WorldWideScience

Sample records for appendage domain critical

  1. Archaeal surface appendages: their function and the critical role of N-linked glycosylation in their assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrell, Ken F.; Nair, Divya B.; Jones, Gareth M.; Aizawa, S.-I.; Chong, James J. P.; Stark, Meg; Logan, Susan M.; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Kelly, John F.

    2011-10-01

    Many cultivated archaea are extremophiles and, as such, various archaea inhabit some of the most inhospitable niches on the planet in terms of temperature, pH, salinity and anaerobiosis. Different archaeal species have been shown to produce a number of unusual and sometimes unique surface structures. The best studied of these are flagella which are fundamentally different from bacterial flagella and instead bear numerous similarities to bacterial type IV pili in their structure and likely assembly. The major structural proteins, flagellins, are made as preproteins with type IV pilin-like signal peptides processed by a specific signal peptidase. In addition, the flagellins are glycoproteins with attached N-linked glycans. Both of these posttranslational modifications have been studied in the anaerobic archaeon, Methanococcus maripaludis, an organism which also possesses other surface appendages, an unusual version of type IV pili, whose major constituents are also glycoproteins. Analysis of mutants unable to make either or both of flagella and pili demonstrated that both are essential for attachment to surfaces. A number of mutants defective in the assembly and biosynthesis of the tetrasaccharide N-linked to the flagellins have been isolated. Investigations of these mutants by electron microscopy, mass spectrometry and motility assays have demonstrated that flagellins possessing no attached glycan or a glycan truncated to a single sugar cannot assemble flagella on their surface. Mutants which can attach a glycan of 2 or 3 sugars to flagellins assemble flagella but they are impaired in their swimming compared with wildtype cells which attach the tetrasaccharide to their flagellins.

  2. Left atrial appendage occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Mirdamadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Left atrial appendage (LAA occlusion is a treatment strategy to prevent blood clot formation in atrial appendage. Although, LAA occlusion usually was done by catheter-based techniques, especially percutaneous trans-luminal mitral commissurotomy (PTMC, it can be done during closed and open mitral valve commissurotomy (CMVC, OMVC and mitral valve replacement (MVR too. Nowadays, PTMC is performed as an optimal management of severe mitral stenosis (MS and many patients currently are treated by PTMC instead of previous surgical methods. One of the most important contraindications of PTMC is presence of clot in LAA. So, each patient who suffers of severe MS is evaluated by Trans-Esophageal Echocardiogram to rule out thrombus in LAA before PTMC. At open heart surgery, replacement of the mitral valve was performed for 49-year-old woman. Also, left atrial appendage occlusion was done during surgery. Immediately after surgery, echocardiography demonstrates an echo imitated the presence of a thrombus in left atrial appendage area, although there was not any evidence of thrombus in pre-pump TEE. We can conclude from this case report that when we suspect of thrombus of left atrial, we should obtain exact history of previous surgery of mitral valve to avoid misdiagnosis clotted LAA, instead of obliterated LAA. Consequently, it can prevent additional evaluations and treatments such as oral anticoagulation and exclusion or postponing surgeries including PTMC.

  3. Family Language Policy--The Critical Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spolsky, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Introducing a pioneering series of studies of family language policy and management, this paper points out that classic language policy dealt almost entirely with the nation-state, although it did recognise the critical role of the family in determining natural intergenerational transmission of a variety. After arguing for the need to look at each…

  4. Evaluating the Appropriateness and Use of Domain Critical Errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad W. Buckendahl

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The consequences associated with the uses and interpretations of scores for many credentialing testing programs have important implications for a range of stakeholders. Within licensure settings specifically, results from examination programs are often one of the final steps in the process of assessing whether individuals will be allowed to enter practice. This article focuses on the concept of domain critical errors and suggests a framework for considering their use in practice. Domain critical errors are defined here as knowledge, skills, abilities, or judgments that are essential to the definition of minimum qualifications in a testing program's pass-'fail decision-making process. Using domain critical errors has psychometric and policy implications, particularly for licensure programs that are mandatory for entry-level practice. Because these errors greatly influence pass-'fail decisions, the measurement community faces an ongoing challenge to promote defensible practices while concurrently providing assessment literacy development about the appropriate design and use of testing methods like domain critical errors.

  5. Four Critical Domains of Accountability for School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemak, Fred; Willians, Joseph M.; Chung, Rita Chi-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Despite recognition of accountability for school counselors, no clear set of interrelated performance measures exists to guide school counselors in collecting and evaluating data that relates to student academic success. This article outlines four critical domains of accountability for school counselors (i.e., grades, attendance, disciplinary…

  6. The critical domain size of stochastic population models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimer, Jody R; Bonsall, Michael B; Maini, Philip K

    2017-02-01

    Identifying the critical domain size necessary for a population to persist is an important question in ecology. Both demographic and environmental stochasticity impact a population's ability to persist. Here we explore ways of including this variability. We study populations with distinct dispersal and sedentary stages, which have traditionally been modelled using a deterministic integrodifference equation (IDE) framework. Individual-based models (IBMs) are the most intuitive stochastic analogues to IDEs but yield few analytic insights. We explore two alternate approaches; one is a scaling up to the population level using the Central Limit Theorem, and the other a variation on both Galton-Watson branching processes and branching processes in random environments. These branching process models closely approximate the IBM and yield insight into the factors determining the critical domain size for a given population subject to stochasticity.

  7. POSSIBLE ROLES OF EPIPLOIC APPENDAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Di Noto

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Historically, only the energy storage function had been attributed to adipose tissue. However, recent studies have shown that it is also able to secrete several substances which act in a paracrine or endocrine manner, contributing to the maintenance of organism’s homeostasis. It has been reported that the visceral fat has distinctive secreting characteristics. Based on previous scientific observations, here we shall describe the possible functional role of epiploic appendages. The epiploic appendages may play an important role in the metabolic regulation and/or in immune defense through the secretion of specific factors, such as leptin and some inflammatory cytokines. Leptin has been seen to be involved both in the regulation of hunger signals, in coordination with the hypothalamus, and in complex immune defense processes. The exact understanding of the behavior of this hormone could play a key role in understanding the functions ascribed to the epiploic appendages.

  8. Primary epiploic appendagitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Augusto Real Martinez

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Primary epiploic appendagitis (PEA is a seldom reported disease caused by spontaneous torsion of one or more epiploic appendices. The aim of this study is to describe two cases of PEA reviewing the main aspects of the diagnosis and treatment of disease. Case report: Case 1 Male patient, 55 years old, obese, with abdominal right iliac fossa (RIF pain for two days. Abdominal examination showed pain on palpation in the RIF with rebound tenderness. Abdominal computed tomography identified lobulated lesion in the cecum, measuring 4.5 cm in diameter, which was suggestive of PEA or early neoplasm of the colon wall. The lapa- roscopic assessment confirmed the diagnosis of PEA and the appendix was removed. The pa- tient had a satisfactory outcome, being discharged on the second postoperative day. Case 2 Female patient, obese, 47 years old, with abdominal pain for six days, with sudden RIF onset. She had pain at palpation with rebound tenderness. Acute diverticulitis was suspected and patient underwent abdominal CT that identified PEA in the sigmoid colon. After expectant management, the patient showed progressive improvement resuming her activities in seven days. PEA is a rarely recalled condition during the investigation of inflammatory acute abdo- men which can be easily recognized by modern imaging methods of assessment. Resumo: Apendagite epiplóica primária (AEP é uma enfermidade raramente descrita, ocasionada pela torção espontânea de um ou mais apêndices epiplóicos. O objetivo deste estudo é descrever dois casos de AEP revisando os principais aspectos do diagnóstico e tratamento da doença. Relato dos Casos: 1° Homem, 55 anos, obeso com dor abdominal em FID há dois dias. No exame do abdômen apresentava dor à palpação na FID e descompressão brusca presente. A tomografia computadorizada do abdômen identificou lesão expansiva no ceco, lobulada, medindo 4,5 cm de diâmetro, suspeitando-se de AEP ou neoplasia primitiva da parede c

  9. Radiologic findings of epiploic appendagitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oztunali, C.; Kara, T.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Epiploic appendagitis is a rare condition characterized by the ischemia and inflammation of the epiploic appendices of the colon. Its clinical features can mimic acute abdominal diseases such as diverticulitis and appendicitis. Objectives: The aim of this report is to present typical ultrasonography (US) and computed tomography (CT) features of this benign disease. Materials and method: A 44 year old man admitted to emergency department with a localized pain to umbilical region. His physical examination revealed rebound tenderness. He had no fever and his laboratory findings were normal. US examination showed a hyperechoic mass with a hypoechoic rim posterior to abdominal wall. Results: He was diagnosed with epiploic appendagitis and CT features confirmed the diagnosis. After a 5-day antibiotic treatment his clinical symptoms resolved. Conclusion: Epiploic appendagitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with an acute onset, localized pain. Because it is managed medically and has a self limited course, recognition of radiologic findings of this entity is important

  10. Prototype cross-domain cyberinfrastructure for the Critical Zone Observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitenack, T.; Zaslavsky, I.; Williams, M. W.; Lehnert, K. A.; Tarboton, D. G.; Schreuders, K.; Aufdenkampe, A. K.; Mayorga, E.

    2011-12-01

    The Critical Zone Observatory (CZO) program is a multi-institutional, collaborative effort to advance scientific understanding of environmental interactions in the critical zone, which extends from bedrock to the atmospheric boundary layer and spans multiple scales and disciplines. An integrated CZO information system that facilitates seamless analysis of hydrology, geochemistry and geomorphology data within and across six CZO sites is being developed. This is comprised of easy to use tools for site data managers to publish their quality controlled data and tools for scientists to identify and access data of interest so that they can use data from multiple sites to address cross discipline and cross CZO hypotheses. It is based on the following principles: (1) building on the experience of environmental observatory projects and leveraging CI development efforts from neighboring disciplines; (2) relying on community standards for data exchange and on state-of-the-art data cataloguing, discovery, integration and visualization tools; (3) preserving the autonomy and minimizing requirements on individual research sites, while creating centralized CI components that achieve cross-CZO integration and are scalable and extensible; (4) ensuring that CZO data are available both in a human-readable form at individual CZO sites and via web services from the centralized components of the system. The current prototype is designed as an evolving, operational system capable of supporting data integration at different interoperability levels: from common dataset-level metadata, which enables data discovery and retrieval regardless of the type or domain system that manages it, to compatible semantics, which ensures that metadata can be unambiguously interpreted in a cross-disciplinary setting, to compatibility at the levels of service interfaces and information model encodings, such as those standardized by the Open Geospatial Consortium, which enables flexible programmatic access to

  11. Cooption of an appendage-patterning gene cassette in the head segmentation of arachnids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setton, Emily V W; Sharma, Prashant P

    2018-04-10

    The jointed appendages of arthropods have facilitated the spectacular diversity and success of this phylum. Key to the regulation of appendage outgrowth is the Krüppel-like factor (KLF)/specificity protein (Sp) family of zinc finger transcription factors. In the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster , the Sp6-9 homolog is activated by Wnt-1/wingless ( wg ) and establishes ventral appendage (leg) fate. Subsequently, Sp6-9 maintains expression of the axial patterning gene Distal-less ( Dll ), which promotes limb outgrowth. Intriguingly, in spiders, Dll has been reported to have a derived role as a segmentation gap gene, but the evolutionary origin and regulation of this function are not understood because functional investigations of the appendage-patterning regulatory network are restricted to insects. We tested the evolutionary conservation of the ancestral appendage-patterning network of arthropods with a functional approach in the spider. RNAi-mediated knockdown of the spider Sp6-9 ortholog resulted in diminution or loss of Dll expression and truncation of appendages, as well as loss of the two body segments specified by the early Dll function. In reciprocal experiments, Dll is shown not to be required for Sp6-9 expression. Knockdown of arrow (Wnt-1 coreceptor) disrupted segmentation and appendage development but did not affect the early Sp6-9 expression domain. Ectopic appendages generated in the spider "abdomen" by knockdown of the Hox gene Antennapedia-1 ( Antp-1 ) expressed Sp6-9 comparably to wild-type walking legs. Our results support ( i ) the evolutionary conservation of an appendage-patterning regulatory network that includes canonical Wnt signaling, Sp6-9 , and Dll and ( ii ) the cooption of the Sp6-9/Dll regulatory cassette in arachnid head segmentation.

  12. Role of the AP2 beta-appendage hub in recruiting partners for clathrin-coated vesicle assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva M Schmid

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Adaptor protein complex 2 alpha and beta-appendage domains act as hubs for the assembly of accessory protein networks involved in clathrin-coated vesicle formation. We identify a large repertoire of beta-appendage interactors by mass spectrometry. These interact with two distinct ligand interaction sites on the beta-appendage (the "top" and "side" sites that bind motifs distinct from those previously identified on the alpha-appendage. We solved the structure of the beta-appendage with a peptide from the accessory protein Eps15 bound to the side site and with a peptide from the accessory cargo adaptor beta-arrestin bound to the top site. We show that accessory proteins can bind simultaneously to multiple appendages, allowing these to cooperate in enhancing ligand avidities that appear to be irreversible in vitro. We now propose that clathrin, which interacts with the beta-appendage, achieves ligand displacement in vivo by self-polymerisation as the coated pit matures. This changes the interaction environment from liquid-phase, affinity-driven interactions, to interactions driven by solid-phase stability ("matricity". Accessory proteins that interact solely with the appendages are thereby displaced to areas of the coated pit where clathrin has not yet polymerised. However, proteins such as beta-arrestin (non-visual arrestin and autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia protein, which have direct clathrin interactions, will remain in the coated pits with their interacting receptors.

  13. Caecal epiploic appendagitis: an unlikely occurrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macari, M. [Department of Radiology, Abdominal Imaging, NYU School of Medicine, NY (United States)], E-mail: michael.macari@nyumc.org; Laks, S.; Hajdu, C.; Babb, J. [Department of Radiology, Abdominal Imaging, NYU School of Medicine, NY (United States)

    2008-08-15

    Aim: To determine whether epiploic appendagitis occurs in the caecum. Methods: From 2000-2006, 58 cases with classic computed tomography (CT) features of acute epiploic appendagitis (focal round or oval fat density immediately adjacent to the colon with surrounding oedema and stranding, with or without a central area of high attenuation) were identified from a radiology information system and available for review on the picture archiving and communication system (PACS). Cases were assigned to one of six colonic segments: rectum, sigmoid, descending colon, transverse colon, ascending colon, and caecum. The Blyth-Still-Casella procedure was used to derive an exact upper bound on the likelihood of epiploic appendagitis occurring within the caecum. Results: Twenty-eight cases occurred in the sigmoid colon, 16 in the descending colon, four in the transverse colon, and 10 in the ascending colon. No cases of acute epiploic appendagitis were identified in the caecum. Four cases of prospectively dictated caecal epiploic appendagitis were identified from the database. Retrospective review of these cases showed two cases to be epiploic appendagitis of the ascending colon. The third case demonstrated peritoneal thickening without evidence of an inflamed epiploic appendage. The fourth case was caecal diverticulitis. Based on these findings there is 95% confidence that no more than 4.6% of patients with epiploic appendagitis will show this condition within the caecum. Conclusion: In the authors' experience, epiploic appendagitis does not occur in the caecum. Therefore, it is an unlikely cause for an inflammatory process in this region and other conditions should be considered.

  14. Caecal epiploic appendagitis: an unlikely occurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macari, M.; Laks, S.; Hajdu, C.; Babb, J.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether epiploic appendagitis occurs in the caecum. Methods: From 2000-2006, 58 cases with classic computed tomography (CT) features of acute epiploic appendagitis (focal round or oval fat density immediately adjacent to the colon with surrounding oedema and stranding, with or without a central area of high attenuation) were identified from a radiology information system and available for review on the picture archiving and communication system (PACS). Cases were assigned to one of six colonic segments: rectum, sigmoid, descending colon, transverse colon, ascending colon, and caecum. The Blyth-Still-Casella procedure was used to derive an exact upper bound on the likelihood of epiploic appendagitis occurring within the caecum. Results: Twenty-eight cases occurred in the sigmoid colon, 16 in the descending colon, four in the transverse colon, and 10 in the ascending colon. No cases of acute epiploic appendagitis were identified in the caecum. Four cases of prospectively dictated caecal epiploic appendagitis were identified from the database. Retrospective review of these cases showed two cases to be epiploic appendagitis of the ascending colon. The third case demonstrated peritoneal thickening without evidence of an inflamed epiploic appendage. The fourth case was caecal diverticulitis. Based on these findings there is 95% confidence that no more than 4.6% of patients with epiploic appendagitis will show this condition within the caecum. Conclusion: In the authors' experience, epiploic appendagitis does not occur in the caecum. Therefore, it is an unlikely cause for an inflammatory process in this region and other conditions should be considered

  15. Passive appendages aid locomotion through symmetry breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Shervin; Lacis, Ugis; Mazzino, Andrea; Kellay, Hamid; Brosse, Nicolas; Lundell, Fredrik; Ingremeau, Francois

    2014-11-01

    Plants and animals use plumes, barbs, tails, feathers, hairs, fins, and other types of appendages to aid locomotion. Despite their enormous variation, passive appendages may contribute to locomotion by exploiting the same physical mechanism. We present a new mechanism that applies to body appendages surrounded by a separated flow, which often develops behind moving bodies larger than a few millimeters. We use theory, experiments, and numerical simulations to show that bodies with protrusions turn and drift by exploiting a symmetry-breaking instability similar to the instability of an inverted pendulum. Our model explains why the straight position of an appendage in flowing fluid is unstable and how it stabilizes either to the left or right of the incoming fluid flow direction. The discovery suggests a new mechanism of locomotion that may be relevant for certain organisms; for example, how plumed seeds may drift without wind and how motile animals may passively reorient themselves.

  16. Critical current density of domain wall oscillation due to spin-transfer torque

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taniguchi, T; Imamura, H, E-mail: tomohiro-taniguchi@aist.go.jp, E-mail: h-imamura@aist.go.jp [Nanosystem Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2011-04-01

    The domain wall oscillation due to spin-transfer torque was studied by numerically solving the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation. For a domain wall whose rotation angle {theta}{sub max} is less than 180{sup 0}, we found the existence of the critical current density above which the magnetization dynamics are induced. We studied the dependence of the critical current density on the rotation angle {theta}{sub max} and found that the critical current density is proportional to 180{sup 0} - {theta}{sub max}.

  17. Cellular plasticity during vertebrate appendage regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaghan, James R; Maden, Malcolm

    2013-01-01

    Many vertebrates have the amazing ability to regenerate all or portions of appendages including limbs, tails, fins, and digits. Unfortunately, our understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of appendage regeneration is severely lacking. However, recent technological advances that facilitate the tracking of cell lineages in vivo through space and time are allowing us to address the unknowns of regeneration, such as characterizing the cells that contribute to regeneration and identifying the tissues these cells differentiate into during regeneration. Here, we describe the experiments and the surprisingly uniform results that have emerged across diverse vertebrate species when specific cell lineages have been tracked during vertebrate appendage regeneration. These investigations show that vertebrates, from zebrafish to salamanders to mammals, utilize a limited amount of cellular plasticity to regenerate missing appendages. The universal approach to appendage regeneration is not to generate pluripotent cells that then differentiate into the new organ, but instead to generate lineage-restricted cells that are propagated in a progenitor-like state. Lessons learned from these natural cases of complex tissue regeneration might inform regenerative medicine on the best approach for re-growing complex tissues.

  18. Passive appendages generate drift through symmetry breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lācis, U.; Brosse, N.; Ingremeau, F.; Mazzino, A.; Lundell, F.; Kellay, H.; Bagheri, S.

    2014-10-01

    Plants and animals use plumes, barbs, tails, feathers, hairs and fins to aid locomotion. Many of these appendages are not actively controlled, instead they have to interact passively with the surrounding fluid to generate motion. Here, we use theory, experiments and numerical simulations to show that an object with a protrusion in a separated flow drifts sideways by exploiting a symmetry-breaking instability similar to the instability of an inverted pendulum. Our model explains why the straight position of an appendage in a fluid flow is unstable and how it stabilizes either to the left or right of the incoming flow direction. It is plausible that organisms with appendages in a separated flow use this newly discovered mechanism for locomotion; examples include the drift of plumed seeds without wind and the passive reorientation of motile animals.

  19. Epiploic appendagitis. Report of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talukdar, R.; Saikia, N.; Mazumder, S.; Gupta, C.; Khanna, S.; Chaudhuri, D.; Bhullar, S.S.; Kumar, A.

    2007-01-01

    Epiploic appendagitis (EA) refers to primary or secondary inflammatory disease of the epiploic appendages: peritoneal pouches of subserosal fat, which run in parallel rows beside the taenia coli of the colon. It is an uncommon but self-limiting condition, which often mimics acute appendicitis or diverticulitis. An accurate diagnosis of EA can be made by performing an abdominal computed tomography scan. Establishing a correct preoperative diagnosis is important to avoid unnecessary exploratory laparoscopy or laparotomy. We report two cases of EA, which to our knowledge represent the first documented cases from India. (author)

  20. The STI and UBA Domains of UBQLN1 Are Critical Determinants of Substrate Interaction and Proteostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurlawala, Zimple; Shah, Parag P; Shah, Charmi; Beverly, Levi J

    2017-08-01

    There are five Ubiquilin proteins (UBQLN1-4, UBQLN-L), which are evolutionarily conserved and structurally similar. UBQLN proteins have three functional domains: N-terminal ubiquitin-like domain (UBL), C-terminal ubiquitin-associated domain (UBA), and STI chaperone-like regions in the middle. Alterations in UBQLN1 gene have been detected in a variety of disorders ranging from Alzheimer's disease to cancer. UBQLN1 has been largely studied in neurodegenerative disorders in the context of protein quality control. Several studies have hypothesized that the UBA domain of UBQLN1 binds to poly-ubiquitin chains of substrate and shuttles it to the proteasome via its UBL domain for degradation. UBQLN1 either facilitates degradation (Ataxin3, EPS15) or stabilizes (PSEN1/2, BCLb) substrates it binds to. The signal that determines this fate is unknown and there is conflicting data to support the existing working model of UBQLN1. Using BCLb as a model substrate, we characterized UBQLN1-substrate interaction. We identified the first two STI domains of UBQLN1 as critical for binding to BCLb. Interaction of UBQLN1 with BCLb is independent of ubiquitination of BCLb, but interaction with ubiquitin via UBA domain is required for stabilization of BCLb. Similarly, we showed that UBQLN1 interacts with IGF1R and ESYT2 through the STI domains and stabilizes these proteins through its UBA domain. Interactions that are not dependent on STI domains, for example, UBL mediated interaction with PSMD4 and BAG6, do not appear to be stabilized by UBQLN1. We conclude that fate of substrates that UBQLN1 associates with, is interaction domain specific. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 2261-2270, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Expansion of polyalanine tracts in the QA domain may play a critical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-09-03

    Sep 3, 2015 ... Haliaeetus leucocephalus. 0. −. Gallus gallus. 2. −. +, specie has clavicle; −, specie has no clavicle. polyalanine tracts in the QA domain of RUNX2 may play a critical role in the clavicular development. According to the literature review and evolutionary anal- ysis, we propose that polyalanine tracts in the QA ...

  2. Supplementary inferences from mysid feeding appendage morphology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diet elucidation: Supplementary inferences from mysid feeding appendage morphology. P. Webb* and T.H. Wooldridge. Institute of Coastal Research and Department of Zoology, University of Port Elizabeth, P.O. Box 1600, Port Elizabeth,. 6000 Republic of South Africa. Received 9 August 1988; accepted 24 October 1988.

  3. Malignant Appendage Tumours in Zaria | Samaila | Sudanese ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    They were diagnosed malignant adnexeal tumour of Eccrine sweat gland origin. Conclusion: Malignant appendage tumours showed a higher frequency in middle aged men in this review. A good knowledge and understanding of the pathology, high index of suspicion and immunohistochemical studies should help in ...

  4. Critical Domain Problem for the Reaction–Telegraph Equation Model of Population Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weam Alharbi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A telegraph equation is believed to be an appropriate model of population dynamics as it accounts for the directional persistence of individual animal movement. Being motivated by the problem of habitat fragmentation, which is known to be a major threat to biodiversity that causes species extinction worldwide, we consider the reaction–telegraph equation (i.e., telegraph equation combined with the population growth on a bounded domain with the goal to establish the conditions of species survival. We first show analytically that, in the case of linear growth, the expression for the domain’s critical size coincides with the critical size of the corresponding reaction–diffusion model. We then consider two biologically relevant cases of nonlinear growth, i.e., the logistic growth and the growth with a strong Allee effect. Using extensive numerical simulations, we show that in both cases the critical domain size of the reaction–telegraph equation is larger than the critical domain size of the reaction–diffusion equation. Finally, we discuss possible modifications of the model in order to enhance the positivity of its solutions.

  5. Regulation of the Hsp104 middle domain activity is critical for yeast prion propagation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer E Dulle

    Full Text Available Molecular chaperones play a significant role in preventing protein misfolding and aggregation. Indeed, some protein conformational disorders have been linked to changes in the chaperone network. Curiously, in yeast, chaperones also play a role in promoting prion maintenance and propagation. While many amyloidogenic proteins are associated with disease in mammals, yeast prion proteins, and their ability to undergo conformational conversion into a prion state, are proposed to play a functional role in yeast biology. The chaperone Hsp104, a AAA+ ATPase, is essential for yeast prion propagation. Hsp104 fragments large prion aggregates to generate a population of smaller oligomers that can more readily convert soluble monomer and be transmitted to daughter cells. Here, we show that the middle (M domain of Hsp104, and its mobility, plays an integral part in prion propagation. We generated and characterized mutations in the M-domain of Hsp104 that are predicted to stabilize either a repressed or de-repressed conformation of the M-domain (by analogy to ClpB in bacteria. We show that the predicted stabilization of the repressed conformation inhibits general chaperone activity. Mutation to the de-repressed conformation, however, has differential effects on ATP hydrolysis and disaggregation, suggesting that the M-domain is involved in coupling these two activities. Interestingly, we show that changes in the M-domain differentially affect the propagation of different variants of the [PSI+] and [RNQ+] prions, which indicates that some prion variants are more sensitive to changes in the M-domain mobility than others. Thus, we provide evidence that regulation of the M-domain of Hsp104 is critical for efficient prion propagation. This shows the importance of elucidating the function of the M-domain in order to understand the role of Hsp104 in the propagation of different prions and prion variants.

  6. Examining Cybersecurity of Cyberphysical Systems for Critical Infrastructures Through Work Domain Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Lau, Nathan; Gerdes, Ryan M

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study was to apply work domain analysis for cybersecurity assessment and design of supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems. Adoption of information and communication technology in cyberphysical systems (CPSs) for critical infrastructures enables automated and distributed control but introduces cybersecurity risk. Many CPSs employ SCADA industrial control systems that have become the target of cyberattacks, which inflict physical damage without use of force. Given that absolute security is not feasible for complex systems, cyberintrusions that introduce unanticipated events will occur; a proper response will in turn require human adaptive ability. Therefore, analysis techniques that can support security assessment and human factors engineering are invaluable for defending CPSs. We conducted work domain analysis using the abstraction hierarchy (AH) to model a generic SCADA implementation to identify the functional structures and means-ends relations. We then adopted a case study approach examining the Stuxnet cyberattack by developing and integrating AHs for the uranium enrichment process, SCADA implementation, and malware to investigate the interactions between the three aspects of cybersecurity in CPSs. The AHs for modeling a generic SCADA implementation and studying the Stuxnet cyberattack are useful for mapping attack vectors, identifying deficiencies in security processes and features, and evaluating proposed security solutions with respect to system objectives. Work domain analysis is an effective analytical method for studying cybersecurity of CPSs for critical infrastructures in a psychologically relevant manner. Work domain analysis should be applied to assess cybersecurity risk and inform engineering and user interface design.

  7. CT features of primary epiploic appendagitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Keng Sin; Tan, Andrew Gee Seng; Chen, Kevin K'o Wen; Wong, Siew Kune; Tan, How Ming

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to describe the computed tomography (CT) findings of primary epiploic appendagitis (PEA). Methods: We reviewed the clinical records and CT images of 14 consecutive patients in Singapore who presented with acute abdominal pain from July 2000 to April 2004 and had radiological signs of PEA. Results: Hyperattenuated ring with adjacent fat stranding was present in all the patients. The central high attenuation dot was seen in 42.9% (6/14) of the patients. We observed a lobulated fatty mass in 21.4% (3/14) of our patients. All patients recovered during clinical follow-up. Conclusions: We believe the lobulated appearance of PEA is due to two or more, contiguous infarcted epiploic appendages lying in close proximity. This appearance further aids in the diagnosis of PEA and helps differentiates the condition from omental infarction. Recognizing the CT signs of PEA should allow a confident diagnosis and avoid unnecessary surgery

  8. Primary epiploic appendagitis and fructose malabsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnedl, W J; Lipp, R W; Wallner-Liebmann, S J; Kalmar, P; Szolar, D H; Mangge, H

    2014-12-01

    Primary epiploic appendagitis (PEA) is a rare cause of abdominal acute or subacute complaints. Diagnosis of PEA is made when computed tomography (CT) reveals a characteristic lesion. We report on contrast-enhanced CT images of a patient with PEA and regression of inflammation and the reduction in size of the inflamed appendage over the time period of 4 months. Patients with PEA usually recover without medication or surgical treatment within a few weeks. However, due to continuing bloating and irregular bowel movements we investigated carbohydrate malabsorption and diagnosed a fructose malabsorption. Bloating and irregular bowel movements in this patient with PEA were correlated to carbohydrate malabsorption and were treated successfully with a diet free of culprit carbohydrates.

  9. Primary epiploic appendagitis: US and CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molla, E.; Ripolles, T.; Martinez, M.J.; Morote, V. [Department of Radiology, Hospital Dr. Peset, Valencia (Spain); Rosello-Sastre, E. [Department of Pathology, Hospital Dr. Peset, Valencia (Spain)

    1998-03-27

    A retrospective review is presented of seven cases of epiploic appendagitis, with surgical confirmation in one case. The main clinico-analytical data and the US and CT findings are described, as well as the histopathologic features in the sole case that underwent surgical resection. We also calculated the frequency of this entity in patients undergoing emergency abdominal US on clinical suspicion of diverticulitis. In all seven cases the clinico-analytical evidence was nonspecific (localized acute abdominal pain and slight leukocytosis), mimicking in six cases the clinical presentation of sigmoid diverticulitis and in one case that of acute appendicitis. US imaging findings were characteristic: a hyperechoic mass localized under the point of maximum pain, adjacent to the anterior peritoneal wall and fixed during deep breathing. In none of the cases did color Doppler US show flow. CT findings were also typical and showed a mass with a peripheral hyperattenuated rim surrounding an area of fatty attenuation. Overall 7.1 % of patients investigated to exclude sigmoid diverticulitis finally showed findings of primary epiploic appendagitis. Primary epiploic appendagitis thus shows characteristic US and CT findings that allow its diagnosis and follow-up. This entity is much more frequent than previously reported, especially in patients referred for US to exclude sigmoid diverticulitis. (orig.) With 4 figs., 14 refs.

  10. Primary epiploic appendagitis: US and CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molla, E.; Ripolles, T.; Martinez, M.J.; Morote, V.; Rosello-Sastre, E.

    1998-01-01

    A retrospective review is presented of seven cases of epiploic appendagitis, with surgical confirmation in one case. The main clinico-analytical data and the US and CT findings are described, as well as the histopathologic features in the sole case that underwent surgical resection. We also calculated the frequency of this entity in patients undergoing emergency abdominal US on clinical suspicion of diverticulitis. In all seven cases the clinico-analytical evidence was nonspecific (localized acute abdominal pain and slight leukocytosis), mimicking in six cases the clinical presentation of sigmoid diverticulitis and in one case that of acute appendicitis. US imaging findings were characteristic: a hyperechoic mass localized under the point of maximum pain, adjacent to the anterior peritoneal wall and fixed during deep breathing. In none of the cases did color Doppler US show flow. CT findings were also typical and showed a mass with a peripheral hyperattenuated rim surrounding an area of fatty attenuation. Overall 7.1 % of patients investigated to exclude sigmoid diverticulitis finally showed findings of primary epiploic appendagitis. Primary epiploic appendagitis thus shows characteristic US and CT findings that allow its diagnosis and follow-up. This entity is much more frequent than previously reported, especially in patients referred for US to exclude sigmoid diverticulitis. (orig.)

  11. Variability of the Left Atrial Appendage in Human Hearts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał Kamiński

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation increases the risk of thrombus formation. It is commonly responsible for cerebral stroke whereas less frequently for pulmonary embolism. The aim of the study was to describe the morphology of the left atrial appendage in the human heart with respect to sex, age and weight. Macroscopic examination was carried out on 100 left appendages taken from the hearts of the patients aged 18-77, both sexes. All hearts preserved in 4% water solution of formaldehyde carried neither marks of coronary artery disease nor congenital abnormalities. Three axes of appendage orientation were performed. After the appendage had been cut off, morphological examination was performed in long and perpendicular axes. Measurements of the appendages were taken from anatomical specimens and their silicone casts. We classified the left atrial appendage into 4 morphological groups according to the number of lobes. Most left atrial appendages in female population were composed of 2 lobes. In the male group typically 2 or 3-lobed appendages were observed. The mean left atrial appendage orifice ranged from 12.0 to 16.0 mm and the most significant difference in the orifices between males and females was observed in LAA type 2 (about 3.3 mm. A smaller orifice and narrower, tubular shape of the LAA lobes could explain a higher risk of thrombus formation during nonvalvular atrial fibrillation in women. Knowledge of anatomical variability of the LAA helps diagnose some undefined echoes in the appendage during transesophageal echocardiographic examination.

  12. Factor H C-Terminal Domains Are Critical for Regulation of Platelet/Granulocyte Aggregate Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Z. Blatt

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Platelet/granulocyte aggregates (PGAs increase thromboinflammation in the vasculature, and PGA formation is tightly controlled by the complement alternative pathway (AP negative regulator, Factor H (FH. Mutations in FH are associated with the prothrombotic disease atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS, yet it is unknown whether increased PGA formation contributes to the thrombosis seen in patients with aHUS. Here, flow cytometry assays were used to evaluate the effects of aHUS-related mutations on FH regulation of PGA formation and characterize the mechanism. Utilizing recombinant fragments of FH spanning the entire length of the protein, we mapped the regions of FH most critical for limiting AP activity on the surface of isolated human platelets and neutrophils, as well as the regions most critical for regulating PGA formation in human whole blood stimulated with thrombin receptor-activating peptide (TRAP. FH domains 19–20 were the most critical for limiting AP activity on platelets, neutrophils, and at the platelet/granulocyte interface. The role of FH in PGA formation was attributed to its ability to regulate AP-mediated C5a generation. AHUS-related mutations in domains 19–20 caused differential effects on control of PGA formation and AP activity on platelets and neutrophils. Our data indicate FH C-terminal domains are key for regulating PGA formation, thus increased FH protection may have a beneficial impact on diseases characterized by increased PGA formation, such as cardiovascular disease. Additionally, aHUS-related mutations in domains 19–20 have varying effects on control of TRAP-mediated PGA formation, suggesting that some, but not all, aHUS-related mutations may cause increased PGA formation that contributes to excessive thrombosis in patients with aHUS.

  13. Echocardiographic predictors of left atrial appendage thrombus formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayirala, Srilatha; Kumar, Simi; O'Sullivan, David M; Silverman, David I

    2011-05-01

    Although transesophageal echocardiography is the definitive test for the detection of left atrial (LA) appendage thrombus, transthoracic echocardiography has yet to prove useful for the determination of increased risk for LA appendage thrombus formation. The authors hypothesized that higher LA volume and/or lower left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) might prove valuable as markers of increased risk for LA appendage thrombus formation and tested this hypothesis in a consecutive retrospective series of patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing both transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography. Three hundred thirty-four consecutive patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing transesophageal echocardiography for the detection of LA appendage thrombus were studied. Anticoagulation status, CHADS(2) scores, and echocardiographic parameters were catalogued. The relationship between the presence of LA appendage thrombus and covariates was analyzed using binary logistic regression. LA appendage thrombus was detected in 52 patients (15.6%). A higher CHADS(2) score (odds ratio, 1.45; P LA volume index (odds ratio, 1.02; P = .018), and lower LVEF (odds ratio, 1.02; P = .05) were significant predictors of LA appendage thrombus formation. LA appendage thrombus was not seen in patients with CHADS(2) scores ≤ 1, LVEFs > 55%, and a LA volume indexes LA volume index ≤ 1.5 produced 100% sensitivity for the presence of LA appendage thrombus. The presence of LA appendage thrombus is related to both clinical and echocardiographic variables. Although no single echocardiographic variable discriminated between the presence and absence of LA thrombus, a normal LVEF and normal LA volume index were associated with the absence of LA appendage thrombus formation. For patients with atrial fibrillation with CHADS(2) scores ≤ 1, normal left ventricular systolic function and normal LA volume in combination may be a useful measure for the identification of patients at low risk

  14. Study on the incidence of testicular and epididymal appendages in patients with cryptorchidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Favorito Luciano A.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To study the incidence of testicular and epididymal appendages in patients with cryptorchidism. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We studied 65 patients with cryptorchidism, totalizing 83 testes and 40 patients who had prostate adenocarcinoma and hydrocele (control group, totalizing 55 testes. The following situations were analyzed: I absence of testicular and epididymal appendages, II presence of testicular appendage only, III presence of epididymal appendage, IV presence of testicular and epididymal appendage, V presence of 2 epididymal appendages and 1 testicular appendage and VI presence of paradidymis or vas aberrans of Haller. RESULTS: In patients with cryptorchidism we found testicular appendages in 23 cases (41.8%, epididymal appendages in 9 (16.3%, testicular and epididymal appendage in 8 (14.5%, 2 epididymal appendages and 1 testicular in 1 (1.8% and absence of appendages in 14 (25.4%. In the control group, we found testicular appendages in 29 (34.9%, epididymal appendages in 19 (22.8%, testicular and epididymal appendage in 7 (8.4%, and absence of appendages in 28 (33.7%, we did not find 2 epididymal appendages in this group, and none of the patients in the 2 groups presented paradidymis or vas aberrans of Haller. CONCLUSION: The occurrence of testicular and epididymal appendages is quite variable. There was no statistically significant difference in the incidence and distribution of the testicular and epididymal appendages between patients with cryptorchidism and those from the control group.

  15. [Testicular and epididymal appendages. Contribution about it's embryology and pathogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blesa, E; Moreno, C; Blesa, A; Rodríguez, L; Núñez, R; Cabrera, R

    2003-04-01

    The testicular appendages are structures with biologic activity and with the possibility to become ischaemic or to degenerate before determined stimulus. Laterly, we have seen an apparent increase in our cases of torsion of testicular appendages. The said, together with the questions about embriology and pathogenesis of this structures, encourage us to do this work. 1- Retrospective clinical study of patients operated of torsion of testicular appendages, from January 1984 to December 2001. We asses age, year of operation and clinical features. 2- Prospective clinical study of patients operated of torsion of testicular appendages, between March 1999 and March 2000. We asses age, time of evolution, degree of ischaemia, nutritional status, sexual maturity stage and testicular volume. 3- Inmunocytochemical study of testicular and epididymal appendages. We identified the oestrogen receptors. There is a meaningful increase in the yearly incidence of ischaemia of testicular appendages. The mean age of the patients was 9.3 +/- 2.5 years, similar alone of the study. In the patients of group 2, the mean time of evolution was 49.2 +/- 46.6 hours. The appendages showed oedema and several degrees of ischaemia in the absence of torsion (14/21). The body mass index was 19.5 +/- 3.7, and 90% of patients had stages I and II of Tanner. The mean of testicular volume was 2.1 +/- 1.6 ml. By means of inmunocytochemical study we identified oestrogen receptors in 7 of all testicular appendages studied and absence of oestrogen receptors in all epididymal appendages. The clinical syndrome of the acute scrotum in the majority of cases is due to oedema and ischemia of the appendages, in absence of torsion, probably related to its enlargement in response to hormonal stimulation, at least in some grade, in prepubertal boys. The difference found, related to oestrogen receptors, suggest a different origin for testicular and epididymal appendages.

  16. Passive control of a sphere by complex-shaped appendages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Shervin; Lacis, Ugis; Olivieri, Stefano; Mazzino, Andrea

    2015-11-01

    Appendages of various shapes and sizes (e.g. plumes, barbs, tails, feathers, hairs, fins) play an important role in dispersion and locomotion. In our previous work (Lacis, U. et al. Passive appendages generate drift through symmetry breaking. Nat. Commun. 5:5310, doi: 10.1038/ncomms6310, 2014), we showed that a free-falling cylinder with a splitter plate turns and drifts due to a symmetry-breaking instability (called inverted-pendulum instability or IPL). In other words, in a separated flow, the straight position of a short splitter plate is unstable and as a consequence a side force and a torque are induced on the cylinder. In this work, we seek the three-dimensional (3D) appendage shape (on a sphere at Re =200) that induces the largest drift of the sphere. We find that highly non-trivial shapes of appendages on a sphere increase the side force significantly compared to trivial shapes (such as an elliptic sheet). We also find that appendages may be designed to generate drift in either direction, that is, a free-falling sphere can drift either in the direction in which appendage is tilted or in the opposite direction depending on the particular geometry of the appendage. We discuss the physical mechanisms behind these optimal appendage shapes in the context of the IPL instability.

  17. Multidetector computed tomography diagnosis of primary and secondary epiploic appendagitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osada, Hisato; Ohno, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Wataru

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the epiploic appendages in patients with acute abdomen using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and to determine the incidence of primary and secondary epiploic appendagitis (EA). A radiologist reviewed MDCT images from 1338 patients with acute abdomen for visible epiploic appendages. Two radiologists then reviewed the MDCT images showing inflamed epiploic appendages and diagnosed primary EA, secondary EA, or other conditions by consensus. The CT criteria for primary EA are a round or oval pericolonic fatty lesion with a hyperattenuated rim and adjacent fat stranding, without other causes of inflammation. Secondary EA is diagnosed if an epiploic appendage is found to be due to inflammation from other inflammatory entities. Epiploic appendages were identified in 19 patients. Four patients (0.3%) had a retrospective CT diagnosis of primary EA. Twelve patients (0.9%) had a retrospective CT diagnosis of secondary EA (primary condition was diverticulitis in 10 patients and inflammatory bowel disease in 2 patients). The remaining three patients had calcification of an epiploic appendage suggestive of old EA. Primary EA should be included in the differential diagnosis of acute abdomen. Occasionally, inflammation of the epiploic appendages is secondary to other inflammatory conditions. (author)

  18. Expansion of polyalanine tracts in the QA domain may play a critical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-09-03

    Sep 3, 2015 ... According to the analysis of the protein structure, RUNX2 has several functional domains: QA domain, runt domain, nuclear localization signal (NSL),. PST domain, VWRPY and nuclear matrix targeting sequence. (NMTS). The QA domain, a stretch of 23 polyglutamine and 17 polyalanine tracts, is located in ...

  19. Discoidin domain receptor 2 is a critical regulator of epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Logan A.; Nawshad, Ali; Medici, Damian

    2011-01-01

    Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is a collagen receptor that is expressed during epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a cellular transformation that mediates many stages of embryonic development and disease. However, the functional significance of this receptor in EMT is unknown. Here we show that Transforming Growth Factor-beta1 (TGF-β1), a common stimulator of EMT, promotes increased expression of type I collagen and DDR2. Inhibiting expression of COL1A1 or DDR2 with siRNA is sufficient to perturb activity of the NF-βB and LEF-1 transcription factors and to inhibit EMT and cell migration induced by TGF-β1. Furthermore, knockdown of DDR2 expression with siRNA inhibits EMT directly induced by type I collagen. These data establish a critical role for type I collagen-dependent DDR2 signaling in the regulation of EMT. PMID:21477649

  20. SAS-1 is a C2 domain protein critical for centriole integrity in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas von Tobel

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Centrioles are microtubule-based organelles important for the formation of cilia, flagella and centrosomes. Despite progress in understanding the underlying assembly mechanisms, how centriole integrity is ensured is incompletely understood, including in sperm cells, where such integrity is particularly critical. We identified C. elegans sas-1 in a genetic screen as a locus required for bipolar spindle assembly in the early embryo. Our analysis reveals that sperm-derived sas-1 mutant centrioles lose their integrity shortly after fertilization, and that a related defect occurs when maternal sas-1 function is lacking. We establish that sas-1 encodes a C2 domain containing protein that localizes to centrioles in C. elegans, and which can bind and stabilize microtubules when expressed in human cells. Moreover, we uncover that SAS-1 is related to C2CD3, a protein required for complete centriole formation in human cells and affected in a type of oral-facial-digital (OFD syndrome.

  1. Influence of temperature on the critical in-plane field range for VBLs in the walls of hard domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nie, X.F.; Guo, G.X.; Xu, J.P.; Liu, S.P.; Wang, L.N.; Huo, S.G.

    2006-01-01

    The influence of temperature on the critical in-plane field range for vertical Bloch lines in the walls of three kinds of hard domains is investigated experimentally. It is found that for each kind of three hard domains, there exists a critical in-plane field range, i. e. [H ip (1) (T),H ip (2) (T)], which depends on temperatures and in which vertical Bloch lines are unstable. Here, H ip (1) (T) is the initial critical in-plane field where VBLs in the walls of three kinds of hard domains are annihilated, and H ip (2) (T) is the lowest in-plane field where VBLs in their corresponding hard domains are annihilated completely. H ip (1) (T), H ip (2) (T) and [H ip (1) (T),H ip (2) (T)], all decrease as the temperature increase. Furthermore, H ip (1) (T) and H ip (2) (T) reach zero at T 0 1 and T 0 , respectively. In addition, there exists a relationship among them, when T is unchanged, H ip (1) (T) of the three kinds of hard domains (ordinary hard bubbles (OHB), first kind of dumbbell domain (ID) and second kind of dumbbell domains (IID)) decrease successively, and theirH ip (2) (T) are the same

  2. Structural insights of ZIP4 extracellular domain critical for optimal zinc transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tuo; Sui, Dexin; Hu, Jian

    2016-06-01

    The ZIP zinc transporter family is responsible for zinc uptake from the extracellular milieu or intracellular vesicles. The LIV-1 subfamily, containing nine out of the 14 human ZIP proteins, is featured with a large extracellular domain (ECD). The critical role of the ECD is manifested by disease-causing mutations on ZIP4, a representative LIV-1 protein. Here we report the first crystal structure of a mammalian ZIP4-ECD, which reveals two structurally independent subdomains and an unprecedented dimer centred at the signature PAL motif. Structure-guided mutagenesis, cell-based zinc uptake assays and mapping of the disease-causing mutations indicate that the two subdomains play pivotal but distinct roles and that the bridging region connecting them is particularly important for ZIP4 function. These findings lead to working hypotheses on how ZIP4-ECD exerts critical functions in zinc transport. The conserved dimeric architecture in ZIP4-ECD is also demonstrated to be a common structural feature among the LIV-1 proteins.

  3. Critical role of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor 3 in vascular repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlaweck, Sebastian; Zimmer, Sebastian; Struck, Rafael [Department of Medicine/Cardiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Bartok, Eva [Institute for Clinical Chemistry and Clinical Pharmacology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Werner, Nikos [Department of Medicine/Cardiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Bauernfeind, Franz [Institute for Clinical Chemistry and Clinical Pharmacology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Latz, Eicke [Institute of Innate Immunity, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Nickenig, Georg [Department of Medicine/Cardiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Hornung, Veit [Institute for Clinical Chemistry and Clinical Pharmacology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Ghanem, Alexander, E-mail: ghanem@uni-bonn.de [Department of Medicine/Cardiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany)

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} NLRP3 is not required for systemic cardiovascular function in healthy mice. {yields} NLRP3 deficiency itself does not affect the functional cardiovascular phenotype and that it does not alter peripheral differential blood counts. {yields} NLRP3 is critical in neointima formation following vascular injury. -- Abstract: Vascular remodeling characterized by hyperproliferative neointima formation is an unfavorable repair process that is triggered by vascular damage. This process is characterized by an increased local inflammatory and proliferative response that critically involves the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}). IL-1{beta} is expressed and cytosolically retained as a procytokine that requires additional processing prior to exerting its pro-inflammatory function. Maturation and release of pro IL-1{beta} is governed by a cytosolic protein scaffold that is known as the inflammasome. Here we show that NLRP3 (NOD-like receptor family, pryin domain containing 3), an important activating component of the inflammasome, is involved in neointima formation after vascular injury. NLRP3 deficiency itself does not affect the functional cardiovascular phenotype and does not alter peripheral differential blood counts. However, neointima development following wire injury of the carotid artery was significantly decreased in NLRP3-deficient mice as compared to wild-type controls. In all, NLRP3 plays a non-redundant role in vascular damage mediated neointima formation. Our data establish NLRP3 as a key player in the response to vascular damage, which could open new avenues to therapeutic intervention.

  4. Critical role of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor 3 in vascular repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlaweck, Sebastian; Zimmer, Sebastian; Struck, Rafael; Bartok, Eva; Werner, Nikos; Bauernfeind, Franz; Latz, Eicke; Nickenig, Georg; Hornung, Veit; Ghanem, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → NLRP3 is not required for systemic cardiovascular function in healthy mice. → NLRP3 deficiency itself does not affect the functional cardiovascular phenotype and that it does not alter peripheral differential blood counts. → NLRP3 is critical in neointima formation following vascular injury. -- Abstract: Vascular remodeling characterized by hyperproliferative neointima formation is an unfavorable repair process that is triggered by vascular damage. This process is characterized by an increased local inflammatory and proliferative response that critically involves the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β). IL-1β is expressed and cytosolically retained as a procytokine that requires additional processing prior to exerting its pro-inflammatory function. Maturation and release of pro IL-1β is governed by a cytosolic protein scaffold that is known as the inflammasome. Here we show that NLRP3 (NOD-like receptor family, pryin domain containing 3), an important activating component of the inflammasome, is involved in neointima formation after vascular injury. NLRP3 deficiency itself does not affect the functional cardiovascular phenotype and does not alter peripheral differential blood counts. However, neointima development following wire injury of the carotid artery was significantly decreased in NLRP3-deficient mice as compared to wild-type controls. In all, NLRP3 plays a non-redundant role in vascular damage mediated neointima formation. Our data establish NLRP3 as a key player in the response to vascular damage, which could open new avenues to therapeutic intervention.

  5. Model checking of safety-critical software in the nuclear engineering domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahtinen, J.; Valkonen, J.; Björkman, K.; Frits, J.; Niemelä, I.; Heljanko, K.

    2012-01-01

    Instrumentation and control (I and C) systems play a vital role in the operation of safety-critical processes. Digital programmable logic controllers (PLC) enable sophisticated control tasks which sets high requirements for system validation and verification methods. Testing and simulation have an important role in the overall verification of a system but are not suitable for comprehensive evaluation because only a limited number of system behaviors can be analyzed due to time limitations. Testing is also performed too late in the development lifecycle and thus the correction of design errors is expensive. This paper discusses the role of formal methods in software development in the area of nuclear engineering. It puts forward model checking, a computer-aided formal method for verifying the correctness of a system design model, as a promising approach to system verification. The main contribution of the paper is the development of systematic methodology for modeling safety critical systems in the nuclear domain. Two case studies are reviewed, in which we have found errors that were previously not detected. We also discuss the actions that should be taken in order to increase confidence in the model checking process.

  6. Epiploic appendages' inflammation: appendagitis. Report of two cases and literature overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Di Blasi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Epiploic Appendagitis (EA is an uncommon, benign, self-limiting inflammatory process of the epiploic appendices. Other, older terms for the process include appendicitis epiploica and appendagitis, but these terms are used less now in order to avoid confusion with acute appendicitis. Epiploic appendices are small, fat-filled sacs or finger-like projections along the surface of the lower colon and rectum. They may become acutely inflamed as a result of torsion (twisting or venous thrombosis. The inflammation causes pain, often described as sharp or stabbing, located on the left, right, or central regions of the abdomen. There is sometimes nausea and vomiting. The symptoms may mimic those of acute appendicitis, diverticulitis, or cholecystitis. Initial lab studies are usually normal. EA is usually diagnosed incidentally on CT scan which is performed to exclude more serious conditions. Epiploic appendagitis usually does not require surgical intervention. It is self-limiting, the symptoms can be treated with analgesics and subsides in about a week.

  7. Fostering Critical Thinking in the Geosciences: Combining Geoethics, the Affective Domain, Metacognition, and Systems Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogk, D. W.; Geissman, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    There is a compelling need to develop the geoscience workforce of the future to address the "grand challenges" that face humanity. This workforce must have a strong understanding of Earth history, processes and materials and be able to communicate effectively and responsibly to inform public policy and personal and societal actions, particularly with regard to geohazards and natural resources. Curricula to train future geoscientists must be designed to help students develop critical thinking skills across the curriculum, from introductory to senior capstone courses. Students will be challenged in their pre-professional training as geoscientists as they encounter an incomplete geologic record, ambiguity and uncertainty in observed and experimental results, temporal reasoning ("deep time", frequency, recurrence intervals), spatial reasoning (from microns to mountains), and complex system behavior. Four instructional approaches can be combined to address these challenges and help students develop critical thinking skills: 1) Geoethics and ethical decision making includes review and integration of the context/facts of the situation, stakeholders, decision-makers, and possible alternative actions and expected outcomes; 2) The affective domain which encompasses factors such as student motivation to learn, curiosity, fear, attitudes, perceptions, social barriers and values; 3) Metacognition which encourages students to be aware about their own thinking processes, and to develop self-monitoring and self-regulating behaviors; and 4) Systems thinking which requires integrative thinking about the interactions between physical, chemical, biological and human processes, feedback mechanisms and emergent phenomena. Guided inquiry and scaffolded exercises can be used to present increasingly complex situations that require a thorough understanding of geologic principles and processes as applied to issues of societal concern. These approaches are not "owned" by any single course or

  8. Functional analyses in the milkweed bug Oncopeltus fasciatus (Hemiptera) support a role for Wnt signaling in body segmentation but not appendage development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelini, David R; Kaufman, Thomas C

    2005-07-15

    Specification of the proximal-distal (PD) axis of insect appendages is best understood in Drosophila melanogaster, where conserved signaling molecules encoded by the genes decapentaplegic (dpp) and wingless (wg) play key roles. However, the development of appendages from imaginal discs as in Drosophila is a derived state, while more basal insects produce appendages from embryonic limb buds. Therefore, the universality of the Drosophila limb PD axis specification mechanism has been debated since dpp expression in more basal insect species differs dramatically from Drosophila. Here, we test the function of Wnt signaling in the development of the milkweed bug Oncopeltus fasciatus, a species with the basal state of appendage development from limb buds. RNA interference of wg and pangolin (pan) produce defects in the germband and eyes, but not in the appendages. Distal-less and dachshund, two genes regulated by Wg signaling in Drosophila and expressed in specific PD domains along the limbs of both species, are expressed normally in the limbs of pan-depleted Oncopeltus embryos. Despite these apparently paradoxical results, Armadillo protein, the transducer of Wnt signaling, does not accumulate properly in the nuclei of cells in the legs of pan-depleted embryos. In contrast, engrailed RNAi in Oncopeltus produces cuticular and appendage defects similar to Drosophila. Therefore, our data suggest that Wg signaling is functionally conserved in the development of the germband, while it is not essential in the specification of the limb PD axis in Oncopeltus and perhaps basal insects.

  9. A Rare Cause of Abdominal Pain: Primary Epiploic Appendagitis (PEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulbanu Erkan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Primary epiploic appendagitis (PEA is a rare disease caused by torsion or spontaneous thrombosis of the central vein that drains epiploic appendages (EA. Primary Epiploic Appendagitis (PEA is an ischemic infarction. Although PEA is a self-limiting disease and does not require surgical intervention in most cases, it may mimic diseases that require surgical intervention or aggressive medical therapy, such as appendicitis, diverticulitis, or cholecystitis. In order to avoid unnecessary surgical intervention, PEA should be kept in mind when patients present with acute abdominal pain. In this report, we present a PEA case admitted with abdominal pain.

  10. The nucleotide-binding domain of NLRC5 is critical for nuclear import and transactivation activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meissner, Torsten B. [Department of Cancer Immunology and AIDS, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunobiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Li, Amy; Liu, Yuen-Joyce [Department of Cancer Immunology and AIDS, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Gagnon, Etienne [Department of Cancer Immunology and AIDS, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Institut de Recherche en Immunologie et Cancerologie, Departement de Microbiologie et Immunologie, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Canada H3T1J4 (Canada); Kobayashi, Koichi S., E-mail: Koichi_Kobayashi@dfci.harvard.edu [Department of Cancer Immunology and AIDS, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunobiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NLRC5 requires an intact NLS for its function as MHC class I transactivator. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear presence of NLRC5 is required for MHC class I induction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nucleotide-binding controls nuclear import and transactivation activity of NLRC5. -- Abstract: Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II are crucial for the function of the human adaptive immune system. A member of the NLR (nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat) protein family, NLRC5, has recently been identified as a transcriptional regulator of MHC class I and related genes. While a 'master regulator' of MHC class II genes, CIITA, has long been known, NLRC5 specifically associates with and transactivates the proximal promoters of MHC class I genes. In this study, we analyzed the molecular requirements of NLRC5 nuclear import and transactivation activity. We show that NLRC5-mediated MHC class I gene induction requires an intact nuclear localization signal and nuclear distribution of NLRC5. In addition, we find that the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) of NLRC5 is critical not only for nuclear translocation but also for the transactivation of MHC class I genes. Changing the cellular localization of NLRC5 is likely to immediately impact MHC class I expression as well as MHC class I-mediated antigen presentation. NLRC5 may thus provide a promising target for the modulation of MHC class I antigen presentation, especially in the setting of transplant medicine.

  11. Residues in the hendra virus fusion protein transmembrane domain are critical for endocytic recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, Andreea; Carter, James R; Smith, Stacy E; Hellman, Lance; Fried, Michael G; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2012-03-01

    Hendra virus is a highly pathogenic paramyxovirus classified as a biosafety level four agent. The fusion (F) protein of Hendra virus is critical for promoting viral entry and cell-to-cell fusion. To be fusogenically active, Hendra virus F must undergo endocytic recycling and cleavage by the endosomal/lysosomal protease cathepsin L, but the route of Hendra virus F following internalization and the recycling signals involved are poorly understood. We examined the intracellular distribution of Hendra virus F following endocytosis and showed that it is primarily present in Rab5- and Rab4-positive endosomal compartments, suggesting that cathepsin L cleavage occurs in early endosomes. Hendra virus F transmembrane domain (TMD) residues S490 and Y498 were found to be important for correct Hendra virus F recycling, with the hydroxyl group of S490 and the aromatic ring of Y498 important for this process. In addition, changes in association of isolated Hendra virus F TMDs correlated with alterations to Hendra virus F recycling, suggesting that appropriate TMD interactions play an important role in endocytic trafficking.

  12. Comparative Design, Scaling, and Control of Appendages for Inertial Reorientation

    OpenAIRE

    Libby, Thomas; Johnson, Aaron M.; Chang-Siu, Evan; Full, Robert J.; Koditschek, D. E.

    2015-01-01

    This paper develops a comparative framework for the design of actuated inertial appendages for planar, aerial reorientation. We define the Inertial Reorientation template, the simplest model of this behavior, and leverage its linear dynamics to reveal the design constraints linking a task with the body designs capable of completing it. As practicable inertial appendage designs lead to morphology that is generally more complex, we advance a notion of "anchoring" whereby a judicious choice of p...

  13. Mechanical discordance between left atrium and left atrial appendage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Khamooshian

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available During standard transesophageal echocardiographic examinations in sinus rhythm (SR patients, the left atrial appendage (LAA is not routinely assessed with Doppler. Despite having a SR, it is still possible to have irregular activity in the LAA. This situation is even more important for SR patients where assessment of the left atrium is often foregone. We describe a case where we encountered this situation and briefly review how to assess the left atrium and its appendage in such a case scenario.

  14. Critical size dependence of domain formation observed in coarse-grained simulations of bilayers composed of ternary lipid mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantelopulos, George A; Nagai, Tetsuro; Bandara, Asanga; Panahi, Afra; Straub, John E

    2017-09-07

    Model cellular membranes are known to form micro- and macroscale lipid domains dependent on molecular composition. The formation of macroscopic lipid domains by lipid mixtures has been the subject of many simulation investigations. We present a critical study of system size impact on lipid domain phase separation into liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered macroscale domains in ternary lipid mixtures. In the popular di-C16:0 PC:di-C18:2 PC:cholesterol at 35:35:30 ratio mixture, we find systems with a minimum of 1480 lipids to be necessary for the formation of macroscopic phase separated domains and systems of 10 000 lipids to achieve structurally converged conformations similar to the thermodynamic limit. To understand these results and predict the behavior of any mixture forming two phases, we develop and investigate an analytical Flory-Huggins model which is recursively validated using simulation and experimental data. We find that micro- and macroscale domains can coexist in ternary mixtures. Additionally, we analyze the distributions of specific lipid-lipid interactions in each phase, characterizing domain structures proposed based on past experimental studies. These findings offer guidance in selecting appropriate system sizes for the study of phase separations and provide new insights into the nature of domain structure for a popular ternary lipid mixture.

  15. Critical size dependence of domain formation observed in coarse-grained simulations of bilayers composed of ternary lipid mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantelopulos, George A.; Nagai, Tetsuro; Bandara, Asanga; Panahi, Afra; Straub, John E.

    2017-09-01

    Model cellular membranes are known to form micro- and macroscale lipid domains dependent on molecular composition. The formation of macroscopic lipid domains by lipid mixtures has been the subject of many simulation investigations. We present a critical study of system size impact on lipid domain phase separation into liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered macroscale domains in ternary lipid mixtures. In the popular di-C16:0 PC:di-C18:2 PC:cholesterol at 35:35:30 ratio mixture, we find systems with a minimum of 1480 lipids to be necessary for the formation of macroscopic phase separated domains and systems of 10 000 lipids to achieve structurally converged conformations similar to the thermodynamic limit. To understand these results and predict the behavior of any mixture forming two phases, we develop and investigate an analytical Flory-Huggins model which is recursively validated using simulation and experimental data. We find that micro- and macroscale domains can coexist in ternary mixtures. Additionally, we analyze the distributions of specific lipid-lipid interactions in each phase, characterizing domain structures proposed based on past experimental studies. These findings offer guidance in selecting appropriate system sizes for the study of phase separations and provide new insights into the nature of domain structure for a popular ternary lipid mixture.

  16. Critical differences between elective and emergency surgery: identifying domains for quality improvement in emergency general surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Columbus, Alexandra B; Morris, Megan A; Lilley, Elizabeth J; Harlow, Alyssa F; Haider, Adil H; Salim, Ali; Havens, Joaquim M

    2018-04-01

    The objective of our study was to characterize providers' impressions of factors contributing to disproportionate rates of morbidity and mortality in emergency general surgery to identify targets for care quality improvement. Emergency general surgery is characterized by a high-cost burden and disproportionate morbidity and mortality. Factors contributing to these observed disparities are not comprehensively understood and targets for quality improvement have not been formally developed. Using a grounded theory approach, emergency general surgery providers were recruited through purposive-criterion-based sampling to participate in semi-structured interviews and focus groups. Participants were asked to identify contributors to emergency general surgery outcomes, to define effective care for EGS patients, and to describe operating room team structure. Interviews were performed to thematic saturation. Transcripts were iteratively coded and analyzed within and across cases to identify emergent themes. Member checking was performed to establish credibility of the findings. A total of 40 participants from 5 academic hospitals participated in either individual interviews (n = 25 [9 anesthesia, 12 surgery, 4 nursing]) or focus groups (n = 2 [15 nursing]). Emergency general surgery was characterized by an exceptionally high level of variability, which can be subcategorized as patient-variability (acute physiology and comorbidities) and system-variability (operating room resources and workforce). Multidisciplinary communication is identified as a modifier to variability in emergency general surgery; however, nursing is often left out of early communication exchanges. Critical variability in emergency general surgery may impact outcomes. Patient-variability and system-variability, with focus on multidisciplinary communication, represent potential domains for quality improvement in this field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Large system change challenges: addressing complex critical issues in linked physical and social domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Steve; Cornell, Sarah; Hsueh, Joe; Ozer, Ceren; McLachlan, Milla; Birney, Anna

    2015-04-01

    Most action to address contemporary complex challenges, including the urgent issues of global sustainability, occurs piecemeal and without meaningful guidance from leading complex change knowledge and methods. The potential benefit of using such knowledge is greater efficacy of effort and investment. However, this knowledge and its associated tools and methods are under-utilized because understanding about them is low, fragmented between diverse knowledge traditions, and often requires shifts in mindsets and skills from expert-led to participant-based action. We have been engaged in diverse action-oriented research efforts in Large System Change for sustainability. For us, "large" systems can be characterized as large-scale systems - up to global - with many components, of many kinds (physical, biological, institutional, cultural/conceptual), operating at multiple levels, driven by multiple forces, and presenting major challenges for people involved. We see change of such systems as complex challenges, in contrast with simple or complicated problems, or chaotic situations. In other words, issues and sub-systems have unclear boundaries, interact with each other, and are often contradictory; dynamics are non-linear; issues are not "controllable", and "solutions" are "emergent" and often paradoxical. Since choices are opportunity-, power- and value-driven, these social, institutional and cultural factors need to be made explicit in any actionable theory of change. Our emerging network is sharing and building a knowledge base of experience, heuristics, and theories of change from multiple disciplines and practice domains. We will present our views on focal issues for the development of the field of large system change, which include processes of goal-setting and alignment; leverage of systemic transitions and transformation; and the role of choice in influencing critical change processes, when only some sub-systems or levels of the system behave in purposeful ways

  18. Membrane localization is critical for activation of the PICK1 BAR domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kenneth L; Eriksen, Jacob; Milan-Lobo, Laura

    2008-01-01

    was observed both upon truncation of a short putative alpha-helical segment in the linker between the PDZ and the BAR domains and upon coexpression of PICK1 with a transmembrane PDZ ligand, including the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor GluR2 subunit, the GluR2 C....... In agreement with negative regulation of the BAR domain by the N-terminal PDZ domain, PICK1 distributed evenly in the cytoplasm, whereas truncation of the PDZ domain caused BAR domain-dependent redistribution to clusters colocalizing with markers of recycling endosomal compartments. A similar clustering......-terminus transferred to the single transmembrane protein Tac or the dopamine transporter C-terminus transferred to Tac. In contrast, transfer of the GluR2 C-terminus to cyan fluorescent protein, a cytosolic protein, did not elicit BAR domain-dependent clustering. Instead, localizing PICK1 to the membrane...

  19. The WATCHMAN Left Atrial Appendage Closure Device: Technical Considerations and Procedural Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Matthew J

    2018-04-01

    Randomized clinical trials have demonstrated that left atrial appendage (LAA) closure with the WATCHMAN device provides stroke prevention in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation while significantly reducing morality and major bleeding. Technical and procedural considerations are paramount for the therapeutic success. Maximizing procedural safety is critical. Optimal LAA sealing is required. Improvements in procedural technique and operator training have resulted in a marked reduction in adverse procedural events, which should increase the absolute long-term clinical benefit. This article outlines the key aspects of patient workup and procedural technique for the best possible outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Epiploic appendagitis and omental infarction: diagnostic imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvador, Diego; Galvez, Mercedes; Medina, Virginia; Terlecki, Alfredo; Orozco, Santiago; Muino, Gustavo

    2002-01-01

    Segmental infarcts of the omentum and primary epiploic appendagitis are two infrequent causes of non-surgical acute abdomen that are usually confused with other surgical pathologies like diverticulitis, appendicitis or cholecystitis. Both have similar clinic, prognosis and treatment. Between November 1998 and August 2001, 10 cases of epiploic appendagitis and 6 of segmental infarction of the omentum were diagnosed with afterward CT confirmation of 6 epiploic appendagitis and all the segmental infarction of the omentum. One patient presented an association between Schoenlein-Henoch's purpura and segmental infarction of the omentum. All of them were handled in a conservative way. US and CT allow a correct diagnosis, avoiding unnecessary surgery. The main purpose of this paper is to describe the clinic, US and CT features and to correlate our findings to the ones reported in international literature. (author)

  1. DMPD: Critical role of toll-like receptors and nucleotide oligomerisation domain inthe regulation of health and disease. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available and nucleotide oligomerisation domain inthe regulation of health and disease. Pu...bmedID 17535871 Title Critical role of toll-like receptors and nucleotide oligomerisation domain inthe regulation of health...17535871 Critical role of toll-like receptors and nucleotide oligomerisation domain inthe regulation of heal...th and disease. Mitchell JA, Paul-Clark MJ, Clarke GW, McMaster SK, Cartwright N. J

  2. Blunt traumatic left atrial appendage rupture and cardiac herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nhan, Nguyen Huu; Anh, Pham Tho Tuan; Trung, Tran Minh; Pezzella, A Thomas

    2014-06-01

    A 42-year-old man sustained blunt thoracic trauma after a motor vehicle accident. He underwent an urgent operation. Operative findings included a large hematoma, a 4-cm tear in the left atrial appendage, and a long pleuropericardial rupture along the right phrenic nerve. We repaired the left atrial appendage without cardiopulmonary bypass, and closed the pericardial defect primarily. The patient recovered fully and was discharged on the 6th postoperative day. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  3. Intrabody construction and expression. I. The critical role of VL domain stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohage, E; Steipe, B

    1999-09-03

    We have constructed a panel of hyperstable immunoglobulin VL domains by a rational approach of consensus sequence engineering and combining stabilizing point mutations. These prototype domains unfold fully reversibly, even when the conserved structural disulfide bridge is reduced. This has allowed us to probe the factors that limit the expression yield of soluble immunoglobulin domains in the reducing environment of the cytoplasm (intrabodies). The most important factor is thermodynamic stability, and there is an excellent quantitative correlation between stability and yield. Surprisingly, an unprocessed N-terminal methionine residue can severely compromise VL stability, but this problem can be overcome by changing the amino acid following the initiator methionine residue. Transcription from the strong T7 promoter does not increase the amount of soluble material over that obtained from the tetA promoter, but large amounts of inclusions bodies can be obtained. Elevated temperature shifts protein from a productive folding pathway to aggregation. The structural disulfide bridge does not form in the cytoplasm, but the two consensus cysteine residues can be quantitatively oxidized in vitro. In summary, stability engineering provides a plannable route to the high-yield cytoplasmic expression of functional intrabody domains.

  4. Conventional estimating method of earthquake response of mechanical appendage system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Shigeru; Suzuki, Kohei

    1981-01-01

    Generally, for the estimation of the earthquake response of appendage structure system installed in main structure system, the method of floor response analysis using the response spectra at the point of installing the appendage system has been used. On the other hand, the research on the estimation of the earthquake response of appendage system by the statistical procedure based on probability process theory has been reported. The development of a practical method for simply estimating the response is an important subject in aseismatic engineering. In this study, the method of estimating the earthquake response of appendage system in the general case that the natural frequencies of both structure systems were different was investigated. First, it was shown that floor response amplification factor was able to be estimated simply by giving the ratio of the natural frequencies of both structure systems, and its statistical property was clarified. Next, it was elucidated that the procedure of expressing acceleration, velocity and displacement responses with tri-axial response spectra simultaneously was able to be applied to the expression of FRAF. The applicability of this procedure to nonlinear system was examined. (Kako, I.)

  5. Advances in appendage joining techniques for PHWR fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, P.B.; Ray, T.K.; Date, V.G.; Purushotham, D.S.C.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes work carried out at the BARC on the development of a technique to join tiny appendages (spacers and bearing pads) to thin cladding (before loading of UO 2 pellets) by resistance welding for PHWR fuel assemblies. The work includes qualifying the process for production environment, designing prototype equipment for regular production and quality monitoring. In the first phase of development, welding of appendages on UO 2 loaded elements was successfully developed, and is being used in production. Welding of appendages on to empty clad tubes is a superior technique for several reasons. Many problems associated with development of welding on empty tubes were resolved. work was initiated, in the second phase of the development task, to select a suitable technique to join appendages on empty clad tubes without any collapse of thin clad. Several alternatives were reviewed and assessed such as laser, full face welding, shim welding and shrink fitting ring spacers. Selection of a method using a mandrel and a modified electrode geometry was fully developed. Results were optimized and process development successfully completed. Appropriate weld monitoring techniques were also reviewed for their adaptation. This technique is useful for 19, 22 as well as 37 element assemblies. (author)

  6. Occlusion of left atrial appendage in patients with atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. Н. Ганеева

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The article reviews a new method of prophylaxis of thromboembolitic complications, specifically occlusion of left atrial appendage, in patients with atrial fibrillation. Indications and contraindications for the procedure, as well as a step-by-step process of the intervention itself are described. Special emphasis is placed on the up-to-date evidence and the review of clinical trials.

  7. Huge left atrial appendage aneurysm revealed by chronic hiccups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asfalou, Iliyasse; Boumaaz, Meriem; Raissouni, Maha; Sabry, Mohammed; Benyass, Aatif; Zbir, El Mehdi

    2017-10-01

    Left atrial appendage (LAA) aneurysm is an extremely rare anomaly. So far, less than one hundred cases only have been reported worldwide. Revelation modes are dominated by complications such as arrhythmias and thromboembolic events. We herein report a pediatric case of huge congenital LAA aneurysm with an original revelation mode that has never been described before in medical literature.

  8. Ultrasonographic findings of torsed testicular appendages in prepubertal children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Su Mi [Dept. of Radiology, SMG-SNU Boramae Medical Center, Seoul, (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-15

    To characterize the sonographic findings of torsed testicular appendages and to evaluate the sonographic findings in making erroneous diagnosis of epididymitis or torsion of testis in prepubertal children. From June 2010 to November 2012, we retrospectively analyzed the duplex sonography of fifteen children with torsion of testicular appendages. The presence or absence of the extratesticular nodule and secondary inflammatory changes were evaluated. Six patients had follow-up sonography and two patients underwent surgery. Sonography demonstrated the extratesticular nodule in 13 (87%) children. Four of these 13 children were misdiagnosed as epididymitis due to imperceptions of the nodule. Out of remaining two (13%) children without the nodule, one mimicked epididymitis and the other was misdiagnosed as torsion of testis. Secondary inflammatory changes included enlarged epididymis in 14 children (93%), scrotal wall edema in 11 (73%), hydrocele in 10 (67%), and enlarged testis in 3 (20%). Ultrasonographic findings of secondary inflammatory changes in the absence or imperception of the nodules for epididymo-testicular groove or epididymal head may suggest an erroneous diagnosis of epididymitis or torsion of testis in children with torsed testicular appendages. Meticulous evaluation for the nodule is important when differentiating the torsed testicular appendages from the two entities of prepubertal children.

  9. Perigastric appendagitis: CT and clinical features in eight patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Justaniah, A.I.; Scholz, F.J.; Katz, D.S.; Scheirey, C.D.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To describe perigastric appendagitis (PA) on CT as a new and distinct clinical entity to enable recognition and prevent additional unnecessary investigation or intervention. Materials and methods: Institutional review board approval was obtained and informed consent was waived. Retrospective review of the clinical data and CT findings in eight patients with PA encountered over 10 years at one institution was performed. The English literature was reviewed and summarized. Two experienced abdominal radiologists reviewed the CT images by consensus. Results: Seven of eight patients had moderate to severe epigastric pain for 1–7 days. All eight patients (four men, four women; mean age 44 years, range 33–81 years) had no fever or leukocytosis. All underwent abdominal CT which showed ovoid fat inflammation along the course of the perigastric ligaments (gastrohepatic, gastrosplenic, and falciform). Two had gastric wall thickening. Although the inflammation was correctly described, the specific diagnosis was not made on initial interpretation in five patients. Subsequently, they underwent further diagnostic testing [an upper gastrointestinal examination and hepatobiliary iminodiacetic acid (HIDA) cholescintigraphy, an upper endoscopy and MRI examination, HIDA cholescintigraphy, another CT, and an MRI examination, respectively]. The HIDA cholescintigraphy, upper GI examination, and upper endoscopy examinations were normal. No repeated examination was performed on the other three patients. Pain resolved spontaneously in all within two days. Conclusion: Perigastric appendagitis can present with an acute abdomen, which is safely managed conservatively if diagnosed correctly. Radiologists should be aware of the entity to avoid unnecessary intervention, and recognize the CT findings of ovoid fat inflammation in the distribution of the perigastric ligaments. - Highlights: • Normal perigastric ligaments can have fatty appendages. • Torsion of these appendages causes

  10. Internal Domains of Natural Porous Media Revealed: Critical Locations for Transport, Storage, and Chemical Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zachara, John M.; Brantley, Susan L.; Chorover, Jon D.; Ewing, Robert P.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Liu, Chongxuan; Perfect, E.; Rother, Gernot; Stack, Andrew G.

    2016-03-16

    Internal pore domains exist within rocks, lithic fragments, subsurface sediments and soil aggregates. These domains, which we term internal domains in porous media (IDPM), contain a significant fraction of their porosity as nanopores, dominate the reactive surface area of diverse porous media types, and are important locations for chemical reactivity and hydrocarbon storage. Traditionally difficult to interrogate, advances in instrumentation and imaging methods are providing new insights on the physical structures and chemical attributes of IDPM. In this review we: discuss analytical methods to characterize IDPM, evaluate what has been learned about their size distributions, connectivity, and extended structures; determine whether they exhibit unique chemical reactivity; and assess potential for their inclusion in reactive transport models. Three key findings are noteworthy. 1) A combination of methods now allows complete characterization of the porosity spectrum of natural materials and its connectivity; while imaging microscopies are providing three dimensional representations of the interconnected pore network. 2) Chemical reactivity in pores <10 nm is expected to be different from micro and macropores, yet research performed to date is inconclusive on the nature, direction, and magnitude of effect. 3) Existing continuum reactive transport models treat IDPM as a sub-grid feature with average, empirical, scale-dependent parameters; and are not formulated to include detailed information on pore networks. Overall we find that IDPM are key features controlling hydrocarbon release from shales in hydrofracking systems, organic matter stabilization and recalcitrance in soil, weathering and soil formation, and long term inorganic and organic contaminant behavior in the vadose zone and groundwater. We conclude with an assessment of impactful research opportunities to advance understanding of IDPM, and to incorporate their important effects in reactive transport models

  11. Information Architecture Used to Manage Multi-Domain Data Analysis in Intensively Managed Landscape - Critical Zone Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooper, R.; Angelo, B.; Marini, L.; Kumar, P.; Muste, M.

    2016-12-01

    The Intensively Managed Landscapes-Critical Zone Observatory (IML-CZO) is a multi-agency partnership that aims to understand the coevoluationary dynamics of change in the context of the landscape, soil, and biota. The Data Management aspect of IML-CZO provides data preservation and analysis for each of the scientific domains as they pursue environmental monitoring throughout the midwestern United States. Data Management is facilitated via data ingestion and storage through Clowder, an open-source, scalable data repository for organizing and analyzing data; and Geodashboard, a web application that provides exploring, querying, visualizing and downloading the data ingested into Clowder. The data collected covers many domains including geology, hydrology, and bioengineering. The data across these domains varies greatly; from real-time streams of environmental measurements to individual soil samples that are sent through a series of laboratories for analysis. All data can be uploaded to Clowder where metadata can be extracted or dynamically calculated based on the nature of the information. Geodashboard was created to provide scientists with a tool to explore data across these varying domains, and to visualize the extracted data from Clowder. Once Clowder has extracted the data, it is available for querying from a REST API for standardized and streamlined access. Users are able to explore the data on multiple axis, and are able to download data across multiple domains in a standardized format for further analysis and research. IML-CZO's Clowder has over 60 users and over 180 datasets. There are over 1.1 million extracted data points that date back to 1992, and it is continually growing.

  12. Residues in the Hendra Virus Fusion Protein Transmembrane Domain Are Critical for Endocytic Recycling

    OpenAIRE

    Popa, Andreea; Carter, James R.; Smith, Stacy E.; Hellman, Lance; Fried, Michael G.; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2012-01-01

    Hendra virus is a highly pathogenic paramyxovirus classified as a biosafety level four agent. The fusion (F) protein of Hendra virus is critical for promoting viral entry and cell-to-cell fusion. To be fusogenically active, Hendra virus F must undergo endocytic recycling and cleavage by the endosomal/lysosomal protease cathepsin L, but the route of Hendra virus F following internalization and the recycling signals involved are poorly understood. We examined the intracellular distribution of H...

  13. The Arabidopsis PLAT domain protein1 is critically involved in abiotic stress tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyun, Tae Kyung; van der Graaff, Eric; Albacete, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    Despite the completion of the Arabidopsis genome sequence, for only a relatively low percentage of the encoded proteins experimental evidence concerning their function is available. Plant proteins that harbour a single PLAT (Polycystin, Lipoxygenase, Alpha-toxin and Triacylglycerol lipase) domain...... and belong to the PLAT-plant-stress protein family are ubiquitously present in monocot and dicots. However, the function of PLAT-plant-stress proteins is still poorly understood. Therefore, we have assessed the function of the uncharacterised Arabidopsis PLAT-plant-stress family members through a combination...... of functional genetic and physiological approaches. PLAT1 overexpression conferred increased abiotic stress tolerance, including cold, drought and salt stress, while loss-of-function resulted in opposite effects on abiotic stress tolerance. Strikingly, PLAT1 promoted growth under non-stressed conditions...

  14. Critical evaluation of in silico methods for prediction of coiled-coil domains in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chen; Ching Han Chang, Catherine; Nagel, Jeremy; Porebski, Benjamin T; Hayashida, Morihiro; Akutsu, Tatsuya; Song, Jiangning; Buckle, Ashley M

    2016-03-01

    Coiled-coils refer to a bundle of helices coiled together like strands of a rope. It has been estimated that nearly 3% of protein-encoding regions of genes harbour coiled-coil domains (CCDs). Experimental studies have confirmed that CCDs play a fundamental role in subcellular infrastructure and controlling trafficking of eukaryotic cells. Given the importance of coiled-coils, multiple bioinformatics tools have been developed to facilitate the systematic and high-throughput prediction of CCDs in proteins. In this article, we review and compare 12 sequence-based bioinformatics approaches and tools for coiled-coil prediction. These approaches can be categorized into two classes: coiled-coil detection and coiled-coil oligomeric state prediction. We evaluated and compared these methods in terms of their input/output, algorithm, prediction performance, validation methods and software utility. All the independent testing data sets are available at http://lightning.med.monash.edu/coiledcoil/. In addition, we conducted a case study of nine human polyglutamine (PolyQ) disease-related proteins and predicted CCDs and oligomeric states using various predictors. Prediction results for CCDs were highly variable among different predictors. Only two peptides from two proteins were confirmed to be CCDs by majority voting. Both domains were predicted to form dimeric coiled-coils using oligomeric state prediction. We anticipate that this comprehensive analysis will be an insightful resource for structural biologists with limited prior experience in bioinformatics tools, and for bioinformaticians who are interested in designing novel approaches for coiled-coil and its oligomeric state prediction. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. A Rare Cause of Acute Abdominal Pain: Primary Appendagitis Epiploica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarkan Ergun

    2014-03-01

    Primary appendagitis epiploica – one of the causes of acute abdominal pain – is a self-limited rare benign inflammatory condition involving the colonic epiploic appendages. Their therapy is conservative and clinically mimics other conditions requiring surgery such as acute diverticulitis or appendicitis. However, being a quite rare condition is the reason they are usually neglected by both the surgeon and the radiologist. However the computed tomography (CT findings are rather characteristic and pathognomonic. Thus, to consider CT as the diagnostic modality of choice is extremely important in order to diagnose the condition and to avoid unnecessary surgical interventions.             This is a paper reporting an acute abdominal pain case of primary appendicitis epiploica diagnosed using computed tomography. 

  16. Overlay Technique for Transcatheter Left Atrial Appendage Closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuang; Zhu, Mengyun; Lu, Yunlan; Tang, Kai; Zhao, Dongdong; Chen, Wei; Xu, Yawei

    2015-08-01

    The Overlay technique is popular in peripheral artery interventions, but not in coronary or cardiac structural procedures. We present an initial experience using three-episode overlays during a transcatheter left atrial appendage closure. The first overlay was applied to facilitate advancement of the delivery sheath into left atrium. The second overlay was used to navigate the advancement of prepped delivery system containing the compressed occluder into its optimal position in the left atrium. The third overlay facilitated the real-time deployment of the closure device. This case report demonstrates the effectiveness of the overlay technique in facilitating each step of the transcatheter left atrial appendage closure. Copyright © 2015 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Radiological features of epiploic appendagitis and segmental omental infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClure, Mark J.; Khalili, Korosh; Sarrazin, Josee; Hanbidge, Anthony

    2001-01-01

    Epiploic appendagitis and segmental omental infarction are more frequently encountered with the increased use of abdominal ultrasound and Computed tomography (CT) in the radiological assessment of the patient who presents clinically with acute abdominal pain. Recognition of specific imaging abnormalities enables the radiologist to make the correct diagnosis. This is important, as the appropriate management of both conditions is often conservative. Follow-up imaging features correlate with clinical improvement. McClure, M.J. et al. (2001)

  18. Hemostasis of Left Atrial Appendage Bleed With Lariat Device

    OpenAIRE

    Hussain, Amena; Saric, Muhamed; Bernstein, Scott; Holmes, Douglas; Chinitz, Larry

    2014-01-01

    New devices designed for minimally invasive closure of the left atrial appendage (LAA) may be a viable alternative for patients in whom anticoagulation is considered high risk. The Lariat (Sentreheart, Redwood City, CA), which is currently FDA-approved for percutaneous closure of tissue, requires both trans-septal puncture and epicardial access. However it requires no anticoagulation after the procedure. Here we describe a case of effusion and tamponade during a Lariat procedure with successf...

  19. [Epiploic appendagitis: a rare cause of abdominal pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Marín, Andrés; Nofuentes-Riera, Carmen; Mella-Laborde, Mario; Pérez-López, Mercedes; Pérez-Bru, Susana; Rubio-Cerdido, José María

    2014-01-01

    Epiploic appendagitis is an atypical cause of abdominal pain whose knowledge could avoid diagnostic or treatment errors. Diagnosis has been performed with abdominal ultrasound or tomography with the only treatment being nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. To analyze patients diagnosed in our hospital. We performed a 4-year retrospective and descriptive study (March 2009-March 2013) of patients diagnosed with epiploic appendagitis in our hospital. Seventeen patients were included, 14 females and three males with a median age of 57 years. Symptom delay was 72 h. Abdominal pains were located in the left lower quadrant in 64.7% and right lower quadrant in 35.3% of patients. Blood test demonstrated leukocytes 6,300 (5,000-9,500), neutrophils 61.6% (57-65.8), and C reactive protein 1.5 (0.85-2.92). Diagnosis was confirmed with abdominal ultrasound or tomography in 88.2% and intraoperatively in 11.8%. Epiploic appendagitis was more frequent in women. Abdominal pain was located in the lower quadrant, more predominant in left than right. Blood tests were normal except for increased levels of C-reactive protein. Diagnosis was made mostly preoperatively due to imaging tests, avoiding unnecessary surgical intervention.

  20. Kodymirus and the case for convergence of raptorial appendages in Cambrian arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamsdell, James C; Stein, Martin; Selden, Paul A

    2013-09-01

    Kodymirus vagans Chlupáč and Havlíček in Sb Geol Ved Paleontol 6:7-20, 1965 is redescribed as an aglaspidid-like arthropod bearing a single pair of enlarged raptorial appendages, which are shown to be the second cephalic appendage. A number of early Palaeozoic arthropods, recognized from predominantly Cambrian Konservat-Lagerstätten, are known to have borne single pairs of large raptorial appendages. They are well established for the iconic yet problematic anomalocarids, the common megacheirans, and the ubiquitous bivalved Isoxys. Further taxa, such as fuxianhuiids and Branchiocaris, have been reported to have single pairs of specialized cephalic appendages, i.e., appendages differentiated from a largely homonomous limbs series, members of which act in metachronal motion. The homology of these raptorial appendages across these Cambrian arthropods has often been assumed, despite differences in morphology. Thus, anomalocaridids, for instance, have long multiarticulate "frontal appendages" consisting of many articles bearing an armature of paired serial spines, while megacheirans and Isoxys have short "great appendages" consisting of few articles with well-developed endites or elongate fingers. Homology of these appendages would require them to belong to the same cephalic segment. We argue based on morphological evidence that, to the contrary, the raptorial appendages of some of these taxa can be shown to belong to different cephalic segments and are the result of convergence in life habits. K. vagans is yet another important example for this, representing an instance for this morphology from a marginal marine environment.

  1. Identification of a Major Dimorphic Region in the Functionally Critical N-Terminal ID1 Domain of VAR2CSA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Doritchamou

    Full Text Available The VAR2CSA protein of Plasmodium falciparum is transported to and expressed on the infected erythrocyte surface where it plays a key role in placental malaria (PM. It is the current leading candidate for a vaccine to prevent PM. However, the antigenic polymorphism integral to VAR2CSA poses a challenge for vaccine development. Based on detailed analysis of polymorphisms in the sequence of its ligand-binding N-terminal region, currently the main focus for vaccine development, we assessed var2csa from parasite isolates infecting pregnant women. The results reveal for the first time the presence of a major dimorphic region in the functionally critical N-terminal ID1 domain. Parasite isolates expressing VAR2CSA with particular motifs present within this domain are associated with gravidity- and parasite density-related effects. These observations are of particular interest in guiding efforts with respect to optimization of the VAR2CSA-based vaccines currently under development.

  2. Morphogenesis of bacteriophage phi29 of Bacillus subtilis: cleavage and assembly of the neck appendage protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosi, M.E.; Reilly, B.E.; Anderson, D.L.

    1975-01-01

    Each of the 12 neck appendages of the Bacillus subtilis bacteriophage phi 29 consists of a single protein molecular weight of about 75,000, and on the mature virion the appendages are assembled to the lower of two collars. The appendage protein is cleaved from a percursor protein, P(J), with a molecular weight of about 88,000. This cleavage is independent of neck assembly, occurring during infection by mutants that cannot synthesize the proteins of the upper and lower collars of the neck. The cleaved form of the appendage protein is efficiently complemented in vitro to particles lacking appendages. Thus, cleavage of the appendage precursor protein apparently does not occur in situ on the maturing virus

  3. Ferroelectric critical size and vortex domain structures of PbTiO3 nanodots: A density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyuan; Yan, Yabin; Shimada, Takahiro; Wang, Jie; Kitamura, Takayuki

    2018-03-01

    The ferroelectric critical size and microscopic domain structure of PbTiO3 nanodots with unit cells of N × N × N (N = 1-3) have been investigated by ab initio (first-principles) density functional theory calculations. Nanodots with PbO and TiO surface terminations are investigated, and the ground state of TiO-terminated nanodots is found to be paraelectric regardless of the size. However, for PbO-terminated nanodots, the ferroelectric state is energetically favorable even in the smallest nanodot, indicating the absence of an intrinsic critical size for ferroelectricity in the nanodot structure. Moreover, the distributions of polarizations in nanodots with different sizes are analyzed. The vortex polarizations rotating around both the central [001] axis and diagonal [1 1 ¯ 1 ] directions of nanodots can stably exist. The vortex polarization arises from the opposite rotation between the cations and anions around the [001] and the [1 1 ¯ 1 ] directions of nanodots, respectively. On the other hand, the toroidal moments of vortex polarizations both around the [001] and [1 1 ¯ 1 ] directions increase with the increment of nanodot size, and these vortex polarizations are energetically favorable in small and large nanodots, respectively.

  4. Infarcted epiploic appendage of the vermiform appendix masquerading as acute appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnuson, April; Reber, Heather; Reyna, Petra; Ries, David; Aanning, H L

    2006-12-01

    Infrequent causes of right lower quadrant pain that mimic acute appendicitis include infarcted epiploic appendages. Although usually located in the colon, we report the very rare case of an infarcted epiploic appendage located directly on the serosal surface of the appendix itself. In a patient with right lower quadrant pain, the diagnosis of infarcted epiploic appendages is rarely made preoperatively and the incidence is rare. Definitive treatment is excision.

  5. Parametric Time-Domain Methods for the Identification of Vibrating STRUCTURES—A Critical Comparison and Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petsounis, K. A.; Fassois, S. D.

    2001-11-01

    A critical comparison of four stochastic (PEM, 2SLS, LMS, IV) and three deterministic (LS, Prony, ERA) methods for the parametric time-domain identification of vibrating structures from random excitation and noise-corrupted response signals is presented. Concise summaries of the methods, highlighting their principles and realisations, are provided, while the study is based upon a six-degree-of-freedom structural model characterised by two closely spaced modes, two weak modes and a wide range of modal damping. Monte-Carlo experiments under two different (wideband/narrowband) noise environments are performed, along with comparisons with non-parametric frequency domain identification. The stochastic methods—most notably PEM, LMS and IV—are, at the price of increased complexity, shown to lead to potential advantages in non-negligible noise cases, while deterministic methods—most notably Prony and ERA—may suffice under negligible noise. In addition: (a) Model order estimation is shown not to be straightforward, and significant overdetermination is required (especially by the LS). (b) A weak closely spaced mode is hard to identify, while being completely missed by the deterministic methods and the 2SLS. (c) A highly damped mode presents some difficulty as well (mainly for the LS). (d) False modes are exhibited, primarily by the LS (wideband noise) and the ERA (narrowband noise). (e) The achievable estimation accuracy is generally high for the natural frequencies, lower for the damping ratios, and even more so for the residues (mode shapes). Furthermore, accuracy is somewhat lower for the closely spaced modes and significantly lower for the two highly damped modes. (f) PEM, LMS and IV achieve lower bias errors and good overall accuracy, followed by the 2SLS, Prony, ERA and, finally, LS. (g) Unstable modes are mainly exhibited by the IV and ERA. (h) All methods appear sensitive to the selected model order and design parameters, and user expertise is necessary.

  6. Hemostasis of Left Atrial Appendage Bleed With Lariat Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amena Hussain, MD

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available New devices designed for minimally invasive closure of the left atrial appendage (LAA may be a viable alternative for patients in whom anticoagulation is considered high risk. The Lariat (Sentreheart, Redwood City, CA, which is currently FDA-approved for percutaneous closure of tissue, requires both trans-septal puncture and epicardial access. However it requires no anticoagulation after the procedure. Here we describe a case of effusion and tamponade during a Lariat procedure with successful completion of the case and resolution of the effusion.

  7. Hemostasis of left atrial appendage bleed with lariat device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Amena; Saric, Muhamed; Bernstein, Scott; Holmes, Douglas; Chinitz, Larry

    2014-09-01

    New devices designed for minimally invasive closure of the left atrial appendage (LAA) may be a viable alternative for patients in whom anticoagulation is considered high risk. The Lariat (Sentreheart, Redwood City, CA), which is currently FDA-approved for percutaneous closure of tissue, requires both trans-septal puncture and epicardial access. However it requires no anticoagulation after the procedure. Here we describe a case of effusion and tamponade during a Lariat procedure with successful completion of the case and resolution of the effusion.

  8. Left atrial appendage occlusion with the AMPLATZER Amulet device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tzikas, Apostolos; Gafoor, Sameer; Meerkin, David

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: This document aims to describe a standardised methodology for performing left atrial appendage occlusion (LAAO) using the AMPLATZER Amulet device, and to provide useful tips and tricks for operators with different levels of experience. METHODS AND RESULTS: Physicians who are experts in LAAO...... is proposed. Device preparation and de-airing is briefly described, followed by sheath exchange, device deployment steps, evaluation of device stability and decision for final release. The way to recapture and change a device is then shown, together with some additional tips on how to deal with challenging...

  9. Primary epiploic appendagitis: Clinic and radiologic imaging findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Koplay

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Primary epiploic appendagitis (PEA is arare and self-limiting disease that can mimicking acuteapendicitis and diverticulitis because of the clinical symptoms.The present retrospective study was discussed toclinical and radiologic characteristics of PEA.Methods: We reviewed the clinical, laboratory and computedtomography (CT findings of 10 patients with PEAbetween August 2010 and December 2012.Results: Ten patients (1 female and 9 males were diagnosedwith PEA. The average age was 37.1 (15-63years. Abdominal pain was localized to the right (2 cases,20% or left (7 cases, 70% lower quadrants and generalized(1 cases, 10%. All patients were afebrile. Only twopatients showed leukocytosis. There were gastrointestinalsymptoms such as nausea (3 patients and vomiting(1patient. In all cases, a pericolic fatty mass with a hyperattenuated ring was observed on CT. All of the patientswere treated symptomatic.Conlusion: In patients have atypical symptoms and laboratoryvalues with abdominal pain (especially left lowerabdominal pain, PEA should be considered in differentialdiagnosis. For correct diagnosis and avoid unnecessarysurgery, CT must be used in diagnosis because imagingfindings characteristic of the disease.Key words: Primary epiploic appendagitis, imaging, CT

  10. Torsion of abdominal appendages presenting with acute abdominal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Jaberi, Tareq M.; Gharabeih, Kamal I.; Yaghan, Rami J.

    2000-01-01

    Diseases of abnormal appendages are rare causes of abdominal pain in all age groups. Nine patients with torsion and infraction of abdominal appendages were retrospectively reviewed. Four patients had torsion and infarction of the appendices epiploicae, four patients had torsion and infarction of the falciform ligament. The patient with falciform ligament disease represents the first reported case of primary torsion and infarction of the falciform ligament, and the patient with the transverse colon epiplocia represents the first reported case of vibration-induced appendix epiplocia torsion and infarction. The patient with the falciform ligament disease presented with a tender upper abdominal mass and the remaining patients were operated upon with the preoperative diagnosis of acute appendicitis. The presence of normal appendix with free serosanguinous fluid in the peritoneal cavity should raise the possibility of a disease and calls for further evaluation of the intra-abdominal organs. If the diagnosis is suspected preoperatively, CT scan and ultrasound may lead to a correct diagnosis and possibly conservative management. Laparoscopy is playing an increasing diagnostic and therapeutic role in such situations. (author)

  11. Co-occurrence of carbohydrate malabsorption and primary epiploic appendagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnedl, Wolfgang J; Kalmar, Peter; Mangge, Harald; Krause, Robert; Wallner-Liebmann, Sandra J

    2015-09-21

    Unspecific abdominal complaints including bloating and irregular bowel movements may be caused by carbohydrate malabsorption syndromes, e.g., lactose and fructose malabsorption. These symptoms were investigated with hydrogen (H2) breath tests and correlated to carbohydrate malabsorption. During performing these H2-breath tests the patient presented with an acute, localized, non-migratory pain in the left lower abdominal quadrant. Primary epiploic appendagitis is a rare cause of abdominal acute or subacute complaints and diagnosis of primary epiploic appendagitis (PEA) is made when computed tomography reveals a characteristic lesion. We report on a patient with co-occurrence of lactose and fructose malabsorption, which was treated successfully with a diet free of culprit carbohydrates, with PEA recovering without medication or surgical treatment within few days. Since the abdominal unspecific symptoms had been present for months, they appeared not to be correlated to the acute localized abdominal pain, therefore we speculate on a random co-occurrence of combined carbohydrate malabsorption and PEA.

  12. Right Atrial Appendage Aneurysm in a Newborn Diagnosed with Fetal Echocardiography

    OpenAIRE

    Helen Bornaun; Elif Yartaşı Tik; Gonca Keskindemirci; Ali Ekiz; Kazım Öztarhan; Reyhan Dedeoğlu; Merih Çetinkaya

    2016-01-01

    Right atrial appendage aneurysm is a very rare condition which can be asymptomatic or can cause arrhythmia or life-threatening thromboembolism. We report a case of newborn with right atrial appendage aneurysm who was diagnosed with fetal echocardiography. Anticoagulant therapy was applied to prevent thromboembolism and he is still going on follow-up without any complaint.

  13. Right Atrial Appendage Aneurysm in a Newborn Diagnosed with Fetal Echocardiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Bornaun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Right atrial appendage aneurysm is a very rare condition which can be asymptomatic or can cause arrhythmia or life-threatening thromboembolism. We report a case of newborn with right atrial appendage aneurysm who was diagnosed with fetal echocardiography. Anticoagulant therapy was applied to prevent thromboembolism and he is still going on follow-up without any complaint.

  14. High Accuracy Attitude Control System Design for Satellite with Flexible Appendages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenya Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to realize the high accuracy attitude control of satellite with flexible appendages, attitude control system consisting of the controller and structural filter was designed. When the low order vibration frequency of flexible appendages is approximating the bandwidth of attitude control system, the vibration signal will enter the control system through measurement device to bring impact on the accuracy or even the stability. In order to reduce the impact of vibration of appendages on the attitude control system, the structural filter is designed in terms of rejecting the vibration of flexible appendages. Considering the potential problem of in-orbit frequency variation of the flexible appendages, the design method for the adaptive notch filter is proposed based on the in-orbit identification technology. Finally, the simulation results are given to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed design techniques.

  15. A conserved genetic mechanism specifies deutocerebral appendage identity in insects and arachnids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Prashant P.; Tarazona, Oscar A.; Lopez, Davys H.; Schwager, Evelyn E.; Cohn, Martin J.; Wheeler, Ward C.; Extavour, Cassandra G.

    2015-01-01

    The segmental architecture of the arthropod head is one of the most controversial topics in the evolutionary developmental biology of arthropods. The deutocerebral (second) segment of the head is putatively homologous across Arthropoda, as inferred from the segmental distribution of the tripartite brain and the absence of Hox gene expression of this anterior-most, appendage-bearing segment. While this homology statement implies a putative common mechanism for differentiation of deutocerebral appendages across arthropods, experimental data for deutocerebral appendage fate specification are limited to winged insects. Mandibulates (hexapods, crustaceans and myriapods) bear a characteristic pair of antennae on the deutocerebral segment, whereas chelicerates (e.g. spiders, scorpions, harvestmen) bear the eponymous chelicerae. In such hexapods as the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, and the cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus, cephalic appendages are differentiated from the thoracic appendages (legs) by the activity of the appendage patterning gene homothorax (hth). Here we show that embryonic RNA interference against hth in the harvestman Phalangium opilio results in homeonotic chelicera-to-leg transformations, and also in some cases pedipalp-to-leg transformations. In more strongly affected embryos, adjacent appendages undergo fusion and/or truncation, and legs display proximal defects, suggesting conservation of additional functions of hth in patterning the antero-posterior and proximo-distal appendage axes. Expression signal of anterior Hox genes labial, proboscipedia and Deformed is diminished, but not absent, in hth RNAi embryos, consistent with results previously obtained with the insect G. bimaculatus. Our results substantiate a deep homology across arthropods of the mechanism whereby cephalic appendages are differentiated from locomotory appendages. PMID:25948691

  16. Left-atrial-appendage occluder migrates in an asymptomatic patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisani, Paolo; Sandrelli, Luca; Fabbrocini, Mario; Tesler, Ugo Filippo; Medici, Dante

    2014-08-01

    Percutaneous closure of the left atrial appendage (LAA) is a new approach to the prevention of cardioembolic events in patients with atrial fibrillation. We implanted an LAA occlusion device (Amplatzer™ Cardiac Plug) in a 70-year-old woman via a transseptal approach. Upon her discharge from the hospital, a transthoracic echocardiogram showed stable anchoring of the device; 6 months after implantation, a routine transthoracic echocardiogram revealed migration of the occluder into the left ventricular outflow tract, in the absence of symptoms. We surgically removed the device from the mitral subvalvular apparatus and closed the LAA with sutures. This case shows that percutaneous LAA occlusion can result in serious adverse events, including device migration in the absence of signs or symptoms; therefore, careful follow-up monitoring is mandatory.

  17. Characterization of Cerebrovascular Events After Left Atrial Appendage Occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freixa, Xavier; Llull, Laura; Gafoor, Sameer; Cruz-Gonzalez, Ignacio; Shakir, Samera; Omran, Heyder; Berti, Sergio; Santoro, Gennaro; Kefer, Joelle; Landmesser, Ulf; Nielsen-Kudsk, Jens Erik; Kanagaratnam, Prapa; Nietlispach, Fabian; Gloekler, Steffen; Aminian, Adel; Danna, Paolo; Rezzaghi, Marco; Stock, Friederike; Stolcova, Miroslava; Paiva, Luis; Costa, Marco; Millán, Xavier; Ibrahim, Reda; Tichelbäcker, Tobias; Schillinger, Wolfgang; Park, Jai-Wun; Sievert, Horst; Meier, Bernhard; Tzikas, Apostolos

    2016-12-15

    Cardioembolic strokes are generally more lethal and disabling than other source of strokes. Data from PROTECT AF (Watchman Left Atrial Appendage Closure Technology for Embolic Protection in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation) suggest that strokes after left atrial appendage occlusion (LAAO) with the Watchman device are less disabling than those in the warfarin group. No data assessing the severity of strokes after LAAO with the AMPLATZER Cardiac Plug (ACP) are available. The objective of the study was to evaluate the severity of cerebrovascular events after LAAO with the ACP in a population mostly characterized by an absolute or relative contraindication to oral anticoagulation. Data from the ACP multicenter registry were analyzed. Disabling strokes were defined as those with a modified Rankin score of 3 to 6 at 90 days after the event. A total of 1,047 subjects were included. The mean age and CHADS 2 score were 75 ± 8 years and 2.8 ± 1.3, respectively. Procedural success was achieved in 97.3% and 4.9% of the patients presented procedural major adverse events. Clinical follow-up was complete in 98.2% of patients with a median of 13 months. There were 9 strokes (0.9%), 9 transient ischemic attacks (0.9%), and no intracranial hemorrhages (0%) at follow-up. After excluding 2 patients with pre-LAAO disability, functional assessment showed disabling events in 3 (19%) of the remaining 16 patients. The median time of presentation was 420 days (interquartile range 234 to 671) after LAAO, and 17 patients (94%) were on single-antiplatelet therapy when the event occurred. According to our results, cerebrovascular events after LAAO with the ACP system were infrequent and mostly nondisabling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. CX3CL1, a chemokine finely tuned to adhesion: critical roles of the stalk glycosylation and the membrane domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariano A. Ostuni

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The multi-domain CX3CL1 transmembrane chemokine triggers leukocyte adherence without rolling and migration by presenting its chemokine domain (CD to its receptor CX3CR1. Through the combination of functional adhesion assays with structural analysis using FRAP, we investigated the functional role of the other domains of CX3CL1, i.e., its mucin stalk, transmembrane domain, and cytosolic domain. Our results indicate that the CX3CL1 molecular structure is finely adapted to capture CX3CR1 in circulating cells and that each domain has a specific purpose: the mucin stalk is stiffened by its high glycosylation to present the CD away from the membrane, the transmembrane domain generates the permanent aggregation of an adequate amount of monomers to guarantee adhesion and prevent rolling, and the cytosolic domain ensures adhesive robustness by interacting with the cytoskeleton. We propose a model in which quasi-immobile CX3CL1 bundles are organized to quickly generate adhesive patches with sufficiently high strength to capture CX3CR1+ leukocytes but with sufficiently low strength to allow their patrolling behavior.

  19. Acute Appendagitis Presenting with Features of Appendicitis: Value of Abdominal CT Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhpreet Dubb

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of acute appendagitis in a patient who presented initially with typical features of acute appendicitis. The diagnosis of acute appendagitis was made on pathognomonic signs on computed tomography (CT scan. Abdominal pain is a common surgical emergency. CT is not always done if there are clear features of acute appendicitis. The rare but important differential diagnosis of acute appendagitis must be borne in mind when dealing with patients with suspected acute appendicitis. A CT scan of the abdomen may avoid unnecessary surgery in these patients.

  20. Homophilic interactions mediated by receptor tyrosine phosphatases mu and kappa. A critical role for the novel extracellular MAM domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zondag, G C; Koningstein, G M; Jiang, Y P

    1995-01-01

    and is found in diverse transmembrane proteins, is not known. We previously reported that both RPTP mu and RPTP kappa can mediate homophilic cell interactions when expressed in insect cells. Here we show that despite their striking structural similarity, RPTP mu and RPTP kappa fail to interact...... in a heterophilic manner. To examine the role of the MAM domain in homophilic binding, we expressed a mutant RPTP mu lacking the MAM domain in insect Sf9 cells. Truncated RPTP mu is properly expressed at the cell surface but fails to promote cell-cell adhesion. Homophilic cell adhesion is fully restored...... in a chimeric RPTP mu molecule containing the MAM domain of RPTP kappa. However, this chimeric RPTP mu does not interact with either RPTP mu or RPTP kappa. These results indicate that the MAM domain of RPTP mu and RPTP kappa is essential for homophilic cell-cell interaction and helps determine the specificity...

  1. Homophilic interactions mediated by receptor tyrosine phosphatases mu and kappa. A critical role for the novel extracellular MAM domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zondag, G C; Koningstein, G M; Jiang, Y P

    1995-01-01

    and is found in diverse transmembrane proteins, is not known. We previously reported that both RPTP mu and RPTP kappa can mediate homophilic cell interactions when expressed in insect cells. Here we show that despite their striking structural similarity, RPTP mu and RPTP kappa fail to interact......The receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTP) mu and RPTP kappa have a modular ectodomain consisting of four fibronectin type III-like repeats, a single Ig-like domain, and a newly identified N-terminal MAM domain. The function of the latter module, which comprises about 160 amino acids...... in a heterophilic manner. To examine the role of the MAM domain in homophilic binding, we expressed a mutant RPTP mu lacking the MAM domain in insect Sf9 cells. Truncated RPTP mu is properly expressed at the cell surface but fails to promote cell-cell adhesion. Homophilic cell adhesion is fully restored...

  2. The eggshell of the almond wasp Eurytoma amygdali (Hymenoptera, Eurytomidae) - 2. The micropylar appendage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarani, F E; Margaritis, L H

    1994-08-01

    Micropylar apparatuses in insects are specialized regions of the eggshell through which sperm enters the oocyte. This work is an ultrastructural study and deals with the structure and morphogenesis of the micropylar appendage in the hymenopteran Eurytoma amygdali. The micropylar appendage is a 130 microm long cylindrical protrusion located at the posterior pole of the egg, unlike other insects i.e. Diptera. in which the micropylar apparatus is located at the anterior pole. In mature eggs there is a 0.4 microm wide pore (micropyle) at the tip of the appendage leading to a 6 microm wide micropylar canal. The canal contains an electron-lucent substance, it travels along the whole appendage and finally reaches the vitelline membrane of the oocyte. The vitelline membrane is covered by a wax layer and an electron-lucent layer, whereas the chorion surrounding the canal consists of a granular layer (fine and rough) and a columnar layer. The morphogenesis of the appendage starts in immature follicles: four central cells located at the posterior tip of the oocyte near the vitelline membrane, differing morphologically from the adjacent follicle cells. These central cells degenerate during early chorionic stages, thus assisting in the formation of the micropylar canal. The adjacent, peripherally located cells secrete the electron-lucent substance which fills the canal and at the same time, the fine granular layer is formed starting from the base towards the tip of the appendage. The secretion persists at late chorionic stages and results in the formation of the chorion around the micropylar canal. The extremely long (compared to other insects) micropylar appendage seems to facilitate the egg passage through the very thin and long ovipositor. The structure and morphogenesis of this appendage differs significantly from the micropylar apparatuses studied so far in other insects i.e. Diptera, and may reflect adaptational and evolutionary relationships.

  3. Isolated tear in left atrial appendage due to blunt trauma chest: A rare case report

    OpenAIRE

    Salooja, Manpreet S.; Singla, Manender; Srivastava, Anupam; Mukherjee, Kishore C.

    2013-01-01

    Blunt traumatic cardiac rupture is associated with a high mortality rate. Motor vehicle accidents account for most cardiac ruptures, but crush injury is relatively rare. We describe a case of a 72-year-old man who had the left atrial appendage ruptured through blunt trauma due to a fall from scooter. Simple suture repair of the atrial appendage was achieved after clamping the base of the left atrium to control the bleeding. He recovered without complication. Traumatic injury to left atrial ap...

  4. The integumental appendages of the turtle shell: An evo-devo perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Moustakas-Verho, Jacqueline; Cherepanov, Gennadii

    2015-01-01

    The turtle shell is composed of dorsal armor (carapace) and ventral armor (plastron) covered by a keratinized epithelium. There are two epithelial appendages of the turtle shell: scutes (large epidermal shields separated by furrows and forming a unique mosaic) and tubercles (numerous small epidermal bumps located on the carapaces of some species). In our perspective, we take a synthetic, comparative approach to consider the homology and evolution of these integumental appendages. Scutes have ...

  5. NTF2-like domain of Tap plays a critical role in cargo mRNA recognition and export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katahira, Jun; Dimitrova, Lyudmila; Imai, Yumiko; Hurt, Ed

    2015-02-18

    Metazoan Tap-p15 (also called Nxf1-Nxt1) and yeast Mex67-Mtr2 heterodimers are the general mRNA export receptors. The RNA binding activity of Tap-p15, which is essential for mRNA nuclear export, has been attributed to the amino-terminal RNA binding module of Tap consists of RNA recognition motif (RRM) and leucine-rich repeat. In this study, we identified a novel RNA interaction surface in the NTF2-like (NTF2L) domain of Tap, which is analogous to the rRNA binding platform of Mex67-Mtr2. Tap-p15 uses the three domains to tightly bind the retroviral constitutive transport element. The RNA binding through the NTF2L domain is functionally relevant as introduction of mutations in this region reduced CTE-containing mRNA export activity. In contrast, only when the RRM and NTF2L domains were mutated simultaneously, bulk poly (A)(+) RNA export and in vivo poly (A)(+) RNA binding activities of Tap-p15 were significantly attenuated. Moreover, an engineered human cell line harboring the NTF2L domain mutation in the NXF1 gene showed a synthetic growth phenotype and severe mRNA export defect under Aly/REF and Thoc5 depleted condition. These data suggest that Tap-p15 recognizes bulk mRNAs through combinatorial use of the distinct RNA binding domains. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. Different domains of the glucagon and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptors provide the critical determinants of ligand selectivity

    OpenAIRE

    Runge, S; Wulff, B S; Madsen, K; Bräuner-Osborne, H; Knudsen, L B

    2003-01-01

    Glucagon and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) are homologous peptide hormones with important functions in glucose metabolism. The receptors for glucagon and GLP-1 are homologous family B G-protein coupled receptors. The GLP-1 receptor amino-terminal extracellular domain is a major determinant of glucagon/GLP-1 selectivity of the GLP-1 receptor. However, the divergent residues in glucagon and GLP-1 that determine specificity for the GLP-1 receptor amino-terminal extracellular domain are not kno...

  7. Strangulation and Necrosis of an Epiploic Appendage of the Sigmoid Colon in a Right Inguinal Hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri N. Shiryajev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An epiploic appendage of the sigmoid colon is considered to be an unusual type of inguinal hernia content. The strangulation of a sigmoid colon appendage into a right inguinal hernia is exclusively rare. We present a case of an 81-year-old female patient with severe cardiovascular comorbidities who was urgently admitted after an episode of strangulation and subsequent spontaneous reduction of a right inguinal hernia. The condition of the patient was stable, and an urgent operation was not indicated for three days after admission. However, we had to operate because the hernia strangulation recurred. In the hernia sac, a free fatty body (a separated and saponified epiploic appendage of the colon and a strangulated epiploic appendage of dolichosigmoid, with signs of necrosis, were found. Removal of the free fatty body and necrotic epiploic appendage and subsequent anterior-wall inguinal hernioplasty were successfully performed. In the world literature, this case may be the first report of a sigmoid epiploic appendage strangulation in a right inguinal hernia that is well documented by photography.

  8. Photodynamic Therapy and Skin Appendage Disorders: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megna, Matteo; Fabbrocini, Gabriella; Marasca, Claudio; Monfrecola, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a noninvasive treatment that utilizes light treatment along with application of a photosensitizing agent. In dermatology, PDT is commonly used and approved for the treatment of oncological conditions such as actinic keratosis, Bowen disease and superficial basal cell carcinoma. In the last 2 decades however, PDT has also been used for the treatment of several nonneoplastic dermatological diseases. The present review summarizes published data on PDT application in skin appendage disorders. Our literature review shows that: (a) PDT may be a suitable treatment for acne, folliculitis decalvans, hidradenitis suppurativa, nail diseases, and sebaceous hyperplasia; (b) there is a lack of agreement on PDT features (type, concentrations and incubation period of used substances, number and frequency of PDT sessions, optimal parameters of light sources, and patient characteristics [e.g., failure to previous treatments, disease severity, body surface area involved, etc.] which should guide PDT use in these diseases); (c) further research is needed to establish international guidelines helping dermatologists to choose PDT for the right patient at the right time.

  9. Different domains of the glucagon and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptors provide the critical determinants of ligand selectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Runge, S; Wulff, B S; Madsen, K

    2003-01-01

    (1) Glucagon and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) are homologous peptide hormones with important functions in glucose metabolism. The receptors for glucagon and GLP-1 are homologous family B G-protein coupled receptors. The GLP-1 receptor amino-terminal extracellular domain is a major determinant...

  10. Left atrial appendage closure: a new technique for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Camm, A; Colombo, Antonio; Corbucci, Giorgio; Padeletti, Luigi

    2014-03-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia. It is associated with increased risk for stroke mainly due to cardiac embolism from the left atrial appendage (LAA). Occlusion of the LAA by means of a device represents a valid alternative to oral anticoagulation, mainly in patients who cannot tolerate this therapy because of a high bleeding risk. Recent data on the endocardial device WATCHMAN show encouraging results for this patient population in terms of stroke risk reduction compared to the expected rate as well as in terms of implant success. This article reviews all relevant publications related to the main surgical and transcatheter devices used for LAA closure (LAAC). PROTECT-AF, the first prospective randomized trial conducted on this technique, showed that LAA occlusion using the WATCHMAN was noninferior to warfarin for a combined end-point in patients with nonvalvular AF. There is a lack of large-scale randomized trials on long-term stroke risk in patients submitted to LAAC. Most studies are relatively small and focus on the comparison of different surgical techniques with regard to complete/incomplete closure success. More recently, PROTECT-AF long-term results (4-year follow-up) demonstrated that LAAC was statistically superior to warfarin in terms of efficacy. This review concludes that it is now appropriate to consider these techniques for patients with AF who are at high risk for stroke for whom effective conventional or novel anticoagulant therapy is not available or who present problems in managing drug treatment. Copyright © 2014 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Evolution of nubbin function in hemimetabolous and holometabolous insect appendages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchyn, Nataliya; Chesebro, John; Hrycaj, Steven; Couso, Juan P.; Popadić, Aleksandar

    2011-01-01

    Insects display a whole spectrum of morphological diversity, which is especially noticeable in the organization of their appendages. A recent study in a hemipteran, Oncopeltus fasciatus (milkweed bug), showed that nubbin (nub) affects antenna morphogenesis, labial patterning, the length of the femoral segment in legs, and the formation of a limbless abdomen. To further determine the role of this gene in the evolution of insect morphology, we analyzed its functions in two additional hemimetabolous species, Acheta domesticus (house cricket) and Periplaneta americana (cockroach), and re-examined its role in Drosophila. While both Acheta and Periplaneta nub-RNAi first nymphs develop crooked antennae, no visible changes are observed in the morphologies of their mouthparts and abdomen. Instead, the main effect is seen in legs. The joint between the tibia and first tarsomere (Ta-1) is lost in Acheta, which in turn, causes a fusion of these two segments and creates a chimeric nub-RNAi tibia-tarsus that retains a tibial identity in its proximal half and acquires a Ta-1 identity in its distal half. Similarly, our re-analysis of nub function in Drosophila reveals that legs lack all true joints and the fly tibia also exhibits a fused tibia and tarsus. Finally, we observe a similar phenotype in Periplaneta except that it encompasses different joints (coxa-trochanter and femur-tibia), and in this species we also show that nub expression in the legs is regulated by Notch signaling, as had previously been reported in flies and spiders. Overall, we propose that nub acts downstream of Notch on the distal part of insect leg segments to promote their development and growth, which in turn is required for joint formation. Our data represent the first functional evidence defining a role for nub in leg segmentation and highlight the varying degrees of its involvement in this process across insects. PMID:21708143

  12. Mutational analyses of the core domain of Avian Leukemia and Sarcoma Viruses integrase: critical residues for concerted integration and multimerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreau, Karen; Faure, Claudine; Violot, Sebastien; Gouet, Patrice; Verdier, Gerard; Ronfort, Corinne

    2004-01-01

    During replicative cycle of retroviruses, the reverse-transcribed viral DNA is integrated into the cell DNA by the viral integrase (IN) enzyme. The central core domain of IN contains the catalytic site of the enzyme and is involved in binding viral ends and cell DNA as well as dimerization. We previously performed single amino acid substitutions in the core domain of an Avian Leukemia and Sarcoma Virus (ALSV) IN [Arch. Virol. 147 (2002) 1761]. Here, we modeled the resulting IN mutants and analyzed the ability of these mutants to mediate concerted DNA integration in an in vitro assay, and to form dimers by protein-protein cross-linking and size exclusion chromatography. The N197C mutation resulted in the inability of the mutant to perform concerted integration that was concomitant with a loss of IN dimerization. Surprisingly, mutations Q102G and A106V at the dimer interface resulted in mutants with higher efficiencies than the wild-type IN in performing two-ended concerted integration of viral DNA ends. The G139D and A195V mutants had a trend to perform one-ended DNA integration of viral ends instead of two-ended integration. More drastically, the I88L and L135G mutants preferentially mediated nonconcerted DNA integration although the proteins form dimers. Therefore, these mutations may alter the formation of IN complexes of higher molecular size than a dimer that would be required for concerted integration. This study points to the important role of core domain residues in the concerted integration of viral DNA ends as well as in the oligomerization of the enzyme

  13. Distinct regenerative potential of trunk and appendages ofDrosophilamediated by JNK signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Raquel; Pinal, Noelia; Morata, Ginés

    2017-11-01

    The Drosophila body comprises a central part, the trunk, and outgrowths of the trunk, the appendages. Much is known about appendage regeneration, but little about the trunk. As the wing imaginal disc contains a trunk component, the notum, and a wing appendage, we have investigated the response to ablation of these two components. We find that, in contrast with the strong regenerative response of the wing, the notum does not regenerate. Nevertheless, the elimination of the wing primordium elicits a proliferative response of notum cells, but they do not regenerate wing; they form a notum duplicate. Conversely, the wing cells cannot regenerate an ablated notum; they overproliferate and generate a hinge overgrowth. These results suggest that trunk and appendages cannot be reprogrammed to generate each other. Our experiments demonstrate that the proliferative response is mediated by JNK signalling from dying cells, but JNK functions differently in the trunk and the appendages, which may explain their distinct regenerative potential. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. Relative uptake of minoxidil into appendages and stratum corneum and permeation through human skin in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grice, Jeffrey E; Ciotti, Susan; Weiner, Norman; Lockwood, Peter; Cross, Sheree E; Roberts, Michael S

    2010-02-01

    We examined uptake of the model therapeutic agent, minoxidil, into appendages, stratum corneum (SC), and through human skin, under the influence of different vehicles. Quantitative estimation of therapeutic drug deposition into all three areas has not previously been reported. Finite doses of minoxidil (2%, w/v) in formulations containing varying amounts of ethanol, propylene glycol (PG), and water (60:20:20, 80:20:0, and 0:80:20 by volume, respectively) were used. Minoxidil in SC (by tape stripping), appendages (by cyanoacrylate casting), and receptor fluid was determined by liquid scintillation counting. At early times (30 min, 2 h), ethanol-containing formulations (60:20:20 and 80:20:0) caused significantly greater minoxidil retention in SC and appendages, compared to the formulation lacking ethanol (0:80:20). A significant increase in minoxidil receptor penetration occurred with the PG-rich 0:80:20 formulation after 12 h. We showed that deposition of minoxidil into appendages, SC, and skin penetration into receptor fluid were similar in magnitude. Transport by the appendageal route is likely to be a key determinant of hair growth promotion by minoxidil. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  15. The interaction between the first transmembrane domain and the thumb of ASIC1a is critical for its N-glycosylation and trafficking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Jing

    Full Text Available Acid-sensing ion channel-1a (ASIC1a, the primary proton receptor in the brain, contributes to multiple diseases including stroke, epilepsy and multiple sclerosis. Thus, a better understanding of its biogenesis will provide important insights into the regulation of ASIC1a in diseases. Interestingly, ASIC1a contains a large, yet well organized ectodomain, which suggests the hypothesis that correct formation of domain-domain interactions at the extracellular side is a key regulatory step for ASIC1a maturation and trafficking. We tested this hypothesis here by focusing on the interaction between the first transmembrane domain (TM1 and the thumb of ASIC1a, an interaction known to be critical in channel gating. We mutated Tyr71 and Trp287, two key residues involved in the TM1-thumb interaction in mouse ASIC1a, and found that both Y71G and W287G decreased synaptic targeting and surface expression of ASIC1a. These defects were likely due to altered folding; both mutants showed increased resistance to tryptic cleavage, suggesting a change in conformation. Moreover, both mutants lacked the maturation of N-linked glycans through mid to late Golgi. These data suggest that disrupting the interaction between TM1 and thumb alters ASIC1a folding, impedes its glycosylation and reduces its trafficking. Moreover, reducing the culture temperature, an approach commonly used to facilitate protein folding, increased ASIC1a glycosylation, surface expression, current density and slowed the rate of desensitization. These results suggest that correct folding of extracellular ectodomain plays a critical role in ASIC1a biogenesis and function.

  16. Skin appendage-derived stem cells: cell biology and potential for wound repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jiangfan; Yao, Bin; Han, Yutong; Huang, Sha; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells residing in the epidermis and skin appendages are imperative for skin homeostasis and regeneration. These stem cells also participate in the repair of the epidermis after injuries, inducing restoration of tissue integrity and function of damaged tissue. Unlike epidermis-derived stem cells, comprehensive knowledge about skin appendage-derived stem cells remains limited. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of skin appendage-derived stem cells, including their fundamental characteristics, their preferentially expressed biomarkers, and their potential contribution involved in wound repair. Finally, we will also discuss current strategies, future applications, and limitations of these stem cells, attempting to provide some perspectives on optimizing the available therapy in cutaneous repair and regeneration.

  17. Percutaneous closure of the left atrial appendage in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizy, Obayda; Rammos, Christos; Lehmann, Nils; Rassaf, Tienush; Kälsch, Hagen

    2017-09-01

    Left atrial appendage closure is a preventive treatment of atrial fibrillation-related thrombo-embolism. Patients with diabetes mellitus have increased risk for a negative outcome in percutaneous cardiac interventions. We assessed whether percutaneous left atrial appendage closure is safe and effective in patients with diabetes mellitus. We included 78 patients (mean age of 74.4 ± 8.3 years) with indication for left atrial appendage closure in an open-label observational single-centre study. Patients with diabetes mellitus ( n = 31) were at higher thrombo-embolic and bleeding risk (CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc: 4.5 ± 0.9, HAS-BLED: 4.7 ± 0.7) compared to patients without diabetes mellitus ( n = 47, CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc: 3.5 ± 1.0, HAS-BLED: 4.1 ± 0.8; p diabetes mellitus (Euro II-Score: 6.6 ± 3.7 vs 3.9 ± 1.9, p diabetes mellitus had no events ( p = 0.672). Follow-up of 6 months revealed no bleeding complication in both groups. No stroke occurred in follow-up, and left atrial appendage flow velocity reduction (55.6 ± 38.6 vs 51.4 ± 19.1 cm/s, p = 0.474) and rate of postinterventional leakage in the left atrial appendage were comparable (0% vs 2.1%, p = 0.672). Despite patients with diabetes mellitus are high-risk patients, the outcome of percutaneous left atrial appendage closure is similar to patients without diabetes mellitus.

  18. The chelifores of sea spiders (Arthropoda, Pycnogonida) are the appendages of the deutocerebral segment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenneis, Georg; Ungerer, Petra; Scholtz, Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    Within the last decade, gene expression patterns and neuro-anatomical data have led to a new consensus concerning the long-debated association between anterior limbs and neuromeres in the arthropod head. According to this new view, the first appendage in all extant euarthropods is innervated by the second neuromere, the deutocerebrum, whereas the anterior-most head region bearing the protocerebrum lacks an appendage. This stands in contrast to the clearly protocerebrally targeted "antennae" of Onychophora and to some evidence for protocerebral limbs in fossil euarthropod representatives. Yet, the latter "frontal appendages" or "primary antennae" have most likely been reduced or lost in the lineage, leading to extant taxa. Surprisingly, a recent neuro-anatomical study on a pycnogonid challenged this evolutionary scenario, reporting a protocerebral innervation of the first appendages, the chelifores. However, this interpretation was soon after questioned by Hox gene expression data. To re-evaluate the unresolved controversy, we analyzed neuro-anatomy and neurogenesis in four pycnogonid species using immunohistochemical techniques. We clearly show the postprotocerebral innervation of the chelifores, which is resolved as the plesiomorphic condition in pycnogonids when evaluated against a recently published comprehensive phylogeny. By providing direct morphological support for the deutocerebral status of the cheliforal ganglia, we reconcile morphological and gene expression data and argue for a corresponding position between the anterior-most appendages in all extant euarthropods. Consequently, other structures have to be scrutinized to illuminate the fate of a presumptive protocerebral appendage in recent euarthropods. The labrum and the "frontal filaments" of some crustaceans are possible candidates for this approach.

  19. Investigation on laser welding characteristics for appendage of bearing pads of nuclear fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. S.; Kim, W. K.; Park, C. H.; Ko, J. H.; Lee, J. W.; Yang, M. S.

    2001-01-01

    In CANDU nuclear fuel manufacturing the brazing technology has been adopted conventionally to attach the bearing pads of nuclear fuel elements. However, in order to meet good performance of nuclear fuel and improved working efficiency, we started developing the laser welding technology for attachments of the bearing pads. Since the YAG laser can be suitable for small parts and transmit the beam through the optical fiber, the process is corresponding to mass-production with working shops. Making the most of this feature, we have developed the laser welding for appendage of the bearing pads of nuclear fuel elements, and has studied on the laser welding characterisitcs of appendages for nuclear fuel element

  20. Self-report indicators of negative valence constructs within the research domain criteria (RDoC): A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, David; Stanton, Kasey; Clark, Lee Anna

    2017-07-01

    In 2010, the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) created the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC), a research framework for integrating multiple units of information to explicate basic dimensions of functioning underlying both adaptive and maladaptive behavior. Our goal in this review is to evaluate self-report indicators of negative valence systems constructs within RDoC. We review the content and correlates of several of the most popular self-report measures currently classified within the negative valence systems in the RDoC matrix, using both our own data and previously published results. We use these data to evaluate whether these measures are appropriately placed; in addition, wherever possible, we recommend better alternatives to assess key RDoC constructs. Our findings indicate that many of the currently listed self-report measures are misplaced. Specifically, our data reveal that some of the purported fear scales are better conceptualized as measures of anxiety and/or anxious arousal. In addition, none of the currently listed measures of frustrative nonreward is a clear, unambiguous indicator of that construct. The RDoC matrix currently does not list any specific measures of either loss or sustained threat, which makes it difficult to identify appropriate measures of these constructs. In many cases, the specificity/discriminant validity of proposed measures remains uncertain. Researchers wanting to include self-report measures of negative valence constructs currently receive little guidance from the RDoC matrix. Future assessment work should be oriented toward the development of measures that are explicitly designed to assess these RDoC constructs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. C-Terminal Substitution of HBV Core Proteins with Those from DHBV Reveals That Arginine-Rich 167RRRSQSPRR175 Domain Is Critical for HBV Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taeyeung; Shin, Bo-Hye; Park, Gil-Soon; Park, Sun; Chwae, Yong-Joon; Shin, Ho-Joon; Kim, Kyongmin

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the contributions of carboxyl-terminal nucleic acid binding domain of HBV core (C) protein for hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication, chimeric HBV C proteins were generated by substituting varying lengths of the carboxyl-terminus of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) C protein for the corresponding regions of HBV C protein. All chimeric C proteins formed core particles. A chimeric C protein with 221–262 amino acids of DHBV C protein, in place of 146–185 amino acids of the HBV C protein, supported HBV pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) encapsidation and DNA synthesis: 40% amino acid sequence identity or 45% homology in the nucleic-acid binding domain of HBV C protein was sufficient for pgRNA encapsidation and DNA synthesis, although we predominantly detected spliced DNA. A chimeric C protein with 221–241 and 251–262 amino acids of DHBV C, in place of HBV C 146–166 and 176–185 amino acids, respectively, could rescue full-length DNA synthesis. However, a reciprocal C chimera with 242–250 of DHBV C (242RAGSPLPRS 250) introduced in place of 167–175 of HBV C (167RRRSQSPRR 175) significantly decreased pgRNA encapsidation and DNA synthesis, and full-length DNA was not detected, demonstrating that the arginine-rich 167RRRSQSPRR175 domain may be critical for efficient viral replication. Five amino acids differing between viral species (underlined above) were tested for replication rescue; R169 and R175 were found to be important. PMID:22911745

  2. Tryptophan Residue Located at the Middle of Putative Transmembrane Domain 11 Is Critical for the Function of Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptide 2B1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Jialin; Jin, Meng; Yue, Mei; Wang, Meiyu; Zhang, Hongjian; Gui, Chunshan

    2016-10-03

    Organic anion transporting polypeptide 2B1 (OATP2B1), which is highly expressed in enterocytes and hepatocytes could be a key determinant for the intestinal absorption and hepatic uptake of its substrates, most of which are amphipathic organic anions. Tryptophan residues may possess a multitude of functions for a transport protein through aromatic interactions, such as maintaining the proper protein structure, guiding the depth of membrane insertion, or interacting directly with substrates. There are totally six tryptophan residues in OATP2B1. However, little is known about their role in the function and expression of OATP2B1. Our results show that, while W272, W276, and W277 located at the border of extracellular loop 3 and transmembrane domain 6 exhibit a moderate effect on the surface expression of OATP2B1, W611 located at the middle of transmembrane domain 11 plays a critical role in the function of OATP2B1. The tryptophan-to-alanine mutation of W611 changes the kinetic characteristics of OATP2B1-mediated estrone-3-sulfate (E3S) transport radically, from a monophasic saturation curve (with K m and V max values being of 7.1 ± 1.1 μM and 182 ± 7 pmol/normalized mg/min, respectively) to a linear curve. Replacing alanine with a phenylalanine will rescue most of OATP2B1's function, suggesting that the aromatic side chain of residue 611 is very important. However, hydrogen-bond forming and positively charged groups at this position are not favorable. The important role of W611 is not substrate-dependent. Molecular modeling indicates that the side chain of W611 faces toward the substrate translocation pathway and might interact with substrates directly. Taken together, our findings reveal that W611 is critical for the function of OATP2B1.

  3. Cephalic and appendage morphology of the Cambrian arthropod Sidneyia inexpectans Walcott, 1911

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stein, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Sidneyia inexpectans Walcott, 1911 from the Cambrian Series 3 Burgess Shale of British Columbia is largely accepted as a representative of the artiopodans, an assemblage of Paleozoic arthropod taxa, including trilobites and their immediate relatives. Its appendage morphology was never fully...

  4. Epicardial Ablation of Focal Atrial Tachycardia Arising From Left Atrial Appendage in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdhija Hanumandla

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Focal left atrial tachycardia (FLAT although a common cause of supraventricular tachycardia(SVT among children, the one's arising from left atrial appendage (LAA present a unique challenge for successful ablation because of anatomical location. We present two children with FLAT arising from the epicardial LAA, successfully mapped and ablated through percutaneuous epicardial approach.

  5. Air-flow sensitive hairs: boundary layers in oscillatory flows around arthropod appendages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steinmann, T.; Casas, J.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; Dangles, O.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this work is to characterize the boundary layer over small appendages in insects in longitudinal and transverse oscillatory flows. The problem of immediate interest is the early warning system in crickets perceiving flying predators using air-flow-sensitive hairs on cerci, two long

  6. Mr-Proanp Rises during Exercise Even after Surgical Closure of the Left Atrial Appendage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagdrup, Christian; Hansen, Jesper Park; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The atrial appendages play a regulatory role in the fluid homeostasis and in the secretion of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP). ANP is a 28-amino-acid peptide synthesized in the cardiac myocytes, where it is stored as a pro-ormone in cardiomyocyte granules. When released, it participa...

  7. Percutaneous occlusion of left atrial appendage with the Amplatzer Cardiac PlugTM in atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenegro, Márcio José; Quintella, Edgard Freitas; Damonte, Aníbal; Sabino, Hugo de Castro; Zajdenverg, Ricardo; Laufer, Gustavo Pinaud; Amorim, Bernardo; Estrada, André Pereira Duque; Armas, Cristian Paul Yugcha; Sterque, Aline

    2012-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation is associated with embolic strokes that often result in death or disability. Effective in reducing these events, anticoagulation has several limitations and has been widely underutilized. Over 90% of thrombi identified in patients with atrial fibrillation without valvular disease originate in the left atrial appendage, whose occlusion is investigated as an alternative to anticoagulation. To determine the feasibility of percutaneous occlusion of the left atrial appendage in patients at high risk of embolic events and limitations to the use of anticoagulation. We report our initial experience with Amplatzer Cardiac Plug™ (St. Jude Medical Inc., Saint Paul, Estados Unidos) in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. We selected patients at high risk of thromboembolism, major bleeding, contraindications to the use or major instability in response to the anticoagulant. The procedures were performed percutaneously under general anesthesia and transesophageal echocardiography. The primary outcome was the presence of periprocedural complications and follow-up program included clinical and echocardiographic review within 30 days and by telephone contact after nine months. In five selected patients it was possible to occlude the left atrial appendage without periprocedural complications. There were no clinical events in follow-up. Controlled clinical trials are needed before percutaneous closure of the left atrial appendage should be considered an alternative to anticoagulation in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. But the device has shown to be promissory in patients at high risk of embolism and restrictions on the use of anticoagulants.

  8. Thrombus-in-Transit Entrapped in a Partially Ligated Left Atrial Appendage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Roshanali

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A 54-year-old man referred to our center with Barlow’s disease and severe mitral regurgitation. He had atrial fibrillation (AF rhythm, with a mildly enlarged left atrium (LA. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE showed no clot in the LA and LA appendage; there was only mild spontaneous echo contrast in the LA appendage. The patient underwent mitral valve repair and the Maze operation, during which the LA appendage was ligated with the double suture technique. He was discharged from the hospital in good condition and in sinus rhythm. He was recommended Warfarin and PT control.One month later, he returned with the complaint of vision loss twice in the left eye each time for a few seconds. The AF rhythm had returned.TEE demonstrated a fresh and mobile thrombus entrapped in the LA appendage with a small portion in the LA (Figures 1 and 2. Laboratory tests showed therapeutic international normalized ratio (INR. The patient refused re- operation.  Plavix was added to his medication, and he was discharged.

  9. Left atrial appendage occlusion versus standard medical care in patients with atrial fibrillation and intracerebral hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen-Kudsk, Jens Erik; Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Wester, Per

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: The aim of this study was to investigate the prognosis in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) having a left atrial appendage occlusion (LAAO) versus patients receiving standard medical therapy. METHODS AND RESULTS: A total of 151 patients from the Nord...

  10. Space robots with flexible appendages: Dynamic modeling, coupling measurement, and vibration suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Deshan; Wang, Xueqian; Xu, Wenfu; Liang, Bin

    2017-05-01

    For a space robot with flexible appendages, vibrations of flexible structure can be easily excited during both orbit and/or attitude maneuvers of the base and the operation of the manipulators. Hence, the pose (position and attitude) of the manipulator's end-effector will greatly deviate from the desired values, and furthermore, the motion of the manipulator will trigger and exacerbate vibrations of flexible appendages. Given lack of the atmospheric damping in orbit, the vibrations will last for quite a while and cause the on-orbital tasks to fail. We derived the rigid-flexible coupling dynamics of a space robot system with flexible appendages and established a coupling model between the flexible base and the space manipulator. A specific index was defined to measure the coupling degree between the flexible motion of the appendages and the rigid motion of the end-effector. Then, we analyzed the dynamic coupling for different conditions, such as modal displacements, joint angles (manipulator configuration), and mass properties. Moreover, the coupling map was adopted and drawn to represent the coupling motion. Based on this map, a trajectory planning method was addressed to suppress structure vibration. Finally, simulation studies of typical cases were performed, which verified the proposed models and method. This work provides a theoretic basis for the system design, performance evaluation, trajectory planning, and control of such space robots.

  11. Developing an ancient epithelial appendage: FGF signalling regulates early tail denticle formation in sharks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rory L. Cooper

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vertebrate epithelial appendages constitute a diverse group of organs that includes integumentary structures such as reptilian scales, avian feathers and mammalian hair. Recent studies have provided new evidence for the homology of integumentary organ development throughout amniotes, despite their disparate final morphologies. These structures develop from conserved molecular signalling centres, known as epithelial placodes. It is not yet certain whether this homology extends beyond the integumentary organs of amniotes, as there is a lack of knowledge regarding their development in basal vertebrates. As the ancient sister lineage of bony vertebrates, extant chondrichthyans are well suited to testing the phylogenetic depth of this homology. Elasmobranchs (sharks, skates and rays possess hard, mineralised epithelial appendages called odontodes, which include teeth and dermal denticles (placoid scales. Odontodes constitute some of the oldest known vertebrate integumentary appendages, predating the origin of gnathostomes. Here, we used an emerging model shark (Scyliorhinus canicula to test the hypothesis that denticles are homologous to other placode-derived amniote integumentary organs. To examine the conservation of putative gene regulatory network (GRN member function, we undertook small molecule inhibition of fibroblast growth factor (FGF signalling during caudal denticle formation. Results We show that during early caudal denticle morphogenesis, the shark expresses homologues of conserved developmental gene families, known to comprise a core GRN for early placode morphogenesis in amniotes. This includes conserved expression of FGFs, sonic hedgehog (shh and bone morphogenetic protein 4 (bmp4. Additionally, we reveal that denticle placodes possess columnar epithelial cells with a reduced rate of proliferation, a conserved characteristic of amniote skin appendage development. Small molecule inhibition of FGF signalling revealed

  12. A critical HA1 neutralizing domain of H5N1 influenza in an optimal conformation induces strong cross-protection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanying Du

    Full Text Available The highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 viruses, especially the laboratory-generated H5N1 mutants, have demonstrated the potential to cross the species barrier and infect mammals and humans. Consequently, the design of an effective and safe anti-H5N1 vaccine is essential. We previously demonstrated that the full-length hemagglutinin 1 (HA1 could induce significant neutralizing antibody response and protection. Here, we intended to identify the critical neutralizing domain (CND in an optimal conformation that can elicit strong cross-neutralizing antibodies and protection against divergent H5N1 strains. We thus constructed six recombinant proteins covering different regions of HA1 of A/Anhui/1/2005(H5N1, each of which was fused with foldon (Fd and Fc of human IgG. We found that the critical fragment fused with Fd/Fc (HA-13-263-Fdc, H5 numbering that could elicit the strongest neutralizing antibody response is located in the N-terminal region of HA1 (residues 13-263, which covers the receptor-binding domain (RBD, residues 112-263. We then constructed three additional recombinants fused with Fd plus His tag (HA-13-263-Fd-His, Fc only (HA-13-263-Fc, and His tag only (HA-13-263-His, respectively. We found that the HA-13-263-Fdc, which formed an oligomeric conformation, induced the strongest neutralizing antibody response and cross-protection against challenges of two tested H5N1 virus strains covering clade 1: A/VietNam/1194/2004 (VN/1194 or clade 2.3.4: A/Shenzhen/406H/06 (SZ/406H, while HA-13-263-Fc dimer and HA-13-263-Fd-His trimer elicited higher neutralizing antibody response and protection than HA-13-263-His monomer. These results suggest that the oligomeric form of the CND containing the RBD can be further developed as an effective and safe vaccine for cross-protection against divergent strains of H5N1 viruses.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulations of Hsp40 J-domain mutants identifies disruption of the critical HPD-motif as the key factor for impaired curing in vivo of the yeast prion [URE3].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, You-Lin; Wang, Hao; Riedy, Michael; Roberts, Brittany-Lee; Sun, Yuna; Song, Yong-Bo; Jones, Gary W; Masison, Daniel C; Song, Youtao

    2018-05-01

    Genetic screens using Saccharomyces cerevisiae have identified an array of Hsp40 (Ydj1p) J-domain mutants that are impaired in the ability to cure the yeast [URE3] prion through disrupting functional interactions with Hsp70. However, biochemical analysis of some of these Hsp40 J-domain mutants has so far failed to provide major insight into the specific functional changes in Hsp40-Hsp70 interactions. To explore the detailed structural and dynamic properties of the Hsp40 J-domain, 20 ns molecular dynamic simulations of 4 mutants (D9A, D36A, A30T, and F45S) and wild-type J-domain were performed, followed by Hsp70 docking simulations. Results demonstrated that although the Hsp70 interaction mechanism of the mutants may vary, the major structural change was targeted to the critical HPD motif of the J-domain. Our computational analysis fits well with previous yeast genetics studies regarding highlighting the importance of J-domain function in prion propagation. During the molecular dynamics simulations several important residues were identified and predicted to play an essential role in J-domain structure. Among these residues, Y26 and F45 were confirmed, using both in silico and in vivo methods, as being critical for Ydj1p function.

  14. Domains and domain loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haberland, Hartmut

    2005-01-01

    politicians and in the media, especially in the discussion whether some languages undergo ‘domain loss’ vis-à-vis powerful international languages like English. An objection that has been raised here is that domains, as originally conceived, are parameters of language choice and not properties of languages...... not described in terms of domains, and recent research e.g. about the multilingual communities in the Danish-German border area seems to confirm this....

  15. Ultrasonographic diagnosis of torsion of testicular appendages; Diagnostico por ecografia de la torsion de los apendices testiculares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esparza, J.; Gonzalez, A.; Cordero, J. L. [Hospital Virgen del Camino. Pamplona (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    To determine the efficacy of ultrasound in boys presenting torsion of a testicular appendage. A series of 30 boys with acute scrotal pain due to torsion of a testicular appendage was studied. Nine patients underwent surgery. The clinical findings and course in the remaining 21 suggested the presence of this abnormality. All of them underwent conventional and color Doppler ultrasound using a 7.5 MHz transducer. In 15 boys, ultrasound images depicted the affected appendage as a mass between the epididymal head and the testicle. In 13 cases, only signs of a inflammatory reaction, with enlargement of the epididymal head and tunicas presenting hyperflow and hydrocele, mimicking acute epididymities. In two cases, the images were normal. There is no definitive, distinguishing ultrasound image corresponding to testicular appendage torsion. Therefore, this diagnostic technique should be accompanied by clinical assessment. (Author) 14 refs.

  16. Patterned Anchorage to the Apical Extracellular Matrix Defines Tissue Shape in the Developing Appendages of Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Robert P.; Matamoro-Vidal, Alexis; Ribeiro, Paulo S.; Tapon, Nic; Houle, David; Salazar-Ciudad, Isaac; Thompson, Barry J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary How tissues acquire their characteristic shape is a fundamental unresolved question in biology. While genes have been characterized that control local mechanical forces to elongate epithelial tissues, genes controlling global forces in epithelia have yet to be identified. Here, we describe a genetic pathway that shapes appendages in Drosophila by defining the pattern of global tensile forces in the tissue. In the appendages, shape arises from tension generated by cell constriction and localized anchorage of the epithelium to the cuticle via the apical extracellular-matrix protein Dumpy (Dp). Altering Dp expression in the developing wing results in predictable changes in wing shape that can be simulated by a computational model that incorporates only tissue contraction and localized anchorage. Three other wing shape genes, narrow, tapered, and lanceolate, encode components of a pathway that modulates Dp distribution in the wing to refine the global force pattern and thus wing shape. PMID:26190146

  17. The integumental appendages of the turtle shell: an evo-devo perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustakas-Verho, Jacqueline E; Cherepanov, Gennadii O

    2015-05-01

    The turtle shell is composed of dorsal armor (carapace) and ventral armor (plastron) covered by a keratinized epithelium. There are two epithelial appendages of the turtle shell: scutes (large epidermal shields separated by furrows and forming a unique mosaic) and tubercles (numerous small epidermal bumps located on the carapaces of some species). In our perspective, we take a synthetic, comparative approach to consider the homology and evolution of these integumental appendages. Scutes have been more intensively studied, as they are autapomorphic for turtles and can be diagnostic taxonomically. Their pattern of tessellation is stable phylogenetically, but labile in the individual. We discuss the history of developmental investigations of these structures and hypotheses of evolutionary and anomalous variation. In our estimation, the scutes of the turtle shell are an evolutionary novelty, whereas the tubercles found on the shells of some turtles are homologous to reptilian scales. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Expression and function of spineless orthologs correlate with distal deutocerebral appendage morphology across Arthropoda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setton, Emily V W; March, Logan E; Nolan, Erik D; Jones, Tamsin E; Cho, Holly; Wheeler, Ward C; Extavour, Cassandra G; Sharma, Prashant P

    2017-10-01

    The deutocerebral (second) head segment is putatively homologous across Arthropoda, in spite of remarkable disparity of form and function of deutocerebral appendages. In Mandibulata this segment bears a pair of sensory antennae, whereas in Chelicerata the same segment bears a pair of feeding appendages called chelicerae. Part of the evidence for the homology of deutocerebral appendages is the conserved function of homothorax (hth), which has been shown to specify antennal or cheliceral fate in the absence of Hox signaling, in both mandibulate and chelicerate exemplars. However, the genetic basis for the morphological disparity of antenna and chelicera is not understood. To test whether downstream targets of hth have diverged in a lineage-specific manner, we examined the evolution of the function and expression of spineless (ss), which in two holometabolous insects is known to act as a hth target and distal antennal determinant. Toward expanding phylogenetic representation of gene expression data, here we show that strong expression of ss is observed in developing antennae of a hemimetabolous insect, a centipede, and an amphipod crustacean. By contrast, ss orthologs are not expressed throughout the cheliceral limb buds of spiders or harvestmen during developmental stages when appendage fate is specified. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of ss in Oncopeltus fasciatus, which bears a simple plesiomorphic antenna, resulted in homeotic distal antenna-to-leg transformation, comparable to data from holometabolous insect counterparts. Knockdown of hth in Oncopeltus fasciatus abrogated ss expression, suggesting conservation of upstream regulation. These data suggest that ss may be a flagellar (distal antennal) determinant more broadly, and that this function was acquired at the base of Mandibulata. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation due to left atrial appendage herniation and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misthos, Panagiotis; Neofotistos, Kostas; Drosos, Polivios; Kokotsakis, John; Lioulias, Achilleas

    2009-04-17

    The incidence of the isolated form of partial absence of the pericardium is a rare finding. The authors present a case of an isolated left sided pericardial defect with intrathoracic protrusion of the left atrial appendage found during a left upper lobectomy for lung cancer, unrecognized after serial echocardiographs and computed tomography scan of the thorax. The patient suffered from episodes of atrial fibrillation which disappeared after pericardial defect repair without antiarrhythmic medication.

  20. Epiploic appendagitis of caecum: a diagnostic dilemma [Appendicitis epiploica des Blinddarms: ein diagnostisches Dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashid, Arshad

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available [english] Epiploic appendagitis is a rare cause of acute abdomen. Depending on the site of occurrence, it can mimic any cause of acute abdomen or disease of the colon and caecal appendix; making its preoperative diagnosis very difficult. We present here a case of a 7-year-old boy misdiagnosed preoperatively as acute appendicitis and later on, upon surgical exploration, found to have caecal appendagitis. The affected epiploic appendage was removed and the patient had an uneventful recovery. We also review the relevant literature and discuss the measures to overcome this diagnostic dilemma. General surgeons should be aware of this self-limiting disease and consider it as a differential diagnosis of acute abdomen.[german] Appendicitis epiploica oder epiploische Appendagitis ist eine seltene Ursache des akuten Abdomens. Je nach Ort des Auftretens kann sie jede Ursache für akuten Unterleibsschmerz oder Erkrankungen des Dickdarms und Appendix vermiformis imitieren, was ihre präoperative Diagnose sehr schwierig macht. Wir präsentieren hier den Fall eines alten Jungen, bei dem präoperativ akute Blinddarmentzündung diagnostiziert wurde. Beim chirurgischen Eingriff stellte sich dann eine Appendicitis epiploica des Blinddarms als Befund heraus. Der betroffene Appendix epiploica wurde entfernt und der Patient erholte sich ohne besondere Vorkommnisse. Wir geben auch eine Übersicht über die relevante Literatur und diskutieren die Maßnahmen, um dieses diagnostische Dilemma zu überwinden. Allgemeine Chirurgen sollten sich dieser selbstlimitierenden Krankheit bewusst sein und sie als eine Differentialdiagnose bei akutem Abdomen in Betracht ziehen.

  1. Penetration of moxalactam and cefazolin into atrial appendage after simultaneous intramuscular or intravenous administration.

    OpenAIRE

    Polk, R E; Smith, J E; Ducey, K; Lower, R R

    1982-01-01

    This study compared the penetration of moxalactam and cefazolin into the human atrial appendage after simultaneous administration of both drugs by two routes. Nineteen adult patients scheduled for coronary vein bypass surgery randomly received 10 mg of moxalactam and cefazolin per kg by either the intramuscular or intravenous (bolus) route on administration of anesthesia. Concentrations of cefazolin in serum were significantly greater than concentrations of moxalactam at all times for both ro...

  2. Left atrial appendage closure devices for cardiovascular risk reduction in atrial fibrillation patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cruz-Gonzalez I

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Ignacio Cruz-Gonzalez,* Juan Carlos Rama-Merchan,* Javier Rodriguez-Collado, Javier Martin-Moreiras, Alejandro Diego-Nieto, Antonio Arribas-Jimenez, Pedro Luís SanchezDepartment of Cardiology, University Hospital of Cardiology and IBSAL, Salamanca, Spain *Ignacio Cruz-Gonzalez and Juan Carlos Rama-Merchan have contributed equally to this work and should be considered co-first authors Abstract: Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most common sustained arrhythmia in clinical practice. AF is associated with a 4–5-fold increased risk of stroke and systemic embolism. Oral anticoagulant is the first-line therapy for this purpose, but it has various limitations and is often contraindicated or underutilized. Autopsy and surgical data have suggested that 90% of atrial thrombi in nonvalvular AF patients originate from the left atrial appendage, leading to the development of percutaneous closure for thromboembolic prevention. This paper examines the current evidence on left atrial appendage closure devices for cardiovascular risk reduction in AF patients. Keywords: atrial fibrillation, left atrial appendage, stroke, oral anticoagulant, percutaneous closure, thromboembolic prevention

  3. Calculation of Flows Over Underwater Bodies with Hull, Sail and Appendages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoab, M.; Ayub, M.; Bilal, S.; Zahir, S.; Khan, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    A comprehensive study has been made for the hydrodynamic analysis of the submarine DARPA 2. The analysis was first performed for hull, then hull with sail on top and then for the complete submarine including hull, sail and appendages. A comparison of tangential velocity and pressure distribution for hull is accomplished using CFD flow solvers and published data. Further, the pressure distribution over the hull with sail is also analyzed. Finally, pressure distribution, forces and moments were calculated over the complete submarine including hull, sail and appendages. Comparison 01 pressure distribution and tangential velocity for the hull show a good agreement with published data. Pressure coefficient comparison for the hull with sail shows the good CFD-CFD agreement. Comparison of Normal force and pitching moment of complete submarine having hull, sail and appendages shows a reasonable agreement with the experimental results of DARPA 2. Both quantitative and qualitative analysis of the complete submarine estimates the required design force and moment at different angles of attack and also demonstrate the flow visualization. (author)

  4. Plain radiographic diagnosis of thrombosis of left atrial appendage in mitral valve disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuyama, S.; Watabe, T.; Kuribayashi, S.

    1983-01-01

    Conventional posteroanterior chest radiographs of 42 patients with mitral valve disease who had had surgery were analyzed, and particular attention was directed to the presence or absence of the convexity of the left lower midcardiac border (left artrial segment). The flatness or concavity of this segment, despite other evidence of left atrial enlargement, was observed in six (60%) of 10 patients who had left atrial thrombosis, and in three (9%) of 32 patients who did not have thrombosis (false positive diagnosis). Four of the 10 patients who had left atrial thrombosis did not show this finding on the radiographs (false negative diagnosis). One of these four had a thrombus only against the posterior wall of the body of the left atrium. Therefore, the accuracy in the diagnosis of thrombosis of the left atrial appendage was 66.7% (six of nine) for patients who had thrombosis of the appendage. Standard chest radiographs are important in the evaluation of the patient with thrombosis of the left atrial appendage

  5. Coupling dynamic analysis of spacecraft with multiple cylindrical tanks and flexible appendages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wen-Jun; Yue, Bao-Zeng; Huang, Hua

    2016-02-01

    This paper is mainly concerned with the coupling dynamic analysis of a complex spacecraft consisting of one main rigid platform, multiple liquid-filled cylindrical tanks, and a number of flexible appendages. Firstly, the carrier potential function equations of liquid in the tanks are deduced according to the wall boundary conditions. Through employing the Fourier-Bessel series expansion method, the dynamic boundaries conditions on a curved free-surface under a low-gravity environment are transformed to general simple differential equations and the rigid-liquid coupled sloshing dynamic state equations of liquid in tanks are obtained. The state vectors of rigid-liquid coupled equations are composed with the modal coordinates of the relative potential function and the modal coordinates of wave height. Based on the Bernoulli-Euler beam theory and the D'Alembert's principle, the rigid-flexible coupled dynamic state equations of flexible appendages are directly derived, and the coordinate transform matrixes of maneuvering flexible appendages are precisely computed as time-varying. Then, the coupling dynamics state equations of the overall system of the spacecraft are modularly built by means of the Lagrange's equations in terms of quasi-coordinates. Lastly, the coupling dynamic performances of a typical complex spacecraft are studied. The availability and reliability of the presented method are also confirmed.

  6. Setal morphology of grooming appendages in the spider crab, Libinia dubia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortham, Jen L; LaVelle, Amanda D

    2016-08-01

    In crustaceans, grooming behaviors decrease fouling by removing debris from the exoskeleton and body structures; these grooming behaviors improve respiration, sensory reception, movement, and reproduction. Setal morphologies of the following grooming appendages in the decapod crustacean spider crab Libinia dubia are examined including the first pereiopod (cheliped), first, second, and third maxillipeds (mouthparts), and first, second, and third epipods (internal extensions of the maxillipeds). The objective of this study was to describe setal morphologies of these grooming appendages and to elucidate possible functions and efficiencies of setal structures. Spider crabs are hypothesized to have elaborate setal morphologies, mainly for cleaning specialized decorating setae as well as for cleaning inside the gill chamber, which has a higher likelihood of becoming fouled compared to other decapods such as shrimps. Fourteen setal types are documented and included several varieties of serrate and pappose setae as well as simple setae, cuspidate setae, papposerrate setae, and canoe setae. Maxillipodal epipods in the gill chamber are free of fouling, suggesting the setation on the third maxilliped protopod has an efficient functional morphology in removing debris before water enters the gill chamber. Serrate setae may function for detangling and separating structures whereas pappose setae may function for fine detailed grooming. The cheliped is the only grooming appendage that can reach decorating setae and it contains only pappose setae; thus decorating setae is not likely groomed in a manner that would greatly decrease fouling. J. Morphol. 277:1045-1061, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Left atrial appendage occlusion: consensus document of Association of Cardiovascular Interventions and Heart Rhythm Section of Polish Cardiac Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grygier, Marek; Wojakowski, Wojtek; Smolka, Grzegorz; Demkow, Marcin; Wąsek, Wojtek; Sorysz, Danuta; Kralisz, Paweł; Bartuś, Krzysztof; Sukiennik, Adam; Pracoń, Radosław; Witkowski, Adam; Kowalski, Oskar; Legutko, Jacek

    2018-02-14

    Left atrial appendage (LAA) occlusion devices have the potential to influence the clinical approach to stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation. A number of percutaneous techniques have been proposed, including various intracardiac plugs and also external ligation. Several devices have been already used in Poland. One of them has been evaluated in randomised controlled trials compared with the current standard of care. Others are less well studied but quite commonly used in Europe. It is anticipated that the use of LAA occlusion technologies in clinical practice will expand. This Consensus Document prepared jointly by Association of Cardiovascular Interventions (AISN) and Heart Rhythm Section (HRS) of Polish Cardiac Society seeks to highlight the critical issues surrounding LAA occlusion therapies and to facilitate the alignment of multiple interests, including those of primary care physicians, general cardiologists and procedural specialists (electrophysiologists and interventional cardiologists) but also other medical professionals. The article summarises current evidence and provides specific recommendations on organization and conduct of LAA therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation in Poland and defines also operator and institutional requirements fundamental to the establishment of successful LAA occlusion programmme.

  8. Domain decomposition methods for the mixed dual formulation of the critical neutron diffusion problem; Methodes de decomposition de domaine pour la formulation mixte duale du probleme critique de la diffusion des neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerin, P

    2007-12-15

    The neutronic simulation of a nuclear reactor core is performed using the neutron transport equation, and leads to an eigenvalue problem in the steady-state case. Among the deterministic resolution methods, diffusion approximation is often used. For this problem, the MINOS solver based on a mixed dual finite element method has shown his efficiency. In order to take advantage of parallel computers, and to reduce the computing time and the local memory requirement, we propose in this dissertation two domain decomposition methods for the resolution of the mixed dual form of the eigenvalue neutron diffusion problem. The first approach is a component mode synthesis method on overlapping sub-domains. Several Eigenmodes solutions of a local problem solved by MINOS on each sub-domain are taken as basis functions used for the resolution of the global problem on the whole domain. The second approach is a modified iterative Schwarz algorithm based on non-overlapping domain decomposition with Robin interface conditions. At each iteration, the problem is solved on each sub domain by MINOS with the interface conditions deduced from the solutions on the adjacent sub-domains at the previous iteration. The iterations allow the simultaneous convergence of the domain decomposition and the eigenvalue problem. We demonstrate the accuracy and the efficiency in parallel of these two methods with numerical results for the diffusion model on realistic 2- and 3-dimensional cores. (author)

  9. Bacterial surface appendages strongly impact nanomechanical and electrokinetic properties of Escherichia coli cells subjected to osmotic stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grégory Francius

    Full Text Available The physicochemical properties and dynamics of bacterial envelope, play a major role in bacterial activity. In this study, the morphological, nanomechanical and electrohydrodynamic properties of Escherichia coli K-12 mutant cells were thoroughly investigated as a function of bulk medium ionic strength using atomic force microscopy (AFM and electrokinetics (electrophoresis. Bacteria were differing according to genetic alterations controlling the production of different surface appendages (short and rigid Ag43 adhesins, longer and more flexible type 1 fimbriae and F pilus. From the analysis of the spatially resolved force curves, it is shown that cells elasticity and turgor pressure are not only depending on bulk salt concentration but also on the presence/absence and nature of surface appendage. In 1 mM KNO(3, cells without appendages or cells surrounded by Ag43 exhibit large Young moduli and turgor pressures (∼700-900 kPa and ∼100-300 kPa respectively. Under similar ionic strength condition, a dramatic ∼50% to ∼70% decrease of these nanomechanical parameters was evidenced for cells with appendages. Qualitatively, such dependence of nanomechanical behavior on surface organization remains when increasing medium salt content to 100 mM, even though, quantitatively, differences are marked to a much smaller extent. Additionally, for a given surface appendage, the magnitude of the nanomechanical parameters decreases significantly when increasing bulk salt concentration. This effect is ascribed to a bacterial exoosmotic water loss resulting in a combined contraction of bacterial cytoplasm together with an electrostatically-driven shrinkage of the surface appendages. The former process is demonstrated upon AFM analysis, while the latter, inaccessible upon AFM imaging, is inferred from electrophoretic data interpreted according to advanced soft particle electrokinetic theory. Altogether, AFM and electrokinetic results clearly demonstrate the

  10. Three-dimensional analysis of the left atrial appendage for detecting paroxysmal atrial fibrillation in acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Koji; Koga, Masatoshi; Sato, Kazuaki; Suzuki, Rieko; Minematsu, Kazuo; Toyoda, Kazunori

    2014-12-01

    Atrial fibrillation impairs left atrial appendage function and the thrombus formation in the left atrial appendage is a major cause of cardioembolic stroke. To evaluate the association between the volume of the left atrial appendage measured by real-time three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography and presence of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation in patients with cerebral infarction or transient ischemic attack. Real-time three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography was performed to measure left atrial appendage end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes to calculate left atrial appendage ejection fraction. Patients with normal sinus rhythm at the time of real-time three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography were divided into groups with and without paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Volumetric data were corrected with the body surface area. Of 146 patients registered, 102 (29 women, 72·2 ± 10·7 years) were normal sinus rhythm at the examination. In 23 patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, left atrial appendage end-diastolic volume (4·78 ± 3·00 ml/m(2) vs. 3·14 ± 2·04 ml/m(2), P = 0·003) and end-systolic volume (3·10 ± 2·47 ml/m(2) vs. 1·39 ± 1·56 ml/m(2), P analysis, all these parameters were independently associated with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation after adjusting for sex, age, diabetes mellitus, and previous stroke. Left atrial appendage volumetric analysis by real-time three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography is a promising method for detecting paroxysmal atrial fibrillation in acute cerebral infarction or transient ischemic attack. © 2014 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2014 World Stroke Organization.

  11. Navx-guided Cryoablation of Atrial Tachycardia Inside the Left Atrial Appendage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandozi, Claudio; Galeazzi, Marco; Lavalle, Carlo; Ficili, Sabina; Russo, Maurizio; Santini, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation procedures inside the left atrial appendage (LAA) are likely to involve dangerous complications because of a high thrombogenic effect. Cryoablation procedures are supposed to be safer. We describe two cases of successful cryoablation procedures. Two NavX-guided cryoablations of permanent focal atrial arrhythmias arising from the LAA were performed. Left atrial reconstruction and mapping allowed the zone of the earliest atrial potential to be recorded; the entire course of the ablation catheter was monitored. The arrhythmias were successfully ablated; no thrombotic complications were observed. PMID:21346824

  12. Siblings with Idiopathic Left Atrial Appendage Ostial Stenosis and Cor Triatriatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Seigo; Ishiguchi, Yukiko; Moritoh, Yuji; Shohi, Mayuko; Nakagawa, Naomi; Okamoto, Kengo; Kamada, Masahiro

    2016-07-01

    Isolated left atrial appendage (LAA) ostial stenosis is a very rare entity found coincidentally in adults by transesophageal echocardiography. A 3-month-old healthy infant was suspected as having cor triatriatum. His brother had a history of surgical treatment of cor triatriatum. A cardiac catheterization revealed a narrowed ostium of the LAA and confirmed the echocardiographic diagnosis of isolated LAA ostial stenosis. This is the first pediatric case of idiopathic LAA ostial stenosis. The siblings called our attention to the differential diagnosis and the etiopathogenesis between LAA ostial stenosis and cor triatriatum. © 2016, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. The Near-iron Transporter (NEAT) Domains of the Anthrax Hemophore IsdX2 Require a Critical Glutamine to Extract Heme from Methemoglobin*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honsa, Erin S.; Owens, Cedric P.; Goulding, Celia W.; Maresso, Anthony W.

    2013-01-01

    Several Gram-positive pathogenic bacteria employ near-iron transporter (NEAT) domains to acquire heme from hemoglobin during infection. However, the structural requirements and mechanism of action for NEAT-mediated heme extraction remains unknown. Bacillus anthracis exhibits a rapid growth rate during systemic infection, suggesting that the bacterium expresses efficient iron acquisition systems. To understand how B. anthracis acquires iron from heme sources, which account for 80% of mammalian iron stores, we investigated the properties of the five-NEAT domain hemophore IsdX2. Using a combination of bioinformatics and site-directed mutagenesis, we determined that the heme extraction properties of IsdX2 are dependent on an amino acid with an amide side chain within the 310-helix of the NEAT domain. Additionally, we used a spectroscopic analysis to show that IsdX2 NEAT domains only scavenge heme from methemoglobin (metHb) and that autoxidation of oxyhemoglobin to metHb must occur prior to extraction. We also report the crystal structures of NEAT5 wild type and a Q29T mutant and present surface plasmon resonance data that indicate that the loss of this amide side chain reduces the affinity of the NEAT domain for metHb. We propose a model whereby the amide side chain is first required to drive an interaction with metHb that destabilizes heme, which is subsequently extracted and coordinated in the aliphatic heme-binding environment of the NEAT domain. Because an amino acid with an amide side chain in this position is observed in NEAT domains of several genera of Gram-positive pathogenic bacteria, these results suggest that specific targeting of this or nearby residues may be an entry point for inhibitor development aimed at blocking bacterial iron acquisition during infection. PMID:23364793

  14. The near-iron transporter (NEAT) domains of the anthrax hemophore IsdX2 require a critical glutamine to extract heme from methemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honsa, Erin S; Owens, Cedric P; Goulding, Celia W; Maresso, Anthony W

    2013-03-22

    Several gram-positive pathogenic bacteria employ near-iron transporter (NEAT) domains to acquire heme from hemoglobin during infection. However, the structural requirements and mechanism of action for NEAT-mediated heme extraction remains unknown. Bacillus anthracis exhibits a rapid growth rate during systemic infection, suggesting that the bacterium expresses efficient iron acquisition systems. To understand how B. anthracis acquires iron from heme sources, which account for 80% of mammalian iron stores, we investigated the properties of the five-NEAT domain hemophore IsdX2. Using a combination of bioinformatics and site-directed mutagenesis, we determined that the heme extraction properties of IsdX2 are dependent on an amino acid with an amide side chain within the 310-helix of the NEAT domain. Additionally, we used a spectroscopic analysis to show that IsdX2 NEAT domains only scavenge heme from methemoglobin (metHb) and that autoxidation of oxyhemoglobin to metHb must occur prior to extraction. We also report the crystal structures of NEAT5 wild type and a Q29T mutant and present surface plasmon resonance data that indicate that the loss of this amide side chain reduces the affinity of the NEAT domain for metHb. We propose a model whereby the amide side chain is first required to drive an interaction with metHb that destabilizes heme, which is subsequently extracted and coordinated in the aliphatic heme-binding environment of the NEAT domain. Because an amino acid with an amide side chain in this position is observed in NEAT domains of several genera of gram-positive pathogenic bacteria, these results suggest that specific targeting of this or nearby residues may be an entry point for inhibitor development aimed at blocking bacterial iron acquisition during infection.

  15. A cellular, molecular, and pharmacological basis for appendage regeneration in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Thomas H; Snyder, Emily R; Liu, Yinghua; Wang, Jing; Kim, Seung K

    2015-10-15

    Regenerative medicine aims to restore normal tissue architecture and function. However, the basis of tissue regeneration in mammalian solid organs remains undefined. Remarkably, mice lacking p21 fully regenerate injured ears without discernable scarring. Here we show that, in wild-type mice following tissue injury, stromal-derived factor-1 (Sdf1) is up-regulated in the wound epidermis and recruits Cxcr4-expressing leukocytes to the injury site. In p21-deficient mice, Sdf1 up-regulation and the subsequent recruitment of Cxcr4-expressing leukocytes are significantly diminished, thereby permitting scarless appendage regeneration. Lineage tracing demonstrates that this regeneration derives from fate-restricted progenitor cells. Pharmacological or genetic disruption of Sdf1-Cxcr4 signaling enhances tissue repair, including full reconstitution of tissue architecture and all cell types. Our findings identify signaling and cellular mechanisms underlying appendage regeneration in mice and suggest new therapeutic approaches for regenerative medicine. © 2015 Leung et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  16. Effects of environmental factors and appendage injury on the wing variation in the cricket Velarifictorus ornatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lü-Quan; Zhu, Dao-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The effects of environmental factors and appendage injury on the wing variation in Velarifictorus ornatus (Shiraki) (Orthoptera: Gryllidae) were investigated. The percentage of micropters was more than 95% when the nymphs were reared at constant photoperiods, and changing photoperiod did not affect wing variation in V. ornatus at 25 or 30°C. In the crowding experiment, the percentage of macropters was only 11.2% when the nymphs were reared separately at 25°C. In contrast, the percentage of macropters was significantly higher when the rearing density was increased to two nymphs per container and lower when the rearing density was increased to five or 10 nymphs per container. These results indicate that low and high rearing densities induce micropters, but intermediate rearing density stimulates the formation of macropters. Meanwhile, severance of appendages, such as antennae, femora, and tibiae, in the nymph stage exerted a micropterizing effect. The period sensitive to such stresses ranged from 35 to 60 days of nymph development. PMID:25368061

  17. Effects of environmental factors and appendage injury on the wing variation in the cricket Velarifictorus ornatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lü-Quan; Zhu, Dao-Hong

    2014-01-01

    The effects of environmental factors and appendage injury on the wing variation in Velarifictorus ornatus (Shiraki) (Orthoptera: Gryllidae) were investigated. The percentage of micropters was more than 95% when the nymphs were reared at constant photoperiods, and changing photoperiod did not affect wing variation in V. ornatus at 25 or 30°C. In the crowding experiment, the percentage of macropters was only 11.2% when the nymphs were reared separately at 25°C. In contrast, the percentage of macropters was significantly higher when the rearing density was increased to two nymphs per container and lower when the rearing density was increased to five or 10 nymphs per container. These results indicate that low and high rearing densities induce micropters, but intermediate rearing density stimulates the formation of macropters. Meanwhile, severance of appendages, such as antennae, femora, and tibiae, in the nymph stage exerted a micropterizing effect. The period sensitive to such stresses ranged from 35 to 60 days of nymph development. This is an open access paper. We use the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 license that permits unrestricted use, provided that the paper is properly attributed.

  18. Left Atrial Appendage: Physiology, Pathology, and Role as a Therapeutic Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damiano Regazzoli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most common clinically relevant cardiac arrhythmia. AF poses patients at increased risk of thromboembolism, in particular ischemic stroke. The CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc scores are useful in the assessment of thromboembolic risk in nonvalvular AF and are utilized in decision-making about treatment with oral anticoagulation (OAC. However, OAC is underutilized due to poor patient compliance and contraindications, especially major bleedings. The Virchow triad synthesizes the pathogenesis of thrombogenesis in AF: endocardial dysfunction, abnormal blood stasis, and altered hemostasis. This is especially prominent in the left atrial appendage (LAA, where the low flow reaches its minimum. The LAA is the remnant of the embryonic left atrium, with a complex and variable morphology predisposing to stasis, especially during AF. In patients with nonvalvular AF, 90% of thrombi are located in the LAA. So, left atrial appendage occlusion could be an interesting and effective procedure in thromboembolism prevention in AF. After exclusion of LAA as an embolic source, the remaining risk of thromboembolism does not longer justify the use of oral anticoagulants. Various surgical and catheter-based methods have been developed to exclude the LAA. This paper reviews the physiological and pathophysiological role of the LAA and catheter-based methods of LAA exclusion.

  19. Effect of Red Clover Isoflavones over Skin, Appendages, and Mucosal Status in Postmenopausal Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Lipovac

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Evaluate in postmenopausal women the effect of red clover extract (RCE isoflavones over subjective status of skin, appendages, and several mucosal sites. Method. Postmenopausal women (n=109 were randomly assigned to receive either two daily capsules of the active compound (80 mg RCE, Group A or placebo of equal appearance (Group B for a 90-day period. After a washout period of 7 days, medication was crossed over and taken for 90 days more. Subjective improvement of skin, appendages, and several mucosal site status was assessed for each studied group at 90 and 187 days using a visual analogue scale (VAS. In addition, libido, tiredness, and urinary, sleep, and mood complaints were also evaluated. Results. Women after RCE intervention (both groups reported better subjective improvement of scalp hair and skin status, libido, mood, sleep, and tiredness. Improvement of urinary complaints, nail, body hair, and mucosa (oral, nasal, and ocular status did not differ between treatment phases (intra- and intergroup. Overall satisfaction with treatment was reported higher after RCE intervention (both groups as compared to placebo. Conclusion. RCE supplementation exerted a subject improvement of scalp hair and skin status as well as libido, mood, sleep, and tiredness in postmenopausal women.

  20. Expression of Foxi3 is regulated by ectodysplasin in skin appendage placodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirokova, Vera; Jussila, Maria; Hytönen, Marjo K; Perälä, Nina; Drögemüller, Cord; Leeb, Tosso; Lohi, Hannes; Sainio, Kirsi; Thesleff, Irma; Mikkola, Marja L

    2013-06-01

    Foxi3 is a member of the large forkhead box family of transcriptional regulators, which have a wide range of biological activities including manifold developmental processes. Heterozygous mutation in Foxi3 was identified in several hairless dog breeds characterized by sparse fur coat and missing teeth. A related phenotype called hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) is caused by mutations in the ectodysplasin (Eda) pathway genes. Expression of Foxi3 was strictly confined to the epithelium in developing ectodermal appendages in mouse embryos, but no expression was detected in the epidermis. Foxi3 was expressed in teeth and hair follicles throughout embryogenesis, but in mammary glands only during the earliest stages of development. Foxi3 expression was decreased and increased in Eda loss- and gain-of-function embryos, respectively, and was highly induced by Eda protein in embryonic skin explants. Also activin A treatment up-regulated Foxi3 mRNA levels in vitro. Eda and activin A were identified as upstream regulators of Foxi3. Foxi3 is a likely transcriptional target of Eda in ectodermal appendage placodes suggesting that HED phenotype may in part be produced by compromised Foxi3 activity. In addition to hair and teeth, Foxi3 may have a role in nail, eye, and mammary, sweat, and salivary gland development. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Design of hair-like appendages and comparative analysis on their coordination toward steady and efficient swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Bokeon; Bae, Joonbum

    2017-05-22

    The locomotion of water beetles has been widely studied in biology owing to their remarkable swimming skills. Inspired by the oar-like legs of water beetles, designing a robot that swims under the principle of drag-powered propulsion can lead to highly agile mobility. But its motion can easily be discontinuous and jerky due to backward motions (i.e. retraction) of the legs. Here we proposed novel hair-like appendages and consider their coordination to achieve steady and efficient swimming on the water surface. First of all, we propose several design schemes and fabrication methods of the hair-like appendages, which can passively adjust their projected area while obtaining enough thrust. The coordination between the two pairs of legs, as with water beetles in nature, were also investigated to achieve steady swimming without backward movement by varying the beating frequency and phase of the legs. To verify the functionality of the hair-like appendages and their coordinations, six different types of appendages were fabricated, and two robots (one with a single pair of legs and the other with two pairs of legs) were built. Locomotion of the robots was extensively compared through experiments, and it was found that steady swimming was achieved by properly coordinating the two pairs of legs without sacrificing their speed. Also, owing to the lower velocity fluctuation during swimming, it was shown that using two pairs of legs was more energy efficient than the robot with single pair of legs.

  2. Influence of cell surface appendages on the bacterium-substratum interface measured real-time using QCM-D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Adam L J; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J; Sharma, Prashant K

    2009-02-03

    Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) utilizes an oscillating quartz crystal to register adsorption of rigid masses through a decrease in its resonance frequency f. In addition, QCM-D has the ability to measure the dissipative nature of nonrigid masses adhering to the crystal surface in the form of oscillation amplitude decay time. Although QCM has been applied to register bacterial adhesion to the crystal surface, full interpretation of the frequency change and dissipation signal has hitherto been impossible due to the complex interactions within the distance of 250 nm between the substratum and the bacterial cell surface. Here, we study adhesion of a series of Streptococcus salivarius mutants, possessing various surface appendages of known lengths, as a function of time using QCM-D. In addition, the number of bacteria adhering to the crystal surface was determined. The results show that adhesion of a "bald" bacterium, completely devoid of surface appendages, is registered as a frequency decrease. Adhesion of bacteria possessing surface appendages yields either a much smaller decrease or an increase in frequency, despite the fact they adhere in higher numbers. Furthermore, the magnitude of frequency and dissipation shifts was found to be influenced by the distance at which the cell body was held from the sensor surface by its surface appendages.

  3. Dynamic Analysis of Maneuvering Flexible Spacecraft Appendage Using Higher Order Sandwich Panel Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milad Azimi

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper is devoted to the vibration of rotating flexible spacecraft. The maneuver of the spacecraft is modeled by a constant torque input acting on the hub. For the first time in this paper the equations of motion of flexible spacecraft are derived based on higher order sandwich panel theory (HSAPT. Hamilton's principle is used for driving the governing partial differential equations of motion. The generalized differential quadrature method (GDQ is utilized to solve the partial differential equations of motion. The effect of different parameters on vibration of rotating flexible spacecraft appendage is investigated. It is also investigated the effect of these parameters on natural frequencies. The result of HSAPT and Euler Bernoulli theory is compared with each other. To show the accuracy the natural frequencies of recent paper are compared with the literature.

  4. Atrial fibrillation ablation beyond pulmonary veins: The role of left atrial appendage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Jorge; Natale, Andrea; Di Biase, Luigi

    2017-11-01

    The role of pulmonary vein isolation in patients with non-paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) is only modest. Several studies have demonstrated the role of the left atrial appendage (LAA) in initiating and maintaining of this arrhythmia. We review in this article the incremental benefit in free-arrhythmia recurrence of LAA electrical isolation in patients undergoing procedures for persistent AF or long standing persistent AF either using radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation or Lariat device implantation. Likewise, acute complications, anticoagulation and the risk of ischemic stroke after LAA electrical isolation (LAAEI) are analyzed. LAAEI in addition to standard ablation appears to have a substantial incremental benefit to achieve freedom from all atrial arrhythmias in patients with persistent AF and long standing persistent atrial fibrillation (LSPAF) without increasing acute procedural complications and without raising the risk of ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Optimal control/structure integrated design of a flexible space platform with articulated appendages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelkar, Atul G.; Alberts, Thomas E.

    1991-10-01

    A complete set of closed form symbolic equations are developed for a 2-D model of a system comprised of a flexible platform with articulated appendages. The system considered has a flexible two link manipulator, with joint compliance, at one end of the flexible platform and an articulated antenna on the other end. The model is formulated using a Lagrangian approach which incorporates homogeneous transformation matrices, similar to those typically seen in the robotics literature, for the kinematic representation. The integrated control/structure design strategy considered emphasizes rapid system response and minimal structural weight. Constraints are included to keep antenna pointing error to a minimum, and at the same time achieve accurate end point positioning of the manipulator with minimal oscillations.

  6. A сase of obstruction of SVC-right atrium appendage anastomosis after procedure Warden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Е. А. Связов

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of a 6-year patient’s medical history after correction of congenital heart disease (partial anomalous drainage of the right superior pulmonary vein into the superior vena cava complicated by obstruction of the anastomosis between the SVC and the appendage right atrium is presented. The article discusses the stages of diagnosis and patient management features, as well as the choice of treatment.Received 12 December 2016. Accepted 14 February 2017.Financing: The study did not have sponsorship.Conflict of interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.Svyazov E.A.: data analysis, article writing and editing. Podoksenov A.U.: article editing. Varvarenko V.I.: implantation of the stent-graft in superior vena cava.Martsinkevich G.I.: echocardiographic examination of the patient before and after endograft implantation, article editing. Krivoshchyokov E.V.: organizational work and referral of the patient to endovascular treatment, article editing.

  7. Catheter Ablation of Ectopic Atrial Tachycardia Originating from the Left Atrial Appendage using CARTOMERGE® System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiko Goya, MD

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A 70-year-old woman was referred because of drug resistant and daily incessant palpitation attack. She had undergone two previous unsuccessful radiofrequency catheter ablations at another hospital. The physical examination, chest X-ray, and echocardiogram were all normal. The 12-lead ECG during tachycardia showed narrow QRS, short PR tachycardia and negative polarity of the P wave in leads I and aVL (Fig. 1A. The ECG monitor showed incessant tachycardia with warming-up phenomenon. Three dimensional electroanatomical map integrated with CT imaging (CARTOMERGE®, Biosense Webster Inc. clearly revealed the radial activation pattern originating from the basalo-postero-inferior aspect of the left atrial appendage. Radiofrequency energy application at this site eliminated tachycardia permanently.

  8. Etiologic significance of enlargement of the left atrial appendage in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, C.E.; Kelley, M.J.; Higgins, C.B.

    1982-01-01

    Fifty-one patients were divided into two groups: 20 patients with proven rheumatic mitral valve disease (RMVD) and 31 patients with left atrial enlargement (LAE) of a nonrheumatic etiology. The latter group included patients with ischemic papillary muscle dysfunction, mitral valve prolapse, and congestive cardiomyopathy. Radiographic studies showed that enlargement of the left atrial appendage (LAAE) was present in 18 of 20 rheumatics but in only one of 31 nonrheumatics. There was no direct relationship between enlargement of the LAA and radiographic or echocardiographic left atrial size, degree of pulmonary venous hypertension (PVH), or presence of atrial fibrillation. It is postulated that rheumatic influammation of the LAA allows it to dilate out of proportion to the body of the left atrium. In the adult patient with radiographic findings of PVH, LAAE is a valuable and specific radiographic sign of rheumatic mitral valve disease

  9. Identifying future research priorities using value of information analyses: left atrial appendage occlusion devices in atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micieli, Andrew; Bennell, Maria C; Pham, Ba'; Krahn, Murray; Singh, Sheldon M; Wijeysundera, Harindra C

    2014-09-16

    Left atrial appendage occlusion devices are cost effective for stroke prophylaxis in atrial fibrillation when compared with dabigatran or warfarin. We illustrate the use of value-of-information analyses to quantify the degree and consequences of decisional uncertainty and to identify future research priorities. A microsimulation decision-analytic model compared left atrial appendage occlusion devices to dabigatran or warfarin in atrial fibrillation. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis quantified the degree of parameter uncertainty. Expected value of perfect information analyses showed the consequences of this uncertainty. Expected value of partial perfect information analyses were done on sets of input parameters (cost, utilities, and probabilities) to identify the source of the greatest uncertainty. One-way sensitivity analyses identified individual parameters for expected value of partial perfect information analyses. Population expected value of perfect information and expected value of partial perfect information provided an upper bound on the cost of future research. Substantial uncertainty was identified, with left atrial appendage occlusion devices being preferred in only 47% of simulations. The expected value of perfect information was $8542 per patient and $227.3 million at a population level. The expected value of partial perfect information for the set of probability parameters represented the most important source of uncertainty, at $6875. Identified in 1-way sensitivity analyses, the expected value of partial perfect information for the odds ratio for stroke with left atrial appendage occlusion compared with warfarin was calculated at $7312 per patient or $194.5 million at a population level. The relative efficacy of stroke reduction with left atrial appendage occlusion devices in relation to warfarin is an important source of uncertainty. Improving estimates of this parameter should be the priority for future research in this area. © 2014 The Authors

  10. Left Atrial Appendage Closure Guided by Integrated Echocardiography and Fluoroscopy Imaging Reduces Radiation Exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Jungen

    Full Text Available To investigate whether percutaneous left atrial appendage (LAA closure guided by automated real-time integration of 2D-/3D-transesophageal echocardiography (TEE and fluoroscopy imaging results in decreased radiation exposure.In this open-label single-center study LAA closure (AmplatzerTM Cardiac Plug was performed in 34 consecutive patients (8 women; 73.1±8.5 years with (n = 17, EN+ or without (n = 17, EN- integrated echocardiography/fluoroscopy imaging guidance (EchoNavigator® [EN]; Philips Healthcare. There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between both groups. Successful LAA closure was documented in all patients. Radiation dose was reduced in the EN+ group about 52% (EN+: 48.5±30.7 vs. EN-: 93.9±64.4 Gy/cm2; p = 0.01. Corresponding to the radiation dose fluoroscopy time was reduced (EN+: 16.7±7 vs. EN-: 24.0±11.4 min; p = 0.035. These advantages were not at the cost of increased procedure time (89.6±28.8 vs. 90.1±30.2 min; p = 0.96 or periprocedural complications. Contrast media amount was comparable between both groups (172.3±92.7 vs. 197.5±127.8 ml; p = 0.53. During short-term follow-up of at least 3 months (mean: 8.1±5.9 months no device-related events occurred.Automated real-time integration of echocardiography and fluoroscopy can be incorporated into procedural work-flow of percutaneous left atrial appendage closure without prolonging procedure time. This approach results in a relevant reduction of radiation exposure.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01262508.

  11. Left Atrial Appendage Closure Guided by Integrated Echocardiography and Fluoroscopy Imaging Reduces Radiation Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzer, Jan; Eickholt, Christian; Petersen, Margot; Kehmeier, Eva; Veulemans, Verena; Kelm, Malte; Willems, Stephan; Meyer, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Aims To investigate whether percutaneous left atrial appendage (LAA) closure guided by automated real-time integration of 2D-/3D-transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and fluoroscopy imaging results in decreased radiation exposure. Methods and Results In this open-label single-center study LAA closure (AmplatzerTM Cardiac Plug) was performed in 34 consecutive patients (8 women; 73.1±8.5 years) with (n = 17, EN+) or without (n = 17, EN-) integrated echocardiography/fluoroscopy imaging guidance (EchoNavigator® [EN]; Philips Healthcare). There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between both groups. Successful LAA closure was documented in all patients. Radiation dose was reduced in the EN+ group about 52% (EN+: 48.5±30.7 vs. EN-: 93.9±64.4 Gy/cm2; p = 0.01). Corresponding to the radiation dose fluoroscopy time was reduced (EN+: 16.7±7 vs. EN-: 24.0±11.4 min; p = 0.035). These advantages were not at the cost of increased procedure time (89.6±28.8 vs. 90.1±30.2 min; p = 0.96) or periprocedural complications. Contrast media amount was comparable between both groups (172.3±92.7 vs. 197.5±127.8 ml; p = 0.53). During short-term follow-up of at least 3 months (mean: 8.1±5.9 months) no device-related events occurred. Conclusions Automated real-time integration of echocardiography and fluoroscopy can be incorporated into procedural work-flow of percutaneous left atrial appendage closure without prolonging procedure time. This approach results in a relevant reduction of radiation exposure. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01262508 PMID:26465747

  12. A sexually dimorphic corolla appendage affects pollen removal and floral longevity in gynodioecious Cyananthus delavayi (Campanulaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yang; Zhang, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Chang-Qiu; Li, Zhi-Min; Sun, Hang

    2015-01-01

    The floral traits of bisexual flowers may evolve in response to selection on both male and female functions, but the relative importance of selection associated with each of these two aspects is poorly resolved. Sexually dimorphic traits in plants with unisexual flowers may reflect gender-specific selection, providing opportunities for gaining an increased understanding of the evolution of specific floral traits. We examined sexually dimorphic patterns of floral traits in perfect and female flowers of the gynodioecious species Cyananthus delavayi. A special corolla appendage, the throat hair, was investigated experimentally to examine its influences on male and female function. We found that perfect flowers have larger corollas and much longer throat hairs than female flowers, while female ones have much exerted stigmas. The presence of throat hairs prolonged the duration of pollen presentation by restricting the amount of pollen removed by pollen-collecting bees during each visit. Floral longevity was negatively related to the rate of pollen removal. When pollen removal rate was limited in perfect flowers, the duration of the female phases diminished with the increased male phase duration. There was a weak negative correlation between throat hair length and seed number per fruit in female flowers, but this correlation was not significant in perfect flowers. These results suggest that throat hairs may enhance male function in terms of prolonged pollen presentation. However, throat hairs have no obvious effect on female function in terms of seed number per fruit. The marked sexual dimorphism of this corolla appendage in C. delavayi is likely to have evolved and been maintained by gender-specific selection.

  13. A sexually dimorphic corolla appendage affects pollen removal and floral longevity in gynodioecious Cyananthus delavayi (Campanulaceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Niu

    Full Text Available The floral traits of bisexual flowers may evolve in response to selection on both male and female functions, but the relative importance of selection associated with each of these two aspects is poorly resolved. Sexually dimorphic traits in plants with unisexual flowers may reflect gender-specific selection, providing opportunities for gaining an increased understanding of the evolution of specific floral traits. We examined sexually dimorphic patterns of floral traits in perfect and female flowers of the gynodioecious species Cyananthus delavayi. A special corolla appendage, the throat hair, was investigated experimentally to examine its influences on male and female function. We found that perfect flowers have larger corollas and much longer throat hairs than female flowers, while female ones have much exerted stigmas. The presence of throat hairs prolonged the duration of pollen presentation by restricting the amount of pollen removed by pollen-collecting bees during each visit. Floral longevity was negatively related to the rate of pollen removal. When pollen removal rate was limited in perfect flowers, the duration of the female phases diminished with the increased male phase duration. There was a weak negative correlation between throat hair length and seed number per fruit in female flowers, but this correlation was not significant in perfect flowers. These results suggest that throat hairs may enhance male function in terms of prolonged pollen presentation. However, throat hairs have no obvious effect on female function in terms of seed number per fruit. The marked sexual dimorphism of this corolla appendage in C. delavayi is likely to have evolved and been maintained by gender-specific selection.

  14. [Regeneration of vertebrate appendage: an old experimental model to study stem cells in the adult].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawk, Marcel; Vriz, Sophie

    2003-04-01

    The application of stem cell therapy to cure degenerative diseases offers immense possibilities, but the research in this field is the subject of ethical debates raised by the question of destructive research on early human embryos. Stem cells taken in the adult constitute an alternative to human embryonic stem cells, but our knowledge on totipotent or pluripotent cells is currently insufficient. Furthermore, many questions must be solved before selection and differentiation of these cells in a given cellular type can be controlled on a routine basis. What are the molecular characteristics of an adult stem cell? What are the mechanisms involved in cell reprogramming? Which signals control stem cell replication and differentiation? Basic research activities must be carried out in order to clarify all these points. In this context, the regeneration of vertebrate appendages provides a model for this type of research. The regeneration process is defined by both the morphological and functional reconstruction of a part of a living organism, which has previously been destroyed. But why are some vertebrates able to regenerate complex structures and others apparently not? Among most vertebrates, the capacity to regenerate is limited to some tissues. It is however possible to observe the regeneration of appendages (limb, tail, fin, jaw, etc.) among several amphibians and fish. This regeneration leads to re-forming of the amputated part with a complete restoration of its shape, segmentation and function. Why is the amputation of limbs not followed by regeneration in mammals and birds: absence of stem cells, absence of recruitment signals for these cells, or absence of signal receptivity? This review constitutes a report on the current understanding of the basis of on regeneration of legs in tetrapods and of fins in fish with an emphasis in the role of the nervous system in this process.

  15. Procedural success and intra-hospital outcome related to left atrial appendage morphology in patients that receive an interventional left atrial appendage closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fastner, Christian; Behnes, Michael; Sartorius, Benjamin; Wenke, Annika; El-Battrawy, Ibrahim; Ansari, Uzair; Gill, Ishar-Singh; Borggrefe, Martin; Akin, Ibrahim

    2017-08-01

    The interventional left atrial appendage (LAA) closure represents an emerging alternative to oral anticoagulation for stroke prevention in certain atrial fibrillation patients. Preliminary results have suggested high procedural success rates and fewer peri-interventional complications; however, there persists an insufficient understanding of the role of many underlying confounding variables (e.g., anatomical characteristics). It was investigated whether varying LAA morphologies influence procedural success as well as in-hospital outcome. Sixty-seven patients ineligible for long-term oral anticoagulation were included in this single-center, prospective, observational registry spanning from the years 2014 to 2016. Interventions were performed with the Watchman occluder (Boston Scientific, Natick, MA) or the Amplatzer Amulet (St. Jude Medical, St. Paul, MN), at the operator's discretion. Results derived from the data describing procedural success, fluoroscopy, and peri-interventional safety events were classified according to the presenting LAA morphology (cauliflower, cactus, windsock, and chicken wing). Rates of successful implantation were high across all groups (≥98%; P = 0.326). Surrogate parameters underlining procedural complexity like median total duration (P = 0.415), median fluoroscopy time (P = 0.459), median dose area product (P = 0.698), and the median amount of contrast agent (P = 0.076) demonstrated similar results across all groups. Likewise, the periprocedural complication rate was not significantly different and was mainly restricted to minor bleeding events. Irrespective of the varying morphological presentation of the LAA, the procedural success rates, interventional characteristics, and safety events did not significantly differ among patients receiving an interventional LAA closure. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Cephalic and Limb Anatomy of a New Isoxyid from the Burgess Shale and the Role of “Stem Bivalved Arthropods” in the Disparity of the Frontalmost Appendage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aria, Cédric; Caron, Jean-Bernard

    2015-01-01

    We herein describe Surusicaris elegans gen. et sp. nov. (in Isoxyidae, amended), a middle (Series 3, Stage 5) Cambrian bivalved arthropod from the new Burgess Shale deposit of Marble Canyon (Kootenay National Park, British Columbia). Surusicaris exhibits 12 simple, partly undivided biramous trunk limbs with long tripartite caeca, which may illustrate a plesiomorphic “fused” condition of exopod and endopod. We construe also that the head is made of five somites (= four segments), including two eyes, one pair of anomalocaridid-like frontalmost appendages, and three pairs of poorly sclerotized uniramous limbs. This fossil may therefore be a candidate for illustrating the origin of the plesiomorphic head condition in euarthropods, and questions the significance of the “two-segmented head” in, e.g., fuxianhuiids. The frontalmost appendage in isoxyids is intriguingly disparate, bearing similarities with both dinocaridids and euarthropods. In order to evaluate the relative importance of bivalved arthropods, such as Surusicaris, in the hypothetical structuro-functional transition between the dinocaridid frontal appendage and the pre-oral—arguably deutocerebral—appendage of euarthropods, we chose a phenetic approach and computed morphospace occupancy for the frontalmost appendages of 36 stem and crown taxa. Results show different levels of evolutionary decoupling between frontalmost appendage disparity and body plans. Variance is greatest in dinocaridids and “stem bivalved” arthropods, but these groups do not occupy the morphospace homogeneously. Rather, the diversity of frontalmost appendages in “stem bivalved” arthropods, distinct in its absence of clear clustering, is found to link the morphologies of “short great appendages,” chelicerae and antennules. This find fits the hypothesis of an increase in disparity of the deutocerebral appendage prior to its diversification in euarthropods, and possibly corresponds to its original time of development

  17. Cephalic and limb anatomy of a new Isoxyid from the Burgess Shale and the role of "stem bivalved arthropods" in the disparity of the frontalmost appendage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aria, Cédric; Caron, Jean-Bernard

    2015-01-01

    We herein describe Surusicaris elegans gen. et sp. nov. (in Isoxyidae, amended), a middle (Series 3, Stage 5) Cambrian bivalved arthropod from the new Burgess Shale deposit of Marble Canyon (Kootenay National Park, British Columbia). Surusicaris exhibits 12 simple, partly undivided biramous trunk limbs with long tripartite caeca, which may illustrate a plesiomorphic "fused" condition of exopod and endopod. We construe also that the head is made of five somites (= four segments), including two eyes, one pair of anomalocaridid-like frontalmost appendages, and three pairs of poorly sclerotized uniramous limbs. This fossil may therefore be a candidate for illustrating the origin of the plesiomorphic head condition in euarthropods, and questions the significance of the "two-segmented head" in, e.g., fuxianhuiids. The frontalmost appendage in isoxyids is intriguingly disparate, bearing similarities with both dinocaridids and euarthropods. In order to evaluate the relative importance of bivalved arthropods, such as Surusicaris, in the hypothetical structuro-functional transition between the dinocaridid frontal appendage and the pre-oral-arguably deutocerebral-appendage of euarthropods, we chose a phenetic approach and computed morphospace occupancy for the frontalmost appendages of 36 stem and crown taxa. Results show different levels of evolutionary decoupling between frontalmost appendage disparity and body plans. Variance is greatest in dinocaridids and "stem bivalved" arthropods, but these groups do not occupy the morphospace homogeneously. Rather, the diversity of frontalmost appendages in "stem bivalved" arthropods, distinct in its absence of clear clustering, is found to link the morphologies of "short great appendages," chelicerae and antennules. This find fits the hypothesis of an increase in disparity of the deutocerebral appendage prior to its diversification in euarthropods, and possibly corresponds to its original time of development. The analysis of this

  18. The facilitative effects of glucose ingestion on memory retrieval in younger and older adults: is task difficulty or task domain critical?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riby, Leigh M; McMurtrie, Hazel; Smallwood, Jonathan; Ballantyne, Carrie; Meikle, Andrew; Smith, Emily

    2006-02-01

    The ingestion of a glucose-containing drink has been shown to improve cognitive performance, particularly memory functioning. However, it remains unclear as to the extent to which task domain and task difficulty moderate the glucose enhancement effect. The aim of this research was to determine whether boosts in performance are restricted to particular classes of memory (episodic v. semantic) or to tasks of considerable cognitive load. A repeated measures (25 g glucose v. saccharin), counterbalanced, double-blind design was used with younger and older adults. Participants performed a battery of episodic (e.g. paired associate learning) and semantic memory (e.g. category verification) tasks under low and high cognitive load. Electrophysiological measures (heart rate and galvanic skin response) of arousal and mental effort were also gathered. The results indicated that whilst glucose appeared to aid episodic remembering, cognitive load did not exaggerate the facilitative effect. For semantic memory, there was little evidence to suggest that glucose can boost semantic memory retrieval even when the load was manipulated. One exception was that glucose facilitated performance during the difficult category fluency task. Regardless, the present findings are consistent with the domain-specific account in which glucose acts primarily on the hippocampal region, which is known to support episodic memory. The possible contribution of the hippocampus in semantic memory processing is also discussed.

  19. CEP128 Localizes to the Subdistal Appendages of the Mother Centriole and Regulates TGF-β/BMP Signaling at the Primary Cilium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mönnich, Maren; Borgeskov, Louise; Breslin, Loretta

    2018-01-01

    The centrosome is the main microtubule-organizing center in animal cells and comprises a mother and daughter centriole surrounded by pericentriolar material. During formation of primary cilia, the mother centriole transforms into a basal body that templates the ciliary axoneme. Ciliogenesis depends...... on mother centriole-specific distal appendages, whereas the role of subdistal appendages in ciliary function is unclear. Here, we identify CEP128 as a centriole subdistal appendage protein required for regulating ciliary signaling. Loss of CEP128 did not grossly affect centrosomal or ciliary structure...

  20. The melanocortin-2 receptor of the rainbow trout: Identifying a role for critical positions in transmembrane domain 4, extracellular loop 2, and transmembrane domain 5 in the activation of rainbow trout MC2R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Liang; Davis, Perry V; Dores, Michael R; Dores, Robert M

    2018-02-01

    The activation of either teleost or tetrapod melanocortin-2 receptor (MC2R) orthologs requires interaction between the HFRW motif and R/KKRRP motif in the primary sequence of ACTH, and two corresponding sites on the melanocortin 2 receptor. While the HFRW contact site on MC2R appears to involve residues in TM2, TM3, and TM6, several studies on human MC2R point to the EC2/TM5 region of MC2R as a possible location for the R/KKRRP contact site. In this study nineteen single-alanine mutants of rainbow trout (rt) MC2R were made beginning at V 153 in TM4, at all positions in EC2 (extracellular loop 2), to F 175 in TM5. For twelve of these alanine mutants (i.e., V 153 , G 155 , C 162 , D 163 , T 165 , V 166 , I 167 , H 169 , F 170 , H 172 , V 173 , L 174 ), alanine substitution did not have a statistically significant effect on activation of the receptor. For four of these alanine mutations (i.e., V 157 , M 158 , F 161 , K 168 ), while the negative shift in ligand sensitivity was statistically significant, the magnitude of the negative shift in activation was fivefold or less. However, for substitution at V 159 in TM4 (negative shift in activation: 110 fold), F 171 in TM5 (negative shift in activation: 48-fold), and F 175 in TM5 (negative shift in activation: 100 fold), the effect on activation was both statistically significant and may be physiologically relevant. To support this conclusion, a triple alanine mutant of rtMC2R (V 159 /A, F 171 /A, F 175 /A), and this mutant receptor could not be activated by ACTH at concentrations as high as 10 -6 M. A Cell Surface ELISA analysis indicated that the trafficking of the triple alanine mutant rtMC2R to the plasma membrane was not impaired by the alanine substitutions. Collectively, these observations point to a critical role for TM4 and TM5 in the activation of the rainbow trout melanocortin-2 receptor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Combined percutaneous balloon mitral valvuloplasty and left atrial appendage occlusion device implantation for rheumatic mitral stenosis and atrial fibrillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murdoch, Dale, E-mail: dale_murdoch@health.qld.gov.au [The Prince Charles Hospital, Brisbane (Australia); The University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); McAulay, Laura [The Prince Charles Hospital, Brisbane (Australia); Walters, Darren L. [The Prince Charles Hospital, Brisbane (Australia); The University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia)

    2014-11-15

    Rheumatic heart disease is a common cause of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality worldwide, mostly in developing countries. Mitral stenosis and atrial fibrillation often coexist, related to both structural and inflammatory changes of the mitral valve and left atrium. Both predispose to left atrial thrombus formation, commonly involving the left atrial appendage. Thromboembolism can occur, with devastating consequences. We report the case of a 62 year old woman with rheumatic heart disease resulting in mitral stenosis and atrial fibrillation. Previous treatment with warfarin resulted in life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding and she refused further anticoagulant therapy. A combined procedure was performed, including percutaneous balloon mitral valvuloplasty and left atrial appendage occlusion device implantation with the Atritech® Watchman® device. No thromboembolic or bleeding complications were encountered at one year follow-up. Long-term follow-up in a cohort of patients will be required to evaluate the safety and efficacy of this strategy.

  2. Nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis associated with cancer of unknown origin complicated with thrombus in the left auricular appendage: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morinaga Yukiko

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A 63-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with a complaint of right lateroabdominal pain. He was diagnosed with metastatic colon cancer, and then developed multiple brain embolic infarctions 7 days after admission. Transesophageal echocardiography showed that mobile, echo-dense masses were attached to the anterior and posterior mitral valve leaflet. Furthermore, there was a thrombus in the left auricular appendage despite sinus rhythm. These findings led to a diagnosis of suspected infectious endocarditis with subsequent multiple brain infarctions. The patient's general condition worsened and he died 13 days after admission. An autopsy was performed, and, while poorly differentiated cancer was observed in multiple organs, no primary tumor could be identified. Histological analysis showed that the masses of the mitral valve consisted mainly of fibrin without bacteria or oncocytes. This patient was therefore diagnosed with nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis associated with cancer of unknown origin complicated with thrombus in the left auricular appendage.

  3. Combined percutaneous balloon mitral valvuloplasty and left atrial appendage occlusion device implantation for rheumatic mitral stenosis and atrial fibrillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murdoch, Dale; McAulay, Laura; Walters, Darren L.

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatic heart disease is a common cause of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality worldwide, mostly in developing countries. Mitral stenosis and atrial fibrillation often coexist, related to both structural and inflammatory changes of the mitral valve and left atrium. Both predispose to left atrial thrombus formation, commonly involving the left atrial appendage. Thromboembolism can occur, with devastating consequences. We report the case of a 62 year old woman with rheumatic heart disease resulting in mitral stenosis and atrial fibrillation. Previous treatment with warfarin resulted in life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding and she refused further anticoagulant therapy. A combined procedure was performed, including percutaneous balloon mitral valvuloplasty and left atrial appendage occlusion device implantation with the Atritech® Watchman® device. No thromboembolic or bleeding complications were encountered at one year follow-up. Long-term follow-up in a cohort of patients will be required to evaluate the safety and efficacy of this strategy

  4. Setal morphology of the grooming appendages of Macrobrachium rosenbergii (Crustacea: Decapoda: Caridea: Palaemonidae) and review of decapod setal classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortham, Jennifer L; Vanmaurik, Lauren N; Wayne Price, W

    2014-06-01

    Setae are vital in grooming activities and aiding in the removal of epibionts and sedimentary fouling from the body surfaces of decapod crustaceans. Thus, the setal structures and their arrangement on the grooming appendages and sensory structures of the commercially important shrimp, Macrobrachium rosenbergii, were examined using scanning electron microscopy. Macrobrachium rosenbergii is extensively grown in aquaculture and exhibits unique male morphological forms, termed morphotypes. The three male morphotypes are termed blue-clawed males, orange-clawed males, and small-clawed or undifferentiated males and all three differ in their dominance, behavior, body morphology, and reproductive success. Seven setal types, two of which have never been described in the literature, are identified on the grooming appendages (third maxillipeds, first, second, and fifth pereopods) and antennae: simple, serrate, serrulate, spiniform, pappose, crinoid, and spinulate. The latter two setae are newly identified. Certain setal types, such as serrate and serrulate setae were located and associated with specific grooming appendages such as the first pereopods. The types of setae on the grooming appendages varied among females and male morphotypes and the novel setal types (crinoid and spinulate) were found only on two of the male morphotypes. A literature review of terminology related to the structure of setae and setal types in decapod crustaceans is offered as the usage of various terms is ambiguous and conflicting in the literature. The intention of this review is to provide future authors with a comprehensive collection of terms and images that can be used to describe various aspects of setal morphology in decapods. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Velocity encoded cardiovascular magnetic resonance to assess left atrial appendage emptying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muellerleile Kai

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The presence of impaired left atrial appendage (LAA function identifies patients who are prone to thrombus formation in the LAA and therefore being at high risk for subsequent cardioembolic stroke. LAA function is typically assessed by measurements of LAA emptying velocities using transesophageal echocardiography (TEE in clinical routine. This study aimed at evaluating the feasibility of assessing LAA emptying by velocity encoded (VENC cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR. Methods This study included 30 patients with sinus rhythm (n = 18 or atrial fibrillation (n = 12. VENC-CMR velocity measurements were performed perpendicular to the orifice of the LAA. Peak velocities were measured of passive diastolic LAA emptying (e-wave in all patients. Peak velocities of active, late-diastolic LAA emptying (a-wave were assessed in patients with sinus rhythm. Correlation and agreement was analyzed between VENC-CMR and TEE measurements of e- and a-wave peak velocities. Results A significant correlation and good agreement was found between VENC-CMR and TEE measurements of maximal e-wave velocities (r = 0.61, P  Conclusions The assessment of active and passive LAA emptying by VENC-CMR is feasible. Further evaluation is required of potential future clinical applications such as risk stratification for cardioembolic stroke.

  6. Left atrial and left atrial appendage function in paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdei, T; Erdei, Tamás; Dénes, M; Kardos, A; Földesi, C; Földesi, A; Temesvári, A; Temesvári, M; Lengyel, M

    2011-06-01

    In patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF) little information is available about left atrial (LA)function, and there is less information about LA appendage (LAA) function, and about their relations. 46 patients were selected for catheter ablation (CA) because of nonvalvular PAF.Transthoracic, tissue Doppler and transoesophageal echocardiography was performed before CA. LA volumes and volume index (LAVI) were calculated. LA function was assessed by LA filling fraction (LAFF), LA emptying fraction (LAEF), systolic fraction of pulmonary venous flow (PVSF) and late diastolic velocities of mitral annulus(Aa,, A5at) LAA function was assessed by peak LAA emptying flow velocity (PLAAEFV). Diastolic dysfunction(DD) was also assessed. Dilated LAVI in 32, LA dysfunction in 20, DD with elevated LV filling pressure in 19 patients was found. Aa,at and Aa,p correlated with LAFF (r:0.53; p<0.001 and r:0.43; p<0.05), LAEF (r:0.51;p<0.001 and r:0.63; p<0.001), PVSF (r:0.49; p<0.001 and r:0.46; p<0.005) and PLAAEFV (r:0.58; p<0.001 and r:0.45; p<0.01). In PAF patients Aa velocity is useful to assess LA function and correlates positively with other TTE derived LA functional parameters and LAA function by TEE derived PLAAEFV.

  7. Analisa CFD Pengaruh Penambahan Appendage pada Lambung Katamaran terhadap Hambatan Viskos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sony Anggara

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Penambahan tonjolan (appendages pada lambung kapal sering dimanfaatkan oleh para desainer untuk meningkatkan performa seekeping kapal ketika beroperasi di air, seperti misalnya penggunaan pelat lajur bilga (bilge keel dan tonjolan haluan (bulbous bow. Melakukan modifikasi semacam itu berarti mengubah bentuk model lambung dari tanpa tonjolan (bare hull menjadi bentuk lambung yang lebih komplek. Hal ini berpengaruh terhadap hambatan bentuk kapal yang secara langsung juga menentukan nilai hambatan viskos. Penelitian ini membahas mengenai seberapa jauh tingkat perubahan hambatan viskos akibat modifikasi bentuk lambung. Metode yang digunakan adalah simulasi pemodelan numerik CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics dengan memanfaatkan model kapal katamaran yang dimodifikasi dengan menambahkan bulbous bow pada bagian depan. Kemudian panjang bulbous bow tersebut divariasikan dengan panjang 2% dan 4% dari panjang garis air (Lwl. Dari hasil simulasi diperoleh nilai hambatan viskos dan visualisasi tekanan fluida di sekitar model. perhitungan nilai koefisien bentuk (form factor 1+k juga disajikan sebagai bahan pendukung identifikasi. Tahap validasi yang digunakan adalah grid independence dan konvergensi. Hasil analisa menunjukkan bahwa perubahan bentuk lambung menunjukkan pengaruh yang relatif kecil terhadap hambatan viskos.

  8. An early Late Triassic long-necked reptile with a bony pectoral shield and gracile appendages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Dzik

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Several partially articulated specimens and numerous isolated bones of Ozimek volans gen. et sp. nov., from the late Carnian lacustrine deposits exposed at Krasiejów in southern Poland, enable a reconstruction of most of the skeleton. The unique character of the animal is its enlarged plate-like coracoids presumably fused with sterna. Other aspects of the skeleton seem to be comparable to those of the only known specimen of Sharovipteryx mirabilis from the latest Middle Triassic of Kyrgyzstan, which supports interpretation of both forms as protorosaurians. One may expect that the pectoral girdle of S. mirabilis, probably covered by the rock matrix in its only specimen, was similar to that of O. volans gen. et sp. nov. The Krasiejów material shows sharp teeth, low crescent scapula, three sacrals in a generalized pelvis (two of the sacrals being in contact with the ilium and curved robust metatarsal of the fifth digit in the pes, which are unknown in Sharovipteryx. Other traits are plesiomorphic and, except for the pelvic girdle and extreme elongation of appendages, do not allow to identify any close connection of the sharovipterygids within the Triassic protorosaurians.

  9. Left atrial appendage isolation using percutaneous (endocardial/epicardial) devices: Pre-clinical and clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Jorge; Natale, Andrea; Engstrom, Krysthel; Di Biase, Luigi

    2016-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia in the elderly population and it is associated with a four-fold to five-fold increased risk of thromboembolic events. It was not until the mid-1950s that the left atrial appendage (LAA) was identified as the main location of thrombus formation, particularly in patients with non-valvular AF. In this review, we explain at some extent its embryology, anatomy and physiology, and as well as the clinical and pre-clinical trials published to date testing the safety and efficacy of most LAA closure devices. Among those devices, the most studied include the PLAATO system (ev3 Endovascular, Plymouth, MN), the Amplatzer cardiac plug (St Jude, Golden Valley, MN; St. Jude Medical, Minneapolis, MN), the WATCHMAN device (Boston Scientific, Plymouth, MN; Atritech Inc., Plymouth, MN), and the LARIAT device (SentreHEART, Palo Alto, CA). Similarly, newer LAA closure devices currently under investigation such as the Transcatheter Patch (Custom Medical Devices, Athens, Greece), AEGIS, and the Coherex WaveCrest (Salt Lake City, UT) will also be discussed. Future perspectives and the need for well-designed prospective studies between devices and new oral anticoagulant drugs are also proposed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. “High-Throughput” Evaluation of Polymer-Supported Triazolic Appendages for Metallic Cations Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riadh Slimi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to find and use a low-cost high-throughput method for a quick primary evaluation of several metal extraction by substituted piperazines appendages as chelatants grafted onto Merrifield polymer using click-chemistry by the copper (I-catalyzed Huisgen’s reaction (CuAAC The polymers were tested for their efficiency to remove various metal ions from neutral aqueous solutions (13 cations studied: Li+, Na+, K+, Mn2+, Fe3+, Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Cd2+, Ba2+, Ce3+, Hg+ and Pb2+ using the simple conductimetric measurement method. The polymers were found to extract all metals with low efficiencies ≤40%, except for Fe3+ and Hg+, and sometimes Pb2+. Some polymers exhibited a selectively for K+, Cd2+ and Ba2+, with good efficiencies. The values obtained here using less polymer, and a faster method, are in fair correspondence (average difference ±16% with another published evaluation by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS.

  11. Percutaneous left atrial appendage closure: procedural techniques and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, Jacqueline; Lempereur, Mathieu

    2014-11-01

    Percutaneous left atrial appendage closure technology for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation has significantly advanced in the past 2 decades. Several devices are under clinical investigation, and a few have already received Conformité Européene (CE)-mark approval and are available in many countries. The WATCHMAN device (Boston Scientific, Natick, Massachusetts) has the most supportive data and is under evaluation by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for warfarin-eligible patients. The Amplatzer Cardiac Plug (St. Jude Medical, Plymouth, Minnesota) has a large real-world experience over the past 5 years, and a randomized trial comparing Amplatzer Cardiac Plug with the WATCHMAN device is anticipated in the near future. The Lariat procedure (SentreHEART Inc., Redwood City, California) has also gained interest lately, but early studies were concerning for high rates of serious pericardial effusion and major bleeding. The current real-world experience predominantly involves patients who are not long-term anticoagulation candidates or who are perceived to have high bleeding risks. This pattern of practice is expected to change when the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approves the WATCHMAN device for warfarin-eligible patients. This paper reviews in depth the procedural techniques, safety, and outcomes of the current leading devices. Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Leptin receptor is expressed by epidermis and skin appendages in dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercati, Francesca; Maranesi, Margherita; Dall'Aglio, Cecilia; Scocco, Paola; Pascucci, Luisa; Boiti, Cristiano; Ceccarelli, Piero

    2014-10-01

    Leptin is a polypeptide secreted by adipocytes which binds to a specific receptor (Ob-R) that is expressed in various tissues. The wide distribution of the Ob-R suggests that leptin might exert diverse biological functions, not only by regulating energy metabolism and appetite, but also by acting as a mitogen in many cell types, including keratinocytes. In this study, the presence and localization of Ob-R was investigated in the skin of the dog using RT-PCR and immunohistochemical techniques. RT-PCR revealed the presence of Ob-R m-RNA in the skin specimens collected from the dorsal region of two smooth coat breed dogs. Through immunohistochemistry performed on the skin of five dogs, the expression of the receptor was observed in the basal layer of the epidermis, in the hair follicles as well as in the apocrine sweat and sebaceous glands. No staining for Ob-R was detected in the suprabasal epidermis layers. Strong positive signals were observed in many cells of the outer root sheath of hair follicles in growing and in regressive phases. The identification of Ob-R in the above targets suggests that leptin may play a role in the regulation of cyclic renewal of the epidermis and skin appendages in dog. This study represents an important contribution to understand the complex mechanisms that are involved in the skin biology in this species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. A remote palm domain residue of RB69 DNA polymerase is critical for enzyme activity and influences the conformation of the active site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Jacewicz

    Full Text Available Non-conserved amino acids that are far removed from the active site can sometimes have an unexpected effect on enzyme catalysis. We have investigated the effects of alanine replacement of residues distant from the active site of the replicative RB69 DNA polymerase, and identified a substitution in a weakly conserved palm residue (D714A, that renders the enzyme incapable of sustaining phage replication in vivo. D714, located several angstroms away from the active site, does not contact the DNA or the incoming dNTP, and our apoenzyme and ternary crystal structures of the Pol(D714A mutant demonstrate that D714A does not affect the overall structure of the protein. The structures reveal a conformational change of several amino acid side chains, which cascade out from the site of the substitution towards the catalytic center, substantially perturbing the geometry of the active site. Consistent with these structural observations, the mutant has a significantly reduced k pol for correct incorporation. We propose that the observed structural changes underlie the severe polymerization defect and thus D714 is a remote, non-catalytic residue that is nevertheless critical for maintaining an optimal active site conformation. This represents a striking example of an action-at-a-distance interaction.

  14. Comparative evaluation of two methods care of the perioperative period after laparoscopic operations on uterine appendages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. S. Lashkul

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim – тo assess the impact of the early multimodal rehabilitation concept on postoperative period after laparoscopic operations on uterine appendages. Маterials and methods. The study involved 79 patients who were randomized by envelope method in two groups. In the main group (26 patients, a protocol of early multimodal rehabilitation (ERAS was used. In the control group (53 patients, the traditional perioperative regimen was used. In both groups, laparoscopic operations were performed under general anesthesia with mechanical ventilation (propofol + fentanyl. In perioperative anesthesia NSAIDs (dexketoprofen, ketorolac, paracetamol were included. Non-invasive monitoring was performed by the «Leon» monitor (StO2, blood pressure, heart rate, capnogram, hourly diuresis was taken into account, thermometry was performed. In the postoperative period analgesia with combination with systemic administration of dexketoprofen (100–150 mg/day + ketorolac (60 mg/day + paracetamol (3000 mg/day was used. Results. The groups were homogeneous according to anamnestic (the beginning of menstruation, the number of pregnancies, childbirth, abortions, miscarriages, anthropometric and demographic characteristics, the duration of operations, blood loss and baseline values of systolic, diastolic, mean arterial pressures and heart rate. In groups the volumes of diuresis did not differ significantly (p < 0.05. Positive intraoperative hemohydrate balance in the FTS group was almost half that in the control group. When assessing pain at rest by VAS, a statistically significant difference was found at the 6 and 24 hours study stages. Nevertheless, at the study stages the pain level in the control group did not exceed 30 mm, which indicates adequate analgesia at rest. The level of cough pain in the control group exceeded the level of pain in the main group, the statistical difference was determined after 6 hours and 24 hours, but was above 30 mm, which required

  15. Interatrial septum pacing decreases atrial dyssynchrony on strain rate imaging compared with right atrial appendage pacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuoka, Yoshinori; Abe, Haruhiko; Umekawa, Seiko; Katsuki, Keiko; Tanaka, Norio; Araki, Ryo; Imanaka, Takahiro; Matsutera, Ryo; Morisawa, Daisuke; Kitada, Hirokazu; Hattori, Susumu; Noda, Yoshiki; Adachi, Hidenori; Sasaki, Tatsuya; Miyatake, Kunio

    2011-03-01

    Interatrial septum pacing (IAS-P) decreases atrial conduction delay compared with right atrial appendage pacing (RAA-P). We evaluate the atrial contraction with strain rate of tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) during sinus activation or with IAS-P or RAA-P. Fifty-two patients with permanent pacemaker for sinus node disease were enrolled in the study. Twenty-three subjects were with IAS-P and 29 with RAA-P. The time from end-diastole to peak end-diastolic strain rate was measured and corrected with RR interval on electrocardiogram. It was defined as the time from end-diastole to peak end-diastolic strain rate (TSRc), and the balance between maximum and minimum TSRc at three sites (ΔTSRc) was compared during sinus activation and with pacing rhythm in each group. There were no significant differences observed in general characteristics and standard echocardiographic parameters except the duration of pacing P wave between the two groups. The duration was significantly shorter in the IAS-P group compared with the RAA-P group (95 ± 34 vs 138 ± 41; P = 0.001). TSRc was significantly different between sinus activation and pacing rhythm (36.3 ± 35.7 vs 61.6 ± 36.3; P = 0.003) in the RAA-P group, whereas no significant differences were observed in the IAS-P group (25.4 ± 12.1 vs 27.7 ± 14.7; NS). During the follow-up (mean 2.4 ± 0.7 years), the incidence of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) conversion to permanent AF was not significantly different between the two groups. IAS-P decreased the contraction delay on atrial TDI compared to RAA-P; however, it did not contribute to the reduction of AF incidence in the present study. ©2010, The Authors. Journal compilation ©2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. CT sizing for left atrial appendage closure is associated with favourable outcomes for procedural safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajwani, Adil; Nelson, Adam J; Shirazi, Masoumeh G; Disney, Patrick J S; Teo, Karen S L; Wong, Dennis T L; Young, Glenn D; Worthley, Stephen G

    2017-12-01

    We evaluated the utility of computerized tomography (CT) with respect to sizing work-up for percutaneous left atrial appendage (LAA) closure, and implications for procedural safety and outcomes. Contrast-enhanced multi-detector CT was routinely conducted to guide sizing for LAA closure in addition to transoesophageal echocardiography (TOE). Procedural safety and efficacy were prospectively assessed. Across 73 consecutive cases there were no device-related procedural complications, and no severe leaks. Systematic bias in orifice sizing by TOE vs. CT was significant on retrospective analysis (bias -3.0 mm vs. maximum diameter on CT; bias -1.1 mm vs. mean diameter on CT). Importantly, this translated to an altered device size selection in more than half of all cases, and median size predicted by CT was one interval greater than that predicted by TOE (27 mm vs. 24 mm). Of particular note, gross sizing error by TOE vs. CT was observed in at least 3.4% of cases. Degree of discrepancy between TOE and CT was correlated with LAA orifice eccentricity, orifice size, and left atrial volume. Mean orifice size by CT had the greatest utility for final Watchman device-size selection. In this single-centre registry of LAA closure, routine incorporation of CT was associated with excellent outcomes for procedural safety and absence of major residual leak. Mean orifice size may be preferable to maximum orifice size. A particular value of CT may be the detection and subsequent avoidance of gross sizing error by 2D TOE that occurs in a small but important proportion of cases. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Left atrial appendage: morphology and function in patients with paroxysmal and persistent atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hwan-Cheol; Shin, Jinho; Ban, Ji-Eun; Choi, Jong-Il; Park, Sang-Weon; Kim, Young-Hoon

    2013-04-01

    The anatomical and functional characteristics of the left atrial appendage (LAA) and its relationships with anatomical remodeling and ischemic stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) have not been clearly established. The purpose of this study was to determine whether functional and morphological features of the LAA independently predict clinical outcome and stroke in patients with AF who underwent catheter ablation (CA). Two hundred sixty-four patients with AF, including 176 with paroxysmal AF (PAF, 54.0 ± 11.4 years old, M:F = 138:38) and 88 with persistent AF (PeAF, 56.4 ± 9.6 years old, M:F = 74:14) were studied. Of these patients, 31 (11.7 %) had a history of stroke/TIA (transient ischemic attack). The LA and LAA volumes were 124.0 ± 42.4 and 24.9 ± 4.3 ml in PeAF, these values were greater than those in PAF (81.2 ± 24.8 ml and 21.2 ± 5.1 ml, P stroke, stroke patients had larger LA volume (106.9 ± 23.0 vs. 94.0 ± 38.9 ml, P = 0.004) and had lower LAA EF (50.0 ± 11.0 vs. 65.7 ± 13.4 %, P stroke were age (P = 0.002) and LAA EF (P stroke/TIA and recurrence of AF after CA in paroxysmal AF patients. Further large scaled prospective study is required for validation.

  18. The feasibility of substituting left atrial wall strain for flow velocity of left atrial appendage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Akihito; Nakamura, Yoichi; Kazatani, Yukio; Ito, Hiroshi

    2017-07-28

    Non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) is frequently complicated by thromboembolism. Left atrial appendage (LAA) flow is a predictor of LAA thrombosis. LAA flow is measured by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), which is a semi-invasive diagnostic tool. Recently, speckle-tracking methods have been adapted for the evaluation of local cardiac function. We hypothesised that if we could determine LAA wall motion utilising a speckle tracking technique, we could non-invasively analyse LAA flow. Sixty-three NVAF patients including 38 with chronic atrial fibrillation (CAF), 14 with paroxysmal AF (PAF) and 11 with atrial flutter (AFL) were enrolled in this study. Normal sinus rhythm (NSR) patients with non-thromboembolic cerebral infarction were also included. Immediately after obtaining a 2D movie of the LAA through the aortic oblique short axis view by transthoracic echocardiography, LAA flow velocity was measured by TEE. Mean strains between the posterior and anterior walls were measured using a speckle-tracking technique. Ten patients exhibited a thrombus and 11 had spontaneous echo contrast (SEC) in the auricle. Mean strain value was similar between CAF and PAF, although LAA flow velocity for CAF was significantly reduced compared with PAF (median value 13.7 cm/s versus 36.1 cm/s, p = reduced compared with NSR patients (median value 1.52% versus 3.17%, p = .00181). Furthermore, mean strain was correlated with LAA flow velocity (R = 0.399, R2 = 0.1595, p = .000615). LAA wall strain identified via speckle-tracking methods may presage LAA peak flow velocity. This technique may contribute to stratification of thrombosis risks in the LAA.

  19. Keratin Gene Mutations in Disorders of Human Skin and its Appendages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamcheu, Jean Christopher; Siddiqui, Imtiaz A.; Syed, Deeba N.; Adhami, Vaqar M.; Liovic, Mirjana; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2011-01-01

    Keratins, the major structural protein of all epithelia, are a diverse group of cytoskeletal scaffolding proteins that form intermediate filament networks, providing structural support to keratinocytes that maintain the integrity of the skin. Expression of keratin genes is usually regulated by differentiation of the epidermal cells within the stratifying squamous epithelium. Amongst the 54 known functional keratin genes in humans, about 21 different genes including hair and hair follicle-specific keratins have been associated with diverse hereditary disorders. The exact phenotype of each disease mostly reflects the spatial level of expression and types of the mutated keratin genes, the positions of the mutations as well as their consequences at sub-cellular levels. The identification of specific mutations in keratin disorders is the basis of our understanding that lead to reclassification, improved diagnosis with prognostic implications, prenatal testing and genetic counseling in severe cutaneous keratin genodermatoses. A disturbance in cutaneous keratins as a result of mutation(s) in the gene(s) that encode keratin intermediate filaments (KIF) causes keratinocytes and cutaneous tissue fragility, accounting for a large number of genetic disorders in human skin and its appendages. These diseases are characterized by a loss of structural integrity in keratinocytes expressing mutated keratins in vivo, often manifested as keratinocytes fragility (cytolysis), intra-epidermal blistering, hyperkeratosis, and keratin filament aggregation in severely affected tissues. Examples include epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS), keratinopathic ichthyosis (KPI), pachyonychia congenital (PC), monilethrix, steatocystoma multiplex and ichthyosis bullosa of Siemens (IBS). These keratins also have been identified to have roles in cell growth, apoptosis, tissue polarity, wound healing and tissue remodeling. PMID:21176769

  20. Left atrial appendage closure using AMPLATZER™ devices: A large, multicenter, Italian registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berti, Sergio; Santoro, Gennaro; Brscic, Elvis; Montorfano, Matteo; Vignali, Luigi; Danna, Paolo; Tondo, Claudio; D'Amico, Gianpiero; Stabile, Amerigo; Saccà, Salvatore; Patti, Giuseppe; Rapacciuolo, Antonio; Poli, Arnaldo; Golino, Paolo; Magnavacchi, Paolo; De Caterina, Alberto; Meucci, Francesco; Pezzulich, Bruno; Rezzaghi, Marco; Stolcova, Miroslava; Tarantini, Giuseppe

    2017-12-01

    Left atrial appendage occlusion (LAAO) has been proven to be effective for stroke prophylaxis in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). We aim to assess the safety and efficacy of LAAO by AMPLATZER™ devices in a large, multicenter, single-nation cohort of NVAF patients at high-risk of stroke and bleeding. From December 2008 to April 2015 613 NVAF patients (75.1±8.0years, 62.5% male) underwent LAAO in 15 Italian centers by AMPLATZER™ devices. There were no restrictions on any personal/institutional protocols with respect to indications, pre-procedural planning, device implantation, drug therapy and follow-up. All the baseline characteristics, imaging, procedural and follow-up data were collected in a single dataset. AMPLATZER™ devices were successfully implanted in 95.4% of cases. Major complications occurred during 38 procedures (6.2%) and included more frequently major bleeding (3.3%) and pericardial tamponade (2.0%). At a mean follow-up of 20months, the overall annual rates of stroke and thromboembolic events, including those periprocedural, was 1.67% and 2.90%, respectively, consisting in a reduction in the rate of stroke and TIA of 66% compared with the risk-based expectation. Among the 218 patients undergoing transesophageal echocardiography at 6months of follow-up, device thrombosis was present in 1.8% of the patients whilst a significant or mild to moderate peri-device leak was found in 0.5% and 11.9% of cases, respectively. In this large, multicenter, single-nation study, LAAO with the AMPLATZER™ devices showed high procedural success, early safety and mid-term efficacy for the prevention of NVAF-related thromboembolism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Lysine 356 is a critical residue for binding the C-6 phospho group of fructose 2,6-bisphosphate to the fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase domain of rat liver 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L; Lin, K; Correia, J J; Pilkis, S J

    1992-08-15

    Lysine 356 has been implicated by protein modification studies as a fructose-2,6-bisphosphate binding site residue in the 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase domain of rat liver 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase (Kitajima, S., Thomas, H., and Uyeda, K. (1985) J. Biol. Chem. 260, 13995-14002). However, Lys-356 is found in the fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase domain (Bazan, F., Fletterick, R., and Pilkis, S. J. (1989) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 86, 9642-9646). In order to ascertain whether Lys-356 is involved in fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase catalysis and/or domain/domain interactions of the bifunctional enzyme, Lys-356 was mutated to Ala, expressed in Escherichia coli, and then purified to homogeneity. Circular dichroism experiments indicated that the secondary structure of the Lys-356-Ala mutant was not significantly different from that of the wild-type enzyme. The Km for fructose 2,6-bisphosphate and the Ki for the noncompetitive inhibitor, fructose 6-phosphate, for the fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase of the Lys-356-Ala mutant were 2700- and 2200-fold higher, respectively, than those of the wild-type enzyme. However, the maximal velocity and the Ki for the competitive product inhibitor, inorganic phosphate, were unchanged compared to the corresponding values of the wild-type enzyme. Furthermore, in contrast to the wild-type enzyme, which exhibits substrate inhibition, there was no inhibition by substrate of the Lys-356-Ala mutant. In the presence of saturating substrate, inorganic phosphate, which acts by relieving fructose-6-phosphate and substrate inhibition, is an activator of the bisphosphatase. The Ka for inorganic phosphate of the Lys-356-Ala mutant was 1300-fold higher than that of the wild-type enzyme. The kinetic properties of the 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase of the Lys-356-Ala mutant were essentially identical with that of the wild-type enzyme. The results demonstrate that: 1) Lys-356 is a critical residue in fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase for binding the 6

  2. Hemolymph circulation in insect sensory appendages: functional mechanics of antennal accessory pulsatile organs (auxiliary hearts) in the mosquito Anopheles gambiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boppana, Sushma; Hillyer, Julián F

    2014-09-01

    Mosquito antennae provide sensory input that modulates host-seeking, mating and oviposition behaviors. Thus, mosquitoes must ensure the efficient transport of molecules into and out of these appendages. To accomplish this, mosquitoes and other insects have evolved antennal accessory pulsatile organs (APOs) that drive hemolymph into the antennal space. This study characterizes the structural mechanics of hemolymph propulsion throughout the antennae of Anopheles gambiae. Using intravital video imaging, we show that mosquitoes possess paired antennal APOs that are located on each side of the head's dorsal midline. They are situated between the frons and the vertex in an area that is dorsal to the antenna but ventral to the medial-most region of the compound eyes. Antennal APOs contract in synchrony at 1 Hz, which is 45% slower than the heart. By means of histology and intravital imaging, we show that each antennal APO propels hemolymph into the antenna through an antennal vessel that traverses the length of the appendage and has an effective diameter of 1-2 μm. When hemolymph reaches the end of the appendage, it is discharged into the antennal hemocoel and returns to the head. Because a narrow vessel empties into a larger cavity, hemolymph travels up the antenna at 0.2 mm s(-1) but reduces its velocity by 75% as it returns to the head. Finally, treatment of mosquitoes with the anesthetic agent FlyNap (triethylamine) increases both antennal APO and heart contraction rates. In summary, this study presents a comprehensive functional characterization of circulatory physiology in the mosquito antennae. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. Use of EchoNavigator, a novel echocardiography-fluoroscopy overlay system, for transseptal puncture and left atrial appendage occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafoor, Sameer; Schulz, Philipp; Heuer, Luisa; Matic, Predrag; Franke, Jennifer; Bertog, Stefan; Reinartz, Markus; Vaskelyte, Laura; Hofmann, Ilona; Sievert, Horst

    2015-04-01

    Structural heart disease requires a coordinated effort to join echocardiographic and fluoroscopic data. Various methods have been used, including echocardiography, CT, and MRI. We report on the use of EchoNavigator (Philips Inc., Amsterdam, Netherlands), a novel echocardiographic-fluoroscopic fusion system. This new system allows real-time integration and marking of important structures that track on fluoroscopy even with movement of the C-arm. In this article, we describe potential uses for this system in respect to transseptal puncture and left atrial appendage closure. © 2015, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Comparing Measurements of CT Angiography, TEE, and Fluoroscopy of the Left Atrial Appendage for Percutaneous Closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, Jacqueline; Fahmy, Peter; Spencer, Ryan; Prakash, Roshan; McLaughlin, Patrick; Nicolaou, Savvas; Tsang, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Left atrial appendage (LAA) closure requires accurate preprocedural measurements, and trans-esophageal echocardiography (TEE), cardiac computed tomography angiography (CCTA) and fluoroscopy can be utilized. However, correlations between these measurements remain inadequately assessed. Patients who underwent LAA closure at Vancouver General Hospital who had baseline LAA measurements by CCTA, TEE, and fluoroscopy were included in this analysis. CCTAs were performed with prospective-ECG-gating with Toshiba 320-detector or Siemens second generation 128-slice dual-source scanners, and images interpreted with VitreaWorkstation.™ LAA maximal dimensions were obtained for all patients at: (1) Amplatzer Cardiac Plug (ACP)/Amulet landing zone 10 mm within orifice, (2) WATCHMAN ostium, and (3) WATCHMAN depth measurements. Correlations and agreements were compared. We report 50 consecutive patients who underwent LAA closure (8 ACP, 10 Amulet, 32 WATCHMAN). Average age was 75.2 ± 8.7 years, mean CHADS2 score 3.0 ± 1.3, and CHA2 DS2 -VASc 4.7 ± 1.5. Procedural device implantation success was 100%. For ACP landing zone, mean maximal measurements were 24.1 ± 4.7 mm with CCTA, 22.3 ± 4.9 mm TEE, and 19.9 ± 5.6 mm fluoroscopy (P fluoroscopy/CTA, 0.67 fluoroscopy/TEE, and 0.80 CTA/TEE. For WATCHMAN ostium, mean maximal measurements were 25.8 ± 4.7 mm CCTA (P fluoroscopy, P = 0.16 vs. TEE), 25.1 ± 4.4 mm TEE (P = 0.016 vs. fluoroscopy), and 23.8 ± 4.9 mm fluoroscopy; R value 0.71 fluoroscopy/CTA, 0.65 fluoroscopy/TEE, and 0.74 CTA/TEE. Depth measurements were 34.3 ± 5.7 mm with CCTA, 31.1 ± 6.5 mm TEE, and 27.8 ± 7.1 mm fluoroscopy (all P fluoroscopy/CTA, 0.22 fluoroscopy/TEE, and 0.56 CTA/TEE. All 3 imaging modalities correlated with ACP landing zone and WATCHMAN ostium measurements, with CCTA providing the largest measurements, followed by TEE and fluoroscopy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Domain crossing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schraefel, M. C.; Rouncefield, Mark; Kellogg, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    In CSCW, how much do we need to know about another domain/culture before we observe, intersect and intervene with designs. What optimally would that other culture need to know about us? Is this a “how long is a piece of string” question, or an inquiry where we can consider a variety of contexts a...

  6. Righting and turning in mid-air using appendage inertia: reptile tails, analytical models and bio-inspired robots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jusufi, A; Full, R J [Department of Integrative Biology, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3140 (United States); Kawano, D T [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-1740 (United States); Libby, T, E-mail: ardianj@berkeley.ed [Center for Interdisciplinary Bio-inspiration in Education and Research, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3140 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    Unlike the falling cat, lizards can right themselves in mid-air by a swing of their large tails in one direction causing the body to rotate in the other. Here, we developed a new three-dimensional analytical model to investigate the effectiveness of tails as inertial appendages that change body orientation. We anchored our model using the morphological parameters of the flat-tailed house gecko Hemidactylus platyurus. The degree of roll in air righting and the amount of yaw in mid-air turning directly measured in house geckos matched the model's results. Our model predicted an increase in body roll and turning as tails increase in length relative to the body. Tails that swung from a near orthogonal plane relative to the body (i.e. 0-30{sup 0} from vertical) were the most effective at generating body roll, whereas tails operating at steeper angles (i.e. 45-60{sup 0}) produced only half the rotation. To further test our analytical model's predictions, we built a bio-inspired robot prototype. The robot reinforced how effective attitude control can be attained with simple movements of an inertial appendage.

  7. Righting and turning in mid-air using appendage inertia: reptile tails, analytical models and bio-inspired robots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jusufi, A; Full, R J; Kawano, D T; Libby, T

    2010-01-01

    Unlike the falling cat, lizards can right themselves in mid-air by a swing of their large tails in one direction causing the body to rotate in the other. Here, we developed a new three-dimensional analytical model to investigate the effectiveness of tails as inertial appendages that change body orientation. We anchored our model using the morphological parameters of the flat-tailed house gecko Hemidactylus platyurus. The degree of roll in air righting and the amount of yaw in mid-air turning directly measured in house geckos matched the model's results. Our model predicted an increase in body roll and turning as tails increase in length relative to the body. Tails that swung from a near orthogonal plane relative to the body (i.e. 0-30 0 from vertical) were the most effective at generating body roll, whereas tails operating at steeper angles (i.e. 45-60 0 ) produced only half the rotation. To further test our analytical model's predictions, we built a bio-inspired robot prototype. The robot reinforced how effective attitude control can be attained with simple movements of an inertial appendage.

  8. Subdivision of arthropod cap-n-collar expression domains is restricted to Mandibulata

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The monophyly of Mandibulata - the division of arthropods uniting pancrustaceans and myriapods - is consistent with several morphological characters, such as the presence of sensory appendages called antennae and the eponymous biting appendage, the mandible. Functional studies have demonstrated that the patterning of the mandible requires the activity of the Hox gene Deformed and the transcription factor cap-n-collar (cnc) in at least two holometabolous insects: the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and the beetle Tribolium castaneum. Expression patterns of cnc from two non-holometabolous insects and a millipede have suggested conservation of the labral and mandibular domains within Mandibulata. However, the activity of cnc is unknown in crustaceans and chelicerates, precluding understanding of a complete scenario for the evolution of patterning of this appendage within arthropods. To redress these lacunae, here we investigate the gene expression of the ortholog of cnc in Parhyale hawaiensis, a malacostracan crustacean, and two chelicerates: the harvestman Phalangium opilio, and the scorpion Centruroides sculpturatus. Results In the crustacean P. hawaiensis, the segmental expression of Ph-cnc is the same as that reported previously in hexapods and myriapods, with two distinct head domains in the labrum and the mandibular segment. In contrast, Po-cnc and Cs-cnc expression is not enriched in the labrum of either chelicerate, but instead is expressed at comparable levels in all appendages. In further contrast to mandibulate orthologs, the expression domain of Po-cnc posterior to the labrum is not confined within the expression domain of Po-Dfd. Conclusions Expression data from two chelicerate outgroup taxa suggest that the signature two-domain head expression pattern of cnc evolved at the base of Mandibulata. The observation of the archetypal labral and mandibular segment domains in a crustacean exemplar supports the synapomorphic nature of mandibulate cnc

  9. Trusted Domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Theis Solberg; Torbensen, Rune

    2012-01-01

    In the digital age of home automation and with the proliferation of mobile Internet access, the intelligent home and its devices should be accessible at any time from anywhere. There are many challenges such as security, privacy, ease of configuration, incompatible legacy devices, a wealth...... of wireless standards, limited resources of embedded systems, etc. Taking these challenges into account, we present a Trusted Domain home automation platform, which dynamically and securely connects heterogeneous networks of Short-Range Wireless devices via simple non-expert user. interactions, and allows...... remote access via IP-based devices such as smartphones. The Trusted Domain platform fits existing legacy technologies by managing their interoperability and access controls, and it seeks to avoid the security issues of relying on third-party servers outside the home. It is a distributed system...

  10. Left Atrial Appendage Closure Device With Delivery System: A Health Technology Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevis, Immaculate; Falk, Lindsey; Wells, David; Higgins, Caroline

    2017-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation is a common cardiac arrhythmia, and 15% to 20% of those who have experienced stroke have atrial fibrillation. Treatment options to prevent stroke in people with atrial fibrillation include pharmacological agents such as novel oral anticoagulants or nonpharmacological devices such as the left atrial appendage closure device with delivery system (LAAC device). The objectives of this health technology assessment were to assess the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the LAAC device versus novel oral anticoagulants in patients without contraindications to oral anticoagulants and versus antiplatelet agents in patients with contraindications to oral anticoagulants. Methods We performed a systematic review and network meta-analysis. We also conducted an economic literature review, economic evaluation, and budget impact analysis to assess the cost-effectiveness and budget impact of the LAAC device compared with novel oral anticoagulants and oral antiplatelet agents (e.g., aspirin). We also spoke with patients to better understand their preferences, perspectives, and values. Results Seven randomized controlled studies met the inclusion criteria for indirect comparison. Five studies assessed the effectiveness of novel oral anticoagulants versus warfarin, and two studies compared the LAAC device with warfarin. No studies were identified that compared the LAAC device with aspirin in patients in whom oral anticoagulants were contraindicated. Using the random effects model, we found that the LAAC device was comparable to novel oral anticoagulants in reducing stroke (odds ratio [OR] 0.85; credible interval [Cr.I] 0.63–1.05). Similarly, the reduction in the risk of all-cause mortality was comparable between the LAAC device and novel oral anticoagulants (OR 0.71; Cr.I 0.49–1.22). The LAAC device was found to be superior to novel oral anticoagulants in preventing hemorrhagic stroke (OR 0.45; Cr.I 0.29–0.79), whereas novel oral

  11. Magnetic Domains

    OpenAIRE

    Harland, Derek; Palmer, Sam; Saemann, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Recently a Nahm transform has been discovered for magnetic bags, which are conjectured to arise in the large n limit of magnetic monopoles with charge n. We interpret these ideas using string theory and present some partial proofs of this conjecture. We then extend the notion of bags and their Nahm transform to higher gauge theories and arbitrary domains. Bags in four dimensions conjecturally describe the large n limit of n self-dual strings. We show that the corresponding Basu-Harvey equatio...

  12. LEFT ATRIAL APPENDAGE CLOSURE AS AN ALTERNATIVE TO WARFARIN FOR STROKE PREVENTION IN ATRIAL FIBRILLATION: A PATIENT¬LEVEL META¬ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Holmes D.R. Jr, Doshi S.K., Kar S., et al. Left Atrial Appendage Closure as an Alternative to Warfarin for Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation: A Patient­Level Meta­Analysis // J. Am. Coll. Cardiol. – 2015. – Vol. 65. – P. 2614–2623.

  13. Locomotion Dynamics for Bio-inspired Robots with Soft Appendages: Application to Flapping Flight and Passive Swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Frédéric; Porez, Mathieu; Morsli, Ferhat; Morel, Yannick

    2017-08-01

    In animal locomotion, either in fish or flying insects, the use of flexible terminal organs or appendages greatly improves the performance of locomotion (thrust and lift). In this article, we propose a general unified framework for modeling and simulating the (bio-inspired) locomotion of robots using soft organs. The proposed approach is based on the model of Mobile Multibody Systems (MMS). The distributed flexibilities are modeled according to two major approaches: the Floating Frame Approach (FFA) and the Geometrically Exact Approach (GEA). Encompassing these two approaches in the Newton-Euler modeling formalism of robotics, this article proposes a unique modeling framework suited to the fast numerical integration of the dynamics of a MMS in both the FFA and the GEA. This general framework is applied on two illustrative examples drawn from bio-inspired locomotion: the passive swimming in von Karman Vortex Street, and the hovering flight with flexible flapping wings.

  14. Left atrial appendage thrombus with resulting stroke post-RF ablation for atrial fibrillation in a patient on dabigatran.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lobo, R

    2015-11-01

    Dabigatran etexilate is licensed for use in prevention of deep venous thromboembolism and in prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF). It has also been used in patients for other indications as a substitute for warfarin therapy because it requires no monitoring; one group being patients undergoing radiofrequency (RF), ablation for AF, although there have been no consensus guidelines with regards to dosage and timing of dose. We report the case of a patient with documentary evidence of left atrial appendage (LAA) thrombus formation and neurological sequelae post-RF ablation despite being on dabigatran. This case highlights the concern that periprocedural dabigatran may not provide adequate protection from development of LAA thrombus and that a standardised protocol will need to be developed and undergo large multicentre trials before dabigatran can be safely used for patients undergoing RF-ablation.

  15. Echocardiographic guidance and monitoring of left atrial appendage closure with AtriClip during open-chest cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contri, Rachele; Clivio, Sara; Torre, Tiziano; Cassina, Tiziano

    2017-10-01

    Left atrial appendage (LAA) closure prevents thromboembolic risk and avoids lifelong anticoagulation due to atrial fibrillation (AF). Nowadays, AtriClip, a modern epicardial device approved in June 2010, allows external and safe closure of LAA in patients undergoing cardiac surgery during other open-chest cardiac surgical procedures. Such a surgical approach and its epicardial deployment differentiates LAA closure with AtriClip from percutaneous closure techniques such as Watchman (Boston Scientific, Marlborough, MA, USA), Lariat (SentreHEART Inc., Redwood City, CA, USA), and Amplatzer Amulet (St. Jude Medical, St. Paul, MN, USA) device procedures. AtriClip positioning must consider perioperative transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) to confirm LAA anatomical features, to explore the links with neighboring structures, and finally to assess its successful closure. We report a sequence of images to document the role of intraoperative TEE during an elective aortic valve replacement and LAA external closure with AtriClip. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Evolution of Chemosensory Gene Families in Arthropods: Insight from the First Inclusive Comparative Transcriptome Analysis across Spider Appendages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizueta, Joel; Frías-López, Cristina; Macías-Hernández, Nuria; Arnedo, Miquel A.

    2017-01-01

    Unlike hexapods and vertebrates, in chelicerates, knowledge of the specific molecules involved in chemoreception comes exclusively from the comparative analysis of genome sequences. Indeed, the genomes of mites, ticks and spiders contain several genes encoding homologs of some insect membrane receptors and small soluble chemosensory proteins. Here, we conducted for the first time a comprehensive comparative RNA-Seq analysis across different body structures of a chelicerate: the nocturnal wandering hunter spider Dysdera silvatica Schmidt 1981. Specifically, we obtained the complete transcriptome of this species as well as the specific expression profile in the first pair of legs and the palps, which are thought to be the specific olfactory appendages in spiders, and in the remaining legs, which also have hairs that have been morphologically identified as chemosensory. We identified several ionotropic (Ir) and gustatory (Gr) receptor family members exclusively or differentially expressed across transcriptomes, some exhibiting a distinctive pattern in the putative olfactory appendages. Furthermore, these IRs were the only known olfactory receptors identified in such structures. These results, integrated with an extensive phylogenetic analysis across arthropods, uncover a specialization of the chemosensory gene repertoire across the body of D. silvatica and suggest that some IRs likely mediate olfactory signaling in chelicerates. Noticeably, we detected the expression of a gene family distantly related to insect odorant-binding proteins (OBPs), suggesting that this gene family is more ancient than previously believed, as well as the expression of an uncharacterized gene family encoding small globular secreted proteins, which appears to be a good chemosensory gene family candidate. PMID:28028122

  17. Cross Domain Analogies for Learning Domain Theories

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Klenk, Matthew; Forbus, Ken

    2007-01-01

    .... This work describes a method for learning new domain theories by analogy. We use analogies between pairs of problems and worked solutions to create a domain mapping between a familiar and a new domain...

  18. Modelling terahertz radiation absorption and reflection with computational phantoms of skin and associated appendages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilagosh, Zoltan; Lajevardipour, Alireza; Wood, Andrew

    2018-01-01

    Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) computational phantoms aid the analysis of THz radiation interaction with human skin. The presented computational phantoms have accurate anatomical layering and electromagnetic properties. A novel "large sheet" simulation technique is used allowing for a realistic representation of lateral absorption and reflection of in-vivo measurements. Simulations carried out to date have indicated that hair follicles act as THz propagation channels and confirms the possible role of melanin, both in nevi and skin pigmentation, to act as a significant absorber of THz radiation. A novel freezing technique has promise in increasing the depth of skin penetration of THz radiation to aid diagnostic imaging.

  19. .Gov Domains API

    Data.gov (United States)

    General Services Administration — This dataset offers the list of all .gov domains, including state, local, and tribal .gov domains. It does not include .mil domains, or other federal domains outside...

  20. CriticalEd

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjellberg, Caspar Mølholt; Meredith, David

    2014-01-01

    such as Sibelius or Finale. It was hypothesized that it would be possible to develop a Sibelius plug-in, written in Manuscript 6, that would improve the critical editing work flow, but it was found that the capabilities of this scripting language were insufficient. Instead, a 3-part system was designed and built......, consisting of a Sibelius plug-in, a cross-platform application, called CriticalEd, and a REST-based solution, which handles data storage/retrieval. A prototype has been tested at the Danish Centre for Music Publication, and the results suggest that the system could greatly improve the efficiency......The best text method is commonly applied among music scholars engaged in producing critical editions. In this method, a comment list is compiled, consisting of variant readings and editorial emendations. This list is maintained by inserting the comments into a document as the changes are made...

  1. A mutational analysis of the endophilin-A N-BAR domain performed in living flies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, Anita G; Mønsted, Christina Labarrera; Jansen, Anna M

    2010-01-01

    -function studies of the endophilin-A BAR domain have almost exclusively been made in reduced systems, either in vitro or ex vivo in cultured cells. To extend and complement this work, we have analyzed the role played by the structural features of the endophilin-A BAR domain in Drosophila in vivo. METHODOLOGY...... was observed in larvae rescued with the EndoA(Arf) transgene, which encodes a form of endophilin-A that completely lacks the central appendage. Whereas a mutation (D151P) designed to increase the BAR curvature was functional, another mutation (P143A, DeltaLEN) designed to decrease the curvature was not......BACKGROUND: Endophilin is a cytoplasmic protein with an important function in clathrin-dependent endocytosis at synapses and elsewhere. Endophilin has a BAR (Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs-homology) domain, which is implicated in the sensing and induction of membrane curvature. Previous structure...

  2. Cyberspace Policy For Critical Infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkin, Dorsey; Raines, Richard; Williams, Paul; Hopkinson, Kenneth

    The first step in preparing any battlespace is to define the domain for attack and maneuver. The various military service components have directed authority to focus their efforts in specific domains of operations (e.g., naval operations are mainly in the maritime domain). However, cyberspace operations pose challenges because they span multiple operational domains. This paper focuses on U.S. cyberspace policy related to defending and exploiting critical infrastructure assets. Also, it examines the issues involved in delineating responsibility for U.S. defensive and offensive operations related to critical infrastructures.

  3. A novel method to estimate blood flow velocity in the left atrial appendage using enhanced computed tomography: role of Hounsfield unit density ratio at two distinct points within the left atrial appendage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuoka, Ryobun; Kurita, Takashi; Kotake, Yasuhito; Akaiwa, Yuzuru; Hashiguchi, Naotaka; Motoki, Koichiro; Yamamoto, Hiromi; Kobuke, Kazuhiro; Iwanaga, Yoshitaka; Hirano, Yutaka; Miyazaki, Shunichi

    2017-07-01

    Low blood flow velocity in the left atrial appendage (LAA) indicates a high risk of thromboembolism. Although transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) has been the standard method with which to evaluate the LAA blood flow velocity, a clinically noninvasive method is desired. We hypothesized that the ratio of the Hounsfield unit (HU) density at two distinct points within the LAA represents the blood flow velocity in the LAA. We retrospectively investigated 60 consecutive patients with atrial fibrillation (paroxysmal type, n = 29) who underwent enhanced computed tomography (CT) and TEE. The peak emptying flow velocity in the LAA (LAAPV) was evaluated using TEE. HU density was measured at proximal and distal sites of the LAA (LAAp and LAAd) on CT images. The LAAd/LAAp ratio was correlated with the LAAPV (P velocity of the LAA can be estimated by the HU density ratio at distal and proximal sites within the LAA. Our method might be a feasible substitution for TEE to discriminate patients with a reduced LAAPV.

  4. Atrial Fibrillation associated chromosome 4q25 variants are not associated with PITX2c expression in human adult left atrial appendages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamone R Gore-Panter

    Full Text Available Atrial Fibrillation (AF, the most common sustained arrhythmia, has a strong genetic component, but the mechanism by which common genetic variants lead to increased AF susceptibility is unknown. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified that the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs most strongly associated with AF are located on chromosome 4q25 in an intergenic region distal to the PITX2 gene. Our objective was to determine whether the AF-associated SNPs on chromosome 4q25 were associated with PITX2c expression in adult human left atrial appendages. Analysis of a lone AF GWAS identified four independent AF risk SNPs at chromosome 4q25. Human adult left atrial appendage tissue was obtained from 239 subjects of European Ancestry and used for SNP analysis of genomic DNA and determination of PITX2c RNA expression levels by quantitative PCR. Subjects were divided into three groups based on their history of AF and pre-operative rhythm. AF rhythm subjects had higher PITX2c expression than those with history of AF but in sinus rhythm. PITX2c expression was not associated with the AF risk SNPs in human adult left atrial appendages in all subjects combined or in each of the three subgroups. However, we identified seven SNPs modestly associated with PITX2c expression located in the introns of the ENPEP gene, ∼54 kb proximal to PITX2. PITX2c expression in human adult left atrial appendages is not associated with the chromosome 4q25 AF risk SNPs; thus, the mechanism by which these SNPs are associated with AF remains enigmatic.

  5. [GISE/AIAC position paper on percutaneous left atrial appendage occlusion in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation: recommendations for patient selection, facilities, competences, organizing and training requirements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berti, Sergio; Themistoclakis, Sakis; Santoro, Gennaro; De Ponti, Roberto; Danna, Paolo; Zecchin, Massimo; Bedogni, Francesco; Padeletti, Luigi

    2014-09-01

    Thromboembolism from the left atrial appendage is the most feared complication in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). The cornerstone for the management of chronic nonvalvular AF is stroke reduction with oral anticoagulation (OAC). However, poor compliance, maintaining a narrow therapeutic window, and major side effects such as bleeding have severely limited its use, creating a therapeutic dilemma. About 20% of AF patients do not receive OAC due to contraindications and less than half of AF patients are not on OAC due to reluctance of the prescribing physician and/or patient non-compliance. Fortunately, over the past decade, the introduction of percutaneous approaches for left atrial appendage occlusion has offered a viable alternative to the management of nonvalvular AF in patients with OAC contraindication. Occlusion devices such as the Amplatzer Cardiac Plug and Watch man device have shown their noninferiority to OAC for stroke prophylaxis with less bleeding complications, while more recently some new devices have been introduced. The aim of this position paper is to review the most relevant clinical aspects of left atrial appendage occlusion from patient selection to periprocedural and follow-up management. In addition, the importance of a medical team and an organizational environment adequate to optimize all the steps of this procedure is discussed.

  6. Needed Research on Stress and Anxiety. A Special Report of the USOE-Sponsored Grant Study: Critical Appraisal of Research in the Personality-Emotions-Motivation Domain. IBR Report No. 72-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielberger, C.D.; And Others

    This series of papers on stress and anxiety is part of a larger project concerned with a critical appraisal of research needs in the areas of personality, emotion, and motivation. A group of behavioral scientists contributed their expertise in identifying critical variables, concepts, and processes relating to stress and anxiety. Rather than…

  7. Interatrial septum versus right atrial appendage pacing for prevention of atrial fibrillation : A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Jiang, H; Wang, W; Bai, J; Liang, Y; Su, Y; Ge, J

    2017-07-28

    Interatrial septum (IAS) pacing seems to be a promising strategy for the prevention of atrial fibrillation (AF); however, studies have yielded conflicting results. This meta-analysis was to compare IAS with right atrial appendage (RAA) pacing on the prevention of postpacing AF occurrence. Pubmed, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Web of Science databases were searched through October 2016 for randomized controlled trials comparing IAS with RAA pacing on the prevention of AF. Data concerning study design, patient characteristics and outcomes were extracted. Risk ratio (RR), weighted mean differences (WMD) or standardized mean differences (SMD) were calculated using fixed or random effects models. A total of 12 trials involving 1146 patients with dual-chamber pacing were included. Although IAS was superior to RAA pacing in terms of reducing the number of AF episodes (SMD = -0.29, P = 0.05), AF burden (SMD = -0.41, P = 0.008) and P -wave duration (WMD = -34.45 ms, P IAS pacing. Nevertheless, no differences were observed concerning all-cause death (RR = 1.04, P = 0.88), procedure-related events (RR = 1.17, P = 0.69) and pacing parameters between IAS and RAA pacing in the follow-up period. IAS pacing is safe and as well tolerated as RAA pacing. Although IAS pacing may fail to prevent permanent AF occurrence and recurrences of AF, it is able to not only improve interatrial conduction, but also reduce AF burden.

  8. Impact of Periprocedural Colchicine on Postprocedural Management in Patients Undergoing a Left Atrial Appendage Ligation Using LARIAT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunda, Sampath; Reddy, Madhu; Nath, Jayant; Nagaraj, Hosakote; Atoui, Moustapha; Rasekh, Abdi; Ellis, Christopher R; Badhwar, Nitish; Lee, Randall J; DI Biase, Luigi; Mansour, Moussa; Ruskin, Jeremy N; Natale, Andrea; Earnest, Matthew; Lakkireddy, Dhanunjaya R

    2016-01-01

    Left atrial appendage (LAA) can be effectively and safely excluded using a novel percutaneous LARIAT ligation system. However, due to pericardial catheter manipulation and LAA ligation and subsequent necrosis, postprocedural course is complicated by pericarditis. We intended to evaluate the preprocedural use of colchicine on the incidence of postprocedural pericardial complications. In this multicenter observational study, we included all consecutive patients who underwent LARIAT procedure at the participating centers. Many patients received periprocedural colchicine at the discretion of the physician. We compared the postprocedural outcomes of patients who received prophylactic periprocedural colchicine (colchicine group) with those who did not receive colchicine (standard group). A total of 344 consecutive patients, 243 in the "colchicine group" and 101 in the "standard group," were included. The mean age, median CHADS2VASc score, and HASBLED scores were 70 ± 11 years, 3 ± 1.7, and 3 ± 1.1, respectively. There were no significant differences in major baseline characteristics between the two groups. Severe pericarditis was significantly lower in the "colchicine group" compared to the "standard group" (10 [4%] vs. 16 [16%] Pcolchicine group, compared to the standard group, had lesser pericardial drain output (186 ± 84 mL vs. 351 ± 83, Pcolchicine periprocedurally was associated with significant reduction in postprocedural pericarditis and associated complications. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Percutaneous left atrial appendage occlusion in atrial fibrillation patients with a contraindication to oral anticoagulation: a focused review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Marin; Sab, Shiv; Reeves, Ryan R; Hsu, Jonathan C

    2017-12-08

    Stroke is the most feared complication of atrial fibrillation (AF). Although oral anticoagulation with non-vitamin K antagonist and non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have been established to significantly reduce risk of stroke, real-world use of these agents are often suboptimal due to concerns for adverse events including bleeding from both patients and clinicians. Particularly in patients with previous serious bleeding, oral anticoagulation may be contraindicated. Left atrial appendage occlusion (LAAO), mechanically targeting the source of most of the thrombi in AF, holds an immense potential as an alternative to OAC in management of stroke prophylaxis. In this focused review, we describe the available evidence of various LAAO devices, detailing data regarding their use in patients with a contraindication for oral anticoagulation. Although some questions of safety and appropriate use of these new devices in patients who cannot tolerate anticoagulation remain, LAAO devices offer a significant step forward in the management of patients with AF, including those patients who may not be able to be prescribed OAC at all. Future studies involving patients fully contraindicated to OAC are warranted in the era of LAAO devices for stroke risk reduction. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Far field R-wave sensing in Myotonic Dystrophy type 1: right atrial appendage versus Bachmann's bundle region lead placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Vincenzo; Nigro, Gerardo; Antonio Papa, Andrea; Rago, Anna; Di Meo, Federica; Cristiano, Anna; Molino, Antonio; Calabrò, Raffaele; Giovanna Russo, Maria; Politano, Luisa

    2014-10-01

    Aim of the present study was to investigate far field R-wave sensing (FFRS) timing and characteristics in 34 Myotonic Dystrophy type 1 (DM1) patients undergoing dual chamber pacemaker implantation, comparing Bachmann's bundle (BB) stimulation (16 patients) site with the conventional right atrial appendage (RAA) pacing site (18 patients). All measurements were done during sinus rhythm and in supine position, with unipolar (UP) and bipolar (BP) sensing configuration. The presence, amplitude threshold (FFRS trsh) and FFRS timing were determined. There were no differences between both atrial sites in the Pmin and Pmean values of sensed P-wave amplitudes, as well as between UP and BP sensing configurations. The FFRS trsh was lower at the BB region in comparison to the RAA site. The mean BP FFRS trsh was significantly lower than UP configuration in both atrial locations. There were no significant differences in atrial pacing threshold, sensing threshold and atrial lead impedances at the implant time and at FFRS measurements. Bachmann's bundle area is an optimal atrial lead position for signal sensing as well as conventional RAA, but it offers the advantage of reducing the oversensing of R-wave on the atrial lead, thus improving functioning of standard dual chamber pacemakers in DM1 patients.

  11. External morphology of the adult of Heraclides anchisiades capys (Hübner, [1809] (Lepidoptera - Papilionidae II: Thorax and thoracic appendages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Anderson Ribeiro Leite

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to highlight the morphological components of the thorax and its appendages of the adults of Heraclides anchisiades capys (Hübner, [1809], seeking a comparative focus with other Papilionoidea and Hesperioidea. The morphology was studied using illustrations and scanning electronic microscope. The most relevant morphological characters were: membranous patagia on prothorax; anepisternum II fused with the pleural wing process II as a small sclerite dorsal to the katepisternum II; 3A present on the forewing, reaching the inner margin on its proximal third; presence of basalare III "pad" and meral suture on coxa III.O propósito deste estudo foi evidenciar os componentes morfológicos do tórax e seus apêndices nos adultos de Heraclides anchisiades capys (Hübner, [1809], visando um enfoque comparativo com outros Papilionoidea e Hesperioidea. A morfologia é descrita com ilustrações e fotografias em microscópio eletrônico de varredura. Dentre os caracteres morfológicos encontrados, destacam-se: patágia membranosa no protórax, anepisterno II fusionado ao processo pleural da asa II como um pequeno esclerito dorsal ao catepisterno II; 3A presente na asa anterior, alcançando a margem interna em seu terço proximal; presença de "almofada" do basalar III e sutura meral na coxa III.

  12. Assessment of normal left atrial appendage anatomy and function over gender and ages by dynamic cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boucebci, Samy; Velasco, Stephane; Duboe, Pier-Olivier; Tasu, Jean-Pierre [University of Poitiers, University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Poitiers (France); Pambrun, Thomas [University of Poitiers, University Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Poitiers (France); Ingrand, Pierre [University of Poitiers, University Institute of Public Health, Poitiers (France)

    2016-05-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate variations in anatomy and function according to age and gender using cardiac computed tomography (CT) in a large prospective cohort of healthy patients. The left atrial appendage (LAA) is considered the most frequent site of intracardiac thrombus formation. However, variations in normal in vivo anatomy and function according to age and gender remain largely unknown. Three-dimensional (3D) cardiac reconstructions of the LAA were performed from CT scans of 193 consecutive patients. Parameters measured included LAA number of lobes, anatomical position of the LAA tip, angulation measured between the proximal and distal portions, minimum (iVol{sub min}) and maximum (iVol{sub max}) volumes indexed to body surface area (BSA), and ejection fraction (LAAEF). Relationship with age was assessed for each parameter. We found that men had longer and wider LAAs. The iVol{sub min} and iVol{sub max} increased by 0.23 and 0.19 ml per decade, respectively, while LAAEF decreased by 2 % per decade in both sexes. Although LAA volumes increase, LAAEF decreases with age in both sexes. (orig.)

  13. Contrast-enhanced CMR in patients after percutaneous closure of the left atrial appendage: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petersen Steffen E

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the feasibility and value of first-pass contrast-enhanced dynamic and post-contrast 3D CMR in patients after transcatheter occlusion of left atrial appendage (LAA to identify incorrect placement and persistent leaks. Methods 7 patients with different occluder systems (n = 4 PLAATO; n = 2 Watchman; n = 1 ACP underwent 2 contrast-enhanced (Gd-DOTA CMR sequences (2D TrueFISP first-pass perfusion and 3D-TurboFLASH to assess localization, artifact size and potential leaks of the devices. Perfusion CMR was analyzed visually and semi-quantitatively to identify potential leaks. Results All occluders were positioned within the LAA. The ACP occluder presented the most extensive artifact size. Visual assessment revealed a residual perfusion of the LAA apex in 4 cases using first-pass perfusion and 3D-TurboFLASH indicating a suboptimal LAA occlusion. By assessing signal-to-time-curves the cases with a visually detected leak showed a 9-fold higher signal-peak in the LAA apex (567 ± 120% increase from baseline signal than those without a leak (61 ± 22%; p Conclusion This CMR pilot study provides valuable non-invasive information in patients after transcatheter occlusion of the LAA to identify correct placement and potential leaks. We recommend incorporating CMR in future clinical studies to evaluate new device types.

  14. [New technology for prevention of embolic events in atrial fibrillation: a systematic review on percutaneous endovascular left atrial appendage closure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danna, Paolo; Sagone, Antonio; Proietti, Riccardo; Arensi, Andrea; Viecca, Maurizio; Santangeli, Pasquale; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea

    2012-09-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia. The mortality rate of patients with AF is doubled as compared to non-fibrillating controls. The most relevant complication of AF is a major increase in the risk of stroke. The gold standard in reducing cerebrovascular events in AF is warfarin therapy, which is not free from contraindications and limitations. The left atrial appendage (LAA) is the main source of emboli causing stroke in AF. LAA closure is a seducing approach to stroke risk reduction in AF without anticoagulation. Since 1949, heart surgeons have performed LAA closure or amputation in patients with AF. Percutaneous endovascular LAA closure is a new, less invasive, technique to reach the goal. Several devices have been used to perform this intervention, and the results of published trials are encouraging in terms of effectiveness and relative safety of this attractive technique. In this review we examine the published trials and data on percutaneous LAA closure, with particular attention to the risks and benefits of this procedure.

  15. Left atrial appendage occlusion for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: multicentre experience with the AMPLATZER Cardiac Plug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzikas, Apostolos; Shakir, Samera; Gafoor, Sameer; Omran, Heyder; Berti, Sergio; Santoro, Gennaro; Kefer, Joelle; Landmesser, Ulf; Nielsen-Kudsk, Jens Erik; Cruz-Gonzalez, Ignacio; Sievert, Horst; Tichelbäcker, Tobias; Kanagaratnam, Prapa; Nietlispach, Fabian; Aminian, Adel; Kasch, Friederike; Freixa, Xavier; Danna, Paolo; Rezzaghi, Marco; Vermeersch, Paul; Stock, Friederike; Stolcova, Miroslava; Costa, Marco; Ibrahim, Reda; Schillinger, Wolfgang; Meier, Bernhard; Park, Jai-Wun

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the safety, feasibility, and efficacy of left atrial appendage occlusion (LAAO) with the AMPLATZER Cardiac Plug (ACP) for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Data from consecutive patients treated in 22 centres were collected. A total of 1,047 patients were included in the study. Procedural success was 97.3%. There were 52 (4.97%) periprocedural major adverse events. Follow-up was complete in 1,001/1,019 (98.2%) of successfully implanted patients (average 13 months, total 1,349 patient-years). One-year all-cause mortality was 4.2%. No death at follow-up was reported as device-related. There were nine strokes (0.9%) and nine transient ischaemic attacks (0.9%) during follow-up. The annual rate of systemic thromboembolism was 2.3% (31/1,349 patient-years), which is a 59% risk reduction. There were 15 major bleedings (1.5%) during follow-up. The annual rate of major bleeding was 2.1% (28/1,349 patient-years), which is a 61% risk reduction. Patients with single LAAO on aspirin monotherapy or no therapy and longer follow-up had fewer cerebral and fewer bleeding events. In this multicentre study, LAAO with the ACP showed high procedural success and a favourable outcome for the prevention of AF-related thromboembolism. Modification in antithrombotic therapy after LAAO may result in reduction of bleeding events.

  16. Association Between Left Atrial Appendage Occlusion and Readmission for Thromboembolism Among Patients With Atrial Fibrillation Undergoing Concomitant Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Daniel J; Piccini, Jonathan P; Wang, Tongrong; Zheng, Jiayin; Malaisrie, S Chris; Holmes, David R; Suri, Rakesh M; Mack, Michael J; Badhwar, Vinay; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Gaca, Jeffrey G; Chow, Shein-Chung; Peterson, Eric D; Brennan, J Matthew

    2018-01-23

    The left atrial appendage is a key site of thrombus formation in atrial fibrillation (AF) and can be occluded or removed at the time of cardiac surgery. There is limited evidence regarding the effectiveness of surgical left atrial appendage occlusion (S-LAAO) for reducing the risk of thromboembolism. To evaluate the association of S-LAAO vs no receipt of S-LAAO with the risk of thromboembolism among older patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Retrospective cohort study of a nationally representative Medicare-linked cohort from the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database (2011-2012). Patients aged 65 years and older with AF undergoing cardiac surgery (coronary artery bypass grafting [CABG], mitral valve surgery with or without CABG, or aortic valve surgery with or without CABG) with and without concomitant S-LAAO were followed up until December 31, 2014. S-LAAO vs no S-LAAO. The primary outcome was readmission for thromboembolism (stroke, transient ischemic attack, or systemic embolism) at up to 3 years of follow-up, as defined by Medicare claims data. Secondary end points included hemorrhagic stroke, all-cause mortality, and a composite end point (thromboembolism, hemorrhagic stroke, or all-cause mortality). Among 10 524 patients undergoing surgery (median age, 76 years; 39% female; median CHA2DS2-VASc score, 4), 3892 (37%) underwent S-LAAO. Overall, at a mean follow-up of 2.6 years, thromboembolism occurred in 5.4%, hemorrhagic stroke in 0.9%, all-cause mortality in 21.5%, and the composite end point in 25.7%. S-LAAO, compared with no S-LAAO, was associated with lower unadjusted rates of thromboembolism (4.2% vs 6.2%), all-cause mortality (17.3% vs 23.9%), and the composite end point (20.5% vs 28.7%) but no significant difference in rates of hemorrhagic stroke (0.9% vs 0.9%). After inverse probability-weighted adjustment, S-LAAO was associated with a significantly lower rate of thromboembolism (subdistribution hazard ratio [HR], 0.67; 95% CI

  17. Superconductivity in domains with corners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnaillie-Noel, Virginie; Fournais, Søren

    2007-01-01

    We study the two-dimensional Ginzburg-Landau functional in a domain with corners for exterior magnetic field strengths near the critical field where the transition from the superconducting to the normal state occurs. We discuss and clarify the definition of this field and obtain a complete...... asymptotic expansion for it in the large $\\kappa$ regime. Furthermore, we discuss nucleation of superconductivity at the boundary....

  18. Localizations of γ-Actins in Skin, Hair, Vibrissa, Arrector Pili Muscle and Other Hair Appendages of Developing Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morioka, Kiyokazu; Takano-Ohmuro, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    Six isoforms of actins encoded by different genes have been identified in mammals including α-cardiac, α-skeletal, α-smooth muscle (α-SMA), β-cytoplasmic, γ-smooth muscle (γ-SMA), and γ-cytoplasmic actins (γ-CYA). In a previous study we showed the localization of α-SMA and other cytoskeletal proteins in the hairs and their appendages of developing rats (Morioka K., et al. (2011) Acta Histochem. Cytochem. 44, 141–153), and herein we determined the localization of γ type actins in the same tissues and organs by immunohistochemical staining. Our results indicate that the expression of γ-SMA and γ-CYA is suggested to be poor in actively proliferating tissues such as the basal layer of the epidermis and the hair matrix in the hair bulb, and as well as in highly keratinized tissues such as the hair cortex and hair cuticle. In contrast, the expression of γ-actins were high in the spinous layer, granular layer, hair shaft, and inner root sheath, during their active differentiations. In particular, the localization of γ-SMA was very similar to that of α-SMA. It was located not only in the arrector pili muscles and muscles in the dermis, but also in the dermal sheath and in a limited area of the outer root sheath in both the hair and vibrissal follicles. The γ-CYA was suggested to be co-localized with γ-SMA in the dermal sheath, outer root sheath, and arrector pili muscles. Sparsely distributed dermal cells expressed both types of γ-actin. The expression of γ-actins is suggested to undergo dynamic changes according to the proliferation and differentiation of the skin and hair-related cells

  19. Predicting Peri-Device Leakage of Left Atrial Appendage Device Closure Using Novel Three-Dimensional Geometric CT Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hyemoon; Jeon, Byunghwan; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Han, Dongjin; Shim, Hackjoon; Cho, In Jeong; Shim, Chi Young; Hong, Geu-Ru; Kim, Jung-Sun; Jang, Yangsoo; Chung, Namsik

    2015-12-01

    After left atrial appendage (LAA) device closure, peri-device leakage into the LAA persists due to incomplete occlusion. We hypothesized that pre-procedural three-dimensional (3D) geometric analysis of the interatrial septum (IAS) and LAA orifice can predict this leakage. We investigated the predictive parameters of LAA device closure obtained from baseline cardiac computerized tomography (CT) using a novel 3D analysis system. We conducted a retrospective study of 22 patients who underwent LAA device closure. We defined peri-device leakage as the presence of a Doppler signal inside the LAA after device deployment (group 2, n = 5) compared with patients without peri-device leakage (group 1, n = 17). Conventional parameters were measured by cardiac CT. Angles θ and φ were defined between the IAS plane and the line, linking the LAA orifice center and foramen ovale. Group 2 exhibited significantly better left atrial (LA) function than group 1 (p = 0.031). Pre-procedural θ was also larger in this group (41.9° vs. 52.3°, p = 0.019). The LAA cauliflower-type morphology was more common in group 2. Overall, the patients' LA reserve significantly decreased after the procedure (21.7 mm(3) vs. 17.8 mm(3), p = 0.035). However, we observed no significant interval changes in pre- and post-procedural values of θ and φ in either group (all p > 0.05). Angles between the IAS and LAA orifice might be a novel anatomical parameter for predicting peri-device leakage after LAA device closure. In addition, 3D CT analysis of the LA and LAA orifice could be used to identify clinically favorable candidates for LAA device closure.

  20. Left Atrial Appendage Closure with Amplatzer Cardiac Plug in Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation: Safety and Long-Term Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Marcio José Montenegro da; Ferreira, Esmeralci; Quintella, Edgard Freitas; Amorim, Bernardo; Fuchs, Alexandre; Zajdenverg, Ricardo; Sabino, Hugo; Albuquerque, Denilson Campos de

    2017-12-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a cardiac arrhythmia with high risk for thromboembolic events, specially stroke. To assess the safety of left atrial appendage closure (LAAC) with the Amplatzer Cardiac Plug for the prevention of thromboembolic events in patients with nonvalvular AF. This study included 15 patients with nonvalvular AF referred for LAAC, 6 older than 75 years (mean age, 69.4 ± 9.3 years; 60% of the male sex). The mean CHADS2 score was 3.4 ± 0.1, and mean CHA2DS2VASc , 4.8 ± 1.8, evidencing a high risk for thromboembolic events. All patients had a HAS-BLED score > 3 (mean, 4.5 ± 1.2) with a high risk for major bleeding within 1 year. The device was successfully implanted in all patients, with correct positioning in the first attempt in most of them (n = 11; 73.3%). There was no periprocedural complication, such as device migration, pericardial tamponade, vascular complications and major bleeding. All patients had an uneventful in-hospital course, being discharged in 2 days. The echocardiographic assessments at 6 and 12 months showed neither device migration, nor thrombus formation, nor peridevice leak. On clinical assessment at 12 months, no patient had thromboembolic events or bleeding related to the device or risk factors. In this small series, LAAC with Amplatzer Cardiac Plug proved to be safe, with high procedural success rate and favorable outcome at the 12-month follow-up. (Arq Bras Cardiol. 2017; [online].ahead print, PP.0-0).

  1. Left atrial appendage morphology assessment for risk stratification of embolic stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupercio, Florentino; Carlos Ruiz, Juan; Briceno, David F; Romero, Jorge; Villablanca, Pedro A; Berardi, Cecilia; Faillace, Robert; Krumerman, Andrew; Fisher, John D; Ferrick, Kevin; Garcia, Mario; Natale, Andrea; Di Biase, Luigi

    2016-07-01

    Thromboembolic event (TE) risk stratification is performed by using CHA2DS2VASc score. It has been suggested that left atrial appendage (LAA) morphology independently influences TE risk in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. LAA morphology has been classified into 4 types: chicken wing, cauliflower, windsock, and cactus. The purpose of this study was to determine TE risk for each LAA morphology in patients with atrial fibrillation with low to intermediate TE risk. A systematic review of MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and Embase for studies that used computed tomography, tridimensional transesophageal echocardiography, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging to categorize the LAA morphologies with assessment of TE prevalence. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were measured using the Mantel-Haenszel method. The fixed effects model was used, and if heterogeneity (I2) was >25%, effects were analyzed using a random model. Eight studies with 2596 patients were included. Eighty-four percent (n=1872) of patients had a CHADS2 score of <2. TE risk was lower in chicken wing morphology than in non-chicken wing morphology (OR 0.46; 95% CI 0.36-0.58). Likewise, chicken wing morphology had lower TE risk than did other morphologies (chicken wing vs cauliflower: OR 0.38; 95% CI 0.26-0.56; chicken wing vs windsock: OR 0.48; 95% CI 0.31-0.73; chicken wing vs cactus: OR 0.49; 95% CI 0.36-0.66). Patients with chicken wing LAA morphology are less likely to develop TE than patients with non-chicken wing morphology. LAA morphology may be a valuable criterion in predicting TE and could affect the stratification and anticoagulation management of patients with low to intermediate TE risk. Copyright © 2016 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Left atrial appendage segmentation and quantitative assisted diagnosis of atrial fibrillation based on fusion of temporal-spatial information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Cheng; Feng, Jianjiang; Wang, Lei; Yu, Heng; Liu, Jiang; Lu, Jiwen; Zhou, Jie

    2018-03-09

    In this paper, we present an approach for left atrial appendage (LAA) multi-phase fast segmentation and quantitative assisted diagnosis of atrial fibrillation (AF) based on 4D-CT data. We take full advantage of the temporal dimension information to segment the living, flailed LAA based on a parametric max-flow method and graph-cut approach to build 3-D model of each phase. To assist the diagnosis of AF, we calculate the volumes of 3-D models, and then generate a "volume-phase" curve to calculate the important dynamic metrics: ejection fraction, filling flux, and emptying flux of the LAA's blood by volume. This approach demonstrates more precise results than the conventional approaches that calculate metrics by area, and allows for the quick analysis of LAA-volume pattern changes of in a cardiac cycle. It may also provide insight into the individual differences in the lesions of the LAA. Furthermore, we apply support vector machines (SVMs) to achieve a quantitative auto-diagnosis of the AF by exploiting seven features from volume change ratios of the LAA, and perform multivariate logistic regression analysis for the risk of LAA thrombosis. The 100 cases utilized in this research were taken from the Philips 256-iCT. The experimental results demonstrate that our approach can construct the 3-D LAA geometries robustly compared to manual annotations, and reasonably infer that the LAA undergoes filling, emptying and re-filling, re-emptying in a cardiac cycle. This research provides a potential for exploring various physiological functions of the LAA and quantitatively estimating the risk of stroke in patients with AF. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Comprehensive Immunophenotypic Characterization of Adult and Fetal Testes, the Excretory Duct System, and Testicular and Epididymal Appendages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magers, Martin J; Udager, Aaron M; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; French, Diana; Myers, Jeffrey L; Jentzen, Jeffrey M; McHugh, Jonathan B; Heider, Amer; Mehra, Rohit

    2016-08-01

    The immunophenotype of a normal testis and the excretory duct system has not been studied comprehensively in fetal and adult patients without testicular disease or hormonal manipulation so far. In addition, testicular (TA) and epididymal (EA) appendages are frequent paratesticular structures without previously reported comprehensive immunophenotypic studies. Immunohistochemistry for multiple markers, including the androgen receptor (AR), the estrogen receptor (ER), the progesterone receptor (PR), the prostate-specific antigen, the prostate-specific membrane antigen, PAX8, WT1, calretinin, CK7, CK20, OCT4, SALL4, and CD117, was performed on full sections of testicular/paratesticular tissue from a large cohort of adult and fetal autopsy patients. In contrast to adult germ cells (GC), fetal GC strongly express OCT4 and CD117, although the expression of these proteins is lost in the early postnatal period; SALL4, in contrast, is expressed in both fetal and adult GC, with only weak and focal expression in adult patients. Fetal Sertoli cells (SC) express WT1 and calretinin strongly and diffusely, in contrast to adult SC. Both fetal and adult excretory duct systems express CK7 and PAX8 with frequent AR coexpression, and all 3 main segments of the excretory duct system (ductuli efferentes, epididymis, and vas deferens) have unique immunophenotypes. The rete testis also has a unique immunohistochemical expression pattern, which includes strong expression of CK7, PAX8, WT1, calretinin, and AR. Finally, of the adult autopsy patients examined, 80% had a TA, and 60% had an EA; these paratesticular structures occurred at stereotypical locations, demonstrated reproducible morphologic features, and had a unique immunophenotype relative to other studied structures, with strong CK7, PAX8, WT1, AR, ER, and PR coexpression. The testis and the paratestis may be involved by diverse neoplastic and non-neoplastic processes, and knowledge of the immunophenotypic expression spectrum of

  4. Impact of chronic kidney disease on left atrial appendage occlusion for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kefer, Joelle; Tzikas, Apostolos; Freixa, Xavier; Shakir, Samera; Gafoor, Sameer; Nielsen-Kudsk, Jens Erik; Berti, Sergio; Santoro, Gennaro; Aminian, Adel; Landmesser, Ulf; Nietlispach, Fabian; Ibrahim, Reda; Danna, Paolo Luciano; Benit, Edouard; Budts, Werner; Stammen, Francis; De Potter, Tom; Tichelbäcker, Tobias; Gloekler, Steffen; Kanagaratnam, Prapa; Costa, Marco; Cruz-Gonzalez, Ignacio; Sievert, Horst; Schillinger, Wolfgang; Park, Jai-Wun; Meier, Bernhard; Omran, Heyder

    2016-03-15

    Left atrial appendage occlusion (LAAO) using the Amplatzer cardiac plug (ACP) is a preventive treatment of atrial fibrillation related thromboembolism. To assess the safety and efficacy of LAAO in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Among the ACP multicentre registry, 1014 patients (75±8yrs) with available renal function were included. Patients with CKD (N=375, CHA2DS2-VASc: 4.9±1.5, HASBLED: 3.4±1.3) were at higher risk than patients without CKD (N=639, CHA2DS2-VASc: 4.2±1.6, HASBLED: 2.9±1.2; p<0.001 for both). Procedural (97%) and occlusion (99%) success were similarly high in all stages of CKD. Peri-procedural major adverse events (MAE) were observed in 5.1% of patients, 0.8% of death, with no difference between patients with and those without CKD (6.1 vs 4.5%, p=0.47). In patients with complete follow-up (1319 patients years), the annual stroke+transient ischaemic attack (TIA) rate was 2.3% and the observed bleeding rate was 2.1% (62 and 60% less than expected, similarly among patients with and those without CKD). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a lower overall survival (84 vs 96% and 84 vs 93% at 1 and 2yrs. respectively; p<0.001) among patients with an eGFR <30ml/min/1.73m(2). LAAO using the ACP has a similar procedural safety among CKD patients compared to patients with normal renal function. LAAO with ACP offers a dramatic reduction of stroke+TIA rate and of bleeding rate persistent in all stages of CKD, as compared to the expected annual risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparison of Efficacy and Safety of Left Atrial Appendage Occlusion in Patients Aged <75 to ≥ 75 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freixa, Xavier; Gafoor, Sameer; Regueiro, Ander; Cruz-Gonzalez, Ignacio; Shakir, Samera; Omran, Heyder; Berti, Sergio; Santoro, Gennaro; Kefer, Joelle; Landmesser, Ulf; Nielsen-Kudsk, Jens Erik; Sievert, Horst; Kanagaratnam, Prapa; Nietlispach, Fabian; Gloekler, Steffen; Aminian, Adel; Danna, Paolo; Rezzaghi, Marco; Stock, Friederike; Stolcova, Miroslava; Costa, Marco; Ibrahim, Reda; Schillinger, Wolfgang; Park, Jai-Wun; Meier, Bernhard; Tzikas, Apostolos

    2016-01-01

    Left atrial appendage occlusion (LAAO) is emerging as a promising alternative to oral anticoagulation. Because aged patients present a greater risk of not only cardioembolic events but also major bleeding, LAAO might represent a valid alternative as this would allow oral anticoagulation cessation while keeping cardioembolic protection. The objective of the study was to explore the safety and efficacy of LAAO in elderly patients. Data from the AMPLATZER Cardiac Plug multicenter registry were analyzed. The cohort was categorized in 2 groups (<75 vs ≥ 75 years). A total of 1,053 subjects were included in the registry. Of them, 219 were excluded because of combined procedures. As a result, 828 subjects were included (54.6% ≥ 75 years). Procedural success was high and similar in both groups (97.3%). Acute procedural major adverse events were not statistically different among groups (3.2% in <75 years vs 5.1%; p = 0.17) although stratified analysis showed a higher incidence of cardiac tamponade in elderly patients (0.5% vs 2.2%; p = 0.04). With a median follow-up of 16.8 months, no significant differences in stroke/TIA (1.9% vs 2.3%; p = 0.89) and major bleeding (1.7% vs 2.6%; p = 0.54) were observed. In conclusion, LAAO was associated with similar procedural success in patients aged <75 and ≥ 75 years although older patients had a higher incidence of cardiac tamponade. At follow-up, stroke and major bleeding rates were similar among groups. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Domain wall diffusion and domain wall softening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W T; Salje, E K H; Bismayer, U

    2003-01-01

    A number of experimental and computational studies of materials have shown that transport rates in domain walls may significantly differ from those in the bulk. One possible explanation for enhanced transport in a domain wall is that the domain wall is elastically soft with respect to the bulk. We investigate the softening of a ferroelastic domain wall in a simple, generic model. We calculate saddle point energies of solute atoms in the bulk and domain wall, using a geometry such that variation in the saddle point energy cannot be attributed to the structural differences of the bulk and the wall, but must instead be attributed to softening of the wall. Our results show a reduction of the saddle point energy in the wall, thus indicating that, in this model at least, domain walls are elastically soft compared with the bulk. A simple analysis based on an Einstein model allows us to explain the observed softening of the wall

  7. Mechanical switching of ferroelectric domains beyond flexoelectricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weijin; Liu, Jianyi; Ma, Lele; Liu, Linjie; Jiang, G. L.; Zheng, Yue

    2018-02-01

    The resurgence of interest in flexoelectricity has prompted discussions on the feasibility of switching ferroelectric domains 'non-electrically'. In this work, we perform three-dimensional thermodynamic simulations in combination with ab initio calculations and effective Hamiltonian simulations to demonstrate the great effects of surface screening and surface bonding on ferroelectric domain switching triggered by local tip loading. A three-dimensional simulation scheme has been developed to capture the tip-induced domain switching behavior in ferroelectric thin films by adequately taking into account the surface screening effect and surface bonding effect of the ferroelectric film, as well as the finite elastic stiffness of the substrate and the electrode layers. The major findings are as follows. (i) Compared with flexoelectricity, surface effects can be overwhelming and lead to much more efficient mechanical switching caused by tip loading. (ii) The surface-assisted mechanical switching can be bi-directional without the necessity of reversing strain gradients. (iii) A mode transition from local to propagating domain switching occurs when the screening below a critical value. A ripple effect of domain switching appears with the formation of concentric loop domains. (iv) The ripple effect can lead to 'domain interference' and a deterministic writing of confined loop domain patterns by local excitations. Our study reveals the hidden switching mechanisms of ferroelectric domains and the possible roles of surface in mechanical switching. The ripple effect of domain switching, which is believed to be general in dipole systems, broadens our current knowledge of domain engineering.

  8. The Value of 3D Printing Models of Left Atrial Appendage Using Real-Time 3D Transesophageal Echocardiographic Data in Left Atrial Appendage Occlusion: Applications toward an Era of Truly Personalized Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Liu, Rijing; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Yingfeng; Tang, Xiaoming; Cheng, Yanzhen

    The objective of this study was to assess the clinical feasibility of generating 3D printing models of left atrial appendage (LAA) using real-time 3D transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE) data for preoperative reference of LAA occlusion. Percutaneous LAA occlusion can effectively prevent patients with atrial fibrillation from stroke. However, the anatomical structure of LAA is so complicated that adequate information of its structure is essential for successful LAA occlusion. Emerging 3D printing technology has the demonstrated potential to structure more accurately than conventional imaging modalities by creating tangible patient-specific models. Typically, 3D printing data sets are acquired from CT and MRI, which may involve intravenous contrast, sedation, and ionizing radiation. It has been reported that 3D models of LAA were successfully created by the data acquired from CT. However, 3D printing of the LAA using real-time 3D TEE data has not yet been explored. Acquisition of 3D transesophageal echocardiographic data from 8 patients with atrial fibrillation was performed using the Philips EPIQ7 ultrasound system. Raw echocardiographic image data were opened in Philips QLAB and converted to 'Cartesian DICOM' format and imported into Mimics® software to create 3D models of LAA, which were printed using a rubber-like material. The printed 3D models were then used for preoperative reference and procedural simulation in LAA occlusion. We successfully printed LAAs of 8 patients. Each LAA costs approximately CNY 800-1,000 and the total process takes 16-17 h. Seven of the 8 Watchman devices predicted by preprocedural 2D TEE images were of the same sizes as those placed in the real operation. Interestingly, 3D printing models were highly reflective of the shape and size of LAAs, and all device sizes predicted by the 3D printing model were fully consistent with those placed in the real operation. Also, the 3D printed model could predict operating difficulty and the

  9. Insights into function of PSI domains from structure of the Met receptor PSI domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlov, Guennadi; Perreault, Audrey; Schrag, Joseph D.; Park, Morag; Cygler, Miroslaw; Gehring, Kalle; Ekiel, Irena

    2004-01-01

    PSI domains are cysteine-rich modules found in extracellular fragments of hundreds of signaling proteins, including plexins, semaphorins, integrins, and attractins. Here, we report the solution structure of the PSI domain from the human Met receptor, a receptor tyrosine kinase critical for proliferation, motility, and differentiation. The structure represents a cysteine knot with short regions of secondary structure including a three-stranded antiparallel β-sheet and two α-helices. All eight cysteines are involved in disulfide bonds with the pattern consistent with that for the PSI domain from Sema4D. Comparison with the Sema4D structure identifies a structurally conserved core comprising the N-terminal half of the PSI domain. Interestingly, this part links adjacent SEMA and immunoglobulin domains in the Sema4D structure, suggesting that the PSI domain serves as a wedge between propeller and immunoglobulin domains and is responsible for the correct positioning of the ligand-binding site of the receptor

  10. Thinking Critically about Critical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulnix, Jennifer Wilson

    2012-01-01

    As a philosophy professor, one of my central goals is to teach students to think critically. However, one difficulty with determining whether critical thinking can be taught, or even measured, is that there is widespread disagreement over what critical thinking actually is. Here, I reflect on several conceptions of critical thinking, subjecting…

  11. A conserved function of the zinc finger transcription factor Sp8/9 in allometric appendage growth in the milkweed bug Oncopeltus fasciatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeper, Nina D; Prpic, Nikola-Michael; Wimmer, Ernst A

    2009-08-01

    The genes encoding the closely related zinc finger transcription factors Buttonhead (Btd) and D-Sp1 are expressed in the developing limb primordia of Drosophila melanogaster and are required for normal growth of the legs. The D-Sp1 homolog of the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum, Sp8 (appropriately termed Sp8/9), is also required for the proper growth of the leg segments. Here we report on the isolation and functional study of the Sp8/9 gene from the milkweed bug Oncopeltus fasciatus. We show that Sp8/9 is expressed in the developing appendages throughout development and that the downregulation of Sp8/9 via RNAi leads to antennae, rostrum, and legs with shortened and fused segments. This supports a conserved role of Sp8/9 in allometric leg segment growth. However, all leg segments including the claws are present and the expression of the leg genes Distal-less, dachshund, and homothorax are proportionally normal, thus providing no evidence for a role of Sp8/9 in appendage specification.

  12. Postoperative pulmonary hypertensive crisis caused by inverted left atrial appendage after cardiopulmonary bypass surgery for congenital heart disease in a neonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qifeng; Hu, Xingti

    2013-09-01

    Postoperative pulmonary hypertensive crisis (PHC) caused by an inverted left atrial appendage (ILAA) is a rare complication following cardiac surgery. We present a case of 23 day-old male infant who developed postoperative PHC attacks after undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) surgery for repair of the coactation of aorta. A hyperechogenic left atrial mass was detected via bedside transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), which was identified as an ILAA and corrected following repeat surgery. In this case, both the negative pressure in vent catheter and the long left atrial appendage (LAA) with a narrow base led to an irreversible ILAA. As in this neonate, ILAA had significant influence on the left atrial volume and caused PHC since the ILAA was located on the mitral valve orifice and interfered with the blood flow through the valve. Therefore, we recommend that the vent catheter should be turned off before removing to avoid this potential complication. Additionally, LAA should be carefully inspected after CPB surgery, and intra-operative and post-operative transoesophageal echocardiography (TEE) should be performed to detect ILAA intraoperatively so as to avoid the reoperation. When an ILAA is diagnosed postoperatively, whether conservative treatment or surgery will depend on the balance of benefit and risk for a particular patient. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Critical Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critical care helps people with life-threatening injuries and illnesses. It might treat problems such as complications from surgery, ... attention by a team of specially-trained health care providers. Critical care usually takes place in an ...

  14. Tryptophan scanning mutagenesis of aromatic residues within the polymerase domain of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase: critical role of Phe-130 for p51 function and second-site revertant restoring viral replication capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, Isabel; Gutiérrez-Rivas, Mónica; López-Galíndez, Cecilio; Menéndez-Arias, Luis

    2004-07-01

    The effects on virus viability and reverse transcriptase (RT) function of substituting Trp for Tyr or Phe residues within the polymerase domain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RT have been analyzed with an infectious HIV-1 clone. Viruses containing mutations Y56W, F61W, F87W, F116W, Y127W, Y144W, F171W, Y181W, Y183W, Y188W, F227W, or Y232W in their RT-coding regions were viable and showed replication capacities similar or slightly reduced in comparison with the wild-type HIV-1. However, RTs bearing mutations F77W or Y146W had a dNTP-binding defect, rendering nonviable viruses. HIV-1 carrying RT mutations F124W or F130W replicated very poorly, but compensatory changes (K83R for F124W, and T58S for F130W) were selected upon passaging the virus in cell culture. The amino acid substitution F130W diminishes the stability of the 51-kDa subunit of the RT (p51) and impairs polyprotein processing in virus-infected cells, an effect that can be mitigated when T58S is found in p51.

  15. Fast domain wall dynamics in amorphous and nanocrystalline magnetic microwires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varga, R., E-mail: rvarga@upjs.sk [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Science, UPJS, Park Angelinum 9, 041 54, Kosice (Slovakia); Klein, P.; Richter, K. [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Science, UPJS, Park Angelinum 9, 041 54, Kosice (Slovakia); Zhukov, A. [Dept. Fisica de Materiales, Fac. Quimica, UPV/EHU, San Sebastian (Spain); Vazquez, M. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, 28049 Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain)

    2012-10-15

    We have studied the effect of thermal treatment on the domain wall dynamics of FeSiB and FeCoMoB microwires. It was shown that annealing in transversal magnetic field increases the domain wall mobility as well as the domain wall velocity. Annealing under the tensile stress hinders the appearance of the monodomain structure but application of tensile stress leads to the magnetic bistability having the domain wall mobility twice higher that in as-cast state. Further increase of the tensile stress reduces the domain wall mobility but the domain wall velocity increases as a result of the decrease of critical propagation field. Annealing of the FeCoMoB microwire by Joule heating leads to introduction of the circular anisotropy that favors the vortex domain wall. Such treatment increases the domain wall mobility as well as the maximum domain wall velocity.

  16. How Critical Is Critical Thinking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Ryan D.

    2014-01-01

    Recent educational discourse is full of references to the value of critical thinking as a 21st-century skill. In music education, critical thinking has been discussed in relation to problem solving and music listening, and some researchers suggest that training in critical thinking can improve students' responses to music. But what exactly is…

  17. Critical Computing - between Sense and Sensibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Olav W.; Bouvin, Niels Olof; Krogh, Peter Gall

    2005-01-01

    It has been our aim with the conference to revitalize the idea of IT-research as critical action, not only as workplace actionism, but also by integrating a broader scope of critical analysis and critical practice. Thus, the papers presented at the 2005 conference covers domains from the workplace...

  18. The New 3D Printed Left Atrial Appendage Closure with a Novel Holdfast Device: A Pre-Clinical Feasibility Animal Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Brzeziński

    Full Text Available Many patients undergoing cardiac surgery have risk factors for both atrial fibrillation (AF and stroke. The left atrial appendage (LAA is the primary site for thrombi formation. The most severe complication of emboli derived from LAA is stroke, which is associated with a 12-month mortality rate of 38% and a 12-month recurrence rate of 17%. The most common form of treatment for atrial fibrillation and stroke prevention is the pharmacological therapy with anticoagulants. Nonetheless this form of therapy is associated with high risk of major bleeding. Therefore LAA occlusion devices should be tested for their ability to reduce future cerebral ischemic events in patients with high-risk of haemorrhage.The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and feasibility of a novel left atrial appendage exclusion device with a minimally invasive introducer in a swine model.A completely novel LAA device, which is composed of two tubes connected together using a specially created bail, was designed using finite element modelling (FEM to obtain an optimal support force of 36 N at the closure line. The monolithic form of the occluder was obtained by using additive manufacturing of granular PA2200 powder with the technology of selective laser sintering (SLS. Fifteen swine were included in the feasibility tests, with 10 animals undergoing fourteen days of follow-up and 5 animals undergoing long-term observation of 3 months. For one animal, the follow-up was further prolonged to 6 months. The device was placed via minithoracotomy. After the observation period, all of the animals were euthanized, and their hearts were tested for LAA closure and local inflammatory and tissue response.After the defined observation period, all fifteen hearts were explanted. In all cases the full closure of the LAA was achieved. The macroscopic and microscopic evaluation of the explanted hearts showed that all devices were securely integrated in the surrounding tissues. No

  19. Critical Jostling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pippin Barr

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Games can serve a critical function in many different ways, from serious games about real world subjects to self-reflexive commentaries on the nature of games themselves. In this essay we discuss critical possibilities stemming from the area of critical design, and more specifically Carl DiSalvo’s adversarial design and its concept of reconfiguring the remainder. To illustrate such an approach, we present the design and outcomes of two games, Jostle Bastard and Jostle Parent. We show how the games specifically engage with two previous games, Hotline Miami and Octodad: Dadliest Catch, reconfiguring elements of those games to create interactive critical experiences and extensions of the source material. Through the presentation of specific design concerns and decisions, we provide a grounded illustration of a particular critical function of videogames and hope to highlight this form as another valuable approach in the larger area of videogame criticism.

  20. Domain Theory for Concurrency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Mikkel

    Concurrent computation can be given an abstract mathematical treatment very similar to that provided for sequential computation by domain theory and denotational semantics of Scott and Strachey. A simple domain theory for concurrency is presented. Based on a categorical model of linear logic and ...... towards more expressive languages than HOPLA and Affine HOPLA—in particular concerning extensions to cover independence models. The thesis concludes with a discussion of related work towards a fully fledged domain theory for concurrency....

  1. Learning and Domain Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Yishay

    Domain adaptation is a fundamental learning problem where one wishes to use labeled data from one or several source domains to learn a hypothesis performing well on a different, yet related, domain for which no labeled data is available. This generalization across domains is a very significant challenge for many machine learning applications and arises in a variety of natural settings, including NLP tasks (document classification, sentiment analysis, etc.), speech recognition (speakers and noise or environment adaptation) and face recognition (different lighting conditions, different population composition).

  2. Higher levels of serum fibrin-monomer reflect hypercoagulable state and thrombus formation in the left atrial appendage in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama, Hidenobu; Hirono, Osamu; Liu, Ling; Takeishi, Yasuchika; Kayama, Takamasa; Kubota, Isao

    2006-08-01

    It is sometimes difficult to make a diagnosis of cardioembolic stroke in the stroke care unit, because of the splashing and vanishing of the intracardiac source of the emboli on transesophageal echocardiography. Serum fibrin-monomer (FM) is a new marker for coagulation activity that is useful for identifying older individuals at increased risk of ischemic stroke. Two hundred and four patients with acute ischemic stroke were examined for serum coagulation and fibrinolytic activity on admission, and underwent transesophageal echocardiography within 7 days of onset. Serum levels of FM was significantly higher in patients with left atrial appendage (LAA) thrombus formation (n=24) than in those with no thrombus (88+/-52 vs 14+/-9 microg/ml, pvs 8+/-5 microg/ml, pstroke.

  3. Critical Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Olsen, Stig Irving

    2017-01-01

    Manipulation and mistakes in LCA studies are as old as the tool itself, and so is its critical review. Besides preventing misuse and unsupported claims, critical review may also help identifying mistakes and more justifiable assumptions as well as generally improve the quality of a study. It thus...

  4. Critical Muralism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosette, Arturo

    2009-01-01

    This study focuses on the development and practices of Critical Muralists--community-educator-artist-leader-activists--and situates these specifically in relation to the Mexican mural tradition of los Tres Grandes and in relation to the history of public art more generally. The study examines how Critical Muralists address artistic and…

  5. Management of focal atrial tachycardias originating from the atrial appendage with the combination of radiofrequency catheter ablation and minimally invasive atrial appendectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiao-gang; Zhang, Jin-lin; Ma, Jian; Jia, Yu-he; Zheng, Zhe; Wang, Hong-yue; Su, Xi; Zhang, Shu

    2014-01-01

    Focal atrial tachycardias (ATs) originating from the left and the right atrial appendage (AA) were the most difficult to eliminate. To evaluate the safety and long-term efficacy of minimally invasive surgical atrial appendectomy in combination with radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) in the management of focal atrial appendage tachycardias (AATs). We included 42 consecutive patients with 42 AATs confirmed by activation mapping and contrast venography. Thirty of them were successfully managed with RFCA (RFCA-successful group), while the remaining 12 (28.6%) finally resorted to video-assisted thoracoscopic atrial appendectomy owing to RFCA failure (resort-to-surgery group). We searched for predictors of RFCA failure, and the need for surgery by using a binomial logistic regression model. In the RFCA-successful group, 6 (20.0%) patients experienced recurrence and re-do ablation and 11 (36.7%) AATs originated from distal AAs. In the resort-to-surgery group, the tachycardias involved exclusively distal AAs and required more RFCA attempts compared with those of the RFCA-successful group (1.58 ± 0.51 vs 1.20 ± 0.41; P = .0165). During atrial appendectomy, incessant ATs were terminated immediately after resection of the AA at the base. Long-term success was achieved in all 42 patients with a follow-up of 29.1 ± 17.5 months. No complications occurred. Fourteen patients with tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy recovered fully. We identified origin at distal AATs and longer time to tachycardia termination by ablation as predictors of RFCA failure and the need for surgical intervention. ATs originating from the distal portion of AA were more refractory to RFCA. The combination of catheter ablation and video-assisted thoracoscopic atrial appendectomy was an effective strategy to manage AATs. © 2014 Heart Rhythm Society Published by Heart Rhythm Society All rights reserved.

  6. Supersymmetric domain walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, Eric A.; Kleinschmidt, Axel; Riccioni, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    We classify the half-supersymmetric "domain walls," i.e., branes of codimension one, in toroidally compactified IIA/IIB string theory and show to which gauged supergravity theory each of these domain walls belong. We use as input the requirement of supersymmetric Wess-Zumino terms, the properties of

  7. Quantum Bounded Symmetric Domains

    OpenAIRE

    Vaksman, L. L.

    2008-01-01

    This is Leonid Vaksman's monograph "Quantum bounded symmetric domains" (in Russian), preceded with an English translation of the table of contents and (a part) of the introduction. Quantum bounded symmetric domains are interesting from several points of view. In particular, they provide interesting examples for noncommutative complex analysis (i.e., the theory of subalgebras of C^*-algebars) initiated by W. Arveson.

  8. Non-slipping domains of a pulled spool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, Clemens; Vaterlaus, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated the pulled spool by considering pulling angles up to 360 ∘ . Our focus was on downward pulling forces with pulling angles in the range of 180 ∘ to 360 ∘ . In this range we have found a domain of pulling angles where the spool never starts to slip independent of the strength of the pulling force. The size of the domain depends on the static friction coefficient and on the moment of inertia of the spool. The non-slipping domain is mainly formed around the critical angle where the static friction force becomes zero. For low static friction the non-slipping domain decays into two different domains. We have determined the limiting angles of the non-slipping domains and explored the transitions from a single domain to two separated domains in parameter space. (paper)

  9. Cholesterol Domains Enhance Transfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betker, Jamie L.; Kullberg, Max; Gomez, Joe; Anchordoquy, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    The formation of cholesterol domains in lipoplexes has been associated with enhanced serum stability and transfection rates both in cell culture and in vivo. This study utilizes the ability of saturated phosphatidylcholines to promote the formation of cholesterol domains at much lower cholesterol contents than have been utilized in previous work. The results show that lipoplexes with identical cholesterol and cationic lipid contents exhibit significantly improved transfection efficiencies when a domain is present, consistent with previous work. In addition, studies assessing transfection rates in the absence of serum demonstrate that the ability of domains to enhance transfection is not dependent on interactions with serum proteins. Consistent with this hypothesis, characterization of the adsorbed proteins composing the corona of these lipoplex formulations did not reveal a correlation between transfection and the adsorption of a specific protein. Finally, we show that the interaction with serum proteins can promote domain formation in some formulations, and thereby result in enhanced transfection only after serum exposure. PMID:23557286

  10. Segmental, Domain-Selective Perdeuteration and Small-Angle Neutron Scattering for Structural Analysis of Multi-Domain Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonntag, Miriam; Jagtap, Pravin Kumar Ankush; Simon, Bernd; Appavou, Marie-Sousai; Geerlof, Arie; Stehle, Ralf; Gabel, Frank; Hennig, Janosch; Sattler, Michael

    2017-08-01

    Multi-domain proteins play critical roles in fine-tuning essential processes in cellular signaling and gene regulation. Typically, multiple globular domains that are connected by flexible linkers undergo dynamic rearrangements upon binding to protein, DNA or RNA ligands. RNA binding proteins (RBPs) represent an important class of multi-domain proteins, which regulate gene expression by recognizing linear or structured RNA sequence motifs. Here, we employ segmental perdeuteration of the three RNA recognition motif (RRM) domains in the RBP TIA-1 using Sortase A mediated protein ligation. We show that domain-selective perdeuteration combined with contrast-matched small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), SAXS and computational modeling provides valuable information to precisely define relative domain arrangements. The approach is generally applicable to study conformational arrangements of individual domains in multi-domain proteins and changes induced by ligand binding. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Critical Arts

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    both formal and informal) in culture and social theory. CRITICAL ARTS aims to challenge and ... Book Review: Brian McNair, An Introduction to Political Communication (3rd edition), London: Routledge, 2003, ISBN 0415307082, 272pp. Phil Joffe ...

  12. Critical proximity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon, Jane

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This essay considers how written language frames visual objects. Drawing on Michel Foucault’s response to Raymond Roussel’s obsessive description, the essay proposes a model of criticism where description might press up against its objects. This critical closeness is then mapped across the conceptual art practice and art criticism of Ian Burn. Burn attends to the differences between seeing and reading, and considers the conditions which frame how we look at images, including how we look at, and through words. The essay goes on to consider Meaghan Morris’s writing on Lynn Silverman’s photographs. Both Morris and Burn offer an alternative to a parasitic model of criticism and enact a patient way of looking across and through visual landscapes.

  13. Time domain modeling of tunable response of graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prokopeva, Ludmila; Emani, Naresh K.; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    We present a causal numerical model for time domain simulations of the optical response of graphene. The dielectric function is approximated with a conductivity term, a Drude term and a number of the critical points terms.......We present a causal numerical model for time domain simulations of the optical response of graphene. The dielectric function is approximated with a conductivity term, a Drude term and a number of the critical points terms....

  14. A mutational analysis of the endophilin-A N-BAR domain performed in living flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Anita G; Labarrera, Christina; Labarerra, Christina; Jansen, Anna M; Qvortrup, Klaus; Wild, Klemens; Kjaerulff, Ole

    2010-03-03

    Endophilin is a cytoplasmic protein with an important function in clathrin-dependent endocytosis at synapses and elsewhere. Endophilin has a BAR (Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs-homology) domain, which is implicated in the sensing and induction of membrane curvature. Previous structure-function studies of the endophilin-A BAR domain have almost exclusively been made in reduced systems, either in vitro or ex vivo in cultured cells. To extend and complement this work, we have analyzed the role played by the structural features of the endophilin-A BAR domain in Drosophila in vivo. The study is based on genetic rescue of endophilin-A (endoA) null mutants with wild type or mutated endoA transgenes. We evaluated the viability of the rescuants, the locomotor behavior in adult flies and the neurotransmission at the larval neuromuscular junction. Whereas mutating the endophilin BAR domain clearly affected adult flies, larval endophilin function was surprisingly resistant to mutagenesis. Previous reports have stressed the importance of a central appendage on the convex BAR surface, which forms a hydrophobic ridge able to directly insert into the lipid bilayer. We found that the charge-negative substitution A66D, which targets the hydrophobic ridge and was reported to completely disrupt the ability of endophilin-BAR to tubulate liposomes in vitro, rescued viability and neurotransmission with the same efficiency as wild type endoA transgenes, even in adults. A similar discrepancy was found for the hydrophilic substitutions A63S/A66S and A63S/A66S/M70Q. The A66W mutation, which introduces a bulky hydrophobic side chain and induces massive vesiculation of liposomes in vitro, strongly impeded eye development, even in presence of the endogenous endoA gene. Substantial residual function was observed in larvae rescued with the EndoA(Arf) transgene, which encodes a form of endophilin-A that completely lacks the central appendage. Whereas a mutation (D151P) designed to increase the BAR curvature

  15. A mutational analysis of the endophilin-A N-BAR domain performed in living flies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita G Jung

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endophilin is a cytoplasmic protein with an important function in clathrin-dependent endocytosis at synapses and elsewhere. Endophilin has a BAR (Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs-homology domain, which is implicated in the sensing and induction of membrane curvature. Previous structure-function studies of the endophilin-A BAR domain have almost exclusively been made in reduced systems, either in vitro or ex vivo in cultured cells. To extend and complement this work, we have analyzed the role played by the structural features of the endophilin-A BAR domain in Drosophila in vivo. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The study is based on genetic rescue of endophilin-A (endoA null mutants with wild type or mutated endoA transgenes. We evaluated the viability of the rescuants, the locomotor behavior in adult flies and the neurotransmission at the larval neuromuscular junction. Whereas mutating the endophilin BAR domain clearly affected adult flies, larval endophilin function was surprisingly resistant to mutagenesis. Previous reports have stressed the importance of a central appendage on the convex BAR surface, which forms a hydrophobic ridge able to directly insert into the lipid bilayer. We found that the charge-negative substitution A66D, which targets the hydrophobic ridge and was reported to completely disrupt the ability of endophilin-BAR to tubulate liposomes in vitro, rescued viability and neurotransmission with the same efficiency as wild type endoA transgenes, even in adults. A similar discrepancy was found for the hydrophilic substitutions A63S/A66S and A63S/A66S/M70Q. The A66W mutation, which introduces a bulky hydrophobic side chain and induces massive vesiculation of liposomes in vitro, strongly impeded eye development, even in presence of the endogenous endoA gene. Substantial residual function was observed in larvae rescued with the EndoA(Arf transgene, which encodes a form of endophilin-A that completely lacks the central appendage

  16. Conserved Domain Database (CDD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — CDD is a protein annotation resource that consists of a collection of well-annotated multiple sequence alignment models for ancient domains and full-length proteins.

  17. One Health Core Competency Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebekah Frankson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of complex global challenges at the convergence of human, animal, and environmental health has catalyzed a movement supporting ‘One Health’ approaches. Despite recognition of the importance of One Health approaches to address these complex challenges, little effort has been directed at identifying the seminal knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary for individuals to successfully contribute to One Health efforts. Between 2008 and 2011, three groups independently embarked on separate initiatives to identify core competencies for professionals involved with One Health approaches. Core competencies were considered critically important for guiding curriculum development and continuing professional education as they describe the knowledge, skills and attitudes required to be effective. A workshop was convened in 2012 to synthesize the various strands of work on One Health competencies. Despite having different mandates, participants, and approaches, all of these initiatives identified similar core competency domains: management; communication and informatics; values and ethics; leadership; teams and collaboration; roles and responsibilities; and systems thinking. These core competency domains have been used to develop new continuing professional education programs for One Health professionals and help university curricula prepare new graduates to be able to contribute more effectively to One Health approaches.

  18. Distant relationships amongst protein domains

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ncbs

    3. Small domains. The 'pleckstrin homology' (PH) domain is a domain of about 100 residues that occurs in a wide range of proteins involved in intracellular signaling or as constituents of the cytoskeleton.

  19. Critical Vidders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svegaard, Robin Sebastian Kaszmarczyk

    2015-01-01

    This article will introduce and take a look at a specific subset of the fan created remix videos known as vids, namely those that deal with feminist based critique of media. Through examples, it will show how fans construct and present their critique, and finally broach the topic of the critical...

  20. Benefit of left atrial appendage electrical isolation for persistent and long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Jorge; Michaud, Gregory F; Avendano, Ricardo; Briceño, David F; Kumar, Saurabh; Carlos Diaz, Juan; Mohanty, Sanghamitra; Trivedi, Chintan; Gianni, Carola; Della Rocca, Domenico; Proietti, Riccardo; Perrotta, Laura; Bordignon, Stefano; Chun, Julian K R; Schmidt, Boris; Garcia, Mario; Natale, Andrea; Di Biase, Luigi

    2018-01-12

    The long-term outcomes of left atrial appendage electrical isolation (LAAEI) in patients with non-paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) have corroborated the significant role of the LAA in this arrhythmia. We sought to investigate the incremental benefit of LAAEI in patients undergoing catheter ablation for persistent AF or long-standing persistent AF (LSPAF). A systematic review of Medline, Cochrane, and Embase for all the clinical studies in which assessment LAAEI in non-paroxysmal AF patients was performed. The benefit of LAAEI in patients with AF was analysed from seven studies that enrolled a total of 930 patients [mean age 63 ± 5 years; male: 69%]. All studies included patients with either persistent AF or LSPAF or the combination of them. The overall freedom from all-arrhythmia recurrence at 12 months of follow-up off antiarrhythmic medications in patients who underwent LAAEI was 75.5% vs. 43.9% in those in whom only standard ablation was performed [56% relative reduction and 31.6% absolute reduction; risk ratio (RR) 0.44, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.31-0.64; P < 0.0001]. The rate of ischaemic stroke in the LAAEI group was 0.4% and in the control group 2.1% at 12 months follow-up (RR 0.40, 95% CI 0.12-1.30; P = 0.13). Acute complications rates were identical between groups [LAAEI 5.5%, control 5.5% (RR 0.99, 95% CI 0.46-2.16; P = 0.99)]. Left atrial appendage electrical isolation in addition to standard ablation appears to have a substantial incremental benefit to achieve freedom from ALL atrial arrhythmias in patients with persistent AF and LSPAF without increasing acute procedural complications and without raising the risk of ischaemic stroke. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author(s) 2018. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Domain-Specific Multimodeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hessellund, Anders

    Enterprise systems are complex artifacts. They are hard to build, manage, understand, and evolve. Existing software development paradigms fail to properly address challenges such as system size, domain complexity, and software evolution when development is scaled to enterprise systems. We propose...... domain-specific multimodeling as a development paradigm to tackle these challenges in a language-oriented manner. The different concerns of a system are conceptually separated and made explicit as independent domain-specific languages. This approach increases productivity and quality by raising...... this coordination problem. By systematically identifying language interactions, we can specify a coordination model for the system. Specifically, we explicitly identify name bindings and references across language boundaries. We argue that such a coordination model facilitates consistency, navigation, and guidance...

  2. Left atrial appendage occlusion with Amplatzer Cardio Plug is an acceptable therapeutic option for prevention of stroke recurrence in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation and contraindication or failure of oral anticoagulation with acenocumarol

    OpenAIRE

    Hawkes, Maximiliano A.; Pertierra, Lucía; Rodriguez-Lucci, Federico; Pujol-Lereis, Virginia A.; Ameriso, Sebastián F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Left atrial appendage occlusion (LAAO) appears as a therapeutic option for some atrial fibrillation patients not suitable for oral anticoagulation because an increased hemorrhagic risk or recurrent ischemic events despite anticoagulant treatment. Methods Report of consecutive atrial fibrillation patients treated with LAAO with Amplatzer Cardio Plug because contraindication or failure of oral anticoagulation with acenocumarol. CHA2DS2VASC, HAS-BLED, NIHSS, mRS, procedural complicati...

  3. Critical reading and critical thinking Critical reading and critical thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loni Kreis Taglieber

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to provide, for L1 and L2 reading and writing teachers, a brief overview of the literature about critical reading and higher level thinking skills. The teaching of these skills is still neglected in some language classes in Brazil, be it in L1 or in L2 classes. Thus, this paper may also serve as a resource guide for L1 and/or L2 reading and writing teachers who want to incorporate critical reading and thinking into their classes. In modern society, even in everyday life people frequently need to deal with complicated public and political issues, make decisions, and solve problems. In order to do this efficiently and effectively, citizens must be able to evaluate critically what they see, hear, and read. Also, with the huge amount of printed material available in all areas in this age of “information explosion” it is easy to feel overwhelmed. But often the information piled up on people’s desks and in their minds is of no use due to the enormous amount of it. The purpose of this paper is to provide, for L1 and L2 reading and writing teachers, a brief overview of the literature about critical reading and higher level thinking skills. The teaching of these skills is still neglected in some language classes in Brazil, be it in L1 or in L2 classes. Thus, this paper may also serve as a resource guide for L1 and/or L2 reading and writing teachers who want to incorporate critical reading and thinking into their classes. In modern society, even in everyday life people frequently need to deal with complicated public and political issues, make decisions, and solve problems. In order to do this efficiently and effectively, citizens must be able to evaluate critically what they see, hear, and read. Also, with the huge amount of printed material available in all areas in this age of “information explosion” it is easy to feel overwhelmed. But often the information piled up on people’s desks and in their minds is of

  4. Domain analysis and modeling to improve comparability of health statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, M; Hashimoto, H; Ohida, T

    2001-01-01

    Health statistics is an essential element to improve the ability of managers of health institutions, healthcare researchers, policy makers, and health professionals to formulate appropriate course of reactions and to make decisions based on evidence. To ensure adequate health statistics, standards are of critical importance. A study on healthcare statistics domain analysis is underway in an effort to improve usability and comparability of health statistics. The ongoing study focuses on structuring the domain knowledge and making the knowledge explicit with a data element dictionary being the core. Supplemental to the dictionary are a domain term list, a terminology dictionary, and a data model to help organize the concepts constituting the health statistics domain.

  5. Critical scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stirling, W.G.; Perry, S.C.

    1996-01-01

    We outline the theoretical and experimental background to neutron scattering studies of critical phenomena at magnetic and structural phase transitions. The displacive phase transition of SrTiO 3 is discussed, along with examples from recent work on magnetic materials from the rare-earth (Ho, Dy) and actinide (NpAs, NpSb, USb) classes. The impact of synchrotron X-ray scattering is discussed in conclusion. (author) 13 figs., 18 refs

  6. Critical scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stirling, W.G. [Liverpool Univ., Dep. of Physics, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Perry, S.C. [Keele Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics

    1996-12-31

    We outline the theoretical and experimental background to neutron scattering studies of critical phenomena at magnetic and structural phase transitions. The displacive phase transition of SrTiO{sub 3} is discussed, along with examples from recent work on magnetic materials from the rare-earth (Ho, Dy) and actinide (NpAs, NpSb, USb) classes. The impact of synchrotron X-ray scattering is discussed in conclusion. (author) 13 figs., 18 refs.

  7. Measuring Critical Thinking in Physics: Development and Validation of a Critical Thinking Test in Electricity and Magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiruneh, Dawit Tibebu; De Cock, Mieke; Weldeslassie, Ataklti G.; Elen, Jan; Janssen, Rianne

    2017-01-01

    Although the development of critical thinking (CT) is a major goal of science education, adequate emphasis has not been given to the measurement of CT skills in specific science domains such as physics. Recognizing that adequately assessing CT implies the assessment of both domain-specific and domain-general CT skills, this study reports on the…

  8. ABO blood groups: A risk factor for left atrial and left atrial appendage thrombogenic milieu in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yuan; Li, Kuibao; Yang, Xinchun

    2017-08-01

    Previous studies have identified ABO blood groups as predictors of thromboembolic diseases. In patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), however, potential association between ABO blood groups and the risk of left atrial (LA) and/or left atrial appendage (LAA) thrombogenic milieu (TM) has not been established. This is a retrospective case-control study that included 125 consecutive patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) plus TM, as evidenced by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) during a period from1 January 2010 to 31 December 2016. The controls were selected randomly from 1072 NVAF without TM at a 1:2 ratio. Potential association between ABO blood groups and TM was analyzed using multivariate logistic regression analysis. The risk of TM was higher in patients with blood group A (33.6% vs. 20.2% in non-A blood groups, P=0.005). After adjusting for age, sex, oral anticoagulant use, AF type and duration, and relevant functional measures (e.g., NT-pro BNP level, left atrium diameter, and left ventricular ejection fraction), blood group A remained associated with an increased risk of TM (OR=2.99, 95% CI 1.4-6.388, P=0.005). Blood group A is an independent risk factor for TM in NVAF patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Limb ischemia, an alarm signal to a thromboembolic cascade - renal infarction and nephrectomy followed by surgical suppression of the left atrial appendage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraşca, Cosmin; Borda, Angela; Incze, Alexandru; Caraşca, Emilian; Frigy, Attila; Suciu, HoraŢiu

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 55-year-old male with mild hypertension and brief episodes of paroxysmal self-limiting atrial fibrillation (AF) since 2010. Despite a small cardioembolic risk score, CHA2DS2-Vasc=1 (Congestive heart failure, Hypertension, Age=75, Diabetes melitus, prior Stroke), the patient is effectively anticoagulated using acenocumarol. In December 2014, he showed signs of plantar transitory ischemia, for which he did not address the doctor. In early January 2015, he urgently presented at the hospital with left renal pain, caused by a renal infarction, diagnosed by computed tomography (CT) angiography. Left nephrectomy was performed with pathological confirmation. He was discharged with effective anticoagulation treatment. Within the next two weeks, he suffered a transitory ischemic event and a stroke, associated with right sided hemiparesis. On admission, AF was found and converted to sinus rhythm with effective anticoagulation - international normalized ratio (INR) of 2.12. Transthoracic echocardiography detected no pathological findings. Transesophageal echocardiography showed an expended left atrial appendage (LAA) with a slow blood flow (0.2 m÷s) and spontaneous echocontrast. Considering these clinical circumstances, surgical LAA suppression was decided on as a last therapeutic resort. Postoperative evolution was favorable; the patient is still free of ischemic events, one year post-intervention. Some morphological and hemodynamic characteristics of LAA may add additional thromboembolic risk factors, not included in scores. Removing them by surgical LAA suppression may decrease the risk of cardioembolic events. Intraoperative presence of thrombus makes it an indisputable proof.

  10. Motion of left atrial appendage as a determinant of thrombus formation in patients with a low CHADS2 score receiving warfarin for persistent nonvalvular atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ono Koji

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to define the independent determinants of left atrial appendage (LAA thrombus among various echocardiographic parameters measured by Velocity Vector Imaging (VVI in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF receiving warfarin, particularly in patients with a low CHADS2 score. Methods LAA emptying fraction (EF and LAA peak longitudinal strain were measured by VVI using transesophageal echocardiography in 260 consecutive patients with nonvalvular persistent AF receiving warfarin. The patients were divided into two groups according to the presence (n=43 or absence (n=217 of LAA thrombus. Moreover, the patients within each group were further divided into subgroups according to a CHADS2 score ≤1. Results Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that LAAEF was an independent determinant of LAA thrombus in the subgroup of 140 with a low CHADS2 score. Receiver operating characteristics curve analysis showed that an LAAEF of 21% was the optimal cutoff value for predicting LAA thrombus. Conclusions LAA thrombus formation depended on LAA contractility. AF patients with reduced LAA contractile fraction (LAAEF ≤21% require strong anticoagulant therapy to avoid thromboembolic events regardless of a low CHADS2 score (≤1.

  11. External morphology of the adult of Heraclides anchisiades capys (Hübner, [1809] (Lepidoptera - Papilionidae I: head, cephalic appendages and cervical region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Anderson Ribeiro Leite

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to highlight the morphological components of the head, its appendages and the cervical region of the adults of Heraclides anchisiades capys (Hübner, [1809], looking for a comparative focus with the other Papilionoidea and Hesperioidea. The most relevant morphological characters were: presence of transclipeal band, laterofacial suture in ventral view near the half of the ocular margin of convex aspect, presence of rudimental maxillary palp; union of the cervical sclerites ventromedially and ventral sclerite situated before the merger of the lateral sclerites.O propósito deste estudo foi evidenciar os componentes morfológicos da cabeça, seus apêndices cefálicos e da região cervical dos adultos de Heraclides anchisiades capys (Hübner, [1809], visando um enfoque comparativo com outros Papilionoidea e Hesperioidea. A morfologia foi descrita através de ilustrações e microscopia eletrônica de varredura. Dentre os caracteres morfológicos encontrados destacam-se: presença de banda transclipeal, sutura laterofacial em vista ventral próxima da metade da margem ocular de aspecto convexo e presença de rudimento de palpo maxilar. União dos escleritos cervicais ventromedianamente; esclerito cervical ventral anterior situado anteriormente à união dos escleritos laterais.

  12. The pattern of a specimen of Pycnogonum litorale (Arthropoda, Pycnogonida) with a supernumerary leg can be explained with the "boundary model" of appendage formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtz, Gerhard; Brenneis, Georg

    2016-02-01

    A malformed adult female specimen of Pycnogonum litorale (Pycnogonida) with a supernumerary leg in the right body half is described concerning external and internal structures. The specimen was maintained in our laboratory culture after an injury in the right trunk region during a late postembryonic stage. The supernumerary leg is located between the second and third walking legs. The lateral processes connecting to these walking legs are fused to one large structure. Likewise, the coxae 1 of the second and third walking legs and of the supernumerary leg are fused to different degrees. The supernumerary leg is a complete walking leg with mirror image symmetry as evidenced by the position of joints and muscles. It is slightly smaller than the normal legs, but internally, it contains a branch of the ovary and a gut diverticulum as the other legs. The causes for this malformation pattern found in the Pycnogonum individual are reconstructed in the light of extirpation experiments in insects, which led to supernumerary mirror image legs, and the "boundary model" for appendage differentiation.

  13. Click-based synthesis and antitubercular evaluation of novel dibenzo[b,d]thiophene-1,2,3-triazoles with piperidine, piperazine, morpholine and thiomorpholine appendages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulipati, Lokesh; Yogeeswari, Perumal; Sriram, Dharmarajan; Kantevari, Srinivas

    2016-06-01

    A series of novel piperidine, piperazine, morpholine and thiomorpholine appended dibenzo[b,d]thiophene-1,2,3-triazoles were designed and synthesized utilizing azide-alkyne click chemistry in the penultimate step. The required azide building block 6a-e was synthesized from commercial dibenzo[b,d]thiophene in good yields following five step reaction sequence. All the new analogues 8a-f, 9a-f, 10a-f, 11a-f &12a-f were characterized by their NMR and mass spectral analysis. Screening all thirty new compounds for in vitro antimycobacterial activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv, resulted 8a, 8f and 11e as potent analogues with MIC 0.78μg/mL, 0.78μg/mL & 1.56μg/mL, respectively, and has shown lower cytotoxicity. Interestingly, all six piperazine appended dibenzo[b,d]thiophene-1,2,3-triazoles 11a-f exhibited Mtb inhibition activity with MIC 1.56-12.5μg/mL. To some extent, the data observed here indicated Mycobacterium tuberculosis inhibition among the appendages is in the order, piperazine>thiomorpholine>morpholine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Assessment of left atrial appendage function by transthoracic pulsed Doppler echocardiography: Comparing against transesophageal interrogation and predicting echocardiographic risk factors for stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wai, Shin Hnin; Kyu, Kyu; Galupo, Mary Joyce; Songco, Geronica G; Kong, William K F; Lee, Chi Hang; Yeo, Tiong Cheng; Poh, Kian Keong

    2017-10-01

    Transesophageal echocardiographic (TEE) findings of left atrial appendage (LAA) thrombus, spontaneous echo contrast (SEC), and LAA dysfunction are established risk factors of cardioembolic stroke. The semi-invasive nature of TEE limits its utility as a routine risk stratification tool. We aim to correlate TEE and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) pulsed Doppler measurements of LAA flow velocities and use TTE measurements to predict TEE findings. We prospectively measured pulsed Doppler LAA flow velocities in 103 consecutive patients on TEE and TTE. There was a strong correlation between TEE and TTE LAA emptying velocity (LAA E) (r = .88, P TTE LAA E predicted the presence of thrombus or SEC independent of atrial fibrillation (AF). To predict the presence of thrombus or SEC, the optimal TTE LAA E cutoff was ≤30 cm/s in all patients (75% sensitive, 90% specific) and ≤31 cm/s in AF patients (80% sensitive, 79% specific). To predict LAA dysfunction (TEE E ≤ 20 cm/s), the optimal TTE LAA E cutoff was ≤27 cm/s (100% sensitive, 89% specific in all patients and 100% sensitive, 74% specific in AF patients). TTE assessment of LAA function is feasible and correlates well with the more invasive TEE method. It predicts the presence of thrombus, SEC, and LAA dysfunction on TEE. TTE LAA assessment has incremental value in thromboembolic risk stratification and should be utilized more frequently. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Domain: Labour market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Mulders, J.; Wadensjö, E.; Hasselhorn, H.M.; Apt, W.

    This domain chapter is dedicated to summarize research on the effects of labour market contextual factors on labour market participation of older workers (aged 50+) and identify research gaps. While employment participation and the timing of (early) retirement is often modelled as an individual

  16. Normed Domains of Holomorphy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven G. Krantz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We treat the classical concept of domain of holomorphy in ℂn when the holomorphic functions considered are restricted to lie in some Banach space. Positive and negative results are presented. A new view of the case n=1 is considered.

  17. How Critical Is Critical Infrastructure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    to Examine Critical Issues Underlying the Planned Rebuilding at the World Trade Center Site. 178 HVS Global Hospitality Services, 2012 Manhattan...Hotel Market Overview (Mineola, NY: HVS Global Hospitality Services, 2012, http://www.hvs.com/Content/3268.pdf. 179 “Key Office Properties,” accessed...premier real estate, luxury shopping, world class hotels, destination dining, and tourism , into an area that produces cumulative consumer spending of

  18. Critical Mass

    CERN Multimedia

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2070299

    2017-01-01

    Critical Mass is a cycling event typically held on the last Friday of every month; its purpose is not usually formalized beyond the direct action of meeting at a set location and time and traveling as a group through city or town streets on bikes. The event originated in 1992 in San Francisco; by the end of 2003, the event was being held in over 300 cities around the world. At CERN it is held once a year in conjunction with the national Swiss campaing "Bike to work".

  19. Functional interchangeability of late domains, late domain cofactors and ubiquitin in viral budding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Zhadina

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The membrane scission event that separates nascent enveloped virions from host cell membranes often requires the ESCRT pathway, which can be engaged through the action of peptide motifs, termed late (L- domains, in viral proteins. Viral PTAP and YPDL-like L-domains bind directly to the ESCRT-I and ALIX components of the ESCRT pathway, while PPxY motifs bind Nedd4-like, HECT-domain containing, ubiquitin ligases (e.g. WWP1. It has been unclear precisely how ubiquitin ligase recruitment ultimately leads to particle release. Here, using a lysine-free viral Gag protein derived from the prototypic foamy virus (PFV, where attachment of ubiquitin to Gag can be controlled, we show that several different HECT domains can replace the WWP1 HECT domain in chimeric ubiquitin ligases and drive budding. Moreover, artificial recruitment of isolated HECT domains to Gag is sufficient to stimulate budding. Conversely, the HECT domain becomes dispensable if the other domains of WWP1 are directly fused to an ESCRT-1 protein. In each case where budding is driven by a HECT domain, its catalytic activity is essential, but Gag ubiquitination is dispensable, suggesting that ubiquitin ligation to trans-acting proteins drives budding. Paradoxically, however, we also demonstrate that direct fusion of a ubiquitin moiety to the C-terminus of PFV Gag can also promote budding, suggesting that ubiquitination of Gag can substitute for ubiquitination of trans-acting proteins. Depletion of Tsg101 and ALIX inhibits budding that is dependent on ubiquitin that is fused to Gag, or ligated to trans-acting proteins through the action of a PPxY motif. These studies underscore the flexibility in the ways that the ESCRT pathway can be engaged, and suggest a model in which the identity of the protein to which ubiquitin is attached is not critical for subsequent recruitment of ubiquitin-binding components of the ESCRT pathway and viral budding to proceed.

  20. Studi Literatur Perubahan Antara CISSP 10 Domain Dengan 8 Domain

    OpenAIRE

    Perkasa, Michael; Noertjahyana, Agustinus; Rostianingsih, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Degree is one that is being achieved by most people in their work, in order to influence the potential possessed by an employee or the employee. So with the development of technology, people increasingly need a degree or certification in order to hone and enhance its capabilities.With the changes under discussion on the differences of the 10 CISSP domains domain into 8 domains in each domain has the characteristics of each and their respective utility functions. CISSP 8 domain is a new domain...

  1. Bifurcations of Baker domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauber, Arnd

    2007-07-01

    We consider the family of transcendental entire functions given by \\{f_c:{\\mathbb C} \\rightarrow {\\mathbb C}:z-c+e^z, c \\in {\\mathbb C} \\} . If Re c > 0, then fc features a Baker domain as the only component of the Fatou set, while the functions fc show a different dynamical behaviour if c \\in \\rmi{\\mathbb R} . We describe the dynamical planes of these functions and show that the Julia sets converge in the limit process f_{c_1+\\rmi c_2} \\rightarrow f_{\\rmi c_2} with respect to the Hausdorff metric, where c_1 \\in {\\mathbb R}^+ and c_2 \\in {\\mathbb R} . We use this to show that Baker domains of any type (concerning a classification of König) are not necessarily stable under perturbation.

  2. Time Domain Induced Polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiandaca, Gianluca; Auken, Esben; Christiansen, Anders Vest

    2012-01-01

    Time-domain-induced polarization has significantly broadened its field of reference during the last decade, from mineral exploration to environmental geophysics, e.g., for clay and peat identification and landfill characterization. Though, insufficient modeling tools have hitherto limited the use...... of time-domaininduced polarization for wider purposes. For these reasons, a new forward code and inversion algorithm have been developed using the full-time decay of the induced polarization response, together with an accurate description of the transmitter waveform and of the receiver transfer function......%. Furthermore, the presence of low-pass filters in time-domain-induced polarization instruments affects the early times of the acquired decays (typically up to 100 ms) and has to be modeled in the forward response to avoid significant loss of resolution. The developed forward code has been implemented in a 1D...

  3. TENCompetence Domain Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2006-01-01

    This is the version 1.1 of the TENCompetence Domain Model (version 1.0 released at 19-6-2006; version 1.1 at 9-11-2008). It contains several files: a) a pdf with the model description, b) three jpg files with class models (also in the pdf), c) a MagicDraw zip file with the model itself, d) a release

  4. Dictionary criticism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sandro

    2018-01-01

    Dictionary criticism is part of the lexicographical universe and reviewing of electronic and printed dictionaries is not an exercise in linguistics or in subject fields but an exercise in lexicography. It does not follow from this that dictionary reviews should not be based on a linguistic approach......, but that the linguistic approach is only one of several approaches to dictionary reviewing. Similarly, the linguistic and factual competences of reviewers should not be relegated to an insignificant position in the review process. Moreover, reviewers should define the object of their reviews, the dictionary, as a complex...... information tool with several components and in terms of significant lexicographical features: lexicographical functions, data and structures. This emphasises the fact that dictionaries are much more than mere vessels of linguistic categories, namely lexicographical tools that have been developed to fulfil...

  5. Updating action domain descriptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiter, Thomas; Erdem, Esra; Fink, Michael; Senko, Ján

    2010-10-01

    Incorporating new information into a knowledge base is an important problem which has been widely investigated. In this paper, we study this problem in a formal framework for reasoning about actions and change. In this framework, action domains are described in an action language whose semantics is based on the notion of causality. Unlike the formalisms considered in the related work, this language allows straightforward representation of non-deterministic effects and indirect effects of (possibly concurrent) actions, as well as state constraints; therefore, the updates can be more general than elementary statements. The expressivity of this formalism allows us to study the update of an action domain description with a more general approach compared to related work. First of all, we consider the update of an action description with respect to further criteria, for instance, by ensuring that the updated description entails some observations, assertions, or general domain properties that constitute further constraints that are not expressible in an action description in general. Moreover, our framework allows us to discriminate amongst alternative updates of action domain descriptions and to single out a most preferable one, based on a given preference relation possibly dependent on the specified criteria. We study semantic and computational aspects of the update problem, and establish basic properties of updates as well as a decomposition theorem that gives rise to a divide and conquer approach to updating action descriptions under certain conditions. Furthermore, we study the computational complexity of decision problems around computing solutions, both for the generic setting and for two particular preference relations, viz. set-inclusion and weight-based preference. While deciding the existence of solutions and recognizing solutions are PSPACE-complete problems in general, the problems fall back into the polynomial hierarchy under restrictions on the additional

  6. - LAA Occluder View for post-implantation Evaluation (LOVE) - standardized imaging proposal evaluating implanted left atrial appendage occlusion devices by cardiac computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behnes, Michael; Akin, Ibrahim; Sartorius, Benjamin; Fastner, Christian; El-Battrawy, Ibrahim; Borggrefe, Martin; Haubenreisser, Holger; Meyer, Mathias; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Henzler, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    A standardized imaging proposal evaluating implanted left atrial appendage (LAA) occlusion devices by cardiac computed tomography angiography (cCTA) has never been investigated. cCTA datasets were acquired on a 3 rd generation dual-source CT system and reconstructed with a slice thickness of 0.5 mm. An interdisciplinary evaluation was performed by two interventional cardiologists and one radiologist on a 3D multi-planar workstation. A standardized multi-planar reconstruction algorithm was developed in order to assess relevant clinical aspects of implanted LAA occlusion devices being outlined within a pictorial essay. The following clinical aspects of implanted LAA occlusion devices were evaluated within the most appropriate cCTA multi-planar reconstruction: (1) topography to neighboring structures, (2) peri-device leaks, (3) coverage of LAA lobes, (4) indirect signs of neo-endothelialization. These are illustrated within concise CT imaging examples emphasizing the potential value of the proposed cCTA imaging algorithm: Starting from anatomical cCTA planes and stepwise angulation planes perpendicular to the base of the LAA devices generates an optimal LAA Occluder View for post-implantation Evaluation (LOVE). Aligned true axial, sagittal and coronal LOVE planes offer a standardized and detailed evaluation of LAA occlusion devices after percutaneous implantation. This pictorial essay presents a standardized imaging proposal by cCTA using multi-planar reconstructions that enables systematical follow-up and comparison of patients after LAA occlusion device implantation. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12880-016-0127-y) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  7. Isolated right atrial appendage (RAA) rupture in blunt trauma--a case report and an anatomic study comparing RAA and right atrium (RA) wall thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Adoniram M; Poggetti, Renato S; Quintavalle, Fabio G; Fontes, Belchor; Dalva, Moise; Younes, Riad N; Jatene, Fabio B; Birolini, Dario

    2007-02-15

    Heart chambers rupture in blunt trauma is uncommon and is associated with a high mortality. The determinant factors, and the incidence of isolated heart chambers rupture remains undetermined. Isolated rupture of the right atrium appendage (RAA) is very rare, with 8 cases reported in the reviewed literature. The thin wall of the RAA has been presumed to render this chamber more prone to rupture in blunt trauma. To report a case of isolated RAA rupture in blunt trauma, and to compare right atrium (RA) and RAA wall thickness in a necropsy study. The thickness of RA and RAA wall of hearts from cadavers of fatal penetrating head trauma victims was measured. Our case of isolated RAA rupture is presented. The main findings of the 8 cases reported in the literature, and the findings of our case, were organized in a table. The comparison of the data showed that wall thickness of the RAA (0.53 +/- 0.33 mm) was significantly thinner than that of RA (1.11 +/- 0.42 mm) (p < 0.05). In all these 9 cases of isolated RAA rupture, cardiac tamponade occurred, RAA rupture was diagnosed intraoperatively and sutured, and the patients survived. Main mechanisms hypothesized for heart chamber rupture include mechanical compression coincident with phases of cardiac cycle, leading to high hydrostatic pressure inside the chamber. Published series include numerous cases of RA rupture, and only a few cases of RAA rupture. Thus, our data suggests that wall thickness is not a determinant factor for RA or RAA rupture in blunt trauma.

  8. Isolated right atrial appendage (RAA rupture in blunt trauma – a case report and an anatomic study comparing RAA and right atrium (RA wall thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jatene Fabio B

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heart chambers rupture in blunt trauma is uncommon and is associated with a high mortality. The determinant factors, and the incidence of isolated heart chambers rupture remains undetermined. Isolated rupture of the right atrium appendage (RAA is very rare, with 8 cases reported in the reviewed literature. The thin wall of the RAA has been presumed to render this chamber more prone to rupture in blunt trauma. Objective To report a case of isolated RAA rupture in blunt trauma, and to compare right atrium (RA and RAA wall thickness in a necropsy study. Methods The thickness of RA and RAA wall of hearts from cadavers of fatal penetrating head trauma victims was measured. Our case of isolated RAA rupture is presented. The main findings of the 8 cases reported in the literature, and the findings of our case, were organized in a table. Result The comparison of the data showed that wall thickness of the RAA (0.53 ± 0.33 mm was significantly thinner than that of RA (1.11 ± 0.42 mm (p Comments In all these 9 cases of isolated RAA rupture, cardiac tamponade occurred, RAA rupture was diagnosed intraoperatively and sutured, and the patients survived. Main mechanisms hypothesized for heart chamber rupture include mechanical compression coincident with phases of cardiac cycle, leading to high hydrostatic pressure inside the chamber. Published series include numerous cases of RA rupture, and only a few cases of RAA rupture. Conclusion Thus, our data suggests that wall thickness is not a determinant factor for RA or RAA rupture in blunt trauma.

  9. Isolated right atrial appendage (RAA) rupture in blunt trauma – a case report and an anatomic study comparing RAA and right atrium (RA) wall thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Adoniram M; Poggetti, Renato S; Quintavalle, Fabio G; Fontes, Belchor; Dalva, Moise; Younes, Riad N; Jatene, Fabio B; Birolini, Dario

    2007-01-01

    Background Heart chambers rupture in blunt trauma is uncommon and is associated with a high mortality. The determinant factors, and the incidence of isolated heart chambers rupture remains undetermined. Isolated rupture of the right atrium appendage (RAA) is very rare, with 8 cases reported in the reviewed literature. The thin wall of the RAA has been presumed to render this chamber more prone to rupture in blunt trauma. Objective To report a case of isolated RAA rupture in blunt trauma, and to compare right atrium (RA) and RAA wall thickness in a necropsy study. Methods The thickness of RA and RAA wall of hearts from cadavers of fatal penetrating head trauma victims was measured. Our case of isolated RAA rupture is presented. The main findings of the 8 cases reported in the literature, and the findings of our case, were organized in a table. Result The comparison of the data showed that wall thickness of the RAA (0.53 ± 0.33 mm) was significantly thinner than that of RA (1.11 ± 0.42 mm) (p < 0.05). Comments In all these 9 cases of isolated RAA rupture, cardiac tamponade occurred, RAA rupture was diagnosed intraoperatively and sutured, and the patients survived. Main mechanisms hypothesized for heart chamber rupture include mechanical compression coincident with phases of cardiac cycle, leading to high hydrostatic pressure inside the chamber. Published series include numerous cases of RA rupture, and only a few cases of RAA rupture. Conclusion Thus, our data suggests that wall thickness is not a determinant factor for RA or RAA rupture in blunt trauma. PMID:17302990

  10. Left atrial appendage occlusion for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation: a systematic review and network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanif, Hasib; Belley-Cote, Emilie P; Alotaibi, Abdullah; Dvirnik, Nazari; Neupane, Binod; Beyene, Joseph; Eikelboom, John W; Holmes, David; Whitlock, Richard P

    2018-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is one of the leading causes of stroke. Risks associated with oral anticoagulation (OAC) limit adherence to recommended therapy. Left atrial appendage (LAA) occlusion is a treatment alternative in patients with AF. We performed a network meta-analysis (NMA) of randomized trials evaluating the efficacy of LAA occlusion compared with oral anticoagulant, antiplatelet, and placebo for stroke prevention. We also assessed the impact of LAA occlusion on mortality, major bleeding, and operative time. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed, and Cochrane Library for randomized trials comparing percutaneous or surgical LAA occlusion with standard of care in AF patients. Conventional meta-analysis found no difference between groups for stroke (5 trials, 1285 patients;RR 0.78, 95% CI 0.47-1.29), and a significant reduction in mortality (5 trials, 1285 patients; RR 0.71, 95% CI 0.51-0.99) favouring LAA occlusion. NMA demonstrated a trend towards reduction in stroke (OR 0.84, 95% CrI 0.47-1.55) and mortality (OR 0.69, 95% CrI 0.44-1.10) for LAA occlusion versus warfarin, but no statistically significant effect. Statistical ranking curves placed LAA occlusion as the most efficacious treatment on the outcomes of stroke and mortality when compared to warfarin, aspirin, or placebo. No significant differences between groups were seen in major bleeding or operative time for surgical trials. The overall quality of the evidence was low as assessed by GRADE. LAA occlusion appears to preserve the benefits of OAC therapy for stroke prevention in patients with AF, but the current evidence is of low quality.

  11. Left Atrial Appendage Occlusion Device and Novel Oral Anticoagulants Versus Warfarin for Stroke Prevention in Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briceno, David F; Villablanca, Pedro; Cyrille, Nicole; Massera, Daniele; Bader, Eric; Manheimer, Eric; Aagaard, Philip; Ferrick, Kevin; Gross, Jay; Kim, Soo Gyum; Krumerman, Andrew; Palma, Eugen; Guttenplan, Nils; Romero, Jorge; Fisher, John; Garcia, Mario; Natale, Andrea; Di Biase, Luigi

    2015-10-01

    Nonvalvular atrial fibrillation is the most common arrhythmia. Patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation are at increased risk of stroke; therefore, we evaluated the efficacy and safety of different approaches to prevent this major complication. We conducted electronic database searches of phase III randomized controlled trials. The groups were novel oral anticoagulants, Watchman left atrial appendage occlusion device (DEVICE), and warfarin. Efficacy outcomes were stroke or systemic embolism, and all-cause mortality. Safety outcome was major bleeding and procedure-related complications. A subgroup analysis of the elderly population was done. We used random-effects model to compare pooled outcomes and tested for heterogeneity. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed for each outcome. Seven randomized controlled trials (n=73,978) were included. There was a significant difference favoring novel oral anticoagulants for systemic embolism (OR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.72-0.97; P=0.01), all-cause mortality (OR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.84-0.94; P<0.001), and safety outcomes (OR, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.65-0.97; P=0.026) compared with warfarin. No difference was seen between DEVICE and warfarin for efficacy end points; however, DEVICE had more complications (OR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.14-3.01; P=0.012). In the elderly (6 randomized controlled trials, n=30,699), systemic embolism was favored with novel oral anticoagulants over warfarin (OR, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.68-0.87; P≤0.001). No evidence of significant publication bias was found. Novel oral anticoagulants is superior to warfarin for stroke prevention in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. This benefit was also observed in the elderly population. DEVICE is a reasonable noninferior alternative to warfarin for stroke prevention, but cautious use is essential given safety concerns. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Does left atrial appendage closure with a cardiac plug system reduce the stroke risk in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation patients? A single-center case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danna, Paolo; Proietti, Riccardo; Sagone, Antonio; Arensi, Andrea; Viecca, Maurizio; Rago, Anna; Russo, Vincenzo

    2013-03-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia and it is associated with an increased stroke risk, due mainly to cardiac embolism from the left atrial appendage (LAA). Percutaneous LAA closure is a method to reduce stroke risk in AF without using anticoagulant agents. In this study we report data from an Italian experience with the LAA occluder Amplatzer Cardiac Plug (ACP) device (Aga Medical Corporation, Plymouth, MN, USA). The study was designed to evaluate the safety of LAA closure using ACP and the efficacy of the procedure in preventing strokes during a 1-year follow-up. Patients with permanent or paroxysmal AF, high stroke risk, and contraindication to warfarin therapy were selected for the procedure. The LAA closure was attempted in 37 patients and succeeded in 34 cases (91.9%). Four patients experienced serious complications (one cardiac tamponade requiring pericardiocentesis, two device embolizations, one low-rate response AF requiring artificial pacing). During a 1-year follow-up, ischemic stroke occurred in one of 34 patients, resulting in a stroke rate of 2.94%; thus there was a stroke rate reduction of 50.2% and 26.5% compared to the expected stroke rate, according to CHADS2 and CHA2 DS2 VASc score. None of the patients who received ACP experienced major bleeding during the follow-up. LAA closure using ACP is a relatively feasible procedure which can be performed by highly experienced operators to reduce stroke rate in patients with AF, high stroke risk, and contraindication to oral anticoagulants. ©2012, The Authors. Journal compilation ©2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Functional Domain Driven Design

    OpenAIRE

    Herrera Guzmán, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Las tecnologías están en constante expansión y evolución, diseñando nuevas técnicas para cumplir con su fin. En el desarrollo de software, las herramientas y pautas para la elaboración de productos software constituyen una pieza en constante evolución, necesarias para la toma de decisiones sobre los proyectos a realizar. Uno de los arquetipos para el desarrollo de software es el denominado Domain Driven Design, donde es importante conocer ampliamente el negocio que se desea modelar en form...

  14. Summarization by domain ontology navigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Troels; Bulskov, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    of the subject. In between these two extremes, conceptual summaries encompass selected concepts derived using background knowledge. We address in this paper an approach where conceptual summaries are provided through a conceptualization as given by an ontology. The ontology guiding the summarization can...... be a simple taxonomy or a generative domain ontology. A domain ontology can be provided by a preanalysis of a domain corpus and can be used to condense improved summaries that better reflects the conceptualization of a given domain....

  15. Single-domain versus two-domain configuration in thin ferromagnetic prisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pini, Maria Gloria; Politi, Paolo

    2007-01-01

    Thin ferromagnetic elements in the form of rectangular prisms are theoretically investigated in order to study the transition from single-domain to two-domain state, with changing the in-plane aspect ratio p. We address two main questions: first, how general is the transition; second, how the critical value p c depends on the physical parameters. We use two complementary methods: discrete-lattice calculations and a micromagnetic continuum approach. Ultrathin films do not appear to split in two domains. Instead, thicker films may undergo the above transition. We have used the continuum approach to analyze recent magnetic force microscopy observations in 30nm-thick patterned permalloy elements, finding a good agreement for p c

  16. XML for Domain Viewpoints

    CERN Document Server

    Van Lingen, F; Van der Stok, P D V; Willers, Ian Malcolm

    2001-01-01

    Within research institutions like CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) there are often disparate databases (different in format, type and structure) that users need to access in a domain-specific manner. Users may want to access a simple unit of information without having to understand detail of the underlying schema or they may want to access the same information from several different sources. It is neither desirable nor feasible to require users to have knowledge of these schemas. Instead it would be advantageous if a user could query these sources using his or her own domain models and abstractions of the data. This paper describes the basis of an XML (eXtended Markup Language) framework that provides this functionality and is currently being developed at CERN. The goal of the first prototype was to explore the possibilities of XML for data integration and model management. It shows how XML can be used to integrate data sources. The framework is not only applicable to CERN data sources but ot...

  17. On Probability Domains IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frič, Roman; Papčo, Martin

    2017-12-01

    Stressing a categorical approach, we continue our study of fuzzified domains of probability, in which classical random events are replaced by measurable fuzzy random events. In operational probability theory (S. Bugajski) classical random variables are replaced by statistical maps (generalized distribution maps induced by random variables) and in fuzzy probability theory (S. Gudder) the central role is played by observables (maps between probability domains). We show that to each of the two generalized probability theories there corresponds a suitable category and the two resulting categories are dually equivalent. Statistical maps and observables become morphisms. A statistical map can send a degenerated (pure) state to a non-degenerated one —a quantum phenomenon and, dually, an observable can map a crisp random event to a genuine fuzzy random event —a fuzzy phenomenon. The dual equivalence means that the operational probability theory and the fuzzy probability theory coincide and the resulting generalized probability theory has two dual aspects: quantum and fuzzy. We close with some notes on products and coproducts in the dual categories.

  18. Metaphors, domains and embodiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.E. Botha

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Investigations of metaphorical meaning constitution and meaning (in- variance have revealed the significance of semantic and semiotic domains and the contexts within which they function as basis for the grounding of metaphorical meaning. In this article some of the current views concerning the grounding of metaphorical meaning in experience and embodiment are explored. My provisional agreement with Lakoff, Johnson and others about the “conceptual” nature of metaphor rests on an important caveat, viz. that this bodily based conceptual structure which lies at the basis of linguistic articulations of metaphor, is grounded in a deeper ontic structure of the world and of human experience. It is the “metaphorical” (actually “analogical” ontological structure of this grounding that is of interest for the line of argumentation followed in this article. Because Johnson, Lakoff and other’s proposal to ground metaphorical meaning in embodiment and neural processes is open to being construed as subjectivist and materialist, I shall attempt to articulate the contours of an alternative theory of conceptual metaphor, meaning and embodiment which counteracts these possibilities. This theory grounds metaphorical meaning and meaning change in an ontological and anthropological framework which recognises the presence and conditioning functioning of radially ordered structures for reality. These categorisations in which humankind, human knowledge and reality participate, condition and constrain (ground analogical and metaphorical meaning transfer, cross-domain mappings, and blends in cognition and in language, provide the basis for the analogical concepts found in these disciplines.

  19. Institutionalizing the Human Domain: Achieving Cross Domain Synergy for Every Day Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-06

    The five elements of the Human Domain ( social , cultural , physical, informational, and psychological) are addressed in the subsequent section of this... social , cultural , physical, informational, and psychological) are critical to “shaping the behavior of actors in the environment” and occur as the first... Vietnam , where he participated in the Defense Department’s efforts to repatriate the remains of service members declared Missing in Action from the

  20. Expansion of protein domain repeats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asa K Björklund

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Many proteins, especially in eukaryotes, contain tandem repeats of several domains from the same family. These repeats have a variety of binding properties and are involved in protein-protein interactions as well as binding to other ligands such as DNA and RNA. The rapid expansion of protein domain repeats is assumed to have evolved through internal tandem duplications. However, the exact mechanisms behind these tandem duplications are not well-understood. Here, we have studied the evolution, function, protein structure, gene structure, and phylogenetic distribution of domain repeats. For this purpose we have assigned Pfam-A domain families to 24 proteomes with more sensitive domain assignments in the repeat regions. These assignments confirmed previous findings that eukaryotes, and in particular vertebrates, contain a much higher fraction of proteins with repeats compared with prokaryotes. The internal sequence similarity in each protein revealed that the domain repeats are often expanded through duplications of several domains at a time, while the duplication of one domain is less common. Many of the repeats appear to have been duplicated in the middle of the repeat region. This is in strong contrast to the evolution of other proteins that mainly works through additions of single domains at either terminus. Further, we found that some domain families show distinct duplication patterns, e.g., nebulin domains have mainly been expanded with a unit of seven domains at a time, while duplications of other domain families involve varying numbers of domains. Finally, no common mechanism for the expansion of all repeats could be detected. We found that the duplication patterns show no dependence on the size of the domains. Further, repeat expansion in some families can possibly be explained by shuffling of exons. However, exon shuffling could not have created all repeats.

  1. A Consideration of Criticism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Terry

    1989-01-01

    Explores critical activities in the visual arts and how they can enhance art appreciation. Outlines sources of criticism, different types of criticism, the varied backgrounds of art critics, and the artist-critic relationship. Maintains that, by emphasizing interpretive aspects, school art criticism can come closer to professional art criticism.…

  2. Fuzzy Bases of Fuzzy Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanping Rao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an attempt to develop quantitative domain theory over frames. Firstly, we propose the notion of a fuzzy basis, and several equivalent characterizations of fuzzy bases are obtained. Furthermore, the concept of a fuzzy algebraic domain is introduced, and a relationship between fuzzy algebraic domains and fuzzy domains is discussed from the viewpoint of fuzzy basis. We finally give an application of fuzzy bases, where the image of a fuzzy domain can be preserved under some special kinds of fuzzy Galois connections.

  3. The framing of scientific domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam Christensen, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: By using the UNISIST models this article argues for the necessity of domain analysis in order to qualify scientific information seeking. The models better understanding of communication processes in a scientific domain and embraces the point that domains are always both unstable over time...... and changeable according to the specific perspective. This understanding is even more important today as numerous digitally generated information tools as well as collaborative and interdisciplinary research are blurring the domain borders. Nevertheless, researchers navigate “intuitively” in “their” specific...... as according to the agents that are charting them. As such, power in a Foucauldian sense is unavoidable in outlining a domain. Originality/value 1. The UNISIST models are applied to the domain of art history; and 2. the article discusses the instability of a scientific domain as well as, at the same time...

  4. Feature-level domain adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kouw, Wouter M.; Van Der Maaten, Laurens J P; Krijthe, Jesse H.

    2016-01-01

    Domain adaptation is the supervised learning setting in which the training and test data are sampled from different distributions: training data is sampled from a source domain, whilst test data is sampled from a target domain. This paper proposes and studies an approach, called feature......-level domain adaptation (flda), that models the dependence between the two domains by means of a feature-level transfer model that is trained to describe the transfer from source to target domain. Subsequently, we train a domain-adapted classifier by minimizing the expected loss under the resulting transfer...... model. For linear classifiers and a large family of loss functions and transfer models, this expected loss can be computed or approximated analytically, and minimized efficiently. Our empirical evaluation of flda focuses on problems comprising binary and count data in which the transfer can be naturally...

  5. Domain architecture conservation in orthologs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background As orthologous proteins are expected to retain function more often than other homologs, they are often used for functional annotation transfer between species. However, ortholog identification methods do not take into account changes in domain architecture, which are likely to modify a protein's function. By domain architecture we refer to the sequential arrangement of domains along a protein sequence. To assess the level of domain architecture conservation among orthologs, we carried out a large-scale study of such events between human and 40 other species spanning the entire evolutionary range. We designed a score to measure domain architecture similarity and used it to analyze differences in domain architecture conservation between orthologs and paralogs relative to the conservation of primary sequence. We also statistically characterized the extents of different types of domain swapping events across pairs of orthologs and paralogs. Results The analysis shows that orthologs exhibit greater domain architecture conservation than paralogous homologs, even when differences in average sequence divergence are compensated for, for homologs that have diverged beyond a certain threshold. We interpret this as an indication of a stronger selective pressure on orthologs than paralogs to retain the domain architecture required for the proteins to perform a specific function. In general, orthologs as well as the closest paralogous homologs have very similar domain architectures, even at large evolutionary separation. The most common domain architecture changes observed in both ortholog and paralog pairs involved insertion/deletion of new domains, while domain shuffling and segment duplication/deletion were very infrequent. Conclusions On the whole, our results support the hypothesis that function conservation between orthologs demands higher domain architecture conservation than other types of homologs, relative to primary sequence conservation. This supports the

  6. Putting the Critical Back in Critical Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    CRITICAL BACK IN CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE by Bradford C. Mason December 2015 Thesis Advisor: Rudolph P. Darken Second Reader: Thomas Mackin...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL December 2015 Approved by: Rudolph P. Darken Thesis Advisor Thomas Mackin, California Polytechnic State...critical infrastructure resilience CIRGP Critical Infrastructure Resilience Grant Program CMI Consequences Measurement Index COAG Council of Australian

  7. Topological Luttinger liquids from decorated domain walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Daniel E.; Scaffidi, Thomas; Vasseur, Romain

    2018-04-01

    We introduce a systematic construction of a gapless symmetry-protected topological phase in one dimension by "decorating" the domain walls of Luttinger liquids. The resulting strongly interacting phases provide a concrete example of a gapless symmetry-protected topological (gSPT) phase with robust symmetry-protected edge modes. Using boundary conformal field theory arguments, we show that while the bulks of such gSPT phases are identical to conventional Luttinger liquids, their boundary critical behavior is controlled by a different, strongly coupled renormalization group fixed point. Our results are checked against extensive density matrix renormalization group calculations.

  8. Randomized crossover comparison of right atrial appendage pacing versus interatrial septum pacing for prevention of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation in patients with sinus bradycardia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padeletti, L; Pieragnoli, P; Ciapetti, C; Colella, A; Musilli, N; Porciani, M C; Ricci, R; Pignalberi, C; Santini, M; Puglisi, A; Azzolini, P; Spampinato, A; Martelli, M; Capucci, A; Boriani, G; Botto, G; Proclemer, A

    2001-12-01

    New atrial pacing techniques and overdrive pacing algorithms have been introduced to prevent atrial fibrillation. This study was designed to test the hypotheses that (1) interatrial septum pacing (IASP) at the triangle of Koch would be more effective than right atrial appendage pacing (RAAP) in preventing paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF) in patients with sinus bradycardia and (2) an algorithm (CAP) designed to achieve constant atrial capture would increase the efficacy of rate-responsive atrial pacing. We studied 46 patients with PAF and sinus bradycardia implanted with a DDD(R) (Medtronic Thera) pacemaker. Twenty-four patients (6.0 +/- 10.1 PAF episodes/month within 3 months before study) were randomized to RAAP and 22 patients (5.4 +/- 7.1, not significant) to IASP. Within each arm 2 randomized crossover periods of CAP-OFF and CAP-ON function were programed. The PAF episodes per month significantly decreased in the RAAP (CAP-OFF: 2.1 +/- 4.2, P <.05; CAP-ON: 1.9 +/- 3.8, P <.05) and in the IASP group (CAP-OFF: 0.2 +/- 0.5, P <.05; CAP-ON: 0.2 +/- 0.5, P <.05). Values were significantly lower in the IASP group than in the RAAP group in both CAP-OFF (0.2 +/- 0.5 vs 2.1 +/- 4.2, P <.05) and CAP-ON (0.2 +/- 0.5 vs 1.9 +/- 3.8, P <.05) conditions. PAF burden was significantly lower in the IASP than in the RAAP group in CAP-OFF (47 +/- 84 min/d vs 140 +/- 217, P <.05) and in CAP-ON (41 +/- 72 vs 193 +/- 266, P <.05) conditions. No differences were observed within each arm in PAF burden between the 2 crossover CAP programing periods. Rate-adaptive IASP at the triangle of Koch is more effective than RAAP in preventing PAF in patients with sinus bradycardia. In our sample of patients no additional clinical benefit is furnished by the CAP algorithm.

  9. Domain Walls and Matter-Antimatter Domains in the Early Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolgov A.D.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We suggest a scenario of spontaneous (or dynamical C and CP violation according to which it is possible to generate domains of matter and antimatter separated by cosmologically large distances. Such C(CP violation existed only in the early universe and later it disappeared with the only trace of generated matter and antimatter domains. So this scenario does not suffer from the problem of domain walls. According to this scenario the width of the domain wall should grow exponentially to prevent annihilation at the domain boundaries. Though there is a classical result obtained by Basu and Vilenkin that the width of the wall tends to the one of the stationary solution (constant physical width. That is why we considered thick domain walls in a de Sitter universe following paper by Basu and Vilenkin. However, we were interested not only in stationary solutions found therein, but also investigated the general case of domain wall evolution with time. When the wall thickness parameter, δ0 , is smaller than H−1/2 where H is the Hubble parameter in de Sitter space-time, then the stationary solutions exist, and initial field configurations tend with time to the stationary ones. However, there are no stationary solutions for δ0>H−1/2 We have calculated numerically the rate of the wall expansion in this case and have found that the width of the wall grows exponentially fast for δ0≫H−1 An explanation for the critical value δ0c=H−1/2 is also proposed.

  10. Year in review 2013: Critical Care - metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Lheureux, Olivier; Preiser, Jean-Charles

    2014-01-01

    Novel insights into the metabolic alterations of critical illness, including new findings on association between blood glucose at admission and poor outcome, were published in Critical Care in 2013. The role of diabetic status in the relation of the three domains of glycemic control (hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, and glycemic variability) was clarified: the association between mean glucose, high glucose variability, and ICU mortality was stronger in the non-diabetic than in diabetic patients. ...

  11. Protein domain organisation: adding order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kummerfeld Sarah K

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Domains are the building blocks of proteins. During evolution, they have been duplicated, fused and recombined, to produce proteins with novel structures and functions. Structural and genome-scale studies have shown that pairs or groups of domains observed together in a protein are almost always found in only one N to C terminal order and are the result of a single recombination event that has been propagated by duplication of the multi-domain unit. Previous studies of domain organisation have used graph theory to represent the co-occurrence of domains within proteins. We build on this approach by adding directionality to the graphs and connecting nodes based on their relative order in the protein. Most of the time, the linear order of domains is conserved. However, using the directed graph representation we have identified non-linear features of domain organization that are over-represented in genomes. Recognising these patterns and unravelling how they have arisen may allow us to understand the functional relationships between domains and understand how the protein repertoire has evolved. Results We identify groups of domains that are not linearly conserved, but instead have been shuffled during evolution so that they occur in multiple different orders. We consider 192 genomes across all three kingdoms of life and use domain and protein annotation to understand their functional significance. To identify these features and assess their statistical significance, we represent the linear order of domains in proteins as a directed graph and apply graph theoretical methods. We describe two higher-order patterns of domain organisation: clusters and bi-directionally associated domain pairs and explore their functional importance and phylogenetic conservation. Conclusion Taking into account the order of domains, we have derived a novel picture of global protein organization. We found that all genomes have a higher than expected

  12. The Garrison Domain: Civil Military Relations in the Cyberspace Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    governance, commerce , communications, and entertainment. The reliance on cyberspace is so predominant it seems unacceptable to not be part of the domain...Almost every type of person and organization on this planet arguably touches the cyberspace domain, directly or indirectly. Because this domain is...Department of Justice (DOJ) has also begun using cyberspace to gather information intelligence. Flying small civilian aircraft with electronic boxes to

  13. Prediction Reweighting for Domain Adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuang Li; Shiji Song; Gao Huang

    2017-07-01

    There are plenty of classification methods that perform well when training and testing data are drawn from the same distribution. However, in real applications, this condition may be violated, which causes degradation of classification accuracy. Domain adaptation is an effective approach to address this problem. In this paper, we propose a general domain adaptation framework from the perspective of prediction reweighting, from which a novel approach is derived. Different from the major domain adaptation methods, our idea is to reweight predictions of the training classifier on testing data according to their signed distance to the domain separator, which is a classifier that distinguishes training data (from source domain) and testing data (from target domain). We then propagate the labels of target instances with larger weights to ones with smaller weights by introducing a manifold regularization method. It can be proved that our reweighting scheme effectively brings the source and target domains closer to each other in an appropriate sense, such that classification in target domain becomes easier. The proposed method can be implemented efficiently by a simple two-stage algorithm, and the target classifier has a closed-form solution. The effectiveness of our approach is verified by the experiments on artificial datasets and two standard benchmarks, a visual object recognition task and a cross-domain sentiment analysis of text. Experimental results demonstrate that our method is competitive with the state-of-the-art domain adaptation algorithms.

  14. Core curriculum illustration: epiploic appendagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Girbes, Alexandre; Alegre, Alberto; Linnau, Ken F

    2017-10-12

    This is the 45th installment of a series that will highlight one case per publication issue from the bank of cases available online as part of the American Society of Emergency Radiology (ASER) educational resources. Our goal is to generate more interest in and use of our online materials. To view more cases online, please visit the ASER Core Curriculum and Recommendations for Study online at: http://www.erad.org/page/CCIP_TOC .

  15. Amino-acid composition after loop deletion drives domain swapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandwani, Neha; Surana, Parag; Udgaonkar, Jayant B; Das, Ranabir; Gosavi, Shachi

    2017-10-01

    Rational engineering of a protein to enable domain swapping requires an understanding of the sequence, structural and energetic factors that favor the domain-swapped oligomer over the monomer. While it is known that the deletion of loops between β-strands can promote domain swapping, the spliced sequence at the position of the loop deletion is thought to have a minimal role to play in such domain swapping. Here, two loop-deletion mutants of the non-domain-swapping protein monellin, frame-shifted by a single residue, were designed. Although the spliced sequence in the two mutants differed by only one residue at the site of the deletion, only one of them (YEIKG) promoted domain swapping. The mutant containing the spliced sequence YENKG was entirely monomeric. This new understanding that the domain swapping propensity after loop deletion may depend critically on the chemical composition of the shortened loop will facilitate the rational design of domain swapping. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  16. Functional conservation study of polarity protein Crumbs intracellular domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qi-ping; Cao, Hao-wei; Xu, Rui; Zhang, Dan-dan; Huang, Juan

    2017-01-20

    The transmembrane protein Crumbs (Crb) plays key roles in the establishing and maintaining cell apical-basal polarity in epithelial cells by determining the apical plasma membrane identity. Although its intracellular domain contains only 37 amino acids, it is absolutely essential for its function. In Drosophila, mutations in this intracellular domain result in severe defects in epithelial polarity and abnormal embryonic development. The intracellular domain of Crb shows high homology across species from Drosophila to Mus musculus and Homo sapiens. However, the intracellular domains of the two Crb proteins in C. elegans are rather divergent from those of Drosophila and mammals, raising the question on whether the function of the intracellular domain of the Crb protein is conserved in C. elegans. Using genomic engineering approach, we replaced the intracellular domain of the Drosophila Crb with that of C. elegans Crb2 (CeCrb2), which has extremely low homology with those from the Crb proteins of Drosophila and mammals. Surprisingly, substituting the intracellular domain of Drosophila Crb with that of CeCrb2 did not cause any abnormalities in development of the Drosophila embryo, in terms of expression and localization of Crb and other polarity proteins and apical-basal polarity in embryonic epithelial cells. Our results support the notion that despite their extensive sequence variations, all functionally critical amino acid residues and motifs of the intercellular domain of Crb proteins are fully conserved between Drosophila and C. elegans.

  17. Critical point fluctuations in supported lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Simon D; Heath, George; Olmsted, Peter D; Kisil, Anastasia

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that it is possible to observe many aspects of critical phenomena in supported lipid bilayers using atomic force microscopy (AFM) with the aid of stable and precise temperature control. The regions of criticality were determined by accurately measuring and calculating phase diagrams for the 2 phase L(d)-L(o) region, and tracking how it moves with temperature, then increasing the sampling density around the estimated critical regions. Compositional fluctuations were observed above the critical temperature (T(c)) and characterised using a spatial correlation function. From this analysis, the phase transition was found to be most closely described by the 2D Ising model, showing it is a critical transition. Below T(c) roughening of the domain boundaries occurred due to the reduction in line tension close to the critical point. Smaller scale density fluctuations were also detected just below T(c). At T(c), we believe we have observed fluctuations on length scales greater than 10 microm. The region of critically fluctuating 10-100 nm nanodomains has been found to extend a considerable distance above T(c) to temperatures within the biological range, and seem to be an ideal candidate for the actual structure of lipid rafts in cell membranes. Although evidence for this idea has recently emerged, this is the first direct evidence for nanoscale domains in the critical region.

  18. Mapping the Moral Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Jesse; Nosek, Brian A.; Haidt, Jonathan; Iyer, Ravi; Koleva, Spassena; Ditto, Peter H.

    2010-01-01

    The moral domain is broader than the empathy and justice concerns assessed by existing measures of moral competence, and it is not just a subset of the values assessed by value inventories. To fill the need for reliable and theoretically-grounded measurement of the full range of moral concerns, we developed the Moral Foundations Questionnaire (MFQ) based on a theoretical model of five universally available (but variably developed) sets of moral intuitions: Harm/care, Fairness/reciprocity, Ingroup/loyalty, Authority/respect, and Purity/sanctity. We present evidence for the internal and external validity of the scale and the model, and in doing so present new findings about morality: 1. Comparative model fitting of confirmatory factor analyses provides empirical justification for a five-factor structure of moral concerns. 2. Convergent/discriminant validity evidence suggests that moral concerns predict personality features and social group attitudes not previously considered morally relevant. 3. We establish pragmatic validity of the measure in providing new knowledge and research opportunities concerning demographic and cultural differences in moral intuitions. These analyses provide evidence for the usefulness of Moral Foundations Theory in simultaneously increasing the scope and sharpening the resolution of psychological views of morality. PMID:21244182

  19. Domain-Generality and Domain-Specificity in Personal Epistemology Research: Philosophical and Empirical Reflections in the Development of a Theoretical Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muis, Krista R.; Bendixen, Lisa D.; Haerle, Florian C.

    2006-01-01

    This review synthesizes and critically examines 19 empirical studies that have addressed the domain-specificity/domain-generality issue in personal epistemology. We present an overview of traditional and more contemporary epistemological stances from philosophical perspectives to offer another basis from which to examine this issue. Explicit…

  20. Critical health literacy: a review and critical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinn, Deborah

    2011-07-01

    Though there has been a considerable expansion of interest in the health literacy concept worldwide, there has also been criticism that this concept has been poorly defined, that it stretches the idea of "literacy" to an indefensible extent and more specifically, that it adds little to the existing concerns and intervention approaches of the better established discipline of health promotion. This paper takes as a starting point the expanded model of health literacy advanced by Nutbeam (2000) and addresses these concerns by interrogating the concept of "critical health literacy" in order to draw conclusions about its utility for advancing the health of individuals and communities. The constituent domains of critical health literacy are identified; namely information appraisal, understanding the social determinants of health, and collective action, and as far as possible each are clearly delineated, with links to related concepts made explicit. The paper concludes that an appreciation of work undertaken in a range of different disciplines, such as media studies, medical sociology, and evidence-based medicine can enhance our understanding of the critical health literacy construct and help us understand its usefulness as a social asset which helps individuals towards a critical engagement with health information. There is some evidence that aspects of critical health literacy have indeed been found to be a resource for better health outcomes, but more research is needed in this area, both to develop quantitative and qualitative approaches to evaluating health literacy skills, and to offer convincing evidence that investment in programmes designed to enhance critical health literacy are worthwhile. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. ANMCO/AIAC/SICI-GISE/SIC/SICCH Consensus Document: percutaneous occlusion of the left atrial appendage in non-valvular atrial fibrillation patients: indications, patient selection, staff skills, organisation, and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casu, Gavino; Gulizia, Michele Massimo; Molon, Giulio; Mazzone, Patrizio; Audo, Andrea; Casolo, Giancarlo; Di Lorenzo, Emilio; Portoghese, Michele; Pristipino, Christian; Ricci, Renato Pietro; Themistoclakis, Sakis; Padeletti, Luigi; Tondo, Claudio; Berti, Sergio; Oreglia, Jacopo Andrea; Gerosa, Gino; Zanobini, Marco; Ussia, Gian Paolo; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Romeo, Francesco; Di Bartolomeo, Roberto

    2017-05-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia and its prevalence is increasing due to the progressive aging of the population. About 20% of strokes are attributable to AF and AF patients are at five-fold increased risk of stroke. The mainstay of treatment of AF is the prevention of thromboembolic complications with oral anticoagulation therapy. Drug treatment for many years has been based on the use of vitamin K antagonists, but recently newer and safer molecules have been introduced (dabigatran etexilate, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban). Despite these advances, many patients still do not receive adequate anticoagulation therapy because of contraindications (relative and absolute) to this treatment. Over the last decade, percutaneous closure of left atrial appendage, main site of thrombus formation during AF, proved effective in reducing thromboembolic complications, thus offering a valid medical treatment especially in patients at increased bleeding risk. The aim of this consensus document is to review the main aspects of left atrial appendage occlusion (selection and multidisciplinary assessment of patients, currently available methods and devices, requirements for centres and operators, associated therapies and follow-up modalities) having as a ground the significant evolution of techniques and the available relevant clinical data.

  2. Ligand binding by PDZ domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Celestine N.; Bach, Anders; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    The postsynaptic density protein-95/disks large/zonula occludens-1 (PDZ) protein domain family is one of the most common protein-protein interaction modules in mammalian cells, with paralogs present in several hundred human proteins. PDZ domains are found in most cell types, but neuronal proteins...... as pathological conditions have been reviewed recently. In this review, we focus on the molecular details of how PDZ domains bind their protein ligands and their potential as drug targets in this context....

  3. The BRCT domain is a phospho-protein binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaochun; Chini, Claudia Christiano Silva; He, Miao; Mer, Georges; Chen, Junjie

    2003-10-24

    The carboxyl-terminal domain (BRCT) of the Breast Cancer Gene 1 (BRCA1) protein is an evolutionarily conserved module that exists in a large number of proteins from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. Although most BRCT domain-containing proteins participate in DNA-damage checkpoint or DNA-repair pathways, or both, the function of the BRCT domain is not fully understood. We show that the BRCA1 BRCT domain directly interacts with phosphorylated BRCA1-Associated Carboxyl-terminal Helicase (BACH1). This specific interaction between BRCA1 and phosphorylated BACH1 is cell cycle regulated and is required for DNA damage-induced checkpoint control during the transition from G2 to M phase of the cell cycle. Further, we show that two other BRCT domains interact with their respective physiological partners in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. Thirteen additional BRCT domains also preferentially bind phospho-peptides rather than nonphosphorylated control peptides. These data imply that the BRCT domain is a phospho-protein binding domain involved in cell cycle control.

  4. Response to ACCEL: Emphasize Development, Domains, and Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszewski-Kubilius, Paula; Subotnik, Rena F.; Worrell, Frank C.

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we provide a response to the Active Concerned Citizenship and Ethical Leadership (ACCEL) model put forward by Sternberg (2017). Our commentary focuses on four critical areas that do not receive sufficient attention in Sternberg's proposed model: (a) the developmental nature of giftedness; (b) that giftedness is domain specific,…

  5. Multiple protein-domain conservation architecture as a non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Epitope prediction is a critical step to diagnostic and vaccine discovery. Despite existence of some parameters for epitope discovery, this area remains inconclusive and wanting-for new complementary or stand-alone tools. The phenomenon of multiple protein-domain conservation architecture (MPDCA) as used here refers ...

  6. Environmental philosophy: response to critics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Sahotra

    2014-03-01

    The following piece is a response to the critiques from Frank, Garson, and Odenbaugh. The issues at stake are: the definition of biodiversity and its normativity, historical fidelity in ecological restoration, naturalism in environmental ethics, and the role of decision theory. The normativity of the concept of biodiversity in conservation biology is defended. Historical fidelity is criticized as an operative goal for ecological restoration. It is pointed out that the analysis requires only minimal assumptions about ethics. Decision theory is presented as a tool, not a domain-limiting necessary requirement for environmental philosophy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Resource Unavailability (RU) Per Domain Behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karagiannis, Georgios; Westberg, L.; Bader, A.; Tschofenig, Hannes; Tschofenig, H.

    2006-01-01

    This draft specifies a Per Domain Behavior that provides the ability to Diffserv nodes located outside Diffserv domain(s), e.g., receiver or other Diffserv enabled router to detect when the resources provided by the Diffserv domain(s) are not available. The unavailability of resources in the domain

  8. Deconstructing ‘the domain of science’ as a sociolinguistic entity in EFL societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, Bent

    2005-01-01

    is simply instrumental, and who embrace the influence of English as a manifestation of internationalization; (2) ‘the concerned,’ a small but influential minority whose views on the influence of English are more critical, and who represent the cultural elite. He then takes a quick detour into postmodernism...... that this is really two domains (i.e. practices): the domain of university research, and that of university teaching. Only in the domain of university teaching does it make sense to talk about a potential ‘domain loss’ for Danish, whereas Preisler concludes that, within the domain of university research, English...

  9. Changing the Culture of Academic Medicine: Critical Mass or Critical Actors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helitzer, Deborah L; Newbill, Sharon L; Cardinali, Gina; Morahan, Page S; Chang, Shine; Magrane, Diane

    2017-05-01

    By 2006, women constituted 34% of academic medical faculty, reaching a critical mass. Theoretically, with critical mass, culture and policy supportive of gender equity should be evident. We explore whether having a critical mass of women transforms institutional culture and organizational change. Career development program participants were interviewed to elucidate their experiences in academic health centers (AHCs). Focus group discussions were held with institutional leaders to explore their perceptions about contemporary challenges related to gender and leadership. Content analysis of both data sources revealed points of convergence. Findings were interpreted using the theory of critical mass. Two nested domains emerged: the individual domain included the rewards and personal satisfaction of meaningful work, personal agency, tensions between cultural expectations of family and academic roles, and women's efforts to work for gender equity. The institutional domain depicted the sociocultural environment of AHCs that shaped women's experience, both personally and professionally, lack of institutional strategies to engage women in organizational initiatives, and the influence of one leader on women's ascent to leadership. The predominant evidence from this research demonstrates that the institutional barriers and sociocultural environment continue to be formidable obstacles confronting women, stalling the transformational effects expected from achieving a critical mass of women faculty. We conclude that the promise of critical mass as a turning point for women should be abandoned in favor of "critical actor" leaders, both women and men, who individually and collectively have the commitment and power to create gender-equitable cultures in AHCs.

  10. Optimal Transport for Domain Adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courty, Nicolas; Flamary, Remi; Tuia, Devis; Rakotomamonjy, Alain

    2017-09-01

    Domain adaptation is one of the most challenging tasks of modern data analytics. If the adaptation is done correctly, models built on a specific data representation become more robust when confronted to data depicting the same classes, but described by another observation system. Among the many strategies proposed, finding domain-invariant representations has shown excellent properties, in particular since it allows to train a unique classifier effective in all domains. In this paper, we propose a regularized unsupervised optimal transportation model to perform the alignment of the representations in the source and target domains. We learn a transportation plan matching both PDFs, which constrains labeled samples of the same class in the source domain to remain close during transport. This way, we exploit at the same time the labeled samples in the source and the distributions observed in both domains. Experiments on toy and challenging real visual adaptation examples show the interest of the method, that consistently outperforms state of the art approaches. In addition, numerical experiments show that our approach leads to better performances on domain invariant deep learning features and can be easily adapted to the semi-supervised case where few labeled samples are available in the target domain.

  11. Texture of lipid bilayer domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Uffe Bernchou; Brewer, Jonathan R.; Midtiby, Henrik Skov

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the texture of gel (g) domains in binary lipid membranes composed of the phospholipids DPPC and DOPC. Lateral organization of lipid bilayer membranes is a topic of fundamental and biological importance. Whereas questions related to size and composition of fluid membrane domain...

  12. Parallel pseudospectral domain decomposition techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, David; Hirsch, Richard S.

    1989-01-01

    The influence of interface boundary conditions on the ability to parallelize pseudospectral multidomain algorithms is investigated. Using the properties of spectral expansions, a novel parallel two domain procedure is generalized to an arbitrary number of domains each of which can be solved on a separate processor. This interface boundary condition considerably simplifies influence matrix techniques.

  13. Design and Implementation of Domain Hijacking Detection System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Jupo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As the basement of Internet application, DNS plays a very critical role in the network running. On Jan. 21st, 2014, the occurrence of a serious DNS hijacking in Internet has aroused the attentions to the DNS security incident again. This paper comes up with a new method to detect DSN hijacking through the construction of a high-speed cache in terms of the corresponding relation between domain name and server IP. With this method, we build a cache with the domain name and the IP. With this cache, domain name can be detected if DSN hijacking happens in DNS cache server and this system can detect domain name hijacking efficiently after it happens.

  14. Polar Domain Discovery with Sparkler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerr, R.; Khalsa, S. J. S.; Mattmann, C. A.; Ottilingam, N. K.; Singh, K.; Lopez, L. A.

    2017-12-01

    The scientific web is vast and ever growing. It encompasses millions of textual, scientific and multimedia documents describing research in a multitude of scientific streams. Most of these documents are hidden behind forms which require user action to retrieve and thus can't be directly accessed by content crawlers. These documents are hosted on web servers across the world, most often on outdated hardware and network infrastructure. Hence it is difficult and time-consuming to aggregate documents from the scientific web, especially those relevant to a specific domain. Thus generating meaningful domain-specific insights is currently difficult. We present an automated discovery system (Figure 1) using Sparkler, an open-source, extensible, horizontally scalable crawler which facilitates high throughput and focused crawling of documents pertinent to a particular domain such as information about polar regions. With this set of highly domain relevant documents, we show that it is possible to answer analytical questions about that domain. Our domain discovery algorithm leverages prior domain knowledge to reach out to commercial/scientific search engines to generate seed URLs. Subject matter experts then annotate these seed URLs manually on a scale from highly relevant to irrelevant. We leverage this annotated dataset to train a machine learning model which predicts the `domain relevance' of a given document. We extend Sparkler with this model to focus crawling on documents relevant to that domain. Sparkler avoids disruption of service by 1) partitioning URLs by hostname such that every node gets a different host to crawl and by 2) inserting delays between subsequent requests. With an NSF-funded supercomputer Wrangler, we scaled our domain discovery pipeline to crawl about 200k polar specific documents from the scientific web, within a day.

  15. Domain shape instabilities and dendrite domain growth in uniaxial ferroelectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shur, Vladimir Ya.; Akhmatkhanov, Andrey R.

    2018-01-01

    The effects of domain wall shape instabilities and the formation of nanodomains in front of moving walls obtained in various uniaxial ferroelectrics are discussed. Special attention is paid to the formation of self-assembled nanoscale and dendrite domain structures under highly non-equilibrium switching conditions. All obtained results are considered in the framework of the unified kinetic approach to domain structure evolution based on the analogy with first-order phase transformation. This article is part of the theme issue `From atomistic interfaces to dendritic patterns'.

  16. Modeling software systems by domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dippolito, Richard; Lee, Kenneth

    1992-01-01

    The Software Architectures Engineering (SAE) Project at the Software Engineering Institute (SEI) has developed engineering modeling techniques that both reduce the complexity of software for domain-specific computer systems and result in systems that are easier to build and maintain. These techniques allow maximum freedom for system developers to apply their domain expertise to software. We have applied these techniques to several types of applications, including training simulators operating in real time, engineering simulators operating in non-real time, and real-time embedded computer systems. Our modeling techniques result in software that mirrors both the complexity of the application and the domain knowledge requirements. We submit that the proper measure of software complexity reflects neither the number of software component units nor the code count, but the locus of and amount of domain knowledge. As a result of using these techniques, domain knowledge is isolated by fields of engineering expertise and removed from the concern of the software engineer. In this paper, we will describe kinds of domain expertise, describe engineering by domains, and provide relevant examples of software developed for simulator applications using the techniques.

  17. Predicting domain-domain interaction based on domain profiles with feature selection and support vector machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Alvaro J; Liao, Li

    2010-10-29

    Protein-protein interaction (PPI) plays essential roles in cellular functions. The cost, time and other limitations associated with the current experimental methods have motivated the development of computational methods for predicting PPIs. As protein interactions generally occur via domains instead of the whole molecules, predicting domain-domain interaction (DDI) is an important step toward PPI prediction. Computational methods developed so far have utilized information from various sources at different levels, from primary sequences, to molecular structures, to evolutionary profiles. In this paper, we propose a computational method to predict DDI using support vector machines (SVMs), based on domains represented as interaction profile hidden Markov models (ipHMM) where interacting residues in domains are explicitly modeled according to the three dimensional structural information available at the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Features about the domains are extracted first as the Fisher scores derived from the ipHMM and then selected using singular value decomposition (SVD). Domain pairs are represented by concatenating their selected feature vectors, and classified by a support vector machine trained on these feature vectors. The method is tested by leave-one-out cross validation experiments with a set of interacting protein pairs adopted from the 3DID database. The prediction accuracy has shown significant improvement as compared to InterPreTS (Interaction Prediction through Tertiary Structure), an existing method for PPI prediction that also uses the sequences and complexes of known 3D structure. We show that domain-domain interaction prediction can be significantly enhanced by exploiting information inherent in the domain profiles via feature selection based on Fisher scores, singular value decomposition and supervised learning based on support vector machines. Datasets and source code are freely available on the web at http

  18. Predicting domain-domain interaction based on domain profiles with feature selection and support vector machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liao Li

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein interaction (PPI plays essential roles in cellular functions. The cost, time and other limitations associated with the current experimental methods have motivated the development of computational methods for predicting PPIs. As protein interactions generally occur via domains instead of the whole molecules, predicting domain-domain interaction (DDI is an important step toward PPI prediction. Computational methods developed so far have utilized information from various sources at different levels, from primary sequences, to molecular structures, to evolutionary profiles. Results In this paper, we propose a computational method to predict DDI using support vector machines (SVMs, based on domains represented as interaction profile hidden Markov models (ipHMM where interacting residues in domains are explicitly modeled according to the three dimensional structural information available at the Protein Data Bank (PDB. Features about the domains are extracted first as the Fisher scores derived from the ipHMM and then selected using singular value decomposition (SVD. Domain pairs are represented by concatenating their selected feature vectors, and classified by a support vector machine trained on these feature vectors. The method is tested by leave-one-out cross validation experiments with a set of interacting protein pairs adopted from the 3DID database. The prediction accuracy has shown significant improvement as compared to InterPreTS (Interaction Prediction through Tertiary Structure, an existing method for PPI prediction that also uses the sequences and complexes of known 3D structure. Conclusions We show that domain-domain interaction prediction can be significantly enhanced by exploiting information inherent in the domain profiles via feature selection based on Fisher scores, singular value decomposition and supervised learning based on support vector machines. Datasets and source code are freely available on

  19. Wavefield extrapolation in pseudodepth domain

    KAUST Repository

    Ma, Xuxin

    2013-02-01

    Wavefields are commonly computed in the Cartesian coordinate frame. Its efficiency is inherently limited due to spatial oversampling in deep layers, where the velocity is high and wavelengths are long. To alleviate this computational waste due to uneven wavelength sampling, we convert the vertical axis of the conventional domain from depth to vertical time or pseudodepth. This creates a nonorthognal Riemannian coordinate system. Isotropic and anisotropic wavefields can be extrapolated in the new coordinate frame with improved efficiency and good consistency with Cartesian domain extrapolation results. Prestack depth migrations are also evaluated based on the wavefield extrapolation in the pseudodepth domain.© 2013 Society of Exploration Geophysicists. All rights reserved.

  20. Nuclear criticality safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruvost, N.L.; Paxton, H.C.

    1996-09-01

    This technical reference document cites information related to nuclear criticality safety principles, experience, and practice. The document also provides general guidance for criticality safety personnel and regulators

  1. Nuclear criticality safety guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruvost, N.L.; Paxton, H.C. [eds.

    1996-09-01

    This technical reference document cites information related to nuclear criticality safety principles, experience, and practice. The document also provides general guidance for criticality safety personnel and regulators.

  2. Improving protein structure similarity searches using domain boundaries based on conserved sequence information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madej Tom

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of protein domains plays an important role in protein structure comparison. Domain query size and composition are critical to structure similarity search algorithms such as the Vector Alignment Search Tool (VAST, the method employed for computing related protein structures in NCBI Entrez system. Currently, domains identified on the basis of structural compactness are used for VAST computations. In this study, we have investigated how alternative definitions of domains derived from conserved sequence alignments in the Conserved Domain Database (CDD would affect the domain comparisons and structure similarity search performance of VAST. Results Alternative domains, which have significantly different secondary structure composition from those based on structurally compact units, were identified based on the alignment footprints of curated protein sequence domain families. Our analysis indicates that domain boundaries disagree on roughly 8% of protein chains in the medium redundancy subset of the Molecular Modeling Database (MMDB. These conflicting sequence based domain boundaries perform slightly better than structure domains in structure similarity searches, and there are interesting cases when structure similarity search performance is markedly improved. Conclusion Structure similarity searches using domain boundaries based on conserved sequence information can provide an additional method for investigators to identify interesting similarities between proteins with known structures. Because of the improvement in performance of structure similarity searches using sequence domain boundaries, we are in the process of implementing their inclusion into the VAST search and MMDB resources in the NCBI Entrez system.

  3. Study of domain wall propagation in nanostructured CoPt multilayers by using antisymmetric magnetoresistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-Rodriguez, G; Perez-Junquera, A; Hierro-Rodriguez, A; Montenegro, N; Alameda, J M; Velez, M; Menendez, J L; Ravelosona, D

    2010-01-01

    Domain wall propagation has been studied in perpendicular anisotropy CoPt multilayers patterned by e-beam lithography into 5 μm wide wires. Positive and negative peaks appear in time resolved magnetoresistance curves, associated to the different directions of domain wall propagation along the wires. The field dependence of domain wall velocity is well described by a creep model of a 1D wall in the presence of weak disorder with critical exponent μ=1/4.

  4. Information rich mapping requirement to product architecture through functional system deployment: The multi entity domain approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauksdóttir, Dagny; Mortensen, Niels Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Successful transformation of design information from customer requirements to design implementation is critical for engineering design. As systems become complex the tracking of how customer requirements are implement becomes difficult. Existing approaches suggest so called domain modelling...... may impede the ability to evolve, maintain or reuse systems. In this paper the Multi Entity Domain Approach (MEDA) is presented. The approach combines different design information within the domain views, incorporates both Software and Hardware design and supports iterative requirements definition...

  5. Nucleation and evaporation of domains due to electric field at room ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    α) ~ 80 erg cm–2 as given in the litera- ture,19 the critical length was estimated to be ~ 1.7 μm. This implies that the domain wall nucleated by 5 kV cm–1 must have a length more than 1.7 μm to form a sustain- able domain structure. The length ...

  6. Critical Thinking--An Overview with Implications for Physical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Ron E.

    1992-01-01

    Describes current issues and difficulties inherent to the topic of critical thinking in physical education; also presents and discusses a schematic representation of a theoretical critical thinking model for the psychomotor domain (cognitive organizing, cognitive action, cognitive and psychomotor outcomes, and metacognitive monitoring). (SM)

  7. Critical phenomena in ferromagnetic spin systems on lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinn-Justin, J.

    1974-01-01

    A perturbation expansion of the partition function, for a spin system on a lattice, is used in order to justify the renormalization group equations satisfied by the correlation functions in the critical domain of a second-order phase transition. These renormalization group equations correspond to a field theoretical formulation of Wilson's theory of critical phenomena [fr

  8. Topology Based Domain Search (TBDS)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Manning, William

    2002-01-01

    This effort will explore radical changes in the way Domain Name System (DNS) is used by endpoints in a network to improve the resilience of the endpoint and its applications in the face of dynamically changing infrastructure topology...

  9. Heliborne time domain electromagnetic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, S.

    2009-01-01

    Atomic Minerals Directorate (AMD), are using heliborne and ground time domain electromagnetic (TDEM) system for the exploration of deep seated unconformity type uranium deposits. Uranium has been explored in various parts of the world like Athabasca basin using time domain electromagnetic system. AMD has identified some areas in India where such deposits are available. Apart from uranium exploration, the TDEM systems are used for the exploration of deep seated minerals like diamonds. Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) is involved in the indigenous design of the heliborne time domain system since this system is useful for DAE and also it has a scope of wide application. In this paper we discuss about the principle of time domain electromagnetic systems, their capabilities and the development and problems of such system for various other mineral exploration. (author)

  10. Anisotropy of domain wall resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viret; Samson; Warin; Marty; Ott; Sondergard; Klein; Fermon

    2000-10-30

    The resistive effect of domain walls in FePd films with perpendicular anisotropy was studied experimentally as a function of field and temperature. The films were grown directly on MgO substrates, which induces an unusual virgin magnetic configuration composed of 60 nm wide parallel stripe domains. This allowed us to carry out the first measurements of the anisotropy of domain wall resistivity in the two configurations of current perpendicular and parallel to the walls. At 18 K, we find 8.2% and 1.3% for the domain wall magnetoresistance normalized to the wall width (8 nm) in these two respective configurations. These values are consistent with the predictions of Levy and Zhang.

  11. Ferroelectric Negative Capacitance Domain Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffmann, Michael; Khan, Asif Islam; Serrao, Claudy; Lu, Zhongyuan; Salahuddin, Sayeef; Pešić, Milan; Slesazeck, Stefan; Schroeder, Uwe; Mikolajick, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Transient negative capacitance effects in epitaxial ferroelectric Pb(Zr$_{0.2}$Ti$_{0.8}$)O$_3$ capacitors are investigated with a focus on the dynamical switching behavior governed by domain nucleation and growth. Voltage pulses are applied to a series connection of the ferroelectric capacitor and a resistor to directly measure the ferroelectric negative capacitance during switching. A time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau approach is used to investigate the underlying domain dynamics. The transien...

  12. Fatou-Bieberbach domains in

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forstnerič, Franc; Wold, Erlend F.

    2015-10-01

    We construct Fatou-Bieberbach domains in for n>1 which contain a given compact set K and at the same time avoid a totally real affine subspace L of dimension < n, provided that K∪ L is polynomially convex. By using this result, we show that the domain for 1≤ k< n enjoys the basic Oka property with approximation for maps from any Stein manifold of dimension < n.

  13. Incompleteness in the finite domain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pudlák, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 4 (2017), s. 405-441 ISSN 1079-8986 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 339691 - FEALORA Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : finite domain Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 0.742, year: 2016 https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/bulletin-of-symbolic-logic/article/incompleteness-in-the-finite-domain/D239B1761A73DCA534A4805A76D81C76

  14. Domain Walls with Strings Attached

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shmakova, Marina

    2001-08-20

    We have constructed a bulk and brane action of IIA theory which describes a pair of BPS domain walls on S{sub 1}/Z{sub 2}, with strings attached. The walls are given by two orientifold O8-planes with coincident D8-branes and F1-D0-strings are stretched between the walls. This static configuration satisfies all matching conditions for the string and domain wall sources and has 1/4 of unbroken supersymmetry.

  15. Incompleteness in the finite domain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pudlák, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 4 (2017), s. 405-441 ISSN 1079-8986 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 339691 - FEALORA Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : finite domain Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 0.742, year: 2016 https://www.cambridge.org/core/ journals /bulletin-of-symbolic-logic/article/incompleteness-in-the-finite-domain/D239B1761A73DCA534A4805A76D81C76

  16. Photoinduced Domain Pattern Transformation in Ferroelectric-Dielectric Superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Youngjun; Park, Joonkyu; Pateras, Anastasios; Rich, Matthew B.; Zhang, Qingteng; Chen, Pice; Yusuf, Mohammed H.; Wen, Haidan; Dawber, Matthew; Evans, Paul G.

    2017-07-01

    The nanodomain pattern in ferroelectric/dielectric superlattices transforms to a uniform polarization state under above-bandgap optical excitation. X-ray scattering reveals a disappearance of domain diffuse scattering and an expansion of the lattice. The reappearance of the domain pattern occurs over a period of seconds at room temperature, suggesting a transformation mechanism in which charge carriers in long-lived trap states screen the depolarization field. A Landau-Ginzburg-Devonshire model predicts changes in lattice parameter and a critical carrier concentration for the transformation.

  17. A Critical Humanist Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magill, Kevin; Rodriguez, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    This essay is a critical humanist discussion of curriculum; a departure from the technicist view of education [education meant to support a global capitalist economy] and an analysis of curriculum considering critical humanism, political economy and critical race theory among other modes of critical analysis and inquiry. Our discussion supports a…

  18. Prevention of criticality accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canavese, S.I.

    1982-01-01

    These notes used in the postgraduate course on Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety discuss macro-and microscopic nuclear constants for fissile materials systems. Critical systems: their definition; criteria to analyze the critical state; determination of the critical size; analysis of practical problems about prevention of criticality. Safety of isolated units and of sets of units. Application of standards. Conception of facilities from the criticality control view point. (author) [es

  19. Domain Decomposition Solvers for Frequency-Domain Finite Element Equations

    KAUST Repository

    Copeland, Dylan

    2010-10-05

    The paper is devoted to fast iterative solvers for frequency-domain finite element equations approximating linear and nonlinear parabolic initial boundary value problems with time-harmonic excitations. Switching from the time domain to the frequency domain allows us to replace the expensive time-integration procedure by the solution of a simple linear elliptic system for the amplitudes belonging to the sine- and to the cosine-excitation or a large nonlinear elliptic system for the Fourier coefficients in the linear and nonlinear case, respectively. The fast solution of the corresponding linear and nonlinear system of finite element equations is crucial for the competitiveness of this method. © 2011 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  20. WHSC1, a 90 kb SET domain-containing gene, expressed in early development and homologous to a Drosophila dysmorphy gene maps in the Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome critical region and is fused to IgH in t(4;14) multiple myeloma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stec, I.; Wright, T. J.; van Ommen, G. J.; de Boer, P. A.; van Haeringen, A.; Moorman, A. F.; Altherr, M. R.; den Dunnen, J. T.

    1998-01-01

    Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is a malformation syndrome associated with a hemizygous deletion of the distal short arm of chromosome 4 (4p16.3). The smallest region of overlap between WHS patients, the WHS critical region, has been confined to 165 kb, of which the complete sequence is known. We

  1. Domain specific MT in use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Offersgaard, Lene; Povlsen, Claus; Almsten, Lisbeth Kjeldgaard

    2008-01-01

    point scale evaluate the sentence from the point of view of the post-editor. The post-editor profile defined by the LSP is based on the experiences of introducing MT in the LSP workflow. The relation between the Translation Edit Rate (TER) scores and “Usability” scores is tested. We find TER a candidate...... for an automatic metric simulating the post-editors’ usability judgements. LSP tests show 67% saved time in post-editing for the tested domain. Finally, the use of weighted sub-domain phrase tables in a SMT system is shown to improve translation quality.......The paper focuses on domain specific use of MT with a special focus on SMT in the workflow of a Language Service Provider (LSP). We report on the feedback of post-editors using fluency/adequacy evaluation and the evaluation metric ’Usability’, understood in this context as where users on a three...

  2. STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF PALLADIN’S ACTIN BINDING DOMAIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Moriah R.; Dixon, Richard D.S.; Goicoechea, Silvia M.; Murphy, Grant S.; Brungardt, Joseph G.; Beam, Matthew T.; Srinath, Pavan; Patel, Julie; Mohiuddin, Jahan; Otey, Carol A.; Campbell, Sharon L.

    2013-01-01

    Here we report the NMR structure of the actin-binding domain contained in the cell adhesion protein palladin. Previously we demonstrated that one of the immunoglobulin domains of palladin (Ig3) is both necessary and sufficient for direct F-actin binding in vitro. In this study, we identify two basic patches on opposite faces of Ig3 that are critical for actin binding and crosslinking. Sedimentation equilibrium assays indicate that the Ig3 domain of palladin does not self-associate. These combined data are consistent with an actin crosslinking mechanism that involves concurrent attachment of two actin filaments by a single palladin molecule by an electrostatic mechanism. Palladin mutations that disrupt actin binding show altered cellular distributions and morphology of actin in cells, revealing a functional requirement for the interaction between palladin and actin in vivo. PMID:23806659

  3. Highly efficient domain wall motion in ferrimagnetic trilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, See-Hun; Garg, Chirag; Parkin, Stuart; IBM-MPI spintronics Team

    The current-induced domain wall motion arising from chiral spin torque forms the basis of a number of technologies such as the racetrack memory and 3-terminal based MRAM devices. One of the main impediments towards this implementation is the high current density usually needed to move domain walls reliably. Here, we show that in ferrimagnetic trilayers, we can reduce the critical current required to move domain walls by 2-5 times compared to a ferromagnetic trilayer while dramatically increasing the velocity for the same current densities. This in part, is effected by the use of a Pt underlayer which is grown as a mixture of (111) and (100) phase, resulting in a 50% greater Slonczewski-like SOT compared to (111) Pt, as measured by harmonic Hall voltage measurements of current-induced effective fields.

  4. Knowledge-based decision support by CRITIC

    OpenAIRE

    W-N Xiang

    1997-01-01

    A knowledge-based diagnostic model which helps decisionmakers learn about hidden liabilities in their plan scenarios is developed in this paper. It offers critical opinions on plan deficiencies that may otherwise remain undetected. Decisionmakers preserve the freedom to explore solutions and retain the authority of making adjustments. This approach to human - computer interface design contributes to a more advanced domain-specific decision support system.

  5. Critical Care Organizations: Business of Critical Care and Value/Performance Building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Sharon; Gregg, Sara R; Coopersmith, Craig M; Layon, A Joseph; Oropello, John; Brown, Daniel R; Pastores, Stephen M; Kvetan, Vladimir

    2018-01-01

    New, value-based regulations and reimbursement structures are creating historic care management challenges, thinning the margins and threatening the viability of hospitals and health systems. The Society of Critical Care Medicine convened a taskforce of Academic Leaders in Critical Care Medicine on February 22, 2016, during the 45th Critical Care Congress to develop a toolkit drawing on the experience of successful leaders of critical care organizations in North America for advancing critical care organizations (Appendix 1). The goal of this article was to provide a roadmap and call attention to key factors that adult critical care medicine leadership in both academic and nonacademic setting should consider when planning for value-based care. Relevant medical literature was accessed through a literature search. Material published by federal health agencies and other specialty organizations was also reviewed. Collaboratively and iteratively, taskforce members corresponded by electronic mail and held monthly conference calls to finalize this report. The business and value/performance critical care organization building section comprised of leaders of critical care organizations with expertise in critical care administration, healthcare management, and clinical practice. Two phases of critical care organizations care integration are described: "horizontal," within the system and regionalization of care as an initial phase, and "vertical," with a post-ICU and postacute care continuum as a succeeding phase. The tools required for the clinical and financial transformation are provided, including the essential prerequisites of forming a critical care organization; the manner in which a critical care organization can help manage transformational domains is considered. Lastly, how to achieve organizational health system support for critical care organization implementation is discussed. A critical care organization that incorporates functional clinical horizontal and

  6. Critical/non-critical system methodology report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The method used to determine how the waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facilities/systems were classified as critical or non-critical to the receipt of CH waste is described within this report. All WIPP critical facilities/systems are listed in the Operational Readiness Review Dictionary. Using the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) as a guide to define the boundaries of the facilities/systems, a direct correlation of the ORR Dictionary to the FSAR can be obtained. The critical facilities/systems are those which are directly related to or have a critical support role in the receipt of CH waste. The facility/systems must meet one of the following requirements to be considered critical: (a) confinement or measure of the release of radioactive materials; (b) continued receipt and/or storage of transuranic waste (TRU) without an interruption greater than one month according to the shipping plan schedule; (c) the environmental and occupational safety of personnel meets the established site programs; and (d) the physical security of the WIPP facilities

  7. Furthering critical institutionalism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cleaver, Frances; Koning, De Jessica

    2015-01-01

    This special issue furthers the study of natural resource management from a critical institutional perspective. Critical institutionalism (CI) is a contemporary body of thought that explores how institutions dynamically mediate relationships between people, natural resources and society. It

  8. California Condor Critical Habitat

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — These Data identify (in general) the areas where critical habitat for the California Condor occur. Critical habitat for the species consists of the following 10...

  9. Surgical Critical Care Initiative

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Surgical Critical Care Initiative (SC2i) is a USU research program established in October 2013 to develop, translate, and validate biology-driven critical care....

  10. Toward critical bioethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Árnason, Vilhjálmur

    2015-04-01

    This article deals with the question as to what makes bioethics a critical discipline. It considers different senses of criticism and evaluates their strengths and weaknesses. A primary method in bioethics as a philosophical discipline is critical thinking, which implies critical evaluation of concepts, positions, and arguments. It is argued that the type of analytical criticism that restricts its critical role to critical thinking of this type often suffers from other intellectual flaws. Three examples are taken to demonstrate this: premature criticism, uncritical self-understanding of theoretical assumptions, and narrow framing of bioethical issues. Such flaws can lead both to unfair treatment of authors and to uncritical discussion of topics. In this context, the article makes use of Häyry's analysis of different rationalities in bioethical approaches and argues for the need to recognize the importance of communicative rationality for critical bioethics. A radically different critical approach in bioethics, rooted in social theory, focuses on analyses of power relations neglected in mainstream critical thinking. It is argued that, although this kind of criticism provides an important alternative in bioethics, it suffers from other shortcomings that are rooted in a lack of normative dimensions. In order to complement these approaches and counter their shortcomings, there is a need for a bioethics enlightened by critical hermeneutics. Such hermeneutic bioethics is aware of its own assumptions, places the issues in a wide context, and reflects critically on the power relations that stand in the way of understanding them. Moreover, such an approach is dialogical, which provides both a critical exercise of speech and a normative dimension implied in the free exchange of reasons and arguments. This discussion is framed by Hedgecoe's argument that critical bioethics needs four elements: to be empirically rooted, theory challenging, reflexive, and politely skeptical.

  11. Application Scenarios and Deployment Domains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niamut, O.A.; Engström, A.; Kochale, A.; Macq, J.; Thomas, G.; Zorić, G.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter describes the impact of deploying the format-agnostic media approach, along the lines of three deployment domains and the end user perspective. The chapter elaborates on a series of potential application scenarios. These application scenarios describe features of a potential

  12. affective domain in developing environmental

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AN ETHIC FOR GEOGRAPHY: THE ROLE OF THE. AFFECTIVE DOMAIN IN DEVELOPING ENVIRONMENTAL. AWARENESS. Margaret E. Marker. Geography is a subject with integral ethical and moral components. However, because of the subject's traditionally close association with scientific rationality this factor has not ...

  13. Categorization in the Affective Domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sauciuc, Gabriela-Alina

    2011-01-01

    Data collected in Romance and Scandinavian languages (N=474) in a superordinate category name production task indicate that a multiple-strategy approach would be more suitable for accounting of categorization in the affective domain instead of a prototype approach as suggested by previous studies...

  14. Ubiquitin domain proteins in disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Louise Kjær; Schulze, Andrea; Seeger, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The human genome encodes several ubiquitin-like (UBL) domain proteins (UDPs). Members of this protein family are involved in a variety of cellular functions and many are connected to the ubiquitin proteasome system, an essential pathway for protein degradation in eukaryotic cells. Despite...... and cancer. Publication history: Republished from Current BioData's Targeted Proteins database (TPdb; http://www.targetedproteinsdb.com)....

  15. Influence of magnetic domain landscape on the flux dynamics in superconductor/ferromagnet bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamus, Z.; Cieplak, Marta Z.; Kończykowski, M.; Zhu, L. Y.; Chien, C. L.

    2016-02-01

    We use a line of miniature Hall sensors to study the influence of the magnetic domain distribution on the flux dynamics in superconductor/ferromagnet bilayers. Two bilayers are built of a ferromagnetic Co/Pt multilayer with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and a superconducting Nb layer, with the insulating layer in-between to avoid proximity effect. The magnetic domain patterns of various geometries are reversibly predefined in the Co/Pt multilayers using the appropriate magnetization procedure. The Pt thickness is different in the two bilayers, resulting in different width and length of the domains, which profoundly affects vortex dynamics. We show that narrow short domains lead to strong confinement of vortices at the sample edge, while narrow elongated domains of uniform width induce smaller confinement and easy vortex entry. Large enhancement of flux pinning and critical current density, by a factor of more than 7, is observed in the last case, while the former results in smaller enhancement. When domains are wide, the disorder in the domain widths becomes beneficial for larger enhancement of pinning, while more uniform distribution of domain widths results in a precipitous drop of the enhancement. The analysis of these results suggests that with increasing domain width, a transition occurs from vortex chains pinned by narrow domains to disordered triangular vortex lattice pinned by a maze of multiply interconnected magnetic domains.

  16. Creating a Critical Thinker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piergiovanni, Polly R.

    2014-01-01

    A college education is expected to improve students' critical thinking skills. Keeping students active in class--through writing activities and class discussion--has been shown to help students think critically. In this article, creative hands-on activities, which are common in engineering courses, are shown to improve students' critical thinking…

  17. Foundations for Critical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bers, Trudy; Chun, Marc; Daly, William T.; Harrington, Christine; Tobolowsky, Barbara F.

    2015-01-01

    "Foundations for Critical Thinking" explores the landscape of critical-thinking skill development and pedagogy through foundational chapters and institutional case studies involving a range of students in diverse settings. By establishing a link between active learning and improved critical thinking, this resource encourages all higher…

  18. Reconceptualising Critical Digital Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangrazio, Luciana

    2016-01-01

    While it has proved a useful concept during the past 20 years, the notion of "critical digital literacy" requires rethinking in light of the fast-changing nature of young people's digital practices. This paper contrasts long-established notions of "critical digital literacy" (based primarily around the critical consumption of…

  19. International critical perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sambrook, S.A.; Poell, R.F.

    2014-01-01

    The Problem Critical perspectives on human resource development (HRD) have emerged, across Europe and America, hailed as the future of the field. However, we note the paucity of critical perspectives globally, the problematic dominance of critical HRD activities in Western sites of theory and

  20. Principles of Critical Dialogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankford, E. Louis

    1986-01-01

    Proposes four principles of critical dialog designed to suggest a consistent pattern of preparation for criticism. The principles concern the characteristics of the intended audience, establishing the goals of art criticism, making a commitment to a context of relevant dialogue, and clarifying one's concept of art in qualifying an object for…

  1. Inferring domain-domain interactions from protein-protein interactions with formal concept analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Khor

    Full Text Available Identifying reliable domain-domain interactions will increase our ability to predict novel protein-protein interactions, to unravel interactions in protein complexes, and thus gain more information about the function and behavior of genes. One of the challenges of identifying reliable domain-domain interactions is domain promiscuity. Promiscuous domains are domains that can occur in many domain architectures and are therefore found in many proteins. This becomes a problem for a method where the score of a domain-pair is the ratio between observed and expected frequencies because the protein-protein interaction network is sparse. As such, many protein-pairs will be non-interacting and domain-pairs with promiscuous domains will be penalized. This domain promiscuity challenge to the problem of inferring reliable domain-domain interactions from protein-protein interactions has been recognized, and a number of work-arounds have been proposed. This paper reports on an application of Formal Concept Analysis to this problem. It is found that the relationship between formal concepts provides a natural way for rare domains to elevate the rank of promiscuous domain-pairs and enrich highly ranked domain-pairs with reliable domain-domain interactions. This piggybacking of promiscuous domain-pairs onto less promiscuous domain-pairs is possible only with concept lattices whose attribute-labels are not reduced and is enhanced by the presence of proteins that comprise both promiscuous and rare domains.

  2. PUBLIC DOMAIN PROTECTION. USES AND REUSES OF PUBLIC DOMAIN WORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Adriana LUPAȘCU

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This study tries to highlight the necessity of an awareness of the right of access to the public domain, particularly using the example of works whose protection period has expired, as well as the ones which the law considers to be excluded from protection. Such works are used not only by large libraries from around the world, but also by rights holders, via different means of use, including incorporations into original works or adaptations. However, the reuse that follows these uses often only remains at the level of concept, as the notion of the public’s right of access to public domain works is not substantiated, nor is the notion of the correct or legal use of such works.

  3. Sampling Approaches for Multi-Domain Internet Performance Measurement Infrastructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calyam, Prasad

    2014-09-15

    The next-generation of high-performance networks being developed in DOE communities are critical for supporting current and emerging data-intensive science applications. The goal of this project is to investigate multi-domain network status sampling techniques and tools to measure/analyze performance, and thereby provide “network awareness” to end-users and network operators in DOE communities. We leverage the infrastructure and datasets available through perfSONAR, which is a multi-domain measurement framework that has been widely deployed in high-performance computing and networking communities; the DOE community is a core developer and the largest adopter of perfSONAR. Our investigations include development of semantic scheduling algorithms, measurement federation policies, and tools to sample multi-domain and multi-layer network status within perfSONAR deployments. We validate our algorithms and policies with end-to-end measurement analysis tools for various monitoring objectives such as network weather forecasting, anomaly detection, and fault-diagnosis. In addition, we develop a multi-domain architecture for an enterprise-specific perfSONAR deployment that can implement monitoring-objective based sampling and that adheres to any domain-specific measurement policies.

  4. The diversity and evolution of Wolbachia ankyrin repeat domain genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanos Siozios

    Full Text Available Ankyrin repeat domain-encoding genes are common in the eukaryotic and viral domains of life, but they are rare in bacteria, the exception being a few obligate or facultative intracellular Proteobacteria species. Despite having a reduced genome, the arthropod strains of the alphaproteobacterium Wolbachia contain an unusually high number of ankyrin repeat domain-encoding genes ranging from 23 in wMel to 60 in wPip strain. This group of genes has attracted considerable attention for their astonishing large number as well as for the fact that ankyrin proteins are known to participate in protein-protein interactions, suggesting that they play a critical role in the molecular mechanism that determines host-Wolbachia symbiotic interactions. We present a comparative evolutionary analysis of the wMel-related ankyrin repeat domain-encoding genes present in different Drosophila-Wolbachia associations. Our results show that the ankyrin repeat domain-encoding genes change in size by expansion and contraction mediated by short directly repeated sequences. We provide examples of intra-genic recombination events and show that these genes are likely to be horizontally transferred between strains with the aid of bacteriophages. These results confirm previous findings that the Wolbachia genomes are evolutionary mosaics and illustrate the potential that these bacteria have to generate diversity in proteins potentially involved in the symbiotic interactions.

  5. Defining critical thoughts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovatt, Abbie

    2014-05-01

    Nursing education has long struggled to define critical thinking and explain how the process of critical thinking fits into the context of nursing. Despite this long time struggle, nurses and nurse educators continue to strive to foster critical thinking skills in nursing students as intuitively most nurses believe that critical thinking is necessary to function competently in the workplace. This article explores the most recent work of Dr. Stephen Brookfield and ties the concepts which are explored in Brookfield's work to nursing practice. Brookfield identifies that learners understand the meaning of critical thinking the best when the process is first demonstrated. Role modeling is a method educators can use to demonstrate critical thinking and is a strategy which nurses often use in the clinical area to train and mentor new nursing staff. Although it is not a new strategy in nursing education, it is a valuable strategy to engage learners in critical thinking activities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Transportable criticality alarm system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clem, W.E.

    1988-09-01

    The Transportable Criticality Alarm System was developed at the Hanford Site in 1982 to comply with the requirements of US Department of Energy Order DOE 5480.1, 12/18/80, and ANSI/ANS-8.3- 1979. The portable unit that it replaced failed to comply with the new requirements in that it did not provide the necessary warning of malfunctions, nor did it provide the Hanford Site standard criticality alarm signal. Modern technology allowed the Transportable Criticality Alarm System to comply with the criticality requirements cited and to incorporate other features that make it more usable, maintainable, and reliable. The Transportable Criticality Alarm System (TCAS) provides temporary criticality coverage in manned areas where the facility criticality alarm system is not operable. This gamma radiation-sensitive system has been in use for the past 6 yr at the Hanford Site. 2 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  7. [Critical illness polyneuropathy and critical illness myopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, A; Günther, A; Witte, O W; Axer, H

    2012-11-01

    Critical illness polyneuropathy (CIP) and critical illness myopathy (CIM) are frequent complications in critically ill patients and both are associated with sepsis, systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and multiorgan failure. Major signs are muscle weakness and problems of weaning from the ventilator. Both CIP and CIM lead to elongated times of ventilation, elongated hospital stay, elongated times of rehabilitation and increased mortality. Electrophysiological measurements help to detect CIP and CIM early in the course of the disease. State of the art sepsis therapy is the major target to prevent the development of CIP and CIM. Although no specific therapy of CIP and CIM has been established in the past, the diagnosis generally improves the therapeutic management (weaning from the ventilator, early physiotherapy, etc.). This review provides an overview of clinical and diagnostic features of CIP and CIM and summarizes current pathophysiological and therapeutic concepts.

  8. From Critical Theory to Critical Hermeneutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Øjvind Larsen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available From their beginning in the 1930s, critical theory and the Frankfurt school had their focus on a critique of disturbed social relations in western society dominated by totalitarian political regimes like Stalinism, Fascism, Nazism, and by capitalism as an oppressive and destructive economic system and culture. Now, 80 years later, this has all become history and thus it is time to leave the concept of critical theory behind us, and instead bring the concept of critique to a broader theoretical framework like hermeneutics. This allows the possibility of retaining the theoretical intentions of the old Frankfurt school and at the same time there will be no boundaries by specific dominant theoretical perspectives. In this paper, such a framework for a critical hermeneutics is discussed on the basis of Weber’s, Gadamer’s, and Habermas’ theories on hermeneutics within the social sciences.

  9. K-core decomposition of a protein domain co-occurrence network reveals lower cancer mutation rates for interior cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Arnold I; Andrews, Simeon; Ahmed, Ikhlak; Azis, Thasni Ka; Malek, Joel A

    2015-01-01

    Network biology currently focuses primarily on metabolic pathways, gene regulatory, and protein-protein interaction networks. While these approaches have yielded critical information, alternative methods to network analysis will offer new perspectives on biological information. A little explored area is the interactions between domains that can be captured using domain co-occurrence networks (DCN). A DCN can be used to study the function and interaction of proteins by representing protein domains and their co-existence in genes and by mapping cancer mutations to the individual protein domains to identify signals. The domain co-occurrence network was constructed for the human proteome based on PFAM domains in proteins. Highly connected domains in the central cores were identified using the k-core decomposition technique. Here we show that these domains were found to be more evolutionarily conserved than the peripheral domains. The somatic mutations for ovarian, breast and prostate cancer diseases were obtained from the TCGA database. We mapped the somatic mutations to the individual protein domains and the local false discovery rate was used to identify significantly mutated domains in each cancer type. Significantly mutated domains were found to be enriched in cancer disease pathways. However, we found that the inner cores of the DCN did not contain any of the significantly mutated domains. We observed that the inner core protein domains are highly conserved and these domains co-exist in large numbers with other protein domains. Mutations and domain co-occurrence networks provide a framework for understanding hierarchal designs in protein function from a network perspective. This study provides evidence that a majority of protein domains in the inner core of the DCN have a lower mutation frequency and that protein domains present in the peripheral regions of the k-core contribute more heavily to the disease. These findings may contribute further to drug development.

  10. Certifying Domain-Specific Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, Michael; Pressburger, Thomas; Rosu, Grigore; Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Proof-checking code for compliance to safety policies potentially enables a product-oriented approach to certain aspects of software certification. To date, previous research has focused on generic, low-level programming-language properties such as memory type safety. In this paper we consider proof-checking higher-level domain -specific properties for compliance to safety policies. The paper first describes a framework related to abstract interpretation in which compliance to a class of certification policies can be efficiently calculated Membership equational logic is shown to provide a rich logic for carrying out such calculations, including partiality, for certification. The architecture for a domain-specific certifier is described, followed by an implemented case study. The case study considers consistency of abstract variable attributes in code that performs geometric calculations in Aerospace systems.

  11. Frequency domain optical parametric amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Bruno E; Thiré, Nicolas; Boivin, Maxime; Laramée, Antoine; Poitras, François; Lebrun, Guy; Ozaki, Tsuneyuki; Ibrahim, Heide; Légaré, François

    2014-05-07

    Today's ultrafast lasers operate at the physical limits of optical materials to reach extreme performances. Amplification of single-cycle laser pulses with their corresponding octave-spanning spectra still remains a formidable challenge since the universal dilemma of gain narrowing sets limits for both real level pumped amplifiers as well as parametric amplifiers. We demonstrate that employing parametric amplification in the frequency domain rather than in time domain opens up new design opportunities for ultrafast laser science, with the potential to generate single-cycle multi-terawatt pulses. Fundamental restrictions arising from phase mismatch and damage threshold of nonlinear laser crystals are not only circumvented but also exploited to produce a synergy between increased seed spectrum and increased pump energy. This concept was successfully demonstrated by generating carrier envelope phase stable, 1.43 mJ two-cycle pulses at 1.8 μm wavelength.

  12. Criticism and Counter-Criticism of Public Management: Strategy Models

    OpenAIRE

    Luis C. Ortigueira

    2007-01-01

    Critical control is very important in scientific management. This paper presents models of critical and counter-critical public-management strategies, focusing on the types of criticism and counter-criticism manifested in parliamentary political debates. The paper includes: (i) a normative model showing how rational criticism can be carried out; (ii) a normative model for oral critical intervention; and (iii) a general motivational strategy model for criticisms and counter-criticisms. The pap...

  13. Domain Specific Language Construction Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-03-28

    REPOSITORIES-89041-N, Software Produc- tivity Consortium Services Corporation, 2214 Rock Hill Road , Herndon, Virginia 22070, June 1989. [3] Grady...Consortium Services Corporation, 2214 Rock Hill Road , Herndon, Virginia 22070, 1990. [4] Charles Consel and Frangois Noel. A general approach for run...automation: Language design in the context of domain engenieering . In The 10th International Conference on Software Engineering & Knowl- edge Engineering (SEKE󈨦), pages 308-317, San Francisco Bay, California, June 1998.

  14. Flexible time domain averaging technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming; Lin, Jing; Lei, Yaguo; Wang, Xiufeng

    2013-09-01

    Time domain averaging(TDA) is essentially a comb filter, it cannot extract the specified harmonics which may be caused by some faults, such as gear eccentric. Meanwhile, TDA always suffers from period cutting error(PCE) to different extent. Several improved TDA methods have been proposed, however they cannot completely eliminate the waveform reconstruction error caused by PCE. In order to overcome the shortcomings of conventional methods, a flexible time domain averaging(FTDA) technique is established, which adapts to the analyzed signal through adjusting each harmonic of the comb filter. In this technique, the explicit form of FTDA is first constructed by frequency domain sampling. Subsequently, chirp Z-transform(CZT) is employed in the algorithm of FTDA, which can improve the calculating efficiency significantly. Since the signal is reconstructed in the continuous time domain, there is no PCE in the FTDA. To validate the effectiveness of FTDA in the signal de-noising, interpolation and harmonic reconstruction, a simulated multi-components periodic signal that corrupted by noise is processed by FTDA. The simulation results show that the FTDA is capable of recovering the periodic components from the background noise effectively. Moreover, it can improve the signal-to-noise ratio by 7.9 dB compared with conventional ones. Experiments are also carried out on gearbox test rigs with chipped tooth and eccentricity gear, respectively. It is shown that the FTDA can identify the direction and severity of the eccentricity gear, and further enhances the amplitudes of impulses by 35%. The proposed technique not only solves the problem of PCE, but also provides a useful tool for the fault symptom extraction of rotating machinery.

  15. Flexoelectricity in nematic domain walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elston, Steve J

    2008-07-01

    Flexoelectric effects are studied in the domain walls of a nematic liquid crystal device showing the Freedericksz transition. Walls parallel to the alignment direction have a strong twist distortion and an electro-optic effect dominated by e1-e3 is seen. Walls perpendicular to the alignment direction have a strong splay-bend distortion and an electro-optic effect dominated by e1+e3 is seen. This allows the study of both flexoelectric coefficient combinations in a single device.

  16. Domains of bosonic functional integrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botelho, Luiz C.L.; Para Univ., Belem, PA

    1998-07-01

    We propose a mathematical framework for bosonic Euclidean quantum field functional integrals based on the theory of integration on the dual algebraic vector space of classical field sources. We present a generalization of the Minlos-Dao Xing theorem and apply it to determine exactly the domain of integration associated to the functional integral representation of the two-dimensional quantum electrodynamics Schwinger generating functional. (author)

  17. Software Innovation in a Mission Critical Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrickson, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Operating in mission-critical environments requires trusted solutions, and the preference for "tried and true" approaches presents a potential barrier to infusing innovation into mission-critical systems. This presentation explores opportunities to overcome this barrier in the software domain. It outlines specific areas of innovation in software development achieved by the Johnson Space Center (JSC) Engineering Directorate in support of NASA's major human spaceflight programs, including International Space Station, Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (Orion), and Commercial Crew Programs. Software engineering teams at JSC work with hardware developers, mission planners, and system operators to integrate flight vehicles, habitats, robotics, and other spacecraft elements for genuinely mission critical applications. The innovations described, including the use of NASA Core Flight Software and its associated software tool chain, can lead to software that is more affordable, more reliable, better modelled, more flexible, more easily maintained, better tested, and enabling of automation.

  18. Critical Psychologies for Critical Health Literacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Health education is largely informed by psychological theories and practices that pursue reductionist views of people learning. However, critical attention is moving to understand health in ways that reconsider relationships to context and the forms of life within which everyday living takes place. This shift is apparent in theoretical…

  19. DIMA 3.0: Domain Interaction Map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Qibin; Pagel, Philipp; Vilne, Baiba; Frishman, Dmitrij

    2011-01-01

    Domain Interaction MAp (DIMA, available at http://webclu.bio.wzw.tum.de/dima) is a database of predicted and known interactions between protein domains. It integrates 5807 structurally known interactions imported from the iPfam and 3did databases and 46,900 domain interactions predicted by four computational methods: domain phylogenetic profiling, domain pair exclusion algorithm correlated mutations and domain interaction prediction in a discriminative way. Additionally predictions are filtered to exclude those domain pairs that are reported as non-interacting by the Negatome database. The DIMA Web site allows to calculate domain interaction networks either for a domain of interest or for entire organisms, and to explore them interactively using the Flash-based Cytoscape Web software.

  20. Dystrophin contains multiple independent membrane-binding domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Junling; Kodippili, Kasun; Yue, Yongping; Hakim, Chady H; Wasala, Lakmini; Pan, Xiufang; Zhang, Keqing; Yang, Nora N; Duan, Dongsheng; Lai, Yi

    2016-09-01

    Dystrophin is a large sub-sarcolemmal protein. Its absence leads to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Binding to the sarcolemma is essential for dystrophin to protect muscle from contraction-induced injury. It has long been thought that membrane binding of dystrophin depends on its cysteine-rich (CR) domain. Here, we provide in vivo evidence suggesting that dystrophin contains three additional membrane-binding domains including spectrin-like repeats (R)1-3, R10-12 and C-terminus (CT). To systematically study dystrophin membrane binding, we split full-length dystrophin into ten fragments and examined subcellular localizations of each fragment by adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer. In skeletal muscle, R1-3, CR domain and CT were exclusively localized at the sarcolemma. R10-12 showed both cytosolic and sarcolemmal localization. Importantly, the CR-independent membrane binding was conserved in murine and canine muscles. A critical function of the CR-mediated membrane interaction is the assembly of the dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex (DGC). While R1-3 and R10-12 did not restore the DGC, surprisingly, CT alone was sufficient to establish the DGC at the sarcolemma. Additional studies suggest that R1-3 and CT also bind to the sarcolemma in the heart, though relatively weak. Taken together, our study provides the first conclusive in vivo evidence that dystrophin contains multiple independent membrane-binding domains. These structurally and functionally distinctive membrane-binding domains provide a molecular framework for dystrophin to function as a shock absorber and signaling hub. Our results not only shed critical light on dystrophin biology and DMD pathogenesis, but also provide a foundation for rationally engineering minimized dystrophins for DMD gene therapy. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Critical Hospitality Management Research

    OpenAIRE

    Morrison, A; Lynch, P; Lugosi, P

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of critical hospitality management research (CHMR) and explores key issues that such approaches raise. The paper is split into two parts. The first reviews contemporary writings that reflect the changing nature of hospitality management research and accounts for the emergence of a critical tradition. The second part identifies eight areas which are central concerns for the future development of CHMR: criticality, ethics and advocacy, scale, claims of legit...

  2. Surveillance and Critical Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Fuchs

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this comment, the author reflects on surveillance from a critical theory approach, his involvement in surveillance research and projects, and the status of the study of surveillance. The comment ascertains a lack of critical thinking about surveillance, questions the existence of something called “surveillance studies” as opposed to a critical theory of society, and reflects on issues such as Edward Snowden’s revelations, and Foucault and Marx in the context of surveillance.

  3. IMPLICATIONS OF CROSS DOMAIN FIRES IN MULTI-DOMAIN BATTLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-06

    academic research paper are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the US government, the Department of Defense, or...Wars of the Future,” The National Interest, July 19, 2016, p. 2, Retrieved on 2 December 2016, http://nationalinterest.org/ blog /the-buzz/cross-domain...www.nationaldefensemagazine.org/ blog /Lists/Posts/Post.aspx?ID=2319. 15 Sam LaGrone, “PACOM Commander Harris Wants the Army to Sink Ships, Expand

  4. Nuclear criticality predictability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, J.B.

    1999-01-01

    As a result of lots of efforts, a large portion of the tedious and redundant research and processing of critical experiment data has been eliminated. The necessary step in criticality safety analyses of validating computer codes with benchmark critical data is greatly streamlined, and valuable criticality safety experimental data is preserved. Criticality safety personnel in 31 different countries are now using the 'International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments'. Much has been accomplished by the work of the ICSBEP. However, evaluation and documentation represents only one element of a successful Nuclear Criticality Safety Predictability Program and this element only exists as a separate entity, because this work was not completed in conjunction with the experimentation process. I believe; however, that the work of the ICSBEP has also served to unify the other elements of nuclear criticality predictability. All elements are interrelated, but for a time it seemed that communications between these elements was not adequate. The ICSBEP has highlighted gaps in data, has retrieved lost data, has helped to identify errors in cross section processing codes, and has helped bring the international criticality safety community together in a common cause as true friends and colleagues. It has been a privilege to associate with those who work so diligently to make the project a success. (J.P.N.)

  5. Critical point predication device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, Kazuhiko; Kariyama, Koji.

    1996-01-01

    An operation for predicting a critical point by using a existent reverse multiplication method has been complicated, and an effective multiplication factor could not be plotted directly to degrade the accuracy for the prediction. The present invention comprises a detector counting memory section for memorizing the counting sent from a power detector which monitors the reactor power, a reverse multiplication factor calculation section for calculating the reverse multiplication factor based on initial countings and current countings of the power detector, and a critical point prediction section for predicting the criticality by the reverse multiplication method relative to effective multiplication factors corresponding to the state of the reactor core previously determined depending on the cases. In addition, a reactor core characteristic calculation section is added for analyzing an effective multiplication factor depending on the state of the reactor core. Then, if the margin up to the criticality is reduced to lower than a predetermined value during critical operation, an alarm is generated to stop the critical operation when generation of a period of more than a predetermined value predicted by succeeding critical operation. With such procedures, forecasting for the critical point can be easily predicted upon critical operation to greatly mitigate an operator's burden and improve handling for the operation. (N.H.)

  6. Successful Left Atrial Appendage Occlusion with the New Generation Amulet® Device after Late-Occurring Embolization of an Amplatzer® Cardiac Plug in a Patient with Repetitive Strokes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco R. Schroeter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Amplatzer Cardiac Plug (ACP is one of the most commonly used devices for percutaneous left atrial appendage (LAA closure in order to prevent a stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation and contraindication for long-term oral anticoagulation therapy. We have previously described a patient who had experienced an embolization of the ACP device about 12 months after implantation and the device could be percutaneously retrieved. A few years later, he suffered from a posterior stroke and a stroke located in the brainstem as well as a transischemic attack (TIA. In order to protect him from further cardioembolic events a reocclusion of the LAA with the new generation of ACP device, the Amplatzer Amulet, was performed. A stable position of the device within follow-up period could be confirmed and the patient was free of additional strokes/TIA or bleeding events. This case stresses the importance of proper LAA sizing in order to prevent device embolization and notes that LAA size is not static. Moreover, it demonstrates that repeated implantation of an LAA occlusion device was still possible; one should be aware of undersizing the LAA dimensions and that the modifications of new generation LAA occlusion devices may overcome limitations of first-generation devices in order to prevent a cardioembolic stroke.

  7. Domain-Specific and Domain-General Training to Improve Kindergarten Children’s Mathematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetha B. Ramani

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Ensuring that kindergarten children have a solid foundation in early numerical knowledge is of critical importance for later mathematical achievement. In this study, we targeted improving the numerical knowledge of kindergarteners (n = 81 from primarily low-income backgrounds using two approaches: one targeting their conceptual knowledge, specifically, their understanding of numerical magnitudes; and the other targeting their underlying cognitive system, specifically, their working memory. Both interventions involved playing game-like activities on tablet computers over the course of several sessions. As predicted, both interventions improved children’s numerical magnitude knowledge as compared to a no-contact control group, suggesting that both domain-specific and domain-general interventions facilitate mathematical learning. Individual differences in effort during the working memory game, but not the number knowledge training game predicted children’s improvements in number line estimation. The results demonstrate the potential of using a rapidly growing technology in early childhood classrooms to promote young children’s numerical knowledge.

  8. Motion Compensation on DCT Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. J. Ray Liu

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Alternative fully DCT-based video codec architectures have been proposed in the past to address the shortcomings of the conventional hybrid motion compensated DCT video codec structures traditionally chosen as the basis of implementation of standard-compliant codecs. However, no prior effort has been made to ensure interoperability of these two drastically different architectures so that fully DCT-based video codecs are fully compatible with the existing video coding standards. In this paper, we establish the criteria for matching conventional codecs with fully DCT-based codecs. We find that the key to this interoperability lies in the heart of the implementation of motion compensation modules performed in the spatial and transform domains at both the encoder and the decoder. Specifically, if the spatial-domain motion compensation is compatiable with the transform-domain motion compensation, then the states in both the coder and the decoder will keep track of each other even after a long series of P-frames. Otherwise, the states will diverge in proportion to the number of P-frames between two I-frames. This sets an important criterion for the development of any DCT-based motion compensation schemes. We also discuss and develop some DCT-based motion compensation schemes as important building blocks of fully DCT-based codecs. For the case of subpixel motion compensation, DCT-based approaches allow more accurate interpolation without any increase in computation. Furthermore, a scare number of DCT coefficients after quantization significantly decreases the number of calculations required for motion compensation. Coupled with the DCT-based motion estimation algorithms, it is possible to realize fully DCT-based codecs to overcome the disadvantages of conventional hybrid codecs.

  9. Critical Utopian Action Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birger Steen; Nielsen, Kurt Aagaard

    2016-01-01

    The specific concept of critical utopian action research is presented and discussed, as to its origin, use and potentials. The inspiration from Robert Jungk and his future creating workshops is elaborated.......The specific concept of critical utopian action research is presented and discussed, as to its origin, use and potentials. The inspiration from Robert Jungk and his future creating workshops is elaborated....

  10. Criticality alarm device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasai, Kenji.

    1994-01-01

    The device of the present invention is utilized, for example, to a reprocessing facility for storing and processing nuclear fuels and measures and controls the nuclear fuel assembly system so as not to exceed criticality. That is, a conventional criticality alarm device applies a predetermined processing to neutron fluxes generated from a nuclear fuel assembly system containing nuclear fuels and outputs an alarm. The device of the present invention comprises (1) a neutron flux supply source for increasing and decreasing neutron fluxes periodically and supplying them to nuclear fuel assemblies, (2) a detector for detecting neutron fluxes in the nuclear fuel assemblies, (3) a critical state judging section for judging the critical state of the nuclear fuel assemblies based on the periodically changing signals obtained from the detector (2) and (4) an alarm section for outputting criticality alarms depending on the result of the judgement. The device of the present invention can accurately recognize the critical state of the nuclear fuel assembly system and can forecast reaching of the nuclear fuel assembly to criticality or prompt neutron critical state. (I.S.)

  11. Nuclear criticality safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ro, Seong Ki; Shin, Hee Seong; Park, Seong Won; Shin, Young Joon.

    1997-06-01

    Nuclear criticality safety guide was described for handling, transportation and storage of nuclear fissile materials in this report. The major part of the report was excerpted frp, TID-7016(revision 2) and nuclear criticality safety written by Knief. (author). 16 tabs., 44 figs., 5 refs

  12. Critical Classroom Discourse Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaravadivelu, B.

    1999-01-01

    Conceptualizes a framework for conducting critical classroom-discourse analysis. Critiques the scope and method of current models of classroom-interaction analysis and classroom-discourse analysis and advocates using poststructuralist and postcolonialist understandings of discourse to develop a critical framework for understanding what actually…

  13. Critical Response Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellingson, Charlene; Roehrig, Gillian; Bakkum, Kris; Dubinsky, Janet M.

    2016-01-01

    This article introduces the Critical Response Protocol (CRP), an arts-based technique that engages students in equitable critical discourse and aligns with the "Next Generation Science Standards" vision for providing students opportunities for language learning while advancing science learning (NGSS Lead States 2013). CRP helps teachers…

  14. The Netherlands ; Critical Sectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luiijf, H.A.M.; Brouwer, W.; Griffioen, A.

    2008-01-01

    Using the so-called Quick Scan method and in consultation with the industry and government, it was determined in 2002 that the Netherlands’ critical infrastructure comprises 11 sectors and 31 critical products and services. That result was adjusted in the ensuing risk analysis phase. Since April

  15. Magnetic field alignable domains in phospholipid vesicle membranes containing lanthanides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Paul; Liebi, Marianne; Kohlbrecher, Joachim; Ishikawa, Takashi; Rüegger, Heinz; Zepik, Helmut; Fischer, Peter; Walde, Peter; Windhab, Erich

    2010-01-14

    Magnetic fields were applied as a structuring force on phospholipid-based vesicular systems, using paramagnetic lanthanide ions as magnetic handles anchored to the vesicle membrane. Different vesicle formulations were investigated using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) in a magnetic field of up to 8 T, cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), (31)P NMR spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and permeability measurements with a fluorescent water-soluble marker (calcein). The investigated vesicle formulations consisted usually of 80 mol % of the phospholipid 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and 20 mol % of a chelator lipid (DMPE-DTPA; 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate) with complexed lanthanide ions (Tm(3+), Dy(3+), or La(3+)), and the total lipid concentration was 15 mM. Vesicles containing the paramagnetic lanthanide Tm(3+) or Dy(3+) exhibited a temperature-dependent response to magnetic fields, which can be explained by considering the formation of lipid domains, which upon reaching a critical size become alignable in a magnetic field. The features of this "magnetic field alignable domain model" are as follows: with decreasing temperature (from 30 to 2.5 degrees C) solid domains, consisting mainly of the higher melting phospholipid (DMPE-DTPA.lanthanide), begin to form and grow in size. The domains assemble the large magnetic moments conferred by the lanthanides and orient in magnetic fields. The direction of alignment depends on the type of lanthanide used. The domains orient with their normal parallel to the magnetic field with thulium (Tm(3+)) and perpendicular with dysprosium (Dy(3+)). No magnetic field alignable domains were observed if DMPE-DTPA is replaced either by POPE-DTPA (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-diethylenetriamine-pentaacetate) or by DMPC (1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine).

  16. Domain Building or Risk Taking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjort, Katrin; Abrahamsen, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    of the relations between gender, values and family obligation but reveals an interesting difference between two strategies for career development: Domain Building and Risk Taking. Both strategies are applied by both men and women. However, one of them seems to be the most effective with regard to achieve......The Nordic Countries are usually seen as the worlds must successful nations when it comes to gender equality, and the Scandinavian population in general appreciates values traditionally labeled feminine as caretaking and the quality of everyday life. However, the inequalities become obvious...

  17. Learning processes across knowledge domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall-Andersen, Lene Bjerg; Broberg, Ole

    2014-01-01

    with the aim of creating a new combined practice. Design/methodology/approach - A case study was carried out as a "natural experiment" in an engineering consultancy, where emerging initiatives to integrate the newly acquired competencies into the existing practice were explored. A theoretical framework......Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to shed light on the problematics of learning across knowledge boundaries in organizational settings. The paper specifically explores learning processes that emerge, when a new knowledge domain is introduced into an existing organizational practice...

  18. Beyond cross-domain learning: Multiple-domain nonnegative matrix factorization

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan

    2014-02-01

    Traditional cross-domain learning methods transfer learning from a source domain to a target domain. In this paper, we propose the multiple-domain learning problem for several equally treated domains. The multiple-domain learning problem assumes that samples from different domains have different distributions, but share the same feature and class label spaces. Each domain could be a target domain, while also be a source domain for other domains. A novel multiple-domain representation method is proposed for the multiple-domain learning problem. This method is based on nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF), and tries to learn a basis matrix and coding vectors for samples, so that the domain distribution mismatch among different domains will be reduced under an extended variation of the maximum mean discrepancy (MMD) criterion. The novel algorithm - multiple-domain NMF (MDNMF) - was evaluated on two challenging multiple-domain learning problems - multiple user spam email detection and multiple-domain glioma diagnosis. The effectiveness of the proposed algorithm is experimentally verified. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Domain Tuning of Bilingual Lexicons for MT

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ayan, Necip F; Dorr, Bonnie; Kolak, Okan

    2003-01-01

    ... (in this case, Chinese) to English. Using automatically induced domain-specific, comparable documents and language-independent clustering, we apply domain-tuning techniques to a bilingual lexicon for downstream translation of the input...

  20. Enhanced functional and structural domain assignments using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    ) by Seema Namboori, Natasha Mhatre, Sentivel Sujatha,. Narayanaswamy Srinivasan and Shashi Bhushan Pandit. The three-dimensional structure and subcellular localization of various domains and sub-domains of. Rv1318c, a putative ...

  1. Self-organization of domain growth in the Ising model with impurities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jørgen Vitting; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1992-01-01

    in a cascade of spin flips at the domain boundaries. We have analyzed the lifetime and size distribution functions for the avalanches and related the results to the general phenomena of self-organized criticality and to recent experiments on cellular magnetic domain patterns in magnetic garnet films. Our...... results suggest that the self-organized state in this system appears to be subcritical, in agreement with a recent theory....

  2. Ferroelectric domain continuity over grain boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantri, Sukriti; Oddershede, Jette; Damjanovic, Dragan

    2017-01-01

    Formation and mobility of domain walls in ferroelectric materials is responsible for many of their electrical and mechanical properties. Domain wall continuity across grain boundaries has been observed since the 1950's and is speculated to affect the grain boundary-domain interactions, thereby...... techniques in manipulating the micro-structure and domain structure to result in desired interactions between neighbouring grains could prove to be beneficial for future polycrystalline ferroelectric materials....

  3. Generic domain models in software engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiden, Neil

    1992-01-01

    This paper outlines three research directions related to domain-specific software development: (1) reuse of generic models for domain-specific software development; (2) empirical evidence to determine these generic models, namely elicitation of mental knowledge schema possessed by expert software developers; and (3) exploitation of generic domain models to assist modelling of specific applications. It focuses on knowledge acquisition for domain-specific software development, with emphasis on tool support for the most important phases of software development.

  4. A Passage into Critical Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Steven

    1990-01-01

    Shows how a single passage might be handled by New Criticism, structuralism, deconstructionism, psychological criticism, and feminist criticism. Concludes that a plurality of critical approaches is better than a unity of approach. (RS)

  5. The Possibility of Film Criticism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poague, Leland; Cadbury, William

    1989-01-01

    Examines the role of critical language in film criticism. Compares and contrasts Monroe Beardsley's philosophy on film aesthetics with the New Criticism. Outlines some of the contributions Beardsley has made to the study of film criticism. (KM)

  6. Topography and instability of monolayers near domain boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamant, H.; Witten, T. A.; Ege, C.; Gopal, A.; Lee, K. Y. C.

    2001-06-01

    We theoretically study the topography of a biphasic surfactant monolayer in the vicinity of domain boundaries. The differing elastic properties of the two phases generally lead to a nonflat topography of {open_quotes}mesas,{close_quotes} where domains of one phase are elevated with respect to the other phase. The mesas are steep but low, having heights of up to 10 nm. As the monolayer is laterally compressed, the mesas develop overhangs and eventually become unstable at a surface tension of about K({delta}c{sub 0}){sup 2} ({delta}c{sub 0} being the difference in spontaneous curvature and K a bending modulus). In addition, the boundary is found to undergo a topography-induced rippling instability upon compression, if its line tension is smaller than about K{delta}c{sub 0}. The effect of diffuse boundaries on these features and the topographic behavior near a critical point are also examined. We discuss the relevance of our findings to several experimental observations related to surfactant monolayers: (i) small topographic features recently found near domain boundaries; (ii) folding behavior observed in mixed phospholipid monolayers and model lung surfactants; (iii) roughening of domain boundaries seen under lateral compression; (iv) the absence of biphasic structures in tensionless surfactant films.

  7. Domain configuration and magnetization switching in arrays of permalloy nanostripes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iglesias-Freire, Ó.; Jaafar, M.; Pérez, L.; Abril, O. de; Vázquez, M.; Asenjo, A.

    2014-01-01

    The proximity effect in the collective behavior of arrays of magnetic nanostripes is currently a subject of intensive research. The imperative of reducing the size and distances between elements in order to achieve higher storage capacity, faster access to the information as well as low energy consumption, brings consequences about the isolated behavior of the elements and devices. Parallel to each other permalloy nanostripes with high aspect ratio have been prepared by the nanolithography technique. The evolution of the closure domains and the magnetization direction in individual nanostructures has been imaged under applied magnetic fields using Variable Field Magnetic Force Microscopy. Moreover, the magnetostatic interactions between neighboring elements and the proximity effects in arrays of such nanostructures have been quantitatively analyzed by Magnetic Force Microscopy and micromagnetic simulations. The agreement between simulations and the experimental results allows us to conclude the relevance of those interactions depending on the geometry characteristics. In particular, results suggest that the magnetostatic coupling between adjacent nanostripes vanishes for separation distances higher than 500 nm. - Highlights: • A shape anisotropy-induced single domain remanent state is present in the stripes. Closure domains are formed under external fields. • Separation distances between neighboring stripes (500 nm) are enough to overcome the magnetostatic coupling and avoid a multi-stripe character. • Micromagnetic simulations predict critical distances of around 500 nm for the onset of magnetostatic coupling between neighboring elements. • Simulations predict stripes with a small longitudinal separation to behave as single elements, with domain walls “jumping” between them

  8. Domain configuration and magnetization switching in arrays of permalloy nanostripes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iglesias-Freire, Ó., E-mail: aasenjo@icmm.csic.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz 3, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Jaafar, M. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz 3, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Dpto. Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco 28049 (Spain); Pérez, L. [Dpto. Física de Materiales, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Abril, O. de [Dpto. Física e Instalaciones Aplicadas a la Edificación, al Medio Ambiente y al Urbanismo, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Vázquez, M.; Asenjo, A. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz 3, Madrid 28049 (Spain)

    2014-04-15

    The proximity effect in the collective behavior of arrays of magnetic nanostripes is currently a subject of intensive research. The imperative of reducing the size and distances between elements in order to achieve higher storage capacity, faster access to the information as well as low energy consumption, brings consequences about the isolated behavior of the elements and devices. Parallel to each other permalloy nanostripes with high aspect ratio have been prepared by the nanolithography technique. The evolution of the closure domains and the magnetization direction in individual nanostructures has been imaged under applied magnetic fields using Variable Field Magnetic Force Microscopy. Moreover, the magnetostatic interactions between neighboring elements and the proximity effects in arrays of such nanostructures have been quantitatively analyzed by Magnetic Force Microscopy and micromagnetic simulations. The agreement between simulations and the experimental results allows us to conclude the relevance of those interactions depending on the geometry characteristics. In particular, results suggest that the magnetostatic coupling between adjacent nanostripes vanishes for separation distances higher than 500 nm. - Highlights: • A shape anisotropy-induced single domain remanent state is present in the stripes. Closure domains are formed under external fields. • Separation distances between neighboring stripes (500 nm) are enough to overcome the magnetostatic coupling and avoid a multi-stripe character. • Micromagnetic simulations predict critical distances of around 500 nm for the onset of magnetostatic coupling between neighboring elements. • Simulations predict stripes with a small longitudinal separation to behave as single elements, with domain walls “jumping” between them.

  9. PROSITE, a protein domain database for functional characterization and annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigrist, Christian J A; Cerutti, Lorenzo; de Castro, Edouard; Langendijk-Genevaux, Petra S; Bulliard, Virginie; Bairoch, Amos; Hulo, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    PROSITE consists of documentation entries describing protein domains, families and functional sites, as well as associated patterns and profiles to identify them. It is complemented by ProRule, a collection of rules based on profiles and patterns, which increases the discriminatory power of these profiles and patterns by providing additional information about functionally and/or structurally critical amino acids. PROSITE is largely used for the annotation of domain features of UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot entries. Among the 983 (DNA-binding) domains, repeats and zinc fingers present in Swiss-Prot (release 57.8 of 22 September 2009), 696 ( approximately 70%) are annotated with PROSITE descriptors using information from ProRule. In order to allow better functional characterization of domains, PROSITE developments focus on subfamily specific profiles and a new profile building method giving more weight to functionally important residues. Here, we describe AMSA, an annotated multiple sequence alignment format used to build a new generation of generalized profiles, the migration of ScanProsite to Vital-IT, a cluster of 633 CPUs, and the adoption of the Distributed Annotation System (DAS) to facilitate PROSITE data integration and interchange with other sources. The latest version of PROSITE (release 20.54, of 22 September 2009) contains 1308 patterns, 863 profiles and 869 ProRules. PROSITE is accessible at: http://www.expasy.org/prosite/.

  10. Faraday instability in deformable domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pucci, G.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrodynamical instabilities are usually studied either in bounded regions or free to grow in space. In this article we review the experimental results of an intermediate situation, in which an instability develops in deformable domains. The Faraday instability, which consists in the formation of surface waves on a liquid experiencing a vertical forcing, is triggered in floating liquid lenses playing the role of deformable domains. Faraday waves deform the lenses from the initial circular shape and the mutual adaptation of instability patterns with the lens boundary is observed. Two archetypes of behaviour have been found. In the first archetype a stable elongated shape is reached, the wave vector being parallel to the direction of elongation. In the second archetype the waves exceed the response of the lens border and no equilibrium shape is reached. The lens stretches and eventually breaks into fragments that have a complex dynamics. The difference between the two archetypes is explained by the competition between the radiation pressure the waves exert on the lens border and its response due to surface tension.

  11. Static domain wall in braneworld gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdalla, M.C.B.; Carlesso, P.F. [UNESP, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Instituto de Fisica Teiorica, Rua Dr. Bento Teobaldo Ferraz 271, Bloco II, Barra-Funda, Caixa Postal 70532-2, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hoff da Silva, J.M. [UNESP, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil)

    2014-01-15

    In this paper we consider a static domain wall inside a 3-brane. Different from the standard achievement obtained in General Relativity, the analysis performed here gives a consistency condition for the existence of static domain walls in a braneworld gravitational scenario. Also the behavior of the domain wall's gravitational field in the newtonian limit is shown. (orig.)

  12. A Domain Standard for Land Administration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemmen, C.; Van Oosterom, P.; Van der Molen, P.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the design of a Domain Model for Land Administration (LA). As a result a formal International Standard is available: ISO 19152 Geographic Information – Land Administration Domain Model (LADM) (ISO, 2012). Domain specific standardisation is needed to capture the semantics of the

  13. Domain-specific languages in perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Heering (Jan); M. Mernik (Marjan)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractDomain-specific languages (DSLs) are languages tailored to a specific application domain. They offer substantial gains in expressiveness and ease of use compared with general-purpose languages in their domain of application. Although the use of DSLs is by no means new, it is receiving

  14. Latent domain models for statistical machine translation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoàng, C.

    2017-01-01

    A data-driven approach to model translation suffers from the data mismatch problem and demands domain adaptation techniques. Given parallel training data originating from a specific domain, training an MT system on the data would result in a rather suboptimal translation for other domains. But does

  15. The Private Legal Governance of Domain Names

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schovsbo, Jens Hemmingsen

    2015-01-01

    . the UDRP (WIPO) and the Danish Complaints Board for Internet Domain Names (the Board) to discuss how and to what extent the domain name system balances interests between trademark owners and other users of domain names and secures the rule of law (legal certainty and predictability) with a special focus...

  16. Heliumlike and lithiumlike ionic sequences: Critical charges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guevara, N. L.; Turbiner, A. V. [Department of Physics, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States); Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-543, 04510 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2011-12-15

    In nonrelativistic quantum mechanics we study the Coulomb systems of infinitely massive center of charge Z and two-three electrons: (Z,e,e) and (Z,e,e,e). It is shown that in both cases the total energy curve in Z is smooth, without any visible irregularities. Thus, for both systems the physical integer charges Z=1, 2,... do not play a distinguished role as would be associated with charge quantization. By definition, a critical charge Z{sub cr} is a charge which separates a domain of the existence of bound states from a domain of unbound ones (continuum). For both systems the critical charges are found, Z{sub cr,2e}=0.910850 and Z{sub cr,3e}=2.0090, respectively. Based on numerical analysis, the Puiseux expansion in fractional powers of (Z-Z{sub cr}) is constructed for both systems. Our results indicate the existence of a square-root branch point singularity at Z{sub cr} with exponent 3/2. A connection between the critical charge and the radius of convergence of 1/Z expansion is briefly discussed.

  17. Critical Outcomes in Longitudinal Observational Studies and Registries in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zamora, Natalia V; Christensen, Robin; Goel, Niti

    2017-01-01

    for which outcome domains should be considered. Our overarching goal is to identify critical longterm outcome domains for patients with rheumatic diseases, and to develop a conceptual framework to measure and classify them within the scope of OMERACT Filter 2.0. METHODS: The steps of this initiative...... primarily concern rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and include (1) performing a systematic review of RA patient registries and cohorts to identify previously collected and reported outcome domains and measurement instruments; (2) developing a conceptual framework and taxonomy for identification and classification...... of outcome domains; (3) conducting focus groups to identify domains considered critical by patients with RA; and (4) surveying patients, providers, and researchers to identify critical outcomes that can be evaluated through the OMERACT filter. RESULTS: In our initial evaluation of databases and registries...

  18. Critical Thinking in the EFL Context of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoor Fahim

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Critical thinking defined as the ability to think about your own thinking with a more analytical perspective, has long been an important side of education history. Recently there has been much attention devoted to this concept, particularly in the domain of language education. The present study is a review of the literature and previous studies done on the issue of critical thinking. In the first section an introduction to the study is presented. In the next section, the definitions of the notion of critical thinking from different scholars are put forth. In the third part, we discussed the features and characteristics of a real critical thinker. In the fourth part, the idea of teachability of critical thinking is discussed. It is tried to present some strategies which can enhance critical thinking in students.

  19. Cyber warfare: critical perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ducheine, P.; Osinga, F.; Soeters, J.

    2012-01-01

    Next to sea, land, air and space, ‘cyber space’ appears to be the fifth operational domain for the military. This manmade and virtual sphere brings along opportunities and threats. In this book, academics of the Netherlands Defence Academy as well as specialists and military professionals from other

  20. PREPP criticality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cargo, C.H.; Becker, G.K.; Berglund, G.R.; O'Connor, N.J.

    1989-03-01

    There is a general lack of data available with regards to criticality control in the use of incineration for full scale processing of TRU waste. In addition to the new analytical tools, such as PRA, are only now starting to be applied to criticality control. These factors have made the development of the PREPP Criticality Control Plan somewhat unique. It is hoped that the PREPP experiences gained in these efforts will provide new insight which will be useful to future facilities processing waste material containing fissile material. 1 fig

  1. Frustration and quantum criticality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojta, Matthias

    2018-03-15

    This review article is devoted to the interplay between frustrated magnetism and quantum critical phenomena, covering both theoretical concepts and ideas as well as recent experimental developments in correlated-electron materials. The first part deals with local-moment magnetism in Mott insulators and the second part with frustration in metallic systems. In both cases, frustration can either induce exotic phases accompanied by exotic quantum critical points or lead to conventional ordering with unconventional crossover phenomena. In addition, the competition of multiple phases inherent to frustrated systems can lead to multi-criticality. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  2. Constructing criticality by classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machacek, Erika

    2017-01-01

    " in the bureaucratic practice of classification: Experts construct material criticality in assessments as they allot information on the materials to the parameters of the assessment framework. In so doing, they ascribe a new set of connotations to the materials, namely supply risk, and their importance to clean energy......This paper explores the role of expertise, the nature of criticality, and their relationship to securitisation as mineral raw materials are classified. It works with the construction of risk along the liberal logic of security to explore how "key materials" are turned into "critical materials...

  3. Domain adaptation via transfer component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Sinno Jialin; Tsang, Ivor W; Kwok, James T; Yang, Qiang

    2011-02-01

    Domain adaptation allows knowledge from a source domain to be transferred to a different but related target domain. Intuitively, discovering a good feature representation across domains is crucial. In this paper, we first propose to find such a representation through a new learning method, transfer component analysis (TCA), for domain adaptation. TCA tries to learn some transfer components across domains in a reproducing kernel Hilbert space using maximum mean miscrepancy. In the subspace spanned by these transfer components, data properties are preserved and data distributions in different domains are close to each other. As a result, with the new representations in this subspace, we can apply standard machine learning methods to train classifiers or regression models in the source domain for use in the target domain. Furthermore, in order to uncover the knowledge hidden in the relations between the data labels from the source and target domains, we extend TCA in a semisupervised learning setting, which encodes label information into transfer components learning. We call this extension semisupervised TCA. The main contribution of our work is that we propose a novel dimensionality reduction framework for reducing the distance between domains in a latent space for domain adaptation. We propose both unsupervised and semisupervised feature extraction approaches, which can dramatically reduce the distance between domain distributions by projecting data onto the learned transfer components. Finally, our approach can handle large datasets and naturally lead to out-of-sample generalization. The effectiveness and efficiency of our approach are verified by experiments on five toy datasets and two real-world applications: cross-domain indoor WiFi localization and cross-domain text classification.

  4. Amphipathic motifs in BAR domains are essential for membrane curvature sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhatia, Vikram K; Madsen, Kenneth L; Bolinger, Pierre-Yves

    2009-01-01

    BAR (Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs) domains and amphipathic alpha-helices (AHs) are believed to be sensors of membrane curvature thus facilitating the assembly of protein complexes on curved membranes. Here, we used quantitative fluorescence microscopy to compare the binding of both motifs on single...... nanosized liposomes of different diameters and therefore membrane curvature. Characterization of members of the three BAR domain families showed surprisingly that the crescent-shaped BAR dimer with its positively charged concave face is not able to sense membrane curvature. Mutagenesis on BAR domains showed...... that membrane curvature sensing critically depends on the N-terminal AH and furthermore that BAR domains sense membrane curvature through hydrophobic insertion in lipid packing defects and not through electrostatics. Consequently, amphipathic motifs, such as AHs, that are often associated with BAR domains...

  5. Young children bet on their numerical skills: metacognition in the numerical domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Vy A; Li, Rosa; Kornell, Nate; Pouget, Alexandre; Cantlon, Jessica F

    2014-09-01

    Metacognition, the ability to assess one's own knowledge, has been targeted as a critical learning mechanism in mathematics education. Yet the early childhood origins of metacognition have proven difficult to study. Using a novel nonverbal task and a comprehensive set of metacognitive measures, we provided the strongest evidence to date that young children are metacognitive. We showed that children as young as 5 years made metacognitive "bets" on their numerical discriminations in a wagering task. However, contrary to previous reports from adults, our results showed that children's metacognition is domain specific: Their metacognition in the numerical domain was unrelated to their metacognition in another domain (emotion discrimination). Moreover, children's metacognitive ability in only the numerical domain predicted their school-based mathematics knowledge. The data provide novel evidence that metacognition is a fundamental, domain-dependent cognitive ability in children. The findings have implications for theories of uncertainty and reveal new avenues for training metacognition in children. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. Cross-domain neurobiology data integration and exploration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Jean

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the biomedical implications of data from high throughput experiments requires solutions for effective cross-scale and cross-domain data exploration. However, existing solutions do not provide sufficient support for linking molecular level data to neuroanatomical structures, which is critical for understanding high level neurobiological functions. Results Our work integrates molecular level data with high level biological functions and we present results using anatomical structure as a scaffold. Our solution also allows the sharing of intermediate data exploration results with other web applications, greatly increasing the power of cross-domain data exploration and mining. Conclusions The Flex-based PubAnatomy web application we developed enables highly interactive visual exploration of literature and experimental data for understanding the relationships between molecular level changes, pathways, brain circuits and pathophysiological processes. The prototype of PubAnatomy is freely accessible at:[http://brainarray.mbni.med.umich.edu/Brainarray/prototype/PubAnatomy

  7. On the origin of stable remanence in pseudo-single domain grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, S. K.

    1977-01-01

    A critique is presented of the quantitative model for the magnetic moment of pseudo-single domain grains (hypothetical magnetite grains larger than the critical size threshold for single domain behavior, yet also difficult to demagnetize), derived by Stacey and Banerjee (1974). Evidence from theoretical studies in micromagnetics demonstrates that the spin orientations in such grains are too complex to permit ready prediction of the magnetic moments. However, this limitation in the theory may be overcome by experiments involving rare earth-cobalt alloys and yttrium iron garnet crystals; these studies have suggested that surface anisotropy is the predominant cause of the high coercivity of pseudo-single domain grains.

  8. Packaging the fly genome: domains and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Rob

    2012-09-01

    Two independent genomic approaches have recently converged to provide insight into the domain organization of the Drosophila genome. Genome-wide mapping of chromosomal proteins and histone modifications has generated detailed maps of the Drosophila chromatin landscape and has led to the identification of a number of different chromatin states and their distribution in domains across the genome. A remarkably similar domain organization is derived from whole genome mapping of chromatin interactions that reveals the segmentation of the genome into structural domains. This review focuses on our current understanding of this domain architecture which provides a foundation for our understanding of the link between chromatin organization and the dynamic activity of the genome.

  9. Word Domain Disambiguation via Word Sense Disambiguation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Tratz, Stephen C.; Gregory, Michelle L.

    2006-06-04

    Word subject domains have been widely used to improve the perform-ance of word sense disambiguation al-gorithms. However, comparatively little effort has been devoted so far to the disambiguation of word subject do-mains. The few existing approaches have focused on the development of al-gorithms specific to word domain dis-ambiguation. In this paper we explore an alternative approach where word domain disambiguation is achieved via word sense disambiguation. Our study shows that this approach yields very strong results, suggesting that word domain disambiguation can be ad-dressed in terms of word sense disam-biguation with no need for special purpose algorithms.

  10. Ten Issues in Criterion-Referenced Testing: A Response to Commonly Heard Criticisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curlette, William L.; Stallings, William M.

    1979-01-01

    The 10 criticisms of criterion-referenced tests addressed in this paper are: the domains tested; pedagogical influence; difficulty of items; cumbersome reports; reliability; arbitrary criteria; local objectives; labeling; predictive validity; and repeated testing. (SJL)

  11. Untangling spider silk evolution with spidroin terminal domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garb Jessica E

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spidroins are a unique family of large, structural proteins that make up the bulk of spider silk fibers. Due to the highly variable nature of their repetitive sequences, spidroin evolutionary relationships have principally been determined from their non-repetitive carboxy (C-terminal domains, though they offer limited character data. The few known spidroin amino (N-terminal domains have been difficult to obtain, but potentially contain critical phylogenetic information for reconstructing the diversification of spider silks. Here we used silk gland expression data (ESTs from highly divergent species to evaluate the functional significance and phylogenetic utility of spidroin N-terminal domains. Results We report 11 additional spidroin N-termini found by sequencing ~1,900 silk gland cDNAs from nine spider species that shared a common ancestor > 240 million years ago. In contrast to their hyper-variable repetitive regions, spidroin N-terminal domains have retained striking similarities in sequence identity, predicted secondary structure, and hydrophobicity. Through separate and combined phylogenetic analyses of N-terminal domains and their corresponding C-termini, we find that combined analysis produces the most resolved trees and that N-termini contribute more support and less conflict than the C-termini. These analyses show that paralogs largely group by silk gland type, except for the major ampullate spidroins. Moreover, spidroin structural motifs associated with superior tensile strength arose early in the history of this gene family, whereas a motif conferring greater extensibility convergently evolved in two distantly related paralogs. Conclusions A non-repetitive N-terminal domain appears to be a universal attribute of spidroin proteins, likely retained from the origin of spider silk production. Since this time, spidroin N-termini have maintained several features, consistent with this domain playing a key role in silk

  12. Blocking-resistant communication through domain fronting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fifield David

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe “domain fronting,” a versatile censorship circumvention technique that hides the remote endpoint of a communication. Domain fronting works at the application layer, using HTTPS, to communicate with a forbidden host while appearing to communicate with some other host, permitted by the censor. The key idea is the use of different domain names at different layers of communication. One domain appears on the “outside” of an HTTPS request—in the DNS request and TLS Server Name Indication—while another domain appears on the “inside”—in the HTTP Host header, invisible to the censor under HTTPS encryption. A censor, unable to distinguish fronted and nonfronted traffic to a domain, must choose between allowing circumvention traffic and blocking the domain entirely, which results in expensive collateral damage. Domain fronting is easy to deploy and use and does not require special cooperation by network intermediaries. We identify a number of hard-to-block web services, such as content delivery networks, that support domain-fronted connections and are useful for censorship circumvention. Domain fronting, in various forms, is now a circumvention workhorse. We describe several months of deployment experience in the Tor, Lantern, and Psiphon circumvention systems, whose domain-fronting transports now connect thousands of users daily and transfer many terabytes per month.

  13. Designated Critical Habitat

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — Critical habitats include those areas documented as currently supporting self-sustaining populations of any threatened or endangered species of wildlife as well as...

  14. Johnsons Seagrass Critical Habitat

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data represent the critical habitat for Johnson's Seagrass as designated by Federal Register Vol. 65, No. 66, Wednesday, April 5, 2000, Rules and Regulations.

  15. Critical incident stress management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, J J; Childs, J; Gonsalves, K

    2000-10-01

    Recent studies have indicated implementation of the CISM Program has impacted and reduced the cost of workers' compensation claims for stress related conditions and the number of lost work days (Ott, 1997; Western Management Consultants, 1996). Occupational health professionals need to be ready to develop and implement a comprehensive critical incident stress management process in anticipation of a major event. The ability to organize, lead, or administer critical incident stress debriefings for affected employees is a key role for the occupational health professional. Familiarity with these concepts and the ability to identify a critical incident enhances value to the business by mitigating the stress and impact to the workplace. Critical Incident Stress Management Systems have the potential for decreasing stress and restoring employees to normal life function--a win/win situation for both the employees and the organization.

  16. Right Whale Critical Habitat

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data represent the critical habitat for Right Whale as designated by Federal Register Vol. 59, No. 28805, May 19, 1993, Rules and Regulations.

  17. Assessment of criticality safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clayton, E.D.

    1983-01-01

    A study was undertaken to determine concerns and possible trends in nuclear criticality safety in DOE facilities. The information gathered from specialists in the field did not indicate that serious concerns or extends exist. The program was terminated before completion

  18. Green Turtle Critical Habitat

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data represent the critical habitat for green turtle as designated by Federal Register Vol. 63, No. 46701, September 2, 1998, Rules and Regulations.

  19. Silencing criticism in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ximena Suárez

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Journalists and human rights defenders in Mexico are being attacked in an attempt to silence their criticism. Many are forced to flee or risk being assassinated. The consequences are both personal and of wider social significance.

  20. Smalltooth Sawfish Critical Habitat

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data represent the critical habitat for smalltooth sawfish (Pristis pectinatat) as designated by 74 FR 45353, September 2, 2009, Rules and Regulations.

  1. Coastal Critical Habitat Designations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Endangered Species Act (ESA) requires the Federal government to designate critical habitat, areas of habitat essential to the species' conservation, for ESA...

  2. A Critical Look at Communication Strategies: Possibilities for Future Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doqaruni, Vahid Rahmani

    2015-01-01

    Like general theories of human communication, previous research into second language (L2) communication strategies (CSs) has also been characterized on either interactional conceived account or cognitively conceived one. However, this paper is a critical attempt to show that CSs' full significance can only be understood if the domain of CSs…

  3. Critical thinking abilities among prospective educators: ideals versus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erna Kinsey

    outcome articulates well with the cognitive domain of holistic development, it also gives rise to some concern. One area of concern ... critical reflection and aspirations for recognition and self-reliance have formed the impetus for the ... cultivation of cognitive capacity among all the country's inhabitants. (Nelmapius, 1999:38 ...

  4. An Evaluation of Critical Thinking Competencies in Business Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Christopher P.; Boswell, Amy; Elliott, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Although critical thinking (CT) skills are usually considered as domain general (Gabbenesch, 2006; Halpern, 2003), CT ability may benefit from expertise knowledge and skill. The current study examined both general CT ability and CT ability related to business scenarios for individuals (a) expert in business, (b) novice in business, and (c) with no…

  5. Domain Adaption Based on ELM Autoencoder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan-Yu Deng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new ELM Autoencoder (ELM-AE based domain adaption algorithm which describes the subspaces of source and target domain by ELM-AE and then carries out subspace alignment to project different domains into a common new space. By leveraging nonlinear approximation ability and efficient one-pass learning ability of ELM-AE, the proposed domain adaption algorithm can efficiently seek a better cross-domain feature representation than linear feature representation approaches such as PCA to improve domain adaption performance. The widely experimental results on Office/Caltech-256 datasets show that the proposed algorithm can achieve better classification accuracy than PCA subspace alignment algorithm and other state-of-the-art domain adaption algorithms in most cases.

  6. Domain Discretization and Circle Packings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dias, Kealey

    A circle packing is a configuration of circles which are tangent with one another in a prescribed pattern determined by a combinatorial triangulation, where the configuration fills a planar domain or a two-dimensional surface. The vertices in the triangulation correspond to centers of circles......, and edges correspond to two circles (having centers corresponding to the endpoints of the edge) being tangent to each other. This circle packing creates a rigid structure having an underlying geometric triangulation, where the centers of circles again correspond to vertices in the triangulation......, and the edges are geodesic segments (Euclidean, hyperbolic, or spherical) connecting centers of circles that are tangent to each other. Three circles that are mutually tangent form a face of the triangulation. Since circle packing is closely related to triangulation, circle packing methods can be applied...

  7. Angular-domain scattering interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipp, Dustin W; Qian, Ruobing; Berger, Andrew J

    2013-11-15

    We present an angular-scattering optical method that is capable of measuring the mean size of scatterers in static ensembles within a field of view less than 20 μm in diameter. Using interferometry, the method overcomes the inability of intensity-based models to tolerate the large speckle grains associated with such small illumination areas. By first estimating each scatterer's location, the method can model between-scatterer interference as well as traditional single-particle Mie scattering. Direct angular-domain measurements provide finer angular resolution than digitally transformed image-plane recordings. This increases sensitivity to size-dependent scattering features, enabling more robust size estimates. The sensitivity of these angular-scattering measurements to various sizes of polystyrene beads is demonstrated. Interferometry also allows recovery of the full complex scattered field, including a size-dependent phase profile in the angular-scattering pattern.

  8. Penerapan Microskills dalam Domain Multicultural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Happy Karlina Marjo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Konselor multikultural menggunakan microskills yang bertujuan untuk memodifikasi interaksi konselor dalam membuat perbedaan yang signifikan pada kehidupan konseli dengan: (1 mengidentifikasi faktor-faktor dari respon nonverbal untuk diri konselor sendiri dan konseli, (2 memahami dasar intervieu microskills dalam proses menerima (attending, mendengarkan (listening, dan mempengaruhi (influencing, serta dampak potensial pada konseli untuk berubah, (3 mencatat fokus microskills, dan perhatian secara selektif yang merupakan dasar untuk masalah keluarga dan konseling multikultural, (4 mengetahui bagaimana dan kapan menggunakan konfrontasi microskill, dan (5 mengetahui keterampilan intervieu sebagai acuan frame multikultural. Sedangkan domain kompetensi konseling multikultural untuk pendidikan dan praktek, antara lain: (1 Counselor Awareness of Own Cultural Values and Biases, (2 Counselor Awareness of Client’ Worldview, dan (3 Culturally Appropriate Intervention Strategies.

  9. Time domain electromagnetic metal detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoekstra, P.

    1996-01-01

    This presentation focuses on illustrating by case histories the range of applications and limitations of time domain electromagnetic (TDEM) systems for buried metal detection. Advantages claimed for TDEM metal detectors are: independent of instrument response (Geonics EM61) to surrounding soil and rock type; simple anomaly shape; mitigation of interference by ambient electromagnetic noise; and responsive to both ferrous and non-ferrous metallic targets. The data in all case histories to be presented were acquired with the Geonics EM61 TDEM system. Case histories are a test bed site on Molokai, Hawaii; Fort Monroe, Virginia; and USDOE, Rocky Flats Plant. The present limitations of this technology are: discrimination capabilities in terms of type of ordnance, and depth of burial is limited, and ability of resolving targets with small metallic ambient needs to be improved

  10. Furthering critical institutionalism

    OpenAIRE

    Cleaver, F.; De Koning, J.

    2015-01-01

    This special issue furthers the study of natural resource management from a critical institutional perspective. Critical institutionalism (CI) is a contemporary body of thought that explores how institutions dynamically mediate relationships between people, natural resources and society. It focuses on the complexity of institutions entwined in everyday social life, their historical formation, the interplay between formal and informal, traditional and modern arrangements, and the power relatio...

  11. Unconventional Quantum Critical Points

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Cenke

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we review the theory of unconventional quantum critical points that are beyond the Landau's paradigm. Three types of unconventional quantum critical points will be discussed: (1). The transition between topological order and semiclassical spin ordered phase; (2). The transition between topological order and valence bond solid phase; (3). The direct second order transition between different competing orders. We focus on the field theory and universality class of these unconventio...

  12. Furthering critical institutionalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances Dalton Cleaver

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This special issue furthers the study of natural resource management from a critical institutional perspective. Critical institutionalism (CI is a contemporary body of thought that explores how institutions dynamically mediate relationships between people, natural resources and society. It focuses on the complexity of institutions entwined in everyday social life, their historical formation, the interplay between formal and informal, traditional and modern arrangements, and the power relations that animate them. In such perspectives a social justice lens is often used to scrutinise the outcomes of institutional processes. We argue here that critical institutional approaches have potentially much to offer commons scholarship, particularly through the explanatory power of the concept of bricolage for better understanding institutional change.  Critical institutional approaches, gathering momentum over the past 15 years or so, have excited considerable interest but the insights generated from different disciplinary perspectives remain insufficiently synthesised. Analyses emphasising complexity can be relatively illegible to policy-makers, a fact which lessens their reach. This special issue therefore aims to synthesise critical institutional ideas and so to lay the foundation for moving beyond the emergent stage to make meaningful academic and policy impact. In bringing together papers here we define and synthesise key themes of critical institutionalism, outline the concept of institutional bricolage and identity some key challenges facing this school of thought.

  13. Structure and Function of KH Domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valverde, R.; Regan, E

    2008-01-01

    The hnRNP K homology (KH) domain was first identified in the protein human heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) 14 years ago. Since then, KH domains have been identified as nucleic acid recognition motifs in proteins that perform a wide range of cellular functions. KH domains bind RNA or ssDNA, and are found in proteins associated with transcriptional and translational regulation, along with other cellular processes. Several diseases, e.g. fragile X mental retardation syndrome and paraneoplastic disease, are associated with the loss of function of a particular KH domain. Here we discuss the progress made towards understanding both general and specific features of the molecular recognition of nucleic acids by KH domains. The typical binding surface of KH domains is a cleft that is versatile but that can typically accommodate only four unpaired bases. Van der Waals forces and hydrophobic interactions and, to a lesser extent, electrostatic interactions, contribute to the nucleic acid binding affinity. 'Augmented' KH domains or multiple copies of KH domains within a protein are two strategies that are used to achieve greater affinity and specificity of nucleic acid binding. Isolated KH domains have been seen to crystallize as monomers, dimers and tetramers, but no published data support the formation of noncovalent higher-order oligomers by KH domains in solution. Much attention has been given in the literature to a conserved hydrophobic residue (typically Ile or Leu) that is present in most KH domains. The interest derives from the observation that an individual with this Ile mutated to Asn, in the KH2 domain of fragile X mental retardation protein, exhibits a particularly severe form of the syndrome. The structural effects of this mutation in the fragile X mental retardation protein KH2 domain have recently been reported. We discuss the use of analogous point mutations at this position in other KH domains to dissect both structure and

  14. New concept of critical infrastructure strengthening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gazizov, Talgat R.; Orlov, Pavel E.; Zabolotsky, Alexander M.; Kuksenko, Sergey P. [Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics, 634050, Lenin Ave., Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-08

    Strengthening of critical infrastructure is considered. Modal reservation of electronics is proposed as a new concept of the strengthening. The concept combines a widely used cold backup and a recently proposed modal filtration. It makes electronics reliable as well as protected against electromagnetic interference, especially the ultra-wide band pulses. New printed circuit board structure is suggested for implementation of the proposed concept. Results of simulation in time and frequency domains are presented for the suggested structures. Considerable attenuation of dangerous excitations shows that the new concept and structure are promising.

  15. Critical sizes and critical characteristics of nanoclusters, nanostructures and nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzdalev, I.P.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Critical sizes and characteristics of nanoclusters and nanostructures are introduced as the parameters of nanosystems and nanomaterials. The next critical characteristics are considered: atomic and electronic 'magic number', critical size of cluster nucleation, critical size of melting-freezing of cluster, critical size of quantum (laser) radiation, critical sizes for the single electron conductivity, critical energy and magnetic field for the magnetic tunneling, critical cluster sizes for the giant magnetic resistance, critical size of the first order magnetic phase transition. The critical characteristics are estimated by thermodynamic approaches, by Moessbauer spectroscopy, AFM, heat capacity, SQUID magnetometry and other technique, The influence of cluster-cluster interactions, cluster-matrix interactions and cluster defects on cluster atomic dynamics, cluster melting, cluster critical sizes, Curie or Neel points and the character of magnetic phase transitions were investigated. The applications of critical size and critical characteristic parameters for the nanomaterial characterization are considered

  16. Reconfigurable field programmable gate arrays for mission-critical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Battezzati, NiccoloI; Violante, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    Embedded systems applications that are either mission or safety-critical usually entail low- to mid- production volumes, require the rapid development of specific tasks, which are typically computing intensive, and are cost bounded. The adoption of re-configurable FPGAs in such application domains is constrained to the availability of suitable techniques to guarantee the dependability requirements entailed by critical applications. This book describes the challenges faced by designers when implementing a mission- or safety-critical application using re-configurable FPGAs and it details various

  17. Early morphogenesis of the sinuatrial region of the chick heart: a contribution to the understanding of the pathogenesis of direct pulmonary venous connections to the right atrium and atrial septal defects in hearts with right isomerism of the atrial appendages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Männer, Jörg; Merkel, Nico

    2007-02-01

    The morphogenesis of the sinuatrial region of embryonic hearts is still not well understood. Current matters of dispute are the topogenesis of the future pulmonary vein orifice and the topogenesis of the primary atrial septum. We analyzed the development of the sinuatrial region in chick embryos ranging from Hamburger and Hamilton (HH) stage 14 to 25. Our study disclosed three features of sinuatrial development. First, the primitive atrium of the HH stage 16 chick embryo heart has a separate inflow component. This inflow component takes up the mouth of the confluence of the systemic veins (sinus venosus) as well as the future mouth of the common pulmonary vein (pulmonary pit). The left portion of the atrial inflow component becomes incorporated into the left atrium and its right portion becomes incorporated into the right atrium. Rightward growth of the sinuatrial fold separates the sinus venosus from the left atrium. Second, the pulmonary pit originally forms as a bilaterally paired structure. Its left and right portions are connected to the left and right portions of the atrial inflow component, respectively. Normally, only the left portion of the pulmonary pit deepens to form the common pulmonary vein orifice, whereas the right portion disappears. Third, the primary atrial septum of the chick heart is not formed at the original midline of the embryonic heart, but is formed to the left of the original midline. This finding is in accord with molecular data suggesting that the primary atrial septum derives from the left heart-forming field. Our findings shed new light on the pathogenesis of direct pulmonary venous connections to the right atrium and atrial septal defects in hearts with right isomerism of the atrial appendages.

  18. High plasma human atrial natriuretic peptide and reduced transthoracic left atrial appendage wall-motion velocity are noninvasive surrogate markers for assessing thrombogenesis in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Naoyasu; Okamoto, Mitsunori; Hirao, Hidekazu; Suenari, Kazuyoshi; Nanba, Kiyomi; Uchida, Mio; Yamazato, Ryo; Watari, Yuichiro; Fukuda, Yukihiro; Ueda, Hironori

    2014-09-01

    The clinical relevance of examining human atrial natriuretic peptide (HANP) or left atrial appendage (LAA) wall-motion velocity during sinus rhythm in paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) patients has not been clearly elucidated. The subjects were 38 patients with paroxysmal AF who underwent transesophageal and transthoracic echocardiography during sinus rhythm. The presence of spontaneous echocontrast (SEC) was examined with transesophageal echocardiography and LAA wall-motion velocity (LAAWV) was measured with transthoracic tissue Doppler echocardiography. Plasma HANP was measured within 3 hours after echocardiography. Human atrial natriuretic peptide ranged from 12 to 106 pg/mL with an average of 43 ± 24 pg/mL and had a significant correlation with LAAWV (r = -0.57) or LAA flow velocity (r = -0.41). HANP was significantly higher in patients with SEC than in patients without SEC (64 ± 29 vs. 34 ± 15 pg/mL, P = 0.008) and LAAWV was significantly lower in patients with SEC than in patients without SEC (13 ± 5 vs. 20 ± 5 cm/sec, P = 0.002). HANP >44 pg/mL had a sensitivity of 73% and specificity of 89% for diagnosing SEC. SEC was more frequently observed (73%) in patients with HANP >44 pg/mL and/or LAAWV velocity (P velocity may be noninvasive surrogate markers for assessing left atrial thrombogenesis during sinus rhythm in paroxysmal AF patients. © 2013, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Percutaneous closure of the left atrial appendage for prevention of thromboembolism in atrial fibrillation for patients with contraindication to or failure of oral anticoagulation: a single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faustino, Ana; Paiva, Luís; Providência, Rui; Trigo, Joana; Botelho, Ana; Costa, Marco; Leitão-Marques, António

    2013-06-01

    In non-valvular atrial fibrillation 90% of thrombi originate in the left atrial appendage (LAA). Percutaneous LAA closure has been shown to be non-inferior to warfarin for prevention of thromboembolism. To evaluate the initial experience of a single center in percutaneous LAA closure in patients with high thromboembolic risk and in whom oral anticoagulation was impractical or contraindicated or had failed. Patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation and CHADS2 score ≥2 in whom oral anticoagulation was impractical or contraindicated or had failed underwent percutaneous LAA closure according to the standard technique. After the procedure, dual antiplatelet therapy was maintained for one month, followed by single antiplatelet therapy indefinitely. Patients were followed by clinical assessment and transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography. The procedure was performed in 22 of the 23 selected patients (95.7%), mean age 70±9 years, CHADS2 score 3.2±0.9 and CHA2DS2-VASC score 4.7±1.4. Intraprocedural device replacement was necessary only in the first patient, due to oversizing. The following periprocedural complications were observed: one femoral pseudoaneurysm, three femoral hematomas and two minor oropharyngeal bleeds, resolved by local hemostatic measures. During a 12±8 month follow-up a mild peri-device flow and a thrombus adhering to the device, resolved under with enoxaparin therapy, were identified. The rate of transient ischemic attack (TIA)/stroke was lower than expected according to the CHADS2 score (0 vs. 6.7±2.2%). In our initial experience, this procedure proved to be a feasible, safe and effective alternative for atrial fibrillation patients in whom oral anticoagulation is not an option. Only relatively minor complications were observed, with a lower than expected TIA/stroke rate. Copyright © 2012 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  20. Safety profiles of percutaneous left atrial appendage closure devices: An analysis of the Food and Drug Administration Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database from 2009 to 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jazayeri, Mohammad-Ali; Vuddanda, Venkat; Turagam, Mohit K; Parikh, Valay; Lavu, Madhav; Atkins, Donita; Earnest, Matthew; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea; Wilber, David; Reddy, Yeruva Madhu; Lakkireddy, Dhanunjaya R

    2018-01-01

    Percutaneous left atrial appendage closure (LAAC) is a viable option for AF patients who are unable to tolerate long-term oral anticoagulation (OAC). We sought to assess the safety of two commonly used percutaneous devices for LAA closure in the United States by analysis of surveillance data from the FDA Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database. The MAUDE database was queried between May 1, 2006 and May 1, 2016 for LARIAT ® (SentreHEART Inc., Redwood City, CA, USA) and WATCHMAN™ (Boston Scientific Corp., Marlborough, MA, USA) devices. Among 622 retrieved medical device reports, 356 unique and relevant reports were analyzed. The cumulative incidence of safety events was calculated over the study period and compared between the two devices. LAAC was performed with LARIAT in 4,889 cases. WATCHMAN was implanted in 2,027 patients prior to FDA approval in March 2015 and 3,822 patients postapproval. The composite outcome of stroke/TIA, pericardiocentesis, cardiac surgery, and death occurred more frequently with WATCHMAN (cumulative incidence, 1.93% vs. 1.15%; P = 0.001). The same phenomenon was observed when comparing the WATCHMAN pre- and postapproval experiences for the composite outcome, as well as device embolization, cardiac surgery, and myocardial infarction. MAUDE-reported data show that postapproval, new technology adoption is fraught with increased complications. Improved collaboration between operators, device manufacturers, and regulators can better serve patients through increased transparency and practical postmarket training and monitoring mechanisms. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.