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Sample records for application structure-function relationships

  1. Understanding the Structure-Function Relationships of Dendrimers in Environmental and Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo

    We are living an era wherein nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely applied in our lives. Dendrimers are special polymeric NPs with unique physiochemical properties, which have been intensely explored for a variety of applications. Current studies on dendrimers are bottlenecked by insufficient understandings of their structure and dynamic behaviors from a molecular level. With primarily computational approaches supplemented by many other experimental technics, this dissertation aims to establish structure-function relationships of dendrimers in environmental and biomedical applications. More specifically, it thoroughly investigates the interactions between dendrimers and different biomolecules including carbon-based NPs, metal-based NPs, and proteins/peptides. Those results not only provide profound knowledge for evaluating the impacts of dendrimers on environmental and biological systems but also facilitate designing next-generation functional polymeric nanomaterials. The dissertation is organized as following. Chapter 1 provides an overview of current progresses on dendrimer studies, where methodology of Discrete Molecular Dynamics (DMD), my major research tool, is also introduced. Two directions of utilizing dendrimers will be discussed in following chapters. Chapter 2 will focus on environmental applications of dendrimers, where two back-to-back studies are presented. I will start from describing some interesting observations from experiments i.e. dendrimers dispersed model oil molecules. Then, I will reveal why surface chemistries of dendrimers lead to different remediation efficiencies by computational modelings. Finally, I will demonstrate different scenarios of dendrimer-small molecules association. Chapter 3 is centered on dendrimers in the biomedical applications including two subtopics. In the first topic, we will discuss dendrimers as surfactants that modulating the interactions between proteins and NPs. Some fundamental concepts regarding to NPs

  2. Structure-function relationships of bacterial and enzymatically produced reuterans and dextran in sourdough bread baking application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao Yan; Levy, Clemens; Gänzle, Michael G

    2016-12-19

    Exopolysaccharides from lactic acid bacteria may improve texture and shelf life of bread. The effect of exopolysaccharides on bread quality, however, depends on properties of the EPS and the EPS producing strain. This study investigated structure-function relationships of EPS in baking application. The dextransucrase DsrM and the reuteransucrase GtfA were cloned from Weissella cibaria 10M and Lactobacillus reuteri TMW1.656, respectively, and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. Site-directed mutagenesis of GtfA was generates reuterans with different glycosidic bonds. NMR spectrum indicated reuteranPI, reuteranNS and reuteranPINS produced by GtfA-V1024P:V1027I, GtfA-S1135N:A1137S and GtfA-V1024P:V1027I:S1135N:A1137S, respectively, had a higher proportion of α-(1→4) linkages when compared to reuteran. ReuteranNS has the lowest molecular weight as measured by asymmetric flow-field-flow fractionation. The reuteransucrase negative mutant L. reuteri TMW1.656ΔgtfA was generated as EPS-negative derivative of L. reuteri TMW1.656. Cell counts, pH, and organic acid levels of sourdough fermented with L. reuteri TMW1.656 and TMW1.656ΔgtfA were comparable. Reuteran produced by L. reuteri TMW1.656 during growth in sourdough and reuteran produced ex situ by GtfA-ΔN had comparable effects on bread volume and crumb hardness. Enzymatically produced dextran improved volume and texture of wheat bread, and of bread containing 20% rye flour. ReuteranNS but not reuteranPI or reuteran was as efficient as dextran in enhancing wheat bread volume and texture. Overall, reuteran linkage type and molecular weight are determinants of EPS effects on bread quality. This study established a valuable method to elucidate structure-function relationships of glucans in baking applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Structure-function relationships of human meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danso, Elvis K; Oinas, Joonas M T; Saarakkala, Simo; Mikkonen, Santtu; Töyräs, Juha; Korhonen, Rami K

    2017-03-01

    Biomechanical properties of human meniscus have been shown to be site-specific. However, it is not known which meniscus constituents at different depths and locations contribute to biomechanical properties obtained from indentation testing. Therefore, we investigated the composition and structure of human meniscus in a site- and depth-dependent manner and their relationships with tissue site-specific biomechanical properties. Elastic and poroelastic properties were analyzed from experimental stress-relaxation and sinusoidal indentation measurements with fibril reinforced poroelastic finite element modeling. Proteoglycan (PG) and collagen contents, as well as the collagen orientation angle, were determined as a function of tissue depth using microscopic and spectroscopic methods, and they were compared with biomechanical properties. For all the measurement sites (anterior, middle and posterior) of lateral and medial menisci (n=26), PG content and collagen orientation angle increased as a function of tissue depth while the collagen content had an initial sharp increase followed by a decrease across tissue depth. The highest values (pmeniscus. This location had also higher (pmeniscus, higher (pmeniscus) significantly higher (pmeniscus modulus and/or nonlinear permeability. This study suggests that nonlinear biomechanical properties of meniscus, caused by the collagen network and fluid, may be strongly influenced by tissue osmotic swelling from the deep meniscus caused by the increased PG content, leading to increased collagen fibril tension. These nonlinear biomechanical properties are suggested to be further amplified by higher collagen content at all tissue depths and superficial collagen fibril orientation. However, these structure-function relationships are suggested to be highly site-specific. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Uncovering the structure-function relationship in spider silk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarger, Jeffery L.; Cherry, Brian R.; van der Vaart, Arjan

    2018-03-01

    All spiders produce protein-based biopolymer fibres that we call silk. The most studied of these silks is spider dragline silk, which is very tough and relatively abundant compared with other types of spider silks. Considerable research has been devoted to understanding the relationship between the molecular structure and mechanical properties of spider dragline silks. In this Review, we overview experimental and computational studies that have provided a wealth of detail at the molecular level on the highly conserved repetitive core and terminal regions of spider dragline silk. We also discuss the role of the nanocrystalline β-sheets and amorphous regions in determining the properties of spider silk fibres, endowing them with strength and elasticity. Additionally, we outline imaging techniques and modelling studies that elucidate the importance of the hierarchical structure of silk fibres at the molecular level. These insights into structure-function relationships can guide the reverse engineering of spider silk to enable the production of superior synthetic fibres.

  5. Breast Milk Oligosaccharides: Structure-Function Relationships in the Neonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smilowitz, Jennifer T.; Lebrilla, Carlito B.; Mills, David A.; German, J. Bruce; Freeman, Samara L.

    2015-01-01

    In addition to providing complete postnatal nutrition, breast milk is a complex biofluid that delivers bioactive components for the growth and development of the intestinal and immune systems. Lactation is a unique opportunity to understand the role of diet in shaping the intestinal environment including the infant microbiome. Of considerable interest is the diversity and abundance of milk glycans that are energetically costly for the mammary gland to produce yet indigestible by infants. Milk glycans comprise free oligosaccharides, glycoproteins, glycopeptides, and glycolipids. Emerging technological advances are enabling more comprehensive, sensitive, and rapid analyses of these different classes of milk glycans. Understanding the impact of inter- and intraindividual glycan diversity on function is an important step toward interventions aimed at improving health and preventing disease. This review discusses the state of technology for glycan analysis and how specific structure-function knowledge is enhancing our understanding of early nutrition in the neonate. PMID:24850388

  6. Structure-function relationships in highly modified shoots of cactaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauseth, James D

    2006-11-01

    Cacti are extremely diverse structurally and ecologically, and so modified as to be intimidating to many biologists. Yet all have the same organization as most dicots, none differs fundamentally from Arabidopsis or other model plants. This review explains cactus shoot structure, discusses relationships between structure, ecology, development and evolution, and indicates areas where research on cacti is necessary to test general theories of morphogenesis. Cactus leaves are diverse; all cacti have foliage leaves; many intermediate stages in evolutionary reduction of leaves are still present; floral shoots often have large, complex leaves whereas vegetative shoots have microscopic leaves. Spines are modified bud scales, some secrete sugar as extra-floral nectaries. Many cacti have juvenile/adult phases in which the flowering adult phase (a cephalium) differs greatly from the juvenile; in some, one side of a shoot becomes adult, all other sides continue to grow as the juvenile phase. Flowers are inverted: the exterior of a cactus 'flower' is a hollow vegetative shoot with internodes, nodes, leaves and spines, whereas floral organs occur inside, with petals physically above stamens. Many cacti have cortical bundles vascularizing the cortex, however broad it evolves to be, thus keeping surface tissues alive. Great width results in great weight of weak parenchymatous shoots, correlated with reduced branching. Reduced numbers of shoot apices is compensated by great increases in number of meristematic cells within individual SAMs. Ribs and tubercles allow shoots to swell without tearing during wet seasons. Shoot epidermis and cortex cells live and function for decades then convert to cork cambium. Many modifications permit water storage within cactus wood itself, adjacent to vessels.

  7. Spiders in Motion: Demonstrating Adaptation, Structure-Function Relationships, and Trade-Offs in Invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowlin, Melissa S.; McLeer, Dorothy F.; Danielson-Francois, Anne M.

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary history and structural considerations constrain all aspects of animal physiology. Constraints on invertebrate locomotion are especially straightforward for students to observe and understand. In this exercise, students use spiders to investigate the concepts of adaptation, structure-function relationships, and trade-offs. Students…

  8. Comparing the Structure-Function Relationship at the Macula With Standard Automated Perimetry and Microperimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Harsha L; Januwada, Manideepak; Hussain, Raza S M; Pillutla, Lalitha N; Begum, Viquar U; Chaitanya, Aditya; Senthil, Sirisha; Garudadri, Chandra S

    2015-12-01

    To compare the structure-function relationship between ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer (GCIPL) thickness measurements using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) and visual sensitivities measured using standard automated perimetry (SAP) and microperimetry (MP) at the macula in glaucoma. In a prospective study, 45 control eyes (29 subjects) and 60 glaucoma eyes (45 patients) underwent visual sensitivity estimation at the macula (central 10°) by SAP and MP, and GCIPL thickness measurement at the macula by SDOCT. Structure-function relationships between GCILP thickness and visual sensitivity loss with SAP and MP at various macular sectors were assessed using the Hood and Kardon model. To compare structure-function relationship with SAP and MP, we calculated the number of data points falling outside the 5th and the 95th percentile values of the Hood and Kardon model with each of the perimeters. The number of points falling outside the 5th and 95th percentile values of the Hood and Kardon model ranged from 28 (superior sector) to 48 (inferonasal sector) with SAP and 33 (superior sector) to 49 (inferonasal sector) with MP. The difference in the number of points falling outside the 5th and 95th percentile values with SAP and MP was statistically insignificant (P > 0.05, χ(2) test) for all the sectors. Visual sensitivity measurements of both SAP and MP demonstrated a similar relationship with the GCIPL measurements of SDOCT at the macula in glaucoma.

  9. Computational modeling of the structure-function relationship in human placental terminal villi.

    OpenAIRE

    Plitman, Mayo R; Olsthoorn, Jason; Charnock-Jones, David Stephen; Burton, Graham James; Oyen, Michelle Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Placental oxygen transport takes place at the final branches of the villous tree and is dictated by the relative arrangement of the maternal and fetal circulations. Modeling techniques have failed to accurately assess the structure-function relationship in the terminal villi due to the geometrical complexity. Three-dimensional blood flow and oxygen transport was modeled in four terminal villi reconstructed from confocal image stacks. The blood flow was analyzed along the center lines of capil...

  10. Structure-function relationships in elderly resting-state-networks : influence of age and cognitive performance

    OpenAIRE

    Jockwitz, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the structure-function relationship in cognitive resting state networks in a large population-based elderly sample. The first study characterized the functional connectivity in four cognitive resting state networks with respect to age, gender and cognitive performance: Default Mode Network (DMN), executive, and left and right frontoparietal resting state networks. The second study assessed the structural correlates of the functional reorganization of th...

  11. Structure-function relationship of skeletal muscle provides inspiration for design of new artificial muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yingxin; Zhang, Chi

    2015-03-01

    A variety of actuator technologies have been developed to mimic biological skeletal muscle that generates force in a controlled manner. Force generation process of skeletal muscle involves complicated biophysical and biochemical mechanisms; therefore, it is impossible to replace biological muscle. In biological skeletal muscle tissue, the force generation of a muscle depends not only on the force generation capacity of the muscle fiber, but also on many other important factors, including muscle fiber type, motor unit recruitment, architecture, structure and morphology of skeletal muscle, all of which have significant impact on the force generation of the whole muscle or force transmission from muscle fibers to the tendon. Such factors have often been overlooked, but can be incorporated in artificial muscle design, especially with the discovery of new smart materials and the development of innovative fabrication and manufacturing technologies. A better understanding of the physiology and structure-function relationship of skeletal muscle will therefore benefit the artificial muscle design. In this paper, factors that affect muscle force generation are reviewed. Mathematical models used to model the structure-function relationship of skeletal muscle are reviewed and discussed. We hope the review will provide inspiration for the design of a new generation of artificial muscle by incorporating the structure-function relationship of skeletal muscle into the design of artificial muscle.

  12. Molecular structure, functionality and applications of oxidized starches: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanier, Nathan Levien; El Halal, Shanise Lisie Mello; Dias, Alvaro Renato Guerra; da Rosa Zavareze, Elessandra

    2017-04-15

    During oxidation, the hydroxyl groups of starch molecules are first oxidized to carbonyl groups, then to carboxyl groups. The contents of the carbonyl and carboxyl groups in a starch molecule therefore indicate the extent of starch oxidation. The mechanisms of starch oxidation with different oxidizing agents, including sodium hypochlorite, hydrogen peroxide, ozone and sodium periodate, are described in this review. The effects of these oxidizing agents on the molecular, physicochemical, thermal, pasting and morphological properties of starch are described as well. In addition, the main industrial applications of oxidized starches are presented. The present review is important for understanding the effects of oxidation on starch properties, and this information may facilitate the development of novel oxidized starches for both food and non-food applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Minor snake venom proteins: Structure, function and potential applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldrini-França, Johara; Cologna, Camila Takeno; Pucca, Manuela Berto; Bordon, Karla de Castro Figueiredo; Amorim, Fernanda Gobbi; Anjolette, Fernando Antonio Pino; Cordeiro, Francielle Almeida; Wiezel, Gisele Adriano; Cerni, Felipe Augusto; Pinheiro-Junior, Ernesto Lopes; Shibao, Priscila Yumi Tanaka; Ferreira, Isabela Gobbo; de Oliveira, Isadora Sousa; Cardoso, Iara Aimê; Arantes, Eliane Candiani

    2017-04-01

    Snake venoms present a great diversity of pharmacologically active compounds that may be applied as research and biotechnological tools, as well as in drug development and diagnostic tests for certain diseases. The most abundant toxins have been extensively studied in the last decades and some of them have already been used for different purposes. Nevertheless, most of the minor snake venom protein classes remain poorly explored, even presenting potential application in diverse areas. The main difficulty in studying these proteins lies on the impossibility of obtaining sufficient amounts of them for a comprehensive investigation. The advent of more sensitive techniques in the last few years allowed the discovery of new venom components and the in-depth study of some already known minor proteins. This review summarizes information regarding some structural and functional aspects of low abundant snake venom proteins classes, such as growth factors, hyaluronidases, cysteine-rich secretory proteins, nucleases and nucleotidases, cobra venom factors, vespryns, protease inhibitors, antimicrobial peptides, among others. Some potential applications of these molecules are discussed herein in order to encourage researchers to explore the full venom repertoire and to discover new molecules or applications for the already known venom components. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Chondroitin Sulfate (CS) Lyases: Structure, Function and Application in Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Aruna; Patel, Seema; Goyal, Arun

    2018-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) such as chondroitin sulfate (CS) are the chief natural polysaccharides which reside in biological tissues mainly in extracellular matrix. These CS along with adhesion molecules and growth factors are involved in central nervous system (CNS) development, cell progression and pathogenesis. The chondroitin lyases are the enzyme that degrade and alter the CS chains and hence modify various signalling pathways involving CS chains. These CS lyases are substrate specific, can precisely manipulate the CS polysaccharides and have various biotechnological, medical and therapeutic applications. These enzymes can be used to produce the unsaturated oligosaccharides, which have immune-modulatory, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective properties. This review focuses on the major breakthrough of the chondroitin sulfate degrading enzymes, their structures and functioning mechanism. This also provides comprehensive information regarding production, purification, characterization of CS lyases and their major applications, both established as well as emerging ones such as neural development. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Use of Random and Site-Directed Mutagenesis to Probe Protein Structure-Function Relationships: Applied Techniques in the Study of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmire, Jeannette M; Merrell, D Scott

    2017-01-01

    Mutagenesis is a valuable tool to examine the structure-function relationships of bacterial proteins. As such, a wide variety of mutagenesis techniques and strategies have been developed. This chapter details a selection of random mutagenesis methods and site-directed mutagenesis procedures that can be applied to an array of bacterial species. Additionally, the direct application of the techniques to study the Helicobacter pylori Ferric Uptake Regulator (Fur) protein is described. The varied approaches illustrated herein allow the robust investigation of the structural-functional relationships within a protein of interest.

  16. A global view of structure-function relationships in the tautomerase superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Rebecca; Baas, Bert-Jan; Akiva, Eyal; Holliday, Gemma L; Polacco, Benjamin J; LeVieux, Jake A; Pullara, Collin R; Zhang, Yan Jessie; Whitman, Christian P; Babbitt, Patricia C

    2018-02-16

    The tautomerase superfamily (TSF) consists of more than 11,000 nonredundant sequences present throughout the biosphere. Characterized members have attracted much attention because of the unusual and key catalytic role of an N-terminal proline. These few characterized members catalyze a diverse range of chemical reactions, but the full scale of their chemical capabilities and biological functions remains unknown. To gain new insight into TSF structure-function relationships, we performed a global analysis of similarities across the entire superfamily and computed a sequence similarity network to guide classification into distinct subgroups. Our results indicate that TSF members are found in all domains of life, with most being present in bacteria. The eukaryotic members of the cis -3-chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase subgroup are limited to fungal species, whereas the macrophage migration inhibitory factor subgroup has wide eukaryotic representation (including mammals). Unexpectedly, we found that 346 TSF sequences lack Pro-1, of which 85% are present in the malonate semialdehyde decarboxylase subgroup. The computed network also enabled the identification of similarity paths, namely sequences that link functionally diverse subgroups and exhibit transitional structural features that may help explain reaction divergence. A structure-guided comparison of these linker proteins identified conserved transitions between them, and kinetic analysis paralleled these observations. Phylogenetic reconstruction of the linker set was consistent with these findings. Our results also suggest that contemporary TSF members may have evolved from a short 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase-like ancestor followed by gene duplication and fusion. Our new linker-guided strategy can be used to enrich the discovery of sequence/structure/function transitions in other enzyme superfamilies. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Structure-function relationships governing activity and stability of a DNA alkylation damage repair thermostable protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perugino, Giuseppe; Miggiano, Riccardo; Serpe, Mario; Vettone, Antonella; Valenti, Anna; Lahiri, Samarpita; Rossi, Franca; Rossi, Mosè; Rizzi, Menico; Ciaramella, Maria

    2015-10-15

    Alkylated DNA-protein alkyltransferases repair alkylated DNA bases, which are among the most common DNA lesions, and are evolutionary conserved, from prokaryotes to higher eukaryotes. The human ortholog, hAGT, is involved in resistance to alkylating chemotherapy drugs. We report here on the alkylated DNA-protein alkyltransferase, SsOGT, from an archaeal species living at high temperature, a condition that enhances the harmful effect of DNA alkylation. The exceptionally high stability of SsOGT gave us the unique opportunity to perform structural and biochemical analysis of a protein of this class in its post-reaction form. This analysis, along with those performed on SsOGT in its ligand-free and DNA-bound forms, provides insights in the structure-function relationships of the protein before, during and after DNA repair, suggesting a molecular basis for DNA recognition, catalytic activity and protein post-reaction fate, and giving hints on the mechanism of alkylation-induced inactivation of this class of proteins. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. Highlighting the Structure-Function Relationship of the Brain with the Ising Model and Graph Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. K. Das

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of neuroimaging techniques, it becomes feasible to explore the structure-function relationships in the brain. When the brain is not involved in any cognitive task or stimulated by any external output, it preserves important activities which follow well-defined spatial distribution patterns. Understanding the self-organization of the brain from its anatomical structure, it has been recently suggested to model the observed functional pattern from the structure of white matter fiber bundles. Different models which study synchronization (e.g., the Kuramoto model or global dynamics (e.g., the Ising model have shown success in capturing fundamental properties of the brain. In particular, these models can explain the competition between modularity and specialization and the need for integration in the brain. Graphing the functional and structural brain organization supports the model and can also highlight the strategy used to process and organize large amount of information traveling between the different modules. How the flow of information can be prevented or partially destroyed in pathological states, like in severe brain injured patients with disorders of consciousness or by pharmacological induction like in anaesthesia, will also help us to better understand how global or integrated behavior can emerge from local and modular interactions.

  19. Structure-function relationship of substituted bromomethylcoumarins in nucleoside specificity of RNA alkylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellner, Stefanie; Kollar, Laura Bettina; Ochel, Antonia; Ghate, Manjunath; Helm, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Selective alkylation of RNA nucleotides is an important field of RNA biochemistry, e.g. in applications of fluorescent labeling or in structural probing experiments, yet detailed structure-function studies of labeling agents are rare. Here, bromomethylcoumarins as reactive compounds for fluorescent labeling of RNA are developed as an attractive scaffold on which electronic properties can be modulated by varying the substituents. Six different 4-bromomethyl-coumarins of various substitution patterns were tested for nucleotide specificity of RNA alkylation using tRNA from Escherichia coli as substrate. Using semi-quantitative LC-MS/MS analysis, reactions at mildly acidic and slightly alkaline pH were compared. For all tested compounds, coumarin conjugates with 4-thiouridine, pseudouridine, guanosine, and uridine were identified, with the latter largely dominating. This data set shows that selectivity of ribonucleotide alkylation depends on the substitution pattern of the reactive dye, and even more strongly on the modulation of the reaction conditions. The latter should be therefore carefully optimized when striving to achieve selectivity. Interestingly, the highest selectivity for labeling of a modified nucleoside, namely of 4-thiouridine, was achieved with a compound whose selectivity was somewhat less dependent on reaction conditions than the other compounds. In summary, bromomethylcoumarin derivatives are a highly interesting class of compounds, since their selectivity for 4-thiouridine can be efficiently tuned by variation of substitution pattern and reaction conditions.

  20. [Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats: structure, function and application--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yujun; Li, Yanjun; Yan, Yanfeng; Yang, Ruifu

    2008-11-01

    CRISPRs (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats), the basis of spoligotyping technology, can provide prokaryotes with heritable adaptive immunity against phages' invasion. Studies on CRISPR loci and their associated elements, including various CAS (CRISPR-associated) proteins and leader sequences, are still in its infant period. We introduce the brief history', structure, function, bioinformatics research and application of this amazing immunity system in prokaryotic organism for inspiring more scientists to find their interest in this developing topic.

  1. Structure-function relationships using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography: comparison with scanning laser polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aptel, Florent; Sayous, Romain; Fortoul, Vincent; Beccat, Sylvain; Denis, Philippe

    2010-12-01

    To evaluate and compare the regional relationships between visual field sensitivity and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness as measured by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) and scanning laser polarimetry. Prospective cross-sectional study. One hundred and twenty eyes of 120 patients (40 with healthy eyes, 40 with suspected glaucoma, and 40 with glaucoma) were tested on Cirrus-OCT, GDx VCC, and standard automated perimetry. Raw data on RNFL thickness were extracted for 256 peripapillary sectors of 1.40625 degrees each for the OCT measurement ellipse and 64 peripapillary sectors of 5.625 degrees each for the GDx VCC measurement ellipse. Correlations between peripapillary RNFL thickness in 6 sectors and visual field sensitivity in the 6 corresponding areas were evaluated using linear and logarithmic regression analysis. Receiver operating curve areas were calculated for each instrument. With spectral-domain OCT, the correlations (r(2)) between RNFL thickness and visual field sensitivity ranged from 0.082 (nasal RNFL and corresponding visual field area, linear regression) to 0.726 (supratemporal RNFL and corresponding visual field area, logarithmic regression). By comparison, with GDx-VCC, the correlations ranged from 0.062 (temporal RNFL and corresponding visual field area, linear regression) to 0.362 (supratemporal RNFL and corresponding visual field area, logarithmic regression). In pairwise comparisons, these structure-function correlations were generally stronger with spectral-domain OCT than with GDx VCC and with logarithmic regression than with linear regression. The largest areas under the receiver operating curve were seen for OCT superior thickness (0.963 ± 0.022; P polarimetry, and was better expressed logarithmically than linearly. Measurements with these 2 instruments should not be considered to be interchangeable. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Study of goldfish (Carassius auratus) growth hormone structure-function relationship by domain swapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Y H; Cheng, C H K; Chan, K M

    2007-03-01

    Using goldfish as a model, the structure-function relationship of goldfish growth hormone was studied using the strategy of homologous domain swapping. Chimeric mutants were constructed by exchanging homologous regions between goldfish growth hormone (gfGH II) and goldfish prolactin (gfPRL) with their cloned complementary DNAs. Six mutants, with their domain-swapped, were generated to have different combinations of three target regions, including the helix a, helix d and the large section in between these helices (possess the helices b, c and other random coiled regions). After expression in E. coli and refolding, these mutants were characterized by using competitive receptor binding assay (RRA) and growth hormone responding promoter activation assay. The different activity profiles of mutants in Spi 2.1 gene promoter assays from that in RRA shows that, for gfGH, receptor binding dose not confer receptor signal activations. When either helices a or d of gfGH was maintained with other helices replaced by their gfPRL counterparts, both receptor binding and hence gene activation activities are reduced. In mutants with helices b and c in gfGH maintained, containing the gfGH middle section, and helices a and d swapped with gfPRL, the had reduced RRA activities but the promoter activation activities retained. In conclusion, as in the case of human GH, the gfGH molecule possesses two functional sites: one of them is composed of discontinuous epitopes located on the target regions of this study and is for receptor binding; another site is located on the middle section of the molecule that helices a and d are not involved, and it is for activation of GH receptor and intracellular signals.

  3. Connecting Structure-Property and Structure-Function Relationships across the Disciplines of Chemistry and Biology: Exploring Student Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Kathryn P.; Underwood, Sonia M.; Cooper, Melanie M.

    2018-01-01

    While many university students take science courses in multiple disciplines, little is known about how they perceive common concepts from different disciplinary perspectives. Structure-property and structure-function relationships have long been considered important explanatory concepts in the disciplines of chemistry and biology, respectively.…

  4. From Green to Blue: Site-Directed Mutagenesis of the Green Fluorescent Protein to Teach Protein Structure-Function Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giron, Maria D.; Salto, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Structure-function relationship studies in proteins are essential in modern Cell Biology. Laboratory exercises that allow students to familiarize themselves with basic mutagenesis techniques are essential in all Genetic Engineering courses to teach the relevance of protein structure. We have implemented a laboratory course based on the…

  5. Structure-function relationships in reconstituted HDL: Focus on antioxidative activity and cholesterol efflux capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukier, Alexandre M O; Therond, Patrice; Didichenko, Svetlana A; Guillas, Isabelle; Chapman, M John; Wright, Samuel D; Kontush, Anatol

    2017-09-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) contains multiple components that endow it with biological activities. Apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) and surface phospholipids contribute to these activities; however, structure-function relationships in HDL particles remain incompletely characterised. Reconstituted HDLs (rHDLs) were prepared from apoA-I and soy phosphatidylcholine (PC) at molar ratios of 1:50, 1:100 and 1:150. Oxidative status of apoA-I was varied using controlled oxidation of Met112 residue. HDL-mediated inactivation of PC hydroperoxides (PCOOH) derived from mildly pre-oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) was evaluated by HPLC with chemiluminescent detection in HDL+LDL mixtures and re-isolated LDL. Cellular cholesterol efflux was characterised in RAW264.7 macrophages. rHDL inactivated LDL-derived PCOOH in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The capacity of rHDL to both inactivate PCOOH and efflux cholesterol via ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) increased with increasing apoA-I/PC ratio proportionally to the apoA-I content in rHDL. Controlled oxidation of apoA-I Met112 gradually decreased PCOOH-inactivating capacity of rHDL but increased ABCA1-mediated cellular cholesterol efflux. Increasing apoA-I content in rHDL enhanced its antioxidative activity towards oxidized LDL and cholesterol efflux capacity via ABCA1, whereas oxidation of apoA-I Met112 decreased the antioxidative activity but increased the cholesterol efflux. These findings provide important considerations in the design of future HDL therapeutics. Non-standard abbreviations and acronyms: AAPH, 2,2'-azobis(-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride; ABCA1, ATP-binding cassette transporter A1; apoA-I, apolipoprotein A-I; BHT, butylated hydroxytoluene; CV, cardiovascular; EDTA, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid; HDL-C, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; LOOH, lipid hydroperoxides; Met(O), methionine sulfoxide; Met112, methionine 112 residue; Met86, methionine 86 residue; oxLDL, oxidized low

  6. Structure-function relationship of tear film lipid layer: A contemporary perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Georgi As; Eftimov, Petar; Yokoi, Norihiko

    2017-10-01

    Tear film lipid layer (TFLL) stabilizes the air/tear surface of the human eye. Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) resulting in quantitative and qualitative modifications of TFLL major (>93%) component, the oily secretion of meibomian lipids (MGS), is the world leading cause of dry eye syndrome (DES) with up to 86% of all DES patients showing signs of MGD. Caused by intrinsic factors (aging, ocular and general diseases) and by extrinsic everyday influences like contact lens wear and extended periods in front of a computer screen, DES (resulting in TF instability, visual disturbances and chronic ocular discomfort) is the major ophthalmic public health disease of the present time affecting the quality of life of 10-30% of the human population worldwide. Therefore there is a pressing need to summarize the present knowledge, contradictions and open questions to be resolved in the field of TFLL composition/structure/functions relationship. The following major aspects are covered by the review: (i) Do we have a reliable mimic for TFLL: MGS vs contact lens lipid extracts (CLLE) vs lipid extracts from whole tears. Does TFLL truly consist of lipids only or it is important to keep in mind the TF proteins as well?; (ii) Structural properties of TFLL and of its mimics in health and disease in vitro and in vivo. How the TFLL uniformity and thickness ensures the functionality of the lipid layer (barrier to evaporation, surface properties, TF stability etc.); (iii) What are the main functions of the TFLL? In this aspect an effort is done to emphasize that there is no single main function of TFLL but instead it simultaneously fulfills plethora of functions: suppresses the evaporation (alone or probably in cooperation with other TF constituents) of the aqueous tears; stabilizes (due to its surface properties) the air/tear surface at eye opening and during the interblink interval; and even acts as a first line of defense against bacterial invasion due to its detergency action on the

  7. Applications of computed nuclear structure functions to inclusive scattering, R-ratios and their moments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinat, A.S.

    2000-01-01

    We discuss applications of previously computed nuclear structure functions (SF) to inclusive cross sections, compare predictions with recent CEBAF data and perform two scaling tests. We mention that the large Q 2 plateau of scaling functions may only in part be due to the asymptotic limit of SF, which prevents the extraction of the nucleon momentum distribution in a model- independent way. We show that there may be sizable discrepancies between computed and semi-heuristic estimates of SF ratios. We compute ratios of moments of nuclear SF and show these to be in reasonable agreement with data. We speculate that an effective theory may underly the model for the nuclear SF, which produces overall agreement with several observables. (author)

  8. Measurement of Exclusive $π^0$ Electroproduction Structure Functions and their Relationship to Transverse Generalized Parton Distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedlinskiy, Ivan; Niccolai, Silvia; Stoler, Paul; Adhikari, Krishna; Aghasyan, Mher; Amaryan, Moskov; Anghinolfi, Marco; Avagyan, Harutyun; Baghdasaryan, Hovhannes; Ball, Jacques; Baltzell, Nathan; Battaglieri, Marco; Bennett, Robert; Biselli, Angela; Bookwalter, Craig; Boyarinov, Sergey; Briscoe, William; Brooks, Williams; Burkert, Volker; Carman, Daniel; Celentano, Andrea; Chandavar, Shloka; Charles, Gabriel; Contalbrigo, Marco; Crede, Volker; D& #x27; Angelo, Annalisa; Daniel, Aji; Dashyan, Natalya; De Vita, Raffaella; De Sanctis, Enzo; Deur, Alexandre; Djalali, Chaden; Doughty, David; Dupre, Raphael; Egiyan, Hovanes; El Alaoui, Ahmed; Elfassi, Lamiaa; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Eugenio, Paul; Fedotov, Gleb; Fegan, Stuart; Fleming, Jamie; Forest, Tony; Garcon, Michel; Gevorgyan, Nerses; Giovanetti, Kevin; Girod, Francoi-Xavier; Gohn, Wesley; Gothe, Ralf; Graham, Lewis; Griffioen, Keith; Guegan, Baptiste; Guidal, Michel; Guo, Lei; Hafidi, Kawtar; Hakobyan, Hayk; Hanretty, Charles; Heddle, David; Hicks, Kenneth; Holtrop, Maurik; Ilieva, Yordanka; Ireland, David; Ishkhanov, Boris; Isupov, Evgeny; Jo, Hyon-Suk; Joo, Kyungseon; Keller, Dustin; Khanddaker, Mahbubul; Khertarpal, Puneet; Kim, Andrey; Kim, Wooyoung; Klein, Franz; Koirala, Suman; Kubarovsky, A; Kuhn, Sebastian; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kvaltine, Nicholas; Livingston, Kenneth; Lu, Haiyun; MacGregor, Ian; Mao, Yuqing; Markov, Nikolai; Martinez, D; Mayer, Michael; McKinnon, Bryan; Meyer, Curtis; Mineeva, Taisiya; Mirazita, Marco; Mokeev, Viktor; Moutarde, Herve; Munevar Espitia, Edwin; Munoz Camacho, Carlos; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Osipenko, Mikhail; Ostrovidov, Alexander; Pappalardo, Luciano; Permuzyan, Rafayel; Park, Kijun; Park, Sungkyun; Pasyuk, Eugene; Pereira, Sergio; Phelps, Evan; Pisano, Silvia; Pogorelko, Oleg; Pozdnyakov, Sergey; Price, John; Procureur, Sebastien; Prok, Yelena; Protopopescu, Dan; Puckett, Andrew; Raue, Brian; Ricco, Giovanni; Rimal, Dipak; Ripani, Marco; Rosner, Guenther; Rossi, Patrizia; Sabatie, Franck; Saini, Mukesh; Salgado, Carlos; Saylor, Nicholas; Schott, Diane; Schumacher, Reinhard; Seder, Erin; Seraydaryan, Heghine; Sharabian, Youri; Smith, Gregory; Sober, Daniel; Sokhan, Daria; Stepanyan, Samuel; Strauch, Steffen; Taiuti, Mauro; Tang, Wei; Taylor, Charles; Tian, Ye; Tkachenko, Svyatoslav; Ungaro, Maurizio; Vineyard, Michael; Vlasov, Alexander; Voskanyan, Hakob; Voutier, Eric; Walford, Natalie; Watts, Daniel; Weinstein, Lawrence; Weygan, Dennis; Wood, Michael; Zachariou, Nicholas; Zhang, Jixie; Zhao, Zhiwen

    2012-09-01

    Exclusive $\\pi^0$ electroproduction at a beam energy of 5.75 GeV has been measured with the Jefferson Lab CLAS spectrometer. Differential cross sections were measured at more than 1800 kinematic values in $Q^2$, $x_B$, $t$, and $\\phi_\\pi$, in the $Q^2$ range from 1.0 to 4.6 GeV$^2$,\\ $-t$ up to 2 GeV$^2$, and $x_B$ from 0.1 to 0.58. Structure functions $\\sigma_T +\\epsilon \\sigma_L, \\sigma_{TT}$ and $\\sigma_{LT}$ were extracted as functions of $t$ for each of 17 combinations of $Q^2$ and $x_B$. The data were compared directly with two handbag-based calculations including both longitudinal and transversity GPDs. Inclusion of only longitudinal GPDs very strongly underestimates $\\sigma_T +\\epsilon \\sigma_L$ and fails to account for $\\sigma_{TT}$ and $\\sigma_{LT}$, while inclusion of transversity GPDs brings the calculations into substantially better agreement with the data. There is very strong sensitivity to the relative contributions of nucleon helicity flip and helicity non-flip processes. The results confirm that exclusive $\\pi^0$ electroproduction offers direct experimental access to the transversity GPDs.

  9. Measurement of exclusive π(0) electroproduction structure functions and their relationship to transverse generalized parton distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedlinskiy, I; Kubarovsky, V; Niccolai, S; Stoler, P; Adhikari, K P; Aghasyan, M; Amaryan, M J; Anghinolfi, M; Avakian, H; Baghdasaryan, H; Ball, J; Baltzell, N A; Battaglieri, M; Bennett, R P; Biselli, A S; Bookwalter, C; Boiarinov, S; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Burkert, V D; Carman, D S; Celentano, A; Chandavar, S; Charles, G; Contalbrigo, M; Crede, V; D'Angelo, A; Daniel, A; Dashyan, N; De Vita, R; De Sanctis, E; Deur, A; Djalali, C; Doughty, D; Dupre, R; Egiyan, H; El Alaoui, A; El Fassi, L; Elouadrhiri, L; Eugenio, P; Fedotov, G; Fegan, S; Fleming, J A; Forest, T A; Fradi, A; Garçon, M; Gevorgyan, N; Giovanetti, K L; Girod, F X; Gohn, W; Gothe, R W; Graham, L; Griffioen, K A; Guegan, B; Guidal, M; Guo, L; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, H; Hanretty, C; Heddle, D; Hicks, K; Holtrop, M; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Isupov, E L; Jo, H S; Joo, K; Keller, D; Khandaker, M; Khetarpal, P; Kim, A; Kim, W; Klein, F J; Koirala, S; Kubarovsky, A; Kuhn, S E; Kuleshov, S V; Kvaltine, N D; Livingston, K; Lu, H Y; MacGregor, I J D; Mao, Y; Markov, N; Martinez, D; Mayer, M; McKinnon, B; Meyer, C A; Mineeva, T; Mirazita, M; Mokeev, V; Moutarde, H; Munevar, E; Munoz Camacho, C; Nadel-Turonski, P; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Pappalardo, L L; Paremuzyan, R; Park, K; Park, S; Pasyuk, E; Anefalos Pereira, S; Phelps, E; Pisano, S; Pogorelko, O; Pozdniakov, S; Price, J W; Procureur, S; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Puckett, A J R; Raue, B A; Ricco, G; Rimal, D; Ripani, M; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Sabatié, F; Saini, M S; Salgado, C; Saylor, N; Schott, D; Schumacher, R A; Seder, E; Seraydaryan, H; Sharabian, Y G; Smith, G D; Sober, D I; Sokhan, D; Stepanyan, S S; Stepanyan, S; Strauch, S; Taiuti, M; Tang, W; Taylor, C E; Tian, Ye; Tkachenko, S; Ungaro, M; Vineyard, M F; Vlassov, A; Voskanyan, H; Voutier, E; Walford, N K; Watts, D P; Weinstein, L B; Weygand, D P; Wood, M H; Zachariou, N; Zhang, J; Zhao, Z W; Zonta, I

    2012-09-14

    Exclusive π(0) electroproduction at a beam energy of 5.75 GeV has been measured with the Jefferson Lab CLAS spectrometer. Differential cross sections were measured at more than 1800 kinematic values in Q(2), x(B), t, and ϕ(π), in the Q(2) range from 1.0 to 4.6  GeV(2), -t up to 2  GeV(2), and x(B) from 0.1 to 0.58. Structure functions σ(T)+ϵσ(L), σ(TT), and σ(LT) were extracted as functions of t for each of 17 combinations of Q(2) and x(B). The data were compared directly with two handbag-based calculations including both longitudinal and transversity generalized parton distributions (GPDs). Inclusion of only longitudinal GPDs very strongly underestimates σ(T)+ϵσ(L) and fails to account for σ(TT) and σ(LT), while inclusion of transversity GPDs brings the calculations into substantially better agreement with the data. There is very strong sensitivity to the relative contributions of nucleon helicity-flip and helicity nonflip processes. The results confirm that exclusive π(0) electroproduction offers direct experimental access to the transversity GPDs.

  10. Measurement of Exclusive π0 Electroproduction Structure Functions and their Relationship to Transverse Generalized Parton Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedlinskiy, I.; Kubarovsky, V.; Niccolai, S.; Stoler, P.; Adhikari, K. P.; Aghasyan, M.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anghinolfi, M.; Avakian, H.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Bennett, R. P.; Biselli, A. S.; Bookwalter, C.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Daniel, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fleming, J. A.; Forest, T. A.; Fradi, A.; Garçon, M.; Gevorgyan, N.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Gohn, W.; Gothe, R. W.; Graham, L.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guegan, B.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Heddle, D.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Khetarpal, P.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, F. J.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, A.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Kvaltine, N. D.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Mao, Y.; Markov, N.; Martinez, D.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Mineeva, T.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Moutarde, H.; Munevar, E.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Phelps, E.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Raue, B. A.; Ricco, G.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Salgado, C.; Saylor, N.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Seraydaryan, H.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Stepanyan, S.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Taylor, C. E.; Tian, Ye; Tkachenko, S.; Ungaro, M.; Vineyard, M. F.; Vlassov, A.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Weinstein, L. B.; Weygand, D. P.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.

    2012-09-01

    Exclusive π0 electroproduction at a beam energy of 5.75 GeV has been measured with the Jefferson Lab CLAS spectrometer. Differential cross sections were measured at more than 1800 kinematic values in Q2, xB, t, and ϕπ, in the Q2 range from 1.0 to 4.6GeV2, -t up to 2GeV2, and xB from 0.1 to 0.58. Structure functions σT+ɛσL, σTT, and σLT were extracted as functions of t for each of 17 combinations of Q2 and xB. The data were compared directly with two handbag-based calculations including both longitudinal and transversity generalized parton distributions (GPDs). Inclusion of only longitudinal GPDs very strongly underestimates σT+ɛσL and fails to account for σTT and σLT, while inclusion of transversity GPDs brings the calculations into substantially better agreement with the data. There is very strong sensitivity to the relative contributions of nucleon helicity-flip and helicity nonflip processes. The results confirm that exclusive π0 electroproduction offers direct experimental access to the transversity GPDs.

  11. Mapping the Structure-Function Relationship in Glaucoma and Healthy Patients Measured with Spectralis OCT and Humphrey Perimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz–Negrete, Francisco J.; Oblanca, Noelia; Rebolleda, Gema

    2018-01-01

    Purpose To study the structure-function relationship in glaucoma and healthy patients assessed with Spectralis OCT and Humphrey perimetry using new statistical approaches. Materials and Methods Eighty-five eyes were prospectively selected and divided into 2 groups: glaucoma (44) and healthy patients (41). Three different statistical approaches were carried out: (1) factor analysis of the threshold sensitivities (dB) (automated perimetry) and the macular thickness (μm) (Spectralis OCT), subsequently applying Pearson's correlation to the obtained regions, (2) nonparametric regression analysis relating the values in each pair of regions that showed significant correlation, and (3) nonparametric spatial regressions using three models designed for the purpose of this study. Results In the glaucoma group, a map that relates structural and functional damage was drawn. The strongest correlation with visual fields was observed in the peripheral nasal region of both superior and inferior hemigrids (r = 0.602 and r = 0.458, resp.). The estimated functions obtained with the nonparametric regressions provided the mean sensitivity that corresponds to each given macular thickness. These functions allowed for accurate characterization of the structure-function relationship. Conclusions Both maps and point-to-point functions obtained linking structure and function damage contribute to a better understanding of this relationship and may help in the future to improve glaucoma diagnosis. PMID:29850196

  12. Multiple amino acid sequence alignment nitrogenase component 1: insights into phylogenetics and structure-function relationships.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James B Howard

    Full Text Available Amino acid residues critical for a protein's structure-function are retained by natural selection and these residues are identified by the level of variance in co-aligned homologous protein sequences. The relevant residues in the nitrogen fixation Component 1 α- and β-subunits were identified by the alignment of 95 protein sequences. Proteins were included from species encompassing multiple microbial phyla and diverse ecological niches as well as the nitrogen fixation genotypes, anf, nif, and vnf, which encode proteins associated with cofactors differing at one metal site. After adjusting for differences in sequence length, insertions, and deletions, the remaining >85% of the sequence co-aligned the subunits from the three genotypes. Six Groups, designated Anf, Vnf , and Nif I-IV, were assigned based upon genetic origin, sequence adjustments, and conserved residues. Both subunits subdivided into the same groups. Invariant and single variant residues were identified and were defined as "core" for nitrogenase function. Three species in Group Nif-III, Candidatus Desulforudis audaxviator, Desulfotomaculum kuznetsovii, and Thermodesulfatator indicus, were found to have a seleno-cysteine that replaces one cysteinyl ligand of the 8Fe:7S, P-cluster. Subsets of invariant residues, limited to individual groups, were identified; these unique residues help identify the gene of origin (anf, nif, or vnf yet should not be considered diagnostic of the metal content of associated cofactors. Fourteen of the 19 residues that compose the cofactor pocket are invariant or single variant; the other five residues are highly variable but do not correlate with the putative metal content of the cofactor. The variable residues are clustered on one side of the cofactor, away from other functional centers in the three dimensional structure. Many of the invariant and single variant residues were not previously recognized as potentially critical and their identification

  13. Structure-function relationship in complex brain networks expressed by hierarchical synchronization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Changsong; Zemanova, Lucia; Zamora-Lopez, Gorka; Hilgetag, Claus C; Kurths, Juergen

    2007-01-01

    The brain is one of the most complex systems in nature, with a structured complex connectivity. Recently, large-scale corticocortical connectivities, both structural and functional, have received a great deal of research attention, especially using the approach of complex network analysis. Understanding the relationship between structural and functional connectivity is of crucial importance in neuroscience. Here we try to illuminate this relationship by studying synchronization dynamics in a realistic anatomical network of cat cortical connectivity. We model the nodes (cortical areas) by a neural mass model (population model) or by a subnetwork of interacting excitable neurons (multilevel model). We show that if the dynamics is characterized by well-defined oscillations (neural mass model and subnetworks with strong couplings), the synchronization patterns are mainly determined by the node intensity (total input strengths of a node) and the detailed network topology is rather irrelevant. On the other hand, the multilevel model with weak couplings displays more irregular, biologically plausible dynamics, and the synchronization patterns reveal a hierarchical cluster organization in the network structure. The relationship between structural and functional connectivity at different levels of synchronization is explored. Thus, the study of synchronization in a multilevel complex network model of cortex can provide insights into the relationship between network topology and functional organization of complex brain networks

  14. Structure-function relationship in complex brain networks expressed by hierarchical synchronization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Changsong [Institute of Physics, University of Potsdam, PF 601553, 14415 Potsdam (Germany); Zemanova, Lucia [Institute of Physics, University of Potsdam, PF 601553, 14415 Potsdam (Germany); Zamora-Lopez, Gorka [Institute of Physics, University of Potsdam, PF 601553, 14415 Potsdam (Germany); Hilgetag, Claus C [Jacobs University Bremen, Campus Ring 6, Rm 116, D-28759 Bremen (Germany); Kurths, Juergen [Institute of Physics, University of Potsdam, PF 601553, 14415 Potsdam (Germany)

    2007-06-15

    The brain is one of the most complex systems in nature, with a structured complex connectivity. Recently, large-scale corticocortical connectivities, both structural and functional, have received a great deal of research attention, especially using the approach of complex network analysis. Understanding the relationship between structural and functional connectivity is of crucial importance in neuroscience. Here we try to illuminate this relationship by studying synchronization dynamics in a realistic anatomical network of cat cortical connectivity. We model the nodes (cortical areas) by a neural mass model (population model) or by a subnetwork of interacting excitable neurons (multilevel model). We show that if the dynamics is characterized by well-defined oscillations (neural mass model and subnetworks with strong couplings), the synchronization patterns are mainly determined by the node intensity (total input strengths of a node) and the detailed network topology is rather irrelevant. On the other hand, the multilevel model with weak couplings displays more irregular, biologically plausible dynamics, and the synchronization patterns reveal a hierarchical cluster organization in the network structure. The relationship between structural and functional connectivity at different levels of synchronization is explored. Thus, the study of synchronization in a multilevel complex network model of cortex can provide insights into the relationship between network topology and functional organization of complex brain networks.

  15. Improving the precision of the structure-function relationship by considering phylogenetic context.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the relationship between protein structure and function is one of the foremost challenges in post-genomic biology. Higher conservation of structure could, in principle, allow researchers to extend current limitations of annotation. However, despite significant research in the area, a precise and quantitative relationship between biochemical function and protein structure has been elusive. Attempts to draw an unambiguous link have often been complicated by pleiotropy, variable transcriptional control, and adaptations to genomic context, all of which adversely affect simple definitions of function. In this paper, I report that integrating genomic information can be used to clarify the link between protein structure and function. First, I present a novel measure of functional proximity between protein structures (F-score. Then, using F-score and other entirely automatic methods measuring structure and phylogenetic similarity, I present a three-dimensional landscape describing their inter-relationship. The result is a "well-shaped" landscape that demonstrates the added value of considering genomic context in inferring function from structural homology. A generalization of methodology presented in this paper can be used to improve the precision of annotation of genes in current and newly sequenced genomes.

  16. Atomic force microscopy study of the structure function relationships of the biofilm-forming bacterium Streptococcus mutans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Sarah E.; Kreth, Jens; Zhu, Lin; Qi, Fengxia; Pelling, Andrew E.; Shi, Wenyuan; Gimzewski, James K.

    2006-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has garnered much interest in recent years for its ability to probe the structure, function and cellular nanomechanics inherent to specific biological cells. In particular, we have used AFM to probe the important structure-function relationships of the bacterium Streptococcus mutans. S. mutans is the primary aetiological agent in human dental caries (tooth decay), and is of medical importance due to the virulence properties of these cells in biofilm initiation and formation, leading to increased tolerance to antibiotics. We have used AFM to characterize the unique surface structures of distinct mutants of S. mutans. These mutations are located in specific genes that encode surface proteins, thus using AFM we have resolved characteristic surface features for mutant strains compared to the wild type. Ultimately, our characterization of surface morphology has shown distinct differences in the local properties displayed by various S. mutans strains on the nanoscale, which is imperative for understanding the collective properties of these cells in biofilm formation.

  17. Structure-function relationships during segregated and integrated network states of human brain functional connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Makoto; Betzel, Richard F; He, Ye; van den Heuvel, Martijn P; Zuo, Xi-Nian; Sporns, Olaf

    2018-04-01

    Structural white matter connections are thought to facilitate integration of neural information across functionally segregated systems. Recent studies have demonstrated that changes in the balance between segregation and integration in brain networks can be tracked by time-resolved functional connectivity derived from resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) data and that fluctuations between segregated and integrated network states are related to human behavior. However, how these network states relate to structural connectivity is largely unknown. To obtain a better understanding of structural substrates for these network states, we investigated how the relationship between structural connectivity, derived from diffusion tractography, and functional connectivity, as measured by rs-fMRI, changes with fluctuations between segregated and integrated states in the human brain. We found that the similarity of edge weights between structural and functional connectivity was greater in the integrated state, especially at edges connecting the default mode and the dorsal attention networks. We also demonstrated that the similarity of network partitions, evaluated between structural and functional connectivity, increased and the density of direct structural connections within modules in functional networks was elevated during the integrated state. These results suggest that, when functional connectivity exhibited an integrated network topology, structural connectivity and functional connectivity were more closely linked to each other and direct structural connections mediated a larger proportion of neural communication within functional modules. Our findings point out the possibility of significant contributions of structural connections to integrative neural processes underlying human behavior.

  18. Structural optimization and structure-functional selectivity relationship studies of G protein-biased EP2 receptor agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Seiji; Watanabe, Toshihide; Moriyuki, Kazumi; Goto, Yoshikazu; Yamane, Shinsaku; Watanabe, Akio; Tsuboi, Kazuma; Kinoshita, Atsushi; Okada, Takuya; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Tani, Kousuke; Maruyama, Toru

    2016-05-15

    The modification of the novel G protein-biased EP2 agonist 1 has been investigated to improve its G protein activity and develop a better understanding of its structure-functional selectivity relationship (SFSR). The optimization of the substituents on the phenyl ring of 1, followed by the inversion of the hydroxyl group on the cyclopentane moiety led to compound 9, which showed a 100-fold increase in its G protein activity compared with 1 without any increase in β-arrestin recruitment. Furthermore, SFSR studies revealed that the combination of meta and para substituents on the phenyl moiety was crucial to the functional selectivity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Structure-function relationships with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography retinal nerve fiber layer and optic nerve head measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollet-Villard, Frédéric; Chiquet, Christophe; Romanet, Jean-Paul; Noel, Christian; Aptel, Florent

    2014-05-02

    To evaluate the regional structure-function relationship between visual field sensitivity and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness and optic nerve head (ONH) measurements using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Prospective cross-sectional study conducted on patients with glaucoma, suspected glaucoma, and healthy subjects. Eyes were tested on Cirrus OCT and standard achromatic perimetry. RNFL thickness of 12 peripapillary 30° sectors, neuroretinal rim thickness extracted from 36 neuroretinal rim scans, and Bruch membrane opening minimum rim width (BMO-MRW)-a recently defined parameter-extracted from 36 neuroretinal rim scans were obtained. Correlations between peripapillary RNFL thickness, neuroretinal rim thickness, all six sectors of BMO-MRW, and visual field sensitivity in the six corresponding areas were evaluated using logarithmic regression analysis. Receiver operating curve areas were calculated for each RNFL, ONH, and macular ganglion cell analysis parameter. We included 142 eyes of 142 subjects. The correlations (r(2)) between RNFL thickness, Cirrus-based neuroretinal rim thickness, BMO-MRW and visual field sensitivity ranged from 0.07 to 0.60, 0.15 to 0.49, and 0.24 to 0.66, respectively. The structure-function correlations were stronger with BMO-MRW than with Cirrus-based neuroretinal rim thickness. The largest areas under the receiver operating curve were seen for rim area (0.926 [95% confidence interval 0.875, 0.977]; P function relationship was significantly stronger with BMO-MRW than other ONH SD-OCT parameters. The best diagnostic capabilities were seen with rim area and average RNFL.

  20. Root structure-function relationships in 74 species: evidence of a root economics spectrum related to carbon economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roumet, Catherine; Birouste, Marine; Picon-Cochard, Catherine; Ghestem, Murielle; Osman, Normaniza; Vrignon-Brenas, Sylvain; Cao, Kun-Fang; Stokes, Alexia

    2016-05-01

    Although fine roots are important components of the global carbon cycle, there is limited understanding of root structure-function relationships among species. We determined whether root respiration rate and decomposability, two key processes driving carbon cycling but always studied separately, varied with root morphological and chemical traits, in a coordinated way that would demonstrate the existence of a root economics spectrum (RES). Twelve traits were measured on fine roots (diameter ≤ 2 mm) of 74 species (31 graminoids and 43 herbaceous and dwarf shrub eudicots) collected in three biomes. The findings of this study support the existence of a RES representing an axis of trait variation in which root respiration was positively correlated to nitrogen concentration and specific root length and negatively correlated to the root dry matter content, lignin : nitrogen ratio and the remaining mass after decomposition. This pattern of traits was highly consistent within graminoids but less consistent within eudicots, as a result of an uncoupling between decomposability and morphology, and of heterogeneity of individual roots of eudicots within the fine-root pool. The positive relationship found between root respiration and decomposability is essential for a better understanding of vegetation-soil feedbacks and for improving terrestrial biosphere models predicting the consequences of plant community changes for carbon cycling. © 2016 CNRS. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  1. Application of the renormalization group to the study of structure function in the deep inelastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    The transformation law of truncated pertubation theory observables under changes of renormalization scheme is deduced. Based on this, a criticism of the calculus of the moments of structure functions in deep inelastic scattering, obtaining that the A 2 coefficient not renormalization group invariant is done. The PMS criterion is used to optimize the perturbative productions of the moments, truncated to 2nd order. (author) [pt

  2. Homologous structure-function relationships between native fibrocartilage and tissue engineered from MSC-seeded nanofibrous scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerurkar, Nandan L; Han, Woojin; Mauck, Robert L; Elliott, Dawn M

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the interplay of composition, organization and mechanical function in load-bearing tissues is a prerequisite in the successful engineering of tissues to replace diseased ones. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) seeded on electrospun scaffolds have been successfully used to generate organized tissues that mimic fibrocartilages such as the knee meniscus and the annulus fibrosus of the intervertebral disc. While matrix deposition has been observed in parallel with improved mechanical properties, how composition, organization, and mechanical function are related is not known. Moreover, how this relationship compares to that of native fibrocartilage is unclear. Therefore, in the present work, functional fibrocartilage constructs were formed from MSC-seeded nanofibrous scaffolds, and the roles of collagen and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) in compressive and tensile properties were determined. MSCs deposited abundant collagen and GAG over 120 days of culture, and these extracellular molecules were organized in such a way that they performed similar mechanical functions to their native roles: collagen dominated the tensile response while GAG was important for compressive properties. GAG removal resulted in significant stiffening in tension. A similar stiffening response was observed when GAG was removed from native inner annulus fibrosus, suggesting an interaction between collagen fibers and their surrounding extrafibrillar matrix that is shared by both engineered and native fibrocartilages. These findings strongly support the use of electrospun scaffolds and MSCs for fibrocartilage tissue engineering, and provide insight on the structure-function relations of both engineered and native biomaterials. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Plant cell wall proteomics: mass spectrometry data, a trove for research on protein structure/function relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albenne, Cécile; Canut, Hervé; Boudart, Georges; Zhang, Yu; San Clemente, Hélène; Pont-Lezica, Rafael; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2009-09-01

    Proteomics allows the large-scale study of protein expression either in whole organisms or in purified organelles. In particular, mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of gel-separated proteins produces data not only for protein identification, but for protein structure, location, and processing as well. An in-depth analysis was performed on MS data from etiolated hypocotyl cell wall proteomics of Arabidopsis thaliana. These analyses show that highly homologous members of multigene families can be differentiated. Two lectins presenting 93% amino acid identity were identified using peptide mass fingerprinting. Although the identification of structural proteins such as extensins or hydroxyproline/proline-rich proteins (H/PRPs) is arduous, different types of MS spectra were exploited to identify and characterize an H/PRP. Maturation events in a couple of cell wall proteins (CWPs) were analyzed using site mapping. N-glycosylation of CWPs as well as the hydroxylation or oxidation of amino acids were also explored, adding information to improve our understanding of CWP structure/function relationships. A bioinformatic tool was developed to locate by means of MS the N-terminus of mature secreted proteins and N-glycosylation.

  4. Structure, functionality and tuning up of laccases for lignocellulose and other industrial applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sitarz, Anna K.; Mikkelsen, Jørn D.; Meyer, Anne S.

    2016-01-01

    Laccases (EC 1.10.3.2) are copper-containing oxidoreductases that have a relatively high redox potential which enables them to catalyze oxidation of phenolic compounds, including lignin-derived phenolics. The laccase-catalyzed oxidation of phenolics is accompanied by concomitant reduction of diox...... but differences in loop conformations. We also evaluate the features and regions of laccases in relation to modification and evolution of laccases for various industrial applications including lignocellulosic biomass processing....

  5. Covariant solutions of the Bethe-Salpeter equation and an application to the nucleon structure function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, A.G.

    1998-01-01

    There is a need for covariant solutions of bound state equations in order to construct realistic QCD based models of mesons and baryons. Furthermore, we ideally need to know the structure of these bound states in all kinematical regimes, which makes a direct solution in Minkowski space (without any 3-dimensional reductions) desirable. The Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE) for bound states in scalar theories is reformulated and solved for arbitrary scattering kernels in terms of a generalized spectral representation directly in Minkowski space. This differs from the conventional Euclidean approach, where the BSE can only be solved in ladder approximation after a Wick rotation. An application of covariant Bethe-Salpeter solutions to a quark-diquark model of the nucleon is also briefly discussed. (orig.)

  6. C-terminal domains of bacterial proteases: structure, function and the biotechnological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J; Wu, C; Liu, D; Yang, X; Wu, R; Zhang, J; Ma, C; He, H

    2017-01-01

    C-terminal domains widely exist in the C-terminal region of multidomain proteases. As a β-sandwich domain in multidomain protease, the C-terminal domain plays an important role in proteolysis including regulation of the secretory process, anchoring and swelling the substrate molecule, presenting as an inhibitor for the preprotease and adapting the protein structural flexibility and stability. In this review, the diversity, structural characteristics and biological function of C-terminal protease domains are described. Furthermore, the application prospects of C-terminal domains, including polycystic kidney disease, prepeptidase C-terminal and collagen-binding domain, in the area of medicine and biological artificial materials are also discussed. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. Structure, Function, and Applications of the Georgetown-Einstein (GE) Breast Cancer Simulation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schechter, Clyde B; Near, Aimee M; Jayasekera, Jinani; Chandler, Young; Mandelblatt, Jeanne S

    2018-04-01

    The Georgetown University-Albert Einstein College of Medicine breast cancer simulation model (Model GE) has evolved over time in structure and function to reflect advances in knowledge about breast cancer, improvements in early detection and treatment technology, and progress in computing resources. This article describes the model and provides examples of model applications. The model is a discrete events microsimulation of single-life histories of women from multiple birth cohorts. Events are simulated in the absence of screening and treatment, and interventions are then applied to assess their impact on population breast cancer trends. The model accommodates differences in natural history associated with estrogen receptor (ER) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) biomarkers, as well as conventional breast cancer risk factors. The approach for simulating breast cancer natural history is phenomenological, relying on dates, stage, and age of clinical and screen detection for a tumor molecular subtype without explicitly modeling tumor growth. The inputs to the model are regularly updated to reflect current practice. Numerous technical modifications, including the use of object-oriented programming (C++), and more efficient algorithms, along with hardware advances, have increased program efficiency permitting simulations of large samples. The model results consistently match key temporal trends in US breast cancer incidence and mortality. The model has been used in collaboration with other CISNET models to assess cancer control policies and will be applied to evaluate clinical trial design, recurrence risk, and polygenic risk-based screening.

  8. Biomedicinal implications of high-density lipoprotein: its composition, structure, functions, and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyung-Hyun

    2009-07-31

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is a proven biomarker for the monitoring of changes in antioxidant and anti-inflammation capability of body fluids. The beneficial virtues of HDL are highly dependent on its lipids and protein compositions, and their ratios. In normal state, the HDL particle is enriched with lipids and several HDL-associated enzymes, which are responsible for its antioxidant activity. Lower HDL-cholesterol levels (40 mg/dL) have been recognized as an independent risk factor for coronary artery disease, as well as being a known component of metabolic syndrome. Functional and structural changes of HDL have been recognized as factors pivotal to the evaluation of HDL-quality. In this review, I have elected to focus on the functional and structural correlations of HDL and the roles of HDL-associated apolipoproteins and enzymes. Recent clinical applications of HDL have also been reviewed, particularly the therapeutic targeting of HDL metabolism and reconstituted HDL; these techniques represent promising emerging strategies for the treatment of cardiovascular disease, for drug or gene therapy.

  9. The application of psoralens to the study of DNA structure, function and dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spielmann, Peter Hans [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1991-04-01

    A series of six nitroxide spin-labeled psoralens were designed, synthesized and tested as probes for DNA dynamics. The synthesis of these spin-labeled psoralen derivatives and their photoreactivity with double-stranded DNA fragments is described. The spin labels (nitroxides) were demonstrated to survive the uv irradiation required to bind the probe to the target DNA. EPR spectra of the photobound spin-labels indicate that they do not wobble with respect to the DNA on the time-scales investigated. The author has used psoralen modified DNA as a model for the study of DNA repair enzyme systems in human cell free extracts. He has shown that damage-induced DNA synthesis is associated with removal of psoralen adducts and therefore is "repair synthesis" and not an aberrant DNA synthesis reaction potentiated by deformation of the DNA by adducts. He has found that all DNA synthesis induced by psoralen monoadducts is the consequence of removal of these adducts. By the same approach he has obtained evidence that this in vitro system is capable of removing psoralen cross-links as well. Reported here are synthetic methods that make use of high intensity lasers coupled with HPLC purification to make homogeneous and very pure micromole quantities of furan-side monoadducted, cross-linked, and pyrone-side monoadducted DNA oligonucleotide. These molecules are currently being studied by NMR and X-ray crystallography. The application of the site-specifically psoralen modified oligonucleotide synthesized by these methods to the construction of substrates for the investigation of DNA repair is also discussed.

  10. Development of carbon nanotube modified cement paste with microencapsulated phase-change material for structural-functional integrated application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Hongzhi; Yang, Shuqing; Memon, Shazim Ali

    2015-04-10

    Microencapsulated phase-change materials (MPCM) can be used to develop a structural-functional integrated cement paste having high heat storage efficiency and suitable mechanical strength. However, the incorporation of MPCM has been found to degrade the mechanical properties of cement based composites. Therefore, in this research, the effect of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on the properties of MPCM cement paste was evaluated. Test results showed that the incorporation of CNTs in MPCM cement paste accelerated the cement hydration reaction. SEM micrograph showed that CNTs were tightly attached to the cement hydration products. At the age of 28 days, the percentage increase in flexural and compressive strength with different dosage of CNTs was found to be up to 41% and 5% respectively. The optimum dosage of CNTs incorporated in MPCM cement paste was found to be 0.5 wt %. From the thermal performance test, it was found that the cement paste panels incorporated with different percentages of MPCM reduced the temperature measured at the center of the room by up to 4.6 °C. Inverse relationship was found between maximum temperature measured at the center of the room and the dosage of MPCM.

  11. TRP channels in calcium homeostasis: from hormonal control to structure-function relationship of TRPV5 and TRPV6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Goor, Mark K C; Hoenderop, Joost G J; van der Wijst, Jenny

    2017-06-01

    Maintaining plasma calcium levels within a narrow range is of vital importance for many physiological functions. Therefore, calcium transport processes in the intestine, bone and kidney are tightly regulated to fine-tune the rate of absorption, storage and excretion. The TRPV5 and TRPV6 calcium channels are viewed as the gatekeepers of epithelial calcium transport. Several calciotropic hormones control the channels at the level of transcription, membrane expression, and function. Recent technological advances have provided the first near-atomic resolution structural models of several TRPV channels, allowing insight into their architecture. While this field is still in its infancy, it has increased our understanding of molecular channel regulation and holds great promise for future structure-function studies of these ion channels. This review will summarize the mechanisms that control the systemic calcium balance, as well as extrapolate structural views to the molecular functioning of TRPV5/6 channels in epithelial calcium transport. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Photon structure function - theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardeen, W.A.

    1984-12-01

    The theoretical status of the photon structure function is reviewed. Particular attention is paid to the hadronic mixing problem and the ability of perturbative QCD to make definitive predictions for the photon structure function. 11 references

  13. Heat, Acid and Chemically Induced Unfolding Pathways, Conformational Stability and Structure-Function Relationship in Wheat α-Amylase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kritika Singh

    Full Text Available Wheat α-amylase, a multi-domain protein with immense industrial applications, belongs to α+β class of proteins with native molecular mass of 32 kDa. In the present study, the pathways leading to denaturation and the relevant unfolded states of this multi-domain, robust enzyme from wheat were discerned under the influence of temperature, pH and chemical denaturants. The structural and functional aspects along with thermodynamic parameters for α-amylase unfolding were probed and analyzed using fluorescence, circular dichroism and enzyme assay methods. The enzyme exhibited remarkable stability up to 70°C with tendency to aggregate at higher temperature. Acid induced unfolding was also incomplete with respect to the structural content of the enzyme. Strong ANS binding at pH 2.0 suggested the existence of a partially unfolded intermediate state. The enzyme was structurally and functionally stable in the pH range 4.0-9.0 with 88% recovery of hydrolytic activity. Careful examination of biophysical properties of intermediate states populated in urea and GdHCl induced denaturation suggests that α-amylase unfolding undergoes irreversible and non-coincidental cooperative transitions, as opposed to previous reports of two-state unfolding. Our investigation highlights several structural features of the enzyme in relation to its catalytic activity. Since, α-amylase has been comprehensively exploited for use in a range of starch-based industries, in addition to its physiological significance in plants and animals, knowledge regarding its stability and folding aspects will promote its biotechnological applications.

  14. High spin structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, H.

    1990-01-01

    This thesis explores deep inelastic scattering of a lepton beam from a polarized nuclear target with spin J=1. After reviewing the formation for spin-1/2, the structure functions for a spin-1 target are defined in terms of the helicity amplitudes for forward compton scattering. A version of the convolution model, which incorporates relativistic and binding energy corrections is used to calculate the structure functions of a neutron target. A simple parameterization of these structure functions is given in terms of a few neutron wave function parameters and the free nucleon structure functions. This allows for an easy comparison of structure functions calculated using different neutron models. (author)

  15. Imaging Cajal's neuronal avalanche: how wide-field optical imaging of the point-spread advanced the understanding of neocortical structure-function relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frostig, Ron D; Chen-Bee, Cynthia H; Johnson, Brett A; Jacobs, Nathan S

    2017-07-01

    This review brings together a collection of studies that specifically use wide-field high-resolution mesoscopic level imaging techniques (intrinsic signal optical imaging; voltage-sensitive dye optical imaging) to image the cortical point spread (PS): the total spread of cortical activation comprising a large neuronal ensemble evoked by spatially restricted (point) stimulation of the sensory periphery (e.g., whisker, pure tone, point visual stimulation). The collective imaging findings, combined with supporting anatomical and electrophysiological findings, revealed some key aspects about the PS including its very large (radius of several mm) and relatively symmetrical spatial extent capable of crossing cytoarchitectural borders and trespassing into other cortical areas; its relationship with underlying evoked subthreshold activity and underlying anatomical system of long-range horizontal projections within gray matter, both also crossing borders; its contextual modulation and plasticity; the ability of its relative spatiotemporal profile to remain invariant to major changes in stimulation parameters; its potential role as a building block for integrative cortical activity; and its ubiquitous presence across various cortical areas and across mammalian species. Together, these findings advance our understanding about the neocortex at the mesoscopic level by underscoring that the cortical PS constitutes a fundamental motif of neocortical structure-function relationship.

  16. Hadron structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, F.

    1981-03-01

    The x dependence of hadron structure functions is investigated. If quarks can exist in very low mass states (10 MeV for d and u quarks) the pion structure function is predicted to behave like (1-x) and not (1-x) 2 in a x-region around 1. Relativistic and non-relativistic quark bound state pictures of hadrons are considered together with their relation with the Q 2 evolution of structure functions. Good agreement with data is in general obtained

  17. Photon structure function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardeen, W.A.

    1980-11-01

    Theoretical understanding of the photon structure function is reviewed. As an illustration of the pointlike component, the parton model is briefly discussed. However, the systematic study of the photon structure function is presented through the framework of the operator product expansion. Perturbative QCD is used as the theoretical basis for the calculation of leading contributions to the operator product expansion. The influence of higher order QCD effects on these results is discussed. Recent results for the polarized structure functions are discussed

  18. An extended structure-function model and its application to the analysis of solar wind intermittency properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-Y. Tu

    Full Text Available An extended structure-function model is developed by including the new effect in the p-model of Meneveau and Sreenivasan which shows that the averaged energy cascade rate changes with scale, a situation which has been found to prevail in non-fully-developed turbulence in the inner solar wind. This model is useful for the small-scale fluctuations in the inner heliosphere, where the turbulence is not fully developed and cannot be explained quantitatively by any of the previous intermittency turbulence models. With two model parameters, the intrinsic index of the energy spectrum α, and the fragmentation fraction P1, the model can fit, for the first time, all the observed scaling exponents of the structure functions, which are calculated for time lags ranging from 81 s to 0.7 h from the Helios solar wind data. From the cases we studied we cannot establish for P1 either a clear radial evolution trend, or a solar-wind-speed or stream-structure dependence or a systematic anisotropy for both the flow velocity and magnetic field component fluctuations. Generally, P1 has values between 0.7 and 0.8. However, in some cases in low-speed wind P1 has somewhat higher values for the magnetic components, especially for the radial component. In high-speed wind, the inferred intrinsic spectral indices α of the velocity and magnetic field components are about equal, while the experimental spectral indices derived from the observed power spectra differ. The magnetic index is somewhat larger than the index of the velocity spectrum. For magnetic fluctuations in both high- and low-speed winds, the intrinsic exponent α has values which are near 1.5, while the observed spectral exponent has much higher values. In the solar wind with considerable density fluctuations near the interplanetary current sheet near 1 AU, it is found that P1 has a comparatively high value of 0

  19. Characterizing the structure-function relationship reveals the mode of action of a novel antimicrobial peptide, P1, from jumper ant Myrmecia pilosula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Tien-Sheng; Tsai, Keng-Chang; Chen, Chinpan

    2017-06-01

    Microbial infections of antibiotic-resistant strains cause serious diseases and have a significant impact on public health worldwide, so novel antimicrobial drugs are urgently needed. Insect venoms, a rich source of bioactive components containing antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), are attractive candidates for new therapeutic agents against microbes. Recently, a novel peptide, P1, identified from the venom of the Australian jumper ant Myrmecia pilosula, showed potent antimicrobial activities against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, but its structure-function relationship is unknown. Here, we used biochemical and biophysical techniques coupled with computational simulations to explore the mode of action of P1 interaction with dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelles as a model membrane system. Our circular dichroism (CD) and NMR studies revealed an amphipathic α-helical structure for P1 upon interaction with DPC micelles. A paramagnetic relaxation enhancement approach revealed that P1 orients its α-helix segment (F6-G14) into DPC micelles. In addition, the α-helix segment could be essential for membrane permeabilization and antimicrobial activity. Moreover, the arginine residues R8, R11, and R15 significantly contribute to helix formation and membrane-binding affinity. The lysine residue K19 of the C-terminus functionally guides P1 to interact with DPC micelles in the early interaction stage. Our study provides insights into the mode of action of P1, which is valuable in modifying and developing potent AMPs as antibiotic drugs.

  20. Assessment of pulmonary structure-function relationships in young children and adolescents with cystic fibrosis by multivolume proton-MRI and CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennati, Francesca; Roach, David J; Clancy, John P; Brody, Alan S; Fleck, Robert J; Aliverti, Andrea; Woods, Jason C

    2018-02-19

    Lung disease is the most frequent cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), and there is a shortage of sensitive biomarkers able to regionally monitor disease progression and to assess early responses to therapy. To determine the feasibility of noncontrast-enhanced multivolume MRI, which assesses intensity changes between expiratory and inspiratory breath-hold images, to detect and quantify regional ventilation abnormalities in CF lung disease, with a focus on the structure-function relationship. Retrospective. Twenty-nine subjects, including healthy young children (n = 9, 7-37 months), healthy adolescents (n = 4, 14-22 years), young children with CF lung disease (n = 10, 7-47 months), and adolescents with CF lung disease (n = 6, 8-18 years) were studied. 3D spoiled gradient-recalled sequence at 1.5T. Subjects were scanned during breath-hold at functional residual capacity (FRC) and total lung capacity (TLC) through noncontrast-enhanced MRI and CT. Expiratory-inspiratory differences in MR signal-intensity (Δ 1 H-MRI) and CT-density (ΔHU) were computed to estimate regional ventilation. MR and CT images were also evaluated using a CF-specific scoring system. Quadratic regression, Spearman's correlation, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Δ 1 H-MRI maps were sensitive to ventilation heterogeneity related to gravity dependence in healthy lung and to ventilation impairment in CF lung disease. A high correlation was found between MRI and CT ventilation maps (R 2  = 0.79, P < 0.001). Globally, Δ 1 H-MRI and ΔHU decrease with increasing morphological score (respectively, R 2  = 0.56, P < 0.001 and R 2  = 0.31, P < 0.001). Locally, Δ 1 H-MRI was higher in healthy regions (median 15%) compared to regions with bronchiectasis, air trapping, consolidation, and to segments fed by airways with bronchial wall thickening (P < 0.001). Multivolume noncontrast-enhanced MRI, as a nonionizing imaging

  1. Introduction to structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwiecinski, J.

    1996-07-01

    The theory of deep inelastic scattering structure functions is reviewed with an emphasis put on the QCD expectations of their behaviour in the region of small values of Bjorken parameter x. (author). 56 refs

  2. Structure-function relationship of a plant NCS1 member - Homology modeling and mutagenesis identified residues critical for substrate specificity of PLUTO, a nucleobase transporter from arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Witz, Sandra; Panwar, Pankaj; Schober, Markus; Deppe, Johannes; Pasha, Farhan Ahmad; Lemieux, M. Joanne; Mö hlmann, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    . Furthermore, competition studies confirmed these results. The present study defines the molecular determinants for PLUTO substrate binding and demonstrates key differences in structure-function relations between PLUTO and other NCS1 family members. 2014 Witz

  3. Structure function monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, John T [Placitas, NM; Zimmer, Peter C [Albuquerque, NM; Ackermann, Mark R [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-01-24

    Methods and apparatus for a structure function monitor provide for generation of parameters characterizing a refractive medium. In an embodiment, a structure function monitor acquires images of a pupil plane and an image plane and, from these images, retrieves the phase over an aperture, unwraps the retrieved phase, and analyzes the unwrapped retrieved phase. In an embodiment, analysis yields atmospheric parameters measured at spatial scales from zero to the diameter of a telescope used to collect light from a source.

  4. Polarized DIS Structure Functions from Neural Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Debbio, L.; Guffanti, A.; Piccione, A.

    2007-01-01

    We present a parametrization of polarized Deep-Inelastic-Scattering (DIS) structure functions based on Neural Networks. The parametrization provides a bias-free determination of the probability measure in the space of structure functions, which retains information on experimental errors and correlations. As an example we discuss the application of this method to the study of the structure function g 1 p (x,Q 2 )

  5. Nucleon structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virchaux, M.

    1992-11-01

    The present status of experimental measurements of the nucleon structure functions is reviewed. The results from nearly all deep inelastic experiments are in good mutual agreement. Principles of the analysis of these structure function data in the framework of QCD are described. The specific features of the perturbative QCD predictions are observed in the data. This provides quantitative tests of the validity of QCD as well as determinations of the various parton distributions in the nucleon and some of the most precise measurements of the strong coupling constant αs. The future of this field of experimental physics is sketched

  6. Unpolarized Structure Functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christy, M.E.; Melnitchouk, W.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade measurements of unpolarized structure functions with unprecedented precision have significantly advanced our knowledge of nucleon structure. These have for the first time allowed quantitative tests of the phenomenon of quark-hadron duality, and provided a deeper understanding of the transition from hadron to quark degrees of freedom in inclusive scattering. Dedicated Rosenbluth-separation experiments have yielded high-precision transverse and longitudinal structure functions in regions previously unexplored, and new techniques have enabled the first glimpses of the structure of the free neutron, without contamination from nuclear effects.

  7. The Design, Synthesis, and Study of Solid-State Molecular Rotors: Structure/Function Relationships for Condensed-Phase Anisotropic Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelsberg, Cortnie Sue

    Amphidynamic crystals are an extremely promising platform for the development of artificial molecular machines and stimuli-responsive materials. In analogy to skeletal muscle, their function will rely upon the collective operation of many densely packed molecular machines (i.e. actin-bound myosin) that are self-assembled in a highly organized anisotropic medium. By choosing lattice-forming elements and moving "parts" with specific functionalities, individual molecular machines may be synthesized and self-assembled in order to carry out desirable functions. In recent years, efforts in the design of amphidynamic materials based on molecular gyroscopes and compasses have shown that a certain amount of free volume is essential to facilitate internal rotation and reorientation within a crystal. In order to further establish structure/function relationships to advance the development of increasingly complex molecular machinery, molecular rotors and a molecular "spinning" top were synthesized and incorporated into a variety of solid-state architectures with different degrees of periodicity, dimensionality, and free volume. Specifically, lamellar molecular crystals, hierarchically ordered periodic mesoporous organosilicas, and metal-organic frameworks were targeted for the development of solid-state molecular machines. Using an array of solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy techniques, the dynamic properties of these novel molecular machine assemblies were determined and correlated with their corresponding structural features. It was found that architecture type has a profound influence on functional dynamics. The study of layered molecular crystals, composed of either molecular rotors or "spinning" tops, probed functional dynamics within dense, highly organized environments. From their study, it was discovered that: 1) crystallographically distinct sites may be utilized to differentiate machine function, 2) halogen bonding interactions are sufficiently

  8. Structure-function relationship between the octopus perimeter cluster mean sensitivity and sector retinal nerve fiber layer thickness measured with the RTVue optical coherence tomography and scanning laser polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghizadeh, Farzaneh; Garas, Anita; Vargha, Péter; Holló, Gábor

    2014-01-01

    To determine structure-function relationship between each of 16 Octopus perimeter G2 program clusters and the corresponding 16 peripapillary sector retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) values measured with the RTVue-100 Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (RTVue OCT) and scanning laser polarimetry with variable corneal compensation (GDx-VCC) and enhanced corneal compensation (GDx-ECC) corneal compensation. One eye of 110 white patients (15 healthy, 20 ocular hypertensive, and 75 glaucoma eyes) were investigated. The Akaike information criterion and the F test were used to identify the best fitting model. Parabolic relationship with logarithmic cluster mean sensitivity and linear sector RNFLT values provided the best fit. For RTVue OCT, significant (P0.05) was found for the control eyes. Mean sensitivity of the Octopus visual field clusters showed significant parabolic relationship with the corresponding peripapillary RNFLT sectors. The relationship was more general with the RTVue OCT than GDx-VCC or GDx-ECC. The results show that visual field clusters of the Octopus G program can be applied for detailed structure-function research.

  9. Structure-function relationship of a plant NCS1 member - Homology modeling and mutagenesis identified residues critical for substrate specificity of PLUTO, a nucleobase transporter from arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Witz, Sandra

    2014-03-12

    Plastidic uracil salvage is essential for plant growth and development. So far, PLUTO, the plastidic nucleobase transporter from Arabidopsis thaliana is the only known uracil importer at the inner plastidic membrane which represents the permeability barrier of this organelle. We present the first homology model of PLUTO, the sole plant NCS1 member from Arabidopsis based on the crystal structure of the benzyl hydantoin transporter MHP1 from Microbacterium liquefaciens and validated by molecular dynamics simulations. Polar side chains of residues Glu-227 and backbones of Val-145, Gly-147 and Thr-425 are proposed to form the binding site for the three PLUTO substrates uracil, adenine and guanine. Mutational analysis and competition studies identified Glu-227 as an important residue for uracil and to a lesser extent for guanine transport. A differential response in substrate transport was apparent with PLUTO double mutants E227Q G147Q and E227Q T425A, both of which most strongly affected adenine transport, and in V145A G147Q, which markedly affected guanine transport. These differences could be explained by docking studies, showing that uracil and guanine exhibit a similar binding mode whereas adenine binds deep into the catalytic pocket of PLUTO. Furthermore, competition studies confirmed these results. The present study defines the molecular determinants for PLUTO substrate binding and demonstrates key differences in structure-function relations between PLUTO and other NCS1 family members. 2014 Witz et al.

  10. Analysis of bacterial core communities in the central Baltic by comparative RNA-DNA-based fingerprinting provides links to structure-function relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brettar, Ingrid; Christen, Richard; Höfle, Manfred G

    2012-01-01

    Understanding structure-function links of microbial communities is a central theme of microbial ecology since its beginning. To this end, we studied the spatial variability of the bacterioplankton community structure and composition across the central Baltic Sea at four stations, which were up to 450 km apart and at a depth profile representative for the central part (Gotland Deep, 235 m). Bacterial community structure was followed by 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA)- and 16S rRNA gene-based fingerprints using single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) electrophoresis. Species composition was determined by sequence analysis of SSCP bands. High similarities of the bacterioplankton communities across several hundred kilometers were observed in the surface water using RNA- and DNA-based fingerprints. In these surface communities, the RNA- and DNA-based fingerprints resulted in very different pattern, presumably indicating large difference between the active members of the community as represented by RNA-based fingerprints and the present members represented by the DNA-based fingerprints. This large discrepancy changed gradually over depth, resulting in highly similar RNA- and DNA-based fingerprints in the anoxic part of the water column below 130 m depth. A conceivable mechanism explaining this high similarity could be the reduced oxidative stress in the anoxic zone. The stable communities on the surface and in the anoxic zone indicate the strong influence of the hydrography on the bacterioplankton community structure. Comparative analysis of RNA- and DNA-based community structure provided criteria for the identification of the core community, its key members and their links to biogeochemical functions.

  11. Spin dependent photon structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manohar, A.V.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge

    1989-01-01

    Spin dependent structure functions of the photon are studied using the operator product expansion. There are new twist-two photon and gluon operators which contribute. The structure functions g 1 and F 3 are calculable in QCD, but differ from their free quark values. The corrections to F 3 are suppressed by 1/log Q 2 . The calculation is an extension of the analysis of Witten for the spin averaged structure functions F 1 and F 2 . (orig.)

  12. Nuclear correlations and structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Guoju; Irvine, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    It is argued that the search for a mass number dependence of the nuclear structure function per nucleon is profitably directed to the region of Bjorken scaling variable x > 1. We show that in the convolution model of the nuclear structure function the nuclear momentum distribution and energy spectrum generated by cluster expansion techniques, here realised in the correlated basis function method, invoking tensor correlations and short-range density-dependent repulsions adequately describes the structure function for 12 C in the region x > 1. The results of structure functions for a number of light-, medium- and heavy-mass nuclei are presented. (author)

  13. The contact activation proteins: a structure/function overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijers, J. C.; McMullen, B. A.; Bouma, B. N.

    1992-01-01

    In recent years, extensive knowledge has been obtained on the structure/function relationships of blood coagulation proteins. In this overview, we present recent developments on the structure/function relationships of the contact activation proteins: factor XII, high molecular weight kininogen,

  14. New insights into structure-function relationship of the DHPR beta1a subunit in skeletal muscle excitation-contraction coupling using zebrafish 'relaxed' as an expression system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dayal, A.

    2010-01-01

    mechanism or already contributes at the ultrastructural level i.e. DHPR tetrad arrangement. Surprisingly, our experiments revealed full tetrad formation and an almost complete restoration of EC coupling in [beta]1-null zebrafish relaxed larvae and isolated myotubes upon expression of a [beta]1a-specific heptad repeat mutant (LVV to AAA) and thus contradict the earlier results. According to our novel finding that the [beta]1a heptad repeat motif is not the key determinant of DHPR-RyR1 coupling, the next aim was to perform further in-depth structural-functional studies on the role of the DHPR [beta]1a subunit in skeletal muscle EC coupling. Previous loss-of-function studies identified the [beta]1a C-terminus as a key determinant of skeletal muscle EC coupling. However, loss-of-function studies always raise concerns if the observed effects are solely due to a more general loss of function because of global protein misfolding. Consequently, we were rather interested to carry out a gain-of-function approach. The ancestral [beta] subunit, [beta]M, despite lacking major parts of the variable N-, C-termini and the HOOK region is able to perform all basic [beta]-functions as mentioned above. So, we used [beta]M as the basis for chimeric gain-of-function experiments to probe for in vivo rescue of EC coupling via the larval motility restoration. Systematic expression studies with [beta]M/[beta]1a chimeras carrying substitutions of all variable (C-, N-termini, and HOOK) and conserved regions (SH3 and GK domains) were performed. All the heterologously expressed [beta]M/[beta]1a chimeras completely restored [alpha]1S triad targeting in relaxed myotubes. Surprisingly, [beta]M/[beta]1a chimeras carrying substitutions of either N- or C-terminus, or of all the three variable regions together with [beta]1a sequence displayed very reduced larval motility restoration. Thus, in clear contrast to the expectations raised by previous loss-of-function studies with [beta]2a/[beta]1a chimeras by

  15. Ensemble averaged structure–function relationship for nanocrystals: effective superparamagnetic Fe clusters with catalytically active Pt skin [Ensemble averaged structure-function relationship for composite nanocrystals: magnetic bcc Fe clusters with catalytically active fcc Pt skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petkov, Valeri [Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, MI (United States); Prasai, Binay [Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, MI (United States); Shastri, Sarvjit [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). X-ray Science Division; Park, Hyun-Uk [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea). Department of Chemistry; Kwon, Young-Uk [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea). Department of Chemistry; Skumryev, Vassil [Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA), Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (Spain). Department of Physics

    2017-09-12

    Practical applications require the production and usage of metallic nanocrystals (NCs) in large ensembles. Besides, due to their cluster-bulk solid duality, metallic NCs exhibit a large degree of structural diversity. This poses the question as to what atomic-scale basis is to be used when the structure–function relationship for metallic NCs is to be quantified precisely. In this paper, we address the question by studying bi-functional Fe core-Pt skin type NCs optimized for practical applications. In particular, the cluster-like Fe core and skin-like Pt surface of the NCs exhibit superparamagnetic properties and a superb catalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction, respectively. We determine the atomic-scale structure of the NCs by non-traditional resonant high-energy X-ray diffraction coupled to atomic pair distribution function analysis. Using the experimental structure data we explain the observed magnetic and catalytic behavior of the NCs in a quantitative manner. Lastly, we demonstrate that NC ensemble-averaged 3D positions of atoms obtained by advanced X-ray scattering techniques are a very proper basis for not only establishing but also quantifying the structure–function relationship for the increasingly complex metallic NCs explored for practical applications.

  16. Study of quark structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dao, F.T.; Flaminio, E.; Lai, K.; Metcalf, M.; Wang, L.

    1977-01-01

    The quark structure functions of the proton are determined through a combined analysis of the reactions pN → ll-barX and eN → eX. The valence-quark structure function of the pion is also given by analyzing the πN → μμ-barX data measured by the Branson et al

  17. Calculations of nucleon structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Signal, A.I.

    1990-01-01

    We present a method of calculating deep inelastic nucleon structure functions using bag model wavefunctions. Our method uses the Peierls - Yoccoz projection to form translation invariant bag states. We obtain the correct support for the structure functions and satisfy the positivity requirements for quark and anti-quark distribution functions. (orig.)

  18. Proton and neutron structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rock, S.

    1991-01-01

    New result on charged lepton scattering from hydrogen and deuterium targets by the BCDMS, NMC and SLAC collaborations have greatly increased our knowledge of the structure functions of protons and neutrons. The disagreement between the high energy muon scattering cross sections obtained by the EMC and BCDMS collaborations have been almost completely resolved by comparison with a global analysis of old and new SLAC data and a reanalysis of EMC data. We now have a consistent set of structure functions which covers an approximate range 1 ≤ Q 2 ≤ 200 (GeV/c) 2 and 0.07 ≤ x ≤ 0.7. The ratio of neutron to proton structure functions decreases with increasing Q 2 for values of x ≥ 0.1. The difference between proton and neutron structure functions approaches zero as x decreases, consistent with the expected √x behavior. (orig.)

  19. Structure-Function Relationships of Ferroelectric Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlopoulou, Eleni; Maiz, Jon; Spampinato, Nicoletta; Maglione, Mario; Hadziioannou, Georges

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride), PVDF, and its copolymers with trifluoroethylene, P(VDF-co-TrFE) have been long appreciated for their excellent ferroelectric properties. Although they have been mainly studied in the 80s and 90s, understanding their performance is still lacking. Yet the increasing use of P(VDF-co-TrFE) thin films in organic electronic devices during the last ten years revives the need for apprehending the function of these materials. In this work we investigate the structure of P(VDF-co-TrFE) films and correlate it to their ferroelectric properties. Our results show that ferroelectric performance is solely driven by the fraction of polymer that has been crystallized in the ferroelectric phases of PVDF. The relations between remnant polarization, coercive field and dipole switching rate of P(VDF-co-TrFE) with the ferroelectric crystallinity are demonstrated. The French Research Agency (ANR), the Aquitaine Region, Arkema and STMicroelectronics are kindly acknowledged for financial support.

  20. Casein kinase-2 structure-function relationship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boldyreff, B; Meggio, F; Pinna, L A

    1992-01-01

    Nine mutants of human casein kinase-2 beta subunit have been created and assayed for their ability to assemble with the catalytic alpha subunit to give, at a 1:1 molar ratio, a fully competent CK-2 holoenzyme as judged by the following criteria: 1) the generation of an active heterotetrameric form...

  1. Diquarks and nucleon structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linkevich, A.D.; Savrin, V.I.; Skachkov, N.B.

    1982-01-01

    Formulae for structure functions of the deep-inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering are obtained through relativistic wave functions of systems composed of particles with spins 0, 1/2 and 1, 1/2. These wave functions are solutions of covariant two-particle single-time equations describing the nucleon as a system formed out of a quark and a diquark. Diquark is considered as a boson with the spin 0 and 1. The expressions for the nucleon structure functions are obtained by using the matrix elements of the current operator corresponding to the elastic scattering of the photon on a quark and on a diquark [ru

  2. Structure functions of electroweak boson and leptons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slominski, W.; Szwed, J.

    1996-01-01

    The QCD structure of the electroweak bosons is reviewed and the lepton structure function is defined and calculated. The leading order splitting functions of electron into quarks are extracted, showing an important contribution from γ-Z interference. Leading logarithmic QCD evolution equations are constructed and solved in the asymptotic region where log 2 behavior of the Parton densities is observed. Possible applications with clear manifestation of ''resolved'' photon and weak bosons are discussed. 8 refs., 3 figs

  3. QCD analysis of structure functions in terms of Jacobi polynomials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivokhizhin, V.G.; Kurlovich, S.P.; Savin, I.A.; Sidorov, A.V.; Skachkov, N.B.; Sanadze, V.V.

    1987-01-01

    A new method of QCD-analysis of singlet and nonsinglet structure functions based on their expansion in orthogonal Jacobi polynomials is proposed. An accuracy of the method is studied and its application is demonstrated using the structure function F 2 (x,Q 2 ) obtained by the EMC Collaboration from measurements with an iron target. (orig.)

  4. Structure functions and parton distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olness, F.; Tung, Wu-Ki

    1991-04-01

    Activities of the structure functions and parton distributions group is summarized. The impact of scheme-dependence of parton distributions (especially sea-quarks and gluons) on the quantitative formulation of the QCD parton model is highlighted. Recent progress on the global analysis of parton distributions is summarized. Issues on the proper use of the next-to-leading parton distributions are stressed

  5. Rise in proton structure function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazal-e-Aleem; Rashid, H.; Ali, S.

    1996-08-01

    By the choice of a new scale factor we obtain a good qualitative fit to the HERA data for the proton structure function in the small x region which exhibits double asymptotic scaling. Any scaling violations in the future measurements when made in smaller bins will be of immense value. (author). 19 refs, 6 figs

  6. Structure functions at low x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeck, A.De.

    2000-01-01

    Deep recent data and phenomenology on low-x structure functions are discussed inelastic scattering. We will be interested primordially in the regions Q 2 → 0 i.e. the transition from γp to, and x → 10 -4 - 10 -6 i.e. the region of high parton densities

  7. Structure/function relationship of the rusticyanin among thiobacillus ferroxidans: from the fermenter to the crystal; Relations structure/fonction de la rusticyanine chez thiobacillus ferrooxidans: du fermenteur au cristal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunzi, F.

    1996-09-23

    The commercial extraction of copper and uranium from ores by microbial leaching turns to account the iron oxidation capacity of Thiobacillus ferroxidans. The iron oxidation involves an electron transport chain localized in the peri-plasmic space of the cell. The aim of our work is to study the structure-function relationships of rusticyanin, the most important component of this respiratory chain. Rusticyanin is a blue copper protein and has been characterized from a new strain of Thilbacillus ferrooxidans. A preliminary electrochemical study has been made with a new modified-gold electrode and we have examined, in particular, the pH dependence of the high redox potential of rusticyanin. Its amino acid sequence has been determined and a comparison with two other rusticyanin sequences, isolated from different strains, shows a high degree of homology. A structural alignment with six other blue copper proteins allows to propose four residues as copper ligands, His 84, Cys 138, His 143 and Met 148. The supposed factors responsible for the high redox potential of rusticyanin are discussed. (author)

  8. Structure functions and parton distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, A.D.; Stirling, W.J.; Roberts, R.G.

    1995-01-01

    The MRS parton distribution analysis is described. The latest sets are shown to give an excellent description of a wide range of deep-inelastic and other hard scattering data. Two important theoretical issues-the behavior of the distributions at small x and the flavor structure of the quark sea-are discussed in detail. A comparison with the new structure function data from HERA is made, and the outlook for the future is discussed

  9. Development and application of pulmonary structure-function registration methods: towards pulmonary image-guidance tools for improved airway targeted therapies and outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fumin; Pike, Damien; Svenningsen, Sarah; Coxson, Harvey O.; Drozd, John J.; Yuan, Jing; Fenster, Aaron; Parraga, Grace

    2014-03-01

    Objectives: We aimed to develop a way to rapidly generate multi-modality (MRI-CT) pulmonary imaging structurefunction maps using novel non-rigid image registration methods. This objective is part of our overarching goal to provide an image processing pipeline to generate pulmonary structure-function maps and guide airway-targeted therapies. Methods: Anatomical 1H and functional 3He MRI were acquired in 5 healthy asymptomatic ex-smokers and 7 ex-smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) at inspiration breath-hold. Thoracic CT was performed within ten minutes of MRI using the same breath-hold volume. Landmark-based affine registration methods previously validated for imaging of COPD, was based on corresponding fiducial markers located in both CT and 1H MRI coronal slices and compared with shape-based CT-MRI non-rigid registration. Shape-based CT-MRI registration was developed by first identifying the shapes of the lung cavities manually, and then registering the two shapes using affine and thin-plate spline algorithms. We compared registration accuracy using the fiducial localization error (FLE) and target registration error (TRE). Results: For landmark-based registration, the TRE was 8.4±5.3 mm for whole lung and 7.8±4.6 mm for the R and L lungs registered independently (p=0.4). For shape-based registration, the TRE was 8.0±4.6 mm for whole lung as compared to 6.9±4.4 mm for the R and L lung registered independently and this difference was significant (p=0.01). The difference for shape-based (6.9±4.4 mm) and landmark-based R and L lung registration (7.8±4.6 mm) was also significant (p=.04) Conclusion: Shape-based registration TRE was significantly improved compared to landmark-based registration when considering L and R lungs independently.

  10. Design and Structure-Function Characterization of 3D Printed Synthetic Porous Biomaterials for Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Cambre N; Miller, Andrew T; Hollister, Scott J; Guldberg, Robert E; Gall, Ken

    2018-04-01

    3D printing is now adopted for use in a variety of industries and functions. In biomedical engineering, 3D printing has prevailed over more traditional manufacturing methods in tissue engineering due to its high degree of control over both macro- and microarchitecture of porous tissue scaffolds. However, with the improved flexibility in design come new challenges in characterizing the structure-function relationships between various architectures and both mechanical and biological properties in an assortment of clinical applications. Presently, the field of tissue engineering lacks a comprehensive body of literature that is capable of drawing meaningful relationships between the designed structure and resulting function of 3D printed porous biomaterial scaffolds. This work first discusses the role of design on 3D printed porous scaffold function and then reviews characterization of these structure-function relationships for 3D printed synthetic metallic, polymeric, and ceramic biomaterials. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. The Structure-Function Linkage Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiva, Eyal; Brown, Shoshana; Almonacid, Daniel E; Barber, Alan E; Custer, Ashley F; Hicks, Michael A; Huang, Conrad C; Lauck, Florian; Mashiyama, Susan T; Meng, Elaine C; Mischel, David; Morris, John H; Ojha, Sunil; Schnoes, Alexandra M; Stryke, Doug; Yunes, Jeffrey M; Ferrin, Thomas E; Holliday, Gemma L; Babbitt, Patricia C

    2014-01-01

    The Structure-Function Linkage Database (SFLD, http://sfld.rbvi.ucsf.edu/) is a manually curated classification resource describing structure-function relationships for functionally diverse enzyme superfamilies. Members of such superfamilies are diverse in their overall reactions yet share a common ancestor and some conserved active site features associated with conserved functional attributes such as a partial reaction. Thus, despite their different functions, members of these superfamilies 'look alike', making them easy to misannotate. To address this complexity and enable rational transfer of functional features to unknowns only for those members for which we have sufficient functional information, we subdivide superfamily members into subgroups using sequence information, and lastly into families, sets of enzymes known to catalyze the same reaction using the same mechanistic strategy. Browsing and searching options in the SFLD provide access to all of these levels. The SFLD offers manually curated as well as automatically classified superfamily sets, both accompanied by search and download options for all hierarchical levels. Additional information includes multiple sequence alignments, tab-separated files of functional and other attributes, and sequence similarity networks. The latter provide a new and intuitively powerful way to visualize functional trends mapped to the context of sequence similarity.

  12. Structure functions of nucleons and nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentz, Wolfgang; Ito, Takuya [Department of Physics, Tokai University, Kanagawa (Japan); Cloet, Ian [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle (United States); Thomas, Anthony [Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States); Yazaki, Koichi [RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama (Japan)

    2009-07-01

    We use an effective chiral quark theory to calculate the quark distributions and structure functions of nucleons and nuclei. The description of the single nucleon is based on the Faddeev framework, and nuclear systems are described in the mean field approximation. Particular amphasis is put on the prediction of the polarized EMC effect in nuclei, and on applications to deep inelastic neutrino-nucleus scattering. Concerning the polarized EMC effect, we discuss the quenching of the quark spin sum in nuclei and its implications for the spin dependent nuclear structure functions, and present results for several nuclei where an experimental observation is feasible. Concerning the case of deep inelastic neutrino-nucleus scattering, we estimate the effect of medium modifications of the quark distribution functions on the measured cross sections, and discuss an interesting resolution of the so called NuTeV anomaly. Finally, we discuss extensions of our model to describe fragmentation functions for semi-inclusive processes. The connection between our effective quark model description and the jet model of Field and Feynman is discussed.

  13. Photon structure functions at small x in holographic QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Akira; Li, Hsiang-nan

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the photon structure functions at small Bjorken variable x in the framework of the holographic QCD, assuming dominance of the Pomeron exchange. The quasi-real photon structure functions are expressed as convolution of the Brower–Polchinski–Strassler–Tan (BPST) Pomeron kernel and the known wave functions of the U(1) vector field in the five-dimensional AdS space, in which the involved parameters in the BPST kernel have been fixed in previous studies of the nucleon structure functions. The predicted photon structure functions, as confronted with data, provide a clean test of the BPST kernel. The agreement between theoretical predictions and data is demonstrated, which supports applications of holographic QCD to hadronic processes in the nonperturbative region. Our results are also consistent with those derived from the parton distribution functions of the photon proposed by Glück, Reya, and Schienbein, implying realization of the vector meson dominance in the present model setup.

  14. Small catalytic RNA: Structure, function and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monforte, J.A.

    1991-04-01

    We have utilized a combination of photochemical cross-linking techniques and site-directed mutagenesis to obtain secondary and tertiary structure information for the self-cleaving, self-ligating subsequence of RNA from the negative strand of Satellite Tobacco Ringspot Virus. We have found that the helical regions fold about a hinge to promoting four different possible tertiary interactions, creating a molecular of similar shape to a paperclip. A model suggesting that the paperclip'' and hammerhead'' RNAs share a similar three dimensional structure is proposed. We have used a self-cleaving RNA molecule related to a subsequence of plant viroids, a hammerhead,'' to study the length-dependent folding of RNA produced during transcription by RNA polymerase. We have used this method to determine the length of RNA sequestered within elongating E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase complexes. The data show that for E. coli RNA polymerase 12{plus minus}1 nucleotides are sequestered within the ternary complex, which is consistent with the presence of an RNA-DNA hybrid within the transcription bubble, as proposed by others. The result for T7 RNA polymerase differs from E. coli RNA polymerase, with only 10{plus minus}1 nucleotides sequestered within the ternary complex, setting a new upper limit for the minimum RNA-DNA required for a stable elongating complex. Comparisons between E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase are made. The relevance of the results to models or transcription termination, abortive initiation, and initiation to elongation mode transitions are discussed.

  15. Small catalytic RNA: Structure, function and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monforte, Joseph Albert [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1991-04-01

    We have utilized a combination of photochemical cross-linking techniques and site-directed mutagenesis to obtain secondary and tertiary structure information for the self-cleaving, self-ligating subsequence of RNA from the negative strand of Satellite Tobacco Ringspot Virus. We have found that the helical regions fold about a hinge to promoting four different possible tertiary interactions, creating a molecular of similar shape to a paperclip. A model suggesting that the ``paperclip`` and ``hammerhead`` RNAs share a similar three dimensional structure is proposed. We have used a self-cleaving RNA molecule related to a subsequence of plant viroids, a ``hammerhead,`` to study the length-dependent folding of RNA produced during transcription by RNA polymerase. We have used this method to determine the length of RNA sequestered within elongating E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase complexes. The data show that for E. coli RNA polymerase 121±s are sequestered within the ternary complex, which is consistent with the presence of an RNA-DNA hybrid within the transcription bubble, as proposed by others. The result for T7 RNA polymerase differs from E. coli RNA polymerase, with only 10{plus_minus}1 nucleotides sequestered within the ternary complex, setting a new upper limit for the minimum RNA-DNA required for a stable elongating complex. Comparisons between E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase are made. The relevance of the results to models or transcription termination, abortive initiation, and initiation to elongation mode transitions are discussed.

  16. GH62 arabinofuranosidases: Structure, function and applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilkens, Casper; Andersen, Susan; Dumon, Claire

    2017-01-01

    Motivated by industrial demands and ongoing scientific discoveries continuous efforts are made to identify and create improved biocatalysts dedicated to plant biomass conversion. α-1,2 and α-1,3 arabinofuranosyl specific α-l-arabinofuranosidases (EC 3.2.1.55) are debranching enzymes catalyzing...... exclusively α-l-arabinofuranosidases and these are of fungal and bacterial origin. Twenty-two GH62 enzymes out of 223 entries in the CAZy database have been characterized and very recently new knowledge was acquired with regard to crystal structures, substrate specificities, and phylogenetics, which overall...

  17. Structure functions from chiral soliton models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weigel, H.; Reinhardt, H.; Gamberg, L.

    1997-01-01

    We study nucleon structure functions within the bosonized Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model where the nucleon emerges as a chiral soliton. We discuss the model predictions on the Gottfried sum rule for electron-nucleon scattering. A comparison with a low-scale parametrization shows that the model reproduces the gross features of the empirical structure functions. We also compute the leading twist contributions of the polarized structure functions g 1 and g 2 in this model. We compare the model predictions on these structure functions with data from the E143 experiment by GLAP evolving them from the scale characteristic for the NJL-model to the scale of the data

  18. Phenomenology of the electron structure function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slominski, W.; Szwed, J.

    2001-01-01

    The advantages of introducing the electron structure function (ESF) in electron induced processes are demonstrated. Contrary to the photon structure function it is directly measured in such processes. At present energies, a simultaneous analysis of both the electron and the photon structure functions gives an important test of the experimentally applied methods. Estimates of the ESF at LEP momenta are given. At very high momenta contributions from W and Z bosons together with γ-Z interference can be observed. Predictions for the next generation of experiments are given. (orig.)

  19. Structure functions and correlations in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fantoni, S.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper the results obtained for the static structure function S(k) and the longitudinal structure function S L (k) of 3 H, 3 He and 4 He nuclei and nuclear matter are presented and discussed. The calculations have been performed using realistic wave functions obtained from Faddeev and variational theories. The Monte Carlo method has been used to calculate the structure functions of finite systems, and the FHNC/SOC method for nuclear matter. The results for the 3 He nucleus are in agreement with the recent Saclay data. The results for nuclear matter are compared with the experimental data relative to heavier nuclei, like e.g. 40 Ca

  20. Dipole rescattering and the nuclear structure function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, F. [Depto de Ciencias Exatas e da Terra, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Goncalves, V. P. [Instituto de Fisica e Matematica, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Caixa Postal 354, CEP 96010-900, Pelotas, RS (Brazil); Navarra, F. S.; Oliveira, E. G. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo Rua do Matao, Travessa R, 187, 05508-090 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-03-25

    In the framework of the dipole model, we study the effects of the dipole multiple scatterings in a nuclear target and compute the nuclear structure function. We compare different unitarization schemes and confront our results with the E665 data.

  1. Application of relationship marketing in non-profit organisations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Application of relationship marketing in non-profit organisations involved in the provision of sport and recreational services. ... A variety of factors have over time contributed to a need for marketing in non-profit ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  2. Proton structure functions at small x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hentschinski, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Proton structure functions are measured in electron-proton collision through inelastic scattering of virtual photons with virtuality Q on protons; x denotes the momentum fraction carried by the struck parton. Proton structure functions are currently described with excellent accuracy in terms of scale dependent parton distribution functions, defined in terms of collinear factorization and DGLAP evolution in Q. With decreasing x however, parton densities increase and are ultimately expected to saturate. In this regime DGLAP evolution will finally break down and non-linear evolution equations w.r.t x are expected to take over. In the first part of the talk we present recent result on an implementation of physical DGLAP evolution. Unlike the conventional description in terms of parton distribution functions, the former describes directly the Q dependence of the measured structure functions. It is therefore physical insensitive to factorization scheme and scale ambiguities. It therefore provides a more stringent test of DGLAP evolution and eases the manifestation of (non-linear) small x effects. It however requires a precise measurement of both structure functions F 2 and F L , which will be only possible at future facilities, such as an Electron Ion Collider. In the second part we present a recent analysis of the small x region of the combined HERA data on the structure function F 2 . We demonstrate that (linear) next-to-leading order BFKL evolution describes the effective Pomeron intercept, determined from the combined HERA data, once a resummation of collinear enhanced terms is included and the renormalization scale is fixed using the BLM optimal scale setting procedure. We also provide a detailed description of the Q and x dependence of the full structure functions F 2 in the small x region, as measured at HERA. Predictions for the structure function F L are found to be in agreement with the existing HERA data. (paper)

  3. Longitudinal structure function from logarithmic slopes of F2 at low x

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroun, G. R.

    2018-01-01

    Using Laplace transform techniques, I calculate the longitudinal structure function FL(x ,Q2) from the scaling violations of the proton structure function F2(x ,Q2) and make a critical study of this relationship between the structure functions at leading order (LO) up to next-to-next-to leading order (NNLO) analysis at small x . Furthermore, I consider heavy quark contributions to the relation between the structure functions, which leads to compact formula for Nf=3 +Heavy . The nonlinear corrections to the longitudinal structure function at LO up to NNLO analysis are shown in the Nf=4 (light quark flavor) based on the nonlinear corrections at R =2 and R =4 GeV-1 . The results are compared with experimental data of the longitudinal proton structure function FL in the range of 6.5 ≤Q2≤800 GeV2 .

  4. Resonance contribution to electromagnetic structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowling, A.L. Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The part of the pion and proton electromagnetic structure functions due to direct channel resonances in the virtual Compton amplitude is discussed. After a phenomenological discussion, based on the work of Bloom and Gilman, of resonance production in inelastic electroproduction, the single resonance contribution to the pion and proton structure functions is expressed in terms of transition form factors. Froissart-Gribov representations of the Compton amplitude partial waves are presented and are used to specify the spin dependence of the transition form factors. The dependence of the form factors on momentum transfer and resonance mass is assumed on the basis of the behavior of exclusive resonance electroproduction. The single resonance contributions are summed in the Bjorken limit, and the result exhibits Bjorken scaling. Transverse photons are found to dominate in the Bjorken limit, and the threshold behavior of the resonant part of the structure functions is related to the asymptotic behavior of exclusive form factors at large momentum transfer. The resonant parts of the annihilation structure functions are not in general given by simple analytic continuation in the scaling vari []ble ω' of the electroproduction structure functions. (Diss. Abstr. Int., B)

  5. Structure functions and correlations in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiavilla, R.; Lewart, D.S.; Pandharipande, V.R.

    1987-01-01

    The static longitudinal structure function S l (k) and the static structure function S(k) of 3 H, 3 He and 4 He nuclei and nuclear matter are calculated using realistic wave functions obtained from Faddeev and variational calculations. In order to study the variation of the structure function with the number of particles in the system we also calculate S(k) of atomic helium liquid drops containing 4, 8, 20, 40, 70, 168 and 240 atoms. Monte Carlo integration is used to calculate the structure functions of finite systems, while those of nuclear matter are calculated with chain summation methods. The behaivior of S(k) and S l (k) at small values of k is discussed. We find that the recent Saclay data on S l (k) of the 3 He nucleus are in agreement with theory. Though the data indicate the the existence of correlations between the two protons in the 3 He nucleus, they are not accurate enough to draw interesting conclusions about the repulsive core in the nucleon-nucleon interaction. The structure functions of atomic helium liquid drops indicate a smooth variation of S(k) with the number of atoms in the drop. The S L (k) of the 4 He nucleus and nuclear matter are very similar for k > 1.5 fm -1 , and it appears plausible that S L (k) of nuclei having A > 3 may not depend significantly on A when k > 1.5 fm -1 . (orig.)

  6. Structure-function-property-design interplay in biopolymers: spider silk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokareva, Olena; Jacobsen, Matthew; Buehler, Markus; Wong, Joyce; Kaplan, David L

    2014-04-01

    Spider silks have been a focus of research for almost two decades due to their outstanding mechanical and biophysical properties. Recent advances in genetic engineering have led to the synthesis of recombinant spider silks, thus helping to unravel a fundamental understanding of structure-function-property relationships. The relationships between molecular composition, secondary structures and mechanical properties found in different types of spider silks are described, along with a discussion of artificial spinning of these proteins and their bioapplications, including the role of silks in biomineralization and fabrication of biomaterials with controlled properties. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Structure functions are not parton probabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Hoyer, Paul; Sannino, Francesco; Marchal, Nils; Peigne, Stephane

    2002-01-01

    The common view that structure functions measured in deep inelastic lepton scattering are determined by the probability of finding quarks and gluons in the target is not correct in gauge theory. We show that gluon exchange between the fast, outgoing partons and target spectators, which is usually assumed to be an irrelevant gauge artifact, affects the leading twist structure functions in a profound way. This observation removes the apparent contradiction between the projectile (eikonal) and target (parton model) views of diffractive and small x B phenomena. The diffractive scattering of the fast outgoing quarks on spectators in the target causes shadowing in the DIS cross section. Thus the depletion of the nuclear structure functions is not intrinsic to the wave function of the nucleus, but is a coherent effect arising from the destructive interference of diffractive channels induced by final state interactions. This is consistent with the Glauber-Gribov interpretation of shadowing as a rescattering effect

  8. Effective constraint algebras with structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojowald, Martin; Brahma, Suddhasattwa

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the result that fluctuations and higher moments of a state, by themselves, do not imply quantum corrections in structure functions of constrained systems. Moment corrections are isolated from other types of quantum effects, such as factor-ordering choices and regularization, by introducing a new condition with two parts: (i) having a direct (or faithful) quantization of the classical structure functions, (ii) free of factor-ordering ambiguities. In particular, it is assumed that the classical constraints can be quantized in an anomaly free way, so that properties of the resulting constraint algebras can be derived. If the two-part condition is not satisfied, effective constraints can still be evaluated, but quantum effects may be stronger. Consequences for canonical quantum gravity, whose structure functions encode space–time structure, are discussed. In particular, deformed algebras found in models of loop quantum gravity provide reliable information even in the Planck regime. (paper)

  9. Boson structure functions from inelastic electron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Jager, C.W.

    1986-01-01

    The even /sup 104-110/Pd isotopes and /sup 196/Pt have been investigated at NIKHEF-K by high-resolution inelastic electron scattering. A new IBA-2 calculation has been performed for the Pd isotopes, in which the ratio of the proton and neutron coupling constants is taken from pion scattering. One set of boson structure functions sufficed for the description of the first and second E2-excitations in all Pd isotopes. The data showed no sensitivity for different structure functions for proton and neutron bosons. A preliminary analysis of a number of negative parity states (3/sup -/,5/sup -/ and 7/sup -/), observed in /sup 196/Pt, was performed through the introduction of an f-boson. The first E4-excitation in the palladium isotopes can be reasonably described with a β-structure function, but all other E4-excitations require the introduction of g-boson admixtures

  10. Structure functions in the chiral bag model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanjose, V.; Vento, V.; Centro Mixto CSIC/Valencia Univ., Valencia

    1989-01-01

    We calculate the structure functions of an isoscalar nuclear target for the deep inelastic scattering by leptons in an extended version of the chiral bag model which incorporates the qanti q structure of the pions in the cloud. Bjorken scaling and Regge behavior are satisfied. The model calculation reproduces the low-x behavior of the data but fails to explain the medium- to large-x behavior. Evolution of the quark structure functions seem inevitable to attempt a connection between the low-energy models and the high-energy behavior of quantum chromodynamics. (orig.)

  11. Structure functions in the chiral bag model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanjose, V.; Vento, V.

    1989-07-13

    We calculate the structure functions of an isoscalar nuclear target for the deep inelastic scattering by leptons in an extended version of the chiral bag model which incorporates the qanti q structure of the pions in the cloud. Bjorken scaling and Regge behavior are satisfied. The model calculation reproduces the low-x behavior of the data but fails to explain the medium- to large-x behavior. Evolution of the quark structure functions seem inevitable to attempt a connection between the low-energy models and the high-energy behavior of quantum chromodynamics. (orig.).

  12. A no extensive statistical model for the nucleon structure function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trevisan, Luis A.; Mirez, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    We studied an application of nonextensive thermodynamics to describe the structure function of nucleon, in a model where the usual Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein energy distribution were replaced by the equivalent functions of the q-statistical. The parameters of the model are given by an effective temperature T, the q parameter (from Tsallis statistics), and two chemical potentials given by the corresponding up (u) and down (d) quark normalization in the nucleon.

  13. 2004 Structural, Function and Evolutionary Genomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas L. Brutlag Nancy Ryan Gray

    2005-03-23

    This Gordon conference will cover the areas of structural, functional and evolutionary genomics. It will take a systematic approach to genomics, examining the evolution of proteins, protein functional sites, protein-protein interactions, regulatory networks, and metabolic networks. Emphasis will be placed on what we can learn from comparative genomics and entire genomes and proteomes.

  14. Progress on nuclear modifications of structure functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumano S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report progress on nuclear structure functions, especially on their nuclear modifications and a new tensor structure function for the deuteron. To understand nuclear structure functions is an important step toward describing nuclei and QCD matters from low to high densities and from low to high energies in terms of fundamental quark and gluon degrees of freedom beyond conventional hadron and nuclear physics. It is also practically important for understanding new phenomena in high-energy heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. Furthermore, since systematic errors of current neutrinooscillation experiments are dominated by uncertainties of neutrino-nucleus interactions, such studies are valuable for finding new physics beyond current framework. Next, a new tensor-polarized structure function b1 is discussed for the deuteron. There was a measurement by HERMES; however, its data are inconsistent with the conventional convolution estimate based on the standard deuteron model with D-state admixture. This fact suggests that a new hadronic phenomenon should exist in the tensor-polarized deuteron at high energies, and it will be experimentally investigated at JLab from the end of 2010’s.

  15. The gluon contribution to polarised nucleon structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, G.G.; Roberts, R.G.

    1990-08-01

    As with all parton distributions in quantum chromodynamics (QCD) the separation of polarised nucleon structure functions into gluon and quark contributions must be specified. We consider a definition of the gluon contribution to polarised nucleon structure functions based on exclusive processes which is explicitly gauge invariant, has no regularisation ambiguities, is insensitive to infrared singularities and can be related to other polarised scattering processes. We discuss the relationship of this gluon definition to others that have recently been used and to the estimates that have been made of the gluon contribution using current algebra and other methods. A quantitative analysis of the structure function g 1 (x,Q 2 ) for polarised deep inelastic scattering is carried out, with the aim of examining the importance of the gluon contribution. Using the positivity of parton distributions the magnitude of Δg(x,Q 2 ) is constrained by a realistic estimate of the unpolarised glue. With the appropriate choice of the hard scattering cross-section, Δσ γg , we find that even with a maximally polarised glue (for x > 0.1), some polarised strange quark contribution is still needed by the data of the EMC. (author)

  16. Geometrical scaling in charm structure function ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boroun, G.R.; Rezaei, B.

    2014-01-01

    By using a Laplace-transform technique, we solve the next-to-leading-order master equation for charm production and derive a compact formula for the ratio R c =F L cc ¯ /F 2 cc ¯ , which is useful for extracting the charm structure function from the reduced charm cross section, in particular, at DESY HERA, at small x. Our results show that this ratio is independent of x at small x. In this method of determining the ratios, we apply geometrical scaling in charm production in deep inelastic scattering (DIS). Our analysis shows that the renormalization scales have a sizable impact on the ratio R c at high Q 2 . Our results for the ratio of the charm structure functions are in a good agreement with some phenomenological models

  17. Theoretical analysis of polarized structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altarelli, G.; ); Ball, R.D.; Forte, S.; Ridolfi, G.

    1998-01-01

    We review the analysis of polarized structure function data using perturbative QCD and NLO We use the most recent experimental data to obtain updated results for polarized parton distributions, first moments and the strong coupling. We also discuss several theoretical issues involving in this analysis and in the interpretation of its results. Finally, we compare our results with other similar analyses in the recent literature. (author)

  18. Theoretical Analysis of Polarized Structure Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Altarelli, Guido; Forte, Stefano; Ridolfi, G

    1998-01-01

    We review the analysis of polarized structure function data using perturbative QCD at next-to-leading order. We use the most recent experimental data to obtain updated results for polarized parton distributions, first moments and the strong coupling. We also discuss several theoretical issues involved in this analysis and in the interpretation of its results. Finally, we compare our results with other similar analyses in the recent literature.

  19. Clustering aspects in nuclear structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirai, M.; Saito, K.; Watanabe, T.; Kumano, S.

    2011-01-01

    For understanding an anomalous nuclear effect experimentally observed for the beryllium-9 nucleus at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, clustering aspects are studied in structure functions of deep inelastic lepton-nucleus scattering by using momentum distributions calculated in antisymmetrized (or fermionic) molecular dynamics (AMD) and also in a simple shell model for comparison. According to AMD, the 9 Be nucleus consists of two α-like clusters with a surrounding neutron. The clustering produces high-momentum components in nuclear wave functions, which affects nuclear modifications of the structure functions. We investigated whether clustering features could appear in the structure function F 2 of 9 Be along with studies for other light nuclei. We found that nuclear modifications of F 2 are similar in both AMD and shell models within our simple convolution description although there are slight differences in 9 Be. It indicates that the anomalous 9 Be result should be explained by a different mechanism from the nuclear binding and Fermi motion. If nuclear-modification slopes d(F 2 A /F 2 D )/dx are shown by the maximum local densities, the 9 Be anomaly can be explained by the AMD picture, namely by the clustering structure, whereas it certainly cannot be described in the simple shell model. This fact suggests that the large nuclear modification in 9 Be should be explained by large densities in the clusters. For example, internal nucleon structure could be modified in the high-density clusters. The clustering aspect of nuclear structure functions is an unexplored topic which is interesting for future investigations.

  20. Structure-function relationships for the interleukin 2 receptor system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. Robb

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available Receptors for interleukin 2 (IL-2 esit in at least three forms which differ in their subunit compositio, their affinity for ligand and their ability to mediate a cellular reponse. Type I receptors occur following cellular acitivation and consist of the 55,000 m. w. glycoprotein Tac. These receptors bind IL-2 with a low affinity, do not internalize ligand and have not been definitively associated with any response. Type II receptors, on the other hand, conssit of one or more glycoproteins of 70,000 m. w. which have been termed "beta ([beta] chains." They bind IL-2 with an intermediate affinity and rapidly internalize the ligand. [Beta] proteins mediate many cellular IL-2-dependent reponses, including the short-term activation of natural killer cells and the induction of Tac protein expression. Type III receptors consist of a ternary complex of the Tac protein, the [beta] chain(s and IL-2. They are characterized by a paricularly high affinity for ligand association. Type III receptors also internalize ligand and mediate IL-2-dependent responses at low factor concentrations. The identification of two independent IL-2-binding molecules, Tac and [beta], thus provides the elusive molecular explanation for the differences in IL-2 receptor affinity and suggests the potential for selective therapeutic manipulation of IL-2 reponses.

  1. Structure-Function Relationship of Hydrophiidae Postsynaptic Neurotoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-03-11

    Fulde, G. (1987) Clin. Dermatology 5: 118. Tu, A. T. (1985) Detection of the sulfhydryl group in proteins by raman scattering spectroscopic method. J...properties of novel forms lacking tryptophan. J. Biochem. 85: 379-388. Yu, N. T., Lin, T. S., and Tu, A. T. (1975) Laser Raman scattering uf neurotoxins...hardwickii), binds tightly and specifically to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) inhibiting neumuscular transmission and results in muscular

  2. Receptor mutagenesis strategies for examination of structure-function relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blomenröhr, Marion; Vischer, Henry F; Bogerd, Jan

    2004-01-01

    This chapter describes three different strategies of receptor mutagenesis with their advantages, disadvantages, and limitations. Oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis using either the Altered Sites II in vitro mutagenesis system or the GeneTailor site-directed mutagenesis system can generate base

  3. Protein kinase CK2 structure-function relationship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boldyreff, B; Meggio, F; Pinna, L A

    1994-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 subunits alpha and beta were expressed either separately or together in a bacterial expression system (pT7-7/BL21(DE3)) and purified to homogeneity. After mixing the subunits, a CK2 holoenzyme (alpha 2 beta 2) was spontaneously reconstituted, which displays identical features...... subunit have been prepared and assayed for their ability to assemble with the catalytic alpha subunit to give a fully competent CK2 holoenzyme. The beta subunit contains an acidic stretch (amino acid 55-64), which is obviously responsible for a negative control of enzyme activity since mutations...

  4. Structure-function relationships during transgenic telomerase expression in Arabidopsis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zachová, D.; Fojtová, Miloslava; Dvořáčková, Martina; Mozgová, I.; Lermontova, I.; Peška, Vratislav; Schubert, I.; Fajkus, Jiří; Sýkorová, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 149, č. 1 (2013), s. 114-126 ISSN 0031-9317 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500040801; GA ČR(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : RNA-BINDING DOMAIN * REVERSE-TRANSCRIPTASE * NUCLEOLAR LOCALIZATION Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.262, year: 2013

  5. Structure-function relationships in sapwood water transport and storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbara L. Gartner; Frederick C. Meinzer

    2005-01-01

    Primary production by plants requires the loss of substantial quantities of water when the stomata are open for carbon assimilation. The delivery of that water to the leaves occurs through the xylem. The structure, condition, and quantity of the xylem control not only the transport efficiency but also the release of water from storage. For example, if there is high...

  6. Network-level structure-function relationships in human neocortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miŝic, Bratislav; Betzel, Richard F.; De Reus, Marcel A.; Van Den Heuvel, Martijn P.; Berman, Marc G.; McIntosh, Anthony R.; Sporns, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of spontaneous fluctuations in neural activity are shaped by underlying patterns of anatomical connectivity. While numerous studies have demonstrated edge-wise correspondence between structural and functional connections, much less is known about how large-scale coherent functional

  7. Glucoamylase: structure/function relationships, and protein engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sauer, J; Sigurskjold, B W; Christensen, U

    2000-01-01

    the starch-binding domain folds as an antiparallel beta-barrel and has two binding sites for starch or beta-cyclodextrin. Certain glucoamylases are widely applied industrially in the manufacture of glucose and fructose syrups. For more than a decade mutational investigations of glucoamylase have addressed......Glucoamylases are inverting exo-acting starch hydrolases releasing beta-glucose from the non-reducing ends of starch and related substrates. The majority of glucoamylases are multidomain enzymes consisting of a catalytic domain connected to a starch-binding domain by an O-glycosylated linker region...

  8. Structure function relationship of recombinant sRAGE

    OpenAIRE

    Premaratne, Dinamithra Gedara Sujeewani Rasika

    2017-01-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) is a member of the immunoglobulin super family of cell surface receptors. It acts as the direct mediator of physiological and pathological responses such as inflammation, chemotaxis, neurite outgrowth, angiogenesis, apoptosis and proliferation. RAGE is known to bind with structurally and functionally diverse ligands, such as advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), high mobility group family proteins including HMGB-1/amphoterin, matrix pr...

  9. Structure-Function Based Molecular Relationships in Ewing's Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Ewing's Sarcoma Oncogene (ews) on chromosome 22q12 is encoding a ubiquitously expressed RNA-binding protein (EWS) with unknown function that is target of tumor-specific chromosomal translocations in Ewing's sarcoma family of tumors. A model of transcription complex was proposed in which the heterodimer Rpb4/7 binds to EAD, connecting it to Core RNA Pol II. The DNA-binding domain, provided by EFP, is bound to the promoter. Rpb4/7 binds RNA, stabilizing the transcription complex. The complex Rpb4/7 can stabilize the preinitiation complexes by converting the conformation of RNA Pol II. EWS may change its conformation, so that NTD becomes accessible. Two different mechanisms of interaction between EWS and RNA Pol II are proposed: (I) an intermolecular EWS-EWS interaction between two molecules, pushing conformation from “closed” to “open” state, or (II) an intramolecular interaction inside the molecule of EWS, pushing conformation of the molecule from “closed” to “open” state. The modified forms of EWS may interact with Pol II subunits hsRpb5 and hsRpb7. The EWS and EFPs binding partners are described schematically in a model, an attempt to link the transcription with the splicing. The proposed model helps to understand the functional molecular interactions in cancer, to find new partners and ways to treat cancer. PMID:25688366

  10. The structure-function relationship of the enterovirus 3'-UTR.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zoll, J.; Heus, H.A.; Kuppeveld, F.J.M. van; Melchers, W.J.G.

    2009-01-01

    Essential processes in living cells are carried out by large complex assemblies, which typically consist of a large number of proteins and frequently also contain nucleic acids, mostly RNA [Alberts, B., 1998. The cell as a collection of protein machines: preparing the next generation of molecular

  11. Summary of the Photon Structure Functions - Measurements at LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przybycien, M.

    2002-01-01

    The present status of the photon structure functions measurements at LEP is discussed. The short introduction to the kinematics and theoretical framework of the structure functions measurements at LEP is given first. Then follow presentations of the most important measurements, ranging from the QED photon structure function, through the hadronic structure functions of real and virtual photons, and at the end the first measurement of the electron structure function is shown. (author)

  12. Oblique photon expansion of QED structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chahine, C.

    1986-01-01

    In the oblique photon expansion, the collinear part of photon emission is summed up to all orders in perturbation theory. The number of oblique or non-collinear photons is the expansion order. Unlike in perturbation theory, every term of the expansion is both infrared finite and gauge invariant. The zero oblique photon contribution to the electromagnetic structure tensor in QED is computed in detail. The behaviors of the structure functions F1 and F2 are discussed in the soft and ultra-soft limits

  13. Data Mining Application in Customer Relationship Management for Hospital Inpatients

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Eun Whan

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study aims to discover patients loyal to a hospital and model their medical service usage patterns. Consequently, this study proposes a data mining application in customer relationship management (CRM) for hospital inpatients. Methods A recency, frequency, monetary (RFM) model has been applied toward 14,072 patients discharged from a university hospital. Cluster analysis was conducted to segment customers, and it modeled the patterns of the loyal customers' medical services us...

  14. Measurement of the nucleon structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, B.A.; Loomis, W.A.; Pipkin, F.M.; Pordes, S.H.; Sessoms, A.L.; Shambroom, W.D.; Tao, C.; Verhey, L.J.; Wilson, R.; Anderson, H.L.; Fine, R.M.; Heisterberg, R.H.; Kinnison, W.W.; Matis, H.S.; Mo, L.W.; Myrianthopoulos, L.C.; Wright, S.C.; Francis, W.R.; Hicks, R.G.; Kirk, T.B.W.; Quirk, T.W.; Bharadwaj, V.K.; Booth, N.E.; Kirkbride, G.I.; Proudfoot, J.; Skuja, A.; Staton, M.A.; Williams, W.S.C.

    1979-01-01

    Measurements have been made of the inclusive scattering of 96, 147, and 219 GeV muons from hydrogen, and of 147 GeV muons from deuterium. Results are presented for the nucleon structure function F 2 (x,Q 2 ) [equivalentνW 2 (x,Q 2 )] for 10 2 2 . The value of F 2 rises with Q 2 at small x, and falls with Q 2 at large x, in agreement with the ideas of quantum chromodynamics. An average value of the ratio sigma/sub L//sigma/sub T/ equivalent R = 0.52 +- 0.35 has been obtained for the region 0.003 2 2 . The values of F 2 from this experiment have been combined with those from other charged-lepton scattering experiments to determine moments of the structure functions. The variation with Q 2 of these moments is used to derive values for Λ, taking into account corrections up to second order in α/sub s/. The fit to the data is very good

  15. Measuring structure functions at SSC energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morfin, J.G.; Owens, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    Topics discussed include measuring Λ, tests of QCD using hard scattering processes, and measuring parton distributions. In each case, any opportunities and advantages afforded by the unique features of the SSC are emphasized. The working group on structure functions was charged with investigating two specific questions: (1) How well are the various parton distributions known in the kinematic region relevant to calculations for the SSC. (2) What new information can be learned about parton distributions at the SSC. Especially for this working group, the advantages of having a fixed-target facility at the SSC for the measurement of the parton distributions with multi-TeV leptons, were to be examined. 15 references

  16. Threshold resummation of the structure function FL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moch, S.; Vogt, A.

    2009-02-01

    The behaviour of the quark coefficient function for the longitudinal structure function F L in deepinelastic scattering is investigated for large values of the Bjorken variable x. We combine a highly plausible conjecture on the large-x limit of the physical evolution kernel for this quantity with our explicit three-loop results to derive the coefficients of the three leading large-x logarithms, α s n ln 2n-1-k (1-x), k=1,2,3, to all orders in the strong coupling constant α s . Corresponding results are derived for the non-C F part of the gluon coefficient function suppressed by a factor 1-x, and for the analogous subleading (1-x)ln k (1-x) contributions in the quark case. Our results appear to indicate an obstacle for an exponentiation with a higher logarithmic accuracy. (orig.)

  17. QCD dipole prediction for dis and diffractive structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royon, CH.

    1996-01-01

    The F 2 , F G , R = F L /F T proton structure functions are derived in the QCD dipole picture of BFKL dynamics. We get a three parameter fit describing the 1994 H1 proton structure function F 2 data in the low x, moderate Q 2 range. Without any additional parameter, the gluon density and the longitudinal structure functions are predicted. The diffractive dissociation processes are also discussed, and a new prediction for the proton diffractive structure function is obtained. (author)

  18. Photon-photon collisions and photon structure functions at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Patt, J

    2000-01-01

    The present knowledge of the structure of the photon based on measurements of photon structure functions is discussed. This review covers recent results on QED structure functions and on the hadronic structure function F/sub 2//sup gamma /. (13 refs).

  19. QCD predictions for weak neutral current structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Jimin

    1987-01-01

    Employing the analytic expression (to the next leading order) for non-singlet component of structure function which the author got from QCD theory and putting recent experiment result of neutral current structure function at Q 2 = 11 (GeV/C) 2 as input, the QCD prediction for neutral current structure function of their scaling violation behaviours was given

  20. An approach to the structure function for nucleon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long Ming

    1986-01-01

    The structure function for nucleon is discussed by using the method given in a previous paper. The formula are compared with the experimental data from low Q 2 to high Q 2 . The results show that the way that the structure function for nucleon can be obtained from the hadronic wavefunction is a possible approach of investigating structure functions for hadron

  1. QCD dipole predictions for DIS and diffractive structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royon, C.

    1997-01-01

    The proton structure function F 2 , the gluon density F G , and the longitudinal structure function F L are derived in the QCD dipole picture of BFKL dynamics. We use a three parameter fit to describe the 1994 H1 proton structure function F 2 data in the low x, moderate Q 2 range. Without any additional parameter, the gluon density and the longitudinal structure functions are predicted. The diffractive dissociation processes are also discussed within the same framework, and a new prediction for the proton diffractive structure function is obtained

  2. Combining vibrational biomolecular spectroscopy with chemometric techniques for the study of response and sensitivity of molecular structures/functional groups mainly related to lipid biopolymer to various processing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Gloria Qingyu; Yu, Peiqiang

    2015-09-01

    The objectives of this project were to (1) combine vibrational spectroscopy with chemometric multivariate techniques to determine the effect of processing applications on molecular structural changes of lipid biopolymer that mainly related to functional groups in green- and yellow-type Crop Development Centre (CDC) pea varieties [CDC strike (green-type) vs. CDC meadow (yellow-type)] that occurred during various processing applications; (2) relatively quantify the effect of processing applications on the antisymmetric CH3 ("CH3as") and CH2 ("CH2as") (ca. 2960 and 2923 cm(-1), respectively), symmetric CH3 ("CH3s") and CH2 ("CH2s") (ca. 2873 and 2954 cm(-1), respectively) functional groups and carbonyl C=O ester (ca. 1745 cm(-1)) spectral intensities as well as their ratios of antisymmetric CH3 to antisymmetric CH2 (ratio of CH3as to CH2as), ratios of symmetric CH3 to symmetric CH2 (ratio of CH3s to CH2s), and ratios of carbonyl C=O ester peak area to total CH peak area (ratio of C=O ester to CH); and (3) illustrate non-invasive techniques to detect the sensitivity of individual molecular functional group to the various processing applications in the recently developed different types of pea varieties. The hypothesis of this research was that processing applications modified the molecular structure profiles in the processed products as opposed to original unprocessed pea seeds. The results showed that the different processing methods had different impacts on lipid molecular functional groups. Different lipid functional groups had different sensitivity to various heat processing applications. These changes were detected by advanced molecular spectroscopy with chemometric techniques which may be highly related to lipid utilization and availability. The multivariate molecular spectral analyses, cluster analysis, and principal component analysis of original spectra (without spectral parameterization) are unable to fully distinguish the structural differences in the

  3. Customer relationship management: Modern aspects of information technology application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soldić-Aleksić Jasna

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of Customer Relationship Management has emerged around the maxim on the essential importance of the customers for business success of the company. The vital role in the concept development is assigned to an employment of the various information communication technologies: in the scope of operational CRM that is the application of Internet technologies, web browsers, e-mails, POS terminals, call centers; on the other side, analytical CRM involves activities such as data mining, web mining, click stream analysis etc. Modern tendencies in the development of information-communication technologies have generated new communication models between company and its customers, therefore companies are not only focused on the products and services, but also on the communication channels and techniques with customers. On that ground many companies are accepting and using new tools belonging to the web 2.0 technologies which have produced the new CRM model - CRM 2.0.

  4. Some hybrid models applicable to dose-response relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumazawa, Shigeru

    1992-01-01

    A new type of models of dose-response relationships has been studied as an initial stage to explore a reliable extrapolation of the relationships decided by high dose data to the range of low dose covered by radiation protection. The approach is to use a 'hybrid scale' of linear and logarithmic scales; the first model is that the normalized surviving fraction (ρ S > 0) in a hybrid scale decreases linearly with dose in a linear scale, and the second is that the induction in a log scale increases linearly with the normalized dose (τ D > 0) in a hybrid scale. The hybrid scale may reflect an overall effectiveness of a complex system against adverse events caused by various agents. Some data of leukemia in the atomic bomb survivors and of rodent experiments were used to show the applicability of hybrid scale models. The results proved that proposed models fit these data not less than the popular linear-quadratic models, providing the possible interpretation of shapes of dose-response curves, e.g. shouldered survival curves varied by recovery time. (author)

  5. The primate fovea: Structure, function and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringmann, Andreas; Syrbe, Steffen; Görner, Katja; Kacza, Johannes; Francke, Mike; Wiedemann, Peter; Reichenbach, Andreas

    2018-03-30

    A fovea is a pitted invagination in the inner retinal tissue (fovea interna) that overlies an area of photoreceptors specialized for high acuity vision (fovea externa). Although the shape of the vertebrate fovea varies considerably among the species, there are two basic types. The retina of many predatory fish, reptilians, and birds possess one (or two) convexiclivate fovea(s), while the retina of higher primates contains a concaviclivate fovea. By refraction of the incoming light, the convexiclivate fovea may function as image enlarger, focus indicator, and movement detector. By centrifugal displacement of the inner retinal layers, which increases the transparency of the central foveal tissue (the foveola), the primate fovea interna improves the quality of the image received by the central photoreceptors. In this review, we summarize ‒ with the focus on Müller cells of the human and macaque fovea ‒ data regarding the structure of the primate fovea, discuss various aspects of the optical function of the fovea, and propose a model of foveal development. The "Müller cell cone" of the foveola comprises specialized Müller cells which do not support neuronal activity but may serve optical and structural functions. In addition to the "Müller cell cone", structural stabilization of the foveal morphology may be provided by the 'z-shaped' Müller cells of the fovea walls, via exerting tractional forces onto Henle fibers. The spatial distribution of glial fibrillary acidic protein may suggest that the foveola and the Henle fiber layer are subjects to mechanical stress. During development, the foveal pit is proposed to be formed by a vertical contraction of the centralmost Müller cells. After widening of the foveal pit likely mediated by retracting astrocytes, Henle fibers are formed by horizontal contraction of Müller cell processes in the outer plexiform layer and the centripetal displacement of photoreceptors. A better understanding of the molecular, cellular

  6. Data mining application in customer relationship management for hospital inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun Whan

    2012-09-01

    This study aims to discover patients loyal to a hospital and model their medical service usage patterns. Consequently, this study proposes a data mining application in customer relationship management (CRM) for hospital inpatients. A recency, frequency, monetary (RFM) model has been applied toward 14,072 patients discharged from a university hospital. Cluster analysis was conducted to segment customers, and it modeled the patterns of the loyal customers' medical services usage via a decision tree. Patients were divided into two groups according to the variables of the RFM model and the group which had significantly high frequency of medical use and expenses was defined as loyal customers, a target market. As a result of the decision tree, the predictable factors of the loyal clients were; length of stay, certainty of selectable treatment, surgery, number of accompanying treatments, kind of patient room, and department from which they were discharged. Particularly, this research showed that when a patient within the internal medicine department who did not have surgery stayed for more than 13.5 days, their probability of being a classified as a loyal customer was 70.0%. To discover a hospital's loyal patients and model their medical usage patterns, the application of data-mining has been suggested. This paper suggests practical use of combining segmentation, targeting, positioning (STP) strategy and the RFM model with data-mining in CRM.

  7. Data Mining Application in Customer Relationship Management for Hospital Inpatients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study aims to discover patients loyal to a hospital and model their medical service usage patterns. Consequently, this study proposes a data mining application in customer relationship management (CRM) for hospital inpatients. Methods A recency, frequency, monetary (RFM) model has been applied toward 14,072 patients discharged from a university hospital. Cluster analysis was conducted to segment customers, and it modeled the patterns of the loyal customers' medical services usage via a decision tree. Results Patients were divided into two groups according to the variables of the RFM model and the group which had significantly high frequency of medical use and expenses was defined as loyal customers, a target market. As a result of the decision tree, the predictable factors of the loyal clients were; length of stay, certainty of selectable treatment, surgery, number of accompanying treatments, kind of patient room, and department from which they were discharged. Particularly, this research showed that when a patient within the internal medicine department who did not have surgery stayed for more than 13.5 days, their probability of being a classified as a loyal customer was 70.0%. Conclusions To discover a hospital's loyal patients and model their medical usage patterns, the application of data-mining has been suggested. This paper suggests practical use of combining segmentation, targeting, positioning (STP) strategy and the RFM model with data-mining in CRM. PMID:23115740

  8. Nucleon structure functions, resonance form factors, and duality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidovsky, V.V.; Struminsky, B.V.

    2003-01-01

    The behavior of nucleon structure functions in the resonance region is explored. For form factors that describe resonance production, expressions are obtained that are dependent on the photon virtuality Q 2 , which have a correct threshold behavior, and which take into account available experimental data on resonance decay. Resonance contributions to nucleon structure functions are calculated. The resulting expressions are used to investigate quark-hadron duality in electron-nucleon scattering by taking the example of the structure function F 2

  9. Nuclear enhanced power corrections to DIS structure functions

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Xiaofeng; Qiu, Jianwei; Zhu, Wei

    2001-01-01

    We calculate nuclear enhanced power corrections to structure functions measured in deeply inelastic lepton-nucleus scattering in Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). We find that the nuclear medium enhanced power corrections at order of $O(\\alpha_s/Q^2)$ enhance the longitudinal structure function $F_L$, and suppress the transverse structure function $F_1$. We demonstrate that strong nuclear effects in $\\sigma_A/\\sigma_D$ and $R_A/R_D$, recently observed by HERMES Collaboration, can be explained in ...

  10. A possible form of the pion's structure function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long Ming; Huang Tao

    1986-01-01

    The pion's structure function behaviour is discussed by using the Fock state expansion of the hadronic wave function in QCD in this paper. As an example, we employ a model wave function of the Fock state in the light-cone and assume a Regge behaviour of a weight function for higher Fock states, and we get a possible form of the pion's structure function. This form is consistent with experimental data of the pion's structure function

  11. Second-order QCD analysis of the photon structure function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoniadis, I.; Grunberg, G.

    1983-01-01

    The QCD predictions for the photon structure function are reexamined with particular emphasis on the small-x behavior. A simple parametrization of the real photon structure function, free of 1/x singularity, is derived. The structure function is found to be sensitive at small x to the non-perturbatively calculable constant term in the n=2 moment, and we show that the problem of a negative structure function can be solved on the basis of the knowledge of this single non-perturbative parameter. (orig.)

  12. Analysis of the proton longitudinal structure function from the gluon distribution function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boroun, G.R.; Rezaei, B.

    2012-01-01

    We make a critical, next-to-leading order, study of the relationship between the longitudinal structure function F L and the gluon distribution proposed in Cooper-Sarkar et al. (Z. Phys. C 39:281, 1988; Acta Phys. Pol. B 34:2911 2003), which is frequently used to extract the gluon distribution from the proton longitudinal structure function at small x. The gluon density is obtained by expanding at particular choices of the point of expansion and compared with the hard Pomeron behavior for the gluon density. Comparisons with H1 data are made and predictions for the proposed best approach are also provided. (orig.)

  13. Dynamical behavior connection of the gluon distribution and the proton structure function at small x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boroun, G.R.

    2014-01-01

    We make a critical study of the relationship between the singlet structure function F 2 S and the gluon distribution G(x,Q 2 ) proposed in the past two decades, which is frequently used to extract the gluon distribution from the proton structure function. We show that a simple relation is not generally valid in the simplest state. We complete this relation by using a Laplace transform method and hard-pomeron behavior at LO and NLO at small x. Our study shows that this relation is dependent on the splitting functions and initial conditions at Q 2 =Q 2 0 and running coupling constant at NLO. The resulting analytic expression allows us to predict the proton structure function with respect to the gluon distributions and to compare the results with H1 data and a QCD analysis fit. Comparisons with other results are made and predictions for the proposed best approach are also provided. (orig.)

  14. MRI in Optic Neuritis: Structure, Function, Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglø, Dan

    2011-01-01

    resonance imaging (MRI), and the visual evoked potential (VEP) continues to show a delayed P100 indicating persistent demyelination. The explanation for this apparent discrepancy between structure and function could be due to either a redundancy in the visual pathways so that some degree of signal loss...... will have very few or no clinical symptoms, or it could be due to compensatory mechanisms in the visual pathway or the visual cortex. In order to understand the pathophysiology and recovery processes in ON it is essential to have sensitive methods to asses both structure and function. These methods...... are low. Functional MRI (fMRI) is a non-invasive technique that can measure brain activity with a high spatial resolution. Recently, technical and methodological advancements have made it feasible to record VEPs and fMRI simultaneously and the relationship between averaged VEPs and averaged fMRI signals...

  15. Comparison of parton distributions and structure functions for the proton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Charchula, K.; Krawczyk, M.; Levy, A.

    1990-09-01

    A comparative study of the most popular parton parametrizations is presented. The individual parton distributions as well as the F 2 structure function are discussed with a particular emphasis on the low x region, 10 -4 -2 . The predictions of these parametrizations for the F 2 structure function have a wide spread which persists also in the HERA kinematical region. (orig.)

  16. [Prostate cancer microenvironment: Its structure, functions and therapeutic applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorion, R; Bladou, F; Spatz, A; van Kempen, L; Irani, J

    2016-06-01

    In the field of prostate cancer there is a growing tendency for more and more studies to emphasise the predominant role of the zone situated between the tumour and the host: the tumour microenvironment. The aim of this article is to describe the structure and the functions of the prostate cancer microenvironment as well as the principal treatments that are being applied to it. PubMed and ScienceDirect databases have been interrogated using the association of keywords "tumour microenvironment" and "neoplasm therapy" along with "microenvironnement tumoral" and "traitements". Of the 593 articles initially found, 50 were finally included. The tumour microenvironment principally includes host elements that are diverted from their primary functions and encourage the development of the tumour. In it we find immunity cells, support tissue as well as vascular and lymphatic neovascularization. Highlighting the major role played by this microenvironment has led to the development of specific treatments, notably antiangiogenic therapy and immunotherapy. The tumour microenvironment, the tumour and the host influence themselves mutually and create a variable situation over time. Improvement of the knowledge of the prostate cancer microenvironment gradually enables us to pass from an approach centred on the tumour to a broader approach to the whole tumoral ecosystem. This enabled the emergence of new treatments whose place in the therapeutic arsenal still need to be found. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Antitumor Lipids--Structure, Functions, and Medical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostadinova, Aneliya; Topouzova-Hristova, Tanya; Momchilova, Albena; Tzoneva, Rumiana; Berger, Martin R

    2015-01-01

    Cell proliferation and metastasis are considered hallmarks of tumor progression. Therefore, efforts have been made to develop novel anticancer drugs that inhibit both the proliferation and the motility of tumor cells. Synthetic antitumor lipids (ATLs), which are chemically divided into two main classes, comprise (i) alkylphospholipids (APLs) and (ii) alkylphosphocholines (APCs). They represent a new entity of drugs with distinct antiproliferative properties in tumor cells. These compounds do not interfere with the DNA or mitotic spindle apparatus of the cell, instead, they incorporate into cell membranes, where they accumulate and interfere with lipid metabolism and lipid-dependent signaling pathways. Recently, it has been shown that the most commonly studied APLs inhibit proliferation by inducing apoptosis in malignant cells while leaving normal cells unaffected and are potent sensitizers of conventional chemo- and radiotherapy, as well as of electrical field therapy. APLs resist catabolic degradation to a large extent, therefore accumulate in the cell and interfere with lipid-dependent survival signaling pathways, notably PI3K-Akt and Raf-Erk1/2, and de novo phospholipid biosynthesis. They are internalized in the cell membrane via raft domains and cause downstream reactions as inhibition of cell growth and migration, cell cycle arrest, actin stress fibers collapse, and apoptosis. This review summarizes the in vitro, in vivo, and clinical trials of most common ATLs and their mode of action at molecular and biochemical levels. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Proteins with Novel Structure, Function and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a small enzyme that ligates two RNA fragments with the rate of 10(exp 6) above background was evolved in vitro (Seelig and Szostak, Nature 448:828-831, 2007). This enzyme does not resemble any contemporary protein (Chao et al., Nature Chem. Biol. 9:81-83, 2013). It consists of a dynamic, catalytic loop, a small, rigid core containing two zinc ions coordinated by neighboring amino acids, and two highly flexible tails that might be unimportant for protein function. In contrast to other proteins, this enzyme does not contain ordered secondary structure elements, such as alpha-helix or beta-sheet. The loop is kept together by just two interactions of a charged residue and a histidine with a zinc ion, which they coordinate on the opposite side of the loop. Such structure appears to be very fragile. Surprisingly, computer simulations indicate otherwise. As the coordinating, charged residue is mutated to alanine, another, nearby charged residue takes its place, thus keeping the structure nearly intact. If this residue is also substituted by alanine a salt bridge involving two other, charged residues on the opposite sides of the loop keeps the loop in place. These adjustments are facilitated by high flexibility of the protein. Computational predictions have been confirmed experimentally, as both mutants retain full activity and overall structure. These results challenge our notions about what is required for protein activity and about the relationship between protein dynamics, stability and robustness. We hypothesize that small, highly dynamic proteins could be both active and fault tolerant in ways that many other proteins are not, i.e. they can adjust to retain their structure and activity even if subjected to mutations in structurally critical regions. This opens the doors for designing proteins with novel functions, structures and dynamics that have not been yet considered.

  19. Unbiased determination of the proton structure function F2p with faithful uncertainty estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Debbio, Luigi; Forte, Stefano; Latorre, Jose I.; Rojo, Joan; Piccione, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    We construct a parametrization of the deep-inelastic structure function of the proton F 2 (x,Q 2 ) based on all available experimental information from charged lepton deep-inelastic scattering experiments. The parametrization effectively provides a bias-free determination of the probability measure in the space of structure functions, which retains information on experimental errors and correlations. The result is obtained in the form of a Monte Carlo sample of neural networks trained on an ensemble of replicas of the experimental data. We discuss in detail the techniques required for the construction of bias-free parameterizations of large amounts of structure function data, in view of future applications to the determination of parton distributions based on the same method. (author)

  20. Deep inelastic structure functions in the chiral bag model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanjose, V.; Vento, V.; Centro Mixto CSIC/Valencia Univ., Valencia

    1989-01-01

    We calculate the structure functions for deep inelastic scattering on baryons in the cavity approximation to the chiral bag model. The behavior of these structure functions is analyzed in the Bjorken limit. We conclude that scaling is satisfied, but not Regge behavior. A trivial extension as a parton model can be achieved by introducing the structure function for the pion in a convolution picture. In this extended version of the model not only scaling but also Regge behavior is satisfied. Conclusions are drawn from the comparison of our results with experimental data. (orig.)

  1. Deep inelastic structure functions in the chiral bag model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanjose, V. (Valencia Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Didactica de las Ciencias Experimentales); Vento, V. (Valencia Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Teorica; Centro Mixto CSIC/Valencia Univ., Valencia (Spain). Inst. de Fisica Corpuscular)

    1989-10-02

    We calculate the structure functions for deep inelastic scattering on baryons in the cavity approximation to the chiral bag model. The behavior of these structure functions is analyzed in the Bjorken limit. We conclude that scaling is satisfied, but not Regge behavior. A trivial extension as a parton model can be achieved by introducing the structure function for the pion in a convolution picture. In this extended version of the model not only scaling but also Regge behavior is satisfied. Conclusions are drawn from the comparison of our results with experimental data. (orig.).

  2. Deep inelastic singlet structure functions and scaling violation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen-zhu, Li; Bing-xun, Hu

    1984-02-01

    The flavour singlet structure functions of deep inelastic scattering processes can yield more decisive tests of QCD than the non-singlet. We give analytical expression for flavour singlet structure functions through analysing the lepton-nucleon deep inelastic scattering processes by means of QCD and using Jacobi polynomials. This expression contains 4 to 5 parameters and shows the changes of the singlet structure functions with x and Q/sup 2/ very well. In QCD leading order, the conclusion is in reasonable agreement with experimental data.

  3. Characterization of technical surfaces by structure function analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalms, Michael; Kreis, Thomas; Bergmann, Ralf B.

    2018-03-01

    The structure function is a tool for characterizing technical surfaces that exhibits a number of advantages over Fourierbased analysis methods. So it is optimally suited for analyzing the height distributions of surfaces measured by full-field non-contacting methods. The structure function is thus a useful method to extract global or local criteria like e. g. periodicities, waviness, lay, or roughness to analyze and evaluate technical surfaces. After the definition of line- and area-structure function and offering effective procedures for their calculation this paper presents examples using simulated and measured data of technical surfaces including aircraft parts.

  4. Towards a lattice calculation of the nucleon structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goeckeler, M.; Ilgenfritz, M.; Perlt, H.; Rakow, P.; Schierholz, G.; Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH; Schiller, A.

    1994-12-01

    We have initiated a programme to compute the lower moments of the unpolarised and polarised deep inelastic structure functions of the nucleon in the quenched approxiation. We review our progress to date. (orig.)

  5. Nonlinear correction to the longitudinal structure function at small x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boroun, G.R.

    2010-01-01

    We computed the longitudinal proton structure function F L , using the nonlinear Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi (NLDGLAP) evolution equation approach at small x. For the gluon distribution, the nonlinear effects are related to the longitudinal structure function. As the very small-x behavior of the gluon distribution is obtained by solving the Gribov, Levin, Ryskin, Mueller and Qiu (GLR-MQ) evolution equation with the nonlinear shadowing term incorporated, we show that the strong rise that corresponds to the linear QCD evolution equations can be tamed by screening effects. Consequently, the obtained longitudinal structure function shows a tamed growth at small x. We computed the predictions for all details of the nonlinear longitudinal structure function in the kinematic range where it has been measured by the H1 Collaboration and made comparisons with the computation by Moch, Vermaseren and Vogt at the second order with input data from the MRST QCD fit. (orig.)

  6. Structure functions in electron-nucleon deep inelastic scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleem, M.; Fazal-E-Aleem (University of the Punjab, Lahore (Pakistan). Dept. of Physics)

    1982-06-26

    The phenomenological expressions for the structure functions in electron-nucleon deep inelastic scattering are proposed and are shown to satisfy the experimental data as well as a number of sum rules.

  7. Experimental investigation of Lagrangian structure functions in turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Jacob; Ott, Søren; Mann, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    Lagrangian properties obtained from a particle tracking velocimetry experiment in a turbulent flow at intermediate Reynolds number are presented. Accurate sampling of particle trajectories is essential in order to obtain the Lagrangian structure functions and to measure intermittency at small...

  8. Proton structure functions in the dipole picture of BFKL dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navelet, H.; Peschanski, R.; Wallon, S.; Royon, Ch.

    1996-06-01

    The proton structure functions are derived in the QCD dipole picture. Assuming k T and renormalization-group factorization, deep-inelastic proton scattering is related to deep-inelastic onium scattering. A three parameter fit of the 1994 H1 data in the low-x, moderate Q 2 range has been obtained. The dipole picture of BFKL dynamics is shown to provide a relevant model for quantitatively describing the proton structure functions at HERA. (author)

  9. An introduction about precise measurements of QED γ structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courau, A.

    1989-11-01

    Pure QED processes are theoretically exactly computable. However precise measurements and theoretical expectations of QED γ structure functions within a given experimental acceptance are not so trivial. Yet such a study is quite interesting. It supplies on the one hand a good QED test and, on the other hand, a good exercise for testing the procedure used for the determination of the hadronic γ structure functions

  10. The photon structure function at large Q2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordier, A.

    1987-01-01

    LEP II offers the unique opportunity to measure the photon structure function over a large Q 2 range up to ∼ 2000 GeV 2 . Two crucial predictions of QCD can be tested in this experiment: the linear rise in log Q 2 as a consequence of asymptotic freedom, and the large renormalization O(1) of the shape of the structure function due to gluon bremsstrahlung, unperturbed by higher-twist effects

  11. The Relationship between Cost Leadership Strategy, Total Quality Management Applications and Financial Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali KURT

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Firms need to implement some competition strategies and total quality management applications to overcome the fierce competition among others. The purpose of this study is to show the relationship between cost leadership strategy, total quality management applications and firms’ financial performance with literature review and empirical analysis. 449 questionnaires were conducted to the managers of 142 big firms. The data gathered was assessed with AMOS. As a result, the relationship between cost leadership strategy, total quality management applications and firms’ financial performance has been gathered. In addition, the relationship between TQM applications and financial performance has also been gathered.

  12. The exponent λ (x,Q ) of the proton structure function F (x, Q ) at low ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    from the gluon (g —q¯q) and so the contribution from the quark can be neglected. In the DGLAP formalism an approximate relationship can be obtained between the gluon momentum density G(x,Q2) and the logarithmic slope of the structure function F2(x,Q2). There are several such relations [6–8] available in the literature.

  13. R-Function Relationships for Application in the Fractional Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Hartley, Tom T.

    2000-01-01

    The F-function, and its generalization the R-function, are of fundamental importance in the fractional calculus. It has been shown that the solution of the fundamental linear fractional differential equation may be expressed in terms of these functions. These functions serve as generalizations of the exponential function in the solution of fractional differential equations. Because of this central role in the fractional calculus, this paper explores various intrarelationships of the R-function, which will be useful in further analysis. Relationships of the R-function to the common exponential function, e(t), and its fractional derivatives are shown. From the relationships developed, some important approximations are observed. Further, the inverse relationships of the exponential function, el, in terms of the R-function are developed. Also, some approximations for the R-function are developed.

  14. A Review of the Factors Off-Putting the Application of Relationship ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The current dominance of relationship marketing (RM) literature does notimply that its application in modern business operations is withoutlimitations. In fact, its successful application by firms in some advancedeconomies does not mean that its application is guaranteed in developingcountries. Observing this, this study ...

  15. Renormalized sum rules for structure functions of heavy meson decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grozin, A.G.; Korchemsky, G.P.

    1996-01-01

    We consider the properties of the structure functions of inclusive heavy meson decays B→X c and treat the c quark mass as a free parameter. We show that in two extreme cases of heavy and light c quarks the structure functions of heavy-heavy and heavy-light transitions are given by a Fourier transform of the matrix elements of Wilson lines containing a timelike and a lightlike segment, correspondingly. Using the renormalization properties of Wilson lines we find the dependence of the structure functions on the factorization scale, the structure function of the heavy-heavy transition is renormalized multiplicatively, while that of the heavy-light transition obeys the GLAP-type evolution equation. We propose a generalization of the sum rules for the moments of the structure functions (Bjorken, Voloshin, and the open-quote open-quote third close-quote close-quote sum rules) with a soft exponential factorization cutoff, which correctly incorporates both perturbative and nonperturbative effects. We analyze nonperturbative corrections by first considering infrared renormalon contributions to the Wilson lines. Uncertainties induced by the leading renormalon pole at u=1/2 are exactly canceled by a similar uncertainty in the heavy quark pole mass. The leading nonperturbative corrections associated with the next renormalon at u=1 are parametrized by the matrix element μ π 2 which is proportional to the heavy quark kinetic energy. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  16. Structure functions of hadrons in the QCD effective theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shigetani, Takayuki

    1996-01-01

    We study the structure functions of hadrons with the low energy effective theory of QCD. We try to clarify a link between the low energy effective theory, where non-perturbative dynamics is essential, and the high energy deep inelastic scattering experiment. We calculate the leading twist matrix elements of the structure function at the low energy model scale within the effective theory. Calculated structure functions are evoluted to the high momentum scale with the help of the perturbative QCD, and compared with the experimental data. Through the comparison of the model calculations with the experiment, we discuss how the non-perturbative dynamics of the effective theory is reflected in the deep inelastic phenomena. We first evaluate the structure functions of the pseudoscalar mesons using the NJL model. The resulting structure functions show reasonable agreements with experiments. We study then the quark distribution functions of the nucleon using a covariant quark-diquark model. We calculate three leading twist distribution functions, spin-independent f 1 (x), longitudinal spin distribution g 1 (x), and chiral-odd transversity spin distribution h 1 (x). The results for f 1 (x) and g 1 (x) turn out to be consistent with available experiments because of the strong spin-0 diquark correlation. (author)

  17. Regge behaviour of structure functions and evolution of gluon structure function upto next-to-leading order at low-x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamil, U.; Sarma, J.K.

    2011-01-01

    Evolution of gluon structure function from Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi (DGLAP) evolution equations upto next-to-leading order at low-x is presented assuming the Regge behaviour of structure functions. We compare our results of gluon structure function with GRV 98 global parameterization and show the compatibility of Regge behaviour of structure functions with PQCD. (author)

  18. Deep-inelastic structure functions in an approximation to the bag theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaffe, R.L.

    1975-01-01

    A cavity approximation to the bag theory developed earlier is extended to the treatment of forward virtual Compton scattering. In the Bjorken limit and for small values of ω (ω = vertical-bar2p center-dot q/q 2 vertical-bar) it is argued that the operator nature of the bag boundaries might be ignored. Structure functions are calculated in one and three dimensions. Bjorken scaling is obtained. The model provides a realization of light-cone current algebra and possesses a parton interpretation. The structure functions show a quasielastic peak. The spreading of the structure functions about the peak is associated with confinement. As expected, Regge behavior is not obtained for large ω. The ''momentum sum rule'' is saturated, indicating that the hadron's charged constituents carry all the momentum in this model. νW/subL/ is found to scale and is calculable. Application of the model to the calculation of spin-dependent and chiral-symmetry--violating structure functions is proposed. The nature of the intermediate states in this approximation is discussed. Problems associated with the cavity approximation are also discussed

  19. Small-x Resummation and HERA Structure Function Data

    CERN Document Server

    Altarelli, Guido; Forte, Stefano; Altarelli, Guido; Ball, Richard D.; Forte, Stefano

    2001-01-01

    We apply our systematic NLO small x resummation of singlet splitting functions to the scaling violations of structure functions and compare the results with data. We develop various theoretical tools which are needed in order to relate resummed parton distributions to measurable structure functions, and we present results from a variety of fits to HERA data for the structure functions F_2 and F_L using the resummation. The behaviour of the singlet splitting functions at small x and fixed Q^2 is effectively parametrized as x^{-lambda}. We find that, for lambda small or negative, the resummed description of scaling violations may be phenomenologically as good as or even better than the standard next-to-leading order treatment. However, the best fit gluon density and value of alpha_s can be significantly modified by the resummation.

  20. Structure functions of longitudinal virtual photons at low virtualities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioffe, B.L.; Shushpanov, I.A.

    1996-01-01

    The structure functions F L 1 and F L 2 of longitudinal virtual photons at low virtualities are calculated in the framework of chiral perturbation theory (ChPT) in the zero and first order of ChPT. It is assumed that the virtuality of a target longitudinal photon p 2 is much less than the virtuality of the hard projectile photon Q 2 and both are less than the characteristic ChPT scale. In this approximation the structure functions are determined by the production of two pions in γγ collisions. The numerical results for F L 2 and F L 1 are presented (the upper index refers to the longitudinal polarization of the virtual target photon). The possibilities of measurements of these structure functions are briefly discussed. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  1. Structure-Function Network Mapping and Its Assessment via Persistent Homology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between brain structure and function is a fundamental problem in network neuroscience. This work deals with the general method of structure-function mapping at the whole-brain level. We formulate the problem as a topological mapping of structure-function connectivity via matrix function, and find a stable solution by exploiting a regularization procedure to cope with large matrices. We introduce a novel measure of network similarity based on persistent homology for assessing the quality of the network mapping, which enables a detailed comparison of network topological changes across all possible thresholds, rather than just at a single, arbitrary threshold that may not be optimal. We demonstrate that our approach can uncover the direct and indirect structural paths for predicting functional connectivity, and our network similarity measure outperforms other currently available methods. We systematically validate our approach with (1) a comparison of regularized vs. non-regularized procedures, (2) a null model of the degree-preserving random rewired structural matrix, (3) different network types (binary vs. weighted matrices), and (4) different brain parcellation schemes (low vs. high resolutions). Finally, we evaluate the scalability of our method with relatively large matrices (2514x2514) of structural and functional connectivity obtained from 12 healthy human subjects measured non-invasively while at rest. Our results reveal a nonlinear structure-function relationship, suggesting that the resting-state functional connectivity depends on direct structural connections, as well as relatively parsimonious indirect connections via polysynaptic pathways. PMID:28046127

  2. 68Ga-Based Radiopharmaceuticals: Production and Application Relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Velikyan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The contribution of 68Ga to the promotion and expansion of clinical research and routine positron emission tomography (PET for earlier better diagnostics and individualized medicine is considerable. The potential applications of 68Ga-comprising imaging agents include targeted, pre-targeted and non-targeted imaging. This review discusses the key aspects of the production of 68Ga and 68Ga-based radiopharmaceuticals in the light of the impact of regulatory requirements and endpoint pre-clinical and clinical applications.

  3. Nucleon structure functions from lattice operator product expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, A.J.; Somfleth, K.; Young, R.D.; Zanotti, J.M. [Adelaide Univ., SA (Australia). CSSM, Dept. of Physics; Horsley, R. [Edinburgh Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Physics and Astronomy; Nakamura, Y. [RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science, Kobe (Japan); Perlt, H.; Schiller, A. [Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Rakow, P.E.L. [Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom). Theoretical Physics Div.; Schierholz, G. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    Deep-inelastic scattering, in the laboratory and on the lattice, is most instructive for understanding how the nucleon is built from quarks and gluons. The long-term goal is to compute the associated structure functions from first principles. So far this has been limited to model calculations. In this Letter we propose a new method to compute the structure functions directly from the virtual, all-encompassing Compton amplitude, utilizing the operator product expansion. This overcomes issues of renormalization and operator mixing, which so far have hindered lattice calculations of power corrections and higher moments.

  4. Photon structure functions with heavy particle mass effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uematsu, Tsuneo, E-mail: uematsu@scphys.kyoto-u.jp [Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-8502 (Japan); Maskawa Institute for Science and Culture, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kamigamo, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    In the framework of the perturbative QCD we investigate heavy particle mass effects on the unpolarized and polarized photon structure functions, F{sub 2}{sup γ} and g{sub 1}{sup γ}, respectively. We present our basic formalism to treat heavy particle mass effects to NLO in perturbative QCD. We also study heavy quark effects on the QCD sum rule for the first moment of g{sub 1}{sup γ}, which is related to axial anomaly. The photon structure function in supersymmetric QCD is also briefly discussed.

  5. Quark-hadron duality of nucleon spin structure function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Y.B.

    2005-01-01

    Bloom-Gilman quark-hadron duality of nuclear spin structure function is studied by comparing the integral of g 1 from perturbative QCD prediction in the scaling region to the moment of g 1 in the resonance region. The spin structure function in the resonance region is estimated by the parametrization forms of non-resonance background and of resonance contributions. The uncertainties of our calculations due to those parametrization forms are discussed. Moreover, the effect of the Δ(1232)-resonance in the first resonance region and the role of the resonances in the second resonance region are explicitly shown. Elastic peak contribution to the duality is also analyzed. (orig.)

  6. Nucleon structure functions from lattice operator product expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambers, A.J.; Somfleth, K.; Young, R.D.; Zanotti, J.M.; Perlt, H.; Schiller, A.

    2017-03-01

    Deep-inelastic scattering, in the laboratory and on the lattice, is most instructive for understanding how the nucleon is built from quarks and gluons. The long-term goal is to compute the associated structure functions from first principles. So far this has been limited to model calculations. In this Letter we propose a new method to compute the structure functions directly from the virtual, all-encompassing Compton amplitude, utilizing the operator product expansion. This overcomes issues of renormalization and operator mixing, which so far have hindered lattice calculations of power corrections and higher moments.

  7. Nucleon Structure Functions from Operator Product Expansion on the Lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, A J; Horsley, R; Nakamura, Y; Perlt, H; Rakow, P E L; Schierholz, G; Schiller, A; Somfleth, K; Young, R D; Zanotti, J M

    2017-06-16

    Deep-inelastic scattering, in the laboratory and on the lattice, is most instructive for understanding how the nucleon is built from quarks and gluons. The long-term goal is to compute the associated structure functions from first principles. So far this has been limited to model calculations. In this Letter we propose a new method to compute the structure functions directly from the virtual, all-encompassing Compton amplitude, utilizing the operator product expansion. This overcomes issues of renormalization and operator mixing, which so far have hindered lattice calculations of power corrections and higher moments.

  8. Defining the Interactions of Cellobiohydrolase with Substrate through Structure Function Studies: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-409

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckham, G. T.; Himmel, M. E.

    2013-07-01

    NREL researchers will use their expertise and skilled resources in numerical computational modeling to generate structure-function relationships for improved cellulase variant enzymes to support the development of cellulases with improved performance in biomass conversion.

  9. From Sequence and Forces to Structure, Function and Evolution of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman-Kay, Julie D.; Mittag, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), which lack persistent structure, are a challenge to structural biology due to the inapplicability of standard methods for characterization of folded proteins as well as their deviation from the dominant structure/function paradigm. Their widespread presence and involvement in biological function, however, has spurred the growing acceptance of the importance of IDPs and the development of new tools for studying their structure, dynamics and function. The interplay of folded and disordered domains or regions for function and the existence of a continuum of protein states with respect to conformational energetics, motional timescales and compactness is shaping a unified understanding of structure-dynamics-disorder/function relationships. On the 20th anniversary of this journal, Structure, we provide a historical perspective on the investigation of IDPs and summarize the sequence features and physical forces that underlie their unique structural, functional and evolutionary properties. PMID:24010708

  10. The Relationship between Cost Leadership Strategy, Total Quality Management Applications and Financial Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Ali KURT; Cemal ZEHİR

    2016-01-01

    Firms need to implement some competition strategies and total quality management applications to overcome the fierce competition among others. The purpose of this study is to show the relationship between cost leadership strategy, total quality management applications and firms’ financial performance with literature review and empirical analysis. 449 questionnaires were conducted to the managers of 142 big firms. The data gathered was assessed with AMOS. As a result, the relationship between ...

  11. The International Market for MBA Qualifications: The Relationship between Tuition Fees and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Caroline; Soo, Kwok Tong

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between tuition fees charged by MBA programmes and the number of applications to these programmes, using a panel dataset comprising universities from countries across the world. Using Three-Stage-Least-Squares methods for simultaneous equations, we find a two-way relationship between tuition fees and…

  12. Essence of psychological approach application to personal sales in the context of relationship marketing paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiseleva Elena Stanislavovna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the essence of psychological approach application to personal sales in conditions of relationship marketing domination. Defintions of global relationship marketing, marketing of client relations and personal sale are given. New element of marketing system is proposed as well as universal model of competence for personal agents. Technique for psychological image of the client has been developed.

  13. Essence of psychological approach application to personal sales in the context of relationship marketing paradigm

    OpenAIRE

    Kiseleva Elena Stanislavovna

    2014-01-01

    The paper analyzes the essence of psychological approach application to personal sales in conditions of relationship marketing domination. Defintions of global relationship marketing, marketing of client relations and personal sale are given. New element of marketing system is proposed as well as universal model of competence for personal agents. Technique for psychological image of the client has been developed.

  14. Riparian ecosystems and buffers - multiscale structure, function, and management: introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathleen A. Dwire; Richard R. Lowrance

    2006-01-01

    Given the importance of issues related to improved understanding and management of riparian ecosystems and buffers, the American Water Resources Association (AWRA) sponsored a Summer Specialty Conference in June 2004 at Olympic Valley, California, entitled 'Riparian Ecosystems and Buffers: Multiscale Structure, Function, and Management.' The primary objective...

  15. What can we learn from polarized structure function data?

    CERN Document Server

    Ball, Richard D.; Altarelli, Guido; Forte, Stefano; Ball, Richard D.; Ridolfi, Giovanni; Altarelli, Guido; Forte, Stefano

    1997-04-20

    We summarise the perturbative QCD analysis of the structure function data for g_1 from longitudinally polarized deep inelastic scattering from proton, deuteron and neutron targets, with particular emphasis on testing sum rules, determining helicity fractions, and extracting the strong coupling from both scaling violations and the Bjorken sum rule.

  16. Spin-dependent parton distributions and structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentz, W.; Ito, T.; Cloet, I.C.; Thomas, A.W.; Yazaki, K.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear parton distributions and structure functions are determined in an effective chiral quark theory. We also discuss an extension of our model to fragmentation functions. Presented at the 20th Few-Body Conference, Pisa, Italy, 10-14 September 2007. (author)

  17. Two-level convolution formula for nuclear structure function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Boqiang

    1990-05-01

    A two-level convolution formula for the nuclear structure function is derived in considering the nucleus as a composite system of baryon-mesons which are also composite systems of quark-gluons again. The results show that the European Muon Colaboration effect can not be explained by the nuclear effects as nucleon Fermi motion and nuclear binding contributions.

  18. Two-level convolution formula for nuclear structure function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Boqiang

    1990-01-01

    A two-level convolution formula for the nuclear structure function is derived in considering the nucleus as a composite system of baryon-mesons which are also composite systems of quark-gluons again. The results show that the European Muon Colaboration effect can not be explained by the nuclear effects as nucleon Fermi motion and nuclear binding contributions

  19. Phenomenological structure functions and Gribov-Lipatov relation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhary, D.K.; Misra, A.K.

    1987-01-01

    An analysis of the Giribov-Lipatov relation using the phenomenological forms of the structure function F 2 ep is made. The analysis indicate breakdown of the relation at PETRA energies. Plausible reasons of the breakdown of Gribov-Lipatov relation are discussed together with its phenomenological form. 33 refs., 6 figures. (author)

  20. Direct Tax Applications in Relationship Between European Union and Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    YAZARKAN, Hakan; MEZARARKALI, Pınar

    2015-01-01

    European Union (EU) is an economic union that exstipulates common tax policy within the union without interfering the taxes which collected by the members. On the other hand union doesn’t put tax systems of member states to harmonization but has a positive look on efforts convergence. The reason of this is the difference between international tax ratio causes limiting even hindering the capital activities. Turkey which made an application at 31st of July 1959 still can’t become member of EU. ...

  1. Pion structure function from leading neutron electroproduction and SU(2) flavor asymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenney, Joshua R. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Sato Gonzalez, Nobuo; Melnitchouk, Wally [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Ji, Chueng-Ryong [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2016-03-01

    We examine the efficacy of pion exchange models to simultaneously describe leading neutron electroproduction at HERA and the $\\bar{d}-\\bar{u}$ flavor asymmetry in the proton. A detailed $\\chi^2$ analysis of the ZEUS and H1 cross sections, when combined with constraints on the pion flux from Drell-Yan data, allows regions of applicability of one-pion exchange to be delineated. The analysis disfavors several models of the pion flux used in the literature, and yields an improved extraction of the pion structure function and its uncertainties at parton momentum fractions in the pion of $4 \\times 10^{-4} \\lesssim x_\\pi \\lesssim 0.05$ at a scale of $Q^2$=10 GeV$^2$. Based on the fit results, we provide estimates for leading proton structure functions in upcoming tagged deep-inelastic scattering experiments at Jefferson Lab on the deuteron with forward protons.

  2. Molecular bioinformatics: algorithms and applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schulze-Kremer, S

    1996-01-01

    ... on molecular biology, especially D N A sequence analysis and protein structure prediction. These two issues are also central to this book. Other application areas covered here are: interpretation of spectroscopic data and discovery of structure-function relationships in D N A and proteins. Figure 1 depicts the interdependence of computer science,...

  3. Estimation of the Lagrangian structure function constant ¤C¤0 from surface-layer wind data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anfossi, D.; Degrazia, G.; Ferrero, E.

    2000-01-01

    Eulerian turbulence observations, made in the surface layer under unstable conditions (z/L > 0), by a sonic anemometer were used to estimate the Lagrangian structure function constant C(0). Two methods were considered. The first one makes use of a relationship, widely used in the Lagrangian...... stochastic dispersion models, relating C(0) to the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate epsilon, wind velocity variance and Lagrangian decorrelation time. The second one employs a novel equation, connecting C(0) to the constant of the second-order Eulerian structure function. Before estimating C(0...

  4. Proton structure functions in the dipole picture of BFKL dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navelet, H.; Wallon, S.

    1996-06-01

    The F 2 , F G , R=F L /F T proton structure functions are derived in the QCD dipole picture. Assuming k T and renormalization-group factorization, we relate deep-inelastic proton scattering to deep-inelastic onium scattering. We get a three-parameter fit of the 1994 H1 data in the low-x, moderate Q 2 range. The ratios F G /F 2 and R are predicted without further adjustment. The dipole picture of BFKL dynamics is shown to provide a relevant model for quantitatively describing the proton structure functions at HERA. The predictions for F 2 and F G are compatible with next-to-leading DGLAP analysis, while R is expected to be significantly lower at very small x. (orig.)

  5. Measurement of the proton spin structure function g1p

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pussieux, T.

    1994-10-01

    In order to check the Bjorken sum rule and confirm the EMC surprising conclusion on the spin structure of the proton, the measurement of the spin structure function of the proton has been performed by the Spin Muon Collaboration via the polarized muon nucleon deep inelastic scattering. The results of the 1993 run are presented within a kinematical range of 0.003 2 = 10 GeV 2 . The first moment of the polarized spin structure function g 1 p is found to be two standard deviations below the Ellis-Jaffe sum rule. Assuming SU(3) for hyperons β decays, the quark spin contribution to the proton spin is extracted. Combining all available data on proton, neutron and deuton, The Bjorken sum rule is confirmed within 10%. (author). 25 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Analysis of structure-function network decoupling in the brain systems of spastic diplegic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dongha; Pae, Chongwon; Lee, Jong Doo; Park, Eun Sook; Cho, Sung-Rae; Um, Min-Hee; Lee, Seung-Koo; Oh, Maeng-Keun; Park, Hae-Jeong

    2017-10-01

    Manifestation of the functionalities from the structural brain network is becoming increasingly important to understand a brain disease. With the aim of investigating the differential structure-function couplings according to network systems, we investigated the structural and functional brain networks of patients with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy with periventricular leukomalacia compared to healthy controls. The structural and functional networks of the whole brain and motor system, constructed using deterministic and probabilistic tractography of diffusion tensor magnetic resonance images and Pearson and partial correlation analyses of resting-state functional magnetic resonance images, showed differential embedding of functional networks in the structural networks in patients. In the whole-brain network of patients, significantly reduced global network efficiency compared to healthy controls were found in the structural networks but not in the functional networks, resulting in reduced structural-functional coupling. On the contrary, the motor network of patients had a significantly lower functional network efficiency over the intact structural network and a lower structure-function coupling than the control group. This reduced coupling but reverse directionality in the whole-brain and motor networks of patients was prominent particularly between the probabilistic structural and partial correlation-based functional networks. Intact (or less deficient) functional network over impaired structural networks of the whole brain and highly impaired functional network topology over the intact structural motor network might subserve relatively preserved cognitions and impaired motor functions in cerebral palsy. This study suggests that the structure-function relationship, evaluated specifically using sparse functional connectivity, may reveal important clues to functional reorganization in cerebral palsy. Hum Brain Mapp 38:5292-5306, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals

  7. Precision measurement of the neutron spin dependent structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolomensky, Y.G.

    1997-02-01

    In experiment E154 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center the spin dependent structure function g 1 n (x, Q 2 ) of the neutron was measured by scattering longitudinally polarized 48.3 GeV electrons off a longitudinally polarized 3 He target. The high beam energy allowed the author to extend the kinematic coverage compared to the previous SLAC experiments to 0.014 ≤ x ≤ 0.7 with an average Q 2 of 5 GeV 2 . The author reports the integral of the spin dependent structure function in the measured range to be ∫ 0.014 0.7 dx g 1 n (x, 5 GeV 2 ) = -0.036 ± 0.004(stat.) ± 0.005(syst.). The author observes relatively large values of g 1 n at low x that call into question the reliability of data extrapolation to x → 0. Such divergent behavior disagrees with predictions of the conventional Regge theory, but is qualitatively explained by perturbative QCD. The author performs a Next-to-Leading Order perturbative QCD analysis of the world data on the nucleon spin dependent structure functions g 1 p and g 1 n paying careful attention to the experimental and theoretical uncertainties. Using the parameterizations of the helicity-dependent parton distributions obtained in the analysis, the author evolves the data to Q 2 = 5 GeV 2 , determines the first moments of the polarized structure functions of the proton and neutron, and finds agreement with the Bjorken sum rule

  8. Measurement of the longitudinal proton structure function at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.

    2009-03-01

    The reduced cross sections for ep deep inelastic scattering have been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA at three different centre-of-mass energies, 318, 251 and 225 GeV. From the cross sections, measured double differentially in Bjorken x and the virtuality, Q 2 , the proton structure functions F L and F 2 have been extracted in the region 5 x 10 -4 2 2 . (orig.)

  9. The γ total cross section and the photon structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, G.

    1986-01-01

    A review on the current experimental status of the photon-photon total hadronic cross section as a function of energy and Q 2 is given in addition to the results obtained for the leptonic and hadronic photon structure functions. The results are discussed in terms of the point-like part of the photon and non-perturbative VDM part. It is shown that the cross section at Q 2 = 0 is well described by VDM derived models

  10. Structure functions and low Q2 physics at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeck, A. de; Klein, M.

    1991-12-01

    Important new insights into the hadron structure are expected from the data which will be collected at the electron-proton storage ring HERA at DESY, Hamburg. In this paper the physics opportunities for cross section related measurements at HERA are reviewed. Emphasis is put on the derivation of the proton structure functions, on the QCD effects expected in the newly accessible low χ region and on almost real photoproduction physics. (orig.)

  11. Nondiffraction photoproduction of vector mesons and the photon structure function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badalyan, R.G.; Gulkanyan, H.R.

    1988-01-01

    In the framework of the recombination model of hadron production a self-consistent description of the available data on the inclusive spectra of the nondiffraction photoproduction of vector mesons in the fragmentation region of photons at high energies is obtained. The parameters of parton distribution in the hadron component of a photon are estimated and its structure is compared with the measurements of the photon structure function in γγ-interactions at low Q 2 . 15 refs.; 2 figs.; 1 tab

  12. Determination of the pion and kaon structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aitkenhead, W.; Barton, D.S.; Brandenburg, G.W.; Busza, W.; Dobrowolski, T.; Friedman, J.I.; Kendall, H.W.; Lyons, T.; Nelson, B.; Rosenson, L.; Toy, W.; Verdier, R.; Votta, L.; Chiaradia, M.T.; DeMarzo, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Germinario, G.; Guerriero, L.; LaVopa, P.; Maggi, G.; Posa, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Spinelli, P.; Waldner, F.; Brenner, A.E.; Carey, D.C.; Elias, J.E.; Garbincius, P.H.; Mikenberg, G.; Polychronakos, V.A.; Meunier, R.; Cutts, D.; Dulude, R.S.; Lanou, R.E. Jr.; Massimo, J.T.

    1980-01-01

    Quark structure functions have been extracted from low-p/sub T/ inclusive hadron production data for the pion and kaon with use of the recombination model. n/sup π/=1.0 +- 0.1 and n/sup K/=2.5 +- 0.6 is obtained, where n is the leading (1-x) power of the nonstrange--valence-quark distribution. Both the pion and kaon nonstrange--sea-quark functions have napprox. =3.5

  13. Nucleon structure functions in noncommutative space-time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafiei, A.; Rezaei, Z.; Mirjalili, A. [Yazd University, Physics Department, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    In the context of noncommutative space-time we investigate the nucleon structure functions which play an important role in identifying the internal structure of nucleons. We use the corrected vertices and employ new vertices that appear in two approaches of noncommutativity and calculate the proton structure functions in terms of the noncommutative tensor θ{sub μν}. To check our results we plot the nucleon structure function (NSF), F{sub 2}(x), and compare it with experimental data and the results from the GRV, GJR and CT10 parametrization models. We show that with the new vertex that arises the noncommutativity correction will lead to a better consistency between theoretical results and experimental data for the NSF. This consistency will be better for small values of the Bjorken variable x. To indicate and confirm the validity of our calculations we also act conversely. We obtain a lower bound for the numerical values of Λ{sub NC} scale which correspond to recent reports. (orig.)

  14. Detailed measurements of structure functions from nucleons and nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The experiment will study deep inelastic muon nucleon scattering in a wide range of $Q^{2}$(1-200 (GeV/c)$^{2}$) and $x(0.005-0.75)$. The main aims of the experiment are: \\\\\\\\ a) Detailed measurements of the nuclear dependence of the structure function $F_{2}^{A}$, of $R = \\sigma_/\\sigma_{T}$ and of the cross-section for $J/\\psi$ production. They will provide a basis for the understanding of the EMC effect: the modification of quark and gluon distributions due to the nuclear environment. \\\\b) A simultaneous high luminosity measurement of the structure function $F_{2}$ on hydrogen and deuterium. This will provide substantially improved accuracy in the knowledge of the neutron structure function $F_{2}^{n}$, of $F_{2}^{p}-F_{2}^{n}$ and $F_{2}^{n}/F_{2}^{p}$ and their $Q^{2}$ dependence. Furthermore, the data will allow a determination of the strong coupling constant $\\alpha_{S}(Q^{2})$ with reduced experimental and theoretical uncertainties as well as of the ratio of the down to up quark distributions in the v...

  15. An Application of Mosaic Diagrams to the Visualization of Set Relationships

    OpenAIRE

    Luz, Saturnino; Masoodian, Masood

    2017-01-01

    We present an application of mosaic diagrams to the visualisation of set relations. Venn and Euler diagrams are the best known visual representations of sets and their relationships (intersections, containment or subsets, exclusion or disjointness). In recent years, alternative forms of visualisation have been proposed. Among them, linear diagrams have been shown to compare favourably to Venn and Euler diagrams, in supporting non-interactive assessment of set relationships. Recent studies tha...

  16. A Determination of the Neutron Spin Structure Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Emlyn W

    2003-08-18

    The authors report the results of the experiment E142 which measured the spin dependent structure function of the neutron, g{sub 1}{sup n}(x, Q{sup 2}). The experiment was carried out at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center by measuring an asymmetry in the deep inelastic scattering of polarized electrons from a polarized {sup 3}He target, at electron energies from 19 to 26 GeV. The structure function was determined over the kinematic range 0.03 < BJorken x < 0.6 and 1.0 < Q{sup 2} < 5.5 (GeV/c){sup 2}. An evaluation of the integral {integral}{sub 0}{sup 1} g{sub 1}{sup n}(x,Q{sup 2})dx at fixed Q{sup 2} = 2 (GeV/c){sup 2} yields the final result {Lambda}{sub 1}{sup n} = -0.032 {+-} 0.006 (stat.) {+-} 0.009 (syst.). This result, when combined with the integral of the proton spin structure function measured in other experiments, confirms the fundamental Bjorken sum rule with O({alpha}{sub s}{sup 3}) corrections to within one standard deviation. This is a major success for perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics. Some ancillary results include the findings that the Ellis-Jaffe sum rule for the neutron is violated at the 2 {sigma} level, and that the total contribution of the quarks to the helicity of the nucleon is 0.36 {+-} 0.10. The strange sea polarization is estimated to be small and negative, {Delta}s = -0.07 {+-} 0.04.

  17. Diquark contributions to the nucleon deep inelastic structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anselmino, M.; Leader, E.; Soares, J.

    1990-01-01

    The contributions of diquarks to the nucleon structure functions are discussed in the framework of the parton model and in the most general case of both vector and scalar diquarks inside unpolarized and polarized nucleons. The vector diquark anomalous magnetic moment and the scalar-vector and vector-scalar diquark transitions are also taken into account. The properties of the diquarks and of their form factors, required in order for the resulting scaling violations to be compatible with the observed ones, are discussed. (author)

  18. Calculation of hadronic part of photon structure function in QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorskij, A.S.; Ioffe, B.L.; Oganesyan, A.G.; Khodzhamiryan, A.Yu.

    1989-01-01

    The photon structure function in QCD in the intermediate region of the Bjorken variable 0.2 2 /2pq, where q 2 is the hard photon virtuality, p is the soft photon momentum) is calculated. It is shown that without introduction of fitting parameters the experimental data can be described in the range 3GeV 2 ≤Q 2 2 /Q 2 =-q 2 /not taking account for the leading logarithmic corrections. It is demonstrated that the corrections proportional to μ ν 2 > to the hard photon scattering amplitude on the longitudinal soft photon and to the Callan-Gross relation vanish. 16 refs.; 6 figs

  19. Higher twist contributions to deep-inelastic structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluemlein, J.; Boettcher, H.

    2008-07-01

    We report on a recent extraction of the higher twist contributions to the deep inelastic structure functions F ep,ed 2 (x,Q 2 ) in the large x region. It is shown that the size of the extracted higher twist contributions is strongly correlated with the higher order corrections applied to the leading twist part. A gradual lowering of the higher twist contributions going from NLO to N 4 LO is observed, where in the latter case only the leading large x terms were considered. (orig.)

  20. Measurement of the longitudinal proton structure function at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (US)] (and others)

    2009-03-15

    The reduced cross sections for ep deep inelastic scattering have been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA at three different centre-of-mass energies, 318, 251 and 225 GeV. From the cross sections, measured double differentially in Bjorken x and the virtuality, Q{sup 2}, the proton structure functions F{sub L} and F{sub 2} have been extracted in the region 5 x 10{sup -4}

  1. A compilation of structure functions in deep-inelastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, R.G.; Whalley, M.R.

    1991-01-01

    A compilation of data on the structure functions F 2 , xF 3 , and R = σ L /σ T from lepton deep-inelastic scattering off protons and nuclei is presented. The relevant experiments at CERN, Fermilab and SLAC from 1985 are covered. All the data in this review can be found in and retrieved from the Durham-RAL HEP Databases (HEPDATA on the RAL and CERN VM systems and on DURPDG VAX/VMS) together with data on a wide variety of other reactions. (author)

  2. Polarized and unpolarized nucleon structure functions from lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goeckeler, M.; Technische Hochschule Aachen; Horsley, R.; Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin; Ilgenfritz, E.M.; Perlt, H.; Rakow, P.; Schierholz, G.; Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH; Schiller, A.

    1995-06-01

    We report on a high statistics quenched lattice QCD calculation of the deep-inelastic structure functions F 1 , F 2 , g 1 and g 2 of the proton and neutron. The theoretical basis for the calculation is the operator product expansion. We consider the moments of the leading twist operators up to spin four. Using Wilson fermions the calculation is done for three values of K, and we perform the extrapolation to the chiral limit. The renormalization constants, which lead us from lattice to continuum operators, are calculated in perturbation theory to one loop order. (orig.)

  3. Form factors and structure functions of hadrons in parton model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkonskij, N.Yu.

    1979-01-01

    The hadron charge form factors and their relation to the deep-inelastic lepton-production structure functions in the regions of asymptotically high and small momentum transfer Q 2 are studied. The nucleon and pion charge radii are calculated. The results of calculations are in good agreement with the experimental data. The K- and D-meson charge radii are estimated. In the region of asymptotically high Q 2 the possibility of Drell-Yan-West relation violation is analyzed. It is shown, that for pseudoscalar mesons this relation is violated. The relation between the proton and neutron form factor asymptotics is obtained

  4. Nucleon form factors and structure functions from Nf=2 Clover fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, S.; Goeckeler, M.; Haegler, P.

    2010-12-01

    We give an update on our ongoing efforts to compute the nucleon's form factors and moments of structure functions using N f =2 flavours of non-perturbatively improved Clover fermions. We focus on new results obtained on gauge configurations where the pseudo-scalar meson mass is in the range of 170-270 MeV. We compare our results with various estimates obtained from chiral effective theories since we have some overlap with the quark mass region where results from such theories are believed to be applicable. (orig.)

  5. CLC Chloride Channels and Transporters: Structure, Function, Physiology, and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jentsch, Thomas J; Pusch, Michael

    2018-07-01

    CLC anion transporters are found in all phyla and form a gene family of eight members in mammals. Two CLC proteins, each of which completely contains an ion translocation parthway, assemble to homo- or heteromeric dimers that sometimes require accessory β-subunits for function. CLC proteins come in two flavors: anion channels and anion/proton exchangers. Structures of these two CLC protein classes are surprisingly similar. Extensive structure-function analysis identified residues involved in ion permeation, anion-proton coupling and gating and led to attractive biophysical models. In mammals, ClC-1, -2, -Ka/-Kb are plasma membrane Cl - channels, whereas ClC-3 through ClC-7 are 2Cl - /H + -exchangers in endolysosomal membranes. Biological roles of CLCs were mostly studied in mammals, but also in plants and model organisms like yeast and Caenorhabditis elegans. CLC Cl - channels have roles in the control of electrical excitability, extra- and intracellular ion homeostasis, and transepithelial transport, whereas anion/proton exchangers influence vesicular ion composition and impinge on endocytosis and lysosomal function. The surprisingly diverse roles of CLCs are highlighted by human and mouse disorders elicited by mutations in their genes. These pathologies include neurodegeneration, leukodystrophy, mental retardation, deafness, blindness, myotonia, hyperaldosteronism, renal salt loss, proteinuria, kidney stones, male infertility, and osteopetrosis. In this review, emphasis is laid on biophysical structure-function analysis and on the cell biological and organismal roles of mammalian CLCs and their role in disease.

  6. Functional materials discovery using energy-structure-function maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido, Angeles; Chen, Linjiang; Kaczorowski, Tomasz; Holden, Daniel; Little, Marc A; Chong, Samantha Y; Slater, Benjamin J; McMahon, David P; Bonillo, Baltasar; Stackhouse, Chloe J; Stephenson, Andrew; Kane, Christopher M; Clowes, Rob; Hasell, Tom; Cooper, Andrew I; Day, Graeme M

    2017-03-30

    Molecular crystals cannot be designed in the same manner as macroscopic objects, because they do not assemble according to simple, intuitive rules. Their structures result from the balance of many weak interactions, rather than from the strong and predictable bonding patterns found in metal-organic frameworks and covalent organic frameworks. Hence, design strategies that assume a topology or other structural blueprint will often fail. Here we combine computational crystal structure prediction and property prediction to build energy-structure-function maps that describe the possible structures and properties that are available to a candidate molecule. Using these maps, we identify a highly porous solid, which has the lowest density reported for a molecular crystal so far. Both the structure of the crystal and its physical properties, such as methane storage capacity and guest-molecule selectivity, are predicted using the molecular structure as the only input. More generally, energy-structure-function maps could be used to guide the experimental discovery of materials with any target function that can be calculated from predicted crystal structures, such as electronic structure or mechanical properties.

  7. A compilation of structure functions in deep inelastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehrmann, T.; Roberts, R.G.; Whalley, M.R.

    1999-01-01

    A compilation of all the available data on the unpolarized structure functions F 2 and xF 3 , R=(σ L /σ T ), the virtual photon asymmetries A 1 and A 2 and the polarized structure functions g 1 and g 2 , from deep inelastic lepton scattering off protons, deuterium and nuclei is presented. The relevant experiments at CERN, DESY, Fermilab and SLAC from 1991, the date of our earlier review [1], to the present day are covered. A brief general theoretical introduction is given followed by the data presented both in tabular and graphical form and, for the F 2 and xF 3 data, the predictions based on the MRST98 and CTEQ4 parton distribution functions are also displayed. All the data in this review, together with data on a wide variety of other reactions, can be found in and retrieved from the Durham-RAL HEP Databases on the World-Wide-Web (http://durpdg.dur.ac.uk/HEPDATA). (author)

  8. Recent structure function results from neutrino scattering at fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, U.K.; Avvakumov, S.; Barbaro, P. de

    2001-01-01

    We report on the extraction of the structure functions F 2 and ΔxF 3 = xF ν 3 - xF ν -bar 3 from CCFR ν μ -Fe and ν-bar μ -Fe differential cross sections. The extraction is performed in a physics model independent (PMI) way. This first measurement of ΔxF 3 , which is useful in testing models of heavy charm production, is higher than current theoretical predictions. The ratio of the F 2 (PMI) values measured in ν μ , and μ scattering is in agreement (within 5%) with the NLO predictions using massive charm production schemes, thus resolving the long-standing discrepancy between the two sets of data. In addition, measurements of F L (or, equivalently, R) and 2xF 1 are reported in the kinematic region where anomalous nuclear effects in R are observed at HERMES. (author)

  9. Probing spin-1 diquarks in deep inelastic structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fredriksson, S.; Jaendel, M.; Larsson, T.

    1983-01-01

    Within the scope of a new diquark model for deep inelastic structure functions presented by us recently we use the existing data on F 1 sup(ep)(x,Q 2 ) to learn about the admixture of spin-1 diquarks in nucleons. It turns out that they are so rare, heavy and extended compared to spin-0 diquarks that they are presumably accidental and not dynamical. Their number and form factors can be understood qualitatively within this picture. Still, the spin-1 diquarks give interesting structures in data and, together with quarks and spin-0 diquarks, carry enough momentum to account for the full nucleon energy. A gluon component is hence not needed in the nucleon. (orig.)

  10. Measuring spin-dependent structure functions at CEBAF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, A. [Universitaet Frankfurt (Germany)

    1994-04-01

    The author analyses whether CEBAF with a 10 GeV beam could contribute significantly to the understanding of spin-dependent deep-inelastic scattering as well as semi-inclusive reactions. The main advantage of CEBAF is the much better attainable statistics, its great disadvantage its comparably low energy, which limits the accessible x-range to about 0.15 to 0.7. Within these constraints CEBAF could provide (1) high precision data which would be very valuable to understand the Q{sup 2} dependence of the spin-dependent structure functions g{sub 1}(x) and G{sub 2}(x) and (2) the by far most precise determination of the third moments of g{sub 1}(x) and g{sub 2}(x) the latter of which the author argues to be related to a fundamental property of the nucleon.

  11. Measuring spin-dependent structure functions at CEBAF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, A.

    1994-01-01

    The author analyses whether CEBAF with a 10 GeV beam could contribute significantly to the understanding of spin-dependent deep-inelastic scattering as well as semi-inclusive reactions. The main advantage of CEBAF is the much better attainable statistics, its great disadvantage its comparably low energy, which limits the accessible x-range to about 0.15 to 0.7. Within these constraints CEBAF could provide (1) high precision data which would be very valuable to understand the Q 2 dependence of the spin-dependent structure functions g 1 (x) and G 2 (x) and (2) the by far most precise determination of the third moments of g 1 (x) and g 2 (x) the latter of which the author argues to be related to a fundamental property of the nucleon

  12. QCD's Partner Needed for Mass Spectra and Parton Structure Functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.S.

    2009-01-01

    as in the case of the hydrogen atom, bound-state wave functions are needed to generate hadronic spectra. For this purpose, in 1971, Feynman and his students wrote down a Lorentz-invariant harmonic oscillator equation. This differential equation has one set of solutions satisfying the Lorentz-covariant boundary condition. This covariant set generates Lorentz-invariant mass spectra with their degeneracies. Furthermore, the Lorentz-covariant wave functions allow us to calculate the valence parton distribution by Lorentz-boosting the quark-model wave function from the hadronic rest frame. However, this boosted wave function does not give an accurate parton distribution. The wave function needs QCD corrections to make a contact with the real world. Likewise, QCD needs the wave function as a starting point for calculating the parton structure function. (author)

  13. Whole-brain analytic measures of network communication reveal increased structure-function correlation in right temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirsich, Jonathan; Perry, Alistair; Ridley, Ben; Proix, Timothée; Golos, Mathieu; Bénar, Christian; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe; Bartolomei, Fabrice; Breakspear, Michael; Jirsa, Viktor; Guye, Maxime

    2016-01-01

    The in vivo structure-function relationship is key to understanding brain network reorganization due to pathologies. This relationship is likely to be particularly complex in brain network diseases such as temporal lobe epilepsy, in which disturbed large-scale systems are involved in both transient electrical events and long-lasting functional and structural impairments. Herein, we estimated this relationship by analyzing the correlation between structural connectivity and functional connectivity in terms of analytical network communication parameters. As such, we targeted the gradual topological structure-function reorganization caused by the pathology not only at the whole brain scale but also both in core and peripheral regions of the brain. We acquired diffusion (dMRI) and resting-state fMRI (rsfMRI) data in seven right-lateralized TLE (rTLE) patients and fourteen healthy controls and analyzed the structure-function relationship by using analytical network communication metrics derived from the structural connectome. In rTLE patients, we found a widespread hypercorrelated functional network. Network communication analysis revealed greater unspecific branching of the shortest path (search information) in the structural connectome and a higher global correlation between the structural and functional connectivity for the patient group. We also found evidence for a preserved structural rich-club in the patient group. In sum, global augmentation of structure-function correlation might be linked to a smaller functional repertoire in rTLE patients, while sparing the central core of the brain which may represent a pathway that facilitates the spread of seizures.

  14. Target mass corrections to electroweak structure functions and perturbative neutrino cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kretzer, S.; Reno, M.H.

    2004-01-01

    We provide a complete and consistent framework to include subasymptotic perturbative as well as mass corrections to the leading twist (τ=2) evaluation of charged and neutral current weak structure functions and the perturbative neutrino cross sections. We reexamine previous calculations in a modern language and fill in the gaps that we find missing for a complete and ready-to-use 'NLO ξ-scaling' formulary. In particular, as a new result we formulate the mixing of the partonic and hadronic structure function tensor basis in the operator approach to deep inelastic scattering. As an underlying framework we follow the operator product expansion in the manner of Georgi and Politzer that allows the inclusion of target mass corrections at arbitrary order in QCD and we provide explicit analytical and numerical results at NLO. We compare this approach with a simpler collinear parton model approach to ξ scaling. Along with target mass corrections we include heavy quark mass effects as a calculable leading twist power suppressed correction. The complete corrections have been implemented into a Monte Carlo integration program to evaluate structure functions and/or integrated cross sections. As applications, we compare the operator approach with the collinear approximation numerically and we investigate the NLO and mass corrections to observables that are related to the extraction of the weak mixing angle from a Paschos-Wolfenstein-like relation in neutrino-iron scattering. We expect that the interpretation of neutrino scattering events in terms of oscillation physics and electroweak precision physics will benefit from our results

  15. Application of Structural Equations Modeling to assess relationship among Emotional Intelligence, General Health and Occupational Accidents

    OpenAIRE

    MOAMMAD KHANDAN; AMIR KAVOUSI; ALIREZA KOOHPAEI

    2015-01-01

    ORIGINAL ARTICLEEmotional intelligence (EI) has been subject of significant amounts of literature over the past two decades. However, little has been contributed to how emotional intelligence may be practically applied to enhance both accident prevention program and general health in workplaces. Purpose of this paper is to survey relationship among these variables in working society of Iran in 2014. As well as identify practical approaches to application of emotional intelligence skills to ma...

  16. Structural-functional integrated concrete with macro-encapsulated inorganic PCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohseni, Ehsan; Tang, Waiching; Wang, Zhiyu

    2017-09-01

    Over the last few years the application of thermal energy storage system incorporating phase change materials (PCMs) to foster productivity and efficiency of buildings energy has grown rapidly. In this study, a structural-functional integrated concrete was developed using macro-encapsulated PCM-lightweight aggregate (LWA) as partial replacement (25 and 50% by volume) of coarse aggregate in control concrete. The PCM-LWA was prepared by incorporation of an inorganic PCM into porous LWAs through vacuum impregnation. The mechanical and thermal performance of PCM-LWA concrete were studied. The test results revealed that though the compressive strength of concrete with PCM-LWA was lower than the control concrete, but ranged from 22.02 MPa to 42.88 MPa which above the minimum strength requirement for structural application. The thermal performance test indicated that macro-encapsulated PCM-LWA has underwent the phase change transition reducing the indoor temperature.

  17. Assessing client-caregiver relationships and the applicability of the 'student-teacher relationship scale' for people with intellectual disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeden, J.M.; Maaskant, M.A.; Koomen, H.M.Y.; Candel, M.J.J.M.; Curfs, L.M.G.

    2012-01-01

    Improvements in client-caregiver relationships may lead to improvements in the quality of life of clients with intellectual disabilities (ID). For this reason, interventions aimed at influencing these relationships are important. To gain insight into the nature and intention of these relationships

  18. Local quark-hadron duality of nucleon spin structure functions with target mass corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Y.B. . E-mail dongyb@mail.ihep.ac.cn; Chen, D.Y.

    2007-01-01

    Target mass corrections to nucleon spin structure functions are analyzed. Our results show that the corrections are important to the structure functions in a large x region. Moreover, they play a remarkable role to the local quark-hadron duality of the nucleon spin structure functions in three individual inelastic resonance production regions

  19. Measurement of the hadronic structure function of the photon

    CERN Document Server

    Affholderbach, Klaus

    2000-01-01

    The hadronic structure function of the photon, Fγ 2 , is measured using a data sample of 52.9 pb−1, recorded with the ALEPH detector at the LEP storage ring in 1997. Approximately 2100 single-tag two-photon events at a centre-of-mass energy of √s ≈ 183GeV are selected from this data sample. The data are analysed in the two Q2 ranges from 7 to 24 and from 17 to 200 GeV2 with mean values of 13.7 and 56.5 GeV2 . The measured distributions of kinematic variables are compared to different model predictions, based on the HERWIG and PHOJET Monte Carlo generators. To determine Fγ 2(x,Q2), a two-dimensional unfolding method employing the principle of maximum entropy is used. In addition to the Bjorken variable x, the variable E17 is introduced, denoting the hadronic energy measured in the polar angle range below 17◦ and is also used in the unfolding. The two-dimensional unfolding method significantly reduces the systematic errors compared to one-dimensional methods which is shown by various unfolding tests. ...

  20. Measurement of the nucleon structure function using high energy muons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyers, P.D.

    1983-12-01

    We have measured the inclusive deep inelastic scattering of muons on nucleons in iron using beams of 93 and 215 GeV muons. To perform this measurement, we have built and operated the Multimuon Spectrometer (MMS) in the muon beam at Fermilab. The MMS is a magnetized iron target/spectrometer/calorimeter which provides 5.61 kg/cm 2 of target, 9% momentum resolution on scattered muons, and a direct measure of total hadronic energy with resolution sigma/sub nu/ = 1.4√nu(GeV). In the distributed target, the average beam energies at the interaction are 88.0 and 209 GeV. Using the known form of the radiatively-corrected electromagnetic cross section, we extract the structure function F 2 (x,Q 2 ) with a typical precision of 2% over the range 5 2 2 /c 2 . We compare our measurements to the predictions of lowest order quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and find a best fit value of the QCD scale parameter Λ/sub LO/ = 230 +- 40/sup stat/ +- 80/sup syst/ MeV/c, assuming R = 0 and without applying Fermi motion corrections. Comparing the cross sections at the two beam energies, we measure R = -0.06 +- 0.06/sup stat/ +- 0.11/sup syst/. Our measurements show qualitative agreement with QCD, but quantitative comparison is hampered by phenomenological uncertainties. The experimental situation is quite good, with substantial agreement between our measurements and those of others. 86 references

  1. Structure-function relations in physiology education: Where's the mechanism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lira, Matthew E; Gardner, Stephanie M

    2017-06-01

    Physiology demands systems thinking: reasoning within and between levels of biological organization and across different organ systems. Many physiological mechanisms explain how structures and their properties interact at one level of organization to produce emergent functions at a higher level of organization. Current physiology principles, such as structure-function relations, selectively neglect mechanisms by not mentioning this term explicitly. We explored how students characterized mechanisms and functions to shed light on how students make sense of these terms. Students characterized mechanisms as 1 ) processes that occur at levels of organization lower than that of functions; and 2 ) as detailed events with many steps involved. We also found that students produced more variability in how they characterized functions compared with mechanisms: students characterized functions in relation to multiple levels of organization and multiple definitions. We interpret these results as evidence that students see mechanisms as holding a more narrow definition than used in the biological sciences, and that students struggle to coordinate and distinguish mechanisms from functions due to cognitive processes germane to learning in many domains. We offer the instructional suggestion that we scaffold student learning by affording students opportunities to relate and also distinguish between these terms so central to understanding physiology. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Structure functions and intermittency in ionospheric plasma turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Dyrud

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Low frequency electrostatic turbulence in the ionospheric E-region is studied by means of numerical and experimental methods. We use the structure functions of the electrostatic potential as a diagnostics of the fluctuations. We demonstrate the inherently intermittent nature of the low level turbulence in the collisional ionospheric plasma by using results for the space-time varying electrostatic potential from two dimensional numerical simulations. An instrumented rocket can not directly detect the one-point potential variation, and most measurements rely on records of potential differences between two probes. With reference to the space observations we demonstrate that the results obtained by potential difference measurements can differ significantly from the one-point results. It was found, in particular, that the intermittency signatures become much weaker, when the proper rocket-probe configuration is implemented. We analyze also signals from an actual ionospheric rocket experiment, and find a reasonably good agreement with the appropriate simulation results, demonstrating again that rocket data, obtained as those analyzed here, are unlikely to give an adequate representation of intermittent features of the low frequency ionospheric plasma turbulence for the given conditions.

  3. Nuclear structure functions at a future electron-ion collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschenauer, E. C.; Fazio, S.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Paukkunen, H.; Zurita, P.

    2017-12-01

    The quantitative knowledge of heavy nuclei's partonic structure is currently limited to rather large values of momentum fraction x —robust experimental constraints below x ˜10-2 at low resolution scale Q2 are particularly scarce. This is in sharp contrast to the free proton's structure which has been probed in Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) measurements down to x ˜10-5 at perturbative resolution scales. The construction of an electron-ion collider (EIC) with a possibility to operate with a wide variety of nuclei, will allow one to explore the low-x region in much greater detail. In the present paper we simulate the extraction of the nuclear structure functions from measurements of inclusive and charm reduced cross sections at an EIC. The potential constraints are studied by analyzing simulated data directly in a next-to-leading order global fit of nuclear Parton Distribution Functions based on the recent EPPS16 analysis. A special emphasis is placed on studying the impact an EIC would have on extracting the nuclear gluon parton distribution function, the partonic component most prone to nonlinear effects at low Q2. In comparison to the current knowledge, we find that the gluon parton distribution function can be measured at an EIC with significantly reduced uncertainties.

  4. Singlet structure function F_1 in double-logarithmic approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermolaev, B. I.; Troyan, S. I.

    2018-03-01

    The conventional ways to calculate the perturbative component of the DIS singlet structure function F_1 involve approaches based on BFKL which account for the single-logarithmic contributions accompanying the Born factor 1 / x. In contrast, we account for the double-logarithmic (DL) contributions unrelated to 1 / x and because of that they were disregarded as negligibly small. We calculate the singlet F_1 in the double-logarithmic approximation (DLA) and account at the same time for the running α _s effects. We start with a total resummation of both quark and gluon DL contributions and obtain the explicit expression for F_1 in DLA. Then, applying the saddle-point method, we calculate the small- x asymptotics of F_1, which proves to be of the Regge form with the leading singularity ω _0 = 1.066. Its large value compensates for the lack of the factor 1 / x in the DLA contributions. Therefore, this Reggeon can be identified as a new Pomeron, which can be quite important for the description of all QCD processes involving the vacuum (Pomeron) exchanges at very high energies. We prove that the expression for the small- x asymptotics of F_1 scales: it depends on a single variable Q^2/x^2 only instead of x and Q^2 separately. Finally, we show that the small- x asymptotics reliably represent F_1 at x ≤ 10^{-6}.

  5. The structure functions of the photon at large x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chase, M.K.

    1981-01-01

    We derive 'improved' perturbative results in QCD for the structure functions of the photon at large Bjorken x by (a) using a correct phase-space treatment of the leading mass-singularity logarithms and (b) summing the leading logarithms of (1-x) associated with the wave function of the final state. We obtain explicit results in three kinematic regimes: (i) Q 2 low enough for logarithmic QCD corrections to the parton model to be negligible; we estimate that this is the case for all presently realistic values of Q 2 (approx. 2 ). (ii) Q 2 high enough (at fixed x) for the effects of the leading mass-singularity logarithms to be important; we discuss the modifications to Witten's result at large x due to the correct kinematical treatment of the leading logarithms. (iii) Q 2 /s → infinite, where we sum the wave-function logarithms of (1-x); we show that F 2 sup(γ) → finite constant as Q 2 /s → infinite and that there is a close inclusive-exclusive connection in this limit. (orig.)

  6. Lamin B Receptor: Interplay between Structure, Function and Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Nikolakaki

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Lamin B receptor (LBR is an integral protein of the inner nuclear membrane, containing a hydrophilic N-terminal end protruding into the nucleoplasm, eight hydrophobic segments that span the membrane and a short, nucleoplasmic C-terminal tail. Two seemingly unrelated functions have been attributed to LBR. Its N-terminal domain tethers heterochromatin to the nuclear periphery, thus contributing to the shape of interphase nuclear architecture, while its transmembrane domains exhibit sterol reductase activity. Mutations within the transmembrane segments result in defects in cholesterol synthesis and are associated with diseases such as the Pelger–Huët anomaly and Greenberg skeletal dysplasia, whereas no such harmful mutations related to the anchoring properties of LBR have been reported so far. Recent evidence suggests a dynamic regulation of LBR expression levels, structural organization, localization and function, in response to various signals. The molecular mechanisms underlying this dynamic behavior have not yet been fully unraveled. Here, we provide an overview of the current knowledge of the interplay between the structure, function and localization of LBR, and hint at the interconnection of the two distinct functions of LBR.

  7. A structure-function analysis in patients with prekallikrein deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girolami, Antonio; Ferrari, Silvia; Cosi, Elisabetta; Lombardi, Anna Maria

    2017-11-22

    To investigate the structure-function relation in prekallikrein (PK) deficiency. PK is one of the proteins of the contact phase of blood coagulation which at the present time is the object of a revival of interest. All patients with PK deficiency who had been investigated by molecular biology techniques are the object of the present investigation. Details of patients were obtained from personal files and a time-unlimited PubMed search. Only cases with a molecular-biology-based diagnosis were included. Twelve families were included. The total number of missense mutation was 10, together with 3 stop codons and 2 insertions. These mutations involved mainly exons 11 and 14. There were eight proved homozygotes and three compound heterozygotes. In one instance, homozygosity was probable but not proved. In nine cases, the defect was Type I, whereas it was Type II in the remaining three. No bleeding manifestations were present in 11 of the 12 probands. One proband had epistaxis, but she had hypertension. Altogether, four patients had hypertension and one of them had also two myocardial infarctions. Despite the paucity of cases, it was established that the majority of mutations involved the catalytic domain. It is auspicable that future reports of patients with this disorder should include molecular studies. This would certainly contribute to the understanding of the contact phase of blood coagulation.

  8. Assessment of relevant factors and relationships concerning human dermal exposure to pesticides in greenhouse applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Vidal, Jose L; Egea González, Francisco J; Garrido Frenich, Antonia; Martínez Galera, María; Aguilera, Pedro A; López Carrique, Enrique

    2002-08-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the gas chromatographic data obtained from 23 different greenhouse trials. This was used to establish which factors, including application technique (very small, small, medium and large drop-size), crop characteristics (short/tall, thin/dense) and pattern application of the operator (walking towards or away from the treated area) are relevant to the dermal exposure levels of greenhouse applicators. The results showed that the highest exposure by pesticides during field applications in greenhouses, in the climatic conditions and in the crop conditions typical of a southern European country, occurs on the lower legs and front thighs of the applicators. Similar results were obtained by hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA). Drop-size seems to be very important in determining total exposure, while height and density of crops have little influence on total exposure under the conditions of the present study. No pesticide type is a major factor in total exposure. The application of multiple regression analysis (MRA) allowed assessment of the relationships between the pesticide exposure of the less affected parts of the body with the most affected parts.

  9. Structure/property relationships in polymer membranes for water purification and energy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geise, Geoffrey

    Providing sustainable supplies of purified water and energy is a critical global challenge for the future, and polymer membranes will play a key role in addressing these clear and pressing global needs for water and energy. Polymer membrane-based processes dominate the desalination market, and polymer membranes are crucial components in several rapidly developing power generation and storage applications that rely on membranes to control rates of water and/or ion transport. Much remains unknown about the influence of polymer structure on intrinsic water and ion transport properties, and these relationships must be developed to design next generation polymer membrane materials. For desalination applications, polymers with simultaneously high water permeability and low salt permeability are desirable in order to prepare selective membranes that can efficiently desalinate water, and a tradeoff relationship between water/salt selectivity and water permeability suggests that attempts to prepare such materials should rely on approaches that do more than simply vary polymer free volume. One strategy is to functionalize hydrocarbon polymers with fixed charge groups that can ionize upon exposure to water, and the presence of charged groups in the polymer influences transport properties. Additionally, in many emerging energy applications, charged polymers are exposed to ions that are very different from sodium and chloride. Specific ion effects have been observed in charged polymers, and these effects must be understood to prepare charged polymers that will enable emerging energy technologies. This presentation discusses research aimed at further understanding fundamental structure/property relationships that govern water and ion transport in charged polymer films considered for desalination and electric potential field-driven applications that can help address global needs for clean water and energy.

  10. Intramolecular didehydro-Diels-Alder reaction and its impact on the structure-function properties of environmentally sensitive fluorophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummond, Kay M; Kocsis, Laura S

    2015-08-18

    Reaction discovery plays a vital role in accessing new chemical entities and materials possessing important function.1 In this Account, we delineate our reaction discovery program regarding the [4 + 2] cycloaddition reaction of styrene-ynes. In particular, we highlight our studies that lead to the realization of the diverging reaction mechanisms of the intramolecular didehydro-Diels-Alder (IMDDA) reaction to afford dihydronaphthalene and naphthalene products. Formation of the former involves an intermolecular hydrogen atom abstraction and isomerization, whereas the latter is formed via an unexpected elimination of H2. Forming aromatic compounds by a unimolecular elimination of H2 offers an environmentally benign alternative to typical oxidation protocols. We also include in this Account ongoing work focused on expanding the scope of this reaction, mainly its application to the preparation of cyclopenta[b]naphthalenes. Finally, we showcase the synthetic utility of the IMDDA reaction by preparing novel environmentally sensitive fluorophores. The choice to follow this path was largely influenced by the impact this reaction could have on our understanding of the structure-function relationships of these molecular sensors by taking advantage of a de novo construction and functionalization of the aromatic portion of these compounds. We were also inspired by the fact that, despite the advances that have been made in the construction of small molecule fluorophores, access to rationally designed fluorescent probes or sensors possessing varied and tuned photophysical, spectral, and chemical properties are still needed. To this end, we report our studies to correlate fluorophore structure with photophysical property relationships for a series of solvatochromic PRODAN analogs and viscosity-sensitive cyanoacrylate analogs. The versatility of this de novo strategy for fluorophore synthesis was demonstrated by showing that a number of functional groups could be installed at

  11. Methods for Specifying Scientific Data Standards and Modeling Relationships with Applications to Neuroscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rübel, Oliver; Dougherty, Max; Prabhat; Denes, Peter; Conant, David; Chang, Edward F.; Bouchard, Kristofer

    2016-01-01

    Neuroscience continues to experience a tremendous growth in data; in terms of the volume and variety of data, the velocity at which data is acquired, and in turn the veracity of data. These challenges are a serious impediment to sharing of data, analyses, and tools within and across labs. Here, we introduce BRAINformat, a novel data standardization framework for the design and management of scientific data formats. The BRAINformat library defines application-independent design concepts and modules that together create a general framework for standardization of scientific data. We describe the formal specification of scientific data standards, which facilitates sharing and verification of data and formats. We introduce the concept of Managed Objects, enabling semantic components of data formats to be specified as self-contained units, supporting modular and reusable design of data format components and file storage. We also introduce the novel concept of Relationship Attributes for modeling and use of semantic relationships between data objects. Based on these concepts we demonstrate the application of our framework to design and implement a standard format for electrophysiology data and show how data standardization and relationship-modeling facilitate data analysis and sharing. The format uses HDF5, enabling portable, scalable, and self-describing data storage and integration with modern high-performance computing for data-driven discovery. The BRAINformat library is open source, easy-to-use, and provides detailed user and developer documentation and is freely available at: https://bitbucket.org/oruebel/brainformat. PMID:27867355

  12. [Application of chemometrics in composition-activity relationship research of traditional Chinese medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sheng-Nan

    2014-07-01

    Chemometrics is a new branch of chemistry which is widely applied to various fields of analytical chemistry. Chemometrics can use theories and methods of mathematics, statistics, computer science and other related disciplines to optimize the chemical measurement process and maximize access to acquire chemical information and other information on material systems by analyzing chemical measurement data. In recent years, traditional Chinese medicine has attracted widespread attention. In the research of traditional Chinese medicine, it has been a key problem that how to interpret the relationship between various chemical components and its efficacy, which seriously restricts the modernization of Chinese medicine. As chemometrics brings the multivariate analysis methods into the chemical research, it has been applied as an effective research tool in the composition-activity relationship research of Chinese medicine. This article reviews the applications of chemometrics methods in the composition-activity relationship research in recent years. The applications of multivariate statistical analysis methods (such as regression analysis, correlation analysis, principal component analysis, etc. ) and artificial neural network (such as back propagation artificial neural network, radical basis function neural network, support vector machine, etc. ) are summarized, including the brief fundamental principles, the research contents and the advantages and disadvantages. Finally, the existing main problems and prospects of its future researches are proposed.

  13. Application of Kramers-Kronig relationships for titanium impedance data validation in a Ringer's solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastidas, D. M.

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the applicability of Kramers-Kronig (KK relationships to assess the validity of real and imaginary impedance measurements for titanium in a Ringer's solution using the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS method. Nyquist and Bode plots showed a capacitive behaviour with a high impedance modulus including two time constants. Two procedures were employed in the implementation of the KK integral relationships based on an equivalent circuit which satisfies KK relationships and an ohmic resistance shunted to the measured EIS data. The titanium's EIS data satisfied the KK relationships.

    Este artículo estudia la aplicabilidad de las relaciones de Kramers-Kronig (KK al estudio de la validez de las medidas de impedancia (EIS, parte real y parte imaginaria, del titanio en contacto con la solución de Ringer. Los diagramas de Nyquist y Bode muestran un comportamiento capacitivo, con un módulo de impedancia elevado y con dos constantes de tiempo. En la implementación de las integrales de KK se emplearon dos procedimientos, que se basan en un circuito equivalente que cumple las relaciones de KK y en una resistencia óhmica en paralelo añadida a los datos de impedancia medidos. Los resultados de impedancia del titanio satisfacen las relaciones de KK.

  14. Measurement of the nucleon structure function using high energy muons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyers, P.D.

    1983-12-01

    We have measured the inclusive deep inelastic scattering of muons on nucleons in iron using beams of 93 and 215 GeV muons. To perform this measurement, we have built and operated the Multimuon Spectrometer (MMS) in the muon beam at Fermilab. The MMS is a magnetized iron target/spectrometer/calorimeter which provides 5.61 kg/cm/sup 2/ of target, 9% momentum resolution on scattered muons, and a direct measure of total hadronic energy with resolution sigma/sub nu/ = 1.4..sqrt..nu(GeV). In the distributed target, the average beam energies at the interaction are 88.0 and 209 GeV. Using the known form of the radiatively-corrected electromagnetic cross section, we extract the structure function F/sub 2/(x,Q/sup 2/) with a typical precision of 2% over the range 5 < Q/sup 2/ < 200 GeV/sup 2//c/sup 2/. We compare our measurements to the predictions of lowest order quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and find a best fit value of the QCD scale parameter ..lambda../sub LO/ = 230 +- 40/sup stat/ +- 80/sup syst/ MeV/c, assuming R = 0 and without applying Fermi motion corrections. Comparing the cross sections at the two beam energies, we measure R = -0.06 +- 0.06/sup stat/ +- 0.11/sup syst/. Our measurements show qualitative agreement with QCD, but quantitative comparison is hampered by phenomenological uncertainties. The experimental situation is quite good, with substantial agreement between our measurements and those of others. 86 references.

  15. Efficiently mapping structure-property relationships of gas adsorption in porous materials: application to Xe adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaija, A R; Wilmer, C E

    2017-09-08

    Designing better porous materials for gas storage or separations applications frequently leverages known structure-property relationships. Reliable structure-property relationships, however, only reveal themselves when adsorption data on many porous materials are aggregated and compared. Gathering enough data experimentally is prohibitively time consuming, and even approaches based on large-scale computer simulations face challenges. Brute force computational screening approaches that do not efficiently sample the space of porous materials may be ineffective when the number of possible materials is too large. Here we describe a general and efficient computational method for mapping structure-property spaces of porous materials that can be useful for adsorption related applications. We describe an algorithm that generates random porous "pseudomaterials", for which we calculate structural characteristics (e.g., surface area, pore size and void fraction) and also gas adsorption properties via molecular simulations. Here we chose to focus on void fraction and Xe adsorption at 1 bar, 5 bar, and 10 bar. The algorithm then identifies pseudomaterials with rare combinations of void fraction and Xe adsorption and mutates them to generate new pseudomaterials, thereby selectively adding data only to those parts of the structure-property map that are the least explored. Use of this method can help guide the design of new porous materials for gas storage and separations applications in the future.

  16. An Examination of Perceived Quality, Satisfaction, and Loyalty Relationship: Applicability of Comparative and Noncomparative Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Licen Indahwati Darsono

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates alternative measurement approaches to investigating the relationship amongst perceived quality, customer satisfaction, and loyalty. The authors define and measure the constructs within a relative attitudinal framework and compare these results to a noncomparative or individual evaluation of brands. In addition, loyalty is measured by and defined as a behavioral and attitudinal loyalty. The object of this research is teh botol whilst the subjects are undergraduate students in Surabaya and Yogyakarta. The proposed model, with satisfaction as a mediator between quality and loyalty, is found to be an acceptable representation of data across three brands of teh botol and for both comparative and noncomparative evaluation. The use of relative attitude, however, indicates a much stronger relationship amongst perceived quality, satisfaction, and loyalty than the attitude towards a brand when they are performed in individual evaluation. With respect to predictive ability, this study’s findings suggest that comparative evaluation has higher degree of applicability than does noncomparative evaluation.

  17. Design of sweet protein based sweeteners: hints from structure-function relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rega, Michele Fortunato; Di Monaco, Rossella; Leone, Serena; Donnarumma, Federica; Spadaccini, Roberta; Cavella, Silvana; Picone, Delia

    2015-04-15

    Sweet proteins represent a class of natural molecules, which are extremely interesting regarding their potential use as safe low-calories sweeteners for individuals who need to control sugar intake, such as obese or diabetic subjects. Punctual mutations of amino acid residues of MNEI, a single chain derivative of the natural sweet protein monellin, allow the modulation of its taste. In this study we present a structural and functional comparison between MNEI and a sweeter mutant Y65R, containing an extra positive charge on the protein surface, in conditions mimicking those of typical beverages. Y65R exhibits superior sweetness in all the experimental conditions tested, has a better solubility at mild acidic pH and preserves a significant thermal stability in a wide range of pH conditions, although slightly lower than MNEI. Our findings confirm the advantages of structure-guided protein engineering to design improved low-calorie sweeteners and excipients for food and pharmaceutical preparations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Understanding of local structure-function relationships of zeolites used in industry through polarized raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera, O. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Lascola, R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Fessler, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Achey, R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hunter, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-09-26

    The overall objective of this project is to optics procurement and instrumental setup completed in Robert Lascola’s laboratory. An Ondax THz-Raman probe was installed in order to obtain Raman terahertz spectra of commercially available Zeolites.

  19. Na,K-ATPase structure/function relationships probed by the denaturant urea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmann, Mikael; Fedosova, Natalya U; Olesen, Claus

    2015-05-01

    Urea interacts with the Na,K-ATPase, leading to reversible as well as irreversible inhibition of the hydrolytic activity. The enzyme purified from shark rectal glands is more sensitive to urea than Na,K-ATPase purified from pig kidney. An immediate and reversible inhibition under steady-state conditions of hydrolytic activity at 37°C is demonstrated for the three reactions studied: the overall Na,K-ATPase activity, the Na-ATPase activity observed in the absence of K+ as well as the K+-dependent phosphatase reaction (K-pNPPase) seen in the absence of Na+. Half-maximal inhibition is seen with about 1M urea for shark enzyme and about 2M urea for pig enzyme. In the presence of substrates there is also an irreversible inhibition in addition to the reversible process, and we show that ATP protects against the irreversible inhibition for both the Na,K-ATPase and Na-ATPase reaction, whereas the substrate paranitrophenylphosphate leads to a slight increase in the rate of irreversible inhibition of the K-pNPPase. The rate of the irreversible inactivation in the absence of substrates is much more rapid for shark enzyme than for pig enzyme. The larger number of potentially urea-sensitive hydrogen bonds in shark enzyme compared to pig enzyme suggests that interference with the extensive hydrogen bonding network might account for the higher urea sensitivity of shark enzyme. The reversible inactivation is interpreted in terms of domain interactions and domain accessibilities using as templates the available crystal structures of Na,K-ATPase. It is suggested that a few interdomain hydrogen bonds are those mainly affected by urea during reversible inactivation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Introductory Bioinformatics Exercises Utilizing Hemoglobin and Chymotrypsin to Reinforce the Protein Sequence-Structure-Function Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inlow, Jennifer K.; Miller, Paige; Pittman, Bethany

    2007-01-01

    We describe two bioinformatics exercises intended for use in a computer laboratory setting in an upper-level undergraduate biochemistry course. To introduce students to bioinformatics, the exercises incorporate several commonly used bioinformatics tools, including BLAST, that are freely available online. The exercises build upon the students'…

  1. New insight into structure/function relationships in plant alpha-amylase family GH13 members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seo, Eun-Seong; Andersen, Joakim Mark; Nielsen, Morten Munch

    2010-01-01

    Two carbohydrate binding surface sites (SBSs) on barley α-amylase 1 (AMY1) of glycoside hydrolase family 13 (GH13) displayed synergy in interactions with starch granules, thus being pivotal for hydrolysis of supramolecular substrates. Mutational analysis showed that SBS1 is more critical for the ......Two carbohydrate binding surface sites (SBSs) on barley α-amylase 1 (AMY1) of glycoside hydrolase family 13 (GH13) displayed synergy in interactions with starch granules, thus being pivotal for hydrolysis of supramolecular substrates. Mutational analysis showed that SBS1 is more critical...... binding domains (SBDs) mediate binding to starch granules. SBDs are currently categorised into 9 carbohydrate binding module (CBM) families. A novel CBM20 subfamily encountered in regulatory enzymes possesses characteristically low affinity for β-CD. Although α-amylase is essential for starch mobilisation...... in germinating barley seeds, efficient degradation requires the concerted action of α-amylase, β-amylase, limit dextrinase (LD) and possibly α-glucosidase. Limit dextrinase (LD) is encoded by a single gene and represents the sole debranching activity during germination. Recent expression of functional LD...

  2. Towards an understanding of structure-function relationships of elongation factor Tu

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiborg, O; Andersen, C; Knudsen, Charlotte Rohde

    1994-01-01

    In light of the recently determined structure of elongation factor Tu, and taking into account chemical studies mapping functional sites, a number of residues have been selected for site-directed mutagenesis studies. Gly94, Gly126, His66, His118, Lys89 and Asp90 have each been point-mutated. Prel......In light of the recently determined structure of elongation factor Tu, and taking into account chemical studies mapping functional sites, a number of residues have been selected for site-directed mutagenesis studies. Gly94, Gly126, His66, His118, Lys89 and Asp90 have each been point...

  3. Structure-function relationships in pulmonary surfactant membranes: from biophysics to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Rodriguez, Elena; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    2014-06-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is an essential lipid-protein complex to maintain an operative respiratory surface at the mammalian lungs. It reduces surface tension at the alveolar air-liquid interface to stabilise the lungs against physical forces operating along the compression-expansion breathing cycles. At the same time, surfactant integrates elements establishing a primary barrier against the entry of pathogens. Lack or deficiencies of the surfactant system are associated with respiratory pathologies, which treatment often includes supplementation with exogenous materials. The present review summarises current models on the molecular mechanisms of surfactant function, with particular emphasis in its biophysical properties to stabilise the lungs and the molecular alterations connecting impaired surfactant with diseased organs. It also provides a perspective on the current surfactant-based strategies to treat respiratory pathologies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Structure and Function: Relevance in the Cell's Physiology, Pathology and Therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Collagenolytic Matrix Metalloproteinase Structure-Function Relationships: Insights From Molecular Dynamics Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabencheva-Christova, Tatyana G; Christov, Christo Z; Fields, Gregg B

    2017-01-01

    Several members of the zinc-dependent matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family catalyze collagen degradation. Experimental data reveal a collaboration between different MMP domains in order to achieve efficient collagenolysis. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been utilized to provide atomistic details of the collagenolytic process. The triple-helical structure of collagen exhibits local regions of flexibility, with modulation of interchain salt bridges and water bridges contributing to accessibility of individual chains by the enzyme. In turn, the hemopexin-like (HPX) domain of the MMP initially binds the triple helix and facilitates the presentation of individual strands to active site in the catalytic (CAT) domain. Extensive positive and negative correlated motions are observed between the CAT and HPX domains when collagen is bound. Ultimately, the MD simulation studies have complemented structural (NMR spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography) and kinetic analyses to provide a more detailed mechanistic view of MMP-catalyzed collagenolysis. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Adaptation to extreme environments: structure-function relationships in Emperor penguin haemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburrini, M; Condò, S G; di Prisco, G; Giardina, B

    1994-04-15

    The functional properties of the single haemoglobin (Hb) of Emperor penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri) have been investigated at different temperatures as a function of proton and organic phosphate concentration. The complete amino acid sequence has been established. Comparison with that of human HbA shows 12 substitutions in the contact regions of alpha beta dimers. In addition to overall similarities shared with most of the avian Hbs previously described, this Hb shows significant differences, which could be related to the peculiar behaviour of this penguin. In particular we may consider that: (1) the shape of the Bohr effect curve seems well adapted for gas exchange during very prolonged dives, preserving penguin Hb from a sudden and not controlled stripping of oxygen; (2) the very minor enthalpy change observed at lower pH could be an example of molecular adaptation, through which oxygen delivery becomes essentially insensitive to exposure to the extremely low temperatures of the environment. Moreover, the small alkaline Bohr effect has been found to be only chloride-linked, since the pH dependence of the oxygen affinity is totally abolished in the absence of this ion. These functional characteristics are discussed on the basis of the primary structure of alpha and beta-chains.

  6. Analysing the relationship between traumatic biographical events and the current structural functioning of personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiltz, L; Schiltz, J

    2008-01-01

    We present the general structure of a multi-annual research project. Our general expectancy concerns the possibilities of arts psychotherapy as a means of launching the blocked process of subjectivation with people suffering from exclusion, precarity and marginalization. The research project follows a complex research design with a sequential strategy, the first part consisting in an integrated psychosocial and clinical study using a mixed methodology. We constructed special rating scales for the analysis of the data of a semi-structured biographical interview and also for the holistic interpretation of the Rotter Blank Sentences Test, separating the associations to sentences beginning with the third and first person. The correlations between two sets of variables (biographical interview and Rotter test) were computed for the total experimental group (N=206), and for clinical subgroups. We shall analyse the matrices of correlations (Spearman's Rho) with the help of optimal scaling procedures (OVERALS). The links between traumatic biographical events and responses to the 3rd, respectively 1st person items of the Rotter test are interpreted in terms of unconscious versus conscious psychological processes and allow us analysing the expression of defence mechanisms and coping strategies. The results of the study are discussed in the light of the recent traumatogenic hypothesis of borderline functioning.

  7. A joint approach: brain structure & function in heavy cannabis users & their relationship with future use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cousijn, J.

    2012-01-01

    Cannabisgebruik is te voorspellen aan de hand van hersenfuncties. Janna Cousijn bracht de hersenstructuur- en functie bij zware cannabisgebruikers in kaart. Met behulp van computertaakjes en functionele MRI (een methode om de hersenen in actie te bekijken) mat ze hersenfuncties op gedragsniveau (bv.

  8. Structure-Function Relationship of the Bik1-Bim1 Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stangier, Marcel M; Kumar, Anil; Chen, Xiuzhen; Farcas, Ana-Maria; Barral, Yves; Steinmetz, Michel O

    2018-04-03

    In budding yeast, the microtubule plus-end tracking proteins Bik1 (CLIP-170) and Bim1 (EB1) form a complex that interacts with partners involved in spindle positioning, including Stu2 and Kar9. Here, we show that the CAP-Gly and coiled-coil domains of Bik1 interact with the C-terminal ETF peptide of Bim1 and the C-terminal tail region of Stu2, respectively. The crystal structures of the CAP-Gly domain of Bik1 (Bik1CG) alone and in complex with an ETF peptide revealed unique, functionally relevant CAP-Gly elements, establishing Bik1CG as a specific C-terminal phenylalanine recognition domain. Unlike the mammalian CLIP-170-EB1 complex, Bik1-Bim1 forms ternary complexes with the EB1-binding motifs SxIP and LxxPTPh, which are present in diverse proteins, including Kar9. Perturbation of the Bik1-Bim1 interaction in vivo affected Bik1 localization and astral microtubule length. Our results provide insight into the role of the Bik1-Bim1 interaction for cell division, and demonstrate that the CLIP-170-EB1 module is evolutionarily flexible. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of Mutations on Structure-Function Relationships of Matrix Metalloproteinase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Warispreet; Fields, Gregg B; Christov, Christo Z; Karabencheva-Christova, Tatyana G

    2016-10-14

    Matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) is one of the most widely studied enzymes involved in collagen degradation. Mutations of specific residues in the MMP-1 hemopexin-like (HPX) domain have been shown to modulate activity of the MMP-1 catalytic (CAT) domain. In order to reveal the structural and conformational effects of such mutations, a molecular dynamics (MD) study was performed of in silico mutated residues in the X-ray crystallographic structure of MMP-1 complexed with a collagen-model triple-helical peptide (THP). The results indicate an important role of the mutated residues in MMP-1 interactions with the THP and communication between the CAT and the HPX domains. Each mutation has a distinct impact on the correlated motions in the MMP-1•THP. An increased collagenase activity corresponded to the appearance of a unique anti-correlated motion and decreased correlated motions, while decreased collagenase activity corresponded both to increased and decreased anti-correlated motions.

  10. Structure-function relationships of new lipids designed for DNA transfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, Matthias; Heinze, Martin; Wölk, Christian; Funari, Sergio S; Dobner, Bodo; Möhwald, Helmuth; Brezesinski, Gerald

    2011-08-22

    Cationic liposome/DNA complexes can be used as nonviral vectors for direct delivery of DNA-based biopharmaceuticals to damaged cells and tissues. To obtain more effective and safer liposome-based gene transfection systems, two cationic lipids with identical head groups but different chain structures are investigated with respect to their in vitro gene-transfer activity, their cell-damaging characteristics, and their physicochemical properties. The gene-transfer activities of the two lipids are very different. Differential scanning calorimetry and synchrotron small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering give valuable structural insight. A subgel-like structure with high packing density and high phase-transition temperature from gel to liquid-crystalline state are found for lipid 7 (N'-2-[(2,6-diamino-1-oxohexyl)amino]ethyl-2,N-bis(hexadecyl)propanediamide) containing two saturated chains. Additionally, an ordered head-group lattice based on formation of a hydrogen-bond network is present. In contrast, lipid 8 (N'-2-[(2,6-diamino-1-oxohexyl)amino]ethyl-2-hexadecyl-N-[(9Z)-octadec-9-enyl]propanediamide) with one unsaturated and one saturated chain shows a lower phase-transition temperature and a reduced packing density. These properties enhance incorporation of the helper lipid cholesterol needed for gene transfection. Both lipids, either pure or in mixtures with cholesterol, form lamellar phases, which are preserved after addition of DNA. However, the system separates into phases containing DNA and phases without DNA. On increasing the temperature, DNA is released and only a lipid phase without intercalated DNA strands is observed. The conversion temperatures are very different in the two systems studied. The important parameter seems to be the charge density of the lipid membranes, which is a result of different solubility of cholesterol in the two lipid membranes. Therefore, different binding affinities of the DNA to the lipid mixtures are achieved. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Structure-Function Relationships Underlying the Capacity of Bordetella Adenylate Cyclase Toxin to Disarm Host Phagocytes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novák, Jakub; Černý, Ondřej; Osičková, Adriana; Linhartová, Irena; Mašín, Jiří; Bumba, Ladislav; Šebo, Peter; Osička, Radim

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 10 (2017), s. 1-28, č. článku 300. E-ISSN 2072-6651 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-09157S; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-05919S; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015064; GA MZd(CZ) NV16-28126A Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : adenylate cyclase toxin * Bordetella * cAMP Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 3.030, year: 2016

  12. Fish axial muscle : structure-function relationships on a micro-level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spierts, I.L.Y.

    2000-01-01

    This paper discusses some examples of strong correlations between functions and structures in axial fish muscle on a micro-level. Muscle tissue needs a certain elasticity to cope with the diverse functional requirements necessary for swimming. During fast-starts of carp, muscles can be stretched up

  13. The virtual photon structure functions and AdS/QCD correspondence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Yutaka

    2010-01-01

    We study the virtual photons structure functions from gauge/string duality. If the Bjorken variable x is not small, supergravity approximation becomes good in dual string theory. We calculate the virtual photon structure functions at large 't Hooft coupling in a moderate x-region and determine x-behavior of the structure functions. We also show that the Callan-Gross relation F L =0 is satisfied to a good approximation in gravity calculation. (author)

  14. Nucleon deep-inelastic structure functions in a quark model with factorizability assumptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linkevich, A.D.; Skachkov, N.B.

    1979-01-01

    Formula for structure functions of deep-inelastic electron scattering on nucleon is derived. For this purpose the dynamic model of factorizing quark amplitudes is used. It has been found that with increase of Q 2 transferred pulse square at great values of x kinemastic variable the decrease of structure function values is observed. At x single values the increase of structure function values is found. The comparison With experimental data shows a good agreement of the model with experiment

  15. On the twist-2 contributions to polarized structure functions and new sum rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluemlein, J.; Kochelev, N.

    1996-03-01

    The twist-2 contributions to the polarized structure functions in deep inelastic lepton-hadron scattering are calculated including the exchange of weak bosons and using both the operator product expansion and the covariant parton model. A new relation between two structure functions leading to a sequence of new sum rules is found. The light quark mass corrections to the structure functions are derived in lowest order QCD. (orig.)

  16. On the twist-2 and twist-3 contributions to the spin-dependent electroweak structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluemlein, J.; Kochelev, N.

    1997-01-01

    The twist-2 and twist-3 contributions of the polarized deep-inelastic structure functions are calculated both for neutral and charged current interactions using the operator product expansion in lowest order in QCD. The relations between the different structure functions are determined. New integral relations are derived between the twist-2 contributions of the structure functions g 3 (x,Q 2 ) and g 5 (x,Q 2 ) and between combinations of the twist-3 contributions to the structure functions g 2 (x,Q 2 ) and g 3 (x,Q 2 ). The sum rules for polarized deep-inelastic scattering are discussed in detail. (orig.)

  17. Mutagenesis Objective Search and Selection Tool (MOSST: an algorithm to predict structure-function related mutations in proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asenjo Juan A

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functionally relevant artificial or natural mutations are difficult to assess or predict if no structure-function information is available for a protein. This is especially important to correctly identify functionally significant non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs or to design a site-directed mutagenesis strategy for a target protein. A new and powerful methodology is proposed to guide these two decision strategies, based only on conservation rules of physicochemical properties of amino acids extracted from a multiple alignment of a protein family where the target protein belongs, with no need of explicit structure-function relationships. Results A statistical analysis is performed over each amino acid position in the multiple protein alignment, based on different amino acid physical or chemical characteristics, including hydrophobicity, side-chain volume, charge and protein conformational parameters. The variances of each of these properties at each position are combined to obtain a global statistical indicator of the conservation degree of each property. Different types of physicochemical conservation are defined to characterize relevant and irrelevant positions. The differences between statistical variances are taken together as the basis of hypothesis tests at each position to search for functionally significant mutable sites and to identify specific mutagenesis targets. The outcome is used to statistically predict physicochemical consensus sequences based on different properties and to calculate the amino acid propensities at each position in a given protein. Hence, amino acid positions are identified that are putatively responsible for function, specificity, stability or binding interactions in a family of proteins. Once these key functional positions are identified, position-specific statistical distributions are applied to divide the 20 common protein amino acids in each position of the protein

  18. Effect of practical application of intimate relationship skills program in marital commitment of couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahareh Chitsazzadeh Alaf

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, due to the increasing rate of divorce and betrayals, the marital commitment has been concerned in marriage and family studies. The research aimed to evaluate the effect of Practical Application of Intimate Relationship Skills (PAIRS program in marital commitment of couples. The method was quasi-experimental and the design was pretest-posttest with a control group. The convenience sampling method was employed to choose 16 couples whose marital commitment score was below the mean in Isfahan, Iran. These couples were randomly assigned to the experimental and control groups (N=8 in each group. Data gathering was carried out using Adams and Jones dimensions of commitment inventory (DCI that was filled out by the members of both groups in the pretest stage. Then, the experimental group received the PAIRS training program in thirteen 90-minute sessions. 35 percent of the total variance belongs to the group membership due to the effectiveness of this educational program. This educational program attempts to make couples aware of themselves and their spouses, enhance, intimacy and empathy and develop effective relationship skills and problem-solving skills. The results demonstrated that the PAIRS program showed a positive effect on marital commitment. Hence, the PAIRS program can be employed to prevent divorce by increasing marital commitment in couples.

  19. On the behaviour of DIS structure function ratio R(x, Q2) at small x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotikov, A.V.

    1993-01-01

    The behaviour of deep inelastic structure functions is studied at small x in the leading and next-to-leading orders of perturbation theory. The scheme-invariant analysis for the longitudinal and transverse structure functions ratio R(x, Q 2 ), is given. It is found that this ratio tends to zero asymptotically when x -> 0. (author). 12 refs.; 1 fig

  20. Gluon structure function for deeply inelastic scattering with nucleus in QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayala Filho, Alvaro L; Ducati, M.B. Gay [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Levin, Eugene [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina (Russian Federation). Theory Dept.

    1995-06-01

    In this talk we present the first calculation of the gluon structure function for nucleus in QCD. We discuss the Glauber formula for the gluon structure function and the violation of this simple approach that we anticipate in QCD. (author). 10 refs, 4 figs.

  1. Measurement of the electron structure function F2e at LEP energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Abdallah

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The hadronic part of the electron structure function F2e has been measured for the first time, using e+e− data collected by the DELPHI experiment at LEP, at centre-of-mass energies of s=91.2–209.5 GeV. The data analysis is simpler than that of the measurement of the photon structure function. The electron structure function F2e data are compared to predictions of phenomenological models based on the photon structure function. It is shown that the contribution of large target photon virtualities is significant. The data presented can serve as a cross-check of the photon structure function F2γ analyses and help in refining existing parameterisations.

  2. Regge analysis of diffractive and leading baryon structure functions from deep inelastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batista, M.; Covolan, R.J.M.; Montanha, J.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we present a combined analysis of the H1 data on leading baryon and diffractive structure functions from DIS, which are handled as two components of the same semi-inclusive process. The available structure function data are analyzed in a series of fits in which three main exchanges are taken into account: the Pomeron, Reggeon, and pion. For each of these contributions, Regge factorization of the correspondent structure function is assumed. By this procedure, we extract information about the interface between the diffractive, Pomeron-dominated, region and the leading proton spectrum, which is mostly ruled by secondary exchanges. One of the main results is that the relative Reggeon contribution to the semi-inclusive structure function is much smaller than the one obtained from an analysis of the diffractive structure function alone

  3. Structure function measurements in the deep inelastic muon-nucleon scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peschel, H.

    1990-03-01

    Measurements of deep inelastic scattering events on a combined copper and deuterium target were performed by the European Muon Collaboration (EMC) using a muon beam at CERN's SPS with energies at 100 GeV and 280 GeV. The data are analysed and compared with a detailed Monte-Carlo simulation and allow the determination of structure functions from both targets. In the light of the present discrepancy between EMC's and BCDMS's structure functions, stringend cuts were applied to the data. The results confirm the EMC structure function measurements on unbound nucleons. The comparison between the copper structure function from this experiment and the NA2 iron structure function shows a trend to lower values at low x Bj . (orig.) [de

  4. Measurement of the electron structure function F{sub 2}{sup e} at LEP energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdallah, J. [LPNHE, IN2P3-CNRS, Univ. Paris VI et VII, 4 place Jussieu, FR-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Abreu, P. [LIP, IST, FCUL, Av. Elias Garcia, 14-1" o, PT-1000 Lisboa Codex (Portugal); Adam, W. [Institut für Hochenergiephysik, Österr. Akad. d. Wissensch., Nikolsdorfergasse 18, AT-1050 Vienna (Austria); Adzic, P. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, N.C.S.R. Demokritos, P.O. Box 60228, GR-15310 Athens (Greece); Albrecht, T. [Institut für Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universität Karlsruhe, Postfach 6980, DE-76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Alemany-Fernandez, R. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Allmendinger, T. [Institut für Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universität Karlsruhe, Postfach 6980, DE-76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Allport, P.P. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, P.O. Box 147, Liverpool L69 3BX (United Kingdom); Amaldi, U. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Univ. di Milano-Bicocca and INFN-Milano, Piazza della Scienza 3, IT-20126 Milan (Italy); Amapane, N. [Dipartimento di Fisica Sperimentale, Università di Torino and INFN, Via P. Giuria 1, IT-10125 Turin (Italy); Amato, S. [Univ. Federal do Rio de Janeiro, C.P. 68528 Cidade Univ., Ilha do Fundão, BR-21945-970 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Anashkin, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Padova and INFN, Via Marzolo 8, IT-35131 Padua (Italy); Andreazza, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano and INFN-Milano, Via Celoria 16, IT-20133 Milan (Italy); Andringa, S.; Anjos, N. [LIP, IST, FCUL, Av. Elias Garcia, 14-1" o, PT-1000 Lisboa Codex (Portugal); Antilogus, P. [LPNHE, IN2P3-CNRS, Univ. Paris VI et VII, 4 place Jussieu, FR-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); and others

    2014-10-07

    The hadronic part of the electron structure function F{sub 2}{sup e} has been measured for the first time, using e{sup +}e{sup −} data collected by the DELPHI experiment at LEP, at centre-of-mass energies of √(s)=91.2–209.5 GeV. The data analysis is simpler than that of the measurement of the photon structure function. The electron structure function F{sub 2}{sup e} data are compared to predictions of phenomenological models based on the photon structure function. It is shown that the contribution of large target photon virtualities is significant. The data presented can serve as a cross-check of the photon structure function F{sub 2}{sup γ} analyses and help in refining existing parameterisations.

  5. Bound-state quark and gluon contributions to structure functions in QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1990-08-01

    One can distinguish two types of contributions to the quark and gluon structure functions of hadrons in quantum chromodynamics: ''intrinsic'' contributions, which are due to the direct scattering on the bound-state constituents, and ''extrinsic'' contributions, which are derived from particles created in the collision. In this talk, I discussed several aspects of deep inelastic structure functions in which the bound-state structure of the proton plays a crucial role: the properties of the intrinsic gluon distribution associated with the proton bound-state wavefunction; the separation of the quark structure function of the proton onto intrinsic ''bound-valence'' and extrinsic ''non-valence'' components which takes into account the Pauli principle; the properties and identification of intrinsic heavy quark structure functions; and a theory of shadowing and anti-shadowing of nuclear structure functions, directly related to quark-nucleon interactions and the gluon saturation phenomenon. 49 refs., 5 figs

  6. Bound-state quark and gluon contributions to structure functions in QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    One can distinguish two types of contributions to the quark and gluon structure functions of hadrons in quantum chromodynamics: 'intrinsic' contributions, which are due to the direct scattering on the bound-state constituents, and 'extrinsic' contributions, which are derived from particles created in the collision. In this talk, I discuss several aspects of deep inealstic structure functions in which the bound-state structure of the proton plays a crucial role: (1) the properties of the intrinsic gluon distribution associated with the proton bound-state wavefunction; (2) the separation of the quark structure function of the proton into intrinsic 'bound-valence' and extrinsic 'non-valence' components which takes into account the Pauli principle; (3) the properties and identification of intrinsic heavy quark structure functions; and (4) a theory of shadowing and anti-shadowing of nuclear structure functions, directly related to quark-nucleon interactions and the gluon saturation phenomenon. (orig.)

  7. Template-assisted growth of nano structured functional materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ying, K.K.; Nur Ubaidah Saidin; Khuan, N.I.; Suhaila Hani Ilias; Foo, C.T.

    2012-01-01

    Template-assisted growth is an important nano electrochemical deposition technique for synthesizing one-dimensional (1-D) nano structures with uniformly well-controlled shapes and sizes. A good template with well-defined dimensions is imperative for realizing this task. Porous anodic alumina (PAA) has been a favorable candidate for this purpose as it can be tailor-made with precise pore geometries, such as pore length and diameter as well as inter-pore distances, via the anodization of pure aluminium. This paper reports the fabrication of PAA templates and electrochemical synthesis of functional nano structures in the form of nano wires using PAA templates as scaffolds. Axial heterostructure and homogeneous nano wires formed by engineering materials configuration via composition and/ or layer thickness variations were fabricated for different functionalities. X-ray diffraction and imaging techniques were used to alucidate the microstructures, morphologies and chemical compositions of the nano wires produced. Due to their large surface area-to-volume ratios, and therefore high sensitivities, these functional nano structures have useful applications as critical components in nano sensor devices and various areas of nano technology. Potential applications include as hydrogen gas sensors in nuclear power plant for monitoring structural integrity of reactor components and containment building, as well as environmental monitoring of air pollution and leakages of toxic gases and chemicals. (Author)

  8. Membrane Transporters: Structure, Function and Targets for Drug Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravna, Aina W.; Sager, Georg; Dahl, Svein G.; Sylte, Ingebrigt

    Current therapeutic drugs act on four main types of molecular targets: enzymes, receptors, ion channels and transporters, among which a major part (60-70%) are membrane proteins. This review discusses the molecular structures and potential impact of membrane transporter proteins on new drug discovery. The three-dimensional (3D) molecular structure of a protein contains information about the active site and possible ligand binding, and about evolutionary relationships within the protein family. Transporters have a recognition site for a particular substrate, which may be used as a target for drugs inhibiting the transporter or acting as a false substrate. Three groups of transporters have particular interest as drug targets: the major facilitator superfamily, which includes almost 4000 different proteins transporting sugars, polyols, drugs, neurotransmitters, metabolites, amino acids, peptides, organic and inorganic anions and many other substrates; the ATP-binding cassette superfamily, which plays an important role in multidrug resistance in cancer chemotherapy; and the neurotransmitter:sodium symporter family, which includes the molecular targets for some of the most widely used psychotropic drugs. Recent technical advances have increased the number of known 3D structures of membrane transporters, and demonstrated that they form a divergent group of proteins with large conformational flexibility which facilitates transport of the substrate.

  9. Linking vegetation structure, function and physiology through spectroscopic remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serbin, S.; Singh, A.; Couture, J. J.; Shiklomanov, A. N.; Rogers, A.; Desai, A. R.; Kruger, E. L.; Townsend, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    Terrestrial ecosystem process models require detailed information on ecosystem states and canopy properties to properly simulate the fluxes of carbon (C), water and energy from the land to the atmosphere and assess the vulnerability of ecosystems to perturbations. Current models fail to adequately capture the magnitude, spatial variation, and seasonality of terrestrial C uptake and storage, leading to significant uncertainties in the size and fate of the terrestrial C sink. By and large, these parameter and process uncertainties arise from inadequate spatial and temporal representation of plant traits, vegetation structure, and functioning. With increases in computational power and changes to model architecture and approaches, it is now possible for models to leverage detailed, data rich and spatially explicit descriptions of ecosystems to inform parameter distributions and trait tradeoffs. In this regard, spectroscopy and imaging spectroscopy data have been shown to be invaluable observational datasets to capture broad-scale spatial and, eventually, temporal dynamics in important vegetation properties. We illustrate the linkage of plant traits and spectral observations to supply key data constraints for model parameterization. These constraints can come either in the form of the raw spectroscopic data (reflectance, absorbtance) or physiological traits derived from spectroscopy. In this presentation we highlight our ongoing work to build ecological scaling relationships between critical vegetation characteristics and optical properties across diverse and complex canopies, including temperate broadleaf and conifer forests, Mediterranean vegetation, Arctic systems, and agriculture. We focus on work at the leaf, stand, and landscape scales, illustrating the importance of capturing the underlying variability in a range of parameters (including vertical variation within canopies) to enable more efficient scaling of traits related to functional diversity of ecosystems.

  10. The Structural, Functional and Molecular Organization of the Brainstem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf eNieuwenhuys

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available According to Wilhelm His (1891, 1893 the brainstem consists of two longitudinal zones, the dorsal alar plate (sensory in nature and the ventral basal plate (motor in nature. Johnston and Herrick indicated that both plates can be subdivided into separate somatic and visceral zones, distinguishing somatosensory and viscerosensory zones within the alar plate, and visceromotor and somatomotor zones within the basal plate. To test the validity of this ‘four-functional-zones’ concept, I developed a topological procedure, surveying the spatial relationships of the various cell masses in the brainstem in a single figure. Brainstems of 16 different anamniote species were analyzed, and revealed that the brainstems are clearly divisible into four morphological zones, which correspond largely with the functional zones of Johnston and Herrick. Exceptions include (1 the magnocellular vestibular nucleus situated in the viscerosensory zone; (2 the basal plate containing a number of evidently non-motor centres (superior and inferior olives. Nevertheless the ‘functional zonal model’ has explanatory value. Thus, it is possible to interpret certain brain specializations related to particular behavioural profiles, as ‘local hypertrophies’ of one or two functional columns. Recent developmental molecular studies on brains of birds and mammals confirmed the presence of longitudinal zones, and also showed molecularly defined transverse bands or neuromeres throughout development. The intersecting boundaries of the longitudinal zones and the transverse bands appeared to delimit radially arranged histogenetic domains. Because neuromeres have been observed in embryonic and larval stages of numerous anamniote species, it may be hypothesized that the brainstems of all vertebrates share a basic organizational plan, in which intersecting longitudinal and transverse zones form fundamental histogenetic and genoarchitectonic units.

  11. Haar wavelets, fluctuations and structure functions: convenient choices for geophysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lovejoy

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Geophysical processes are typically variable over huge ranges of space-time scales. This has lead to the development of many techniques for decomposing series and fields into fluctuations Δv at well-defined scales. Classically, one defines fluctuations as differences: (Δvdiff = v(xx-v(x and this is adequate for many applicationsx is the "lag". However, if over a range one has scaling Δv ∝ ΔxH, these difference fluctuations are only adequate when 0 < H < 1. Hence, there is the need for other types of fluctuations. In particular, atmospheric processes in the "macroweather" range ≈10 days to 10–30 yr generally have −1 < H < 0, so that a definition valid over the range −1 < H < 1 would be very useful for atmospheric applications. A general framework for defining fluctuations is wavelets. However, the generality of wavelets often leads to fairly arbitrary choices of "mother wavelet" and the resulting wavelet coefficients may be difficult to interpret. In this paper we argue that a good choice is provided by the (historically first wavelet, the Haar wavelet (Haar, 1910, which is easy to interpret and – if needed – to generalize, yet has rarely been used in geophysics. It is also easy to implement numerically: the Haar fluctuation (ΔvHaar at lag Δx is simply equal to the difference of the mean from x to x+ Δx/2 and from xx/2 to xx. Indeed, we shall see that the interest of the Haar wavelet is this relation to the integrated process rather than its wavelet nature per se.

    Using numerical multifractal simulations, we show that it is quite accurate, and we compare and contrast it with another similar technique, detrended fluctuation analysis. We find that, for estimating scaling exponents, the two methods are very similar, yet

  12. Toward a standardized structural-functional group connectome in MNI space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Andreas; Blankenburg, Felix

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of the structural architecture of the human brain in terms of connectivity between its subregions has provided profound insights into its underlying functional organization and has coined the concept of the "connectome", a structural description of the elements forming the human brain and the connections among them. Here, as a proof of concept, we introduce a novel group connectome in standard space based on a large sample of 169 subjects from the Enhanced Nathan Kline Institute-Rockland Sample (eNKI-RS). Whole brain structural connectomes of each subject were estimated with a global tracking approach, and the resulting fiber tracts were warped into standard stereotactic (MNI) space using DARTEL. Employing this group connectome, the results of published tracking studies (i.e., the JHU white matter and Oxford thalamic connectivity atlas) could be largely reproduced directly within MNI space. In a second analysis, a study that examined structural connectivity between regions of a functional network, namely the default mode network, was reproduced. Voxel-wise structural centrality was then calculated and compared to others' findings. Furthermore, including additional resting-state fMRI data from the same subjects, structural and functional connectivity matrices between approximately forty thousand nodes of the brain were calculated. This was done to estimate structure-function agreement indices of voxel-wise whole brain connectivity. Taken together, the combination of a novel whole brain fiber tracking approach and an advanced normalization method led to a group connectome that allowed (at least heuristically) performing fiber tracking directly within MNI space. Such an approach may be used for various purposes like the analysis of structural connectivity and modeling experiments that aim at studying the structure-function relationship of the human connectome. Moreover, it may even represent a first step toward a standard DTI template of the human brain

  13. The Structural-functional Organization of the Urban Landschaft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile GUŢULEAC

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The structure of the anthropic landschaft characterizes its internal organization, the connections between its components and the natural-anthropic associations of an inferior degree.The anthropic layer is to be analyzed in analogy with the natural component of the landschaft, which includes architectural edifices, communications, the geological component,the anthropic vegetation, the barren heaps resulted from mining activities, etc. The parametres of the anthropic components of the landschaft are the free surface, the built surface, the heightof the buildings and the density.The different geographical elements are reconstituted on the basis of NTCs (National Territorial Complex, separated on subtypes according to their specific (NTC IV – functionallandschaft area, NTC III – human settlement, NTC II – technogene fenced-in district, NTC I– technogene lot. We emphasized the features of these organizational types after we had donemuch research in field and in laboratory. We managed to draw a landschaft – functional mapof Czernowitz town, with a scale of 1: 10 000. We managed to detect 125 types of anthropiccomplex of lanschaft.For the urban territory we proposed two types of classification for the landschaftsystems: 1. NTCs that existed before the intense industrial anthropization; 2. technohenenatural complexes. The map of the anthropic-landschaft complexes of the town can be used asa basis for the geo-chemical map and for some applicative maps, especially ecological ones.

  14. Structure, function and diversity of the healthy human microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-13

    Studies of the human microbiome have revealed that even healthy individuals differ remarkably in the microbes that occupy habitats such as the gut, skin and vagina. Much of this diversity remains unexplained, although diet, environment, host genetics and early microbial exposure have all been implicated. Accordingly, to characterize the ecology of human-associated microbial communities, the Human Microbiome Project has analysed the largest cohort and set of distinct, clinically relevant body habitats so far. We found the diversity and abundance of each habitat's signature microbes to vary widely even among healthy subjects, with strong niche specialization both within and among individuals. The project encountered an estimated 81-99% of the genera, enzyme families and community configurations occupied by the healthy Western microbiome. Metagenomic carriage of metabolic pathways was stable among individuals despite variation in community structure, and ethnic/racial background proved to be one of the strongest associations of both pathways and microbes with clinical metadata. These results thus delineate the range of structural and functional configurations normal in the microbial communities of a healthy population, enabling future characterization of the epidemiology, ecology and translational applications of the human microbiome.

  15. Preliminary Results on the Experimental Investigation of the Structure Functions of Bound Nucleons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodek, Arie [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-08-01

    We present preliminary results on an experimental study of the nuclear modification of the longitudinal ($\\sigma_L$) and transverse ($\\sigma_T$) structure functions of nucleons bound in nuclear targets. The origin of these modifications (commonly referred as as the EMC effect) is not fully understood. Our measurements of R= $\\sigma_L / \\sigma_T$ for nuclei ($R_A$) and for deuterium ($R_D$) indicate that nuclear modifications of the structure functions of bound nucleons are different for the longitudinal and transverse structure functions, and that contrary to expectation from several theoretical models, $R_A< R_D$.

  16. The ratio of the beauty structure functions Rb=(FLb)/(F2b) at low x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boroun, G.R.

    2014-01-01

    We study the structure functions F k b (x,Q 2 ) (k=2,L) and the reduced cross section σ r b (x,Q 2 ) for small values of Bjorken's x variable with respect to the hard (Lipatov) pomeron for the gluon distribution and provide a compact formula for the ratio R b that is useful to extract the beauty structure function from the beauty reduced cross section, in particular at DESY HERA. Also we show that the effects of the nonlinear corrections to the gluon distribution tame the behavior of the beauty structure function and the beauty reduced cross section at low x

  17. Application of radioisotope tracer techniques in studies on host-parasite relationships, with special reference to larval trematodes. A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, N.Oe.

    1981-01-01

    The application of radioisotope tracer techniques in studies on various host-parasite relationships between larval trematodes and their intermediate and definite hosts is reviewed. Such studies comprise, for example, the reproduction and nutrition of various developmental stages of trematodes in relation to host and environment. The preparation and application of radiolabelled larvae are also discussed with special emphasis on their use in studies on free-living ecology and migration in hosts. (author)

  18. Structure function of off-mass-shell pions and the calculation of the Sullivan process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakin, C.M.; Sun, W.

    1994-01-01

    We construct a model for the pion (valence) structure function that fits the experimental data obtained in the study of the Drell-Yan process. The model may also be used to calculate the structure function of off-mass-shell pions. We apply our model in the study of deep-inelastic scattering from off-mass-shell pions found in the nucleon and are thus able to resolve a problem encountered in the standard analysis of such processes. The usual analysis is made using the structure function of on-mass-shell pions and requires the use of a soft πNN form factor that is inconsistent with standard nuclear physics phenomenology. The use of our off-mass-shell structure functions allows for a fit to the data for nonperturbative aspects of the nucleon ''sea'' with a pion-nucleon form factor of the standard form

  19. The spin-dependent structure function g1 of the deuteron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bueltmann, S.

    1996-01-01

    Results on the spin-dependent structure function g 1 d of the deuteron measured by the Spin Muon Collaboration at CERN are presented. They are based on deep-inelastic scattering of 190 GeV polarized muons off a polarized deuteron target in the kinematic range of 0.003 ≤ x Bj ≤ 0.7 and 1 GeV 2 ≤ Q 2 ≤ 60 GeV 2 . The structure function is found to be negative for small values of x Bj , while the proton structure function g 1 p measured earlier by the SMC is positive over the whole x Bj -range. The Bjorken sum rule is in good agreement with the first moments of the structure functions, while the Ellis-Jaffe sum rule is violated by more than three standard deviations for the deuteron measurement. (author)

  20. Moments of unpolarized nucleon structure functions in chirally improved lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goeckeler, Meinulf; Maurer, Thilo; Schaefer, Andreas [University of Regensburg (Germany); Lang, Christian B.; Limmer, Markus [University of Graz (Austria)

    2008-07-01

    We present our results for the lowest moments of unpolarized nucleon structure functions at leading twist. We employ lattice quantum chromodynamics using chirally improved fermions in quenched as well as dynamical simulations.

  1. An estimation of the structure function xF3 in neutrino-proton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Kenzaburo; Arimoto, Shinsuke; Hoshino, Shigetoshi; Itoh, Nobuhisa; Konno, Toshiharu.

    1981-01-01

    The structure function xF 3 (x, Q 2 ) in the deep-inelastic neutrino-proton scattering was estimated without differentiating with respect to Q 2 in the evolution function. At first, the moment of the non-singlet structure function xF 3 (x, Q 2 ) is defined. Then, the kernel function f(z, Q 2 ) is presented. Finally, the expression for the structure function xF 3 is given. The values of the structure function for various Q 2 are shown in five figures. A peak is seen in each figure, and the highest peak is at about Q 2 = 14GeV 2 . The analysis suggests very small value of xF 3 in small Q 2 region. The kernel function f(x/y, Q 2 ) may be interpreted as the probability of finding a quark of momentum fraction x arising from that of y is quantum chromodynamics. (Kato, T.)

  2. On the behaviour of the hadronic structure functions at x → 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigoryan, S.G.; Yesaybegyan, S.B.; Ter-Isaakyan, N.L.

    1977-01-01

    The hadronic structure functions are studied in quarkgluon model (when x=q 2 /2pq → 1, where q is the quark transferred momentum, p is the hadron momentum). For baryon octet the relations between structure functions depending on quark mass are obtained. For LAMBDA and Ψ hyperons strange quark contribution dominates at x → 1. In the case of Σ hyperons the contributions of U and S quarks are nearly of the same order. The average transverse momentum of quark with x approximately 1 turns out to be = 6 msup(2), where m is quark mass. For tne n quark bound state the behaviour of structure functions for odd n and for even n are obtained. The dependence of structure functions on the polarization of the initial particle is also analyzed. It is shown that the Λ hyperon helicity reache 3O % while for the Σ + hyperon this magnitude is equal to 15 %

  3. The photon structure function and hard scattering in two-photon reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolanoski, H.

    1984-09-01

    This report summarizes experimental results obtained by the CELLO, JADE, PLUTO and TASSO collaborations on the following topics: the structure function of the photon; hard scattering and jet production and exclusive hadron pair production. (orig.)

  4. Structure-function discrepancy in Clostridium botulinum C3 toxin for its rational prioritization as a subunit vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prathiviraj, R; Prisilla, A; Chellapandi, P

    2016-06-01

    Clostridium botulinum is anaerobic pathogenic bacterium causing food-born botulism in human and animals by producing botulinum neurotoxins A-H, C2, and C3 cytotoxins. Physiological group III strains (type C and D) of this bacterium are capable of producing C2 and C3 toxins in cattle and avian. Herein, we have revealed the structure-function disparity of C3 toxins from two different C. botulinum type C phage (CboC) and type D phage (CboD) to design avirulent toxins rationally. Structure-function discrepancy of the both toxins was computationally evaluated from their homology models based on the conservation in sequence-structure-function relationships upon covariation and point mutations. It has shown that 8 avirulent mutants were generated from CboC of 34 mutants while 27 avirulent mutants resulted from CboD mutants. No major changes were found in tertiary structure of these toxins; however, some structural variations appeared in the coiled and loop regions. Correlated mutation on the first residue would disorder or revolutionize the hydrogen bonding pattern of the coevolved pairs. It suggested that the residues coupling in the local structural environments were compensated with coevolved pairs so as to preserve a pseudocatalytic function in the avirulent mutants. Avirulent mutants of C3 toxins have shown a stable structure with a common blue print of folding process and also attained a near-native backrub ensemble. Thus, we concluded that selecting the site-directed mutagenesis sites are very important criteria for designing avirulent toxins, in development of rational subunit vaccines, to cattle and avian, but the vaccine specificity can be determined by the C3 toxins of C. botulinum harboring phages.

  5. Linear estimates of structure functions from deep inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering data. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anikeev, V.B.; Zhigunov, V.P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper concerns the linear estimation of structure functions from muon(electron)-nucleon scattering. The expressions obtained for the structure functions estimate provide correct analysis of the random error and the bias The bias arises because of the finite number of experimental data and the finite resolution of experiment. The approach suggested may become useful for data handling from experiments at HERA. 9 refs

  6. Structure functions of the deuteron with allowance for meson exchange currents within QCD-VMD model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burov, V.V.

    1992-01-01

    The deuteron structure functions A(q 2 ), B(q 2 ) and tensor polarization T 20 (q 2 ) are studied within the QCD-VMD model. It is shown that the calculation of the structure functions with allowance for meson exchange currents does not allow us to improve the agreement with experiment at large transfer momenta where probably other degrees of freedom are to be taken into account. 24 refs.; 6 figs

  7. Structure functions and pair correlations of the quark-gluon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoma, Markus H.

    2005-01-01

    Recent experiments at RHIC and theoretical considerations indicate that the quark-gluon plasma, present in the fireball of relativistic heavy-ion collisions, might be in a liquid phase. The liquid state can be identified by characteristic correlation and structure functions. Here definitions of the structure functions and pair correlations of the quark-gluon plasma are presented as well as perturbative results. These definitions might be useful for verifying the quark-gluon-plasma liquid in QCD lattice calculations

  8. Regge behaviour of structure function and gluon distribution at low-x in leading order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarma, J.K.

    2000-01-01

    We present a method to find the gluon distribution from the F 2 proton structure function data at low-x assuming the Regge behaviour of the gluon distribution function at this limit. We use the leading order (LO) Altarelli-Parisi (AP) evolution equation in our analysis and compare our result with those of other authors. We also discuss the limitations of the Taylor expansion method in extracting the gluon distribution from the F 2 structure function used by those authors. (orig.)

  9. Measurement of the spin dependent structure functions of proton and neutron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rith, K.

    1989-01-01

    Recent results from the EMC experiment on the spin dependent structure function g 1 p (x) of the proton are discussed. They suggest that the nucleon spin does not originate from quark spins but rather from angular orbital momentum and gluon contributions. A proposed experiment at HERA is presented which will allow a very accurate measurement of the spin dependent structure functions and their integrals of both proton and neutron and a precise test of the Bjorken sum rule. (orig.)

  10. A next-to-leading order QCD analysis of the spin structure function $g_1$

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2067425; Arik, E; Badelek, B; Bardin, G; Baum, G; Berglund, P; Betev, L; Birsa, R; De Botton, N R; Bradamante, Franco; Bravar, A; Bressan, A; Bültmann, S; Burtin, E; Crabb, D; Cranshaw, J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Dalla Torre, S; Van Dantzig, R; Derro, B R; Deshpande, A A; Dhawan, S K; Dulya, C M; Eichblatt, S; Fasching, D; Feinstein, F; Fernández, C; Forthmann, S; Frois, Bernard; Gallas, A; Garzón, J A; Gilly, H; Giorgi, M A; von Goeler, E; Görtz, S; Gracia, G; De Groot, N; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Haft, K; Von Harrach, D; Hasegawa, T; Hautle, P; Hayashi, N; Heusch, C A; Horikawa, N; Hughes, V W; Igo, G; Ishimoto, S; Iwata, T; Kabuss, E M; Kageya, T; Karev, A G; Kessler, H J; Ketel, T; Kiryluk, J; Kiselev, Yu F; Krämer, Dietrich; Krivokhizhin, V G; Kröger, W; Kukhtin, V V; Kurek, K; Kyynäräinen, J; Lamanna, M; Landgraf, U; Le Goff, J M; Lehár, F; de Lesquen, A; Lichtenstadt, J; Litmaath, M; Magnon, A; Mallot, G K; Marie, F; Martin, A; Martino, J; Matsuda, T; Mayes, B W; McCarthy, J S; Medved, K S; Meyer, W T; Van Middelkoop, G; Miller, D; Miyachi, Y; Mori, K; Moromisato, J H; Nassalski, J P; Naumann, Lutz; Niinikoski, T O; Oberski, J; Ogawa, A; Ozben, C; Pereira, H; Perrot-Kunne, F; Peshekhonov, V D; Piegia, R; Pinsky, L; Platchkov, S K; Pló, M; Pose, D; Postma, H; Pretz, J; Puntaferro, R; Rädel, G; Rijllart, A; Reicherz, G; Roberts, J; Rodríguez, M; Rondio, Ewa; Sabo, I; Saborido, J; Sandacz, A; Savin, I A; Schiavon, R P; Schiller, A; Sichtermann, E P; Simeoni, F; Smirnov, G I; Staude, A; Steinmetz, A; Stiegler, U; Stuhrmann, H B; Szleper, M; Tessarotto, F; Thers, D; Tlaczala, W; Tripet, A; Ünel, G; Velasco, M; Vogt, J; Voss, Rüdiger; Whitten, C; Windmolders, R; Willumeit, R; Wislicki, W; Witzmann, A; Ylöstalo, J; Zanetti, A M; Zaremba, K; Zhao, J

    1998-01-01

    We present a next-to-leading order QCD analysis of the presently available data on the spin structure function $g_1$ including the final data from the Spin Muon Collaboration (SMC). We present resu lts for the first moments of the proton, deuteron and neutron structure functions, and determine singlet and non-singlet parton distributions in two factorization schemes. We also test the Bjor ken sum rule and find agreement with the theoretical prediction at the level of 10\\%.

  11. The pion structure function and scale breaking in Drell-Yan processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, R.

    1979-01-01

    By use of the formalism of QCD, the structure functions of the nucleon and the pion obtained at Q 2 = m 2 sub(psi) is extended to higher values of Q 2 . These structure functions are then used to obtain predictions of scale-breaking effects in Drell-Yan lepton-pair production for both nucleon-nucleon and pion-nucleon cases. A comparison with recent experimental data is also presented. (author)

  12. Nuclear effects in the F3 structure function for finite and asymptotic Q2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulagin, S.A.

    1998-01-01

    We study nuclear effects in the structure function F 3 which describes the parity violating part of the charged-current neutrino nucleon deep inelastic scattering. Starting from a covariant approach we derive a factorized expression for the nuclear structure function in terms of the nuclear spectral function and off-shell nucleon structure functions valid for arbitrary momentum transfer Q and in the limit of weak nuclear binding, i.e. when a nucleus can be treated as a non-relativistic system. We develop a systematic expansion of nuclear structure functions in terms of a Q -2 series caused by nuclear effects (''nuclear twist'' series). Basing ourselves on this expansion we calculate nuclear corrections to the Gross-Llewellyn-Smith sum rule as well as to higher moments of F 3 . We show that corrections to the GLS sum rule due to nuclear effects cancel out in the Bjorken limit and calculate the corresponding Q -2 correction. Special attention is paid to the discussion of the off-shell effects in the structure functions. A sizable impact of these effects both on the Q 2 and x dependence of nuclear structure functions is found. (orig.)

  13. The Relationship Between Interpersonal Cognitive Distortions and Attribution Styles Among Divorce Applicant Couples and its Impact on Sexual Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdoodizaman, Morteza; Razaghi, Samira; Amirsardari, Lili; Hobbi, Omran; Ghaderi, Davod

    2016-09-01

    The current study aimed to investigate the relationship between cognitive distortions and attribution styles among divorce applicant couples and its impact on sexual satisfaction. It was a cross-sectional study and its statistical samples were 55 divorce applicant couples (110 individuals) referred to Urmia courts, Urmia, Iran, from 2012 to 2013. The required data were gathered by interpersonal cognitive distortions, Larson sexual satisfaction and attribution style questionnaire. The findings of the research indicated the existence of a significant relationship between attribution styles for pleasant events and cognitive distortions. The results showed that an increasing amount of pleasant events reduces cognitive distortions among the divorce applicant couples (P divorced couples. As stable-unstable variables increase (P factors affecting satisfaction or dissatisfaction in couples who are living together (sexual satisfaction is one of its main elements).

  14. Structure-Property Relationships in Polymer Derived Amorphous/Nano-Crystalline Silicon Carbide for Nuclear Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zunjarrao, Suraj C.; Singh, Abhishek K.; Singh, Raman P.

    2006-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is a promising candidate for several applications in nuclear reactors owing to its high thermal conductivity, high melting temperature, good chemical stability, and resistance to swelling under heavy ion bombardment. However, fabricating SiC by traditional powder processing route generally requires very high temperatures for pressureless sintering. Polymer derived ceramic materials offer unique advantages such as ability to fabricate net shaped components, incorporate reinforcements and relatively low processing temperatures. Furthermore, for SiC based ceramics fabricated using polymer infiltration process (PIP), the microstructure can be tailored by controlling the processing parameters, to get an amorphous, nanocrystalline or crystalline SiC. In this work, fabrication of polymer derived amorphous and nano-grained SiC is presented and its application as an in-core material is explored. Monolithic SiC samples are fabricated by controlled pyrolysis of allyl-hydrido-poly-carbo-silane (AHPCS) under inert atmosphere. Chemical changes, phase transformations and microstructural changes occurring during the pyrolysis process are studied as a function of the processing temperature. Polymer cross-linking and polymer to ceramic conversion is studied using infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) are performed to monitor the mass loss and phase change as a function of temperature. X-ray diffraction studies are done to study the intermediate phases and microstructural changes. Variation in density is carefully monitored as a function of processing temperature. Owing to shrinkage and gas evolution during pyrolysis, precursor derived ceramics are inherently porous and composite fabrication typically involves repeated cycles of polymer re-infiltration and pyrolysis. However, there is a limit to the densification that can be achieved by this method and porosity in the final materials presents

  15. On the Relationship between Aquatic Plant Stem Characteristics and Drag Force: Is a Modeling Application Possible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Łoboda

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a basic model that shows the relationship between the diameter of a stem and its flexural rigidity. The model was developed from experimental measurements of biomechanical traits (i.e., tensile and bending traits like maximum forces, stresses, moduli of elasticity, flexural rigidity, strain of three freshwater macrophyte species (Elodea canadensis Michx., Potamogeton pectinatus L., and P. crispus L., reflecting the seasonal changes in plant biomechanics throughout the vegetative season. These were obtained with the use of a bench-top testing machine in 2016 and 2017. The presented calculations are based on the ratio of drag-to-bending forces, in which the flexural rigidity plays a key role. The proposed model has the form EI = adb, and two approaches based on a regression analysis were applied to determine the parameters of the model—a and b. In the first method, the parameters were identified separately for each day of measurement, while in the second method, the coefficient b was calculated for all data from all days as a unified number for individual plants. The results suggest that coefficient b may provide information about the proportion of changes in drag forces depending on plant stiffness. The values of this coefficient were associated with the shape of the stem cross-section. The more circular the cross-section, the closer the value of the parameter was to 1. The parameter values were 1.60 for E. canadensis, 1.98 for P. pectinatus, and 2.46 for P. crispus. Moreover, this value also depended on the density of the cross-section structure. Most of the results showed that with an increase in stem diameter, the ratio between the drag and bending forces decreased, which led to fewer differences between these two forces. The model application may be introduced in many laboratory measurements of flow–biota interactions as well as in aquatic plant management applications. The implementation of these results in control

  16. The ratio of structure functions for the neutron and the proton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballintijn, M.K.

    1994-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is the ratio of the structure functions F 2 of the deuteron and the proton. The structure function ratio is measured by the NMC with high precision due to a dedicated target setup. In this thesis the analysis is presented of the data taken in 1989, which were obtained using incident muon energies of 120, 200 and 280 GeV. These data complement the results from earlier measurements performed in 1986 and 1987 which were obtained at 90 and 280 GeV incident muon energy. The newly determined structure function ratio, in a slightly extended range of the scaling parameter x, is compared to the previous one and is found to be in good agreement. All data are combined to give the most accurate determination of the structure function ratio to date. The results are used to determine the dependence of the structure function ratio on the value of Q 2 , the scale at which the nucleon is probed. Finally, the structure function ratios obtained at four different incident muon energies separately, are used to determine the difference R d -R p , where R is the ratio of cross sections for the absorption of longitudinally and transversely polarized virtual photons. The difference in R for the deuteron and the proton is related to differences in the gluon distribution. The result is compatible with a gluon distribution that is identical for the deuteron and the proton. The degree of equality of R d and R p is a measure for the correctness of the procedure to extract structure function ratios. The present result is R d -R p =0.02±0.02 and hence compatible with zero. (orig.)

  17. A Marketing-Finance Approach towards Industrial Channel Contract Relationships: A Model and Application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pennings, J.M.E.

    2004-01-01

    Channel contract relations are dynamic. In this paper, it is argued that one of the drivers for this dynamism is a firm's strive for shareholder value. Using channel contract relationships as market-based assets, firms are managing a portfolio of spot and forward contract relationships. By

  18. The Relationship between Leisure and Life Satisfaction: Application of Activity and Need Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Ariel; Latkova, Pavlina; Sun, Ya-Yen

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to better understand the complex relationship between leisure and life satisfaction. Components of two distinct, but potentially integrative, theoretical frameworks (i.e., activity theory and need theory) predicting the relationship between leisure and life satisfaction were tested with a sample of residents from a…

  19. DMPD: Structure, function and regulation of the Toll/IL-1 receptor adaptor proteins. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17667936 Structure, function and regulation of the Toll/IL-1 receptor adaptor prote... (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Structure, function and regulation of the Toll/IL-1 receptor adaptor proteins. ...PubmedID 17667936 Title Structure, function and regulation of the Toll/IL-1 recep

  20. The HIVToolbox 2 web system integrates sequence, structure, function and mutation analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David P Sargeant

    Full Text Available There is enormous interest in studying HIV pathogenesis for improving the treatment of patients with HIV infection. HIV infection has become one of the best-studied systems for understanding how a virus can hijack a cell. To help facilitate discovery, we previously built HIVToolbox, a web system for visual data mining. The original HIVToolbox integrated information for HIV protein sequence, structure, functional sites, and sequence conservation. This web system has been used for almost 40,000 searches. We report improvements to HIVToolbox including new functions and workflows, data updates, and updates for ease of use. HIVToolbox2, is an improvement over HIVToolbox with new functions. HIVToolbox2 has new functionalities focused on HIV pathogenesis including drug-binding sites, drug-resistance mutations, and immune epitopes. The integrated, interactive view enables visual mining to generate hypotheses that are not readily revealed by other approaches. Most HIV proteins form multimers, and there are posttranslational modification and protein-protein interaction sites at many of these multimerization interfaces. Analysis of protease drug binding sites reveals an anatomy of drug resistance with different types of drug-resistance mutations regionally localized on the surface of protease. Some of these drug-resistance mutations have a high prevalence in specific HIV-1 M subtypes. Finally, consolidation of Tat functional sites reveals a hotspot region where there appear to be 30 interactions or posttranslational modifications. A cursory analysis with HIVToolbox2 has helped to identify several global patterns for HIV proteins. An initial analysis with this tool identifies homomultimerization of almost all HIV proteins, functional sites that overlap with multimerization sites, a global drug resistance anatomy for HIV protease, and specific distributions of some DRMs in specific HIV M subtypes. HIVToolbox2 is an open-access web application available at

  1. Signatures of non-universal large scales in conditional structure functions from various turbulent flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, Daniel B; Voth, Greg A; Bewley, Gregory P; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Gibert, Mathieu; Xu Haitao; Gylfason, Ármann; Mydlarski, Laurent; Yeung, P K

    2011-01-01

    We present a systematic comparison of conditional structure functions in nine turbulent flows. The flows studied include forced isotropic turbulence simulated on a periodic domain, passive grid wind tunnel turbulence in air and in pressurized SF 6 , active grid wind tunnel turbulence (in both synchronous and random driving modes), the flow between counter-rotating discs, oscillating grid turbulence and the flow in the Lagrangian exploration module (in both constant and random driving modes). We compare longitudinal Eulerian second-order structure functions conditioned on the instantaneous large-scale velocity in each flow to assess the ways in which the large scales affect the small scales in a variety of turbulent flows. Structure functions are shown to have larger values when the large-scale velocity significantly deviates from the mean in most flows, suggesting that dependence on the large scales is typical in many turbulent flows. The effects of the large-scale velocity on the structure functions can be quite strong, with the structure function varying by up to a factor of 2 when the large-scale velocity deviates from the mean by ±2 standard deviations. In several flows, the effects of the large-scale velocity are similar at all the length scales we measured, indicating that the large-scale effects are scale independent. In a few flows, the effects of the large-scale velocity are larger on the smallest length scales. (paper)

  2. Gluon structure function of a color dipole in the light-cone limit of lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruenewald, D.; Ilgenfritz, E.-M.; Pirner, H. J.

    2009-01-01

    We calculate the gluon structure function of a color dipole in near-light-cone SU(2) lattice QCD as a function of x B . The quark and antiquark are external nondynamical degrees of freedom which act as sources of the gluon string configuration defining the dipole. We compute the color dipole matrix element of transversal chromo-electric and chromo-magnetic field operators separated along a direction close to the light cone, the Fourier transform of which is the gluon structure function. As vacuum state in the pure glue sector, we use a variational ground state of the near-light-cone Hamiltonian. We derive a recursion relation for the gluon structure function on the lattice similar to the perturbative Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi equation. It depends on the number of transversal links assembling the Schwinger string of the dipole. Fixing the mean momentum fraction of the gluons to the 'experimental value' in a proton, we compare our gluon structure function for a dipole state with four links with the next-to-leading-order MRST 2002 and the CTEQ AB-0 parametrizations at Q 2 =1.5 GeV 2 . Within the systematic uncertainty we find rather good agreement. We also discuss the low x B behavior of the gluon structure function in our model calculation.

  3. Effective field theory approach to structure functions at small xBj

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nachtmann, O.

    2003-01-01

    We relate the structure functions of deep inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering to current-current correlation functions in a Euclidean field theory depending on a parameter r. The r-dependent Hamiltonian of the theory is P 0 -(1-r)P 3 , with P 0 the usual Hamiltonian and P 3 the third component of the momentum operator. We show that a small x Bj in the structure functions corresponds to the small r limit of the effective theory. We argue that for r→0 there is a critical regime of the theory where simple scaling relations should hold. We show that in this framework Regge behaviour of the structure functions obtained with the hard pomeron ansatz corresponds to a scaling behaviour of the matrix elements in the effective theory where the intercept of the hard pomeron appears as a critical index. Explicit expressions for various analytic continuations of the structure functions and matrix elements are given as well as path integral representations for the matrix elements in the effective theory. Our aim is to provide a framework for truly non-perturbative calculations of the structure functions at small x Bj for arbitrary Q 2 . (orig.)

  4. Longitudinal and transverse structure functions in decaying nearly homogeneous and isotropic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad Imtiaz; Lu Zhi-Ming; Liu Yu-Lu

    2014-01-01

    Streamwise evolution of longitudinal and transverse velocity structure functions in a decaying homogeneous and nearly isotropic turbulence is reported for Reynolds numbers Re λ up to 720. First, two theoretical relations between longitudinal and transverse structure functions are examined in the light of recently derived relations and the results show that the low-order transverse structure functions can be well approximated by longitudinal ones within the sub-inertial range. Reconstruction of fourth-order transverse structure functions with a recently proposed relation by Grauer et al. is comparatively less valid than the relation already proposed by Antonia et al. Secondly, extended self-similarity methods are used to measure the scaling exponents up to order eight and the streamwise evolution of scaling exponents is explored. The scaling exponents of longitudinal structure functions are, at first location, close to Zybin's model, and at the fourth location, close to She—Leveque model. No obvious trend is found for the streamwise evolution of longitudinal scaling exponents, whereas, on the contrary, transverse scaling exponents become slightly smaller with the development of a steamwise direction. Finally, the stremwise variation of the order-dependent isotropy ratio indicates the turbulence at the last location is closer to isotropic than the other three locations. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  5. Application Use, Online Relationship Types, Self-Disclosure, and Internet Abuse among Children and Youth: Implications for Education and Internet Safety Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, Ina

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the relationships between Internet abuse (IA)--self-disclosure, online application usage, and relationship types--traditional long-distance, purely virtual, and migratory mixed-mode. An online questionnaire was administered to 2884 children and youth. According to the hypotheses, applications differed in their relationships…

  6. Application of amphipols for structure-functional analysis of TRP channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Kevin W; Cohen, Matthew R; Moiseenkova-Bell, Vera Y

    2014-10-01

    Amphipathic polymers (amphipols), such as A8-35 and SApol, are a new tool for stabilizing integral membrane proteins in detergent-free conditions for structural and functional studies. Transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels function as tetrameric protein complexes in a diverse range of cellular processes including sensory transduction. Mammalian TRP channels share ~20 % sequence similarity and are categorized into six subfamilies: TRPC (canonical), TRPV (vanilloid), TRPA (ankyrin), TRPM (melastatin), TRPP (polycystin), and TRPML (mucolipin). Due to the inherent difficulties in purifying eukaryotic membrane proteins, structural studies of TRP channels have been limited. Recently, A8-35 was essential in resolving the molecular architecture of the nociceptor TRPA1 and led to the determination of a high-resolution structure of the thermosensitive TRPV1 channel by cryo-EM. Newly developed maltose-neopentyl glycol (MNG) detergents have also proven to be useful in stabilizing TRP channels for structural analysis. In this review, we will discuss the impacts of amphipols and MNG detergents on structural studies of TRP channels by cryo-EM. We will compare how A8-35 and MNG detergents interact with the hydrophobic transmembrane domains of TRP channels. In addition, we will discuss what these cryo-EM studies reveal on the importance of screening different types of surfactants toward determining high-resolution structures of TRP channels.

  7. Relationship between LIBS Ablation and Pit Volume for Geologic Samples: Applications for in situ Absolute Geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devismes, D.; Cohen, Barbara A.

    2014-01-01

    In planetary sciences, in situ absolute geochronology is a scientific and engineering challenge. Currently, the age of the Martian surface can only be determined by crater density counting. However this method has significant uncertainties and needs to be calibrated with absolute ages. We are developing an instrument to acquire in situ absolute geochronology based on the K-Ar method. The protocol is based on the laser ablation of a rock by hundreds of laser pulses. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) gives the potassium content of the ablated material and a mass spectrometer (quadrupole or ion trap) measures the quantity of 40Ar released. In order to accurately measure the quantity of released 40Ar in cases where Ar is an atmospheric constituent (e.g., Mars), the sample is first put into a chamber under high vacuum. The 40Arquantity, the concentration of K and the estimation of the ablated mass are the parameters needed to give the age of the rocks. The main uncertainties with this method are directly linked to the measures of the mass (typically some µg) and of the concentration of K by LIBS (up to 10%). Because the ablated mass is small compared to the mass of the sample, and because material is redeposited onto the sample after ablation, it is not possible to directly measure the ablated mass. Our current protocol measures the ablated volume and estimates the sample density to calculate ablated mass. The precision and accuracy of this method may be improved by using knowledge of the sample's geologic properties to predict its response to laser ablation, i.e., understanding whether natural samples have a predictable relationship between laser energy deposited and resultant ablation volume. In contrast to most previous studies of laser ablation, theoretical equations are not highly applicable. The reasons are numerous, but the most important are: a) geologic rocks are complex, polymineralic materials; b) the conditions of ablation are unusual (for example

  8. Observations on Three Endpoint Properties and Their Relationship to Regulatory Outcomes of European Oncology Marketing Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberti, Lawrence; Stolk, Pieter; McAuslane, James Neil; Schellens, Jan; Breckenridge, Alasdair M; Leufkens, Hubert

    2015-06-01

    Guidance and exploratory evidence indicate that the type of endpoints and the magnitude of their outcome can define a therapy's clinical activity; however, little empirical evidence relates specific endpoint properties with regulatory outcomes. We explored the relationship of 3 endpoint properties to regulatory outcomes by assessing 50 oncology marketing authorization applications (MAAs; reviewed from 2009 to 2013). Overall, 16 (32%) had a negative outcome. The most commonly used hard endpoints were overall survival (OS) and the duration of response or stable disease. OS was a component of 91% approved and 63% failed MAAs. The most commonly used surrogate endpoints were progression-free survival (PFS), response rate, and health-related quality of life assessments. There was no difference (p = .3801) between the approved and failed MAA cohorts in the proportion of hard endpoints used. A mean of slightly more than four surrogate endpoints were used per approved MAA compared with slightly more than two for failed MAAs. Longer OS and PFS duration outcomes were generally associated with approvals, often when not statistically significant. The approved cohort was associated with a preponderance of statistically significant (p < .05) improvements in primary endpoints (p < .0001 difference between the approved and failed groups). Three key endpoint properties (type of endpoint [hard/surrogate], magnitude of an endpoint outcome, and its statistical significance) are consistent with the European Medicines Agency guidance and, notwithstanding the contribution of unique disease-specific circumstances, are associated with a predictable positive outcome for oncology MAAs. Regulatory decisions made by the European Medicines Agency determine which new medicines will be available to European prescribers and for which therapeutic indications. Regulatory success or failure can be influenced by many factors. This study assessed three key properties of endpoints used in

  9. Intrinsic polarization of the high energy W-boson structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ralston, J.P.; Olness, F.

    1986-01-01

    Several new issues are presented that are to be incorporated into a consistent treatment of high-energy transverse effective-W boson structure functions. The issues included the numerical importance of the proper choice of scale, and the q 2 evolution of the boson structure functions in an Altarelli-Parisi framework. We investigate a novel effect of the V-A coupling which produces a sizable intrinsic polarization of the W distributions. A preliminary estimate yields a left- to right-helicity structure function ratio W/sub L// + W/sub R/ + ≅ 1 - 21/(1 - x) + 21/(1 - x) 2 . For x ≥ 0.06, there are two lift-handed W + 's for every right-handed one in an unpolarized proton. 11 refs., 2 figs

  10. Leading twist moments of the neutron structure function F_2n

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Osipenko; W. Melnitchouk; S. Simula; S. Kulagin; G. Ricco

    2005-10-20

    We perform a global analysis of neutron $F_2^n$ structure function data, obtained by combining proton and deuteron measurements over a large range of kinematics. From these data the lowest moments ($n \\leq 10$) of the leading twist neutron $F_2^n$ structure function are extracted. Particular attention is paid to nuclear effects in the deuteron, which become increasingly important for the higher moments. Our results for the nonsinglet, isovector $p - n$ combination of the leading twist moments are compared with those of available lattice simulations. We also determine the lowest few moments of the higher twist contributions, obtained by subtracting the leading twist from the total structure function, and analyze their isospin dependence.

  11. Collinear factorization for deep inelastic scattering structure functions at large Bjorken xB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accardi, Alberto; Qiu, Jian-Wei

    2008-01-01

    http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1126-6708/2008/07/090 We examine the uncertainty of perturbative QCD factorization for hadron structure functions in deep inelastic scattering at a large value of the Bjorken variable xB. We analyze the target mass correction to the structure functions by using the collinear factorization approach in the momentum space. We express the long distance physics of structure functions and the leading target mass corrections in terms of parton distribution functions with the standard operator definition. We compare our result with existing work on the target mass correction. We also discuss the impact of a final-state jet function on the extraction of parton distributions at large fractional momentum x.

  12. Measurement of the deuteron elastic structure functions up to large momentum transfers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jager, K. De

    1999-01-01

    The cross section for elastic electron-deuteron scattering was measured in JLab experiment 91-026. The deuteron elastic structure functions A(Q 2 ) and B(Q 2 ) have been extracted from this data. The final results for the ''electric'' structure function A(Q 2 ), in the range of 0.7 less than or equal to Q 2 less than or equal to 6.0 (GeV/c) 2 are presented. Preliminary results for the ''magnetic'' structure function B(Q 2 ) are presented in the range of 0.7 less than or equal to Q 2 less than or equal to 1.35 (GeV/c) 2 . These data are compared with theoretical predictions of both meson-nucleon and quark-gluon based models

  13. x- and xi-scaling of the Nuclear Structure Function at Large x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrington, J.; Armstrong, C. S.; Averett, T.; Baker, O. K.; Bever, L. de; Bochna, C. W.; Boeglin, W.; Bray, B.; Carlini, R. D.; Collins, G.; Cothran, C.; Crabb, D.; Day, D.; Dunne, J. A.; Dutta, D.; Ent, R.; Filippone, B. W.; Honegger, A.; Hughes, E. W.; Jensen, J.; Jourdan, J.; Keppel, C. E.; Koltenuk, D. M.; Lindgren, R.; Lung, A.; Mack, D. J.; McCarthy, J.; McKeown, R. D.; Meekins, D.; Mitchell, J. H.; Mkrtchyan, H. G.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Petitjean, T.; Rondon, O.; Sick, I.; Smith, C.; Terburg, B.; Vulcan, W. F.; Wood, S. A.; Yan, C.; Zhao, J.; Zihlmann, B.

    2001-01-01

    Inclusive electron scattering data are presented for 2 H and Fe targets at an incident electron energy of 4.045 GeV for a range of momentum transfers from Q 2 = 1 to 7 (GeV/c) 2 . Data were taken at Jefferson Laboratory for low values of energy loss, corresponding to values of Bjorken x greater than or near 1. The structure functions do not show scaling in x in this range, where inelastic scattering is not expected to dominate the cross section. The data do show scaling, however, in the Nachtmann variable ξ. This scaling may be the result of Bloom Gilman duality in the nucleon structure function combined with the Fermi motion of the nucleons in the nucleus. The resulting extension of scaling to larger values of ξ opens up the possibility of accessing nuclear structure functions in the high-x region at lower values of Q 2 than previously believed

  14. Once more on the radiative corrections to the nucleon structure functions in QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamenov, D.B.

    1994-09-01

    A new representation of the next to leading QCD corrections to the nucleon structure functions is given in terms of parton distributions. All O(α s ) corrections to the leading logarithmic approximation (LLA) are included. In contrast to the similar representations in the literature terms of order O(α 2 s ) do not attend in our expressions for the nucleon structure functions taken in the next to leading logarithmic approximation. This result is generalized for any order in α s beyond the LLA. Terms of order O(α n s ) which belong only tot he approximation in consideration are present in such a representation for the structure functions. (author). 11 refs

  15. Relationships between inherent optical properties in the Baltic Sea for application to the underwater imaging problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sławomir Sagan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Statistical relationships between coefficients of light attenuation, scattering and backscattering at wavelength 550 nm derived from series of optical measurements performed in Baltic Sea waters are presented. The relationships were derived primarily to support data analysis from underwater imaging systems. Comparison of these relations with analogous empirical data from the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans shows that the two sets of relationships are similar, despite the different water types and the various experimental procedures and instrumentation applied. The apparently universal character of the relationships enables an approximate calculation of other optical properties and subsequently of the contrast, signal/noise ratio, visibility range and spatial resolution of underwater imaging systems based on attenuation coefficients at wavelength 550 nm only.

  16. On the behaviour of non-singlet structure functions at small x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluemlein, J.

    1995-10-01

    The resummation of O(α s l+1 ln 2l x) terms in the evolution kernels of non-singlet combinations of unpolarized and polarized structure functions is investigated. The agreement with complete calculations up to order α s 2 is demonstrated, and the leading small-x contributions to the three-loop non-singlet splitting functions P ± are derived. The additional contributions due to the resummed terms are studied numerically for the most important non-singlet structure functions. They are found to be about 1% or smaller in the kinematical regions accessible at present and in the forseeable future. (orig.)

  17. Next-to leading order analysis of target mass corrections to structure functions and asymmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, L.T.; Accardi, A.; Hobbs, T.J.; Melnitchouk, W.

    2011-01-01

    We perform a comprehensive analysis of target mass corrections (TMCs) to spin-averaged structure functions and asymmetries at next-to-leading order. Several different prescriptions for TMCs are considered, including the operator product expansion, and various approximations to it, collinear factorization, and xi-scaling. We assess the impact of each of these on a number of observables, such as the neutron to proton F 2 structure function ratio, and parity-violating electron scattering asymmetries for protons and deuterons which are sensitive to gamma-Z interference effects. The corrections from higher order radiative and nuclear effects on the parity-violating deuteron asymmetry are also quantified.

  18. Measurement of the proton structure function F2 in ep scattering at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.

    1993-08-01

    This paper presents our first measurement of the F 2 structure function in neutral-current, deep inelastic scattering using the ZEUS detector at HERA, the ep colliding beam facility at DESY. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 24.7 nb -1 . Results are presented for data in a range of Q 2 from 10 GeV 2 to 4700 GeV 2 and Bjorken x down to 3.0x10 -4 . The F 2 structure function increases rapidly as x decreases. (orig.)

  19. Monte Carlo study of four-spinon dynamic structure function in antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Si-Lakhal, B.; Abada, A.

    2003-11-01

    Using Monte Carlo integration methods, we describe the behavior of the exact four-s pinon dynamic structure function S 4 in the antiferromagnetic spin 1/2 Heisenberg quantum spin chain as a function of the neutron energy ω and momentum transfer k. We also determine the fourspinon continuum, the extent of the region in the (k, ω) plane outside which S 4 is identically zero. In each case, the behavior of S 4 is shown to be consistent with the four-spinon continuum and compared to the one of the exact two-spinon dynamic structure function S 2 . Overall shape similarity is noted. (author)

  20. Proton structure function and Bc meson production in γγ collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martynenko, A.P.; Saleev, V.A.

    1996-01-01

    Using nonrelativistic quark model and perturbative QCD the production of B c (B* c ) mesons via resolved-photon interaction in γγ-collisions is studied. It is shown that the resolved-photon contribution via partionic subprocess cγ→B c (B* c )b is very important both near threshold of the B c (B* c )-meson production, where the hadron-like part of the photon structure function dominates, and at large energies, where only the point-like part of the photon structure function give the contribution increased versus energy. 18 refs., 5 figs

  1. Experimental determination of the π meson structure functions by the Drell-Yan mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badier, J.; Bourotte, J.; Mine, P.; Vanderhaghen, R.; Weisz, S.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Decamp, D.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lefrancois, J.; Crozon, M.; Delpierre, P.; Leray, T.; Maillard, J.; Tilquin, A.; Valentin, J.

    1983-01-01

    We have studied high statistics samples of dimuon events (proportional35,000) produced from πsup(+-) on platinum target in the mass interval 4.2 2 sigma/dx 1 dx 2 to π + and π - data. At 200 GeV, the simultaneous use of π + and π - data allows a separate determination of the valence and sea structure functions of the π. Furthermore, the 150 and 280 GeV data allow an accurate determination of the shape of the valence structure function and give an estimate of its evolution between Q 2 =25 and 50 GeV 2 . (orig.)

  2. Brain structure-function associations in multi-generational families genetically enriched for bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fears, Scott C; Schür, Remmelt; Sjouwerman, Rachel; Service, Susan K; Araya, Carmen; Araya, Xinia; Bejarano, Julio; Knowles, Emma; Gomez-Makhinson, Juliana; Lopez, Maria C; Aldana, Ileana; Teshiba, Terri M; Abaryan, Zvart; Al-Sharif, Noor B; Navarro, Linda; Tishler, Todd A; Altshuler, Lori; Bartzokis, George; Escobar, Javier I; Glahn, David C; Thompson, Paul M; Lopez-Jaramillo, Carlos; Macaya, Gabriel; Molina, Julio; Reus, Victor I; Sabatti, Chiara; Cantor, Rita M; Freimer, Nelson B; Bearden, Carrie E

    2015-07-01

    members. Additionally, while age had a relatively strong impact on all neurocognitive traits, the effects of age on cognition did not differ between diagnostic groups. Most brain-behaviour associations were also similar across the age range, with the exception of cortical and ventricular volume and lingual gyrus thickness, which showed weak correlations with verbal fluency and inhibitory control at younger ages that increased in magnitude in older subjects, regardless of diagnosis. Findings indicate that neuroanatomical traits potentially impacted by bipolar disorder are significantly associated with multiple neurobehavioural domains. Structure-function relationships are generally preserved across diagnostic groups, with the notable exception of ventrolateral prefrontal and parietal association cortex, volumetric increases in which may be associated with cognitive resilience specifically in individuals with bipolar disorder. Although age impacted all neurobehavioural traits, we did not find any evidence of accelerated cognitive decline specific to bipolar disorder subjects. Regardless of diagnosis, greater global brain volume may represent a protective factor for the effects of ageing on executive functioning. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Coopetitive Supply Chain Relationship Model: Application to the Smartphone Manufacturing Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Jeremy Jie Ming; Lee, Dong-Yup

    2015-01-01

    Previous researches for understanding supply chain relationship have mostly focused on its vertical collaboration between buyers and suppliers. However, there have been some instances of volatile and stable collaborative relationships amongst competitors such as Apple-Samsung product manufacturer-component supplier relationship and airline alliances, respectively, which is recognized as coopetition. Even though there have been several qualitative studies and a number of game theory models on coopetition, it is rare to find any attempts on quantitative characterization of such coopetitive dynamic behavior in supply chain relationship. Hence, in this work, we formulated a MINLP model mathematically representing coopetitive relationships in a cost efficient supply chain network. In particular, the coopetition factor was newly introduced to measure the degree of coopetition among supply chain players and determine the optimal level of coopetition to engage in. The utility and practicality of the model were strongly demonstrated using a case study of a hypothetical smartphone supply chain network under different scenarios, thus proposing their strategically viable optimal interactions. Therefore, this exploratory study can herald a new era of global coopetitive business. PMID:26186227

  4. Coopetitive Supply Chain Relationship Model: Application to the Smartphone Manufacturing Network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Jie Ming Kwok

    Full Text Available Previous researches for understanding supply chain relationship have mostly focused on its vertical collaboration between buyers and suppliers. However, there have been some instances of volatile and stable collaborative relationships amongst competitors such as Apple-Samsung product manufacturer-component supplier relationship and airline alliances, respectively, which is recognized as coopetition. Even though there have been several qualitative studies and a number of game theory models on coopetition, it is rare to find any attempts on quantitative characterization of such coopetitive dynamic behavior in supply chain relationship. Hence, in this work, we formulated a MINLP model mathematically representing coopetitive relationships in a cost efficient supply chain network. In particular, the coopetition factor was newly introduced to measure the degree of coopetition among supply chain players and determine the optimal level of coopetition to engage in. The utility and practicality of the model were strongly demonstrated using a case study of a hypothetical smartphone supply chain network under different scenarios, thus proposing their strategically viable optimal interactions. Therefore, this exploratory study can herald a new era of global coopetitive business.

  5. Coopetitive Supply Chain Relationship Model: Application to the Smartphone Manufacturing Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Jeremy Jie Ming; Lee, Dong-Yup

    2015-01-01

    Previous researches for understanding supply chain relationship have mostly focused on its vertical collaboration between buyers and suppliers. However, there have been some instances of volatile and stable collaborative relationships amongst competitors such as Apple-Samsung product manufacturer-component supplier relationship and airline alliances, respectively, which is recognized as coopetition. Even though there have been several qualitative studies and a number of game theory models on coopetition, it is rare to find any attempts on quantitative characterization of such coopetitive dynamic behavior in supply chain relationship. Hence, in this work, we formulated a MINLP model mathematically representing coopetitive relationships in a cost efficient supply chain network. In particular, the coopetition factor was newly introduced to measure the degree of coopetition among supply chain players and determine the optimal level of coopetition to engage in. The utility and practicality of the model were strongly demonstrated using a case study of a hypothetical smartphone supply chain network under different scenarios, thus proposing their strategically viable optimal interactions. Therefore, this exploratory study can herald a new era of global coopetitive business.

  6. Addressing Culture, Gender, and Power with Asian American Couples: Application of Socio-Emotional Relationship Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ChenFeng, Jessica; Kim, Lana; Wu, Yuwei; Knudson-Martin, Carmen

    2017-09-01

    Asian Americans juggle the intersections of multiple social identities and societal discourses as they respond to experiences of immigration, marginalization, and patriarchy, integrate collectivist and individualistic family values, and form families and intimate relationships. In this study we examine what we have learned as we apply Socio-Emotional Relationship Therapy (SERT) with heterosexual couples of Asian heritage. SERT begins with sociocultural attunement and the assumption that relationships should mutually support each partner. Drawing on case examples, we illustrate how we practice sociocultural attunement as couples respond to the relational processes that comprise the Circle of Care (mutual influence, vulnerability, attunement, and shared relational responsibility). We emphasize three key socioemotional themes that intersect with gender: (1) intangible loss; (2) quiet fortitude/not burdening others; and (3) duty to the family. © 2016 Family Process Institute.

  7. [Application of data mining on the relationship between deqi and effect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Qiuyin; Ma, Liangxiao; Yang, Yang; Zhu, Jiang

    2017-06-12

    To analyze the relationship between deqi and effect by data mining technique with retrieving clinical literature about acupuncture deqi since the founding of the country. The modern computerization and data mining technologies were adopted to set up clinical literature about acupuncture deqi database. The relevant clinical literature was collected, screened, extracted, and statistical and correlation analyses were used so as to explore the relationship between deqi and effect. 82.1% (46/56) of the studies considered that deqi was related to the effect; 17.9% (10/56) of the studies considered that deqi was unrelated to the effect. The support of deqi related to the effect is 100% on dysmenorrhea and facial paralysis. 72% (18/25) of the the articles of pain syndrome considered that deqi was related to the effect; 28% (7/25)of the studies considered that deqi was unrelated to the effect. In the research of the relationship between the features of deqi and effect, 60.7% of the studies suggested that the sense of conduction was positively correlated with the effect. There were 21 studies on the relationship between the intensity of deqi and effect, involving a variety of diseases, which was related to the type of the disease. 58.3% (7/12) of the articles on dysmenorrhea and 63% (34/54) on pain syndrome supported conduction positively correlated to effect, showing the highest frequencies. 50% (3/6) of the papers on facial paralysis supported weak deqi sensation positively correlated to effect, which was the highest frequency. Most studies considered that deqi can improve clinical efficacy. The relationship between different features of deqi and effect is closely related to the disease. Further study may focus on high quality research on the relationship between deqi and the obvious effect achieved by acupuncture so as to summarize the law of deqi .

  8. Issues and relationships among software standards for nuclear safety applications. Version 2.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, J.A.; Preckshot, G.G.; Lawrence, J.D.; Johnson, G.L.

    1996-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is assisting the Nuclear Regulatory Commission with the development of draft regulatory guides for selected software engineering standards. This report describes the results of the initial task in this work. The selected software standards and a set of related software engineering standards were reviewed, and the resulting preliminary elements of the regulatory positions are identified in this report. The importance of a thorough understanding of the relationships among standards useful for developing safety-related software is emphasized. The relationship of this work to the update of the Standard Review Plan is also discussed

  9. Urban ecological stewardship: understanding the structure, function and network of community-based urban land management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erika s. Svendsen; Lindsay K. Campbell

    2008-01-01

    Urban environmental stewardship activities are on the rise in cities throughout the Northeast. Groups participating in stewardship activities range in age, size, and geography and represent an increasingly complex and dynamic arrangement of civil society, government and business sectors. To better understand the structure, function and network of these community-based...

  10. Analytical expression for the nonsinglet structure functions at small x in the double logarithmic approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lublinsky, Michael

    2004-01-01

    A simple analytic expression for the nonsinglet structure function f NS is given. The expression is derived from the result of Ermolaev, Manaenkov, and Ryskin obtained by low x resummation of the quark ladder diagrams in the double logarithmic approximation of perturbative QCD

  11. Determination of the pion structure function from muon-pair production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, C.B.; Anderson, K.J.; Coleman, R.N.; Hogan, G.E.; Karhi, K.P.; McDonald, K.T.; Pilcher, J.E.; Rosenberg, E.I.; Sanders, G.H.; Smith, A.J.S.; Thaler, J.J.

    1979-01-01

    Data on muon-pair production by pions are used to determine the momentum distribution for valence quarks in the pion. The shape of a nucleon structure function is also obtained and is compared with a calculation based on existing data

  12. Phenomenological study of the nucleon structure functions; Etude phenomenologique des fonctions de structure du nucleon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertini, M

    1995-05-12

    This thesis is devoted to the study of the deep inelastic scattering. Its purpose is the development of phenomenological models describing experimental results on unpolarized (F{sub 2}) and polarized (g{sub 1}) nucleon structure functions in the wide range of the kinematical domain. Special attention is paid to the small-x behaviour of F{sub 2} and to the link between deep inelastic scattering and photoproduction process. The investigation of the Pomeron in deep inelastic scattering shows that one single Pomeron compatible with the Froissard-Martin limit can account for all the present HERA data. A phenomenological model of the proton structure function is developed, based on a two-component structure including various features expected from both perturbative quantum chromodynamics and non perturbative Regge theory. A link with the photoproduction process is provided. A detailed analysis of the perturbative components, based on the Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi evolution equations is presented. Taking into account the different parton distribution, this approach allows to describe data on proton and neutron structure functions, on deep inelastic neutrino scattering, and to reproduce the gluons distribution extracted by the ZEUS collaboration. The model is applied to the polarized deep inelastic scattering and the axial anomaly effect appearing both in the description of results on the spin dependent structure functions g{sup p,n,d} and in the interpretation of the nucleon spin structure is discussed. (J.S.). 260 refs., 34 figs., 8 tabs., 6 appends.

  13. Structure functions and parton distributions in deep inelastic lepton-hadron scattering at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluemlein, J.

    1993-08-01

    The possibilities to measure structure functions, to extract parton distributions, and to measure α s and Λ QCD in current and future high energy deep inelastic scattering experiments are reviewed. A comparison is given for experiments at HERA, an ep option at LEP xLHC, and a high energy neutrino experiment. (orig.)

  14. Test of determination of nucleon structure functions in the hypothesis of scalar di-quark existence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavernier, P.; Dugne, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    The authors present the nucleon structure functions that have been obtained in the hypothesis of existence of a scalar di-quark, progressively broken by increasing energy of electromagnetic probe (Stockolm model). Comparisons with other models and experimental results are presented. 20 figs

  15. Comparison of moments from the valence structure function with QCD predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groot, J.G.H. de; Hansl, T.; Holder, M.; Knobloch, J.; May, J.; Paar, H.P.; Palazzi, P.; Para, A.; Ranjard, F.; Schlatter, D.; Steinberger, J.; Suter, H.; Rueden, W. von; Wahl, H.; Whitaker, S.; Williams, E.G.H.; Eisele, F.; Kleinknecht, K.; Lierl, H.; Spahn, G.; Willutzki, H.J.; Dorth, W.; Dydak, F.; Geweniger, C.; Hepp, V.; Tittel, K.; Wotschack, J.; Bloch, P.; Devaux, B.; Loucatos, S.; Maillard, J.; Merlo, J.P.; Peyaud, B.; Rander, J.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Turlay, R.; Navarria, F.L.

    1979-01-01

    Moments (both ordinary and Nachtmann) of the nucleon valence structure function measured in high Q 2 γFe scattering are presented, supplemented by data from deep inelastic eD scattering. These data seem to agree with QCD predictions for vector gluons. The QCD parameter Λ is found to be of the order 0.5 GeV. (Auth.)

  16. Measurement of the Proton and Deuteron Spin Structure Functions G1 and G2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobias, Al

    2003-04-02

    The SLAC experiment E155 was a deep-inelastic scattering experiment that scattered polarized electrons off polarized proton and deuteron targets in the effort to measure precisely the proton and deuteron spin structure functions. The nucleon structure functions g{sub 1} and g{sub 2} are important quantities that help test our present models of nucleon structure. Such information can help quantify the constituent contributions to the nucleon spin. The structure functions g{sub 1}{sup p} and G{sub 1}{sup d} have been measured over the kinematic range 0.01 {le} x {le} 0.9 and 1 {le} Q{sup 2} {le} 40 GeV{sup 2} by scattering 48.4 GeV longitudinally polarized electrons off longitudinally polarized protons and deuterons. In addition, the structure functions g{sub 2}{sup p} and g{sub 2}{sup d} have been measured over the kinematic range 0.01 {le} x {le} 0.7 and 1 {le} Q{sup 2} {le} 17 GeV{sup 2} by scattering 38.8 GeV longitudinally polarized electrons off transversely polarized protons and deuterons. The measurements of g{sub 1} confirm the Bjorken sum rule and find the net quark polarization to be {Delta}{Sigma} = 0.23 {+-} 0.04 {+-} 0.6 while g{sub 2} is found to be consistent with the g{sub 2}{sup WW} model.

  17. Experimental study of the photon structure function F2 in the high Q2 region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartel, W.; Cords, D.; Dietrich, G.; Dittmann, P.; Eichler, R.; Felst, R.; Haidt, D.; Krehbiel, H.; Meier, K.; Naroska, B.

    1982-09-01

    We report on a measurement of the process e + e - → e + e - + hadrons, where one of the scattered electron is detected at large angles, with an average Q 2 of 23 GeV 2 . The results are analysed in terms of the photon structure function F 2 and are compared with QCD predictions. (orig.)

  18. Measurement of the proton structure function at HERA using the ZEUS detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentvelsen, S.C.M.

    1994-01-01

    In May 1992, the HERA collider produced its first collisions between electrons and protons, at a center-of-mass energy of 295 GeV. The ZEUS experiment, one of the two main detectors at HERA, recorded 24.7 nb -1 of data in the fall of 1992. The analysis of this data, leading to an initial determination of the proton structure function F 2 in the kinematic domain accessible at HERA, is the main subject of this thesis. In the first chapter, a short review of inclusive deep-inelastic-scattering (DIS) is given. We also briefly present the status of pre-HERA fixed target DIS experiments. The second chapter offers a description of the HERA accelerator complex, the luminosity measurement and the ZEUS detector. Chapter three treats the reconstruction of x ans Q 2 from measured quantities. Chapter four describes the selection of the DIS data sample. Chapter five investigates various distributions of the DIS sample in comparison with the Monte Carlo predictions. The Monte Carlo distributions are given for extreme choices of the proton structure function parametrizations. In chapter six, we determine from the x and Q 2 distributions the proton structure function F 2 . A correction is made for the effect of the longitudinal structure function F L . The measured F 2 as a function of x is rising rapidly towards low values of x. (orig.)

  19. Relationship between Maximum Principle and Dynamic Programming for Stochastic Recursive Optimal Control Problems and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingtao Shi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the relationship between maximum principle and dynamic programming for stochastic recursive optimal control problems. Under certain differentiability conditions, relations among the adjoint processes, the generalized Hamiltonian function, and the value function are given. A linear quadratic recursive utility portfolio optimization problem in the financial engineering is discussed as an explicitly illustrated example of the main result.

  20. Heritable Environmental Variance Causes Nonlinear Relationships Between Traits: Application to Birth Weight and Stillbirth of Pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, H.A.; Hill, W.G.; Knol, E.F.

    2015-01-01

    There is recent evidence from laboratory experiments and analysis of livestock populations that not only the phenotype itself, but also its environmental variance, is under genetic control. Little is known about the relationships between the environmental variance of one trait and mean levels of

  1. Relationship between meanings, emotions, product preferences and personal values. Application to ceramic tile floorings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agost, María-Jesús; Vergara, Margarita

    2014-07-01

    This work aims to validate a conceptual framework which establishes the main relationships between subjective elements in human-product interaction, such as meanings, emotions, product preferences, and personal values. The study analyzes the relationships between meanings and emotions, and between these and preferences, as well as the influence of personal values on such relationships. The study was applied to ceramic tile floorings. A questionnaire with images of a neutral room with different ceramic tile floorings was designed and distributed via the web. Results from the study suggest that both meanings and emotions must be taken into account in the generation of product preferences. The meanings given to the product can cause the generation of emotions, and both types of subjective impressions give rise to product preferences. Personal reference values influence these relationships between subjective impressions and product preferences. As a consequence, not only target customers' demographic data but specifically their values and criteria must be taken into account from the beginning of the development process. The specific results of this paper can be used directly by ceramic tile designers, who can better adjust product design (and the subjective impressions elicited) to the target market. Consequently, the chance of product success is reinforced. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  2. Structure, Function and Evolution of Clostridium botulinum C2 and C3 Toxins: Insight to Poultry and Veterinary Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellapandi, Paulchamy; Prisilla, Arokiyasamy

    2017-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum group III strains are able to produce cytotoxins, C2 toxin and C3 exotoxin, along with botulinum neurotoxin types C and D. C2 toxin and C3 exotoxin produced by this organism are the most important members of bacterial ADP-ribosyltransferase superfamily. Both toxins have distinct pathophysiological functions in the avian and mammalian hosts. The members of this superfamily transfer an ADP-ribose moiety of NAD+ to specific eukaryotic target proteins. The present review describes the structure, function and evolution aspects of these toxins with a special emphasis to the development of veterinary vaccines. C2 toxin is a binary toxin that consists of a catalytic subunit (C2I) and a translocation subunit (C2II). C2I component is structurally and functionally similar to the VIP2 and iota A toxin whereas C2II component shows a significant homology with the protective antigen from anthrax toxin and iota B. Unlike C2 toxin, C3 toxin is devoid of translocation/binding subunit. Extensive studies on their sequence-structure-function link spawn additional efforts to understand the catalytic mechanisms and target recognition. Structural and functional relationships with them are often determined by using evolutionary constraints as valuable biological measures. Enzyme-deficient mutants derived from these toxins have been used as drug/protein delivery systems in eukaryotic cells. Thus, current knowledge on their molecular diversity is a well-known perspective to design immunotoxin or subunit vaccine for C. botulinum infection. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. The Relationship between Corporate Governance Approach and Internal Audit in Tourism Sector: An Application in Marmaris Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çağrı Köroğlu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Tourism sector is one of the important sectors in Turkey. Corporate governance is an important tool to increase the efficiency of tourism sector. An effective i nternal audit helps to improve the effectiveness of corporate governance in tourism sector. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between corporate governance and the internal audit at four -star and five-star hotels in Marmaris. First, corporate governance and internal control concepts have been discussed within the scope of the literature. Next, in the application part, for the purpose of our study, four-star and five-star hotels were selected in Marmaris region. A survey was conducted on the hotel managers. The data set is analyzed by using SPSS. The results show significant relationship between internal control and corporate governance. In addition, hotel managements recognize the importance of the both the basic principles of corporate governance and internal audit activities.

  4. The Effectiveness Of The Intelligence E-CRM Application In Enhancing Positive Customer Relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashar Ahmed

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available AbstractE-CRM electronic customer relationship management is a derivation from CRM techniques which influenced direct marketing technology and call Centre to promote massively created products and services to small sub-segments of market. When CRM techniques are incorporated in e-commerce environment it becomes E-CRM which involves building a strong and sustainable customer relationship by using Internet. It is a strategy which is purely based on Internet and software development it requires to create essential integrated software suite to deal with all kinds of customer related issues like customer services sales and marketing field support. The essential parts of E-CRM are to focus on building new customer base segmentation of high valued customers enhancing the profitability of existing customer and maximize the value and life of profitable customers.

  5. Application of Customer Relationship Management Systems in Business: Challenges and Opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    K. Liagkouras; K. Metaxiotis

    2014-01-01

    Customer relationship management (CRM) systems in business are a reality of the contemporary business world for the last decade or so. Still, there are grey areas regarding the successful implementation and operation of CRM systems in business. This paper, through the systematic study of the CRM implementation paradigm, attempts to identify the most important challenges and opportunities that the CRM systems face in a rapidly changing business world.

  6. Application of Customer Relationship Management Systems in Lithuanian Mobile Telecommunications Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Uturytė-Vrubliauskienė

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Global investments in information technologies are constantly growing as the result of quick changes in technologies, globalization process, accelerating pace of life and increase in the importance of information to the modern society. Thus, the latest information technologies and systems are emphasized as one of the most important features of competitive ability of an organisation. As information technologies are getting more and more important in determining the advantage of a company in the business world, CEOs of organisations should pay more attention to implementation of systems that contribute to operational capacity of the entire organisation. In order to ensure success of an organisation, it is important to look for new investment solutions helping companies to develop individualized and differentiated ways of interaction with customers, ensuring their loyalty and allowing to maintain competitiveness in the market. More and more often, customer relationship management systems are chosen to achieve these aims. These systems are applied for business to efficiently manage relations with customers of a company; they help increasing the benefit obtained by every supplier or customer to the maximum and improving the results of the entire activity. Due to the increase in the number of organisations implementing customer relationship management systems (CRM, it is becoming important to study and evaluate these technologies and their influence. This would help to better understand the present problems related with customer relationship management (CRM systems.

  7. i-Tree: Tools to assess and manage structure, function, and value of community forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirabayashi, S.; Nowak, D.; Endreny, T. A.; Kroll, C.; Maco, S.

    2011-12-01

    Trees in urban communities can mitigate many adverse effects associated with anthropogenic activities and climate change (e.g. urban heat island, greenhouse gas, air pollution, and floods). To protect environmental and human health, managers need to make informed decisions regarding urban forest management practices. Here we present the i-Tree suite of software tools (www.itreetools.org) developed by the USDA Forest Service and their cooperators. This software suite can help urban forest managers assess and manage the structure, function, and value of urban tree populations regardless of community size or technical capacity. i-Tree is a state-of-the-art, peer-reviewed Windows GUI- or Web-based software that is freely available, supported, and continuously refined by the USDA Forest Service and their cooperators. Two major features of i-Tree are 1) to analyze current canopy structures and identify potential planting spots, and 2) to estimate the environmental benefits provided by the trees, such as carbon storage and sequestration, energy conservation, air pollution removal, and storm water reduction. To cover diverse forest topologies, various tools were developed within the i-Tree suite: i-Tree Design for points (individual trees), i-Tree Streets for lines (street trees), and i-Tree Eco, Vue, and Canopy (in the order of complexity) for areas (community trees). Once the forest structure is identified with these tools, ecosystem services provided by trees can be estimated with common models and protocols, and reports in the form of texts, charts, and figures are then created for users. Since i-Tree was developed with a client/server architecture, nationwide data in the US such as location-related parameters, weather, streamflow, and air pollution data are stored in the server and retrieved to a user's computer at run-time. Freely available remote-sensed images (e.g. NLCD and Google maps) are also employed to estimate tree canopy characteristics. As the demand for i

  8. Some higher moments of deep inelastic structure functions at next-to-next-to-leading order of perturbative QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retey, A.; Vermaseren, J.A.M.

    2001-01-01

    We present the analytic next-to-next-to-leading QCD calculation of some higher moments of deep inelastic structure functions in the leading twist approximation. We give results for the moments N=1,3,5,7,9,11,13 of the structure function F 3 . Similarly we present the moments N=10,12 for the flavour singlet and N=12,14 for the non-singlet structure functions F 2 and F L . We have calculated both the three-loop anomalous dimensions of the corresponding operators and the three-loop coefficient functions of the moments of these structure functions

  9. 75 FR 73034 - Application(s) for Duty-Free Entry of Scientific Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-29

    ... into structure function relationships. Key capabilities of the instrument include extended [[Page 73035... geological samples for their microstructure, phase characteristics, and interfacial processes. This...

  10. Application of the Generalized Nonlinear Complementary Relationship for Estimating Evaporation in North China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, M.; Wu, B.

    2017-12-01

    As an important part of the coupled Eco-Hydrological processes, evaporation is the bond for exchange of energy and heat between the surface and the atmosphere. However, the estimation of evaporation remains a challenge compared with other main hydrological factors in water cycle. The complementary relationship which proposed by Bouchet (1963) has laid the foundation for various approaches to estimate evaporation from land surfaces, the essence of the principle is a relationship between three types of evaporation in the environment. It can simply implemented with routine meteorological data without the need for resistance parameters of the vegetation and bare land, which are difficult to observed and complicated to estimate in most surface flux models. On this basis the generalized nonlinear formulation was proposed by Brutsaert (2015). The daily evaporation can be estimated once the potential evaporation (Epo) and apparent potential evaporation (Epa) are known. The new formulation has a strong physical basis and can be expected to perform better under natural water stress conditions, nevertheless, the model has not been widely validated over different climate types and underlying surface patterns. In this study, we attempted to apply the generalized nonlinear complementary relationship in North China, three flux stations in North China are used for testing the universality and accuracy of this model against observed evaporation over different vegetation types, including Guantao Site, Miyun Site and Huailai Site. Guantao Site has double-cropping systems and crop rotations with summer maize and winter wheat; the other two sites are dominated by spring maize. Detailed measurements of meteorological factors at certain heights above ground surface from automatic weather stations offered necessary parameters for daily evaporation estimation. Using the Bowen ratio, the surface energy measured by the eddy covariance systems at the flux stations is adjusted on a daily scale

  11. A Multidimensional and Multimembership Clustering Method for Social Networks and Its Application in Customer Relationship Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peixin Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Community detection in social networks plays an important role in cluster analysis. Many traditional techniques for one-dimensional problems have been proven inadequate for high-dimensional or mixed type datasets due to the data sparseness and attribute redundancy. In this paper we propose a graph-based clustering method for multidimensional datasets. This novel method has two distinguished features: nonbinary hierarchical tree and the multi-membership clusters. The nonbinary hierarchical tree clearly highlights meaningful clusters, while the multimembership feature may provide more useful service strategies. Experimental results on the customer relationship management confirm the effectiveness of the new method.

  12. New COMPASS results on the spin structure function $g_1^p$, and QCD fit

    CERN Document Server

    Wilfert, Malte

    2014-01-01

    The COMPASS experiment at CERN SPS has taken data with a polarised muon beam scattering off a polarised NH 3 target in 2011. The beam energy has been increased to 200 GeV compared to 160 GeV in 2007 and thus, higher values of Q 2 and lower values of x are reached. From these data the longitudinal double spin asymmetry A p 1 and the spin-dependent structure function g p 1 are extracted. The results are used in a NLO QCD fit to the world data to obtain the polarised parton distributions and also to test the Bjorken sum rule, connecting the integral of the non-singlet structure function with the ratio of the weak coupling constants

  13. Covariant boost and structure functions of baryons in Gross-Neveu models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brendel, Wieland; Thies, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Baryons in the large N limit of two-dimensional Gross-Neveu models are reconsidered. The time-dependent Dirac-Hartree-Fock approach is used to boost a baryon to any inertial frame and shown to yield the covariant energy-momentum relation. Momentum distributions are computed exactly in arbitrary frames and used to interpolate between the rest frame and the infinite momentum frame, where they are related to structure functions. Effects from the Dirac sea depend sensitively on the occupation fraction of the valence level and the bare fermion mass and do not vanish at infinite momentum. In the case of the kink baryon, they even lead to divergent quark and antiquark structure functions at x=0.

  14. The Spin Structure Function of the Proton from SLAC Experiment E155

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKee, P

    2004-02-17

    Experiment E155 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) measured the longitudinal and transverse deep inelastic structure functions of the proton and deuteron using a polarized, 48.3 GeV electron beam and solid polarized targets of ammonia ({sup 15}NH{sub 3}) for proton measurements and lithium deuteride ({sup 6}Li{sup 2}H) for deuteron measurements. Three electromagnetic spectrometers at angles of 2.75{sup o}, 5.5{sup o}, and 10.5{sup o} measured the scattered electrons. This work presents an analysis of the longitudinal structure function of the proton, g{sub 1}{sup p}(x, Q{sup 2}). Included is a re-analysis of the proton target polarization data that for the first time corrects a problem encountered which altered those measurements.

  15. Study of nuclear effects in the determination of nucleon structure functions with heavy targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benvenuti, A.S.; Bollini, D.; Camporesi, T.

    1984-01-01

    Results of the experiment on deep inelastic scattering of 280 GeV muons on deuterium, nitrogen and iron nuclei are presented. The purpose of the measurements was to compare the Bjorken variable dependence of nucleon structure functions obtained in experiments on different nuclei and also Q 2 -dependence (Q- four-momentum transfer) of structure functions. The results of the experiments do not indicate any Q 2 -dependence of the Fsub(2)sup(Fe)/Fsub(2)sup(Dsub(2)) and Fsub(2)sup(Nsub(2))Fsub(2)sup(Dsub(2)) ratios. These ratios depend linearly on the parameter x: R=a+bx. The parameters of the linear fit for the iron/deuterium ratio are a=1.16+-0.03, b=-0.56+-0.08; and for the. ni;rogen/deuterium ratio, a=1.10+-0.04, anti b=-0.39+-0.09

  16. Particle correlations in the recombination model associated with modified Kuti-Weisskopf structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takasugi, E.; Tata, X.

    1982-01-01

    The recombination model associated with modified Kuti-Weisskopf multiquark structure functions is used to analyze particle production by hadronic collisions. The justification of the use of the impulse approximation in these processes and the universal nature of the recombination process are discussed. Single-meson inclusive production in the fragmentation domains of the proton, the pion, and the kaon is used as an input to determine the primitive structure functions. Our parameter-free predictions for low-p/sub T/ multimeson and associated meson-baryon inclusive production are found to be in good agreement with a large amount of recently obtained correlation data. It is pointed out, however, that reactions involving multivalence recombination fall outside the scope of present considerations

  17. Measurement of the photon structure function $F_{2}^{\\gamma}$ at low x

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Beeston, C.; Behnke, T.; Bell, A.N.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bloomer, J.E.; Bobinski, M.; Bock, P.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Bouwens, B.T.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Burgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davies, R.; De Jong, S.; del Pozo, L.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Doucet, M.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Edwards, J.E.G.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Evans, H.G.; Evans, M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fischer, H.M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Fong, D.G.; Foucher, M.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Geddes, N.I.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Geralis, T.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giacomelli, R.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Goodrick, M.J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hart, P.A.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hillier, S.J.; Hobson, P.R.; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ingram, M.R.; Ishii, K.; Jawahery, A.; Jeffreys, P.W.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Joly, A.; Jones, C.R.; Jones, G.; Jones, M.; Jost, U.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kirk, J.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lahmann, R.; Lai, W.P.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lefebvre, E.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markus, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mincer, A.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Morii, M.; Muller, U.; Mihara, S.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oh, A.; Oldershaw, N.J.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Pearce, M.J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Posthaus, A.; Rees, D.L.; Rigby, D.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rooke, A.; Ros, E.; Rossi, A.M.; Routenburg, P.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Ruppel, U.; Rust, D.R.; Rylko, R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schenk, P.; Schieck, J.; Schleper, P.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skillman, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Springer, Robert Wayne; Sproston, M.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stockhausen, B.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Szymanski, P.; Tafirout, R.; Talbot, S.D.; Tanaka, S.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Utzat, P.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Verzocchi, M.; Vikas, P.; Vokurka, E.H.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilkens, B.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1997-01-01

    Deep inelastic electron-photon scattering is studied using e+e- data collected by the OPAL detector at centre-of-mass energies sqrt{s_ee} ~ M_{Z^0}. The photon structure function F_2^gamma(x,Q^2) is explored in a Q^2 range of 1.1 to 6.6 GeV/c^2 at lower x values than ever before. To probe this kinematic region events are selected with a beam electron scattered into one of the OPAL luminosity calorimeters at scattering angles between 27 and 55 mrad. A measurement is presented of the photon structure function F_2^gamma(x,Q^2) at = 1.86 GeV^2 and 3.76 GeV^2 in five logarithmic x bins from 0.0025 to 0.2.

  18. Study of the hadronic photon structure function $F^\\gamma_2$ at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Ball, R C; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Boutigny, D; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, M; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Drago, E; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Easo, S; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gerald, J; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hidas, P; Hirschfelder, J; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Iashvili, I; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Lacentre, P E; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lavorato, A; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee, H J; Leggett, C; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Marchesini, P A; Marian, G; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; Mazumdar, K; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Migani, D; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palit, S; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Pothier, J; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Rind, O; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sauvage, G; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schneegans, M; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Soulimov, V; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhou, Y; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F; Zilizi, G

    1998-01-01

    The hadronic photon structure function $F^\\gamma_2$ is studied in the reaction $\\mathrm{e^+e^-} \\rightarrow \\mathrm{e^+e^-hadrons}$ at LEP with the L3 detector. The data, collected from 1991 to 1995 at a centre-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s} \\simeq 91 \\GeV$, correspond to an integrated luminosity of 140~pb$^{-1}$. The photon structure function $F^\\gamma_2$ is measured in the $Q^2$ interval $1.2 \\GeV^2 \\leq Q^2 \\leq 9.0 \\GeV^2$ and the $x$ interval $0.002 < x < 0.2$. $\\FF$ shows a linear growth with $\\ln Q^2$. The value of the slope $\\alpha^{-1}\\mathrm{d}\\FF(Q^2)/\\mathrm{d}\\ln{Q^2}$ is measured to be $0.079 \\pm 0.011 \\pm 0.009$.

  19. A lattice calculation of the nucleon's spin-dependent structure function g2 revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goeckeler, M.; Rakow, P.E.L.; Schaefer, A.; Schierholz, G.

    2000-11-01

    Our previous calculation of the spin-dependent structure function g 2 is revisited. The interest in this structure function is to a great extent motivated by the fact that it receives contributions from twist-two as well as from twist-three operators already in leading order of 1/Q 2 thus offering the unique possibility of directly assessing higher-twist effects. In our former calculation the lattice operators were renormalized perturbatively and mixing with lower-dimensional operators was ignored. However, the twist-three operator which gives rise to the matrix element d 2 mixes non-perturbatively with an operator of lower dimension. Taking this effect into account leads to a considerably smaller value of d 2 , which is consistent with the experimental data. (orig.)

  20. Study of the spin structure functions of the nucleon: the E143 experiment at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenier, Philippe

    1995-01-01

    In this thesis, we present the results of the E143 experiment of deep inelastic scattering of 29 GeV polarized electrons from polarized NH 3 and ND 3 targets, at SLAC. The goal of the experiment is the measurement of the spin structure functions g 1 and g 2 of the nucleon which provide information on its internal spin structure. Experimentally, the structure functions are extracted from the measurement of cross section asymmetries. Our measured values of the first moment of g 1 are two and three standard deviations below the Ellis-Jaffe sum rule predictions, for the proton and for the deuteron, respectively. The Bjoerken sum rule, a QCD fundamental prediction, has been confirmed. We find the quark contribution to the nucleon spin to be around 30 pc. Our results on g 2 are well described by the Wandzura-Wilczek expression. (author) [fr

  1. Governance of Offshore IT Outsourcing at Shell Global Functions IT-BAM Development and Application of a Governance Framework to Improve Outsourcing Relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Floor; van Hillegersberg, Jos; van Eck, Pascal; van der Kolk, Feiko; Jorissen, Rene; Oshri, Ilan; Kotlarsky, Julia

    The lack of effective IT governance is widely recognized as a key inhibitor to successful global IT outsourcing relationships. In this study we present the development and application of a governance framework to improve outsourcing relationships. The approach used to developing an IT governance

  2. Measurement of the Polarized Structure Function $g_1^p$ at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Ball, R.D.; Forte, S.; Hughes, V.W.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Ridolfi, G.; Ball, Richard D.; Deshpande, Abhay; Forte, Stefano; Hughes, Vernon W.; Lichtenstadt, Jechiel; Ridolfi, Giovanni

    1996-01-01

    We present estimates of possible data on spin-dependent asymmetries in inclusive scattering of high energy polarized electrons by high energy polarized protons at HERA, including statistical errors, and discuss systematic uncertainties. We show that these data would shed light on the small x behaviour of the polarized structure function g_1, and would reduce substantially the uncertainty on the determination of the polarized gluon distribution.

  3. Spin structure function measurements with polarized protons and electrons at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, R.D.; Deshpande, A.; Forte, S.; Hughes, V.W.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Ridolfi, G.

    1995-01-01

    Useful insights into the spin structure functions of the nucleon can be achieved by measurements of spin-dependent asymmetries in inclusive scattering of high energy polarized electrons by high energy polarized protons at HERA. Such an experiment would be a natural extension of the polarized lepton-nucleon scattering experiments presently carried out at CERN and SLAC. We present here estimates of possible data in the extended kinematic range of HERA and associated statistical errors. (orig.)

  4. QCD at low Q2 - a correspondence relation for moments of structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrempp, B.; Schrempp, F.

    1980-01-01

    The precocious validity of QCD predictions in deep inelastic lepton nucleon scattering and e + e - annihilation is interpreted as a signal for an underlying 'correspondence principle' relating perturbative and nonperturbative physics on the Q 2 average. Correspondence relations for nonsinglet moments of deep inelastic structure functions are formulated, discussed and successfully tested against experiment. The relations provide an independent determination of the QCD Λ-parameter from low Q 2 data in perfect agreement with results from large Q 2 analyses. (author)

  5. On the Rise of the Proton Structure Function F_2 Towards Low x

    CERN Document Server

    Adloff, C.; Andrieu, B.; Anthonis, T.; Arkadov, V.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Bahr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Bate, P.; Beglarian, A.; Behnke, O.; Beier, C.; Belousov, A.; Benisch, T.; Berger, Christoph; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Broker, H.B.; Brown, D.P.; Bruckner, W.; Bruncko, D.; Burger, J.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Burrage, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cao, Jun; Caron, S.; Clarke, D.; Clerbaux, B.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J.G.; Coppens, Y.R.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cousinou, M.C.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; Davidsson, M.; Delcourt, B.; Delerue, N.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dingfelder, J.; Dixon, P.; Dodonov, V.; Dowell, J.D.; Droutskoi, A.; Dubak, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, D.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Ferron, S.; Fleischer, M.; Fleming, Y.H.; Flugge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formanek, J.; Foster, J.M.; Franke, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garvey, J.; Gassner, J.; Gayler, Joerg; Gerhards, R.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Goldberg, M.; Goodwin, C.; Grab, C.; Grassler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Hadig, T.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haynes, W.J.; Heinemann, B.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hengstmann, S.; Henschel, H.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hilgers, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hladky, J.; Hoting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hurling, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Issever, C .; Jacquet, M.; Jaffre, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jones, M.A.S.; Jung, H.; Kastli, H.K.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Karschnick, O.; Keil, F.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kermiche, S.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Kjellberg, P.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Koblitz, B.; Kolya, S.D.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S.K.; Koutouev, R.; Koutov, A.; Krehbiel, H.; Kroseberg, J.; Kruger, K.; Kupper, A.; Kuhr, T.; Kurca, T.; Lahmann, R.; Lamb, D.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebailly, E.; Lebedev, A.; Leissner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindstroem, M.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Loginov, A.; Loktionova, N.; Lubimov, V.; Luders, S.; Luke, D.; Lytkin, L.; Mahlke-Kruger, H.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Malinovski, I.; Maracek, R.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martyn, H.U.; Martyniak, J.; Maxfield, S.J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, P.O.; Mikocki, S.; Milstead, D.; Mkrtchyan, T.; Mohr, R.; Mohrdieck, S.; Mondragon, M.N.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, T.; Nellen, G.; Newman, Paul R.; Nicholls, T.C.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nix, O.; Nowak, G.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Panassik, V.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Phillips, J.P.; Pitzl, D.; Poschl, R.; Potachnikova, I.; Povh, B.; Rabbertz, K.; Radel, G.; Rauschenberger, J.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Reyna, D.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, M.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schorner, T.; Schroder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Chekelian, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Solovev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Straumann, U.; Swart, M.; Tasevsky, M.; Chernyshov, V.; Chetchelnitski, S.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tobien, N.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Turney, J.E.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Udluft, S.; Urban, Marcel; Usik, A.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vassilev, S.; Vazdik, Y.; Vichnevski, A.; Wacker, K.; Wallny, R.; Waugh, B.; Weber, G.; Weber, M.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, M.; Werner, N.; White, G.; Wiesand, S.; Wilksen, T.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.G.; Wissing, C.; Wobisch, M.; Wunsch, E.; Wyatt, A.C.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zomer, F.; Zsembery, J.; zur Nedden, M.

    2001-01-01

    A measurement of the derivative (d ln F_2 / d lnx)_(Q^2)= -lambda(x,Q^2) of the proton structure function F_2 is presented in the low x domain of deeply inelastic positron-proton scattering. For 5*10^(-5)=1.5 GeV^2, lambda(x,Q^2) is found to be independent of x and to increase linearly with ln(Q^2).

  6. Differences in ecological structure, function, and native species abundance between native and invaded Hawaiian streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tara Holitzki; Richard A. MacKenzie; Tracy N. Wiegner; Karla J. McDermid

    2013-01-01

    Poeciliids, one of the most invasive species worldwide, are found on almost every continent and have been identified as an ‘‘invasive species of concern’’ in the United States, New Zealand, and Australia. Despite their global prevalence, few studies have quantified their impacts on tropical stream ecosystem structure, function, and biodiversity. Utilizing Hawaiian...

  7. A thermodynamical analysis of the π and K meson valence structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelini, C.; Pazzi, R.

    1982-01-01

    The π and K meson valance structure functions are analysed in the framework of a thermodynamical model already applied to the nucleon. We obtain a simple expression which reproduces quite well the data for chi > 0.3. The effective temperatures are found to be of the order of 20 MeV for the pion and 65 MeV for the kaon. (orig.)

  8. Measurements of the Deuteron Elastic Structure Function A(Q2) for 0.7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L. C. Alexa; B. D. Anderson; K. A. Aniol; K. Arundell; L. Auerbach; F. T. Baker; J. Berthot; P. Y. Bertin; W. Bertozzi; L. Bimbot; W. U. Boeglin; E. J. Brash; V. Breton; H. Breuer; E. Burtin; J. R. Calarco; L. S. Cardman; C. Cavata; C.-C. Chang; J.-P. Chen; E. Chudakov; E. Cisbani; D. S. Dale; N. Degrande; R. De Leo; A. Deur; N. d'Hose; B. Diederich; J. J. Domingo; M. B. Epstein; L. A. Ewell; J. M. Finn; K. G. Fissum; H. Fonvieille; B. Frois; S. Frullani; H. Gao; J. Gao; F. Garibaldi; A. Gasparian,; S. Gilad; R. Gilman; A. Glamazdin; C. Glashausser; J. Gomez; V. Gorbenko; J.-O. Hansen; R. Holmes; M. Holtrop; C. Howell; G. M. Huber; C. Hyde-Wright; M. Iodice; C. W. de Jager; S. Jaminion; J. Jardillier; M. K. Jones; C. Jutier,; W. Kahl; S. Kato; A. T. Katramatou; J. J. Kelly; S. Kerhoas; A. Ketikyan; M. Khayat; K. Kino; L. H. Kramer; K. S. Kumar; G. Kumbartzki; M. Kuss; G. Lavessiere; A. Leone; J. J. LeRose; M. Liang; R. A. Lindgren; N. Liyanage; G. J. Lolos; R. W. Lourie; R. Madey,; K. Maeda; S. Malov; D. M. Manley; D. J. Margaziotis; P. Markowitz; J. Marroncle; J. Martino; C. J. Martoff; K. McCormick; J. McIntyre; R. L. J. van der Meer; S. Mehrabyan; Z.-E. Meziani; R. Michaels; G. W. Miller; J. Y. Mougey; S. K. Nanda; D. Neyret; E. A. J. M. Offermann; Z. Papandreou; C. F. Perdrisat; R. Perrino; G. G. Petratos; S. Platchkov; R. Pomatsalyuk; D. L. Prout; V. A. Punjabi; T. Pussieux; G. Quemener; R. D. Ransome; O. Ravel; Y. Roblin; D. Rowntree; G. Rutledge; P. M. Rutt; A. Saha; T. Saito; A. J. Sarty; A. Serdarevic,; T. Smith; K. Soldi; P. Sorokin; P. A. Souder; R. Suleiman; J. A. Templon; T. Terasawa; L. Todor; H. Tsubota; H. Ueno; P. E. Ulmer; G. M. Urciuoli; L. Van Hoorebeke; P. Vernin; B. Vlahovic; H. Voskanyan; J. W. Watson; L. B. Weinstein; K. Wijesooriya; R. Wilson; B. B. Wojtsekhowski; D. G. Zainea; W-M. Zhang; J. Zhao; Z.-L. Zhou

    1999-01-01

    The deuteron elastic structure function A(Q 2 ) has been extracted in the range 0.7 2 2 from cross section measurements of elastic electron-deuteron scattering in coincidence using the Hall A Facility of Jefferson Laboratory. The data are compared to theoretical models, based on the impulse approximation with the inclusion of meson-exchange currents, and to predictions of quark dimensional scaling and perturbative quantum chromodynamics

  9. Scaling exponents of the velocity structure functions in the interplanetary medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Carbone

    Full Text Available We analyze the scaling exponents of the velocity structure functions, obtained from the velocity fluctuations measured in the interplanetary space plasma. Using the expression for the energy transfer rate which seems the most relevant in describing the evolution of the pseudo-energy densities in the interplanetary medium, we introduce an energy cascade model derived from a simple fragmentation process, which takes into account the intermittency effect. In the absence and in the presence of the large-scale magnetic field decorrelation effect the model reduces to the fluid and the hydromagnetic p-model, respectively. We show that the scaling exponents of the q-th power of the velocity structure functions, as obtained by the model in the absence of the decorrelation effect, furnishes the best-fit to the data analyzed from the Voyager 2 velocity field measurements at 8.5 AU. Our results allow us to hypothesize a new kind of scale-similarity for magnetohydrodynamic turbulence when the decorrelation effect is at work, related to the fourth-order velocity structure function.

  10. Regression analysis of the structure function for reliability evaluation of continuous-state system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamiz, M.L.; Martinez Miranda, M.D.

    2010-01-01

    Technical systems are designed to perform an intended task with an admissible range of efficiency. According to this idea, it is permissible that the system runs among different levels of performance, in addition to complete failure and the perfect functioning one. As a consequence, reliability theory has evolved from binary-state systems to the most general case of continuous-state system, in which the state of the system changes over time through some interval on the real number line. In this context, obtaining an expression for the structure function becomes difficult, compared to the discrete case, with difficulty increasing as the number of components of the system increases. In this work, we propose a method to build a structure function for a continuum system by using multivariate nonparametric regression techniques, in which certain analytical restrictions on the variable of interest must be taken into account. Once the structure function is obtained, some reliability indices of the system are estimated. We illustrate our method via several numerical examples.

  11. Regression analysis of the structure function for reliability evaluation of continuous-state system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamiz, M.L., E-mail: mgamiz@ugr.e [Departamento de Estadistica e I.O., Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Granada, Granada 18071 (Spain); Martinez Miranda, M.D. [Departamento de Estadistica e I.O., Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Granada, Granada 18071 (Spain)

    2010-02-15

    Technical systems are designed to perform an intended task with an admissible range of efficiency. According to this idea, it is permissible that the system runs among different levels of performance, in addition to complete failure and the perfect functioning one. As a consequence, reliability theory has evolved from binary-state systems to the most general case of continuous-state system, in which the state of the system changes over time through some interval on the real number line. In this context, obtaining an expression for the structure function becomes difficult, compared to the discrete case, with difficulty increasing as the number of components of the system increases. In this work, we propose a method to build a structure function for a continuum system by using multivariate nonparametric regression techniques, in which certain analytical restrictions on the variable of interest must be taken into account. Once the structure function is obtained, some reliability indices of the system are estimated. We illustrate our method via several numerical examples.

  12. The proton and deuteron F2 structure function at low Q2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tvaskis, Vladas; Arrington, John; Asaturyan, Razmik; Baker, Oliver; Blok, Henk; Bosted, Peter; Boswell, Melissa; Bruell, Antje; Christy, Michael; Cochran, Anthony; Ent, Rolf; Filippone, Bradley; Gasparian, Ashot; Keppel, Cynthia; Kinney, Edward; Lapikas, L.; Lorenzon, Wolfgang; Mack, David; Mammei, Juliette; Martin, J.W.; Mkrtchyan, Hamlet; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Piercey, Rodney; Potterveld, David; Smith, Gregory; Spurlock, Kurt; Van der Steenhoven, Gerard; Stepanyan, Stepan; Tadevosyan, Vardan; Wood, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of the proton and deuteron F2 structure functions are presented. The data, taken at Jefferson Lab Hall C, span the four-momentum transfer range 0:06 < Q2 < 2:8 GeV2, and Bjorken x values from 0.009 to 0.45, thus extending the knowledge of F2 to low values of Q2 at low x. Next-to-next-to-leading order calculations using recent parton distribution functions start to deviate from the data for Q2 < 2 GeV2 at the low and high x-values. Down to the lowest value of Q2, the structure function is in good agreement with a parameterization of F2 based on data that have been taken at much higher values of Q2 or much lower values of x, and which is constrained by data at the photon point. The ratio of the deuteron and proton structure functions at low x remains well described by a logarithmic dependence on Q2 at low Q2.

  13. Measurement of the diffractive structure function in deep inelastic scattering hat HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.

    1995-05-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the inclusive properties of diffractive deep inelastic scattering events produced in ep interactions at HERA. The events are characterised by a rapidity gap between the outgoing proton system and the remaining hadronic system. Inclusive distributions are presented and compared with Monte Carlo models for diffractive processes. The data are consistent with models where the pomeron structure function has a hard and a soft contribution. The diffractive structure function is measured as a function of x IP , the momentum fraction lost by the proton, of β, the momentum fraction of the struck quark with respect to x IP , and of Q 2 . The x IP dependence is consistent with the form (1/x IP ) a where a=1.30-±0.80(stat) -0.14 +0.08 (sys) in all bins of βand Q 2 . In the measured Q 2 range, the diffractive structure function approximately scales with Q 2 at fixed β. In an Ingelman-Schlein type model, where commonly used pomeron flux factor normalisations are assumed, it is found that the quarks within the pomeron do not saturate the momentum sum rule. (orig.)

  14. Customizing Structure-Function Displacements in the Macula for Individual Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turpin, Andrew; Chen, Siyuan; Sepulveda, Juan A; McKendrick, Allison M

    2015-09-01

    In the macula, retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) are displaced from their receptive fields. We used optical coherence tomography (OCT) to customize displacements for individual eyes by taking into account macular shape parameters, and determined the likely effect of individual anatomical differences on structure-function mapping in the central visual field. Using the population average model of Drasdo et al. as a starting point, we altered the RGC count in that model based on the ratio of an individual's RGC layer plus inner plexiform layer thickness to the population average on a pointwise basis as a function of eccentricity from the fovea. For 20 adults (age, 24-33; median age, 28) with normal vision, we computed displacements with the original model and our customized approach. We report the variance in displacements among individuals and compare the effects of such displacements on structure-function mapping of the commonly used the 10-2 visual field pattern. As expected, customizing the displacement using individual OCT data made only a small difference on average from the population-based values predicted by the Drasdo et al. model. However, the range between individuals was over 1° at many locations, and closer to 2° at some locations in the superior visual field. Individualizing macular displacement measurements based on OCT data for an individual can result in large spatial shifts in the retinal area corresponding to 10-2 locations, which may be important for clinical structure-function analysis when performed on a local, spatial scale.

  15. A new model for the structure function of integrated water vapor in turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobak, Justin P.; Ruf, Christopher S.

    1999-01-01

    Turbulent fluctuation of integrated water vapor in the troposphere is one of the major noise sources in radio interferometry. Processed integrated water vapor estimates from microwave radiometers colocated with interferometers have been used to set bounds on this uncertainty. The bound has been in the form of a calculated structure function, which is a measure of temporal or spatial decorrelation of fluctuations. In this paper a new model is presented for the estimation of the structure function in the absence of radiometer measurements. Using this model, the structure function can be estimated using measurements or estimates of a limited number of meteorological parameters. These parameters include boundary layer depth, surface heat and humidity fluxes, entrainment humidity flux, average virtual potential temperature in the boundary layer, and geostrophic wind speed. These parameters can be found or estimated from radiosonde and surface eddy correlation system data. The model is based on a framework of turbulence meteorology and provides excellent agreement when compared with state-of-the-art atmospheric turbulence simulations. Results of preliminary comparisons with ground truth show some excellent agreement, as well as some problems. The performance of the new model exceeds that of one current model. (c) 1999 American Geophysical Union

  16. QCD coherence in the structure function and associated distributions at small x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchesini, G.

    1995-01-01

    We recall the origin of angular ordering in soft parton emission and show that at small x this coherent structure is masked in the structure function while it can be detected in the associated distributions. This is due to the fact that collinear singularities cancel completely in the structure function at fixed transverse momentum for x →0. In this limit the dependence on the hard scale is lost, the angular ordered region becomes equivalent to the multi-Regge region in which all transverse momenta are of the same order, and one derives the BFKL equation. For the associated distributions at small x such a complete cancellation of collinear singularities does not hold in general, thus large singular contributions are neglected if angular ordering is replaced by multi-Regge phase space. The deduction of these features requires an analysis without any collinear approximations which is done by extending to small x the soft gluon factorization techniques typically used in the region of large x. Since the coherent structure of parton emission is the same in the small and large x regions, one can formulate a unified evolution equation for the structure function, a unified coherent branching and jet algorithm which allows the calculation of associated distributions in all x regions. Such a unified formulation, valid for all x, is presented and compared with usual treatments. ((orig.))

  17. Refined algebraic quantisation in a system with nonconstant gauge invariant structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martínez-Pascual, Eric

    2013-01-01

    In a previous work [J. Louko and E. Martínez-Pascual, “Constraint rescaling in refined algebraic quantisation: Momentum constraint,” J. Math. Phys. 52, 123504 (2011)], refined algebraic quantisation (RAQ) within a family of classically equivalent constrained Hamiltonian systems that are related to each other by rescaling one momentum-type constraint was investigated. In the present work, the first steps to generalise this analysis to cases where more constraints occur are developed. The system under consideration contains two momentum-type constraints, originally abelian, where rescalings of these constraints by a non-vanishing function of the coordinates are allowed. These rescalings induce structure functions at the level of the gauge algebra. Providing a specific parametrised family of real-valued scaling functions, the implementation of the corresponding rescaled quantum momentum-type constraints is performed using RAQ when the gauge algebra: (i) remains abelian and (ii) undergoes into an algebra of a nonunimodular group with nonconstant gauge invariant structure functions. Case (ii) becomes the first example known to the author where an open algebra is handled in refined algebraic quantisation. Challenging issues that arise in the presence of non-gauge invariant structure functions are also addressed

  18. A Next-to-Leading Order QCD Analysis of Neutrino - Iron Structure Functions at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seligman, William Glenn [Nevis Labs, Columbia U.

    1997-01-01

    Nucleon structure functions measured in neutrino-iron and antineutrinoiron charged-current interactions are presented. The data were taken in two high-energy high-statistics runs by the LAB-E detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. Structure functions are extracted from a sample of 950,000 neutrino and 170,000 antineutrino events with neutrino energies from 30 to 360 Ge V. The structure functions $F_2$ and $xF_3$ are compared with the the predictions of perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics (PQCD). The combined non-singlet and singlet evolution in the context of PQCD gives NL0(4) . 2 value of $\\Lambda^{NLO,(4)}_{\\overline MS}$ = 337 ± 28 (exp.) MeV, which corresponds to $\\alpha_s$ ($M^2_z$) = 0.119 ± 0.002 (exp.) ± 0.004 (theory), and with a gluon distribution given by $xG(x,Q^2_0 = 5 GeV^2$ ) = (2.22±0.34) x ($1-x)^{4.65 \\pm 0.68}$

  19. The E142 SLAC experiment: measurement of the neutron gn1(x) spin structure function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roblin, Y.

    1995-01-01

    This thesis describes the E142 experiment which has been carried out at the Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC), USA, from October to December 1992. This experiment of polarized inelastic scattering of a 22.6 GeV electron beam on a polarized helium 3 target has allowed the first measurement of the neutron g n 1 (x) spin structure function. The knowledge of this structure function gives informations on the nucleon spin structure. On the other hand, the g n 1 (x) structure function integral value on the 0 2 mean value of 2 GeV 2 after some extrapolations. This value is at about two standard deviations away from the theoretical predictions of the Ellis-Jaffe rule. Thanks to the existing experimental results for the proton (E143 experiment), the Bjorken sum rule has been precisely tested and is perfectly compatible with the theoretical value. The results have allowed to estimate the nucleon spin fraction carried by the quarks. (J.S.). 86 refs., 58 figs., 13 tabs

  20. Detangling complex relationships in forensic data: principles and use of causal networks and their application to clinical forensic science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, Thomas; Lepresle, Aude; Chariot, Patrick

    2015-09-01

    The search for complex, nonlinear relationships and causality in data is hindered by the availability of techniques in many domains, including forensic science. Linear multivariable techniques are useful but present some shortcomings. In the past decade, Bayesian approaches have been introduced in forensic science. To date, authors have mainly focused on providing an alternative to classical techniques for quantifying effects and dealing with uncertainty. Causal networks, including Bayesian networks, can help detangle complex relationships in data. A Bayesian network estimates the joint probability distribution of data and graphically displays dependencies between variables and the circulation of information between these variables. In this study, we illustrate the interest in utilizing Bayesian networks for dealing with complex data through an application in clinical forensic science. Evaluating the functional impairment of assault survivors is a complex task for which few determinants are known. As routinely estimated in France, the duration of this impairment can be quantified by days of 'Total Incapacity to Work' ('Incapacité totale de travail,' ITT). In this study, we used a Bayesian network approach to identify the injury type, victim category and time to evaluation as the main determinants of the 'Total Incapacity to Work' (TIW). We computed the conditional probabilities associated with the TIW node and its parents. We compared this approach with a multivariable analysis, and the results of both techniques were converging. Thus, Bayesian networks should be considered a reliable means to detangle complex relationships in data.

  1. The structure function of the death domain of human IRAK-M.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jiangfeng; Nicolaes, Gerry Af; Kruijswijk, Danielle; Versloot, Miranda; van der Poll, Tom; van 't Veer, Cornelis

    2014-12-07

    IRAK-M is an inhibitor of Toll-like receptor signaling that acts by re-directing IRAK-4 activity to TAK1 independent NF-κB activation and by inhibition of IRAK-1/IRAK-2 activity. IRAK-M is expressed in monocytes/macrophages and lung epithelial cells. Lack of IRAK-M in mice greatly improves the resistance to nosocomial pneumonia and lung tumors, which entices IRAK-M as a potential therapeutic target. IRAK-M consists of an N-terminal death domain (DD), a dysfunctional kinase domain and unstructured C-terminal domain. Little is known however on IRAK-M's structure-function relationships. Since death domains provide the important interactions of IRAK-1, IRAK-2 and IRAK-4 molecules, we generated a 3D structure model of the human IRAK-M-DD (residues C5-G119) to guide mutagenesis studies and predict protein-protein interaction points. First we identified the DD residues involved in the endogenous capacity of IRAK-M to activate NF-κB that is displayed upon overexpression in 293T cells. W74 and R97, at distinct interfaces of the IRAK-M-DD, were crucial for this endogenous NF-κB activating capacity, as well as the C-terminal domain (S445-E596) of IRAK-M. Resulting anti-inflammatory A20 and pro-inflammatory IL-8 transcription in 293T cells was W74 dependent, while IL-8 protein expression was dependent on R97 and the TRAF6 binding motif at P478. The IRAK-M-DD W74 and R97 binding interfaces are predicted to interact with opposite sides of IRAK-4-DD's. Secondly we identified DD residues important for the inhibitory action of IRAK-M by stable overexpression of mutants in THP-1 macrophages and H292 lung epithelial cells. IRAK-M inhibited TLR2/4-mediated cytokine production in macrophages in a manner that is largely dependent on W74. R97 was not involved in inhibition of TNF production but was engaged in IL-6 down-regulation by IRAK-M. Protein-interactive residues D19-A23, located in between W74 and R97, were also observed to be crucial for inhibition of TLR2/4 mediated cytokine

  2. ON THE INFLUENTIAL POINTS IN THE FUNCTIONAL CIRCULAR RELATIONSHIP MODELS WITH AN APPLICATION ON WIND DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALi Hassan Abuzaid

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available If the interest is to calibrate two instruments then the functional relationship model is more appropriate than regression models. Fitting a straight line when both variables are circular and subject to errors has not received much attention. In this paper, we consider the problem of detecting influential points in two functional relationship models for circular variables. The first is based on the simple circular regression the (SC, while the last is derived from the complex linear regression the (CL.   The covariance matrices are derived and then the COVRATIO statistics are formulated for both models. The cut-off points are obtained and the power of performance is assessed via simulation studies.   The performance of COVRATIO statistics depends on the concentration of error, sample size and level of contamination. In the case of linear relationship between two circular variables COVRATIO statistics of the (SC model performs better than the (CL.  On the other hand, a novel diagram, the so-called spoke plot, is utilized to detect possible influential points For illustration purposes, the proposed procedures are applied on real data of wind directions measured by two different instruments. COVRATIO statistics and the spoke plot were able to identify two observations as influential points. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"جدول عادي"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  3. THE RELATIONSHIP MARKETING APPLICATION IN SMALL AND MEDIUM-SIZED ENTERPRISES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SABOU FELICIA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the importance of relationship marketing, the communication between customers and romanian small and medium-sized enterprises, analyzing also how are investigated and resolved the complaints received from the customers. In the paper, I made a study through I analyzed if the small and medium-sized enterprises undertake investigations about the reasons which they have lost customers. The study was conducted during january - february 2016, the main research methods used in the study were observation, documentation, analysis and market survey. Also, I chose the study questionnaire as research tool. From this study resulted that 79,31% of companies surveyed, were concerned and investigated the reasons they lost customers. Customer satisfaction is very important to business success, so it is recommended that companies must pay attention to the customers reactions and customers dissatisfaction consequences.

  4. Synthesis, quantitative structure-property relationship study of novel fluorescence active 2-pyrazolines and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girgis, Adel S.; Basta, Altaf H.; El-Saied, Houssni; Mohamed, Mohamed A.; Bedair, Ahmad H.; Salim, Ahmad S.

    2018-03-01

    A variety of fluorescence-active fluorinated pyrazolines 13-33 was synthesized in good yields through cyclocondensation reaction of propenones 1-9 with aryl hydrazines 10-12. Some of the synthesized compounds provided promising fluorescence properties with quantum yield (Φ) higher than that of quinine sulfate (standard reference). Quantitative structure-property relationship studies were undertaken supporting the exhibited fluorescence properties and estimating the parameters governing properties. Five synthesized fluorescence-active pyrazolines (13, 15, 18, 19 and 23) with variable Φ were selected for treating two types of paper sheets (Fabriano and Bible paper). These investigated fluorescence compounds, especially compounds 19 and 23, provide improvements in strength properties of paper sheets. Based on the observed performance they can be used as markers in security documents.

  5. Applications of genetic algorithms on the structure-activity relationship analysis of some cinnamamides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, T J; Wang, J M; Liao, N; Xu, X J

    1999-01-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) for 35 cinnamamides were studied. By using a genetic algorithm (GA), a group of multiple regression models with high fitness scores was generated. From the statistical analyses of the descriptors used in the evolution procedure, the principal features affecting the anticonvulsant activity were found. The significant descriptors include the partition coefficient, the molar refraction, the Hammet sigma constant of the substituents on the benzene ring, and the formation energy of the molecules. It could be found that the steric complementarity and the hydrophobic interaction between the inhibitors and the receptor were very important to the biological activity, while the contribution of the electronic effect was not so obvious. Moreover, by construction of the spline models for these four principal descriptors, the effective range for each descriptor was identified.

  6. Application of the Gini correlation coefficient to infer regulatory relationships in transcriptome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chuang; Wang, Xiangfeng

    2012-09-01

    One of the computational challenges in plant systems biology is to accurately infer transcriptional regulation relationships based on correlation analyses of gene expression patterns. Despite several correlation methods that are applied in biology to analyze microarray data, concerns regarding the compatibility of these methods with the gene expression data profiled by high-throughput RNA transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) technology have been raised. These concerns are mainly due to the fact that the distribution of read counts in RNA-Seq experiments is different from that of fluorescence intensities in microarray experiments. Therefore, a comprehensive evaluation of the existing correlation methods and, if necessary, introduction of novel methods into biology is appropriate. In this study, we compared four existing correlation methods used in microarray analysis and one novel method called the Gini correlation coefficient on previously published microarray-based and sequencing-based gene expression data in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and maize (Zea mays). The comparisons were performed on more than 11,000 regulatory relationships in Arabidopsis, including 8,929 pairs of transcription factors and target genes. Our analyses pinpointed the strengths and weaknesses of each method and indicated that the Gini correlation can compensate for the shortcomings of the Pearson correlation, the Spearman correlation, the Kendall correlation, and the Tukey's biweight correlation. The Gini correlation method, with the other four evaluated methods in this study, was implemented as an R package named rsgcc that can be utilized as an alternative option for biologists to perform clustering analyses of gene expression patterns or transcriptional network analyses.

  7. Application of the Gini Correlation Coefficient to Infer Regulatory Relationships in Transcriptome Analysis[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chuang; Wang, Xiangfeng

    2012-01-01

    One of the computational challenges in plant systems biology is to accurately infer transcriptional regulation relationships based on correlation analyses of gene expression patterns. Despite several correlation methods that are applied in biology to analyze microarray data, concerns regarding the compatibility of these methods with the gene expression data profiled by high-throughput RNA transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) technology have been raised. These concerns are mainly due to the fact that the distribution of read counts in RNA-Seq experiments is different from that of fluorescence intensities in microarray experiments. Therefore, a comprehensive evaluation of the existing correlation methods and, if necessary, introduction of novel methods into biology is appropriate. In this study, we compared four existing correlation methods used in microarray analysis and one novel method called the Gini correlation coefficient on previously published microarray-based and sequencing-based gene expression data in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and maize (Zea mays). The comparisons were performed on more than 11,000 regulatory relationships in Arabidopsis, including 8,929 pairs of transcription factors and target genes. Our analyses pinpointed the strengths and weaknesses of each method and indicated that the Gini correlation can compensate for the shortcomings of the Pearson correlation, the Spearman correlation, the Kendall correlation, and the Tukey’s biweight correlation. The Gini correlation method, with the other four evaluated methods in this study, was implemented as an R package named rsgcc that can be utilized as an alternative option for biologists to perform clustering analyses of gene expression patterns or transcriptional network analyses. PMID:22797655

  8. Otolith Length-Fish Length Relationships of Eleven US Arctic Fish Species and Their Application to Ice Seal Diet Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, K. L.; Norcross, B.

    2016-02-01

    The Arctic ecosystem has moved into the spotlight of scientific research in recent years due to increased climate change and oil and gas exploration. Arctic fishes and Arctic marine mammals represent key parts of this ecosystem, with fish being a common part of ice seal diets in the Arctic. Determining sizes of fish consumed by ice seals is difficult because otoliths are often the only part left of the fish after digestion. Otolith length is known to be positively related to fish length. By developing species-specific otolith-body morphometric relationships for Arctic marine fishes, fish length can be determined for fish prey found in seal stomachs. Fish were collected during ice free months in the Beaufort and Chukchi seas 2009 - 2014, and the most prevalent species captured were chosen for analysis. Otoliths from eleven fish species from seven families were measured. All species had strong linear relationships between otolith length and fish total length. Nine species had coefficient of determination values over 0.75, indicating that most of the variability in the otolith to fish length relationship was explained by the linear regression. These relationships will be applied to otoliths found in stomachs of three species of ice seals (spotted Phoca largha, ringed Pusa hispida, and bearded Erignathus barbatus) and used to estimate fish total length at time of consumption. Fish lengths can in turn be used to calculate fish weight, enabling further investigation into ice seal energetic demands. This application will aid in understanding how ice seals interact with fish communities in the US Arctic and directly contribute to diet comparisons among and within ice seal species. A better understanding of predator-prey interactions in the US Arctic will aid in predicting how ice seal and fish species will adapt to a changing Arctic.

  9. Spin-dependent structure functions of sea quarks in the framework of nonperturbative QCD and new Regge trajectory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorokhov, A.E.; Kochelev, N.I.

    1991-01-01

    Within the model of QCD vacuum as an instanton liquid the spin-dependent structure functions of sea quarks are obtained. It is shown that the EMC data manages the definition of new Regge trajectory connected with the axial anomaly. The model explains the modern experimental data on the sea quark structure functions. 23 refs.; 3 figs

  10. Structure functions of the deuteron with allowance for meon-exchange currents within the QCD-VMD model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burov, V.V.; Dostovalov, V.N.; Sus'kov, S.Eh.

    1993-01-01

    The deuteron structure functions and tensor polarization are studied within the QCD-VMD model. It is shown that the calculation of the structure functions with allowance for meson-exchange currents does not allow to improve the agreement with experiment at large transfer momenta where probably other degrees of freedom are to be taken into accout

  11. Material property relationships for pipeline steels and the potential for application of NDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Lucinda; Bond, Leonard J.

    2016-02-01

    The oil and gas industry in the USA has an extensive infrastructure of pipelines, 70% of which were installed prior to 1980, and almost half were installed during the 1950s and 1960s. Ideally the mechanical properties (i.e. yield strength, tensile strength, transition temperature, and fracture toughness) of a steel pipe must be known in order to respond to detected defects in an appropriate manner. Neither current in-ditch methods nor the ILI inspection data have yet determined and map the desired mechanical properties with adequate confidence. In the quest to obtain the mechanical properties of a steel pipe using a nondestructive method, it is important to understand that there are many inter-related variables. This paper reports a literature review and an analysis of a sample set of data. There is promise for correlating the results of NDE measurement modalities to the information required to develop relationships between those measurements and the mechanical measurements desired for pipelines to ensure proper response to defects which are of significant threat.

  12. Relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties in ODS materials for nuclear application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Carlan, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Oxide Dispersion Strengthened ferritic/martensitic alloys are developed as prospective cladding materials for future Sodium-Cooled-Fast-Reactors (GEN IV) [1]. These advanced alloys present a good resistance to irradiation and a high creep rupture strength due to a reinforcement by the homogeneous dispersion of hard nano-sized particles (such as Y 2 O 3 or YTiO). ODS alloys are elaborated by powder metallurgy, consolidated by hot extrusion and manufactured into cladding tube using the Pilger cold-rolling process [2, 3]. ODS alloys present usually low ductility and high hardness. The aim of this talk is to present the specificity of the metallurgy of ODS materials in relationship with the main mechanical properties (tensile and creep properties, toughness, transition temperature). Two types of alloys will be presented: Fe-9Cr martensitic ODS and Fe-14Cr ferritic ODS alloys. Mechanical properties of the materials depend on the metallurgical state (fine grains, recrystallized, martensitic) and very different behaviors are observed as a function of final microstructure. For example, for a Fe-9Cr ODS alloy, tempered martensite lets obtaining material with high strength whereas softened ferrite see figure 1 [4] tolerates high deformation levels. (authors)

  13. The relationship between perceived stress and computer technology attitude: an application on health sciences students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozyurek, Pakize; Oztasan, Nuray; Kilic, Ibrahim

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study is to define attitudes of students in health sciences towards perceived personal stress and computer technologies, and to present the relationship between stress and computer technology attitudes. In this scope, this study has a descriptive nature and thus a questionnaire has been applied on 764 students from Afyon Kocatepe University Health Sciences High School, Turkey for data gathering. Descriptive statistics, independent samples, t test, one way ANOVA, and regression analysis have been used for data analysis. In the study, it is seen that female (=3,78) have a more positive attitude towards computer technology than male students (=3,62). according to the results of regression analysis of the study, the regression model between computer technology attitude (CTA) and perceived stress (PS) has been found meaningful (F=16,291; ptechnology attitude and perceived stress (when computer technology altitude increases, perceived stress decreases), and an increase of one unit in computer attitude results in 0.275 decrease in perceived stress. it can be concluded that correct and proper use of computer technologies can be accepted as a component of overcoming stress methods.

  14. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE PERSONALITY OF URBANITES AND CITY BRAND PERSONALITY - AN APPLICATION IN TURKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilsun Sariyer

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Brand personality claims that brands convey human characteristics. In this study, attempts have been made to determine the brand personality dimensions of cities based on the assumption that cities also have brand personality. Additionally, it has been studied whether or not urbanites reflect their own personality traits to brand personality characteristics of the city. In this descriptive study, data has been collected through face-to-face interviews. The sampling where stratified sampling is used – one method of random sampling – has been performed in Kayseri in Turkey. A total of 382 consumers have been reached. Factor and regression analyses have been used for data analysis. In conclusion, the city of Kayseri has five city brand dimensions: exhilarating, mature, androgen, traditional and sincere. In addition, it has also revealed that there is a relationship between the personalities of those who live in Kayseri and their city brand personalities. Those who live in metropolitan Kayseri and like taking risks – a criterion of extrovert personality – find Kayseri exhilarated and competent. In the light of this conclusion, it can be said that urbanites’ personalities should also be considered when forming city brand personality.

  15. Application of Nonlinear Analysis Methods for Identifying Relationships Between Microbial Community Structure and Groundwater Geochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schryver, Jack C.; Brandt, Craig C.; Pfiffner, Susan M.; Palumbo, A V.; Peacock, Aaron D.; White, David C.; McKinley, James P.; Long, Philip E.

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between groundwater geochemistry and microbial community structure can be complex and difficult to assess. We applied nonlinear and generalized linear data analysis methods to relate microbial biomarkers (phospholipids fatty acids, PLFA) to groundwater geochemical characteristics at the Shiprock uranium mill tailings disposal site that is primarily contaminated by uranium, sulfate, and nitrate. First, predictive models were constructed using feedforward artificial neural networks (NN) to predict PLFA classes from geochemistry. To reduce the danger of overfitting, parsimonious NN architectures were selected based on pruning of hidden nodes and elimination of redundant predictor (geochemical) variables. The resulting NN models greatly outperformed the generalized linear models. Sensitivity analysis indicated that tritium, which was indicative of riverine influences, and uranium were important in predicting the distributions of the PLFA classes. In contrast, nitrate concentration and inorganic carbon were least important, and total ionic strength was of intermediate importance. Second, nonlinear principal components (NPC) were extracted from the PLFA data using a variant of the feedforward NN. The NPC grouped the samples according to similar geochemistry. PLFA indicators of Gram-negative bacteria and eukaryotes were associated with the groups of wells with lower levels of contamination. The more contaminated samples contained microbial communities that were predominated by terminally branched saturates and branched monounsaturates that are indicative of metal reducers, actinomycetes, and Gram-positive bacteria. These results indicate that the microbial community at the site is coupled to the geochemistry and knowledge of the geochemistry allows prediction of the community composition

  16. Structure-function relationship of viral coat proteins : a site-directed spectroscopic study of M13 coat protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stopar, D.

    1997-01-01

    This thesis describes the results of a spectroscopic study of the major coat protein of bacteriophage M13. During the infection process this protein is incorporated into the cytoplasmic membrane of Escherichia coli host cells. To specifically monitor the local structural changes

  17. The Yucatan Minipig Temporomandibular Joint Disc Structure-Function Relationships Support Its Suitability for Human Comparative Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vapniarsky, Natalia; Aryaei, Ashkan; Arzi, Boaz; Hatcher, David C; Hu, Jerry C; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2017-11-01

    Frequent involvement of the disc in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders warrants attempts to tissue engineer TMJ disc replacements. Physiologically, a great degree of similarity is seen between humans and farm pigs (FPs), but the pig's rapid growth confers a significant challenge for in vivo experiments. Minipigs have a slower growth rate and are smaller than FPs, but minipig TMJ discs have yet to be fully characterized. The objective of this study was to determine the suitability of the minipig for TMJ studies by extensive structural and functional characterization. The properties of minipig TMJ discs closely reproduced previously reported morphological, biochemical, and biomechanical values of human and FP discs. The width/length dimension ratio of the minipig TMJ disc was 1.95 (1.69 for human and 1.94 for FP). The biochemical evaluation revealed, on average per wet weight, 24.3% collagen (22.8% for human and 24.9% for FP); 0.8% glycosaminoglycan (GAG; 0.5% for human and 0.4% for FP); and 0.03% DNA (0.008% for human and 0.02% for FP). Biomechanical testing revealed, on average, compressive relaxation modulus of 50 kPa (37 kPa for human and 32 kPa for FP), compressive instantaneous modulus of 1121 kPa (1315 kPa for human and 1134 kPa for FP), and coefficient of viscosity of 13 MPa·s (9 MPa·s for human and 3 MPa·s for FP) at 20% strain. These properties also varied topographically in accordance to those of human and FP TMJ discs. Anisotropy, quantified by bidirectional tensile testing and histology, again was analogous among minipig, human, and FP TMJ discs. The minipig TMJ's ginglymoarthrodial nature was verified through cone beam computer tomography. Collectively, the similarities between minipig and human TMJ discs support the use of minipig as a relevant model for TMJ research; considering the practical advantages conferred by its growth rate and size, the minipig may be a preferred model over FP.

  18. PREVENTION OF POLYURETHANE OXIDATIVE DEGRADATION WITH PHENOLIC-ANTIOXIDANTS COVALENTLY ATTACHED TO THE HARD SEGMENTS: STRUCTURE FUNCTION RELATIONSHIPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachelek, Stanley J; Alferiev, Ivan; Ueda, Masako; Eckels, Edward C.; Gleason, Kevin T.; Levy, Robert J

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative degradation of the polyurethane elastomeric (PU) components greatly reduces the efficacy of PU containing cardiovascular devices. Covalently appending the phenol-based antioxidant, 4-substituted 2,6-di-tert-butylphenol (DBP), to PU hard segments effectively reduced oxidative degradation of the PU in vivo and in vitro in prior studies by our group. In these experiments we analyze the contribution of the tethering molecule to the antioxidant capabilities of the DBP modified PU. Bromoalkylation chemistry was used to link DBP to the hard segment of the polyether polyurethane, Tecothane, via our original linker (PU-DBP), or variants containing side chains with 1 (PU-C-DBP) or 3 (PU-3C-DBP) carbons. Two additional DBP variants were fabricated in which the DBP group was appended to the alkyl chain via an oxygen atom (PU-O-DBP) or an amide linkage in the middle of the tether (PU-NHCO-DBP). All DBP variant films and unmodified control films were subject to oxidative degradation via 15 day immersion in a solution of 20% H2O2 + 0.1 M CoCl2. At the end of the oxidation protocol films were analyzed for the presence of oxidation related endpoints via scanning electron microscopy, contact angle measurements and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). All DBP containing variants resisted oxidation damage significantly better than the unmodified control PU. SEM analysis of oxidized PU-C-DBP and PU-O-DBP showed evidence of surface cracking consistent with oxidative degradation of the PU surfaces. Similarly there was a trend in increased ether cross-linking, a marker for oxidative degradation, in PU-C-DBP and PU-NHCO-DBP films. Consistent with these FTIR results, both PU-C-DBP and PU-NHCO-DBP had significant reductions in measured surface hydrophobicity as a result of oxidation. These data show for the first time that the choice of linker molecule significantly affects the efficiency of the linked phenolic antioxidant. PMID:20306526

  19. Delineating the structural, functional and evolutionary relationships of sucrose phosphate synthase gene family II in wheat and related grasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil Zaynali

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS is an important component of the plant sucrose biosynthesis pathway. In the monocotyledonous Poaceae, five SPS genes have been identified. Here we present a detailed analysis of the wheat SPSII family in wheat. A set of homoeologue-specific primers was developed in order to permit both the detection of sequence variation, and the dissection of the individual contribution of each homoeologue to the global expression of SPSII. Results The expression in bread wheat over the course of development of various sucrose biosynthesis genes monitored on an Affymetrix array showed that the SPS genes were regulated over time and space. SPSII homoeologue-specific assays were used to show that the three homoeologues contributed differentially to the global expression of SPSII. Genetic mapping placed the set of homoeoloci on the short arms of the homoeologous group 3 chromosomes. A resequencing of the A and B genome copies allowed the detection of four haplotypes at each locus. The 3B copy includes an unspliced intron. A comparison of the sequences of the wheat SPSII orthologues present in the diploid progenitors einkorn, goatgrass and Triticum speltoides, as well as in the more distantly related species barley, rice, sorghum and purple false brome demonstrated that intronic sequence was less well conserved than exonic. Comparative sequence and phylogenetic analysis of SPSII gene showed that false purple brome was more similar to Triticeae than to rice. Wheat - rice synteny was found to be perturbed at the SPS region. Conclusion The homoeologue-specific assays will be suitable to derive associations between SPS functionality and key phenotypic traits. The amplicon sequences derived from the homoeologue-specific primers are informative regarding the evolution of SPSII in a polyploid context.

  20. Dissecting the Structure-Function Relationship of a Fungicidal Peptide Derived from the Constant Region of Human Immunoglobulins

    OpenAIRE

    Ciociola, Tecla; Pertinhez, Thelma A.; Giovati, Laura; Sperindè, Martina; Magliani, Walter; Ferrari, Elena; Gatti, Rita; D'Adda, Tiziana; Spisni, Alberto; Conti, Stefania; Polonelli, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic peptides encompassing sequences related to the complementarity-determining regions of antibodies or derived from their constant region (Fc peptides) were proven to exert differential antimicrobial, antiviral, antitumor, and/or immunomodulatory activities in vitro and/or in vivo, regardless of the specificity and isotype of the parental antibody. Alanine substitution derivatives of these peptides exhibited unaltered, increased, or decreased candidacidal activities in vitro. The bioac...

  1. Utilizing Unnatural Amino Acids to Illustrate Protein Structure-Function Relationships: An Experiment Designed for an Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maza, Johnathan C.; Villa, Jordan K.; Landino, Lisa M.; Young, Douglas D

    2016-01-01

    The site-specific introduction of unnatural amino acids (UAAs) has been demonstrated to be a useful tool in protein engineering. Moreover, the incorporation of a UAA into a protein has become feasible with the increased commercial availability of UAAs and robust expression plasmids. In addition to the ease of incorporation, the concepts utilized…

  2. Isotopic studies on structure-function relationships of nucleic acids and enzymes. Three year progress report, May 1972--October 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, P.D.

    1975-01-01

    The most important accomplishments and major contributions are tabulated with citations to published work. The more important unpublished contributions deal with the early events in ATP formation by chloroplasts, energy linkage in reaction steps of oxidative phosphorylation, molecular integrity of parental DNA, bound pyrophosphate and 18 O-exchanges by inorganic pyrophosphatase, and glutamine synthetase exchanges and mechanisms. These are being prepared for publication

  3. Structure-function relationships of Na+, K+, ATP, or Mg2+ binding and energy transduction in Na,K-ATPase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Peter L.; Pedersen, Per Amstrup

    2000-01-01

    Na,K-ATPase; Mutagenesis; Na+ binding; K+ binding; Tl+ binding; Mg2+ binding; ATP binding; Cation binding site; Energy transduction......Na,K-ATPase; Mutagenesis; Na+ binding; K+ binding; Tl+ binding; Mg2+ binding; ATP binding; Cation binding site; Energy transduction...

  4. NMR Insights into the Structure-Function Relationships in the Binding of Melanocortin Analogues to the MC1R Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Maurício; Zamora-Carreras, Héctor; Raposinho, Paula D; Oliveira, Maria Cristina; Pantoja-Uceda, David; Correia, João D G; Jiménez, M Angeles

    2017-07-15

    Linear and cyclic analogues of the α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) targeting the human melanocortin receptor 1 (MC1R) are of pharmacological interest for detecting and treating melanoma. The central sequence of α-MSH (His-Phe-Arg-Trp) has been identified as being essential for receptor binding. To deepen current knowledge on the molecular basis for α-MSH bioactivity, we aimed to understand the effect of cycle size on receptor binding. To that end, we synthesised two macrocyclic isomeric α-MSH analogues, c[NH-NO₂-C₆H₃-CO-His-DPhe-Arg-Trp-Lys]-Lys-NH₂ ( CycN-K6 ) and c[NH-NO₂-C₆H₃-CO-His-DPhe-Arg-Trp-Lys-Lys]-NH₂ ( CycN-K7 ). Their affinities to MC1R receptor were determined by competitive binding assays, and their structures were analysed by ¹H and 13 C NMR. These results were compared to those of the previously reported analogue c[S-NO₂-C₆H₃-CO-His-DPhe-Arg-Trp-Cys]-Lys-NH₂ ( CycS-C6 ). The MC1R binding affinity of the 22-membered macrocyclic peptide CycN-K6 (IC 50 = 155 ± 16 nM) is higher than that found for the 25-membered macrocyclic analogue CycN-K7 (IC 50 = 495 ± 101 nM), which, in turn, is higher than that observed for the 19-membered cyclic analogue CycS-C6 (IC 50 = 1770 ± 480 nM). NMR structural study indicated that macrocycle size leads to changes in the relative dispositions of the side chains, particularly in the packing of the Arg side chain relative to the aromatic rings. In contrast to the other analogues, the 22-membered cycle's side chains are favorably positioned for receptor interaction.

  5. The Arabidopsis thaliana NAC transcription factor family: structure-function relationships and determinants of ANAC019 stress signalling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael K; Kjaersgaard, Trine; Nielsen, Michael M.

    2010-01-01

    -termini. Nine of the ten NAC domains analysed bind a previously identified conserved DNA target sequence with a CGT[GA] core, although with different affinities. Likewise, all but one of the NAC proteins analysed is dependent on the C-terminal region for transactivational activity. In silico analyses show......TFs (transcription factors) are modular proteins minimally containing a DBD (DNA-binding domain) and a TRD (transcription regulatory domain). NAC [for NAM (no apical meristem), ATAF, CUC (cup-shaped cotyledon)] proteins comprise one of the largest plant TF families. They are key regulators...... of stress perception and developmental programmes, and most share an N-terminal NAC domain. On the basis of analyses of gene expression data and the phylogeny of Arabidopsis thaliana NAC TFs we systematically decipher structural and functional specificities of the conserved NAC domains and the divergent C...

  6. Taurocholate transport by brush-border membrane vesicles from the developing rabbit ileum: Structure/function relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, S.M.; Watkins, J.B.; Ling, S.C.

    1990-01-01

    To examine the ontogenesis of bile acid transport in the rabbit ileum, brush-border membrane vesicles (12- to 20-fold purified) were prepared from 14- to 49-day-old animals. Taurocholate uptake was characterized by the emergence of secondary active, Na(+)-dependent transport at the start of weaning (21 days). Transient intravesicular accumulation (overshoot) of taurocholate occurred at 5-10 s of incubation, and the overshoot maximum increased significantly from 21 days (349.2 +/- 22.4 nmol/mg protein) to 35 days (569.0 +/- 84.3 nmol/mg protein; p less than 0.001), without further increase at maturity (49 days, not equal to 607.6 +/- 136.7 nmol/mg protein). No significant taurocholate active uptake component was noted at 14 days; however, ileal vesicles from sucklings showed carrier-mediated, Na+ D-glucose cotransport. In greater than or equal to 35-day-old rabbits, osmolarity studies at 20 s of incubation showed that only approximately 12% of [14C]taurocholate uptake was secondary to bile acid-to-membrane binding. Conversely, at 20 min, greater than 95% of radiolabel incorporation represented solute bound to the external and/or internal membrane surface. Arrhenius plots establish brush-border membrane taurocholate uptake as an intrinsic, lipid-dependent process, with a slope discontinuity between 24 and 28 degrees C, similar to the membrane lipid thermotropic transition region. Steady-state fluorescence polarization studies (1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene) demonstrate a temporal association between the maturation of taurocholate uptake and age-related decreases in ileal brush-border membrane fluidity. These data indicate that maturation of bile acid secondary active transport in the rabbit ileum may be regulated, at least in part, by changes in brush-border membrane lipid dynamics

  7. Multidimensional structure-function relationships in human β-cardiac myosin from population-scale genetic variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homburger, J.R. (Julian R.); Green, E.M. (Eric M.); Caleshu, C. (Colleen); Sunitha, M.S. (Margaret S.); Taylor, R.E. (Rebecca E.); Ruppel, K.M. (Kathleen M.); Metpally, R.P.R. (Raghu Prasad Rao); S.D. Colan (Steven); M. Michels (Michelle); Day, S.M. (Sharlene M.); I. Olivotto (Iacopo); Bustamante, C.D. (Carlos D.); Dewey, F.E. (Frederick E.); Ho, C.Y. (Carolyn Y.); Spudich, J.A. (James A.); Ashley, E.A. (Euan A.)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractMyosin motors are the fundamental force-generating elements of muscle contraction. Variation in the human β-cardiac myosin heavy chain gene (MYH7) can lead to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), a heritable disease characterized by cardiac hypertrophy, heart failure, and sudden cardiac

  8. Structure-Function Relationships in the Gas-Sensing Heme-Dependent Transcription Factors RcoM and DNR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Hannah E.

    Transition metals play an important role in many biological processes, however, they are also toxic at high concentrations. Therefore, the uptake and efflux of these metals must be tightly regulated by the cell. Bacteria have evolved a variety of pathways and regulatory systems to monitor the presence and concentration of metals in the cellular environment. A key component of those systems are transcription factors that either "sense metals" or use "metal sensors". The first class of these proteins have metals as their allosteric effector ligand. The second class of these proteins utilize transition metal containing cofactors to sense other environmental cues through the specific chemistry afforded by the cofactor. Chapter 1 reviews the current literature regarding both types of transcription factors. The focus of this work has been on two heme-containing, gas-sensing transcription factors found in bacteria, RcoM (regulator of CO metabolism) and DNR (dissimilative nitrate respiration regulator). RcoM is a CO-dependent protein found in Burkholderia xenovorans and sits upstream of the cox operon for oxidative CO metabolism. RcoM senses the presence of CO, as well as changes in redox potential, through a ligand switch process at its heme cofactor. Chapter 2 details spectroscopic characterization of several methionine mutants to identify the Fe(II) ligand trans to His 74. That study concludes that Met104 acts as the CO-replacable ligand. Met105, while not the ligand, does play an important role in reversibility of the ligand switch process. RcoM has a unique tertiary structure that combines a sensory domain and a DNA-binding domain normally found in two-component systems. Chapter 3 provides evidence that RcoM adopts a dimeric state. Further biophysical and structural characterization gives further insight into how the two domains are organized and the implications for the DNA-binding mechanism. DNR is a NO-sensing transcription factor from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and regulates part of the nitrate respiration pathway. P. aeruginosa uses this pathway to evade host immune response, especially in cystic fibrosis patients. Previous work makes a strong case for the presence of a heme cofactor in DNR; however, attempts to express large quantities of holo-protein have proven unsuccessful. Chapter 4 outlines strategies used to develop a suitable expression protocol. While not entirely successful, the experiments provide a firm foundation for future research on this protein. During the 2015--2016 school year, I conducted educational psychology research as a project assistant in Prof. Martina Rau's lab. She focuses on understanding how students use visual representations and technology to learn chemistry. Chapter 5 summarizes a study we conducted in CHEM 109 to test whether having a computer provide immediate feedback on wedge-dash drawings as well as prompts to collaborate in lab would lead to learning gains. The effect of the intervention was subtle, but statistically significant.

  9. Structure-Function Relationships in the Gas-Sensing Heme-Dependent Transcription Factors RcoM and DNR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Hannah E.

    2016-01-01

    Transition metals play an important role in many biological processes, however, they are also toxic at high concentrations. Therefore, the uptake and efflux of these metals must be tightly regulated by the cell. Bacteria have evolved a variety of pathways and regulatory systems to monitor the presence and concentration of metals in the cellular…

  10. Mechanical properties and structure-function relationships of human chondrocyte-seeded cartilage constructs after in vitro culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middendorf, Jill M; Griffin, Darvin J; Shortkroff, Sonya; Dugopolski, Caroline; Kennedy, Stephen; Siemiatkoski, Joseph; Cohen, Itai; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2017-10-01

    Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation (ACI) is a widely recognized method for the repair of focal cartilage defects. Despite the accepted use, problems with this technique still exist, including graft hypertrophy, damage to surrounding tissue by sutures, uneven cell distribution, and delamination. Modified ACI techniques overcome these challenges by seeding autologous chondrocytes onto a 3D scaffold and securing the graft into the defect. Many studies on these tissue engineered grafts have identified the compressive properties, but few have examined frictional and shear properties as suggested by FDA guidance. This study is the first to perform three mechanical tests (compressive, frictional, and shear) on human tissue engineered cartilage. The objective was to understand the complex mechanical behavior, function, and changes that occur with time in these constructs grown in vitro using compression, friction, and shear tests. Safranin-O histology and a DMMB assay both revealed increased sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) content in the scaffolds with increased maturity. Similarly, immunohistochemistry revealed increased lubricin localization on the construct surface. Confined compression and friction tests both revealed improved properties with increased construct maturity. Compressive properties correlated with the sGAG content, while improved friction coefficients were attributed to increased lubricin localization on the construct surfaces. In contrast, shear properties did not improve with increased culture time. This study suggests the various mechanical and biological properties of tissue engineered cartilage improve at different rates, indicating thorough mechanical evaluation of tissue engineered cartilage is critical to understanding the performance of repaired cartilage. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:2298-2306, 2017. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Molecular basis of two novel dehalogenating activities in bacteria : structure/function relationships in an evolutionary context

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, René Marcel

    2004-01-01

    It is generally believed that evolution is at the heart of species differentiation of all living organisms, a hypothesis that was first stated by Charles Darwin in his revolutionary work "The origin of Species". Although this hypothesis was originally based on phenotypic similarities between

  12. Coupled cryoconite ecosystem structure-function relationships are revealed by comparing bacterial communities in alpine and Arctic glaciers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Arwyn; Mur, Luis A. J.; Girdwood, Susan E.

    2014-01-01

    Cryoconite holes are known as foci of microbial diversity and activity on polar glacier surfaces, but are virtually unexplored microbial habitats in alpine regions. In addition, whether cryoconite community structure reflects ecosystem functionality is poorly understood. Terminal restriction...... revealed Proteobacteria were particularly abundant, with Cyanobacteria likely acting as ecosystem engineers in both alpine and Arctic cryoconite communities. However, despite these generalities, significant differences in bacterial community structures, compositions and metabolomes are found between alpine...... fragment length polymorphism and Fourier transform infrared metabolite fingerprinting of cryoconite from glaciers in Austria, Greenland and Svalbard demonstrated cryoconite bacterial communities are closely correlated with cognate metabolite fingerprints. The influence of bacterial-associated fatty acids...

  13. Modeling a Neural Network as a Teaching Tool for the Learning of the Structure-Function Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Dino G.; Acevedo, Cristian; Gomez, Christian R.

    2010-01-01

    The authors describe an activity they have created in which students can visualize a theoretical neural network whose states evolve according to a well-known simple law. This activity provided an uncomplicated approach to a paradigm commonly represented through complex mathematical formulation. From their observations, students learned many basic…

  14. Structure-Function Relationship of Transporters in the Glutamate–Glutamine Cycle of the Central Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariko Kato Hayashi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Many kinds of transporters contribute to glutamatergic excitatory synaptic transmission. Glutamate is loaded into synaptic vesicles by vesicular glutamate transporters to be released from presynaptic terminals. After synaptic vesicle release, glutamate is taken up by neurons or astrocytes to terminate the signal and to prepare for the next signal. Glutamate transporters on the plasma membrane are responsible for transporting glutamate from extracellular fluid to cytoplasm. Glutamate taken up by astrocyte is converted to glutamine by glutamine synthetase and transported back to neurons through glutamine transporters on the plasma membranes of the astrocytes and then on neurons. Glutamine is converted back to glutamate by glutaminase in the neuronal cytoplasm and then loaded into synaptic vesicles again. Here, the structures of glutamate transporters and glutamine transporters, their conformational changes, and how they use electrochemical gradients of various ions for substrate transport are summarized. Pharmacological regulations of these transporters are also discussed.

  15. Structure-function relationships in soft tissue mechanics: Examining how the micro-scale architecture of biochemical constituents effects health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, David Sheldon

    Countless debilitating pathologies exhibit symptoms that result from altered mechanical behavior of soft tissue. Therefore, it is of clinical and economic importance to mechanically evaluate soft tissues and attribute degenerative changes to alterations in structural constituents. The studies presented here focus on the annulus fibrosus and the sclera. Failure in these tissues is common and catastrophic. The annulus fibrosus may fail, resulting in herniation and nerve impingement, or the disc may degenerate over time, resulting in reduced mobility and pain. Similarly, the sclera may degenerate over time with intraocular pressure spurring creep behavior that distends the eye beyond its ideal shape. This causes myopic vision and puts patients at risk of macular degeneration and retinal detachment. These two tissues share a common structural role as the outer wall of a pressure vessel. Also, they are made of strikingly similar constituents, primarily consisting of water, type I collagen, glycosaminoglycans and elastin. The microstructure of these tissues, however, is very different. The annulus fibrosus is representative of an anisotropic tissue. Its well-organized fibril structure was analyzed via polarization modulated second harmonic microscopy in order to characterize fibril architecture. Structurally relevant biochemical constituents were quantified with biochemical assays. Morphologically healthy annulus tended to have a more highly organized microstructure and tended to absorb more strain energy when subject to a tensile load cycle. Given the strong correlation between fibril organization and select mechanical properties, predictive models will likely benefit from a characterization of fibril continuity and orientation coherence. The sclera is representative of an isotropic tissue. Its less-organized fibril structure has evolved to sustain biaxial plane stress. In the sclera, collagen content and associated crosslinks were primary determinants of stiffness. Substantial collagen crosslink accumulation is a primary factor causing the stiffening of sclera with increased age. The influence of crosslinks dominates diffusion and permeability behavior. Exogenous crosslinking may help modulate the mechanical and fluid transport properties of the sclera and cornea. Treatment with methylglyoxal reduces the permeability and increases the stiffness of both. However, differences in the pre-treatment level of organization within the microstructure encourages asymmetric results.

  16. Students' Understanding of External Representations of the Potassium Ion Channel Protein Part II: Structure-Function Relationships and Fragmented Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harle, Marissa; Towns, Marcy H.

    2012-01-01

    Research that has focused on external representations in biochemistry has uncovered student difficulties in comprehending and interpreting external representations. This study focuses on students' understanding of three external representations (ribbon diagram, wireframe, and hydrophobic/hydrophilic) of the potassium ion channel protein. Analysis…

  17. Application of multigene phylogenetics and site-stripping to resolve intraordinal relationships in the Rhodymeniales (Rhodophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filloramo, Gina V; Saunders, Gary W

    2016-06-01

    Previous molecular assessments of the red algal order Rhodymeniales have confirmed its monophyly and distinguished the six currently recognized families (viz. Champiaceae, Faucheaceae, Fryeellaceae, Hymenocladiaceae, Lomentariaceae, and Rhodymeniaceae); however, relationships among most of these families have remained unresolved possibly as a result of substitution saturation at deeper phylogenetic nodes. The objective of the current study was to improve rhodymenialean systematics by increasing taxonomic representation and using a more robust multigene dataset of mitochondrial (COB, COI/COI-5P), nuclear (LSU, EF2) and plastid markers (psbA, rbcL). Additionally, we aimed to prevent phylogenetic inference problems associated with substitution saturation (particularly at the interfamilial nodes) by removing fast-evolving sites and analyzing a series of progressively more conservative alignments. The Rhodymeniales was resolved as two major lineages: (i) the Fryeellaceae as sister to the Faucheaceae and Lomentariaceae; and (ii) the Rhodymeniaceae allied to the Champiaceae and Hymenocladiaceae. Support at the interfamilial nodes was highest when 20% of variable sites were removed. Inclusion of Binghamiopsis, Chamaebotrys, and Minium, which were absent in previous phylogenetic investigations, established their phylogenetic affinities while assessment of two genera consistently polyphyletic in phylogenetic analyses, Erythrymenia and Lomentaria, resulted in the proposition of the novel genera Perbella and Fushitsunagia. The taxonomic position of Drouetia was reinvestigated with re-examination of holotype material of D. coalescens to clarify tetrasporangial development in this genus. In addition, we added three novel Australian species to Drouetia as a result of ongoing DNA barcoding assessments-D. aggregata sp. nov., D. scutellata sp. nov., and D. viridescens sp. nov. © 2016 Phycological Society of America.

  18. A detailed study of nucleon structure function in nuclei in the valence quark region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianchi, N. [INFN-Laboratori, Nazionali di Frascati (Italy)

    1994-04-01

    The so called {open_quotes}EMC effect{close_quotes} discovered during the 1980`s, has caused a big controversy in the community of nuclear and high energy physicists; during the last ten years, five experiments have been performed in different laboratories and several hundreds of papers about the possible interpretation of the modification of the nucleon structure function inside nuclei have been published. However, from the experimental point of view, the main goal of four experiments (EMC, BCDMS, NMC, FNAL) has been to emphasize the region of low x{sub b}, where shadowing effects appear. In the region of valence quarks and nuclear effects (x{sub b} > 0.1 - 0.2) the most reliable data presently available are from the SLAC E139 experiment performed in 1983 with only 80 hours of beam time. New precise data in the valence quark region are necessary to measure separate structure functions F{sub 2}(x{sub b}, Q{sup 2}) and R{sup lt}(x{sub b},Q{sup 2}) = {sigma}{sub l}/{sigma}{sub t}, and to investigate the real A-dependence of the ratio between bound and free-nucleon structure functions which is not completely defined by the SLAC data. Moreover, from the nuclear physics point of view, a measurement on some unexplored nuclei, like {sup 3}He and {sup 48}Ca, would be of great interest. The intermediate scaling region (0.1 < x{sub b} < 0.7) would be accessible at CEBAF if the machine energy will reach 6-8 GeV, as suggested by all the tests performed on the RF cavities. This physics program has been already presented in two letter of intents.

  19. Spectral analysis of structure functions and their scaling exponents in forced isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkmann, Moritz; McComb, W. David; Yoffe, Samuel; Berera, Arjun

    2014-11-01

    The pseudospectral method, in conjunction with a new technique for obtaining scaling exponents ζn from the structure functions Sn (r) , is presented as an alternative to the extended self-similarity (ESS) method and the use of generalized structure functions. We propose plotting the ratio | Sn (r) /S3 (r) | against the separation r in accordance with a standard technique for analysing experimental data. This method differs from the ESS technique, which plots the generalized structure functions Gn (r) against G3 (r) , where G3 (r) ~ r . Using our method for the particular case of S2 (r) we obtain the new result that the exponent ζ2 decreases as the Taylor-Reynolds number increases, with ζ2 --> 0 . 679 +/- 0 . 013 as Rλ --> ∞ . This supports the idea of finite-viscosity corrections to the K41 prediction for S2, and is the opposite of the result obtained by ESS. The pseudospectral method permits the forcing to be taken into account exactly through the calculation of the energy input in real space from the work spectrum of the stirring forces. The combination of the viscous and the forcing corrections as calculated by the pseudospectral method is shown to account for the deviation of S3 from Kolmogorov's ``four-fifths''-law at all scales. This work has made use of the resources provided by the UK supercomputing service HECToR, made available through the Edinburgh Compute and Data Facility (ECDF). A. B. is supported by STFC, S. R. Y. and M. F. L. are funded by EPSRC.

  20. Is the social brain theory applicable to human individual differences? Relationship between sociability personality dimension and brain size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Klára; Martos, János; Mihalik, Béla; Bódizs, Róbert

    2011-06-17

    Our study intends to examine whether the social brain theory is applicable to human individual differences. According to the social brain theory primates have larger brains as it could be expected from their body sizes due to the adaptation to a more complex social life. Regarding humans there were few studies about the relationship between theory of mind and frontal and temporal brain lobes. We hypothesized that these brain lobes, as well as the whole cerebrum and neocortex are in connection with the Sociability personality dimension that is associated with individuals' social lives. Our findings support this hypothesis as Sociability correlated positively with the examined brain structures if we control the effects of body size differences and age. These results suggest that the social brain theory can be extended to human interindividual differences and they have some implications to personality psychology too.

  1. Applications of rule-induction in the derivation of quantitative structure-activity relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    A-Razzak, Mohammed; Glen, Robert C.

    1992-08-01

    Recently, methods have been developed in the field of Artificial Intelligence (AI), specifically in the expert systems area using rule-induction, designed to extract rules from data. We have applied these methods to the analysis of molecular series with the objective of generating rules which are predictive and reliable. The input to rule-induction consists of a number of examples with known outcomes (a training set) and the output is a tree-structured series of rules. Unlike most other analysis methods, the results of the analysis are in the form of simple statements which can be easily interpreted. These are readily applied to new data giving both a classification and a probability of correctness. Rule-induction has been applied to in-house generated and published QSAR datasets and the methodology, application and results of these analyses are discussed. The results imply that in some cases it would be advantageous to use rule-induction as a complementary technique in addition to conventional statistical and pattern-recognition methods.

  2. Reciprocity relationships in vector acoustics and their application to vector field calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deal, Thomas J; Smith, Kevin B

    2017-08-01

    The reciprocity equation commonly stated in underwater acoustics relates pressure fields and monopole sources. It is often used to predict the pressure measured by a hydrophone for multiple source locations by placing a source at the hydrophone location and calculating the field everywhere for that source. A similar equation that governs the orthogonal components of the particle velocity field is needed to enable this computational method to be used for acoustic vector sensors. This paper derives a general reciprocity equation that accounts for both monopole and dipole sources. This vector-scalar reciprocity equation can be used to calculate individual components of the received vector field by altering the source type used in the propagation calculation. This enables a propagation model to calculate the received vector field components for an arbitrary number of source locations with a single model run for each vector field component instead of requiring one model run for each source location. Application of the vector-scalar reciprocity principle is demonstrated with analytic solutions for a range-independent environment and with numerical solutions for a range-dependent environment using a parabolic equation model.

  3. Application of ISSR markers to analyze molecular relationships in Iranian jasmine (Jasminum spp.) accessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi Ghehsareh, Masood; Salehi, Hassan; Khosh-Khui, Morteza; Niazi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    demonstrated that the ISSR is an useful tool in jasmine genomic diversity studies and to detect their relationships.

  4. Process-Structure-Property Relationship in Magnesium-Based Biodegradable Alloy for Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Pramanshu

    Magnesium alloys are considered to be the next generation of biomaterials because of their ability to degrade in the physiological environment. We elucidate here the impact of multiaxial forging of Mg-2Zn-2Gd alloy on grain refinement to sub-micron regime and relate the structure to mechanical properties and biological functionality. As-cast and annealed samples were multiaxial forged (MAF) for a total number of two passes with a true strain of 2/pass. Considering that the microstructure governs the biological response of materials, we studied the constituents of the microstructure in conjunction with the mechanical behavior. The antimicrobial behavior in a Mg-2Zn-2Gd alloy with different grain size in the range of 44 microm to 710 nm was studied by seeding. Surface energy and contact angle measurements using goniometer and wettability were assessed with water, SBF, n-Hexane, and DMEM. The structure-property relationship in Mg-2Zn-2Gd alloy to maintaining mechanical integrity during degradation was studied by seeding Escherichia coli ( E. coli). Furthermore, we studied the effect of degradation behavior in the presence and absence of cells. This was followed by the study of bioactivity in terms of phases present on the surface and degradation products in simulated body fluid (SBF). Magnesium coated with apatite using a biomimetic approach were placed in a 24-well culture plate with alpha-MEM media and the degradation behavior was studied in the absence and presence of cells (seeding density: 10,000 cells/cm2). The change in pH was monitored at regular intervals. Cell attachment was studied by seeding the cells for 4h and cell viability was studied by seeding the cells for up to 1, 3, and 7 days. The study underscores that the fine-grained alloys exhibited superior mechanical properties, antimicrobial resistance, and cell attachment. The degradation rate was also least for fine-grained alloy. The higher surface energy of ultrafine-grained Mg-2Zn-2Gd alloy led to the

  5. Nuclear effect study on nucleon structure functions, in comparison with antineutrino interactions on neon and deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallee, C.

    1984-03-01

    We have studied the nuclear effects on high energy antineutrino charged current interactions by comparing the data which were taken in the Bubble Chamber BEBC filled with Neon and Deuterium. On the one hand, the study of nuclear reinteractions gave us the possibility to estimate the formation time of hadrons. On the other hand, the comparison of structure functions does not show any significant difference between Neon and Deuterium. Though this result does not contradict the effects observed with charged leptons by the EMC and SLAC experiments, it is strongly incompatible with certain theoretical interpretations which implied a stronger effect in antineutrino interactions [fr

  6. On relation of momenta of structure functions of the composite systems with their simultaneous wave functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linkevich, A.D.; Savrin, V.I.; Sanadze, V.V.; Skachkov, N.B.

    1984-01-01

    Calculation of hadron structure function (SF) comprising point objects is carried out. The obtained hadron SF is expressed by means of simultaneous relativistic wave functions of a composite particle. Exact calculation of hadron SF momenta in simultaneous formulation of quantum field theory off-energy surface is conducted. The given calculation of hadron SF is shown to result in their dependence on momentum transferred square (or square of total vector of energy-momentum of Compton scattering on a quark) whih is determined by the set of simultaneous hadron wave functions as bound state of quark (partons) in the considered case of non-structural quarks

  7. Second-order contributions to the structure functions in deep inelastic scattering III The singlet

    CERN Document Server

    González-Arroyo, A

    1980-01-01

    For pt.II see ibid., vol.159, p.512 (1979). Pointlike QCD predictions for the singlet part of the structure functions are given up to next- to-leading order of perturbation theory. This generalises the result obtained in pt.I (see ibid., vol.153, p.161, 1979) which deals with the non-singlet case. An interesting by-product is an exact and simple analytical expression for the anomalous dimension matrix to second non-trivial order in the QCD coupling constant. (18 refs).

  8. The role of nuclear corrections on the structure function and the EMC-ratio of deuteron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nematollahi, H.; Yazdanpannah, M.M. [Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Faculty of Physics, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-11-15

    We investigate the EMC effect in the deuteron nucleus using the quark exchange formalism and the harmonic-oscillator shell model. We first calculate the parton distribution functions (PDFs) of deuteron applying the chiral quark exchange model and also considering the shell model effect, at low Q{sup 2} scale. Then we obtain the deuteron structure function (SF) and the EMC-ratio of this nucleus. We compare the results with the available experimental data and the results of some parametrization models. It is found that the results of our completely theoretical model are in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data and the parametrized results. (orig.)

  9. A-dependence of structure functions and multiquark clusters in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondratyuk, L.; Shmatikov, M.

    1984-01-01

    Assuming existence of 12q-clusters (bags) in nuclei the structure functions of deep inelastic scattering of leptons on nuclei are discussed. Universal momentum distribution of quarks in a multiquark cluster is used with high-momentum component falling exponentially PHIsub(q)sup(2)(k) approximately esup(-k/ksub(0)) with k 0 approximately equal to 50-60 MeV/c. The admixture of 12q-cluster W required for the description of SLAG data increases from 10% for 4 He to 30% for Au. The A-dependence of W agrees well with the A-dependence of cumulative particle spectra

  10. Deuteron A(Q2) structure function and the neutron electric form factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platchkov, S.; Amroun, A.; Auffret, S.; Cavedon, J.M.; Dreux, P.; Duclos, J.; Frois, B.; Goutte, D.; Hachemi, H.; Martino, J.

    1989-01-01

    We present new measurements of the deuteron A(Q 2 ) structure function in the momentum transfer region between 1 and 18 fm -2 . The accuracy of the data ranges from 2% to 6%. We investigate the sensitivity of A(Q 2 ) to the nucleon-nucleon interaction and to the neutron electric form factor G E n . Our analysis shows that below 20 fm -2 G E n can be inferred from these data with a significantly improved accuracy. The model dependence of this analysis is discussed

  11. Measurement of the photon structure function F2 gamma with the L3 detector at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, Valery P.; Anselmo, F.; Arefev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Bajo, A.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldew, S.V.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Barczyk, A.; Barillere, R.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Batalova, N.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bellucci, L.; Berbeco, R.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B.L.; Biasini, M.; Biglietti, M.; Biland, A.; Blaising, J.J.; Blyth, S.C.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bohm, A.; Boldizsar, L.; Borgia, B.; Bottai, S.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Braccini, S.; Branson, J.G.; Brochu, F.; Burger, J.D.; Burger, W.J.; Cai, X.D.; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A.; Casaus, J.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo, M.; Chang, Y.H.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chiefari, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Costantini, S.; de la Cruz, B.; Cucciarelli, S.; de Asmundis, R.; Deglon, P.; Debreczeni, J.; Degre, A.; Dehmelt, K.; Deiters, K.; della Volpe, D.; Delmeire, E.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; De Salvo, A.; Diemoz, M.; Dierckxsens, M.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Doria, A.; Dova, M.T.; Duchesneau, D.; Duda, M.; Echenard, B.; Eline, A.; El Hage, A.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F.J.; Extermann, P.; Falagan, M.A.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J.H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P.H.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, I.; Forconi, G.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Iouri; Ganguli, S.N.; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gataullin, M.; Gentile, S.; Giagu, S.; Gong, Z.F.; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Grimm, O.; Gruenewald, M.W.; Guida, M.; Gupta, V.K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L.J.; Haas, D.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hebbeker, T.; Herve, Alain; Hirschfelder, J.; Hofer, H.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzner, G.; Hou, S.R.; Jin, B.N.; Jindal, P.; Jones, Lawrence W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M.N.; Kim, J.K.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; Konig, A.C.; Kopal, M.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraber, M.; Kraemer, R.W.; Kruger, A.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Laktineh, I.; Landi, G.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leiste, R.; Levtchenko, M.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Likhoded, S.; Lin, C.H.; Lin, W.T.; Linde, F.L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z.A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y.S.; Luci, C.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W.G.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Mana, C.; Mans, J.; Martin, J.P.; Marzano, F.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R.R.; Mele, S.; Mermod, P.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W.J.; Mihul, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Mohanty, G.B.; Muanza, G.S.; Muijs, A.J.M.; Musicar, B.; Musy, M.; Nagy, S.; Natale, S.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Nisati, A.; Novak, T.; Kluge, Hannelies; Ofierzynski, R.; Organtini, G.; Pal, I.; Palomares, C.; Paolucci, P.; Paramatti, R.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, Thomas Cantzon; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pedace, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Piccolo, D.; Pierella, F.; Pioppi, M.; Piroue, P.A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Pothier, J.; Prokofev, D.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rahaman, Mohammad Azizur; Raics, P.; Raja, N.; Ramelli, R.; Rancoita, P.G.; Ranieri, R.; Raspereza, A.; Razis, P.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Riemann, S.; Riles, Keith; Roe, B.P.; Romero, L.; Rosca, A.; Rosemann, C.; Rosenbleck, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Roth, Stefan; Rubio, J.A.; Ruggiero, G.; Rykaczewski, H.; Sakharov, A.; Saremi, S.; Sarkar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Schafer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D.J.; Sciacca, C.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Son, D.; Souga, C.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D.P.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L.Z.; Sushkov, S.; Suter, H.; Swain, J.D.; Szillasi, Z.; Tang, X.W.; Tarjan, P.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Tellili, B.; Teyssier, D.; Timmermans, Charles; Ting, Samuel C.C.; Ting, S.M.; Tonwar, S.C.; Toth, J.; Tully, C.; Tung, K.L.; Ulbricht, J.; Valente, E.; Van de Walle, R.T.; Vasquez, R.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Viertel, G.; Villa, S.; Vivargent, M.; Vlachos, S.; Vodopianov, I.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobev, I.; Vorobyov, A.A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Z.M.; Weber, M.; Wynhoff, S.; Xia, L.; Xu, Z.Z.; Yamamoto, J.; Yang, B.Z.; Yang, C.G.; Yang, H.J.; Yang, M.; Yeh, S.C.; Zalite, An.; Zalite, Yu.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhao, J.; Zhu, G.Y.; Zhu, R.Y.; Zhuang, H.L.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Zoller, M.

    2005-01-01

    The e+e- -> e+e- hadrons reaction, where one of the two electrons is detected in a low polar-angle calorimeter, is analysed in order to measure the hadronic photon structure function F2gamma . The full high-energy and high-luminosity data set, collected with the L3 detector at centre-of-mass energies 189-209GeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 608/pb is used. The Q^2 range 11-34GeV^2 and the x range 0.006-0.556 are considered. The data are compared with recent parton density functions.

  12. Measurement of the Low-x Behaviour of the Photon Structure Function $F2-\\gamma$

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Ainsley, C.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Boeriu, O.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Cammin, J.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Cooke, O.C.; Couchman, J.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Dallison, S.; de Roeck, A.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Fanti, M.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Grandi, C.; Graham, K.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hargrove, C.K.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauke, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Hensel, C.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hocker, James Andrew; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klein, K.; Klier, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kokott, T.P.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Leins, A.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; Lillich, J.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Marchant, T.E.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Mendez-Lorenzo, P.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oh, A.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schmitt, S.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S.D.; Tarem, S.; Taylor, R.J.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trefzger, T.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Ward, J.J.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    2000-01-01

    The photon structure function F2-gamma(x,Q**2) has been measured using data taken by the OPAL detector at centre-of-mass energies of 91Gev, 183Gev and 189Gev, in Q**2 ranges of 1.5 to 30.0 GeV**2 (LEP1), and 7.0 to 30.0 GeV**2 (LEP2), probing lower values of x than ever before. Since previous OPAL analyses, new Monte Carlo models and new methods, such as multi-variable unfolding, have been introduced, reducing significantly the model dependent systematic errors in the measurement.

  13. Anomalous scaling of structure functions and dynamic constraints on turbulence simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakhot, Victor; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2006-12-01

    The connection between anomalous scaling of structure functions (intermittency) and numerical methods for turbulence simulations is discussed. It is argued that the computational work for direct numerical simulations (DNS) of fully developed turbulence increases as Re 4 , and not as Re 3 expected from Kolmogorov's theory, where Re is a large-scale Reynolds number. Various relations for the moments of acceleration and velocity derivatives are derived. An infinite set of exact constraints on dynamically consistent subgrid models for Large Eddy Simulations (LES) is derived from the Navier-Stokes equations, and some problems of principle associated with existing LES models are highlighted. (author)

  14. Screening of nuclear structure function F2A(x,Q2) at small x values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidovs'kij, V.V.

    1999-01-01

    The U-matrix method have been applied to build an amplitude for virtual photon absorption by nuclei which satisfies unitarity.This amplitude have been utilised to obtain the expression for the structure function F 2A ,which is convenient to perform analytical calculations with.Profile functions of nuclei with Gauss,Woods-Saxon and constant density distribution have been considered.It is shown that effects of quark-antiquark pair rescattering in nucleus cause the screening of F 2A and the change of power-like behaviour of F 2A to logarithmic one at small x. Numerical estimations are given

  15. The hadronic component of the photon structure function F2γ(Q2, x)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotsman, E.

    1988-01-01

    The quality of the high Q 2 data presently available in photon-photon scattering, is not sufficient to allow for a unique determination of the QCD parameter Λ (as it is strongly correlated with the hadronic component of the photon). The authors show that a combination of the QPM point-like cross section and a hadronic cross section given by a simple power expansion in energy, provides a good description of the experimental photon structure function and photon-photon total cross section

  16. Bound nucleon structure function in the picture of relativistic constituent quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigoryan, L.A.; Shakhbazyan, V.A.

    1987-01-01

    The structure function F 2N of nucleons in the deuterium, carbon and iron nuclei is calculated as a function of Q 2 in two approaches: taking into account the nucleon swelling in nuclei due to the partial deconfinement of quarks in nuclear medium; in the conventional approach of nuclear physics, taking into account the getting off the mass shell of the bound nucleon and Fermi motion in nucleons. It is shown that the conventional approach of nuclear physics does not explain the EMC effect in the region of small x

  17. Review: P4-ATPases as Phospholipid Flippases-Structure, Function, and Enigmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens P; Vestergaard, Anna L; Mikkelsen, Stine A

    2016-01-01

    group is propelled along against its concentration gradient with the hydrocarbon chains projecting out into the lipid phase by movement of an isoleucine located at the position corresponding to an ion binding glutamate in the Ca2+- and Na+/K+-ATPases. Hence, the P4-ATPase mechanism is quite similar...... on properties of mammalian and yeast P4-ATPases for which most mechanistic insight is available. However, the structure, function and enigmas associated with mammalian and yeast P4-ATPases most likely extend to P4-ATPases of plants and other organisms....

  18. Determination of αS from scaling violations of truncated moments of structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forte, Stefano; Latorre, J.I.; Magnea, Lorenzo; Piccione, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    We determine the strong coupling α S (M Z ) from scaling violations of truncated moments of the nonsinglet deep inelastic structure function F 2 . Truncated moments are determined from BCDMS and NMC data using a neural network parametrization which retains the full experimental information on errors and correlations. Our method minimizes all sources of theoretical uncertainty and bias which characterize extractions of α S from scaling violations. We obtain α S (M Z )=0.124 +0.004 -0.007 (exp.) +0.003 -0.004 (th.)

  19. Structure, function and physiological consequences of virally encoded chemokine seven transmembrane receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, M M; Smit, M J; Waldhoer, M

    2008-01-01

    A number of human and animal herpes viruses encode G-protein coupled receptors with seven transmembrane (7TM) segments-most of which are clearly related to human chemokine receptors. It appears, that these receptors are used by the virus for immune evasion, cellular transformation, tissue targeting...... pathogenesis is still poorly understood. Here we focus on the current knowledge of structure, function and trafficking patterns of virally encoded chemokine receptors and further address the putative roles of these receptors in virus survival and host -cell and/or -immune system modulation. Finally, we...

  20. The deuteron spin-dependent structure function and its first moment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Alexakhin, V. Yu.; Alexandrov, Yu.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alexeev, M.; Amoroso, A.; Badelek, B.; Balestra, F.; Ball, J.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Becker, M.; Bedfer, Y.; Bernet, C.; Bertini, R.; Bettinelli, M.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A.; Brona, G.; Burtin, E.; Bussa, M.P.; Bytchkov, V.N.; Chapiro, A.; Cicuttin, A.; Colantoni, M.; Colavita, A.A.; Costa, S.; Crespo, M.L.; d'Hose, N.; Dalla Torre, S.; Das, S.; Dasgupta, S. S.; De Masi, R.; Dedek, N.; Demchenko, D.; Denisov, O.Yu.; Dhara, L.; Diaz, V.; Dinkelbach, A. M.; Donskov, S.V.; Dorofeev, V. A.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dunnweber, W.; Efremov, A.; Eversheim, P.D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Fauland, P.; Ferrero, A.; Ferrero, L.; Finger, M.; Finger jr., M.; Fischer, H.; Franz, J.; Friedrich, J.M.; Frolov, V.; Garfagnini, R.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O.P.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giorgi, M.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Gorin, A.M.; Grajek, O.A.; Grasso, A.; Grube, B.; Guskov, A.; Haas, F.; Hannappel, J.; von Harrach, D.; Hasegawa, T.; Hedicke, S.; Heinsius, F.H.; Hermann, R.; Hess, C.; Hinterberger, F.; von Hodenberg, M.; Horikawa, N.; Horikawa, S.; Horn, I.; Ilgner, C.; Ioukaev, A.I.; Ivanchin, I.; Ivanov, O.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Janata, A.; Joosten, R.; Jouravlev, N. I.; Kabuss, E.; Kang, D.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G.V.; Khokhlov, Yu.A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koblitz, S.; Koivuniemi, J.H.; Kolosov, V.N.; Komissarov, E.V.; Kondo, K.; Konigsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V.F.; Korentchenko, A.S.; Korzenev, A.; Kotzinian, A.M.; Koutchinski, N.A.; Kouznetsov, O.; Kowalik, K.; Kramer, D.; Kravchuk, N.P.; Krivokhizhin, G.V.; Kroumchtein, Z.V.; Kubart, J.; Kuhn, R.; Kukhtin, V.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Ladygin, M.E.; Lamanna, M.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leberig, M.; Lednev, A.A.; Lehmann, A.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Liska, T.; Ludwig, I.; Maggiora, A.; Maggiora, M.; Magnon, A.; Mallot, G.K.; Marchand, C.; Marroncle, J.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Masek, L.; Massmann, F.; Matsuda, T.; Matthia, D.; Maximov, A.N.; Meyer, W.; Mielech, A.; Mikhailov, Yu.V.; Moinester, M.A.; Nagel, T.; Nahle, O.; Nassalski, J.; Neliba, S.; Neyret, D.P.; Nikolaenko, V.I.; Nikolaev, K.; Nozdrin, A.A.; Obraztsov, V. F.; Olshevsky, A.G.; Ostrick, M.; Padee, A.; Pagano, P.; Panebianco, S.; Panzieri, D.; Paul, S.; Peshekhonov, D.V.; Peshekhonov, V.D.; Piragino, G.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polak, J.; Polyakov, V.A.; Pontecorvo, G.; Popov, A.A.; Pretz, J.; Procureur, S.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Reicherz, G.; Rondio, E.; Rozhdestvensky, A.M.; Ryabchikov, D.; Samoylenko, V.D.; Sandacz, A.; Santos, H.; Sapozhnikov, M.G.; Savin, I.A.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schmitt, L.; Schroeder, W.; Seeharsch, D.; Seimetz, M.; Setter, D.; Shevchenko, O.Yu.; Siebert, H.-W.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sissakian, A.N.; Slunecka, M.; Smirnov, G.I.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, Aleš; Stinzing, F.; Stolarski, M.; Sugonyaev, V.P.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Tchalishev, V.V.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Teufel, A.; Tkatchev, L.G.; Trippel, S.; Venugopal, G.; Virius, M.; Vlassov, N.V.; Webb, R.; Weise, E.; Weitzel, Q.; Windmolders, R.; Wislicki, W.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Zhao, J.; Ziegler, R.; Zvyagin, A.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 647, č. 1 (2007), s. 8-17 ISSN 0370-2693 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 492 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : Deep inelastic scattering * Spin * Structure function * QCD analysis * A1 * g1 Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 4.189, year: 2007 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6TVN-4MYVG5P-1/2/387d70e7f30fb736514de259c62118d9

  1. Using the structure-function linkage database to characterize functional domains in enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Shoshana; Babbitt, Patricia

    2014-12-12

    The Structure-Function Linkage Database (SFLD; http://sfld.rbvi.ucsf.edu/) is a Web-accessible database designed to link enzyme sequence, structure, and functional information. This unit describes the protocols by which a user may query the database to predict the function of uncharacterized enzymes and to correct misannotated functional assignments. The information in this unit is especially useful in helping a user discriminate functional capabilities of a sequence that is only distantly related to characterized sequences in publicly available databases. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  2. Strangeness content and structure function of the nucleon in a statistical quark model

    CERN Document Server

    Trevisan, L A; Tomio, L

    1999-01-01

    The strangeness content of the nucleon is determined from a statistical model using confined quark levels, and is shown to have a good agreement with the corresponding values extracted from experimental data. The quark levels are generated in a Dirac equation that uses a linear confining potential (scalar plus vector). With the requirement that the result for the Gottfried sum rule violation, given by the new muon collaboration (NMC), is well reproduced, we also obtain the difference between the structure functions of the proton and neutron, and the corresponding sea quark contributions. (27 refs).

  3. Precise Measurement of the Deuteron Elastic structure Function A(Q2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. Abbott; A. Ahmidouch; H. Anklin; J. Arvieux; J. Bail; S. Beedoe; E. J. Beise; L. Bimbot; W. Boeglin; H. Breuer; R. Carlini; N. S. Chant; S. Danagoulian; K. Dow; J.E. Ducret; J. Dunne; R. Ent; L. Ewell; L. Eyraud; C. Furget; M. Garcon; R. Gilman; C. Glashausser; P. Gucye; K. Gustafsson; K. Hafidi; A. Honegger; J. Jourdan; S. Kox; G. Kumbartzki; L. Lu; A. Lung; D. Mack; P. Markowitz; J. McIntyre; D. Meekins; F. Merchez; J. Mitchell; R. Mohring; S. Mtingwa; H. Mrktchyan; D. Pitz; L. Qin; R. Ransome; J.S. Real; P. G. Roos; P. Rutt; R. Sawafta; S. Stepanyan; R. Tieulent; E. Tomasi-Gustafsson; W. Turchinetz; K. Vansyoc; J. Volmer; E. Voutier; W. Vulcan; C. Williamson; S. A. Wood; C. Yan; J. Zhao; W. Zhao

    1999-01-01

    The A(Q 2 ) structure function in elastic electron-deuteron scattering was measured at six momentum transfers Q 2 between 0.66 and 1.80 (GeV/c) 2 in Hall C at Jefferson Laboratory. The scattered electrons and recoil deuterons were detected in coincidence, at a fixed deuteron angle of 60.5 o . These new precise measurements resolve discrepancies between older sets of data. They put significant constraints on existing models of the deuteron electromagnetic structure, and on the strength of isoscalar meson exchange currents

  4. Precise Measurement of the Deuteron Elastic Structure Function A(Q2 )

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, J.; Ducret, J.; Garcon, M.; Hafidi, K.; Pitz, D.; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E.; Honegger, A.; Jourdan, J.; Zhao, J.; Beise, E.J.; Breuer, H.; Chant, N.S.; Ewell, L.; Gustafsson, K.; Lung, A.; Mohring, R.; Pitz, D.; Roos, P.G.; Eyraud, L.; Furget, C.; Kox, S.; Lu, L.; Merchez, F.; Real, J.; Tieulent, R.; Voutier, E.; Abbott, D.; Carlini, R.; Dunne, J.; Ent, R.; Gilman, R.; Gueye, P.; Mack, D.; Meekins, D.; Mitchell, J.; Pitz, D.; Qin, L.; Vansyoc, K.; Volmer, J.; Vulcan, W.; Wood, S.A.; Yan, C.; Gilman, R.; Glashausser, C.; Kumbartzki, G.; McIntyre, J.; Ransome, R.; Rutt, P.; Ahmidouch, A.; Dow, K.; Turchinetz, W.; Williamson, C.; Zhao, W.; Anklin, H.; Boeglin, W.; Markowitz, P.; Mrktchyan, H.; Stepanyan, S.; Ahmidouch, A.; Beedoe, S.; Danagoulian, S.; Mtingwa, S.; Sawafta, R.; Arvieux, J.; Ball, J.; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E.; Arvieux, J.; Bimbot, L.

    1999-01-01

    The A(Q 2 ) structure function in elastic electron-deuteron scattering was measured at six momentum transfers Q 2 between 0.66 and 1.80 (GeV/c) 2 in Hall C at Jefferson Laboratory. The scattered electrons and recoil deuterons were detected in coincidence, at a fixed deuteron angle of 60.5 degree. These new precise measurements resolve discrepancies between older sets of data. They put significant constraints on existing models of the deuteron electromagnetic structure, and on the strength of isoscalar meson exchange currents. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  5. Experimental results on polarized structure functions in deep inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, L.

    1994-08-01

    A summary is given of experimental results on spin structure functions of the proton g 1 p (x,Q 2 ), deuteron g 1 d (x,Q 2 ), and neutron g 1 n (x,Q 2 ) as measured in deep inelastic scattering of polarized leptons from a polarized target. All results are consistent with the Bjorken sum rule predictions at the Q 2 of each experiment. The data do not support the Ellis-Jaffe sum rule prediction for the proton which implies that the hencity carried by the strange quark may be nonzero and that the net quark helicity is smaller than expected from simple quark models

  6. Structure functions and particle production in the cumulative region: two different exponentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, M.; Vechernin, V.

    1997-01-01

    In the framework of the recently proposed (QCD-based parton model for the cumulative phenomena in the interactions with nuclei two mechanisms for particle production, direct and spectator ones, are analyzed. It is shown that due to final-state interactions the leading terms of the direct mechanism contribution are cancelled and the spectator mechanism is the dominant one. It leads to a smaller slope of the cumulative particle production rates compared to the slope of the nuclear structure function in the cumulative region x ≥ 1, in agreement with the recent experimental data

  7. SocialCloudShare: a Facebook Application for a Relationship-based Information Sharing in the Cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Albertini

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In last few years, Online Social Networks (OSNs have become one of the most used platforms for sharing data (e.g., pictures, short texts on the Internet. Nowadays Facebook and Twitter are the most popular OSN providers, though they implement different social models. However, independently from the social model they implement, OSN platforms have become a widespread repository of personal information. All these data (e.g., profile information, shared elements, users’ likes are stored in a centralized repository that can be exploited for data mining and marketing analysis. With this data collection process, lots of sensitive information are gathered by OSN providers that, in time, have become more and more targeted by malicious attackers. To overcome this problem, in this paper we present an architectural framework that, by means of a Social Application registered in Facebook, allows users to move their data (e.g., relationships, resources outside the OSN realm and to store them in the public Cloud. Given that the public Cloud is not a secure and private environment, our proposal provides users security and privacy guarantees over their data by encrypting the resources and by anonymizing their social graphs. The presented framework enforces Relationship-Based Access Control (ReBAC rules over the anonymized social graph, providing OSN users the possibility to selectively share information and resources as they are used to do in Facebook.

  8. Structure/function analysis of PARP-1 in oxidative and nitrosative stress-induced monomeric ADPR formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Buelow

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Poly adenosine diphosphate-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1 is a multifunctional enzyme that is involved in two major cellular responses to oxidative and nitrosative (O/N stress: detection and response to DNA damage via formation of protein-bound poly adenosine diphosphate-ribose (PAR, and formation of the soluble 2(nd messenger monomeric adenosine diphosphate-ribose (mADPR. Previous studies have delineated specific roles for several of PARP-1's structural domains in the context of its involvement in a DNA damage response. However, little is known about the relationship between the mechanisms through which PARP-1 participates in DNA damage detection/response and those involved in the generation of monomeric ADPR. To better understand the relationship between these events, we undertook a structure/function analysis of PARP-1 via reconstitution of PARP-1 deficient DT40 cells with PARP-1 variants deficient in catalysis, DNA binding, auto-PARylation, and PARP-1's BRCT protein interaction domain. Analysis of responses of the respective reconstituted cells to a model O/N stressor indicated that PARP-1 catalytic activity, DNA binding, and auto-PARylation are required for PARP-dependent mADPR formation, but that BRCT-mediated interactions are dispensable. As the BRCT domain is required for PARP-dependent recruitment of XRCC1 to sites of DNA damage, these results suggest that DNA repair and monomeric ADPR 2(nd messenger generation are parallel mechanisms through which PARP-1 modulates cellular responses to O/N stress.

  9. Lab determination of soil thermal Conductivity. Fundamentals, geothermal applications and relationship with other soil parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nope Gomez, F. I.; Santiago, C. de

    2014-01-01

    Shallow geothermal energy application in buildings and civil engineering works (tunnels, diaphragm walls, bridge decks, roads, and train/metro stations) are spreading rapidly all around the world. the dual role of these energy geostructures makes their design challenging and more complex with respect to conventional projects. Besides the geotechnical parameters, thermal behavior parameters are needed in the design and dimensioning to warrantee the thermo-mechanical stability of the geothermal structural element. As for obtaining any soil thermal parameter, both in situ and laboratory methods can be used. The present study focuses on a lab test known the need ke method to measure the thermal conductivity of soils (λ). Through this research work, different variables inherent to the test procedure, as well as external factors that may have an impact on thermal conductivity measurements were studied. Samples extracted from the cores obtained from a geothermal drilling conducted on the campus of the Polytechnic University of Valencia, showing different mineralogical and nature composition (granular and clayey) were studied different (moisture and density) compacting conditions. 550 thermal conductivity measurements were performed, from which the influence of factors such as the degree of saturation-moisture, dry density and type of material was verified. Finally, a stratigraphic profile with thermal conductivities ranges of each geologic level was drawn, considering the degree of saturation ranges evaluated in lab tests, in order to be compared and related to thermal response test, currently in progress. Finally, a test protocol is set and proposed, for both remolded and undisturbed samples, under different saturation conditions. Together with this test protocol, a set of recommendations regarding the configuration of the measuring equipment, treatment of samples and other variables, are posed in order to reduce errors in the final results. (Author)

  10. Raman spectroscopy application in frozen carrot cooked in different ways and the relationship with carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camorani, Paolo; Chiavaro, Emma; Cristofolini, Luigi; Paciulli, Maria; Zaupa, Maria; Visconti, Attilio; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Pellegrini, Nicoletta

    2015-08-30

    Raman spectroscopy, in its confocal micro-Raman variation, has been recently proposed as a spatially resolved method to identify carotenoids in various food matrices, being faster, non-destructive, and avoiding sample extraction, but no data are present in the literature concerning its application to the evaluation of carotenoid pattern changes after thermal treatment of carrots. The effect of three cooking methods (i.e. boiling, steaming and microwaving) was evaluated on frozen carrot, comparing changes on carotenoid profiles measured by means of Raman spectroscopy with their high-performance liquid chromatographic determination and colour. A more pronounced detrimental effect on carotenoids was detected in steamed carrots, in accordance with colour data. Conversely, boiling and, to a lesser extent, microwaving caused an increase in carotenoid concentration. Cooking procedures affected the Raman spectral features of carotenoids, causing a shift of vibration frequencies towards a higher energy, increase in the spectral baseline and peak intensities as well as a broadening of their width, probably in relation to the thermal degradation of longer carotenoids (i.e. the all-trans form) and the isomerization process. In particular, steamed samples showed a significantly higher increase of centre frequency, in accordance with a more pronounced isomerization and changes in colour parameters. This work showed that the evolution of Raman spectral parameters could provide information on carotenoid bioaccessibility for carrots cooked using various methods. This paves the way for a future use of this technique to monitor and optimize cooking processes aimed at maximizing carotenoid bioaccessibility and bioavailability. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Low-Dimensional Material: Structure-Property Relationship and Applications in Energy and Environmental Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hang

    In the past several decades, low-dimensional materials (0D materials, 1D materials and 2D materials) have attracted much interest from both the experimental and theoretical points of view. Because of the quantum confinement effect, low-dimensional materials have exhibited a kaleidoscope of fascinating phenomena and unusual physical and chemical properties, shedding light on many novel applications. Despite the enormous success has been achieved in the research of low-dimensional materials, there are three fundamental challenges of research in low-dimensional materials: 1) Develop new computational tools to accurately describe the properties of low-dimensional materials with low computational cost. 2) Predict and synthesize new low-dimensional materials with novel properties. 3) Reveal new phenomenon induced by the interaction between low-dimensional materials and the surrounding environment. In this thesis, atomistic modelling tools have been applied to address these challenges. We first developed ReaxFF parameters for phosphorus and hydrogen to give an accurate description of the chemical and mechanical properties of pristine and defected black phosphorene. ReaxFF for P/H is transferable to a wide range of phosphorus and hydrogen containing systems including bulk black phosphorus, blue phosphorene, edge-hydrogenated phosphorene, phosphorus clusters and phosphorus hydride molecules. The potential parameters were obtained by conducting global optimization with respect to a set of reference data generated by extensive ab initio calculations. We extended ReaxFF by adding a 60° correction term which significantly improved the description of phosphorus clusters. Emphasis was placed on the mechanical response of black phosphorene with different types of defects. Compared to the nonreactive SW potential of phosphorene, ReaxFF for P/H systems provides a significant improvement in describing the mechanical properties of the pristine and defected black phosphorene, as well

  12. Determination of the Bjorken Sum and Strong Coupling from Polarized Structure Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Altarelli, Guido; Forte, Stefano; Ridolfi, G; Altarelli, Guido; Ball, Richard D.; Forte, Stefano; Ridolfi, Giovanni

    1997-01-01

    We present a NLO perturbative analysis of all available data on the polarized structure function g_1(x,Q^2) with the aim of making a quantitative test of the validity of the Bjorken sum rule, of measuring \\alpha_s, and of deriving helicity fractions. We take particular care over the small x extrapolation, since it is now known that Regge behaviour is unreliable at perturbative scales. For fixed \\alpha_s we find that if all the most recent data are included g_A=1.18\\pm0.09, confirming the Bjorken sum rule at the 8% level. We further show that the value of \\alpha_s is now reasonably well constrained by scaling violations in the structure function data, despite the fact that it cannot yet be reliably fixed by the value of the Bjorken sum: our final result is \\alpha_s(m_Z) = 0.120+0.010-0.008. We also confirm earlier indications of a sizeable positive gluon polarization in the nucleon.

  13. Measurement of the leptonic structure functions of the photon at PEP [Positron Electron Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cain, M.P.

    1987-01-01

    At beam energies available at the PEP e + e - storage ring at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center the cross-section for two-photon particle production is sufficiently large to warrant an investigation of this O(α 4 ) process. Of particular interest is the two-photon process ee → eeμμ at non-zero Q 2 . This channel is not only relatively easy to observe experimentally but also serves as a model for the process ee → eeq bar q. For the case of inelastic eγ scattering the cross-section could be parameterized in terms of the photon structure functions F 1 (x,Q 2 ) and F 2 (x,Q 2 ). In this thesis I will present data on the process ee → eeμμ collected by the Two-Photon collaboration (PEP-9) at PEP. For the subset of data which proceeds by inelastic eγ scattering I will present a procedure for extracting the QED photon structure functions and apply this method to the data. 42 refs., 44 figs

  14. A Precision Measurement of the Spin Structure Function G(2)(P)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benmouna, N

    2004-01-05

    The spin structure function g{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}) and the virtual photon asymmetry A{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}) were measured for the proton using deep inelastic scattering. The experiment was conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), where longitudinally polarized electrons at 29.1 and 32.3 GeV were scattered from a transversely polarized NH{sub 3} target. Large data sets were accumulated using three independent spectrometers covering a kinematic range 0.02 {le} x {le} 0.8 and 1 {le} Q{sup 2} {le} 20 (GeV/c){sup 2}. This new data is the first data precise enough to distinguish between current models for the proton. The structure function g{sub 2}{sup p} was found to be reasonably consistent with the twist-2 Wandzura-Wilczek calculation. The Q{sup 2} dependence of g{sub 2} approximately follows the Q{sup 2} dependence of g{sub 2}{sup WW}, although the data are not precise enough to rule out no Q{sup 2} dependence. The absolute value for A{sub 2}{sup p} was found to be significantly smaller than the Soffer limit over the measured range. The virtual photon asymmetry A{sub 2} was also found to be inconsistent with zero over much of the measured range.

  15. STRUCTURAL-FUNCTIONAL MODEL OF PROFESSIONAL BUSINESS COMMUNICATION DEVELOPMENT OF FUTURE ECONOMIC SPECIALISTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zotova-Sadylo Yelena Yurievna

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose The structural-functional model of professional business communication development of future economic specialists is presented by the author. Its basic components, purpose, function, principles, methods of its practical realization are characterized in the article. Methodology The considered model is aimed at providing advanced and competent levels of professional business communication / cross-cultural business communication of future specialists in economics by means of relevant to the problem special course within a system of humanitarian cycle disciplines, and integrated class hours and extracurricular activity. The main feature of the special course is its integrated character determined by the necessity to synthesize contents of humanitarian cycle disciplines for the purpose of training material comprehensive awareness. Results In this context focused professional extracurricular activity carried out in strict accordance with an overall objective of young specialist training is effective. Successful implementation of structural functional model is possible providing that integrated approach to creative specialists training by means of entire educational and extracurricular activity system.

  16. The Precision Measurement of the Neutron Spin Structure Function Using Polarized HE-3 Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, X

    2004-01-05

    Using a 48.6 GeV polarized electron beam scattering off a polarized {sup 3}He target at Stanford Linear Accelerator Centre (SLAC), they measured the neutron spin structure function g{sub 1}{sup n} over kinematic(x) ranging 0.014 < x <0.7 and 1 < Q{sup 2} < 17GeV{sup 2}. The measurement gave the integral result over the neutron spin structure function {integral}{sub 0.014}{sup 0.7} g{sub 1}{sup n}(x)dx = -0.036 {+-} 0.004(stat) {+-} 0.005(syst) at an average Q{sup 2} = 5GeV{sup 2}. Along with the proton results from SLAC E143 experiment (0.03 < x) and SMC experiment (0.014 < x < 0.03), they find the Bjorken sum rule appears to be largely saturated by the data integrated down to x of 0.014. However, they observe relatively large values for g{sub 1}{sup n} at low x. The result calls into question the usual methods (Regge theory) for extrapolating to x = 0 to find the full neutron integral {integral}{sub 0}{sup t} g{sub 1}{sup n}(x) dx, needed for testing the Quark-Parton Model (QMP).

  17. Q2 dependence of the spin structure function in the resonance region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Z.; Li, Z.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, we show what we can learn from the CEBAF experiments on spin-structure functions, and the transition from the Drell-Hearn-Gerasimov sum rule in the real photon limit to the spin-dependent sum rules in deep inelastic scattering, and how the asymmetry A 1 (x,Q 2 ) approaches the scaling limit in the resonance region. The spin structure function in the resonance region alone cannot determine the spin-dependent sum rule due to the kinematic restriction of the resonance region. The integral ∫ 0 1 {A 1 (x,Q 2 )F 2 (x,Q 2 )/2x[1+R(x,Q 2 )]}dx is estimated from Q 2 =0--2.5 GeV 2 . The result shows that there is a region where both contributions from the baryon resonances and the deep inelastic scattering are important; thus it provides important information on the high twist effects on the spin-dependent sum rule

  18. All-loops calculation of the structure function x→0 in perturbative QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catani, S.

    1991-01-01

    We study in perturbative QCD the initial-state radiation associated to hadron processes in the semi-hard region of small x (x is the Bjorken variable). A recent analysis of the exclusive multi-gluon distributions to double (infrared and collinear) logarithmic accuracy is extended to the case of inclusive distributions, which we evaluate to single (infrared) logarithmic accuracy. Thus the resulting x→0 structure function or N→1 gluon anomalous dimension is computed to all-loops accuracy. For the inclusive distributions we are able to perform a calculation to such an accuracy by extensively using cancellations which originate from coherence of QCD radiation and the infrared regularity of real-virtual singularities. We find that the x→0 structure function satisfies the Lipatov equation. With the present study we therefore provide a new derivation of the Lipatov result in the context of hard collisions together with a fully exclusive description. We discuss the structure of the Lipatov equation in relation with the x→0 exclusive distributions previously obtained and with the Altarelli-Parisi equation valid for finite values of x. (orig.)

  19. Study of the nucleon spin structure functions: the E154 experiment at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabatie, Franck

    1998-01-01

    In experiment E154 at SLAC, the spin dependent structure function g 1 n was measured by scattering longitudinally polarized 50 GeV electrons off a longitudinally polarized helium 3 target. We report the integral over the measured x range to be ∫ 0.014 0.7 g 1 n (x,5 GeV 2 )dx = -0.0348 ± 0.0033 ± 0.0043 ± 0.0014. We observe relatively large values of g 1 n at low x, calling into question the reliability of the data extrapolation down to x equal 0. Such a divergent behavior seems to disagree with the prediction of the Regge theory but can be quantitatively explained by perturbative QCD. Moreover, we have performed a NLO perturbative QCD analysis of the world data on g 1 , paying careful attention to both the theoretical hypothesis and the calculation of errors. Using a parametrization of the polarized parton distribution at a low scale, we can access the fraction of spin carried by quarks: ΔΣ = 29 ± 6 pc in the MS-bar scheme, and ΔΣ = 37 ± 7 pc in the AB scheme. The gluon contribution to the nucleon spin is not well enough constrained by the current data, but seems to lie between 0 and 2. This study allows us to extract the first moment of the g 1 structure function and we find agreement with the Bjorken sum rule expectations. (author) [fr

  20. Measurement of the Neutron F2 Structure Function via Spectator Tagging with CLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillie, N.; Tkachenko, S.; Zhang, J.; Bosted, P.; Bültmann, S.; Christy, M. E.; Fenker, H.; Griffioen, K. A.; Keppel, C. E.; Kuhn, S. E.; Melnitchouk, W.; Tvaskis, V.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Aghasyan, M.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anghinolfi, M.; Arrington, J.; Avakian, H.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Battaglieri, M.; Biselli, A. S.; Branford, D.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Daniel, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Dey, B.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G.; Domingo, J.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; Dutta, D.; Ent, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fradi, A.; Gabrielyan, M. Y.; Gevorgyan, N.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Graham, L.; Guegan, B.; Guidal, M.; Guler, N.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Heddle, D.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hungerford, E.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ispiryan, M.; Isupov, E. L.; Jawalkar, S. S.; Jo, H. S.; Kalantarians, N.; Khandaker, M.; Khetarpal, P.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; King, P. M.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Klimenko, A.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Kvaltine, N. D.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Mao, Y.; Markov, N.; McKinnon, B.; Mineeva, T.; Morrison, B.; Moutarde, H.; Munevar, E.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Ni, A.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, I.; Niculescu, G.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Pappalardo, L.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Pisano, S.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Raue, B. A.; Ricco, G.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Stoler, P.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Ungaro, M.; Vineyard, M. F.; Voutier, E.; Watts, D. P.; Weinstein, L. B.; Weygand, D. P.; Wood, M. H.; Zana, L.; Zhao, B.

    2012-04-01

    We report on the first measurement of the F2 structure function of the neutron from the semi-inclusive scattering of electrons from deuterium, with low-momentum protons detected in the backward hemisphere. Restricting the momentum of the spectator protons to ≲100MeV/c and their angles to ≳100° relative to the momentum transfer allows an interpretation of the process in terms of scattering from nearly on-shell neutrons. The F2n data collected cover the nucleon-resonance and deep-inelastic regions over a wide range of Bjorken x for 0.65structure function ratio F2n/F2p at 0.2≲x≲0.8 with little uncertainty due to nuclear effects.

  1. Effect of the strange axial form factor on structure functions for neutral current neutrino scattering in the quasielastic region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyungsik

    2011-01-01

    We study the effect of the strange axial form factor on various structure functions for the neutral reaction of neutrino-nucleus scattering in the quasielastic region within the framework of a relativistic single particle model. We use 12 C as the target nucleus, and the incident neutrino energy range is between 150 MeV and 1.5 GeV. The structure functions are extracted at a fixed three momentum transfer and energy transfer by using the intrinsic helicity of neutrino. While the effect of the strange axial form factor is very small, the effect on various structure functions is exhibited explicitly.

  2. Extraction of Structure Function and Gluon Distribution Function at Low-x from Cross Section Derivative by Regge Behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boroun, G.R.

    2005-01-01

    An approximation method based on Regge behavior is presented. This new method relates the reduced cross section derivative and the structure function Regge behavior at low x. With the use of this approximation method, the C and λ parameters are calculated from the HERA reduced cross section data taken at low-x. Also, we calculate the structure functions F 2 (x,Q 2 ) even for low-x values, which have not been investigated. To test the validity of calculated structure functions, we find the gluon distribution function in the Leading order approximation based on Regge behaviour of structure function and compare to the NLO QCD fit to H1 data and NLO parton distribution function.

  3. The triple-pomeron regime and structure function of the pomeron in diffractive deep inelastic scattering at very small x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaev, N.N.; Zakharov, B.G.

    1994-01-01

    We develop the novel description of diffractive deep inelastic scattering based on the technique of lightcone wave functions of multiparton Fock states of the photon. The technique takes advantage of the exact diagonalization of the diffractive S-matrix in the dipole-cross section representation. In this paper we derive properties of the diffractive dissociation of virtual photons in the triple-pomeron regime. We demonstrate that the photon-pomeron interactions can be described by the partonic structure function, which satisfies the conventional GLDAP evolution equations. We identify the valence and sea (anti) quark and the valence gluon structure functions of the pomeron. We show how the gluon structure of the pomeron can be described by the constituent gluon wave function. We derive the leading unitarization correction to the rising structure functions at small x and conclude that the unitarized structure function satisfies the linear GLDAP evolution equations. This result holds even when the multipomeron exchanges are included. (orig.)

  4. Structure functions in the decay τ±→π±π0π0ντ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Browder, T. E.; Li, Y.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Yamamoto, H.; Bergfeld, T.; Eisenstein, B. I.; Ernst, J.; Gladding, G. E.; Gollin, G. D.; Hans, R. M.

    2000-01-01

    Using the CLEO II detector operating at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) e + e - collider, we have measured the structure functions in the decay τ ± →π ± π 0 π 0 ν τ , based on a sample corresponding to 4x10 6 produced τ-pair events. We determine the integrated structure functions, which depend only on the three pion invariant mass, as well as the structure functions differential in the Dalitz plot variables. We extract model independent limits on non-axial-vector contributions from the measured structure functions as less than 16.6% of the total branching fraction, at the 95% confidence level. Separating the non-axial-vector contributions into scalar and vector contributions, we measure that scalars (vectors) contribute with less than 9.4% (7.3%) to the total branching fraction, at the 95% confidence level. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  5. A Precision Measurement of the Neutron Spin Structure Functions Using a Polarized HE-3 Target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, T

    2003-01-01

    This thesis describes a precision measurement of the neutron spin dependent structure function, g 1 n (x). The measurement was made by the E154 collaboration at SLAC using a longitudinally polarized, 48.3 GeV electron beam, and a 3 He target polarized by spin exchange with optically pumped rubidium. A target polarization as high as 50% was achieved. The elements of the experiment which pertain to the polarized 3 He target will be described in detail in this thesis. To achieve a precision measurement, it has been necessary to minimize the systematic error from the uncertainty in the target parameters. All of the parameters of the target have been carefully measured, and the most important parameters of the target have been measured using multiple techniques. The polarization of the target was measured using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques, and has been calibrated using both proton NMR and by measuring the shift of the Rb Zeeman resonance frequency due to the 3 He polarization. The fraction of events which originated in the 3 He, as measured by the spectrometers, has been determined using a physical model of the target and the spectrometers. It was also measured during the experiment using a variable pressure 3 He reference cell in place of the polarized 3 He target. The spin dependent structure function g 1 n (z) was measured in the Bjorken x range of 0.014 2 of 5 (GeV/c) 2 . One of the primary motivations for this experiment was to test the Bjorken sum rule. Because the experiment had smaller statistical errors and a broader kinematic coverage than previous experiments, the behavior of the spin structure function g 1 n (x) could be studied in detail at low values of the Bjorken scaling variable x. It was found that g 1 n (x) has a strongly divergent behavior at low values of x, calling into question the methods commonly used to extrapolate the value of g 1 n (x) to low x. The precision of the measurement made by the E154 collaboration at SLAC puts a tighter

  6. A Precision Measurement of the Neutron Spin Structure Functions Using a Polarized HE-3 Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, T

    2003-11-05

    This thesis describes a precision measurement of the neutron spin dependent structure function, g{sub 1}{sup n}(x). The measurement was made by the E154 collaboration at SLAC using a longitudinally polarized, 48.3 GeV electron beam, and a {sup 3}He target polarized by spin exchange with optically pumped rubidium. A target polarization as high as 50% was achieved. The elements of the experiment which pertain to the polarized {sup 3}He target will be described in detail in this thesis. To achieve a precision measurement, it has been necessary to minimize the systematic error from the uncertainty in the target parameters. All of the parameters of the target have been carefully measured, and the most important parameters of the target have been measured using multiple techniques. The polarization of the target was measured using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques, and has been calibrated using both proton NMR and by measuring the shift of the Rb Zeeman resonance frequency due to the {sup 3}He polarization. The fraction of events which originated in the {sup 3}He, as measured by the spectrometers, has been determined using a physical model of the target and the spectrometers. It was also measured during the experiment using a variable pressure {sup 3}He reference cell in place of the polarized {sup 3}He target. The spin dependent structure function g{sub 1}{sup n}(z) was measured in the Bjorken x range of 0.014 < x < 0.7 with an average Q{sup 2} of 5 (GeV/c){sup 2}. One of the primary motivations for this experiment was to test the Bjorken sum rule. Because the experiment had smaller statistical errors and a broader kinematic coverage than previous experiments, the behavior of the spin structure function g{sub 1}{sup n}(x) could be studied in detail at low values of the Bjorken scaling variable x. It was found that g{sub 1}{sup n}(x) has a strongly divergent behavior at low values of x, calling into question the methods commonly used to extrapolate the value of g

  7. Results of practical application of questionnaire to determine the level of dentophobia and dynamics in the doctor— patient relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savina Е.А.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to develop a questionnaire for assessing the level of dentophobia and dynamics of the relationship in the «doctor-patient» in the course of treatment and to conduct its clinical trials. Material and Methods. 90 patients aged 26-56 years with chronic generalized periodontitis have been examined. The research has been conducted by Hospital Anxiety and depression (HADS questionnaire to determine the level of dentophobia; psychophysiological testing was carried out on the hardware-software complex (APC «NS-Psychotest» (LLC «Neurosoft», Russia, Ivanovo, 2007. Clinical examination included examination of the mouth and the index of assessment of hard tissue of teeth and peri-odontal tissue: a defining simplified oral hygiene index (UIG, sulcus bleeding index (IR, gingival index (PMA. The survey was carried out before the treatment and 3 months after the treatment. Statistical analysis was performed in the program Statistica. Using non-parametric methods (Wilcoxon test, criterion A2, Spearman correlation coefficient. Statistically significant differences with p < 0,05 were considered. Results. The development of the questionnaire was carried out in accordance with all generally accepted standards. The initial testing was performed easily by patients. During the clinical trials visible results of the proposed questionnaire were obtained that proved its sensitivity to the changes in dental and psychological status of the oral cavity. Conclusion. The practical application of the questionnaire determines the level of dentophobia during the first visit. The data of the questionnaire identify the differentiated deontological approach. It improves the relationship with the patient, reduces his level of dentophobia. The reduced dentophobia promotes compliance and psychologically comfortable communication in the doctor-patient system, which also contributes to the prevention of emotional burn out among dentists.

  8. The next-next-to-leading QCD approximation for non-singlet moments of deep inelastic structure functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larin, S.A.; Ritbergen, T. van; Vermaseren, J.A.M.

    1993-12-01

    We obtain the analytic next-next-to-leading perturbative QCD corrections in the leading twist approximation for the moments N = 2, 4, 6, 8 of the non-singlet deep inelastic structure functions F{sub 2} and F{sub L}. We calculate the three-loop anomalous dimensions of the corresponding non-singlet operators and the three-loop coefficient functions of the structure function F{sub L}. (orig.).

  9. The next-next-to-leading QCD approximation for non-singlet moments of deep inelastic structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larin, S.A.; Ritbergen, T. van; Vermaseren, J.A.M.

    1993-12-01

    We obtain the analytic next-next-to-leading perturbative QCD corrections in the leading twist approximation for the moments N = 2, 4, 6, 8 of the non-singlet deep inelastic structure functions F 2 and F L . We calculate the three-loop anomalous dimensions of the corresponding non-singlet operators and the three-loop coefficient functions of the structure function F L . (orig.)

  10. Evolution of spin-dependent structure functions from DGLAP equations in leading order and next to leading order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baishya, R.; Jamil, U.; Sarma, J. K.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the spin-dependent singlet and nonsinglet structure functions have been obtained by solving Dokshitzer, Gribov, Lipatov, Altarelli, Parisi evolution equations in leading order and next to leading order in the small x limit. Here we have used Taylor series expansion and then the method of characteristics to solve the evolution equations. We have also calculated t and x evolutions of deuteron structure functions, and the results are compared with the SLAC E-143 Collaboration data.

  11. Estimating the small-x exponent of the structure function g1NS from the Bjorken sum rule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knauf, Anke; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Soff, Gerhard

    2002-01-01

    We present a new estimate of the exponent governing the small-x behavior of the nonsinglet structure function g 1 p-n derived under the assumption that the Bjorken sum rule is valid. We use the world wide average of α s and the NNNLO QCD corrections to the Bjorken sum rule. The structure function g 1 NS is found to be clearly divergent for small x

  12. The effects of continuous application of sunscreen on photoaged skin in Japanese elderly people – the relationship with the usage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizuno M

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Makoto Mizuno,1,2 Kayo Kunimoto,1 Eiji Naru,2 Koichi Kameyama,2 Fukumi Furukawa,1 Yuki Yamamoto1,3 1Department of Dermatology, Wakayama Medical University, Wakayama, Japan; 2Fundamental Research Laboratories, KOSÉ Corporation, Tokyo, Japan; 3Department of Cosmetic Dermatology and Photomedicine, Wakayama Medical University, Wakayama, Japan Abstract: Since photoaging of skin is caused by chronic sun exposure, it is well-recognized that regular sunscreen use can help prevent photoaging of skin in fair-skinned people. Therefore, application of sunscreen is recommended for the prevention of photoaging in many countries. However, the relationship between UV exposure and photoaging has rarely been investigated in clinical studies in Japan. In addition, there have been almost no long-term interventional studies in Japanese people. We have previously conducted a study where Japanese actinic keratosis patients were instructed to continuously apply sunscreen. The results indicated that long-term application of sunscreen is effective in suppressing actinic keratosis progression and generation. In the present study, we investigated the effects of sunscreen on photoaged skin in 14 elderly Japanese people. Skin conditions such as water content, transepidermal water loss, the number of spots, wrinkles, and skin color tone uniformity were measured and compared before and after the study. A statistically significant difference was observed only in skin surface hydration. There were large inter-individual differences in amount of sunscreen used throughout the study. The changes in the number of spots and skin color tone uniformity during the 18 months showed good correlation with amount of sunscreen being used. These results suggest an increase in the number of spots and deterioration in skin color tone uniformity in the 18-month non-sunscreen application period, and that such skin conditions improved with increasing use of sunscreen. In this study, we suggested

  13. Application of the Speed-Duration Relationship to Normalize the Intensity of High-Intensity Interval Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Carrie; Wilson, John; Birch, Karen M.; Kemi, Ole J.

    2013-01-01

    The tolerable duration of continuous high-intensity exercise is determined by the hyperbolic Speed-tolerable duration (S-tLIM) relationship. However, application of the S-tLIM relationship to normalize the intensity of High-Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) has yet to be considered, with this the aim of present study. Subjects completed a ramp-incremental test, and series of 4 constant-speed tests to determine the S-tLIM relationship. A sub-group of subjects (n = 8) then repeated 4 min bouts of exercise at the speeds predicted to induce intolerance at 4 min (WR4), 6 min (WR6) and 8 min (WR8), interspersed with bouts of 4 min recovery, to the point of exercise intolerance (fixed WR HIIT) on different days, with the aim of establishing the work rate that could be sustained for 960 s (i.e. 4×4 min). A sub-group of subjects (n = 6) also completed 4 bouts of exercise interspersed with 4 min recovery, with each bout continued to the point of exercise intolerance (maximal HIIT) to determine the appropriate protocol for maximizing the amount of high-intensity work that can be completed during 4×4 min HIIT. For fixed WR HIIT tLIM of HIIT sessions was 399±81 s for WR4, 892±181 s for WR6 and 1517±346 s for WR8, with total exercise durations all significantly different from each other (PHIIT, there was no difference in tLIM of each of the 4 bouts (Bout 1: 229±27 s; Bout 2: 262±37 s; Bout 3: 235±49 s; Bout 4: 235±53 s; P>0.050). However, there was significantly less high-intensity work completed during bouts 2 (153.5±40. 9 m), 3 (136.9±38.9 m), and 4 (136.7±39.3 m), compared with bout 1 (264.9±58.7 m; P>0.050). These data establish that WR6 provides the appropriate work rate to normalize the intensity of HIIT between subjects. Maximal HIIT provides a protocol which allows the relative contribution of the work rate profile to physiological adaptations to be considered during alternative intensity-matched HIIT protocols. PMID:24244266

  14. Structure function scaling in a Reλ = 250 turbulent mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Attili, Antonio; Bisetti, Fabrizio

    2011-01-01

    A highly resolved Direct Numerical Simulation of a spatially developing turbulent mixing layer is presented. In the fully developed region, the flow achieves a turbulent Reynolds number Reλ = 250, high enough for a clear separation between large and dissipative scales, so for the presence of an inertial range. Structure functions have been calculated in the self-similar region using velocity time series and Taylor's frozen turbulence hypothesis. The Extended Self-Similarity (ESS) concept has been employed to evaluate relative scaling exponents. A wide range of scales with scaling exponents and intermittency levels equal to homogeneous isotropic turbulence has been identified. Moreover an additional scaling range exists for larger scales; it is characterized by smaller exponents, similar to the values reported in the literature for flows with strong shear.

  15. Two comments to utilization of structure function approach in deep inelastic scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuraev, E.; Galynskij, M.; Il'ichev, A.

    2002-01-01

    The 'returning to resonance' mechanism can be used to obtain the simple procedure of taking radiative corrections (RC) to deep inelastic scattering (DIS) cross sections into account in the framework of the Drell-Yan picture. Iteration procedure is proposed. Kinematical region y→1 can be described in the framework of the Drell-Yan picture using the structure function approach. The large RC in the lowest order reflect the Sudakov form factor suppression, which can be taken into account in all orders of the perturbation theory. Based on explicit calculation in two lowest orders of the perturbation theory, we construct the cross section in the y→1 region obeying renormalization group equations and including the Sudakov-like form factor suppression

  16. Structure function scaling in a Reλ = 250 turbulent mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Attili, Antonio

    2011-12-22

    A highly resolved Direct Numerical Simulation of a spatially developing turbulent mixing layer is presented. In the fully developed region, the flow achieves a turbulent Reynolds number Reλ = 250, high enough for a clear separation between large and dissipative scales, so for the presence of an inertial range. Structure functions have been calculated in the self-similar region using velocity time series and Taylor\\'s frozen turbulence hypothesis. The Extended Self-Similarity (ESS) concept has been employed to evaluate relative scaling exponents. A wide range of scales with scaling exponents and intermittency levels equal to homogeneous isotropic turbulence has been identified. Moreover an additional scaling range exists for larger scales; it is characterized by smaller exponents, similar to the values reported in the literature for flows with strong shear.

  17. Measurement of the proton structure function FL(x,Q2) at low x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaron, F.D.; Andreev, V.

    2008-05-01

    A first measurement is reported of the longitudinal proton structure function F L (x,Q 2 ) at the ep collider HERA. It is based on inclusive deep inelastic e + p scattering cross section measurements with a positron beam energy of 27.5 GeV and proton beam energies of 920, 575 and 460 GeV. Employing the energy dependence of the cross section, F L is measured in a range of squared four-momentum transfers 12≤Q 2 ≤90 GeV 2 and low Bjorken x 0.00024≤x≤0.0036. The FL values agree with higher order QCD calculations based on parton densities obtained using cross section data previously measured at HERA. (orig.)

  18. Recent SLAC measurements of the spin dependent structure functions for the proton and neutron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapalac, G.

    1995-09-01

    The authors present results from SLAC experiments E142 and E143 for the spin dependent structure functions of the proton g 1 p (x, Q 2 ) and neutron g 1 n (x,Q 2 ) measured in deep inelastic scattering of polarized electrons from a polarized target. Experiment E142 measures ∫ 0 1 g 1 n (x)dx = -0.022 ± 0.011 at 2 > = 2 (GeV/c) 2 using a polarized 3 He target. Experiment E143 measures ∫ 0 1 g 1 p (x)dx = 0.129 ± 0.011 at 2 > = 3 (GeV/c) 2 using a polarized NH 3 target. These results are combined at Q 2 = 3 (GeV/c) 2 to yield ∫ 0 1 [g 1 p (x) - g 1 n (x)]dx = 0.151 ± 0.015. The Bjorken sum rule predicts 0.171 ± 0.008

  19. Measurement of the $Q^2$ evolution of the photon structure function $F^{\\gamma}_{2}$

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Beeston, C.; Behnke, T.; Bell, A.N.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bloomer, J.E.; Bobinski, M.; Bock, P.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Bouwens, B.T.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Burgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davies, R.; De Jong, S.; del Pozo, L.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Doucet, M.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Edwards, J.E.G.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Evans, H.G.; Evans, M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fischer, H.M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Fong, D.G.; Foucher, M.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Geddes, N.I.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Geralis, T.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giacomelli, R.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Goodrick, M.J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hart, P.A.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hillier, S.J.; Hobson, P.R.; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ingram, M.R.; Ishii, K.; Jawahery, A.; Jeffreys, P.W.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Joly, A.; Jones, C.R.; Jones, G.; Jones, M.; Jost, U.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kirk, J.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lahmann, R.; Lai, W.P.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lefebvre, E.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markus, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mincer, A.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Morii, M.; Muller, U.; Mihara, S.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oh, A.; Oldershaw, N.J.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Pearce, M.J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Posthaus, A.; Rees, D.L.; Rigby, D.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rooke, A.; Ros, E.; Rossi, A.M.; Routenburg, P.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Ruppel, U.; Rust, D.R.; Rylko, R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schenk, P.; Schieck, J.; Schleper, P.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skillman, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Springer, Robert Wayne; Sproston, M.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stockhausen, B.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Szymanski, P.; Tafirout, R.; Talbot, S.D.; Tanaka, S.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Utzat, P.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Verzocchi, M.; Vikas, P.; Vokurka, E.H.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilkens, B.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1997-01-01

    New measurements are presented of the photon structure function F_2^gamma(Q) at four values of Q^2 between 9 and 59 GeV/c^2 based on data collected with the OPAL detector at centre-of-mass energies of 161-172 GeV, with a total integrated luminosity of 18.1 pb^-1. The evolution of F_2^gamma with Q^2 in bins of x is determined in the Q^2 range from 1.86 to 135 GeV/c^2 using data taken at centre-of-mass energies of 91 GeV and 161-172 GeV. F_2^gamma is observed to increase with Q^2 with a slope of 1/alpha_em dF_2^gamma/dln(Q^2) = 0.10 +0.05 -0.03 measured in the range 0.1 < x < 0.6.

  20. Patchwork structure-function analysis of the Sendai virus matrix protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottet-Osman, Geneviève; Miazza, Vincent; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Roux, Laurent

    2014-09-01

    Paramyxoviruses contain a bi-lipidic envelope decorated by two transmembrane glycoproteins and carpeted on the inner surface with a layer of matrix proteins (M), thought to bridge the glycoproteins with the viral nucleocapsids. To characterize M structure-function features, a set of M domains were mutated or deleted. The genes encoding these modified M were incorporated into recombinant Sendai viruses and expressed as supplemental proteins. Using a method of integrated suppression complementation system (ISCS), the functions of these M mutants were analyzed in the context of the infection. Cellular membrane association, localization at the cell periphery, nucleocapsid binding, cellular protein interactions and promotion of viral particle formation were characterized in relation with the mutations. At the end, lack of nucleocapsid binding go together with lack of cell surface localization and both features definitely correlate with loss of M global function estimated by viral particle production. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.