WorldWideScience

Sample records for application purex storage

  1. Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application, PUREX storage tunnels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, C. R.

    1997-09-08

    The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document number DOE/RL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. The scope of the Unit-Specific Portion is limited to Part B permit application documentation submitted for individual, `operating` treatment, storage, and/or disposal units, such as the PUREX Storage Tunnels (this document, DOE/RL-90-24).

  2. Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application, PUREX storage tunnels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, S.M.

    1997-09-08

    The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document number DOE/RL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. The scope of the Unit-Specific Portion is limited to Part B permit application documentation submitted for individual, operating treatment, storage, and/or disposal units, such as the PUREX Storage Tunnels (this document, DOE/RL-90-24). Both the General Information and Unit-Specific portions of the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application address the content of the Part B permit application guidance prepared by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology 1996) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (40 Code of Federal Regulations 270), with additional information needs defined by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments and revisions of Washington Administrative Code 173-303. For ease of reference, the Washington State Department of Ecology alpha-numeric section identifiers from the permit application guidance documentation (Ecology 1996) follow, in brackets, the chapter headings and subheadings. A checklist indicating where information is contained in the PUREX Storage Tunnels permit application documentation, in relation to the Washington State Department of Ecology guidance, is located in the Contents Section. Documentation contained in the General Information Portion is broader in nature and could be used by multiple treatment, storage, and/or disposal units (e.g., the glossary provided in the General Information Portion). Wherever appropriate, the PUREX Storage Tunnels permit application documentation makes cross-reference to the General Information Portion, rather than duplicating text. Information provided in this PUREX Storage Tunnels permit application documentation is current as of April 1997.

  3. Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application, PUREX storage tunnels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document number DOE/RL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. The scope of the Unit-Specific Portion is limited to Part B permit application documentation submitted for individual, operating treatment, storage, and/or disposal units, such as the PUREX Storage Tunnels (this document, DOE/RL-90-24). Both the General Information and Unit-Specific portions of the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application address the content of the Part B permit application guidance prepared by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology 1996) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (40 Code of Federal Regulations 270), with additional information needs defined by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments and revisions of Washington Administrative Code 173-303. For ease of reference, the Washington State Department of Ecology alpha-numeric section identifiers from the permit application guidance documentation (Ecology 1996) follow, in brackets, the chapter headings and subheadings. A checklist indicating where information is contained in the PUREX Storage Tunnels permit application documentation, in relation to the Washington State Department of Ecology guidance, is located in the Contents Section. Documentation contained in the General Information Portion is broader in nature and could be used by multiple treatment, storage, and/or disposal units (e.g., the glossary provided in the General Information Portion). Wherever appropriate, the PUREX Storage Tunnels permit application documentation makes cross-reference to the General Information Portion, rather than duplicating text. Information provided in this PUREX Storage Tunnels permit application documentation is current as of April 1997

  4. PUREX storage tunnels waste analysis plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washington Administrative Code 173-303-300 requires that a facility develop and follow a written waste analysis plan which describes the procedures that will be followed to ensure that its dangerous waste is managed properly. This document covers the activities at the PUREX Storage Tunnels used to characterize and designate waste that is generated within the PUREX Plant, as well as waste received from other on-site sources

  5. PUREX storage tunnels waste analysis plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washington Administrative Code 173-303-300 requires that a facility develop and follow a written waste analysis plan which describes the procedures that will be followed to ensure that its dangerous waste is managed properly. This document covers the activities at the PUREX Storage Tunnels used to characterize and designate waste that is generated within the PUREX plant, as well as waste received from other on-site sources

  6. PUREX Storage Tunnels waste analysis plan. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washington Administrative Code 173-303-300 requires that a facility develop and follow a written waste analysis plan which describes the procedures that will be followed to ensure that its dangerous waste is managed properly. This document covers the activities at the PUREX Storage Tunnels used to characterize and designate waste that is generated within the PUREX Plant, as well as waste received from other on-site sources

  7. PUREX facility preclosure work plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelmann, R.H.

    1997-04-24

    This preclosure work plan presents a description of the PUREX Facility, the history of the waste managed, and addresses transition phase activities that position the PUREX Facility into a safe and environmentally secure configuration. For purposes of this documentation, the PUREX Facility does not include the PUREX Storage Tunnels (DOE/RL-90/24). Information concerning solid waste management units is discussed in the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, General Information Portion (DOE/RL-91-28, Appendix 2D).

  8. PUREX facility preclosure work plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This preclosure work plan presents a description of the PUREX Facility, the history of the waste managed, and addresses transition phase activities that position the PUREX Facility into a safe and environmentally secure configuration. For purposes of this documentation, the PUREX Facility does not include the PUREX Storage Tunnels (DOE/RL-90/24). Information concerning solid waste management units is discussed in the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, General Information Portion (DOE/RL-91-28, Appendix 2D)

  9. Radioactive air emissions notice of construction for reactivation of the PUREX storage tunnel number 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant Storage Tunnel Number 2 (hereafter referred to as the PUREX Tunnel) was built in 1964. Since that time, the PUREX Tunnel has been used for storage of radioactive and mixed waste. In 1991, the PUREX Plant ceased operations and was transitioned to deactivation. The PUREX Tunnel continued to receive PUREX Plant waste material for storage during transition activities. Before 1995, a decision was made to store radioactive and mixed waste in the PUREX Tunnel generated from other onsite sources, on a case-by-case basis. This notice of construction (NOC) describes the activities associated with the reactivation of the PUREX Tunnel ventilation system and the transfer of up to 3.5 million curies (MCi) of radioactive waste to the PUREX Tunnel from any location on the Hanford Site. The unabated total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) estimated for the hypothetical offsite maximally exposed individual (MEI) is 5.6 E-2 millirem (mrem). The abated TEDE conservatively is estimated to account for 1.9 E-5 mrem to the MEI. The following text provides information requirements of Appendix A of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247 (requirements 1 through 18)

  10. Application of biomass for the sorption of radionuclides from low level Purex aqueous wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microbial biomass have been found to be good biological adsorbents for radioactive nuclides such as uranium and thorium with comparatively easy desorption and recovery. Based on this, sorption studies have been carried out to assess the feasibility of using biomass Rhizopus arrhizus (RA) for the removal of radionuclides present in Purex low level waste streams. Biomass Rhizopus arrhizus (RA) appears effective for the removal of actinides and fission products from low level Purex plant waste/effluent solutions. Maximum sorption for uranium and plutonium is observed at 6-7 pH whereas for Am, Eu, Pm, Ce and Zr the sorption is maximum at pH 2 with high D values and fast kinetics in both cases. Sorption for Ru and Cs are negligible. Sorbed nuclides are recoverable by elution with 1 M HNO3, on once through basis. The method can be used for treating the evaporator condensates from the plant and the hold-up delay tank solution. The sodium nitrate salt concentration in the aqueous solution beyond 0.14 M seriously affects the metal uptake. The results from column experiments indicate a limited loading capacity in terms of mg of Am/U/Pu etc. per gm of RA. However, as the Purex low level effluents contain only trace level activities whose absolute ionic concentrations are much lower, the capacities observed with the present form of biomass may still be satisfactory

  11. Neptunium distribution in PUREX process streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    237Np is one of the most important minor actinides present in spent fuel both from environmental and application point of view. The routing of neptunium to the particular waste stream of PUREX process is required for its separation and purification as 237Np is the target nuclide for production of 238Pu. In addition, the routing of neptunium to a particular PUREX stream will help in better waste management, which in turn will reduce its bearing on the environment considering its long half life, alpha emitting properties and mobile nature. In order to route Neptunium to a particular waste stream of PUREX process, it is imperative to understand the distribution of neptunium in various process streams. Although, there are reports on Np distribution under simulated conditions of PUREX streams, the present study deals with neptunium determination in actual PUREX streams samples. (author)

  12. Application of extraction chromatographic technique in the recovery of actinides from Purex waste solutions using CMPO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extraction chromatographic technique using octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbomoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) adsorbed on chromosorb-102 (CAC) has been developed as a potential alternative to the Truex process, where CMPO has been deployed as the extracting agent to recover minor actinides from the high active waste (HAW) solution of Purex origin. In this connection, the batch-wise uptake behaviour of U(VI), Pu(VI), Am(III), Eu(III), Zr(IV), Fe(III), Ru(III) and TcO4 from nitric acid medium by CAC has been studied. The uptake of actinides and lanthanides are higher than those of other fission products and inert materials. The batch-wise loading experiments in presence of Nd(III)/U(VI) have shown that at lower concentration of these metal ions, the uptake of Pu(IV), U(VI) and Am(III) are reasonably high. Studies on loading of Nd(III), U(VI) and Pu(IV) on a column containing 1.7 g CAC have shown that Nd(III) (30 mg) and U(VI) (90 mg) could be loaded, while Pu(IV) (∼0.6 mg) was loaded on a small column containing 100 mg CAC without any breakthrough. Further, a synthetic HAW solution and the actual Purex HAW solution were loaded on a CAC column. The effluents did not contain any alpha activity above the background level. The activities could subsequently be eluted with 0.04 M HNO3 (Am and RE), 0.01 M oxalic acid (Pu) and 0.25 MNa2CO3 solution (U(VI)). The recoveries of these metal ions were found to be > 99%. The eluted Am and rare earth fraction is an important source for 147Pm. This process is amenable for further scaling up. (author). 17 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs

  13. PUREX facility hazards assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the hazards assessment for the Plutonium Uranium Extraction Plant (PUREX) located on the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. Operation of PUREX is the responsibility of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). This hazards assessment was conducted to provide the emergency planning technical basis for PUREX. DOE Order 5500.3A requires an emergency planning hazards assessment for each facility that has the potential to reach or exceed the lowest level emergency classification. In October of 1990, WHC was directed to place PUREX in standby. In December of 1992 the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management authorized the termination of PUREX and directed DOE-RL to proceed with shutdown planning and terminal clean out activities. Prior to this action, its mission was to reprocess irradiated fuels for the recovery of uranium and plutonium. The present mission is to establish a passively safe and environmentally secure configuration at the PUREX facility and to preserve that condition for 10 years. The ten year time frame represents the typical duration expended to define, authorize and initiate follow-on decommissioning and decontamination activities

  14. PUREX irradiated fuel recovery simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the application of IGRIP (Interactive Graphical Robot Instruction Program) to assist environmental remediation efforts at the Department of Energy PUREX Plant at the Hanford Site. An IGRIP simulation was developed to plan, review, and verify proposed remediation activities. This simulation was designed to satisfy a number of unique purposes that each placed specific constraints and requirements on the design and implementation of the simulation. These purposes and their influence on the design of the simulation are presented. A discussion of several control code architectures for mechanical system simulations, including their advantages and limitations, is also presented

  15. PUREX new substation ATR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is the acceptance test report (ATR) for the New PUREX Main and Minisubstations. It covers the factory and vendor acceptance and commissioning test reports. Reports are presented for the Main 5 kV substation building, the building fire system, switchgear, and vacuum breaker; the minisubstation control building and switch gear; commissioning test; electrical system and loads inspection; electrical utilities transformer and cable; and relay setting changes based on operational experience

  16. Uranous nitrate production for Purex process applications using PtO2 catalyst and hydrazine nitrate as reductant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In spent fuel reprocessing by Purex process uranium and plutonium are extracted together in the solvent 30% TBP-dodecane to effect decontamination from fission products and trivalent actinides. In a subsequent partition step, uranium and plutonium are separated from each other by selectively reducing Pu(IV) to Pu(III) in which valency it is least extractable in the above solvent. The reduction of Pu(IV) to Pu(III) is accomplished with the reducing agent uranous nitrate, which is produced conventionally by electrolytic reduction of U(VI) with hydrazine nitrate as uranous nitrate stabilizer. In this method of reduction the percentage conversion attainable is only 50 to 60%. The use of this solution as partitioning agent leads not only to the dilution of the plutonium product but also to increase in uranium processing load by each externally fed uranous nitrate batch. Also the oxide coating of the anode, TSIA (Titanium Substrate Insoluble Anode) wears out after a certain period of operation. This necessitates recoating which is quite cumbersome considering the amount of the decontamination involved. So an alternative to the conventional electrolytic method has been explored in the laboratory at FRD. It is observed that quantitative reduction of uranyl nitrate to uranous nitrate can be achieved with hydrazine nitrate as reductant in presence of PtO2 catalyst. Extensive laboratory scale studies were carried out to optimize the various parameters for quantitative reduction. The optimum parameters for the reduction of 4 grams of uranyl ions as a single batch (20 ml) with a catalyst amount of 320 milligrams are H+ 1 M, N2H2+ = 1.0 M and temperature = 60 degC and the time for quantitative reduction under these optimized conditions was 60 minutes. These studies were then extended to pilot plant scale and the catalyst amount used in these in studies was 80 grams. When the column was operated under the optimized conditions, the uranous production per single batch (10 litres

  17. Uranous nitrate production for purex process applications using PtO2 catalyst and H2/H2-gas mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Purex process of spent fuel reprocessing. the twin objectives- decontamination and partitioning are achieved by extracting uranium (VI) and plutonium (IV) together in the solvent 30% TBP-dodecane and then selectively reducing Pu (IV) to Pu (III) in which valency it is least extractable in the solvent. Uranous nitrate stabilized with hydrazine nitrate is the widely employed partitioning agent. The conventional method of producing U(IV) is by the electrolytic reduction of uranyl nitrate with hydrazine nitrate as uranous ion stabilizer. Tre percentage conversion of U(VI) to U(IV) obtained in this method is 50 -60 %. The use of this solution as partitioning agent leads not only to the dilution of the plutonium product but also to increase in uranium processing load by each externally fed uranous nitrate batch. Also the oxide coating of the anode, TSIA (Titanium Substrate Insoluble Anode) wears out after a certain period of operation. This necessitates recoating which is quite cumbersome considering the amount of the decontamination involved. An alternative to the conventional electrolytic method of reduction of uranyl nitrate to uranous nitrate was explored at FRD laboratory .The studies have revealed that near 100% uranous nitrate can be produced by reducing uranyl nitrate with H2 gas or H2(8%)- Ar/N2 gas mixture in presence of PtO2 catalyst. This report describes the laboratory scale studies carried out to optimize the various parameters. Based on these studies reduction of uranyl nitrate on a pilot plant scale was carried out. The design and operation of the reductor column and also the various studies carried out in the pilot plant studies are discussed. Near 100% conversion of uranyl nitrate to uranous nitrate and also the redundancy of supply of electrical energy make this process a viable alternative to the existing electrolytic method. (author)

  18. Purex process performance summary, January 1963 thru December 1963

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judson, B.F.

    1963-01-15

    This report documents information acquired from the operation of the purex process during the year of 1963 at the Hanford Site. The report is broken down into sections containing data collected on two to four week intervals. The data included: Performance, flowsheets, feed preparation, solvent extraction, product treatment, solvent treatment, acid recovery, waste concentration, fission product recovery, and waste treatment and storage.

  19. Functional design criteria for the 242-A evaporator and PUREX [Plutonium-Uranium Extraction] Plant condensate interim retention basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document contains the functional design criteria for a 26- million-gallon retention basin and 10 million gallons of temporary storage tanks. The basin and tanks will be used to store 242-A Evaporator process condensate, the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant process distillate discharge stream, and the PUREX Plant ammonia scrubber distillate stream. Completion of the project will allow both the 242-A Evaporator and the PUREX Plant to restart. 4 refs

  20. Alternatives for the disposition of PUREX organic solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Supporting Document submits options and recommendations for final management of Tank 40 Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant organic solution per Tri-Party Agreement Milestorm Number M-80-00-T03. Hanford is deactivating the PUREX Plant for the US DOE. One the key element of this Deactivation is disposition of approximately 81,300 liters (21,500 gallons) of slightly radioactively contaminated organic solution to reduce risk to the environment, reduce cost of long-term storage, and assure regulatory compliance. An announcement in the Commerce Business Daily (CBD) on October 14, 1994 has resulted in the submission of proposals from two facilities capabLe of receiving and thermally destroying the solution. Total decomposition by thermal destruction is the recommended option for the disposition of the PUREX organic solution and WHC is evaluating the proposals from the two facilities

  1. PUREX transition project case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In December 1992, the US Department of Energy (DOE) directed that the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant be shut down and deactivated because it was no longer needed to support the nation's production of weapons-grade plutonium. The PUREX/UO2 Deactivation Project will establish a safe and environmentally secure configuration for the facility and preserve that configuration for 10 years. The 10-year span is used to predict future maintenance requirements and represents the estimated time needed to define, authorize, and initiate the follow-on decontamination and decommissioning activities. Accomplishing the deactivation project involves many activities. Removing major hazards, such as excess chemicals, spent fuel, and residual plutonium are major goals of the project. The scope of the PUREX Transition Project is described within

  2. Purex process solvent: literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document summarizes the data on Purex process solvent presently published in a variety of sources. Extracts from these various sources are presented herein and contain the work done, the salient results obtained, and the original, unaltered conclusions of the author of each paper. Three major areas are addressed: solvent stability, solvent quality testing, and solvent treatment processes. 34 references, 44 tables

  3. Purex: process and equipment performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Purex process is the solvent extraction system that uses tributyl phosphate as the extractant for separating uranium and plutonium from irradiated reactor fuels. Since the first flowsheet was proposed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1950, the process has endured for over 30 years with only minor modifications. The spread of the technology was rapid, and worldwide use or research on Purex-type processes was reported by the time of the 1955 Geneva Conference. The overall performance of the process has been so good that there are no serious contenders for replacing it soon. This paper presents: process description; equipment performance (mixer-settlers, pulse columns, rapid contactors); fission product decontamination; solvent effects (solvent degradation products); and partitioning of uranium and plutonium

  4. PUREX Plant deactivation mission analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the PUREX Deactivation Project mission analysis is to define the problem to be addressed by the PUREX mission, and to lay the ground work for further system definition. The mission analysis is an important first step in the System Engineering (SE) process. This report presents the results of the PUREX Deactivation Project mission analysis. The purpose of the PUREX Deactivation Project is to prepare PUREX for Decontamination and Decommissioning within a five year time frame. This will be accomplished by establishing a passively safe and environmentally secure configuration of the PUREX Plant, that can be preserved for a 10-year horizon. During deactivation, appropriate portions of the safety envelop will be maintained to ensure deactivation takes place in a safe and regulatory compliant manner

  5. Nanotechnology for Data Storage Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarid, Dror; McCarthy, Brendan; Jabbour, Ghassan

    This chapter considers atomic force microscopy (AFM) as an enabling technology for data storage applications, considering already existing technologies such as hard disk drives (HDD), optical disk drives (ODD) and flash memories that currently dominate the nonvolatile data storage market, together with future devices based on magnetoresistive and phase change effects. The issue at hand is the question of whether the novel AFM-based storage, dubbed probe storage, can offer a competing approach to the currently available technologies by playing the role of a disruptive technology. Probe storage will be contrasted to HDD and ODD, which are purely mechanical as they are based on a rotating disk that uses just a single probe to address billions of bits of data, and nonvolatile random-access memory (RAM) that has no moving parts yet requires billions of interconnects. In particular, capacity, areal density, transfer rate, form factor and the cost of various data storage devices will be discussed and the unique opportunity offered by probe storage in employing massive parallelism will be outlined. It will be shown that probe storage bridges the gap between HDD, ODD and other nonvolatile RAM, drawing from the strength of each one of these and adding a significant attribute neither of these has; namely, the possibility of addressing a very large number of nanoscale bits of data in parallel. This chapter differs from the other chapters in this book in that it addresses the important issue of whether a given scientific effort, namely, probe storage, is mature enough to evolve into a commercially viable technology. The answer seems to indicate that there is indeed a huge niche in the data storage arena that such a technology is uniquely qualified to fill, which is large enough to justify a major investment in research and development. Indeed, as other chapters indicate, such an effort is developing at a rapid pace, with hopes of having a viable product within a few years.

  6. Application of N,N-ethyl(hydroxyethyl) hydroxylamine in the separation of Pu from U in PUREX process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reduction back-extraction behavior of Pu(IV) from 30% TBP/OK with EHEH was investigated under conditions of different temperatures, different concentration of EHEH and HNO3, various contacting-time and phase ratios respectively. It is show that Pu(IV) from organic phase can be rapidly stripped into aqueous phase by EHEH; the batch stripping percentage of Pu(IV) approach 99% in contacting time of 5 seconds at phase ratio (o/a) 1:1, compared with 89% in 30 seconds at phase ratio (o/a) 4:1. It is also found that the higher reductant concentration, the lower acidity and the higher temperature could speed up the stripping extraction process of Pu. The application of EHEH to separate Pu from U in the 1 B contactor was studied by the 14-stages counter current cascade experiment. It is shown that the recovery percentage of U reaches over 99.999% and the recovery percentage of Pu reaches over 99.99% at phase ratio (1BX : 1BF : 1BS)1 : 4 : 1. The separation factor of Pu from U (α (Pu/U)) is 1.1 x 104; the separation factor of U from Pu(α(U/Pu)) is 3.2 x 105. The results show that EHEH as an organic reductant has obvious effect on the separation of Pu from U. (authors)

  7. Alternatives for the disposition of fuel stored in the PUREX facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides an evaluation of five alternatives for the disposition of 3.4 metric tons of irradiated fuel from PUREX to support facility turnover following deactivation. The alternatives for disposition of the fuel include transfer to the K Basins, transfer to T Plant, passivation and dry vault storage, and dissolution and underground tank storage. The five alternatives were compared and it was determined that the fuel should be transferred from PUREX to the K Basins where it would be placed into pool storage

  8. Energy Storage for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Davis, Marla E.; Loyselle, Patricia L.; Hoberecht, Mark A.; Manzo, Michelle A.; Kohout, Lisa L.; Burke, Kenneth A.; Cabrera, Carlos R.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has long been a major contributor to the development and application of energy storage technologies for NASAs missions and programs. NASA GRC has supported technology efforts for the advancement of batteries and fuel cells. The Electrochemistry Branch at NASA GRC continues to play a critical role in the development and application of energy storage technologies, in collaboration with other NASA centers, government agencies, industry and academia. This paper describes the work in batteries and fuel cell technologies at the NASA Glenn Research Center. It covers a number of systems required to ensure that NASAs needs for a wide variety of systems are met. Some of the topics covered are lithium-based batteries, proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, and nanotechnology activities. With the advances of the past years, we begin the 21st century with new technical challenges and opportunities as we develop enabling technologies for batteries and fuel cells for aerospace applications.

  9. Data quality objectives for PUREX deactivation flushing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Data Quality Objection (DQO) defines the sampling and analysis requirements necessary to support the deactivation of the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) facility vessels that are regulated by WAC 173-303. Specifically, sampling and analysis requirements are identified for the flushing operations that are a major element of PUREX deactivation

  10. Cloud Storage Client Application Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Malik

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The research proposed in this paper focuses on gathering evidence from devices with UNIX/Linux systems (in particular on Ubuntu 14.04 and Android OS, and Windows 8.1, in order to find artifacts left by cloud storage applications that suggests their use even after the deletion of the applications. The work performed aims to expand upon the prior work done by other researches in the field of cloud forensics and to show an example of analysis. We show where and what type of data remnants can be found using our analysis and how this information can be used as evidence in a digital forensic investigation.

  11. PUREX Deactivation Health and Safety documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the PUREX Deactivation Project is to establish a passively safe and environmentally secure configuration of PUREX at the Hanford Site, and to preserve that configuration for a 10-year horizon. The 10-year horizon is used to predict future maintenance requirements and represents they typical time duration expended to define, authorize, and initiate the follow-on Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) activities. This document was prepared to increase attention to worker safety issues during the deactivation project and, as such, identifies the documentation and programs associated with PUREX Deactivation Health and Safety

  12. PUREX Deactivation Health and Safety documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodd, E.N. III

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the PUREX Deactivation Project is to establish a passively safe and environmentally secure configuration of PUREX at the Hanford Site, and to preserve that configuration for a 10-year horizon. The 10-year horizon is used to predict future maintenance requirements and represents they typical time duration expended to define, authorize, and initiate the follow-on Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) activities. This document was prepared to increase attention to worker safety issues during the deactivation project and, as such, identifies the documentation and programs associated with PUREX Deactivation Health and Safety.

  13. The reduction of Np(VI) and Np(V) by tit dihydroxyurea and its application to the U/Np separation in the PUREX process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reduction of Np(VI) and Np(V) by Dihydroxyurea (DHU) was studied by spectrophotometry. The results show that the reduction of Np(VI) to Np(V) by DHU is particularly fast. The apparent rate constant is 1.86s-1 at 4 C as [HNO3] = 0.44 M and [DHU] = 7.5 x 10-2 M. While further reduction of Np(V) to Np(IV) is so slow that no Np(IV) is observed in 2 h. The reduction back-extraction behavior of Np(VI) in 30% tri-butyl phosphate/kerosene was firstly investigated under conditions of different temperature, different concentrations of DHU and HNO3 and various phase contact time, respectively. The results show that 98% of Np(VI) in the organic phase can be stripped rapidly to the aqueous phase by DHU under the given experimental conditions. As the concentration of HNO3 in the aqueous phase increases, the stripping efficiency decreases. While the stripping efficiency increases with the increase of the concentration of DHU. Simulating the 1B contactor of the PUREX process using DHU as the stripping agent, the SFU/Np equals to 183 under the given experimental conditions. It indicates that Np will follow with Pu in the U/Pu separation stage in the reprocessing of spent fuels. (orig.)

  14. Thermal energy storage application areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-03-01

    The use of thermal energy storage in the areas of building heating and cooling, recovery of industrial process and waste heat, solar power generation, and off-peak energy storage and load management in electric utilities is reviewed. (TFD)

  15. Syncing Mobile Applications with Cloud Storage Services

    OpenAIRE

    Paul POCATILU; Catalin BOJA; Cristian CIUREA

    2013-01-01

    Cloud data storage is an option available almost on any mobile platform. Nowadays, there are multiple solutions for syncing data in mobile applications. The aim of the paper is to analyze mobile application developers’ possibilities for syncing content using major free cloud storage providers. The paper describes the cloud computing in mobile context and highlights cloud providers APIs. Experimental results are analyzed in order to identify the best cloud storage solution for syncing mobile...

  16. PUREX exhaust ventilation system installation test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Acceptance Test Report validates the testing performed, the exceptions logged and resolved and certifies this portion of the SAMCONS has met all design and test criteria to perform as an operational system. The proper installation of the PUREX exhaust ventilation system components and wiring was systematically evaluated by performance of this procedure. Proper operation of PUREX exhaust fan inlet, outlet, and vortex damper actuators and limit switches were verified, using special test equipment, to be correct and installed wiring connections were verified by operation of this equipment

  17. Syncing Mobile Applications with Cloud Storage Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul POCATILU

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cloud data storage is an option available almost on any mobile platform. Nowadays, there are multiple solutions for syncing data in mobile applications. The aim of the paper is to analyze mobile application developers’ possibilities for syncing content using major free cloud storage providers. The paper describes the cloud computing in mobile context and highlights cloud providers APIs. Experimental results are analyzed in order to identify the best cloud storage solution for syncing mobile applications, depending on the operating system on which they are implemented.

  18. Distribution of technetium in PUREX process streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement of 99Tc in various streams of the process is a difficult task as it is pure beta emitter. With this in view, a γ-emitting relatively long-lived radioisotope of technetium (95Tc) has been used in the present work as a tracer and its distribution in various streams of the Purex process is studied

  19. PUREX low-level waste radionuclide characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PUREX low-level waste (LLW) radionuclide characterization document describes the methodology for the characterization of solid LLW and solid low-level mixed waste (MW) with the respect to radiological characteristics. This document only serves as an overview of the PUREX radionuclide characterization methodology and provides specific examples for how the radionuclide distribution is derived. It would be impractical to provide all background information in this document. If further clarification and background information is required, consult the PUREX Regulatory Compliance group files. This document applies to only that waste generated in or is the responsibility of the PUREX facilities. The US Department of Energy (DOE) establishes the requirements for radioactive solid waste in DOE Order 5820.2A Radioactive Waste Management. Chapters 2 and 3 from DOE Order 5820.2A requires that generators of solid wastes in the LLW categories and the radioactive mixed waste subcategories: (1) identify the major radionuclides in each solid waste matrix and (2) determine the radionuclide concentrations and waste classes of their solid wastes. In addition, the Order also requires each generator to carry out a compliance program that ensures the proper certification of the solid waste generated

  20. Determination of the mothers' milk storage applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinar Sercekus

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Breast milk storage conditions, is an important issue alongside the protection of substantiality and immunological content of milk in terms of preventing the development of microorganisms. The purpose of this research was to determine breast milk storage applications of mothers. Methods: This study was a descriptive survey. Ten health care centers were taken for the study scope in Denizli. The study sample consisted of 77 mothers who stored breast milk. Results: 49.4% of the mother's stores their milk at room temperature, 76.6% of them stores in the refrigerator, 59.7% of them stores it in the deep-freezer. % 41.6 of women use plastic milk storage bags to store milk, 57.1% of them write date on the storage container, 37.7% of them boil in order to clean the containers, 51.9% of them clean containers after each use. Conclusion: It was found incorrect applications, which can adversely affect baby's health, at the selection of storage containers and cleaning, storage location, duration and thawing the frozen milk stages in this study. Important tasks fall to the healthcare personnel while teaching mothers the right applications for the storage of milk. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2015; 14(6.000: 483-488

  1. The Distribution of Tc in Purex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Tc is an important fission product (fission yield of 99Tc is 6.13%) and has complex chemical behavior. It distributes in many flows of Purex. The influence of Tc can be ignored in military plutonium production reactor because the burning up of it is very low and the production of Tc is little. The burning up of PWR is much deeper and the production of Tc is much higher than the former so the tendency and controlling of Tc in Purex causes popular consideration. The main reason for that is the peculiar chemical property of Tc. Tc co-extracts with Zr, U and Pu in 1A cell and effect the separation of U or Pu in 1B cell by consuming large amount of reductants and

  2. PUREX Plant waste analysis plan. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Washington Administrative Code 173-303-300 requires that a facility develop and follow a written waste analysis plan which describes the procedures that will be followed to ensure that its dangerous wastes are managed properly. This document covers the activities at the PUREX Plant to characterize the designate waste that is generated within the plant, stored in Tanks F18, U3/U4, and managed through elementary neutralization in Tank 31

  3. Integrating safety and health during deactiviation: With lessons learned from PUREX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes an integrated safety and health approach used during facility deactivation activities at the Department of Energy (DOE) Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility in Hanford, Washington. Resulting safety and health improvements and the potential, complex-wide application of this approach are discussed in this report through a description of its components and the impacts, or lessons-learned, of its use during the PUREX deactivation project. As a means of developing and implementing the integrated safety and health approach, the PUREX technical partnership was established in 1993 among the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Worker Health and Safety (EH-5); the Office of Environmental Management's Offices of Nuclear Material and Facility Stabilization (EM-60) and Compliance and Program Coordination (EM-20); the DOE Richland Operations Office; and the Westinghouse Hanford Company. It is believed that this report will provide guidance for instituting an integrated safety and health approach not only for deactivation activities, but for decommissioning and other clean-up activities as well. This confidence is based largely upon the rationality of the approach, often termed as common sense, and the measurable safety and health and project performance results that application of the approach produced during actual deactivation work at the PUREX Facility

  4. Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, V. Vasudeva

    2008-10-01

    This paper gives an Introduction to Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) systems and their applications along with an overview of their present status. Further a brief description to a Micro SMES/UPS system of 0.5 MJ capacity that was developed/tested at IIT, Kharagpur is also included.

  5. Hydrogen storage technology materials and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Klebanoff, Lennie

    2012-01-01

    Zero-carbon, hydrogen-based power technology offers the most promising long-term solution for a secure and sustainable energy infrastructure. With contributions from the world's leading technical experts in the field, Hydrogen Storage Technology: Materials and Applications presents a broad yet unified account of the various materials science, physics, and engineering aspects involved in storing hydrogen gas so that it can be used to provide power. The book helps you understand advanced hydrogen storage materials and how to build systems around them. Accessible to nonscientists, the first chapt

  6. Interface control document between PUREX/UO3 Plant Transition and Solid Waste Disposal Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This interface control document (ICD) between PUREX/UO3 Plant Transition (PPT) and Solid Waste Disposal Division (SWD) establishes at a top level the functional responsibilities of each division where interfaces exist between the two divisions. Since the PUREX Transition and Solid Waste Disposal divisions operate autonomously, it is important that each division has a clear understanding of the other division's expectations regarding these interfaces. This ICD primarily deals with solid wastes generated by the PPT. In addition to delineating functional responsibilities, the ICD includes a baseline description of those wastes that will require management as part of the interface between the divisions. The baseline description of wastes includes waste volumes and timing for use in planning the proper waste management capabilities: the primary purpose of this ICD is to ensure defensibility of expected waste stream volumes and Characteristics for future waste management facilities. Waste descriptions must be as complete as-possible to ensure adequate treatment, storage, and disposal capability will exist. The ICD also facilitates integration of existing or planned waste management capabilities of the PUREX. Transition and Solid Waste Disposal divisions. The ICD does not impact or affect the existing processes or procedures for shipping, packaging, or approval for shipping wastes by generators to the Solid Waste Division

  7. Solvent extraction: SEPHIS III. A simulation code for the 'PUREX' process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The general structure of a simulation program for the PUREX process (SEPHIS III) applicable to the evaluation of multicomponents extraction processes between aqueous solutions and organic solvents is presented in detail. Particular attention is given to the inclusion, in the mentioned code, of the concept of 'stage Hausen efficiency' (not included in the original version of the same), required for the evaluation of the obtained results in the extraction cycles tests program at the LPR (Radiochemical Processes Laboratory) plant. (Author)

  8. Flywheel Energy Storage for Automotive Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Hedlund

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A review of flywheel energy storage technology was made, with a special focus on the progress in automotive applications. We found that there are at least 26 university research groups and 27 companies contributing to flywheel technology development. Flywheels are seen to excel in high-power applications, placing them closer in functionality to supercapacitors than to batteries. Examples of flywheels optimized for vehicular applications were found with a specific power of 5.5 kW/kg and a specific energy of 3.5 Wh/kg. Another flywheel system had 3.15 kW/kg and 6.4 Wh/kg, which can be compared to a state-of-the-art supercapacitor vehicular system with 1.7 kW/kg and 2.3 Wh/kg, respectively. Flywheel energy storage is reaching maturity, with 500 flywheel power buffer systems being deployed for London buses (resulting in fuel savings of over 20%, 400 flywheels in operation for grid frequency regulation and many hundreds more installed for uninterruptible power supply (UPS applications. The industry estimates the mass-production cost of a specific consumer-car flywheel system to be 2000 USD. For regular cars, this system has been shown to save 35% fuel in the U.S. Federal Test Procedure (FTP drive cycle.

  9. Bases for PUREX deactivation safety equipment list

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides the basis and justification for changes in classification of equipment listed in WHC-SD-SEL-001 Rev 1, open-quotes PUREX Plant Safety Equipment List.close quotes The reference document will be re-issued as Rev 2 based on the DEACTIVATION mode as evaluated in this document. Systems, components, and structures are evaluated based on consequences of failure on the health and safety of the general public for Safety Class 1, the health and safety of the on-site worker for Safety Class 2, and the health and safety of the facility worker for Safety Class 3. The consequences of a failure on the environment are also addressed in this ranking based on the level of insult. The criteria for the three levels of Safety class equipment are given in Appendix I for ease of reference

  10. Gas purification facilities at Purex: Process study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michels, L.R.; Gerhart, J.M.

    1958-12-31

    This report provides a summary of the results of a process study, requested by the Atomic Energy Commission an the recovery of krypton and xenon from irradiated uranium at the Hanford Purex Plant. This request was prompted by original Commission forecasts of the expanded requirements for Krypton-85 for commercial phosphorescent signal lights and markers and for xenon isotopes of low neutron cross-section for use in liquid xenon scintillation counters, in connection with D.M.A., government and university-sponsored work. It was requested that both Hanford and Savannah River submit order of magnitude cost estimates for recovery facilities at the respective sites for three separate design cases. The cost information developed, along with market survey information obtained-through the A. D. Little Company and Department of Defense market surveys, would serve as the basis for scheduling of the Hanford and Savannah River participation in the Commission`s overall fission rare gas recovery program.

  11. Calculation code revised MIXSET for Purex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revised MIXSET is a FORTRAN IV calculation code developed to simulate steady and transient behaviors of the Purex extraction process and calculate the optimum operating condition of the process. Revised MIXSET includes all the functions of MIXSET code as shown below. a) Maximum chemical system of eight components can be handled with or without mutual dependence of the distribution of components. b) The flowrate and concentration of feed can be renewed successively at any state, transient or steady, for searching optimum operating conditions. c) Optimum inputs of feed concentrations and flowrates can be calculated to satisfy both of specification and recovery rate of a product. d) Radioactive decay reactions can be handled on each component. Besides these functions, the following chemical reactions concerned in Purex process are newly-included in Revised MIXSET code and the quantitative changes of components such as H+, U(IV), U(VI), Pu(III), Pu(IV), NH2OH, N2H4 can be simulated. 1st Gr. (i) reduction of Pu(IV); U4+ + 2Pu4+ + 2H2O → UO22+ + 2Pu3+ + 4H+. (ii) oxidation of Pu(III); 2Pu3+ + 3H+ + NO3- → 2Pu4+ + HNO2 + H2O. (iii) oxidation of U(IV); U4+ + NO3- + H2O → UO22+ + H+ + HNO2 2U4+ + O2 + 2H2O → 2UO22+ + 4H+. (iv) decomposition of HNO2; HNO2 + N2H5+ → HN3 + 2H2O + H+. (author)

  12. Stabilization of Pu and Np valences in Purex process: problems and outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the trends for improving the Purex-process involves the development of new methods of Pu and Np valence regulation. The application of salt-free chemical reagents of the organic nature that simultaneously have the properties of reductants and stabilizers-anti-nitrites will allow the mutual U, Pu and Np separation processes to be implemented in a more flexible way, a reduction in the amount of non-vaporizable compounds in liquid waste and an improvement of the safety level of the SNF reprocessing process. The electrochemical method commercially used in the operation of the U and Pu separation at the RT-1 plant (Russia) is an actual alternative to the traditional chemical methods of Pu and Np reduction and oxidation in the Purex-process. (author)

  13. Nanomaterials for Hydrogen Storage Applications: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael U. Niemann

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials have attracted great interest in recent years because of the unusual mechanical, electrical, electronic, optical, magnetic and surface properties. The high surface/volume ratio of these materials has significant implications with respect to energy storage. Both the high surface area and the opportunity for nanomaterial consolidation are key attributes of this new class of materials for hydrogen storage devices. Nanostructured systems including carbon nanotubes, nano-magnesium based hydrides, complex hydride/carbon nanocomposites, boron nitride nanotubes, TiS2/MoS2 nanotubes, alanates, polymer nanocomposites, and metal organic frameworks are considered to be potential candidates for storing large quantities of hydrogen. Recent investigations have shown that nanoscale materials may offer advantages if certain physical and chemical effects related to the nanoscale can be used efficiently. The present review focuses the application of nanostructured materials for storing atomic or molecular hydrogen. The synergistic effects of nanocrystalinity and nanocatalyst doping on the metal or complex hydrides for improving the thermodynamics and hydrogen reaction kinetics are discussed. In addition, various carbonaceous nanomaterials and novel sorbent systems (e.g. carbon nanotubes, fullerenes, nanofibers, polyaniline nanospheres and metal organic frameworks etc. and their hydrogen storage characteristics are outlined.

  14. Ethanol as radon storage: applications for measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ethanol as Radon Storage: Applications for Measurement Ethanol has a solubility for radon of 6 Bq/l per kBq/m3 air, 24 times higher than water. On filtration of ethanol, radon decay products are completely adsorbed on glass fiber filters, as previously reported for water. Hence: 1. A new simple method for measuring radon in soil air, without expensive equipment. 2. The production of mailable radon calibration sources ('radonol') with 50-100 kBq/l in PET-bottles with 3.8 days half-life, using uraniferous rocks as primary source. (orig.)

  15. Main characteristic of high level solid wastes from the head-end of the Purex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulls and dissolution residues are the main high-level radioactive wastes recovered at the head end of the Purex process. Transuranium element content of these solid wastes will define management, conditioning and storage. Following laboratory results actual wastes from the La Hague reprocessing plant UP2 are characterized. Results of the Coquenstock operation: characterization of whole assembly hulls produced by industrial reprocessing of PWR fuels are examined after cutting and dissolution at the HAO plant (high activity oxide). For fines or dissolution residues laboratory results are described and compared to those obtained recently with HAO plant after clarification of the solution

  16. Process for the treatment of spent TBP/Kerosene (Purex) solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This process was developed by NUKEM GmbH in the years from 1978 to 1980. A scale 1:1 pilot plant was constructed at NUKEM's R and D-facilities and successfully tested over a period of approximately 5000 operating hours. The process has proven to be a simple, easy to handle and to control possibility for the treatment of PUREX solvents. The solid product from this process, a free flowing ash consisting mainly of Calciumpyrophosphates, can be solidified without any problem by cementation and meets any requirement for final storage. The handling of the process can be performed in glove box technique (reactor, ash discharge)

  17. Purex process operation and performance, 1970 Thoria Campaign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford Purex Plant fulfilled a 1970 commitment to the Atomic Energy Commission to produce 360 kilograms of high purity 233U as uranyl nitrate solution. Overall plant performance during both 1970 and 1966 confirmed the suitability of Purex for processing thorium on a campaign basis. The 1970 processing campaign, including flushing operations, is discussed with particular emphasis on problem areas. Background information on the process and equipment used is also presented. The organizations and their designations described are those existing in 1970

  18. Thermal Storage Applications Workshop. Volume 2: Contributed Papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    The solar thermal and the thermal and thermochemical energy storage programs are described as well as the technology requirements for both external (electrical) and internal (thermal, chemical) modes for energy storage in solar power plants. Specific technical issues addressed include thermal storage criteria for solar power plants interfacing with utility systems; optimal dispatch of storage for solar plants in a conventional electric grid; thermal storage/temperature tradeoffs for solar total energy systems; the value of energy storage for direct-replacement solar thermal power plants; systems analysis of storage in specific solar thermal power applications; the value of seasonal storage of solar energy; criteria for selection of the thermal storage system for a 10 MW(2) solar power plant; and the need for specific requirements by storage system development teams.

  19. Plutonium uranium extraction (PUREX) end state basis for interim operation (BIO) for surveillance and maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) was developed for the PUREX end state condition following completion of the deactivation project. The deactivation project has removed or stabilized the hazardous materials within the facility structure and equipment to reduce the hazards posed by the facility during the surveillance and maintenance (S and M) period, and to reduce the costs associated with the S and M. This document serves as the authorization basis for the PUREX facility, excluding the storage tunnels, railroad cut, and associated tracks, for the deactivated end state condition during the S and M period. The storage tunnels, and associated systems and areas, are addressed in WHC-SD-HS-SAR-001, Rev. 1, PUREX Final Safety Analysis Report. During S and M, the mission of the facility is to maintain the conditions and equipment in a manner that ensures the safety of the workers, environment, and the public. The S and M phase will continue until the final decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) project and activities are begun. Based on the methodology of DOE-STD-1027-92, Hazards Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports, the final facility hazards category is identified as hazards category This considers the remaining material inventories, form and distribution of the material, and the energies present to initiate events of concern. Given the current facility configuration, conditions, and authorized S and M activities, there are no operational events identified resulting in significant hazard to any of the target receptor groups (e.g., workers, public, environment). The only accident scenarios identified with consequences to the onsite co-located workers were based on external natural phenomena, specifically an earthquake. The dose consequences of these events are within the current risk evaluation guidelines and are consistent with the expectations for a hazards category 2

  20. Plutonium uranium extraction (PUREX) end state basis for interim operation (BIO) for surveillance and maintenance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DODD, E.N.

    1999-05-12

    This Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) was developed for the PUREX end state condition following completion of the deactivation project. The deactivation project has removed or stabilized the hazardous materials within the facility structure and equipment to reduce the hazards posed by the facility during the surveillance and maintenance (S and M) period, and to reduce the costs associated with the S and M. This document serves as the authorization basis for the PUREX facility, excluding the storage tunnels, railroad cut, and associated tracks, for the deactivated end state condition during the S and M period. The storage tunnels, and associated systems and areas, are addressed in WHC-SD-HS-SAR-001, Rev. 1, PUREX Final Safety Analysis Report. During S and M, the mission of the facility is to maintain the conditions and equipment in a manner that ensures the safety of the workers, environment, and the public. The S and M phase will continue until the final decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) project and activities are begun. Based on the methodology of DOE-STD-1027-92, Hazards Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports, the final facility hazards category is identified as hazards category This considers the remaining material inventories, form and distribution of the material, and the energies present to initiate events of concern. Given the current facility configuration, conditions, and authorized S and M activities, there are no operational events identified resulting in significant hazard to any of the target receptor groups (e.g., workers, public, environment). The only accident scenarios identified with consequences to the onsite co-located workers were based on external natural phenomena, specifically an earthquake. The dose consequences of these events are within the current risk evaluation guidelines and are consistent with the expectations for a hazards category 2

  1. Thermal storage technologies for solar industrial process heat applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, L. H.

    1979-01-01

    The state-of-the-art of thermal storage subsystems for the intermediate and high temperature (100 C to 600 C) solar industrial process heat generation is presented. Primary emphasis is focused on buffering and diurnal storage as well as total energy transport. In addition, advanced thermal storage concepts which appear promising for future solar industrial process heat applications are discussed.

  2. Application of hydrogen storage materials in the tritium technics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen storage materials have been used for the storage, purification, compress of tritium and the separation of hydrogen isotopes. The research progress in this field and the excellence of their applications in tritium technics as well as the characteristics of some typical hydrogen storage materials are introduced in brief. (authors)

  3. Calculation code MIXSET for Purex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MIXSET is a FORTRAN IV calculation code for Purex process that simulate the dynamic behavior of solvent extraction processes in mixer-settlers. Two options permit terminating dynamic phase by time or by achieving steady state. These options also permit continuing calculation successively using new inputs from a arbitrary phase. A third option permits artificial rapid close to steady state and a fourth option permits searching optimum input to satisfy both of specification and recovery rate of product. MIXSET handles maximum chemical system of eight components with or without mutual dependence of the distribution of the components. The chemical system in MIXSET includes chemical reactions and/or decaying reaction. Distribution data can be supplied by third-power polynominal equations or tables, and kinetic data by tables or given constants. The fluctuation of the interfacial level height in settler is converted into the flow rate changes of organic and aqueous stream to follow dynamic behavior of extraction process in detail. MIXSET can be applied to flowsheet study, start up and/or shut down procedure study and real time process management in countercurrent solvent extraction processes. (auth.)

  4. Cloud-Based Storage Applications for Smart Phones: Forensic Investigation of Cloud Storage Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Ochrymowicz, Radoslaw

    2014-01-01

    The proliferation of smart phones across the globe, development of 4G network standards and its progressing implementation along with shift towards cloud computing bring risks to smart phone users who avail of these service. Security of cloud storage mobile applications should be essential to smart phone users. Enterprises’ move to huge data centres and availing of their infrastructure, platform and service is an advantage but poses a risk. Users use corporate resources managed and administer...

  5. Value of Energy Storage for Grid Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denholm, P.; Jorgenson, J.; Hummon, M.; Jenkin, T.; Palchak, D.; Kirby, B.; Ma, O.; O' Malley, M.

    2013-05-01

    This analysis evaluates several operational benefits of electricity storage, including load-leveling, spinning contingency reserves, and regulation reserves. Storage devices were simulated in a utility system in the western United States, and the operational costs of generation was compared to the same system without the added storage. This operational value of storage was estimated for devices of various sizes, providing different services, and with several sensitivities to fuel price and other factors. Overall, the results followed previous analyses that demonstrate relatively low value for load-leveling but greater value for provision of reserve services. The value was estimated by taking the difference in operational costs between cases with and without energy storage and represents the operational cost savings from deploying storage by a traditional vertically integrated utility. The analysis also estimated the potential revenues derived from a merchant storage plant in a restructured market, based on marginal system prices. Due to suppression of on-/off-peak price differentials and incomplete capture of system benefits (such as the cost of power plant starts), the revenue obtained by storage in a market setting appears to be substantially less than the net benefit provided to the system. This demonstrates some of the additional challenges for storage deployed in restructured energy markets.

  6. PUREX SAMCONS uninterruptible power supply (UPS) acceptance test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Acceptance Test Report for the PUREX Surveillance and Monitoring and Control System (SAMCONS) Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) Acceptance Test Procedure validates the operation of the UPS, all alarming and display functions and the ability of the UPS to supply power to the SAMCONS as designed. The proper installation of the PUREX SAMCONS Trailer UPS components and wiring will be systematically evaluated by performance of this procedure. Proper operation of the SAMCONS computer UPS will be verified by performance of a timed functional load test, and verification of associated alarms and trouble indications. This test procedure will be performed in the SAMCONS Trailer and will include verification of receipt of alarms at the SAMCONS computer stations. This test may be performed at any time after the completion of HNF-SD-CP-ATP-083, PUREX Surveillance and Monitoring and Control System (SAMCONS) Acceptance Test Procedure, when computer display and alarm functions have been proven to operate correctly

  7. 1997 project of the year, PUREX deactivation project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the end of 1992, the PUREX and UO3 plants were deemed no longer necessary for the defense needs of the United States. Although no longer necessary, they were very costly to maintain in their post-operation state. The DOE embarked on a deactivation strategy for these plants to reduce the costs of providing continuous surveillance of the facilities and their hazards. Deactivation of the PUREX and UO3 plants was estimated to take 5 years and cost $222.5 million and result in an annual surveillance and maintenance cost of $2 million. Deactivation of the PUREX/UO3 plants officially began on October 1, 1993. The deactivation was 15 months ahead of the original schedule and $75 million under the original cost estimate. The annual cost of surveillance and maintenance of the plants was reduced to less than $1 million

  8. PUREX Plant aggregate area management study technical baseline report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PUREX aggregate area is made up of six operable units; 200-PO-1 through 200-PO-6 and consists of liquid and solid waste disposal sites in the vicinity of, and related to, PUREX Plant operations. This report describes PUREX and its waste sites, including cribs, french drains, septic tanks and drain fields, trenches and ditches, ponds, catch tanks, settling tanks, diversion boxes, underground tank farms, and the lines and encasements that connect them. Each waste site in the aggregate area is described separately. Close relationships between waste units, such as overflow from one to another, are also discussed. This document provides a technical baseline of the aggregate area and results from an environmental investigation. This document is based upon review and evaluation of numerous Hanford Site current and historical reports, drawings and photographs, supplemented with site inspections and employee interviews. No intrusive field investigations or sampling were conducted

  9. Theme 1: fuel cycle and waste management. 1.3 the nuclear fuel cycle in the future. 1.3.1. thermal recycle of plutonium ''Ongoing industrialization of Purex'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Purex process has been developed over many years from a process supporting military programmes in the years 1940 with the emphasis on production of a single product to today sophisticated large scale commercial plants designed to separate Uranium and Plutonium as high quality products. The plants have been designed, and are operated so as to discharge minimal aerial and liquid effluents whilst at the same time minimising arisings of liquid and solid waste. The scope of the facilities includes treatment of such wastes to create a form that is suitable for interim storage prior to final disposal. Typical of such plants are Thorp at Sellafield and UP3 at Cap La Hague, where plutonium dioxide is separated for the production of Mixed Oxide Fuel (MOX). The paper demonstrates the practical application of improvements to the Purex process at an industrial scale with the constraints imposed by technical, regulatory and commercial requirements. Successful examples will be addressed which illustrate the logical progression from technical concept, strategic decision and option taking, front end engineering definition, design and initial safety approval, regulatory approval leading to effective plant implementation and proving. (author)

  10. PUREX/UO{sub 3} facilities deactivation lessons learned: History

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, M.S.

    1997-11-25

    In May 1997, a historic deactivation project at the PUREX (Plutonium URanium EXtraction) facility at the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State concluded its activities (Figure ES-1). The project work was finished at $78 million under its original budget of $222.5 million, and 16 months ahead of schedule. Closely watched throughout the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex and by the US Department of Defense for the value of its lessons learned, the PUREX Deactivation Project has become the national model for the safe transition of contaminated facilities to shut down status.

  11. PUREX/UO3 facilities deactivation lessons learned history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In May 1997, a historic deactivation project at the PUREX (Plutonium URanium EXtraction) facility at the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State concluded its activities (Figure ES-1). The project work was finished at $78 million under its original budget of $222.5 million, and 16 months ahead of schedule. Closely watched throughout the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex and by the US Department of Defense for the value of its lessons learned, the PUREX Deactivation Project has become the national model for the safe transition of contaminated facilities to shut down status

  12. Benefits and applications of modular hydroelectric pumped storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on hydroelectric pumped storage which is the only proven and most efficient technology available for energy storage. It is used by utilities to provide peak and intermediate power and to optimize overall system performance. Because of increased environmental and regulatory constraints, few acceptable sites, long schedules, and huge financial commitments, large conventional pumped storage plants, are now virtually impossible to build. As an alternative, small modular pumped storage, with project sizes ranging from 25 MW to 200 MW, was created to overcome the difficulties of conventional projects. The modular approach involves standardizing the elements of a pumped storage plant by utilizing specialized siting techniques and optimizing design, equipment, and construction. Compared with conventional pumped storage, the modular design can reduce cost and expedite schedule; reduce environmental concerns and permitting obstacles; and expand applications of energy storage on a utility's system

  13. Preliminary requirements for thermal storage subsystems in solar thermal applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copeland, R.J.

    1980-04-01

    Methodologies for the analysis of value and comparing thermal storage concepts are presented. Value is a measure of worth and is determined by the cost of conventional fuel systems. Value data for thermal storage in large solar thermal electric power applications are presented. Thermal storage concepts must be compared when all are performing the same mission. A method for doing that analysis, called the ranking index, is derived. Necessary data to use the methodology are included.

  14. Cost analysis of energy storage systems for electric utility applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhil, A. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Swaminathan, S.; Sen, R.K. [R.K. Sen & Associates, Inc., Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy, Office of Utility Technologies, the Energy Storage System Analysis and Development Department at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) conducted a cost analysis of energy storage systems for electric utility applications. The scope of the study included the analysis of costs for existing and planned battery, SMES, and flywheel energy storage systems. The analysis also identified the potential for cost reduction of key components.

  15. A thermal energy storage process for large scale electric applications

    OpenAIRE

    Desrues, T; Ruer, J; Marty, P.; Fourmigué, JF

    2009-01-01

    Abstract A new type of thermal energy storage process for large scale electric applications is presented, based on a high temperature heat pump cycle which transforms electrical energy into thermal energy and stores it inside two large regenerators, followed by a thermal engine cycle which transforms the stored thermal energy back into electrical energy. The storage principle is described, and its thermodynamic cycle is analyzed, leading to the theoretical efficiency of the storage...

  16. Multifunctional Carbon Nanostructures for Advanced Energy Storage Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiran Wang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanostructures—including graphene, fullerenes, etc.—have found applications in a number of areas synergistically with a number of other materials. These multifunctional carbon nanostructures have recently attracted tremendous interest for energy storage applications due to their large aspect ratios, specific surface areas, and electrical conductivity. This succinct review aims to report on the recent advances in energy storage applications involving these multifunctional carbon nanostructures. The advanced design and testing of multifunctional carbon nanostructures for energy storage applications—specifically, electrochemical capacitors, lithium ion batteries, and fuel cells—are emphasized with comprehensive examples.

  17. 78 FR 9687 - Prineville Energy Storage, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-11

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Prineville Energy Storage, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application..., 2012, Prineville Energy Storage, LLC, filed an application for a preliminary permit, pursuant to...-hours. Applicant Contact: Mr. Matthew Shapiro, Chief Executive Officer, Prineville Energy Storage,...

  18. 75 FR 21288 - Henry Gas Storage LLC; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-23

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Henry Gas Storage LLC; Notice of Application April 16, 2010. Take notice that on April 5, 2010, Henry Gas Storage LLC (HGS), 1010 Lamar, Suite 1720, Houston, Texas 77002, filed... Law, 2707 N. Kensington St., Arlington, Virginia 22207, at (703) 533-7638. Pursuant to Section...

  19. Building a mass storage system for physics applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IEEE Mass Storage Reference Model and forthcoming standards based on it provide a standardized architecture to facilitate designing and building mass storage systems, and standard interfaces so that hardware and software from different vendors can interoperate in providing mass storage capabilities. A key concept of this architecture is the separation of control and data flows. This separation allows a smaller machine to provide control functions, while the data can flow directly between high-performance channels. Another key concept is the layering of the file system and the storage functions. This layering allows the designers of the mass storage system to focus on storage functions, which can support a variety of file systems, such as the Network File System, the Andrew File System, and others. The mass storage system provides location-independent file naming, essential if files are to be migrated to different storage devices without requiring changes in application programs. Physics data analysis applications are particularly challenging for mass storage systems because they stream vast amounts of data through analysis applications. Special mechanisms are required, to handle the high data rates and to avoid upsetting the caching mechanisms commonly used for smaller, repetitive-use files. High data rates are facilitated by direct channel connections, where, for example, a dual-ported drive will be positioned by the mass storage controller on one channel, then the data will flow on a second channel directly into the user machine, or directly to a high capacity network, greatly reducing the I/O capacity required in the mass storage control computer. Intelligent storage allocation can be used to bypass the cache devices entirely when large files are being moved

  20. Sampling and Analysis Plan for PUREX canyon vessel flushing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sampling and analysis plan is necessary to provide direction for the sampling and analytical activities determined by the data quality objectives. This document defines the sampling and analysis necessary to support the deactivation of the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) facility vessels that are regulated pursuant to Washington Administrative Code 173-303

  1. PUREX/UO{sub 3} deactivation project management plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washenfelder, D.J.

    1993-12-01

    From 1955 through 1990, the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant (PUREX) provided the United States Department of Energy Hanford Site with nuclear fuel reprocessing capability. It operated in sequence with the Uranium Trioxide (UO{sub 3}) Plant, which converted the PUREX liquid uranium nitrate product to solid UO{sub 3} powder. Final UO{sub 3} Plant operation ended in 1993. In December 1992, planning was initiated for the deactivation of PUREX and UO{sub 3} Plant. The objective of deactivation planning was to identify the activities needed to establish a passively safe, environmentally secure configuration at both plants, and ensure that the configuration could be retained during the post-deactivation period. The PUREX/UO{sub 3} Deactivation Project management plan represents completion of the planning efforts. It presents the deactivation approach to be used for the two plants, and the supporting technical, cost, and schedule baselines. Deactivation activities concentrate on removal, reduction, and stabilization of the radioactive and chemical materials remaining at the plants, and the shutdown of the utilities and effluents. When deactivation is completed, the two plants will be left unoccupied and locked, pending eventual decontamination and decommissioning. Deactivation is expected to cost $233.8 million, require 5 years to complete, and yield $36 million in annual surveillance and maintenance cost savings.

  2. PUREX/UO3 deactivation project management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From 1955 through 1990, the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant (PUREX) provided the United States Department of Energy Hanford Site with nuclear fuel reprocessing capability. It operated in sequence with the Uranium Trioxide (UO3) Plant, which converted the PUREX liquid uranium nitrate product to solid UO3 powder. Final UO3 Plant operation ended in 1993. In December 1992, planning was initiated for the deactivation of PUREX and UO3 Plant. The objective of deactivation planning was to identify the activities needed to establish a passively safe, environmentally secure configuration at both plants, and ensure that the configuration could be retained during the post-deactivation period. The PUREX/UO3 Deactivation Project management plan represents completion of the planning efforts. It presents the deactivation approach to be used for the two plants, and the supporting technical, cost, and schedule baselines. Deactivation activities concentrate on removal, reduction, and stabilization of the radioactive and chemical materials remaining at the plants, and the shutdown of the utilities and effluents. When deactivation is completed, the two plants will be left unoccupied and locked, pending eventual decontamination and decommissioning. Deactivation is expected to cost $233.8 million, require 5 years to complete, and yield $36 million in annual surveillance and maintenance cost savings

  3. Waste Feed Delivery Purex Process Connector Design Pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BRACKENBURY, P.J.

    2000-04-11

    The pressure retaining capability of the PUREX process connector is documented. A context is provided for the connector's current use within existing Projects. Previous testing and structural analyses campaigns are outlined. The deficient condition of the current inventory of connectors and assembly wrenches is highlighted. A brief history of the connector is provided. A bibliography of pertinent references is included.

  4. Twelve Principles for Green Energy Storage in Grid Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbabzadeh, Maryam; Johnson, Jeremiah X; Keoleian, Gregory A; Rasmussen, Paul G; Thompson, Levi T

    2016-01-19

    The introduction of energy storage technologies to the grid could enable greater integration of renewables, improve system resilience and reliability, and offer cost effective alternatives to transmission and distribution upgrades. The integration of energy storage systems into the electrical grid can lead to different environmental outcomes based on the grid application, the existing generation mix, and the demand. Given this complexity, a framework is needed to systematically inform design and technology selection about the environmental impacts that emerge when considering energy storage options to improve sustainability performance of the grid. To achieve this, 12 fundamental principles specific to the design and grid application of energy storage systems are developed to inform policy makers, designers, and operators. The principles are grouped into three categories: (1) system integration for grid applications, (2) the maintenance and operation of energy storage, and (3) the design of energy storage systems. We illustrate the application of each principle through examples published in the academic literature, illustrative calculations, and a case study with an off-grid application of vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs). In addition, trade-offs that can emerge between principles are highlighted. PMID:26629882

  5. Feasibility studies on the decontamination of caesium-137 in purex process streams by use of inorganic ion exchanger ammonium molybdo phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the purex process condensate streams it is essential to bring down the gamma activity due to 137Cs to an acceptable limit prior to its discharge. Application of the inorganic ion exchanger micro cystal salt of heteropoly acid ammonium molybdo phosphate has been investigated. (author). 7 refs

  6. Analysis of residual organic materials in aqueous radioactive streams from the Purex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New solid phase extraction methods have been developed to allow determination of residual normal paraffin hydrocarbon (NPH) and tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) in aqueous radioactive streams from the Purex process. The techniques concentrate organic materials and separate them from radioactive species for analysis by gas chromatography. TBP and NPH have good radiolytic and chemical stability and have low aqueous solubility. However, they can contaminate aqueous streams and cause processing difficulties. Knowledge of the concentration of organic materials in aqueous waste is useful in assessing impact on pollution control equipment. The storage quality of diluent-washed aqueous plutonium product solution can be determined by a gas chromatographic analysis for residual TBP. 4 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs

  7. Borehole data package for well 699-37-47A, PUREX Plant Cribs, CY 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new groundwater monitoring well (699-37-47A) was installed in 1996 as a downgradient well near the PUREX Plant Cribs Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facility at Hanford. This document provides data from the well drilling and construction operations, as well as data from subsequent characterization of groundwater and sediment samples collected during the drilling process. The data include: well construction documentation, geologist's borehole logs, results of laboratory analysis of groundwater samples collected during drilling and of physical tests conducted on sediment samples collected during drilling, borehole geophysics, and results of aquifer testing including slug tests and flowmeter analysis. This well (699-37-47A) was constructed in support of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) milestone M-24-00H and interim milestone M-24-35 (Ecology et al. 1994), and was funded under Project W-152

  8. Spark Discharge Generated Nanoparticles for Hydrogen Storage Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vons, V.A.

    2010-01-01

    One of the largest obstacles to the large scale application of hydrogen powered fuel cell vehicles is the absence of hydrogen storage methods suitable for application on-board of these vehicles. Metal hydrides are materials in which hydrogen is reversibly absorbed by one or more metals or combinatio

  9. Electrochemical supercapacitors for energy storage and delivery fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Aiping

    2013-01-01

    Although recognized as an important component of all energy storage and conversion technologies, electrochemical supercapacitators (ES) still face development challenges in order to reach their full potential. A thorough examination of development in the technology during the past decade, Electrochemical Supercapacitors for Energy Storage and Delivery: Fundamentals and Applications provides a comprehensive introduction to the ES from technical and practical aspects and crystallization of the technology, detailing the basics of ES as well as its components and characterization techniques. The b

  10. An Isotope-Powered Thermal Storage unit for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisano, Michael E.; Rose, M. F.

    1991-01-01

    An Isotope-Powered Thermal Storage Unit (ITSU), that would store and utilize heat energy in a 'pulsed' fashion in space operations, is described. Properties of various radioisotopes are considered in conjunction with characteristics of thermal energy storage materials, to evaluate possible implementation of such a device. The utility of the unit is discussed in light of various space applications, including rocket propulsion, power generation, and spacecraft thermal management.

  11. Chemical behavior of degradation products of tributylphosphate in purex reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical behavior of butyl nitrate/butyl alcohol, degradation products from dealkylation of tri-n-butylphosphate(TBP) in PUREX reprocessing, which has not so far been reported, was investigated. No accumulation of those compounds in the organic phase of TBP(30%)-dodecane was observed in any separation cycle of PUREX despite the fact that the apparent distribution of the compounds lies to the organic phase at their high concentrations. The distribution of butyl nitrate/butyl alcohol between organic/aqueous phases is found to be dependent on their concentrations and on nitric acid concentration, which could explain the above phenomena. Only butyl nitrate of the above two compounds was slightly detected in the organic streams. It is probable from this investigation that butyl nitrate is removed into aqueous waste stream primarily through alkali scrubber

  12. The chemistry of technetium in the PUREX process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behaviour of the element technetium in the PUREX-process has been investigated. Pertechnetate ion is reduced to tetravalent technetium, TcO2+, by hydrazine in acidic aqueous solution. The autocatalytic reduction shows the rate constant k2 = 11 L x M-1 x min-1. The rate constant for the initial reduction is k1 = 3.3x10-4 L2 x M-2 x min-1. After the almost quantitative reduction of Tc(VII) a complicated oxidation of the hydrazine begins accompanied by the slow reoxidation of the tetravalent technetium to TcO4. A large amount of tetravalent technetium remains stable in the acidic solution for several years. The TcO2+ ion was identified by absorption spectroscopy and EPR techniques. Its behaviour was studied under experimental conditions of the PUREX-process. (orig./RB)

  13. PUREX/UO3 facilities deactivation lessons learned history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility operated from 1956-1972, from 1983-1988, and briefly during 1989-1990 to produce for national defense at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The Uranium Trioxide (UO3) Facility operated at the Hanford Site from 1952-1972, 1984-1988, and briefly in 1993. Both plants were ordered to permanent shutdown by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in December 1992, thus initiating their deactivation phase. Deactivation is that portion of a facility's life cycle that occurs between operations and final decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D). This document details the history of events, and the lessons learned, from the time of the PUREX Stabilization Campaign in 1989-1990, through the end of the first full fiscal year (FY) of the deactivation project (September 30, 1994)

  14. Spectrophotometric estimation of uranium in PUREX process samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple and quick method of uranium estimation from PUREX process aqueous stream samples has been field tested for concentration range of 1g/L to 50 g/L. Method involves minimum dilution of sample aliquot with 1 M Na2CO3 (with 3% EDTA) solution followed by absorbance measurement. Molar absorbance coefficient observed is 26.42 L.mole-1cm-1. Precision and accuracy of the method is about 2%. (author)

  15. Review on the Distributed Energy Storage Technology in the Application of the Micro Network

    OpenAIRE

    Huang Qiyuan; Wang Zhijie; Zhu Jun; Wang Dongwei; Du Bin

    2015-01-01

    This paper summarized the application process of energy storage technology in the micro-grid, elaborated on the development of energy storage technology concisely, and illustrated the roles of battery energy storage, flywheel energy storage, superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES), super capacitor energy storage and other energy storage and so on in micro-hybrid. Then it compared the performances of some sorts of the storage method. As characteristics and actual demands of micro-grid w...

  16. Flowsheet for shear/leach processing of N Reactor fuel at PUREX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enghusen, M.B.

    1995-04-13

    This document was originally prepared to support the restart of the PUREX plant using a new Shear/Leach head end process. However, the PUREX facility was shutdown and processing of the remaining N Reactor fuel is no longer considered an alternative for fuel disposition. This document is being issued for reference only to document the activities which were investigated to incorporate the shear/leach process in the PUREX plant.

  17. Flowsheet for shear/leach processing of N Reactor fuel at PUREX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document was originally prepared to support the restart of the PUREX plant using a new Shear/Leach head end process. However, the PUREX facility was shutdown and processing of the remaining N Reactor fuel is no longer considered an alternative for fuel disposition. This document is being issued for reference only to document the activities which were investigated to incorporate the shear/leach process in the PUREX plant

  18. Test profiles for stationary energy-storage applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, P. C.; Cole, J. F.; Taylor, P. A.

    Evaluation of battery and other energy-storage technologies for stationary uses is progressing rapidly toward application-specific testing. This testing uses computer-based data acquisition and control equipment, active electronic loads and power supplies, and customized software, to enable sophisticated test regimes which simulate actual use conditions. These simulated-use tests provide more accurate performance and life evaluations than simple constant resistance or current testing regimes. Several organizations are cooperating to develop simulated-use tests for utility-scale storage systems, especially battery energy-storage systems (BESSs). Some of the tests use stepped constant-power charge and discharge regimes to simulate conditions created by electric utility applications such as frequency regulation (FR) and spinning reserve (SR). Other test profiles under development simulate conditions for the energy-storage component of remote-area power supplies (RAPSs) which include renewable and/or fossil-fuelled generators. Various RAPS applications have unique sets of service conditions that require specialized test profiles. Almost all RAPS tests and many tests that represent other stationary applications need, however, to simulate significant time periods that storage devices operate at low-to-medium states-of-charge without full recharge. Consideration of these and similar issues in simulated-use test regimes is necessary to predict effectively the responses of the various types of batteries in specific stationary applications. This paper describes existing and evolving stationary applications for energy-storage technologies and test regimes which are designed to simulate them. The paper also discusses efforts to develop international testing standards.

  19. Biophotopol: A Sustainable Photopolymer for Holographic Data Storage Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Beléndez

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Photopolymers have proved to be useful for different holographic applications such as holographic data storage or holographic optical elements. However, most photopolymers have certain undesirable features, such as the toxicity of some of their components or their low environmental compatibility. For this reason, the Holography and Optical Processing Group at the University of Alicante developed a new dry photopolymer with low toxicity and high thickness called biophotopol, which is very adequate for holographic data storage applications. In this paper we describe our recent studies on biophotopol and the main characteristics of this material.

  20. Current and future applications of vault dry storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dry storage of irradiated nuclear fuel for a medium term period, either at the reactor site or at an away-from reactor site, provides a buffer in the nuclear fuel cycle that allows the final disposal options to be established. At some time in the future the disposal option decision will have to be taken as storage is only an interim solution and not a final disposal option in itself. The Modular Vault Dry Store (MVDS) is a licensed vertical concrete vault dry fuel store technology that is available for the interim storage of nuclear materials. This paper will describe the design, development and recent applications of the vault dry store technology and present a review of the future applications. (author)

  1. Overview of Energy Storage Technologies for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surampudi, Subbarao

    2006-01-01

    This presentations gives an overview of the energy storage technologies that are being used in space applications. Energy storage systems have been used in 99% of the robotic and human space missions launched since 1960. Energy storage is used in space missions to provide primary electrical power to launch vehicles, crew exploration vehicles, planetary probes, and astronaut equipment; store electrical energy in solar powered orbital and surface missions and provide electrical energy during eclipse periods; and, to meet peak power demands in nuclear powered rovers, landers, and planetary orbiters. The power source service life (discharge hours) dictates the choice of energy storage technology (capacitors, primary batteries, rechargeable batteries, fuel cells, regenerative fuel cells, flywheels). NASA is planning a number of robotic and human space exploration missions for the exploration of space. These missions will require energy storage devices with mass and volume efficiency, long life capability, an the ability to operate safely in extreme environments. Advanced energy storage technologies continue to be developed to meet future space mission needs.

  2. Fuel Receiving and Storage Station. License application, amendment 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amendment No. 7 to Allied-General Nuclear Services application for licensing of the Fuel Receiving and Storage Station consists of revised pages for: Amendment No. 7 to AG-L 105, ''Technical Description in Support of Application for FRSS Operation''; Amendment No. 1 to AG-L 105A, ''Early Operation of the Service Concentrator''; and Amendment No. 2 to AG-L 110, ''FRSS Summary Preoperational Report.''

  3. Software Application for Storage Devices Data Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciprian Munteanu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of a simple Windows authentication password is not always enough to ensure protection and confidentiality of the data stored on user’s workstations. In this paper we propose and implement an encrypted file system. The proposed solution is based on creating and using encrypted volumes embedded (stored on a physical partition. The encrypted volumes act as virtual drives which offer the user the impression that he’s working with a normal physical partition. Security of the password and the encrypted volumes’ portability are ensured by the developed application.

  4. Third international workshop on ice storage for cooling applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorski, A.J. (comp.)

    1986-04-01

    The third international workshop on ice storage for cooling applications which was informal and interactive in nature, was open to persons interested in all ice-growing technologies and in ice storage, both seasonal and diurnal. Presentations were made on some 20 topics, ranging from freezers in Alaska to ice cooling of commercial jet aircraft. Workshop tours included visits to ice-storage systems at Commonwealth Edison's facilities in Bolingbrook and Des Plaines Valley, the A.C. Neilsen builing in Northbrook, and the new State of Illinois Center in Chicago. The first workshop in the present series considered the future of ice storage and predicted applications in the agricultural sector, desalinization, and commercial ice production. Progress has been rapid in the intervening two years, and an important topic at the third workshop was the possible use of ''warm ices'' (clathrate hydrates) for energy storage. This report consists primarily of abstracts of presentations made at the workshop. Persons wishing to obtain further information about particular papers should contact the speakers directly; speakers' addresses and telephone numbers are listed in this report.

  5. Grapefruit gland oil composition is affected by wax application, storage temperature, and storage time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, D; Petracek, P D

    1999-05-01

    The effect of wax application, storage temperature (4 or 21 degrees C), and storage time (14 or 28 days after wax application) on grapefruit gland oil composition was examined by capillary gas chromatography. Wax application decreases nonanal and nootkatone levels. beta-Pinene, alpha-phellandrene, 3-carene, ocimene, octanol, trans-linalool oxide, and cis-p-mentha-2,8-dien-1-ol levels increase, but limonene levels decrease, with temperature. Levels of alpha-pinene, limonene, linalool, citronellal, alpha-terpineol, neral, dodecanal, and alpha-humulene decrease with time. Levels of alpha-phellandrene, 3-carene, ocimene, and trans-linalool oxide increase with time. No compound level was affected by the interactive action of temperature and wax application, suggesting that these two factors cause grapefruit oil gland collapse (postharvest pitting) through means other than changing gland oil composition. Compounds that are toxic to the Caribbean fruit fly (alpha-pinene, limonene, alpha-terpineol, and some aldehydes) decrease with time, thus suggesting grapefruit becomes increasingly susceptible to the fly during storage. PMID:10552497

  6. Storage, transportation, and atomization of CWF for residential applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimanis, M.P.; Breault, R.W. (TECOGEN, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States)); Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C. (AMAX Research and Development Center, Golden, CO (United States))

    1991-11-01

    This project investigated the properties and behavior with regard to handling, storage, and atomization in small-scale applications of different CWFs (coal water fuels) prepared from different parent coals and various beneficiation techniques as well as consideration for bulk storage and distribution. The CWFs that were prepared included Upper Elkhorn No. 3, Illinois No. 6, and Upper Wyodak coal cleaned by heavy media separation. Also, several CWFs were prepared with Upper Elkhorn No. 3 coal cleaned by heavy media separation with filtration, chemical cleaning, oil agglomeration, and froth flotation.

  7. FLYWHEEL ENERGY STORAGE SYSTEMS WITH SUPERCONDUCTING BEARINGS FOR UTILITY APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Michael Strasik; Mr. Arthur Day; Mr. Philip Johnson; Dr. John Hull

    2007-10-26

    This project’s mission was to achieve significant advances in the practical application of bulk high-temperature superconductor (HTS) materials to energy-storage systems. The ultimate product was planned as an operational prototype of a flywheel system on an HTS suspension. While the final prototype flywheel did not complete the final offsite demonstration phase of the program, invaluable lessons learned were captured on the laboratory demonstration units that will lead to the successful deployment of a future HTS-stabilized, composite-flywheel energy-storage system (FESS).

  8. Chemical interaction matrix between reagents in a Purex based process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is the responsible entity for the disposal of the United States excess weapons grade plutonium. DOE selected a PUREX-based process to convert plutonium to low-enriched mixed oxide fuel for use in commercial nuclear power plants. To initiate this process in the United States, a Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) is under construction and will be operated by Shaw AREVA MOX Services at the Savannah River Site. This facility will be licensed and regulated by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). A PUREX process, similar to the one used at La Hague, France, will purify plutonium feedstock through solvent extraction. MFFF employs two major process operations to manufacture MOX fuel assemblies: (1) the Aqueous Polishing (AP) process to remove gallium and other impurities from plutonium feedstock and (2) the MOX fuel fabrication process (MP), which processes the oxides into pellets and manufactures the MOX fuel assemblies. The AP process consists of three major steps, dissolution, purification, and conversion, and is the center of the primary chemical processing. A study of process hazards controls has been initiated that will provide knowledge and protection against the chemical risks associated from mixing of reagents over the life time of the process. This paper presents a comprehensive chemical interaction matrix evaluation for the reagents used in the PUREX-based process. Chemical interaction matrix supplements the process conditions by providing a checklist of any potential inadvertent chemical reactions that may take place. It also identifies the chemical compatibility/incompatibility of the reagents if mixed by failure of operations or equipment within the process itself or mixed inadvertently by a technician in the laboratories. (authors)

  9. Ruthenium determination in synthetic Purex waste solutions by AAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for the determination of ruthenium in synthetic Purex waste solutions by flame AAS is described. With the usual flames and a lanthanum buffer, only cerium interference in the air-acetylene flame need be considered under the conditions applied. Ruthenium nitrosyl nitrate, ruthenium(IV) hydroxychloride and alkaline ruthenate samples gave identical results, showing that the extraordinarily stable Ru-NO bond does not hinder atomization. The preparation and standardization of the ruthenium nitrosyl solutions, and the alkaline fusion, are briefly described. (author)

  10. Experimental purex flowsheet studies of small scale pulsed columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the MINKA installation consisting of three pulsed sieve plate columns, joint extractional behaviour of U and Pu under conditions, greatly differing from the standard ones for the cycle of joint purification in the purex process, is investigated. The content of uranium and plutonium in the initial solution constituted 256 g/l and 2.31 g/l respectively, concentration NHO3 - 2.96 M; extraction was realied by 30% TBP. Concentrational profiles of U and Pu at different flow rate ratios are presented. It is shown that plutonium losses depend on the ratio of flow rates. 3 refs.; 3 figs

  11. PUREX/UO3 Facilities deactivation lessons learned history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, M.S.

    1996-09-19

    Disconnecting the criticality alarm permanently in June 1996 signified that the hazards in the PUREX (plutonium-uranium extraction) plant had been so removed and reduced that criticality was no longer a credible event. Turning off the PUREX criticality alarm also marked a salient point in a historic deactivation project, 1 year before its anticipated conclusion. The PUREX/UO3 Deactivation Project began in October 1993 as a 5-year, $222.5- million project. As a result of innovations implemented during 1994 and 1995, the project schedule was shortened by over a year, with concomitant savings. In 1994, the innovations included arranging to send contaminated nitric acid from the PUREX Plant to British Nuclear Fuels, Limited (BNFL) for reuse and sending metal solutions containing plutonium and uranium from PUREX to the Hanford Site tank farms. These two steps saved the project $36.9- million. In 1995, reductions in overhead rate, work scope, and budget, along with curtailed capital equipment expenditures, reduced the cost another $25.6 million. These savings were achieved by using activity-based cost estimating and applying technical schedule enhancements. In 1996, a series of changes brought about under the general concept of ``reengineering`` reduced the cost approximately another $15 million, and moved the completion date to May 1997. With the total savings projected at about $75 million, or 33.7 percent of the originally projected cost, understanding how the changes came about, what decisions were made, and why they were made becomes important. At the same time sweeping changes in the cultural of the Hanford Site were taking place. These changes included shifting employee relations and work structures, introducing new philosophies and methods in maintaining safety and complying with regulations, using electronic technology to manage information, and, adopting new methods and bases for evaluating progress. Because these changes helped generate cost savings and were

  12. Advanced Purex process for the new French reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes the main process innovations of the new Cogema reprocessing plants of La Hague (UP3 and UP2 800). Major improvements of process like the use of rotary dissolvers and annular columns, and also entirely new processes like solvent distillation and plutonium oxidizing dissolution, yield an advanced Purex process. The results of these innovations are significant improvements for throughput, end-products purification performances and waste minimization. They contribute also to limit personnel exposure. The main results of the first three years of operation are described. (author). 3 refs., 5 figs

  13. The study of reductive reextraction of plutonium in the Purex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The methods of separation of U and Pu in the Purex process and the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of Pu(4) reductants are discussed. The kinetic equation of the process of reductive reextraction of plutonium for the first order reaction with respect to Pu(4) is derived. The kinetics of plutonium reextraction with the use of uranium (4), ascorbic acid and other reductants has been studied. The necessity of application of the stoichiometric excess of reductant has been explained by simultaneously occured reoxidation process of plutonium. The method of calculation of the steady- state plutonium concentration profiles has been elaborated for counter-current separation of U and Pu in multistage contactor. 90 refs., 20 tabs., 29 figs. (author)

  14. MOFs for storage of natural gas in mobile applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marx, S.; Arnold, L.; Gaab, M.; Maurer, S.; Weickert, M.; Mueller, U. [BASF SE, Ludwigshafen (Germany); Gummaraju, R.; SantaMaria, M.; Wilson, K.; Garbotz, C.; Lynch, J. [BASF Corporation, Iselin, NJ (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are supposed to have high potential in gas storage, particular in the storage of natural gas (NG) for mobile applications. Due to the shale gas exploration and the cost advantage of natural gas on the North American market as well as the environmental benign behavior upon combustion, storage of gaseous fuels will become more important for future mobility. The main challenge with all gaseous fuels is the limited range of the fuel stored on board of a vehicle. Instead of increasing the pressure in the tank, which would lead to heavy tanks and high compression costs, MOFs might help to improve the energy density of the gas stored in a tank resulting in an increased driving distance or reduced space needed for the gas tanks. (orig.)

  15. TBP and diluent mass balances in the PUREX Plant at Hanford, 1955--1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to develop an estimate of the quantities of tributyl phosphate and diluent discharged in aqueous waste streams to the tank farms from the Hanford Purex Plant over its operating life. Purex was not the sole source of organics in the tank farms, but was a major contributor. Tributyl phosphate (TBP) and diluent, which changed from Shell E-2342 reg-sign to Soltrol-170 reg-sign and then to normal paraffin hydrocarbon (NPH), were organic chemicals used in the Purex solvent extraction process at Hanford to separate plutonium and uranium from spent nuclear fuels. This report is an estimate of the material balances for these chemicals in the Purex Plant at Hanford over its entire operating life. The Purex Plant had cold start up in November 1955 and shut down in 1990. It's process used a solution of 30 vol% TBP in diluent

  16. Application of Cloud Storage on BIM Life-cycle Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lieyun Ding

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Because of its high information intensity, strong consistency and convenient visualization features, building information modelling (BIM has received widespread attention in the fields of construction and project management. However, due to large amounts of information, high integration, the need for resource sharing between various departments, the long time-span of the BIM application, challenges relating to data interoperability, security and cost all slow down the adoption of BIM. This paper constructs a BIM cloud storage concept system using cloud storage, an advanced computer technology, to solve the problem of mass data processing, information security, and cost problems in the existing application of BIM to full life-cycle management. This system takes full advantage of the cloud storage technique. Achievements are reached in four areas of BIM information management, involving security and licensing management, file management, work process management and collaborative management. The system expands the time and space scales, improves the level of participation, and reduces the cost of BIM. The construction of the BIM cloud storage system is one of the most important directions of the development of BIM, which benefits the promotion and further development of BIM to better serve construction and engineering project management.

  17. Review on the Distributed Energy Storage Technology in the Application of the Micro Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Qiyuan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarized the application process of energy storage technology in the micro-grid, elaborated on the development of energy storage technology concisely, and illustrated the roles of battery energy storage, flywheel energy storage, superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES, super capacitor energy storage and other energy storage and so on in micro-hybrid. Then it compared the performances of some sorts of the storage method. As characteristics and actual demands of micro-grid work were given full into consideration, the current micro-grid energy storage technology research problems and development trend in the future were pointed out.

  18. Conducting Polymer Nanostructures: Template Synthesis and Applications in Energy Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijia Pan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Conducting polymer nanostructures have received increasing attention in both fundamental research and various application fields in recent decades. Compared with bulk conducting polymers, conducting polymer nanostructures are expected to display improved performance in energy storage because of the unique properties arising from their nanoscaled size: high electrical conductivity, large surface area, short path lengths for the transport of ions, and high electrochemical activity. Template methods are emerging for a sort of facile, efficient, and highly controllable synthesis of conducting polymer nanostructures. This paper reviews template synthesis routes for conducting polymer nanostructures, including soft and hard template methods, as well as its mechanisms. The application of conducting polymer mesostructures in energy storage devices, such as supercapacitors and rechargeable batteries, are discussed.

  19. Technology Roadmaps: Carbon Capture and Storage in Industrial Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    A new technology roadmap on Carbon Capture and Storage in Industrial Applications, released today in Beijing, shows that carbon capture and storage (CCS) has the potential to reduce CO2 emissions from industrial applications by 4 gigatonnes in 2050. Such an amount is equal to roughly one-tenth of the total emission cuts needed from the energy sector by the middle of the century. This requires a rapid deployment of CCS technologies in various industrial sectors, and across both OECD and non-OECD countries. The roadmap, a joint report from the International Energy Agency (IEA) and the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO), says that over 1800 industrial-scale projects are required over the next 40 years.

  20. Biophotopol: A Sustainable Photopolymer for Holographic Data Storage Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Augusto Beléndez; Inmaculada Pascual; Andrés Márquez; Cristian Neipp; Manuel Ortuño; Sergi Gallego

    2012-01-01

    Photopolymers have proved to be useful for different holographic applications such as holographic data storage or holographic optical elements. However, most photopolymers have certain undesirable features, such as the toxicity of some of their components or their low environmental compatibility. For this reason, the Holography and Optical Processing Group at the University of Alicante developed a new dry photopolymer with low toxicity and high thickness called biophotopol, which is very adeq...

  1. Zirconium and technetium recovery and partitioning in the presence of actinides in modified Purex process for ATW program. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzekun, E.G.; Fedorov, Y.S.; Galkin, B.Y.; Lyubtsev, R.I.; Mashkin, A.N.; Mishin, E.N.; Zilberman, B.Y. [Radievyj Inst., Leningrad (Russian Federation)

    1994-12-31

    The modified Purex process flowsheet is based on combination of all irradiated materials, their joint dissolution and reprocessing as a NPP spent fuel solution with abnormal Pu content after addition of recycled depleted U concentrate. Some groups of long-lived radionuclides could be completely recovered and localized at the stage of extraction reprocessing using 30% TBP. Studies were conducted for 10 y to develop the process for recovery, concentration, and localization of U, Pu, Np, Tc, and Zr within 1st extraction cycle. Actinides are recovered from high-level raffinate of this cycle after evaporation and feed adjustment. Results in this report show that combined deep recovery of several elements from highly irradiated materials by TBP extraction, for further transmutation, is possible. Selective stripping of Zr from solvent phase containing U, Pu, Np, and Tc is quite effective. Development of the modified Purex process is not complete; main problem to be solved should be oxide separation from the loop and permissible storage duration before reprocessing and reuse in the loop.

  2. PUMA - a new mathematical model for the rapid calculation of steady-state concentration profiles in mixer-settler extraction, partitioning, and stripping contactors using the Purex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mathematical basis for a computer code PUMA (Plutonium-Uranium-Matrix-Algorithm) is described. The code simulates steady-state concentration profiles of solvent extraction contactors used in the Purex process, directly without first generating the transient behavior. The computational times are reduced, with no loss of accuracy, by about tenfold over those required by codes that generate the steady-state profiles via transient state conditions. Previously developed codes that simulate the steady-state conditions directly are not applicable to partitioning contactors, whereas PUMA is applicable to all contactors in the Purex process. Since most difficulties are encountered with partitioning contactors when simulating steady-state profiles via transient state conditions, it is with these contactors that the greatest saving in computer times is achieved

  3. Lithium Ion Cell Development for Photovoltaic Energy Storage Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babinec, Susan [A123 Systems, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States)

    2012-02-08

    with this material will be to maintain proven performance when this composite is coated onto a thicker electrode; as well the high temperature storage must meet application requirements. One continuing program challenge was the lack of specific performance variables for this PV application and so the low power requirements of PHEV/EV transportation markets were again used.

  4. Energy Storage Applications in Power Systems with Renewable Energy Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghofrani, Mahmoud

    In this dissertation, we propose new operational and planning methodologies for power systems with renewable energy sources. A probabilistic optimal power flow (POPF) is developed to model wind power variations and evaluate the power system operation with intermittent renewable energy generation. The methodology is used to calculate the operating and ramping reserves that are required to compensate for power system uncertainties. Distributed wind generation is introduced as an operational scheme to take advantage of the spatial diversity of renewable energy resources and reduce wind power fluctuations using low or uncorrelated wind farms. The POPF is demonstrated using the IEEE 24-bus system where the proposed operational scheme reduces the operating and ramping reserve requirements and operation and congestion cost of the system as compared to operational practices available in the literature. A stochastic operational-planning framework is also proposed to adequately size, optimally place and schedule storage units within power systems with high wind penetrations. The method is used for different applications of energy storage systems for renewable energy integration. These applications include market-based opportunities such as renewable energy time-shift, renewable capacity firming, and transmission and distribution upgrade deferral in the form of revenue or reduced cost and storage-related societal benefits such as integration of more renewables, reduced emissions and improved utilization of grid assets. A power-pool model which incorporates the one-sided auction market into POPF is developed. The model considers storage units as market participants submitting hourly price bids in the form of marginal costs. This provides an accurate market-clearing process as compared to the 'price-taker' analysis available in the literature where the effects of large-scale storage units on the market-clearing prices are neglected. Different case studies are provided to

  5. Wallboard with Latent Heat Storage for Passive Solar Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kedl, R.J.

    2001-05-31

    Conventional wallboard impregnated with octadecane paraffin [melting point-23 C (73.5 F)] is being developed as a building material with latent heat storage for passive solar and other applications. Impregnation was accomplished simply by soaking the wallboard in molten wax. Concentrations of wax in the combined product as high as 35% by weight can be achieved. Scale-up of the soaking process, from small laboratory samples to full-sized 4- by 8-ft sheets, has been successfully accomplished. The required construction properties of wallboard are maintained after impregnation, that is, it can be painted and spackled. Long-term, high-temperature exposure tests and thermal cycling tests showed no tendency of the paraffin to migrate within the wallboard, and there was no deterioration of thermal energy storage capacity. In support of this concept, a computer model was developed to handle thermal transport and storage by a phase change material (PCM) dispersed in a porous media. The computer model was confirmed by comparison with known analytical solutions and also by comparison with temperatures measured in wallboard during an experimentally generated thermal transient. Agreement between the model and known solution was excellent. Agreement between the model and thermal transient was good, only after the model was modified to allow the PCM to melt over a temperature range, rather than at a specific melting point. When the melting characteristics of the PCM (melting point, melting range, and heat of fusion), as determined from a differential scanning calorimeter plot, were used in the model, agreement between the model and transient data was very good. The confirmed computer model may now be used in conjunction with a building heating and cooling code to evaluate design parameters and operational characteristics of latent heat storage wallboard for passive solar applications.

  6. The PUREX process as designated for the Wackersdorf reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Wackersdorf plant was designed on the basis of national and international experience with reprocessing plants for a throughput of 2 Mg of nuclear fuel per day. The long-proven PUREX process was adapted to local requirements and simplified by the introduction of electrolytical process stages. The amount of secondary waste was minimized by virtually complete recycling of the chemicals. For the first time in a commercial reprocessing plant, concentration of the dissolved tritium in a relatively small stream of waste water, which can be treated separately, was intended. The equipment is arranged in modules and can be remotely maintained, repaired and replaced. In this way, the exposure of the personnel to radiation is reduced to a minimum, not only during operation and maintenance, but also during repairs and decommissioning of the plant. (orig.)

  7. Spectrophotometric determination of nitrite in simulated Purex Process solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A spectrophotometric method for nitrite determination in simulated Purex Process solutions is presented, utilizing the Griess reagent for the formation of the coloured azocompound with an absorption maximum at 525 nm. Molar absortivity was 36,262 and the sensitivity of the method 10-6M for nitrite. The calibration curve is linear in the range of 2 to 30μg NO-2/25 ml in cells of 1 cm optical path. The method can be used in the presence of uranium up to limits of an U/NO-2 ratio of 150. Test solutions were prepared to simulate composition and concentrations as obtained by irradiating standard fuel with a neutro flux of 3.2 x 1013 n.s-1.cm-2, with a burn-up value of 33,000 Mwd/T and cooling time of two years. Nitrite determinations in these solutions were accurate within limits of 5%. (Author)

  8. Sludge source term (PUREX process radionuclide dose impact)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report analyzes the radionuclide dose impact of the PUREX process waste stream. The radionuclide ingestion and inhalation pathways are analyzed. Two spent fuel assemblies processed in the Separation facilities are analyzed, the Mark 31A and Mark 31B. The individual radionuclide significance to dose is evaluated in terms of dose percentage. Comparing the radionuclide individual dose value allows the determination of those radionuclides whose dose impact is significant. The results of this analysis demonstrate that a limited number of radionuclides contribute 1% or more to the total dose and that the major contributor to the sludge source dose is strontium. The results obtained permit reducing the list of radionuclides to be considered in the development of source terms to support the High Level Waste Safety Analysis Report

  9. Testing and economical evaluation of U(IV) in Purex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of uranous nitrate, U(IV), as a plutonium reductant in the Purex solvent extraction process could significantly reduce the waste generation at the Savannah River Plant. The current reductant is a ferrous sulfamate (FS)/hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN) mixture. The iron and sulfate in the FS are major contributors to waste generation. The U(IV) reductant oxidizes to U(VI) producing no waste. The Savannah River Laboratory has developed an efficient electrochemical cell for U(IV) production and has demonstrated the effectiveness of U(IV) as a plutonium reductant. Plant tests and economic analyses are currently being conducted to determine the cost effectiveness of U(IV) implementation. The results of recent studies are presented

  10. Carbon-nanostructured materials for energy generation and storage applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Linkov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed and refined a chemical vapour deposition method to synthesise nanotubes using liquid petroleum gasasthe carbonsource. The nanotubes were thoroughly characterised by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy
    X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis. The protocol to grow nanotubes was then adapted to deposit nanotubes on the surface of different substrates, which were chosen based upon how
    the substrates could be applied in various hydrogen energyconver-sion systems. Carbon nanotubes area nanostructured material with an extremely wide range of application sinvariousenergy applications. The methods outlined demonstrate the complete
    development of carbon nanotube composite materials with direct applications in hydrogen energy generation, storage and conversion.

  11. 77 FR 73651 - Cascade Energy Storage, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-11

    ... Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Cascade Energy Storage, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application..., 2012, Cascade Energy Storage, LLC, filed an application for a preliminary permit, pursuant to section 4.... Matthew Shapiro, Chief Executive Officer, Cascade Energy Storage, LLC, 1210 W. Franklin Street, Ste....

  12. 40 CFR 411.30 - Applicability; description of the materials storage piles runoff subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... materials storage piles runoff subcategory. 411.30 Section 411.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Materials Storage Piles Runoff Subcategory § 411.30 Applicability; description of the materials storage piles runoff subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from...

  13. 78 FR 58529 - Floridian Natural Gas Storage Company, LLC; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-24

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Floridian Natural Gas Storage Company, LLC; Notice of Application Take notice that on September 4, 2013, Floridian Natural Gas Storage Company, LLC (Floridian Gas Storage... application under section 7(c) of the Natural Gas Act (NGA) and Part 157 of the Commission's...

  14. A Flywheel Energy Storage System Demonstration for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Barbara H.; Kascak, Peter E.; Jansen, Ralph; Dever, Timothy

    2003-01-01

    A novel control algorithm for the charge and discharge modes of operation of a flywheel energy storage system for space applications is presented. The motor control portion of the algorithm uses sensorless field oriented control with position and speed estimates determined from a signal injection technique at low speeds and a back EMF technique at higher speeds. The charge and discharge portion of the algorithm use command feed-forward and disturbance decoupling, respectively, to achieve fast response with low gains. Simulation and experimental results are presented.

  15. Candidate thermal energy storage technologies for solar industrial process heat applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furman, E. R.

    1979-01-01

    A number of candidate thermal energy storage system elements were identified as having the potential for the successful application of solar industrial process heat. These elements which include storage media, containment and heat exchange are shown.

  16. Partitioning of actinides from acid waste solutions of the Purex process by solvent extraction and extraction chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disposal of nuclear wastes containing long-lived alpha emitters is a matter of great environmental concern. At this Centre, solvent extraction and extraction chromatographic studies are in progress with CMPO (Octyl(phenyl)N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethyl phosphine oxide) as the main extractant for the removal of actinides from Purex high active aqueous raffinate waste (HAW) and high level waste concentrate (HLW) solutions. Batch extraction studies with HAW solutions reveal that after two contacts with 0.2 M CMPO + 1.2 M TBP in dodecane, its alpha activity reduces to ∼0.2% of initial value. The CMPO loaded actinides are efficiently stripped with suitable reagents. Mixer settler experiments in progress confirm these results. Extraction chromatographic studies with CMPO impregnated Chromosorb-102 (CAC) column show higher uptakes of actinides and lanthanides as compared to other metal ions and the capacity in terms of Nd(III) is 18 mg/g of CAC at 3 M HNO3 for less than 1% breakthrough. The results indicate that CMPO based extraction chromatographic techniques have great potential for application in the removal of actinides from Purex waste streams. (author). 7 refs, 3 figs, 8 tabs

  17. Project C-018H, 242-A Evaporator/PUREX Plant Process Condensate Treatment Facility, functional design criteria. Revision 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides the Functional Design Criteria (FDC) for Project C-018H, the 242-A Evaporator and Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant Condensate Treatment Facility (Also referred to as the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility [ETF]). The project will provide the facilities to treat and dispose of the 242-A Evaporator process condensate (PC), the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant process condensate (PDD), and the PUREX Plant ammonia scrubber distillate (ASD)

  18. Project C-018H, 242-A Evaporator/PUREX Plant Process Condensate Treatment Facility, functional design criteria. Revision 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, N.

    1995-05-02

    This document provides the Functional Design Criteria (FDC) for Project C-018H, the 242-A Evaporator and Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant Condensate Treatment Facility (Also referred to as the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility [ETF]). The project will provide the facilities to treat and dispose of the 242-A Evaporator process condensate (PC), the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant process condensate (PDD), and the PUREX Plant ammonia scrubber distillate (ASD).

  19. Applications of CCTO supercapacitor in energy storage and electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Pandey

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of colossal dielectric constant in CCTO supercapacitor in 2000, development of its practical application to energy storage has been of great interest. In spite of intensive efforts, there has been thus far, no report of proven application. The object of this research is to understand the reason for this lack of success and to find ways to overcome this limitation. Reported herein is the synthesis of our research in ceramic processing of this material and its characterization, particularly with the objective of identifying potential applications. Experimental results have shown that CCTO's permittivity and loss tangent, the two most essential dielectric parameters of fundamental importance for the efficiency of a capacitor device, are intrinsically coupled. They increase or decrease in tandem. Therefore, efforts to simultaneously retain the high permittivity while minimizing the loss tangent of CCTO might not succeed unless an entirely non-typical approach is taken for processing this material. Based on the experimental results and their analysis, it has been identified that it is possible to produce CCTO bulk ceramics with conventional processes having properties that can be exploited for fabricating an efficient energy storage device (EDS. We have additionally identified that CCTO can be used for the development of efficient solid state capacitors of Class II type comparable to the widely used barium titanate (BT capacitors. Based on high temperature studies of the resistivity and the Seebeck coefficient it is found that CCTO is a wide bandgap n-type semiconductor material which could be used for high temperature electronics. The temperature dependence of the linear thermal expansion of CCTO shows the presence of possible phase changes at 220 and 770 °C the origin of which remains unexplained.

  20. Graphene Thermal Properties: Applications in Thermal Management and Energy Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackie D. Renteria

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We review the thermal properties of graphene, few-layer graphene and graphene nanoribbons, and discuss practical applications of graphene in thermal management and energy storage. The first part of the review describes the state-of-the-art in the graphene thermal field focusing on recently reported experimental and theoretical data for heat conduction in graphene and graphene nanoribbons. The effects of the sample size, shape, quality, strain distribution, isotope composition, and point-defect concentration are included in the summary. The second part of the review outlines thermal properties of graphene-enhanced phase change materials used in energy storage. It is shown that the use of liquid-phase-exfoliated graphene as filler material in phase change materials is promising for thermal management of high-power-density battery parks. The reported experimental and modeling results indicate that graphene has the potential to outperform metal nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, and other carbon allotropes as filler in thermal management materials.

  1. All-optical signal processing data communication and storage applications

    CERN Document Server

    Eggleton, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive review of the state-of-the art of optical signal processing technologies and devices. It presents breakthrough solutions for enabling a pervasive use of optics in data communication and signal storage applications. It presents presents optical signal processing as solution to overcome the capacity crunch in communication networks. The book content ranges from the development of innovative materials and devices, such as graphene and slow light structures, to the use of nonlinear optics for secure quantum information processing and overcoming the classical Shannon limit on channel capacity and microwave signal processing. Although it holds the promise for a substantial speed improvement, today’s communication infrastructure optics remains largely confined to the signal transport layer, as it lags behind electronics as far as signal processing is concerned. This situation will change in the near future as the tremendous growth of data traffic requires energy efficient and ful...

  2. Uranium for hydrogen storage applications : a materials science perspective.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shugard, Andrew D.; Tewell, Craig R.; Cowgill, Donald F.; Kolasinski, Robert D.

    2010-08-01

    Under appropriate conditions, uranium will form a hydride phase when exposed to molecular hydrogen. This makes it quite valuable for a variety of applications within the nuclear industry, particularly as a storage medium for tritium. However, some aspects of the U+H system have been characterized much less extensively than other common metal hydrides (particularly Pd+H), likely due to radiological concerns associated with handling. To assess the present understanding, we review the existing literature database for the uranium hydride system in this report and identify gaps in the existing knowledge. Four major areas are emphasized: {sup 3}He release from uranium tritides, the effects of surface contamination on H uptake, the kinetics of the hydride phase formation, and the thermal desorption properties. Our review of these areas is then used to outline potential avenues of future research.

  3. Computational study of sodium magnesium hydride for hydrogen storage applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto Valle, Fernando Antonio

    Hydrogen offers considerable potential benefits as an energy carrier. However, safe and convenient storage of hydrogen is one of the biggest challenges to be resolved in the near future. Sodium magnesium hydride (NaMgH 3) has attracted attention as a hydrogen storage material due to its light weight and high volumetric hydrogen density of 88 kg/m3. Despite the advantages, hydrogen release in this material occurs at approximately 670 K, which is well above the operable range for on-board hydrogen storage applications. In this regard, hydrogen release may be facilitated by substitution doping of transition-metals. This dissertation describes first-principles computational methods that enable an examination of the hydrogen storage properties of NaMgH3. The novel contribution of this dissertation includes a combination of crystal, supercell, and surface slab calculations that provides new and relevant insights about the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of NaMgH3. First-principles calculations on the pristine crystal structure provide a starting reference point for the study of this material as a hydrogen storage material. To the best of our knowledge, it is reported for the first time that a 25% mol doping concentration of Ti, V, Cu, and Zn dopants reduce the reaction enthalpy of hydrogen release for NaMgH3. The largest decrease in the DeltaH(298 K) value corresponds to the Zn-doped model (67.97 kJ/(mol H2)). Based on cohesive energy calculations, it is reported that at the 6.25% mol doping concentration, Ti and Zn dopants are the only transition metals that destabilize the NaMgH3 hydride. In terms of hydrogen removal energy, it is quantified that the energy cost to remove a single H from the Ti-doped supercell model is 0.76 eV, which is lower with respect to the pristine model and other prototypical hydrogen storage materials. From the calculation of electronic properties such as density of states, electron density difference, and charge population analysis

  4. Solvent extraction of dibutylphosphate bearing alkaline wastes from purex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Purex process tributylphosphate undergoes chemical and radiolytic attack leading to the formation of acidic degradation products, mainly dibutylphosphate (DBP) and to a lesser extent monobutylphosphate (MBP). These alkylphosphoric compounds are extractants and may also give insoluble complexes with several cations of fission products. Thus their elimination from the organic phase by alkaline scrubbing of the solvent is necessary. The alkaline solution is generally made of carbonate, in order to keep uranium and plutonium, which can be present in small quantities, under a soluble form. The destination of this aqueous solution is usually the high or the medium activity wastes. Recycling actinide values from these effluent solutions in the process is to be considered to lower alpha-activity in the wastes. In this paper is studied the tri-iso-octylamine for extracting the disturbing organophosphorous compounds from neutral or alkaline solutions where they are under an anionic form. The actinides will stay in these aqueous solutions which can be concentrated and recycled without any risk of precipitation

  5. Colorimetric determination of reducing normality in the Purex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adjustment of the valence state of plutonium from extractable Pu(IV) to nonextractable Pu(III) in the Purex process is accomplished by addition of reductants such as Fe(II), hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN), or U(IV). To implement on-line monitoring of this reduction step for improved process control at the Savannah River Plant, a simple colorimetric method for determining excess reductant (reducing normality) was developed. The method is based on formation of a colored complex of Fe(II) with FerroZine (Hach Chemical Company). The concentration of Fe(II) is determined directly. The concentration of HAN or U(IV), in addition to Fe(II), is determined indirectly as Fe(II), produced through reduction of Fe(III). Experimental conditions for a HAN-Fe(III) reaction of known stoichiometry were established. The effect of hydrazine, which stabilizes U(IV), was also determined. Real-time measurements of color development were made that simulated on-line performance. A laboratory analytical procedure is included. 5 references, 8 figures

  6. Tritium and zirconium separation from PUREX-process solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent nuclear fuel of LWR-reactors contains among others tritium and zirkonium. Under PUREX-process conditions about 50 % of the total tritium enters the process with the aqueous solution after dissolution. While the major amount of the dissolved tritium and zirkonium follows the aqueous waste stream, a small part is extracted in or entrained by the organic phase which is loaded with uranium and plutonium. In order to prevent spreading of this tritium beyond the extended head end area, a special second scrub section has been added to the first high active scrub. According to the flowsheet for a reprocessing plant, a tritium decontamination factor of 40 should be obtained. A special tritium scrubber with a 0.8 molar nitric acid as the srub-solution is integrated therefore in the first extraction cycle of the German industrial reprocessing plant (WAK). In function of the low acidity this tritium scrubber works as a zirkoniumtrap as well, even when an external phase ratio of o:a = 20 - 40 was chosen. A five stage mixer settler with internal recycling of the scrub phase and a pulsed-nozzle plate column, both in a 1 :1 scale have been tested alternately

  7. Fission products control by gamma spectrometry in purex process solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with a radiometric method for fission products analysisby gamma spectrometry. This method will be applied for fission productscontrol at the irradiated material processing facility, under construction inthe Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, SP, Brazil. Countinggeometry was defined taking into account the activities of process solutionsto be analysed, the remotely operated aliquotation device of analytical celland the available detection system. Natural and 19,91% enriched uraniumsamples were irradiated at IEAR-1 reactor in order to simulate thecomposition of Purex process solutions. After a short decay time, the sampleswere dissolved with HNO3 and then, conditioned in standard flasks withdefined geometry. The spectra were obtained by a Ge(Li) semiconductordetector and analysed by the GELIGAM software system, losing a floppy-diskconnected to a PDP-11/05 computer. Libraries were prepared and calibrationswere made with standard sources to fit the programs to the analysis offission products in irradiated uranium solutions. It was possible to choosethe best program to be used in routine analysis with the obtained data.(author)

  8. Calculation code PULCO for Purex process in pulsed column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The calculation code PULCO, which can simulate the Purex process using a pulsed column as an extractor, has been developed. The PULCO is based on the fundamental concept of mass transfer that the mass transfer within a pulsed column occurs through the interface of liquid drops and continuous phase fluid, and is the calculation code different from conventional ones, by which various phenomena such as the generation of liquid drops, their rising and falling, and the unification of liquid drops actually occurring in a pulsed column are exactly reflected and can be correctly simulated. In the PULCO, the actually measured values of the fundamental quantities representing the extraction behavior of liquid drops in a pulsed column are incorporated, such as the mass transfer coefficient of each component, the diameter and velocity of liquid drops in a pulsed column, the holdup of dispersed phase, and axial turbulent flow diffusion coefficient. The verification of the results calculated with the PULCO was carried out by installing a pulsed column of 50 mm inside diameter and 2 m length with 40 plate stage in a glove box for unirradiated uranium-plutonium mixed system. The results of the calculation and test were in good agreement, and the validity of the PULCO was confirmed. (Kako, I.)

  9. Updating an Android Cloud Storage Solutionfrom an Existing iOS Application

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmermann, Jay

    2012-01-01

    Android and iOS are two of the leading smart phone and mobile device operating systems on the present market. Both of these platforms support third party application development. Cloud storage involves storing and accessing data online. The goal of this project involved helping a cloud storage company, with an existing iOS application and a less developed Android application, to update the Android application and simultaneously develop both applications. In addition to producing functionality...

  10. Analytical control of reducing agents on uranium/plutonium partitioning at purex process; Controle analitico dos agentes redutores na particao uranio/plutonio no processo purex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Izilda da Cruz de

    1995-07-01

    Spectrophotometric methods for uranium (IV), hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}) and its decomposition product hydrazoic acid(HN{sub 3}), and hydroxylamine (NH{sub 2} OH) determinations were developed aiming their applications for the process control of CELESTE I installation at IPEN/CNEN-SP. These compounds are normally present in the U/Pu partitioning phase of the spent nuclear treatment via PUREX process. The direct spectrophotometry was used for uranium (IV) analysis in nitric acid-hydrazine solutions based on the absorption measurement at 648 nm. The azomethine compound formed by reaction of hydrazine and p-dimethylamine benzaldehyde with maximum absorption at 457 nm was the basis for the specific analytical method for hydrazine determination. The hydrazoic acid analysis was performed indirectly by its conversion into ferric azide complex with maximum absorption at 465 nm. The hydroxylamine detection was accomplished based on its selective oxidation to nitrous acid which is easily analyzed by the reaction with Griess reagent. The resulted azocompound gas a maximum absorption at 520 nm. The sensibility of 1,4x10{sup -6}M for U(IV) with 0,8% of precision, 1,6x10{sup -6}M for hydrazine with 0,8% of precision, 2,3x10{sup -6}M hydrazoic acid with 0,9% of precision and 2,5x10{sup -6}M for hydroxylamine with 0,8% of precision were achieved. The interference studies have shown that each reducing agent can be determined in the presence of each other without any interference. Uranium(VI) and plutonium have also shown no interference in these analysis. The established methods were adapted to run inside glove-boxes by using an optical fiber colorimetry and applied to process control of the CELESTE I installation. The results pointed out that the methods are reliable and safety in order to provide just-in-time information about process conditions. (author)

  11. Application of dielectric surface barrier discharge for food storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yassine BELLEBNA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ozone (O3 is a powerful oxidizer and has much higher disinfection potential than chlorine and other disinfectants. Ozone finds its application mainly in water treatment and air purification Dielectric barrier discharge (DBD method has proved to be the best method to produce ozone. Dried air or oxygen is forced to pass through a 1-2 mm gap. The aim of this study was to show that disinfection system using ozone generated by dielectric barrier discharge (DBD is an effective alternative to be used in food industry and ensures a safe quality of air for optimum preservation of fruits and vegetables. The DBDs are specific kind of discharges because one (or sometimes both electrodes is covered by a dielectric material, thereby preventing the discharge to move towards electrical breakdown. A succession of microdischarges occurs rapidly; their "lifetime" is in the range of a few nanoseconds. One of their most important applications is the production of ozone for air treatment, used mainly in the area of food industry, for extending the storage life of foods. After the achievement of a surface DBD reactor of cylindrical shape and its electrical characterization, it was then used as an ozone generator for air disinfection. Obtained results have shown that this reactor used as an ozone generator is effective for disinfection of air by removing viruses, bacteria and pathogens, causing the slowdown of the ripening process of fruits and vegetables.

  12. Metallic Hydrides I: Hydrogen Storage and Other Gas-Phase Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Bowman, Robert C., Jr.; Fultz, Brent

    2002-01-01

    A brief survey is given of the various classes of metal alloys and compounds that are suitable for hydrogen-storage and energy-conversion applications. Comparisons are made of relevant properties including hydrogen absorption and desorption pressures, total and reversible hydrogen-storage capacity, reaction-rate kinetics, initial activation requirements, susceptibility to contamination, and durability during long-term thermal cycling. Selected applications are hydrogen storage as a fuel, gas ...

  13. Evaluation of thermal-storage concepts for solar cooling applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, P. J.; Morehouse, J. H.; Choi, M. K.; White, N. M.; Scholten, W. B.

    1981-10-01

    Various configuration concepts for utilizing thermal energy storage to improve the thermal and economic performance of solar cooling systems for buildings were analyzed. The storge concepts evaluated provide short-term thermal storge via the bulk containment of water or salt hydrates. The evaluations were made for both residential-size cooling systems (3-ton) and small commercial-size cooling systems (25-ton). The residential analysis considers energy requirements for space heating, space cooling and water heating, while the commercial building analysis is based only on energy requirements for space cooling. The commercial building analysis considered a total of 10 different thermal storage/solar systems, 5 each for absorption and Rankine chiller concepts. The residential analysis considered 4 thermal storage/solar systems, all utilizing an absorption chiller. The trade-offs considered include: cold-side versus hot-side storage, single vs multiple stage storage, and phase-change vs sensible heat storage.

  14. Disposition of PUREX facility tanks D5 and E6 uranium and plutonium solutions. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harty, D.P.

    1993-12-01

    Approximately 9 kilograms of plutonium and 5 metric tons of uranium in a 1 molar nitric acid solution are being stored in two PUREX facility vessels, tanks D5 and E6. The plutonium was accumulated during cleanup activities of the plutonium product area of the PUREX facility. Personnel at PUREX recently completed a formal presentation to the Surplus Materials Peer Panel (SMPP) regarding disposition of the material currently in these tanks. The peer panel is a group of complex-wide experts who have been chartered by EM-64 (Office of Site and Facility Transfer) to provide a third party independent review of disposition decisions. The information presented to the peer panel is provided in the first section of this report. The panel was generally receptive to the information provided at that time and the recommendations which were identified.

  15. Disposition of PUREX facility tanks D5 and E6 uranium and plutonium solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Approximately 9 kilograms of plutonium and 5 metric tons of uranium in a 1 molar nitric acid solution are being stored in two PUREX facility vessels, tanks D5 and E6. The plutonium was accumulated during cleanup activities of the plutonium product area of the PUREX facility. Personnel at PUREX recently completed a formal presentation to the Surplus Materials Peer Panel (SMPP) regarding disposition of the material currently in these tanks. The peer panel is a group of complex-wide experts who have been chartered by EM-64 (Office of Site and Facility Transfer) to provide a third party independent review of disposition decisions. The information presented to the peer panel is provided in the first section of this report. The panel was generally receptive to the information provided at that time and the recommendations which were identified

  16. Disposition of PUREX contaminated nitric acid the role of stakeholder involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    What does the United States space shuttle and the Hanford PUREX facility's contaminated nitric acid have in common. Both are reusable. The PUREX Transition Project has achieved success and, minimized project expenses and waste generation by looking at excess chemicals not as waste but as reusable substitutes for commercially available raw materials. This philosophy has helped PUREX personnel to reuse or recycle more than 2.5 million pounds of excess chemicals, a portion of which is the slightly contaminated nitric acid. After extensive public review, the first shipment of contaminated acid was made in May 1995. Removal of the acid was completed on November 6, 1995 when the fiftieth shipment left the Hanford site. This activity, which avoided dispositioning the contaminated acid as a waste, generated significantly more public input and concern than was expected. One of the lessons learned from this process is to not underestimate public perceptions regarding the reuse of contaminated materials

  17. Conceptual design of thermal energy storage systems for near-term electric utility applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, E. W.

    1980-01-01

    Promising thermal energy storage systems for midterm applications in conventional electric utilities for peaking power generation are evaluated. Conceptual designs of selected thermal energy storage systems integrated with conventional utilities are considered including characteristics of alternate systems for peaking power generation, viz gas turbines and coal fired cycling plants. Competitive benefit analysis of thermal energy storage systems with alternate systems for peaking power generation and recommendations for development and field test of thermal energy storage with a conventional utility are included. Results indicate that thermal energy storage is only marginally competitive with coal fired cycling power plants and gas turbines for peaking power generation.

  18. Value of Energy Storage for Grid Applications (Report Summary) (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denholm, P.; Jorgenson, J.; Hummon, M.; Jenkin, T.; Palchak, D.; Kirby, B.; Ma, O.; O' Malley, M.

    2013-06-01

    This analysis evaluates several operational benefits of electricity storage, including load-leveling, spinning contingency reserves, and regulation reserves. Storage devices were simulated in a utility system in the western United States, and the operational costs of generation was compared to the same system without the added storage. This operational value of storage was estimated for devices of various sizes, providing different services, and with several sensitivities to fuel price and other factors. Overall, the results followed previous analyses that demonstrate relatively low value for load-leveling but greater value for provision of reserve services. The value was estimated by taking the difference in operational costs between cases with and without energy storage and represents the operational cost savings from deploying storage by a traditional vertically integrated utility. The analysis also estimated the potential revenues derived from a merchant storage plant in a restructured market, based on marginal system prices. Due to suppression of on-/off-peak price differentials and incomplete capture of system benefits (such as the cost of power plant starts), the revenue obtained by storage in a market setting appears to be substantially less than the net benefit provided to the system. This demonstrates some of the additional challenges for storage deployed in restructured energy markets.

  19. The Value of Energy Storage for Grid Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denholm, Paul [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jorgenson, Jennie [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hummon, Marissa [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jenkin, Thomas [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Palchak, David [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kirby, Brendan [Kirby Consultant; Ma, Ookie [U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); O' Malley, Mark [Univ. College of Dublin (Ireland)

    2013-05-01

    This analysis evaluates several operational benefits of electricity storage, including load-leveling, spinning contingency reserves, and regulation reserves. Storage devices were simulated in a utility system in the western United States, and the operational costs of generation was compared to the same system without the added storage. This operational value of storage was estimated for devices of various sizes, providing different services, and with several sensitivities to fuel price and other factors. Overall, the results followed previous analyses that demonstrate relatively low value for load-leveling but greater value for provision of reserve services. The value was estimated by taking the difference in operational costs between cases with and without energy storage and represents the operational cost savings from deploying storage by a traditional vertically integrated utility. The analysis also estimated the potential revenues derived from a merchant storage plant in a restructured market, based on marginal system prices. Due to suppression of on-/off-peak price differentials and incomplete capture of system benefits (such as the cost of power plant starts), the revenue obtained by storage in a market setting appears to be substantially less than the net benefit provided to the system. This demonstrates some of the additional challenges for storage deployed in restructured energy markets.

  20. 78 FR 73566 - Standard Format and Content for a License Application for an Independent Spent Fuel Storage...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-06

    ... COMMISSION Standard Format and Content for a License Application for an Independent Spent Fuel Storage... Application for an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation or a Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility... Josh Goshen, Licensing Branch, Division of Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation, Office of...

  1. Delisting strategy for the Hanford Site 242-A Evaporator PUREX Plant Condensate Treatment Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes the strategy that the US Department of Energy, Richland Field Office intends to use in preparing the delisting petition for the 242-A Evaporator/PUREX Plant Condensate Treatment Facility. Because the 242-A Evaporator/PUREX Plant Condensate Treatment Facility will not be operational until 1994, the delisting petition will be structured as an up-front petition based on the ''multiple waste treatment facility'' approach outline in the 1985 US Environmental Protection Agency's Petitions to Delist Hazardous Waste. The 242-A evaporator/PUREX Plant Condensate Treatment Facility effluent characterization data will not be available to support the delisting petition, because the delisting petition will be submitted to the US Environmental Protection Agency before start-up of the 242-A Evaporator/PUREX Plant Condensate Treatment Facility. Therefore, the delisting petition will be based on data collected during the pilot plant testing for the 242-A Evaporator/PUREX Plant Condensate Treatment Facility. This pilot plant testing will be conducted on synthetic waste. The composition of the synthetic waste will be based on: (1) constituents of regulatory concern, and (2) on process knowledge. The pilot plant testing will be performed to determine the removal efficiencies of the process equipment at concentrations greater than reasonably could be expected in the actual waste. This strategy document also describes the logic used to develop the synthetic waste, to develop the pilot plant testing program, and to prepare the delisting petition. This strategy document also described how full-scale operating data will be collected during initial operation of the 242-A Evaporator/PUREX Plant Condensate Treatment Facility to verify information presented in the delisting petition

  2. Environmental performance of electricity storage systems for grid applications, a life cycle approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Large energy storage systems: environmental performance under different scenarios. • ReCiPe midpoint and endpoint impact assessment results are analyzed. • Energy storage systems can replace peak power generation units. • Energy storage systems and renewable energy have the best environmental scores. • Environmental performance of storage systems is application dependent. - Abstract: In this paper, the environmental performance of electricity storage technologies for grid applications is assessed. Using a life cycle assessment methodology we analyze the impacts of the construction, disposal/end of life, and usage of each of the systems. Pumped hydro and compressed air storage are studied as mechanical storage, and advanced lead acid, sodium sulfur, lithium-ion and nickel–sodium-chloride batteries are addressed as electrochemical storage systems. Hydrogen production from electrolysis and subsequent usage in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell are also analyzed. The selected electricity storage systems mimic real world installations in terms of capacity, power rating, life time, technology and application. The functional unit is one kW h of energy delivered back to the grid, from the storage system. The environmental impacts assessed are climate change, human toxicity, particulate matter formation, and fossil resource depletion. Different electricity mixes are used in order to exemplify scenarios where the selected technologies meet specific applications. Results indicate that the performance of the storage systems is tied to the electricity feedstocks used during use stage. Renewable energy sources have lower impacts throughout the use stage of the storage technologies. Using the Belgium electricity mix of 2011 as benchmark, the sodium sulfur battery is shown to be the best performer for all the impacts analyzed. Pumped hydro storage follows in second place. Regarding infrastructure and end of life, results indicate that battery systems

  3. Application of Lippmann interference photography to data storage

    OpenAIRE

    Contreras, Kevin; Pauliat, Gilles; Arnaud, Carole; Roosen, Gérald

    2008-01-01

    Lippmann's interference photography is an elegant process to record coloured images in the volume of a sensitive material. We propose to use this technique for wavelength multiplexed data storage in a page-oriented approach. Using computer simulations, we demonstrate that the capacities reached with this technique are similar to those reached by volume holographic data storage.

  4. Phenothiazine based polymers for energy and data storage application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golriz, Seyed Ahmad Ali

    2013-03-15

    charge and discharge cycles. In addition to applications in batteries the bistability of phenothiazine polymers for high density data storage purposes was studied. Using the conductive mode of scanning force microscopy (SFM), nano-scaled patterning of spin-coated polymer films induced by electrochemical oxidation was successfully demonstrated. The scanning probe experiments revealed differences in the conductive states of written patterns before and after oxidation with no significant change in topography. Remarkably, the patterns were stable with respect to the storage time as well as mechanical wear. Finally, new synthetic approaches towards mechanically nanowear stable and redox active surfaces were established. Via grafting from methods based on Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (ATRP), redox active polymer brushes with phenothiazine moieties were prepared and characterized by SFM and X-ray techniques. In particular, a synthetic route based on polymer brush structures with activated ester functionality appeared as a very promising and versatile fabrication method. The activated ester brushes were used for attachment of phenothiazine moieties in a successive step. By using crosslinkable diamine moieties, polymer brushes with redox functionalities and with increased surface wear resistance were successfully synthesized. In summary, this work offers deep insights into the electronic properties of polymers with phenothiazine redox active moieties. Furthermore, the applicability of phenothiazine polymers for electronic devices was explored and improved from synthetic polymer chemistry point of view.

  5. Electromechanical Storage Systems for Application to Isolated Wind Energy Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Substantial technology advances have occurred during the last decade that have had and appreciated impact on performance and feasibility of the Electromechanical Storage Systems. Improvements in magnetic bearings, composite materials, power conversion systems, microelectronic control systems and computer simulation models have increased flywheel reliability, and energy storage capacity, while decreasing overall system size, weight and cost. These improvements have brought flywheels to the forefront in the quest for alternate systems. The result of the study carried out under the scope of the SEDUCTOR, about the state of art of the Electromechanical Storage Systems is presented in this report. (Author) 15 refs

  6. Flywheel Energy Storage Drive System for Wind Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Constantin Georgescu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a wind small power plant with a Smart Storage Modular Structure (SSMS, as follows: a Short Time Storage Module (STSM based on a flywheel with Induction Motor (IM and a Medium/Long Time Storage Module (MLTSM based on a Vanadium Redox flow Battery (VRB. To control the speed and torque of the IM are used a nonlinear sensorless solution and a direct torque solution which have been compared. Now, the author proposes to replace the IM by a dc motor with permanent magnet energy injection. In this aim, are accomplished some laboratory tests.

  7. High Temperature Metal Hydrides as Heat Storage Materials for Solar and Related Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Borislav Bogdanović; Michael Felderhoff

    2009-01-01

    For the continuous production of electricity with solar heat power plants the storage of heat at a temperature level around 400 °C is essential. High temperature metal hydrides offer high heat storage capacities around this temperature. Based on Mg-compounds, these hydrides are in principle low-cost materials with excellent cycling stability. Relevant properties of these hydrides and their possible applications as heat storage materials are described.

  8. High Temperature Metal Hydrides as Heat Storage Materials for Solar and Related Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borislav Bogdanović

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available For the continuous production of electricity with solar heat power plants the storage of heat at a temperature level around 400 °C is essential. High temperature metal hydrides offer high heat storage capacities around this temperature. Based on Mg-compounds, these hydrides are in principle low-cost materials with excellent cycling stability. Relevant properties of these hydrides and their possible applications as heat storage materials are described.

  9. High temperature metal hydrides as heat storage materials for solar and related applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felderhoff, Michael; Bogdanović, Borislav

    2009-01-01

    For the continuous production of electricity with solar heat power plants the storage of heat at a temperature level around 400 degrees C is essential. High temperature metal hydrides offer high heat storage capacities around this temperature. Based on Mg-compounds, these hydrides are in principle low-cost materials with excellent cycling stability. Relevant properties of these hydrides and their possible applications as heat storage materials are described. PMID:19333448

  10. Integrating STATCOM and Battery Energy Storage System for Power System Transient Stability: A Review and Application

    OpenAIRE

    Arindam Chakraborty; Musunuri, Shravana K.; Srivastava, Anurag K.; Kondabathini, Anil K.

    2012-01-01

    Integration of STATCOM with energy storage devices plays an imperative role in improving the power system operation and control. Significant research has been done in this area for practical realization of benefits of the integration. This paper, however, pays particular importance to the performance improvement for the transients as is achievable by STATCOM with battery-powered storage systems. Application of STATCOM with storage in regard to intermittent renewable energy sources such as win...

  11. Advanced Insulation Materials for Cryogenic Propellant Storage Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Materials Technology, Inc (AMTI) responds to the Topic X9 entitled [HTML_REMOVED]Propulsion and Propellant Storage[HTML_REMOVED] under subtopic X9.01,...

  12. Applications of thermal energy storage in the cement industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, F. A.; Beshore, D. G.; Miller, F. M.; Gartner, E. M.

    1978-01-01

    In the manufacture of cement, literally trillions of Btu's are rejected to the environment each year. The purpose of this feasibility study program was to determine whether thermal energy storage could be used to conserve or allow alternative uses of this rejected energy. This study identifies and quantifies the sources of rejected energy in the cement manufacturing process, established use of this energy, investigates various storage system concepts, and selects energy conservation systems for further study. Thermal performance and economic analyses are performed on candidate storage systems for four typical cement plants representing various methods of manufacturing cement. Through the use of thermal energy storage in conjunction with waste heat electric power generation units, an estimated 2.4 x 10 to the 13th power Btu/year, or an equivalent on investment of the proposed systems are an incentive for further development.

  13. Electrospun nanostructured composite fibres for hydrogen storage applications

    OpenAIRE

    Kurban, Z.

    2011-01-01

    The urgent realisation of the low carbon economy requires the development of cheap, safe and lightweight hydrogen storage, both for commercialisation of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles, and for the use of hydrogen as a reservoir of energy from intermittent renewable energy sources. The primary motivation of this PhD project was to investigate (co)electrospinning, a cheap and scalable fibre production technique, for nanostructuring potential solid state hydrogen storage materials. Solid state stor...

  14. 75 FR 52937 - Turtle Bayou Gas Storage Company, LLC; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-30

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Turtle Bayou Gas Storage Company, LLC; Notice of Application August 20, 2010. Take notice that on August 6, 2010, Turtle Bayou Gas Storage Company, LLC (Turtle Bayou), One Office... caverns and related facilities to be located in Chambers and Liberty Counties, Texas. Turtle Bayou...

  15. 77 FR 20618 - PetroLogistics Natural Gas Storage, LLC; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-05

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission PetroLogistics Natural Gas Storage, LLC; Notice of Application Take notice that on March 22, 2012, PetroLogistics Natural Gas Storage, LLC (PetroLogistics), 4470 Bluebonnet Blvd...) of the Natural Gas Act (NGA) and Part 157 of the Commission's regulations, to amend its...

  16. 76 FR 544 - PetroLogistics Natural Gas Storage, LLC; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-05

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission PetroLogistics Natural Gas Storage, LLC; Notice of Application December 28, 2010. Take notice that on December 14, 2010, PetroLogistics Natural Gas Storage, LLC (PetroLogistics... pursuant to section 7(c) of the Natural Gas Act (NGA) and Part 157 of the Commission's...

  17. 75 FR 8318 - Petrologistics Natural Gas Storage, LLC; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-24

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Petrologistics Natural Gas Storage, LLC; Notice of Application February 17, 2010. Take notice that on February 12, 2010, Petrologistics Natural Gas Storage, LLC (Petrologistics... to section 7(c) of the Natural Gas Act (NGA), to amend its Certificate of Public Convenience...

  18. 77 FR 5788 - PetroLogistics Natural Gas Storage, LLC; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-06

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission PetroLogistics Natural Gas Storage, LLC; Notice of Application Take notice that on January 27, 2012, PetroLogistics Natural Gas Storage, LLC (PetroLogistics), 4470 Bluebonnet... section 7(c) of the Natural Gas Act (NGA) and Part 157 of the Commission's regulations, to amend...

  19. Purex co-processing of spent LWR fuels: comparative fuel cycle cost analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fuel cycle costs for purex reprocessing and co-processing cycles are to be evaluated, by calculating unit costs of recovered, accordingly treated and fabricated products and then comparing those to the unit cost of fresh uranium fuel ready to be loaded into a typical LWR on the once-through cycle

  20. Separation of cerium from high level waste solution of Purex origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple solvent extraction procedure for the separation of 144Ce from Purex high level waste (HLW) is described. 2-ethylhexyl 2-ethylhexyl phosphonic acid (KSM-17) has been used as extractant. About 10 mCi of cerium was separated from HLW using this technique. This method is amenable for automation and scale up. (author)

  1. Analytical control of reducing agents on uranium/plutonium partitioning at purex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spectrophotometric methods for uranium (IV), hydrazine (N2H4) and its decomposition product hydrazoic acid(HN3), and hydroxylamine (NH2 OH) determinations were developed aiming their applications for the process control of CELESTE I installation at IPEN/CNEN-SP. These compounds are normally present in the U/Pu partitioning phase of the spent nuclear treatment via PUREX process. The direct spectrophotometry was used for uranium (IV) analysis in nitric acid-hydrazine solutions based on the absorption measurement at 648 nm. The azomethine compound formed by reaction of hydrazine and p-dimethylamine benzaldehyde with maximum absorption at 457 nm was the basis for the specific analytical method for hydrazine determination. The hydrazoic acid analysis was performed indirectly by its conversion into ferric azide complex with maximum absorption at 465 nm. The hydroxylamine detection was accomplished based on its selective oxidation to nitrous acid which is easily analyzed by the reaction with Griess reagent. The resulted azocompound gas a maximum absorption at 520 nm. The sensibility of 1,4x10-6M for U(IV) with 0,8% of precision, 1,6x10-6M for hydrazine with 0,8% of precision, 2,3x10-6M hydrazoic acid with 0,9% of precision and 2,5x10-6M for hydroxylamine with 0,8% of precision were achieved. The interference studies have shown that each reducing agent can be determined in the presence of each other without any interference. Uranium(VI) and plutonium have also shown no interference in these analysis. The established methods were adapted to run inside glove-boxes by using an optical fiber colorimetry and applied to process control of the CELESTE I installation. The results pointed out that the methods are reliable and safety in order to provide just-in-time information about process conditions. (author)

  2. Storage, transportation, and atomization of CWF for residential applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breault, R.; Sayre, A.

    1990-07-01

    The proposed test program will examine the stability and rheology of the coal water fuels (CWFs) prepared from various beneficiated coal products made from the following coals: Illinois No. 6, Wyodak, and Upper Elkhorn No. 3. Fuel characterization will include: particle size distribution, ultimate and proximate analyses of coal, ash composition, ash fusion temperature, and solids concentration. For rheological characteristics, data will be obtained at varying shear rates, temperature, and agitation or recirculation in the bulk storage tanks. The effect of freeze-thaw on the stability and rheology of the CWF will be evaluated. Control of the environmental conditions will be examined by means of formulation additives, including the addition of freezing point depressants and biocides. Bulk storage studies will involve testing CWF stability characteristics with and without agitation and recirculation. The design of the storage tank will be reviewed, and the effectiveness of cone bottom and dish bottom tanks will be tested. The CWF storage and handling tests will be carried out at Tecogen's CWF-fired advanced combustor facility. This quarter, under Task 2, two coal water slurry fuels were produced from the baseline coal. Chemical stability tests and mechanical resuspension tests were begun under the Task 3 effort. Residential storage work was also initiated and a bladder tank developed. Residential handling tests were initiated under the Task 5 effort to develop pressure drop characteristics for the slurries at residential flows in residential type components. 5 refs., 9 figs., 8 tabs.

  3. Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application, 616 Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Storage Facility. Revision 2A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This permit application for the 616 Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Storage Facility consists for 15 chapters. Topics of discussion include the following: facility description and general provisions; waste characteristics; process information; personnel training; reporting and record keeping; and certification

  4. Evaluation for the application of metal fuel in the spent fuel dry storage system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation for application of reduced metal fuel in the day storage system has been carried out for selection of optimum storage method. The state of art has been analyzed for dry storage system of spent fuel. Design basis fuel has been decided with burn-up of 48,000 MWD/MTU for storage of metal fuel. Safety analyses have been carried out for existing dry storage system loaded by reduced metal fuel with storage capacity of four times. Maximum temperatures of metal fuel were calculated about 350 .deg. C and 250 .deg. C for 5 years and 10 years cooling times, respectively. The results of criticality analysis showed that the existing dry storage system has been identified to be adequate for the reduced metal storage. As the results of analysis for application of reduced metal fuel, metal cask and MVDS have the advantage for structural safety respect and cooling efficiency, respectively. Therefore, metal cask and MVDS were selected with optimum storage method

  5. Thermodynamic Properties of Organometallic Dihydrogen Complexes for Hydrogen Storage Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrecht, David Gregory

    appropriate ranges for hydrogen storage applications. Simulated thermodynamic values for Fe complexes were found to significantly underestimate experimental behavior, demonstrating the importance of the magnetic spin state of the molecule to hydrogen binding properties.

  6. A Non-MDS Erasure Code Scheme For Storage Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kiani, Abbas

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the use of redundancy and self repairing against node failures in distributed storage systems, using various strategies. In replication method, access to one replication node is sufficient to reconstruct a lost node, while in MDS erasure coded systems which are optimal in terms of redundancy-reliability tradeoff, a single node failure is repaired after recovering the entire stored data. Moreover, regenerating codes yield a tradeoff curve between storage capacity and repair bandwidth. The current paper aims at investigating a new storage code. Specifically, we propose a non-MDS (2k, k) code that tolerates any three node failures and more importantly, it is shown using our code a single node failure can be repaired through access to only three nodes.

  7. A Toolkit For Storage Qos Provisioning For Data-Intensive Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Renata Słota; Dariusz Krol; Kornel Skałkowski; Michal Orzechowski; Darin Nikolow; Bartosz Kryza; Michal Wrzeszcz; Jacek Kitowski

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a programming toolkit developed in the PL-Grid project, named QStorMan, which supports storage QoS provisioning for data-intensive applications in distributed environments. QStorMan exploits knowledge-oriented methods for matching storage resources to non-functional requirements, which are defined for a data-intensive application. In order to support various usage scenarios, QStorMan provides two interfaces, such as programming libraries or a web portal. The interf...

  8. Workshop on compact storage ring technology: applications to lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Project planning in the area of x-ray lithography is discussed. Three technologies that are emphasized are the light source, the lithographic technology, and masking technology. The needs of the semiconductor industry in the lithography area during the next decade are discussed, particularly as regards large scale production of high density dynamic random access memory devices. Storage ring parameters and an overall exposure tool for x-ray lithography are addressed. Competition in this area of technology from Germany and Japan is discussed briefly. The design of a storage ring is considered, including lattice design, magnets, and beam injection systems

  9. Flywheel energy storage and conversion system for photovoltaic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millner, A. R.

    1979-01-01

    A flywheel energy storage and conversion system has been designed and is now being built at Massachusetts Institute of Technology/Lincoln Laboratory for the United States Department of Energy. It is intended to serve as an interface between a solar photovoltaic array and an ac load, providing output waveform regulation as well as energy storage. Important characteristics include magnetic bearings, an ironless armature motor-generator, and a low-cost flywheel rotor. The system design tradeoffs are described, and a preliminary economic analysis is presented.

  10. Workshop on compact storage ring technology: applications to lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-05-30

    Project planning in the area of x-ray lithography is discussed. Three technologies that are emphasized are the light source, the lithographic technology, and masking technology. The needs of the semiconductor industry in the lithography area during the next decade are discussed, particularly as regards large scale production of high density dynamic random access memory devices. Storage ring parameters and an overall exposure tool for x-ray lithography are addressed. Competition in this area of technology from Germany and Japan is discussed briefly. The design of a storage ring is considered, including lattice design, magnets, and beam injection systems. (LEW)

  11. A new diarylethene and its application in optical storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Weijun; Jiang Duohua; Pu Shouzhi; Cui Shiqiang, E-mail: pushouzhi@tsinghua.org.cn [Jiangxi Key Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, Jiangxi Science and Technology Normal University, Nanchang 330013 (China)

    2011-02-01

    A new blue photochromic diarylethene compound, 1-[5-(3-methoxyphenyl)-2-methyl-3-thienyl]-2-[5-(3-cyanophenyl) -2-methyl-3-thienyl]perfluoroclopentene (1a), was synthesized and its photochemical properties were investigated in detail. The measurement results demonstrated that the compound has good photochromism in solution and in PMMA amorphous film, fluorescence and optical storage properties.

  12. A new diarylethene and its application in optical storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new blue photochromic diarylethene compound, 1-[5-(3-methoxyphenyl)-2-methyl-3-thienyl]-2-[5-(3-cyanophenyl) -2-methyl-3-thienyl]perfluoroclopentene (1a), was synthesized and its photochemical properties were investigated in detail. The measurement results demonstrated that the compound has good photochromism in solution and in PMMA amorphous film, fluorescence and optical storage properties.

  13. Ballistics Testing of the 9977 Shipping Package for Storage Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive materials are stored in a variety of locations throughout the DOE complex. At the Savannah River Site (SRS), materials are stored within dedicated facilities. Each of those facilities has a documented safety analysis (DSA) that describes accidents that the facility and the materials within it may encounter. Facilities at the SRS are planning on utilizing the certified Model 9977 Shipping Package as a long term storage package and one of these facilities required ballistics testing. Specifically, in order to meet the facility DSA, the radioactive materials (RAM) must be contained within the storage package after impact by a .223 caliber round. In order to qualify the Model 9977 Shipping Package for storage in this location, the package had to be tested under these conditions. Over the past two years, the Model 9977 Shipping Package has been subjected to a series of ballistics tests. The purpose of the testing was to determine if the 9977 would be suitable for use as a storage package at a Savannah River Site facility. The facility requirements are that the package must not release any of its contents following the impact in its most vulnerable location by a .223 caliber round. A package, assembled to meet all of the design requirements for a certified 9977 shipping configuration and using simulated contents, was tested at the Savannah River Site in March of 2011. The testing was completed and the package was examined. The results of the testing and examination are presented in this paper.

  14. BALLISTICS TESTING OF THE 9977 SHIPPING PACKAGE FOR STORAGE APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loftin, B.; Abramczyk, G.; Koenig, R.

    2012-06-06

    Radioactive materials are stored in a variety of locations throughout the DOE complex. At the Savannah River Site (SRS), materials are stored within dedicated facilities. Each of those facilities has a documented safety analysis (DSA) that describes accidents that the facility and the materials within it may encounter. Facilities at the SRS are planning on utilizing the certified Model 9977 Shipping Package as a long term storage package and one of these facilities required ballistics testing. Specifically, in order to meet the facility DSA, the radioactive materials (RAM) must be contained within the storage package after impact by a .223 caliber round. In order to qualify the Model 9977 Shipping Package for storage in this location, the package had to be tested under these conditions. Over the past two years, the Model 9977 Shipping Package has been subjected to a series of ballistics tests. The purpose of the testing was to determine if the 9977 would be suitable for use as a storage package at a Savannah River Site facility. The facility requirements are that the package must not release any of its contents following the impact in its most vulnerable location by a .223 caliber round. A package, assembled to meet all of the design requirements for a certified 9977 shipping configuration and using simulated contents, was tested at the Savannah River Site in March of 2011. The testing was completed and the package was examined. The results of the testing and examination are presented in this paper.

  15. Fuel Receiving and Storage Station. License application, amendment 5, addendum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Addendum to AG-L105 addresses the utilization of the Service Concentrator for evaporation of low level wastes generated during fuel receiving and storage operations. The Service Concentrator is described from various viewpoints and necessary relevant data are included for adequate assessment of safety. (U.S.)

  16. Small form factor (SFF) optical data storage devices for mobile applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young-Pil; Park, No-Cheol; Kim, Chul-Jin

    2005-09-01

    There are two basic requirements in the field of optical storage data devices. The first is the demand for the improvement of memory capacity to manage the increased data capacity in personal and official purposes. The second is the demand for small sized optical storage devices for mobile multimedia digital electronics, including digital camera, PDA and mobile phones. To summarize, for the sake of mobile applications, it is necessary to develop optical data storage devices which have simultaneously a large capacity and a small size. Small form factor optical disk drive (SFF ODD) is expected to become a good match for mobile applications due its advantages over other devices in cost and removability. Nowadays, many companies and research institutes including universities cooperate together in the research on SFF ODD and other related optical storage devices. Due such active researches, it is expected that SFF ODD will be widely used in mobile applications in the very near future.

  17. Summary of State-of-the-Art Power Conversion Systems for Energy Storage Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atcitty, S.; Gray-Fenner, A.; Ranade, S.

    1998-09-01

    The power conversion system (PCS) is a vital part of many energy storage systems. It serves as the interface between the storage device, an energy source, and an AC load. This report summarizes the results of an extensive study of state-of-the-art power conversion systems used for energy storage applications. The purpose of the study was to investigate the potential for cost reduction and performance improvement in these power conversion systems and to provide recommendations for fiture research and development. This report provides an overview of PCS technology, a description of several state-of-the-art power conversion systems and how they are used in specific applications, a summary of four basic configurations for l:he power conversion systems used in energy storage applications, a discussion of PCS costs and potential cost reductions, a summary of the stancku-ds and codes relevant to the technology, and recommendations for future research and development.

  18. The application of power-to-gas, pumped hydro storage and compressed air energy storage in an electricity system at different wind power penetration levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many countries worldwide have committed themselves to reducing the rate in which they emit greenhouse gasses. These emissions are the major driver behind human induced global warming. Renewable electricity implementation is one way of reducing the amount of greenhouse gas emissions. However, this transition is also accompanied by some problems. The intermittency of renewables demands for a more flexible electricity system. In existing electricity systems this lack of flexibility already leads to load balancing issues increasing costs and threatening energy security. Large scale storage facilities could provide the needed flexibility. This paper focuses on the economic and environmental system consequences of the application of power-to-gas, pumped hydro storage and compressed air energy storage in an electricity system at different wind power penetration levels. The study shows that the application of large scale energy storage techniques results in economic costs reducing effects on the electricity system. These are highest for pumped hydro storage, followed by the cost reducing effects of compressed air energy storage and power-to-gas. The impact on the fuel use and the emissions is less obvious. In some scenarios, the application of storage even resulted in an increase of the fuel use and the emissions. - Highlights: • We studied the effects of adding three storage techniques to an electricity system. • We modelled: Power-to-gas, pumped hydro storage and compressed air energy storage. • Storage is used for optimizing the operational costs of the electricity system. • The economic system benefits were highest when applying pumped hydro storage. • The application of storage not always resulted in environmental system benefits

  19. Review of power quality applications of energy storage systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swaminathan, S.; Sen, R.K. [Sentech, Inc., Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1997-05-01

    Under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Utility Technologies, the Energy Storage Systems Analysis and Development Department at Sandia National Laboratories contracted Sentech, Inc., to assess the impact of power quality problems on the electricity supply system. This report contains the results of several studies that have identified the cost of power quality events for electricity users and providers. The large annual cost of poor power quality represents a national inefficiency and is reflected in the cost of goods sold, reducing US competitiveness. The Energy Storage Systems (ESS) Program takes the position that mitigation merits the attention of not only the DOE but affected industries as well as businesses capable of assisting in developing solutions to these problems. This study represents the preliminary stages of an overall strategy by the ESS Program to understand the magnitude of these problems so as to begin the process of engaging industry partners in developing solutions.

  20. Energy storage, and design of tractive system for EV application

    OpenAIRE

    Skåravik, Martin Standal; Børsheim, Eirik

    2014-01-01

    The efficiency and specific power of electrical motors have for decades been superior to the combustion motors. With the arrival of modern permanent magnet motors the advantage of electrical propulsion for vehicles now greater than ever. Energy storage has previously been the restraining factor, but with the arrival of stable durable lithium ion batteries the conventional car market has seen an exponential increase in the sales of electric vehicles. This development has also been picked up ...

  1. The Distribution of Technetium in U/Pu Partition Step of Advanced Purex Process Based on Organic Reagents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Hui; WEI; Yan; LIU; Fang; JIA; Yong-fen; LIU; Zhan-yuan

    2012-01-01

    <正>Advanced Purex process based on organic reagents (APOR) is an advanced Purex process, where monomethylhydrazine (MMH)-dimethylhydroxylamine (DMHAN) are adopted as salt-free plutonium- reductant in the partition step. During this step, technetium mainly goes into aqueous plutonium stream, and the aim of our work is to explain this phenomena. Reaction kinetic experiments and process experiments with mixer-settler were carried out for this purpose.

  2. Attitudes of Polish society to nuclear energetics, applications of ionizing radiation and radioactive wastes storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attitudes of Polish society to nuclear energetics, applications of ionizing radiation and radioactive waste storage have been examined through polling the population in 1991, 1994, 1996 and 1998. The inquiry for broad representative of Poles shows that less than half of the population do not accept the nuclear power and applications of radiation in economy and everyday life

  3. Environmental report of Purex Plant and Uranium Oxide Plant - Hanford reservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A description of the site, program, and facilities is given. The data and calculations indicate that there will be no significant adverse environmental impact from the resumption of full-scale operations of the Purex and Uranium Oxide Plants. All significant pathways of radionuclides in Purex Plant effluents are evaluated. This includes submersion in the airborne effluent plumes, consumption of drinking water and foodstuffs irrigated with Columbia River water, ingestion of radioactive iodine through the cow-to-milk pathway, consumption of fish, and other less significant pathways. A summary of research and surveillance programs designed to assess the possible changes in the terresstrial and aquatic environments on or near the Hanford Reservation is presented. The nonradiological discharges to the environment of prinicpal interest are chemicals, sewage, and solid waste. These discharges will not lead to any significant adverse effects on the environment

  4. Completion report, Purex and Redox Phase 2 expansion: Jobs 1063 and 1063R. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1955-05-01

    Vitro Corporation of America entered into a contract with the US Atomic Energy Commission on July 2, 1952 to furnish architect-engineering services in connection with the design and construction of a new chemical plant facility located in the 200 Area of the Hanford Works, Richland, Washington. This contract provided for engineering of facilities utilizing the Purex process to separate and decontaminate uranium and plutonium contained in slugs irradiated in Hanford reactors. Later, Vitro was requested to provide architect-engineering services for an expansion of the previously constructed Redox separation facility. This work, designated as ``Redox Phase II Expansion,`` was authorized by Modification No. 1 to the above contract and was executed April 17, 1953. This completion report has been prepared at the request of the AEC and is intended to provide a convenient source of information concerning the administrative history and engineering features of the Purex plant and the Redox Phase II Expansion.

  5. Application of electrical energy storage systems in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Hakim, Jafar

    2014-01-01

    This study addresses the possibilities and profits of taking advantages of price differences on the electricity market by using a electrical energy storage system (EES) in Germany. The analysis of which technique that is chosen for the purpose is made from two views, one that reflects only over the 4 technical aspects explained in the study and the second one is based on the German market demands where an analysis of the electricity price for 2013 is made. As we know we are moving towards a m...

  6. Technical Assessment of Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, Thanh [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ahluwalia, Rajesh [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Peng, J. -K [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kromer, Matt [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); Lasher, Stephen [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); McKenney, Kurtis [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); Law, Karen [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); Sinha, Jayanti [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States)

    2010-09-01

    This technical report describes DOE's assessment of the performance and cost of compressed hydrogen storage tank systems for automotive applications. The on-board performance (by Argonne National Lab) and high-volume manufacturing cost (by TIAX LLC) were estimated for compressed hydrogen storage tanks. The results were compared to DOE's 2010, 2015, and ultimate full fleet hydrogen storage targets. The Well-to-Tank (WTT) efficiency as well as the off-board performance and cost of delivering compressed hydrogen were also documented in the report.

  7. Hydrogen Storage Options: Technologies and Comparisons for Light-Duty Vehicle Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, Andy; Gardiner, Monterey

    2005-01-01

    This report is concerned with the characterization and comparison of various technologies for hydrogen storage for light-duty vehicle applications. The storage technologies considered are compressed gas, cryogenic liquid, metallic and chemical hydrides, and activated carbon at 77 K. The technologies were evaluated in terms of weight and volume metrics - %wt H2/ system kg and gm H2/system and an energy intensity metric kJ/kg H2 for preparing the hydrogen fuel and placing it into storage for us...

  8. Influence of control strategies on battery/supercapacitor hybrid Energy Storage Systems for traction applications

    OpenAIRE

    ALLEGRE,AL; Bouscayrol, A; Trigui, R.

    2009-01-01

    The energy storage is key issue for traction applications like Electric Vehicles (EVs) or Hybrid Electric Vehicles (HEVs). Indeed, it needs a higher power and energy density, a weak bulk and size, a long lifetime and a low cost. A hybrid Energy Storage System (ESS) using batteries and supercapacitors, seems to be a good device to answer to these constraints. The objective of the paper is to study the influence of control strategies for this hybrid ESS. Indeed, according to the used strategy, ...

  9. Analysis and comparison of battery energy storage technologies for grid applications

    OpenAIRE

    SAEZ-DE-IBARRA, A.; Milo, Aitor; Gaztañaga, Haizea; Etxeberria Otadui, Ion; Rodríguez Cortés, Pedro; BACHA, Seddik; Debusschere, V.

    2013-01-01

    Battery Energy Storage Systems (BESSs) could contribute to the generation/consumption balance of the grid and could provide advanced functionalities at different grid levels (generation, T&D, end-user and RES integration). In this paper an analysis and comparison of Battery Energy Storage (BES) technologies for grid applications is carried out. The comparison is focused on the most installed technologies in the recent experimental BESS installations. Furthermore, the pape...

  10. Chemical reactor for a PUREX reprocessing plant of 200Kg U/day capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissolution of spent reactor fuels in Purex process is studied. Design of a chemical reactor for PWR elements, 3% enriched uranium dioxide with zircaloy cladding, for a 200Kg/day uranium plant is the main objective. Chop-leach process is employed and 7.5M nitric acid is used. Non-criticality was obtained by safe geometry and checked by spectrum homogeneous calculus and diffusion codes. Fuel cycle is considered and decladding and dissolution are treated more accurately

  11. A computer program based on quasi-newton arithmetic for the simulation of Purex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to predict the distribution and chemical behaviors of U, Pu, nitric acid in the Purex process of spent fuel reprocessing, a computer program is developed. The mathematical model of the program is based on quasi-Newton arithmetic. The distribution profiles of 1 A and 2 D are calculated by the computer program, and the calculated results are in good agreement with the experimental results. A conclusion can be drown that the program shows better astringency and precision

  12. Chemical properties of neptunium applied to neptunium management in extraction cycles of Purex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alternative ways of managing neptunium in the Purex process are discussed. Main coordination and redox properties of neptunium in nitric medium are reviewed. Kinetics results with reagents consistent with ''salt free process'' are presented with emphasis on the influence of uranium and plutonium ions, including results about some peculiar behaviour of neptunium in TBP (the so-called cation-cation complexes). Attempts to fit chemical engineering models to neptunium metabolism in extraction equipment (mixer-settlers and pulsed columns) are described

  13. Laboratory evaluation of an ion exchange process for removing cesium from Purex acid waste solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A laboratory investigation was made of an ion exchange process for removing radioactive cesium from acidic Purex waste. Twenty-seven laboratory ion exchanger runs are reported. Parameters investigated include comparison of Zeolon-900, AW-500 and Duolite ARC-359 ion exchangers, pH of feed solutions, composition of sodium scrub solutions, composition of eluting solutions and overflow versus downflow elution. The cause and rate of zeolite degradation was investigated

  14. Direct determination of uranium in Purex process waste condensate samples by ICP-AES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes an inductively coupled argon plasma-atomic emission spectrometric (ICP-AES) method for the determination of trace concentrations of uranium (0.05-1ppm) in waste condensate sample of the Purex process. The method involves the direct measurement of uranium line intensity at 385.958 nm. The method enables the determination of uranium at 0.05 ppm level in the presence of corrosion product elements with a precision of 5% R.S.D. (author)

  15. Experimental analysis of Hybridised Energy Storage Systems for automotive applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwar, Wasim; Engstrom, Timothy; Marinescu, Monica; Green, Nick; Taylor, Nigel; Offer, Gregory J.

    2016-08-01

    The requirements of the Energy Storage System (ESS) for an electrified vehicle portfolio consisting of a range of vehicles from micro Hybrid Electric Vehicle (mHEV) to a Battery Electric Vehicle (BEV) vary considerably. To reduce development cost of an electrified powertrain portfolio, a modular system would ideally be scaled across each vehicle; however, the conflicting requirements of a mHEV and BEV prevent this. This study investigates whether it is possible to combine supercapacitors suitable for an mHEV with high-energy batteries suitable for use in a BEV to create a Hybridised Energy Storage System (HESS) suitable for use in a HEV. A passive HESS is found to be capable of meeting the electrical demands of a HEV drive cycle; the operating principles of HESSs are discussed and factors limiting system performance are explored. The performance of the HESS is found to be significantly less temperature dependent than battery-only systems, however the heat generated suggests a requirement for thermal management. As the HESS degrades (at a similar rate to a specialised high-power-battery), battery resistance rises faster than supercapacitor resistance; as a result, the supercapacitor provides a greater current contribution, therefore the energy throughput, temperature rise and degradation of the batteries is reduced.

  16. Technical and economic feasibility of thermal energy storage. Thermal energy storage application to the brick/ceramic industry. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn, D.R.

    1976-10-01

    An initial project to study the technical and economic feasibility of thermal energy storage (TES) in the three major consumer markets, namely, the residential, commercial and industrial sectors is described. A major objective of the study was to identify viable TES applications from which a more concise study could be launched, leading to a conceptual design and in-depth validation of the TES energy impacts. This report documents one such program. The brick/ceramic industries commonly use periodic kilns which by their operating cycle require time-variant energy supply and consequently variable heat rejection. This application was one of the numerous TES opportunities that emerged from the first study, now available from the ERDA Technical Information Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, identified as Report No. COO-2558-1.

  17. GTI's hydrogen programs: hydrogen production, storage, and applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范钦柏

    2006-01-01

    The use of hydrogen as an energy carrier could help address our concerns about energy security, global climate change,and air quality. Fuel cells are an important enabling technology for the Hydrogen Future and have the potential to revolutionize theway we power our nation, offering cleaner, more-efficient alternatives to the combustion of gasoline and other fossil fuels.For over 45 years, GTI has been active in hydrogen energy research, development and demonstration. The Institute has extensive experience and on-going work in all aspects of the hydrogen energy economy including production, delivery, infrastructure,use, safety and public policy. This paper discusses the recent GTI programs in hydrogen production, hydrogen storage, and proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) and solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC).

  18. The Current Status of Hydrogen Storage Alloy Development for Electrochemical Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Kwo-hsiung Young; Jean Nei

    2013-01-01

    In this review article, the fundamentals of electrochemical reactions involving metal hydrides are explained, followed by a report of recent progress in hydrogen storage alloys for electrochemical applications. The status of various alloy systems, including AB5, AB2, A2B7-type, Ti-Ni-based, Mg-Ni-based, BCC, and Zr-Ni-based metal hydride alloys, for their most important electrochemical application, the nickel metal hydride battery, is summarized. Other electrochemical applications, such as Ni...

  19. Short Term Energy Storage for Grid Support in Wind Power Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stroe, Daniel Ioan; Stan, Ana-Irina; Diosi, Robert;

    2012-01-01

    to increase the power system stability and the energy quality, is to integrate energy storage devices into wind power plants. This paper gives an overview of the state-of-the-art short-term energy storage devices and presents several applications which can be provided by the energy storage device...... - wind power plant combined system. Moreover, two methods for estimating the remaining useful lifetime of the energy storage devices are presented.......The penetration of wind power into the power system has been increasing in the recent years. Therefore, a lot of concerns related to the reliable operation of the power system have been addressed. An attractive solution to minimize the limitations faced by the wind power grid integration, and thus...

  20. High efficiency thermal energy storage system for utility applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A concept of coupling a high efficiency base loaded coal or nuclear power plant with a thermal energy storage scheme for efficient and low-cost intermediate and peaking power is presented. A portion of the power plant's thermal output is used directly to generate superheated steam for continuous operation of a conventional turbine-generator to product base-load power. The remaining thermal output is used on a continuous basis to heat a conventional heat transfer salt (such as the eutectic composition of KaNO3/NaNO3/NaNO2), which is stored in a high-temperature reservoir [5380C (10000F)]. During peak demand periods, the salt is circulated from the high-temperature reservoir to a low-temperature reservoir through steam generators in order to provide peaking power from a conventional steam cycle plant. The period of operation can vary, but may typically be the equivalent of about 4 to 8 full-power hours each day. The system can be tailored to meet the utilities' load demand by varying the base-load level and the period of operation of the peak-load system

  1. Thermal energy storage using phase change materials fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Fleischer, Amy S

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive introduction to the use of solid‐liquid phase change materials to store significant amounts of energy in the latent heat of fusion. The proper selection of materials for different applications is covered in detail, as is the use of high conductivity additives to enhance thermal diffusivity. Dr. Fleischer explores how applications of PCMS have expanded over the past 10 years to include the development of high efficiency building materials to reduce heating and cooling needs, smart material design for clothing, portable electronic systems thermal management, solar thermal power plant design and many others. Additional future research directions and challenges are also discussed.

  2. Storage and production of hydrogen for fuel cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, Rita

    The increased utilization of proton-exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells as an alternative to internal combustion engines is expected to increase the demand for hydrogen, which is used as the energy source in these systems. The objective of this work is to develop and test new methods for the storage and production of hydrogen for fuel cells. Six ligand-stabilized hydrides were synthesized and tested as hydrogen storage media for use in portable fuel cells. These novel compounds are more stable than classical hydrides (e.g., NaBH4, LiAlH4) and react to release hydrogen less exothermically upon hydrolysis with water. Three of the compounds produced hydrogen in high yield (88 to 100 percent of the theoretical) and at significantly lower temperatures than those required for the hydrolysis of NaBH4 and LiAlH4. However, a large excess of water and acid were required to completely wet the hydride and keep the pH of the reaction medium neutral. The hydrolysis of the classical hydrides with steam can overcome these limitations. This reaction was studied in a flow reactor and the results indicate that classical hydrides can be hydrolyzed with steam in high yields at low temperatures (110 to 123°C) and in the absence of acid. Although excess steam was required, the pH of the condensed steam was neutral. Consequently, steam could be recycled back to the reactor. Production of hydrogen for large-scale transportation fuel cells is primarily achieved via the steam reforming, partial oxidation or autothermal reforming of natural gas or the steam reforming of methanol. However, in all of these processes CO is a by-product that must be subsequently removed because the Pt-based electrocatalyst used in the fuel cells is poisoned by its presence. The direct cracking of methane over a Ni/SiO2 catalyst can produce CO-free hydrogen. In addition to hydrogen, filamentous carbon is also produced. This material accumulates on the catalyst and eventually deactivates it. The Ni/SiO2 catalyst

  3. Nanostructured Boron Nitride: From Molecular Design to Hydrogen Storage Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges Moussa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The spray-pyrolysis of borazine at 1400 °C under nitrogen generates boron nitride (BN nanoparticles (NPs. The as-prepared samples form elementary blocks containing slightly agglomerated NPs with sizes ranging from 55 to 120 nm, a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET-specific surface area of 34.6 m2 g−1 and a helium density of 1.95 g cm−3. They are relatively stable in air below 850 °C in which only oxidation of the NP surface proceeds, whereas under nitrogen, their lower size affects their high temperature thermal behavior in the temperature range of 1450–2000 °C. Nitrogen heat-treated nanostructures have been carefully analyzed using X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The high temperature treatment (2000 °C gives hollow-cored BN-NPs that are strongly facetted, and after ball-milling, hollow core-mesoporous shell NPs displaying a BET-specific surface area of 200.5 m2·g−1 and a total pore volume of 0.287 cm3·g−1 were produced. They have been used as host material to confine, then destabilize ammonia borane (AB, thus improving its dehydrogenation properties. The as-formed AB@BN nanocomposites liberated H2 at 40 °C, and H2 is pure in the temperature range 40–80 °C, leading to a safe and practical hydrogen storage composite material.

  4. Design aspects of integrated compact thermal storage system for solar dryer applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solar energy is an excellent source for drying of crops, fruits, vegetables and other agricultural and forest products. Though the availability of solar energy is plenty, it is time dependent in nature. The energy need for some applications is also time dependent, but in a different pattern and phase from the solar energy supply. This implies that the solar dryer should be integrated with an efficient thermal storage system to match the time-dependent supply and end-use requirements. Based on the studies carried out on Latent Heat Thermal Storage (LHTS) Systems, it is observed that when air is used as the heat transfer fluid in LHTS system, nearly uniform surface heat flux can be achieved. Hence the LHTS systems are most suitable for air based solar drying applications. In the present work some major conclusions arrived from the investigations on LHTS systems and the design considerations for the integrated latent heat thermal storage for the solar dryer are reported. (Author)

  5. Analysis Tools for Sizing and Placement of Energy Storage for Grid Applications - A Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, Michael G.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Sadovsky, Artyom; DeSteese, John G.

    2010-09-24

    The purpose of this report was to review pertinent literature and studies that might reveal models capable of optimizing the siting, sizing and economic value of energy storage in the future smart grid infrastructure. Energy storage technology and utility system deployment have been subjects of intense research and development for over three decades. During this time, many models have been developed that consider energy storage implementation in the electric power industry and other applications. Nevertheless, this review of literature discovered no actual models and only a few software tools that relate specifically to the application environment and expected requirements of the evolving smart grid infrastructure. This report indicates the existing need for such a model and describes a pathway for developing it.

  6. SCADS: Scale-Independent Storage for Social Computing Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Armbrust, Michael; Patterson, David; Lanham, Nick; Trushkowsky, Beth; Trutna, Jesse; Oh, Haruki

    2009-01-01

    Collaborative web applications such as Facebook, Flickr and Yelp present new challenges for storing and querying large amounts of data. As users and developers are focused more on performance than single copy consistency or the ability to perform ad-hoc queries, there exists an opportunity for a highly-scalable system tailored specifically for relaxed consistency and pre-computed queries. The Web 2.0 development model demands the ability to both rapidly deploy new features and automatically scale with the number of users. There have been many successful distributed key-value stores, but so far none provide as rich a query language as SQL. We propose a new architecture, SCADS, that allows the developer to declaratively state application specific consistency requirements, takes advantage of utility computing to provide cost effective scale-up and scale-down, and will use machine learning models to introspectively anticipate performance problems and predict the resource requirements of new queries before executi...

  7. Application of Cloud Storage on BIM Life-cycle Management

    OpenAIRE

    Lieyun Ding; Xun Xu

    2014-01-01

    Because of its high information intensity, strong consistency and convenient visualization features, building information modelling (BIM) has received widespread attention in the fields of construction and project management. However, due to large amounts of information, high integration, the need for resource sharing between various departments, the long time-span of the BIM application, challenges relating to data interoperability, security and cost all slow down the adoption of BIM. This p...

  8. Application of dielectric surface barrier discharge for food storage

    OpenAIRE

    Yassine BELLEBNA; Rabah OUIDDIR; Said NEMMICH; Amar TILMATINE

    2015-01-01

    Ozone (O3) is a powerful oxidizer and has much higher disinfection potential than chlorine and other disinfectants. Ozone finds its application mainly in water treatment and air purification Dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) method has proved to be the best method to produce ozone. Dried air or oxygen is forced to pass through a 1-2 mm gap. The aim of this study was to show that disinfection system using ozone generated by dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) is an effective ...

  9. Study on preparation and application performance of blue sky rare earth light storage and emission material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Under reduction atmosphere, a blue sky rare earth silicate light storage and emission material was prepared by high temperature solid phase synthesis. The best constituent ratio of this material was determined through orthogonal experiment, and its excitation and emission spectra and X-ray diffraction patterns were measured. And a comparative study was conducted on its application properties.

  10. Review of thermal energy storage technologies based on PCM application in buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pomianowski, Michal Zbigniew; Heiselberg, Per; Zhang, Yinping

    2013-01-01

    paid to discussion and identification of proper methods to correctly determine the thermal properties of PCM materials and their composites and as well procedures to determine their energy storage and saving potential. The purpose of the paper is to highlight promising technologies for PCM application...

  11. Research and application of Automatic Voltage Control in Tongbai Pumped Storage Power Station

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    The Automatic Voltage Control is significant technique of modem power grid operation, and it is one of important function of intelligent grid management, it plays an important role to ensure the security, high quality and economical operation of power grid. This paper introduces the research and application of Automatic Voltage Control in Tongtai Pumped Storage Power Station.

  12. Ammonia emissions factors from broiler litter in barns, storage, and after land application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammonia (NH3) emissions from poultry litter can cause high levels of NH3 in poultry rearing facilities, as well as atmospheric pollution. The objectives of this study were to: (1) measure NH3 emissions from litter in broiler houses, during storage and following land application, and (2) conduct a m...

  13. Integrating STATCOM and Battery Energy Storage System for Power System Transient Stability: A Review and Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arindam Chakraborty

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Integration of STATCOM with energy storage devices plays an imperative role in improving the power system operation and control. Significant research has been done in this area for practical realization of benefits of the integration. This paper, however, pays particular importance to the performance improvement for the transients as is achievable by STATCOM with battery-powered storage systems. Application of STATCOM with storage in regard to intermittent renewable energy sources such as wind power generation is also discussed in the paper. At the beginning of this paper, an overall review of the STATCOM and energy storage systems are elaborated. A brief overview of the advantages of using STATCOM in conjunction to energy storage systems in achieving power system stability is presented. In the second part of the paper, a typical transient stability model of a STATCOM is presented. The dynamics of real and reactive power responses of the integrated system to transients is studied. The study is aimed at showing that the combination of STATCOM and battery energy storage significantly improves the performance of the system. The final results show that the STATCOM reactive power/voltage control helps in transient stability enhancement.

  14. Battery Energy Storage System (BESS) and Battery Management System (BMS) for Grid-Scale Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawder, M. T.; Suthar, B.; Northrop, P. W. C.; De, S.; Hoff, C. M.; Leitermann, O.; Crow, M. L.; Santhanagopalan, S.; Subramanian, V. R.

    2014-05-07

    The current electric grid is an inefficient system that wastes significant amounts of the electricity it produces because there is a disconnect between the amount of energy consumers require and the amount of energy produced from generation sources. Power plants typically produce more power than necessary to ensure adequate power quality. By taking advantage of energy storage within the grid, many of these inefficiencies can be removed. Advanced modeling is required when using battery energy storage systems (BESS) for grid storage in order to accurately monitor and control the storage system. Battery management systems (BMS) control how the storage system will be used and a BMS that utilizes advanced physics-based models will offer for much more robust operation of the storage system. The paper outlines the current state of the art for modeling in BMS and the advanced models required to fully utilize BMS for both lithium-ion batteries and vanadium redox-flow batteries. In addition, system architecture and how it can be useful in monitoring and control is discussed. A pathway for advancing BMS to better utilize BESS for grid-scale applications is outlined.

  15. Application of Discrete Event Simulation in LPG Storage Operation and Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Dyntar

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present an application of discrete event simulation in Liquid Petroleum Gases (LPG storage operation and optimization. The proposed solution consists of Witness simulation model supported by MS Excel for data loading and outputs upgrading. The solution upgraded into the form of LPG Storage Simulator (LPG SIM adopts the principles of agent-based modeling and is suitable to support the decision making in LPG manufacturing, storing and distribution supply chain optimization. We apply our simulator to identify possible capacity constraints of LPG storage and expedition area owned by two operators (petrochemical company SYNTHOS Kralupy, a.s. and crude processing company ESK RAFINRSK, a.s. (CRC connected with planned intensification of LPG manufacturing. With help of LPG SIM we test 4 different varieties differing in the total amounts of products flowing from the CRC Fluid Catalytic Cracking unit to LPG storage and expedition area equipped with the rail way tank cars (RTC loading and road tank-trucks (RT loading terminal. For each simulated variety we specify the requirements on storage and expedition capacities ensuring the smooth product flows through the LPG storage area, gasoline blending requirements and the requirements on products expedition in RTC and RT.

  16. Conditioning, storage and disposal of radioactive waste from non-power applications in Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slovak Republic has centralised facilities for processing, storage and disposal of radioactive waste both from power generation facilities (NPPs) and from non-power nuclear applications. All these activities are carried out in accordance with the established legislative and administrative procedures. Combined and centralised system for radioactive waste management in Slovakia is described with emphasis of waste from non-power applications (institutional waste, spent sealed radioactive sources, etc.). (author)

  17. Liquid Crystal on Silicon Displays Characterization for Diffractive Applications and for Holographic Data Storage in Photopolymers

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Guardiola, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    In this PhD Thesis I present some methods for characterizing PA-LCoS microdisplays. It is useful to fully characterize this type of devices for evaluating its performance required in different applications. We have tested its validity in different applications such as diffractive optics elements (DOEs). Finally we apply these microdisplays in a full holographic data storage scheme using a photopolymer as holographic recording medium. We evaluate the capability of PVA/AA photopolymer for this ...

  18. Super-capacitor and Thin Film Battery Hybrid Energy Storage for Energy Harvesting Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wensi; Wang, Ningning; Vinco, Alessandro; Siddique, Rashid; Hayes, Mike; O'Flynn, Brendan; O'Mathuna, Cian

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents the design of hybrid energy storage unit (HESU) for energy harvesting applications using super-capacitor and thin film battery (TFB). The power management circuits of this hybrid energy storage unit are proposed to perform "smart" charge/discharge control in order to optimize the HESU from the perspectives of energy loss due to leakage current and equivalent series resistance (ESR). This paper shows the characterizations of ESUs for energy harvesting powered wireless sensor networks (WSN) applications. A new design of power management circuits is proposed in order to utilize the low ESR characteristics of super-capacitor and the low leakage current characteristics of the TFB in the hybrid energy storage. The average power loss due to leakage current is measured at 38μW in the proposed system. When Compared to the super-capacitor energy storage with the similar capacity, the proposed hybrid energy storage unit reduces the leakage power by approximately 45% whilst maintains a similar (<100 mΩ) ESR.

  19. Super-capacitor and Thin Film Battery Hybrid Energy Storage for Energy Harvesting Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the design of hybrid energy storage unit (HESU) for energy harvesting applications using super-capacitor and thin film battery (TFB). The power management circuits of this hybrid energy storage unit are proposed to perform ''smart'' charge/discharge control in order to optimize the HESU from the perspectives of energy loss due to leakage current and equivalent series resistance (ESR). This paper shows the characterizations of ESUs for energy harvesting powered wireless sensor networks (WSN) applications. A new design of power management circuits is proposed in order to utilize the low ESR characteristics of super-capacitor and the low leakage current characteristics of the TFB in the hybrid energy storage. The average power loss due to leakage current is measured at 38μW in the proposed system. When Compared to the super-capacitor energy storage with the similar capacity, the proposed hybrid energy storage unit reduces the leakage power by approximately 45% whilst maintains a similar (<100 mΩ) ESR

  20. Cane Fiberboard Degradation within the 9975 Shipping Package during Long-Term Storage Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 9975 shipping package is used as part of the configuration for long-term storage of special nuclear materials in the K Area Complex at the Savannah River Site. The cane fiberboard overpack in the 9975 package provides thermal insulation, impact absorption and criticality control functions relevant to this application. The Savannah River National Laboratory has conducted physical, mechanical and thermal tests on aged fiberboard samples to identify degradation rates and support the development of aging models and service life predictions in a storage environment. This paper reviews the data generated to date, and preliminary models describing degradation rates of cane fiberboard in elevated temperature – elevated humidity environments.

  1. Dietary Fibre in Pig's Diets: Effects on Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Slurry Storage to Field Application

    OpenAIRE

    Estellés, Fernando; Sanz Cobeña, Alberto; Beccaccia, Alba; Antezana, W.; Cambra López, M.; Ferrer, Pablo; Cerisuelo, A.; García Rebollar, Pilar; Vallejo Garcia, Antonio; Blas, C. de; Calvet, Salvador

    2014-01-01

    Pig’s slurry is a key source of greenhouse gases (GHG). In Spain, GHG emissions (CH4+ N2O) from pig slurry (storage and land application) accounted in 2011 for 18.4% of total GHG emissions (in CO2- equivalent) of the agriculture sector according to the National Inventory Report (NIR). Slurry composition can be modified through diet manipulation. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of different fibre types in fattening pigs’ diets on GHG emissions from pig slurry storag...

  2. Thermal energy storage technologies for sustainability systems design, assessment and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kalaiselvam, S

    2014-01-01

    Thermal Energy Storage Technologies for Sustainability is a broad-based overview describing the state-of-the-art in latent, sensible, and thermo-chemical energy storage systems and their applications across industries. Beginning with a discussion of the efficiency and conservation advantages of balancing energy demand with production, the book goes on to describe current state-of-the art technologies. Not stopping with description, the authors also discuss design, modeling, and simulation of representative systems, and end with several case studies of systems in use.Describes how thermal energ

  3. Solid-state structures and properties of scandium hydride; hydrogen storage and switchable mirrors application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodja, Khadidja; Bouhadda, Youcef; Seddik, Larbi; Benyelloul, Kamel

    2016-05-01

    First-principles calculation has been performed on the rare earth hydride ScH2 for hydrogen storage and switchable mirror applications, using the pseudo-potentials and plane waves based on the density-functional theory (DFT). The electronic and structural properties are studied within both local-density and generalized gradient approximations for exchange energy. The formation energy and the optical properties have been investigated and discussed. Our calculated results are generally in good agreement with theoretical and experimental data. Contribution to the topical issue "Materials for Energy Harvesting, Conversion and Storage (ICOME 2015) - Elected submissions", edited by Jean-Michel Nunzi, Rachid Bennacer and Mohammed El Ganaoui

  4. Laboratory studies on the evolution of iodine-129 during Purex-uranium metal dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The path of iodine from the Purex dissolver was determined during fuel dissolution using 125I tracer. Laboratory-scale equipment qualification studies were completed using sections of nonirradiated uranium N-reactor fuel elements. A proof-of-principle dissolution study was completed at the end of FY 1979 in the PNL hot cells using wafers of irradiated N-reactor fuel. The findings include the following: the laboratory-scale dissolver/downdraft condenser was designed at a factor of 5 x 10-5 of the Purex flowsheet; with no refluxing, 5.6 moles of HNO3 were required per mole of dissolved uranium. With NO/sub x/ recovery in the reflux stream, an average of 3.6 moles of HNO3 was required. These results formed the basis for adequate modeling of the laboratory Purex downdraft dissolver; approximately 8% of the iodine was found in the final dissolver solution when the 125I tracer was added to the initial dissolver solution prior to the first cut, 6-h dissolution; when the 125I was added continuously during the 6-h dissolution without any refluxing of the condenser acid back to the dissolver, approximately 16% of the iodine was found in the dissolver solution; when irradiated N-reactor fuel was dissolved while 125I tracer was continuously added to the dissolver during the 6-h test, 11% of the 125I tracer was found in the dissolver solution. After 2 h of refluxing with air sparging, 6% of the 125I tracer was found in the dissolver solution; and analysis of the fission product 129I in the fuel duplicated the tracer study results with 8% and 7% of the iodine remaining in the dissolver solution after 6 and 8 h, respectively

  5. A preliminary dynamic behaviors analysis of a hybrid energy storage system based on adiabatic compressed air energy storage and flywheel energy storage system for wind power application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Integrating energy storage system into wind system can mitigate the negative effects caused by the intermittent wind. In addition, the spectrum analysis of wind power implies that the hybrid energy storage system may have better performance on smoothing out the wind power fluctuations than the independent energy storage system. The main advantage of the hybrid energy storage system is the multi-response speeds. Also, the hybrid energy storage system often operates in the modes switch, partial load and frequent start/stop conditions. Thus, the dynamic behaviors of each devices and the assembly of hybrid energy storage system are important for the system operation and control system design. The design, off-design analysis and parametric analysis of a wind-hybrid energy storage system consisting an A-CAES (adiabatic compressed air energy storage) system and a FESS (flywheel energy storage system) based on spectrum analysis method are carried out in the previous paper (P Zhao et al., 2014). This paper will conduct a preliminary dynamic behaviors analysis of the proposed wind-hybrid energy storage system based on the dynamic models. The simulation results indicate that the total power of wind-hybrid energy storage system can fit the load requirement well, providing an efficient power management for wind power penetration. - Highlights: • A hybrid energy storage system based on A-CAES and FESS is proposed. • Dynamic model of a wind-hybrid energy storage system is laid out. • Dynamic behaviors of wind-hybrid energy storage system are investigated. • The power output of wind-hybrid energy storage system can fit the load well

  6. Advance purex process for the new reprocessing plants in France and in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the early Eighties, Japanese utilities formed the Japan Nuclear Fuel Service Co (JNFS), which is in charge of the construction and the operation of the first commercial reprocessing plant in Japan to be erected in Rokkasho Village, Aomori Prefecture. Following a thorough worldwide examination of available processes and technologies, JNFS selected the French technology developed for UP3 and UP2 800 for the plants' main facilities. For these three new plants, the 40-year old PUREX process which is used worldwide for spent fuel reprocessing, has been significantly improved. This paper describes some of the innovative features of the selected processes

  7. Modified Purex process for the separation and recovery of plutonium--uranium residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navratil, J.D.; Leebl, R.G.

    1978-07-08

    A modified (one-cycle) Purex process has been developed for the separation and recovery of plutonium and uranium from mixed actinide residues. The process utilizes 30 vol % tributyl phosphate--dodecane to extract uranium from a 5M nitric acid-plutonium (III)-uranium(VI) feed. After uranium extraction, plutonium in the aqueous feed solution is purified by anion exchange technology. Uranium in the organic is scrubbed and stripped to effectively purify the uranium so that it contains <5,000 ppM plutonium. The process has been used successfully to separate residues consisting of plutonium and uranium oxide.

  8. Studies on the separation of radiochemically pure 90Sr from PUREX HLLW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies carried out in this paper deal with the recovery of 90Sr from PUREX-HLLW using only solid-liquid separation routes. Initially, majority of 137Cs is removed by ammonium molybdophosphate to reduce the radiation level. This was followed by a pH controlled hydroxide precipitation to remove the hydrolysable cations after adding Sr carrier. Finally, Sr is precipitated as carbonate. The precipitate is washed free of 137Cs. The scheme was tested with simulated PHWR-HLLW as well as with a diluted actual research reactor - HLLW. Sr recovery exceeding 95% was obtained with good purity. (author)

  9. Study of the formation, prevention, and recovery of plutonium from plutonium esters in the Purex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Savannah River Plant uses the basic Purex process to separate 239Pu from 238U and fission products. Dark-brown, dense solids containing up to 30% Pu have previously occurred in rotameters in the plutonium finishing operations. The kinetics of formation of this mixture of DBP- and MBP-Pu esters suggest two methods to prevent the formation of the solids. A selective dissolution method using NaOH metathesis has been developed to separate the phosphate ester from the plutonium before dissolution of the residual plutonium hydroxide in a HNO3-HF medium

  10. Developments in organic solid–liquid phase change materials and their applications in thermal energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Review of organic phase change materials for thermal energy storage. • Review of the eutectic mixtures of organic PCMs. • Review of the techniques of PCM encapsulations and enhancing the thermal conductivity. • Applications of low and medium temperature organic PCMs are listed in detail. • Recommendations are made for future applications of organic PCMs. - Abstract: Thermal energy storage as sensible or latent heat is an efficient way to conserve the waste heat and excess energy available such as solar radiation. Storage of latent heat using organic phase change materials (PCMs) offers greater energy storage density over a marginal melting and freezing temperature difference in comparison to inorganic materials. These favorable characteristics of organic PCMs make them suitable in a wide range of applications. These materials and their eutectic mixtures have been successfully tested and implemented in many domestic and commercial applications such as, building, electronic devices, refrigeration and air-conditioning, solar air/water heating, textiles, automobiles, food, and space industries. This review focuses on three aspects: the materials, encapsulation and applications of organic PCMs, and provides an insight on the recent developments in applications of these materials. Organic PCMs have inherent characteristic of low thermal conductivity (0.15–0.35 W/m K), hence, a larger surface area is required to enhance the heat transfer rate. Therefore, attention is also given to the thermal conductivity enhancement of the materials, which helps to keep the area of the system to a minimum. Besides, various available techniques for material characterization have also been discussed. It has been found that a wide range of the applications of organic PCMs in buildings and other low and medium temperature solar energy applications are in abundant use but these materials are not yet popular among space applications and virtual data storage media. In

  11. Analysis of H2 storage needs for early market non-motive fuel cell applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Terry Alan; Moreno, Marcina; Arienti, Marco; Pratt, Joseph William; Shaw, Leo; Klebanoff, Leonard E.

    2012-03-01

    Hydrogen fuel cells can potentially reduce greenhouse gas emissions and the United States dependence on foreign oil, but issues with hydrogen storage are impeding their widespread use. To help overcome these challenges, this study analyzes opportunities for their near-term deployment in five categories of non-motive equipment: portable power, construction equipment, airport ground support equipment, telecom backup power, and man-portable power and personal electronics. To this end, researchers engaged end users, equipment manufacturers, and technical experts via workshops, interviews, and electronic means, and then compiled these data into meaningful and realistic requirements for hydrogen storage in specific target applications. In addition to developing these requirements, end-user benefits (e.g., low noise and emissions, high efficiency, potentially lower maintenance costs) and concerns (e.g., capital cost, hydrogen availability) of hydrogen fuel cells in these applications were identified. Market data show potential deployments vary with application from hundreds to hundreds of thousands of units.

  12. A Toolkit For Storage Qos Provisioning For Data-Intensive Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Słota

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a programming toolkit developed in the PL-Grid project, named QStorMan, which supports storage QoS provisioning for data-intensive applications in distributed environments. QStorMan exploits knowledge-oriented methods for matching storage resources to non-functional requirements, which are defined for a data-intensive application. In order to support various usage scenarios, QStorMan provides two interfaces, such as programming libraries or a web portal. The interfaces allow to define the requirements either directly in an application source code or by using an intuitive graphical interface. The first way provides finer granularity, e.g., each portion of data processed by an application can define a different set of requirements. The second method is aimed at legacy applications support, which source code can not be modified. The toolkit has been evaluated using synthetic benchmarks and the production infrastructure of PL-Grid, in particular its storage infrastructure, which utilizes the Lustre file system.

  13. Hydrogen Research for Spaceport and Space-Based Applications: Hydrogen Production, Storage, and Transport. Part 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Tim; Balaban, Canan

    2008-01-01

    The activities presented are a broad based approach to advancing key hydrogen related technologies in areas such as fuel cells, hydrogen production, and distributed sensors for hydrogen-leak detection, laser instrumentation for hydrogen-leak detection, and cryogenic transport and storage. Presented are the results from research projects, education and outreach activities, system and trade studies. The work will aid in advancing the state-of-the-art for several critical technologies related to the implementation of a hydrogen infrastructure. Activities conducted are relevant to a number of propulsion and power systems for terrestrial, aeronautics and aerospace applications. Hydrogen storage and in-space hydrogen transport research focused on developing and verifying design concepts for efficient, safe, lightweight liquid hydrogen cryogenic storage systems. Research into hydrogen production had a specific goal of further advancing proton conducting membrane technology in the laboratory at a larger scale. System and process trade studies evaluated the proton conducting membrane technology, specifically, scale-up issues.

  14. Thermal energy storage - A review of concepts and systems for heating and cooling applications in buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pavlov, Georgi Krasimiroy; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2012-01-01

    period required, economic viability, and operating conditions. One of the main issues impeding the utilization of the full potential of natural and renewable energy sources, e.g., solar and geothermal, for space heating and space cooling applications is the development of economically competitive and...... reliable means for seasonal storage of thermal energy. This is particularly true at locations where seasonal variations of solar radiation are significant and/or in climates where seasonally varying space heating and cooling loads dominate energy consumption. This article conducts a literature review of......The use of thermal energy storage (TES) in buildings in combination with space heating and/or space cooling has recently received much attention. A variety of TES techniques have developed over the past decades. TES systems can provide short-term storage for peak-load shaving as well as long...

  15. High capacity hydrogen storage materials: attributes for automotive applications and techniques for materials discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Sudik, Andrea; Wolverton, Christopher; Siegel, Donald J

    2010-02-01

    Widespread adoption of hydrogen as a vehicular fuel depends critically upon the ability to store hydrogen on-board at high volumetric and gravimetric densities, as well as on the ability to extract/insert it at sufficiently rapid rates. As current storage methods based on physical means--high-pressure gas or (cryogenic) liquefaction--are unlikely to satisfy targets for performance and cost, a global research effort focusing on the development of chemical means for storing hydrogen in condensed phases has recently emerged. At present, no known material exhibits a combination of properties that would enable high-volume automotive applications. Thus new materials with improved performance, or new approaches to the synthesis and/or processing of existing materials, are highly desirable. In this critical review we provide a practical introduction to the field of hydrogen storage materials research, with an emphasis on (i) the properties necessary for a viable storage material, (ii) the computational and experimental techniques commonly employed in determining these attributes, and (iii) the classes of materials being pursued as candidate storage compounds. Starting from the general requirements of a fuel cell vehicle, we summarize how these requirements translate into desired characteristics for the hydrogen storage material. Key amongst these are: (a) high gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen density, (b) thermodynamics that allow for reversible hydrogen uptake/release under near-ambient conditions, and (c) fast reaction kinetics. To further illustrate these attributes, the four major classes of candidate storage materials--conventional metal hydrides, chemical hydrides, complex hydrides, and sorbent systems--are introduced and their respective performance and prospects for improvement in each of these areas is discussed. Finally, we review the most valuable experimental and computational techniques for determining these attributes, highlighting how an approach that

  16. Separation of 90Sr from Purex high level waste and development of a 90Sr-90Y generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    90Y (T1/2=64.2 h) finds several applications in nuclear medicine. It is formed from the decay of 90Sr which has a long half-life of 28.8 years. 90Sr can be used as a long-lasting source for the production of carrier-free 90Y. 90Sr itself is abundantly available in high level waste (HLW) of PUREX origin. The present studies deal with the separation of pure 90Sr from HLW and the subsequent separation of 90Y from 90Sr. Actinides and some of the fission products like lanthanides, zirconium, molybdenum and cesium were first removed from the HLW using methods based on solvent extraction and ion-exchange studied earlier in our laboratory. The resulting waste solution was used as a feed for the present process. The separation of 90Sr from HLW was based on radiochemical method which involved a repeated scavenging with ferric hydroxide followed by strontium carbonate precipitation. The separation of 90Y from 90Sr was achieved by membrane separation technique. A compact generator is developed for this separation using a commercially available polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membrane, impregnated with indigenously synthesised 2-ethylhexyl 2-ethylhexyl phosphonic acid (KSM-17). Generator system overcomes the drawbacks associated with conventional solvent extraction and ion-exchange based generators. The product is in chloride form and is suitable for complexation studies. After gaining an operating experience of ∼3 years in generating carrier-free 90Y at 2 mCi level for initial studies in radiotherapeutic applications, the process was scaled up for the production of about 12 mCi of 90Y to be used for animal studies before its application to patients. Radiochemical and chemical purity of the product was critically assayed by radiometry, ICP-AES, etc. The process is amenable for further scaling up. (author)

  17. The Current Status of Hydrogen Storage Alloy Development for Electrochemical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwo-hsiung Young

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this review article, the fundamentals of electrochemical reactions involving metal hydrides are explained, followed by a report of recent progress in hydrogen storage alloys for electrochemical applications. The status of various alloy systems, including AB5, AB2, A2B7-type, Ti-Ni-based, Mg-Ni-based, BCC, and Zr-Ni-based metal hydride alloys, for their most important electrochemical application, the nickel metal hydride battery, is summarized. Other electrochemical applications, such as Ni-hydrogen, fuel cell, Li-ion battery, air-metal hydride, and hybrid battery systems, also have been mentioned.

  18. A study of the applicability/compatibility of inertial energy storage systems to future space missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weldon, W. F.

    1980-01-01

    The applicability/compatibility of inertial energy storage systems like the homopolar generator (HPG) and the compensated pulsed alternator (CPA) to future space missions is explored. Areas of CPA and HPG design requiring development for space applications are identified. The manner in which acceptance parameters of the CPA and HPG scale with operating parameters of the machines are explored and the types of electrical loads which are compatible with the CPA and HPG are examined. Potential applications including the magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster, pulsed data transmission, laser ranging, welding and electromagnetic space launch are discussed.

  19. Innovative applications of energy storage in a restructured electricity marketplace : Phase III final report : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eyer, James M. (Distributed Utility Associates, Livermore, CA); Erdman, Bill (Distributed Utility Associates, Livermore, CA); Iannucci, Joseph J., Jr. (, . Distributed Utility Associates, Livermore, CA)

    2005-03-01

    This report describes Phase III of a project entitled Innovative Applications of Energy Storage in a Restructured Electricity Marketplace. For this study, the authors assumed that it is feasible to operate an energy storage plant simultaneously for two primary applications: (1) energy arbitrage, i.e., buy-low-sell-high, and (2) to reduce peak loads in utility ''hot spots'' such that the utility can defer their need to upgrade transmission and distribution (T&D) equipment. The benefits from the arbitrage plus T&D deferral applications were estimated for five cases based on the specific requirements of two large utilities operating in the Eastern U.S. A number of parameters were estimated for the storage plant ratings required to serve the combined application: power output (capacity) and energy discharge duration (energy storage). In addition to estimating the various financial expenditures and the value of electricity that could be realized in the marketplace, technical characteristics required for grid-connected distributed energy storage used for capacity deferral were also explored.

  20. The Design and Application of Data Storage System in Miyun Satellite Ground Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xiping; Su, Yan; Zhang, Hongbo; Liu, Bin; Yao, Meijuan; Zhao, Shu

    2015-04-01

    China has launched Chang'E-3 satellite in 2013, firstly achieved soft landing on moon for China's lunar probe. Miyun satellite ground station firstly used SAN storage network system based-on Stornext sharing software in Chang'E-3 mission. System performance fully meets the application requirements of Miyun ground station data storage.The Stornext file system is a sharing file system with high performance, supports multiple servers to access the file system using different operating system at the same time, and supports access to data on a variety of topologies, such as SAN and LAN. Stornext focused on data protection and big data management. It is announced that Quantum province has sold more than 70,000 licenses of Stornext file system worldwide, and its customer base is growing, which marks its leading position in the big data management.The responsibilities of Miyun satellite ground station are the reception of Chang'E-3 satellite downlink data and management of local data storage. The station mainly completes exploration mission management, receiving and management of observation data, and provides a comprehensive, centralized monitoring and control functions on data receiving equipment. The ground station applied SAN storage network system based on Stornext shared software for receiving and managing data reliable.The computer system in Miyun ground station is composed by business running servers, application workstations and other storage equipments. So storage systems need a shared file system which supports heterogeneous multi-operating system. In practical applications, 10 nodes simultaneously write data to the file system through 16 channels, and the maximum data transfer rate of each channel is up to 15MB/s. Thus the network throughput of file system is not less than 240MB/s. At the same time, the maximum capacity of each data file is up to 810GB. The storage system planned requires that 10 nodes simultaneously write data to the file system through 16

  1. MnO2 Based Nanostructures for Supercapacitor Energy Storage Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Wei

    2013-11-01

    Nanostructured materials provide new and exciting approaches to the development of supercapacitor electrodes for high-performance electrochemical energy storage applications. One of the biggest challenges in materials science and engineering, however, is to prepare the nanomaterials with desirable characteristics and to engineer the structures in proper ways. This dissertation presents the successful preparation and application of very promising materials in the area of supercapacitor energy storage, including manganese dioxide and its composites, polyaniline and activated carbons. Attention has been paid to understanding their growth process and performance in supercapacitor devices. The morphological and electrochemical cycling effects, which contribute to the understanding of the energy storage mechanism of MnO2 based supercapacitors is thoroughly investigated. In addition, MnO2 based binary (MnO2-carbon nanocoils, MnO2-graphene) and ternary (MnO2-carbon nanotube-graphene) nanocomposites, as well as two novel electrodes (MnO2-carbon nanotube-textile and MnO2-carbon nanotube-sponge) have been studied as supercapacitor electrode materials, showing much improved electrochemical storage performance with good energy and power densities. Furthermore, a general chemical route was introduced to synthesize different conducting polymers and activated carbons by taking the MnO2 nanostructures as reactive templates. The electrochemical behaviors of the polyaniline and activated nanocarbon supercapacitors demonstrate the morphology-dependent enhancement of capacitance. Excellent energy and power densities were obtained from the template-derived polyaniline and activated carbon based supercapacitors, indicating the success of our proposed chemical route toward the preparation of high performance supercapacitor materials. The work discussed in this dissertation conclusively showed the significance of the preparation of desirable nanomaterials and the design of effective

  2. Pressure Relief Devices for High-Pressure Gaseous Storage Systems: Applicability to Hydrogen Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostival, A.; Rivkin, C.; Buttner, W.; Burgess, R.

    2013-11-01

    Pressure relief devices (PRDs) are viewed as essential safety measures for high-pressure gas storage and distribution systems. These devices are used to prevent the over-pressurization of gas storage vessels and distribution equipment, except in the application of certain toxic gases. PRDs play a critical role in the implementation of most high-pressure gas storage systems and anyone working with these devices should understand their function so they can be designed, installed, and maintained properly to prevent any potentially dangerous or fatal incidents. As such, the intention of this report is to introduce the reader to the function of the common types of PRDs currently used in industry. Since high-pressure hydrogen gas storage systems are being developed to support the growing hydrogen energy infrastructure, several recent failure incidents, specifically involving hydrogen, will be examined to demonstrate the results and possible mechanisms of a device failure. The applicable codes and standards, developed to minimize the risk of failure for PRDs, will also be reviewed. Finally, because PRDs are a critical component for the development of a successful hydrogen energy infrastructure, important considerations for pressure relief devices applied in a hydrogen gas environment will be explored.

  3. Hydroxamic acids - novel reagents for advanced Purex processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BNFL has undertaken a wide-ranging research programme to investigate the fundamental properties of hydroxamic acids and, in particular, their reactions with actinide ions. Most work has focussed on simple hydroxamic acids (R = H and CH3) although some comparative data with more complex molecules including di-hydroxamates have been obtained. Properties of hydroxamic acids studied include, hydrolysis in nitric acid, decomposition to gases, pKa's and redox potentials. The redox and co-ordination of actinides by hydroxamic acids has been investigated using a range of techniques and stability constants for both 4f and 5f hydroxamate complexes have been determined. In conjunction with these fundamental studies, more applied work has been carried out to assess the applications of simple hydroxamic acids under process conditions. A large database of solvent extraction distribution data has been accumulated and, from this, extraction algorithms describing how hydroxamic acids modify actinide extraction in to TBP have been derived. Also the effects of hydroxamic acids on U and Np mass transfer has been studied in single stage centrifugal contactors and this has been modelled theoretically. The third stage of our development work so far has looked at the actual testing of novel hydroxamic acid based flowsheets which selectively strip Np(IV) from a uranium loaded TBP stream. (authors)

  4. Stability and modification of passive films of new PUREX-materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The valve metals Ti, Zr and others and their alloys can be used in nitric acid solutions of the Purex process. They are protected by passive films which are stable at least at low temperatures and concentrations. Electrochemical investigations and corrosion tests are applied to check improvements of the materials. Niobium can be used to substitute the very expensive tantalum. Electrochemical and analytical investigations show the formation of the corrosion stable oxide film. Special problems are treated, such as the stability of welded joints or the influence of radioactive irradiation. α-radiation and hot atoms are simulated by ion implantation, β- and γ-radiation are simulated by laser light. In both types of experiments no decrease of stability is indicated. The alloy Ti5Ta is more stable than Ti, but it is not as good as Ta. Other alloys of Ti were investigated, but they are not suitable for the Purex process. New protection layers are tested. With respect to their preparation as well as their corrosion stability, ANOF-films are promising, but TiN-films are not stable enough. (orig.) With 71 refs., 7 tabs., 71 figs

  5. Studies in support of an SNM cutoff agreement: The PUREX exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On September 23, 1993, President Clinton, in a speech before the United Nations General Assembly, called for an international agreement banning the production of plutonium and highly enriched uranium for nuclear explosive purposes. A major element of any verification regime for such an agreement would probably involve inspections of reprocessing plants in Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty weapons states. Many of these are large facilities built in the 1950s with no thought that they would be subject to international inspection. To learn about some of the problems that might be involved in the inspection of such large, old facilities, the Department of Energy, Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation, sponsored a mock inspection exercise at the PUREX plant on the Hanford Site. This exercise examined a series of alternatives for inspections of the PUREX as a model for this type of facility at other locations. A series of conclusions were developed that can be used to guide the development of verification regimes for a cutoff agreement at reprocessing facilities

  6. Selective recovery of americium alone from PUREX or COEXTM raffinate by the EXAm process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Americium is the main contributor to the long-term radiotoxicity and to the heat generation of glasses used for the HLW conditioning. To decrease both impact on the ultimate waste and to avoid the difficult recycling of curium, the CEA has developed the EXAm process for the the separation and the recovery of the sole americium directly from PUREX or COEXTM raffinates. The principle of the EXAm process is to extract americium and light lanthanides from high nitric acid media, leaving curium and heavy lanthanides in the raffinate. A water-soluble amide molecule, TEDGA, is added in aqueous phase to increase Am/Cm and Am/heavy lanthanides selectivity, because of the preferential complexation of curium and heavy lanthanides by this diglycolamide. Many experimental data have been acquired mainly at the extraction-scrubbing step (Am/Cm separation) and were used for the development of a phenomenological model implemented in the PAREX process simulation code. The scientific feasibility demonstration of the EXAm process was then performed on a genuine PUREX raffinate in Atalante CBP hot cell in 2010. (author)

  7. Synthesis Of Graphene Nanomaterials And Their Application In Electrochemical Energy Storage

    OpenAIRE

    Xiong, Guoping

    2013-01-01

    The need to store and use energy on diverse scales in a modern technological society necessitates the design of large and small energy systems, among which electrical energy storage systems such as batteries and capacitors have attracted much interest in the past several decades. Supercapacitors, also known as ultracapacitors, or electrochemical capacitors, with fast power delivery and long cycle life are complementing or even replacing batteries in many applications. The rapid development of...

  8. Technical Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage Systems for Automotive Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahluwalia, R. K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hua, T. Q. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Peng, J. -K [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kromer, M. [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); Lasher, S. [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); McKenney, K. [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); Law, K. [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); Sinha, J. [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States)

    2011-06-21

    In 2007-2009, the DOE Hydrogen Program conducted a technical assessment of organic liquid carrier based hydrogen storage systems for automotive applications, consistent with the Program’s Multiyear Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan. This joint performance (ANL) and cost analysis (TIAX) report summarizes the results of this assessment. These results should be considered only in conjunction with the assumptions used in selecting, evaluating, and costing the systems discussed here and in the Appendices.

  9. Development of Cellulose-Based, Nanostructured, Conductive Paper for Biomolecular Extraction and Energy Storage Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Razaq, Aamir

    2011-01-01

    Conductive paper materials consisting of conductive polymers and cellulose are promising for high-tech applications (energy storage and biosciences) due to outstanding aspects of environmental friendliness, mechanical flexibility, electrical conductivity and efficient electroactive behavior. Recently, a conductive composite paper material was developed by covering the individual nanofibers of cellulose from the green algae Cladophora with a polypyrrole (PPy) layer. The PPy-Cladophora cellulos...

  10. Characterization and optimization of liquid crystal displays for data storage applications

    OpenAIRE

    Márquez Ruiz, Andrés; Gallego Rico, Sergi; Méndez Alcaraz, David Israel; Álvarez López, Mariela Lázara; Fernández Varó, Elena; Ortuño Sánchez, Manuel; Beléndez Vázquez, Augusto; Pascual Villalobos, Inmaculada

    2007-01-01

    We present the characterization and the optimization of the phase and amplitude modulation of a liquid crystal display (LCD) applied to holographic data storage. We discuss the main LCD modulation regimes demanded in the literature in the application to holographic memories: binary amplitude, binary phase and hybrid ternary modulation (HTM). We show how to obtain optimally these modulation regimes with a LCD. In our strategy it is essential the accuracy demonstrated by the model we use to des...

  11. Energy storage

    CERN Document Server

    Brunet, Yves

    2013-01-01

    Energy storage examines different applications such as electric power generation, transmission and distribution systems, pulsed systems, transportation, buildings and mobile applications. For each of these applications, proper energy storage technologies are foreseen, with their advantages, disadvantages and limits. As electricity cannot be stored cheaply in large quantities, energy has to be stored in another form (chemical, thermal, electromagnetic, mechanical) and then converted back into electric power and/or energy using conversion systems. Most of the storage technologies are examined: b

  12. Synthesis and Engineering Materials Properties of Fluid Phase Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials for Automotive Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Young Joon; Westman, Matthew P.; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Chun, Jaehun; Ronnebro, Ewa

    2015-09-01

    Among candidates for chemical hydrogen storage in PEM fuel cell automotive applications, ammonia borane (AB, NH3BH3) is considered to be one of the most promising materials due to its high practical hydrogen content of 14-16 wt%. This material is selected as a surrogate chemical for a hydrogen storage system. For easier transition to the existing infrastructure, a fluid phase hydrogen storage material is very attractive and thus, we investigated the engineering materials properties of AB in liquid carriers for a chemical hydrogen storage slurry system. Slurries composed of AB and high temperature liquids were prepared by mechanical milling and sonication in order to obtain stable and fluidic properties. Volumetric gas burette system was adopted to observe the kinetics of the H2 release reactions of the AB slurry and neat AB. Viscometry and microscopy were employed to further characterize slurries engineering properties. Using a tip-sonication method we have produced AB/silicone fluid slurries at solid loadings up to 40wt% (6.5wt% H2) with viscosities less than 500cP at 25°C.

  13. Application of new and novel fracture stimulation technologies to enhance the deliverability of gas storage wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    Based on the information presented in this report, our conclusions regarding the potential for new and novel fracture stimulation technologies to enhance the deliverability of gas storage wells are as follows: New and improved gas storage well revitalization methods have the potential to save industry on the order of $20-25 million per year by mitigating deliverability decline and reducing the need for costly infill wells Fracturing technologies have the potential to fill this role, however operators have historically been reluctant to utilize this approach due to concerns with reservoir seal integrity. With advanced treatment design tools and methods, however, this risk can be minimized. Of the three major fracturing classifications, namely hydraulic, pulse and explosive, two are believed to hold potential to gas storage applications (hydraulic and pulse). Five particular fracturing technologies, namely tip-screenout fracturing, fracturing with liquid carbon dioxide, and fracturing with gaseous nitrogen, which are each hydraulic methods, and propellant and nitrogen pulse fracturing, which are both pulse methods, are believed to hold potential for gas storage applications and will possibly be tested as part of this project. Field evidence suggests that, while traditional well remediation methods such as blowing/washing, mechanical cleaning, etc. do improve well deliverability, wells are still left damaged afterwards, suggesting that considerable room for further deliverability enhancement exists. Limited recent trials of hydraulic fracturing imply that this approach does in fact provide superior deliverability results, but further RD&D work is needed to fully evaluate and demonstrate the benefits and safe application of this as well as other fracture stimulation technologies.

  14. Thermal energy storage for building heating and cooling applications. Quarterly progress report, April--June 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, H.W.; Kedl, R.J.

    1976-11-01

    This is the first in a series of quarterly progress reports covering activities at ORNL to develop thermal energy storage (TES) technology applicable to building heating and cooling. Studies to be carried out will emphasize latent heat storage in that sensible heat storage is held to be an essentially existing technology. Development of a time-dependent analytical model of a TES system charged with a phase-change material was started. A report on TES subsystems for application to solar energy sources is nearing completion. Studies into the physical chemistry of TES materials were initiated. Preliminary data were obtained on the melt-freeze cycle behavior and viscosities of sodium thiosulfate pentahydrate and a mixture of Glauber's salt and Borax; limited melt-freeze data were obtained on two paraffin waxes. A subcontract was signed with Monsanto Research Corporation for studies on form-stable crystalline polymer pellets for TES; subcontracts are being negotiated with four other organizations (Clemson University, Dow Chemical Company, Franklin Institute, and Suntek Research Associates). Review of 10 of 13 unsolicited proposals received was completed by the end of June 1976.

  15. Metal hydride hydrogen and heat storage systems as enabling technology for spacecraft applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A metal hydride tank concept for heat and hydrogen storage is presented. • The tank is part of a closed-loop reversible fuel cell system for space application. • For several engineering issues specific to the spacecraft application, solutions have been developed. • The effect of water contamination has been approximated for Ti-doped NaAlH4. • A novel heat exchanger design has been realized by Selective Laser Melting. - Abstract: The next generation of telecommunication satellites will demand a platform payload performance in the range of 30+ kW within the next 10 years. At this high power output, a Regenerative Fuel Cell Systems (RFCS) offers an efficiency advantage in specific energy density over lithium ion batteries. However, a RFCS creates a substantial amount of heat (60–70 kJ per mol H2) during fuel cell operation. This requires a thermal hardware that accounts for up to 50% of RFCS mass budget. Thus the initial advantage in specific energy density is reduced. A metal hydride tank for combined storage of heat and hydrogen in a RFCS may overcome this constraint. Being part of a consortium in an ongoing European Space Agency project, FOTEC is building a technology demonstrator for such a combined hydrogen and heat storage system

  16. A High-Efficiency Voltage Equalization Scheme for Supercapacitor Energy Storage System in Renewable Generation Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liran Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to its fast charge and discharge rate, a supercapacitor-based energy storage system is especially suitable for power smoothing in renewable energy generation applications. Voltage equalization is essential for series-connected supercapacitors in an energy storage system, because it supports the system’s sustainability and maximizes the available cell energy. In this paper, we present a high-efficiency voltage equalization scheme for supercapacitor energy storage systems in renewable generation applications. We propose an improved isolated converter topology that uses a multi-winding transformer. An improved push-pull forward circuit is applied on the primary side of the transformer. A coupling inductor is added on the primary side to allow the switches to operate under the zero-voltage switching (ZVS condition, which reduces switching losses. The diodes in the rectifier are replaced with metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs to reduce the power dissipation of the secondary side. In order to simplify the control, we designed a controllable rectifying circuit to achieve synchronous rectifying on the secondary side of the transformer. The experimental results verified the effectiveness of the proposed design.

  17. Metal hydride hydrogen and heat storage systems as enabling technology for spacecraft applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reissner, Alexander, E-mail: reissner@fotec.at [FOTEC Forschungs- und Technologietransfer GmbH, Viktor Kaplan Straße 2, 2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); University of Applied Sciences Wiener Neustadt, Johannes Gutenberg-Straße 3, 2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Pawelke, Roland H.; Hummel, Stefan; Cabelka, Dusan [FOTEC Forschungs- und Technologietransfer GmbH, Viktor Kaplan Straße 2, 2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Gerger, Joachim [University of Applied Sciences Wiener Neustadt, Johannes Gutenberg-Straße 3, 2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Farnes, Jarle, E-mail: Jarle.farnes@prototech.no [CMR Prototech AS, Fantoftvegen 38, PO Box 6034, 5892 Bergen (Norway); Vik, Arild; Wernhus, Ivar; Svendsen, Tjalve [CMR Prototech AS, Fantoftvegen 38, PO Box 6034, 5892 Bergen (Norway); Schautz, Max, E-mail: max.schautz@esa.int [European Space Agency, ESTEC – Keplerlaan 1, 2201 AZ Noordwijk Zh (Netherlands); Geneste, Xavier, E-mail: xavier.geneste@esa.int [European Space Agency, ESTEC – Keplerlaan 1, 2201 AZ Noordwijk Zh (Netherlands)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • A metal hydride tank concept for heat and hydrogen storage is presented. • The tank is part of a closed-loop reversible fuel cell system for space application. • For several engineering issues specific to the spacecraft application, solutions have been developed. • The effect of water contamination has been approximated for Ti-doped NaAlH{sub 4}. • A novel heat exchanger design has been realized by Selective Laser Melting. - Abstract: The next generation of telecommunication satellites will demand a platform payload performance in the range of 30+ kW within the next 10 years. At this high power output, a Regenerative Fuel Cell Systems (RFCS) offers an efficiency advantage in specific energy density over lithium ion batteries. However, a RFCS creates a substantial amount of heat (60–70 kJ per mol H{sub 2}) during fuel cell operation. This requires a thermal hardware that accounts for up to 50% of RFCS mass budget. Thus the initial advantage in specific energy density is reduced. A metal hydride tank for combined storage of heat and hydrogen in a RFCS may overcome this constraint. Being part of a consortium in an ongoing European Space Agency project, FOTEC is building a technology demonstrator for such a combined hydrogen and heat storage system.

  18. Supercapacitor energy storage technology and its application in renewable energy power generation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Sibo [Inst. of Electrical Engineering, CAS, BJ (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy Science, BJ (China); Wei Tongzhen; Qi Zhiping [Inst. of Electrical Engineering, CAS, BJ (China)

    2008-07-01

    Supercapacitor is an emerging technology in the field of energy storage systems that can offer higher power density than batteries and higher energy density over traditional capacitors. Supercapacitor will become an attractive power solution to an increasing number of applications, such as renewable energy power generation, transportation, power system and many others, because of its advantages which include high charge/discharge current capability, very high efficiency, wide temperature range, etc. In this paper, the advantages and disadvantages of supercapacitor are discussed and some critical technologies for designing supercapacitor energy storage system are presented in detail. Finally, the role of the supercapacitor in renewable energy power system is discussed and a supercapacitor based uninterrupted power system (UPS) for the wind turbine pitch systems is presented as a design example. (orig.)

  19. Application of modular vault dry storage to Public Service of Colorado-Fort St. Vrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehr, M. (Public Service Co. of Colorado, Denver, CO (USA)); Ealing, C.J. (GEC Alsthom Engineering Systems, Ltd., Whetstone, Leicester (GB)); Agarwal, B.K. (Foster Wheeler Energy Applications, Inc., Livingston, NJ (USA))

    1990-05-01

    This paper discusses NRC approval for the first dry vault storage system to be submitted for nonsite specific design approval. It describes the first site specific application of the FW/GEC modular vault dry store (MVDS) for the Public Service of Colorado---Fort St. Vrain site. The decision to permanently shut down the Fort St. Vrain high temperature gas-cooled reactor provides the need to store on site 1,482 irradiated fuel blocks and a quantity of other reactor core components categorized as greater than Class C wastes. The MVDS system has been selected for the safe storage of these items in a facility designed to receive, store and discharge fuel to the repository totally independent from the original reactor facilities.

  20. Warehousing in the Global Supply Chain Advanced Models, Tools and Applications for Storage Systems

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    With increased globalization and offshore sourcing, global supply chain management is becoming an important issue for many businesses as it involves a company's worldwide interests and suppliers rather than simply a local or national orientation. The storage systems significantly affect the level of quality of products, the customer’s service level, and the global logistic cost. The mission of warehousing systems design, control and optimization is to effectively ship products in the right place, at the right time, and in the right quantity (i.e. in any configuration) without any damages or alterations, and minimizing costs. Warehousing in the Global Supply Chain presents and discusses a set of models, tools and real applications, including a few case studies rarely presented with a sufficient detail by other literature, to illustrate the main challenges in warehousing activities. This includes all warehouse operations (from receiving to shipping), problems and issues (e.g. storage allocation, assignment,...

  1. Development of a hydrogen and deuterium polarized gas target for application in storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polarized gas targets of atomic hydrogen and deuterium have significant advantages over conventional polarized targets, e.g. chemical and isotopic purity, large polarization including deuteron tensor polarization, absence of strong magnetic fields, rapid polarization reversal. While in principle the beam of polarized atoms from an atomic beam source (Stern-Gerlach spin separation) can be used as a polarized target, the target thickness achieved is too small for most applications. We propose to increase the target thickness by injecting the polarized atoms into a storage cell. Provided the atoms survive several hundred wall collisions without losing their polarization, it will be possible to achieve a target thickness of 1013 to 1014 atoms/cm2 by injection of polarized atoms from an atomic-beam source into suitable cells. Such targets are very attractive as internal targets in storage rings

  2. Application of modular vault dry storage to Public Service of Colorado-Fort St. Vrain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses NRC approval for the first dry vault storage system to be submitted for nonsite specific design approval. It describes the first site specific application of the FW/GEC modular vault dry store (MVDS) for the Public Service of Colorado---Fort St. Vrain site. The decision to permanently shut down the Fort St. Vrain high temperature gas-cooled reactor provides the need to store on site 1,482 irradiated fuel blocks and a quantity of other reactor core components categorized as greater than Class C wastes. The MVDS system has been selected for the safe storage of these items in a facility designed to receive, store and discharge fuel to the repository totally independent from the original reactor facilities

  3. Hydrogen storage intermetallic compounds: first principles investigations of properties relevant to applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantum mechanical calculations of the electronic structure of hydrogen storage materials have undoubtly deepened our fundamental understanding of their basic properties. In addition, ab-initio calculations can provide a useful insight on the hydrogen storage properties that are crucial for applications. In this paper, we focuss on the latter aspects, we discuss the electronic and elastic properties of Haucke compounds of AB5 type (A=La or Y, B=Ni), in relation with their hydrogen absorption properties. The effects of substitutions of Ni by an s element of the 3d series, Cu, as well as by s-p elements of the IIIA (Al) and IVA series (Si,Ge,Sn) for several substitution rates are presented. and discussed in light of available experimental data on electronic, thermodynamic and elastic properties. (orig.)

  4. On-chip liquid storage and dispensing for lab-on-a-chip applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents novel components for on-chip storage and dispensing inside a lab-on-a-chip (LOC) for applications in immunoassay point-of-care testing (POCT), where incubation and washing steps are essential. It involves easy-to-use on-chip solutions for the sequential thermo-hydraulic actuation of liquids. The novel concept of combining the use of a rubber plug, both as a non-return valve cap and as a liquid injection interface of a sealed reservoir, allows simple filling of a sterilized cavity, as well as the storage and dispensing of reagent and washing buffer liquids. Segmenting the flow with air spacers enables effective rinsing and the use of small volumes of on-chip stored liquids. The chip uses low-resistance resistors as heaters in the paraffin actuator, providing the low-voltage actuation that is preferred for handheld battery driven instruments

  5. Impedance and self-discharge mechanism studies of nickel metal hydride batteries for energy storage applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenhua; Zhu, Ying; Tatarchuk, Bruce

    2013-04-01

    Nickel metal hydride battery packs have been found wide applications in the HEVs (hybrid electric vehicles) through the on-board rapid energy conservation and efficient storage to decrease the fossil fuel consumption rate and reduce CO2 emissions as well as other harmful exhaust gases. In comparison to the conventional Ni-Cd battery, the Ni-MH battery exhibits a relatively higher self-discharge rate. In general, there are quite a few factors that speed up the self-discharge of the electrodes in the sealed nickel metal hydride batteries. This disadvantage eventually reduces the overall efficiency of the energy conversion and storage system. In this work, ac impedance data were collected from the nickel metal hydride batteries. The self-discharge mechanism and battery capacity degradation were analyzed and discussed for further performance improvement.

  6. Computer Simulation of Technetium Scrubbing Section of Purex Ⅰ: Computer Simulation and Technical Parameter Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Yan-xin; HE; Hui; ZHANG; Chun-long; CHANG; Li; LI; Rui-xue; TANG; Hong-bin; YU; Ting

    2012-01-01

    <正>A computer program was developed to simulate technetium scrubbing section (TcS) in Purex based on the theory of cascade extraction. The program can simulate the steady-state behavior of HNO3, U, Pu and Tc in TcS. The reliability of the program was verified by cascade extraction experiment, the relative error between calculation value and experiment value is 10% more or less except few spots. The comparison between experiment and calculation results is illustrated in Fig. 1. The technical parameters of TcS were analyzed by this program, it is found that the Decontamination factor (DFTc/U) in TcS is remarkably affected by the overall consumption (multiply molarity by volume flux) of HNO3, DFTc/U is

  7. Recent studies related to head-end fuel processing at the Hanford PUREX plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swanson, J.L.

    1988-08-01

    This report presents the results of studies addressing several problems in the head-end processing (decladding, metathesis, and core dissolution) of N Reactor fuel elements in the Hanford PUREX plant. These studies were conducted over 2 years: FY 1986 and FY 1987. The studies were divided into three major areas: 1) differences in head-end behavior of fuels having different histories, 2) suppression of /sup 106/Ru volatilization when the ammonia scrubber solution resulting from decladding is decontaminated by distillation prior to being discharged, and 3) suitability of flocculating agents for lowering the amount of transuranic (TRU) element-containing solids that accompany the decladding solution to waste. 16 refs., 43 figs.

  8. ICPSEF: a user's manual for the computer mathematical model of the ICPP purex solvent extraction system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer-based mathematical program, ICPSEF, was developed for the first-cycle extraction system at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). At the ICPP, spent nuclear fuels are processed to recover unfissioned uranium. The uranium is recovered from aqueous solutions in a pulse column, solvent extraction system using tributyl phosphate (TBP) solvent (purex process). A previously developed SEPHIS-MOD4 computer program was added to and modified to provide a model for the ICPP system. Major modifications included addition of: (1) partial theoretical stages to permit more accurate modeling of ICPP columns, (2) modeling ammonium hydroxide neutralization of nitric acid in a scrubbing column, and (3) equilibrium data for 5 to 10 vol % TBP. The model was verified by comparison with actual operating data. Detailed instructions for using the ICPSEF model and sample results of the model are included

  9. Plutonium-uranium separation in the Purex process using mixtures of hydroxylamine nitrate and ferrous sulfamate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laboratory studies, followed by plant operation, established that a mixture of hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN) and ferrous sulfamate (FS) is superior to FS used alone as a reductant for plutonium in the Purex first cycle. FS usage has been reduced by about 70% (from 0.12 to 0.04M) compared to the pre-1978 period. This reduced the volume of neutralized waste due to FS by 194 liters/metric ton of uranium (MTU) processed. The new flowsheet also gives lower plutonium losses to waste and at least comparable fission product decontamination. To achieve satisfactory performance at this low concentration of FS, the acidity in the 1B mixer-settler was reduced by using a split-scrub - a low acid scrub in stage one and a higher acid scrub in stage three - to remove acid from the solvent exiting the 1A centrifugal contactor. 8 references, 14 figures, 1 table

  10. The isolation of lutetium from gadolinium contained in Purex process solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A chemical separation procedure has been devised to isolate Lu from Purex dissolver solutions containing the neutron poison, Gd. The isolation procedure involves the removal of U and >Pu from a dissolver solution using tributylphosphate solvent extraction. If required, solvent extraction using di-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid can be employed to further purify the sample be removing alkali and alkali earth elements. Finally, Lu is chromatographically separated from Gd and rare earth fission products on a Dowex 50W-X8 resin column using an alpha-hydroxyisobutyrate eluant. The success of the chemical separation procedure has been demonstrated in the quantitative recovery of as little as 1.4 ng Lu from solutions containing a 5000-fold excess of Gd. Additionally, Lu has been isolated from synthetic dissolver samples containing U, Ba, Cs, and Gd. Thermal emission MS data indicated that the Lu fraction of the synthetic sample was free of Gd interference

  11. Removal of plutonium from low level Purex waste streams by Chitosan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The low level waste solution generated from Purex process contains traces of Plutonium and Americium contributing alpha activity to the solution. Chitosan is it natural bio-polymer derived from Chitin. Successful studies were carried out using Chitosan to recover the uranium, thorium and americium from different waste streams. The studies were extended to find out its plutonium sorption characteristics. Chitosan was equilibrated with pure plutonium tracer solution at different pH, for 60 minutes with a Chitosan to aqueous ratio of 1:100 and the raffinates were filtered and analysed radio metrically. The results showed -95 % of plutonium could be recovered by Chitosan between pH 4 and 7. Elution study of loaded plutonium was also studied with 1M HNO3. (author)

  12. Alkaline hydrolysis process for treatment and disposal of Purex solvent waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment of spent Purex solvent (30% TBP-70% n-dodecane mixture) from reprocessing plants by alkaline hydrolysis process was investigated using inactive 30% TBP solvent as well as actual radioactive spent solvent. Complete conversion of TBP to water-soluble reaction products was achieved in 7 hours reaction time at 130 deg C using 50%(w/v) NaOH solution at NaOH to TBP mole ratio of 3:2. Addition of water to the product mixture resulted in the complete separation of diluent containing less than 2 and 8 Bg./ml. of α and β activity respectively. Silica gel and alumina were found effective for purification of the separated diluent. Aqueous phase containing most of the original radioactivity was found compatible with cement matrix for further conditioning and disposal. (author). 17 refs., 10 tabs., 1 fig

  13. Controllability of plutonium concentration for FBR fuel at a solvent extraction process in the PUREX process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Typical Purex solvent extraction systems for the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel have a feed material containing dilute, 1% in weight, plutonium, along with uranium and fission products. Current reprocessing proposals call for no separation of the pure plutonium. The work described in this paper studied, by computer simulation, the fundamental feasibility of preparing a 20% concentrated plutonium product solution from the 1% feed by adjusting only the feed rates and acid concentrations of the incoming streams and without the addition of redox reagents for the plutonium. A set of process design flowsheets has been developed to realize a concentrated plutonium solution of a 20% stream from the dilute plutonium feed without using redox reagents. (authors)

  14. DIST: a computer code system for calculation of distribution ratios of solutes in the purex system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tachimori, Shoichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1996-05-01

    Purex is a solvent extraction process for reprocessing the spent nuclear fuel using tri n-butylphosphate (TBP). A computer code system DIST has been developed to calculate distribution ratios for the major solutes in the Purex process. The DIST system is composed of database storing experimental distribution data of U(IV), U(VI), Pu(III), Pu(IV), Pu(VI), Np(IV), Np(VI), HNO{sub 3} and HNO{sub 2}: DISTEX and of Zr(IV), Tc(VII): DISTEXFP and calculation programs to calculate distribution ratios of U(IV), U(VI), Pu(III), Pu(IV), Pu(VI), Np(IV), Np(VI), HNO{sub 3} and HNO{sub 2}(DIST1), and Zr(IV), Tc(VII)(DITS2). The DIST1 and DIST2 determine, by the best-fit procedures, the most appropriate values of many parameters put on empirical equations by using the DISTEX data which fulfill the assigned conditions and are applied to calculate distribution ratios of the respective solutes. Approximately 5,000 data were stored in the DISTEX and DISTEXFP. In the present report, the following items are described, 1) specific features of DIST1 and DIST2 codes and the examples of calculation 2) explanation of databases, DISTEX, DISTEXFP and a program DISTIN, which manages the data in the DISTEX and DISTEXFP by functions as input, search, correction and delete. and at the annex, 3) programs of DIST1, DIST2, and figure-drawing programs DIST1G and DIST2G 4) user manual for DISTIN. 5) source programs of DIST1 and DIST2. 6) the experimental data stored in the DISTEX and DISTEXFP. (author). 122 refs.

  15. Extraction chromatographic separation of minor actinides from PUREX high-level wastes using CMPO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An extraction chromatographic technique using octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) adsorbed on chromosorb-102 (CAC) has been tested as an alternative to the TRUEX solvent extraction process, where CMPO has been used as the extracting agent to recover minor actinides from high-activity waste (HAW) solutions of PUREX origin. The batchwise uptake behavior of U(VI), Pu(IV), Am(III), Eu(III), Zr(IV), Fe(III), Ru(III), and TcO4- from a nitric acid medium by CAC has been studied. The uptake of actinides and lanthanides are higher than those of other fission products and inert materials. The batchwise loading experiments in the presence of Nd(III)/U(VI) have shown that at lower concentrations of these metal ions, the uptake of Pu(IV), U(VI), and Am(III) are reasonably high. Studies on loading of Nd(III), U(VI), and Pu(IV) on a column containing 1.7 g of CAC have shown that Nd(III) (30 mg) and U(VI) (90 mg) could be loaded, while Pu(IV) (∼0.6) was loaded on a small column containing 100 mg of CAC without any break-through. Further, a synthetic HAW solution as such and the actual PUREX HAW solution, after depleting the uranium content by a 30% tributyl-phosphate contact, were loaded on a CAC column. The effluents did not contain any alpha activity above the background level. The activities could subsequently be eluted with 0.0.4 M HNO3 (americium and rare earths), 0.01 M oxalic acid (plutonium), and 0.25 M Na2CO3 [U(VI)]. The recoveries of these metal ions were found to be >99%

  16. The development of chemical separation technology for an advanced Purex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Future reprocessing plants will require flexible processes that minimise the environmental impact and improve cost effectiveness. This paper discusses some of the technical advances made in the Chemical Separation area of BNFL's Advanced Purex project. An integrated approach involving fundamental process chemistry, computer modelling and flow-sheeting, equipment development, and small scale confirmation trials, has been adopted. The main aims of the project are process simplification and intensification, and this has led to the development of flexible single cycle flowsheets using centrifugal contactors. In order to achieve this cost effectively, comprehensive computer models have been developed based on extraction algorithms for all the major actinide and fission product species. These models also incorporate reaction kinetics, radiolysis, TBP degradation products, and contactor data. The models have been validated by data from plant and from miniature multi-stage centrifugal contactor rigs. One rig has been used to run counter-current α-active flowsheet trials with both on-line and off-line analysis. In parallel, contactor development has concentrated on the scaling up of centrifugal contactor stages up to industrial sizes and obtaining engineering data such as mass transfer rates in single stages. Chemical development is focused on both the accumulation of data needed in computer modelling such as distribution coefficients and reaction rates, and more fundamental research in to new separation processes including chelating agent based flowsheets and new salt free reducing agents. In particular key species, such as Np, Tc, Pu and U(IV), which have a significant impact on the efficiency of single cycle flowsheets are targeted. This paper will report developments in these areas, particularly highlighting how they are integrated in the design of Advanced Purex flowsheets. (author)

  17. Synthesis and applications of carbon nanomaterials for energy generation and storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notarianni, Marco; Liu, Jinzhang; Vernon, Kristy; Motta, Nunzio

    2016-01-01

    The world is facing an energy crisis due to exponential population growth and limited availability of fossil fuels. Over the last 20 years, carbon, one of the most abundant materials found on earth, and its allotrope forms such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes and graphene have been proposed as sources of energy generation and storage because of their extraordinary properties and ease of production. Various approaches for the synthesis and incorporation of carbon nanomaterials in organic photovoltaics and supercapacitors have been reviewed and discussed in this work, highlighting their benefits as compared to other materials commonly used in these devices. The use of fullerenes, carbon nanotubes and graphene in organic photovoltaics and supercapacitors is described in detail, explaining how their remarkable properties can enhance the efficiency of solar cells and energy storage in supercapacitors. Fullerenes, carbon nanotubes and graphene have all been included in solar cells with interesting results, although a number of problems are still to be overcome in order to achieve high efficiency and stability. However, the flexibility and the low cost of these materials provide the opportunity for many applications such as wearable and disposable electronics or mobile charging. The application of carbon nanotubes and graphene to supercapacitors is also discussed and reviewed in this work. Carbon nanotubes, in combination with graphene, can create a more porous film with extraordinary capacitive performance, paving the way to many practical applications from mobile phones to electric cars. In conclusion, we show that carbon nanomaterials, developed by inexpensive synthesis and process methods such as printing and roll-to-roll techniques, are ideal for the development of flexible devices for energy generation and storage - the key to the portable electronics of the future. PMID:26925363

  18. Mission Applicability and Benefits of Thin-Film Integrated Power Generation and Energy Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, David; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses the space mission applicability and benefits of a thin-film integrated power generation and energy storage device, i.e., an "Integrated Power Source" or IPS. The characteristics of an IPS that combines thin-film photo-voltaic power generation with thin-film energy storage are described. Mission concepts for a thin-film IPS as a spacecraft main electrical power system, as a decentralized or distributed power source and as an uninterruptible power supply are discussed. For two specific missions, preliminary sizing of an IPS as a main power system is performed and benefits are assessed. IPS developmental challenges that need to be overcome in order to realize the benefits of an IPS are examined. Based on this preliminary assessment, it is concluded that the most likely and beneficial application of an IPS will be as the main power system on a very small "nanosatellite," or in specialized applications serving as a decentralized or distributed power source or uninterruptible power supply.

  19. A parallel simplex optimizer and its application to high-brightness storage ring design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An efficient parallel Simplex optimizer was developed that can on run Solaris and Linux clusters. It can optimize the result of running essentially any program or script that returns a penalty function value. We have used this optimizer with elegant to optimize the dynamic aperture of storage ring designs. This paper discusses the optimization algorithm and performance, design of penalty functions, optimization results, and applications in storage ring design. Optimization is commonly used in accelerator design to find linear optics solutions. Such optimizations are usually fairly fast as linear optics computations are themselves fast. For high-brightness storage rings, optimization of nonlinear elements (e.g., sextupoles) is also important in obtaining sufficient dynamic aperture. However, such optimization can be very time consuming as the basic computations are time consuming. For this reason, we developed an efficient parallel Simplex optimizer that can run on Solaris and Linux clusters. It can optimize the result of running essentially any program or script that returns a penalty function value.

  20. Thermodynamic, Environmental and Economic Analyses of Solar Ejector Refrigeration System Application for Cold Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İbrahim ÜÇGÜL

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The refrigeration processes have been widely applied for especially in cold storages. In these plants, the systems working with compressed vapour cooling cycles have been used as a classical method. In general, electrical energy is used for compressing in these processes. Although, mainly the electricity itself has no pollution effect on the environment, the fossil fuels that are widely used to produce electricity in the most of the world, affect the nature terribly. In short, these refrigeration plants, because of the source of the electricity pollute the nature indirectly. However, for compression an ejector refrigeration system requires one of the important renewable energy sources with negligible pollution impact on the environment, namely solar energy from a thermal source. Thermodynamical, environmental and economical aspects of the ejector refrigeration system working with solar energy was investigated in this study. As a pilot case, apple cold storage plants widely used in ISPARTA city, which 1/5 th of apple production of TURKEY has been provided from, was chosen. Enviromental and economical advantages of solar ejector refrigeration system application for cold storage dictated by thermodynamic, economic and enviromental analyses in this research.

  1. High-Temperature Phase Change Materials (PCM) Candidates for Thermal Energy Storage (TES) Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, J. C.

    2011-09-01

    It is clearly understood that lower overall costs are a key factor to make renewable energy technologies competitive with traditional energy sources. Energy storage technology is one path to increase the value and reduce the cost of all renewable energy supplies. Concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies have the ability to dispatch electrical output to match peak demand periods by employing thermal energy storage (TES). Energy storage technologies require efficient materials with high energy density. Latent heat TES systems using phase change material (PCM) are useful because of their ability to charge and discharge a large amount of heat from a small mass at constant temperature during a phase transformation like melting-solidification. PCM technology relies on the energy absorption/liberation of the latent heat during a physical transformation. The main objective of this report is to provide an assessment of molten salts and metallic alloys proposed as candidate PCMs for TES applications, particularly in solar parabolic trough electrical power plants at a temperature range from 300..deg..C to 500..deg.. C. The physical properties most relevant for PCMs service were reviewed from the candidate selection list. Some of the PCM candidates were characterized for: chemical stability with some container materials; phase change transformation temperatures; and latent heats.

  2. Technical assessment of compressed hydrogen storage tank systems for automotive applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, T. Q.; Ahluwalia, R. K.; Peng, J. K.; Kromer, M.; Lasher, S.; McKenney, K.; Law, K.; Sinha, J. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (TIAX, LLC)

    2011-02-09

    The performance and cost of compressed hydrogen storage tank systems has been assessed and compared to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 2010, 2015, and ultimate targets for automotive applications. The on-board performance and high-volume manufacturing cost were determined for compressed hydrogen tanks with design pressures of 350 bar ({approx}5000 psi) and 700 bar ({approx}10,000 psi) capable of storing 5.6 kg of usable hydrogen. The off-board performance and cost of delivering compressed hydrogen was determined for hydrogen produced by central steam methane reforming (SMR). The main conclusions of the assessment are that the 350-bar compressed storage system has the potential to meet the 2010 and 2015 targets for system gravimetric capacity but will not likely meet any of the system targets for volumetric capacity or cost, given our base case assumptions. The 700-bar compressed storage system has the potential to meet only the 2010 target for system gravimetric capacity and is not likely to meet any of the system targets for volumetric capacity or cost, despite the fact that its volumetric capacity is much higher than that of the 350-bar system. Both the 350-bar and 700-bar systems come close to meeting the Well-to-Tank (WTT) efficiency target, but fall short by about 5%. These results are summarized.

  3. Investigation of potential waste material insulating properties at different temperature for thermal storage application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal energy storage system (TES) is developed to extend the operation of power generation. TES system is a key component in a solar energy power generation plant, but the main issue in designing the TES system is its thermal capacity of storage materials, e.g. insulator. This study is focusing on the potential waste material acts as an insulator for thermal energy storage applications. As the insulator is used to absorb heat, it is needed to find suitable material for energy conversion and at the same time reduce the waste generation. Thus, a small-scale experimental testing of natural cooling process of an insulated tank within a confined room is conducted. The experiment is repeated by changing the insulator from the potential waste material and also by changing the heat transfer fluid (HTF). The analysis presented the relationship between heat loss and the reserved period by the insulator. The results show the percentage of period of the insulated tank withstands compared to tank insulated by foam, e.g. newspaper reserved the period of 84.6% as much as foam insulated tank to withstand the heat transfer of cooking oil to the surrounding. The paper finally justifies the most potential waste material as an insulator for different temperature range of heat transfer fluid

  4. The CUNY Energy Institute Electrical Energy Storage Development for Grid Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Sanjoy

    2013-03-31

    1. Project Objectives The objectives of the project are to elucidate science issues intrinsic to high energy density electricity storage (battery) systems for smart-grid applications, research improvements in such systems to enable scale-up to grid-scale and demonstrate a large 200 kWh battery to facilitate transfer of the technology to industry. 2. Background Complex and difficult to control interfacial phenomena are intrinsic to high energy density electrical energy storage systems, since they are typically operated far from equilibrium. One example of such phenomena is the formation of dendrites. Such dendrites occur on battery electrodes as they cycle, and can lead to internal short circuits, reducing cycle life. An improved understanding of the formation of dendrites and their control can improve the cycle life and safety of many energy storage systems, including rechargeable lithium and zinc batteries. Another area where improved understanding is desirable is the application of ionic liquids as electrolytes in energy storage systems. An ionic liquid is typically thought of as a material that is fully ionized (consisting only of anions and cations) and is fluid at or near room temperature. Some features of ionic liquids include a generally high thermal stability (up to 450 °C), a high electrochemical window (up to 6 V) and relatively high intrinsic conductivities. Such features make them attractive as battery or capacitor electrolytes, and may enable batteries which are safer (due to the good thermal stability) and of much higher energy density (due to the higher voltage electrode materials which may be employed) than state of the art secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Of particular interest is the use of such liquids as electrolytes in metal air batteries, where energy densities on the order of 1-2,000 Wh / kg are possible; this is 5-10 times that of existing state of the art lithium battery technology. The Energy Institute has been engaged in the

  5. N, P and K storage efficiency on degraded peat soil through ameliorant application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Maftu’ah

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The availability of nutrients, especially N, P, K in the degraded peat are very low. The high organic acids can decrease the soil pH, its causes the negatively charged nutrients such as nitrate and phosphate are also very low. Ameliorant contributes some cations both monovalent and polivalent which acts as a bridge cations, thus increasing the availability of nutrients, especially nitrogen and phosphate. The objective of research was to determine the storage efficiency of N, P, K on application of some ameliorants on degraded peat land. The experiment was conducted at the laboratory of ISARI, Banjarbaru. Peat soil collected from the degraded peat land at Kalampangan, Central Kalimantan. The treatments were 8 ameliorant formula and two control treatments (+NPK and -NPK. The treatments were arranged in CRD, with 3 replications, And using soil coloum (lysimeter. The leaching was conducted every once a week, with 1.25 liter of aquades and the volume of leachate would be recorded. N, P, K concentration in leachate were analyzed periodically at 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks after incubation. The results showed that the concentrations of N and K on each observation time were relatively same, but P increased significantly at 4 weeks after incubation. The highest concentrations of N, P, and K in leachate were ameliorant from 100% of chicken manure. The storage efficiency of N, P and K varied depending on the type of ameliorant. Ameliorant that improved storage efficiency of N and K was ameliorant which consist of 80% agricultural weed + 20% dolomite, whereas for P efficiency storage was on ameliorant which consist of 80% Chinese water chestnut (Eleocharis dulcis + 20% dolomite.

  6. Spent fuel storage and transport cask decontamination and modification. An overview of management requirements and applications based on practical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large increase in the number of casks required for transport and/or storage of spent fuel is forecast into the next century. The principal requirement will be for increased number of storage and dual purpose (transport/storage) casks for interim storage of spent fuel prior to reprocessing or permanent disposal in both on-site and off-site storage facilities. Through contact with radioactive materials spent fuel casks will be contaminated on both internal and external surfaces. In broad terms, cask contamination management can be defined by three components: minimisation, prevention and decontamination. This publication is a compilation of international experience with cask contamination problems and decontamination practices. The objective is to present current knowledge and experience as well as developments, trends and potential for new applications in this field. Furthermore, the report may assist in new design or modification of existing casks, cask handling systems and decontamination equipment

  7. Rare-earth-doped materials for applications in quantum information storage and signal processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiel, C.W., E-mail: thiel@physics.montana.ed [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Boettger, Thomas, E-mail: tbottger@usfca.ed [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of San Francisco, 2130 Fulton St., San Francisco, CA 94117 (United States); Cone, R.L., E-mail: cone@montana.ed [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    Realization of practical quantum memory and optical signal processing systems critically depends on suitable materials that offer specific combinations of properties. Solid-state materials such as rare-earth ions doped into dielectric crystals are one of the most promising candidates for several quantum information storage protocols, including quantum storage of single photons. This article provides an overview of rare-earth-doped material properties and summarizes some of the most promising materials studied in our laboratory and by other groups for applications in quantum information storage and for ultra-wide bandwidth signal processing. Understanding and controlling spectral diffusion in these materials, which ultimately limits the achievable performance of any quantum memory system, is also briefly reviewed. Applications in quantum information impose stringent requirements on laser phase and frequency stability, and employing a narrow spectral hole in the inhomogeneous absorption profile in these materials as a frequency reference can dramatically improve laser stability. We review our work on laser frequency and phase stabilization and report our recent results on using a narrow spectral hole as a passive dynamic spectral filter for laser phase noise suppression, which can dramatically narrow the laser linewidth with or without the requirement of active feedback. - Research highlights: Rare-earth materials offer key properties for quantum memory and signal processing. Physics and properties of rare-earth optical transitions in solids are reviewed. Details of 47 promising optical transitions are tabulated and compared. A new narrow-band dynamic filtering method using spectral hole burning is discussed. Results of successful passive laser phase noise suppression are presented.

  8. Technical assessment of cryo-compressed hydrogen storage tank systems for automotive applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahluwalia, R. K.; Hua, T. Q.; Peng, J.-K.; Lasher, S.; McKenney, K.; Sinha, J.; Nuclear Engineering Division; TIAX LLC

    2010-03-03

    On-board and off-board performance and cost of cryo-compressed hydrogen storage has been assessed and compared to the DOE 2010, 2015 and ultimate targets for automotive applications. The Gen-3 prototype system of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was modeled to project the performance of a scaled-down 5.6-kg usable hydrogen storage system. The on-board performance of the system and high-volume manufacturing cost were determined for liquid hydrogen refueling with a single-flow nozzle and a pump that delivers 1.5 kg/min of liquid H{sub 2} to the insulated cryogenic tank capable of being pressurized to 272 atm (4000 psi). The off-board performance and cost of delivering liquid hydrogen were determined for two scenarios in which hydrogen is produced by central steam methane reforming (SMR) and by central electrolysis using electricity from renewable sources. The main conclusions from the assessment are that the cryo-compressed storage system has the potential of meeting the ultimate target for system gravimetric capacity and the 2015 target for system volumetric capacity (see Table I). The system compares favorably with targets for durability and operability although additional work is needed to understand failure modes for combined pressure and temperature cycling. The system may meet the targets for hydrogen loss during dormancy under certain conditions of minimum daily driving. The high-volume manufacturing cost is projected to be 2-4 times the current 2010 target of $4/kWh. For the reference conditions considered most applicable, the fuel cost for the SMR hydrogen production and liquid H{sub 2} delivery scenario is 60%-140% higher than the current target of $2-$3/gge while the well-to-tank efficiency is well short of the 60% target specified for off-board regenerable materials.

  9. The Application of Graphene and Its Derivatives to Energy Conversion, Storage, and Environmental and Biosensing Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali Tahir, Asif; Ullah, Habib; Sudhagar, Pitchaimuthu; Asri Mat Teridi, Mohd; Devadoss, Anitha; Sundaram, Senthilarasu

    2016-06-01

    Graphene (GR) and its derivatives are promising materials on the horizon of nanotechnology and material science and have attracted a tremendous amount of research interest in recent years. The unique atom-thick 2D structure with sp(2) hybridization and large specific surface area, high thermal conductivity, superior electron mobility, and chemical stability have made GR and its derivatives extremely attractive components for composite materials for solar energy conversion, energy storage, environmental purification, and biosensor applications. This review gives a brief introduction of GR's unique structure, band structure engineering, physical and chemical properties, and recent energy-related progress of GR-based materials in the fields of energy conversion (e.g., photocatalysis, photoelectrochemical water splitting, CO2 reduction, dye-sensitized and organic solar cells, and photosensitizers in photovoltaic devices) and energy storage (batteries, fuel cells, and supercapacitors). The vast coverage of advancements in environmental applications of GR-based materials for photocatalytic degradation of organic pollutants, gas sensing, and removal of heavy-metal ions is presented. Additionally, the use of graphene composites in the biosensing field is discussed. We conclude the review with remarks on the challenges, prospects, and further development of GR-based materials in the exciting fields of energy, environment, and bioscience. PMID:27230414

  10. Impedance Analysis of Heat Treated Polyethylene Oxide Polymeric Material for a Neural Storage Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Z. Iskandarani

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: From the early days of, researchers have developed electronic models of neurons designed to emulate neural behavior with electrical signals that mimic in some ways the measured potentials of biological neurons. Researchers interested in fabricating artificial neurons have long sought a simple and techniques to produce devices that efficiently store synaptic weights, which is behind holding a particular state in relation to conductance parameters. As Engineers become closer to realizing accurate hardware models of neurons, the need for a simple analog memory device grows correspondingly. To determine the storage characteristics of polyethylene oxide based polymer as the base material for high charge storage analogue neural switch. Approach: Various devices prepared under controlled conditions. Each device tested for its impedance characteristics as a function of both frequency and temperature. Mathematical model developed to account for the obtained characteristics. Results: The heat treated devices showed stability, repeatability and ability to store enough charge for long time periods. Impedance analysis proved a similar response to the actual neural switches. Conclusion: The symmetrical behavior for such devices opened a wide application area for the manufacturing of low and high frequency analogue devices for intelligent system applications.

  11. Highly stable supercapacitors with conducting polymer core-shell electrodes for energy storage applications

    KAUST Repository

    Xia, Chuan

    2015-01-14

    Conducting polymers such as polyaniline (PAni) show a great potential as pseudocapacitor materials for electrochemical energy storage applications. Yet, the cycling instability of PAni resulting from structural alteration is a major hurdle to its commercial application. Here, the development of nanostructured PAni-RuO2 core-shell arrays as electrodes for highly stable pseudocapacitors with excellent energy storage performance is reported. A thin layer of RuO2 grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on PAni nanofibers plays a crucial role in stabilizing the PAni pseudocapacitors and improving their energy density. The pseudocapacitors, which are based on optimized PAni-RuO2 core-shell nanostructured electrodes, exhibit very high specific capacitance (710 F g-1 at 5 mV s-1) and power density (42.2 kW kg-1) at an energy density of 10 Wh kg-1. Furthermore, they exhibit remarkable capacitance retention of ≈88% after 10 000 cycles at very high current density of 20 A g-1, superior to that of pristine PAni-based pseudocapacitors. This prominently enhanced electrochemical stability successfully demonstrates the buffering effect of ALD coating on PAni, which provides a new approach for the preparation of metal-oxide/conducting polymer hybrid electrodes with excellent electrochemical performance.

  12. Study of cloud storage technology and its application%云存储技术及其应用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈一明

    2014-01-01

    Cloud computing is a new network application model,cloud storage is a data storage and management as the core of cloud computing systems.Describes cloud computing and cloud storage principles and application characteristics,design of a university-based teaching and learning environment of wisdom cloud storage - cloud teaching platform,the platform analysis principles,characteristics and so on.%云计算是一种新的网络应用模式,云存储是一个以数据存储和管理为核心的云计算系统。阐述云计算与云存储的原理及应用特点,设计一种基于云存储的高校智慧教学环境--云教学平台,分析该平台的原理、特点等。

  13. Atomistic Modelling of Materials for Clean Energy Applications : hydrogen generation, hydrogen storage, and Li-ion battery

    OpenAIRE

    Qian, Zhao

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, a number of clean-energy materials for hydrogen generation, hydrogen storage, and Li-ion battery energy storage applications have been investigated through state-of-the-art density functional theory. As an alternative fuel, hydrogen has been regarded as one of the promising clean energies with the advantage of abundance (generated through water splitting) and pollution-free emission if used in fuel cell systems. However, some key problems such as finding efficient ways to prod...

  14. Basic Investigations on PVK-based Photorefractive Polymers Focussing on their Applicability as Mass Data Storage Media

    OpenAIRE

    Bittner, Reinhard

    2003-01-01

    Poly(N-vinylcarbazole)-based PR polymer composites were investigated focussing on the particular features required for a potential application of this relatively new class of materials as optical holographic storage media in mass data storage devices. The main objective of this work was to get a more detailed insight into and a better understanding of the dynamic recording, erasure and dark decay behavior of holograms in this type of PR polymer. By means of a simplified model calculation the ...

  15. Carbon storage in a heavy clay soil landfill site after biosolid application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Applying organic amendments including biosolids and composts to agricultural land could increase carbon (C) storage in soils and contribute significantly to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. Although a number of studies have examined the potential value of biosolids as a soil conditioner and nutrient source, there has been only limited work on the impact of biosolid application on C sequestration in soils. The objective of this study was to examine the potential value of biosolids in C sequestration in soils. Two types of experiments were conducted to examine the effect of biosolid application on C sequestration. In the first laboratory incubation experiment, the rate of decomposition of a range of biosolid samples was compared with other organic amendments including composts and biochars. In the second field experiment, the effect of biosolids on the growth of two bioenergy crops, Brassica juncea (Indian mustard) and Helianthus annuus (sunflower) on a landfill site was examined in relation to biomass production and C sequestration. The rate of decomposition varied amongst the organic amendments, and followed: composts > biosolids > biochar. There was a hundred fold difference in the rate of decomposition between biochar and other organic amendments. The rate of decomposition of biosolids decreased with increasing iron (Fe) and aluminum (Al) contents of biosolids. Biosolid application increased the dry matter yield of both plant species (by 2–2.5 fold), thereby increasing the biomass C input to soils. The rate of net C sequestration resulting from biosolid application (Mg C ha−1 yr−1 Mg−1 biosolids) was higher for mustard (0.103) than sunflower (0.087). Biosolid application is likely to result in a higher level of C sequestration when compared to other management strategies including fertilizer application and conservation tillage, which is attributed to increased microbial biomass, and Fe and Al oxide-induced immobilization of C. - Graphical

  16. Carbon storage in a heavy clay soil landfill site after biosolid application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolan, N.S., E-mail: Nanthi.Bolan@unisa.edu.au [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation (CERAR), University of South Australia, SA 5095 (Australia); Cooperative Research Centre for Contaminants Assessment and Remediation of the Environment (CRC CARE), University of South Australia, SA 5095 (Australia); Kunhikrishnan, A. [Chemical Safety Division, Department of Agro-Food Safety, National Academy of Agricultural Science, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do 441-707 (Korea, Republic of); Naidu, R. [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation (CERAR), University of South Australia, SA 5095 (Australia); Cooperative Research Centre for Contaminants Assessment and Remediation of the Environment (CRC CARE), University of South Australia, SA 5095 (Australia)

    2013-11-01

    Applying organic amendments including biosolids and composts to agricultural land could increase carbon (C) storage in soils and contribute significantly to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. Although a number of studies have examined the potential value of biosolids as a soil conditioner and nutrient source, there has been only limited work on the impact of biosolid application on C sequestration in soils. The objective of this study was to examine the potential value of biosolids in C sequestration in soils. Two types of experiments were conducted to examine the effect of biosolid application on C sequestration. In the first laboratory incubation experiment, the rate of decomposition of a range of biosolid samples was compared with other organic amendments including composts and biochars. In the second field experiment, the effect of biosolids on the growth of two bioenergy crops, Brassica juncea (Indian mustard) and Helianthus annuus (sunflower) on a landfill site was examined in relation to biomass production and C sequestration. The rate of decomposition varied amongst the organic amendments, and followed: composts > biosolids > biochar. There was a hundred fold difference in the rate of decomposition between biochar and other organic amendments. The rate of decomposition of biosolids decreased with increasing iron (Fe) and aluminum (Al) contents of biosolids. Biosolid application increased the dry matter yield of both plant species (by 2–2.5 fold), thereby increasing the biomass C input to soils. The rate of net C sequestration resulting from biosolid application (Mg C ha{sup −1} yr{sup −1} Mg{sup −1} biosolids) was higher for mustard (0.103) than sunflower (0.087). Biosolid application is likely to result in a higher level of C sequestration when compared to other management strategies including fertilizer application and conservation tillage, which is attributed to increased microbial biomass, and Fe and Al oxide-induced immobilization of C

  17. Assessment of shielding analysis methods, codes, and data for spent fuel transport/storage applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides a preliminary assessment of the computational tools and existing methods used to obtain radiation dose rates from shielded spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). Particular emphasis is placed on analysis tools and techniques applicable to facilities/equipment designed for the transport or storage of spent nuclear fuel or HLW. Applications to cask transport, storage, and facility handling are considered. The report reviews the analytic techniques for generating appropriate radiation sources, evaluating the radiation transport through the shield, and calculating the dose at a desired point or surface exterior to the shield. Discrete ordinates, Monte Carlo, and point kernel methods for evaluating radiation transport are reviewed, along with existing codes and data that utilize these methods. A literature survey was employed to select a cadre of codes and data libraries to be reviewed. The selection process was based on specific criteria presented in the report. Separate summaries were written for several codes (or family of codes) that provided information on the method of solution, limitations and advantages, availability, data access, ease of use, and known accuracy. For each data library, the summary covers the source of the data, applicability of these data, and known verification efforts. Finally, the report discusses the overall status of spent fuel shielding analysis techniques and attempts to illustrate areas where inaccuracy and/or uncertainty exist. The report notes the advantages and limitations of several analysis procedures and illustrates the importance of using adequate cross-section data sets. Additional work is recommended to enable final selection/validation of analysis tools that will best meet the US Department of Energy's requirements for use in developing a viable HLW management system. 188 refs., 16 figs., 27 tabs

  18. Vibration non-sensitive lithographic system for writing individualized holograms for data storage and security applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomann, Robert C.; Gerspach, Matthias; Noehte, Steffen

    2005-05-01

    A vibration non-sensitive lithographic system for writing individual computer-generated micro-holograms into a polymer material for data storage and security application is described. The robust lithograph is the central element of the data storage system consisting of the calculation of a computer-generated micro-hologram (CGH), the writing process and the retrieval of the data stored. The writing process is based on the pattern of a CGH, which projects a data pattern with an optimized signal-to-noise ratio. The hologram, which has the size of one square millimeter, consists of one million dots with a diameter of one micrometer each. In less than one second the laser scanning lithograph transfers the calculated hologram into a polyethelen perephtalate foil (PET) using a high-power single-mode laser diode. A thermal process locally converts the semi-crystalline structure of the foil into an amorphous structure. This leads to a change of the refractive index of more than 0.1 without the need of a post-processing5. Because of the diffractive nature of the introduced optical pattern a relative position accuracy of better than 100 nm has to be accomplished. A high-speed differential optical position detection system guarantees the required position accuracy even in a vibration-afflicted industrial environment. A position deviation of the writing spot caused by vibration is detected by a close correlation between the laser spot in the storage material and a second scanning laser spot on top of a grid mask. The position information is combined with the individual hologram pattern by a fast free-programmable gate-array (FPGA) processor, which again controls the laser diode. The reaction time of 26 ns ensures an interference compensation of up to one MHz. The quality of the reconstructed micro-hologram allows the retrieval of up to one kByte of machine-readable information.

  19. Recent research and applications of ground source heat pump integrated with thermal energy storage systems: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a renewable energy technology, ground source heat pump (GSHP) system is high efficient for space heating and cooling in buildings. Thermal energy storage (TES) technology facilitates the efficient utilization of renewable energy sources and energy conservation. It is expected to be more prevalent in the future. GSHP application is growing rapidly as it is integrated with TES system. During the last decade, a number of investigators have conducted the studies on the designing, modeling and testing of TES assisted GSHP (GSHP–TES) system. This paper presents a review on the research and applications of GSHP integrated with TES system, including various cooling and heating storage technologies. The studies on the GSHP–TES systems are categorized into five groups including: GSHP integrated with ice storage tank, GSHP integrated with solar collectors, GSHP integrated with soil, GSHP integrated with water tank and GSHP integrated with phase change materials (PCM). However, there are still several challenges for the applications of GSHP–TES systems, such as the mechanisms, thermodynamics and performance of the unsteady and transient heat transfer of underground soil and the thermal storage process as well as control strategies of the GSHP–TES systems. Addressing these problems will strengthen the theoretical and practical understandings and facilitate more extensive applications of GSHP–TES systems. - Highlights: • Ground source heat pump combined with thermal energy storage (GSHP–TES) systems. • Theoretical and practical understandings on GSHP–TES systems. • Outline review of the available studies and identify the future research opportunities

  20. Materials Engineering and Scale Up of Fluid Phase Chemical Hydrogen Storage for Automotive Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westman, Matthew P.; Chun, Jaehun; Choi, Young Joon; Ronnebro, Ewa

    2016-01-25

    Among candidates for chemical hydrogen storage in PEM fuel cell automotive applications, ammonia borane (AB, NH3BH3) is considered to be one of the most promising materials due to its high hydrogen content of 14-16 wt% below 200°C and high volumetric density. In our previous paper, we selected AB in silicone oil as a role model for a slurry hydrogen storage system. Materials engineering properties were optimized by increasing solid loading by using an ultra-sonic process. In this paper, we proceeded to scale up to liter size batches with solid loadings up to 50 wt% (8 wt% H2) with dynamic viscosities less than 1000cP at 25°C. The use of a non-ionic surfactant, Triton X-15, shows significant promise in controlling the level of foaming produced during the thermal dehydrogenation of the AB. Through the development of new and efficient processing techniques and the ability to adequately control the foaming, stable homogenous slurries of high solid loading have been demonstrated as a viable hydrogen delivery source.

  1. Image storage, cataloguing and retrieval using a personal computer database software application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Interesting images and cases are collected and collated by most nuclear medicine practitioners throughout the world. Changing imaging technology has altered the way in which images may be presented and are reported, with less reliance on 'hard copy' for both reporting and archiving purposes. Digital image generation and storage is rapidly replacing film in both radiological and nuclear medicine practice. A personal computer database based interesting case filing system is described and demonstrated. The digital image storage format allows instant access to both case information (e.g. history and examination, scan report or teaching point) and the relevant images. The database design allows rapid selection of cases and images appropriate to a particular diagnosis, scan type, age or other search criteria. Correlative X-ray, CT, MRI and ultrasound images can also be stored and accessed. The application is in use at The New Children's Hospital as an aid to postgraduate medical education, with new cases being regularly added to the database

  2. Memory Storage Issues of Temporal Database Applications on Relational Database Management Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami M. Halawani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Many existing database applications manage time-varying data. These database applications are referred to as temporal databases or time-oriented database applications that are considered as repositories of time-dependent data. Many proposals have been introduced for developing time-oriented database applications, some of which suggest building support for Temporal Database Management Systems (TDBMS on top of existing non-temporal DBMSs, while others suggest modifying the models of exiting DBMSs or building TDBMS from scratch. Approach: This study addressed several issues concerning developing a technique that enables database designers to understand the way in which time-varying behavior can be modeled and mapped into tabular form. Results: Conventional DBMSs do not have the capability to record and process time-varying aspects of the real world. With growing sophistication of DBMS applications, the lack of temporal support in conventional DBMS raises serious problems when used to develop temporal database. The technique of understanding how to think about time and represent it in formal systems is the topic of this study. We examined how to implement time-varying application in the SQL structured query language by introducing temporal data concepts that need to be simulated in DBMSs which lack temporal supports. We proposed a temporal data model that combines the features of previous temporal models and that reduces the cost of memory storage. Conclusion: We proposed a technique for implementing temporal database on top of exiting non-temporal DBMS. This technique includes five main areas. These areas are temporal database conceptual design, temporal database logical design, integrity constraints preventions in temporal database, modifying and querying temporal database. We proposed a data model for the temporal database based on the data models which are discussed in literature.

  3. The use of application-specific performance targets and engineering considerations to guide hydrogen storage materials development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Portable power and material handling equipment as early market technology pathways. •Engineering based system-level storage-materials requirements. •Application based targets. -- Abstract: The Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Technologies Office, carried out through the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, maintains a broad portfolio of activities to enable the commercialization of fuel cells across a range of near, mid and long-term applications. Improved, advanced hydrogen storage technologies are seen as a critical need for successful implementation of hydrogen fuel cells in many of these applications. To guide and focus materials development efforts, the DOE develops system performance targets for the specific applications of interest, and carries out system engineering analyses to determine the system-level performance delivered when the materials are incorporated into a complete system. To meet the needs of applications, it is important to consider the system-level performance, not just the material-level properties. An overview of the DOE’s hydrogen storage efforts in developing application-specific performance targets and systems engineering to guide hydrogen storage materials identification and development is herein provided

  4. Applications of thermal energy storage to process heat storage and recovery in the paper and pulp industry. Final report, September 1977--May 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, J.H.; Hurley, P.J.; Martin, P.J.

    1978-09-01

    Applications of Thermal Energy Storage (TES) in a paper and pulp mill power house were studied as one approach to the transfer of steam production from fossil fuel boilers to waste fuel (hog fuel) boilers. Data from specific mills were analyzed, and various TES concepts evaluated for application in the process steam supply system. Constant pressure and variable pressure steam accumulators were found to be the most attractive storage concepts for this application. Performance analyses based on the operation of a math model of the process steam supply system indicate potential substitution of waste wood fuel for 100,000 bbl oil per year per installation with the accumulator TES system. Based on an industry survey of potential TES application, which requires excess base steaming capability, the results from the individual installation were extrapolated to a near-term (1980's) fossil fuel savings in the paper and pulp industry of 3.2 x 10/sup 6/ bbl oil/year. Conceptual designs of mechanical equipment and control systems indicate installed cost estimates of about $560,000 per installation, indicating an after tax return on investment of over 30%.

  5. Nonradioactive Air Emissions Notice of Construction (NOC) Application for the Central Waste Complex (CSC) for Storage of Vented Waste Containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KAMBERG, L.D.

    2000-04-01

    This Notice of Construction (NOC) application is submitted for the storage and management of waste containers at the Central Waste Complex (CWC) stationary source. The CWC stationary source consists of multiple sources of diffuse and fugitive emissions, as described herein. This NOC is submitted in accordance with the requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-400-110 (criteria pollutants) and 173-460-040 (toxic air pollutants), and pursuant to guidance provided by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology). Transuranic (TRU) mixed waste containers at CWC are vented to preclude the build up of hydrogen produced as a result of radionuclide decay, not as safety pressure releases. The following activities are conducted within the CWC stationary source: Storage and inspection; Transfer and staging; Packaging; Treatment; and Sampling. This NOC application is intended to cover all existing storage structures within the current CWC treatment, storage, and/or disposal (TSD) boundary, as well as any storage structures, including waste storage pads and staging areas, that might be constructed in the future within the existing CWC boundary.

  6. Nonradioactive Air Emissions Notice of Construction (NOC) Application for the Central Waste Complex (CSC) for Storage of Vented Waste Containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Notice of Construction (NOC) application is submitted for the storage and management of waste containers at the Central Waste Complex (CWC) stationary source. The CWC stationary source consists of multiple sources of diffuse and fugitive emissions, as described herein. This NOC is submitted in accordance with the requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-400-110 (criteria pollutants) and 173-460-040 (toxic air pollutants), and pursuant to guidance provided by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology). Transuranic (TRU) mixed waste containers at CWC are vented to preclude the build up of hydrogen produced as a result of radionuclide decay, not as safety pressure releases. The following activities are conducted within the CWC stationary source: Storage and inspection; Transfer and staging; Packaging; Treatment; and Sampling. This NOC application is intended to cover all existing storage structures within the current CWC treatment, storage, and/or disposal (TSD) boundary, as well as any storage structures, including waste storage pads and staging areas, that might be constructed in the future within the existing CWC boundary

  7. Sla-Oriented Semi-Automatic Management Of Data Storage And Applications In Distributed Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariusz Król

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe a semi-automatic programming framework for supporting userswith managing the deployment of distributed applications along with storing large amountsof data in order to maintain Quality of Service in highly dynamic and distributed environments,e.g., Grid. The Polish national PL-GRID project aims to provide Polish science withboth hardware and software infrastructures which will allow scientists to perform complexsimulations and in-silico experiments on a scale greater than ever before. We highlight theissues and challenges related to data storage strategies that arise at the analysis stage ofuser requirements coming from different areas of science. Next we present a solution to thediscussed issues along with a description of sample usage scenarios. At the end we provideremarks on the current status of the implementation work and some results from the testsperformed.

  8. Control of a lithium-ion battery storage system for microgrid applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegueroles-Queralt, Jordi; Bianchi, Fernando D.; Gomis-Bellmunt, Oriol

    2014-12-01

    The operation of future microgrids will require the use of energy storage systems employing power electronics converters with advanced power management capacities. This paper presents the control scheme for a medium power lithium-ion battery bidirectional DC/AC power converter intended for microgrid applications. The switching devices of a bidirectional DC converter are commanded by a single sliding mode control law, dynamically shaped by a linear voltage regulator in accordance with the battery management system. The sliding mode controller facilitates the implementation and design of the control law and simplifies the stability analysis over the entire operating range. Control parameters of the linear regulator are designed to minimize the impact of commutation noise in the DC-link voltage regulation. The effectiveness of the proposed control strategy is illustrated by experimental results.

  9. Porous Polymer Networks: Synthesis, Porosity, and Applications in Gas Storage/Separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Weigang; Yuan, Daqiang; Zhao, Dan; Schilling, Christine Inge; Plietzsch, Oliver; Muller, Thierry; Braese, Stefano; Guenther, Johannes; Blumel, Janet; Krishna, Rajamani; Li, Zhen; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2010-11-09

    Three porous polymer networks (PPNs) have been synthesized by the homocoupling of tetrahedral monomers. Like other hyper-cross-linked polymer networks, these materials are insoluble in conventional solvents and exhibit high thermal and chemical stability. Their porosity was confirmed by N₂ sorption isotherms at 77 K. One of these materials, PPN-3, has a Langmuir surface area of 5323 m² g-1. Their clean energy applications, especially in H₂, CH₄, and CO₂ storage, as well as CO₂/CH₄ separation, have been carefully investigated. Although PPN-1 has the highest gas affinity because of its smaller pore size, the maximal gas uptake capacity is directly proportional to their surface area. PPN-3 has the highest H₂ uptake capacity among these three (4.28 wt %, 77 K). Although possessing the lowest surface area, PPN-1 shows the best CO₂/CH₄ selectivity among them.

  10. On Permeability Dynamics in Carbonaceous Aquifers used in Energy Storage Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Ds; Tilley, Bs; Ueckert, M.; Baumann, T.

    2015-11-01

    Geothermal energy harvesting applications use deep groundwater aquifers to store harvested energy. The impact of this additional energy to the aquifer chemistry is crucial for long-term operation. Gaseous CO2 is added to the injected water to compensate potential precipitates of carbonates and to prevent structural changes to the aquifer. Both of these effects affect the local chemical equilibrium of the aquifer, and we consider an effective model through homogenization which captures the hydrochemistry, heat transfer, fluid flow and permeability dynamics of the aquifer as heated fluid is added to the aquifer (injection), and as it is later removed (production). The impact of these different physical mechanisms of the heat storage performance of the aquifer is discussed. Support from the Bavarian State Ministry for the Economy is gratefully acknowledged.

  11. Development of Specific Rules for the Application of Life Cycle Assessment to Carbon Capture and Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Gallo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS is a very innovative and promising solution for greenhouse gases (GHG reduction, i.e., capturing carbon dioxide (CO2 at its source and storing it indefinitely to avoid its release to the atmosphere. This paper investigates a set of key issues in the development of specific rules for the application of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA to CCS. The following LCA-based information are addressed in this work: definition of service type, definition of functional unit, definition of system boundaries, choice of allocation rules, choice of selected Life Cycle Inventory (LCI results or other selected parameters for description of environmental performance. From a communication perspective, the specific rules defined in this study have been developed coherently with the requirements of a type III environment label scheme, the International EPD® System, according to the ISO 14025 standard.

  12. Application study by laser compton scattering gamma-ray source on storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser Compton scattering gamma-ray beam source has been developed at the NewSUBARU synchrotron light facility. The available maximum Gamma-ray photon energy is 76 MeV. The flux of quasi-monochromatic gamma-ray photons (for 16.7 MeV, ΔE/E=5%) is more than 106 photons/sec using a 35 W Nd:YVO4 laser combined with the 1 GeV storage electron beam with an intensity of 300 mA. We used the electron beams at 0.55 - 1.47 GeV for changing the energy of quasi-monochromatic gamma-ray beam. Gamma-ray beams were used for application experiments, a nuclear physics research, a nondestructive inspection of thick material, a generation of positron by pair creation, a magnetic Compton scattering measurements, and a nuclear transmutation. (author)

  13. Status and issues on storage and disposal of radioactive waste from non-power applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The first part of the paper will outline and interpret the main legal provisions in the EU applying to the management of radioactive waste from non-power station applications including waste containing natural radioactivity from oil and gas production. It will include issues relating to transport, storage and disposal of the waste. Important Directives include: Council Directive 96/29/Euratom - which lays down basic safety standards for the health protection of the general public and workers against the dangers of ionising radiation; Council Directive 92/3/Euratom - which addresses the supervision and control of radioactive waste between Member States and of shipments into and out of the community; Council Directive 97/1 I/EC - which requires an environmental impact assessment to be undertaken for facilities for disposal or long-term storage of radioactive waste. The second part of the paper will discuss management schemes for non-power station waste in key EU member states, particularly the UK, Germany and the Netherlands, including a review of the facilities for waste storage and disposal. There is a wide diversity of approaches between different member states, reflecting different rules applying to the fate of waste materials. For example, in the Netherlands, waste for which the total activity concentration is less than 100 Bq/g dry weight can be unconditionally released, whereas, if the activity exceeds that level, it must be transferred to an authorised facility for treatment and storage. In Germany, material from oil and gas exploration with activity concentrations in the range 0.5 to 500 Bq/g has to be backfilled into abandoned wells. Wastes with activity concentrations of greater than 500Bq/g have to be treated and stored. Different rules also apply to the disposal of liquid waste. There are centralised facilities for treatment and long-term storage of waste, including disused sources, in Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Italy, the

  14. Characteristics and mechanism of explosive reactions of Purex solvents with Nitric Acid at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This investigation was undertaken to make clear the energetic properties and mechanism of explosive decomposition of Purex solvent systems (TBP/n-Dodecane/HNO3) by Nitric Acid at elevated temperatures using a calorimetric technique (DSC, ARC) and a chromatographic technique (GC, GC/MS). The measurement of exothermic events of solvent-HNO3 reactions using DSC with a stainless steel sealed cell showed distinct two peaks with maxima at around 170 and 320degC, respectively. The peak at around 170degC was mainly attributed to the reactions of dealkylation products (n-butyl nitrate) of TBP and the solvent with nitric acid, and the peak at around 320degC was attributed to the exothermic decomposition of nitrated dodecanes formed in the foregoing exothermic reaction of dodecane with nitric acid. By using the data obtained in ARC experiments, activation energies of 123.2 and 152.5 kJ/mol were determined for the exothermic reaction of TBP with nitric acid and for the exothermic pyrolysis of n-butyl nitrate, respectively. Some possible pathways were considered for the explosive decomposition of TBP by nitric acid at elevated temperatures. (author)

  15. Separation of cesium from acid ILW-Purex solutions by sorption on inorganic ion exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The separation of cesium by use of the inorganic ion exchanger ammonium molybdatophosphate from nitric acid solutions of intermediate level waste (ILW) from reprocessing of spent fuel elements according to the PUREX PROCESS has been demonstrated. Other inorganic exchange materials have shown high sorption values only for certain pH ranges: ammonium hexacyano cobaltous ferrate (pH 12, 35 g Cs/kg), potassium hexacyano nickel ferrate (pH 10, 30 g Cs/kg), zirconium phosphate (pH 7, 100 g Cs/kg), titanium phosphate (pH 7, 15 g Cs/kg), antimony pentoxide (pH 2, 30 g Cs/kg) and titanium oxide (pH 7, 1 g Cs/kg). Except for high salt loading of 3.6 M NaNO3, a significant loss of capacities usually occurs; this does not allow the use of these exchangers. However, ammonium molybdatophosphate shows excellent performance with high salt loadings and in a broad pH-range from pH 9 to conc. HNO3 with a breakthrough-capacity of 60 g Cs/kg. (orig.)

  16. Advanced PUREX process for the new reprocessing plants in France and in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the late 1970s, COGEMA decided to build two reprocessing plants at La Hague. One is the completely new UP3 plant with the capacity of 800t per year of spent fuel from LWRs, which was put in operation in two steps, November, 1989 and August, 1990. Another is the UP2 800 plant, an extension of the existing UP2 facility to achieve the same annual capacity of 800t at the beginning of 1993, by the commissioning of a new head end and high active chemical process facilities. In the early 1980s, Japanese utilities formed the Japan Nuclear Fuel Service Co. which is in charge of the construction and the operation of the first commercial reprocessing plant in Japan to be constructed in Rokkasho, Aomori Prefecture. For these three new plants, the 40 year old PUREX process has been significantly improved. In this paper, some of the innovative features of the selected process are described. The criteria for process selection, the main features of the process, iodine management, the clarification of dissolution liquor, technetium behavior in the first extraction cycle, tritium decontamination and so on are reported. (K.I.)

  17. Effect of nonuniform concentration profile of plutonium in mixer settlers on criticality of the Purex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Purex solvent extraction process, change of process conditions, such as a decrease of solvent flowrate, causes an accumulation of Pu(IV) in a mixer settler bank. When the concentration of Pu(IV) exceeds a certain concentration limit in the organic phase, a heavy organic phase, the third phase, forms. These phenomena, the accumulation and the third phase formation, remarkably affect concentration profile of Pu, liquid-liquid interfacial level of mixer settlers and composition of the solvent. In the present study, some parameters which influence the criticality, keff, were examined. Effects of matrix solvent, concentration profile of Pu, interfacial levels and TBP content in the organic solvent on the keff value were examined by the Monte Carlo Code MULTI-KENO with MGCL 26 and 137 groups of constants library made from ENDF/B-IV. The result of the analysis showed that the differences of keff value between the organic and the aqueous solutions were as small as approx. 1%, and the accumulation of Pu in a central part of system caused higher Keff value, and TBP content higher than 30% in the organic solvent showed lower keff value than that of 30% TBP solvent. (author)

  18. Counter-current extraction studies for the recovery of neptunium by the purex process (Part III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Counter-current extraction experiments were carried out using the simulated purex process conditions to study the extraction behaviour of neptunium. Using low feed acidity (3) and high uranium loading of the organic phase (approximately 85 g/1), Np present in the feed as Np(IV) can be forced to the aqueous raffinate in uranium purification cycle conditions. If the feed activity is high (approximately 1.5M HNO3), the same could be achieved by using either formic or acetic acid which selectively complexes Np(IV) as the scrub in 2D cycle. Alternately Np present in the feed as Np(V) can be diverted to aqueous raffinate even when the feed acidity is relatively high, if the reducing agent U(IV), required to be added to achieve the decontamination of U from residual Pu, is added in the scrub rather than in the feed. Based on these data suitable conditions can be chosen to force Np to aqueous in the uranium purification cycle. (auth.)

  19. High-temperature molten salt thermal energy storage systems for solar applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petri, R. J.; Claar, T. D.; Ong, E.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental results of compatibility screening studies of 100 salt/containment/thermal conductivity enhancement (TCE) combinations for the high temperature solar thermal application range of 704 deg to 871 C (1300 to 1600 F) are presented. Nine candidate containment/HX alloy materials and two TCE materials were tested with six candidate solar thermal alkali and alkaline earth carbonate storage salts (both reagent and technical grade of each). Compatibility tests were conducted with salt encapsulated in approx. 6.0 inch x 1 inch welded containers of test material from 300 to 3000 hours. Compatibility evaluations were end application oriented, considering the potential 30 year lifetime requirement of solar thermal power plant components. Analyses were based on depth and nature of salt side corrosion of materials, containment alloy thermal aging effects, weld integrity in salt environment, air side containment oxidation, and chemical and physical analyses of the salt. A need for more reliable, and in some cases first time determined thermophysical and transport property data was also identified for molten carbonates in the 704 to 871 C temperature range. In particular, accurate melting point (mp) measurements were performed for Li2CO3 and Na2CO3 while melting point, heat of fusion, and specific heat determinations were conducted on 81.3 weight percent Na2CO3-18.7 weight percent K2CO3 and 52.2 weight percent BaCO3-47.8 weight percent Na2CO3 to support future TES system design and ultimate scale up of solar thermal energy storage (TES) subsystems.

  20. Conceptual design of thermal energy storage systems for near term electric utility applications. Volume 1: Screening of concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausz, W.; Berkowitz, B. J.; Hare, R. C.

    1978-01-01

    Over forty thermal energy storage (TES) concepts gathered from the literature and personal contacts were studied for their suitability for the electric utility application of storing energy off-peak discharge during peak hours. Twelve selections were derived from the concepts for screening; they used as storage media high temperature water (HTW), hot oil, molten salts, and packed beds of solids such as rock. HTW required pressure containment by prestressed cast-iron or concrete vessels, or lined underground cavities. Both steam generation from storage and feedwater heating from storage were studied. Four choices were made for further study during the project. Economic comparison by electric utility standard cost practices, and near-term availability (low technical risk) were principal criteria but suitability for utility use, conservation potential, and environmental hazards were considered.

  1. 40 CFR 429.100 - Applicability; description of the wet storage subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... publicly owned treatment works from the storage of unprocessed wood, i.e., the storage of logs or roundwood before or after removal of bark in self-contained bodies of water (mill ponds or log ponds) or...

  2. FreedomCAR :electrical energy storage system abuse test manual for electric and hybrid electric vehicle applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doughty, Daniel Harvey; Crafts, Chris C.

    2006-08-01

    This manual defines a complete body of abuse tests intended to simulate actual use and abuse conditions that may be beyond the normal safe operating limits experienced by electrical energy storage systems used in electric and hybrid electric vehicles. The tests are designed to provide a common framework for abuse testing various electrical energy storage systems used in both electric and hybrid electric vehicle applications. The manual incorporates improvements and refinements to test descriptions presented in the Society of Automotive Engineers Recommended Practice SAE J2464 ''Electric Vehicle Battery Abuse Testing'' including adaptations to abuse tests to address hybrid electric vehicle applications and other energy storage technologies (i.e., capacitors). These (possibly destructive) tests may be used as needed to determine the response of a given electrical energy storage system design under specifically defined abuse conditions. This manual does not provide acceptance criteria as a result of the testing, but rather provides results that are accurate and fair and, consequently, comparable to results from abuse tests on other similar systems. The tests described are intended for abuse testing any electrical energy storage system designed for use in electric or hybrid electric vehicle applications whether it is composed of batteries, capacitors, or a combination of the two.

  3. Gas Storage Valuation under Limited Market Liquidity: An Application in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Felix, Bastian; Woll, Oliver; Weber, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    Natural gas storages may be valuated by applying real options theory. However it is crucial, not to ignore that most evolving gas spot markets, like the German spot market, lack of liquidity. In this context, considering storage operators as price takers does not account for interdependencies of storage operations and market prices. This paper offers a novel approach to storage valuation taking into account the effect of management decisions on market prices. The within this paper proposed me...

  4. NAC's Modular, Advanced Generation, Nuclear All-purpose STORage (MAGNASTOR) system: new generation multipurpose spent fuel storage for global application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multipurpose canister systems (MCS) have been designed, licensed, fabricated, constructed, and loaded over the last decade within the U.S. These systems are characterized as concrete-based storage overpacks containing transportable canisters utilizing redundantly welded closures. Canisters are designed and intended to be transferred into transport packagings for shipment off-site, and canister designs do not preclude their use in waste disposal overpacks. NAC has learned a number of significant lessons in the deployment of its first generation MCS. During this period prior to the next procurement phase, NAC has developed a new generation MCS, incorporating the lessons learned from the first generation while considering the capabilities of the plants populating the next phase. The system is identified as the Modular, Advanced Generation, Nuclear All-purpose STORage (MAGNASTOR) system, and this paper addresses its unique design, fabrication, and operations features. Among these are: a unique developed cell basket design, under patent review, that increases spent fuel capacities and simplifies fabrication while providing high strength and heat removal efficiency: a significantly enhanced canister closure design that improves welding time, personnel dose, and drying performance: a low profile vertical concrete cask design that improves on-site handling and site dose rates, offers tangible threat limitations for beyond-design-basis events, and maintains proven and simple construction/operation features: a simple, proven transfer system that facilitates transfer without excessive dose or handling: a new approach to water removal and canister drying, using a moisture entrainment, gas absorption vacuum (MEGAVAC) system. The paper includes design and licensing status of the MAGNASTOR system, and prototyping development that NAC has performed to date

  5. An Actuator Control Unit for Safety-Critical Mechatronic Applications with Embedded Energy Storage Backup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Saponara

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an actuator control unit (ACU with a 450-J embedded energy storage backup to face safety critical mechatronic applications. The idea is to ensure full operation of electric actuators, even in the case of battery failure, by using supercapacitors as a local energy tank. Thanks to integrated switching converter circuitry, the supercapacitors provide the required voltage and current levels for the required time to guarantee actuator operation until the system enters into safety mode. Experimental results are presented for a target application related to the control of servomotors for a robotized prosthetic arm. Mechatronic devices for rehabilitation or assisted living of injured and/or elderly people are available today. In most cases, they are battery powered with lithium-based cells, providing high energy density and low weight, but at the expense of a reduced robustness compared to lead-acid- or nickel-based battery cells. The ACU of this work ensures full operation of the wearable robotized arm, controlled through acceleration and electromyography (EMG sensor signals, even in the case of battery failure, thanks to the embedded energy backup unit. To prove the configurability and scalability of the proposed solution, experimental results related to the electric actuation of the car door latch and of a robotized gearbox in vehicles are also shown. The reliability of the energy backup device has been assessed in a wide temperature range, from −40 to 130 °C, and in a durability test campaign of more than 10,000 cycles. Achieved results prove the suitability of the proposed approach for ACUs requiring a burst of power of hundreds of watts for only a few seconds in safety-critical applications. Alternatively, the aging and temperature characterizations of energy backup units is limited to supercapacitors of thousands of farads for high power applications (e.g., electric/hybrid propulsion and with a temperature range limited to

  6. Combined long reach and dexterous manipulation for waste storage tank applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the highest priority environmental restoration tasks within the Department of Energy (DOE) is the remediation of single-shell waste storage tanks (WSTs), especially those suspected of, or documented as, leakers. Most currently proposed approaches for remediation of large underground WSTs require application of remotely operated long-reach (greater than 10 m), high-lift capacity (greater than 200 kg) manipulator systems. Because of the complexity of in-tank hardware, waste forms, remediation tasks, and variety of end-effector tools, these manipulator systems must also be capable of performing a diverse set of dexterous manipulations. This presentation will describe the integration of a Spar RMS 2500 manipulator system, a Schilling Titan-7F manipulator, and control systems developed at ORNL and SNL to provide a combined long reach and dexterous manipulation system. The purpose of integrating these two manipulator systems was to study and demonstrate their combined performance, evaluate design requirements for a deployed system, and provide a testbed for control and end-effector technologies that might be applicable to remediation of WSTs. 5 refs

  7. Automated tune measurements in the Advanced Light Source storage ring using a LabVIEW application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horizontal and vertical betatron tunes and the synchrotron tune are measured frequently during storage ring commissioning. The measurements are tedious and subject to human errors. Automating this kind of repetitive measurement is underway using LabVIEW for Windows, a software application supplied by National Instruments Corporation, that provides acquisition, graphing, and analysis of data as well as instrument control through the General Purpose Interface Bus (GPIB). We have added LabVIEW access to the Advanced Light Source (ALS) data base and control system. LabVIEW is a fast and efficient tool for accelerator commissioning and beam physics studies. Hardware used to perform tune measurements include a tracking generator (or a white noise generator), strip line electrodes for external ''citation of the beam, button monitors, and a spectrum analyzer. All three tunes are displayed simultaneously on the spectrum analyzer. Our program automatically identifies three tunes by applying and analyzing small variations and reports the results. This routine can be encapsulated in other applications, for instance, in a chromaticity measurement and correction program

  8. APPLICATIONS OF THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE TO WASTE HEAT RECOVERY IN THE FOOD PROCESSING INDUSTRY, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundberg, W. L.; Christenson, James A.

    1979-07-31

    A project is discussed in which the possibilities for economical waste heat recovery and utilization in the food industry were examined. Waste heat availability and applications surveys were performed at two manufacturing plants engaged in low temperature (freezing) and high temperature (cooking, sterilizing, etc.) food processing. The surveys indicate usable waste heat is available in significant quantities which could be applied to existing, on-site energy demands resulting in sizable reductions in factory fuel and energy usage. At the high temperature plant, the energy demands involve the heating of fresh water for boiler make-up, for the food processes and for the daily clean-up operation. Clean-up poses an opportunity for thermal energy storage since waste heat is produced during the one or two production shifts of each working day while the major clean-up effort does not occur until food production ends. At the frozen food facility, the clean-up water application again exists and, in addition, refrigeration waste heat could also be applied to warm the soil beneath the ground floor freezer space. Systems to recover and apply waste heat in these situations were developed conceptually and thermal/economic performance predictions were obtained. The results of those studies indicate the economics of waste heat recovery can be attractive for facilities with high energy demand levels. Small factories, however, with relatively low energy demands may find the economics marginal although, percentagewise, the fuel and energy savings are appreciable.

  9. Photosynthesis, Carbohydrate Storage and Remobilization During Grain Filling as Affected by Sulphur Application in Winter Wheat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Dong; YU Zhen-wen; XU Zhen-zhu

    2005-01-01

    Photosynthesis and carbohydrate storage and remobilization was investigated during grain filling of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L., cv. Lumai 22) in sulphur application experiments where the available sulphur (S) content in the soil of 0-20 cm soil layer was 5.84 mg kg-1. Two levels of S were applied as S0 (0 kg S ha-1) and S1 (67.5 kg S ha-1). The results showed that net photosynthetic rate of flag leaf of S1 treatment was significantly higher than S0 treatment, and it increased gradually from anthesis to 35 DAA. Sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS) activity and sucrose content of S1 treatment were significantly higher than those of S0 treatment. The contents of total soluble sugar, sucrose, fructose, glucose, DP3 and DP ≥ 4fructan in stem and sheath of S1 treatment were significantly higher than those of S0 treatment also. The amount of total soluble sugar and fructans remobilization from stem and sheath and the starch accumulating rate in grain of S1 treatment was significantly higher than those of S0 treatment. It is suggested that sulphur application increase photosynthate remobilization from stem and sheath to grain at later filling stage.

  10. 3D graphene-based hybrid materials: synthesis and applications in energy storage and conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qiurong; Cha, Younghwan; Song, Yang; Lee, Jung-In; Zhu, Chengzhou; Li, Xiaoyu; Song, Min-Kyu; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2016-08-25

    Porous 3D graphene-based hybrid materials (3D GBHMs) are currently attractive nanomaterials employed in the field of energy. Heteroatom-doped 3D graphene and metal, metal oxide, and polymer-decorated 3D graphene with modified electronic and atomic structures provide promising performance as electrode materials in energy storage and conversion. Numerous synthesis methods such as self-assembly, templating, electrochemical deposition, and supercritical CO2, pave the way to mass production of 3D GBHMs in the commercialization of energy devices. This review summarizes recent advances in the fabrication of 3D GBHMs with well-defined architectures such as finely controlled pore sizes, heteroatom doping types and levels. Moreover, current progress toward applications in fuel cells, supercapacitors and batteries employing 3D GBHMs is also highlighted, along with the detailed mechanisms of the enhanced electrochemical performance. Furthermore, current critical issues, challenges and future prospects with respect to applications of 3D GBHMs in practical devices are discussed at the end of this review. PMID:27531643

  11. Diffusion and elastoplastic analyses of polycrystalline magnesium for solid state hydrogen storage application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathakari, Amey

    Solid state hydrogen storage can be an effective way of storing hydrogen as an energy source for mobile applications. The advantage includes high energy density, low setup cost, safe operation, abundance of metal hydrides, low maintenance, etc. Magnesium is one of the potential metals for the application. However, sluggish desorption kinetics of magnesium requiring relatively high operation temperature has hindered its practical realization. In the present study, an attempt is made to analyze effects of grain boundary on diffusion and diffusion induced stresses in polycrystalline magnesium. Grain boundaries in nanostructured magnesium can undergo severe plastic deformations during the hydrogen insertion and desertion processes. Such boundaries are characterized by excess grain boundary energy, presence of long range elastic stresses and enhanced pathways for hydrogen transport. Finite element models have been developed for the analyses by realizing the different physical and chemical parameters of magnesium grains and grain boundaries. The study provides convincing evidence of the importance of the presence of grain boundaries. The results may help find ways to improve hydrogen charging/discharging efficiency by means of plastic deformations in grain boundaries while maintaining the overall structural integrity of host magnesium.

  12. Batteries: An Advanced Na-FeCl2 ZEBRA Battery for Stationary Energy Storage Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Guosheng; Lu, Xiaochuan; Kim, Jin Yong; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2015-06-17

    Sodium-metal chloride batteries, ZEBRA, are considered as one of the most important electrochemical devices for stationary energy storage applications because of its advantages of good cycle life, safety, and reliability. However, sodium-nickel chloride (Na-NiCl2) batteries, the most promising redox chemistry in ZEBRA batteries, still face great challenges for the practical application due to its inevitable feature of using Ni cathode (high materials cost). In this work, a novel intermediate-temperature sodium-iron chloride (Na-FeCl2) battery using a molten sodium anode and Fe cathode is proposed and demonstrated. The first use of unique sulfur-based additives in Fe cathode enables Na-FeCl2 batteries can be assembled in the discharged state and operated at intermediate-temperature (<200°C). The results in this work demonstrate that intermediate-temperature Na-FeCl2 battery technology could be a propitious solution for ZEBRA battery technologies by replacing the traditional Na-NiCl2 chemistry.

  13. Functional porous carbon-ZnO nanocomposites for high-performance biosensors and energy storage applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhu, Rajesh; Veeramani, Vediyappan; Chen, Shen-Ming; Veerakumar, Pitchaimani; Liu, Shang-Bin; Miyamoto, Nobuyoshi

    2016-06-28

    A one-pot synthesis method for the fabrication of biomass-derived activated carbon-zinc oxide (ZAC) nanocomposites using sugarcane bagasse as a carbon precursor and ZnCl2 as an activating agent is reported. For the first time, we used ZnCl2 as not only an activating agent and also for the synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles on the AC surface. ZAC materials with varying ZnO loading were prepared and characterized by a variety of analytical and spectroscopic techniques such as FE-SEM, FE-TEM, XRD, EA, XPS, and Raman spectroscopy. ZAC-modified glassy carbon electrodes (GCEs) were found to exhibit remarkable electrochemical properties for simultaneous detection of ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA), and uric acid (UA) as well as hazardous pollutants such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and hydrazine (N2H4) with desirable sensitivity, selectivity, and detection limits. Moreover, ZAC-modified stainless steel electrodes also showed superior performances for supercapacitor applications. The ZAC nanocomposites, which may be mass produced by the reported facile direct route from sugarcane bagasse, are not only eco-friendly but also cost-effective, and thus, are suitable as a practical platform for bio-sensing and energy storage applications. PMID:27265120

  14. SHI induced defects in chemically synthesized graphene oxide for hydrogen storage applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Preetam K.; Sharma, Vinay; Rajaura, Rajveer Singh; Srivastava, Subodh; Sharma, S. S.; Singh, M.; Vijay, Y. K.

    2016-05-01

    Graphene, due to its unique properties arising from the single carbon layer, is a potential candidate for applications in a variety of fields including sensors, photovoltaics and energy storage. The atomic structure and morphology of the carbon nanomaterials especially graphene can be tailored by energetic ionic irradiation. As graphene sheet is very stable, the surface have less reactivity as compared to the edges of the sheets. By surface modification with energetic ion-beams additional dangling bonds can be formed to enhance the surface activity of the graphene film which could be exploited in a variety of applications. In the present work, graphene oxide was synthesized by improved Hummers' Method. The irradiation was done with Ag+ ions carrying energy 100 MeV with the fluence of 3×1013. Raman spectrum of graphene irradiated by Ag+ beam shows additional disordered peaks of &Dacute; and D+G bands. There is also a decrease in the intensity of D band. AFM images depict the increase in the surface roughness of the films. This can be attributed to the increase in the defects in the flakes and intermixing of adjacent layers by irradiation.

  15. 10 CFR 72.103 - Geological and seismological characteristics for applications for dry cask modes of storage on or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Geological and seismological characteristics for... § 72.103 Geological and seismological characteristics for applications for dry cask modes of storage on... foundation and geological investigation, literature review, and regional geological reconnaissance show...

  16. Modeling Diffusion and Buoyancy-Driven Convection with Application to Geological CO2 Storage

    KAUST Repository

    Allen, Rebecca

    2015-04-01

    ABSTRACT Modeling Diffusion and Buoyancy-Driven Convection with Application to Geological CO2 Storage Rebecca Allen Geological CO2 storage is an engineering feat that has been undertaken around the world for more than two decades, thus accurate modeling of flow and transport behavior is of practical importance. Diffusive and convective transport are relevant processes for buoyancy-driven convection of CO2 into underlying fluid, a scenario that has received the attention of numerous modeling studies. While most studies focus on Darcy-scale modeling of this scenario, relatively little work exists at the pore-scale. In this work, properties evaluated at the pore-scale are used to investigate the transport behavior modeled at the Darcy-scale. We compute permeability and two different forms of tortuosity, namely hydraulic and diffusive. By generating various pore ge- ometries, we find hydraulic and diffusive tortuosity can be quantitatively different in the same pore geometry by up to a factor of ten. As such, we emphasize that these tortuosities should not be used interchangeably. We find pore geometries that are characterized by anisotropic permeability can also exhibit anisotropic diffusive tortuosity. This finding has important implications for buoyancy-driven convection modeling; when representing the geological formation with an anisotropic permeabil- ity, it is more realistic to also account for an anisotropic diffusivity. By implementing a non-dimensional model that includes both a vertically and horizontally orientated 5 Rayleigh number, we interpret our findings according to the combined effect of the anisotropy from permeability and diffusive tortuosity. In particular, we observe the Rayleigh ratio may either dampen or enhance the diffusing front, and our simulation data is used to express the time of convective onset as a function of the Rayleigh ratio. Also, we implement a lattice Boltzmann model for thermal convective flows, which we treat as an analog for

  17. CONTROLLED GROWTH OF CARBON NANOTUBES ON CONDUCTIVE METAL SUBSTRATES FOR ENERGY STORAGE APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, P.; Engtrakul, C.

    2009-01-01

    a characteristic CNT sample was measured to be 232 m2/g with a cryogenic (77K) hydrogen storage of 0.85 wt%. This level of hydrogen adsorption is slightly higher than that predicted by the Chahine rule, indicating that these CNTs may bind hydrogen more strongly than other carbonaceous materials. More work is needed to confi rm and determine the reason for increased hydrogen adsorption in these CNTs, and to test them for use as catalyst support networks. This study demonstrates the feasibility of producing CNTs for energy storage applications using water-assisted CVD.

  18. Cloud Storage Application in Public Security Monitoring%云存储在公安监控中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡辉毅

    2015-01-01

    通过对原有监控数据CVR存储设备的软硬件升级改造,使其成为视频云存储系统,这样不仅能利用原有的监控数据CVR存储设备,节省存储设备的成本投入,而且提升了数据的存储效率,加强了智能平台的综合应用,并介绍了云存储的优越性及其改造方案和具体步骤。%based on the original monitoring data CVR storage hardware and software upgrades , making it a vid-eo cloud storage system .CVR in this way , not only to the original monitoring data storage devices of old utili-zation and save the cost of storage devices , and improves the data storage efficiency , strengthen the compre-hensive intelligence platform integration application .This paper introduces the advantages of cloud storage , the retrofit scheme and concrete steps .

  19. 储氢技术综述及在氢储能中的应用展望%Overview of Hydrogen Storage Technologies and Their Application Prospects in Hydrogen-based Energy Storage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐丽; 马光; 盛鹏; 李瑞文; 刘志伟; 李平

    2016-01-01

    氢储能技术是解决大规模风电储存的一种新途径,高效储氢技术是氢储能系统得以应用的关键环节之一。综述储氢技术的国内外研究进展,对适于商业应用的高压气态储氢技术、低温液态储氢技术、金属氢化物储氢技术,以及低温高压、高压金属氢化物复合储氢技术展开比较和分析。通过对氢储能系统应用过程的分析,认为氢储能系统对储氢技术的要求,更侧重于安全性、成本和体积密度。综合考虑各种储氢方式在氢储能应用上的优缺点,认为金属氢化物储氢技术和高压金属氢化物储氢技术具有显著的优势。%Hydrogen storage technology is a new way to solve large-scale wind power storage, and high efficient hydrogen storage technology is one of the key links in the application of hydrogen energy storage system. This paper reviews its domestic and foreign research progresses of hydrogen storage technology. Comparative analysis of high pressure gaseous hydrogen storage technology, cryogenic liquid hydrogen storage technology, metal hydride hydrogen storage technology, cryogenic high pressure and high-pressure metal hydride composite hydrogen storage technology for commercial application is carried out. According to the analysis of hydrogen energy storage system’s application process, it could be deemed that the requirements of hydrogen energy storage system for hydrogen storage technology are more focused on safety, cost and volume density. The advantages and disadvantages of various hydrogen storage ways in hydrogen energy storage applications are synthetically considered. It can draw the conclusion that metal hydride hydrogen storage technology and high-pressure metal hydride hydrogen storage technology have remarkable advantages.

  20. 25th Anniversary Article: Polymer-Particle Composites: Phase Stability and Applications in Electrochemical Energy Storage

    KAUST Repository

    Srivastava, Samanvaya

    2013-12-09

    Polymer-particle composites are used in virtually every field of technology. When the particles approach nanometer dimensions, large interfacial regions are created. In favorable situations, the spatial distribution of these interfaces can be controlled to create new hybrid materials with physical and transport properties inaccessible in their constituents or poorly prepared mixtures. This review surveys progress in the last decade in understanding phase behavior, structure, and properties of nanoparticle-polymer composites. The review takes a decidedly polymers perspective and explores how physical and chemical approaches may be employed to create hybrids with controlled distribution of particles. Applications are studied in two contexts of contemporary interest: battery electrolytes and electrodes. In the former, the role of dispersed and aggregated particles on ion-transport is considered. In the latter, the polymer is employed in such small quantities that it has been historically given titles such as binder and carbon precursor that underscore its perceived secondary role. Considering the myriad functions the binder plays in an electrode, it is surprising that highly filled composites have not received more attention. Opportunities in this and related areas are highlighted where recent advances in synthesis and polymer science are inspiring new approaches, and where newcomers to the field could make important contributions. Polymer-particle composites are used in virtually every field of technology. When the particles approach nanometer dimensions, large interfacial regions are created that can be exploited for applications. The fundamental approaches and bottom-up synthesis strategies for understanding and controlling nanoparticle dispersion in polymers are reviewed. Applications of these approaches for creating polymer-particle composite electrolytes and electrodes for energy storage are also considered. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Behavior of mercury and iodine during vitrification of simulated alkaline Purex waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current plans indicate that the high-level wastes stored at the Savannah River Plant will be solidified by vitrification. The behavior of mercury and iodine during the vitrification process is of concern because: mercury is present in the waste in high concentrations (0.1 to 2.8 wt%); mercury will react with iodine and the other halogens present in the waste during vitrification and; the mercury compounds formed will be volatilized from the vitrification process placing a high particulate load in the vitrification system off-gas. Twelve experiments were completed to study the behavior of mercury during vitrification of simulated SRP Purex waste. The mercury was completely volatized from the vitrification system in all experiments. The mercury reacted with iodine, chlorine and oxygen to form a fine particulate solid. Quantitative recovery of mercury compounds formed in the vitrification system off-gas was not possible due to high (37 to 90%) deposition of solids in the off-gas piping. The behavior of mercury and iodine was most strongly influenced by the vitrification system atmosphere. During experiments performed in which the oxygen content of the vitrification system atmosphere was low (< 1 vol%); iodine retention in the glass product was 27 to 55%, the mercury composition of the solids recovered from the off-gas scrub solutions was 75 to 85 wt%, and a small quantity of metallic mercury was recovered from the off-gas scrub solution. During experiments performed in which the oxygen content of the vitrification system atmosphere was high (20 vol%), iodide retention in the glass product was 3 to 15%, the mercury composition of the solids recovered from the off-gas scrub solutions was 60 to 80 wt%, and very little metallic mercury was recovered from the off-gas scrub solution

  2. Di-hydroxyurea-a Promising Reducing Reagent for the U/Pu split in the PUREX process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel by the Purex process, the separation of U and Pu is a major stage. This is commonly achieved by a redox process, in which a reducing agent (e.g. U(IV) or (FeII)) and a stabiliser (e.g. N2H4 or NH2SO3H) are added to reduce extractable Pu4+ to un-extractable Pu3+. The stabiliser prevents the nitrous acid catalysed re-oxidation of Pu(III) back to Pu(IV). One of the key objectives is to reduce both the number of solvent extraction cycles and the waste stream volumes [1]. One option for Advanced Purex flowsheets is to adopt a new salt-free reductant in the U/Pu split. Di-hydroxyurea(DHU)-a new Reducing reagent was synthesized with tri-associated solid phosgene (Bis(trichloromethyl)Carbonate) solved in dioxane and hydroxylamine hydrochloride solved in potassium acetate solution. The Reduction of Pu(IV) by DHU was investigated using UV-Vis spectrophotometer. The reduction back-extraction behavior of Pu(IV) in 30%TBP /OK was firstly investigated under conditions of different temperature, different concentration of DHU and HNO3 and various phase contract time respectively.The results showed that Pu(IV) in organic phase can be stripped rapidly to aqueous phase by DHU. Simulating the 1B contactor of the Purex process by DHU with nitric acid solution as the stripping agent,the separation factors of uranium/plutonium can reach 2.1 104. This indicates that DHU is a promising salt free agent for uranium/plutonium separation. (authors)

  3. Two-dimensional Clay and Graphene Nanosheets for Polymer Nanocomposites and Energy Storage Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yuqiang

    Clay and graphene nanosheets are attractive to materials scientists due to their unique structural and physical properties and potentially low cost. This thesis focuses on the surface modification and structure design of clay and graphene nanosheets, targeting special requirements in polymer nanocomposites and energy storage applications. The high aspect ratio and stiffness of clay and graphene nanosheets make them promising candidates to reinforce polymers. However, it is challenging to achieve a good dispersion of the nanosheets in a polymer matrix. It is demonstrated in this study that organic modifications of clay and graphene nanosheets lead to better filler dispersion in polymer matrices. A prepolymer route was developed to achieve clay exfoliation in a polyurethane-vermiculite system. However, the phase-separated structure of the polyurethane matrix was disrupted. Intragallery catalysis was adopted to promote the clay exfoliation during polymerization. With both catalytic and reactive groups on the clay modifier, the polyurethane-vermiculite nanocomposites showed a significant increase in modulus and improved barrier performance, compared to neat polyurethane. The toughening effect of graphene on thermosetting epoxies and unsaturated polyesters (UPs) was also investigated. Various types of graphene with different structures and surface functionalities were incorporated into the thermosetting resin by in situ polymerization. The toughening effect was observed for epoxy nanocomposites at loading levels of less than 0.1 wt%, and a peak of fracture toughness was observed at 0.02 or 0.04 wt% of graphene loadings for all epoxy-graphene systems. A microcrack-crazing mechanism was proposed to explain the fracture behavior of epoxy-graphene systems based on fractography observations. Similar peak behavior of fracture toughness was not observed in UP system. UP nanocomposites with modified graphene oxide showed better mechanical performance than those with unmodified

  4. Storage, transportation, and atomization of CWF for residential applications. Final report, September 27, 1989--November 15, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimanis, M.P.; Breault, R.W. [TECOGEN, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States); Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C. [AMAX Research and Development Center, Golden, CO (United States)

    1991-11-01

    This project investigated the properties and behavior with regard to handling, storage, and atomization in small-scale applications of different CWFs (coal water fuels) prepared from different parent coals and various beneficiation techniques as well as consideration for bulk storage and distribution. The CWFs that were prepared included Upper Elkhorn No. 3, Illinois No. 6, and Upper Wyodak coal cleaned by heavy media separation. Also, several CWFs were prepared with Upper Elkhorn No. 3 coal cleaned by heavy media separation with filtration, chemical cleaning, oil agglomeration, and froth flotation.

  5. Blister pouches for effective reagent storage and release for low cost point-of-care diagnostic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Suzanne; Sewart, Rene; Land, Kevin; Roux, Pieter; Gärtner, Claudia; Becker, Holger

    2016-03-01

    Lab-on-a-chip devices are often applied to point-of-care diagnostic solutions as they are low-cost, compact, disposable, and require only small sample volumes. For such devices, various reagents are required for sample preparation and analysis and, for an integrated solution to be realized, on-chip reagent storage and automated introduction are required. This work describes the implementation and characterization of effective liquid reagent storage and release mechanisms utilizing blister pouches applied to various point-of-care diagnostic device applications. The manufacturing aspects as well as performance parameters are evaluated.

  6. Technology and Manufacturing Readiness of Early Market Motive and Non-Motive Hydrogen Storage Technologies for Fuel Cell Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronnebro, Ewa

    2012-06-16

    PNNL’s objective in this report is to provide DOE with a technology and manufacturing readiness assessment to identify hydrogen storage technologies’ maturity levels for early market motive and non-motive applications and to provide a path forward toward commercialization. PNNL’s Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) is based on a combination of Technology Readiness Level (TRL) and Manufacturing Readiness Level (MRL) designations that enable evaluation of hydrogen storage technologies in varying levels of development. This approach provides a logical methodology and roadmap to enable the identification of hydrogen storage technologies, their advantages/disadvantages, gaps and R&D needs on an unbiased and transparent scale that is easily communicated to interagency partners. The TRA report documents the process used to conduct the TRA, reports the TRL and MRL for each assessed technology and provides recommendations based on the findings.

  7. Globally gridded terrestrial water storage variations from GRACE satellite gravimetry for hydrometeorological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liangjing; Dobslaw, Henryk; Thomas, Maik

    2016-07-01

    Globally gridded estimates of monthly-mean anomalies of terrestrial water storage (TWS) are estimated from the most recent GRACE release 05a of GFZ Potsdam in order to provide non-geodetic users a convenient access to state-of-the-art GRACE monitoring data. We use an ensemble of five global land model simulations with different physics and different atmospheric forcing to obtain reliable gridded scaling factors required to correct for spatial leakage introduced during data processing. To allow for the application of this data-set for large-scale monitoring tasks, model validation efforts, and subsequently also data assimilation experiments, globally gridded estimates of TWS uncertainties that include (i) measurement, (ii) leakage and (iii) re-scaling errors are provided as well. The results are generally consistent with the gridded data provided by Tellus, but deviate in some basins which are largely affected by the uncertainties of the model information required for re-scaling, where the approach based on the median of a small ensemble of global land models introduced in this paper leads to more robust results.

  8. Synthesis of diphenylalanine/cobalt oxide hybrid nanowires and their application to energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jungki; Kim, Sung-Wook; Kang, Kisuk; Park, Chan Beum

    2010-01-26

    We report the synthesis of novel diphenylalanine/cobalt(II,III) oxide (Co(3)O(4)) composite nanowires by peptide self-assembly. Peptide nanowires were prepared by treating amorphous diphenylalanine film with aniline vapor at an elevated temperature. They were hybridized with Co(3)O(4) nanocrystals through the reduction of cobalt ions in an aqueous solution using sodium borohydride (NaBH(4)) without any complex processes such as heat treatment. The formation of peptide/Co(3)O(4) composite nanowires was characterized using multiple tools, such as electron microscopies and elemental analysis, and their potential application as a negative electrode for Li-ion batteries was explored by constructing Swagelok-type cells with hybrid nanowires as a working electrode and examining their charge/discharge behavior. The present study provides a useful approach for the synthesis of functional metal oxide nanomaterials by demonstrating the feasibility of peptide/Co(3)O(4) hybrid nanowires as an energy storage material. PMID:20000841

  9. Relational database hybrid model, of high performance and storage capacity for nuclear engineering applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this work is to present the relational database, named FALCAO. It was created and implemented to support the storage of the monitored variables in the IEA-R1 research reactor, located in the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN/CNEN-SP. The data logical model and its direct influence in the integrity of the provided information are carefully considered. The concepts and steps of normalization and de normalization including the entities and relations involved in the logical model are presented. It is also presented the effects of the model rules in the acquisition, loading and availability of the final information, under the performance concept since the acquisition process loads and provides lots of information in small intervals of time. The SACD application, through its functionalities, presents the information stored in the FALCAO database in a practical and optimized form. The implementation of the FALCAO database occurred successfully and its existence leads to a considerably favorable situation. It is now essential to the routine of the researchers involved, not only due to the substantial improvement of the process but also to the reliability associated to it. (author)

  10. New capabilities in the HENP grand challenge storage access system and its application at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The High Energy and Nuclear Physics Data Access Grand Challenge project has developed an optimizing storage access software system that was prototyped at RHIC. It is currently undergoing integration with the STAR experiment in preparation for data taking that starts in mid-2000. The behavior and lessons learned in the RHIC Mock Data Challenge exercises are described as well as the observed performance under conditions designed to characterize scalability. Up to 250 simultaneous queries were tested and up to 10 million events across 7 event components were involved in these queries. The system coordinates the staging of ''bundles'' of files from the HPSS tape system, so that all the needed components of each event are in disk cache when accessed by the application software. The caching policy algorithm for the coordinated bundle staging is described in the paper. The initial prototype implementation interfaced to the Objectivity/DB. In this latest version, it evolved to work with arbitrary files and use CORBA interfaces to the tag database and file catalog services. The interface to the tag database and the MySQL-based file catalog services used by STAR are described along with the planned usage scenarios

  11. A Voltage Controller in Photo-Voltaic System with Battery Storage for Stand-Alone Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesh Dharmireddy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes the new voltage controller in photo-voltaic system for Stand-Alone Applications with battery energy storage. The output of the PV array is unregulated DC supply due to change in weather conditions. The maximum power is tracked with respect to temperature and irradiance levels by using DC-DC converter. The perturbation and observes algorithm is applied for maximum power point tracking (MPPT purpose. This algorithm is selected due to its ability to withstand against any parameter variation and having high efficiency. The solar cell array powers the steady state energy and the battery compensates the dynamic energy in the system. The aim of the control strategy is to control the SEPIC converter and bi-direction DC-DC converter to operate in suitable modes according to the condition of solar cell and battery, so as to coordinate the two sources of solar cell and battery supplying power and ensure the system operates with high efficiency and behaviors with good dynamic performance. The output of DC-DC converter is converted to AC voltage by using inverter.  The AC output voltage and frequency are regulated. A closed loop voltage control for inverter is done by using unipolar sine wave pulse width modulation (SPWM. The regulated AC voltage is fed to AC standalone loads or grid integration. The overall system is designed, developed and validated by using MATLAB-SIMULINK. The simulation results demonstrate the effective working of MPPT algorithm, control strategy and voltage controller with SPWM technique for inverter in AC standalone load applications.

  12. Tailoring Thermodynamics and Kinetics for Hydrogen Storage in Complex Hydrides towards Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongfeng; Yang, Yaxiong; Gao, Mingxia; Pan, Hongge

    2016-02-01

    Solid-state hydrogen storage using various materials is expected to provide the ultimate solution for safe and efficient on-board storage. Complex hydrides have attracted increasing attention over the past two decades due to their high gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen densities. In this account, we review studies from our lab on tailoring the thermodynamics and kinetics for hydrogen storage in complex hydrides, including metal alanates, borohydrides and amides. By changing the material composition and structure, developing feasible preparation methods, doping high-performance catalysts, optimizing multifunctional additives, creating nanostructures and understanding the interaction mechanisms with hydrogen, the operating temperatures for hydrogen storage in metal amides, alanates and borohydrides are remarkably reduced. This temperature reduction is associated with enhanced reaction kinetics and improved reversibility. The examples discussed in this review are expected to provide new inspiration for the development of complex hydrides with high hydrogen capacity and appropriate thermodynamics and kinetics for hydrogen storage. PMID:26638824

  13. Grid-scale energy storage applications in renewable energy integration: A survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • This paper examines the use of grid-scale energy storage for renewable energy integration. • Storage has great potential to help facilitate renewable energy integration. • There are a number of technical, economic and regulatory barriers to large-scale storage use. • A better understanding of the interdependence of technical and economic aspects is needed. • Without better market and regulatory coordination grid-scale storage cannot reach its full potential. - Abstract: This paper examines both the potential of and barriers to grid-scale energy storage playing a substantive role in transitioning to an efficient, reliable and cost-effective power system with a high penetration of renewable energy sources. Grid-scale storage is a term that describes a number of different technologies with a wide range of characteristics. This versatility leads to the use of storage to perform a number of grid-services. We first enumerate these services, with an emphasize on those that are best suited to mitigate the effects of uncertainty and variability associated with intermittent, non-dispatchable renewable energy sources. We then provide an overview of the current methods to evaluate grid-integrated storage, summarize key findings, and highlight ongoing challenges to large-scale adoption of grid-scale energy storage. We focus on one particular area that is critical to both the efficient use of energy storage in the power grid and its long-term economic viability: the conflict between the technical benefits of this resource, which can provide both power and energy related grid-services (in some cases simultaneously), and the economic challenges of compensating these services within the current market structures. We then examine recent progress in addressing these issues through regulatory changes and other initiatives designed to mitigate previous market failures. This discussion is followed by some remarks about ongoing regulatory and market design

  14. Synthesis of novel ZnV₂O₄ hierarchical nanospheres and their applications as electrochemical supercapacitor and hydrogen storage material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Faheem K; Tahir, Muhammad; Cao, Chuanbao; Idrees, Faryal; Ahmed, R; Khan, Waheed S; Ali, Zulfiqar; Mahmood, Nasir; Tanveer, M; Mahmood, Asif; Aslam, Imran

    2014-08-27

    Hierarchical nanostructures (Hs) have recently garnered enormous attention due to their remarkable performances in catalysis, electronic devices, energy storage and conversion. Considering the advantage of hierarchical nanostructures, we have formulated a facile and template free method to synthesize novel hierarchical nanospheres (NHNs) of ZnV2O4. Both zinc and vanadium are earth abundant, relatively economical and can offer several oxidation states, which can render a broad range of redox reactions favorable for electrochemical energy storage applications. Keeping these points in mind, we investigated for the first time the electrochemical supercapacitor performance of NHNs. The electrochemical measurements were performed in 2 M KOH solution. The measured specific capacitance of ZnV2O4 electrode is 360 F/g at 1 A/g with good stability and retention capacity of 89% after 1000 cycles. Moreover, the hydrogen storage properties of NHNs were measured at 473, 573, and 623 K with an absorption of 1.76, 2.03, and 2.49 wt %. respectively. These studies pave the way to consider ZnV2O4 as prospective material for energy storage applications. PMID:25076046

  15. Separation of 90Sr from PUREX HLLW using N,N,N',N'-tetra (2-ethylhexyl)diglycolamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the separation of 90Sr from PUREX-HLLW employing separation techniques viz. solvent extraction and precipitation. In the first step, PUREX-HLLW was subjected to solvent extraction using TBP (30% in n-dodecane) to remove residual uranium and plutonium. In the subsequent step the raffinate was treated with N,N,N',N'-tetra (2-ethylhexyl) diglycolamide (TEHDGA, 0.20M in 30% isodecyl alcohol and n-dodecane) for the bulk separation of trivalent actinides and lanthanides. The raffinate from this step containing major activity of 90Sr and other fission products such as 137Cs and 106Ru etc. forms ideal feed for 90Sr recovery. Strontium from this non alpha bearing HLLW was extracted using 0.30M TEHDGA in 5% isodecyl alcohol and n-dodecane and stripped with 0.01M HNO3. Recovery of 90Sr was found to be quantitative which was further purified from trace impurities such as 106Ru etc. and concentrated using radiochemical precipitation technique employing Fe scavenging as hydroxide followed by carbonate precipitation after adding natural Fe and Sr as carriers

  16. Structural Inhomogeneity and Anisotropy in Optical Filters and Thin Films; Applications to Optical Storage Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham

    Optical filters and thin film optical devices play an important role in Science and Industry. Several significant applications have emerged in optics, microelectronics and computer technology. In this work, we study some aspects of their design and applications. One class of optical fibers, known as Christiansen filters, are based on scattering phenomena in suspensions of solid particles in a liquid medium. Some new scattering filters in the visible and the near UV regions and their performance characteristics are reported here. Feasibility to fabricate such optical filters in solid matrix form is established. Some applications of these scattering filters are discussed. After an introduction to the optics of homogeneous and isotropic thin films, I discuss the general design of anisotropic thin film media and a scheme implemented to calculate their performance. Optical anisotropy, produced by the growth-induced columnar microstructure in thin films and its effects on the performance of optical filters are studied. Large shifts in the peak wavelength of a typical narrow band filter are predicted. Magneto-optical (MO) thin film media of great importance to erasable optical data storage technology are studied. An approximate technique based on a 2 x 2 matrix formalism is developed to calculate the normal incidence performance of these media. To investigate anisotropic effects, to incorporate more than one magnetic film with arbitrary orientations of magnetization, and to study oblique incidence performance, a completely general 4 x 4 matrix technique is implemented in a computer program. Effects of substrate/superstrate birefringence in the read-out signal of MO media are investigated. Several optimizing design criteria, particularly, the effectiveness in employing appropriate metal or dielectric reflector layers are studied. The influence of the plasma edge of metals in enhancing the polar Kerr rotation of MO media is discussed with illustrations. A contour plot of

  17. The application of mature dry storage technology and remote handling robotics to nuclear plant extension, clean-up and decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews a mature dry storage technology developed by GEC ALSTHOM Engineering Systems Limited (GAES) which offers a passive, economical and licensable method of providing irradiated fuel storage capacity at operational nuclear power stations. The evolution of the modular vault dry store (MVDS) technology has taken place over 25 years of operational experience, culminating in a product which meets all of the concerns of licensing authorities regarding safety and fuel integrity. The application of remote handling robotics to nuclear fuel and active component handling as a routine process rather than as an intervention technique is also reviewed. The growth of the application of this technology is governed by several factors which include: statutory requirements, safety assurance, risk reduction and economic pressures. The availability of a mature MVDS technology with an evolving process-capable robotics technology opens up opportunities for exploring proven UK products. (Author)

  18. Application of burnup credit with partial boron credit to PWR spent fuel storage pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The outcome of performing a burnup credit criticality safety analysis of a PWR spent fuel storage pool is the determination of burnup credit loading curves BLC=BLC(e) for the spent fuel storage racks designed for burnup credit, cp. Reference. A burnup credit loading curve BLC=BLC(e) specifies the loading criterion by indicating the minimum burnup BLC(e) necessary for the fuel assembly with a specific initial enrichment e to be placed in storage racks designed for burnup credit. (orig.)

  19. The application of liquid air energy storage for large scale long duration solutions to grid balancing

    OpenAIRE

    Brett Gareth; Barnett Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Liquid Air Energy Storage (LAES) provides large scale, long duration energy storage at the point of demand in the 5 MW/20 MWh to 100 MW/1,000 MWh range. LAES combines mature components from the industrial gas and electricity industries assembled in a novel process and is one of the few storage technologies that can be delivered at large scale, with no geographical constraints. The system uses no exotic materials or scarce resources and all major components have a proven lifetime of 25+ years....

  20. New Class of Flow Batteries for Terrestrial and Aerospace Energy Storage Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; West, William C.; Kindler, Andrew; Smart, Marshall C.

    2013-01-01

    Future sustainable energy generation technologies such as photovoltaic and wind farms require advanced energy storage systems on a massive scale to make the alternate (green) energy options practical. The daunting requirements of such large-scale energy systems such as long operating and cycle life, safety, and low cost are not adequately met by state-of-the-art energy storage technologies such as vanadium flow cells, lead-acid, and zinc-bromine batteries. Much attention is being paid to redox batteries specifically to the vanadium redox battery (VRB) due to their simplicity, low cost, and good life characteristics compared to other related battery technologies. NASA is currently seeking high-specific- energy and long-cycle-life rechargeable batteries in the 10-to-100-kW range to support future human exploration missions, such as planetary habitats, human rovers, etc. The flow batteries described above are excellent candidates for these applications, as well as other applications that propose to use regenerative fuel cells. A new flow cell technology is proposed based on coupling two novel electrodes in the form of solvated electron systems (SES) between an alkali (or alkaline earth) metal and poly aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), separated by an ionically conducting separator. The cell reaction involves the formation of such SES with a PAH of high voltage in the cathode, while the alkali (or alkaline earth metal) is reduced from such an MPAH complex in the anode half-cell. During recharge, the reactions are reversed in both electrodes. In other words, the alkali (alkaline earth) metal ion simply shuttles from one M-PAH complex (SES) to another, which are separated by a metal-ion conducting solid or polymer electrolyte separator. As an example, the concept was demonstrated with Li-naphthalene//Li DDQ (DDQ is 2,3-Dichloro-5,6-dicyano- 1,4-benzoquinone) separated by lithium super ion conductor, either ceramic or polymer (solid polymer or gel polymer) electrolytes. The

  1. Energy Storage and Generation for Extreme Temperature and Pressure and Directional Measurement While Drilling Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Signorelli, Riccardo [FastCAP Systems Corporation, Boston, MA (United States); Cooley, John [FastCAP Systems Corporation, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-10-14

    FastCAP Systems Corporation has successfully completed all milestones defined by the award DE-EE0005503. Under this program, FastCAP developed three critical subassemblies to TRL3 demonstrating proof of concept of a geothermal MWD power source. This power source includes an energy harvester, electronics and a novel high temperature ultracapacitor (“ultracap”) rechargeable energy storage device suitable for geothermal exploration applications. FastCAP’s ruggedized ultracapacitor (ultracap) technology has been proven and commercialized in oil and gas exploration operating to rated temperatures of 150°C. Characteristics of this technology are that it is rechargeable and relatively high power. This technology was the basis for the advancements in rechargeable energy storage under this project. The ultracap performs reliably at 250°C and beyond and operates over a wide operating temperature range: -5°C to 250°C. The ultracap has significantly higher power density than lithium thionyl chloride batteries, a non-rechargeable incumbent used in oil and gas drilling today. Several hermetically sealed, prototype devices were tested in our laboratories at constant temperatures of 250°C showing no significant degradation over 2000 hours of operation. Other prototypes were tested at Sandia National Lab in the month of April, 2015 for a third party performance validation. These devices showed outstanding performance over 1000 hours of operation at three rated temperatures, 200°C, 225°C and 250°C, with negligible capacitance degradation and minimal equivalent series resistance (ESR) increase. Similarly, FastCAP’s ruggedized electronics have been proven and commercialized in oil and gas exploration operating to rated temperatures of 150°C. This technology was the basis for the advancements in downhole electronics under this project. Principal contributions here focused on design for manufacture innovations that have reduced the prototype build cycle time by a factor

  2. Application of Battery-Based Storage Systems in household-demand smoothening in electricity-distribution grids

    OpenAIRE

    PURVINS ARTURS; PAPAIOANNOU IOULIA; DEBARBERIS Luigi

    2012-01-01

    This article analyses in technical terms the application of battery-based storage systems for demand shifting in distribution grids. The analysis includes two case studies, Denmark and Portugal, thus comparing the use of batteries in two different climate regions: northern and south-western Europe. In the Portugal case study, a high penetration of photovoltaic systems in distribution grids is considered as an additional scenario. A sensitivity analysis is performed in order to examine the dai...

  3. Electron - Ion Recombination Data for Plasma Applications : Results from Electron Beam Ion Trap and Ion Storage Ring

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Safdar

    2012-01-01

    This thesis contains results of electron-ion recombination processes in atomic ions relevant for plasma applications. The measurements were performed at the Stockholm Refrigerated Electron Beam Ion Trap (R-EBIT) and at the CRYRING heavy-ion storage ring. Dielectronic recombination (DR) cross sections, resonant strengths, rate coefficients and energy peak positions in H-like and He-like S are obtained for the first time from the EBIT measurements. Furthermore, the experimentally obtained DR re...

  4. Effect of reducing agent on graphene synthesis and its influence on charge storage towards supercapacitor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Chemical reduction route was adopted for graphene preparation. • Electrochemical measurements were carried out in 6 M KOH. • Better electrochemical properties obtained for graphene than graphene oxide. • A high specific capacitance of 284.3 F/g was observed for SR1:10. - Abstract: A simple chemical route was adopted for the preparation of graphene by chemical reduction route using sodium borohydride (NaBH4) as a reducing agent. A systematic study was done to show the effect of NaBH4 on the reduction and the obtained graphene samples were characterized using X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Atomic force microcopy and High resolution transmission electron microscopy. Better reduction of GO was observed at GO and NaBH4 ratio of 1:10 (denoted as SR1:10). Further, the investigation was emphasized to show the effect of the above GO to reductant ratio on its charge storage properties. Electrochemical measurements were carried out in 6 M KOH electrolyte and the results show that the capacitance performance was increased in the order of GO < SR1:8 < SR1:4 < SR1:12 < SR1:10. A high specific capacitance of 284.3 F/g was observed for SR1:10 electrode at 5 mV/s scan rate could be due to better electrical conductivity of sample. The ratio of GO and NaBH4 was optimized to 1:10 for high degree reduction of graphene, which has higher capacitance towards supercapacitor applications

  5. Borehole thermal energy storage system for heating applications: Thermodynamic performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Exergy analysis of BTES for heating season is carried out. • Exergy efficiency of BTES is determined to be 41.35% for overall system. • COPHP is determined to be 2.6 for overall system. • Increasing evaporator temperature to 6 °C decreases the exergy destruction rate. • Increasing condenser temperature to 70 °C increases the exergy destruction rate. - Abstract: A comprehensive thermodynamic assessment of a borehole thermal energy storage system (BTES), which helps in meeting the heating and cooling demands of campus buildings of University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT), is presented for the heating case. The BTES located on UOIT campus in Oshawa, Canada is recognized as the world’s second largest BTES system. Energy and exergy analyses of the heating system are performed through the balance equations, and exergy destruction rates are determined for each system component and the overall BTES. In addition, a comparative system performance assessment is carried out. Based on the conducted research for the studied system, COPHP is calculated to be 2.65 for heating applications. Energy and exergy efficiencies of the boilers are determined to be 83.2% and 35.83%, respectively. The results of the exergy analysis show that the boilers are the major contributor to exergy destruction, followed by condenser and evaporator. The effects of condenser and evaporator temperatures of the heat pump systems on energy and exergy efficiencies are also investigated. The overall exergy efficiency of the whole system is calculated to be 41.35%

  6. Miscibility gap alloys with inverse microstructures and high thermal conductivity for high energy density thermal storage applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New high energy-density thermal storage materials are proposed which use miscibility gap binary alloy systems to operate through the latent heat of fusion of one component dispersed in a thermodynamically stable matrix. Using trial systems Al–Sn and Fe–Cu, we demonstrate the development of the required inverse microstructure (low melting point phase embedded in high melting point matrix) and excellent thermal storage potential. Several other candidate systems are discussed. It is argued that such systems offer enhancement over conventional phase change thermal storage by using high thermal conductivity microstructures (50–400 W/m K); minimum volume of storage systems due to high energy density latent heat of fusion materials (0.2–2.2 MJ/L); and technical utility through adaptability to a great variety of end uses. Low (<300 °C), mid (300–400 °C) and high (600–1400 °C) temperature options exist for applications ranging from space heating and process drying to concentrated solar thermal energy conversion and waste heat recovery. -- Highlights: ► Alloys of immiscible metals are proposed as thermal storage systems. ► High latent heat of fusion per unit volume and tunable temperature are advantageous. ► Thermal storage systems with capacities of 0.2–2.2 MJ/L are identified. ► Heat delivery is via a rigid non-reactive high thermal conductivity matrix. ► The required inverse microstructures were developed for Sn–Al and Cu–Fe systems

  7. Flexible Graphene-based Energy Storage Devices for Space Application Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Carlos I.

    2014-01-01

    Develop prototype graphene-based reversible energy storage devices that are flexible, thin, lightweight, durable, and that can be easily attached to spacesuits, rovers, landers, and equipment used in space.

  8. Slurry-Based Chemical Hydrogen Storage Systems for Automotive Fuel Cell Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, Kriston P.; Semelsberger, Troy; Simmons, Kevin L.; Van Hassel, Bart A.

    2014-05-30

    In this paper, the system designs for hydrogen storage using chemical hydrogen materials in an 80 kWe fuel cell, light-duty vehicle are described. Ammonia borane and alane are used for these designs to represent the general classes of exothermic and endothermic materials. The designs are then compared to the USDRIVE/DOE developed set of system level targets for on-board storage. While most of the DOE targets are predicted to be achieved based on the modeling, the system gravimetric and volumetric densities were more challenging and became the focus of this work. The resulting system evaluation determined that the slurry is majority of the system mass. Only modest reductions in the system mass can be expected with improvements in the balance of plant components. Most of the gravimetric improvements will require developing materials with higher inherent storage capacity or by increasing the solids loading of the chemical hydrogen storage material in the slurry.

  9. Hybrid Aerogel-MLI Insulation System for Cryogenic Storage in Space Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The future of the NASA space program includes longer and more invasive missions into space. Long duration storage of large quantities of cryogenic fluids for...

  10. Feasibility Study of Energy Storage Systems in Wind/Diesel Applications Using the HOMER Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Stiel

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available With an increased focus on solutions to the ensuing “climate crisis”, the need for energy storage systems is becoming increasingly important as a means to increase the penetration of renewable technologies such as wind energy. The Vanadium Redox Battery is one such energy storage system showing considerable potential owing to its flexibility in power output and capacity, high efficiency and long operating life. This study models the use of the Vanadium Redox Battery as an integration technology in realistic large-scale remote wind/diesel power systems using the HOMER Micropower Optimization Model computer program developed by the US National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Results from this modelling demonstrate the significant financial and environmental benefits to be gained in installing energy storage in a wind farm. The storage system considered here was a Vanadium Redox Battery.

  11. Advanced high-speed flywheel energy storage systems for pulsed power application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebi Rafsanjan, Salman

    Power systems on modern commercial transportation systems are moving to more electric based equipment, thus improving the reliability of the overall system. Electrical equipment on such systems will include some loads that require very high power for short periods of time, on the order of a few seconds, especially during acceleration and deceleration. The current approach to solving this problem is sizing the electrical grid for peak power, rather than the average. A method to efficiently store and discharge the pulsed power is necessary to eliminate the cost and weight of oversized generation equipment to support the pulsed power needs of these applications. Highspeed Flywheel Energy Storage Systems (FESS) are effectively capable of filling the niche of short duration, high cycle life applications where batteries and ultra capacitors are not usable. In order to have an efficient high-speed FESS, performing three important steps towards the design of the overall system are extremely vital. These steps are modeling, analysis and control of the FESS that are thoroughly investigated in this dissertation. This dissertation establishes a comprehensive analysis of a high-speed FESS in steady state and transient operations. To do so, an accurate model for the complete FESS is derived. State space averaging approach is used to develop DC and small-signal AC models of the system. These models effectively simplify analysis of the FESS and give a strong physical intuition to the complete system. In addition, they result in saving time and money by avoiding time consuming simulations performed by expensive packages, such as Simulink, PSIM, etc. In the next step, two important factors affecting operation of the Permanent Magnet Synchronous Machine (PMSM) implemented in the high-speed FESS are investigated in detail and outline a proper control strategy to achieve the required performance by the system. Next, a novel design algorithm developed by S.P. Bhattacharyya is used to

  12. Feasibility Study of Energy Storage Systems in Wind/Diesel Applications Using the HOMER Model

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Stiel; Maria Skyllas-Kazacos

    2012-01-01

    With an increased focus on solutions to the ensuing “climate crisis”, the need for energy storage systems is becoming increasingly important as a means to increase the penetration of renewable technologies such as wind energy. The Vanadium Redox Battery is one such energy storage system showing considerable potential owing to its flexibility in power output and capacity, high efficiency and long operating life. This study models the use of the Vanadium Redox Battery as an integration technolo...

  13. Storage of Solar Energy by Application of Thermally Stratified Phase Change Materials. Experimental Research and Optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Dzikēvičs, M; Žandeckis, A

    2014-01-01

    Main aspect when solar thermal energy storage (TES) is considered is thermal storage capacity in form of sensible heat, latent heat or chemical energy. In case of solar systems, solar TES provide a solution for mismatch between energy supply and energy demand. Higher capacity reduces the size of the system and increases overall efficiency [1]. Water is used in almost every system as working fluid due to characteristics like nontoxicity, abundance, high specific heat and suitability for wide r...

  14. Applications of thermal energy storage to waste heat recovery in the food processing industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojnar, F.; Lunberg, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    A study to assess the potential for waste heat recovery in the food industry and to evaluate prospective waste heat recovery system concepts employing thermal energy storage was conducted. The study found that the recovery of waste heat in canning facilities can be performed in significant quantities using systems involving thermal energy storage that are both practical and economical. A demonstration project is proposed to determine actual waste heat recovery costs and benefits and to encourage system implementation by the food industry.

  15. Feasibility analysis of river off-grid hydrokinetic systems with pumped hydro storage in rural applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The option of using hydrokinetic with pumped hydro storage in rural South Africa is examined. • Techno-economic feasibility is conducted in comparison to the system with battery storage systems. • The two schemes are compared in terms of cost of energy produced and technical viability. • Results show that hydrokinetic with pumped hydro is a cost-effective and reliable rural electrification option. - Abstract: Hydrokinetic power generation is currently gaining interest as a cost effective way of supplying isolated areas where reasonable water resource is available. However the seasonal characteristic of the water resource as well as the intermittent fluctuating load demand prevents this power generation system from being entirely reliable without appropriate energy storage system. Few researchers have recently analyzed the use of hydrokinetic systems as standalone or combined with other energy source, however the authors of these researches did not explore other means of storing energy except for traditional battery storage systems. In this study, the most conventional and established storage technology, pumped hydro storage, is proposed to be used in conjunction with a standalone hydrokinetic system in off-grid power supply. The techno-economic feasibility of such combination is analyzed and compared to the option where batteries are considered as storage system. The operation principle of the system is presented; the mathematical model and simulation model are also developed. Simulations are performed using two different types of loads in rural South Africa as case studies to demonstrate the technical cost advantages as well as the cost effectiveness of the proposed supply option. The results reveal that the novel micro-pumped hydro storage based hydrokinetic system is a cost-effective, reliable and environmentally friendly solution to achieve 100% energy autonomy in remote and isolated communities

  16. Feasibility studies for the removal of entrained and dissolved tributyl phosphate (TBP) from purex stream using Duolite S-861 (Preprint No. CT-11)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the reprocessing plant following purex process for the separation of U and Pu, the problem occured in concentrating the uranium product in the intercycle evaporators due to the presence of entrained and dissolved TBP. Present scrubbing procedure is not quite satisfactory. This paper investigates the feasibility studies for the removal of entrained and dissolved TBP using Duolite S-861. (author)

  17. Application of phase change energy storage technology in heat storage during the electricity valley%相变储能技术在谷电蓄热供暖中的应用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张继皇; 孙利; 杨强; 李文

    2016-01-01

    The phase change energy storage is an advanced technology for heat storage, which realizes electric heat storage using phase change energy storage technology in the valley electricity time, and is applied to electric heat storage building heating. The technolo⁃gy has the very good value for heating power load of power grid and the user operation cost. In this paper, the phase change heat storage technology is compared with the other heating technologies. The phase change heat storage products are tested on specific perfor⁃mance. A commercial center heat storage in Tianjin using valley elec⁃tricity is introduced and analyzed as the application case.%相变储能是一种先进的储热技术,在谷电时间采用相变储能技术进行电热蓄热,并将电热蓄热应用于建筑供暖,对电网的电力调峰以及用户供暖运行成本都具有很好的价值。对相变蓄热技术与其它供暖技术进行对比分析,对相变蓄热产品进行具体的性能测试,并对天津某商业中心采用谷电蓄热供暖的应用案例进行了介绍分析。

  18. A statistical approach to electrical storage sizing with application to the recovery of braking energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the context of efficient energy use, electrical energy in electric drives plays a fundamental role. High efficiency energy storage systems permit energy recovery, peak shaving and power quality functions. Due to their cost and the importance of system integration, there is a need for a correct design based on technical-economical optimization. In this paper, a method to design a centralized storage system for the recovery of the power regenerated by a number of electric drives is presented. It is assumed that the drives follow deterministic power cycles, but shifted by an uncertain amount. Therefore the recoverable energy and, consequently, the storage size requires the optimization of a random cost function, embedding both the plant total cost and the saving due to the reduced energy consumption during the useful life of the storage. The underlying stochastic model for the power profile of the drives as a whole is built from a general Markov chain framework. A numerical example, based on Monte Carlo simulations, concerns the maximization of the recoverable potential energy of multiple bridge cranes, supplied by a unique grid connection point and a centralized supercapacitor storage system. -- Highlights: ► Recovery of braking power produced by multiple electric drives. ► Temporal power profile modeled through the multinomial distribution and Markov chains. ► Storage sizing via random cost function optimization. ► The search region for the optimization is given explicitly. ► The value of energy recovered during the useful life of the storage outweighs its cost.

  19. Transfer of Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant and N Reactor irradiated fuel for storage at the 105-KE and 105-KW fuel storage basins, Hanford Site, Richland Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) needs to remove irradiated fuel from the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant and N Reactor at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington, to stabilize the facilities in preparation for decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) and to reduce the cost of maintaining the facilities prior to D ampersand D. DOE is proposing to transfer approximately 3.9 metric tons (4.3 short tons) of unprocessed irradiated fuel, by rail, from the PUREX Plant in the 200 East Area and the 105 N Reactor (N Reactor) fuel storage basin in the 100 N Area, to the 105-KE and 105-KW fuel storage basins (K Basins) in the 100 K Area. The fuel would be placed in storage at the K Basins, along with fuel presently stored, and would be dispositioned in the same manner as the other existing irradiated fuel inventory stored in the K Basins. The fuel transfer to the K Basins would consolidate storage of fuels irradiated at N Reactor and the Single Pass Reactors. Approximately 2.9 metric tons (3.2 short tons) of single-pass production reactor, aluminum clad (AC) irradiated fuel in four fuel baskets have been placed into four overpack buckets and stored in the PUREX Plant canyon storage basin to await shipment. In addition, about 0.5 metric tons (0.6 short tons) of zircaloy clad (ZC) and a few AC irradiated fuel elements have been recovered from the PUREX dissolver cell floors, placed in wet fuel canisters, and stored on the canyon deck. A small quantity of ZC fuel, in the form of fuel fragments and chips, is suspected to be in the sludge at the bottom of N Reactor's fuel storage basin. As part of the required stabilization activities at N Reactor, this sludge would be removed from the basin and any identifiable pieces of fuel elements would be recovered, placed in open canisters, and stored in lead lined casks in the storage basin to await shipment. A maximum of 0.5 metric tons (0.6 short tons) of fuel pieces is expected to be recovered

  20. Phase change material thermal storage for biofuel preheating in micro trigeneration application: A numerical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Engine exhaust heat driven phase change material thermal storage. • Fuel preheating for direct use of straight plant oil on diesel engine. • CFD aided design of the phase change material thermal storage. • Melting and solidification model considering natural convection. - Abstract: A biofuel micro trigeneration prototype has been developed to utilise local energy crop oils as fuel in rural areas and developing countries. Straight plant oils (SPOs) only leave behind very little carbon footprint during its simply production process compared to commercial biodiesels in refineries, but the high viscosity of SPOs causes difficulties at engine cold starts, which further results in poor fuel atomisation, compromised engine performance and fast engine deterioration. In this study, a phase change material (PCM) thermal storage is designed to recover and store engine exhaust heat to preheat SPOs at cold starts. High temperature commercial paraffin is selected as the PCM to meet the optimal preheating temperature range of 70–90 °C, in terms of the SPO property study. A numerical model of the PCM thermal storage is developed and validated by references. The PCM melting and solidification processes with the consideration of natural convection in liquid zone are simulated in ANSYS-FLUENT to verify the feasibility of the PCM thermal storage as a part of the self-contained biofuel micro trigeneration prototype

  1. High Temperature Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage Applications: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, J.; Glatzmaier, G. C.; Starace, A.; Turchi, C.; Ortega, J.

    2011-08-01

    To store thermal energy, sensible and latent heat storage materials are widely used. Latent heat thermal energy storage (TES) systems using phase change materials (PCM) are useful because of their ability to charge and discharge a large amount of heat from a small mass at constant temperature during a phase transformation. Molten salt PCM candidates for cascaded PCMs were evaluated for the temperatures near 320 degrees C, 350 degrees C, and 380 degrees C. These temperatures were selected to fill the 300 degrees C to 400 degrees C operating range typical for parabolic trough systems, that is, as one might employ in three-PCM cascaded thermal storage. Based on the results, the best candidate for temperatures near 320 degrees C was the molten salt KNO3-4.5wt%KCl. For the 350 degrees C and 380 degrees C temperatures, the evaluated molten salts are not good candidates because of the corrosiveness and the high vapor pressure of the chlorides.

  2. Distributed Data Collection and Storage Algorithms for Collaborative Learning Vision Sensor Devices with Applications to Pilgrimage

    CERN Document Server

    Aly, Salah A

    2012-01-01

    This work presents novel distributed data collection systems and storage algorithms for collaborative learning wireless sensor networks (WSNs). In a large WSN, consider $n$ collaborative sensor devices distributed randomly to acquire information and learn about a certain field. Such sensors have less power, small bandwidth, and short memory, and they might disappear from the network after certain time of operations. The goal of this work is to design efficient strategies to learn about the field by collecting sensed data from these $n$ sensors with less computational overhead and efficient storage encoding operations. In this data collection system, we propose two distributed data storage algorithms (DSA's) to solve this problem with the means of network flooding and connectivity among sensor devices. In the first algorithm denoted, DSA-I, it's assumed that the total number of nodes is known for each node in the network. We show that this algorithm is efficient in terms of the encoding/decoding operations. Fu...

  3. Filtration and Leach Testing for PUREX Cladding Sludge and REDOX Cladding Sludge Actual Waste Sample Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Hallen, Richard T.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

    2009-03-02

    A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan (Barnes and Voke 2006). The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Under test plan TP RPP WTP 467 (Fiskum et al. 2007), eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. Under this test plan, a waste testing program was implemented that included: • Homogenizing the archive samples by group as defined in the test plan. • Characterizing the homogenized sample groups. • Performing parametric leaching testing on each group for compounds of interest. • Performing bench-top filtration/leaching tests in the hot cell for each group to simulate filtration and leaching activities if they occurred in the UFP2 vessel of the WTP Pretreatment Facility. This report focuses on a filtration/leaching test performed using two of the eight waste composite samples. The sample groups examined in this report were the plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) cladding waste sludge (Group 3, or CWP) and reduction-oxidation (REDOX) cladding waste sludge (Group 4, or CWR). Both the Group 3 and 4 waste composites were anticipated to be high in gibbsite, thus requiring caustic leaching. WTP RPT 167 (Snow et al. 2008) describes the homogenization, characterization, and parametric leaching activities before benchtop filtration/leaching testing of these two waste groups. Characterization and initial parametric data in that report were used to plan a single filtration/leaching test using a blend of both wastes. The test focused on filtration testing of the waste and caustic leaching for aluminum, in the form

  4. Pre-harvest application of oxalic acid increases quality and resistance to Penicillium expansum in kiwifruit during postharvest storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuyan; Yu, Jie; Brecht, Jeffrey K; Jiang, Tianjia; Zheng, Xiaolin

    2016-01-01

    Kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa cv. Bruno) fruits were sprayed with 5mM oxalic acid (OA) at 130, 137, and 144 days after full blossom, and then harvested at commercial maturity [soluble solid content (SSC) around 10.0%] and stored at room temperature (20 ± 1 °C). Pre-harvest application of OA led to fruit with higher ascorbic acid content at harvest, slowed the decreases in fruit firmness and ascorbic acid content and increase in SSC during storage, and also decreased the natural disease incidence, lesion diameter, and patulin accumulation in fruit inoculated with Penicillium expansum, indicating that the OA treatment increased quality and induced disease resistance in kiwifruit. It was suggested that the increase in activities of defense-related enzymes and in levels of substances related to disease resistance might collectively contribute to resistance in kiwifruit against fungi such as P. expansum in storage. PMID:26213007

  5. Evaluation of lead/carbon devices for utility applications : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Program.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walmet, Paula S. (MeadWestvaco Corporation,North Charleston, SC)

    2009-06-01

    This report describes the results of a three-phase project that evaluated lead-based energy storage technologies for utility-scale applications and developed carbon materials to improve the performance of lead-based energy storage technologies. In Phase I, lead/carbon asymmetric capacitors were compared to other technologies that used the same or similar materials. At the end of Phase I (in 2005) it was found that lead/carbon asymmetric capacitors were not yet fully developed and optimized (cost/performance) to be a viable option for utility-scale applications. It was, however, determined that adding carbon to the negative electrode of a standard lead-acid battery showed promise for performance improvements that could be beneficial for use in utility-scale applications. In Phase II various carbon types were developed and evaluated in lead-acid batteries. Overall it was found that mesoporous activated carbon at low loadings and graphite at high loadings gave the best cycle performance in shallow PSoC cycling. Phase III studied cost/performance benefits for a specific utility application (frequency regulation) and the full details of this analysis are included as an appendix to this report.

  6. Effect of application of Chlorpropham in sprouting of olluco tubers (Ullucus tuberosus L.) under storage

    OpenAIRE

    Isaac Aliaga; Frank Velásquez; René Mendoza; Roberto Chuquilín

    2011-01-01

    It was evaluated the effect of Chlorpropham on the sprouting of root’s tubers vegetables (Ullucus tuberosum L.) Tarmeño variety during storage at 15 °C and RH of 85 %, the treatments were 0, 5, 10, 20 and 30 mg of Chlorpropham / kg of tubers, in a completely random design with 4 repetitions. After 60 days of storage the sprouts, length for the control without Chlorpropham was 9.63 cm and for the treatments with Chlorpropham from 0.22 to 0.71 cm after 90 days the length of the spro...

  7. The storage of hydrogen in the form of metal hydrides: An application to thermal engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gales, C.; Perroud, P.

    1981-01-01

    The possibility of using LaNi56, FeTiH2, or MgH2 as metal hydride storage sytems for hydrogen fueled automobile engines is discussed. Magnesium copper and magnesium nickel hydrides studies indicate that they provide more stable storage systems than pure magnesium hydrides. Several test engines employing hydrogen fuel have been developed: a single cylinder motor originally designed for use with air gasoline mixture; a four-cylinder engine modified to run on an air hydrogen mixture; and a gas turbine.

  8. The fate of sulfate in acidified pig slurry during storage and following application to cropped soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Jørgen; Sørensen, Peter; Elsgaard, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Received for publication June 18, 2007. Acidification of slurry with sulfuric acid is a recent agricultural practice that may serve a double purpose: reducing ammonia emission and ensuring crop sulfur sufficiency. We investigated S transformations in untreated and acidified pig slurry stored for up...... plant-available sulfate form. Microbial sulfate reduction during storage of acidified pig slurry was limited, presumably due to initial pH effects and a limitation in the availability of easily degradable organic matter. Sulfide accumulation was observed during storage but the sulfide levels in...

  9. QoS support for end users of I/O-intensive applications using shared storage systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Marion Kei [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhang, Xuechen [WAYNE STATE UNIV; Jiang, Song [WAYNE STATE UNIV.

    2011-01-19

    I/O-intensive applications are becoming increasingly common on today's high-performance computing systems. While performance of compute-bound applications can be effectively guaranteed with techniques such as space sharing or QoS-aware process scheduling, it remains a challenge to meet QoS requirements for end users of I/O-intensive applications using shared storage systems because it is difficult to differentiate I/O services for different applications with individual quality requirements. Furthermore, it is difficult for end users to accurately specify performance goals to the storage system using I/O-related metrics such as request latency or throughput. As access patterns, request rates, and the system workload change in time, a fixed I/O performance goal, such as bounds on throughput or latency, can be expensive to achieve and may not lead to a meaningful performance guarantees such as bounded program execution time. We propose a scheme supporting end-users QoS goals, specified in terms of program execution time, in shared storage environments. We automatically translate the users performance goals into instantaneous I/O throughput bounds using a machine learning technique, and use dynamically determined service time windows to efficiently meet the throughput bounds. We have implemented this scheme in the PVFS2 parallel file system and have conducted an extensive evaluation. Our results show that this scheme can satisfy realistic end-user QoS requirements by making highly efficient use of the I/O resources. The scheme seeks to balance programs attainment of QoS requirements, and saves as much of the remaining I/O capacity as possible for best-effort programs.

  10. Uranium (UO22+) retention property of degraded n-dodecane by acidic radiolysis in the purex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation effects on the uranium retention property of degraded n-dodecane by acidic radiolysis in the Purex process were studied. The absorbed dose of n-dodecane varied from 24.04 to 2 403.69 kGy (5 to 500 Wh/dm3). When the absorbed dose exceeded 48.07 kGy (10 Wh/dm3), the uranium (UO22+) was retained in degraded n-dodecane even without TBP as extractant. An empirical correlation of the uranium retention was also derived. This correlation is a very effective one because it can especially be used for the prediction of the amount of retained uranium in the degraded n-dodecane. Data obtained through this work should be useful for the process design under solvent degradation conditions in nuclear fuel processing facilities especially reused solvent. (author)

  11. Partitioning of actinides from high-level waste streams of Purex process using mixtures of CMPO and TBP in dodecane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extraction of actinides from high active aqueous raffinate waste (HAW) as well as high-level waste (HLW) solutions arising from Purex processing of thermal reactor fuels has been studied using a mixture of octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoyl-methylphosphine oxide (CMPO) and TBP in dodecane. The results on the extraction and stripping of actinides, lanthanides, and other fission products are discussed. Optimum conditions are proposed for the efficient recovery of residual actinides from HAW and HLW streams by CMPO extraction followed by their selective stripping with suitable reagents. Experiments on the extraction and separation of actinides and lanthanides by CMPO in the presence of TBP in dodecane have also been carried out with U(VI) and Nd(III) to arrive at the limiting conditions for avoiding third-phase formation

  12. Extraction of actinides from high level waste streams of purex process using mixtures of CMPO and TBP in dodecane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extraction of actinides from high-active aqueous raffinate waste (HAW) as well as high level waste (HLW) solutions arising from Purex processing of thermal reactor fuels has been studied using a mixture of octyl(phenyl)-N, N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) and TBP in dodecane. The results on the extraction and striping of actinides, lanthanides and other fission products have been discussed in this report and optimum conditions have been proposed for the efficient recovery of residual actinides from HAW and HLW streams by CMPO extraction and for their selective stripping with suitable reagents. Experiments on the extraction and separation of actinides and lanthanides by CMPO in the presence of TBP in dodecane have also been carried out with U(VI) and Nd(III) to arrive at the limiting conditions for avoiding third phase formation. (author). 18 refs., 5 figs., 10 tabs

  13. Separation and purification of 90Sr from PUREX HLLW using N,N,N',N'-tetra(2-ethylhexyl) diglycolamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a method for the separation and purification of 90Sr from PUREX-HLLW employing solvent extraction and precipitation techniques. 30 % TBP in n-dodecane was used for the removal of residual uranium, plutonium and neptunium from HLLW. Trivalent actinides and lanthanides were subsequently removed using N,N,N',N'-tetra(2-ethylhexyl) diglycolamide (TEHDGA, 0.20 M in 30 % isodecyl alcohol and n-dodecane). 90Sr was selectively extracted from actinides and lanthanides depleted HLLW using 0.3 M TEHDGA in 5 % isodecyl alcohol and dodecane. Loaded strontium was stripped using 0.01 M HNO3 and further purified by radiochemical precipitation technique after adding Fe and natural strontium as carriers. Based on the experimental results, a flow-sheet was formulated and mCi levels of 90Sr recovered. (author)

  14. Feasibility of using tri-ethanolamine for the removal of colour and holdup activity of spent PUREX solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study deals with results of the experiments conducted using a solution of TEA (Tri-ethanolamine) for removal of hydrophobic degradation products from highly coloured and radiolysed organic solvent and regeneration of PUREX solvent Different concentrations of aqueous solution of TEA (10-50%) were contacted with degraded solvent followed by acid and water wash. The clear solvent after equilibrium was subjected to gas chromatographic assay. The study revealed that the activity left out in the degraded organic, after treatment with 20% or more concentration of TEA in water remained more or less constant. Thus 20% aq solution of TEA was found sufficient for the removal of many undesirable species from the degraded solvent to make it amenable for safe disposal. (author)

  15. Application of thermal energy storage in the cement industry. Final report, September 1977--March 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaegr, F.A.; Beshore, D.G.; Miller, F.M.; Gartner, E.M.

    1978-10-01

    In the manufacture of cement, literally trillions of Btu's are rejected to the environment each year. The purpose of this feasibility study program was to determine whether thermal energy storage could be used to conserve or allow alternative uses of this rejected energy. This study identifies and quantifies the sources of rejected energy in the cement manufacturing process, establishes use of this energy, investigates various storage system concepts, and selects energy conservation systems for further study. Thermal performance and economic analyses are performed on candidate storage systems for four typical cement plants representing various methods of manufacturing cement. Through the use of thermal energy storage in conjunction with waste heat electric power generation units, an estimated 2.4 x 10/sup 13/ Btu/year, or an equivalent of 4.0 x 10/sup 6/ barrels of oil per year, can be conserved. Attractive rates of return on investment of the proposed systems are an incentive for further development.

  16. The Ti-V-Fe ternary alloy system and its application to hydrogen storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the samples synthesized on a wide composition range of the system Ti-V-Fe have allowed to specify the isothermal section at 1000 C and to give data on the expansion of the centered cubic structure, attractive for hydrogen storage. (O.M.)

  17. Theoretical studies of carbon-based nanostructured materials with applications in hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuc, Agnieszka

    2008-07-01

    The main goal of this work is to search for new stable porous carbon-based materials, which have the ability to accommodate and store hydrogen gas. Theoretical and experimental studies suggest a close relation between the nano-scale structure of the material and its storage capacity. In order to design materials with a high storage capacity, a compromise between the size and the shape of the nanopores must be considered. Therefore, a number of different carbon-based materials have been investigated: carbon foams, dislocated graphite, graphite intercalated by C60 molecules, and metal-organic frameworks. The structures of interest include experimentally well-known as well as hypothetical systems. The studies were focused on the determination of important properties and special features, which may result in high storage capacities. Although the variety of possible pure carbon structures and metal-organic frameworks is almost infinite, the materials described in this work possess the main structural characteristics, which are important for gas storage. (orig.)

  18. Survey of solar thermal energy storage subsystems for thermal/electric applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segaser, C. L.

    1978-08-01

    A survey of the current technology and estimated costs of subsystems for storing the thermal energy produced by solar collectors is presented. The systems considered were capable of producing both electricity and space conditioning for three types of loads: a single-family detached residence, an apartment complex of 100 units, and a city of 30,000 residents, containing both single-family residences and apartments. Collector temperatures will be in four ranges: (1) 100 to 250/sup 0/F (used for space heating and single-cycle air conditioners and organic Rankine low-temperature turbines); (2) 300 to 400/sup 0/F (used for dual-cycle air conditioners and low-temperature turbines); (3) 400 to 600/sup 0/F (using fluids from parabolic trough collectors to run Rankine turbines); (4) 800 to 1000/sup 0/F (using fluids from heliostats to run closed-cycle gas turbines and steam Rankine turbines). The solar thermal energy subsystems will require from 60 to 36 x 10/sup 5/ kWhr (2.05 x 10/sup 5/ to 1.23 x 10/sup 10/ Btu) of thermal storage capacity. In addition to sensible heat and latent heat storage materials, several other media were investigated as potential thermal energy storage materials, including the clathrate and semiclathrate hydrates, various metal hydrides, and heat storage based on inorganic chemical reactions.

  19. Solid State NMR Characterization of Complex Metal Hydrides systems for Hydrogen Storage Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Son-Jong; Bowman, Robert C., Jr.; Kim, Chul; Zan, Jason A.; Reiter, Joseph W.

    2011-01-01

    Solid state NMR is widely applied in studies of solid state chemistries for hydrogen storage reactions. Use of ^(11)B MAS NMR in studies of metal borohydrides (BH_4) is mainly focused, revisiting the issue of dodecaborane formation and observation of ^(11)B{^1H} Nuclear Overhauser Effect.

  20. Optimal Utilization of Microgrids Supplemented with Battery Energy Storage Systems in Grid Support Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anvari-Moghaddam, Amjad; Dragicevic, Tomislav; Vasquez, Juan Carlos;

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a control scheme which minimizes the operating cost of a grid connected micro-grid supplemented by battery energy storage system (BESS). What distinguishes approach presented here from conventional strategies is that not only the price of electricity is considered in the...

  1. The application of liquid air energy storage for large scale long duration solutions to grid balancing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett Gareth

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Liquid Air Energy Storage (LAES provides large scale, long duration energy storage at the point of demand in the 5 MW/20 MWh to 100 MW/1,000 MWh range. LAES combines mature components from the industrial gas and electricity industries assembled in a novel process and is one of the few storage technologies that can be delivered at large scale, with no geographical constraints. The system uses no exotic materials or scarce resources and all major components have a proven lifetime of 25+ years. The system can also integrate low grade waste heat to increase power output. Founded in 2005, Highview Power Storage, is a UK based developer of LAES. The company has taken the concept from academic analysis, through laboratory testing, and in 2011 commissioned the world's first fully integrated system at pilot plant scale (300 kW/2.5 MWh hosted at SSE's (Scottish & Southern Energy 80 MW Biomass Plant in Greater London which was partly funded by a Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC grant. Highview is now working with commercial customers to deploy multi MW commercial reference plants in the UK and abroad.

  2. Application of a PVA/Acrylamide photopolymer for data page storage as a holographic memory

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández Varó, Elena; García Llopis, Celia; Ortuño Sánchez, Manuel; Gallego Rico, Sergi; Beléndez Vázquez, Augusto; Pascual Villalobos, Inmaculada

    2007-01-01

    Holographic data pages have been stores into a PVA/Acrylamide photopolymer. During storage process, some parameters like exposure time, beam ratio and intensity beam have been controlled to obtain high quality images after reconstruction process. Bit Error Rate (BER) has been calculated by fitting the histograms to the images.

  3. Parametric study of a solar air heater with and without thermal storage for solar drying applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aboul-Enein, S.; El-Sebaii, A.A.; Ramadan, M.R.I.; El-Gohary, H.G. [Tanta Univ., Physics Dept., Tanta (Egypt)

    2000-12-01

    A transient analytical model is presented for a flat-plate solar air heater with and without thermal storage. The flowing air temperature is assumed to vary with time and space coordinates. Analytical expressions are obtained for various temperatures of the air heater elements as well as for the temperature of the storage material. The performance of the air heater is investigated by computer simulation using the climatic conditions of Tanta (Lat. 30deg 47' N, Egypt). Effects of design parameters of the air heater such as length (L), width (b), gap spacing between the absorber plate and glass cover (d{sub f}), mass flow rate (m) and thickness and type of the storage material (sand, granite and water) on the outlet and average temperatures of the flowing air are studied. It is found that as L and b increase the average temperatures of flowing air (T{sub fav}) increases up to typical values for these parameters. Typical values for L and b are obtained as 3 and 2 m, respectively. The outlet temperature (T{sub fo}) of flowing air is found to decrease with increasing gap spacing and mass flow rate of air. Improvements in the heater performance with storage have been achieved at the optimum thickness (0.12 m) of the storage material. Therefore, the air heater can be used as a heat source for drying agricultural products and the drying process will continue during night, instead of re-absorption of moisture from the surrounding air. Comparisons between experimental and theoretical results indicated that the proposed mathematical model can be used for estimating the thermal performance of flat-plate solar air heaters with reasonable accuracy. (Author)

  4. First burnup credit application including actinides and fission products for transport and storage cask by using French experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The burnup credit (BUC) methodology for a transport and storage cask application, including actinides and fission products, is implemented at AREVA TN using the French BUC calculation route for pressurized water reactor (PWR) UO2 used fuel. The methodology is based on the connection of the French depletion code DARWIN2 and the French criticality safety package CRISTAL V1. The BUC methodology includes the experimental validation of the computation codes dedicated to the calculation of the used fuel inventory calculations. Indeed, the results of the comparison calculation–experiment (C-E)/E allow to determine either a set of isotopic correction factors (ICFs) for the BUC nuclides considered in the criticality calculation or keff-penalty terms directly used for the definition of the keff-acceptance criterion for the criticality assessment of the transport and storage cask. These ICFs or keff-penalty terms are one of the key of the BUC method to guarantee the conservativeness of the fuel reactivity in safety-criticality calculations using BUC approach. A French BUC program has been developed at CEA/Cadarache in the framework of the CEA-AREVA collaboration in order to validate fuel inventory calculations. This program involves two kinds of experiments: chemical analyses and microprobe measurements of PWR irradiated fuel pins (French PIE program) on one hand, and reactivity worth measurements of the BUC nuclides in the MINERVE reactor on the other hand. This paper highlights, through a first industrial AREVA TN's application of the BUC method, including fission products, that the French PIE program and reactivity worth measurements in MINERVE reactor are suitable for the implementation of BUC in transport and storage cask applications loaded with PWR UO2 used fuels assemblies. (author)

  5. Hydrogen storage on Ni/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ nano-composite for fuel application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanomaterials are now emerging as an alternative to the conventional bulk materials due to their unprecedented physical and chemical properties. A material is said to be nano if the particle size is less than 100 nm in at least one dimension. From the great many advantages of nanomaterials one is the opportunity to control the microstructure (composition, structure, shape and size) at nano-meter level scale. The properties of nanomaterials change as a function of size of the particles. The smaller size allows large specific surface area which enables them excellent candidates for adsorption applications. This presentation highlights the synthesis of Ni/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ nano-composite and its application for hydrogen adsorption (storage), one of the burning topics of the present times. A dynamic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique was used for the synthesis of Ni/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ nano-composite. The material was achieved by reducing Ni+2 to Ni0 under the steady stream of hydride-modified aluminum alkoxides ((H2Al(OtBu)2). The CVD reactor has the advantage of dynamic vacuum removing the byproduct as soon as produced and thus hindering the contamination of the resulting Ni/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ nano-composite. The physical (analytical) characterization techniques revealed the formation of metallic nickel dispersed in alumina (Ni/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/) matrix. The material has sufficient porosity which is revealed by the scanning electron microscopic photographs. The material was tested for possible hydrogen storage using homemade Sievert's type apparatus and it was found that approximately 2.9 wt.% (w/w %) hydrogen can be stored upon the Ni/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ nano-composite. Although the amount of hydrogen stored is below of the required amount for onboard applications. However, the study will open new dimension in terms of hydrogen storage materials. (author)

  6. Overview of current development in electrical energy storage technologies and the application potential in power system operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • An overview of the state-of-the-art in Electrical Energy Storage (EES) is provided. • A comprehensive analysis of various EES technologies is carried out. • An application potential analysis of the reviewed EES technologies is presented. • The presented synthesis to EES technologies can be used to support future R and D and deployment. - Abstract: Electrical power generation is changing dramatically across the world because of the need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to introduce mixed energy sources. The power network faces great challenges in transmission and distribution to meet demand with unpredictable daily and seasonal variations. Electrical Energy Storage (EES) is recognized as underpinning technologies to have great potential in meeting these challenges, whereby energy is stored in a certain state, according to the technology used, and is converted to electrical energy when needed. However, the wide variety of options and complex characteristic matrices make it difficult to appraise a specific EES technology for a particular application. This paper intends to mitigate this problem by providing a comprehensive and clear picture of the state-of-the-art technologies available, and where they would be suited for integration into a power generation and distribution system. The paper starts with an overview of the operation principles, technical and economic performance features and the current research and development of important EES technologies, sorted into six main categories based on the types of energy stored. Following this, a comprehensive comparison and an application potential analysis of the reviewed technologies are presented

  7. The capric and lauric acid mixture with chemical additives as latent heat storage materials for cooling application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roxas-Dimaano, M.N. [University of Santo Tomas, Manila (Philippines). Research Center for the Natural Sciences; Watanabe, T. [Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan). Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors

    2002-09-01

    The mixture of capric acid and lauric acid (C-L acid), with the respective mole composition of 65% and 35%, is a potential phase change material (PCM). Its melting point of 18.0{sup o}C, however, is considered high for cooling application of thermal energy storage. The thermophysical and heat transfer characteristics of the C-L acid with some organic additives are investigated. Compatibility of C-L acid combinations with additives in different proportions and their melting characteristics are analyzed using the differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). Among the chemical additives, methyl salicylate, eugenol, and cineole presented the relevant melting characteristics. The individual heat transfer behavior and thermal storage performance of 0.1 mole fraction of these additives in the C-L acid mixture are evaluated. The radial and axial temperature distribution during charging and discharging at different concentrations of selected PCM combinations are experimentally determined employing a vertical cylindrical shell and tube heat exchanger. The methyl salicylate in the C-L acid provided the most effective additive in the C-L acid. It demonstrated the least melting band width aimed at lowering the melting point of the C-L acid with the highest heat of fusion value with relatively comparable rate of heat transfer. Furthermore, the thermal performance based on the total amount of transferred energy and their rates, established the PCM's latent heat storage capability. (author)

  8. Application of Ocimum basilicum Essential Oil as Vapor on Postharvest Storage of Plum Fruit cv. ‘Golden Drop’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra FAKHAR

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Increased interest in theuse of natural compounds instead of chemicals is due to concerns about the effect of synthetic ingredients on humans’ health and over environment. Therefore, in this study essential oil from Ocimum basilicum as a natural and safe compound, was applied at three levels (100, 200 and 300 μl/l as vapor and its effects on postharvest quality and storage life of ‘Golden Drop’ plums was evaluated. After application of treatments, the fruits were stored at +1 °C and 80-85% relative humidity for 42 days. During the storage period, samplings were carried out every week and to simulate market condition, they were kept at room temperate for 24 h. Then some of the qualitative and quantitative traits, such as total soluble solids (TSS, titrable acidity (TA, TSS/TA ratio, weight loss, firmness, ascorbic acid, total antioxidants, as well as color (L*,  hue angle were measured. Results showed that the basil essential oil contributed to a better maintenance of TSS, TA, TSS/TA ratio, firmness, ascorbic acid, antioxidant and delayed weight loss and color changes compared to control. However, the fruit treated with 300 µl/l concentration had essence flavor compared to control. Inconclusion, the use of basil essential oil is an effective tool on maintaining postharvest quality and storage life of plum fruits.

  9. Thermal reliability test of some fatty acids as PCMs used for solar thermal latent heat storage applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to determine the thermal reliability of stearic acid, palmitic acid, myristic acid and lauric acid as latent heat energy storage materials with respect to various numbers of thermal cycles. The fatty acids, as phase change materials (PCMs), of industrial grade (purity between 90% and 97%) were subjected to accelerated thermal cycle tests. The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis technique was applied to the PCMs after 0, 120, 560, 850 and 1200 melt/freeze cycles in order to measure the melting temperatures and the latent heats of fusion of the PCMs. The DSC results indicated that the change in melting temperature for the PCMs was in the range of 0.07-7.87 deg. C, and the change in latent heat of fusion was -1.0% to -27.7%, except for stearic acid between 560 and 1200 melt/freeze cycles. However, the decrease in the latent heats of fusion for all the PCMs was not regular with increasing thermal cycles. The experimental results also show that the investigated fatty acids as latent heat energy storage materials have a good thermal reliability in view of the latent heat of fusion and melting temperature with respect to thermal cycling for thermal energy storage applications in the long term

  10. Effects of sterilization and storage on the properties of ALP-grafted biomaterials for prosthetic and bone tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, S; Pan, G; Cassinelli, C; Mazzucco, L; Vernè, E; Spriano, S

    2012-10-01

    Grafting of the biomaterial surfaces with biomolecules is nowadays a challenging research field for prosthetic and bone tissue engineering applications. On the other hand, very few research works investigate the effect of the sterilization processes on the properties of functionalized biomaterials. In this study, the effects of different sterilization techniques (e.g. gamma and electron beam irradiation, ethylene oxide) on the enzymatic activity of bioactive glasses and Ti6Al4V grafted with alkaline phosphatase (ALP) have been analyzed. Sterility maintenance and in vitro bioactivity of the sterilized surfaces have also been investigated. Finally the effect of packaging and storage conditions has been considered. PMID:22971978

  11. Effects of sterilization and storage on the properties of ALP-grafted biomaterials for prosthetic and bone tissue engineering applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grafting of the biomaterial surfaces with biomolecules is nowadays a challenging research field for prosthetic and bone tissue engineering applications. On the other hand, very few research works investigate the effect of the sterilization processes on the properties of functionalized biomaterials. In this study, the effects of different sterilization techniques (e.g. gamma and electron beam irradiation, ethylene oxide) on the enzymatic activity of bioactive glasses and Ti6Al4V grafted with alkaline phosphatase (ALP) have been analyzed. Sterility maintenance and in vitro bioactivity of the sterilized surfaces have also been investigated. Finally the effect of packaging and storage conditions has been considered. (paper)

  12. Feasibility of flywheel energy storage systems for applications in future space missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santo, G. Espiritu; Gill, S. P.; Kotas, J. F.; Paschall, R.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the overall feasibility of deploying electromechanical flywheel systems in space used for excess energy storage. Results of previous Rocketdyne studies have shown that the flywheel concept has a number of advantages over the NiH2 battery, including higher specific energy, longer life and high roundtrip efficiency. Based on this prior work, this current study was broken into four subtasks. The first subtask investigated the feasibility of replacing the NiH2 battery orbital replacement unit (ORU) on the international space station (ISSA) with a flywheel ORU. In addition, a conceptual design of a generic flywheel demonstrator experiment implemented on the ISSA was completed. An assessment of the life cycle cost benefits of replacing the station battery energy storage ORU's with flywheel ORU's was performed. A fourth task generated a top-level development plan for critical flywheel technologies, the flywheel demonstrator experiments and its evolution into the production unit flywheel replacement ORU.

  13. 9975 Shipping Package Performance Of Alternate Materials For Long-Term Storage Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Model 9975 shipping package specifies the materials of construction for its various components. With the loss of availability of material for two components (cane fiberboard overpack and Viton(regsign) GLT O-rings), alternate materials of construction were identified and approved for use for transport (softwood fiberboard and Viton(regsign) GLT-S O-rings). As these shipping packages are part of a long-term storage configuration at the Savannah River Site, additional testing is in progress to verify satisfactory long-term performance of the alternate materials under storage conditions. The test results to date can be compared to comparable results on the original materials of construction to draw preliminary conclusions on the performance of the replacement materials.

  14. Layered double hydroxides toward electrochemical energy storage and conversion: design, synthesis and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Mingfei; Zhang, Ruikang; Li, Zhenhua; Wei, Min; Evans, David G; Duan, Xue

    2015-11-14

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have attracted increasing interest in electrochemical energy storage and conversion. As typical 2D materials, layered double hydroxides (LDHs) display large potential in this area due to the facile tunability of their composition, structure and morphology. Various preparation strategies, including in situ growth, electrodeposition and layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly, have been developed to directly modify electrodes by using LDH materials. Moreover, several composite materials based on LDHs and conductive matrices have also been rationally designed and employed in supercapacitors, batteries and electrocatalysis with largely enhanced performances. This feature article summarizes the latest developments in the design, preparation and evaluation of LDH materials toward electrochemical energy storage and conversion. PMID:26459951

  15. Estimated heats of fusion of fluoride salt mixtures suitable for thermal energy storage applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, A. K.; Whittenberger, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    The heats of fusion of several fluoride salt mixtures with melting points greater than 973 K were estimated from a coupled analysis of the available thermodynamic data and phase diagrams. Simple binary eutectic systems with and without terminal solid solutions, binary eutectics with congruent melting intermediate phases, and ternary eutectic systems were considered. Several combinations of salts were identified, most notable the eutectics LiF-22CaF2 and NaF-60MgF2 which melt at 1039 and 1273 K respectively which posses relatively high heats of fusion/gm (greater than 0.7 kJ/g). Such systems would seemingly be ideal candidates for the light weight, high energy storage media required by the thermal energy storage unit in advanced solar dynamic power systems envisioned for the future space missions.

  16. Thermodynamic, Environmental and Economic Analyses of Solar Ejector Refrigeration System Application for Cold Storage

    OpenAIRE

    İbrahim ÜÇGÜL

    2009-01-01

    The refrigeration processes have been widely applied for especially in cold storages. In these plants, the systems working with compressed vapour cooling cycles have been used as a classical method. In general, electrical energy is used for compressing in these processes. Although, mainly the electricity itself has no pollution effect on the environment, the fossil fuels that are widely used to produce electricity in the most of the world, affect the nature terribly. In short, these refrigera...

  17. Optimal Utilization of Microgrids Supplemented with Battery Energy Storage Systems in Grid Support Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Anvari-Moghaddam, Amjad; Dragicevic, Tomislav; Vasquez, Juan Carlos; Josep M. Guerrero

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a control scheme which minimizes the operating cost of a grid connected micro-grid supplemented by battery energy storage system (BESS). What distinguishes approach presented here from conventional strategies is that not only the price of electricity is considered in the formulation of the total operating cost but an additional item that takes into account inevitable battery degradation. The speed of degradation depends on battery technology and its mission profile and thi...

  18. The application of PDA and 2D bar code in material fuel storage management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper extends a management system based on PDA and 2D bar code technology, system design and solutions concerned with domestic transfer, storehouse entry and setting, transfer among storehouses, physical inventory are described as well. The system fits business processes well and optimizes data acquisition and processing effectively by u sing the following key technologies: bar code material and paste stand under radioactive conditions, two dimensional storage space emulation, information cascade protection. (authors)

  19. Atomistic modeling of water infiltration in defective zeolite for thermal storage applications

    OpenAIRE

    Asinari, Pietro; Chiavazzo, Eliodoro; Bevilacqua, Alessio; Fasano, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the impact that zeolite materials may have in the near future in loss-free, more compact and efficient thermal storage systems is numerically investigated. Water infiltration within MFI zeolite presenting different concentrations of hydrophilic defects is studied by Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. Results show that the characteristic infiltration pressure of water in the considered zeolite framework is reduced with increased hydrophilicity. Dubinin-Astakhov model is then...

  20. Technical Assessment of Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahluwalia, Rajesh [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hua, T. Q. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Peng, J. -K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Lasher, S. [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); McKenney, Kurtis [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); Sinha, J. [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States)

    2009-12-01

    Technical report describing DOE's second assessment report on a third generation (Gen3) system capable of storing hydrogen at cryogenic temperatures within a pressure vessel on-board a vehicle. The report includes an overview of technical progress to date, including the potential to meet DOE onboard storage targets, as well as independent reviews of system cost and energy analyses of the technology paired with delivery costs.

  1. Economic analysis of large-scale hydrogen storage for renewable utility applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenung, Susan M.

    2011-08-01

    The work reported here supports the efforts of the Market Transformation element of the DOE Fuel Cell Technology Program. The portfolio includes hydrogen technologies, as well as fuel cell technologies. The objective of this work is to model the use of bulk hydrogen storage, integrated with intermittent renewable energy production of hydrogen via electrolysis, used to generate grid-quality electricity. In addition the work determines cost-effective scale and design characteristics and explores potential attractive business models.

  2. A Review on Concepts, Applications, and Models of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Kun Sang Lee

    2010-01-01

    Being a heat source or sink, aquifers have been used to store large quantities of thermal energy to match cooling and heating supply and demand on both a short-term and long-term basis. The current technical, economic, and environmental status of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) is promising. General information on the basic operation principles, design, and construction of ATES systems is discussed in this paper. Numerous projects in operation around the world are summarized to illustra...

  3. First-Principles Studies of Transition Metal Oxides and Sulfides in Electrochemical Energy Storage Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Chi-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Unlike batteries, electrochemical supercapacitors require not only high energy density, but also very high rates of charge and ionic transport. In this thesis, first-principles calculations, such as Density Functional Theory (DFT), Molecular Dynamics (MD), and Monte Carlo (MC) are applied to study charge storage mechanisms and factors that affect ion intercalation / diffusion in transition metal compounds (Nb2O5, WO3, and MoS2).Recent experimental results show that niobium oxide exhibits an o...

  4. Comparison of photopolymers for optical data storage applications and relief diffractive optical elements recorded onto photopolymers

    OpenAIRE

    Gallego Rico, Sergi; Márquez Ruiz, Andrés; Ortuño Sánchez, Manuel; Neipp López, Cristian; Beléndez Vázquez, Augusto; Pascual Villalobos, Inmaculada

    2011-01-01

    In this paper four different photopolymers are compared on the basis of their suitability for holographic data storage. The optical recording parameters of these photopolymers were directly determined using the zero spatial frequency limit. The behavior of cover plated and uncover plated material layers was analyzed. Once the main parameters were determined, we proposed a novel model to simulate the recording of relief diffractive elements onto the photopolymers without cover plating. Relief ...

  5. Modifications of the SEPHIS computer code for calculating the Purex solvent extraction system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SEPHIS computer program was developed to simulate the countercurrent solvent extraction. This report gives modifications in the program which result in improved fit to experimental data, a decrease in computer storage requirements, and a decrease in execution time. Methods for applying the computer program to practical solvent extraction problems are explained

  6. Performance Evaluation of Virtualization Techniques for Control and Access of Storage Systems in Data Center Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Mohammad Reza

    2013-09-01

    Virtualization is a new technology that creates virtual environments based on the existing physical resources. This article evaluates effect of virtualization techniques on control servers and access method in storage systems [1, 2]. In control server virtualization, we have presented a tile based evaluation based on heterogeneous workloads to compare several key parameters and demonstrate effectiveness of virtualization techniques. Moreover, we have evaluated the virtualized model using VMotion techniques and maximum consolidation. In access method, we have prepared three different scenarios using direct, semi-virtual, and virtual attachment models. We have evaluated the proposed models with several workloads including OLTP database, data streaming, file server, web server, etc. Results of evaluation for different criteria confirm that server virtualization technique has high throughput and CPU usage as well as good performance with noticeable agility. Also virtual technique is a successful alternative for accessing to the storage systems especially in large capacity systems. This technique can therefore be an effective solution for expansion of storage area and reduction of access time. Results of different evaluation and measurements demonstrate that the virtualization in control server and full virtual access provide better performance and more agility as well as more utilization in the systems and improve business continuity plan.

  7. Performance and cost of energy transport and storage systems for dish applications using reversible chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schredder, J. M.; Fujita, T.

    1984-01-01

    The use of reversible chemical reactions for energy transport and storage for parabolic dish networks is considered. Performance and cost characteristics are estimated for systems using three reactions (sulfur-trioxide decomposition, steam reforming of methane, and carbon-dioxide reforming of methane). Systems are considered with and without storage, and in several energy-delivery configurations that give different profiles of energy delivered versus temperature. Cost estimates are derived assuming the use of metal components and of advanced ceramics. (The latter reduces the costs by three- to five-fold). The process that led to the selection of the three reactions is described, and the effects of varying temperatures, pressures, and heat exchanger sizes are addressed. A state-of-the-art survey was performed as part of this study. As a result of this survey, it appears that formidable technical risks exist for any attempt to implement the systems analyzed in this study, especially in the area of reactor design and performance. The behavior of all components and complete systems under thermal energy transients is very poorly understood. This study indicates that thermochemical storage systems that store reactants as liquids have efficiencies below 60%, which is in agreement with the findings of earlier investigators.

  8. Applicability of ICRP principles for safety analysis of radioactive waste geological storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the beginning of the eighties, the international organisations have established new recommendations for radioactive waste management. These recommendations are based on two principles. First is concerned with limitation of risks. It should be shown that the risk is smaller than the limit of acceptance. Practically only on risk criterion is foreseen. The principle demands, if a storage causes an event of individual risk (defined as a product of probability of occurrence and the probability of its causing severe health effects) is higher than 10 -5 per year, this storage is not acceptable. The second principle deals with optimisation, demands that the level of protection related to the storage should be determined by a comparative process choosing the best compromise between the price of protection and the residual risk. These recommendations, especially the second one, differ from the safety analysis principles adopted presently in France and other countries. This study analyzes the advantages and potential inconveniences related to the introduction of the second principle. (author)

  9. Control analysis of renewable energy system with hydrogen storage for residential applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilodeau, A.; Agbossou, K. [Hydrogen Research Institute, Universite du Quebec a Trois-Rivieres, 3351 boul. Des Forges, C.P. 500, Trois-Rivieres, Que. (Canada G9A 5H7)

    2006-11-22

    The combination of an electrolyzer and a fuel cell can provide peak power control in a decentralized/distributed power system. The electrolyzer produces hydrogen and oxygen from off-peak electricity generated by the renewable energy sources (wind turbine and photovoltaic array), for later use in the fuel cell to produce on-peak electricity. An issue related to this system is the control of the hydrogen loop (electrolyzer, tank, fuel cell). A number of control algorithms were developed to decide when to produce hydrogen and when to convert it back to electricity, most of them assuming that the electrolyzer and the fuel cell run alternatively to provide nominal power (full power). This paper presents a complete model of a stand-alone renewable energy system with hydrogen storage controlled by a dynamic fuzzy logic controller (FLC). In this system, batteries are used as energy buffers and for short time storage. To study the behavior of such a system, a complete model is developed by integrating the individual sub-models of the fuel cell, the electrolyzer, the power conditioning units, the hydrogen storage system, and the batteries. An analysis of the performances of the dynamic fuzzy logic controller is then presented. This model is useful for building efficient peak power control. (author)

  10. Effect of application of Chlorpropham in sprouting of olluco tubers (Ullucus tuberosus L. under storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Aliaga

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available It was evaluated the effect of Chlorpropham on the sprouting of root’s tubers vegetables (Ullucus tuberosum L. Tarmeño variety during storage at 15 °C and RH of 85 %, the treatments were 0, 5, 10, 20 and 30 mg of Chlorpropham / kg of tubers, in a completely random design with 4 repetitions. After 60 days of storage the sprouts, length for the control without Chlorpropham was 9.63 cm and for the treatments with Chlorpropham from 0.22 to 0.71 cm after 90 days the length of the sprouts were kept the same and some of them began to dry up, except the control where increased in size from 15 to 20 cm. After 90 days of storage, weight loss for the treatments with Chlorpropham was averaged of 21 % and for the witness of 37.35 %. All Chlorpropham treatments showed a lower number of sprouts per tuber, lower length of buds, fewer number of tubers with sprouts and less weight loss, with a p <0.05, Duncan test showed don’t exist significant differences between treatments with Chlorpropham for the assessed variables, but significant differences with the control treatment

  11. Thermo-mechanical modelling of cyclic gas storage applications in salt caverns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttcher, Norbert; Watanabe, Norihiro; Görke, Uwe-Jens; Kolditz, Olaf; Nagel, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Due to the growing importance of renewable energy sources it becomes more and more necessary to investigate energy storage potentials. One major way to store energy is the power-to-gas concept. Excessive electrical energy can be used either to produce hydrogen or methane by electrolysis or methanation or to compress air, respectively. Those produced gases can then be stored in artificial salt caverns, which are constructed in large salt formations by solution mining. In combination with renewable energy sources, the power-to-gas concept is subjected to fluctuations. Compression and expansion of the storage gases lead to temperature differences within the salt rock. The variations can advance several metres into the host rock, influencing its material behaviour, inducing thermal stresses and altering the creep response. To investigate the temperature influence on the cavern capacity, we have developed a numerical model to simulate the thermo-mechanical behaviour of salt caverns during cyclic gas storage. The model considers the thermodynamic behaviour of the stored gases as well as the heat transport and the temperature dependent material properties of the host rock. Therefore, we utilized well-known constitutive thermo-visco-plastic material models, implemented into the open source-scientific software OpenGeoSys. Both thermal and mechanical processes are solved using a finite element approach, connected via a staggered coupling scheme. The model allows the assessment of the structural safety as well as the convergence of the salt caverns.

  12. Comparison of closed and open thermochemical processes, for long-term thermal energy storage applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper focuses on the study of a solid/gas thermochemical reaction between a porous reactive bed and vapor. The objective is to determine the operating mode, either closed or open system, that best suits the requirements of a thermochemical seasonal storage applied to house heating. These two working modes have been compared thanks to two validated 2D models. This study shows that for the chosen set of parameters, the two operating modes lead to close global performances (the average specific power is 0.96 and 1.13 W/kg respectively for open and closed operating mode). Thus, the open thermochemical reactor, which presents technical advantages (easier conception and management, lower cost, …), is a promising way to implement a thermochemical process as long-term heat storage. Moreover, simulations allow identifying the main limitations for each working mode and the ways to reduce them. - Highlights: • Two thermochemical storage operating modes (moist air/pure vapour) are compared. • Two 2D models of solid/gas thermochemical reaction are developed and validated. • A 2nd law analysis lead to identify the phenomena limiting the reaction. • For the set parameters, the two operating modes lead to close global performances

  13. TIG welding of aluminum alloys for the APS storage ring - a UHV application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) incorporates a 7-GeV positron storage ring 1104 meters in circumference. The storage ring vacuum system is designed to maintain a pressure of 1 nTorr or less with a circulating current of 300 mA to enable beam lifetimes of greater than 10 hours. The vacuum chamber is an aluminum extrusion of 6063T5 alloy. There are 235 separate aluminum vacuum chambers in the storage ring connected by stainless steel bellows assemblies. Aluminum was chosen for the vacuum chamber because it can be economically extruded and machined, has good thermal conductivity, low thermal emissivity, a low outgassing rate, low residual radioactivity, and is non-magnetic. The 6063 aluminum-silicon-magnesium alloy provides high strength combined with good machining and weldability characteristics. The extrusion process provides the interior surface finish needed for the ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) environments There are six different vacuum chambers with the same extrusion cross section. The average vacuum chamber length is 171.6 inches. The extruded vacuum chambers are welded to flange assemblies made up of machined 2219 aluminum alloy pieces and 2219 aluminum vacuum flanges from a commercial source

  14. TIG welding of aluminum alloys for the APS storage ring - a UHV application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goeppner, G.A.

    1996-05-29

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) incorporates a 7-GeV positron storage ring 1104 meters in circumference. The storage ring vacuum system is designed to maintain a pressure of 1 nTorr or less with a circulating current of 300 mA to enable beam lifetimes of greater than 10 hours. The vacuum chamber is an aluminum extrusion of 6063T5 alloy. There are 235 separate aluminum vacuum chambers in the storage ring connected by stainless steel bellows assemblies. Aluminum was chosen for the vacuum chamber because it can be economically extruded and machined, has good thermal conductivity, low thermal emissivity, a low outgassing rate, low residual radioactivity, and is non-magnetic. The 6063 aluminum-silicon-magnesium alloy provides high strength combined with good machining and weldability characteristics. The extrusion process provides the interior surface finish needed for the ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) environments There are six different vacuum chambers with the same extrusion cross section. The average vacuum chamber length is 171.6 inches. The extruded vacuum chambers are welded to flange assemblies made up of machined 2219 aluminum alloy pieces and 2219 aluminum vacuum flanges from a commercial source.

  15. Progress in polymeric material for hydrogen storage application in middle conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen sorption using a manganese oxide anchored to PEEK (Poly(ether-ether-keton)) matrix was studied. The functionalization process and the obtained results on hydrogen storage capability of the synthesized polymer are reported. The functionalised polymer was characterised by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Volumetric Hydrogen sorption measurements. Different synthesis conditions in terms of precursor concentration and reaction time were used and the direct correlation between manganese oxide percentage and hydrogen storage capability was confirmed. In this way different powders were synthesised. It is assumed that the sample with 78 wt% (SPMnO6) forms a combination of mixed manganese oxides since different reticular planes were observed. On this sample, promising results regarding to hydrogen capability at 110 °C and 60 bar were obtained, in particular 1.1 wt% hydrogen sorption was recorded. Moreover, this value, after about 30 h, remains quite constant. These preliminary results demonstrate the capability of such compound to absorb hydrogen, for this reason further morphological and structural studies are in progress with the aim to better understand the mechanism involving the storage. - Highlights: • A chlorosulphonated PEEK was modified by a manganese oxide in situ formation. • Correlation between manganese oxide content and reaction parameters. • A Birnessite structure of manganese oxide was confirmed by XRD and TEM. • A H2 sorption of about 1 wt% at 110 °C/60 bar was recorded by Sievert apparatus

  16. Multiple sample setup for testing the hydrothermal stability of adsorbents in thermal energy storage applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal energy storage based on adsorption and desorption of water on an adsorbent can achieve high energy storage densities. Many adsorbents lose adsorption capacity when operated under unfavourable hydrothermal conditions during adsorption and desorption. The stability of an adsorbent against stressing hydrothermal conditions is a key issue for its usability in adsorption thermal energy storage. We built an experimental setup that simultaneously controls the hydrothermal conditions of 16 samples arranged in a matrix of four temperatures and four water vapour pressures. This setup allows the testing of potential adsorbents between temperatures of 50 °C and 350 °C and water vapour pressures of up to 32 kPa. A measurement procedure that allows the detection of the hydrothermal stability of an adsorbent after defined time spans has been designed. We verified the functionality of the multiple sample measurements with a microporous adsorbent, a zeolite NaMSX. The hydrothermal stability of this zeolite is tested by water uptake measurements. A standard deviation lower than 1% of the 16 samples for detecting the hydrothermal stability enables setting different conditions in each sample cell. Further, we compared the water uptake measurements by measuring their adsorption isotherms with the volumetric device BELSORP Aqua 3 from Bel Japan. (paper)

  17. Lithium Ion Battery Chemistries from Renewable Energy Storage to Automotive and Back-up Power Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stan, Ana-Irina; Swierczynski, Maciej Jozef; Stroe, Daniel Ioan;

    2014-01-01

    systems for stationary applications, as well as power source for sustainable automotive and back-up power supply applications. This paper gives an overview of the Li-ion battery chemistries that are available at present in the market, and describes the three out of four main applications (except the...... consumers’ applications), grid support, automotive, and back-up power, for which the Li-ion batteries are suitable. Each of these applications has its own specifications and thus, the chemistry of the Li-ion battery should be chosen to fulfil the requirements of the corresponding application. Consequently...

  18. Molecular interactions in metal organic frameworks for optimized gas separation, storage and sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijem, Nour

    Hydrogen storage and CO2 capture are two of the most challenging problems for the development of renewable energy sources and the reduction of CO2 emission. Hydrogen storage aims at storing a high volumetric density of hydrogen at room temperature. Fundamental studies exploring molecular hydrogen interactions in storage materials are therefore important to foster further development of materials. Metal-organic Frameworks (MOFs) are promising candidates for hydrogen storage and gas separation because their high surface area, porosity and structural tailorability all contribute to selective high hydrogen and CO2 physisorption at specific sites in the structures. This work explores the incorporation of hydrogen, CO2 and hydrocarbons into various MOFs using infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopy to characterize their interaction. IR spectroscopy can distinguish possible H2 binding sites based on the perturbation of the initially IR inactive internal H2 stretch mode. Comparative IR measurements are performed on MOFs with both saturated metal centers (e.g., M(bdc)(ted)0.5) and unsaturated metal centers (e.g., MOF-74-M with M=Zn, Mg and Ni) by varying the ligand and/or the metal center. We combine room-temperature and high-pressure with low-temperature (20--100K) measurements and use theoretical van der Waals density functional (vdW-DF) calculations to derive quantitative information from the vibrational band shifts and dipole moment strengths. In addition to H2, CO2 and hydrocarbon adsorption and selectivity in a flexible MOF system using Raman and IR spectroscopy are explored. The CO2 specific interaction with the framework and the specific connectivity of the metal to the ligands is found to be the main reason for this MOFs flexibility leading to its large CO2 selectivity, and a novel "gate opening" phenomenon. The unexpected gate opening behavior in this flexible framework upon different hydrocarbon adsorption is studied to uncover effects of specific hydrogen bonding

  19. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B permit application for tank storage units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-01

    In compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), this report discusses information relating to permit applications for three tank storage units at Y-12. The storage units are: Building 9811-1 RCRA Tank Storage Unit (OD-7); Waste Oil/Solvent Storage Unit (OD-9); and Liquid Organic Solvent Storage Unit (OD-10). Numerous sections discuss the following: Facility description; waste characteristics; process information; groundwater monitoring; procedures to prevent hazards; contingency plan; personnel training; closure plan, post closure plan, and financial requirements; record keeping; other federal laws; organic air emissions; solid waste management units; and certification. Sixteen appendices contain such items as maps, waste analyses and forms, inspection logs, equipment identification, etc.

  20. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B permit application for tank storage units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), this report discusses information relating to permit applications for three tank storage units at Y-12. The storage units are: Building 9811-1 RCRA Tank Storage Unit (OD-7); Waste Oil/Solvent Storage Unit (OD-9); and Liquid Organic Solvent Storage Unit (OD-10). Numerous sections discuss the following: Facility description; waste characteristics; process information; groundwater monitoring; procedures to prevent hazards; contingency plan; personnel training; closure plan, post closure plan, and financial requirements; record keeping; other federal laws; organic air emissions; solid waste management units; and certification. Sixteen appendices contain such items as maps, waste analyses and forms, inspection logs, equipment identification, etc

  1. 77 FR 16219 - Cortez Pumped Storage Project; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-20

    ... 30, 2011, INCA Engineers, Inc., Washington, filed an application for a preliminary permit, pursuant... between 600 and 1,500 gigawatthours. Applicant Contact: Mr. Donald Thompson, INCA Engineers, Inc.,...

  2. 76 FR 80926 - Cortez Pumped Storage Project; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-27

    ... December 1, 2011, INCA Engineers, Inc., Washington, filed an application for a preliminary permit, pursuant... between 600 and 1,500 gigawatt hours. Applicant Contact: Mr. Donald Thompson, INCA Engineers, Inc.,...

  3. Memory Storage Issues of Temporal Database Applications on Relational Database Management Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Sami M. Halawani; Nashwan A.A Romema

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: Many existing database applications manage time-varying data. These database applications are referred to as temporal databases or time-oriented database applications that are considered as repositories of time-dependent data. Many proposals have been introduced for developing time-oriented database applications, some of which suggest building support for Temporal Database Management Systems (TDBMS) on top of existing non-temporal DBMSs, while others suggest modifying the m...

  4. Economic Evaluation of Tank Storage and Pot Calcination of Power-Reactor Fuel-Reprocessing Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of a comprehensive study undertaken to evaluate the economics and hazards associated with methods for ultimate disposal of highly radioactive liquid and solid wastes, costs have been estimated for interim storage of the wastes in tanks and conversion to solids by pot calcination. A 6-t(metric)/d capacity fuel-processing plant was assumed, processing 1500 t/yr of uranium fuel of 10 000-MWd/t bum-up and 270 t/yr of thorium fuel of 20 000-MWd/t burn-up, which would process all the fuel from a 15 000-MWe nuclear economy. Costs for storage of acidic and neutralized Purex and Thorex wastes were estimated for storage in stainless- steel tanks for acidic wastes and mild steel for neutralized waste. With interim storage time defined as filling time plus full time, tank costs were minimum when the full time was roughly 40 to 75% of the interim storage time. For 0.5 - 30 yr storage, costs ranged from 2.0 x 10-3 to 9.3 x 10-3 mill/kWhe for acid wastes and from 1.5 x 10-3 to 4.7 x 10-3 mill/kWhe for alkaline wastes. Costs were estimated for converting acidic and reacidified Purex and Thorex wastes to solids by pot calcination and for producing glass from acidic Thorex wastes. The vessels studied were made of 6-, 12-, and 24-in-diam. stainless-steel pipe, 10 ft high, with estimated costs of $500, $855 and $2515. Aging had negligible effect on costs for processing in a vessel of a given size, because capital costs were only about 10% of vessel and operating costs, but permitted larger vessels to be used; costs for processing in 6-in-diam. vessels were two to three times those in 24-in-diam.vessels. The lowest cost was 0.87 x 10-2 mill/kWhe for processing-acidic Purex and .Thorex wastes in 24-in-diam. vessels and the highest was 5.0 x 10-2 mill/kWhe for processing reacidified Purex and Thorex wastes in 6-in-diam. vessels. (author)

  5. Fuel storage systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donakowski, T.D.; Tison, R.R.

    1979-08-01

    Storage technologies are characterized for solid, liquid, and gaseous fuels. Emphasis is placed on storage methods applicable to Integrated Community Energy Systems based on coal. Items discussed here include standard practice, materials and energy losses, environmental effects, operating requirements, maintenance and reliability, and cost considerations. All storage systems were found to be well-developed and to represent mature technologies; an exception may exist for low-Btu gas storage, which could have materials incompatability.

  6. Energy Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, William W.

    Described are technological considerations affecting storage of energy, particularly electrical energy. The background and present status of energy storage by batteries, water storage, compressed air storage, flywheels, magnetic storage, hydrogen storage, and thermal storage are discussed followed by a review of development trends. Included are…

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF A HYDROGEN AND DEUTERIUM POLARIZED GAS TARGET FOR APPLICATION IN STORAGE RINGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willy Haeberli

    2009-06-18

    The exploration of spin degrees of freedom in nuclear and high-energy interactions requires the use of spin-polarized projectiles and/or spin-polarized targets. During the last two decades, the use of external beams from cyclotrons has to a large extent been supplanted by use of circulating beams stored in storage rings. In these experiments, the circulating particles pass millions of times through targets internal to the ring. Thus the targets need to be very thin to avoid beam loss by scattering out of the acceptance aperture of the ring.

  8. Burnup credit application in criticality analysis of storage casks with spent RBMK-1500 nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear criticality safety analysis of two types of the casks CASTOR RBMK-1500 and CONSTOR RBMK-1500 was performed using the SCALE 4.3 computer code system. These casks are planned for an interim dry storage of spent nuclear fuel at Ignalina nuclear power plant. Effective neutron multiplication factor keff was calculated for different density of the water inside the casks for unfavorable operational cases and for assumed hypothetical accident conditions when fuel in the system is fresh and fuel is depleted (i.e. burnup credit taken into account). Results show that for all cases effective neutron multiplication factor keff is less then allowable value 0.95. (author)

  9. Durability design of heated concrete structures. Methodology and application to long-term interim storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The operation of civil engineering structures subjected to thermal and mechanical loading has led the CEA to examine temperature-dependent variations in the concrete properties and the processes affecting the durability of these structures. A new approach has been undertaken to specify the thermal, hydraulic and mechanical history of these structures. This technical approach is based on three areas of research: material characterization, modelling to identify weaknesses in the structure and validation by experimental tests on heavily instrumented structures subjected to representative loads. The procedure adopted for long-term interim storage facilities can also be applied to other domains. (authors)

  10. The application of NAND flash memory in high-speed multi-channel acquisition storage system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new storage measurement system based on the PIC MCU CPLD (complex programmable logic device) and FLASH (large-capacity flash memory) is proposed. The design implement that in the variable sampling rate, FIFO cache achieve self-adapting function of the rate adjustment, and multi-channel data can be stored uninterrupted in FLASH memory. Using a new way of detecting FLASH invalid block, extend the using time of the system. The results show that the design can meet the requirement of acquisition system. (authors)

  11. Application of autonomous robotics to surveillance of waste storage containers for radioactive surface contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a proof-of-principal demonstration performed with the HERMIES-III mobile robot to automate the inspection of waste storage drums for radioactive surface contamination and thereby reduce the human burden of operating a robot and worker exposure to potentially hazardous environments. Software and hardware for the demonstration were developed by a team consisting of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the Universities of Florida, Michigan, Tennessee, and Texas. Robot navigation, machine vision, manipulator control, parallel processing and human-machine interface techniques developed by the team were demonstrated utilizing advanced computer architectures. The demonstration consists of over 100,000 lines of computer code executing on nine computers

  12. Nanoroses of nickel oxides: Synthesis, electron tomography study, and application in CO oxidation and energy storage

    KAUST Repository

    Fihri, Aziz

    2012-04-11

    Nickel oxide and mixed-metal oxide structures were fabricated by using microwave irradiation in pure water. The nickel oxide self-assembled into unique rose-shaped nanostructures. These nickel oxide roses were studied by performing electron tomography with virtual cross-sections through the particles to understand their morphology from their interior to their surface. These materials exhibited promising performance as nanocatalysts for CO oxidation and in energy storage devices. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Freestanding nanocellulose-composite fibre reinforced 3D polypyrrole electrodes for energy storage applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaohui; Tammela, Petter; Zhang, Peng; Huo, Jinxing; Ericson, Fredric; Strømme, Maria; Nyholm, Leif

    2014-10-01

    It is demonstrated that 3D nanostructured polypyrrole (3D PPy) nanocomposites can be reinforced with PPy covered nanocellulose (PPy@nanocellulose) fibres to yield freestanding, mechanically strong and porosity optimised electrodes with large surface areas. Such PPy@nanocellulose reinforced 3D PPy materials can be employed as free-standing paper-like electrodes in symmetric energy storage devices exhibiting cell capacitances of 46 F g-1, corresponding to specific electrode capacitances of up to ~185 F g-1 based on the weight of the electrode, and 5.5 F cm-2 at a current density of 2 mA cm-2. After 3000 charge/discharge cycles at 30 mA cm-2, the reinforced 3D PPy electrode material also showed a cell capacitance corresponding to 92% of that initially obtained. The present findings open up new possibilities for the fabrication of high performance, low-cost and environmentally friendly energy-storage devices based on nanostructured paper-like materials.It is demonstrated that 3D nanostructured polypyrrole (3D PPy) nanocomposites can be reinforced with PPy covered nanocellulose (PPy@nanocellulose) fibres to yield freestanding, mechanically strong and porosity optimised electrodes with large surface areas. Such PPy@nanocellulose reinforced 3D PPy materials can be employed as free-standing paper-like electrodes in symmetric energy storage devices exhibiting cell capacitances of 46 F g-1, corresponding to specific electrode capacitances of up to ~185 F g-1 based on the weight of the electrode, and 5.5 F cm-2 at a current density of 2 mA cm-2. After 3000 charge/discharge cycles at 30 mA cm-2, the reinforced 3D PPy electrode material also showed a cell capacitance corresponding to 92% of that initially obtained. The present findings open up new possibilities for the fabrication of high performance, low-cost and environmentally friendly energy-storage devices based on nanostructured paper-like materials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c

  14. Development of time-resolved laser fluorescence spectrometry for on-line uranium checking in solutions of the Purex reprocessing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Purex process and the fluorescence spectrometry are first recalled, then uranyl fluorescence is studied in a pure nitric medium without other elements to establish a theoretical model, allowing the description of uranium fluorescence signal with a general equation. The influence of different parameters (temperature, inhibitors, dynamic quenching of iron and cerium) is investigated to develop the model. A quantitative analysis method without addition of reagents is proposed to validate the model

  15. Combination RCRA groundwater monitoring plan for the 216-A-10, 216-A-36B, and 216-A-37-1 PUREX cribs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindberg, J.W.

    1997-06-01

    This document presents a groundwater quality assessment monitoring plan, under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) regulatory requirements for three RCRA sites in the Hanford Site`s 200 East Area: 216-A-10, 216-A-36B, and 216-A-37-1 cribs (PUREX cribs). The objectives of this monitoring plan are to combine the three facilities into one groundwater quality assessment program and to assess the nature, extent, and rate of contaminant migration from these facilities. A groundwater quality assessment plan is proposed because at least one downgradient well in the existing monitoring well networks has concentrations of groundwater constituents indicating that the facilities have contributed to groundwater contamination. The proposed combined groundwater monitoring well network includes 11 existing near-field wells to monitor contamination in the aquifer in the immediate vicinity of the PUREX cribs. Because groundwater contamination from these cribs is known to have migrated as far away as the 300 Area (more than 25 km from the PUREX cribs), the plan proposes to use results of groundwater analyses from 57 additional wells monitored to meet environmental monitoring requirements of US Department of Energy Order 5400.1 to supplement the near-field data. Assessments of data collected from these wells will help with a future decision of whether additional wells are needed.

  16. Combination RCRA groundwater monitoring plan for the 216-A-10, 216-A-36B, and 216-A-37-1 PUREX cribs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents a groundwater quality assessment monitoring plan, under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) regulatory requirements for three RCRA sites in the Hanford Site's 200 East Area: 216-A-10, 216-A-36B, and 216-A-37-1 cribs (PUREX cribs). The objectives of this monitoring plan are to combine the three facilities into one groundwater quality assessment program and to assess the nature, extent, and rate of contaminant migration from these facilities. A groundwater quality assessment plan is proposed because at least one downgradient well in the existing monitoring well networks has concentrations of groundwater constituents indicating that the facilities have contributed to groundwater contamination. The proposed combined groundwater monitoring well network includes 11 existing near-field wells to monitor contamination in the aquifer in the immediate vicinity of the PUREX cribs. Because groundwater contamination from these cribs is known to have migrated as far away as the 300 Area (more than 25 km from the PUREX cribs), the plan proposes to use results of groundwater analyses from 57 additional wells monitored to meet environmental monitoring requirements of US Department of Energy Order 5400.1 to supplement the near-field data. Assessments of data collected from these wells will help with a future decision of whether additional wells are needed

  17. Environmental performance of advanced hybrid energy storage systems for electric vehicle applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The environmental impact of advanced energy storage systems is assessed. • The methodology used is Life Cycle Assessment following the ISO 14040 and 14044. • Twelve impact categories are assessed to avoid burden shifting. • Increasing the efficiency and extending the lifetime benefits the environmental performance. • The results show that there are hot spots where to act and reduce the overall impact. - Abstract: In this paper the environmental performance of an advanced hybrid energy storage system, comprising high power and high energy lithium iron phosphate cells, is compared with a stand alone battery concept composed of lithium manganese oxide cells. The methodology used to analyse the environmental impacts is Life Cycle Assessment (LCA). The manufacturing, use phase and end-of-life of the battery packs are assessed for twelve impact categories. The functional unit is 1 km driven under European average conditions. The present study assesses the environmental performance of the two battery packs for two scenarios: scenario 1 with a vehicle total drive range of 150,000 km and scenario 2 with total driving range of the car of 300,000 km. The results of scenario 1 show that the increased efficiency of the hybrid system reduces, in general, the environmental impact during the use stage, although the manufacturing stage has higher impact than the benchmark. Scenario 2 shows how the extended lifetime of the hybrid system benefits the emissions per km driven

  18. On-board hydrogen storage and production: An application of ammonia electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggs, Bryan K.; Botte, Gerardine G.

    On-board hydrogen storage and production via ammonia electrolysis was evaluated to determine whether the process was feasible using galvanostatic studies between an ammonia electrolytic cell (AEC) and a breathable proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). Hydrogen-dense liquid ammonia stored at ambient temperature and pressure is an excellent source for hydrogen storage. This hydrogen is released from ammonia through electrolysis, which theoretically consumes 95% less energy than water electrolysis; 1.55 Wh g -1 H 2 is required for ammonia electrolysis and 33 Wh g -1 H 2 for water electrolysis. An ammonia electrolytic cell (AEC), comprised of carbon fiber paper (CFP) electrodes supported by Ti foil and deposited with Pt-Ir, was designed and constructed for electrolyzing an alkaline ammonia solution. Hydrogen from the cathode compartment of the AEC was fed to a polymer exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). In terms of electric energy, input to the AEC was less than the output from the PEMFC yielding net electrical energies as high as 9.7 ± 1.1 Wh g -1 H 2 while maintaining H 2 production equivalent to consumption.

  19. Biotemplating of BaFBr:Eu{sup 2+} for X-ray storage phosphor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostova, M.H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering - Glass and Ceramics, University of Erlangen - Nuremberg, Martensstr. 5, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Batentschuk, M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering - Materials for Electronics and Energy Technology, University of Erlangen - Nuremberg, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Goetz-Neunhoeffer, F. [GeoZentrum Nordbayern, Mineralogy, University of Erlangen - Nuremberg, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Gruber, S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering - Glass and Ceramics, University of Erlangen - Nuremberg, Martensstr. 5, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Winnacker, A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering - Materials for Electronics and Energy Technology, University of Erlangen - Nuremberg, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Greil, P. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering - Glass and Ceramics, University of Erlangen - Nuremberg, Martensstr. 5, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Zollfrank, C., E-mail: cordt.zollfrank@ww.uni-erlangen.de [Department of Materials Science and Engineering - Glass and Ceramics, University of Erlangen - Nuremberg, Martensstr. 5, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2010-09-01

    The design of hierarchically patterned novel structures by replicating the cellular tissue of wood has recently attained increasing interest. X-ray storage phosphor BaFBr:Eu{sup 2+} is manufactured via vacuum assisted repeated infiltration of wood tissue (Pinus sylvestris). A submicrometer precipitate is formed via wet chemical reaction of NH{sub 4}F, BaBr{sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O and EuCl{sub 3}.6H{sub 2}O in methanol. According to scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), the original wood cell walls are filled with the precipitate and completely transformed into BaFBr struts after sintering at 800 deg. C. The optical properties of the biomorphous phosphor microstructure are determined by photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL) at room temperature, photo-stimulated luminescence spectroscopy (PSL) and cathodoluminescence spectroscopy (CL) in the SEM. A broadening of the PSL peak is observed and ascribed to the incorporation of calcium impurities present in the pine wood tissue. The potential of biotemplates for generating highly oriented and optically isolated {mu}m- and sub-{mu}m matrix of X-ray storage phosphor material is illustrated.

  20. Thermal Energy Storage for Building Load Management: Application to Electrically Heated Floor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène Thieblemont

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In cold climates, electrical power demand for space conditioning becomes a critical issue for utility companies during certain periods of the day. Shifting a portion or all of it to off-peak periods can help reduce peak demand and reduce stress on the electrical grid. Sensible thermal energy storage (TES systems, and particularly electrically heated floors (EHF, can store thermal energy in buildings during the off-peak periods and release it during the peak periods while maintaining occupants’ thermal comfort. However, choosing the type of storage system and/or its configuration may be difficult. In this paper, the performance of an EHF for load management is studied. First, a methodology is developed to integrate EHF in TRNSYS program in order to investigate the impact of floor assembly on the EHF performance. Then, the thermal comfort (TC of the night-running EHF is studied. Finally, indicators are defined, allowing the comparison of different EHF. Results show that an EHF is able to shift 84% of building loads to the night while maintaining acceptable TC in cold climate. Moreover, this system is able to provide savings for the customer and supplier if there is a significant difference between off-peak and peak period electricity prices.

  1. Inherent Tracers for Carbon Capture and Storage in Sedimentary Formations: Composition and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flude, Stephanie; Johnson, Gareth; Gilfillan, Stuart M V; Haszeldine, R Stuart

    2016-08-01

    Inherent tracers-the "natural" isotopic and trace gas composition of captured CO2 streams-are potentially powerful tracers for use in CCS technology. This review outlines for the first time the expected carbon isotope and noble gas compositions of captured CO2 streams from a range of feedstocks, CO2-generating processes, and carbon capture techniques. The C-isotope composition of captured CO2 will be most strongly controlled by the feedstock, but significant isotope fractionation is possible during capture; noble gas concentrations will be controlled by the capture technique employed. Comparison with likely baseline data suggests that CO2 generated from fossil fuel feedstocks will often have δ(13)C distinguishable from storage reservoir CO2. Noble gases in amine-captured CO2 streams are likely to be low concentration, with isotopic ratios dependent on the feedstock, but CO2 captured from oxyfuel plants may be strongly enriched in Kr and Xe which are potentially valuable subsurface tracers. CO2 streams derived from fossil fuels will have noble gas isotope ratios reflecting a radiogenic component that will be difficult to distinguish in the storage reservoir, but inheritance of radiogenic components will provide an easily recognizable signature in the case of any unplanned migration into shallow aquifers or to the surface. PMID:27379462

  2. Outstanding mechanical properties of monolayer MoS2 and its application in elastic energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Qing; de, Suvranu

    2014-03-01

    The structural and mechanical properties of graphene-like honeycomb monolayer structures of MoS2(g-MoS2) under various large strains are investigated using density functional theory (DFT). g-MoS2 is mechanically stable and can sustain extra large strains: the ultimate strains are 0.24, 0.37, and 0.26 for armchair, zigzag, and biaxial deformation, respectively. The in-plane stiffness is as high as 120 N/m (184 GPa equivalently). The third, fourth, and fifth order elastic constants are indispensable for accurate modeling of the mechanical properties under strains larger than 0.04, 0.07, and 0.13 respectively. The second order elastic constants, including in-plane stiffness, are predicted to monotonically increase with pressure while the Poisson ratio monotonically decreases with increasing pressure. With the prominent mechanical properties including large ultimate strains and in-plane stiffness, g-MoS2 is a promising candidate of elastic energy storage for clean energy. It possesses a theoretical energy storage capacity as high as 8.8 MJ/L and 1.7 MJ/kg, or 476 Wh/kg, larger than a Li-ion battery and is environmentally friendly. Financial support from the Defence Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) Grant # BRBAA08-C-2-0130 and.

  3. Low-Temperature Hydrogen Storage Alloy and Its Application in Ni-MH Battery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶明大; 陈云贵; 吴朝玲; 付春艳; 涂铭旌

    2004-01-01

    Rare earth compositions, La, Ce and Pr in Mm(NiCoMnAl)5 hydrogen storage alloy, were arranged by uniform design method. The discharge performances and kinetics parameters including capacity, exchange current density, symmetry factor and hydrogen diffusion coefficient of the alloy at -40 ℃, were tested in standard tri-electrode cell. And linear regression method was used to analyze the effect of rare earth compositions on the performances of hydrogen storage alloys. The results show that the capacities of the alloys are positively correlative to the square of Ce content at -40 ℃ and under both 0.4 and 0.2C rate. The kinetics parameters and hydrogen diffusion coefficient indicate that the low-temperature performances of the alloys are mainly controlled by hydrogen diffusion process, and the surface electrochemical reaction affects the low-temperature performances to a certain extent. The low-temperature discharge capacities of the battery were also tested. The results show excellent low-temperature performances.The battery delivers 69.6% of its room-temperature capacity at -40 ℃ and 0.2C rate, 77.7% at -40 ℃ and 0.4C rate, 59.1% at -45 ℃ and 0.2C rate.

  4. APPLICATION OF REAL OPTIONS THEORY IN THE EVALUATION OF SWINE BIOGAS STORAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gláucia Fernandes

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates the real option of storing the biogas from swine biomass. We analyze deferring the immediate sale of this energy in the spot market to store it in the form of gas for future sale. We consider that once a storage tank reaches maximum capacity, the producer will sell all of the energy generated in either the spot market or regulated market for a minimum selling price. The farm we chose to study already produces energy and sells it in the spot market. The real options methodology was chosen to consider managerial flexibility and the uncertainty of the energy price. Additionally, considerations were made for the stochastic process applied to the price time series of the weekly Differences Settlement Price (Preço de Liquidação das Diferenças in Portuguese of low voltage power in southern Brazil. Our results indicate that the storage option has value for the power generation from swine biomass.

  5. Investigations into the use of energy storage in power system applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Ka Kit

    This thesis embodies research work on the design and implementation of novel fast responding battery energy storage systems, which, with sufficient capacity and rating, could remove the uncertainty in forecasting the annual peak demand. They would also benefit the day to day operation by curtailing the fastest demand variations, particularly at the daily peak periods. Energy storage that could curtail peak demands, when the most difficult operational problems occur offers a promising approach. Although AC energy cannot be stored, power electronic developments offer a fast responding interface between the AC network and DC energy stored in batteries. The attractive feature of the use of this energy storage could most effectively be located near the source of load variations, i.e. near consumers in the distribution networks. The proposed, three phase multi-purpose, Battery Energy Storage System will provide active and reactive power independent of the supply voltage with excellent power quality in terms of its waveform. Besides the above important functions applied at the distribution side of the utility, several new topologies have been developed to provide both Dynamic Voltage Regulator (DVR) and Unified Power Flow Controller (UPFC) functions for line compensation. These new topologies can provide fast and accurate control of power flow along a distribution corridor. The topologies also provide for fast damping of system oscillation due to transient or dynamic disturbances. Having demonstrated the various functions that the proposed Battery Energy Storage System can provide, the final part of the thesis investigates means of improving the performance of the proposed BESS. First, there is a need to reduce the switching losses by using soft switching instead of hard switching. A soft switching inverter using a parallel resonant dc-link (PRDCL) is proposed for use with the proposed BESS. The proposed PRDCL suppresses the dc-link voltage to zero for a very short time

  6. Energy Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-09-30

    Energy storage technology is critical if the U.S. is to achieve more than 25% penetration of renewable electrical energy, given the intermittency of wind and solar. Energy density is a critical parameter in the economic viability of any energy storage system with liquid fuels being 10 to 100 times better than batteries. However, the economical conversion of electricity to fuel still presents significant technical challenges. This project addressed these challenges by focusing on a specific approach: efficient processes to convert electricity, water and nitrogen to ammonia. Ammonia has many attributes that make it the ideal energy storage compound. The feed stocks are plentiful, ammonia is easily liquefied and routinely stored in large volumes in cheap containers, and it has exceptional energy density for grid scale electrical energy storage. Ammonia can be oxidized efficiently in fuel cells or advanced Carnot cycle engines yielding water and nitrogen as end products. Because of the high energy density and low reactivity of ammonia, the capital cost for grid storage will be lower than any other storage application. This project developed the theoretical foundations of N2 catalysis on specific catalysts and provided for the first time experimental evidence for activation of Mo 2N based catalysts. Theory also revealed that the N atom adsorbed in the bridging position between two metal atoms is the critical step for catalysis. Simple electrochemical ammonia production reactors were designed and built in this project using two novel electrolyte systems. The first one demonstrated the use of ionic liquid electrolytes at room temperature and the second the use of pyrophosphate based electrolytes at intermediate temperatures (200 – 300 ºC). The mechanism of high proton conduction in the pyrophosphate materials was found to be associated with a polyphosphate second phase contrary to literature claims and ammonia production rates as high as 5X 10

  7. Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application Immobilized High Level Waste (IHLW) Interim Storage Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both the General Information and Unit-Specific portions of the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application address the content of the Part B permit application guidance prepared by the Washington State Department of Ecology and the U.S. EPA

  8. Thermal oxidation synthesis hollow MoO3 microspheres and their applications in lithium storage and gas-sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: MoO3 hollow microspheres were synthesized via a facile and template-free solvothermal route and subsequent heat treatment in air. The MoO3 hollow microspheres exhibit an improved lithium storage and gas-sensing performance. Highlights: ► Hollow MoO3 microspheres were synthesized by thermal oxidation of hollow MoO2. ► The MoO3 hollow microspheres have a relatively high specific surface area. ► The MoO3 hollow microspheres exhibit improved lithium storage performance. ► The MoO3 hollow microspheres show good responses to ammonia gas. - Abstract: In this paper, MoO3 hollow microspheres were synthesized via a facile and template-free solvothermal route and subsequent heat treatment in air. The MoO3 hollow microspheres have a relatively high specific surface area, and with such a feature, the as-synthesized MoO3 hollow microspheres have potential applications in Li-ion battery and gas-sensor. When tested as a Li-storage anode material, the MoO3 hollow microspheres show a higher discharge capacity of 1377.1 mA h g−1 in the first discharge and a high reversible capacity of 780 mA h g−1 after 100 cycles at a rate of 1 C. Furthermore, as a gas sensing material, the MoO3 hollow microspheres exhibit an improved sensitivity and short response/recovery time to trace levels of ammonia gas

  9. Application of nonlinear ultrasonics to inspection of stainless steel for dry storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulrich, Timothy James II [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Anderson, Brain E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Remillieux, Marcel C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Le Bas, Pierre -Yves [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pieczonka, Lukasz [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-09-22

    This report summarized technical work conducted by LANL staff an international collaborators in support of the UFD Storage Experimentation effort. The focus of the current technical work is on the detection and imaging of a failure mechanism known as stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in stainless steel using the nonlinear ultrasonic technique known as TREND. One of the difficulties faced in previous work is in finding samples that contain realistically sized SCC. This year such samples were obtained from EPRI. Reported here are measurements made on these samples. One of the key findings is the ability to detect subsurface changes to the direction in which a crack is penetrating into the sample. This result follows from last year's report that demonstrated the ability of TREND techniques to image features below the sample surface. A new collaboration was established with AGH University of Science and Technology, Krakow, Poland.

  10. Development of a modular room-temperature hydride storage system for vehicular applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capurso, Giovanni; Schiavo, Benedetto; Jepsen, Julian; Lozano, Gustavo; Metz, Oliver; Saccone, Adriana; De Negri, Serena; Bellosta von Colbe, José M.; Klassen, Thomas; Dornheim, Martin

    2016-03-01

    The subject of this paper concerns the development of a vehicular hydrogen tank system, using a commercial interstitial metal hydride as storage material. The design of the tank was intended to feed a fuel cell in a light prototype vehicle, and the chosen hydride material, Hydralloy C5 by GfE, was expected to be able to absorb and desorb hydrogen in a range of pressure suitable for this purpose. A systematic analysis of the material in laboratory scale allows an extrapolation of the thermodynamic and reaction kinetics data. The following development of the modular tank was done according to the requirements of the prototype vehicle propulsion system and led to promising intermediate results. The modular approach granted flexibility in the design, allowing both to reach carefully the design goals and to learn the limiting factors in the sorption process. Proper heat management and suitable equipment remain key factors in order to achieve the best performances.

  11. Investigation into the application of polyetherimide to nuclear waste storage containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The procedure of the analysis of the effects of irradiation on the mechanical and chemical properties of the polyetherimide (PEI) is outlined. Previous research in this field at the Royal Military College of Canada is presented. Samples of PEI will be exposed to a mixed radiation field, in the pool of a SLOWPOKE-2 nuclear reactor, then changes in mechanical properties, degradation product formation, and physical property changes will be assessed. Additionally, the heat transfer in the sample will be calculated in order to model the heat transfer rate and heat diffusion profile of PEI. The purpose of the proposed research is to determine the feasibility of using PEI for spent CANDU nuclear fuel and nuclear waste storage containers. (author)

  12. Application of multivariate storage model to quantify trends in seasonally frozen soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woody Jonathan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a study of the ground thermal regime recorded at 11 stations in the North Dakota Agricultural Network. Particular focus is placed on detecting trends in the annual ground freeze process portion of the ground thermal regime’s daily temperature signature. A multivariate storage model from queuing theory is fit to a quantity of estimated daily depths of frozen soil. Statistical inference on a trend parameter is obtained by minimizing a weighted sum of squares of a sequence of daily one-step-ahead predictions. Standard errors for the trend estimates are presented. It is shown that the daily quantity of frozen ground experienced at these 11 sites exhibited a negative trend over the observation period.

  13. Toroidal cell and battery. [storage battery for high amp-hour load applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagle, W. J. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A toroidal storage battery designed to handle relatively high amp-hour loads is described. The cell includes a wound core disposed within a pair of toroidal channel shaped electrodes spaced apart by nylon insulator. The shape of the case electrodes of this toroidal cell allows a first planar doughnut shaped surface and the inner cylindrical case wall to be used as a first electrode and a second planar doughnut shaped surface and the outer cylindrical case wall to be used as a second electrode. Connectors may be used to stack two or more toroidal cells together by connecting substantially the entire surface area of the first electrode of a first cell to substantially the entire surface area of the second electrode of a second cell. The central cavity of each toroidal cell may be used as a conduit for pumping a fluid through the toroidal cell to thereby cool the cell.

  14. Copper vanadate nanowires-based MIS capacitors: synthesis, characterization, and their electrical charge storage applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copper vanadate (CVO) nanowires were grown on Si/SiO2 substrates by thermal annealing technique. A thin film of a CVO precursor at 550 °C under an ambient atmosphere could also be prepared. The electrical properties of the nanowires embedded in the dielectrical layer were examined by capacitance–voltage (C–V) measurements. The C–V curves for Au/CVO nanowires embedded in an hafnium oxide layer/SiO2/p-Si capacitor at 298 K showed a clockwise hysteresis loop when the gate bias was swept cyclically. The hysteresis characteristics were studied further at different frequencies, which clearly indicated that the traps in the nanowires have a large charging–discharging time and thus the as-synthesized nanowires can be utilized for electrical charge storage devices

  15. Scaling experiments on plasma opening switches for inductive energy storage applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new type of fast opening switch for use with pulsed power accelerators is examined. This Plasma Opening Switch (POS) utilizes an injected carbon plasma to conduct large currents (circa 1 MA) for up to 100 ns while a vacuum inductor (circa 100 nH) is charged. The switch is then capable of opening on a short (circa 10 ns) timescale and depositing the stored energy into a load impedance. Output pulse widths and power levels are determined by the storage inductance and the load impedance. The switch operation is studied in detail both analytically and experimentally. Experiments are performed at the 5 kJ stored energy level on the Gamble I generator and at the 50 kJ level on the Gamble II generator. Results of both experiments are reported and the scaling of switch operation is discussed

  16. Application of superconducting magnetic energy storage unit for damping of subsynchronous oscillations in power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devotta, J.B.X.; Rabbani, M.G.; Elangovan, S. [National University of Singapore (Singapore). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    1999-10-01

    A novel strategy for suppressing subsynchronous resonance (SSR) in power systems using a superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) unit is presented. The energy transfer between the power system and the SMES unit is based on simultaneous control of active and reactive power modulation of the SMES unit. The active power is controlled by an artificial neural network (ANN) based controller, while the reactive power is controlled by a conventional regulator. The gains of the controllers are determined from the power system operating conditions and the rating of the SMES unit. Unequal {alpha}-mode of firing angle control of the converters is utilized to enforce zero energy transfer in the SMES unit under steady state conditions. The proposed scheme is tested using the IEEE first benchmark model for subsynchronous oscillations, and it is found that, with the proposed mode of control, the SMES unit can effectively restore power system stability. (author)

  17. DSTATCOM with Flywheel Energy Storage System for wind energy applications: Control design and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suvire, G.O.; Mercado, P.E. [CONICET, Instituto de Energia Electrica, Universidad Nacional de San Juan, San Juan (Argentina)

    2010-03-15

    In this work, the use of a Distribution Static Synchronous Compensator (DSTATCOM) coupled with a Flywheel Energy Storage System (FESS) is proposed to mitigate problems introduced by wind generation in the electric system. A dynamic model of the DSTATCOM/FESS device is introduced and a multi-level control technique is proposed. This control technique presents one control mode for active power and two control modes for reactive power, power factor correction, and voltage control. Tests of dynamic response of the device are conducted, and performance characteristics are studied taking into consideration variations of power references. Moreover, the behaviour of the device is analyzed when combined with wind generation in the electric system. The results obtained demonstrate a good performance of the model developed and of the control technique proposed as well as a high effectiveness of the device to mitigate problems introduced by wind generation. (author)

  18. A Note on Interfacing Object Warehouses and Mass Storage Systems for Data Mining Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Robert L.; Northcutt, Dave

    1996-01-01

    Data mining is the automatic discovery of patterns, associations, and anomalies in data sets. Data mining requires numerically and statistically intensive queries. Our assumption is that data mining requires a specialized data management infrastructure to support the aforementioned intensive queries, but because of the sizes of data involved, this infrastructure is layered over a hierarchical storage system. In this paper, we discuss the architecture of a system which is layered for modularity, but exploits specialized lightweight services to maintain efficiency. Rather than use a full functioned database for example, we use light weight object services specialized for data mining. We propose using information repositories between layers so that components on either side of the layer can access information in the repositories to assist in making decisions about data layout, the caching and migration of data, the scheduling of queries, and related matters.

  19. Copper vanadate nanowires-based MIS capacitors: Synthesis, characterization, and their electrical charge storage applications

    KAUST Repository

    Shahid, Muhammad

    2013-07-14

    Copper vanadate (CVO) nanowires were grown on Si/SiO2 substrates by thermal annealing technique. A thin film of a CVO precursor at 550 C under an ambient atmosphere could also be prepared. The electrical properties of the nanowires embedded in the dielectrical layer were examined by capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements. The C-V curves for Au/CVO nanowires embedded in an hafnium oxide layer/SiO2/p-Si capacitor at 298 K showed a clockwise hysteresis loop when the gate bias was swept cyclically. The hysteresis characteristics were studied further at different frequencies, which clearly indicated that the traps in the nanowires have a large charging-discharging time and thus the as-synthesized nanowires can be utilized for electrical charge storage devices. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

  20. Scalable fabrication of silicon nanotubes and their application to energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Jung-Keun; Jung, Yeon Sik [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jongsoon; Kang, Kisuk [Dept. Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-23

    The facile synthesis of silicon nanotubes using a surface sol-gel reaction on pyridine nanowire templates is reported and their performance for energy storage is investigated. Organic-inorganic hybrid pyridine/silica core-shell nanowires prepared using surface sol-gel reaction were converted to silica nanotubes by pyrolysis in air; this was followed by the reduction to silicon nanotubes via magnesiothermic reaction. The electrochemical activity of the obtained silicon nanotubes showed excellent cycle stability, suggesting that the hollow one-dimensional structure would be a good candidate for a high-capacity anode for a lithium ion battery. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)