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Sample records for apoptotic topoisomerase i-dna

  1. BACTERIAL CELL KILLING MEDIATED BY TOPOISOMERASE I DNA CLEAVAGE ACTIVITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Bokun; Shukla, Shikha; Vasunilashorn, Sarinnapha; Mukhopadhyay, Somshuvra; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2005-01-01

    DNA topoisomerases are important clinical targets for antibacterial and anticancer therapy. At least one type IA DNA topoisomerases can be found in every bacterium, making it a logical target for antibacterial agents that can convert the enzyme into poison by trapping its covalent complex with DNA. However, it has not been possible previously to observe the consequence of having such stabilized covalent complex of bacterial topoisomerase I in vivo. We isolated a mutant of recombinant Yersinia pestis topoisomerase I that forms a stabilized covalent complex with DNA by screening for the ability to induce the SOS response in Escherichia coli. Overexpression of this mutant topoisomerase I resulted in bacterial cell death. From sequence analysis and site-directed mutagenesis, it was determined that a single amino acid substitution in the TOPRIM domain changing a strictly conserved glycine residue to serine in either the Y. pestis or E. coli topoisomerase I can result in a mutant enzyme that has the SOS inducing and cell killing properties. Analysis of the purified mutant enzymes showed that they have no relaxation activity but retain the ability to cleave DNA and form a covalent complex. These results demonstrate that perturbation of the active site region of bacterial topoisomerase I can result in stabilization of the covalent intermediate, with the in vivo consequence of bacterial cell death. Small molecules that induce similar perturbation in the enzyme-DNA complex should be candidates as leads for novel antibacterial agents. PMID:16159875

  2. Inhibition of Hsp90 acts synergistically with topoisomerase II poisons to increase the apoptotic killing of cells due to an increase in topoisomerase II mediated DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Catherine R; McNamara, Anne V; Rackstraw, Stephen A; Nelson, David E; White, Mike R; Watson, Alastair J M; Jenkins, John R

    2006-01-01

    Topoisomerase II plays a crucial role during chromosome condensation and segregation in mitosis and meiosis and is a highly attractive target for chemotherapeutic agents. We have identified previously topoisomerase II and heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) as part of a complex. In this paper we demonstrate that drug combinations targeting these two enzymes cause a synergistic increase in apoptosis. The objective of our study was to identify the mode of cell killing and the mechanism behind the increase in topoisomerase II mediated DNA damage. Importantly we demonstrate that Hsp90 inhibition results in an increased topoiosmerase II activity but not degradation of topoisomerase II and it is this, in the presence of a topoisomerase II poison that causes the increase in cell death. Our results suggest a novel mechanism of action where the inhibition of Hsp90 disrupts the Hsp90-topoisomerase II interaction leading to an increase in and activation of unbound topoisomerase II, which, in the presence of a topoisomerase II poison leads to the formation of an increased number of cleavable complexes ultimately resulting in rise in DNA damage and a subsequent increase cell death.

  3. Inhibition of Hsp90 acts synergistically with topoisomerase II poisons to increase the apoptotic killing of cells due to an increase in topoisomerase II mediated DNA damage

    OpenAIRE

    Barker, Catherine R.; McNamara, Anne V.; Rackstraw, Stephen A.; Nelson, David E.; White, Mike R.; Watson, Alastair J. M.; Jenkins, John R.

    2006-01-01

    Topoisomerase II plays a crucial role during chromosome condensation and segregation in mitosis and meiosis and is a highly attractive target for chemotherapeutic agents. We have identified previously topoisomerase II and heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) as part of a complex. In this paper we demonstrate that drug combinations targeting these two enzymes cause a synergistic increase in apoptosis. The objective of our study was to identify the mode of cell killing and the mechanism behind the inc...

  4. La ADN topoisomerasa tipo I de protozoos patógenos como Diana terapéutica de fármacos antitumorales Type I DNA topoisomerase from protozoan pathogens as a potential target for anti-tumoral drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa M Reguera

    2007-12-01

    , Chagas disease or leishmaniasis, among others, are unicellular protozoan parasites with no immune-prophylactic treatment and where the chemotherapeutical treatment is still under controversy. At present, the chemotherapeutic approach to these diseases is expensive, has side or toxic effects and it does not provide economic profits to the Pharmaceuticals which then have no or scarce enthusiasm in R & D investments in this field. The identification of type I DNAtopoisomerases as promising drug targets is based on the excellent results obtained with camptothecin derivatives in anticancer therapy. The recent finding of significant structural differences between human type I DNAtopoisomerase and their counterparts in trypanosomatids has open a new field in drug discovery, the aim is to find structural insights to be targeted by new drugs. This review is an update of DNA-topoisomerases as potential chemotherapeutic targets against the most important protozoan agents of medical interest.

  5. Fluoroquinolone-dependent DNA supercoiling by Vaccinia topoisomerase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamau, Edwin; Grove, Anne

    2004-09-10

    Vaccinia topoisomerase I is a site-specific DNA strand transferase that acts through a DNA-(3'-phosphotyrosyl)-enzyme intermediate, resulting in relaxation of supercoiled DNA. Although Vaccinia topoisomerase I is not an essential enzyme, its role in early transcription makes it a potential antiviral target. We describe the interaction of Vaccinia topoisomerase I with fluoroquinolone antibiotics otherwise known to target DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV in bacterial cells. The fluoroquinolone enrofloxacin inhibits DNA relaxation by Vaccinia topoisomerase I at concentrations similar to those required for inhibition by the coumarin drugs coumermycin and novobiocin. When Vaccinia topoisomerase I is presented with relaxed DNA in the presence of enrofloxacin, it executes the reverse reaction, supercoiling the DNA. Further characterization indicates that enrofloxacin does not interfere with the initial strand scission by Vaccinia topoisomerase I. The structurally related fluoroquinolones moxifloxacin and lomefloxacin have no effect on the topoisomerase at the concentrations at which enrofloxacin mediates DNA supercoiling. The mechanism with which Vaccinia topoisomerase I supercoils relaxed DNA, an energetically unfavorable, yet ATP-independent process, must entail protein-DNA contacts downstream of the cleavage site, as opposed to the free rotation mechanism proposed for DNA relaxation; as proposed for fluoroquinolone-mediated inhibition of gyrase, the drug may target a preformed topoisomerase I-DNA complex to induce conformational changes in the enzyme that permit such contacts.

  6. DNA Topoisomerases in Transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rødgaard, Morten Terpager

    2015-01-01

    This Ph.D. thesis summarizes the main results of my studies on the interplay between DNA topoisomerases and transcription. The work was performed from 2011 to 2015 at Aarhus University in the Laboratory of Genome Research, and was supervised by associate professor Anni H. Andersen. Most of the ex......This Ph.D. thesis summarizes the main results of my studies on the interplay between DNA topoisomerases and transcription. The work was performed from 2011 to 2015 at Aarhus University in the Laboratory of Genome Research, and was supervised by associate professor Anni H. Andersen. Most...... topoisomerase-DNA cleavage complex. The second study is an investigation of how topoisomerases influence gene regulation by keeping the genome in an optimal topological state....

  7. Topoisomerase II and leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, MaryJean; Lindsey, R. Hunter; Felix, Carolyn A.; Grimwade, David; Osheroff, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Type II topoisomerases are essential enzymes that modulate DNA under- and overwinding, knotting, and tangling. Beyond their critical physiological functions, these enzymes are the targets for some of the most widely prescribed anticancer drugs (topoisomerase II poisons) in clinical use. Topoisomerase II poisons kill cells by increasing levels of covalent enzyme-cleaved DNA complexes that are normal reaction intermediates. Drugs such as etoposide, doxorubicin, and mitoxantrone are frontline therapies for a variety of solid tumors and hematological malignancies. Unfortunately, their use is also associated with the development of specific leukemias. Regimens that include etoposide or doxorubicin are linked to the occurrence of acute myeloid leukemias that feature rearrangements at chromosomal band 11q23. Similar rearrangements are seen in infant leukemias and are associated with gestational diets that are high in naturally occurring topoisomerase II–active compounds. Finally, regimens that include mitoxantrone and epirubicin are linked to acute promyelocytic leukemias that feature t(15;17) rearrangements. The first part of this article will focus on type II topoisomerases and describe the mechanism of enzyme and drug action. The second part will discuss how topoisomerase II poisons trigger chromosomal breaks that lead to leukemia and potential approaches for dissociating the actions of drugs from their leukemogenic potential. PMID:24495080

  8. An RNA Topoisomerase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; di Gate, Russell J.; Seeman, Nadrian C.

    1996-09-01

    A synthetic strand of RNA has been designed so that it can adopt two different topological states (a circle and a trefoil knot) when ligated into a cyclic molecule. The RNA knot and circle have been characterized by their behavior in gel electrophoresis and sedimentation experiments. This system allows one to assay for the existence of an RNA topoisomerase, because the two RNA molecules can be interconverted only by a strand passage event. We find that the interconversion of these two species can be catalyzed by Escherichia coli DNA topoisomerase III, indicating that this enzyme can act as an RNA topoisomerase. The conversion of circles to knots is accompanied by a small amount of RNA catenane generation. These findings suggest that strand passage must be considered a potential component of the folding and modification of RNA structures.

  9. Programmed activation of cancer cell apoptosis: A tumor-targeted phototherapeutic topoisomerase I inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Weon Sup; Han, Jiyou; Kumar, Rajesh; Lee, Gyung Gyu; Sessler, Jonathan L.; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Kim, Jong Seung

    2016-07-01

    We report here a tumor-targeting masked phototherapeutic agent 1 (PT-1). This system contains SN-38—a prodrug of the topoisomerase I inhibitor irinotecan. Topoisomerase I is a vital enzyme that controls DNA topology during replication, transcription, and recombination. An elevated level of topoisomerase I is found in many carcinomas, making it an attractive target for the development of effective anticancer drugs. In addition, PT-1 contains both a photo-triggered moiety (nitrovanillin) and a cancer targeting unit (biotin). Upon light activation in cancer cells, PT-1 interferes with DNA re-ligation, diminishes the expression of topoisomerase I, and enhances the expression of inter alia mitochondrial apoptotic genes, death receptors, and caspase enzymes, inducing DNA damage and eventually leading to apoptosis. In vitro and in vivo studies showed significant inhibition of cancer growth and the hybrid system PT-1 thus shows promise as a programmed photo-therapeutic (“phototheranostic”).

  10. DNA Topoisomerases as Targets for Antibacterial Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiasa, Hiroshi

    2018-01-01

    DNA topoisomerases are proven therapeutic targets of antibacterial agents. Quinolones, especially fluoroquinolones, are the most successful topoisomerase-targeting antibacterial drugs. These drugs target type IIA topoisomerases in bacteria. Recent structural and biochemical studies on fluoroquinolones have provided the molecular basis for both their mechanism of action, as well as the molecular basis of bacterial resistance. Due to the development of drug resistance, including fluoroquinolone resistance, among bacterial pathogens, there is an urgent need to discover novel antibacterial agents. Recent advances in topoisomerase inhibitors may lead to the development of novel antibacterial drugs that are effective against fluoroquinolone-resistant pathogens. They include type IIA topoisomerase inhibitors that either interact with the GyrB/ParE subunit or form nick-containing ternary complexes. In addition, several topoisomerase I inhibitors have recently been identified. Thus, DNA topoisomerases remain important targets of antibacterial agents.

  11. Structure of the N-terminal fragment of topoisomerase V reveals a new family of topoisomerases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taneja, Bhupesh; Patel, Asmita; Slesarev, Alexei; Mondragon, Alfonso (NWU); (FSI)

    2010-09-02

    Topoisomerases are involved in controlling and maintaining the topology of DNA and are present in all kingdoms of life. Unlike all other types of topoisomerases, similar type IB enzymes have only been identified in bacteria and eukarya. The only putative type IB topoisomerase in archaea is represented by Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V. Despite several common functional characteristics, topoisomerase V shows no sequence similarity to other members of the same type. The structure of the 61 kDa N-terminal fragment of topoisomerase V reveals no structural similarity to other topoisomerases. Furthermore, the structure of the active site region is different, suggesting no conservation in the cleavage and religation mechanism. Additionally, the active site is buried, indicating the need of a conformational change for activity. The presence of a topoisomerase in archaea with a unique structure suggests the evolution of a separate mechanism to alter DNA.

  12. Induction of apoptosis in colon cancer cells by a novel topoisomerase I inhibitor TopIn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Soo Kyung; Gwak, Jungsug; Song, Im-Sook; Park, Hyung-Soon; Oh, Sangtaek

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → TopIn activates p53-dependent transcription in colon cancer cells. → TopIn induces apoptosis in colon cancer cells. → TopIn selectively inhibits topoisomerase I activity. → TopIn does not affect the activity of BCRP and MDR-1. -- Abstract: The tumor suppressor p53 plays an important role in cellular emergency mechanisms through regulating the genes involved in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. To identify small molecules that can activate p53-responsive transcription, we performed chemical screening using genetically engineered HCT116 reporter cells. We found that TopIn (7-phenyl-6H-[1,2,5]oxadiazolo[3,4-e]indole 3-oxide) efficiently activated p53-mediated transcriptional activity and induced phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15, thereby stabilizing the p53 protein. Furthermore, TopIn upregulated the expression of p21 WAF1/CIP1 , a downstream target of p53, and suppressed cellular proliferation in various colon cancer cells. Additionally, TopIn induced DNA fragmentation, caspase-3/7 activation and poly ADP ribose polymerase cleavage, typical biochemical markers of apoptosis, in p53 wild-type and mutated colon cancer cells. Finally, we found that TopIn inhibited topoisomerase I activity, but not topoisomerase II, in vitro and induced the formation of the topoisomerase I-DNA complex in HCT116 colon cancer cells. Unlike camptothecin (CPT) and its derivative SN38, TopIn did not affect the activity of the ATP-binding cassette transporter breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) or multidrug-resistant protein-1 (MDR-1). These results suggest that TopIn may present a promising new topoisomerase I-targeting anti-tumor therapeutics.

  13. Inhibition of topoisomerase II by liriodenine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, S H; Reynolds, M C; Sun, N J; Cassady, J M; Snapka, R M

    1997-08-15

    The cytotoxic oxoaporphine alkaloid liriodenine, isolated from Cananga odorata, was found to be a potent inhibitor of topoisomerase II (EC 5.99.1.3) both in vivo and in vitro. Liriodenine treatment of SV40 (simian virus 40)-infected CV-1 cells caused highly catenated SV40 daughter chromosomes, a signature of topoisomerase II inhibition. Strong catalytic inhibition of topoisomerase II by liriodenine was confirmed by in vitro assays with purified human topoisomerase II and kinetoplast DNA. Liriodenine also caused low-level protein-DNA cross-links to pulse-labeled SV40 chromosomes in vivo, suggesting that it may be a weak topoisomerase II poison. This was supported by the finding that liriodenine caused topoisomerase II-DNA cross-links in an in vitro assay for topoisomerase II poisons. Verapamil did not increase either liriodenine-induced protein-DNA cross-links or catalytic inhibition of topoisomerase II in SV40-infected cells. This indicates that liriodenine is not a substrate for the verapamil-sensitive drug efflux pump in CV-1 cells.

  14. Topoisomerase II poisoning by indazole and imidazole complexes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    of topoisomerase II by forming a ternary cleavage complex of DNA, drug and topoisomerase II. The thymidine incorporation assays show that the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation correlates with topoisomerase II poisoning. The present study on topoisomerase II poisoning by these two compounds opens a new avenue ...

  15. Next generation topoisomerase I inhibitors: Rationale and biomarker strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teicher, Beverly A

    2008-03-15

    Topoisomerase I (TopoI), an essential enzyme, produces a DNA single strand break allowing DNA relaxation for replication. The enzymatic mechanism involves sequential transesterifcations. The breakage and closure reactions generate phosphodiester bonds and similar free energies, so the reaction is freely reversible. The TopoI reaction intermediate consists of enzyme covalently linked to DNA dubbed a 'cleavable complex'. Covalently bound TopoI-DNA complexes can be recovered. Camptothecin analogs, topotecan and irinotecan, are approved TopoI-targeted drugs. Both have limitations due to the equilibrium between the camptothecin lactone and ring-opened forms. Several strategies are being explored to develop improved TopoI inhibitors. Homocamptothecins, in which the metabolically labile camptothecin lactone is replaced with a more stable seven-membered beta-hydroxylactone, are potent anticancer agents. Gimatecan is a seven-position modified lipophilic camptothecin developed to provide rapid uptake and accumulation in cells and a stable TopoI-DNA-drug ternary complex. Diflomotecan, a homocamptothecin, and gimatecan are in Phase II clinical trial. Among non-camptothecins, edotecarin, an indolocarbazole that results in DNA C/T-G cleavage compared with T-G/A for camptothecins, is in Phase II clinical trial. Indenoisoquinolines were identified as TopoI inhibitors by the NCI 60-cell line COMPARE analysis. Co-crystal structures of two indenoisoquinolines with TopoI-DNA elucidated the structure of the ternary complex. Indenoisoquinolines are in preclinical development. Dibenzonaphthyridinone TopoI inhibitors have undergone extensive structure-activity examination. ARC-111 was selected for in-depth preclinical study. Biomarkers are under investigation to predict clinical efficacy from preclinical models, to allow determination of drug targeting in vivo and to aid selection of patients most likely to benefit from TopoI inhibitor therapy. gamma-H2AX formation may be a useful

  16. Topoisomerases, new targets in cancer chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, J G; de Jong, Steven; de Vries, Liesbeth; Mulder, Nanno

    1990-01-01

    The enzymes involved in the regulation of the three-dimensional structure of DNA, topoisomerase I and II, are important for the handling of DNA during vital cellular processes such as translation, transcription and mitosis. The enzymes are currently being studied intensively, they are being

  17. Topoisomerase IB of Deinococcus radiodurans resolves guanine ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-28

    Nov 28, 2015 ... structure in vitro and it may be one such protein that could resolve G4 DNA under normal growth conditions in. D. radiodurans. [Kota S and Misra HS 2015 Topoisomerase IB of ..... 2004 Intracellular transcription of G-rich DNAs induces forma- tion of G-loops, novel structures containing G4 DNA. Genes. Dev.

  18. Topoisomerase IB of Deinococcus radiodurans resolves guanine ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-28

    Nov 28, 2015 ... [Kota S and Misra HS 2015 Topoisomerase IB of Deinococcus radiodurans resolves guanine quadruplex DNA structures in vitro. J. Biosci. 40 833–843] ... known for its efficient DNA double strand break repair. (Zahradka et al. ..... These samples were analysed on 12% native PAGE in KCl buffer (a). For CD ...

  19. Targeting bacterial topoisomerases: how to counter mechanisms of resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2016-06-01

    DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV are type IIA bacterial topoisomerases that are targeted by highly effective antibiotics. However, resistance via multiple mechanisms arises to limit the efficacies of these drugs. Continued research on type IIA bacterial topoisomerases has provided novel approaches to counter the most common resistance mechanism for utilization of these proven targets in antibacterial therapy. Bacterial topoisomerase I is being explored as an alternative target that is not expected to show cross-resistance. Dual targeting or combination therapy could be strategies for circumventing the development of resistance to topoisomerase-targeting antibiotics. Bacterial topoisomerases are high-value bactericidal targets that could continue to be exploited for antibacterial therapy, if new tactics to counter resistance can be adopted.

  20. Role for DNA topoisomerase II in prostatic growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, W.G. V.

    1987-01-01

    In the studies presented the role of the mammalian type II topoisomerase in the proliferation of normal and neoplastic rat prostate cells in vitro and in vivo was evaluated. First, the utility of mammalian type II topoisomerase inhibitors for the study of the biologic functions of the enzyme was assessed. Novobiocin inhibited rat topoisomerase II, but also interacted directly with chromatin in rat ventral prostate nuclei as well. Teniposide and amsacrine both trapped topoisomerase II in a covalent enzyme-DNA reaction intermediate that could be recovered using a K-SDS precipitation assay. The specific trapping of covalent topoisomerase II-DNA complexes by teniposide was exploited to implicate topoisomerase II in DNA replication in cultured Dunning R3327-G rat prostatic adenocarcinoma cells. In 3 H-thymidine pulse and pulse-chase labelling experiments, newly replicated DNA was found to be enriched among DNA linked topoisomerase II following teniposide treatment. Additional experiments demonstrated that topoisomerase II formed covalent complexes in the presence of teniposide directly with nascent DNA chains. On the basis of this data, a model for topoisomerase II function in untangling intertwined daughter DNA strands during replication by acting in the wake of the DNA replication fork near the site of DNA synthesis was proposed

  1. The importance of topoisomerases for chromatin regulated genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredsøe, Jacob Christian; Pedersen, Jakob Madsen; Rødgaard, Morten Terpager

    2013-01-01

    DNA topoisomerases are enzymes, which function to relieve torsional stress in the DNA helix by introducing transient breaks into the DNA molecule. By use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and microarray technology we have previously shown that topoisomerases are required for the activation of chromatin...... topoisomerases for optimal activation, but in contrast to the PHO5 gene, topoisomerases are not required for chromatin remodeling of the GAL1/10 promoter region, indicating a different role of the enzymes. We are currently performing a detailed investigation of the GAL genes to elucidate the precise role...

  2. Type IA topoisomerase inhibition by clamp closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leelaram, Majety Naga; Bhat, Anuradha Gopal; Godbole, Adwait Anand; Bhat, Rajeshwari Subray; Manjunath, Ramanathapuram; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2013-08-01

    Bacterial DNA topoisomerase I (topoI) catalyzes relaxation of negatively supercoiled DNA. The enzyme alters DNA topology through protein-operated DNA gate, switching between open and closed conformations during its reaction. We describe the mechanism of inhibition of Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis topoI by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that bind with high affinity and inhibit at 10-50 nM concentration. Unlike other inhibitors of topoisomerases, the mAbs inhibited several steps of relaxation reaction, namely DNA binding, cleavage, strand passage, and enzyme-DNA dissociation. The enhanced religation of the cleaved DNA in presence of the mAb indicated closing of the enzyme DNA gate. The formation of enzyme-DNA heterocatenane in the presence of the mAbs as a result of closing the gate could be inferred by the salt resistance of the complex, visualized by atomic force microscopy and confirmed by fluorescence measurements. Locking the enzyme-DNA complex as a closed clamp restricted the movements of the DNA gate, affecting all of the major steps of the relaxation reaction. Enzyme trapped on DNA in closed clamp conformation formed roadblock for the elongating DNA polymerase. The unusual multistep inhibition of mycobacterial topoisomerases may facilitate lead molecule development, and the mAbs would also serve as valuable tools to probe the enzyme mechanism.

  3. Increment of DNA topoisomerases in chemically and virally transformed cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crespi, M.D.; Mladovan, A.G.; Baldi, A.

    1988-01-01

    The activities of topoisomerases I and II were assayed in subcellular extracts obtained from nontumorigenic BALB/c 3T3 A31 and normal rat kidney (NRK) cell lines and from the same cells transformed by benzo[a]pyrene (BP-A31), Moloney (M-MSV-A31) and Kirsten (K-A31) sarcoma viruses, and simian virus 40 (SV-NRK). The enzymatic activity of topoisomerase I was monitored by the relaxation of negatively supercoiled pBR322 DNA and by the formation of covalent complexes between 32 P-labeled DNA and topoisomerase I. Topoisomerase II activity was determined by decatenation of kinetoplast DNA (k-DNA). It was found that nuclear and cytoplasmic type I topoisomerase specific activities were higher in every transformed cell line than in the normal counterparts. These differences cannot be attributed to an inhibitory factor present in A31 cells. When chromatin was treated at increasing ionic strengths, the 0.4 M NaCl extract showed the highest topoisomerase I specific activity. Spontaneously transformed A31 cells showed topoisomerase I activity similar to that of extracts of cells transformed by benzo[a]pyrene. Topoisomerase II specific activity was also increased in SV-NRK cells, as judged by the assay for decatenation of k-DNA to yield minicircle DNA

  4. Topoisomerase II poisoning by indazole and imidazole complexes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    of topoisomerase II by forming a ternary cleavage complex of DNA, drug and topoisomerase II. The thymidine incorporation assays ... sage reaction is central to the various functions of topo II, as well as for targeting the .... or imidazole. These cationic ligands may be released from the main molecules in biological systems.

  5. A study of topoisomerase activity in human testicular cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, K; Shuhin, T

    1995-01-01

    Topoisomerases are widely detected in rapidly proliferating cancer cells. Many anti-topoisomerase agents are utilized for cancer chemotherapy. Testicular cancers are highly chemotherapy sensitive, however, 10% of them are refractory to the standard regimen. To investigate the topoisomerase activities in human testicular neoplasms, we examined the activity of topoisomerase I (TopoI) and topoisomerase II (TopoII) in 29 testicular tumors. TopoI activity was observed irrespective of pathological types of the tumor (21/29). TopoII was detected in seminoma and teratocarcinoma (5/29). In our experience, seminoma was relatively sensitive to chemotherapy including anti-TopoII agents. Our results suggest that Topol inhibitors could be more effective against seminoma as well as the other types of testicular tumors.

  6. A functional type I topoisomerase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roper Benjamin J

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa encodes a putative topoisomerase with sequence similarity to the eukaryotic type IB topoisomerase from Vaccinia virus. Residues in the active site are conserved, notably Tyr292 which would be predicted to form the transient covalent bond to DNA. Results The gene encoding the P. aeruginosa topoisomerase I was cloned and expressed in E. coli. The enzyme relaxes supercoiled DNA, while a mutant containing a Tyr292 to Phe substitution at the active site was found to be catalytically inert. This is consistent with the role of Tyr in forming the covalent intermediate. Like Vaccinia topoisomerase, the P. aeruginosa topoisomerase relaxes DNA in the absence of ATP, but unlike Vaccinia topoisomerase, P. aeruginosa topoisomerase does not relax supercoiled DNA without MgCl2 present. In addition, high concentration of NaCl is not able to substitute for MgCl2 as seen for Vaccinia topoisomerase. A truncated derivative of the topoisomerase lacking residues 1–98 relaxes DNA, with both full length and truncated enzyme exhibiting equivalent requirements for divalent cations and the ability to relax DNA to completion, suggesting a shared domain organization. DNA-binding assays suggest an only modest preference for the CCCTT pentameric sequence required for transesterification by Vaccinia topoisomerase IB. Conclusion P. aeruginosa encodes a functional topoisomerase with significant similarity to the type IB enzyme encoded by poxviruses. In contrast to the Vaccinia-encoded homolog, the P. aeruginosa-encoded enzyme requires divalent cations for catalytic activity, relaxes DNA to completion, and does not exhibit a strong preference for the pentameric sequence stringently required by the Vaccinia-encoded homolog. A comparison with the structure of poxviral topoisomerase in complex with DNA suggests that bacterial homologs of the eukaryotic type IB topoisomerase may exhibit a relaxed sequence preference due to the lack of

  7. A Novel Apoptotic Protease Activated in Human Breast Cancer Cells After Poisoning Topoisomerase I

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-10-01

    the unknown protease activated by the active anti -breast cancer agent, B-lapachone (B- lap). The research team showed for the first time that B-lap...protease activated by the active anti -breast cancer agent, B-lapachone (B-lap). The research team showed for the first time that B-lap requires NQ01, a...leukemia cell line HL60 cells peroxide production in Trypanosoma cruzi . Acta Trop., 35: 35-40, 1978. undergoing apoptosis induced by DNA damage. Cancer

  8. Activity of Topotecan toward the DNA/Topoisomerase I Complex: A Theoretical Rationalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bali, Semiha Kevser; Marion, Antoine; Ugur, Ilke; Dikmenli, Ayse Kumru; Catak, Saron; Aviyente, Viktorya

    2018-03-06

    Topotecan (TPT) is a nontoxic anticancer drug characterized by a pH-dependent lactone/carboxyl equilibrium. TPT acts on the covalently bonded DNA/topoisomerase I (DNA/TopoI) complex by intercalating between two DNA bases at the active site. This turns TopoI into a DNA-damaging agent and inhibits supercoil relaxation. Although only the lactone form of the drug is active and effectively inhibits TopoI, both forms have been co-crystallized at the same location within the DNA/TopoI complex. To gain further insights into the pH-dependent activity of TPT, the differences between two TPT:DNA/TopoI complexes presenting either the lactone (acidic pH) or the carboxyl (basic pH) form of TPT were studied by means of molecular dynamic simulations, quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical calculations, and topological analysis. We identified two specific amino acids that have a direct relationship with the activity of the drug, i.e., lysine 532 (K532) and asparagine 722 (N722). K532 forms a stable hydrogen bond bridge between TPT and DNA only when the drug is in its active lactone form. The presence of the active drug triggers the formation of an additional stable interaction between DNA and protein residues, where N722 acts as a bridge between the two fragments, thus increasing the binding affinity of DNA for TopoI and further slowing the release of DNA. Overall, our results provide a clear understanding of the activity of the TPT-like class of molecules and can help in the future design of new anticancer drugs targeting topoisomerase enzymes.

  9. Phytochemicals as Anticancer and Chemopreventive Topoisomerase II Poisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketron, Adam C.

    2013-01-01

    Phytochemicals are a rich source of anticancer drugs and chemopreventive agents. Several of these chemicals appear to exert at least some of their effects through interactions with topoisomerase II, an essential enzyme that regulates DNA supercoiling and removes knots and tangles from the genome. Topoisomerase II-active phytochemicals function by stabilizing covalent protein-cleaved DNA complexes that are intermediates in the catalytic cycle of the enzyme. As a result, these compounds convert topoisomerase II to a cellular toxin that fragments the genome. Because of their mode of action, they are referred to as topoisomerase II poisons as opposed to catalytic inhibitors. The first sections of this article discuss DNA topology, the catalytic cycle of topoisomerase II, and the two mechanisms (interfacial vs. covalent) by which different classes of topoisomerase II poisons alter enzyme activity. Subsequent sections discuss the effects of several phytochemicals on the type II enzyme, including demethyl-epipodophyllotoxins (semisynthetic anticancer drugs) as well as flavones, flavonols, isoflavones, catechins, isothiocyanates, and curcumin (dietary chemopreventive agents). Finally, the leukemogenic potential of topoisomerase II-targeted phytochemicals is described. PMID:24678287

  10. Exploring DNA topoisomerases as targets of novel therapeutic agents in the treatment of infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse-Dinh, Y-C

    2007-03-01

    DNA topoisomerases are ubiquitous enzymes needed to overcome topological problems encountered during DNA replication, transcription, recombination and maintenance of genomic stability. They have proved to be valuable targets for therapy, in part because some anti-topoisomerase agents act as poisons. Bacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV (type IIA topoisomerases) are targets of fluoroquinolones while human topoisomerase I (a type IB topoisomerase) and topoisomerase II are targets of various anticancer drugs. Bacterial type IA topoisomerase share little sequence homology to type IB or type IIA topoisomerases, but all topoisomerases have the potential of having the covalent phosphotyrosine DNA cleavage intermediate trapped by drug action. Recent studies have demonstrated that stabilization of the covalent complex formed by bacterial topoisomerase I and cleaved DNA can lead to bacterial cell death, supporting bacterial topoisomerase I as a promising target for the development of novel antibiotics. For current antibacterial therapy, the prevalence of fluoroquinolone-resistant bacterial pathogens has become a major public health concern, and efforts are directed towards identifying novel inhibitors of bacterial type IIA topoisomerases that are not affected by fluoroquinolone resistant mutations on the gyrase or topoisomerase IV genes. For anti-viral therapy, poxviruses encode their own type IB topoisomerases; these enzymes differ in drug sensitivity from human topoisomerase I. To confront potential threat of small pox as a weapon in terrorist attacks, vaccinia virus topoisomerase I has been targeted for discovery of anti-viral agents. These new developments of DNA topoisomerases as targets of novel therapeutic agents being reviewed here represent excellent opportunities for drug discovery in the treatment of infectious diseases.

  11. Anti-topoisomerase drugs as potent inducers of chromosomal aberrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana Bassi

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available DNA topoisomerases catalyze topological changes in DNA that are essential for normal cell cycle progression and therefore they are a preferential target for the development of anticancer drugs. Anti-topoisomerase drugs can be divided into two main classes: "cleavable complex" poisons and catalytic inhibitors. The "cleavable complex" poisons are very effective as anticancer drugs but are also potent inducers of chromosome aberrations so they can cause secondary malignancies. Catalytic inhibitors are cytotoxic but they do not induce chromosome aberrations. Knowledge about the mechanism of action of topoisomerase inhibitors is important to determine the best anti-topoisomerase combinations, with a reduced risk of induction of secondary malignancies.As topoisomerases de DNA catalisam alterações topológicas no DNA que são essenciais para a progressão do ciclo celular normal e, portanto, são um alvo preferencial para o desenvolvimento de drogas anticâncer. Drogas anti-topoisomerases podem ser divididas em duas classes principais: drogas anti-"complexos cliváveis" e inibidores catalíticos. As drogas anti-"complexos cliváveis" são muito eficazes como drogas anticancerígenas, mas são também potentes indutores de aberrações cromossômicas, podendo causar neoplasias malignas secundárias. Inibidores catalíticos são citotóxicos mas não induzem aberrações cromossômicas. Conhecimento a respeito do mecanismo de ação de inibidores de topoisomerases é importante para determinar as melhores combinações anti-topoisomerases, com um reduzido risco de indução de neoplasias malignas secundárias.

  12. DNA binding induces conformational transition within human DNA topoisomerase I in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleinikov, Vladimir; Sukhanova, Alyona; Mochalov, Konstantin; Ustinova, Olga; Kudelina, Irina; Bronstein, Igor; Nabiev, Igor

    2002-01-01

    We employed Raman and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy to probe the molecular structure of 68-kDa recombinant human DNA topoisomerase I (TopoI) in solution, in a complex with a 16-bp DNA fragment containing a camptothecin-enhanced TopoI cleavage site, and in a ternary complex with this oligonucleotide and topotecan. Raman spectroscopy reveals a TopoI secondary structure transition and significant changes in the hydrogen bonding of the tyrosine residues induced by the DNA binding. CD spectroscopy confirms the Raman data and identifies a DNA-induced (>7%) decrease of the TopoI alpha helix accompanied by at least a 6% increase of the beta structure. The Raman DNA molecular signatures demonstrated a bandshift that is expected for a net change in the environment of guanine C6 [double bond] O groups from pairing to solvent exposure. The formation of a ternary cleavage complex with TopoI, DNA, and topotecan as probed by CD spectroscopy reveals neither additional modifications of the TopoI secondary structure nor of the oligonucleotide structure, compared to the TopoI-oligonucleotide complex. Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Camptothecin resistance is determined by the regulation of topoisomerase I degradation mediated by ubiquitin proteasome pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Koji; Shah, Ankur K; Sachdev, Vibhu; Kleinstiver, Benjamin P; Taylor-Parker, Julian; Welch, Moira M; Hu, Yiheng; Salgia, Ravi; White, Forest M; Parvin, Jeffrey D; Ozonoff, Al; Rameh, Lucia E; Joung, J Keith; Bharti, Ajit K

    2017-07-04

    Proteasomal degradation of topoisomerase I (topoI) is one of the most remarkable cellular phenomena observed in response to camptothecin (CPT). Importantly, the rate of topoI degradation is linked to CPT resistance. Formation of the topoI-DNA-CPT cleavable complex inhibits DNA re-ligation resulting in DNA-double strand break (DSB). The degradation of topoI marks the first step in the ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP) dependent DNA damage response (DDR). Here, we show that the Ku70/Ku80 heterodimer binds with topoI, and that the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) phosphorylates topoI on serine 10 (topoI-pS10), which is subsequently ubiquitinated by BRCA1. A higher basal level of topoI-pS10 ensures rapid topoI degradation leading to CPT resistance. Importantly, PTEN regulates DNA-PKcs kinase activity in this pathway and PTEN deletion ensures DNA-PKcs dependent higher topoI-pS10, rapid topoI degradation and CPT resistance.

  14. Synthesis and topoisomerase II inhibitory and cytotoxic activity of oxiranylmethoxy- and thiiranylmethoxy-chalcone derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Younghwa; Nam, Jung-Min

    2011-01-01

    In order to find potential anticancer drug candidate targeting topoisomerases enzyme, we have designed and synthesized oxiranylmethoxy- and thiiranylmethoxy-retrochalcone derivatives and evaluated their pharmacological activity including topoisomerases inhibitory and cytotoxic activity. Of the compounds prepared compound 25 showed comparable or better cytotoxic activity against cancer cell lines tested. Compound 25 inhibited MCF7 (IC(50): 0.49 ± 0.21 μM) and HCT15 (IC(50): 0.23 ± 0.02 μM) carcinoma cell growth more efficiently than references. In the topoisomerases inhibition test, all the compounds were inactive to topoisomerase I but moderate inhibitors to topoisomerase II enzyme. Especially, compound 25 inhibited topoisomerase II activity with comparable extent to etoposide at 100 μM concentrations. Correlation between cytotoxicity and topoisomerase II inhibitory activity implies that compound 25 can be a possible lead compound for anticancer drug impeding the topoisomerase II function. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Development and validation of I-DNA1: a 15-Loci multiplex system for identity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odriozola, A; Aznar, J M; Celorrio, D; Bravo, M L; Builes, J J; Val-Bernal, J F; de Pancorbo, Marian M

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents a system for the multiplex amplification of 15 loci, known as I-DNA1, which combines mini and midiSTR technology, with amplicon sizes ranging from 49 to 297 bp. I-DNA1 analyses all the STR loci included in the CODIS and the Interpol Standard Set of loci, nine of the ten European core loci and seven of the eight German core loci, making it suitable for use in identifying humans. Moreover, its high sensitivity and the small size of its amplicons mean that I-DNA1 is potentially highly useful for analysing highly degraded and/or very small DNA samples.

  16. A Fluorescence-Based Assay for Identification of Bacterial Topoisomerase I Poisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annamalai, Thirunavukkarasu; Cheng, Bokun; Keswani, Neelam; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2018-01-01

    Bacterial Topoisomerase I is a potential target for the identification of novel topoisomerase poison inhibitors that could provide leads for a new class of antibacterial compounds. Here we describe in detail a fluorescence-based cleavage assay that is successfully used in HTS for the discovery of bacterial topoisomerase Ι poisons.

  17. The dynamic interplay between DNA topoisomerases and DNA topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Yeonee; Neuman, Keir C

    2016-11-01

    Topological properties of DNA influence its structure and biochemical interactions. Within the cell, DNA topology is constantly in flux. Transcription and other essential processes, including DNA replication and repair, not only alter the topology of the genome but also introduce additional complications associated with DNA knotting and catenation. These topological perturbations are counteracted by the action of topoisomerases, a specialized class of highly conserved and essential enzymes that actively regulate the topological state of the genome. This dynamic interplay among DNA topology, DNA processing enzymes, and DNA topoisomerases is a pervasive factor that influences DNA metabolism in vivo. Building on the extensive structural and biochemical characterization over the past four decades that has established the fundamental mechanistic basis of topoisomerase activity, scientists have begun to explore the unique roles played by DNA topology in modulating and influencing the activity of topoisomerases. In this review we survey established and emerging DNA topology-dependent protein-DNA interactions with a focus on in vitro measurements of the dynamic interplay between DNA topology and topoisomerase activity.

  18. Inhibition of topoisomerase II α activity and induction of apoptosis in mammalian cells by semi-synthetic andrographolide analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nateewattana, Jintapat; Saeeng, Rungnapha; Kasemsook, Sakkasem; Suksen, Kanoknetr; Dutta, Suman; Jariyawat, Surawat; Chairoungdua, Arthit; Suksamrarn, Apichart; Piyachaturawat, Pawinee

    2013-04-01

    Topoisomerase II α enzyme plays a critical role in DNA replication process. It controls the topologic states of DNA during transcription and is essential for cell proliferation. Human DNA topoisomerase II α (hTopo II α) is a promising chemotherapeutic target for anticancer agents against a variety of cancer types. In the present study, andrographolide and its structurally modified analogues were investigated for their inhibitory activities on hTopo II α enzyme. Five out of nine andrographolide analogues potently reduced hTopo II α activity and inhibited cell proliferation in four mammalian cell lines (Hela, CHO, BCA-1 and HepG2 cells). IC50 values for cytotoxicity of analogues 3A.1, 3A.2, 3A.3, 1B and 2C were 4 to 7 μM. Structure-activity relationship studies revealed that both core structure of andrographolide and silicon based molecule of functional group were important for the inhibition of hTopo II α activity whereas position C-19 of analogues was required for anti-proliferation. In addition, the analogue 2C at 10 μM concentration inhibited hTopo II α, and induced apoptosis with nuclear fragmentation and formation of apoptotic bodies in HepG2 cells. The analogue 2C may, therefore, have a therapeutic potential as effective anticancer agent targeting the hTopo II α functions.

  19. The dual topoisomerase inhibitor A35 preferentially and specially targets topoisomerase 2? by enhancing pre-strand and post-strand cleavage and inhibiting DNA religation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Wuli; Jiang, Guohua; Bi, Chongwen; Li, Yangbiao; Liu, Jingbo; Ye, Cheng; He, Hongwei; Li, Liang; Song, Danqing; Shao, Rongguang

    2015-01-01

    DNA topoisomerases play a key role in tumor proliferation. Chemotherapeutics targeting topoisomerases have been widely used in clinical oncology, but resistance and side effects, particularly cardiotoxicity, usually limit their application. Clinical data show that a decrease in topoisomerase (top) levels is the primary factor responsible for resistance, but in cells there is compensatory effect between the levels of top1 and top2?. Here, we validated cyclizing-berberine A35, which is a dual t...

  20. Cinnamomum verum component 2-methoxycinnamaldehyde: a novel antiproliferative drug inducing cell death through targeting both topoisomerase I and II in human colorectal adenocarcinoma COLO 205 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuen-daw Tsai

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cinnamomum verum is used to manufacture the spice cinnamon. In addition, the plant has been used as a Chinese herbal medication. Methods: We investigated the antiproliferative effect of 2-methoxycinnamaldehyde (2-MCA, a constituent of the cortex of the plant, and the molecular biomarkers associated with tumorigenesis in human colorectal adenocarcinoma COLO 205 cells. Specifically, cell viability was evaluated by colorimetric assay; apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry and morphological analysis with bright field, acridine orange, and neutral red stainings, as well as comet assay; topoisomerase I activity was determined by assay based upon DNA relaxation and topoisomerase II by DNA relaxation plus decatentation of kinetoplast DNA; lysosomal vacuolation and volume of acidic compartments (VACs were determined by neutral red staining. Results: The results demonstrate that 2-MCA inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis as implicated by mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm loss, activation of both caspase-3 and -9, increase of annexin V+PI+ cells, as well as morphological characteristics of apoptosis. Furthermore, 2-MCA also induced lysosomal vacuolation with elevated VAC, cytotoxicity, and inhibitions of topoisomerase I as well as II activities. Additional study demonstrated the antiproliferative effect of 2-MCA found in a nude mice model. Conclusions: Our data implicate that the antiproliferative activity of 2-MCA in vitro involved downregulation of cell growth markers, both topoisomerase I and II, and upregulation of pro-apoptotic molecules, associated with increased lysosomal vacuolation. In vivo 2-MCA reduced the tumor burden that could have significant clinical impact. Indeed, similar effects were found in other tested cell lines, including human hepatocellular carcinoma SK-Hep-1 and Hep 3B, lung adenocarcinoma A549 and squamous cell carcinoma NCI-H520, and T-lymphoblastic MOLT-3 (results not shown. Our data implicate

  1. Dual Inhibition of Topoisomerase II and Tyrosine Kinases by the Novel Bis-Fluoroquinolone Chalcone-Like Derivative HMNE3 in Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yong-Chao; Wang, Zhi-Xin; Jin, Shao-Ju; Zhang, Yan-Xin; Hu, Guo-Qiang; Cui, Dong-Tao; Wang, Jiang-Shuan; Wang, Min; Wang, Fu-Qing; Zhao, Zhi-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Both tyrosine kinase and topoisomerase II (TopII) are important anticancer targets, and their respective inhibitors are widely used in cancer therapy. However, some combinations of anticancer drugs could exhibit mutually antagonistic actions and drug resistance, which further limit their therapeutic efficacy. Here, we report that HMNE3, a novel bis-fluoroquinolone chalcone-like derivative that targets both tyrosine kinase and TopII, induces tumor cell proliferation and growth inhibition. The viabilities of 6 different cancer cell lines treated with a range of HMNE3 doses were detected using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Cellular apoptosis was determined using Hoechst 33258 fluorescence staining and the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay. The expression of activated Caspase-3 was examined by immunocytochemistry. The tyrosine kinase activity was measured with a human receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) detection kit using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated phosphotyrosine (pY20) antibody as the substrate. The topoisomerase II activity was measured using agarose gel electrophoresis with the DNA plasmid pBR322 as the substrate. The expression levels of the P53, Bax, Bcl-2, Caspase-3, -8, -9, p-cSrc, c-Src and topoisomerase II proteins were detected by western blot analysis. The proliferation of five of the six cancer cell lines was significantly inhibited by HMNE3 at 0.312 to 10 μmol/L in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Treatment of the Capan-1 and Panc-1 cells with 1.6 to 3.2 μM HMNE3 for 48 h significantly increased the percentage of apoptotic cells (Ptopoisomerase IIβ activity was noted following treatment with HMNE3 for 24 h. Our data suggest that HMNE3 induced apoptosis in Capan-1 and Panc-1 cells by inhibiting the activity of both tyrosine kinases and topoisomerase II.

  2. Conversion of DNA gyrase into a conventional type II topoisomerase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampranis, S C; Maxwell, A

    1996-01-01

    -dependent manner. Novobiocin, a competitive inhibitor of ATP binding by gyrase, inhibits this reaction. The truncated enzyme, unlike gyrase, does not introduce a right-handed wrap when bound to DNA and stabilizes DNA crossovers; characteristics reminiscent of conventional type II topoisomerases. This new enzyme...

  3. A novel filarial topoisomerase II inhibitor produced by native isolate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A novel inhibitor of filarial topoisomerase II was isolated from the culture filtrate of native isolate Micrococcus luteus B1252. The methanolic extract of the cell pellet was partially purified by silica column chromatography and preparative high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The active fraction obtained from HPLC ...

  4. Targeting Mycobacterium tuberculosis topoisomerase I by small-molecule inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbole, Adwait Anand; Ahmed, Wareed; Bhat, Rajeshwari Subray; Bradley, Erin K; Ekins, Sean; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2015-03-01

    We describe inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis topoisomerase I (MttopoI), an essential mycobacterial enzyme, by two related compounds, imipramine and norclomipramine, of which imipramine is clinically used as an antidepressant. These molecules showed growth inhibition of both Mycobacterium smegmatis and M. tuberculosis cells. The mechanism of action of these two molecules was investigated by analyzing the individual steps of the topoisomerase I (topoI) reaction cycle. The compounds stimulated cleavage, thereby perturbing the cleavage-religation equilibrium. Consequently, these molecules inhibited the growth of the cells overexpressing topoI at a low MIC. Docking of the molecules on the MttopoI model suggested that they bind near the metal binding site of the enzyme. The DNA relaxation activity of the metal binding mutants harboring mutations in the DxDxE motif was differentially affected by the molecules, suggesting that the metal coordinating residues contribute to the interaction of the enzyme with the drug. Taken together, the results highlight the potential of these small molecules, which poison the M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis topoisomerase I, as leads for the development of improved molecules to combat mycobacterial infections. Moreover, targeting metal coordination in topoisomerases might be a general strategy to develop new lead molecules. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Topoisomerase II poisoning by indazole and imidazole complexes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... compounds. This is because they could be effective lead candidates for the development of more potent and less toxic ruthenium containing topoisomerase II poisons. Specificity of action on this molecular target may reduce the toxic effects of these ruthenium-containing molecules and thus improve their therapeutic index.

  6. Immunosuppressive effects of apoptotic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voll, Reinhard E.; Herrmann, Martin; Roth, Edith A.; Stach, Christian; Kalden, Joachim R.; Girkontaite, Irute

    1997-11-01

    Apoptotic cell death is important in the development and homeostasis of multicellular organisms and is a highly controlled means of eliminating dangerous, damaged or unnecessary cells without causing an inflammatory response or tissue damage,. We now show that the presence of apoptotic cells during monocyte activation increases their secretion of the anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokine interleukin 10 (IL-10) and decreases secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), IL-1 and IL-12. This may inhibit inflammation and contribute to impaired cell-mediated immunity in conditions associated with increased apoptosis, such as viral infections, pregnancy, cancer and exposure to radiation.

  7. Induction of apoptosis in cholangiocarcinoma by an andrographolide analogue is mediated through topoisomerase II alpha inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nateewattana, Jintapat; Dutta, Suman; Reabroi, Somrudee; Saeeng, Rungnapha; Kasemsook, Sakkasem; Chairoungdua, Arthit; Weerachayaphorn, Jittima; Wongkham, Sopit; Piyachaturawat, Pawinee

    2014-01-15

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA), the common primary malignant tumor of bile duct epithelial cells, is unresponsive to most chemotherapeutic drugs. Diagnosis with CCA has a poor prognosis, and therefore urgently requires effective therapeutic agents. In the present study we investigated anti-cancer effects of andrographolide analogue 3A.1 (19-tert-butyldiphenylsilyl-8, 17-epoxy andrographolide) and its mechanism in human CCA cell line KKU-M213 derived from a Thai CCA patient. By 24h after exposure, the analogue 3A.1 exhibited a potent cytotoxic effect on KKU-M213 cells with an inhibition concentration 50 (IC50) of approximately 8.0µM. Analogue 3A.1 suppressed DNA topoisomerase II α (Topo II α) protein expression, arrested the cell cycle at sub G0/G1 phase, induced cleavage of DNA repair protein poly (ADP-ribose) polymerases-1 (PARP-1), and enhanced expression of tumor suppressor protein p53 and pro-apoptotic protein Bax. In addition, analogue 3A.1 induced caspase 3 activity and inhibited cyclin D1, CDK6, and COX-2 protein expression. These results suggest that andrographolide analogue 3A.1, a novel topo II inhibitor, has significant potential to be developed as a new anticancer agent for the treatment of CCA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. RNA topoisomerase is prevalent in all domains of life and associates with polyribosomes in animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Muzammil; Xue, Yutong; Lee, Seung Kyu; Martindale, Jennifer L.; Shen, Weiping; Li, Wen; Zou, Sige; Ciaramella, Maria; Debat, Hélène; Nadal, Marc; Leng, Fenfei; Zhang, Hongliang; Wang, Quan; Siaw, Grace Ee-Lu; Niu, Hengyao; Pommier, Yves; Gorospe, Myriam; Hsieh, Tao-Shih; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching; Xu, Dongyi; Wang, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    DNA Topoisomerases are essential to resolve topological problems during DNA metabolism in all species. However, the prevalence and function of RNA topoisomerases remain uncertain. Here, we show that RNA topoisomerase activity is prevalent in Type IA topoisomerases from bacteria, archaea, and eukarya. Moreover, this activity always requires the conserved Type IA core domains and the same catalytic residue used in DNA topoisomerase reaction; however, it does not absolutely require the non-conserved carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD), which is necessary for relaxation reactions of supercoiled DNA. The RNA topoisomerase activity of human Top3β differs from that of Escherichia coli topoisomerase I in that the former but not the latter requires the CTD, indicating that topoisomerases have developed distinct mechanisms during evolution to catalyze RNA topoisomerase reactions. Notably, Top3β proteins from several animals associate with polyribosomes, which are units of mRNA translation, whereas the Top3 homologs from E. coli and yeast lack the association. The Top3β-polyribosome association requires TDRD3, which directly interacts with Top3β and is present in animals but not bacteria or yeast. We propose that RNA topoisomerases arose in the early RNA world, and that they are retained through all domains of DNA-based life, where they mediate mRNA translation as part of polyribosomes in animals. PMID:27257063

  9. Dynamic Effects of Topoisomerase I Inhibition on R-Loops and Short Transcripts at Active Promoters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Marinello

    Full Text Available Topoisomerase I-DNA-cleavage complexes (Top1cc stabilized by camptothecin (CPT have specific effects at transcriptional levels. We recently reported that Top1cc increase antisense transcript (aRNAs levels at divergent CpG-island promoters and, transiently, DNA/RNA hybrids (R-loop in nuclear and mitochondrial genomes of colon cancer HCT116 cells. However, the relationship between R-loops and aRNAs was not established. Here, we show that aRNAs can form R-loops in N-TERA-2 cells under physiological conditions, and that promoter-associated R-loops are somewhat increased and extended in length immediately upon cell exposure to CPT. In contrast, persistent Top1ccs reduce the majority of R-loops suggesting that CPT-accumulated aRNAs are not commonly involved in R-loops. The enhancement of aRNAs by Top1ccs is present both in human colon cancer HCT116 cells and WI38 fibroblasts suggesting a common response of cancer and normal cells. Although Top1ccs lead to DSB and DDR kinases activation, we do not detect a dependence of aRNA accumulation on ATM or DNA-PK activation. However, we showed that the cell response to persistent Top1ccs can involve an impairment of aRNA turnover rather than a higher synthesis rate. Finally, a genome-wide analysis shows that persistent Top1ccs also determine an accumulation of sense transcripts at 5'-end gene regions suggesting an increased occurrence of truncated transcripts. Taken together, the results indicate that Top1 may regulate transcription initiation by modulating RNA polymerase-generated negative supercoils, which can in turn favor R-loop formation at promoters, and that transcript accumulation at TSS is a response to persistent transcriptional stress by Top1 poisoning.

  10. Identification of a minimal functional linker in human topoisomerase I by domain swapping with Cre recombinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Rikke Frøhlich; Juul, Sissel; Vinther, Maria

    2008-01-01

    . In this study we replace 86 amino acids including the linker domain of the cellular type IB topoisomerase, human topoisomerase I, with four, six, or eight amino acids from the corresponding short loop region in Cre recombinase. In vitro characterization of the resulting chimeras, denoted Cropos, reveals...... that six amino acids from the Cre linker loop constitute the minimal length of a functional linker in human topoisomerase I....

  11. Dual Inhibition of Topoisomerase II and Tyrosine Kinases by the Novel Bis-Fluoroquinolone Chalcone-Like Derivative HMNE3 in Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Chao Ma

    Full Text Available Both tyrosine kinase and topoisomerase II (TopII are important anticancer targets, and their respective inhibitors are widely used in cancer therapy. However, some combinations of anticancer drugs could exhibit mutually antagonistic actions and drug resistance, which further limit their therapeutic efficacy. Here, we report that HMNE3, a novel bis-fluoroquinolone chalcone-like derivative that targets both tyrosine kinase and TopII, induces tumor cell proliferation and growth inhibition. The viabilities of 6 different cancer cell lines treated with a range of HMNE3 doses were detected using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. Cellular apoptosis was determined using Hoechst 33258 fluorescence staining and the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL assay. The expression of activated Caspase-3 was examined by immunocytochemistry. The tyrosine kinase activity was measured with a human receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK detection kit using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP-conjugated phosphotyrosine (pY20 antibody as the substrate. The topoisomerase II activity was measured using agarose gel electrophoresis with the DNA plasmid pBR322 as the substrate. The expression levels of the P53, Bax, Bcl-2, Caspase-3, -8, -9, p-cSrc, c-Src and topoisomerase II proteins were detected by western blot analysis. The proliferation of five of the six cancer cell lines was significantly inhibited by HMNE3 at 0.312 to 10 μmol/L in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Treatment of the Capan-1 and Panc-1 cells with 1.6 to 3.2 μM HMNE3 for 48 h significantly increased the percentage of apoptotic cells (P<0.05, and this effect was accompanied by a decrease in tyrosine kinase activity. HMNE3 potentially inhibited tyrosine kinase activity in vitro with an IC50 value of 0.64±0.34 μmol/L in Capan-1 cells and 3.1±0.86 μmol/L in Panc-1 cells. The activity of c-Src was significantly inhibited by HMNE3 in a dose

  12. Developing T lymphocytes are uniquely sensitive to a lack of topoisomerase III alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mönnich, Maren; Hess, Isabell; Wiest, Waltraud

    2010-01-01

    All organisms possess at least one type IA DNA topoisomerase. These topoisomerases function as part of a DNA structure-specific "dissolvasome," also known as the RTR complex, which has critical functions in faithful DNA replication, recombination, and chromosome segregation. In humans, the hetero......All organisms possess at least one type IA DNA topoisomerase. These topoisomerases function as part of a DNA structure-specific "dissolvasome," also known as the RTR complex, which has critical functions in faithful DNA replication, recombination, and chromosome segregation. In humans...

  13. Dual-Acting Histone Deacetylase-Topoisomerase I Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrant, William; Patil, Vishal; Canzoneri, Joshua C.; Yao, Li-Pan; Hood, Rebecca; Oyelere, Adegboyega K.

    2013-01-01

    Current chemotherapy regimens are comprised mostly of single-target drugs which are often plagued by toxic side effects and resistance development. A pharmacological strategy for circumventing these drawbacks could involve designing multivalent ligands that can modulate multiple targets while avoiding the toxicity of a single-targeted agent. Two attractive targets, histone deacetylase (HDAC) and topoisomerase I (Topo I), are cellular modulators that can broadly arrest cancer proliferation through a range of downstream effects. Both are clinically validated targets with multiple inhibitors in therapeutic use. We describe herein the design and synthesis of dual-acting histone deacetylase-topoisomerase I inhibitors. We also show that these dual-acting agents retain activity against HDAC and Topo I, and potently arrest cancer proliferation. PMID:23622981

  14. DNA topoisomerase II enzyme activity appears in mouse sperm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-22

    Aug 22, 2011 ... Sperm suspensions of 4 male mice (A, B, C and D), having an initial motility grade of 3.5 were used to examine the presence of DNA topoisomerase II (top 2) activity in sperm heads. The initial percentage motile of male A was 75%, male B was 80%, male C was 70% and male D was 60%. Top 2 activity was.

  15. Dual-Acting Histone Deacetylase-Topoisomerase I Inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Guerrant, William; Patil, Vishal; Canzoneri, Joshua C.; Yao, Li-Pan; Hood, Rebecca; Oyelere, Adegboyega K.

    2013-01-01

    Current chemotherapy regimens are comprised mostly of single-target drugs which are often plagued by toxic side effects and resistance development. A pharmacological strategy for circumventing these drawbacks could involve designing multivalent ligands that can modulate multiple targets while avoiding the toxicity of a single-targeted agent. Two attractive targets, histone deacetylase (HDAC) and topoisomerase I (Topo I), are cellular modulators that can broadly arrest cancer proliferation thr...

  16. DNA topoisomerases participate in fragility of the oncogene RET.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura W Dillon

    Full Text Available Fragile site breakage was previously shown to result in rearrangement of the RET oncogene, resembling the rearrangements found in thyroid cancer. Common fragile sites are specific regions of the genome with a high susceptibility to DNA breakage under conditions that partially inhibit DNA replication, and often coincide with genes deleted, amplified, or rearranged in cancer. While a substantial amount of work has been performed investigating DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint proteins vital for maintaining stability at fragile sites, little is known about the initial events leading to DNA breakage at these sites. The purpose of this study was to investigate these initial events through the detection of aphidicolin (APH-induced DNA breakage within the RET oncogene, in which 144 APH-induced DNA breakpoints were mapped on the nucleotide level in human thyroid cells within intron 11 of RET, the breakpoint cluster region found in patients. These breakpoints were located at or near DNA topoisomerase I and/or II predicted cleavage sites, as well as at DNA secondary structural features recognized and preferentially cleaved by DNA topoisomerases I and II. Co-treatment of thyroid cells with APH and the topoisomerase catalytic inhibitors, betulinic acid and merbarone, significantly decreased APH-induced fragile site breakage within RET intron 11 and within the common fragile site FRA3B. These data demonstrate that DNA topoisomerases I and II are involved in initiating APH-induced common fragile site breakage at RET, and may engage the recognition of DNA secondary structures formed during perturbed DNA replication.

  17. DNA topoisomerase II enzyme activity appears in mouse sperm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sperm suspensions of 4 male mice (A, B, C and D), having an initial motility grade of 3.5 were used to examine the presence of DNA topoisomerase II (top 2) activity in sperm heads. The initial percentage motile of male A was 75%, male B was 80%, male C was 70% and male D was 60%. Top 2 activity was examined by ...

  18. Inhibition of Zn(II binding type IA topoisomerases by organomercury compounds and Hg(II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bokun Cheng

    Full Text Available Type IA topoisomerase activities are essential for resolving DNA topological barriers via an enzyme-mediated transient single strand DNA break. Accumulation of topoisomerase DNA cleavage product can lead to cell death or genomic rearrangement. Many antibacterial and anticancer drugs act as topoisomerase poison inhibitors that form stabilized ternary complexes with the topoisomerase covalent intermediate, so it is desirable to identify such inhibitors for type IA topoisomerases. Here we report that organomercury compounds were identified during a fluorescence based screening of the NIH diversity set of small molecules for topoisomerase inhibitors that can increase the DNA cleavage product of Yersinia pestis topoisomerase I. Inhibition of relaxation activity and accumulation of DNA cleavage product were confirmed for these organomercury compounds in gel based assays of Escherichia coli topoisomerase I. Hg(II, but not As(III, could also target the cysteines that form the multiple Zn(II binding tetra-cysteine motifs found in the C-terminal domains of these bacterial topoisomerase I for relaxation activity inhibition. Mycobacterium tuberculosis topoisomerase I activity is not sensitive to Hg(II or the organomercury compounds due to the absence of the Zn(II binding cysteines. It is significant that the type IA topoisomerases with Zn(II binding domains can still cleave DNA when interfered by Hg(II or organomercury compounds. The Zn(II binding domains found in human Top3α and Top3β may be potential targets of toxic metals and organometallic complexes, with potential consequence on genomic stability and development.

  19. Effects of Olive Metabolites on DNA Cleavage Mediated by Human Type II Topoisomerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vann, Kendra R; Sedgeman, Carl A; Gopas, Jacob; Golan-Goldhirsh, Avi; Osheroff, Neil

    2015-07-28

    Several naturally occurring dietary polyphenols with chemopreventive or anticancer properties are topoisomerase II poisons. To identify additional phytochemicals that enhance topoisomerase II-mediated DNA cleavage, a library of 341 Mediterranean plant extracts was screened for activity against human topoisomerase IIα. An extract from Phillyrea latifolia L., a member of the olive tree family, displayed high activity against the human enzyme. On the basis of previous metabolomics studies, we identified several polyphenols (hydroxytyrosol, oleuropein, verbascoside, tyrosol, and caffeic acid) as potential candidates for topoisomerase II poisons. Of these, hydroxytyrosol, oleuropein, and verbascoside enhanced topoisomerase II-mediated DNA cleavage. The potency of these olive metabolites increased 10-100-fold in the presence of an oxidant. Hydroxytyrosol, oleuropein, and verbascoside displayed hallmark characteristics of covalent topoisomerase II poisons. (1) The activity of the metabolites was abrogated by a reducing agent. (2) Compounds inhibited topoisomerase II activity when they were incubated with the enzyme prior to the addition of DNA. (3) Compounds were unable to poison a topoisomerase IIα construct that lacked the N-terminal domain. Because hydroxytyrosol, oleuropein, and verbascoside are broadly distributed across the olive family, extracts from the leaves, bark, and fruit of 11 olive tree species were tested for activity against human topoisomerase IIα. Several of the extracts enhanced enzyme-mediated DNA cleavage. Finally, a commercial olive leaf supplement and extra virgin olive oils pressed from a variety of Olea europea subspecies enhanced DNA cleavage mediated by topoisomerase IIα. Thus, olive metabolites appear to act as topoisomerase II poisons in complex formulations intended for human dietary consumption.

  20. Effects of Olive Metabolites on DNA Cleavage Mediated by Human Type II Topoisomerases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Several naturally occurring dietary polyphenols with chemopreventive or anticancer properties are topoisomerase II poisons. To identify additional phytochemicals that enhance topoisomerase II-mediated DNA cleavage, a library of 341 Mediterranean plant extracts was screened for activity against human topoisomerase IIα. An extract from Phillyrea latifolia L., a member of the olive tree family, displayed high activity against the human enzyme. On the basis of previous metabolomics studies, we identified several polyphenols (hydroxytyrosol, oleuropein, verbascoside, tyrosol, and caffeic acid) as potential candidates for topoisomerase II poisons. Of these, hydroxytyrosol, oleuropein, and verbascoside enhanced topoisomerase II-mediated DNA cleavage. The potency of these olive metabolites increased 10–100-fold in the presence of an oxidant. Hydroxytyrosol, oleuropein, and verbascoside displayed hallmark characteristics of covalent topoisomerase II poisons. (1) The activity of the metabolites was abrogated by a reducing agent. (2) Compounds inhibited topoisomerase II activity when they were incubated with the enzyme prior to the addition of DNA. (3) Compounds were unable to poison a topoisomerase IIα construct that lacked the N-terminal domain. Because hydroxytyrosol, oleuropein, and verbascoside are broadly distributed across the olive family, extracts from the leaves, bark, and fruit of 11 olive tree species were tested for activity against human topoisomerase IIα. Several of the extracts enhanced enzyme-mediated DNA cleavage. Finally, a commercial olive leaf supplement and extra virgin olive oils pressed from a variety of Olea europea subspecies enhanced DNA cleavage mediated by topoisomerase IIα. Thus, olive metabolites appear to act as topoisomerase II poisons in complex formulations intended for human dietary consumption. PMID:26132160

  1. Maternal topoisomerase II alpha, not topoisomerase II beta, enables embryonic development of zebrafish top2a-/- mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapetto-Rebow Beata

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic alterations in human topoisomerase II alpha (TOP2A are linked to cancer susceptibility. TOP2A decatenates chromosomes and thus is necessary for multiple aspects of cell division including DNA replication, chromosome condensation and segregation. Topoisomerase II alpha is also required for embryonic development in mammals, as mouse Top2a knockouts result in embryonic lethality as early as the 4-8 cell stage. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the extended developmental capability of zebrafish top2a mutants arises from maternal expression of top2a or compensation from its top2b paralogue. Results Here, we describe bloody minded (blm, a novel mutant of zebrafish top2a. In contrast to mouse Top2a nulls, zebrafish top2a mutants survive to larval stages (4-5 day post fertilization. Developmental analyses demonstrate abundant expression of maternal top2a but not top2b. Inhibition or poisoning of maternal topoisomerase II delays embryonic development by extending the cell cycle M-phase. Zygotic top2a and top2b are co-expressed in the zebrafish CNS, but endogenous or ectopic top2b RNA appear unable to prevent the blm phenotype. Conclusions We conclude that maternal top2a enables zebrafish development before the mid-zygotic transition (MZT and that zebrafish top2a and top2b are not functionally redundant during development after activation of the zygotic genome.

  2. Maternal topoisomerase II alpha, not topoisomerase II beta, enables embryonic development of zebrafish top2a-/- mutants

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sapetto-Rebow, Beata

    2011-11-23

    Abstract Background Genetic alterations in human topoisomerase II alpha (TOP2A) are linked to cancer susceptibility. TOP2A decatenates chromosomes and thus is necessary for multiple aspects of cell division including DNA replication, chromosome condensation and segregation. Topoisomerase II alpha is also required for embryonic development in mammals, as mouse Top2a knockouts result in embryonic lethality as early as the 4-8 cell stage. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the extended developmental capability of zebrafish top2a mutants arises from maternal expression of top2a or compensation from its top2b paralogue. Results Here, we describe bloody minded (blm), a novel mutant of zebrafish top2a. In contrast to mouse Top2a nulls, zebrafish top2a mutants survive to larval stages (4-5 day post fertilization). Developmental analyses demonstrate abundant expression of maternal top2a but not top2b. Inhibition or poisoning of maternal topoisomerase II delays embryonic development by extending the cell cycle M-phase. Zygotic top2a and top2b are co-expressed in the zebrafish CNS, but endogenous or ectopic top2b RNA appear unable to prevent the blm phenotype. Conclusions We conclude that maternal top2a enables zebrafish development before the mid-zygotic transition (MZT) and that zebrafish top2a and top2b are not functionally redundant during development after activation of the zygotic genome.

  3. Toxicological evaluation of the topoisomerase inhibitor, etoposide, in the model animal Caenorhabditis elegans and 3T3-L1 normal murine cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, So Young; Kim, Joo Yeon; Jung, Yu-Jin; Kang, Kyungsu

    2017-06-01

    Etoposide, a topoisomerase II inhibitor, has been widely used as a clinical anticancer drug to treat diverse cancer patients. Since not only rapidly dividing cancer cells but also the cells of normal human tissues and every living organism in environmental ecosystems have topoisomerases, it is crucial to study the toxicity of etoposide in other organisms in addition to cancer cells. In this study, we evaluated the toxicity of etoposide in both a soil nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, and 3T3-L1 normal murine cells. Etoposide significantly retarded the growth, egg laying, and hatching in C. elegans. Etoposide also affected the reproductive gonad tissue, decreased the number of germ cells and induced abnormally enlarged nuclei in C. elegans. In addition, etoposide inhibited 3T3-L1 cell proliferation, with IC 50 values of 37.8 ± 7.3 and 9.8 ± 1.8 μM after 24 and 48 hours of treatment, respectively, via the induction of cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase and apoptotic cell death. Etoposide also induced nuclear enlargement in 3T3-L1 normal murine cells. The reproductive toxicity and abnormal nuclear morphological changes seemed to correlate with the adverse effects of etoposide. We suggest that these experimental platforms, i.e., the toxicological evaluation of both nematodes and 3T3-L1 cells, may be useful to study the mechanisms underlying the side effects of chemicals, including topoisomerase inhibitors. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Bacterial topoisomerase I as a target for discovery of antibacterial compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2009-02-01

    Bacterial topoisomerase I is a potential target for discovery of new antibacterial compounds. Mutant topoisomerases identified by SOS induction screening demonstrated that accumulation of the DNA cleavage complex formed by type IA topoisomerases is bactericidal. Characterization of these mutants of Yersinia pestis and Escherichia coli topoisomerase I showed that DNA religation can be inhibited while maintaining DNA cleavage activity by decreasing the binding affinity of Mg(II) ions. This can be accomplished either by mutation of the TOPRIM motif involved directly in Mg(II) binding or by altering the charge distribution of the active site region. Besides being used to elucidate the key elements for the control of the cleavage-religation equilibrium, the SOS-inducing mutants of Y. pestis and E. coli topoisomerase I have also been utilized as models to study the cellular response following the accumulation of bacterial topoisomerase I cleavage complex. Bacterial topoisomerase I is required for preventing hypernegative supercoiling of DNA during transcription. It plays an important role in transcription of stress genes during bacterial stress response. Topoisomerase I targeting poisons may be particularly effective when the bacterial pathogen is responding to host defense, or in the presence of other antibiotics that induce the bacterial stress response.

  5. Synthesis and antibacterial evaluation of anziaic acid and analogues as topoisomerase I inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Hao; Annamalai, Thirunavukkarasu; Bansod, Priyanka; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching; Sun, Dianqing

    2013-01-01

    Naturally occurring anziaic acid was very recently reported as a topoisomerase I inhibitor with antibacterial activity. Herein total synthesis of anziaic acid and structural analogues is described and the preliminary structure-activity relationship (SAR) has been developed based on topoisomerase inhibition and whole cell antibacterial activity.

  6. SOS Induction by Stabilized Topoisomerase IA Cleavage Complex Occurs via the RecBCD Pathway▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Sutherland, Jeanette H.; Cheng, Bokun; Liu, I-Fen; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2008-01-01

    Accumulation of mutant topoisomerase I cleavage complex can lead to SOS induction and cell death in Escherichia coli. The single-stranded break associated with mutant topoisomerase I cleavage complex is converted to double-stranded break, which then is processed by the RecBCD pathway, followed by association of RecA with the single-stranded DNA.

  7. The RNA splicing factor ASF/SF2 inhibits human topoisomerase I mediated DNA relaxation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Félicie Faucon; Tange, Thomas Ø.; Sinnathamby, Thayaline

    2002-01-01

    Human topoisomerase I interacts with and phosphorylates the SR-family of RNA splicing factors, including ASF/SF2, and has been suggested to play an important role in the regulation of RNA splicing. Here we present evidence to support the theory that the regulation can go the other way around...... mutants of the two proteins to interact directly, suggesting that an interaction between the RS-domain of ASF/SF2 and a region between amino acid residues 208-735 on topoisomerase I accounts for the observed effect. Consistently, phosphorylation of the RS-domain with either topoisomerase I or a human cell...... extract reduced the inhibition of relaxation activity. Taken together with the previously published studies of the topoisomerase I kinase activity, these observations suggest that topoisomerase I activity is shifted from relaxation to kinasing by specific interaction with SR-splicing factors....

  8. Voreloxin is an anticancer quinolone derivative that intercalates DNA and poisons topoisomerase II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael E Hawtin

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Topoisomerase II is critical for DNA replication, transcription and chromosome segregation and is a well validated target of anti-neoplastic drugs including the anthracyclines and epipodophyllotoxins. However, these drugs are limited by common tumor resistance mechanisms and side-effect profiles. Novel topoisomerase II-targeting agents may benefit patients who prove resistant to currently available topoisomerase II-targeting drugs or encounter unacceptable toxicities. Voreloxin is an anticancer quinolone derivative, a chemical scaffold not used previously for cancer treatment. Voreloxin is completing Phase 2 clinical trials in acute myeloid leukemia and platinum-resistant ovarian cancer. This study defined voreloxin's anticancer mechanism of action as a critical component of rational clinical development informed by translational research.Biochemical and cell-based studies established that voreloxin intercalates DNA and poisons topoisomerase II, causing DNA double-strand breaks, G2 arrest, and apoptosis. Voreloxin is differentiated both structurally and mechanistically from other topoisomerase II poisons currently in use as chemotherapeutics. In cell-based studies, voreloxin poisoned topoisomerase II and caused dose-dependent, site-selective DNA fragmentation analogous to that of quinolone antibacterials in prokaryotes; in contrast etoposide, the nonintercalating epipodophyllotoxin topoisomerase II poison, caused extensive DNA fragmentation. Etoposide's activity was highly dependent on topoisomerase II while voreloxin and the intercalating anthracycline topoisomerase II poison, doxorubicin, had comparable dependence on this enzyme for inducing G2 arrest. Mechanistic interrogation with voreloxin analogs revealed that intercalation is required for voreloxin's activity; a nonintercalating analog did not inhibit proliferation or induce G2 arrest, while an analog with enhanced intercalation was 9.5-fold more potent.As a first-in-class anticancer

  9. Regulation of Xenopus laevis DNA topoisomerase I activity by phosphorylation in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiserman, H.B.; Ingebritsen, T.S.; Benbow, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    DNA topoisomerase I has been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from ovaries of the frog Xenopus laevis. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the most purified fraction revealed a single major band at 110 kDa and less abundant minor bands centered at 62 kDa. Incubation of the most purified fraction with immobilized calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase abolished all DNA topoisomerase enzymatic activity in a time-dependent reaction. Treatment of the dephosphorylated X. laevis DNA topoisomerase I with a X. laevis casein kinase type II activity and ATP restored DNA topoisomerase activity to a level higher than that observed in the most purified fraction. In vitro labeling experiments which employed the most purified DNA topoisomerase I fraction, [γ- 32 P]ATP, and the casein kinase type II enzyme showed that both the 110- and 62-kDa bands became phosphorylated in approximately molar proportions. Phosphoamino acid analysis showed that only serine residues became phosphorylated. Phosphorylation was accompanied by an increase in DNA topoisomerase activity in vitro. Dephosphorylation of DNA topoisomerase I appears to block formation of the initial enzyme-substrate complex on the basis of the failure of the dephosphorylated enzyme to nick DNA in the presence of camptothecin. The authors conclude that X. laevis DNA topoisomerase I is partially phosphorylated as isolated and that this phosphorylation is essential for expression of enzymatic activity in vitro. On the basis of the ability of the casein kinase type II activity to reactivate dephosphorylated DNA topoisomerase I, they speculate that this kinase may contribute to the physiological regulation of DNA topoisomerase I activity

  10. Human topoisomerase IIIalpha is a single-stranded DNA decatenase that is stimulated by BLM and RMI1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Jay; Bachrati, Csanad Z; Ou, Jiongwen

    2010-01-01

    -passage mechanism. We generated single-stranded catenanes that resemble the proposed dissolution intermediate recognized by human topoisomerase IIIalpha. We demonstrate that human topoisomerase IIIalpha is a single-stranded DNA decatenase that is specifically stimulated by the BLM-RMI1 pair. In addition, RMI1......Human topoisomerase IIIalpha is a type IA DNA topoisomerase that functions with BLM and RMI1 to resolve DNA replication and recombination intermediates. BLM, human topoisomerase IIIalpha, and RMI1 catalyze the dissolution of double Holliday junctions into noncrossover products via a strand...

  11. Prospects for developing new antibacterials targeting bacterial type IIA topoisomerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomašić, Tihomir; Mašič, Lucija Peterlin

    2014-01-01

    The modulation of DNA topology by DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV, both of which are type IIA topoisomerases and found in most bacteria, is a function vital to DNA replication, repair and decatenation. Despite the potential for resistance development, DNA gyrase and/or topoisomerase IV have been proven to be and remain highly attractive targets in antibacterial drug discovery due to their potential for dual targeting. The search for new GyrA and/or ParC inhibitors that can overcome the increasing spread of multidrug-resistant bacteria has been successfully focused in the last decades on the modification of the known fluoroquinolone scaffold as primarily guided by ligand-based design via classical structure-activity relationship studies and the optimisation of physicochemical properties. This focus has resulted in several novel fluoroquinolones that have been introduced into clinical practice since 2000, and several of these new compounds are currently in different phases of clinical trials. Due to increasing resistance to fluoroquinolones, a significant part of DNA gyrase research has shifted to the discovery of new GyrB and/or ParE inhibitors, which are commonly identified through fragment-based design as well as virtual screening techniques and structure-based hit optimisation programs. This research often results in lead compounds with potent inhibitory activity and promising antibacterial activity profiles. Nevertheless, it is important to understand how different physicochemical properties (e.g., logD and total polar surface area) and different structural motifs influence the compounds' permeability to ensure the efficient discovery of potent, small-molecule antibacterials particularly against Gram-negative strains.

  12. Apoptotic engulfment pathway and schizophrenia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chen, Xiangning

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Apoptosis has been speculated to be involved in schizophrenia. In a previously study, we reported the association of the MEGF10 gene with the disease. In this study, we followed the apoptotic engulfment pathway involving the MEGF10, GULP1, ABCA1 and ABCA7 genes and tested their association with the disease. METHODOLOGY\\/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Ten, eleven and five SNPs were genotyped in the GULP1, ABCA1 and ABCA7 genes respectively for the ISHDSF and ICCSS samples. In all 3 genes, we observed nominally significant associations. Rs2004888 at GULP1 was significant in both ISHDSF and ICCSS samples (p = 0.0083 and 0.0437 respectively). We sought replication in independent samples for this marker and found highly significant association (p = 0.0003) in 3 Caucasian replication samples. But it was not significant in the 2 Chinese replication samples. In addition, we found a significant 2-marker (rs2242436 * rs3858075) interaction between the ABCA1 and ABCA7 genes in the ISHDSF sample (p = 0.0022) and a 3-marker interaction (rs246896 * rs4522565 * rs3858075) amongst the MEGF10, GULP1 and ABCA1 genes in the ICCSS sample (p = 0.0120). Rs3858075 in the ABCA1 gene was involved in both 2- and 3-marker interactions in the two samples. CONCLUSIONS\\/SIGNIFICANCE: From these data, we concluded that the GULP1 gene and the apoptotic engulfment pathway are involved in schizophrenia in subjects of European ancestry and multiple genes in the pathway may interactively increase the risks to the disease.

  13. Tackling the Cytotoxic Effect of a Marine Polycyclic Quinone-Type Metabolite: Halenaquinone Induces Molt 4 Cells Apoptosis via Oxidative Stress Combined with the Inhibition of HDAC and Topoisomerase Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shou-Ping Shih

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A marine polycyclic quinone-type metabolite, halenaquinone (HQ, was found to inhibit the proliferation of Molt 4, K562, MDA-MB-231 and DLD-1 cancer cell lines, with IC50 of 0.48, 0.18, 8.0 and 6.76 μg/mL, respectively. It exhibited the most potent activity against leukemia Molt 4 cells. Accumulating evidence showed that HQ may act as a potent protein kinase inhibitor in cancer therapy. To fully understand the mechanism of HQ, we further explored the precise molecular targets in leukemia Molt 4 cells. We found that the use of HQ increased apoptosis by 26.23%–70.27% and caused disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP by 17.15%–53.25% in a dose-dependent manner, as demonstrated by Annexin-V/PI and JC-1 staining assays, respectively. Moreover, our findings indicated that the pretreatment of Molt 4 cells with N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC, a reactive oxygen species (ROS scavenger, diminished MMP disruption and apoptosis induced by HQ, suggesting that ROS overproduction plays a crucial rule in the cytotoxic activity of HQ. The results of a cell-free system assay indicated that HQ could act as an HDAC and topoisomerase catalytic inhibitor through the inhibition of pan-HDAC and topoisomerase IIα expression, respectively. On the protein level, the expression of the anti-apoptotic proteins p-Akt, NFκB, HDAC and Bcl-2, as well as hexokinase II was inhibited by the use of HQ. On the other hand, the expression of the pro-apoptotic protein Bax, PARP cleavage, caspase activation and cytochrome c release were increased after HQ treatment. Taken together, our results suggested that the antileukemic effect of HQ is ROS-mediated mitochondrial apoptosis combined with the inhibitory effect on HDAC and topoisomerase activities.

  14. Identification of anziaic acid, a lichen depside from Hypotrachyna sp., as a new topoisomerase poison inhibitor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bokun Cheng

    Full Text Available Topoisomerase inhibitors are effective for antibacterial and anticancer therapy because they can lead to the accumulation of the intermediate DNA cleavage complex formed by the topoisomerase enzymes, which trigger cell death. Here we report the application of a novel enzyme-based high-throughput screening assay to identify natural product extracts that can lead to increased accumulation of the DNA cleavage complex formed by recombinant Yersinia pestis topoisomerase I as part of a larger effort to identify new antibacterial compounds. Further characterization and fractionation of the screening positives from the primary assay led to the discovery of a depside, anziaic acid, from the lichen Hypotrachyna sp. as an inhibitor for both Y. pestis and Escherichia coli topoisomerase I. In in vitro assays, anziaic acid exhibits antibacterial activity against Bacillus subtilis and a membrane permeable strain of E. coli. Anziaic acid was also found to act as an inhibitor of human topoisomerase II but had little effect on human topoisomerase I. This is the first report of a depside with activity as a topoisomerase poison inhibitor and demonstrates the potential of this class of natural products as a source for new antibacterial and anticancer compounds.

  15. Occurrence of [i]Leptospira[/i] DNA in water and soil samples collected in eastern Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelina Wójcik-Fatla

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available [i]Leptospira[/i] is an important re-emerging zoonotic human pathogen, disseminated by sick and carrier animals, water and soil. Weather calamities, such as flooding or cyclones favour the spreading of these bacteria. To check a potential role of natural water and soil in the persistence and spread of [i]Leptospira [/i]on the territory of eastern Poland, 40 samples of natural water and 40 samples of soil were collected from areas exposed to flooding, and 64 samples of natural water and 68 samples of soil were collected from areas not exposed to flooding. Samples of water were taken from various reservoirs (rivers, natural lakes, artificial lakes, canals, ponds, farm wells and samples of soils were taken at the distance of 1–3 meters from the edge of the reservoirs. The samples were examined for the presence of [i]Leptospira[/i] DNA by nested-PCR. Two out of 40 samples of water (5.0% collected from the area exposed to flooding showed the presence of [i]Leptospira[/i] DNA, while all 40 samples of soil from this area were negative. All samples of water and soil (64 and 68, respectively collected from the areas not exposed to flooding were negative. No significant difference were found between the results obtained in the areas exposed and not exposed to flooding. In conclusion, these results suggest that water and soil have only limited significance in the persistence and dissemination of [i]Leptospira[/i] in eastern Poland.

  16. Nitric oxide inhibits topoisomerase II activity and induces resistance to topoisomerase II-poisons in human tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashutosh; Ehrenshaft, Marilyn; Tokar, Erik J; Mason, Ronald P; Sinha, Birandra K

    2016-07-01

    Etoposide and doxorubicin, topoisomerase II poisons, are important drugs for the treatment of tumors in the clinic. Topoisomerases contain several free sulfhydryl groups which are important for their activity and are also potential targets for nitric oxide (NO)-induced nitrosation. NO, a physiological signaling molecule nitrosates many cellular proteins, causing altered protein and cellular functions. Here, we have evaluated the roles of NO/NO-derived species in the activity/stability of topo II both in vitro and in human tumor cells, and in the cytotoxicity of topo II-poisons, etoposide and doxorubicin. Treatment of purified topo IIα with propylamine propylamine nonoate (PPNO), an NO donor, resulted in inhibition of both the catalytic and relaxation activity in vitro, and decreased etoposide-dependent cleavable complex formation in both human HT-29 colon and MCF-7 breast cancer cells. PPNO treatment also induced significant nitrosation of topo IIα protein in these human tumor cells. These events, taken together, caused a significant resistance to etoposide in both cell lines. However, PPNO had no effect on doxorubicin-induced cleavable complex formation, or doxorubicin cytotoxicity in these cell lines. Inhibition of topo II function by NO/NO-derived species induces significant resistance to etoposide, without affecting doxorubicin cytotoxicity in human tumor cells. As tumors express inducible nitric oxide synthase and generate significant amounts of NO, modulation of topo II functions by NO/NO-derived species could render tumors resistant to certain topo II-poisons in the clinic. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Identification of proximal sites for unwound DNA substrate in E. coli topoisomerase I with oxidative crosslinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Bokun; Zhou, Qingxuan; Weng, Liwei; Leszyk, John D.; Greenberg, Marc M.; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerases catalyze changes in DNA topology by directing the movement of DNA strands through consecutive cleavage-rejoining reactions of the DNA backbone. We describe the use of a phenylselenyl-modified thymidine incorporated into a specific position of a partially unwound DNA substrate in crosslinking studies of Escherichia coli topoisomerase I to gain new insights into its catalytic mechanism. Crosslinking of the phenylselenyl-modified thymidine to the topoisomerase protein was achieved by the addition of a mild oxidant. Following nuclease and trypsin digestion, lysine residues on topoisomerase I crosslinked to the modified thymidine were identified by mass spectrometry. The crosslinked sites may correspond to proximal sites for the unwound DNA strand as it interacts with enzyme in the different stages of the catalytic cycle. PMID:27926785

  18. A mouse model for studying the interaction of bisdioxopiperazines with topoisomerase IIα in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grauslund, Morten; Vinding, Annemette; Füchtbauer, Annette C.

    2007-01-01

    The bisdioxopiperazines such as (+)-(S)-4,4′-propylenedi-2,6-piperazinedione (dexrazoxane; ICRF-187), 1,2-bis(3,5-dioxopiperazin-1-yl)ethane (ICRF-154), and 4,4′-(1,2-dimethyl-1,2-ethanediyl)bis-2,6-piperazinedione (ICRF-193) are agents that inhibit eukaryotic topoisomerase II, whereas their ring......-opened hydrolysis products are strong iron chelator. The clinically approved analog ICRF-187 is a pharmacological modulator of topoisomerase II poisons such as etoposide in preclinical animal models. ICRF-187 is also used to protect against anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy and has recently been approved...... their intracellular iron chelating activity. In an attempt to distinguish between these possibilities, we here present a transgenic mouse model aimed at identifying the contribution of topoisomerase IIα to the effects of bisdioxopiperazines. A tyrosine 165 to serine mutation (Y165S) in topoisomerase IIα, demonstrated...

  19. Distinct Mechanism Evolved for Mycobacterial RNA Polymerase and Topoisomerase I Protein-Protein Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banda, Srikanth; Cao, Nan; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2017-09-15

    We report here a distinct mechanism of interaction between topoisomerase I and RNA polymerase in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis that has evolved independently from the previously characterized interaction between bacterial topoisomerase I and RNA polymerase. Bacterial DNA topoisomerase I is responsible for preventing the hyper-negative supercoiling of genomic DNA. The association of topoisomerase I with RNA polymerase during transcription elongation could efficiently relieve transcription-driven negative supercoiling. Our results demonstrate a direct physical interaction between the C-terminal domains of topoisomerase I (TopoI-CTDs) and the β' subunit of RNA polymerase of M. smegmatis in the absence of DNA. The TopoI-CTDs in mycobacteria are evolutionarily unrelated in amino acid sequence and three-dimensional structure to the TopoI-CTD found in the majority of bacterial species outside Actinobacteria, including Escherichia coli. The functional interaction between topoisomerase I and RNA polymerase has evolved independently in mycobacteria and E. coli, with distinctively different structural elements of TopoI-CTD utilized for this protein-protein interaction. Zinc ribbon motifs in E. coli TopoI-CTD are involved in the interaction with RNA polymerase. For M. smegmatis TopoI-CTD, a 27-amino-acid tail that is rich in basic residues at the C-terminal end is responsible for the interaction with RNA polymerase. Overexpression of recombinant TopoI-CTD in M. smegmatis competed with the endogenous topoisomerase I for protein-protein interactions with RNA polymerase. The TopoI-CTD overexpression resulted in decreased survival following treatment with antibiotics and hydrogen peroxide, supporting the importance of the protein-protein interaction between topoisomerase I and RNA polymerase during stress response of mycobacteria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Metal ions and inter-domains interactions as functional networks in E. coli Topoisomerase I

    OpenAIRE

    Sissi, Claudia; Cheng, Bokun; Lombardo, Valentina; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching; Palumbo, Manlio

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli Topoisomerase I (EcTopoI) is a type IA bacterial topoisomerase which is receiving large attention due to its potential application as novel target for antibacterial therapeutics. Nevertheless, a detailed knowledge of its mechanism of action at molecular level is to some extent lacking. This is partly due to the requirement of several factors (metal ions, nucleic acid) to the proper progress of the enzyme catalytic cycle. Additionally, each of them can differently affect the p...

  1. Insights from the Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Topoisomerase I with a Novel Protein Fold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kemin; Cao, Nan; Cheng, Bokun; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2016-01-16

    The DNA topoisomerase I enzyme of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtTOP1) is essential for the viability of the organism and survival in a murine model. This topoisomerase is being pursued as a novel target for the discovery of new therapeutic agents for the treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis. In this study, we succeeded in obtaining a structure of MtTOP1 by first predicting that the C-terminal region of MtTOP1 contains four repeated domains that do not involve the Zn-binding tetracysteine motifs seen in the C-terminal domains of Escherichia coli topoisomerase I. A construct (amino acids A2-T704), MtTOP1-704t, that includes the N-terminal domains (D1-D4) and the first predicted C-terminal domain (D5) of MtTOP1 was expressed and found to retain DNA cleavage-religation activity and catalyze single-stranded DNA catenation. MtTOP1-704t was crystallized, and a structure of 2.52Å resolution limit was obtained. The structure of the MtTOP1 N-terminal domains has features that have not been observed in other previously available bacterial topoisomerase I crystal structures. The first C-terminal domain D5 forms a novel protein fold of a four-stranded antiparallel β-sheet stabilized by a crossing-over α-helix. Since there is only one type IA topoisomerase present in Mycobacteriaceae and related Actinobacteria, this subfamily of type IA topoisomerase may be required for multiple functions in DNA replication, transcription, recombination, and repair. The unique structural features observed for MtTOP1 may allow these topoisomerase I enzymes to carry out physiological functions associated with topoisomerase III enzyme in other bacteria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Anucleate Cell Blue Assay: a Useful Tool for Identifying Novel Type II Topoisomerase Inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Oyamada, Yoshihiro; Ito, Hideaki; Fujimoto-Nakamura, Mika; Tanitame, Akihiko; Iwai, Noritaka; Nagai, Kazuo; Yamagishi, Jun-ichi; Wachi, Masaaki

    2006-01-01

    About 95,000 compounds were screened by the anucleate cell blue assay. Fifty-one of the hit compounds had various structures and showed inhibitory activity against DNA gyrase and/or topoisomerase IV. Moreover, the compounds exhibited antibacterial activity against a fluoroquinolone- and novobiocin-resistant strain of Staphylococcus aureus. The anucleate cell blue assay is therefore a useful tool for finding novel type II topoisomerase inhibitors.

  3. Structural insight into the quinolone-DNA cleavage complex of type IIA topoisomerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laponogov, Ivan; Sohi, Maninder K; Veselkov, Dennis A; Pan, Xiao-Su; Sawhney, Ritica; Thompson, Andrew W; McAuley, Katherine E; Fisher, L Mark; Sanderson, Mark R

    2009-06-01

    Type II topoisomerases alter DNA topology by forming a covalent DNA-cleavage complex that allows DNA transport through a double-stranded DNA break. We present the structures of cleavage complexes formed by the Streptococcus pneumoniae ParC breakage-reunion and ParE TOPRIM domains of topoisomerase IV stabilized by moxifloxacin and clinafloxacin, two antipneumococcal fluoroquinolones. These structures reveal two drug molecules intercalated at the highly bent DNA gate and help explain antibacterial quinolone action and resistance.

  4. Direct control of type IIA topoisomerase activity by a chromosomally encoded regulatory protein

    OpenAIRE

    Vos, Seychelle M.; Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Hershey, David M.; Schoeffler, Allyn J.; Sengupta, Sugopa; Nagaraja, Valakunja; Berger, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Topoisomerases are central regulators of DNA supercoiling; how these enzymes are regulated to suit specific cellular needs is poorly understood. Vos et al. now report the structure of E. coli gyrase, a type IIA topoisomerase bound to an inhibitor, YacG. YacG represses gyrase through steric occlusion of its DNA-binding site. Further studies show that YacG engages two spatially segregated regions associated with small-molecule inhibitor interactions—fluoroquinolone antibiotics and a gyrase agon...

  5. [Isolation and partial characterization of DNA topoisomerase I from the nucleoids of white mustard chloroplasts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkina, G G; Pogul'skaia, E V; Iurina, N P

    2004-01-01

    DNA topoisomerase was isolated for the first time from nucleoids of white mustard (Sinapis alba L.) chloroplasts. The enzyme had a molecular weight of 70 kDa; it was ATP-independent, required the presence of mono- (K+) and bivalent (Mg2+) cations, and was capable of relaxing both negatively and positively supercoiled DNA. These results suggest that the enzyme isolated belongs to type IB DNA topoisomerases.

  6. Insights from the Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Topoisomerase I with a Novel Protein Fold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Kemin; Cao, Nan; Cheng, Bokun; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2016-01-16

    The DNA topoisomerase I enzyme of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtTOP1) is essential for the viability of the organism and survival in a murine model. This topoisomerase is being pursued as a novel target for the discovery of new therapeutic agents for the treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis. In this study, we succeeded in obtaining a structure of MtTOP1 by first predicting that the C-terminal region of MtTOP1 contains four repeated domains that do not involve the Zn-binding tetracysteine motifs seen in the C-terminal domains of Escherichia coli topoisomerase I. A construct (amino acids A2-T704), MtTOP1-704t, that includes the N-terminal domains (D1-D4) and the first predicted C-terminal domain (D5) of MtTOP1 was expressed and found to retain DNA cleavage-religation activity and catalyze single-stranded DNA catenation. MtTOP1-704t was crystallized, and a structure of 2.52 angstrom resolution limit was obtained. The structure of the MtTOP1 N-terminal domains has features that have not been observed in other previously available bacterial topoisomerase I crystal structures. The first C-terminal domain D5 forms a novel protein fold of a four-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet stabilized by a crossing-over alpha-helix. Since there is only one type IA topoisomerase present in Mycobacteriaceae and related Actinobacteria, this subfamily of type IA topoisomerase may be required for multiple functions in DNA replication, transcription, recombination, and repair. The unique structural features observed for MtTOP1 may allow these topoisomerase I enzymes to carry out physiological functions associated with topoisomerase III enzyme in other bacteria.

  7. Interaction between natural compounds and human topoisomerase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelli, Silvia; Coletta, Andrea; D'Annessa, Ilda; Fiorani, Paola; Tesauro, Cinzia; Desideri, Alessandro

    2012-11-01

    Eukaryotic topoisomerase I (Top1) is a monomeric enzyme that catalyzes the relaxation of supercoiled DNA during important processes including DNA replication, transcription, recombination and chromosome condensation. Human Top1 I is of significant medical interest since it is the unique cellular target of camptothecin (CPT), a plant alkaloid that rapidly blocks both DNA and RNA synthesis. In this review, together with CPT, we point out the interaction between human Top1 and some natural compounds, such us terpenoids, flavonoids, stilbenes and fatty acids. The drugs can interact with the enzyme at different levels perturbing the binding, cleavage, rotation or religation processes. Here we focus on different assays that can be used to identify the catalytic step of the enzyme inhibited by different natural compounds.

  8. Synthesis and Topoisomerase I inhibitory properties of klavuzon derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akçok, İsmail; Mete, Derya; Şen, Ayhan; Kasaplar, Pınar; Korkmaz, Kemal S; Çağır, Ali

    2017-04-01

    Klavuzon is a naphthalen-1-yl substituted α,β-unsaturated δ-lactone derivative, and is one of the anti-proliferative members of this class of compounds. Asymmetric and racemic syntheses of novel α,β-unsaturated δ-lactone derivatives are important to investigate their potential for the treatment of cancer. In this study, asymmetric and racemic syntheses of heteroatom-substituted klavuzon derivatives are reported. The syntheses were completed by a well-known three-step procedure. Anti-proliferative activity of seven novel racemic klavuzon derivatives were reported against MCF-7, PC3, HCT116 p53+/+ and HCT116 p53-/- cancer cell lines. Topoisomerase I inhibitory properties of 5,6-dihydro-2H-pyran-2-one derivatives were also studied. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Activities of Fluoroquinolones against Streptococcus pneumoniae Type II Topoisomerases Purified as Recombinant Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Ian; George, John

    1999-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae topoisomerase IV and DNA gyrase have been purified from a fluoroquinolone-susceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae strain, from first-step mutants showing low-level resistance to ciprofloxacin, sparfloxacin, levofloxacin, and ofloxacin, and from two clinical isolates showing intermediate- and high-level fluoroquinolone resistance by a gene cloning method that produces recombinant proteins from Escherichia coli. The concentrations of ciprofloxacin, sparfloxacin, levofloxacin, or ofloxacin required to inhibit wild-type topoisomerase IV were 8 to 16 times lower than those required to inhibit wild-type DNA gyrase. Furthermore, low-level resistance to these fluoroquinolones was entirely due to the reduced inhibitory activity of fluoroquinolones against topoisomerase IV. For all the laboratory strains, the 50% inhibitory concentration for topoisomerase IV directly correlated with the MIC. We therefore propose that with S. pneumoniae, ciprofloxacin, sparfloxacin, levofloxacin, and ofloxacin target topoisomerase IV in preference to DNA gyrase. Sitafloxacin, on the other hand, was found to be equipotent against either enzyme. This characteristic is unique for a fluoroquinolone. A reduction in the sensitivities of both topoisomerase IV and DNA gyrase are required, however, to achieve intermediate- or high-level fluoroquinolone resistance in S. pneumoniae. PMID:10543732

  10. Topoisomerase Inhibitors: Fluoroquinolone Mechanisms of Action and Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, David C; Jacoby, George A

    2016-09-01

    Quinolone antimicrobials are widely used in clinical medicine and are the only current class of agents that directly inhibit bacterial DNA synthesis. Quinolones dually target DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV binding to specific domains and conformations so as to block DNA strand passage catalysis and stabilize DNA-enzyme complexes that block the DNA replication apparatus and generate double breaks in DNA that underlie their bactericidal activity. Resistance has emerged with clinical use of these agents and is common in some bacterial pathogens. Mechanisms of resistance include mutational alterations in drug target affinity and efflux pump expression and acquisition of resistance-conferring genes. Resistance mutations in one or both of the two drug target enzymes are commonly in a localized domain of the GyrA and ParC subunits of gyrase and topoisomerase IV, respectively, and reduce drug binding to the enzyme-DNA complex. Other resistance mutations occur in regulatory genes that control the expression of native efflux pumps localized in the bacterial membrane(s). These pumps have broad substrate profiles that include other antimicrobials as well as quinolones. Mutations of both types can accumulate with selection pressure and produce highly resistant strains. Resistance genes acquired on plasmids confer low-level resistance that promotes the selection of mutational high-level resistance. Plasmid-encoded resistance is because of Qnr proteins that protect the target enzymes from quinolone action, a mutant aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme that also modifies certain quinolones, and mobile efflux pumps. Plasmids with these mechanisms often encode additional antimicrobial resistances and can transfer multidrug resistance that includes quinolones. Copyright © 2016 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  11. Apoptotic Bodies: Selective Detection in Extracellular Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Paul; Wang, Sha; Didenko, Vladimir V

    2017-01-01

    Normal and dying cells release various types of membrane-bound vesicles including microvesicles, exosomes, and apoptotic bodies. These vesicles play important roles in intercellular communication and signal transduction. However, their diverse forms and subtypes fluctuate in size and other properties. In result current purification approaches do not fully discriminate between different categories of extracellular vesicles. Here, we present a fluorescence technique that specifically identifies apoptotic bodies in preparations of microvesicles, exosomes, and other extracellular vesicles.The approach exclusively labels the vesicles that contain DNA with 5'PO 4 blunt-ended DNA breaks, such as those produced by the apoptotic CAD nuclease during apoptotic DNA degradation. The technique can be useful in studies of apoptosis involving microvesicles and exosomes.

  12. Selective and effective targeting of chronic myeloid leukemia stem cells by topoisomerase II inhibitor etoposide in combination with imatinib mesylate in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Man-Yu; Wang, Wei-Zhang; Liao, Fen-Fang; Wu, Qing-Qing; Lin, Xiang-Hua; Chen, Yong-Hen; Cheng, Lin; Jin, Xiao-Bao; Zhu, Jia-Yong

    2017-01-01

    Imatinib mesylate (IM) and other BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have improved chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patient survival markedly but fail to eradicate quiescent CML leukemia stem cells (LSCs). Thus, strategies targeting LSCs are required to induce long-term remission and achieve cure. Here, we investigated the ability of topoisomerase II (Top II) inhibitor etoposide (Eto) to target CML LSCs. Treatment with Eto combined with IM markedly induced apoptosis in primitive CML CD34 + CD38 - stem cells resistant to eradication by IM alone, but not in normal hematopoietic stem cells, CML and normal mature CD34 - cells, and other leukemia and lymphoma cell lines. The interaction of IM and Eto significantly inhibited phosphorylation of PDK1, AKT, GSK3, S6, and ERK proteins; increased the expression of pro-apoptotic gene Bax; and decreased the expression of anti-apoptotic gene c-Myc in CML CD34 + cells. Top II inhibitors treatment represents an attractive approach for targeting LSCs in CML patients undergoing TKIs monotherapy. © 2016 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  13. DNA Topoisomerases Maintain Promoters in a State Competent for Transcriptional Activation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jakob Madsen; Fredsøe, Jacob Christian; Rødgaard, Morten Terpager

    2012-01-01

    -depth analysis of the inducible PHO5 gene reveals that topoisomerases are essential for binding of the Pho4p transcription factor to the PHO5 promoter, which is required for promoter nucleosome removal during activation. In contrast, topoisomerases are dispensable for constitutive transcription initiation...... and elongation of PHO5, as well as the nuclear entrance of Pho4p. Finally, we provide evidence that topoisomerases are required to maintain the PHO5 promoter in a superhelical state, which is competent for proper activation. In conclusion, our results reveal a hitherto unknown function of topoisomerases during...

  14. Evaluation of the topoisomerase II-inactive bisdioxopiperazine ICRF-161 as a protectant against doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, E.; Thougaard, A.V.; Grauslund, M.

    2009-01-01

    of topoisomerase II, resulting in the risk of additional myelosuppression in patients receiving ICRF-187 as a cardioprotectant in combination with doxorubicin. The development of a topoisomerase II-inactive iron chelating compound thus appeared attractive. In the present paper we evaluate the topoisomerase II......-inactive 3 carbon linker bisdioxopiperazine analog ICRF-161 as a cardioprotectant. We demonstrate that this compound does chelate iron and protects against doxorubicin-induced LDH release from primary rat cardiomyocytes in vitro, similarly to ICRF-187. The compound does not target topoisomerase II in vitro...... chelation alone does not appear to be sufficient for protection against anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy Udgivelsesdato: 2009/1/8...

  15. The association between the p53/topoisomerase I and p53/ topoisomerase IIalpha immunophenotypes and the progression of ovarian carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar, Julia K; Grelewski, Piotr; Noga, Leszek; Rabczyński, Jerzy; Gryboś, Marian; Jeleń, Michał

    2012-01-01

    In in vitro studies it has been revealed that p53 protein expression might regulate topoisomerase I (topo I) and topoisomerase IIalpha (topo IIalpha) levels in tumor cells. So far, the association between the p53 protein and topo I and topo IIalpha expression and its impact on ovarian carcinoma progression has not been analyzed. The aim of the study was to examine the association between topo I and topo IIalpha expression and p53 protein overexpression with respect to the morphological features and progressive growth of ovarian tumors. The expression of the studied biomarkers was estimated by immunohistochemical staining in tumor sections from 136 malignant and 30 benign ovarian neoplasms. Significant differences for topo I, topo IIalpha and p53 expression between malignant and benign tumors were observed (p p53 protein was associated with advanced stages of ovarian carcinomas (p ovarian carcinomas, positive correlations between topo I and topo IIalpha, topo I and p53 and topo Ilalpha and p53 protein expression were revealed (p = 0.001). No relationship between the studied biomarkers was found in benign ovarian tumors (p > 0.05). p53/topo I and p53/topo IIalpha immunophenotypes were associated with advanced stages of ovarian carcinoma (p = 0.045 and p = 0.009, respectively), p53/topo IIalpha positive ovarian carcinomas were more frequently observed in high than in low tumor grades and the differences were only of borderline significance (p = 0.07). Current findings suggest that on the one hand, cooperation between topo I, topo IIalpha and p53 protein participates in the progressive growth of ovarian tumors. On the other hand, simultaneous expression of the studied proteins identifies the subgroup of ovarian cancers with aggressive biological features which might be considered in therapy.

  16. Exploitation of Apoptotic Regulation in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S. Ucker

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Within an organism, environmental stresses can trigger cell death, particularly apoptotic cell death. Apoptotic cells, themselves, are potent regulators of their cellular environment, involved primarily in effecting homeostatic control. Tumors, especially, exist in a dynamic balance of cell proliferation and cell death. This special feature of the tumorous microenvironment—namely, the prominence and persistence of cell death—necessarily entails a magnification of the extrinsic, postmortem effects of dead cells. In both normal and malignant tissues, apoptotic regulation is exerted through immune as well as non-immune mechanisms. Apoptotic cells suppress the repertoire of immune reactivities, both by attenuating innate (especially inflammatory responses and by abrogating adaptive responses. In addition, apoptotic cells modulate multiple vital cell activities, including survival, proliferation (cell number, and growth (cell size. While the microenvironment of the tumor may contribute to apoptosis, the postmortem effects of apoptotic cells feature prominently in the reciprocal acclimatization between the tumor and its environment. In much the same way that pathogens evade the host’s defenses through exploitation of key aspects of innate and adaptive immunity, cancer cells subvert several normal homeostatic processes, in particular wound healing and organ regeneration, to transform and overtake their environment. In understanding this subversion, it is crucial to view a tumor not simply as a clone of malignant cells, but rather as a complex and highly organized structure in which there exists a multidirectional flow of information between the cancer cells themselves and the multiple other cell types and extracellular matrix components of which the tumor is comprised. Apoptotic cells, therefore, have the unfortunate consequence of facilitating tumorigenesis and tumor survival.

  17. Catalytic inhibition of topoisomerase II by a novel rationally designed ATP-competitive purine analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chène, Patrick; Rudloff, Joëlle; Schoepfer, Joseph; Furet, Pascal; Meier, Peter; Qian, Zhiyan; Schlaeppi, Jean-Marc; Schmitz, Rita; Radimerski, Thomas

    2009-01-07

    Topoisomerase II poisons are in clinical use as anti-cancer therapy for decades and work by stabilizing the enzyme-induced DNA breaks. In contrast, catalytic inhibitors block the enzyme before DNA scission. Although several catalytic inhibitors of topoisomerase II have been described, preclinical concepts for exploiting their anti-proliferative activity based on molecular characteristics of the tumor cell have only recently started to emerge. Topoisomerase II is an ATPase and uses the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to orchestrate the movement of the DNA double strands along the enzyme. Thus, interfering with ATPase function with low molecular weight inhibitors that target the nucleotide binding pocket should profoundly affect cells that are committed to undergo mitosis. Here we describe the discovery and characterization of a novel purine diamine analogue as a potent ATP-competitive catalytic inhibitor of topoisomerase II. Quinoline aminopurine compound 1 (QAP 1) inhibited topoisomerase II ATPase activity and decatenation reaction at sub-micromolar concentrations, targeted both topoisomerase II alpha and beta in cell free assays and, using a quantitative cell-based assay and a chromosome segregation assay, displayed catalytic enzyme inhibition in cells. In agreement with recent hypothesis, we show that BRCA1 mutant breast cancer cells have increased sensitivity to QAP 1. The results obtained with QAP 1 demonstrate that potent and selective catalytic inhibition of human topoisomerase II function with an ATP-competitive inhibitor is feasible. Our data suggest that further drug discovery efforts on ATP-competitive catalytic inhibitors are warranted and that such drugs could potentially be developed as anti-cancer therapy for tumors that bear the appropriate combination of molecular alterations.

  18. Catalytic inhibition of topoisomerase II by a novel rationally designed ATP-competitive purine analogue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schlaeppi Jean-Marc

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Topoisomerase II poisons are in clinical use as anti-cancer therapy for decades and work by stabilizing the enzyme-induced DNA breaks. In contrast, catalytic inhibitors block the enzyme before DNA scission. Although several catalytic inhibitors of topoisomerase II have been described, preclinical concepts for exploiting their anti-proliferative activity based on molecular characteristics of the tumor cell have only recently started to emerge. Topoisomerase II is an ATPase and uses the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to orchestrate the movement of the DNA double strands along the enzyme. Thus, interfering with ATPase function with low molecular weight inhibitors that target the nucleotide binding pocket should profoundly affect cells that are committed to undergo mitosis. Results Here we describe the discovery and characterization of a novel purine diamine analogue as a potent ATP-competitive catalytic inhibitor of topoisomerase II. Quinoline aminopurine compound 1 (QAP 1 inhibited topoisomerase II ATPase activity and decatenation reaction at sub-micromolar concentrations, targeted both topoisomerase II alpha and beta in cell free assays and, using a quantitative cell-based assay and a chromosome segregation assay, displayed catalytic enzyme inhibition in cells. In agreement with recent hypothesis, we show that BRCA1 mutant breast cancer cells have increased sensitivity to QAP 1. Conclusion The results obtained with QAP 1 demonstrate that potent and selective catalytic inhibition of human topoisomerase II function with an ATP-competitive inhibitor is feasible. Our data suggest that further drug discovery efforts on ATP-competitive catalytic inhibitors are warranted and that such drugs could potentially be developed as anti-cancer therapy for tumors that bear the appropriate combination of molecular alterations.

  19. Topoisomerase I function during Escherichia coli response to antibiotics and stress enhances cell killing from stabilization of its cleavage complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, I-Fen; Sutherland, Jeanette H.; Cheng, Bokun; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To explore the role of topoisomerase I in gene activation and increased RecA levels during the bacterial SOS response, as well as the effect of antibiotic treatment and stress challenge on cell killing initiated by trapped topoisomerase I cleavage complex. Methods A mutant Escherichia coli strain with a ΔtopA mutation was used to investigate the role of topoisomerase I function in the SOS response to trimethoprim and mitomycin C. Induction of the recA and dinD1 promoters was measured using luciferase reporters of these promoters fused to luxCDABE. An increase in the RecA level following trimethoprim treatment was quantified directly by western blotting. The effect of stress challenge from trimethoprim and acidified nitrite treatments on cell killing by topoisomerase I cleavage complex accumulation was measured by the decrease in viability following induction of recombinant mutant topoisomerase I that forms a stabilized cleavage complex. Results Topoisomerase I function was found to be required for efficient transcriptional activation of the recA and dinD1 promoters during the E. coli SOS response to trimethoprim and mitomycin C. The role of topoisomerase I in the SOS response was confirmed with quantitative western blot analysis of RecA following trimethoprim treatment. The bactericidal effect from topoisomerase I cleavage complex accumulation was shown to be enhanced by stress challenge from trimethoprim and acidified nitrite. Conclusions Bacterial topoisomerase I function is actively involved in the SOS response to antibiotics and stress challenge. Cell killing initiated by the topoisomerase I cleavage complex would be enhanced by antibiotics and the host response. These findings provide further support for bacterial topoisomerase I as a therapeutic target. PMID:21486853

  20. Investigating direct interaction between Escherichia coli topoisomerase I and RecA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darici, Yesim; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are of special importance in cellular processes, including replication, transcription, recombination, and repair. Escherichia coli topoisomerase I (EcTOP1) is primarily involved in the relaxation of negative DNA supercoiling. E. coli RecA, the key protein for homologous recombination and SOS DNA-damage response, has been shown to stimulate the relaxation activity of EcTOP1. The evidence for their direct protein-protein interaction has not been previously established. We report here the direct physical interaction between E. coli RecA and topoisomerase I. We demonstrated the RecA-topoisomerase I interaction via pull-down assays, and surface plasmon resonance measurements. Molecular docking supports the observation that the interaction involves the topoisomerase I N-terminal domains that form the active site. Our results from pull-down assays showed that ATP, although not required, enhances the RecA-EcTOP1 interaction. We propose that E. coli RecA physically interacts with topoisomerase I to modulate the chromosomal DNA supercoiling. PMID:27001450

  1. Electrostatics of DNA-DNA juxtapositions: consequences for type II topoisomerase function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randall, Graham L; Pettitt, B Montgomery; Buck, Gregory R; Zechiedrich, E Lynn

    2006-01-01

    Type II topoisomerases resolve problematic DNA topologies such as knots, catenanes, and supercoils that arise as a consequence of DNA replication and recombination. Failure to remove problematic DNA topologies prohibits cell division and can result in cell death or genetic mutation. Such catastrophic consequences make topoisomerases an effective target for antibiotics and anticancer agents. Despite their biological and clinical importance, little is understood about how a topoisomerase differentiates DNA topologies in a molecule that is significantly larger than the topoisomerase itself. It has been proposed that type II topoisomerases recognize angle and curvature between two DNA helices characteristic of knotted and catenated DNA to account for the enzyme's preference to unlink instead of link DNA. Here we consider the electrostatic potential of DNA juxtapositions to determine the possibility of juxtapositions occurring through Brownian diffusion. We found that despite the large negative electrostatic potential formed between two juxtaposed DNA helices, a bulk counterion concentration as small as 50 mM provides sufficient electrostatic screening to prohibit significant interaction beyond an interhelical separation of 3 nm in both hooked and free juxtapositions. This suggests that instead of electrostatics, mechanical forces such as those occurring in anaphase, knots, catenanes, or the writhe of supercoiled DNA may be responsible for the formation of DNA juxtapositions

  2. Contribution of Topoisomerase IV and DNA Gyrase Mutations in Streptococcus pneumoniae to Resistance to Novel Fluoroquinolones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestova, Ekaterina; Beyer, Rebecca; Cianciotto, Nicholas P.; Noskin, Gary A.; Peterson, Lance R.

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we assessed the activity of ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, sparfloxacin, and trovafloxacin against clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae that were resistant to the less-recently developed fluoroquinolones by using defined amino acid substitutions in DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV. The molecular basis for resistance was assessed by using mutants selected with trovafloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and levofloxacin in vitro. This demonstrated that the primary target of trovafloxacin in S. pneumoniae is the ParC subunit of DNA topoisomerase IV, similar to most other fluoroquinolones. However, first-step mutants bearing the Ser79→Phe/Tyr substitution in topoisomerase IV subunit ParC were susceptible to trovafloxacin with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 0.25 μg/ml, and mutations in the structural genes for both topoisomerase IV subunit ParC (parC) and the DNA gyrase subunit (gyrA) were required to achieve levels of resistance above the breakpoint. The data also suggest that enhanced activity of trovafloxacin against pneumococci is due to a combination of factors that may include reduced efflux of this agent and an enhanced activity against both DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV. PMID:10428926

  3. Direct control of type IIA topoisomerase activity by a chromosomally encoded regulatory protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Seychelle M; Lyubimov, Artem Y; Hershey, David M; Schoeffler, Allyn J; Sengupta, Sugopa; Nagaraja, Valakunja; Berger, James M

    2014-07-01

    Precise control of supercoiling homeostasis is critical to DNA-dependent processes such as gene expression, replication, and damage response. Topoisomerases are central regulators of DNA supercoiling commonly thought to act independently in the recognition and modulation of chromosome superstructure; however, recent evidence has indicated that cells tightly regulate topoisomerase activity to support chromosome dynamics, transcriptional response, and replicative events. How topoisomerase control is executed and linked to the internal status of a cell is poorly understood. To investigate these connections, we determined the structure of Escherichia coli gyrase, a type IIA topoisomerase bound to YacG, a recently identified chromosomally encoded inhibitor protein. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that YacG is frequently associated with coenzyme A (CoA) production enzymes, linking the protein to metabolism and stress. The structure, along with supporting solution studies, shows that YacG represses gyrase by sterically occluding the principal DNA-binding site of the enzyme. Unexpectedly, YacG acts by both engaging two spatially segregated regions associated with small-molecule inhibitor interactions (fluoroquinolone antibiotics and the newly reported antagonist GSK299423) and remodeling the gyrase holoenzyme into an inactive, ATP-trapped configuration. This study establishes a new mechanism for the protein-based control of topoisomerases, an approach that may be used to alter supercoiling levels for responding to changes in cellular state. © 2014 Vos et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  4. Natural variation in a single amino acid substitution underlies physiological responses to topoisomerase II poisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdraljevic, Stefan; Strand, Christine; Seidel, Hannah S; Cook, Daniel E; Doench, John G; Andersen, Erik C

    2017-07-01

    Many chemotherapeutic drugs are differentially effective from one patient to the next. Understanding the causes of this variability is a critical step towards the development of personalized treatments and improvements to existing medications. Here, we investigate sensitivity to a group of anti-neoplastic drugs that target topoisomerase II using the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. We show that wild strains of C. elegans vary in their sensitivity to these drugs, and we use an unbiased genetic approach to demonstrate that this natural variation is explained by a methionine-to-glutamine substitution in topoisomerase II (TOP-2). The presence of a non-polar methionine at this residue increases hydrophobic interactions between TOP-2 and its poison etoposide, as compared to a polar glutamine. We hypothesize that this stabilizing interaction results in increased genomic instability in strains that contain a methionine residue. The residue affected by this substitution is conserved from yeast to humans and is one of the few differences between the two human topoisomerase II isoforms (methionine in hTOPIIα and glutamine in hTOPIIβ). We go on to show that this amino acid difference between the two human topoisomerase isoforms influences cytotoxicity of topoisomerase II poisons in human cell lines. These results explain why hTOPIIα and hTOPIIβ are differentially affected by various poisons and demonstrate the utility of C. elegans in understanding the genetics of drug responses.

  5. Structure and operation of the DNA-translocating type I DNA restriction enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennaway, Christopher K.; Taylor, James E.; Song, Chun Feng; Potrzebowski, Wojciech; Nicholson, William; White, John H.; Swiderska, Anna; Obarska-Kosinska, Agnieszka; Callow, Philip; Cooper, Laurie P.; Roberts, Gareth A.; Artero, Jean-Baptiste; Bujnicki, Janusz M.; Trinick, John; Kneale, G. Geoff; Dryden, David T.F.

    2012-01-01

    Type I DNA restriction/modification (RM) enzymes are molecular machines found in the majority of bacterial species. Their early discovery paved the way for the development of genetic engineering. They control (restrict) the influx of foreign DNA via horizontal gene transfer into the bacterium while maintaining sequence-specific methylation (modification) of host DNA. The endonuclease reaction of these enzymes on unmethylated DNA is preceded by bidirectional translocation of thousands of base pairs of DNA toward the enzyme. We present the structures of two type I RM enzymes, EcoKI and EcoR124I, derived using electron microscopy (EM), small-angle scattering (neutron and X-ray), and detailed molecular modeling. DNA binding triggers a large contraction of the open form of the enzyme to a compact form. The path followed by DNA through the complexes is revealed by using a DNA mimic anti-restriction protein. The structures reveal an evolutionary link between type I RM enzymes and type II RM enzymes. PMID:22215814

  6. Structure and operation of the DNA-translocating type I DNA restriction enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennaway, Christopher K; Taylor, James E; Song, Chun Feng; Potrzebowski, Wojciech; Nicholson, William; White, John H; Swiderska, Anna; Obarska-Kosinska, Agnieszka; Callow, Philip; Cooper, Laurie P; Roberts, Gareth A; Artero, Jean-Baptiste; Bujnicki, Janusz M; Trinick, John; Kneale, G Geoff; Dryden, David T F

    2012-01-01

    Type I DNA restriction/modification (RM) enzymes are molecular machines found in the majority of bacterial species. Their early discovery paved the way for the development of genetic engineering. They control (restrict) the influx of foreign DNA via horizontal gene transfer into the bacterium while maintaining sequence-specific methylation (modification) of host DNA. The endonuclease reaction of these enzymes on unmethylated DNA is preceded by bidirectional translocation of thousands of base pairs of DNA toward the enzyme. We present the structures of two type I RM enzymes, EcoKI and EcoR124I, derived using electron microscopy (EM), small-angle scattering (neutron and X-ray), and detailed molecular modeling. DNA binding triggers a large contraction of the open form of the enzyme to a compact form. The path followed by DNA through the complexes is revealed by using a DNA mimic anti-restriction protein. The structures reveal an evolutionary link between type I RM enzymes and type II RM enzymes.

  7. Characterization of topoisomerase I and II activities in nuclear extracts during callogenesis in immature embryos of Zea mays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballo, M; Giné, R; Santos, M; Puigdomènech, P

    1991-01-01

    We have characterized the topoisomerase I and II activities in nuclear extracts from immature embryos of Zea mays and the effect of the treatment with 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and abscisic acid (ABA). These extracts were shown to be essentially devoid of protease and nuclease activities and they were tested for their ability to relax supercoiled DNA, unknotting P4 DNA and catenate circular duplex DNA under catalytic conditions. Unknotting and catenation reactions are strictly magnesium- and ATP-dependent, but not the relaxation of circular supercoiled DNA allowing the detection of both topoisomerase I and II activities. Two cytotoxic drugs, camptothecin, a plant alkaloid that inhibits eukaryotic topoisomerase I, and epipodophyllotoxin VM-26 (teniposide) that inhibits topoisomerase II, have been assayed in our extracts showing similar inhibitory effects on topoisomerase enzymes. Alkaline phosphatase treatment of nuclear extracts abolishes both topoisomerase activities. Nuclear extracts from embryos treated with 2,4-D showed 200% increase on topoisomerase II activity as compared with untreated ones, but only residual activity was detected in ABA-treated embryos. Nuclear extracts from hormone-treated and untreated embryos showed similar topoisomerase I activity with deviations of less than 25%. These differences are discussed in terms of possible post-translational modifications of the enzymes associated with the increase in proliferation activity of calli.

  8. Resveratrol: A novel type of topoisomerase II inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joyce H; Wendorff, Timothy J; Berger, James M

    2017-12-22

    Resveratrol, a polyphenol found in various plant sources, has gained attention as a possible agent responsible for the purported health benefits of certain foods, such as red wine. Despite annual multi-million dollar market sales as a nutriceutical, there is little consensus about the physiological roles of resveratrol. One suggested molecular target of resveratrol is eukaryotic topoisomerase II (topo II), an enzyme essential for chromosome segregation and DNA supercoiling homeostasis. Interestingly, resveratrol is chemically similar to ICRF-187, a clinically approved chemotherapeutic that stabilizes an ATP-dependent dimerization interface in topo II to block enzyme activity. Based on this similarity, we hypothesized that resveratrol may antagonize topo II by a similar mechanism. Using a variety of biochemical assays, we find that resveratrol indeed acts through the ICRF-187 binding locus, but that it inhibits topo II by preventing ATPase domain dimerization rather than stabilizing it. This work presents the first comprehensive analysis of the biochemical effects of both ICRF-187 and resveratrol on the human isoforms of topo II, and reveals a new mode for the allosteric regulation of topo II through modulation of ATPase status. Natural polyphenols related to resveratrol that have been shown to impact topo II function may operate in a similar manner. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Autoregulation of topoisomerase I expression by supercoiling sensitive transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Wareed; Menon, Shruti; Karthik, Pullela V D N B; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2016-02-29

    The opposing catalytic activities of topoisomerase I (TopoI/relaxase) and DNA gyrase (supercoiling enzyme) ensure homeostatic maintenance of bacterial chromosome supercoiling. Earlier studies in Escherichia coli suggested that the alteration in DNA supercoiling affects the DNA gyrase and TopoI expression. Although, the role of DNA elements around the promoters were proposed in regulation of gyrase, the molecular mechanism of supercoiling mediated control of TopoI expression is not yet understood. Here, we describe the regulation of TopoI expression from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis by a mechanism termed Supercoiling Sensitive Transcription (SST). In both the organisms, topoI promoter(s) exhibited reduced activity in response to chromosome relaxation suggesting that SST is intrinsic to topoI promoter(s). We elucidate the role of promoter architecture and high transcriptional activity of upstream genes in topoI regulation. Analysis of the promoter(s) revealed the presence of sub-optimal spacing between the -35 and -10 elements, rendering them supercoiling sensitive. Accordingly, upon chromosome relaxation, RNA polymerase occupancy was decreased on the topoI promoter region implicating the role of DNA topology in SST of topoI. We propose that negative supercoiling induced DNA twisting/writhing align the -35 and -10 elements to facilitate the optimal transcription of topoI. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. The phosphoCTD-interacting domain of Topoisomerase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jianhong; Phatnani, Hemali P.; Hsieh, Tao-Shih [Department of Biochemistry, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Greenleaf, Arno L., E-mail: arno.greenleaf@duke.edu [Department of Biochemistry, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States)

    2010-06-18

    The N-terminal domain (NTD) of Drosophila melanogaster (Dm) Topoisomerase I has been shown to bind to RNA polymerase II, but the domain of RNAPII with which it interacts is not known. Using bacterially-expressed fusion proteins carrying all or half of the NTDs of Dm and human (Homo sapiens, Hs) Topo I, we demonstrate that the N-terminal half of each NTD binds directly to the hyperphosphorylated C-terminal repeat domain (phosphoCTD) of the largest RNAPII subunit, Rpb1. Thus, the amino terminal segment of metazoan Topo I (1-157 for Dm and 1-114 for Hs) contains a novel phosphoCTD-interacting domain that we designate the Topo I-Rpb1 interacting (TRI) domain. The long-known in vivo association of Topo I with active genes presumably can be attributed, wholly or in part, to the TRI domain-mediated binding of Topo I to the phosphoCTD of transcribing RNAPII.

  11. Activation of Pro-apoptotic Caspases in Non-apoptotic Cells During Odontogenesis and Related Osteogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Svandova

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Caspases are well known proteases in the context of inflammation and apoptosis. Recently, novel roles of pro-apoptotic caspases have been reported, including findings related to the development of hard tissues. To further investigate these emerging functions of pro-apoptotic caspases, the in vivo localisation of key pro-apoptotic caspases (-3,-6,-7,-8, and -9 was assessed, concentrating on the development of two neighbouring hard tissues, cells participating in odontogenesis (represented by the first mouse molar and intramembranous osteogenesis (mandibular/alveolar bone. The expression of the different caspases within the developing tissues was correlated with the apoptotic status of the cells, to produce a picture of whether different caspases have potentially distinct, or overlapping non-apoptotic functions. The in vivo investigation was additionally supported by examination of caspases in an osteoblast-like cell line in vitro. Caspases-3,-7, and -9 were activated in apoptotic cells of the primary enamel knot of the first molar; however, caspase-7 and -8 activation was also associated with the non-apoptotic enamel epithelium at the same stage and later with differentiating/differentiated odontoblasts and ameloblasts. In the adjacent bone, active caspases-7 and -8 were present abundantly in the prenatal period, while the appearance of caspases-3,-6, and -9 was marginal. Perinatally, caspases-3 and -7 were evident in some osteoclasts and osteoblastic cells, and caspase-8 was abundant mostly in osteoclasts. In addition, postnatal activation of caspases-7 and -8 was retained in osteocytes. The results provide a comprehensive temporo-spatial pattern of pro-apoptotic caspase activation, and demonstrate both unique and overlapping activation in non-apoptotic cells during development of the molar tooth and mandibular/alveolar bone. The importance of caspases in osteogenic pathways is highlighted by caspase inhibition in osteoblast-like cells, which

  12. Real-Time Label-Free Direct Electronic Monitoring of Topoisomerase Enzyme Binding Kinetics on Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccaro, Laura; Tesauro, Cinzia; Kurkina, Tetiana; Fiorani, Paola; Yu, Hak Ki; Knudsen, Birgitta R; Kern, Klaus; Desideri, Alessandro; Balasubramanian, Kannan

    2015-11-24

    Monolayer graphene field-effect sensors operating in liquid have been widely deployed for detecting a range of analyte species often under equilibrium conditions. Here we report on the real-time detection of the binding kinetics of the essential human enzyme, topoisomerase I interacting with substrate molecules (DNA probes) that are immobilized electrochemically on to monolayer graphene strips. By monitoring the field-effect characteristics of the graphene biosensor in real-time during the enzyme-substrate interactions, we are able to decipher the surface binding constant for the cleavage reaction step of topoisomerase I activity in a label-free manner. Moreover, an appropriate design of the capture probes allows us to distinctly follow the cleavage step of topoisomerase I functioning in real-time down to picomolar concentrations. The presented results are promising for future rapid screening of drugs that are being evaluated for regulating enzyme activity.

  13. The Effects of Arolycoricidine and Narciprimine on Tumor Cell Killing and Topoisomerase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buket Bozkurt Sarikaya

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, narciprimine and arolycoricidine were isolated from G. rizehensis Stern (Amaryllidaceae. The structures of the alkaloids were elucidated by spectroscopic methods (1D NMR, EI-MS. Due to the previous reports on anti-cancer activity of this group of alkaloids, we investigated their effects on DNA topoisomerase reactions, which are known as the cellular targets of a number of chemotherapeutical drugs. The results revealed that arolycoricidine and narciprimine were effective in both type I and type II DNA topoisomerase reactions in a dose-dependent manner. Topoisomerase-interfering ability of these alkaloids partially correlated with cytostaticity assays, using HeLa (cervix adenocarcinoma, MCF7 (breast adenocarcinoma and A431 (skin epidermoid carcinoma cells. Our results are discussed in relation to the potential significance of these alkaloids in the course of drug-development studies.

  14. Identification and localization of a gene that specifies production of Escherichia coli DNA topoisomerase I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trucksis, M.; Depew, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    A gene that specifies production of Escherichia coli DNA topoisomerase I (ω protein) was identified with the aid of a radioimmunoassay for this protein. E. coli DNA topoisomerase I was produced by Salmonella typhimurium merodiploids that harbored E. coli plasmid F' 123, but not by strains that lost this plasmid. Analysis of strains with spontaneous deletions of F' 123 showed that the gene, topA, required for production of the E. coli ω protein was between the trp operon and the cysB gene. Deletions that eliminated topA also eliminated the supX gene. We suggest that topA is the structural gene of E. coli DNA topoisomerase I and that topA is identical to supX

  15. Analysis of an immunodominant epitope of topoisomerase I in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meesters, T M; Hoet, M; van den Hoogen, F H; Verheijen, R; Habets, W J; van Venrooij, W J

    1992-05-01

    In this paper an immunodominant epitope of Topoisomerase I is described. An epitope expression sublibrary was constructed from Topoisomerase I cDNA. The subclones were screened with an antiserum from a patient with systemic sclerosis (SSc). The positive clones defined one immunodominant B cell epitope (epitope III), which was located at the carboxyterminal part of the protein. The epitope, 52 amino acids in length, neither contains the p30gag sequence nor the suggested active site Tyr-723, both presumed antibody recognition sites. More than 70% of our anti-TopoI sera recognize this epitope III, indicating that it is a major recognition site of the anti-TopoI autoantibodies in SSc sera. DNA relaxation experiments show that all sera that recognize epitope III and most sera with antibodies to other epitopes inhibit Topoisomerase I activity.

  16. Increased topoisomerase IIalpha expression in colorectal cancer is associated with advanced disease and chemotherapeutic resistance via inhibition of apoptosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Coss, Alan

    2012-02-01

    Topoisomerase IIalpha is a nuclear enzyme that regulates the tertiary structure of DNA. The influence of topoisomerase IIalpha gene (TOP2A) or protein alterations on disease progression and treatment response in colorectal cancer (CRC) is unknown. The study investigated the clinical relevance of topoisomerase IIalpha in CRC using in vivo and in vitro models. Differentially expressed genes in early and late-stage CRC were identified by array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). Cellular location of gene amplifications was determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Topoisomerase IIalpha levels, proliferation index, and HER2 expression were examined in 228 colorectal tumors by immunohistochemistry. Overexpression of topoisomerase IIalpha in vitro was achieved by liposome-based transfection. Cell growth inhibition and apoptosis were quantified using the crystal violet assay and flow cytometry, respectively, in response to drug treatment. Amplification of TOP2A was identified in 3 (7.7%) tumors using array CGH and confirmed using FISH. At the protein level, topoisomerase IIalpha staining was observed in 157 (69%) tumors, and both staining and intensity levels were associated with an aggressive tumor phenotype (p values 0.04 and 0.005, respectively). Using logistic regression analysis, topoisomerase IIalpha remained significantly associated with advanced tumor stage when corrected for tumor proliferation (p=0.007) and differentiation (p=0.001). No association was identified between topoisomerase IIalpha and HER2. In vitro, overexpression of topoisomerase IIalpha was associated with resistance to irinotecan (p=0.001) and etoposide chemotherapy (p=0.03), an effect mediated by inhibition of apoptosis. Topoisomerase IIalpha overexpression is significantly associated with alterations in tumor behavior and response to drug treatment in CRC. Our results suggest that gene amplification may represent an important mechanism underlying these changes.

  17. Detection of apoptotic cells using immunohistochemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Newbold, Andrea; Martin, Ben P.; Cullinane, Carleen; Bots, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry is commonly used to show the presence of apoptotic cells in situ. In this protocol, B-cell lymphoma cells are injected into recipient mice and, on tumor formation, the mice are treated with the apoptosis inducer vorinostat (a histone deacetylase inhibitor). Tumor samples are

  18. Comparative Antioxidant, Antiproliferative and Apoptotic Effects of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine and compare the antioxidant, antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of leaf infusions of Ilex laurina and Ilex paraguariensis in colon cancer cells. Methods: Antioxidant activity was determined by ORAC (Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity) and FRAP (Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power). Cytotoxic ...

  19. Bioassays and in silico methods in the identification of human DNA topoisomerase IIa inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergant, Kaja; Janezic, Matej; Perdih, Andrej

    2018-03-06

    The family of DNA topoisomerases comprises a group of enzymes that catalyse the induction of topological changes to DNA. These enzymes play a role in the cell replication machinery and are, therefore, important targets for anticancer drugs - with human DNA topoisomerase IIα being one of the most prominent. Active compounds targeting this enzyme are classified into two groups with diverse mechanisms of action: DNA poisons act by stabilizing a covalent cleavage complex between DNA and the topoisomerase enzyme, transforming it into a cellular toxin, while the second diverse group of catalytic inhibitors, provides novel inhibition avenues for tackling this enzyme due to frequent occurrence of side effects observed during the DNA poison therapy. Based on a comprehensive literature search we present an overview of available bioassays and in silico methods in the identification of human DNA topoisomerase IIα inhibitors. A comprehensive outline of the available methods and approaches that explore in detail the in vitro mechanistic and functional aspects of the topoisomerase IIα inhibition of both topo IIα inhibitor groups is presented. The utilized in vitro cell-based assays and in vivo studies to further explore the validated topo IIα inhibitors in subsequent preclinical stages of the drug discovery are discussed. The potential of in silico methods in topoisomerase IIα inhibitor discovery is outlined. A list of practical guidelines was compiled to aid new as well experienced researchers in how to optimally approach the design of targeted inhibitors and validation in the preclinical drug development stages. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. Isolation and quantitation of topoisomerase complexes accumulated on Escherichia coli chromosomal DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aedo, Sandra; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2012-11-01

    DNA topoisomerases are important targets in anticancer and antibacterial therapy because drugs can initiate cell death by stabilizing the transient covalent topoisomerase-DNA complex. In this study, we employed a method that uses CsCl density gradient centrifugation to separate unbound from DNA-bound GyrA/ParC in Escherichia coli cell lysates after quinolone treatment, allowing antibody detection and quantitation of the covalent complexes on slot blots. Using these procedures modified from the in vivo complexes of enzyme (ICE) bioassay, we found a correlation between gyrase-DNA complex formation and DNA replication inhibition at bacteriostatic (1× MIC) norfloxacin concentrations. Quantitation of the number of gyrase-DNA complexes per E. coli cell permitted an association between cell death and chromosomal gyrase-DNA complex accumulation at norfloxacin concentrations greater than 1× MIC. When comparing levels of gyrase-DNA complexes to topoisomerase IV-DNA complexes in the absence of drug, we observed that the gyrase-DNA complex level was higher (∼150-fold) than that of the topoisomerase IV-DNA complex. In addition, levels of gyrase and topoisomerase IV complexes reached a significant increase after 30 min of treatment at 1× and 1.7× MIC, respectively. These results are in agreement with gyrase being the primary target for quinolones in E. coli. We further validated the utility of this method for the study of topoisomerase-drug interactions in bacteria by showing the gyrase covalent complex reversibility after removal of the drug from the medium, and the resistant effect of the Ser83Leu gyrA mutation on accumulation of gyrase covalent complexes on chromosomal DNA.

  1. Streptococcus pneumoniae DNA Gyrase and Topoisomerase IV: Overexpression, Purification, and Differential Inhibition by Fluoroquinolones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiao-Su; Fisher, L. Mark

    1999-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae gyrA and gyrB genes specifying the DNA gyrase subunits have been cloned into pET plasmid vectors under the control of an inducible T7 promoter and have been separately expressed in Escherichia coli. Soluble 97-kDa GyrA and 72-kDa GyrB proteins bearing polyhistidine tags at their respective C-terminal and N-terminal ends were purified to apparent homogeneity by one-step nickel chelate column chromatography and were free of host E. coli topoisomerase activity. Equimolar amounts of the gyrase subunits reconstituted ATP-dependent DNA supercoiling with comparable activity to gyrase of E. coli and Staphylococcus aureus. In parallel, S. pneumoniae topoisomerase IV ParC and ParE subunits were similarly expressed in E. coli, purified to near homogeneity as 93- and 73-kDa proteins, and shown to generate efficient ATP-dependent DNA relaxation and DNA decatenation activities. Using the purified enzymes, we examined the inhibitory effects of three paradigm fluoroquinolones—ciprofloxacin, sparfloxacin, and clinafloxacin—which previous genetic studies with S. pneumoniae suggested act preferentially through topoisomerase IV, through gyrase, and through both enzymes, respectively. Surprisingly, all three quinolones were more active in inhibiting purified topoisomerase IV than gyrase, with clinafloxacin showing the greatest inhibitory potency. Moreover, the tested agents were at least 25-fold more effective in stabilizing a cleavable complex (the relevant cytotoxic lesion) with topoisomerase IV than with gyrase, with clinafloxacin some 10- to 32-fold more potent against either enzyme, in line with its superior activity against S. pneumoniae. The uniform target preference of the three fluoroquinolones for topoisomerase IV in vitro is in apparent contrast to the genetic data. We interpret these results in terms of a model for bacterial killing by quinolones in which cellular factors can modulate the effects of target affinity to determine the cytotoxic

  2. Non-apoptotic function of apoptotic proteins in the development of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    apoptotic roles such as immune function. (Stoven et al. 2003; Tanji and Ip 2005), cell proliferation. (Chun et al. 2002; Salmena and Hakem 2005), cell differentiation (Kang et al. 2004; Lamkanfi et al. 2006) spermatid individualization (Arama et al.

  3. Targeting the gyrase of Plasmodium falciparum with topoisomerase poisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang Girdwood, Sonya C; Nenortas, Elizabeth; Shapiro, Theresa A

    2015-06-15

    Drug-resistant malaria poses a major public health problem throughout the world and the need for new antimalarial drugs is growing. The apicoplast, a chloroplast-like organelle essential for malaria parasite survival and with no counterpart in humans, offers an attractive target for selectively toxic new therapies. The apicoplast genome (plDNA) is a 35 kb circular DNA that is served by gyrase, a prokaryotic type II topoisomerase. Gyrase is poisoned by fluoroquinolone antibacterials that stabilize a catalytically inert ternary complex of enzyme, its plDNA substrate, and inhibitor. We used fluoroquinolones to study the gyrase and plDNA of Plasmodium falciparum. New methods for isolating and separating plDNA reveal four topologically different forms and permit a quantitative exam of perturbations that result from gyrase poisoning. In keeping with its role in DNA replication, gyrase is most abundant in late stages of the parasite lifecycle, but several lines of evidence indicate that even in these cells the enzyme is present in relatively low abundance: about 1 enzyme for every two plDNAs or a ratio of 1 gyrase: 70 kb DNA. For a spectrum of quinolones, correlation was generally good between antimalarial activity and gyrase poisoning, the putative molecular mechanism of drug action. However, in P. falciparum there is evidence for off-target toxicity, particularly for ciprofloxacin. These studies highlight the utility of the new methods and of fluoroquinolones as a tool for studying the in situ workings of gyrase and its plDNA substrate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Stabilization Of Apoptotic Cells: Generation Of Zombie Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Sánchez Alcázar

    2015-08-01

    Stabilization of apoptotic cells can be used for reliable detection and quantification of apoptosis in cultured cells and may allow a safer administration of apoptotic cells in clinical applications. Furthermore, it opens new avenues in the functional reconstruction of apoptotic cells for longer preservation.

  5. Structural and mechanistic insight into Holliday-junction dissolution by topoisomerase IIIα and RMI1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bocquet, Nicolas; Bizard, Anna H; Abdulrahman, Wassim

    2014-01-01

    to TopIIIα influences it to behave as a hemicatenane dissolvase, rather than as an enzyme that relaxes DNA topology, is unknown. Here, we present the crystal structure of human TopIIIα complexed to the first oligonucleotide-binding domain (OB fold) of RMI1. TopIII assumes a toroidal type 1A topoisomerase...

  6. A systematic review on topoisomerase 1 inhibition in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kümler, Iben; Brünner, Nils; Stenvang, Jan

    2013-01-01

    as standard treatment for the disease. We performed a systematic review on topoisomerase 1 inhibitors in MBC and found 22 prospective trials and three retrospective ones. No phase III trials were identified. Only one study was randomized, and generally studies were small. Response rates (RR) for irinotecan...

  7. Topoisomerase II minimizes DNA entanglements by proofreading DNA topology after DNA strand passage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-García, Belén; Fernández, Xavier; Díaz-Ingelmo, Ofelia; Rodríguez-Campos, Antonio; Manichanh, Chaysavanh; Roca, Joaquim

    2014-02-01

    By transporting one DNA double helix (T-segment) through a double-strand break in another (G-segment), topoisomerase II reduces fractions of DNA catenanes, knots and supercoils to below equilibrium values. How DNA segments are selected to simplify the equilibrium DNA topology is enigmatic, and the biological relevance of this activity is unclear. Here we examined the transit of the T-segment across the three gates of topoisomerase II (entry N-gate, DNA-gate and exit C-gate). Our experimental results uncovered that DNA transport probability is determined not only during the capture of a T-segment at the N-gate. When a captured T-segment has crossed the DNA-gate, it can backtrack to the N-gate instead of exiting by the C-gate. When such backtracking is precluded by locking the N-gate or by removing the C-gate, topoisomerase II no longer simplifies equilibrium DNA topology. Therefore, we conclude that the C-gate enables a post-DNA passage proofreading mechanism, which challenges the release of passed T-segments to either complete or cancel DNA transport. This proofreading activity not only clarifies how type-IIA topoisomerases simplify the equilibrium topology of DNA in free solution, but it may explain also why these enzymes are able to solve the topological constraints of intracellular DNA without randomly entangling adjacent chromosomal regions.

  8. Direct regulation of topoisomerase activity by a nucleoid-associated protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soumitra; Mallick, Bratati; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2014-01-01

    The topological homeostasis of bacterial chromosomes is maintained by the balance between compaction and the topological organization of genomes. Two classes of proteins play major roles in chromosome organization: the nucleoid-associated proteins (NAPs) and topoisomerases. The NAPs bind DNA to compact the chromosome, whereas topoisomerases catalytically remove or introduce supercoils into the genome. We demonstrate that HU, a major NAP of Mycobacterium tuberculosis specifically stimulates the DNA relaxation ability of mycobacterial topoisomerase I (TopoI) at lower concentrations but interferes at higher concentrations. A direct physical interaction between M. tuberculosis HU (MtHU) and TopoI is necessary for enhancing enzyme activity both in vitro and in vivo. The interaction is between the amino terminal domain of MtHU and the carboxyl terminal domain of TopoI. Binding of MtHU did not affect the two catalytic trans-esterification steps but enhanced the DNA strand passage, requisite for the completion of DNA relaxation, a new mechanism for the regulation of topoisomerase activity. An interaction-deficient mutant of MtHU was compromised in enhancing the strand passage activity. The species-specific physical and functional cooperation between MtHU and TopoI may be the key to achieve the DNA relaxation levels needed to maintain the optimal superhelical density of mycobacterial genomes. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. Pharmacophore Hybridization To Discover Novel Topoisomerase II Poisons with Promising Antiproliferative Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Jose Antonio; Riccardi, Laura; Minniti, Elirosa; Borgogno, Marco; Arencibia, Jose M; Greco, Maria L; Minarini, Anna; Sissi, Claudia; De Vivo, Marco

    2018-02-08

    We used a pharmacophore hybridization strategy to combine key structural elements of merbarone and etoposide and generated new type II topoisomerase (topoII) poisons. This first set of hybrid topoII poisons shows promising antiproliferative activity on human cancer cells, endorsing their further exploration for anticancer drug discovery.

  10. An Archaebacterial Topoisomerase Homolog Not Present in Other Eukaryotes Is Indispensable for Cell Proliferation of Plants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hartung, F.; Angelis, Karel; Meister, A.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 12, - (2002), s. 1787-1791 ISSN 0960-9822 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA6038201; GA ČR GA521/01/1418 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5038910 Keywords : Archaebacterial Topoisomerase * Cell Proliferation Subject RIV: GE - Plant Breeding Impact factor: 7.007, year: 2002

  11. Consistent rationalization of type-2 topoisomerases' unknotting, decatenating, supercoil-relaxing actions and their scaling relation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhirong; Chan, Hue Sun

    2015-09-09

    How type-2 topoisomerases discern global topology from local properties of DNA is not known precisely but the hypothesis that the enzymes selectively pass double-helix strands at hook-like juxtapositions is promising. Building upon an investigation of unknotting and decatenating using an improved wormlike DNA model, here we focus primarily on the enzymes' action in narrowing the distribution of linking number (Lk) in supercoiled DNA. Consistent with experiments, with selective passage at a hooked juxtaposition, the simulated narrowing factor RLk diminishes with decreasing DNA circle size but approaches an asymptotic RLk ≈ 1.7-1.8 for circle size ≳3.5 kb. For the larger DNA circles, we found that (RLk - 1) ≈ 0.42log10RK ≈ 0.68log10RL and thus RK ≈ (RL)(1.6) holds for the computed RLk and knot and catenane reduction factors RK and RL attained by selective passage at different juxtaposition geometries. Remarkably, this general scaling relation is essentially identical to that observed experimentally for several type-2 topoisomerases from a variety of organisms, indicating that the different disentangling powers of the topoisomerases likely arise from variations in the hooked geometries they select. Taken together, our results suggest strongly that type-2 topoisomerases recognize not only the curvature of the G-segment but also that of the T-segment.

  12. Collaborating functions of BLM and DNA topoisomerase I in regulating human rDNA transcription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grierson, Patrick M.; Acharya, Samir; Groden, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Bloom's syndrome (BS) is an inherited disorder caused by loss of function of the recQ-like BLM helicase. It is characterized clinically by severe growth retardation and cancer predisposition. BLM localizes to PML nuclear bodies and to the nucleolus; its deficiency results in increased intra- and inter-chromosomal recombination, including hyper-recombination of rDNA repeats. Our previous work has shown that BLM facilitates RNA polymerase I-mediated rRNA transcription in the nucleolus (Grierson et al., 2012 [18]). This study uses protein co-immunoprecipitation and in vitro transcription/translation (IVTT) to identify a direct interaction of DNA topoisomerase I with the C-terminus of BLM in the nucleolus. In vitro helicase assays demonstrate that DNA topoisomerase I stimulates BLM helicase activity on a nucleolar-relevant RNA:DNA hybrid, but has an insignificant effect on BLM helicase activity on a control DNA:DNA duplex substrate. Reciprocally, BLM enhances the DNA relaxation activity of DNA topoisomerase I on supercoiled DNA substrates. Our study suggests that BLM and DNA topoisomerase I function coordinately to modulate RNA:DNA hybrid formation as well as relaxation of DNA supercoils in the context of nucleolar transcription

  13. Contribution of Type II Topoisomerase Mutations to Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Enterococcus faecium from Japanese Clinical Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urushibara, Noriko; Suzaki, Keisuke; Kawaguchiya, Mitsuyo; Aung, Meiji Soe; Shinagawa, Masaaki; Takahashi, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

    High-level fluoroquinolone resistance is conferred by the mutation of conserved serine and acidic amino acids in the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) of the A subunits of the type II topoisomerases, DNA gyrase (GyrA) and topoisomerase IV (ParC). In Japan, fluoroquinolone-resistant Enterococcus faecium continues to emerge in clinical settings. We analyzed 131 Japanese E. faecium clinical isolates for susceptibility to levofloxacin (LVFX), and QRDR mutational status. The bacterial collection had a high percentage of resistance (79%) and showed elevated drug minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs). Eighty-three isolates had single or combined mutations in gyrA and/or parC; all were resistant to LVFX. A strong correlation was evident between log-transformed MICs and the total number of QRDR mutations (r = 0.7899), confirming the involvement of QRDR mutations in drug resistance, as previously described. Three-dimensional modeling indicated that the amino acid change(s) in QRDR could disrupt the interaction between the enzymes and drugs: the most common cause of quinolone resistance. Interestingly, eight isolates had a single mutation on gyrA and exhibited significantly reduced susceptibility. These data imply that either DNA gyrase or topoisomerase IV can be the primary target of fluoroquinolones, although topoisomerase IV is commonly thought to be the primary target in gram-positive bacteria.

  14. Methanosarcina acetivorans C2A topoisomerase IIIα, an archaeal enzyme with promiscuity in divalent cation dependence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Morales

    Full Text Available Topoisomerases play a fundamental role in genome stability, DNA replication and repair. As a result, topoisomerases have served as therapeutic targets of interest in Eukarya and Bacteria, two of the three domains of life. Since members of Archaea, the third domain of life, have not been implicated in any diseased state to-date, there is a paucity of data on archaeal topoisomerases. Here we report Methanosarcina acetivorans TopoIIIα (MacTopoIIIα as the first biochemically characterized mesophilic archaeal topoisomerase. Maximal activity for MacTopoIIIα was elicited at 30-35°C and 100 mM NaCl. As little as 10 fmol of the enzyme initiated DNA relaxation, and NaCl concentrations above 250 mM inhibited this activity. The present study also provides the first evidence that a type IA Topoisomerase has activity in the presence of all divalent cations tested (Mg(2+, Ca(2+, Sr(2+, Ba(2+, Mn(2+, Fe(2+, Co(2+, Ni(2+, Cu(2+, Zn(2+ and Cd(2+. Activity profiles were, however, specific to each metal. Known type I (ssDNA and camptothecin and type II (etoposide, novobiocin and nalidixic acid inhibitors with different mechanisms of action were used to demonstrate that MacTopoIIIα is a type IA topoisomerase. Alignment of MacTopoIIIα with characterized topoisomerases identified Y317 as the putative catalytic residue, and a Y317F mutation ablated DNA relaxation activity, demonstrating that Y317 is essential for catalysis. As the role of Domain V (C-terminal domain is unclear, MacTopoIIIα was aligned with the canonical E. coli TopoI 67 kDa fragment in order to construct an N-terminal (1-586 and a C-terminal (587-752 fragment for analysis. Activity could neither be elicited from the fragments individually nor reconstituted from a mixture of the fragments, suggesting that native folding is impaired when the two fragments are expressed separately. Evidence that each of the split domains plays a role in Zn(2+ binding of the enzyme is also provided.

  15. Methanosarcina acetivorans C2A topoisomerase IIIα, an archaeal enzyme with promiscuity in divalent cation dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Raymond; Sriratana, Palita; Zhang, Jing; Cann, Isaac K O

    2011-01-01

    Topoisomerases play a fundamental role in genome stability, DNA replication and repair. As a result, topoisomerases have served as therapeutic targets of interest in Eukarya and Bacteria, two of the three domains of life. Since members of Archaea, the third domain of life, have not been implicated in any diseased state to-date, there is a paucity of data on archaeal topoisomerases. Here we report Methanosarcina acetivorans TopoIIIα (MacTopoIIIα) as the first biochemically characterized mesophilic archaeal topoisomerase. Maximal activity for MacTopoIIIα was elicited at 30-35°C and 100 mM NaCl. As little as 10 fmol of the enzyme initiated DNA relaxation, and NaCl concentrations above 250 mM inhibited this activity. The present study also provides the first evidence that a type IA Topoisomerase has activity in the presence of all divalent cations tested (Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Sr(2+), Ba(2+), Mn(2+), Fe(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+) and Cd(2+)). Activity profiles were, however, specific to each metal. Known type I (ssDNA and camptothecin) and type II (etoposide, novobiocin and nalidixic acid) inhibitors with different mechanisms of action were used to demonstrate that MacTopoIIIα is a type IA topoisomerase. Alignment of MacTopoIIIα with characterized topoisomerases identified Y317 as the putative catalytic residue, and a Y317F mutation ablated DNA relaxation activity, demonstrating that Y317 is essential for catalysis. As the role of Domain V (C-terminal domain) is unclear, MacTopoIIIα was aligned with the canonical E. coli TopoI 67 kDa fragment in order to construct an N-terminal (1-586) and a C-terminal (587-752) fragment for analysis. Activity could neither be elicited from the fragments individually nor reconstituted from a mixture of the fragments, suggesting that native folding is impaired when the two fragments are expressed separately. Evidence that each of the split domains plays a role in Zn(2+) binding of the enzyme is also provided.

  16. NPRL-Z-1, as a new topoisomerase II poison, induces cell apoptosis and ROS generation in human renal carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Szu-Ying; Pan, Shiow-Lin; Xiao, Zhi-Yan; Hsu, Jui-Ling; Chen, Mei-Chuan; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Teng, Che-Ming

    2014-01-01

    NPRL-Z-1 is a 4β-[(4"-benzamido)-amino]-4'-O-demethyl-epipodophyllotoxin derivative. Previous reports have shown that NPRL-Z-1 possesses anticancer activity. Here NPRL-Z-1 displayed cytotoxic effects against four human cancer cell lines (HCT 116, A549, ACHN, and A498) and exhibited potent activity in A498 human renal carcinoma cells, with an IC50 value of 2.38 µM via the MTT assay. We also found that NPRL-Z-1 induced cell cycle arrest in G1-phase and detected DNA double-strand breaks in A498 cells. NPRL-Z-1 induced ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) protein kinase phosphorylation at serine 1981, leading to the activation of DNA damage signaling pathways, including Chk2, histone H2AX, and p53/p21. By ICE assay, the data suggested that NPRL-Z-1 acted on and stabilized the topoisomerase II (TOP2)-DNA complex, leading to TOP2cc formation. NPRL-Z-1-induced DNA damage signaling and apoptotic death was also reversed by TOP2α or TOP2β knockdown. In addition, NPRL-Z-1 inhibited the Akt signaling pathway and induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. These results demonstrated that NPRL-Z-1 appeared to be a novel TOP2 poison and ROS generator. Thus, NPRL-Z-1 may present a significant potential anticancer candidate against renal carcinoma.

  17. Context-dependent antagonism between Akt inhibitors and topoisomerase poisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gálvez-Peralta, Marina; Flatten, Karen S; Loegering, David A; Peterson, Kevin L; Schneider, Paula A; Erlichman, Charles; Kaufmann, Scott H

    2014-05-01

    Signaling through the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway, which is aberrantly activated in >50% of carcinomas, inhibits apoptosis and contributes to drug resistance. Accordingly, several Akt inhibitors are currently undergoing preclinical or early clinical testing. To examine the effect of Akt inhibition on the activity of multiple widely used classes of antineoplastic agents, human cancer cell lines were treated with the Akt inhibitor A-443654 [(2S)-1-(1H-indol-3-yl)-3-[5-(3-methyl-2H-indazol-5-yl)pyridin-3-yl]oxypropan-2-amine; ATP-competitive] or MK-2206 (8-[4-(1-aminocyclobutyl)phenyl]-9-phenyl-2H-[1,2,4]triazolo[3,4-f][1,6]naphthyridin-3-one;dihydrochloride; allosteric inhibitor) or with small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1) along with cisplatin, melphalan, camptothecin, or etoposide and assayed for colony formation. Surprisingly different results were observed when Akt inhibitors were combined with different drugs. Synergistic effects were observed in multiple cell lines independent of PI3K pathway status when A-443654 or MK-2206 was combined with the DNA cross-linking agents cisplatin or melphalan. In contrast, effects of the Akt inhibitors in combination with camptothecin or etoposide were more complicated. In HCT116 and DLD1 cells, which harbor activating PI3KCA mutations, A-443654 over a broad concentration range enhanced the effects of camptothecin or etoposide. In contrast, in cell lines lacking activating PI3KCA mutations, partial inhibition of Akt signaling synergized with camptothecin or etoposide, but higher A-443654 or MK-2206 concentrations (>80% inhibition of Akt signaling) or PDK1 siRNA antagonized the topoisomerase poisons by diminishing DNA synthesis, a process that contributes to effective DNA damage and killing by these agents. These results indicate that the effects of combining inhibitors of the PI3K/Akt pathway with certain classes of chemotherapeutic agents might be more

  18. Inhibition of DNA topoisomerase I and growth inhibition of human cancer cell lines by an oleanane from Junellia aspera (Verbenaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pungitore, C R; Padron, J M; Leon, L G; Garcia, C; Ciuffo, G M; Martin, V S; Tonn, C E

    2007-05-15

    DNA topoisomerases and DNA polymerases are enzymes that play a crucial role in DNA metabolism events such as replication, transcription, recombination, and chromosome segregation during mitosis. Thus, DNA topoisomerases and DNA polymerases inhibitors could be expected to have antitumor effects. Naturally occurring triterpenoids isolated from Junellia aspera (Gillies & Hook; Moldenke) (Verbenaceae) were assayed for human DNA topoisomerase I and Taq DNA polymerase inhibitory activities. Maslinic acid (2) and its diacetyl derivative (7) showed human DNA topoisomerase I inhibitory activity with IC50 values in the range of 76-80 microM and growth inhibition against various human solid tumour cell lines with GI50 values in the range of 5-18 microM. The triterpene frames could be used for screening new inhibitors of the enzyme, and computer-simulated drug design using the frame and pocket structure of enzyme may in theory be a possible approach to develop new inhibitors.

  19. Evaluation of the topoisomerase II-inactive bisdioxopiperazine ICRF-161 as a protectant against doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, E.; Thougaard, A.V.; Grauslund, M.

    2009-01-01

    Anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy is a major problem in anti-cancer therapy. The only approved agent for alleviating this serious dose limiting side effect is ICRF-187 (dexrazoxane). The current thinking is that the ring-opened hydrolysis product of this agent, ADR-925, which is formed inside...... of topoisomerase II, resulting in the risk of additional myelosuppression in patients receiving ICRF-187 as a cardioprotectant in combination with doxorubicin. The development of a topoisomerase II-inactive iron chelating compound thus appeared attractive. In the present paper we evaluate the topoisomerase II......-inactive 3 carbon linker bisdioxopiperazine analog ICRF-161 as a cardioprotectant. We demonstrate that this compound does chelate iron and protects against doxorubicin-induced LDH release from primary rat cardiomyocytes in vitro, similarly to ICRF-187. The compound does not target topoisomerase II in vitro...

  20. Decreased nuclear matrix DNA topoisomerase II in human leukemia cells resistant to VM-26 and m-AMSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, D.J.; Danks, M.K.; Beck, W.T.

    1990-01-01

    CEM leukemia cells selected for resistance to VM-26 (CEM/VM-1) are cross-resistant to various other DNA topoisomerase II inhibitors but not to Vinca alkaloids. Since DNA topoisomerase II is a major protein of the nuclear matrix, the authors asked if alterations in nuclear matrix topoisomerase II might be important in this form of multidrug resistance. Pretreatment of drug-sensitive CEM cells for 2 h with either 5 μM VM-26 or 3 μM m-AMSA reduced the specific activity of newly replicated DNA on the nuclear matrix by 75 and 50%, respectively, relative to that of the bulk DNA. The decatenating and unknotting activities of DNA topoisomerase II were 6- and 7-fold lower, respectively, in the nuclear matrix preparations from the CEM/VM-1 cells compared to parental CEM cells. Western blot analysis revealed that the amount of immunoreactive topoisomerase II in the nuclear matrices of the CEM/VM-1 cells decreased 3.2-fold relative to that in CEM cells. Increasing the NaCl concentration used in the matrix isolation procedure from 0.2 to 1.8 M resulted in a progressive decrease in the specific activity of topoisomerase II in matrices of CEM/VM-1 but not CEM cells, which suggested that the association of the enzyme with the matrix is altered in the resistant cells. These data support the hypothesis that resistance to VM-26 and m-AMSA is directly related to the decreased activity of nuclear matrix topoisomerase II. In CEM/VM-1 cells the interaction of either VM-26 or m-AMSA with nuclear matrix topoisomerase II is specifically diminished

  1. Crystal structure of a covalent intermediate in DNA cleavage and rejoining by Escherichia coli DNA topoisomerase I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongtao; Cheng, Bokun; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2011-01-01

    DNA topoisomerases control DNA topology by breaking and rejoining DNA strands via covalent complexes with cleaved DNA substrate as catalytic intermediates. Here we report the structure of Escherichia coli topoisomerase I catalytic domain (residues 2–695) in covalent complex with a cleaved single-stranded oligonucleotide substrate, refined to 2.3-Å resolution. The enzyme-substrate intermediate formed after strand cleavage was captured due to the presence of the D111N mutation. This structure of the covalent topoisomerase-DNA intermediate, previously elusive for type IA topoisomerases, shows distinct conformational changes from the structure of the enzyme without bound DNA and provides detailed understanding of the covalent catalysis required for strand cleavage to take place. The portion of cleaved DNA 5′ to the site of cleavage is anchored tightly with extensive noncovalent protein–DNA interactions as predicted by the “enzyme-bridged” model. Distortion of the scissile strand at the -4 position 5′ to the cleavage site allows specific selectivity of a cytosine base in the binding pocket. Many antibacterial and anticancer drugs initiate cell killing by trapping the covalent complexes formed by topoisomerases. We have demonstrated in previous mutagenesis studies that accumulation of the covalent complex of bacterial topoisomerase I is bactericidal. This structure of the covalent intermediate provides the basis for the design of novel antibiotics that can trap the enzyme after formation of the covalent complex. PMID:21482796

  2. Non-apoptotic function of apoptotic proteins in the development of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Here we show that in the Malpighian tubules expression of apoptotic proteins commences right from embryonic development and continues throughout the larval stages. Overexpression of these proteins in the Malpighian tubules causes larval lethality resulting in malformed tubules. The number and regular organization of.

  3. Non-apoptotic function of apoptotic proteins in the development of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2011-07-08

    Jul 8, 2011 ... Here we show that in the Malpighian tubules expression of apoptotic proteins commences right from embryonic development and continues throughout the larval stages. Overexpression of these proteins in the Malpighian tubules causes larval lethality resulting in malformed tubules. The number and ...

  4. Characterization of molecular interactions between E. coli RNA polymerase and topoisomerase I by molecular simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Purushottam Babu; Chapagain, Prem P.; Banda, Srikanth; Darici, Yesim; Üren, Aykut; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli topoisomerase I (EctopoI), a type IA DNA topoisomerase, relaxes the negative DNA supercoiling generated by RNA polymerase (RNAP) during transcription elongation. Due to the lack of structural information on the complex, the exact nature of the RNAP-EctopoI interactions remains unresolved. Herein, we report for the first time, the structure-based modeling of the RNAP-EctopoI interactions using computational methods. Our results predict that the salt-bridge as well as hydrogen bond interactions are responsible for the formation and stabilization of the RNAP-EctopoI complex. Our investigations provide molecular insights for understanding how EctopoI interacts with RNAP, a critical step for preventing hypernegative DNA supercoiling during transcription. PMID:27448274

  5. Chromatin structure and dynamics in hot environments: architectural proteins and DNA topoisomerases of thermophilic archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visone, Valeria; Vettone, Antonella; Serpe, Mario; Valenti, Anna; Perugino, Giuseppe; Rossi, Mosè; Ciaramella, Maria

    2014-09-25

    In all organisms of the three living domains (Bacteria, Archaea, Eucarya) chromosome-associated proteins play a key role in genome functional organization. They not only compact and shape the genome structure, but also regulate its dynamics, which is essential to allow complex genome functions. Elucidation of chromatin composition and regulation is a critical issue in biology, because of the intimate connection of chromatin with all the essential information processes (transcription, replication, recombination, and repair). Chromatin proteins include architectural proteins and DNA topoisomerases, which regulate genome structure and remodelling at two hierarchical levels. This review is focussed on architectural proteins and topoisomerases from hyperthermophilic Archaea. In these organisms, which live at high environmental temperature (>80 °C <113 °C), chromatin proteins and modulation of the DNA secondary structure are concerned with the problem of DNA stabilization against heat denaturation while maintaining its metabolic activity.

  6. Chromatin Structure and Dynamics in Hot Environments: Architectural Proteins and DNA Topoisomerases of Thermophilic Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Visone

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In all organisms of the three living domains (Bacteria, Archaea, Eucarya chromosome-associated proteins play a key role in genome functional organization. They not only compact and shape the genome structure, but also regulate its dynamics, which is essential to allow complex genome functions. Elucidation of chromatin composition and regulation is a critical issue in biology, because of the intimate connection of chromatin with all the essential information processes (transcription, replication, recombination, and repair. Chromatin proteins include architectural proteins and DNA topoisomerases, which regulate genome structure and remodelling at two hierarchical levels. This review is focussed on architectural proteins and topoisomerases from hyperthermophilic Archaea. In these organisms, which live at high environmental temperature (>80 °C <113 °C, chromatin proteins and modulation of the DNA secondary structure are concerned with the problem of DNA stabilization against heat denaturation while maintaining its metabolic activity.

  7. Replacement of the human topoisomerase linker domain with the plasmodial counterpart renders the enzyme camptothecin resistant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Arnò

    Full Text Available A human/plasmodial hybrid enzyme, generated by swapping the human topoisomerase IB linker domain with the corresponding domain of the Plasmodium falciparum enzyme, has been produced and characterized. The hybrid enzyme displays a relaxation activity comparable to the human enzyme, but it is characterized by a much faster religation rate. The hybrid enzyme is also camptothecin resistant. A 3D structure of the hybrid enzyme has been built and its structural-dynamical properties have been analyzed by molecular dynamics simulation. The analysis indicates that the swapped plasmodial linker samples a conformational space much larger than the corresponding domain in the human enzyme. The large linker conformational variability is then linked to important functional properties such as an increased religation rate and a low drug reactivity, demonstrating that the linker domain has a crucial role in the modulation of the topoisomerase IB activity.

  8. Replacement of the human topoisomerase linker domain with the plasmodial counterpart renders the enzyme camptothecin resistant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnò, Barbara; D'Annessa, Ilda; Tesauro, Cinzia; Zuccaro, Laura; Ottaviani, Alessio; Knudsen, Birgitta; Fiorani, Paola; Desideri, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    A human/plasmodial hybrid enzyme, generated by swapping the human topoisomerase IB linker domain with the corresponding domain of the Plasmodium falciparum enzyme, has been produced and characterized. The hybrid enzyme displays a relaxation activity comparable to the human enzyme, but it is characterized by a much faster religation rate. The hybrid enzyme is also camptothecin resistant. A 3D structure of the hybrid enzyme has been built and its structural-dynamical properties have been analyzed by molecular dynamics simulation. The analysis indicates that the swapped plasmodial linker samples a conformational space much larger than the corresponding domain in the human enzyme. The large linker conformational variability is then linked to important functional properties such as an increased religation rate and a low drug reactivity, demonstrating that the linker domain has a crucial role in the modulation of the topoisomerase IB activity.

  9. Rolling circle amplification-based detection of human topoisomerase I activity on magnetic beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccaro, Laura; Tesauro, Cinzia; Cerroni, Barbara; Ottaviani, Alessio; Knudsen, Birgitta Ruth; Balasubramanian, Kannan; Desideri, Alessandro

    2014-04-15

    A high-sensitivity assay has been developed for the detection of human topoisomerase I with single molecule resolution. The method uses magnetic sepharose beads to concentrate rolling circle products, produced by the amplification of DNA molecules circularized by topoisomerase I and detectable with a confocal microscope as single and discrete dots, once reacted with fluorescent probes. Each dot, corresponding to a single cleavage-religation event mediated by the enzyme, can be counted due to its high signal/noise ratio, allowing detection of 0.3pM enzyme and representing a valid method to detect the enzyme activity in highly diluted samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Human topoisomerase IB is a target of a thiosemicarbazone copper(II) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vutey, Venn; Castelli, Silvia; D'Annessa, Ilda; Sâmia, Luciana B P; Souza-Fagundes, Elaine M; Beraldo, Heloisa; Desideri, Alessandro

    2016-09-15

    The human topoisomerase IB inhibition and the antiproliferative activity of 3-(4-bromophenyl)-1-pyridin-2-ylprop-2-en-1-one thiosemicarbazone HPyCT4BrPh alone and its copper(II) complex [Cu(PyCT4BrPh)Cl] was investigated. [Cu(PyCT4BrPh)Cl] inhibits both the DNA cleavage and religation step of the enzyme, whilst the ligand alone does not display any effect. In addition we show that coordination to copper(II) improves the cytotoxicity of HPyCT4BrPh against THP-1 leukemia and MCF-7 breast cancer cells. The data indicate that the copper(II) thiosemicarbazone complex may hit human topoisomerase IB and that metal coordination can be useful to improve cytotoxicity of this versatile class of compounds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of lapachol derivatives possessing indole scaffolds as topoisomerase I inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chong; Qu, Yan; Niu, Bingxuan

    2016-11-15

    A series of novel lapachol derivatives possessing indole scaffolds was designed and synthesized. The in vitro anti-proliferative activity of these novel compounds was evaluated in Eca109 and Hela cell lines. Almost all the tested compounds showed manifested potent inhibitory activity against the two tested cancer cell lines. Topo I-mediated DNA relaxation activity indicated that these novel compounds have potent Topoisomerase I inhibition activity. The most potent compounds 4n and 4k demonstrated more cytotoxicity than camptothecin and was comparable to camptothecin in inhibitory activities on Topoisomerase I in our biological assay. In addition, the Hoechst 33342 staining method also showed that the complex can induce Hela cell apoptosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Inhibition of Topoisomerase IIα and Induction of Apoptosis in Gastric Cancer Cells by 19-Triisopropyl Andrographolide

    OpenAIRE

    Monger, Adeep; Boonmuen, Nittaya; Suksen, Kanoknetr; Saeeng, Rungnapha; Kasemsuk, Teerapich; Piyachaturawat, Pawinee; Saengsawang, Witchuda; Chairoungdua, Arthit

    2017-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the most common cancer in Eastern Asia. Increasing chemoresistance and general systemic toxicities have complicated the current chemotherapy leading to an urgent need of more effective agents. The present study reported a potent DNA topoisomerase IIα inhibitory activity of an andrographolide analogue (19-triisopropyl andrographolide, analogue-6) in gastric cancer cells; MKN-45, and AGS cells. The analogue was potently cytotoxic to both gastric cancer cell lines with the half...

  13. HMGB1 interacts with human topoisomerase IIalpha and stimulates its catalytic activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štros, Michal; Bačíková, Alena; Muselíková Polanská, Eva; Štokrová, Jitka; Strauss, F.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 15 (2007), s. 5001-5013 ISSN 0305-1048 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA204/05/2031; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400040702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702; CEZ:AV0Z50520514; CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : HMGB1 * DNA topoisomerase IIalpha * DNA repair Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 6.954, year: 2007

  14. HMGB1 and HMGB2 proteins up-regulate cellular expression of human topoisomerase IIalpha

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štros, Michal; Muselíková Polanská, Eva; Štruncová, S.; Pospíšilová, Š.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 7 (2009), s. 2070-2086 ISSN 0305-1048 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400040702 Grant - others:GA MZd(CZ) NR9293 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : HMGB * topoisomerase IIalpha * cellular expression Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 7.479, year: 2009

  15. Activities of Fluoroquinolones against Streptococcus pneumoniae Type II Topoisomerases Purified as Recombinant Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Morrissey, Ian; George, John

    1999-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae topoisomerase IV and DNA gyrase have been purified from a fluoroquinolone-susceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae strain, from first-step mutants showing low-level resistance to ciprofloxacin, sparfloxacin, levofloxacin, and ofloxacin, and from two clinical isolates showing intermediate- and high-level fluoroquinolone resistance by a gene cloning method that produces recombinant proteins from Escherichia coli. The concentrations of ciprofloxacin, sparfloxacin, levofloxac...

  16. Effects of an unusual poison identify a lifespan role for Topoisomerase 2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Tombline, Gregory; Millen, Jonathan I.; Polevoda, Bogdan; Rapaport, Matan; Baxter, Bonnie; Van Meter, Michael; Gilbertson, Matthew; Madrey, Joe; Piazza, Gary A.; Rasmussen, Lynn; Wennerberg, Krister; White, E. Lucile; Nitiss, John L.; Goldfarb, David S.

    2017-01-01

    A progressive loss of genome maintenance has been implicated as both a cause and consequence of aging. Here we present evidence supporting the hypothesis that an age-associated decay in genome maintenance promotes aging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) due to an inability to sense or repair DNA damage by topoisomerase 2 (yTop2). We describe the characterization of LS1, identified in a high throughput screen for small molecules that shorten the replicative lifespan of yeast. LS1 accelerates...

  17. Probing Conformational Changes in Human DNA Topoisomerase IIα by Pulsed Alkylation Mass Spectrometry*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-tsung; Collins, Tammy R. L.; Guan, Ziqiang; Chen, Vincent B.; Hsieh, Tao-Shih

    2012-01-01

    Type II topoisomerases are essential enzymes for solving DNA topological problems by passing one segment of DNA duplex through a transient double-strand break in a second segment. The reaction requires the enzyme to precisely control DNA cleavage and gate opening coupled with ATP hydrolysis. Using pulsed alkylation mass spectrometry, we were able to monitor the solvent accessibilities around 13 cysteines distributed throughout human topoisomerase IIα by measuring the thiol reactivities with monobromobimane. Most of the measured reactivities are in accordance with the predicted ones based on a homology structural model generated from available crystal structures. However, these results reveal new information for both the residues not covered in the structural model and potential differences between the modeled and solution holoenzyme structures. Furthermore, on the basis of the reactivity changes of several cysteines located at the N-gate and DNA gate, we could monitor the movement of topoisomerase II in the presence of cofactors and detect differences in the DNA gate between two closed clamp enzyme conformations locked by either 5′-adenylyl β,γ-imidodiphosphate or the anticancer drug ICRF-193. PMID:22679013

  18. Cloning and biochemical characterization of Staphylococcus aureus type IA DNA topoisomerase comprised of distinct five domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung Eun; Kim, Hyun Ik; Park, Jong Woo; Park, Jong Kun; Lee, Jung Sup

    2011-04-01

    DNA topoisomerases play critical roles in regulating DNA topology and are essential enzymes for cell survival. In this study, a gene encoding type IA DNA topoisomerase was cloned from Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) sp. strain C-66, and the biochemical properties of recombinant enzyme was characterized. The nucleotide sequence analysis showed that the cloned gene contained an open reading frame (2070 bp) that could encode a polypeptide of 689 amino acids. The cloned gene actually produced 79.1 kDa functional enzyme (named Sau-TopoI) in Escherichia coli (E. coli). Sau-TopoI enzyme purified from E. coli showed ATP-independent and Mg(2+)-dependent manners for relaxing negatively supercoiled DNA. The relaxation activity of Sau-TopoI was inhibited by camptothecin, but not by nalidixic acid and etoposide. Cleavage site mapping showed that the enzyme could preferentially bind to and cleave the sequence GGNN↓CAT (N and ↓ represent any nucleotide and cleavage site, respectively). All these results suggest that the purified enzyme is type IA DNA topoisomerase. In addition, domain mapping analysis showed that the enzyme was composed of conserved four domains (I through IV), together with a variable C-terminal region containing a unique domain V. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Conditional silencing of topoisomerase I gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis validates its essentiality for cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Wareed; Menon, Shruti; Godbole, Adwait Anand; Karthik, Pullela V D N B; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2014-04-01

    Topoisomerases are an important class of enzymes for regulating the DNA transaction processes. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is one of the most formidable pathogens also posing serious challenges for therapeutic interventions. The organism contains only one type IA topoisomerase (Rv3646c), offering an opportunity to test its potential as a candidate drug target. To validate the essentiality of M. tuberculosis topoisomerase I (TopoI(Mt) ) for bacterial growth and survival, we have generated a conditionally regulated strain of topoI in Mtb. The conditional knockdown mutant exhibited delayed growth on agar plate. In liquid culture, the growth was drastically impaired when TopoI expression was suppressed. Additionally, novobiocin and isoniazid showed enhanced inhibitory potential against the conditional mutant. Analysis of the nucleoid revealed its altered architecture upon TopoI depletion. These studies establish the essentiality of TopoI for the M. tuberculosis growth and open up new avenues for targeting the enzyme. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Use of divalent metal ions in the DNA cleavage reaction of topoisomerase IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, Steven L.; Liou, Grace F.; Mitchenall, Lesley A.; Burgin, Alex B.; Maxwell, Anthony; Neuman, Keir C.; Osheroff, Neil

    2011-01-01

    It has long been known that type II topoisomerases require divalent metal ions in order to cleave DNA. Kinetic, mutagenesis and structural studies indicate that the eukaryotic enzymes utilize a novel variant of the canonical two-metal-ion mechanism to promote DNA scission. However, the role of metal ions in the cleavage reaction mediated by bacterial type II enzymes has been controversial. Therefore, to resolve this critical issue, this study characterized the DNA cleavage reaction of Escherichia coli topoisomerase IV. We utilized a series of divalent metal ions with varying thiophilicities in conjunction with oligonucleotides that replaced bridging and non-bridging oxygen atoms at (and near) the scissile bond with sulfur atoms. DNA scission was enhanced when thiophilic metal ions were used with substrates that contained bridging sulfur atoms. In addition, the metal-ion dependence of DNA cleavage was sigmoidal in nature, and rates and levels of DNA cleavage increased when metal ion mixtures were used in reactions. Based on these findings, we propose that topoisomerase IV cleaves DNA using a two-metal-ion mechanism in which one of the metal ions makes a critical interaction with the 3′-bridging atom of the scissile phosphate and facilitates DNA scission by the bacterial type II enzyme. PMID:21300644

  1. Molecular modeling of cationic porphyrin-anthraquinone hybrids as DNA topoisomerase IIβ inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arba, Muhammad; Ruslin; Ihsan, Sunandar; Tri Wahyudi, Setyanto; Tjahjono, Daryono H

    2017-12-01

    Human DNA Topoisomerase II has been regarded as a promising target in anticancer drug discovery. In the present study, we designed six porphyrin-anthraquinone hybrids bearing pyrazole or pyridine group as meso substituents and evaluated their potentials as DNA Topoisomerase IIβ inhibitor. First, we investigated the binding orientation of porphyrin hybrids into DNA topoisomerase IIβ employing AutoDock 4.2 and then performed 20-ns molecular dynamics simulations to see the dynamic stability of each porphyrin-Topo IIβ complex using Amber 14. We found that the binding of porphyrin hybrids occured through intercalation and groove binding mode in addition interaction with the amino acid residues constituting the active cavity of Topo IIβ. Each porphyrin-Topo IIβ complex was stabilized during 20-ns dynamics simulations. The MM-PBSA free energy calculation shows that the binding affinities of porphyrin hybrids were modified with the number of meso substituent. Interestingly, the affinity of all porphyrin hybrids to Topo IIβ was stronger than that of native ligand (EVP), indicating the potential of the designed porphyrin to be considered in experimental research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV mutations in an in vitro fluoroquinolone-resistant Coxiella burnetii strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranakis, Iosif; Sandalakis, Vassilios; Chochlakis, Dimosthenis; Tselentis, Yannis; Psaroulaki, Anna

    2010-06-01

    The etiological agent of Q fever, Coxiella burnetii, is an obligate intracellular bacterium that multiplies within a vacuole with lysosomal characteristics. Quinolones have been used as an alternative therapy for Q fever. In this study, quinolone-resistance-determining regions of the genes coding for DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV were analyzed by DNA sequencing from an in vitro fluoroquinolone-resistant C. burnetii strain (Q212). Sequencing and aligning of DNA gyrase encoding genes (gyrA and gyrB) and topoisomerase IV genes (parC and parE) revealed one gyrA mutation leading to the amino acid substitution Asp87Gly (Escherichia coli numbering), two gyrB mutations leading to the amino acid substitutions Ser431Pro and Met518Ile, and three parC mutations leading to the amino acid substitutions Asp69Asn, Thr80Ile, and Gly104Ser. The corresponding alignment of the C. burnetii Q212 reference strain, the in vitro developed fluoroquinolone-resistant C. burnetii Q212 strain, and E. coli resulted in the identification of several other naturally occurring mutations within and outside the quinolone-resistance-determining regions of C. burnetii providing indications of possible natural resistance to fluoroquinolones. The present study adds additional potential mutations in the DNA topoisomerases that may be involved in fluoroquinolone resistance in C. burnetii due to their previous characterization in other bacterial species.

  3. Novel Bacterial Topoisomerase Inhibitors with Potent Broad-Spectrum Activity against Drug-Resistant Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charrier, Cédric; Salisbury, Anne-Marie; Savage, Victoria J; Duffy, Thomas; Moyo, Emmanuel; Chaffer-Malam, Nathan; Ooi, Nicola; Newman, Rebecca; Cheung, Jonathan; Metzger, Richard; McGarry, David; Pichowicz, Mark; Sigerson, Ralph; Cooper, Ian R; Nelson, Gary; Butler, Hayley S; Craighead, Mark; Ratcliffe, Andrew J; Best, Stuart A; Stokes, Neil R

    2017-05-01

    The novel bacterial topoisomerase inhibitor class is an investigational type of antibacterial inhibitor of DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV that does not have cross-resistance with the quinolones. Here, we report the evaluation of the in vitro properties of a new series of this type of small molecule. Exemplar compounds selectively and potently inhibited the catalytic activities of Escherichia coli DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV but did not block the DNA breakage-reunion step. Compounds showed broad-spectrum inhibitory activity against a wide range of Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens, including biodefence microorganisms and Mycobacterium tuberculosis No cross-resistance with fluoroquinolone-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and E. coli isolates was observed. Measured MIC 90 values were 4 and 8 μg/ml against a panel of contemporary multidrug-resistant isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii and E. coli , respectively. In addition, representative compounds exhibited greater antibacterial potency than the quinolones against obligate anaerobic species. Spontaneous mutation rates were low, with frequencies of resistance typically 100 μM). In summary, the compounds' distinct mechanism of action relative to the fluoroquinolones, whole-cell potency, low potential for resistance development, and favorable in vitro safety profile warrant their continued investigation as potential broad-spectrum antibacterial agents. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  4. Type IIA topoisomerase inhibition by a new class of antibacterial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bax, Benjamin D; Chan, Pan F; Eggleston, Drake S; Fosberry, Andrew; Gentry, Daniel R; Gorrec, Fabrice; Giordano, Ilaria; Hann, Michael M; Hennessy, Alan; Hibbs, Martin; Huang, Jianzhong; Jones, Emma; Jones, Jo; Brown, Kristin Koretke; Lewis, Ceri J; May, Earl W; Saunders, Martin R; Singh, Onkar; Spitzfaden, Claus E; Shen, Carol; Shillings, Anthony; Theobald, Andrew J; Wohlkonig, Alexandre; Pearson, Neil D; Gwynn, Michael N

    2010-08-19

    Despite the success of genomics in identifying new essential bacterial genes, there is a lack of sustainable leads in antibacterial drug discovery to address increasing multidrug resistance. Type IIA topoisomerases cleave and religate DNA to regulate DNA topology and are a major class of antibacterial and anticancer drug targets, yet there is no well developed structural basis for understanding drug action. Here we report the 2.1 A crystal structure of a potent, new class, broad-spectrum antibacterial agent in complex with Staphylococcus aureus DNA gyrase and DNA, showing a new mode of inhibition that circumvents fluoroquinolone resistance in this clinically important drug target. The inhibitor 'bridges' the DNA and a transient non-catalytic pocket on the two-fold axis at the GyrA dimer interface, and is close to the active sites and fluoroquinolone binding sites. In the inhibitor complex the active site seems poised to cleave the DNA, with a single metal ion observed between the TOPRIM (topoisomerase/primase) domain and the scissile phosphate. This work provides new insights into the mechanism of topoisomerase action and a platform for structure-based drug design of a new class of antibacterial agents against a clinically proven, but conformationally flexible, enzyme class.

  5. The regulation of apoptotic cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarante-Mendes G.P.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is a fundamental biological phenomenon in which the death of a cell is genetically and biochemically regulated. Different molecules are involved in the regulation of the apoptotic process. Death receptors, coupled to distinct members of the caspases as well as other adapter molecules, are involved in the initiation of the stress signals (The Indictment. Members of the Bcl-2 family control at the mitochondrial level the decision between life and death (The Judgement. The effector caspases are responsible for all morphological and biochemical changes related to apoptosis including the "eat-me" signals perceived by phagocytes and neighboring cells (The Execution. Finally, apoptosis would have little biological significance without the recognition and removal of the dying cells (The Burial.

  6. The regulation of apoptotic cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.P. Amarante-Mendes

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is a fundamental biological phenomenon in which the death of a cell is genetically and biochemically regulated. Different molecules are involved in the regulation of the apoptotic process. Death receptors, coupled to distinct members of the caspases as well as other adapter molecules, are involved in the initiation of the stress signals (The Indictment. Members of the Bcl-2 family control at the mitochondrial level the decision between life and death (The Judgement. The effector caspases are responsible for all morphological and biochemical changes related to apoptosis including the "eat-me" signals perceived by phagocytes and neighboring cells (The Execution. Finally, apoptosis would have little biological significance without the recognition and removal of the dying cells (The Burial.

  7. Role of the Water–Metal Ion Bridge in Mediating Interactions between Quinolones and Escherichia coli Topoisomerase IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Although quinolones have been in clinical use for decades, the mechanism underlying drug activity and resistance has remained elusive. However, recent studies indicate that clinically relevant quinolones interact with Bacillus anthracis (Gram-positive) topoisomerase IV through a critical water–metal ion bridge and that the most common quinolone resistance mutations decrease drug activity by disrupting this bridge. As a first step toward determining whether the water–metal ion bridge is a general mechanism of quinolone–topoisomerase interaction, we characterized drug interactions with wild-type Escherichia coli (Gram-negative) topoisomerase IV and a series of ParC enzymes with mutations (S80L, S80I, S80F, and E84K) in the predicted bridge-anchoring residues. Results strongly suggest that the water–metal ion bridge is essential for quinolone activity against E. coli topoisomerase IV. Although the bridge represents a common and critical mechanism that underlies broad-spectrum quinolone function, it appears to play different roles in B. anthracis and E. coli topoisomerase IV. The water–metal ion bridge is the most important binding contact of clinically relevant quinolones with the Gram-positive enzyme. However, it primarily acts to properly align clinically relevant quinolones with E. coli topoisomerase IV. Finally, even though ciprofloxacin is unable to increase levels of DNA cleavage mediated by several of the Ser80 and Glu84 mutant E. coli enzymes, the drug still retains the ability to inhibit the overall catalytic activity of these topoisomerase IV proteins. Inhibition parallels drug binding, suggesting that the presence of the drug in the active site is sufficient to diminish DNA relaxation rates. PMID:25115926

  8. Nitric Oxide Down-Regulates Topoisomerase I and Induces Camptothecin Resistance in Human Breast MCF-7 Tumor Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilesh K Sharma

    Full Text Available Camptothecin (CPT, a topoisomerase I poison, is an important drug for the treatment of solid tumors in the clinic. Nitric oxide (·NO, a physiological signaling molecule, is involved in many cellular functions, including cell proliferation, survival and death. We have previously shown that ·NO plays a significant role in the detoxification of etoposide (VP-16, a topoisomerase II poison in vitro and in human melanoma cells. ·NO/·NO-derived species are reported to modulate activity of several important cellular proteins. As topoisomerases contain a number of free sulfhydryl groups which may be targets of ·NO/·NO-derived species, we have investigated the roles of ·NO/·NO-derived species in the stability and activity of topo I. Here we show that ·NO/·NO-derived species induces a significant down-regulation of topoisomerase I protein via the ubiquitin/26S proteasome pathway in human colon (HT-29 and breast (MCF-7 cancer cell lines. Importantly, ·NO treatment induced a significant resistance to CPT only in MCF-7 cells. This resistance to CPT did not result from loss of topoisomerase I activity as there were no differences in topoisomerase I-induced DNA cleavage in vitro or in tumor cells, but resulted from the stabilization/induction of bcl2 protein. This up-regulation of bcl2 protein in MCF-7 cells was wtp53 dependent as pifithrine-α, a small molecule inhibitor of wtp53 function, completely reversed CPT resistance, suggesting that wtp53 and bcl2 proteins played important roles in CPT resistance. Because tumors in vivo are heterogeneous and contaminated by infiltrating macrophages, ·NO-induced down-regulation of topoisomerase I protein combined with bcl2 protein stabilization could render certain tumors highly resistant to CPT and drugs derived from it in the clinic.

  9. Dynamics of tobacco DNA topoisomerases II in cell cycle regulation: to manage topological constrains during replication, transcription and mitotic chromosome condensation and segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Badri Nath; Achary, V Mohan Murali; Panditi, Varakumar; Sopory, Sudhir K; Reddy, Malireddy K

    2017-08-01

    The topoisomerase II expression varies as a function of cell proliferation. Maximal topoisomerase II expression was tightly coupled to S phase and G2/M phase via both transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation. Investigation in meiosis using pollen mother cells also revealed that it is not the major component of meiotic chromosomes, it seems to diffuse out once meiotic chromosomal condensation is completed. Synchronized tobacco BY-2 cell cultures were used to study the role of topoisomerase II in various stages of the cell cycle. Topoisomerase II transcript accumulation was observed during the S- and G2/M- phase of cell cycle. This biphasic expression pattern indicates the active requirement of topoisomerase II during these stages of the cell cycle. Through immuno-localization of topoisomerase II was observed diffusely throughout the nucleoplasm in interphase nuclei, whereas, the nucleolus region exhibited a more prominent immuno-positive staining that correlated with rRNA transcription, as shown by propidium iodide staining and BrUTP incorporation. The immuno-staining analysis also showed that topoisomerase II is the major component of mitotic chromosomes and remain attached to the chromosomes during cell division. The inhibition of topoisomerase II activity using specific inhibitors revealed quite dramatic effect on condensation of chromatin and chromosome individualization from prophase to metaphase transition. Partially condensed chromosomes were not arranged on metaphase plate and chromosomal perturbations were observed when advance to anaphase, suggesting the importance of topoisomerase II activity for proper chromosome condensation and segregation during mitosis. Contrary, topoisomerase II is not the major component of meiotic chromosomes, even though mitosis and meiosis share many processes, including the DNA replication, chromosome condensation and precisely regulated partitioning of chromosomes into daughter cells. Even if topoisomerase II is

  10. From the Worm in a Bottle of Mezcal: iDNA Confirmation of a Leech Parasitizing the Antillean Manatee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Flores, J; Rueda-Calderon, H; Kvist, S; Siddall, M E; Oceguera-Figueroa, A

    2016-10-01

    Invertebrate-derived ingested DNA (iDNA) is quickly proving to be a valuable, non-invasive tool for monitoring vertebrate species of conservation concern. Using the DNA barcoding locus, we successfully identified both the blood-feeding leech Haementeria acuecueyetzin and its blood meal-the latter is shown to be derived from the Caribbean manatee, Trichechus manatus . DNA amplification was successful despite the fact that the specimen was fixed in Mezcal (a beverage distilled from agave). We report the first confirmed case of a leech feeding on a manatee, the first record of H. acuecueyetzin for the State of Chiapas and, to our knowledge, the first case of successful DNA amplification of a biological sample fixed in Mezcal other than the caterpillar "worms" more commonly found in that beverage.

  11. topIb, a phylogenetic hallmark gene of Thaumarchaeota encodes a functional eukaryote-like topoisomerase IB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmane, Narimane; Gadelle, Danièle; Delmas, Stéphane; Criscuolo, Alexis; Eberhard, Stephan; Desnoues, Nicole; Collin, Sylvie; Zhang, Hongliang; Pommier, Yves; Forterre, Patrick; Sezonov, Guennadi

    2016-04-07

    Type IB DNA topoisomerases can eliminate torsional stresses produced during replication and transcription. These enzymes are found in all eukaryotes and a short version is present in some bacteria and viruses. Among prokaryotes, the long eukaryotic version is only observed in archaea of the phylum Thaumarchaeota. However, the activities and the roles of these topoisomerases have remained an open question. Here, we demonstrate that all available thaumarchaeal genomes contain a topoisomerase IB gene that defines a monophyletic group closely related to the eukaryotic enzymes. We show that the topIB gene is expressed in the model thaumarchaeon Nitrososphaera viennensis and we purified the recombinant enzyme from the uncultivated thaumarchaeon Candidatus Caldiarchaeum subterraneum. This enzyme is active in vitro at high temperature, making it the first thermophilic topoisomerase IB characterized so far. We have compared this archaeal type IB enzyme to its human mitochondrial and nuclear counterparts. The archaeal enzyme relaxes both negatively and positively supercoiled DNA like the eukaryotic enzymes. However, its pattern of DNA cleavage specificity is different and it is resistant to camptothecins (CPTs) and non-CPT Top1 inhibitors, LMP744 and lamellarin D. This newly described thermostable topoisomerases IB should be a promising new model for evolutionary, mechanistic and structural studies. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. Isolation and partial characterisation of a mammalian cell mutant hypersensitive to topoisomerase II inhibitors and X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, S.M.; Davies, S.L.; Hickson, I.D.; Hall, A.G.

    1990-01-01

    The authors have isolated, following one-step mutagenesis, a Chinese hamster ovary cell mutant hypersensitive to the intercalating agent, adriamycin. This agent exerts at least part of its cytotoxic action via inhibition of the nuclear enzyme, topoisomerase II. The mutant, designated ADR-3, showed hypersensitivity to all classes of topoisomerase II inhibitors, inlcuding actinomycin D, amsacrine (m-AMSA), etoposide (VP16) and mitoxantrone. ADR-3 cells also showed cross-sensitivity to ionizing radiation, but not no UV light. Topoisomerase II activity was elevated to a small but significant degree in ADR-3 cells, and this was reflected in a 1.5-fold higher level of topoisomerase II protein in ADR-3 than in CHO-K1 cells, as judged by Western blotting. ADR-3 cells were hypersensitive to cumene hydroperoxide but cross-resistant to hydrogen peroxide, suggesting possible abnormality in the detoxification of peroxides by glutathione peroxidase or catalase. Glutathione peroxidase activity against hydroperoxide was elevated to a small but significant extent in mutant cells. Catalase levels were not significantly different in ADR-3 and CHO-K1 cells. ADR-3 cells were recessive in hybrids with parental CHO-K1 cells with respect to sensitivity to topoisomerase II inhibitors and X-rays, and represent a different genetic complementation group from the previously reported adriamycin-sensitive mutant, ADR-1. (author). 34 refs.; 5 figs.; 3 tabs

  13. Deletion of the topoisomerase III gene in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus islandicus results in slow growth and defects in cell cycle control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xiyang; Guo, Li; Deng, Ling

    2011-01-01

    Topoisomerase III (topo III), a type IA topoisomerase, is widespread in hyperthermophilic archaea. In order to interrogate the in vivo role of archaeal topo III, we constructed and characterized a topo III gene deletion mutant of Sulfolobus islandicus. The mutant was viable but grew more slowly t...

  14. Differential cytotoxic pathways of topoisomerase I and II anticancer agents after overexpression of the E2F-1/DP-1 transcription factor complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofland, K; Petersen, B O; Falck, J

    2000-01-01

    and drug sensitivity in detail, we established human osteosarcoma U-20S-TA cells expressing full-length E2F-1/ DP-1 under the control of a tetracycline-responsive promoter, designated UE1DP-1 cells. Topoisomerase I levels and activity as well as the number of camptothecin-induced DNA single- and double...... of an E2F-1/ DP-1-induced post-DNA damage pathway rather than an increase in the number of replication forks caused by the S-phase initiation. In contrast, topoisomerase IIalpha levels (but not topoisomerase IIbeta levels), together with topoisomerase IIalpha promoter activity, increased 2--3-fold in UE1......-targeted anticancer drugs. However, the mechanism by which this occurs appears to be qualitatively different. The UE1DP-1 cell model may be used to elucidate post-DNA damage mechanisms of cell death induced by topoisomerase I-directed anticancer agents....

  15. Combination phenylbutyrate/gemcitabine therapy effectively inhibits in vitro and in vivo growth of NSCLC by intrinsic apoptotic pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schniewind Bodo

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Standard chemotherapy protocols in NSCLC are of limited clinical benefit. Histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors represent a new strategy in human cancer therapy. In this study the combination of the HDAC inhibitor phenylbutyrate (PB and the nucleoside analogue gemcitabine (GEM was evaluated and the mechanisms underlying increased cell death were analyzed. Methods Dose escalation studies evaluating the cytotoxicity of PB (0.01–100 mM, GEM (0.01–100 μg/ml and a combination of the two were performed on two NSCLC cell lines (BEN and KNS62. Apoptotic cell death was quantified. The involvement of caspase-dependent cell death and MAP-kinase activation was analyzed. Additionally, mitochondrial damage was determined. In an orthotopic animal model the combined effect of PB and GEM on therapy was analyzed. Results Applied as a single drug both GEM and PB revealed limited potential to induce apoptosis in KNS62 and Ben cells. Combination therapy was 50–80% (p = 0.012 more effective than either agent alone. On the caspase level, combination therapy significantly increased cleavage of the pro-forms compared to single chemotherapy. The broad spectrum caspase-inhibitor zVAD was able to inhibit caspase cleavage completely, but reduced the frequency of apoptotic cells only by 30%. Combination therapy significantly increased changes in MTP and the release of cyto-c, AIF and Smac/Diabolo into the cytoplasm. Furthermore, the inhibitors of apoptosis c-IAP1 and c-IAP2 were downregulated and it was shown that in combination therapy JNK activation contributed significantly to induction of apoptosis. The size of the primary tumors growing orthotopically in SCID mice treated for 4 weeks with GEM and PB was significantly reduced (2.2–2.7 fold compared to GEM therapy alone. The Ki-67 (KNS62: p = 0.015; Ben: p = 0.093 and topoisomerase IIα (KNS62: p = 0.008; Ben: p = 0.064 proliferation indices were clearly reduced in tumors treated by combination

  16. A small organic compound enhances the religation reaction of human topoisomerase I and identifies crucial elements for the religation mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnò, Barbara; Coletta, Andrea; Tesauro, Cinzia; Zuccaro, Laura; Fiorani, Paola; Lentini, Sara; Galloni, Pierluca; Conte, Valeria; Floris, Barbara; Desideri, Alessandro

    2013-03-07

    The different steps of the human Top1 (topoisomerase I) catalytic cycle have been analysed in the presence of a pentacyclic-diquinoid synthetic compound. The experiments indicate that it efficiently inhibits the cleavage step of the enzyme reaction, fitting well into the catalytic site. Surprisingly the compound, when incubated with the binary topoisomerase-DNA cleaved complex, helps the enzyme to remove itself from the cleaved DNA and close the DNA gap, increasing the religation rate. The compound also induces the religation of the stalled enzyme-CPT (camptothecin)-DNA ternary complex. Analysis of the molecule docked over the binary complex, together with its chemical properties, suggests that the religation enhancement is due to the presence on the compound of two oxygen atoms that act as hydrogen acceptors. This property facilitates the deprotonation of the 5' DNA end, suggesting that this is the limiting step in the topoisomerase religation mechanism.

  17. Insights into the mechanism of inhibition of novel bacterial topoisomerase inhibitors from characterization of resistant mutants of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, Sushmita D; Kutschke, Amy; McCormack, Kathy; Alm, Richard A

    2015-09-01

    The type II topoisomerases DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV are clinically validated bacterial targets that catalyze the modulation of DNA topology that is vital to DNA replication, repair, and decatenation. Increasing resistance to fluoroquinolones, which trap the topoisomerase-DNA complex, has led to significant efforts in the discovery of novel inhibitors of these targets. AZ6142 is a member of the class of novel bacterial topoisomerase inhibitors (NBTIs) that utilizes a distinct mechanism to trap the protein-DNA complex. AZ6142 has very potent activity against Gram-positive organisms, including Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Streptococcus pyogenes. In this study, we determined the frequencies of resistance to AZ6142 and other representative NBTI compounds in S. aureus and S. pneumoniae. The frequencies of selection of resistant mutants at 4× the MIC were 1.7 × 10(-8) for S. aureus and topoisomerase subunits were identified. Many of these substitutions were located outside the NBTI binding pocket and impact the susceptibility of AZ6142, resulting in a 4- to 32-fold elevation in the MIC over the wild-type parent strain. Data on cross-resistance with other NBTIs and fluoroquinolones enabled the differentiation of scaffold-specific changes from compound-specific variations. Our results suggest that AZ6142 inhibits both type II topoisomerases in S. aureus but that DNA gyrase is the primary target. Further, the genotype of the resistant mutants suggests that domain conformations and DNA interactions may uniquely impact NBTIs compared to fluoroquinolones. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Inhibitory effects of lapachol on rat C6 glioma in vitro and in vivo by targeting DNA topoisomerase I and topoisomerase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huanli; Chen, Qunying; Wang, Hong; Xu, Pingxiang; Yuan, Ru; Li, Xiaorong; Bai, Lu; Xue, Ming

    2016-11-16

    Lapachol is a natural naphthoquinone compound that possesses extensive biological activities. The aim of this study is to investigate the inhibitory effects of lapachol on rat C6 glioma both in vitro and in vivo, as well as the potential mechanisms. The antitumor effect of lapachol was firstly evaluated in the C6 glioma model in Wistar rats. The effects of lapachol on C6 cell proliferation, apoptosis and DNA damage were detected by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (MTS)/ phenazinemethosulfate (PMS) assay, hoechst 33358 staining, annexin V-FITC/PI staining, and comet assay. Effects of lapachol on topoisomerase I (TOP I) and topoisomerase II (TOP II) activities were detected by TOP I and TOP II mediated supercoiled pBR322 DNA relaxation assays and molecular docking. TOP I and TOP II expression levels in C6 cells were also determined. High dose lapachol showed significant inhibitory effect on the C6 glioma in Wistar rats (P lapachol could inhibit proliferation, induce apoptosis and DNA damage of C6 cells in dose dependent manners. Lapachol could inhibit the activities of both TOP I and II. Lapachol-TOP I showed relatively stronger interaction than that of lapachol-TOP II in molecular docking study. Also, lapachol could inhibit TOP II expression levels, but not TOP I expression levels. These results showed that lapachol could significantly inhibit C6 glioma both in vivo and in vitro, which might be related with inhibiting TOP I and TOP II activities, as well as TOP II expression.

  19. Inhibitory effects of lapachol on rat C6 glioma in vitro and in vivo by targeting DNA topoisomerase I and topoisomerase II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huanli Xu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lapachol is a natural naphthoquinone compound that possesses extensive biological activities. The aim of this study is to investigate the inhibitory effects of lapachol on rat C6 glioma both in vitro and in vivo, as well as the potential mechanisms. Methods The antitumor effect of lapachol was firstly evaluated in the C6 glioma model in Wistar rats. The effects of lapachol on C6 cell proliferation, apoptosis and DNA damage were detected by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl-2-(4-sulfophenyl-2H-tetrazolium (MTS/ phenazinemethosulfate (PMS assay, hoechst 33358 staining, annexin V-FITC/PI staining, and comet assay. Effects of lapachol on topoisomerase I (TOP I and topoisomerase II (TOP II activities were detected by TOP I and TOP II mediated supercoiled pBR322 DNA relaxation assays and molecular docking. TOP I and TOP II expression levels in C6 cells were also determined. Results High dose lapachol showed significant inhibitory effect on the C6 glioma in Wistar rats (P < 0.05. It was showed that lapachol could inhibit proliferation, induce apoptosis and DNA damage of C6 cells in dose dependent manners. Lapachol could inhibit the activities of both TOP I and II. Lapachol-TOP I showed relatively stronger interaction than that of lapachol-TOP II in molecular docking study. Also, lapachol could inhibit TOP II expression levels, but not TOP I expression levels. Conclusion These results showed that lapachol could significantly inhibit C6 glioma both in vivo and in vitro, which might be related with inhibiting TOP I and TOP II activities, as well as TOP II expression.

  20. Synthesis and biological activity of ferrocenyl indeno[1,2-c]isoquinolines as topoisomerase II inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wambang, Nathalie; Schifano-Faux, Nadège; Aillerie, Alexandre; Baldeyrou, Brigitte; Jacquet, Camille; Bal-Mahieu, Christine; Bousquet, Till; Pellegrini, Sylvain; Ndifon, Peter T; Meignan, Samuel; Goossens, Jean-François; Lansiaux, Amélie; Pélinski, Lydie

    2016-02-15

    Three series of indeno[1,2-c]isoquinolines bearing a ferrocenyl entity were synthesized and evaluated for DNA interaction, topoisomerase I and II inhibition, and cytotoxicity against breast human cancer cell lines. In the first and second series, the ferrocenyl scaffold was inserted as a linker between the two nitrogen atoms. In the last series, it was introduced at the end of the carbon chain. The present study showed that the ferrocenyl entity enhanced the topoisomerase II inhibition. Most compounds showed a potent growth inhibitory effect on MDA-MB-231 cell line with the IC50 in μM range. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Inhibition of Topoisomerase IIα and Induction of Apoptosis in Gastric Cancer Cells by 19-Triisopropyl Andrographolide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monger, Adeep; Boonmuen, Nittaya; Suksen, Kanoknetr; Saeeng, Rungnapha; Kasemsuk, Teerapich; Piyachaturawat, Pawinee; Saengsawang, Witchuda; Chairoungdua, Arthit

    2017-10-26

    Gastric cancer is the most common cancer in Eastern Asia. Increasing chemoresistance and general systemic toxicities have complicated the current chemotherapy leading to an urgent need of more effective agents. The present study reported a potent DNA topoisomerase IIα inhibitory activity of an andrographolide analogue (19-triisopropyl andrographolide, analogue-6) in gastric cancer cells; MKN-45, and AGS cells. The analogue was potently cytotoxic to both gastric cancer cell lines with the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 values) of 6.3±0.7 μM, and 1.7±0.05 μM at 48 h for MKN-45, and AGS cells, respectively. It was more potent than the parent andrographolide and the clinically used, etoposide with the IC50 values of >50 μM in MKN-45 and 11.3±2.9 μM in AGS cells for andrographolide and 28.5±4.4 μM in MKN-45 and 4.08±0.5 μM in AGS cells for etoposide. Analogue-6 at 2 μM significantly inhibited DNA topoisomerase IIα enzyme in AGS cells, induced DNA damage, activated cleaved PARP-1, and Caspase3 leading to late cellular apoptosis. Interestingly, the expression of tumor suppressor p53 was not activated. These results show the importance of 19-triisopropyl-andrographolide in its emerging selectivity to primary target on topoisomerase IIα enzyme, inducing DNA damage and apoptosis by p53- independent mechanism. Thereby, the results provide insights of the potential of 19-triisopropyl andrographolide as an anticancer agent for gastric cancer. The chemical transformation of andrographolide is a promising strategy in drug discovery of a novel class of anticancer drugs from bioactive natural products. Creative Commons Attribution License

  2. Inhibition of DNA topoisomerases I and II and cytotoxicity of compounds from Ulmus davidiana var. japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ming Shan; Lee, Yeun-Kyung; Li, Ying; Hwangbo, Kyoung; Lee, Chong-Soon; Kim, Jae-Ryong; Lee, Sunny Kyung-Seon; Chang, Hyun-Wook; Son, Jong-Keun

    2010-09-01

    Twenty five compounds including ten triterpenes (1-3, 5-11), six flavonoids (12-15, 24, 25), five lignans (17, 18, 21-23), two butenyl clohexnone glycosides (19-20), one fructofuranoside (16) and one fatty acid (4) were isolated from the roots of Ulmus davidiana var. japonica. The structures of those compounds were identified by comparing their physicochemical and spectral data with those of published in literatures. All the compounds were evaluated for DNA topoisomerase inhibitory activities and cytotoxicities. Among the purified compounds, 4 and 19 showed more potent inhibitory acitivities (IC(50): 39 and 19 μM, respectively) than camptothecin, as the positive control (IC(50): 46 μM) against topoisomerase I. Compounds, 4, 10, 12, 19, 24 and 25 showed strong inhibitory activities toward DNA topoisomerase II (IC(50): 0.1, 0.52, 0.47, 0.42, 0.17 μM and 17 nM, respectively), which were more potent than that of etoposide as positive control (IC(50): 20 μM). In A549 cell line, 5 and 6 showed cytotoxicities (IC(50): 4 μM and 3 μM, respectively, with IC(50) of camptothecin as positive control: 10.3 μM). In the HepG2 cell line, 3, 5 and 7 showed cytotoxicity (IC(50): 4, 3 and 4 μM, respectively, with IC(50) of camptothecin: 0.3 μM). Compounds 6, 12 and 23 showed cytotoxicities in the HT-29 cell line (IC(50): 19, 19 and 15 μM, respectively, with IC(50) of camptothecin: 2 μM).

  3. Topoisomerase II-mediated DNA cleavage by adocia- and xestoquinones from the Philippine sponge Xestospongia sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concepción, G P; Foderaro, T A; Eldredge, G S; Lobkovsky, E; Clardy, J; Barrows, L R; Ireland, C M

    1995-10-27

    Investigation of an orange Xestospongia sp. sponge collected at Cape Bolinao in northern Luzon, Philippines, yielded the known compounds adociaquinones A and B (1, 2) and six new metabolites, secoadociaquinones A and B (3, 4), 14-methoxyxestoquinone (5), 15-methoxyxestoquinone (6), 15-chloro-14-hydroxyxestoquinone (7), and 14-chloro-15-hydroxyxestoquinone (8). All compounds showed inhibition of topoisomerase II in catalytic DNA unwinding and/or decatenation assays. Furthermore, adociaquinone B showed activity in a KSDS assay, suggesting it inhibits the enzyme by freezing the enzyme-DNA cleavable complex. Interestingly, adociaquinone B did not displace ethidium bromide from DNA or unwind supercoiled DNA, implying it does not intercalate DNA.

  4. Cytostatic and apoptotic effects of paclitaxel in human ovarian tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millenbaugh, N J; Gan, Y; Au, J L

    1998-01-01

    The present study evaluated the cytostatic and apoptotic effects of a 24-hr paclitaxel treatment in ovarian tumors. Three-dimensional histocultures of surgical specimens from patients (n = 17) were used. The cytostatic effect was measured by inhibition of 96-hr cumulative DNA precursor incorporation and induction of apoptosis was determined by morphological changes. Paclitaxel produced partial inhibition of DNA precursor incorporation in about 40% of tumors (maximum inhibition of approximately 30%) and induced apoptosis in about 90% of tumors (maximum apoptotic index of approximately 15%). In responsive tumors, maximum cytostatic and apoptotic effects were achieved at < or = 1 microM with no further enhancement by increasing the drug concentration to 10 microM. In individual tumors, the apoptotic effect inversely correlated with cytostatic effect (r2 = 0.27, p = 0.031), and the maximal apoptotic index correlated with the LI for the untreated controls (r2 = 0.38, p < 0.01). More than 95% of apoptotic cells after paclitaxel treatment were labeled with DNA precursor. The incomplete cytostatic and apoptotic effects of paclitaxel and the link between DNA synthesis and apoptosis in ovarian tumors are similar to our previous findings in other human solid tumors. These findings suggest that (a) apoptosis is the major paclitaxel effect in advanced ovarian tumors, (b) tumor sensitivity to drug-induced cytostatic effect is opposite to sensitivity to apoptotic effect, (c) paclitaxel-induced apoptosis increases with increased cell proliferation and is completed after DNA synthesis, and (d) further increasing the dose to elevate plasma concentration beyond 1 microM may not improve treatment outcome.

  5. The structure of M.EcoKI Type I DNA methyltransferase with a DNA mimic antirestriction protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennaway, Christopher K.; Obarska-Kosinska, Agnieszka; White, John H.; Tuszynska, Irina; Cooper, Laurie P.; Bujnicki, Janusz M.; Trinick, John; Dryden, David T. F.

    2009-01-01

    Type-I DNA restriction–modification (R/M) systems are important agents in limiting the transmission of mobile genetic elements responsible for spreading bacterial resistance to antibiotics. EcoKI, a Type I R/M enzyme from Escherichia coli, acts by methylation- and sequence-specific recognition, leading to either methylation of DNA or translocation and cutting at a random site, often hundreds of base pairs away. Consisting of one specificity subunit, two modification subunits, and two DNA translocase/endonuclease subunits, EcoKI is inhibited by the T7 phage antirestriction protein ocr, a DNA mimic. We present a 3D density map generated by negative-stain electron microscopy and single particle analysis of the central core of the restriction complex, the M.EcoKI M2S1 methyltransferase, bound to ocr. We also present complete atomic models of M.EcoKI in complex with ocr and its cognate DNA giving a clear picture of the overall clamp-like operation of the enzyme. The model is consistent with a large body of experimental data on EcoKI published over 40 years. PMID:19074193

  6. Harnessing Apoptotic Cell Clearance to Treat Autoimmune Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Saas

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Early-stage apoptotic cells possess immunomodulatory properties. Proper apoptotic cell clearance during homeostasis has been shown to limit subsequent immune responses. Based on these observations, early-stage apoptotic cell infusion has been used to prevent unwanted inflammatory responses in different experimental models of autoimmune diseases or transplantation. Moreover, this approach has been shown to be feasible without any toxicity in patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation to prevent graft-versus-host disease. However, whether early-stage apoptotic cell infusion can be used to treat ongoing inflammatory disorders has not been reported extensively. Recently, we have provided evidence that early-stage apoptotic cell infusion is able to control, at least transiently, ongoing collagen-induced arthritis. This beneficial therapeutic effect is associated with the modulation of antigen-presenting cell functions mainly of macrophages and plasmacytoid dendritic cells, as well as the induction of collagen-specific regulatory CD4+ T cells (Treg. Furthermore, the efficacy of this approach is not altered by the association with two standard treatments of rheumatoid arthritis (RA, methotrexate and tumor necrosis factor (TNF inhibition. Here, in the light of these observations and recent data of the literature, we discuss the mechanisms of early-stage apoptotic cell infusion and how this therapeutic approach can be transposed to patients with RA.

  7. Analysis of DNA relaxation and cleavage activities of recombinant Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA topoisomerase I from a new expression and purification protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamalai Thirunavukkarasu

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA topoisomerase I is an attractive target for discovery of novel TB drugs that act by enhancing the accumulation of the topoisomerase-DNA cleavage product. It shares a common transesterification domain with other type IA DNA topoisomerases. There is, however, no homology between the C-terminal DNA binding domains of Escherichia coli and M. tuberculosis DNA topoisomerase I proteins. Results A new protocol for expression and purification of recombinant M. tuberculosis DNA topoisomerase I (MtTOP has been developed to produce enzyme of much higher specific activity than previously characterized recombinant enzyme. MtTOP was found to be less efficient than E. coli DNA topoisomerase I (EcTOP in removal of remaining negative supercoils from partially relaxed DNA. DNA cleavage by MtTOP was characterized for the first time. Comparison of DNA cleavage site selectivity with EcTOP showed differences in cleavage site preferences, but the preferred sites of both enzymes have a C nucleotide in the -4 position. Conclusion Recombinant M. tuberculosis DNA topoisomerase I can be expressed as a soluble protein and purified in high yield from E. coli host with a new protocol. Analysis of DNA cleavage with M. tuberculosis DNA substrate showed that the preferred DNA cleavage sites have a C nucleotide in the -4 position.

  8. Apoptotic response of malignant rhabdoid tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nocentini Silvano

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malignant rhabdoid tumors (MRTs are extremely aggressive and resist current radio- and chemotherapic treatments. To gain insight into the dysfunctions of MRT cells, the apoptotic response of a model cell line, MON, was analyzed after exposure to several genotoxic and non-genotoxic agents employed separately or in association. Results Fluorescence microscopy of chromatin morphology and electrophoretic analysis of internucleosomal DNA fragmentation revealed that MON cells were, comparatively to HeLa cells, resistant to apoptosis after treatment with etoposide, cisplatin (CisPt or X-rays, but underwent some degree of apoptosis after ultraviolet (UV C irradiation. Concomitant treatment of MON cells with X-rays or vinblastine and the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K inhibitor wortmannin resulted in synergistic induction of apoptosis. Western blot analysis showed that the p53 protein was upregulated in MON cells after exposure to all the different agents tested, singly or in combination. In treated cells, the p53 downstream effectors p21WAF1/CIP1, Mdm2 and Bax were induced with some inconsistency with regard to the accumulation of p53. Poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP cleavage, indicative of ongoing apoptosis, occurred in UVC-irradiated cells and, especially, in cells treated with combinations of X-rays or vinblastine with wortmannin. However, there was moderate or no PARP cleavage in cells treated with CisPt, X-rays, vinblastine or wortmannin singly or with the combinations X-rays plus CisPt or vinblastine and CisPt plus vinblastine or wortmannin. The synergistic effect on the induction of apoptosis exerted by some agent combinations corresponded with synergy in respect of MON cell growth inhibition. Conclusion These results suggest abnormalities in the p53 pathway and apoptosis control in MRT cells. The Ras/PI3-K/AKT signaling pathway might also be deregulated in these cells by generating an excess of survival factors. These

  9. c-erbB2 and topoisomerase IIα protein expression independently predict poor survival in primary human breast cancer: a retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritz, Peter; Cabrera, Cristina M; Dippon, Jürgen; Gerteis, Andreas; Simon, Wolfgang; Aulitzky, Walter E; Kuip, Heiko van der

    2005-01-01

    c-erbB2 (also known as HER-2/neu) and topoisomerase IIα are frequently overexpressed in breast cancer. The aim of the study was to analyze retrospectively whether the expression of c-erbB2 and topoisomerase IIα protein influences the long-term outcome of patients with primary breast cancer. In this study c-erbB2 and topoisomerase IIα protein were evaluated by immunohistochemistry in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue from 225 samples of primary breast cancer, obtained between 1986 and 1998. The prognostic value of these markers was analyzed. Of 225 primary breast tumor samples, 78 (34.7%) showed overexpression of either c-erbB2 (9.8%) or topoisomerase IIα protein (24.9%), whereas in 21 tumors (9.3%) both proteins were found to be overexpressed. Patients lacking both c-erbB2 and topoisomerase IIα overexpression had the best long-term survival. Overexpression of either c-erbB2 or topoisomerase IIα was associated with shortened survival, whereas patients overexpressing both c-erbB2 and topoisomerase IIα showed the worst disease outcome (P < 0.0001). Treatment with anthracyclines was not capable of reversing the negative prognostic impact of topoisomerase IIα or c-erbB2 overexpression. The results of this exploratory study suggest that protein expression of c-erbB2 and topoisomerase IIα in primary breast cancer tissues are independent prognostic factors and are not exclusively predictive factors for anthracycline response in patients with primary breast cancer

  10. Oxabicyclooctane-Linked Novel Bacterial Topoisomerase Inhibitors as Broad Spectrum Antibacterial Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Sheo B.; Kaelin, David E.; Wu, Jin; Miesel, Lynn; Tan, Christopher M.; Meinke, Peter T.; Olsen, David; Lagrutta, Armando; Bradley, Prudence; Lu, Jun; Patel, Sangita; Rickert, Keith W.; Smith, Robert F.; Soisson, Stephen; Wei, Changqing; Fukuda, Hideyuki; Kishii, Ryuta; Takei, Masaya; Fukuda, Yasumichi (Merck); (WuXi App Tec); (Kyorin)

    2014-05-08

    Bacterial resistance is eroding the clinical utility of existing antibiotics necessitating the discovery of new agents. Bacterial type II topoisomerase is a clinically validated, highly effective, and proven drug target. This target is amenable to inhibition by diverse classes of inhibitors with alternative and distinct binding sites to quinolone antibiotics, thus enabling the development of agents that lack cross-resistance to quinolones. Described here are novel bacterial topoisomerase inhibitors (NBTIs), which are a new class of gyrase and topo IV inhibitors and consist of three distinct structural moieties. The substitution of the linker moiety led to discovery of potent broad-spectrum NBTIs with reduced off-target activity (hERG IC50 > 18 μM) and improved physical properties. AM8191 is bactericidal and selectively inhibits DNA synthesis and Staphylococcus aureus gyrase (IC50 = 1.02 μM) and topo IV (IC50 = 10.4 μM). AM8191 showed parenteral and oral efficacy (ED50) at less than 2.5 mg/kg doses in a S. aureus murine infection model. A cocrystal structure of AM8191 bound to S. aureus DNA-gyrase showed binding interactions similar to that reported for GSK299423, displaying a key contact of Asp83 with the basic amine at position-7 of the linker.

  11. Carboxyl terminal domain basic amino acids of mycobacterial topoisomerase I bind DNA to promote strand passage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Wareed; Bhat, Anuradha Gopal; Leelaram, Majety Naga; Menon, Shruti; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2013-08-01

    Bacterial DNA topoisomerase I (topoI) carries out relaxation of negatively supercoiled DNA through a series of orchestrated steps, DNA binding, cleavage, strand passage and religation. The N-terminal domain (NTD) of the type IA topoisomerases harbor DNA cleavage and religation activities, but the carboxyl terminal domain (CTD) is highly diverse. Most of these enzymes contain a varied number of Zn(2+) finger motifs in the CTD. The Zn(2+) finger motifs were found to be essential in Escherichia coli topoI but dispensable in the Thermotoga maritima enzyme. Although, the CTD of mycobacterial topoI lacks Zn(2+) fingers, it is indispensable for the DNA relaxation activity of the enzyme. The divergent CTD harbors three stretches of basic amino acids needed for the strand passage step of the reaction as demonstrated by a new assay. We also show that the basic amino acids constitute an independent DNA-binding site apart from the NTD and assist the simultaneous binding of two molecules of DNA to the enzyme, as required during the catalytic step. Although the NTD binds to DNA in a site-specific fashion to carry out DNA cleavage and religation, the basic residues in CTD bind to non-scissile DNA in a sequence-independent manner to promote the crucial strand passage step during DNA relaxation. The loss of Zn(2+) fingers from the mycobacterial topoI could be associated with Zn(2+) export and homeostasis.

  12. Human topoisomerase IIα uses a two-metal-ion mechanism for DNA cleavage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deweese, Joseph E.; Burgin, Alex B.; Osheroff, Neil

    2008-01-01

    The DNA cleavage reaction of human topoisomerase IIα is critical to all of the physiological and pharmacological functions of the protein. While it has long been known that the type II enzyme requires a divalent metal ion in order to cleave DNA, the role of the cation in this process is not known. To resolve this fundamental issue, the present study utilized a series of divalent metal ions with varying thiophilicities in conjunction with DNA cleavage substrates that replaced the 3′-bridging oxygen of the scissile bond with a sulfur atom (i.e. 3′-bridging phosphorothiolates). Rates and levels of DNA scission were greatly enhanced when thiophilic metal ions were included in reactions that utilized sulfur-containing substrates. Based on these results and those of reactions that employed divalent cation mixtures, we propose that topoisomerase IIα mediates DNA cleavage via a two-metal-ion mechanism. In this model, one of the metal ions makes a critical interaction with the 3′-bridging atom of the scissile phosphate. This interaction greatly accelerates rates of enzyme-mediated DNA cleavage, and most likely is needed to stabilize the leaving 3′-oxygen. PMID:18653531

  13. Type II topoisomerase mutations in Bacillus anthracis associated with high-level fluoroquinolone resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bast, Darrin J; Athamna, Abed; Duncan, Carla L; de Azavedo, Joyce C S; Low, Donald E; Rahav, Galia; Farrell, David; Rubinstein, Ethan

    2004-07-01

    To identify and characterize the mechanisms of high-level fluoroquinolone resistance in two strains of Bacillus anthracis following serial passage in increasing concentrations of fluoroquinolones. Fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates of the Sterne and Russian Anthrax Vaccine STi strains were obtained following serial passage in the presence of increasing concentrations of four different fluoroquinolones. The quinolone-resistance-determining regions of the type II topoisomerase genes from the resistant strains were amplified by PCR and characterized by DNA sequence analysis. The MICs in the presence and absence of reserpine were determined using broth microdilution as a means of detecting active efflux. Single and double amino acid substitutions in the GyrA (Ser-85-Leu; Glu-89-Arg/Gly/Lys) and GrlA (Ser-81-Tyr; Val-96-Ala; Asn-70-Lys) were most common. A single amino acid substitution in GyrB (Asp-430-Asn) was also identified. Efflux only applied to isolates selected for by either levofloxacin or ofloxacin. Specific amino acid substitutions in the type II topoisomerase enzymes significantly contributed to the development of high-level fluoroquinolone resistance in B. anthracis. However, notable differences between the strains and the drugs tested were identified including the role of efflux and the numbers and types of mutations identified.

  14. Beyond topoisomerase inhibition: antitumor 1,4-naphthoquinones as potential inhibitors of human monoamine oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho-Cerqueira, Eduardo; Netz, Paulo A; do Canto, Vanessa P; Pinto, Angelo C; Follmer, Cristian

    2014-04-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) action has been involved in the regulation of neurotransmitters levels, cell signaling, cellular growth, and differentiation as well as in the balance of the intracellular polyamine levels. Although so far obscure, MAO inhibitors are believed to have some effect on tumors progression. 1,4-naphthoquinone (1,4-NQ) has been pointed out as a potential pharmacophore for inhibition of both MAO and DNA topoisomerase activities, this latter associated with antitumor activity. Herein, we demonstrated that certain antitumor 1,4-NQs, including spermidine-1,4-NQ, lapachol, and nor-lapachol display inhibitory activity on human MAO-A and MAO-B. Kinetic studies indicated that these compounds are reversible and competitive MAO inhibitors, being the enzyme selectivity greatly affected by substitutions on 1,4-NQ ring. Molecular docking studies suggested that the most potent MAO inhibitors are capable to bind to the MAO active site in close proximity of flavin moiety. Furthermore, ability to inhibit both MAO-A and MAO-B can be potentialized by the formation of hydrogen bonds between these compounds and FAD and/or the residues in the active site. Although spermidine-1,4-NQs exhibit antitumor action primarily by inhibiting topoisomerase via DNA intercalation, our findings suggest that their effect on MAO activity should be taken into account when their application in cancer therapy is considered. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. Topoisomerase-1 and -2A gene copy numbers are elevated in mismatch repair-proficient colorectal cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderstrup, Ida Marie Heeholm; Nygård, Sune Boris; Poulsen, Tim Svenstrup

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Topoisomerase 1 (TOP1) and 2A (TOP2A) are potential predictive biomarkers for irinotecan and anthracycline treatment, respectively, in colorectal cancer (CRC), and we have recently reported a high frequency of gene gain of the TOP1 and TOP2A genes in CRC. Furthermore, Mismatch Repair...

  16. The RecQ helicase-topoisomerase III-Rmi1 complex: a DNA structure-specific 'dissolvasome'?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mankouri, Hocine W; Hickson, Ian D

    2007-01-01

    RecQ helicases, together with topoisomerase III and Rmi1 family proteins, form an evolutionarily conserved complex that is essential for the maintenance of genome integrity. This complex, which we term RTR, is capable of, or has been implicated in, the processing of a diverse array of DNA...

  17. Resistance to topoisomerase cleavage complex induced lethality in Escherichia coli via titration of transcription regulators PurR and FNR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu I-Fen

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accumulation of gyrase cleavage complex in Escherichia coli from the action of quinolone antibiotics induces an oxidative damage cell death pathway. The oxidative cell death pathway has also been shown to be involved in the lethality following accumulation of cleavage complex formed by bacterial topoisomerase I with mutations that result in defective DNA religation. Methods A high copy number plasmid clone spanning the upp-purMN region was isolated from screening of an E. coli genomic library and analyzed for conferring increased survival rates following accumulation of mutant topoisomerase I proteins as well as treatment with the gyrase inhibitor norfloxacin. Results Analysis of the intergenic region upstream of purM demonstrated a novel mechanism of resistance to the covalent protein-DNA cleavage complex through titration of the cellular transcription regulators FNR and PurR responsible for oxygen sensing and repression of purine nucleotide synthesis respectively. Addition of adenine to defined growth medium had similar protective effect for survival following accumulation of topoisomerase cleavage complex, suggesting that increase in purine level can protect against cell death. Conclusions Perturbation of the global regulator FNR and PurR functions as well as increase in purine nucleotide availability could affect the oxidative damage cell death pathway initiated by topoisomerase cleavage complex.

  18. Advantages of an optical nanosensor system for the mechanistic analysis of a novel topoisomerase I targeting drug: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Marie B; Tesauro, Cinzia; Gonzalez, María; Kristoffersen, Emil L; Alonso, Concepción; Rubiales, Gloria; Coletta, Andrea; Frøhlich, Rikke; Stougaard, Magnus; Ho, Yi-Ping; Palacios, Francisco; Knudsen, Birgitta R

    2017-02-02

    The continuous need for the development of new small molecule anti-cancer drugs calls for easily accessible sensor systems for measuring the effect of vast numbers of new drugs on their potential cellular targets. Here we demonstrate the use of an optical DNA biosensor to unravel the inhibitory mechanism of a member of a new family of small molecule human topoisomerase I inhibitors, the so-called indeno-1,5-naphthyridines. By analysing human topoisomerase I catalysis on the biosensor in the absence or presence of added drug complemented with a few traditional assays, we demonstrate that the investigated member of the indeno-1,5-naphthyridine family inhibited human topoisomerase I activity by blocking enzyme-DNA dissociation. To our knowledge, this represents the first characterized example of a small molecule drug that inhibits a post-ligation step of catalysis. The elucidation of a completely new and rather surprising drug mechanism-of-action using an optical real time sensor highlights the value of this assay system in the search for new topoisomerase I targeting small molecule drugs.

  19. Characterization of New Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec (SCCmec) and Topoisomerase Genes in Fluoroquinolone- and Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius▿

    OpenAIRE

    Descloux, Sybill; Rossano, Alexandra; Perreten, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone- and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolates harbor two new staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) elements that belong to class A, allotype 3 (SCCmec II-III), and to the new allotype 5 (SCCmec VII). Analysis of the complete nucleotide sequences of the topoisomerase loci gyrB/gyrA and grlB/grlA revealed mutations involved in fluoroquinolone resistance.

  20. Characterization of new staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) and topoisomerase genes in fluoroquinolone- and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descloux, Sybill; Rossano, Alexandra; Perreten, Vincent

    2008-05-01

    Fluoroquinolone- and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolates harbor two new staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) elements that belong to class A, allotype 3 (SCCmec II-III), and to the new allotype 5 (SCCmec VII). Analysis of the complete nucleotide sequences of the topoisomerase loci gyrB/gyrA and grlB/grlA revealed mutations involved in fluoroquinolone resistance.

  1. Surface code—biophysical signals for apoptotic cell clearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biermann, Mona; Maueröder, Christian; Brauner, Jan M; Chaurio, Ricardo; Herrmann, Martin; Muñoz, Luis E; Janko, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Apoptotic cell death and the clearance of dying cells play an important and physiological role in embryonic development and normal tissue turnover. In contrast to necrosis, apoptosis proceeds in an anti-inflammatory manner. It is orchestrated by the timed release and/or exposure of so-called ‘find-me’, ‘eat me’ and ‘tolerate me’ signals. Mononuclear phagocytes are attracted by various ‘find-me’ signals, including proteins, nucleotides, and phospholipids released by the dying cell, whereas the involvement of granulocytes is prevented via ‘stay away’ signals. The exposure of anionic phospholipids like phosphatidylserine (PS) by apoptotic cells on the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane is one of the main ‘eat me’ signals. PS is recognized by a number of innate receptors as well as by soluble bridging molecules on the surface of phagocytes. Importantly, phagocytes are able to discriminate between viable and apoptotic cells both exposing PS. Due to cytoskeleton remodeling PS has a higher lateral mobility on the surfaces of apoptotic cells thereby promoting receptor clustering on the phagocyte. PS not only plays an important role in the engulfment process, but also acts as ‘tolerate me’ signal inducing the release of anti-inflammatory cytokines by phagocytes. An efficient and fast clearance of apoptotic cells is required to prevent secondary necrosis and leakage of intracellular danger signals into the surrounding tissue. Failure or prolongation of the clearance process leads to the release of intracellular antigens into the periphery provoking inflammation and development of systemic inflammatory autoimmune disease like systemic lupus erythematosus. Here we review the current findings concerning apoptosis-inducing pathways, important players of apoptotic cell recognition and clearance as well as the role of membrane remodeling in the engulfment of apoptotic cells by phagocytes. (paper)

  2. Thermodynamics of the DNA structural selectivity of the Pol I DNA polymerases from Escherichia coli and Thermus aquaticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wowor, Andy J; Datta, Kausiki; Brown, Hiromi S; Thompson, Gregory S; Ray, Sreerupa; Grove, Anne; LiCata, Vince J

    2010-06-16

    Understanding the thermodynamics of substrate selection by DNA polymerase I is important for characterizing the balance between replication and repair for this enzyme in vivo. Due to their sequence and structural similarities, Klenow and Klentaq, the large fragments of the Pol I DNA polymerases from Escherichia coli and Thermus aquaticus, are considered functional homologs. Klentaq, however, does not have a functional proofreading site. Examination of the DNA binding thermodynamics of Klenow and Klentaq to different DNA structures: single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA), primer-template DNA (pt-DNA), and blunt-end double-stranded DNA (ds-DNA) show that the binding selectivity pattern is similar when examined across a wide range of salt concentration, but can significantly differ at any individual salt concentration. For both proteins, binding of single-stranded DNA shifts from weakest to tightest binding of the three structures as the salt concentration increases. Both Klenow and Klentaq release two to three more ions when binding to pt-DNA and ds-DNA than when binding to ss-DNA. Klenow exhibits significant differences in the Delta C(p) of binding to pt-DNA versus ds-DNA, and a difference in pI for these two complexes, whereas Klentaq does not, suggesting that Klenow and Klentaq discriminate between these two structures differently. Taken together, the data suggest that the two polymerases bind ds-DNA very differently, but that both bind pt-DNA and ss-DNA similarly, despite the absence of a proofreading site in Klentaq. (c) 2010 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Rho kinase regulates fragmentation and phagocytosis of apoptotic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlando, Kelly A.; Stone, Nicole L.; Pittman, Randall N.

    2006-01-01

    During the execution phase of apoptosis, a cell undergoes cytoplasmic and nuclear changes that prepare it for death and phagocytosis. The end-point of the execution phase is condensation into a single apoptotic body or fragmentation into multiple apoptotic bodies. Fragmentation is thought to facilitate phagocytosis; however, mechanisms regulating fragmentation are unknown. An isoform of Rho kinase, ROCK-I, drives membrane blebbing through its activation of actin-myosin contraction; this raises the possibility that ROCK-I may regulate other execution phase events, such as cellular fragmentation. Here, we show that COS-7 cells fragment into a number of small apoptotic bodies during apoptosis; treating with ROCK inhibitors (Y-27632 or H-1152) prevents fragmentation. Latrunculin B and blebbistatin, drugs that interfere with actin-myosin contraction, also inhibit fragmentation. During apoptosis, ROCK-I is cleaved and activated by caspases, while ROCK-II is not activated, but rather translocates to a cytoskeletal fraction. siRNA knock-down of ROCK-I but not ROCK-II inhibits fragmentation of dying cells, consistent with ROCK-I being required for apoptotic fragmentation. Finally, cells dying in the presence of the ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 are not efficiently phagocytized. These data show that ROCK plays an essential role in fragmentation and phagocytosis of apoptotic cells

  4. Cell cycle stage dependent variations in drug-induced topoisomerase II mediated DNA cleavage and cytotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estey, E.; Adlakha, R.C.; Hittelman, W.N.; Zwelling, L.A.

    1987-01-01

    The DNA cleavage produced by 4'-(9-acridinylamino)methanesulfon-m-anisidide (m-AMSA) in mammalian cells is putatively mediated by topoisomerase II. The authors found that in synchronized HeLa cells the frequency of such cleavage was 4-15-fold greater in mitosis than in S while the DNA of G 1 and G 2 cells exhibited an intermediate susceptibility to cleavage. The hypersensitivity of mitotic DNA to m-AMSA-induced cleavage was acquired relatively abruptly in late G 2 and was lost similarly abruptly in early G 1 . The susceptibility of mitotic cells to m-AMSA-induced DNA cleavage was not clearly paralleled by an increase in topoisomerase II activity in 350 mM NaCl extracts from mitotic cells compared to similar extracts from cells in G 1 , S, or G 2 . Furthermore, equal amounts of decatenating activity from cells in mitosis and S produced equal amounts of m-AMSA-induced cleavage of simian virus 40 (SV40) DNA; i.e., the interaction between m-AMSA and extractable enzyme was similar in mitosis and S. The DNA of mitotic cells was also hypersensitive to cleavage by 4'-demethylepipodophyllotoxin 4-(4,6-O-ethylidene-β-D-glucopyranoside) (etoposide), a drug that produces topoisomerase II mediated DNA cleavage without binding to DNA. Cell cycle stage dependent fluctuations in m-AMSA-induced DNA cleavage may result from fluctuations in the structure of chromatin per se that occur during the cell cycle. Surprisingly, cell cycle stage dependent differences in m-AMSA-induced DNA cleavage did not correlate with differences in the susceptibility to the cytotoxic effects of the drug. In fact, cells in S were most sensitive to these effects. These results are an exception to the previously observed parallel between the susceptibility of mammalian cells to drug-induced DNA cleavage and the susceptibility of the cells to drug-induced cytotoxicity and indicate the complexity of any relationship between the two phenomena

  5. Opium induces apoptosis in Jurkat cells via promotion of pro-apoptotic and inhibition of anti-apoptotic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arababadi, Mohammad Kazemi; Asadikaram, Gholamreza

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the important molecules involved in apoptosis induction by opium in Jurkat cell line. Jurkat cells were incubated 48 hrs with 2.86×10(-5) g/ml concentration of opium and apoptosis as well as expression levels of related molecules were measured. Our results demonstrated that 50.3±0.2 percent of opium treated Jurkat cells were revealed apoptotic features. The levels of mRNA of several pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic molecules were increased and decreased, respectively, in the opium treated cells. The results also demonstrated that expression levels of BCL2, DFFA and NOL3 as anti-apoptotic molecules were increased in the opium treated cells. It seems that opium induces apoptosis in Jurkat cells via both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. Although opium induces apoptosis in the cells but increased expression of some anti-apoptotic molecules may be a normal resistance of the cell for death.

  6. Analysis of RuvABC and RecG Involvement in the Escherichia coli Response to the Covalent Topoisomerase-DNA Complex▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Jeanette H.; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2010-01-01

    Topoisomerases form a covalent enzyme-DNA intermediate after initial DNA cleavage. Trapping of the cleavage complex formed by type IIA topoisomerases initiates the bactericidal action of fluoroquinolones. It should be possible also to identify novel antibacterial lead compounds that act with a similar mechanism on type IA bacterial topoisomerases. The cellular response and repair pathways for trapped topoisomerase complexes remain to be fully elucidated. The RuvAB and RecG proteins could play a role in the conversion of the initial protein-DNA complex to double-strand breaks and also in the resolution of the Holliday junction during homologous recombination. Escherichia coli strains with ruvA and recG mutations are found to have increased sensitivity to low levels of norfloxacin treatment, but the mutations had more pronounced effects on survival following the accumulation of covalent complexes formed by mutant topoisomerase I defective in DNA religation. Covalent topoisomerase I and DNA gyrase complexes are converted into double-strand breaks for SOS induction by the RecBCD pathway. SOS induction following topoisomerase I complex accumulation is significantly lower in the ruvA and recG mutants than in the wild-type background, suggesting that RuvAB and RecG may play a role in converting the initial single-strand DNA-protein cleavage complex into a double-strand break prior to repair by homologous recombination. The use of a ruvB mutant proficient in homologous recombination but not in replication fork reversal demonstrated that the replication fork reversal function of RuvAB is required for SOS induction by the covalent complex formed by topoisomerase I. PMID:20601468

  7. Responding to the challenge of untreatable gonorrhea: ETX0914, a first-in-class agent with a distinct mechanism-of-action against bacterial Type II topoisomerases

    OpenAIRE

    Basarab, Gregory S.; Kern, Gunther H.; McNulty, John; Mueller, John P.; Lawrence, Kenneth; Vishwanathan, Karthick; Alm, Richard A.; Barvian, Kevin; Doig, Peter; Galullo, Vincent; Gardner, Humphrey; Gowravaram, Madhusudhan; Huband, Michael; Kimzey, Amy; Morningstar, Marshall

    2015-01-01

    With the diminishing effectiveness of current antibacterial therapies, it is critically important to discover agents that operate by a mechanism that circumvents existing resistance. ETX0914, the first of a new class of antibacterial agent targeted for the treatment of gonorrhea, operates by a novel mode-of-inhibition against bacterial type II topoisomerases. Incorporating an oxazolidinone on the scaffold mitigated toxicological issues often seen with topoisomerase inhibitors. Organisms resis...

  8. Analysis of RuvABC and RecG involvement in the escherichia coli response to the covalent topoisomerase-DNA complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Jeanette H; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2010-09-01

    Topoisomerases form a covalent enzyme-DNA intermediate after initial DNA cleavage. Trapping of the cleavage complex formed by type IIA topoisomerases initiates the bactericidal action of fluoroquinolones. It should be possible also to identify novel antibacterial lead compounds that act with a similar mechanism on type IA bacterial topoisomerases. The cellular response and repair pathways for trapped topoisomerase complexes remain to be fully elucidated. The RuvAB and RecG proteins could play a role in the conversion of the initial protein-DNA complex to double-strand breaks and also in the resolution of the Holliday junction during homologous recombination. Escherichia coli strains with ruvA and recG mutations are found to have increased sensitivity to low levels of norfloxacin treatment, but the mutations had more pronounced effects on survival following the accumulation of covalent complexes formed by mutant topoisomerase I defective in DNA religation. Covalent topoisomerase I and DNA gyrase complexes are converted into double-strand breaks for SOS induction by the RecBCD pathway. SOS induction following topoisomerase I complex accumulation is significantly lower in the ruvA and recG mutants than in the wild-type background, suggesting that RuvAB and RecG may play a role in converting the initial single-strand DNA-protein cleavage complex into a double-strand break prior to repair by homologous recombination. The use of a ruvB mutant proficient in homologous recombination but not in replication fork reversal demonstrated that the replication fork reversal function of RuvAB is required for SOS induction by the covalent complex formed by topoisomerase I.

  9. DNA Topoisomerase Inhibitory Activity of Constituents from the Fruits of Illicium verum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae In; Shin, Bora; Kim, Geum Jin; Choi, Hyukjae; Lee, Chong Soon; Woo, Mi Hee; Oh, Dong-Chan; Son, Jong Keun

    2017-12-01

    Three new compounds, a sesquilignan (1) and two glucosylated phenylpropanoids (2, 3), and seven known compounds (4-10), were isolated from the fruits of Illicium verum HOOK. FIL. (Illiciaceae). The structures of 1-3 were determined based on one and two dimensional (1D- and 2D-) NMR data and electronic circular dichroism (ECD) spectra analyses. Compounds 3, 5, 6, and 8-10 exhibited potent inhibitory activities against topoisomerase II with IC 50 values of 54.6, 25.5, 17.9, 12.1, 0.3 and 1.0 µM, respectively, compared to etoposide, the positive control, with an IC 50 of 43.8 µM.

  10. Topoisomerase I copy number alterations as biomarker for irinotecan efficacy in metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palshof, Jesper Andreas; Hogdall, Estrid Vilma Solyom; Poulsen, Tim Svenstrup

    2017-01-01

    Background No biomarker exists to guide the optimal choice of chemotherapy for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. We examined the copy numbers (CN) of topoisomerase I (TOP1) as well as the ratios of TOP1/CEN-20 and TOP1/CEN-2 as biomarkers for irinotecan efficacy in patients...... with metastatic colorectal cancer. Methods From a national cohort, we identified 163 patients treated every third week with irinotecan 350 mg/m2 as second-line therapy. Among these 108 were eligible for analyses and thus entered the study. Primary tumors samples were collected and tissue microarray (TMA) blocks...... of the markers TOP1 CN, TOP1/CEN-20-ratio or TOP1/CEN-2-ratio were associated with progression free survival, overall survival or baseline characteristics. Yet, we observed a borderline association for a stepwise increase of the TOP1 CN in relation to objective response as hazard ratio were 1.35 (95% CI 0...

  11. Topoisomerase-1 gene copy aberrations are frequent in patients with breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kümler, Iben; Balslev, Eva; Poulsen, Tim S.

    2015-01-01

    Topoisomerase-1 (Top1) targeting drugs have shown promising efficacy in patients with metastatic breast cancer (BC). However, these drugs are rather toxic calling for development and validation of predictive biomarkers to increase the therapeutic index. As these drugs are targeting the Top1 protein......, and since no validated anti-Top1 antibodies for immunohistochemistry have been reported, we raised the hypothesis that TOP1 gene amplifications may serve as a proxy for the Top1 protein and thereby a biomarker of response to treatment with Top1 inhibitors in BC. The aim was to determine the prevalence...... of TOP1 gene copy gain in BC. The prevalence of TOP1 gene copy gain was investigated by fluorescence in situ hybridization with a TOP1/CEN-20 probemix in normal breast tissue (N=100) and in tissue from patients with metastatic BC in a discovery (N=100) and a validation cohort (N=205). As amplification...

  12. Phaeophytins from Thyrsacanthus ramosissimus Moric. with inhibitory activity on human DNA topoisomerase II-{alpha}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabral, Analucia Guedes Silveira; Tenorio-Souza, Fabio Henrique; Moura, Marcelo Dantas; Mota, Sabrina Gondim Ribeiro; Silva Lins, Antonio Claudio da; Dias, Celidarque da Silva; Barbosa-Filho, Jose Maria [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Frmaceuticas; Giulietti, Ana Maria [Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana, Feira de Santana, BA (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Biologicas; Silva, Tania Maria Sarmento da [Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Moleculares; Santos, Creusioni Figueredo dos, E-mail: jbarbosa@ltf.ufpb.br [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil). Dept. de Biologia Molecular

    2012-07-01

    Our study reports the extraction and isolation of a new phaeophytin derivative 15{sup 1}-hydroxy-(15{sup 1}-S)-porphyrinolactone, designated anamariaine (1) herein, isolated from the chloroform fraction of aerial parts of Thyrsacanthus ramosissimus Moric. along with the known 15{sup 1}-ethoxy-(15{sup 1}-S)-porphyrinolactone (2). These compounds were identified by usual spectroscopic methods. Both compounds were subjected to in vitro (inhibitory activity) tests by means of supercoiled DNA relaxation techniques and were shown to display inhibitory activity against human DNA topoisomerase II-{alpha} at 50 {mu}M. Interconversion of these two pigments under the mild conditions of the isolation techniques should be highly unlikely but cannot be entirely ruled out. (author)

  13. The gene encoding topoisomerase I from the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosh, K; Kilbey, B

    1995-09-22

    Part of the topoisomerase I (TopoI)-encoding gene from Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) was isolated by PCR from cDNA using oligodeoxyribonucleotides modelled on the highly conserved regions of sequence from other species. The entire TopoI gene was obtained by screening a Pf K1 HindIII-EcoRI genomic library in lambda NM1149 with a random-labeled heterologous probe from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae TopoI gene. DNA sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame of 2520 nt encoding a deduced protein of 839 amino acids (aa) with no detectable introns. The Pf TopoI aa sequence has about 40% identity with most eukaryotic TopoI homologues. The gene is located as a single copy on chromosome 5 and Northern analysis identified a transcript of 3.8 kb.

  14. Topoisomerase I as a Biomarker: Detection of Activity at the Single Molecule Level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Proszek, Joanna; Roy, Amit; Jakobsen, Ann-Katrine

    2014-01-01

    of hTopI cleavage-religation activity at the single molecule level, may be used to detect posttranslational enzymatic differences influencing CPT response. These differences cannot be detected by analysis of hTopI gene copy number, mRNA amount, or protein amount, and only become apparent upon measuring......Human topoisomerase I (hTopI) is an essential cellular enzyme. The enzyme is often upregulated in cancer cells, and it is a target for chemotherapeutic drugs of the camptothecin (CPT) family. Response to CPT-based treatment is dependent on hTopI activity, and reduction in activity, and mutations...... in hTopI have been reported to result in CPT resistance. Therefore, hTOPI gene copy number, mRNA level, protein amount, and enzyme activity have been studied to explain differences in cellular response to CPT. We show that Rolling Circle Enhanced Enzyme Activity Detection (REEAD), allowing measurement...

  15. Quantitative analysis of topoisomerase IIα to rapidly evaluate cell proliferation in brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Masashi; Arakawa, Yoshiki; Kano, Hideyuki; Kawabata, Yasuhiro; Katsuki, Takahisa; Shirahata, Mitsuaki; Ono, Makoto; Yamana, Norikazu; Hashimoto, Nobuo; Takahashi, Jun A.

    2005-01-01

    Immunohistochemical cell proliferation analyses have come into wide use for evaluation of tumor malignancy. Topoisomerase IIα (topo IIα), an essential nuclear enzyme, has been known to have cell cycle coupled expression. We here show the usefulness of quantitative analysis of topo IIα mRNA to rapidly evaluate cell proliferation in brain tumors. A protocol to quantify topo IIα mRNA was developed with a real-time RT-PCR. It took only 3 h to quantify from a specimen. A total of 28 brain tumors were analyzed, and the level of topo IIα mRNA was significantly correlated with its immuno-staining index (p < 0.0001, r = 0.9077). Furthermore, it sharply detected that topo IIα mRNA decreased in growth-inhibited glioma cell. These results support that topo IIα mRNA may be a good and rapid indicator to evaluate cell proliferate potential in brain tumors

  16. Woodfruticosin (woodfordin C), a new inhibitor of DNA topoisomerase II. Experimental antitumor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuramochi-Motegi, A; Kuramochi, H; Kobayashi, F; Ekimoto, H; Takahashi, K; Kadota, S; Takamori, Y; Kikuchi, T

    1992-11-17

    Woodfruticosin (woodfordin C) (WFC), a new inhibitor of DNA topoisomerase II (topo-II), was isolated from methanol extract of Woodfordia fruticosa Kurz (Lythraceae) and studied for in vitro and in vivo antitumor activities in comparison with Adriamycin (ADR) and etoposide (ETP), well known inhibitors of topo-II. The inhibitory activity against DNA topo-II shown by WFC was much stronger than that shown by ETP or ADR. WFC inhibited strongly intracellular DNA synthesis but not RNA and protein synthesis. On the other hand, WFC had a weaker growth inhibitory activity against various human tumor cells than ETP or ADR, but it showed remarkable activity against PC-1 cells and moderate activity against MKN45 and KB cells. Furthermore, WFC had in vivo growth inhibitory activity against s.c. inoculated colon38. These results indicate that the mechanism by which WFC exhibits antitumor activity may be through inhibition of topo-II.

  17. [Mutations of DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV in clinical isolates of fluoroquinolone-resistant Proteus mirabilis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Ryoichi; Sato, Kenya; Kumita, Wakako; Inami, Natsuko; Nishiyama, Hiroyuki; Okamura, Noboru; Moriya, Kyoji; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2006-02-01

    The presence of fluoroquinolone resistance-associated mutations within the quinolone resistance-determining region of DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV was investigated genetically in clinical isolates of Proteus mirabilis recovered from patients with urinay tract infections. Two isolates of fluoroquinolone-resistant P. mirabilis possessed the mutations in GyrA (Ser-83 --> Arg or Ile), GyrB (Ser-464 --> Tyr or Phe) and ParC (Ser-80 --> Ile). A novel mutation with Glu-87 --> Lys in GyrA, where suggested to be responsible for fluoroquinolone resistance, was identified. These results demonstrate that the presence of an additional mutation at Glu-87 in GyrA may contribute to high-level fluoroquinolone resistance, too.

  18. Analysis of topoisomerase mutations in fluoroquinolone-resistant and -susceptible Campylobacter jejuni strains isolated in Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinana, Alfred Dieudonné; Cardinale, Eric; Bahsoun, Ibrahim; Tall, Fatou; Sire, Jean-Marie; Garin, Benoit; Boye, Cheikh Saad-Bouh; Dromigny, Jacques-Albert; Perrier-Gros-Claude, Jean-David

    2007-04-01

    In this study, topoisomerase mutations in ciprofloxacin-resistant and -susceptible Campylobacter jejuni were analysed by DNA sequencing. In certain ciprofloxacin-resistant C. jejuni, the mechanism of resistance was complex. The Thr86-Ala substitution in the GyrA protein appears to play a role in increasing the minimum inhibitory concentration of nalidixic acid only. In addition, isolates with this amino acid change and those resistant to quinolones but lacking a mutation in the GyrA quinolone resistance-determining region could be derived from two different clones. Based on gyrA and gyrB polymorphisms, C. jejuni isolates from the Dakar region of Senegal appeared to be less diverse than those from other countries. Moreover, C. jejuni isolates in Senegal appeared to differ from European isolates by lack of a silent mutation at codon 120 of the gyrA gene.

  19. Mutations of human DNA topoisomerase I at poly(ADP-ribose) binding sites: modulation of camptothecin activity by ADP-ribose polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesauro, Cinzia; Graziani, Grazia; Arnò, Barbara; Zuccaro, Laura; Muzi, Alessia; D'Annessa, Ilda; Santori, Elettra; Tentori, Lucio; Leonetti, Carlo; Fiorani, Paola; Desideri, Alessandro

    2014-09-17

    DNA topoisomerases are key enzymes that modulate the topological state of DNA through the breaking and rejoining of DNA strands. Human topoisomerase I belongs to the family of poly(ADP-ribose)-binding proteins and is the target of camptothecin derived anticancer drugs. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation occurs at specific sites of the enzyme inhibiting the cleavage and enhancing the religation steps during the catalytic cycle. Thus, ADP-ribose polymers antagonize the activity of topoisomerase I poisons, whereas PARP inhibitors increase their antitumor effects. Using site-directed mutagenesis we have analyzed the interaction of human topoisomerase I and poly(ADP-ribose) through enzymatic activity and binding procedures. Mutations of the human topoisomerase I hydrophobic or charged residues, located on the putative polymer binding sites, are not sufficient to abolish or reduce the binding of the poly(ADP-ribose) to the protein. These results suggest either the presence of additional binding sites or that the mutations are not enough perturbative to destroy the poly(ADP-ribose) interaction, although in one mutant they fully abolish the enzyme activity. It can be concluded that mutations at the hydrophobic or charged residues of the putative polymer binding sites do not interfere with the ability of poly(ADP-ribose) to antagonize the antitumor activity of topoisomerase I poisons.

  20. Decreased camptothecin sensitivity of the stem-cell-like fraction of Caco2 cells correlates with an altered phosphorylation pattern of topoisomerase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Amit; Tesauro, Cinzia; Frøhlich, Rikke; Hede, Marianne S; Nielsen, Maria J; Kjeldsen, Eigil; Bonven, Bjarne; Stougaard, Magnus; Gromova, Irina; Knudsen, Birgitta R

    2014-01-01

    The CD44+ and CD44- subpopulations of the colorectal cancer cell line Caco2 were analyzed separately for their sensitivities to the antitumor drug camptothecin. CD44+ cells were less sensitive to camptothecin than CD44- cells. The relative resistance of CD44+ cells was correlated with (i) reduced activity of the nuclear enzyme topoisomerase I and (ii) insensitivity of this enzyme to camptothecin when analyzed in extracts. In contrast, topoisomerase I activity was higher in extracts from CD44- cells and the enzyme was camptothecin sensitive. Topoisomerase I from the two subpopulations were differentially phosphorylated in a manner that appeared to determine the drug sensitivity and activity of the enzyme. This finding was further supported by the fact that phosphorylation of topoisomerase I in CD44+ cell extract by protein kinase CK2 converted the enzyme to a camptothecin sensitive, more active form mimicking topoisomerase I in extracts from CD44- cells. Conversely, dephosphorylation of topoisomerase I in extracts from CD44- cells rendered the enzyme less active and camptothecin resistant. These findings add to our understanding of chemotherapy resistance in the Caco2 CD44+ cancer stem cell model.

  1. Decreased camptothecin sensitivity of the stem-cell-like fraction of Caco2 cells correlates with an altered phosphorylation pattern of topoisomerase I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Roy

    Full Text Available The CD44+ and CD44- subpopulations of the colorectal cancer cell line Caco2 were analyzed separately for their sensitivities to the antitumor drug camptothecin. CD44+ cells were less sensitive to camptothecin than CD44- cells. The relative resistance of CD44+ cells was correlated with (i reduced activity of the nuclear enzyme topoisomerase I and (ii insensitivity of this enzyme to camptothecin when analyzed in extracts. In contrast, topoisomerase I activity was higher in extracts from CD44- cells and the enzyme was camptothecin sensitive. Topoisomerase I from the two subpopulations were differentially phosphorylated in a manner that appeared to determine the drug sensitivity and activity of the enzyme. This finding was further supported by the fact that phosphorylation of topoisomerase I in CD44+ cell extract by protein kinase CK2 converted the enzyme to a camptothecin sensitive, more active form mimicking topoisomerase I in extracts from CD44- cells. Conversely, dephosphorylation of topoisomerase I in extracts from CD44- cells rendered the enzyme less active and camptothecin resistant. These findings add to our understanding of chemotherapy resistance in the Caco2 CD44+ cancer stem cell model.

  2. cDNA cloning of human DNA topoisomerase I. Catalytic activity of a 67.7-kDa carboxyl-terminal fragment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Arpa, P.; Machlin, P.S.; Ratrie, H. III; Rothfield, N.F.; Cleveland, D.W.; Earnshaw, W.C.

    1988-01-01

    cDNA clones encoding human topoisomerase I were isolated from an expression vector library (λgt11) screened with autoimmune anti-topoisomerase I serum. One of these clones has been expressed as a fusion protein comprised of a 32-kDa fragment of the bacterial TrpE protein linked to 67.7 kDa of protein encoded by the cDNA. Three lines of evidence indicate that the cloned cDNA encodes topoisomerase I. (i) Proteolysis maps of the fusion protein and human nuclear topoisomerase I are essentially identical. (ii) The fusion protein relaxes supercoiled DNA, an activity that can be immunoprecipitated by anti-topoisomerase I serum. (iii) Sequence analysis has revealed that the longest cDNA clone (3645 base pairs) encodes a protein of 765 amino acids that shares 42% identity with Saccharomyces cerevisiae topoisomerase I. The sequence data also show that the catalytically active 67.7-kDa fragment is comprised of the carboxyl terminus

  3. Novel trifluoromethylated 9-amino-3,4-dihydroacridin-1(2H)-ones act as covalent poisons of human topoisomerase IIα.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infante Lara, Lorena; Sledge, Alexis; Laradji, Amine; Okoro, Cosmas O; Osheroff, Neil

    2017-02-01

    A number of topoisomerase II-targeted anticancer drugs, including amsacrine, utilize an acridine or related aromatic core as a scaffold. Therefore, to further explore the potential of acridine-related compounds to act as topoisomerase II poisons, we synthesized a series of novel trifluoromethylated 9-amino-3,4-dihydroacridin-1(2H)-one derivatives and examined their ability to enhance DNA cleavage mediated by human topoisomerase IIα. Derivatives containing a H, Cl, F, and Br at C7 enhanced enzyme-mediated double-stranded DNA cleavage ∼5.5- to 8.5-fold over baseline, but were less potent than amsacrine. The inclusion of an amino group at C9 was critical for activity. The compounds lost their activity against topoisomerase IIα in the presence of a reducing agent, displayed no activity against the catalytic core of topoisomerase IIα, and inhibited DNA cleavage when incubated with the enzyme prior to the addition of DNA. These findings strongly suggest that the compounds act as covalent, rather than interfacial, topoisomerase II poisons. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Inhibition of hypoxia inducible factor 1 and topoisomerase with acriflavine sensitizes perihilar cholangiocarcinomas to photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijer, Ruud; Broekgaarden, Mans; Krekorian, Massis; Alles, Lindy K; van Wijk, Albert C; Mackaaij, Claire; Verheij, Joanne; van der Wal, Allard C; van Gulik, Thomas M; Storm, Gert; Heger, Michal

    2016-01-19

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) induces tumor cell death by oxidative stress and hypoxia but also survival signaling through activation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1). Since perihilar cholangiocarcinomas are relatively recalcitrant to PDT, the aims were to (1) determine the expression levels of HIF-1-associated proteins in human perihilar cholangiocarcinomas, (2) investigate the role of HIF-1 in PDT-treated human perihilar cholangiocarcinoma cells, and (3) determine whether HIF-1 inhibition reduces survival signaling and enhances PDT efficacy. Increased expression of VEGF, CD105, CD31/Ki-67, and GLUT-1 was confirmed in human perihilar cholangiocarcinomas. PDT with liposome-delivered zinc phthalocyanine caused HIF-1α stabilization in SK-ChA-1 cells and increased transcription of HIF-1α downstream genes. Acriflavine was taken up by SK-ChA-1 cells and translocated to the nucleus under hypoxic conditions. Importantly, pretreatment of SK-ChA-1 cells with acriflavine enhanced PDT efficacy via inhibition of HIF-1 and topoisomerases I and II. The expression of VEGF, CD105, CD31/Ki-67, and GLUT-1 was determined by immunohistochemistry in human perihilar cholangiocarcinomas. In addition, the response of human perihilar cholangiocarcinoma (SK-ChA-1) cells to PDT with liposome-delivered zinc phthalocyanine was investigated under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Acriflavine, a HIF-1α/HIF-1β dimerization inhibitor and a potential dual topoisomerase I/II inhibitor, was evaluated for its adjuvant effect on PDT efficacy. HIF-1, which is activated in human hilar cholangiocarcinomas, contributes to tumor cell survival following PDT in vitro. Combining PDT with acriflavine pretreatment improves PDT efficacy in cultured cells and therefore warrants further preclinical validation for therapy-recalcitrant perihilar cholangiocarcinomas.

  5. Anticancer activity of botanical alkyl hydroquinones attributed to topoisomerase II poisoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, C.-P.; Fang, W.-H.; Lin, L.-I.; Chiou, Robin Y.; Kan, L.-S.; Chi, N.-H.; Chen, Y.-R.; Lin, T.-Y.; Lin, S.-B.

    2008-01-01

    Cytotoxic alkyl hydroquinone compounds have been isolated from many plants. We previously isolated 3 structurally similar cytotoxic alkyl hydroquinone compounds from the sap of the lacquer tree Rhus succedanea L. belonging to the sumac family, which have a long history of medicinal use in Asia. Each has an unsaturated alkyl chain attached to the 2-position of a hydroquinone ring. One of these isolates, 10'(Z),13'(E),15'(E)-heptadecatrienylhydroquinone [HQ17(3)], being the most cytotoxic, was chosen for studying the anticancer mechanism of these compounds. We found that HQ17(3) was a topoisomerase (Topo) II poison. It irreversibly inhibited Topo IIα activity through the accumulation of Topo II-DNA cleavable complexes. A cell-based assay showed that HQ17(3) inhibited the growth of leukemia HL-60 cells with an EC 50 of 0.9 μM, inhibited the topoisomerase-II-deficient cells HL-60/MX2 with an EC 50 of 9.6 μM, and exerted no effect on peripheral blood mononuclear cells at concentrations up to 50 μM. These results suggest that Topo II is the cellular drug target. In HL-60 cells, HQ17(3) promptly inhibited DNA synthesis, induced chromosomal breakage, and led to cell death with an EC 50 about one-tenth that of hydroquinone. Pretreatment of the cells with N-acetylcysteine could not attenuate the cytotoxicity and DNA damage induced by HQ17(3). However, N-acetylcysteine did significantly reduce the cytotoxicity of hydroquinone. In F344 rats, intraperitoneal injection of HQ17(3) for 28 days induced no clinical signs of toxicity. These results indicated that HQ17(3) is a potential anticancer agent, and its structural features could be a model for anticancer drug design

  6. Reduction in DNA topoisomerase I level affects growth, phenotype and nucleoid architecture of Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Wareed; Menon, Shruti; Karthik, Pullela V; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2015-02-01

    The steady-state negative supercoiling of eubacterial genomes is maintained by the action of DNA topoisomerases. Topoisomerase distribution varies in different species of mycobacteria. While Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) contains a single type I (TopoI) and a single type II (Gyrase) enzyme, Mycobacterium smegmatis (Msm) and other members harbour additional relaxases. TopoI is essential for Mtb survival. However, the necessity of TopoI or other relaxases in Msm has not been investigated. To recognize the importance of TopoI for growth, physiology and gene expression of Msm, we have developed a conditional knock-down strain of TopoI in Msm. The TopoI-depleted strain exhibited extremely slow growth and drastic changes in phenotypic characteristics. The cessation of growth indicates the essential requirement of the enzyme for the organism in spite of having additional DNA relaxation enzymes in the cell. Notably, the imbalance in TopoI level led to the altered expression of topology modulatory proteins, resulting in a diffused nucleoid architecture. Proteomic and transcript analysis of the mutant indicated reduced expression of the genes involved in central metabolic pathways and core DNA transaction processes. RNA polymerase (RNAP) distribution on the transcription units was affected in the TopoI-depleted cells, suggesting global alteration in transcription. The study thus highlights the essential requirement of TopoI in the maintenance of cellular phenotype, growth characteristics and gene expression in mycobacteria. A decrease in TopoI level led to altered RNAP occupancy and impaired transcription elongation, causing severe downstream effects. © 2015 The Authors.

  7. QSAR and docking studies on xanthone derivatives for anticancer activity targeting DNA topoisomerase IIα

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alam S

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarfaraz Alam, Feroz KhanMetabolic and Structural Biology Department, Central Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, IndiaAbstract: Due to the high mortality rate in India, the identification of novel molecules is important in the development of novel and potent anticancer drugs. Xanthones are natural constituents of plants in the families Bonnetiaceae and Clusiaceae, and comprise oxygenated heterocycles with a variety of biological activities along with an anticancer effect. To explore the anticancer compounds from xanthone derivatives, a quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR model was developed by the multiple linear regression method. The structure–activity relationship represented by the QSAR model yielded a high activity–descriptors relationship accuracy (84% referred by regression coefficient (r2=0.84 and a high activity prediction accuracy (82%. Five molecular descriptors – dielectric energy, group count (hydroxyl, LogP (the logarithm of the partition coefficient between n-octanol and water, shape index basic (order 3, and the solvent-accessible surface area – were significantly correlated with anticancer activity. Using this QSAR model, a set of virtually designed xanthone derivatives was screened out. A molecular docking study was also carried out to predict the molecular interaction between proposed compounds and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA topoisomerase IIα. The pharmacokinetics parameters, such as absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity, were also calculated, and later an appraisal of synthetic accessibility of organic compounds was carried out. The strategy used in this study may provide understanding in designing novel DNA topoisomerase IIα inhibitors, as well as for other cancer targets.Keywords: drug likeness, ADMET, regression model, HeLa cell line

  8. Dual inhibition of topoisomerases I and IIα by ruthenium(II) complexes containing asymmetric tridentate ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Kejie; Liang, Jiewen; Wang, Yi; Kou, Junfeng; Qian, Chen; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2014-12-14

    Five novel ruthenium(II) complexes, [Ru(dtzp)(dppt)](2+) (1), [Ru(dtzp)(pti)](2+) (2), [Ru(dtzp)(ptn)](2+) (3), [Ru(dtzp)(pta)](2+) (4) and [Ru(dtzp)(ptp)](2+) (5) (where dtzp = 2,6-di(thiazol-2-yl)pyridine, dppt = 3-(1,10-phenanthroline-2-yl)-5,6-diphenyl-as-triazine), pti = 3-(1,10-phenanthroline-2-yl)-as-triazino-[5,6-f]isatin, ptn = 3-(1,10-phenanthroline-2-yl)-as-triazino[5,6-f]naphthalene, pta = 3-(1,10-phenanthroline-2-yl)-as-triazino[5,6-f]acenaphthylene, and ptp = 3-(1,10-phenanthroline-2-yl)-as-triazino[5,6-f]-phenanthrene), were synthesised and characterised. The structures of complexes 3-5 were determined by X-ray diffraction. The DNA binding behaviours of the complexes were studied by spectroscopic and viscosity measurements. The results suggested that the Ru(II) complexes, except for complex 1, bind to DNA in an intercalative mode. Topoisomerase inhibition and DNA strand passage assay confirmed that Ru(II) complexes 3, 4, and 5 acted as efficient dual inhibitors of topoisomerases I and IIα. In vitro cytotoxicity assays indicated that these complexes exhibited anticancer activity against various cancer cell lines. Ruthenium(ii) complexes were confirmed to preferentially accumulate in the nucleus of cancer cells and induced DNA damage. Flow cytometric analysis and AO/EB staining assays indicated that these complexes induced cell apoptosis. With the loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential, the Ru(ii) complexes induce apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway.

  9. Rac1 protein signaling is required for DNA damage response stimulated by topoisomerase II poisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huelsenbeck, Stefanie C; Schorr, Anne; Roos, Wynand P; Huelsenbeck, Johannes; Henninger, Christian; Kaina, Bernd; Fritz, Gerhard

    2012-11-09

    To investigate the potency of the topoisomerase II (topo II) poisons doxorubicin and etoposide to stimulate the DNA damage response (DDR), S139 phosphorylation of histone H2AX (γH2AX) was analyzed using rat cardiomyoblast cells (H9c2). Etoposide caused a dose-dependent increase in the γH2AX level as shown by Western blotting. By contrast, the doxorubicin response was bell-shaped with high doses failing to increase H2AX phosphorylation. Identical results were obtained by immunohistochemical analysis of γH2AX focus formation, comet assay-based DNA strand break analysis, and measuring the formation of the topo II-DNA cleavable complex. At low dose, doxorubicin activated ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) but not ATM and Rad3-related (ATR). Both the lipid-lowering drug lovastatin and the Rac1-specific inhibitor NSC23766 attenuated doxorubicin- and etoposide-stimulated H2AX phosphorylation, induction of DNA strand breaks, and topo II-DNA complex formation. Lovastatin and NSC23766 acted in an additive manner. They did not attenuate doxorubicin-induced increase in p-ATM and p-Chk2 levels. DDR stimulated by topo II poisons was partially blocked by inhibition of type I p21-associated kinases. DDR evoked by the topoisomerase I poison topotecan remained unaffected by lovastatin. The data show that the mechanisms involved in DDR stimulated by topo II poisons are agent-specific with anthracyclines lacking DDR-stimulating activity at high doses. Pharmacological inhibition of Rac1 signaling counteracts doxorubicin- and etoposide-stimulated DDR by disabling the formation of the topo II-DNA cleavable complex. Based on the data we suggest that Rac1-regulated mechanisms are required for DNA damage induction and subsequent activation of the DDR following treatment with topo II but not topo I poisons.

  10. Rac1 Protein Signaling Is Required for DNA Damage Response Stimulated by Topoisomerase II Poisons*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huelsenbeck, Stefanie C.; Schorr, Anne; Roos, Wynand P.; Huelsenbeck, Johannes; Henninger, Christian; Kaina, Bernd; Fritz, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the potency of the topoisomerase II (topo II) poisons doxorubicin and etoposide to stimulate the DNA damage response (DDR), S139 phosphorylation of histone H2AX (γH2AX) was analyzed using rat cardiomyoblast cells (H9c2). Etoposide caused a dose-dependent increase in the γH2AX level as shown by Western blotting. By contrast, the doxorubicin response was bell-shaped with high doses failing to increase H2AX phosphorylation. Identical results were obtained by immunohistochemical analysis of γH2AX focus formation, comet assay-based DNA strand break analysis, and measuring the formation of the topo II-DNA cleavable complex. At low dose, doxorubicin activated ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) but not ATM and Rad3-related (ATR). Both the lipid-lowering drug lovastatin and the Rac1-specific inhibitor NSC23766 attenuated doxorubicin- and etoposide-stimulated H2AX phosphorylation, induction of DNA strand breaks, and topo II-DNA complex formation. Lovastatin and NSC23766 acted in an additive manner. They did not attenuate doxorubicin-induced increase in p-ATM and p-Chk2 levels. DDR stimulated by topo II poisons was partially blocked by inhibition of type I p21-associated kinases. DDR evoked by the topoisomerase I poison topotecan remained unaffected by lovastatin. The data show that the mechanisms involved in DDR stimulated by topo II poisons are agent-specific with anthracyclines lacking DDR-stimulating activity at high doses. Pharmacological inhibition of Rac1 signaling counteracts doxorubicin- and etoposide-stimulated DDR by disabling the formation of the topo II-DNA cleavable complex. Based on the data we suggest that Rac1-regulated mechanisms are required for DNA damage induction and subsequent activation of the DDR following treatment with topo II but not topo I poisons. PMID:23012366

  11. Different apoptotic responses to Plasmodium chabaudi malaria in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hope&shola

    2010-11-08

    Nov 8, 2010 ... The purpose of this study is to determine whether the apoptotic responses to Plasmodium chabaudi malaria in spleen and liver via mRNA expression of three genes involved in apoptosis (Bax, Bcl-2 and. Caspase-3) are similar or not and to detect if these genes could be a good marker for apoptosis due to.

  12. In vitro Anti-proliferative and Apoptotic Activities of Eurycoma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the anti-proliferative, apoptotic and differentiating activities of Eurycoma longifolia root extracts on HL-60 leukemic cells. Methods: HL-60 cells were treated with different partially purified sub-fractions (F1 – F3) derived from the resin chromatography of the crude methanol root extract of E. longifolia ...

  13. Growth inhibitory, apoptotic and anti-inflammatory activities ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    mice. Collectively, these results suggest that CEMB is a very potent anti-tumour compound. [Ravanan P, Singh SK, Subba Rao GSR and Kondaiah P 2011 Growth inhibitory, apoptotic and anti-inflammatory activities displayed by a novel modified triterpenoid, cyano enone of methyl boswellates. J. Biosci. 36 297–307] DOI ...

  14. Abnormalities in Alternative Splicing of Apoptotic Genes and Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zodwa Dlamini

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is required for normal heart development in the embryo, but has also been shown to be an important factor in the occurrence of heart disease. Alternative splicing of apoptotic genes is currently emerging as a diagnostic and therapeutic target for heart disease. This review addresses the involvement of abnormalities in alternative splicing of apoptotic genes in cardiac disorders including cardiomyopathy, myocardial ischemia and heart failure. Many pro-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family have alternatively spliced isoforms that lack important active domains. These isoforms can play a negative regulatory role by binding to and inhibiting the pro-apoptotic forms. Alternative splicing is observed to be increased in various cardiovascular diseases with the level of alternate transcripts increasing elevated in diseased hearts compared to healthy subjects. In many cases these isoforms appear to be the underlying cause of the disease, while in others they may be induced in response to cardiovascular pathologies. Regardless of this, the detection of alternate splicing events in the heart can serve as useful diagnostic or prognostic tools, while those splicing events that seem to play a causative role in cardiovascular disease make attractive future drug targets.

  15. Cytotoxicity and Apoptotic Activity of Ficus pseudopalma Blanco ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The presence of terpenoid lupeol and flavonoid quercetin was determined through high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of different concentrations of FP extracts on PRST2 cells and on non-cancerous human foreskin surface epithelial (hFSE) cells were determined by 3-[4, ...

  16. Antiproliferative and apoptotic activities of Cola lepidota against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The stem bark, seed, roots and leaves of Cola lepidota have been used for various health conditions in Nigeria folk medicine including treatment of cancer related ailments. The study evaluated the antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of extracts of the leaves and stem bark on breast cancer (MCF-7) cell line. Powdered ...

  17. Detection of apoptotic cells using propidium iodide staining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Newbold, Andrea; Martin, Ben P.; Cullinane, Carleen; Bots, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Flow cytometry assays are often used to detect apoptotic cells in in vitro cultures. Depending on the experimental model, these assays can also be useful in evaluating apoptosis in vivo. In this protocol, we describe a propidium iodide (PI) flow cytometry assay to evaluate B-cell lymphomas that have

  18. Elimination of apoptotic boar spermatozoa using magnetic activated cell sorting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janko Mrkun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the features of apoptosis is the externalization of phosphatidylserine which could be used to remove apoptotic cells from semen preparations. Magnetic-activated cell sorting using annexin V-conjugated microbeads which bind to phosphatidylserine could be used to enhance semen quality. Twelve boar semen samples after 3 days of liquid storage at 16­­–17 °C were subjected to magnetic-activated cell sorting. Bound and unbound fractions and control samples were subjected to flow cytometry following the staining of spermatozoa with Annexin V conjugated with Alexa Fluor 488 and propidium iodide. Four subpopulations were obtained: live, early apoptotic live, late apoptotic, early necrotic dead and late necrotic dead. The frequency of early apoptotic and late necrotic spermatozoa was significantly higher (P P P P < 0.05 lower proportion of morphologically normal spermatozoa was observed in both fractions compared to control (67.2 ± 17.0%. Boar spermatozoa were separated by the above method for the first time, however, the results showed this method to be inappropriate for boar semen separation under the tested conditions.

  19. Molecular mechanism of the camptothecin resistance of Glu710Gly topoisomerase IB mutant analyzed in vitro and in silico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesauro, Cinzia; Morozzo della Rocca, Blasco; Ottaviani, Alessio; Coletta, Andrea; Zuccaro, Laura; Arnò, Barbara; D'Annessa, Ilda; Fiorani, Paola; Desideri, Alessandro

    2013-09-03

    DNA topoisomerases are key enzymes that modulate the topological state of DNA through the breaking and rejoining of DNA strands. Human topoisomerase IB can be inhibited by several compounds that act through different mechanisms, including clinically used drugs, such as the derivatives of the natural compound camptothecin that reversibly bind the covalent topoisomerase-DNA complex, slowing down the religation of the cleaved DNA strand, thus inducing cell death. Three enzyme mutations, which confer resistance to irinotecan in an adenocarcinoma cell line, were recently identified but the molecular mechanism of resistance was unclear. The three resistant mutants have been investigated in S. cerevisiae model system following their viability in presence of increasing amounts of camptothecin. A systematical analysis of the different catalytic steps has been made for one of these mutants (Glu710Gly) and has been correlated with its structural-dynamical properties studied by classical molecular dynamics simulation. The three mutants display a different degree of camptothecin resistance in a yeast cell viability assay. Characterization of the different steps of the catalytic cycle of the Glu710Gly mutant indicated that its resistance is related to a high religation rate that is hardly affected by the presence of the drug. Analysis of the dynamic properties through simulation indicate that the mutant displays a much lower degree of correlation in the motion between the different protein domains and that the linker almost completely loses its correlation with the C-terminal domain, containing the active site tyrosine. These results indicate that a fully functional linker is required to confer camptothecin sensitivity to topoisomerase I since the destabilization of its structural-dynamical properties is correlated to an increase of religation rate and drug resistance.

  20. Target-based resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli to NBTI 5463, a novel bacterial type II topoisomerase inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayar, Asha S; Dougherty, Thomas J; Reck, Folkert; Thresher, Jason; Gao, Ning; Shapiro, Adam B; Ehmann, David E

    2015-01-01

    In a previous report (T. J. Dougherty, A. Nayar, J. V. Newman, S. Hopkins, G. G. Stone, M. Johnstone, A. B. Shapiro, M. Cronin, F. Reck, and D. E. Ehmann, Antimicrob Agents Chemother 58:2657-2664, 2014), a novel bacterial type II topoisomerase inhibitor, NBTI 5463, with activity against Gram-negative pathogens was described. First-step resistance mutations in Pseudomonas aeruginosa arose exclusively in the nfxB gene, a regulator of the MexCD-OprJ efflux pump system. The present report describes further resistance studies with NBTI 5463 in both Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. Second-step mutations in P. aeruginosa arose at aspartate 82 of the gyrase A subunit and led to 4- to 8-fold increases in the MIC over those seen in the parental strain with a first-step nfxB efflux mutation. A third-step mutant showed additional GyrA changes, with no changes in topoisomerase IV. Despite repeated efforts, resistance mutations could not be selected in E. coli. Genetic introduction of the Asp82 mutations observed in P. aeruginosa did not significantly increase the NBTI MIC in E. coli. However, with the aspartate 82 mutation present, it was possible to select second-step mutations in topoisomerase IV that did lead to MIC increases of 16- and 128-fold. As with the gyrase aspartate 82 mutation, the mutations in topoisomerase IV did not by themselves raise the NBTI MIC in E. coli. Only the presence of mutations in both targets of E. coli led to an increase in NBTI MIC values. This represents a demonstration of the value of balanced dual-target activity in mitigating resistance development. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Topoisomerase Mutations in Fluoroquinolone-Resistant and Methicillin-Susceptible and -Resistant Clinical Isolates of Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Kaatz, Glenn W.; Seo, Susan M.

    1998-01-01

    The incidence of the various mutations in the genes encoding topoisomerase IV and DNA gyrase in fluoroquinolone-resistant clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus is not known. Using restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and DNA sequencing, we found that in fluoroquinolone- and methicillin-resistant strains, mutations in grlA and gyrA are quite likely to be present together. For fluoroquinolone-resistant but methicillin-susceptible strains, mutations in grlA alone are more common.

  2. Characterization of New Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec (SCCmec) and Topoisomerase Genes in Fluoroquinolone- and Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descloux, Sybill; Rossano, Alexandra; Perreten, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone- and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolates harbor two new staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) elements that belong to class A, allotype 3 (SCCmec II-III), and to the new allotype 5 (SCCmec VII). Analysis of the complete nucleotide sequences of the topoisomerase loci gyrB/gyrA and grlB/grlA revealed mutations involved in fluoroquinolone resistance. PMID:18305127

  3. Exploring Left-Hand-Side substitutions in the benzoxazinone series of 4-amino-piperidine bacterial type IIa topoisomerase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Bolin; Comita-Prevoir, Janelle; Eyermann, Charles J; Reck, Folkert; Fisher, Stewart

    2011-09-15

    An SAR survey at the C-6 benzoxazinone position of a novel scaffold which inhibits bacterial type IIa topoisomerase demonstrates that a range of small electron donating groups (EDG) and electron withdrawing groups (EWG) are tolerated for antibacterial activity. Cyano was identified as a preferred substituent that affords good antibacterial potency while minimizing hERG cardiac channel activity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Molecular characterization of homologues of both subunits A (SPO11) and B of the archaebacterial topoisomerase 6 in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartung, F; Puchta, H

    2001-06-13

    The Spo11 protein is an eukaryotic homologue of the topoisomerase 6 subunit A from archaebacteria. In yeast Spo11p has been found to bind covalently to double-strand breaks (DSBs) during meiosis. Single homologues of the SPO11 gene exist in various eukaryotes, except plants. Previously, we found in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome two ancient paralogs, AtSPO11-1 and 2. Here we report on the molecular characterization of a third one, AtSPO11-3. This puzzling finding might be explained by the fact that we detected additionally--for the first time outside of the archaebacterial kingdom--a homologue of the subunit B of topoisomerase 6, AtTOP6B. Both AtSPO11-3 and AtTOP6B are abundantly expressed in Arabidopsis and EST comparisons indicate the presence of both genes in various plant species. Via two hybrid studies we could demonstrate that full length AtTop6B is able to interact with AtSpo11-2 and 3 but not with AtSpo11-1. Our data suggest that plants possess in contrast to other eukaryotes an additional archaebacterial kind of topoisomerase.

  5. Sequence-selective topoisomerase II inhibition by anthracycline derivatives in SV40 DNA: Relationship with DNA binding affinity and cytotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capranico, G.; Kohn, K.W.; Pommier, Y.; Zunino, F.

    1990-01-01

    Topoisomerase II mediated double-strand breaks produced by anthracycline analogues were studied in SV40 DNA. The compounds included doxorubicin, daunorubicin, two doxorubicin stereoisomers (4'-epimer and β-anomer), and five chromophore-modified derivatives, with a wide range of cytotoxic activity and DNA binding affinity. Cleavage of 32 P-end-labeled DNA fragments was visualized by autoradiography of agarose and polyacrylamide gels. Structure-activity relationships indicated that alterations in the chromophore structure greatly affected drug action on topoisomerase II. In particular, removal of substituents on position 4 of the D ring resulted in more active inducers of cleavage with lower DNA binding affinity. The stereochemistry between the sugar and the chromophore was also essential for activity. All the active anthracyclines induced a single region of prominent cleavage in the entire SV40 DNA, which resulted from a cluster of sites between nucleotides 4237 and 4294. DNA cleavage intensity patterns exhibited differences among analogues and were also dependent upon drug concentration. Intensity at a given site dependent on both stimulatory and suppressive effects depending upon drug concentration and DNA sequence. A good correlation was found between cytotoxicity and intensity of topoisomerase II mediated DNA breakage

  6. Topoisomerase IV-quinolone interactions are mediated through a water-metal ion bridge: mechanistic basis of quinolone resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldred, Katie J.; McPherson, Sylvia A.; Turnbough, Charles L.; Kerns, Robert J.; Osheroff, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Although quinolones are the most commonly prescribed antibacterials, their use is threatened by an increasing prevalence of resistance. The most common causes of quinolone resistance are mutations of a specific serine or acidic residue in the A subunit of gyrase or topoisomerase IV. These amino acids are proposed to serve as a critical enzyme-quinolone interaction site by anchoring a water-metal ion bridge that coordinates drug binding. To probe the role of the proposed water-metal ion bridge, we characterized wild-type, GrlAE85K, GrlAS81F/E85K, GrlAE85A, GrlAS81F/E85A and GrlAS81F Bacillus anthracis topoisomerase IV, their sensitivity to quinolones and related drugs and their use of metal ions. Mutations increased the Mg2+ concentration required to produce maximal quinolone-induced DNA cleavage and restricted the divalent metal ions that could support quinolone activity. Individual mutation of Ser81 or Glu85 partially disrupted bridge function, whereas simultaneous mutation of both residues abrogated protein–quinolone interactions. Results provide functional evidence for the existence of the water-metal ion bridge, confirm that the serine and glutamic acid residues anchor the bridge, demonstrate that the bridge is the primary conduit for interactions between clinically relevant quinolones and topoisomerase IV and provide a likely mechanism for the most common causes of quinolone resistance. PMID:23460203

  7. QSAR Modeling on Benzo[c]phenanthridine Analogues as Topoisomerase I Inhibitors and Anti-cancer Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi-Ngoc-Phuong Huynh

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Benzo[c]phenanthridine (BCP derivatives were identified as topoisomerase I (TOP-I targeting agents with pronounced antitumor activity. In this study, hologram-QSAR, 2D-QSAR and 3D-QSAR models were developed for BCPs on topoisomerase I inbibitory activity and cytotoxicity against seven tumor cell lines including RPMI8402, CPT-K5, P388, CPT45, KB3-1, KBV-1and KBH5.0. The hologram, 2D, and 3D-QSAR models were obtained with the square of correlation coefficient R2 = 0.58 − 0.77, the square of the crossvalidation coefficient q2 = 0.41 − 0.60 as well as the external set’s square of predictive correlation coefficient r2 = 0.51 − 0.80. Moreover, the assessment method based on reliability test with confidence level of 95% was used to validate the predictive power of QSAR models and to prevent over-fitting phenomenon of classical QSAR models. Our QSAR model could be applied to design new analogues of BCPs with higher antitumor and topoisomerase I inhibitory activity.

  8. Bacillus anthracis GrlAV96A topoisomerase IV, a quinolone resistance mutation that does not affect the water-metal ion bridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldred, Katie J; Breland, Erin J; McPherson, Sylvia A; Turnbough, Charles L; Kerns, Robert J; Osheroff, Neil

    2014-12-01

    The rise in quinolone resistance is threatening the clinical use of this important class of broad-spectrum antibacterials. Quinolones kill bacteria by increasing the level of DNA strand breaks generated by the type II topoisomerases gyrase and topoisomerase IV. Most commonly, resistance is caused by mutations in the serine and acidic amino acid residues that anchor a water-metal ion bridge that facilitates quinolone-enzyme interactions. Although other mutations in gyrase and topoisomerase IV have been reported in quinolone-resistant strains, little is known regarding their contributions to cellular quinolone resistance. To address this issue, we characterized the effects of the V96A mutation in the A subunit of Bacillus anthracis topoisomerase IV on quinolone activity. The results indicate that this mutation causes an ∼ 3-fold decrease in quinolone potency and reduces the stability of covalent topoisomerase IV-cleaved DNA complexes. However, based on metal ion usage, the V96A mutation does not disrupt the function of the water-metal ion bridge. A similar level of resistance to quinazolinediones (which do not use the bridge) was seen. V96A is the first topoisomerase IV mutation distal to the water-metal ion bridge demonstrated to decrease quinolone activity. It also represents the first A subunit mutation reported to cause resistance to quinazolinediones. This cross-resistance suggests that the V96A change has a global effect on the structure of the drug-binding pocket of topoisomerase IV. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Chromosome damage induced by DNA topoisomerase II inhibitors combined with g-radiation in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina P. Araújo

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Combined radiation and antineoplastic drug treatment have important applications in cancer therapy. In the present work, an evaluation was made of two known topoisomerase II inhibitors, doxorubicin (DXR and mitoxantrone (MXN, with g-radiation. The effects of DXR or MXN on g-radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells were analyzed. Two concentrations of each drug, 0.5 and 1.0 µg/ml DXR, and 0.02 and 0.04 µg/ml MXN, were applied in combination with two doses of g-radiation (20 and 40 cGy. A significant potentiating effect on chromosomal aberrations was observed in CHO cells exposed to 1.0 µg/ml DXR plus 40 cGy. In the other tests, the combination of g-radiation with DXR or MXN gave approximately additive effects. Reduced mitotic indices reflected higher toxicity of the drugs when combined with radiation.A associação de radiação ionizante com drogas antineoplásicas tem importante aplicação na terapia do câncer. No presente trabalho, foram avaliados os efeitos de dois inibidores de topoisomerase II, doxorubicina (DXR e mitoxantrona (MXN, sobre as aberrações cromossômicas induzidas pelas radiações-g em células do ovário de hamster chinês (CHO. Foram usadas as concentrações 0,5 e 1,0 mg/ml de DXR e 0,02 e 0,04 mg/ml de MXN, combinadas com duas doses de radiações gama (20 e 40 cGy. Um significativo efeito potenciador das aberrações cromossômicas foi observado em células CHO tratadas com 1,0 mg/ml de DXR e expostas a 40 cGy de radiação. Nos outros testes, a combinação da radiação-g com a DXR ou MXN apresentou um efeito próximo ao aditivo. A redução dos índices mitóticos refletiu a alta citotoxicidade das drogas quando combinadas às radiações-g.

  10. In vitro inhibition of African swine fever virus-topoisomerase II disrupts viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Ferdinando B; Frouco, Gonçalo; Martins, Carlos; Leitão, Alexandre; Ferreira, Fernando

    2016-10-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) is the etiological agent of a highly-contagious and fatal disease of domestic pigs, leading to serious socio-economic impact in affected countries. To date, neither a vaccine nor a selective anti-viral drug are available for prevention or treatment of African swine fever (ASF), emphasizing the need for more detailed studies at the role of ASFV proteins involved in viral DNA replication and transcription. Notably, ASFV encodes for a functional type II topoisomerase (ASFV-Topo II) and we recently showed that several fluoroquinolones (bacterial DNA topoisomerase inhibitors) fully abrogate ASFV replication in vitro. Here, we report that ASFV-Topo II gene is actively transcribed throughout infection, with transcripts being detected as early as 2 hpi and reaching a maximum peak concentration around 16 hpi, when viral DNA synthesis, transcription and translation are more active. siRNA knockdown experiments showed that ASFV-Topo II plays a critical role in viral DNA replication and gene expression, with transfected cells presenting lower viral transcripts (up to 89% decrease) and reduced cytopathic effect (-66%) when compared to the control group. Further, a significant decrease in the number of both infected cells (75.5%) and viral factories per cell and in virus yields (up to 99.7%, 2.5 log) was found only in cells transfected with siRNA targeting ASFV-Topo II. We also demonstrate that a short exposure to enrofloxacin during the late phase of infection (from 15 to 1 hpi) induces fragmentation of viral genomes, whereas no viral genomes were detected when enrofloxacin was added from the early phase of infection (from 2 to 16 hpi), suggesting that fluoroquinolones are ASFV-Topo II poisons. Altogether, our results demonstrate that ASFV-Topo II enzyme has an essential role during viral genome replication and transcription, emphasizing the idea that this enzyme can be a potential target for drug and vaccine development against ASF

  11. Frequent topoisomerase IV mutations associated with fluoroquinolone resistance in Ureaplasma species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jingjuan; Qiao, Yingli; Kong, Yingying; Ruan, Zhi; Huang, Jun; Song, Tiejun; Zhang, Jun; Xie, Xinyou

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to investigate the role of quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of DNA gyrase (encoded by gyrA and gyrB) and topoisomerase IV (encoded by parC and parE) associated with fluoroquinolone resistance. A total of 114 Ureaplasma spp. strains, isolated from clinical female patients with symptomatic infection, were tested for species distribution and susceptibility to four fluoroquinolones. Moreover, we analysed the QRDRs and compared these with 14 ATCC reference strains of Ureaplasma spp. serovars to identify mutations that caused antimicrobial resistance. Our study indicated that moxifloxacin was the most effective fluoroquinolone against Ureaplasma spp. (MIC range: 0.125-32 μg ml⁻¹). However, extremely high MICs were estimated for ciprofloxacin (MIC range: 1-256 μg ml⁻¹) and ofloxacin (MIC range: 0.5-128 μg ml⁻¹), followed by levofloxacin (MIC range: 0.5-64 μg ml⁻¹). Seven amino acid substitutions were discovered in GyrB, ParC and ParE, but not in GyrA. Ser-83 → Leu/Trp (C248T/G) in ParC and Arg-448 → Lys (G1343A) in ParE, which were potentially responsible for fluoroquinolone resistance, were observed in 89 (77.2 %) and three (2.6 %) strains, respectively. Pro-462 → Ser (C1384T), Asn-481 → Ser (A1442G) and Ala-493 → Val (C1478T) in GyrB and Met-105 → Ile (G315T) in ParC seemed to be neutral polymorphisms, and were observed and occurred along with the amino acid change of Ser-83 → Leu (C248T) in ParC. Interestingly, two novel mutations of ParC and ParE were independently found in four strains. These observations suggest that amino acid mutation in topoisomerase IV appears to be the leading cause of fluoroquinolone resistance, especially the mutation of Ser-83 → Leu (C248T) in ParC. Moxifloxacin had the best activity against strains with Ser-83 → Leu mutation.

  12. Ultrastructural apoptotic lesions induced in rat thymocytes after borax ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvain, I C; Berry, J P; Galle, P

    1998-01-01

    Apoptosis has gained increasing attention in recent years. Several chemical compounds induce apoptotic lesions in the thymus. Male Wistar rats received 2000 ppm of borax (Na2B4O7.10H2O) in their food for 16 days. The rats were sacrificed 2, 5, 9, 12, 19, 21, 26 and 28 days after the beginning of treatment. Thymus samples of all rats were taken. A Philips EM 300 electron microscopy was used to study the ultrastructural morphology. Serious nuclear and cytoplasmic lesions were observed. Moreover, numerous macrophages containing apoptotic cells were present in the thymus. The alterations were observed from the 2nd to the 28th day. The extent of damage was much more important in the rats sacrificed 21, 26 and 28 days after borax ingestion.

  13. Macrophage Clearance of Apoptotic Cells: A Critical Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siamon Gordon

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available As the body continues to grow and age, it becomes essential to maintain a balance between living and dying cells. Macrophages and dendritic cells play a central role in discriminating among viable, apoptotic, and necrotic cells, as selective and efficient phagocytes, without inducing inappropriate inflammation or immune responses. A great deal has been learnt concerning clearance receptors for modified and non-self-ligands on potential targets, mediating their eventual uptake, disposal, and replacement. In this essay, we assess current understanding of the phagocytic recognition of apoptotic cells within their tissue environment; we conclude that efferocytosis constitutes a more complex process than simply removal of corpses, with regulatory interactions between the target and effector cells, which determine the outcome of this homeostatic process.

  14. A surface plasmon resonance study of the intermolecular interaction between Escherichia coli topoisomerase I and pBAD/Thio supercoiled plasmid DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Purushottam Babu; Annamalai, Thirunavukkarasu; Cheng, Bokun; Narula, Gagandeep; Wang, Xuewen; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching; He, Jin; Darici, Yesim

    2014-01-01

    To date, the bacterial DNA topoisomerases are one of the major target biomolecules for the discovery of new antibacterial drugs. DNA topoisomerase regulates the topological state of DNA, which is very important for replication, transcription and recombination. The relaxation of negatively supercoiled DNA is catalyzed by bacterial DNA topoisomerase I (topoI) and this reaction requires Mg2+. In this report, we first quantitatively studied the intermolecular interactions between Escherichia coli topoisomerase I (EctopoI) and pBAD/Thio supercoiled plasmid DNA using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique. The equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) for EctopoI-pBAD/Thio interactions is determined to be about 8 nM. We then studied the effect of Mg2+ on the catalysis of EctopoI-pBAD/Thio reaction. A slightly higher equilibrium dissociation constant (~15 nM) was obtained for Mg2+ coordinated EctopoI (Mg2+EctopoI)-pBAD/Thio interactions. In addition, we observed a larger dissociation rate constant (kd) for Mg2+EctopoI-pBAD/Thio interactions (~0.043 s−1), compared to EctopoI-pBAD/Thio interactions (~0.017 s−1). These results suggest that enzyme turnover during plasmid DNA relaxation is enhanced due to the presence of Mg2+ and furthers the understanding of importance of the Mg2+ ion for bacterial topoisomerase I catalytic activity. PMID:24530905

  15. The Strictly Conserved Arg-321 Residue in the Active Site of Escherichia coli Topoisomerase I Plays a Critical Role in DNA Rejoining*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narula, Gagandeep; Annamalai, Thirunavukkarasu; Aedo, Sandra; Cheng, Bokun; Sorokin, Elena; Wong, Agnes; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2011-01-01

    The strictly conserved arginine residue proximal to the active site tyrosine of type IA topoisomerases is required for the relaxation of supercoiled DNA and was hypothesized to be required for positioning of the scissile phosphate for DNA cleavage to take place. Mutants of recombinant Yersinia pestis topoisomerase I with hydrophobic substitutions at this position were found in genetic screening to exhibit a dominant lethal phenotype, resulting in drastic loss in Escherichia coli viability when overexpressed. In depth biochemical analysis of E. coli topoisomerase I with the corresponding Arg-321 mutation showed that DNA cleavage can still take place in the absence of this arginine function if Mg2+ is present to enhance the interaction of the enzyme with the scissile phosphate. However, DNA rejoining is inhibited in the absence of this conserved arginine, resulting in accumulation of the cleaved covalent intermediate and loss of relaxation activity. These new experimental results demonstrate that catalysis of DNA rejoining by type IA topoisomerases has a more stringent requirement than DNA cleavage. In addition to the divalent metal ions, the side chain of this arginine residue is required for the precise positioning of the phosphotyrosine linkage for nucleophilic attack by the 3′-OH end to result in DNA rejoining. Small molecules that can interfere or distort the enzyme-DNA interactions required for DNA rejoining by bacterial type IA topoisomerases could be developed into novel antibacterial drugs. PMID:21478161

  16. A surface plasmon resonance study of the intermolecular interaction between Escherichia coli topoisomerase I and pBAD/Thio supercoiled plasmid DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Purushottam Babu; Annamalai, Thirunavukkarasu; Cheng, Bokun; Narula, Gagandeep; Wang, Xuewen; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching; He, Jin; Darici, Yesim

    2014-03-07

    To date, the bacterial DNA topoisomerases are one of the major target biomolecules for the discovery of new antibacterial drugs. DNA topoisomerase regulates the topological state of DNA, which is very important for replication, transcription and recombination. The relaxation of negatively supercoiled DNA is catalyzed by bacterial DNA topoisomerase I (topoI) and this reaction requires Mg(2+). In this report, we first quantitatively studied the intermolecular interactions between Escherichia coli topoisomerase I (EctopoI) and pBAD/Thio supercoiled plasmid DNA using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique. The equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) for EctopoI-pBAD/Thio interactions was determined to be about 8 nM. We then studied the effect of Mg(2+) on the catalysis of EctopoI-pBAD/Thio reaction. A slightly higher equilibrium dissociation constant (~15 nM) was obtained for Mg(2+) coordinated EctopoI (Mg(2+)EctopoI)-pBAD/Thio interactions. In addition, we observed a larger dissociation rate constant (kd) for Mg(2+)EctopoI-pBAD/Thio interactions (~0.043 s(-1)), compared to EctopoI-pBAD/Thio interactions (~0.017 s(-1)). These results suggest that enzyme turnover during plasmid DNA relaxation is enhanced due to the presence of Mg(2+) and furthers the understanding of importance of the Mg(2+) ion for bacterial topoisomerase I catalytic activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Pim kinase inhibition sensitizes FLT3-ITD acute myeloid leukemia cells to topoisomerase 2 inhibitors through increased DNA damage and oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doshi, Kshama A.; Trotta, Rossana; Natarajan, Karthika; Rassool, Feyruz V.; Tron, Adriana E.; Huszar, Dennis; Perrotti, Danilo; Baer, Maria R.

    2016-01-01

    Internal tandem duplication of fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 (FLT3-ITD) is frequent (30 percent) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and is associated with short disease-free survival following chemotherapy. The serine threonine kinase Pim-1 is a pro-survival oncogene transcriptionally upregulated by FLT3-ITD that also promotes its signaling in a positive feedback loop. Thus inhibiting Pim-1 represents an attractive approach in targeting FLT3-ITD cells. Indeed, co-treatment with the pan-Pim kinase inhibitor AZD1208 or expression of a kinase-dead Pim-1 mutant sensitized FLT3-ITD cell lines to apoptosis triggered by chemotherapy drugs including the topoisomerase 2 inhibitors daunorubicin, etoposide and mitoxantrone, but not the nucleoside analog cytarabine. AZD1208 sensitized primary AML cells with FLT3-ITD to topoisomerase 2 inhibitors, but did not sensitize AML cells with wild-type FLT3 or remission bone marrow cells, supporting a favorable therapeutic index. Mechanistically, the enhanced apoptosis observed with AZD1208 and topoisomerase 2 inhibitor combination treatment was associated with increased DNA double-strand breaks and increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and co-treatment with the ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine rescued FLT3-ITD cells from AZD1208 sensitization to topoisomerase 2 inhibitors. Our data support testing of Pim kinase inhibitors with topoisomerase 2 inhibitors, but not with cytarabine, to improve treatment outcomes in AML with FLT3-ITD. PMID:27374090

  18. PDT-treated apoptotic cells induce macrophage synthesis NO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, S.; Xing, D.; Zhou, F. F.; Chen, W. R.

    2009-11-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a biologically active molecule which has multi-functional in different species. As a second messenger and neurotransmitter, NO is not only an important regulatory factor between cells' information transmission, but also an important messenger in cell-mediated immunity and cytotoxicity. On the other side, NO is involving in some diseases' pathological process. In pathological conditions, the macrophages are activated to produce a large quantity of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), which can use L-arginine to produce an excessive amount of NO, thereby killing bacteria, viruses, parasites, fungi, tumor cells, as well as in other series of the immune process. In this paper, photofrin-based photodynamic therapy (PDT) was used to treat EMT6 mammary tumors in vitro to induce apoptotic cells, and then co-incubation both apoptotic cells and macrophages, which could activate macrophage to induce a series of cytotoxic factors, especially NO. This, in turn, utilizes macrophages to activate a cytotoxic response towards neighboring tumor cells. These results provided a new idea for us to further study the immunological mechanism involved in damaging effects of PDT, also revealed the important function of the immune effect of apoptotic cells in PDT.

  19. QUANTITATION OF DNA TOPOISOMERASE-II-ALPHA MESSENGER-RIBONUCLEIC-ACID LEVELS IN A SMALL-CELL LUNG-CANCER CELL-LINE AND 2 DRUG-RESISTANT SUBLINES USING A POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION-AIDED TRANSCRIPT TITRATION ASSAY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WITHOFF, S; SMIT, EF; MEERSMA, GJ; van den Berg, Anke; TIMMERBOSSCHA, H; KOK, K; POSTMUS, PE; MULDER, NH; DEVRIES, EGE; BUYS, CHCM

    BACKGROUND: We have modified a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-aided transcript titration assay (1) in order to allow quantitation of low amounts of DNA topoisomerase II alpha mRNA in small RNA samples. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The titration assay was used to quantitate the amount of DNA topoisomerase

  20. Ginkgo biloba leaf extract induces DNA damage by inhibiting topoisomerase II activity in human hepatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhuhong; Chen, Si; Mei, Hu; Xuan, Jiekun; Guo, Xiaoqing; Couch, Letha; Dobrovolsky, Vasily N; Guo, Lei; Mei, Nan

    2015-09-30

    Ginkgo biloba leaf extract has been shown to increase the incidence in liver tumors in mice in a 2-year bioassay conducted by the National Toxicology Program. In this study, the DNA damaging effects of Ginkgo biloba leaf extract and many of its constituents were evaluated in human hepatic HepG2 cells and the underlying mechanism was determined. A molecular docking study revealed that quercetin, a flavonoid constituent of Ginkgo biloba, showed a higher potential to interact with topoisomerase II (Topo II) than did the other Ginkgo biloba constituents; this in silico prediction was confirmed by using a biochemical assay to study Topo II enzyme inhibition. Moreover, as measured by the Comet assay and the induction of γ-H2A.X, quercetin, followed by keampferol and isorhamnetin, appeared to be the most potent DNA damage inducer in HepG2 cells. In Topo II knockdown cells, DNA damage triggered by Ginkgo biloba leaf extract or quercetin was dramatically decreased, indicating that DNA damage is directly associated with Topo II. DNA damage was also observed when cells were treated with commercially available Ginkgo biloba extract product. Our findings suggest that Ginkgo biloba leaf extract- and quercetin-induced in vitro genotoxicity may be the result of Topo II inhibition.

  1. Resveratrol Modulates the Topoisomerase Inhibitory Potential of Doxorubicin in Human Colon Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anika Schroeter

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol (RSV is currently being widely discussed as potentially useful for anticancer therapy in combination with classical chemotherapeutics, e.g., the topoisomerase II (TOP II poison doxorubicin (DOX. However, there is still a lack of knowledge of possible interference at the target enzyme, especially since RSV itself has recently been described to act as a TOP poison. We therefore sought to address the question whether RSV affects DOX-induced genotoxic and cytotoxic effects with special emphasis on TOP II in HT-29 colon carcinoma cells. RSV was found to counteract DOX-induced formation of DNA-TOP-intermediates at ≥100 µM for TOP IIα and at 250 µM for TOP IIβ. As a consequence, RSV modulated the DNA-strand breaking potential of DOX by mediating protective effects with an apparent maximum at 100 µM. At higher concentration ranges (≥200 µM RSV diminished the intracellular concentrations of DOX. Nevertheless, the presence of RSV slightly enhanced the cytotoxic effects of DOX after 1.5 h and 24 h of incubation. Taken together, at least in cell culture RSV was found to affect the TOP-poisoning potential of DOX and to modulate its cytotoxic effectiveness. Thus, further studies are needed to clarify the impact of RSV on the therapeutic effectiveness of DOX under in vivo conditions.

  2. Topoisomerase II Inhibitors Induce DNA Damage-Dependent Interferon Responses Circumventing Ebola Virus Immune Evasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Luthra

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus (EBOV protein VP35 inhibits production of interferon alpha/beta (IFN by blocking RIG-I-like receptor signaling pathways, thereby promoting virus replication and pathogenesis. A high-throughput screening assay, developed to identify compounds that either inhibit or bypass VP35 IFN-antagonist function, identified five DNA intercalators as reproducible hits from a library of bioactive compounds. Four, including doxorubicin and daunorubicin, are anthracycline antibiotics that inhibit topoisomerase II and are used clinically as chemotherapeutic drugs. These compounds were demonstrated to induce IFN responses in an ATM kinase-dependent manner and to also trigger the DNA-sensing cGAS-STING pathway of IFN induction. These compounds also suppress EBOV replication in vitro and induce IFN in the presence of IFN-antagonist proteins from multiple negative-sense RNA viruses. These findings provide new insights into signaling pathways activated by important chemotherapy drugs and identify a novel therapeutic approach for IFN induction that may be exploited to inhibit RNA virus replication.

  3. Deacetylation of topoisomerase I is an important physiological function of E. coli CobB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qingxuan; Zhou, Yan Ning; Jin, Ding Jun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Escherichia coli topoisomerase I (TopA), a regulator of global and local DNA supercoiling, is modified by Nε-Lysine acetylation. The NAD+-dependent protein deacetylase CobB can reverse both enzymatic and non-enzymatic lysine acetylation modification in E. coli. Here, we show that the absence of CobB in a ΔcobB mutant reduces intracellular TopA catalytic activity and increases negative DNA supercoiling. TopA expression level is elevated as topA transcription responds to the increased negative supercoiling. The slow growth phenotype of the ΔcobB mutant can be partially compensated by further increase of intracellular TopA level via overexpression of recombinant TopA. The relaxation activity of purified TopA is decreased by in vitro non-enzymatic acetyl phosphate mediated lysine acetylation, and the presence of purified CobB protects TopA from inactivation by such non-enzymatic acetylation. The specific activity of TopA expressed from His-tagged fusion construct in the chromosome is inversely proportional to the degree of in vivo lysine acetylation during growth transition and growth arrest. These findings demonstrate that E. coli TopA catalytic activity can be modulated by lysine acetylation–deacetylation, and prevention of TopA inactivation from excess lysine acetylation and consequent increase in negative DNA supercoiling is an important physiological function of the CobB protein deacetylase. PMID:28398568

  4. Antioxidant, cyclooxygenase and topoisomerase inhibitory compounds from Apium graveolens Linn. seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momin, R A; Nair, M G

    2002-05-01

    Cyclooxygenase inhibitory and antioxidant bioassay-directed extraction and purification of celery seeds yielded sedanolide (1), senkyunolide-N (2), senkyunolide-J (3), 3-hydroxymethyl-6-methoxy-2,3-dihydro-1H-indol-2-ol (4), L-tryptophan (6), and 7-[3-(3,4-dihydroxy-4-hydroxymethyl-tetrahydro-furan-2-yloxy)-4,5-dihydroxy-6-hydroxymethyl-tetrahydro-pyran-2-yloxy]-5-hydroxy-2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-phenyl)-chromen-4-one (7). The structures of compounds 1-7 were determined using spectroscopic methods. Compound 4 is reported here for the first time. At 250 pg ml(-1), compounds 1-4, 6 and 7 displayed prostaglandin H endoperoxide synthase-I (COX-I) and prostaglandin H endoperoxide synthase-II (COX-II) inhibitory activities at pH 7. The acetylated product (5) of compound 4 also inhibited COX-I and COX-II enzymes when tested at 250 microg ml(-1). Compounds 6 and 7 exhibited good antioxidant activity at concentrations of 125 and 250 microg ml(-1). Only compounds 1-3 exhibited topoisomerase-I and -II enzyme inhibitory activity at concentrations of 100, 200 and 200 microg ml(-1), respectively.

  5. Topoisomerase-1 gene copy aberrations are frequent in patients with breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kümler, Iben; Balslev, Eva; Poulsen, Tim Svenstrup

    2015-01-01

    Topoisomerase-1 (Top1) targeting drugs have shown promising efficacy in patients with metastatic breast cancer (BC). However, these drugs are rather toxic calling for development and validation of predictive biomarkers to increase the therapeutic index. As these drugs are targeting the Top1 protein...... of 20q including CEN-20 is common in BC a TOP1/CEN-2 probemix was applied to the validation cohort. More than 30% of the patients had gene copy numbers of ≥ 4 and approximately 20% of the patients had TOP1/CEN-20 ratios ≥ 1.5. The CEN-2 probe did not add any information. Gain of the TOP1 gene appears...... of TOP1 gene copy gain in BC. The prevalence of TOP1 gene copy gain was investigated by fluorescence in situ hybridization with a TOP1/CEN-20 probemix in normal breast tissue (N=100) and in tissue from patients with metastatic BC in a discovery (N=100) and a validation cohort (N=205). As amplification...

  6. ZATT (ZNF451)-mediated resolution of topoisomerase 2 DNA-protein cross-links.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, Matthew J; Lieberman, Jenna Ariel; Herrero-Ruiz, Andrés; Butler, Logan R; Williams, Jason G; Muñoz-Cabello, Ana M; Mueller, Geoffrey A; London, Robert E; Cortés-Ledesma, Felipe; Williams, R Scott

    2017-09-29

    Topoisomerase 2 (TOP2) DNA transactions proceed via formation of the TOP2 cleavage complex (TOP2cc), a covalent enzyme-DNA reaction intermediate that is vulnerable to trapping by potent anticancer TOP2 drugs. How genotoxic TOP2 DNA-protein cross-links are resolved is unclear. We found that the SUMO (small ubiquitin-related modifier) ligase ZATT (ZNF451) is a multifunctional DNA repair factor that controls cellular responses to TOP2 damage. ZATT binding to TOP2cc facilitates a proteasome-independent tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (TDP2) hydrolase activity on stalled TOP2cc. The ZATT SUMO ligase activity further promotes TDP2 interactions with SUMOylated TOP2, regulating efficient TDP2 recruitment through a "split-SIM" SUMO2 engagement platform. These findings uncover a ZATT-TDP2-catalyzed and SUMO2-modulated pathway for direct resolution of TOP2cc. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  7. Synthesis, DNA Binding and Topoisomerase I Inhibition Activity of Thiazacridine and Imidazacridine Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Almeida Lafayette

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Thiazacridine and imidazacridine derivatives have shown promising results as tumors suppressors in some cancer cell lines. For a better understanding of the mechanism of action of these compounds, binding studies of 5-acridin-9-ylmethylidene-3-amino-2-thioxo-thiazolidin-4-one, 5-acridin-9-ylmethylidene-2-thioxo-thiazolidin-4-one, 5-acridin-9-ylmethylidene-2-thioxo-imidazolidin-4-one and 3-acridin-9-ylmethyl-thiazolidin-2,4-dione with calf thymus DNA (ctDNA by electronic absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism spectroscopy were performed. The binding constants ranged from 1.46 × 104 to 6.01 × 104 M−1. UV-Vis, fluorescence and circular dichroism measurements indicated that the compounds interact effectively with ctDNA, both by intercalation or external binding. They demonstrated inhibitory activities to human topoisomerase I, except for 5-acridin-9-ylmethylidene-2-thioxo-1,3-thiazolidin-4-one. These results provide insight into the DNA binding mechanism of imidazacridines and thiazacridines.

  8. Topoisomerase IIbeta is required for proper retinal development and survival of postmitotic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Li

    2014-01-01

    Topoisomerase IIbeta (Top2b is an enzyme that modulates DNA supercoiling by catalyzing the passage of DNA duplexes through one another. It is ubiquitously expressed in postmitotic cells and known to function during the development of neuromuscular junctions in the diaphragm and the proper formation of laminar structure in the cerebral cortex. However, due to the perinatal death phenotype of the traditional constitutive and brain-specific Top2b knockout mice, the precise in vivo function of Top2b, especially during postnatal neural development, remains to be determined. Using both the constitutive and retina-specific knockout mouse models, we showed that Top2b deficiency resulted in delayed neuronal differentiation, degeneration of the plexiform layers and outer segment of photoreceptors, as well as dramatic reduction in cell number in the retina. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis by RNA sequencing revealed that genes involved in neuronal survival and neural system development were preferentially affected in Top2b-deficient retinas. Collectively, our findings have indicated an important function of Top2b in proper development and the maintenance/survival of postmitotic neurons in the retina.

  9. Value of urinary topoisomerase-IIA cell-free DNA for diagnosis of bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ye-Hwan; Yan, Chunri; Lee, Il-Seok; Piao, Xuan-Mei; Byun, Young Joon; Jeong, Pildu; Kim, Won Tae; Yun, Seok-Joong; Kim, Wun-Jae

    2016-03-01

    Topoisomerase-II alpha (TopoIIA ), a DNA gyrase isoform that plays an important role in the cell cycle, is present in normal tissues and various human cancers, and can show altered expression in both. The aim of the current study was to examine the value of urinary TopoIIA cell-free DNA as a noninvasive diagnosis of bladder cancer (BC). Two patient cohorts were examined. Cohort 1 (73 BC patients and seven controls) provided bladder tissue samples, whereas cohort 2 (83 BC patients, 54 nonmalignant hematuric patients, and 61 normal controls) provided urine samples. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to measure expression of TopoIIA mRNA in tissues and TopoIIA cell-free DNA in urine samples. The results showed that expression of TopoIIA mRNA in BC tissues was significantly higher than that in noncancer control tissues (pbladder cancer (MIBC) when compared with nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) (p=0.002). Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis was performed to examine the sensitivity/specificity of urinary TopoIIA cell-free DNA for diagnosing BC, NMIBC, and MIBC. The areas under the ROC curve for BC, NMIBC, and MIBC were 0.741, 0.701, and 0.838, respectively. In summary, the results of this study provide evidence that cell-free TopoIIA DNA may be a potential biomarker for BC.

  10. Expression of stable and active human DNA topoisomerase I in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Mooi Kwai; Lim, Shern Kwok; Miswan, Noorizan; Chew, Ai Lan; Noordin, Rahmah; Khoo, Boon Yin

    2018-01-01

    This study described the isolation of the coding region of human topoisomerase I (TopoI) from MDA-MB-231 and the expression of multiple copy recombinant genes in four Pichia pastoris strains. First, polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplification of the enzyme coding region was performed. The PCR fragment was cloned into pPICZ-α-A vector and sequenced. It was then transformed into X33, GS115, SMD1168H and KM71H strains of Pichia. PCR-screening for positive clones was performed, and estimation of multiple copy integrants in each Pichia strain was carried out using agar plates containing increasing concentrations of Zeocin ® . The selected clones of multiple copy recombinant genes were then induced for TopoI expression in shaker flasks. GS115 and SMD1168 were found to be better Pichia strains to accommodate the recombinant gene for the expression of TopoI extracellularly. However, the DNA relaxation activity revealed that only the target enzyme in the culture supernatants of GS115-pPICZ-α-A-TopoI exhibited consistent enzyme activity over the cultivation time-points. Active enzyme activity was inhibited by Camptothecin. The enzyme produced can be used for in-house gel-based DNA relaxation assay development in performing high throughput screening for target-specific growth inhibitors that display similar effect as the TopoI inhibitors. These inhibitors may contribute to the improvement of the treatment of cancer patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A recombinant topoisomerase I used for autoantibody detection in sera from patients with systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheijen, R; Van den Hoogen, F; Beijer, R; Richter, A; Penner, E; Habets, W J; van Venrooij, W J

    1990-04-01

    We report the expression of a cDNA clone encoding 695 carboxyl-terminal amino acids of human DNA topoisomerase I (topoI) in Escherichia coli. More than 96% of the anti-HeLa topoI-positive sera from patients with a connective tissue disease displayed also an immunoreactivity with this recombinant protein (the HTopoA protein). Sera from patients with a definite diagnosis systemic sclerosis and reacting with HeLa topoI, all reacted with the HTopoA protein as well. Sera from patients with systemic sclerosis that did not contain anti-topoI antibodies (about 30% of the systemic sclerosis sera), as concluded from HeLa immunoblot, displayed also no immunoreactivity with our recombinant antigen. By expressing different fragments of HTopoA, we were able to assign at least three different autoimmune epitope regions on the HTopoA protein and we show that over a period of 5 years the amount of anti-topoI antibodies against these regions may fluctuate.

  12. [Clinical significant of semiquantificating DNA topoisomerase- I mRNA in colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Hideyuki; Shirakawa, Kazuo; Ohsawa, Tomonori; Hayashi, Yoichi; Okada, Norimichi; Nakada, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Masaru

    2005-09-01

    To examine the clinical significance of determining the expression levels of DNA topoisomerase- I (topo-I) mRNA of colorectal cancer. The relative expression levels of topo-I mRNA in primary colorectal cancer and adjacent normal mucosa were semiquantificated by the RT-PCR method. The relative expression of thymidylate synthase (TS) mRNA of the primary lesions was also examined. The topo- I mRNA expression was higher in the tumorous tissue than in the normal mucosa (n=22, ptopoI mRNA expression did not differ nor correlate with the response to CPT-11 (PR, n=14; SD, n=11; PR; n=24) (p=0.91). In these patients, there was no relationship between the topo I mRNA expression and the TS mRNA expression (p=0.22, r=0.18). In addition, the efficacy of CPT-11 did not correlate with combinations subdivided according to the expression levels of topo- I mRNA and TS mRNA. Determination of topo- I mRNA levels of primary colorectal cancer may not be useful for predicting the efficacy of CPT-11 treatment alone or in combination with TS mRNA levels.

  13. Design and synthesis of 2-phenylnaphthalenoids and 2-phenylbenzofuranoids as DNA topoisomerase inhibitors and antitumor agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Huilin; Chen, Wang; Zhu, Jing; Lu, Chunhua; Shen, Yuemao

    2015-09-18

    Eight 2-phenylnaphthalenoids (2PNs) (3a-h) and twenty four 2-phenylbenzofuranoids (2PBFs) (4a--4j, 5a-5j, 6a, 6f-6h) were successfully designed, synthesized and their antiproliferative and in vitro DNA topoisomerase inhibitory activities were evaluated. Nine compounds (four 2PNs and five 2PBFs) showed either TopoI or TopoIIα inhibitory activities. Six compounds (four 2PNs and two 2PBFs) exhibited potent cytotoxicity with IC50 values for 72 h exposure ranging from 0.3 to above 20 μM against MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-435, HepG2 and PC3 cell lines. The two 2PBFs displayed comparable and even better antiproliferative as well as TopoIIα inhibitory activities than 2PNs. Interestingly, the active 2PBFs displayed different mechanisms of TopoIIα inhibition from that of 2PNs, suggesting that the chromophore scaffold replacement may result in a change of the binding site of inhibitors to TopoIIα. Furthermore, the mechanisms of antiproliferation on MDA-MB-231 cells indicate that compounds 5a and 5f are promising for further development of anticancer agents. The results of this study reveal that the evolutionary strategy of medicinal chemistry through scaffold hopping is a promising strategy for structure optimization of TopoIIα inhibitors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Construction, characterization, and complementation of a conditional-lethal DNA topoisomerase IIalpha mutant human cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Adam J; Porter, Andrew C G

    2004-12-01

    DNA Topoisomerase IIalpha (topoIIalpha) is a DNA decatenating enzyme, abundant constituent of mammalian mitotic chromosomes, and target of numerous antitumor drugs, but its exact role in chromosome structure and dynamics is unclear. In a powerful new approach to this important problem, with significant advantages over the use of topoII inhibitors or RNA interference, we have generated and characterized a human cell line (HTETOP) in which >99.5% topoIIalpha expression can be silenced in all cells by the addition of tetracycline. TopoIIalpha-depleted HTETOP cells enter mitosis and undergo chromosome condensation, albeit with delayed kinetics, but normal anaphases and cytokineses are completely prevented, and all cells die, some becoming polyploid in the process. Cells can be rescued by expression of topoIIalpha fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP), even when certain phosphorylation sites have been mutated, but not when the catalytic residue Y805 is mutated. Thus, in addition to validating GFP-tagged topoIIalpha as an indicator for endogenous topoIIalpha dynamics, our analyses provide new evidence that topoIIalpha plays a largely redundant role in chromosome condensation, but an essential catalytic role in chromosome segregation that cannot be complemented by topoIIbeta and does not require phosphorylation at serine residues 1106, 1247, 1354, or 1393.

  15. Activities of different fluoroquinolones against Bacillus anthracis mutants selected in vitro and harboring topoisomerase mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grohs, Patrick; Podglajen, Isabelle; Gutmann, Laurent

    2004-08-01

    Three sets of mutants of Bacillus anthracis resistant to fluoroquinolones were selected on ciprofloxacin and moxifloxacin in a stepwise manner from a nalidixic acid-resistant but fluoroquinolone-susceptible plasmidless strain harboring a Ser85Leu GyrA mutation. A high level of resistance to fluoroquinolones could be obtained in four or five selection steps. In each case, ParC was the secondary target. However, in addition to the GyrA mutation, expression of high-level resistance required (i) in the first set of mutants, active drug efflux associated with a mutation in the QRDR of ParC; (ii) in the second set, two mutations in the QRDR of ParC associated with a mutation in GyrB; and (iii) in the third set, two QRDR mutations, one in ParC and one in GyrA. Interestingly, several selection steps occurred without obvious mutations in the QRDR of any topoisomerase, thereby implying the existence of other resistance mechanisms. Among the fluoroquinolones tested, garenoxacin showed the best activity.

  16. Structural Insights into the Fluoroquinolone Resistance Mechanism of Shigella flexneri DNA Gyrase and Topoisomerase IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamanna; Ramana, Jayashree

    2016-07-01

    Traveler's diarrhea (TD) is an important public health concern that can result from a variety of intestinal pathogens, including bacteria, parasites, and virus. A number of antibiotics are being used to cure TD, but due to widespread use of these antibiotics, the pathogens are becoming resistant to them. In this work, we performed docking studies of DNA gyraseA (GyrA) and topoisomerase IV (ParC) of Shigella flexneri and their mutants with two different fluoroquinolones, ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin, to understand their resistance mechanism at the structural level. S. flexneri strains with mutations at serine 83 to leucine and aspartic acid 87 to glutamate or asparagine of GyrA and that of serine 80 to isoleucine in ParC have decreased susceptibility to fluoroquinolones. This analysis revealed that interaction of ciprofloxacin/norfloxacin with all the mutants was weaker than the interaction of ciprofloxacin/norfloxacin with the wild type. This study highlights the importance of aspartic acid and serine in GyrA and that of serine in ParC, forming bonds with ciprofloxacin/norfloxacin, which may play a crucial role in antibiotic resistance. This work corelates very well with the experimental outcomes and gives a good explanation for fluoroquinolone resistance in S. flexneri.

  17. Topoisomerase mutations and efflux are associated with fluoroquinolone resistance in Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyamada, Yoshihiro; Ito, Hideaki; Inoue, Matsuhisa; Yamagishi, Jun-ichi

    2006-10-01

    To understand better the mechanisms of fluoroquinolone resistance in Enterococcus faecalis, fluoroquinolone-resistant mutants isolated from Ent. faecalis ATCC 29212 by stepwise selection with sparfloxacin (SPX) and norfloxacin (NOR) were analysed. The results showed the following. (i) In general, fluoroquinolone-resistance mechanisms in Ent. faecalis are similar to those in other Gram-positive bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae, namely, mutants with amino acid changes in both GyrA and ParC exhibited high fluoroquinolone resistance, and single GyrA mutants and a single ParC mutant were more resistant to SPX and NOR, respectively, than the parent strain, indicating that the primary targets of SPX and NOR in Ent. faecalis are DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV, respectively. (ii) Alterations in GyrB (DeltaKGA, residues 395-397) and ParE (Glu-459 to Lys) were associated with fluoroquinolone resistance in some mutants. Moreover, the facts that the NOR MIC, but not the SPX MIC, decreased in the presence of multidrug efflux pump inhibitors, that NOR accumulation decreased in the cells, and that the EmeA mRNA expression level did not change, strongly suggested that a NorA-like efflux pump, rather than EmeA, was involved in resistance to NOR.

  18. Effects of an unusual poison identify a lifespan role for Topoisomerase 2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombline, Gregory; Millen, Jonathan I; Polevoda, Bogdan; Rapaport, Matan; Baxter, Bonnie; Van Meter, Michael; Gilbertson, Matthew; Madrey, Joe; Piazza, Gary A; Rasmussen, Lynn; Wennerberg, Krister; White, E Lucile; Nitiss, John L; Goldfarb, David S

    2017-01-05

    A progressive loss of genome maintenance has been implicated as both a cause and consequence of aging. Here we present evidence supporting the hypothesis that an age-associated decay in genome maintenance promotes aging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) due to an inability to sense or repair DNA damage by topoisomerase 2 (yTop2). We describe the characterization of LS1, identified in a high throughput screen for small molecules that shorten the replicative lifespan of yeast. LS1 accelerates aging without affecting proliferative growth or viability. Genetic and biochemical criteria reveal LS1 to be a weak Top2 poison. Top2 poisons induce the accumulation of covalent Top2-linked DNA double strand breaks that, if left unrepaired, lead to genome instability and death. LS1 is toxic to cells deficient in homologous recombination, suggesting that the damage it induces is normally mitigated by genome maintenance systems. The essential roles of yTop2 in proliferating cells may come with a fitness trade-off in older cells that are less able to sense or repair yTop2-mediated DNA damage. Consistent with this idea, cells live longer when yTop2 expression levels are reduced. These results identify intrinsic yTop2-mediated DNA damage as potentially manageable cause of aging.

  19. Structure and Chromosomal Organization of Yeast Genes Regulated by Topoisomerase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Ricky S; Nikolaou, Christoforos; Roca, Joaquim

    2018-01-03

    Cellular DNA topoisomerases (topo I and topo II) are highly conserved enzymes that regulate the topology of DNA during normal genome transactions, such as DNA transcription and replication. In budding yeast, topo I is dispensable whereas topo II is essential, suggesting fundamental and exclusive roles for topo II, which might include the functions of the topo IIa and topo IIb isoforms found in mammalian cells. In this review, we discuss major findings of the structure and chromosomal organization of genes regulated by topo II in budding yeast. Experimental data was derived from short (10 min) and long term (120 min) responses to topo II inactivation in top-2 ts mutants. First, we discuss how short term responses reveal a subset of yeast genes that are regulated by topo II depending on their promoter architecture. These short term responses also uncovered topo II regulation of transcription across multi-gene clusters, plausibly by common DNA topology management. Finally, we examine the effects of deactivated topo II on the elongation of RNA transcripts. Each study provides an insight into the particular chromatin structure that interacts with the activity of topo II. These findings are of notable clinical interest as numerous anti-cancer therapies interfere with topo II activity.

  20. Topoisomerase II Inhibitors and Poisons, and the Influence of Cell Cycle Checkpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D Arcy, Nicholas; Gabrielli, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Interactions between the decatenation checkpoint and Topoisomerase II (TopoII) are vital for maintaining integrity of the genome. Agents that target this enzyme have been in clinical use in cancer therapy for over 30 years with great success. The types of compounds that have been developed to target TopoII are broadly divided into poisons and catalytic inhibitors. The TopoII poisons are in clinical use as anti-cancer therapies, although in common to most chemotherapeutic agents, they display considerable normal tissue toxicity. Inhibition of the TopoIIb isoform has been implicated in this cytotoxicity. Response to TopoII active agents is determined by several factors, but cell cycle checkpoints play a large role in sensitivity and resistance. The G2/M phase checkpoints are of particular importance in considering the effectiveness of these drugs and are reviewed in this article. Functionality of the ATM dependent decatenation checkpoint may represent a new avenue for selective cancer therapy. Here we review the function of TopoII, the anti-cancer mechanisms and limitations of current catalytic inhibitors and poisons, and their influence on cell cycle checkpoints. We will also assess potential new mechanisms for targeting this enzyme to limit normal tissue toxicity, and how the cell cycle checkpoint triggered by these drugs may provide an alternative and possibly better target for novel therapies. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. Mechanistic studies on E. coli DNA topoisomerase I: Divalent ion effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domanico, P.L.; Tse-Dinh, Y.C.

    1991-01-01

    E. coli DNA topoisomerase I catalyzes the hydrolysis of short, single stranded oligodeoxynucleotides. It also forms a covalent protein-DNA complex with negatively supercoiled DNA in the absence of Mg2+ but requires Mg2+ for the relaxation of negatively supercoiled DNA. In this paper we investigate the effects of various divalent metals on catalysis. For the relaxation reaction, maximum enzyme activity plateaus after 2.5 mM Mg2+. However, the rate of cleavage of short oligodeoxynucleotide increased linearly between 0 and 15 mM Mg2+. In the oligodeoxynucleotide cleavage reaction, Ca2+, Mn2+, Co2+, and Zn2+ inhibit enzymatic activity. When these metals are coincubated with Mg2+ at equimolar concentrations, the normal effect of Mg2+ is not detectable. Of these metals, only Ca2+ can be substituted for Mg2+ as a metal cofactor in the relaxation reaction. And when Mg2+ is coincubated with Mn2+, Co2+, or Zn2+ at equimolar concentrations, the normal effect of Mg2+ on relaxation is not detectable. The authors propose that Mg2+ allows the protein-DNA complex to assume a conformation necessary for strand passage and enhance the rate of enzyme turnover

  2. Design and docking of novel series of hybrid xanthones as anti-cancer agent to target human DNA topoisomerase 2-alpha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalit Mohan Nainwal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Topoisomerase (topo IIα is a homodimeric protein catalyzes topological vicissitudes by adding or by soothing super coiling transpiration, occurs in human DNA during DNA replication as an outcome chromosome segregation and condensation occurs during meiosis I and recombination. To prevent the cleavage and religation activity we administered novel hybrid substituted Xanthone series of drugs. The toxicity prediction showed outstanding results which impetus to study its anticancer activities by targeting topoisomerase (topo IIα. We developed the homology model of the topoisomerase (topo IIα due to the unavailability of 3D structure in the Protein Data Bank. Structural assessment of the modeled protein and confirmed the quality of the model. The ligands were docked using Autodock4.2 software and binding energy was reported. The compound XM9, XN2, XM7, XLNU and XNS scored lowest binding energy and highest binding affinity. The interaction sites and the hydrogen bond were observed.

  3. Fluoroquinolones stimulate the DNA cleavage activity of topoisomerase IV by promoting the binding of Mg(2+) to the second metal binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppegard, Lisa M; Schwanz, Heidi A; Towle, Tyrell R; Kerns, Robert J; Hiasa, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    Fluoroquinolones target bacterial type IIA topoisomerases, DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV (Topo IV). Fluoroquinolones trap a topoisomerase-DNA covalent complex as a topoisomerase-fluoroquinolone-DNA ternary complex and ternary complex formation is critical for their cytotoxicity. A divalent metal ion is required for type IIA topoisomerase-catalyzed strand breakage and religation reactions. Recent studies have suggested that type IIA topoisomerases use two metal ions, one structural and one catalytic, to carry out the strand breakage reaction. We conducted a series of DNA cleavage assays to examine the effects of fluoroquinolones and quinazolinediones on Mg(2+)-, Mn(2+)-, or Ca(2+)-supported DNA cleavage activity of Escherichia coli Topo IV. In the absence of any drug, 20-30 mM Mg(2+) was required for the maximum levels of the DNA cleavage activity of Topo IV, whereas approximately 1mM of either Mn(2+) or Ca(2+) was sufficient to support the maximum levels of the DNA cleavage activity of Topo IV. Fluoroquinolones promoted the Topo IV-catalyzed strand breakage reaction at low Mg(2+) concentrations where Topo IV alone could not efficiently cleave DNA. At low Mg(2+) concentrations, fluoroquinolones may stimulate the Topo IV-catalyzed strand breakage reaction by promoting Mg(2+) binding to metal binding site B through the structural distortion in DNA. As Mg(2+) concentration increases, fluoroquinolones may inhibit the religation reaction by either stabilizing Mg(2+) at site B or inhibition the binding of Mg(2+) to site A. This study provides a molecular basis of how fluoroquinolones stimulate the Topo IV-catalyzed strand breakage reaction by modulating Mg(2+) binding. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Fluoroquinolones stimulate the DNA cleavage activity of topoisomerase IV by promoting the binding of Mg2+ to the second metal binding site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppegard, Lisa M.; Schwanz, Heidi A.; Towle, Tyrell R.; Kerns, Robert J.; Hiasa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Background Fluoroquinolones target bacterial type IIA topoisomerases, DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV (Topo IV). Fluoroquinolones trap a topoisomerase-DNA covalent complex as a topoisomerase-fluoroquinolone-DNA ternary complex and ternary complex formation is critical for their cytotoxicity. A divalent metal ion is required for type IIA topoisomerase-catalyzed strand breakage and religation reactions. Recent studies have suggested that type IIA topoisomerases use two metal ions, one structural and one catalytic, to carry out the strand breakage reaction. Methods We conducted a series of DNA cleavage assays to examine the effects of fluoroquinolones and quinazolinediones on Mg2+-, Mn2+-, or Ca2+-supported DNA cleavage activity of Esherichia coli Topo IV. Results In the absence of any drug, 20–30 mM Mg2+ was required for the maximum levels of the DNA cleavage activity of Topo IV, whereas approximately 1 mM of either Mn2+ or Ca2+ was sufficient to support the maximum levels of the DNA cleavage activity of Topo IV. Fluoroquinolones promoted the Topo IV-catalyzed strand breakage reaction at low Mg2+ concentrations where Topo IV alone could not efficiently cleave DNA. Conclusions and General Significance At low Mg2+ concentrations, fluoroquinolones may stimulate the Topo IV-catalyzed strand breakage reaction by promoting Mg2+ binding to metal binding site B through the structural distortion in DNA. As Mg2+ concentration increases, fluoroquinolones may inhibit the religation reaction by either stabilizing Mg2+ at site B or inhibition the binding of Mg2+ to site A. This study provides a molecular basis of how fluoroquinolones stimulate the Topo IV-catalyzed strand breakage reaction by modulating Mg2+ binding. PMID:26723176

  5. A murine experimental anthracycline extravasation model: pathology and study of the involvement of topoisomerase II alpha and iron in the mechanism of tissue damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thougaard, Annemette V; Langer, Seppo W; Hainau, Bo

    2010-01-01

    damage. In contrast to dexrazoxane, the iron-chelating bisdioxopiperazine ICRF-161 do not inhibit the catalytic cycle of topoisomerase II alpha. This compound was used to isolate and test the importance of iron in the wound pathogenesis. ICRF-161 was found ineffective in the treatment of anthracycline...... of topoisomerase II alpha and thereby prevents access of anthracycline to the enzyme and thus cytotoxicity, and also acts as a strong iron chelator following opening of its two bisdioxopiperazine rings. Using the model of extravasation in a dexrazoxane-resistant transgenic mouse with a heterozygous mutation...

  6. Loss of topoisomerase I function affects the RpoS-dependent and GAD systems of acid resistance in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Natalee; Feng, Jingyang; Liu, Xiaoping; Chaudhuri, Devyani; Foster, John W.; Drolet, Marc; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2006-01-01

    SUMMARY Acid resistance (AR) for Escherichia coli is important for its survival in the human gastrointestinal tract and involves three systems. The first AR system is dependent on the sigma factor RpoS. The second system (GAD system) requires glutamate decarboxylase isoforms encoded by the gadA and gadB genes. The third system (ARG system) requires arginine decarboxylase encoded by adiA. Loss of topoisomerase I function from topA deletion or Tn10 insertion mutations lowered the resistance to killing by pH 2 or 2.5 treatment by 10 to >100 fold. The RpoS and GAD systems were both affected by the topA mutation but the ARG system of acid resistance was not affected. Northern blot analysis showed that induction of gadA and gadB transcription in stationary phase and at pH 5.5 was decreased in the topA mutant. Western blot analysis showed that the topA mutation did not affect accumulation of RpoS, GadX or GadW proteins. Topoisomerase I could have a direct influence on transcription of acid resistance genes. This influence did not involve R-loop formation as the overexpression of RNase H did not alleviate the decrease of acid resistance from the topA mutation. The effect of the topA mutation could be suppressed by the hns mutation so topoisomerase I might be required to counteract the effect of H-NS protein on gene expression in addition to its influence on RpoS-dependent transcription. PMID:16079354

  7. DNA damage response (DDR) induced by topoisomerase II poisons requires nuclear function of the small GTPase Rac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wartlick, Friedrich; Bopp, Anita; Henninger, Christian; Fritz, Gerhard

    2013-12-01

    Here, we investigated the influence of Rac family small GTPases on mechanisms of the DNA damage response (DDR) stimulated by topoisomerase II poisons. To this end, we examined the influence of the Rac-specific small molecule inhibitor EHT1864 on Ser139 phosphorylation of histone H2AX, a widely used marker of the DDR triggered by DNA double-strand breaks. EHT1864 attenuated the doxorubicin-stimulated DDR in a subset of cell lines tested, including HepG2 hepatoma cells. EHT1864 reduced the level of DNA strand breaks and increased viability following treatment of HepG2 cells with topo II poisons. Protection by EHT1864 was observed in both p53 wildtype (HepG2) and p53 deficient (Hep3B) human hepatoma cells and, furthermore, remained unaffected upon pharmacological inhibition of p53 in HepG2. Apparently, the impact of Rac on the DDR is independent of p53. Protection from doxorubicin-induced DNA damage by EHT1864 comprises both S and G2 phase cells. The inhibitory effect of EHT1864 on doxorubicin-stimulated DDR was mimicked by pharmacological inhibition of various protein kinases, including JNK, ERK, PI3K, PAK and CK1. EHT1864 and protein kinase inhibitors also attenuated the formation of the topo II-DNA cleavable complex. Moreover, EHT1864 mitigated the constitutive phosphorylation of topoisomerase IIα at positions S1106, S1213 and S1247. Doxorubicin transport, nuclear import/export of topoisomerase II and Hsp90-related mechanisms are likely not of relevance for doxorubicin-stimulated DDR impaired by EHT1864. We suggest that multiple kinase-dependent but p53- and heat shock protein-independent Rac-regulated nuclear mechanisms are required for activation of the DDR following treatment with topo II poisons. © 2013.

  8. Cloning of the mouse cDNA encoding DNA topoisomerase I and chromosomal location of the gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koiwai, O; Yasui, Y; Sakai, Y; Watanabe, T; Ishii, K; Yanagihara, S; Andoh, T

    1993-03-30

    The mouse cDNA encoding DNA topoisomerase I (TopoI) was cloned and the nucleotide sequence of 3512 bp was determined. The cDNA clone contained an open reading frame encoding a protein of 767 amino acids (aa), which is 2 aa longer than its human counterpart. Overall aa sequence homology between the mouse and human, and between the mouse and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) sequences was 96% and 42%, respectively. The mouse TopI gene was mapped at position 54.5 on chromosome 2 from linkage analyses of a three-point cross test with Geg, Ada, and a as marker genes.

  9. Novel insights into the apoptosis mechanism of DNA topoisomerase I inhibitor isoliquiritigenin on HCC tumor cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ze-xin; Li, Jian; Li, Yan; You, Kun; Xu, Hongwei; Wang, Jianguo, E-mail: wangjianguoxx@163.com

    2015-08-21

    The inhibitory effect of DNA topoisomerase (Top I) by isoliquiritigenin(ISO) were investigated and their interaction mechanism was evaluated using methods including UV–vis absorption, fluorescence, coupled with molecular simulation, and using the MTT method of inhibition rate of HCC tumor cell SNU475 proliferation assay, finally, the interaction of ISO with calf thymus DNA was investigated by melting measurements and molecular docking studies. It was found that isoliquiritigenin reversibly inhibited DNA Top I in a competitive manner with the concentrations of ISO resulting in 50% activity lost (IC{sub 50}) were estimated to be 0.178 ± 0.12 mM. Isoliquiritigenin exhibited a strong ability to quench the intrinsic fluorescence of Top I through a static quenching procedure. The positive values of enthalpy change and entropy change suggested that the binding of isoliquiritigenin to Top I was driven mainly by hydrophobic interactions. The molecular docking results revealed isoliquiritigenin actually interacted with the primary amino acid residues on the active site of Top I, and the detection results of fluorescence staining and the inhibitory effect on the growth of HCC SUN475 showed that isoliquiritigenin induced the apoptosis cells increased gradually. The interaction of ISO with DNA can cause the denaturation temperature to be increased, which indicated that the stabilization of the DNA helix was increased in the presence of ISO, which indicated that the results provide strong evidence for intercalative binding of ISO with DNA. - Highlights: • ISO reversibly inhibits TOP I activity in an A dose dependent manner. • Hydrophobic interactions play a major role in ISO–TOP I interaction. • ISO has a high affinity close to the active site pocket of TOP I. • The binding of ISO to DNA induces the stability of the structure of DNA.

  10. Novel topoisomerase I inhibitors. Syntheses and biological evaluation of phosphorus substituted quinoline derivates with antiproliferative activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Concepción; Fuertes, María; Martín-Encinas, Endika; Selas, Asier; Rubiales, Gloria; Tesauro, Cinzia; Knudssen, Birgitta K; Palacios, Francisco

    2018-02-22

    This work describes the synthesis of 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinolinylphosphine oxides, phosphanes and phosphine sulfides as well as that of quinolinylphosphine oxides and phosphine sulfides, which were synthesized in good to high overall yield. The synthetic route involves a multicomponent reaction of (2-phosphine-oxide)-, 2-phosphine- or (2-phosphine-sulfide)-aniline, aldehydes and olefins and allows the selective generation of two stereogenic centres in a short, efficient and reliable synthesis. The selective dehydrogenation of 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinolinylphosphine oxides and phosphine sulfides leads to the formation of corresponding phosphorus substituted quinolines. Some of the products which were prepared showed excellent activity as topoisomerase I (Top1) inhibitors. In addition, prolonged effect of the most potent compounds is maintained with the same intensity even after 3 min of the beginning of the enzymatic reaction. The cytotoxic effect on cell lines derived from human lung adenocarcinoma (A549), human ovarian carcinoma (SKOV03) and human embryonic kidney (HEK293) was also screened. 1,2,3,4-Tetrahydroquinolinylphosphine oxide 6g with an IC 50 value of 0.25 ± 0.03 μM showed excellent activity against the A549 cell line in vitro, while 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinolinylphosphane 9c with an IC 50 value of 0.08 ± 0.01 μM and 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinolinylphosphine sulfide derivative 10f with an IC 50 value of 0.03 ± 0.04 μM are more active against the A549 cell line. Moreover, selectivity towards cancer cell (A549) over non-malignant cells (MRC5) has been observed. According to their structure, they may be excellent antiproliferative candidates. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. The Role of the MAPK Signaling, Topoisomerase and Dietary Bioactives in Controlling Cancer Incidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled A. Selim

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS are common products of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, xenobiotics metabolism and are generated in response to several environmental stress conditions. Some of them play important biochemical roles in cellular signal transduction and gene transcription. On the other hand, ROS are known to be involved in a wide range of human diseases, including cancer. The excessive production of such ROS together with disruption of homeostasis detoxifying mechanisms can mediate a series of cellular oxidative stresses. The oxidative stress of redundant free radicals production can lead to oxidative denaturation of cellular macromolecules including proteins, lipids and DNA. Moreover, oxidative damage is one of the major causes of DNA mutations, replication errors and genomic abnormalities which result in either inhibition or induction of transcription, and end with the disturbance of signal transduction pathways. Among affected signaling pathways are redox-sensitive kinases. The stimulation of these kinases induces several transcription factors through the phosphorylation of their module proteins. The activation of such pathways induces proliferation and cellular transformation. A diet rich in antioxidant compounds has potential health benefits, and there is a growing interest in the role of natural antioxidants in nutrition for prevention and cure of cancer diseases. A controversy has risen regarding the relation between antioxidants and the significant decrease in the risk of cancer incidence. In this review, we will focus on redox-sensitive kinases signaling pathways, highlighting the effects of dietary antioxidant on the prevention, incidence, prognosis or even treatment of human cancers. In addition, we will place emphasis on the chemical classes of pterocarpans as natural anti-oxidants/cancers as well as their underlying mechanisms of action, including their effects on MAPKs and topoisomerase activities.

  12. Cytotoxic and DNA-topoisomerase effects of lapachol amine derivatives and interactions with DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Esteves-Souza

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The cytotoxic activity of amino (3a-e, aza-1-antraquinone (4a-e lapachol derivatives against Ehrlich carcinoma and human K562 leukemia cells was investigated. Cell viability was determined using MTT assay, after 48 (Ehrlich or 96 h (K562 of culture, and vincristine (for K562 leukemia and quercetin (for Ehrlich carcinoma were used as positive controls. The results showed dose-dependent growth-inhibiting activities and that the amino derivatives were active against the assayed cells, whereas the 4a-e derivatives were not. The allylamine derivative 3a was the most active against Ehrlich carcinoma, with IC50 = 16.94 ± 1.25 µM, and against K562 leukemia, with IC50 = 14.11 ± 1.39 µM. The analogous lawsone derivative, 5a, was also active against Ehrlich carcinoma (IC50 = 23.89 ± 2.3 µM, although the 5d and 5e derivatives showed lower activity. The interaction between 3a-d and calf thymus DNA was investigated by fluorimetric titration and the results showed a hyperchromic effect indicating binding to DNA as presented of ethidium bromide, used as positive control. The inhibitory action on DNA-topoisomerase II-a was also evaluated by a relaxation assay of supercoiled DNA plasmid, and the etoposide (200 µM was used as positive control. Significant inhibitory activities were observed for 3a-d at 200 µM and a partial inhibitory action was observed for lapachol and methoxylapachol.

  13. Cytotoxic and DNA-topoisomerase effects of lapachol amine derivatives and interactions with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves-Souza, A; Figueiredo, D V; Esteves, A; Câmara, C A; Vargas, M D; Pinto, A C; Echevarria, A

    2007-10-01

    The cytotoxic activity of amino (3a-e), aza-1-antraquinone (4a-e) lapachol derivatives against Ehrlich carcinoma and human K562 leukemia cells was investigated. Cell viability was determined using MTT assay, after 48 (Ehrlich) or 96 h (K562) of culture, and vincristine (for K562 leukemia) and quercetin (for Ehrlich carcinoma) were used as positive controls. The results showed dose-dependent growth-inhibiting activities and that the amino derivatives were active against the assayed cells, whereas the 4a-e derivatives were not. The allylamine derivative 3a was the most active against Ehrlich carcinoma, with IC50 = 16.94 +/- 1.25 microM, and against K562 leukemia, with IC50 = 14.11 +/- 1.39 microM. The analogous lawsone derivative, 5a, was also active against Ehrlich carcinoma (IC50 = 23.89 +/- 2.3 microM), although the 5d and 5e derivatives showed lower activity. The interaction between 3a-d and calf thymus DNA was investigated by fluorimetric titration and the results showed a hyperchromic effect indicating binding to DNA as presented of ethidium bromide, used as positive control. The inhibitory action on DNA-topoisomerase II-a was also evaluated by a relaxation assay of supercoiled DNA plasmid, and the etoposide (200 microM) was used as positive control. Significant inhibitory activities were observed for 3a-d at 200 microM and a partial inhibitory action was observed for lapachol and methoxylapachol.

  14. Topoisomerase II Inhibitors Induce DNA Damage-Dependent Interferon Responses Circumventing Ebola Virus Immune Evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthra, Priya; Aguirre, Sebastian; Yen, Benjamin C; Pietzsch, Colette A; Sanchez-Aparicio, Maria T; Tigabu, Bersabeh; Morlock, Lorraine K; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Leung, Daisy W; Williams, Noelle S; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Bukreyev, Alexander; Basler, Christopher F

    2017-04-04

    Ebola virus (EBOV) protein VP35 inhibits production of interferon alpha/beta (IFN) by blocking RIG-I-like receptor signaling pathways, thereby promoting virus replication and pathogenesis. A high-throughput screening assay, developed to identify compounds that either inhibit or bypass VP35 IFN-antagonist function, identified five DNA intercalators as reproducible hits from a library of bioactive compounds. Four, including doxorubicin and daunorubicin, are anthracycline antibiotics that inhibit topoisomerase II and are used clinically as chemotherapeutic drugs. These compounds were demonstrated to induce IFN responses in an ATM kinase-dependent manner and to also trigger the DNA-sensing cGAS-STING pathway of IFN induction. These compounds also suppress EBOV replication in vitro and induce IFN in the presence of IFN-antagonist proteins from multiple negative-sense RNA viruses. These findings provide new insights into signaling pathways activated by important chemotherapy drugs and identify a novel therapeutic approach for IFN induction that may be exploited to inhibit RNA virus replication. IMPORTANCE Ebola virus and other emerging RNA viruses are significant but unpredictable public health threats. Therapeutic approaches with broad-spectrum activity could provide an attractive response to such infections. We describe a novel assay that can identify small molecules that overcome Ebola virus-encoded innate immune evasion mechanisms. This assay identified as hits cancer chemotherapeutic drugs, including doxorubicin. Follow-up studies provide new insight into how doxorubicin induces interferon (IFN) responses, revealing activation of both the DNA damage response kinase ATM and the DNA sensor cGAS and its partner signaling protein STING. The studies further demonstrate that the ATM and cGAS-STING pathways of IFN induction are a point of vulnerability not only for Ebola virus but for other RNA viruses as well, because viral innate immune antagonists consistently fail to

  15. Fusion of GFP to the M.EcoKI DNA methyltransferase produces a new probe of Type I DNA restriction and modification enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kai; Roberts, Gareth A.; Stephanou, Augoustinos S.; Cooper, Laurie P.; White, John H.; Dryden, David T.F.

    2010-01-01

    We describe the fusion of enhanced green fluorescent protein to the C-terminus of the HsdS DNA sequence-specificity subunit of the Type I DNA modification methyltransferase M.EcoKI. The fusion expresses well in vivo and assembles with the two HsdM modification subunits. The fusion protein functions as a sequence-specific DNA methyltransferase protecting DNA against digestion by the EcoKI restriction endonuclease. The purified enzyme shows Förster resonance energy transfer to fluorescently-labelled DNA duplexes containing the target sequence and to fluorescently-labelled ocr protein, a DNA mimic that binds to the M.EcoKI enzyme. Distances determined from the energy transfer experiments corroborate the structural model of M.EcoKI. PMID:20599730

  16. Antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of xanthohumol in cholangiocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walden, Daniel; Kunnimalaiyaan, Selvi; Sokolowski, Kevin; Clark, T Gamblin; Kunnimalaiyaan, Muthusamy

    2017-10-20

    Cholangiocarcinoma remains the second most prevalent hepatic neoplasm in the United States with a 5-year survival rate of less than 10%. Currently, no systemic therapy has demonstrated efficacy. Therefore, an urgent need for the identification of molecularly targeted compound(s) remains. The Notch signaling pathway has been shown to be dysregulated in cholangiocarcinoma, exhibiting hyperactivity while also possibly mediating chemotherapeutic resistance. We analyzed the effects of xanthohumol, a prenylated chalcone, on cholangiocarcinoma proliferation utilizing human cholangiocarcinoma cell lines CCLP1, SG-231 and CC-SW-1 while gaining insight into the associated mechanism. Xanthohumol potently reduced cellular proliferation, colony formation, and cell confluency in all three cell lines. Xanthohumol induced cell cycle arrest as well as apoptosis through the reduction of cell cycle regulatory proteins as well as an increase in pro-apoptotic markers (cleaved poly ADP ribose polymerase, cleaved caspase-3) and a decrease in anti-apoptotic markers (X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis and survivin). At the molecular level, xanthohumol reduced Notch1 and AKT expression in a step-wise and time-dependent fashion, with Notch1 reductions preceding AKT. Additionally, xanthohumol reduced cholangiocarcinoma growth in both CCLP-1 and SG-231 derived mice xenografts. In summary, we show that xanthohumol significantly reduced cholangiocarcinoma growth through the Notch1/AKT signaling axis. Furthermore, known pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of XN supports continued development of treatment for cholangiocarcinoma.

  17. A stapled BIM peptide overcomes apoptotic resistance in hematologic cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBelle, James L.; Katz, Samuel G.; Bird, Gregory H.; Gavathiotis, Evripidis; Stewart, Michelle L.; Lawrence, Chelsea; Fisher, Jill K.; Godes, Marina; Pitter, Kenneth; Kung, Andrew L.; Walensky, Loren D.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer cells subvert the natural balance between cellular life and death, achieving immortality through pathologic enforcement of survival pathways and blockade of cell death mechanisms. Pro-apoptotic BCL-2 family proteins are frequently disarmed in relapsed and refractory cancer through genetic deletion or interaction-based neutralization by overexpressed antiapoptotic proteins, resulting in resistance to chemotherapy and radiation treatments. New pharmacologic strategies are urgently needed to overcome these formidable apoptotic blockades. We harnessed the natural killing activity of BCL-2–interacting mediator of cell death (BIM), which contains one of the most potent BH3 death domains of the BCL-2 protein family, to restore BH3-dependent cell death in resistant hematologic cancers. A hydrocarbon-stapled peptide modeled after the BIM BH3 helix broadly targeted BCL-2 family proteins with high affinity, blocked inhibitory antiapoptotic interactions, directly triggered proapoptotic activity, and induced dose-responsive and BH3 sequence–specific cell death of hematologic cancer cells. The therapeutic potential of stapled BIM BH3 was highlighted by the selective activation of cell death in the aberrant lymphoid infiltrates of mice reconstituted with BIM-deficient bone marrow and in a human AML xenograft model. Thus, we found that broad and multimodal targeting of the BCL-2 family pathway can overcome pathologic barriers to cell death. PMID:22622039

  18. Apoptotic-like programmed cell death in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reape, Theresa J; McCabe, Paul F

    2008-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is now accepted as a fundamental cellular process in plants. It is involved in defence, development and response to stress, and our understanding of these processes would be greatly improved through a greater knowledge of the regulation of plant PCD. However, there may be several types of PCD that operate in plants, and PCD research findings can be confusing if they are not assigned to a specific type of PCD. The various cell-death mechanisms need therefore to be carefully described and defined. This review describes one of these plant cell death processes, namely the apoptotic-like PCD (AL-PCD). We begin by examining the hallmark 'apoptotic-like' features (protoplast condensation, DNA degradation) of the cell's destruction that are characteristic of AL-PCD, and include examples of AL-PCD during the plant life cycle. The review explores the possible cellular 'executioners' (caspase-like molecules; mitochondria; de novo protein synthesis) that are responsible for the hallmark features of the cellular destruction. Finally, senescence is used as a case study to show that a rigorous definition of cell-death processes in plant cells can help to resolve arguments that occur in the scientific literature regarding the timing and control of plant cell death.

  19. Apoptotic potential and cell sensitivity to fractionated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rupnow, Brent A.; Murtha, Albert D.; Alarcon, Rodolfo M.; Giaccia, Amato J.; Knox, Susan J.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: At present, the relationship between sensitivity to radiation-induced apoptosis and overall cellular radiosensitivity remains unclear. In particular, the relationship of apoptotic sensitivity to the survival of cells following fractionated irradiation has not been well studied. The purpose of the present study was to determine if increasing cell sensitivity to radiation-induced apoptosis would result in decreased clonogenic survival following single dose and fractionated irradiation in vitro. Materials and Methods: To address this, we chose a cell line (Rat-1MycER) in which the sensitivity to radiation-induced apoptosis could be altered by switching on or off the activity of a conditional c-Myc allele (c-MycER). The c-MycER construct expresses a full length c-Myc protein fused to a modified hormone binding domain of the estrogen receptor. Only in the presence of the estrogen analog 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4HT), does the conditional c-MycER become active. Apoptosis following irradiation in these cells (with and without c-MycER activation) was analyzed by flow cytometry to determine the percentage of cells undergoing apoptosis following various radiation doses and at different times after irradiation. Additionally, clonogenic survival analysis was performed following single radiation doses from 0 to 10 Gy and following five fractions of 2 or 4 Gy each. Survival of cells with and without c-MycER activation was compared. Furthermore, the effect of overexpressing the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 gene on apoptosis induction and clonogenic survival of these cells was examined. Results: Rat-1MycER cells were strongly sensitized to radiation-induced apoptosis in a dose and time dependent manner when MycER was activated relative to cells treated without c-MycER activation. This c-Myc-mediated sensitivity to radiation-induced apoptosis was suppressed by overexpression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. In addition to increasing apoptosis, activating c-MycER prior to

  20. Propofol inhibits burn injury-induced hyperpermeability through an apoptotic signal pathway in microvascular endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    K.Y. Tian; X.J. Liu; J.D. Xu; L.J. Deng; G. Wang

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that an intrinsic apoptotic signaling cascade is involved in vascular hyperpermeability and endothelial barrier dysfunction. Propofol (2,6-diisopropylphenol) has also been reported to inhibit apoptotic signaling by regulating mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening and caspase-3 activation. Here, we investigated whether propofol could alleviate burn serum-induced endothelial hyperpermeability through the inhibition of the intrinsic apoptotic sign...

  1. Residues of E. coli topoisomerase I conserved for interaction with a specific cytosine base to facilitate DNA cleavage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narula, Gagandeep; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial and archaeal topoisomerase I display selectivity for a cytosine base 4 nt upstream from the DNA cleavage site. Recently, the solved crystal structure of Escherichia coli topoisomerase I covalently linked to a single-stranded oligonucleotide revealed that R169 and R173 interact with the cytosine base at the −4 position via hydrogen bonds while the phenol ring of Y177 wedges between the bases at the −4 and the −5 position. Substituting R169 to alanine changed the selectivity of the enzyme for the base at the −4 position from a cytosine to an adenine. The R173A mutant displayed similar sequence selectivity as the wild-type enzyme, but weaker cleavage and relaxation activity. Mutation of Y177 to serine or alanine rendered the enzyme inactive. Although mutation of each of these residues led to different outcomes, R169, R173 and Y177 work together to interact with a cytosine base at the −4 position to facilitate DNA cleavage. These strictly conserved residues might act after initial substrate binding as a Molecular Ruler to form a protein–DNA complex with the scissile phosphate positioned at the active site for optimal DNA cleavage by the tyrosine hydroxyl nucleophile to facilitate DNA cleavage in the reaction pathway. PMID:22833607

  2. Protection of halogenated DNA from strand breakage and sister-chromatid exchange induced by the topoisomerase I inhibitor camptothecin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orta, Manuel Luis; Mateos, Santiago; Cantero, Gloria; Wolff, Lisa J.; Cortes, Felipe

    2008-01-01

    The fundamental nuclear enzyme DNA topoisomerase I (topo I), cleaves the double-stranded DNA molecule at preferred sequences within its recognition/binding sites. We have recently reported that when cells incorporate halogenated nucleosides analogues of thymidine into DNA, it interferes with normal chromosome segregation, as shown by an extraordinarily high yield of endoreduplication, and results in a protection against DNA breakage induced by the topo II poison m-AMSA [F. Cortes, N. Pastor, S. Mateos, I. Dominguez, The nature of DNA plays a role in chromosome segregation: endoreduplication in halogen-substituted chromosomes, DNA Repair 2 (2003) 719-726; G. Cantero, S. Mateos, N. Pastor; F. Cortes, Halogen substitution of DNA protects from poisoning of topoisomerase II that results in DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), DNA Repair 5 (2006) 667-674]. In the present investigation, we have assessed whether the presence of halogenated nucleosides in DNA diminishes the frequency of interaction of topo I with DNA and thus the frequency with which the stabilisation of cleavage complexes by the topo I poison camptothecin (CPT) takes place, in such a way that it protects from chromosome breakage and sister-chromatid exchange. This protective effect is shown to parallel a loss in halogen-substituted cells of the otherwise CPT-increased catalytic activity bound to DNA

  3. Flavonoids from Annona dioica leaves and their effects in Ehrlich carcinoma cells, DNA-topoisomerase I and II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega, Maria R.G.; Esteves-Souza, Andressa; Echevarria, Aurea; Vieira, Ivo J.C.; Mathias, Leda; Braz-Filho, Raimundo

    2007-01-01

    Chemical investigation of methanol extract leaves from Annona dioica (Annonaceae) resulted in the identification of flavonoids kaempferol (1), 3-O-[3'',6''-di-O-p-hydroxycinnamoyl]-β- galactopyranosyl-kaempferol (2), 6''-O-p-hydroxycinnamoyl-β-galactopyranosyl-kaempferol (3) and 3-O-β-galactopyranosyl-kaempferol (4). The structures were unequivocally characterized by 1 H and 13 C NMR spectroscopic analyses using 1D and 2D experiments. The cytotoxic effects of the flavonoids and flavonoid fraction (FF) were evaluated by MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2- yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay against Ehrlich carcinoma cells. The results indicated that 1, 2, 3 and FF exhibit significant antiproliferative action when compared to quercetin. The inhibitory action on DNA-topoisomerase I and II of all the flavonoids was evaluated by relaxation assays on pBR322 plasmid DNA. The results indicated the inhibitory and non-selective effects of the flavonoids on DNA-topoisomerase I and II. (author)

  4. Flavonoids from Annona dioica leaves and their effects in Ehrlich carcinoma cells, DNA-topoisomerase I and II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega, Maria R.G.; Esteves-Souza, Andressa; Echevarria, Aurea [Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ), Seropedica, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica]. E-mail: echevarr@ufrrj.br; Vieira, Ivo J.C.; Mathias, Leda; Braz-Filho, Raimundo [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense (UENF), Campos dos Goytacases, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Ciencias Quimicas

    2007-07-01

    Chemical investigation of methanol extract leaves from Annona dioica (Annonaceae) resulted in the identification of flavonoids kaempferol (1), 3-O-[3'',6''-di-O-p-hydroxycinnamoyl]-{beta}- galactopyranosyl-kaempferol (2), 6''-O-p-hydroxycinnamoyl-{beta}-galactopyranosyl-kaempferol (3) and 3-O-{beta}-galactopyranosyl-kaempferol (4). The structures were unequivocally characterized by {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopic analyses using 1D and 2D experiments. The cytotoxic effects of the flavonoids and flavonoid fraction (FF) were evaluated by MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2- yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay against Ehrlich carcinoma cells. The results indicated that 1, 2, 3 and FF exhibit significant antiproliferative action when compared to quercetin. The inhibitory action on DNA-topoisomerase I and II of all the flavonoids was evaluated by relaxation assays on pBR322 plasmid DNA. The results indicated the inhibitory and non-selective effects of the flavonoids on DNA-topoisomerase I and II. (author)

  5. C-terminal lysine repeats in Streptomyces topoisomerase I stabilize the enzyme–DNA complex and confer high enzyme processivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzałka, Agnieszka; Szafran, Marcin J.; Strick, Terence

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Streptomyces topoisomerase I (TopA) exhibits exceptionally high processivity. The enzyme, as other actinobacterial topoisomerases I, differs from its bacterial homologs in its C-terminal domain (CTD). Here, bioinformatics analyses established that the presence of lysine repeats is a characteristic feature of actinobacterial TopA CTDs. Streptomyces TopA contains the longest stretch of lysine repeats, which terminate with acidic amino acids. DNA-binding studies revealed that the lysine repeats stabilized the TopA–DNA complex, while single-molecule experiments showed that their elimination impaired enzyme processivity. Streptomyces coelicolor TopA processivity could not be restored by fusion of its N-terminal domain (NTD) with the Escherichia coli TopA CTD. The hybrid protein could not re-establish the distribution of multiple chromosomal copies in Streptomyces hyphae impaired by TopA depletion. We expected that the highest TopA processivity would be required during the growth of multigenomic sporogenic hyphae, and indeed, the elimination of lysine repeats from TopA disturbed sporulation. We speculate that the interaction of the lysine repeats with DNA allows the stabilization of the enzyme–DNA complex, which is additionally enhanced by acidic C-terminal amino acids. The complex stabilization, which may be particularly important for GC-rich chromosomes, enables high enzyme processivity. The high processivity of TopA allows rapid topological changes in multiple chromosomal copies during Streptomyces sporulation. PMID:28981718

  6. The Cytotoxicity of Benzaldehyde Nitrogen Mustard-2-Pyridine Carboxylic Acid Hydrazone Being Involved in Topoisomerase IIα Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Fu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The antitumor property of iron chelators and aromatic nitrogen mustard derivatives has been well documented. Combination of the two pharmacophores in one molecule in drug designation is worth to be explored. We reported previously the syntheses and preliminary cytotoxicity evaluation of benzaldehyde nitrogen mustard pyridine carboxyl acid hydrazones (BNMPH as extended study, more tumor cell lines (IC50 for HepG2: 26.1 ± 3.5 μM , HCT-116: 57.5 ± 5.3 μM, K562: 48.2 ± 4.0 μM, and PC-12: 19.4 ± 2.2 μM were used to investigate its cytotoxicity and potential mechanism. In vitro experimental data showed that the BNMPH chelating Fe2+ caused a large number of ROS formations which led to DNA cleavage, and this was further supported by comet assay, implying that ROS might be involved in the cytotoxicity of BNMPH. The ROS induced changes of apoptosis related genes, but the TFR1 and NDRG1 metastatic genes were not obviously regulated, prompting that BNMPH might not be able to deprive Fe2+ of ribonucleotide reductase. The BNMPH induced S phase arrest was different from that of iron chelators (G1 and alkylating agents (G2. BNMPH also exhibited its inhibition of human topoisomerase IIα. Those revealed that the cytotoxic mechanism of the BNMPH could stem from both the topoisomerase II inhibition, ROS generation and DNA alkylation.

  7. Chiral ruthenium(II) complexes with phenolic hydroxyl groups as dual poisons of topoisomerases I and IIα.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pingyu; Wang, Jinquan; Huang, Huaiyi; Qiao, Liping; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2013-06-28

    A series of novel chiral ruthenium(II) complexes with phenolic hydroxyl groups were synthesized and characterized. These ruthenium(II) complexes exhibited strong dual inhibition of topoisomerases I and IIα, with approximate IC50 values of 3-15 mM, which were more efficient than the widely clinically used single TopoI poison camptothecin (CPT) or TopoIIα poison etoposide (VP-16). Δ-1 and Λ-1 with more hydroxyls were observed to be more potent inhibitors. To further evaluate the mechanism of the complexes at a cellular level, these complexes were investigated for their effect on cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and induction of apoptosis. The results indicated that ruthenium(II) complexes permeated the nuclei in cancer cells and inhibited the activities of nuclear enzymes topoisomerases I and IIα, then triggered DNA damage and induced apoptosis in the cancer cells. The simultaneous inhibition of TopoI and TopoIIα induced the death of cancer cells, which may be a promising and effective strategy for cancer therapy.

  8. Alterations in DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV in resistant mutants of Clostridium perfringens found after in vitro treatment with fluoroquinolones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafii, Fatemeh; Park, Miseon; Novak, John S

    2005-02-01

    To compare mutations in the DNA gyrase (gyrA and gyrB) and topoisomerase IV (parC and parE) genes of Clostridium perfringens, which are associated with in vitro exposure to fluoroquinolones, resistant mutants were selected from eight strains by serial passage in the presence of increasing concentrations of norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, gatifloxacin, or trovafloxacin. The nucleotide sequences of the entire gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE genes of 42 mutants were determined. DNA gyrase was the primary target for each fluoroquinolone, and topoisomerase IV was the secondary target. Most mutations appeared in the quinolone resistance-determining regions of gyrA (resulting in changes of Asp-87 to Tyr or Gly-81 to Cys) and parC (resulting in changes of Asp-93 or Asp-88 to Tyr or Ser-89 to Ile); only two mutations were found in gyrB, and only two mutations were found in parE. More mutants with multiple gyrA and parC mutations were produced with gatifloxacin than with the other fluoroquinolones tested. Allelic diversity was observed among the resistant mutants, for which the drug MICs increased 2- to 256-fold. Both the structures of the drugs and their concentrations influenced the selection of mutants.

  9. Development of derivatives of 3, 3'-diindolylmethane as potent Leishmania donovani bi-subunit topoisomerase IB poisons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Roy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The development of 3, 3'-diindolyl methane (DIM resistant parasite Leishmania donovani (LdDR50 by adaptation with increasing concentrations of the drug generates random mutations in the large and small subunits of heterodimeric DNA topoisomerase I of Leishmania (LdTOP1LS. Mutation of large subunit of LdTOP1LS at F270L is responsible for resistance to DIM up to 50 µM concentration. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In search of compounds that inhibit the growth of the DIM resistant parasite and inhibit the catalytic activity of mutated topoisomerase I (F270L, we have prepared three derivatives of DIM namely DPDIM (2,2'-diphenyl 3,3'-diindolyl methane, DMDIM (2,2'-dimethyl 3,3'-diindolyl methane and DMODIM (5,5'-dimethoxy 3,3'-diindolyl methane from parent compound DIM. All the compounds inhibit the growth of DIM resistant parasites, induce DNA fragmentation and stabilize topo1-DNA cleavable complex with the wild type and mutant enzyme. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that the three derivatives of DIM can act as promising lead molecules for the generation of new anti-leishmanial agents.

  10. Refined Method for Droplet Microfluidics-Enabled Detection of Plasmodium falciparum Encoded Topoisomerase I in Blood from Malaria Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Smedegaard Hede

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Rapid and reliable diagnosis is essential in the fight against malaria, which remains one of the most deadly infectious diseases in the world. In the present study we take advantage of a droplet microfluidics platform combined with a novel and user-friendly biosensor for revealing the main malaria-causing agent, the Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum parasite. Detection of the parasite is achieved through detection of the activity of a parasite-produced DNA-modifying enzyme, topoisomerase I (pfTopoI, in the blood from malaria patients. The assay presented has three steps: (1 droplet microfluidics-enabled extraction of active pfTopoI from a patient blood sample; (2 pfTopoI-mediated modification of a specialized DNA biosensor; (3 readout. The setup is quantitative and specific for the detection of Plasmodium topoisomerase I. The procedure is a considerable improvement of the previously published Rolling Circle Enhanced Enzyme Activity Detection (REEAD due to the advantages of involving no signal amplification steps combined with a user-friendly readout. In combination these alterations represent an important step towards exploiting enzyme activity detection in point-of-care diagnostics of malaria.

  11. Responding to the challenge of untreatable gonorrhea: ETX0914, a first-in-class agent with a distinct mechanism-of-action against bacterial Type II topoisomerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basarab, Gregory S; Kern, Gunther H; McNulty, John; Mueller, John P; Lawrence, Kenneth; Vishwanathan, Karthick; Alm, Richard A; Barvian, Kevin; Doig, Peter; Galullo, Vincent; Gardner, Humphrey; Gowravaram, Madhusudhan; Huband, Michael; Kimzey, Amy; Morningstar, Marshall; Kutschke, Amy; Lahiri, Sushmita D; Perros, Manos; Singh, Renu; Schuck, Virna J A; Tommasi, Ruben; Walkup, Grant; Newman, Joseph V

    2015-07-14

    With the diminishing effectiveness of current antibacterial therapies, it is critically important to discover agents that operate by a mechanism that circumvents existing resistance. ETX0914, the first of a new class of antibacterial agent targeted for the treatment of gonorrhea, operates by a novel mode-of-inhibition against bacterial type II topoisomerases. Incorporating an oxazolidinone on the scaffold mitigated toxicological issues often seen with topoisomerase inhibitors. Organisms resistant to other topoisomerase inhibitors were not cross-resistant with ETX0914 nor were spontaneous resistant mutants to ETX0914 cross-resistant with other topoisomerase inhibitor classes, including the widely used fluoroquinolone class. Preclinical evaluation of ETX0914 pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics showed distribution into vascular tissues and efficacy in a murine Staphylococcus aureus infection model that served as a surrogate for predicting efficacious exposures for the treatment of Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections. A wide safety margin to the efficacious exposure in toxicological evaluations supported progression to Phase 1. Dosing ETX0914 in human volunteers showed sufficient exposure and minimal adverse effects to expect a highly efficacious anti-gonorrhea therapy.

  12. Structure-based design, synthesis and biological testing of etoposide analog epipodophyllotoxin-N-mustard hybrid compounds designed to covalently bind to topoisomerase II and DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Arun A; Wu, Xing; Patel, Daywin; Yalowich, Jack C; Hasinoff, Brian B

    2014-11-01

    Drugs that target DNA topoisomerase II isoforms and alkylate DNA represent two mechanistically distinct and clinically important classes of anticancer drugs. Guided by molecular modeling and docking a series of etoposide analog epipodophyllotoxin-N-mustard hybrid compounds were designed, synthesized and biologically characterized. These hybrids were designed to alkylate nucleophilic protein residues on topoisomerase II and thus produce inactive covalent adducts and to also alkylate DNA. The most potent hybrid had a mean GI(50) in the NCI-60 cell screen 17-fold lower than etoposide. Using a variety of in vitro and cell-based assays all of the hybrids tested were shown to target topoisomerase II. A COMPARE analysis indicated that the hybrids had NCI 60-cell growth inhibition profiles matching both etoposide and the N-mustard compounds from which they were derived. These results supported the conclusion that the hybrids displayed characteristics that were consistent with having targeted both topoisomerase II and DNA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Lack of cross-resistance to fostriecin in a human small-cell lung carcinoma cell line showing topoisomerase II-related drug resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Steven; Zijlstra, J G; Mulder, Nanno; de Vries, Liesbeth

    1991-01-01

    Cells exhibiting decreased topoisomerase II (Topo II) activity are resistant to several drugs that require Topo II as an intermediate. These drugs are cytotoxic due to the formation of a cleavable complex between the drug, Topo II and DNA. Fostriecin belongs to a new class of drugs that inhibit Topo

  14. Mutation of Gly717Phe in human topoisomerase 1B has an effect on enzymatic function, reactivity to the camptothecin anticancer drug and on the linker domain orientation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zhenxing; D'Annessa, Ilda; Tesauro, Cinzia

    2015-01-01

    Human topoisomerase 1B controls the topological state of supercoiled DNA allowing the progression of fundamental cellular processes. The enzyme, which is the unique molecular target of the natural anticancer compound camptothecin, acts by cleaving one DNA strand and forming a transient protein–DN...

  15. Responding to the challenge of untreatable gonorrhea: ETX0914, a first-in-class agent with a distinct mechanism-of-action against bacterial Type II topoisomerases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basarab, Gregory S.; Kern, Gunther H.; McNulty, John; Mueller, John P.; Lawrence, Kenneth; Vishwanathan, Karthick; Alm, Richard A.; Barvian, Kevin; Doig, Peter; Galullo, Vincent; Gardner, Humphrey; Gowravaram, Madhusudhan; Huband, Michael; Kimzey, Amy; Morningstar, Marshall; Kutschke, Amy; Lahiri, Sushmita D.; Perros, Manos; Singh, Renu; Schuck, Virna J. A.; Tommasi, Ruben; Walkup, Grant; Newman, Joseph V.

    2015-01-01

    With the diminishing effectiveness of current antibacterial therapies, it is critically important to discover agents that operate by a mechanism that circumvents existing resistance. ETX0914, the first of a new class of antibacterial agent targeted for the treatment of gonorrhea, operates by a novel mode-of-inhibition against bacterial type II topoisomerases. Incorporating an oxazolidinone on the scaffold mitigated toxicological issues often seen with topoisomerase inhibitors. Organisms resistant to other topoisomerase inhibitors were not cross-resistant with ETX0914 nor were spontaneous resistant mutants to ETX0914 cross-resistant with other topoisomerase inhibitor classes, including the widely used fluoroquinolone class. Preclinical evaluation of ETX0914 pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics showed distribution into vascular tissues and efficacy in a murine Staphylococcus aureus infection model that served as a surrogate for predicting efficacious exposures for the treatment of Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections. A wide safety margin to the efficacious exposure in toxicological evaluations supported progression to Phase 1. Dosing ETX0914 in human volunteers showed sufficient exposure and minimal adverse effects to expect a highly efficacious anti-gonorrhea therapy. PMID:26168713

  16. Mechanisms of topoisomerase I (TOP1) gene copy number increase in a stage III colorectal cancer patient cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, David Hersi; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Jensen, Niels Frank

    2013-01-01

    Topoisomerase I (Top1) is the target of Top1 inhibitor chemotherapy. The TOP1 gene, located at 20q12-q13.1, is frequently detected at elevated copy numbers in colorectal cancer (CRC). The present study explores the mechanism, frequency and prognostic impact of TOP1 gene aberrations in stage III C...

  17. Differential cytotoxic pathways of topoisomerase I and II anticancer agents after overexpression of the E2F-1/DP-1 transcription factor complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofland, K; Petersen, B O; Falck, J

    2000-01-01

    -1/tc--cells was shown to be due to S-phase initiation per se because it was blocked by ectopic expression of dominant negative cyclin-dependent kinase 2. In conclusion, overexpression of E2F-1/DP-1 in U-20S-TA cells is sufficient to increase clonogenic sensitivity to both topoisomerase I- and II...

  18. Topoisomerase 1(TOP1) gene copy number in stage III colorectal cancer patients and its relation to prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rømer, Maria Unni Koefoed; Nygård, Sune Boris; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2013-01-01

    A Topoisomerase 1 (Top1) poison is frequently included in the treatment regimens for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). However, no predictive biomarkers for Top1 poisons are available. We here report a study on the TOP1 gene copy number in CRC patients and its association with patient prognosis...

  19. Rapid Screening of Topoisomerase Gene Mutations by a Novel Melting Curve Analysis Method for Early Warning of Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae Emergence▿

    OpenAIRE

    Fukushima, Kazuko Y.; Hirakata, Yoichi; Sugahara, Kazuyuki; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Kondo, Akira; Kohno, Shigeru; Kamihira, Shimeru

    2006-01-01

    We developed a real-time PCR assay combined with melting curve analysis for rapidly genotyping quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDR) of topoisomerase genes in Streptococcus pneumoniae. This assay was not only accurate for the screening of fluoroquinolone (FQ) resistance but also relevant as an early warning system for detecting preexisting single QRDR mutations.

  20. Exploring the active site of the Streptococcus pneumoniae topoisomerase IV-DNA cleavage complex with novel 7,8-bridged fluoroquinolones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laponogov, Ivan; Pan, Xiao-Su; Veselkov, Dennis A; Cirz, Ryan T; Wagman, Allan; Moser, Heinz E; Fisher, L Mark; Sanderson, Mark R

    2016-09-01

    As part of a programme of synthesizing and investigating the biological properties of new fluoroquinolone antibacterials and their targeting of topoisomerase IV from Streptococcus pneumoniae, we have solved the X-ray structure of the complexes of two new 7,8-bridged fluoroquinolones (with restricted C7 group rotation favouring tight binding) in complex with the topoisomerase IV from S. pneumoniae and an 18-base-pair DNA binding site-the E-site-found by our DNA mapping studies to bind drug strongly in the presence of topoisomerase IV (Leo et al. 2005 J. Biol. Chem. 280, 14 252-14 263, doi:10.1074/jbc.M500156200). Although the degree of antibiotic resistance towards fluoroquinolones is much lower than that of β-lactams and a range of ribosome-bound antibiotics, there is a pressing need to increase the diversity of members of this successful clinically used class of drugs. The quinolone moiety of the new 7,8-bridged agents ACHN-245 and ACHN-454 binds similarly to that of clinafloxocin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin and trovofloxacin but the cyclic scaffold offers the possibility of chemical modification to produce interactions with other topoisomerase residues at the active site. © 2016 The Authors.

  1. Interspecies Recombination in Type II Topoisomerase Genes Is Not a Major Cause of Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Pletz, Mathias W. R.; McGee, Lesley; Beall, Bernard; Whitney, Cynthia G.; Klugman, Keith P.

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the topoisomerase type II enzymes account for fluoroquinolone resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae. These mutations can arise spontaneously or be transferred by intraspecies or interspecies recombination, primarily with viridans streptococci. We analyzed the nucleotide sequences of the quinolone resistance-determining regions of 49 invasive levofloxacin-resistant pneumococcal isolates and did not find any evidence for interspecies recombination.

  2. Exploring the active site of the Streptococcus pneumoniae topoisomerase IV–DNA cleavage complex with novel 7,8-bridged fluoroquinolones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laponogov, Ivan; Pan, Xiao-Su; Veselkov, Dennis A.; Cirz, Ryan T.; Wagman, Allan; Moser, Heinz E.

    2016-01-01

    As part of a programme of synthesizing and investigating the biological properties of new fluoroquinolone antibacterials and their targeting of topoisomerase IV from Streptococcus pneumoniae, we have solved the X-ray structure of the complexes of two new 7,8-bridged fluoroquinolones (with restricted C7 group rotation favouring tight binding) in complex with the topoisomerase IV from S. pneumoniae and an 18-base-pair DNA binding site—the E-site—found by our DNA mapping studies to bind drug strongly in the presence of topoisomerase IV (Leo et al. 2005 J. Biol. Chem. 280, 14 252–14 263, doi:10.1074/jbc.M500156200). Although the degree of antibiotic resistance towards fluoroquinolones is much lower than that of β-lactams and a range of ribosome-bound antibiotics, there is a pressing need to increase the diversity of members of this successful clinically used class of drugs. The quinolone moiety of the new 7,8-bridged agents ACHN-245 and ACHN-454 binds similarly to that of clinafloxocin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin and trovofloxacin but the cyclic scaffold offers the possibility of chemical modification to produce interactions with other topoisomerase residues at the active site. PMID:27655731

  3. Alterations in the GyrA Subunit of DNA Gyrase and the ParC Subunit of DNA Topoisomerase IV Associated with Quinolone Resistance in Enterococcus faecalis

    OpenAIRE

    Kanematsu, Emiko; Deguchi, Takashi; Yasuda, Mitsuru; Kawamura, Takeshi; Nishino, Yoshinori; Kawada, Yukimichi

    1998-01-01

    The gyrA and parC genes of 31 clinical isolates of Enterococcus faecalis, including fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates, were partially sequenced and analyzed for target alterations. Topoisomerase IV may be a primary target in E. faecalis, but high-level fluoroquinolone resistance was associated with simultaneous alterations in both GyrA and ParC.

  4. Cloning and sequencing of cDNA encoding human DNA topoisomerase II and localization of the gene to chromosome region 17q21-22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai-Pflugfelder, M.; Liu, L.F.; Liu, A.A.; Tewey, K.M.; Whang-Peng, J.; Knutsen, T.; Huebner, K.; Croce, C.M.; Wang, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    Two overlapping cDNA clones encoding human DNA topoisomerase II were identified by two independent methods. In one, a human cDNA library in phage λ was screened by hybridization with a mixed oligonucleotide probe encoding a stretch of seven amino acids found in yeast and Drosophila DNA topoisomerase II; in the other, a different human cDNA library in a λgt11 expression vector was screened for the expression of antigenic determinants that are recognized by rabbit antibodies specific to human DNA topoisomerase II. The entire coding sequences of the human DNA topoisomerase II gene were determined from these and several additional clones, identified through the use of the cloned human TOP2 gene sequences as probes. Hybridization between the cloned sequences and mRNA and genomic DNA indicates that the human enzyme is encoded by a single-copy gene. The location of the gene was mapped to chromosome 17q21-22 by in situ hybridization of a cloned fragment to metaphase chromosomes and by hybridization analysis with a panel of mouse-human hybrid cell lines, each retaining a subset of human chromosomes

  5. Polyphenol supplementation alters intramuscular apoptotic signaling following acute resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Jeremy R; Stout, Jeffrey R; Jajtner, Adam R; Church, David D; Beyer, Kyle S; Riffe, Joshua J; Muddle, Tyler W D; Herrlinger, Kelli L; Fukuda, David H; Hoffman, Jay R

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of 28-days of supplementation with an aqueous proprietary polyphenol blend (PPB) sourced from Camellia sinensis on intramuscular apoptotic signaling following an acute lower-body resistance exercise protocol and subsequent recovery. Untrained males (n = 38, 21.8 ± 2.7 years, 173.4 ± 7.9 cm, 77.6 ± 14.6 kg) were randomized to PPB (n = 14), placebo (PL; n = 14) or control (CON; n = 10). Participants completed a lower-body resistance exercise protocol comprised of the squat, leg press, and leg extension exercises. Skeletal muscle microbiopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis preexercise (PRE), 1-h (1HR), 5-h (5HR), and 48-h (48HR) post-resistance exercise. Apoptotic signaling pathways were quantified using multiplex signaling assay kits to quantify total proteins (Caspase 3, 8, 9) and markers of phosphorylation status (JNK, FADD, p53, BAD, Bcl-2). Changes in markers of muscle damage and intramuscular signaling were analyzed via separate repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). Change in Bcl-2 phosphorylation at 1H was significantly greater in PL compared to CON (P = 0.001). BAD phosphorylation was significantly elevated at 5H in PL compared to PPB (P = 0.015) and CON (P = 0.006). The change in JNK phosphorylation was significantly greater in PPB (P = 0.009), and PL (P = 0.017) compared to CON at 1H, while the change for PL was elevated compared to CON at 5H (P = 0.002). A main effect was observed (P < 0.05) at 1H, 5H, and 48H for p53 and Caspase 8, with Caspase 3 and Caspase 9 elevated at 48H. These data indicate that chronic supplementation with PPB alters apoptotic signaling in skeletal muscle following acute muscle-damaging resistance exercise. © 2018 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  6. PEGylated apoptotic protein-loaded PLGA microspheres for cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byeon HJ

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyeong Jun Byeon,1 Insoo Kim,1 Ji Su Choi,1 Eun Seong Lee,2 Beom Soo Shin,3 Yu Seok Youn11Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Republic of Korea; 2Division of Biotechnology, The Catholic University of Korea, Bucheon-si, Republic of Korea; 3Department of Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Catholic University of Daegu, Gyeongsan-si, Republic of KoreaAbstract: The aim of the current study was to investigate the antitumor potential of poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid microspheres (PLGA MSs containing polyethylene glycol (PEG-conjugated (PEGylated tumor necrosis factor–related apoptosis-inducing ligand (PEG-TRAIL. PEG-TRAIL PLGA MSs were prepared by using a water-in-oil-in-water double-emulsion method, and the apoptotic activities of supernatants released from the PLGA MSs at days 1, 3, and 7 were examined. The antitumor effect caused by PEG-TRAIL PLGA MSs was evaluated in pancreatic Mia Paca-2 cell-xenografted mice. PEG-TRAIL PLGA MS was found to be spherical and 14.4±1.06 µm in size, and its encapsulation efficiency was significantly greater than that of TRAIL MS (85.7%±4.1% vs 43.3%±10.9%, respectively. The PLGA MS gradually released PEG-TRAIL for 14 days, and the released PEG-TRAIL was shown to have clear apoptotic activity in Mia Paca-2 cells, whereas TRAIL released after 1 day had a negligible activity. Finally, PEG-TRAIL PLGA MS displayed remarkably greater antitumor efficacy than blank or TRAIL PLGA MS in Mia Paca-2 cell-xenografted mice in terms of tumor volume and weight, apparently due to increased stability and well-retained apoptotic activity of PEG-TRAIL in PLGA MS. We believe that this PLGA MS system, combined with PEG-TRAIL, should be considered a promising candidate for treating pancreatic cancer.Keywords: Poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid, controlled release, PEGylation, TRAIL, pancreatic cancer

  7. Dual targeting of topoisomerase IV and gyrase to reduce mutant selection: direct testing of the paradigm by using WCK-1734, a new fluoroquinolone, and ciprofloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahilevitz, Jacob; Hooper, David C

    2005-05-01

    Quinolones that act equally against DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV are a desirable modality to decrease the selection of resistant strains. We first determined by genetic and biochemical studies in Staphylococcus aureus that the primary target enzyme of WCK-1734, a new quinolone, was DNA gyrase. A single mutation in gyrase, but not topoisomerase IV, caused a two- to fourfold increase in the MIC. Studies with purified topoisomerase IV and gyrase from S. aureus also showed that gyrase was more sensitive than topoisomerase IV to WCK-1734 (50% inhibitory concentration, 1.25 and 2.5 to 5.0 microg/ml, respectively; 50% stimulation of cleavage complex formation, 0.62 and 2.5 to 5.0 microg/ml, respectively). To test the effect of balanced activity of quinolones against the two target enzymes, we measured the frequency of selection of mutants with ciprofloxacin (which targets topoisomerase IV) and WCK-1734 alone and in combination. With the combination of ciprofloxacin and WCK-1734, each at its MIC, the ratio of frequency of mutants selected was significantly lower than that with each drug alone at two times their respective MICs. We further characterized resistant strains selected with the combination of ciprofloxacin and WCK-1734 and found evidence to suggest the existence of novel mutational mechanisms for low-level quinolone resistance. By use of a combination of differentially targeting quinolones, this study provides novel data in direct support of the paradigm for dual targeting of quinolone action and reduced development of resistance.

  8. Clinical differences between Thai systemic sclerosis patients with positive versus negative anti-topoisomerase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foocharoen, Chingching; Suwannachat, Prangsuporn; Netwijitpan, Sittichai; Mahakkanukrauh, Ajanee; Suwannaroj, Siraphop; Nanagara, Ratanavadee

    2016-03-01

    Anti-topoisomerase I antibody (ATA) carries an increased risk of systemic sclerosis (SSc) internal organ involvement. There have been no published comparisons of the clinical characteristics of patients positive and negative for ATA in Thailand, where the positive rate for ATA is higher than among Caucasians. To define the clinical differences between SSc, positive versus negative, for ATA. A retrospective cohort study was performed among SSc patients over 18 at Srinagarind Hospital, Khon Kaen University, Thailand, during January 2006-December 2013. SSc-overlap syndrome was excluded. Two hundred and ninety-four SSc patients were included (female : male 2.5 : 1). The majority (68.6%) were the diffuse cutaneous SSc subset (dcSSc). ATA was positive in 252 patients (85.7%), among whom 71.7% had dcSSc and 28.2% limited cutaneous SSc (lcSSc). Using a multivariate analysis, hand deformity had a significantly positive association with ATA (odds ratio [OR] 7.01; 95% CI 1.02-48.69), whereas being anti-centromere (ACA) positive had a negative association (OR 0.17; 95% CI 0.03-0.92). After doing a subgroup analysis of the SSc subset, the median duration of disease at time of pulmonary fibrosis detection among ATA positive dcSSc was significantly shorter than the ATA negative group (1.05 vs. 6.77 years, P = 0.01). Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) at onset was significantly more frequent in lcSSc sufferers who were ATA negative than those who were ATA positive (90.5% vs. 56.9%, P = 0.005). A high prevalence of ATA positivity was found among Thai SSc patients and this was associated with a high frequency of hand deformity, ACA negativity, a short duration of pulmonary fibrosis in dcSSc and a lower frequency of RP in lcSSc. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Dual effectiveness of Alternaria but not Fusarium mycotoxins against human topoisomerase II and bacterial gyrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarolim, Katharina; Del Favero, Giorgia; Ellmer, Doris; Stark, Timo D; Hofmann, Thomas; Sulyok, Michael; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich; Marko, Doris

    2017-04-01

    Type II DNA-topoisomerases (topo II) play a crucial role in the maintenance of DNA topology. Previously, fungi of the Alternaria genus were found to produce mycotoxins that target human topo II. These results implied the question why a fungus should produce secondary metabolites that target a human enzyme. In the current work, the homology between human topo II and its bacterial equivalent, gyrase, served as basis to study a potential dual inhibition of both enzymes by mycotoxins. A total of 15 secondary metabolites produced by fungi of the genera Alternaria and Fusarium were assessed for their impact on topo II of human and bacterial origin in the decatenation and the supercoiling assay, respectively. In line with the theory of dual topo II inhibition, six of the tested Alternaria mycotoxins were active against both enzymes, the dibenzo-α-pyrones alternariol (AOH) and alternariol monomethyl ether (AME), as well as the perylene-quinones altertoxin I (ATX I) and II (ATX II), alterperylenol (ALP) and stemphyltoxin III (STTX III). The Alternaria metabolites altersetin (ALN), macrosporin (MAC), altenusine (ALS) and pyrenophorol (PYR) impaired the function of human topo II, but did not show any effect on gyrase. The potency to inhibit topo II activity declined in the row STTX III (initial inhibitory concentration 10 µM) > AOH (25 µM) = AME (25 µM) = ALS (25 µM) = ATX II (25 µM) > ALN (50 µM) = ATX I (50 µM) > ALP (75 µM) = PYR (75 µM) > MAC (150 µM). Inhibition of gyrase activity was most pronounced for AOH and AME (initial inhibitory concentration 10 µM) followed by ATX II (25 µM) > ATX I = ALP = STTX III (50 µM). In contrast, none of the investigated Fusarium mycotoxins deoxynivalenol (DON), fumonisin B1, fusarin C and moniliformin, as well as the Alternaria metabolite tentoxin, had any impact on the activity of neither human nor bacterial topo II.

  10. Fitness of Streptococcus pneumoniae fluoroquinolone-resistant strains with topoisomerase IV recombinant genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsalobre, Luz; de la Campa, Adela G

    2008-03-01

    The low prevalence of ciprofloxacin-resistant (Cp r) Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates carrying recombinant topoisomerase IV genes could be attributed to a fitness cost imposed by the horizontal transfer, which often implies the acquisition of larger-than-normal parE-parC intergenic regions. A study of the transcription of these genes and of the fitness cost for 24 isogenic Cp r strains was performed. Six first-level transformants were obtained either with PCR products containing the parC quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of S. pneumoniae Cp r mutants with point mutations or with a PCR product that includes parE-QRDR-ant-parC-QRDR from a Cp r Streptococcus mitis isolate. The latter yielded two strains, T6 and T11, carrying parC-QRDR and parE-QRDR-ant-parC-QRDR, respectively. These first-level transformants were used as recipients in further transformations with the gyrA-QRDR PCR products to obtain 18 second-level transformants. In addition, strain Tr7 (which contains the GyrA E85K change) was used. Reverse transcription-PCR experiments showed that parE and parC were cotranscribed in R6, T6, and T11; and a single promoter located upstream of parE was identified in R6 by primer extension. The fitness of the transformants was estimated by pairwise competition with R6 in both one-cycle and two-cycle experiments. In the one-cycle experiments, most strains carrying the GyrA E85K change showed a fitness cost; the exception was recombinant T14. In the two-cycle experiments, a fitness cost was observed in most first-level transformants carrying the ParC changes S79F, S79Y, and D83Y and the GyrA E85K change; the exceptions were recombinants T6 and T11. The results suggest that there is no impediment due to a fitness cost for the spread of recombinant Cp r S. pneumoniae isolates, since some recombinants (T6, T11, and T14) exhibited an ability to compensate for the cost.

  11. Effects of Glucocorticoids on Apoptosis and Clearance of Apoptotic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisleen McColl

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The glucocorticoid (GC drugs are one of the most commonly prescribed and effective anti-inflammatory agents used for the treatment of many inflammatory disorders through their ability to attenuate phlogistic responses. The glucocorticoid receptor (GCR primarily mediates GC actions via activation or repression of gene expression. GCs directly induce the expression of proteins displaying anti-inflammatory activities. However, the likely predominant effect of GCs is the repression of multiple inflammatory genes that invariably are overexpressed during nonresolving chronic inflammation. Although most GC actions are mediated through regulation of transcription, rapid nongenomic actions have also been reported. In addition, GCs modulate inflammatory cell survival, inducing apoptosis in immature thymocytes and eosinophils, while delaying constitutive neutrophil apoptosis. Importantly, GCs promote noninflammatory phagocytosis of apoptotic cell targets, a process important for the successful resolution of inflammation. Here, the effects and mechanisms of action of GC on inflammatory cell apoptosis and phagocytosis will be discussed.

  12. The Procoagulant Activity of Apoptotic Cells Is Mediated by Interaction with Factor XII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aizhen Yang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Apoptotic cells, by externalizing phosphatidylserine (PS as a hallmark feature, are procoagulant. However, the mechanism by which apoptotic cells activate coagulation system remains unknown. Intrinsic coagulation pathway is initiated by coagulation factor XII (FXII of contact activation system. The purpose of this study was to determine whether FXII is involved in procoagulant activity of apoptotic cells. Using western blotting and chromogenic substrate assay, we found that incubation with apoptotic cells, but not with viable cells, resulted in rapid cleavage and activation of FXII in the presence of prekallikrein and high molecular weight kininogen (HK, other two components of contact activation system. As detected by flow cytometry, FXII bound to apoptotic cells in a concentration-dependent manner, which was inhibited by annexin V and PS liposome. Direct association of FXII with PS was confirmed in a surface plasmon resonance assay. Clotting time of FXII-deficient plasma induced by apoptotic cells was significantly prolonged, which was fully reversed by replenishment with FXII. Corn trypsin inhibitor, a FXII inhibitor, completely prevented apoptotic cells-induced intrinsic tenase complex formation. Consistently, apoptotic cells significantly increased thrombin production in normal plasma, which was not affected by an inhibitory anti-tissue factor antibody. However, blocking of PS by annexin V, inhibition of FXII, or the deficiency of FXII suppressed apoptotic cells-induced thrombin generation. Addition of purified FXII to FXII-deficient plasma recovered thrombin generation to the normal plasma level. In conclusion, FXII binds to apoptotic cells via PS and becomes activated, thereby constituting a novel mechanism mediating the procoagulant activity of apoptotic cells.

  13. PARP Inhibition Restores Extrinsic Apoptotic Sensitivity in Glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpel-Massler, Georg; Pareja, Fresia; Aimé, Pascaline; Shu, Chang; Chau, Lily; Westhoff, Mike-Andrew; Halatsch, Marc-Eric; Crary, John F.; Canoll, Peter; Siegelin, Markus D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Resistance to apoptosis is a paramount issue in the treatment of Glioblastoma (GBM). We show that targeting PARP by the small molecule inhibitors, Olaparib (AZD-2281) or PJ34, reduces proliferation and lowers the apoptotic threshold of GBM cells in vitro and in vivo. Methods The sensitizing effects of PARP inhibition on TRAIL-mediated apoptosis and potential toxicity were analyzed using viability assays and flow cytometry in established GBM cell lines, low-passage neurospheres and astrocytes in vitro. Molecular analyses included western blots and gene silencing. In vivo, effects on tumor growth were examined in a murine subcutaneous xenograft model. Results The combination treatment of PARP inhibitors and TRAIL led to an increased cell death with activation of caspases and inhibition of formation of neurospheres when compared to single-agent treatment. Mechanistically, pharmacological PARP inhibition elicited a nuclear stress response with up-regulation of down-stream DNA-stress response proteins, e.g., CCAAT enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) homology protein (CHOP). Furthermore, Olaparib and PJ34 increased protein levels of DR5 in a concentration and time-dependent manner. In turn, siRNA-mediated suppression of DR5 mitigated the effects of TRAIL/PARP inhibitor-mediated apoptosis. In addition, suppression of PARP-1 levels enhanced TRAIL-mediated apoptosis in malignant glioma cells. Treatment of human astrocytes with the combination of TRAIL/PARP inhibitors did not cause toxicity. Finally, the combination treatment of TRAIL and PJ34 significantly reduced tumor growth in vivo when compared to treatment with each agent alone. Conclusions PARP inhibition represents a promising avenue to overcome apoptotic resistance in GBM. PMID:25531448

  14. Andrographolide induces apoptotic and non-apoptotic death and enhances tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand-mediated apoptosis in gastric cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Sung-Chul; Jeon, Ho Jong; Kee, Keun Hong; Lee, Mi Ja; Hong, Ran; Han, Song Iy

    2017-01-01

    Andrographolide, a natural compound isolated from Andrographis paniculata, has been reported to possess antitumor activity. In the present study, the effect of andrographolide in human gastric cancer (GC) cells was investigated. Andrographolide induced cell death with apoptotic and non-apoptotic features. At a low concentration, andrographolide potentiated apoptosis and reduction of clonogenicity triggered by recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (rhTRAIL)....

  15. Fusion of GFP to the M.EcoKI DNA methyltransferase produces a new probe of Type I DNA restriction and modification enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Kai; Roberts, Gareth A.; Stephanou, Augoustinos S.; Cooper, Laurie P.; White, John H. [School of Chemistry, University of Edinburgh, The King' s Buildings, Edinburgh, EH9 3JJ (United Kingdom); Dryden, David T.F., E-mail: david.dryden@ed.ac.uk [School of Chemistry, University of Edinburgh, The King' s Buildings, Edinburgh, EH9 3JJ (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-23

    Research highlights: {yields} Successful fusion of GFP to M.EcoKI DNA methyltransferase. {yields} GFP located at C-terminal of sequence specificity subunit does not later enzyme activity. {yields} FRET confirms structural model of M.EcoKI bound to DNA. -- Abstract: We describe the fusion of enhanced green fluorescent protein to the C-terminus of the HsdS DNA sequence-specificity subunit of the Type I DNA modification methyltransferase M.EcoKI. The fusion expresses well in vivo and assembles with the two HsdM modification subunits. The fusion protein functions as a sequence-specific DNA methyltransferase protecting DNA against digestion by the EcoKI restriction endonuclease. The purified enzyme shows Foerster resonance energy transfer to fluorescently-labelled DNA duplexes containing the target sequence and to fluorescently-labelled ocr protein, a DNA mimic that binds to the M.EcoKI enzyme. Distances determined from the energy transfer experiments corroborate the structural model of M.EcoKI.

  16. An investigation of the structural requirements for ATP hydrolysis and DNA cleavage by the EcoKI Type I DNA restriction and modification enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Gareth A.; Cooper, Laurie P.; White, John H.; Su, Tsueu-Ju; Zipprich, Jakob T.; Geary, Paul; Kennedy, Cowan; Dryden, David T. F.

    2011-01-01

    Type I DNA restriction/modification systems are oligomeric enzymes capable of switching between a methyltransferase function on hemimethylated host DNA and an endonuclease function on unmethylated foreign DNA. They have long been believed to not turnover as endonucleases with the enzyme becoming inactive after cleavage. Cleavage is preceded and followed by extensive ATP hydrolysis and DNA translocation. A role for dissociation of subunits to allow their reuse has been proposed for the EcoR124I enzyme. The EcoKI enzyme is a stable assembly in the absence of DNA, so recycling was thought impossible. Here, we demonstrate that EcoKI becomes unstable on long unmethylated DNA; reuse of the methyltransferase subunits is possible so that restriction proceeds until the restriction subunits have been depleted. We observed that RecBCD exonuclease halts restriction and does not assist recycling. We examined the DNA structure required to initiate ATP hydrolysis by EcoKI and find that a 21-bp duplex with single-stranded extensions of 12 bases on either side of the target sequence is sufficient to support hydrolysis. Lastly, we discuss whether turnover is an evolutionary requirement for restriction, show that the ATP hydrolysis is not deleterious to the host cell and discuss how foreign DNA occasionally becomes fully methylated by these systems. PMID:21685455

  17. Specific detection of topoisomerase I from the malaria causing P. falciparum parasite using isothermal rolling circle amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesauro, Cinzia; Juul, Sissel; Arnò, Barbara; Nielsen, Christine J F; Fiorani, Paola; Frøhlich, Rikke F; Andersen, Felicie F; Desideri, Alessandro; Stougaard, Magnus; Petersen, Eskild; Knudsen, Birgitta R

    2012-01-01

    We present a Rolling-Circle-Enhance-Enzyme-Activity-Detection (REEAD) system with potential use for future point-of-care diagnosis of malaria. In the developed setup, specific detection of malaria parasites in crude blood samples is facilitated by the conversion of single Plasmodium falciparum topoisomerase I (pfTopI) mediated cleavage-ligation events, happening within nanometer dimensions, to micrometer-sized products readily detectable at the single molecule level in a fluorescence microscope. In principle, REEAD requires no special equipment and the readout is adaptable to simple colorimetric detection systems. Moreover, with regard to detection limit the presented setup is likely to outcompete standard gold immuno-based diagnostics. Hence, we believe the presented assay forms the basis for a new generation of easy-to-use diagnostic tools suitable for the malaria epidemic areas in developing countries.

  18. Synthesis and biological evaluation of indeno[1,5]naphthyridines as topoisomerase I (TopI) inhibitors with antiproliferative activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Concepción; Fuertes, María; González, María; Rubiales, Gloria; Tesauro, Cinzia; Knudsen, Birgitta R; Palacios, Francisco

    2016-06-10

    In an effort to establish new candidates with improved anticancer activity, we report here the synthesis of various series of 7H-indeno[2,1-c][1,5]-naphthyridines and novel 7H-indeno[2,1-c][1,5]-naphthyridine-7-ones and 7H-indeno[2,1-c][1,5]-naphthyridine-7-ols. Most of the products which were synthesized were able to inhibit Topoisomerase I activity. Moreover, in vitro testing demonstrated that a subset of the products exhibited a cytotoxic effect on cell lines derived from human breast cancer (BT 20), human lung adenocarcinoma (A 549), or human ovarian carcinoma (SKOV3). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Lack of topoisomerase copy number changes in patients with de novo and relapsed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mette Ø; Poulsen, Tim S; Gang, Anne O

    2015-01-01

    Topoisomerase (TOP) gene copy number changes may predict response to treatment with TOP-targeting drugs in cancer treatment. This was first described in patients with breast cancer and is currently being investigated in other malignant diseases. TOP-targeting drugs may induce TOP gene copy number...... changes at relapse, with possible implications for relapse therapy efficacy. TOP gene alterations in lymphoma are poorly investigated. In this study, TOP1 and TOP2A gene alterations were investigated in patients with de novo diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) (n = 33) and relapsed DLBCL treated...... with chemotherapy regimens including TOP2-targeting drugs (n = 16). No TOP1 or TOP2A copy number changes were found. Polysomy of chromosomes 20 and 17 was seen in 3 of 25 patients (12%) and 2 of 32 patients (6%) with de novo DLBCL. Among relapsed patients, chromosome polysomy was more frequently observed in 5 of 13...

  20. A Support Vector Machine Classification Model for Benzo[c]phenathridine Analogues with Topoisomerase-I Inhibitory Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanh-Dao Tran

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Benzo[c]phenanthridine (BCP derivatives were identified as topoisomerase I (TOP-I targeting agents with pronounced antitumor activity. In this study, a support vector machine model was performed on a series of 73 analogues to classify BCP derivatives according to TOP-I inhibitory activity. The best SVM model with total accuracy of 93% for training set was achieved using a set of 7 descriptors identified from a large set via a random forest algorithm. Overall accuracy of up to 87% and a Matthews coefficient correlation (MCC of 0.71 were obtained after this SVM classifier was validated internally by a test set of 15 compounds. For two external test sets, 89% and 80% BCP compounds, respectively, were correctly predicted. The results indicated that our SVM model could be used as the filter for designing new BCP compounds with higher TOP-I inhibitory activity.

  1. Synthesis, insecticidal activity and inhibition on topoisomerase I of 20(S)-t-Boc-amino acid derivatives of camptothecin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liping; Li, Zhe; Zhang, Lan; Zhang, Yanning; Mao, Liangang; Jiang, Hongyun

    2017-06-01

    Camptothecin (CPT), a quinolone alkaloid extracted from Camptotheca acuminata Decne, exhibits potential insecticidal activities against various insect species. Our previous studies have showed that CPT induced apoptosis in Spodoptera exigua Hübner cell line and inhibited the relaxation activity of topoisomerase I (Topo I). In this study, total seven 20(S)-t-butoxy carbonyl-amino acid derivatives of CPT were synthesized and evaluated for insecticidal activities, cytotoxicity and Topo I inhibitory activities. Results showed that introduction of t-Boc amino acids to 20-position on CPT improves contact assay and cytotoxicity of most derivatives toward S. exigua but reduces inhibitory effect on relaxation activity of S. exigua Topo I. Furthermore, compounds 1d and 1g demonstrated higher level of contact activities and cytotoxicity than CPT and hydroxyl-camptothecin (HCPT), which are potential to be developed as potential insecticides targeted at more than Topo I. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Postincubation with aclarubicin reverses topoisomerase II mediated DNA cleavage, strand breaks, and cytotoxicity induced by VP-16

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, L N; Jensen, P B; Sørensen, B S

    1994-01-01

    In previous studies, we found that VP-16 (etoposide) induced cytotoxicity and protein-concealed strand break formation was prevented in a small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell line, when the cells were incubated with aclarubicin prior to treatment with VP-16. In the present work, we studied the effect...... of adding aclarubicin to the cell suspension after VP-16. In a clonogenic assay, we found that the cytotoxicity induced by VP-16 in SCLC cells was inhibited when cells were postincubated with aclarubicin. The addition of aclarubicin at any time in relation to VP-16 was able to stop further cytotoxicity...... induced by the topoisomerase II (topo-II) targeting drug. Aclarubicin was also found to antagonize the cytotoxicity induced by VM-26 (teniposide), and m-AMSA. With the alkaline elution technique we found that postincubating the cells with aclarubicin inhibited VP-16-induced DNA strand break formation...

  3. Discovery of membrane active benzimidazole quinolones-based topoisomerase inhibitors as potential DNA-binding antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Addla, Dinesh; Ponmani, Jeyakkumar; Wang, Ao; Xie, Dan; Wang, Ya-Nan; Zhang, Shao-Lin; Geng, Rong-Xia; Cai, Gui-Xin; Li, Shuo; Zhou, Cheng-He

    2016-03-23

    A series of novel benzimidazole quinolones as potential antimicrobial agents were designed and synthesized. Most of the prepared compounds exhibited good or even stronger antimicrobial activities in comparison with reference drugs. The most potent compound 15m was membrane active and did not trigger the development of resistance in bacteria. It not only inhibited the formation of biofilms but also disrupted the established Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli biofilms. It was able to inhibit the relaxation activity of E. coli topoisomerase IV at 10 μM concentration. Moreover, this compound also showed low toxicity against mammalian cells. Molecular modeling and experimental investigation of compound 15m with DNA suggested that this compound could effectively bind with DNA to form a steady 15m-DNA complex which might further block DNA replication to exert the powerful bioactivities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Protein expression of DNA damage repair proteins dictates response to topoisomerase and PARP inhibitors in triple-negative breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie L Boerner

    Full Text Available Patients with metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC have a poor prognosis. New approaches for the treatment of TNBC are needed to improve patient survival. The concept of synthetic lethality, brought about by inactivating complementary DNA repair pathways, has been proposed as a promising therapeutic option for these tumors. The TNBC tumor type has been associated with BRCA mutations, and inhibitors of Poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP, a family of proteins that facilitates DNA repair, have been shown to effectively kill BRCA defective tumors by preventing cells from repairing DNA damage, leading to a loss of cell viability and clonogenic survival. Here we present preclinical efficacy results of combining the PARP inhibitor, ABT-888, with CPT-11, a topoisomerase I inhibitor. CPT-11 binds to topoisomerase I at the replication fork, creating a bulky adduct that is recognized as damaged DNA. When DNA damage was stimulated with CPT-11, protein expression of the nucleotide excision repair enzyme ERCC1 inversely correlated with cell viability, but not clonogenic survival. However, 4 out of the 6 TNBC cells were synergistically responsive by cell viability and 5 out of the 6 TNBC cells were synergistically responsive by clonogenic survival to the combination of ABT-888 and CPT-11. In vivo, the BRCA mutant cell line MX-1 treated with CPT-11 alone demonstrated significant decreased tumor growth; this decrease was enhanced further with the addition of ABT-888. Decrease in tumor growth correlated with an increase in double strand DNA breaks as measured by γ-H2AX phosphorylation. In summary, inhibiting two arms of the DNA repair pathway simultaneously in TNBC cell lines, independent of BRCA mutation status, resulted in un-repairable DNA damage and subsequent cell death.

  5. Inhibition of topoisomerase IIα activity in CHO K1 cells by 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol (WR-1065)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grdina, D.J.

    1993-06-01

    The aminothiol 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol (WR-1065) is the active thiol of the clinically studied radioprotective agent S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721). WR-1065 is an effective radiation protector and antimutagenic agent when it is administered 30 min prior to radiation exposure to Chinese hamster ovary Kl cells at a concentration of 4 mM. Under these exposure conditions, topoisomerase (topo) I and II activities and associated protein contents were measured in the K1 cell line using the DNA relaxation assay, the P4 unknotting assay, and immunoblotting, respectively. WR-1065 was ineffective in modifying topo I activity, but it did reduce topo IIa activity by an average of 50 percent. The magnitude of topo IIa protein content, however, was not affected by these exposure conditions. Cell cycle effects were monitored by the method of flow cytometry. Exposure of cells to 4 mM WR-1065 for a period of up to 6 h resulted in a buildup of cells in the G2 compartment. However, in contrast to topo II inhibitors used in chemotherapy, WR-1065 is an effective radioprotector agent capable of protecting against both radiation-induced cell lethality and mutagenesis. One of several mechanisms of radiation protection attributed to aminothiol compounds such as WR-1065 has been their ability to affect endogenous enzymatic reactions involved in DNA synthesis, repair, and cell cycle progression. These results are consistent with such a proposed mechanism and demonstrate in particular a modifying effect by 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol on type II topoisomerase, which is involved in DNA synthesis

  6. Role of DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV mutations in fluoroquinolone resistance of Capnocytophaga spp. clinical isolates and laboratory mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrmann, Elodie; Jolivet-Gougeon, Anne; Bonnaure-Mallet, Martine; Fosse, Thierry

    2017-08-01

    Capnocytophaga spp. are often reported to cause bacteraemia and extra-oral infections and are characterized by their significant contribution to resistance to β-lactam and macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin antibiotics in the human oral microbiota. The implication of mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) of DNA gyrase A and B ( gyrA and gyrB ) and topoisomerase IV ( parC and parE ) of fluoroquinolone (FQ)-resistant Capnocytophaga spp., hitherto unknown, was explored in this study. Two reference strains ( Capnocytophaga gingivalis ATCC 33624 and Capnocytophaga sputigena ATCC 33612) and four Capnocytophaga spp. isolated from clinical samples were studied. Nine in vitro FQ-resistant mutants, derived from two reference strains and one FQ-susceptible clinical isolate, were selected by successive inoculations onto medium containing levofloxacin. MICs of ofloxacin, norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin and moxifloxacin were determined. The presumed QRDRs of GyrA, GyrB, ParC and ParE from Capnocytophaga spp. were determined by sequence homology to Bacteroides fragilis and Escherichia coli . PCR primers were designed to amplify the presumed QRDR genetic region of Capnocytophaga spp. and sequence analyses were performed using the BLAST program at the National Center for Biotechnology Information. gyrA mutations leading to a substitution from amino acid position 80 to 86 were systematically detected in Capnocytophaga spp. with ciprofloxacin MIC >1 mg/L and considered as the primary target of FQs. No mutational alteration in the QRDR of gyrB was detected. Other mutations in parC and parE led to spontaneous amino acid substitutions of DNA topoisomerase IV subunit B with no alteration in FQ susceptibility. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Nitric oxide inhibits ATPase activity and induces resistance to topoisomerase II-poisons in human MCF-7 breast tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Birandra K; Kumar, Ashutosh; Mason, Ronald P

    2017-07-01

    Topoisomerase poisons are important drugs for the management of human malignancies. Nitric oxide ( • NO), a physiological signaling molecule, induces nitrosylation (or nitrosation) of many cellular proteins containing cysteine thiol groups, altering their cellular functions. Topoisomerases contain several thiol groups which are important for their activity and are also targets for nitrosation by nitric oxide. Here, we have evaluated the roles of • NO/ • NO-derived species in the stability and activity of topo II (α and β) both in vitro and in human MCF-7 breast tumor cells. Furthermore, we have examined the effects of • NO on the ATPase activity of topo II. Treatment of purified topo IIα and β with propylamine propylamine nonoate (PPNO), an NO donor, resulted in inhibition of the catalytic activity of topo II. Furthermore, PPNO significantly inhibited topo II-dependent ATP hydrolysis. • NO-induced inhibition of these topo II (α and β) functions resulted in a decrease in cleavable complex formation in MCF-7 cells in the presence of m-AMSA and XK469 and induced significant resistance to both drugs in MCF-7 cells. PPNO treatment resulted in the nitrosation of the topo II protein in MCF-7 cancer cells and inhibited both catalytic-, and ATPase activities of topo II. Furthermore, PPNO significantly affected the DNA damage and cytotoxicity of m-AMSA and XK469 in MCF-7 tumor cells. As tumors express nitric oxide synthase and generate • NO, inhibition of topo II functions by • NO/ • NO-derived species could render tumors resistant to certain topo II-poisons in the clinic.

  8. Tetraarsenic oxide and cisplatin induce apoptotic synergism in cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Jung Mi; Jeong, Dae Hoon; Lee, Dae Sim; Kim, Joo Ran; Park, Sae Gwang; Kang, Mi Seon; Kim, Young Nam; Lee, Kyung Bok; Sung, Moon Su; Kim, Ki Tae

    2013-04-01

    Tetraarsenic oxide (As4O6, TAO) is a new arsenic compound that inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis in human cervical cancer cell lines. In the present study, we report that the growth of tumor cells (CaSki) was inhibited by treatment with TAO alone or in combination with cisplatin or paclitaxel in vitro and in vivo. Proliferation was assessed by WST-1 assay, and apoptosis was assessed by Annexin-V/PI FACS analysis in the CaSki cell line treated with a single agent or with the combinations of two agents. Expression of apoptosis-related proteins was analyzed by western blot analysis. A mouse xenograft model using CaSki cells was used to determine the in vivo activity of tetraarsenic oxide alone and in combination with cisplatin or paclitaxel by estimation of tumor size. At the end of the experiment, tumor tissue from each mouse was removed and processed for TUNEL analysis for confirmation of apoptotic cells. TAO was able to inhibit cell proliferation in a time- and dose-dependent manner. A combination of TAO and cisplatin effectively induced apoptosis by activating caspase-3. Using a mouse xenograft model, the sizes of tumors which were treated with a single agent and with a combination of agents decreased in a time-dependent manner. A combination of TAO and cisplatin resulted in a significantly reduced tumor size (Pcisplatin. Thus, TAO is a good candidate for use in a combined regimen with cisplatin for patients with cervical cancer.

  9. Genotoxic and apoptotic effects of Goeckerman therapy for psoriasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borska, L.; Andrys, C.; Krejsek, J.; Hamakova, K.; Kremlacek, J.; Palicka, V.; Ranna, D.; Fiala, Z. [Charles University Prague, Prague (Czech Republic). Faculty of Medicine

    2010-03-15

    Goeckerman therapy (GT) for psoriasis is based on cutaneous application of crude coal tar (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)) and exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR). PAH and UVR are mutagenic, carcinogenic and immunotoxic agents that promote apoptosis. We evaluated dermal absorption of PAH as well as the genotoxic and apoptotic effects of GT in 20 patients with psoriasis, by determining numbers of chromosomal abnormalities in peripheral lymphocytes, and levels of 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHP), p53 protein and soluble FasL (sFasL) in urine and/or blood, before and after GT. Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) score was used to evaluate clinical efficacy of GT. Compared with pre-treatment levels, there was a significant increase in urine 1-OHP, indicating a high degree of dermal absorption of PAH (P <0.01). We also found a significant increase in the number of chromosomal abnormalities in peripheral blood lymphocytes (P <0.001), suggesting that GT is genotoxic; significantly increased p53 protein in plasma (P <0.05), an indicator of cell response to DNA damage; and significantly increased sFasL in serum (P <0.01), an indicator of apoptosis. The PASI score was significantly decreased after GT (P <0.001), confirming clinical benefit of this treatment. Our results demonstrate high dermal absorption of PAH during GT and provide evidence that GT promotes genotoxicity and apoptosis.

  10. Non-apoptotic cell death associated with perturbations of macropinocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltese, William A; Overmeyer, Jean H

    2015-01-01

    Although macropinocytosis is widely recognized as a distinct form of fluid-phase endocytosis in antigen-presenting dendritic cells, it also occurs constitutively in many other normal and transformed cell types. Recent studies have established that various genetic or pharmacological manipulations can hyperstimulate macropinocytosis or disrupt normal macropinosome trafficking pathways, leading to accumulation of greatly enlarged cytoplasmic vacuoles. In some cases, this extreme vacuolization is associated with a unique form of non-apoptotic cell death termed "methuosis," from the Greek methuo (to drink to intoxication). It remains unclear whether cell death related to dysfunctional macropinocytosis occurs in normal physiological contexts. However, the finding that some types of cancer cells are particularly vulnerable to this unusual form of cell death has raised the possibility that small molecules capable of altering macropinosome trafficking or function might be useful as therapeutic agents against cancers that are resistant to drugs that work by inducing apoptosis. Herein we review examples of cell death associated with dysfunctional macropinocytosis and summarize what is known about the underlying mechanisms.

  11. Non-apoptotic cell death associated with perturbations of macropinocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A. Maltese

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Although macropinocytosis is widely recognized as a distinct form of fluid-phase endocytosis in antigen-presenting dendritic cells, it also occurs constitutively in many other normal and transformed cell types. Recent studies have established that various genetic or pharmacological manipulations can hyperstimulate macropinocytosis or disrupt normal macropinosome trafficking pathways, leading to accumulation of greatly enlarged cytoplasmic vacuoles. In some cases, this extreme vacuolization is associated with a unique form of non-apoptotic cell death termed ‘methuosis’, from the Greek methuo (to drink to intoxication. It remains unclear whether cell death related to dysfunctional macropinocytosis occurs in normal physiological contexts. However, the finding that some types of cancer cells are particularly vulnerable to this unusual form of cell death has raised the possibility that small molecules capable of altering macropinosome trafficking or function might be useful as therapeutic agents against cancers that are resistant to drugs that work by inducing apoptosis. Herein we review examples of cell death associated with dysfunctional macropinocytosis and summarize what is known about the underlying mechanisms.

  12. Genes of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noelia Estévez-Calvar

    Full Text Available Bivalves play vital roles in marine, brackish, freshwater and terrestrial habitats. In recent years, these ecosystems have become affected through anthropogenic activities. The ecological success of marine bivalves is based on the ability to modify their physiological functions in response to environmental changes. One of the most important mechanisms involved in adaptive responses to environmental and biological stresses is apoptosis, which has been scarcely studied in mollusks, although the final consequence of this process, DNA fragmentation, has been frequently used for pollution monitoring. Environmental stressors induce apoptosis in molluscan cells via an intrinsic pathway. Many of the proteins involved in vertebrate apoptosis have been recognized in model invertebrates; however, this process might not be universally conserved. Mytilus galloprovincialis is presented here as a new model to study the linkage between molecular mechanisms that mediate apoptosis and marine bivalve ecological adaptations. Therefore, it is strictly necessary to identify the key elements involved in bivalve apoptosis. In the present study, six mitochondrial apoptotic-related genes were characterized, and their gene expression profiles following UV irradiation were evaluated. This is the first step for the development of potential biomarkers to assess the biological responses of marine organisms to stress. The results confirmed that apoptosis and, more specifically, the expression of the genes involved in this process can be used to assess the biological responses of marine organisms to stress.

  13. Apoptotic study in Graves disease treated with thyroid arterial embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Wei; Gao Bulang; Yi Genfa

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate apoptosis in the thyroid of Graves disease (GD) induced by thyroid arterial embolization. Forty one patients with clinically and laboratorily ascertained GD were treated with thyroid arterial embolization and followed up for 3-54 months following embolization. Prior to embolization and at 1, 3, 6, 12 and 36 months following embolization, thyroid autoimmune antibodies were tested respectively, including thyroid stimulating antibody (TSAb), thyroglobulin antibody (TGAb) and thyroid microsomal antibody (TMAb). Thyroid biopsy was performed under the guidance of computed tomography for immunohistochemistry examination using semi-quantity analysis. The positive staining of Fas and FasL was mostly in the cytoplasma and cell membrane, the positive expression of Bax was mainly in the cytoplasma, and no positive expression of P53 was detected in the thyroid cells before embolization. After arterial embolziation, the positive cell number and staining degree of these genes were both greater than before embolization. The treatment method of thyroid arterial embolization can effectively enhance the positive expression of pro-apoptotic genes of Fas, FasL, Bax, Bcl-2 and P53 in GD thyroid, thus promoting apoptosis of GD thyroid and helping restore the thyroid size and function to normal conditions. (author)

  14. iDNA at Sea: Recovery of Whale Shark (Rhincodon typus Mitochondrial DNA Sequences from the Whale Shark Copepod (Pandarus rhincodonicus Confirms Global Population Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Meekan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The whale shark (Rhincodon typus is an iconic and endangered species with a broad distribution spanning warm-temperate and tropical oceans. Effective conservation management of the species requires an understanding of the degree of genetic connectivity among populations, which is hampered by the need for sampling that involves invasive techniques. Here, the feasibility of minimally-invasive sampling was explored by isolating and sequencing whale shark DNA from a commensal or possibly parasitic copepod, Pandarus rhincodonicus that occurs on the skin of the host. We successfully recovered mitochondrial control region DNA sequences (~1,000 bp of the host via DNA extraction and polymerase chain reaction from whole copepod specimens. DNA sequences obtained from multiple copepods collected from the same shark exhibited 100% sequence similarity, suggesting a persistent association of copepods with individual hosts. Newly-generated mitochondrial haplotypes of whale shark hosts derived from the copepods were included in an analysis of the genetic structure of the global population of whale sharks (644 sequences; 136 haplotypes. Our results supported those of previous studies and suggested limited genetic structuring across most of the species range, but the presence of a genetically unique and potentially isolated population in the Atlantic Ocean. Furthermore, we recovered the mitogenome and nuclear ribosomal genes of a whale shark using a shotgun sequencing approach on copepod tissue. The recovered mitogenome is the third mitogenome reported for the species and the first from the Mozambique population. Our invertebrate DNA (iDNA approach could be used to better understand the population structure of whale sharks, particularly in the Atlantic Ocean, and also for genetic analyses of other elasmobranchs parasitized by pandarid copepods.

  15. Role of Flexibility in Protein-DNA-Drug Recognition: The Case of Asp677Gly-Val703Ile Topoisomerase Mutant Hypersensitive to Camptothecin

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Annessa, Ilda; Tesauro, Cinzia; Fiorani, Paola; Chillemi, Giovanni; Castelli, Silvia; Vassallo, Oscar; Capranico, Giovanni; Desideri, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Topoisomerases I are ubiquitous enzymes that control DNA topology within the cell. They are the unique target of the antitumor drug camptothecin that selectively recognizes the DNA-topoisomerase covalent complex and reversibly stabilizes it. The biochemical and structural-dynamical properties of the Asp677Gly-Val703Ile double mutant with enhanced CPT sensitivity have been investigated. The mutant displays a lower religation rate of the DNA substrate when compared to the wild-type protein. Analyses of the structural dynamical properties by molecular dynamics simulation show that the mutant has reduced flexibility and an active site partially destructured at the level of the Lys532 residue. These results demonstrate long-range communication mechanism where reduction of the linker flexibility alters the active site geometry with the consequent lowering of the religation rate and increase in drug sensitivity. PMID:22315664

  16. Role of Flexibility in Protein-DNA-Drug Recognition: The Case of Asp677Gly-Val703Ile Topoisomerase Mutant Hypersensitive to Camptothecin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilda D'Annessa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Topoisomerases I are ubiquitous enzymes that control DNA topology within the cell. They are the unique target of the antitumor drug camptothecin that selectively recognizes the DNA-topoisomerase covalent complex and reversibly stabilizes it. The biochemical and structural-dynamical properties of the Asp677Gly-Val703Ile double mutant with enhanced CPT sensitivity have been investigated. The mutant displays a lower religation rate of the DNA substrate when compared to the wild-type protein. Analyses of the structural dynamical properties by molecular dynamics simulation show that the mutant has reduced flexibility and an active site partially destructured at the level of the Lys532 residue. These results demonstrate long-range communication mechanism where reduction of the linker flexibility alters the active site geometry with the consequent lowering of the religation rate and increase in drug sensitivity.

  17. Microparticles from apoptotic platelets promote resident macrophage differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasina, E M; Cauwenberghs, S; Feijge, M A H; Heemskerk, J W M; Weber, C; Koenen, R R

    2011-09-29

    Platelets shed microparticles not only upon activation, but also upon ageing by an apoptosis-like process (apoptosis-induced platelet microparticles, PM(ap)). While the activation-induced microparticles have widely been studied, not much is known about the (patho)physiological consequences of PM(ap) formation. Flow cytometry and scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that PM(ap) display activated integrins and interact to form microparticle aggregates. PM(ap) were chemotactic for monocytic cells, bound to these cells, an furthermore stimulated cell adhesion and spreading on a fibronectin surface. After prolonged incubation, PM(ap) promoted cell differentiation, but inhibited proliferation. Monocyte membrane receptor analysis revealed increased expression levels of CD11b (integrin α(M)β(2)), CD14 and CD31 (platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1), and the chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR4, but not of CCR2. This indicated that PM(ap) polarized the cells into resident M2 monocytes. Cells treated with PM(ap) actively consumed oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL), and released matrix metalloproteinases and hydrogen peroxide. Further confirmation for the differentiation towards resident professional phagocytes came from the finding that PM(ap) stimulated the expression of the (ox)LDL receptors, CD36 and CD68, and the production of proinflammatory and immunomodulating cytokines by monocytes. In conclusion, interaction of PM(ap) with monocytic cells has an immunomodulating potential. The apoptotic microparticles polarize the cells into a resident M2 subset, and induce differentiation to resident professional phagocytes.

  18. Apoptotic activity of frog Bombina maxima skin albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying-Xia; Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Lee, Wen-Hui; Zheng, Yong-Tang; Zhang, Yun

    2006-02-01

    Albumin, the most abundant protein components of blood plasma, is synthesized and secreted by liver cells in vertebrates. Recently, it was demonstrated that frog Bombina maxima albumin is also expressed in skin. Both B. maxima albumins from skin and serum (BmA-skin and BmA-serum) have similar biochemical characteristics except that the former contains haem b. Present studies showed that BmA-skin exhibited cytotoxic activity on H9 and C8166 cells. Pretreated with hemin to induce erythroid differentiation, K562 cells lost their resistance to cytotoxicity of BmA-skin. After treating cells with BmA-skin for 48 h, 50 percentage cytotoxic concentrations (CC(50)) of BmA-skin on H9, C8166 and hemin-treated K562 cells were 1.31+/-0.09, 1.59+/-0.08 and 2.28+/-0.06 microM, respectively. The cell death induced by BmA-skin was mediated by apoptosis of the tested cell lines, as demonstrated by nuclear morphological changes, DNA fragmentation and DNA hypodiploidy of apoptosis cells. At BmA-skin concentration of 2 microM, 27.3%, 19.7% and 17.8% of H9, C8166 and hemin-treated K562 cells were found to be apoptotic. In contrast, BmA-serum possessed no cytotoxic and apoptosis-inducing activity on all the cell lines tested, even with concentration used up to 15 microM. These results indicated that bound haem b in BmA-skin contributed significantly to its cytotoxic and apoptosis-inducing activity on the cell lines assayed.

  19. Role of Topoisomerases in Pediatric High Grade Osteosarcomas: TOP2A Gene Is One of the Unique Molecular Biomarkers of Chemoresponse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natacha Entz-Werle

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the treatment of pediatric high-grade osteosarcomas systematically includes one topoisomerase IIα inhibitor. This chemotherapy is usually adapted to the response to the neo-adjuvant therapy after surgery. The current and unique marker of chemoresponsiveness is the percentage of viable residual cells in the surgical resection. This late patient management marker has to be evaluated earlier in the therapeutic history of the patients on initial biopsy. Therefore, new biomarkers, especially those involved in the topoisomerase IIα inhibitor response might be good candidates. Therefore, our study was designed to target TOP1, TOP2A and TOP2B genes in 105 fresh-frozen diagnostic biopsies by allelotyping and real-time quantitative PCR. Our analyses in those pediatric osteosarcomas, homogeneously treated, highlighted the frequent involvement of topo-isomerase genes. The main and most important observation was the statistical link between the presence of TOP2A amplification and the good response to neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. Compared to adult cancers, the 17q21 amplicon, including TOP2A and ERBB2 genes, seems to be differentially implicated in the osteosarcoma chemoresponsiveness. Surprisingly, there is no ERBB2 gene co-amplification and the patients harboring TOP2A amplification tend to show a worse survival, so TOP2A analyses remain a preliminary, but a good molecular approach for the evaluation at diagnosis of pediatric osteosarcoma chemoresponsiveness.

  20. The Identification of a Novel Mutant Allele of topoisomerase II in Caenorhabditis elegans Reveals a Unique Role in Chromosome Segregation During Spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo-Lambert, Aimee; Fabritius, Amy S; Hansen, Tyler J; Smith, Harold E; Golden, Andy

    2016-12-01

    Topoisomerase II alleviates DNA entanglements that are generated during mitotic DNA replication, transcription, and sister chromatid separation. In contrast to mitosis, meiosis has two rounds of chromosome segregation following one round of DNA replication. In meiosis II, sister chromatids segregate from each other, similar to mitosis. Meiosis I, on the other hand, segregates homologs, which requires pairing, synapsis, and recombination. The exact role that topoisomerase II plays during meiosis is unknown. In a screen reexamining Caenorhabditis elegans legacy mutants isolated 30 years ago, we identified a novel allele of the gene encoding topoisomerase II, top-2(it7). In this study, we demonstrate that top-2(it7) males produce dead embryos, even when fertilizing wild-type oocytes. Characterization of early embryonic events indicates that fertilization is successful and sperm components are transmitted to the embryo. However, sperm chromatin is not detected in these fertilized embryos. Examination of top-2(it7) spermatogenic germ lines reveals that the sperm DNA fails to segregate properly during anaphase I of meiosis, resulting in anucleate sperm. top-2(it7) chromosome-segregation defects observed during anaphase I are not due to residual entanglements incurred during meiotic DNA replication and are not dependent on SPO-11-induced double-strand DNA breaks. Finally, we show that TOP-2 associates with chromosomes in meiotic prophase and that chromosome association is disrupted in the germ lines of top-2(it7) mutants. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  1. Experimental and computational investigations of Ser10 and Lys13 in the binding and cleavage of DNA substrates by Escherichia coli DNA topoisomerase I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahs, Daniel; Zhu, Chang-Xi; Cheng, Bokun; Chen, Jason; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2006-01-01

    Ser10 and Lys13 found near the active site tyrosine of Escherichia coli DNA topoisomerase I are conserved among the type IA topoisomerases. Site-directed mutagenesis of these two residues to Ala reduced the relaxation and DNA cleavage activity, with a more severe effect from the Lys13 mutation. Changing Ser10 to Thr or Lys13 to Arg also resulted in loss of DNA cleavage and relaxation activity of the enzyme. In simulations of the open form of the topoisomerase–DNA complex, Lys13 interacts directly with Glu9 (proposed to be important in the catalytic mechanism). This interaction is removed in the K13A mutant, suggesting the importance of lysine as either a proton donor or a stabilizing cation during strand cleavage, while the Lys to Arg mutation significantly distorts catalytic residues. Ser10 forms a direct hydrogen bond with a phosphate group near the active site and is involved in direct binding of the DNA substrate; this interaction is disturbed in the S10A and S10T mutants. This combination of a lysine and a serine residue conserved in the active site of type IA topoisomerases may be required for correct positioning of the scissile phosphate and coordination of catalytic residues relative to each other so that DNA cleavage and subsequent strand passage can take place. PMID:16582104

  2. Ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes with 1,8-naphthalimide group as DNA binder, photonuclease, and dual inhibitors of topoisomerases I and IIα.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yanmei; Li, Jia; Zhao, Hong; Tan, Lifeng

    2016-10-01

    Two ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes containing 1,8-naphthalimide group as DNA binders, photonucleases, and inhibitors of topoisomerases I and IIα are evaluated. The binding properties of [Ru(phen) 2 (pnip)] 2+ {1; phen=1,10-phenanthroline; pnip=12-[N-(p-phenyl)-1,8-napthalimide]- imidazo[4',5'-f] [1,10]phenanthroline} and [Ru(bpy) 2 (pnip)] 2+ (2; bpy=2,2'-bipyridine) with calf thymus DNA increases with increasing the bulkiness and hydrophobic character of ancillary ligands, although the two complexes possess high affinities for DNA via intercalation. Moreover, photoirradiation (λ=365nm) of the two complexes are found to induce strand cleavage of closed circular pBR322 plasmid DNA via singlet oxygen mechanism, while complex 1 displays more effective photocleavage activity than complex 2 under the same conditions. Topoisomerase inhibition and DNA strand passage assay reflect that complexes 1 and 2 are efficient dual poisons of topoisomerases I and IIα. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Cytotoxic and Apoptotic Effect of the Decoction of the Aerial Parts of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cytotoxic and Apoptotic Effect of the Decoction of the Aerial Parts of Flueggea leucopyrus on Human Endometrial Carcinoma (AN3CA) Cells. SR Samarakoon, SB Kotigala, I Gammana-Liyanage, I Thabrew, KH Tennekoon, A Siriwardana, PB Galhena ...

  4. A Novel Mitochondria-Dependent Apoptotic Pathway (MAP) in Prostate Cancer (Pca) Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chandra, Dhyan

    2004-01-01

    ...) are also up-regulated (Chandra et al., J. Biol. Chem., 277, 50842-54; 2002). Later, when the apoptotic machinery is activated, I notice that there is prominent localization of active caspase-9 and -3 in the mitochondria...

  5. Cytotoxic and Apoptotic Effect of the Decoction of the Aerial Parts of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , respectively. The decoction also enhanced apoptosis as shown by enhanced DNA fragmentation, microscopic observation of nuclear condensation, fragmentation and apoptotic bodies and enhanced caspase 3 and. 9 activities, as well as ...

  6. Antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of diffractaic acid in A549 and AGS cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kızıl, Hamit Emre; Aǧar, Güleray

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we determined the antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of diffractaic acid by measuring the gene expression changes of topo II α, caspase-3 and p53 on A549 and AGS cancer cells. Real time PCR assay was used to measure the change folds. It was determined that concentrations of 12,5, 50 and 100 µg / ml were antiproliferative and apoptotic for the A549 cancer cell line and 50 µg / ml for the AGS cell line.

  7. BRCA1 expression, proliferative and apoptotic activities in ovarian epithelial inclusions

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yiying; Wang, Yue; Wei, Li; Hong, Shuhui; Zhao, Miaoqing; Zhang, Xi; Zheng, Wenxin

    2017-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to examine proliferative and apoptotic activity in relation with BRCA1 expression in ovarian epithelial inclusions (OEIs), the putative precursor lesions of ovarian epithelial cancer (OEC). Methods Benign ovaries from 95 patients were examined. Dual immunohistochemical staining for both BRCA1 and MIB-1 were performed to examine the relationship between BRCA1 and MIB-1 in OEI cells. Apoptotic activity was assessed on the parallel tissue sections by usin...

  8. Visible tumor surface response to physical plasma and apoptotic cell kill in head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Matthias; Seebauer, Christian; Rutkowski, Rico; Hauschild, Anna; Podmelle, Fred; Metelmann, Camilla; Metelmann, Bibiana; von Woedtke, Thomas; Hasse, Sybille; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Metelmann, Hans-Robert

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the study was to learn, whether clinical application of cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAP) is able to cause (i) visible tumor surface effects and (ii) apoptotic cell kill in squamous cell carcinoma and (iii) whether CAP-induced visible tumor surface response occurs as often as CAP-induced apoptotic cell kill. Twelve patients with advanced head and neck cancer and infected ulcerations received locally CAP followed by palliative treatment. Four of them revealed tumor surface response appearing 2 weeks after intervention. The tumor surface response expressed as a flat area with vascular stimulation (type 1) or a contraction of tumor ulceration rims forming recesses covered with scabs, in each case surrounded by tumor tissue in visible progress (type 2). In parallel, 9 patients with the same kind of cancer received CAP before radical tumor resection. Tissue specimens were analyzed for apoptotic cells. Apoptotic cells were detectable and occurred more frequently in tissue areas previously treated with CAP than in untreated areas. Bringing together both findings and placing side by side the frequency of clinical tumor surface response and the frequency of analytically proven apoptotic cell kill, detection of apoptotic cells is as common as clinical tumor surface response. There was no patient showing signs of an enhanced or stimulated tumor growth under influence of CAP. CAP was made applicable by a plasma jet, kINPen(®) MED (neoplas tools GmbH, Greifswald, Germany). Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Effects of Malnutrition on Neutrophil/Mononuclear Cell Apoptotic Functions in Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakir, Fatma Betul; Berrak, Su Gülsün; Aydogan, Gonul; Tulunay, Aysin; Timur, Cetin; Canpolat, Cengiz; Eksioglu Demiralp, Emel

    2017-04-01

    Recent studies claim that apoptosis may explain immune dysfunction observed in malnutrition. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of malnutrition on apoptotic functions of phagocytic cells in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Twenty-eight ALL patients (13 with malnutrition) and thirty controls were enrolled. Neutrophil and mononuclear cell apoptosis of ALL patients and the control group were studied on admission before chemotherapy and repeated at a minimum of three months after induction of chemotherapy or when the nutritional status of leukemic children improved. The apoptotic functions of both ALL groups on admission were significantly lower than those of the control group. The apoptotic functions were lower in ALL patients with malnutrition than those in ALL patients without malnutrition, but this was not statistically significant. The repeated apoptotic functions of both ALL groups were increased to similar values with the control group. This increase was found to be statistically significant. The apoptotic functions in ALL patients were not found to be affected by malnutrition. However, after dietary intervention, increased apoptotic functions in both ALL patient groups deserve mentioning. Dietary intervention should always be recommended as malnutrition or cachexia leads to multiple complications. Enhanced apoptosis might originate also from remission state of cancer.

  10. Phagocytosis mechanism of apoptotic granulosa cells regulated by milk-fat globule-EGF factor 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naka, Mayumi; Kusakabe, Ken; Takeshita, Ai; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Ito, Yuko; Shibata, Masa-Aki; Otsuki, Yoshinori

    2009-09-01

    In the process of ovary sexual maturation, most immature ovarian follicles degrade into atretic follicles accompanied by apoptosis in granulosa cells. Macrophages can recognize apoptotic cells through specific binding with phosphatidylserine (PS), exposed on the surface of apoptotic cells, which is mediated by milk-fat globule-EGF factor 8 (MFG-E8). In the present research, we examined the involvement of the MFG-E8-dependent phagocytosis system in the atretic follicles of developing mouse ovaries. The number of atretic follicles and DNA-fragmented granulosa cells significantly increased in B6C3F1 mice during 2 to 6 weeks. Chromatin-condensed granulosa cells were engulfed by macrophages, which existed in the stroma or atretic follicles, or by neighboring normal granulosa cells. MFG-E8 mRNA increased in ovaries during 2 to 6 weeks, and immunoreactivity of MFG-E8 was detected at the surface of apoptotic cells existing around the antrum. Immunoelectron microscopic study revealed MFG-E8-positive signals on the membrane of apoptotic cells near macrophages, but apoptotic cells engulfed by neighboring granulosa cells showed few signals. Anti-Fas antibody elevated the annexin-V-positive reaction in isolated granulosa cells from 3-week-old mouse ovaries. MFG-E8 seems to act on the phagocytosis of apoptotic granulosa cells via macrophages and contribute to the regression process of atretic follicles.

  11. The oncogenic tyrosine kinase Lyn impairs the pro-apoptotic function of Bim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aira, Lazaro E; Villa, Elodie; Colosetti, Pascal; Gamas, Parvati; Signetti, Laurie; Obba, Sandrine; Proics, Emma; Gautier, Fabien; Bailly-Maitre, Béatrice; Jacquel, Arnaud; Robert, Guillaume; Luciano, Frédéric; Juin, Philippe P; Ricci, Jean-Ehrland; Auberger, Patrick; Marchetti, Sandrine

    2018-02-02

    Phosphorylation of Ser/Thr residues is a well-established modulating mechanism of the pro-apoptotic function of the BH3-only protein Bim. However, nothing is known about the putative tyrosine phosphorylation of this Bcl-2 family member and its potential impact on Bim function and subsequent Bax/Bak-mediated cytochrome c release and apoptosis. As we have previously shown that the tyrosine kinase Lyn could behave as an anti-apoptotic molecule, we investigated whether this Src family member could directly regulate the pro-apoptotic function of Bim. In the present study, we show that Bim is phosphorylated onto tyrosine residues 92 and 161 by Lyn, which results in an inhibition of its pro-apoptotic function. Mechanistically, we show that Lyn-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of Bim increases its interaction with anti-apoptotic members such as Bcl-xL, therefore limiting mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization and subsequent apoptosis. Collectively, our data uncover one molecular mechanism through which the oncogenic tyrosine kinase Lyn negatively regulates the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, which may contribute to the transformation and/or the chemotherapeutic resistance of cancer cells.

  12. Growth arrest and induction of apoptotic and non-apoptotic programmed cell death by, Physalis minima L. chloroform extract in human ovarian carcinoma Caov-3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Kheng Leong; Muhammad, Tengku Sifzizul Tengku; Sulaiman, Shaida Fariza

    2010-03-02

    The decoction of the whole plant of Physalis minima L. is traditionally consumed to treat cancer. Its anticancer property has been previously verified (using in vitro cytotoxicity assays) against NCI-H23 lung, CORL23 lung and MCF7 breast cancer cell lines but the mechanism underlying the anticancer potency towards ovarian carcinoma cells remain unclear. The present study is aimed to systematically determine the cytotoxicity and possible cell death mechanism elicited by the chloroform extract of Physalis minima in human ovarian Caov-3 carcinoma. Cytotoxicity of the extract was measured using the methylene blue assay. The mechanism of cell death was determined using four independent methods, namely DeadEnd assay to label the DNA fragmentation nuclei cells, RT-PCR analysis to determine the mRNA expression level of three apoptotic genes (c-myc, p53 and caspase-3 genes), Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) analysis to describe the ultra structural characteristics and annexin V and propidium iodide staining to confirm the types and stages of cell deaths. Cytotoxicity screening of the extract on Caov-3 cells exhibited concentration- and time-dependent inhibitory effects. A combination of apoptotic and autophagic programmed cell death was detected. The apoptotic characteristic was initially determined by DNA fragmentation followed by the expression of c-myc and p53 genes that was much earlier than caspase-3. Apoptotic ultra structural changes (including clumping and magination of chromatin, blebbing and convolution of nucleus membrane and formation of apoptotic bodies) and autophagy (Type II non-apoptotic programmed cell death) with distinct vacuolated morphology were detected in TEM analysis. The existence of these programmed cell deaths was then corroborated using annexin V and propidium iodide staining. The chloroform extract of Physalis minima exerted anticancer effect due to a combination of apoptotic and autophagic cell death mechanisms on Caov-3 cells. The

  13. Apoptotic DNA Degradation into Oligonucleosomal Fragments, but Not Apoptotic Nuclear Morphology, Relies on a Cytosolic Pool of DFF40/CAD Endonuclease*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias-Guimarais, Victoria; Gil-Guiñon, Estel; Gabernet, Gisela; García-Belinchón, Mercè; Sánchez-Osuna, María; Casanelles, Elisenda; Comella, Joan X.; Yuste, Victor J.

    2012-01-01

    Apoptotic cell death is characterized by nuclear fragmentation and oligonucleosomal DNA degradation, mediated by the caspase-dependent specific activation of DFF40/CAD endonuclease. Here, we describe how, upon apoptotic stimuli, SK-N-AS human neuroblastoma-derived cells show apoptotic nuclear morphology without displaying concomitant internucleosomal DNA fragmentation. Cytotoxicity afforded after staurosporine treatment is comparable with that obtained in SH-SY5Y cells, which exhibit a complete apoptotic phenotype. SK-N-AS cell death is a caspase-dependent process that can be impaired by the pan-caspase inhibitor q-VD-OPh. The endogenous inhibitor of DFF40/CAD, ICAD, is correctly processed, and dff40/cad cDNA sequence does not reveal mutations altering its amino acid composition. Biochemical approaches show that both SH-SY5Y and SK-N-AS resting cells express comparable levels of DFF40/CAD. However, the endonuclease is poorly expressed in the cytosolic fraction of healthy SK-N-AS cells. Despite this differential subcellular distribution of DFF40/CAD, we find no differences in the subcellular localization of both pro-caspase-3 and ICAD between the analyzed cell lines. After staurosporine treatment, the preferential processing of ICAD in the cytosolic fraction allows the translocation of DFF40/CAD from this fraction to a chromatin-enriched one. Therefore, the low levels of cytosolic DFF40/CAD detected in SK-N-AS cells determine the absence of DNA laddering after staurosporine treatment. In these cells DFF40/CAD cytosolic levels can be restored by the overexpression of their own endonuclease, which is sufficient to make them proficient at degrading their chromatin into oligonucleosome-size fragments after staurosporine treatment. Altogether, the cytosolic levels of DFF40/CAD are determinants in achieving a complete apoptotic phenotype, including oligonucleosomal DNA degradation. PMID:22253444

  14. Importance of a stable topoisomerase IB clamping for an efficient DNA processing: Effect of the Lys(369)Glu mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Sara; Castelli, Silvia; Desideri, Alessandro

    2015-11-01

    The role of lysine 369 of human topoisomerase IB in recognizing, clamping and processing its DNA substrate was experimentally investigated. Lys(369) is located in one of the two lips that interact to each other allowing the protein to embrace and firmly bind the DNA substrate. The lysine was mutated to a glutamate residue and the catalytic activity of the mutant enzyme was assayed. The mutant shows a distributive behavior, has a reduced binding to the substrate and a lower cleavage extent when compared to the wild type enzyme. The mutant displays reduced sensitivity to CPT both "in vitro" and in an "in vivo" yeast model, likely because of the low amount of cleaved DNA, however it displays cleavage and religation rates comparable to the wild type. These results demonstrate that the mutation causes a destabilization of the lips clamping around the DNA, impairing the protein-DNA interaction, emphasizing the importance of the ionic pair in tuning the stability of the protein-DNA complex. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The role of the Zn(II binding domain in the mechanism of E. coli DNA topoisomerase I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tse-Dinh Yuk-Ching

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Escherichia coli DNA topoisomerase I binds three Zn(II with three tetracysteine motifs which, together with the 14 kDa C-terminal region, form a 30 kDa DNA binding domain (ZD domain. The 67 kDa N-terminal domain (Top67 has the active site tyrosine for DNA cleavage but cannot relax negatively supercoiled DNA. We analyzed the role of the ZD domain in the enzyme mechanism. Results Addition of purified ZD domain to Top67 partially restored the relaxation activity, demonstrating that covalent linkage between the two domains is not necessary for removal of negative supercoils from DNA. The two domains had similar affinities to ssDNA. However, only Top67 could bind dsDNA with high affinity. DNA cleavage assays showed that the Top67 had the same sequence and structure selectivity for DNA cleavage as the intact enzyme. DNA rejoining also did not require the presence of the ZD domain. Conclusions We propose that during relaxation of negatively supercoiled DNA, Top67 by itself can position the active site tyrosine near the junction of double-stranded and single-stranded DNA for cleavage. However, the interaction of the ZD domain with the passing single-strand of DNA, coupled with enzyme conformational change, is needed for removal of negative supercoils.

  16. Detection of the Malaria causing Plasmodium Parasite in Saliva from Infected Patients using Topoisomerase I Activity as a Biomarker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hede, Marianne Smedegaard; Fjelstrup, Søren; Lötsch, Felix; Zoleko, Rella Manego; Klicpera, Anna; Groger, Mirjam; Mischlinger, Johannes; Endame, Lilian; Veletzky, Luzia; Neher, Ronja; Simonsen, Anne Katrine Wrist; Petersen, Eskild; Mombo-Ngoma, Ghyslain; Stougaard, Magnus; Ho, Yi-Ping; Labouriau, Rodrigo; Ramharter, Michael; Knudsen, Birgitta Ruth

    2018-03-07

    Malaria is among the major threats to global health with the main burden of disease being in rural areas of developing countries where accurate diagnosis based on non-invasive samples is in high demand. We here present a novel molecular assay for detection of malaria parasites based on technology that may be adapted for low-resource settings. Moreover, we demonstrate the exploitation of this assay for detection of malaria in saliva. The setup relies on pump-free microfluidics enabled extraction combined with a DNA sensor substrate that is converted to a single-stranded DNA circle specifically by topoisomerase I expressed by the malaria causing Plasmodium parasite. Subsequent rolling circle amplification of the generated DNA circle in the presence of biotin conjugated deoxynucleotides resulted in long tandem repeat products that was visualized colorimetrically upon binding of horse radish peroxidase (HRP) and addition of 3,3',5,5'-Tetramethylbenzidine that was converted to a blue colored product by HRP. The assay was directly quantitative, specific for Plasmodium parasites, and allowed detection of Plasmodium infection in a single drop of saliva from 35 out of 35 infected individuals tested. The results could be determined directly by the naked eye and documented by quantifying the color intensity using a standard paper scanner.

  17. Hypoxia-Targeted Drug Q6 Induces G2-M Arrest and Apoptosis via Poisoning Topoisomerase II under Hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linlin Chang

    Full Text Available In spite of the tremendous efforts dedicated to developing hypoxia-activated prodrugs, no agents yet have been approved for clinical therapy. In the present study, the hypoxic selective anti-cancer activity as well as the cellular target of a novel tirapazamine (TPZ analogue, 7-methyl-3-(3-chlorophenyl-quinoxaline-2-carbonitrile 1,4-dioxide (Q6 were investigated. Q6 implemented anti-cancer effects via poisoning topoisomerase II (topo II under hypoxia. Modified trapped in agarose DNA immunostaining (TARDIS assay showed more topo II-DNA cleavage complexes trapped by Q6 than TPZ at even lower concentration. In addition, by introducing ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM kinase inhibitors caffeine and KU-60019, we displayed that Q6-triggered apoptosis was attributed, at least partially, to DNA double-strand breaks generated by the topo II-targeting effect. Collectively, Q6 stood out for its better hypoxia-selectivity and topo II-poisoning than the parental compound TPZ. All these data shed light on the research of Q6 as a promising hypoxia-activated prodrug candidate for human hepatocellular carcinoma therapy.

  18. DNA topoisomerase 1α promotes transcriptional silencing of transposable elements through DNA methylation and histone lysine 9 dimethylation in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanh Theresa Dinh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM and histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation (H3K9me2 are related transcriptional silencing mechanisms that target transposable elements (TEs and repeats to maintain genome stability in plants. RdDM is mediated by small and long noncoding RNAs produced by the plant-specific RNA polymerases Pol IV and Pol V, respectively. Through a chemical genetics screen with a luciferase-based DNA methylation reporter, LUCL, we found that camptothecin, a compound with anti-cancer properties that targets DNA topoisomerase 1α (TOP1α was able to de-repress LUCL by reducing its DNA methylation and H3K9me2 levels. Further studies with Arabidopsis top1α mutants showed that TOP1α silences endogenous RdDM loci by facilitating the production of Pol V-dependent long non-coding RNAs, AGONAUTE4 recruitment and H3K9me2 deposition at TEs and repeats. This study assigned a new role in epigenetic silencing to an enzyme that affects DNA topology.

  19. The molecular mechanism regulating the autonomous circadian expression of Topoisomerase I in NIH3T3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fang; Nakajima, Yoshihiro; Kumagai, Megumi; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro; Ikeda, Masaaki

    2009-02-27

    To identify whether Topoisomerase I (TopoI) has autonomous circadian rhythms regulated by clock genes, we tested mouse TopoI (mTopoI) promoter oscillation in NIH3T3 cells using a real-time monitoring assay and TopoI mRNA oscillations using real-time RT-PCR. Analysis of the mTopoI promoter region with Matlnspector software revealed two putative E-box (E1 and E2) and one DBP/E4BP4-binding element (D-box). Luciferase assays indicated that mTopoI gene expression was directly regulated by clock genes. The real-time monitoring assay showed that E-box and D-box response elements participate in the regulation of the circadian expression of mTopoI. Furthermore, a gel-shift assay showed that E2 is a direct target of the BMAL1/CLOCK heterodimer and DBP binds to the putative D-site. These results indicate that TopoI is expressed in an autonomous circadian rhythm in NIH3T3 cells.

  20. Overexpression of carboxylesterase-2 results in enhanced efficacy of topoisomerase I inhibitor, irinotecan (CPT-11), for multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Hiroki; Kayukawa, Satoshi; Iida, Shinsuke; Nakagawa, Chiharu; Oguri, Tetsuya; Sanda, Takaomi; Ding, Jianming; Mori, Fumiko; Ito, Asahi; Ri, Masaki; Inagaki, Atsushi; Kusumoto, Shigeru; Ishida, Takashi; Komatsu, Hirokazu; Inagaki, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Atsushi; Ueda, Ryuzo

    2008-11-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) remains an incurable disease and further development of novel agents is needed. Because constitutive expression of topoisomerase I (TopoI) in MM cells and the efficacy of SN-38, an active metabolite of irinotecan (CPT-11), have been reported, we investigated the therapeutic potential of CPT-11. Of the eight MM cell lines analyzed, four showed 50% inhibitory concentration values of less than 2 microg/mL for CPT-11 and less than 2 ng/mL for SN-38. This efficacy was partly explained by the high expression level of human carboxylesterase-2 (hCE-2) in MM cells. Interestingly, high expression of hCE-2 represented the nature of normal plasma cells, suggesting that hCE-2 could efficiently generate SN-38 within the plasma cells. As expected, higher sensitivity to CPT-11 was observed in hCE-2-overexpressing U266 cells than mock U266 cells. On the other hand, the expression levels of hCE-1, TopoI, UGT1A and ABCG2 did not seem to be associated with the sensitivity of MM cells to CPT-11. In a murine xenograft model inoculated s.c. with RPMI8226 cells, administration of CPT-11 alone significantly reduced the tumor volume. When a combination of CPT-11 and bortezomib was administered, the subcutaneous tumors completely disappeared. Thus, clinical trials on CPT-11 in patients with relapsed or refractory MM are warranted.

  1. DNA topoisomerase IIα inhibitory and anti-HIV-1 flavones from leaves and twigs of Gardenia carinata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongkum, Naowarat; Tuchinda, Patoomratana; Pohmakotr, Manat; Reutrakul, Vichai; Piyachaturawat, Pawinee; Jariyawat, Surawat; Suksen, Kanoknetr; Yoosook, Chalobon; Kasisit, Jitra; Napaswad, Chanita

    2012-03-01

    Four new flavones, 5,2'-dihydroxy-7,3',4',5'-tetramethoxyflavone (1), 5,2',5'-trihydroxy-7,3',4'-trimethoxyflavone (2), 5,7,2',5'-tetrahydroxy-6,3',4'-trimethoxyflavone (3) and 5,2',5'-trihydroxy-6,7,3',4'-tetramethoxyflavone (4), along with the known 5,3'-dihydroxy-6,7,4',5'-tetramethoxyflavone (5), 5,7,3',5'-tetrahydroxy-6,4'-dimethoxyflavone (6), syringaldehyde, vanillic acid and scopoletin were isolated from the leaves and twigs of Gardenia carinata (Rubiaceae). Their structures were determined by spectroscopic methods. Flavone 2 exhibited cytotoxic activity against P-388 and MCF-7 cell lines, while 3, 5 and 6 were active only in P-388 cell line. All active compounds were found to inhibit DNA topoisomerase IIα activity, which may be responsible for the observed cytotoxicity. Flavones 1-3, 5 and 6 also exhibited anti-HIV-1 activity in the anti-syncytium assay using (∆Tat/rev)MC99 virus and 1A2 cell line system; 2 was most potent. Only flavones 1 and 6 showed considerably activity against HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Synthesis of pharmacologically important naphthoquinones and anticancer activity of 2-benzyllawsone through DNA topoisomerase-II inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Balagani Sathish; Ravi, Kusumoori; Verma, Amit Kumar; Fatima, Kaneez; Hasanain, Mohammad; Singh, Arjun; Sarkar, Jayanta; Luqman, Suaib; Chanda, Debabrata; Negi, Arvind S

    2017-02-15

    Naphthoquinones are naturally occurring biologically active entities. Practical de novo syntheses of three naphthoquinones i.e. lawsone (1), lapachol (2), and β-lapachone (3b) have been achieved from commercially available starting materials. The conversion of lapachol (2) to β-lapachone (3b) was achieved through p-TSA/Iodine/BF 3 -etherate mediated regioselective cyclisation. Further, 2-alkyl and 2-benzyllawsone derivatives have been prepared as possible anticancer agents. Four derivatives exhibited significant anticancer activity and the best analogue i.e. compound 21a exhibited potential anticancer activity (IC 50 =5.2μM) against FaDu cell line. Compound 21a induced apoptosis through activation of caspase pathway and exerted cell cycle arrest at S phase in FaDU cells. It also exhibited significant topoisomerase-II inhibition activity. Compound 21a was found to be safe in Swiss albino mice up to 1000mg/kg oral dose. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Synthesis of novel naphthoquinone-spermidine conjugates and their effects on DNA-topoisomerases I and II-{alpha}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, Andrea S.; Lima, Edson L.S.; Pinto, Angelo C.; Esteves-Souza, Andressa; Torrese, Jose C. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Echevarria, Aurea [Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Camara, Celso A. [Paraiba Univ., Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil). Lab. de Tecnologia Farmaceutica; Vargas, Maria D. [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica]. E-mail: mdvargas@vm.uff.br

    2006-05-15

    Novel derivatives of lapachol 2, nor-lapachol 3 and lawsone 4 have been synthesized by nucleophilic displacement of the methoxynaphthoquinones 2a, 3a and 4a with the polyamine (PA) N{sup 1}-Boc-N{sup 5}-Bn-spermidine 1a. The respective products 2b-4b were obtained in good yields and characterized by spectroscopic and analytical methods. The inhibitory action of these naphthoquinone-PA conjugates on DNA-topoisomerases (topo) I and II-{alpha} was evaluated by relaxation assay of supercoiled DNA plasmid. All compounds (1a 2b, 3b and 4b) presented significant inhibition of topo II-{alpha} catalytic activity at the 2 {mu}M dose. Considering that only PA 1a did not inhibit the enzyme catalytic activity at the 0.2 {mu}M dose, the appended naphthoquinone moiety acts as a 'value added' fragment. Compounds 1a 2b, 3b and 4b did not inhibit the enzyme DNA-topo I at the 200 {mu}M dose. (author)

  4. Synthesis of novel naphthoquinone-spermidine conjugates and their effects on DNA-topoisomerases I and II-alpha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunha Andréa S.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Novel derivatives of lapachol 2, nor-lapachol 3 and lawsone 4 have been synthesized by nucleophilic displacement of the methoxynaphthoquinones 2a, 3a and 4a with the polyamine (PA N¹-Boc-N5-Bn-spermidine 1a. The respective products 2b-4b were obtained in good yields and characterized by spectroscopic and analytical methods. The inhibitory action of these naphthoquinone-PA conjugates on DNA-topoisomerases (topo I and II-alpha was evaluated by relaxation assay of supercoiled DNA plasmid. All compounds (1a 2b, 3b and 4b presented significant inhibition of topo II-alpha catalytic activity at the 2 µM dose. Considering that only PA 1a did not inhibit the enzyme catalytic activity at the 0.2 µM dose, the appended naphthoquinone moiety acts as a "value added" fragment. Compounds 1a 2b, 3b and 4b did not inhibit the enzyme DNA-topo I at the 200 µM dose.

  5. Human small cell lung cancer NYH cells selected for resistance to the bisdioxopiperazine topoisomerase II catalytic inhibitor ICRF-187 demonstrate a functional R162Q mutation in the Walker A consensus ATP binding domain of the alpha isoform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wessel, I; Jensen, L H; Jensen, P B

    1999-01-01

    Bisdioxopiperazine drugs such as ICRF-187 are catalytic inhibitors of DNA topoisomerase II, with at least two effects on the enzyme: namely, locking it in a closed-clamp form and inhibiting its ATPase activity. This is in contrast to topoisomerase II poisons as etoposide and amsacrine (m...... inactive at enzyme at 1 mM ATP was not resistant to ICRF-187 compared to wt, whereas it was clearly less sensitive than wt to ICRF-187 at low ATP concentrations. This suggests that it is a shift in the equilibrium to an open......-AMSA), which act by stabilizing enzyme-DNA-drug complexes at a stage in which the DNA gate strand is cleaved and the protein is covalently attached to DNA. Human small cell lung cancer NYH cells selected for resistance to ICRF-187 (NYH/187) showed a 25% increase in topoisomerase IIalpha level and no change...

  6. Apico-basal forces exerted by apoptotic cells drive epithelium folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monier, Bruno; Gettings, Melanie; Gay, Guillaume; Mangeat, Thomas; Schott, Sonia; Guarner, Ana; Suzanne, Magali

    2015-02-12

    Epithelium folding is a basic morphogenetic event that is essential in transforming simple two-dimensional epithelial sheets into three-dimensional structures in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Folding has been shown to rely on apical constriction. The resulting cell-shape changes depend either on adherens junction basal shift or on a redistribution of myosin II, which could be driven by mechanical signals. Yet the initial cellular mechanisms that trigger and coordinate cell remodelling remain largely unknown. Here we unravel the active role of apoptotic cells in initiating morphogenesis, thus revealing a novel mechanism of epithelium folding. We show that, in a live developing tissue, apoptotic cells exert a transient pulling force upon the apical surface of the epithelium through a highly dynamic apico-basal myosin II cable. The apoptotic cells then induce a non-autonomous increase in tissue tension together with cortical myosin II apical stabilization in the surrounding tissue, eventually resulting in epithelium folding. Together our results, supported by a theoretical biophysical three-dimensional model, identify an apoptotic myosin-II-dependent signal as the initial signal leading to cell reorganization and tissue folding. This work further reveals that, far from being passively eliminated as generally assumed (for example, during digit individualization), apoptotic cells actively influence their surroundings and trigger tissue remodelling through regulation of tissue tension.

  7. Modafinil Abrogates Methamphetamine-Induced Neuroinflammation and Apoptotic Effects in the Mouse Striatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goitia, Belen; Garcia-Rill, Edgar; Krasnova, Irina N.; Cadet, Jean Lud; Urbano, Francisco J.; Bisagno, Veronica

    2012-01-01

    Methamphetamine is a drug of abuse that can cause neurotoxic damage in humans and animals. Modafinil, a wake-promoting compound approved for the treatment of sleeping disorders, is being prescribed off label for the treatment of methamphetamine dependence. The aim of the present study was to investigate if modafinil could counteract methamphetamine-induced neuroinflammatory processes, which occur in conjunction with degeneration of dopaminergic terminals in the mouse striatum. We evaluated the effect of a toxic methamphetamine binge in female C57BL/6 mice (4×5 mg/kg, i.p., 2 h apart) and modafinil co-administration (2×90 mg/kg, i.p., 1 h before the first and fourth methamphetamine injections) on glial cells (microglia and astroglia). We also evaluated the striatal expression of the pro-apoptotic BAX and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins, which are known to mediate methamphetamine-induced apoptotic effects. Modafinil by itself did not cause reactive gliosis and counteracted methamphetamine-induced microglial and astroglial activation. Modafinil also counteracted the decrease in tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine transporter levels and prevented methamphetamine-induced increases in the pro-apoptotic BAX and decreases in the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein expression. Our results indicate that modafinil can interfere with methamphetamine actions and provide protection against dopamine toxicity, cell death, and neuroinflammation in the mouse striatum. PMID:23056363

  8. Apoptotic effect as biomarker of disease, severity and follow-up in interstitial cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Capua-Sacoto, C; Sanchez-Llopis, A; Oconnor, J E; Martinez-Romero, A; Ruiz-Cerdá, J L

    2017-11-10

    To determine whether the apoptotic effect test could serve as a biomarker of severity in bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis. A prospective study was conducted between January 2010 and January 2015, which included 57 patients diagnosed with interstitial cystitis and 49 diagnosed with chronic pelvic pain of gynaecological origin. The urine was exposed to cell cultures, and the urine's capacity for inducing apoptosis in the cultures was analysed. A statistical analysis was then conducted to assess whether the apoptotic effect was associated with the symptoms. After performing an analysis of the association between the degree of apoptotic effect and the symptoms of patients with interstitial cystitis, we observed a significant increase in the mean percentages of apoptosis as the degree of symptom severity increased. After analysing the association between the apoptotic effect and symptoms, we obtained a positive correlation in the patients with interstitial cystitis and a lack of correlation in the patients with chronic pelvic pain of gynaecological origin. The rates of apoptosis increased progressively in the patients with interstitial cystitis as the symptoms increased, while the patients with chronic pelvic pain of gynaecological origin remained stable. The apoptotic effect of the urine of patients with interstitial cystitis could be a marker of disease, thus differentiating patients with interstitial cystitis from patients with chronic pelvic pain. The effect could also provide an objective measure of symptom severity. Copyright © 2017 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Selection of apoptotic cell specific human antibodies from adult bone marrow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Grönwall

    Full Text Available Autoreactive antibodies that recognize neo-determinants on apoptotic cells in mice have been proposed to have protective, homeostatic and immunoregulatory properties, although our knowledge about the equivalent antibodies in humans has been much more limited. In the current study, human monoclonal antibodies with binding specificity for apoptotic cells were isolated from the bone marrow of healthy adults using phage display technology. These antibodies were shown to recognize phosphorylcholine (PC-associated neo-determinants. Interestingly, three of the four identified apoptotic cell-specific antibody clones were encoded by VH3 region rearrangements with germline or nearly germline configuration without evidence of somatic hypermutation. Importantly, the different identified antibody clones had diverse heavy chain CDR3 and deduced binding surfaces as suggested by structure modeling. This may suggest a potentially great heterogeneity in human antibodies recognizing PC-related epitopes on apoptotic cells. To re-construct the postulated structural format of the parental anti-PC antibody, the dominant clone was also expressed as a recombinant human polymeric IgM, which revealed a substantially increased binding reactivity, with dose-dependent and antigen-inhibitable binding of apoptotic cells. Our findings may have implication for improved prognostic testing and therapeutic interventions in human inflammatory disease.

  10. Modafinil abrogates methamphetamine-induced neuroinflammation and apoptotic effects in the mouse striatum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Raineri

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine is a drug of abuse that can cause neurotoxic damage in humans and animals. Modafinil, a wake-promoting compound approved for the treatment of sleeping disorders, is being prescribed off label for the treatment of methamphetamine dependence. The aim of the present study was to investigate if modafinil could counteract methamphetamine-induced neuroinflammatory processes, which occur in conjunction with degeneration of dopaminergic terminals in the mouse striatum. We evaluated the effect of a toxic methamphetamine binge in female C57BL/6 mice (4 × 5 mg/kg, i.p., 2 h apart and modafinil co-administration (2 × 90 mg/kg, i.p., 1 h before the first and fourth methamphetamine injections on glial cells (microglia and astroglia. We also evaluated the striatal expression of the pro-apoptotic BAX and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins, which are known to mediate methamphetamine-induced apoptotic effects. Modafinil by itself did not cause reactive gliosis and counteracted methamphetamine-induced microglial and astroglial activation. Modafinil also counteracted the decrease in tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine transporter levels and prevented methamphetamine-induced increases in the pro-apoptotic BAX and decreases in the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein expression. Our results indicate that modafinil can interfere with methamphetamine actions and provide protection against dopamine toxicity, cell death, and neuroinflammation in the mouse striatum.

  11. Uptake of apoptotic cells drives the growth of a pathogenic trypanosome in macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire-de-Lima, Célio G.; Nascimento, Danielle O.; Soares, Milena B. P.; Bozza, Patricia T.; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo C.; de Mello, Fernando G.; Dosreis, George A.; Lopes, Marcela F.

    2000-01-01

    After apoptosis, phagocytes prevent inflammation and tissue damage by the uptake and removal of dead cells. In addition, apoptotic cells evoke an anti-inflammatory response through macrophages. We have previously shown that there is intense lymphocyte apoptosis in an experimental model of Chagas' disease, a debilitating cardiac illness caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. Here we show that the interaction of apoptotic, but not necrotic T lymphocytes with macrophages infected with T. cruzi fuels parasite growth in a manner dependent on prostaglandins, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and polyamine biosynthesis. We show that the vitronectin receptor is critical, in both apoptotic-cell cytoadherence and the induction of prostaglandin E2/TGF-β release and ornithine decarboxylase activity in macrophages. A single injection of apoptotic cells in infected mice increases parasitaemia, whereas treatment with cyclooxygenase inhibitors almost completely ablates it in vivo. These results suggest that continual lymphocyte apoptosis and phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by macrophages have a role in parasite persistence in the host, and that cyclooxygenase inhibitors have potential therapeutic application in the control of parasite replication and spread in Chagas' disease.

  12. Apoptotic cells can induce non-autonomous apoptosis through the TNF pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Garijo, Ainhoa; Fuchs, Yaron; Steller, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    Apoptotic cells can produce signals to instruct cells in their local environment, including ones that stimulate engulfment and proliferation. We identified a novel mode of communication by which apoptotic cells induce additional apoptosis in the same tissue. Strong induction of apoptosis in one compartment of the Drosophila wing disc causes apoptosis of cells in the other compartment, indicating that dying cells can release long-range death factors. We identified Eiger, the Drosophila tumor necrosis factor (TNF) homolog, as the signal responsible for apoptosis-induced apoptosis (AiA). Eiger is produced in apoptotic cells and, through activation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway, is able to propagate the initial apoptotic stimulus. We also show that during coordinated cell death of hair follicle cells in mice, TNF-α is expressed in apoptotic cells and is required for normal cell death. AiA provides a mechanism to explain cohort behavior of dying cells that is seen both in normal development and under pathological conditions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01004.001 PMID:24066226

  13. Real-time investigation of human topoisomerase I reaction kinetics using an optical sensor: a fast method for drug screening and determination of active enzyme concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristoffersen, Emil L.; Jørgensen, Line A.; Franch, Oskar; Etzerodt, Michael; Frøhlich, Rikke; Bjergbæk, Lotte; Stougaard, Magnus; Ho, Yi-Ping; Knudsen, Birgitta R.

    2015-05-01

    Human DNA topoisomerase I (hTopI) is a nuclear enzyme that catalyzes relaxation of super helical tension that arises in the genome during essential DNA metabolic processes. This is accomplished through a common reaction mechanism shared among the type IB topoisomerase enzymes, including eukaryotic and poxvirus topoisomerase I. The mechanism of hTopI is specifically targeted in cancer treatment using camptothecin derivatives. These drugs convert the hTopI activity into a cellular poison, and hence the cytotoxic effects of camptothecin derivatives correlate with the hTopI activity. Therefore, fast and reliable techniques for high throughput measurements of hTopI activity are of high clinical interest. Here we demonstrate potential applications of a fluorophore-quencher based DNA sensor designed for measurement of hTopI cleavage-ligation activities, which are the catalytic steps affected by camptothecin. The kinetic analysis of the hTopI reaction with the DNA sensor exhibits a characteristic burst profile. This is the result of a two-step ping-pong reaction mechanism, where a fast first reaction, the one creating the signal, is followed by a slower second reaction necessary for completion of the catalytic cycle. Hence, the burst profile holds information about two reactions in the enzymatic mechanism. Moreover, it allows the amount of active enzyme in the reaction to be determined. The presented results pave the way for future high throughput drug screening and the potential of measuring active hTopI concentrations in clinical samples for individualized treatment.Human DNA topoisomerase I (hTopI) is a nuclear enzyme that catalyzes relaxation of super helical tension that arises in the genome during essential DNA metabolic processes. This is accomplished through a common reaction mechanism shared among the type IB topoisomerase enzymes, including eukaryotic and poxvirus topoisomerase I. The mechanism of hTopI is specifically targeted in cancer treatment using

  14. Targeting apoptotic machinery as approach for anticancer therapy: Smac mimetics as anticancer agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevine M.Y. Elsayed

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is a chief regulator of cellular homeostasis. Impairment of apoptotic machinery is a main characteristic of several diseases such as cancer, where the evasion of apoptosis is a cardinal hallmark of cancer. Apoptosis is regulated by contribution of pro- and anti- apoptotic proteins, where caspases are the main executioners of the apoptotic machinery. IAP (inhibitors of apoptosis proteins is a family of endogenous inhibitors of apoptosis, which perform their function through interference with the function of caspases. Smac (second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases is endogenous inhibitor of IAPs, thus it is one of the major proapoptotic endogenous proteins. Thus, the development of Smac mimetics has evolved as an approach for anticancer therapy. Several Smac mimetic agents have been introduced to clinical trial such as birinapanet 12. Herein, the history of development of Smac mimetics along with the recent development in this field is briefly discussed.

  15. Actin-myosin–based contraction is responsible for apoptotic nuclear disintegration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, Daniel R.; Coleman, Mathew L.; Li, Shuixing; Robertson, David; Sullivan, Teresa; Stewart, Colin L.; Olson, Michael F.

    2005-01-01

    Membrane blebbing during the apoptotic execution phase results from caspase-mediated cleavage and activation of ROCK I. Here, we show that ROCK activity, myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation, MLC ATPase activity, and an intact actin cytoskeleton, but not microtubular cytoskeleton, are required for disruption of nuclear integrity during apoptosis. Inhibition of ROCK or MLC ATPase activity, which protect apoptotic nuclear integrity, does not affect caspase-mediated degradation of nuclear proteins such as lamins A, B1, or C. The conditional activation of ROCK I was sufficient to tear apart nuclei in lamin A/C null fibroblasts, but not in wild-type fibroblasts. Thus, apoptotic nuclear disintegration requires actin-myosin contractile force and lamin proteolysis, making apoptosis analogous to, but distinct from, mitosis where nuclear disintegration results from microtubule-based forces and from lamin phosphorylation and depolymerization. PMID:15657395

  16. Anti-apoptotic peptides protect against radiation-induced cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, Kevin W.; Muenzer, Jared T.; Chang, Kathy C.; Davis, Chris G.; McDunn, Jonathan E.; Coopersmith, Craig M.; Hilliard, Carolyn A.; Hotchkiss, Richard S.; Grigsby, Perry W.; Hunt, Clayton R.

    2007-01-01

    The risk of terrorist attacks utilizing either nuclear or radiological weapons has raised concerns about the current lack of effective radioprotectants. Here it is demonstrated that the BH4 peptide domain of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL can be delivered to cells by covalent attachment to the TAT peptide transduction domain (TAT-BH4) and provide protection in vitro and in vivo from radiation-induced apoptotic cell death. Isolated human lymphocytes treated with TAT-BH4 were protected against apoptosis following exposure to 15 Gy radiation. In mice exposed to 5 Gy radiation, TAT-BH4 treatment protected splenocytes and thymocytes from radiation-induced apoptotic cell death. Most importantly, in vivo radiation protection was observed in mice whether TAT-BH4 treatment was given prior to or after irradiation. Thus, by targeting steps within the apoptosis signaling pathway it is possible to develop post-exposure treatments to protect radio-sensitive tissues

  17. Asp to Asn substitution at the first position of the DxD TOPRIM motif of recombinant bacterial topoisomerase I is extremely lethal to E. coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Bokun; Annamalai, Thirunavakkarasu; Sorokin, Elena; Abrenica, Maria; Aedo, Sandra; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The TOPRIM domain found in many nucleotidyl transferases contains a DxD motif involved in magnesium ion coordination for catalysis. Medium to high copy number plasmid clones of Yersinia pestis topoisomerase I (YpTOP) with Asp to Asn substitution at the first aspartate residue (D117N) of this motif could not be generated in Escherichia coli without second site mutation even when expression was under the control of the tightly regulated BAD promoter and suppressed by 2% glucose in the medium. Arabinose induction of a single copy YpTOP-D117N mutant gene integrated into the chromosome resulted in ~105 fold of cell killing in 2.5 h. Attempt to induce expression of the corresponding E. coli topoisomerase I mutant (EcTOP-D111N) encoded on a high copy number plasmid resulted in either loss of viability or reversion of the clone to wild-type. High copy plasmid clones of YpTOP-D119N and EcTOP-D113N with the Asn substitution at the second Asp of the TOPRIM motif could be stably maintained, but overexpression also decreased cell viability significantly. The Asp to Asn substitutions at these TOPRIM residues can selectively decrease Mg2+ binding affinity with minimal disruption of the active site geometry, leading to trapping of the covalent complex with cleaved DNA and causing bacterial cell death. The extreme sensitivity of the first TOPRIM position suggested that this might be a useful site for binding of small molecules that could act as topoisomerase poisons. PMID:19013470

  18. Emergence of a new mutation and its accumulation in the topoisomerase IV gene confers high levels of resistance to fluoroquinolones in Escherichia coli isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Dong Chan; Seol, Sung Yong; Gurung, Mamata; Jin, Jong Sook; Choi, Chul Hee; Kim, Jungmin; Lee, Yoo Chul; Cho, Dong Taek; Lee, Je Chul

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV genes are the main mechanisms of resistance to quinolones. In this study, we determined mutations in gyrA, gyrB, parC and parE among 57 ciprofloxacin-resistant Escherichia coli isolates from a South Korean hospital and analysed the relationship between the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of fluoroquinolones and mutations in the topoisomerase IV gene. All ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli isolates carried double mutations in gyrA and at least a single mutation in parC; some isolates also carried a single mutation in parE. The most common mutations were S83L and D87N in gyrA, S80I in parC and S458A in parE, which accounted for 25% of isolates. Single mutations in parE at L445I, S458P and S458W were identified for the first time. Double mutations in parC and a combination of single mutations in parC and parE significantly increased the MIC values of fluoroquinolones. In vitro induction of resistance to ciprofloxacin showed that double mutations in gyrA were a prerequisite to conferring a resistant phenotype to fluoroquinolones, and an additional mutation in the topoisomerase IV gene increased the MIC values of ciprofloxacin. In conclusion, emergence of a new mutation in parC and parE and its accumulation induces high levels of resistance to fluoroquinolones in E. coli.

  19. Type II Topoisomerase Mutations in Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Clinical Strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated in 1998 and 1999: Role of Target Enzyme in Mechanism of Fluoroquinolone Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akasaka, Takaaki; Tanaka, Mayumi; Yamaguchi, Akihito; Sato, Kenichi

    2001-01-01

    The major mechanism of resistance to fluoroquinolones for Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the modification of type II topoisomerases (DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV). We examined the mutations in quinolone-resistance-determining regions (QRDR) of gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE genes of recent clinical isolates. There were 150 isolates with reduced susceptibilities to levofloxacin and 127 with reduced susceptibilities to ciprofloxacin among 513 isolates collected during 1998 and 1999 in Japan. Sequencing results predicted replacement of an amino acid in the QRDR of DNA gyrase (GyrA or GyrB) for 124 of the 150 strains (82.7%); among these, 89 isolates possessed mutations in parC or parE which lead to amino acid changes. Substitutions of both Ile for Thr-83 in GyrA and Leu for Ser-87 in ParC were the principal changes, being detected in 48 strains. These replacements were obviously associated with reduced susceptibilities to levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and sparfloxacin; however, sitafloxacin showed high activity against isolates with these replacements. We purified GyrA (The-83 to Ile) and ParC (Ser-87 to Leu) by site-directed mutagenesis and compared the inhibitory activities of the fluoroquinolones. Sitafloxacin showed the most potent inhibitory activities against both altered topoisomerases among the fluoroquinolones tested. These results indicated that, compared with other available quinolones, sitafloxacin maintained higher activity against recent clinical isolates with multiple mutations in gyrA and parC, which can be explained by the high inhibitory activities of sitafloxacin against both mutated enzymes. PMID:11451683

  20. Novel symmetric and asymmetric DNA scission determinants for Streptococcus pneumoniae topoisomerase IV and gyrase are clustered at the DNA breakage site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, Elisabetta; Gould, Katherine A; Pan, Xiao-Su; Capranico, Giovanni; Sanderson, Mark R; Palumbo, Manlio; Fisher, L Mark

    2005-04-08

    Topoisomerase (topo) IV and gyrase are bacterial type IIA DNA topoisomerases essential for DNA replication and chromosome segregation that act via a transient double-stranded DNA break involving a covalent enzyme-DNA "cleavage complex." Despite their mechanistic importance, the DNA breakage determinants are not understood for any bacterial type II enzyme. We investigated DNA cleavage by Streptococcus pneumoniae topo IV and gyrase stabilized by gemifloxacin and other antipneumococcal fluoroquinolones. Topo IV and gyrase induce distinct but overlapping repertoires of double-strand DNA breakage sites that were essentially identical for seven different quinolones and were augmented (in intensity) by positive or negative supercoiling. Sequence analysis of 180 topo IV and 126 gyrase sites promoted by gemifloxacin on pneumococcal DNA revealed the respective consensus sequences: G(G/c)(A/t)A*GNNCt(T/a)N(C/a) and GN4G(G/c)(A/c)G*GNNCtTN(C/a) (preferred bases are underlined; disfavored bases are in small capitals; N indicates no preference; and asterisk indicates DNA scission between -1 and +1 positions). Both enzymes show strong preferences for bases clustered symmetrically around the DNA scission site, i.e. +1G/+4C, -4G/+8C, and particularly the novel -2A/+6T, but with no preference at +2/+3 within the staggered 4-bp overhang. Asymmetric elements include -3G and several unfavored bases. These cleavage preferences, the first for Gram-positive type IIA topoisomerases, differ markedly from those reported for Escherichia coli topo IV (consensus (A/G)*T/A) and gyrase, which are based on fewer sites. However, both pneumococcal enzymes cleaved an E. coli gyrase site suggesting overlap in gyrase determinants. We propose a model for the cleavage complex of topo IV/gyrase that accommodates the unique -2A/+6T and other preferences.

  1. Topoisomerase 3alpha and RMI1 suppress somatic crossovers and are essential for resolution of meiotic recombination intermediates in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Hartung

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Topoisomerases are enzymes with crucial functions in DNA metabolism. They are ubiquitously present in prokaryotes and eukaryotes and modify the steady-state level of DNA supercoiling. Biochemical analyses indicate that Topoisomerase 3alpha (TOP3alpha functions together with a RecQ DNA helicase and a third partner, RMI1/BLAP75, in the resolution step of homologous recombination in a process called Holliday Junction dissolution in eukaryotes. Apart from that, little is known about the role of TOP3alpha in higher eukaryotes, as knockout mutants show early lethality or strong developmental defects. Using a hypomorphic insertion mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana (top3alpha-2, which is viable but completely sterile, we were able to define three different functions of the protein in mitosis and meiosis. The top3alpha-2 line exhibits fragmented chromosomes during mitosis and sensitivity to camptothecin, suggesting an important role in chromosome segregation partly overlapping with that of type IB topoisomerases. Furthermore, AtTOP3alpha, together with AtRECQ4A and AtRMI1, is involved in the suppression of crossover recombination in somatic cells as well as DNA repair in both mammals and A. thaliana. Surprisingly, AtTOP3alpha is also essential for meiosis. The phenotype of chromosome fragmentation, bridges, and telophase I arrest can be suppressed by AtSPO11 and AtRAD51 mutations, indicating that the protein is required for the resolution of recombination intermediates. As Atrmi1 mutants have a similar meiotic phenotype to Attop3alpha mutants, both proteins seem to be involved in a mechanism safeguarding the entangling of homologous chromosomes during meiosis. The requirement of AtTOP3alpha and AtRMI1 in a late step of meiotic recombination strongly hints at the possibility that the dissolution of double Holliday Junctions via a hemicatenane intermediate is indeed an indispensable step of meiotic recombination.

  2. Exposure and binding of selected immunodominant La/SSB epitopes on human apoptotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufing, Petra J; Clancy, Robert M; Jackson, Michael W; Tran, Hai Bac; Buyon, Jill P; Gordon, Tom P

    2005-12-01

    Opsonization of apoptotic cells by autoantibodies bound to surface membrane-translocated La/SSB antigens may initiate tissue damage in the setting of congenital heart block. By injecting pregnant mice with human anti-La antibodies, we previously demonstrated the formation of IgG-apoptotic cell complexes in the developing mouse fetus; however, the binding of anti-La antibodies to human-specific epitopes could not be addressed. Accordingly, the objective of the current study was to delineate the epitope specificity of human La antibodies that are exposed on the surface of apoptotic cells. We used fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry to assess the binding of human anti-La antibodies affinity purified against immunodominant epitopes of La to human cells undergoing spontaneous apoptosis, in a murine xenograft model in vivo and in cultured human fetal cardiocytes rendered apoptotic in vitro, respectively. Anti-La antibodies bound to immunodominant epitopes of La within the NH(2)-terminus and the RNA recognition motif (RRM) region of apoptotic human cells, in both xenografts and fetal cardiocytes. In contrast, human antibodies affinity purified against the COOH-terminal La epitope did not bind apoptotic cells in either model. This defines the topology of redistributed La during apoptosis, with surface exposure of the NH(2)-terminus and RRM regions. The potential importance of anti-La NH(2)-terminal and anti-La RRM specificity was confirmed by detection of this reactivity in mothers of children with congenital heart block. These findings provide insight into both the molecular modification of the La autoantigen during apoptosis and the specificity of antibodies capable of binding to surface-exposed La. Subsequent formation of surface immune complexes may lead to tissue injury in patients with autoimmune diseases such as congenital heart block.

  3. Activities of Trovafloxacin Compared with Those of Other Fluoroquinolones against Purified Topoisomerases and gyrA and grlA Mutants of Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gootz, Thomas D.; Zaniewski, Richard P.; Haskell, Suzanne L.; Kaczmarek, Frank S.; Maurice, Alison E.

    1999-01-01

    Frequencies of mutation to resistance with trovafloxacin and four other quinolones were determined with quinolone-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus RN4220 by a direct plating method. First-step mutants were selected less frequently with trovafloxacin (1.1 × 10−10 at 2 to 4× the MIC) than with levofloxacin or ciprofloxacin (3.0 × 10−7 to 3.0 × 10−8 at 2 to 4× the MIC). Mutants with a change in GrlA (Ser80→Phe or Tyr) were most commonly selected with trovafloxacin, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, or pefloxacin. First-step mutants were difficult to select with sparfloxacin; however, second-step mutants with mutations in gyrA were easily selected when a preexisting mutation in grlA was present. Against 29 S. aureus clinical isolates with known mutations in gyrA and/or grlA, trovafloxacin was the most active quinolone tested (MIC at which 50% of isolates are inhibited [MIC50] and MIC90, 1 and 4 μg/ml, respectively); in comparison, MIC50s and MIC90s were 32 and 128, 16 and 32, 8 and 32, and 128 and 256 μg/ml for ciprofloxacin, sparfloxacin, levofloxacin, and pefloxacin, respectively. Strains with a mutation in grlA only were generally susceptible to all of the quinolones tested. For mutants with changes in both grlA and gyrA MICs were higher and were generally above the susceptibility breakpoint for ciprofloxacin, sparfloxacin, levofloxacin, and pefloxacin. Addition of reserpine (20 μg/ml) lowered the MICs only of ciprofloxacin fourfold or more for 18 of 29 clinical strains. Topoisomerase IV and DNA gyrase genes were cloned from S. aureus RN4220 and from two mutants with changes in GrlA (Ser80→Phe and Glu84→Lys). The enzymes were overexpressed in Escherichia coli GI724, purified, and used in DNA catalytic and cleavage assays that measured the relative potency of each quinolone. Trovafloxacin was at least five times more potent than ciprofloxacin, sparfloxacin, levofloxacin, or pefloxacin in stimulating topoisomerase IV-mediated DNA cleavage. While all of

  4. Mechanistic studies of the modulation of cleavage activity of topoisomerase I by DNA adducts of mono- and bi-functional Pt-II complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malina, Jaroslav; Vrána, Oldřich; Brabec, Viktor

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 16 (2009), s. 5432-5442 ISSN 0305-1048 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06030; GA MŠk(CZ) ME08017; GA MŠk(CZ) OC08003; GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS500040581; GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN200200651; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400040803 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : cisplatin * camptothecin * topoisomerase I Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 7.479, year: 2009

  5. Andrographolide induces apoptotic and non-apoptotic death and enhances tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand-mediated apoptosis in gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sung-Chul; Jeon, Ho Jong; Kee, Keun Hong; Lee, Mi Ja; Hong, Ran; Han, Song Iy

    2017-05-01

    Andrographolide, a natural compound isolated from Andrographis paniculata , has been reported to possess antitumor activity. In the present study, the effect of andrographolide in human gastric cancer (GC) cells was investigated. Andrographolide induced cell death with apoptotic and non-apoptotic features. At a low concentration, andrographolide potentiated apoptosis and reduction of clonogenicity triggered by recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (rhTRAIL). Exposure of GC cells to andrographolide altered the expression level of several growth-inhibiting and apoptosis-regulating proteins, including death receptors. It was demonstrated that activity of the TRAIL-R2 (DR5) pathway was critical in the development of andrographolide-mediated rhTRAIL sensitization, since its inhibition significantly reduced the extent of apoptosis induced by the combination of rhTRAIL and andrographolide. In addition, andrographolide increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in a dose-dependent manner. N-acetyl cysteine prevented andrographolide-mediated DR5 induction and the apoptotic effect induced by the combination of rhTRAIL and andrographolide. Collectively, the present study demonstrated that andrographolide enhances TRAIL-induced apoptosis through induction of DR5 expression. This effect appears to involve ROS generation in GCs.

  6. Apoptotic Cells Induced Signaling for Immune Homeostasis in Macrophages and Dendritic Cells

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    Uriel Trahtemberg

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Inefficient and abnormal clearance of apoptotic cells (efferocytosis contributes to systemic autoimmune disease in humans and mice, and inefficient chromosomal DNA degradation by DNAse II leads to systemic polyarthritis and a cytokine storm. By contrast, efficient clearance allows immune homeostasis, generally leads to a non-inflammatory state for both macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs, and contributes to maintenance of peripheral tolerance. As many as 3 × 108 cells undergo apoptosis every hour in our bodies, and one of the primary “eat me” signals expressed by apoptotic cells is phosphatidylserine (PtdSer. Apoptotic cells themselves are major contributors to the “anti-inflammatory” nature of the engulfment process, some by secreting thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1 or adenosine monophosphate and possibly other immune modulating “calm-down” signals that interact with macrophages and DCs. Apoptotic cells also produce “find me” and “tolerate me” signals to attract and immune modulate macrophages and DCs that express specific receptors for some of these signals. Neither macrophages nor DCs are uniform, and each cell type may variably express membrane proteins that function as receptors for PtdSer or for opsonins like complement or opsonins that bind to PtdSer, such as protein S and growth arrest-specific 6. Macrophages and DCs also express scavenger receptors, CD36, and integrins that function via bridging molecules such as TSP-1 or milk fat globule-EGF factor 8 protein and that differentially engage in various multi-ligand interactions between apoptotic cells and phagocytes. In this review, we describe the anti-inflammatory and pro-homeostatic nature of apoptotic cell interaction with the immune system. We do not review some forms of immunogenic cell death. We summarize the known apoptotic cell signaling events in macrophages and DCs that are related to toll-like receptors, nuclear factor kappa B, inflammasome, the lipid

  7. Anti-apoptotic signaling as a cytoprotective mechanism in mammalian hibernation

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    Andrew N. Rouble

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In the context of normal cell turnover, apoptosis is a natural phenomenon involved in making essential life and death decisions. Apoptotic pathways balance signals which promote cell death (pro-apoptotic pathways or counteract these signals (anti-apoptotic pathways. We proposed that changes in anti-apoptotic proteins would occur during mammalian hibernation to aid cell preservation during prolonged torpor under cellular conditions that are highly injurious to most mammals (e.g. low body temperatures, ischemia. Immunoblotting was used to analyze the expression of proteins associated with pro-survival in six tissues of thirteen-lined ground squirrels, Ictidomys tridecemlineatus. The brain showed a concerted response to torpor with significant increases in the levels of all anti-apoptotic targets analyzed (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, BI-1, Mcl-1, cIAP1/2, xIAP as well as enhanced phosphorylation of Bcl-2 at S70 and T56. Heart responded similarly with most anti-apoptotic proteins elevated significantly during torpor except for Bcl-xL and xIAP that decreased and Mcl-1 that was unaltered. In liver, BI-1 increased whereas cIAP1/2 decreased. In kidney, there was an increase in BI-1, cIAP and xIAP but decreases in Bcl-xL and p-Bcl-2(T56 content. In brown adipose tissue, protein levels of BI-1, cIAP1/2, and xIAP decreased significantly during torpor (compared with euthermia whereas Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, Mcl-1 were unaltered; however, Bcl-2 showed enhanced phosphorylation at Thr56 but not at Ser70. In skeletal muscle, only xIAP levels changed significantly during torpor (an increase. The data show that anti-apoptotic pathways have organ-specific responses in hibernators with a prominent potential role in heart and brain where coordinated enhancement of anti-apoptotic proteins occurred in response to torpor.

  8. Salicylate, a catalytic inhibitor of topoisomerase II, inhibits DNA cleavage and is selective for the α isoform.

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    Bau, Jason T; Kang, Zhili; Austin, Caroline A; Kurz, Ebba U

    2014-02-01

    Topoisomerase II (topo II) is a ubiquitous enzyme that is essential for cell survival through its role in regulating DNA topology and chromatid separation. Topo II can be poisoned by common chemotherapeutics (such as doxorubicin and etoposide), leading to the accumulation of cytotoxic enzyme-linked DNA double-stranded breaks. In contrast, nonbreak-inducing topo II catalytic inhibitors have also been described and have more limited use in clinical chemotherapy. These agents, however, may alter the efficacy of regimens incorporating topo II poisons. We previously identified salicylate, the primary metabolite of aspirin, as a novel catalytic inhibitor of topo II. We have now determined the mechanism by which salicylate inhibits topo II. As catalytic inhibitors can act at a number of steps in the topo II catalytic cycle, we used multiple independent, biochemical approaches to interrogate the catalytic cycle. Furthermore, as mammalian cells express two isoforms of topo II (α and β), we examined whether salicylate was isoform selective. Our results demonstrate that salicylate is unable to intercalate DNA, and does not prevent enzyme-DNA interaction, nor does it promote stabilization of topo IIα in closed clamps on DNA. Although salicylate decreased topo IIα ATPase activity in a dose-dependent noncompetitive manner, this was secondary to salicylate-mediated inhibition of DNA cleavage. Surprisingly, comparison of salicylate's effects using purified human topo IIα and topo IIβ revealed that salicylate selectively inhibits the α isoform. These findings provide a definitive mechanism for salicylate-mediated inhibition of topo IIα and provide support for further studies determining the basis for its isoform selectivity.

  9. Structural determinants of the catalytic inhibition of human topoisomerase IIα by salicylate analogs and salicylate-based drugs.

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    Bau, Jason T; Kurz, Ebba U

    2014-06-15

    We previously identified salicylate as a novel catalytic inhibitor of human DNA topoisomerase II (topo II; EC 5.99.1.3) that preferentially targets the alpha isoform by interfering with topo II-mediated DNA cleavage. Many pharmaceuticals and compounds found in foods are salicylate-based. We have now investigated whether these are also catalytic inhibitors of topo II and the structural determinants modulating these effects. We have determined that a number of hydroxylated benzoic acids attenuate doxorubicin-induced DNA damage signaling mediated by the ATM protein kinase and inhibit topo II decatenation activity in vitro with varying potencies. Based on the chemical structures of these and other derivatives, we identified unique properties influencing topo II inhibition, including the importance of substitutions at the 2'- and 5'-positions. We extended our findings to a number of salicylate-based pharmaceuticals including sulfasalazine and diflunisal and found that both were effective at attenuating doxorubicin-induced DNA damage signaling, topo II DNA decatenation and they blocked stabilization of doxorubicin-induced topo II cleavable complexes in cells. In a manner similar to salicylate, we determined that these agents inhibit topo II-mediated DNA cleavage. This was accompanied by a concomitant decrease in topo II-mediated ATP-hydrolysis. Taken together, these findings reveal a novel function for the broader class of salicylate-related compounds and highlight the need for additional studies into whether they may impact the efficacy of chemotherapy regimens that include topo II poisons. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Clinicopathological Significance of the Proliferation Markers Ki67, RacGAP1, and Topoisomerase 2 Alpha in Breast Cancer.

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    Şahin, Sevinç; Işık Gönül, İpek; Çakır, Aslı; Seçkin, Selda; Uluoğlu, Ömer

    2016-10-01

    Objectives The aims of this study are to evaluate expressions of Ki67, RacGAP1 (MgcRacGAP) and topoisomerase 2 alpha (TOP2a), the markers related with cell proliferation that have been proposed to affect the prognosis in the literature and correlate the results with clinicopathological parameters of breast cancer patients. Methods Ki67, RacGAP1, and TOP2a antibodies were applied immunohistochemically to the tissue micrarray blocks of 457 female breast cancer patients. The results were correlated with clinical, prognostic, histopathological features, and other immunohistochemical findings (estrogen receptor [ER], progesterone receptor [PR], HER2, cytokeratin [CK]5/6, CK14, epidermal growth factor receptor [EGFR] and vimentin), statistically. Results Ki67 expression demonstrated direct correlation with TOP2a expression, mitotic count, tumor grade, geographic necrosis, basal-like phenotype. RacGAP1 expression was directly correlated with TOP2a expression, nipple invasion, and number of metastatic lymph nodes, and it was inversely correlated with PR expression. TOP2a expression was directly correlated with vimentin and Ki67 expressions, mitotic count, tumor grade, and geographic necrosis, and nipple invasion, and negatively correlated with ER and PR expressions. Higher TOP2a and Ki67 expressions were correlated with shorter overall survival. Higher TOP2a expression and RacGAP1 positivity were directly correlated with shorter disease-free survival. Conclusion This study showed that the overexpressions of Ki67, RacGAP1, and TOP2a affect the prognosis adversely, thus to develop target therapies against RacGAP1 and TOP2a as well as using Ki67 as a part of routine pathology practice might be beneficial in breast cancer therapy and prediction of prognosis. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. Novel Bacterial Topoisomerase Inhibitors Exploit Asp83 and the Intrinsic Flexibility of the DNA Gyrase Binding Site

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    Sebastian Franco-Ulloa

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available DNA gyrases are enzymes that control the topology of DNA in bacteria cells. This is a vital function for bacteria. For this reason, DNA gyrases are targeted by widely used antibiotics such as quinolones. Recently, structural and biochemical investigations identified a new class of DNA gyrase inhibitors called NBTIs (i.e., novel bacterial topoisomerase inhibitors. NBTIs are particularly promising because they are active against multi-drug resistant bacteria, an alarming clinical issue. Structural data recently demonstrated that these NBTIs bind tightly to a newly identified pocket at the dimer interface of the DNA–protein complex. In the present study, we used molecular dynamics (MD simulations and docking calculations to shed new light on the binding of NBTIs to this site. Interestingly, our MD simulations demonstrate the intrinsic flexibility of this binding site, which allows the pocket to adapt its conformation and form optimal interactions with the ligand. In particular, we examined two ligands, AM8085 and AM8191, which induced a repositioning of a key aspartate (Asp83B, whose side chain can rotate within the binding site. The conformational rearrangement of Asp83B allows the formation of a newly identified H-bond interaction with an NH on the bound NBTI, which seems important for the binding of NBTIs having such functionality. We validated these findings through docking calculations using an extended set of cognate oxabicyclooctane-linked NBTIs derivatives (~150, in total, screened against multiple target conformations. The newly identified H-bond interaction significantly improves the docking enrichment. These insights could be helpful for future virtual screening campaigns against DNA gyrase.

  12. P53, MAPK, topoisomerase II alpha and Ki67 immunohistochemical expression and KRAS/BRAF mutation in ovarian serous carcinomas.

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    Sundov, Dinka; Caric, Ana; Mrklic, Ivana; Gugic, Dijana; Capkun, Vesna; Hofman, Irena Drmic; Mise, Branka Petric; Tomic, Snjezana

    2013-02-06

    We investigated the immunohistochemical expression of p53, MAPK, topoisomerase II alpha (topoII alpha) and Ki67 in ovarian serous carcinomas (OSCs) along with mutational analysis for KRAS and BRAF. Eighty one cases of OSCs were reviewed and examined immunohistochemically using antibodies against p53, MAPK, topoII alpha and Ki67. Staining was evaluated as a percentage of immunopositive cells with cut-off levels at 10% for p53 and topoII alpha, and 5% for MAPK. The Ki67 immunoexpression was assessed by means of Olympus Image Analysis System as a percentage of immunopositive cells in 1000 tumor cells. KRAS and BRAF mutational analysis was performed on 73 available microdissected samples. Of 81 cases of OSCs 13.6% were of low-grade and 86.4% were of high-grade morphology. In the high-grade group there was a significantly higher immunoexpression of p53 (P p53 immunopositivity. Although this study is limited by its humble number of low-grade samples, our data fit the proposed dualistic pathway of ovarian carcinogenesis. Mutational analysis for KRAS and BRAF discloses some possible interactions between different tumorigenic pathways of low- and high-grade carcinomas. Immunohistochemical staining for MAPK was not sufficiently sensitive, nor specific, to precisely predict the KRAS mutation. However, it appears to be quite reliable in ruling out a KRAS mutation if the staining is negative. The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/9283563368804632.

  13. Characterization of DNA topoisomerase-1 in Spodoptera exigua for toxicity evaluation of camptothecin and hydoxy-camptothecin.

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    Lan Zhang

    Full Text Available Camptothecin (CPT, a plant alkaloid originally isolated from the native Chinese tree, Camptotheca acuminate, exerts the toxic effect by targeting eukaryotic DNA topoisomerase 1 (DNA Topo1. Besides as potent anti-cancer agents, CPT and its derivatives are now being explored as potential pesticides for insect control. In this study, we assessed their toxicity to an insect homolog, the Topo1 protein from beet armyworms (Spodoptera exigua Hübner, a worldwide pest of many important crops. The S. exigua Topo1 gene contains an ORF of 2790 base pairs that is predicted to encode a polypeptide of 930 amino acids. The deduced polypeptide exhibits polymorphism at residue sites V420, L530, A653 and T729 (numbered according to human Topo1 among insect species, which are predicted to confer sensitivity to CPT. The DNA relaxation activity of this protein was subsequently examined using a truncated form that contained the residues 337-930 and was expressed in bacteria BL21 cells. The purified protein retained the ability to relax double-stranded DNA and was susceptible to CPT and its derivative hydroxy-camptothecin (HCPT in a dose-dependent manner. The same inhibitory effect was also found on the native Topo1 extracted from IOZCAS-Spex-II cells, a cell line established from beet armyworms. Additionally, CPT and HCPT treatment reduced the steady accumulation of Topo1 protein despite the increased mRNA expression in response to the treatment. Our studies provide information of the S. exigua Topo1 gene and its amino acid polymorphism in insects and uncover some clues about potential mechanisms of CPT toxicity against insect pests. These results also are useful for development of more effective Topo1-targeted CPT insecticides in the future.

  14. Topoisomerase II-mediated DNA cleavage and mutagenesis activated by nitric oxide underlie the inflammation-associated tumorigenesis.

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    Yang, Yu-Chen; Chou, Han-Yi E; Shen, Tang-Long; Chang, Wei-Jer; Tai, Pei-Han; Li, Tsai-Kun

    2013-04-01

    Both cancer-suppressing and cancer-promoting properties of reactive nitrogen and oxygen species (RNOS) have been suggested to play a role in tumor pathology, particularly those activities associated with chronic inflammation. Here, we address the impact of nitric oxide (NO) on the induction of DNA damage and genome instability with a specific focus on the involvement of topoisomerase II (TOP2). We also investigate the contribution of NO to the formation of skin melanoma in mice. Similar to the TOP2-targeting drug, etoposide (VP-16), the NO-donor, S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), induces skin melanomas formation in 7,12-dimethyl- benz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-initiated mice. To explore the mechanism(s) underlying this NO-induced tumorigenesis, we use a co-culture model system to demonstrate that inflamed macrophages with inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression cause γ-H2AX activation, p53 phosphorylation, and chromosome DNA breaks in the target cells. Inhibitor experiments revealed that NO and TOP2 isozymes are responsible for the above described cellular phenotypes. Notably, NO, unlike VP-16, preferentially induces the formation of TOP2β cleavable complexes (TOP2βcc) in cells. Moreover, GSNO induced TOP2-dependent DNA sequence rearrangements and cytotoxicity. Furthermore, the incidences of GSNO- and VP-16-induced skin melanomas were also observed to be lower in the skin-specific top2β-knockout mice. Our results suggest that TOP2 isozymes contribute to NO-induced mutagenesis and subsequent cancer development during chronic inflammation. We provide the first experimental evidence for the functional role of TOP2 in NO-caused DNA damage, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis. Notably, these studies contribute to our molecular understanding of the cancer-promoting actions of RNOS during chronic inflammation.

  15. Identification and characterization of the regions involved in the nuclear translocation of the heterodimeric leishmanial DNA topoisomerase IB.

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    Christopher F Prada

    Full Text Available Leishmania donovani, the causative organism for visceral leishmaniasis, contains a unique heterodimeric DNA-topoisomerase IB (LdTopIB. LdTopIB is a heterodimer made up of a large subunit and a small subunit that must interact with each other to build an active enzyme able to solve the topological tensions on the DNA. As LdTopIB is located within the nucleus, one or more nuclear localization signals (NLS should exist to ensure its nuclear translocation. In this report three novel NLS have been identified through a sequential deletion study of the genes encoding of both subunits fused to that encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFP. NLS1 is a highly basic sequence of 43 amino acids in the C-terminal extension of the large protomer. We found two well-defined sequences in the small protomer: NLS2 is a 10-amino acid motif located in the N-terminal extension of the protein; NLS3 consists of a complex region of 28 amino acids placed in the vicinity of the catalytic Tyr-222 included at the conserved SKINY signature within the C-terminal. Furthermore, by means of yeast cell viability assays, conducted with several LdTopIB chimeras lacking any of the NLS motives, we have revealed that both subunits are transported independently to the nucleus. There was no evidence of LdTopIB accumulation in mitochondria or association to the kinetoplast DNA network. The results rule out the former hypothesis, which attributes nucleocytoplasmic transport of LdTopIB entirely to the large subunit. The LdTopIB is localized to the nucleus only.

  16. Producing irreversible topoisomerase II-mediated DNA breaks by site-specific Pt(II)-methionine coordination chemistry.

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    Wang, Ying-Ren; Chen, Shin-Fu; Wu, Chyuan-Chuan; Liao, Yi-Wen; Lin, Te-Sheng; Liu, Ko-Ting; Chen, Yi-Song; Li, Tsai-Kun; Chien, Tun-Cheng; Chan, Nei-Li

    2017-10-13

    Human type II topoisomerase (Top2) isoforms, hTop2α and hTop2β, are targeted by some of the most successful anticancer drugs. These drugs induce Top2-mediated DNA cleavage to trigger cell-death pathways. The potency of these drugs correlates positively with their efficacy in stabilizing the enzyme-mediated DNA breaks. Structural analysis of hTop2α and hTop2β revealed the presence of methionine residues in the drug-binding pocket, we therefore tested whether a tighter Top2-drug association may be accomplished by introducing a methionine-reactive Pt2+ into a drug to further stabilize the DNA break. Herein, we synthesized an organoplatinum compound, etoplatin-N2β, by replacing the methionine-juxtaposing group of the drug etoposide with a cis-dichlorodiammineplatinum(II) moiety. Compared to etoposide, etoplatin-N2β more potently inhibits both human Top2s. While the DNA breaks arrested by etoposide can be rejoined, those captured by etoplatin-N2β are practically irreversible. Crystallographic analyses of hTop2β complexed with DNA and etoplatin-N2β demonstrate coordinate bond formation between Pt2+ and a flanking methionine. Notably, this stable coordinate tether can be loosened by disrupting the structural integrity of drug-binding pocket, suggesting that Pt2+ coordination chemistry may allow for the development of potent inhibitors with protein conformation-dependent reversibility. This approach may be exploited to achieve isoform-specific targeting of human Top2s. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-encoded LANA recruits topoisomerase IIβ for latent DNA replication of the terminal repeats.

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    Purushothaman, Pravinkumar; McDowell, Maria E; McGuinness, James; Salas, Ruth; Rumjahn, Sharif M; Verma, Subhash C

    2012-09-01

    The latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) encoded by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) plays a major role in maintaining latency and is critical for the perpetual segregation of viral episomes to the progeny nuclei of newly divided cells. LANA binds to KSHV terminal repeat (TR) DNA and tethers the viral episomes to host chromosomes through the association of chromatin-bound cellular proteins. TR elements serve as potential origin sites of KSHV replication and have been shown to play important roles in latent DNA replication and transcription of adjacent genes. Affinity chromatography and proteomics analysis using KSHV TR DNA and the LANA binding site as the affinity column identified topoisomerase IIβ (TopoIIβ) as a LANA-interacting protein. Here, we show that TopoIIβ forms complexes with LANA that colocalize as punctuate bodies in the nucleus of KSHV-infected cells. The specific TopoIIβ binding region of LANA has been identified to its N terminus and the first 32 amino acid residues containing the nucleosome-binding region crucial for binding. Moreover, this region could also act as a dominant negative to disrupt association of TopoIIβ with LANA. TopoIIβ plays an important role in LANA-dependent latent DNA replication, as addition of ellipticine, a selective inhibitor of TopoII, negatively regulated replication mediated by the TR. DNA break labeling and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay using biotin-16-dUTP and terminal deoxynucleotide transferase showed that TopoIIβ mediates a transient DNA break on viral DNA. These studies confirm that LANA recruits TopoIIβ at the origins of latent replication to unwind the DNA for replication.

  18. Topoisomerase I peptide-loaded dendritic cells induce autoantibody response as well as skin and lung fibrosis.

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    Mehta, Heena; Goulet, Philippe-Olivier; Nguyen, Vinh; Pérez, Gemma; Koenig, Martial; Senécal, Jean-Luc; Sarfati, Marika

    2016-12-01

    DNA Topoisomerase I (TopoI) is a candidate autoantigen for diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis (dcSSc) associated with fatal lung disease. Dendritic cells (DCs) contribute to bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis. However, the possibility that TopoI-loaded DCs are involved in the initiation and/or perpetuation of dcSSc has not been explored. Here, we show that immunization with TopoI peptide-loaded DCs induces anti-TopoI autoantibody response and long-term fibrosis. Mice were repeatedly immunized with unpulsed DCs or DCs loaded with either TOPOIA or TOPOIB peptides, selected from different regions of TopoI. At week 12 after initial DC immunization, TOPOIA DCs but not TOPOIB DCs immunization induced mixed inflammation and fibrosis in lungs and skin. At a late time point (week 18), both TOPOIA DCs and TOPOIB DCs groups displayed increased alpha-smooth muscle actin expression in lungs and dermis along with skin fibrosis distal from the site of injection when compared with unpulsed DCs. Both TopoI peptide-DC-immunized groups developed IgG2a anti-TopoI autoantibody response. At week 10, signs of perivascular, peribronchial, and parenchymal pulmonary inflammation were already observed in the TOPOIA DCs group, together with transient elevation in bronchoalveolar lavage cell counts, IL-17A expression, and CXCL4 production, a biomarker of early human dcSSc. Collectively, TopoI peptide DCs induce progressive autoantibody response as well as development of protracted skin and lung dcSSc-like disease. Pronounced lung inflammation, transient IL-17A, and CXCL4 expression precede fibrosis development. Our immunization strategy, that uses self immune system and autoantigen, will help to further investigate the pathogenesis of this complex autoimmune disorder with unmet medical needs.

  19. ERK1/2 signaling plays an important role in topoisomerase II poison-induced G2/M checkpoint activation.

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    Kolb, Ryan H; Greer, Patrick M; Cao, Phu T; Cowan, Kenneth H; Yan, Ying

    2012-01-01

    Topo II poisons, which target topoisomerase II (topo II) to generate enzyme mediated DNA damage, have been commonly used for anti-cancer treatment. While clinical evidence demonstrate a capability of topo II poisons in inducing apoptosis in cancer cells, accumulating evidence also show that topo II poison treatment frequently results in cell cycle arrest in cancer cells, which was associated with subsequent resistance to these treatments. Results in this report indicate that treatment of MCF-7 and T47D breast cancer cells with topo II poisons resulted in an increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and an subsequent induction of G2/M cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, inhibition of ERK1/2 activation using specific inhibitors markedly attenuated the topo II poison-induced G2/M arrest and diminished the topo II poison-induced activation of ATR and Chk1 kinases. Moreover, decreased expression of ATR by specific shRNA diminished topo II poison-induced G2/M arrest but had no effect on topo II poison-induced ERK1/2 activation. In contrast, inhibition of ERK1/2 signaling had little, if any, effect on topo II poison-induced ATM activation. In addition, ATM inhibition by either incubation of cells with ATM specific inhibitor or transfection of cells with ATM specific siRNA did not block topo II poison-induced G2/M arrest. Ultimately, inhibition of ERK1/2 signaling greatly enhanced topo II poison-induced apoptosis. These results implicate a critical role for ERK1/2 signaling in the activation of G2/M checkpoint response following topo II poison treatment, which protects cells from topo II poison-induced apoptosis.

  20. Emergence of fluoroquinolone-resistant Propionibacterium acnes caused by amino acid substitutions of DNA gyrase but not DNA topoisomerase IV.

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    Nakase, Keisuke; Sakuma, Yui; Nakaminami, Hidemasa; Noguchi, Norihisa

    2016-12-01

    With the aim of elucidating the mechanisms of fluoroquinolones resistance in Propionibacterium acnes, we determined the susceptibility of fluoroquinolones in 211 isolates from patients with acne vulgaris. We identified five isolates (2.4%) with reduced susceptibility to nadifloxacin (minimum inhibitory concentration ≥ 4 μg/ml). Determination of the sequences of the DNA gyrase (gyrA and gyrB) and DNA topoisomerase (parC and parE) genes showed the amino acid substitutions Ser101Leu and Asp105Gly of GyrA in four and one of the isolates, respectively. In vitro mutation experiments showed that low-level fluoroquinolone-resistant mutants with the Ser101Leu or Asp105Gly substitution in GyrA could be obtained from selection with ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin. The pattern of substitution (Ser101Trp in GyrA) caused by nadifloxacin selection was different from that induced by the other fluoroquinolones. In the isolation of further high-level resistant mutants, acquisition of another amino acid substitution of GyrB in addition to those of GyrA was detected, but there were no substitutions of ParC and ParE. In addition, the mutant prevention concentration and mutation frequency of nadifloxacin were lowest among the tested fluoroquinolones. The growth of the Ser101Trp mutant was lower than that of the other mutants. Our findings suggest that the Ser101Trp mutant of P. acnes emerges rarely and disappears immediately, and the risk for the prevalence of fluoroquinolones-resistant P. acnes differs according to the GyrA mutation type. To our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate the mechanisms of resistance to fluoroquinolones in P. acnes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Relationship of cellular topoisomerase IIα inhibition to cytotoxicity and published genotoxicity of fluoroquinolone antibiotics in V79 cells.

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    Williams, Gary M; Brunnemann, Klaus D; Smart, Daniel J; Molina, David; Jeffrey, Alan M; Duan, Jian-Dong; Krebsfaenger, Niels; Kampkoetter, Andreas; Schmuck, Gabriele

    2013-04-25

    Fluoroquinolone (FQ) antibiotics are bacteriocidal through inhibition of the bacterial gyrase and at sufficient concentrations in vitro, they can inhibit the homologous eukaryotic topoisomerase (TOPO) II enzyme. FQ exert a variety of genotoxic effects in mammalian systems through mechanisms not yet established, but which are postulated to involve inhibition of TOPO II enzymes. To assess the relationship of inhibition of cell nuclear TOPO II to cytotoxicity and reported genotoxicity, two FQ, clinafloxacin (CLFX) and lomefloxacin (LOFX), having available genotoxicity data showing substantial differences with CLFX being more potent than LOFX, were selected for study. The relative inhibitory activities of these FQ on nuclear TOPO IIα in cultured Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts (V79 cells) over dose ranges and at equimolar concentrations were assessed by measuring nuclear stabilized cleavage complexes of TOPO IIα-DNA. Cytotoxicity was measured by relative cell counts. Both FQ inhibited V79 cell nuclear TOPO IIα. The lowest-observed-adverse-effect levels for TOPO IIα inhibition were 55 μM for CLFX, and 516 μM for LOFX. The no-observed-adverse-effect-levels were 41 μM for CLFX, and 258 μM for LOFX. At equimolar concentrations (175 μM), CLFX was more potent than LOFX. Likewise, CLFX was more cytotoxic than LOFX. Thus, the two FQ, inhibited TOPO IIα in intact V79 cells, differed in their potencies and exhibited no-observed-adverse-effect levels. These findings are in concordance with published genotoxicity data and observed cytotoxicity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Emergence of quinolone-resistant, topoisomerase-mutant Brucella after treatment with fluoroquinolones in a macrophage experimental infection model.

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    Rodríguez Tarazona, Elisa; García Rodríguez, José Ángel; Muñoz Bellido, Juan Luis

    2015-04-01

    To determine the activity of fluoroquinolones (FQ) and the selection of FQ-resistant mutants in a macrophage experimental infection model (MEIM). Canine macrophages were inoculated with Brucella melitensis ATCC 23457 (WT), achieving intracellular counts of around 105 CFU/mL. Cell cultures were incubated in the presence of ciprofloxacin (CIP), levofloxacin (LEV), moxifloxacin (MOX), and doxycycline (DOX). After cell lysis, surviving microorganisms were plated for count purposes, and plated onto antibiotics-containing media for mutant selection. Topoisomerases mutations were detected by PCR and sequencing. Bacterial counts after cell lysis were 14.3% (CIP), 65.3% (LEV), and 75% (MOX) lower compared to the control. Quinolone-resistant mutants emerged in cell cultures containing CIP and LEV with a frequency of around 0.5×10(-3). All mutants showed an Ala87Val change in GyrA. Mutants had FQs MICs around 10×WT. The ability of these mutants for infecting new macrophages and the intracellular lysis after antibiotic exposure did not change significantly. No 2nd step FQ-resistant mutants were selected from 1st step mutants. Intracellular activity of FQs is low against WT and gyrA-mutant Brucella. FQs easily select gyrA mutants in MEIM. The ability of mutants for infecting new macrophages remains unchanged. In this MEIM, 2nd step mutants do not emerge. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  3. Cytotoxicity and cell death mechanisms induced by the polyamine-vectorized anti-cancer drug F14512 targeting topoisomerase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brel, Viviane; Annereau, Jean-Philippe; Vispé, Stéphane; Kruczynski, Anna; Bailly, Christian; Guilbaud, Nicolas

    2011-12-15

    The polyamines transport system (PTS) is usually enhanced in cancer cells and can be exploited to deliver anticancer drugs. The spermine-conjugated epipodophyllotoxin derivative F14512 is a topoisomerase II poison that exploits the PTS to target preferentially tumor cells. F14512 has been characterized as a potent anticancer drug candidate and is currently in phase 1 clinical trials. Here we have analyzed the mechanisms of cell death induced by F14512, compared to the parent drug etoposide lacking the polyamine tail. F14512 proved to be >30-fold more cytotoxic than etoposide against A549 non-small cell lung cancer cells and triggers less but unrecoverable DNA damages. The cytotoxic action of F14512 is extremely rapid (within 3 h) and does not lead to a marked accumulation in the S-phase of the cell cycle, unlike etoposide. Interestingly, A549 cells treated with F14512 were less prone to undergo apoptosis (neither caspases-dependent nor caspases-independent pathways) or autophagy but preferentially entered into senescence. Drug-induced senescence was characterized qualitatively and quantitatively by an increased β-galactosidase activity, both by cytochemical staining and by flow cytometry. A morphological analysis by electron microscopy revealed the presence of numerous multi-lamellar and vesicular bodies and large electron-lucent (methuosis-like) vacuoles in F14512-treated cell samples. The mechanism of drug-induced cell death is thus distinct for F14512 compared to etoposide, and this difference may account for their distinct pharmacological profiles and the markedly superior activity of F14512 in vivo. This study suggests that senescence markers should be considered as potential pharmacodynamic biomarkers of F14512 antitumor activity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. MicroRNA-139 suppresses proliferation in luminal type breast cancer cells by targeting Topoisomerase II alpha

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, Wei [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); Sa, Ke-Di; Zhang, Xiang; Jia, Lin-Tao; Zhao, Jing [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); Yang, An-Gang [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Immunology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); Zhang, Rui, E-mail: ruizhang@fmmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); Fan, Jing, E-mail: jingfan@fmmu.edu.cn [Department of Vascular and Endocrine Surgery, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Bian, Ka, E-mail: kakamax85@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Immunology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); Department of Otolaryngology, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710038 (China)

    2015-08-07

    The classification of molecular subtypes of breast cancer improves the prognostic accuracy and therapeutic benefits in clinic. However, because of the complexity of breast cancer, more biomarkers and functional molecules need to be explored. Here, analyzing the data in a huge cohort of breast cancer patients, we found that Topoisomerase II alpha (TOP2a), an important target of chemotherapy is a biomarker for prognosis in luminal type breast cancer patients, but not in basal like or HER2 positive breast cancer patients. We identified that miR-139, a previous reported anti-metastatic microRNA targets 3’-untranslated region (3′UTR) of TOP2a mRNA. Further more, we revealed that the forced expression of miR-139 reduces the TOP2a expression at both mRNA and protein levels. And our functional experiments showed that the ectopic expression of miR-139 remarkably inhibits proliferation in luminal type breast cancer cells, while exogenous TOP2a expression could rescue inhibition of cell proliferation mediated by miR-139. Collectively, our present study demonstrates the miR-139-TOP2a regulatory axis is important for proliferation in luminal type breast cancer cells. This functional link may help us to further understand the specificity of subtypes of breast cancer and optimize the strategy of cancer treatment. - Highlights: • High levels of TOP2a expression are closely associated with poor prognosis in luminal type breast cancer patients. • TOP2a is a novel target of miR-139. • Overexpression of miR-139 inhibits proliferation in luminal type breast cancer cells. • TOP2a is essential for miR-139-induced growth arrest in luminal type breast cancer cells.

  5. MicroRNA-139 suppresses proliferation in luminal type breast cancer cells by targeting Topoisomerase II alpha

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua, Wei; Sa, Ke-Di; Zhang, Xiang; Jia, Lin-Tao; Zhao, Jing; Yang, An-Gang; Zhang, Rui; Fan, Jing; Bian, Ka

    2015-01-01

    The classification of molecular subtypes of breast cancer improves the prognostic accuracy and therapeutic benefits in clinic. However, because of the complexity of breast cancer, more biomarkers and functional molecules need to be explored. Here, analyzing the data in a huge cohort of breast cancer patients, we found that Topoisomerase II alpha (TOP2a), an important target of chemotherapy is a biomarker for prognosis in luminal type breast cancer patients, but not in basal like or HER2 positive breast cancer patients. We identified that miR-139, a previous reported anti-metastatic microRNA targets 3’-untranslated region (3′UTR) of TOP2a mRNA. Further more, we revealed that the forced expression of miR-139 reduces the TOP2a expression at both mRNA and protein levels. And our functional experiments showed that the ectopic expression of miR-139 remarkably inhibits proliferation in luminal type breast cancer cells, while exogenous TOP2a expression could rescue inhibition of cell proliferation mediated by miR-139. Collectively, our present study demonstrates the miR-139-TOP2a regulatory axis is important for proliferation in luminal type breast cancer cells. This functional link may help us to further understand the specificity of subtypes of breast cancer and optimize the strategy of cancer treatment. - Highlights: • High levels of TOP2a expression are closely associated with poor prognosis in luminal type breast cancer patients. • TOP2a is a novel target of miR-139. • Overexpression of miR-139 inhibits proliferation in luminal type breast cancer cells. • TOP2a is essential for miR-139-induced growth arrest in luminal type breast cancer cells

  6. The calcimimetic R-568 induces apoptotic cell death in prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Guangming

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased serum level of parathyroid hormone (PTH was found in metastatic prostate cancers. Calcimimetic R-568 was reported to reduce PTH expression, to suppress cell proliferation and to induce apoptosis in parathyroid cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of R-568 on cellular survival of prostate cancer cells. Methods Prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP and PC-3 were used in this study. Cellular survival was determined with MTT, trypan blue exclusion and fluorescent Live/Death assays. Western blot assay was utilized to assess apoptotic events induced by R-568 treatment. JC-1 staining was used to evaluate mitochondrial membrane potential. Results In cultured prostate cancer LNCaP and PC-3 cells, R-568 treatment significantly reduced cellular survival in a dose- and time-dependent manner. R-568-induced cell death was an apoptotic event, as evidenced by caspase-3 processing and PARP cleavage, as well as JC-1 color change in mitochondria. Knocking down calcium sensing receptor (CaSR significantly reduced R-568-induced cytotoxicity. Enforced expression of Bcl-xL gene abolished R-568-induced cell death, while loss of Bcl-xL expression led to increased cell death in R-568-treated LNCaP cells,. Conclusion Taken together, our data demonstrated that calcimimetic R-568 triggers an intrinsic mitochondria-related apoptotic pathway, which is dependent on the CaSR and is modulated by Bcl-xL anti-apoptotic pathway.

  7. High mobility group box 1 skews macrophage polarization and negatively influences phagocytosis of apoptotic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaper, Fleur; de Leeuw, Karina; Horst, Geesje; Bootsma, Hendrika; Limburg, Pieter C.; Heeringa, Peter; Bijl, Marc; Westra, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Decreased phagocytosis of apoptotic cells plays an important role in the pathogenesis of SLE. This can lead to secondary necrosis and release of nuclear proteins, such as high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1). We hypothesized that increased HMGB1 levels, as present in SLE, skew macrophage

  8. Role of BK channels in the apoptotic volume decrease in native eel intestinal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lionetto, Maria Giulia; Giordano, Maria Elena; Calisi, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    of these channels in the Apoptotic Volume Decrease (AVD) of isolated eel enterocytes, and the possible interaction between BK channels and the progression of apoptosis. The detection of apoptosis was performed by confocal microscopy and annexin V and propidium iodide labelling; cell volume changes were monitored...

  9. Antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects of Uncaria tomentosa in human medullary thyroid carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinner, Beate; Li, Zeng Xia; Haas, Helga; Siegl, Veronika; Sturm, Sonja; Stuppner, Hermann; Pfragner, Roswitha

    2009-11-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), a rare calcitonin-producing tumor, is derived from parafollicular C-cells of the thyroid and is characterized by constitutive Bcl-2 overexpression. The tumor is relatively insensitive to radiation therapy as well as conventional chemotherapy. To date, the only curative treatment is the early and complete surgical removal of all neoplastic tissue. In this study, the antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects of fractions obtained from Uncaria tomentosa (Willd.) DC, commonly known as uña de gato or cat's claw were investigated. Cell growth of MTC cells as well as enzymatic activity of mitochondrial dehydrogenase was markedly inhibited after treatment with different fractions of the plant. Furthermore, there was an increase in the expressions of caspase-3 and -7 and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) fraction, while bcl-2 overexpression remained constant. In particular, the alkaloids isopterpodine and pteropodine of U. tomentosa exhibited a significant pro-apoptotic effect on MTC cells, whereas the alkaloid-poor fraction inhibited cell proliferation but did not show any pro-apoptotic effects. These promising results indicate the growth-restraining and apoptotic potential of plant extracts against neuroendocrine tumors, which may add to existing therapies for cancer.

  10. Relationship between apoptotic markers in semen from fertile men and demographic, hormonal and seminal characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, Ina; Spanò, Marcello; Hougaard, Karin S

    2012-01-01

    by the World Health Organization. Immunofluorescence coupled to flow cytometry was utilized for detection of apoptotic markers in the sperm cell. DNA damage was assessed by flow cytometry using both the sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA) and the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labelling...

  11. Geno protective and anti-apoptotic effect of green tea against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Geno protective and anti-apoptotic effect of green tea against perinatal lipopolysaccharide-exposure induced liver toxicity in rat newborns. Ahmed A. Allam, Sami A. Gabr, Jamaan Ajarem, Ahmad H. Alghadir, Revathi Sekar, Billy K.C. Chow ...

  12. Antitumor and apoptotic effects of cucurbitacin a in A-549 lung ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The main aim of this study was to demonstrate the antitumor potential of cucurbitacin A on A-549 NSCLC (non-small cell lung cancer cells). The effects of Cucurbitacin A on apoptotic induction, cell physic, cell cycle failure and m-TOR/PI3K/Akt signalling pathway were also investigated in the present study.

  13. Evaluation of synergistic anticandidal and apoptotic effects of ferulic acid and caspofungin against Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canturk, Zerrin

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the synergy between anticandidal and apoptotic effects of ferulic acid and caspofungin against Candida albicans and Candida glabrata, with the help of a quantitative checkerboard microdilution assay using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) as a viability dye. Apoptotic effects of caspofungin and ferulic acid concentrations (alone and combined) were analyzed for C. albicans and C. glabrata based on annexin V-propidium iodide binding capacities using flow cytometric analysis. C. albicans showed a synergistic effect, represented by a fractional inhibitory concentration index of 0.5). Early and late apoptotic effects of caspofungin and ferulic acid concentrations (1 μg/mL and 1000 μg/mL) were calculated as 55.7% and 18.3%, respectively, while their necrotic effects were determined as 5.8% and 51.6%, respectively, using flow cytometric analyses. The apoptotic effects of the combination of caspofungin and ferulic acid at concentrations of 1 μg/mL and 1000 μg/mL on C. albicans and C. glabrata were 73.0% and 48.7%, respectively. Ferulic acid also demonstrated a synergistic effect in combination with caspofungin against C. albicans. Another possibility is to combine the existing anticandidal drug with phytochemicals to enhance the efficacy of anticandidal drug. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Chlamydia pneumoniae hides inside apoptotic neutrophils to silently infect and propagate in macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Rupp

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intracellular pathogens have developed elaborate strategies for silent infection of preferred host cells. Chlamydia pneumoniae is a common pathogen in acute infections of the respiratory tract (e.g. pneumonia and associated with chronic lung sequelae in adults and children. Within the lung, alveolar macrophages and polymorph nuclear neutrophils (PMN are the first line of defense against bacteria, but also preferred host phagocytes of chlamydiae. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We could show that C. pneumoniae easily infect and hide inside neutrophil granulocytes until these cells become apoptotic and are subsequently taken up by macrophages. C. pneumoniae infection of macrophages via apoptotic PMN results in enhanced replicative activity of chlamydiae when compared to direct infection of macrophages, which results in persistence of the pathogen. Inhibition of the apoptotic recognition of C. pneumoniae infected PMN using PS- masking Annexin A5 significantly lowered the transmission of chlamydial infection to macrophages. Transfer of apoptotic C. pneumoniae infected PMN to macrophages resulted in an increased TGF-ss production, whereas direct infection of macrophages with chlamydiae was characterized by an enhanced TNF-alpha response. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, our data suggest that C. pneumoniae uses neutrophil granulocytes to be silently taken up by long-lived macrophages, which allows for efficient propagation and immune protection within the human host.

  15. Withaferin A Suppresses Anti-apoptotic BCL2, Bcl-xL, XIAP and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    apoptotic genes, BCL2, Bcl-xL, XIAP and Survivin), in cervical carcinoma cells. Methods: Annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide (PI) staining was used for the investigation of cell apoptosis. RNA RNeasy Kits was used to isolate RNA and Omniscript ...

  16. Evaluation of synergistic anticandidal and apoptotic effects of ferulic acid and caspofungin against Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zerrin Canturk

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the synergy between anticandidal and apoptotic effects of ferulic acid and caspofungin against Candida albicans and Candida glabrata, with the help of a quantitative checkerboard microdilution assay using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT as a viability dye. Apoptotic effects of caspofungin and ferulic acid concentrations (alone and combined were analyzed for C. albicans and C. glabrata based on annexin V–propidium iodide binding capacities using flow cytometric analysis. C. albicans showed a synergistic effect, represented by a fractional inhibitory concentration index of 0.5. Early and late apoptotic effects of caspofungin and ferulic acid concentrations (1 μg/mL and 1000 μg/mL were calculated as 55.7% and 18.3%, respectively, while their necrotic effects were determined as 5.8% and 51.6%, respectively, using flow cytometric analyses. The apoptotic effects of the combination of caspofungin and ferulic acid at concentrations of 1 μg/mL and 1000 μg/mL on C. albicans and C. glabrata were 73.0% and 48.7%, respectively. Ferulic acid also demonstrated a synergistic effect in combination with caspofungin against C. albicans. Another possibility is to combine the existing anticandidal drug with phytochemicals to enhance the efficacy of anticandidal drug.

  17. Cloning and analysis of a defender against apoptotic cell death (DAD1) homologue from tomato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeberichts, F.A.; Woltering, E.J.

    2001-01-01

    A cDNA clone homologous to the human defender against apoptotic cell death (DAD1) gene, which is believed to be a conserved inhibitor of programmed cell death, was isolated from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum cv. Prisca). The 351 basepairs open reading frame predicted a 116 amino acid protein

  18. Antiproliferative and Pro-apoptotic activities of the stem bark of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Persea americana (Lauraceae) have been used in traditional medicine for a wide range of illness and some of these uses have been proven scientifically. The aim of this present study is to screen for the phytochemical content, determine the proximate parameter and determine the antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of ...

  19. Modulation of Apoptotic Signaling by the Hepatitis B Virus X Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Bouchard

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide, an estimated 350 million people are chronically infected with the Hepatitis B Virus (HBV; chronic infection with HBV is associated with the development of severe liver diseases including hepatitis and cirrhosis. Individuals who are chronically infected with HBV also have a significantly higher risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC than uninfected individuals. The HBV X protein (HBx is a key regulatory HBV protein that is important for HBV replication, and likely plays a cofactor role in the development of HCC in chronically HBV-infected individuals. Although some of the functions of HBx that may contribute to the development of HCC have been characterized, many HBx activities, and their putative roles during the development of HBV-associated HCC, remain incompletely understood. HBx is a multifunctional protein that localizes to the cytoplasm, nucleus, and mitochondria of HBV‑infected hepatocytes. HBx regulates numerous cellular signal transduction pathways and transcription factors as well as cell cycle progression and apoptosis. In this review, we will summarize reports in which the impact of HBx expression on cellular apoptotic pathways has been analyzed. Although various effects of HBx on apoptotic pathways have been observed in different model systems, studies of HBx activities in biologically relevant hepatocyte systems have begun to clarify apoptotic effects of HBx and suggest mechanisms that could link HBx modulation of apoptotic pathways to the development of HBV-associated HCC.

  20. Dynamic release of nuclear RanGTP triggers TPX2-dependent microtubule assembly during the apoptotic execution phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, David K; Wilde, Andrew; Lane, Jon D

    2009-03-01

    During apoptosis, the interphase microtubule network is dismantled then later replaced by a novel, non-centrosomal microtubule array. These microtubules assist in the peripheral redistribution of nuclear fragments in the apoptotic cell; however, the regulation of apoptotic microtubule assembly is not understood. Here, we demonstrate that microtubule assembly depends upon the release of nuclear RanGTP into the apoptotic cytoplasm because this process is blocked in apoptotic cells overexpressing dominant-negative GDP-locked Ran (T24N). Actin-myosin-II contractility provides the impetus for Ran release and, consequently, microtubule assembly is blocked in blebbistatin- and Y27632-treated apoptotic cells. Importantly, the spindle-assembly factor TPX2 (targeting protein for Xklp2), colocalises with apoptotic microtubules, and siRNA silencing of TPX2, but not of the microtubule motors Mklp1 and Kid, abrogates apoptotic microtubule assembly. These data provide a molecular explanation for the assembly of the apoptotic microtubule network, and suggest important similarities with the process of RanGTP- and TPX2-mediated mitotic spindle formation.

  1. In vitro evidence for participation of DEC-205 expressed by thymic cortical epithelial cells in clearance of apoptotic thymocytes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Small, M; Kraal, G.

    2003-01-01

    Binding of apoptotic cells was compared after incubation of thymocytes with two clones of murine thymic stromal cells to which CD4(+)/CD8(+) thymocytes attach. With the BA/10, but not the BA/2, clone, thymocytes with apoptotic morphology were bound irreversibly. These tightly bound thymocytes were

  2. Real-time analysis of cleavage and religation activity of human topoisomerase 1 based on ternary fluorescence resonance energy transfer DNA substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenxing; Ouyang, Hui; Tesauro, Cinzia; Ottaviani, Alessio; He, Yong; Fiorani, Paola; Xie, Hui; Desideri, Alessandro; Fu, Zhifeng

    2018-02-16

    Human topoisomerase 1B is a ubiquitous and essential enzyme involved in relaxing the topological state of supercoiled DNA to allow the progression of fundamental DNA metabolism. Its enzymatic catalytic cycle consists of cleavage and religation reaction. A ternary fluorescence resonance energy transfer biosensor based on a suicide DNA substrate conjugated with three fluorophores has been developed to monitor both cleavage and religation Topoisomerase I catalytic function. The presence of fluorophores does not alter the specificity of the enzyme catalysis on the DNA substrate. The enzyme-mediated reaction can be tracked in real-time by simple fluorescence measurement, avoiding the use of risky radioactive substrate labeling and time-consuming denaturing gel electrophoresis. The method is applied to monitor the perturbation brought by single mutation on the cleavage or religation reaction and to screen the effect of the camptothecin anticancer drug monitoring the energy transfer decrease during religation reaction. Pathological mutations usually affect only the cleavage or the religation reaction and the proposed approach represent a fast protocol for assessing chemotherapeutic drug efficacy and analyzing mutant's properties. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Erybraedin C, a natural compound from the plant Bituminaria bituminosa, inhibits both the cleavage and religation activities of human topoisomerase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesauro, Cinzia; Fiorani, Paola; D'Annessa, Ilda; Chillemi, Giovanni; Turchi, Gino; Desideri, Alessandro

    2010-01-15

    The interaction of human topoisomerase I and erybraedin C, a pterocarpan purified from the plant Bituminaria bituminosa, that was shown to have an antitumour activity, was investigated through enzymatic activity assays and molecular docking procedures. Erybraedin C is able to inhibit both the cleavage and the religation steps of the enzyme reaction. In both cases, pre-incubation of the drug with the enzyme is required to produce a complete inhibition. Molecular docking simulations indicate that, when interacting with the enzyme alone, the preferential drug-binding site is localized in proximity to the active Tyr723 residue, with one of the two prenilic groups close to the active-site residues Arg488 and His632, essential for the catalytic reaction. When interacting with the cleavable complex, erybraedin C interacts with both the enzyme and DNA in a way similar to that found for topotecan. This is the first example of a natural compound able to act on both the cleavage and religation reaction of human topoisomerase I.

  4. Topoisomerase mutations that are associated with high-level resistance to earlier fluoroquinolones in Staphylococcus aureus have less effect on the antibacterial activity of besifloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfilippo, Christine M; Hesje, Christine K; Haas, Wolfgang; Morris, Timothy W

    2011-01-01

    The impact of mutations in DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV on minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) was investigated to better understand why besifloxacin has a higher potency against Staphylococcus aureus when compared to other fluoroquinolones, which was especially pronounced against ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates. MICs were determined for 52 clinical isolates against besifloxacin, moxifloxacin, gatifloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and levofloxacin. The genes encoding GyrA, GyrB, ParC, and ParE were sequenced and the potential impact of mutations assessed in light of recent structural data. For all fluoroquinolones tested, the MICs increased with the number of mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions. However, this increase was the smallest for besifloxacin and the largest for ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin. In addition to the commonly observed mutations in ParC and GyrA, more unusual mutations in ParE, such as Asp-432→His or Pro-585→Ser, were also detected. Compared to earlier fluoroquinolones, the higher potency of besifloxacin suggests that the drug's unique combination of a 7-azepinyl ring and an 8-chloro-substituent results in unique interactions with DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Alpha, beta-unsaturated lactones 2-furanone and 2-pyrone induce cellular DNA damage, formation of topoisomerase I- and II-DNA complexes and cancer cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Montaño, José Manuel; Burgos-Morón, Estefanía; Orta, Manuel Luis; Pastor, Nuria; Austin, Caroline A; Mateos, Santiago; López-Lázaro, Miguel

    2013-09-12

    The alpha, beta-unsaturated lactones 2-furanone and 2-pyrone are part of the chemical structure of a variety of naturally occurring compounds (e.g., cardenolides, bufadienolides, acetogenins, coumarins, and food-flavoring furanones), some of which have shown anticancer activity and/or DNA damaging effects. Here we report that 2-furanone and 2-pyrone induce cellular DNA damage (assessed by the comet assay and the gamma-H2AX focus assay) and the formation of topoisomerase I- and topoisomerase II-DNA complexes in cells (visualized and quantified in situ by the TARDIS assay). Cells mutated in BRCA2 (deficient in homologous recombination repair) were significantly hypersensitive to the cytotoxic activity of 2-pyrone, therefore suggesting that BRCA2 plays an important role in the repair of DNA damage induced by this lactone. Both lactones were cytotoxic in A549 lung cancer cells at lower concentrations than in MRC5 non-malignant lung fibroblasts. The possible involvement of 2-furanone and 2-pyrone in the anticancer and DNA-damaging activities of compounds containing these lactones is discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Phase I and pharmacokinetic study of XR11576, an oral topoisomerase I and II inhibitor, administered on days 1-5 of a 3-weekly cycle in patients with advanced solid tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J.A. de Jonge (Maja); S.B. Kaye (Stan); J. Verweij (Jaap); C. Brock (C.); S. Reade (Sarah); M. Scurr (M.); L. van Doorn (Leni); C. Verheij (Coleta); W.J. Loos (Walter); C. Brindley (C.); H.D. Mistry; M. Cooper (Meghan); I.R. Judson (Ian)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractXR11576 is an oral topoisomerase I and II inhibitor. The objectives of this phase I study were to assess the dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs), to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and to describe the pharmacokinetics (PKs) of XR11576 when administered orally on days 1-5 every 3

  7. DNA-binding, topoisomerases I and II inhibition and in vitro cytotoxicity of ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes: [Ru(dppz)2L](2+) (L=dppz-11-CO2Me and dppz).

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaojun; Jin, Lianhe; Tan, Lifeng

    2015-01-25

    Two ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes, [Ru(dppz)2dppz-11-CO2Me](ClO4)2 (Ru1) and [Ru(dppz)3](ClO4)2 (Ru2), have been synthesized and characterized. The spectral characteristics of Ru1 and Ru2 were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy and revealed that both complexes were sensitive to solvent polarity. The binding properties of the two complexes towards calf-thymus DNA (CT-DNA) have been investigated by different spectrophotometric methods and viscosity measurements, indicating that both complexes bind to CT-DNA by means of intercalation, but with different binding affinities. Topoisomerase inhibition and DNA strand passage assay demonstrates that the two complexes are dual inhibitors of topoisomerases I and IIa. On the other hand, the cytotoxicity of both complexes has been evaluated by MTT assays and Giemsa staining experiments. The main results reveal that the ester functional group has a significant effect on the DNA-binding affinities and topoisomerases inhibition effects of Ru1 and Ru2, and further advance our knowledge on the DNA-binding and topoisomerase inhibition by Ru(II) complexes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Apoptotic circulating tumor cells in early and metastatic breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallergi, Galatea; Konstantinidis, Georgios; Markomanolaki, Harris; Papadaki, Maria A; Mavroudis, Dimitris; Stournaras, Christos; Georgoulias, Vassilis; Agelaki, Sofia

    2013-09-01

    The detection of circulating tumor cells (CTC) in breast cancer is strongly associated with disease relapse. Since it is unclear whether all CTCs are capable of generating metastasis, we investigated their apoptotic and proliferative status in 56 CTC-positive (29 early and 27 metastatic) patients with breast cancer. Double-staining immunofluorescence experiments were carried out in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) cytospins, using the pancytokeratin A45-B/B3 antibody and either M30 (apoptotic marker) or Ki67 (proliferation marker) antibodies. Apoptosis was also evaluated using a polycaspase detection kit. Patients with metastatic disease had significantly lower numbers of apoptotic CTCs compared with patients with early breast cancer (polycaspase kit: 8.1% vs. 47.4% of the total CTC number; P = 0.0001; M30-antibody: 32.1% vs. 76.63%; P = 0.002). The median percentage of apoptotic CTCs per patient was also lower in patients with advanced compared with those with early disease (polycaspase kit: 0% vs. 53.6%; M30-antibody: 15% vs. 80%). Ki67-positive CTCs were identified in 51.7% and 44% of patients with early and metastatic disease, respectively. Adjuvant chemotherapy reduced both the number of CTCs per patient and the number of proliferating CTCs (63.9% vs. 30%). In conclusion, apoptotic CTCs could be detected in patients with breast cancer irrespective of their clinical status, though the incidence of detection is higher in early compared with metastatic patients. The detection of CTCs that survive despite adjuvant therapy implies that CTC elimination should be attempted using agents targeting their distinctive molecular characteristics.

  9. New insights into the apoptotic process in mollusks: characterization of caspase genes in Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Romero

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is an essential biological process in the development and maintenance of immune system homeostasis. Caspase proteins constitute the core of the apoptotic machinery and can be categorized as either initiators or effectors of apoptosis. Although the genes encoding caspase proteins have been described in vertebrates and in almost all invertebrate phyla, there are few reports describing the initiator and executioner caspases or the modulation of their expression by different stimuli in different apoptotic pathways in bivalves. In the present work, we characterized two initiator and four executioner caspases in the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. Both initiators and executioners showed structural features that make them different from other caspase proteins already described. Evaluation of the genes' tissue expression patterns revealed extremely high expression levels within the gland and gills, where the apoptotic process is highly active due to the clearance of damaged cells. Hemocytes also showed high expression values, probably due to of the role of apoptosis in the defense against pathogens. To understand the mechanisms of caspase gene regulation, hemocytes were treated with UV-light, environmental pollutants and pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs and apoptosis was evaluated by microscopy, flow cytometry and qPCR techniques. Our results suggest that the apoptotic process could be tightly regulated in bivalve mollusks by overexpression/suppression of caspase genes; additionally, there is evidence of caspase-specific responses to pathogens and pollutants. The apoptotic process in mollusks has a similar complexity to that of vertebrates, but presents unique features that may be related to recurrent exposure to environmental changes, pollutants and pathogens imposed by their sedentary nature.

  10. Barium inhibits arsenic-mediated apoptotic cell death in human squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Ichiro; Uemura, Noriyuki; Nizam, Saika; Khalequzzaman, Md; Thang, Nguyen D; Kumasaka, Mayuko Y; Akhand, Anwarul A; Shekhar, Hossain U; Nakajima, Tamie; Kato, Masashi

    2012-06-01

    Our fieldwork showed more than 1 μM (145.1 μg/L) barium in about 3 μM (210.7 μg/L) arsenic-polluted drinking well water (n = 72) in cancer-prone areas in Bangladesh, while the mean concentrations of nine other elements in the water were less than 3 μg/L. The types of cancer include squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). We hypothesized that barium modulates arsenic-mediated biological effects, and we examined the effect of barium (1 μM) on arsenic (3 μM)-mediated apoptotic cell death of human HSC-5 and A431 SCC cells in vitro. Arsenic promoted SCC apoptosis with increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and JNK1/2 and caspase-3 activation (apoptotic pathway). In contrast, arsenic also inhibited SCC apoptosis with increased NF-κB activity and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) expression level and decreased JNK activity (antiapoptotic pathway). These results suggest that arsenic bidirectionally promotes apoptotic and antiapoptotic pathways in SCC cells. Interestingly, barium in the presence of arsenic increased NF-κB activity and XIAP expression and decreased JNK activity without affecting ROS production, resulting in the inhibition of the arsenic-mediated apoptotic pathway. Since the anticancer effect of arsenic is mainly dependent on cancer apoptosis, barium-mediated inhibition of arsenic-induced apoptosis may promote progression of SCC in patients in Bangladesh who keep drinking barium and arsenic-polluted water after the development of cancer. Thus, we newly showed that barium in the presence of arsenic might inhibit arsenic-mediated cancer apoptosis with the modulation of the balance between arsenic-mediated promotive and suppressive apoptotic pathways.

  11. SIRT1 inhibition restores apoptotic sensitivity in p53-mutated human keratinocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbert, Katharine J.; Cook, Anthony L., E-mail: Anthony.Cook@utas.edu.au; Snow, Elizabeth T., E-mail: elizabeth.snow@utas.edu.au

    2014-06-15

    Mutations to the p53 gene are common in UV-exposed keratinocytes and contribute to apoptotic resistance in skin cancer. P53-dependent activity is modulated, in part, by a complex, self-limiting feedback loop imposed by miR-34a-mediated regulation of the lysine deacetylase, SIRT1. Expression of numerous microRNAs is dysregulated in squamous and basal cell carcinomas; however the contribution of specific microRNAs to the pathogenesis of skin cancer remains untested. Through use of RNAi, miRNA target site blocking oligonucleotides and small molecule inhibitors, this study explored the influence of p53 mutational status, SIRT1 activity and miR-34a levels on apoptotic sensitivity in primary (NHEK) and p53-mutated (HaCaT) keratinocyte cell lines. SIRT1 and p53 are overexpressed in p53-mutated keratinocytes, whilst miR-34a levels are 90% less in HaCaT cells. HaCaTs have impaired responses to p53/SIRT1/miR-34a axis manipulation which enhanced survival during exposure to the chemotherapeutic agent, camptothecin. Inhibition of SIRT1 activity in this cell line increased p53 acetylation and doubled camptothecin-induced cell death. Our results demonstrate that p53 mutations increase apoptotic resistance in keratinocytes by interfering with miR-34a-mediated regulation of SIRT1 expression. Thus, SIRT1 inhibitors may have a therapeutic potential for overcoming apoptotic resistance during skin cancer treatment. - Highlights: • Impaired microRNA biogenesis promotes apoptotic resistance in HaCaT keratinocytes. • TP53 mutations suppress miR-34a-mediated regulation of SIRT1 expression. • SIRT1 inhibition increases p53 acetylation in HaCaTs, restoring apoptosis.

  12. The apoptotic effect of simvastatin via the upregulation of BIM in nonsmall cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hwa Young; Kim, In Kyoung; Lee, Hye In; Mo, Jin Young; Yeo, Chang Dong; Kang, Hyeon Hui; Moon, Hwa Sik; Lee, Sang Haak

    2016-01-01

    Statins are known to have pleiotropic effects that induce cell death in certain cancer cells. BIM is a member of the bcl-2 gene family, which promotes apoptotic cell death. This study investigated the hypothesis that simvastatin has pro-apoptotic effects in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mutated lung cancer cell lines via the upregulation of the expression of the BIM protein. The cytotoxic effects of simvastatin on gefitinib-sensitive (HCC827, E716-A750del) and -resistant (H1975, T790M + L858R) nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells were compared. Cell proliferation and expression of apoptosis-related and EGFR downstream signaling proteins were evaluated. Expression of BIM was compared in H1975 cells after treatment with simvastatin or gefitinib. SiRNA-mediated BIM depletion was performed to confirm whether the cytotoxicity of simvastatin was mediated by the expression of BIM. H1975 cells showed significantly reduced viability compared with HCC827 cells after treatment with simvastatin (2 μM) for 48 hours. In simvastatin-treated H1975 cells, expression of pro-apoptotic proteins was increased and the phosphorylation of ERK 1/2 (p-ERK 1/2) was reduced. Expression of BIM was suppressed by gefitinib (1 μM) treatment in H1975 cells, but it was significantly increased by treatment with simvastatin. BIM depletion by siRNA transfection enhanced the viability of H1975 cells that received simvastatin treatment and increased their expression of anti-apoptotic proteins. Simvastatin restored the expression of BIM to induce apoptotic cell death in NSCLC cells harboring an EGFR-resistant mutation. Our study suggests the potential utility of simvastatin as a BIM-targeted treatment for NSCLC.

  13. Antagonism between apoptotic (Bax/Bcl-2) and anti-apoptotic (IAP) signals in human osteoblastic cells under vector-averaged gravity condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Hiroshi; Kumei, Yasuhiro; Morita, Sadao; Shimokawa, Hitoyata; Ohya, Keiichi; Shinomiya, Kenichi

    2003-12-01

    A functional disorder associated with weightlessness is well documented in osteoblasts. The apototic features of this disorder are poorly understood. Harmful stress induces apoptosis in cells via mitochondria and/or Fas. The Bax triggers cytochrome c release from mitochondria, which can be blocked by the Bcl-2. Released cytochrome c then activates the initiator caspase, caspase-9, which can be blocked by the anti-apototic (IAP) family of molecules. The effector caspase, caspase-3, finally exerts DNA fragmentation. We conducted this study to examine the apoptotic effects of vector-averaged gravity on normal human osteoblastic cells. Cell culture flasks were incubated on the clinostat, which generated vector-averaged gravity condition (simulated microgravity) for 12, 24, 48, and 96 hours. Upon termination of clinostat cultures, the cell number and cell viability were assessed. DNA fragmentation was analyzed on the agarose-gel electrophoresis. The mRNA levels for Bax, Bcl-2, XIAP, and caspase-3 genes were analyzed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Twenty-four hours after starting clinostat rotation, the ratios of Bax/Bcl-2 mRNA levels (indicator of apoptosis) were significantly increased to 136% of the 1G static controls. However, the XIAP mRNA levels (anti-apoptotic molecule) were increased concomitantly to 138% of the 1G static controls. Thus, cell proliferation or cell viability was not affected by vector-averaged gravity. DNA fragmentation was not observed in clinostat group as well as in control group. Finally, the caspase-3 mRNA levels were not affected by vector-averaged gravity. Simulated microgravity might modulate some apoptotic signals upstream the mitochondrial pathway.

  14. Potent Antipneumococcal Activity of Gemifloxacin Is Associated with Dual Targeting of Gyrase and Topoisomerase IV, an In Vivo Target Preference for Gyrase, and Enhanced Stabilization of Cleavable Complexes In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, Victoria J.; Ambler, Jane E.; Fisher, L. Mark

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the roles of DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV in determining the susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae to gemifloxacin, a novel fluoroquinolone which is under development as an antipneumococcal drug. Gemifloxacin displayed potent activity against S. pneumoniae 7785 (MIC, 0.06 μg/ml) compared with ciprofloxacin (MIC, 1 to 2 μg/ml). Complementary genetic and biochemical approaches revealed the following. (i) The gemifloxacin MICs for isogenic 7785 mutants bearing either parC or gyrA quinolone resistance mutations were marginally higher than wild type at 0.12 to 0.25 μg/ml, whereas the presence of both mutations increased the MIC to 0.5 to 1 μg/ml. These data suggest that both gyrase and topoisomerase IV contribute significantly as gemifloxacin targets in vivo. (ii) Gemifloxacin selected first-step gyrA mutants of S. pneumoniae 7785 (gemifloxacin MICs, 0.25 μg/ml) encoding Ser-81 to Phe or Tyr, or Glu-85 to Lys mutations. These mutants were cross resistant to sparfloxacin (which targets gyrase) but not to ciprofloxacin (which targets topoisomerase IV). Second-step mutants (gemifloxacin MICs, 1 μg/ml) exhibited an alteration in parC resulting in changes of ParC hot spot Ser-79 to Phe or Tyr. Thus, gyrase appears to be the preferential in vivo target. (iii) Gemifloxacin was at least 10- to 20-fold more effective than ciprofloxacin in stabilizing a cleavable complex (the cytotoxic lesion) with either S. pneumoniae gyrase or topoisomerase IV enzyme in vitro. These data suggest that gemifloxacin is an enhanced affinity fluoroquinolone that acts against gyrase and topoisomerase IV in S. pneumoniae, with gyrase the preferred in vivo target. The marked potency of gemifloxacin against wild type and quinolone-resistant mutants may accrue from greater stabilization of cleavable complexes with the target enzymes. PMID:11036032

  15. Human topoisomerase II-alpha is highly expressed in sinonasal-inverted papilloma, but not in inflammatory polyp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadar, Tuvia; Shvero, Jacob; Yaniv, Eitan; Shvili, Itzhac; Leabu, Mircea; Koren, Rumelia

    2008-01-01

    Sinonasal-inverted papilloma is a benign tumour with a high rate of recurrence, but possible malignant transformation. Therefore, investigation of predisposition to malignant transformation of sinonasal-inverted papilloma gives clinicians the opportunity for adequate treatment. Topoisomerase II-alpha (topoII-alpha) and Ki67 are markers of cell proliferation in both normal and neoplastic tissues and its level o expression could be used as a predictive parameter. Our goal was to investigate by immunochemistry the expression level of topoII-in inverted papilloma, inflammatory nasal polyp and normal sinonasal epithelium and to compare it with expression level of Ki67. TopoI alpha nuclear immunostaining showed a differential positivity in the investigated cases. The topoII-alpha index was 30.6 +/- 12.8 in inverte papilloma, 10.7 +/- 6.6 in the adjacent epithelium of inverted papilloma, but only 2.3 +/- 2.0 in the normal sinonasal epithelium. The differences in topoII-alpha expression between inverted papilloma and normal sinonasal epithelia were statistically significant. In inflammatory nasal polyp group, topoII-alpha index was 2.4 +/- 2.1, and the difference in the topoII-alpha index between inverted papilloma and inflammatory polyp group was also statistically significant. Nuclear immunostaining for Ki67 followed a similar variation. The Ki67 index was 50.0 +/- 20. in inverted papilloma, 9.0 +/- 6.6 in the adjacent epithelium of inverted papilloma and 2.4 +/- 0.9 in normal sinonasal epithelium. The differences in Ki67 expression between inverted papilloma and either adjacent or normal sinonasal epithelia were statistically significant. Significant correlation coefficients were found between topoII-alpha and epithelial thickness (r = 0.70, P > 0.0001), and between Ki67 index and epithelial thickness (r = 0.71, P> 0.0001). In the inflammatory nasal polyp group Ki67 index was 5.9 +/- 3.4. The difference in th Ki67 index between inverted papilloma and inflammatory nasal

  16. Accumulation of mutations in DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV genes contributes to fluoroquinolone resistance in Vibrio cholerae O139 strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanyan; Yu, Li; Li, Jie; Zhang, Lijuan; Tong, Ying; Kan, Biao

    2013-07-01

    High resistance rates to nalidixic acid (NAL) in Vibrio cholerae serogroup O139 strains have been found, and ciprofloxacin (CIP) resistance is also observed. In this study, mutations within the quinolone-resistance determining regions (QRDRs) of DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV from NAL-resistant O139 strains were analysed. The predominant mutation profile was S83I in GyrA in combination with S85L in ParC. In addition, the combination substitutions of D87N in GyrA and D420N in ParE in combination with S83I in GyrA and S85L in ParC as well as D87N in GyrA and P439S in ParE in combination with S83I in GyrA and S85L in ParC were found in the CIP-resistant strains. A series of site-directed mutants comprising D87 in GyrA, D420 in ParE and P439 in ParE were constructed from a wild-type V. cholerae O139 strain carrying the common mutations S83I in GyrA and S85L in ParC. Introduction of the mutation D87N in GyrA increased the CIP minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the mutant strain by nearly 4-fold compared with the initial strain. The second introduction of D420N in ParE further significantly increased the CIP MIC to ca. 23-fold compared with the initial strain. A second introduction of P439S in ParE also increased the CIP MIC by 17-fold. Therefore, it is concluded that the emergence of D87N in GyrA and D420N or P439S in ParE dramatically induces resistance to fluoroquinolones in V. cholerae O139, and the accumulation of multiple mutations in the QRDRs confers significant resistance to fluoroquinolones in V. cholerae. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  17. Copper induced immunotoxicity promote differential apoptotic pathways in spleen and thymus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitra, Soham; Keswani, Tarun; Ghosh, Nabanita; Goswami, Suranjana; Datta, Anuradha; Das, Salomie; Maity, Subhajit; Bhattacharyya, Arindam

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Copper-induced ROS generation and mitochondrial trans-membrane potential changes result in different consequences in spleen and thymus. ► Inflammation appeared in both the spleen and thymus after to copper treatment. ► Apoptosis in the spleen appears to follow a p53-independent pathway. ► Apoptosis in the thymus appears to follow a p53-dependent intrinsic and extrinsic pathway. ► In both the spleen and thymus, the CD4+ T cell population decreased and CD8+ T cell population increased after copper treatment. - Abstract: Inorganic copper, such as that in drinking water and copper supplements, largely bypasses the liver and enters the free copper pool of the blood directly and that promote immunosuppression. Nevertheless, the signaling pathways underlying copper-induced immune cell death remains largely unclear. According to our previous in vivo report, to evaluate the further details of the apoptotic mechanism, we have investigated how copper regulates apoptotic pathways in spleen and thymus. We have analyzed different protein expression by western blotting and immunohistochemistry and mRNA expression by RT-PCR and gel electrophoresis. We also have measured mitochondrial trans-membrane potential, ROS and CD4 + and CD8 + population by flow cytometry. Sub lethal doses of copper in spleen and thymus of in vivo Swiss albino mice promote different apoptotic pathways. In case of spleen, ROS generation and mitochondrial trans-membrane potential changes promotes intrinsic pathway of apoptosis that was p53 independent, ultimately leads to decrease in CD4 + T cell population and increase in CD8 + T cell population. However in case of thymus, ROS generation and mitochondrial trans-membrane potential changes lead to death receptor that regulate extrinsic and intrinsic pathways of apoptosis and the apoptotic mechanism which was p53 dependent. Due to copper treatment, thymic CD4 + T cell population decreased and CD8 + T cell population was increased or

  18. Ginkgo biloba and Angelica archangelica bring back an impartial hepatic apoptotic to anti-apoptotic protein ratio after exposure to technetium 99mTc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raafat, Bassem M; Saleh, Ahmed; Shafaa, Medhat W; Khedr, Mahmoud; Ghafaar, Amany A

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to study the effect of ionizing radiation on apoptosis-related protein concentrations as well as the radio-protective role of Ginkgo biloba and Angelica archangelica. The experiments were performed on 68 adult Wistar rats weighing 175 g (±10 g). Animals were subdivided into control group in which the animals received neither the protector nor the isotopes. The second group represents the animals that received 1 mCi of (99m)Tc only. The third group represents the animals that received A. archangelica for 7 days. The fourth group represents the animals that received G. biloba for 7 days. The fifth group represents the animals that received 1 mCi of (99m)Tc once after receiving A. archangelica for 7 days. The sixth group represents the animals that received mCi of (99m)Tc once after receiving G. biloba for 7 days. Radiation was administered as intravenous injection by 1 mCi of (99m)Tc with the legend methoxyisobutylisonitrile for 24 h. The concentration of p53, Bcl2 and malondialdehyde in liver as well as histopathological examination of liver cells were carried out. Results showed that apoptotic to anti-apoptotic protein ratio significantly (p archangelica and G. biloba in a dose based on the animal body weight. Electron microscope photographing supported this finding. It was concluded that both antioxidants can be used as radio-protective agents in cases of ionizing radiation exposure.

  19. Leptin suppresses non-apoptotic cell death in ischemic rat cardiomyocytes by reduction of iPLA{sub 2} activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takatani-Nakase, Tomoka, E-mail: nakase@mukogawa-u.ac.jp; Takahashi, Koichi, E-mail: koichi@mukogawa-u.ac.jp

    2015-07-17

    Caspase-independent, non-apoptotic cell death is an important therapeutic target in myocardial ischemia. Leptin, an adipose-derived hormone, is known to exhibit cytoprotective effects on the ischemic heart, but the mechanisms are poorly understood. In this research, we found that pretreatment of leptin strongly suppressed ischemic-augmented nuclear shrinkage and non-apoptotic cell death on cardiomyocytes. Leptin was also shown to significantly inhibit the activity of iPLA{sub 2}, which is considered to play crucial roles in non-apoptotic cell death, resulting in effective prevention of ischemia-induced myocyte death. These findings provide the first evidence of a protective mechanism of leptin against ischemia-induced non-apoptotic cardiomyocyte death. - Highlights: • Myocardial ischemia-model induces in caspase-independent, non-apoptotic cell death. • Leptin strongly inhibits ischemic-augmented non-apoptotic cell death. • Leptin reduces iPLA{sub 2} activity, leading to avoidance of non-apoptotic cell death.

  20. P53, MAPK, topoisomerase II alpha and Ki67 immunohistochemical expression and KRAS/BRAF mutation in ovarian serous carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundov Dinka

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We investigated the immunohistochemical expression of p53, MAPK, topoisomerase II alpha (topoII alpha and Ki67 in ovarian serous carcinomas (OSCs along with mutational analysis for KRAS and BRAF. Methods Eighty one cases of OSCs were reviewed and examined immunohistochemically using antibodies against p53, MAPK, topoII alpha and Ki67. Staining was evaluated as a percentage of immunopositive cells with cut-off levels at 10% for p53 and topoII alpha, and 5% for MAPK. The Ki67 immunoexpression was assessed by means of Olympus Image Analysis System as a percentage of immunopositive cells in 1000 tumor cells. KRAS and BRAF mutational analysis was performed on 73 available microdissected samples. Results Of 81 cases of OSCs 13.6% were of low-grade and 86.4% were of high-grade morphology. In the high-grade group there was a significantly higher immunoexpression of p53 (P P = 0.001, with Ki67 median 56.5 vs. 19 in low-grade group (P P = 0.003. MAPK positive immunostaining was detected in 63.6% of low-grade vs. 17.1% of high-grade OSCs. The frequency of KRAS mutation was significantly higher in low-grade as compared to high-grade group (P = 0.006. None of the samples had BRAF mutation. In addition, we detected positive MAPK immunoexpression in 13/59 samples with wild-type KRAS, suggesting that activation of MAPK pathway is not ultimately related either to KRAS or BRAF mutation. Seven morphologically high-grade samples (11.7% showed both KRAS mutation and p53 immunopositivity. Conclusions Although this study is limited by its humble number of low-grade samples, our data fit the proposed dualistic pathway of ovarian carcinogenesis. Mutational analysis for KRAS and BRAF discloses some possible interactions between different tumorigenic pathways of low- and high-grade carcinomas. Immunohistochemical staining for MAPK was not sufficiently sensitive, nor specific, to precisely predict the KRAS mutation. However, it appears

  1. The prototypic tissue pentraxin PTX3, in contrast to the short pentraxin serum amyloid P, inhibits phagocytosis of late apoptotic neutrophils by macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rossum, AP; Fazzini, F; Limburg, PC; Manfredi, AA; Rovere-Querini, P; Mantovani, A; Kallenberg, CGM

    Objective. Phagocytosis of apoptotic cells can be facilitated by complement components and short pentraxins, such as serum amyloid P (SAP). In contrast, the long pentraxin PTX3 was shown to inhibit phagocytosis of apoptotic Jurkat cells by dendritic cells and to bind late apoptotic polymorphonuclear

  2. Assessment of topoisomerase II-alpha gene status by dual color chromogenic in situ hybridization in a set of Iraqi patients with invasive breast carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasha Abd Alraouf Neama

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The human epidermal growth factor receptor 2(HER2 proto-oncogene is overexpressed or amplified in approximately 15%–25% of invasive breast cancers. Approximately 35% of HER2-amplified breast cancers have coamplification of the topoisomerase II-alpha (TOP2A gene encoding an enzyme that is a major target of anthracyclines. Hence, the determination of genetic alteration (amplification or deletion of both genes is considered as an important predictive factor that determines the response of breast cancer patients to treatment. The aims of this study are to determinate TOP2A status gene amplification in a set of Iraqi patients with breast cancer that have had an equivocal (2+ and positive HER2/neu by immunohistochemistry (IHC and to compare the results with estrogen receptor (ER and progesterone receptor (PR and HER2/neu status. Patients and Methods: A cross-sectional prospective study done on 53 patients with invasive breast carcinoma. Twenty-six out of total 53 cases were positive HER2/neu (3+, the remaining 27 equivocal HER2-IHC (2+ cases reanalyzed using dual-color chromogenic in situ hybridization (ZytoVision probe kit for further identification of HER2/neu gene amplification. Using chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH, TOP2A gene status determination was done for all cases. Results: There is a direct significant correlation between TOP2A gene amplification and HER2/neu positivity, P < 0.05 in that 15 (39.4% out of 38 positive HER2/neu cases were associated with topoisomerase gene amplification. Regarding relation of topoisomerase gene to hormone receptor status (ER and PR, there was a significant negative relationship between the gene and ER receptor status. The higher level of gene amplification was noticed in ER and PR negative cases in about 13 (43.3% and 14 (48.2% for ER and PR, respectively. Conclusion: TOP2A gene status has a significantly positive correlation with HER2/neu status while it has a significantly negative

  3. The apoptotic effects of escin in the H-Ras transformed 5RP7 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güney, G; Kutlu, H M; Işcan, A

    2013-06-01

    Extracts of Aesculus hippocastanum L. (horse chestnut) seed have been used in the treatment of chronic venous insufficiency, edema and hemorrhoids. Most of the beneficial effects of horse chestnut are attributed to its principal component β-escin or escin. We have evaluated the cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of escin in the H-Ras 5RP7 cell line by analyzing cell growth inhibition, apoptosis and caspase-3 dependent activity. We have also shown structural and ultrastructural changes in these cell using confocal and transmission electron microscopy. The results indicated that escin has significant inhibitory effects on cell growth and the percentage of apoptotic cells increased after treatment with escin, and the micrographs confirmed that escin damaged these cells and induced apoptosis. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. The anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family are attractive tumor-associated antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Straten, Per thor; Andersen, Mads Hald; Andersen, Mads Hald

    2010-01-01

    Anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family (Bcl-2, Bcl-X(L) and Mcl-2) are pivotal regulators of apoptotic cell death. They are all highly overexpressed in cancers of different origin in which they enhance the survival of the cancer cells. Consequently, they represent prime candidates for anti......-cancer therapy and specific antisense oligonucleotides or small molecule inhibitors have shown broad anti-cancer activities in pre-clinical models and are currently tested in clinical trials. In addition, immune-mediated tumor destruction is emerging as an interesting modality to treat cancer patients. Notably......, spontaneous cellular immune responses against the Bcl-2 family proteins have been identified as frequent features in cancer patients underscoring that these proteins are natural targets for the immune system. Thus, Bcl-2 family may serve as an important and widely applicable target for anti...

  5. Cell-Centric View of Apoptosis and Apoptotic Cell Death-Inducing Antitumoral Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dolores Boyano

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Programmed cell death and especially apoptotic cell death, occurs under physiological conditions and is also desirable under pathological circumstances. However, the more we learn about cellular signaling cascades, the less plausible it becomes to find restricted and well-limited signaling pathways. In this context, an extensive description of pathway-connections is necessary in order to point out the main regulatory molecules as well as to select the most appropriate therapeutic targets. On the other hand, irregularities in programmed cell death pathways often lead to tumor development and cancer-related mortality is projected to continue increasing despite the effort to develop more active and selective antitumoral compounds. In fact, tumor cell plasticity represents a major challenge in chemotherapy and improvement on anticancer therapies seems to rely on appropriate drug combinations. An overview of the current status regarding apoptotic pathways as well as available chemotherapeutic compounds provides a new perspective of possible future anticancer strategies.

  6. Modulation of Apoptotic Pathways by Human Papillomaviruses (HPV: Mechanisms and Implications for Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Hsiang Yuan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The ability of the host to trigger apoptosis in infected cells is perhaps the most powerful tool by which viruses can be cleared from the host organism. To avoid elimination by this mechanism, human papillomaviruses (HPV have developed several mechanisms that enable the cells they infect to elude both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptosis. In this manuscript, we review the current literature regarding how HPV-infected cells avoid apoptosis and the molecular mechanisms involved in these events. In particular, we will discuss the modifications in intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways caused by proteins encoded by HPV early genes. Many of the current efforts regarding anti-cancer drug development are focused on directing tumor cells to undergo apoptosis. However, the ability of HPV-infected cells to resist apoptotic signals renders such therapies ineffective. Possible mechanisms for overcoming the resistance of HPV-infected tumor cells to anticancer drugs will be discussed.

  7. Photoluminescent graphene quantum dots for in vivo imaging of apoptotic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Prathik; Periasamy, Arun Prakash; Lin, Chiu-Ya; Her, Guor-Mour; Chiu, Wei-Jane; Li, Chi-Lin; Shu, Chia-Lun; Huang, Chih-Ching; Liang, Chi-Te; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis (programmed cell death) is linked to many incurable neurodegenerative, cardiovascular and cancer causing diseases. Numerous methods have been developed for imaging apoptotic cells in vitro; however, there are few methods available for imaging apoptotic cells in live animals (in vivo). Here we report a novel method utilizing the unique photoluminescence properties of plant leaf-derived graphene quantum dots (GQDs) modified with annexin V antibody (AbA5) to form (AbA5)-modified GQDs (AbA5-GQDs) enabling us to label apoptotic cells in live zebrafish (Danio rerio). The key is that zebrafish shows bright red photoluminescence in the presence of apoptotic cells. The toxicity of the GQDs has also been investigated with the GQDs exhibiting high biocompatibility as they were excreted from the zebrafish's body without affecting its growth significantly at a concentration lower than 2 mg mL-1 over a period of 4 to 72 hour post fertilization. The GQDs have further been used to image human breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MCF-7 cells), human cervical cancer cell line (HeLa cells), and normal human mammary epithelial cell line (MCF-10A). These results are indispensable to further the advance of graphene-based nanomaterials for biomedical applications.Apoptosis (programmed cell death) is linked to many incurable neurodegenerative, cardiovascular and cancer causing diseases. Numerous methods have been developed for imaging apoptotic cells in vitro; however, there are few methods available for imaging apoptotic cells in live animals (in vivo). Here we report a novel method utilizing the unique photoluminescence properties of plant leaf-derived graphene quantum dots (GQDs) modified with annexin V antibody (AbA5) to form (AbA5)-modified GQDs (AbA5-GQDs) enabling us to label apoptotic cells in live zebrafish (Danio rerio). The key is that zebrafish shows bright red photoluminescence in the presence of apoptotic cells. The toxicity of the GQDs has also been investigated with

  8. Caloric restriction suppresses apoptotic cell death in the mammalian cochlea and leads to prevention of presbycusis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Someya, Shinichi; Yamasoba, Tatsuya; Weindruch, Richard; Prolla, Tomas A; Tanokura, Masaru

    2007-10-01

    Presbycusis is characterized by an age-related progressive decline of auditory function, and arises mainly from the degeneration of hair cells or spiral ganglion (SG) cells in the cochlea. Here we show that caloric restriction suppresses apoptotic cell death in the mouse cochlea and prevents late onset of presbycusis. Calorie restricted (CR) mice, which maintained body weight at the same level as that of young control (YC) mice, retained normal hearing and showed no cochlear degeneration. CR mice also showed a significant reduction in the number of TUNEL-positive cells and cleaved caspase-3-positive cells relative to middle-age control (MC) mice. Microarray analysis revealed that CR down-regulated the expression of 24 apoptotic genes, including Bak and Bim. Taken together, our findings suggest that loss of critical cells through apoptosis is an important mechanism of presbycusis in mammals, and that CR can retard this process by suppressing apoptosis in the inner ear tissue.

  9. Proinflammatory cytokines activate the intrinsic apoptotic pathway in beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunnet, Lars G; Aikin, Reid; Tonnesen, Morten F

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Proinflammatory cytokines are cytotoxic to beta-cells and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes and islet graft failure. The importance of the intrinsic mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in cytokine-induced beta-cell death is unclear. Here, cytokine activation...... of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway and the role of the two proapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins, Bad and Bax, were examined in beta-cells. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Human and rat islets and INS-1 cells were exposed to a combination of proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1beta, interferon-gamma, and/or tumor necrosis...... to investigate the role of Bad and Bax activation, respectively. RESULTS: We found that proinflammatory cytokines induced calcineurin-dependent dephosphorylation of Bad Ser136, mitochondrial stress, cytochrome c release, activation of caspase-9 and -3, and DNA fragmentation. Inhibition of Bad Ser136...

  10. Deficiency in the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway reveals the toxic potential of autophagy under ER stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, Shane; Saveljeva, Svetlana; Logue, Susan E; Pakos-Zebrucka, Karolina; Gupta, Sanjeev; Vandenabeele, Peter; Bertrand, Mathieu J M; Samali, Afshin

    2014-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced cell death is normally associated with activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, which is characterized by CYCS (cytochrome c, somatic) release, apoptosome formation, and caspase activation, resulting in cell death. In this study, we demonstrate that under conditions of ER stress cells devoid of CASP9/caspase-9 or BAX and BAK1, and therefore defective in the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, still undergo a delayed form of cell death associated with the activation of caspases, therefore revealing the existence of an alternative stress-induced caspase activation pathway. We identified CASP8/caspase-8 as the apical protease in this caspase cascade, and found that knockdown of either of the key autophagic genes, ATG5 or ATG7, impacted on CASP8 activation and cell death induction, highlighting the crucial role of autophagy in the activation of this novel ER stress-induced death pathway. In line with this, we identified a protein complex composed of ATG5, FADD, and pro-CASP8 whose assembly coincides with caspase activation and cell death induction. Together, our results reveal the toxic potential of autophagy in cells undergoing ER stress that are defective in the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, and suggest a model in which the autophagosome functions as a platform facilitating pro-CASP8 activation. Chemoresistance, a common problem in the treatment of cancer, is frequently caused by the downregulation of key mitochondrial death effector proteins. Alternate stress-induced apoptotic pathways, such as the one described here, may become of particular relevance for tackling the problem of chemoresistance in cancer cells.

  11. A selective procedure for DNA extraction from apoptotic cells applicable for gel electrophoresis and flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, J; Traganos, F; Darzynkiewicz, Z

    1994-05-01

    In cells undergoing apoptosis (programmed cell death), a fraction of nuclear DNA is fragmented to the size equivalent of DNA in mono- or oligonucleosomes. When such DNA is analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis it generates the characteristic "ladder" pattern of discontinuous DNA fragments. Such a pattern of DNA degradation generally serves as a marker of the apoptotic mode of cell death. We developed a simple, rapid, and selective procedure for extraction of the degraded, low-molecular-weight DNA from apoptotic cells. The cells are prefixed in 70% ethanol, DNA is extracted with 0.2 M phosphate-citrate buffer at pH 7.8, and the extract is sequentially treated with RNase A and proteinase K and then subjected to electrophoresis. The ladder pattern was detected from DNA extracted from 1-2 x 10(6) HL-60 cells, of which as few as 8% were apoptotic, by flow cytometric criteria, as well as from blood and bone marrow samples from leukemic patients undergoing chemotherapy. The method is rapid and uses nontoxic reagents (no phenol, chloroform, etc.). This approach permits the analysis of DNA extracted from the very same cell population that is subjected to measurements by flow cytometry to estimate DNA ploidy, the cell cycle distribution of nonapoptotic cells, the percentage of apoptotic cells, or other parameters. Furthermore, the cells may be stored in 70% ethanol for at least several weeks before analysis without any significant DNA degradation. Treatment with ethanol also inactivates several pathogens, thereby increasing the safety of sample handling. The method is applicable to clinical samples, which can be fixed in ethanol and then stored and/or safety transported prior to analysis.

  12. Investigating The Anti-apoptotic Effects of Shigella Flexneri Infection In Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-13

    Nakamura, Y . Nakamura, and H. Arakawa. 2002. p53AIP1 regulates the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Cancer Res. 62:2883-2889. 48. Micheau, O., S. Lens...hydrogen peroxide; protects from CD95 -induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells IER3 protection of cells from Fas- or TNF-alpha-induced apoptosis; involved...Glutathione peroxidase functions in the detoxification of hydrogen peroxide; protects from CD95 -induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells GSTA1

  13. Early radiation effects in highly apoptotic murine lymphoma xenografts monitored by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Hideyuki; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Murata, Osamu; Kitamoto, Yoshizumi; Saito, Yoshihiro; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Akimoto, Tetsuo; Takahashi, Takeo; Nasu, Sachiko; Niibe, Hideo

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectra ( 31 P-MRS) were obtained from highly apoptotic murine lymphoma xenografts before and up to 24 hr following graded doses of radiation ranging from 2 to 30 Gy. Radiation-induced apoptosis was also estimated up to 24 hr by scoring apoptotic cells in tumor tissue. Methods and Materials: Highly apoptotic murine lymphoma cells, EL4, were subcutaneously transplanted into C57/BL mice. At 7 days after transplantation, radiation was given to the tumor with a single dose at 3, 10, and 30 Gy. The β-ATP/Pi, PME/Pi, and β-ATP/PME values were calculated from the peak area of each spectrum. Radiation-induced apoptosis was scored with counting apoptotic cells on hematoxylin and eosin stained specimens (%apoptosis). Results: The values of % apoptosis 4, 8, and 24 hr after radiation were 21.8, 19.6, and 4.6% at 3 Gy, 35.1, 25.6, and 14.8% at 10 Gy, 38.4, 38.0, and 30.6% at 30 Gy, respectively (cf. 4.4% in control). There was no correlation between early change in β-ATP/Pi and % apoptosis at 4 hr after radiation when most of the apoptosis occurred. An early decrease in PME/Pi was observed at 4 hr after radiation dose at 30 Gy. For each dose, the values of β-ATP/Pi 24 hr after radiation were inversely related to radiation dose. Conclusion: The increase in β-ATP/Pi observed by 31 P-MRS was linked to the degree of histological recovery from radiation-induced apoptosis

  14. Targeting multiple pro-apoptotic signaling pathways with curcumin in prostate cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariela Rivera

    Full Text Available Curcumin, an extract from the turmeric rhizome (Curcuma longa, is known to exhibit anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, chemopreventive and antitumoral activities against aggressive and recurrent cancers. Accumulative data indicate that curcumin may induce cancer cell death. However, the detailed mechanism underlying its pro-apoptotic and anti-cancer effects remains to be elucidated. In the present study, we examined the signaling pathways triggered by curcumin, specifically, the exact molecular mechanisms of curcumin-induced apoptosis in highly metastatic human prostate cancer cells. The effect of curcumin was evaluated using for the first time in prostate cancer, a gel-free shotgun quantitative proteomic analysis coupled with Tandem Mass Tag isobaric labeling-based-signaling networks. Results were confirmed at the gene expression level by qRT-PCR and at the protein expression level by western blot and flow cytometry. Our findings revealed that curcumin induced an Endoplasmic Reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis in PC3. The mechanisms by which curcumin promoted cell death in these cells were associated with cell cycle arrest, increased reactive oxygen species, autophagy and the Unfolded Protein Response. Furthermore, the upregulation of ER stress was measured using key indicators of ER stress: Glucose-Regulated Protein 78, Inositol-Requiring Enzyme 1 alpha, Protein Disulfide isomerase and Calreticulin. Chronic ER stress induction was concomitant with the upregulation of pro-apoptotic markers (caspases 3,9,12 and Poly (ADP-ribose polymerase. The downregulated proteins include anti-apoptotic and anti-tumor markers, supporting their curcumin-induced pro-apoptotic role in prostate cancer cells. Taken together, these data suggest that curcumin may serve as a promising anticancer agent by inducing a chronic ER stress mediated cell death and activation of cell cycle arrest, UPR, autophagy and oxidative stress responses.

  15. Lentinan diminishes apoptotic bodies in the ileal crypts associated with S-1 administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suga, Yasuyo; Takehana, Kenji

    2017-09-01

    S-1 is an oral agent containing tegafur (a prodrug of 5-fluorouracil) that is used to treat various cancers, but adverse effects are frequent. Two pilot clinical studies have suggested that lentinan (LNT; β-1,3-glucan) may reduce the incidence of adverse effects caused by S-1 therapy. In this study, we established a murine model for assessment of gastrointestinal toxicity associated with S-1 and studied the effect of LNT. S-1 was administered orally to BALB/c mice at the effective dose (8.3mg/kg, as tegafur equivalent) once daily (5days per week) for 3weeks. Stool consistency and intestinal specimens were examined. We investigated the effect of combined intravenous administration of LNT at 0.1mg, which is an effective dose in murine tumor models. We also investigated the effect of a single administration of S-1. During long-term administration of S-1, some mice had loose stools and an increase in apoptotic bodies was observed in the ileal crypts. An increase in apoptotic bodies was also noted after a single administration of S-1 (15mg/kg). Prior or concomitant administration of LNT inhibited the increase in apoptotic bodies in both settings. Administration of LNT also increased the accumulation of CD11b + TIM-4 + cells in the ileum, while depletion of these cells by liposomal clodronate diminished the inhibitory effect of LNT on S-1 toxicity. Combined administration of LNT with S-1 led to a decrease in apoptotic bodies in the ileal crypts, possibly because LNT promoted phagocytosis of damaged cells by CD11b + TIM-4 + cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Distinct RNA profiles in subpopulations of extracellular vesicles: apoptotic bodies, microvesicles and exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescitelli, Rossella; Lässer, Cecilia; Szabó, Tamas G; Kittel, Agnes; Eldh, Maria; Dianzani, Irma; Buzás, Edit I; Lötvall, Jan

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an exponential increase in the number of studies aiming to understand the biology of exosomes, as well as other extracellular vesicles. However, classification of membrane vesicles and the appropriate protocols for their isolation are still under intense discussion and investigation. When isolating vesicles, it is crucial to use systems that are able to separate them, to avoid cross-contamination. EVS RELEASED FROM THREE DIFFERENT KINDS OF CELL LINES: HMC-1, TF-1 and BV-2 were isolated using two centrifugation-based protocols. In protocol 1, apoptotic bodies were collected at 2,000×g, followed by filtering the supernatant through 0.8 µm pores and pelleting of microvesicles at 12,200×g. In protocol 2, apoptotic bodies and microvesicles were collected together at 16,500×g, followed by filtering of the supernatant through 0.2 µm pores and pelleting of exosomes at 120,000×g. Extracellular vesicles were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy, flow cytometry and the RNA profiles were investigated using a Bioanalyzer(®). RNA profiles showed that ribosomal RNA was primary detectable in apoptotic bodies and smaller RNAs without prominent ribosomal RNA peaks in exosomes. In contrast, microvesicles contained little or no RNA except for microvesicles collected from TF-1 cell cultures. The different vesicle pellets showed highly different distribution of size, shape and electron density with typical apoptotic body, microvesicle and exosome characteristics when analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. Flow cytometry revealed the presence of CD63 and CD81 in all vesicles investigated, as well as CD9 except in the TF-1-derived vesicles, as these cells do not express CD9. Our results demonstrate that centrifugation-based protocols are simple and fast systems to distinguish subpopulations of extracellular vesicles. Different vesicles show different RNA profiles and morphological characteristics, but they are indistinguishable using

  17. Targeting multiple pro-apoptotic signaling pathways with curcumin in prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Mariela; Ramos, Yanilda; Rodríguez-Valentín, Madeline; López-Acevedo, Sheila; Cubano, Luis A.; Zou, Jin; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Guangdi

    2017-01-01

    Curcumin, an extract from the turmeric rhizome (Curcuma longa), is known to exhibit anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, chemopreventive and antitumoral activities against aggressive and recurrent cancers. Accumulative data indicate that curcumin may induce cancer cell death. However, the detailed mechanism underlying its pro-apoptotic and anti-cancer effects remains to be elucidated. In the present study, we examined the signaling pathways triggered by curcumin, specifically, the exact molecular mechanisms of curcumin-induced apoptosis in highly metastatic human prostate cancer cells. The effect of curcumin was evaluated using for the first time in prostate cancer, a gel-free shotgun quantitative proteomic analysis coupled with Tandem Mass Tag isobaric labeling-based-signaling networks. Results were confirmed at the gene expression level by qRT-PCR and at the protein expression level by western blot and flow cytometry. Our findings revealed that curcumin induced an Endoplasmic Reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis in PC3. The mechanisms by which curcumin promoted cell death in these cells were associated with cell cycle arrest, increased reactive oxygen species, autophagy and the Unfolded Protein Response. Furthermore, the upregulation of ER stress was measured using key indicators of ER stress: Glucose-Regulated Protein 78, Inositol-Requiring Enzyme 1 alpha, Protein Disulfide isomerase and Calreticulin. Chronic ER stress induction was concomitant with the upregulation of pro-apoptotic markers (caspases 3,9,12) and Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase. The downregulated proteins include anti-apoptotic and anti-tumor markers, supporting their curcumin-induced pro-apoptotic role in prostate cancer cells. Taken together, these data suggest that curcumin may serve as a promising anticancer agent by inducing a chronic ER stress mediated cell death and activation of cell cycle arrest, UPR, autophagy and oxidative stress responses. PMID:28628644

  18. Reemergence of apoptotic cells between fractionated doses in irradiated murine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyn, R.E.; Hunter, N.R.; Milas, L.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to follow up our previous studies on the development of apoptosis in irradiated murine tumors by testing whether an apoptotic subpopulation of cells reemerges between fractionated exposures. Mice bearing a murine ovarian carcinoma, OCa-I, were treated in vivo with two fractionation protocols: two doses of 12.5 Gy separated by various times out to 5 days and multiple daily fractions of 2.5 Gy. Animals were killed 4 h after the last dose in each protocol, and the percent apoptosis was scored from stained histological sections made from the irradiated tumors according to the specific features characteristic of this mode of cell death. The 12.5+12.5 Gy protocol yielded a net total percent apoptosis of about 45% when the two doses were separated by 5 days (total dose = 25 Gy), whereas the 2.5 Gy per day protocol yielded about 50% net apoptotic cells when given for 5 days (total dose = 12.5 Gy). These values are to be compared to the value of 36% apoptotic cells that is yielded by large single doses (> 25 Gy). Thus, these results indicate that an apoptotic subpopulation of cells reemerged between the fractions in both protocols, but the kinetics appeared to be delayed in the 12.5+12.5 Gy vs. the multiple 2.5 Gy protocol. This reemergence of cells with the propensity for radiation-induced apoptosis between fractionated exposures is consistent with a role for this mode of cell death in the response of tumors to radiotherapy and may represent the priming of a new subpopulation of tumor cells for apoptosis as part of normal tumor homeostasis to counterbalance cell division. 25 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  19. Parkin Promotes Degradation of the Mitochondrial Pro-Apoptotic ARTS Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemeny, Stav; Dery, Dikla; Loboda, Yelena; Rovner, Marshall; Lev, Tali; Zuri, Dotan; Finberg, John P. M.; Larisch, Sarit

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is associated with excessive cell death causing selective loss of dopaminergic neurons. Dysfunction of the Ubiquitin Proteasome System (UPS) is associated with the pathophysiology of PD. Mutations in Parkin which impair its E3-ligase activity play a major role in the pathogenesis of inherited PD. ARTS (Sept4_i2) is a mitochondrial protein, which initiates caspase activation upstream of cytochrome c release in the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Here we show that Parkin serves as an E3-ubiquitin ligase to restrict the levels of ARTS through UPS-mediated degradation. Though Parkin binds equally to ARTS and Sept4_i1 (H5/PNUTL2), the non-apoptotic splice variant of Sept4, Parkin ubiquitinates and degrades only ARTS. Thus, the effect of Parkin on ARTS is specific and probably related to its pro-apoptotic function. High levels of ARTS are sufficient to promote apoptosis in cultured neuronal cells, and rat brains treated with 6-OHDA reveal high levels of ARTS. However, over-expression of Parkin can protect cells from ARTS-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, Parkin loss-of-function experiments reveal that reduction of Parkin causes increased levels of ARTS and apoptosis. We propose that in brain cells in which the E3-ligase activity of Parkin is compromised, ARTS levels increase and facilitate apoptosis. Thus, ARTS is a novel substrate of Parkin. These observations link Parkin directly to a pro-apoptotic protein and reveal a novel connection between Parkin, apoptosis, and PD. PMID:22792159

  20. Acrylamide-derived cytotoxic, anti-proliferative, and apoptotic effects on A549 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacar, S; Vejselova, D; Kutlu, H M; Sahinturk, V

    2017-01-01

    Acrylamide is a very common compound even reaching up to our daily foods. It has been studied in a wealth of cell lines on which it proved to have various toxic effects. Among these cell lines, human lung adenocarcinoma cell line (A549) is one of that on which acrylamide's toxicity has not been studied well yet. We intended to determine the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC 50 ) dose of acrylamide and to investigate its cytotoxic, anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects on A549 cells. We determined the IC 50 dose by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Then, the mode of cell death was evaluated by flow cytometry using Annexin-V fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)/propidium iodide (PI) staining. Next, we performed transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and confocal microscopy analyses for morphological alterations and apoptotic indices. According to the MTT assay results, A549 cell viability decreases proportionally with increasing acrylamide concentrations and IC 50 for A549 was 4.6 mM for 24 h. Annexin-V FITC/PI assay results indicated that acrylamide induces apoptosis in 64% of the A549 cells. TEM and confocal microscopy analyses showed nuclear condensations, fragmentations, cytoskeleton laceration, and membrane blebbing, which are morphological characteristics of apoptosis. Our research suggests that acrylamide causes cytotoxic, anti-proliferative, and apoptotic effects on A549 cells at 4.6 mM IC 50 dose in 24 h.

  1. Extracellular Vesicles Arising from Apoptotic Cells in Tumors: Roles in Cancer Pathogenesis and Potential Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Lynch

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available It is known that apoptotic cells can have diverse effects on the tumor microenvironment. Emerging evidence indicates that, despite its renowned role in tumor suppression, apoptosis may also promote oncogenic evolution or posttherapeutic relapse through multiple mechanisms. These include immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory, and trophic environmental responses to apoptosis, which drive tumor progression. Our group has introduced the term “onco-regenerative niche (ORN” to describe a conceptual network of conserved cell death-driven tissue repair and regeneration mechanisms that are hijacked in cancer. We propose that, among the key elements of the ORN are extracellular vesicles (EVs, notably those derived from apoptotic tumor cells. EVs are membrane-delimited subcellular particles, which contain multiple classes of bioactive molecules including markers of the cell from which they are derived. EVs are implicated in an increasing number of physiological and pathological contexts as mediators of local and systemic intercellular communication and detection of specific EVs may be useful in monitoring disease progression. Here, we discuss the mechanisms by which EVs produced by apoptotic tumor cells—both constitutively and as a consequence of therapy—may mediate host responsiveness to cell death in cancer. We also consider how the monitoring of such EVs and their cargoes may in the future help to improve cancer diagnosis, staging, and therapeutic efficacy.

  2. Necrotic and apoptotic cell death induced by Captan on Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scariot, Fernando J; Jahn, Luciane; Delamare, Ana Paula L; Echeverrigaray, Sergio

    2017-08-01

    Captan is one of the most widely used broad-spectrum fungicide applied to control several early and late diseases of grapes, apples, and other fruits and vegetables, and as other phthalimide fungicides is defined as a multisite compound with thiol-reactivity. Captan can affect non-target organisms as yeasts, modifying microbial populations and fermentation processes. In this study, we asked whether Captan thiol-reactivity and other mechanisms are involved in acute Captan-induced cell death on aerobic growing Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Thus for, we analyze cellular protein and non-protein thiols, cell membrane integrity, reactive oxygen species accumulation, phosphatidylserine externalization, and apoptotic mutants behavior. The results showed that when submitted to acute Captan treatment most cells lost their membrane integrity and died by necrosis due to Captan reaction with thiols. However, part of the cells, even maintaining their membrane integrity, lost their culture ability. These cells showed an apoptotic behavior that may be the result of non-protein thiol depletion and consequent increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS accumulation triggers a metacaspase-dependent apoptotic cascade, as shown by the higher viability of the yca1-deleted mutant. Together, necrosis and apoptosis are responsible for the high mortality detected after acute Captan treatment of aerobically growing cells of S. cerevisiae.

  3. Proliferative and apoptotic effects of andrographolide on the BGC-823 human gastric cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shu-Guang; Wang, Yuan-yu; Ye, Zai-yuan; Shao, Qing-shu; Tao, Hou-quan; Shu, Li-sha; Zhao, Yi-feng; Yang, Yong-jiang; Yang, Jing; Peng, Tao; Han, Bo; Huang, Di

    2013-01-01

    Andrographolide has been shown to have anticancer activity on diverse cancer cell lines representing different types of human cancers. The aim of this research was to investigate the anticancer and apoptotic effects of andrographolide on the BGC-823 human gastric cancer cell line. Cell proliferation and IC50 were evaluated using MTT assay, cell-cycle analysis with flow cytometry apoptotic effects with Annexin-V/propidium iodide double-staining assay, and morphologic structure with transmission electron microscopy. Immunohistochemistry and reverse-transcription PCR was used to analyze Bcl-2, Bax, and caspase-3 expressions. Andrographolide showed a time- and concentration-dependent inhibitory effects on BGC-823 cell growth. Compared to controls, the number of cells in the G0-G1-phase increased significantly, S and G2-M-phase cells decreased after 48 hours of treatment with andrographolide, and both early and late apoptotic rates increased significantly compared to the controls, all in a concentration-dependent manner. Bax and caspase-3 expressions were markedly increased, and Bcl-2 expression was decreased. Andrographolide inhibits BGC-823 cell growth and induces BGC-823 cell apoptosis by up-regulating Bax and caspase-3 expressions and down-regulating Bcl-2 expression. Andrographolide may be useful as a potent and selective agent in the treatment of human gastric cancers.

  4. Apoptotic-cell-derived membrane microparticles and IFN-α induce an inflammatory immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niessen, Anna; Heyder, Petra; Krienke, Stefan; Blank, Norbert; Tykocinski, Lars-Oliver; Lorenz, Hanns-Martin; Schiller, Martin

    2015-07-15

    A dysregulation in the clearance of apoptotic material is considered a major pathogenetic factor for the emergence of autoimmune diseases. Apoptotic-cell-derived membrane microparticles (AdMPs), which are released from the cell surface during apoptosis, have been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. Also of importance are cytokines, such as interferon-α (IFN-α), which is known to be a major player in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This study investigates the combined effect of AdMPs and IFN-α on professional phagocytes. In the presence of IFN-α, phagocytosis of AdMPs by human monocytes was significantly increased in a dose-dependent manner. The combination of AdMPs and raised IFN-α concentrations resulted in an increase in the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and an upregulation of surface molecule expression involved in antigen uptake. In addition, macrophage polarisation was shifted towards a more inflammatory type of cell. The synergism between IFN-α and AdMPs seemed to be mediated by an upregulation of phosphorylated STAT1. Our results indicate that IFN-α, together with AdMPs, amplify the initiation and maintenance of inflammation. This mechanism might especially play a crucial role in disorders with a defective clearance of apoptotic material. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. Apoptotic effect of alpha-mangostin on head and neck squamous carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaomongkolgit, Ruchadaporn; Chaisomboon, Niratcha; Pavasant, Prasit

    2011-05-01

    The purposes of this study were to measure the cytotoxic effect of alpha-mangostin on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines, to evaluate the apoptotic aspect of dead cells, and to identify the molecular mechanism involved in apoptosis. The human HNSCC cell lines HN-22, HN-30 and HN-31 were treated with alpha-mangostin. The apoptotic effects of alpha-mangostin on HNSCC cells were determined by observation the morphological changes of cells, immunofluorescence for single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), and DNA fragmentation analysis. The expression of bax, bcl-2, and p53 were detected by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Alpha-mangostin showed excellent apoptotic effects on HNSCC cell lines, which induced the down-regulation of bcl-2, but up-regulation of bax and p53 in HN-22, HN-30 and HN-31. The present study suggests that the induction of apoptosis by alpha-mangostin seemed to be modulated by bcl-2, bax and p53 level in HNSCC cell lines. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Apoptotic effects of bovine apo-lactoferrin on HeLa tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzi, Carla; Brisdelli, Fabrizia; Iorio, Roberto; Bozzi, Argante; Carnicelli, Veronica; Di Giulio, Antonio; Lizzi, Anna Rita

    2017-01-01

    Lactoferrin (Lf), a cationic iron-binding glycoprotein of 80 kDa present in body secretions, is known as a compound with marked antimicrobial activity. In the present study, the apoptotic effect of iron-free bovine lactoferrin (apo-bLf) on human epithelial cancer (HeLa) cells was examined in association with reactive oxygen species and glutathione (GSH) levels. Apoptotic effect of iron-free bovine lactoferrin inhibited the growth of HeLa cells after 48 hours of treatment while the diferric-bLf was ineffective in the concentration range tested (from 1 to 12.5 μM). Western blot analysis showed that key apoptotic regulators including Bax, Bcl-2, Sirt1, Mcl-1, and PARP-1 were modulated by 1.25 μM of apo-bLf. In the same cell line, apo-bLf induced apoptosis together with poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage, caspase activation, and a significant drop of NAD + . In addition, apo-bLf-treated HeLa cells showed a marked increase of reactive oxygen species level and a significant GSH depletion. On the whole, apo-bLf triggered apoptosis of HeLa cells upon oxygen radicals burst and GSH decrease. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Identification of a conserved anti-apoptotic protein that modulates the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhang

    Full Text Available Here we identified an evolutionarily highly conserved and ubiquitously expressed protein (C9orf82 that shows structural similarities to the death effector domain of apoptosis-related proteins. RNAi knockdown of C9orf82 induced apoptosis in A-549 and MCF7/casp3-10b lung and breast carcinoma cells, respectively, but not in cells lacking caspase-3, caspase-10 or both. Apoptosis was associated with activated caspases-3, -8, -9 and -10, and inactivation of caspases 10 or 3 was sufficient to block apoptosis in this pathway. Apoptosis upon knockdown of C9orf82 was associated with increased caspase-10 expression and activation, which was required for the generation of an 11 kDa tBid fragment and activation of Caspase-9. These data suggest that C9orf82 functions as an anti-apoptotic protein that modulates a caspase-10 dependent mitochondrial caspase-3/9 feedback amplification loop. We designate this ubiquitously expressed and evolutionarily conserved anti-apoptotic protein Conserved Anti-Apoptotic Protein (CAAP. We also demonstrated that treatment of MCF7/casp3-10b cells with staurosporine and etoposides induced apoptosis and knockdown of CAAP expression. This implies that the CAAP protein could be a target for chemotherapeutic agents.

  8. Apoptotic-like phenotype triggered by hydrogen peroxide and amphotericin B in the fungus Rhizopus arrhizus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sibu; Li, Ruoyu; Yu, Jin

    2014-12-01

    Rhizopus is the most common genus of invasive mucormycosis, whose prognosis and outcome was not improved over the past decades. We studied the apoptotic-like phenotype in Rhizopus arrhizus exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) and amphotericin B (AMB). The strain provided by Fungal Genetic Stock centre was studied about the apoptotic-like phenotype treated with different concentrations of H2 O2 and AMB, and then analyzed by fluorescent microscopy (observed by Annexin-V/FITC and TUNEL staining), flow cytometry (stained with DHR123/PI), and DNA agarose gel electrophores. When R. arrhizus was treated with H2 O2 and AMB, there was a loss of viability associated with different phenotype of apoptosis makers. Membrane externalization of phosphatidylserine (PS) on the cell surface, DNA fragmentation, chromatin condensation can be induced and observed obviously by Annexin-V/FITC, DAPI and TUNEL staining. DNA smear not DNA ladder was also visible in R. arrhizus. Flowcytometry of R. arrhizus cells revealed not only the increase of apoptosis cell stained with DHR123 under the nonfungicida doses but dead cells stained with PI under the fungicida concentrations.This study indicated that both H2 O2 and AMB could induce the apoptotic-like phenotype in R. arrhizus. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  9. Antitumor effects of traditional Chinese medicine targeting the cellular apoptotic pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu HL

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Huanli Xu,1 Xin Zhao,2 Xiaohui Liu,1 Pingxiang Xu,1 Keming Zhang,2 Xiukun Lin11Department of Pharmacology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Capital Medical University, 2Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, 302 Hospital of Chinese People’s Liberation Army, Beijing, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: Defects in apoptosis are common phenomena in many types of cancer and are also a critical step in tumorigenesis. Targeting the apoptotic pathway has been considered an intriguing strategy for cancer therapy. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM has been used in the People’s Republic of China for thousands of years, and many of the medicines have been confirmed to be effective in the treatment of a number of tumors. With increasing cancer rates worldwide, the antitumor effects of TCMs have attracted more and more attention globally. Many of the TCMs have been shown to have antitumor activity through multiple targets, and apoptosis pathway-related targets have been extensively studied and defined to be promising. This review focuses on several antitumor TCMs, especially those with clinical efficacy, based on their effects on the apoptotic signaling pathway. The problems with and prospects of development of TCMs as anticancer agents are also presented.Keywords: traditional Chinese medicine, antitumor effects, apoptotic pathway

  10. Biomolecular structure manipulation using tailored electromagnetic radiation: a proof of concept on a simplified model of the active site of bacterial DNA topoisomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarukanont, Daungruthai; Coimbra, João T S; Bauerhenne, Bernd; Fernandes, Pedro A; Patel, Shekhar; Ramos, Maria J; Garcia, Martin E

    2014-10-21

    We report on the viability of breaking selected bonds in biological systems using tailored electromagnetic radiation. We first demonstrate, by performing large-scale simulations, that pulsed electric fields cannot produce selective bond breaking. Then, we present a theoretical framework for describing selective energy concentration on particular bonds of biomolecules upon application of tailored electromagnetic radiation. The theory is based on the mapping of biomolecules to a set of coupled harmonic oscillators and on optimal control schemes to describe optimization of temporal shape, the phase and polarization of the external radiation. We have applied this theory to demonstrate the possibility of selective bond breaking in the active site of bacterial DNA topoisomerase. For this purpose, we have focused on a model that was built based on a case study. Results are given as a proof of concept.

  11. Intercalating polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-DNA adducts poison DNA religation by Vaccinia topoisomerase and act as roadblocks to digestion by exonuclease III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovleva, Lyudmila; Handy, Christopher J; Yagi, Haruhiko; Sayer, Jane M; Jerina, Donald M; Shuman, Stewart

    2006-06-20

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-DNA adducts pervert the execution or fidelity of enzymatic DNA transactions and cause mutations and cancer. Here, we examine the effects of intercalating PAH-DNA adducts on the religation reaction of vaccinia DNA topoisomerase, a prototypal type IB topoisomerase (TopIB), and the 3' end-resection reaction of Escherichia coli exonuclease III (ExoIII), a DNA repair enzyme. Vaccinia TopIB forms a covalent DNA-(3'-phosphotyrosyl)-enzyme intermediate at a target site 5'-C(+5)C(+4)C(+3)T(+2)T(+1)p / N(-1) in duplex DNA. The rate of the forward cleavage reaction is suppressed to varying degrees by benzo[a]pyrene (BP) or benzo[c]phenanthrene (BPh) adducts at purine bases within the 3'-G(+5)G(+4)G(+3)A(+2)A(+1)T(-1)A(-2) sequence of the nonscissile strand. We report that BP adducts at the +1 and -2 N6-deoxyadenosine (dA) positions flanking the scissile phosphodiester slow the rate of DNA religation to a greater degree than they do the cleavage rate. By increasing the cleavage equilibrium constant > or = 10-fold, the BPdA adducts, which are intercalated via the major groove, act as TopIB poisons. With respect to ExoIII, we find that (i) single BPdA adducts act as durable roadblocks to ExoIII digestion, which is halted at sites 1 and 2 nucleotides prior to the modified base; (ii) single BPhdA adducts, which also intercalate via the major groove, elicit a transient pause prior to the lesion, which is eventually resected; and (iii) BPh adducts at N2-deoxyguanosine, which intercalate via the minor groove, are durable impediments to ExoIII digestion. These results highlight the sensitivity of repair outcomes to the structure of the PAH ring system and whether intercalation occurs via the major or minor groove.

  12. Characterization of Abcc4 gene amplification in stepwise-selected mouse J774 macrophages resistant to the topoisomerase II inhibitor ciprofloxacin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Béatrice Marquez

    Full Text Available Exposure of J774 mouse macrophages to stepwise increasing concentrations of ciprofloxacin, an antibiotic inhibiting bacterial topoisomerases, selects for resistant cells that overexpress the efflux transporter Abcc4 (Marquez et al. [2009] Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 53: 2410-2416, encoded by the Abcc4 gene located on Chromosome 14qE4. In this study, we report the genomic alterations occurring along the selection process. Abcc4 expression progressively increased upon selection rounds, with exponential changes observed between cells exposed to 150 and 200 µM of ciprofloxacin, accompanied by a commensurate decrease in ciprofloxacin accumulation. Molecular cytogenetics experiments showed that this overexpression is linked to Abcc4 gene overrepresentation, grading from a partial trisomy of Chr 14 at the first step of selection (cells exposed to 100 µM ciprofloxacin, to low-level amplifications (around three copies of Abcc4 locus on 1 or 2 Chr 14 (cells exposed to 150 µM ciprofloxacin, followed by high-level amplification of Abcc4 as homogeneous staining region (hsr, inserted on 3 different derivative Chromosomes (cells exposed to 200 µM ciprofloxacin. In revertant cells obtained after more than 60 passages of culture without drug, the Abcc4 hsr amplification was lost in approx. 70% of the population. These data suggest that exposing cells to sufficient concentrations of an antibiotic with low affinity for eukaryotic topoisomerases can cause major genomic alterations that may lead to the overexpression of the transporter responsible for its efflux. Gene amplification appears therefore as a mechanism of resistance that can be triggered by non-anticancer agents but contribute to cross-resistance, and is partially and slowly reversible.

  13. Yeast cytotoxic sensitivity to the antitumour agent β-lapachone depends mainly on oxidative stress and is largely independent of microtubule- or topoisomerase-mediated DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Pérez, Cristina; Lorenzo-Castrillejo, Isabel; Quevedo, Oliver; García-Luis, Jonay; Matos-Perdomo, Emiliano; Medina-Coello, Chaxiraxi; Estévez-Braun, Ana; Machín, Félix

    2014-11-15

    β-Lapachone (β-lap) is a promising antitumour drug currently undergoing clinical trials. Although it is known that β-lap generates reactive oxygen species (ROS), its actual mechanism of action is still controversial. Especially important is to determine whether concomitant DNA or microtubule damage is the key target of its antitumour properties and whether DNA damage is mediated by topoisomerases as previously suggested. Here, we have searched for determinants of β-lap cytotoxicity in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae through a mechanism-driven approach whereby several pathways of the DNA and microtubule integrity responses, as well as the anti-oxidant response, were downregulated and the outcome of β-lap treatment examined. We also included in the analysis several β-lap derivatives expected to modify drug bioavailability and activity. We found that neither topoisomerase II nor microtubules contributed to yeast sensitivity to β-lap and its equitoxic derivative 3-bromo-β-lapachone. Instead, we found that oxidative and related environmental stresses were primarily responsible for toxicity. Accordingly, Yap1, the central transcription factor in the antioxidant response in yeast, together with several components involved in stress tolerance (i.e., Snf1 and Hog1) and chromatin remodelling (i.e., the SWR1 and RSC complexes), played major roles in protection against β-lapachone. Critically, we show that dioxygen enhanced toxicity and that ROS scavengers protected cells from it. Furthermore, we show that both quinones resulted in cell death in a manner which cytologically resembled apoptosis/necrosis. We thus conclude that β-lap is toxic to yeast through massive ROS production that either directly kills the cells or else triggers programmed cell death. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Inhibition of topoisomerase II activity in repair-proficient CHO K1 cells by 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol (WR-1065)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grdina, D.J.; Constantinou, A.; Shigematsu, N.

    1992-09-01

    The aminothiol 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol (WR-1065) is the active thiol of the clinically studied radioprotective agent S-2-(3-aminopropylamino) ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721). WR-1065 is an effective radiation protector under in vitro conditions when it is administered 30 min prior to radiation exposure at a concentration of 4 mM to repair-proficient Chinese hamster ovary Kl cells (i.e., a dose modification factor of 1.4). In contrast, the DNA double-strand break, repair-deficient Chinese hamster ovary xrs-5 cell line is not protected under these conditions (i.e., a dose modification factor of 1.0). Topoisomerase (topo) I and II activities and protein contents were measured in both Kl and xrs-5 cell lines and were found to be similar in magnitude. Neither exposure to radiation, to WR-1065, or to both affected these variables in xrs-5 cells. WR 1065 was effective, however, in reducing topo 11 activity by a factor of 2 in the repair-proficient Kl cell line. Topo II protein content, however, was not affected by these exposure conditions. One of several mechanisms of radiation protection attributed to aminothiol compounds has been their ability to affect enzymatic reactions involved in DNA synthesis, repair, and cell cycle progression. These results demonstrate a modifying effect by 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol on a specific nuclear enzyme (i.e., type H topoisomerase), which is involved in DNA synthesis. These results also suggest that differences do exist between the topo 11 enzymes isolated from the parent repair-proficient Kl and the DNA double-strand break, repair-deficient xrs-5 mutant cell lines

  15. Presence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants and mutations in gyrase and topoisomerase in Salmonella enterica isolates with resistance and reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Monique Ribeiro Tiba; Camargo, Carlos Henrique; Soares, Flávia Barrosa; da Silveira, Wanderley Dias; Fernandes, Sueli Aparecida

    2016-05-01

    In recent decades, the emergence and spread of resistance to nalidixic acid are usually associated with reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin among Salmonella serotypes. The aims of this study were to investigate the mechanisms associated with resistance to fluoroquinolone and the clonal relatedness of Salmonella strains isolated from human and nonhuman origins, in a 5-year period in São Paulo, Brazil. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing for Salmonella isolates was performed. PCR and DNA sequencing were accomplished to identify mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions of the topoisomerase genes and to determine the fluoroquinolone determinants. The strains presented MIC to ciprofloxacin ranging from 0.125 to 8.0 mg/L (all nonsusceptible). From these, 16 strains (17.5%) were resistant to ciprofloxacin (MIC ≥1 mg/L) and belonging to serotypes Typhimurium, I. 4,5,12:i:-, Enteritidis, and Heidelberg. Amplification and DNA sequencing of topoisomerases genes identified multiple amino acid substitutions in GyrA and ParC. No mutations were identified in GyrB, and 1 amino acid substitution was identified in ParE. Among the 16 Salmonella strains resistant to ciprofloxacin, 8 S. I. 4,5,12:i:- presenting mutations in gyrA and parE genes were grouped into the same pulsotype. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) determinants: qnrB, aac(6')-lb-cr, and oqxA/B were detected among 13 strains. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work to report Salmonella isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin in Brazil. Indeed, this is the first detection of PMQR determinants in Salmonella strains from Sao Paulo State. These findings alert for the potential spread of quinolone resistance of Salmonella strains, particularly in S. I. 4,5,12:i:-, a prevalent serotype implicated in human disease and foodborne outbreaks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Engineering the Specificity of Antibacterial Fluoroquinolones: Benzenesulfonamide Modifications at C-7 of Ciprofloxacin Change Its Primary Target in Streptococcus pneumoniae from Topoisomerase IV to Gyrase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alovero, Fabiana L.; Pan, Xiao-Su; Morris, Julia E.; Manzo, Ruben H.; Fisher, L. Mark

    2000-01-01

    We have examined the antipneumococcal mechanisms of a series of novel fluoroquinolones that are identical to ciprofloxacin except for the addition of a benzenesulfonylamido group to the C-7 piperazinyl ring. A number of these derivatives displayed enhanced activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae strain 7785, including compound NSFQ-105, bearing a 4-(4-aminophenylsulfonyl)-1-piperazinyl group at C-7, which exhibited an MIC of 0.06 to 0.125 μg/ml compared with a ciprofloxacin MIC of 1 μg/ml. Several complementary approaches established that unlike the case for ciprofloxacin (which targets topoisomerase IV), the increased potency of NSFQ-105 was associated with a target preference for gyrase: (i) parC mutants of strain 7785 that were resistant to ciprofloxacin remained susceptible to NSFQ-105, whereas by contrast, mutants bearing a quinolone resistance mutation in gyrA were four- to eightfold more resistant to NSFQ-105 (MIC of 0.5 μg/ml) but susceptible to ciprofloxacin; (ii) NSFQ-105 selected first-step gyrA mutants (MICs of 0.5 μg/ml) encoding Ser-81-to-Phe or -Tyr mutations, whereas ciprofloxacin selects parC mutants; and (iii) NSFQ-105 was at least eightfold more effective than ciprofloxacin at inhibiting DNA supercoiling by S. pneumoniae gyrase in vitro but was fourfold less active against topoisomerase IV. These data show unequivocally that the C-7 substituent determines not only the potency but also the target preference of fluoroquinolones. The importance of the C-7 substituent in drug-enzyme contacts demonstrated here supports one key postulate of the Shen model of quinolone action. PMID:10639357

  17. Transcription profiling of activated human T cells induced by microgravity to identify apoptotic genes and other immune response genes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The purpose of this study was to search for microgravity-sensitive genes specifically for apoptotic genes influenced by the microgravity environment and other genes...

  18. Apoptotic Regulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thress, Kenneth

    2000-01-01

    ... for implementation of the cell death program. In an extensive analysis of chromosomal deletion mutants in the fly, Drosophila Melanogaster, Steller and colleagues identified a chromosomal region containing a number of genes critical...