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Sample records for apparent polar wander

  1. New Late Permian paleomagnetic data from Argentina: Refinement of the apparent polar wander path of Gondwana

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    Domeier, Mathew; van der Voo, Rob; Tohver, Eric; Tomezzoli, Renata N.; Vizan, Haroldo; Torsvik, Trond H.; Kirshner, Jordan

    2011-07-01

    The Late Paleozoic-Early Mesozoic apparent polar wander path of Gondwana is largely constructed from relatively old paleomagnetic results, many of which are considered unreliable by modern standards. Paleomagnetic results derived from sedimentary sequences, which are generally poorly dated and prone to inclination shallowing, are especially common. Here we report the results of a joint paleomagnetic-geochronologic study of a volcanic complex in central Argentina. U-Pb dating of zircons has yielded a robust age estimate of 263.0 +1.6/-2.0 Ma for the complex. Paleomagnetic analysis has revealed a pretilting (primary Permian) magnetization with dual polarities. Rock magnetic experiments have identified pseudo-single domain (titano)magnetite and hematite as the mineralogic carriers of the magnetization. Lightning-induced isothermal remagnetizations are widespread in the low-coercivity magnetic carriers. The resulting paleomagnetic pole is 80.1°S, 349.0°E, A95 = 3.3°, N = 35, and it improves a Late Permian mean pole calculated from a filtered South American paleomagnetic data set. More broadly, this new, high-quality, igneous-based paleomagnetic pole falls between the previously distinct Late Permian segments of the Laurussian and Gondwanan apparent polar wander paths, suggesting that the long-recognized disparity between these large paleomagnetic data sets may be primarily due to the inclusion of low-quality or systemically biased data.

  2. Cretaceous Apparent Polar Wander Relative to the Major Cratons and Displacement Estimates of Baja British Columbia

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    Enkin, R. J.

    2004-12-01

    When paleogeographic interpretations derived from independent observations conflict, the methods and results from each discipline come under careful scrutiny, as illustrated by the Baja British Columbia controversy. Cretaceous paleomagnetic data from a large region of the Canadian Cordillera render paleopoles which are far-sided with respect to cratonic North American poles, suggesting this region, designated Baja British Columbia, translated northward during Late Cretaceous - Paleogene time. Criticism of this interpretation based on other geological reasoning prompted me to perform new reviews of Cretaceous to Eocene paleomagnetic results from the Cordillera and from the major cratons of the globe. The global review follows the method of Besse and Courtillot (1991; 2002). One difference between our methods is that I compiled paleomagnetic results from highly studied rock units to single results to balance data weightings spatially and temporally, thus reducing the number of individual results. For the period 160 to 40 Ma, 51 poles were included compared to 92 poles by Besse and Courtillot (2002). Differences between apparent polar wander paths in their and my analyses are never significant at 95% confidence, however mean pole positions differ by up to 500 km, which is important for paleogeographic analysis. The global distribution of sampling localities and the tight clustering of the paleomagnetic poles after plate reconstruction provide invaluable confirmation of plate tectonically derived Euler rotations, the reliability of paleomagnetic remanence directions, and the geocentric dipole geometry of the geomagnetic field. My Cordilleran review shows that paleolatitudes derived from plutons and remagnetized rocks are significantly more scattered than those derived from bedded rocks. Using bedded rocks only, the paleomagnetic record shows that Baja British Columbia sat 2100 ± 500 km south of its present position with respect to cratonic North America during the

  3. Amalgamation of East Eurasia Since Late Paleozoic: Constraints from the Apparent Polar Wander Paths of the Major China Blocks

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    Wu, L.; Kravchinsky, V. A.; Potter, D. K.

    2014-12-01

    It has been a longstanding challenge in the last few decades to quantitatively reconstruct the paleogeographic evolution of East Eurasia because of its great tectonic complexities. As the core region, the major China cratons including North China Block, South China Block and Tarim Block hold the key clues for the understanding of the amalgamation history, tectonic activities and biological affinity among the component blocks and terranes in East Eurasia. Compared with the major Gondwana and Laurentia plates, however, the apparent polar wander paths of China are not well constrained due to the outdated paleomagnetic database and relatively loose pole selection process. With the recruitment of the new high-fidelity poles published in the last decade, the rejection of the low quality data and the strict implementation of Voo's grading scheme, we build an updated paleomagnetic database for the three blocks from which three types of apparent polar wander paths (APWP) are computed. Version 1 running mean paths are constructed during the pole selection and compared with those from the previous publications. Version 2 running mean and spline paths with different sliding time windows are computed from the thoroughly examined poles to find the optimal paths with the steady trend, reasonable speed for the polar drift and plate rotation. The spline paths are recommended for the plate reconstructions, however, considering the poor data coverage during certain periods. Our new China APWPs, together with the latest European reference path, the geological, geochronological and biological evidence from the studied Asian plates allow us to reevaluate the paleogeographic and tectonic history of East Eurasia.

  4. Apparent polar wander path for Adria extended by new Jurassic paleomagnetic results from its stable core: Tectonic implications

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    Márton, Emő; Zampieri, Dario; Ćosović, Vlasta; Moro, Alan; Drobne, Katica

    2017-03-01

    As a continuation of a systematic paleomagnetic research in the northern part of stable Adria, which provided a well-defined apparent polar wander (APW) path for the Cretaceous-Eocene, we present new paleomagnetic results for the Jurassic. These new data were obtained from 15 geographically distributed localities from the Trento platform (eastern Southern Alps) using standard paleomagnetic approach. The Lower Jurassic shallow water carbonates are not considered for tectonic interpretation, due to inconsistent inclinations. The Middle and Upper Jurassic Rosso Ammonitico provided excellent kinematic constraints. With the new Jurassic results, an APW is now defined for Adria for the 167-40 Ma interval. It is well constrained for timing of important changes, like the speed and the sense of rotations. This APW suggests that the CW rotation and southward shift changed to the opposite at 155.1 ± 5.3 Ma, signifying a dramatic change in the life of the Neo-Tethys, from opening to closing. The latter is manifested in fast CCW rotation and northward movement of Adria up to 102.9 ± 2.4 Ma and moderate displacements in the same manner in post-103 Ma times. Combined data sets from stable Istria and the foreland of the Southern Alps point to an approximately 15° CW rotation with respect to Africa at the end of the Cretaceous, and an about 25° in the CCW sense, after the Eocene.

  5. An Early Cretaceous paleomagnetic pole from Ponta Grossa dikes (Brazil): Implications for the South American Mesozoic apparent polar wander path

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    Bartolomeu Raposo, Maria Irene; Ernesto, Marcia

    1995-10-01

    Paleomagnetic results from the Early Cretaceous Ponta Grossa dike swarm are reported. These dikes crosscut sediments and basement rocks associated with the Ponta Grossa Arch, a tectonic feature in the eastern border of the Paleozoic-Mesozoic Paraná Basin. These dikes are vertical or subvertical and trend mainly NW and NE. Samples from 127 dikes were submitted to both alternating field and thermal demagnetizations; 121 of them yielded characteristic directions interpreted as original thermal remanent magnetizations. Both normal and reversed polarities as well as intermediate directions (6 dikes) are recorded. The paleomagnetic pole is located at 30.3°E, 82.4°S (N=115; α95=2.0° k=43.8). This pole along with the available paleomagnetic poles for the Paraná Basin volcanics (Serra Geral Formation), recalculated in this paper in the light of reported 40Ar/39Ar ages describe an apparent polar wander path segment corresponding to a clockwise rotation (~6.9°) of the South American plate. This movement is compatible with the initial phase of the South Atlantic opening with rifting progressing from south to north. However, the calculated plate velocity is higher than the predicted velocities reported so far based on oceanic floor magnetic anomalies. The new data reported in this paper allowed the calculation of a mean Early Cretaceous pole (60.3°E, 83.8°S N=7, α95=2.9°) which can be discriminated from the Middle-Late Jurassic (191.3°E, 86.2°S N=3, α95=7.8°) and Late Cretaceous (346.5°E, 84.1°S N=5, α95=4.9°) mean poles for South America, indicating a more complex movement of the continent than the simple east-west drift generally proposed.

  6. An Extended Paleozoic Apparent Polar Wander Path for Baltica: new Permo-Carboniferous Paleopoles From the Donbas Region (Ukraine)

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    Hamers, M. F.; Meijers, M. J.; van Hinsbergen, D. J.; van der Meer, D. G.; Langereis, C. G.; Stephenson, R. A.

    2007-12-01

    An improved Paleozoic apparent polar wander (APW) path for Baltica is presented here on the basis of six new paleopoles that have been determined from samples collected in the Donbas region in the Dniepr-Donets basin in south-eastern Ukraine. Constructing APW paths allows improving paleogeographic reconstructions that reach further back in time than 200 Ma, where the use of oceanic isochrons and hotspot track has limited applicability. The absence of penetrative regional deformation and the subparallel trending bedding attitudes across the basin suggest that our sites did not suffer from local rotations and their results are interpreted as representative for Baltica. The data presented here improve the paleogeographic reconstruction of Baltica within the collage of the supercontinent Pangea. The six new paleopoles cover a time span from earliest Carboniferous (~356 Ma) to early Permian (~295 Ma). In our reconstruction, Baltica was located at a constant latitude of ~5°N during a major part of the Carboniferous, while at ~310 Ma it started to move gradually northward, reaching a paleolatitude of ~13°N at 295 Ma. From ~355 Ma to 295 Ma Baltica experienced a net ~20° clockwise rotation. Our new data differ with the APW path from Torsvik et al. (submitted) in the time span from ~320-300 Ma, wherein they propose a northward movement from more southerly latitudes. From 300 Ma onwards, our path fits the reference path from Torsvik et al. A possible Permian remagnetization of our sites is not likely, considering the rotational differences in the various time spans, and rockmagnetic analyses that have been performed. We also discuss the usage of the TK03 model (Tauxe and Kent (2004), Geoph. Mon. 145, pp 101-116) that allows for the correction of inclination error caused by compaction during burial, which is insignificant for most sites. This suggest that the NRM has been acquired after compaction.

  7. A new paleomagnetic Paleocene-Eocene apparent polar wandering path derived from magnetostratigraphies: correlations for faunal and floral development at high latitude.

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    Moreau, M.; Besse, J.; Fluteau, F.

    2005-12-01

    The development of endemic warm-climate flora and fauna at high latitudes in both hemispheres attests to the global warming that affected the Earth at the end of the Paleocene and the beginning of the Eocene. Nonetheless, the presence of these species at very high latitudes is also conditional on insolation, and the presence of tropical flora and fauna at very high paleomagnetic paleolatitudes, well north of the Arctic Circle, remains intriguing. We thus reappraise paleomagnetic data in a new way, defining an apparent geomagnetic polar wander path (APWP) from the beginning of the Paleocene to the middle of the mid-Eocene (65-42Ma) using a selection of magnetostratigraphies published over the last 25 years. Six series of VGPs are sufficiently long and of high enough quality to be retained; they originate from Gubbio (Italy) and from leg 74 for the African plate; from the Aix en Provence (France) and Basque (Spain) basins for Europe; from leg 171B for North America, and from leg 121 for Australia. For each site, a VGP (virtual geomagnetic pole) is defined for each magnetic anomaly and then transferred using classical kinematic parameters onto Africa selected as the single reference frame. The successive mean geomagnetic poles for each anomaly (hence perfectly synchronous) are then calculated in order to define the APWP. This shows a loop with two cusps at anomalies 26-25 (61-56 Ma) and 24-23 (56-51 Ma); the corresponding mean poles differ according to McFadden and McElhinny (1990), whereas the end poles relating to anomalies 29-27 (65.5-61 Ma) and 22-19 (51-42.5 Ma) are identical. The plate movements inferred from this loop, possibly related to an episode of true polar wander, are shown to be in agreement with the climatic and paleoenvironmental data and suggests a migration of flora and fauna which is synchronous with migration of the pole, rather than an adaptation of these species to the polar obscurity.

  8. Paleomagnetism of the Late Proterozoic Sierras Bayas Group and the Ediacaran-Cambrian Apparent Polar Wander Path of the Rio de la Plata Craton

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    Rapalini, A. E.; Trindade, R. I.; Poiré, D. G.; Vieira, L.

    2007-05-01

    The apparent polar wander path (APWP) of the Rio de la Plata craton (RP) for the Late Proterozoic and Early Paleozoic is of significance to reconstruct the tectonic processes that led to the amalgamation of Gondwana. In order to define the Ediacaran-Cambrian APWP for RP, a systematic paleomagnetic study was carried out in the Sierras Bayas Group exposed in the province of Buenos Aires, Argentina. 328 samples from 44 sites were collected in the Cryogenian to Ediacaran Villa Mónica Fm., the Ediacaran Cerro Largo, Loma Negra and Las Aguilas Fms. and the Cambrian (?) Cerro Negro Fm. Sampling included mainly limestone and dolomite, red claystone and marls. Although most sites presented secondary magnetizations of likely recent and Permian (?) age, a few sites from the Cerro Largo and uppermost Villa Mónica Fms. carry a pre-tectonic magnetization that yielded a preliminary paleomagnetic pole at 34.6°S, 211.3° (6.4°/10-9°; n: 18 samples), while a pre-tectonic remanence from the Cerro Negro Fm. yielded a paleomagnetic pole at 10.9°N, 323.5°E (9.7°/13.3°, n:17 samples). These two preliminary paleomagnetic poles for the Sierras Bayas Group together with previously published ones permit to define with confidence the APWP of RP from ca. 600 to ca. 500 Ma.

  9. An analysis of apparent polar wander path for southwest Japan suggests no relative movement with respect to Eurasia during the Cretaceous

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    Uno, Koji; Furukawa, Kuniyuki; Hatanaka, Yuri

    2017-06-01

    To test the hypothesis that southwest Japan was involved in large-scale tectonic movement with southward translation as far as 2000 km with respect to Eurasia during the Cretaceous, we examined Cretaceous paleomagnetic poles from southwest Japan to compare with those from Eurasia. Red and gray sandstone samples from the Upper Cretaceous Onogawa Group were collected from twelve sites in the Onogawa Basin in the western part of southwest Japan for paleomagnetic analysis. This group formed over the time span in which the proposed tectonic event is hypothesized to have occurred. A characteristic remanent magnetization component was isolated from red sandstone at ten sites; it is interpreted to be of primary Late Cretaceous origin. The primary directions combined with previously reported data provide a mean direction (D = 76.8°, I = 44.6°, α95 = 11.1°, N = 15) and a paleomagnetic pole (24.4°N, 202.6°E, A95 = 11.0°) for the Onogawa area. This pole is consistent with other Late Cretaceous poles from a wide area of southwest Japan, and a mean Late Cretaceous pole (28.4°N, 202.5°E, A95 = 7.5°, N = 6) is calculated and regarded as representative of this region. The Late Cretaceous pole, together with mid- and Early Cretaceous poles, constitutes an apparent polar wander path (APWP) for southwest Japan during the Cretaceous. After restoration of post-Cretaceous tectonic rotation, each Cretaceous pole for southwest Japan shows agreement with the coeval poles for Eurasia; therefore, it is unlikely that the previously proposed tectonic model that includes southward translation of southwest Japan occurred in the Late Cretaceous. Southwest Japan is considered to have behaved as a stable part of the Eurasian continental margin during the Cretaceous.

  10. A Short Review of True Polar Wander

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    Courtillot, V.

    2004-12-01

    Polar wander on Earth has been suggested since the 19th century. With the discovery that continental drift accounted for much of the apparent polar wander of continents, one could ask whether there was a remaining ("true") fraction in polar wander not accounted for by plate tectonics, which would be a characteristic of "Earth as a whole". TPW results from conservation of angular momentum in a rotating, deformable body. Seen from the surface of the Earth, TPW appears as the wave-like propagation of the Earth's bulge, whose rate of motion is controlled by mantle viscosity. The bulge adjusts in about 104 years, the characteristic time for glacio-isostatic rebound. Paleomagnetic poles (used to derive APWPs) and oceanic data (used to derive plate kinematic models) can be blended to produce a "synthetic " APWP for all plates. Motion of hotspots with respect to plates can then be integrated to derive an estimate of TPW: this displays in succession a standstill at 160-130 Ma, a quasi-circular track from 130 to 70 Ma (rate 30 km/m.y.), a standstill at 50-10 Ma and faster motion up to the present (rate 100 km/m.y.). Suggested episodes of superfast TPW seem to be artefacts. Field geometry is unlikely to severely alter TPW estimates. A legitimate concern is that the analysis is not truly global (it fails to encompass the Pacific plate). And there are ongoing debates on the fixity of hotspots with respect to each other. We find little evidence for significant inter-hotspot motion (larger than 5 km/m.y.) either within the Pacific or Indo-Atlantic hemispheres. Other authors do find some motion (e.g. between Hawaii and Louisville). We suggest that (primary) hotspots form two slowly deforming subsets in the two geodynamically distinct hemispheres. The two subsets would have been in slow motion for the last 45 m.y., but in faster motion prior to that. Other authors (Gordon) conclude that there is no significant motion in the past 125 m.y. It has been suggested that a quasi

  11. RESEARCH PAPERS : Palaeomagnetism of the Ross of Mull granite complex, western Scotland: lower Palaeozoic apparent polar wander of the Orthotectonic Caledonides

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    Piper, J. D. A.

    1998-01-01

    The Ross of Mull granite complex was emplaced near the western margin of the Orthotectonic Caledonides of Scotland in early-mid-Silurian times. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility reflects the post-tectonic character of the pluton and contrasts with magnetic fabrics in adjoining country rocks which record the regional D3 deformation. Palaeomagnetic study identifies two dominant magnetizations. An `A' component is magnetite-resident with distributed blocking temperatures (100-500°C) and normal polarity (D/I=339/-50°, 30 samples, α95=5.6°, palaeomagnetic pole at 12°E, 1°S, dp/dm=5.0/7.5°) it was probably acquired during initial cooling. A `B' magnetization (unblocking temperatures 500-580°C, D/I=195/+21°, 40 samples, α95=4.3°, palaeomagnetic pole at 339°E, 22°S, dp/dm=2.4/4.5°) is of dual polarity and comparable to magnetizations widely recorded in the Younger Granite Suite of the Scottish Caledonides. It does not correlate with the timing of regional isotopic closure as defined by K/Ar thermochron ages and appears to have been imparted during a regional thermochemical event at low temperatures (~250-150°C) and a late stage of cooling of the orogen (~420-410 Ma). Metamorphic facies in the aureole and adjoining country rocks record examples of both A and B magnetizations, together with a low-blocking-temperature (0-350°C) component acquired during late Palaeozoic/early Mesozoic rifting in the Hebridean Basin. Palaeomagnetic poles from the Orthotectonic Caledonides define a late to post-tectonic magnetization record equivalent to a general east to west apparent polar wander trend of late Ordovician-Lower Devonian age. A short-term reversal of this trend is identified during the earlier part of Silurian times so that mid-late Silurian poles are located in a similar position to late Ordovician poles. The overall path coincides with the contemporaneous record from the Paratectonic Caledonides of England and Wales from c. 455 Ma. It is therefore concluded

  12. Lunar true polar wander inferred from polar hydrogen.

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    Siegler, M A; Miller, R S; Keane, J T; Laneuville, M; Paige, D A; Matsuyama, I; Lawrence, D J; Crotts, A; Poston, M J

    2016-03-24

    The earliest dynamic and thermal history of the Moon is not well understood. The hydrogen content of deposits near the lunar poles may yield insight into this history, because these deposits (which are probably composed of water ice) survive only if they remain in permanent shadow. If the orientation of the Moon has changed, then the locations of the shadowed regions will also have changed. The polar hydrogen deposits have been mapped by orbiting neutron spectrometers, and their observed spatial distribution does not match the expected distribution of water ice inferred from present-day lunar temperatures. This finding is in contrast to the distribution of volatiles observed in similar thermal environments at Mercury's poles. Here we show that polar hydrogen preserves evidence that the spin axis of the Moon has shifted: the hydrogen deposits are antipodal and displaced equally from each pole along opposite longitudes. From the direction and magnitude of the inferred reorientation, and from analysis of the moments of inertia of the Moon, we hypothesize that this change in the spin axis, known as true polar wander, was caused by a low-density thermal anomaly beneath the Procellarum region. Radiogenic heating within this region resulted in the bulk of lunar mare volcanism and altered the density structure of the Moon, changing its moments of inertia. This resulted in true polar wander consistent with the observed remnant polar hydrogen. This thermal anomaly still exists and, in part, controls the current orientation of the Moon. The Procellarum region was most geologically active early in lunar history, which implies that polar wander initiated billions of years ago and that a large portion of the measured polar hydrogen is ancient, recording early delivery of water to the inner Solar System. Our hypothesis provides an explanation for the antipodal distribution of lunar polar hydrogen, and connects polar volatiles to the geologic and geophysical evolution of the Moon

  13. Mechanisms for oscillatory true polar wander.

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    Creveling, J R; Mitrovica, J X; Chan, N-H; Latychev, K; Matsuyama, I

    2012-11-08

    Palaeomagnetic studies of Palaeoproterozoic to Cretaceous rocks propose a suite of large and relatively rapid (tens of degrees over 10 to 100 million years) excursions of the rotation pole relative to the surface geography, or true polar wander (TPW). These excursions may be linked in an oscillatory, approximately coaxial succession about the centre of the contemporaneous supercontinent. Within the framework of a standard rotational theory, in which a delayed viscous adjustment of the rotational bulge acts to stabilize the rotation axis, geodynamic models for oscillatory TPW generally appeal to consecutive, opposite loading phases of comparable magnitude. Here we extend a nonlinear rotational stability theory to incorporate the stabilizing effect of TPW-induced elastic stresses in the lithosphere. We demonstrate that convectively driven inertia perturbations acting on a nearly prolate, non-hydrostatic Earth with an effective elastic lithospheric thickness of about 10 kilometres yield oscillatory TPW paths consistent with palaeomagnetic inferences. This estimate of elastic thickness can be reduced, even to zero, if the rotation axis is stabilized by long-term excess ellipticity in the plane of the TPW. We speculate that these sources of stabilization, acting on TPW driven by a time-varying mantle flow field, provide a mechanism for linking the distinct, oscillatory TPW events of the past few billion years.

  14. Climate Catastrophe, True Polar Wander, and Inclination Shallowing in the Ediacaran Period

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    Raub, T. D.; Evans, D. A.

    2004-12-01

    Syntheses of global paleomagnetic data for the Ediacaran Period are difficult to reconcile with standard, uniformitarian plate-tectonic interpretations. Instead, they appear to support a substantial component of true polar wandering (TPW) contributing to each continent's apparent polar wander (APW) path. Construction of magnetostratigraphy-based APWP's has been undertaken in order to quantify the timing and magnitude of putative true polar wander events. If verified, large-scale, multi-episode TPW would establish a second axisymmetric reference frame, about Earth's equatorial minimum inertial axis, suitable for APWP superposition and longitude-controlled paleogeographic reconstruction. In addition to TPW, the terminal Proterozoic interval witnessed repeated episodes of low paleolatitude glaciation. High-resolution magnetostratigraphy of South Australia's Nuccaleena cap dolostone documents three correlatable geomagnetic reversals intimately associated with the solid cap facies. This implies a conservative estimate of 100's kyr duration for postglacial return to "normal" sedimentologic and ocean geochemical regimes. While confirming a low paleolatitude for Marinoan glacial deposits, paleomagnetic inclinations in the Nuccaleena cap dolostone are steeper than those from the underlying, glaciogenic Elatina Formation. Whether due to paleomagnetic compaction shallowing; to geomagnetic low-intensity or non-dipole field contributions; or to rapid APW, demonstration of similar behavior in correlative units across Australia could offer hope of resolving several paleogeographic and geodynamic enigmas that characterize the Ediacaran Period.

  15. A true polar wander model for Neoproterozoic plate motions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ripperdan, R.L. (Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovot (Israel))

    1992-01-01

    Recent paleogeographic reconstructions for the interval 750--500 Ma (Neoproterozoic to Late Cambrian) require rapid rates of plate motion and/or rotation around an equatorial Euler pole to accommodate reconstructions for the Early Paleozoic. Motions of this magnitude appear to be very uncommon during the Phanerozoic. A model for plate motions based on the hypothesis that discrete intervals of rapid true polar wander (RTPW) occurred during the Neoproterozoic can account for the paleogeographic changes with minimum amounts of plate motion. The model uses the paleogeographic reconstructions of Hoffman (1991). The following constraints were applied during derivation of the model: (1) relative motions between major continental units were restricted to be combinations of great circle or small circle translations with Euler poles of rotation = spin axis; (2) maximum rates of relative translational plate motion were 0.2 m/yr. Based on these constraints, two separate sets of synthetic plate motion trajectories were determined. The sequence of events in both can be summarized as: (1) A rapid true polar wander event of ca 90[degree] rafting a supercontinent to the spin axis; (2) breakup of the polar supercontinent into two fragments, one with the Congo, West Africa, Amazonia, and Baltica cratons, the other with the Laurentia, East Gondwana, and Kalahari cratons; (3) great circle motion of the blocks towards the equator; (4) small circle motion leading to amalgamation of Gondwana and separation of Laurentia and Baltica. In alternative 1, rifting initiates between East Antarctica and Laurentia and one episode of RTPW is required. Alternative 2 requires two episodes of RTPW; and that rifting occurred first along the eastern margin and later along the western margin of Laurentia. Synthetic plate motion trajectories are compared to existing paleomagnetic and geological data, and implications of the model for paleoclimatic changes during the Neoproterozoic are discussed.

  16. The break-up of Rodinia, birth of Gondwana, true polar wander and the snowball Earth

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    Hoffman, Paul F.

    A major global plate reorganisation occurred between ˜750 and ˜550 Ma. Gondwana was assembled following the dispersal of Rodinia, a supercontinent centred on Laurentia in existence since ˜1050 Ma. The reorganisation began when tectonic elements, later composing East Gondwana, rotated piecemeal away from the Pacific margin of Laurentia. These elements swept across the ancestral Pacific (Mozambique) Ocean that lay between Laurentia and the combined African cratons of Congo and Kalahari, which were loosely joined after ˜820 Ma. Simultaneously, the Adamastor (Brasilide) Ocean closed by subduction bordering the West Gondwana cratons, drawing virtually all of Gondwana together by ˜550 Ma. The final assembly of Gondwana occurred contemporaneously with the separation of Laurentia from West Gondwana. It has been postulated that the imprint of Rodinia's long-lived existence on lower mantleconvection produced a prolate ellipsoidal geoid figure. This could give rise to episodic inertial interchange true polar wander (IITPW), meaning that the entire silicate shell of the Earth (above the core-mantle boundary) rolled through 90° with respect to the diurnal spin axis in ˜15 Ma (equivalent to an apparent polar wander velocity of ˜66 cm a -1. Although empirical arguments for IITPW of Cambrian age appear to be flawed, evidence for an ultra-fast ( > 40 cm a -1) meridional component of apparent polar wander for Laurentia between 564 and 550 Ma suggests that IITPW might have occurred at that time. The break-up of Rodinia increased the continental margin area and preferential organic C burial globally, which is reflected by high δ 13C values in seawater proxies. The consequent drawdown of CO 2 is implicated in a succession of runaway ice-albedo catastrophes between ˜750 and ˜570 Ma, during each of which the oceans completely froze over. Each "snowball" Earth event must have lasted for millions of years because their terminations depended on extreme CO 2 levels, built up by

  17. True polar wander of Enceladus from topographic data

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    Tajeddine, Radwan; Soderlund, Krista M.; Thomas, Peter C.; Helfenstein, Paul; Hedman, Matthew M.; Burns, Joseph A.; Schenk, Paul M.

    2017-10-01

    Many objects in the solar system are suspected to have experienced reorientation of their spin axes. As their rotation rates are slow and their shapes are nearly spherical, the formation of mass anomalies, by either endogenic or exogenic processes, can change objects' moments of inertia. Therefore, the objects reorient to align their largest moment of inertia with their spin axis. Such a phenomenon is called True Polar Wander (TPW). Here we report the discovery of a global series of topographic lows on Saturn's satellite Enceladus that we interpret to show that this synchronously locked moon has undergone TPW by ∼55° about the tidal axis. We use improved topographic data from the spherical harmonic expansion of Cassini limb and stereogrammetric measurements to characterize regional topography over the surface of Enceladus. We identify a group of nearly antipodal basins orthogonal to a basin chain tracing a non-equatorial circumglobal belt across Enceladus' surface. We argue that the belt and the antipodal regions are fossil remnants of earlier equator and poles, respectively. We argue that these lows arise from isostasic compensation and that their pattern reflects spatial variations in internal dynamics of the ice shell. Our hypothesis is consistent with a variety of geological features visible in Cassini images.

  18. Rotational Inerfia of Continents: A Proposed Link between Polar Wandering and Plate Tectonics.

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    Kane, M F

    1972-03-24

    A mechanism is proposed whereby displacement between continents and the earth's pole of rotation (polar wandering) gives rise to latitudinal transport of continental plates (continental drift) because of their relatively greater rotational inertia. When extended to short-term polar wobble, the hypothesis predicts an energy change nearly equivalent to the seismic energy rate.

  19. Estimating relative paleolongitudes with the assumption of middle Paleozoic true polar wander

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    van der Voo, R.; Bazhenov, M.

    2003-04-01

    Three new paleomagnetic poles have been obtained from Lower Ordovician, Lower Silurian, and Middle Devonian rocks in the Chingiz Range, Kazakhstan (see Bazhenov et al. presentation in session MG3, this meeting). They form an apparent polar wander (APW) loop that resembles similar loops for Ordovician through Devonian poles from Baltica, Laurentia and Gondwana. The latter have previously been attributed to true polar wander (TPW) in an admittedly speculative paper (Van der Voo, 1994, EPSL, vol. 122, pp. 239-243). A characteristic of TPW is that all continents should see its expression manifested in their APW paths, especially if relative plate velocities were much less than TPW rates. Paleopoles from Siberia and the China blocks do not contradict a TPW signature for the Ordovician through Devonian interval, but the results are not complete enough to establish a loop in the APW paths. However, the paleopoles from the Chingiz block in Kazakhstan fit the requisite looping pattern. Even though TPW remains speculative for this interval until it has been shown that all continents have similarly shaped APW paths, there are two interesting issues that are related to TPW. (1) If TPW occurred, similarly shaped APW paths from all continents can be superposed and the Euler rotations necessary for this superposition place the continents in their ancient relative positions to first approximation. This implies that a rough estimate of relative paleolongitudes can be obtained. (2) Superposition of the APW paths should not lead to overlap in continental positions, so that the absence of overlaps constitutes one possible test of the TPW hypothesis. The currently available data from the major continents pass this test.

  20. True Polar Wander of Enceladus From Topographic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajeddine, Radwan; Soderlund, Krista M.; Thomas, Peter C.; Helfenstein, Paul; Hedman, Matthew M.; Burns, Joseph A.; Schenk, Paul M.

    2016-10-01

    Besides the relative motion of lithospheric plates, the Earth as a whole moves with respect to its rotation pole, as shown by paleomagnetic, astrometric and geodetic measurements [1]. Such so-called true polar wander (TPW) occurs because our planet's moments of inertia change temporally owing to internal thermal convection and to the redistribution of surficial mass during ice ages. Thus, to conserve angular momentum while losing rotational energy, Earth's axis of maximum moment of inertia aligns with its spin axis. Theoreticians suspect similar reorientations of other celestial bodies but supporting evidence is fragmentary, at best [2]. Here we report the discovery of a global series of topographic lows on Saturn's satellite Enceladus indicating that this synchronously locked moon has undergone reorientation by ~55°. We use improved topographic data from spherical harmonic expansion of Cassini limb [3,4,5] and stereogrammetric [5,6,7] measurements to characterize regional topography over the surface of Enceladus. We identify a group of nearly antipodal basins orthogonal to a topographic basin chain tracing a non-equatorial circumglobal belt across Enceladus' surface. We argue that the belt and the antipodal regions are fossil remnants of old equator and poles, respectively. These lows are argued to arise from isostasic compensation [7,8] with their pattern reflecting variations in internal dynamics of the ice shell. Our hypothesis is consistent with many geological features visible in Cassini images [9].References:[1] Mitrovica, J.X. & Wahr, Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences, 39, 577-616 (2011).[2] Matsuyama, I. et al. Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences, 42, 605-634 (2014).[3] Thomas, P.C. et al. Icarus, 190, 573-584 (2007).[4] Thomas, P.C. Icarus, 208, 395-401 (2010).[5] Thomas, P.C. et al. Icarus, 264, 37-47 (2016).[6] Edwards, K. Photogrammetric Engineering and Remote Sensing, 53, 1219-1222 (1987).[7] Schenk, P.M. & McKinnon, W. B

  1. Polar Wander on the Moon Inferred from its Shape and Magnetic Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrick-Bethell, I.

    2015-12-01

    The lunar shape can inform us about the Moon's early spin pole location, or history of true polar wander. This history is important for understanding the stability of polar ice deposits [1], and possible relationships between large-scale lunar features and the lunar orbit. Recently, Garrick-Bethell et al. [2] showed that when the effects of large basins are ignored, the Moon's early spin pole could be inferred from a tidal-rotational deformation that froze-in when the Moon was closer to the Earth. They also showed that the lunar shape is consistent with early tidal heating in the crust during the magma ocean epoch [3]. Here we will present some updates to this work, and discuss how the lunar spin pole may have evolved in time, as inferred from the progressive formation of large basins and components of the degree-2 gravity field that are not associated with basins. Separately, magnetic anomalies can address the problem of lunar polar wander, assuming the ancient dynamo that magnetized them was dominantly dipolar and aligned with the spin axis. However, recent surveys of magnetic anomalies reveal paleopole distributions that are quite complicated and inconsistent across different studies [4, 5]. Some reported paleopoles are consistent with the early spin pole inferred from the lunar shape [2], while others are not. These paleopoles imply either very large amounts of polar wander, or that the dynamo evolved with a complex field geometry. Some possible resolutions to these problems will be discussed, including secular variation of the magnetic field and difficulties with inversions for magnetic sources. References 1. Siegler, M. A. et al., 46th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, LPI Contribution No. 1832, p. 2675 (2015). 2. Garrick-Bethell, I., et al., Nature 512, 181 (2014). 3. Garrick-Bethell, I., et al., Science 330, 949 (2010). 4. Arkani-Hamed, J. and Boutin, D., Icarus 237, 262 (2014). 5. Takahashi, F., et al., Nature Geoscience 7, 409 (2014).

  2. Looking for Martian True Polar Wander in mutually oriented slices of ALH84001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buz, J.; Murphy, T. G.; Kirschvink, J. L.

    2016-12-01

    True polar wander (TPW) on Mars has been hypothesized based on a variety of observations including geoid instability [1], locations of apparent polar deposits [2], and locations of magnetic anomalies [3, 4]. A proposed driving force for TPW is redistribution of mass on the surface of the planet such as by extensive volcanism events [5]. The majority of TPW modeling research has been using orbital datasets and modeling. However, laboratory analyses of Martian samples should also be conducted to test for Martian TPW. The Martian meteorite, ALH84001, is a prime sample for observing Martian TPW because of its preservation of thermal remanent magnetization from Mars [6]. Previous work on the sample has demonstrated that the interior of the meteorite was not heated above 40 C during transport from Mars to Earth and that there is a heterogeneous magnetization within the meteorite [7]. Within the meteorite are a series of fracture-filling carbonate blebs which contain magnetite and pyrrhotite with original remanence. These carbonates are presumed to have precipitated onto the meteorite [8]. We have divided a fracture-containing portion of the meteorite into three sets of sequential, mutually oriented slices. Using an ultra-high resolution scanning SQuID magnetometer we are able to visualize the magnetization within each slice. We are able to model each magnetic scan as a series of discrete dipoles using a modification from Lima and Weiss [9]. Our results demonstrate that within one of our slice sequences the dipoles lie along a great circle path. Dipoles lying along an arc in a stereographic projection can be interpreted as resulting from TPW if there is a significant amount of time from start to end of magnetization. Our ongoing work includes continued analysis and scanning of our slices as well as statistical tests for confirming if the dipoles lie along an arc. [1] Sprenke, KF et al. 2005 Icarus 174(2) 486-9 [2] Perron, JT et al. 2007 Nature 447(7146) 840-3 [3

  3. Strike-Slip Fault Patterns on Europa: Obliquity or Polar Wander?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoden, Alyssa Rose; Hurford, Terry A.; Manga, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Variations in diurnal tidal stress due to Europa's eccentric orbit have been considered as the driver of strike-slip motion along pre-existing faults, but obliquity and physical libration have not been taken into account. The first objective of this work is to examine the effects of obliquity on the predicted global pattern of fault slip directions based on a tidal-tectonic formation model. Our second objective is to test the hypothesis that incorporating obliquity can reconcile theory and observations without requiring polar wander, which was previously invoked to explain the mismatch found between the slip directions of 192 faults on Europa and the global pattern predicted using the eccentricity-only model. We compute predictions for individual, observed faults at their current latitude, longitude, and azimuth with four different tidal models: eccentricity only, eccentricity plus obliquity, eccentricity plus physical libration, and a combination of all three effects. We then determine whether longitude migration, presumably due to non-synchronous rotation, is indicated in observed faults by repeating the comparisons with and without obliquity, this time also allowing longitude translation. We find that a tidal model including an obliquity of 1.2?, along with longitude migration, can predict the slip directions of all observed features in the survey. However, all but four faults can be fit with only 1? of obliquity so the value we find may represent the maximum departure from a lower time-averaged obliquity value. Adding physical libration to the obliquity model improves the accuracy of predictions at the current locations of the faults, but fails to predict the slip directions of six faults and requires additional degrees of freedom. The obliquity model with longitude migration is therefore our preferred model. Although the polar wander interpretation cannot be ruled out from these results alone, the obliquity model accounts for all observations with a value

  4. True polar wander driven by late-stage volcanism and the distribution of paleopolar deposits on Mars

    CERN Document Server

    Kite, Edwin S; Manga, Michael; Perron, J Taylor; Mitrovica, Jerry X

    2009-01-01

    The areal centroids of the youngest polar deposits on Mars are offset from those of adjacent paleopolar deposits by 5-10 degrees. We test the hypothesis that the offset is the result of true polar wander (TPW), the motion of the solid surface with respect to the spin axis, caused by a mass redistribution within or on the surface of Mars. In particular, we consider TPW driven by late-stage volcanism during the late Hesperian to Amazonian. There is observational and qualitative support for this hypothesis: in both North and South, observed offsets lie close to a great circle 90 degrees from Tharsis, as expected for polar wander after Tharsis formed. We calculate the magnitude and direction of TPW produced by mapped late-stage lavas for a range of lithospheric thicknesses, lava thicknesses, eruption histories, and prior polar wander events. If Tharsis formed close to the equator, the stabilizing effect of a fossil rotational bulge located close to the equator leads to predicted TPW of <2 degrees, too small to...

  5. On the possibility of viscoelastic deformation of the large south polar craters and true polar wander on the asteroid Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Saman; Dombard, Andrew J.

    2016-09-01

    The asteroid Vesta, located within the inner asteroid belt, is a differentiated body with a prominent rotational bulge. NASA's Dawn mission revealed the presence of two large, relatively shallow impact craters in the south polar region, one with a high-standing central peak. The shallowness and prominent central peak are reminiscent of large craters on some icy satellites that may have experienced strong topographic relaxation. The location of these basins near the south pole is also unusual and suggests true polar wander, which requires relaxation of the rotational bulge. Thus, we use the finite element method and a viscoelastic rheology to examine the feasibility of relaxation processes operating on Vesta. Given the plausible thermal state of Vesta by the decay of long-lived radioactive elements, we find that the lithosphere is not compliant enough to allow strong relaxation of the large south polar craters, and thus the peculiar morphology is possibly a product of the formation of these large basins at a planetary scale. Additionally, the asteroid has not been warm enough to permit the relaxation of the rotational bulge. Consequently, these craters both happened to form near the south pole, as unlikely as that is.

  6. The influence of true polar wander on glacial inception in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daradich, A.; Huybers, P.; Mitrovica, J. X.; Chan, N.-H.; Austermann, J.

    2017-03-01

    The impact that long-term changes in Earth's rotation axis relative to the surface geography, or true polar wander (TPW), and continental drift have had in driving cooling of high-latitude North America since the Eocene is explored. Recent reanalyses of paleomagnetic pole positions suggest a secular drift in Earth's rotation axis of ∼ 8 ° over the last 40 Myr, in a direction that has brought North America to increasingly higher latitudes. Using modern temperature data in tandem with a simple model, a reduction in the annual sum of positive degree days (PDDs) driven by this polar and plate motion over the last 20 Myr is quantified. At sites in Baffin Island, the TPW- and continental drift-driven decrease in insolation forcing over the last 20 Myr rivals changes in insolation forcing caused by variations in Earth's obliquity and precession. Using conservative PDD scaling factors and an annual snowfall equal to modern station observations, the snowiest location in Baffin Island 20 Myr ago had a mass balance deficit of ∼0.75-2 m yr-1 (water equivalent thickness) relative to its projected mass balance at 2.7 Ma. This mass balance deficit would have continued to increase as one goes back in time until ∼40 Myr ago based on adopted paleopole locations. TPW and continental drift that moved Arctic North America poleward would have strongly promoted glacial inception in Baffin Island at ∼3 Ma, a location where the proto-Laurentide Ice Sheet is thought to have originated.

  7. The Style of Density Stratification In The Mantle and True Polar Wander Induced By Ice Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabadini, R.; Marotta, A. M.; de Franco, R.; Vermeersen, L. L. A.

    The present day velocity of true polar wander (TPW) and the displacement of the axis of rotation of the Earth in response to ice ages, resulting from stratified, viscoelastic Earth models, are sensitive to the non adiabatic density gradient in the mantle. Previ- ous studies, based on a fully non adiabatic, or chemically stratified mantle, overesti- mated the present day TPW for lower mantle viscosities 1021-1022 Pa s. For a density profile in agreement with the reference seismological model, where non adiabaticity is confined to the transition zone between 420 and 670 km, with the remanent mantle fully adiabatic, the present day TPW is 0.65-0.9 Deg/Myr, substantially lower than the 3.0 Deg/Myr obtained for the chemical mantle, due to the lack of isostatic restor- ing force in the adiabatic mantle, or global reduction of the buoyancy, that favours the attainment of a situation of rotational equilibrium. The correctness of this physi- cal interpretation is demonstrated by the behaviour of a fully adiabatic phase change that can be satisfactorily reproduced by deleting the buoyancy restoring modes due to chemical density jumps. The reduction of present day TPW induced by the Pleis- tocenic deglaciation, for a realistically stratified mantle with non adiabatic density gradients due to phase changes localized in the transition zone, impacts the inversion of the lower mantle viscosity, characterized by two best fit values in proximity of 1021 Pa s and 1022 Pa s, resembling the behaviour of the time derivative of the degree two component of the gravity field. The reduction of present day TPW suggests that other mechanisms, such as present day ice mass instability in Antarctica and Greenland, are presently at work to maintain the drift of 0.9 Deg/Myr of the axis of rotaton towards Newfoundland. The secular drift of the adiabatic mantle model during the continuous occurrence of ice ages is increased by the fifty per cent with respect to the chemically stratified one

  8. Apparent resistivity and spectral induced polarization in the submarine environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HERCULES DE SOUZA

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Relatively few investigations have employed electrical methods in the submarine environment, which may be promising for mineral deposits or threatened by environmental problems. We have measured the electric field using both disk and bar electrodes in the sea water at three different levels: sea surface, seven meters deep, and sea bottom at a depth of ten meters, employing a 2 m spacing dipole-dipole array with 7 array spacings of investigation, and 13 values of frequencies at steps of (2N hertz, N = -2, -1, 0, 1, 2,.....10. The measurement allowed the analysis of the electric field as a function of frequency and spacing, and of the spectral induced polarization. Modelling and interpretation of the apparent resistivity yielded a good fit with previous drilling data. Analysis of the spectrum of the complex apparent resistivity and the comparison with equivalent circuits, provided information about the grain size, the mineral composition and the major induced polarization phenomenon occurring below the sea. Therefore the result of the present research show the feasibility of measuring the variation of seawater resistivity in situ, as well as the resistivity of sea bottom sediments.Relativamente poucas investigações têm empregado métodos elétricos no ambiente submarino, o qual pode ser promissor para depósitos minerais ou ameaçado por problemas ambientais. Nós medimos o campo elétrico usando eletrodos em forma de disco e de barra na água do mar, em três níveis distintos: superfície, sete metros de profundidade, e fundo do mar a dez metros de profundidade, empregando um dispositivo dipolo-dipolo com 2m de afastamento, 7 níveis de investigação e 13 valores de freqüência a intervalos de (2N hertz, N = -2, -1, 0, 1, 2, ... 10. A medida permitiu a análise do campo elétrico como uma função de freqüência e afastamento, e da polarização induzida espectral. A modelagem e a interpretação da resistividade aparente se ajustaram bem

  9. Magnetization in the South Pole-Aitken basin: Implications for the lunar dynamo and true polar wander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Michael; Hemingway, Doug; Garrick-Bethell, Ian

    2017-04-01

    A number of magnetic anomalies are present along the northern edge of the lunar South Pole-Aitken (SPA) basin. A variety of hypotheses for their formation have been proposed, but an in-depth study of their properties has not been performed. Here we use two different methods to invert for their source body characteristics: one that completely searches a small parameter space of less than ten uniform-strength dipoles per anomaly, and another that uses grids of hundreds of dipoles with variable magnetization strengths. Both methods assume uniform magnetization directions at each anomaly and with one exception, produce nearly the same results. We introduce new Monte Carlo methods to quantify errors in our inversions arising from Gaussian time-dependent changes in the external field and the uncertain geometry of the source bodies. We find the errors from uncertainty in source body geometry are almost always higher. We also find a diverse set of magnetization directions around SPA, which we combine with other physical arguments to conclude that the source bodies were likely magnetized in a dynamo field. Igneous intrusions are a reasonable explanation (Purucker et al., 2012) for the directional variability, since they could be intruded over different magnetic epochs. However, the directional variability also implies either surprisingly large amounts of true polar wander or a dynamo not aligned with the lunar spin axis. We also explore the possibility that true polar wander caused by the SPA impact could allow iron-rich SPA ejecta to record a diverse set of magnetic field directions. Some of this material may have also become "sesquinary" ejecta and re-impacted across the Moon on 104-106 year timescales to capture such changes. No completely satisfactory answer emerges, except that the dipole-axis of the lunar dynamo may have been variable in direction.

  10. Paleomagnetic study of Siluro-Devonian volcanic rocks from the central Lachlan Orogen: Implications for the apparent pole wander path of Gondwana

    Science.gov (United States)

    VéRard, Christian; Tait, Jennifer; Glen, Richard

    2005-06-01

    The apparent pole wander (APW) path for Gondwana is still not clearly established, in particular, for Silurian-Devonian times. A controversial debate places authors who argue for an "X path," running directly through Africa on a reconstruction of Gondwana against those who advocate a large loop passing by southern South America, the "Y path." Most of the paleomagnetic data used to draw this loop come from the Lachlan Orogen (Australia). A paleomagnetic study was carried out in the well-dated Ambone and Ural volcanics in the central subprovince of Lachlan Orogen, New South Wales. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility measurements confirms detailed mapping of the region and shows that these massive dacitic sills and/or lava flows are flat lying. Among the different localities studied, only one yields interpretable paleomagnetic results. Two components of magnetization can be identified: a midtemperature direction yielding a corresponding pole in Australian coordinates λ = 67.9°S/ϕ = 084.4°E (B = 5; n = 21; dp = 17.5°/dm = 23.1°) and a high-temperature direction with a corresponding VGP λ = 24.4°S/ϕ = 060.6°E (B = 5; n = 25; dp = 1.4°/dm = 2.5°). The first is interpreted as corresponding to an Early Carboniferous pole position and can be regarded as an overprint probably related to the Early Carboniferous Kanimblan orogenic event. The second does not correspond to any expected Silurian-Devonian or younger pole position. This magnetization is thought to be primary in origin; however, secular variation has apparently not been averaged out in the single lava flow sampled. Therefore the earliest Devonian paleopole position probably lies in a 30° cone around the obtained VGP, and this position can only match the X-type APW path for Gondwana. It is in particular very different from coeval poles obtained in the eastern subprovince of the Lachlan Orogen, and it is mostly used as key poles supporting the Silurian-Devonian loop for the APW path of Gondwana

  11. Wandering spleen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qazi Shabir

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Wandering spleen is a rare clinical entity, characterized by splenic hypermobility that results from elongation or maldevelopment of its suspensary ligaments. The wandering spleen is in constant danger of torsion and infarction. This condition poses a great diagnostic challenge due to lack of awareness and paucity of symptoms. Among adults, it usually occurs in females of childbearing age, the children below ten years of age are other sufferers. The clinical presentation may be acute or chronic; such as asymptomatic abdominal mass, an acute abdomen, or, most commonly, a mass associated with vague abdominal symptoms. Computed tomography and duplex ultrasonography are best diagnostic modalities. The traditional conservative approach carries high risk of infarction leading to splenectomy and postsplenectomy sepsis. Splenopexy is the treatment of choice for all noninfarcted wandering spleens. Splenectomy should only be performed when there is no evidence of splenic blood flow after detorsion of the spleen. The present study, reviews the presentation, course, diagnostic modalities and management options of wandering spleen

  12. Wandering in a mall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zabiliute, Emilija

    2016-01-01

    to social mobility as they wander in Delhi’s middle-class consumer-oriented spaces. Wandering (ghūmnā) is evaluated differently by young men and their parents, pointing to generational and gendered distinctions. For young men, such wandering is a means to participate in the consumer culture, while...... their families evaluate it as a waste of time and useless (bekār) behaviour. By placing aspirations in a temporal perspective, I show how the young men adjust their aspirations relationally, as they take up new roles as carers of their families....

  13. Equation of motion for the solvent polarization apparent charges in the polarizable continuum model: Application to time-dependent CI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipolo, Silvio; Corni, Stefano; Cammi, Roberto

    2017-02-01

    The dynamics of the electrons for a molecule in solution is coupled to the dynamics of its polarizable environment, i.e., the solvent. To theoretically investigate such electronic dynamics, we have recently developed equations of motion (EOM) for the apparent solvent polarization charges that generate the reaction field in the Polarizable Continuum Model (PCM) for solvation and we have coupled them to a real-time time-dependent density functional theory (RT TDDFT) description of the solute [S. Corni et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 119, 5405 (2014)]. Here we present an extension of the EOM-PCM approach to a Time-Dependent Configuration Interaction (TD CI) description of the solute dynamics, which is free from the qualitative artifacts of RT TDDFT in the adiabatic approximation. As tests of the developed approach, we investigate the solvent Debye relaxation after an electronic excitation of the solute obtained either by a π pulse of light or by assuming the idealized sudden promotion to the excited state. Moreover, we present EOM for the Onsager solvation model and we compare the results with PCM. The developed approach provides qualitatively correct real-time evolutions and is promising as a general tool to investigate the electron dynamics elicited by external electromagnetic fields for molecules in solution.

  14. Oculometric variations during mind wandering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandchamp, Romain; Braboszcz, Claire; Delorme, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    A significant body of literature supports the contention that pupil size varies depending on cognitive load, affective state, and level of drowsiness. Here we assessed whether oculometric measures such as gaze position, blink frequency and pupil size were correlated with the occurrence and time course of self-reported mind-wandering episodes. We recorded the pupil size of two subjects engaged in a monotonous breath counting task while keeping their eyes on a fixation cross. This task is conducive to producing mind-wandering episodes. Each subject performed ten 20-min sessions, for total duration of about 4 h. Subjects were instructed to report spontaneous mind-wandering episodes by pressing a button when they lost count of their breath. After each button press, subjects filled in a short questionnaire describing the characteristics of their mind-wandering episode. We observed larger pupil size during the breath-focusing period compared to the mind-wandering period (p mind wandering episodes in visual tasks. We discuss possible explanations for this discrepancy. We also analyzed nine other oculometric measures including blink rate, blink duration and gaze position. We built a support vector machine (SVM) classifier and showed that mean pupil size was the most reliable predictor of mind wandering in both subjects. The classification accuracy of mind wandering data segments vs. breath-focusing data segments was 81% for the first subject and 77% for the second subject. Additionally, we analyzed oculometric measures in light of the phenomenological data collected in the questionnaires. We showed that how well subjects remembered their thoughts while mind wandering was positively correlated with pupil size (subject 1, p mind-wandering episodes.

  15. Oculometric variations during mind wandering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain eGrandchamp

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A significant body of literature supports the contention that pupil size varies depending on cognitive load, affective state, and level of drowsiness. Here we assessed whether oculometric measures such as gaze position, blink frequency and pupil size were correlated with the occurrence and time course of self-reported mind-wandering episodes. We recorded the pupil size of two subjects engaged in a monotonous breath counting task while keeping their eyes on a fixation cross. Each subject performed ten 20-minute sessions, for total duration of about 4 hours. This task is conducive to producing mind-wandering episodes. Subjects were instructed to report spontaneous mind-wandering episodes by pressing a button when they lost count of their breath. After each button press, subjects filled in a short questionnaire describing the characteristics of their mind-wandering episode. We observed larger pupil size during the breath-focusing period compared to the mind-wandering period (p< 0.01 for both subjects. Our findings contradict previous research showing a higher baseline pupil size during mind wandering episodes in visual tasks. We discuss possible explanations for this discrepancy. We also analyzed nine other oculometric measures including blink rate, blink duration and gaze position. We built a support vector machine classifier and showed that mean pupil size was the most reliable predictors of mind wandering in both subjects. The classification accuracy of mind wandering data segments versus breath-focusing data segments was 81% for the first subject and 77% for the second subject. Additionally, we analyzed oculometric measures in light of the phenomenological data collected in the questionnaires. We showed that how well subjects remembered their thoughts while mind wandering was positively correlated with pupil size (subject 1, p< 0.001; subject 2, p< 0.05. Feelings of well being were also positively correlated with pupil size (subject 1, p< 0

  16. Torsion of a wandering spleen

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of peri-umbilical pain progressing to generalised abdominal pain ... surgical intervention. A midline ... No improvement was noted on detorsion of the vascular pedicle, and a ... Surgical treatment of patients with wandering spleen: Report of six.

  17. Wandering Between Practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallace, Jamie

    this integration of the playful inquiry of art-making and structured organisational practice, it is suggested that an increased likelihood of ‘useful surprise' will result which would otherwise remain hidden due to instrumental issues and organisational thinking. This new possibility is seen as being largely...... a consequence of the reflexive and material nature of art making.  This generally intuitive interaction between artist and work is the essence of ‘material thinking', ways of making in which thoughts and concepts are evolved through the interrelationship with the material handling and physical artwork....... By consciously framing art-making within a formal or ‘managed' structure it is proposed that ‘material thinking' can mediate a 'wandering' of concerns between the organisational sphere and the subjective, individual inquiry of the artist. Addittionally, because of the constantly changing dynamic of its own ways...

  18. Unexpected benefits of deciding by mind wandering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giblin, Colleen E; Morewedge, Carey K; Norton, Michael I

    2013-01-01

    The mind wanders, even when people are attempting to make complex decisions. We suggest that mind wandering-allowing one's thoughts to wander until the "correct" choice comes to mind-can positively impact people's feelings about their decisions. We compare post-choice satisfaction from choices made by mind wandering to reason-based choices and randomly assigned outcomes. Participants chose a poster by mind wandering or deliberating, or were randomly assigned a poster. Whereas forecasters predicted that participants who chose by mind wandering would evaluate their outcome as inferior to participants who deliberated (Experiment 1), participants who used mind wandering as a decision strategy evaluated their choice just as positively as did participants who used deliberation (Experiment 2). In some cases, it appears that people can spare themselves the effort of deliberation and instead "decide by wind wandering," yet experience no decrease in satisfaction.

  19. Unexpected Benefits of Deciding by Mind Wandering

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The mind wanders, even when people are attempting to make complex decisions. We suggest that mind wandering—allowing one's thoughts to wander until the “correct” choice comes to mind—can positively impact people's feelings about their decisions. We compare post-choice satisfaction from choices made by mind wandering to reason-based choices and randomly assigned outcomes. Participants chose a poster by mind wandering or deliberating, or were randomly assigned a poster. Whereas forecasters pred...

  20. An Invitation to Wander

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavrova L.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available "An invitation to wander" is Lyudmila Lavrova’s introduction to the book Contrasts, collection of poems by Hamlet Isaxanli which were translated from Azerbaijani into Russian by Alla Akhundova (Izograf, Moscow, 2006. Lavrova describes Isaxanli’s poetry as "transparent and simple", comparing him to a medieval Arab-Islamic philosopher because of the themes throughout his works of "Many and One". Even in small details of life and nature, he finds cause to revere the Divine. His poetry is also notable for its connection to mathematics and its foundation of reason. This is logical given Isakhanli’s background as a mathematician; Lavrova offers an extensive biography of the poet and a list of awards he has won. Despite the mathematic and rational foundations of his work, his poetry is not limited to being appreciated by a Western audience; Lavrova points out that Isakhanli’s poetry is also considered beautiful by Eastern standards of aesthetics. In fact, from an Eastern perspective, even more important than his "success" is his personal character, which is also worthy of esteem. Lavrova also discusses the origins of his inspiration for his works, concluding that the goal of Isakhanli’s poetry is to "nurture morality".‖

  1. Long-term trends of nutrients and apparent oxygen utilization South of the polar front in Southern Ocean intermediate water from 1965 to 2008.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Iida

    Full Text Available The variation of nutrients over decadal timescales south of the polar front in the Southern Ocean is poorly known because of a lack of continuous observational data in this area. We examined data from long-term continuous hydrographic monitoring of 43 years (1965-2008 in the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean, via the resupply of Antarctic stations under the Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition and Australian Antarctic Research Expedition. We found significant increasing trends in phosphate and nitrate, and a decreasing trend in apparent oxygen utilization (AOU in intermediate water (neutral density = 27.8-28.1 kgm(-3 south of the polar front. The rates of phosphate and nitrate increase are 0.004 µmol yr(-1 and 0.02 µmol yr(-1, respectively. The rate of decline of AOU was 0.32 µmol yr(-1. One reason for this phosphate and nitrate increase and AOU decline is reduced horizontal advection of North Atlantic Deep Water, which is characterized by low nutrients and high AOU. The relationship between climate change and nutrient variability remains obscure, emphasizing the importance of long-term monitoring.

  2. Long-term trends of nutrients and apparent oxygen utilization South of the polar front in Southern Ocean intermediate water from 1965 to 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Takahiro; Odate, Tsuneo; Fukuchi, Mitsuo

    2013-01-01

    The variation of nutrients over decadal timescales south of the polar front in the Southern Ocean is poorly known because of a lack of continuous observational data in this area. We examined data from long-term continuous hydrographic monitoring of 43 years (1965-2008) in the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean, via the resupply of Antarctic stations under the Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition and Australian Antarctic Research Expedition. We found significant increasing trends in phosphate and nitrate, and a decreasing trend in apparent oxygen utilization (AOU) in intermediate water (neutral density = 27.8-28.1 kgm(-3)) south of the polar front. The rates of phosphate and nitrate increase are 0.004 µmol yr(-1) and 0.02 µmol yr(-1), respectively. The rate of decline of AOU was 0.32 µmol yr(-1). One reason for this phosphate and nitrate increase and AOU decline is reduced horizontal advection of North Atlantic Deep Water, which is characterized by low nutrients and high AOU. The relationship between climate change and nutrient variability remains obscure, emphasizing the importance of long-term monitoring.

  3. Mind-Wandering With and Without Intention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seli, Paul; Risko, Evan F; Smilek, Daniel; Schacter, Daniel L

    2016-08-01

    The past decade has seen a surge of research examining mind-wandering, but most of this research has not considered the potential importance of distinguishing between intentional and unintentional mind-wandering. However, a recent series of papers have demonstrated that mind-wandering reported in empirical investigations frequently occurs with and without intention, and, more crucially, that intentional and unintentional mind-wandering are dissociable. This emerging literature suggests that, to increase clarity in the literature, there is a need to reconsider the bulk of the mind-wandering literature with an eye toward deconvolving these two different cognitive experiences. In this review we highlight recent trends in investigations of the intentionality of mind-wandering, and we outline a novel theoretical framework regarding the mechanisms underlying intentional and unintentional mind-wandering.

  4. My wanderings with the tiple

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Velosa Ruis

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available From the “Fifth” we’ve been invited To talk long about the tiple And each one started telling  His own feelings and his thoughts; If you really want to know, That’s what I said right away About my wanderings with it Through sixty Aprils, even more.

  5. MODY-like diabetes associated with an apparently balanced translocation: possible involvement of MPP7 gene and cell polarity in the pathogenesis of diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartov Guy

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Characterization of disease-associated balanced translocations has led to the discovery of genes responsible for many disorders, including syndromes that include various forms of diabetes mellitus. We studied a man with unexplained maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY-like diabetes and an apparently balanced translocation [46,XY,t(7;10(q22;p12] and sought to identify a novel diabetes locus by characterizing the translocation breakpoints. Results Mutations in coding exons and splice sites of known MODY genes were first ruled out by PCR amplification and DNA sequencing. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH studies demonstrated that the translocation did not disrupt two known diabetes-related genes on 10p12. The translocation breakpoints were further mapped to high resolution using FISH and somatic cell hybrids and the junctions PCR-amplified and sequenced. The translocation did not disrupt any annotated transcription unit. However, the chromosome 10 breakpoint was 220 kilobases 5' to the Membrane Protein, Palmitoylated 7 (MPP7 gene, which encodes a protein required for proper cell polarity. This biological function is shared by HNF4A, a known MODY gene. Databases show MPP7 is highly expressed in mouse pancreas and is expressed in human islets. The translocation did not appear to alter lymphoblastoid expression of MPP7 or other genes near the breakpoints. Conclusion The balanced translocation and MODY-like diabetes in the proband could be coincidental. Alternatively, the translocation may cause islet cell dysfunction by altering MPP7 expression in a subtle or tissue-specific fashion. The potential roles of MPP7 mutations in diabetes and perturbed islet cell polarity in insulin secretion warrant further study.

  6. Can mind-wandering be timeless? Atemporal focus and aging in mind-wandering paradigms

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has examined how often mind-wandering occurs about past vs. future events. However, mind-wandering may also be atemporal, although previous investigations of this possibility have not yielded consistent results. Indeed, it is unclear what proportion of mind-wandering is atemporal, and also how an atemporal response option would affect the future-oriented bias often reported during low-demand tasks used to measure mind-wandering. The present study examined self-reported (Experi...

  7. A Neural Model of Mind Wandering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittner, Matthias; Hawkins, Guy E; Boekel, Wouter; Forstmann, Birte U

    2016-08-01

    The role of the default-mode network (DMN) in the emergence of mind wandering and task-unrelated thought has been studied extensively. In parallel work, mind wandering has been associated with neuromodulation via the locus coeruleus (LC) norepinephrine (LC-NE) system. Here we propose a neural model that links the two systems in an integrative framework. The model attempts to explain how dynamic changes in brain systems give rise to the subjective experience of mind wandering. The model implies a neural and conceptual distinction between an off-focus state and an active mind-wandering state and provides a potential neural grounding for well-known cognitive theories of mind wandering. Finally, the proposed neural model of mind wandering generates precise, testable predictions at neural and behavioral levels.

  8. Can mind-wandering be timeless? Atemporal focus and aging in mind-wandering paradigms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan David Jackson

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent research has examined how often mind-wandering occurs about past versus future events. However, mind-wandering may also be atemporal, although previous investigations of this possibility have not yielded consistent results. Indeed, it is unclear what proportion of mind-wandering is atemporal, and also how an atemporal response option would affect the future oriented bias often reported during low-demand tasks used to measure mind-wandering. The present study examined self-reported (Experiment 1 and probe-caught (Experiment 2 mind-wandering using the low-demand Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART in younger (18-30 and older (50-73 adults in an experimental paradigm developed to measure mind-wandering in a sample using Amazon’s Mechanical Turk. Across self-reported and probe-caught mind-wandering, the atemporal response option was used at least as frequently as past or future mind-wandering options. Although older adults reported far fewer mind-wandering events, they showed a very similar temporal pattern to younger adults. Most importantly, inclusion of the atemporal report option affected performance on the SART and selectively eliminated the prospective bias in self-reported mind-wandering, but not in probe-caught mind-wandering. These results suggest that both young and older participants are often not thinking of past or future events when mind-wandering, but are thinking of events that cannot easily be categorized as either.

  9. Can mind-wandering be timeless? Atemporal focus and aging in mind-wandering paradigms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jonathan D.; Weinstein, Yana; Balota, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has examined how often mind-wandering occurs about past vs. future events. However, mind-wandering may also be atemporal, although previous investigations of this possibility have not yielded consistent results. Indeed, it is unclear what proportion of mind-wandering is atemporal, and also how an atemporal response option would affect the future-oriented bias often reported during low-demand tasks used to measure mind-wandering. The present study examined self-reported (Experiment 1) and probe-caught (Experiment 2) mind-wandering using the low-demand Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART) in younger (18–30) and older (50–73) adults in an experimental paradigm developed to measure mind-wandering using Amazon's Mechanical Turk (Mturk). Across self-reported and probe-caught mind-wandering, the atemporal response option was used at least as frequently as past or future mind-wandering options. Although older adults reported far fewer mind-wandering events, they showed a very similar temporal pattern to younger adults. Most importantly, inclusion of the atemporal report option affected performance on the SART and selectively eliminated the prospective bias in self-reported mind-wandering, but not in probe-caught mind-wandering. These results suggest that both young and older participants are often not thinking of past or future events when mind-wandering, but are thinking of events that cannot easily be categorized as either. PMID:24137147

  10. Can mind-wandering be timeless? Atemporal focus and aging in mind-wandering paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jonathan D; Weinstein, Yana; Balota, David A

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has examined how often mind-wandering occurs about past vs. future events. However, mind-wandering may also be atemporal, although previous investigations of this possibility have not yielded consistent results. Indeed, it is unclear what proportion of mind-wandering is atemporal, and also how an atemporal response option would affect the future-oriented bias often reported during low-demand tasks used to measure mind-wandering. The present study examined self-reported (Experiment 1) and probe-caught (Experiment 2) mind-wandering using the low-demand Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART) in younger (18-30) and older (50-73) adults in an experimental paradigm developed to measure mind-wandering using Amazon's Mechanical Turk (Mturk). Across self-reported and probe-caught mind-wandering, the atemporal response option was used at least as frequently as past or future mind-wandering options. Although older adults reported far fewer mind-wandering events, they showed a very similar temporal pattern to younger adults. Most importantly, inclusion of the atemporal report option affected performance on the SART and selectively eliminated the prospective bias in self-reported mind-wandering, but not in probe-caught mind-wandering. These results suggest that both young and older participants are often not thinking of past or future events when mind-wandering, but are thinking of events that cannot easily be categorized as either.

  11. Wandering Motive and Its Appeal on Reluctantly Wandering Franz Schubert

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana Jeremić-Molnar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Franz Schubert was not generous in commenting his own creative procedures, or in revealing his artistic inspirations. Therefore, it is even today not clear why Wilhelm Müller’s collection of poems entitled Winter journey attracted Schubert so strongly that he was so determined to set it as a whole to the music. In this article the author mentions, and rejects as well, couple of commonly accepted interpretations. The path to the lieder cycle Winter journey was paved neither by Schubert’s identification with the main character – outcast overwhelmed by desperation and anticipation of the approaching death – and his strange ways of experiencing the world; neither by composer’s acceptance of impious beliefs hidden in Müller’s poems. The author argues that both poet and composer of Winter journey shared the affinity for the wandering (and wanderer motive which was one of the central topics in the rising romantic Weltanschauung. Schubert was dealing with this motive from 1815 until his death mainly in his lieder, sometimes in very complex manner. In order to understand the real nature of Schubert’s artistic rapprochement to the motive of wandering, the author was obliged to consider and, at the first place, evaluate the works of scholars (such as Theodor Adorno, David Gramit, and Jeffrey Perry who have been dealing with this problem. After that the author focuses her attention to the narrative entitled My dream, the most extensive and enigmatic writing left behind Schubert; she analyses the role of wandering in it, arguing that Schubert was participating in the spiritual currents of his time even unconsciously and trying to adapt them in order to serve as the solutions to his own existent ional dilemmas. Finally, she concludes that the composer was very sensitive for the complexity of the phenomena of wandering, when romantic Weltanschauung was at its peak, and eager to come to terms with this complexity artistically, paying the most

  12. Towards a neuroscience of mind-wandering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal eGruberger

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Mind wandering is among the most robust and permanent expressions of human conscious awareness, classically regarded by philosophers, clinicians and scientists as a core element of an intact sense of self. Nevertheless, the scientific exploration of mind wandering poses unique challenges; mind wandering is by nature a spontaneous, off-task, internal mental process which is often unaware and usually difficult to control, document or replicate. Consequently, there is a lack of accepted modus operandi for exploring mind wandering in a laboratory setup, leading to a relatively small amount of studies regarding the neural basis of mind wandering.In order to facilitate scientific examination of mind wandering the current review categorizes recent literature into five suggested strategies. Each strategy represents a different methodology of mind wandering research within functional neuroimaging paradigms.Particular attention is paid to resting state brain activity and to the ‘default mode’ network. Since the default network is known to exert high activity levels during off-task conditions, it stands out as a compelling candidate in mind wandering research which in of itself is a rest based phenomenon. By summarizing the results within and across strategies we suggest further insights into the neural basis and adaptive value of mind wandering, a truly intriguing and unique human experience.

  13. Wandering in both mind and body: individual differences in mind wandering and inattention predict fidgeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carriere, Jonathan S A; Seli, Paul; Smilek, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    Anecdotal reports suggest that during periods of inattention or mind wandering, people tend to experience increased fidgeting. In four studies, we examined whether individual differences in the tendency to be inattentive and to mind wander in everyday life are related to the tendency to make spontaneous and involuntary movements (i.e., to fidget). To do so, we developed self-report measures of spontaneous and deliberate mind wandering, as well as a self-report scale to index fidgeting. In addition, we used several existing self-report measures of inattentiveness, attentional control, and memory failures. Across our studies, a series of multiple regression analyses indicated that fidgeting was uniquely predicted by inattentiveness and spontaneous mind wandering but not by other related factors, including deliberate mind wandering, attentional control, and memory failures. As a result, we suggest that only spontaneously wandering thoughts are related to a wandering body.

  14. Boethian similitude in 'Deor' and The 'Wanderer'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langeslag, Paul S.

    2008-01-01

    None of the many claims that either Deor or The Wanderer has received formative influence from Boethius's De consolatione Philosophiae is without problems. In an analysis of concepts like fate and Providence as used in The Wanderer and the Latin and Old English redactions of the Consolatio, it

  15. The neurotic wandering mind: An individual differences investigation of neuroticism, mind-wandering, and executive control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robison, Matthew K; Gath, Katherine I; Unsworth, Nash

    2017-04-01

    Cognitive psychology and cognitive neuroscience have recently developed a keen interest in the phenomenon of mind-wandering. People mind-wander frequently, and mind-wandering is associated with decreased cognitive performance. But why do people mind-wander so much? Previous investigations have focused on cognitive abilities like working memory capacity and attention control. But an individual's tendency to worry, feel anxious, and entertain personal concerns also influences mind-wandering. The Control Failure × Concerns model of mind-wandering. Psychological Bulletin, 136, 188-197] argues that individual differences in the propensity to mind-wander are jointly determined by cognitive abilities and by the presence of personally salient concerns that intrude on task focus. In order to test this model, we investigated individual differences in mind-wandering, executive attention, and personality with a focus on neuroticism. The results showed that neurotic individuals tended to report more mind-wandering during cognitive tasks, lower working memory capacity, and poorer attention control. Thus the trait of neuroticism adds an additional source of variance in the tendency to mind-wander, which offers support for the Control Failure × Concerns model. The results help bridge the fields of clinical psychology, cognitive psychology, affective neuroscience, and cognitive neuroscience as a means of developing a more complete understanding of the complex relationship between cognition, personality, and emotion.

  16. Individual variation in intentionality in the mind-wandering state is reflected in the integration of the default-mode, fronto-parietal, and limbic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golchert, Johannes; Smallwood, Jonathan; Jefferies, Elizabeth; Seli, Paul; Huntenburg, Julia M; Liem, Franziskus; Lauckner, Mark E; Oligschläger, Sabine; Bernhardt, Boris C; Villringer, Arno; Margulies, Daniel S

    2017-02-01

    Mind-wandering has a controversial relationship with cognitive control. Existing psychological evidence supports the hypothesis that episodes of mind-wandering reflect a failure to constrain thinking to task-relevant material, as well the apparently alternative view that control can facilitate the expression of self-generated mental content. We assessed whether this apparent contradiction arises because of a failure to consider differences in the types of thoughts that occur during mind-wandering, and in particular, the associated level of intentionality. Using multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) analysis, we examined the cortical organisation that underlies inter-individual differences in descriptions of the spontaneous or deliberate nature of mind-wandering. Cortical thickness, as well as functional connectivity analyses, implicated regions relevant to cognitive control and regions of the default-mode network for individuals who reported high rates of deliberate mind-wandering. In contrast, higher reports of spontaneous mind-wandering were associated with cortical thinning in parietal and posterior temporal regions in the left hemisphere (which are important in the control of cognition and attention) as well as heightened connectivity between the intraparietal sulcus and a region that spanned limbic and default-mode regions in the ventral inferior frontal gyrus. Finally, we observed a dissociation in the thickness of the retrosplenial cortex/lingual gyrus, with higher reports of spontaneous mind-wandering being associated with thickening in the left hemisphere, and higher repots of deliberate mind-wandering with thinning in the right hemisphere. These results suggest that the intentionality of the mind-wandering state depends on integration between the control and default-mode networks, with more deliberation being associated with greater integration between these systems. We conclude that one reason why mind-wandering has a controversial relationship

  17. Children's mental time travel during mind wandering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Qun; Song, Xiaolan; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Qinqin

    2014-01-01

    The prospective bias is a salient feature of mind wandering in healthy adults, yet little is known about the temporal focus of children's mind wandering. In the present study, (I) we developed the temporal focus of mind wandering questionnaire for school-age children (TFMWQ-C), a 12-item scale with good test-retest reliability and construct validity. (II) The criterion validity was tested by thought sampling in both choice reaction time task and working memory task. A positive correlation was found between the temporal focus measured by the questionnaire and the one adopted during task-unrelated thoughts (TUTs) by thought sampling probes, especially in the trait level of future-oriented mind wandering. At the same time, children who experienced more TUTs tended to show worse behavioral performance during tasks. (III) The children in both tasks experienced more future-oriented TUTs than past-oriented ones, which was congruent with the results observed in adults; however, in contrast with previous research on adults, the prospective bias was not influenced by task demands. Together these results indicate that the prospective bias of mind wandering has emerged since the school-age (9∼13 years old), and that the relationship between mental time travel (MTT) during mind wandering and the use of cognitive resources differs between children and adults. Our study provides new insights into how this interesting feature of mind wandering may adaptively contribute to the development of children's MTT.

  18. Intrusive thoughts: linking spontaneous mind wandering and OCD symptomatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seli, Paul; Risko, Evan F; Purdon, Christine; Smilek, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    One recent line of research in the literature on mind wandering has been concerned with examining rates of mind wandering in special populations, such as those characterized by attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, dysphoria, and schizophrenia. To best conceptualize mind wandering in studies examining special populations, it has recently been suggested that researchers distinguish between deliberate and spontaneous subtypes of this experience. Extending this line of research on mind wandering in special populations, in a large non-clinical sample (N = 2636), we examined how rates of deliberate and spontaneous mind wandering vary with symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Results indicate that, whereas deliberate mind wandering is not associated with OCD symptomatology, spontaneous mind wandering is, with higher reports of spontaneous mind wandering being associated with higher reports of OCD symptoms. We discuss the implications of these results for understanding both mind wandering and OCD.

  19. Wandering Skipper Survey Observations 2010 [ds666

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The wandering skipper (Panoquina errans) is a small butterfly of the family Hesperiidae. It is identifiable by its rich dark brown color and cream-colored spots on...

  20. Not all mind wandering is created equal: dissociating deliberate from spontaneous mind wandering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seli, Paul; Carriere, Jonathan S A; Smilek, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    In two large samples we show a dissociation between trait-level tendencies to mind-wander spontaneously (unintentionally) and deliberately (intentionally). Participants completed online versions of the Mind Wandering Spontaneous (MW-S) and the Mind Wandering Deliberate (MW-D) self-report scales and the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ). The results revealed that deliberate and spontaneous mind wandering were uniquely associated with some factors of the FFMQ. Notably, while the MW-D and the MW-S were positively associated with each other, the MW-D was uniquely positively associated with the 'Non-Reactivity to Inner Experience' factor of the FFMQ, whereas the MW-S was uniquely negatively associated with this factor. We also showed that conflating deliberate and spontaneous mind wandering can result in a misunderstanding of how mind wandering is related to other traits. We recommend that studies assessing individual differences in mind wandering should distinguish between deliberate and spontaneous subtypes of mind wandering to avoid possibly erroneous conclusions.

  1. Your Mind Wanders Weakly, Your Mind Wanders Deeply: Objective Measures Reveal Mindless Reading at Different Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schad, Daniel J.; Nuthmann, Antje; Engbert, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Time Factors (Learning);When the mind wanders, attention turns away from the external environment and cognitive processing is decoupled from perceptual information. Mind wandering is usually treated as a dichotomy (dichotomy-hypothesis), and is often measured using self-reports. Here, we propose the levels of inattention hypothesis, which…

  2. Wandering Minds and Wavering Rhythms: Linking Mind Wandering and Behavioral Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seli, Paul; Cheyne, James Allan; Smilek, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Mind wandering is a pervasive feature of human cognition often associated with the withdrawal of task-related executive control processes. Here, we explore the possibility that, in tasks requiring executive control to sustain consistent responding, moments of mind wandering could be associated with moments of increased behavioral variability. To…

  3. A wandering spleen: A common presentation of an uncommon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wandering spleen is a rare entity with less than 500 cases reported in literature so far. Method: This case report ... spleen.7 The noninvasiveness of ultrasonography makes ... Abell I. Wandering spleen with torsion of the pedicle. Ann Surg ...

  4. Phenomenology of future-oriented mind-wandering episodes

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Recent research suggests that prospective and non-prospective forms of mind-wandering possess distinct properties, yet little is known about what exactly differentiates between future-oriented and non-future-oriented mind-wandering episodes. In the present study, we used multilevel exploratory factor analyses (MEFA) to examine the factorial structure of various phenomenological dimensions of mind-wandering, and we then investigated whether future-oriented mind-wandering episodes differ from o...

  5. Phenomenology of future-oriented mind-wandering episodes

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Recent research suggests that prospective and non-prospective forms of mind-wandering possess distinct properties, yet little is known about what exactly differentiate between future-oriented and non-future-oriented mind-wandering episodes. In the present study, we used multilevel exploratory factor analyses to examine the factorial structure of various phenomenological dimensions of mind-wandering, and we then investigated whether future-oriented mind-wandering episodes differ from other cla...

  6. Phenomenology of future-oriented mind-wandering episodes

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Recent research suggests that prospective and non-prospective forms of mind-wandering possess distinct properties, yet little is known about what exactly differentiates between future-oriented and non-future-oriented mind-wandering episodes. In the present study, we used multilevel exploratory factor analyses to examine the factorial structure of various phenomenological dimensions of mind-wandering, and we then investigated whether future-oriented mind-wandering episodes differ from other cl...

  7. Are FRB Wandering Narrow Beams?

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, J I

    2016-01-01

    It is generally assumed that the sources of Fast Radio Bursts radiate roughly isotropically, so that the observed low duty cycle of any individual source indicates a similar low duty cycle of its radio-frequency emission. An alternative hypothesis is that the radiative duty cycle is ${\\cal O}(1)$, but that the radiation is emitted in a beam with a solid angle comparable to the observed duty cycle, whose direction wanders or sweeps across the sky. This hypothesis relaxes the extreme power demands of isotropically radiating models of FRB at the price of multiplying the number of sources. The constraints on pulsar models are relaxed; rather than being unprecedentedly fast-spinning and highly-magnetized with short spin-down times, their parameters may be closer to those of typical radio pulsars. The nanoshots of Galactic pulsars pose analogous energetic problems that may be resolved if their emission also is beamed, suggesting a relation between these phenomena, despite their vastly different energy scales.

  8. Not all minds that wander are lost: the importance of a balanced perspective on the mind-wandering state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Jonathan; Andrews-Hanna, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    The waking mind is often occupied with mental contents that are minimally constrained by events in the here and now. These self-generated thoughts-e.g., mind-wandering or daydreaming-interfere with external task performance and can be a marker for unhappiness and even psychiatric problems. They also occupy our thoughts for upwards of half of the time, and under non-demanding conditions they (i) allow us to connect our past and future selves together, (ii) help us make successful long-term plans and (iii) can provide a source of creative inspiration. The lengths that the mind goes to self-generate thought, coupled with its apparent functionality, suggest that the mind places a higher priority on such cognition than on many other mental acts. Although mind-wandering may be unpleasant for the individual who experiences it and disruptive to the tasks of the moment, self-generated thought allows consciousness freedom from the here and now and so reflects a key evolutionary adaptation for the mind. Here we synthesize recent literature from cognitive and clinical psychology and propose two formal hypotheses that (1) highlight task context and thought content as critical factors that constrain the costs and benefits of self-generated thought and (2) provide direction on ways to investigate the costs and benefits from an impartial perspective.

  9. Apparent Oxygen Uphill Diffusion in La0.8Sr0.2MnO3 Thin Films upon Cathodic Polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Tobias M; Navickas, Edvinas; Friedbacher, Gernot; Hutter, Herbert; Fleig, Jürgen

    2015-10-01

    The impact of cathodic bias on oxygen transport in La0.8Sr0.2MnO3 (LSM) thin films was investigated. Columnar-grown LSM thin films with different microstructures were deposited by pulsed laser deposition. (18)O tracer experiments were performed on thin film microelectrodes with an applied cathodic bias of -300 or -450 mV, and the microelectrodes were subsequently analyzed by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. The (18)O concentration in the cathodically polarized LSM microelectrodes was strongly increased relative to that in the thermally annealed film (without bias). Most remarkable, however, was the appearance of a pronounced (18)O fraction maximum in the center of the films. This strongly depended on the applied bias and on the microstructure of the LSM thin layers. The unusual shape of the (18)O depth profiles was caused by a combination of Wagner-Hebb-type stoichiometry polarization of the LSM bulk, fast grain boundary transport and voltage-induced modification of the oxygen incorporation kinetics.

  10. Phenomenology of future-oriented mind-wandering episodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawarczyk, David; Cassol, Helena; D'Argembeau, Arnaud

    2013-01-01

    Recent research suggests that prospective and non-prospective forms of mind-wandering possess distinct properties, yet little is known about what exactly differentiates between future-oriented and non-future-oriented mind-wandering episodes. In the present study, we used multilevel exploratory factor analyses (MEFA) to examine the factorial structure of various phenomenological dimensions of mind-wandering, and we then investigated whether future-oriented mind-wandering episodes differ from other classes of mind-wandering along the identified factors. We found that the phenomenological dimensions of mind-wandering are structured in four factors: representational format (inner speech vs. visual imagery), personal relevance, realism/concreteness, and structuration. Prospective mind-wandering differed from non-prospective mind-wandering along each of these factors. Specifically, future-oriented mind-wandering episodes involved inner speech to a greater extent, were more personally relevant, more realistic/concrete, and more often part of structured sequences of thoughts. These results show that future-oriented mind-wandering possesses a unique phenomenological signature and provide new insights into how this particular form of mind-wandering may adaptively contribute to autobiographical planning.

  11. Mind wandering and the attention network system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Óscar F; Rêgo, Gabriel; Oliveira-Silva, Patrícia; Leite, Jorge; Carvalho, Sandra; Fregni, Felipe; Amaro, Edson; Boggio, Paulo S

    2017-01-01

    Attention and mind wandering are often seen as anticorrelated. However, both attention and mind wandering are multi-component processes, and their relationship may be more complex than previously thought. In this study, we tested the interference of different types of thoughts as measured by a Thought Identification Task - TIT (on task thoughts, task related interference thoughts, external distractions, stimulus independent and task unrelated thoughts) on different components of the attention network system - ANT (alerting, orienting, executive). Results show that, during the ANT, individuals were predominantly involved in task related interference thoughts which, along with external distractors, significantly impaired their performance accuracy. However, mind wandering (i.e., stimulus independent and task unrelated thoughts) did not significantly interfere with accuracy in the ANT. No significant relationship was found between type of thoughts and alerting, orienting, or executive effects in the ANT. While task related interference thoughts and external distractions seemed to impair performance on the attention task, mind wandering was still compatible with satisfactory performance in the ANT. The present results confirmed the importance of differentiating type of "out of task" thoughts in studying the relationship between though distractors and attention.

  12. On the relation of mind wandering and ADHD symptomatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seli, Paul; Smallwood, Jonathan; Cheyne, James Allan; Smilek, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    Mind wandering seems to be a prototypical feature of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, an important emerging distinction of mind-wandering types hinges on whether a given episode of mind wandering reflects a failure of executive control (spontaneous mind wandering) or the engagement of controlled processes for internal processing (deliberate mind wandering). Here we distinguish between spontaneous and deliberate mind wandering and test the hypothesis that symptoms of ADHD are associated with the former but not the latter. We assessed ADHD symptomatology and everyday levels of deliberate and spontaneous mind wandering in two large non-clinical samples (Ns = 1,354). In addition, to provide converging evidence, we examined rates of deliberate and spontaneous mind wandering in a clinically diagnosed ADHD sample. Results provide clear evidence that spontaneous, but not deliberate, mind wandering is a central feature of ADHD symptomatology at both the clinical and non-clinical level. We discuss the implications of these results for understanding both ADHD and mind wandering.

  13. Mind wandering, sleep quality, affect and chronotype: an exploratory study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Carciofo

    Full Text Available Poor sleep quality impairs cognition, including executive functions and concentration, but there has been little direct research on the relationships between sleep quality and mind wandering or daydreaming. Evening chronotype is associated with poor sleep quality, more mind wandering and more daydreaming; negative affect is also a mutual correlate. This exploratory study investigated how mind wandering and daydreaming are related to different aspects of sleep quality, and whether sleep quality influences the relationships between mind wandering/daydreaming and negative affect, and mind wandering/daydreaming and chronotype. Three surveys (Ns = 213; 190; 270 were completed with Chinese adults aged 18-50, including measures of sleep quality, daytime sleepiness, mind wandering, daydreaming, chronotype and affect (positive and negative. Higher frequencies of mind wandering and daydreaming were associated with poorer sleep quality, in particular with poor subjective sleep quality and increased sleep latency, night-time disturbance, daytime dysfunction and daytime sleepiness. Poor sleep quality was found to partially mediate the relationships between daydreaming and negative affect, and mind wandering and negative affect. Additionally, low positive affect and poor sleep quality, in conjunction, fully mediated the relationships between chronotype and mind wandering, and chronotype and daydreaming. The relationships between mind wandering/daydreaming and positive affect were also moderated by chronotype, being weaker in those with a morning preference. Finally, while daytime sleepiness was positively correlated with daydream frequency, it was negatively correlated with a measure of problem-solving daydreams, indicating that more refined distinctions between different forms of daydreaming or mind wandering are warranted. Overall, the evidence is suggestive of a bi-directional relationship between poor sleep quality and mind wandering/daydreaming, which

  14. Mind wandering, sleep quality, affect and chronotype: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carciofo, Richard; Du, Feng; Song, Nan; Zhang, Kan

    2014-01-01

    Poor sleep quality impairs cognition, including executive functions and concentration, but there has been little direct research on the relationships between sleep quality and mind wandering or daydreaming. Evening chronotype is associated with poor sleep quality, more mind wandering and more daydreaming; negative affect is also a mutual correlate. This exploratory study investigated how mind wandering and daydreaming are related to different aspects of sleep quality, and whether sleep quality influences the relationships between mind wandering/daydreaming and negative affect, and mind wandering/daydreaming and chronotype. Three surveys (Ns = 213; 190; 270) were completed with Chinese adults aged 18-50, including measures of sleep quality, daytime sleepiness, mind wandering, daydreaming, chronotype and affect (positive and negative). Higher frequencies of mind wandering and daydreaming were associated with poorer sleep quality, in particular with poor subjective sleep quality and increased sleep latency, night-time disturbance, daytime dysfunction and daytime sleepiness. Poor sleep quality was found to partially mediate the relationships between daydreaming and negative affect, and mind wandering and negative affect. Additionally, low positive affect and poor sleep quality, in conjunction, fully mediated the relationships between chronotype and mind wandering, and chronotype and daydreaming. The relationships between mind wandering/daydreaming and positive affect were also moderated by chronotype, being weaker in those with a morning preference. Finally, while daytime sleepiness was positively correlated with daydream frequency, it was negatively correlated with a measure of problem-solving daydreams, indicating that more refined distinctions between different forms of daydreaming or mind wandering are warranted. Overall, the evidence is suggestive of a bi-directional relationship between poor sleep quality and mind wandering/daydreaming, which may be important in

  15. Mind Wandering, Sleep Quality, Affect and Chronotype: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carciofo, Richard; Du, Feng; Song, Nan; Zhang, Kan

    2014-01-01

    Poor sleep quality impairs cognition, including executive functions and concentration, but there has been little direct research on the relationships between sleep quality and mind wandering or daydreaming. Evening chronotype is associated with poor sleep quality, more mind wandering and more daydreaming; negative affect is also a mutual correlate. This exploratory study investigated how mind wandering and daydreaming are related to different aspects of sleep quality, and whether sleep quality influences the relationships between mind wandering/daydreaming and negative affect, and mind wandering/daydreaming and chronotype. Three surveys (Ns = 213; 190; 270) were completed with Chinese adults aged 18–50, including measures of sleep quality, daytime sleepiness, mind wandering, daydreaming, chronotype and affect (positive and negative). Higher frequencies of mind wandering and daydreaming were associated with poorer sleep quality, in particular with poor subjective sleep quality and increased sleep latency, night-time disturbance, daytime dysfunction and daytime sleepiness. Poor sleep quality was found to partially mediate the relationships between daydreaming and negative affect, and mind wandering and negative affect. Additionally, low positive affect and poor sleep quality, in conjunction, fully mediated the relationships between chronotype and mind wandering, and chronotype and daydreaming. The relationships between mind wandering/daydreaming and positive affect were also moderated by chronotype, being weaker in those with a morning preference. Finally, while daytime sleepiness was positively correlated with daydream frequency, it was negatively correlated with a measure of problem-solving daydreams, indicating that more refined distinctions between different forms of daydreaming or mind wandering are warranted. Overall, the evidence is suggestive of a bi-directional relationship between poor sleep quality and mind wandering/daydreaming, which may be

  16. Differential recruitment of executive resources during mind wandering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, Julia W Y; Handy, Todd C

    2014-05-01

    Recent research has shown that mind wandering recruits executive resources away from the external task towards inner thoughts. No studies however have determined whether executive functions are drawn away in a unitary manner during mind wandering episodes, or whether there is variation in specific functions impacted. Accordingly, we examined whether mind wandering differentially modulates three core executive functions-response inhibition, updating of working memory, and mental set shifting. In three experiments, participants performed one of these three executive function tasks and reported their attentional state as either on-task or mind wandering at random intervals. We found that mind wandering led to poorer performance in the response inhibition and working memory tasks, but not the set-shifting task. These findings suggest that mind wandering does not recruit executive functions in a monolithic manner. Rather, it appears to selectively engage certain executive functions, which may reflect the adaptive maintenance of ongoing task performance.

  17. On the influence of re-reading on mind wandering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Natalie E; Mills, Caitlin; D'Mello, Sidney; Risko, Evan F

    2016-12-01

    Re-reading has been shown to have a minimal benefit on text comprehension, in comparison to reading only once or other types of study techniques (e.g., testing; self-explanation). In two experiments we examined the effect of re-reading on mind wandering. Participants read two texts, during which they responded to intermittent mind wandering probes. One text was read once and the other twice. Consistent with previous findings, there was no effect of re-reading on comprehension even though participants reported feeling more competent when they re-read the text. Critically, participants mind wandered more while re-reading. Furthermore, the effect of re-reading on mind wandering was specific to intentional forms of mind wandering rather than unintentional. The implications of these results for understanding mind wandering and the limited effectiveness of re-reading as a mnemonic are discussed.

  18. Your mind wanders weakly, your mind wanders deeply: objective measures reveal mindless reading at different levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schad, Daniel J; Nuthmann, Antje; Engbert, Ralf

    2012-11-01

    When the mind wanders, attention turns away from the external environment and cognitive processing is decoupled from perceptual information. Mind wandering is usually treated as a dichotomy (dichotomy-hypothesis), and is often measured using self-reports. Here, we propose the levels of inattention hypothesis, which postulates attentional decoupling to graded degrees at different hierarchical levels of cognitive processing. To measure graded levels of attentional decoupling during reading we introduce the sustained attention to stimulus task (SAST), which is based on psychophysics of error detection. Under experimental conditions likely to induce mind wandering, we found that subjects were less likely to notice errors that required high-level processing for their detection as opposed to errors that only required low-level processing. Eye tracking revealed that before errors were overlooked influences of high- and low-level linguistic variables on eye fixations were reduced in a graded fashion, indicating episodes of mindless reading at weak and deep levels. Individual fixation durations predicted overlooking of lexical errors 5s before they occurred. Our findings support the levels of inattention hypothesis and suggest that different levels of mindless reading can be measured behaviorally in the SAST. Using eye tracking to detect mind wandering online represents a promising approach for the development of new techniques to study mind wandering and to ameliorate its negative consequences. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Mind wandering, sleep quality, affect and chronotype: an exploratory study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carciofo, Richard; Du, Feng; Song, Nan; Zhang, Kan

    2014-01-01

    Poor sleep quality impairs cognition, including executive functions and concentration, but there has been little direct research on the relationships between sleep quality and mind wandering or daydreaming...

  20. Studying in the region of proximal learning reduces mind wandering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Judy; Metcalfe, Janet

    2016-07-01

    Insofar as mind wandering has been linked to poor learning, finding ways to reduce the propensity to mind wander should have implications for improving learning. We investigated the possibility that studying materials at an appropriate level of difficulty with respect to the individual's capabilities-that is, studying in the region of proximal learning (RPL)-might reduce mind wandering. In Experiments 1 and 2, participants were probed for their attentional state while they studied blocks of English-Spanish word pairs that were (a) easy, (b) in the RPL, or (c) difficult. We found that studying materials in the RPL was associated with reduced mind wandering. Test performance on items studied while mind wandering was also poorer. In Experiment 3, we investigated the relation between differences in participants' mastery and mind wandering. We found that high performers mind wandered more when studying the easier word pairs, whereas low performers mind wandered more when studying the difficult items. These results indicate that the RPL is specific to the individual's level of mastery and that mind wandering occurs when people are outside that region.

  1. Torsion of Wandering Gallbladder following Colonoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean R. Warfe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Torsion of the gallbladder is an uncommon condition that may present as an acute abdomen. Its preoperative diagnosis can often be challenging due to its variable presentation, with specific sonographic signs seen infrequently. We describe, to our knowledge, the first case of torsion of a wandering gallbladder following a colonoscopy in a 69-year-old female who presented with acute abdominal pain after procedure. This was discovered intraoperatively, and after a subsequent cholecystectomy, she had an uncomplicated recovery.

  2. Young and restless: validation of the Mind-Wandering Questionnaire (MWQ) reveals disruptive impact of mind-wandering for youth

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Mind-wandering is the focus of extensive investigation, yet until recently there has been no validated scale to directly measure trait levels of task-unrelated thought. Scales commonly used to assess mind-wandering lack face validity, measuring related constructs such as daydreaming or behavioral errors. Here we report four studies validating a Mind-Wandering Questionnaire (MWQ) across college, high school, and middle school samples. The 5-item scale showed high internal consistency, as well ...

  3. Young & restless: Validation of the Mind-Wandering Questionnaire (MWQ reveals disruptive impact of mind-wandering for youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Mrazek

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Mind-wandering is the focus of extensive investigation, yet until recently there has been no validated scale to directly measure trait levels of task-unrelated thought. Scales commonly used to assess mind-wandering lack face validity, measuring related constructs such as daydreaming or behavioral errors. Here we report four studies validating a Mind-Wandering Questionnaire (MWQ across college, high school, and middle school samples. The 5-item scale showed high internal consistency, as well as convergent validity with existing measures of mind-wandering and related constructs. Trait levels of mind-wandering, as measured by the MWQ, were correlated with task-unrelated thought measured by thought sampling during a test of reading comprehension. In both middle school and high school samples, mind-wandering during testing was associated with worse reading comprehension. By contrast, elevated trait levels of mind-wandering predicted worse mood, less life-satisfaction, greater stress, and lower self-esteem. By extending the use of thought sampling to measure mind-wandering among adolescents, our findings also validate the use of this methodology with younger populations. Both the MWQ and thought sampling indicate that mind-wandering is a pervasive – and problematic – influence on the performance and well-being of adolescents.

  4. Young and restless: validation of the Mind-Wandering Questionnaire (MWQ) reveals disruptive impact of mind-wandering for youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrazek, Michael D; Phillips, Dawa T; Franklin, Michael S; Broadway, James M; Schooler, Jonathan W

    2013-01-01

    Mind-wandering is the focus of extensive investigation, yet until recently there has been no validated scale to directly measure trait levels of task-unrelated thought. Scales commonly used to assess mind-wandering lack face validity, measuring related constructs such as daydreaming or behavioral errors. Here we report four studies validating a Mind-Wandering Questionnaire (MWQ) across college, high school, and middle school samples. The 5-item scale showed high internal consistency, as well as convergent validity with existing measures of mind-wandering and related constructs. Trait levels of mind-wandering, as measured by the MWQ, were correlated with task-unrelated thought measured by thought sampling during a test of reading comprehension. In both middle school and high school samples, mind-wandering during testing was associated with worse reading comprehension. By contrast, elevated trait levels of mind-wandering predicted worse mood, less life-satisfaction, greater stress, and lower self-esteem. By extending the use of thought sampling to measure mind-wandering among adolescents, our findings also validate the use of this methodology with younger populations. Both the MWQ and thought sampling indicate that mind-wandering is a pervasive-and problematic-influence on the performance and well-being of adolescents.

  5. The costs and benefits of mind-wandering: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooneyham, Benjamin W; Schooler, Jonathan W

    2013-03-01

    Substantial evidence suggests that mind-wandering typically occurs at a significant cost to performance. Mind-wandering-related deficits in performance have been observed in many contexts, most notably reading, tests of sustained attention, and tests of aptitude. Mind-wandering has been shown to negatively impact reading comprehension and model building, impair the ability to withhold automatized responses, and disrupt performance on tests of working memory and intelligence. These empirically identified costs of mind-wandering have led to the suggestion that mind-wandering may represent a pure failure of cognitive control and thus pose little benefit. However, emerging evidence suggests that the role of mind-wandering is not entirely pernicious. Recent studies have shown that mind-wandering may play a crucial role in both autobiographical planning and creative problem solving, thus providing at least two possible adaptive functions of the phenomenon. This article reviews these observed costs and possible functions of mind-wandering and identifies important avenues of future inquiry.

  6. Modeling mind-wandering: a tool to better understand distraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vugt, Marieke; Taatgen, Niels; Sackur, Jerome; Bastian, Mikael; Taatgen, Niels; van Vugt, Marieke; Borst, Jelmer; Mehlhorn, Katja

    2015-01-01

    When we get distracted, we may engage in mind-wandering, or task-unrelated thinking, which impairs performance on cognitive tasks. Yet, we do not have cognitive models that make this process explicit. On the basis of both recent experiments that have started to investigate mind-wandering and introsp

  7. Toward a model-based cognitive neuroscience of mind wandering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hawkins, G.E.; Mittner, M.; Boekel, W.; Heathcote, A.; Forstmann, B.U.

    2015-01-01

    People often "mind wander" during everyday tasks, temporarily losing track of time, place, or current task goals. In laboratory-based tasks, mind wandering is often associated with performance decrements in behavioral variables and changes in neural recordings. Such empirical associations provide de

  8. A pie: wandering y cotidianidad en Simone de Eduardo Lalo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oliver, M.

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the relationship between wandering and everyday life in Simone (2012), a novel by the Puerto Rican writer Eduardo Lalo. Wandering, defined as an aimless movement around the city, is not only an instance to reflect and discover by walking the everyday life, but also to express a

  9. Mind Wandering and the Incubation Effect in Insight Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Tengteng; Zou, Hong; Chen, Chuansheng; Luo, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Although many anecdotes suggest that creative insights often arise during mind wandering, empirical research is still sparse. In this study, the number reduction task (NRT) was used to assess whether insightful solutions were related to mind wandering during the incubation stage of the creative process. An experience sampling paradigm was used to…

  10. On the breakup of tectonic plates by polar wandering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H.-S.

    1974-01-01

    The equations for the stresses in a homogeneous shell of uniform thickness caused by a shift of the axis of rotation are derived. The magnitude of these stresses reaches a maximum value of the order of 10 to the 9th power dyn/sq cm, which is sufficient for explaining a tectonic breakup. In order to deduce the fracture pattern according to which the breakup of tectonic plates can be expected the theory of plastic deformation of shells is applied. The analysis of this pattern gives an explanation of the existing boundary systems of the major tectonic plates as described by Morgan (1968), LePichon (1968) and Isacks et al. (1968).

  11. Excessive daydreaming: a case history and discussion of mind wandering and high fantasy proneness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schupak, Cynthia; Rosenthal, Jesse

    2009-03-01

    This case study describes a patient presenting with a long history of excessive daydreaming which has caused her distress but is not incident to any other apparent clinical psychiatric disorders. We have treated this patient for over 10 years, and she has responded favorably to fluvoxamine therapy, stating that it helps to control her daydreaming. Our patient, and other psychotherpists, have brought to our attention other possible cases of excessive daydreaming. We examine the available literature regarding daydreaming, mind wandering, and fantasy proneness relative to current cognitive and neuroanatomical models of executive attention.

  12. Fluctuating Minds: Spontaneous Psychophysical Variability during Mind-Wandering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henríquez, Rodrigo A; Chica, Ana B; Billeke, Pablo; Bartolomeo, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Mind-wandering is the occasional distraction we experience while performing a cognitive task. It arises without any external precedent, varies over time, and interferes with the processing of sensory information. Here, we asked whether the transition from the on-task state to mind-wandering is a gradual process or an abrupt event. We developed a new experimental approach, based on the continuous, online assessment of individual psychophysical performance. Probe questions were asked whenever response times (RTs) exceeded 2 standard deviations from the participant's average RT. Results showed that mind-wandering reports were generally preceded by slower RTs, as compared to trials preceding on-task reports. Mind-wandering episodes could be reliably predicted from the response time difference between the last and the second-to-last trials. Thus, mind-wandering reports follow an abrupt increase in behavioral variability, lasting between 2.5 and 10 seconds.

  13. Mindfulness and mind-wandering: finding convergence through opposing constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrazek, Michael D; Smallwood, Jonathan; Schooler, Jonathan W

    2012-06-01

    Research into both mindfulness and mind-wandering has grown rapidly, yet clarification of the relationship between these two seemingly opposing constructs is still absent. A first study addresses the relationship between a dispositional measure of mindfulness (Mindful Attention and Awareness Scale, MAAS) and converging measures of both self-reported and indirect markers of mind-wandering. Negative correlations between dispositional mindfulness and 4 measures of mind-wandering confirm the opposing relationship between the 2 constructs and further validate the use of the MAAS as a dispositional measure of mindfulness. A second study demonstrated that 8 minutes of mindful breathing reduces behavioral indicators of mind-wandering during a Sustained Attention to Response Task compared with both passive relaxation and reading. Together these studies clarify the opposition between the constructs of mindfulness and mind-wandering and so should lead to greater convergence between what have been predominately separate, yet mutually relevant, lines of research.

  14. Mind wandering while reading easy and difficult texts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shi; D'Mello, Sidney; Graesser, Arthur C

    2013-06-01

    Mind wandering is a phenomenon in which attention drifts away from the primary task to task-unrelated thoughts. Previous studies have used self-report methods to measure the frequency of mind wandering and its effects on task performance. Many of these studies have investigated mind wandering in simple perceptual and memory tasks, such as recognition memory, sustained attention, and choice reaction time tasks. Manipulations of task difficulty have revealed that mind wandering occurs more frequently in easy than in difficult conditions, but that it has a greater negative impact on performance in the difficult conditions. The goal of this study was to examine the relation between mind wandering and task difficulty in a high-level cognitive task, namely reading comprehension of standardized texts. We hypothesized that reading comprehension may yield a different relation between mind wandering and task difficulty than has been observed previously. Participants read easy or difficult versions of eight passages and then answered comprehension questions after reading each of the passages. Mind wandering was reported using the probe-caught method from several previous studies. In contrast to the previous results, but consistent with our hypothesis, mind wandering occurred more frequently when participants read difficult rather than easy texts. However, mind wandering had a more negative influence on comprehension for the difficult texts, which is consistent with the previous data. The results are interpreted from the perspectives of the executive-resources and control-failure theories of mind wandering, as well as with regard to situation models of text comprehension.

  15. An automated behavioral measure of mind wandering during computerized reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Myrthe; Bixler, Robert; D'Mello, Sidney K

    2017-02-08

    Mind wandering is a ubiquitous phenomenon in which attention shifts from task-related to task-unrelated thoughts. The last decade has witnessed an explosion of interest in mind wandering, but research has been stymied by a lack of objective measures, leading to a near-exclusive reliance on self-reports. We addressed this issue by developing an eye-gaze-based, machine-learned model of mind wandering during computerized reading. Data were collected in a study in which 132 participants reported self-caught mind wandering while reading excerpts from a book on a computer screen. A remote Tobii TX300 or T60 eyetracker recorded their gaze during reading. The data were used to train supervised classification models to discriminate between mind wandering and normal reading in a manner that would generalize to new participants. We found that at the point of maximal agreement between the model-based and self-reported mind-wandering means (smallest difference between the group-level means: M model = .310, M self = .319), the participant-level mind-wandering proportional distributions were similar and were significantly correlated (r = .400). The model-based estimates were internally consistent (r = .751) and predicted text comprehension more strongly than did self-reported mind wandering (r model = -.374, r self = -.208). Our results also indicate that a robust strategy of probabilistically predicting mind wandering in cases with poor or missing gaze data led to improved performance on all metrics, as compared to simply discarding these data. Our findings demonstrate that an automated objective measure might be available for laboratory studies of mind wandering during reading, providing an appealing alternative or complement to self-reports.

  16. An unusual case of acute wandering paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Bianchi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors reported on a 63-year-old diabetic male who developed a strange wandering hemiparesis affecting first left side and then right side, not consistent with a right parasagittal meningioma nor with ischemic stroke. The subsequent rapid worsening of clinical picture, with occurrence of paraparesis, urinary incontinence and midthoracic sensory level, together with the evidence of leucocytosis, led to the diagnosis of a T6-T7 spondylodiscitis with spinal cord compression. The authors underlied the difficulties in diagnosing this condition in the setting of general hospital practice and the importance of clinical and neurological examination.

  17. An unusual case of acute wandering paralysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Federico Bianchi; Quintino Giorgio D'Alessandris; Roberto Pallini; Eduardo Fernandez; Liverana Lauretti

    2016-01-01

    The authors reported on a 63-year-old diabetic male who developed a strange wandering hemiparesis affecting first left side and then right side, not consistent with a right para-sagittal meningioma nor with ischemic stroke. The subsequent rapid worsening of clinical picture, with occurrence of paraparesis, urinary incontinence and midthoracic sensory level, together with the evidence of leucocytosis, led to the diagnosis of a T6-T7 spon-dylodiscitis with spinal cord compression. The authors underlied the difficulties in diagnosing this condition in the setting of general hospital practice and the importance of clinical and neurological examination.

  18. Not all minds that wander are lost:The importance of a balanced perspective on the mind-wandering stateTowards a balanced perspective of the mind-wandering state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan eSmallwood

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The waking mind is often occupied with mental contents that are minimally constrained by events in the here and now. These self-generated thoughts—e.g. mind-wandering or daydreaming—interfere with external task performance and can be a marker for unhappiness and even psychiatric problems. They also occupy our thoughts for upwards of half of the time, and under non-demanding conditions they (i allow us to connect our past and future selves together, (ii help us make successful long-term plans and (iii can provide a source of creative inspiration. The lengths that the mind goes to self-generate thought, coupled with its apparent functionality, suggest that the mind places a higher priority on such cognition than on many other mental acts. Although mind-wandering may be unpleasant for the individual who experiences it and disruptive to the tasks of the moment, self-generated thought allows consciousness freedom from the here and now and so reflects a key evolutionary adaptation for the mind. Here we synthesize recent literature from cognitive and clinical psychology and propose two formal hypotheses that 1 highlight task context and thought content as critical factors that constrain the costs and benefits of self-generated thought and 2 provide direction on ways to investigate the costs and benefits from an impartial perspective.

  19. Mind wandering and the adaptive control of attentional resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, Julia W Y; Dao, Elizabeth; Stanciulescu, Maria; Tildesley, Hamish; Handy, Todd C

    2013-06-01

    Mind wandering is a natural, transient state wherein our neurocognitive systems become temporarily decoupled from the external sensory environment as our thoughts drift away from the current task at hand. Yet despite the ubiquity of mind wandering in everyday human life, we rarely seem impaired in our ability to adaptively respond to the external environment when mind wandering. This suggests that despite widespread neurocognitive decoupling during mind wandering states, we may nevertheless retain some capacity to attentionally monitor external events. But what specific capacities? In Experiment 1, using traditional performance measures, we found that both volitional and automatic forms of visual-spatial attentional orienting were significantly attenuated when mind wandering. In Experiment 2, however, ERPs revealed that, during mind wandering states, there was a relative preservation of sensitivity to deviant or unexpected sensory events, as measured via the auditory N1 component. Taken together, our findings suggest that, although some selective attentional processes may be subject to down-regulation during mind wandering, we may adaptively compensate for these neurocognitively decoupled states by maintaining automatic deviance-detection functions.

  20. Children’s Mental Time Travel during Mind Wandering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qun eYe

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The prospective bias is a salient feature of mind wandering in healthy adults, yet little is known about the temporal focus of children’s mind wandering. In the present study, (I we developed the Temporal Focus of Mind Wandering Questionnaire for school-age children (TFMWQ-C, a 12-item scale with good test-retest reliability and construct validity. (II The criterion validity was tested by thought sampling in both Choice Reaction Time Task (CRT and Working Memory Task (WMT. A positive correlation was found between the temporal focus measured by the questionnaire and the one adopted during task-unrelated thoughts (TUTs by thought sampling probes, especially in the trait level of future-oriented mind wandering. At the same time, children who experienced more TUTs tended to show worse behavioral performance during tasks. (III The children in both tasks experienced more future-oriented TUTs than past-oriented ones, which was congruent with the results observed in adults; however, in contrast with previous research on adults, the prospective bias was not influenced by task demands. Together these results indicate that the prospective bias of mind wandering has emerged since the school age (9~13 years old, and that the relationship between mental time travel during mind wandering and the use of cognitive resources differs between children and adults. Our study provides new insights into how this interesting feature of mind wandering may adaptively contribute to the development of children’s mental time travel.

  1. Characterization of Mind Wandering using fNIRS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautier eDurantin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Assessing whether someone is attending to a task has become importantfor educational and professional applications. Such attentional drifts are usually termed mind wandering. The purpose of the current study is to test to what extent a recent neural imaging modality can be used to detect mind wandering episodes. Functional near infra-red spectroscopy is a non-invasive neuro-imaging technique that has never been studied so far to measure mind wandering. The Sustained Attention to Response Task was used to assess when subjects attention leaves a primary task. 16-channel fNIRS data were collected over frontal cortices. We observed significant activations over the medial prefrontal cortex during mind wandering, a brain region associated with the default mode network. fNIRS data were used to classify mind wandering data above chance level. In line with previous brain-imaging studies of mind wandering, our results confirm the ability of fNIRS to detect Default Network activations in the context of mind wandering.

  2. Torsion of a wandering spleen: an unusual abdominal catastrophe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz ul Haq, Muhammad; Elhassan, Elbagir; Mahdi, Diaa

    2014-11-01

    Wandering spleen is a rare clinical entity characterised by splenic hypermobility resulting from laxity or maldevelopment of the suspensory gastrosplenic, splenorenal, and phrenicocolic ligaments. Diagnosis is quite difficult, especially in children because of the lack of symptoms and signs until splenic torsion have occurred. An array of investigations is possible but US with color Doppler, CT with intravenous contrast and MRI are frequently being used to diagnose wandering spleen with or without torsion. We present a case of 5 years old child with torsion of wandering spleen to highlight the importance of prompt diagnosis and management.

  3. Examining the role of emotional valence of mind wandering: All mind wandering is not equal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Jonathan B; Welhaf, Matthew S; Hood, Audrey V B; Boals, Adriel; Tartar, Jaime L

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the role of emotional valence on the impact of mind wandering on working memory (WM) and sustained attention, we reanalyzed data from three independently conducted studies that examined the impact of stress on WM (Banks & Boals, 2016; Banks, Welhaf, & Srour, 2015) and sustained attention (Banks, Tartar, & Welhaf, 2014). Across all studies, participants reported the content of their thoughts at random intervals during the WM or sustained attention task. Thought probes in all studies included a core set of response options for task-unrelated thoughts (TUTs) that were negatively, positively, or neutrally emotionally valenced. In line with theories of emotional valenced stimuli on capture of attention, results suggest negatively valenced TUTs, but not positively valenced TUTs, were related to poorer WM and sustained attention in two studies. Neutral TUTs were related to poorer WM but not sustained attention performance. Implications for models of mind wandering are discussed.

  4. Wandering bumps in stochastic neural fields

    CERN Document Server

    Kilpatrick, Zachary P

    2012-01-01

    We study the effects of noise on stationary pulse solutions (bumps) in spatially extended neural fields. The dynamics of a neural field is described by an integrodifferential equation whose integral term characterizes synaptic interactions between neurons in different spatial locations of the network. Translationally symmetric neural fields support a continuum of stationary bump solutions, which may be centered at any spatial location. Random fluctuations are introduced by modeling the system as a spatially extended Langevin equation whose noise term we take to be multiplicative or additive. For nonzero noise, these bumps are shown to wander about the domain in a purely diffusive way. We can approximate the effective diffusion coefficient using a small noise expansion. Upon breaking the (continuous) translation symmetry of the system using a spatially heterogeneous inputs or synapses, bumps in the stochastic neural field can become temporarily pinned to a finite number of locations in the network. In the case...

  5. Detecting and Quantifying Mind Wandering during Simulated Driving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carryl L. Baldwin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Mind wandering is a pervasive threat to transportation safety, potentially accounting for a substantial number of crashes and fatalities. In the current study, mind wandering was induced through completion of the same task for 5 days, consisting of a 20-min monotonous freeway-driving scenario, a cognitive depletion task, and a repetition of the 20-min driving scenario driven in the reverse direction. Participants were periodically probed with auditory tones to self-report whether they were mind wandering or focused on the driving task. Self-reported mind wandering frequency was high, and did not statistically change over days of participation. For measures of driving performance, participant labeled periods of mind wandering were associated with reduced speed and reduced lane variability, in comparison to periods of on task performance. For measures of electrophysiology, periods of mind wandering were associated with increased power in the alpha band of the electroencephalogram (EEG, as well as a reduction in the magnitude of the P3a component of the event related potential (ERP in response to the auditory probe. Results support that mind wandering has an impact on driving performance and the associated change in driver’s attentional state is detectable in underlying brain physiology. Further, results suggest that detecting the internal cognitive state of humans is possible in a continuous task such as automobile driving. Identifying periods of likely mind wandering could serve as a useful research tool for assessment of driver attention, and could potentially lead to future in-vehicle safety countermeasures.

  6. Revisiting the wandering womb: Oxytocin in endometriosis and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinsdale, Natalie L; Crespi, Bernard J

    2017-09-19

    Hippocrates attributed women's high emotionality - hysteria - to a 'wandering womb'. Although hysteria diagnoses were abandoned along with the notion that displaced wombs cause emotional disturbance, recent research suggests that elevated levels of oxytocin occur in both bipolar disorder and endometriosis, a gynecological condition involving migration of endometrial tissue beyond the uterus. We propose and evaluate the hypothesis that elevated oxytocinergic system activity jointly contributes to bipolar disorder and endometriosis. First, we provide relevant background on endometriosis and bipolar disorder, and then we examine evidence for comorbidity between these conditions. We next: (1) review oxytocin's associations with personality traits, especially extraversion and openness, and how they overlap with bipolar spectrum traits; (2) describe evidence for higher oxytocinergic activity in both endometriosis and bipolar disorder; (3) examine altered hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis functioning in both conditions; (4) describe data showing that medications that treat one condition can improve symptoms of the other; (5) discuss fitness-related impacts of endometriosis and bipolar disorder; and (6) review a pair of conditions, polycystic ovary syndrome and autism, that show evidence of involving reduced oxytocinergic activity, in direct contrast to endometriosis and bipolar disorder. Considered together, the bipolar spectrum and endometriosis appear to involve dysregulated high extremes of normally adaptive pleiotropy in the female oxytocin system, whereby elevated levels of oxytocinergic activity coordinate outgoing sociality with heightened fertility, apparently characterizing, overall, a faster life history. These findings should prompt a re-examination of how mind-body interactions, and the pleiotropic endocrine systems that underlie them, contribute to health and disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Patterns of aging in the long-lived wandering albatross.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecomte, Vincent Julien; Sorci, Gabriele; Cornet, Stéphane; Jaeger, Audrey; Faivre, Bruno; Arnoux, Emilie; Gaillard, Maria; Trouvé, Colette; Besson, Dominique; Chastel, Olivier; Weimerskirch, Henri

    2010-04-06

    How does an animal age in natural conditions? Given the multifaceted nature of senescence, identifying the effects of age on physiology and behavior remains challenging. We investigated the effects of age on a broad array of phenotypic traits in a wild, long-lived animal, the wandering albatross. We studied foraging behavior using satellite tracking and activity loggers in males and females (age 6-48+ years), and monitored reproductive performance and nine markers of baseline physiology known to reflect senescence in vertebrates (humoral immunity, oxidative stress, antioxidant defenses, and hormone levels). Age strongly affected foraging behavior and reproductive performance, but not baseline physiology. Consistent with results of mammal and human studies, age affected males and females differently. Overall, our findings demonstrate that age, sex, and foraging ability interact in shaping aging patterns in natural conditions. Specifically, we found an unexpected pattern of spatial segregation by age; old males foraged in remote Antarctica waters, whereas young and middle-aged males never foraged south of the Polar Front. Old males traveled a greater distance but were less active at the sea surface, and returned from sea with elevated levels of stress hormone (corticosterone), mirroring a low foraging efficiency. In contrast to findings in captive animals and short-lived birds, and consistent with disposable soma theory, we found no detectable age-related deterioration of baseline physiology in albatrosses. We propose that foraging efficiency (i.e., the ability of individuals to extract energy from their environment) might play a central role in shaping aging patterns in natural conditions.

  8. Toward a model-based cognitive neuroscience of mind wandering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, G E; Mittner, M; Boekel, W; Heathcote, A; Forstmann, B U

    2015-12-03

    People often "mind wander" during everyday tasks, temporarily losing track of time, place, or current task goals. In laboratory-based tasks, mind wandering is often associated with performance decrements in behavioral variables and changes in neural recordings. Such empirical associations provide descriptive accounts of mind wandering - how it affects ongoing task performance - but fail to provide true explanatory accounts - why it affects task performance. In this perspectives paper, we consider mind wandering as a neural state or process that affects the parameters of quantitative cognitive process models, which in turn affect observed behavioral performance. Our approach thus uses cognitive process models to bridge the explanatory divide between neural and behavioral data. We provide an overview of two general frameworks for developing a model-based cognitive neuroscience of mind wandering. The first approach uses neural data to segment observed performance into a discrete mixture of latent task-related and task-unrelated states, and the second regresses single-trial measures of neural activity onto structured trial-by-trial variation in the parameters of cognitive process models. We discuss the relative merits of the two approaches, and the research questions they can answer, and highlight that both approaches allow neural data to provide additional constraint on the parameters of cognitive models, which will lead to a more precise account of the effect of mind wandering on brain and behavior. We conclude by summarizing prospects for mind wandering as conceived within a model-based cognitive neuroscience framework, highlighting the opportunities for its continued study and the benefits that arise from using well-developed quantitative techniques to study abstract theoretical constructs.

  9. The wandering spleen: CT findings and possible pitfalls in diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Ely, A.; Zissin, R.; Copel, L.; Vasserman, M.; Hertz, M.; Gottlieb, P.; Gayer, G

    2006-11-15

    Aim: To report the CT features of wandering spleen, a rare condition which can be incidentally detected as an abdominal or pelvic mass or can present with torsion, causing an acute abdomen. Materials and methods: The CT studies of seven patients, two children and five adults, with wandering spleen were reviewed. CT was performed urgently in three patients for acute abdomen, and electively in four. Results: CT findings of wandering spleen included absence of the spleen in its normal position and a mass located elsewhere in the abdomen or pelvis, i.e. an ectopic spleen, enhancing homogeneously in four cases and failing partially or completely to enhance in the other three, indicating infarction. A 'whirl' appearance representing the twisted splenic pedicle was seen in the three cases with torsion. Urgent splenectomy confirmed infarction secondary to torsion. Conclusion: The possible diagnosis of wandering spleen should be kept in mind when CT shows the spleen to be absent from its usual position and a mass is found elsewhere in the abdomen or pelvis. When, in addition, a 'whirl' or partial or no enhancement of this mass are seen in a case presenting with acute abdomen, torsion of a wandering spleen is a likely diagnosis.

  10. Migraine and attention to visual events during mind wandering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, Julia W Y; Mickleborough, Marla J S; Eades, Chelsea; Handy, Todd C

    2015-05-01

    Although migraine is traditionally categorized as a primary headache disorder, the condition is also associated with abnormalities in visual attentional function in between headache events. Namely, relative to controls, migraineurs show both a heightened sensitivity to nominally unattended visual events, as well as decreased habituation responses at sensory and post-sensory (cognitive) levels. Here we used event-related potentials (ERPs) to examine whether cortical hypersensitivities in migraineurs extend to mind wandering, or periods of time wherein we transiently attenuate the processing of external stimulus inputs as our thoughts drift away from the on-going task at hand. Participants performed a sustained attention to response task while they were occasionally queried as to their attentional state-either "on-task" or "mind wandering." We then analyzed the ERP responses to task-relevant stimuli as a function of whether they immediately preceded an on-task versus mind wandering report. We found that despite the commonly reported heightened visual sensitivities in our migraine group, they nevertheless manifest a reduced cognitive response during periods of mind wandering relative to on-task attentional states, as measured via amplitude changes in the P3 ERP component. This suggests that our capacity to attenuate the processing of external stimulus inputs during mind wandering is not necessarily impaired by the class of cortical hypersensitivities characteristic of the interictal migraine brain.

  11. Mind-wandering and negative mood: does one thing really lead to another?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poerio, Giulia L; Totterdell, Peter; Miles, Eleanor

    2013-12-01

    Mind-wandering is closely connected with negative mood. Whether negative mood is a cause or consequence of mind-wandering remains an important, unresolved, issue. We sought to clarify the direction of this relationship by measuring mood before and after mind-wandering. We also measured the affective content, time-orientation and relevance of mind-wandering to current concerns to explore whether the link between mind-wandering and negative mood might be explained by these characteristics. A novel experience-sampling technique with smartphone application prompted participants to answer questions about mind-wandering and mood across 7 days. While sadness tended to precede mind-wandering, mind-wandering itself was not associated with later mood and only predicted feeling worse if its content was negative. We also found prior sadness predicted retrospective mind-wandering, and prior negative mood predicted mind-wandering to current concerns. Our findings provide new insight into how mood and mind-wandering relate but suggest mind-wandering is not inherently detrimental to well-being.

  12. Shadowing the wandering mind: how understanding the mind-wandering state can inform our appreciation of conscious experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konishi, Mahiko; Smallwood, Jonathan

    2016-07-01

    The mind-wandering state illustrates two fundamental aspects of consciousness: its generative nature, which is reflected by the stimulus-independent content of thought that occurs when our minds wander; and metacognition, the unique capacity of the mind to reflect and understand itself. Self-generated thought, which allows us to consider people and events that are not present in the immediate environment, and metacognition, allowing us to introspect and report our inner experiences, are both essential to the scientific study of mind-wandering. Nevertheless, they also inevitably lead to specific issues that mirror more general problems in the field of consciousness research. The generative nature of consciousness makes it difficult to have direct control on the phenomenon, and the act of introspecting on inner experience has the potential to influence the state itself. We illustrate how the field of mind-wandering research can overcome these problems. Its generative nature can be understood by triangulating the objective measures (such as neural function) with subjective measures of experience and it can be manipulated indirectly by varying the demands of the external environment. Furthermore, we describe candidate covert markers for the mind-wandering state, which allow the phenomenon to be observed without direct interference, minimizing the concern that instructions to introspect necessarily change conscious experience. WIREs Cogn Sci 2016, 7:233-246. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1392 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  13. Mind Wandering and Education: From the Classroom to Online Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl K Szpunar

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, cognitive and educational psychologists have become interested in applying principles of cognitive psychology to education. Here, we discuss the importance of understanding the nature and occurrence of mind wandering in the context of classroom and online lectures. In reviewing the relevant literature, we begin by considering early studies that provide important clues about student attentiveness via dependent measures such as physical markers of inattention, note taking, and retention. We then provide a broad overview of studies that have directly measured mind wandering in the classroom and online learning environments. Finally, we conclude by discussing interventions that might be effective at curbing the occurrence of mind wandering in educational settings, and consider various avenues of future research that we believe can shed light on this well-known but little studied phenomenon.

  14. On mind wandering, attention, brain networks, and meditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Amit; Jones, David T

    2013-01-01

    Human attention selectively focuses on aspects of experience that are threatening, pleasant, or novel. The physical threats of the ancient times have largely been replaced by chronic psychological worries and hurts. The mind gets drawn to these worries and hurts, mostly in the domain of the past and future, leading to mind wandering. In the brain, a network of neurons called the default mode network has been associated with mind wandering. Abnormal activity in the default mode network may predispose to depression, anxiety, attention deficit, and posttraumatic stress disorder. Several studies show that meditation can reverse some of these abnormalities, producing salutary functional and structural changes in the brain. This narrative review presents a mechanistic understanding of meditation in the context of recent advances in neurosciences about mind wandering, attention, and the brain networks.

  15. Reduced mind wandering in experienced meditators and associated EEG correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandmeyer, Tracy; Delorme, Arnaud

    2016-11-04

    One outstanding question in the contemplative science literature relates to the direct impact of meditation experience on the monitoring of internal states and its respective correspondence with neural activity. In particular, to what extent does meditation influence the awareness, duration and frequency of the tendency of the mind to wander. To assess the relation between mind wandering and meditation, we tested 2 groups of meditators, one with a moderate level of experience (non-expert) and those who are well advanced in their practice (expert). We designed a novel paradigm using self-reports of internal mental states based on an experiential sampling probe paradigm presented during ~1 h of seated concentration meditation to gain insight into the dynamic measures of electroencephalography (EEG) during absorption in meditation as compared to reported mind wandering episodes. Our results show that expert meditation practitioners report a greater depth and frequency of sustained meditation, whereas non-expert practitioners report a greater depth and frequency of mind wandering episodes. This is one of the first direct behavioral indices of meditation expertise and its associated impact on the reduced frequency of mind wandering, with corresponding EEG activations showing increased frontal midline theta and somatosensory alpha rhythms during meditation as compared to mind wandering in expert practitioners. Frontal midline theta and somatosensory alpha rhythms are often observed during executive functioning, cognitive control and the active monitoring of sensory information. Our study thus provides additional new evidence to support the hypothesis that the maintenance of both internal and external orientations of attention may be maintained by similar neural mechanisms and that these mechanisms may be modulated by meditation training.

  16. Remembering apparent behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagoner, Brady

    2011-01-01

    The present experiment systematically investigates the role of narrative templates (Wertsch, 2002) in remembering. To stimulate the construction of a diversity of narratives I used Heider and Simmel’s (1944) celebrated “apparent behavior” film, in which geometric shapes moving around a screen...

  17. Mind-wandering and negative mood: Does one thing really lead to another?

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Mind-wandering is closely connected with negative mood. Whether negative mood is a\\ud cause or consequence of mind-wandering remains an important, unresolved, issue. We\\ud sought to clarify the direction of this relationship by measuring mood before and after\\ud mind-wandering. We also measured the affective content, time-orientation and relevance\\ud of mind-wandering to current concerns to explore whether the link between mind-wandering\\ud and negative mood might be explained by these charac...

  18. Mind wandering in Chinese daily lives--an experience sampling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaolan; Wang, Xiao

    2012-01-01

    Mind wandering has recently received extensive research because it reveals an important characteristic of our consciousness: conscious experience can arise internally and involuntarily. As the first attempt to examine mind wandering in a non-western population, the present study used experience-sampling method to collect the daily momentary mind wandering episodes in a Chinese sample. The results showed that mind wandering was also a ubiquitous experience among the Chinese population, and, instead of emerging out of nowhere, it was often elicited by external or internal cues. Furthermore, most of the mind wandering episodes involved prospective thinking and were closely related to one's personal life. Finally, the frequency of mind wandering was influenced by some contextual factors. These results taken together suggest that mind wandering plays an important role in helping people to maintain a continuous feeling of "self" and to prepare them to cope with the upcoming events.

  19. Mind wandering in Chinese daily lives--an experience sampling study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolan Song

    Full Text Available Mind wandering has recently received extensive research because it reveals an important characteristic of our consciousness: conscious experience can arise internally and involuntarily. As the first attempt to examine mind wandering in a non-western population, the present study used experience-sampling method to collect the daily momentary mind wandering episodes in a Chinese sample. The results showed that mind wandering was also a ubiquitous experience among the Chinese population, and, instead of emerging out of nowhere, it was often elicited by external or internal cues. Furthermore, most of the mind wandering episodes involved prospective thinking and were closely related to one's personal life. Finally, the frequency of mind wandering was influenced by some contextual factors. These results taken together suggest that mind wandering plays an important role in helping people to maintain a continuous feeling of "self" and to prepare them to cope with the upcoming events.

  20. On the Necessity of Distinguishing Between Unintentional and Intentional Mind Wandering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seli, Paul; Risko, Evan F; Smilek, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, there has been an enormous increase in the number of studies examining mind wandering. Although participants' reports of mind wandering are often assumed to largely reflect spontaneous, unintentional thoughts, many researchers' conceptualizations of mind wandering have left open the possibility that at least some of these reports reflect deliberate, intentional thought. Critically, however, in most investigations on the topic, researchers have not separately assessed each type of mind wandering; instead, they have measured mind wandering as a unitary construct, thereby conflating intentional and unintentional types. We report the first compelling evidence that an experimental manipulation can have qualitatively different effects on intentional and unintentional types of mind wandering. This result provides clear evidence that researchers interested in understanding mind wandering need to consider the distinction between unintentional and intentional occurrences of this phenomenon.

  1. Remembering apparent behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagoner, Brady

    2011-01-01

    The present experiment systematically investigates the role of narrative templates (Wertsch, 2002) in remembering. To stimulate the construction of a diversity of narratives I used Heider and Simmel’s (1944) celebrated “apparent behavior” film, in which geometric shapes moving around a screen...... to attend to in the idiographic analysis. Generalization still moves from single case to general model and back to single case, but the movement is facilitated by analysis at the level of the sample as a whole....

  2. ECG baseline wander reduction using linear phase filters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alsté, van J.A.; Eck, van W.; Hermann, O.E.

    1986-01-01

    The continuous real time reduction of baseline wander is a considerable problem in electrocardiography during exercises. Our solution consists of spectral filtering. The legitimacy of high-pass filtering of the ECG by means of digital linear phase filters with a low cut-off frequency as high as the

  3. The Right to Wander: Politics and Recreational Land Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donelly, Peter

    1993-01-01

    Growing privatization of land and restrictions within parks have led to a limited "right to wander" (the right to be on land or water for the purposes of sport, leisure, or pleasure with minimal limitations). Right wing political economies of the 1980s have placed further limits on access to wilderness. Presents alternatives that may reestablish…

  4. People Mind Wander More during Massed than Spaced Inductive Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Janet; Xu, Judy

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates the relation between mind wandering and the spacing effect in inductive learning. Participants studied works of art by different artists grouped in blocks, where works by a particular artist were either presented all together successively (the massed condition), or interleaved with the works of other artists (the spaced…

  5. Spontaneous Repetitive Thoughts Can Be Adaptive: Postscript on "Mind Wandering"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baars, Bernard J.

    2010-01-01

    When researchers use the term "mind wandering" for task-unrelated thoughts in signal detection tasks, we may fall into the trap of believing that spontaneous thoughts are task unrelated in a deeper sense. Similar negative connotations are attached to common terms like "cognitive failures", "resting state", "rumination", "distraction", "attentional…

  6. Mind Wandering, Noncontingent Processing, and Recall in Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Peter; Bortolussi, Marisa; Khangura, Milandeep

    2015-01-01

    In the present research, we attempted to manipulate noncontingent processing in reading, that is, mental activities not dependent on processing the words of the text. An important class of noncontingent processing is mind wandering, but noncontingent processing may include other task-related activities as well. In our study, participants read…

  7. The Right to Wander: Politics and Recreational Land Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donelly, Peter

    1993-01-01

    Growing privatization of land and restrictions within parks have led to a limited "right to wander" (the right to be on land or water for the purposes of sport, leisure, or pleasure with minimal limitations). Right wing political economies of the 1980s have placed further limits on access to wilderness. Presents alternatives that may reestablish…

  8. Reducing dementia related wandering behaviour with an interactive wall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robben, S.; Bergman, K.; Haitjema, S.; de Lange, Y.; Kröse, B.

    2012-01-01

    People suffering from dementia often have problems with way finding and feel restless. In this paper we present an interactive wall developed for decreasing the amount of wandering behaviour of people suffering from dementia. The installation aims at making these people feel more at home in the

  9. Understanding the role of mind wandering in stress-related working memory impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Jonathan B; Boals, Adriel

    2016-05-04

    Mind wandering has been identified as a possible cause for stress-related working memory (WM) task impairments following laboratory stressors. The current study attempted to induce mind wandering regarding negative, positive, or neutral events using an expressive writing task and examined the impact on WM task performance. We examined the role of mind wandering in understanding the impact of life stress on WM. Additionally, we explored the role of thought suppression on the relationship between mind wandering and WM. One hundred and fifty participants completed WM measures before (Time 1) and after (Time 2) the writing manipulation. The writing manipulation did not alter mind wandering or WM task performance. Time 1 WM predicted mind wandering during the Time 2 WM task, which subsequently predicted poorer Time 2 WM task performance. The impact of daily life stress on WM was mediated by mind wandering. Trait levels of thought suppression moderated the impact of mind wandering on WM. Specifically, higher levels of suppression resulted in stronger negative impact of mind wandering on WM task performance. Findings are discussed in terms of the impact of mind wandering on WM task performance.

  10. Not all minds wander equally: The influence of traits, states and road environment factors on self-reported mind wandering during everyday driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdett, Bridget R D; Charlton, Samuel G; Starkey, Nicola J

    2016-10-01

    Inattention is a road safety problem, but few studies have focused specifically on mind wandering during everyday driving. This paper explores differences in self-reported mind wandering according to driver demographic characteristics (including age and gender), cognitive traits (such as tendency toward cognitive failure or mindful attention), states (such as feeling tired or stressed) and road environment factors (such as route familiarity). Five hundred and two participants (113 male, average age 44.4 years, SD=14.0years) completed a series of questionnaires (Mindful Attention and Awareness Scale (MAAS), Cognitive Failures Questionnaire (CFQ) and Driver Behaviour Questionnaire (DBQ)), as well as study-specific questions about mind wandering during different personal states and across a range of road and traffic situations. All respondents reported mind wandering during driving at least some of the time. Mind wandering was more likely to be reported on familiar roads than on unfamiliar roads and when drivers are tired. Drivers who reported relatively more mind wandering were younger, reported less mindful attention in daily life, more cognitive failures, and more driving violations and lapses. Together, the findings suggest that mind wandering is common in everyday driving, however any link with crash risk remains unclear. Future research using self-report and naturalistic methods could provide more insight into relationships between mind wandering, error and crash risk.

  11. The apparent Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binétruy, P.; Helou, A.

    2015-10-01

    We exploit the parallel between dynamical black holes and cosmological spacetimes to describe the evolution of Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker universes from the point of view of an observer in terms of the dynamics of the apparent horizon. Using the Hayward-Kodama formalism of dynamical black holes, we clarify the role of the Clausius relation to derive the Friedmann equations for a Universe, in the spirit of Jacobson’s work on the thermodynamics of spacetime. We also show how dynamics at the horizon naturally leads to the quantum-mechanical process of Hawking radiation. We comment on the connection of this work with recent ideas to consider our observable Universe as a Bose-Einstein condensate and on the corresponding role of vacuum energy.

  12. On the asymmetric effects of mind-wandering on levels of processing at encoding and retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, David R; Smilek, Daniel; Besner, Derek

    2014-06-01

    The behavioral consequences of off-task thought (mind-wandering) on primary-task performance are now well documented across an increasing range of tasks. In the present study, we investigated the consequences of mind-wandering on the encoding of information into memory in the context of a levels-of-processing framework (Craik & Lockhart, 1972). Mind-wandering was assessed via subjective self-reports in response to thought probes that were presented under both semantic (size judgment) and perceptual (case judgment) encoding instructions. Mind-wandering rates during semantic encoding negatively predicted subsequent recognition memory performance, whereas no such relation was observed during perceptual encoding. We discuss the asymmetric effects of mind-wandering on levels of processing in the context of attentional-resource accounts of mind-wandering.

  13. On the link between mind wandering and task performance over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, David R; Seli, Paul; Besner, Derek; Smilek, Daniel

    2014-07-01

    Here we test the hypothesis that fluctuations in subjective reports of mind wandering over time-on-task are associated with fluctuations in performance over time-on-task. In Study 1, we employed a singleton search task and found that performance did not differ prior to on- and off-task reports, nor did individual differences in mind wandering predict differences in performance (so-called standard analytic methods). Importantly however, we find that fluctuations in mind wandering over time are strongly associated with fluctuations in behavior. In Study 2, we provide a replication of the relation between mind wandering and performance over time found in Study 1, using a Flanker interference task. These data indicate (1) a tight coupling between mind wandering and performance over time and (2) that a temporal-analytic approach can reveal effects of mind wandering on performance in tasks where standard analyses fail to do so. The theoretical and methodological implications of these findings are discussed.

  14. Language facilitates introspection: Verbal mind-wandering has privileged access to consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, Mikaël; Lerique, Sébastien; Adam, Vincent; Franklin, Michael S; Schooler, Jonathan W; Sackur, Jérôme

    2017-03-01

    Introspection and language are the cognitive prides of humankind, but their interactions in healthy cognition remain unclear. Episodes of mind-wandering, where personal thoughts often go unnoticed for some time before being introspected, offer a unique opportunity to study the role of language in introspection. In this paper, we show that inner speech facilitates awareness of mind-wandering. In two experiments, we either interfered with verbal working memory, via articulatory suppression (Exp. 1), or entrained it, via presentation of verbal material (Exp. 2), and measured the resulting awareness of mind-wandering. Articulatory suppression decreased the likelihood to spontaneously notice mind-wandering, whereas verbal material increased retrospective awareness of mind-wandering. In addition, an ecological study using smartphones confirmed that inner speech vividness positively predicted mind-wandering awareness (Exp. 3). Together, these findings support the view that inner speech facilitates introspection of one's thoughts, and therefore provides empirical evidence for a positive relation between language and consciousness.

  15. Friedrich Nietzsche: the wandering and learned neuropath under Dionisius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Marleide da Mota

    2015-11-01

    Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900) was a remarkable philologist-philosopher while remaining in a condition of ill-health. Issues about his wandering/disruptive behavior that might be a consequence and/or protection against his cognitive decline and multifaceted disease are presented. The life complex that raises speculations about its etiology is constituted by: insight, creativity and wandering behavior besides several symptoms and signs of disease(s), mainly neurological one. The most important issue to be considered at the moment is not the disease diagnosis (Lissauer's general paresis or CADASIL, e.g.), but the probable Nietzsche's great cognitive reserve linked to the multifactorial etiology (genetic and environmental), and shared characteristics both to creativity and psychopathology. This makes any disease seems especial regarding Nietzsche, and whichever the diagnostic hypothesis has to consider the Nietzsche's unique background to express any disease(s).

  16. Non-wandering points and the depth for graph maps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Let G be a graph and f: G → G be continuous. Denote by R(f) and Ω(f) the set of recurrent points and the set of non-wandering points of f respectively. Let Ω0 (f) = G and Ωn (f) =Ω(f|Ωn-1(f)) for all n ∈ N. The minimal m ∈ NU {∞} such that Ωm(f) = Ωm+1(f) is called the depth of f. In this paper, we show that Ω2(f) = R(f) and the depth of f is at most 2. Furthermore, we obtain some properties of non-wandering points of f.

  17. Friedrich Nietzsche: the wandering and learned neuropath under Dionisius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marleide da Mota Gomes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900 was a remarkable philologist-philosopher while remaining in a condition of ill-health. Issues about his wandering/disruptive behavior that might be a consequence and/or protection against his cognitive decline and multifaceted disease are presented. The life complex that raises speculations about its etiology is constituted by: insight, creativity and wandering behavior besides several symptoms and signs of disease(s, mainly neurological one. The most important issue to be considered at the moment is not the disease diagnosis (Lissauer’s general paresis or CADASIL, e.g., but the probable Nietzsche’s great cognitive reserve linked to the multifactorial etiology (genetic and environmental, and shared characteristics both to creativity and psychopathology. This makes any disease seems especial regarding Nietzsche, and whichever the diagnostic hypothesis has to consider the Nietzsche’s unique background to express any disease(s.

  18. Assessing the associations among trait and state levels of deliberate and spontaneous mind wandering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seli, Paul; Risko, Evan F; Smilek, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that mind wandering can be subdivided into spontaneous and deliberate types, and this distinction has been found to hold at both the trait and state levels. However, to date, no attempts have been made to link trait-level spontaneous and deliberate mind wandering with state-level assessments of these two subtypes of mind wandering. Here we evaluated whether trait-level deliberate and spontaneous mind wandering map onto state levels of these subtypes of mind wandering. Results showed correspondence between trait-level reports of spontaneous and deliberate mind wandering and their state-level counterparts, indicating that people's reports on the intentionality of their mind wandering in the laboratory correspond to their reports of the intentionality of mind wandering in everyday life. Thus, the trait- and state-level scales of mind wandering were found to validate each other: Whereas the state-level measures provided some construct validity for the trait-level measures, the trait-level measures indicated that the state-level measures may be generalizable to everyday situations.

  19. K1: Your Wandering Mind: Neuronal Correlates and Behavioral Consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Maunsell

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available No matter how hard we focus on a task, we cannot prevent our attention from wandering. By recording simultaneously from dozens of neurons in visual cerebral cortex, it is now possible to obtain a nearly instantaneous measure of how visual attention is allocated. This approach is providing new insights into the mechanisms that control attention to locations and features, and how short-term drifts in attention affect behavioral performance.

  20. Pros and cons of a wandering mind: a prospective study

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Mind wandering (MW) has recently been associated with both adaptive (e.g., creativity enhancement) and maladaptive (e.g., mood worsening) consequences. This study aimed at investigating whether proneness to MW was prospectively associated with negative health outcomes. At time 0, 21 women, 19 men; mean age = 24.5 (4.9) underwent a 5-min baseline electrocardiogram (ECG), a 20-min laboratory tracking task with thought probes, and personality questionnaires. At time 1 (1 year follow-up), the sam...

  1. Pros and cons of a wandering mind: A prospective study

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Mind wandering (MW) has recently been associated with both adaptive (e.g., creativity enhancement) and maladaptive (e.g., mood worsening) consequences. This study aimed at investigating whether proneness to MW was prospectively associated with negative health outcomes. At time 0, 21 women, 19 men; mean age = 24.5 (4.9) underwent a 5-min baseline electrocardiogram (ECG), a 20-min laboratory tracking task with thought probes, and personality questionnaires. At time 1 (1 year follow-up), the sam...

  2. Characterization of mind wandering using fNIRS

    OpenAIRE

    Durantin, Gautier; Dehais, Frederic; Delorme, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    Assessing whether someone is attending to a task has become important for educational and professional applications. Such attentional drifts are usually termed mind wandering (MW). The purpose of the current study is to test to what extent a recent neural imaging modality can be used to detect MW episodes. Functional near infrared spectroscopy is a non-invasive neuroimaging technique that has never been used so far to measure MW. We used the Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART) to asse...

  3. Canonical and Irish Gothic Features in Melmoth the Wanderer

    OpenAIRE

    González Rodríguez, Julia

    2016-01-01

    In the eighteenth century, a Gothic literary canon emerged. This B.A. Thesis aims to show that there is not a unique type of Gothic literary tradition. To illustrate this, a variant of the canonical Gothic, namely the Irish Gothic, is presented, with an Irish novel, Melmoth the Wanderer (1820) by Charles Robert Maturin, as an illustration of its main traits. Following an analytic method, the distinctive features of each Gothic tradition are explained separately. Then, an analysis of the major...

  4. Transcriptional profiling of midgut immunity response and degeneration in the wandering silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuyun Xu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lepidoptera insects have a novel development process comprising several metamorphic stages during their life cycle compared with vertebrate animals. Unlike most Lepidoptera insects that live on nectar during the adult stage, the Bombyx mori silkworm adults do not eat anything and die after egg-laying. In addition, the midguts of Lepidoptera insects produce antimicrobial proteins during the wandering stage when the larval tissues undergo numerous changes. The exact mechanisms responsible for these phenomena remain unclear. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used the silkworm as a model and performed genome-wide transcriptional profiling of the midgut between the feeding stage and the wandering stage. Many genes concerned with metabolism, digestion, and ion and small molecule transportation were down-regulated during the wandering stage, indicating that the wandering stage midgut loses its normal functions. Microarray profiling, qRT-PCR and western blot proved the production of antimicrobial proteins (peptides in the midgut during the wandering stage. Different genes of the immune deficiency (Imd pathway were up-regulated during the wandering stage. However, some key genes belonging to the Toll pathway showed no change in their transcription levels. Unlike butterfly (Pachliopta aristolochiae, the midgut of silkworm moth has a layer of cells, indicating that the development of midgut since the wandering stage is not usual. Cell division in the midgut was observed only for a short time during the wandering stage. However, there was extensive cell apoptosis before pupation. The imbalance of cell division and apoptosis probably drives the continuous degeneration of the midgut in the silkworm since the wandering stage. CONCLUSIONS: This study provided an insight into the mechanism of the degeneration of the silkworm midgut and the production of innate immunity-related proteins during the wandering stage. The imbalance of cell division and apoptosis

  5. Daydreaming Style Moderates the Relation between Working Memory and Mind Wandering: Integrating Two Hypotheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcusson-Clavertz, David; Cardeña, Etzel; Terhune, Devin Blair

    2016-01-01

    Mind wandering--mentation unrelated to one's current activity and surroundings--is a ubiquitous phenomenon, but seemingly competing ideas have been proposed regarding its relation to executive cognitive processes. The control-failure hypothesis postulates that executive processes prevent mind wandering, whereas the global availability hypothesis…

  6. Dissociation of subjectively reported and behaviorally indexed mind wandering by EEG rhythmic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jungang; Perdoni, Christopher; He, Bin

    2011-01-01

    Inattention to current activity is ubiquitous in everyday situations. Mind wandering is an example of such a state, and its related brain areas have been examined in the literature. However, there is no clear evidence regarding neural rhythmic activities linked to mind wandering. Using a vigilance task with thought sampling and electroencephalography recording, the current study simultaneously examined neural oscillatory activities related to subjectively reported and behaviorally indexed mind wandering. By implementing time-frequency analysis, we found that subjectively reported mind wandering, relative to behaviorally indexed, showed increased gamma band activity at bilateral frontal-central areas. By means of beamformer source imaging, we found subjectively reported mind wandering within the gamma band to be characterized by increased activation in bilateral frontal cortices, supplemental motor area, paracentral cortex and right inferior temporal cortex in comparison to behaviorally indexed mind wandering. These findings dissociate subjectively reported and behaviorally indexed mind wandering and suggest that a higher degree of executive control processes are engaged in subjectively reported mind wandering.

  7. Self-Reported Stickiness of Mind-Wandering Affects Task Performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vugt, Marieke K; Broers, Nico

    2016-01-01

    When asked to perform a certain task, we typically spend a decent amount of time thinking thoughts unrelated to that task-a phenomenon referred to as "mind-wandering." It is thought that this mind-wandering is driven at least in part by our unfinished goals and concerns. Previous studies have shown

  8. Dissociation of subjectively reported and behaviorally indexed mind wandering by EEG rhythmic activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungang Qin

    Full Text Available Inattention to current activity is ubiquitous in everyday situations. Mind wandering is an example of such a state, and its related brain areas have been examined in the literature. However, there is no clear evidence regarding neural rhythmic activities linked to mind wandering. Using a vigilance task with thought sampling and electroencephalography recording, the current study simultaneously examined neural oscillatory activities related to subjectively reported and behaviorally indexed mind wandering. By implementing time-frequency analysis, we found that subjectively reported mind wandering, relative to behaviorally indexed, showed increased gamma band activity at bilateral frontal-central areas. By means of beamformer source imaging, we found subjectively reported mind wandering within the gamma band to be characterized by increased activation in bilateral frontal cortices, supplemental motor area, paracentral cortex and right inferior temporal cortex in comparison to behaviorally indexed mind wandering. These findings dissociate subjectively reported and behaviorally indexed mind wandering and suggest that a higher degree of executive control processes are engaged in subjectively reported mind wandering.

  9. When the brain takes a break: A model-based analysis of mind wandering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mittner, M.; Boekel, W.; Tucker, A.M.; Turner, B.M.; Heathcote, A.; Forstmann, B.U.

    2014-01-01

    Mind wandering is an ubiquitous phenomenon in everyday life. In the cognitive neurosciences, mind wandering has been associated with several distinct neural processes, most notably increased activity in the default mode network (DMN), suppressed activity within the anti-correlated (task-positive) ne

  10. Distracted by Your Mind? Individual Differences in Distractibility Predict Mind Wandering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Sophie; Lavie, Nilli

    2014-01-01

    Attention may be distracted from its intended focus both by stimuli in the external environment and by internally generated task-unrelated thoughts during mind wandering. However, previous attention research has focused almost exclusively on distraction by external stimuli, and the extent to which mind wandering relates to external distraction is…

  11. Self-Reported Stickiness of Mind-Wandering Affects Task Performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vugt, Marieke K; Broers, Nico

    2016-01-01

    When asked to perform a certain task, we typically spend a decent amount of time thinking thoughts unrelated to that task-a phenomenon referred to as "mind-wandering." It is thought that this mind-wandering is driven at least in part by our unfinished goals and concerns. Previous studies have shown

  12. Students' Mind Wandering in Macroscopic and Submicroscopic Textual Narrations and Its Relationship with Their Reading Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Balushi, Sulaiman M.; Al-Harthy, Ibrahim S.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate students' mind wandering while reading different types of textual narrations (macroscopic and submicroscopic) in chemistry. Another goal was to determine the relationship between mind wandering and students' reading comprehension. The participants were 65 female ninth grade students in Oman. Using a…

  13. Increasing propensity to mind-wander with transcranial direct current stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrod, Vadim; Rees, Geraint; Lavidor, Michal; Bar, Moshe

    2015-03-17

    Humans mind-wander quite intensely. Mind wandering is markedly different from other cognitive behaviors because it is spontaneous, self-generated, and inwardly directed (inner thoughts). However, can such an internal and intimate mental function also be modulated externally by means of brain stimulation? Addressing this question could also help identify the neural correlates of mind wandering in a causal manner, in contrast to the correlational methods used previously (primarily functional MRI). In our study, participants performed a monotonous task while we periodically sampled their thoughts to assess mind wandering. Concurrently, we applied transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). We found that stimulation of the frontal lobes [anode electrode at the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), cathode electrode at the right supraorbital area], but not of the occipital cortex or sham stimulation, increased the propensity to mind-wander. These results demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, that mind wandering can be enhanced externally using brain stimulation, and that the frontal lobes play a causal role in mind-wandering behavior. These results also suggest that the executive control network associated with the DLPFC might be an integral part of mind-wandering neural machinery.

  14. Distracted by Your Mind? Individual Differences in Distractibility Predict Mind Wandering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Sophie; Lavie, Nilli

    2014-01-01

    Attention may be distracted from its intended focus both by stimuli in the external environment and by internally generated task-unrelated thoughts during mind wandering. However, previous attention research has focused almost exclusively on distraction by external stimuli, and the extent to which mind wandering relates to external distraction is…

  15. A Review of "Wandering" Instruments for People with Dementia Who Get Lost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bantry White, Eleanor; Montgomery, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study is the first review to be conducted to evaluate measures of wandering behavior for identifying people with dementia at risk of getting lost. Method: Drawing upon systematic review search strategies, the relevant literature was reviewed for wandering instruments using MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, and Cumulative Index to Nursing…

  16. Thinking one thing, saying another: the behavioral correlates of mind-wandering while reading aloud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Michael S; Mooneyham, Benjamin W; Baird, Benjamin; Schooler, Jonathan W

    2014-02-01

    Although mind-wandering during silent reading is well documented, to date no research has investigated whether similar processes occur during reading aloud. In the present study, participants read a passage either silently or aloud while periodically being probed about mind-wandering. Although their comprehension accuracies were similar for both reading conditions, participants reported more mind-wandering while they were reading aloud. These episodes of mindless reading were associated with nearly normal prosody, but were nevertheless distinguished by subtle fluctuations in volume that were predictive of both overall comprehension accuracy and individual sentence comprehension. Together, these findings reveal that previously hidden within the common activity of reading aloud lies: (1) a demonstration of the remarkable automaticity of speech, (2) a situation that is surprisingly conducive to mind-wandering, (3) subtle vocal signatures of mind-wandering and comprehension accuracy, and (4) the promise of developing useful interventions to improve reading.

  17. The science of mind wandering: empirically navigating the stream of consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Jonathan; Schooler, Jonathan W

    2015-01-03

    Conscious experience is fluid; it rarely remains on one topic for an extended period without deviation. Its dynamic nature is illustrated by the experience of mind wandering, in which attention switches from a current task to unrelated thoughts and feelings. Studies exploring the phenomenology of mind wandering highlight the importance of its content and relation to meta-cognition in determining its functional outcomes. Examination of the information-processing demands of the mind-wandering state suggests that it involves perceptual decoupling to escape the constraints of the moment, its content arises from episodic and affective processes, and its regulation relies on executive control. Mind wandering also involves a complex balance of costs and benefits: Its association with various kinds of error underlines its cost, whereas its relationship to creativity and future planning suggest its potential value. Although essential to the stream of consciousness, various strategies may minimize the downsides of mind wandering while maintaining its productive aspects.

  18. [Development of Japanese versions of the Daydream Frequency Scale and the Mind Wandering Questionnaire].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajimura, Shogo; Nomura, Michio

    2016-04-01

    This study developed and examined the validity of Japanese versions of the Daydream Frequency Scale (DDFS) and the Mind Wandering Questionnaire (MWQ), which measures propensity for spontaneous thoughts and mind wandering, respectively. In Study 1, we translated the items of the DDFS and the MWQ into Japanese and verified their validity. In Study 2, we confirmed the correlation of both scales with mind wandering, as measured by thought sampling during an attention-demanding task. These two studies revealed a dissociation between the properties of the scales; while DDFS reflects propensity for spontaneous thoughts, MWQ specifically reflects propensity for mind,wandering. We discuss the usefulness of the DDFS and the MWQ for studying the psychological functions of spontaneous thoughts and mind wandering.

  19. Mind wandering in sentence reading: decoupling the link between mind and eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulsham, Tom; Farley, James; Kingstone, Alan

    2013-03-01

    When people read, their thoughts sometimes drift away from the task at hand: They are "mind wandering." Recent research suggests that this change in task focus is reflected in eye movements and this was tested in an experiment using controlled stimuli. Participants were presented with a series of sentences containing high- and low-frequency words, which they read while being eye-tracked, and they were sometimes probed to indicate whether they were on task or mind wandering. The results showed multiple differences between reading prior to a mind-wandering response and reading when on task: Mind wandering led to slower reading times, longer average fixation duration, and an absence of the word frequency effect on gaze duration. Collectively, these findings confirm that task focus could be inferred from eye movements, and they indicate that the link between word identification and eye scanning is decoupled when the mind wanders.

  20. Spreading and wandering of Gaussian-Schell model laser beams in an anisotropic turbulent ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuqian; Zhang, Yixin; Zhu, Yun; Hu, Zhengda

    2016-09-01

    The effect of anisotropic turbulence on the spreading and wandering of Gaussian-Schell model (GSM) laser beams propagating in an ocean is studied. The long-term spreading of a GSM beam propagating through the paraxial channel of a turbulent ocean is also developed. Expressions of random wander for such laser beams are derived in an anisotropic turbulent ocean based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle. We investigate the influence of parameters in a turbulent ocean on the beam wander and spreading. Our results indicate that beam spreading and random beam wandering are smaller without considering the anisotropy of turbulence in the oceanic channel. Salinity fluctuation has a greater contribution to both the beam spreading and beam wander than that of temperature fluctuations in a turbulent ocean. Our results could be helpful for designing a free-space optical wireless communication system in an oceanic environment.

  1. Wandering spleen, gastric and pancreatic volvulus and right-sided descending and sigmoid colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Ríos, Enrique; Méndez-Díaz, Cristina; Rodríguez-García, Esther; Pérez-Ramos, Tania

    2015-10-01

    Wandering spleen is a rare condition, characterized by a mobile spleen that is attached only by an elongated vascular pedicle, allowing it to migrate to any part of the abdomen or pelvis. Mesenteroaxial gastric volvulus usually occurs in children and may be associated with wandering spleen. Both entities result from abnormal laxity or absence of the peritoneal attachments due to abnormal fusion of the peritoneal mesenteries. Pancreatic volvulus is a very rare anomaly, with only a few isolated case reports described in association with wandering spleen. Anomalous right sided descending and sigmoid colon is a very rare entity and its association with wandering spleen has not been previously reported. We report a case of wandering spleen associated with mesenteroaxial gastric volvulus, pancreatic volvulus and rightward shift of the splenic flexure of the colon and right sided descending and sigmoid colon in a young female.

  2. Brief mindfulness meditation training reduces mind wandering: The critical role of acceptance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahl, Hayley A; Lindsay, Emily K; Pacilio, Laura E; Brown, Kirk W; Creswell, J David

    2017-03-01

    Mindfulness meditation programs, which train individuals to monitor their present-moment experience in an open or accepting way, have been shown to reduce mind wandering on standardized tasks in several studies. Here we test 2 competing accounts for how mindfulness training reduces mind wandering, evaluating whether the attention-monitoring component of mindfulness training alone reduces mind wandering or whether the acceptance training component is necessary for reducing mind wandering. Healthy young adults (N = 147) were randomized to either a 3-day brief mindfulness training condition incorporating instruction in both attention monitoring and acceptance, a mindfulness training condition incorporating attention monitoring instruction only, a relaxation training condition, or an active reading-control condition. Participants completed measures of dispositional mindfulness and treatment expectancies before the training session on Day 1 and then completed a 6-min Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART) measuring mind wandering after the training session on Day 3. Acceptance training was important for reducing mind wandering, such that the attention-monitoring plus acceptance mindfulness training condition had the lowest mind wandering relative to the other conditions, including significantly lower mind wandering than the attention-monitoring only mindfulness training condition. In one of the first experimental mindfulness training dismantling studies to-date, we show that training in acceptance is a critical driver of mindfulness-training reductions in mind wandering. This effect suggests that acceptance skills may facilitate emotion regulation on boring and frustrating sustained attention tasks that foster mind wandering, such as the SART. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. An Appreciation for I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘素勤

    2010-01-01

    William Wordsworth, the representative poet of the early romanticism, is regarded as a "worshipper of nature", who can penetrate to the heart of things and give the reader the very life of nature. He wrote a lot of natural poems. "I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud" is one of his famous short lyrics to show his deep love for nature. This paper focuses on talking about the background and appreciating of the beauty of the poem for its charming poetic language and the significance of it.

  4. STUDY ON THE MATHEMATICAL MODEL FOR DRILL WANDERING MOTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Based on the kinematic relationship of the drill, drill point and workpiece and the coordinate systems founded, the mathematical models of the drill point wandering motion for the drill initial penetration, i. e. the formulae for the drill point center locus, hole shape and cutting edge locus, are established. According to these formulae the hole shape to be made is simulated and analyzed. It is verified that the bending chatter of the drill during the drill penetrating is the main cause to form a polygon like hole.

  5. Breeding ecology of Wandering Tattlers Tringa incana: a study from south-central Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Robert; Tomkovich, Pavel S.; Dementyev, Maksim N.

    2015-01-01

    Montane-nesting shorebirds are arguably the least studied of the Charadriiformes, owing in part to the remoteness of their breeding areas, low nesting densities, and specialized behaviors. We studied a marked population of the Wandering Tattler Tringa incana, during a three-year period (1997–1999) on nesting grounds in south-central Alaska. Two aspects of our results stand out. First is the previously undescribed preference for tattlers to nest several kilometers removed from pre-nesting feeding areas, mostly in association with both small (kettle) lakes and running water (near small distributaries of major drainages). Second is the apparent use of the study area by cohorts of birds of different breeding status, including (1) local breeders, which defended pre-breeding foraging areas, (2) local non-breeding birds, which remained on the area but were not territorial, and (3) transients that were captured later in the season, but not seen again on the area during the season of capture. We also found that (1) birds tended to nest in clusters despite what appeared to be the ample availability of nesting habitat, (2) they employed an inconspicuous’ nesting strategy whereby neither member of a pair betrayed its presence on the nesting area, and (3) females departed the area during early chick-rearing, leaving males to tend broods.

  6. The nature of mind wandering during reading varies with the cognitive control demands of the reading strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Jarrod; Schunn, Christian D; Schneider, Walter; McNamara, Danielle S

    2013-11-20

    Prior studies of mind wandering find the default network active during mind wandering, but these studies have yielded mixed results concerning the role of cognitive control brain regions during mind wandering. Mind wandering often interferes with reading comprehension, and prior neuroimaging studies of discourse comprehension and strategic reading comprehension have shown that there are at least two networks of brain regions that support strategic discourse comprehension: a domain-general control network and a network of regions supporting coherence-building comprehension processes. The present study was designed to further examine the neural correlates of mind wandering by examining mind wandering during strategic reading comprehension. Participants provided ratings of mind wandering frequency that were used to investigate interactions between the strategy being performed and brain regions whose activation was modulated by wind wandering. The results support prior findings showing that cognitive control regions are at times more active during mind wandering than during a task with low control demands, such as rereading. This result provides an initial examination of the neural correlates of mind wandering during discourse comprehension and shows that the processes being engaged by the primary task need to be considered when studying mind wandering. The results also replicate, in a different learning domain, prior findings of key brain areas associated with different reading strategies.

  7. Attentional Decoupling while Pursuing Intentions: A Form of Mind Wandering?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Lisa eCohen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In the current study, participants performed an ongoing lexical decision task (LDT in which they had to classify letter strings as words or nonwords. In intention conditions, they also had to encode a postponed intention to remember to make a different response if a pre-specified cue appeared. Attempting to replicate an important finding from Cohen, Jaudas, and Gollwitzer (2008, the interest was in examining how varying cognitive load associated with an intention influences attention to the ongoing task (measured by reaction times. Typically, disengaging from a primary task is perceived as negative as it can lead to performance decrements; however, if disengaging from a primary task helps one to accomplish a desired future goal, then these attentional shifts may in fact be constructive. Results replicated those of Cohen et al. (2008 and showed that participants were very flexible in how they managed attention in the ongoing lexical decision task. Reaction time costs emerged when cognitive load was high and solely for word trials (i.e., not for nonword trials. The implications for mind wandering are that, while our attention may wander when stimuli are present that trigger a suspended or unfulfilled goal, we are better able to stay on task when the stimuli are less goal relevant. Therefore, the decoupling process (e.g., Schooler et al., 2011 might be initiated when postponed goals are accompanied by a high degree of cognitive load and when external stimuli are present that relate to that goal.

  8. Wandering spleen: 'presentation in adolescent with high thrombotic risk'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchidjou, Hyppolite K; Castelluzzo, Maria A; Messia, Virginia; Luciani, Matteo; Monti, Lidia; Grimaldi, Chiara; Bernardi, Stefania; D'Argenio, Patrizia

    2014-07-01

    The term 'wandering spleen' refers to an abnormal hypermobility of the spleen, which may be congenital or acquired. The absence or abnormal laxity of splenic ligaments combined with an abnormally long and mobile vascular pedicle predispose to complications such as torsion of the splenic pedicle, infarction and splenic vein thrombosis. The clinical presentation of such disease is highly variable. In this case, we describe an asymptomatic case of wandering spleen in high thrombotic risk patients with cavernoma of splenic vein and infarction of the spleen. Physical examination was normal except the enlarged and no tender consistency spleen palpable at left iliac fossa. Ultrasonography revealed enlarged spleniform mass below its normal position suggesting vascular impairment and subsequently has been confirmed by colour Doppler ultrasound and computed tomography. The family history was positive for ischemic thrombotic vascular diseases and the screening for thrombotic risk has revealed hyperhomocysteinemia, thrombophilic homozygous gene mutations for factor V (H1299R) and MTHFR (C677T). For high thrombotic risk, prophylaxis postsplenectomy was suggested according to the international recommendations with subcutaneous low molecular weight heparin, associated with a preventive treatment with acetyl salicylic acid and folic acid along with B-vitamin. This case report may be helpful for clinicians involved in the care of splenectomized patients, because it has shown the importance of an appropriate pre and postoperative antithrombotic management to reduce as soon as possible the risk of thrombotic events in such patients after splenectomy.

  9. Accessing Creativity: Jungian Night Sea Journeys, Wandering Minds, and Chaos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Diane

    2016-01-01

    NDS theory has been meaningfully applied to the dynamics of creativity and psychology. These complex systems have much in common, including a broad definition of "product" as new order emerging from disorder, a new whole (etymologically, 'health') out of disintegration or destabilization. From a nonlinear dynamical systems perspective, this paper explores the far-from-equilibrium zone of creative incubation: first in the Jungian night sea journey, a primordial myth of psychological and creative transformation; then in the neuroscience of mind wandering, the well-spring of creative ideation within the larger neural matrix. Finally, chaos theory grounds the elusive subject of creativity, modeling chaotic generation of idea elements that tend toward strange attractors, combine unpredictably, and produce change by means of tension between opposites, particularly notes consciousness (light) and the poetic unconscious (darkness). Examples from my own artwork illustrate this dialectical process. Considered together, the unconscious mythic sea journey, the unknowing wandering mind, and the generative paradigm of deterministic chaos suggest conditions that facilitate creativity across disciplines, providing fresh indications that the darkness of the unknown or irrational is, paradoxically, the illuminative source and strength of creativity.

  10. Mind wandering away from pain dynamically engages antinociceptive and default mode brain networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucyi, Aaron; Salomons, Tim V; Davis, Karen D

    2013-11-12

    Human minds often wander away from their immediate sensory environment. It remains unknown whether such mind wandering is unsystematic or whether it lawfully relates to an individual's tendency to attend to salient stimuli such as pain and their associated brain structure/function. Studies of pain-cognition interactions typically examine explicit manipulation of attention rather than spontaneous mind wandering. Here we sought to better represent natural fluctuations in pain in daily life, so we assessed behavioral and neural aspects of spontaneous disengagement of attention from pain. We found that an individual's tendency to attend to pain related to the disruptive effect of pain on his or her cognitive task performance. Next, we linked behavioral findings to neural networks with strikingly convergent evidence from functional magnetic resonance imaging during pain coupled with thought probes of mind wandering, dynamic resting state activity fluctuations, and diffusion MRI. We found that (i) pain-induced default mode network (DMN) deactivations were attenuated during mind wandering away from pain; (ii) functional connectivity fluctuations between the DMN and periaqueductal gray (PAG) dynamically tracked spontaneous attention away from pain; and (iii) across individuals, stronger PAG-DMN structural connectivity and more dynamic resting state PAG-DMN functional connectivity were associated with the tendency to mind wander away from pain. These data demonstrate that individual tendencies to mind wander away from pain, in the absence of explicit manipulation, are subserved by functional and structural connectivity within and between default mode and antinociceptive descending modulation networks.

  11. Back to the future: autobiographical planning and the functionality of mind-wandering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Benjamin; Smallwood, Jonathan; Schooler, Jonathan W

    2011-12-01

    Given that as much as half of human thought arises in a stimulus independent fashion, it would seem unlikely that such thoughts would play no functional role in our lives. However, evidence linking the mind-wandering state to performance decrement has led to the notion that mind-wandering primarily represents a form of cognitive failure. Based on previous work showing a prospective bias to mind-wandering, the current study explores the hypothesis that one potential function of spontaneous thought is to plan and anticipate personally relevant future goals, a process referred to as autobiographical planning. The results confirm that the content of mind-wandering is predominantly future-focused, demonstrate that individuals with high working memory capacity are more likely to engage in prospective mind-wandering, and show that prospective mind-wandering frequently involves autobiographical planning. Together this evidence suggests that mind-wandering can enable prospective cognitive operations that are likely to be useful to the individual as they navigate through their daily lives.

  12. Relationships between mind-wandering and attentional control abilities in young adults and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawarczyk, David; Majerus, Steve; Catale, Corinne; D'Argembeau, Arnaud

    2014-05-01

    Recent findings suggest that mind-wandering-the occurrence of thoughts that are both stimulus-independent and task-unrelated-corresponds to temporary failures in attentional control processes involved in maintaining constant task-focused attention. Studies supporting this proposal are, however, limited by a possible confound between mind-wandering episodes and other kinds of conscious experiences, such as external distractions (i.e., interoceptive sensations and exteroceptive perceptions). In the present study, we addressed this issue by examining, in adolescents and young adults, the relations between tasks measuring attentional control abilities and a measure of mind-wandering that is distinct from external distractions. We observed (1) that adolescents experienced more frequent external distractions, but not more mind-wandering, than young adults during the Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART) and (2) that, in young adults, the influence of external distractions on SART performance was fully accounted for by attentional control abilities, whereas mind-wandering was associated with decreases in SART performance above and beyond what was explained by attentional control abilities. These results show that mind-wandering cannot be entirely reduced to failures in the ability to maintain one's attention focused on task, and suggest that external distractions rather than mind-wandering are due to attentional control failures.

  13. ECG baseline wander correction based on mean-median filter and empirical mode decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Yi; Chen, Yu; Hao, Wei Tuo

    2014-01-01

    A novel approach of ECG baseline wander correction based on mean-median filter and empirical mode decomposition is presented in this paper. The low frequency parts of the original signals were removed by the mean median filter in a nonlinear way to obtain the baseline wander estimation, then its series of IMFs were sifted by t-test after empirical mode decomposition. The proposed method, tested by the ECG signals in MIT-BIH Arrhythmia database and European ST_T database, is more effective compared with other baseline wander removal methods.

  14. Reverse polarity magnetized melt rocks from the Chicxulub impact structure, Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia-Fucugauchi, Jaime; Marin, Luis E.; Sharpton, Virgil L.; Quezada, Juan Manuel

    1993-01-01

    Further paleomagnetic data for core samples of melt rock recovered in the Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) exploratory wells within the Chicxulub structure, northern Yucatan peninsula, Mexico are reported. A previous report by Sharpton showed that the rocks studied contain high iridium levels and shocked breccia clasts, and an Ar-40/Ar-39 age of 65.2 plus or minus 0.4 Ma. The geomagnetic polarity determined for two samples is reverse (R) and was correlated with chron 29R that includes the K/T boundary. Our present analysis is based on two samples from each of three clasts of the melt rock from PEMEX well Y6-N17 (1295 to 1299 m b.s.l.). This study concentrates on the vectorial nature and stability of the remanence (NRM), the magnetic mineralogy and remanence carriers (i.e., the reliability and origin of the record), and on the implications (correlation with expected paleolatitude and polarity). The relative orientation of the drill core samples with respect to the horizontal is known. Samples were stable under alternating field (AF) and thermal treatments, and after removal of a small component they exhibited single-vectorial behavior. The characteristic remanence inclinations show small dispersion and a mean value (-43 deg) in close agreement with the expected inclination and paleolatitude (derived from the North American apparent polar wander path). Isothermal remenence (IRM) acquisition experiments, Lowrie-Fuller tests, coercivity and unblocking temperature spectra of NRM and saturation IRM, susceptibility and Q-coefficient analyses, and the single-component nature indicate a dominant mineralogy of iron-rich titanomagnetites with single or pseduo-single domain states. The stable characteristic magnetization may be interpreted as a result of shock heating of the rock at the time of formation of the inpact structure and its polarity, age, and paleolatitude are consistent with a time about the K/T boundary.

  15. Reverse polarity magnetized melt rocks from the Chicxulub impact structure, Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia-Fucugauchi, Jaime; Marin, Luis E.; Sharpton, Virgil L.; Quezada, Juan Manuel

    1993-03-01

    Further paleomagnetic data for core samples of melt rock recovered in the Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) exploratory wells within the Chicxulub structure, northern Yucatan peninsula, Mexico are reported. A previous report by Sharpton showed that the rocks studied contain high iridium levels and shocked breccia clasts, and an Ar-40/Ar-39 age of 65.2 plus or minus 0.4 Ma. The geomagnetic polarity determined for two samples is reverse (R) and was correlated with chron 29R that includes the K/T boundary. Our present analysis is based on two samples from each of three clasts of the melt rock from PEMEX well Y6-N17 (1295 to 1299 m b.s.l.). This study concentrates on the vectorial nature and stability of the remanence (NRM), the magnetic mineralogy and remanence carriers (i.e., the reliability and origin of the record), and on the implications (correlation with expected paleolatitude and polarity). The relative orientation of the drill core samples with respect to the horizontal is known. Samples were stable under alternating field (AF) and thermal treatments, and after removal of a small component they exhibited single-vectorial behavior. The characteristic remanence inclinations show small dispersion and a mean value (-43 deg) in close agreement with the expected inclination and paleolatitude (derived from the North American apparent polar wander path). Isothermal remenence (IRM) acquisition experiments, Lowrie-Fuller tests, coercivity and unblocking temperature spectra of NRM and saturation IRM, susceptibility and Q-coefficient analyses, and the single-component nature indicate a dominant mineralogy of iron-rich titanomagnetites with single or pseduo-single domain states. The stable characteristic magnetization may be interpreted as a result of shock heating of the rock at the time of formation of the inpact structure and its polarity, age, and paleolatitude are consistent with a time about the K/T boundary.

  16. Oscillation and wandering characteristics of solutions of a linear differential system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sergeev, Igor N [M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Mechanics and Mathematics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2012-02-28

    We introduce new Lyapunov characteristics for the oscillation and wandering of solutions of linear differential equations or systems, namely, the frequency of a solution (the mean number of zeros on the time axis), of some coordinate of the solution, or of all possible linear combinations of these coordinates, and also the mean angular velocity of the rotation of a solution (about the origin in the phase space) and various wandering exponents (derived from the mean angular velocity). We shall show that the sets of values of all these quantities on the solutions of a linear autonomous system coincide with the set of absolute values of the imaginary parts of eigenvalues of the matrix of the system. We shall see that the frequencies of solutions are bounded above by their wandering exponents, and the frequencies and wandering exponents of all solutions of an arbitrary second-order equation coincide.

  17. Beam wander relieved orbital angular momentum communication in turbulent atmosphere using Bessel beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yangsheng; Lei, Ting; Li, Zhaohui; Li, Yangjin; Gao, Shecheng; Xie, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xiaocong

    2017-02-01

    Optical beam wander is one of the most important issues for free-space optical (FSO) communication. We theoretically derive a beam wander model for Bessel beams propagating in turbulent atmosphere. The calculated beam wander of high order Bessel beams with different turbulence strengths are consistent with experimental measurements. Both theoretical and experimental results reveal that high order Bessel beams are less influenced by the turbulent atmosphere. We also demonstrate the Bessel beams based orbital angular momentum (OAM) multiplexing/demultiplexing in FSO communication with atmospheric turbulence. Under the same atmospheric turbulence condition, the bit error rates of transmitted signals carried by high order Bessel beams show smaller values and fluctuations, which indicates that the high order Bessel beams have an advantage of mitigating the beam wander in OAM multiplexing FSO communication.

  18. Torsion of a Wandering Pelvic Spleen; Acute Abdomen in a Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metin GUNDUZ

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Wandering spleen is an uncommon clinical entity. Acute splenic torsion of wandering spleen is a potentially fatal surgical emergency case, and its correct and early identification continues to represent a challenge especially in children. A 11 years old girl was taken to the operative room for an explorative laparotomy due to abdominal pain, tenderness, and a midabdominal mass. Preoperative computerise tomography showed a torsion of an enlarged wandering pelvic spleen which was in a serious ischemic suffering due to a 720 degrees clock torsion around its exceptionally long pedicle. Splenectomy has been the treatment for symptomatic wandering spleen as in our case. [J Contemp Med 2012; 2(2.000: 115-117

  19. Prediction of Mind-Wandering with Electroencephalogram and Non-linear Regression Modeling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Issaku Kawashima; Hiroaki Kumano

    2017-01-01

    Mind-wandering (MW), task-unrelated thought, has been examined by researchers in an increasing number of articles using models to predict whether subjects are in MW, using numerous physiological variables...

  20. Beam wander relieved orbital angular momentum communication in turbulent atmosphere using Bessel beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yangsheng; Lei, Ting; Li, Zhaohui; Li, Yangjin; Gao, Shecheng; Xie, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xiaocong

    2017-02-10

    Optical beam wander is one of the most important issues for free-space optical (FSO) communication. We theoretically derive a beam wander model for Bessel beams propagating in turbulent atmosphere. The calculated beam wander of high order Bessel beams with different turbulence strengths are consistent with experimental measurements. Both theoretical and experimental results reveal that high order Bessel beams are less influenced by the turbulent atmosphere. We also demonstrate the Bessel beams based orbital angular momentum (OAM) multiplexing/demultiplexing in FSO communication with atmospheric turbulence. Under the same atmospheric turbulence condition, the bit error rates of transmitted signals carried by high order Bessel beams show smaller values and fluctuations, which indicates that the high order Bessel beams have an advantage of mitigating the beam wander in OAM multiplexing FSO communication.

  1. Accessory wandering spleen: Report of a case of laparoscopic approach in an asymptomatic patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Perin

    2014-01-01

    CONCLUSION: We suggest performing surgery with a laparoscopic approach in patients with accessory wandering spleen, though asymptomatic, because of the risk of serious complications in case of accessory spleen torsion.

  2. Chromatic effects in beam wander correction for free-space quantum communications

    CERN Document Server

    Carrasco-Casado, Alberto; Fernandez, Veronica

    2016-01-01

    Beam wander caused by atmospheric turbulence can significantly degrade the performance of horizontal free-space quantum communication links. Classical beam wander correction techniques cannot be applied due to the stronger requirements of transmitting single photons. One strategy to overcome this limitation consists in using a separate wavelength from that of the quantum signal to analyze the beam wander and use this information for its correction. For this strategy to work adequately, both wavelengths should be affected equally by atmospheric turbulence, i.e. no chromatic effects should be originated from beam wander. In this letter, a series of experiments are performed to prove that this is the case for {\\lambda} ~ 850 nm as the quantum signal and {\\lambda} ~ 1550 nm as the tracking signal of a quantum communication system.

  3. Wandering Around Salvation and Temptation——The Analysis of the Characteristics of Prufrock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian; Yan

    2014-01-01

    Prufrock in the poem "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" is a split character with timidity and hesitation, who wanders around salvation and temptation. This paper tries to analyze his paradoxical psychology with the analysis of the poem.

  4. Wandering Tales: Evolutionary origins of mental time travel and language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Charles Corballis

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A central component of mind wandering is mental time travel, the calling to mind of remembered past events and of imagined future ones. Mental time travel may also be critical to the evolution of language, which enables us to communicate about the nonpresent, sharing memories, plans, and ideas. Mental time travel is indexed in humans by hippocampal activity, and studies also suggest that the hippocampus in rats is active when the animals replay or pre play activity in a spatial environment, such as a maze. Mental time travel may have ancient origins, contrary to the view that it is unique to humans. Since mental time travel is also thought to underlie language, these findings suggest that language evolved gradually from pre-existing cognitive capacities, contrary to the view of Chomsky and others that language and symbolic thought emerged abruptly, in a single step, within the past 100,000 years.

  5. Wandering crowd simulation based on space syntax theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Liping; SUN Chen; LIU Li; WANG Lin

    2012-01-01

    Space syntax has proven there appears to be a fundamental process that informs human and social usage of an environ- ment, and the effects of spatial configuration on movement patterns are consistent with a model of individual decision behavior. In- troducing space syntax to crowd simulation will enable space structure guide the random movement of the crowd with no specific targets. This paper proposes a simulation method of the wandering crowd, which calculates the crowd distribution corresponding to the space through space syntax and uses a hybrid path planning algorithm to dynamically navigate the crowd to conform to the dis- tribution. Experiments show the presented method can obtain reasonable and vision-realistic simulation results.

  6. Wandering tales: evolutionary origins of mental time travel and language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corballis, Michael C

    2013-01-01

    A central component of mind wandering is mental time travel, the calling to mind of remembered past events and of imagined future ones. Mental time travel may also be critical to the evolution of language, which enables us to communicate about the non-present, sharing memories, plans, and ideas. Mental time travel is indexed in humans by hippocampal activity, and studies also suggest that the hippocampus in rats is active when the animals replay or pre play activity in a spatial environment, such as a maze. Mental time travel may have ancient origins, contrary to the view that it is unique to humans. Since mental time travel is also thought to underlie language, these findings suggest that language evolved gradually from pre-existing cognitive capacities, contrary to the view of Chomsky and others that language and symbolic thought emerged abruptly, in a single step, within the past 100,000 years.

  7. Turbulence-induced persistence in laser beam wandering

    CERN Document Server

    Zunino, Luciano; Funes, Gustavo; Pérez, Darío G

    2015-01-01

    We have experimentally confirmed the presence of long-memory correlations in the wandering of a thin Gaussian laser beam over a screen after propagating through a turbulent medium. A laboratory-controlled experiment was conducted in which coordinate fluctuations of the laser beam were recorded at a sufficiently high sampling rate for a wide range of turbulent conditions. Horizontal and vertical displacements of the laser beam centroid were subsequently analyzed by implementing detrended fluctuation analysis. This is a very well-known and widely used methodology to unveil memory effects from time series. Results obtained from this experimental analysis allow us to confirm that both coordinates behave as highly persistent signals for strong turbulent intensities. This finding is relevant for a better comprehension and modeling of the turbulence effects in free-space optical communication systems and other applications related to propagation of optical signals in the atmosphere.

  8. Pros and cons of a wandering mind: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottaviani, Cristina; Couyoumdjian, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Mind wandering (MW) has recently been associated with both adaptive (e.g., creativity enhancement) and maladaptive (e.g., mood worsening) consequences. This study aimed at investigating whether proneness to MW was prospectively associated with negative health outcomes. At time 0, 21 women, 19 men; mean age = 24.5 (4.9) underwent a 5-min baseline electrocardiogram (ECG), a 20-min laboratory tracking task with thought probes, and personality questionnaires. At time 1 (1 year follow-up), the same participants underwent a 24-h Ecological Momentary Assessment characterized by ambulatory ECG recording and electronic diaries. First, we examined if the likelihood of being a "mind wanderer" was associated with specific personality dispositions. Then, we tested if the occurrence of episodes of MW in the lab would be correlated with frequency of MW in daily life. Finally, multiple regression models were used to test if MW longitudinally acted as a risk factor for health, accounting for the effects of biobehavioral variables. Among dispositional traits, the frequency of MW episodes in daily life was inversely associated with the capacity of being mindful (i.e., aware of the present moment and non-judging). There was a positive correlation between frequency of MW in the lab and in daily life, suggesting that it is a stable disposition of the individual. When differentiated from perseverative cognition (i.e., rumination and worry), MW did not predict the presence of health risk factors 1 year later, however, a higher occurrence of episodes of MW was associated with short-term adverse consequences, such as increased 24-h heart rate (HR) on the same day and difficulty falling asleep the subsequent night. Present findings suggest that MW may be associated with short term "side effects" but argue against a long term dysfunctional view of this cognitive process.

  9. Evidence for olfactory search in wandering albatross, Diomedea exulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevitt, Gabrielle A; Losekoot, Marcel; Weimerskirch, Henri

    2008-03-25

    Wandering albatrosses (Diomedea exulans) forage over thousands of square kilometers of open ocean for patchily distributed live prey and carrion. These birds have large olfactory bulbs and respond to fishy-scented odors in at-sea trials, suggesting that olfaction plays a role in natural foraging behavior. With the advent of new, fine-scale tracking technologies, we are beginning to explore how birds track prey in the pelagic environment, and we relate these observations to models of odor transport in natural situations. These models suggest that odors emanating from prey will tend to disperse laterally and downwind of the odor source and acquire an irregular and patchy concentration distribution due to turbulent transport. For a seabird foraging over the ocean, this scenario suggests that olfactory search would be facilitated by crosswind flight to optimize the probability of encountering a plume emanating from a prey item, followed by upwind, zigzag flight to localize the prey. By contrast, birds approaching prey by sight would be expected to fly directly to a prey item, irrespective of wind direction. Using high-precision global positioning system (GPS) loggers in conjunction with stomach temperature recorders to simultaneously monitor feeding events, we confirm these predictions in freely ranging wandering albatrosses. We found that initial olfactory detection was implicated in nearly half (46.8%) of all flown approaches preceding prey-capture events, accounting for 45.5% of total prey mass captured by in-flight foraging. These results offer insights into the sensory basis for area-restricted search at the large spatial scales of the open ocean.

  10. Age-related mate choice in the wandering albatross.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouventin; Lequette; Dobson

    1999-05-01

    We studied mate choice in the wandering albatross, Diomedea exulans, using data from 32 years of banding returns in the population of the Crozet Islands. We studied mating choices in a single year, when the Crozet Islands population was male biased (8:5, males:females). Thus, we expected that females might show great flexibility of choice of partners. Because age and experience might influence mate choice, we tested the expectation that females would choose the oldest and most experienced males for pair bonding. Pair bonds usually last until one member of the pair dies (0.3% of the birds 'divorce'), so mate choice should be especially important. We found that the ages of males and females in both displaying and bonded (breeding) pairs were significantly correlated. These age-associated pairings were not a passive phenomenon, but appeared to be due to an active process of selection of mates of similar age. First-time breeders sought mates of similar age, but preferred those with the most experience. Remating, experienced birds whose mates had died did not pair with individuals of significantly similar age, but predominantly paired with other widowed birds that, on average, were also relatively old. Mate fidelity in wandering albatrosses may be due to the cost of finding and bonding with a new mate. Pair bonds, and thus breeding, took an average of 3.2 and 2.3 years to establish, for males and females, respectively. Thus, remating exerts a potential average reproductive cost of about 15% of lifetime reproductive success. Copyright 1999 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour.

  11. The ARSQ 2.0 reveals age and personality effects on mind-wandering experiences

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The human brain frequently generates thoughts and feelings detached from environmental demands. Investigating the rich repertoire of these mind-wandering experiences is challenging, as it depends on introspection and mapping its content requires an unknown number of dimensions. We recently developed a retrospective self-report questionnaire—the Amsterdam Resting-State Questionnaire (ARSQ)—which quantifies mind wandering along seven dimensions: “Discontinuity of Mind,” “Theory of Mind,” “Self,...

  12. Mind-wandering, cognition, and performance: a theory-driven meta-analysis of attention regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Jason G; Oswald, Frederick L; Beier, Margaret E

    2014-11-01

    The current meta-analysis accumulates empirical findings on the phenomenon of mind-wandering, integrating and interpreting findings in light of psychological theories of cognitive resource allocation. Cognitive resource theory emphasizes both individual differences in attentional resources and task demands together to predict variance in task performance. This theory motivated our conceptual and meta-analysis framework by introducing moderators indicative of task-demand to predict who is more likely to mind-wander under what conditions, and to predict when mind-wandering and task-related thought are more (or less) predictive of task performance. Predictions were tested via a random-effects meta-analysis of correlations obtained from normal adult samples (k = 88) based on measurement of specified episodes of off-task and/or on-task thought frequency and task performance. Results demonstrated that people with fewer cognitive resources tend to engage in more mind-wandering, whereas those with more cognitive resources are more likely to engage in task-related thought. Addressing predictions of resource theory, we found that greater time-on-task-although not greater task complexity-tended to strengthen the negative relation between cognitive resources and mind-wandering. Additionally, increases in mind-wandering were generally associated with decreases in task performance, whereas increases in task-related thought were associated with increased performance. Further supporting resource theory, the negative relation between mind-wandering and performance was more pronounced for more complex tasks, though not longer tasks. Complementarily, the positive association between task-related thought and performance was stronger for more complex tasks and for longer tasks. We conclude by discussing implications and future research directions for mind-wandering as a construct of interest in psychological research.

  13. Beginnings and Importance of Romantic Wandering in mid-18th Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandar Molnar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In the article, the author is discussing the importance of the wandering experiences for the emergence of Romanticism in the mid-18th century. His point of view is that without such experiences the rising culture of novels would not be able to trigger the correspondent take off in romantic arts and philosophy. Only during wanderings in the unknown nature it was possible not only to contemplate the alternative universes reveled by novels, but also to feel the possibility of their existence. And the most precious experiences wanderings could offer were the experiences of the possibility that the golden age was not only part of a mythic past but could be re-established again. Romantic wanderings were always part of the search for such golden age and source of the urge to re-invent the alternative to the oppressive bourgeois society. Such a view on the importance of romantic wanderings the author tries to demonstrate on examples of Jean-Jacques Rousseau in France and Johann Gottfried Herder in Germany. He considers them as first Romantics (along with Johann Georg Hamann in Germany whose early wandering experiences shaped to a great extent their intellectual development and enabled them to engage passionately in battle with the ideals of Enlightenment.

  14. Conjoint influence of mind-wandering and sleepiness on task performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawarczyk, David; D'Argembeau, Arnaud

    2016-10-01

    Recent research suggests that sleepiness and mind-wandering-the experience of thoughts that are both stimulus-independent and task-unrelated-frequently co-occur and are both associated with poorer cognitive functioning. Whether these two phenomena have distinguishable effects on task performance remains unknown, however. To investigate this question, we used the online experience sampling of mind-wandering episodes and subjective sleepiness during a laboratory task (the Sustained Attention to Response Task; SART), and also assessed mind-wandering frequency and sleep-related disturbances in daily life using self-report questionnaires. The results revealed that the tendency to experience mind-wandering episodes during the SART and daily life was associated with higher levels of daytime sleepiness and sleep-related disturbances. More important, however, mind-wandering and sleepiness were independent predictors of SART performance at both the within- and between-individuals levels. These findings demonstrate that, although mind-wandering and sleepiness frequently co-occur, these two phenomena have distinguishable and additive effects on task performance. (PsycINFO Database Record

  15. The way we encounter reading material influences how frequently we mind wander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varao Sousa, Trish L.; Carriere, Jonathan S. A.; Smilek, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    We examined whether different encounters of reading material influence the likelihood of mind wandering, memory for the material, and the ratings of interest in the material. In a within-subjects design participants experienced three different reading encounters: (1) reading a passage aloud, (2) listening to a passage being read to them, and (3) reading a passage silently. Throughout each reading encounter probes were given in order to identify mind wandering. After finishing the passage participants also rated how interesting it was and completed a content recognition test. Results showed that reading aloud led to the least amount of mind wandering, while listening to the passage led to the most mind wandering. Listening to the passage was also associated with the poorest memory performance and the least interest in the material. Finally, within the silent reading and listening encounters we observed negative relations between mind wandering and both memory performance and interest in the material, replicating previous findings. Taken together, the present findings improve our understanding of the nature of mind wandering while reading, and have potentially important implications for readers seeking to take advantage of the convenience of audiobooks and podcasts. PMID:24348444

  16. The role of the default mode network in component processes underlying the wandering mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poerio, Giulia L; Sormaz, Mladen; Wang, Hao-Ting; Margulies, Daniel; Jefferies, Elizabeth; Smallwood, Jonathan

    2017-03-21

    Experiences such as mind-wandering illustrate that cognition is not always tethered to events in the here-and-now. Although converging evidence emphasises the default mode network (DMN) in mind-wandering, its precise contribution remains unclear. The DMN comprises cortical regions that are maximally distant from primary sensory and motor cortex, a topological location that may support the stimulus-independence of mind-wandering. The DMN is functionally heterogeneous, comprising regions engaged by memory, social cognition, and planning; processes relevant to mind-wandering content. Our study examined the relationships between: (i) individual differences in resting-state DMN connectivity, (ii) performance on memory, social, and planning tasks and (iii) variability in spontaneous thought, to investigate whether the DMN is critical to mind-wandering because it supports stimulus-independent cognition, memory retrieval, or both. Individual variation in task performance modulated the functional organisation of the DMN: poor external engagement was linked to stronger coupling between medial and dorsal subsystems, while decoupling of the core from the cerebellum predicted reports of detailed memory retrieval. Both patterns predicted off-task future thoughts. Consistent with predictions from component process accounts of mind-wandering, our study suggests a two-fold involvement of the DMN: (i) it supports experiences that are unrelated to the environment through strong coupling between its sub-systems; (ii) it allows memory representations to form the basis of conscious experience. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press.

  17. The more your mind wanders, the smaller your attentional blink: an individual differences study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, David R; Ralph, Brandon C W; Besner, Derek; Smilek, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The present studies investigate the hypothesis that individuals who frequently report experiencing episodes of mind wandering do so because they under-invest attentional/executive resources in the external environment. Here we examined whether self-reported instances of mind wandering predict the magnitude of the "attentional blink" (AB) in a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) task, since a prominent view is that the AB derives from an over-investment of attention in the information stream. Study 1 demonstrates that subjective reports of mind wandering in a sustained attention task have a negative predictive relation with respect to the magnitude of the AB measured in a subsequent RSVP task. In addition, using the Spontaneous and Deliberate Mind Wandering Questionnaire in Study 2, we were again able to show that trait-level mind wandering in everyday life negatively predicts AB magnitude. We suggest that mind wandering may be the behavioural outcome of an adaptive cognitive style intended to maximize the efficient processing of dynamic and temporally unpredictable events.

  18. Ventromedial prefrontal damage reduces mind-wandering and biases its temporal focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertossi, Elena; Ciaramelli, Elisa

    2016-11-01

    Mind-wandering, an ubiquitous expression of humans' mental life, reflects a drift of attention away from the current task towards self-generated thoughts, and has been associated with activity in the brain default network. To date, however, little is understood about the contribution of individual nodes of this network to mind-wandering. Here, we investigated whether the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) is critically involved in mind-wandering, by studying the propensity to mind-wander in patients with lesion to the vmPFC (vmPFC patients), control patients with lesions not involving the vmPFC, and healthy individuals. Participants performed three tasks varying in cognitive demands while their thoughts were periodically sampled, and a self-report scale of daydreaming in daily life. vmPFC patients exhibited reduced mind-wandering rates across tasks, and claimed less frequent daydreaming, than both healthy and brain-damaged controls. vmPFC damage reduced off-task thoughts related to the future, while it promoted those about the present. These results indicate that vmPFC critically supports mind-wandering, possibly by helping to construct future-related scenarios and thoughts that have the potential to draw attention inward, away from the ongoing tasks.

  19. The way we encounter reading material influences how frequently we mind wander

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trish L Varao Sousa

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We examined whether different encounters of reading material influence the likelihood of mind wandering, memory for the material, and the ratings of interest in the material. In a within-subjects design participants experienced three different reading encounters: 1 reading a passage aloud, 2 listening to a passage being read to them, and 3 reading a passage silently. Throughout each reading encounter probes were given in order to identify mind wandering. After finishing the passage participants also rated how interesting it was and completed a content recognition test. Results showed that reading aloud led to the least amount of mind wandering, while listening to the passage led to the most mind wandering. Listening to the passage was also associated with the poorest memory performance and the least interest in the material. Finally, within the silent reading and listening encounters we observed negative relations between mind wandering and both memory performance and interest in the material, replicating previous findings. Taken together, the present findings improve our understanding of the nature of mind wandering while reading, and have potentially important implications for readers seeking to take advantage of the convenience of audiobooks and podcasts.

  20. Mind wandering and reading comprehension: examining the roles of working memory capacity, interest, motivation, and topic experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsworth, Nash; McMillan, Brittany D

    2013-05-01

    Individual differences in mind wandering and reading comprehension were examined in the current study. In particular, individual differences in mind wandering, working memory capacity, interest in the current topic, motivation to do well on the task, and topic experience and their relations with reading comprehension were examined in the current study. Using confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling it was found that variation in mind wandering while reading was influenced by working memory capacity, topic interest, and motivation. Furthermore, these same factors, along with topic experience, influenced individual differences in reading comprehension. Importantly, several factors had direct effects on reading comprehension (and mind wandering), while the relation between reading comprehension (and mind wandering) and other factors occurred via indirect effects. These results suggest that both domain-general and domain-specific factors contribute to mind wandering while reading and to reading comprehension.

  1. Apparent Clustering and Apparent Background Earthquakes Biased by Undetected Seismicity

    CERN Document Server

    Sornette, D

    2005-01-01

    In models of triggered seismicity and in their inversion with empirical data, the detection threshold m_d is commonly equated to the magnitude m_0 of the smallest triggering earthquake. This unjustified assumption neglects the possibility of shocks below the detection threshold triggering observable events. We introduce a formalism that distinguishes between the detection threshold m_d and the minimum triggering earthquake m_0 < m_d. By considering the branching structure of one complete cascade of triggered events, we derive the apparent branching ratio n_a (which is the apparent fraction of aftershocks in a given catalog) and the apparent background source S_a that are observed when only the structure above the detection threshold m_d is known due to the presence of smaller undetected events that are capable of triggering larger events. If earthquake triggering is controlled in large part by the smallest magnitudes as several recent analyses have shown, this implies that previous estimates of the cluster...

  2. SPLENIC VOLVULUS WITH LACERATION AFTER TRIVIAL TRAUMA IN A CASE OF WANDERING SPLEEN: A RARE CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinayak

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Volvulus of wandering spleen is a rare clinical occurrence with fewer than 500 cases reported and an incidence of less than 0.2%. We present a case of a 27-year-old man, who complained of a short history of severe abdominal pain with the background of recurrent abdominal pain. Ultrasound revealed wandering spleen with splenic vein thrombosis. An abdominal contrast enhanced computerized tomography scan revealed a torted wandering spleen with splenic vein thrombosis with infarction. This required a splenectomy due to splenic infarction. This report highlights the investigations including USG and CECT necessary for a patient who presents with an ischaemic torted wandering spleen.

  3. Working memory capacity does not always support future-oriented mind-wandering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVay, Jennifer C; Unsworth, Nash; McMillan, Brittany D; Kane, Michael J

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the claim that mind-wandering demands executive resources, and more specifically that people with better executive control will have the resources to engage in more future-oriented thought than will those with poorer executive control, we reanalyzed thought-report data from 2 independently conducted studies (J. C. McVay & M. J. Kane, 2012, Why does working memory capacity predict variation in reading comprehension? On the influence of mind wandering and executive attention, Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, Vol. 141, pp. 302-320; N. Unsworth & B. D. McMillan, in press, Mind-wandering and reading comprehension: Examining the roles of working memory capacity, interest, motivation, and topic experience, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition) on working memory capacity (WMC), mind-wandering, and reading comprehension. Both of these individual-differences studies assessed large samples of university subjects' WMC abilities via multiple tasks and probed their immediate thought content while reading; in reporting any task-unrelated thoughts (TUTs), subjects indicated whether those thoughts were about the future or the past, if applicable. In contrast to previously published findings indicating that higher WMC subjects mind-wandered about the future more than did lower WMC subjects (B. Baird, J. Smallwood, & J. W. Schooler, 2011, Back to the future: Autobiographical planning and the functionality of mind-wandering, Consciousness and Cognition, Vol. 20, pp. 1604-1611), we found only weak to modest negative correlations between WMC and future-oriented TUTs. If anything, our findings suggest that higher WMC subjects' TUTs were somewhat less often future-oriented than were lower WMC subjects'. Either WMC is not truly associated with mind-wandering about the future, or we have identified some important boundary conditions around that association.

  4. Mind wandering and motor control: off-task thinking disrupts the online adjustment of behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, Julia W Y; Dao, Elizabeth; Blinn, Patricia; Krigolson, Olav E; Boyd, Lara A; Handy, Todd C

    2012-01-01

    Mind wandering episodes have been construed as periods of "stimulus-independent" thought, where our minds are decoupled from the external sensory environment. In two experiments, we used behavioral and event-related potential (ERP) measures to determine whether mind wandering episodes can also be considered as periods of "response-independent" thought, with our minds disengaged from adjusting our behavioral outputs. In the first experiment, participants performed a motor tracking task and were occasionally prompted to report whether their attention was "on-task" or "mind wandering." We found greater tracking error in periods prior to mind wandering vs. on-task reports. To ascertain whether this finding was due to attenuation in visual perception per se vs. a disruptive effect of mind wandering on performance monitoring, we conducted a second experiment in which participants completed a time-estimation task. They were given feedback on the accuracy of their estimations while we recorded their EEG, and were also occasionally asked to report their attention state. We found that the sensitivity of behavior and the P3 ERP component to feedback signals were significantly reduced just prior to mind wandering vs. on-task attentional reports. Moreover, these effects co-occurred with decreases in the error-related negativity elicited by feedback signals (fERN), a direct measure of behavioral feedback assessment in cortex. Our findings suggest that the functional consequences of mind wandering are not limited to just the processing of incoming stimulation per se, but extend as well to the control and adjustment of behavior.

  5. Mind Wandering and Motor Control: Off-Task Thinking Disrupts the Online Adjustment of Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia W. Y. Kam

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Mind wandering episodes have been construed as periods of "stimulus-independent" thought, where our minds are decoupled from the external sensory environment. In two experiments, we used behavioral and event-related potential (ERP measures to determine whether mind wandering episodes can also be considered as periods of "response-independent" thought, with our minds disengaged from adjusting our behavioral outputs. In the first experiment, participants performed a motor tracking task and were occasionally prompted to report whether their attention was "on-task" or "mind wandering." We found greater tracking error in periods prior to mind wandering vs. on-task reports. To ascertain whether this finding was due to attenuation in visual perception per se vs. a disruptive effect of mind wandering on performance monitoring, we conducted a second experiment in which participants completed a time-estimation task. They were given feedback on the accuracy of their estimations while we recorded their EEG, and were also occasionally asked to report their attention state. We found that the sensitivity of behavior and the P3 ERP component to feedback signals were significantly reduced just prior to mind wandering vs. on-task attentional reports. Moreover, these effects co-occurred with decreases in the error-related negativity elicited by feedback signals (fERN, a direct measure of behavioral feedback assessment in cortex. Our findings suggest that the functional consequences of mind wandering are not limited to just the processing of incoming stimulation per se, but extend as well to the control and adjustment of behavior.

  6. Magnetization in the South Pole Aitken basin: Implications for the lunar dynamo and true polar wander

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-14

    Bethell a , c a Department of Earth & Planetary Sciences, University of California Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA, 95064, USA b Red Sky ...space varies burial depth in km, agnetic dipole moment in Am 2 , magnetic dip (inclination) in de- rees downward from the horizontal, and declination...Santa ruz / NASA Ames University Affiliated Research Center, Aligned esearch Program and ( 3) Red Sky Research, LLC. Thanks to Rob oe and Gary

  7. NEUROCOMPUTATIONAL MODEL OF EEG COMPLEXITY DURING MIND WANDERING

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    Antonio José Ibáñez-Molina

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mind wandering (MW can be understood as a transient state in which attention drifts from an external task to internal self-generated thoughts. MW has been associated with the activation of the Default Mode Network (DMN. In addition, it has been shown that the activity of the DMN is anti-correlated with activation in brain networks related to the processing of external events (e.g., Salience network, SN. In this study, we present a mean field model based on weakly coupled Kuramoto oscillators. We simulated the oscillatory activity of the entire brain and explored the role of the interaction between the nodes from the DMN and SN in MW states. External stimulation was added to the network model in two opposite conditions. Stimuli could be presented when oscillators in the SN showed more internal coherence (synchrony than in the DMN, or, on the contrary, when the coherence in the SN was lower than in the DMN. The resulting phases of the oscillators were analyzed and used to simulate EEG signals. Our results showed that the structural complexity from both simulated and real data was higher when the model was stimulated during periods in which DMN was more coherent than the SN. Overall, our results provided a plausible mechanistic explanation to MW as a state in which high coherence in the DMN partially suppresses the capacity of the system to process external stimuli.

  8. Unsteady wandering magnetic field lines, turbulence and laboratory flux ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intrator, T.; Sears, J.; Weber, T.; Liu, D.; Pulliam, D.; Lazarian, A.

    2011-12-01

    We describe earth bound laboratory experiment investigations of patchy, unsteady, bursty, patchy magnetic field structures that are unifying features of magnetic reconnection and turbulence in helio, space and astro physics. Macroscopic field lines occupy cross sectional areas, fill up three dimensional (3D) volumes as flux tubes. They contain mass with Newtonian dynamics that follow magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) equations of motion. Flux rope geometry can be ubiquitous in laminar reconnection sheet geometries that are themselves unstable to formation of secondary "islands" that in 3D are really flux ropes. Flux ropes are ubiquitous structures on the sun and the rest of the heliosphere. Understanding the dynamics of flux ropes and their mutual interactions offers the key to many important astrophysical phenomena, including magnetic reconnection and turbulence. We describe laboratory investigations on RSX, where 3D interaction of flux ropes can be studied in great detail. We use experimental probes inside the the flux ropes to measure the magnetic and electric fields, current density, density, temperatures, pressure, and electrostatic and vector plasma potentials. Macroscopic magnetic field lines, unsteady wandering characteristics, and dynamic objects with structure down to the dissipation scale length can be traced from data sets in a 3D volume. Computational approaches are finally able to tackle simple 3D systems and we sketch some intriguing simulation results that are consistent with 3D extensions of typical 2D cartoons for magnetic reconnection and turbulence.

  9. The effect of disfluency on mind wandering during text comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Myrthe; Mills, Caitlin; Kopp, Kristopher; D'Mello, Sidney

    2017-06-01

    When reading, we frequently find ourselves thinking about something other than the text. These attentional lapses, known as mind wandering (MW), are negatively correlated with text comprehension. Previous studies have shown that more syntactically and semantically difficult texts elicit more MW, because textual difficulty impedes the construction of a mental model of the text, which makes it more difficult to suppress off-task thoughts. But is it possible to reduce MW without altering the content of the text itself? We hypothesized that reading a perceptually disfluent text might require more attentional resources, even if the content remained the same, leaving fewer resources available for MW. To test this idea, we manipulated the typefaces (fluent [Arial] or disfluent [ ]) of two instructional texts on scientific research methods (each about 1,490 words long), and found that MW was less frequent when participants read the disfluent text. There were no comprehension differences between the fluent and disfluent groups. However, we did find an indirect effect of disfluency on comprehension through MW, suggesting that disfluency influences comprehension by enhancing attention. These findings provide insights into how processing difficulty and attention interact during reading comprehension.

  10. Characterization of mind wandering using fNIRS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durantin, Gautier; Dehais, Frederic; Delorme, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    Assessing whether someone is attending to a task has become important for educational and professional applications. Such attentional drifts are usually termed mind wandering (MW). The purpose of the current study is to test to what extent a recent neural imaging modality can be used to detect MW episodes. Functional near infrared spectroscopy is a non-invasive neuroimaging technique that has never been used so far to measure MW. We used the Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART) to assess when subjects attention leaves a primary task. Sixteen-channel fNIRS data were collected over frontal cortices. We observed significant activations over the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) during MW, a brain region associated with the default mode network (DMN). fNIRS data were used to classify MW data above chance level. In line with previous brain-imaging studies, our results confirm the ability of fNIRS to detect Default Network activations in the context of MW.

  11. When attention wanders: Pupillometric signatures of fluctuations in external attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konishi, Mahiko; Brown, Kevin; Battaglini, Luca; Smallwood, Jonathan

    2017-11-01

    Attention is not always directed to events in the external environment. On occasion our thoughts wander to people and places distant from the here and now. Sometimes, this lack of external attention can compromise ongoing task performance. In the current study we set out to understand the extent to which states of internal and external attention can be determined using pupillometry as an index of ongoing cognition. In two experiments we found that periods of slow responding were associated with elevations in the baseline pupil signal over three and a half seconds prior to a behavioural response. In the second experiment we found that unlike behavioural lapses, states of off-task thought, particularly those associated with a focus on the past and with an intrusive quality, were associated with reductions in the size of the pupil over the same window prior to the probe. These data show that both states of large and small baseline pupil size are linked to states when attention is not effectively focused on the external environment, although these states have different qualities. More generally, these findings illustrate that subjective and objective markers of task performance may not be equivalent and underscore the importance of developing objective indicators that can allow these different states to be understood. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Mind Wandering in Text Comprehension under Dual-Task Conditions

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    Peter eDixon

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In two experiments, subjects responded to on-task probes while reading under dual-task conditions. The secondary task was to monitor the text for occurrences of the letter e. In Experiment 1, reading comprehension was assessed with a multiple-choice recognition test; in Experiment 2, subjects recalled the text. In both experiments, the secondary task replicated the well-known missing-letter effect in which detection of e’s was less effective for the word the. Letter detection was also more effective when subjects were on task, but this effect did not interact with the missing-letter effect. Comprehension was assessed in both the dual-task conditions and in a control single-task conditions. In the single-task conditions, both recognition (Experiment 1 and recall (Experiment 2 was better when subjects were on task, replicating previous research on mind wandering. Surprisingly, though, comprehension under dual-task conditions only showed an effect of being on task when measured with recall; there was no effect on recognition performance. Our interpretation of this pattern of results is that subjects generate their response to on-task probes on the basis of a retrospective assessment of the contents of working memory. Further, we argue that under dual-task conditions, the contents of working memory is not related to the reading processes required for accurate recognition performance. These conclusions have implications for models of text comprehension and for the interpretation of on-task probe responses.

  13. Neurocomputational Model of EEG Complexity during Mind Wandering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez-Molina, Antonio J; Iglesias-Parro, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Mind wandering (MW) can be understood as a transient state in which attention drifts from an external task to internal self-generated thoughts. MW has been associated with the activation of the Default Mode Network (DMN). In addition, it has been shown that the activity of the DMN is anti-correlated with activation in brain networks related to the processing of external events (e.g., Salience network, SN). In this study, we present a mean field model based on weakly coupled Kuramoto oscillators. We simulated the oscillatory activity of the entire brain and explored the role of the interaction between the nodes from the DMN and SN in MW states. External stimulation was added to the network model in two opposite conditions. Stimuli could be presented when oscillators in the SN showed more internal coherence (synchrony) than in the DMN, or, on the contrary, when the coherence in the SN was lower than in the DMN. The resulting phases of the oscillators were analyzed and used to simulate EEG signals. Our results showed that the structural complexity from both simulated and real data was higher when the model was stimulated during periods in which DMN was more coherent than the SN. Overall, our results provided a plausible mechanistic explanation to MW as a state in which high coherence in the DMN partially suppresses the capacity of the system to process external stimuli.

  14. Mind wandering via mental contrasting as a tool for behavior change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oettingen, Gabriele; Schwörer, Bettina

    2013-09-02

    When people engage in mind wandering they drift away from a task toward their inner thoughts and feelings. These thoughts often circle around people's personal futures. One assumed function of mind wandering is that it aids problem solving and planning for the future. We will discuss different forms of mind wandering and their effects on problem solving and behavior change. While solely fantasizing about a desired future leads to poor problem solving and little behavior change, mind wandering in the form of mental contrasting leads to skilled problem solving and substantial behavior change. In mental contrasting, people first envision the desired future and then imagine the obstacles that need to be surmounted to reach said future. Mental contrasting instigates behavior change by modulating the strength of associations between future and reality and between reality and instrumental action. Intervention research shows that mental contrasting can be taught as a cost- and time-effective self-regulation strategy of behavior change. The findings have implications for research on mind wandering, problem solving, and on creating effective interventions of behavior change.

  15. Mind wandering via mental contrasting as a tool for behavior change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele eOettingen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available When people engage in mind wandering they drift away from a task towards their inner thoughts and feelings. These thoughts often circle around people’s personal futures. One assumed function of mind wandering is that it aids problem solving and planning for the future. We will discuss different forms of mind wandering and their effects on problem solving and behavior change. While solely fantasizing about a desired future leads to poor problem solving and little behavior change, mind wandering in the form of mental contrasting leads to skilled problem solving and substantial behavior change. In mental contrasting, people first envision the desired future and then imagine the obstacles that need to be surmounted to reach said future. Mental contrasting instigates behavior change by modulating the strength of associations between future and reality and between reality and instrumental action. Intervention research shows that mental contrasting can be taught as a cost- and time-effective self-regulation strategy of behavior change. The findings have implications for research on mind wandering, problem solving, and on creating effective interventions of behavior change.

  16. Concern-induced negative affect is associated with the occurrence and content of mind-wandering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawarczyk, David; Majerus, Steve; D'Argembeau, Arnaud

    2013-06-01

    Previous research has shown that the content and frequency of mind-wandering episodes--the occurrence of thoughts that are both stimulus-independent and task-unrelated--are closely related to an individual's future-related concerns. Whether this relationship is shaped by the affective changes that are usually associated with future-related concerns still remains unclear, however. In this study, we induced the anticipation of a negatively valenced event and examined whether the ensuing affective changes were related to the occurrence and content of mind-wandering during an unrelated attentional task. We found that the increase in negative affect following concern induction predicted the general frequency of mind-wandering episodes. Furthermore, mind-wandering episodes specifically directed at the induced concern were related to a lower decrease in negative affect during the attentional task. These results suggest that the negative emotional impact of future-related concerns is an important factor to be taken into consideration for the subsequent occurrence of mind-wandering episodes, which might in turn be involved in the maintenance of negative affect over time.

  17. Motivating meta-awareness of mind wandering: A way to catch the mind in flight?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zedelius, Claire M; Broadway, James M; Schooler, Jonathan W

    2015-11-01

    Given the negative effects of mind wandering on performance, it may be profitable to be aware of task-unrelated thoughts (TUTs) as they occur. The present study investigated whether motivating people to catch TUTs increases meta-awareness. We offered incentives for increased self-catching during reading. To enhance the veracity of these self-reports, we used a "bogus-pipeline" procedure; we convinced participants that their mental states were being covertly monitored using physiological measures. In reality, mind wandering was assessed covertly by a secondary task ("gibberish detection"), and overtly by experience sampling. The results showed that incentives increased the number of self-catches without increasing overall mind wandering. Moreover, both the bogus pipeline and the opportunity for incentives increased the validity of self-reports, evidenced by significantly increased correlations between self-caught and behaviorally assessed mind wandering. We discuss the relevance of this methodological approach for research on mind wandering and research building on introspective reports more generally.

  18. Self-reflection and the temporal focus of the wandering mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Jonathan; Schooler, Jonathan W; Turk, David J; Cunningham, Sheila J; Burns, Phebe; Macrae, C Neil

    2011-12-01

    Current accounts suggest that self-referential thought serves a pivotal function in the human ability to simulate the future during mind-wandering. Using experience sampling, this hypothesis was tested in two studies that explored the extent to which self-reflection impacts both retrospection and prospection during mind-wandering. Study 1 demonstrated that a brief period of self-reflection yielded a prospective bias during mind-wandering such that participants' engaged more frequently in spontaneous future than past thought. In Study 2, individual differences in the strength of self-referential thought - as indexed by the memorial advantage for self rather than other-encoded items - was shown to vary with future thinking during mind-wandering. Together these results confirm that self-reflection is a core component of future thinking during mind-wandering and provide novel evidence that a key function of the autobiographical memory system may be to mentally simulate events in the future. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Evidence for sex-segregated ocean distributions of first-winter wandering albatrosses at Crozet islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åkesson, Susanne; Weimerskirch, Henri

    2014-01-01

    The highly mobile wandering albatrosses (Diomedea exulans) are adapted to navigate the extreme environment of the Southern Ocean and return to isolated islands to breed. Each year they cover several hundreds of thousands of kilometers during travels across the sea. Little is known about the dispersal flights and migration of young albatrosses. We tracked, by satellite telemetry, the departure dispersal of 13 juvenile wandering albatrosses from the Crozet Islands and compared them with tracks of 7 unrelated adults during the interbreeding season. We used the satellite tracks to identify different behavioural steps of the inherited migration program used by juvenile wandering albatrosses during their first solo-migration. Our results show that the juvenile wandering albatrosses from Crozet Islands moved to sex-specific foraging zones of the ocean using at departures selectively the wind. The results suggest that the inherited migration program used by the juvenile wandering albatrosses encode several distinct steps, based on inherited preferred departure routes, differences in migration distance between sexes, and selective use of winds. During long transportation flights the albatrosses were influenced by winds and both adult and juveniles followed approximate loxodrome (rhumbline) routes coinciding with the foraging zone and the specific latitudes of their destination areas. During the long segments of transportation flights across open seas the juveniles selected routes at more northerly latitudes than adults.

  20. Evidence for sex-segregated ocean distributions of first-winter wandering albatrosses at Crozet islands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Åkesson

    Full Text Available The highly mobile wandering albatrosses (Diomedea exulans are adapted to navigate the extreme environment of the Southern Ocean and return to isolated islands to breed. Each year they cover several hundreds of thousands of kilometers during travels across the sea. Little is known about the dispersal flights and migration of young albatrosses. We tracked, by satellite telemetry, the departure dispersal of 13 juvenile wandering albatrosses from the Crozet Islands and compared them with tracks of 7 unrelated adults during the interbreeding season. We used the satellite tracks to identify different behavioural steps of the inherited migration program used by juvenile wandering albatrosses during their first solo-migration. Our results show that the juvenile wandering albatrosses from Crozet Islands moved to sex-specific foraging zones of the ocean using at departures selectively the wind. The results suggest that the inherited migration program used by the juvenile wandering albatrosses encode several distinct steps, based on inherited preferred departure routes, differences in migration distance between sexes, and selective use of winds. During long transportation flights the albatrosses were influenced by winds and both adult and juveniles followed approximate loxodrome (rhumbline routes coinciding with the foraging zone and the specific latitudes of their destination areas. During the long segments of transportation flights across open seas the juveniles selected routes at more northerly latitudes than adults.

  1. Mind wandering minimizes mind numbing: Reducing semantic-satiation effects through absorptive lapses of attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooneyham, Benjamin W; Schooler, Jonathan W

    2016-08-01

    Mind wandering is associated with perceptual decoupling: the disengagement of attention from perception. This decoupling is deleterious to performance in many situations; however, we sought to determine whether it might occur in the service of performance in certain circumstances. In two studies, we examined the role of mind wandering in a test of "semantic satiation," a phenomenon in which the repeated presentation of a word reduces semantic priming for a subsequently presented semantic associate. We posited that the attentional and perceptual decoupling associated with mind wandering would reduce the amount of satiation in the semantic representations of repeatedly presented words, thus leading to a reduced semantic-satiation effect. Our results supported this hypothesis: Self-reported mind-wandering episodes (Study 1) and behavioral indices of decoupled attention (Study 2) were both predictive of maintained semantic priming in situations predicted to induce semantic satiation. Additionally, our results suggest that moderate inattention to repetitive stimuli is not sufficient to enable "dishabituation": the refreshment of cognitive performance that results from diverting attention away from the task at hand. Rather, full decoupling is necessary to reap the benefits of mind wandering and to minimize mind numbing.

  2. Can research participants comment authoritatively on the validity of their self-reports of mind wandering and task engagement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seli, Paul; Jonker, Tanya R; Cheyne, James Allan; Cortes, Kassandra; Smilek, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    The study of mind wandering rests upon the assumption that people are able to consistently and accurately introspect and report on these sorts of mental experiences. Although there is some initial evidence that people can indeed accurately report on the subjective experience of mind wandering, to date, no work has directly examined people's degree of confidence in their self-reports of mind wandering and the effects that confidence has on the accuracy of such reports. In the present study, participants completed a sustained-attention task during which they intermittently provided assessments of task engagement (i.e., whether they were focused on the task or mind wandering), as well as reports of confidence in the accuracy of their assessments. This study yielded 3 key findings: We found substantial between- and within-subject variability in both (a) reported mind wandering and (b) confidence in mind-wandering reports, and, most critically, (c) we found that the relation of reported mind wandering and task performance varied as a function of confidence. We discuss the implications of these findings in the context of the literature on mind wandering.

  3. Does Mind Wandering Reflect Executive Function or Executive Failure? Comment on Smallwood and Schooler (2006) and Watkins (2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVay, Jennifer C.; Kane, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    In this comment, we contrast different conceptions of mind wandering that were presented in 2 recent theoretical reviews: Smallwood and Schooler (2006) and Watkins (2008). We also introduce a new perspective on the role of executive control in mind wandering by integrating empirical evidence presented in Smallwood and Schooler with 2 theoretical…

  4. Does Mind Wandering Reflect Executive Function or Executive Failure? Comment on Smallwood and Schooler (2006) and Watkins (2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVay, Jennifer C.; Kane, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    In this comment, we contrast different conceptions of mind wandering that were presented in 2 recent theoretical reviews: Smallwood and Schooler (2006) and Watkins (2008). We also introduce a new perspective on the role of executive control in mind wandering by integrating empirical evidence presented in Smallwood and Schooler with 2 theoretical…

  5. Quantitative monitoring of relative clock wander between signal and sampling sources in asynchronous optical under-sampling system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huixing Zhang; Wei Zhao

    2012-01-01

    Optical performance monitoring using asynchronous optical or electrical sampling has gained considerable attention. Relative clock wander between data signal and sampling source is a typical occurrence in such systems. A method for the quantitative monitoring of the relative clock wander in asynchronous optical under-sampling system is presented. With a series of simulations, the clock wanders recovered using this method are in good agreement with the preset clock wanders of different amounts and frequencies for both RZ and NRZ signals. Hence, the reliability and robustness of the method are proven.%Optical performance monitoring using asynchronous optical or electrical sampling has gained considerable attention.Relative clock wander between data signal and sampling source is a typical occurrence in such systems.A method for the quantitative monitoring of the relative clock wander in asynchronous optical under-sampling system is presented.With a series of simulations,the clock wanders recovered using this method are in good agreement with the preset clock wanders of different amounts and frequencies for both RZ and NRZ signals.Hence,the reliability and robustness of the method are proven.

  6. Mind Wandering and Reading Comprehension: Examining the Roles of Working Memory Capacity, Interest, Motivation, and Topic Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsworth, Nash; McMillan, Brittany D.

    2013-01-01

    Individual differences in mind wandering and reading comprehension were examined in the current study. In particular, individual differences in mind wandering, working memory capacity, interest in the current topic, motivation to do well on the task, and topic experience and their relations with reading comprehension were examined in the current…

  7. In pursuit of off-task thought: mind wandering-performance trade-offs while reading aloud and color naming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, David R; Besner, Derek; Smilek, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated whether the frequency of probe-caught mind wandering varied by condition and had any impact on performance in both an item-by-item reading aloud task and a blocked version of the classic Stroop task. Across both experiments, mind wandering rates were found to be quite high and were negatively associated with vocal onset latencies and error rates across conditions. Despite this however, we observed poor correspondence between the effects of task demands on mind wandering rates and the effects of mind wandering on primary task performance. We discuss these findings in relation to attentional resource accounts of mind wandering and suggest that individuals can adjust the relative distribution of executive/attentional resources between internal and external goals in a way that maximizes off-task thought while preserving primary task performance.

  8. Conditions associated with wandering in people with dementia from the viewpoint of self-awareness: five case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoi, Teruo; Aoyama, Keiji; Ishida, Kie; Okamura, Hitoshi

    2012-05-01

    The conditions associated with wandering in people with dementia include purposeless activity, purposeful actions, irritation, and symptoms of depression. The words and actions of 5 people admitted to long-term health care facilities who often exhibited wandering behavior were observed, and the above conditions were studied based on our self-awareness model (consisting of "theory of mind," "self-evaluation," and "self-consciousness"). One person who had not passed the theory of mind task but had passed the self-evaluation task was aware of her wandering. However, she could not understand where she wanted to go or for what purpose. Four persons who had not passed the self-evaluation tasks were not aware of their wandering and had no purpose for their wandering.

  9. Intentionality and meta-awareness of mind wandering: Are they one and the same, or distinct dimensions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seli, Paul; Ralph, Brandon C W; Risko, Evan F; W Schooler, Jonathan; Schacter, Daniel L; Smilek, Daniel

    2017-02-27

    Researchers have recently demonstrated that mind-wandering episodes can vary on numerous dimensions, and it has been suggested that assessing these dimensions will play an important role in our understanding of mind wandering. One dimension that has received considerable attention in recent work is the intentionality of mind wandering. Although it has been claimed that indexing the intentionality of mind wandering will be necessary if researchers are to obtain a coherent understanding of the wandering mind, one concern is that this dimension might be redundant with another, longstanding, dimension: namely, meta-awareness. Thus, the utility of the argument for assessing intentionality rests upon a demonstration that this dimension is distinct from the meta-awareness dimension. To shed light on this issue, across two studies we compared and contrasted these dimensions to determine whether they are redundant or distinct. In both studies, we found support for the view that these dimensions are distinct.

  10. On the relation between motivation and retention in educational contexts: The role of intentional and unintentional mind wandering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seli, Paul; Wammes, Jeffrey D; Risko, Evan F; Smilek, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    Highly motivated students often exhibit better academic performance than less motivated students. However, to date, the specific cognitive mechanisms through which motivation increases academic achievement are not well understood. Here we explored the possibility that mind wandering mediates the relation between motivation and academic performance, and additionally, we examined possible mediation by both intentional and unintentional forms of mind wandering. We found that participants reporting higher motivation to learn in a lecture-based setting tended to engage in less mind wandering, and that this decrease in mind wandering was in turn associated with greater retention of the lecture material. Critically, we also found that the influence of motivation on retention was mediated by both intentional and unintentional types of mind wandering. Not only do the present results advance our theoretical understanding of the mechanisms underlying the relation between motivation and academic achievement, they also provide insights into possible methods of intervention that may be useful in improving student retention in educational settings.

  11. In pursuit of off-task thought: mind wandering-performance trade-offs while reading aloud and color naming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, David R.; Besner, Derek; Smilek, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated whether the frequency of probe-caught mind wandering varied by condition and had any impact on performance in both an item-by-item reading aloud task and a blocked version of the classic Stroop task. Across both experiments, mind wandering rates were found to be quite high and were negatively associated with vocal onset latencies and error rates across conditions. Despite this however, we observed poor correspondence between the effects of task demands on mind wandering rates and the effects of mind wandering on primary task performance. We discuss these findings in relation to attentional resource accounts of mind wandering and suggest that individuals can adjust the relative distribution of executive/attentional resources between internal and external goals in a way that maximizes off-task thought while preserving primary task performance. PMID:23785351

  12. When the brain takes a break: a model-based analysis of mind wandering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittner, Matthias; Boekel, Wouter; Tucker, Adrienne M; Turner, Brandon M; Heathcote, Andrew; Forstmann, Birte U

    2014-12-03

    Mind wandering is an ubiquitous phenomenon in everyday life. In the cognitive neurosciences, mind wandering has been associated with several distinct neural processes, most notably increased activity in the default mode network (DMN), suppressed activity within the anti-correlated (task-positive) network (ACN), and changes in neuromodulation. By using an integrative multimodal approach combining machine-learning techniques with modeling of latent cognitive processes, we show that mind wandering in humans is characterized by inefficiencies in executive control (task-monitoring) processes. This failure is predicted by a single-trial signature of (co)activations in the DMN, ACN, and neuromodulation, and accompanied by a decreased rate of evidence accumulation and response thresholds in the cognitive model.

  13. Beam wander of Gaussian-Schell model beams propagating through oceanic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuqian; Zhang, Yixin; Li, Ye; Hu, Zhengda

    2016-07-01

    For Gaussian-Schell model beams propagating in the isotropic turbulent ocean, theoretical expression of beam wander is derived based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle. The spatial coherence radius of spherical waves propagating in the paraxial channel of turbulent ocean including inner scale is also developed. Our results show that the beam wander decreases with the increasing rate of dissipation of kinetic energy per unit mass of fluid ɛ, but it increases as the increasing of the dissipation rate of temperature variance χt and the relative strength of temperature and salinity fluctuations ϖ. The salinity fluctuation has greater influence on the beam wander than that of temperature fluctuations. The model can be evaluated submarine-to-submarine/ship optical wireless communication performance.

  14. "And I look down and he is gone": narrating autism, elopement and wandering in Los Angeles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Olga; Lawlor, Mary C

    2013-10-01

    'Wandering' and 'elopement' have been identified as common in autism, affecting half of all diagnosed children ages four to ten, yet families rarely receive advice from practitioners even after the fact. Family perspectives have been missing from the literature as well as from public health and policy debates on how and when to respond to this problem. The problem of 'wandering' and 'elopement' reveals a complex intersection of larger issues encountered by families of children with autism. To consider these issues, this article examines 'wandering' and 'elopement' from the perspectives of African American mothers of children with autism, an underrepresented group in autism research. We consider how the mothers experience these behaviors and the response to these behaviors by professionals, such as service coordinators and law enforcement personnel working within various jurisdictions that become involved with the problem. We analyze the mothers' narratives about 'wandering' and 'elopement' drawn from ethnographic interviews that were collected between October 1, 2009 and August 31, 2012. These interviews were part of a larger project on disparities in autism diagnosis and services that followed a cohort of 25 four to ten-year old children. Drawing on narrative, phenomenological and interpretive traditions, we trace the mothers' developing understandings of 'wandering' and 'elopement' over time, and show how these understandings become elaborated and transformed. This article provides a nuanced, moment-to-moment and longitudinal picture of the mothers' experiences of 'wandering' and 'elopement' that enriches the cross-sectional view of large-scale surveys about the problem and contributes unique insights at the family and community levels. Implications for professional awareness, clinical practice and service provision are also suggested.

  15. Persons with dementia missing in the community: Is it wandering or something unique?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandez Rachael M

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At some point in the disease process many persons with dementia (PWD will have a missing incident and be unable to safely return to their care setting. In previous research studies, researchers have begun to question whether this phenomenon should continue to be called wandering since the antecedents and characteristics of a missing incident are dissimilar to accepted definitions of wandering in dementia. The purpose of this study was to confirm previous findings regarding the antecedents and characteristics of missing incidents, understand the differences between those found dead and alive, and compare the characteristics of a missing incident to that of wandering. Methods A retrospective design was used to analyse 325 newspaper reports of PWD missing in the community. Results The primary antecedent to a missing incident, particularly in community-dwelling PWD, was becoming lost while conducting a normal and permitted activity alone in the community. The other common antecedent was a lapse in supervision with the expectation that the PWD would remain in a safe location but did not. Deaths most commonly occurred in unpopulated areas due to exposure and drowning. Those who died were found closer to the place last seen and took longer to find, but there were no significant differences in gender or age. The key characteristics of a missing incident were: unpredictable, non-repetitive, temporally appropriate but spatially-disordered, and while using multiple means of movement (walking, car, public transportation. Missing incidents occurred without the discernible pattern present in wandering such as lapping or pacing, repetitive and temporally-disordered. Conclusions This research supports the mounting evidence that the concept of wandering, in its formal sense, and missing incidents are two distinct concepts. It will be important to further develop the concept of missing incidents by identifying the differences and similarities

  16. Polarization Effects in Attosecond Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baggesen, Jan Conrad; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2010-01-01

    following the field instead. We show that polarization effects may lead to an apparent temporal shift that needs to be properly accounted for in the analysis. The effect may be isolated and studied by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy from oriented polar molecules. We also show that polarization...

  17. Evaluation of novel ECG signal processing on quantification of transient ischemia and baseline wander suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostic, Marko N; Fakhar, Sina; Foxall, Tom; Drakulic, Budimir S; Krucoff, Mitchell W

    2007-01-01

    The performance assessment of a novel ECG signal processing technology in Fidelity 100 (test) and four modern ECG systems (controls) was conducted. A quantitative evaluation for one control and a test system was done by simultaneous recordings on 54 patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and on a biological reference signal from an ECG simulator. A qualitative performance of baseline wander suppression was done on all five systems. The results showed that the Fidelity 100 system provided excellent detection and quantification of transient ischemia and baseline wander suppression.

  18. Pros and cons of a wandering mind: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina eOttaviani

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Mind wandering (MW has recently been associated with both adaptive (e.g., creativity enhancement and maladaptive (e.g., mood worsening consequences. This study aimed at investigating whether proneness to MW was prospectively associated with negative health outcomes. At time 0, 21 women, 19 men; mean age = 24.5 (4.9 underwent a 5-min baseline electrocardiogram (ECG, a 20-min laboratory tracking task with thought probes, and personality questionnaires. At time 1 (1 year follow-up, the same participants underwent a 24-hour Ecological Momentary Assessment characterized by ambulatory ECG recording and electronic diaries. First, we examined if the likelihood of being a ‘mind wanderer’ was associated with specific personality dispositions. Then, we tested if the occurrence of episodes of MW in the lab would be correlated with frequency of MW in daily life. Finally, multiple regression models were used to test if MW longitudinally acted as a risk factor for health, accounting for the effects of biobehavioral variables. Among dispositional traits, the frequency of MW episodes in daily life was inversely associated with the capacity of being mindful (i.e., aware of the present moment and non-judging. There was a positive correlation between frequency of MW in the lab and in daily life, suggesting that it is a stable disposition of the individual. When differentiated from perseverative cognition (i.e., rumination and worry, MW did not predict the presence of health risk factors one year later, however, a higher occurrence of episodes of MW was associated with short-term adverse consequences, such as increased 24-hour heart rate on the same day and difficulty falling asleep the subsequent night. Present findings suggest that MW may be associated with short term ‘side effects’ but argue against a long term dysfunctional view of this cognitive process.

  19. Apparent Bicarbonate Space in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horacio A. Repetto

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The amount needed to change the concentration of a solute requires the knowledge of its volume of distribution in the solution. Electrolytes that do not participate in active metabolic reactions have a fixed volume of distribution that corresponds to the volume of water in which they solubilize. Bicarbonate infusion is used to correct hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis. Its volume of distribution (bicarbonate space changes with its participation in the blood buffer systems. In other words, it is not a fixed physical volume, like that of other solutes. In this paper, we shall review experimental studies that supported evidence for this knowledge and analyze the basic hypothesis to explain the phenomena. Since we have not found clinical studies in children, we shall report our experience in a group of patients with metabolic acidosis treated with bicarbonate infusion in whom apparent bicarbonate space was measured and compared with data in adults from the literature. Guidelines for amount of bicarbonate needed to increase its concentration according to baseline bicarbonate concentration will be suggested.

  20. Level crossing statistics for optical beam wander in a turbulent atmosphere with applications to ground-to-space laser communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yura, Harold T; Fields, Renny A

    2011-06-20

    Level crossing statistics is applied to the complex problem of atmospheric turbulence-induced beam wander for laser propagation from ground to space. A comprehensive estimate of the single-axis wander angle temporal autocorrelation function and the corresponding power spectrum is used to develop, for the first time to our knowledge, analytic expressions for the mean angular level crossing rate and the mean duration of such crossings. These results are based on an extension and generalization of a previous seminal analysis of the beam wander variance by Klyatskin and Kon. In the geometrical optics limit, we obtain an expression for the beam wander variance that is valid for both an arbitrarily shaped initial beam profile and transmitting aperture. It is shown that beam wander can disrupt bidirectional ground-to-space laser communication systems whose small apertures do not require adaptive optics to deliver uniform beams at their intended target receivers in space. The magnitude and rate of beam wander is estimated for turbulence profiles enveloping some practical laser communication deployment options and suggesting what level of beam wander effects must be mitigated to demonstrate effective bidirectional laser communication systems.

  1. Mind wandering and attention during focused meditation: a fine-grained temporal analysis of fluctuating cognitive states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenkamp, Wendy; Wilson-Mendenhall, Christine D; Duncan, Erica; Barsalou, Lawrence W

    2012-01-02

    Studies have suggested that the default mode network is active during mind wandering, which is often experienced intermittently during sustained attention tasks. Conversely, an anticorrelated task-positive network is thought to subserve various forms of attentional processing. Understanding how these two systems work together is central for understanding many forms of optimal and sub-optimal task performance. Here we present a basic model of naturalistic cognitive fluctuations between mind wandering and attentional states derived from the practice of focused attention meditation. This model proposes four intervals in a cognitive cycle: mind wandering, awareness of mind wandering, shifting of attention, and sustained attention. People who train in this style of meditation cultivate their abilities to monitor cognitive processes related to attention and distraction, making them well suited to report on these mental events. Fourteen meditation practitioners performed breath-focused meditation while undergoing fMRI scanning. When participants realized their mind had wandered, they pressed a button and returned their focus to the breath. The four intervals above were then constructed around these button presses. We hypothesized that periods of mind wandering would be associated with default mode activity, whereas cognitive processes engaged during awareness of mind wandering, shifting of attention and sustained attention would engage attentional subnetworks. Analyses revealed activity in brain regions associated with the default mode during mind wandering, and in salience network regions during awareness of mind wandering. Elements of the executive network were active during shifting and sustained attention. Furthermore, activations during these cognitive phases were modulated by lifetime meditation experience. These findings support and extend theories about cognitive correlates of distributed brain networks.

  2. Motivation, intentionality, and mind wandering: Implications for assessments of task-unrelated thought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seli, Paul; Cheyne, James Allan; Xu, Mengran; Purdon, Christine; Smilek, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    Researchers of mind wandering frequently assume that (a) participants are motivated to do well on the tasks they are given, and (b) task-unrelated thoughts (TUTs) that occur during task performance reflect unintentional, unwanted thoughts that occur despite participants' best intentions to maintain task-focus. Given the relatively boring and tedious nature of most mind-wandering tasks, however, there is the possibility that some participants have little motivation to do well on such tasks, and that this lack of motivation might in turn result in increases specifically in intentional TUTs. In the present study, we explored these possibilities, finding that individuals reporting lower motivation to perform well on a sustained-attention task reported more intentional relative to unintentional TUTs compared with individuals reporting higher motivation. Interestingly, our results indicate that the extent to which participants engage in intentional versus unintentional TUTs does not differentially relate to performance: both types of off-task thought were found to be equally associated with performance decrements. Participants with low levels of task-motivation also engaged in more overall TUTs, however, and this increase in TUTs was associated with greater performance decrements. We discuss these findings in the context of the literature on mind wandering, highlighting the importance of assessing the intentionality of TUTs and motivation to perform well on tasks assessing mind wandering.

  3. Weakly repelling fixed points and multiply-connected wandering domains of meromorphic functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    We consider the dynamics of a transcendental meromorphic function f(z) with only finitely many poles and prove that if f has only finitely many weakly repelling fixed points,then there is no multiply-connected wandering domain in its Fatou set.

  4. Educating the Wandering Mind: Pedagogical Mechanisms of Mindfulness for a Curricular Blind Spot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergas, Oren

    2016-01-01

    Educational theory and practice have been focusing on educating students as to "how to think." Yet, contemporary neuroscience and psychological research reveal that many of our waking hours are spent in a state of "mind-wandering" characterized by uncontrolled thoughts that have little to do with our concrete present…

  5. Mind-Wandering at the fingertips: automatic parsing of subjective states based on response time variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikael eBastian

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Research from the last decade has successfully used two kinds of thought reports in order to probe whether the mind is wandering: random thought-probes and spontaneous reports. However, none of these two methods allows any assessment of the subjective state of the participant between two reports. In this paper, we present a step by step elaboration and testing of a continuous index, based on response time variability within Sustained Attention to Response Tasks (N=106, for a total of 10 conditions. We first show that increased response time variability predicts mind-wandering. We then compute a continuous index of response time variability throughout full experiments and show that the temporal position of a probe relative to the nearest local peak of the continuous index is predictive of mind-wandering. This suggests that our index carries information about the subjective state of the subject even when he or she is not probed, and opens the way for on-line tracking of mind-wandering. Finally we proceed a step further and infer the internal attentional states on the basis of the variability of response times. To this end we use the Hidden Markov Model framework, which allows us to estimate the durations of on-task and off-task episodes.

  6. Level of Construal, Mind Wandering, and Repetitive Thought: Reply to McVay and Kane (2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Edward R.

    2010-01-01

    In this reply to the comment of McVay and Kane (2010), I consider their argument concerning how Watkins's (2008) elaborated control theory informs their perspective on the role of executive control in mind wandering. I argue that although in a number of places the elaborated control theory is consistent with the perspective of McVay and Kane that…

  7. The ARSQ 2.0 reveals age and personality effects on mind-wandering experiences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diaz, B Alexander; Van Der Sluis, Sophie; Benjamins, Jeroen S; Stoffers, Diederick; Hardstone, Richard; Mansvelder, Huibert D; Van Someren, Eus J W; Linkenkaer-Hansen, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    The human brain frequently generates thoughts and feelings detached from environmental demands. Investigating the rich repertoire of these mind-wandering experiences is challenging, as it depends on introspection and mapping its content requires an unknown number of dimensions. We recently developed

  8. Dispatching the wandering mind? Toward a laboratory method for cuing "spontaneous" off-task thought

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer C. McVay

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive psychologists and neuroscientists study most phenomena of attention by measuring subjects’ overt responses to discrete environmental stimuli that can be manipulated to test competing theories. The mind-wandering experience, however, cannot be locally instigated by cleverly engineered stimuli. Investigators must therefore rely on correlational and observational methods to understand subjects’ flow of thought, which is only occasionally and indirectly monitored. In an effort toward changing this state of affairs, we present four experiments that develop a method for inducing mind-wandering episodes – on demand – in response to task-embedded cues. In an initial laboratory session, subjects described their personal goals and concerns across several life domains (amid some filler questionnaires. In a second session, 48 hours later, subjects completed a go/no-go task in which they responded to the perceptual features of words; unbeknownst to subjects, some stimulus words were presented in triplets to represent the personal concerns they had described in session 1. Thought probes appearing shortly after these personal-goal triplets indicated that, compared to control triplets, priming subjects’ concerns increased mind-wandering rate by about 3 – 4%. We argue that this small effect is, nonetheless, a promising development toward the pursuit of an experimentally informed, theory-driven science of mind wandering.

  9. Self-reported stickiness of mind-wandering affects task performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke Karlijn Van Vugt

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available When asked to perform a certain task, we typically spend a decent amount of time thinking thoughts unrelated to that task--a phenomenon referred to as 'mind-wandering.' It is thought that this mind-wandering is driven at least in part by our unfinished goals and concerns. Previous studies have shown that just after presenting a participant with their own concerns, their reports of task-unrelated thinking increased somewhat. However, effects of these concerns on task performance were somewhat inconsistent. In this study we take the opposite approach, and examine whether task performance depends on the self-reported thought content. Specifically, a particularly intriguing aspect of mind-wandering that has hitherto received little attention is the difficulty of disengaging from it, in other words, the ''stickiness'' of the thoughts. While presenting participants with their own concerns was not associated with clear effects on task performance, we showed that the reports of off-task thinking and variability of response times increased with the amount of self-reported stickiness of thoughts. This suggests that the stickiness of mind-wandering is a relevant variable, and participants are able to meaningfully report on it.

  10. Dispatching the wandering mind? Toward a laboratory method for cuing "spontaneous" off-task thought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVay, Jennifer C; Kane, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive psychologists and neuroscientists study most phenomena of attention by measuring subjects' overt responses to discrete environmental stimuli that can be manipulated to test competing theories. The mind wandering experience, however, cannot be locally instigated by cleverly engineered stimuli. Investigators must therefore rely on correlational and observational methods to understand subjects' flow of thought, which is only occasionally and indirectly monitored. In an effort toward changing this state of affairs, we present four experiments that develop a method for inducing mind wandering episodes-on demand-in response to task-embedded cues. In an initial laboratory session, subjects described their personal goals and concerns across several life domains (amid some filler questionnaires). In a second session, 48 h later, subjects completed a go/no-go task in which they responded to the perceptual features of words; unbeknownst to subjects, some stimulus words were presented in triplets to represent the personal concerns they had described in session 1. Thought probes appearing shortly after these personal-goal triplets indicated that, compared to control triplets, priming subjects' concerns increased mind wandering rate by about 3-4%. We argue that this small effect is, nonetheless, a promising development toward the pursuit of an experimentally informed, theory-driven science of mind wandering.

  11. The Mediating Role of Mind Wandering in the Relationship between Working Memory Capacity and Reading Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVay, Jennifer C.

    2010-01-01

    The primary goal of this study was to investigate the mediating role of mind wandering in the relationship between working memory capacity (WMC) and reading comprehension as predicted by the executive-attention theory of WMC (e.g., Kane & Engle, 2003). I used a latent-variable, structural-equation-model approach with three WMC span tasks, seven…

  12. The Neurocognitive Consequences of the Wandering Mind: A Mechanistic Account of Sensory-Motor Decoupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia W. Y. Kam

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A unique human characteristic is our ability to mind wander – a state in which we are free to engage in thoughts that are not directly tied to sensations and perceptions from our immediate physical environment. From a neurocognitive perspective, it has been proposed that during mind wandering, our executive resources are decoupled from the external environment and directed to these internal thoughts. In this review, we examine an underappreciated aspect of this phenomenon – attenuation of sensory-motor processing – from two perspectives. First, we describe the range of widespread sensory, cognitive and motor processes attenuated during mind wandering states, and how this impacts our neurocognitive processing of external events. We then consider sensory-motor attenuation in a class of clinical neurocognitive disorders that have ties to pathological patterns of decoupling, reviews suggesting that mind wandering and these clinical states may share a common mechanism of sensory-motor attenuation. Taken together, these observations suggest the sensory-motor consequences of decoupled thinking are integral to normal and pathological neurocognitive states.

  13. Mind wandering at the fingertips: automatic parsing of subjective states based on response time variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, Mikaël; Sackur, Jérôme

    2013-01-01

    RESEARCH FROM THE LAST DECADE HAS SUCCESSFULLY USED TWO KINDS OF THOUGHT REPORTS IN ORDER TO ASSESS WHETHER THE MIND IS WANDERING: random thought-probes and spontaneous reports. However, none of these two methods allows any assessment of the subjective state of the participant between two reports. In this paper, we present a step by step elaboration and testing of a continuous index, based on response time variability within Sustained Attention to Response Tasks (N = 106, for a total of 10 conditions). We first show that increased response time variability predicts mind wandering. We then compute a continuous index of response time variability throughout full experiments and show that the temporal position of a probe relative to the nearest local peak of the continuous index is predictive of mind wandering. This suggests that our index carries information about the subjective state of the subject even when he or she is not probed, and opens the way for on-line tracking of mind wandering. Finally we proceed a step further and infer the internal attentional states on the basis of the variability of response times. To this end we use the Hidden Markov Model framework, which allows us to estimate the durations of on-task and off-task episodes.

  14. The neurocognitive consequences of the wandering mind: a mechanistic account of sensory-motor decoupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, Julia W Y; Handy, Todd C

    2013-10-14

    A unique human characteristic is our ability to mind wander - a state in which we are free to engage in thoughts that are not directly tied to sensations and perceptions from our immediate physical environment. From a neurocognitive perspective, it has been proposed that during mind wandering, our executive resources are decoupled from the external environment and directed to these internal thoughts. In this review, we examine an underappreciated aspect of this phenomenon - attenuation of sensory-motor processing - from two perspectives. First, we describe the range of widespread sensory, cognitive and motor processes attenuated during mind wandering states, and how this impacts our neurocognitive processing of external events. We then consider sensory-motor attenuation in a class of clinical neurocognitive disorders that have ties to pathological patterns of decoupling, reviews suggesting that mind wandering and these clinical states may share a common mechanism of sensory-motor attenuation. Taken together, these observations suggest the sensory-motor consequences of decoupled thinking are integral to normal and pathological neurocognitive states.

  15. Self-Reported Stickiness of Mind-Wandering Affects Task Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vugt, Marieke K; Broers, Nico

    2016-01-01

    When asked to perform a certain task, we typically spend a decent amount of time thinking thoughts unrelated to that task-a phenomenon referred to as "mind-wandering." It is thought that this mind-wandering is driven at least in part by our unfinished goals and concerns. Previous studies have shown that just after presenting a participant with their own concerns, their reports of task-unrelated thinking increased somewhat. However, effects of these concerns on task performance were somewhat inconsistent. In this study we take the opposite approach, and examine whether task performance depends on the self-reported thought content. Specifically, a particularly intriguing aspect of mind-wandering that has hitherto received little attention is the difficulty of disengaging from it, in other words, the "stickiness" of the thoughts. While presenting participants with their own concerns was not associated with clear effects on task performance, we showed that the reports of off-task thinking and variability of response times increased with the amount of self-reported stickiness of thoughts. This suggests that the stickiness of mind-wandering is a relevant variable, and participants are able to meaningfully report on it.

  16. The ARSQ 2.0 reveals age and personality effects on mind-wandering experiences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diaz, B Alexander; Van Der Sluis, Sophie; Benjamins, Jeroen S; Stoffers, Diederick; Hardstone, Richard; Mansvelder, Huibert D; Van Someren, Eus J W; Linkenkaer-Hansen, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    The human brain frequently generates thoughts and feelings detached from environmental demands. Investigating the rich repertoire of these mind-wandering experiences is challenging, as it depends on introspection and mapping its content requires an unknown number of dimensions. We recently developed

  17. Insight of scent: experimental evidence of olfactory capabilities in the wandering albatross (Diomedea exulans).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardon, J; Nesterova, A P; Traugott, J; Saunders, S M; Bonadonna, F

    2010-02-15

    Wandering albatrosses routinely forage over thousands of kilometres of open ocean, but the sensory mechanisms used in the food search itself have not been completely elucidated. Recent telemetry studies show that some spatial behaviours of the species are consistent with the 'multimodal foraging strategy' hypothesis which proposes that birds use a combination of olfactory and visual cues while foraging at sea. The 'multimodal foraging strategy' hypothesis, however, still suffers from a lack of experimental evidence, particularly regarding the olfactory capabilities of wandering albatrosses. As an initial step to test the hypothesis, we carried out behavioural experiments exploring the sensory capabilities of adult wandering albatrosses at a breeding colony. Three two-choice tests were designed to investigate the birds' response to olfactory and visual stimuli, individually or in combination. Perception of the different stimuli was assessed by comparing the amount of exploration directed towards an 'experimental' display or a 'control' display. Our results indicate that birds were able to perceive the three types of stimulus presented: olfactory, visual and combined. Moreover, olfactory and visual cues were found to have additional effects on the exploratory behaviours of males. This simple experimental demonstration of reasonable olfactory capabilities in the wandering albatross supports the 'multimodal foraging strategy' and is consistent with recent hypotheses of the evolutionary history of procellariiforms.

  18. The Role of Mind-Wandering in Measurements of General Aptitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrazek, Michael D.; Smallwood, Jonathan; Franklin, Michael S.; Chin, Jason M.; Baird, Benjamin; Schooler, Jonathan W.

    2012-01-01

    Tests of working memory capacity (WMC) and fluid intelligence (gF) are thought to capture variability in a crucial cognitive capacity that is broadly predictive of success, yet pinpointing the exact nature of this capacity is an area of ongoing controversy. We propose that mind-wandering is associated with performance on tests of WMC and gF,…

  19. Motivation, Intentionality, and Mind Wandering: Implications for Assessments of Task-Unrelated Thought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seli, Paul; Cheyne, James Allan; Xu, Mengran; Purdon, Christine; Smilek, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Researchers of mind wandering frequently assume that (a) participants are motivated to do well on the tasks they are given, and (b) task-unrelated thoughts (TUTs) that occur during task performance reflect unintentional, unwanted thoughts that occur despite participants' best intentions to maintain task-focus. Given the relatively boring and…

  20. The Role of Mind-Wandering in Measurements of General Aptitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrazek, Michael D.; Smallwood, Jonathan; Franklin, Michael S.; Chin, Jason M.; Baird, Benjamin; Schooler, Jonathan W.

    2012-01-01

    Tests of working memory capacity (WMC) and fluid intelligence (gF) are thought to capture variability in a crucial cognitive capacity that is broadly predictive of success, yet pinpointing the exact nature of this capacity is an area of ongoing controversy. We propose that mind-wandering is associated with performance on tests of WMC and gF,…

  1. Autopilot, Mind Wandering, and the Out of the Loop Performance Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Gouraud

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available To satisfy the increasing demand for safer critical systems, engineers have integrated higher levels of automation, such as glass cockpits in aircraft, power plants, and driverless cars. These guiding principles relegate the operator to a monitoring role, increasing risks for humans to lack system understanding. The out of the loop performance problem arises when operators suffer from complacency and vigilance decrement; consequently, when automation does not behave as expected, understanding the system or taking back manual control may be difficult. Close to the out of the loop problem, mind wandering points to the propensity of the human mind to think about matters unrelated to the task at hand. This article reviews the literature related to both mind wandering and the out of the loop performance problem as it relates to task automation. We highlight studies showing how these phenomena interact with each other while impacting human performance within highly automated systems. We analyze how this proximity is supported by effects observed in automated environment, such as decoupling, sensory attention, and cognitive comprehension decrease. We also show that this link could be useful for detecting out of the loop situations through mind wandering markers. Finally, we examine the limitations of the current knowledge because many questions remain open to characterize interactions between out of the loop, mind wandering, and automation.

  2. The brain on silent: mind wandering, mindful awareness, and states of mental tranquility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vago, David R; Zeidan, Fadel

    2016-06-01

    Mind wandering and mindfulness are often described as divergent mental states with opposing effects on cognitive performance and mental health. Spontaneous mind wandering is typically associated with self-reflective states that contribute to negative processing of the past, worrying/fantasizing about the future, and disruption of primary task performance. On the other hand, mindful awareness is frequently described as a focus on present sensory input without cognitive elaboration or emotional reactivity, and is associated with improved task performance and decreased stress-related symptomology. Unfortunately, such distinctions fail to acknowledge similarities and interactions between the two states. Instead of an inverse relationship between mindfulness and mind wandering, a more nuanced characterization of mindfulness may involve skillful toggling back and forth between conceptual and nonconceptual processes and networks supporting each state, to meet the contextually specified demands of the situation. In this article, we present a theoretical analysis and plausible neurocognitive framework of the restful mind, in which we attempt to clarify potentially adaptive contributions of both mind wandering and mindful awareness through the lens of the extant neurocognitive literature on intrinsic network activity, meditation, and emerging descriptions of stillness and nonduality. A neurophenomenological approach to probing modality-specific forms of concentration and nonconceptual awareness is presented that may improve our understanding of the resting state. Implications for future research are discussed.

  3. Gaussian beam scintillation on ground-to-space paths: the importance of beam wander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Gary J.; Benson, Robert S.

    2004-10-01

    Predictions of scintillation for ground to space collimated Gaussian beams generated from a numerical wave optics simulation are compared with recent weak scintillation theory developed from the Rytov perturbation approach (L.C. Andrews, R.L. Phillips, P.T. Yu, Ap Opt 34, p 7742-7751, 1995; J.D. Shelton, JOSA A 12, p 2172-2181, 1995). Significant discrepancies are revealed for intermediate-sized beams, defined as beams whose initial diameters place the near ground turbulence in the transmitter near field and the remote space target in the transmitter far field. By adding wander tracking to the wave optics simulation, and by developing a separate analytic model of the beam wander scintillation mechanism, we show that the scintillation for intermediate-sized beams is dominated by turbulence-induced beam wander at the target, and that the results from the wave optics simulation are accurate. We conclude that the analytic theory"s treatment of beam wander is incomplete, leading to the output of incorrect predictions for the second moment of irradiance. The error is most severe at the target point on the transmitter"s optical axis.

  4. Wanderers y Valparaíso: Fútbol, imaginarios y cultura urbana en el puerto principal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián Ponce Olmos

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Resumen En el artículo se revisan y vislumbran los imaginarios urbanos de la ciudad de Valparaíso que se hacen manifiestos a raíz del estudio de uno de los símbolos más relevantes de la ciudad: la institución deportiva Santiago Wanderers. A través de una estrategia metodológica basada en la investigación documental, observaciones y entrevistas, se da cuenta de la emergencia de imaginarios urbanos de la ciudad durante la época de existencia del club porteño (1892 a la actualidad. Desde la fundación del club hasta el inicio de la participación de Wanderers en el profesionalismo, se aprecia la invención de un mito fundacional y representaciones que llenan al símbolo. Desde 1942 en adelante, se avizora la construcción de tres imaginarios: el imaginario wanderino de Valparaíso, el imaginario de la resistencia porteña y el imaginario patrimonial de Santiago Wanderers. En el presente texto se pone énfasis en el imaginario wanderino de Valparaíso y el imaginario patrimonial de Valparaíso. Abstract In the article are reviewed the urban imaginary of the city of Valparaiso which become manifest from the study of one of the most important symbols of the city: Santiago Wanderers sports institution. Through a methodological strategy based on desk research, observations and interviews, we realize the emergence of urban imagery of the city during the time of existence of the sport team (1892-present. Since the founding of the club until the beginning of the participation of Wanderers in the professionalism, the invention of a founding myth and representations that fill the symbol shown. From 1942 onwards, the construction of three imaginary is looming: imaginary wanderino of Valparaíso, imaginary of resistance of Valparaíso and heritage Imaginary of Santiago Wanderers. Here, the emphasis is placed on the imaginary wanderino of Valparaiso and heritage Imaginary of Santiago Wanderers.

  5. Reverse polarization in conjugated heterocycle polythiophene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王鹿霞; 刘德胜; 张大成; 解士杰; 韩圣浩; 梅良模

    2005-01-01

    Reverse polarization in polythiophene under an applied electric field has been studied in the framework of the tightbinding model. It is found that the applied electronic field has a great influence on the excited states of polythiophene.The effect of the heteroatoms on the polarization has been calculated and analysed carefully. It is indicated that a reverse polarization of biexcitons in polythiophene will be observed more easily. The heteroatoms increase this reversed polarization strength apparently.

  6. Reverse polarization in conjugated heterocycle polythiophene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu-Xia; Liu, De-Sheng; Zhang, Da-Cheng; Xie, Shi-Jie; Han, Sheng-Hao; Mei, Liang-Mo

    2005-01-01

    Reverse polarization in polythiophene under an applied electric field has been studied in the framework of the tight-binding model. It is found that the applied electronic field has a great influence on the excited states of polythiophene. The effect of the heteroatoms on the polarization has been calculated and analysed carefully. It is indicated that a reverse polarization of biexcitons in polythiophene will be observed more easily. The heteroatoms increase this reversed polarization strength apparently.

  7. Influence of beam wander on bit-error rate in a ground-to-satellite laser uplink communication system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing; Jiang, Yijun; Tan, Liying; Yu, Siyuan; Du, Wenhe

    2008-11-15

    Based on weak fluctuation theory and the beam-wander model, the bit-error rate of a ground-to-satellite laser uplink communication system is analyzed, in comparison with the condition in which beam wander is not taken into account. Considering the combined effect of scintillation and beam wander, optimum divergence angle and transmitter beam radius for a communication system are researched. Numerical results show that both of them increase with the increment of total link margin and transmitted wavelength. This work can benefit the ground-to-satellite laser uplink communication system design.

  8. Dementia wander garden aids post cerebrovascular stroke restorative therapy: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detweiler, Mark B; Warf, Carlena

    2005-01-01

    An increasing amount of literature suggests the positive effects of nature in healthcare. The extended life expectancy in the US and the consequent need for long-term care indicates a future need for restorative therapy innovations to reduce the expense associated with long-term care. Moving carefully selected stroke patients' sessions to the peaceful setting of a dementia wander garden, with its designed paths and natural stimuli, may be beneficial. Natural settings have been shown to improve attention and reduce stress--both important therapy objectives in many post-stroke rehabilitation programs. In this case study, using the dementia wander garden for restorative therapy of a non-dementia patient was a novel idea for the restorative therapy group, which does not have a horticultural therapy program. The dementia wander garden stage of the post-stroke rehabilitation helped the patient through a period of treatment resistance. The garden provided both an introduction to the patient's goal of outdoor rehabilitation and a less threatening environment than the long-term care facility hallways. In part because the patient was less self-conscious about manifesting his post-stroke neurological deficits, falling, and being viewed as handicapped when in the dementia wander garden setting, he was able to resume his treatment plan and finish his restorative therapy. In many physical and mental rehabilitation plans, finding a treatment modality that will motivate an individual to participate is a principal goal. Use of a dementia wander garden may help some patients achieve this goal in post-stroke restorative therapy.

  9. How few and far between? Examining the effects of probe rate on self-reported mind wandering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seli, Paul; Carriere, Jonathan S A; Levene, Merrick; Smilek, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    We examined whether the temporal rate at which thought probes are presented affects the likelihood that people will report periods of mind wandering. To evaluate this possibility, we had participants complete a sustained-attention task (the Metronome Response Task; MRT) during which we intermittently presented thought probes. Critically, we varied the average time between probes (i.e., probe rate) across participants, allowing us to examine the relation between probe rate and mind-wandering rate. We observed a positive relation between these variables, indicating that people are more likely to report mind wandering as the time between probes increases. We discuss the methodological implications of this finding in the context of the mind-wandering literature, and suggest that researchers include a range of probe rates in future work to provide more insight into this methodological issue.

  10. Multidetector computed tomography findings of mesenteroaxial gastric volvulus combined with torsion of wandering spleen: A case report and literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youn, In Kyung; Ku, Young Mi; Lee, Su Lim [Dept. of Radiology, Uijeongbu St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Uijeongbu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Gastric volvulus, defined as an abnormal rotation of stomach, may be idiopathic or secondary to abnormal fixation of intraperitoneal visceral ligaments. Wandering spleen is a movable spleen resulting from absence or underdevelopment of the splenic supporting ligaments that suspend the spleen to its normal position in the left part of the supramesocolic compartment of the abdomen. Wandering spleen increases the risk of splenic torsion. Both gastric volvulus and splenic torsion are potentially life-threatening if not urgently managed with surgery. Prompt and accurate diagnosis based on multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is crucial to prevent unforeseen complications. Gastric volvulus and coexistent torsion of wandering spleen is a very rare condition. Herein, we described a case of gastric volvulus associated with wandering spleen and intestinal non-rotation in a 15-year-old girl focusing on MDCT findings.

  11. How few and far between? Examining the effects of probe rate on self-reported mind wandering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul eSeli

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We examined whether the temporal rate at which thought probes are presented affects the likelihood that people will report periods of mind wandering. To evaluate this possibility, we had participants complete a sustained-attention task (the Metronome Response Task; MRT during which we intermittently presented thought probes. Critically, we varied the average time between probes (i.e., probe rate across participants, allowing us to examine the relation between probe rate and mind-wandering rate. We observed a positive relation between these variables, indicating that people are more likely to report mind wandering as the time between probes increases. We discuss the methodological implications of this finding in the context of the mind-wandering literature, and suggest that researchers include a range of probe rates in future work to provide more insight into this methodological issue.

  12. Causal relationship between effective connectivity within the default mode network and mind-wandering regulation and facilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajimura, Shogo; Kochiyama, Takanori; Nakai, Ryusuke; Abe, Nobuhito; Nomura, Michio

    2016-06-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) can modulate mind wandering, which is a shift in the contents of thought away from an ongoing task and/or from events in the external environment to self-generated thoughts and feelings. Although modulation of the mind-wandering propensity is thought to be associated with neural alterations of the lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC) and regions in the default mode network (DMN), the precise neural mechanisms remain unknown. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we investigated the causal relationships among tDCS (one electrode placed over the right IPL, which is a core region of the DMN, and another placed over the left LPFC), stimulation-induced directed connection alterations within the DMN, and modulation of the mind-wandering propensity. At the behavioral level, anodal tDCS on the right IPL (with cathodal tDCS on the left LPFC) reduced mind wandering compared to the reversed stimulation. At the neural level, the anodal tDCS on the right IPL decreased the afferent connections of the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) from the right IPL and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Furthermore, mediation analysis revealed that the changes in the connections from the right IPL and mPFC correlated with the facilitation and inhibition of mind wandering, respectively. These effects are the result of the heterogeneous function of effective connectivity: the connection from the right IPL to the PCC inhibits mind wandering, whereas the connection from the mPFC to the PCC facilitates mind wandering. The present study is the first to demonstrate the neural mechanisms underlying tDCS modulation of mind-wandering propensity.

  13. Integrative Proteomics and Metabolomics Analysis of Insect Larva Brain: Novel Insights into the Molecular Mechanism of Insect Wandering Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Wang, Xin; Hou, Yong; Zhou, Xiaoying; Chen, Quanmei; Guo, Chao; Xia, Qingyou; Zhang, Yan; Zhao, Ping

    2016-01-04

    Before metamorphosis, most holometabolous insects, such as the silkworm studied here, undergo a special phase called the wandering stage. Insects in this stage often display enhanced locomotor activity (ELA). ELA is vital because it ensures that the insect finds a safe and suitable place to live through the pupal stage. The physiological mechanisms of wandering behavior are still unclear. Here, we integrated proteomics and metabolomics approaches to analyze the brain of the lepidopteran insect, silkworm, at the feeding and wandering stages. Using LC-MS/MS and GC-MS, in all we identified 3004 proteins and 37 metabolites at these two stages. Among them, 465 proteins and 22 metabolites were changed. Neural signal transduction proteins and metabolites, such as neurofilament, dopaminergic synapse related proteins, and glutamic acid, were significantly altered, which suggested that active neural conduction occurred in the brain at the wandering stage. We also found decreased dopamine degradation at the wandering stage. The proposed changes in active neural conduction and increased dopamine concentration might induce ELA. In addition, proteins involved in the ubiquitin proteasome system and lysosome pathway were upregulated, revealing that the brain experiences morphological remodeling during metamorphosis. These findings yielded novel insights into the molecular mechanism underlying insect wandering behavior.

  14. Wandering spleen in children: a report of 3 cases and a brief literature review underlining the importance of diagnostic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lombardi, Roberta; Menchini, Laura; Corneli, Teresa; Magistrelli, Andrea; Monti, Lidia; Toma, Paolo [Bambino Gesu Pediatric Hospital, Department of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Accinni, Antonella [Bambino Gesu Pediatric Hospital, Department of General and Thoracic Surgery, Rome (Italy)

    2014-03-15

    Wandering spleen is a rare condition in children that is often caused by loss or weakening of the splenic ligaments. Its clinical presentation is variable; 64% of children with wandering spleen have splenic torsion as a complication. To provide up-to-date information on the diagnosis, clinical management and diagnostic imaging approaches for wandering spleen in infants and children and to underline the importance of color Doppler US and CT in providing important information for patient management. We report a series of three children with wandering spleen treated at our children's hospital over the last 6 years. All three underwent clinical evaluation, color Doppler US and CT and were surgically treated. We also reviewed 40 articles that included 55 patients younger than 18 years reported in the Medline database from 2002 to 2012. We correlated pathological data with imaging findings. Color Doppler US, the first imaging modality in investigating abdominal symptoms in children with suspected wandering spleen, yielded a diagnostic sensitivity of 54.9%, whereas CT achieved about 71.7%. Radiologic evaluation has a major role in confirming the diagnosis of a suspected wandering spleen and avoiding potentially life-threatening complications requiring immediate surgery. (orig.)

  15. Mind-wandering in younger and older adults: converging evidence from the Sustained Attention to Response Task and reading for comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jonathan D; Balota, David A

    2012-03-01

    One mechanism that has been hypothesized to contribute to older adults' changes in cognitive performance is goal neglect or impairment in maintaining task set across time. Mind-wandering and task-unrelated thought may underlie these potential age-related changes. The present study investigated age-related changes in mind-wandering in three different versions of the Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART), along with self-reported mind-wandering during a reading for comprehension task. In the SART, both younger and older adults produced similar levels of faster reaction times before No-Go errors of commission, whereas, older adults produced disproportionate post-error slowing. Subjective self-reports of mind-wandering recorded during the SART and the reading task indicated that older adults were less likely to report mind-wandering than younger adults. Discussion focuses on cognitive and motivational mechanisms that may account for older adults' relatively low levels of reported mind-wandering.

  16. Tracking the train of thought from the laboratory into everyday life: an experience-sampling study of mind wandering across controlled and ecological contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVay, Jennifer C; Kane, Michael J; Kwapil, Thomas R

    2009-10-01

    In an experience-sampling study that bridged laboratory, ecological, and individual-differences approaches to mind-wandering research, 72 subjects completed an executive-control task with periodic thought probes (reported by McVay & Kane, 2009) and then carried PDAs for a week that signaled them eight times daily to report immediately whether their thoughts were off task. Subjects who reported more mind wandering during the laboratory task endorsed more mind-wandering experiences during everyday life (and were more likely to report worries as off-task thought content). We also conceptually replicated laboratory findings that mind wandering predicts task performance: Subjects rated their daily-life performance to be impaired when they reported off-task thoughts, with greatest impairment when subjects' mind wandering lacked metaconsciousness. The propensity to mind wander appears to be a stable cognitive characteristic and seems to predict performance difficulties in daily life, just as it does in the laboratory.

  17. Using the daydreaming frequency scale to investigate the relationships between mind-wandering, psychological well-being, and present-moment awareness

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Recent findings have shown that mind-wandering – the occurrence of stimulusindependent and task-unrelated thoughts – is associated with negative affect and lower psychological well-being. However, it remains unclear whether this relationship is due to the occurrence of mind-wandering per se or to the fact that people who mind wander more tend to be generally less attentive to present-moment experience. In three studies, we first validate a French translation of a retrospective ...

  18. Quantifying the Statistics of Animal Motion: Lévy Flights of the Wandering Albatross

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Gandhimohan M.

    1998-03-01

    Lévy flights are commonly observed in physical and biological systems(See, e.g., M. F. Shlesinger, G. Zaslavsky and U. Frisch, eds., Lévy flights and Related Topics in Physics) (Springer, Berlin, 1995)., raising the possibility that similar random walks may be used to describe animal motion. Here we discuss recent findings showing that the Wandering Albatross and other animals may perform Lévy flights when foraging( G. M. Viswanathan, V. Afanasyev, S. V. Buldyrev, E. J. Murphy, P. A. Prince and H. E. Stanley, ``Lévy Flight Search Patterns of Wandering Albatrosses,'' Nature) 381, 413--415 (1996). We further examine how such random walks may confer biological advantages and discuss recent findings which suggest that under certain conditions there is a universal power law exponent which characterizes Lévy flight foraging ( G. M. Viswanathan, Sergey V. Buldyrev, Shlomo Havlin, M. G. E. da Luz, E. P. Raposo and H. E. Stanley, preprint.).

  19. Hunting A Wandering Supermassive Black Hole in M31 Halo -- Hermitage of Black Hole

    CERN Document Server

    Miki, Yohei; Kawaguchi, Toshihiro; Saito, Yuriko

    2014-01-01

    In the hierarchical structure formation scenario, galaxies enlarge through multiple merging events with less massive galaxies. In addition, the Magorrian relation indicates that almost all galaxies are occupied by a central supermassive black hole (SMBH) of mass $10^{-3}$ of its spheroidal component. Consequently, SMBHs are expected to wander in the halos of their host galaxies following a galaxy collision, although evidence of this activity is currently lacking. We investigate a current plausible location of an SMBH wandering in the halo of the Andromeda galaxy (M31). According to theoretical studies of $N$-body simulations, some of the many substructures in the M31 halo are remnants of a minor merger occurring about 1 Gyr ago. First, to evaluate the possible parameter space of the infalling orbit of the progenitor, we perform numerous parameter studies using a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) cluster. To reduce uncertainties in the predicted position of the expected SMBH, we then calculate the time evolution ...

  20. Mindfulness training improves working memory capacity and GRE performance while reducing mind wandering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrazek, Michael D; Franklin, Michael S; Phillips, Dawa Tarchin; Baird, Benjamin; Schooler, Jonathan W

    2013-05-01

    Given that the ability to attend to a task without distraction underlies performance in a wide variety of contexts, training one's ability to stay on task should result in a similarly broad enhancement of performance. In a randomized controlled investigation, we examined whether a 2-week mindfulness-training course would decrease mind wandering and improve cognitive performance. Mindfulness training improved both GRE reading-comprehension scores and working memory capacity while simultaneously reducing the occurrence of distracting thoughts during completion of the GRE and the measure of working memory. Improvements in performance following mindfulness training were mediated by reduced mind wandering among participants who were prone to distraction at pretesting. Our results suggest that cultivating mindfulness is an effective and efficient technique for improving cognitive function, with wide-reaching consequences.

  1. letter to editor: Torsion of a Wandering Spleen: A Pediatric Acute Abdominal Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharath GG

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Dear editor:"n"nWandering spleen is a rare pediatric emergency. Persistent torsion of the splenic pedicle causes splenic infarction, which results as an acute abdomen and severe pain. An abdominal mass is present in the majority of cases. We emphasize that whenever a pediatric patient comes with acute abdomen and the spleen is not in the usual position and a mass is found elsewhere in the abdomen or pelvis, the possible diagnosis of wandering spleen with acute torsion should be kept in mind. Ultrasonography (US is the initial study of choice, but CT scan of the liver and the spleen are excellent adjuncts when the diagnosis remains in question.    

  2. The wandering mind in borderline personality disorder: Instability in self- and other-related thoughts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanske, Philipp; Schulze, Lars; Dziobek, Isabel; Scheibner, Hannah; Roepke, Stefan; Singer, Tania

    2016-08-30

    Diagnostic criteria for borderline personality disorder (BPD) include instability in identity and interpersonal relationships. Here, we probed whether instability is already present in BPD patients' thoughts about themselves and others. We tested BPD patients (N=27) and healthy controls (N=25) with a mind-wandering task that assesses content and variability of stimulus-independent self-generated thoughts. Multi-level modeling revealed that while BPD patients and healthy controls mind-wander to a similar extent, BPD patients' thoughts are colored predominantly negatively. Most importantly, although their thoughts concerned the self and others as much as in controls, they fluctuated more strongly in the degree to which their thoughts concerned themselves and others and also gave more extreme ratings. Self- and other related thoughts that were more extreme were also more negative in valence. The increased variability supports current conceptualizations of BPD and may account for the instability in identity and interpersonal relationships.

  3. Nursing Care of Wandering Mental Patients%流浪精神病患者的护理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜娟

    2013-01-01

    总结流浪精神病患者的护理,结合流浪精神病患者的病情特点,经过安全护理,心理护理,饮食及合并症护理,及时开展健康教育,通过落实各项护理措施,有效控制患者病情,促进康复有利于患者回归社会。%Nursing summary of wandering mental patients, combined with the characteristics of wandering mental patients, after safety nursing, psychological nursing, diet and complications nursing, health education in a timely manner, through the implementation of the nursing measures, ef ectively control the disease, promote rehabilitation can help patients return to society.

  4. Wander Lust: Genre, Sexuality and Identity in Ana Kokkinos’s Head On

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe Hardwick

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available While the road movie has long held a privileged place in Australian cinema, less prevalent, though increasingly present, has been the street movie, which—like its road movie cousin—poses important questions about identity in tracing the trajectory of its wanderer protagonists. The most remarkable recent example of an Australian street movie is Ana Kokkinos’s 1997 feature Head On. The film recounts a day in the life of a late adolescent Greek-Australian male who wanders the streets participating in sexual encounters with mainly, though not exclusively, other men. Whereas reviews and articles have generally read the film as a coming out narrative, this article—with reference to Ross Chambers’ theories on digressive narratives in his book Loiterature—will argue that Head On rejects the simplistic teleology of the coming out story in favour of a much more complex understanding of adolescent male sexuality.

  5. Orientation in the wandering albatross: interfering with magnetic perception does not affect orientation performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonadonna, F; Bajzak, C; Benhamou, S; Igloi, K; Jouventin, P; Lipp, H P; Dell'Omo, G

    2005-03-07

    After making foraging flights of several thousands of kilometers, wandering albatrosses (Diomedea exulans) are able to pinpoint a specific remote island where their nests are located. This impressive navigation ability is highly precise but its nature is mysterious. Here we examined whether albatrosses rely on the perception of the Earth's magnetic field to accomplish this task. We disturbed the perception of the magnetic field using mobile magnets glued to the head of nine albatrosses and compared their performances with those of 11 control birds. We then used satellite telemetry to monitor their behavior. We found that the ability of birds to home specific nest sites was unimpaired by this manipulation. In particular, experimental and control birds did not show significant differences with respect to either foraging trip duration, or length, or with respect to homing straightness index. Our data suggest that wandering albatrosses do not require magnetic cues to navigate back to their nesting birds.

  6. Distribution of apparent stress in western China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴忠良; 黄静; 林碧苍

    2002-01-01

    Distribution of apparent stress in Chinese mainland and its surrounding regions was presented using the NEIC broadband radiated energy catalogue and the Harvard CMT catalogue from January 1987 to December 1998. Due to the limitation on the number of samples, reliable results are only for the western China. It is observed that the average apparent stress in Chinese mainland is 0.8 MPa; The maximum apparent stress to the east of the Tibetan plateau is 2.6 MPa; And the average apparent stress in the north-south seismic belt is more than one time higher than its adjacent regions. Distribution pattern of apparent stress seems to have a large-scale correlation with the cumulative energy release level in the 20th century.

  7. Removal of Baseline Wander Noise from Electrocardiogram (ECG) using Fifth-order Spline Interpolation

    OpenAIRE

    John A. OJO; Temilade B. ADETOYI; Solomon A. Adeniran

    2016-01-01

    Baseline wandering can mask some important features of the Electrocardiogram (ECG) signal hence it is desirable to remove this noise for proper analysis and display of the ECG signal. This paper presents the implementation and evaluation of spline interpolation and linear phase FIR filtering methods to remove this noise. Spline interpolation method requires the QRS waves to be first detected and fifth-order (quintic) interpolation technique applied to determine the smo...

  8. The Great Pretender: Pediatric Wandering Spleen: Two Case Reports and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radillo, Lucia; Taddio, Andrea; Ghirardo, Sergio; Bramuzzo, Matteo; Pederiva, Federica; Maschio, Massimo; Barbi, Egidio

    2016-09-01

    Wandering spleen is a rare condition, typically not only due to embryological defects of the splenic ligaments, but also secondary to trauma and splenomegaly. The most common presentation is acute abdomen with a mobile abdominal mass or recurrent abdominal pain. However, the spleen may be temporary in its normal position, and patients could be asymptomatic. A familiarity, if present, strengthens the diagnostic suspect.Abdominal ultrasonography and computed tomography are the examination of choice, and the management is surgical.

  9. Digital Critical Editing, Digital Text Analysis, and Charles R. Maturin’s Melmoth the Wanderer

    OpenAIRE

    Murtagh, Shane

    2015-01-01

    This thesis considers why critical editions have not established themselves in the digital medium to the same extent as documentary editions and offers some potential ways to remedy this. The written thesis is accompanied by a digital critical edition of Charles R. Maturin’s Melmoth the Wanderer, which acts as an example of and case study for the arguments set forth in the written thesis. This edition can be accessed at app.melmoththewanderer.com or at https://pacific-harbor-29...

  10. Removal of Baseline Wander Noise from Electrocardiogram (ECG using Fifth-order Spline Interpolation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A. OJO

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Baseline wandering can mask some important features of the Electrocardiogram (ECG signal hence it is desirable to remove this noise for proper analysis and display of the ECG signal. This paper presents the implementation and evaluation of spline interpolation and linear phase FIR filtering methods to remove this noise. Spline interpolation method requires the QRS waves to be first detected and fifth-order (quintic interpolation technique applied to determine the smoothest curve joining several QRS points. Filtering of the ECG baseline wander was performed by using the difference between the estimated baseline wander and the noisy ECG signal. ECG signals from the MIT-BIT arrhythmia database was used to test the system, while the technique was implemented in MATLAB. The performance of the system was evaluated using Average Power (AP after filtering, Mean Square Error (MSE and the Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR. The quintic spline interpolation gave the best performance in terms of AP, MSE and SNR when compared with linear phase filtering and cubic (3rd-order spline interpolation methods.

  11. A Wandering Abdominal Mass in a Neonate: An Enteric Duplication Cyst Mimicking an Ovarian Cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Shigeo

    2017-01-01

    Enteric duplication cysts are rare congenital anomalies that are prenatally diagnosed through antenatal ultrasonography (US). In female patients, however, attention must be paid since these formations might be confused with ovarian cysts. Herein, we present a case of a low birth weight female infant with an enteric duplication cyst. A cystic lesion was detected in the right abdomen of the fetus on antenatal US and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Serial US and MRI examinations performed after birth showed a single cyst that wandered from side to side in the abdomen; the initial diagnosis was thought to be an ovarian cyst. During laparotomy, however, it was found to be an enteric duplication cyst with volvulus. To our knowledge, there has been no report of an enteric duplication cyst presenting as a wandering abdominal mass. Our experience indicates that early intervention is necessary for patients who have a wandering abdominal mass to avoid complications and urgent surgery, whether it is an ovarian cyst or an enteric duplication cyst.

  12. Suppression of baseline wander in the ECG using a bilinearly transformed, null-phase filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottala, E W; Bailey, J J; Horton, M R; Gradwohl, J R

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to design and test a bilinearly transformed, null-phase (BLT/NP) filter for removing baseline wander and to compare it with the cubic spline for performance. For this purpose, the ECG data were filtered to remove high-frequency noise and low-frequency baseline wander to form a set of "clean" ECGs. Artificial low-frequency noise mimicking typical baseline wander was constructed from sine and cosine waves at 0.20 and 0.45 Hz and with amplitudes of 400 and 300 microV, respectively, and added to the "clean" ECGs to form the "test" ECGs. The BLT/NP filter and the cubic spline method each were applied to a "test" ECG to form a "restored" ECG. The measure of performance was the root mean square difference (RMSD) between the "restored" ECG and the initial "clean" ECG. RMSD values showed that on the average the BLT/NP filter performed as well as the cubic spline method and has the advantage that accurate determination of the QRS onset is not required.

  13. Everyday Attention and Lecture Retention: The Effects of Time, Fidgeting, and Mind Wandering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James eFarley

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We have all had our thoughts wander from the immediate task at hand. The emerging embodied cognition literature emphasizes the role that the body plays in human thought, and raises the possibility that changes in attentional focus may be associated with changes in body behaviour. Recent research has found that when individuals view a lecture, mind wandering increases as a function of time. In the present study we asked whether this decline in attention during lecture viewing was associated with fidgeting. Participants were filmed while they watched a 40-minute lecture video, and at regular 5 minute intervals provided ratings of their attentiveness. Following the lecture, participant's memory for the material was assessed. Fidgeting behaviour was coded from video recordings of each session. Results indicated that attention to, and retention of, lecture material declined as a function of time on task. Critically, and as predicted, fidgeting also increased with time on task. We also found that the relation between fidgeting and retention was significant even when the role of attention was factored into the equation, suggesting that fidgeting makes a unique contribution to retention of lecture material over and above that contributed by an individual’s attention. We propose a novel non-attentional stress-based account of fidgeting and how this impacts retention for lecture material over and above changes in levels in mind wandering vis-a-vis changes in attention.

  14. Taming a Wandering Attention: Short-Form Mindfulness Training in Student Cohorts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra B. Morrison

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mindfulness training (MT is a form of mental training in which individuals engage in exercises to cultivate an attentive, present centered, and non-reactive mental mode. The present study examines the putative benefits of MT in University students for whom mind wandering can interfere with learning and academic success. We tested the hypothesis that short-form MT (7 hours over 7 weeks contextualized for the challenges and concerns of University students may reduce mind wandering and improve working memory. Performance on the sustained attention response task (SART and two working memory tasks (operation span, delayed-recognition with distracters was indexed in participants assigned to a waitlist control group or the MT course. Results demonstrated MT-related benefits in SART performance. Relative to the control group, MT participants had higher task accuracy and self-reported being more on-task after the 7-week training period. MT did not significantly benefit the operation span task or accuracy on the delayed-recognition task. Together these results suggest that while short-form MT did not bolster working memory task performance, it may help curb mind wandering and should, therefore, be further investigated for its use in academic contexts.

  15. Dispositional mindfulness and the wandering mind: Implications for attentional control in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountain-Zaragoza, Stephanie; Londerée, Allison; Whitmoyer, Patrick; Prakash, Ruchika Shaurya

    2016-08-01

    Age-related cognitive decline brings decreases in functional status. Dispositional mindfulness, the tendency towards present-moment attention, is hypothesized to correspond with enhanced attention, whereas mind-wandering may be detrimental to cognition. The relationships among mindfulness, task-related and task-unrelated thought, and attentional control performance on Go/No-Go and Continuous Performance tasks were examined in older adults. Dispositional mindfulness was negatively associated with task-unrelated thought and was positively associated with reactive control, but not proactive control or Go/No-Go performance. Although mind-wandering was not directly associated with performance, task-unrelated thought mediated the mindfulness-proactive control relation. Fewer task-unrelated thoughts were associated with lower proactive control. Interestingly, this effect was moderated by working memory such that it was present for those with low-average, but not high, working memory. This study highlights the importance of dispositional mindfulness and mind-wandering propensity in accounting for individual differences in attentional control in older adults, providing important targets for future cognitive remediation interventions.

  16. Being a grump only makes things worse: a transactional account of acute stress on mind wandering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinski, Melaina T; Watter, Scott

    2013-01-01

    The current work investigates the influence of acute stress on mind wandering. Participants completed the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule as a measure of baseline negative mood, and were randomly assigned to either the high-stress or low-stress version of the Trier Social Stress Test. Participants then completed the Sustained Attention to Response Task as a measure of mind-wandering behavior. In Experiment 1, participants reporting a high degree of negative mood that were exposed to the high-stress condition were more likely to engage in a variable response time, make more errors, and were more likely to report thinking about the stressor relative to participants that report a low level of negative mood. These effects diminished throughout task performance, suggesting that acute stress induces a temporary mind-wandering state in participants with a negative mood. The temporary affect-dependent deficits observed in Experiment 1 were replicated in Experiment 2, with the high negative mood participants demonstrating limited resource availability (indicated by pupil diameter) immediately following stress induction. These experiments provide novel evidence to suggest that acute psychosocial stress briefly suppresses the availability of cognitive resources and promotes an internally oriented focus of attention in participants with a negative mood.

  17. Everyday attention and lecture retention: the effects of time, fidgeting, and mind wandering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, James; Risko, Evan F; Kingstone, Alan

    2013-01-01

    We have all had our thoughts wander from the immediate task at hand. The emerging embodied cognition literature emphasizes the role that the body plays in human thought, and raises the possibility that changes in attentional focus may be associated with changes in body behavior. Recent research has found that when individuals view a lecture, mind wandering increases as a function of time. In the present study we asked whether this decline in attention during lecture viewing was associated with fidgeting. Participants were filmed while they watched a 40-min lecture video, and at regular 5-min intervals provided ratings of their attentiveness. Following the lecture, participant's memory for the material was assessed. Fidgeting behavior was coded from video recordings of each session. Results indicated that attention to, and retention of, lecture material declined as a function of time on task. Critically, and as predicted, fidgeting also increased with time on task. We also found that the relation between fidgeting and retention was significant even when the role of attention was factored into the equation, suggesting that fidgeting makes a unique contribution to retention of lecture material over and above that contributed by an individual's attention. We propose a novel non-attentional stress-based account of fidgeting and how this impacts retention for lecture material over and above changes in levels in mind wandering vis-a-vis changes in attention.

  18. Working memory capacity and mind-wandering during low-demand cognitive tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robison, Matthew K; Unsworth, Nash

    2017-07-01

    Individual differences in working memory capacity (WMC) typically predict reduced rates of mind-wandering during laboratory tasks (Randall, Oswald, & Beier, 2014). However, some studies have shown a positive relationship between WMC and mind-wandering during particularly low-demand tasks (Levinson, Smallwood, & Davidson, 2012; Rummel & Boywitt, 2014; Zavagnin, Borella, & De Beni, 2014). More specifically, Baird, Smallwood, and Schooler (2011) found that when individuals with greater WMC do mind-wander, they tend entertain more future-oriented thoughts. This piece of evidence is frequently used to support the context-regulation hypothesis, which states that using spare capacity to think productively (e.g. plan) during relatively simple tasks is indicative of a cognitive system that is functioning in an adaptive manner (Smallwood & Andrews-Hanna, 2013). The present investigation failed to replicate the finding that WMC is positively related to future-oriented off-task thought, which has implications for several theoretical viewpoints. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Global population structure and taxonomy of the wandering albatross species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burg, T M; Croxall, J P

    2004-08-01

    A recent taxonomic revision of wandering albatross elevated each of the four subspecies to species. We used mitochondrial DNA and nine microsatellite markers to study the phylogenetic relationships of three species (Diomedea antipodensis, D. exulans and D. gibsoni) in the wandering albatross complex. A small number of samples from a fourth species, D. dabbenena, were analysed using mitochondrial DNA only. Mitochondrial DNA sequence analyses indicated the presence of three distinct groups within the wandering albatross complex: D. exulans, D. dabbenena and D. antipodensis/D. gibsoni. Although no fixed differences were found between D. antipodensis and D. gibsoni, a significant difference in the frequency of a single restriction site was detected using random fragment length polymorphism. Microsatellite analyses using nine variable loci, showed that D. exulans, D. antipodensis and D. gibsoni were genetically differentiated. Despite the widespread distribution of D. exulans, we did not detect any genetic differentiation among populations breeding on different island groups. The lower level of genetic differentiation between D. antipodensis and D. gibsoni should be reclassified as D. antipodensis. Within the context of the current taxonomy, these combined data support three species: D. dabbenena, D. exulans and D. antipodensis. Copyright 2004 Blackwell Publishing Ltd

  20. Everyday attention and lecture retention: the effects of time, fidgeting, and mind wandering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, James; Risko, Evan F.; Kingstone, Alan

    2013-01-01

    We have all had our thoughts wander from the immediate task at hand. The emerging embodied cognition literature emphasizes the role that the body plays in human thought, and raises the possibility that changes in attentional focus may be associated with changes in body behavior. Recent research has found that when individuals view a lecture, mind wandering increases as a function of time. In the present study we asked whether this decline in attention during lecture viewing was associated with fidgeting. Participants were filmed while they watched a 40-min lecture video, and at regular 5-min intervals provided ratings of their attentiveness. Following the lecture, participant's memory for the material was assessed. Fidgeting behavior was coded from video recordings of each session. Results indicated that attention to, and retention of, lecture material declined as a function of time on task. Critically, and as predicted, fidgeting also increased with time on task. We also found that the relation between fidgeting and retention was significant even when the role of attention was factored into the equation, suggesting that fidgeting makes a unique contribution to retention of lecture material over and above that contributed by an individual's attention. We propose a novel non-attentional stress-based account of fidgeting and how this impacts retention for lecture material over and above changes in levels in mind wandering vis-a-vis changes in attention. PMID:24065933

  1. A resource-control account of sustained attention: evidence from mind-wandering and vigilance paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, David R; Besner, Derek; Smilek, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Staying attentive is challenging enough when carrying out everyday tasks, such as reading or sitting through a lecture, and failures to do so can be frustrating and inconvenient. However, such lapses may even be life threatening, for example, if a pilot fails to monitor an oil-pressure gauge or if a long-haul truck driver fails to notice a car in his or her blind spot. Here, we explore two explanations of sustained-attention lapses. By one account, task monotony leads to an increasing preoccupation with internal thought (i.e., mind wandering). By another, task demands result in the depletion of information-processing resources that are needed to perform the task. A review of the sustained-attention literature suggests that neither theory, on its own, adequately explains the full range of findings. We propose a novel framework to explain why attention lapses as a function of time-on-task by combining aspects of two different theories of mind wandering: attentional resource (Smallwood & Schooler, 2006) and control failure (McVay & Kane, 2010). We then use our "resource-control" theory to explain performance decrements in sustained-attention tasks. We end by making some explicit predictions regarding mind wandering in general and sustained-attention performance in particular.

  2. Visual asymmetry revisited: Mind wandering preferentially disrupts processing in the left visual field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, Julia W Y; Nagamatsu, Lindsay S; Handy, Todd C

    2014-10-29

    An emerging theory proposes that visual attention operates in parallel at two distinct time scales - a shorter one (10s) associated with more global aspects of attention-to-task. Given their parallel nature, here we examined whether these comparatively slower fluctuations in task-related attention show the same visual field asymmetry - namely, a right visual field bias - as often reported for selective visual-spatial attention. Participants performed a target detection task at fixation while event-related potentials (ERP) time-locked to task-irrelevant visual probes presented in the left and right visual fields were recorded. At random intervals, participants were asked to report whether they were "on-task" or "mind wandering". Our results demonstrated that sensory attenuation during periods of "mind wandering" relative to "on-task", as measured by the visual P1 ERP component at electrodes sites contralateral to the stimulus, was only observed for probes presented in the left visual field. In contrast, the magnitude of sensory gain in the right visual field was insensitive to whether participants were "on-task" or "mind wandering". Taken together, our results support the notion that task-related attention at longer time scales and spatial attention at shorter time scales affect the same underlying mechanism in visual cortex.

  3. Being a Grump Only Makes Things Worse: A Transactional Account of Acute Stress on Mind Wandering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melaina T Vinski

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The current work investigates the influence of acute stress on mind wandering. Participants completed the Positive and Negative Affect Scale as a measure of baseline negative mood, and were randomly assigned to either the high stress or low stress version of the Trier Social Stress Test. Participants then completed the Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART as a measure of mind wandering behaviour. In Experiment 1, participants reporting a high degree of negative mood that were exposed to the high stress condition were more likely to engage in a variable response time, make more errors, and were more likely to report thinking about the stressor relative to participants that report a low level of negative mood. These effects diminished throughout task performance, suggesting that acute stress induces a temporary mind wandering state in participants with a negative mood. The temporary affect-dependent deficits observed in Experiment 1 were replicated in Experiment 2, with the high negative mood participants demonstrating limited resource availability (indicated by pupil diameter immediately following stress induction. These experiments provide novel evidence to suggest that acute psychosocial stress briefly suppresses the availability of cognitive resources and promotes an internally-oriented focus of attention in participants with a negative mood.

  4. Friedmann equations and thermodynamics of apparent horizons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yungui; Wang, Anzhong

    2007-11-23

    With the help of a masslike function which has a dimension of energy and is equal to the Misner-Sharp mass at the apparent horizon, we show that the first law of thermodynamics of the apparent horizon dE=T(A)dS(A) can be derived from the Friedmann equation in various theories of gravity, including the Einstein, Lovelock, nonlinear, and scalar-tensor theories. This result strongly suggests that the relationship between the first law of thermodynamics of the apparent horizon and the Friedmann equation is not just a simple coincidence, but rather a more profound physical connection.

  5. Polarization developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1993-07-01

    Recent developments in laser-driven photoemission sources of polarized electrons have made prospects for highly polarized electron beams in a future linear collider very promising. This talk discusses the experiences with the SLC polarized electron source, the recent progress with research into gallium arsenide and strained gallium arsenide as a photocathode material, and the suitability of these cathode materials for a future linear collider based on the parameters of the several linear collider designs that exist.

  6. Wilcox Group Apparent Thickness, Gulf Coast (wlcxthkg)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Apparent Wilcox Group thickness maps are contoured from location and top information derived from the Petroleum Information (PI) Wells database. The Wilcox...

  7. Understanding dynamical black hole apparent horizons

    CERN Document Server

    Faraoni, Valerio

    2015-01-01

    Dynamical, non-asymptotically flat black holes are best characterized by their apparent horizons. Cosmological black hole solutions of General Relativity exhibit two types of apparent horizon behaviours which, thus far, appeared to be completely disconnected. By taking the limit to General Relativity of a class of Brans-Dicke spacetimes, it is shown how one of these two behaviours is really a limit of the other.

  8. Controlling the stream of thought: working memory capacity predicts adjustment of mind-wandering to situational demands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummel, Jan; Boywitt, C Dennis

    2014-10-01

    Although engaging in task-unrelated thoughts can be enjoyable and functional under certain circumstances, allowing one's mind to wander off-task will come at a cost to performance in many situations. Given that task-unrelated thoughts need to be blocked out when the current task requires full attention, it has been argued that cognitive control is necessary to prevent mind-wandering from becoming maladaptive. Extending this idea, we exposed participants to tasks of different demands and assessed mind-wandering via thought probes. Employing a latent-change model, we found mind-wandering to be adjusted to current task demands. As hypothesized, the degree of adjustment was predicted by working memory capacity, indicating that participants with higher working memory capacity were more flexible in their coordination of on- and off-task thoughts. Notably, the better the adjustment, the smaller performance decrements due to increased task demands were. On the basis of these findings, we argue that cognitive control does not simply allow blocking out task-unrelated thoughts but, rather, allows one to flexibly adjust mind-wandering to situational demands.

  9. The era of the wandering mind? Twenty-first century research on self-generated mental activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicity eCallard

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The first decade of the twenty-first century was characterized by renewed scientific interest in self-generated mental activity (activity largely generated by the individual, rather than in response to experimenters’ instructions or specific external sensory inputs. To understand this renewal of interest, we interrogated the peer-reviewed literature from 2003–2012 (i to explore recent changes in use of terms for self-generated mental activity; (ii to investigate changes in the topics on which mind wandering research, specifically, focuses; and (iii to visualize co-citation communities amongst researchers working on self-generated mental activity. Our analyses demonstrated that there has been a dramatic increase in the term mind wandering, and a significant crossing-over of psychological investigations of mind wandering, specifically, into cognitive neuroscience. If this is, indeed, the ‘era of the wandering mind’, our paper calls for more explicit reflection to be given by mind wandering researchers to the terms they use, the topics and brain regions they focused on, and the research literatures that they implicitly foreground or ignore as not relevant.

  10. Polarization, political

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Wojcieszak

    2015-01-01

    Polarization has been studied in three different forms: on a social, group, and individual level. This entry first focuses on the undisputed phenomenon of elite polarization (i.e., increasing adherence of policy positions among the elites) and also outlines different approaches to assessing mass pol

  11. Polar Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    QPSK Gaussian channels . .......................................................................... 39 vi 1. INTRODUCTION Forward error correction (FEC...Capacity of BSC. 7 Figure 5. Capacity of AWGN channel . 8 4. INTRODUCTION TO POLAR CODES Polar codes were introduced by E. Arikan in [1]. This paper...Under authority of C. A. Wilgenbusch, Head ISR Division EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This report describes the results of the project “More reliable wireless

  12. Polarization holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolova, L.; Ramanujam, P.S.

    Current research into holography is concerned with applications in optically storing, retrieving, and processing information. Polarization holography has many unique properties compared to conventional holography. It gives results in high efficiency, achromaticity, and special polarization...... properties. This books reviews the research carried out in this field over the last 15 years. The authors provide basic concepts in polarization and the propagation of light through anisotropic materials, before presenting a sound theoretical basis for polarization holography. The fabrication...... and characterization of azobenzene based materials, which remain the most efficient for the purpose, is described in detail. This is followed by a description of other materials that are used in polarization holography. An in-depth description of various applications, including display holography and optical storage...

  13. Polarization holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolova, L.; Ramanujam, P.S.

    properties. This books reviews the research carried out in this field over the last 15 years. The authors provide basic concepts in polarization and the propagation of light through anisotropic materials, before presenting a sound theoretical basis for polarization holography. The fabrication......Current research into holography is concerned with applications in optically storing, retrieving, and processing information. Polarization holography has many unique properties compared to conventional holography. It gives results in high efficiency, achromaticity, and special polarization...... and characterization of azobenzene based materials, which remain the most efficient for the purpose, is described in detail. This is followed by a description of other materials that are used in polarization holography. An in-depth description of various applications, including display holography and optical storage...

  14. Polarization of Tapered Semiconductor Travelling-Wave Amplifiers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Dexiu; Li Hong

    2001-01-01

    The polarization of a tapered semi-conductor travelling-wave amplifier has been investigated with the transfer matrix method based on convective equation. It is shown that the apparent polarization mode competition exists, and polarization-independent tapered semiconductor travellingwave amplifiers can be obtained through the optimization of amplifier parameters.

  15. Torsion of a Wandering Spleen in a 24 Years Old Female: a Case Report and Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KavianiFar Kamran

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Wandering spleen is a rare condition characterized by increased splenic mobility due to the absence or laxity of its suspensory ligaments that may present as acute abdomen when it is twisted on its pedicle. Herein we report a case of torsion of a wandering spleen in a 24- year-old female patient without any history of trauma. The patient was admitted to emergency ward at February 2008 with clinical findings of acute abdomen. Laparotomy was performed and the infarcted spleen was removed. Although wandering spleen is a rare clinical entity, the possibility of torsion should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of acute abdomen to avoid serious complications.

  16. Viscous Cosmology and Thermodynamics of Apparent Horizon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Akbar

    2008-01-01

    @@ It is shown that the differential form of Friedmann equations of Friedman-Robertson-Walker (FRW) universe can be recast as a similar form of the first law ThdSh=dE + W dV of thermodynamics at the apparent horizon of FRW universe filled with the viscous fluid.It is also shown that by employing the general expression of temperature Th=|k|/2π=1/2π(r)A(1-(r)A/2H(r)A) associated with the apparent horizon of an FRW universe and assumed that the temperature Tm of the energy inside the apparent horizon is proportional to the horizon temperature Tm = bTh,we are able to show that the generalized second law of thermodynamics holds in the Einstein gravity provided Th-Tm/(r)A≤(p+(P)).

  17. Graphics-processor-unit-based parallelization of optimized baseline wander filtering algorithms for long-term electrocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederhauser, Thomas; Wyss-Balmer, Thomas; Haeberlin, Andreas; Marisa, Thanks; Wildhaber, Reto A; Goette, Josef; Jacomet, Marcel; Vogel, Rolf

    2015-06-01

    Long-term electrocardiogram (ECG) often suffers from relevant noise. Baseline wander in particular is pronounced in ECG recordings using dry or esophageal electrodes, which are dedicated for prolonged registration. While analog high-pass filters introduce phase distortions, reliable offline filtering of the baseline wander implies a computational burden that has to be put in relation to the increase in signal-to-baseline ratio (SBR). Here, we present a graphics processor unit (GPU)-based parallelization method to speed up offline baseline wander filter algorithms, namely the wavelet, finite, and infinite impulse response, moving mean, and moving median filter. Individual filter parameters were optimized with respect to the SBR increase based on ECGs from the Physionet database superimposed to autoregressive modeled, real baseline wander. A Monte-Carlo simulation showed that for low input SBR the moving median filter outperforms any other method but negatively affects ECG wave detection. In contrast, the infinite impulse response filter is preferred in case of high input SBR. However, the parallelized wavelet filter is processed 500 and four times faster than these two algorithms on the GPU, respectively, and offers superior baseline wander suppression in low SBR situations. Using a signal segment of 64 mega samples that is filtered as entire unit, wavelet filtering of a seven-day high-resolution ECG is computed within less than 3 s. Taking the high filtering speed into account, the GPU wavelet filter is the most efficient method to remove baseline wander present in long-term ECGs, with which computational burden can be strongly reduced.

  18. The ARSQ 2.0 reveals age and personality effects on mind-wandering experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, B Alexander; Van Der Sluis, Sophie; Benjamins, Jeroen S; Stoffers, Diederick; Hardstone, Richard; Mansvelder, Huibert D; Van Someren, Eus J W; Linkenkaer-Hansen, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    The human brain frequently generates thoughts and feelings detached from environmental demands. Investigating the rich repertoire of these mind-wandering experiences is challenging, as it depends on introspection and mapping its content requires an unknown number of dimensions. We recently developed a retrospective self-report questionnaire-the Amsterdam Resting-State Questionnaire (ARSQ)-which quantifies mind wandering along seven dimensions: "Discontinuity of Mind," "Theory of Mind," "Self," "Planning," "Sleepiness," "Comfort," and "Somatic Awareness." Here, we show using confirmatory factor analysis that the ARSQ can be simplified by standardizing the number of items per factor and extending it to a 10-dimensional model, adding "Health Concern," "Visual Thought," and "Verbal Thought." We will refer to this extended ARSQ as the "ARSQ 2.0." Testing for effects of age and gender revealed no main effect for gender, yet a moderate and significant negative effect for age on the dimensions of "Self," "Planning," and "Visual Thought." Interestingly, we observed stable and significant test-retest correlations across measurement intervals of 3-32 months except for "Sleepiness" and "Health Concern." To investigate whether this stability could be related to personality traits, we correlated ARSQ scores to proxy measures of Cloninger's Temperament and Character Inventory, revealing multiple significant associations for the trait "Self-Directedness." Other traits correlated to specific ARSQ dimensions, e.g., a negative association between "Harm Avoidance" and "Comfort." Together, our results suggest that the ARSQ 2.0 is a promising instrument for quantitative studies on mind wandering and its relation to other psychological or physiological phenomena.

  19. The ARSQ 2.0 reveals age and personality effects on mind-wandering experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Alexander Diaz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The human brain frequently generates thoughts and feelings detached from environmental demands. Investigating the rich repertoire of these mind-wandering experiences is challenging, as it depends on introspection and mapping its content requires an unknown number of dimensions. We recently developed a retrospective self-report questionnaire—the Amsterdam Resting-State questionnaire (ARSQ—which quantifies mind wandering along seven dimensions: Discontinuity of Mind, Theory of Mind, Self, Planning, Sleepiness, Comfort, and Somatic Awareness. Here, we show using confirmatory factor analysis that the ARSQ can be simplified by standardizing the number of items per factor and extending it to a 10-dimensional model, adding Health Concern, Visual Thought and Verbal Thought. We will refer to this extended ARSQ as the ARSQ 2.0. Testing for effects of age and gender revealed no main effect for gender, yet a moderate and significant negative effect for age on the dimensions of Self, Planning and Visual Thought. Interestingly, we observed stable and significant test-retest correlations across measurement intervals of 3 to 32 months except for Sleepiness and Health Concern. To investigate whether this stability could be related to personality traits, we correlated ARSQ scores to proxy measures of Cloninger’s Temperament and Character Inventory, revealing multiple significant associations for the trait Self-Directedness. Other traits correlated to specific ARSQ dimensions, e.g., a negative association between Harm Avoidance and Comfort. Together, our results suggest that the ARSQ 2.0 is a promising instrument for quantitative studies on mind wandering and its relation to other psychological or physiological phenomena.

  20. Distracted by the Unthought - Suppression and Reappraisal of Mind Wandering under Stereotype Threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Carolin; Martiny, Sarah E; Schmader, Toni

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has found that subtle reminders of negative stereotypes about one's group can lead individuals to underperform on stereotype-relevant tests (e.g., women in math, ethnic minorities on intelligence tests). This so called stereotype threat effect can contribute to systematic group differences in performance that can obscure the true abilities of certain social groups and thereby sustain social inequalities. In the present study, we examined processes underlying stereotype threat effects on women's math performance, specifically focusing on the role of suppression of mind wandering (i.e., task-irrelevant thinking) in stereotype threat (ST) and no threat (NT) situations. Based on a process model of stereotype threat effects on performance, we hypothesized that women under stereotype threat spontaneously suppress mind wandering, and that this suppression impairs performance. An alternative regulation strategy that prevents suppression (i.e., reappraising task-irrelevant thoughts as normal) was predicted to prevent stereotype threat effects on performance. We manipulated stereotype threat (ST vs. NT) and cognitive regulation strategy (suppression, reappraisal, or no strategy) and measured women's performance on a math and a concentration task (N = 113). We expected three groups to perform relatively more poorly: Those in ST with either no strategy or suppression and those in NT with a suppression strategy. We tested the performance of these groups against the remaining three groups hypothesized to perform relatively better: those in NT with no strategy or reappraisal and those in ST with reappraisal. The results showed the expected pattern for participants' math performance, but not for concentration achievement. This pattern suggests that ineffective self-regulation by suppressing mind wandering can at least partly explain stereotype threat effects on performance, whereas a reappraisal strategy can prevent this impairment. We discuss implications for

  1. Distracted by the Unthought - Suppression and Reappraisal of Mind Wandering under Stereotype Threat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin Schuster

    Full Text Available Previous research has found that subtle reminders of negative stereotypes about one's group can lead individuals to underperform on stereotype-relevant tests (e.g., women in math, ethnic minorities on intelligence tests. This so called stereotype threat effect can contribute to systematic group differences in performance that can obscure the true abilities of certain social groups and thereby sustain social inequalities. In the present study, we examined processes underlying stereotype threat effects on women's math performance, specifically focusing on the role of suppression of mind wandering (i.e., task-irrelevant thinking in stereotype threat (ST and no threat (NT situations. Based on a process model of stereotype threat effects on performance, we hypothesized that women under stereotype threat spontaneously suppress mind wandering, and that this suppression impairs performance. An alternative regulation strategy that prevents suppression (i.e., reappraising task-irrelevant thoughts as normal was predicted to prevent stereotype threat effects on performance. We manipulated stereotype threat (ST vs. NT and cognitive regulation strategy (suppression, reappraisal, or no strategy and measured women's performance on a math and a concentration task (N = 113. We expected three groups to perform relatively more poorly: Those in ST with either no strategy or suppression and those in NT with a suppression strategy. We tested the performance of these groups against the remaining three groups hypothesized to perform relatively better: those in NT with no strategy or reappraisal and those in ST with reappraisal. The results showed the expected pattern for participants' math performance, but not for concentration achievement. This pattern suggests that ineffective self-regulation by suppressing mind wandering can at least partly explain stereotype threat effects on performance, whereas a reappraisal strategy can prevent this impairment. We discuss

  2. Hidden Markov model tracking of continuous gravitational waves from a neutron star with wandering spin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvorova, S.; Sun, L.; Melatos, A.; Moran, W.; Evans, R. J.

    2016-06-01

    Gravitational wave searches for continuous-wave signals from neutron stars are especially challenging when the star's spin frequency is unknown a priori from electromagnetic observations and wanders stochastically under the action of internal (e.g., superfluid or magnetospheric) or external (e.g., accretion) torques. It is shown that frequency tracking by hidden Markov model (HMM) methods can be combined with existing maximum likelihood coherent matched filters like the F -statistic to surmount some of the challenges raised by spin wandering. Specifically, it is found that, for an isolated, biaxial rotor whose spin frequency walks randomly, HMM tracking of the F -statistic output from coherent segments with duration Tdrift=10 d over a total observation time of Tobs=1 yr can detect signals with wave strains h0>2 ×10-26 at a noise level characteristic of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (Advanced LIGO). For a biaxial rotor with randomly walking spin in a binary orbit, whose orbital period and semimajor axis are known approximately from electromagnetic observations, HMM tracking of the Bessel-weighted F -statistic output can detect signals with h0>8 ×10-26. An efficient, recursive, HMM solver based on the Viterbi algorithm is demonstrated, which requires ˜103 CPU hours for a typical, broadband (0.5-kHz) search for the low-mass x-ray binary Scorpius X-1, including generation of the relevant F -statistic input. In a "realistic" observational scenario, Viterbi tracking successfully detects 41 out of 50 synthetic signals without spin wandering in stage I of the Scorpius X-1 Mock Data Challenge convened by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration down to a wave strain of h0=1.1 ×10-25, recovering the frequency with a root-mean-square accuracy of ≤4.3 ×10-3 Hz .

  3. Carl Schmitt and Ahasver. The Idea of the State and the Wandering Jew

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galit Hasan- Rokem

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available In this article the cultural effects and the specific reverberations in Carl Schmitt’s work of two literary figures emerging in vastly different cultural contexts in the 16th century, Leviathan and the Wandering Jew, are analyzed using a pair of discursive concepts – political theology and Midrash. My aim is to show that whereas Schmitt was informed by the kind of stereotypical thinking embodied in the legendary and very popular figure of Ahasver, the figure itself was suppressed and replaced by a seemingly rational political discourse addressing Leviathan.

  4. Random wandering of laser beams with orbital angular momentum during propagation through atmospheric turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksenov, Valerii P; Kolosov, Valeriy V; Pogutsa, Cheslav E

    2014-06-10

    The propagation of laser beams having orbital angular momenta (OAM) in the turbulent atmosphere is studied numerically. The variance of random wandering of these beams is investigated with the use of the Monte Carlo technique. It is found that, among various types of vortex laser beams, such as the Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beam, modified Bessel-Gaussian beam, and hypergeometric Gaussian beam, having identical initial effective radii and OAM, the LG beam occupying the largest effective volume in space is the most stable one.

  5. Beam wandering statistics of twin thin laser beam propagation under generalized atmospheric conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Darío G; Funes, Gustavo

    2012-12-03

    Under the Geometrics Optics approximation is possible to estimate the covariance between the displacements of two thin beams after they have propagated through a turbulent medium. Previous works have concentrated in long propagation distances to provide models for the wandering statistics. These models are useful when the separation between beams is smaller than the propagation path-regardless of the characteristics scales of the turbulence. In this work we give a complete model for these covariances, behavior introducing absolute limits to the validity of former approximations. Moreover, these generalizations are established for non-Kolmogorov atmospheric models.

  6. The wandering of Rudolf Laban in the pedagogical paths of the body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franca Zagatti

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The word “wandering” recalls the idea of moving and exploring, the idea of going around not so much motivated by the wish to achieve, as rather from the pleasure of being on the road. In a pedagogical perspective it calls to mind the value of that kind of experience we fully live and cross with curiosity and desire to go beyond the boundaries of the known. In this paper the concept of wandering will be the key to a reflection on the pedagogical thought of Rudolf Laban.

  7. Wandering Spleen and Organoaxial Gastric Volvulus after Morgagni Hernia Repair: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noemi Cantone

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Wandering spleen and gastric volvulus are two rare entities that have been described in association with congenital diaphragmatic hernia. The diagnosis is difficult and any delay can result in ischemia and necrosis of both organs. We present a case of a 13-year-old girl, previously operated on for anterior diaphragmatic hernia and intrathoracic gastric volvulus, that presented to our service for a subdiaphragmatic gastric volvulus recurrence associated with a wandering spleen. In this report we reviewed the literature, analyzing the clinical presentation, diagnostic assessment, and treatment options of both conditions, in particular in the case associated with diaphragmatic hernia.

  8. Influence of beam wander on uplink of ground-to-satellite laser communication and optimization for transmitter beam radius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hong; Luo, Bin; Ren, Yongxiong; Zhao, Sinan; Dang, Anhong

    2010-06-15

    We restudy the influence of beam wander on the uplink of ground-to-satellite laser communication, using the effective pointing error method, for a collimated untracked Gaussian beam under a weak atmospheric turbulence condition. It shows that the beam wander may cause significant increase in bit error rate (BER), and there exists an optimal transmitter radius for minimizing the value of BER. Further studies manifest that this optimal radius only changes with the laser wavelength and zenith angle, while independent on the satellite altitude and the fade threshold at the receiver. These results can be used in system design and optimization for the transmitter.

  9. Polarizing cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Stephen P

    2012-01-01

    People categorize themselves and others, creating ingroup and outgroup distinctions. In American politics, parties constitute the in- and outgroups, and party leaders hold sway in articulating party positions. A party leader's endorsement of a policy can be persuasive, inducing co-partisans to take the same position. In contrast, a party leader's endorsement may polarize opinion, inducing out-party identifiers to take a contrary position. Using survey experiments from the 2008 presidential election, I examine whether in- and out-party candidate cues—John McCain and Barack Obama—affected partisan opinion. The results indicate that in-party leader cues do not persuade but that out-party leader cues polarize. This finding holds in an experiment featuring President Bush in which his endorsement did not persuade Republicans but it polarized Democrats. Lastly, I compare the effect of party leader cues to party label cues. The results suggest that politicians, not parties, function as polarizing cues.

  10. More mind wandering, fewer original ideas: be not distracted during creative idea generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Ning; Wu, Mengxia; Runco, Mark A; Pina, Jeremy

    2015-10-01

    Several studies suggest that mind wandering (MW) benefits creativity when the MW occurs in the incubation period of creative problem solving. The aim of present study was to examine the effects of MW that occurs in the course of creative idea generation. Participants received an Alternative Uses Task (AUT) and were asked to generate ideas for 20min. Their MW frequencies as time passed were measured by means of probe-caught MW. Comparisons of the AUT performances of high and low MW groups revealed that greater MW was associated with lower fluency and originality scores on the AUT. Furthermore, the high MW group showed greater MW as time passed, while the low MW group's MW was steady during the course of idea generation. Accordingly, the originality of idea generation decreased with time passing for the high MW group but was steady for the low MW group. The findings suggest that the MW during the course of creative idea generation is negatively related to creativity, perhaps because the control processes involved in idea generation are impaired by the mind wandering.

  11. First report of MRI findings in a case of an autoamputated wandering calcified ovary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahajan PS

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Parag Suresh Mahajan, Nazeer Ahamad, Sheik Akbar Hussain Department of Radiology, Al-Khor Hospital, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar Abstract: An autoamputated wandering calcified ovary (AWCO is an extremely rare cause of abdominal calcification in the pediatric population. We present the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI features of AWCO in a child. To our knowledge, the MRI features of AWCO have not been previously described in the published literature. Our case report indicates that the MRI findings are characteristic in the diagnosis of an AWCO and can completely obviate the need for invasive procedures in this mostly benign disease. An AWCO should be considered in all cases of mobile calcific opacities on radiographs in female patients. We advise that MRI be conducted in all suspected cases of AWCO for accurate and noninvasive diagnosis, and regular follow-up should be performed with ultrasound. The findings in our case report have the potential to change the course of investigations and management in suspected cases. Keywords: magnetic resonance imaging, ovary, adnexa, autoamputation, wandering calcification

  12. Flood duration and chute cutoff formation in a wandering gravel-bed river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, A.; Wilcox, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    Chute cutoffs occur when a bypass or "chute" channel incises across a bar or low floodplain area, re-distributing water and sediment. Cutoffs result from a setup and a triggering event, typically during overbank flow, but the combined effect of magnitude and duration on potential erosion in in-channel and overbank areas is still poorly constrained. Here we investigated how overbank flow duration impacts cutoff formation and spatiotemporal shear stress patterns in a wandering gravel-bed river. We applied a two-dimensional hydraulic model to a recently reconstructed reach of the Clark Fork River in western Montana that experienced chute cutoffs during a long-duration flood in 2011. Hydrographs with increasing durations exceeding overbank were simulated; for each magnitude-duration combination, various metrics were quantified for in-channel and overbank areas separately. We confirm the hypothesized importance of floodplain elevation, vegetation presence, chute-channel inlet entrance location, and high overbank shear stress zones at bend apexes on cutoff occurrence. Floodplain width plays an important role in controlling unit discharge such that overbank areas are more competent in a narrower floodplain conveyance corridor. Duration controls cumulative flow exceeding sediment mobility thresholds, having the largest effect in overbank areas. Side channels at the reconstructed study site act like naturally formed incipient chutes. This work describes a complex floodplain system characteristic of wandering gravel-bed rivers with implications for understanding morphodynamic evolution, river restoration, and flow management in regulated rivers.

  13. Unaware yet reliant on attention: Experience sampling reveals that mind-wandering impedes implicit learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Michael S; Smallwood, Jonathan; Zedelius, Claire M; Broadway, James M; Schooler, Jonathan W

    2016-02-01

    Although implicit learning has been widely studied, controversy remains regarding its reliance on attentional resources. A central issue in this controversy is the question of how best to manipulate attention. The usual approach of comparing implicit learning in a serial reaction time (SRT) task under single- versus dual-task conditions is known to be problematic, because the secondary task may not only divert attention away from the primary task, but also interfere with the implicit-learning process itself. To address this confound, in the present study we used an experience-sampling instead of a dual-task approach. We assessed lapses of attention (mind-wandering) with experience-sampling thought probes during a standard implicit-learning SRT task. The results revealed a significant negative correlation between mind-wandering and implicit learning. Thus, greater task focus was associated with improved implicit sequence learning. This result suggests that, at least in the context of this SRT task, optimal implicit learning relies on attention.

  14. Desiccation resistance reflects patterns of microhabitat choice in a Central American assemblage of wandering spiders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapinski, Witold; Tschapka, Marco

    2014-08-01

    The lowland rainforest of northeastern Costa Rica harbours an assemblage of large wandering spider species belonging to three habitat subguilds: (1) semi-aquatic, (2) forest ground dwelling and (3) vegetation dwelling. We hypothesized that desiccation resistance should differ among species preferring different microhabitats and the associated microclimate. Desiccation resistance was assessed by: (1) measuring water loss rates of the spiders under relatively dry experimental conditions, and (2) recording desiccation susceptibility, i.e. the reactions of the spiders to a relatively dry environment. High water loss rates and desiccation susceptibility of the semi-aquatic and forest-ground-dwelling subguilds clearly mirrored the relatively humid microclimate of the understory. Significantly lower water loss rates and desiccation susceptibility of the vegetation-dwelling species reflected the highly variable, often dry and hot conditions of the rainforest canopy and forest edge habitats. Vegetation-dwelling wandering spiders are therefore physiologically better adapted to dry conditions than the semi-aquatic and forest-ground-dwelling species. The results illustrate the significance of physiological characteristics for explaining both species-specific habitat use and, in a larger context, niche partitioning within a community.

  15. From mind wandering to involuntary retrieval: Age-related differences in spontaneous cognitive processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillet, David; Schacter, Daniel L

    2016-01-08

    The majority of studies that have investigated the effects of healthy aging on cognition have focused on age-related differences in voluntary and deliberately engaged cognitive processes. Yet many forms of cognition occur spontaneously, without any deliberate attempt at engaging them. In this article we review studies that have assessed age-related differences in four such types of spontaneous thought processes: mind-wandering, involuntary autobiographical memory, intrusive thoughts, and spontaneous prospective memory retrieval. These studies suggest that older adults exhibit a reduction in frequency of both mind-wandering and involuntary autobiographical memory, whereas findings regarding intrusive thoughts have been more mixed. Additionally, there is some preliminary evidence that spontaneous prospective memory retrieval may be relatively preserved in aging. We consider the roles of age-related differences in cognitive resources, motivation, current concerns and emotional regulation in accounting for these findings. We also consider age-related differences in the neural correlates of spontaneous cognitive processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Where the Narcissistic Mind Wanders: Increased Self-Related Thoughts Are More Positive and Future Oriented.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanske, Philipp; Sharifi, Marjan; Smallwood, Jonathan; Dziobek, Isabel; Singer, Tania

    2016-09-12

    Narcissism is characterized by a preoccupation with fantasies of unlimited success, power, beauty, and similar values, which has been discussed as intra-individual regulation of a grandiose, but vulnerable self-concept. To explore where the narcissistic mind wanders, we used an experience-sampling approach in a sample with large variability in pathological narcissism inventory scores. Multilevel modeling revealed (1) more mind-wandering in participants with higher levels of narcissism and (2) a difference in the content of these thoughts (more self- and other-related, past and future oriented, negative content). Critically, (3) in high levels of narcissism, the self-related thoughts were associated with more positive valence and were also more future oriented. The results demonstrate the validity of the assumed grandiose, self-absorbed view of oneself in narcissism, which includes self-indulgent fantasies of future success. We also found additional evidence for negative, past-oriented thoughts in narcissism, a dysfunctional pattern reminiscent of rumination, possibly linked to increased psychopathological vulnerability in narcissism.

  17. Hidden Markov model tracking of continuous gravitational waves from a neutron star with wandering spin

    CERN Document Server

    Suvorova, S; Melatos, A; Moran, W; Evans, R J

    2016-01-01

    Gravitational wave searches for continuous-wave signals from neutron stars are especially challenging when the star's spin frequency is unknown a priori from electromagnetic observations and wanders stochastically under the action of internal (e.g. superfluid or magnetospheric) or external (e.g. accretion) torques. It is shown that frequency tracking by hidden Markov model (HMM) methods can be combined with existing maximum likelihood coherent matched filters like the F-statistic to surmount some of the challenges raised by spin wandering. Specifically it is found that, for an isolated, biaxial rotor whose spin frequency walks randomly, HMM tracking of the F-statistic output from coherent segments with duration T_drift = 10d over a total observation time of T_obs = 1yr can detect signals with wave strains h0 > 2e-26 at a noise level characteristic of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (Advanced LIGO). For a biaxial rotor with randomly walking spin in a binary orbit, whose orbital...

  18. Using the Daydreaming Frequency Scale to Investigate the Relationships between Mind-Wandering, Psychological Well-Being, and Present-Moment Awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawarczyk, David; Majerus, Steve; Van der Linden, Martial; D'Argembeau, Arnaud

    2012-01-01

    Recent findings have shown that mind-wandering - the occurrence of stimulus-independent and task-unrelated thoughts - is associated with negative affect and lower psychological well-being. However, it remains unclear whether this relationship is due to the occurrence of mind-wandering per se or to the fact that people who mind wander more tend to be generally less attentive to present-moment experience. In three studies, we first validate a French translation of a retrospective self-report questionnaire widely used to assess the general occurrence of mind-wandering in daily life - the Daydreaming Frequency Scale. Using this questionnaire, we then show that the relationship between mind-wandering frequency and psychological distress is fully accounted for by individual differences in dispositional mindful awareness and encoding style. These findings suggest that it may not be mind-wandering per se that is responsible for psychological distress, but rather the general tendency to be less aware and attentive to the present-moment. Thus, although mind-wandering and present-moment awareness are related constructs, they are not reducible to one another, and are distinguishable in terms of their relationship with psychological well-being.

  19. Comment: An Apparent Controversy in Auroral Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haerendel, Gerhard

    2007-03-01

    In his article ``A turning point in auroral physics,'' Bryant argued against what he called the `standard' theory of auroral acceleration, according to which the electrons ``gain their energy from static electric fields,'' and offered wave acceleration as an alternative. Because of the importance of the process, not only for the aurora borealis but also for other cosmic plasmas, a clarification of this apparent controversy seems to be in place.

  20. Rubber friction on (apparently) smooth lubricated surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mofidi, M; Prakash, B [Division of Machine Elements, Luleaa University of Technology, Luleaa SE-97187 (Sweden); Persson, B N J [IFF, FZ-Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Albohr, O [Pirelli Deutschland AG, 64733 Hoechst/Odenwald, Postfach 1120 (Germany)

    2008-02-27

    We study rubber sliding friction on hard lubricated surfaces. We show that even if the hard surface appears smooth to the naked eye, it may exhibit short-wavelength roughness, which may make the dominant contribution to rubber friction. That is, the observed sliding friction is mainly due to the viscoelastic deformations of the rubber by the counterface surface asperities. The results presented are of great importance for rubber sealing and other rubber applications involving (apparently) smooth surfaces.

  1. Rubber friction on (apparently) smooth lubricated surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mofidi, M.; Prakash, B.; Persson, B. N. J.; Albohr, O.

    2008-02-01

    We study rubber sliding friction on hard lubricated surfaces. We show that even if the hard surface appears smooth to the naked eye, it may exhibit short-wavelength roughness, which may make the dominant contribution to rubber friction. That is, the observed sliding friction is mainly due to the viscoelastic deformations of the rubber by the counterface surface asperities. The results presented are of great importance for rubber sealing and other rubber applications involving (apparently) smooth surfaces.

  2. Apparently healthy urinary bacteriology in children

    OpenAIRE

    Burstein de Herrera, S.; Departamento de Microbiología y Laboratorios Clínicos, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú; Domínguez Navarrete, N.; Laboratorios Clínicos, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú; Villanueva, D.; Laboratorios Clínicos, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriological study of urine of 350 apparently healthy children who were divided into groups according to the various stages of childhood ago. In each study urine sediment , gram staining and the qualitative and quantitative culture was performed. The study revealed three maximum sediment leukocytes per microscopic field in 12.3 % of things and 1-2 erythrocytes per field in 6.28 %. No clear cylinders or inflammatory cells were observed . QRAM by coloring germs no sediment or total urine wer...

  3. Osteosarcoma with apparent Ewing sarcoma gene rearrangement

    OpenAIRE

    Mathias, Melissa; Chou, Alexander J; Meyers, Paul; Shukla, Neerav; Hameed, Meera; Agaram, Narasimhan; Wang, Lulu; Berger, Michael F.; Walsh, Michael; Kentsis, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Poorly differentiated round cell sarcomas present diagnostic challenges due to their variable morphology and lack of specific immunophenotypic markers. We present a case of a 15-year-old female with a tibial tumor that exhibited features of Ewing-like sarcoma, including apparent rearrangement of the EWSR1 gene. Hybridization capture-based next-generation DNA sequencing showed evidence of complex genomic rearrangements, absence of known pathogenic Ewing-like chromosome translocations, and dele...

  4. The delicate balance between parental protection, unsupervised wandering, and adolescents' autonomy and its relation with antisocial behavior : The TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sentse, M.; Dijkstra, J.K.; Lindenberg, S.; Ormel, J.; Veenstra, R.

    In a large sample of early adolescents (T2: N = 1023; M age = 13.51; 55.5% girls), the impact of parental protection and unsupervised wandering on adolescents' antisocial behavior 2.5 years later was tested in this TRAILS study; gender and parental knowledge were controlled for. In addition, the

  5. Vultures of the seas: hyperacidic stomachs in wandering albatrosses as an adaptation to dispersed food resources, including fishery wastes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Grémillet

    Full Text Available Animals are primarily limited by their capacity to acquire food, yet digestive performance also conditions energy acquisition, and ultimately fitness. Optimal foraging theory predicts that organisms feeding on patchy resources should maximize their food loads within each patch, and should digest these loads quickly to minimize travelling costs between food patches. We tested the prediction of high digestive performance in wandering albatrosses, which can ingest prey of up to 3 kg, and feed on highly dispersed food resources across the southern ocean. GPS-tracking of 40 wandering albatrosses from the Crozet archipelago during the incubation phase confirmed foraging movements of between 475-4705 km, which give birds access to a variety of prey, including fishery wastes. Moreover, using miniaturized, autonomous data recorders placed in the stomach of three birds, we performed the first-ever measurements of gastric pH and temperature in procellariformes. These revealed surprisingly low pH levels (average 1.50±0.13, markedly lower than in other seabirds, and comparable to those of vultures feeding on carrion. Such low stomach pH gives wandering albatrosses a strategic advantage since it allows them a rapid chemical breakdown of ingested food and therefore a rapid digestion. This is useful for feeding on patchy, natural prey, but also on fishery wastes, which might be an important additional food resource for wandering albatrosses.

  6. Flashbacks, intrusions, mind-wandering - Instances of an involuntary memory spectrum: A commentary on Takarangi, Strange, and Lindsay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyer, T.; Otgaar, H.; Smeets, T.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    In their paper, Takarangi, Strange, and Lindsay (2014) showed in two experiments that participants who had witnessed a shocking film frequently "mind-wandered without awareness" about the content of the film. More importantly, they equated this effect with the occurrence of traumatic intrusions. In

  7. Temporal focus, temporal distance, and mind-wandering valence: Results from an experience sampling and an experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spronken, M.; Holland, R.W.; Figner, B.C.; Dijksterhuis, A.J.

    2016-01-01

    When mind-wandering, people may think about events that happened in the past, or events that may happen in the future. Using experience sampling, we first aimed to replicate the finding that future-oriented thoughts show a greater positivity bias than past-oriented thoughts. Furthermore, we investig

  8. Why Does Working Memory Capacity Predict Variation in Reading Comprehension? On the Influence of Mind Wandering and Executive Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVay, Jennifer C.; Kane, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Some people are better readers than others, and this variation in comprehension ability is predicted by measures of working memory capacity (WMC). The primary goal of this study was to investigate the mediating role of mind-wandering experiences in the association between WMC and normal individual differences in reading comprehension, as predicted…

  9. Toward a Real-Time (Day) Dreamcatcher: Sensor-Free Detection of Mind Wandering during Online Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Caitlin; D'Mello, Sidney

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the results from a sensor-free detector of mind wandering during an online reading task. Features consisted of reading behaviors (e.g., reading time) and textual features (e.g., level of difficulty) extracted from self-paced reading log files. Supervised machine learning was applied to two datasets in order to predict if…

  10. The silver lining of a mind in the clouds: interesting musings are associated with positive mood while mind-wandering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Michael S; Mrazek, Michael D; Anderson, Craig L; Smallwood, Jonathan; Kingstone, Alan; Schooler, Jonathan W

    2013-01-01

    The negative effects of mind-wandering on performance and mood have been widely documented. In a recent well-cited study, Killingsworth and Gilbert (2010) conducted a large experience sampling study revealing that all off-task episodes, regardless of content, have equal to or lower happiness ratings, than on-task episodes. We present data from a similarly implemented experience sampling study with additional mind-wandering content categories. Our results largely conform to those of the Killingsworth and Gilbert (2010) study, with mind-wandering generally being associated with a more negative mood. However, subsequent analyses reveal situations in which a more positive mood is reported after being off-task. Specifically when off-task episodes are rated for interest, the high interest episodes are associated with an increase in positive mood compared to all on-task episodes. These findings both identify a situation in which mind-wandering may have positive effects on mood, and suggest the possible benefits of encouraging individuals to shift their off-task musings to the topics they find most engaging.

  11. The silver lining of a mind in the clouds: Interesting musings are associated with positive mood while mind-wandering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S. Franklin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The negative effects of mind-wandering on performance and mood have been widely documented. In a recent well-cited study, Killingsworth and Gilbert (2010 conducted a large experience sampling study revealing that all off-task episodes, regardless of content, have equal to or lower happiness ratings, than on-task episodes. We present data from a similarly implemented experience sampling study with additional mind-wandering content categories. Our results largely conform to those of the Killingsworth and Gilbert (2010 study, with mind-wandering generally being associated with a more negative mood. However, subsequent analyses reveal situations in which a more positive mood is reported after being off-task. Specifically when off-task episodes are rated for interest, the high interest episodes are associated with an increase in positive mood compared to all on-task episodes. These findings both identify a situation in which mind-wandering may have positive effects on mood, and suggest the possible benefits of encouraging individuals to shift their off task musings to the topics they find most engaging.

  12. Conducting the Train of Thought: Working Memory Capacity, Goal Neglect, and Mind Wandering in an Executive-Control Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVay, Jennifer C.; Kane, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    On the basis of the executive-attention theory of working memory capacity (WMC; e.g., M. J. Kane, A. R. A. Conway, D. Z. Hambrick, & R. W. Engle, 2007), the authors tested the relations among WMC, mind wandering, and goal neglect in a sustained attention to response task (SART; a go/no-go task). In 3 SART versions, making conceptual versus…

  13. The era of the wandering mind? Twenty-first century research on self-generated mental activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callard, Felicity; Smallwood, Jonathan; Golchert, Johannes; Margulies, Daniel S

    2013-01-01

    The first decade of the twenty-first century was characterized by renewed scientific interest in self-generated mental activity (activity largely generated by the individual, rather than in direct response to experimenters' instructions or specific external sensory inputs). To understand this renewal of interest, we interrogated the peer-reviewed literature from 2003 to 2012 (i) to explore recent changes in use of terms for self-generated mental activity; (ii) to investigate changes in the topics on which mind wandering research, specifically, focuses; and (iii) to visualize co-citation communities amongst researchers working on self-generated mental activity. Our analyses demonstrated that there has been a dramatic increase in the term "mind wandering" from 2006, and a significant crossing-over of psychological investigations of mind wandering into cognitive neuroscience (particularly in relation to research on the default mode and default mode network). If our article concludes that this might, indeed, be the "era of the wandering mind," it also calls for more explicit reflection to be given by researchers in this field to the terms they use, the topics and brain regions they focus on, and the research literatures that they implicitly foreground or ignore.

  14. Why does working memory capacity predict variation in reading comprehension? On the influence of mind wandering and executive attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVay, Jennifer C; Kane, Michael J

    2012-05-01

    Some people are better readers than others, and this variation in comprehension ability is predicted by measures of working memory capacity (WMC). The primary goal of this study was to investigate the mediating role of mind-wandering experiences in the association between WMC and normal individual differences in reading comprehension, as predicted by the executive-attention theory of WMC (e.g., Engle & Kane, 2004). We used a latent-variable, structural-equation-model approach, testing skilled adult readers on 3 WMC span tasks, 7 varied reading-comprehension tasks, and 3 attention-control tasks. Mind wandering was assessed using experimenter-scheduled thought probes during 4 different tasks (2 reading, 2 attention-control). The results support the executive-attention theory of WMC. Mind wandering across the 4 tasks loaded onto a single latent factor, reflecting a stable individual difference. Most important, mind wandering was a significant mediator in the relationship between WMC and reading comprehension, suggesting that the WMC-comprehension correlation is driven, in part, by attention control over intruding thoughts. We discuss implications for theories of WMC, attention control, and reading comprehension.

  15. The Wanderer, the Chameleon, and the Warrior: Experiences of Doctoral Students of Color Developing a Research Identity in Educational Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami-Ramalho, Elizabeth; Piert, Joyce; Militello, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors use their personal narratives and collaborative portraits as methods to shed light on the complexities of developing a research identity while journeying through a doctoral program. Using the metaphors of a wanderer, a chameleon, and a warrior, their narratives represent portraits of experiences faced by doctoral…

  16. NON-WANDERING SET OF A CONTINUOUS GRAPH MAP%图映射的非游荡集

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾荣宝; 孙太祥; 郑婷婷

    2003-01-01

    The non-wandering set Ω(f) for a graph map f is investigated. It is sentually recurrent points of f and ω -limit set ω(Ω(f)) of Ω(f) is contained in the closure of the set R(f) of recurrent points of f .

  17. Flashbacks, intrusions, mind-wandering - Instances of an involuntary memory spectrum: A commentary on Takarangi, Strange, and Lindsay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyer, T.; Otgaar, H.; Smeets, T.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    In their paper, Takarangi, Strange, and Lindsay (2014) showed in two experiments that participants who had witnessed a shocking film frequently "mind-wandered without awareness" about the content of the film. More importantly, they equated this effect with the occurrence of traumatic intrusions. In

  18. The silver lining of a mind in the clouds: interesting musings are associated with positive mood while mind-wandering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Michael S.; Mrazek, Michael D.; Anderson, Craig L.; Smallwood, Jonathan; Kingstone, Alan; Schooler, Jonathan W.

    2013-01-01

    The negative effects of mind-wandering on performance and mood have been widely documented. In a recent well-cited study, Killingsworth and Gilbert (2010) conducted a large experience sampling study revealing that all off-task episodes, regardless of content, have equal to or lower happiness ratings, than on-task episodes. We present data from a similarly implemented experience sampling study with additional mind-wandering content categories. Our results largely conform to those of the Killingsworth and Gilbert (2010) study, with mind-wandering generally being associated with a more negative mood. However, subsequent analyses reveal situations in which a more positive mood is reported after being off-task. Specifically when off-task episodes are rated for interest, the high interest episodes are associated with an increase in positive mood compared to all on-task episodes. These findings both identify a situation in which mind-wandering may have positive effects on mood, and suggest the possible benefits of encouraging individuals to shift their off-task musings to the topics they find most engaging. PMID:24009599

  19. Why the Global Availability of Mind Wandering Necessitates Resource Competition: Reply to McVay and Kane (2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    When the mind wanders, conscious thoughts come to mind that are only loosely related to the task being performed. This phenomenon produces tension within the cognitive sciences because the interfering nature of these thoughts is at odds with the assumption that such processes are functional in daily life. In their comment, McVay and Kane (2010)…

  20. Why the Global Availability of Mind Wandering Necessitates Resource Competition: Reply to McVay and Kane (2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    When the mind wanders, conscious thoughts come to mind that are only loosely related to the task being performed. This phenomenon produces tension within the cognitive sciences because the interfering nature of these thoughts is at odds with the assumption that such processes are functional in daily life. In their comment, McVay and Kane (2010)…

  1. The delicate balance between parental protection, unsupervised wandering, and adolescents' autonomy and its relation with antisocial behavior : The TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sentse, M.; Dijkstra, J.K.; Lindenberg, S.; Ormel, J.; Veenstra, R.

    2010-01-01

    In a large sample of early adolescents (T2: N = 1023; M age = 13.51; 55.5% girls), the impact of parental protection and unsupervised wandering on adolescents' antisocial behavior 2.5 years later was tested in this TRAILS study; gender and parental knowledge were controlled for. In addition, the lev

  2. The Delicate Balance between Parental Protection, Unsupervised Wandering, and Adolescents' Autonomy and Its Relation with Antisocial Behavior: The TRAILS Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentse, Miranda; Dijkstra, Jan Kornelis; Lindenberg, Siegwart; Ormel, Johan; Veenstra, Rene

    2010-01-01

    In a large sample of early adolescents (T2: N = 1023; M age = 13.51; 55.5% girls), the impact of parental protection and unsupervised wandering on adolescents' antisocial behavior 2.5 years later was tested in this TRAILS study; gender and parental knowledge were controlled for. In addition, the level of biological maturation and having antisocial…

  3. Apparent exchange rate mapping with diffusion MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasič, Samo; Nilsson, Markus; Lätt, Jimmy; Ståhlberg, Freddy; Topgaard, Daniel

    2011-08-01

    Water exchange through the cell membranes is an important feature of cells and tissues. The rate of exchange is determined by factors such as membrane lipid composition and organization, as well as the type and activity of aquaporins. A method for noninvasively estimating the rate of water exchange would be useful for characterizing pathological conditions, e.g., tumors, multiple sclerosis, and ischemic stroke, expected to be associated with a change of the membrane barrier properties. This study describes the filter exchange imaging method for determining the rate of water exchange between sites having different apparent diffusion coefficients. The method is based on the filter-exchange pulsed gradient spin-echo NMR spectroscopy experiment, which is here modified to be compatible with the constraints of clinical MR scanners. The data is analyzed using a model-free approach yielding maps of the apparent exchange rate, here being introduced in analogy with the concept of the apparent diffusion coefficient. Proof-of-principle experiments are performed on microimaging and whole-body clinical scanners using yeast suspension phantoms. The limitations and appropriate experimental conditions are examined. The results demonstrate that filter exchange imaging is a fast and reliable method for characterizing exchange, and that it has the potential to become a powerful diagnostic tool.

  4. Two normal paleomagnetic polarity intervals in the lower Matuyama Chron recorded in the Shungura Formation (Omo Valley, Southwest Ethiopia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidane, Tesfaye; Otofuji, Yo-Ichiro; Brown, Francis H.; Takemoto, Kazuhiro; Eshete, Getachew

    2007-10-01

    Two hundred fifty meters of fluvio-lacustrine deposits were sampled from the 760-meter thick Shungura Formation to study magnetostratigraphy within the lower Matuyama Chron. Two to three block samples (at different positions) were collected from 46 units in the section. Characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM) is isolated at temperatures between 390 °C and 620 °C or alternating fields between 25 and 100 mT. The ChRM is carried by detrital magnetite and maghemite. Directional analyses revealed three reversed and three normal polarity zones: R3-N3-R2-N2-R1-N1 in the sequence. The overall mean direction Ds = 359.1°, Is = 3.4°; α95 = 3.9°, N = 44 differs marginally from the expected mean dipole field direction ( D = 1.0°, I = 8.8°, α95 = 2.3°, N = 26) [Besse, J., Courtillot, V., 2003. Apparent and True Polar wander and the geometry of the geomagnetic field in the last 200 million years. J. Geophys. Res. 108 (B10), 2469. doi 10.1029/2003JB002684]. Using stratigraphic scaling between 40Ar/ 39Ar and K/Ar isotopic age data [Brown, F.H., McDougall, I., Davies, I., Maier, R., 1985. An integrated Plio-Pleistocene chronology for the Turkana basin. In: Delson, E. (Ed.), Ancestors: The Hard Evidence. Alan R. Liss, Inc., New York, pp. 82-90; McDougall, I., Brown, F.H., 2006. Precise 40Ar/ 39Ar geochronology for the upper Koobi Fora Foramtions, Turkana Basin, northern Kenya. J. Geo. Soc. (Lond.) 163, 205-220], the normal zones N3, N2, and N1 are dated between 2.06 ± 0.01-2.08 ± 0.01 Ma, 2.15 ± 0.01-2.20 ± 0.01 Ma, and at 1.93 ± 0.02 Ma respectively. These age estimates imply that N1 represents the bottom of the Olduvai Subchron while N2 and N3 might represent Réunion Subchrons. If the sedimentation rates are assumed to be constant, the duration for the older Réunion (I) Subchron is about four to seven times (57 ± 15 kyr) that currently adopted by the recent GPTS [Cande, S.C., Kent, D.V., 1995. Revised calibration of the geomagnetic polarity timescale for the

  5. Polarized Campuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, Susan Resneck

    1991-01-01

    On college campuses, the climate is polarized because of intolerance and discrimination, censorship, factionalism, and anger among students and faculty. As a result, the campus is in danger of becoming dominated by political issues and discouraging the exchange of ideas characteristic of a true liberal arts education. (MSE)

  6. INFLUENCE OF TEXTURE AND MINERALOGY IN APPARENT POROSITY, WATER ABSORPTION AND APPARENT DENSITY OF IGNEOUS ROCKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Meyer

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The work consists in evaluating the results of physical indices (apparent porosity, water absorption and apparent density obtained in granitoids exploited as ornamental and revetment stones in the state of São Paulo and Espírito Santo. The results of physical indices were qualified as parameters specification published by Abirochas use and compared the characteristics observed in petrographic samples.

  7. Apparent magnitude of earthshine: a simple calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Dulli Chandra

    2016-05-01

    The Sun illuminates both the Moon and the Earth with practically the same luminous fluxes which are in turn reflected by them. The Moon provides a dim light to the Earth whereas the Earth illuminates the Moon with somewhat brighter light which can be seen from the Earth and is called earthshine. As the amount of light reflected from the Earth depends on part of the Earth and the cloud cover, the strength of earthshine varies throughout the year. The measure of the earthshine light is luminance, which is defined in photometry as the total luminous flux of light hitting or passing through a surface. The expression for the earthshine light in terms of the apparent magnitude has been derived for the first time and evaluated for two extreme cases; firstly, when the Sun’s rays are reflected by the water of the oceans and secondly when the reflector is either thick clouds or snow. The corresponding values are -1.30 and -3.69, respectively. The earthshine value -3.22 reported by Jackson lies within these apparent magnitudes. This paper will motivate the students and teachers of physics to look for the illuminated Moon by earthlight during the waning or waxing crescent phase of the Moon and to reproduce the expressions derived here by making use of the inverse-square law of radiation, Planck’s expression for the power in electromagnetic radiation, photopic spectral luminous efficiency function and expression for the apparent magnitude of a body in terms of luminous fluxes.

  8. Apparent life threatening events (ALTE: diagnostic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erick Manuel Toro-Monjaraz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Apparent Life-Threatening Events (ALTE are a form of clinical presen- tation of various problems or diseases in children under one year of age. A frequency of 0.6/1000 newborns is estimated. In Mexico, there is no known incidence, systematic approach or guidelines for hospital discharge, so we performed a literature review. Its etiology may be gastrointestinal, neurological, cardiovascular, metabolic, endocrine or-idiopathic. The detailed history and physical examination provide an outline to select the laboratory and imaging studies to perform.

  9. Noncommutative FRW Apparent Horizon and Hawking Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhallouf, H.; Mebarki, N.; Aissaoui, H.

    2017-09-01

    In the context of noncommutative (NCG) gauge gravity, and using a cosmic time power law formula for the scale factor, a Friedman-Robertson-Walker (FRW) like metric is obtained. Within the fermions tunneling effect approach and depending on the various intervals of the power parameter, expressions of the apparent horizon are also derived. It is shown that in some regions of the parameter space, a pure NCG trapped horizon does exist leading to new interpretation of the role played by the noncommutativity of the space-time.

  10. Apparent exchange rate imaging in anisotropic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderby, Casper Kaae; Lundell, Henrik M; Søgaard, Lise V;

    2014-01-01

    Double-wave diffusion experiments offer the possibility of probing correlation between molecular diffusion at multiple time points. It has recently been shown that this technique is capable of measuring the exchange of water across cellular membranes. The aim of this study was to investigate the ...... the effect of macroscopic tissue anisotropy on the measurement of the apparent exchange rate (AXR) in multicompartment systems.......Double-wave diffusion experiments offer the possibility of probing correlation between molecular diffusion at multiple time points. It has recently been shown that this technique is capable of measuring the exchange of water across cellular membranes. The aim of this study was to investigate...

  11. Apparent speed increases at low luminance

    OpenAIRE

    Vaziri-Pashkam, Maryam; Cavanagh, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the effect of luminance on apparent speed, subjects adjusted the speed of a low-luminance rotating grating (0.31 cd/m2) to match that of a high-luminance one (1260 cd/m2). Above 4 Hz, subjects overestimated the speed of the low-luminance grating. This overestimation increased as a function of temporal rate and reached 30% around 10 Hz temporal rates. The speed overestimation became significant once the lower luminance was 2.4 log units lower than the high luminance comparison. ...

  12. Apparent contact angle of an evaporating drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, S. J. S.

    2012-11-01

    In experiments by Poulard et al. (2005), a sessile drop of perfectly wetting liquid evaporates from a non-heated substrate into an under-saturated mixture of vapour with an inert gas; evaporation is limited by vapour diffusion. The system exhibits an apparent contact angle θ that is a flow property. Under certain conditions, the apparent contact line was stationary relative to the substrate; we predict θ for this case. Observed values of θ are small, allowing lubrication analysis of the liquid film. The liquid and vapour flows are coupled through conditions holding at the phase interface; in particular, vapour partial pressure there is related to the local value of liquid pressure through the Kelvin condition. Because the droplet is shallow, the interfacial conditions can be transferred to the solid-liquid interface at y = 0 . We show that the dimensionless partial pressure p (x , y) and the film thickness h (x) are determined by solving ∇2 p = 0 for y > 0 subject to a matching condition at infinity, and the conditions - p = L hxx +h-3 and (h3px) x + 3py = 0 at y = 0 . The parameter L controls the ratio of Laplace to disjoining pressure. We analyse this b.v.p. for the experimentally-relevant case L --> 0 .

  13. For whom the mind wanders, and when: an experience-sampling study of working memory and executive control in daily life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Michael J; Brown, Leslie H; McVay, Jennifer C; Silvia, Paul J; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Kwapil, Thomas R

    2007-07-01

    An experience-sampling study of 124 undergraduates, pretested on complex memory-span tasks, examined the relation between working memory capacity (WMC) and the experience of mind wandering in daily life. Over 7 days, personal digital assistants signaled subjects eight times daily to report immediately whether their thoughts had wandered from their current activity, and to describe their psychological and physical context. WMC moderated the relation between mind wandering and activities' cognitive demand. During challenging activities requiring concentration and effort, higher-WMC subjects maintained on-task thoughts better, and mind-wandered less, than did lower-WMC subjects. The results were therefore consistent with theories of WMC emphasizing the role of executive attention and control processes in determining individual differences and their cognitive consequences.

  14. Wandering spleen with torsion causing pancreatic volvulus and associated intrathoracic gastric volvulus. An unusual triad and cause of acute abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aswani, Yashant; Anandpara, Karan Manoj; Hira, Priya

    2015-01-31

    Wandering spleen is a rare medical entity in which the spleen is orphaned of its usual peritoneal attachments and thus assumes an ever wandering and hypermobile state. This laxity of attachments may even cause torsion of the splenic pedicle. Both gastric volvulus and wandering spleen share a common embryology owing to maldevelopment of the dorsal mesentery. Gastric volvulus complicating a wandering spleen is, however, an extremely unusual association, with a few cases described in literature. We present a case of a young female who presented with acute abdominal pain and vomiting. Radiological imaging revealed a intrathoracic gastric volvulus, torsion in an ectopic spleen, and additionally demonstrated a pancreatic volvulus - an unusual triad, reported only once, causing an acute abdomen. The patient subsequently underwent an emergency surgical laparotomy with splenopexy and gastropexy.

  15. Polar Diving

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    3 July 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows layers exposed by erosion in a trough within the north polar residual cap of Mars, diving beneath a younger covering of polar materials. The layers have, since the Mariner 9 mission in 1972, been interpreted to be composed of a combination of dust and ice in unknown proportions. In this scene, a layer of solid carbon dioxide, which was deposited during the previous autumn and winter, blankets the trough as well as the adjacent terrain. Throughout northern spring, the carbon dioxide will be removed; by summer, the layers will be frost-free. Location near: 81.4oN, 352.2oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Spring

  16. Interpolated memory tests reduce mind wandering and improve learning of online lectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szpunar, Karl K; Khan, Novall Y; Schacter, Daniel L

    2013-04-16

    The recent emergence and popularity of online educational resources brings with it challenges for educators to optimize the dissemination of online content. Here we provide evidence that points toward a solution for the difficulty that students frequently report in sustaining attention to online lectures over extended periods. In two experiments, we demonstrate that the simple act of interpolating online lectures with memory tests can help students sustain attention to lecture content in a manner that discourages task-irrelevant mind wandering activities, encourages task-relevant note-taking activities, and improves learning. Importantly, frequent testing was associated with reduced anxiety toward a final cumulative test and also with reductions in subjective estimates of cognitive demand. Our findings suggest a potentially key role for interpolated testing in the development and dissemination of online educational content.

  17. Unsupervised learning technique for surface electromyogram denoising from power line interference and baseline wander.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niegowski, Maciej; Zivanovic, Miroslav; Gomez, Marisol; Lecumberri, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel approach to single-channel power line interference (PLI) and baseline wander (BW) removal from surface electromyograms (EMG). It is based on non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) using a priori knowledge about the interferences. It performs a linear decomposition of the input signal spectrogram into non-negative components, which represent the PLI, BW and EMG spectrogram estimates. They all exhibit very different time-frequency patterns: PLI and BW are both sparse whereas EMG is noise-like. Initialization of the classical NMF algorithm with accurately designed PLI, BW and EMG structures and a carefully adjusted matrix decomposition rank increases the separation performance. The comparative study suggests that the proposed method outperforms two state-of-the-art reference methods.

  18. Mind Wandering "Ahas" versus Mindful Reasoning: Alternative Routes to Creative Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire M Zedelius

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on mixed results linking both mindfulness and its opposing construct mind wandering to enhanced creativity, we predicted that the relationship between mindfulness and creativity might depend on whether creative problems are approached through analytic strategy or through insight (i.e., sudden awareness of a solution. Study 1 investigated the relationship between trait mindfulness and compound remote associates problem solving as a function of participants’ self-reported approach to each problem. The results revealed a negative relationship between mindfulness and problem-solving overall. However, more detailed analysis revealed that mindfulness was associated with impaired problem solving when approaching problems with insight, but increased problem solving when using analysis. In Study 2, we manipulated participants’ problem-solving approach through instructions. We again found a negative relationship between mindfulness and creative performance in general, however, more mindful participants again performed better when instructed to approach problems analytically.

  19. A Few Remarks on the Poetics of Turbulence in Richard Powers’ Operation Wandering Soul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Yves Pellegrin

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Dans le roman de Richard Powers Operation Wandering Soul, la linéarité conventionnelle du récit cède le pas à une forme de discontinuité et de circularité qui évoque le mouvement imprévisible d’une turbulence. On propose de montrer ici que cette turbulence met en œuvre une nouvelle manière d’écrire et de lire les récits. Dans le roman, la turbulence apparaît toujours sous l’aspect d’une force désorganisatrice qu’il faut maîtriser, un bruit qui doit être supprimé. Cet impératif, témoin des aspirations du récit au sens et à la clôture, peut se concevoir comme l’indice de la manière dont l’ordre narratif s’efforce de soumettre toute turbulence en dissimulant son chaos sous une linéarité de façade et des dénouements postiches. Cette activité transforme le récit (et le type de lecture qu’elle induit en une sorte d’eschatologie dont Operation Wandering Soul dénonce le mensonge et la fuite en avant. Pour en combattre les effets néfastes, le roman s’emploie à perturber l’ordre narratif et à bousculer nos habitudes de lecture ; il se fait texte turbulent en conformant sa structure la plus intime à celle des systèmes non linéaires.In Richard Powers’ Operation Wandering Soul, the conventional linearity of narrative gives way to a type of discontinuity and circularity that is reminiscent of the unpredictable movement of turbulent flows. This paper suggests that such turbulence enacts a new way of writing and reading narrative. Turbulence is always described in the novel as a disruptive force that must be checked or a noise that must be silenced. This imperative, which testifies to narrative’s desire for closure and meaning, may be construed as an index of the way narrative order attempts to subdue all turbulence by covering up its proliferating chaos with perfunctory linearity and cosmetic endings. Such activity turns narrative—and the type of reading it encourages—into some kind of

  20. Anglo-Saxon Themes, Ideas, and Techniques of Expression Reflected in The Wanderer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于晓然

    2012-01-01

      The poem The Wanderer was one of finest of the Old English laments, whose theme, ideas and literary techniques were typical of the Anglo-Saxon period. The study explained how Anglo-Saxon themes, ideas, and techniques of expression exhibited themselves in the poem. The findings suggest that the theme of the poem which reflected the Anglo-Saxon value system, and the techniques of expression presented as corroboration, all contributed to central ideas of the poem:“beasts of bat⁃tle”motif, achievements of wisdom, traveling seas, exile, heroic ideal, loyalty to the lord, kinsmanship, and fates of men. Those ideas were rooted in the emerging Christianity.

  1. Settling the name Diomedea exulans Linnaeus, 1758 for the Wandering Albatross by neotypification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schodde, Richard; Tennyson, Alan J D; Groth, Jeff G; Lai, Jonas; Scofield, Paul; Steinheimer, Frank D

    2017-02-21

    On-going conflict in use of the name Diomedea exulans Linnaeus, 1758 for different taxa of the great albatrosses (Wandering Albatross complex) is resolved by neotypification, fixing the name to the large subantarctic form formerly often known as D. chionoptera Salvin, 1896. Application of all scientific names in the complex is reviewed, an annotated synonymy for the large subantarctic form is provided, available names for smaller, temperate-zone forms are listed, and unavailable and otherwise invalid names referable to the complex are identified. Syntypes of D. chionoptera and D. spadicea J.F. Gmelin, 1789 are lectotypified as well, fixing their names as synonyms of D. exulans to prevent possible disturbance to in-use names for the smaller, temperate-zone forms.

  2. Ocean wanderers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, de Marijke N.; Jones, Duncan; Jones, Hannah

    2017-01-01

    Reports of bowhead whales (Balaena mysticetus) outside the Arctic Circle are scarce. On 15 May 2016, a juvenile bowhead whale was recorded in shallow water in Mount's Bay (Cornwall, UK) much further south than the species' normal dis- tribution. Fifteen months earlier, another such sighting was made

  3. Hunting a wandering supermassive black hole in the M31 halo hermitage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miki, Yohei; Mori, Masao [Center for Computational Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Kawaguchi, Toshihiro [Department of Physics and Information Science, Yamaguchi University, 1677-1 Yoshida, Yamaguchi, Yamaguchi 753-8512 (Japan); Saito, Yuriko, E-mail: ymiki@ccs.tsukuba.ac.jp [Department of Astronomical Science, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2014-03-10

    In the hierarchical structure formation scenario, galaxies enlarge through multiple merging events with less massive galaxies. In addition, the Magorrian relation indicates that almost all galaxies are occupied by a central supermassive black hole (SMBH) of mass 10{sup –3} times the mass of its spheroidal component. Consequently, SMBHs are expected to wander in the halos of their host galaxies following a galaxy collision, although evidence of this activity is currently lacking. We investigate a current plausible location of an SMBH wandering in the halo of the Andromeda galaxy (M31). According to theoretical studies of N-body simulations, some of the many substructures in the M31 halo are remnants of a minor merger occurring about 1 Gyr ago. First, to evaluate the possible parameter space of the infalling orbit of the progenitor, we perform numerous parameter studies using a graphics processing unit cluster. To reduce uncertainties in the predicted position of the expected SMBH, we then calculate the time evolution of the SMBH in the progenitor dwarf galaxy from N-body simulations using the plausible parameter sets. Our results show that the SMBH lies within the halo (∼20-50 kpc from the M31 center), closer to the Milky Way than the M31 disk. Furthermore, the predicted current positions of the SMBH were restricted to an observational field of 0.°6 × 0.°7 in the northeast region of the M31 halo. We also discuss the origin of the infalling orbit of the satellite galaxy and its relationships with the recently discovered vast thin disk plane of satellite galaxies around M31.

  4. Mind wandering and retrieval from episodic memory: a pilot event-related potential study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riby, Leigh Martin; Smallwood, Jonathan; Gunn, Valerie P

    2008-06-01

    The present study investigated the effects of mind wandering (task-unrelated thought) on the subcomponents of episodic memory as reflected by event-related potentials (ERPs). Specifically, individual differences in the pattern of ERP episodic 'old/new' effects (left-parietal, right-frontal and central-negativity effects) were examined across groups of participants experiencing either high or low frequencies of task-unrelated thought during encoding. Twenty participants studied lists of words and line drawings in one of two contexts (red versus green coloured boxes). At test, participants discriminated between target (old words or line drawings presented in one colour) and nontargets (old items from the other colour and new items). On completion of the memory task, participants completed the 'thinking' component of the Dundee Stress State Questionnaire to provide a retrospective measure of task-unrelated thought. Behavioural data indicated that irrespective of the presence of task-unrelated thought, participants were able to complete the memory task equally well. However, an analysis of ERPs across High and Low task-unrelated thought groups revealed differences in retrieval strategy. Those individuals with infrequent episodes of task-unrelated thought at study used a 'pure' recollection strategy (left-parietal effect only). Conversely, those participants experiencing frequent episodes of task-unrelated thought were unable to recollect the stimuli with ease, as indexed by a diminished parietal effect. As a consequence, these participants employed additional strategic processes for task completion, as indexed by an elevated amplitude of central negativity effects. These data are consistent with the decoupling hypothesis of mind wandering which suggests impaired recollection when attention becomes directed away from the task.

  5. Melanctha′s Wander%梅兰克莎的“游荡”

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘莹

    2015-01-01

    The chapter " Melanctha" ,from Three Lives,is regarded as one of the experimental masterpiece of Gertrude Stein. The word " wander" ,repeatedly occurs in it,is hard and vague to understand. This paper,from the feminism perspective,proposes that the purpose of Melanctha′s " wander" is to seek wisdom and power. But un-der the Bridge point paradigma,Melanctha can not find what she wants. As a result,she dies silently as an accuse to the patriarchal society,and the ending is doomed. This is also Stein′s exploration for women′s life and identity.%斯泰因《三个女人》中的“梅兰克莎”一篇被认作是作者的文字实验代表作。文中不断出现“游荡”一词,让人费解。本文从女性主义视角出发,剖析梅兰克莎“游荡”的根本目的是为了寻找“智慧”和“力量”,但在桥头镇的男权模本下,梅兰克莎最终却没能找到她想要的“智慧”和“力量”,她以孤独离世作为对男权社会的控诉,而她的结局也是注定的,同时也是斯泰因对于当时女性何去何从的一种探讨。

  6. Revisiting Lévy flight search patterns of wandering albatrosses, bumblebees and deer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Andrew M.; Phillips, Richard A.; Watkins, Nicholas W.; Freeman, Mervyn P.; Murphy, Eugene J.; Afanasyev, Vsevolod; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; da Luz, M. G. E.; Raposo, E. P.; Stanley, H. Eugene; Viswanathan, Gandhimohan M.

    2007-10-01

    The study of animal foraging behaviour is of practical ecological importance, and exemplifies the wider scientific problem of optimizing search strategies. Lévy flights are random walks, the step lengths of which come from probability distributions with heavy power-law tails, such that clusters of short steps are connected by rare long steps. Lévy flights display fractal properties, have no typical scale, and occur in physical and chemical systems. An attempt to demonstrate their existence in a natural biological system presented evidence that wandering albatrosses perform Lévy flights when searching for prey on the ocean surface. This well known finding was followed by similar inferences about the search strategies of deer and bumblebees. These pioneering studies have triggered much theoretical work in physics (for example, refs 11, 12), as well as empirical ecological analyses regarding reindeer, microzooplankton, grey seals, spider monkeys and fishing boats. Here we analyse a new, high-resolution data set of wandering albatross flights, and find no evidence for Lévy flight behaviour. Instead we find that flight times are gamma distributed, with an exponential decay for the longest flights. We re-analyse the original albatross data using additional information, and conclude that the extremely long flights, essential for demonstrating Lévy flight behaviour, were spurious. Furthermore, we propose a widely applicable method to test for power-law distributions using likelihood and Akaike weights. We apply this to the four original deer and bumblebee data sets, finding that none exhibits evidence of Lévy flights, and that the original graphical approach is insufficient. Such a graphical approach has been adopted to conclude Lévy flight movement for other organisms, and to propose Lévy flight analysis as a potential real-time ecosystem monitoring tool. Our results question the strength of the empirical evidence for biological Lévy flights.

  7. A new perspective on the growth pattern of the Wandering Albatross (Diomedea exulans) through DEB theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Carlos M. G. L.; Sousa, Tânia; Marques, Gonçalo M.; Domingos, Tiago; Kooijman, Sebastiaan A. L. M.

    2014-11-01

    The Wandering Albatross (Diomedea exulans) and other seabirds exhibit a growing pattern that includes a period of body mass decrease before fledging. Several hypotheses have been suggested to explain it without success. We hypothesized that: 1) chicks and adults have similar metabolic traits regulating assimilation, growth and maturation; 2) there is a difference in locomotion effort between chicks and adults, and 3) chicks are exposed to a decline in food availability before fledging. This set of hypotheses allows for an energy surplus to be available and stored in reserve during the first months of development, explaining the mass recession that starts before fledging and the fact that adults keep a lower weight than fledglings, throughout the rest of their life span. To test this set of hypotheses we applied the Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) theory. Using a small set of life-history traits and growth curves we parameterized the DEB standard model. We confirmed this set of hypotheses and estimated the pattern of decline in food availability that explains mass recession. An assessment of the daily energy intake was also performed. The implications related to that energy flux and diet composition are discussed based on current knowledge. The DEB model for the Wandering Albatross also provided estimates for the adult daily food ingested by adults (464.06 kJ kg- 1 d- 1), fasting capacity (25 d), Field Metabolic Rate (4.29 W kg- 1) and resting metabolic rate (2.87 W kg- 1). These values are consistent with the averages obtained in the field, suggesting that DEB may be useful to provide good estimations on a broader scale.

  8. I don't feel your pain (as much): the desensitizing effect of mind wandering on the perception of others' discomfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, Julia W Y; Xu, Judy; Handy, Todd C

    2014-03-01

    Mind wandering reduces both the sensory and cognitive processing of affectively neutral stimuli, but whether it also modulates the processing of affectively salient stimuli remains unclear. In particular, we examined whether mind wandering attenuates one's sensitivity to observing mild pain in others. In the first experiment, we recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) as participants viewed images of hands in either painful or neutral situations, while being prompted at random intervals to report whether their thoughts were on task or mind wandering. We found that the brain's later response to painful images was significantly reduced immediately preceding "mind-wandering" versus "on-task" reports, as measured via amplitude decreases in a frontal-central positivity beginning approximately 300 ms poststimulus. In a second, control experiment using behavioral measures, we wanted to confirm whether the subjective sense of pain observed in others does in fact decrease during mind wandering. Accordingly, we asked participants to rate how painful the hand images looked on a 5-point Likert scale, again while taking reports of their mind-wandering states at unpredictable intervals. Consistent with our ERP data, we found that the ratings for painful images were significantly reduced immediately preceding mind-wandering reports. Additional control analyses suggested that the effect could not simply be ascribed to general habituation in the affective response to painful images over time. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that mind wandering can directly modulate the cortical processing of affectively salient stimulus inputs, serving in this case to reduce sensitivity to the physical discomfort of others.

  9. Distribution of apparent magnetization for Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Magsat total field anomalies over Asia were used to construct an equivalent magnetization model, which represents the apparent magnetization distribution within an equivalent layer 40 km thick and correlates well with large-scale tectonics, for example, the Kazakhstan, Tarim, Yangtze, India, Sino-Korea and Indochina blocks. The basin, plain, sea basin, and islands are delineated by magnetization lows whereas the plateau and marine ridge correspond to magnetization highs. The boundary between Tibetan Plateau and India marked by a strong gradient along its length coincides with the Yarlung Zangbo River fault roughly. The Tanlu fault belt is the boundary between positive and negative anomalies. This boundary stretches in southwest direction and joins Sanjiang fault belt. The boundary between the Southeast China block and the Yangtze block is also clearly delineated by the magnetization anomalies. Generally, the magnetization boundaries are consistent with the collisional suture of blocks.

  10. Field signature for apparently superluminal particle motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, Martin

    2015-05-01

    In the context of Stueckelberg's covariant symplectic mechanics, Horwitz and Aharonovich [1] have proposed a simple mechanism by which a particle traveling below light speed almost everywhere may exhibit a transit time that suggests superluminal motion. This mechanism, which requires precise measurement of the particle velocity, involves a subtle perturbation affecting the particle's recorded time coordinate caused by virtual pair processes. The Stueckelberg framework is particularly well suited to such problems, because it permits pair creation/annihilation at the classical level. In this paper, we study a trajectory of the type proposed by Horwitz and Aharonovich, and derive the Maxwell 4-vector potential associated with the motion. We show that the resulting fields carry a signature associated with the apparent superluminal motion, providing an independent test for the mechanism that does not require direct observation of the trajectory, except at the detector.

  11. Field signature for apparently superluminal particle motion

    CERN Document Server

    Land, Martin

    2016-01-01

    In the context of Stueckelberg's covariant symplectic mechanics, Horwitz and Aharonovich have proposed a simple mechanism by which a particle traveling below light speed almost everywhere may exhibit a transit time that suggests superluminal motion. This mechanism, which requires precise measurement of the particle velocity, involves a subtle perturbation affecting the particle's recorded time coordinate caused by virtual pair processes. The Stueckelberg framework is particularly well suited to such problems, because it permits pair creation/annihilation at the classical level. In this paper, we study a trajectory of the type proposed by Horwitz and Aharonovich, and derive the Maxwell 4-vector potential associated with the motion. We show that the resulting fields carry a signature associated with the apparent superluminal motion, providing an independent test for the mechanism that does not require direct observation of the trajectory, except at the detector.

  12. Apparent energy distribution of sea waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙孚; 丁平兴

    1995-01-01

    A concept of apparent energy distribution of sea waves is suggested and named "the outer frequency spectrum" to distinguish it from the frequency spectrum in common sense In line with the concept, a kind of outer spectrum with three parameters in Cauchy’ s form is derived theoretically from the joint distribution of wave periods and heights reached previously by the present authors and the Bretschneider spectrum is rededuced simply in a distinct manner. The foundation of mechanics of the similarity between the frequency spectrum in common sense and the outer one is briefly discussed. In view of the fact that Bretschneider spectrum has a wide application in engineering, the advantages and probability of using the outer spectrum as a common one are also considered.

  13. AGN jet physics and apparent opening angles

    CERN Document Server

    Clausen-Brown, Eric; Pushkarev, Alexander B; Kovalev, Yuri Y; Lister, Matthew L

    2013-01-01

    We present a new method to measure Gamma*theta_j in flux-limited samples of active galactic nuclei (AGN) jets, where Gamma is the bulk Lorentz factor and theta_j is the jet's half-opening angle. The Gamma*theta_j parameter is physically important for models of jet launching, and also determines the effectiveness of jet instabilities and magnetic reconnection. We measure Gamma*theta_j by analyzing the observed distribution of apparent opening angles in very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) flux-limited samples of jets, given some prior knowledge of the active galactic nuclei (AGN) radio luminosity function. We then apply this method to the MOJAVE flux-limited sample of radio loud objects and find Gamma*theta_j = 0.1 +- 0.03, which implies that AGN jets are subject to a variety of physical processes that require causal connection.

  14. Using the Daydreaming Frequency Scale to investigate the relationships between mind-wandering, psychological well-being, and present-moment awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eStawarczyk

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent findings have shown that mind-wandering—the occurrence of stimulus-independent and task-unrelated thoughts—is associated with negative affect and lower psychological well-being. However, it remains unclear whether this relationship is due to the occurrence of mind-wandering per se or to the fact that people who mind wander more tend to be generally less attentive to present-moment experience. In three studies, we first validate a French translation of a retrospective self-report questionnaire widely used to assess the general occurrence of mind-wandering in daily life―the Daydreaming Frequency Scale. Using this questionnaire, we then show that the relationship between mind-wandering frequency and psychological distress is fully accounted for by individual differences in dispositional mindful awareness and encoding style. These findings suggest that it may not be mind-wandering per se that is responsible for psychological distress, but rather the general tendency to be less aware and attentive to the present moment. Thus, although mind-wandering and present-moment awareness are related constructs, they are not reducible to one another, and are distinguishable in terms of their relationship with psychological well-being.

  15. Mind-wandering in Younger and Older Adults: Converging Evidence from the Sustained Attention to Response Task and Reading for Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jonathan D.; Balota, David A.

    2011-01-01

    One mechanism that has been hypothesized to contribute to older adults’ changes in cognitive performance is goal neglect or impairment in maintaining task set across time. Mind-wandering and task-unrelated thought may underlie these potential age-related changes. The present study investigated age-related changes in mind-wandering in three different versions of the Sustained Attention to Response task (SART), along with self-reported mind-wandering during a reading for comprehension task. In the SART, both younger and older adults produced similar levels of faster reaction times before No-Go errors of commission, whereas, older adults produced disproportionate post-error slowing. Subjective self-reports of mind-wandering recorded during the SART and the reading task indicated that older adults were less likely to report mind-wandering than younger adults. Discussion focuses on cognitive and motivational mechanisms that may account for older adults’ relatively low levels of reported mind-wandering. PMID:21707183

  16. Can I get me out of my head? Exploring strategies for controlling the self-referential aspects of the mind-wandering state during reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Jet G; Wang, Hao-Ting; Schooler, Jonathan; Smallwood, Jonathan

    2017-06-01

    Trying to focus on a piece of text and keep unrelated thoughts at bay can be a surprisingly futile experience. The current study explored the effects of different instructions on participants' capacity to control their mind-wandering and maximize reading comprehension, while reading. Participants were instructed to (a) enhance focus on what was read (external) or (b) enhance meta-awareness of mind-wandering (internal). To understand when these strategies were important, we induced a state of self-focus in half of our participants at the beginning of the experiment. Results replicated the negative association between mind-wandering and comprehension and demonstrated that both internal and external instructions impacted on the efficiency of reading following a period of induced self-focus. Techniques that foster meta-awareness improved task focus but did so at the detriment of reading comprehension, while promoting a deeper engagement while reading improved comprehension with no changes in reported mind-wandering. These data provide insight into how we can control mind-wandering and improve comprehension, and they underline that a state of self-focus is a condition under which they should be employed. Furthermore, these data support component process models that propose that the self-referent mental contents that arise during mind-wandering are distinguishable from those processes that interfere with comprehension.

  17. Ambiguity in Tactile Apparent Motion Perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela Liaci

    Full Text Available In von Schiller's Stroboscopic Alternative Motion (SAM stimulus two visually presented diagonal dot pairs, located on the corners of an imaginary rectangle, alternate with each other and induce either horizontal, vertical or, rarely, rotational motion percepts. SAM motion perception can be described by a psychometric function of the dot aspect ratio ("AR", i.e. the relation between vertical and horizontal dot distances. Further, with equal horizontal and vertical dot distances (AR = 1 perception is biased towards vertical motion. In a series of five experiments, we presented tactile SAM versions and studied the role of AR and of different reference frames for the perception of tactile apparent motion.We presented tactile SAM stimuli and varied the ARs, while participants reported the perceived motion directions. Pairs of vibration stimulators were attached to the participants' forearms and stimulator distances were varied within and between forearms. We compared straight and rotated forearm conditions with each other in order to disentangle the roles of exogenous and endogenous reference frames.Increasing the tactile SAM's AR biased perception towards vertical motion, but the effect was weak compared to the visual modality. We found no horizontal disambiguation, even for very small tactile ARs. A forearm rotation by 90° kept the vertical bias, even though it was now coupled with small ARs. A 45° rotation condition with crossed forearms, however, evoked a strong horizontal motion bias.Existing approaches to explain the visual SAM bias fail to explain the current tactile results. Particularly puzzling is the strong horizontal bias in the crossed-forearm conditions. In the case of tactile apparent motion, there seem to be no fixed priority rule for perceptual disambiguation. Rather the weighting of available evidence seems to depend on the degree of stimulus ambiguity, the current situation and on the perceptual strategy of the individual

  18. Flashbacks, intrusions, mind-wandering - Instances of an involuntary memory spectrum: A commentary on Takarangi, Strange, and Lindsay (2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Thomas; Otgaar, Henry; Smeets, Tom

    2015-05-01

    In their paper, Takarangi, Strange, and Lindsay (2014) showed in two experiments that participants who had witnessed a shocking film frequently "mind-wandered without awareness" about the content of the film. More importantly, they equated this effect with the occurrence of traumatic intrusions. In this commentary, we argue that the authors adhered to conceptually ambiguous terms, and thereby unintentionally contribute to an already existing conceptual blur in the trauma-memory field. We postulate that clear definitions are urgently needed for phenomena such as intrusions, flashbacks, and mind-wandering, when using them in the context of trauma memory. Furthermore, our proposal is that these phenomena can fall under a spectrum of different involuntary memory instances. We propose that by adopting stricter definitions and viewing them as separate, but interrelated phenomena, different lines of trauma-memory research can be reconciled, which would considerably advance the field.

  19. Why Does Working Memory Capacity Predict Variation in Reading Comprehension? On the Influence of Mind Wandering and Executive Attention

    OpenAIRE

    McVay, Jennifer C.; Kane, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Some people are better readers than others, and this variation in comprehension ability is predicted by measures of working memory capacity (WMC). The primary goal of this study was to investigate the mediating role of mind wandering experiences in the association between WMC and normal individual differences in reading comprehension, as predicted by the executive-attention theory of WMC (e.g., Engle & Kane, 2004). We used a latent-variable, structural-equation-model approach, testing skilled...

  20. Apparent life-threatening event in infancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hee Joung

    2016-01-01

    An apparent life-threatening event (ALTE) is defined as the combination of clinical presentations such as apnea, marked change in skin and muscle tone, gagging, or choking. It is a frightening event, and it predominantly occurs during infancy at a mean age of 1–3 months. The causes of ALTE are categorized into problems that are: gastrointestinal (50%), neurological (30%), respiratory (20%), cardiovascular (5%), metabolic and endocrine (2%–5%), or others such as child abuse. Up to 50% of ALTEs are idiopathic, where the cause cannot be diagnosed. Infants with an ALTE are often asymptomatic at hospital and there is no standard workup protocol for ALTE. Therefore, a detailed initial history and physical examination are important to determine the extent of the medical evaluation and treatment. Regardless of the cause of an ALTE, all infants with an ALTE should require hospitalization and continuous cardiorespiratory monitoring and evaluation for at least 24 hours. The natural course of ALTEs has seemed benign, and the outcome is generally associated with the affected infants' underlying disease. In conclusion, systemic diagnostic evaluation and adequate treatment increases the survival and quality of life for most affected infants.

  1. Stochastic slowly adapting ionic currents may provide a decorrelation mechanism for neural oscillators by causing wander in the intrinsic period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Sharon E; Butera, Robert J; Canavier, Carmen C

    2016-09-01

    Oscillatory neurons integrate their synaptic inputs in fundamentally different ways than normally quiescent neurons. We show that the oscillation period of invertebrate endogenous pacemaker neurons wanders, producing random fluctuations in the interspike intervals (ISI) on a time scale of seconds to minutes, which decorrelates pairs of neurons in hybrid circuits constructed using the dynamic clamp. The autocorrelation of the ISI sequence remained high for many ISIs, but the autocorrelation of the ΔISI series had on average a single nonzero value, which was negative at a lag of one interval. We reproduced these results using a simple integrate and fire (IF) model with a stochastic population of channels carrying an adaptation current with a stochastic component that was integrated with a slow time scale, suggesting that a similar population of channels underlies the observed wander in the period. Using autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) models, we found that a single integrator and a single moving average with a negative coefficient could simulate both the experimental data and the IF model. Feeding white noise into an integrator with a slow time constant is sufficient to produce the autocorrelation structure of the ISI series. Moreover, the moving average clearly accounted for the autocorrelation structure of the ΔISI series and is biophysically implemented in the IF model using slow stochastic adaptation. The observed autocorrelation structure may be a neural signature of slow stochastic adaptation, and wander generated in this manner may be a general mechanism for limiting episodes of synchronized activity in the nervous system.

  2. Neural correlates of personal goal processing during episodic future thinking and mind-wandering: An ALE meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawarczyk, David; D'Argembeau, Arnaud

    2015-08-01

    The ability to imagine the future is a complex mental faculty that depends on an ensemble of cognitive processes supported by an extended set of brain regions. Our aim here was to shed light on one key component of future thinking--personal goal processing--and to determine its neural correlates during both directed and spontaneous forms of thoughts. To address this question, we performed separate ALE meta-analyses of neuroimaging studies of episodic future thinking (EFT), mind-wandering, and personal goal processing, and then investigated the commonalities and differences in brain activity between these three domains. The results showed that the three domains activated a common set of brain regions within the default network and, most notably, the medial prefrontal cortex. This finding suggests that the medial prefrontal cortex mediates the processing of personal goals during both EFT and mind-wandering. Differences in activation were also observed, and notably regions supporting cognitive control processes (the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex) were recruited to a lesser extent during mind-wandering than experimentally directed future thinking, suggesting that different kinds of self-generated thoughts may recruit varying levels of attentional control abilities.

  3. Validating older adults' reports of less mind-wandering: An examination of eye movements and dispositional influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, David J; Nara, Brent; Zavagnin, Michela; Touron, Dayna R; Kane, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    The Control Failures × Concerns theory perspective proposes that mind-wandering occurs, in part, because of failures to inhibit distracting thoughts from entering consciousness (McVay & Kane, 2012). Despite older adults (OAs) exhibiting poorer inhibition, they report less mind-wandering than do young adults (YAs). Proposed explanations include (a) that OAs' thought reports are less valid due to an unawareness of, or reluctance to report, task-unrelated thoughts (TUTs) and (b) that dispositional factors protect OAs from mind-wandering. The primary goal of the current study was to test the validity of thought reports via eye-tracking. A secondary goal was to examine whether OAs' greater mindfulness (Splevins, Smith, & Simpson, 2009) or more positive mood (Carstensen, Isaacowitz, & Charles, 1999) protects them from TUTs. We found that eye movement patterns predicted OAs' TUT reports and YAs' task-related interference (TRI, or thoughts about one's performance) reports. Additionally, poor comprehension was associated with more TUTs in both age groups and more TRI in YAs. These results support the validity of OAs' thought reports. Concerning the second aim of the study, OAs' greater tendency to observe their surroundings (a facet of mindfulness) was related to increased TRI, and OAs' more positive mood and greater motivation partially mediated age differences in TUTs. OAs' reduced TUT reports appear to be genuine and potentially related to dispositional factors. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  4. The era of the wandering mind? Twenty-first century research on self-generated mental activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callard, Felicity; Smallwood, Jonathan; Golchert, Johannes; Margulies, Daniel S.

    2013-01-01

    The first decade of the twenty-first century was characterized by renewed scientific interest in self-generated mental activity (activity largely generated by the individual, rather than in direct response to experimenters’ instructions or specific external sensory inputs). To understand this renewal of interest, we interrogated the peer-reviewed literature from 2003 to 2012 (i) to explore recent changes in use of terms for self-generated mental activity; (ii) to investigate changes in the topics on which mind wandering research, specifically, focuses; and (iii) to visualize co-citation communities amongst researchers working on self-generated mental activity. Our analyses demonstrated that there has been a dramatic increase in the term “mind wandering” from 2006, and a significant crossing-over of psychological investigations of mind wandering into cognitive neuroscience (particularly in relation to research on the default mode and default mode network). If our article concludes that this might, indeed, be the “era of the wandering mind,” it also calls for more explicit reflection to be given by researchers in this field to the terms they use, the topics and brain regions they focus on, and the research literatures that they implicitly foreground or ignore. PMID:24391606

  5. Optical Spatial Filter to Suppress Beam Wander and Spatial Noise Induced by Atmospheric Turbulence in Free-Space Optical Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ucuk Darusalam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose an optical spatial filter (OSF method to suppress beam wander and spatial noise effects. Signal from random displacements of the focus spot around the optical axis within the constricted area is collected. This method advantageously suppresses fluctuations in signal intensity. The OSF consists of a pinhole and cone reflector. The pinhole produces Fresnel diffraction on the focus spot. The cone reflector provides directed reflectance onto the pinhole for random focus spot displacements due to beam wander. The calculations of signal power are based on fluctuations of signal intensity that are minimized by the circular aperture function of the pinhole and the cosine of the reflectance angle from the cone reflector. The method is applied to free-space optical communications at a wavelength of 1.55 μm with an atmospheric chamber to provide optical propagation media. Based on calculations, the beam wander angles that can be received by the OSF are from 14.0° to 28.0°. Moreover, based on experiment, the OSF with a pinhole diameter of 20.0 μm and cone reflector diameter of 1.5 mm produces signal power of −15.3 dBm. Both calculations and experiment show that the OSF enhances the received signal power in the presence of turbulence.

  6. Polar Shapelets

    CERN Document Server

    Massey, R; Massey, Richard; Refregier, Alexandre

    2004-01-01

    The shapelets method for astronomical image analysis is based around the decomposition of localised objects into a series of orthogonal components with particularly convenient mathematical properties. We extend the "Cartesian shapelet" formalism from earlier work, and construct "polar shapelet" basis functions that separate an image into components with explicit rotational symmetries. This provides a more compact representation of typical galaxy shapes, and its physical interpretation is frequently more intuitive. Linear coordinate transformations can be simply expressed using this basis set, and shape measures (including object photometry, astrometry and galaxy morphology estimators) take a naturally elegant form. Particular attention is paid to the analysis of astronomical survey images, and we test shapelet techniques with real data from the Hubble Space Telescope. We present a practical method to automatically optimise the quality of an arbitrary shapelet decomposition in the presence of noise, pixellisat...

  7. Apparent diffusion coefficient of normal adrenal glands*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Sara Reis; Elias, Paula Condé Lamparelli; Leite, Andrea Farias de Melo; de Oliveira, Tatiane Mendes Gonçalves; Muglia, Valdair Francisco; Elias Junior, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the feasibility and reliability of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements of normal adrenal glands. Materials and methods This was a retrospective study involving 32 healthy subjects, divided into two groups: prepubertal (PreP, n = 12), aged from 2 months to 12.5 years (4 males; 8 females); and postpubertal (PostP, n = 20), aged from 11.9 to 61 years (5 males; 15 females). Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) sequences were acquired at a 1.5 T scanner using b values of 0, 20, 500, and 1000 s/mm2. Two radiologists evaluated the images. ADC values were measured pixel-by-pixel on DW-MRI scans, and automatic co-registration with the ADC map was obtained. Results Mean ADC values for the right adrenal glands were 1.44 × 10-3 mm2/s for the PreP group and 1.23 × 10-3 mm2/s for the PostP group, whereas they were 1.58 × 10-3 mm2/s and 1.32 × 10-3 mm2/s, respectively, for the left glands. ADC values were higher in the PreP group than in the PostP group (p < 0.05). Agreement between readers was almost perfect (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.84-0.94; p < 0.05). Conclusion Our results demonstrate the feasibility and reliability of performing DW-MRI measurements of normal adrenal glands. They could also support the feasibility of ADC measurements of small structures. PMID:28057963

  8. Apparent exchange rate for breast cancer characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasič, Samo; Oredsson, Stina; Partridge, Savannah C; Saal, Lao H; Topgaard, Daniel; Nilsson, Markus; Bryskhe, Karin

    2016-05-01

    Although diffusion MRI has shown promise for the characterization of breast cancer, it has low specificity to malignant subtypes. Higher specificity might be achieved if the effects of cell morphology and molecular exchange across cell membranes could be disentangled. The quantification of exchange might thus allow the differentiation of different types of breast cancer cells. Based on differences in diffusion rates between the intra- and extracellular compartments, filter exchange spectroscopy/imaging (FEXSY/FEXI) provides non-invasive quantification of the apparent exchange rate (AXR) of water between the two compartments. To test the feasibility of FEXSY for the differentiation of different breast cancer cells, we performed experiments on several breast epithelial cell lines in vitro. Furthermore, we performed the first in vivo FEXI measurement of water exchange in human breast. In cell suspensions, pulsed gradient spin-echo experiments with large b values and variable pulse duration allow the characterization of the intracellular compartment, whereas FEXSY provides a quantification of AXR. These experiments are very sensitive to the physiological state of cells and can be used to establish reliable protocols for the culture and harvesting of cells. Our results suggest that different breast cancer subtypes can be distinguished on the basis of their AXR values in cell suspensions. Time-resolved measurements allow the monitoring of the physiological state of cells in suspensions over the time-scale of hours, and reveal an abrupt disintegration of the intracellular compartment. In vivo, exchange can be detected in a tumor, whereas, in normal tissue, the exchange rate is outside the range experimentally accessible for FEXI. At present, low signal-to-noise ratio and limited scan time allows the quantification of AXR only in a region of interest of relatively large tumors.

  9. Apparent diffusion coefficient of normal adrenal glands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Reis Teixeira

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To assess the feasibility and reliability of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC measurements of normal adrenal glands. Materials and methods: This was a retrospective study involving 32 healthy subjects, divided into two groups: prepubertal (PreP, n = 12, aged from 2 months to 12.5 years (4 males; 8 females; and postpubertal (PostP, n = 20, aged from 11.9 to 61 years (5 males; 15 females. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI sequences were acquired at a 1.5 T scanner using b values of 0, 20, 500, and 1000 s/mm2. Two radiologists evaluated the images. ADC values were measured pixel-by-pixel on DW-MRI scans, and automatic co-registration with the ADC map was obtained. Results: Mean ADC values for the right adrenal glands were 1.44 × 10-3 mm2/s for the PreP group and 1.23 × 10-3 mm2/s for the PostP group, whereas they were 1.58 × 10-3 mm2/s and 1.32 × 10-3 mm2/s, respectively, for the left glands. ADC values were higher in the PreP group than in the PostP group (p < 0.05. Agreement between readers was almost perfect (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.84-0.94; p < 0.05. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate the feasibility and reliability of performing DW-MRI measurements of normal adrenal glands. They could also support the feasibility of ADC measurements of small structures.

  10. Mechanics of Apparent Horizon in Two Dimensional Dilaton Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, Rong-Gen

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we give a definition of apparent horizon in a two dimensional general dilaton gravity theory. With this definition, we construct the mechanics of the apparent horizon by introducing a quasi-local energy of the theory. Our discussion generalizes the apparent horizons mechanics in general spherically symmetric spactimes in four or higher dimensions to the two dimensional dilaton gravity case.

  11. Apparent Surface Free Energy of Polymer/Paper Composite Material Treated by Air Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Terpiłowski

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface plasma treatment consists in changes of surface properties without changing internal properties. In this paper composite polymer/paper material is used for production of packaging in cosmetic industry. There are problems with bonding this material at the time of packaging production due to its properties. Composite surface was treated by air plasma for 1, 10, 20, and 30 s. The advancing and receding contact angles of water, formamide, and diiodomethane were measured using both treated and untreated samples. Apparent surface free energy was estimated using the hysteresis (CAH and Van Oss, Good, Chaudhury approaches (LWAB. Surface roughness was investigated using optical profilometry and identification of after plasma treatment emerging chemical groups was made by means of the XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy technique. After plasma treatment the values of contact angles decreased which is particularly evident for polar liquids. Apparent surface free energy increased compared to that of untreated samples. Changes of energy value are due to the electron-donor parameter of energy. This parameter increases as a result of adding polar groups at the time of surface plasma activation. Changes of surface properties are combination of increase of polar chemical functional groups, increase on the surface, and surface roughness increase.

  12. A wandering mind does not stray far from home: the value of metacognition in distant search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudesia, Ravi S; Baer, Markus; Elfenbein, Hillary Anger

    2015-01-01

    When faced with a problem, how do individuals search for potential solutions? In this article, we explore the cognitive processes that lead to local search (i.e., identifying options closest to existing solutions) and distant search (i.e., identifying options of a qualitatively different nature than existing solutions). We suggest that mind wandering is likely to lead to local search because it operates by spreading activation from initial ideas to closely associated ideas. This reduces the likelihood of accessing a qualitatively different solution. However, instead of getting lost in thought, individuals can also step back and monitor their thoughts from a detached perspective. Such mindful metacognition, we suggest, is likely to lead to distant search because it redistributes activation away from initial ideas to other, less strongly associated, ideas. This hypothesis was confirmed across two studies. Thus, getting lost in thoughts is helpful when one is on the right track and needs only a local search whereas stepping back from thoughts is helpful when one needs distant search to produce a change in perspective.

  13. A wandering mind does not stray far from home: the value of metacognition in distant search.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi S Kudesia

    Full Text Available When faced with a problem, how do individuals search for potential solutions? In this article, we explore the cognitive processes that lead to local search (i.e., identifying options closest to existing solutions and distant search (i.e., identifying options of a qualitatively different nature than existing solutions. We suggest that mind wandering is likely to lead to local search because it operates by spreading activation from initial ideas to closely associated ideas. This reduces the likelihood of accessing a qualitatively different solution. However, instead of getting lost in thought, individuals can also step back and monitor their thoughts from a detached perspective. Such mindful metacognition, we suggest, is likely to lead to distant search because it redistributes activation away from initial ideas to other, less strongly associated, ideas. This hypothesis was confirmed across two studies. Thus, getting lost in thoughts is helpful when one is on the right track and needs only a local search whereas stepping back from thoughts is helpful when one needs distant search to produce a change in perspective.

  14. Mind wandering during film comprehension: The role of prior knowledge and situational interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Kristopher; Mills, Caitlin; D'Mello, Sidney

    2016-06-01

    This study assessed the occurrence and factors that influence mind wandering (MW) in the domain of film comprehension. The cascading model of inattention assumes that a stronger mental representation (i.e., a situation model) during comprehension results in less MW. Accordingly, a suppression hypothesis suggests that MW would decrease as a function of having the knowledge of the plot of a film prior to viewing, because the prior-knowledge would help to strengthen the situation model during comprehension. Furthermore, an interest-moderation hypothesis would predict that the suppression effect of prior-knowledge would only emerge when there was interest in viewing the film. In the current experiment, 108 participants either read a short story that depicted the plot (i.e., prior-knowledge condition) or read an unrelated story of equal length (control condition) prior to viewing the short film (32.5 minutes) entitled The Red Balloon. Participants self-reported their interest in viewing the film immediately before the film was presented. MW was tracked using a self-report method targeting instances of MW with metacognitive awareness. Participants in the prior-knowledge condition reported less MW compared with the control condition, thereby supporting the suppression hypothesis. MW also decreased over the duration of the film, but only for those with prior-knowledge of the film. Finally, prior-knowledge effects on MW were only observed when interest was average or high, but not when interest was low.

  15. NIETZSCHE’S PHILOSOPHY AS “WANDERING THROUGH THE FORBIDDEN”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROBERT DOLEWSKI

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to show the transgressive aspects of Nietzsche’s philosophy described here with the phrase of “wandering through the forbidden”, and applied to some of the main issues of the German thinkers philosophy, such as revaluation of all values, the superhuman, or the genealogical critique of the Western Platonic and Christian morality. The Nietzschean philosophy will be interpreted as a process of “wandering”, initialized by the genealogical critique of the Platonic and Christian morality, then pointed towards redefining all values, and the idea of the superhuman. The benchmark of this work will be the analysis of Nietzsche’s genealogy as the main tool used for criticising the Western morality. Questioning the traditional dichotomy of values as well as morally underpinned truth, the genealogical critique thus opens the horizon to a new kind of philosophy, the “philosophy of future”, exceeding towards everything that traditional morality considers cursed and forbidden. Thus comprehended “philosophy of future” will require redefining all values and redefining the very man culminating in the plan of the superhuman. The transgressive motif of Nietzsche’s philosophy will finally be illustrated through Bataille’s concept of the holy day, understood as transgressing the forbidden frontiers. From this perspective, the German thinker’s philosophy will transpire as consecration of transgressive, therefore transcending the moral boundary’s of human life.

  16. Brief quiet ego contemplation reduces oxidative stress and mind-wandering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayment, Heidi A; Collier, Ann F; Birkett, Melissa; Traustadóttir, Tinna; Till, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    Excessive self-concern increases perceptions of threat and defensiveness. In contrast, fostering a more inclusive and expanded sense of self can reduce stress and improve well-being. We developed and tested a novel brief intervention designed to strengthen a student's compassionate self-identity, an identity that values balance and growth by reminding them of four quiet ego characteristics: detached awareness, inclusive identity, perspective taking, and growth. Students (N = 32) in their first semester of college who reported greater self-protective (e.g., defensive) goals in the first 2 weeks of the semester were invited to participate in the study. Volunteers were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: quiet ego contemplation (QEC), QEC with virtual reality (VR) headset (QEC-VR), and control. Participants came to the lab three times to engage in a 15-min exercise in a 30-days period. The 15-min QEC briefly described each quiet ego characteristic followed by a few minutes time to reflect on what that characteristic meant to them. Those in the QEC condition reported improved quiet ego characteristics and pluralistic thinking, decreases in a urinary marker of oxidative stress, and reduced mind-wandering on a cognitive task. Contrary to expectation, participants who wore the VR headsets while listening to the QEC demonstrated the least improvement. Results suggest that a brief intervention that reduces self-focus and strengthens a more compassionate self-view may offer an additional resource that individuals can use in their everyday lives.

  17. The Wandering Jew in Novels of Jane Austen: The Pursuit of an Organic Whole in Romanticism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Kenseh Madaki

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Austen’s fictions may or may not set out to express the framework of imagery that projects the division of beings into four levels as enumerated by Northrop Frye in his Essay “The drunken boat: the revolutionary element in Romanticism”, her works, like the Romanticism poets are greatly influenced by this framework. This framework is found in the imagery of pre- Romanticism poetry and is the basis for the conflict between the Romanticism and the pre-Romanticism one despite their affiliation and similarities. Frye expounds the influence of this framework in the poetic garden of imagery in Romanticism, this work attempts to expand the influence in the prose garden of Austen’s symbolic expressions. Austen uses symbolism to interpret the structure of beings and their station, the concept of alienation, the journey, and the quest and finally the formation of an organic whole; the superb inter-change of the masculine and feminine domain in metaphoric representation excels Austen’s works within Romanticism expressions.Keywords: Wandering, Jew, Organic, Whole.

  18. Torted and Ruptured Wandering Spleen Presenting as a Surgical Emergency in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Parvaiz

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Wandering spleen (WS is characterised by incomplete fixation of the spleen to its supporting linorenal and gastrosplenic ligaments. It can predispose to life-threatening complications due to torsion of its vascular pedicle, splenic infarction, portal hypertension, and haemorrhage. A 27-year-old, 36-week prima gravida underwent emergency caesarean section for tachycardia and hypotension. A healthy baby girl was delivered. However, she remained shocked despite aggressive fluid therapy and intraoperatively it was noted that there was significant intraperitoneal bleeding and the on-call surgical team was summoned. Midline laparotomy revealed a lacerated, infarcted, hypermobile spleen found with free intraperitoneal bleeding. The unsalvageable spleen was resected and the patient went on to make an excellent recovery. The aetiology of WS is contentious. With an increased frequency among multiparous females of reproductive age, some suggest the hormonal effects of pregnancy as contributing factors. Clinical presentations range from an asymptomatic abdominal mass to acute abdominal pain with hypovolaemic shock. WS poses a serious threat to life due to thrombosis, bleeding, or infarction. Ultrasound scan and CT scan are equally effective in the diagnosis. Patients with asymptomatic WS should be treated with elective splenopexy, however, in the acute presentation, splenectomy is the procedure of choice.

  19. Demographic Responses to Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in the Wandering Albatross (Diomedea exulans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Costantini

    Full Text Available One of the major challenges in ecological research is the elucidation of physiological mechanisms that underlie the demographic traits of wild animals. We have assessed whether a marker of plasma oxidative stress (TBARS and plasma haptoglobin (protein of the acute inflammatory phase response measured at time t predict five demographic parameters (survival rate, return rate to the breeding colony, breeding probability, hatching and fledging success in sexually mature wandering albatrosses over the next four years (Diomedea exulans using a five-year individual-based dataset. Non-breeder males, but not females, having higher TBARS at time t had reduced future breeding probabilities; haptoglobin was not related to breeding probability. Neither TBARS nor haptoglobin predicted future hatching or fledging success. Haptoglobin had a marginally positive effect on female survival rate, while TBARS had a marginally negative effect on return rate. Our findings do not support the role for oxidative stress as a constraint of future reproductive success in the albatross. However, our data point to a potential mechanism underlying some aspects of reproductive senescence and survival. Our results also highlight that the study of the consequences of oxidative stress should consider the life-cycle stage of an individual and its reproductive history.

  20. Demographic Responses to Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in the Wandering Albatross (Diomedea exulans).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, David; Goutte, Aurelie; Barbraud, Christophe; Faivre, Bruno; Sorci, Gabriele; Weimerskirch, Henri; Delord, Karine; Chastel, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    One of the major challenges in ecological research is the elucidation of physiological mechanisms that underlie the demographic traits of wild animals. We have assessed whether a marker of plasma oxidative stress (TBARS) and plasma haptoglobin (protein of the acute inflammatory phase response) measured at time t predict five demographic parameters (survival rate, return rate to the breeding colony, breeding probability, hatching and fledging success) in sexually mature wandering albatrosses over the next four years (Diomedea exulans) using a five-year individual-based dataset. Non-breeder males, but not females, having higher TBARS at time t had reduced future breeding probabilities; haptoglobin was not related to breeding probability. Neither TBARS nor haptoglobin predicted future hatching or fledging success. Haptoglobin had a marginally positive effect on female survival rate, while TBARS had a marginally negative effect on return rate. Our findings do not support the role for oxidative stress as a constraint of future reproductive success in the albatross. However, our data point to a potential mechanism underlying some aspects of reproductive senescence and survival. Our results also highlight that the study of the consequences of oxidative stress should consider the life-cycle stage of an individual and its reproductive history.

  1. Non-wandering sets of the powers of maps of a tree

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG; Wen

    2001-01-01

    [1]Erdos, A., Stone, A. H., Some remarks about almost periodic transformations, Bull. Amer. Math. Soc., 945, 5: 26.[2]Gottschalk, W. H., Powers of homeomorphisms with almost periodic properties, Bull. Amer. Math. Soc., 944, 50: 222.[3]Coven, E. M., Nitecki, Z., Non-wandering sets of the powers of maps of the interval, Ergod. Th. & Dynam. Sys., 98, : 9.[4]Franks, J., Misiurewicz, M., Cycles for disk homeomorphisms and thick trees, Contemporary Mathematics, 993, 52: 69.[5]Li, L., Ye, X., Topological entropy for finite invariant subset of Y, Trans. Amer. Math. Soc., 995, 347: 465.[6]Alseda, L., Guaschi, J., Los, J. et al., Canonical representative for patterns of tree maps, Topology, 997, 36: 23.[7]Alseda, L., Baldwin, S., Llibre, J. et al., Entropy of transitive tree maps, Topology, 997, 36: 59.[8]Ye, X., Topological entropy of transitive maps of a tree, Ergod. Th. & Dynam. Sys., 2000, 20: 289.[9]Walters, P., An Introduction to Ergodic Theory, Berlin, New York: Springer-Verlag, 982.[10]Block, L., Coppel, W. A., Dynamics in one-dimension, Lec. Notes in Math., 53, Berlin: Springer-Verlag, 992.[11]Li, T., Ye, X., Chain recurrent points of a tree map, Bull. Austral. Math. Soc., 999, 59: 8.

  2. RESEARCHING CITY AND SUBJECTIVITY: BODIES AND WANDERINGS OF A FLÂNEUR- CARTOGRAPHER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Linck de Romero

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In light of the cartographic method of research proposed by Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari (2011, we present reflections on the study on subjectivity and the contemporary city with an approach to its process and production dimensions. The cartographer’s body is crucial for the methodology and is created along the research process in order to allow for the existence of universes of reference (Rolnik, 1993 of modes of existence in urban life. We then develop relationships between the cartographer’s practice and that of the flâneur as examples of urban wandering (Jacques, 2012 that problematize the possibilities of body experiences in the urban space as a resistance to the contemporary spectacularization of the city. For such, we use concepts-tools from the field of schizoanalysis and those of the authors mentioned in this abstract, developing the idea that urban experiences, in some ways, can prove to be a source of production and knowledge of subjectivity, the city, the body and the relationships between them.

  3. A New Strategy for ECG Baseline Wander Elimination Using Empirical Mode Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbakhti, Mohammad; Bagheri, Hamed; Shekarchi, Babak; Mohammadi, Somayeh; Naji, Mohsen

    2016-06-01

    Electrocardiogram (ECG) signals might be affected by various artifacts and noises that have biological and external sources. Baseline wander (BW) is a low-frequency artifact that may be caused by breathing, body movements and loose sensor contact. In this paper, a novel method based on empirical mode decomposition (EMD) for removal of baseline noise from ECG is presented. When compared to other EMD-based methods, the novelty of this research is to reach the optimized number of decomposed levels for ECG BW de-noising using mean power frequency (MPF), while the reduction of processing time is considered. To evaluate the performance of the proposed method, a fifth-order Butterworth high pass filtering (BHPF) with cut-off frequency at 0.5Hz and wavelet approach are applied. Three performance indices, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), mean square error (MSE) and correlation coefficient (CC), between pure and filtered signals have been utilized for qualification of presented techniques. Results suggest that the EMD-based method outperforms the other filtering method.

  4. Multiadaptive Bionic Wavelet Transform: Application to ECG Denoising and Baseline Wandering Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayadi Omid

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new modified wavelet transform, called the multiadaptive bionic wavelet transform (MABWT, that can be applied to ECG signals in order to remove noise from them under a wide range of variations for noise. By using the definition of bionic wavelet transform and adaptively determining both the center frequency of each scale together with the -function, the problem of desired signal decomposition is solved. Applying a new proposed thresholding rule works successfully in denoising the ECG. Moreover by using the multiadaptation scheme, lowpass noisy interference effects on the baseline of ECG will be removed as a direct task. The method was extensively clinically tested with real and simulated ECG signals which showed high performance of noise reduction, comparable to those of wavelet transform (WT. Quantitative evaluation of the proposed algorithm shows that the average SNR improvement of MABWT is 1.82 dB more than the WT-based results, for the best case. Also the procedure has largely proved advantageous over wavelet-based methods for baseline wandering cancellation, including both DC components and baseline drifts.

  5. Brief quiet ego contemplation reduces oxidative stress and mind-wandering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayment, Heidi A.; Collier, Ann F.; Birkett, Melissa; Traustadóttir, Tinna; Till, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Excessive self-concern increases perceptions of threat and defensiveness. In contrast, fostering a more inclusive and expanded sense of self can reduce stress and improve well-being. We developed and tested a novel brief intervention designed to strengthen a student’s compassionate self-identity, an identity that values balance and growth by reminding them of four quiet ego characteristics: detached awareness, inclusive identity, perspective taking, and growth. Students (N = 32) in their first semester of college who reported greater self-protective (e.g., defensive) goals in the first 2 weeks of the semester were invited to participate in the study. Volunteers were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: quiet ego contemplation (QEC), QEC with virtual reality (VR) headset (QEC-VR), and control. Participants came to the lab three times to engage in a 15-min exercise in a 30-days period. The 15-min QEC briefly described each quiet ego characteristic followed by a few minutes time to reflect on what that characteristic meant to them. Those in the QEC condition reported improved quiet ego characteristics and pluralistic thinking, decreases in a urinary marker of oxidative stress, and reduced mind-wandering on a cognitive task. Contrary to expectation, participants who wore the VR headsets while listening to the QEC demonstrated the least improvement. Results suggest that a brief intervention that reduces self-focus and strengthens a more compassionate self-view may offer an additional resource that individuals can use in their everyday lives. PMID:26483734

  6. Reconfigurable thz polarizer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention provides a polarizer. The polarizer comprises a first membrane having a first polarization region comprising a first plurality of membrane perforations; a second membrane having a second polarization region comprising a second plurality of membrane perforations; and a support...... with one or more membrane perforations in the second plurality of perforations in a direction normal to the first polarization region or normal to the second polarization region, resulting in corresponding one or more openings in said direction....

  7. Transverse Lambda polarization at high energy colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Boer, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of transverse polarization of Lambda hyperons produced in high energy pp collisions may help to address several open issues about Lambda production and polarization mechanisms, such as the amount of SU(3) breaking, the importance of gluons and sea quarks, and the origin of spontaneous Lambda polarization. The process p + p -> Lambda^\\uparrow + jet + X at midrapidity is ideally suited for this purpose, for instance at LHC's ALICE experiment. New expressions and predictions are presented for the transverse Lambda polarization in this process, within a factorized description which involves transverse momentum and spin dependence in the fragmentation process. Uncertainties from the unpolarized Lambda fragmentation functions, due to the unknown magnitude of SU(3) breaking and the apparent inconsistency between pp and e^+ e^- data, are investigated.

  8. Errância e normalização social: um estudo sobre andarilhos de estrada Errantes y normalización social: un estudio sobre andariegos de carretera Wandering and social normalization: a study about highway wanderers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eurípedes Costa do Nascimento

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available O nomadismo contemporâneo associado à migração, pobreza, desemprego e desfiliação social é uma característica marcante de nosso tempo e se expressa com maior radicalidade no fenômeno da errância, compreendida por uma perambulação a pé do indivíduo pelas rodovias, sem rumo certo e destino definido. O presente artigo tem por objetivo analisar a relação entre a errância e a normalização social, tendo como foco de análise o caso dos andarilhos de estrada.El nomadismo contemporáneo articulado con la migración, pobreza, desempleo y desafiliación social es una característica común de nuestro tiempo y puede ser percibido radicalmente en el fenómeno de los errantes, sujetos que son conocidos por caminaren a pie por las carreteras, sin rumbo cierto y destino definido. Ese artículo procura analizar la relación entre los errantes y la normalización social eligiendo como foco de análisis el caso de los andariegos de carretera.The contemporary nomadic life related to migration, poverty, unemployment and social disaffiliation is a common characteristic of our time and it can be seen radically in the wandering phenomenon understood as a displacement on foot of the individual through the highways without certain course and no definite destination. The present paper aims to analyze the relation between the wandering and the social normalization being the highway wanderers the main analysis focus.

  9. Line tension and reduction of apparent contact angle associated with electric double layers

    CERN Document Server

    Dörr, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    The line tension of an electrolyte wetting a non-polar substrate is computed analytically and numerically. The results show that, depending on the value of the apparent contact angle, positive or negative line tension values may be obtained. Furthermore, a significant difference between Young's contact angle and the apparent contact angle measured several Debye lengths remote from the three-phase contact line occurs. When applying the results to water wetting highly charged surfaces, line tension values of the same order of magnitude as found in recent experiments can be achieved. Therefore, the theory presented may contribute to the understanding of line tension measurements and points to the importance of the electrostatic line tension. Being strongly dependent on the interfacial charge density, electrostatic line tension is found to be tunable via the pH value of the involved electrolyte. As a practical consequence, the stability of nanoparticles adsorbed at fluid-fluid interfaces is predicted to be depend...

  10. Similarities and differences between mind-wandering and external distraction: a latent variable analysis of lapses of attention and their relation to cognitive abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsworth, Nash; McMillan, Brittany D

    2014-07-01

    The current study examined the extent to which task-unrelated thoughts represent both vulnerability to mind-wandering and susceptibility to external distraction from an individual difference perspective. Participants performed multiple measures of attention control, working memory capacity, and fluid intelligence. Task-unrelated thoughts were assessed using thought probes during the attention control tasks. Using latent variable techniques, the results suggested that mind-wandering and external distraction reflect distinct, yet correlated constructs, both of which are related to working memory capacity and fluid intelligence. Furthermore, the results suggest that the common variance shared by mind-wandering, external distraction, and attention control is what primarily accounts for their relation with working memory capacity and fluid intelligence. These results support the notion that lapses of attention are strongly related to cognitive abilities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Aging ebbs the flow of thought: adult age differences in mind wandering, executive control, and self-evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVay, Jennifer C; Meier, Matthew E; Touron, Dayna R; Kane, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Two experiments examined the relations among adult aging, mind wandering, and executive-task performance, following from surprising laboratory findings that older adults report fewer task-unrelated thoughts (TUTs) than do younger adults (e.g., Giambra, 1989; Jackson & Balota, 2012). Because older adults may experience more ability- and performance-related worry during cognitive tasks in the laboratory, and because these evaluative thoughts (known as task-related interference, "TRI") might be sometimes misclassified by subjects as task-related, we asked subjects to distinguish task-related thoughts from TRI and TUTs when probed during ongoing tasks. In Experiment 1, younger and older adults completed either a go/no-go or a vigilance version of a sustained attention to response task (SART). Older adults reported more TRI and fewer TUTs than did younger adults while also performing more accurately. In Experiment 2, subjects completed either a 1- or a 2-back version of the n-back task. Older adults again reported more TRI and fewer TUTs than younger adults in both versions, while performing better than younger adults in the 1-back and worse in the 2-back. Across experiments, older adults' reduced TUT rates were independent of performance relative to younger adults. And, although older adults consistently reported more TRI and less mind wandering than did younger adults, overall they reported more on-task thoughts. TRI cannot, therefore, account completely for prior reports of decreasing TUTs with aging. We discuss the implications of these results for various theoretical approaches to mind-wandering. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Aging Ebbs the Flow of Thought: Adult Age Differences in Mind Wandering, Executive Control, and Self-Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVay, Jennifer C.; Meier, Matthew E.; Touron, Dayna R.; Kane, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Two experiments examined the relations among adult aging, mind wandering, and executive-task performance, following from surprising laboratory findings that older adults report fewer task-unrelated thoughts (TUTs) than do younger adults (e.g., Giambra, 1989; Jackson & Balota, 2011). Because older adults may experience more ability- and performance-related worry during cognitive tasks in the laboratory, and because these evaluative thoughts (known as task-related interference, “TRI”) might be sometimes misclassified by subjects as task-related, we asked subjects to distinguish task-related thoughts from TRI and TUTs when probed during ongoing tasks. In Experiment 1, younger and older adults completed either a go/no-go or a vigilance version of a sustained attention to response task (SART). Older adults reported more TRI and fewer TUTs than did younger adults while also performing more accurately. In Experiment 2, subjects completed either a 1- or 2-back version of the n-back task. Older adults again reported more TRI and fewer TUTs than younger adults in both versions, while performing better than younger adults in the 1-back and worse in the 2-back. Across experiments, older adults’ reduced TUT rates were independent of performance relative to younger adults. And, although older adults consistently reported more TRI and less mind wandering than did younger adults, overall they reported more on-task thoughts. TRI cannot, therefore, account completely for prior reports of decreasing TUTs with aging. We discuss the implications of these results for various theoretical approaches to mind-wandering. PMID:23261422

  13. Wandering and Modern Experience%游荡与现代性经验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪民安

    2009-01-01

    In the description of Walter Benjamin, the flaneur in modern metropolis is the product as well as the observer of it. They are wandering aimlessly in the metropolis, walking on the street lined up with stores and observing all kinds of cultural images created by commercial economics. They are shuttling among people but isolated from the pace of modern city life. They are deserted by modern life, but observe this life as an on-looker in the heart of city. They have a unique perspective, different from those busy citizens, which enables them to perceive the nature of city life.%在本雅明的笔下,现代都市中的游荡者既是现代性的产物,也是现代性的观察者.游荡者漫无目的地在都市中游逛,行走在店铺林立的街头,穿梭于熙攘的人群中,欣赏着商品经济制造的琳琅满目的文化形象,但却脱离于现代都市生活的节奏.游荡者被现代都市生活所遗弃,但又深处都市生活的中心地带,以冷眼旁观的姿态观察着都市生活,他的视角是那些忙忙碌碌的都市男女所不具备的,正是这个视角使他能够洞悉都市生活的本质.

  14. An investigation of the neural substrates of mind wandering induced by viewing traditional Chinese landscape paintings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting eWang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to investigate whether the calming effect induced by viewing traditional Chinese landscape paintings would make disengagement from that mental state more difficult, as measured by performance on a cognitive control task. In Experiment 1 we examined the subjective experience of viewing traditional Chinese landscape paintings vs. realistic oil landscape paintings in a behavioral study. Our results confirmed that, as predicted, traditional Chinese landscape paintings induce greater levels of relaxation and mind wandering and lower levels of object-oriented absorption and recognition, compared to realistic oil landscape paintings. In Experiment 2 we used functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI to explore the behavioural and neural effects of viewing traditional Chinese landscape paintings on a task requiring cognitive control (i.e., the flanker task—administered immediately following exposure to paintings. Contrary to our prediction, the behavioural data demonstrated that compared to realistic oil landscape paintings, exposure to traditional Chinese landscape paintings had no effect on performance on the flanker task. However, the neural data demonstrated an interaction effect such that there was greater activation in the inferior parietal cortex (IPC and the superior frontal gyrus (SFG on incongruent compared with congruent flanker trials when participants switched from viewing traditional Chinese landscape paintings to the flanker task than when they switched from realistic oil landscape paintings. These results suggest that switching from traditional Chinese landscape paintings placed greater demands on the brain’s attention and working memory networks during the flanker task than did switching from realistic oil landscape paintings.

  15. Cognitive, behavioral, and autonomic correlates of mind wandering and perseverative cognition in major depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina eOttaviani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autonomic dysregulation has been hypothesized to play a role in the relationships between psychopathology and cardiovascular risk. An important transdiagnostic factor that has been associated with autonomic dysfunction is perseverative cognition (PC, mainly present in Major Depressive Disorder (MDD in the form of rumination. As the ability to adaptively let our mind wander (MW without ruminating is critical to mental health, this study aimed to examine the autonomic concomitants of functional versus dysfunctional intrusive thoughts in MDD.Ambulatory heart rate (HR and variability (HRV of 18 MDD subjects and 18 healthy controls were recorded for 24 hours. Approximately every 30 minutes during waking hours subjects reported their ongoing thoughts and moods using electronic diaries. Random regression models were performed. Compared to controls, MDD subjects were more often caught during episodes of PC. In both groups, PC required more effort to be inhibited and interfered more with ongoing activities compared to MW (ps < .0001. This cognitive rigidity was mirrored by autonomic inflexibility, as PC was characterized by lower HRV (p < .0001 compared to MW. A worse mood was reported by MDD patients compared to controls, independently of their ongoing cognitive process. Controls, however, showed the highest mood worsening during PC compared to being on task and MW. HRV during rumination correlated with self reported somatic symptoms on the same day and several dispositional traits. MDD subjects showed lower HRV during sleep, which correlated with hopelessness rumination. Results show that PC is associated with autonomic dysfunctions in both healthy and MDD subjects. Understanding when spontaneous thought is adaptive and when it is not may clarify its role in the etiology of mood disorders, shedding light on the still unexplained association between psychopathology, chronic stress, and risk for health.

  16. The wandering mood: psychological and neural determinants of rest-related negative affect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal eGruberger

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Rest related negative affect (RRNA has gained scientific interest in the past decade. However, it is mostly studied within the context of mind-wandering (MW, and the relevance of other psychological and neural aspects of the resting state to its' occurrence has never been studied. Several indications associate RRNA with internally directed attention, yet the nature of this relation remains largely unknown. Moreover, the role of neural networks associated with rest related phenomenology - the default mode (DMN, executive (EXE and salience (SAL networks, has not been studied in this context. To this end, we explored two 5- (baseline and 15-minute resting-state simultaneous fMRI-EEG scans of 29 participants. As vigilance has been shown to affect attention, and thus its availability for inward allocation, EEG-based vigilance levels were computed for each participant. Questionnaires for affective assessment were administered before and after scans, and retrospective reports of MW were additionally collected. Results revealed increased negative affect following rest, but only among participants who retained high vigilance levels. Among low-vigilance participants, changes in negative affect were negligible, despite reports of MW occurrence in both groups. In addition, in the high-vigilance group only, a significant increase in functional connectivity (FC levels was found between the DMN-related ventral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC,associated with emotional processing, and the EXE-related dorsal ACC, associated with monitoring of self and other's behavior. These heightened FC levels further correlated with reported negative affect among this group. Taken together, these results demonstrate that, rather than an unavoidable outcome of the resting state, RRNA depends on internal allocation of attention at rest. Results are discussed in terms of two rest-related possible scenarios which defer in mental and neural processing, and subsequently, in the

  17. Brief quiet ego contemplation reduces oxidative stress and mind-wandering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi A. Wayment

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Excessive self-concern increases perceptions of threat and defensiveness. In contrast, fostering a more inclusive and expanded sense of self can reduce stress and improve well-being. We developed and tested a novel brief intervention designed to strengthen a student’s compassionate self-identity, an identity that values balance and growth by reminding them of four quiet ego characteristics: detached awareness, inclusive identity, perspective taking, and growth. Students (N = 32 in their first semester of college who reported greater self-protective (e.g., defensive goals in the first two weeks of the semester were invited to participate in the study. Volunteers were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: quiet ego contemplation (QEC, QEC with virtual reality headset (QEC-VR, and control. Participants came to the lab three times to engage in a 15-minute exercise in a 30-day period. The 15-minute Quiet Ego Contemplation (QEC briefly described each quiet ego characteristic followed by a few minutes time to reflect on what that characteristic meant to them. Those in the QEC condition reported improved quiet ego characteristics and pluralistic thinking, decreases in a urinary marker of oxidative stress, and reduced mind-wandering on a cognitive task. Contrary to expectation, participants who wore the VR headsets while listening to the QEC demonstrated the least improvement. Results suggest that a brief intervention that reduces self-focus and strengthens a more compassionate self-view may offer an additional resource that individuals can use in their everyday lives.

  18. Dreaming as mind wandering: evidence from functional neuroimaging and first-person content reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kieran C. R. Fox

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Isolated reports have long suggested a similarity in content and thought processes across mind wandering (MW during waking, and dream mentation during sleep. This overlap has encouraged speculation that both ‘daydreaming’ and dreaming may engage similar brain mechanisms. To explore this possibility, we systematically examined published first-person experiential reports of MW and dreaming and found many similarities: in both states, content is largely audiovisual and emotional, follows loose narratives tinged with fantasy, is strongly related to current concerns, draws on long-term memory, and simulates social interactions. Both states are also characterized by a relative lack of meta-awareness. To relate first-person reports to neural evidence, we compared meta-analytic data from numerous functional neuroimaging (PET, fMRI studies of the default mode network (DMN, with high chances of MW and rapid eye movement (REM sleep (with high chances of dreaming. Our findings show large overlaps in activation patterns of cortical regions: similar to MW/DMN activity, dreaming and REM sleep activate regions implicated in self-referential thought and memory, including medial prefrontal cortex (PFC, medial temporal lobe structures, and posterior cingulate. Conversely, in REM sleep numerous PFC executive regions are deactivated, even beyond levels seen during waking MW. We argue that dreaming can be understood as an ‘intensified’ version of waking MW: though the two share many similarities, dreams tend to be longer, more visual and immersive, and to more strongly recruit numerous key hubs of the DMN. Further, whereas MW recruits fewer PFC regions than goal-directed thought, dreaming appears to be characterized by an even deeper quiescence of PFC regions involved in cognitive control and metacognition, with a corresponding lack of insight and meta-awareness. We suggest, then, that dreaming amplifies the same features that distinguish MW from goal

  19. Prediction of Mind-Wandering with Electroencephalogram and Non-linear Regression Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Issaku; Kumano, Hiroaki

    2017-01-01

    Mind-wandering (MW), task-unrelated thought, has been examined by researchers in an increasing number of articles using models to predict whether subjects are in MW, using numerous physiological variables. However, these models are not applicable in general situations. Moreover, they output only binary classification. The current study suggests that the combination of electroencephalogram (EEG) variables and non-linear regression modeling can be a good indicator of MW intensity. We recorded EEGs of 50 subjects during the performance of a Sustained Attention to Response Task, including a thought sampling probe that inquired the focus of attention. We calculated the power and coherence value and prepared 35 patterns of variable combinations and applied Support Vector machine Regression (SVR) to them. Finally, we chose four SVR models: two of them non-linear models and the others linear models; two of the four models are composed of a limited number of electrodes to satisfy model usefulness. Examination using the held-out data indicated that all models had robust predictive precision and provided significantly better estimations than a linear regression model using single electrode EEG variables. Furthermore, in limited electrode condition, non-linear SVR model showed significantly better precision than linear SVR model. The method proposed in this study helps investigations into MW in various little-examined situations. Further, by measuring MW with a high temporal resolution EEG, unclear aspects of MW, such as time series variation, are expected to be revealed. Furthermore, our suggestion that a few electrodes can also predict MW contributes to the development of neuro-feedback studies.

  20. Small-scale dispersal and survival in a long-lived seabird, the wandering albatross.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Gilles; Milot, Emmanuel; Weimerskirch, Henri

    2010-07-01

    1. Dispersal is a fundamental but still poorly known process in population dynamics and several hypotheses have been proposed to explain its patterns. We studied natal and breeding dispersal and survival in a long-lived seabird, the wandering albatross (Diomedea exulans L.), and examined several hypotheses concerning dispersal patterns in birds. 2. We applied multi-state capture-recapture models to a 36-year data set (1969-2004) collected at three albatross colonies on Ile de Possession, Crozet Islands. Because the species has biennial reproduction, we introduced unobservable states in the model to account for the absence of individuals in those years. 3. Adults were highly faithful to their nesting colony but colony fidelity, as well as survival rate, differed slightly among colonies (fidelity ranged from 0.957 to 0.977). Breeding fidelity was highest in the colony where survival was lowest and individuals were not more likely to change colony following a failed breeding attempt than after a successful one. The colony that attracted most dispersers had the lowest density of nesting birds. 4. Philopatry (the probability that young return to breed at a birth site) was generally high but variable among colonies (ranging from 0.70 to 0.92), and survival of young differed little. Philopatry was highest in the largest colony, where the availability of potential mates was presumably greatest. However, among dispersing individuals, the colony that had the lowest density of nesting individuals, not the largest colony, attracted the most recruits. 5. Although size of the colony influenced the decision to stay or to leave in young, density was most influential in the selection of a new colony among both adult and young dispersers. Our results support the hypothesis that philopatry is the strategy favoured by most recruits and that conspecific attraction can explain variation in the level of philopatry among colonies but not settlement patterns among dispersing individuals.

  1. Polarized Light in Astronomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    The application of very sensitive electronic detecting devices during the last decade has revolutionized and revitalized the study of polarization in celestial objects. The nature of polarization, how polaroids work, interstellar polarization, dichroic filters, polarization by scattering, and modern polarimetry are among the topics discussed. (JN)

  2. "Apparent Weight": A Concept that Is Confusing and Unnecessary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Albert A.

    2010-01-01

    Two recent articles make prominent use of the concept of "apparent weight." The concept of "apparent weight" leads to two confusing inconsistencies. We need to know that with very little change in our representations, we can give our students an improved understanding of "weight" without ever having to invent the appealing but confusing concept of…

  3. Observations on the Apparent Solubility of Carbonate-Apatites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellis; Lee; Wilson

    1999-10-15

    Previousreports indicating that the apparent solubilities of carbonate-apatites are low appear to conflict with findings that carbonate incorporation into the apatite structure tends to reduce stability. Carbonate-apatites were prepared by a precipitation method and by hydrolysis of monetite and brushite. Apparent solubility profiles were determined by measuring dissolution after exposure for 24 h to acetate buffers with known saturations with respect to hydroxyapatite. All preparations showed a range of apparent solubilities, in agreement with previous work. Precipitated samples had higher apparent solubilities than samples prepared by hydrolysis and this was correlated with differences in crystallinity. Further experiments showed that pyrophosphate ion reduced the apparent solubility, but it was concluded that pyrophosphate occurring naturally in synthetic apatites would be insufficient to cause low apparent solubilities. Microscopical observations showed that precipitated carbonate-apatites were composed of small crystals of uniform size, whereas carbonate-apatites prepared by hydrolysis consisted of both small crystals and very large crystals. The low apparent solubilities observed in the latter preparations are attributed to the large crystals. The surface phenomena possibly involved in apparent solubility behavior are discussed. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  4. Thermodynamics of apparent horizon and modified Friedman equations

    CERN Document Server

    Sheykhi, Ahmad

    2010-01-01

    Starting from the first law of thermodynamics, $dE=T_hdS_h+WdV$, at apparent horizon of a FRW universe, and assuming that the associated entropy with apparent horizon has a quantum corrected relation, $S=\\frac{A}{4G}-\\alpha \\ln \\frac{A}{4G}+\\beta \\frac{4G}{A}$, we derive modified Friedmann equations describing the dynamics of the universe with any spatial curvature. We also examine the time evolution of the total entropy including the quantum corrected entropy associated with the apparent horizon together with the matter field entropy inside the apparent horizon. Our study shows that, with the local equilibrium assumption, the generalized second law of thermodynamics is fulfilled in a region enclosed by the apparent horizon.

  5. A robust method for pulse peak determination in a digital volume pulse waveform with a wandering baseline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Dae-Geun; Farooq, Umar; Park, Seung-Hun; Hahn, Minsoo

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a robust method for pulse peak determination in a digital volume pulse (DVP) waveform with a wandering baseline. A proposed new method uses a modified morphological filter (MMF) to eliminate a wandering baseline signal of the DVP signal with minimum distortion and a slope sum function (SSF) with an adaptive thresholding scheme to detect pulse peaks from the baseline-removed DVP signal. Further in order to cope with over-detected and missed pulse peaks, knowledge based rules are applied as a postprocessor. The algorithm automatically adjusts detection parameters periodically to adapt to varying beat morphologies and fluctuations. Compared with conventional methods (highpass filtering, linear interpolation, cubic spline interpolation, and wavelet adaptive filtering), our method performs better in terms of the signal-to-error ratio, the computational burden (0.125 seconds for one minute of DVP signal analysis with the Intel Core 2 Quad processor @ 2.40 GHz PC), the true detection rate (97.32% with an acceptance level of 4 ms ) as well as the normalized error rate (0.18%). In addition, the proposed method can detect true positions of pulse peaks more accurately and becomes very useful for pulse transit time (PTT) and pulse rate variability (PRV) analyses.

  6. Extreme variation in migration strategies between and within wandering albatross populations during their sabbatical year, and their fitness consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weimerskirch, Henri; Delord, Karine; Guitteaud, Audrey; Phillips, Richard A; Pinet, Patrick

    2015-03-09

    Migratory behavior, routes and zones used during the non-breeding season are assumed to have been selected to maximize fitness, and can lead to genetic differentiation. Yet, here we show that migration strategies differ markedly between and within two genetically similar populations of wandering albatross Diomedea exulans from the Crozet and Kerguelen archipelagos in the Indian Ocean. Wandering albatrosses usually breed biennially if successful, and during the sabbatical year, all birds from Kerguelen migrate to the Pacific Ocean, whereas most from Crozet are sedentary. Instead of taking the shortest routes, which would involve a return against headwinds, migratory birds fly with the westerly winds, requiring detours of 10,000 s km. In total, migrants circumnavigate Antarctica 2 to 3 times, covering more than 120,000 km in a single sabbatical year. Our results indicate strong links between migratory behavior and fitness; all birds from Kerguelen breed biennially, whereas a significant proportion of those from Crozet, especially females, are sedentary and breed in consecutive calendar years. To breed annually, these females temporarily change mate, but return to their original partner in the following year. This extreme variation in migratory behavior has important consequences in term of life history evolution and susceptibility to climate change and fisheries.

  7. Role of triggers and dysphoria in mind-wandering about past, present and future: A laboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plimpton, Benjamin; Patel, Priya; Kvavilashvili, Lia

    2015-05-01

    To bridge the related but separate areas of research on mind-wandering and Involuntary Autobiographical Memory (IAM), the frequency and temporal focus of task unrelated thoughts about past, present, and future was compared in 19 dysphoric and 21 non-dysphoric participants, using a modified laboratory method for studying IAMs. Participants were stopped 11 times during a 15-min vigilance task and recorded their thoughts at that moment. In both groups, most thoughts were spontaneous, task-unrelated, and triggered by irrelevant cue-words on the screen with negative words being more likely to trigger past memories and positive cues - thoughts about future. Both groups reported more past memories than current or future thoughts, but differences emerged in the type of future thought experienced: non-dysphoric participants reported more planning thoughts, and dysphoric participants more abstract hypothetical thoughts. The results suggest that some findings from IAM research regarding cues and the impact of dysphoria may be generalizable to mind-wandering. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Influence of age, sex and breeding status on mercury accumulation patterns in the wandering albatross Diomedea exulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, S; Xavier, J C; Phillips, R A; Pereira, M E; Pardal, M A

    2013-10-01

    Although mercury bio-amplifies through the food chain and accumulates in top predators, mercury concentrations in tissues of the wandering albatross are greater than in any other vertebrate, including closely related species. In order to explore the alternative explanations for this pattern, we measured total mercury concentrations in feathers, plasma and blood cells of wandering albatrosses of known age, sex and breeding status sampled at South Georgia. Mercury concentrations were low in feathers and blood components of chicks, and higher in the feathers of young pre-breeders than in feathers or blood of older pre-breeders and breeding adults. There was no effect of sex on mercury concentrations in the feathers of pre-breeders or breeding adults, whereas levels were significantly higher in blood cells of breeding females than males. The high feather mercury concentrations of young pre-breeders compared with older birds suggest an increase in moult frequency as birds approach maturity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Wandering albatrosses document latitudinal variations in the transfer of persistent organic pollutants and mercury to Southern Ocean predators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carravieri, Alice; Bustamante, Paco; Tartu, Sabrina; Meillère, Alizée; Labadie, Pierre; Budzinski, Hélène; Peluhet, Laurent; Barbraud, Christophe; Weimerskirch, Henri; Chastel, Olivier; Cherel, Yves

    2014-12-16

    Top marine predators are effective tools to monitor bioaccumulative contaminants in remote oceanic environments. Here, we used the wide-ranging wandering albatross Diomedea exulans to investigate potential geographical variations of contaminant transfer to predators in the Southern Ocean. Blood concentrations of 19 persistent organic pollutants and 14 trace elements were measured in a large number of individuals (N = 180) of known age, sex and breeding status from the subantarctic Crozet Islands. Wandering albatrosses were exposed to a wide range of contaminants, with notably high blood mercury concentrations. Contaminant burden was markedly influenced by latitudinal foraging habitats (inferred from blood δ(13)C values), with individuals feeding in warmer subtropical waters having lower concentrations of pesticides, but higher concentrations of mercury, than those feeding in colder subantarctic waters. Sexual differences in contaminant burden seemed to be driven by gender specialization in feeding habitats, rather than physiological characteristics, with females foraging further north than males. Other individual traits, such as adult age and reproductive status, had little effect on blood contaminant concentrations. Our study provides further evidence of the critical role of global distillation on organic contaminant exposure to Southern Ocean avian predators. In addition, we document an unexpected high transfer of mercury to predators in subtropical waters, which merits further investigation.

  10. Multiple weather factors affect apparent survival of European passerine birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker Salewski

    Full Text Available Weather affects the demography of animals and thus climate change will cause local changes in demographic rates. In birds numerous studies have correlated demographic factors with weather but few of those examined variation in the impacts of weather in different seasons and, in the case of migrants, in different regions. Using capture-recapture models we correlated weather with apparent survival of seven passerine bird species with different migration strategies to assess the importance of selected facets of weather throughout the year on apparent survival. Contrary to our expectations weather experienced during the breeding season did not affect apparent survival of the target species. However, measures for winter severity were associated with apparent survival of a resident species, two short-distance/partial migrants and a long-distance migrant. Apparent survival of two short distance migrants as well as two long-distance migrants was further correlated with conditions experienced during the non-breeding season in Spain. Conditions in Africa had statistically significant but relatively minor effects on the apparent survival of the two long-distance migrants but also of a presumably short-distance migrant and a short-distance/partial migrant. In general several weather effects independently explained similar amounts of variation in apparent survival for the majority of species and single factors explained only relatively low amounts of temporal variation of apparent survival. Although the directions of the effects on apparent survival mostly met our expectations and there are clear predictions for effects of future climate we caution against simple extrapolations of present conditions to predict future population dynamics. Not only did weather explains limited amounts of variation in apparent survival, but future demographics will likely be affected by changing interspecific interactions, opposing effects of weather in different seasons, and

  11. Multiple weather factors affect apparent survival of European passerine birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salewski, Volker; Hochachka, Wesley M; Fiedler, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Weather affects the demography of animals and thus climate change will cause local changes in demographic rates. In birds numerous studies have correlated demographic factors with weather but few of those examined variation in the impacts of weather in different seasons and, in the case of migrants, in different regions. Using capture-recapture models we correlated weather with apparent survival of seven passerine bird species with different migration strategies to assess the importance of selected facets of weather throughout the year on apparent survival. Contrary to our expectations weather experienced during the breeding season did not affect apparent survival of the target species. However, measures for winter severity were associated with apparent survival of a resident species, two short-distance/partial migrants and a long-distance migrant. Apparent survival of two short distance migrants as well as two long-distance migrants was further correlated with conditions experienced during the non-breeding season in Spain. Conditions in Africa had statistically significant but relatively minor effects on the apparent survival of the two long-distance migrants but also of a presumably short-distance migrant and a short-distance/partial migrant. In general several weather effects independently explained similar amounts of variation in apparent survival for the majority of species and single factors explained only relatively low amounts of temporal variation of apparent survival. Although the directions of the effects on apparent survival mostly met our expectations and there are clear predictions for effects of future climate we caution against simple extrapolations of present conditions to predict future population dynamics. Not only did weather explains limited amounts of variation in apparent survival, but future demographics will likely be affected by changing interspecific interactions, opposing effects of weather in different seasons, and the potential for

  12. WFPC2 Polarization Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biretta, J.; McMaster, M.

    1997-12-01

    We derive a detailed calibration for WFPC2 polarization data which is accurate to about 1.5%. We begin by computing polarizer flats, and show how they are applied to data. A physical model for the polarization effects of the WFPC2 optics is then created using Mueller matricies. This model includes corrections for the instrumental polarization (diattenuation and phase retardance) of the pick-off mirror, as well as the high cross-polarization transmission of the polarizer filter. We compare this model against the on-orbit observations of polarization calibrators, and show it predicts relative counts in the different polarizer/aperture settings to 1.5% RMS accuracy. We then show how this model can be used to calibrate GO data, and present two WWW tools which allow observers to easily calibrate their data. Detailed examples are given illustrationg the calibration and display of WFPC2 polarization data. In closing we describe future plans and possible improvements.

  13. Metasurface polarization splitter

    CERN Document Server

    Slovick, Brian A; Yu, Zhi Gang; Kravchenckou, Ivan I; Briggs, Dayrl P; Moitra, Parikshit; Krishnamurthy, Srini; Valentine, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Polarization beam splitters, devices that separate the two orthogonal polarizations of light into different propagation directions, are one of the most ubiquitous optical elements. However, traditionally polarization splitters rely on bulky optical materials, while emerging optoelectronic and photonic circuits require compact, chip-scale polarization splitters. Here we show that a subwavelength rectangular lattice of cylindrical silicon Mie resonators functions as a polarization splitter, efficiently reflecting one polarization while transmitting the other. We show that the polarization splitting arises from the anisotropic permittivity and permeability of the metasurface due to the two-fold rotational symmetry of the rectangular unit cell. The high polarization efficiency, low loss, and low profile make these metasurface polarization splitters ideally suited for monolithic integration with optoelectronic and photonic circuits.

  14. Polarized Electron Source Developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles K. Sinclair

    1990-02-23

    Presently, only two methods of producing beams of polarized electrons for injection into linear accelerators are in use. Each of these methods uses optical pumping by circularly polarized light to produce electron polarization. In one case, electron polarization is established in metastable helium atoms, while in the other case, the polarized electrons are produced in the conduction band of appropriate semiconductors. The polarized electrons are liberated from the helium metastable by chemi-ionization, and from the semiconductors by lowering the work function at the surface of the material. Developments with each of these sources since the 1988 Spin Physics Conference are reviewed, and the prospects for further improvements discussed.

  15. Geographical Income Polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azhar, Hussain; Jonassen, Anders Bruun

    In this paper we estimate the degree, composition and development of geographical income polarization based on data at the individual and municipal level in Denmark from 1984 to 2002. Rising income polarization is reconfirmed when applying new polarization measures, the driving force being greater...... inter municipal income inequality. Counter factual simulations show that rising property prices to a large part explain the rise in polarization. One side-effect of polarization is tendencies towards a parallel polarization of residence location patterns, where low skilled individuals tend to live...

  16. Drifting from Slow to "D'oh!": Working Memory Capacity and Mind Wandering Predict Extreme Reaction Times and Executive Control Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVay, Jennifer C.; Kane, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    A combined experimental, individual-differences, and thought-sampling study tested the predictions of executive attention (e.g., Engle & Kane, 2004) and coordinative binding (e.g., Oberauer, Suss, Wilhelm, & Sander, 2007) theories of working memory capacity (WMC). We assessed 288 subjects' WMC and their performance and mind-wandering rates during…

  17. Drifting from Slow to "D'oh!": Working Memory Capacity and Mind Wandering Predict Extreme Reaction Times and Executive Control Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVay, Jennifer C.; Kane, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    A combined experimental, individual-differences, and thought-sampling study tested the predictions of executive attention (e.g., Engle & Kane, 2004) and coordinative binding (e.g., Oberauer, Suss, Wilhelm, & Sander, 2007) theories of working memory capacity (WMC). We assessed 288 subjects' WMC and their performance and mind-wandering rates…

  18. Working Memory Capacity, Mind Wandering, and Creative Cognition: An Individual-Differences Investigation into the Benefits of Controlled Versus Spontaneous Thought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeekens, Bridget A; Kane, Michael J

    2016-11-01

    Should executive control, as indicated by working memory capacity (WMC) and mind-wandering propensity, help or hinder creativity? Sustained and focused attention should help guide a selective search of solution-relevant information in memory and help inhibit uncreative, yet accessible, ideas. However, unfocused attention and daydreaming should allow mental access to more loosely relevant concepts, remotely linked to commonplace solutions. Three individual-differences studies inserted incubation periods into one or two divergent thinking tasks and tested whether WMC (assessed by complex span tasks) and incubation-period mind wandering (assessed as probed reports of task-unrelated thought [TUT]) predicted post-incubation performance. Retrospective self-reports of Openness (Experiment 2) and mind-wandering and daydreaming propensity (Experiment 3) complemented our thought-probe assessments of TUT. WMC did not correlate with creativity in divergent thinking, whereas only the questionnaire measure of daydreaming, but not probed thought reports, weakly predicted creativity; the fact that in-the-moment TUTs did not correlate divergent creativity is especially problematic for claims that mind-wandering processes contribute to creative cognition. Moreover, the fact that WMC tends to strongly predict analytical problem solving and reasoning, but may not correlate with divergent thinking, provides a useful boundary condition for defining WMC's nomological net. On balance, our data provide no support for either benefits or costs of executive control for at least one component of creativity.

  19. Drifting from Slow to "D'oh!": Working Memory Capacity and Mind Wandering Predict Extreme Reaction Times and Executive Control Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVay, Jennifer C.; Kane, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    A combined experimental, individual-differences, and thought-sampling study tested the predictions of executive attention (e.g., Engle & Kane, 2004) and coordinative binding (e.g., Oberauer, Suss, Wilhelm, & Sander, 2007) theories of working memory capacity (WMC). We assessed 288 subjects' WMC and their performance and mind-wandering rates…

  20. Drifting from Slow to “D’oh!” Working Memory Capacity and Mind Wandering Predict Extreme Reaction Times and Executive-Control Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVay, Jennifer C.; Kane, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    A combined experimental, individual-differences, and thought-sampling study tested the predictions of executive attention (e.g., Engle & Kane, 2004) and coordinative binding (e.g., Oberauer, Süß, Wilhelm, & Sander, 2007) theories of working memory capacity (WMC). We assessed 288 subjects’ WMC and their performance and mind-wandering rates during a sustained-attention task; subjects completed either a go/no-go version requiring executive control over habit, or a vigilance version that did not. We further combined the data with those from McVay and Kane (2009) to: (1) gauge the contributions of WMC and attentional lapses to the worst-performance rule and the tail, or τ parameter, of response time (RT) distributions; (2) assess which parameters from a quantitative evidence-accumulation RT model were predicted by WMC and mind-wandering reports, and (3) consider intra-subject RT patterns – particularly, speeding – as potential objective markers of mind wandering. We found that WMC predicted action and thought control in only some conditions, that attentional lapses (indicated by TUT reports and drift-rate variability in evidence accumulation) contributed to τ, performance accuracy, and WMC’s association with them, and that mind-wandering experiences were not predicted by trial-to-trial RT changes, and so they cannot always be inferred from objective performance measures. PMID:22004270

  1. Polar bears and sea ice habitat change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durner, George M.; Atwood, Todd C.; Butterworth, Andy

    2017-01-01

    The polar bear (Ursus maritimus) is an obligate apex predator of Arctic sea ice and as such can be affected by climate warming-induced changes in the extent and composition of pack ice and its impacts on their seal prey. Sea ice declines have negatively impacted some polar bear subpopulations through reduced energy input because of loss of hunting habitats, higher energy costs due to greater ice drift, ice fracturing and open water, and ultimately greater challenges to recruit young. Projections made from the output of global climate models suggest that polar bears in peripheral Arctic and sub-Arctic seas will be reduced in numbers or become extirpated by the end of the twenty-first century if the rate of climate warming continues on its present trajectory. The same projections also suggest that polar bears may persist in the high-latitude Arctic where heavy multiyear sea ice that has been typical in that region is being replaced by thinner annual ice. Underlying physical and biological oceanography provides clues as to why polar bear in some regions are negatively impacted, while bears in other regions have shown no apparent changes. However, continued declines in sea ice will eventually challenge the survival of polar bears and efforts to conserve them in all regions of the Arctic.

  2. The apparent elastic modulus of the juxtarticular subchondral bone of the femoral head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, T D; Vrahas, M S

    1984-01-01

    An experiment was undertaken to obtain approximate values for the intrinsic elastic modulus of subchondral bone. Shallow spherical caps, with uniform and incrementally controlled thickness, were machined from subchondral bone in the weight-bearing regions of 11 fresh-frozen normal femoral head autopsy specimens. Under application of polar point loads, the measured deflections were compared with a corresponding analytical shell solution, thus allowing back-calculation of the apparent modulus. Analogous tests were performed on similarly shaped specimens of stock Plexiglas of known modulus in order to estimate the precision of the testing method. The aggregate results for subchondral bone showed that its intrinsic stiffness correlated inversely with nominal shell thickness, but even the thinnest (1.0 mm thick) of these shells had an apparent modulus (mean = 1.372 GN/m2, SD = 414 MN/m2) well below that generally accepted for "pure" cortical bone (about 14 GN/m2). This stiffness deficit was very likely due to the presence of histologically evident marrow spaces. However, the low apparent modulus values measured in this study may not be fully representative of complex in vivo behavior, because in the testing of excised shells there is no radial compressive stress transfer to underlying cancellous bone.

  3. The effect of visual apparent motion on audiovisual simultaneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jinhwan; Ogawa, Ken-ichiro; Miyake, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Visual motion information from dynamic environments is important in multisensory temporal perception. However, it is unclear how visual motion information influences the integration of multisensory temporal perceptions. We investigated whether visual apparent motion affects audiovisual temporal perception. Visual apparent motion is a phenomenon in which two flashes presented in sequence in different positions are perceived as continuous motion. Across three experiments, participants performed temporal order judgment (TOJ) tasks. Experiment 1 was a TOJ task conducted in order to assess audiovisual simultaneity during perception of apparent motion. The results showed that the point of subjective simultaneity (PSS) was shifted toward a sound-lead stimulus, and the just noticeable difference (JND) was reduced compared with a normal TOJ task with a single flash. This indicates that visual apparent motion affects audiovisual simultaneity and improves temporal discrimination in audiovisual processing. Experiment 2 was a TOJ task conducted in order to remove the influence of the amount of flash stimulation from Experiment 1. The PSS and JND during perception of apparent motion were almost identical to those in Experiment 1, but differed from those for successive perception when long temporal intervals were included between two flashes without motion. This showed that the result obtained under the apparent motion condition was unaffected by the amount of flash stimulation. Because apparent motion was produced by a constant interval between two flashes, the results may be accounted for by specific prediction. In Experiment 3, we eliminated the influence of prediction by randomizing the intervals between the two flashes. However, the PSS and JND did not differ from those in Experiment 1. It became clear that the results obtained for the perception of visual apparent motion were not attributable to prediction. Our findings suggest that visual apparent motion changes temporal

  4. A Translational Polarization Rotator

    CERN Document Server

    Chuss, David T; Pisano, Giampaolo; Ackiss, Sheridan; U-Yen, Kongpop; Ng, Ming wah

    2012-01-01

    We explore a free-space polarization modulator in which a variable phase introduction between right- and left-handed circular polarization components is used to rotate the linear polarization of the outgoing beam relative to that of the incoming beam. In this device, the polarization states are separated by a circular polarizer that consists of a quarter-wave plate in combination with a wire grid. A movable mirror is positioned behind and parallel to the circular polarizer. As the polarizer-mirror distance is separated, an incident linear polarization will be rotated through an angle that is proportional to the introduced phase delay. We demonstrate a prototype device that modulates Stokes Q and U over a 20% bandwidth.

  5. Polarized Light Corridor Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, G. R.

    1990-01-01

    Eleven demonstrations of light polarization are presented. Each includes a brief description of the apparatus and the effect demonstrated. Illustrated are strain patterns, reflection, scattering, the Faraday Effect, interference, double refraction, the polarizing microscope, and optical activity. (CW)

  6. NESDIS VIIRS Polar Winds

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains the Level 3 Polar Winds Northern and Southern Hemisphere datasets. The Level 3 Polar Winds data from VIIRS for the Arctic and Antarctic from 65...

  7. Plasma polarization spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimoto, Takashi [Department of Engineering Physics and Mechanics, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    Polarization of radiation emitted from a plasma reflects the anisotropic properties of the plasma, especially the angular anisotropic distribution of electron velocities. Polarization has been observed on impurity ion lines from the WT-3 tokamak and the GAMMA-10 tandem mirror machines. The soft x-ray laser line from the neonlike germanium was also found polarized. (author)

  8. Polarity at Many Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannery, Maura C.

    2004-01-01

    An attempt is made to find how polarity arises and is maintained, which is a central issue in development. It is a fundamental attribute of living things and cellular polarity is also important in the development of multicellular organisms and controversial new work indicates that polarization in mammals may occur much earlier than previously…

  9. Geographical Income Polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azhar, Hussain; Jonassen, Anders Bruun

    In this paper we estimate the degree, composition and development of geographical income polarization based on data at the individual and municipal level in Denmark from 1984 to 2002. Rising income polarization is reconfirmed when applying new polarization measures, the driving force being greater...

  10. Graphing Polar Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawes, Jonathan F.

    2013-01-01

    Graphing polar curves typically involves a combination of three traditional techniques, all of which can be time-consuming and tedious. However, an alternative method--graphing the polar function on a rectangular plane--simplifies graphing, increases student understanding of the polar coordinate system, and reinforces graphing techniques learned…

  11. Analysis of Apparent Elasticity Constants of Woven Fabrics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董侠; 张建春; 张燕

    2001-01-01

    The woven fabric can be defined as orthogonal elastomer if the extension force that puts on the fabric is very small. Based on the precondition, the apparent elasticity constants of a woven fabric were analyzed theoretically in the paper. The bias angle (which is between weft yarns and extension direction ) affects apparent elasticity modulus and elasticity coefficient of the fabric in the extension direction. And the experiment describes fluxes of elasticity constants going with the bias angle of the fabric.

  12. Polarized fuel for controlled thermonuclear fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartalucci, Sergio

    2017-07-01

    The use of polarized nuclei as a fuel for thermonuclear fusion reactors was suggested more than 30 years ago, providing evidence for a significant increase of the total cross section. In particular, an enhancement factor close to 1.5 is expected in the energy range below 100 keV for the dominant nuclear fusion reactions 2H + 3H → 4He + n + 17.58 MeV and 2H + 3He → 4He + p + 18.34 MeV. Furthermore, the use of polarized fuel allows one to control the ejectile trajectories, via an enhancement in the forward-backward cross section asymmetry due to polarization. This allows some control on the energy transfer from the plasma to the reactor wall or helps concentrate the neutron flux to defined wall areas. Nevertheless, this idea was received with skepticism by the relevant scientific community, due to some uncertainty in the physics of the process, the low efficiency in the production of polarized beams for injection into plasma and the apparent difficulty of preserving the ion polarization for a time long compared with nuclear burning time. But more recently, as a consequence of significant progress in the field of atomic beam sources and polarized targets, the interest in this matter has been refreshed for both inertially and magnetically confined plasmas. The possibility of implementing nuclear polarization in present and future fusion reactors is discussed in this paper. In particular, the interaction between polarized ions and magnetic fields, both static and RF, which are typically used in a Tokamak for plasma heating via ion cyclotron resonance (ICRH), is considered. Also, experimental issues for practically performing a feasibility test on a real fusion reactors are illustrated.

  13. Thermodynamics of the apparent horizon in massive cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Hui

    2013-01-01

    Applying Clausius relation with energy-supply defined by the unified first law of thermodynamics formalism to the apparent horizon of a massive cosmological model proposed lately, the corrected entropic formula of the apparent horizon is obtained with the help of the modified Friedmann equations. This entropy-area relation, together with the identified internal energy, verifies the first law of thermodynamics for the apparent horizon with a volume change term for consistency. On the other hand, by means of the corrected entropy-area formula and the Clausius relation $\\delta Q=T dS$, where the heat flow $\\delta Q$ is the energy-supply of pure matter projecting on the vector $\\xi$ tangent to the apparent horizon and should be looked on as the amount of energy crossing the apparent horizon during the time interval $dt$ and the temperature of the apparent horizon for energy crossing during the same interval is $1/(2\\pi \\widetilde{r}_A)$, the modified Friedmann equations governing the dynamical evolution of the un...

  14. The Physics of Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi Degl'Innocenti, Egidio

    2015-10-01

    The introductory lecture that has been delivered at this Symposium is a condensed version of an extended course held by the author at the XII Canary Island Winter School from November 13 to November 21, 2000. The full series of lectures can be found in Landi Degl'Innocenti (2002). The original reference is organized in 20 Sections that are here itemized: 1. Introduction, 2. Description of polarized radiation, 3. Polarization and optical devices: Jones calculus and Muller matrices, 4. The Fresnel equations, 5. Dichroism and anomalous dispersion, 6. Polarization in everyday life, 7. Polarization due to radiating charges, 8. The linear antenna, 9. Thomson scattering, 10. Rayleigh scattering, 11. A digression on Mie scattering, 12. Bremsstrahlung radiation, 13. Cyclotron radiation, 14. Synchrotron radiation, 15. Polarization in spectral lines, 16. Density matrix and atomic polarization, 17. Radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium equations, 18. The amplification condition in polarized radiative transfer, and 19. Coupling radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium equations.

  15. Polarization effects. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courant, E.

    1981-01-01

    The use of polarized proton beams in ISABELLE is important for several general reasons: (1) With a single longitudinally polarized proton beam, effects involving parity violation can be identified and hence processes involving weak interactions can be separated from those involving strong and electromagnetic interactions. (2) Spin effects are important in the strong interactions and can be useful for testing QCD. The technique for obtaining polarized proton beams in ISABELLE appears promising, particularly in view of the present development of a polarized proton beam for the AGS. Projections for the luminosity in ISABELLE for collisions of polarized protons - one or both beams polarized with longitudinal or transverse polarization - range from 1/100 to 1 times the luminosity for unpolarized protons.

  16. Evolution of sum-chirp in polarization multiplexed communication system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jing; Wang Zhen-Li

    2004-01-01

    The evolution of sum-chirp for an initially chirped Gaussian pulse is studied in the polarization multiplexed communication system, with fibre attenuation considered. The sum-chirp is found to have the character of saturation.Its value appears different along the two different polarization axes, determined by the incidence polarization angle. We also find that sum-chirp is dominated by the initial chirp at a short distance, and by the cross-phase modulation effect at long distance. And it is influenced apparently by a wavevector mismatch parameter below 10 ps/km. Further, its saturation results from the effective distance determined by fibre attenuation.

  17. Standard Test Method for Water Absorption, Bulk Density, Apparent Porosity, and Apparent Specific Gravity of Fired Whiteware Products

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers procedures for determining water absorption, bulk density, apparent porosity, and apparent specific gravity of fired unglazed whiteware products. 1.2 This standard may involve hazardous materials, operations, and equipment. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety problems associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  18. Polarity inversion in polar-nonpolar-polar heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, S; Youn, S J; Kim, Y; DiVenere, A; Wong, G K; Freeman, A J; Ketterson, J B

    2001-09-17

    We have observed an epilayer-thickness-dependent polarity inversion for the growth of CdTe on Sb(Bi)/CdTe(111)B. For films with Sb(Bi) thicknesses of less than 40 A (15 A), the CdTe layer shows a B (Te-terminated) face, but it switches to an A (Cd-terminated) face for thicker layers. On the other hand, a CdTe layer grown on Bi(Sb)/CdTe(111)A always shows the A face regardless of Sb or Bi layer thicknesses. In order to address the observations we have performed ab initio calculations, which suggest that the polarity of a polar material on a nonpolar one results from the binding energy difference between the two possible surface configurations.

  19. Correction of beam wander for a free-space quantum key distribution system operating in urban environment

    CERN Document Server

    Carrasco-Casado, Alberto; Fernandez, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    Free-space quantum key distribution links in urban environment have demanding operating needs, such as functioning in daylight and under atmospheric turbulence, which can dramatically impact their performance. Both effects are usually mitigated with a careful design of the field of view of the receiver. However, a trade-off is often required, since a narrow field of view improves background noise rejection but it is linked to an increase in turbulence-related losses. In this paper, we present a high-speed automatic tracking system to overcome these limitations. Both a reduction in the field-of-view to decrease the background noise and the mitigation of the losses caused by atmospheric turbulence are addressed. Two different designs are presented and discussed, along with technical considerations for the experimental implementation. Finally, preliminary experimental results of beam wander correction are used to estimate the potential improvement of both the quantum bit error rate and secret key rate of a free ...

  20. Age-related variation in reproductive traits in the wandering albatross: evidence for terminal improvement following senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froy, Hannah; Phillips, Richard A; Wood, Andrew G; Nussey, Daniel H; Lewis, Sue

    2013-05-01

    The processes driving age-related variation in demographic rates are central to understanding population and evolutionary ecology. An increasing number of studies in wild vertebrates find evidence for improvements in reproductive performance traits in early adulthood, followed by senescent declines in later life. However, life history theory predicts that reproductive investment should increase with age as future survival prospects diminish, and that raised reproductive investment may have associated survival costs. These non-mutually exclusive processes both predict an increase in breeding performance at the terminal breeding attempt. Here, we use a 30-year study of wandering albatrosses (Diomedea exulans) to disentangle the processes underpinning age-related variation in reproduction. Whilst highlighting the importance of breeding experience, we reveal senescent declines in performance are followed by a striking increase in breeding success and a key parental investment trait at the final breeding attempt. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  1. DISCOVERY OF A WANDERING RADIO JET BASE AFTER A LARGE X-RAY FLARE IN THE BLAZAR MARKARIAN 421

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niinuma, K. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Yamaguchi University, Yoshida 1677-1, Yamaguchi, Yamaguchi 753-8512 (Japan); Kino, M. [Korean VLBI Network, Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daedeokdae-ro 776, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Doi, A. [The Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuou-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-8510 (Japan); Hada, K. [Mizusawa VLBI Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Nagai, H. [Chile Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Koyama, S., E-mail: niinuma@yamaguchi-u.ac.jp [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the location of the radio jet bases (“radio cores”) of blazars in radio images and their stationarity by means of dense very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations. In order to measure the position of a radio core, we conducted a 12 epoch astrometric observation of the blazar Markarian 421 with the VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry at 22 GHz immediately after a large X-ray flare, which occurred in the middle of 2011 September. For the first time,we find that the radio core is not stationary but rather changes its location toward 0.5 mas downstream. This angular scale corresponds to the de-projected length of a scale of 10{sup 5} Schwarzschild radii (R{sub s}) at the distance of Markarian 421. This radio-core wandering may be a new type of manifestation associated with the phenomena of large X-ray flares.

  2. Discovery of a wandering radio jet base after a large X-ray flare in the blazar Markarian 421

    CERN Document Server

    Niinuma, K; Doi, A; Hada, K; Nagai, H; Koyama, S

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the location of the radio jet bases ("radio cores") of blazars in radio images, and their stationarity by means of dense very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations. In order to measure the position of a radio core, we conducted 12 epoch astrometric observation of the blazar Markarian 421 with the VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry at 22 GHz immediately after a large X-ray flare, which occurred in the middle of 2011 September. For the first time, we find that the radio core is not stationary but rather changes its location toward 0.5 mas downstream. This angular scale corresponds to the de-projected length of a scale of $10^5$ Schwarzschild radii (Rs) at the distance of Markarian~421. This radio-core wandering may be a new type of manifestation associated with the phenomena of large X-ray flares.

  3. Wandering Fish Bone: a Case of Pelvic Abscess due to Rectum Perforation Resulting from an Accidental Fish Bone Ingestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirous Abbasi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Fish bone is the most common foreign body that is ingested accidentally and can be caused gastrointestinal complications such as perforation, abstraction, and abscess. We describe a 75-year-old man who suffered from constipation, diarrhea, and fever and chills for 3 months. He had mild tenderness in hypogasteric region and also mild tenderness and swelling on anterior rectal wall and prostate upon clinical examination. The abdominal and pelvic sonography and CT scan findings suggested existence of abscess in the space of between bladder and rectum. The patient underwent laparotomy to drainage the pelvic abscess. The surgeon found a 6-cm fish bone which was embedded in the abscess. The presented case indicated the importance of accidental fish bone ingestion and its possible complications. In addition, the patients with abdominal pain, GI bleeding, and fever of unknown origin living in the seaside regions, the wandering fish bone as a differential diagnosis should be kept in mind.

  4. AUV Mapping and ROV Sampling of Ridges and Seamounts: No Longer Wandering Around in the Dark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paduan, J. B.; Clague, D. A.; Dreyer, B. M.; Caress, D. W.

    2011-12-01

    's relatively small field of view. New features have been discovered due to the maps, for example, hydrothermal chimneys that had not been stumbled upon before. While the great detail of the AUV maps is revolutionary, it is not enough to use just the one technique: distinguishing between lava channels and eruptive fissures sometimes requires visual observation; and map interpretation may indicate that there should be a contact between flows, but the contact can be too subtle for visual observation and must be confirmed with analysis of samples. A frustration has been that even well-calibrated ultra-short- and even long-baseline navigation has larger errors than the precision of the maps, so the maps must be relocated post-survey to GPS-navigated, albeit lower resolution, ship-based multibeam data. Also, an ROV's ultra-short baseline location during a dive may appear to be offset from the map. A tremendous benefit is that by applying insights from the new maps to dives done prior to the maps, those older dive observations and samples become even more valuable though we were "wandering in the dark" at the time.

  5. Device For Viewing Polarized Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noever, David A.

    1995-01-01

    Technique for detection of polarized light based on observation of scene through two stacked polarizing disks. No need to rotate polarizers to create flicker indicative of polarization. Implemented by relatively simple, lightweight apparatus. Polarization seen as bow-tie rainbow pattern. Advantageous for detecting polarization in variety of meteorological, geological, astronomical, and related applications.

  6. 心智游移的适应性功能及其理论解释%Adaptive Functions and Theoretical Explanations of Mind Wandering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟毅平; 朱佳; 秦敏辉; 孟楚熠

    2015-01-01

    Mind wandering refers to a phenomena,that attention switches from a current task or external environment to unrelated thoughts and feelings. Previous studies mainly focused on the cost of mind wandering. However,recently much evidence suggest that mind wandering also has its positive adaptive functions. This article synthesizes these functions includ-ing monitoring the external environment, autobiographical planning, improving creativity, facilitating decision making and lowering negative affect,and analyses the corresponding theoretical explanations,such as context regulation hypothesis and content regulation hypothesis,and thought continuum hypothesis. Future research will tend to investigate the adaptive func-tions of mind wandering in a direct way. Also,technisms which regulating content,time and context of mind wandering should be developed in the future,so as to improve the adaptive function of mind wandering.%心智游移是指注意从当前任务或者外界环境转移到内部想法和感觉的现象。尽管以往的研究主要关注心智游移的代价,但是最近的研究发现心智游移也具有一些积极的适应性功能。相关功能主要包括外部监控、自传体计划、提高创造力、促进决策和降低负性情绪等。相应的理论解释有情境管理假说、内容管理假说、意识连续体假说等。未来的研究应该进一步为相关功能提供直接的证据,也可以从内容管理、时间管理和情境管理的角度探索提高心智游移适应性功能的技术。

  7. Shape reconstruction from apparent contours theory and algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Bellettini, Giovanni; Paolini, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by a variational model concerning the depth of the objects in a picture and the problem of hidden and illusory contours, this book investigates one of the central problems of computer vision: the topological and algorithmic reconstruction of a smooth three dimensional scene starting from the visible part of an apparent contour. The authors focus their attention on the manipulation of apparent contours using a finite set of elementary moves, which correspond to diffeomorphic deformations of three dimensional scenes. A large part of the book is devoted to the algorithmic part, with implementations, experiments, and computed examples. The book is intended also as a user's guide to the software code appcontour, written for the manipulation of apparent contours and their invariants. This book is addressed to theoretical and applied scientists working in the field of mathematical models of image segmentation.

  8. Study of multi black hole and ring singularity apparent horizons

    CERN Document Server

    Jaramillo, Gabriela

    2010-01-01

    We study critical black hole separations for the formation of a common apparent horizon in systems of $N$ - black holes in a time symmetric configuration. We study in detail the aligned equal mass cases for $N=2,3,4,5$, and relate them to the unequal mass binary black hole case. We then study the apparent horizon of the time symmetric initial geometry of a ring singularity of different radii. The apparent horizon is used as indicative of the location of the event horizon in an effort to predict a critical ring radius that would generate an event horizon of toroidal topology. We found that a good estimate for this ring critical radius is $20/(3\\pi) M$. We briefly discuss the connection of this two cases through a discrete black hole 'necklace' configuration.

  9. Rice polarization scattering characteristics and paddyfield recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Shuanghe; Zhang, Pingping; Li, Bingbai

    2007-09-01

    Paddy rice is a staple food in China and it's growth monitoring, acreage extraction and yield estimate are of far reaching importance. It is difficult to apply conventional remote sensing technique for obtaining precise information on paddy planting and growth, for rice bowls are mostly distributed over rainy regions in China. The radar image is unlimited by cloud, rain and fog, and could proceed all weather operation and obtain more stable data, therefore it could be used for paddy monitoring. Making use of Envisat's ASAR data and NOAA data in 2004, paddy's backward-scattering characteristics with different polarizations were studied in this paper. To combine multi-temporal radar data with one view ETM image, paddyfield of experimental area in Hongze of Jiangsu Province was classified. Results show that 1) characteristics of paddy's hh and vv polarizations vary from stage to stage and vv polarization is more sensitive. The polarization ratio hh / vv of paddy during metaphase is apparently higher than other objects'. 2) paddy's polarization ratio hh / vv and growth vigor closely relate to each other , thereof two empirical time-domain models of backward- scattering were established, wherewith to estimate number of days after transplanting and growing season. 3) hh and ratio hh / vv are both well correlated with NDVI. 4) hh polarization data could be used for information extraction of towns and water bodies, and the hh / vv image in metaphase for partition of paddy from other objects. The recognition accuracy being ninety percent over, multi-temporal and -polarization radarsat data are of predominance and potential for paddy growth and/or acreage monitoring.

  10. Foliation dependence of black hole apparent horizons in spherical symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Faraoni, Valerio; Firouzjaee, Javad T; Helou, Alexis; Musco, Ilia

    2016-01-01

    Numerical studies of gravitational collapse to black holes make use of apparent horizons, which are intrinsically foliation-dependent. We expose the problem and discuss possible solutions using the Hawking quasilocal mass. In spherical symmetry, we present a physically sensible approach to the problem by restricting to spherically symmetric spacetime slicings. In spherical symmetry the apparent horizons are gauge-independent in any spherically symmetric foliation but physical quantities associated with them, such as surface gravity and temperature, are not. The widely used comoving and Kodama foliations, which are of particular interest, are discussed in detail.

  11. Foliation dependence of black hole apparent horizons in spherical symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraoni, Valerio; Ellis, George F. R.; Firouzjaee, Javad T.; Helou, Alexis; Musco, Ilia

    2017-01-01

    Numerical studies of gravitational collapse to black holes make use of apparent horizons, which are intrinsically foliation dependent. We expose the problem and discuss possible solutions using the Hawking-Hayward quasilocal mass. In spherical symmetry, we present a physically sensible approach to the problem by restricting to spherically symmetric spacetime slicings. In spherical symmetry, the apparent horizons enjoy a restricted gauge independence in any spherically symmetric foliation, but physical quantities associated with them, such as surface gravity and temperature, are fully gauge dependent. The widely used comoving and Kodama foliations, which are of particular interest, are discussed in detail as examples.

  12. Polar varieties revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Piene, Ragni

    2016-01-01

    We recall the definition of classical polar varieties, as well as those of affine and projective reciprocal polar varieties. The latter are defined with respect to a non-degenerate quadric, which gives us a notion of orthogonality. In particular we relate the reciprocal polar varieties to the "Euclidean geometry" in projective space. The Euclidean distance degree and the degree of the focal loci can be expressed in terms of the ranks, i.e., the degrees of the classical polar varieties, and he...

  13. Polarization at SLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swartz, M.L.

    1988-07-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider has been designed to readily accommodate polarized electron beams. Considerable effort has been made to implement a polarized source, a spin rotation system, and a system to monitor the beam polarization. Nearly all major components have been fabricated. At the current time, several source and polarimeter components have been installed. The installation and commissioning of the entire system will take place during available machine shutdown periods as the commissioning of SLC progresses. It is expected that a beam polarization of 45% will be achieved with no loss in luminosity. 13 refs., 15 figs.

  14. Polarized negative ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haeberli, W.

    1981-04-01

    This paper presents a survey of methods, commonly in use or under development, to produce beams of polarized negative ions for injection into accelerators. A short summary recalls how the hyperfine interaction is used to obtain nuclear polarization in beams of atoms. Atomic-beam sources for light ions are discussed. If the best presently known techniques are incorporated in all stages of the source, polarized H/sup -/ and D/sup -/ beams in excess of 10 ..mu..A can probably be achieved. Production of polarized ions from fast (keV) beams of polarized atoms is treated separately for atoms in the H(25) excited state (Lamb-Shift source) and atoms in the H(1S) ground state. The negative ion beam from Lamb-Shift sources has reached a plateau just above 1 ..mu..A, but this beam current is adequate for many applications and the somewhat lower beam current is compensated by other desirable characteristics. Sources using fast polarized ground state atoms are in a stage of intense development. The next sections summarize production of polarized heavy ions by the atomic beam method, which is well established, and by optical pumping, which has recently been demonstrated to yield very large nuclear polarization. A short discussion of proposed ion sources for polarized /sup 3/He/sup -/ ions is followed by some concluding remarks.

  15. Automatic real and apparent age estimation in still images

    OpenAIRE

    Pardo Garcia, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    We performed a study on age estimation via still images creating a new face image database containing real age and apparent age label annotations. Two age estimation methods are proposed using the state of the art techniques and analyse their performance with the proposed database.

  16. Studying the cosmological apparent horizon with quasistatic coordinates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rui-Yan Yu; Towe Wang

    2013-02-01

    This article aims at a natural generalization of the static coordinates to the ( + 1)-dimensional Friedmann–Lemaître–Robertson–Walker (FLRW) Universe. After demonstrating a no-go theorem, we put forward the quasistatic coordinates for the FLRW Universe. Then, the quasistatic coordinates are utilized to study the unified first law and the scalar-type perturbations on the cosmological apparent horizon.

  17. Increasing Range Of Apparent Depth In A Stereoscopic Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busquets, Anthony M.; Parrish, Russell V.; Williams, Steven P.

    1995-01-01

    Optical configuration conceived for increasing range of apparent depth provided by stereoscopic display system, without imposing concomitant reduction in field of view. Observer wears shuttered goggles synchronized with alternating left- and right-eye views on display. However, instead of looking directly at display screen, observer looks at screen via reflection in mirror collimating light emitted by screen.

  18. Children with fever without apparent source: diagnosis and dilemmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.E. Bleeker (Sacha)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractTills thesis describes the results of diagnostic research in young children presenting with fever without apparent source at the emergency department. The study was conducted at the Sophia Children's University Hospital in Rotterdam and the Juliana Children's Hospital in The Hague, both

  19. An Apparent Paradox: Catt's Anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieraccini, M.; Selleri, S.

    2013-01-01

    Catt's anomaly is a sort of "thought experiment" (a "gedankenexperiment") where electrons seem to travel at the speed of light. Although its author argued with conviction for many years, it has a clear and satisfactory solution and it can be considered indubitably just an apparent paradox. Nevertheless, it is curious and…

  20. Requirement of the laying hen for apparent fecal digestible lysine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutte, J.B.; Smink, W.

    1998-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the requirement for lysine of a White Leghorn strain of hens with a body weight of approximately 1,600 g. Before starting the experiment, apparent fecal digestibility of amino acids of the basal diet was determined in an in vivo digestibility trial with six individ