, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an optimal design strategy for therapeutic magnetic micro carriers (TMMC) guided in real time by a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. As aggregates of TMMCs must be formed to carry the most amount of drug and magnetic actuation capability, different clustering agglomerations could be arranged. Nevertheless, its difficult to predict the hydrodynamic behavior of any arbitrary-shaped object due to the nonlinear hydrodynamic effects. Indeed, the drag effect is related not only to the properties of the bolus but also to its interaction with the fluid viscosity, the free-stream velocity and the container geometry. In this work, we propose a mathematical framework to optimize the TMMC aggregates to improve the steering efficiency in experimental endovascular conditions. The proposed analysis is carried out on various sizes and geometries of microcarrier: spherical, ellipsoid-like, and chain-like of microsphere structures. We analyze the magnetophoretic behavior of such designs to exhibit the optimal configuration. Based on the optimal design of the boluses, experimental investigations were carried out in mm-sized fluidic artery phantoms to demonstrate the steerability of the magnetic bolus using a proof-of-concept setup. The experiments demonstrate the steerability of the magnetic bolus under different velocity, shear-stress, and trajectory constraints with a laminar viscous fluidic environment. Preliminary experiments with a MRI system confirm the feasibility of the steering of these TMMCs in hepatic artery microchannel phantom

  10. MRI diagnosis of knee joint injury: the clinical application with a report of 35 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Quan; Tang Ni; Wu Xiaoyong; Zhao Ping; Guan Huanwen

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the MRI findings of knee joint injury and the pathalogical basis and clinical significance. Methods: MR images of the knee joint injury were investigated in 35 cases. Results: In 23 cases of meniscus damage, lesions were nodular, linear or radioactive fissure with hyperintense signal within the dark meniscus, extending to or beneath the articular cartilage surface. In 9 cases of cruciate ligament injury, the disorder was a hyperintense shadow which was hyperintense on T 1 WI and hypointense on T 2 WI within the stripe-like, hypointense ligament, accompanying with the alteration of the ligament, which was in a wave shape or discontinued. Dislocation of the tibia was also revealed. In 5 cases of the bilateral collateral ligament damage. The involved thickened ligament had increased signal and blurred edge. In 4 cases of obscure bone fracture, the lesion was located in the metaphysic, manifested a hypo-intense shadow on T 1 WI, diverse on T 2 WI. Conclusion: MRI plays an important role in the diagnosis of the injury of menicus, ligament, and the obscure fracture of knee joint, and provides detailed information for the clinical management. (authors)

  11. Application of micro-PIXE, MRI and light microscopy for research in wood science and dendroecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merela, M.; Pelicon, P.; Vavpetic, P.; Regvar, M.; Vogel-Mikus, K.; Sersa, I.; Policnik, H.; Pokorny, B.; Levanic, T.; Oven, P.

    2009-01-01

    Beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) branches were topped and after five months the wound response was analyzed by PIXE, 3D-MRI and light microscopy. From freshly cut and deeply frozen sample 30 μm thick longitudinal-radial tissue sections were prepared for anatomical investigations and micro-PIXE analysis. Light microscopy revealed the structural response to wounding, i.e. occurrence of the reaction zone between the exposed and dehydrated dead tissue and healthy sound wood. The reaction zone was characterized by tylosis in vessels and accumulation of colored deposits in parenchyma cells, fibres and vessels. 3D MRI of a parallel sample showed that the moisture content in the reaction zone was three times higher than in normal healthy wood. Micro-PIXE mapping at margins of compromised wood in beech revealed an increased concentration of potassium in the reaction zone. The increase in the calcium concentration was associated with the dehydrated tissue adjacent to reaction zones. In addition, micro-PIXE was used to determine the elemental distribution in annual tree rings. This may be relevant for retrospective assessment of environmental pollution in wood by measuring yearly increments as a biomonitoring tool. The analysis of European larch (Larix decidua Mill.) wood revealed a high similarity between optical characteristics (i.e. late versus earlywood) and elemental (e.g. Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Zn) distribution.

  12. Nonparametric trend estimation in the presence of fractal noise: application to fMRI time-series analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshinpour, Babak; Hossein-Zadeh, Gholam-Ali; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid

    2008-06-30

    Unknown low frequency fluctuations called "trend" are observed in noisy time-series measured for different applications. In some disciplines, they carry primary information while in other fields such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) they carry nuisance effects. In all cases, however, it is necessary to estimate them accurately. In this paper, a method for estimating trend in the presence of fractal noise is proposed and applied to fMRI time-series. To this end, a partly linear model (PLM) is fitted to each time-series. The parametric and nonparametric parts of PLM are considered as contributions of hemodynamic response and trend, respectively. Using the whitening property of wavelet transform, the unknown components of the model are estimated in the wavelet domain. The results of the proposed method are compared to those of other parametric trend-removal approaches such as spline and polynomial models. It is shown that the proposed method improves activation detection and decreases variance of the estimated parameters relative to the other methods.

  13. Advanced ultrafast fiber laser sources enabled by fiber nonlinearities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Wei

    2017-05-01

    Development of high power/energy ultrafast fiber lasers for scientific research and industrial applications is one of the most exciting fields in ultrafast optics. This thesis demonstrated new means to improve two essential properties - which are indispensable for novel applications such as high-harmonic generation (HHG) and multiphoton microscopy (MPM) - of an ultrafast fiber laser system: energy scaling capability and wavelength tunability. High photon-flux extreme ultraviolet sources enabled by HHG desire high power (>100 W), high repetition-rate (>1 MHz) ultrafast driving laser sources. We have constructed from scratch a high-power Yb-fiber laser system using the well-known chirped-pulse amplification (CPA) technique. Such a CPA system capable of producing ∝200-W average power consists of a monolithic Yb-fiber oscillator, an all-fiber stretcher, a pre-amplifier chain, a main amplifier constructed from rode-type large pitch fiber, and a diffraction-grating based compressor. To increase the HHG efficiency, ultrafast pulses with duration 130-W average power. The amplified pulses are compressed to 60-fs pulses with 100-W average power, constituting a suitable HHG driving source. MPM is a powerful biomedical imaging tool, featuring larger penetration depth while providing the capability of optical sectioning. Although femtosecond solid-state lasers have been widely accepted as the standard option as MPM driving sources, fiber-based sources have received growing research efforts due to their superior performance. In the second part of this thesis, we both theoretically and experimentally demonstrated a new method of producing wavelength widely tunable femtosecond pulses for driving MPM. We employed self-phase modulation to broaden a narrowband spectrum followed by bandpass filters to select the rightmost/leftmost spectral lobes. Widely tunable in 820-1225 nm, the resulting sources generated nearly transform-limited, ∝100 fs pulses. Using short fibers with large

  14. Ultrafast photoelectron spectroscopy of small molecule organic films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Kendall Laine

    As research in the field of ultrafast optics has produced shorter and shorter pulses, at an ever-widening range of frequencies, ultrafast spectroscopy has grown correspondingly. In particular, ultrafast photoelectron spectroscopy allows direct observation of electrons in transient or excited states, regardless of the eventual relaxation mechanisms. High-harmonic conversion of 800nm, femtosecond, Ti:sapphire laser pulses allows excite/probe spectroscopy down into atomic core level states. To this end, an ultrafast, X-UV photoelectron spectroscopic system is described, including design considerations for the high-harmonic generation line, the time of flight detector, and the subsequent data collection electronics. Using a similar experimental setup, I have performed several ultrafast, photoelectron excited state decay studies at the IBM, T. J. Watson Research Center. All of the observed materials were electroluminescent thin film organics, which have applications as the emitter layer in organic light emitting devices. The specific materials discussed are: Alq, BAlq, DPVBi, and Alq doped with DCM or DMQA. Alq:DCM is also known to lase at low photoexcitation thresholds. A detailed understanding of the involved relaxation mechanisms is beneficial to both applications. Using 3.14 eV excite, and 26.7 eV probe, 90 fs laser pulses, we have observed the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) decay rate over the first 200 picoseconds. During this time, diffusion is insignificant, and all dynamics occur in the absence of electron transport. With excitation intensities in the range of 100μJ/cm2, we have modeled the Alq, BAlq, and DPVBi decays via bimolecular singlet-singlet annihilation. At similar excitations, we have modeled the Alq:DCM decay via Förster transfer, stimulated emission, and excimeric formation. Furthermore, the Alq:DCM occupied to unoccupied molecular orbital energy gap was seen to shrink as a function of excite-to-probe delay, in accordance with the

  15. Advanced ultrafast fiber laser sources enabled by fiber nonlinearities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wei

    2017-05-15

    Development of high power/energy ultrafast fiber lasers for scientific research and industrial applications is one of the most exciting fields in ultrafast optics. This thesis demonstrated new means to improve two essential properties - which are indispensable for novel applications such as high-harmonic generation (HHG) and multiphoton microscopy (MPM) - of an ultrafast fiber laser system: energy scaling capability and wavelength tunability. High photon-flux extreme ultraviolet sources enabled by HHG desire high power (>100 W), high repetition-rate (>1 MHz) ultrafast driving laser sources. We have constructed from scratch a high-power Yb-fiber laser system using the well-known chirped-pulse amplification (CPA) technique. Such a CPA system capable of producing ∝200-W average power consists of a monolithic Yb-fiber oscillator, an all-fiber stretcher, a pre-amplifier chain, a main amplifier constructed from rode-type large pitch fiber, and a diffraction-grating based compressor. To increase the HHG efficiency, ultrafast pulses with duration <60 fs are highly desired. We proposed and demonstrated a novel amplification technique, named as pre-chirp managed amplification (PCMA). We successfully constructed an Yb-fiber based PCMA system that outputs 75-MHz spectrally broadened pulses with >130-W average power. The amplified pulses are compressed to 60-fs pulses with 100-W average power, constituting a suitable HHG driving source. MPM is a powerful biomedical imaging tool, featuring larger penetration depth while providing the capability of optical sectioning. Although femtosecond solid-state lasers have been widely accepted as the standard option as MPM driving sources, fiber-based sources have received growing research efforts due to their superior performance. In the second part of this thesis, we both theoretically and experimentally demonstrated a new method of producing wavelength widely tunable femtosecond pulses for driving MPM. We employed self-phase modulation

  16. Comparative studies of brain activation with MEG and functional MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, J.S.; Aine, C.J.; Sanders, J.A.; Lewine, J.D.; Caprihan, A.

    1993-01-01

    The past two years have witnessed the emergence of MRI as a functional imaging methodology. Initial demonstrations involved the injection of a paramagnetic contrast agent and required ultrafast echo planar imaging capability to adequately resolve the passage of the injected bolus. By measuring the local reduction in image intensity due to magnetic susceptibility, it was possible to calculate blood volume, which changes as a function of neural activation. Later developments have exploited endogenous contrast mechanisms to monitor changes in blood volume or in venous blood oxygen content. Recently, we and others have demonstrated that it is possible to make such measurements in a clinical imager, suggesting that the large installed base of such machines might be utilized for functional imaging. Although it is likely that functional MRI (fMRI) will subsume some of the clinical and basic neuroscience applications now touted for MEG, it is also clear that these techniques offer different largely complementary, capabilities. At the very least, it is useful to compare and cross-validate the activation maps produced by these techniques. Such studies will be valuable as a check on results of neuromagnetic distributed current reconstructions and will allow better characterization of the relationship between neurophysiological activation and associated hemodynamic changes. A more exciting prospect is the development of analyses that combine information from the two modalities to produce a better description of underlying neural activity than is possible with either technique in isolation. In this paper we describe some results from initial comparative studies and outline several techniques that can be used to treat MEG and fMRI data within a unified computational framework

  17. Three-dimensional anisotropy contrast MRI and functional MRI of the human brain. Clinical application to assess pyramidal tract in patients with brain tumor and infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morikawa, Minoru; Kaminogo, Makio; Ishimaru, Hideki; Nakashima, Kazuaki; Kitagawa, Naoki; Ochi, Makoto; Hayashi, Kuniaki; Shibata, Shobu; Kabasawa, Hiroyuki

    2001-01-01

    We describe and evaluate the findings of three-dimensional anisotropy contrast MR axonography (3DAC MRX) and functional MRI (fMRI) in brain tumor and infarction. We obtained diffusion-weighted images (DWI) in 28 patients including 23 brain tumors and 15 acute infarctions located in or near pyramidal tract. Three anisotropic DWIs were transformed into graduations color-coded as red, green and blue, and then composed to form a combined color 3DAC MRX. We also performed functional MRI in 7 of the 28 patients and compared with cortical mapping of 3DAC MRX. 3DAC MRX with 23 brain tumors showed that the ipsilateral pyramidal tract was either discontinuous due to impaired anisotropy (n=8) or compressed due to mass effect (n=15). In 10 patients of acute infarction with motor impairment, pyramidal tract involvement was visually more conspicuous on 3DAC MRX compared to standard DWI. On functional MRI, hand motor activation was observed between blue vertical directional colors of pre- and post central gyrus. In conclusion, 3DAC MRX is a new noninvasive approach for visualization of the white matter neuronal tract and provides the information concerning pyramidal tract involvement. (author)

  18. Application of language blood oxygenation level dependent functional MRI in the navigating operation of neurosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shuyong; Li Min; Yao Chengjun; Geng Daoying

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To verify the accuracy of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD)-based activation using electrocortical stimulation mapping (ESM) and explore the value of language fMRI in the navigating operation of neurosurgery. Methods: In 8 cases with brain tumors, BOLD-fMRI examinations were done before the operations. Under the state of awake anesthesia,the patients were aroused and ESM was conducted. Point-to-point comparison between the BOLD signal activations and the ESM was carried out under the surveillance of the neuro-navigation technology. In order to observe the sensibility and specificity of BOLD activations, the location of BOLD activations and the point of ESM was compared to calculate the stimulating positive points inside the regions of BOLD signals (real positive), outside BOLD regions (pseudo- negative), the stimulating negative points inside the regions of BOLD signals (pseudo-positive), and outside BOLD region (real negative). Two kinds of criteria for assessment were used. One was that the positive stimulating points were located in BOLD regions, and the other was that the positive stimulating points were located within 1 cm around the range of BOLD regions. Removal of the lesions were conducted with the tissue 1 cm around the language region preserved, and the cortex inside 0.5-1.0 cm distance from the positive points were retained. Results: Of the 8 cases, only 6 finished the tasks. Among them, 3 cases were with astrocytoma of grade 2, 2 were with astrocytoma of grade 3, and one with glioblastoma. The total number of stimulating points was 48, among which the positive points were 11. When the first criteria was applied, the sensitivity was 72.7% (8/11), and the specificity was 81.8% (30/37). When the second criteria was applied, the sensitivity was 82.0% (9/11), and the specificity was 75.6% (28/37). Follow-up after operation showed no aphasia occurred. Conclusions: BOLD-fMRI had a high sensitivity and specificity in displaying the language

  19. A Study on the Application of Fuzzy Information Seeded Region Growing in Brain MRI Tissue Segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuin-Mu Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available After long-term clinical trials, MRI has been proven to be used in humans harmlessly, and it is popularly used in medical diagnosis. Although MR is highly sensitive, it provides abundant organization information. Therefore, how to transform the multi-spectral images which is easier to be used for doctor’s clinical diagnosis. In this thesis, the fuzzy bidirectional edge detection method is used to solve conventional SRG problem of growing order in the initial seed stages. In order to overcome the problems of the different regions, although it is the same Euclidean distance for region growing and merging process stages, we present the peak detection method to improve them. The standard deviation target generation process (SDTGP is applied to guarantee the regions merging process does not cause over- or undersegmentation. Experimental results reveal that FISRG segments a multispectral MR image much more effectively than FAST and K-means.

  20. A Parcellation Based Nonparametric Algorithm for Independent Component Analysis with Application to fMRI Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan eLi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Independent Component analysis (ICA is a widely used technique for separating signals that have been mixed together. In this manuscript, we propose a novel ICA algorithm using density estimation and maximum likelihood, where the densities of the signals are estimated via p-spline based histogram smoothing and the mixing matrix is simultaneously estimated using an optimization algorithm. The algorithm is exceedingly simple, easy to implement and blind to the underlying distributions of the source signals. To relax the identically distributed assumption in the density function, a modified algorithm is proposed to allow for different density functions on different regions. The performance of the proposed algorithm is evaluated in different simulation settings. For illustration, the algorithm is applied to a research investigation with a large collection of resting state fMRI datasets. The results show that the algorithm successfully recovers the established brain networks.

  1. Ultrafast THz Saturable Absorption in Doped Semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turchinovich, Dmitry; Hoffmann, Matthias C.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate ultrafast THz saturable absorption in n-doped semiconductors by nonlinear THz time-domain spectroscopy. This effect is caused by the semiconductor conductivity modulation due to electron heating and satellite-valley scattering in strong THz fields.......We demonstrate ultrafast THz saturable absorption in n-doped semiconductors by nonlinear THz time-domain spectroscopy. This effect is caused by the semiconductor conductivity modulation due to electron heating and satellite-valley scattering in strong THz fields....

  2. Measurement of pulsatile motion with millisecond resolution by MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souchon, Rémi; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Salomir, Rares; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Rouvière, Olivier

    2012-06-01

    We investigated a technique based on phase-contrast cine MRI combined with deconvolution of the phase shift waveforms to measure rapidly varying pulsatile motion waveforms. The technique does not require steady-state displacement during motion encoding. Simulations and experiments were performed in porcine liver samples in view of a specific application, namely the observation of transient displacements induced by acoustic radiation force. Simulations illustrate the advantages and shortcomings of the methods. For experimental validation, the waveforms were acquired with an ultrafast ultrasound scanner (Supersonic Imagine Aixplorer), and the rates of decay of the waveforms (relaxation time) were compared. With bipolar motion-encoding gradient of 8.4 ms, the method was able to measure displacement waveforms with a temporal resolution of 1 ms over a time course of 40 ms. Reasonable agreement was found between the rate of decay of the waveforms measured in ultrasound (2.8 ms) and in MRI (2.7-3.3 ms). Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Ultrafast molecular dynamics illuminated with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozek, John D.; Miron, Catalin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Ultrafast molecular dynamics probed with synchrotron radiation. • Core-excitation as probe of ultrafast dynamics through core-hole lifetime. • Review of experimental and theoretical methods in ultrafast dynamics using core-level excitation. - Abstract: Synchrotron radiation is a powerful tool for studying molecular dynamics in small molecules in spite of the absence of natural matching between the X-ray pulse duration and the time scale of nuclear motion. Promoting core level electrons to unoccupied molecular orbitals simultaneously initiates two ultrafast processes, nuclear dynamics on the potential energy surfaces of the highly excited neutral intermediate state of the molecule on the one hand and an ultrafast electronic decay of the intermediate excited state to a cationic final state, characterized by a core hole lifetime. The similar time scales of these processes enable core excited pump-probe-type experiments to be performed with long duration X-ray pulses from a synchrotron source. Recent results obtained at the PLIEADES beamline concerning ultrafast dissociation of core excited states and molecular potential energy curve mapping facilitated by changes in the geometry of the short-lived intermediate core excited state are reviewed. High brightness X-ray beams combined with state-of-the art electron and ion-electron coincidence spectrometers and highly sophisticated theoretical methods are required to conduct these experiments and to achieve a full understanding of the experimental results.

  4. Ultrafast, laser-based, x-ray science: the dawn of atomic-scale cinematography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barty, C.P.J.

    2000-01-01

    The characteristics of ultrafast chirped pulse amplification systems are reviewed. Application of ultrafast chirped pulse amplification to the generation of femtosecond, incoherent, 8-keV line radiation is outlined and the use of femtosecond laser-based, x-rays for novel time-resolved diffraction studies of crystalline dynamics with sub-picosecond temporal resolution and sub-picometer spatial resolution is reviewed in detail. Possible extensions of laser-based, x-ray technology and evaluation of alternative x-ray approaches for time-resolved studies of the atomic scale dynamics are given. (author)

  5. Ultrafast spontaneous emission modulation of graphene quantum dots interacting with Ag nanoparticles in solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Jianwei [Department of Physics, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Research Center of Quantum Macro-Phenomenon and Application, Shanghai Advanced Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201210 (China); Lu, Jian, E-mail: luj@sari.ac.cn; Wang, Zhongyang, E-mail: wangzy@sari.ac.cn [Research Center of Quantum Macro-Phenomenon and Application, Shanghai Advanced Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201210 (China); Wang, Liang [School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Institute of Nanochemistry and Nanobiology, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Tian, Linfan [Research Center of Quantum Macro-Phenomenon and Application, Shanghai Advanced Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201210 (China); School of Physical Science and Technology, ShanghaiTech University, Shanghai 201210 (China); Deng, Xingxia [Research Center of Quantum Macro-Phenomenon and Application, Shanghai Advanced Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201210 (China); School of Physical Science and Technology, ShanghaiTech University, Shanghai 201210 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Tian, Lijun [Department of Physics, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Pan, Dengyu [School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China)

    2016-07-11

    We investigated the strong interaction between graphene quantum dots and silver nanoparticles in solution using time-resolved photoluminescence techniques. In solution, the silver nanoparticles are surrounded by graphene quantum dots and interacted with graphene quantum dots through exciton-plasmon coupling. An ultrafast spontaneous emission process (lifetime 27 ps) was observed in such a mixed solution. This ultrafast lifetime corresponds to the emission rate exceeding 35 GHz, with the purcell enhancement by a factor of ∼12. These experiment results pave the way for the realization of future high speed light sources applications.

  6. Microwave-controlled ultrafast synthesis of uniform silver nanocubes and nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tian; Fan, Jun-Bing; Cui, Jing; Liu, Jin-Hua; Xu, Xiao-Bo; Zhu, Ming-Qiang

    2011-01-01

    Synthesis of well-defined silver nanostructure in terms of size and shape has been strongly motivated by the requirements to their size- and shape-dependent optical properties which achieve their practical applications ranging from biosensing to catalysis and optics. In this Letter, an ultrafast synthetic process for the well-defined Ag nanocubes and nanowires have been developed, which simply involve the microwave-mediated polyol reduction of silver nitrate in ethylene glycol by adding different amount sodium sulfide (Na2S) into the solution. The possible growth and evolution process of the Ag nanocubes and nanowires involves the microwave ultrafast nucleation and growth followed by oxidative etching of Ag nanocrystals.

  7. Ultrafast, laser-based, x-ray science: the dawn of atomic-scale cinematography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barty, C.P.J. [University of California, Department of Applied Mechanics and Engineering Science, Urey Hall, Mali Code 0339, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2000-03-01

    The characteristics of ultrafast chirped pulse amplification systems are reviewed. Application of ultrafast chirped pulse amplification to the generation of femtosecond, incoherent, 8-keV line radiation is outlined and the use of femtosecond laser-based, x-rays for novel time-resolved diffraction studies of crystalline dynamics with sub-picosecond temporal resolution and sub-picometer spatial resolution is reviewed in detail. Possible extensions of laser-based, x-ray technology and evaluation of alternative x-ray approaches for time-resolved studies of the atomic scale dynamics are given. (author)

  8. A computational atlas of the hippocampal formation using ex vivo, ultra-high resolution MRI: Application to adaptive segmentation of in vivo MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iglesias, Juan Eugenio; Augustinack, Jean C.; Nguyen, Khoa

    2015-01-01

    level using ultra-high resolution, ex vivo MRI. Fifteen autopsy samples were scanned at 0.13 mm isotropic resolution (on average) using customized hardware. The images were manually segmented into 13 different hippocampal substructures using a protocol specifically designed for this study; precise...... datasets with different types of MRI contrast. The results show that the atlas and companion segmentation method: 1) can segment T1 and T2 images, as well as their combination, 2) replicate findings on mild cognitive impairment based on high-resolution T2 data, and 3) can discriminate between Alzheimer......'s disease subjects and elderly controls with 88% accuracy in standard resolution (1 mm) T1 data, significantly outperforming the atlas in FreeSurfer version 5.3 (86% accuracy) and classification based on whole hippocampal volume (82% accuracy)....

  9. The application of MRI in the infantile congenital dislocation of the hip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hongsheng; Guo Qiyong; Ye Binbin

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of MRI in infantile congenital dislocation of the hip (CDH), and to provide a reasonable basis for clinical examination. Methods: Forty-seven infants (< 3 years) with untreated CDH were examined by using MR imaging. Three types were classified according to the standard of Ogden and Dunn, and then the bony and cartilaginous hip parameters of all hips, including the bony acetabular index (BAI), cartilaginous acetabular index (CAI), bony acetabular quotient (BAQ), and cartilaginous acetabular quotient (CAQ), were measured except in the type III hips. Results: For the normal hips, dislocated hips, the type I hips, and the type II hips, BAI was (25.24 ± 3.70) degree, (38.12 ± 4.07) degree, (35.59 ± 2.86) degree, and (39.64 ± 3.97) degree, respectively, CAI was (8.49 ± 2.15) degree, (17.25 ± 2.41) degree, (15.85 ± 2.00) degree, and (18.08 ± 2.26) degree, respectively, BAQ was 0.199 ± 0.026, 0.126 ± 0.028, 0.131 ± 0.028, and 0.124 ± 0.028, respectively, CAQ was 0.195 ± 0.027, 0.120 ± 0.027, 0.120 ± 0.023, and 0.121 ± 0.030, respectively. The BAI and CAI of the type II hips were higher than those of the type I, and BAQ and CAQ were lower. There was a linear correlation between BAI and CAI (r=0.876) and between BAQ and CAQ (r=0.706), respectively. MRI demonstrated that bony changes as loss of sphericity and diminished aperture of the acetabulum, and cartilage changes as the distortion and overgrowth in CDH. Conclusion: MR imaging is not only a very useful imaging modality for assessment of the bony, cartilaginous, and soft-tissue structures of the infantile hip, but also an excellent tool in the diagnosis and treatment of CDH. (author)

  10. Ultrafast Electron Dynamics in Solar Energy Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponseca, Carlito S; Chábera, Pavel; Uhlig, Jens; Persson, Petter; Sundström, Villy

    2017-08-23

    Electrons are the workhorses of solar energy conversion. Conversion of the energy of light to electricity in photovoltaics, or to energy-rich molecules (solar fuel) through photocatalytic processes, invariably starts with photoinduced generation of energy-rich electrons. The harvesting of these electrons in practical devices rests on a series of electron transfer processes whose dynamics and efficiencies determine the function of materials and devices. To capture the energy of a photogenerated electron-hole pair in a solar cell material, charges of opposite sign have to be separated against electrostatic attractions, prevented from recombining and being transported through the active material to electrodes where they can be extracted. In photocatalytic solar fuel production, these electron processes are coupled to chemical reactions leading to storage of the energy of light in chemical bonds. With the focus on the ultrafast time scale, we here discuss the light-induced electron processes underlying the function of several molecular and hybrid materials currently under development for solar energy applications in dye or quantum dot-sensitized solar cells, polymer-fullerene polymer solar cells, organometal halide perovskite solar cells, and finally some photocatalytic systems.

  11. Ultrafast coherence transfer in DNA-templated silver nanoclusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyrhaug, Erling; Bogh, Sidsel Ammitzbøll; Carro, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    DNA-templated silver nanoclusters of a few tens of atoms or less have come into prominence over the last several years due to very strong absorption and efficient emission. Applications in microscopy and sensing have already been realized, however little is known about the excited-state structure...... and dynamics in these clusters. Here we report on a multidimensional spectroscopy investigation of the energy-level structure and the early-time relaxation cascade, which eventually results in the population of an emitting state. We find that the ultrafast intramolecular relaxation is strongly coupled...

  12. An eigenvalue approach for the automatic scaling of unknowns in model-based reconstructions: Application to real-time phase-contrast flow MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhengguo; Hohage, Thorsten; Kalentev, Oleksandr; Joseph, Arun A; Wang, Xiaoqing; Voit, Dirk; Merboldt, K Dietmar; Frahm, Jens

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop an automatic method for the scaling of unknowns in model-based nonlinear inverse reconstructions and to evaluate its application to real-time phase-contrast (RT-PC) flow magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Model-based MRI reconstructions of parametric maps which describe a physical or physiological function require the solution of a nonlinear inverse problem, because the list of unknowns in the extended MRI signal equation comprises multiple functional parameters and all coil sensitivity profiles. Iterative solutions therefore rely on an appropriate scaling of unknowns to numerically balance partial derivatives and regularization terms. The scaling of unknowns emerges as a self-adjoint and positive-definite matrix which is expressible by its maximal eigenvalue and solved by power iterations. The proposed method is applied to RT-PC flow MRI based on highly undersampled acquisitions. Experimental validations include numerical phantoms providing ground truth and a wide range of human studies in the ascending aorta, carotid arteries, deep veins during muscular exercise and cerebrospinal fluid during deep respiration. For RT-PC flow MRI, model-based reconstructions with automatic scaling not only offer velocity maps with high spatiotemporal acuity and much reduced phase noise, but also ensure fast convergence as well as accurate and precise velocities for all conditions tested, i.e. for different velocity ranges, vessel sizes and the simultaneous presence of signals with velocity aliasing. In summary, the proposed automatic scaling of unknowns in model-based MRI reconstructions yields quantitatively reliable velocities for RT-PC flow MRI in various experimental scenarios. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Design of a 300-Watt Isolated Power Supply for Ultra-Fast Tracking Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen-Duy, Khiem; Ouyang, Ziwei; Petersen, Lars Press

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the design of a medium-powerrating isolated power supply for ultra-fast tracking converters and MOS-gate driver circuits in medium and high voltage applications. The key feature of the design is its very low circuit input-to-output parasitic capacitance, which maximizes its...

  14. Application of the fractional Fourier transform to image reconstruction in MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parot, Vicente; Sing-Long, Carlos; Lizama, Carlos; Tejos, Cristian; Uribe, Sergio; Irarrazaval, Pablo

    2012-07-01

    The classic paradigm for MRI requires a homogeneous B(0) field in combination with linear encoding gradients. Distortions are produced when the B(0) is not homogeneous, and several postprocessing techniques have been developed to correct them. Field homogeneity is difficult to achieve, particularly for short-bore magnets and higher B(0) fields. Nonlinear magnetic components can also arise from concomitant fields, particularly in low-field imaging, or intentionally used for nonlinear encoding. In any of these situations, the second-order component is key, because it constitutes the first step to approximate higher-order fields. We propose to use the fractional Fourier transform for analyzing and reconstructing the object's magnetization under the presence of quadratic fields. The fractional fourier transform provides a precise theoretical framework for this. We show how it can be used for reconstruction and for gaining a better understanding of the quadratic field-induced distortions, including examples of reconstruction for simulated and in vivo data. The obtained images have improved quality compared with standard Fourier reconstructions. The fractional fourier transform opens a new paradigm for understanding the MR signal generated by an object under a quadratic main field or nonlinear encoding. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. State-of-the-art MRI techniques in neuroradiology: principles, pitfalls, and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viallon, Magalie [Universite de Lyon, CREATIS, UMR CNRS 5220 - INSERM U1044, INSA de Lyon, Lyon (France); Universite de Lyon-Saint-Etienne, Department of Radiology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Saint-Etienne, Saint Etienne (France); Cuvinciuc, Victor; Barnaure-Nachbar, Isabelle; Lovblad, Karl-Olof; Haller, Sven [University Hospital of Geneva, Department of Neuroradiology, Geneva (Switzerland); Delattre, Benedicte; Toso-Patel, Seema; Becker, Minerva [University Hospital of Geneva, Department of Radiology, Geneva (Switzerland); Merlini, Laura [University Hospital of Geneva, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2015-05-01

    This article reviews the most relevant state-of-the-art magnetic resonance (MR) techniques, which are clinically available to investigate brain diseases. MR acquisition techniques addressed include notably diffusion imaging (diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI)) as well as perfusion imaging (dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC), arterial spin labeling (ASL), and dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)). The underlying models used to process these images are described, as well as the theoretic underpinnings of quantitative diffusion and perfusion MR imaging-based methods. The technical requirements and how they may help to understand, classify, or follow-up neurological pathologies are briefly summarized. Techniques, principles, advantages but also intrinsic limitations, typical artifacts, and alternative solutions developed to overcome them are discussed. In this article, we also review routinely available three-dimensional (3D) techniques in neuro MRI, including state-of-the-art and emerging angiography sequences, and briefly introduce more recently proposed 3D quantitative neuro-anatomy sequences, and new technology, such as multi-slice and multi-transmit imaging. (orig.)

  16. Orthopedic and interventional applications at low field MRI with horizontally open configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koskinen, S.K.; Parkkola, R.K.; Karhu, J.; Komu, M.E.S.; Kormano, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    The recently introduced horizontally open configuration imagers allow imaging of knee, hip or shoulder during whole range of motion, which is not possible in conventional MR imagers. Special joint motion devices can be used to provide accurate and reproducible studies. In cervical spine, functional MR imaging may be useful in evaluating alarligament stability in patients with late sequelae of a whiplash injury, and in patients with rheumatoid arthritis who are clinically suspected of having a cervical myelopathy or superior migration of the odontoid process. In shoulder, full range of motion abduction study may be helpful in assessing the supraspinatus tendon impingement. To evaluate patellofemoral malalignment, quadriceps loading is recommended since associated contracting muscles and related soft tissue structures can be evaluated. The position of the femoral head relative to the acetabulum during different positions can be assessed. Open-configuration scanners provide an access to patients during scanning procedure, and therefore permit interventional procedures to be monitored with MRI. Such interventions include aspiration cytology/biopsy and different drainage procedures. (orig.) [de

  17. Prospective MR image alignment between breath-holds: Application to renal BOLD MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalis, Inge M; Pilutti, David; Krafft, Axel J; Hennig, Jürgen; Bock, Michael

    2017-04-01

    To present an image registration method for renal blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) measurements that enables semiautomatic assessment of parenchymal and medullary R2* changes under a functional challenge. In a series of breath-hold acquisitions, three-dimensional data were acquired initially for prospective image registration of subsequent BOLD measurements. An algorithm for kidney alignment for BOLD renal imaging (KALIBRI) was implemented to detect the positions of the left and right kidney so that the kidneys were acquired in the subsequent BOLD measurement at consistent anatomical locations. Residual in-plane distortions were corrected retrospectively so that semiautomatic dynamic R2* measurements of the renal cortex and medulla become feasible. KALIBRI was tested in six healthy volunteers during a series of BOLD experiments, which included a 600- to 1000-mL water challenge. Prospective image registration and BOLD imaging of each kidney was achieved within a total measurement time of about 17 s, enabling its execution within a single breath-hold. KALIBRI improved the registration by up to 35% as found with mutual information measures. In four volunteers, a medullary R2* decrease of up to 40% was observed after water ingestion. KALIBRI improves the quality of two-dimensional time-resolved renal BOLD MRI by aligning local renal anatomy, which allows for consistent R2* measurements over many breath-holds. Magn Reson Med 77:1573-1582, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  18. State-of-the-art MRI techniques in neuroradiology: principles, pitfalls, and clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viallon, Magalie; Cuvinciuc, Victor; Barnaure-Nachbar, Isabelle; Lovblad, Karl-Olof; Haller, Sven; Delattre, Benedicte; Toso-Patel, Seema; Becker, Minerva; Merlini, Laura

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the most relevant state-of-the-art magnetic resonance (MR) techniques, which are clinically available to investigate brain diseases. MR acquisition techniques addressed include notably diffusion imaging (diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI)) as well as perfusion imaging (dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC), arterial spin labeling (ASL), and dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)). The underlying models used to process these images are described, as well as the theoretic underpinnings of quantitative diffusion and perfusion MR imaging-based methods. The technical requirements and how they may help to understand, classify, or follow-up neurological pathologies are briefly summarized. Techniques, principles, advantages but also intrinsic limitations, typical artifacts, and alternative solutions developed to overcome them are discussed. In this article, we also review routinely available three-dimensional (3D) techniques in neuro MRI, including state-of-the-art and emerging angiography sequences, and briefly introduce more recently proposed 3D quantitative neuro-anatomy sequences, and new technology, such as multi-slice and multi-transmit imaging. (orig.)

  19. Applications of cerebral MRI in neonatology; MRT bei Neugeborenen mit Verdacht auf zerebrale Stoerung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prayer, D. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Wien (Austria). Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie; Kuhle, S. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Kinder- und Jugendheilkunde, Wien (Austria). Abt. fuer Neonatologie, angeborene Stoerungen und Intensivmedizin; Blaicher, W. [Abt. fuer Frauenheilkunde und Praenatale Diagnostik, Wien (Germany)

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic resonance tomography (MRT) has become the most important method in the workup of infantile cerebral complications after primary sonography. Cerebral MR examination and image interpretation during the infantile period require extensive knowledge of morphological manifestations, their pathophysiological background, and frequency. The choice of imaging parameters and image interpretation is demonstrated in infarctions and hemorrhages of the mature and immature brain. A review of the main differential diagnoses is also given. The relevance of MR spectroscopy and fetal MRI is discussed. (orig.) [German] Zur Abklaerung zerebraler Veraenderungen bei Neugeborenen hat sich die Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) als wichtigste weiterfuehrende Methode nach der Sonographie entwickelt. Die Durchfuehrung und Auswertung der MR-Untersuchungen erfordern jedoch eine genaue Kenntnis der morphologischen Manifestation, des pathophysiologischen Hintergrunds und der Haeufigkeit bestimmter zerebraler Komplikationen in diesem Lebensalter. Resuemee: Ausgehend von zerebrovaskulaeren Erkrankungen werden diese Fragen behandelt, wobei sowohl auf die Auswahl der adaequaten Untersuchungsparameter als auch auf die Bildinterpretation und die wichtigsten Differentialdiagnosen eingegangen wird. Die Bedeutung von MR-Spektroskopie und fetaler MRT wird diskutiert. (orig.)

  20. A portable infrared photoplethysmograph: heartbeat of Mytilus galloprovincialis analyzed by MRI and application to Bathymodiolus septemdierum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriko Seo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Infrared photoplethysmogram (IR-PPG and magnetic resonance image (MRI of the Mytilus galloprovincialis heart were obtained simultaneously. Heart rate was varied by changing temperature, aerial exposure and hypoxia. Higher heart rates (35-20 beat min−1 were usually observed at 20°C under the aerobic condition, and typical IR-PPG represented a single peak (peak v. The upward and downward slopes of the peak v corresponded to the filling and contracting of the ventricle, respectively. A double-peak IR-PPG was observed in a wide range of heart rates (5 to 35 beats min−1 under various conditions. The initial peak v corresponded to the filling of the ventricle, and the origin of the second peak (v’ varied with the heart rate. A flat IR-PPG with a noise-level represented cardiac arrest. Although large movement of the shells and the foot caused slow waves or a baseline drift of the IR-PPG, the heart rate can be calculated from the v-v interval. Based on these results, we assembled a portable IR-PPG recording system, and measured the heartbeats of Bathymodiolus septemdierum (Mytilidae for 24 h on a research vessel just after sampling from the deep sea, showing that IR-PPG is a noninvasive, economical, robust method that can be used in field experiments.

  1. Chest MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resonance imaging - chest; NMR - chest; MRI of the thorax; Thoracic MRI Patient Instructions ... Gotway MB, Panse PM, Gruden JF, Elicker BM. Thoracic radiology. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et ...

  2. Propagation of error from parameter constraints in quantitative MRI: Example application of multiple spin echo T2 mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankford, Christopher L; Does, Mark D

    2018-02-01

    Quantitative MRI may require correcting for nuisance parameters which can or must be constrained to independently measured or assumed values. The noise and/or bias in these constraints propagate to fitted parameters. For example, the case of refocusing pulse flip angle constraint in multiple spin echo T 2 mapping is explored. An analytical expression for the mean-squared error of a parameter of interest was derived as a function of the accuracy and precision of an independent estimate of a nuisance parameter. The expression was validated by simulations and then used to evaluate the effects of flip angle (θ) constraint on the accuracy and precision of T⁁2 for a variety of multi-echo T 2 mapping protocols. Constraining θ improved T⁁2 precision when the θ-map signal-to-noise ratio was greater than approximately one-half that of the first spin echo image. For many practical scenarios, constrained fitting was calculated to reduce not just the variance but the full mean-squared error of T⁁2, for bias in θ⁁≲6%. The analytical expression derived in this work can be applied to inform experimental design in quantitative MRI. The example application to T 2 mapping provided specific cases, depending on θ⁁ accuracy and precision, in which θ⁁ measurement and constraint would be beneficial to T⁁2 variance or mean-squared error. Magn Reson Med 79:673-682, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  3. Application of machine learning classification for structural brain MRI in mood disorders: Critical review from a clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Ku; Na, Kyoung-Sae

    2018-01-03

    Mood disorders are a highly prevalent group of mental disorders causing substantial socioeconomic burden. There are various methodological approaches for identifying the underlying mechanisms of the etiology, symptomatology, and therapeutics of mood disorders; however, neuroimaging studies have provided the most direct evidence for mood disorder neural substrates by visualizing the brains of living individuals. The prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, amygdala, thalamus, ventral striatum, and corpus callosum are associated with depression and bipolar disorder. Identifying the distinct and common contributions of these anatomical regions to depression and bipolar disorder have broadened and deepened our understanding of mood disorders. However, the extent to which neuroimaging research findings contribute to clinical practice in the real-world setting is unclear. As traditional or non-machine learning MRI studies have analyzed group-level differences, it is not possible to directly translate findings from research to clinical practice; the knowledge gained pertains to the disorder, but not to individuals. On the other hand, a machine learning approach makes it possible to provide individual-level classifications. For the past two decades, many studies have reported on the classification accuracy of machine learning-based neuroimaging studies from the perspective of diagnosis and treatment response. However, for the application of a machine learning-based brain MRI approach in real world clinical settings, several major issues should be considered. Secondary changes due to illness duration and medication, clinical subtypes and heterogeneity, comorbidities, and cost-effectiveness restrict the generalization of the current machine learning findings. Sophisticated classification of clinical and diagnostic subtypes is needed. Additionally, as the approach is inevitably limited by sample size, multi-site participation and data-sharing are needed in the future. Copyright

  4. SU-F-T-47: MRI T2 Exclusive Based Planning Using the Endocavitary/interstitial Gynecological Benidorm Applicator: A Proposed TPS Library and Preplan Efficient Methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richart, J; Otal, A; Rodriguez, S; Santos, M [Clinica Benidorm, Benidorm, Alicante (Spain); Perez-Calatayud, J [Clinica Benidorm, Benidorm, Alicante (Spain); Hospital La Fe, Valencia (Spain)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: ABS and GEC-ESTRO have recommended MRI T2 for image guided brachytherapy. Recently, a new applicator (Benidorm Template, TB) has been developed in our Department (Rodriguez et al 2015). TB is fully MRI compatible because the Titanium needles and it allows the use of intrauterine tandem. Currently, TPS applicators library are not currently available for non-rigid applicators in case of interstitial component as the TB.The purpose of this work is to present the development of a library for the TB, together with its use on a pre-planning technique. Both new goals allow a very efficient and exclusive T2 MRI based planning clinical TB implementation. Methods: The developed library has been implemented in Oncentra Brachytherapy TPS, version 4.3.0 (Elekta) and now is being implemented on Sagiplan v 2.0 TPS (Eckert&Ziegler BEBIG). To model the TB, free and open software named FreeCAD and MeshLab have been used. The reconstruction process is based on three inserted A-vitamin pellets together with the data provided by the free length. The implemented preplanning procedure is as follow: 1) A MRI T2 acquisition is performed with the template in place just with the vaginal cylinder (no uterine tube nor needles). 2) The CTV is drawn and the required needles are selected using a developed Java based application and 3) A post-implant MRI T2 is performed. Results: This library procedure has been successfully applied by now in 25 patients. In this work the use of the developed library will be illustrated with clinical examples. The preplanning procedure has been applied by now in 6 patients, having significant advantages: needle depth estimation, needle positions and number are optimized a priori, time saving, etc Conclusion: TB library and pre-plan techniques are feasible and very efficient and their use will be illustrated in this work.

  5. SU-F-T-47: MRI T2 Exclusive Based Planning Using the Endocavitary/interstitial Gynecological Benidorm Applicator: A Proposed TPS Library and Preplan Efficient Methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richart, J; Otal, A; Rodriguez, S; Santos, M; Perez-Calatayud, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: ABS and GEC-ESTRO have recommended MRI T2 for image guided brachytherapy. Recently, a new applicator (Benidorm Template, TB) has been developed in our Department (Rodriguez et al 2015). TB is fully MRI compatible because the Titanium needles and it allows the use of intrauterine tandem. Currently, TPS applicators library are not currently available for non-rigid applicators in case of interstitial component as the TB.The purpose of this work is to present the development of a library for the TB, together with its use on a pre-planning technique. Both new goals allow a very efficient and exclusive T2 MRI based planning clinical TB implementation. Methods: The developed library has been implemented in Oncentra Brachytherapy TPS, version 4.3.0 (Elekta) and now is being implemented on Sagiplan v 2.0 TPS (Eckert&Ziegler BEBIG). To model the TB, free and open software named FreeCAD and MeshLab have been used. The reconstruction process is based on three inserted A-vitamin pellets together with the data provided by the free length. The implemented preplanning procedure is as follow: 1) A MRI T2 acquisition is performed with the template in place just with the vaginal cylinder (no uterine tube nor needles). 2) The CTV is drawn and the required needles are selected using a developed Java based application and 3) A post-implant MRI T2 is performed. Results: This library procedure has been successfully applied by now in 25 patients. In this work the use of the developed library will be illustrated with clinical examples. The preplanning procedure has been applied by now in 6 patients, having significant advantages: needle depth estimation, needle positions and number are optimized a priori, time saving, etc Conclusion: TB library and pre-plan techniques are feasible and very efficient and their use will be illustrated in this work.

  6. Ultrafast transmission electron microscopy using a laser-driven field emitter: Femtosecond resolution with a high coherence electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feist, Armin; Bach, Nora; Rubiano da Silva, Nara; Danz, Thomas; Möller, Marcel; Priebe, Katharina E.; Domröse, Till; Gatzmann, J. Gregor; Rost, Stefan; Schauss, Jakob; Strauch, Stefanie; Bormann, Reiner; Sivis, Murat; Schäfer, Sascha, E-mail: sascha.schaefer@phys.uni-goettingen.de; Ropers, Claus, E-mail: claus.ropers@uni-goettingen.de

    2017-05-15

    We present the development of the first ultrafast transmission electron microscope (UTEM) driven by localized photoemission from a field emitter cathode. We describe the implementation of the instrument, the photoemitter concept and the quantitative electron beam parameters achieved. Establishing a new source for ultrafast TEM, the Göttingen UTEM employs nano-localized linear photoemission from a Schottky emitter, which enables operation with freely tunable temporal structure, from continuous wave to femtosecond pulsed mode. Using this emission mechanism, we achieve record pulse properties in ultrafast electron microscopy of 9 Å focused beam diameter, 200 fs pulse duration and 0.6 eV energy width. We illustrate the possibility to conduct ultrafast imaging, diffraction, holography and spectroscopy with this instrument and also discuss opportunities to harness quantum coherent interactions between intense laser fields and free-electron beams. - Highlights: • First implementation of an ultrafast TEM employing a nanoscale photocathode. • Localized single photon-photoemission from nanoscopic field emitter yields low emittance ultrashort electron pulses. • Electron pulses focused down to ~9 Å, with a duration of 200 fs and an energy width of 0.6 eV are demonstrated. • Quantitative characterization of ultrafast electron gun emittance and brightness. • A range of applications of high coherence ultrashort electron pulses is shown.

  7. Magnetization curves of sintered heavy tungsten alloys for applications in MRI-guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolling, Stefan; Oborn, Bradley M.; Keall, Paul J.; Horvat, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Due to the current interest in MRI-guided radiotherapy, the magnetic properties of the materials commonly used in radiotherapy are becoming increasingly important. In this paper, measurement results for the magnetization (BH) curves of a range of sintered heavy tungsten alloys used in radiation shielding and collimation are presented. Methods: Sintered heavy tungsten alloys typically contain >90 % tungsten and 0 and the BH curve derived. Results: The iron content of the alloys was found to play a dominant role, directly influencing the magnetizationM and thus the nonlinearity of the BH curve. Generally, the saturation magnetization increased with increasing iron content of the alloy. Furthermore, no measurable magnetization was found for all alloys without iron content, despite containing up to 6% of nickel. For two samples from different manufacturers but with identical quoted nominal elemental composition (95% W, 3.5% Ni, 1.5% Fe), a relative difference in the magnetization of 11%–16% was measured. Conclusions: The measured curves show that the magnetic properties of sintered heavy tungsten alloys strongly depend on the iron content, whereas the addition of nickel in the absence of iron led to no measurable effect. Since a difference in the BH curves for two samples with identical quoted nominal composition from different manufacturers was observed, measuring of the BH curve for each individual batch of heavy tungsten alloys is advisable whenever accurate knowledge of the magnetic properties is crucial. The obtained BH curves can be used in FEM simulations to predict the magnetic impact of sintered heavy tungsten alloys

  8. Assessment of dysmyelination with RAFFn MRI: application to murine MPS I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Satzer

    Full Text Available Type I mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS I is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder with neurological features. Humans and laboratory animals with MPS I exhibit various white matter abnormalities involving the corpus callosum and other regions. In this study, we first validated a novel MRI technique, entitled Relaxation Along a Fictitious Field in the rotating frame of rank n (RAFFn, as a measure of myelination and dysmyelination in mice. We then examined differences between MPS I mice and heterozygotes using RAFF5 and histology. RAFF5 (i.e., RAFFn with n = 5 relaxation time constants were highly correlated with histological myelin density (R2 = 0.68, P<0.001, and RAFF5 clearly distinguished between the hypomyelinated and dysmyelinated shiverer mouse and the wild-type mouse. Bloch-McConnell theoretical analysis revealed slower exchange correlation times and smaller exchange-induced relaxation rate constants for RAFF4 and RAFF5 compared to RAFF1-3, T1ρ, and T2ρ. These data suggest that RAFF5 may assess methylene protons in myelin lipids and proteins, though other mechanisms (e.g. detection of myelin-bound water may also explain the sensitivity of RAFF5 to myelin. In MPS I mice, mean RAFF5 relaxation time constants were significantly larger for the striatum (P = 0.004 and internal capsule (P = 0.039, and marginally larger for the fornix (P = 0.15. Histological assessment revealed no differences between MPS I mice and heterozygotes in myelin density or corpus callosum thickness. Taken together, these findings support subtle dysmyelination in the brains of mice with MPS I. Dysmyelination may result from myelin lipid abnormalities caused by the absence of α-L-iduronidase. Our findings may help to explain locomotor and cognitive deficits seen in mice with MPS I.

  9. Actual clinical use of gadolinium-chelates for non-MRI applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strunk, Holger M; Schild, H [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53105, Bonn (Germany)

    2004-06-01

    For many years, alternatives to iodinated X-ray contrast media have been sought. Of the contrast media investigated to date, only CO{sub 2} and the gadolinium-chelates have been shown to be viable alternatives for selected X-ray examinations. Therefore, we have reviewed the general literature and that specific for gadopentetate (Magnevist) in particular, since this agent has been studied the most. This review indicates that diagnostic CT examinations can be achieved following the intravenous administration of gadolinium-containing contrast media (CM) for evaluation of aortic abnormalities. Gadolinium-containing CM at the dose approved for MR imaging are not useful for CT evaluation of the abdominal parenchymal organs. Intravenous/intraarterial injections have also been used in a variety of angiographic and interventional procedures. Image quality, however, is generally inferior to iodinated contrast media. Gadolinium-containing CM require no special handling and can be administered by hand injection or via conventional angiographic automated injectors with the same flow rates and pressures as are used with iodinated contrast media. For CT, a peripheral bolus injection of a diluted gadolinium agent (1:1 with saline) of 60-90 ml at 3-5 ml/s is usually performed. Similar to all other gadolinium-chelates, the non-MRI use of gadopentetate (Magnevist) is not approved by regulatory agencies. However, the literature suggests that a dose of 0.3-0.4 mmol/kg b.w. has been safely administered for CT as well as for angiography and interventional procedures intravenously and intraarterially. Even at this dose, though, this results in a relatively small overall volume to be injected, which limits utility somewhat. (orig.)

  10. Actual clinical use of gadolinium-chelates for non-MRI applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strunk, Holger M.; Schild, H.

    2004-01-01

    For many years, alternatives to iodinated X-ray contrast media have been sought. Of the contrast media investigated to date, only CO 2 and the gadolinium-chelates have been shown to be viable alternatives for selected X-ray examinations. Therefore, we have reviewed the general literature and that specific for gadopentetate (Magnevist) in particular, since this agent has been studied the most. This review indicates that diagnostic CT examinations can be achieved following the intravenous administration of gadolinium-containing contrast media (CM) for evaluation of aortic abnormalities. Gadolinium-containing CM at the dose approved for MR imaging are not useful for CT evaluation of the abdominal parenchymal organs. Intravenous/intraarterial injections have also been used in a variety of angiographic and interventional procedures. Image quality, however, is generally inferior to iodinated contrast media. Gadolinium-containing CM require no special handling and can be administered by hand injection or via conventional angiographic automated injectors with the same flow rates and pressures as are used with iodinated contrast media. For CT, a peripheral bolus injection of a diluted gadolinium agent (1:1 with saline) of 60-90 ml at 3-5 ml/s is usually performed. Similar to all other gadolinium-chelates, the non-MRI use of gadopentetate (Magnevist) is not approved by regulatory agencies. However, the literature suggests that a dose of 0.3-0.4 mmol/kg b.w. has been safely administered for CT as well as for angiography and interventional procedures intravenously and intraarterially. Even at this dose, though, this results in a relatively small overall volume to be injected, which limits utility somewhat. (orig.)

  11. Ultrafast dynamics of correlated electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rettig, Laurenz

    2012-01-01

    This work investigates the ultrafast electron dynamics in correlated, low-dimensional model systems using femtosecond time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (trARPES) directly in the time domain. In such materials, the strong electron-electron (e-e) correlations or coupling to other degrees of freedom such as phonons within the complex many-body quantum system lead to new, emergent properties that are characterized by phase transitions into broken-symmetry ground states such as magnetic, superconducting or charge density wave (CDW) phases. The dynamical processes related to order like transient phase changes, collective excitations or the energy relaxation within the system allow deeper insight into the complex physics governing the emergence of the broken-symmetry state. In this work, several model systems for broken-symmetry ground states and for the dynamical charge balance at interfaces have been studied. In the quantum well state (QWS) model system Pb/Si(111), the charge transfer across the Pb/Si interface leads to an ultrafast energetic stabilization of occupied QWSs, which is the result of an increase of the electronic confinement to the metal film. In addition, a coherently excited surface phonon mode is observed. In antiferromagnetic (AFM) Fe pnictide compounds, a strong momentum-dependent asymmetry of electron and hole relaxation rates allows to separate the recovery dynamics of the AFM phase from electron-phonon (e-ph) relaxation. The strong modulation of the chemical potential by coherent phonon modes demonstrates the importance of e-ph coupling in these materials. However, the average e-ph coupling constant is found to be small. The investigation of the excited quasiparticle (QP) relaxation dynamics in the high-T c 4 superconductor Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+δ reveals a striking momentum and fluence independence of the QP life times. In combination with the momentum-dependent density of excited QPs, this demonstrates the suppression of momentum

  12. Ultrafast dynamics of correlated electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rettig, Laurenz

    2012-07-09

    This work investigates the ultrafast electron dynamics in correlated, low-dimensional model systems using femtosecond time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (trARPES) directly in the time domain. In such materials, the strong electron-electron (e-e) correlations or coupling to other degrees of freedom such as phonons within the complex many-body quantum system lead to new, emergent properties that are characterized by phase transitions into broken-symmetry ground states such as magnetic, superconducting or charge density wave (CDW) phases. The dynamical processes related to order like transient phase changes, collective excitations or the energy relaxation within the system allow deeper insight into the complex physics governing the emergence of the broken-symmetry state. In this work, several model systems for broken-symmetry ground states and for the dynamical charge balance at interfaces have been studied. In the quantum well state (QWS) model system Pb/Si(111), the charge transfer across the Pb/Si interface leads to an ultrafast energetic stabilization of occupied QWSs, which is the result of an increase of the electronic confinement to the metal film. In addition, a coherently excited surface phonon mode is observed. In antiferromagnetic (AFM) Fe pnictide compounds, a strong momentum-dependent asymmetry of electron and hole relaxation rates allows to separate the recovery dynamics of the AFM phase from electron-phonon (e-ph) relaxation. The strong modulation of the chemical potential by coherent phonon modes demonstrates the importance of e-ph coupling in these materials. However, the average e-ph coupling constant is found to be small. The investigation of the excited quasiparticle (QP) relaxation dynamics in the high-T{sub c}4 superconductor Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+δ} reveals a striking momentum and fluence independence of the QP life times. In combination with the momentum-dependent density of excited QPs, this demonstrates the

  13. Ultrafast laser spectroscopy in complex solid state materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Tianqi [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This thesis summarizes my work on applying the ultrafast laser spectroscopy to the complex solid state materials. It shows that the ultrafast laser pulse can coherently control the material properties in the femtosecond time scale. And the ultrafast laser spectroscopy can be employed as a dynamical method for revealing the fundamental physical problems in the complex material systems.

  14. Application of the kappa statistic in MRI diagnosis of lumbar disk herniation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Dasheng; Zhang Fang; Gao Shuming; Gu Jinxiang; Li Lu; Qu Hui

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To assess the concordance of MRI diagnosis for patients suspected of lumbar disk herniation by using Kappa statistic. Methods: One hundred patients (48 males and 52 females) with lumbosacral radiculm pain, aged from 17 to 86 (average 61). All patients underwent fast spin-echo T 1 and T 2 weighted imaging on a 3.0 T MR scanner and spine surface coil. Two radiologists (doctor A and doctor B) evaluated the lumbar disks from L3-4, L4-5, and L5-S1 in 50 out of the 100 patients independently. The presence of a bulging disk or a herniation was reported. Images were interpreted twice: once before and once after disclosure of clinical information. And disks of 52 patients out of the 100 samples were interpreted by the two radiologists independently without clinical information as well. The Kappa statistics was employed to assess the concordance of each radiologist's diagnoses as well as the observer variation of the two radiologists. Results: Diagnoses before and after disclosure to clinical information were concordant in 114 disks for doctor A and in 109 for doctor B, respectively. Diagnoses before and after disclosure to clinical information were not concordant in 36 disks for doctor A and in 41 disks for doctor B, respectively. The Kappa values were 0.60±0.06 and 0.57±0.06 for doctor A and doctor B, respectively. The concordance was moderate. After disclosure to clinical information, the numbers of reported bulging disks increased significantly, by 10 and 31 for doctor A and doctor B, respectively. Without clinical information, the diagnoses of the two radiologists were concordant in 77 disks, while not concordant in 79 disks. The interobserver agreement was poor (Kappa=0.24±0.06). The difference on diagenoses made between with and without clinical information mainly happened on the differential diagnosis of normal disks and bulging disks. The different diagnoses made between with and without clinical information were on 20 disks and on 30 disks for doctor

  15. Orthopedic and interventional applications at low field MRI with horizontally open configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koskinen, S.K.; Parkkola, R.K.; Karhu, J.; Komu, M.E.S.; Kormano, M.J. [Diagnostic Radiology, Turku Univ. Hospital (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    The recently introduced horizontally open configuration imagers allow imaging of knee, hip or shoulder during whole range of motion, which is not possible in conventional MR imagers. Special joint motion devices can be used to provide accurate and reproducible studies. In cervical spine, functional MR imaging may be useful in evaluating alarligament stability in patients with late sequelae of a whiplash injury, and in patients with rheumatoid arthritis who are clinically suspected of having a cervical myelopathy or superior migration of the odontoid process. In shoulder, full range of motion abduction study may be helpful in assessing the supraspinatus tendon impingement. To evaluate patellofemoral malalignment, quadriceps loading is recommended since associated contracting muscles and related soft tissue structures can be evaluated. The position of the femoral head relative to the acetabulum during different positions can be assessed. Open-configuration scanners provide an access to patients during scanning procedure, and therefore permit interventional procedures to be monitored with MRI. Such interventions include aspiration cytology/biopsy and different drainage procedures. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die kuerzlich eingefuehrten bildgebenden Systeme mit horizontal offener Konfiguration ermoeglichen die Darstellung von Knie, Huefte oder Schulter ueber den gesamten Bewegungsbereich, war bisher mit konventionellen MR-Systemen nicht moeglich. Fuer genauere und reproduzierbare Untersuchungen koennen spezielle Gelenkbewegungsgeraete verwendet werden. Bei der Halswirbelsaeule kann die funktionelle NMR-Darstellung im Hinblick auf die Beurteilung der Stabilitaet der Ligamenta alaria bei Patienten mit Spaetfolgen eines Schleudertraumas und bei Patienten mit rheumatoider Arthritis von Nutzen sein, wenn klinisch eine zervikale Myelopathie oder superiore migration des Dens axis vermutet wird. Bei der Schulter kann eine Abduktionsstudie des vollen Bewegungsbereichs bei der Beurteilung

  16. Ultra-Fast Hadronic Calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denisov, Dmitri [Fermilab; Lukić, Strahinja [VINCA Inst. Nucl. Sci., Belgrade; Mokhov, Nikolai [Fermilab; Striganov, Sergei [Fermilab; Ujić, Predrag [VINCA Inst. Nucl. Sci., Belgrade

    2017-12-18

    Calorimeters for particle physics experiments with integration time of a few ns will substantially improve the capability of the experiment to resolve event pileup and to reject backgrounds. In this paper time development of hadronic showers induced by 30 and 60 GeV positive pions and 120 GeV protons is studied using Monte Carlo simulation and beam tests with a prototype of a sampling steel-scintillator hadronic calorimeter. In the beam tests, scintillator signals induced by hadronic showers in steel are sampled with a period of 0.2 ns and precisely time-aligned in order to study the average signal waveform at various locations w.r.t. the beam particle impact. Simulations of the same setup are performed using the MARS15 code. Both simulation and test beam results suggest that energy deposition in steel calorimeters develop over a time shorter than 3 ns providing opportunity for ultra-fast calorimetry. Simulation results for an "ideal" calorimeter consisting exclusively of bulk tungsten or copper are presented to establish the lower limit of the signal integration window.

  17. Ultrafast palladium diffusion in germanium

    KAUST Repository

    Tahini, Hassan Ali

    2015-01-01

    The slow transport of dopants through crystal lattices has hindered the development of novel devices. Typically atoms are contained within deep potential energy wells which necessitates multiple attempts to hop between minimum energy positions. This is because the bonds that constrain atoms are strongest at the minimum positions. As they hop between sites the bonds must be broken, only to re-form as the atoms slide into adjacent minima. Here we demonstrate that the Pd atoms introduced into the Ge lattice behave differently. They retain bonds as the atoms shift across so that at the energy maximum between sites Pd still exhibits strong bonding characteristics. This reduces the energy maximum to almost nothing (a migration energy of only 0.03 eV) and means that the transport of Pd through the Ge lattice is ultrafast. We scrutinize the bonding characteristics at the atomic level using quantum mechanical simulation tools and demonstrate why Pd behaves so differently to other metals we investigated (i.e. Li, Cu, Ag, Pt and Au). Consequently, this fundamental understanding can be extended to systems where extremely rapid diffusion is desired, such as radiation sensors, batteries and solid oxide fuel cells.

  18. Ultrafast electron microscopy in materials science, biology, and chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Wayne E.; Campbell, Geoffrey H.; Frank, Alan; Reed, Bryan; Schmerge, John F.; Siwick, Bradley J.; Stuart, Brent C.; Weber, Peter M.

    2005-01-01

    The use of pump-probe experiments to study complex transient events has been an area of significant interest in materials science, biology, and chemistry. While the emphasis has been on laser pump with laser probe and laser pump with x-ray probe experiments, there is a significant and growing interest in using electrons as probes. Early experiments used electrons for gas-phase diffraction of photostimulated chemical reactions. More recently, scientists are beginning to explore phenomena in the solid state such as phase transformations, twinning, solid-state chemical reactions, radiation damage, and shock propagation. This review focuses on the emerging area of ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM), which comprises ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) and dynamic transmission electron microscopy (DTEM). The topics that are treated include the following: (1) The physics of electrons as an ultrafast probe. This encompasses the propagation dynamics of the electrons (space-charge effect, Child's law, Boersch effect) and extends to relativistic effects. (2) The anatomy of UED and DTEM instruments. This includes discussions of the photoactivated electron gun (also known as photogun or photoelectron gun) at conventional energies (60-200 keV) and extends to MeV beams generated by rf guns. Another critical aspect of the systems is the electron detector. Charge-coupled device cameras and microchannel-plate-based cameras are compared and contrasted. The effect of various physical phenomena on detective quantum efficiency is discussed. (3) Practical aspects of operation. This includes determination of time zero, measurement of pulse-length, and strategies for pulse compression. (4) Current and potential applications in materials science, biology, and chemistry. UEM has the potential to make a significant impact in future science and technology. Understanding of reaction pathways of complex transient phenomena in materials science, biology, and chemistry will provide fundamental

  19. Application of contrast media in post-mortem imaging (CT and MRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabherr, Silke; Grimm, Jochen; Baumann, Pia; Mangin, Patrice

    2015-09-01

    The application of contrast media in post-mortem radiology differs from clinical approaches in living patients. Post-mortem changes in the vascular system and the absence of blood flow lead to specific problems that have to be considered for the performance of post-mortem angiography. In addition, interpreting the images is challenging due to technique-related and post-mortem artefacts that have to be known and that are specific for each applied technique. Although the idea of injecting contrast media is old, classic methods are not simply transferable to modern radiological techniques in forensic medicine, as they are mostly dedicated to single-organ studies or applicable only shortly after death. With the introduction of modern imaging techniques, such as post-mortem computed tomography (PMCT) and post-mortem magnetic resonance (PMMR), to forensic death investigations, intensive research started to explore their advantages and limitations compared to conventional autopsy. PMCT has already become a routine investigation in several centres, and different techniques have been developed to better visualise the vascular system and organ parenchyma in PMCT. In contrast, the use of PMMR is still limited due to practical issues, and research is now starting in the field of PMMR angiography. This article gives an overview of the problems in post-mortem contrast media application, the various classic and modern techniques, and the issues to consider by using different media.

  20. Progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science II

    CERN Document Server

    Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Agostini, Pierre; Ferrante, Gaetano

    2007-01-01

    This book series addresses a newly emerging interdisciplinary research field, Ultrafast Intense Laser Science, spanning atomic and molecular physics, molecular science, and optical science. Its progress is being stimulated by the recent development of ultrafast laser technologies. Highlights of this second volume include Coulomb explosion and fragmentation of molecules, control of chemical dynamics, high-order harmonic generation, propagation and filamentation, and laser-plasma interaction. All chapters are authored by foremost experts in their fields and the texts are written at a level accessible to newcomers and graduate students, each chapter beginning with an introductory overview.

  1. Progress in ultrafast intense laser science XI

    CERN Document Server

    Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Martin, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The PUILS series delivers up-to-date reviews of progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science, a newly emerging interdisciplinary research field spanning atomic and molecular physics, molecular science and optical science, which has been stimulated by the recent developments in ultrafast laser technologies. Each volume compiles peer-reviewed articles authored by researchers at the forefront of each their own subfields of UILS. Every chapter opens with an overview of the topics to be discussed, so that researchers unfamiliar to the subfield, as well as graduate students, can grasp the importance

  2. Progress in ultrafast intense laser science

    CERN Document Server

    Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Mathur, Deepak

    2014-01-01

    The PUILS series delivers up-to-date reviews of progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science, a newly emerging interdisciplinary research field spanning atomic and molecular physics, molecular science, and optical science, which has been stimulated by the recent developments in ultrafast laser technologies. Each volume compiles peer-reviewed articles authored by researchers at the forefront of each their own subfields of UILS. Every chapter opens with an overview of the topics to be discussed, so that researchers unfamiliar to the subfield, as well as graduate students, can grasp the importance

  3. Ultrafast Nonlinear Signal Processing in Silicon Waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo; Mulvad, Hans Christian Hansen; Hu, Hao

    2012-01-01

    We describe recent demonstrations of exploiting highly nonlinear silicon waveguides for ultrafast optical signal processing. We describe wavelength conversion and serial-to-parallel conversion of 640 Gbit/s data signals and 1.28 Tbit/s demultiplexing and all-optical sampling.......We describe recent demonstrations of exploiting highly nonlinear silicon waveguides for ultrafast optical signal processing. We describe wavelength conversion and serial-to-parallel conversion of 640 Gbit/s data signals and 1.28 Tbit/s demultiplexing and all-optical sampling....

  4. SU-E-J-04: Integration of Interstitial High Intensity Therapeutic Ultrasound Applicators On a Clinical MRI-Guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Treatment Planning Software Platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellens, N [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Partanen, A [Philips Healthcare, Andover, Massachusetts (United States); Ghoshal, G; Burdette, E [Acoustic MedSystems Inc., Savoy, IL (United States); Farahani, K [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Interstitial high intensity therapeutic ultrasound (HITU) applicators can be used to ablate tissue percutaneously, allowing for minimally-invasive treatment without ionizing radiation [1,2]. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and usability of combining multielement interstitial HITU applicators with a clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided focused ultrasound software platform. Methods: The Sonalleve software platform (Philips Healthcare, Vantaa, Finland) combines anatomical MRI for target selection and multi-planar MRI thermometry to provide real-time temperature information. The MRI-compatible interstitial US applicators (Acoustic MedSystems, Savoy, IL, USA) had 1–4 cylindrical US elements, each 1 cm long with either 180° or 360° of active surface. Each applicator (4 Fr diameter, enclosed within a 13 Fr flexible catheter) was inserted into a tissue-mimicking agar-silica phantom. Degassed water was circulated around the transducers for cooling and coupling. Based on the location of the applicator, a virtual transducer overlay was added to the software to assist targeting and to allow automatic thermometry slice placement. The phantom was sonicated at 7 MHz for 5 minutes with 6–8 W of acoustic power for each element. MR thermometry data were collected during and after sonication. Results: Preliminary testing indicated that the applicator location could be identified in the planning images and the transducer locations predicted within 1 mm accuracy using the overlay. Ablation zones (thermal dose ≥ 240 CEM43) for 2 active, adjacent US elements ranged from 18 mm × 24 mm (width × length) to 25 mm × 25 mm for the 6 W and 8 W sonications, respectively. Conclusion: The combination of interstitial HITU applicators and this software platform holds promise for novel approaches in minimally-invasive MRI-guided therapy, especially when bony structures or air-filled cavities may preclude extracorporeal HIFU.[1] Diederich et al

  5. Two-stage decompositions for the analysis of functional connectivity for fMRI with application to Alzheimer’s disease risk

    OpenAIRE

    Caffo, Brian S.; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M.; Verduzco, Guillermo; Joel, Suresh; Mostofsky, Stewart H.; Bassett, Susan Spear; Pekar, James J.

    2010-01-01

    Functional connectivity is the study of correlations in measured neurophysiological signals. Altered functional connectivity has been shown to be associated with a variety of cognitive and memory impairments and dysfunction, including Alzheimer’s disease. In this manuscript we use a two-stage application of the singular value decomposition to obtain data driven population-level measures of functional connectivity in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The method is computationally s...

  6. Ultrafast laser-semiconductor interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schile, L.A.

    1996-01-01

    Studies of the ultrafast (< 100 fs) interactions of infrared, sub-100 fs laser pulses with IR, photosensitive semiconductor materials InGaAs, InSb, and HgCdTe are reported. Both the carrier dynamics and the associated Terahertz radiation from these materials are discussed. The most recent developments of femtosecond (< 100 fs) Optical Parametric Oscillators (OPO) has extended the wavelength range from the visible to 5.2 μm. The photogenerated semiconductor free carrier dynamics are determined in the 77 to 300 degrees K temperature range using the Transmission Correlation Peak (TCP) method. The electron-phonon scattering times are typically 200 - 600 fs. Depending upon the material composition and substrate on which the IR crystalline materials are deposited, the nonlinear TCP absorption gives recombination rates as fast as 10's of picoseconds. For the HgCdTe, there exists a 400 fs electron-phonon scattering process along with a much longer 3600 fs loss process. Studies of the interactions of these ultrashort laser pulses with semiconductors produce Terahertz (Thz) radiative pulses. With undoped InSb, there is a substantial change in the spectral content of this THz radiation between 80 - 260 degrees K while the spectrum of Te-doped InSb remains nearly unchanged, an effect attributed to its mobility being dominated by impurity scattering. At 80 degrees K, the terahertz radiation from undoped InSb is dependent on wavelength, with both a higher frequency spectrum and much larger amplitudes generated at longer wavelengths. No such effect is observed at 260 degrees K. Finally, new results on the dependence of the emitted THz radiation on the InSb crystal's orientation is presented

  7. VISARTTM superconducting MRI system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usui, Yoshiyuki; Goro, Takehiko; Yamagata, Hitoshi.

    1995-01-01

    We have developed VISART TM , a 1.5 T high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system based on technology developed for both the FLEXART TM (0.5T) and MRT-200/GP (1.5T) systems as the first and second products, respectively, of a new series of MRI systems. VISART TM is a newly coined word combining VISion and state-of-the-ART. A higher power gradient system and new high-speed imaging techniques have been developed to meet the market demand for higher resolution images and shorter scan times. The product concepts of VISART TM are high image quality, high patient throughput, flexible clinical application, and ease of use, all of which are essential features for an MRI system in the high-field MRI market segment. (author)

  8. The combined application of 1H MRI and 19F MRS to the study of cerebroprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haga, K.K.

    2000-01-01

    The research presented in this thesis focuses on the application of 1 H and 19 F nuclear magnetic resonance techniques to the evaluation of the neuroprotective and pharmacokinetic properties of a novel, nitric oxide synthase inhibitor in a rat model of stroke. Although there is a growing body of research on the application of 19 F magnetic resonance spectroscopy techniques to the study of psychotropic agents, this is the first attempt to apply these methods to the evaluation of an agent being developed for cerebroprotection. TRIM, 1-(2-trifluoromethylphenyl) imidazole, is a selective inhibitor of the neuronal form of nitric oxide synthase in the rat and mouse brain. The first portion of this thesis demonstrates TRIM's neuroprotective properties when administered post-occlusion in the middle cerebral artery occlusion model of focal cerebral ischaemia. In addition, these neuroprotective effects may be eliminated by the co-administration of L-arginine, a nitric oxide precursor, indicating a role for neuronal nitric oxide synthase in ischaemic damage. 1 H magnetic resonance imaging at 24 hours post-occlusion indicates a 40% reduction in lesion volume following TRIM administration as compared to the saline control group. The second part of this thesis pertains to the development and application of 19 F MRS methods, in vivo and in vitro, to enable the investigator to monitor and quantify TRIM in the rat CNS pre and post-occlusion. In this section, 19 F MRS studies were conducted to measure the in vivo T 1 and T 2 relaxation parameters and subsequently, the concentration of TRIM achieved in the rat CNS over an 8 hour measuring period. From this data, the in vivo pharmacokinetics of TRIM were evaluated and applied to the neuroprotective strategy in cerebral ischaemia. In vitro measurements of TRIM concentrations in the rat CNS were compared to the in vivo concentration calculations to evaluate the reliability of TRIM quantification using the combined coils system. Finally

  9. Time-dependent diffusion MRI in cancer: tissue modeling and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynaud, Olivier

    2017-11-01

    In diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), the apparent diffusion coefficient has been recognized as a useful and sensitive surrogate for cell density, paving the way for non-invasive tumor staging, and characterization of treatment efficacy in cancer. However, microstructural parameters, such as cell size, density and/or compartmental diffusivities affect diffusion in various fashions, making of conventional DWI a sensitive but non-specific probe into changes happening at cellular level. Alternatively, tissue complexity can be probed and quantified using the time dependence of diffusion metrics, sometimes also referred to as temporal diffusion spectroscopy when only using oscillating diffusion gradients. Time-dependent diffusion (TDD) is emerging as a strong candidate for specific and non-invasive tumor characterization. Despite the lack of a general analytical solution for all diffusion times / frequencies, TDD can be probed in various regimes where systems simplify in order to extract relevant information about tissue microstructure. The fundamentals of TDD are first reviewed (a) in the short time regime, disentangling structural and diffusive tissue properties, and (b) near the tortuosity limit, assuming weakly heterogeneous media near infinitely long diffusion times. Focusing on cell bodies (as opposed to neuronal tracts), a simple but realistic model for intracellular diffusion can offer precious insight on diffusion inside biological systems, at all times. Based on this approach, the main three geometrical models implemented so far (IMPULSED, POMACE, VERDICT) are reviewed. Their suitability to quantify cell size, intra- and extracellular spaces (ICS and ECS) and diffusivities are assessed. The proper modeling of tissue membrane permeability – hardly a newcomer in the field, but lacking applications - and its impact on microstructural estimates are also considered. After discussing general issues with tissue modeling and microstructural parameter estimation (i

  10. Functional MRI of the kidneys

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jeff L.; Rusinek, Henry; Chandarana, Hersh; Lee, Vivian S.

    2013-01-01

    Renal function is characterized by different physiologic aspects, including perfusion, glomerular filtration, interstitial diffusion and tissue oxygenation. MRI shows great promise in assessing these renal tissue characteristics noninvasively. The last decade has witnessed a dramatic progress in MRI techniques for renal function assessment. This article briefly describes relevant renal anatomy and physiology, reviews the applications of functional MRI techniques for the diagnosis of renal dis...

  11. A Tool for Interactive Data Visualization: Application to Over 10,000 Brain Imaging and Phantom MRI Data Sets

    OpenAIRE

    Panta, Sandeep R.; Wang, Runtang; Fries, Jill; Kalyanam, Ravi; Speer, Nicole; Banich, Marie; Kiehl, Kent; King, Margaret; Milham, Michael; Wager, Tor D.; Turner, Jessica A.; Plis, Sergey M.; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we propose a web-based approach for quick visualization of big data from brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans using a combination of an automated image capture and processing system, nonlinear embedding, and interactive data visualization tools. We draw upon thousands of MRI scans captured via the COllaborative Imaging and Neuroinformatics Suite (COINS). We then interface the output of several analysis pipelines based on structural and functional data to a t-distributed ...

  12. Time-Dependent Diffusion MRI in Cancer: Tissue Modeling and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Reynaud

    2017-11-01

    estimation (i.e., fitting, potential solutions are detailed. The in vivo applications of this new, non-invasive, specific approach in cancer are reviewed, ranging from the characterization of gliomas in rodent brains and observation of time-dependence in breast tissue lesions and prostate cancer, to the recent preclinical evaluation of new treatments efficacy. It is expected that clinical applications of TDD will strongly benefit the community in terms of non-invasive cancer screening.

  13. Ultrafast Bessel beams: advanced tools for laser materials processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoian, Razvan; Bhuyan, Manoj K.; Zhang, Guodong; Cheng, Guanghua; Meyer, Remy; Courvoisier, Francois

    2018-05-01

    Ultrafast Bessel beams demonstrate a significant capacity of structuring transparent materials with a high degree of accuracy and exceptional aspect ratio. The ability to localize energy on the nanometer scale (bypassing the 100-nm milestone) makes them ideal tools for advanced laser nanoscale processing on surfaces and in the bulk. This allows to generate and combine micron and nano-sized features into hybrid structures that show novel functionalities. Their high aspect ratio and the accurate location can equally drive an efficient material modification and processing strategy on large dimensions. We review, here, the main concepts of generating and using Bessel non-diffractive beams and their remarkable features, discuss general characteristics of their interaction with matter in ablation and material modification regimes, and advocate their use for obtaining hybrid micro and nanoscale structures in two and three dimensions (2D and 3D) performing complex functions. High-throughput applications are indicated. The example list ranges from surface nanostructuring and laser cutting to ultrafast laser welding and the fabrication of 3D photonic systems embedded in the volume.

  14. Ultrafast Carbon Dioxide Sorption Kinetics Using Lithium Silicate Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambo, Apolo; He, Juan; Nguyen, Tu Quang; Atla, Veerendra; Druffel, Thad; Sunkara, Mahendra

    2017-06-14

    In this paper, the Li 4 SiO 4 nanowires (NWs) were shown to be promising for CO 2 capture with ultrafast kinetics. Specifically, the nanowire powders exhibited an uptake of 0.35 g g -1 of CO 2 at an ultrafast adsorption rate of 0.22 g g -1 min -1 at 650-700 °C. Lithium silicate (Li 4 SiO 4 ) nanowires and nanopowders were synthesized using a "solvo-plasma" technique involving plasma oxidation of silicon precursors mixed with lithium hydroxide. The kinetic parameter values (k) extracted from sorption kinetics obtained using NW powders are 1 order of magnitude higher than those previously reported for the Li 4 SiO 4 -CO 2 reaction system. The time scales for CO 2 sorption using nanowires are approximately 3 min and two orders magnitude faster compared to those obtained using lithium silicate powders with spherical morphologies and aggregates. Furthermore, Li 4 SiO 4 nanowire powders showed reversibility through sorption-desorption cycles indicating their suitability for CO 2 capture applications. All of the morphologies of Li 4 SiO 4 powders exhibited a double exponential behavior in the adsorption kinetics indicating two distinct time constants for kinetic and the mass transfer limited regimes.

  15. Clinical evaluation of female pelvic tumors. Application fields of integrated PET/MRI; Lokal- und Ganzkoerperdiagnostik weiblicher Beckentumore. Anwendungsfelder der integrierten PET-MRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grueneisen, J.; Umutlu, L. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen, Institut fuer diagnostische und interventionelle Radiologie und Neuroradiologie, Essen (Germany)

    2016-07-15

    Integrated positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning has recently become established in clinical imaging. Various studies have demonstrated the great potential of this new hybrid imaging procedure for applications in the field of oncology and the diagnostics of inflammatory processes. With initial studies demonstrating the feasibility and high diagnostic potential of PET/MRI comparable to PET-computed tomography (CT), the focus of future studies should be on the identification of application fields with a potential diagnostic benefit of PET/MRI over other established diagnostic tools. Both MRI and PET/CT are widely used in the diagnostic algorithms for malignancies of the female pelvis. A simultaneous acquisition of PET and MRI data within a single examination provides complementary information which can be used for a more comprehensive evaluation of the primary tumor as well as for whole body staging. Therefore, the aim of this article is to outline potential clinical applications of integrated PET/MRI for the diagnostic work-up of primary or recurrent gynecological neoplasms of the female pelvis. (orig.) [German] Integrierte Positronenemissionstomographie-Magnetresonanztomographen (PET-MRT) stehen seit wenigen Jahren fuer die klinische Diagnostik zur Verfuegung. Diverse Arbeiten konnten bereits das grosse Potenzial dieser neuen hybriden Bildgebungsmodalitaet zur Anwendung in der onkologischen und inflammatorischen Diagnostik aufzeigen. Nachdem initiale Studien die Durchfuehrbarkeit und diagnostische Vergleichbarkeit der PET-MRT zur etablierten PET-Computertomographie (PET-CT) gezeigt haben, sollte fuer eine Implementierung in der Routinediagnostik der Fokus zukuenftiger Studien darin liegen, eindeutige Indikationen zu definieren, in denen die simultane PET-MRT-Bildgebung einen definitiven Vorteil verglichen mit den etablierten diagnostischen Verfahren bietet. Sowohl die MRT als auch die PET-CT finden bereits eine

  16. Fetal MRI: techniques and protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prayer, Daniela; Brugger, Peter Christian; Prayer, Lucas

    2004-01-01

    The development of ultrafast sequences has led to a significant improvement in fetal MRI. Imaging protocols have to be adjusted to the rapidly developing fetal central nervous system (CNS) and to the clinical question. Sequence parameters must be changed to cope with the respective developmental stage, to produce images free from motion artefacts and to provide optimum visualization of the region and focus of interest. In contrast to postnatal studies, every suspect fetal CNS abnormality requires examination of the whole fetus and the extrafetal intrauterine structures including the uterus. This approach covers both aspects of fetal CNS disorders: isolated and complex malformations and cerebral lesions arising from the impaired integrity of the feto-placental unit. (orig.)

  17. Fetal MRI: techniques and protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prayer, Daniela [Department of Neuroradiology, University Clinics of Radiodiagnostics, Medical University Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-10, 1090, Vienna (Austria); Brugger, Peter Christian [Department of Anatomy, Integrative Morphology Group, Medical University Vienna (Austria); Prayer, Lucas [Diagnosezentrum Urania, Vienna (Austria)

    2004-09-01

    The development of ultrafast sequences has led to a significant improvement in fetal MRI. Imaging protocols have to be adjusted to the rapidly developing fetal central nervous system (CNS) and to the clinical question. Sequence parameters must be changed to cope with the respective developmental stage, to produce images free from motion artefacts and to provide optimum visualization of the region and focus of interest. In contrast to postnatal studies, every suspect fetal CNS abnormality requires examination of the whole fetus and the extrafetal intrauterine structures including the uterus. This approach covers both aspects of fetal CNS disorders: isolated and complex malformations and cerebral lesions arising from the impaired integrity of the feto-placental unit. (orig.)

  18. Quantum Computation with Ultrafast Laser Pulse Shaping

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 10; Issue 6. Quantum Computation with Ultrafast Laser Pulse Shaping. Debabrata Goswami. General Article Volume 10 Issue 6 June 2005 pp 8-14. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  19. Ultrafast spectroscopy of model biological membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghosh, Avishek

    2009-01-01

    In this PhD thesis, I have described the novel time-resolved sum-frequency generation (TR-SFG) spectroscopic technique that I developed during the course of my PhD research and used it study the ultrafast vibrational, structural and orientational dynamics of water molecules at model biological

  20. Photonic-assisted ultrafast THz wireless access

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Xianbin; Chen, Ying; Galili, Michael

    THz technology has been considered feasible for ultrafast wireless data communi- cation, to meet the increasing demand on next-generation fast wireless access, e.g., huge data file transferring and fast mobile data stream access. This talk reviews recent progress in high-speed THz wireless...

  1. Application of eigen value expansion to feature extraction from MRI images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinosada, Yasutomi; Takeda, Kan; Nakagawa, Tsuyoshi

    1991-01-01

    The eigen value expansion technique was utilized for feature extraction of magnetic resonance (MR) images. The eigen value expansion is an orthonormal transformation method which decomposes a set of images into some statistically uncorrelated images. The technique was applied to MR images obtained with various imaging parameters at the same anatomical site. It generated one mean image and another set of images called bases for the images. Each basis corresponds to a feature in the images. A basis is, therefore, utilized for the feature extraction from MR images and a weighted sum of bases is also used for the feature enhancement. Furthermore, any MR image with specific feature can be obtained from a linear combination of the mean image and all of the bases. Images of hemorrhaged brain with a spin echo sequence and a series of cinematic cerebro spinal fluid flow images with ECG gated gradient refocused echo sequence were employed to estimate the ability of the feature extraction and the contrast enhancement. Results showed us that proposed application of an eigen value expansion technique to the feature extraction of MR images is good enough to clinical use and superior to other feature extraction methods such as producing a calculated MR image with a given TR and TE or the matched-filter method in processing speed and reproducibility of results. (author)

  2. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) and T2 mapping at 3T MRI of the wrist: Feasibility and clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehnitz, Christoph; Klaan, Bastian; Burkholder, Iris; von Stillfried, Falko; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Weber, Marc-André

    2017-02-01

    To assess the feasibility of delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cartilage (dGEMRIC) and T 2 mapping for biochemical imaging of the wrist at 3T. Seventeen patients with wrist pain (mean age, 41.4 ± 13.1 years) including a subgroup with chondromalacia (n = 11) and 15 healthy volunteers (26.0 ± 2.2 years) underwent dGEMRIC and T 2 mapping at 3T. For dGEMRIC, the optimum time window after contrast-injection (gadopentetate dimeglumine) was defined as the plateau of the T 1 curve of repeated measurements 15-90 minutes postinjection and assessed in all volunteers. Reference values of healthy-appearing cartilage from all individuals and values in areas of chondromalacia were assessed using region-of-interest analyses. Receiver-operating-characteristic analyses were applied to assess discriminatory ability between damaged and normal cartilage. The optimum time window was 45-90 minutes, and the 60-minute timepoint was subsequently used. In chondromalacia, dGEMRIC values were lower (551 ± 84 msec, P imaging of the wrist. Both techniques allow separation and biochemical assessment of thin opposing cartilage surfaces and can distinguish between healthy and damaged cartilage. 3 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;45:381-389. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  3. Application of fMRI to obesity research: differences in reward pathway activation measured with fMRI BOLD during visual presentation of high and low calorie foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Sinchai; Adam, Tanja C.; Goran, Michael I.; Singh, Manbir

    2012-03-01

    The factors behind the neural mechanisms that motivate food choice and obesity are not well known. Furthermore, it is not known when these neural mechanisms develop and how they are influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. This study uses fMRI together with clinical data to shed light on the aforementioned questions by investigating how appetite-related activation in the brain changes with low versus high caloric foods in pre-pubescent girls. Previous studies have shown that obese adults have less striatal D2 receptors and thus reduced Dopamine (DA) signaling leading to the reward-deficit theory of obesity. However, overeating in itself reduces D2 receptor density, D2 sensitivity and thus reward sensitivity. The results of this study will show how early these neural mechanisms develop and what effect the drastic endocrinological changes during puberty has on these mechanisms. Our preliminary results showed increased activations in the Putamen, Insula, Thalamus and Hippocampus when looking at activations where High Calorie > Low Calorie. When comparing High Calorie > Control and Low Calorie > Control, the High > Control test showed increased significant activation in the frontal lobe. The Low > Control also yielded significant activation in the Left and Right Fusiform Gyrus, which did not appear in the High > Control test. These results indicate that the reward pathway activations previously shown in post-puberty and adults are present in pre-pubescent teens. These results may suggest that some of the preferential neural mechanisms of reward are already present pre-puberty.

  4. Time-resolved single-shot terahertz time-domain spectroscopy for ultrafast irreversible processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Zhao-Hui; Zhong, Sen-Cheng; Li, Jun; Zhu, Li-Guo; Meng, Kun; Li, Jiang; Liu, Qiao; Peng, Qi-Xian; Li, Ze-Ren; Zhao, Jian-Heng

    2016-09-01

    Pulsed terahertz spectroscopy is suitable for spectroscopic diagnostics of ultrafast events. However, the study of irreversible or single shot ultrafast events requires ability to record transient properties at multiple time delays, i.e., time resolved at single shot level, which is not available currently. Here by angular multiplexing use of femtosecond laser pulses, we developed and demonstrated a time resolved, transient terahertz time domain spectroscopy technique, where burst mode THz pulses were generated and then detected in a single shot measurement manner. The burst mode THz pulses contain 2 sub-THz pulses, and the time gap between them is adjustable up to 1 ns with picosecond accuracy, thus it can be used to probe the single shot event at two different time delays. The system can detect the sub-THz pulses at 0.1 THz-2.5 THz range with signal to noise ratio (SNR) of ˜400 and spectrum resolution of 0.05 THz. System design was described here, and optimizations of single shot measurement of THz pulses were discussed in detail. Methods to improve SNR were also discussed in detail. A system application was demonstrated where pulsed THz signals at different time delays of the ultrafast process were successfully acquired within single shot measurement. This time resolved transient terahertz time domain spectroscopy technique provides a new diagnostic tool for irreversible or single shot ultrafast events where dynamic information can be extracted at terahertz range within one-shot experiment.

  5. Robust Stacking-Independent Ultrafast Charge Transfer in MoS2/WS2 Bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Ziheng; Hong, Hao; Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Qi; Huang, Wei; Cao, Ting; Qiao, Ruixi; Liu, Can; Liang, Jing; Jin, Chuanhong; Jiao, Liying; Shi, Kebin; Meng, Sheng; Liu, Kaihui

    2017-12-26

    Van der Waals-coupled two-dimensional (2D) heterostructures have attracted great attention recently due to their high potential in the next-generation photodetectors and solar cells. The understanding of charge-transfer process between adjacent atomic layers is the key to design optimal devices as it directly determines the fundamental response speed and photon-electron conversion efficiency. However, general belief and theoretical studies have shown that the charge transfer behavior depends sensitively on interlayer configurations, which is difficult to control accurately, bringing great uncertainties in device designing. Here we investigate the ultrafast dynamics of interlayer charge transfer in a prototype heterostructure, the MoS 2 /WS 2 bilayer with various stacking configurations, by optical two-color ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy. Surprisingly, we found that the charge transfer is robust against varying interlayer twist angles and interlayer coupling strength, in time scale of ∼90 fs. Our observation, together with atomic-resolved transmission electron characterization and time-dependent density functional theory simulations, reveals that the robust ultrafast charge transfer is attributed to the heterogeneous interlayer stretching/sliding, which provides additional channels for efficient charge transfer previously unknown. Our results elucidate the origin of transfer rate robustness against interlayer stacking configurations in optical devices based on 2D heterostructures, facilitating their applications in ultrafast and high-efficient optoelectronic and photovoltaic devices in the near future.

  6. Ultra-Fast Image Reconstruction of Tomosynthesis Mammography Using GPU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arefan D

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT is a technology that creates three dimensional (3D images of breast tissue. Tomosynthesis mammography detects lesions that are not detectable with other imaging systems. If image reconstruction time is in the order of seconds, we can use Tomosynthesis systems to perform Tomosynthesis-guided Interventional procedures. This research has been designed to study ultra-fast image reconstruction technique for Tomosynthesis Mammography systems using Graphics Processing Unit (GPU. At first, projections of Tomosynthesis mammography have been simulated. In order to produce Tomosynthesis projections, it has been designed a 3D breast phantom from empirical data. It is based on MRI data in its natural form. Then, projections have been created from 3D breast phantom. The image reconstruction algorithm based on FBP was programmed with C++ language in two methods using central processing unit (CPU card and the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU. It calculated the time of image reconstruction in two kinds of programming (using CPU and GPU.

  7. Multiplane wave imaging increases signal-to-noise ratio in ultrafast ultrasound imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiran, Elodie; Deffieux, Thomas; Correia, Mafalda; Maresca, David; Osmanski, Bruno-Felix; Pernot, Mathieu; Tanter, Mickael; Sieu, Lim-Anna; Bergel, Antoine; Cohen, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast imaging using plane or diverging waves has recently enabled new ultrasound imaging modes with improved sensitivity and very high frame rates. Some of these new imaging modalities include shear wave elastography, ultrafast Doppler, ultrafast contrast-enhanced imaging and functional ultrasound imaging. Even though ultrafast imaging already encounters clinical success, increasing even more its penetration depth and signal-to-noise ratio for dedicated applications would be valuable.Ultrafast imaging relies on the coherent compounding of backscattered echoes resulting from successive tilted plane waves emissions; this produces high-resolution ultrasound images with a trade-off between final frame rate, contrast and resolution. In this work, we introduce multiplane wave imaging, a new method that strongly improves ultrafast images signal-to-noise ratio by virtually increasing the emission signal amplitude without compromising the frame rate. This method relies on the successive transmissions of multiple plane waves with differently coded amplitudes and emission angles in a single transmit event. Data from each single plane wave of increased amplitude can then be obtained, by recombining the received data of successive events with the proper coefficients.The benefits of multiplane wave for B-mode, shear wave elastography and ultrafast Doppler imaging are experimentally demonstrated. Multiplane wave with 4 plane waves emissions yields a 5.8  ±  0.5 dB increase in signal-to-noise ratio and approximately 10 mm in penetration in a calibrated ultrasound phantom (0.7 d MHz −1 cm −1 ). In shear wave elastography, the same multiplane wave configuration yields a 2.07  ±  0.05 fold reduction of the particle velocity standard deviation and a two-fold reduction of the shear wave velocity maps standard deviation. In functional ultrasound imaging, the mapping of cerebral blood volume results in a 3 to 6 dB increase of the contrast-to-noise ratio in

  8. MRI Primer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oldendorf, W.; Oldendorf, W. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Designed for studies, radiologists, and clinicians at all levels of training, this book provides a basic introduction to the principles, physics, and instrumentation of magnetic resonance imaging. The fundamental concepts that are essential for the optimal clinical use of MRI are thoroughly explained in easily accessible terms. To facilitate the reader's comprehension, the material is presented nonmathematically, using no equations and a minimum of symbols and abbreviations. MRI Primer presents a clear account of the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance and the use of gradient magnetic fields to create clinically useful images of cross-sectional slices. Close attention is given to the magnetization vector as a means of expressing nuclear behavior, the role of T 1 and T 2 weighing in imaging, the use of contrast agents, and the pulse sequences most often used in clinical practice, as well as to the relative capabilities and limitations of MRI and CT. The basic hardware components of an MRI scanner are described in detail. Sample MRI scans illustrate how MRI characterizes tissue. An appendix provides a brief introduction to quantum processes in MRI

  9. High-speed ultrafast laser machining with tertiary beam positioning (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chuan; Zhang, Haibin

    2017-03-01

    For an industrial laser application, high process throughput and low average cost of ownership are critical to commercial success. Benefiting from high peak power, nonlinear absorption and small-achievable spot size, ultrafast lasers offer advantages of minimal heat affected zone, great taper and sidewall quality, and small via capability that exceeds the limits of their predecessors in via drilling for electronic packaging. In the past decade, ultrafast lasers have both grown in power and reduced in cost. For example, recently, disk and fiber technology have both shown stable operation in the 50W to 200W range, mostly at high repetition rate (beyond 500 kHz) that helps avoid detrimental nonlinear effects. However, to effectively and efficiently scale the throughput with the fast-growing power capability of the ultrafast lasers while keeping the beneficial laser-material interactions is very challenging, mainly because of the bottleneck imposed by the inertia-related acceleration limit and servo gain bandwidth when only stages and galvanometers are being used. On the other side, inertia-free scanning solutions like acoustic optics and electronic optical deflectors have small scan field, and therefore not suitable for large-panel processing. Our recent system developments combine stages, galvanometers, and AODs into a coordinated tertiary architecture for high bandwidth and meanwhile large field beam positioning. Synchronized three-level movements allow extremely fast local speed and continuous motion over the whole stage travel range. We present the via drilling results from such ultrafast system with up to 3MHz pulse to pulse random access, enabling high quality low cost ultrafast machining with emerging high average power laser sources.

  10. Modelling cardiac signal as a confound in EEG-fMRI and its application in focal epilepsy studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liston, A. D.; Ellegaard Lund, Torben; Salek-Haddadi, A

    2006-01-01

    effects to be modelled, as effects of no interest. Our model is based on an over-complete basis set covering a linear relationship between cardiac-related MR signal and the phase of the cardiac cycle or time after pulse (TAP). This method showed that, on average, 24.6 +/- 10.9% of grey matter voxels......Cardiac noise has been shown to reduce the sensitivity of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) to an experimental effect due to its confounding presence in the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal. Its effect is most severe in particular regions of the brain and a method is yet...... to take it into account in routine fMRI analysis. This paper reports the development of a general and robust technique to improve the reliability of EEG-fMRI studies to BOLD signal correlated with interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs). In these studies, ECG is routinely recorded, enabling cardiac...

  11. Clinical Nononcologic Applications of PET/CT and PET/MRI in Musculoskeletal, Orthopedic, and Rheumatologic Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholamrezanezhad, Ali; Basques, Kyle; Batouli, Ali; Matcuk, George; Alavi, Abass; Jadvar, Hossein

    2018-06-01

    With improvements in PET/CT and PET/MRI over the last decade, as well as increased understanding of the pathophysiology of musculoskeletal diseases, there is an emerging potential for PET as a primary or complementary modality in the management of rheumatologic and orthopedic conditions. We discuss the role of PET/CT and PET/MRI in nononcologic musculoskeletal disorders, including inflammatory and infectious conditions and postoperative complications. There is great potential for an increased role for PET to serve as a primary or complementary modality in the management of orthopedic and rheumatologic disorders.

  12. Seeing in 4D with electrons: development of ultrafast electron microscopy at Caltech

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baskin, J.S.; Zewail, A.H.

    2014-01-01

    The vision to develop 4D electron microscopy, a union of the capabilities of electron microscopy with ultrafast techniques to capture clearly defined images of the nano-scale structure of a material at each step in the course of its chemical or physical transformations, has been pursued at Caltech for the last decade. In this contribution, we will give a brief overview of the capabilities of three currently active Caltech 4D microscopy laboratories. Ongoing work is illustrated by a description of the most recent application of photon-induced near-field electron microscopy (PINEM), a field made possible only by the development of the 4D ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM). An appendix gives the various applications made so far and the historic roots of the development at Caltech. (authors)

  13. Ultrafast Time-Resolved Photoluminescence Studies of Gallium-Arsenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew Bruce

    This thesis concerns the study of ultrafast phenomena in GaAs using time-resolved photoluminescence (PL). The thesis consists of five chapters. Chapter one is an introduction, which discusses the study of ultrafast phenomena in semiconductors. Chapter two is a description of the colliding-pulse mode-locked (CPM) ring dye laser, which is at the heart of the experimental apparatus used in this thesis. Chapter three presents a detailed experimental and theoretical investigation of photoluminescence excitation correlation spectroscopy (PECS), the novel technique which is used to time-resolve ultrafast PL phenomena. Chapters 4 and 5 discuss two applications of the PECS technique. In Chapter 4 the variation of PL intensity in In-alloyed GaAs substrate material is studied, while Chapter 5 discusses the variation of carrier lifetimes in ion-damaged GaAs used in photo-conductive circuit elements (PCEs). PECS is a pulse-probe technique that measures the cross correlation of photo-excited carrier populations. The theoretical model employed in this thesis is based upon the rate equation for a simple three-level system consisting of valence and conduction bands and a single trap level. In the limit of radiative band-to-band dominated recombination, no PECS signal should be observed; while in the capture -dominated recombination limit, the PECS signal from the band-to-band PL measures the cross correlation of the excited electron and hole populations and thus, the electron and hole lifetimes. PECS is experimentally investigated using a case study of PL in semi-insulating (SI) GaAs and In -alloyed GaAs. At 77 K, the PECS signal is characteristic of a capture-dominated system, yielding an electron-hole lifetime of about 200 ps. However, at 5 K the behavior is more complicated and shows saturation effects due to the C acceptor level, which is un-ionized at 5 K. As a first application, PECS is used to investigate the large band-to-band PL contrast observed near dislocations in In

  14. Combined PET/MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, D. L.; Pichler, B. J.; Gückel, B.

    2015-01-01

    This paper summarises key themes and discussions from the 4th international workshop dedicated to the advancement of the technical, scientific and clinical applications of combined positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems that was held in Tübingen, Germany, from...

  15. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia: MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wall, E.E. van der; Bootsma, M.M.; Schalij, M.J.; Kayser, H.W.M.; Roos, A. de

    2000-01-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD) is a heart muscle disorder of unknown cause that is characterized pathologically by fibrofatty replacement of the right ventricular myocardium. Clinical manifestations include structural and functional malformations of the right ventricle, electrocardiographic abnormalities, and presentation with ventricular tachycardias with left bundle branch pattern or sudden death. The disease is often familial with an autosomal inheritance. In addition to right ventricular dilatation, right ventricular aneurysms are typical deformities of ARVD and they are distributed in the so-called ''triangle of dysplasia'', i. e., right ventricular outflow tract, apex, and infundibulum. Ventricular aneurysms at these sites can be considered pathognomonic of ARVD. Another typical hallmark of ARVD is fibrofatty infiltration of the right ventricular free wall. These functional and morphologic characteristics are relevant to clinical imaging investigations such as contrast angiography, echocardiography, radionuclide angiography, ultrafast computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Among these techniques, MRI allows the clearest visualization of the heart, in particular because the right ventricle is involved, which is usually more difficult to explore with the other imaging modalities. Furthermore, MRI offers the specific advantage of visualizing adipose infiltration as a bright signal of the right ventricular myocardium. MRI provides the most important anatomic, functional, and morphologic criteria for diagnosis of ARVD within one single study. As a result, MRI appears to be the optimal imaging technique for detecting and following patients with clinical suspicion of ARVD. (orig.) [de

  16. Head MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hearing aids Pins, hairpins, metal zippers, and similar metallic items Removable dental work How the Test will ... an MRI can make heart pacemakers and other implants not work as well. It can also cause ...

  17. Pediatric MRI

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The NIH Study of Normal Brain Development is a longitudinal study using anatomical MRI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and MR spectroscopy (MRS) to map pediatric...

  18. Progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science

    CERN Document Server

    Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Li, Ruxin; Chin, See Leang

    2009-01-01

    The PUILS series presents Progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science, a newly emerging interdisciplinary research field spanning atomic and molecular physics, molecular science, and optical science. PUILS has been stimulated by the recent development of ultrafast laser technologies. Each volume contains approximately 15 chapters, authored by researchers at the forefront. Each chapter opens with an overview of the topics to be discussed, so that researchers, who are not experts in the specific topics, as well as graduate students can grasp the importance and attractions of this sub-field of research, and these are followed by reports of cutting-edge discoveries. This fourth volume covers a broad range of topics from this interdisciplinary research field, focusing on strong field ionization of atoms; excitation, ionization and fragmentation of molecules; nonlinear intense optical phenomena and attosecond pulses; and laser - solid interactions and photoemission.

  19. Ultrafast magnetodynamics with free-electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvestuto, Marco; Ciprian, Roberta; Caretta, Antonio; Casarin, Barbara; Parmigiani, Fulvio

    2018-02-01

    The study of ultrafast magnetodynamics has entered a new era thanks to the groundbreaking technological advances in free-electron laser (FEL) light sources. The advent of these light sources has made possible unprecedented experimental schemes for time-resolved x-ray magneto-optic spectroscopies, which are now paving the road for exploring the ultimate limits of out-of-equilibrium magnetic phenomena. In particular, these studies will provide insights into elementary mechanisms governing spin and orbital dynamics, therefore contributing to the development of ultrafast devices for relevant magnetic technologies. This topical review focuses on recent advancement in the study of non-equilibrium magnetic phenomena from the perspective of time-resolved extreme ultra violet (EUV) and soft x-ray spectroscopies at FELs with highlights of some important experimental results.

  20. Progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science III

    CERN Document Server

    Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Agostini, Pierre; Ferrante, Gaetano

    2008-01-01

    The PUILS series presents Progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science, a newly emerging interdisciplinary research field spanning atomic and molecular physics, molecular science, and optical science. PUILS has been stimulated by the recent development of ultrafast laser technologies. Each volume contains approximately 15 chapters, authored by researchers at the forefront. Each chapter opens with an overview of the topics to be discussed, so that researchers, who are not experts in the specific topics, as well as graduate students can grasp the importance and attractions of this sub-field of research, and these are followed by reports of cutting-edge discoveries. This third volume covers a diverse range of disciplines, focusing on such topics as strong field ionization of atoms, ionization and fragmentation of molecules and clusters, generation of high-order harmonics and attosecond pulses, filamentation and laser plasma interaction, and the development of ultrashort and ultrahigh-intensity light sources.

  1. Ultra-fast framing camera tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalibjian, Ralph

    1981-01-01

    An electronic framing camera tube features focal plane image dissection and synchronized restoration of the dissected electron line images to form two-dimensional framed images. Ultra-fast framing is performed by first streaking a two-dimensional electron image across a narrow slit, thereby dissecting the two-dimensional electron image into sequential electron line images. The dissected electron line images are then restored into a framed image by a restorer deflector operated synchronously with the dissector deflector. The number of framed images on the tube's viewing screen is equal to the number of dissecting slits in the tube. The distinguishing features of this ultra-fast framing camera tube are the focal plane dissecting slits, and the synchronously-operated restorer deflector which restores the dissected electron line images into a two-dimensional framed image. The framing camera tube can produce image frames having high spatial resolution of optical events in the sub-100 picosecond range.

  2. Ultrafast Terahertz Conductivity of Photoexcited Nanocrystalline Silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooke, David; MacDonald, A. Nicole; Hryciw, Aaron

    2007-01-01

    The ultrafast transient ac conductivity of nanocrystalline silicon films is investigated using time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy. While epitaxial silicon on sapphire exhibits a free carrier Drude response, silicon nanocrystals embedded in glass show a response that is best described by a class...... in the silicon nanocrystal films is dominated by trapping at the Si/SiO2 interface states, occurring on a 1–100 ps time scale depending on particle size and hydrogen passivation......The ultrafast transient ac conductivity of nanocrystalline silicon films is investigated using time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy. While epitaxial silicon on sapphire exhibits a free carrier Drude response, silicon nanocrystals embedded in glass show a response that is best described...

  3. Development of Scanning Ultrafast Electron Microscope Capability.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Kimberlee Chiyoko [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Talin, Albert Alec [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Chandler, David W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Michael, Joseph R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Modern semiconductor devices rely on the transport of minority charge carriers. Direct examination of minority carrier lifetimes in real devices with nanometer-scale features requires a measurement method with simultaneously high spatial and temporal resolutions. Achieving nanometer spatial resolutions at sub-nanosecond temporal resolution is possible with pump-probe methods that utilize electrons as probes. Recently, a stroboscopic scanning electron microscope was developed at Caltech, and used to study carrier transport across a Si p-n junction [ 1 , 2 , 3 ] . In this report, we detail our development of a prototype scanning ultrafast electron microscope system at Sandia National Laboratories based on the original Caltech design. This effort represents Sandia's first exploration into ultrafast electron microscopy.

  4. Coherent combination of ultrafast fiber amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanna, Marc; Guichard, Florent; Druon, Frédéric; Georges, Patrick; Zaouter, Yoann; Papadopoulos, Dimitris N

    2016-01-01

    We review recent progress in coherent combining of femtosecond pulses amplified in optical fibers as a way to scale the peak and average power of ultrafast sources. Different methods of achieving coherent pulse addition in space (beam combining) and time (divided pulse amplification) domains are described. These architectures can be widely classified into active methods, where the relative phases between pulses are subject to a servomechanism, and passive methods, where phase matching is inherent to the geometry. Other experiments that combine pulses with different spectral contents, pulses that have been nonlinearly broadened or successive pulses from a mode-locked laser oscillator, are then presented. All these techniques allow access to unprecedented parameter range for fiber ultrafast sources. (topical review)

  5. Silicon based ultrafast optical waveform sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ji, Hua; Galili, Michael; Pu, Minhao

    2010-01-01

    A 300 nmx450 nmx5 mm silicon nanowire is designed and fabricated for a four wave mixing based non-linear optical gate. Based on this silicon nanowire, an ultra-fast optical sampling system is successfully demonstrated using a free-running fiber laser with a carbon nanotube-based mode-locker as th......A 300 nmx450 nmx5 mm silicon nanowire is designed and fabricated for a four wave mixing based non-linear optical gate. Based on this silicon nanowire, an ultra-fast optical sampling system is successfully demonstrated using a free-running fiber laser with a carbon nanotube-based mode......-locker as the sampling source. A clear eye-diagram of a 320 Gbit/s data signal is obtained. The temporal resolution of the sampling system is estimated to 360 fs....

  6. Progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science VI

    CERN Document Server

    Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Bandrauk, André D

    2010-01-01

    The PUILS series delivers up-to-date reviews of progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science, a newly emerging interdisciplinary research field spanning atomic and molecular physics, molecular science, and optical science, which has been stimulated by the recent developments in ultrafast laser technologies. Each volume compiles peer-reviewed articles authored by researchers at the forefront of each their own subfields of UILS. Every chapter opens with an overview of the topics to be discussed, so that researchers unfamiliar to the subfield, as well as graduate students, can grasp the importance and attractions of the research topic at hand; these are followed by reports of cutting-edge discoveries. This sixth volume covers a broad range of topics from this interdisciplinary research field, focusing on responses of molecules to ultrashort intense laser pulses, generation and characterization of attosecond pulses and high-order harmonics, and filamentation and laser-plasma interaction.

  7. Ultrafast Dynamic Pressure Sensors Based on Graphene Hybrid Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shanbiao; Wu, Xing; Zhang, Dongdong; Guo, Congwei; Wang, Peng; Hu, Weida; Li, Xinming; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Xu, Hejun; Luo, Chen; Zhang, Jian; Chu, Junhao

    2017-07-19

    Mechanical flexible electronic skin has been focused on sensing various physical parameters, such as pressure and temperature. The studies of material design and array-accessible devices are the building blocks of strain sensors for subtle pressure sensing. Here, we report a new and facile preparation of a graphene hybrid structure with an ultrafast dynamic pressure response. Graphene oxide nanosheets are used as a surfactant to prevent graphene restacking in aqueous solution. This graphene hybrid structure exhibits a frequency-independent pressure resistive sensing property. Exceeding natural skin, such pressure sensors, can provide transient responses from static up to 10 000 Hz dynamic frequencies. Integrated by the controlling system, the array-accessible sensors can manipulate a robot arm and self-rectify the temperature of a heating blanket. This may pave a path toward the future application of graphene-based wearable electronics.

  8. Ultrafast secondary emission x-ray imaging detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akkerman, A.; Gibrekhterman, A.; Majewski, S.

    1991-07-01

    Fast high accuracy, x-ray imaging at high photon flux can be achieved when coupling thin solid convertors to gaseous electron multipliers, operating at low gas pressures. Secondary electron emitted from the convertor foil are multiplied in several successive amplification elements. The obvious advantage of solid x-ray detectors, as compared to gaseous conversion, are the production of parallax-free images and the fast (subnanoseconds) response. These x-ray detectors have many potential applications in basic and applied research. Of particular interest is the possibility of an efficient and ultrafast high resolution imaging of transition radiation,with a reduced dE/dx background. We present experimental results on the operation of the secondary emission x-ray (SEX) detectors, their detection efficiency, localization and time resolution. The experimental work is accompanied by mathematical modelling and computer simulation of transition radiation detectors based on CsI transition radiation convertors. (author)

  9. Measuring protein dynamics with ultrafast two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamczyk, Katrin; Candelaresi, Marco; Hunt, Neil T; Robb, Kirsty; Hoskisson, Paul A; Tucker, Nicholas P; Gumiero, Andrea; Walsh, Martin A; Parker, Anthony W

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in the methodology and application of ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy to biomolecular systems are reviewed. A description of the 2D-IR technique and the molecular contributions to the observed spectra are presented followed by a discussion of recent literature relating to the use of 2D-IR and associated approaches for measuring protein dynamics. In particular, these include the use of diatomic ligand groups for measuring haem protein dynamics, isotopic labelling strategies and the use of vibrational probe groups. The final section reports on the current state of the art regarding the use of 2D-IR methods to provide insights into biological reaction mechanisms. (topical review)

  10. Locking Lasers to RF in an Ultrafast FEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilcox, R.; Huang, G.; Doolittle, L.; White, W.; Frisch, J.; Coffee, R.

    2010-01-01

    Using a novel, phase-stabilized RF-over-fiber scheme, they transmit 3GHz over 300m with 27fs RMS error in 250kHz bandwidth over 12 hours, and phase lock a laser to enable ultrafast pump-probe experiments. Free-electron lasers (FELs) are capable of producing short-duration (< 10fs), high-energy X-ray pulses for a range of scientific applications. The recently activated Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) FEL facility at SLAC will support experiments which require synchronized light pulses for pump-probe schemes. They developed and operated a fiber optic RF transmission system to synchronize lasers to the emitted X-ray pulses, which was used to enable the first pump-probe experiments at the LCLS.

  11. Ultrafast protein structure-based virtual screening with Panther

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niinivehmas, Sanna P.; Salokas, Kari; Lätti, Sakari; Raunio, Hannu; Pentikäinen, Olli T.

    2015-10-01

    Molecular docking is by far the most common method used in protein structure-based virtual screening. This paper presents Panther, a novel ultrafast multipurpose docking tool. In Panther, a simple shape-electrostatic model of the ligand-binding area of the protein is created by utilizing the protein crystal structure. The features of the possible ligands are then compared to the model by using a similarity search algorithm. On average, one ligand can be processed in a few minutes by using classical docking methods, whereas using Panther processing takes Panther protocol can be used in several applications, such as speeding up the early phases of drug discovery projects, reducing the number of failures in the clinical phase of the drug development process, and estimating the environmental toxicity of chemicals. Panther-code is available in our web pages (http://www.jyu.fi/panther) free of charge after registration.

  12. Ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry and spectroscopy of laser shocked materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcgrane, Shawn David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bolme, Cindy B [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Whitley, Von H [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Moore, David S [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Shock waves create extreme states of matter with very high pressures, temperatures, and volumetric compressions, at an exceedingly rapid rate of change. We review how to use a beamsplitter and a note card to turn a typical chirp pulse amplified femtosecond laser system into an ultrafast shock dynamics machine. Open scientific questions that can be addressed with such an apparatus are described. We report on the development of several single shot time resolved diagnostics needed to answer these questions. These single shot diagnostics are expected to be broadly applicable to other types of laser ablation experiments. Experimental results measured from shocked material dynamics of several systems are detailed. Finally, we report on progress towards using transient absorption as a measure of electronic excitation and coherent Raman as a picosecond probe of temperature in shock compressed condensed matter.

  13. A passion for precision - from the ultrafast to the ultraslow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haensch, T.W.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Femtosecond laser optical frequency comb synthesizers have become the established tool for measuring the frequency of light with extreme precision. By permitting phase-coherent comparisons of optical and microwave frequencies, they can serve as the clockwork for ultraprecise optical atomic clocks. Applications to laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen permit stringent tests of basic laws of quantum physics. Such experiments can yield accurate values of fundamental constants, and they may reveal slow changes of fundamental constants with the evolution of the universe. Laser frequency comb techniques can also control the light phase of femtosecond laser pulses, thus advancing the frontier of ultrafast science from the femtosecond to the attosecond regime. High harmonic generation with intense femtosecond pulses may extend frequency comb techniques to the extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray regime, conquering new territory for precision laser spectroscopy and fundamental measurements. (author)

  14. Ultrafast stimulated Raman spectroscopy in the near-infrared region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takaya, Tomohisa

    2016-01-01

    A number of electronic transitions in the near-infrared wavelength region are associated with migration or delocalization of electrons in large molecules or molecular systems. Time-resolved near-infrared Raman spectroscopy will be a powerful tool for investigating the structural dynamic of samples with delocalized electrons. However, the sensitivity of near-infrared spontaneous Raman spectrometers is significantly low due to an extremely small probability of Raman scattering and a low sensitivity of near-infrared detectors. Nonlinear Raman spectroscopy is one of the techniques that can overcome the sensitivity problems and enable us to obtain time-resolved Raman spectra in resonance with near-IR transitions. In this article, the author introduces recent progress of ultrafast time-resolved near-infrared stimulated Raman spectroscopy. Optical setup, spectral and temporal resolution, and applications of the spectrometer are described. (author)

  15. Nonlinear ultrafast optical response in organic molecular crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Talat S.; Turkowski, Volodymyr; Leuenberger, Michael N.

    2012-02-01

    We analyze possible nonlinear excitonic effects in the organic molecule crystals by using a combined time-dependent DFT and many-body approach. In particular, we analyze possible effects of the time-dependent (retarded)interaction between different types of excitations, Frenkel excitons, charge transfer excitons and excimers, on the electric and the optical response of the system. We pay special attention to the case of constant electric field and ultrafast pulses, including that of four-wave mixing experiments. As a specific application we examine the optical excitations of pentacene nanocrystals and compare the results with available experimental data.[1] Our results demostrate that the nonlinear effects can play an important role in the optical response of these systems. [1] A. Kabakchiev, ``Scanning Tunneling Luminescence of Pentacene Nanocrystals'', PhD Thesis (EPFL, Lausanne, 2010).

  16. CT and MRI assessment and characterization using segmentation and 3D modeling techniques: applications to muscle, bone and brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Gargiulo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the novel use of CT and MRI data and image processing tools to segment and reconstruct tissue images in 3D to determine characteristics of muscle, bone and brain.This to study and simulate the structural changes occurring in healthy and pathological conditions as well as in response to clinical treatments. Here we report the application of this methodology to evaluate and quantify: 1. progression of atrophy in human muscle subsequent to permanent lower motor neuron (LMN denervation, 2. muscle recovery as induced by functional electrical stimulation (FES, 3. bone quality in patients undergoing total hip replacement and 4. to model the electrical activity of the brain. Study 1: CT data and segmentation techniques were used to quantify changes in muscle density and composition by associating the Hounsfield unit values of muscle, adipose and fibrous connective tissue with different colors. This method was employed to monitor patients who have permanent muscle LMN denervation in the lower extremities under two different conditions: permanent LMN denervated not electrically stimulated and stimulated. Study 2: CT data and segmentation techniques were employed, however, in this work we assessed bone and muscle conditions in the pre-operative CT scans of patients scheduled to undergo total hip replacement. In this work, the overall anatomical structure, the bone mineral density (BMD and compactness of quadriceps muscles and proximal femoral was computed to provide a more complete view for surgeons when deciding which implant technology to use. Further, a Finite element analysis provided a map of the strains around the proximal femur socket when solicited by typical stresses caused by an implant press fitting. Study 3 describes a method to model the electrical behavior of human brain using segmented MR images. The aim of the work is to use these models to predict the electrical activity of the human brain under normal and pathological

  17. Synthesis, Characterization, and Ultrafast Dynamics of Metal, Metal Oxide, and Semiconductor Nanomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Wheeler, Damon Andreas

    2013-01-01

    SYNTHESIS, CHARACTERIZATION, AND ULTRAFAST DYNAMICS OF METAL, METAL OXIDE, AND SEMICONDUCTOR NANOMATERIALSABSTRACTThe optical properties of each of the three main classes of inorganic nanomaterials, metals, metal oxides, and semiconductors differ greatly due to the intrinsically different nature of the materials. These optical properties are among the most fascinating and useful aspects of nanomaterials with applications spanning cancer treatment, sensors, lasers, and solar cells. One techn...

  18. Mechano-actuated ultrafast full-colour switching in layered photonic hydrogels

    OpenAIRE

    Yue, Youfeng; Kurokawa, Takayuki; Haque, Md Anamul; Nakajima, Tasuku; Nonoyama, Takayuki; Li, Xufeng; Kajiwara, Itsuro; Gong, Jian Ping

    2014-01-01

    Photonic crystals with tunability in the visible region are of great interest for controlling light diffraction. Mechanochromic photonic materials are periodically structured soft materials designed with a photonic stop-band that can be tuned by mechanical forces to reflect specific colours. Soft photonic materials with broad colour tunability and fast colour switching are invaluable for application. Here we report a novel mechano-actuated, soft photonic hydrogel that has an ultrafast-respons...

  19. An ultrafast nanotip electron gun triggered by grating-coupled surface plasmons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schröder, Benjamin; Sivis, Murat; Bormann, Reiner; Schäfer, Sascha; Ropers, Claus, E-mail: cropers@gwdg.de [4th Physical Institute - Solids and Nanostructures, University of Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2015-12-07

    We demonstrate multiphoton photoelectron emission from gold nanotips induced by nanofocusing surface plasmons, resonantly excited on the tip shaft by a grating coupler. The tip is integrated into an electron gun assembly, which facilitates control over the spatial emission sites and allows us to disentangle direct grating emission from plasmon-triggered apex emission. The nanoscale source size of this electron gun concept enables highly coherent electron pulses with applications in ultrafast electron imaging and diffraction.

  20. Ultrafast Phase Comparator for Phase-Locked Loop-Based Optoelectronic Clock Recovery Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomez-Agis, F.; Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo; Kurimura, S.

    2009-01-01

    The authors report on a novel application of a chi((2)) nonlinear optical device as an ultrafast phase comparator, an essential element that allows an optoelectronic phase-locked loop to perform clock recovery of ultrahigh-speed optical time-division multiplexed (OTDM) signals. Particular interest...... is devoted to a quasi-phase-matching adhered-ridge-waveguide periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) device, which shows a sufficient high temporal resolution to resolve a 640 Gbits OTDM signal....

  1. A novel anisotropic fast marching method and its application to blood flow computation in phase-contrast MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenke, M; Hennemuth, A; Fischer, B; Friman, O

    2012-01-01

    Phase-contrast MRI (PC MRI) can be used to assess blood flow dynamics noninvasively inside the human body. The acquired images can be reconstructed into flow vector fields. Traditionally, streamlines can be computed based on the vector fields to visualize flow patterns and particle trajectories. The traditional methods may give a false impression of precision, as they do not consider the measurement uncertainty in the PC MRI images. In our prior work, we incorporated the uncertainty of the measurement into the computation of particle trajectories. As a major part of the contribution, a novel numerical scheme for solving the anisotropic Fast Marching problem is presented. A computing time comparison to state-of-the-art methods is conducted on artificial tensor fields. A visual comparison of healthy to pathological blood flow patterns is given. The comparison shows that the novel anisotropic Fast Marching solver outperforms previous schemes in terms of computing time. The visual comparison of flow patterns directly visualizes large deviations of pathological flow from healthy flow. The novel anisotropic Fast Marching solver efficiently resolves even strongly anisotropic path costs. The visualization method enables the user to assess the uncertainty of particle trajectories derived from PC MRI images.

  2. Modelling Cardiac Signal as a Confound in EEG-fMRI and its Application in Focal Epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liston, Adam David; Salek-Haddadi, Afraim; Hamandi, Khalid

    2005-01-01

    Cardiac noise has been shown to reduce the sensitivity of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) to an experimental effect due to its confounding presence in the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal. Its effect is most severe in particular regions of the brain and a method is yet...

  3. Pulsatility of Lenticulostriate Arteries Assessed by 7 Tesla Flow MRI-Measurement, Reproducibility, and Applicability to Aging Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnerr, Roald S; Jansen, Jacobus F A; Uludag, Kamil; Hofman, Paul A M; Wildberger, Joachim E; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J; Backes, Walter H

    2017-01-01

    Characterization of flow properties in cerebral arteries with 1.5 and 3 Tesla MRI is usually limited to large cerebral arteries and difficult to evaluate in the small perforating arteries due to insufficient spatial resolution. In this study, we assessed the feasibility to measure blood flow waveforms in the small lenticulostriate arteries with 7 Tesla velocity-sensitive MRI. The middle cerebral artery was included as reference. Imaging was performed in five young and five old healthy volunteers. Flow was calculated by integrating time-varying velocity values over the vascular cross-section. MRI acquisitions were performed twice in each subject to determine reproducibility. From the flow waveforms, the pulsatility index and damping factor were deduced. Reproducibility values, in terms of the intraclass correlation coefficients, were found to be good to excellent. Measured pulsatility index of the lenticulostriate arteries significantly increased and damping factor significantly decreased with age. In conclusion, we demonstrate that blood flow through the lenticostriate arteries can be precisely measured using 7 Tesla MRI and reveal effects of arterial stiffness due to aging. These findings hold promise to provide relevant insights into the pathologies involving perforating cerebral arteries.

  4. Application of whole-lesion histogram analysis of pharmacokinetic parameters in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of breast lesions with the CAIPIRINHA-Dixon-TWIST-VIBE technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiwei; Ai, Tao; Hu, Yiqi; Yan, Xu; Nickel, Marcel Dominik; Xu, Xiao; Xia, Liming

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the application of whole-lesion histogram analysis of pharmacokinetic parameters for differentiating malignant from benign breast lesions on dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). In all, 92 women with 97 breast lesions (26 benign and 71 malignant lesions) were enrolled in this study. Patients underwent dynamic breast MRI at 3T using a prototypical CAIPIRINHA-Dixon-TWIST-VIBE (CDT-VIBE) sequence and a subsequent surgery or biopsy. Inflow rate of the agent between plasma and interstitium (K trans ), outflow rate of agent between interstitium and plasma (K ep ), extravascular space volume per unit volume of tissue (v e ) including mean value, 25th/50th/75th/90th percentiles, skewness, and kurtosis were then calculated based on the whole lesion. A single-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, paired t-test, and receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis were used for statistical analysis. Malignant breast lesions had significantly higher K trans , K ep , and lower v e in mean values, 25th/50th/75th/90th percentiles, and significantly higher skewness of v e than benign breast lesions (all P 0.05). The 90th percentile of K trans , the 90th percentile of K ep , and the 50th percentile of v e showed the greatest areas under the ROC curve (AUC) for each pharmacokinetic parameter derived from DCE-MRI. The 90th percentile of K ep achieved the highest AUC value (0.927) among all histogram-derived values. The whole-lesion histogram analysis of pharmacokinetic parameters can improve the diagnostic accuracy of breast DCE-MRI with the CDT-VIBE technique. The 90th percentile of K ep may be the best indicator in differentiation between malignant and benign breast lesions. 4 Technical Efficacy Stage: 2 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018;47:91-96. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  5. Comparison of Diffusion MRI Acquisition Protocols for the In Vivo Characterization of the Mouse Spinal Cord: Variability Analysis and Application to an Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figini, Matteo; Scotti, Alessandro; Marcuzzo, Stefania; Bonanno, Silvia; Padelli, Francesco; Moreno-Manzano, Victoria; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Bernasconi, Pia; Mantegazza, Renato; Bruzzone, Maria Grazia; Zucca, Ileana

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (dMRI) has relevant applications in the microstructural characterization of the spinal cord, especially in neurodegenerative diseases. Animal models have a pivotal role in the study of such diseases; however, in vivo spinal dMRI of small animals entails additional challenges that require a systematical investigation of acquisition parameters. The purpose of this study is to compare three acquisition protocols and identify the scanning parameters allowing a robust estimation of the main diffusion quantities and a good sensitivity to neurodegeneration in the mouse spinal cord. For all the protocols, the signal-to-noise and contrast-to noise ratios and the mean value and variability of Diffusion Tensor metrics were evaluated in healthy controls. For the estimation of fractional anisotropy less variability was provided by protocols with more diffusion directions, for the estimation of mean, axial and radial diffusivity by protocols with fewer diffusion directions and higher diffusion weighting. Intermediate features (12 directions, b = 1200 s/mm2) provided the overall minimum inter- and intra-subject variability in most cases. In order to test the diagnostic sensitivity of the protocols, 7 G93A-SOD1 mice (model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) at 10 and 17 weeks of age were scanned and the derived diffusion parameters compared with those estimated in age-matched healthy animals. The protocols with an intermediate or high number of diffusion directions provided the best differentiation between the two groups at week 17, whereas only few local significant differences were highlighted at week 10. According to our results, a dMRI protocol with an intermediate number of diffusion gradient directions and a relatively high diffusion weighting is optimal for spinal cord imaging. Further work is needed to confirm these results and for a finer tuning of acquisition parameters. Nevertheless, our findings could be important for the

  6. Ultrafast Photovoltaic Response in Ferroelectric Nanolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-19

    the free energy of the system [3,4,8]. Intensive research has been aimed at bypassing the intrinsic size limits imposed by the depolarization field...Page 1 of 21   Ultrafast photovoltaic response in ferroelectric nanolayers Dan Daranciang1,2, Matthew J. Highland3, Haidan Wen4, Steve M. Young5...ferroelectric PbTiO3 via direct coupling to its intrinsic photovoltaic response. Using time-resolved x-ray scattering to visualize atomic displacements on

  7. On applicability of PCA, voxel-wise variance normalization and dimensionality assumptions for sliding temporal window sICA in resting-state fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remes, Jukka J; Abou Elseoud, Ahmed; Ollila, Esa; Haapea, Marianne; Starck, Tuomo; Nikkinen, Juha; Tervonen, Osmo; Silven, Olli

    2013-10-01

    Subject-level resting-state fMRI (RS-fMRI) spatial independent component analysis (sICA) may provide new ways to analyze the data when performed in the sliding time window. However, whether principal component analysis (PCA) and voxel-wise variance normalization (VN) are applicable pre-processing procedures in the sliding-window context, as they are for regular sICA, has not been addressed so far. Also model order selection requires further studies concerning sliding-window sICA. In this paper we have addressed these concerns. First, we compared PCA-retained subspaces concerning overlapping parts of consecutive temporal windows to answer whether in-window PCA and VN can confound comparisons between sICA analyses in consecutive windows. Second, we compared the PCA subspaces between windowed and full data to assess expected comparability between windowed and full-data sICA results. Third, temporal evolution of dimensionality estimates in RS-fMRI data sets was monitored to identify potential challenges in model order selection in a sliding-window sICA context. Our results illustrate that in-window VN can be safely used, in-window PCA is applicable with most window widths and that comparisons between windowed and full data should not be performed from a subspace similarity point of view. In addition, our studies on dimensionality estimates demonstrated that there are sustained, periodic and very case-specific changes in signal-to-noise ratio within RS-fMRI data sets. Consequently, dimensionality estimation is needed for well-founded model order determination in the sliding-window case. The observed periodic changes correspond to a frequency band of ≤0.1 Hz, which is commonly associated with brain activity in RS-fMRI and become on average most pronounced at window widths of 80 and 60 time points (144 and 108 s, respectively). Wider windows provided only slightly better comparability between consecutive windows, and 60 time point or shorter windows also provided the

  8. MRI in gout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidl, G.; Ullrich, R.; Trattnig, S.; Dominkus, M.; Morscher, M.; Aringer, M.; Imhof, H.

    1996-01-01

    The appearance of gouty tophus in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is characteristic. On T1- and T2-weighted SE images, the signal intensity of tophaceous lesions is similar to that of muscles. According to the histology, T2-weighted SE images demonstrate extremely hyperintense signals, which reflect the high protein content in the amorpheous center of the tophus. The microscopic urate crystals deposited there have no MRI signal and are of no further diagnostic impact. Vascularized granulation tissue surrounding the tophus center enhance after intervenous application of contrast agents (Gadolinium). The inflammed tophus is associated with local edema, causing high signal intensity. MRI is superior to plain radiography for early detection of intraosseous tophi. Involvement of anatomical structures such as ligaments and tendons can be evaluated sufficiently. For peripheral joints, axial slice orientation is most helpful. (orig.) [de

  9. Roadmap of ultrafast x-ray atomic and molecular physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Linda; Ueda, Kiyoshi; Gühr, Markus; Bucksbaum, Philip H.; Simon, Marc; Mukamel, Shaul; Rohringer, Nina; Prince, Kevin C.; Masciovecchio, Claudio; Meyer, Michael; Rudenko, Artem; Rolles, Daniel; Bostedt, Christoph; Fuchs, Matthias; Reis, David A.; Santra, Robin; Kapteyn, Henry; Murnane, Margaret; Ibrahim, Heide; Légaré, François; Vrakking, Marc; Isinger, Marcus; Kroon, David; Gisselbrecht, Mathieu; L'Huillier, Anne; Wörner, Hans Jakob; Leone, Stephen R.

    2018-02-01

    its discovery roughly 30 years ago, showcasing experiments in AMO physics and other applications. Here we capture the perspectives of 17 leading groups and organize the contributions into four categories: ultrafast molecular dynamics, multidimensional x-ray spectroscopies; high-intensity x-ray phenomena; attosecond x-ray science.

  10. Ultrafast photoinduced structure phase transition in antimony single crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fausti, Daniele; Misochko, Oleg V.; van Loosdrecht, Paul H. M.

    2009-01-01

    Picosecond Raman scattering is used to study the photoinduced ultrafast dynamics in Peierls distorted antimony. We find evidence for an ultrafast nonthermal reversible structural phase transition. Most surprisingly, we find evidence that this transition evolves toward a lower symmetry in contrast to

  11. Ultrafast electron diffraction studies of optically excited thin bismuth films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajkovic, Ivan

    2008-01-01

    This thesis contains work on the design and the realization of an experimental setup capable of providing sub-picosecond electron pulses for ultrafast electron diffraction experiments, and performing the study of ultrafast dynamics in bismuth after optical excitation using this setup. (orig.)

  12. Generation of ultrafast pulse via combined effects of stimulated

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A project of ultrafast pulse generation has been presented and demonstrated by utilizing the combined nonlinear effects of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and non-degenerate two-photon absorption (TPA) based on silicon nanophotonic chip, in which a continuous wave (CW) and an ultrafast dark pulse are ...

  13. Ultrafast electron diffraction studies of optically excited thin bismuth films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajkovic, Ivan

    2008-10-21

    This thesis contains work on the design and the realization of an experimental setup capable of providing sub-picosecond electron pulses for ultrafast electron diffraction experiments, and performing the study of ultrafast dynamics in bismuth after optical excitation using this setup. (orig.)

  14. Application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to determine the influence of fluid dynamics on desulfurization in Bench scale reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, N.L.; Reimert, R. [Engler-Bunte-Institut, Bereich Gas, Erdoel und Kohle, Universitaet Karlsruhe (T.H.) (Germany); Hardy, E.H. [Institut fuer Mechanische Verfahrenstechnik und Mechanik, Universitaet Karlsruhe (T.H.) (Germany)

    2006-07-15

    The influence of fluid dynamics on the hydrodesulfurization (HDS) reactions of a diesel oil in bench-scale reactors was evaluated. The porosities and liquid saturations of catalyst beds were quantified by using the MRI technique. The gas-liquid systems used in the experiments were nitrogen diesel and hydrogen diesel. An apparatus was especially constructed, allowing in situ measurements of gas and liquid distributions in packed beds at elevated pressure and temperature up to 20 bar and 200 C, respectively. The reactor itself had a length of 500 mm and an internal diameter of 19 mm. The packed beds used in this MRI study consisted of: (1) 2 mm diameter nonporous spherical glass beads and (2) 1.3 mm diameter porous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} trilobes having the same size as the original trilobe catalyst used in HDS bench-scale experiments. The superficial gas and liquid velocities were set within the range of trickle flow, e.g., u{sub 0G} = 20-500 mm/s and u{sub 0L} = 0.1-6 mm/s. In parallel with the MRI experiments, the hydrodesulfurization of a gas oil was investigated in a bench-scale plant. Its reactor had the same dimensions of the trickle-bed column used in the MRI experiments and was filled with original trilobe catalyst. These catalytic experiments were carried out at a wide range of operating conditions (p = 30-80 bar, T = 300-380 C, LHSV = 1-4 h{sup -1}). The results of both fluid dynamic and catalytic reaction experiments were then combined for developing a simulation model to predict the HDS performance by accounting for fluid dynamic nonidealities. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  15. Clinical application of high magnetic field strength of MRI for the study of viral hepatitis and HCC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuji, K.; Furukawa, T.; Mizuno, K.; Matumoto, N.

    1990-01-01

    The current image of 1.5 Tesla MRI for the study of viral hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma, is discussed. The chain/program is not available in the 1.5 Tesla Sigma machine. The simple transverse image of the upper abdominal scanning is performed as the routine method of image acquisition, while the exposure method should be studied for more attractive image acquisition. The projection angle, pulse sequence difference and respiratory controlled exposure methods have also been examined. (author). 4 figs

  16. MRI of plants and foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van As, Henk; van Duynhoven, John

    2013-04-01

    The importance and prospects for MRI as applied to intact plants and to foods are presented in view of one of humanity's most pressing concerns, the sustainable and healthy feeding of a worldwide increasing population. Intact plants and foods have in common that their functionality is determined by complex multiple length scale architectures. Intact plants have an additional level of complexity since they are living systems which critically depend on transport and signalling processes between and within tissues and organs. The combination of recent cutting-edge technical advances and integration of MRI accessible parameters has the perspective to contribute to breakthroughs in understanding complex regulatory plant performance mechanisms. In food science and technology MRI allows for quantitative multi-length scale structural assessment of food systems, non-invasive monitoring of heat and mass transport during shelf-life and processing, and for a unique view on food properties under shear. These MRI applications are powerful enablers of rationally (re)designed food formulations and processes. Limitations and bottlenecks of the present plant and food MRI methods are mainly related to short T2 values and susceptibility artefacts originating from small air spaces in tissues/materials. We envisage cross-fertilisation of solutions to overcome these hurdles in MRI applications in plants and foods. For both application areas we witness a development where MRI is moving from highly specialised equipment to mobile and downscaled versions to be used by a broad user base in the field, greenhouse, food laboratory or factory.

  17. Gliomas: Application of Cumulative Histogram Analysis of Normalized Cerebral Blood Volume on 3 T MRI to Tumor Grading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyungjin; Choi, Seung Hong; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Ryoo, Inseon; Kim, Soo Chin; Yeom, Jeong A.; Shin, Hwaseon; Jung, Seung Chai; Lee, A. Leum; Yun, Tae Jin; Park, Chul-Kee; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Park, Sung-Hye

    2013-01-01

    Background Glioma grading assumes significant importance in that low- and high-grade gliomas display different prognoses and are treated with dissimilar therapeutic strategies. The objective of our study was to retrospectively assess the usefulness of a cumulative normalized cerebral blood volume (nCBV) histogram for glioma grading based on 3 T MRI. Methods From February 2010 to April 2012, 63 patients with astrocytic tumors underwent 3 T MRI with dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion-weighted imaging. Regions of interest containing the entire tumor volume were drawn on every section of the co-registered relative CBV (rCBV) maps and T2-weighted images. The percentile values from the cumulative nCBV histograms and the other histogram parameters were correlated with tumor grades. Cochran’s Q test and the McNemar test were used to compare the diagnostic accuracies of the histogram parameters after the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Using the parameter offering the highest diagnostic accuracy, a validation process was performed with an independent test set of nine patients. Results The 99th percentile of the cumulative nCBV histogram (nCBV C99), mean and peak height differed significantly between low- and high-grade gliomas (P = histogram analysis of nCBV using 3 T MRI can be a useful method for preoperative glioma grading. The nCBV C99 value is helpful in distinguishing high- from low-grade gliomas and grade IV from III gliomas. PMID:23704910

  18. Ultra-fast dynamics in the nonlinear optical response of silver nanoprism ordered arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Esquivel, Héctor; Raygoza-Sanchez, Karen Y; Rangel-Rojo, Raúl; Kalinic, Boris; Michieli, Niccolò; Cesca, Tiziana; Mattei, Giovanni

    2018-03-15

    In this work we present the study of the ultra-fast dynamics of the nonlinear optical response of a honeycomb array of silver triangular nanoprisms, performed using a femtosecond pulsed laser tuned with the dipolar surface plasmon resonance of the nanoarray. Nonlinear absorption and refraction, and their time-dependence, were explored using the z-scan and time-resolved excite-probe techniques. Nonlinear absorption is shown to change sign with the input irradiance and the behavior was explained on the basis of a three-level model. The response time was determined to be in the picosecond regime. A technique based on a variable frequency chopper was also used in order to discriminate the thermal and electronic contributions to the nonlinearity, which were found to have opposite signs. All these findings propel the investigated nanoprism arrays as good candidates for applications in advanced ultra-fast nonlinear nanophotonic devices.

  19. Protonation-induced ultrafast torsional dynamics in 9-anthrylbenzimidazole: a pH activated molecular rotor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Amitabha; Kushwaha, Archana; Das, Dipanwita; Ghosh, Rajib

    2018-03-07

    We report the photophysical properties and excited state dynamics of 9-anthrylbenzimidazole (ANBI) which exhibits protonation-induced molecular rotor properties. In contrast to the highly emissive behavior of neutral ANBI, protonation of the benzimidazole group of ANBI induces efficient nonradiative deactivation by ultrafast torsional motion around the bond connecting the anthracene and benzimidazole units, as revealed by ultrafast transient absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. Contrary to viscosity-independent fluorescence of neutral dyes, protonated ANBI is shown to display linear variation of emission yield and lifetime with solvent viscosity. The protonation-induced molecular rotor properties in the studied system are shown to be driven by enhanced charge transfer and are corroborated by quantum chemical calculations. Potential application as a microviscosity sensor of acidic regions in a heterogeneous environment by these proton-activated molecular rotor properties of ANBI is discussed.

  20. Ultrafast generation of pseudo-magnetic field for valley excitons in WSe2 monolayers

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, J.

    2014-12-04

    The valley pseudospin is a degree of freedom that emerges in atomically thin two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (MX2). The capability to manipulate it, in analogy to the control of spin in spintronics, can open up exciting opportunities. Here, we demonstrate that an ultrafast and ultrahigh valley pseudo-magnetic field can be generated by using circularly polarized femtosecond pulses to selectively control the valley degree of freedom in monolayer MX2. Using ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy, we observed a pure and valley-selective optical Stark effect in WSe2 monolayers from the nonresonant pump, resulting in an energy splitting of more than 10 milli-electron volts between the K and K′ valley exciton transitions. Our study opens up the possibility to coherently manipulate the valley polarization for quantum information applications.

  1. Determination of hot carrier energy distributions from inversion of ultrafast pump-probe reflectivity measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilpern, Tal; Manjare, Manoj; Govorov, Alexander O; Wiederrecht, Gary P; Gray, Stephen K; Harutyunyan, Hayk

    2018-05-10

    Developing a fundamental understanding of ultrafast non-thermal processes in metallic nanosystems will lead to applications in photodetection, photochemistry and photonic circuitry. Typically, non-thermal and thermal carrier populations in plasmonic systems are inferred either by making assumptions about the functional form of the initial energy distribution or using indirect sensors like localized plasmon frequency shifts. Here we directly determine non-thermal and thermal distributions and dynamics in thin films by applying a double inversion procedure to optical pump-probe data that relates the reflectivity changes around Fermi energy to the changes in the dielectric function and in the single-electron energy band occupancies. When applied to normal incidence measurements our method uncovers the ultrafast excitation of a non-Fermi-Dirac distribution and its subsequent thermalization dynamics. Furthermore, when applied to the Kretschmann configuration, we show that the excitation of propagating plasmons leads to a broader energy distribution of electrons due to the enhanced Landau damping.

  2. Ultrafast generation of pseudo-magnetic field for valley excitons in WSe2 monolayers

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, J.; Hong, X.; Jin, C.; Shi, S.-F.; Chang, C.-Y. S.; Chiu, Ming-Hui; Li, Lain-Jong; Wang, F.

    2014-01-01

    The valley pseudospin is a degree of freedom that emerges in atomically thin two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (MX2). The capability to manipulate it, in analogy to the control of spin in spintronics, can open up exciting opportunities. Here, we demonstrate that an ultrafast and ultrahigh valley pseudo-magnetic field can be generated by using circularly polarized femtosecond pulses to selectively control the valley degree of freedom in monolayer MX2. Using ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy, we observed a pure and valley-selective optical Stark effect in WSe2 monolayers from the nonresonant pump, resulting in an energy splitting of more than 10 milli-electron volts between the K and K′ valley exciton transitions. Our study opens up the possibility to coherently manipulate the valley polarization for quantum information applications.

  3. Simultaneous quantitation of polygalaxanthone III and four ginsenosides by ultra-fast liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry in rat and beagle dog plasma after oral administration of Kai-Xin-San: application to a comparative pharmacokinetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Chunxiao; Li, Qing; Zhang, Xiaowen; He, Bosai; Xu, Huarong; Yin, Yidi; Liu, Ran; Liu, Jingjing; Chen, Xiaohui; Bi, Kaishun

    2014-05-01

    A fast, selective, and quantitative ultra-fast liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry method has been developed and validated for the simultaneous quantitation of polygalaxanthone III, ginsenoside Rb1, ginsenoside Rd, ginsenoside Re, and ginsenoside Rg1 in the plasma of rat and beagle dog after oral administration of Kai-Xin-San. After addition of the internal standard, salidroside, the plasma samples were extracted by liquid-liquid extraction and separated on a Venusil MP C18 column with methanol/0.01% acetic acid water as mobile phase. The tandem mass spectrometric detection was performed in the multiple reaction monitoring with turbo ion spray source in a switching ionization mode. The method was examined, and found to be precise and accurate with the linearity range of the compounds. The intra- and interday precision and accuracy of the analytes were well within acceptance criteria (±15%). The mean extraction recoveries of analytes and internal standard were all >75.0%. The validated method has been successfully applied to comparing pharmacokinetic profiles of analytes in rat and beagle dog plasma. The results indicated that no significant differences were observed in pharmacokinetic parameters of ginsenoside Rg1, while the others had significant differences, which may due to the different mechanisms of absorption and metabolism. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Modelling multi-pulse population dynamics from ultrafast spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luuk J G W van Wilderen

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Current advanced laser, optics and electronics technology allows sensitive recording of molecular dynamics, from single resonance to multi-colour and multi-pulse experiments. Extracting the occurring (bio- physical relevant pathways via global analysis of experimental data requires a systematic investigation of connectivity schemes. Here we present a Matlab-based toolbox for this purpose. The toolbox has a graphical user interface which facilitates the application of different reaction models to the data to generate the coupled differential equations. Any time-dependent dataset can be analysed to extract time-independent correlations of the observables by using gradient or direct search methods. Specific capabilities (i.e. chirp and instrument response function for the analysis of ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopic data are included. The inclusion of an extra pulse that interacts with a transient phase can help to disentangle complex interdependent pathways. The modelling of pathways is therefore extended by new theory (which is included in the toolbox that describes the finite bleach (orientation effect of single and multiple intense polarised femtosecond pulses on an ensemble of randomly oriented particles in the presence of population decay. For instance, the generally assumed flat-top multimode beam profile is adapted to a more realistic Gaussian shape, exposing the need for several corrections for accurate anisotropy measurements. In addition, the (selective excitation (photoselection and anisotropy of populations that interact with single or multiple intense polarised laser pulses is demonstrated as function of power density and beam profile. Using example values of real world experiments it is calculated to what extent this effectively orients the ensemble of particles. Finally, the implementation includes the interaction with multiple pulses in addition to depth averaging in optically dense samples. In summary, we show that mathematical

  5. Modelling multi-pulse population dynamics from ultrafast spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wilderen, Luuk J G W; Lincoln, Craig N; van Thor, Jasper J

    2011-03-21

    Current advanced laser, optics and electronics technology allows sensitive recording of molecular dynamics, from single resonance to multi-colour and multi-pulse experiments. Extracting the occurring (bio-) physical relevant pathways via global analysis of experimental data requires a systematic investigation of connectivity schemes. Here we present a Matlab-based toolbox for this purpose. The toolbox has a graphical user interface which facilitates the application of different reaction models to the data to generate the coupled differential equations. Any time-dependent dataset can be analysed to extract time-independent correlations of the observables by using gradient or direct search methods. Specific capabilities (i.e. chirp and instrument response function) for the analysis of ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopic data are included. The inclusion of an extra pulse that interacts with a transient phase can help to disentangle complex interdependent pathways. The modelling of pathways is therefore extended by new theory (which is included in the toolbox) that describes the finite bleach (orientation) effect of single and multiple intense polarised femtosecond pulses on an ensemble of randomly oriented particles in the presence of population decay. For instance, the generally assumed flat-top multimode beam profile is adapted to a more realistic Gaussian shape, exposing the need for several corrections for accurate anisotropy measurements. In addition, the (selective) excitation (photoselection) and anisotropy of populations that interact with single or multiple intense polarised laser pulses is demonstrated as function of power density and beam profile. Using example values of real world experiments it is calculated to what extent this effectively orients the ensemble of particles. Finally, the implementation includes the interaction with multiple pulses in addition to depth averaging in optically dense samples. In summary, we show that mathematical modelling is

  6. MRI diagnosis for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamada, Tsutomu; Nagai, Kiyohisa; Imai, Shigeki; Kajihara, Yasumasa; Jo, Yoshimasa; Tanaka, Hiroyoshi; Fukunaga, Masao (Kawasaki Medical School, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan)); Matsuki, Takakazu

    1998-01-01

    Recently, in Japan, both the Westernization of life styles and the advent of an aged-society have led to an increase in the incidence of prostate cancer. In making a localizing diagnosis of prostate cancer, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which has excellent contrast resolution, and transrectal ultrasonography, are used clinically, and their usefulness is being established. MRI is employed in the diagnosis of prostate cancer to detect tumors, and to determine the stage of such tumors. For the visualization of prostate cancer by MRI, T2-weighted axial images are used exclusively. After becoming familiar with normal prostate images, it is important to evaluate the localization of a tumor, and the invasion of the capsule and seminal vesicles. Future applications of new techniques for MRI will undoubtedly be found. In this paper, the present state of MRI diagnosis of prostate cancer at Kawasaki Medical School Hospital will be reviewed. (author)

  7. MRI diagnosis for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamada, Tsutomu; Nagai, Kiyohisa; Imai, Shigeki; Kajihara, Yasumasa; Jo, Yoshimasa; Tanaka, Hiroyoshi; Fukunaga, Masao [Kawasaki Medical School, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan); Matsuki, Takakazu

    1998-12-31

    Recently, in Japan, both the Westernization of life styles and the advent of an aged-society have led to an increase in the incidence of prostate cancer. In making a localizing diagnosis of prostate cancer, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which has excellent contrast resolution, and transrectal ultrasonography, are used clinically, and their usefulness is being established. MRI is employed in the diagnosis of prostate cancer to detect tumors, and to determine the stage of such tumors. For the visualization of prostate cancer by MRI, T2-weighted axial images are used exclusively. After becoming familiar with normal prostate images, it is important to evaluate the localization of a tumor, and the invasion of the capsule and seminal vesicles. Future applications of new techniques for MRI will undoubtedly be found. In this paper, the present state of MRI diagnosis of prostate cancer at Kawasaki Medical School Hospital will be reviewed. (author)

  8. Portable MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espy, Michelle A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-29

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  9. Portable MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espy, Michelle A.

    2012-01-01

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  10. Ultra-fast silicon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadrozinski, H. F.-W., E-mail: hartmut@scipp.ucsc.edu [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, UC Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Ely, S.; Fadeyev, V.; Galloway, Z.; Ngo, J.; Parker, C.; Petersen, B.; Seiden, A.; Zatserklyaniy, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, UC Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Cartiglia, N.; Marchetto, F. [INFN Torino, Torino (Italy); Bruzzi, M.; Mori, R.; Scaringella, M.; Vinattieri, A. [University of Florence, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy)

    2013-12-01

    We propose to develop a fast, thin silicon sensor with gain capable to concurrently measure with high precision the space (∼10 μm) and time (∼10 ps) coordinates of a particle. This will open up new application of silicon detector systems in many fields. Our analysis of detector properties indicates that it is possible to improve the timing characteristics of silicon-based tracking sensors, which already have sufficient position resolution, to achieve four-dimensional high-precision measurements. The basic sensor characteristics and the expected performance are listed, the wide field of applications are mentioned and the required R and D topics are discussed. -- Highlights: •We are proposing thin pixel silicon sensors with 10's of picoseconds time resolution. •Fast charge collection is coupled with internal charge multiplication. •The truly 4-D sensors will revolutionize imaging and particle counting in many applications.

  11. Interventional MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harada, Junta; Dohi, Michiko; Yoshihiro, Akiko; Mogami, Takuji; Kuwada, Tomoko; Nakata, Norio [Jikei Univ., Chiba (Japan). Kashiwa Hospital

    2000-06-01

    Open type MR system and fast sequence is now available and MRI becomes a new modality for interventional Radiology, including biopsy, drainage operation, and monitoring for minimally invasive therapy. Experimental studies of temperature monitoring were performed under hot and cold status. Signal changes of porcine disc and meat under microwave and laser ablation were observed as low signal area by signal intensity method. Using proton chemical shift method, signal change by laser ablation was displaced color imaging and correlated with thermometric temperature measurement. The very T2 relaxation time of ice affords excellent contrast between ice and surrounding gelatin tissue allowing acute depiction of the extent of the iceball under MRI. (author)

  12. Interventional MRI. Current status and potential for development considering economic perspectives. Pt. 2. Liver and other applications in oncology; Interventionelle MRT. Status Quo und Entwicklungspotenzial unter oekonomischen Perspektiven. T. 2. Therapeutische und onkologische Anwendungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkhausen, Joerg [Univ. Hospital Schleswig Holstein, Luebeck (Germany). Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Kahn, Thomas [Clinic and Policlinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Leipzig (Germany); Krombach, Gabriele A. [Univ. Hospital Giessen (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Kuhl, Christiane K. [Univ. Hospital RWTH Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Lotz, Joachim [Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Maintz, David [Univ. Hospital Cologne (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Ricke, Jens [Univ. Hospital Magdeburg (Germany). Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Schoenberg, Stefan O. [Univ. Medical Center Mannheim, Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Inst. of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Vogl, Thomas J. [Frankfurt Univ. Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Wacker, Frank K. [Hannover Medical School (Germany). Dept. for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2017-11-15

    MRI is attractive for guiding and monitoring interventional procedures due to its high intrinsic soft tissue contrast and the possibility to measure flow and cardiac function. Technical solutions have been developed for all procedural steps including imaging guidance, MR-safe catheters and instruments and patient monitoring. This has led to widening of the clinical applications. Interventional MRI is becoming increasingly important for the treatment of patients suffering from malignant diseases. The detectability of masses and consequently their accessibility for biopsy is higher, compared to other modalities, due to the high intrinsic soft tissue contrast of MRI. Temperature-dependent sequences allow for minimally invasive and tissue-sparing ablation (A-0 ablation). Interventional MRI has become established in the clinical routine for a variety of indications, including biopsies and tumor ablation. Since the economic requirement of covering costs by reimbursement is met and interventional MRI decreases the mortality and morbidity of interventional procedures, broader application of interventional MRI can be expected in the clinical routine in the future.

  13. White paper. Interventional MRI. Current status and potential for development considering economic perspectives. Pt. 1. General application; White Paper. Interventionelle MRT. Status Quo und Entwicklungspotenzial unter oekonomischen Perspektiven. T. 1. Generelle Anwendungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkhausen, Joerg [Univ. Hospital Schleswig Holstein, Luebeck (Germany). Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Kahn, Thomas [Clinic and Policlinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Leipzig (Germany); Krombach, Gabriele A. [Univ. Hospital Giessen (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Kuhl, Christiane K. [Univ. Hospital RWTH Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Lotz, Joachim [Univ. Goettingen (Germany). Inst. for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Maintz, David [Univ. Hospital Cologne (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Ricke, Jens [Univ. Hospital Magdeburg (Germany). Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Schoenberg, Stefan O. [Heidelberg Univ. - Univ. Medical Center Mannheim (Germany). Inst. of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Vogl, Thomas J. [Univ. Hospital Frankfurt (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Wacker, Frank K. [Hannover Medical School (Germany). Dept. for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2017-07-15

    MRI is attractive for the guiding and monitoring of interventional procedures due to its high intrinsic soft tissue contrast and the possibility to measure physiologic parameters like flow and cardiac function. The current status of interventional MRI for the clinical routine was analyzed. The effort needed for the development of MR-safe monitoring systems and instruments initially resulted in the application of interventional MRI only for procedures that could not be performed by other means. Accordingly, biopsy of lesions in the breast, which are not detectable by other modalities, has been performed under MRI guidance for decades. Currently, biopsies of the prostate under MRI guidance are established in a similar fashion. At many sites blind biopsy has already been replaced by MR-guided biopsy or at least by the fusion of MR images with ultrasound. Cardiovascular interventions are performed at several centers for ablation as a treatment for atrial fibrillation. Interventional MRI has been established in the clinical routine for a variety of indications. Broader application can be expected in the clinical routine in the future owing to the multiple advantages compared to other techniques.

  14. MRI for chronic inflammatory bowel disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansmann, H.J.; Hess, T.; Hahmann, M.; Erb, G.; Richter, G.M.; Duex, M.; Elsing, C.

    2001-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory bowel disease is diagnosed and monitored by the combination of colonoscopy and small bowel enteroklysis. Magnetic resonance imaging has become the gold standard for the imaging of perirectal and pelvic fistulas. With the advent of ultrafast MRI small and large bowel imaging has become highly attractive and is being advocated more and more in the diagnostic work up of inflammatory bowel disease. Imaging protocols include fast T 1 -weighted gradient echo and T 2 -weighted TSE sequences and oral or rectal bowel distension. Furthermore, dedicated imaging protocols are based on breath-hold imaging under pharmacological bowel paralysis and gastrointestinal MR contrast agents (Hydro-MRI). High diagnostic accuracy can be achieved in Crohn's disease with special reference to the pattern of disease, depth of inflammation, mesenteric reaction, sinus tract depiction and formation of abscess. In ulcerative colitis, the mucosa-related inflammation causes significantly less bowel wall thickening compared to Crohn's disease. Therefore with MRI, the extent of inflammatory changes is always underestimated compared to colonoscopy. According to our experience in more than 200 patients as well as the results in other centers, Hydro-MRI possesses the potential to replace enteroklysis in the diagnosis of chronic inflammatory bowel disease and most of the follow-up colonoscopies in Crohn's disease. Further technical improvements in 3D imaging will allow interactive postprocessing of the MR data. (orig.) [de

  15. Characterization of Nanostructured Semiconductors by Ultrafast Luminescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Jolie

    Single nanostructures are predicted to be the building blocks of next generation devices and have already been incorporated into prototypes for solar cells, biomedical devices and lasers. Their role in such applications requires a fundamental understanding of their opto-electronic properties and in particular the charge carrier dynamics occurring on an ultrafast timescale. Luminescence detection is a common approach used to investigate electronic properties of nanostructures because of the contact-less nature of these methods. They are, however, often not equipped to efficiently measure multiple single nanostructures nor do they have the temporal resolution necessary for observing femtosecond dynamics. This dissertation intends to address this paucity of techniques available for the contact-less measurement of single nanostructures through the development of an ultrafast wide-field Kerr-gated microscope system and measurement technique. The setup, operational in both the steady state and transient mode and capable of microscopic and spectroscopic measurements, was developed to measure the transient luminescence of single semiconductor nanostructures. With sub micron spatial resolution and the potential to achieve a temporal resolution greater than 90 fs, the system was used to probe the charge carrier dynamics at multiple discrete locations on single nanowires exhibiting amplified spontaneous emission. Using a rate model for amplified spontaneous emission, the transient emission data was fitted to extract the values of the competing Shockley-Read-Hall, non-geminate and Auger recombination constants. The capabilities of the setup were first demonstrated in the visible detection range, where single nanowires of the ternary alloy CdS x Se1-x were measured. The temporal emission dynamics at two separate locations were compared and calculation of the Langevin mobility revealed that the large carrier densities generated in the nanowire allows access to non

  16. Sensors for ultra-fast silicon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadrozinski, H.F.-W., E-mail: hartmut@scipp.ucsc.edu [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, UC Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Baselga, M.; Ely, S.; Fadeyev, V.; Galloway, Z.; Ngo, J.; Parker, C.; Schumacher, D.; Seiden, A.; Zatserklyaniy, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, UC Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Cartiglia, N. [INFN Torino, Torino (Italy); Pellegrini, G.; Fernández-Martínez, P.; Greco, V.; Hidalgo, S.; Quirion, D. [Centro Nacional de Microelectrónica, IMB-CNM-CSIC, Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-11-21

    We report on electrical and charge collection tests of silicon sensors with internal gain as part of our development of ultra-fast silicon detectors. Using C–V and α TCT measurements, we investigate the non-uniform doping profile of so-called low-gain avalanche detectors (LGAD). These are n-on-p pad sensors with charge multiplication due to the presence of a thin, low-resistivity diffusion layer below the junction, obtained with a highly doped implant. We compare the bias dependence of the pulse shapes of traditional sensors and of LGAD sensors with different dopant density of the diffusion layer, and extract the internal gain.

  17. Ultra-fast relaxation kinetics in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luzzi, R.

    1983-01-01

    It is presented a brief description of relaxation processes in highly excited semiconductor plasmas (HESP). Comparison with experimental data obtained by means of ultra-fast laser light spectroscopy (UFLS) is made. Some aspects of response funtion theory in systems far-from-equilibrium are reviewed in Section II. In Section III we present some comments on the question of nonequilibrium thermodynamics relevant to the problem to be considered. In last section we present a brief summary of the different aspects of the subject. (author) [pt

  18. Sensors for ultra-fast silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadrozinski, H.F.-W.; Baselga, M.; Ely, S.; Fadeyev, V.; Galloway, Z.; Ngo, J.; Parker, C.; Schumacher, D.; Seiden, A.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Cartiglia, N.; Pellegrini, G.; Fernández-Martínez, P.; Greco, V.; Hidalgo, S.; Quirion, D.

    2014-01-01

    We report on electrical and charge collection tests of silicon sensors with internal gain as part of our development of ultra-fast silicon detectors. Using C–V and α TCT measurements, we investigate the non-uniform doping profile of so-called low-gain avalanche detectors (LGAD). These are n-on-p pad sensors with charge multiplication due to the presence of a thin, low-resistivity diffusion layer below the junction, obtained with a highly doped implant. We compare the bias dependence of the pulse shapes of traditional sensors and of LGAD sensors with different dopant density of the diffusion layer, and extract the internal gain

  19. Femtosecond laser studies of ultrafast intramolecular processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayden, C. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this research is to better understand the detailed mechanisms of chemical reactions by observing, directly in time, the dynamics of fundamental chemical processes. In this work femtosecond laser pulses are used to initiate chemical processes and follow the progress of these processes in time. The authors are currently studying ultrafast internal conversion and subsequent intramolecular relaxation in unsaturated hydrocarbons. In addition, the authors are developing nonlinear optical techniques to prepare and monitor the time evolution of specific vibrational motions in ground electronic state molecules.

  20. Imacon 600 ultrafast streak camera evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, T.C.; Coleman, L.W.

    1975-01-01

    The Imacon 600 has a number of designed in disadvantages for use as an ultrafast diagnostic instrument. The unit is physically large (approximately 5' long) and uses an external power supply rack for the image intensifier. Water cooling is required for the intensifier; it is quiet but not conducive to portability. There is no interlock on the cooling water. The camera does have several switch selectable sweep speeds. This is desirable if one is working with both slow and fast events. The camera can be run in a framing mode. (MOW)

  1. Ultra-fast relaxation kinetics in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luzzi, R.

    1983-01-01

    It is presented a brief description of relaxation processes in highly excited semiconductor plasmas (HESP). Comparison with experimental data obtained by means of ultra-fast laser light spectroscopy (UFLS) is made. Some aspects of response function theory in systems far-from-equilibrium are reviewed in Section II. In Section III some comments on the question of nonequilibrium thermodynamics relevant to the problem to be considered are presented. In last Section a brief summary of the different aspects of the subject is also presented. (Author) [pt

  2. Cluster analysis of quantitative parametric maps from DCE-MRI: application in evaluating heterogeneity of tumor response to antiangiogenic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Dario Livio; Dastrù, Walter; Consolino, Lorena; Espak, Miklos; Arigoni, Maddalena; Cavallo, Federica; Aime, Silvio

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to compare a clustering approach to conventional analysis methods for assessing changes in pharmacokinetic parameters obtained from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) during antiangiogenic treatment in a breast cancer model. BALB/c mice bearing established transplantable her2+ tumors were treated with a DNA-based antiangiogenic vaccine or with an empty plasmid (untreated group). DCE-MRI was carried out by administering a dose of 0.05 mmol/kg of Gadocoletic acid trisodium salt, a Gd-based blood pool contrast agent (CA) at 1T. Changes in pharmacokinetic estimates (K(trans) and vp) in a nine-day interval were compared between treated and untreated groups on a voxel-by-voxel analysis. The tumor response to therapy was assessed by a clustering approach and compared with conventional summary statistics, with sub-regions analysis and with histogram analysis. Both the K(trans) and vp estimates, following blood-pool CA injection, showed marked and spatial heterogeneous changes with antiangiogenic treatment. Averaged values for the whole tumor region, as well as from the rim/core sub-regions analysis were unable to assess the antiangiogenic response. Histogram analysis resulted in significant changes only in the vp estimates (pclustering approach depicted marked changes in both the K(trans) and vp estimates, with significant spatial heterogeneity in vp maps in response to treatment (pclustered in three or four sub-regions. This study demonstrated the value of cluster analysis applied to pharmacokinetic DCE-MRI parametric maps for assessing tumor response to antiangiogenic therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. On application of kernel PCA for generating stimulus features for fMRI during continuous music listening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsatsishvili, Valeri; Burunat, Iballa; Cong, Fengyu; Toiviainen, Petri; Alluri, Vinoo; Ristaniemi, Tapani

    2018-06-01

    There has been growing interest towards naturalistic neuroimaging experiments, which deepen our understanding of how human brain processes and integrates incoming streams of multifaceted sensory information, as commonly occurs in real world. Music is a good example of such complex continuous phenomenon. In a few recent fMRI studies examining neural correlates of music in continuous listening settings, multiple perceptual attributes of music stimulus were represented by a set of high-level features, produced as the linear combination of the acoustic descriptors computationally extracted from the stimulus audio. NEW METHOD: fMRI data from naturalistic music listening experiment were employed here. Kernel principal component analysis (KPCA) was applied to acoustic descriptors extracted from the stimulus audio to generate a set of nonlinear stimulus features. Subsequently, perceptual and neural correlates of the generated high-level features were examined. The generated features captured musical percepts that were hidden from the linear PCA features, namely Rhythmic Complexity and Event Synchronicity. Neural correlates of the new features revealed activations associated to processing of complex rhythms, including auditory, motor, and frontal areas. Results were compared with the findings in the previously published study, which analyzed the same fMRI data but applied linear PCA for generating stimulus features. To enable comparison of the results, methodology for finding stimulus-driven functional maps was adopted from the previous study. Exploiting nonlinear relationships among acoustic descriptors can lead to the novel high-level stimulus features, which can in turn reveal new brain structures involved in music processing. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. [Application evaluation of multi-parametric MRI in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of early prostate cancer and prostatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, P; Huang, Y; Li, Y; Cai, L; Ji, G H; Zheng, Y; Chen, Z Q

    2016-10-11

    Objective: To evaluate the value of multi-parametric MRI (Mp-MRI) in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of early prostate cancer(PCa) in the peripheral zone(PZ) and low T 2 WI signal intensity of prostatitis. Methods: A total of 40 patients with PZ early PCa and 37 with prostatitis of hypointense T 2 WI signal in PZ were retrospectively analyzed, which were collected from the General Hospital of Ningxia Medical University from Janurary 2009 to June 2015, who underwent T 2 WI, DWI, and DCE-MRI examination and all patients were confirmed by pathology. All the data was transferred to GE Advanced Workstation AW4.3, the indexes divided into cancerous and prostatitis regions were calculated by Functool2 of signal intensity-time(SI-T) curve and ADC value, to calcuate the time to minimum(T max ), the whole enhancment degree (SI max ). ROC cure was used to determine the cutoff value for PCa detection with the ADC value. Result: On T 2 WI, 57.5% of PCa (23/40) showed focal nodular homogeneous low signal intensity, 70.3% of prostatitis(26/37) showed diffuse inhomogeneous low signal intensity. DCE-MRI, the distribution of curve types for malignant tumors was type Ⅰ 2.5%(1/40), typeⅡ32.5%(13/40) and type Ⅲ 65.0% (26/40). While the numbers for prostatitis was type Ⅰ 16.2%(6/37) , type Ⅱ 56.8% (21/37) and type Ⅲ 27.0% (10/37)respectively.The patterns of curve types in malignant lesions were different from benign lesions significantly(χ 2 =12.32, P prostatitis regions were (17.96±2.91)s, 1.76%±0.23% and (21.19±3.59)s, 1.53%±0.18%, respectively ( t =5.37, 6.10; P prostatitis regions were (0.95±0.13)×10 -3 mm 2 /s and (1.12±0.13)×10 -3 mm 2 /s, respectively ( t =7.10, P prostatitis from early PCa.

  5. A Tool for Interactive Data Visualization: Application to Over 10,000 Brain Imaging and Phantom MRI Data Sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep R Panta

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose a web-based approach for quick visualization of big data from brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scans using a combination of an automated image capture and processing system, nonlinear embedding, and interactive data visualization tools. We draw upon thousands of MRI scans captured via the COllaborative Imaging and Neuroinformatics Suite (COINS. We then interface the output of several analysis pipelines based on structural and functional data to a t-distributed stochastic neighbor embedding (t-SNE algorithm which reduces the number of dimensions for each scan in the input data set to two dimensions while preserving the local structure of data sets. Finally, we interactively display the output of this approach via a web-page, based on data driven documents (D3 JavaScript library. Two distinct approaches were used to visualize the data. In the first approach, we computed multiple quality control (QC values from pre-processed data, which were used as inputs to the t-SNE algorithm. This approach helps in assessing the quality of each data set relative to others. In the second case, computed variables of interest (e.g. brain volume or voxel values from segmented gray matter images were used as inputs to the t-SNE algorithm. This approach helps in identifying interesting patterns in the data sets. We demonstrate these approaches using multiple examples including 1 quality control measures calculated from phantom data over time, 2 quality control data from human functional MRI data across various studies, scanners, sites, 3 volumetric and density measures from human structural MRI data across various studies, scanners and sites. Results from (1 and (2 show the potential of our approach to combine t-SNE data reduction with interactive color coding of variables of interest to quickly identify visually unique clusters of data (i.e. data sets with poor QC, clustering of data by site quickly. Results from (3 demonstrate

  6. Multiphoton microscopy in every lab: the promise of ultrafast semiconductor disk lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emaury, Florian; Voigt, Fabian F.; Bethge, Philipp; Waldburger, Dominik; Link, Sandro M.; Carta, Stefano; van der Bourg, Alexander; Helmchen, Fritjof; Keller, Ursula

    2017-07-01

    We use an ultrafast diode-pumped semiconductor disk laser (SDL) to demonstrate several applications in multiphoton microscopy. The ultrafast SDL is based on an optically pumped Vertical External Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VECSEL) passively mode-locked with a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) and generates 170-fs pulses at a center wavelength of 1027 nm with a repetition rate of 1.63 GHz. We demonstrate the suitability of this laser for structural and functional multiphoton in vivo imaging in both Drosophila larvae and mice for a variety of fluorophores (including mKate2, tdTomato, Texas Red, OGB-1, and R-CaMP1.07) and for endogenous second-harmonic generation in muscle cell sarcomeres. We can demonstrate equivalent signal levels compared to a standard 80-MHz Ti:Sapphire laser when we increase the average power by a factor of 4.5 as predicted by theory. In addition, we compare the bleaching properties of both laser systems in fixed Drosophila larvae and find similar bleaching kinetics despite the large difference in pulse repetition rates. Our results highlight the great potential of ultrafast diode-pumped SDLs for creating a cost-efficient and compact alternative light source compared to standard Ti:Sapphire lasers for multiphoton imaging.

  7. New Aspects of Photocurrent Generation at Graphene pn Junctions Revealed by Ultrafast Optical Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aivazian, Grant; Sun, Dong; Jones, Aaron; Ross, Jason; Yao, Wang; Cobden, David; Xu, Xiaodong

    2012-02-01

    The remarkable electrical and optical properties of graphene make it a promising material for new optoelectronic applications. However, one important, but so far unexplored, property is the role of hot carriers in charge and energy transport at graphene interfaces. Here we investigate the photocurrent (PC) dynamics at a tunable graphene pn junction using ultrafast scanning PC microscopy. Pump-probe measurements show a temperature dependent relaxation time of photogenerated carriers that increases from 1.5ps at 290K to 4ps at 20K; while the amplitude of the PC is independent of the lattice temperature. These observations imply that it is hot carriers, not phonons, which dominate ultrafast energy transport. Gate dependent measurements show many interesting features such as pump induced saturation, enhancement, and sign reversal of probe generated PC. These observations reveal that the underlying PC mechanism is a combination of the thermoelectric and built-in electric field effects. Our results enhance the understanding of non-equilibrium electron dynamics, electron-electron interactions, and electron-phonon interactions in graphene. They also determine fundamental limits on ultrafast device operation speeds (˜500 GHz) for graphene-based photodetectors.

  8. Large lateral photovoltaic effect with ultrafast relaxation time in SnSe/Si junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xianjie; Zhao, Xiaofeng; Hu, Chang; Zhang, Yang; Song, Bingqian; Zhang, Lingli; Liu, Weilong; Lv, Zhe; Zhang, Yu; Sui, Yu, E-mail: suiyu@hit.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Tang, Jinke [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming 82071 (United States); Song, Bo, E-mail: songbo@hit.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Academy of Fundamental and Interdisciplinary Sciences, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2016-07-11

    In this paper, we report a large lateral photovoltaic effect (LPE) with ultrafast relaxation time in SnSe/p-Si junctions. The LPE shows a linear dependence on the position of the laser spot, and the position sensitivity is as high as 250 mV mm{sup −1}. The optical response time and the relaxation time of the LPE are about 100 ns and 2 μs, respectively. The current-voltage curve on the surface of the SnSe film indicates the formation of an inversion layer at the SnSe/p-Si interface. Our results clearly suggest that most of the excited-electrons diffuse laterally in the inversion layer at the SnSe/p-Si interface, which results in a large LPE with ultrafast relaxation time. The high positional sensitivity and ultrafast relaxation time of the LPE make the SnSe/p-Si junction a promising candidate for a wide range of optoelectronic applications.

  9. Blockage of ultrafast and directional diffusion of Li atoms on phosphorene with intrinsic defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruiqi; Wu, Xiaojun; Yang, Jinlong

    2016-02-21

    The diffusion of Li in electrode materials is a key factor for the charging/discharging rate capacity of a Li-ion battery (LIB). Recently, two-dimensional phosphorene has been proposed as a very promising electrode material due to its ultrafast and directional lithium diffusion, as well as large energy capacity. Herein, on the basis of density functional theory, we report that intrinsic point defects, including vacancy and stone-wales defects, will block the directional ultrafast diffusion of lithium in phosphorene. On the defect-free phosphorene, diffusion of Li along the zig-zag lattice direction is 1.6 billion times faster than along the armchair lattice direction, and 260 times faster than that in graphite. After introducing intrinsic vacancy and stone-wales defect, the diffusion energy barrier of Li along the zig-zag lattice direction increases sharply to the range of 0.17-0.49 eV, which blocks the ultrafast migration of lithium along the zig-zag lattice direction. Moreover, the open circuit voltage increases with the emergence of defects, which is not suitable for anode materials. In addition, the formation energies of the defects in phosphorene are considerably lower than those in graphene and silicene sheet; therefore, it is highly important to generate defect-free phosphorene for LIB applications.

  10. Four-Dimensional Ultrafast Electron Microscopy: Insights into an Emerging Technique

    KAUST Repository

    Adhikari, Aniruddha

    2016-12-15

    Four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy (4D-UEM) is a novel analytical technique that aims to fulfill the long-held dream of researchers to investigate materials at extremely short spatial and temporal resolutions by integrating the excellent spatial resolution of electron microscopes with the temporal resolution of ultrafast femtosecond laser-based spectroscopy. The ingenious use of pulsed photoelectrons to probe surfaces and volumes of materials enables time-resolved snapshots of the dynamics to be captured in a way hitherto impossible by other conventional techniques. The flexibility of 4D-UEM lies in the fact that it can be used in both the scanning (S-UEM) and transmission (UEM) modes depending upon the type of electron microscope involved. While UEM can be employed to monitor elementary structural changes and phase transitions in samples using real-space mapping, diffraction, electron energy-loss spectroscopy, and tomography, S-UEM is well suited to map ultrafast dynamical events on materials surfaces in space and time. This review provides an overview of the unique features that distinguish these techniques and also illustrates the applications of both S-UEM and UEM to a multitude of problems relevant to materials science and chemistry.

  11. Using quantitative image analysis to classify axillary lymph nodes on breast MRI: A new application for the Z 0011 Era

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schacht, David V., E-mail: dschacht@radiology.bsd.uchicago.edu; Drukker, Karen, E-mail: kdrukker@uchicago.edu; Pak, Iris, E-mail: irisgpak@gmail.com; Abe, Hiroyuki, E-mail: habe@radiology.bsd.uchicago.edu; Giger, Maryellen L., E-mail: m-giger@uchicago.edu

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: •Quantitative image analysis showed promise in evaluating axillary lymph nodes. •13 of 28 features performed better than guessing at metastatic status. •When all features were used in together, a considerably higher AUC was obtained. -- Abstract: Purpose: To assess the performance of computer extracted feature analysis of dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance images (MRI) of axillary lymph nodes. To determine which quantitative features best predict nodal metastasis. Methods: This institutional board-approved HIPAA compliant study, in which informed patient consent was waived, collected enhanced T1 images of the axilla from patients with breast cancer. Lesion segmentation and feature analysis were performed on 192 nodes using a laboratory-developed quantitative image analysis (QIA) workstation. The importance of 28 features were assessed. Classification used the features as input to a neural net classifier in a leave-one-case-out cross-validation and evaluated with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results: The area under the ROC curve (AUC) values for features in the task of distinguishing between positive and negative nodes ranged from just over 0.50 to 0.70. Five features yielded AUCs greater than 0.65: two morphological and three textural features. In cross-validation, the neural net classifier obtained an AUC of 0.88 (SE 0.03) for the task of distinguishing between positive and negative nodes. Conclusion: QIA of DCE MRI demonstrated promising performance in discriminating between positive and negative axillary nodes.

  12. Actual imaging time in fetal MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brugger, Peter C.; Prayer, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Safety issues in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are important, especially in fetal MRI. However, since basic data with respect of the effective exposure time in fetal MRI are not available, this study aimed to determine the actual imaging time during a fetal MRI study. Methods: 100 fetal MRI studies of singleton pregnancies performed on a 1.5 T system were analysed with respect to study duration (from starting the survey scan until the end of study), the number of sequences acquired, and the actual imaging time, which was calculated by adding up scan time of each sequence. Furthermore, each sequence type was analysed regarding the number of acquisitions, specific absorption rates (SAR), and duration. Results: Mean study duration was 34.6 min (range: 14–58 min; standard deviation (SD): 9.7 min), the average number of sequences acquired was 26.6 (range: 11–44, SD: 6.6). Actual scan time averaged 11.4 min (range: 4–19 min, SD: 4.0 min). Ultrafast T2-weighted and steady-state free-precession sequences accounted for 62.3% of actual scan time, and were distributed over the whole duration of the study. Conclusion: Actual imaging time only accounts for 33% of total study time and is not continuous. The remaining time is consumed by the preparation phases of the scanner, and is spent with planning sequences and the eventual repositioning of the coil and/or pregnant woman. These data may help to more accurately estimate the exposure to radiofrequency deposition and noise during fetal MRI studies.

  13. Spin-controlled ultrafast vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höpfner, Henning; Lindemann, Markus; Gerhardt, Nils C.; Hofmann, Martin R.

    2014-05-01

    Spin-controlled semiconductor lasers are highly attractive spintronic devices providing characteristics superior to their conventional purely charge-based counterparts. In particular, spin-controlled vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers (spin-VCSELs) promise to offer lower thresholds, enhanced emission intensity, spin amplification, full polarization control, chirp control and ultrafast dynamics. Most important, the ability to control and modulate the polarization state of the laser emission with extraordinarily high frequencies is very attractive for many applications like broadband optical communication and ultrafast optical switches. We present a novel concept for ultrafast spin-VCSELs which has the potential to overcome the conventional speed limitation for directly modulated lasers by the relaxation oscillation frequency and to reach modulation frequencies significantly above 100 GHz. The concept is based on the coupled spin-photon dynamics in birefringent micro-cavity lasers. By injecting spin-polarized carriers in the VCSEL, oscillations of the coupled spin-photon system can by induced which lead to oscillations of the polarization state of the laser emission. These oscillations are decoupled from conventional relaxation oscillations of the carrier-photon system and can be much faster than these. Utilizing these polarization oscillations is thus a very promising approach to develop ultrafast spin-VCSELs for high speed optical data communication in the near future. Different aspects of the spin and polarization dynamics, its connection to birefringence and bistability in the cavity, controlled switching of the oscillations, and the limitations of this novel approach will be analysed theoretically and experimentally for spin-polarized VCSELs at room temperature.

  14. A US Based Ultrafast Interdisciplinary Research Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueye, Paul; Hill, Wendell; Johnson, Anthony

    2006-10-01

    The US scientific competitiveness on the world arena has substantially decreased due to the lack of funding and training of qualified personnel. Most of the potential workforce found in higher education is composed of foreign students and post-docs. In the specific field of low- and high-field science, the European and Asian communities are rapidly catching-up with the US, even leading in some areas. To remain the leader in ultrafast science and technology, new visions and commitment must be embraced. For that reason, an international effort of more than 70 countries for a US-based interdisciplinary research facility using ultrafast laser technology is under development. It will provide research and educational training, as well as new venues for a strong collaboration between the fields of astrophysics, nuclear/high energy physics, plasma physics, optical sciences, biological and medical physics. This facility will consist of a uniquely designed high contrast multi-lines concept housing twenty experimental rooms shared between four beams:[0.1 TW, 1 kHz], [10 TW, 9 kHz], [100-200 TW, 10 Hz] and [500 TW, 10 Hz]. The detail schematic of this multi-laser system, foreseen research and educational programs, and organizational structure of this facility will be presented.

  15. Optimization and practical implementation of ultrafast 2D NMR experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Queiroz Junior, Luiz H. K., E-mail: professorkeng@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSC), SP (Brazil). Departamento de Quimica; Universidade Federal de Goias (UFGO), Goiania, GO (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Ferreira, Antonio G. [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSC), SP (Brazil). Departamento de Quimica; Giraudeau, Patrick [Universite de Nantes (France). CNRS, Chimie et Interdisciplinarite: Synthese, Analyse, Modelisation

    2013-09-01

    Ultrafast 2D NMR is a powerful methodology that allows recording of a 2D NMR spectrum in a fraction of second. However, due to the numerous non-conventional parameters involved in this methodology its implementation is no trivial task. Here, an optimized experimental protocol is carefully described to ensure efficient implementation of ultrafast NMR. The ultrafast spectra resulting from this implementation are presented based on the example of two widely used 2D NMR experiments, COSY and HSQC, obtained in 0.2 s and 41 s, respectively. (author)

  16. MRI angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poncelet, B.; Baleriiaux, D.; struyven, J.; Segebarth, C.

    1989-01-01

    In MRI angiography two basis images are measured which only differ by the signal intensity of the flowing blood in the vessels. Subtraction of these two images produces a high contrast-to-noise representation of the vessels. Contrast between stationary tissues and flowing blood is changed, for one image compared to the second one, using a selective modification of the phase of the signal from the flowing blood, and/or using a selective modification of its longitudinal magnetization: The macroscopic spin motions along the selection and the measurement gradient directions affect the phase of the nuclear signal; assuming constant velocity, the phase is proportional to the velocity and to the first moment of the gradient waveforms applied. This work concentrates on the generarion of MRI angiograms, following a phase-based approach, of the carotid bifurcation and of different intracranical regions including the carotid syphon and the circle of Willis. (author). 21 refs.; 3 figs

  17. MRI zoo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Christoffer

    The basic idea was to use MRI to produce a sequence of 3D gray scale image slices of various animals, subsequentlyimaged with a clinical CT system. For this purpose, these animals were used: toad, lungfish, python snake and a horseshoe crab. Each animal was sacrificed according to standard...... visually inspected, both in 2D and 3D, and compared with photographs and anatomy atlases found at library and on the internet....

  18. Fully three-dimensional reconstruction from data collected on concentric cubes in Fourier space: implementation and a sample application to MRI [magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, G.T.; Roberts, D.; Axel, L.

    1992-01-01

    An algorithm is proposed for rapid and accurate reconstruction from data collected in Fourier space at points arranged on a grid of concentric cubes. The whole process has computational complexity of the same order as required for the 3D fast Fourier transform and so (for medically relevant sizes of the data set) it is faster than backprojection into the same size rectangular grid. The design of the algorithm ensures that no interpolations are needed, in contrast to methods involving backprojection with their unavoidable interpolations. As an application, a 3D data collection method for MRI has been designed which directly samples the Fourier transform of the object to be reconstructed on concentric cubes as needed for the algorithm. (author)

  19. MRI-powered biomedical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovet, Sierra; Ren, Hongliang; Xu, Sheng; Wood, Bradford; Tokuda, Junichi; Tse, Zion Tsz Ho

    2017-11-16

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is beneficial for imaging-guided procedures because it provides higher resolution images and better soft tissue contrast than computed tomography (CT), ultrasound, and X-ray. MRI can be used to streamline diagnostics and treatment because it does not require patients to be repositioned between scans of different areas of the body. It is even possible to use MRI to visualize, power, and control medical devices inside the human body to access remote locations and perform minimally invasive procedures. Therefore, MR conditional medical devices have the potential to improve a wide variety of medical procedures; this potential is explored in terms of practical considerations pertaining to clinical applications and the MRI environment. Recent advancements in this field are introduced with a review of clinically relevant research in the areas of interventional tools, endovascular microbots, and closed-loop controlled MRI robots. Challenges related to technology and clinical feasibility are discussed, including MRI based propulsion and control, navigation of medical devices through the human body, clinical adoptability, and regulatory issues. The development of MRI-powered medical devices is an emerging field, but the potential clinical impact of these devices is promising.

  20. Application of High-Resolution Magic-Angle Spinning NMR Spectroscopy to Define the Cell Uptake of MRI Contrast Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabi, Luisella; Alfieri, Goffredo; Biondi, Luca; De Miranda, Mario; Paleari, Lino; Ghelli, Stefano

    2002-06-01

    A new method, based on proton high-resolution magic-angle spinning ( 1H HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy, has been employed to study the cell uptake of magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents (MRI-CAs). The method was tested on human red blood cells (HRBC) and white blood cells (HWBC) by using three gadolinium complexes, widely used in diagnostics, Gd-BOPTA, Gd-DTPA, and Gd-DOTA, and the analogous complexes obtained by replacing Gd(III) with Dy(III), Nd(III), and Tb(III) (i.e., complexes isostructural to the ones of gadolinium but acting as shift agents). The method is based on the evaluation of the magnetic effects, line broadening, or induced lanthanide shift (LIS) caused by these complexes on NMR signals of intra- and extracellular water. Since magnetic effects are directly linked to permeability, this method is direct. In all the tests, these magnetic effects were detected for the extracellular water signal only, providing a direct proof that these complexes are not able to cross the cell membrane. Line broadening effects (i.e., the use of gadolinium complexes) only allow qualitative evaluations. On the contrary, LIS effects can be measured with high precision and they can be related to the concentration of the paramagnetic species in the cellular compartments. This is possible because the HR-MAS technique provides the complete elimination of bulk magnetic susceptibility (BMS) shift and the differentiation of extra- and intracellular water signals. Thus with this method, the rapid quantification of the MRI-CA amount inside and outside the cells is actually feasible.

  1. Functional MRI of the pharynx in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) with rapid 2-D flash sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeger, L.; Guenther, E.; Gauger, J.; Nitz, W.; Kastenbauer, E.; Reiser, M.

    1996-01-01

    Functional imaging of the pharynx used to be the domain of cineradiography, CT and ultrafast CT. The development of modern MRI techniques led to new access to functional disorders of the pharynx. The aim of this study was to implement a new MRI technique to examine oropharyngeal obstructive mechanisms in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Sixteen patients suffering from OSA and 6 healthy volunteers were examined on a 1.5 T whole-body imager ('Vision', Siemens, Erlangen Medical Engineering, Germany) using a circular polarized head coil. Imaging was performed with 2D flash sequences in midsagittal and axial planes. Patients and volunteers were asked to breathe normally through the nose and to simulate snoring and the Mueller maneuver during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Prior to MRI, all patients underwent an ear, nose and throat (ENT) examination, functional fiberoptic nasopharyngoscopy and polysomnography. A temporal resolution of 6 images/s and an in-plane resolution of 2.67x1.8 mm were achieved. The mobility of the tongue, soft palate and pharyngeal surface could be clearly delineated. The MRI findings correlated well with the clinical examinations. We propose ultrafast MRI as a reliable and non-invasive method of evaluating pharyngeal obstruction and their levels. (orig.) [de

  2. Feasibility study to assess clinical applications of 3-T cine MRI coupled with synchronous audio recording during speech in evaluation of velopharyngeal insufficiency in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagar, Pallavi; Nimkin, Katherine [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-08-16

    In the past decade, there has been increased utilization of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in evaluating and understanding velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI). To our knowledge, none of the prior studies with MRI has simultaneously linked the audio recordings of speech during cine MRI acquisition with the corresponding images and created a video for evaluating VPI. To develop an MRI protocol with static and cine sequences during phonation to evaluate for VPI in children and compare the findings to nasopharyngoscopy and videofluoroscopy. Five children, ages 8-16 years, with known VPI, who had previously undergone nasopharyngoscopy and videofluoroscopy, were included. MRI examination was performed on a 3-T Siemens scanner. Anatomical data was obtained using an isotropic T2-weighted 3-D SPACE sequence with multiplanar reformation capability. Dynamic data was obtained using 2-D FLASH cine sequences of the airway in three imaging planes during phonation. Audio recordings were captured by a MRI compatible optical microphone. All five cases had MRI and nasopharyngoscopy and four had videofluoroscopy performed. VPI was identified by MRI in all five patients. The location and severity of the velopharyngeal gap, closure pattern, velar size and shape and levator veli palatini (LVP) muscle were identified in all patients. MRI was superior in visualizing the integrity of the LVP muscle. MRI was unable to identify hemipalatal weakness in one case. In a case of stress-induced VPI, occurring only during clarinet playing, cine MRI demonstrated discordant findings of a velopharyngeal gap during phonatory tasks but not with instrument playing. Overall, there was satisfactory correlation among MRI, nasopharyngoscopy and videofluoroscopy findings. Cine MRI of the airway during speech is a noninvasive, well-tolerated diagnostic imaging tool that has the potential to serve as a guide prior to and after surgical correction of VPI. MRI provided superior anatomical detail of the levator

  3. Feasibility study to assess clinical applications of 3-T cine MRI coupled with synchronous audio recording during speech in evaluation of velopharyngeal insufficiency in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagar, Pallavi; Nimkin, Katherine

    2015-02-01

    In the past decade, there has been increased utilization of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in evaluating and understanding velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI). To our knowledge, none of the prior studies with MRI has simultaneously linked the audio recordings of speech during cine MRI acquisition with the corresponding images and created a video for evaluating VPI. To develop an MRI protocol with static and cine sequences during phonation to evaluate for VPI in children and compare the findings to nasopharyngoscopy and videofluoroscopy. Five children, ages 8-16 years, with known VPI, who had previously undergone nasopharyngoscopy and videofluoroscopy, were included. MRI examination was performed on a 3-T Siemens scanner. Anatomical data was obtained using an isotropic T2-weighted 3-D SPACE sequence with multiplanar reformation capability. Dynamic data was obtained using 2-D FLASH cine sequences of the airway in three imaging planes during phonation. Audio recordings were captured by a MRI compatible optical microphone. All five cases had MRI and nasopharyngoscopy and four had videofluoroscopy performed. VPI was identified by MRI in all five patients. The location and severity of the velopharyngeal gap, closure pattern, velar size and shape and levator veli palatini (LVP) muscle were identified in all patients. MRI was superior in visualizing the integrity of the LVP muscle. MRI was unable to identify hemipalatal weakness in one case. In a case of stress-induced VPI, occurring only during clarinet playing, cine MRI demonstrated discordant findings of a velopharyngeal gap during phonatory tasks but not with instrument playing. Overall, there was satisfactory correlation among MRI, nasopharyngoscopy and videofluoroscopy findings. Cine MRI of the airway during speech is a noninvasive, well-tolerated diagnostic imaging tool that has the potential to serve as a guide prior to and after surgical correction of VPI. MRI provided superior anatomical detail of the levator

  4. Feasibility study to assess clinical applications of 3-T cine MRI coupled with synchronous audio recording during speech in evaluation of velopharyngeal insufficiency in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagar, Pallavi; Nimkin, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, there has been increased utilization of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in evaluating and understanding velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI). To our knowledge, none of the prior studies with MRI has simultaneously linked the audio recordings of speech during cine MRI acquisition with the corresponding images and created a video for evaluating VPI. To develop an MRI protocol with static and cine sequences during phonation to evaluate for VPI in children and compare the findings to nasopharyngoscopy and videofluoroscopy. Five children, ages 8-16 years, with known VPI, who had previously undergone nasopharyngoscopy and videofluoroscopy, were included. MRI examination was performed on a 3-T Siemens scanner. Anatomical data was obtained using an isotropic T2-weighted 3-D SPACE sequence with multiplanar reformation capability. Dynamic data was obtained using 2-D FLASH cine sequences of the airway in three imaging planes during phonation. Audio recordings were captured by a MRI compatible optical microphone. All five cases had MRI and nasopharyngoscopy and four had videofluoroscopy performed. VPI was identified by MRI in all five patients. The location and severity of the velopharyngeal gap, closure pattern, velar size and shape and levator veli palatini (LVP) muscle were identified in all patients. MRI was superior in visualizing the integrity of the LVP muscle. MRI was unable to identify hemipalatal weakness in one case. In a case of stress-induced VPI, occurring only during clarinet playing, cine MRI demonstrated discordant findings of a velopharyngeal gap during phonatory tasks but not with instrument playing. Overall, there was satisfactory correlation among MRI, nasopharyngoscopy and videofluoroscopy findings. Cine MRI of the airway during speech is a noninvasive, well-tolerated diagnostic imaging tool that has the potential to serve as a guide prior to and after surgical correction of VPI. MRI provided superior anatomical detail of the levator

  5. An MRI-Conditional External Cardiac Defibrillator for Resuscitation Within the MRI Scanner Bore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Ehud J.; Watkins, Ronald D.; Zviman, Menekhem M.; Guttman, Michael A.; Wang, Wei; Halperin, Henry A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Subjects undergoing cardiac arrest within an MRI scanner are currently removed from the bore and then from the MRI suite, prior to delivery of CPR and defibrillation, potentially increasing risk of mortality. This precludes many higher-risk (acute-ischemic, acute-stroke) patients from undergoing MRI imaging and MRI-guided intervention. An MRI-conditional cardiac defibrillator should enable scanning with defibrillation pads attached and the generator ON, enabling application of defibrillation within the MRI seconds after a cardiac event. An MRI-conditional external defibrillator may improve patient acceptance for MRI procedures. Methods and Results A commercial external defibrillator was rendered 1.5 Tesla MRI-conditional by addition of novel Radio-Frequency (RF) filters between the generator and commercial disposable surface-pads. The RF filters reduced emission into the MRI scanner, and prevented cable/surface-pad heating during imaging, while preserving all the defibrillator’s monitoring and delivery functions. Human volunteers were imaged using high Specific-Absorption-Rate sequences to validate MRI image quality (IQ) and lack of heating. Swine were electrically fibrillated (N=4) and thereafter defibrillated both outside and inside the MRI bore. MRI IQ was reduced by 0.8 or 1.6 dB, with the generator in monitoring mode and operating on battery or AC power, respectively. Commercial surface-pads did not create artifacts deeper than 6mm below the skin surface. RF heating was within FDA guidelines. Defibrillation was completely successful inside and outside the MRI bore. Conclusions A prototype MRI-conditional defibrillation system successfully defibrillated in the MRI without degrading image quality, or increasing the time needed for defibrillation. It can increase patient acceptance for MRI procedures. PMID:27729363

  6. The Ultrafast Wolff Rearrangement in the Gas Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbacher, Andreas; Roeding, Sebastian; Brixner, Tobias; Nuernberger, Patrick

    The Wolff rearrangement of gas-phase 5-diazo Meldrum's acid is disclosed with femtosecond ion spectroscopy. Distinct differences are found for 267 nm and 200 nm excitation, the latter leading to even two ultrafast rearrangement reactions.

  7. Ultrafast Plasmonic Electron Emission from Ag Nanolayers with Different Roughness

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Márton, I.; Ayadi, V.; Rácz, P.; Stefaniuk, T.; Wróbel, Piotr; Földi, P.; Dombi, P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 3 (2016), s. 811-816 ISSN 1557-1955 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Nanoparticles * Ultrafast phenomena * Electron emission Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 2.139, year: 2016

  8. Ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry and spectroscopies of laser shocked materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcgrane, Shawn David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bolme, Cindy B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whitley, Von H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moore, David S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Ultrafast ellipsometry and transient absorption spectroscopies are used to measure material dynamics under extreme conditions of temperature, pressure, and volumetric compression induced by shock wave loading with a chirped, spectrally clipped shock drive pulse.

  9. Direct Characterization of Ultrafast Energy-Time Entangled Photon Pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Jean-Philippe W; Donohue, John M; Resch, Kevin J

    2018-02-02

    Energy-time entangled photons are critical in many quantum optical phenomena and have emerged as important elements in quantum information protocols. Entanglement in this degree of freedom often manifests itself on ultrafast time scales, making it very difficult to detect, whether one employs direct or interferometric techniques, as photon-counting detectors have insufficient time resolution. Here, we implement ultrafast photon counters based on nonlinear interactions and strong femtosecond laser pulses to probe energy-time entanglement in this important regime. Using this technique and single-photon spectrometers, we characterize all the spectral and temporal correlations of two entangled photons with femtosecond resolution. This enables the witnessing of energy-time entanglement using uncertainty relations and the direct observation of nonlocal dispersion cancellation on ultrafast time scales. These techniques are essential to understand and control the energy-time degree of freedom of light for ultrafast quantum optics.

  10. Ultrafast characterization of optoelectronic devices and systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xuemei

    The recent fast growth in high-speed electronics and optoelectronics has placed demanding requirements on testing tools. Electro-optic (EO) sampling is a well-established technique for characterization of high-speed electronic and optoelectronic devices and circuits. However, with the progress in device miniaturization, lower power consumption (smaller signal), and higher throughput (higher clock rate), EO sampling also needs to be updated, accordingly, towards better signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and sensitivity, without speed sacrifice. In this thesis, a novel EO sampler with a single-crystal organic 4-dimethylamino-N-methy-4-stilbazolium tosylate (DAST) as the EO sensor is developed. The system exhibits sub-picosecond temporal resolution, sub-millivolt sensitivity, and a 10-fold improvement on SNR, compared with its LiTaO3 counterpart. The success is attributed to the very high EO coefficient, the very low dielectric constant, and the fast response, coming from the major contribution of the pi-electrons in DAST. With the advance of ultrafast laser technology, low-noise and compact femtosecond fiber lasers have come to maturation and become light-source options for ultrafast metrology systems. We have successfully integrated a femtosecond erbium-doped-fiber laser into an EO sampler, making the system compact and very reliable. The fact that EO sampling is essentially an impulse-response measurement process, requires integration of ultrashort (sub-picosecond) impulse generation network with the device under test. We have implemented a reliable lift-off and transfer technique in order to obtain epitaxial-quality freestanding low-temperature-grown GaAs (LT-GaAs) thin-film photo-switches, which can be integrated with many substrates. The photoresponse of our freestanding LT-GaAs devices was thoroughly characterized with the help of our EO sampler. As fast as 360 fs full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) and >1 V electrical pulses were obtained, with quantum efficiency

  11. Ultrafast demagnetisation dependence on film thickness: A TDDFT calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, N.; Sharma, S.

    2018-04-01

    Ferromagnetic materials when subjected to intense laser pulses leads to reduction of their magnetisation on an ultrafast scale. Here, we perform an ab-initio calculation to study the behavior of ultrafast demagnetisation as a function of film thickness for Nickel as compared to the bulk of the material. In thin films surface formation results in amplification of demagnetisation with the percentage of demagnetisation depending upon the film thickness.

  12. Ultrafast optical signal processing using semiconductor quantum dot amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Tommy Winther; Mørk, Jesper

    2002-01-01

    The linear and nonlinear properties of quantum dot amplifiers are discussed on the basis of an extensive theoretical model. These devices show great potential for linear amplification as well as ultrafast signal processing.......The linear and nonlinear properties of quantum dot amplifiers are discussed on the basis of an extensive theoretical model. These devices show great potential for linear amplification as well as ultrafast signal processing....

  13. Tissue strain rate estimator using ultrafast IQ complex data

    OpenAIRE

    TERNIFI , Redouane; Elkateb Hachemi , Melouka; Remenieras , Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    International audience; Pulsatile motion of brain parenchyma results from cardiac and breathing cycles. In this study, transient motion of brain tissue was estimated using an Aixplorer® imaging system allowing an ultrafast 2D acquisition mode. The strain was computed directly from the ultrafast IQ complex data using the extended autocorrelation strain estimator (EASE), which provides great SNRs regardless of depth. The EASE first evaluates the autocorrelation function at each depth over a set...

  14. MRI of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahlensieck, M.

    2000-02-01

    Shoulder imaging is one of the major applications in musculoskeletal MRI. In order to analyze the images it is important to keep informed about anatomical and pathological findings and publications. In this article MRI technique, anatomy and pathology is reviewed. Technical considerations about MR sequences and examination strategy are only shortly discussed with emphasis on turbo spin echo and short T1 inversion recovery imaging. Basic anatomy as well as recent findings, including macroscopic aspects of the supraspinatus fat pad, composition of the supraspinatus muscle belly, and variability of the glenohumeral ligaments or coracoid ligament, are presented. Basic pathological conditions are described in detail, e. g. instability particularly problems in differentiating the various subtypes of labral pathology. Rotator cuff diseases are elucidated with emphasis on some rarer entities such as subscapularis calcifying tendinitis, coracoid impingement, chronic bursitis producing the double-line sign, prominent coraco-acromial ligament and the impingement due to an inflamed os acromiale. (orig.)

  15. MRI of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vahlensieck, M.

    2000-01-01

    Shoulder imaging is one of the major applications in musculoskeletal MRI. In order to analyze the images it is important to keep informed about anatomical and pathological findings and publications. In this article MRI technique, anatomy and pathology is reviewed. Technical considerations about MR sequences and examination strategy are only shortly discussed with emphasis on turbo spin echo and short T1 inversion recovery imaging. Basic anatomy as well as recent findings, including macroscopic aspects of the supraspinatus fat pad, composition of the supraspinatus muscle belly, and variability of the glenohumeral ligaments or coracoid ligament, are presented. Basic pathological conditions are described in detail, e. g. instability particularly problems in differentiating the various subtypes of labral pathology. Rotator cuff diseases are elucidated with emphasis on some rarer entities such as subscapularis calcifying tendinitis, coracoid impingement, chronic bursitis producing the double-line sign, prominent coraco-acromial ligament and the impingement due to an inflamed os acromiale. (orig.)

  16. Ultrafast Synaptic Events in a Chalcogenide Memristor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Zhong, Yingpeng; Xu, Lei; Zhang, Jinjian; Xu, Xiaohua; Sun, Huajun; Miao, Xiangshui

    2013-04-01

    Compact and power-efficient plastic electronic synapses are of fundamental importance to overcoming the bottlenecks of developing a neuromorphic chip. Memristor is a strong contender among the various electronic synapses in existence today. However, the speeds of synaptic events are relatively slow in most attempts at emulating synapses due to the material-related mechanism. Here we revealed the intrinsic memristance of stoichiometric crystalline Ge2Sb2Te5 that originates from the charge trapping and releasing by the defects. The device resistance states, representing synaptic weights, were precisely modulated by 30 ns potentiating/depressing electrical pulses. We demonstrated four spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) forms by applying programmed pre- and postsynaptic spiking pulse pairs in different time windows ranging from 50 ms down to 500 ns, the latter of which is 105 times faster than the speed of STDP in human brain. This study provides new opportunities for building ultrafast neuromorphic computing systems and surpassing Von Neumann architecture.

  17. Laser-driven ultrafast antiproton beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shun; Pei, Zhikun; Shen, Baifei; Xu, Jiancai; Zhang, Lingang; Zhang, Xiaomei; Xu, Tongjun; Yu, Yong; Bu, Zhigang

    2018-02-01

    Antiproton beam generation is investigated based on the ultra-intense femtosecond laser pulse by using two-dimensional particle-in-cell and Geant4 simulations. A high-flux proton beam with an energy of tens of GeV is generated in sequential radiation pressure and bubble regime and then shoots into a high-Z target for producing antiprotons. Both yield and energy of the antiproton beam increase almost linearly with the laser intensity. The generated antiproton beam has a short pulse duration of about 5 ps and its flux reaches 2 × 10 20 s - 1 at the laser intensity of 2.14 × 10 23 W / cm 2 . Compared to conventional methods, this new method based on the ultra-intense laser pulse is able to provide a compact, tunable, and ultrafast antiproton source, which is potentially useful for quark-gluon plasma study, all-optical antihydrogen generation, and so on.

  18. Ultrafast strain engineering in complex oxide heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovich, Paul; Caviglia, Andrea; Hu, Wanzheng; Bromberger, Hubertus; Singla, Rashmi; Mitrano, Matteo; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Kaiser, Stefan; Foerst, Michael [Max-Planck Research Group for Structural Dynamics - Center for Free Electron Laser Science, University of Hamburg (Germany); Scherwitzl, Raoul; Zubko, Pavlo; Gariglio, Sergio; Triscone, Jean-Marc [Departement de Physique de la Matiere Condensee, University of Geneva, 24 Quai Ernest-Ansermet, 1211 Geneve 4, Geneva (Switzerland); Cavalleri, Andrea [Max-Planck Research Group for Structural Dynamics - Center for Free Electron Laser Science, University of Hamburg (Germany); Department of Physics, Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    The mechanical coupling between the substrate and the thin film is expected to be effective on the ultrafast timescale, and could be exploited for the dynamic control of materials properties. Here, we demonstrate that a large-amplitude mid-infrared field, made resonant with a stretching mode of the substrate, can switch the electronic properties of a thin film across an interface. Exploiting dynamic strain propagation between different components of a heterostructure, insulating antiferromagnetic NdNiO{sub 3} is driven through a prompt, five-order-of-magnitude increase of the electrical conductivity, with resonant frequency and susceptibility that is controlled by choice of the substrate material. Vibrational phase control, extended here to a wide class of heterostructures and interfaces, may be conductive to new strategies for electronic phase control at THz repetition rates.

  19. Ultrafast photoconductor detector-laser-diode transmitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.L.; Davis, B.A.; Davies, T.J.; Nelson, M.A.; Thomas, M.C.; Zagarino, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    We report the results of an experiment in which we used an ultrafast, photoconductive, radiation detector to drive a fast laser-diode transmitter. When we irradiated the neutron-damaged Cr-doped GaAs detector with 17-MeV electron beams, the temporal response was measured to be less than 30 ps. The pulses from this detector modulated a fast GaAlAs laser diode to transmit the laser output through 30- and 1100-m optical fibers. Preliminary results indicate that 50- and 80-ps time resolutions, respectively, are obtainable with these fibers. We are now working to integrate the photoconductive detector and the laser diode transmitter into a single chip

  20. Ultrafast photoconductive detector-laser-diode transmitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.L.; Davies, T.J.; Nelson, M.A.; Thomas, M.C.; Zagarino, P.A.; Davis, B.A.

    1987-01-01

    The authors report the results of an experiment in which they used an ultrafast, photoconductive, radiation detector to drive a fast laser-diode transmitter. When they irradiated the neutron-damaged Cr-doped Ga/As detector with 17-MeV electron beams, the temporal response of was measured to be less than 30 ps. The pulses from this detector modulated a fast GaAlAs laser diode to transmit the laser output through 30- and 1100-m optical fibers. Preliminary results indicate that 50- and 80-ps time resolutions, respectively, are obtainable with these fibers. They are now working to integrate the photoconductive detector and the laser diode transmitter into a single chip

  1. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... affecting the MRI images, these objects can become projectiles within the MRI scanner room and may cause ... MRI has proven valuable in diagnosing a broad range of conditions, including cancer, heart and vascular disease, ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines are open on the sides (open MRI). Open units are especially helpful for examining larger patients or those with claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for ...

  3. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging procedure for ...

  4. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... does not completely surround you. Some newer MRI machines have a larger diameter bore which can be ... size patients or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines are open on the sides (open MRI). Open ...

  5. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in the first three to four months of pregnancy unless the potential benefit from the MRI exam ... the MRI Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of ...

  6. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Chest Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... clearer and more detailed than with other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in ...

  7. Play the MRI Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teachers' Questionnaire MRI Play MRI the Magnetic Miracle Game About the game In the MRI imaging technique, strong magnets and ... last will in Paris. Play the Blood Typing Game Try to save some patients and learn about ...

  8. Linear transforms for Fourier data on the sphere: application to high angular resolution diffusion MRI of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldar, Justin P; Leahy, Richard M

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a novel family of linear transforms that can be applied to data collected from the surface of a 2-sphere in three-dimensional Fourier space. This family of transforms generalizes the previously-proposed Funk-Radon Transform (FRT), which was originally developed for estimating the orientations of white matter fibers in the central nervous system from diffusion magnetic resonance imaging data. The new family of transforms is characterized theoretically, and efficient numerical implementations of the transforms are presented for the case when the measured data is represented in a basis of spherical harmonics. After these general discussions, attention is focused on a particular new transform from this family that we name the Funk-Radon and Cosine Transform (FRACT). Based on theoretical arguments, it is expected that FRACT-based analysis should yield significantly better orientation information (e.g., improved accuracy and higher angular resolution) than FRT-based analysis, while maintaining the strong characterizability and computational efficiency of the FRT. Simulations are used to confirm these theoretical characteristics, and the practical significance of the proposed approach is illustrated with real diffusion weighted MRI brain data. These experiments demonstrate that, in addition to having strong theoretical characteristics, the proposed approach can outperform existing state-of-the-art orientation estimation methods with respect to measures such as angular resolution and robustness to noise and modeling errors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. In vivo noninvasive thermometry for hyperthermia applications using the MRI-based proton-resonance-frequency method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Poorter, J; De Deene, Y; Achten, E [Ghent University (Belgium). Dept. of Magnetic Resonance; De Wagter, C [Ghent Rijksuniversiteit (Belgium). Kliniek voor Radiotherapie en Kerngeneeskunde; Thomsen, C [Hvidovre Univ. (Denmark); Staahlberg, F [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Physics

    1995-12-01

    The lack of noninvasive temperature monitoring is seriously limiting hyperthermia treatment of deep-seated tumors. MRI methods exploit the temperature dependence of a physical property whose spatial distribution can be visualized. The Proton Resonance Frequency (PRF) as physical property was examined because phantom studies prove the high accuracy that can be obtained using this parameter. Thermal experiments were performed in human lower legs. The results show that in muscle tissue the three-dimensional temperature distribution can be evaluated with a mean spatial distribution of 2 millimetres, a temporal resolution of 2 minutes and an accuracy of about 1 degree Celsius. However, it is not possible to retrieve the temperature distribution in fat tissue using the PRF-method due to the predominance of susceptibility effects in fat. The susceptibility effects are a consequence of the temperature dependence of the susceptibility constants. Experimental data on these dependencies were obtained and the magnitude of these effects was modelled for some specific configurations. The susceptibility effects in muscle tissue can be neglected when precautions are made. The PRF method is an attractive tool to study time-varying temperature changes in muscle tissue.

  10. In vivo noninvasive thermometry for hyperthermia applications using the MRI-based proton-resonance-frequency method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Poorter, J.; De Deene, Y.; Achten, E.; Staahlberg, F.

    1995-01-01

    The lack of noninvasive temperature monitoring is seriously limiting hyperthermia treatment of deep-seated tumors. MRI methods exploit the temperature dependence of a physical property whose spatial distribution can be visualized. The Proton Resonance Frequency (PRF) as physical property was examined because phantom studies prove the high accuracy that can be obtained using this parameter. Thermal experiments were performed in human lower legs. The results show that in muscle tissue the three-dimensional temperature distribution can be evaluated with a mean spatial distribution of 2 millimetres, a temporal resolution of 2 minutes and an accuracy of about 1 degree Celsius. However, it is not possible to retrieve the temperature distribution in fat tissue using the PRF-method due to the predominance of susceptibility effects in fat. The susceptibility effects are a consequence of the temperature dependence of the susceptibility constants. Experimental data on these dependencies were obtained and the magnitude of these effects was modelled for some specific configurations. The susceptibility effects in muscle tissue can be neglected when precautions are made. The PRF method is an attractive tool to study time-varying temperature changes in muscle tissue

  11. Animal MRI Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Animal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Core develops and optimizes MRI methods for cardiovascular imaging of mice and rats. The Core provides imaging expertise,...

  12. Single-order laser high harmonics in XUV for ultrafast photoelectron spectroscopy of molecular wavepacket dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizuho Fushitani

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We present applications of extreme ultraviolet (XUV single-order laser harmonics to gas-phase ultrafast photoelectron spectroscopy. Ultrashort XUV pulses at 80 nm are obtained as the 5th order harmonics of the fundamental laser at 400 nm by using Xe or Kr as the nonlinear medium and separated from other harmonic orders by using an indium foil. The single-order laser harmonics is applied for real-time probing of vibrational wavepacket dynamics of I2 molecules in the bound and dissociating low-lying electronic states and electronic-vibrational wavepacket dynamics of highly excited Rydberg N2 molecules.

  13. Wavelength and pulse duration tunable ultrafast fiber laser mode-locked with carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Diao; Jussila, Henri; Wang, Yadong; Hu, Guohua; Albrow-Owen, Tom; C. T. Howe, Richard; Ren, Zhaoyu; Bai, Jintao; Hasan, Tawfique; Sun, Zhipei

    2018-01-01

    Ultrafast lasers with tunable parameters in wavelength and time domains are the choice of light source for various applications such as spectroscopy and communication. Here, we report a wavelength and pulse-duration tunable mode-locked Erbium doped fiber laser with single wall carbon nanotube-based saturable absorber. An intra-cavity tunable filter is employed to continuously tune the output wavelength for 34 nm (from 1525 nm to 1559 nm) and pulse duration from 545 fs to 6.1 ps, respectively....

  14. Single-order laser high harmonics in XUV for ultrafast photoelectron spectroscopy of molecular wavepacket dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fushitani, Mizuho; Hishikawa, Akiyoshi

    2016-11-01

    We present applications of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) single-order laser harmonics to gas-phase ultrafast photoelectron spectroscopy. Ultrashort XUV pulses at 80 nm are obtained as the 5th order harmonics of the fundamental laser at 400 nm by using Xe or Kr as the nonlinear medium and separated from other harmonic orders by using an indium foil. The single-order laser harmonics is applied for real-time probing of vibrational wavepacket dynamics of I 2 molecules in the bound and dissociating low-lying electronic states and electronic-vibrational wavepacket dynamics of highly excited Rydberg N 2 molecules.

  15. Application of routine MRI and 1H-MRS in evaluating the central neurological damages caused by occupational manganese exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiangrong; Long Liling; Jiang Muliang

    2010-01-01

    Objective: MRI and MR hydrogen proton spectroscopy ( 1 H-MRS) were used to detect the abnormal signal and alteration of metabolites, in order to explore the efficacy of these method in evaluating the damages of central nervous system (CNS) induced by occupational manganese exposure. Methods: Eighteen workers exposed to manganese without any manganism symptoms, 12 workers with slightly chronic manganese poisoning, and 19 healthy workers were scanned using routine MRI sequence and 1 H-MRS. The blood manganese concentration was also collected for each subject. On cerebral axial T 1 WI, the signal intensities of ipsilateral globus pallidus and frontal white matter were measured in the visually brightest area (try to select the signal homogeneous region), and the globus pallidus index (PI) was then calculated. The 1 H-MRS data was calculated to get the values of the peak height of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), choline (Cho), inositol (mI) and creatine (Cr) and the ratios of NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr, and mL/Cr were also calculated. One way ANOVA was used to compare the values of PI, NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr, mI/Cr and MnB among the three groups, and the correlations between PI and the time span of manganese exposure or blood manganese concentration were analyzed by Pearson correlation analysis. Eight workers exposed to manganese were followed up one year, and their PI, NAA/Cr before and after follow-up were compared by t test. Results: Fourteen of 18 cases exposed to manganese without any manganism symptoms showed symmetrically high intensity signal on T 1 WI, while the T 2 WI were normal. No high signal intensity was obseerved on T 1 WI in any of the healthy workers or manganese poisoning workers. We found that the average PI in manganese exposed group (1.16 ± 0.09) was significantly higher (F=24.79,P=0.000) than those of the poisoning (1.05±0.07) and control groups (1.01±0.05). The blood manganese concentration in manganese exposed group, the poisoning group and the control group were (0

  16. Rapid MRI evaluation of acute intracranial hemorrhage in pediatric head trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, Maura E.; Jaju, Alok [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging, Chicago, IL (United States); Ciolino, Jody D. [Northwestern University, Biostatistics Collaboration Center, Department of Preventive Medicine Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Alden, Tord [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Neurological Surgery, Chicago, IL (United States); Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Neurosurgery, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Rapid MRI with ultrafast T2 sequences can be performed without sedation and is often used in place of computed tomography (CT) to evaluate pediatric patients for indications such as hydrocephalus. This study investigated the sensitivity of rapid magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detection and follow-up of acute intracranial hemorrhage in comparison to CT, which is commonly the first-line imaging. Patients presenting to a pediatric hospital with acute intracranial hemorrhage on CT and follow-up rapid MRI within 48 h were included. Rapid MRI studies consisted of three plane ultrafast T2 sequences either with or without axial gradient echo (GRE) sequences. Identification of hemorrhage on rapid MRI was assessed by readers both blinded and unblinded to prior CT results. One hundred two acute hemorrhages in 61 patients were identified by CT. Rapid MRI detection of subdural and epidural hemorrhages was modest in the absence of prior CT for comparison (sensitivity 61-74 %), but increased with review of the prior CT (sensitivity 80-86 %). Hemorrhage size was a significant predictor of detection (p < 0.0001). Three plane fast T2 images alone without GRE sequences were poor at detecting subarachnoid hemorrhage (sensitivity 10-25 %); rapid MRI with GRE sequences identified the majority of subarachnoid hemorrhage (sensitivity 71-93 %). GRE modestly increased detection of other extra-axial hemorrhages. Rapid MRI with GRE sequences is sensitive for most acute intracranial hemorrhages only when a prior CT is available for review. Rapid MRI is not adequate to replace CT in initial evaluation of intracranial hemorrhages but may be helpful in follow-up of known hemorrhages. (orig.)

  17. Rapid MRI evaluation of acute intracranial hemorrhage in pediatric head trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, Maura E.; Jaju, Alok; Ciolino, Jody D.; Alden, Tord

    2016-01-01

    Rapid MRI with ultrafast T2 sequences can be performed without sedation and is often used in place of computed tomography (CT) to evaluate pediatric patients for indications such as hydrocephalus. This study investigated the sensitivity of rapid magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detection and follow-up of acute intracranial hemorrhage in comparison to CT, which is commonly the first-line imaging. Patients presenting to a pediatric hospital with acute intracranial hemorrhage on CT and follow-up rapid MRI within 48 h were included. Rapid MRI studies consisted of three plane ultrafast T2 sequences either with or without axial gradient echo (GRE) sequences. Identification of hemorrhage on rapid MRI was assessed by readers both blinded and unblinded to prior CT results. One hundred two acute hemorrhages in 61 patients were identified by CT. Rapid MRI detection of subdural and epidural hemorrhages was modest in the absence of prior CT for comparison (sensitivity 61-74 %), but increased with review of the prior CT (sensitivity 80-86 %). Hemorrhage size was a significant predictor of detection (p < 0.0001). Three plane fast T2 images alone without GRE sequences were poor at detecting subarachnoid hemorrhage (sensitivity 10-25 %); rapid MRI with GRE sequences identified the majority of subarachnoid hemorrhage (sensitivity 71-93 %). GRE modestly increased detection of other extra-axial hemorrhages. Rapid MRI with GRE sequences is sensitive for most acute intracranial hemorrhages only when a prior CT is available for review. Rapid MRI is not adequate to replace CT in initial evaluation of intracranial hemorrhages but may be helpful in follow-up of known hemorrhages. (orig.)

  18. The Investigation of New Magnetic Materials and Their Phenomena Using Ultrafast Fresnel Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schliep, Karl B.

    the University of Minnesota and how I explored the application of it toward the investigation of magnetic materials. In my discussion of UEM, I have made a concerted effort to highlight the unique challenges faced when getting a UEM lab running so that new researchers may circumvent these challenges. Of note in my graduate studies, I assisted in the development of three different magnetic material systems, strained Fe nanoparticles for permanent magnetic applications, FePd for applications in spintronic devices, and a rare-earth transition-metal (RE-TM) alloy that exhibits new magneto-optic phenomena. In studying the morphological and magnetic effects of lasers on these RE-TM alloys using the in situ laser irradiation capabilities of UEM along with standard TEM techniques and computational modeling, I uncovered a possible limitation in their utility for memory applications. Furthermore, with the aid of particle tracing software, I was able to optimize our UEM system for magnetic imaging and demonstrate the resolution of ultrafast demagnetization using UEM.

  19. Cinematic study of temporomandibular joint motion using ultra-fast magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manière-Ezvan, A; Havet, T; Franconi, J M; Quémar, J C; de Certaines, J D

    1999-10-01

    Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are usually performed to study the opening/closing movements of the mandible and have up to now been pseudodynamic step-by-step images simulating condylar motion by post-processing reconstruction. The aim of this study was: 1. to optimize a TMJ cine-imaging method to give a better clinical result than the step-by-step methods; 2. to develop an ultra-fast MRI Gradient Echo (GE) sequence for this purpose; and 3. to analyze condylar movements in the sagittal, coronal and para-axial planes during border mandibular displacements and chewing. Both TM joints were studied in six asymptomatic volunteers. The method involved a compromise between in-plane resolution, slice thickness, signal-to-noise ratio and time resolution. Routine clinical use was found to be a GE pulse sequence providing three images per second with an isometric voxel resolution of approximately two millimeters in ridge. This did not allow visualization of the disk. Using this sequence enabled real and simultaneous condylar displacement observation in the three planes of space and therefore contributed to a better functional diagnosis of pathologic TMJ motions.

  20. Synchronization control for ultrafast laser parallel microdrilling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Zhongsheng; Kuang, Zheng; Ouyang, Jinlei; Liu, Dun; Perrie, Walter; Edwardson, Stuart P.; Dearden, Geoff

    2014-11-01

    Ultrafast lasers, emitting ultra-short pulses of light, generally of the order of femtoseconds to ten picoseconds, are widely used in micro-processing with the advantage of very little thermal damage. Parallel micro-processing is seen significant developments in laser fabrication, thanking to the spatial light modulator (SLM) which can concert single beam to multiple beams through computer generate holograms (CGHs). However, without synchronization control, on the conditions of changing different holograms or processing on large area beyond scanning galvo's ability, the fabrication will be interrupted constantly for changing holograms and moving the stages. Therefore, synchronization control is very important to improve the convenience and application of parallel micro-processing. A synchronization control method, carried out through two application software: SAMLight (or WaveRunner) and Labview, is presented in this paper. SAMLight is used to control the laser and the scanning galvo to implement microprocessing, and the developed program with Labview is used to control the SLM and motion stages. The synchronization signals, transmitted between the two software, are utilized by a National Instruments (NI) device USB-6008. Using optimal control methods, the synchronized system can easily and automatically accomplish complicated fabrications with minimum time. A multi-drilling application is provided to verify the affectivity of the synchronized control method. It uses multiple annular beams, generated by superimposing multi-beam CGH onto a diffractive axicon CGH, to drill multiple holes at one time, and it can automatically finish different patterns based on synchronization control. This drilling way is an optical trepanning and it avoids huge laser energy waste with attenuation. The multi-beam CGHs, generated by the Grating and Lens algorithm, are different for different patterns. The processing is over 200 times faster than traditional mechanical trepanning

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) with retrograde intralumen contrast enhancement of the rectum in diagnostics of rectovaginal fistulas after combination therapy of rectal cancer. Experience of application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usova, A.; Frolova, I.; Afanasev, S.; Tarasova, A.; Molchanov, S.

    2016-02-01

    Experiment of use of MRI in diagnostics of rectovaginal fistulas after combination therapy of rectal cancer is shown on clinical examples. We used retrograde contrasting of a rectum with 150ml ultrasonic gel to make MRI more informative in case of low diagnostic efficiency of ultrasound, colonoscopy and gynecological examination.

  2. Nonconventional MRI and microstructural cerebral changes in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enzinger, Christian; Barkhof, Frederik; Ciccarelli, Olga

    2015-01-01

    on disease-associated changes. This Review summarizes the rapid technical progress in the use of MRI in patients with MS, with a focus on nonconventional structural MRI. We critically discuss the present utility of nonconventional MRI in MS, and provide an outlook on future applications, including clinical...

  3. Cardiovascular MRI with ferumoxytol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, J.P.; Nguyen, K.-L.; Han, F.; Zhou, Z.; Salusky, I.; Ayad, I.; Hu, P.

    2016-01-01

    The practice of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CEMRA) has changed significantly in the span of a decade. Concerns regarding gadolinium (Gd)-associated nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in those with severely impaired renal function spurred developments in low-dose CEMRA and non-contrast MRA as well as efforts to seek alternative MR contrast agents. Originally developed for MR imaging use, ferumoxytol (an ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle), is currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of iron deficiency anaemia in adults with renal disease. Since its clinical availability in 2009, there has been rising interest in the scientific and clinical use of ferumoxytol as an MR contrast agent. The unique physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties of ferumoxytol, including its long intravascular half-life and high r 1 relaxivity, support a spectrum of MRI applications beyond the scope of Gd-based contrast agents. Moreover, whereas Gd is not found in biological systems, iron is essential for normal metabolism, and nutritional iron deficiency poses major public health challenges worldwide. Once the carbohydrate shell of ferumoxytol is degraded, the elemental iron at its core is incorporated into the reticuloendothelial system. These considerations position ferumoxytol as a potential game changer in the field of CEMRA and MRI. In this paper, we aim to summarise our experience with the cardiovascular applications of ferumoxytol and provide a brief synopsis of ongoing investigations on ferumoxytol-enhanced MR applications.

  4. SU-G-IeP1-09: MRI Evaluation of a Direction-Modulated Brachytherapy (DMBT) Tandem Applicator for Cervical Cancer On 3T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soliman, A; Safigholi, H [Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, ON (Canada); Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); Han, D [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Elzibak, A; Mashouf, S; Owrangi, A; Ravi, A [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Song, W [Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, ON (Canada); Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To assess image quality and artifact extent of a novel direction modulated brachytherapy (DMBT) tandem applicator on a 3T MRI using various clinical imaging sequences. Methods: The tandem applicator is composed of a tungsten alloy with 6 peripheral grooves covered with a PEEK tip. An MR-compatible phantom with similar dimensions to the female pelvis was manufactured. To visually assess the spatial shift of the applicator’s tip, a mountable radial-fiducial with 4 plastic rods, each of 3mm diameter, was designed to tightly fit on the applicator. The rods are separated by 16 mm and mounted at 90-degree relative to one another. The pelvis phantom was filled with a solution of MnCl2 to mimic T2 relaxation time of the cervix (60-80 ms at 3T).Imaging was performed on a 3T Philips Achieva using a 16-channel Torso coil array. Four MR sequences were tested: T2-weighted fast spin-echo (T2w-FSE), proton density weighted FSE (PDw-FSE), T1-weighted FSE (T1w-FSE) and T1 weighted spoiled gradient echo (T1w-GE). The spatial resolution was kept the same between all sequences: 0.6 × 0.6 × 3 mm{sup 3} with no slice gaps. Para-sagittal images were acquired with the applicator fixed at a 30-degree angle anterior to the B0- field to mimic clinical settings. Results: Minimal artifacts were observed on T2w-FSE, PDw-FSE and T1-FSE, while significant artifacts were seen on T1w-GE images. Artifacts induced in all 3 FSE sequences did not hinder accurate localisation of the tip and the applicator boundaries. The drift of the applicator’s centreline from the radial fiducials was measured and found to be < 1 mm for the 3 FSE sequences. Conclusion: The tungsten–based DMBT applicator can be potentially used on 3T with various clinical sequences without inducing significant artifacts. Further validation on patients as well as the evaluation of relative SNR among the different sequences is required.

  5. Optical nonlinearities and ultrafast all-optical switching of m-plane GaN in the near-infrared

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Yu; Zhou, Feng; Yang, Junyi; Yang, Yong [College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy, Soochow University, 215006 Suzhou (China); Xiao, Zhengguo; Wu, Xingzhi [Department of Physics, Harbin Institute of Technology, 150001 Harbin (China); Song, Yinglin, E-mail: ylsong@hit.edu.cn [College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy, Soochow University, 215006 Suzhou (China); Department of Physics, Harbin Institute of Technology, 150001 Harbin (China)

    2015-06-22

    We reported a systematic investigation on the three-photon absorption (3PA) spectra and wavelength dispersion of Kerr refraction of bulk m-plane GaN crystal with both polarization E⊥c and E//c by femtosecond Z-scan technique in the near-infrared region from 760 to 1030 nm. Both 3PA spectra and Kerr refraction dispersion were in good agreement with two-band models. The calculated nonlinear figure of merit and measured ultrafast nonlinear refraction dynamics via femtosecond pump-probe with phase object method revealed that m-plane GaN would be a promising candidate for ultrafast all-optical switching and autocorrelation applications at telecommunication wavelengths.

  6. Optimal and robust control of quantum state transfer by shaping the spectral phase of ultrafast laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yu; Dong, Daoyi; Shu, Chuan-Cun

    2018-04-04

    Achieving fast and efficient quantum state transfer is a fundamental task in physics, chemistry and quantum information science. However, the successful implementation of the perfect quantum state transfer also requires robustness under practically inevitable perturbative defects. Here, we demonstrate how an optimal and robust quantum state transfer can be achieved by shaping the spectral phase of an ultrafast laser pulse in the framework of frequency domain quantum optimal control theory. Our numerical simulations of the single dibenzoterrylene molecule as well as in atomic rubidium show that optimal and robust quantum state transfer via spectral phase modulated laser pulses can be achieved by incorporating a filtering function of the frequency into the optimization algorithm, which in turn has potential applications for ultrafast robust control of photochemical reactions.

  7. A New MRI-Based Model of Heart Function with Coupled Hemodynamics and Application to Normal and Diseased Canine Left Ventricles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young Joon; Constantino, Jason; Vedula, Vijay; Trayanova, Natalia; Mittal, Rajat

    2015-01-01

    A methodology for the simulation of heart function that combines an MRI-based model of cardiac electromechanics (CE) with a Navier–Stokes-based hemodynamics model is presented. The CE model consists of two coupled components that simulate the electrical and the mechanical functions of the heart. Accurate representations of ventricular geometry and fiber orientations are constructed from the structural magnetic resonance and the diffusion tensor MR images, respectively. The deformation of the ventricle obtained from the electromechanical model serves as input to the hemodynamics model in this one-way coupled approach via imposed kinematic wall velocity boundary conditions and at the same time, governs the blood flow into and out of the ventricular volume. The time-dependent endocardial surfaces are registered using a diffeomorphic mapping algorithm, while the intraventricular blood flow patterns are simulated using a sharp-interface immersed boundary method-based flow solver. The utility of the combined heart-function model is demonstrated by comparing the hemodynamic characteristics of a normal canine heart beating in sinus rhythm against that of the dyssynchronously beating failing heart. We also discuss the potential of coupled CE and hemodynamics models for various clinical applications. PMID:26442254

  8. Impact system for ultrafast synchrotron experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, B. J.; Owens, C. T.; Ramos, K. J.; Yeager, J. D.; Saavedra, R. A.; Luo, S. N.; Hooks, D. E.; Iverson, A. J.; Fezzaa, K.

    2013-01-01

    The impact system for ultrafast synchrotron experiments, or IMPULSE, is a 12.6-mm bore light-gas gun (<1 km/s projectile velocity) designed specifically for performing dynamic compression experiments using the advanced imaging and X-ray diffraction methods available at synchrotron sources. The gun system, capable of reaching projectile velocities up to 1 km/s, was designed to be portable for quick insertion/removal in the experimental hutch at Sector 32 ID-B of the Advanced Photon Source (Argonne, IL) while allowing the target chamber to rotate for sample alignment with the beam. A key challenge in using the gun system to acquire dynamic data on the nanosecond time scale was synchronization (or bracketing) of the impact event with the incident X-ray pulses (80 ps width). A description of the basic gun system used in previous work is provided along with details of an improved launch initiation system designed to significantly reduce the total system time from launch initiation to impact. Experiments were performed to directly measure the gun system time and to determine the gun performance curve for projectile velocities ranging from 0.3 to 0.9 km/s. All results show an average system time of 21.6 ± 4.5 ms, making it possible to better synchronize the gun system and detectors to the X-ray beam.

  9. The potential of multiparametric MRI of the breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinker, Katja; Helbich, Thomas H

    2017-01-01

    MRI is an essential tool in breast imaging, with multiple established indications. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) is the backbone of any breast MRI protocol and has an excellent sensitivity and good specificity for breast cancer diagnosis. DCE-MRI provides high-resolution morphological information, as well as some functional information about neoangiogenesis as a tumour-specific feature. To overcome limitations in specificity, several other functional MRI parameters have been investigated and the application of these combined parameters is defined as multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) of the breast. MpMRI of the breast can be performed at different field strengths (1.5–7 T) and includes both established (diffusion-weighted imaging, MR spectroscopic imaging) and novel MRI parameters (sodium imaging, chemical exchange saturation transfer imaging, blood oxygen level-dependent MRI), as well as hybrid imaging with positron emission tomography (PET)/MRI and different radiotracers. Available data suggest that multiparametric imaging using different functional MRI and PET parameters can provide detailed information about the underlying oncogenic processes of cancer development and progression and can provide additional specificity. This article will review the current and emerging functional parameters for mpMRI of the breast for improved diagnostic accuracy in breast cancer. PMID:27805423

  10. Carrier dynamics in graphene. Ultrafast many-particle phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malic, E.; Brem, S.; Jago, R. [Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden); Winzer, T.; Wendler, F.; Knorr, A. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Technische Universitaet Berlin (Germany); Mittendorff, M.; Koenig-Otto, J.C.; Schneider, H.; Helm, M.; Winnerl, S. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Ploetzing, T.; Neumaier, D. [Advanced Microelectronic Center Aachen, AMO GmbH, Aachen (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    Graphene is an ideal material to study fundamental Coulomb- and phonon-induced carrier scattering processes. Its remarkable gapless and linear band structure opens up new carrier relaxation channels. In particular, Auger scattering bridging the valence and the conduction band changes the number of charge carriers and gives rise to a significant carrier multiplication - an ultrafast many-particle phenomenon that is promising for the design of highly efficient photodetectors. Furthermore, the vanishing density of states at the Dirac point combined with ultrafast phonon-induced intraband scattering results in an accumulation of carriers and a population inversion suggesting the design of graphene-based terahertz lasers. Here, we review our work on the ultrafast carrier dynamics in graphene and Landau-quantized graphene is presented providing a microscopic view on the appearance of carrier multiplication and population inversion. (copyright 2017 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. PET/MRI. Challenges, solutions and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herzog, Hans [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). Inst. of Neuroscience and Medicine - 4

    2012-07-01

    Already from the start of PET/CT integrating positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) in one instrument, there have been considerations how to combine PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) so that their complementary abilities can be utilized in a single investigation. Since classical PET electronics fail in an even weak magnetic field and PET signal processing might disturb high-frequency signals of MRI, it soon became clear that new solutions had to be found to avoid mutual interferences. During the last fifteen years a number of different approaches towards PET/MRI for small animal imaging have been developed by research groups which together with their specific features are summarized in this review. Recently, PET/MRI for human imaging became available as well - this time by industrial initiatives. First some prototypes of BrainPET/MRI were developed followed by commercial products for simultaneous and non-simultaneous whole-body PET/MRI. Although only PET/MRI integrated in one scanner offers the full diversity of complementary multiparametric imaging, there are also promising applications of non-simultaneous sequential PET/MRI. While describing the present instrumentation for human PET/MRI, this review discusses the challenges and promises related to this new imaging technology. (orig.)

  12. Photo-conductive detection of continuous THz waves via manipulated ultrafast process in nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Kiwon; Lee, Eui Su; Lee, Il-Min; Park, Dong Woo; Park, Kyung Hyun

    2018-01-01

    Time-domain and frequency-domain terahertz (THz) spectroscopy systems often use materials fabricated with exotic and expensive methods that intentionally introduce defects to meet short carrier lifetime requirements. In this study, we demonstrate the development of a nano-photomixer that meets response speed requirements without using defect-incorporated, low-temperature-grown (LTG) semiconductors. Instead, we utilized a thin InGaAs layer grown on a semi-insulating InP substrate by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) combined with nano-electrodes to manipulate local ultrafast photo-carrier dynamics via a carefully designed field-enhancement and plasmon effect. The developed nano-structured photomixer can detect continuous-wave THz radiation up to a frequency of 2 THz with a peak carrier collection efficiency of 5%, which is approximately 10 times better than the reference efficiency of 0.4%. The better efficiency results from the high carrier mobility of the MOCVD-grown InGaAs thin layer with the coincidence of near-field and plasmon-field distributions in the nano-structure. Our result not only provides a generally applicable methodology for manipulating ultrafast carrier dynamics by means of nano-photonic techniques to break the trade-off relation between the carrier lifetime and mobility in typical LTG semiconductors but also contributes to mass-producible photo-conductive THz detectors to facilitate the widespread application of THz technology.

  13. Emerging Low-Dimensional Materials for Nonlinear Optics and Ultrafast Photonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaofeng; Guo, Qiangbing; Qiu, Jianrong

    2017-04-01

    Low-dimensional (LD) materials demonstrate intriguing optical properties, which lead to applications in diverse fields, such as photonics, biomedicine and energy. Due to modulation of electronic structure by the reduced structural dimensionality, LD versions of metal, semiconductor and topological insulators (TIs) at the same time bear distinct nonlinear optical (NLO) properties as compared with their bulk counterparts. Their interaction with short pulse laser excitation exhibits a strong nonlinear character manifested by NLO absorption, giving rise to optical limiting or saturated absorption associated with excited state absorption and Pauli blocking in different materials. In particular, the saturable absorption of these emerging LD materials including two-dimensional semiconductors as well as colloidal TI nanoparticles has recently been utilized for Q-switching and mode-locking ultra-short pulse generation across the visible, near infrared and middle infrared wavelength regions. Beside the large operation bandwidth, these ultrafast photonics applications are especially benefit from the high recovery rate as well as the facile processibility of these LD materials. The prominent NLO response of these LD materials have also provided new avenues for the development of novel NLO and photonics devices for all-optical control as well as optical circuits beyond ultrafast lasers. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Mapping Carrier Dynamics on Material Surfaces in Space and Time using Scanning Ultrafast Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jingya

    2016-02-25

    Selectively capturing the ultrafast dynamics of charge carriers on materials surfaces and at interfaces is crucial to the design of solar cells and optoelectronic devices. Despite extensive research efforts over the past few decades, information and understanding about surface-dynamical processes, including carrier trapping and recombination remains extremely limited. A key challenge is to selectively map such dynamic processes, a capability that is hitherto impractical by time-resolved laser techniques, which are limited by the laser’s relatively large penetration depth and consequently they record mainly bulk information. Such surface dynamics can only be mapped in real space and time by applying four-dimensional (4D) scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (S-UEM), which records snapshots of materials surfaces with nanometer spatial and sub-picosecond temporal resolutions. In this method, the secondary electron (SE) signal emitted from the sample’s surface is extremely sensitive to the surface dynamics and is detected in real time. In several unique applications, we spatially and temporally visualize the SE energy gain and loss, the charge carrier dynamics on the surface of InGaN nanowires and CdSe single crystals and its powder film. We also provide the mechanisms for the observed dynamics, which will be the foundation for future potential applications of S-UEM to a wide range of studies on material surfaces and device interfaces.

  15. Mapping Carrier Dynamics on Material Surfaces in Space and Time using Scanning Ultrafast Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jingya; Adhikari, Aniruddha; Shaheen, Basamat; Yang, Haoze; Mohammed, Omar F.

    2016-01-01

    Selectively capturing the ultrafast dynamics of charge carriers on materials surfaces and at interfaces is crucial to the design of solar cells and optoelectronic devices. Despite extensive research efforts over the past few decades, information and understanding about surface-dynamical processes, including carrier trapping and recombination remains extremely limited. A key challenge is to selectively map such dynamic processes, a capability that is hitherto impractical by time-resolved laser techniques, which are limited by the laser’s relatively large penetration depth and consequently they record mainly bulk information. Such surface dynamics can only be mapped in real space and time by applying four-dimensional (4D) scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (S-UEM), which records snapshots of materials surfaces with nanometer spatial and sub-picosecond temporal resolutions. In this method, the secondary electron (SE) signal emitted from the sample’s surface is extremely sensitive to the surface dynamics and is detected in real time. In several unique applications, we spatially and temporally visualize the SE energy gain and loss, the charge carrier dynamics on the surface of InGaN nanowires and CdSe single crystals and its powder film. We also provide the mechanisms for the observed dynamics, which will be the foundation for future potential applications of S-UEM to a wide range of studies on material surfaces and device interfaces.

  16. Stroke MRI: pathophysiology, potential and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiehler, J.; Kucinski, T.; Zeumer, H.

    2004-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRT) is increasingly utilized as the primary imaging modality in major stroke centers. The ability to depict several aspects of individual pathophysiology makes the use of MRI in stroke both attractive and complex. Profound knowledge of the pathophysiology of the imaging findings is crucial for a rational diagnostic workup. The pathophysiology of MRI in stroke will be reviewed considering recent experiences in clinical application, and the potential of stroke MRI will be assessed. Further perspectives like application of 'blood oxygen level dependent' (BOLD) and the use of multiparametric prediction maps will be discussed. (orig.) [de

  17. MRI experiments for introductory physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghizadeh, Sanaz; Lincoln, James

    2018-04-01

    The introductory physics classroom has long educated students about the properties of the atom and the nucleus. But absent from these lessons has been an informed discussion of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and its parent science nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Physics teachers should not miss the opportunity to instruct upon this highly relevant application of modern physics, especially with so many of our students planning to pursue a career in medicine. This article provides an overview of the physics of MRI and gives advice on how physics teachers can introduce this topic. Also included are some demonstration activities and a discussion of a desktop MRI apparatus that may be used by students in the lab or as a demo.

  18. Superconducting magnet systems for MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawksworth, D.G.

    1988-01-01

    MRI is the first large scale commercial application of superconductivity and has not achieved the status of a mature industry with an annual turnover in the magnet industry alone in excess of $150M. Conservative estimates put the investment of the medical industry in MRI as a whole at more than a billion dollars. In the nine years since shipment of the first superconducting whole body imaging magnets of 0.3 Tesla field the standard product of the industry has become a system of 1 meter bore and field strength 0.5 Tesla to 1.5 Tesla. In this paper the evolution of present day MRI magnets from small bore but high field spectrometer magnets is reviewed and the direction of future developments discussed

  19. Computational Diffusion MRI : MICCAI Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    Grussu, Francesco; Ning, Lipeng; Tax, Chantal; Veraart, Jelle

    2018-01-01

    This volume presents the latest developments in the highly active and rapidly growing field of diffusion MRI. The reader will find numerous contributions covering a broad range of topics, from the mathematical foundations of the diffusion process and signal generation, to new computational methods and estimation techniques for the in-vivo recovery of microstructural and connectivity features, as well as frontline applications in neuroscience research and clinical practice. These proceedings contain the papers presented at the 2017 MICCAI Workshop on Computational Diffusion MRI (CDMRI’17) held in Québec, Canada on September 10, 2017, sharing new perspectives on the most recent research challenges for those currently working in the field, but also offering a valuable starting point for anyone interested in learning computational techniques in diffusion MRI. This book includes rigorous mathematical derivations, a large number of rich, full-colour visualisations and clinically relevant results. As such, it wil...

  20. Femtochemistry and femtobiology ultrafast dynamics in molecular science

    CERN Document Server

    Douhal, Abderrazzak

    2002-01-01

    This book contains important contributions from top international scientists on the-state-of-the-art of femtochemistry and femtobiology at the beginning of the new millennium. It consists of reviews and papers on ultrafast dynamics in molecular science.The coverage of topics highlights several important features of molecular science from the viewpoint of structure (space domain) and dynamics (time domain). First of all, the book presents the latest developments, such as experimental techniques for understanding ultrafast processes in gas, condensed and complex systems, including biological mol

  1. Patellofemoral joint motion: Evaluation by ultrafast computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanford, W.; Phelan, J.; Kathol, M.H.; Rooholamini, S.A.; El-Khoury, G.Y.; Palutsis, G.R.; Albright, J.P.

    1988-01-01

    Patellofemoral maltracking is a recognized cause of peripatellar pain. Clinicians currently rely on observation, palpation, and static radiographic images to evaluate the symptomatic patient. Ultrafast computed tomography (ultrafast CT) offers objective observations of the dynamic influences of muscle contraction on the patellofemoral joint as the knee is actively moved through a range of motion from 90 0 C flexion of full extension. This study reports our initial observations and establishes a range of normal values so that patients with a clinical suspicion of patellar maltracking may be evaluated. (orig./GDG)

  2. Patellofemoral joint motion: Evaluation by ultrafast computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanford, W.; Phelan, J.; Kathol, M.H.; Rooholamini, S.A.; El-Khoury, G.Y.; Palutsis, G.R.; Albright, J.P.

    1988-10-01

    Patellofemoral maltracking is a recognized cause of peripatellar pain. Clinicians currently rely on observation, palpation, and static radiographic images to evaluate the symptomatic patient. Ultrafast computed tomography (ultrafast CT) offers objective observations of the dynamic influences of muscle contraction on the patellofemoral joint as the knee is actively moved through a range of motion from 90/sup 0/C flexion of full extension. This study reports our initial observations and establishes a range of normal values so that patients with a clinical suspicion of patellar maltracking may be evaluated. (orig./GDG).

  3. The combined application of {sup 1}H MRI and {sup 19}F MRS to the study of cerebroprotection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haga, K.K

    2000-07-01

    The research presented in this thesis focuses on the application of {sup 1}H and {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance techniques to the evaluation of the neuroprotective and pharmacokinetic properties of a novel, nitric oxide synthase inhibitor in a rat model of stroke. Although there is a growing body of research on the application of {sup 19}F magnetic resonance spectroscopy techniques to the study of psychotropic agents, this is the first attempt to apply these methods to the evaluation of an agent being developed for cerebroprotection. TRIM, 1-(2-trifluoromethylphenyl) imidazole, is a selective inhibitor of the neuronal form of nitric oxide synthase in the rat and mouse brain. The first portion of this thesis demonstrates TRIM's neuroprotective properties when administered post-occlusion in the middle cerebral artery occlusion model of focal cerebral ischaemia. In addition, these neuroprotective effects may be eliminated by the co-administration of L-arginine, a nitric oxide precursor, indicating a role for neuronal nitric oxide synthase in ischaemic damage. {sup 1}H magnetic resonance imaging at 24 hours post-occlusion indicates a 40% reduction in lesion volume following TRIM administration as compared to the saline control group. The second part of this thesis pertains to the development and application of {sup 19}F MRS methods, in vivo and in vitro, to enable the investigator to monitor and quantify TRIM in the rat CNS pre and post-occlusion. In this section, {sup 19}F MRS studies were conducted to measure the in vivo T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} relaxation parameters and subsequently, the concentration of TRIM achieved in the rat CNS over an 8 hour measuring period. From this data, the in vivo pharmacokinetics of TRIM were evaluated and applied to the neuroprotective strategy in cerebral ischaemia. In vitro measurements of TRIM concentrations in the rat CNS were compared to the in vivo concentration calculations to evaluate the reliability of TRIM

  4. Electron beam dynamics in an ultrafast transmission electron microscope with Wehnelt electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bücker, K.; Picher, M.; Crégut, O. [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg, UMR 7504 CNRS, Université de Strasbourg, 23 rue du Loess, 67034 Strasbourg (France); LaGrange, T. [Interdisciplinary Centre for Electron Microscopy, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Reed, B.W.; Park, S.T.; Masiel, D.J. [Integrated Dynamic Electron Solutions, Inc., 5653 Stoneridge Drive 117, Pleasanton, CA 94588 (United States); Banhart, F., E-mail: florian.banhart@ipcms.unistra.fr [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg, UMR 7504 CNRS, Université de Strasbourg, 23 rue du Loess, 67034 Strasbourg (France)

    2016-12-15

    pulses in an ultrafast TEM is presented. • Intense picosecond pulses with many electrons are studied. • The influence of electron trajectories limits the temporal resolution of the TEM. • The energy resolution in EELS is limited by space charge and Boersch effect. • The optimum operation conditions for different applications are revealed.

  5. Ultra-fast transient plasmonics using transparent conductive oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrera, Marcello; Carnemolla, Enrico G.

    2018-02-01

    During the last decade, plasmonic- and metamaterial-based applications have revolutionized the field of integrated photonics by allowing for deep subwavelength confinement and full control over the effective permittivity and permeability of the optical environment. However, despite the numerous remarkable proofs of principle that have been experimentally demonstrated, few key issues remain preventing a widespread of nanophotonic technologies. Among these fundamental limitations, we remind the large ohmic losses, incompatibility with semiconductor industry standards, and largely reduced dynamic tunability of the optical properties. In this article, in the larger context of the new emerging field of all-dielectric nanophotonics, we present our recent progresses towards the study of large optical nonlinearities in transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) also giving a general overview of the most relevant and recent experimental attainments using TCO-based technology. However, it is important to underline that the present article does not represent a review paper but rather an original work with a broad introduction. Our work lays in a sort of ‘hybrid’ zone in the middle between high index contrast systems, whose behaviour is well described by applying Mie scattering theory, and standard plasmonic elements where optical modes originate from the electromagnetic coupling with the electronic plasma at the metal-to-dielectric interface. Beside remaining in the context of plasmonic technologies and retaining all the fundamental peculiarities that promoted the success of plasmonics in the first place, our strategy has the additional advantage to allow for large and ultra-fast tunability of the effective complex refractive index by accessing the index-near-zero regime in bulk materials at telecom wavelength.

  6. Spherical transceivers for ultrafast optical wireless communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xian; Hristovski, Blago A.; Collier, Christopher M.; Geoffroy-Gagnon, Simon; Born, Brandon; Holzman, Jonathan F.

    2016-02-01

    Optical wireless communications (OWC) offers the potential for high-speed and mobile operation in indoor networks. Such OWC systems often employ a fixed transmitter grid and mobile transceivers, with the mobile transceivers carrying out bi-directional communication via active downlinks (ideally with high-speed signal detection) and passive uplinks (ideally with broad angular retroreflection and high-speed modulation). It can be challenging to integrate all of these bidirectional communication capabilities within the mobile transceivers, however, as there is a simultaneous desire for compact packaging. With this in mind, the work presented here introduces a new form of transceiver for bi-directional OWC systems. The transceiver incorporates radial photoconductive switches (for high-speed signal detection) and a spherical retro-modulator (for broad angular retroreflection and high-speed all-optical modulation). All-optical retromodulation are investigated by way of theoretical models and experimental testing, for spherical retro-modulators comprised of three glasses, N-BK7, N-LASF9, and S-LAH79, having differing levels of refraction and nonlinearity. It is found that the spherical retro-modulator comprised of S-LAH79, with a refractive index of n ≍ 2 and a Kerr nonlinear index of n2 ≍ (1.8 ± 0.1) × 10-15 cm2/W, yields both broad angular retroreflection (over a solid angle of 2π steradians) and ultrafast modulation (over a duration of 120 fs). Such transceivers can become important elements for all-optical implementations in future bi-directional OWC systems.

  7. Interactive local super-resolution reconstruction of whole-body MRI mouse data: a pilot study with applications to bone and kidney metastases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleh Dzyubachyk

    Full Text Available In small animal imaging studies, when the locations of the micro-structures of interest are unknown a priori, there is a simultaneous need for full-body coverage and high resolution. In MRI, additional requirements to image contrast and acquisition time will often make it impossible to acquire such images directly. Recently, a resolution enhancing post-processing technique called super-resolution reconstruction (SRR has been demonstrated to improve visualization and localization of micro-structures in small animal MRI by combining multiple low-resolution acquisitions. However, when the field-of-view is large relative to the desired voxel size, solving the SRR problem becomes very expensive, in terms of both memory requirements and computation time. In this paper we introduce a novel local approach to SRR that aims to overcome the computational problems and allow researchers to efficiently explore both global and local characteristics in whole-body small animal MRI. The method integrates state-of-the-art image processing techniques from the areas of articulated atlas-based segmentation, planar reformation, and SRR. A proof-of-concept is provided with two case studies involving CT, BLI, and MRI data of bone and kidney tumors in a mouse model. We show that local SRR-MRI is a computationally efficient complementary imaging modality for the precise characterization of tumor metastases, and that the method provides a feasible high-resolution alternative to conventional MRI.

  8. Interactive local super-resolution reconstruction of whole-body MRI mouse data: a pilot study with applications to bone and kidney metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzyubachyk, Oleh; Khmelinskii, Artem; Plenge, Esben; Kok, Peter; Snoeks, Thomas J A; Poot, Dirk H J; Löwik, Clemens W G M; Botha, Charl P; Niessen, Wiro J; van der Weerd, Louise; Meijering, Erik; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P F

    2014-01-01

    In small animal imaging studies, when the locations of the micro-structures of interest are unknown a priori, there is a simultaneous need for full-body coverage and high resolution. In MRI, additional requirements to image contrast and acquisition time will often make it impossible to acquire such images directly. Recently, a resolution enhancing post-processing technique called super-resolution reconstruction (SRR) has been demonstrated to improve visualization and localization of micro-structures in small animal MRI by combining multiple low-resolution acquisitions. However, when the field-of-view is large relative to the desired voxel size, solving the SRR problem becomes very expensive, in terms of both memory requirements and computation time. In this paper we introduce a novel local approach to SRR that aims to overcome the computational problems and allow researchers to efficiently explore both global and local characteristics in whole-body small animal MRI. The method integrates state-of-the-art image processing techniques from the areas of articulated atlas-based segmentation, planar reformation, and SRR. A proof-of-concept is provided with two case studies involving CT, BLI, and MRI data of bone and kidney tumors in a mouse model. We show that local SRR-MRI is a computationally efficient complementary imaging modality for the precise characterization of tumor metastases, and that the method provides a feasible high-resolution alternative to conventional MRI.

  9. Synergetic and Redundant Information Flow Detected by Unnormalized Granger Causality: Application to Resting State fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stramaglia, Sebastiano; Angelini, Leonardo; Wu, Guorong; Cortes, Jesus M; Faes, Luca; Marinazzo, Daniele

    2016-12-01

    We develop a framework for the analysis of synergy and redundancy in the pattern of information flow between subsystems of a complex network. The presence of redundancy and/or synergy in multivariate time series data renders difficulty to estimate the neat flow of information from each driver variable to a given target. We show that adopting an unnormalized definition of Granger causality, one may put in evidence redundant multiplets of variables influencing the target by maximizing the total Granger causality to a given target, over all the possible partitions of the set of driving variables. Consequently, we introduce a pairwise index of synergy which is zero when two independent sources additively influence the future state of the system, differently from previous definitions of synergy. We report the application of the proposed approach to resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging data from the Human Connectome Project showing that redundant pairs of regions arise mainly due to space contiguity and interhemispheric symmetry, while synergy occurs mainly between nonhomologous pairs of regions in opposite hemispheres. Redundancy and synergy, in healthy resting brains, display characteristic patterns, revealed by the proposed approach. The pairwise synergy index, here introduced, maps the informational character of the system at hand into a weighted complex network: the same approach can be applied to other complex systems whose normal state corresponds to a balance between redundant and synergetic circuits.

  10. Stress cine MRI for detection of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, T.; Hofer, U.; Schild, H.

    2002-01-01

    Stress testing is the cornerstone in the diagnosis of patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). Stress echocardiography has become a well-established modality for the detection of ischemia-induced wall motion abnormalities. However, display and reliable interpretation of stress echocardiography studies are user-dependent, the test reproducibility is low, and 10 to 15% of patients yield suboptimal or non-diagnostic images. Due to its high spatial and contrast resolution, MRI is known to permit an accurate determination of left ventricular function and wall thickness at rest. Early stress MRI studies provided promising results with respect to the detection of CAD. However, the clinical impact was limited due to long imaging time and problematic patient monitoring in the MRI environment. Recent technical improvements - namely ultrafast MR image acquisition - led to a significant reduction of imaging time and improved patient safety. Stress can be induced by physical exercise or pharmacologically by administration of a beta 1 -agonist (dobutamine) or vasodilatator (dipyridamole and adenosine). The best developed and most promising stress MRI technique is a high-dose dobutamine/atropine stress protocol (10, 20, 30, 40 μg/kg/min; optionally 0.25-mg fractions of atropine up to maximal dose 1 mg). Severe complications (myocardial infarction, ventricular fibrillation and sustained tachycardia, cardiogenic shock) may be expected in 0.25% of patients. Currently, data of three high-dose dobutamine stress MRI studies are available, revealing a good sensitivity (83 - 87%) and specificity (83 - 86%) in the assessment of CAD. The direct comparison between echocardiography and MRI for the detection of stress-induced wall motion abnormalities yielded better results for dobutamine-MRI in terms of sensitivity (86.2% vs. 74.3%; p [de

  11. Multiparametric and molecular imaging of breast tumors with MRI and PET/MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinker, K.; Marino, M.A.; Meyer-Baese, A.; Helbich, T.H.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast is an indispensable tool in breast imaging for many indications. Several functional parameters with MRI and positron emission tomography (PET) have been assessed for imaging of breast tumors and their combined application is defined as multiparametric imaging. Available data suggest that multiparametric imaging using different functional MRI and PET parameters can provide detailed information about the hallmarks of cancer and may provide additional specificity. Multiparametric and molecular imaging of the breast comprises established MRI parameters, such as dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), MR proton spectroscopy ( 1 H-MRSI) as well as combinations of radiological and MRI techniques (e.g. PET/CT and PET/MRI) using radiotracers, such as fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). Multiparametric and molecular imaging of the breast can be performed at different field-strengths (range 1.5-7 T). Emerging parameters comprise novel promising techniques, such as sodium imaging ( 23 Na MRI), phosphorus spectroscopy ( 31 P-MRSI), chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging, blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) and hyperpolarized MRI as well as various specific radiotracers. Multiparametric and molecular imaging has multiple applications in breast imaging. Multiparametric and molecular imaging of the breast is an evolving field that will enable improved detection, characterization, staging and monitoring for personalized medicine in breast cancer. (orig.) [de

  12. Training of ultra-fast speech comprehension induces functional reorganization of the central-visual system in late-blind humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne eDietrich

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Individuals suffering from vision loss of a peripheral origin may learn to understand spoken language at a rate of up to about 22 syllables (syl per seconds (s – exceeding by far the maximum performance level of untrained listeners (ca. 8 syl/s. Previous findings indicate the central-visual system to contribute to the processing of accelerated speech in blind subjects. As an extension, the present training study addresses the issue whether acquisition of ultra-fast (18 syl/s speech perception skills induces de novo central-visual hemodynamic activation in late-blind participants. Furthermore, we asked to what extent subjects with normal or residual vision can improve understanding of accelerated verbal utterances by means of specific training measures. To these ends, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI was performed while subjects were listening to forward and reversed sentence utterances of moderately fast and ultra-fast syllable rates (8 or 18 syl/s prior to and after a training period of ca. six months. Four of six participants showed – independently from residual visual functions – considerable enhancement of ultra-fast speech perception (about 70 percentage points correctly repeated words whereas behavioral performance did not change in the two remaining participants. Only subjects with very low visual acuity displayed training-induced hemodynamic activation of the central-visual system. By contrast, participants with moderately impaired or even normal visual acuity showed, instead, increased right-hemispheric frontal or bilateral anterior temporal lobe responses after training. All subjects with significant training effects displayed a concomitant increase of hemodynamic activation of left-hemispheric SMA. In spite of similar behavioral performance, trained experts appear to use distinct strategies of ultra-fast speech processing depending on whether the occipital cortex is still deployed for visual processing.

  13. Ge22As20Se58 glass ultrafast laser inscribed waveguides for mid-IR integrated optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morris, James M.; Mackenzie, Mark D.; Petersen, Christian Rosenberg

    2018-01-01

    Ultrafast laser inscription has been used to produce channel waveguides in Ge22As20Se58 glass (GASIR-1, Umicore N.V). The mode field diameter and waveguide losses at 2.94 mu m were measured along with the waveguide dispersion in the 1 to 4.5 mu m range, which is used to estimate the zero-dispersi...... ultrafast laser inscribed waveguide devices in GASIR-1 for mid-IR integrated optics applications. Published by The Optical Society under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.......Ultrafast laser inscription has been used to produce channel waveguides in Ge22As20Se58 glass (GASIR-1, Umicore N.V). The mode field diameter and waveguide losses at 2.94 mu m were measured along with the waveguide dispersion in the 1 to 4.5 mu m range, which is used to estimate the zero......-dispersion wavelength. Z-scan measurements of bulk samples have also been performed to determine the nonlinear refractive index. Finally, midIR supercontinuum generation has been shown when pumping the waveguides with femtosecond pulses centered at 4.6 mu m. Supercontinuum spanning approximately 4 mu m from 2.5 to 6...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety What is MRI and how ... What is MRI and how does it work? Magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, is a way of obtaining ...

  15. [MRI methods for pulmonary ventilation and perfusion imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, G; Bauman, G

    2016-02-01

    Separate assessment of respiratory mechanics, gas exchange and pulmonary circulation is essential for the diagnosis and therapy of pulmonary diseases. Due to the global character of the information obtained clinical lung function tests are often not sufficiently specific in the differential diagnosis or have a limited sensitivity in the detection of early pathological changes. The standard procedures of pulmonary imaging are computed tomography (CT) for depiction of the morphology as well as perfusion/ventilation scintigraphy and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) for functional assessment. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with hyperpolarized gases, O2-enhanced MRI, MRI with fluorinated gases and Fourier decomposition MRI (FD-MRI) are available for assessment of pulmonary ventilation. For assessment of pulmonary perfusion dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), arterial spin labeling (ASL) and FD-MRI can be used. Imaging provides a more precise insight into the pathophysiology of pulmonary function on a regional level. The advantages of MRI are a lack of ionizing radiation, which allows a protective acquisition of dynamic data as well as the high number of available contrasts and therefore accessible lung function parameters. Sufficient clinical data exist only for certain applications of DCE-MRI. For the other techniques, only feasibility studies and case series of different sizes are available. The clinical applicability of hyperpolarized gases is limited for technical reasons. The clinical application of the techniques described, except for DCE-MRI, should be restricted to scientific studies.

  16. MRI methods for pulmonary ventilation and perfusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, G.; Bauman, G.

    2016-01-01

    Separate assessment of respiratory mechanics, gas exchange and pulmonary circulation is essential for the diagnosis and therapy of pulmonary diseases. Due to the global character of the information obtained clinical lung function tests are often not sufficiently specific in the differential diagnosis or have a limited sensitivity in the detection of early pathological changes. The standard procedures of pulmonary imaging are computed tomography (CT) for depiction of the morphology as well as perfusion/ventilation scintigraphy and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) for functional assessment. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with hyperpolarized gases, O 2 -enhanced MRI, MRI with fluorinated gases and Fourier decomposition MRI (FD-MRI) are available for assessment of pulmonary ventilation. For assessment of pulmonary perfusion dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), arterial spin labeling (ASL) and FD-MRI can be used. Imaging provides a more precise insight into the pathophysiology of pulmonary function on a regional level. The advantages of MRI are a lack of ionizing radiation, which allows a protective acquisition of dynamic data as well as the high number of available contrasts and therefore accessible lung function parameters. Sufficient clinical data exist only for certain applications of DCE-MRI. For the other techniques, only feasibility studies and case series of different sizes are available. The clinical applicability of hyperpolarized gases is limited for technical reasons. The clinical application of the techniques described, except for DCE-MRI, should be restricted to scientific studies. (orig.) [de

  17. Ultrafast Mid-Infrared Intra-Excitonic Response of Individualized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jigang; Graham, Matt W.; Ma, Yingzhong; Fleming, Graham R.; Kaindl, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    The quasi-1D confinement and reduced screening of photoexcited charges in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) entails strongly-enhanced Coulomb interactions and exciton binding energies. Such amplified electron-hole (e-h) correlations have important implications for both fundamental physics and optoelectronic applications of nanotubes. The availability of 'individualized' SWNT ensembles with bright and structured luminescence has rendered specific tube chiralities experimentally accessible. In these samples, evidence for excitonic behavior was found in absorption-luminescence maps, two-photon excited luminescence, or ultrafast carrier dynamics. Here, we report ultrafast mid-infrared (mid-IR) studies of individualized SWNTs, evidencing strong photoinduced absorption around 200 meV in semiconducting tubes of (6,5) and (7,5) chiralities. This manifests the observation of quasi-1D intra-excitonic transitions between different relative-momentum states, in agreement with the binding energy and calculated oscillator strength. Our measurements further reveal a saturation of the photoinduced absorption with increasing phase-space filling of the correlated e-h pairs. The transient mid-IR response represents a new tool, unhindered by restrictions of momentum or interband dipole moment, to investigate the density and dynamics of SWNT excitons.

  18. Ultrafast Adiabatic Photodehydration of 2-Hydroxymethylphenol and the Formation of Quinone Methide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škalamera, Đani; Antol, Ivana; Mlinarić-Majerski, Kata; Vančik, Hrvoj; Phillips, David Lee; Ma, Jiani; Basarić, Nikola

    2018-04-20

    The photochemical reactivity of 2-hydroxymethylphenol (1) was investigated experimentally by photochemistry under cryogenic conditions, by detecting reactive intermediates by IR spectroscopy, and by using nanosecond and femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopic methods in solution at room temperature. In addition, theoretical studies were performed to facilitate the interpretation of the experimental results and also to simulate the reaction pathway to obtain a better understanding of the reaction mechanism. The main finding of this work is that photodehydration of 1 takes place in an ultrafast adiabatic photochemical reaction without any clear intermediate, delivering quinone methide (QM) in the excited state. Upon photoexcitation to a higher vibrational level of the singlet excited state, 1 undergoes vibrational relaxation leading to two photochemical pathways, one by which synchronous elimination of H 2 O gives QM 2 in its S 1 state and the other by which homolytic cleavage of the phenolic O-H bond produces a phenoxyl radical (S 0 ). Both are ultrafast processes that occur within a picosecond. The excited state of QM 2 (S 1 ) probably deactivates to S 0 through a conical intersection to give QM 2 (S 0 ), which subsequently delivers benzoxete 4. Elucidation of the reaction mechanisms for the photodehydration of phenols by which QMs are formed is important to tune the reactivity of QMs with DNA and proteins for the potential application of QMs in medicine as therapeutic agents. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Ultrafast transient absorption revisited: Phase-flips, spectral fingers, and other dynamical features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cina, Jeffrey A., E-mail: cina@uoregon.edu; Kovac, Philip A. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Oregon Center for Optical, Molecular, and Quantum Science, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon 97403 (United States); Jumper, Chanelle C. [Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6 (Canada); Dean, Jacob C.; Scholes, Gregory D., E-mail: gscholes@princeton.edu [Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2016-05-07

    We rebuild the theory of ultrafast transient-absorption/transmission spectroscopy starting from the optical response of an individual molecule to incident femtosecond pump and probe pulses. The resulting description makes use of pulse propagators and free molecular evolution operators to arrive at compact expressions for the several contributions to a transient-absorption signal. In this alternative description, which is physically equivalent to the conventional response-function formalism, these signal contributions are conveniently expressed as quantum mechanical overlaps between nuclear wave packets that have undergone different sequences of pulse-driven optical transitions and time-evolution on different electronic potential-energy surfaces. Using this setup in application to a simple, multimode model of the light-harvesting chromophores of PC577, we develop wave-packet pictures of certain generic features of ultrafast transient-absorption signals related to the probed-frequency dependenc