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Sample records for apoptotic enzymes escape

  1. Echinacoside induces apoptotic cancer cell death by inhibiting the nucleotide pool sanitizing enzyme MTH1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong L

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Liwei Dong,1 Hongge Wang,1 Jiajing Niu,1 Mingwei Zou,2 Nuoting Wu,1 Debin Yu,1 Ye Wang,1 Zhihua Zou11Key Laboratory for Molecular Enzymology and Engineering of the Ministry of Education, National Engineering Laboratory for AIDS Vaccine, School of Life Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin Province, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Psychology, College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences, University of Houston, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: Inhibition of the nucleotide pool sanitizing enzyme MTH1 causes extensive oxidative DNA damages and apoptosis in cancer cells and hence may be used as an anticancer strategy. As natural products have been a rich source of medicinal chemicals, in the present study, we used the MTH1-catalyzed enzymatic reaction as a high-throughput in vitro screening assay to search for natural compounds capable of inhibiting MTH1. Echinacoside, a compound derived from the medicinal plants Cistanche and Echinacea, effectively inhibited the catalytic activity of MTH1 in an in vitro assay. Treatment of various human cancer cell lines with Echinacoside resulted in a significant increase in the cellular level of oxidized guanine (8-oxoguanine, while cellular reactive oxygen species level remained unchanged, indicating that Echinacoside also inhibited the activity of cellular MTH1. Consequently, Echinacoside treatment induced an immediate and dramatic increase in DNA damage markers and upregulation of the G1/S-CDK inhibitor p21, which were followed by marked apoptotic cell death and cell cycle arrest in cancer but not in noncancer cells. Taken together, these studies identified a natural compound as an MTH1 inhibitor and suggest that natural products can be an important source of anticancer agents. Keywords: Echinacoside, MTH1, 8-oxoG, DNA damage, apoptosis, cell cycle arrest

  2. Thymosin beta 4 protects cardiomyocytes from oxidative stress by targeting anti-oxidative enzymes and anti-apoptotic genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanyu Wei

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4 is a ubiquitous protein with many properties relating to cell proliferation and differentiation that promotes wound healing and modulates inflammatory mediators. The mechanism by which Tβ4 modulates cardiac protection under oxidative stress is not known. The purpose of this study is to dissect the cardioprotective mechanism of Tβ4 on H(2O(2 induced cardiac damage. METHODS: Rat neonatal cardiomyocytes with or without Tβ4 pretreatment were exposed to H(2O(2 and expression of antioxidant, apoptotic, and anti-inflammatory genes was evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR and western blotting. ROS levels were estimated by DCF-DA using fluorescent microscopy and fluorimetry. Selected antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic genes were silenced by siRNA transfections in neonatal cardiomyocytes and effect of Tβ4 on H(2O(2-induced cardiac damage was evaluated. RESULTS: Pre-treatment of Tβ4 resulted in reduction of the intracellular ROS levels induced by H(2O(2 in cardiomyocytes. Tβ4 pretreatment also resulted in an increase in the expression of antiapoptotic proteins and reduction of Bax/BCl(2 ratio in the cardiomyocytes. Pretreatment with Tβ4 resulted in stimulating the expression of antioxidant enzymes copper/zinc SOD and catalase in cardiomyocytes at both transcription and translation levels. Tβ4 treatment resulted in the increased expression of anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory genes. Silencing of Cu/Zn SOD and catalase gene resulted in apoptotic cell death in the cardiomyocytes which was prevented by treatment with Tβ4. CONCLUSION: This is the first report that demonstrates the effect of Tβ4 on cardiomyocytes and its capability to selectively upregulate anti-oxidative enzymes, anti-inflammatory genes, and antiapoptotic enzymes in the neonatal cardiomyocytes thus preventing cell death thereby protecting the myocardium. Tβ4 treatment resulted in decreased oxidative stress and inflammation in the

  3. Induced resistance enzymes in wild plants-do `early birds' escape from pathogen attack?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heil, Martin; Ploss, Kerstin

    2006-09-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) of plants to pathogens is a well-defined phenomenon. The underlying signalling pathways and its application in crop protection are intensively studied. However, most studies are conducted on crop plants or on Arabidopsis as a model plant. The taxonomic distribution of this phenomenon and its dependence on life history are thus largely unknown. We quantified activities of three classes of resistance-related enzymes in 18 plant species to investigate whether plants with varying life histories differ in their investment in disease resistance. Enzyme activities were quantified in untreated plants, and in plants induced with BION, a chemical resistance elicitor. All species showed constitutive activities of chitinase, peroxidase, or glucanase. However, constitutive chitinase activities varied by 30 times, and peroxidase by 50 times, among species. Several species did not respond to the induction treatment, while enzyme activities in other species increased more than threefold after BION application. Plant species differ dramatically in the presence and inducibility of resistance enzymes. This variation could be related to life history: While all resistance enzymes were significantly induced in larger perennial plants that flower during summer, spring geophytes hardly showed inducible resistance. These plants grow in an environment that is characterised by a low-pathogen pressure, and thus may simply ‘escape’ from infection. Our study presents the first comparative data set on resistance-related enzymes in noncultivated plants. The current view on SAR—narrowed by the concentration on cultivated crops—is not sufficient to understand the ecological and evolutionary relevance of this widespread plant trait.

  4. Escape Velocity

    OpenAIRE

    Nikola Vlacic

    2010-01-01

    In this project, we investigated if it is feasible for a single staged rocket with constant thrust to attain escape velocity. We derived an equation for the velocity and position of a single staged rocket that launches vertically. From this equation, we determined if an ideal model of a rocket is able to reach escape velocity.

  5. Enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzymes are complex proteins that cause a specific chemical change in all parts of the body. For ... use them. Blood clotting is another example of enzymes at work. Enzymes are needed for all body ...

  6. Single oral acute fluoride exposure causes changes in cardiac expression of oxidant and antioxidant enzymes, apoptotic and necrotic markers in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panneerselvam, Lakshmikanthan; Govindarajan, Vimal; Ameeramja, Jaishabanu; Nair, Harikumaran Raveendran; Perumal, Ekambaram

    2015-12-01

    Several studies have shown that acute fluoride (F(-)) exposure impairs cardiac function, but the molecular mechanism is not clear. In order to study this, male Wistar rats were treated with single oral doses of 45 and 90 mg/kg F(-) for 24 h. A significant accumulation of F(-) was found in the serum and myocardium of experimental rats. F(-) treatment causes myocardial necrosis as evident from increased levels of myocardial troponin I, creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase and aspartate transaminase. In addition, F(-) induces myocardial oxidative stress via increased reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyl content and nitrate levels along with decreased in the levels of enzymatic (superoxide dismutase 2, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione s transferase pi class) and non-enzymatic (reduced glutathione) antioxidants. Notably, F(-) triggers myocardial apoptosis through altered Bax/Bcl2 ratio and increased cytochrome c, caspase 3p20 and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeled positive cells. An increased cardiac expression of Nox4 and p38α MAPK in F(-) treated rats indicates the oxidative and apoptotic damage. Moreover, ultra-structural changes, histopathological and luxol fast blue staining demonstrates the degree of myocardial damage at subcellular level. Taken together, these findings reveal that acute F(-) exposure causes cardiac impairment by altering the expression of oxidative stress, apoptosis and necrotic markers. PMID:26455266

  7. In the absence of cellular poly (A) binding protein, the glycolytic enzyme GAPDH translocated to the cell nucleus and activated the GAPDH mediated apoptotic pathway by enhancing acetylation and serine 46 phosphorylation of p53

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → PABP knock down and cell apoptosis. → Nuclear translocation of GAPDH in PABP depleted cells. → Role of p53 in apoptosis of PABP depleted cells. → Bax translocation and cytochrome C release and caspase 3 activation following PABP depletion. → Association of p53 with Bcl2 and Bax. -- Abstract: The cytoplasmic poly (A) binding protein (PABP) interacts with 3' poly (A) tract of eukaryotic mRNA and is important for both translation and stability of mRNA. Previously, we have shown that depletion of PABP by siRNA prevents protein synthesis and consequently leads to cell death through apoptosis. In the present investigation, we studied the mechanism of cell apoptosis. We show that in the absence of PABP, the glycolytic enzyme GAPDH translocated to the cell nucleus and activated the GAPDH mediated apoptotic pathway by enhancing acetylation and serine 46 phosphorylation of p53. As a result, p53 translocated to the mitochondria to initiate Bax mediated apoptosis.

  8. In the absence of cellular poly (A) binding protein, the glycolytic enzyme GAPDH translocated to the cell nucleus and activated the GAPDH mediated apoptotic pathway by enhancing acetylation and serine 46 phosphorylation of p53

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thangima Zannat, Mst.; Bhattacharjee, Rumpa B. [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G 2W1 (Canada); Bag, Jnanankur, E-mail: jbag@uoguelph.ca [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G 2W1 (Canada)

    2011-06-03

    Highlights: {yields} PABP knock down and cell apoptosis. {yields} Nuclear translocation of GAPDH in PABP depleted cells. {yields} Role of p53 in apoptosis of PABP depleted cells. {yields} Bax translocation and cytochrome C release and caspase 3 activation following PABP depletion. {yields} Association of p53 with Bcl2 and Bax. -- Abstract: The cytoplasmic poly (A) binding protein (PABP) interacts with 3' poly (A) tract of eukaryotic mRNA and is important for both translation and stability of mRNA. Previously, we have shown that depletion of PABP by siRNA prevents protein synthesis and consequently leads to cell death through apoptosis. In the present investigation, we studied the mechanism of cell apoptosis. We show that in the absence of PABP, the glycolytic enzyme GAPDH translocated to the cell nucleus and activated the GAPDH mediated apoptotic pathway by enhancing acetylation and serine 46 phosphorylation of p53. As a result, p53 translocated to the mitochondria to initiate Bax mediated apoptosis.

  9. Escaping from MOND

    OpenAIRE

    Famaey, Benoit; Bruneton, Jean-Philippe; Zhao, HongSheng

    2007-01-01

    We present a new test of modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) on galactic scales, based on the escape speed in the solar neighbourhood. This test is independent from other empirical successes of MOND at reproducing the phenomenology of galactic rotation curves. The galactic escape speed in MOND is entirely determined by the baryonic content of the Galaxy and the external field in which it is embedded. We estimate that the external field in which the Milky Way must be embedded to produce the obs...

  10. Escape behaviors in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Card, Gwyneth M

    2012-04-01

    Escape behaviors are, by necessity, fast and robust, making them excellent systems with which to study the neural basis of behavior. This is especially true in insects, which have comparatively tractable nervous systems and members who are amenable to manipulation with genetic tools. Recent technical developments in high-speed video reveal that, despite their short duration, insect escape behaviors are more complex than previously appreciated. For example, before initiating an escape jump, a fly performs sophisticated posture and stimulus-dependent preparatory leg movements that enable it to jump away from a looming threat. This newfound flexibility raises the question of how the nervous system generates a behavior that is both rapid and flexible. Recordings from the cricket nervous system suggest that synchrony between the activity of specific interneuron pairs may provide a rapid cue for the cricket to detect the direction of an approaching predator and thus which direction it should run. Technical advances make possible wireless recording from neurons while locusts escape from a looming threat, enabling, for the first time, a direct correlation between the activity of multiple neurons and the time-course of an insect escape behavior. PMID:22226514

  11. Nosema Tolerant Honeybees (Apis mellifera) Escape Parasitic Manipulation of Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurze, Christoph; Le Conte, Yves; Dussaubat, Claudia; Erler, Silvio; Kryger, Per; Lewkowski, Oleg; Müller, Thomas; Widder, Miriam; Moritz, Robin F. A.

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is not only pivotal for development, but also for pathogen defence in multicellular organisms. Although numerous intracellular pathogens are known to interfere with the host’s apoptotic machinery to overcome this defence, its importance for host-parasite coevolution has been neglected. We conducted three inoculation experiments to investigate in the apoptotic respond during infection with the intracellular gut pathogen Nosema ceranae, which is considered as potential global threat to the honeybee (Apis mellifera) and other bee pollinators, in sensitive and tolerant honeybees. To explore apoptotic processes in the gut epithelium, we visualised apoptotic cells using TUNEL assays and measured the relative expression levels of subset of candidate genes involved in the apoptotic machinery using qPCR. Our results suggest that N. ceranae reduces apoptosis in sensitive honeybees by enhancing inhibitor of apoptosis protein-(iap)-2 gene transcription. Interestingly, this seems not be the case in Nosema tolerant honeybees. We propose that these tolerant honeybees are able to escape the manipulation of apoptosis by N. ceranae, which may have evolved a mechanism to regulate an anti-apoptotic gene as key adaptation for improved host invasion. PMID:26445372

  12. Nosema Tolerant Honeybees (Apis mellifera Escape Parasitic Manipulation of Apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Kurze

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is not only pivotal for development, but also for pathogen defence in multicellular organisms. Although numerous intracellular pathogens are known to interfere with the host's apoptotic machinery to overcome this defence, its importance for host-parasite coevolution has been neglected. We conducted three inoculation experiments to investigate in the apoptotic respond during infection with the intracellular gut pathogen Nosema ceranae, which is considered as potential global threat to the honeybee (Apis mellifera and other bee pollinators, in sensitive and tolerant honeybees. To explore apoptotic processes in the gut epithelium, we visualised apoptotic cells using TUNEL assays and measured the relative expression levels of subset of candidate genes involved in the apoptotic machinery using qPCR. Our results suggest that N. ceranae reduces apoptosis in sensitive honeybees by enhancing inhibitor of apoptosis protein-(iap-2 gene transcription. Interestingly, this seems not be the case in Nosema tolerant honeybees. We propose that these tolerant honeybees are able to escape the manipulation of apoptosis by N. ceranae, which may have evolved a mechanism to regulate an anti-apoptotic gene as key adaptation for improved host invasion.

  13. [Sphingolipid-mediated apoptotic signaling pathways].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuvillier, Olivier; Andrieu-Abadie, Nathalie; Ségui, Bruno; Malagarie-Cazenave, Sophie; Tardy, Claudine; Bonhoure, Elisabeth; Levade, Thierry

    2003-01-01

    Various sphingolipids are being viewed as bioactive molecules and/or second messengers. Among them, ceramide (or N-acylsphingosine) and sphingosine generally behave as pro-apoptotic mediators. Indeed, ceramide mediates the death signal initiated by numerous stress agents which either stimulate its de novo synthesis or activate sphingomyelinases that release ceramide from sphingomyelin. For instance, the early generation of ceramide promoted by TNF is mediated by a neutral sphingomyelinase the activity of which is regulated by the FAN adaptor protein, thereby controlling caspase activation and the cell death programme. In addition, the activity of this neutral sphingomyelinase is negatively modulated by caveolin, a major constituent of some membrane microdomains. The enzyme sphingosine kinase also plays a crucial role in apoptosis signalling by regulating the intracellular levels of two sphingolipids having opposite effects, namely the pro-apoptotic sphingosine and the anti-apoptotic sphingosine 1-phosphate molecule. Ceramide and sphingosine metabolism therefore appears as a pivotal regulatory pathway in the determination of cell fate. PMID:14708343

  14. Reconstructing the Alcatraz escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baart, F.; Hoes, O.; Hut, R.; Donchyts, G.; van Leeuwen, E.

    2014-12-01

    In the night of June 12, 1962 three inmates used a raft made of raincoatsto escaped the ultimate maximum security prison island Alcatraz in SanFrancisco, United States. History is unclear about what happened tothe escapees. At what time did they step into the water, did theysurvive, if so, where did they reach land? The fate of the escapees has been the subject of much debate: did theymake landfall on Angel Island, or did the current sweep them out ofthe bay and into the cold pacific ocean? In this presentation, we try to shed light on this historic case using avisualization of a high-resolution hydrodynamic simulation of the San Francisco Bay, combined with historical tidal records. By reconstructing the hydrodynamic conditions and using a particle based simulation of the escapees we show possible scenarios. The interactive model is visualized using both a 3D photorealistic and web based visualization. The "Escape from Alcatraz" scenario demonstrates the capabilities of the 3Di platform. This platform is normally used for overland flooding (1D/2D). The model engine uses a quad tree structure, resulting in an order of magnitude speedup. The subgrid approach takes detailed bathymetry information into account. The inter-model variability is tested by comparing the results with the DFlow Flexible Mesh (DFlowFM) San Francisco Bay model. Interactivity is implemented by converting the models from static programs to interactive libraries, adhering to the Basic ModelInterface (BMI). Interactive models are more suitable for answeringexploratory research questions such as this reconstruction effort. Although these hydrodynamic simulations only provide circumstantialevidence for solving the mystery of what happened during the foggy darknight of June 12, 1962, it can be used as a guidance and provides aninteresting testcase to apply interactive modelling.

  15. Escape from Vela X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinton, J.; /Leicester U.; Funk, S.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Parsons, R.D.; /Leeds U.; Ohm, S.; /Leicester U. /Leeds U.

    2012-02-15

    While the Vela pulsar and its associated nebula are often considered as the archetype of a system powered by a {approx} 10{sup 4} year old isolated neutron star, many features of the spectral energy distribution of this pulsar wind nebula are both puzzling and unusual. Here we develop a model that for the first time relates the main structures in the system, the extended radio nebula (ERN) and the X-ray cocoon through continuous injection of particles with a fixed spectral shape. We argue that diffusive escape of particles from the ERN can explain the steep Fermi-LAT spectrum. In this scenario Vela X should produce a distinct feature in the locally-measured cosmic ray electron spectrum at very high energies. This prediction can be tested in the future using the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). If particles are indeed released early in the evolution of PWNe and can avoid severe adiabatic losses, PWN provide a natural explanation for the rising positron fraction in the local CR spectrum.

  16. Suicide as Escape from Self.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, Roy F.

    1990-01-01

    Suicide is analyzed as a motivation to escape from adversive self-awareness. The causal chain is traced from initial failures that are attributed internally because of a cognitively deconstructed state. (SLD)

  17. Immunosuppressive effects of apoptotic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voll, Reinhard E.; Herrmann, Martin; Roth, Edith A.; Stach, Christian; Kalden, Joachim R.; Girkontaite, Irute

    1997-11-01

    Apoptotic cell death is important in the development and homeostasis of multicellular organisms and is a highly controlled means of eliminating dangerous, damaged or unnecessary cells without causing an inflammatory response or tissue damage,. We now show that the presence of apoptotic cells during monocyte activation increases their secretion of the anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokine interleukin 10 (IL-10) and decreases secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), IL-1 and IL-12. This may inhibit inflammation and contribute to impaired cell-mediated immunity in conditions associated with increased apoptosis, such as viral infections, pregnancy, cancer and exposure to radiation.

  18. Energy-limited escape revised

    OpenAIRE

    Salz, M.; Schneider, P. C.; Czesla, S.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2015-01-01

    Gas planets in close proximity to their host stars experience photoevaporative mass loss. The energy-limited escape concept is generally used to derive estimates for the planetary mass-loss rates. Our photoionization hydrodynamics simulations of the thermospheres of hot gas planets show that the energy-limited escape concept is valid only for planets with a gravitational potential lower than $\\log_\\mathrm{10}\\left( -\\Phi_{\\mathrm{G}}\\right) < 13.11~$erg$\\,$g$^{-1}$ because in these planets th...

  19. BCL2 suppresses PARP1 function and non-apoptotic cell death

    OpenAIRE

    Dutta, Chaitali; Day, Tovah; Kopp, Nadja; van Bodegom, Diederik; Davids, Matthew S.; Ryan, Jeremy; Bird, Liat; Kommajosyula, Naveen; Weigert, Oliver; Yoda, Akinori; Fung, Hua; Brown, Jennifer R; Shapiro, Geoffrey I.; Letai, Anthony; Weinstock, David M.

    2012-01-01

    BCL2 suppresses apoptosis by binding the BH3 domain of pro-apoptotic factors and thereby regulating outer mitochondrial membrane permeabilization. Many tumor types, including B-cell lymphomas and chronic lymphocytic leukemia, are dependent on BCL2 for survival, but become resistant to apoptosis after treatment. Here we identified a direct interaction between the anti-apoptotic protein BCL2 and the enzyme poly(ADP) ribose polymerase 1 (PARP1), which suppresses PARP1 enzymatic activity and inhi...

  20. Crystal Structure of CRN-4: Implications for Domain Function in Apoptotic DNA Degradation▿

    OpenAIRE

    Hsiao, Yu-Yuan; Nakagawa, Akihisa; Shi, Zhonghao; Mitani, Shohei; Xue, Ding; Yuan, Hanna S.

    2008-01-01

    Cell death related nuclease 4 (CRN-4) is one of the apoptotic nucleases involved in DNA degradation in Caenorhabditis elegans. To understand how CRN-4 is involved in apoptotic DNA fragmentation, we analyzed CRN-4's biochemical properties, in vivo cell functions, and the crystal structures of CRN-4 in apo-form, Mn2+-bound active form, and Er3+-bound inactive form. CRN-4 is a dimeric nuclease with the optimal enzyme activity in cleaving double-stranded DNA in apoptotic salt conditions. Both mut...

  1. Apoptotic Signaling in Mouse Odontogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Matalova, Eva; Svandova, Eva; Tucker, Abigail S.

    2012-01-01

    Apoptosis is an important morphogenetic event in embryogenesis as well as during postnatal life. In the last 2 decades, apoptosis in tooth development (odontogenesis) has been investigated with gradually increasing focus on the mechanisms and signaling pathways involved. The molecular machinery responsible for apoptosis exhibits a high degree of conservation but also organ and tissue specific patterns. This review aims to discuss recent knowledge about apoptotic signaling networks during odon...

  2. Escaping carbon lock-in

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unruh, G.C. [Instituto de Empresa, Madrid (Spain)

    2002-03-01

    This article explores the climate policy implications of the arguments made in ''Understanding carbon lock-in'' (Unruh, 2000), which posited that industrial countries have become locked-into fossil fuel-based energy systems through path dependent processes driven by increasing returns to scale. Carbon lock-in arises through technological, organizational, social and institutional co-evolution, ''culminating'' in what was termed as techno-institutional complex (TIC). In order to resolve the climate problem, an escape from the lock-in condition is required. However, due to the self-referential nature of TIC, escape conditions are unlikely to be generated internally and it is argued here that erogenous forces are probably required. (author)

  3. Photochemical Escape of Oxygen from Early Mars

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Jinjin

    2015-01-01

    Photochemical escape is an important process for oxygen escape from present Mars. In this work, a 1-D Monte-Carlo Model is developed to calculate escape rates of energetic oxygen atoms produced from O2+ dissociative recombination reactions (DR) under 1, 3, 10, and 20 times present solar XUV fluxes. We found that although the overall DR rates increase with solar XUV flux almost linearly, oxygen escape rate increases from 1 to 10 times present solar XUV conditions but decreases when increasing solar XUV flux further. Analysis shows that atomic species in the upper thermosphere of early Mars increases more rapidly than O2+ when increasing XUV fluxes. While the latter is the source of energetic O atoms, the former increases the collision probability and thus decreases the escape probability of energetic O. Our results suggest that photochemical escape be a less important escape mechanism than previously thought for the loss of water and/or CO2 from early Mars.

  4. Bacillus anthracis Factors for Phagosomal Escape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Zornetta

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of phagosome escape by intracellular pathogens is an important step in the infectious cycle. During the establishment of anthrax, Bacillus anthracis undergoes a transient intracellular phase in which spores are engulfed by local phagocytes. Spores germinate inside phagosomes and grow to vegetative bacilli, which emerge from their resident intracellular compartments, replicate and eventually exit from the plasma membrane. During germination, B. anthracis secretes multiple factors that can help its resistance to the phagocytes. Here the possible role of B. anthracis toxins, phospholipases, antioxidant enzymes and capsules in the phagosomal escape and survival, is analyzed and compared with that of factors of other microbial pathogens involved in the same type of process.

  5. Energy-limited escape revised

    CERN Document Server

    Salz, M; Czesla, S; Schmitt, J H M M

    2016-01-01

    Gas planets in close proximity to their host stars experience photoevaporative mass loss. The energy-limited escape concept is generally used to derive estimates for the planetary mass-loss rates. Our photoionization hydrodynamics simulations of the thermospheres of hot gas planets show that the energy-limited escape concept is valid only for planets with a gravitational potential lower than $\\log_\\mathrm{10}\\left( -\\Phi_{\\mathrm{G}}\\right) < 13.11~$erg$\\,$g$^{-1}$ because in these planets the radiative energy input is efficiently used to drive the planetary wind. Massive and compact planets with $\\log_\\mathrm{10}\\left( -\\Phi_{\\mathrm{G}}\\right) \\gtrsim 13.6~$erg$\\,$g$^{-1}$ exhibit more tightly bound atmospheres in which the complete radiative energy input is re-emitted through hydrogen Ly$\\alpha$ and free-free emission. These planets therefore host hydrodynamically stable thermospheres. Between these two extremes the strength of the planetary winds rapidly declines as a result of a decreasing heating eff...

  6. Apoptotic engulfment pathway and schizophrenia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chen, Xiangning

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Apoptosis has been speculated to be involved in schizophrenia. In a previously study, we reported the association of the MEGF10 gene with the disease. In this study, we followed the apoptotic engulfment pathway involving the MEGF10, GULP1, ABCA1 and ABCA7 genes and tested their association with the disease. METHODOLOGY\\/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Ten, eleven and five SNPs were genotyped in the GULP1, ABCA1 and ABCA7 genes respectively for the ISHDSF and ICCSS samples. In all 3 genes, we observed nominally significant associations. Rs2004888 at GULP1 was significant in both ISHDSF and ICCSS samples (p = 0.0083 and 0.0437 respectively). We sought replication in independent samples for this marker and found highly significant association (p = 0.0003) in 3 Caucasian replication samples. But it was not significant in the 2 Chinese replication samples. In addition, we found a significant 2-marker (rs2242436 * rs3858075) interaction between the ABCA1 and ABCA7 genes in the ISHDSF sample (p = 0.0022) and a 3-marker interaction (rs246896 * rs4522565 * rs3858075) amongst the MEGF10, GULP1 and ABCA1 genes in the ICCSS sample (p = 0.0120). Rs3858075 in the ABCA1 gene was involved in both 2- and 3-marker interactions in the two samples. CONCLUSIONS\\/SIGNIFICANCE: From these data, we concluded that the GULP1 gene and the apoptotic engulfment pathway are involved in schizophrenia in subjects of European ancestry and multiple genes in the pathway may interactively increase the risks to the disease.

  7. Metabolic connections during apoptotic cell engulfment

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Claudia Z.; Ravichandran, Kodi S.

    2011-01-01

    Billions of cells die via apoptosis every day and are swiftly and efficiently removed. When a phagocyte engulfs an apoptotic cell, it essentially doubles its cellular contents, raising the question of how a phagocyte may manage the excess metabolic load. This review discusses phagocyte cellular metabolism, the digestion of the ingested apoptotic cell and the impact of these processes on engulfment.

  8. Wind-Induced Atmospheric Escape: Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartle, Richard; Johnson, Robert; Sittler, Edward, Jr.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Simpson, David

    2012-01-01

    Rapid thermospheric flows can significantly enhance the estimates of the atmospheric loss rate and the structure of the atmospheric corona of a planetary body. In particular, rapid horizontal flow at the exobase can increase the corresponding constituent escape rate. Here we show that such corrections, for both thermal and non-thermal escape, cannot be ignored when calculating the escape of methane from Titan, for which drastically different rates have been proposed. Such enhancements are also relevant to Pluto and exoplanets.

  9. Electronic Escape Trails for Firefighters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Charles; Schipper, John; Betts, Bradley

    2008-01-01

    A proposed wireless-communication and data-processing system would exploit recent advances in radio-frequency identification devices (RFIDs) and software to establish information lifelines between firefighters in a burning building and a fire chief at a control station near but outside the building. The system would enable identification of trails that firefighters and others could follow to escape from the building, including identification of new trails should previously established trails become blocked. The system would include a transceiver unit and a computer at the control station, portable transceiver units carried by the firefighters in the building, and RFID tags that the firefighters would place at multiple locations as they move into and through the building (see figure). Each RFID tag, having a size of the order of a few centimeters, would include at least standard RFID circuitry and possibly sensors for measuring such other relevant environmental parameters as temperature, levels of light and sound, concentration of oxygen, concentrations of hazardous chemicals in smoke, and/or levels of nuclear radiation. The RFID tags would be activated and interrogated by the firefighters and control-station transceivers. Preferably, RFID tags would be configured to communicate with each other and with the firefighters units and the control station in an ordered sequence, with built-in redundancy. In a typical scenario, as firefighters moved through a building, they would scatter many RFID tags into smoke-obscured areas by use of a compressed-air gun. Alternatively or in addition, they would mark escape trails by dropping RFID tags at such points of interest as mantraps, hot spots, and trail waypoints. The RFID tags could be of different types, operating at different frequencies to identify their functions, and possibly responding by emitting audible beeps when activated by signals transmitted by transceiver units carried by nearby firefighters.

  10. Exploiting death: apoptotic immunity in microbial pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucker, D S

    2016-06-01

    Innate immunity typically is responsible for initial host responses against infections. Independently, nucleated cells that die normally as part of the physiological process of homeostasis in mammals (including humans) suppress immunity. Specifically, the physiological process of cell death (apoptosis) generates cells that are recognized specifically by viable cells of all types and elicit a profound transient suppression of host immunity (termed 'innate apoptotic immunity' (IAI)). IAI appears to be important normally for the maintenance of self-tolerance and for the resolution of inflammation. In addition, pathogens are able to take advantage of IAI through a variety of distinct mechanisms, to enable their proliferation within the host and enhance pathogenicity. For example, the protist pathogen Leishmania amazonensis, at its infective stage, mimics apoptotic cells by expressing apoptotic-like protein determinants on the cell surface, triggering immunosuppression directly. In contrast, the pathogenic bacterium Listeria monocytogenes triggers cell death in host lymphocytes, relying on those apoptotic cells to suppress host immune control and facilitate bacterial expansion. Finally, although the inhibition of apoptotic cell death is a common attribute of many viruses which facilitates their extended replication, it is clear that adenoviruses also reprogram the non-apoptotic dead cells that arise subsequently to manifest apoptotic-like immunosuppressive properties. These three instances represent diverse strategies used by microbial pathogens to exploit IAI, focusing attention on the potency of this facet of host immune control. Further examination of these cases will be revealing both of varied mechanisms of pathogenesis and the processes involved in IAI control. PMID:26943319

  11. Escape as Reinforcement and Escape Extinction in the Treatment of Feeding Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRue, Robert H.; Stewart, Victoria; Piazza, Cathleen C.; Volkert, Valerie M.; Patel, Meeta R.; Zeleny, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Given the effectiveness of putative escape extinction as treatment for feeding problems, it is surprising that little is known about the effects of escape as reinforcement for appropriate eating during treatment. In the current investigation, we examined the effectiveness of escape as reinforcement for mouth clean (a product measure of…

  12. Escape of atmospheric gases from the Moon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Da Dao-an; Yang Ya-tian

    2005-12-01

    The escape rate of atmospheric molecules on the Moon is calculated.Based on the assumption that the rates of emission and escape of gases attain equilibrium, the ratio of molecular number densities during day and night, 0/0, can be explained. The plausible emission rate of helium and radioactive elements present in the Moon has also been calculated.

  13. Submarine 'safe to escape' studies in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurd, K M; Seddon, F M; Thacker, J C; Blogg, S L; Stansfield, M R D; White, M G; Loveman, G A M

    2014-01-01

    The Royal Navy requires reliable advice on the safe limits of escape from a distressed submarine (DISSUB). Flooding in a DISSUB may cause a rise in ambient pressure, increasing the risk of decompression sickness (DCS) and decreasing the maximum depth from which it is safe to escape. The aim of this study was to investigate the pressure/depth limits to escape following saturation at raised ambient pressure. Exposure to saturation pressures up to 1.6 bar (a) (160 kPa) (n = 38); escapes from depths down to 120 meters of sea water (msw) (n = 254) and a combination of saturation followed by escape (n = 90) was carried out in the QinetiQ Submarine Escape Simulator, Alverstoke, United Kingdom. Doppler ultrasound monitoring was used to judge the severity of decompression stress. The trials confirmed the previously untested advice, in the Guardbook, that if a DISSUB was lying at a depth of 90 msw, then it was safe to escape when the pressure in the DISSUB was 1.5 bar (a), but also indicated that this advice may be overly conservative. This study demonstrated that the upper DISSUB saturation pressure limit to safe escape from 90 msw was 1.6 bar (a), resulting in two cases of DCS. PMID:25109084

  14. Escaping Homelessness: Anticipated and Perceived Facilitators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Allisha; Tweed, Roger

    2009-01-01

    One study with two distinct sections was conducted to identify factors facilitating escape from homelessness. In Section 1, 58 homeless individuals rated possible facilitators of escape (factors they believed would help them become more independent and self-sufficient). In Section 2, 80 participants who had already exited homelessness rated the…

  15. Optimal escape theory predicts escape behaviors beyond flight initiation distance: risk assessment and escape by striped plateau lizards Sceloporus virgatus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    William E.COOPER Jr

    2009-01-01

    Escape theory predicts that flight initiation distance (FID=distance between predator and prey when escape begins) is longer when risk is greater and shorter when escape is more costly. A few tests suggest that escape theory applies to distance fled. Escape models have not addressed stochastic variables, such as probability of fleeing and of entering refuge, but their economic logic might be applicable. Experiments on several risk factors in the lizard Sceloporus virgatus confirmed all predictions for the above escape variables. FID was greater when approach was faster and more direct, for lizards on ground than on trees, for lizards rarely exposed to humans, for the second of two approaches, and when the predator turned toward lizards rather than away. Lizards fled further during rapid and second consecutive approaches. They were more likely to flee when approached directly, when a predator turned toward them, and during second approaches. They were more likely to enter refuge when approached rapidly. A novel finding is that perch height in trees was unrelated to FID because lizards escaped by moving out of sight, then moving up or down unpredictably. These findings add to a growing body of evidence supporting predictions of escape theory for FID and distance fled. They show that two probabilistic aspects of escape are predictable based on relative predation risk levels. Because individuals differ in boldness, the assessed optimal FID and threshold risks for fleeing and entering refuge are exceeded for an increasing proportion of individuals as risk increases[Current Zoology 55(2):123-131,2009].

  16. Intercellular transfer of apoptotic signals via electrofusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Suk; Lee, Wilson; McCulloch, Christopher A., E-mail: christopher.mcculloch@utoronto.ca

    2012-05-01

    We determined whether cells that are induced to undergo anoikis by matrix detachment can initiate apoptosis in healthy cells following electroporation-induced fusion. Separate populations of MDCK cells undergoing anoikis and stained with FITC-annexin or viable MDCK cells that were labeled with spectrally discrete fluorescent beads were electroporated. Cells were analyzed by flow cytometry for enumeration of viable cells with beads, apoptotic cells or fused cells. Electroporation promoted a 49-fold increase of the percentage of viable cells that had fused with apoptotic cells. Apoptotic cell-viable cell fusions were 8-fold more likely to not attach to cell culture plastic and 2.3-fold less likely to proliferate after 24 hr incubation than viable cell fusion controls. These data demonstrate that apoptotic signals can be transferred between cells by electrofusion, possibly suggesting a novel investigative approach for optimizing targeted cell deletion in cancer treatment.

  17. The curious world of apoptotic cell clearance

    OpenAIRE

    Weitzman, Jonathan B

    2004-01-01

    Analysis of knockout mice has brought into question the previously proposed role of the phosphatidylserine receptor (Ptdsr) in the clearance of apoptotic cell corpses, and has suggested important functions in regulating differentiation and inflammation.

  18. Intercellular transfer of apoptotic signals via electrofusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We determined whether cells that are induced to undergo anoikis by matrix detachment can initiate apoptosis in healthy cells following electroporation-induced fusion. Separate populations of MDCK cells undergoing anoikis and stained with FITC-annexin or viable MDCK cells that were labeled with spectrally discrete fluorescent beads were electroporated. Cells were analyzed by flow cytometry for enumeration of viable cells with beads, apoptotic cells or fused cells. Electroporation promoted a 49-fold increase of the percentage of viable cells that had fused with apoptotic cells. Apoptotic cell-viable cell fusions were 8-fold more likely to not attach to cell culture plastic and 2.3-fold less likely to proliferate after 24 hr incubation than viable cell fusion controls. These data demonstrate that apoptotic signals can be transferred between cells by electrofusion, possibly suggesting a novel investigative approach for optimizing targeted cell deletion in cancer treatment.

  19. Escapes in Hamiltonian systems with multiple exit channels: Part II

    OpenAIRE

    Zotos, Euaggelos E.

    2015-01-01

    We explore the escape dynamics in open Hamiltonian systems with multiple channels of escape continuing the work initiated in Part I. A thorough numerical investigation is conducted distinguishing between trapped (ordered and chaotic) and escaping orbits. The determination of the location of the basins of escape towards the different escape channels and their correlations with the corresponding escape periods of the orbits is undoubtedly an issue of paramount importance. We consider four diffe...

  20. Karachi Commander Escapes Attack, 10 Dead

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘志强

    2004-01-01

    KARACHI: The army commander in the Pakistani city of Karachi narrowly① escaped assassination② yesterday when gunmen attacked his convoy③ with gunfire and a bomb, killing at least 10 and wounding his driver, officials said.

  1. Escape dynamics: a continuous-time approximation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolyuzhnov, D.; Bogomolova, A.; Slobodyan, Sergey

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 38, January (2014), s. 161-183. ISSN 0165-1889 Institutional support: RVO:67985998 Keywords : constant gain adaptive learning * escape dynamics * recursive least squares Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 1.018, year: 2014

  2. Submarine tower escape decompression sickness risk estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveman, G A M; Seddon, E M; Thacker, J C; Stansfield, M R; Jurd, K M

    2014-01-01

    Actions to enhance survival in a distressed submarine (DISSUB) scenario may be guided in part by knowledge of the likely risk of decompression sickness (DCS) should the crew attempt tower escape. A mathematical model for DCS risk estimation has been calibrated against DCS outcome data from 3,738 exposures of either men or goats to raised pressure. Body mass was used to scale DCS risk. The calibration data included more than 1,000 actual or simulated submarine escape exposures and no exposures with substantial staged decompression. Cases of pulmonary barotrauma were removed from the calibration data. The calibrated model was used to estimate the likelihood of DCS occurrence following submarine escape from the United Kingdom Royal Navy tower escape system. Where internal DISSUB pressure remains at - 0.1 MPa, escape from DISSUB depths 60% DCS risk predicted for a 200-meter escape from saturation at 0.21 MPa. Using the calibrated model to predict DCS for direct ascent from saturation gives similar risk estimates to other published models. PMID:25109085

  3. Hydrogen Escape from early Earth and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zugger, M. E.; Ramirez, R. M.; Kasting, J. F.

    2012-12-01

    A controversy regarding hydrodynamic escape rates arose when Tian et al. (2005) published transonic escape rates for an atmosphere composed of pure H2. Tian et al. concluded that the hydrogen escape rate from early Earth would have been a factor of 20 or more slower than the diffusion limit, even if the solar EUV (extreme ultraviolet) flux was enhanced by a factor of 5 relative to today. This conclusion was challenged by Catling (2006), who pointed out that solar EUV fluxes could have been much higher than this so that plenty of energy should have been available to power escape. This controversy has remained unresolved to date. Hydrogen escape from early Mars is also of interest. As discussed in this session in a complementary paper by Ramirez et al., collision-induced absorption by molecular hydrogen could have helped to warm early Mars, perhaps explaining the formation of valleys and valley networks. Ramirez et al. have shown that a mixture of 90% CO2 and 10% H2 is capable raising early Mars' surface temperature above the freezing point of water, for surface pressures exceeding ~3 bar. However, we need to understand whether H2 mixing ratios of 10% are physically plausible. The H2 partial pressure in Mars' early atmosphere would have been determined by the balance between volcanic outgassing and escape to space. The 10% mixing ratio is high compared to the value of ~10-3 typically assumed for early Earth. But Mars' early atmosphere may have been more reduced than Earth's (Wadwha, 2001); if the hydrogen escape rate on Mars was also slower than on Earth, then additional increases in atmospheric hydrogen concentration are possible. To answer these questions about the early atmospheres of Earth and Mars, we have modified an existing model of hydrodynamic escape, developed by F. Tian, J. Kasting, and others, to converge for atmospheres with a wide range of hydrogen mixing ratios. The model finds subsonic solutions to the hydrodynamic equations; these can be shown to

  4. Gene therapy for carcinoma of the breast: Pro-apoptotic gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dysregulation of apoptosis contributes in a variety of ways to the malignant phenotype. It is increasingly recognized that the alteration of pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic molecules determines not only escape from mechanisms that control cell cycle and DNA damage, but also endows the cancer cells with the capacity to survive in the presence of a metabolically adverse milieu, to resist the attack of the immune system, to locally invade and survive despite a lack of tissue anchorage, and to evade the otherwise lethal insults induced by drugs and radiotherapy. A multitude of apoptosis mediators has been identified in the past decade, and the roles of several of them in breast cancer have been delineated by studying the clinical correlates of pathologically documented abnormalities. Using this information, attempts are being made to correct the fundamental anomalies at the genetic level. Fundamental to this end are the design of more efficient and selective gene transfer systems, and the employment of complex interventions that are tailored to breast cancer and that are aimed concomitantly towards different components of the redundant regulatory pathways. The combination of such genetic modifications is most likely to be effective when combined with conventional treatments, thus robustly activating several pro-apoptotic pathways

  5. On the escape of CH4 from Pluto's atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Koskinen, T. T.; Erwin, J. T.; Yelle, R. V.

    2015-01-01

    We adapted a multi-species escape model, developed for close-in extrasolar planets, to calculate the escape rates of CH4 and N2 from Pluto. In the absence of escape, CH4 should overtake N2 as the dominant species below the exobase. The CH4 profile depends strongly on the escape rate, however, and the typical escape rates predicted for Pluto lead to a nearly constant mixing ratio of less than 1 % below the exobase. In this case the CH4 escape rate is only 5-10 % of the N2 escape rate. Observat...

  6. Radiative equilibrium and escape of Pluto's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, Justin; Koskinen, Tommi T.; Yelle, Roger V.

    2015-11-01

    Observations of Pluto’s extend atmosphere by the New Horizons spacecraft motivate an update to our modeling effort on Pluto’s atmosphere. New Horizons observations have already improved our constraints on planet radius and surface pressure, which are key to modeling the atmospheric structure. We model the radiative conductive equilibrium in the lower atmosphere combined with the UV driven escape model of the upper atmosphere. The non-LTE radiative transfer model in the lower atmosphere include heating and cooling by CH4, CO, and HCN. The escape model of the upper atmosphere is updated to include diffusion and escape of each molecular component. These results will be used to aid in the analysis and better understanding of the full atmospheric structure.

  7. Unexpected variability of Martian hydrogen escape

    OpenAIRE

    Chaffin, Michael S.; Chaufray, Jean-Yves; Stewart, Ian; Montmessin, Franck; Schneider, Nicholas M.; Bertaux, Jean-Loup

    2014-01-01

    International audience Mars today is much drier than the Earth, though they likely began with similar relative amounts of water. One potential cause for this discrepancy is hydrogen loss to space, which may have removed a large fraction of Mars' initial water. Here we demonstrate an order-of-magnitude change in the Martian hydrogen escape rate in 2007, inconsistent with established models for the source of escaping hydrogen. We analyze 121.6 nm (hydrogen Lyman-α) airglow observations made ...

  8. Martian Atmospheric and Ionospheric plasma Escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, Rickard

    2016-04-01

    Solar forcing is responsible for the heating, ionization, photochemistry, and erosion processes in the upper atmosphere throughout the lifetime of the terrestrial planets. Of the four terrestrial planets, the Earth is the only one with a fully developed biosphere, while our kin Venus and Mars have evolved into arid inhabitable planets. As for Mars, there are ample evidences for an early Noachian, water rich period on Mars. The question is, what made Mars evolve so differently compared to the Earth? Various hydrosphere and atmospheric evolution scenarios for Mars have been forwarded based on surface morphology, chemical composition, simulations, semi-empiric (in-situ data) models, and the long-term evolution of the Sun. Progress has been made, but the case is still open regarding the changes that led to the present arid surface and tenuous atmosphere at Mars. This presentation addresses the long-term variability of the Sun, the solar forcing impact on the Martian atmosphere, and its interaction with the space environment - an electromagnetic wave and particle interaction with the upper atmosphere that has implications for its photochemistry, composition, and energization that governs thermal and non-thermal escape. Non-thermal escape implies an electromagnetic upward energization of planetary ions and molecules to velocities above escape velocity, a process governed by a combination of solar EUV radiation (ionization), and energy and momentum transfer by the solar wind. The ion escape issue dates back to the early Soviet and US-missions to Mars, but the first more accurate estimates of escape rates came with the Phobos-2 mission in 1989. Better-quality ion composition measurement results of atmospheric/ionospheric ion escape from Mars, obtained from ESA Mars Express (MEX) instruments, have improved our understanding of the ion escape mechanism. With the NASA MAVEN spacecraft orbiting Mars since Sept. 2014, dual in-situ measurement with plasma instruments are now

  9. Kunstige Enzymer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bols, Mikael; Bjerre, Jeannette; Marinescu, Lavinia

    2007-01-01

    Enzymer har en enestående evne til at accelerere kemiske processer. Der forskes målrettet i at optimere enzymer baseret på cyclodextrin.......Enzymer har en enestående evne til at accelerere kemiske processer. Der forskes målrettet i at optimere enzymer baseret på cyclodextrin....

  10. On the escape of CH4 from Pluto's atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Koskinen, T T; Yelle, R V

    2015-01-01

    We adapted a multi-species escape model, developed for close-in extrasolar planets, to calculate the escape rates of CH4 and N2 from Pluto. In the absence of escape, CH4 should overtake N2 as the dominant species below the exobase. The CH4 profile depends strongly on the escape rate, however, and the typical escape rates predicted for Pluto lead to a nearly constant mixing ratio of less than 1 % below the exobase. In this case the CH4 escape rate is only 5-10 % of the N2 escape rate. Observations of the CH4 profile by the New Horizons/ALICE spectrograph can constrain the CH4 escape rate and provide a unique test for escape models.

  11. Pade approximant calculations for neutron escape probability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutron escape probability from a non-multiplying slab containing internal source is defined in terms of a functional relation for the scattering function for the diffuse reflection problem. The Pade approximant technique is used to get numerical results which compare with exact results. (author)

  12. Centrifugally Stimulated Exospheric Ion Escape at Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delcourt, Dominique; Seki, K.; Terada, N.; Moore, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the transport of ions in the low-altitude magnetosphere magnetosphere of Mercury. We show that, because of small spatial scales, the centrifugal effect due to curvature of the E B drift paths can lead to significant particle energization in the parallel direction. We demonstrate that because of this effect, ions with initial speed smaller than the escape speed such as those produced via thermal desorption can overcome gravity and escape into the magnetosphere. The escape route of this low-energy exosphere originating material is largely controlled by the magnetospheric convection rate. This escape route spreads over a narrower range of altitudes when the convection rate increases. Bulk transport of low-energy planetary material thus occurs within a limited region of space once moderate magnetospheric convection is established. These results suggest that, via release of material otherwise gravitationally trapped, the E B related centrifugal acceleration is an important mechanism for the net supply of plasma to the magnetosphere of Mercury.

  13. Net escapement of Antartic krill in trawls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krafft, B.A.; Krag, Ludvig Ahm; Herrmann, Bent; Engås, A.; Nordrum, S.; Iversen, S.

    This document describes the aims and methodology of a three year project (commenced in 2012) entitled Net Escapement of Antarctic krill in Trawls (NEAT). The study will include a morphology based mathematical modeling (FISHSELECT) of different sex and maturity groups of Antarctic krill (Euphausia...

  14. Escape dynamics: a continuous-time approximation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolyuzhnov, Dmitri; Bogomolova, Anna; Slobodyan, S.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 38, January (2014), s. 161-183. ISSN 0165-1889 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP402/12/G097 Institutional support: PRVOUK-P23 Keywords : constant gain adaptive learning * escape dynamics * recursive least squares Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 1.018, year: 2014

  15. Elevated Levels of Uterine Anti-Apoptotic Signaling May Activate NFKB and Potentially Confer Resistance to Caspase 3-Mediated Apoptotic Cell Death During Pregnancy in Mice1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyasuria, Pancharatnam; Subedi, Kalpana; Suresh, Arvind; Condon, Jennifer C.

    2011-01-01

    Preserving the uterus in a state of relative quiescence is vital to the maintenance of a successful pregnancy. Elevated cytoplasmic levels of uterine caspase 3 during pregnancy have been proposed as a potential regulator of uterine quiescence through direct targeting and disabling of the uterine contractile architecture. However, despite highly elevated levels of uterine caspase 3 during pregnancy, there is minimal evidence of apoptosis. This current study defines the mechanism whereby the pregnant uterine myocyte may harness the tocolytic activity of active caspases while avoiding apoptotic cell death. Using the pregnant mouse model, we have analyzed the uterus for changes in pro- and antiapoptotic signaling patterns associated with the advancing stages of pregnancy. Briefly, we have found that members of the IAP family, such as SURVIVIN and XIAP, and the Bcl2 family members, such as MCL1, are elevated in the uterine myocyte during late gestation. The IAP family members are the only endogenous inhibitors of active caspase 3, and MCL1 limits activation of caspase 3 by suppressing proapoptotic signaling. Elevated XIAP levels partner with SURVIVIN, resulting in increased levels of the antiapoptotic MCL1 via NFKB activation; these together have the potential to limit both the activity and level of active caspase 3 in the pregnant uterus as term approaches. We propose that modification of these antiapoptotic signaling partners allows the pregnant uterus to escape the apoptotic action of elevated active caspase 3 levels but also functions to limit the levels of active uterine caspase 3 near term. PMID:21566000

  16. Antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of spanish honeys

    OpenAIRE

    Paloma Morales; Ana Isabel Haza

    2013-01-01

    Background: Current evidence supports that consumption of polyphenols has beneficial effects against numerous diseases mostly associated with their antioxidant activity. Honey is a good source of antioxidants since it contains a great variety of phenolic compounds. Objective: The main objective of this work was to investigate the antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of three crude commercial honeys of different floral origin (heather, rosemary and polyfloral honey) from Madrid Autonomic Co...

  17. Apoptotic regulation of epithelial cellular extrusion

    OpenAIRE

    De Andrade, Daniel,; Rosenblatt, Jody

    2011-01-01

    Cellular extrusion is a mechanism that removes dying cells from epithelial tissues to prevent compromising their barrier function. Extrusion occurs in all observed epithelia in vivo and can be modeled in vitro by inducing apoptosis in cultured epithelial monolayers. We established that actin and myosin form a ring that contracts in the surrounding cells that drives cellular extrusion. It is not clear, however, if all apoptotic pathways lead to extrusion and how apoptosis and extrusion are mol...

  18. The Effects of NAD+ on Apoptotic Neuronal Death and Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Function after Glutamate Excitotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowan Wang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available NAD+ is an essential co-enzyme for cellular energy metabolism and is also involved as a substrate for many cellular enzymatic reactions. It has been shown that NAD+ has a beneficial effect on neuronal survival and brain injury in in vitro and in vivo ischemic models. However, the effect of NAD+ on mitochondrial biogenesis and function in ischemia has not been well investigated. In the present study, we used an in vitro glutamate excitotoxicity model of primary cultured cortical neurons to study the effect of NAD+ on apoptotic neuronal death and mitochondrial biogenesis and function. Our results show that supplementation of NAD+ could effectively reduce apoptotic neuronal death, and apoptotic inducing factor translocation after neurons were challenged with excitotoxic glutamate stimulation. Using different approaches including confocal imaging, mitochondrial DNA measurement and Western blot analysis of PGC-1 and NRF-1, we also found that NAD+ could significantly attenuate glutamate-induced mitochondrial fragmentation and the impairment of mitochondrial biogenesis. Furthermore, NAD+ treatment effectively inhibited mitochondrial membrane potential depolarization and NADH redistribution after excitotoxic glutamate stimulation. Taken together, our results demonstrated that NAD+ is capable of inhibiting apoptotic neuronal death after glutamate excitotoxicity via preserving mitochondrial biogenesis and integrity. Our findings provide insights into potential neuroprotective strategies in ischemic stroke.

  19. Cloning and sequencing of a DNA fragment encoding N37 apoptotic peptide derived from p53

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-xia Bai; Qing-yong Ma; Guang-xiao Yang

    2009-01-01

    Objective It was reported that p53 apoptotic peptide (N37) could inhibit p73 gene through being bound with iASPP, which could induce tumor cell apoptosis. To further explore the function of N37, we constructed the cloning plasmid of DNA fragment encoding p53 (N37) apoptotic peptide by using DNA synthesis and molecular biology methods. Methods According to human p53 sequence from the GenBank database, the primer of p53(N37) gene was designed using Primer V7.0 software. The DNA fragment encoding p53 (N37) apoptotic peptide was amplified by using self-complementation polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method and cloned into the pGEM-T Easy vector. The constructed plasmid was confirmed by endonuclease analysis and sequencing. Results The insertion of objective DNA fragment was confirmed by plasmid DNA enzyme spectrum analysis, p53 (N37) gene was successfully synthesized chemically in vitro. The sequencing result of positive clone was completely identical to the human p53(N37) sequence in GenBank using BLAST software (http://www. ncbi. him. nih. gov/cgi-bin /BLASTn). Conclusion The cloning of DNA fragment encoding p53(N37) apoptotic peptide was constructed by using DNA synthesis and pGEM-T Easy cloning methods. With the constructed plasmid, we could further investigate the function of N37 peptide.

  20. Launch Pad Escape System Design (Human Spaceflight)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Kelli

    2011-01-01

    A launch pad escape system for human spaceflight is one of those things that everyone hopes they will never need but is critical for every manned space program. Since men were first put into space in the early 1960s, the need for such an Emergency Escape System (EES) has become apparent. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has made use of various types of these EESs over the past 50 years. Early programs, like Mercury and Gemini, did not have an official launch pad escape system. Rather, they relied on a Launch Escape System (LES) of a separate solid rocket motor attached to the manned capsule that could pull the astronauts to safety in the event of an emergency. This could only occur after hatch closure at the launch pad or during the first stage of flight. A version of a LES, now called a Launch Abort System (LAS) is still used today for all manned capsule type launch vehicles. However, this system is very limited in that it can only be used after hatch closure and it is for flight crew only. In addition, the forces necessary for the LES/LAS to get the capsule away from a rocket during the first stage of flight are quite high and can cause injury to the crew. These shortcomings led to the development of a ground based EES for the flight crew and ground support personnel as well. This way, a much less dangerous mode of egress is available for any flight or ground personnel up to a few seconds before launch. The early EESs were fairly simple, gravity-powered systems to use when thing's go bad. And things can go bad very quickly and catastrophically when dealing with a flight vehicle fueled with millions of pounds of hazardous propellant. With this in mind, early EES designers saw such a passive/unpowered system as a must for last minute escapes. This and other design requirements had to be derived for an EES, and this section will take a look at the safety design requirements had to be derived for an EES, and this section will take a look at

  1. Measurement of the resonance escape probability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The average cadmium ratio in natural uranium rods has been measured, using equal diameter natural uranium disks. These values correlated with independent measurements of the lattice buckling, enabled us to calculate values of the resonance escape probability for the G1 reactor with one or the other of two definitions. Measurements were performed on 26 mm and 32 mm rods, giving the following values for the resonance escape probability p: 0.8976 ± 0.005 and 0.912 ± 0.006 (d. 26 mm), 0.8627 ± 0.009 and 0.884 ± 0.01 (d. 32 mm). The influence of either definition on the lattice parameters is discussed, leading to values of the effective integral. Similar experiments have been performed with thorium rods. (author)

  2. [Escape mutants of hepatitis B virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Carlos Mario; Navas, María-Cristina

    2015-04-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a public health problem worldwide. Considering HBV morbidity and mortality and the economic consequences .of this infection, policies and strategies to control it have been implemented, especially in regions where HBV infection is endemic, with high rates of vertical and horizontal infection. One of these strategies is the development of the recombinant vaccine. A 92% of the countries in the world have implemented the vaccine with a global coverage of 69%. The escape variants of HBV correspond to isolates with mutations in the sequence coding for the "a" determinant; these mutations result in changes in the amino acid sequence of the surface antigen (HBsAg) that prevent neutralization of viral particles by antibodies generated in response to vaccination or infection. The escape variants can infect vaccinated individuals and have been identified in the population of countries with different epidemiological patterns. PMID:26065452

  3. Escape and Stand of the Pluto Atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Chong-Yi

    2002-01-01

    Molar mass μmin of the lightest gas, which will exist "forever" in the atmosphere at the planet surface,can be evaluated by Jeans rule. The μmin of Pluto is 17.3 g@ mol-1. It is evident that both N2 and CO can be major atmospheric composition at the Pluto surface, and will exist "forever". CH4 can only be escaping slowly from Pluto atmosphere, and still holds quite a proportion in current Pluto atmosphere. However, it will not escape from Titan (or Jupiter, Saturn) atmosphere largely, and will exist "forever". Given the quantitylevelof partial pressure of CH4 in Pluto and Titan (or Jupiter, Saturn) original atmosphere is the same, it will be clear that the current partial pressure of CH4 in Pluto surface atmosphere is 10-3 Pa.

  4. Designing an escape room with the Experience Pyramid model

    OpenAIRE

    Heikkinen, Outi; Shumeyko, Julia

    2016-01-01

    The concept of real life room escape, although relatively new, has been constantly gaining popularity and spreading across countries and continents. Despite the ever-growing appeal and widespread appreciation, the phenomenon is highly underresearched. The authors of this paper, employed at InsideOut Escape Games – the first room escape company of Finland – decided to explore the question of applicability of available experience design tools in the context of room escape. The Experience Py...

  5. Dishabituation of the Tritonia Escape Swim

    OpenAIRE

    Mongeluzi, Donna L.; Frost, William N.

    2000-01-01

    When repeatedly elicited, the oscillatory escape swim of the marine mollusc Tritonia diomedea undergoes habituation of the number of cycles per swim. Although similar in most respects to habituation observed in vertebrates and other invertebrates, one key feature, dishabituation, has been surprisingly difficult to demonstrate. Here we evaluate the hypothesis that this is due to interference from short-term sensitization, which is manifested as a reduction in swim onset latency, that occurs si...

  6. The Escape Rate of a Molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knauf, Andreas, E-mail: knauf@mi.uni-erlangen.de; Krapf, Markus [Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Department Mathematik (Germany)

    2010-06-15

    We show existence and give an implicit formula for the escape rate of the n-centre problem of celestial mechanics for high energies. Furthermore we give precise computable estimates of this rate. This exponential decay rate plays an important role especially in semiclassical scattering theory of n-atomic molecules. Our result shows that the diameter of a molecule is measurable in a (classical) high-energy scattering experiment.

  7. How inflation hawks escape expectations traps

    OpenAIRE

    Sylvain Leduc

    2003-01-01

    Why did inflation increase so dramatically from the 1960s to the 1970s? One possible theory is that once people started believing inflation would rise, the Fed was forced to validate those expectations by increasing the money supply. In "How Inflation Hawks Escape Expectations Traps," Sylvain Leduc discusses this "expectations trap" hypothesis and uses a direct measure of expectations to see if the theory is consistent with the data.

  8. Escape from a Riddled-Like Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAO Xiao-Gang; DAI Jun; WANG Wen-Xiu; HE Da-Ren

    2005-01-01

    @@ We investigate a system described by a conservative and a dissipative map concatenation. A fat fractal forbidden net, induced by interaction between discontinuous and noninvertible properties, introduces rippled-like attraction basins of two periodic attractors. Small areas, which serve as escaping holes of a new type of crisis, are dominated by conventional strong dissipation and are bounded by the forbidden region, but only in the vicinity of each periodic point.

  9. Effects of submarine escape training on the pulmonary function and carbon dioxide retention in the escape

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Rui-yong; WANG Wen-bo; FANG Yi-qun; XU Ji; XU Lin-jun

    2011-01-01

    Objective Fast buoyancy ascent escape used in submarine escape is the most probable choice of survival in case of a submarine accident.Rate of success for escape depends very much on the extent of training,in spite of the fact that rapid compression and decompression pose great challenges to the human body in terms of enormous stresses.To minimize stresses experienced during sub escape training has always been a research subject for us.Lungs are susceptible to rapid change in pressure during escape.Dynamic pulmonary function and the end-tidal PCO2 ( PETCO2 ) might be the best indicator for its effect on the pulmonary function of the submarine escapee.Methods Five male navy divers received submarine escape trainings,at different depths from 3-60 m.They were compressed at different rates (with pressure doubled every 20 s or 30 s),in the simulated submarine escape tower located in the Naval Medical Research Institute.The gas of end-expiration was collected immediately after escape,respiratory rate (RR) and dynamic pulmonary function were closely monitored,and PETCO2 was determined with the mass spectrometer.Results Experimental results showed that forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1.0) tended to increase with increasing depth,and that it increased significantly at 50 m and 60 m,when compared with the basic data (P < 0.05 ),and it was coupled with a decrease in forced expiratory flow at 25 % ( FEF25% ),indicating that it had certain effect on the function of small airways.PETCO2 and RR all elevated markedly following escapes.No significant differences could be seen in RR following escapes at various depths.PETCO2 and depth ( r =0.387,P < 0.01 ) were positively correlated with compression rate ( r =0.459,P < 0.01 ) and RR ( r =0.467,P < 0.01 ).CO2 retention might be attributed to pulmonary ventilation disorder induced by rapid changes in pressure.PETCO2 was within normal range,following escapes at various depths,suggesting that increased RR might be

  10. Scrunching: a novel escape gait in planarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochet-Escartin, Olivier; Mickolajczyk, Keith J; Collins, Eva-Maria S

    2015-10-01

    The ability to escape a predator or other life-threatening situations is central to animal survival. Different species have evolved unique strategies under anatomical and environmental constraints. In this study, we describe a novel musculature-driven escape gait in planarians, 'scrunching', which is quantitatively different from other planarian gaits, such as gliding and peristalsis. We show that scrunching is a conserved gait among different flatworm species, underlying its importance as an escape mechanism. We further demonstrate that it can be induced by a variety of physical stimuli, including amputation, high temperature, electric shock and low pH. We discuss the functional basis for scrunching as the preferential gait when gliding is impaired due to a disruption of mucus production. Finally, we show that the key mechanical features of scrunching are adequately captured by a simple biomechanical model that is solely based on experimental data from traction force microscopy and tissue rheology without fit parameters. Together, our results form a complete description of this novel form of planarian locomotion. Because scrunching has distinct dynamics, this gait can serve as a robust behavioral readout for studies of motor neuron and muscular functions in planarians and in particular the restoration of these functions during regeneration. PMID:26356147

  11. Cold ion escape from the Martian ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fränz, M.; Dubinin, E.; Andrews, D.; Barabash, S.; Nilsson, H.; Fedorov, A.

    2015-12-01

    We here report on new measurements of the escape flux of oxygen ions from Mars by combining the observations of the ASPERA-3 and MARSIS experiments on board the European Mars Express spacecraft. We show that in previous estimates of the total heavy ion escape flow the contribution of the cold ionospheric outflow with energies below 10 eV has been underestimated. Both case studies and the derived flow pattern indicate that the cold plasma observed by MARSIS and the superthermal plasma observed by ASPERA-3 move with the same bulk speed in most regions of the Martian tail. We determine maps of the tailside heavy ion flux distribution derived from mean ion velocity distributions sampled over 7 years. If we assume that the superthermal bulk speed derived from these long time averages of the ion distribution function represent the total plasma bulk speed we derive the total tailside plasma flux. Assuming cylindrical symmetry we determine the mean total escape rate for the years 2007-2014 at 2.8 ± 0.4 ×1025 atoms / s which is in good agreement with model estimates. A possible mechanism to generate this flux can be the ionospheric pressure gradient between dayside and nightside.

  12. Scrunching: a novel escape gait in planarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochet-Escartin, Olivier; Mickolajczyk, Keith J.; Collins, Eva-Maria S.

    2015-10-01

    The ability to escape a predator or other life-threatening situations is central to animal survival. Different species have evolved unique strategies under anatomical and environmental constraints. In this study, we describe a novel musculature-driven escape gait in planarians, ‘scrunching’, which is quantitatively different from other planarian gaits, such as gliding and peristalsis. We show that scrunching is a conserved gait among different flatworm species, underlying its importance as an escape mechanism. We further demonstrate that it can be induced by a variety of physical stimuli, including amputation, high temperature, electric shock and low pH. We discuss the functional basis for scrunching as the preferential gait when gliding is impaired due to a disruption of mucus production. Finally, we show that the key mechanical features of scrunching are adequately captured by a simple biomechanical model that is solely based on experimental data from traction force microscopy and tissue rheology without fit parameters. Together, our results form a complete description of this novel form of planarian locomotion. Because scrunching has distinct dynamics, this gait can serve as a robust behavioral readout for studies of motor neuron and muscular functions in planarians and in particular the restoration of these functions during regeneration.

  13. Xenon Fractionation and Archean Hydrogen Escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahnle, K. J.

    2015-01-01

    Xenon is the heaviest gas found in significant quantities in natural planetary atmospheres. It would seem the least likely to escape. Yet there is more evidence for xenon escape from Earth than for any element other than helium and perhaps neon. The most straightforward evidence is that most of the radiogenic Xe from the decay of (129)I (half-life 15.7 Myr) and (244)Pu (half-life 81 Myr) that is Earth's birthright is missing. The missing xenon is often attributed to the impact erosion of early atmospheres of Earth and its ancestors. It is obvious that if most of the radiogenic xenon were driven off by impacts, most of the rest of the atmophiles fared the same fate. The other line of evidence is in the nonradiogenic isotopes of xenon and its silent partner, krypton. Atmospheric xenon is strongly mass fractionated (at about 4% per amu) compared to any known solar system source (Figure 1). This is in stark contrast to krypton, which may not be fractionated at all: atmospheric Kr is slightly heavier than solar Kr (at about 0.5% per amu), but it is the same as in carbonaceous chondrites. Nonradiogenic xenon is also under abundant relative to krypton (the so-called "missing xenon" problem). Together these observations imply that xenon has been subject to fractionating escape and krypton not.

  14. The escape of natural satellites from Mercury and Venus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar's (1977) suggestion that the slow rotations of Mercury and Venus are in part due to natural satellites that subsequently escaped is discussed. A more useful criterion for the escape of such satellites than the previously proposed is derived, and it is shown that this distance is sufficiently small for Mercury and Venus to make the escape of satellites a likely possibility. (Auth.)

  15. 46 CFR 177.500 - Means of escape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Means of escape. 177.500 Section 177.500 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Escape Requirements § 177.500 Means of escape. (a) Except as otherwise provided...

  16. 30 CFR 75.382 - Mechanical escape facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.382 Mechanical escape facilities. (a) Mechanical escape facilities shall be provided with overspeed, overwind, and automatic stop... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mechanical escape facilities. 75.382 Section...

  17. Antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of spanish honeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma Morales

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Current evidence supports that consumption of polyphenols has beneficial effects against numerous diseases mostly associated with their antioxidant activity. Honey is a good source of antioxidants since it contains a great variety of phenolic compounds. Objective: The main objective of this work was to investigate the antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of three crude commercial honeys of different floral origin (heather, rosemary and polyfloral honey from Madrid Autonomic Community (Spain as well as of an artificial honey in human peripheral blood promyelocytic leukemia cells (HL-60. Material and Methods: HL-60 cells were cultured in the presence of honeys at various concentrations for up to 72 hours and the percentage of cell viability was evaluated by MTT assay. Apoptotic cells were identified by chromatin condensation and flow cytometry analysis. ROS production was determined using 2΄,7΄-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (H 2 DCFDA. Results: The three types of crude commercial honey induced apoptosis in a concentration and time dependent-manner. In addition, honeys with the higher phenolic content, heather and polyfloral, were the most effective to induce apoptosis in HL-60 cells. However, honeys did not generate reactive oxygen species (ROS and N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC could not block honeys-induced apoptosis in HL-60 cells. Conclusion: These data support that honeys induced apoptosis in HL-60 cells through a ROS-independent cell death pathway.Moreover, our findings indicate that the antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of honey varied according to the floral origin and the phenolic content.

  18. Hydrodynamical Modeling of Hydrogen Escape from Rocky Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barringer, Daniel; Zugger, M.; Kasting, J.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen escape affects both the composition of primitive atmospheres of terrestrial planets and the planet’s state of oxidation. On Mars, hydrogen escape played a critical role in how long the planet remained in a warm wet state amenable to life. For both solar and extrasolar planets, hydrogen-rich atmospheres are better candidates for originating life by way of Miller-Urey-type prebiotic synthesis. However, calculating the rate of atmospheric hydrogen escape is difficult, for a number of reasons. First, the escape can be controlled either by diffusion through the homopause or by conditions in the upper atmosphere, whichever is slower. Second, both thermal and non-thermal escape mechanisms are typically important. Third, thermal escape itself can be subdivided into Jeans escape (thin upper atmosphere), and hydrodynamic escape, and hydrodynamic escape can be further subdivided into transonic escape and slower subsonic escape, depending on whether the exobase occurs above or below the sonic point. Additionally, the rate of escape for real terrestrial planet atmospheres, which are not 100% hydrogen, depends upon the concentration of infrared coolants, and upon heating and photochemistry driven largely by extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. We have modified an existing 1-D model of hydrodynamic escape (F. Tian et al., JGR, 2008) to work in the high- hydrogen regime. Calculations are underway to determine hydrogen escape rates as a function of atmospheric H2 mixing ratio and the solar EUV flux. We will compare these rates with the estimated upper limit on the escape rate based on diffusion. Initial results for early Earth and Mars will later be extended to rocky exoplanets.

  19. Risks incurred by hydrogen escaping from containers and conduits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swain, M.R.; Grilliot, E.S. [Univ. of Miami, Coral Gables, FL (United States); Swain, M.N. [Analytical Technologies, Inc., Miami, FL (United States)

    1998-08-01

    This paper is a discussion of a method for hydrogen leak classification. Leaks are classified as; gas escapes into enclosed spaces, gas escapes into partially enclosed spaces (vented), and gas escapes into unenclosed spaces. Each of the three enclosure classifications is further divided into two subclasses; total volume of hydrogen escaped and flow rate of escaping hydrogen. A method to aid in risk assessment determination in partially enclosed spaces is proposed and verified for several enclosure geometries. Examples are discussed for additional enclosure geometries.

  20. Non-apoptotic function of apoptotic proteins in the development of Malpighian tubules of Drosophila melanogaster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu G Tapadia; Naveen K Gautam

    2011-08-01

    Drosophila metamorphosis is characterized by the histolysis of larval structures by programmed cell death, which paves the way for the establishment of adult-specific structures under the influence of the steroid hormone ecdysone. Malpighian tubules function as an excretory system and are one of the larval structures that are not destroyed during metamorphosis and are carried over to adulthood. The pupal Malpighian tubules evade destruction in spite of expressing apoptotic proteins, Reaper, Hid, Grim, Dronc and Drice. Here we show that in the Malpighian tubules expression of apoptotic proteins commences right from embryonic development and continues throughout the larval stages. Overexpression of these proteins in the Malpighian tubules causes larval lethality resulting in malformed tubules. The number and regular organization of principal and stellate cells of Malpighian tubules is disturbed, in turn disrupting the physiological functioning of the tubules as well. Strikingly, the localization of -tubulin, F-actin and Disclarge (Dlg) is also disrupted. These results suggest that the apoptotic proteins could be having non-apoptotic function in the development of Malpighian tubules.

  1. The cost of the sword: escape performance in male swordtails.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Baumgartner

    Full Text Available The handicap theory of sexual selection posits that male display traits that are favored in mate choice come at a significant cost to performance. We tested one facet of this hypothesis in the green swordtail (Xiphophorus helleri. In this species, the lower ray of male caudal fin is extended into a 'sword', which serves to attract potential mates. However, bearing a long sword may increase drag and thus compromise a male's ability to swim effectively. We tested escape performance in this species by eliciting C-start escape responses, an instinctive escape behavior, in males with various sword lengths. We then removed males' swords and retested escape performance. We found no relationship between escape performance and sword length and no effect of sword removal on escape performance. While having a large sword may attract a predator's attention, our results suggest that sword size does not compromise a male's escape performance.

  2. Potential for Modulation of the Fas Apoptotic Pathway by Epidermal Growth Factor in Sarcomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E. Joyner

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available One important mechanism by which cancer cells parasitize their host is by escaping apoptosis. Thus, selectively facilitating apoptosis is a therapeutic mechanism by which oncotherapy may prove highly advantageous. One major apoptotic pathway is mediated by Fas ligand (FasL. The death-inducing signaling Ccmplex (DISC and subsequent death-domain aggregations are created when FasL is bound by its receptor thereby enabling programmed cell death. Conceptually, if a better understanding of the Fas pathway can be garnered, an oncoselective prodeath therapeutic approach can be tailored. Herein, we propose that EGF and CTGF play essential roles in the regulation of the Fas apoptotic pathway in sarcomas. Tumor and in vitro data suggest viable cells counter the prodeath signal induced by FasL by activating EGF, which in turn induces prosurvival CTGF. The prosurvival attributes of CTGF ultimately predominate over the death-inducing FasL. Cells destined for elimination inhibit this prosurvival response via a presently undefined pathway. This scenario represents a novel role for EGF and CTGF as regulators of the Fas pathway in sarcomas.

  3. Galectin-1 and Galectin-3 induce mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in Jurkat cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'eva, O. A.; Isaeva, A. V.; Prokhorenko, T. S.; Zima, A. P.; Novitsky, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    Cellular malignant transformation is often accompanied by increased gene expression of low-molecular proteins of lectins family-galectins. But it is unknown how galectins promote tumor growth and malignization. Galectins-1 and galectin-3 are thought to be possible immunoregulators exerting their effects by regulating the balance of CD4+ lymphocytes. In addition it is known that tumor cells overexpressing galectins are capable of escaping immunological control, causing apoptosis of lymphocytes. The aim of the study is to investigate the role of galectin-1 and galectin-3 in the implementation of mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in Jurkat cells. Methods: Jurkat cells were used as a model for the study of T-lymphocytes. Jurkat cells were activated with antibodies to CD3 and CD28 and cultured with recombinant galectin-1 and -3. Apoptosis of Jurkat cells and depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane were assessed by flow cytometry. It was found that galectin-1 and galectin-3 have a dose-dependent pro-apoptotic effect on Jurkat cells in vitro and enlarge the number of cells with decreased mitochondrial membrane potential compared with intact cells.

  4. Distinct mathematical behavior of apoptotic versus non-apoptotic tumor cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The presence or absence of a p53-dependent apoptosis response has previously been shown to greatly influence radiosensitivity in tumor cells. Here, we examine clonogenic survival curves for two genetically related oncogene transformed cell lines differing in the presence or absence of p53 and apoptosis. Solid tumor radiosensitivity patterns have been previously described for these lines. Materials and Methods: Oncogene-transformed fibroblasts derived from E1A + Ras transfection of p53-wild-type or p53-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts were plated as single cells and irradiated at increasing radiation doses in single fractions from 1.5 to 11 Gy. Clonogenic cell survival assays were obtained. Survival data are fit to a linear-quadratic relationship: S = e-αD-βD2. Apoptosis was assessed and quantitated morphologically by staining with the fluorescent nuclear dye DAPI, by TUNEL assay for DNA fragmentation, and by measurement of apoptotic cysteine protease cleavage activity in cytosolic extracts. Results: Whereas radiation triggers massive apoptosis in the presence of p53, it produces no measurable DNA fragmentation, apoptotic cysteine protease cleavage activity, or morphological changes of apoptosis in the cells lacking p53. These contrasting mechanisms of death display dramatically different quantitative behavior: log-survival of apoptotic cells is linearly proportional to dose (S = e-αD), whereas survival of non-apoptotic (p53 null) is linear-quadratic with a significant quadratic contribution. The surviving fraction at 2 Gy (SF-2) for p53-null cells was 70% verses 12% for p53-intact cells. Conclusions: In this system, apoptosis appears to exhibit a dominance of single-event which produces a very high α/β ratio, and no significant shoulder; whereas non-apoptotic death in this system exhibits a comparatively small linear component, a low α/β ratio, and a larger shoulder

  5. Dual-functional bio-derived nanoparticulates for apoptotic antitumor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yang; Wang, Yazhe; Opoku-Damoah, Yaw; Wang, Cheng; Shen, Lingjia; Yin, Lifang; Zhou, Jianping

    2015-12-01

    The application of bio-derived nanoparticulates has gained a remarkable degree of interest as a promising sustained-release, site-targeted and completely biodegradable delivery system for chemotherapeutics. We hereby introduce a dual-functionalized biomimetic nanovector, cell-penetrating peptide (CPP)-anchored recombinant high density lipoproteins (cp-rHDL), which affords high payload and improved targeting of gambogic acid (GA), a therapeutic agent for apoptotic antitumor therapy. GA-loaded cp-rHDL nanoparticles (cp-rHDL/GA) consisted of hydrophobic core modulating GA, apolipoprotein A-I (apo A-I) for attractive integrating and tumor-homing, and lipophilic anchored R6H4 (RRRRRRHHHH, a pH-responsive CPP) offering a pH-controlled penetrating potential. Upon stepwise incubation with apo A-I and R6H4, cp-rHDL/GA presented several merits, including desirable physicochemical properties, superior biostability, and favorable buffering capacity resulting in proton sponge effect. Synergistic intracellular mechanism for scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI)-mediated direct transmembrane delivery, and pH-responsive R6H4 associated endocytotic pathway with rapid endo-lysosomal escape was also observed. This tailored cp-rHDL/GA displayed remarkable cytotoxicity and apoptotic effect via triggering p53 pathway, and provided approximately 5-fold increase in IC50 compared to free GA. Moreover, this rational biomimetic therapeutic strategy attained superior tumor accumulation and significant inhibition of tumor growth in HepG2 xenograft tumor animal models without measurable adverse effect. Results of this study demonstrated that bio-derived cp-rHDL/GA presents pH-responsive penetrating potential and efficient cellular internalization. This dual-functionalization model will open an avenue for exploration of multi-functional bio-derived drug delivery, thereby rendering potential broad applications in apoptotic anticancer therapy. PMID:26344366

  6. Abnormalities in Alternative Splicing of Apoptotic Genes and Cardiovascular Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Zodwa Dlamini; Tshidino, Shonisani C.; Rodney Hull

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is required for normal heart development in the embryo, but has also been shown to be an important factor in the occurrence of heart disease. Alternative splicing of apoptotic genes is currently emerging as a diagnostic and therapeutic target for heart disease. This review addresses the involvement of abnormalities in alternative splicing of apoptotic genes in cardiac disorders including cardiomyopathy, myocardial ischemia and heart failure. Many pro-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 f...

  7. Loss of runt-related transcription factor 3 expression leads hepatocellular carcinoma cells to escape apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3) is known as a tumor suppressor gene for gastric cancer and other cancers, this gene may be involved in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). RUNX3 expression was analyzed by immunoblot and immunohistochemistry in HCC cells and tissues, respectively. Hep3B cells, lacking endogenous RUNX3, were introduced with RUNX3 constructs. Cell proliferation was measured using the MTT assay and apoptosis was evaluated using DAPI staining. Apoptosis signaling was assessed by immunoblot analysis. RUNX3 protein expression was frequently inactivated in the HCC cell lines (91%) and tissues (90%). RUNX3 expression inhibited 90 ± 8% of cell growth at 72 h in serum starved Hep3B cells. Forty-eight hour serum starvation-induced apoptosis and the percentage of apoptotic cells reached 31 ± 4% and 4 ± 1% in RUNX3-expressing Hep3B and control cells, respectively. Apoptotic activity was increased by Bim expression and caspase-3 and caspase-9 activation. RUNX3 expression enhanced serum starvation-induced apoptosis in HCC cell lines. RUNX3 is deleted or weakly expressed in HCC, which leads to tumorigenesis by escaping apoptosis

  8. Loss of runt-related transcription factor 3 expression leads hepatocellular carcinoma cells to escape apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakamura Shinichiro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3 is known as a tumor suppressor gene for gastric cancer and other cancers, this gene may be involved in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Methods RUNX3 expression was analyzed by immunoblot and immunohistochemistry in HCC cells and tissues, respectively. Hep3B cells, lacking endogenous RUNX3, were introduced with RUNX3 constructs. Cell proliferation was measured using the MTT assay and apoptosis was evaluated using DAPI staining. Apoptosis signaling was assessed by immunoblot analysis. Results RUNX3 protein expression was frequently inactivated in the HCC cell lines (91% and tissues (90%. RUNX3 expression inhibited 90 ± 8% of cell growth at 72 h in serum starved Hep3B cells. Forty-eight hour serum starvation-induced apoptosis and the percentage of apoptotic cells reached 31 ± 4% and 4 ± 1% in RUNX3-expressing Hep3B and control cells, respectively. Apoptotic activity was increased by Bim expression and caspase-3 and caspase-9 activation. Conclusion RUNX3 expression enhanced serum starvation-induced apoptosis in HCC cell lines. RUNX3 is deleted or weakly expressed in HCC, which leads to tumorigenesis by escaping apoptosis.

  9. Arduino adventures escape from Gemini station

    CERN Document Server

    Kelly, James Floyd

    2013-01-01

    Arduino Adventures: Escape from Gemini Station provides a fun introduction to the Arduino microcontroller by putting you (the reader) into the action of a science fiction adventure story.  You'll find yourself following along as Cade and Elle explore Gemini Station-an orbiting museum dedicated to preserving and sharing technology throughout the centuries. Trouble ensues. The station is evacuated, including Cade and Elle's class that was visiting the station on a field trip. Cade and Elle don't make it aboard their shuttle and are trapped on the station along with a friendly artificial intellig

  10. Escape Artists of the X Chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaton, Bradley P; Brown, Carolyn J

    2016-06-01

    Inactivation of one X chromosome in mammalian females achieves dosage compensation between XX females and XY males; however, over 15% of human X-linked genes continue to be expressed from the inactive X chromosome. New genomic methodologies have improved our identification and characterization of these escape genes, revealing the importance of DNA sequence, chromatin structure, and chromosome ultrastructure in regulating expression from an otherwise inactive chromosome. Study of these exceptions to the rule of silencing highlights the interconnectedness of chromatin and chromosome structure in X-chromosome inactivation (XCI). Recent advances also demonstrate the importance of these genes in sexually dimorphic disease risk, particularly cancer. PMID:27103486

  11. Tectonically controlled methane escape in Lake Baikal

    OpenAIRE

    Klerkx, J.; De Batist, M.; J. Poort; Hus, R.; Van Rensbergen, P.; Khlystov, O.; Granin, N.

    2006-01-01

    Methane, which is at least partly stored in the bottom sediments of Lake Baikal as gas hydrates, is released on the lake floor in the deeper parts of the basin along major faults, forming venting structures similar to small mud volcanoes. The CH4 venting structures are considered to be the surface expression of escape pathways for excess CH4 generated by the dissociation of pre-existing hydrates. The existence of a local heat flow anomaly associated with the seep area is most likely due to a ...

  12. Has the UAE Escaped the Oil Curse?

    OpenAIRE

    Ilham Haouas; Raimundo Soto

    2012-01-01

    The UAE is blessed with vast deposits of oil and gas. Contrary to other oil-rich economies, the UAE seems to have escaped from the so-called “oil curse”. We study how the UAE used resource rents to achieve economic development and provide higher welfare for the local population. We identify, nevertheless, symptoms of the resource curse in three areas: very low growth in labor productivity, government policies unable to counteract economic cycles induced by oil-price volatility, and massive ov...

  13. Bcl-2 Inhibitors: Targeting Mitochondrial Apoptotic Pathways in Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Min H.; Reynolds, C. Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Defects in apoptotic pathways can promote cancer cell survival and also confer resistance to antineoplastic drugs. One pathway being targeted for antineoplastic therapy is the anti-apoptotic B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) family of proteins (Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, Bcl-w, Mcl-1, Bfl1/A-1, and Bcl-B) that bind to and inactivate BH3-domain pro-apoptotic proteins. Signals transmitted by cellular damage (including antineoplastic drugs) or cytokine deprivation can initiate apoptosis via the intrinsic apoptotic ...

  14. The effects of steady swimming on fish escape performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Sanam B; Cathcart, Kelsey; Darakananda, Karin; Gaing, Ashley N; Shin, Seo Yim; Vronay, Xena; Wright, Dania N; Ellerby, David J

    2016-06-01

    Escape maneuvers are essential to the survival and fitness of many animals. Escapes are frequently initiated when an animal is already in motion. This may introduce constraints that alter the escape performance. In fish, escape maneuvers and steady, body caudal fin (BCF) swimming are driven by distinct patterns of curvature of the body axis. Pre-existing muscle activity may therefore delay or diminish a response. To quantify the performance consequences of escaping in flow, escape behavior was examined in bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) in both still-water and during steady swimming. Escapes executed during swimming were kinematically less variable than those made in still-water. Swimming escapes also had increased response latencies and lower peak velocities and accelerations than those made in still-water. Performance was also lower for escapes made up rather than down-stream, and a preference for down-stream escapes may be associated with maximizing performance. The constraints imposed by pre-existing motion and flow, therefore, have the potential to shape predator-prey interactions under field conditions by shifting the optimal strategies for both predators and prey. PMID:27161016

  15. Escape from X inactivation varies in mouse tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel B Berletch

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available X chromosome inactivation (XCI silences most genes on one X chromosome in female mammals, but some genes escape XCI. To identify escape genes in vivo and to explore molecular mechanisms that regulate this process we analyzed the allele-specific expression and chromatin structure of X-linked genes in mouse tissues and cells with skewed XCI and distinguishable alleles based on single nucleotide polymorphisms. Using a binomial model to assess allelic expression, we demonstrate a continuum between complete silencing and expression from the inactive X (Xi. The validity of the RNA-seq approach was verified using RT-PCR with species-specific primers or Sanger sequencing. Both common escape genes and genes with significant differences in XCI status between tissues were identified. Such genes may be candidates for tissue-specific sex differences. Overall, few genes (3-7% escape XCI in any of the mouse tissues examined, suggesting stringent silencing and escape controls. In contrast, an in vitro system represented by the embryonic-kidney-derived Patski cell line showed a higher density of escape genes (21%, representing both kidney-specific escape genes and cell-line specific escape genes. Allele-specific RNA polymerase II occupancy and DNase I hypersensitivity at the promoter of genes on the Xi correlated well with levels of escape, consistent with an open chromatin structure at escape genes. Allele-specific CTCF binding on the Xi clustered at escape genes and was denser in brain compared to the Patski cell line, possibly contributing to a more compartmentalized structure of the Xi and fewer escape genes in brain compared to the cell line where larger domains of escape were observed.

  16. Molecular Dications in Planetary Atmospheric Escape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Falcinelli

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Fundamental properties of multiply charged molecular ions, such as energetics, structure, stability, lifetime and fragmentation dynamics, are relevant to understand and model the behavior of gaseous plasmas as well as ionosphere and astrophysical environments. Experimental determinations of the Kinetic Energy Released (KER for ions originating from dissociations reactions, induced by Coulomb explosion of doubly charged molecular ions (molecular dications produced by double photoionization of CO2, N2O and C2H2 molecules of interest in planetary atmospheres, are reported. The KER measurement as a function of the ultraviolet (UV photon energy in the range of 28–65 eV was extracted from the electron-ion-ion coincidence spectra obtained by using tunable synchrotron radiation coupled with ion imaging techniques at the ELETTRA Synchrotron Light Laboratory Trieste, Italy. These experiments, coupled with a computational analysis based on a Monte Carlo trajectory simulation, allow assessing the probability of escape for simple ionic species in the upper atmosphere of Mars, Venus and Titan. The measured KER in the case of H+, C+, CH+, CH2+, N+, O+, CO+, N2+ and NO+ fragment ions range between 1.0 and 5.5 eV, being large enough to allow these ionic species to participate in the atmospheric escape from such planets into space. In the case of Mars, we suggest a possible explanation for the observed behavior of the O+ and CO22+ ion density profiles.

  17. How some T cells escape tolerance induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammon, G; Sercarz, E

    1989-11-01

    A feature common to many animal models of autoimmune disease, for example, experimental allergic encephalomyelitis, experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis and collagen-induced arthritis, is the presence of self-reactive T cells in healthy animals, which are activated to produce disease by immunization with exogenous antigen. It is unclear why these T cells are not deleted during ontogeny in the thymus and, having escaped tolerance induction, why they are not spontaneously activated by self-antigen. To investigate these questions, we have examined an experimental model in which mice are tolerant to an antigen despite the presence of antigen-reactive T cells. We find that the T cells that escape tolerance induction are specific for minor determinants on the antigen. We propose that these T cells evade tolerance induction because some minor determinants are only available in relatively low amounts after in vivo processing of the whole antigen. For the same reason, these T cells are not normally activated but can be stimulated under special circumstances to circumvent tolerance. PMID:2478888

  18. Uremic escape of renal allograft rejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is demonstrated in rats that, in the presence of early postoperative severe but transient uremia, the survival of first set Brown-Norway (BN) renal allografts in Lewis (LEW) recipients is at least three times prolonged when compared to non-uremic controls. This phenomenon is called 'uremic escape of renal allograft rejection'. By means of lethal X-irradiation of donors of BN kidneys transplanted into transiently uremic and non-uremic LEW recipients, the presence of passenger lymphocyte immunocompetence is demonstrated to be obilgatory for this phenomenon to occur. As a result of mobile passenger lymphocyte immunocompetence, a graft-versus-host (GVH) reaction is elicited in the spleens of LEW recipients of BN kidneys which amplifies the host response. The splenomegaly observed in LEW recipients of BN kidneys is caused not only by this GVH reaction, which is shown to be exquisitely sensitive to even mild uremia. It is also contributed to by a proliferative response of the host against the graft (which latter response is equated with an in vivo equivalent of a unilateral mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR)), since the reduction in spleen weights caused by abrogation of mobile passenger lymphocyte immunocompetence brought about by lethal donor X-irradiation is increased significantly by early postoperative severe but transient uremia. It is concluded that in uremic escape of renal allograft rejection both reactions are suppressed by uremia during the early post-operative period. (Auth.)

  19. The regulation of apoptotic cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarante-Mendes G.P.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is a fundamental biological phenomenon in which the death of a cell is genetically and biochemically regulated. Different molecules are involved in the regulation of the apoptotic process. Death receptors, coupled to distinct members of the caspases as well as other adapter molecules, are involved in the initiation of the stress signals (The Indictment. Members of the Bcl-2 family control at the mitochondrial level the decision between life and death (The Judgement. The effector caspases are responsible for all morphological and biochemical changes related to apoptosis including the "eat-me" signals perceived by phagocytes and neighboring cells (The Execution. Finally, apoptosis would have little biological significance without the recognition and removal of the dying cells (The Burial.

  20. The Anti-Apoptotic Role of Neuroglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Brittain

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The small heme-protein neuroglobin is expressed at high concentrations in certain brain neurons and in the rod cells of the retina. This paper reviews the many studies which have recently identified a protective role for neuroglobin, in a wide range of situations involving apoptotic cell death. The origins of this protective mechanism are discussed in terms of both experimental results and computational modeling of the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis, which shows that neuroglobin can intervene in this process by a reaction with released mitochondrial cytochrome c. An integrated model, based on the various molecular actions of both neuroglobin and cytochrome c, is developed, which accounts for the cellular distribution of neuroglobin.

  1. Investigations of extracellular matrix proteases, apoptotic and anti-apoptotic factors in the bovine corpus luteum

    OpenAIRE

    Kliem, Heike

    2006-01-01

    The study is subdivided into two different parts: the first part deals with the development of a method to gain uterus milk in vivo during the preimplantation periode in cattle for the investigation of regulatory factors. The second part investigates different proteases in bovine follicles 20 hours after GnRH (Gonadotropin releasing hormone) injection (shortly bevor ovulation) for comparable as well as in the corpus luteum (CL) during oestrous cycle and induced luteolysis. In addition apoptot...

  2. Nitric oxide as a pro-apoptotic as well as anti-apoptotic modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Byung-Min; Pae, Hyun-Ock; Jang, Seon Il; Kim, Young-Myeong; Chung, Hun-Taeg

    2002-01-31

    Nitric oxide (NO), synthesized from L-arginine by NO synthases, is a small, lipophilic, diffusible, highly reactive molecule with dichotomous regulatory roles in many biological events under physiological and pathological conditions. NO can promote apoptosis (pro-apoptosis) in some cells, whereas it inhibits apoptosis (anti-apoptosis) in other cells. This complexity is a consequence of the rate of NO production and the interaction with biological molecules such as metal ion, thiol, protein tyrosine, and reactive oxygen species. Long-lasting overproduction of NO acts as a pro-apoptotic modulator, activating caspase family proteases through the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c into cytosol, up-regulation of the p53 expression, and alterations in the expression of apoptosis-associated proteins, including the Bcl-2 family. However, low or physiological concentrations of NO prevent cells from apoptosis that is induced by the trophic factor withdrawal, Fas, TNFalpha/ActD, and LPS. The anti-apoptotic mechanism is understood on the basis of gene transcription of protective proteins. These include: heat shock protein, hemeoxygenase, or cyclooxygenase-2 and direct inhibition of the apoptotic executive effectors caspase family protease by S-nitrosylation of the cysteine thiol group in their catalytic site in a cell specific way. Our current understanding of the mechanisms by which NO exerts both pro- and anti-apototic action is discussed in this review article. PMID:16248976

  3. New Analysis of Hydrogen and Deuterium Escape from Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Thomas M.

    1999-10-01

    This paper is concerned with the time required for escape of hydrogen and deuterium to produce the present D/ H ratio in Venus water, the sizes of the original hydrogen reservoirs and their sensitivity to the magnitude of the present escape fluxes, the characteristics of exogenous and endogenous hydrogen sources, and the D/ H ratio for primordial Venus hydrogen. The procedure followed allowed the H escape flux to vary over a large range, the ratio of input to escape flux to vary from 0 to 1, and the fractionation factor, which expresses the relative efficiency of D and H escape, to vary between 0.02 and 0.5. It was found that, unless deuterium escape is very efficient, the present H escape flux (averaged over a solar cycle) cannot be larger than about 10 7 cm -2 s -1 if today's water is to be the remnant of water deposited eons ago. On the other hand if the escape flux is as large as large as 3×10 7 cm -2 s -1, today's water would be the remnant of water outgassed only about 500 million years ago. These conclusions are relatively insensitive to factors other than the magnitude of the escape flux. Since recent analysis of escape fluxes indicates that the H escape fluxes may be in the neighborhood of 3×10 7 cm -2 s -1 and the fractionation factor may be 0.14 or larger, the suggestion of Grinspoon (1993, Nature 363, 1702-1704) that the water now on Venus was created during a recent massive resurfacing event is credible. However, since it is still possible that the average escape flux is as small as 7×10 6 cm -2 s -1, the choice between 4 and 0.5 Gyr must await a resolution of this conflict by reanalysis of Pioneer Venus Lyman α data (Paxton, L., D. E. Anderson, and A. I. F. Stewart 1988, J. Geophys. Res. 93, 1766-1772).

  4. The atmospheric escape at Mars: complementing the scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilensten, Jean; Simon, Cyril; Barthélémy, Mathieu; Thissen, Roland; Ehrenreich, David; Gronoff, Guillaume; Witasse, Olivier

    2013-04-01

    In the recent years, the presence of dications in the atmospheres of Mars, Venus, Earth and Titan has been modeled and assessed. These studies also suggested that these ions could participate to the escape of the planetary atmospheres because a large fraction of them is unstable and highly ener- getic. When they dissociate, their internal energy is transformed into kinetic energy which may be larger than the escape energy. This study assesses the impact of the doubly-charged ions in the escape of CO2-dominated planetary atmospheres and to compare it to the escape of thermal photo-ions.We solve a Boltzmann transport equation at daytime taking into account the dissociative states of CO++ for a simplified single constituent atmosphere of a 2 case-study planet. We compute the escape of fast ions using a Beer-Lambert approach. We study three test-cases. On a Mars-analog planet in today's conditions, we retrieve the measured electron escape flux. When comparing the two mechanisms (i.e. excluding solar wind effects, sputtering ...), the escape due to the fast ions issuing from the dissociation of dications may account for up to 6% of the total and the escape of thermal ions for the remaining. We show that these two mechanisms cannot explain the escape of the atmosphere since the magnetic field vanished but complement the other processes and allow writing the scenario of the Mars escape. We show that the atmosphere of a Mars analog planet would empty in another giga years and a half. At Venus orbit, the contribution of the dications in the escape rate is negligible.When simulating the hot Jupiter HD209458b, the two processes cannot explain the measured escape flux of C+.

  5. Chaotic Scattering and Escape Times of Marginally Trapped Ultracold Neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, K. J.; Doyle, J. M.; Dzhosyuk, S. N.; Yang, L.; Huffman, P. R.

    2005-01-01

    We compute classical trajectories of Ultracold neutrons (UCNs) in a superconducting Ioffe-type magnetic trap using a symplectic integration method. We find that the computed escape time for a particular set of initial conditions (momentum and position) does not generally stabilize as the time step parameter is reduced unless the escape time is short (less than approximately 10 s). For energy intervals where more than half of the escape times computed for UCN realizations are numerically well determined, we predict the median escape time as a function of the midpoint of the interval.

  6. Distinct mathematical behavior of apoptotic vs. non-apoptotic tumor cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: A quantitative description of cancer cell death behavior is of potential importance in identifying prognostically meaningful treatment responses and mechanisms underlying those responses. Here we examine clonogenic survival curves for two genetically related tumor cell lines differing in the presence or absence of p53, for whom solid tumor radiosensitivity patterns have been previously described. Materials and Methods: Oncogene-transformed fibroblasts derived from E1A+Ras tranfections of p53 wildtype or p53 null mouse embryonic fibroblasts were plated in single cell suspension. Cells were irradiated at increasing radiation doses from 1.5 Gy to 11 Gy. Dishes were scored for colonies at day 11. Survival curves were generated by least-squares regression over dose of log (survival) onto the quadratic (αD + βD2), each point being weighted inversely to the variance among replicates. Apoptosis was assessed morphologically by staining with flourescent nuclear dye DAPI, by DNA fragmentation with the APOPTAG Apoptosis Detection Kit (Oncor), and by measurement of apoptotic cysteine protease cleavage activity in cytosolic extracts. Results: Whereas radiation triggers massive apoptosis in the presence of p53, in this system it produces no measurable DNA fragmentation, apoptotic cysteine protease cleavage activity, or morphologic changes of apoptosis in the cells lacking p53. These contrasting mechanisms of death display dramatically different quantitative behavior: log-survival of apoptotic cells is linearly proportional to dose (S=e-nD) whereas non-apoptotic survival is quadratically related to dose (S=e-nD2). Radioresistance at clinical doses (about 2 Gy) were largely mirrored by the initial slopes. For quadratic killing, survival was nearly flat at 77%, whereas it was only 12% for apoptosis owing to its steep linear slope. Conclusions: Apoptosis exhibits single hit kinetics and is seen to produce a high α/β ratio and no significant shoulder, whereas non-apoptotic

  7. The Fastest Saccadic Responses Escape Visual Masking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    M. Crouzet, Sébastien; Overgaard, Morten; Busch, Niko A.

    2014-01-01

    Object-substitution masking (OSM) occurs when a briefly presented target in a search array is surrounded by small dots that remain visible after the target disappears. The reduction of target visibility occurring after OSM has been suggested to result from a specific interference with reentrant...... visual processing while the initial feedforward processing is thought to be left intact. We tested a prediction derived from this hypothesis: the fastest responses, being triggered before the beginning of reentrant processing, should escape the OSM interference. In a saccadic choice reaction time task......, which gives access to very early stages of visual processing, target visibility was reduced either by OSM, conventional backward masking, or low stimulus contrast. A general reduction of performance was observed in all three conditions. However, the fastest saccades did not show any sign of interference...

  8. Gated narrow escape time for molecular signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reingruber, Jürgen; Holcman, David

    2009-10-01

    The mean time for a diffusing ligand to activate a target protein located on the surface of a microdomain can regulate cellular signaling. When the ligand switches between various states induced by chemical interactions or conformational changes, while target activation occurs in only one state, this activation time is affected. We investigate this dynamics using new equations for the sojourn times spent in each state. For two states, we obtain exact solutions in dimension one, and asymptotic ones confirmed by Brownian simulations in dimension 3. We find that the activation time is quite sensitive to changes of the switching rates, which can be used to modulate signaling. Interestingly, our analysis reveals that activation can be fast although the ligand spends most of the time "hidden" in the nonactivating state. Finally, we obtain a new formula for the narrow escape time in the presence of switching. PMID:19905605

  9. Methane attenuates retinal ischemia/reperfusion injury via anti-oxidative and anti-apoptotic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Sun, Qinglei; Wang, Ruobing; Chen, Zeli; Wu, Jiangchun; Xia, Fangzhou; Fan, Xian-Qun

    2016-09-01

    Retinal ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) may cause incurable visual impairment due to neural regeneration limits. Methane was shown to exert a protective effect against IRI in many organs. This study aims to explore the possible protective effects of methane-rich saline against retinal IRI in rat. Retinal IRI was performed on the right eyes of male Sprague-Dawley rats, which were immediately injected intraperitoneally with methane-saturated saline (25ml/kg). At one week after surgery, the number of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), total retinal thickness, visual function were measured by hematoxylin and eosin staining, FluoroGold anterograde labeling and flash visual evoked potentials. The levels of 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), 4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE), malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), caspase-3, caspase-9, B cell lymphoma/leukemia-2 (Bcl-2) and Bcl-2 associated X protein (Bax) in retinas were assessed by immunofluorescence staining, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. As expected, methane treatment significantly improved the retinal IRI-induced RGC loss, total retinal layer thinning and visual dysfunction. Moreover, methane treatment significantly reduced the levels of oxidative stress biomarkers (8-OHdG, 4-HNE, MDA) and increased the antioxidant enzyme activities (SOD, CAT, GPx) in the retinas with IRI. Meanwhile, methane treatment significantly increased the anti-apoptotic gene (Bcl-2) expression and decreased the pro-apoptotic gene (Bax) expression, accompanied by the suppression of caspase-3 and caspase-9 activity. Thus, these data demonstrated that methane can exert a neuroprotective role against retinal IRI through anti-oxidative and anti-apoptotic pathways. PMID:27208496

  10. Teachers Offering Healthy Escape Options for Teenagers in Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaywell, Joan F.

    2005-01-01

    "[T]wenty-five percent of today's teenagers have inordinate emotional baggage beyond the normal angst of adolescence." This burden can lead to unhealthy escapes, including substance abuse, sexual activity, violence, eating disorders, and suicide. One healthy escape, however, lies in books, where students can read about teenagers living in painful…

  11. Escape response of planktonic protists to fluid mechanical signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Hans Henrik

    2001-01-01

    The escape response to fluid mechanical signals was examined in 6 protists, 4 ciliates and 2 dinoflagellates. When exposed to a siphon flow. 3 species of ciliates, Balanion comatum, Strobilidium sp., and Mesodinium pulex, responded with escape jumps. The threshold deformation rates required to...

  12. Split-second escape decisions in blue tits (Parus caeruleus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Johan; Kaby, Ulrika; Jakobsson, Sven

    2002-07-01

    Bird mortality is heavily affected by birds of prey. Under attack, take-off is crucial for survival and even minor mistakes in initial escape response can have devastating consequences. Birds may respond differently depending on the character of the predator's attack and these split-second decisions were studied using a model merlin (Falco columbarius) that attacked feeding blue tits (Parus caeruleus) from two different attack angles in two different speeds. When attacked from a low attack angle they took off more steeply than when attacked from a high angle. This is the first study to show that escape behaviour also depends on predator attack speed. The blue tits responded to a high-speed attack by dodging sideways more often than when attacked at a low speed. Escape speed was not significantly affected by the different treatments. Although they have only a split-second before escaping an attack, blue tits do adjust their escape strategy to the prevailing attack conditions.

  13. Escaping in couples facilitates evacuation: Experimental study and modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Ning; Hu, Mao-Bin; Ding, Jian-Xun; Ding, Zhong-Jun

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the impact of escaping in couples on the evacuation dynamics has been investigated via experiments and modeling. Two sets of experiments have been implemented, in which pedestrians are asked to escape either in individual or in couples. The experiments show that escaping in couples can decrease the average evacuation time. Moreover, it is found that the average evacuation time gap is essentially constant, which means that the evacuation speed essentially does not depend on the number of pedestrians that have not yet escaped. To model the evacuation dynamics, an improved social force model has been proposed, in which it is assumed that the driving force of a pedestrian cannot be fulfilled when the composition of physical forces exceeds a threshold because the pedestrian cannot keep his/her body balance under this circumstance. To model the effect of escaping in couples, attraction force has been introduced between the partners. Simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental ones.

  14. Mission Impossible (Escape from the Lyman Limit)

    CERN Document Server

    Fernández-Soto, A; Chen, H W

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the intrinsic opacity of high-redshift galaxies to outgoing ionising photons using high-quality photometry of a sample of 27 spectroscopically-identified galaxies of redshift 1.9escape galaxies of redshift 1.9

  15. Enzyme immunoassay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, B; Dinesen, B; Deckert, M

    1985-01-01

    An enzyme linked immunoadsorbent assay for urinary albumin using commercially available reagents is described. The assay range is 2.5-120 micrograms/l. When samples are analysed in two standard dilutions, the assayable albumin concentration range is 2.5-240 mg/l, covering the clinical range from...

  16. Food Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBroom, Rachel; Oliver-Hoyo, Maria T.

    2007-01-01

    Many students view biology and chemistry as two unrelated, separate sciences; how these courses are generally taught in high schools may do little to change that impression. The study of enzymes provide a great opportunity for both biology and chemistry teachers to share with students the interdisciplinary nature of science. This article describes…

  17. In vitro study of immunosuppressive effect of apoptotic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wen-jin; ZHENG Shu-sen

    2005-01-01

    Recent studies revealed that apoptotic cells are actively involved in immunosuppression and anti-inflammation. After being phagocytosed by macrophages, apoptotic cells can actively regulate cytokines secretion from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages, in which the secretion of immunosuppressive cytokines such as interleukin-10 (IL-10) is increased while the pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα), interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) and leukin-8 (IL-8) are suppressed. In this paper, we first present evidence that phagocytosed apoptotic cells regulate cytokine secretion of LPS-stimulated macrophages, but also inhibit the activation of T lymphocytes stimulated by ConA. These data suggest that apoptotic cells can alter the biological behavior of macrophages which gain immunosuppressive property.

  18. Dications and thermal ions in planetary atmospheric escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilensten, J.; Simon Wedlund, C.; Barthélémy, M.; Thissen, R.; Ehrenreich, D.; Gronoff, G.; Witasse, O.

    2013-01-01

    In the recent years, the presence of dications in the atmospheres of Mars, Venus, Earth and Titan has been modeled and assessed. These studies also suggested that these ions could participate to the escape of the planetary atmospheres because a large fraction of them is unstable and highly energetic. When they dissociate, their internal energy is transformed into kinetic energy which may be larger than the escape energy. The goal of this study is to assess the impact of the doubly-charged ions in the escape of CO2-dominated planetary atmospheres and to compare it to the escape of thermal photo-ions. We solve a Boltzmann transport equation at daytime taking into account the dissociative states of CO2++ for a simplified single constituent atmosphere of a case-study planet. We compute the escape of fast ions using a Beer-Lambert approach. We study three test-cases. On a Mars-analog planet in today's conditions, we retrieve the measured electron escape flux. When comparing the two mechanisms (i.e. excluding solar wind effects, sputtering, etc.), the escape due to the fast ions issuing from the dissociation of dications may account for up to 6% of the total and the escape of thermal ions for the remaining. We show that these two mechanisms cannot explain the escape of the atmosphere since the magnetic field vanished and even contribute only marginally to this loss. We show that with these two mechanisms, the atmosphere of a Mars analog planet would empty in another giga years and a half. At Venus orbit, the contribution of the dications in the escape rate is negligible. When simulating the hot Jupiter HD 209458 b, the two processes cannot explain the measured escape flux of C+. This study shows that the dications may constitute a source of the escape of planetary atmospheres which had not been taken into account until now. This source, although marginal, is not negligible. The influence of the photoionization is of course large, but cannot explain alone the loss of Mars

  19. Apoptotic Genes are Differentially Expressed in Aged Gingival Tissue

    OpenAIRE

    González, O. A.; Stromberg, A.J.; Huggins, P. M.; Gonzalez-Martinez, J.; Novak, M.J.; Ebersole, J. L.

    2011-01-01

    Cellular and molecular changes of the periodontium associated with a higher prevalence of oral diseases (e.g., chronic periodontitis) in aged populations have received little attention. Since impaired apoptosis during aging appears to be related to chronic inflammatory disorders, we hypothesized that the expression of genes associated with apoptotic processes are altered in aged healthy and periodontitis-affected gingival tissue. Ontology analysis of 88 genes related to apoptotic pathways was...

  20. Alterations in oxidative, inflammatory and apoptotic events in short-lived and long-lived mice testes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzkin, María Eugenia; Miquet, Johanna Gabriela; Fang, Yimin; Hill, Cristal Monique; Turyn, Daniel; Calandra, Ricardo Saúl; Bartke, Andrzej; Frungieri, Mónica Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    Aged testes undergo profound histological and morphological alterations leading to a reduced functionality. Here, we investigated whether variations in longevity affect the development of local inflammatory processes, the oxidative state and the occurrence of apoptotic events in the testis. To this aim, well-established mouse models with delayed (growth hormone releasing hormone-knockout and Ames dwarf mice) or accelerated (growth hormone-transgenic mice) aging were used. We hereby show that the testes of short-lived mice show a significant increase in cyclooxygenase 2 expression, PGD2 production, lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzymes expression, local macrophages and TUNEL-positive germ cells numbers, and the levels of both pro-caspase-3 and cleaved caspase-3. In contrast, although the expression of antioxidant enzymes remained unchanged in testes of long-lived mice, the remainder of the parameters assessed showed a significant reduction. This study provides novel evidence that longevity confers anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and anti-apoptotic capacities to the adult testis. Oppositely, short-lived mice suffer testicular inflammatory, oxidative and apoptotic processes. PMID:26805572

  1. Xenon Fractionation, Hydrogen Escape, and the Oxidation of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahnle, K. J.; Catling, D. C.

    2014-12-01

    Xenon in Earth's atmosphere is severely mass fractionated and depleted compared to any plausible solar system source material, yet Kr is unfractionated. These observations seem to imply that Xe has escaped from Earth. Vigorous hydrodynamic hydrogen escape can produce mass fractionation in heavy gases. The required hydrogen flux is very high but within the range permitted by solar EUV heating when Earth was 100 Myrs old or younger. However this model cannot explain why Xe escapes but Kr does not. Recently, what appears to be ancient atmospheric xenon has been recovered from several very ancient (3-3.5 Ga) terrestrial hydrothermal barites and cherts (Pujol 2011, 2013). What is eye-catching about this ancient Xe is that it is less fractionated that Xe in modern air. In other words, it appears that a process was active on Earth some 3 to 3.5 billion years ago that caused xenon to fractionate. By this time the Sun was no longer the EUV source that it used to be. If xenon was being fractionated by escape — currently the only viable hypothesis — it had to be in Earth's Archean atmosphere and under rather modest levels of EUV forcing. It should be possible for Xe, but not Kr, to escape from Earth as an ion. In a hydrodynamically escaping hydrogen wind the hydrogen is partially ionized. The key concepts are that ions are much more strongly coupled to the escaping flow than are neutrals (so that a relatively modest flow of H and H+ to space could carry Xe+ along with it, the flux can be small enough to be consistent with diffusion-limited flux), and that Xe alone among the noble gases is more easily ionized than hydrogen. This sort of escape is possible along the polar field lines, although a weak or absent magnetic field would likely work as well. The extended history of hydrogen escape implicit in Xe escape in the Archean is consistent with other suggestions that hydrogen escape in the Archean was considerable. Hydrogen escape plausibly played the key role in creating

  2. Photoreactivating enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photoreactivating enzymes (PRE) also called photolyases (EC 4.1.99.3) catalyze the light 300 to 600 nm)-dependent monomerization of cyclobutyl pyrimidine dimers, formed between adjacent pyrimidines on the same DNA strand, upon exposure to ultraviolet (uv) irradiation (220 to 320 nm). Although much is known about the substrate and product of these unusual enzymes, their identification required the development and synthesis of such fields as photochemistry, biochemistry, and microbiology. Photoreactivation was first known as a biological recovery phenomenon: cells exposed to visible light following uv irradiation showed higher survival than those kept in the dark. Early investigators examined the photoreactivability of an enormous range of cellular damage in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. This review article discusses the purification and properties of PRE, the kinetics of photoreactivation and the biological role of this repair process

  3. Engineering enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Dutton, P. Leslie; Moser, Christopher C.

    2011-01-01

    Fundamental research into bioinorganic catalysis of the kind presented at this Faraday Discussion has the potential to turn inspiration drawn from impressive natural energy and chemical transformations into artificial catalyst constructions useful to mankind. Creating bio-inspired artificial constructions requires a level of understanding well beyond simple description of structures and mechanisms of natural enzymes. To be useful, such description must be augmented by a practical sense of str...

  4. Surface code—biophysical signals for apoptotic cell clearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apoptotic cell death and the clearance of dying cells play an important and physiological role in embryonic development and normal tissue turnover. In contrast to necrosis, apoptosis proceeds in an anti-inflammatory manner. It is orchestrated by the timed release and/or exposure of so-called ‘find-me’, ‘eat me’ and ‘tolerate me’ signals. Mononuclear phagocytes are attracted by various ‘find-me’ signals, including proteins, nucleotides, and phospholipids released by the dying cell, whereas the involvement of granulocytes is prevented via ‘stay away’ signals. The exposure of anionic phospholipids like phosphatidylserine (PS) by apoptotic cells on the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane is one of the main ‘eat me’ signals. PS is recognized by a number of innate receptors as well as by soluble bridging molecules on the surface of phagocytes. Importantly, phagocytes are able to discriminate between viable and apoptotic cells both exposing PS. Due to cytoskeleton remodeling PS has a higher lateral mobility on the surfaces of apoptotic cells thereby promoting receptor clustering on the phagocyte. PS not only plays an important role in the engulfment process, but also acts as ‘tolerate me’ signal inducing the release of anti-inflammatory cytokines by phagocytes. An efficient and fast clearance of apoptotic cells is required to prevent secondary necrosis and leakage of intracellular danger signals into the surrounding tissue. Failure or prolongation of the clearance process leads to the release of intracellular antigens into the periphery provoking inflammation and development of systemic inflammatory autoimmune disease like systemic lupus erythematosus. Here we review the current findings concerning apoptosis-inducing pathways, important players of apoptotic cell recognition and clearance as well as the role of membrane remodeling in the engulfment of apoptotic cells by phagocytes. (paper)

  5. Amplitude modulation control of escape from a potential well

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chacón, R. [Departamento de Física Aplicada, Escuela de Ingenierías Industriales, Universidad de Extremadura, Apartado Postal 382, E-06006 Badajoz (Spain); Martínez García-Hoz, A. [Departamento de Física Aplicada, Escuela Universitaria Politécnica, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, E-13400 Almadén (Ciudad Real) (Spain); Miralles, J.J. [Departamento de Física Aplicada, Escuela de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, E-02071 Albacete (Spain); Martínez, P.J. [Departamento de Física Aplicada, E.I.N.A., Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón, CSIC – Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate the effectiveness of periodic amplitude modulations in controlling (suppressing and enhancing) escape from a potential well through the universal model of a damped Helmholtz oscillator subjected to an external periodic excitation (the escape-inducing excitation) whose amplitude is periodically modulated (the escape-controlling excitation). Analytical and numerical results show that this multiplicative control works reliably for different subharmonic resonances between the two periodic excitations involved, and that its effectiveness is comparable to those of different methods of additive control. Additionally, we demonstrate the robustness of the multiplicative control against the presence of low-intensity Gaussian noise. -- Highlights: •Multiplicative control of escape from a potential well has been demonstrated. •Theoretical predictions are obtained from a Melnikov analysis. •It has been shown the robustness of the multiplicative control against noise.

  6. Theoretical Study on Ion Escape in Martian Atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Jian-Kui; LIU Zhen-Xing; Klaus TORKAR; Tielong ZHANG

    2007-01-01

    @@ Based on the observation that Martian magnetic moment is gradually reducing from the ancient to the present,we investigate the O+ ion flux distribution along magnetic field lines and the ion escaping flux in Martian tail with different assumed Martian magnetic moments. The results show that the O+ ion flux along magnetic field lines decreases with distance from Mars; the ion flux along the field line decreases more quickly if the magnetic moment is larger; the larger the magnetic moment, the smaller the ion escaping flux in the Martian tail. The ion escaping flux depends on Z-coordinate in the Martian tail. With decrease of the magnetic moment, the ion escaping flux in the Martian tail increases. The results are significant for studying the water loss from Mars surface.

  7. Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) Ionosphere Evidence for Atmospheric Escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebowsky, J. M.; Hoegy, W. R.

    2009-12-01

    An early estimate of escape of H2O from Venus [McElroy et al., 1982] using observed hot oxygen densities inferred by Nagy et al. [1981] from PVO OUVS 1304 Å dayglow and using ionization rates from photoionization and electron impact. This resulted in an estimated oxygen ionization rate planet-wide above the plasmapause of 3x1025 atoms/s. Based on the energetic O+ being swept up and removed by solar wind, McElroy et al. [1982] gave an estimate of a loss rate for O of 6x106 atoms/cm2/s. Using a different method of estimating escape based data in the ionotail of Venus, Brace et al. [1987] estimated a total planetary O+ escape rate of 5x1025 ions/s. Their estimate was based on PVO measurements of superthermal O+ (energy range 9-16 eV) in the tail ray plasma between 2000 and 3000 km. Their estimated global mean flux was 107 atoms/cm2/s. The two escape rates are remarkably close considering all the errors involved in such estimates of escape. A study of escape by Luhmann et al. [2008] using VEX observations at low solar activity finds modest escape rates, prompting the authors to reconsider the evidence from both PVO and VEX of the possibility of enhanced escape during extreme interplanetary conditions. We reexamine the variation of escape under different solar wind conditions using ion densities and plasma content in the dayside and nightside of Venus using PVO ionosphere density during times of high solar activity. Citations: Brace, L.H., W. T. Kasprzak, H.A. Taylor, R. F. Theis, C. T. Russess, A. Barnes, J. D. Mihalov, and D. M. Hunten, "The Ionotail of Venus: Its Configuration and Evidence for Ion Escape", J. Geophys. Res. 92, 15-26, 1987. Luhmann, J.G., A. Fedorov, S. Barabash, E. Carlsson, Y. Futaana, T.L. Zhang, C.T. Russell, J.G. Lyon, S.A. Ledvina, and D.A. Brain, “Venus Express observations of atmospheric oxygen escape during the passage of several coronal mass ejections”, J. Geophys. Res., 113, 2008. McElroy, M. B., M. J. Prather, J. M. Rodiquez, " Loss

  8. Speed kills: ineffective avian escape responses to oncoming vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Travis L DeVault; Blackwell, Bradley F.; Seamans, Thomas W.; Lima, Steven L.; Fernández-Juricic, Esteban

    2015-01-01

    Animal–vehicle collisions cause high levels of vertebrate mortality worldwide, and what goes wrong when animals fail to escape and ultimately collide with vehicles is not well understood. We investigated alert and escape behaviours of captive brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater) in response to virtual vehicle approaches of different sizes and at speeds ranging from 60 to 360 km h−1. Alert and flight initiation distances remained similar across vehicle speeds, and accordingly, alert and flig...

  9. Escape angles in bulk chi((2)) soliton interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Johansen, Steffen Kjær; Bang, Ole; Sørensen, Mads Peter

    2002-01-01

    We develop a theory for nonplanar interaction between two identical type I spatial solitons propagating at opposite, but arbitrary transverse angles in quadratic nonlinear (or so-called chi((2))) bulk, media. We predict quantitatively the outwards escape angle, below which the solitons turn around and collide, and above which they continue to move-away from each other. For in-plane interaction, the theory allows prediction of the Outcome of a collision through the inwards escape angle, i.e., ...

  10. Recording Field Potentials From Zebrafish Larvae During Escape Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Monesson-Olson, Bryan D.; Troconis, Eileen L.; Trapani, Josef G.

    2014-01-01

    Among vertebrates, startle responses are a ubiquitous method for alerting, and avoiding or escaping from alarming or dangerous stimuli. In zebrafish larvae, fast escape behavior is easily evoked through either acoustic or tactile stimuli. For example, a light touch to the head will excite trigeminal neurons that in turn excite a large reticulospinal neuron in the hindbrain called the Mauthner cell (M-cell). The M-cell action potential then travels down the contralateral trunk of the larva exc...

  11. On the escape of particles from cosmic ray modified shocks

    OpenAIRE

    Caprioli, D.; P. Blasi(INAF Arcetri); Amato, E.

    2008-01-01

    Stationary solutions to the problem of particle acceleration at shock waves in the non-linear regime, when the dynamical reaction of the accelerated particles on the shock cannot be neglected, are known to show a prominent energy flux escaping from the shock towards upstream infinity. On physical grounds, the escape of particles from the upstream region of a shock has to be expected in all those situations in which the maximum momentum of accelerated particles, $p_{max}$, decreases with time,...

  12. Non-linear diffusive shock acceleration with free escape boundary

    OpenAIRE

    Caprioli, D.; Amato, E.; P. Blasi(INAF Arcetri)

    2009-01-01

    We present here a semi-analytical solution of the problem of particle acceleration at non-linear shock waves with a free escape boundary at some location upstream. This solution, besides allowing us to determine the spectrum of particles accelerated at the shock front, including the shape of the cutoff at some maximum momentum, also allows us to determine the spectrum of particles escaping the system from upstream. This latter aspect of the problem is crucial for establishing a connection bet...

  13. Escaping From Predation At Low Reynolds Number: A Compensatory Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmell, Brad; Sheng, Jian; Buskey, Ed

    2010-11-01

    Small planktonic organisms such as copepods are often the first foods for many species of fish and thus, subject to high predation rates. They have developed strong escape responses to attacks from visual predators and this behavior is found even in the youngest development stage. Because of their small size (approx. 100 μm), these juvenile copepods must contend with greater viscous forces than their predators during encounters. In this study, we investigate the role of viscosity on escape swimming performance of young copepods within the context of the environmental temperatures (10C-30C) these animals experience along the Texas coast. 3-Dimensional high speed (3000 frames per second) digital holographic techniques were used to elucidate kinematics and kinetics of swimming. Here we show that although escape velocity and acceleration are reduced as a function of both increasing viscosity and decreasing temperature, total escape distance is conserved. Interestingly, we observed no difference in the number swimming strokes per escape. Instead, the animals exhibit a compensatory mechanism based on increasing power stroke duration to recovery stroke duration to counter act the increasing viscosity at lower temperature. Flow analysis shows this results in the conservation of energy expenditure, and consequently escape distance.

  14. Optimal escapement in stage-structured fisheries with environmental stochasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Matthew H; Conrad, Jon M

    2015-11-01

    Stage-structured population models are commonly used to understand fish population dynamics and additionally for stock assessment. Unfortunately, there is little theory on the optimal harvest of stage-structured populations, especially in the presence of stochastic fluctuations. In this paper, we find closed form optimal equilibrium escapement policies for a three-dimensional, discrete-time, stage-structured population model with linear growth, post-harvest nonlinear recruitment, and stage-specific pricing and extend the analytic results to structured populations with environmental stochasticity. When only fishing reproductive adults, stochasticity does not affect optimal escapement policies. However, when harvesting immature fish, the addition of stochasticity can increase or decrease optimal escapement depending on the second and third derivative of the recruitment function. For logistic recruitment, stochasticity reduces optimal immature escapement by a multiplicative factor of one over one plus the variance of the environmental noise. Using hard clam, Mercenaria mercenaria, as an example and assuming Beverton-Holt recruitment, we show that optimal fishing of hard clam targets the immature stage class exclusively and that environmental stochasticity increases optimal escapement for low discount rates and decreases optimal escapement for high discount rates. PMID:26362229

  15. Escape dynamics and fractal basin boundaries in Seyfert galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Zotos, Euaggelos E

    2015-01-01

    The escape dynamics in a simple analytical gravitational model which describes the motion of stars in a Seyfert galaxy is investigated in detail. We conduct a thorough numerical analysis distinguishing between regular and chaotic orbits as well as between trapped and escaping orbits, considering only unbounded motion for several energy levels. In order to distinguish safely and with certainty between ordered and chaotic motion, we apply the Smaller ALingment Index (SALI) method. It is of particular interest to locate the escape basins through the openings around the collinear Lagrangian points $L_1$ and $L_2$ and relate them with the corresponding spatial distribution of the escape times of the orbits. Our exploration takes place both in the physical $(x,y)$ and in the phase $(x,\\dot{x})$ space in order to elucidate the escape process as well as the overall orbital properties of the galactic system. Our numerical analysis reveals the strong dependence of the properties of the considered escape basins with the...

  16. Resveratrol engages selective apoptotic signals in gastric adenocarcinoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    William L Riles; Jason Erickson; Sanjay Nayyar; Mary Jo Atten; Bashar M Attar; Oksana Holian

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the intracellular apoptotic signals engaged by resveratrol in three gastric adenocarcinoma cancer cell lines, two of which (AGS and SNU-1) express p53 and one (KATO-Ⅲ) with deleted p53.METHODS: Nuclear fragmentation was used to quantitate apoptotic cells; caspase activity was determined by photometric detection of cleaved substrates; formation of oxidized cytochrome C was used to measure cytochrome C activity, and Western blot analysis was used to determine protein expression.RESULTS: Gastric cancer cells, irrespective of their p53 status, responded to resveratrol with fragmentation of DNA and cleavage of nuclear lamins A and B and PARP, Resveratrol, however, has no effect on mitochondria-associated apoptotic proteins Bcl-2, Bclxl, Bax, Bid or Smac/Diablo, and did not promote subcellular redistribution of cytochrome C, indicating that resveratrol-induced apoptosis of gastric carcinoma cells does not require breakdown of mitochondrial membrane integrity. Resveratrol up-regulated p53 protein in SNU-1 and AGS cells but there was a difference in response of intracellular apoptotic signals between these cell lines.SNU-1 cells responded to resveratrol treatment with down-regulation of survivin, whereas in AGS and KATO-Ⅲ cells resveratrol stimulated caspase 3 and cytochrome C oxidase activities.CONCLUSION: These findings indicate that even within a specific cancer the intracellular apoptotic signals engaged by resveratrol are cell type dependent and suggest that such differences may be related to differentiation or lack of differentiation of these cells.

  17. Lactadherin inhibits secretory phospholipase A2 activity on pre-apoptotic leukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Nyegaard

    Full Text Available Secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2 is a critical component of insect and snake venoms and is secreted by mammalian leukocytes during inflammation. Elevated secretory PLA2 concentrations are associated with autoimmune diseases and septic shock. Many sPLA2's do not bind to plasma membranes of quiescent cells but bind and digest phospholipids on the membranes of stimulated or apoptotic cells. The capacity of these phospholipases to digest membranes of stimulated or apoptotic cells correlates to the exposure of phosphatidylserine. In the present study, the ability of the phosphatidyl-L-serine-binding protein, lactadherin to inhibit phospholipase enzyme activity has been assessed. Inhibition of human secretory phospholipase A2-V on phospholipid vesicles exceeded 90%, whereas inhibition of Naja mossambica sPLA2 plateaued at 50-60%. Lactadherin inhibited 45% of activity of Naja mossambica sPLA2 and >70% of human secretory phospholipase A2-V on the membranes of human NB4 leukemia cells treated with calcium ionophore A23187. The data indicate that lactadherin may decrease inflammation by inhibiting sPLA2.

  18. Local Augmented Angiotensinogen Secreted from Apoptotic Vascular Endothelial Cells Is a Vital Mediator of Vascular Remodelling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyh-Jong Wu

    Full Text Available Vascular remodelling is a critical vasculopathy found in atheromatous diseases and allograft failures. The local renin angiotensin system (RAS has been implicated in vascular remodelling. However, the mechanisms by which the augmented local RAS is associated with the initial event of endothelial cell apoptosis in injured vasculature remain undefined. We induced the apoptosis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs through serum starvation (SS. After the cells were subjected to SS, we found that the mRNA expression of angiotensinogen (AGT was increased by >3-fold in HUVECs and by approximately 2.5-fold in VSMCs. In addition, the expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE mRNA was increased in VSMCs but decreased to 50% in HUVECs during the same apoptotic process. Increases in the expression of AGT protein and angiotensin II (Ang II were found in a serum-free medium conditioned by HUVECs (SSC. The increased Ang II was suppressed using lisinopril (an ACE inhibitor treatment. Moreover, the activation of ERK1/2 induced by the SSC in VSMCs was also suppressed by losartan. In conclusion, we first demonstrated that the augmented AGT released from apoptotic endothelial cells acts as a vital progenitor of Ang II to accelerate vascular remodelling, and we suggest that blocking local augmented Ang II might be an effective strategy for restraining intimal hyperplasia.

  19. Exocytosis of macrophage lysosomes leads to digestion of apoptotic adipocytes and foam cell formation[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haka, Abigail S.; Barbosa-Lorenzi, Valéria C.; Lee, Hyuek Jong; Falcone, Domenick J.; Hudis, Clifford A.; Dannenberg, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Many types of apoptotic cells are phagocytosed and digested by macrophages. Adipocytes can be hundreds of times larger than macrophages, so they are too large to be digested by conventional phagocytic processes. The nature of the interaction between macrophages and apoptotic adipocytes has not been studied in detail. We describe a cellular process, termed exophagy, that is important for macrophage clearance of dead adipocytes and adipose tissue homeostasis. Using mouse models of obesity, human tissue, and a cell culture model, we show that macrophages form hydrolytic extracellular compartments at points of contact with dead adipocytes using local actin polymerization. These compartments are acidic and contain lysosomal enzymes delivered by exocytosis. Uptake and complete degradation of adipocyte fragments, which are released by extracellular hydrolysis, leads to macrophage foam cell formation. Exophagy-mediated foam cell formation is a highly efficient means by which macrophages internalize large amounts of lipid, which may ultimately overwhelm the metabolic capacity of the macrophage. This process provides a mechanism for degradation of objects, such as dead adipocytes, that are too large to be phagocytosed by macrophages. PMID:27044658

  20. Exocytosis of macrophage lysosomes leads to digestion of apoptotic adipocytes and foam cell formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haka, Abigail S; Barbosa-Lorenzi, Valéria C; Lee, Hyuek Jong; Falcone, Domenick J; Hudis, Clifford A; Dannenberg, Andrew J; Maxfield, Frederick R

    2016-06-01

    Many types of apoptotic cells are phagocytosed and digested by macrophages. Adipocytes can be hundreds of times larger than macrophages, so they are too large to be digested by conventional phagocytic processes. The nature of the interaction between macrophages and apoptotic adipocytes has not been studied in detail. We describe a cellular process, termed exophagy, that is important for macrophage clearance of dead adipocytes and adipose tissue homeostasis. Using mouse models of obesity, human tissue, and a cell culture model, we show that macrophages form hydrolytic extracellular compartments at points of contact with dead adipocytes using local actin polymerization. These compartments are acidic and contain lysosomal enzymes delivered by exocytosis. Uptake and complete degradation of adipocyte fragments, which are released by extracellular hydrolysis, leads to macrophage foam cell formation. Exophagy-mediated foam cell formation is a highly efficient means by which macrophages internalize large amounts of lipid, which may ultimately overwhelm the metabolic capacity of the macrophage. This process provides a mechanism for degradation of objects, such as dead adipocytes, that are too large to be phagocytosed by macrophages. PMID:27044658

  1. Glycine tomentella Hayata inhibits IL-1β and IL-6 production, inhibits MMP-9 activity, and enhances RAW264.7 macrophage clearance of apoptotic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Yu-Shu

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess the effects of Glycine tomentella Hayata (GTH, a traditional herbal medicine for treatment of rheumatic diseases on the expression of the proinflammatory cytokines and on the clearance of apoptotic cells by macrophages. Methods RAW264.7 cells were cultured with lipopolysaccharide (LPS in the presence or absence of ethanol extract of GTH. The expression of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and transglutaminase 2 (TG2 were assayed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 and MMP-9 were assayed by gelatin zymography. For detecting uptake of apoptotic cells, RAW264.7 cells were cultured with carboxyfluorescein diacetate (CFDA-stained apoptotic cells and assayed by flow cytometry. Results The major components of GTH analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC chromatogram were daidzein (42.5%, epicatechin (28.8%, and naringin (9.4%. GTH treatment inhibited the expression of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 and MMP-9 but did not affect the expression of TNF-α and iNOS. GTH significantly enhanced the expression of TG2 and the clearance of apoptotic cells by RAW264.7 macrophages. Conclusions GTH inhibits proinflammatory cytokine secretion and MMP-9 activity, enhances apoptotic cell uptake and up-regulates TG2 expression. Our data show that GTH might have beneficial effects on rheumatic diseases.

  2. The Protective Properties of the Strawberry (Fragaria ananassa) against Carbon Tetrachloride-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats Mediated by Anti-Apoptotic and Upregulation of Antioxidant Genes Expression Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Sherifa S.; AL-Yhya, Nouf A.; El-Khadragy, Manal F.; Al-Olayan, Ebtesam M.; Alajmi, Reem A.; Hassan, Zeinab K.; Hassan, Salwa B.; Abdel Moneim, Ahmed E.

    2016-01-01

    The strawberry (Fragaria ananassa) has been extensively used to treat a wide range of ailments in many cultures. The present study was aimed at evaluating the hepatoprotective effect of strawberry juice on experimentally induced liver injury in rats. To this end, rats were introperitoneally injected with carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) with or without strawberry juice supplementation for 12 weeks and the hepatoprotective effect of strawberry was assessed by measuring serum liver enzyme markers, hepatic tissue redox status and apoptotic markers with various techniques including biochemistry, ELISA, quantitative PCR assays and histochemistry. The hepatoprotective effect of the strawberry was evident by preventing CCl4-induced increase in liver enzymes levels. Determination of oxidative balance showed that strawberry treatment significantly blunted CCl4-induced increase in oxidative stress markers and decrease in enzymatic and non-enzymatic molecules in hepatic tissue. Furthermore, strawberry supplementation enhanced the anti-apoptotic protein, Bcl-2, and restrained the pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and caspase-3 with a marked reduction in collagen areas in hepatic tissue. These findings demonstrated that strawberry (F. ananassa) juice possessed antioxidant, anti-apoptotic and anti-fibrotic properties, probably mediated by the presence of polyphenols and flavonoids compounds. PMID:27547187

  3. Rømt regnbueørret blir i fjorden : Behaviour of escaped rainbow trout

    OpenAIRE

    Skilbrei, Ove

    2009-01-01

    Rainbow trout are mainly farmed in fjords. They are thought to be more sedentary after escaping than escaped salmon, however this has not previously been well documented. The behaviour of escaped rainbow trout is now being studied in the fjords around the island of Osterøy in Hordaland in order to increase our understanding of escaped fish and to develop recapture strategies.

  4. Mars atmospheric escape constrained using MAVEN IUVS coronal observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffin, Michael S.; Deighan, Justin; Chaufray, Jean-Yves; Jain, Sonal; Stewart, Ian; McClintock, Bill; Crismani, Matteo; Stiepen, Arnaud; Holsclaw, Greg; Clarke, John; Montmessin, Franck; Eparvier, Frank; Thiemann, Ed; Chamberlain, Phil; Schneider, Nick; Jakosky, Bruce

    2015-11-01

    Every planetary atmosphere is capped by a corona: an extended, extremely tenuous region where collisions are negligible and particles follow ballistic trajectories. At Mars, the corona is especially extended due to the low gravity of the planet, and a large number of coronal particles are on escaping trajectories. Such escape has played a critical role in the history of the Mars system, likely removing a substantial fraction of the water initially present on the planet, but the mechanism and magnitude of this escape remains poorly constrained. Currently in orbit at Mars, MAVEN's Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS) is mapping the distribution of oxygen and hydrogen above 200 km at a high spatial and temporal cadence, revealing a dynamic corona in unprecedented detail. Results will be presented demonstrating that the H in the corona is not spherically symmetric in its distribution, and can potentially be used as a tracer of thermospheric general circulation; and that non-thermal "hot" O (in contrast with more spatially confined "cold" thermal O) is ionospherically sourced with a characteristic energy of 1.1 eV and responds to solar EUV forcing. These results will be interpreted in terms of their impact on our current understanding of how atmospheric escape operates today. We will also discuss how these processes may have acted in the past to deplete Mars' initial water inventory, potentially altering the redox balance of the planet and atmosphere through differential escape of H and O.

  5. History of oxygen and carbon escape from the Martian atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Zhang, M. H. G.; Johnson, R. E.; Bougher, S. W.; Nagy, A. F.

    1992-01-01

    A fraction of the oxygen in the Martian atmosphere continually escapes to space because dissociative recombination of the O2(+) ions in the ionosphere can impart sufficient energy to the product O atoms. In addition, ionization of the extended atomic oxygen corona resulting from the above process adds to escape since the solar wind can carry away O(+) ions born above a few hundred km altitude. A further by-product of this ion-pickup by the solar wind is an additional population of escaping oxygen atoms that are sputtered from the atmosphere near the exobase by pickup ions that are on reentry rather than escaping trajectories. This sputtering process can also remove carbon in the form of intact or dissociated CO2 since all atoms and molecules in the 'target' gas are subject to the collisional energy transfer that characterizes sputtering. We have estimated the present rates of escape of oxygen and carbon due to these mechanisms, as well as the rates at several epochs in the history of the solar system.

  6. Single-File Escape of Colloidal Particles from Microfluidic Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, Emanuele; Pierno, Matteo; Baldovin, Fulvio; Orlandini, Enzo; Tan, Yizhou; Pagliara, Stefano

    2016-07-15

    Single-file diffusion is a ubiquitous physical process exploited by living and synthetic systems to exchange molecules with their environment. It is paramount to quantify the escape time needed for single files of particles to exit from constraining synthetic channels and biological pores. This quantity depends on complex cooperative effects, whose predominance can only be established through a strict comparison between theory and experiments. By using colloidal particles, optical manipulation, microfluidics, digital microscopy, and theoretical analysis we uncover the self-similar character of the escape process and provide closed-formula evaluations of the escape time. We find that the escape time scales inversely with the diffusion coefficient of the last particle to leave the channel. Importantly, we find that at the investigated microscale, bias forces as tiny as 10^{-15}  N determine the magnitude of the escape time by drastically reducing interparticle collisions. Our findings provide crucial guidelines to optimize the design of micro- and nanodevices for a variety of applications including drug delivery, particle filtering, and transport in geometrical constrictions. PMID:27472142

  7. Folding and escape of nascent proteins at ribosomal exit tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Phuong Thuy; Hoang, Trinh Xuan

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the interplay between post-translational folding and escape of two small single-domain proteins at the ribosomal exit tunnel by using Langevin dynamics with coarse-grained models. It is shown that at temperatures lower or near the temperature of the fastest folding, folding proceeds concomitantly with the escape process, resulting in vectorial folding and enhancement of foldability of nascent proteins. The concomitance between the two processes, however, deteriorates as temperature increases. Our folding simulations as well as free energy calculation by using umbrella sampling show that, at low temperatures, folding at the tunnel follows one or two specific pathways without kinetic traps. It is shown that the escape time can be mapped to a one-dimensional diffusion model with two different regimes for temperatures above and below the folding transition temperature. Attractive interactions between amino acids and attractive sites on the tunnel wall lead to a free energy barrier along the escape route of the protein. It is suggested that this barrier slows down the escape process and consequently promotes correct folding of the released nascent protein.

  8. Escape dynamics in a binary system of interacting galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Zotos, Euaggelos E

    2016-01-01

    The escape dynamics in an analytical gravitational model which describes the motion of stars in a binary system of interacting dwarf spheroidal galaxies is investigated in detail. We conduct a numerical analysis distinguishing between regular and chaotic orbits as well as between trapped and escaping orbits, considering only unbounded motion for several energy levels. In order to distinguish safely and with certainty between ordered and chaotic motion, we apply the Smaller ALingment Index (SALI) method. It is of particular interest to locate the escape basins through the openings around the collinear Lagrangian points $L_1$ and $L_2$ and relate them with the corresponding spatial distribution of the escape times of the orbits. Our exploration takes place both in the configuration $(x,y)$ and in the phase $(x,\\dot{x})$ space in order to elucidate the escape process as well as the overall orbital properties of the galactic system. Our numerical analysis reveals the strong dependence of the properties of the con...

  9. Non-thermal escape of molecular hydrogen from Mars

    CERN Document Server

    Gacesa, Marko; Kharchenko, Vasili

    2012-01-01

    We present a detailed theoretical analysis of a non-thermal escape of molecular hydrogen from Mars induced by collisions with hot atomic oxygen from martian corona. To accurately describe the energy transfer in O + H$_2(v,j)$ collisions, we performed extensive quantum-mechanical calculations of state-to-state elastic, inelastic, and reactive cross sections. The escape flux of H$_2$ molecules was evaluated using a simplified 1D column model of the martian atmosphere with realistic densities of atmospheric gases and hot oxygen production rates for the low solar activity conditions. An average density of the non-thermal escape flux of H$_2$ of $1.9\\times10^5$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ was obtained considering energetic O atoms produced in dissociative recombinations of O$_{2}^{+}$ ions. Predicted rovibrational distribution of the escaping H$_2$ was found to contain a significant fraction of higher rotational states. While the non-thermal escape rate was found to be lower than Jeans flux for H$_2$ molecules, the non-ther...

  10. Single-File Escape of Colloidal Particles from Microfluidic Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, Emanuele; Pierno, Matteo; Baldovin, Fulvio; Orlandini, Enzo; Tan, Yizhou; Pagliara, Stefano

    2016-07-01

    Single-file diffusion is a ubiquitous physical process exploited by living and synthetic systems to exchange molecules with their environment. It is paramount to quantify the escape time needed for single files of particles to exit from constraining synthetic channels and biological pores. This quantity depends on complex cooperative effects, whose predominance can only be established through a strict comparison between theory and experiments. By using colloidal particles, optical manipulation, microfluidics, digital microscopy, and theoretical analysis we uncover the self-similar character of the escape process and provide closed-formula evaluations of the escape time. We find that the escape time scales inversely with the diffusion coefficient of the last particle to leave the channel. Importantly, we find that at the investigated microscale, bias forces as tiny as 10-15 N determine the magnitude of the escape time by drastically reducing interparticle collisions. Our findings provide crucial guidelines to optimize the design of micro- and nanodevices for a variety of applications including drug delivery, particle filtering, and transport in geometrical constrictions.

  11. Extreme hydrodynamic atmospheric loss near the critical thermal escape regime

    CERN Document Server

    Erkaev, N V; Odert, P; Kulikov, Yu N; Kislyakova, K G

    2015-01-01

    By considering martian-like planetary embryos inside the habitable zone of solar-like stars we study the behavior of the hydrodynamic atmospheric escape of hydrogen for small values of the Jeans escape parameter $\\beta < 3$, near the base of the thermosphere, that is defined as a ratio of the gravitational and thermal energy. Our study is based on a 1-D hydrodynamic upper atmosphere model that calculates the volume heating rate in a hydrogen dominated thermosphere due to the absorption of the stellar soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (XUV) flux. We find that when the $\\beta$ value near the mesopause/homopause level exceeds a critical value of $\\sim$2.5, there exists a steady hydrodynamic solution with a smooth transition from subsonic to supersonic flow. For a fixed XUV flux, the escape rate of the upper atmosphere is an increasing function of the temperature at the lower boundary. Our model results indicate a crucial enhancement of the atmospheric escape rate, when the Jeans escape parameter $\\beta$ decr...

  12. MAVEN measurements of photochemical escape of oxygen from the Martian atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillis, R. J.; Deighan, J.; Fox, J. L.; Bougher, S. W.; Cravens, T. E.; Lee, Y.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Benna, M.; Elrod, M. K.; Andersson, L.; McFadden, J.

    2015-10-01

    One of the primary goals of the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution Mission (MAVEN) mission is to characterize rates of atmospheric escape at the present epoch and relate those escape rates to solar drivers [1]. One of the major escape processes is known as photochemical escape, which is broadly defined as a process by which a) an exothermic reaction in the atmosphere/ionosphere results in an upward-traveling neutral particle whose velocity exceeds planetary escape velocity and b) the particle is not prevented from escaping through any subsequent collisions[2].At Mars, photochemical escape of oxygen is expected to be a significant channel for atmospheric escape, particularly in the early solar system when extreme ultraviolet (EUV) fluxes were much higher[3]. Thus characterizing this escape process is central to understanding the role escape to space has played in Mars' climate evolution.

  13. Differential nitric oxide synthesis and host apoptotic events correlate with bleaching susceptibility in reef corals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, T. D.; Krueger, T.; Becker, S.; Fisher, P. L.; Davy, S. K.

    2014-03-01

    Coral bleaching poses a threat to coral reefs worldwide. As a consequence of the temperature-induced breakdown in coral-dinoflagellate symbiosis, bleaching can have extensive effects on reef communities. However, our understanding of bleaching at a cellular level is limited, and this is particularly true regarding differential susceptibility among coral species. Recent work suggests that bleaching may represent a host innate immune-like response to symbiont dysfunction that involves synthesis of the signalling compound nitric oxide (NO) and the induction of host apoptotic-like cell death. In this study, we examined the activity of apoptosis-regulating enzymes alongside oxidised NO accumulation (a proxy for NO synthesis) in the reef corals Acropora millepora, Montipora digitata, and Pocillopora damicornis during experimental thermal stress. P. damicornis was the most sensitive species, suffering mortality (tissue sloughing) after 5 days at 33 °C but non-lethal bleaching after 9 days at 31.5 °C. A. millepora bleached at 33 °C but remained structurally intact, while M. digitata showed little evidence of bleaching. P. damicornis and A. millepora both exhibited evidence of temperature-induced NO synthesis and, after 5 days of heating, levels of oxidised NO in both species were fivefold higher than in controls maintained at 28.5 °C. These responses preceded bleaching by a number of days and may have occurred before symbiont dysfunction (measured as chlorophyll a degradation and oxidised NO accumulation). In A. millepora, apparent NO synthesis correlated with the induction of host apoptotic-like pathways, while in P. damicornis, the upregulation of apoptotic pathways occurred later. No evidence of elevated NO production or apoptosis was observed in M. digitata at 33 °C and baseline activity of apoptosis-regulating enzymes was negligible in this species. These findings provide important physiological data in the context of the responses of corals to global change and

  14. Abnormalities in Alternative Splicing of Apoptotic Genes and Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zodwa Dlamini

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is required for normal heart development in the embryo, but has also been shown to be an important factor in the occurrence of heart disease. Alternative splicing of apoptotic genes is currently emerging as a diagnostic and therapeutic target for heart disease. This review addresses the involvement of abnormalities in alternative splicing of apoptotic genes in cardiac disorders including cardiomyopathy, myocardial ischemia and heart failure. Many pro-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family have alternatively spliced isoforms that lack important active domains. These isoforms can play a negative regulatory role by binding to and inhibiting the pro-apoptotic forms. Alternative splicing is observed to be increased in various cardiovascular diseases with the level of alternate transcripts increasing elevated in diseased hearts compared to healthy subjects. In many cases these isoforms appear to be the underlying cause of the disease, while in others they may be induced in response to cardiovascular pathologies. Regardless of this, the detection of alternate splicing events in the heart can serve as useful diagnostic or prognostic tools, while those splicing events that seem to play a causative role in cardiovascular disease make attractive future drug targets.

  15. The apoptotic thanatotranscriptome associated with the liver of cadavers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javan, Gulnaz T; Can, Ismail; Finley, Sheree J; Soni, Shivani

    2015-12-01

    Gene expression investigations are well-established components of ante mortem studies with broad applications ranging from elucidating basic mechanisms responsible for normal physiological processes to discovering therapeutic targets in pathophysiological conditions. However, gene expression studies and their application in the medico-legal field are still in their infancy. Therefore, the present study focuses on RNA using PCR array in the analysis of gene expression associated with tissues taken from actual criminal cases. RNA was extracted from the liver tissues of bodies with PMIs between 6 and 48 h. The results demonstrated that mRNA was stable up to 48 h postmortem. Further, as cell death is an indispensable and necessary part of the biological life cycle, apoptotic gene expression profiles were investigated. The gene expression related to the programmed cell death found in body tissues after death is defined as the apoptotic thanatotranscriptome (thanatos-, Greek for death). On comparison of control and decaying tissues, the results show that with time, pro-apoptotic genes such as caspases are up-regulated and the expression of genes responsible for anti-apoptosis such as BCL2 and BAG3 were down-regulated. Thus, this current work gives a unique perspective of the apoptotic thanatotranscriptome that is affected after death. Up to the present time, gene expression in bodies from criminal cases has not been reported in literature using PCR array techniques. Thus, this thanatotranscriptome study provides insight into postmortem gene activity with potential applications in medico-legal investigations. PMID:26318598

  16. Can transgenic rice cause ecological risks through transgene escape?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Alien transgene escape from genetically engineered rice to non-transgenic varieties or close wild relatives (including weedy rice) may lead to unpredictable ecological risks. However, for transgene escape to occur three conditions need to be met: (i) spatially, transgenic rice and its non-transgenic counterparts or wild relatives should have sympatric distributions; (ii) temporally, the flowering time of transgenic rice and the non-transgenic varieties or wild relatives should overlap; and (iii) biologically, transgenic rice and its wild relative species should have such a sufficiently close relationship that their interspecific hybrids can have normal generative reproduction. This paper presents research data on the geographic distribution, flowering habits, interspecific hybridization, and gene flow of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) and its closely related wild relatives containing the AA genome. The objective is to estimate the possibility of transgene escape to non-transgenic rice varieties and wild relatives of rice, which may result in unpredictable ecological risks.

  17. Escape probability of the super-Penrose process

    CERN Document Server

    Ogasawara, Kota; Miyamoto, Umpei; Igata, Takahisa; Patil, Mandar

    2016-01-01

    We consider a head-on collision of two massive particles that move in the equatorial plane of an extremal Kerr black hole, which results in the production of two massless particles. Focusing a typical case, where both of the colliding particles have zero angular momenta, we show that a massless particle produced in such a collision can escape to infinity with arbitrarily large energy in the near-horizon limit of the collision point. Furthermore, if we assume that the emission of the produced massless particles is isotropic in the center-of-mass frame but confined to the equatorial plane, the escape probability of the produced massless particle approaches $5/12$ and almost all escaping massless particles have arbitrarily large energy at infinity and an impact parameter approaching $2M$.

  18. Group nightmares about escape from ex-homeland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernovsky, Z

    1990-09-01

    Escape nightmares (recurrent nightmares about re-escaping ex-homeland) were studied via a 79-item questionnaire administered to 83 Czechoslovak refugees who were living in Switzerland. The key features of the nightmare were not related significantly to the refugees' age, gender, occupation, or educational level. Further analyses dealt with mutual relationships of the various reported aspects of the escape nightmares. The reports of dreaming about arrival in the ex-homeland by a "mistake," such as boarding a wrong airplane (i.e., a Freudian parapraxis), were associated with higher levels of (subsequent) dream anxiety, with waking up due to mounting dream tension, and with the dreamer not knowing at first upon awakening whether he was now in the free world or elsewhere. PMID:2246363

  19. Characterization of escape times of Josephson Junctions for signal detection

    CERN Document Server

    Addesso, Paolo; Pierro, Vincenzo

    2011-01-01

    The measurement of the escape time of a Josephson junction might be used to detect the presence of a sinusoidal signal embedded in noise when standard signal processing tools can be prohibitive. We show that the prescriptions for the experimental set-up and some physical behaviors depend on the detection strategy. More specifically, by exploiting the sample mean of escape times to perform detection, two resonant regions are identified. At low frequencies there is a stochastic resonance/activation phenomenon, while near the plasma frequency a geometric resonance appears. The naive sample mean detector is outperformed, in terms of error probability, by the optimal likelihood ratio test. The latter exhibits only geometric resonance, showing monotonically increasing performance as the bias current approaches the junction critical current. In this regime the escape times are vanishingly small and therefore performance are essentially limited by measurement electronics. The behavior of the likelihood ratio and samp...

  20. Apoptotic bone marrow CD34+ cells in cirrhotic patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuang-Suo Dang; Wen-Jun Wang; Ning Gao; Shun-Da Wang; Mei Li; La-Yang Liu; Ming-Zhun Sun; Tao Dong

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To access the frequency and level of apoptotic CD34+ cells isolated from the marrow fluid of patients with post-hepatitis cirrhosis.METHODS: The frequency of bone marrow CD34+ cells and apoptotic bone marrow CD34+ cells in 31 in-patients with post-hepatitis cirrhosis (cirrhosis group), and 15 out-patients without liver or blood disorders (control group) was calculated by flow cytometry. Pa-rameters were collected to evaluate liver functions of patients in cirrhosis group.RESULTS: The percentage of normal bone marrow CD34+ cells was 6.30% ± 2.48% and 1.87% ± 0.53% (t = 3.906, P < 0.01) while that of apoptotic marrow CD34+ cells was 15.00% ± 15.81% and 5.73% ± 1.57% (t = 2.367, P < 0.05) in cirrhosis and control groups, re-spectively. The percentage of apoptotic marrow CD34+ cells was 6.25% ± 3.30% and 20.92 ± 18.5% (t = 2.409, P < 0.05) in Child-Pugh A and Child-Pugh B + C cirrhotic patients, respectively. The percentage of late apoptotic marrow CD34+ cells was positively correlated with the total bilirubin and aspartate aminotransferase serum levels in patients with cirrhosis.CONCLUSION: The status of CD34+ marrow cells in cirrhotic patients may suggest that the ability of he-matopoietic progenitor cells to transform into mature blood cells is impaired.

  1. Water-escape velocities in jumping blacktip sharks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunnschweiler, Juerg M

    2005-09-22

    This paper describes the first determination of water-escape velocities in free-ranging sharks. Two approximations are used to estimate the final swimming speed at the moment of penetrating the water surface. Blacktip sharks were videotaped from below the surface and parameters were estimated by analysing the sequences frame by frame. Water-escape velocities averaged 6.3 ms(-1). These velocities for blacktip sharks seem accurate and are similar to estimates obtained for other shark species of similar size. PMID:16849197

  2. Water-escape velocities in jumping blacktip sharks

    OpenAIRE

    Juerg M. Brunnschweiler

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the first determination of water-escape velocities in free-ranging sharks. Two approximations are used to estimate the final swimming speed at the moment of penetrating the water surface. Blacktip sharks were videotaped from below the surface and parameters were estimated by analysing the sequences frame by frame. Water-escape velocities averaged 6.3 m s−1. These velocities for blacktip sharks seem accurate and are similar to estimates obtained for other shark species of ...

  3. Structured noise induced non-recross barrier escaping

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Chun-Yang

    2015-01-01

    The time-dependent barrier passage of a particle driven by the structured noise is studied in the field of a metastable potential. Quantities such as the probability of passing over the saddle point and transmission coefficient of the escaping rate are calculated for a thimbleful of insight into the diffusion dynamical properties. Results show that the barrier recrossing behavior is greatly reduced by the structured noisy environment. Particles diffusion in such an dissipative environment tends to successfully escape from the potential well without any embarrassments.

  4. A functional yeast survival screen of tumor-derived cDNA libraries designed to identify anti-apoptotic mammalian oncogenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz Eißmann

    Full Text Available Yeast cells can be killed upon expression of pro-apoptotic mammalian proteins. We have established a functional yeast survival screen that was used to isolate novel human anti-apoptotic genes overexpressed in treatment-resistant tumors. The screening of three different cDNA libraries prepared from metastatic melanoma, glioblastomas and leukemic blasts allowed for the identification of many yeast cell death-repressing cDNAs, including 28% of genes that are already known to inhibit apoptosis, 35% of genes upregulated in at least one tumor entity and 16% of genes described as both anti-apoptotic in function and upregulated in tumors. These results confirm the great potential of this screening tool to identify novel anti-apoptotic and tumor-relevant molecules. Three of the isolated candidate genes were further analyzed regarding their anti-apoptotic function in cell culture and their potential as a therapeutic target for molecular therapy. PAICS, an enzyme required for de novo purine biosynthesis, the long non-coding RNA MALAT1 and the MAST2 kinase are overexpressed in certain tumor entities and capable of suppressing apoptosis in human cells. Using a subcutaneous xenograft mouse model, we also demonstrated that glioblastoma tumor growth requires MAST2 expression. An additional advantage of the yeast survival screen is its universal applicability. By using various inducible pro-apoptotic killer proteins and screening the appropriate cDNA library prepared from normal or pathologic tissue of interest, the survival screen can be used to identify apoptosis inhibitors in many different systems.

  5. Apoptotic Cells Are Cleared by Directional Migration and elmo1-Dependent Macrophage Engulfment

    OpenAIRE

    van Ham, Tjakko J.; Kokel, David; Peterson, Randall T.

    2012-01-01

    Apoptotic cell death is essential for development and tissue homeostasis [1, 2]. Failure to clear apoptotic cells can ultimately cause inflammation and autoimmunity [3, 4]. Apoptosis has primarily been studied by staining of fixed tissue sections, and a clear understanding of the behavior of apoptotic cells in living tissue has been elusive. Here, we use a newly developed technique [5] to track apoptotic cells in real time as they emerge and are cleared from the zebrafish brain. We find that ...

  6. Apoptotic cell death and its relationship to gastric carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ferda Bir; Nese Calli-Demirkan; A Cevik Tufan; Metin Akbulut; N Lale Satiroglu-Tufan

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the apoptotic process of cells within the intestinal metaplasia areas co-localizing with chronic gastritis and gastric carcinomas and to analyze the involvement of proteins regulating apoptosis in the process of intestinal metaplasia related gastric carcinogenesis.METHODS: Forty-two gastric carcinoma and seventeen chronic gastritis cases were included in this study. All cases were examined for the existence of intestinal metaplasia. Ten cases randomly selected from each group were processed for TUNEL assay. TUNEL positive cells within the intestinal metaplasia areas, colocalizing either to gastric carcinoma or chronic gastritis,were counted and converted to apoptotic indices.In addition, p53, bcl-2 and bax expression patterns within these tissues were analyzed on the basis of immunohistochemistry.RESULTS: Twenty-eight of the cases were intestinal and 14 of the cases were diffuse type adenocarcinomas.64% (27/42) of the gastric carcinoma cases had intestinal metaplasia. Intestinal metaplasia co-localized more with intestinal type carcinomas compared with diffuse type carcinomas [75% (21/28) vs 42% (6/14),respectively; P≤0.05]. The mean apoptotic index in tumor cells was 0.70±0.08. The mean apoptotic index in intestinal metaplasias co-localizing to tumors was significantly higher than that of intestinal metaplasias co-localizing to chronic gastritis (0.70±0.03 vs 0.09±0.01, respectively; P≤0.05). P53 positivity was not observed in areas of intestinal metaplasia adjacent to tumors or chronic gastritis. Intestinal metaplasia areas adjacent to tumors showed lower cytoplasmic bcl-2 positivity compared to intestinal metaplasia areas adjacent to chronic gastritis [55.5% (15/27) vs 70.5%(12/17), respectively]. On the other hand, intestinal metaplasia areas adjacent to tumors showed significantly higher cytoplasmic bax positivity compared to intestinal metaplasia areas adjacent to chronic gastritis [44.4%(12/27) vs 11.7% (2/17), respectively; P≤0

  7. Apoptotic machinery diversity in Multiple Myeloma molecular subtypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia eGomez-Bougie

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma (MM is a plasma cell malignancy that is heterogeneous in its clinical presentation and prognosis. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS consistently preceded development of MM. The presence of primary IgH translocations and the universal over-expression of cyclin D genes led to a molecular classification of MM patients into different disease subtypes. Since Bcl-2 family proteins determine cell fate, we analyzed a publicly available Affymetrix gene expression of 44 MGUS and 414 newly diagnosed MM patients to investigate (1 the global change of Bcl-2 family members in MM versus MGUS (2 whether the four major subtypes defined as hyperdiploid, CCND1, MAF and MMSET, display specific apoptotic machineries.We showed that among the main anti-apoptotic members (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and Mcl-1, Mcl-1 up-regulation discriminated MM from MGUS, in agreement with the prominent role of Mcl-1 in plasma cell differentiation. Surprisingly, the expression of multi-domain pro-apoptotic Bak and Bax were increased during the progression of MGUS to MM. The combined profile of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and Mcl-1 was sufficient to distinguish MM molecular groups. While specific pro-apoptotic members expression was observed for each MM subtypes, CCDN1 subgroup, was identified as a particular entity characterized by a low expression of both BH3-only (Puma, Bik and Bad and multi-domain pro-apoptotic members (Bax and Bak. Our analysis supports the notion that MM heterogeneity is extended to the differential expression of the Bcl-2 family content in each MM subgroup. The influence of Bcl-2 family profile in the survival of the different patient groups will be further discussed to establish the potential consequences for therapeutic interventions. Finally, the use of distinct pro-survival members in the different steps of immune responses to antigen rise also the question of whether the different Bcl-2 anti-apoptotic profile could reflect a different origin of

  8. Entropy, Lyapunov Exponents and Escape Rates in Open Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Demers, Mark; Young, Lai-Sang

    2011-01-01

    We study the relation between escape rates and pressure in general dynamical systems with holes, where pressure is defined to be the difference between entropy and the sum of positive Lyapunov exponents. Central to the discussion is the formulation of a class of invariant measures supported on the survivor set over which we take the supremum to measure the pressure. Upper bounds for escape rates are proved for general diffeomorphisms of manifolds, possibly with singularities, for arbitrary holes and natural initial distributions including Lebesgue and SRB measures. Lower bounds do not hold in such generality, but for systems admitting Markov tower extensions with spectral gaps, we prove the equality of the escape rate with the absolute value of the pressure and the existence of an invariant measure realizing the escape rate, i.e. we prove a full variational principle. As an application of our results, we prove a variational principle for the billiard map associated with a planar Lorentz gas of finite horizon ...

  9. 46 CFR 169.313 - Means of escape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Means of escape. 169.313 Section 169.313 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction... apart, uniform for the length of the ladder; (3) At least 3 inches from the nearest permanent object...

  10. Action of cocaine and chronic sympathetic denervation on vagal escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, H. A.; Urquilla, P. R.

    1969-01-01

    1. The effect of cocaine has been studied on vagal escape and on the tachycardia due to vagal stimulation in the atropinized dog. All the dogs were submitted to acute cervical section of the spinal cord and acute or chronic sympathetic denervation. 2. Cocaine, 5 mg/kg or 40 μg/kg/min, I.V., induces a significant enhancement of the ventricular escape. The effects of a continuous infusion of cocaine are more reproducible than those of a single injection of the drug. 3. Cocaine, 40 μg/kg/min, I.V., potentiates the tachycardia due to vagal stimulation in the atropinized dog. 4. Chronic thoracic sympathectomy markedly retards the recovery of the ventricular rate from the inhibitory action of the vagus. Under this condition, the infusion of cocaine does not significantly enhance the ventricular escape. 5. These findings suggest that an adrenergic mechanism located at the sympathetic nerves supplying the heart is substantially involved in the phenomenon of vagal escape. PMID:5249864

  11. Escape angles in bulk chi((2)) soliton interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Steffen Kjær; Bang, Ole; Sørensen, Mads Peter

    2002-01-01

    We develop a theory for nonplanar interaction between two identical type I spatial solitons propagating at opposite, but arbitrary transverse angles in quadratic nonlinear (or so-called chi((2))) bulk, media. We predict quantitatively the outwards escape angle, below which the solitons turn aroun...

  12. Enuresis Control through Fading, Escape, and Avoidance Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Gordon D.

    1979-01-01

    A twin signal device that provides both escape and avoidance conditioning in enuresis control was documented with case studies of two enuretic children (eight and nine years old). In addition, a technique of fading as an adjunct to the process was utilized with one subject. (Author/SBH)

  13. A Structural Soundness Proof for Shivers's Escape Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midtgaard, Jan; Adams, Michael D.; Matthew, Might

    2012-01-01

    Shivers’s escape technique enables one to analyse the control flow of higher-order program fragments. It is widely used, but its soundness has never been proven. In this paper, we present the first soundness proof for the technique. Our proof is structured as a composition of Galois connections and...

  14. Comparing the escape dynamics in tidally limited star cluster models

    CERN Document Server

    Zotos, Euaggelos E

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to compare the orbital dynamics in three different models describing the properties of a star cluster rotating around its parent galaxy in a circular orbit. In particular, we use the isochrone and the Hernquist potentials to model the spherically symmetric star cluster and we compare our results with the corresponding ones of a previous work in which the Plummer model was applied for the same purpose. Our analysis takes place both in the configuration $(x,y)$ and in the phase $(x,\\dot{x})$ space in order to elucidate the escape process as well as the overall orbital properties of the tidally limited star cluster. We restrict our investigation into two dimensions and we conduct a thorough numerical analysis distinguishing between ordered and chaotic orbits as well as between trapped and escaping orbits, considering only unbounded motion for several energy levels above the critical escape energy. It is of particular interest to determine the escape basins towards the two exit channels (n...

  15. Enzyme detection by microfluidics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic-implemented methods of detecting an enzyme, in particular a DNA-modifying enzyme, are provided, as well as methods for detecting a cell, or a microorganism expressing said enzyme. The enzyme is detected by providing a nucleic acid substrate, which is specifically targeted by that...... enzyme...

  16. Plasma-induced Escape and Alterations of Planetary Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. E.; Tucker, O. J.; Ewrin, J.; Cassidy, T. A.; Leblanc, F.

    2009-12-01

    The atmospheres of planets and planetary satellites are typically imbedded in space plasmas. Depending on the interaction with the induced or intrinsic fields energetic ions can have access to the thermosphere and the corona affecting their composition and thermal structure and causing loss to space. These processes are often lumped together as ‘atmospheric sputtering’ (Johnson 1994). In this talk I will review the results of simulations of the plasma bombardment at a number of solar system bodies and use those data to describe the effect on the upper atmosphere and on escape. Of considerable recent interest is the modeling of escape from Titan. Prior to Cassini’s tour of the Saturnian system, plasma-induced escape was suggested to be the dominant loss process, but recent models of enhanced thermal escape, often referred to as ‘slow hydrodynamic’ escape, have been suggested to lead to much larger Titan atmospheric loss rates (Strobel 2008; Cui et al. 2008). Such a process has been suggested to be active at some point in time on a number of solar system bodies. I will present hybrid fluid/ kinetic models of the upper atmosphere of certain bodies in order to test both the plasma-induced and thermal escape processes. Preliminary results suggest that the loss rates estimated using the ‘slow hydrodynamic’ escape process can be orders of magnitude too large. The implications for Mars, Titan and Pluto will be discussed. Background for this talk is contained in the following papers (Johnson 2004; 2009; Chaufray et al. 2007; Johnson et al. 2008; 2009; Tucker and Johnson 2009). References: Chaufray, J.Y., R. Modolo, F. Leblanc, G. Chanteur, R.E. Johnson, and J.G. Luhmann, Mars Solar Wind interaction: formation of the Martian corona and atmosphric loss to space, JGR 112, E09009, doi:10.1029/2007JE002915 (2007) Cui, J., Yelle, R. V., Volk, K. Distribution and escape of molecular hydrogen in Titan's thermosphere and exosphere. J. Geophys. Res. 113, doi:10

  17. Action and mechanism of Fas and Fas ligand in immune escape of gallbladder carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Ning Xu; Sheng-Quan Zou; Jian-Ming Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the role of Fas and Fas ligand (FasL) in biological behaviors of gallbladder carcinoma, and their correlated action and mechanism in tumor escape.METHODS: Streptavidin-biotin-peroxidase immunohistochemistry technique was used to study the expression of Fas and FasL protein in 26 gallbladder carcinoma tissues,18 gallbladder adenoma tissues, 3 gallbladder dysplasia tissues and 20 chronic cholecystitis tissues. Apoptosis of the infiltrating lymphocytes in these tissues was studied by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) method. Expression of both proteins and apoptosis of the tumor infiltrating lymphocytes in cancer tissues of primary foci was compared with clinicopathological features of gallbladder carcinoma.RESULTS: The positive rates of Fas were not significantly different among carcinoma, adenoma, dysplasia and chronic cholecystitis. The positive rate of FasL in carcinoma was significantly higher than that in chronic cholecystitis (x2 = 4.89, P<0.05). The apoptotic index (AI) in carcinoma was significantly higher than that in adenoma (t'= 4.19, P<0.01) and chronic cholecystitis (t'= 8.06, P<0.01). The AI was significantly lower in well-differentiated carcinoma and Nevin Ⅰ-Ⅲ carcinoma than that in poorly-differentiated carcinoma (t'= 2.63, P<0.05) and Nevin Ⅳ-Ⅴ carcinoma(t'= 3.33, P<0.01). The confidence interval (CI) ofinfiltrating lymphocytes in adenoma, chronic cholecystitis, well-differentiated carcinoma and Nevin Ⅰ-Ⅲ carcinoma wasvery significantly lower than that in carcinoma (t' = 6.99,P<0.01), adenoma (t' = 3.66, P<0.01), poorly-differentiated carcinoma (t' = 5.31, P<0.01) and Nevin Ⅳ-Ⅴ carcinoma(t' = 3.76, P<0.01), respectively. The CI of apoptosis of infiltrating lymphocytes in well-differentiated carcinoma was significantly lower than that in poorly-differentiated carcinoma (t = 2.52, P<0.05), and was not significantly lower in Nevin Ⅰ-Ⅲ carcinoma than

  18. Recording field potentials from zebrafish larvae during escape responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monesson-Olson, Bryan D; Troconis, Eileen L; Trapani, Josef G

    2014-01-01

    Among vertebrates, startle responses are a ubiquitous method for alerting, and avoiding or escaping from alarming or dangerous stimuli. In zebrafish larvae, fast escape behavior is easily evoked through either acoustic or tactile stimuli. For example, a light touch to the head will excite trigeminal neurons that in turn excite a large reticulospinal neuron in the hindbrain called the Mauthner cell (M-cell). The M-cell action potential then travels down the contralateral trunk of the larva exciting motoneurons, which subsequently excite the entire axial musculature, producing a large amplitude body bend away from the source of the stimulus. This body conformation is known as the "C-bend" due to the shape of the larva during the behavior. As a result of the semi-synchronized activation of the M-cell, the population of motor neurons, and the axial trunk muscles, a large field potential is generated and can be recorded from free-swimming or fixed-position larvae. Undergraduate laboratories that record field potentials during escape responses in larval zebrafish are relatively simple to setup and allow students to observe and study the escape reflex circuit. Furthermore, by testing hypotheses, analyzing data and writing journal-style laboratory reports, students have multiple opportunities to learn about many neuroscience topics including vertebrate reflexes; sensory transduction; synaptic-, neuro-, and muscle-physiology; the M-cell mediated escape response; and the zebrafish as a model organism. Here, we detail the equipment, software, and recording setup necessary to observe field potentials in an undergraduate teaching lab. Additionally, we discuss potential advanced laboratory exercises and pedagogical outcomes. Finally, we note possible low-cost alternatives for recording field potentials. PMID:25565920

  19. Reducing VDAC1 expression induces a non-apoptotic role for pro-apoptotic proteins in cancer cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, Tasleem; Krelin, Yakov; Shoshan-Barmatz, Varda

    2016-08-01

    Proteins initially identified as essential for apoptosis also mediate a wide range of non-apoptotic functions that include cell cycle progression, differentiation and metabolism. As this phenomenon was mostly reported with non-cancer cells, we considered non-conventional roles for the apoptotic machinery in the cancer setting. We found that treating glioblastoma (GBM) tumors with siRNA against VDAC1, a mitochondrial protein found at the crossroads of metabolic and survival pathways and involved in apoptosis, inhibited tumor growth while leading to differentiation of tumor cells into neuronal-like cells, as reflected in the expression of specific markers. Although VDAC1 depletion did not induce apoptosis, the expression levels of several pro-apoptotic regulatory proteins were changed. Specifically, VDAC1 deletion led to up-regulation of caspases, p53, cytochrome c, and down-regulation of SMAC/Diablo, AIF and TSPO. The down-regulated group was highly expressed in U-87MG xenografts, as well as in GBMs from human patients. We also showed that the rewired cancer-cell metabolism resulting from VDAC1 depletion reinforced cell growth arrest and differentiation via alterations in the transcription factors p53, c-Myc, HIF-1α and NF-κB. The decrease in c-Myc, HIF-1α and NF-κB levels was in accord with reduced cell proliferation, whereas increased p53 expression promoted differentiation. Thus, upon metabolic re-programing induced by VDAC1 depletion, the levels of pro-apoptotic proteins associated with cell growth decreased, while those connected to cell differentiation increased, converting GBM cells into astrocyte- and neuron-like cells. The results reveal that in tumors, pro-apoptotic proteins can perform non-apoptotic functions, acting as regulators of cell growth and differentiation, making these molecules potential new targets for cancer therapy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy

  20. Apoptotic clearance in rabbits with experimental pulmonary emphysema

    OpenAIRE

    Žunić-Božinovski Snežana; Žunić Svetlana; Mladenović-Đorđević Aleksandra; Ruždijić Sabera; Kanazir Selma

    2011-01-01

    In order to better understand pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema, the model of experimentally induced pulmonary emphysema in Chinchilla rabbits was used for the estimation of apoptotic clearance of pulmonary tissue. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed in three groups of animals: experimental group-E on hypercholesterolemic diet (4% edible oil solution of crystalline cholesterol), control group-C1 on standard diet for that animal species and animals on oil...

  1. ELMO1 signaling in apoptotic germ cell clearance and spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Michael R; Ravichandran, Kodi S

    2010-10-01

    Apoptosis and the subsequent removal of dying cells are crucial processes for tissue development and maintenance. Although we are beginning to understand the signaling pathways that control the phagocytic clearance of apoptotic cells, the physiological relevance of these pathways is lacking. During spermatogenesis, over half of the developing germ cells eventually die by apoptosis, yet the signaling pathways that regulate the phagocytic clearance of these dying cells or the impact of this clearance on development and maintenance of the germ cell population is not well understood. The ELMO1/Dock180 proteins form an evolutionarily conserved signaling module that functions as a bipartite guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the small GTPase Rac. The subsequent Rac-dependent cytoskeletal changes play an important role in the physical engulfment of apoptotic cells. Recent findings demonstrate an in vivo role for ELMO1-dependent clearance in the testes, with implications for spermatogenesis. Here we will discuss the role of apoptotic cell clearance during spermatogenesis, with a particular emphasis on ELMO1/Dock180 signaling. PMID:20958313

  2. PDT-treated apoptotic cells induce macrophage synthesis NO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, S.; Xing, D.; Zhou, F. F.; Chen, W. R.

    2009-11-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a biologically active molecule which has multi-functional in different species. As a second messenger and neurotransmitter, NO is not only an important regulatory factor between cells' information transmission, but also an important messenger in cell-mediated immunity and cytotoxicity. On the other side, NO is involving in some diseases' pathological process. In pathological conditions, the macrophages are activated to produce a large quantity of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), which can use L-arginine to produce an excessive amount of NO, thereby killing bacteria, viruses, parasites, fungi, tumor cells, as well as in other series of the immune process. In this paper, photofrin-based photodynamic therapy (PDT) was used to treat EMT6 mammary tumors in vitro to induce apoptotic cells, and then co-incubation both apoptotic cells and macrophages, which could activate macrophage to induce a series of cytotoxic factors, especially NO. This, in turn, utilizes macrophages to activate a cytotoxic response towards neighboring tumor cells. These results provided a new idea for us to further study the immunological mechanism involved in damaging effects of PDT, also revealed the important function of the immune effect of apoptotic cells in PDT.

  3. Cell shape and organelle modification in apoptotic U937 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MR Montinari

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available U937 cells induced to apoptosis, progressively and dramatically modified their cell shape by intense blebbing formation, leading to the production of apoptotic bodies. The blebs evolved with time; milder forms of blebbing involving only a region or just the cortical part of the cytoplasm were observed within the first hour of incubation with puromycin; blebbing involving the whole cell body with very deep constrictions is the most frequent event observed during late times of incubation. The ultrastructural analysis of apoptotic cells revealed characteristic features of nuclear fragmentation (budding and cleavage mode and cytoplasmatic modifications. The cytoplasm of blebs does not contain organelles, such as ribosomes or mitochondria. Scarce presence of endoplasmic reticulum can be observed at the site of bleb detachment. However, blebbing is a dispensable event as evaluated by using inhibitor of actin polymerization. In the present study, the progressive modifications of the nucleus, mitochondria, nuclear fragmentation, cytoplasmic blebs formation and production of apoptotic bodies in U937 monocytic cells induced to apoptosis by puromycin (an inhibitor of protein synthesis were simultaneously analyzed.

  4. Enzyme immobilization: an update

    OpenAIRE

    Homaei, Ahmad Abolpour; Sariri, Reyhaneh; Vianello, Fabio; Stevanato, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Compared to free enzymes in solution, immobilized enzymes are more robust and more resistant to environmental changes. More importantly, the heterogeneity of the immo-bilized enzyme systems allows an easy recovery of both enzymes and products, multiple re-use of enzymes, continuous operation of enzymatic processes, rapid termination of reactions, and greater variety of bioreactor designs. This paper is a review of the recent literatures on enzyme immobilization by various techniques, the need...

  5. Extracellular Matrix Proteins Modulate Antimigratory and Apoptotic Effects of Doxorubicin

    OpenAIRE

    Georges Said; Marie Guilbert; Hamid Morjani; Roselyne Garnotel; Pierre Jeannesson; Hassan El Btaouri

    2012-01-01

    Anticancer drug resistance is a multifactorial process that includes acquired and de novo drug resistances. Acquired resistance develops during treatment, while de novo resistance is the primary way for tumor cells to escape chemotherapy. Tumor microenvironment has been recently shown to be one of the important factors contributing to de novo resistance and called environment-mediated drug resistance (EMDR). Two forms of EMDR have been described: soluble factor-mediated drug resistance (SFM-D...

  6. Parameter Optimization on Experimental Study to Reduce Ammonia Escape in CO2 Absorption by Ammonia Scrubbing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Leng; Jianmin Gao; Mingyue He; Min Xie; Qian Du; Rui Sun; Shaohua Wu

    2016-01-01

    In order to research ammonia escape in CO2 absorption by ammonia scrubbing, ammonia escape was studied in CO2 absorption process using the bubbling reactor in different conditions as gas flow rate, CO2 ratio, absorbent temperature and ammonia concentration and quantity of escaped ammonia was measured by chemical titration. The results indicated that, the amount of ammonia escape can be around 20% of original amount in 90 min and the escaped amount will increase with the rise of gas flow rate, absorbent temperature, concentration of ammonia while decrease as CO2 ratio goes up. Through the analysis of the law of ammonia escape, at the same time, combined with ammonia escape and the influence of the relationship between the CO2 absorption efficiency, reducing ammonia escape working condition parameter optimization is given.

  7. Fixation and escape times in stochastic game learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Realpe-Gomez, John; Szczesny, Bartosz; Dall'Asta, Luca; Galla, Tobias

    2012-10-01

    Evolutionary dynamics in finite populations is known to fixate eventually in the absence of mutation. We here show that a similar phenomenon can be found in stochastic game dynamical batch learning, and investigate fixation in learning processes in a simple 2×2 game, for two-player games with cyclic interaction, and in the context of the best-shot network game. The analogues of finite populations in evolution are here finite batches of observations between strategy updates. We study when and how such fixation can occur, and present results on the average time-to-fixation from numerical simulations. Simple cases are also amenable to analytical approaches and we provide estimates of the behaviour of so-called escape times as a function of the batch size. The differences and similarities with escape and fixation in evolutionary dynamics are discussed.

  8. Kuiper Prize Lecture - Escape of atmospheres, ancient and modern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunten, D.M. (Arizona Univ., Tucson (USA))

    1990-05-01

    A development history is presented for theories concerning planetary atmosphere gas-escape phenomena, which although firmly grounded in the kinetics of gases achieved truly productive results only after spacecraft remote sensing data for both the earth atmosphere and the planets became widely available. The most significant initial advances, encompassing diffusion-limited flow, nonthermal escape mechanisms, bound nonthermal coronas, and mass fractionation during early blowoff, followed from sounding rocket studies of the earth upper atmosphere, Mariner 5 results on hydrogen near Venus, and the nitrogen isotopic composition discovered by Viking in Mars. Attention has more recently been given to the xenon isotopic patterns in various atmospheres, as well as to the puzzling behavior of the Io atmosphere and plasma torus. 126 refs.

  9. Quantum and thermal phase escape in extended Josephson systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work I examine phase escape in long annular Josephson tunnel junctions. The sine-Gordon equation governs the dynamics of the phase variable along the junction. This equation supports topological soliton solutions, which correspond to quanta of magnetic flux trapped in the junction barrier. For such Josephson vortices an effective potential is formed by an external magnetic field, while a bias current acts as a driving force. Both together form a metastable potential well, which the vortex is trapped in. When the driving force exceeds the pinning force of the potential, the vortex escapes and the junction switches to the voltage state. At a finite temperature the driving force fluctuates. If the junction's energy scale is small, the phase variable can undergo a macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) process at temperatures below the crossover temperature. Without a vortex trapped, the metastable state is not a potential minimum in space, but a potential minimum at zero phase difference. (orig.)

  10. Quantum and thermal phase escape in extended Josephson systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemp, A.

    2006-07-12

    In this work I examine phase escape in long annular Josephson tunnel junctions. The sine-Gordon equation governs the dynamics of the phase variable along the junction. This equation supports topological soliton solutions, which correspond to quanta of magnetic flux trapped in the junction barrier. For such Josephson vortices an effective potential is formed by an external magnetic field, while a bias current acts as a driving force. Both together form a metastable potential well, which the vortex is trapped in. When the driving force exceeds the pinning force of the potential, the vortex escapes and the junction switches to the voltage state. At a finite temperature the driving force fluctuates. If the junction's energy scale is small, the phase variable can undergo a macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) process at temperatures below the crossover temperature. Without a vortex trapped, the metastable state is not a potential minimum in space, but a potential minimum at zero phase difference. (orig.)

  11. Fractal escapes in Newtonian and relativistic multipole gravitational fields

    CERN Document Server

    Servio de Moura, A P; Moura, Alessandro P. S. de; Letelier, Patricio S.

    1999-01-01

    We study the planar motion of test particles in gravitational fields produced by an external material halo, of the type found in many astrophysical systems, such as elliptical galaxies and globular clusters. Both the Newtonian and the general-relativistic dynamics are examined, and in the relativistic case the dynamics of both massive and massless particles are investigated. The halo field is given in general by a multipole expansion; we restrict ourselves to multipole fields of pure order, whose Newtonian potentials are homogeneous polynomials in cartesian coordinates. A pure (n)-pole field has (n) different escapes, one of which is chosen by the particle according to its initial conditions. We find that the escape has a fractal dependency on the initial conditions for (n>2) both in the Newtonian and the relativistic cases for massive test particles, but with important differences between them. The relativistic motion of massless particles, however, was found to be regular for all the fields we could study. ...

  12. Kuiper Prize Lecture - Escape of atmospheres, ancient and modern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A development history is presented for theories concerning planetary atmosphere gas-escape phenomena, which although firmly grounded in the kinetics of gases achieved truly productive results only after spacecraft remote sensing data for both the earth atmosphere and the planets became widely available. The most significant initial advances, encompassing diffusion-limited flow, nonthermal escape mechanisms, bound nonthermal coronas, and mass fractionation during early blowoff, followed from sounding rocket studies of the earth upper atmosphere, Mariner 5 results on hydrogen near Venus, and the nitrogen isotopic composition discovered by Viking in Mars. Attention has more recently been given to the xenon isotopic patterns in various atmospheres, as well as to the puzzling behavior of the Io atmosphere and plasma torus. 126 refs

  13. Fixation and escape times in stochastic game learning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evolutionary dynamics in finite populations is known to fixate eventually in the absence of mutation. We here show that a similar phenomenon can be found in stochastic game dynamical batch learning, and investigate fixation in learning processes in a simple 2×2 game, for two-player games with cyclic interaction, and in the context of the best-shot network game. The analogues of finite populations in evolution are here finite batches of observations between strategy updates. We study when and how such fixation can occur, and present results on the average time-to-fixation from numerical simulations. Simple cases are also amenable to analytical approaches and we provide estimates of the behaviour of so-called escape times as a function of the batch size. The differences and similarities with escape and fixation in evolutionary dynamics are discussed. (paper)

  14. Self-organized escape of oscillator chains in nonlinear potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, D; Fugmann, S; Schimansky-Geier, L; Hänggi, P

    2007-10-01

    We present the noise-free escape of a chain of linearly interacting units from a metastable state over a cubic on-site potential barrier. The underlying dynamics is conservative and purely deterministic. The mutual interplay between nonlinearity and harmonic interactions causes an initially uniform lattice state to become unstable, leading to an energy redistribution with strong localization. As a result, a spontaneously emerging localized mode grows into a critical nucleus. By surpassing this transition state, the nonlinear chain manages a self-organized, deterministic barrier crossing. Most strikingly, these noise-free, collective nonlinear escape events proceed generally by far faster than transitions assisted by thermal noise when the ratio between the average energy supplied per unit in the chain and the potential barrier energy assumes small values. PMID:17994939

  15. Dynamics of the verge and foliot clock escapement

    CERN Document Server

    Hoyng, P

    2016-01-01

    The verge and foliot escapement has received relatively little attention in horology, despite the fact that it has been used in clocks for ages. We analyse the operation of a verge and foliot escapement in stationary swing. It is driven by a torque $m=\\pm\\mu$, switching sign at fixed swing angles $\\pm\\phi_0$, and $\\mu$ is taken to be constant. Friction is assumed to exert a torque proportional to the angular speed. We determine the shape of the swing angle $\\varphi(t)$, and compute the period and the swing amplitude of the foliot as a function of the model parameters. We find that the period of the foliot scales as $P\\propto\\mu^{-1}$ for weak driving, gradually changing into $P\\propto\\mu^{-1/3}$ for strong driving (large $\\mu$), which underlines that the motion of the foliot is not isochonous.

  16. Escape of Mars atmospheric carbon through time by photochemical means

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Kim, J.; Nagy, A. F.

    Luhmann et al. recently suggested that sputtering of the Martian atmosphere by re-entering O(+) pickup ions could have provided a significant route of escape for CO2 and its products throughout Mars' history. They estimated that the equivalent of C in an approximately 140-mbar CO2 atmosphere should have been lost this way if the Sun and solar wind evolved according to available models. Another source of escaping C (and O) that is potentially important is the dissociative recombination of ionospheric CO(+) near the exobase. We have evaluated the loss rates due to this process for 'ancient' solar EUV radiation fluxes of 1, 3, and 6 times the present flux in order to calculate the possible cumulative loss over the last 3.5 Gyr.

  17. Escape of Mars atmospheric carbon through time by photochemical means

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Kim, J.; Nagy, A. F.

    1993-01-01

    Luhmann et al. recently suggested that sputtering of the Martian atmosphere by re-entering O(+) pickup ions could have provided a significant route of escape for CO2 and its products throughout Mars' history. They estimated that the equivalent of C in an approximately 140-mbar CO2 atmosphere should have been lost this way if the Sun and solar wind evolved according to available models. Another source of escaping C (and O) that is potentially important is the dissociative recombination of ionospheric CO(+) near the exobase. We have evaluated the loss rates due to this process for 'ancient' solar EUV radiation fluxes of 1, 3, and 6 times the present flux in order to calculate the possible cumulative loss over the last 3.5 Gyr.

  18. NAMPT inhibition synergizes with NQO1-targeting agents in inducing apoptotic cell death in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui-Ying; Li, Qing-Ran; Cheng, Xue-Fang; Wang, Guang-Ji; Hao, Hai-Ping

    2016-08-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) catalyzes the first rate-limiting step in converting nicotinamide to NAD(+), essential for a number of enzymes and regulatory proteins involved in a variety of cellular processes, including deacetylation enzyme SIRT1 which modulates several tumor suppressors such as p53 and FOXO. Herein we report that NQO1 substrates Tanshione IIA (TSA) and β-lapachone (β-lap) induced a rapid depletion of NAD(+) pool but adaptively a significant upregulation of NAMPT. NAMPT inhibition by FK866 at a nontoxic dose significantly enhanced NQO1-targeting agent-induced apoptotic cell death. Compared with TSA or β-lap treatment alone, co-treatment with FK866 induced a more dramatic depletion of NAD(+), repression of SIRT1 activity, and thereby the increased accumulation of acetylated FOXO1 and the activation of apoptotic pathway. In conclusion, the results from the present study support that NAMPT inhibition can synergize with NQO1 activation to induce apoptotic cell death, thereby providing a new rationale for the development of combinative therapeutic drugs in combating non-small lung cancer. PMID:27608947

  19. The escape of natural satellites from Mercury and Venus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is suggested that the slow rotations of Mercury and Venus may be connected with the absence of natural satellites around them. If Mercury or Venus possessed a satellite at the time of formation, the tidal evolution would have caused the satellite to recede. At a sufficiently large distance from the planet, the Sun's gravitational influence makes the satellite orbit unstable. The natural satellites of Mercury and Venus might have escaped as a consequence of this instability. (Auth.)

  20. Brain size as a driver of avian escape strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Samia, Diogo S. M.; Pape Møller, Anders; Blumstein, Daniel T.

    2015-01-01

    After detecting an approaching predator, animals make a decision when to flee. Prey will initiate flight soon after detecting a predator so as to minimize attentional costs related to on-going monitoring of the whereabouts of the predator. Such costs may compete with foraging and other maintenance activities and hence be larger than the costs of immediate flight. The drivers of interspecific variation in escape strategy are poorly known. Here we investigated the morphological, life history an...

  1. Transcriptional control of behavior: Engrailed knockout changes cockroach escape trajectories

    OpenAIRE

    Booth, David; Marie, Bruno; Domenici, Paolo; Blagburn, Jonathan M.; Bacon, Jonathan P.

    2009-01-01

    The cerci of the cockroach are covered with identified sensory hairs, which detect air movements. The sensory neurons which innervate these hairs synapse with giant interneurons (GIs) in the terminal ganglion which in turn synapse with interneurons and leg motorneurons in thoracic ganglia. This neural circuit mediates the animal's escape behavior. The transcription factor Engrailed (En) is expressed only in the medially born sensory neurons, which suggested it could work as a positional deter...

  2. Viral Resistance Evolution Fully Escapes a Rationally Designed Lethal Inhibitor

    OpenAIRE

    Keller, Thomas E.; Molineux, Ian J.; Bull, James J

    2009-01-01

    Viruses are notoriously capable of evolving resistance to drugs. However, if the endpoint of resistance evolution is only partial escape, a feasible strategy should be to stack drugs, so the combined effect of partial inhibition by several drugs results in net inhibition. Assessing the feasibility of this approach requires quantitative data on viral fitness before and after evolution of resistance to a drug, as done here with bacteriophage T7. An inhibitory gene expressed from a phage promote...

  3. Self-organized escape of oscillator chains in nonlinear potentials

    OpenAIRE

    Hennig, D.; Fugmann, S.; Schimansky-Geier, L.; Hänggi, P

    2007-01-01

    We present the noise free escape of a chain of linearly interacting units from a metastable state over a cubic on-site potential barrier. The underlying dynamics is conservative and purely deterministic. The mutual interplay between nonlinearity and harmonic interactions causes an initially uniform lattice state to become unstable, leading to an energy redistribution with strong localization. As a result a spontaneously emerging localized mode grows into a critical nucleus. By surpassing this...

  4. Transitions between three swimming gaits in Paramecium escape

    OpenAIRE

    Hamel, Amandine; Fisch, C; Combettes, L; Dupuis-Williams, P.; Baroud, Charles,

    2011-01-01

    Paramecium and other protists are able to swim at velocities reaching several times their body size per second by beating their cilia in an organized fashion. The cilia beat in an asymmetric stroke, which breaks the time reversal symmetry of small scale flows. Here we show that Paramecium uses three different swimming gaits to escape from an aggression, applied in the form of a focused laser heating. For a weak aggression, normal swimming is sufficient and produces a steady swimming velocity....

  5. Amygdala involvement in human avoidance, escape and approach behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Schlund, Michael W.; Cataldo, Michael F

    2010-01-01

    Many forms of psychopathology and substance abuse problems are characterized by chronic ritualized forms of avoidance and escape behavior that are designed to control or modify external or internal (i.e, thoughts, emotions, bodily sensations) threats. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging investigation, we examined amygdala reactivity to threatening cues when avoidance responding consistently prevented contact with an upcoming aversive event (money loss). In addition, we examined esca...

  6. Escape rates for rotor walk in Z^d

    OpenAIRE

    Florescu, Laura; Ganguly, Shirshendu; Levine, Lionel; Peres, Yuval

    2013-01-01

    Rotor walk is a deterministic analogue of random walk. We study its recurrence and transience properties on Z^d for the initial configuration of all rotors aligned. If n particles in turn perform rotor walks starting from the origin, we show that the number that escape (i.e., never return to the origin) is of order n in dimensions d>=3, and of order n/log(n) in dimension 2.

  7. ESCAPE: an integrated climate model for the EC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A framework has been developed for the evaluation of policy options for climate change, called ESCAPE (Evaluation of Strategies to address Climate change by Adapting to and Preventing Emissions). ESCAPE consists of a suite of linked models which enables scenarios of greenhouse gas emissions to be constructed and their impact on global and regional climate and sea level and sectors of the European economy to be assessed. Conclusions resulting from simulations with the ESCAPE 1.1 model include: the major problem of a climate change for the EC is a sea level rise; Greece, Italy, Portugal and Spain will be faced with higher costs in the agricultural sector; worldwide implementation of an EC carbon tax leads to about 12% lower worldwide CO2 emissions; to stabilize CO2 emissions an Ecotax of 18 dollars per barrel would be required; and in all cases the rate of global temperature increase will be above the rate of 0.1 degree C per decade for the coming 40 years. 2 figs

  8. The RAVE Survey: Constraining the Local Galactic Escape Speed

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, M C; Helmi, A; Wyse, R F G; Fulbright, J P; Freeman, K C; Navarro, J F; Seabroke, G M; Steinmetz, M; Williams, M; Bienaymé, O; Binney, J; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Dehnen, W; Gibson, B K; Gilmore, G; Grebel, E K; Munari, U; Parker, Q A; Scholz, R D; Siebert, A; Watson, F G; Zwitter, T

    2006-01-01

    We report new constraints on the local escape speed of our Galaxy. Our analysis is based on a sample of high velocity stars from the RAVE survey and two previously published datasets. We use cosmological simulations of disk galaxy formation to motivate our assumptions on the shape of the velocity distribution, allowing for a significantly more precise measurement of the escape velocity compared to previous studies. We find that the escape velocity lies within the range $498\\kms < \\ve < 608 \\kms$ (90 per cent confidence), with a median likelihood of $544\\kms$. The fact that $\\ve^2$ is significantly greater than $2\\vc^2$ (where $\\vc=220\\kms$ is the local circular velocity) implies that there must be a significant amount of mass exterior to the Solar circle, i.e. this convincingly demonstrates the presence of a dark halo in the Galaxy. For a simple isothermal halo, one can calculate that the minimum radial extent is $\\sim58$ kpc. We use our constraints on $\\ve$ to determine the mass of the Milky Way halo f...

  9. Transitions between three swimming gaits in Paramecium escape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Amandine; Fisch, Cathy; Combettes, Laurent; Dupuis-Williams, Pascale; Baroud, Charles N

    2011-05-01

    Paramecium and other protists are able to swim at velocities reaching several times their body size per second by beating their cilia in an organized fashion. The cilia beat in an asymmetric stroke, which breaks the time reversal symmetry of small scale flows. Here we show that Paramecium uses three different swimming gaits to escape from an aggression, applied in the form of a focused laser heating. For a weak aggression, normal swimming is sufficient and produces a steady swimming velocity. As the heating amplitude is increased, a higher acceleration and faster swimming are achieved through synchronized beating of the cilia, which begin by producing oscillating swimming velocities and later give way to the usual gait. Finally, escape from a life-threatening aggression is achieved by a "jumping" gait, which does not rely on the cilia but is achieved through the explosive release of a group of trichocysts in the direction of the hot spot. Measurements through high-speed video explain the role of trichocysts in defending against aggressions while showing unexpected transitions in the swimming of microorganisms. These measurements also demonstrate that Paramecium optimizes its escape pattern by taking advantage of its inertia. PMID:21464291

  10. Effective climate-energy solutions, escape routes and peak oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many well-intended climate-energy strategies are ineffective in the absence of serious environmental regulation. This holds, among others, for direct support of clean energy, voluntary energy conservation, technical standards on a limited set of products, unilateral stringent carbon pricing, and awaiting peak oil as a climate strategy. All of these suffer from “escape routes” that indirectly increase CO2 emissions and thus make the original strategy ineffective. On the other hand, environmental regulation alone may lead to a myopia-bias, stimulating early dominance of cost-effective technologies and a focus on incremental innovations associated with such technologies rather than on radical innovations. Although adopting a partial viewpoint keeps the analysis simple, we urgently need a more inclusive systems perspective on climate solutions. This will allow the formulation of an effective climate policy package that addresses the various escape routes. - Highlights: ► Many well-intended climate-energy strategies are ineffective because of escape routes. ► In this context the relationship between peak oil and climate policy receives attention. ► Environmental regulation alone creates myopia-bias, the resolution of which requires technology-specific policies. ► To formulate an effective climate policy package an inclusive systems perspective is needed.

  11. Fleeing to refuge: Escape decisions in the race for life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, William E

    2016-10-01

    Economic escape theory that predicts that flight initiation distance (FID=predator-prey distance when a prey begins to flee from an approaching predator) increases as predation risk increases has been overwhelmingly supported. However, the vast majority of empirical tests have focused on effects of single predation risk factors. Even studies that have included multiple risk factors have not predicted how they jointly affect FID. I present a model that predicts joint effects of several predation risk factors that affect the outcome of a race between predator and prey to the prey's refuge. As a prey's distance to refuge and predator attack speed increase, and as the prey's location forces it to flee more toward a predator to reach refuge, FID increases. A published model proposed and experiment showed that FID is longer when prey flee directly toward than directly away from a predator to a refuge. We present a new geometric model that predicts FID for all angles between the prey's and predator's paths to refuge, distance of the prey from refuge when escape begins, predator and prey speeds, and a margin of safety allowing the prey to reach refuge before the predator. The model provides many new, testable predictions about relationships among its variables and FID. Most notably, it predicts that FID increases sigmoidally as the angle between predator and prey paths to refuge increases. Although the model is not economic (cost-benefit), we discuss its relationship to economic escape theory. PMID:27343624

  12. 46 CFR 108.155 - Restrictions on means of escape utilized.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restrictions on means of escape utilized. 108.155 Section 108.155 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE... means of escape utilized. A required means of escape may not be a vertical ladder or deck...

  13. Escape Performance Following Exposure to Inescapable Shock: Deficits in Motor Response Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisman, Hymie; And Others

    1978-01-01

    A series of 13 experiments employing mice systematically investigated shock-elicited activity in a circular field and escape performance in a shuttle box following exposure to either escapable or inescapable shock. Results show that escape interference induced by inescapable shock may be comfortably interpreted in terms of a decreased tendency for…

  14. MAVEN in situ measurements of photochemical escape of oxygen from Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillis, Robert; Deighan, Justin; Fox, Jane; Bougher, Stephen; Lee, Yuni; Cravens, Thomas; Rahmati, Ali; Mahaffy, Paul; Benna, Mehdi; Groller, Hannes; Jakosky, Bruce

    2016-04-01

    One of the primary goals of the MAVEN mission is to characterize rates of atmospheric escape from Mars at the present epoch and relate those escape rates to solar drivers. One of the known escape processes is photochemical escape, where a) an exothermic chemical reaction in the atmosphere results in an upward-traveling neutral particle whose velocity exceeds planetary escape velocity and b) the particle is not prevented from escaping through subsequent collisions. At Mars, photochemical escape of oxygen is expected to be a significant channel for atmospheric escape, particularly in the early solar system when extreme ultraviolet (EUV) fluxes were much higher. Thus characterizing this escape process and its variability with solar drivers is central to understanding the role escape to space has played in Mars' climate evolution. We use near-periapsis (CO2+ to calculate the probability distribution for the initial energies of the resulting hot oxygen atoms. The second is a Monte Carlo hot atom transport model that takes that distribution of initial O energies and the measured neutral density profiles and calculates the probability that a hot atom born at that altitude will escape. The third takes the measured electron and ion densities and electron temperatures and calculates the production rate of hot O atoms. We then multiply together the profiles of hot atom production and escape probability to get profiles of the production rate of escaping atoms. We integrate with respect to altitude to give us the escape flux of hot oxygen atoms for that periapsis pass. We have sufficient coverage in solar zenith angle (SZA) to estimate total escape rates for two intervals with the obvious assumption that escape rates are the same at all points with the same SZA. We estimate total escape rates of 3.5-5.8 x 1025 s-1 for Ls = 289° to 319° and 1.6-2.6 x 1025 s-1 for Ls = 326° to 348°. The latter is the most directly comparable to previous model-based estimates and is roughly in

  15. Effects of inescapable versus escapable social stress in Syrian hamsters: The importance of stressor duration versus escapability

    OpenAIRE

    McCann, Katharine E.; Bicknese, Corinne N.; Norvelle, Alisa; Huhman, Kim L.

    2014-01-01

    Social avoidance is a common characteristic of many clinical psychopathologies and is often triggered by social stress. Our lab uses Syrian hamsters to model stress-induced social avoidance, and we have previously established that both inescapable and escapable social defeat result in increased social avoidance when compared with no-defeat controls. Our previous work suggested, however, that social avoidance was significantly greater after inescapable defeat. The goal of this study was to det...

  16. Kramers escape rate in overdamped systems with the power-law distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Yanjun; Du, Jiulin

    2014-01-01

    Kramers escape rate in the overdamped systems with the power-law distribution is studied. By using the mean first passage time, we derive the escape rate for the power-law distribution and obtain the Kramers' infinite barrier escape rate in this case. It is shown that the escape rate for the power-law distribution extends the Kramers' overdamped result to the relatively low barrier. Furthermore, we apply the escape rate for the power-law distribution to the unfolding of titin and show a bette...

  17. Histone deacetylase inhibitor upregulates peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation and inhibits apoptotic cell death in abcd1-deficient glial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaspreet Singh

    Full Text Available In X-ALD, mutation/deletion of ALD gene (ABCD1 and the resultant very long chain fatty acid (VLCFA derangement has dramatically opposing effects in astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. While loss of Abcd1 in astrocytes produces a robust inflammatory response, the oligodendrocytes undergo cell death leading to demyelination in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD. The mechanisms of these distinct pathways in the two cell types are not well understood. Here, we investigated the effects of Abcd1-knockdown and the subsequent alteration in VLCFA metabolism in human U87 astrocytes and rat B12 oligodendrocytes. Loss of Abcd1 inhibited peroxisomal β-oxidation activity and increased expression of VLCFA synthesizing enzymes, elongase of very long chain fatty acids (ELOVLs (1 and 3 in both cell types. However, higher induction of ELOVL's in Abcd1-deficient B12 oligodendrocytes than astrocytes suggests that ELOVL pathway may play a prominent role in oligodendrocytes in X-ALD. While astrocytes are able to maintain the cellular homeostasis of anti-apoptotic proteins, Abcd1-deletion in B12 oligodendrocytes downregulated the anti-apototic (Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL and cell survival (phospho-Erk1/2 proteins, and upregulated the pro-apoptotic proteins (Bad, Bim, Bax and Bid leading to cell loss. These observations provide insights into different cellular signaling mechanisms in response to Abcd1-deletion in two different cell types of CNS. The apoptotic responses were accompanied by activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9 suggesting the involvement of mitochondrial-caspase-9-dependent mechanism in Abcd1-deficient oligodendrocytes. Treatment with histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA corrected the VLCFA derangement both in vitro and in vivo, and inhibited the oligodendrocytes loss. These observations provide a proof-of principle that HDAC inhibitor SAHA may have a therapeutic potential for X-ALD.

  18. Development of novel cyclic peptides as pro-apoptotic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brindisi, Margherita; Maramai, Samuele; Brogi, Simone; Fanigliulo, Emanuela; Butini, Stefania; Guarino, Egeria; Casagni, Alice; Lamponi, Stefania; Bonechi, Claudia; Nathwani, Seema M; Finetti, Federica; Ragonese, Francesco; Arcidiacono, Paola; Campiglia, Pietro; Valenti, Salvatore; Novellino, Ettore; Spaccapelo, Roberta; Morbidelli, Lucia; Zisterer, Daniela M; Williams, Clive D; Donati, Alessandro; Baldari, Cosima; Campiani, Giuseppe; Ulivieri, Cristina; Gemma, Sandra

    2016-07-19

    Our recent finding that paclitaxel behaves as a peptidomimetic of the endogenous protein Nur77 inspired the design of two peptides (PEP1 and PEP2) reproducing the effects of paclitaxel on Bcl-2 and tubulin, proving the peptidomimetic nature of paclitaxel. Starting from these peptide-hits, we herein describe the synthesis and the biological investigation of linear and cyclic peptides structurally related to PEP2. While linear peptides (2a,b, 3a,b, 4, 6a-f) were found inactive in cell-based assays, biological analysis revealed a pro-apoptotic effect for most of the cyclic peptides (5a-g). Cellular permeability of 5a (and also of 2a,b) on HL60 cells was assessed through confocal microscopy analysis. Further cellular studies on a panel of leukemic cell lines (HL60, Jurkat, MEC, EBVB) and solid tumor cell lines (breast cancer MCF-7 cells, human melanoma A375 and 501Mel cells, and murine melanoma B16F1 cells) confirmed the pro-apoptotic effect of the cyclic peptides. Cell cycle analysis revealed that treatment with 5a, 5c, 5d or 5f resulted in an increase in the number of cells in the sub-G0/G1 peak. Direct interaction with tubulin (turbidimetric assay) and with microtubules (immunostaining experiments) was assessed in vitro for the most promising compounds. PMID:27150036

  19. The ENZYME data bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bairoch, A

    1994-01-01

    The ENZYME data bank is a repository of information relative to the nomenclature of enzymes. It is primarily based on the recommendations of the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (IUBMB) and it contains the following data for each type of characterized enzyme for which an EC (Enzyme Commission) number has been provided: EC number Recommended name Alternative names (if any) Catalytic activity Cofactors (if any) Pointers to the SWISS-PROT protein sequence entrie(s) that correspond to the enzyme (if any) Pointers to human disease(s) associated with a deficiency of the enzyme (if any). PMID:7937072

  20. Allograft tolerance induced by donor apoptotic lymphocytes requires phagocytosis in the recipient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, E.; Gao, Y.; Chen, J.; Roberts, A. I.; Wang, X.; Chen, Z.; Shi, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Cell death through apoptosis plays a critical role in regulating cellular homeostasis. Whether the disposal of apoptotic cells through phagocytosis can actively induce immune tolerance in vivo, however, remains controversial. Here, we report in a rat model that without using immunosuppressants, transfusion of apoptotic splenocytes from the donor strain prior to transplant dramatically prolonged survival of heart allografts. Histological analysis verified that rejection signs were significantly ameliorated. Splenocytes from rats transfused with donor apoptotic cells showed a dramatically decreased response to donor lymphocyte stimulation. Most importantly, blockade of phagocytosis in vivo, either with gadolinium chloride to disrupt phagocyte function or with annexin V to block binding of exposed phosphotidylserine to its receptor on phagocytes, abolished the beneficial effect of transfused apoptotic cells on heart allograft survival. Our results demonstrate that donor apoptotic cells promote specific allograft acceptance and that phagocytosis of apoptotic cells in vivo plays a crucial role in maintaining immune tolerance.

  1. Apoptosis Regulation via the Mitochondrial Pathway : Membrane Response upon Apoptotic Stimuli

    OpenAIRE

    Sani, Marc-Antoine

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was the investigation of the mitochondrial response mechanisms upon apoptotic stimuli. The specific objectives were the biophysical characterization of membrane dynamics and the specific roles of lipids in the context of apoptotic regulation occurring at the mitochondrion and its complex membrane systems. The BH4 domain is an anti-apoptotic specific domain of the Bcl-2 protein. Solid phase peptide synthesis was used to produce large amount of the peptide for biophysical...

  2. Decreased Apoptotic Rate of Alveolar Macrophages of Patients with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Fotios Drakopanagiotakis; Areti Xifteri; Evaggelos Tsiambas; Andreas Karameris; Konstantina Tsakanika; Napoleon Karagiannidis; Demetrios Mermigkis; Vlasis Polychronopoulos; Demosthenes Bouros

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Increased apoptosis of epithelial cells and decreased apoptosis of myofibroblasts are involved in the pathogenesis of IPF. The apoptotic profile of alveolar macrophages (AMs) in IPF is unclear. Aim. To investigate whether AMs of patients with IPF exhibit a different apoptotic profile compared to normal subjects. Methods. We analyzed, by immunohistochemistry, the expression of the apoptotic markers fas, fas ligand , bcl-2, and bax in AM obtained from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid ...

  3. HMM Search for Apoptotic Domains (MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND INFORMATION-Biological Information Science)

    OpenAIRE

    Hattori, Masahiro; Kanehisa, Minoru

    2000-01-01

    For the purpose of analyzing apoptotic molecular interactions, we have developed a knowledge base, which consists of apoptotic molecular interactions, together with the WWW interface for it. This database and the user interface enabled us to find out entries containing various information about cell death. This information tells us that the apoptotic molecular interactions are likely to be controlled under a series of specific conserved domains. Thus, the viewpoint of domain seems to be more ...

  4. Age-related activation of mitochondrial caspase-independent apoptotic signaling in rat gastrocnemius muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Marzetti, Emanuele; Wohlgemuth, Stephanie Eva; Lees, Hazel Anne; Chung, Hae-young; Giovannini, Silvia; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondria-mediated apoptosis represents a central process driving age-related muscle loss. However, the temporal relation between mitochondrial apoptotic signaling and sarcopenia as well as the regulation of release of pro-apoptotic factors from the mitochondria has not been elucidated. In this study, we investigated mitochondrial apoptotic signaling in skeletal muscle of rats across a wide age range. We also investigated whether mitochondrial-driven apoptosis was accompanied by changes in...

  5. Pro-apoptotic effects of the flavonoid luteolin in rat H4IIE cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyphenols are ubiquitous substances in the diet. Their anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory and anti-viral effects are of interest for human health, and polyphenols such as luteolin are used at high concentrations in food supplements. The aim of this project was to determine the intrinsic effects of luteolin in H4IIE rat hepatoma cells. Luteolin is relatively toxic, cell death was caused via induction of apoptosis as detected by DNA-ladder formation, by nuclear fragmentation and activation of apoptotic enzymes (caspase-2, -3/7, -9 and -8/10). Luteolin (250 μM, 24 h) increased the caspase-3/7 activity four-fold and the caspase-9 activity six-fold. In a time course experiment caspase-9 is activated after 6 h, while caspase-2 and -3/7 are activated after 12 h. After 24 h, caspase-8/10 also displays activation. We found a concentration-dependent increase in malondialdehyde release suggesting a prooxidative effect of luteolin. Furthermore, we analysed DNA strand break formation by luteolin and found a distinct increase of DNA strand breaks after incubation for 3 h with 100 μM luteolin, a concentration which induces oligonucleosomal DNA cleavage at 24 h. In conclusion, the sequence of events is compatible with the assumption that luteolin triggers the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis, probably by inducing DNA damage

  6. Mitochondria, calcium and pro-apoptotic proteins as mediators in cell death signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.S. Smaili

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Cellular Ca2+ signals are crucial in the control of most physiological processes, cell injury and programmed cell death through the regulation of a number of Ca2+-dependent enzymes such as phospholipases, proteases, and nucleases. Mitochondria along with the endoplasmic reticulum play pivotal roles in regulating intracellular Ca2+ content. Mitochondria are endowed with multiple Ca2+ transport mechanisms by which they take up and release Ca2+ across their inner membrane. During cellular Ca2+ overload, mitochondria take up cytosolic Ca2+, which in turn induces opening of permeability transition pores and disrupts the mitochondrial membrane potential (Dym. The collapse of Dym along with the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria is followed by the activation of caspases, nuclear fragmentation and cell death. Members of the Bcl-2 family are a group of proteins that play important roles in apoptosis regulation. Members of this family appear to differentially regulate intracellular Ca2+ level. Translocation of Bax, an apoptotic signaling protein, from the cytosol to the mitochondrial membrane is another step in this apoptosis signaling pathway.

  7. PKCη confers protection against apoptosis by inhibiting the pro-apoptotic JNK activity in MCF-7 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apoptosis is frequently regulated by different protein kinases including protein kinase C family enzymes. Both inhibitory and stimulatory effects were demonstrated for several of the different PKC isoforms. Here we show that the novel PKC isoform, PKCη, confers protection against apoptosis induced by the DNA damaging agents, UVC irradiation and the anti-cancer drug - Camptothecin, of the breast epithelial adenocarcinoma MCF-7 cells. The induced expression of PKCη in MCF-7 cells, under the control of the tetracycline-responsive promoter, resulted in increased cell survival and inhibition of cleavage of the apoptotic marker PARP-1. Activation of caspase-7 and 9 and the release of cytochrome c were also inhibited by the inducible expression of PKCη. Furthermore, JNK activity, required for apoptosis in MCF-7, as indicated by the inhibition of both caspase-7 cleavage and cytochrome c release from the mitochondria in the presence of the JNK inhibitor SP600125, was also suppressed by PKCη expression. Hence, in contrast to most PKC isoforms enhancing JNK activation, our studies show that PKCη is an anti-apoptotic protein, acting as a negative regulator of JNK activity. Thus, PKCη could represent a target for intervention aimed to reduce resistance to anti-cancer treatments.

  8. Escaping stars from young low-N clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Weidner, Carsten; Bonnell, Ian A.; Moeckel, Nickolas

    2010-01-01

    With the use of N-body calculations the amount and properties of escaping stars from low-N (N = 100 and 1000) young embedded star clusters prior to gas expulsion are studied over the first 5 Myr of their existence. Besides the number of stars also different initial radii and binary populations are examined as well as virialised and collapsing clusters. It is found that these clusters can loose substantial amounts (up to 20%) of stars within 5 Myr with considerable velocities up to more than 1...

  9. First-passage and escape problems in the Feller process

    CERN Document Server

    Masoliver, Jaume

    2012-01-01

    The Feller process is an one-dimensional diffusion process with linear drift and state-dependent diffusion coefficient vanishing at the origin. The process is positive definite and it is this property along with its linear character that have made Feller process a convenient candidate for the modeling of a number of phenomena ranging from single neuron firing to volatility of financial assets. While general properties of the process are well known since long, less known are properties related to level crossing such as the first-passage and the escape problems. In this work we thoroughly address these questions.

  10. The mirror of the escaped God – Alejandra Pizarnik

    OpenAIRE

    Mariano Carou

    2015-01-01

    Alejandra Pizarnik (1936-1972) shows many different stands regarding to “God’s escape” in her poetry and his diaries: from the psalmist’s request to the more combative atheism. There is, however, a constant development of a symbolic constellation to speak about God’s mistery, and the certitude –inherited from German romanticism– that the poet has always something to say about God’s escape, searching for a new hope in which is maybe a new form of mysticism.

  11. Chases and escapes the mathematics of pursuit and evasion

    CERN Document Server

    Nahin, Paul J

    2012-01-01

    We all played tag when we were kids. What most of us don't realize is that this simple chase game is in fact an application of pursuit theory, and that the same principles of games like tag, dodgeball, and hide-and-seek are also at play in military strategy, high-seas chases by the Coast Guard, and even romantic pursuits. In Chases and Escapes, Paul Nahin gives us the first complete history of this fascinating area of mathematics, from its classical analytical beginnings to the present day. Drawing on game theory, geometry, linear algebra, target-tracking algorithms, and much

  12. Nuclear reaction diagnostics of fast confined and escaping alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The resonant radiative capture nuclear reactions D(α,γ)6Li, 6Li(α,γ) 19B and 7Li(α,γ)11B are examined as diagnostics of the energy distribution of confined fast alpha particles in tokamak plasmas. Count rates for realistic Q=1 DT plasma conditions are presented and compared to expected backgrounds. The design of and preliminary results from the prototype fusion gamma ray detector on TFTR are presented. The activation reactions are similarly examined as diagnostics of escaping fast alpha particles. Where possible, count rate estimates for Q=1 DT plasmas and proposed ignition devices are presented

  13. Escape from a potential well with a randomly switching boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider diffusion in a potential well with a boundary that randomly switches between absorbing and reflecting and show how the switching boundary affects the classical escape theory. Using the theory of stochastic hybrid systems, we derive boundary value problems for the mean first passage time and splitting probability and find explicit solutions in terms of the spectral decomposition of the associated differential operator. Further, using a more probabilistic approach, we prove asymptotic formulae for these statistics in the small diffusion limit. In particular, we show that the statistical behavior depends critically on the gradient of the potential near the switching boundary and we derive corrections to Kramers’ reaction rate theory. (paper)

  14. Escaping the poverty trap in a developing rural economy

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen Manh Hung; Paul Makdissi

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the economic policies that might allow a developing rural economy to escape from the poverty trap characterized by a subsistence level of per capita consumption in the long run. In our model where labour is combined to land available in fixed quantity to produce a homogeneous good, saving could be made through only having children, the number of which is an endogenous decision. We provide conditions under which the economy runs into a poverty trap, and proceed to ana...

  15. Enzyme Therapy: Current Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    UmaMaheswari, Thiyagamoorthy; Hemalatha, Thiagarajan; Sankaranarayanan, Palavesam; Puvanakrishnan, Rengarajulu

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes control all metabolic processes in human system from simple digestion of food to highly complex immune response. Physiological reactions occuring in healthy individuals are disturbed when enzymes are deficient or absent. Enzymes are administered for normalizing biological function in certain pathologies. Initially, crude proteolytic enzymes were used for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. Recent advances have enabled enzyme therapy as a promising tool in the treatment of cardiovascular, oncological and hereditary diseases. Now, a spectrum of other diseases are also covered under enzyme therapy. But, the available information on the use of enzymes as therapeutic agents for different diseases is scanty. This review details the enzymes which have been used to treat various diseases/disorders. PMID:26891548

  16. Phosphorylation of Puma modulates its apoptotic function by regulating protein stability

    OpenAIRE

    Fricker, M; O'Prey, J.; Tolkovsky, A M; Ryan, K M

    2010-01-01

    Puma is a potent BH3-only protein that antagonises anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins, promotes Bax/Bak activation and has an essential role in multiple apoptotic models. Puma expression is normally kept very low, but can be induced by several transcription factors including p53, p73, E2F1 and FOXO3a, whereby it can induce an apoptotic response. As Puma can to bind and inactivate all anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family, its activity must be tightly controlled. We report here, for the first ...

  17. Apoptotic cells are cleared by directional migration and elmo1- dependent macrophage engulfment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ham, Tjakko J; Kokel, David; Peterson, Randall T

    2012-05-01

    Apoptotic cell death is essential for development and tissue homeostasis. Failure to clear apoptotic cells can ultimately cause inflammation and autoimmunity. Apoptosis has primarily been studied by staining of fixed tissue sections, and a clear understanding of the behavior of apoptotic cells in living tissue has been elusive. Here, we use a newly developed technique to track apoptotic cells in real time as they emerge and are cleared from the zebrafish brain. We find that apoptotic cells are remarkably motile, frequently migrating several cell diameters to the periphery of living tissues. F-actin remodeling occurs in surrounding cells, but also within the apoptotic cells themselves, suggesting a cell-autonomous component of motility. During the first 2 days of development, engulfment is rare, and most apoptotic cells lyse at the brain periphery. By 3 days postfertilization, most cell corpses are rapidly engulfed by macrophages. This engulfment requires the guanine nucleotide exchange factor elmo1. In elmo1-deficient macrophages, engulfment is rare and may occur through macropinocytosis rather than directed engulfment. These findings suggest that clearance of apoptotic cells in living vertebrates is accomplished by the combined actions of apoptotic cell migration and elmo1-dependent macrophage engulfment. PMID:22503503

  18. Enzyme inhibition by iminosugars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López, Óscar; Qing, Feng-Ling; Pedersen, Christian Marcus;

    2013-01-01

    Imino- and azasugar glycosidase inhibitors display pH dependant inhibition reflecting that both the inhibitor and the enzyme active site have groups that change protonation state with pH. With the enzyme having two acidic groups and the inhibitor one basic group, enzyme-inhibitor complexes with...

  19. PEGylated apoptotic protein-loaded PLGA microspheres for cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byeon HJ

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyeong Jun Byeon,1 Insoo Kim,1 Ji Su Choi,1 Eun Seong Lee,2 Beom Soo Shin,3 Yu Seok Youn11Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Republic of Korea; 2Division of Biotechnology, The Catholic University of Korea, Bucheon-si, Republic of Korea; 3Department of Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Catholic University of Daegu, Gyeongsan-si, Republic of KoreaAbstract: The aim of the current study was to investigate the antitumor potential of poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid microspheres (PLGA MSs containing polyethylene glycol (PEG-conjugated (PEGylated tumor necrosis factor–related apoptosis-inducing ligand (PEG-TRAIL. PEG-TRAIL PLGA MSs were prepared by using a water-in-oil-in-water double-emulsion method, and the apoptotic activities of supernatants released from the PLGA MSs at days 1, 3, and 7 were examined. The antitumor effect caused by PEG-TRAIL PLGA MSs was evaluated in pancreatic Mia Paca-2 cell-xenografted mice. PEG-TRAIL PLGA MS was found to be spherical and 14.4±1.06 µm in size, and its encapsulation efficiency was significantly greater than that of TRAIL MS (85.7%±4.1% vs 43.3%±10.9%, respectively. The PLGA MS gradually released PEG-TRAIL for 14 days, and the released PEG-TRAIL was shown to have clear apoptotic activity in Mia Paca-2 cells, whereas TRAIL released after 1 day had a negligible activity. Finally, PEG-TRAIL PLGA MS displayed remarkably greater antitumor efficacy than blank or TRAIL PLGA MS in Mia Paca-2 cell-xenografted mice in terms of tumor volume and weight, apparently due to increased stability and well-retained apoptotic activity of PEG-TRAIL in PLGA MS. We believe that this PLGA MS system, combined with PEG-TRAIL, should be considered a promising candidate for treating pancreatic cancer.Keywords: Poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid, controlled release, PEGylation, TRAIL, pancreatic cancer

  20. Myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK) induces actin cytoskeletal reorganization and apoptotic-like blebbing in lens cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, S.; Shimizu, M.; Balasubramanyam, A.; Epstein, H. F.

    2000-01-01

    DMPK, the product of the DM locus, is a member of the same family of serine-threonine protein kinases as the Rho-associated enzymes. In DM, membrane inclusions accumulate in lens fiber cells producing cataracts. Overexpression of DMPK in cultured lens epithelial cells led to apoptotic-like blebbing of the plasma membrane and reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. Enzymatically active DMPK was necessary for both effects; inactive mutant DMPK protein did not produce either effect. Active RhoA but not constitutive GDP-state mutant protein produced similar effects as DMPK. The similar actions of DMPK and RhoA suggest that they may function in the same regulatory network. The observed effects of DMPK may be relevant to the removal of membrane organelles during normal lens differentiation and the retention of intracellular membranes in DM lenses. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Involvement of caspase-12-dependent apoptotic pathway in ionic radiocontrast urografin-induced renal tubular cell injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Cheng Tien [Institute of Toxicology, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Weng, Te I. [Department of Forensic Medicine, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Li Ping [Department of Dentistry, Chang Gang Memorial Hospital, Chang Gang University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chiang, Chih Kang [Department of Integrated Diagnostics and Therapeutics, National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liu, Shing Hwa, E-mail: shinghwaliu@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Toxicology, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Urology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2013-01-01

    Contrast medium (CM) induces a direct toxic effect on renal tubular cells. This toxic effect subjects in the disorder of CM-induced nephropathy. Our previous work has demonstrated that CM shows to activate the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-related adaptive unfolding protein response (UPR) activators. Glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78)/eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α)-related pathways play a protective role during the urografin (an ionic CM)-induced renal tubular injury. However, the involvement of ER stress-related apoptotic signals in the urografin-induced renal tubular cell injury remains unclear. Here, we examined by the in vivo and in vitro experiments to explore whether ER stress-regulated pro-apoptotic activators participate in urografin-induced renal injury. Urografin induced renal tubular dilation, tubular cells detachment, and necrosis in the kidneys of rats. The tubular apoptosis, ER stress-related pro-apoptotic transcriptional factors, and kidney injury marker-1 (kim-1) were also conspicuously up-regulated in urografin-treated rats. Furthermore, treatment of normal rat kidney (NRK)-52E tubular cells with urografin augmented the expressions of activating transcription factor-6 (ATF-6), C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), Bax, caspase-12, JNK, and inositol-requiring enzyme (IRE) 1 signals. Urografin-induced renal tubular cell apoptosis was not reversed by the inhibitors of ATF-6, JNK signals or CHOP siRNA transfection, but it could be partially reversed by the inhibitor of caspase-12. Taken together, the present results and our previous findings suggest that exposure of CM/urografin activates the ER stress-regulated survival- and apoptosis-related signaling pathways in renal tubular cells. Caspase-12-dependent apoptotic pathway may be partially involved in the urografin-induced nephropathy. -- Highlights: ► Ionic contrast medium-urografin induces renal tubular cell apoptosis. ► Urografin induces the ER stress-regulated survival and apoptosis

  2. Involvement of caspase-12-dependent apoptotic pathway in ionic radiocontrast urografin-induced renal tubular cell injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contrast medium (CM) induces a direct toxic effect on renal tubular cells. This toxic effect subjects in the disorder of CM-induced nephropathy. Our previous work has demonstrated that CM shows to activate the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-related adaptive unfolding protein response (UPR) activators. Glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78)/eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α)-related pathways play a protective role during the urografin (an ionic CM)-induced renal tubular injury. However, the involvement of ER stress-related apoptotic signals in the urografin-induced renal tubular cell injury remains unclear. Here, we examined by the in vivo and in vitro experiments to explore whether ER stress-regulated pro-apoptotic activators participate in urografin-induced renal injury. Urografin induced renal tubular dilation, tubular cells detachment, and necrosis in the kidneys of rats. The tubular apoptosis, ER stress-related pro-apoptotic transcriptional factors, and kidney injury marker-1 (kim-1) were also conspicuously up-regulated in urografin-treated rats. Furthermore, treatment of normal rat kidney (NRK)-52E tubular cells with urografin augmented the expressions of activating transcription factor-6 (ATF-6), C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), Bax, caspase-12, JNK, and inositol-requiring enzyme (IRE) 1 signals. Urografin-induced renal tubular cell apoptosis was not reversed by the inhibitors of ATF-6, JNK signals or CHOP siRNA transfection, but it could be partially reversed by the inhibitor of caspase-12. Taken together, the present results and our previous findings suggest that exposure of CM/urografin activates the ER stress-regulated survival- and apoptosis-related signaling pathways in renal tubular cells. Caspase-12-dependent apoptotic pathway may be partially involved in the urografin-induced nephropathy. -- Highlights: ► Ionic contrast medium-urografin induces renal tubular cell apoptosis. ► Urografin induces the ER stress-regulated survival and apoptosis

  3. FEM analysis of escape capsule suffered to gas explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chang-lu; Mei, Rui-bin; Li, Chang-sheng; Cai, Ban; Liu, Xiang-hua

    2013-05-01

    Escape capsules are new devices for underground coal mines that provide air, water, food and supplies in the event of an emergency in where miners are unable to escape. It is difficult to carry out the experiments of explosion and safety because the danger and nonrepeatability of explosion. The structure deformation and distribution of equivalent stress has been investigated under different impact pressure conditions including unimodal and bimodal loads based on the FEM and software LS-DYNA. The results show that the distribution of deformation and equivalent stress has the same trend on the same surface with the increment of explosion pressure. The deformation and stress are larger with side impact pressure compared with that of the same front impact pressure. Furthermore, the maximum equivalent stress is 246MPa and 260MPa on the front and sides of capsule with five times for national standard impact pressure 1.5MPa. Under these conditions, the deformation is less than about 9.97mm and 10.47mm, respectively. When the front impact pressure is 2.0MPa, the deformation of capsule still belongs to elasticity but the less plastic deformation occurs on the Ushape stiffening channels with the same side impact pressure. However, it is safe for capsule structure because the equivalent stress 283MPa is much less than the tensile strength. It is noted that bimodal load accelerates the capsule deformation so that it is more dangerous compared with unimodal load.

  4. Metastatic Tumor Dormancy in Cutaneous Melanoma: Does Surgery Induce Escape?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the concept of tumor dormancy, tumor cells may exist as single cells or microscopic clusters of cells that are clinically undetectable, but remain viable and have the potential for malignant outgrowth. At metastatic sites, escape from tumor dormancy under more favorable local microenvironmental conditions or through other, yet undefined stimuli, may account for distant recurrence after supposed “cure” following surgical treatment of the primary tumor. The vast majority of evidence to date in support of the concept of tumor dormancy originates from animal studies; however, extensive epidemiologic data from breast cancer strongly suggests that this process does occur in human disease. In this review, we aim to demonstrate that metastatic tumor dormancy does exist in cutaneous melanoma based on evidence from mouse models and clinical observations of late recurrence and occult transmission by organ transplantation. Experimental data underscores the critical role of impaired angiogenesis and immune regulation as major mechanisms for maintenance of tumor dormancy. Finally, we examine evidence for the role of surgery in promoting escape from tumor dormancy at metastatic sites in cutaneous melanoma

  5. Viral resistance evolution fully escapes a rationally designed lethal inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Thomas E; Molineux, Ian J; Bull, James J

    2009-09-01

    Viruses are notoriously capable of evolving resistance to drugs. However, if the endpoint of resistance evolution is only partial escape, a feasible strategy should be to stack drugs, so the combined effect of partial inhibition by several drugs results in net inhibition. Assessing the feasibility of this approach requires quantitative data on viral fitness before and after evolution of resistance to a drug, as done here with bacteriophage T7. An inhibitory gene expressed from a phage promoter aborts wild-type T7 infections. The effect is so severe that the phage population declines when exposed to the inhibitor but expands a billion-fold per hour in its absence. In prior work, T7 evolved modest resistance to this inhibitor, an expected result. Given the nature of the inhibitor, that it used the phage's own promoter to target the phage's destruction, we anticipated that resistance evolution would be limited as the phage may need to evolve a new regulatory system, with simultaneous changes in its RNA polymerase (RNAP) and many of its promoters to fully escape inhibition. We show here that further adaptation of the partially resistant phage led to complete resistance. Resistance evolution was due to three mutations in the RNAP gene and two other genes; unexpectedly, no changes were observed in promoters. Consideration of other mechanisms of T7 inhibition leaves hope that permanent inhibition of viral growth with drugs can in principle be achieved. PMID:19494036

  6. Ultra-fast Escape of a Octopus-inspired Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weymouth, Gabriel; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2013-11-01

    The octopus, squid, and other cephalopods inflate with water and then release a jet to accelerate in the opposite direction. This escape mechanism is particularly interesting in the octopus because they become initially quite bluff, yet this does not hinder them in achieving impressive bursts of speed. We examine this somewhat paradoxical maneuver using a simple deflating spheroid model in both potential and viscous flow. We demonstrate that the dynamic reduction of the width of the body completely changes the flow and forces acting on the escaping rocket in three ways. First, a body which reduces in size can generate an added mass thrust which counteracts the added mass inertia. Second, the motion of the shrinking wall acts similar to suction on a static wall, reducing separation and drag forces in a viscous fluid, but that this effects depends on the rate of size change. Third, using a combination of these two features it is possible to initially load the fluid with kinetic energy when heavy and bluff and then recover that energy when streamlined and light, enabling ultra-fast accelerations. As a notable example, these mechanisms allow a shrinking spheroid rocket in a heavy inviscid fluid to achieve speeds greater than an identical rocket in the vacuum of space. Southampton Marine and Maritime Institute.

  7. The C. elegans touch response facilitates escape from predacious fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Sean M; Clark, Christopher M; Nunnari, John; Pirri, Jennifer K; Alkema, Mark J

    2011-08-01

    Predator-prey interactions are vital determinants in the natural selection of behavioral traits. Gentle touch to the anterior half of the body of Caenorhabditis elegans elicits an escape response in which the animal quickly reverses and suppresses exploratory head movements [1, 2]. Here, we investigate the ecological significance of the touch response in predator-prey interactions between C. elegans and predacious fungi that catch nematodes using constricting hyphal rings. We show that the constricting rings of Drechslerella doedycoides catch early larval stages with a diameter similar to the trap opening. There is a delay between the ring entry and ring closure, which allows the animal to withdraw from the trap before being caught. Mutants that fail to suppress head movements in response to touch are caught more efficiently than the wild-type. This demonstrates that the coordination of motor programs allows C. elegans to smoothly retract from a fungal noose and evade capture. Our results suggest that selective pressures imposed by predacious fungi have shaped the evolution of C. elegans escape behavior. PMID:21802299

  8. Metastatic Tumor Dormancy in Cutaneous Melanoma: Does Surgery Induce Escape?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tseng, William W. [Department of Surgery, University of California at San Francisco, 513 Parnassus Avenue, Room S-321, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States); Fadaki, Niloofar; Leong, Stanley P., E-mail: leongsx@cpmcri.org [Department of Surgery and Center for Melanoma Research and Treatment, California Pacific Medical Center and Research Institute, 2340 Clay Street, 2nd floor, San Francisco, CA 94115 (United States)

    2011-02-21

    According to the concept of tumor dormancy, tumor cells may exist as single cells or microscopic clusters of cells that are clinically undetectable, but remain viable and have the potential for malignant outgrowth. At metastatic sites, escape from tumor dormancy under more favorable local microenvironmental conditions or through other, yet undefined stimuli, may account for distant recurrence after supposed “cure” following surgical treatment of the primary tumor. The vast majority of evidence to date in support of the concept of tumor dormancy originates from animal studies; however, extensive epidemiologic data from breast cancer strongly suggests that this process does occur in human disease. In this review, we aim to demonstrate that metastatic tumor dormancy does exist in cutaneous melanoma based on evidence from mouse models and clinical observations of late recurrence and occult transmission by organ transplantation. Experimental data underscores the critical role of impaired angiogenesis and immune regulation as major mechanisms for maintenance of tumor dormancy. Finally, we examine evidence for the role of surgery in promoting escape from tumor dormancy at metastatic sites in cutaneous melanoma.

  9. Group chase and escape model with chasers' interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Takuya; Nakamura, Tomomichi; Ohira, Toru

    2016-04-01

    Group chase and escape is a new direction of studying collective behaviors merged with the traditional mathematical problems of chases and escapes proposed by Kamimura and Ohira in 2010. In their model, the chasers recognize only the escapees and pursue the nearest neighbor escapee, and the escapees recognize only the chasers and flee from the nearest neighbor chaser. We call the basic moving rule the nearest opponent interaction (NOI) strategy. In this paper we introduce a new strategy in the model. It is a local interaction that the chasers do not get too close each other, where we call the chasers' local interaction (CLI) strategy. The result of comparisons of the two strategies shows that when the number of the chasers is relatively small compared to the number of the escapees, the trapping time by the CLI strategy is much shorter than that by the NOI strategy. On the other hand, when the number of the chasers is larger than that of the escapees, this advantage of the CLI strategy does not appear. Also, we find that although chasers form clusters (spatial aggregates of chasers) when we apply the NOI strategy, the clusters appear less when we apply the CLI strategy.

  10. Pair interaction of catalytically active colloids: from assembly to escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi-Mood, Nima; Mozaffari, Ali; Córdova-Figueroa, Ubaldo M.

    2016-07-01

    The dynamics and pair trajectory of two self-propelled colloids are reported. The autonomous motions of the colloids are due to a catalytic chemical reaction taking place asymmetrically on their surfaces that generates a concentration gradient of interactive solutes around the particles and actuate particle propulsion. We consider two spherical particles with symmetric catalytic caps extending over the local polar angles $\\theta^1_{cap}$ and $\\theta^2_{cap}$ from the centers of active sectors in an otherwise quiescent fluid. A combined analytical-numerical technique was developed to solve the coupled mass transfer equation and the hydrodynamics in the Stokes flow regime. The ensuing pair trajectory of the colloids is controlled by the reacting coverages $\\theta^j_{cap}$ and their initial relative orientation with respect to each other. Our analysis indicates two possible scenarios for pair trajectories of catalytic self-propelled particles: either the particles approach, come into contact and assemble or they interact and move away from each other (escape). For arbitrary motions of the colloids, it is found that the direction of particle rotations is the key factor in determining the escape or assembly scenario. Based on the analysis, a phase diagram is sketched for the pair trajectory of the catalytically active particles as a function of active coverages and their initial relative orientations. We believe this study has important implications in elucidation of collective behaviors of auotophoretically self-propelled colloids.

  11. Metastatic Tumor Dormancy in Cutaneous Melanoma: Does Surgery Induce Escape?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William W. Tseng

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available According to the concept of tumor dormancy, tumor cells may exist as single cells or microscopic clusters of cells that are clinically undetectable, but remain viable and have the potential for malignant outgrowth. At metastatic sites, escape from tumor dormancy under more favorable local microenvironmental conditions or through other, yet undefined stimuli, may account for distant recurrence after supposed “cure” following surgical treatment of the primary tumor. The vast majority of evidence to date in support of the concept of tumor dormancy originates from animal studies; however, extensive epidemiologic data from breast cancer strongly suggests that this process does occur in human disease. In this review, we aim to demonstrate that metastatic tumor dormancy does exist in cutaneous melanoma based on evidence from mouse models and clinical observations of late recurrence and occult transmission by organ transplantation. Experimental data underscores the critical role of impaired angiogenesis and immune regulation as major mechanisms for maintenance of tumor dormancy. Finally, we examine evidence for the role of surgery in promoting escape from tumor dormancy at metastatic sites in cutaneous melanoma.

  12. Formation and Internal Structure of Terrestrial Planets, and Atmospheric Escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, S.

    2014-11-01

    As of 2014 April 21, over 1490 confirmed exoplanets and 3705 Kepler candidates have been detected. This implies that exoplanets may be ubiquitous in the universe. In this paper, we focus on the formation, evolution, and internal structure of terrestrial planets, and the atmospheric escape of close-in planets. In chapter 2, we investigate the dynamical evolution of planetary system after the protoplanetary disk has dissipated. We find that in the final assembly stage, the occurrence of terrestrial planets is quite common and in 40% of our simulations finally at least one planet is formed in the habitable zone. We also find that if there is a highly-inclined giant planet in the system, a great many bodies will be either driven out of the system, or collide with the giant planet or the central star. This will lead to the difficulty in planetary accretion. Moreover, our results show that planetary migration can lead to the formation of close-in planets. Besides migration, close-in terrestrial planets can also be formed by a collision-merger mechanism, which means that planetary embryos can kick terrestrial planets directly into orbits that are extremely close to their parent stars. In chapter 3, we construct numerically an internal structure model for terrestrial planets, and provide three kinds of possible internal structures of Europa (Jupiter's moon) based on this model. Then, we calculate the radii of low-mass exoplanets for various mass combinations of core and mantle, and find that some of them are inconsistent with the observed radius of rocky planets. This phenomenon can be explained only if there exists a large amount of water in the core, or they own gaseous envelopes. In chapter 4, we improve our planetary evolution codes using the semi-gray model of Guillot (2010), which includes the incident flux from the host star as a heating source in planetary atmosphere. The updated codes can solve the structure of the top radiative zone of intensely irradiated

  13. Role of protein kinase C δ in apoptotic signaling of oxidized phospholipids in RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogl, F; Humpolícková, J; Amaro, M; Koller, D; Köfeler, H; Zenzmaier, E; Hof, M; Hermetter, A

    2016-04-01

    The oxidized phospholipids (oxPl) 1-palmitoyl-2-glutaroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PGPC) and 1-palmitoyl-2-(5-oxovaleroyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POVPC) are cytotoxic components of oxidized LDL (oxLDL). Sustained exposure to oxLDL or isolated oxPl induces apoptotic signaling in vascular cells, which is a hallmark of the late phase of atherosclerosis. Activation of sphingomyelinase, the coordinate formation of ceramide and activation of caspase 3/7 as well as the activation of stress-associated kinases are causally involved in this process. Here, we provide evidence for a role of PKCδ in oxPl cytotoxicity. Silencing of the enzyme by siRNA significantly reduced caspase 3/7 activation in RAW 264.7 macrophages under the influence of oxPl. Concomitantly, PKCδ was phosphorylated as a consequence of cell exposure to PGPC or POVPC. Single molecule fluorescence microscopy provided direct evidence for oxPl-protein interaction. Both oxPl recruited an RFP-tagged PKCδ to the plasma membrane in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, two color cross-correlation number and brightness (ccN&B) analysis of the molecular motions revealed that fluorescently labeled PGPC or POVPC analogs co-diffuse and are associated with the fluorescent protein kinase in live cells. The underlying lipid-protein interactions may be due to chemical bonding (imine formation between the phospholipid aldehyde POVPC with protein amino groups) and physical association (with POVPC or PGPC). In summary, our data supports the assumption that PKCδ acts as a proapototic kinase in oxPl-included apoptosis of RAW 264.7 macrophages. The direct association of the bioactive lipids with this enzyme seems to be an important step in the early phase of apoptotic signaling. PMID:26707247

  14. In vitro apoptotic cell death during erythroid differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamai, L; Burattini, S; Luchetti, F; Canonico, B; Ferri, P; Melloni, E; Gonelli, A; Guidotti, L; Papa, S; Falcieri, E

    2004-03-01

    Erythropoiesis occurs in bone marrow and it has been shown that during in vivo erythroid differentiation some immature erythroblasts undergo apoptosis. In this regard, it is known that immature erythroblasts are FasL- and TRAIL-sensitive and can be killed by cells expressing these ligand molecules. In the present study, we have investigated the cell death phenomenon that occurs during a common unilineage model of erythroid development. Purified CD34+ human haemopoietic progenitors were cultured in vitro in the presence of SCF, IL-3 and erythropoietin. Their differentiation stages and apoptosis were followed by multiple technical approaches. Flow cytometric evaluation of surface and intracellular molecules revealed that glycophorin A appeared at day 3-4 of incubation and about 75% of viable cells co-expressed high density glycophorin A (Gly(bright)) and adult haemoglobin at day 14 of culture, indicating that this system reasonably recapitulates in vivo normal erythropoiesis. Interestingly, when mature (Gly(bright)) erythroid cells reached their higher percentages (day 14) almost half of cultured cells were apoptotic. Morphological studies indicated that the majority of dead cells contained cytoplasmic granular material typical of basophilic stage, and DNA analysis by flow cytometry and TUNEL reaction revealed nuclear fragmentation. These observations indicate that in vitro unilineage erythroid differentiation, as in vivo, is associated with apoptotic cell death of cells with characteristics of basophilic erythroblasts. We suggest that the interactions between different death receptors on immature basophilic erythroblasts with their ligands on more mature erythroblasts may contribute to induce apoptosis in vitro. PMID:15004520

  15. PARP Inhibition Restores Extrinsic Apoptotic Sensitivity in Glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpel-Massler, Georg; Pareja, Fresia; Aimé, Pascaline; Shu, Chang; Chau, Lily; Westhoff, Mike-Andrew; Halatsch, Marc-Eric; Crary, John F.; Canoll, Peter; Siegelin, Markus D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Resistance to apoptosis is a paramount issue in the treatment of Glioblastoma (GBM). We show that targeting PARP by the small molecule inhibitors, Olaparib (AZD-2281) or PJ34, reduces proliferation and lowers the apoptotic threshold of GBM cells in vitro and in vivo. Methods The sensitizing effects of PARP inhibition on TRAIL-mediated apoptosis and potential toxicity were analyzed using viability assays and flow cytometry in established GBM cell lines, low-passage neurospheres and astrocytes in vitro. Molecular analyses included western blots and gene silencing. In vivo, effects on tumor growth were examined in a murine subcutaneous xenograft model. Results The combination treatment of PARP inhibitors and TRAIL led to an increased cell death with activation of caspases and inhibition of formation of neurospheres when compared to single-agent treatment. Mechanistically, pharmacological PARP inhibition elicited a nuclear stress response with up-regulation of down-stream DNA-stress response proteins, e.g., CCAAT enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) homology protein (CHOP). Furthermore, Olaparib and PJ34 increased protein levels of DR5 in a concentration and time-dependent manner. In turn, siRNA-mediated suppression of DR5 mitigated the effects of TRAIL/PARP inhibitor-mediated apoptosis. In addition, suppression of PARP-1 levels enhanced TRAIL-mediated apoptosis in malignant glioma cells. Treatment of human astrocytes with the combination of TRAIL/PARP inhibitors did not cause toxicity. Finally, the combination treatment of TRAIL and PJ34 significantly reduced tumor growth in vivo when compared to treatment with each agent alone. Conclusions PARP inhibition represents a promising avenue to overcome apoptotic resistance in GBM. PMID:25531448

  16. PARP inhibition restores extrinsic apoptotic sensitivity in glioblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Karpel-Massler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Resistance to apoptosis is a paramount issue in the treatment of Glioblastoma (GBM. We show that targeting PARP by the small molecule inhibitors, Olaparib (AZD-2281 or PJ34, reduces proliferation and lowers the apoptotic threshold of GBM cells in vitro and in vivo. METHODS: The sensitizing effects of PARP inhibition on TRAIL-mediated apoptosis and potential toxicity were analyzed using viability assays and flow cytometry in established GBM cell lines, low-passage neurospheres and astrocytes in vitro. Molecular analyses included western blots and gene silencing. In vivo, effects on tumor growth were examined in a murine subcutaneous xenograft model. RESULTS: The combination treatment of PARP inhibitors and TRAIL led to an increased cell death with activation of caspases and inhibition of formation of neurospheres when compared to single-agent treatment. Mechanistically, pharmacological PARP inhibition elicited a nuclear stress response with up-regulation of down-stream DNA-stress response proteins, e.g., CCAAT enhancer binding protein (C/EBP homology protein (CHOP. Furthermore, Olaparib and PJ34 increased protein levels of DR5 in a concentration and time-dependent manner. In turn, siRNA-mediated suppression of DR5 mitigated the effects of TRAIL/PARP inhibitor-mediated apoptosis. In addition, suppression of PARP-1 levels enhanced TRAIL-mediated apoptosis in malignant glioma cells. Treatment of human astrocytes with the combination of TRAIL/PARP inhibitors did not cause toxicity. Finally, the combination treatment of TRAIL and PJ34 significantly reduced tumor growth in vivo when compared to treatment with each agent alone. CONCLUSIONS: PARP inhibition represents a promising avenue to overcome apoptotic resistance in GBM.

  17. Nanoparticles Escaping RES and Endosome: Challenges for siRNA Delivery for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shutao Guo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs technology has emerged as a promising potential treatment for viral, genetic diseases and cancers. Despite the powerful therapeutic potential of siRNA, there are challenges for developing efficient and specific delivery systems for systemic administration. There are extracellular and intracellular barriers for nanoparticle-mediated delivery. First, nanoparticles are rapidly cleared from the circulation by the reticuloendothelial system (RES. Second, following their cellular uptake, nanoparticles are trapped in endosomes/lysosomes, where siRNA would be degraded by enzymes. In this review, we describe strategies for grafting a polyethylene glycol (PEG brush to the nanoparticles for evading RES, such that they may effectively accumulate in the tumor by the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR effect. PEG has to shed from the nanoparticles to allow close interaction with the tumor cells. Current strategies for facilitating endosome escape, such as ion pair formation, “proton sponge effect”, destabilizing endosome membrane, and hydrophobic modification of the vector, are discussed.

  18. Increased synthesis and release of atrial peptide during DOCA escape in conscious dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The escape from the sodium-retaining effects of prolonged mineralocorticoid treatment in animals and humans was first noted over 40 yr ago, but despite intense study the mechanisms responsible for the escape phenomenon have not been identified. Putative natriuretic hormones have been proposed to account for the escape phenomenon. To determine whether atrial natriuretic peptides (ANP) could participate in the escape phenomenon, the mineralocorticoid deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA) was administered to conscious dogs for 14 days. Escape was accompanied by a doubling of plasma ANP concentration, determined by radioimmunoassay, and four- to sevenfold increases in caridac ANP messenger RNA. There were also significant increases in mean arterial blood pressure during the last 8 days of DOCA treatment. Thus increases in the synthesis and secretion of ANP and increases in atrial pressure may represent mechanisms that contribute to the escape from mineralocorticoid-induced sodium retention

  19. Integrating geographical information and augmented reality techniques for mobile escape guidelines on nuclear accident sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During nuclear accidents, when radioactive materials spread into the environment, the people in the affected areas should evacuate immediately. However, few information systems are available regarding escape guidelines for nuclear accidents. Therefore, this study constructs escape guidelines on mobile phones. This application is called Mobile Escape Guidelines (MEG) and adopts two techniques. One technique is the geographical information that offers multiple representations; the other is the augmented reality that provides semi-realistic information services. When this study tested the mobile escape guidelines, the results showed that this application was capable of identifying the correct locations of users, showing the escape routes, filtering geographical layers, and rapidly generating the relief reports. Users could evacuate from nuclear accident sites easily, even without relief personnel, since using slim devices to access the mobile escape guidelines is convenient. Overall, this study is a useful reference for a nuclear accident emergency response.

  20. Experimental measurements of Doppler broadening of escape peaks in HPGe detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single-escape, double-escape, and annihilation peak widths from eleven spectra taken with differing HPGe coaxial detectors and differing primary gamma sources were measured. For each of these, the Doppler broadening component of the peak width was derived. Significant Doppler broadening was observed only in the single escape peak and in the annihilation peak width. Averaged values and their uncertainties useful for modeling each type of peak width in nuclear radiation spectra are presented. (author)

  1. Light Primes the Escape Response of the Calanoid Copepod, Calanus finmarchicus

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The timing and magnitude of an escape reaction is often the determining factor governing a copepod’s success at avoiding predation. Copepods initiate rapid and directed escapes in response to fluid signals created by predators; however little is known about how copepods modulate their behavior in response to additional sensory input. This study investigates the effect of light level on the escape behavior of Calanus finmarchicus. A siphon flow was used to generate a consistent fluid signal an...

  2. Light Primes the Escape Response of the Calanoid Copepod, Calanus finmarchicus

    OpenAIRE

    Fields, David M.; Shema, Steven D.; Browman, Howard I.; Browne, Thomas Q.; Skiftesvik, Anne Berit

    2012-01-01

    The timing and magnitude of an escape reaction is often the determining factor governing a copepod’s success at avoiding predation. Copepods initiate rapid and directed escapes in response to fluid signals created by predators; however little is known about how copepods modulate their behavior in response to additional sensory input. This study investigates the effect of light level on the escape behavior of Calanus finmarchicus. A siphon flow was used to generate a consistent fluid ...

  3. When a Fish is a Fish: The Economic Impacts of Escaped Farmed Fish

    OpenAIRE

    Yajie Liu; Jon Olaf Olaussen; Anders Skonhoft

    2011-01-01

    The escape of cultured fish from a marine aquaculture facility is a type of biological invasion that may lead to a variety of potential ecological and economic effects on native fish. This paper develops a general invasive species impact model to capture explicitly both the ecological and economic effects of invasive species, especially escaped farmed fish, on native stocks and harvests. First, the possible effects of escaped farmed fish on the growth and stock size of a native fish are exami...

  4. Hepatitis E virus ORF2 protein activates the pro-apoptotic gene CHOP and anti-apoptotic heat shock proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijo John

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hepatitis E virus (HEV is a non-enveloped plus-strand RNA virus that causes acute hepatitis. The capsid protein open reading frame 2 (ORF2 is known to induce endoplasmic reticulum stress in ORF2 expressing cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we found that HEV ORF2 activates the expression of the pro-apoptotic gene C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP. ORF2 stimulates the CHOP promoter mainly through AARE (amino acid response elements and to a minor extent the ERSE (endoplasmic reticulum stress response elements. Activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4 protein binds and activates the AARE regulatory sites of the CHOP promoter. ORF2 expression also leads to increased phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 alpha (eIF2α that in turn initiates the translation of ATF4 mRNA. The pro-apoptotic gene CHOP is an important trigger to initiate endoplasmic reticulum stress induced apoptosis. However, the activation of CHOP by ORF2 in this study did not induce apoptosis, nor did BCL2-associated X protein (Bax translocate to mitochondria. Microarray analysis revealed an ORF2 specific increased expression of chaperones Hsp72, Hsp70B', and co-chaperone Hsp40. Co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP and in silico molecular docking analysis suggests that HEV ORF2 interacts with Hsp72. In addition, Hsp72 shows nuclear accumulation in ORF2 expressing cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data provide new insight into simultaneously occurring counter-acting effects of HEV ORF2 that may be part of a strategy to prevent host suicide before completion of the viral replication cycle.

  5. The effect of deuterated water on induced apoptotic mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The water is a dominant component of the biological organisms as well as of the environmental medium in which these exist and evolve. Replacing usual water by heavy water in the biological systems (deuteration process) induces changes of their properties, functions and behaviour due to the differences in the physico-chemical properties of usual water and deuterated water. Exposing cells to a high concentration of the heavy water (over 50 %) entails important changes in cell biochemical reactions and functions, finally ending by death of the cell. This latter effect may be either necrosis or apoptosis, each of them presenting different mechanisms of initiation and activation. Apoptosis or programmed cell death takes places by combined action of the caspase family, responsible for cracking structural substrates and key enzymes, a systematic and ordered cell destruction resulting. In the present work a relationship between the cytotoxicity mediated by D2O and caspase 3 activation, one of the enzymes critical for the entire process was followed up. Activation of the enzyme has been analyzed in tumoral cells cultivated in media with 20%, 65%, 90% D2O for 12, 24, 36, 48, 60 and 72 h. The results showed a significant increase of the activity of the enzyme cultivated for 72 h in a 65% deuterated medium while in case of a 90% D2O medium the peak value was reached after a 12 h exposure time. The medium with 20% heavy water showed no activation of this enzyme

  6. Sharks modulate their escape behavior in response to predator size, speed and approach orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seamone, Scott; Blaine, Tristan; Higham, Timothy E

    2014-12-01

    Escape responses are often critical for surviving predator-prey interactions. Nevertheless, little is known about how predator size, speed and approach orientation impact escape performance, especially in larger prey that are primarily viewed as predators. We used realistic shark models to examine how altering predatory behavior and morphology (size, speed and approach orientation) influences escape behavior and performance in Squalus acanthias, a shark that is preyed upon by apex marine predators. Predator models induced C-start escape responses, and increasing the size and speed of the models triggered a more intense response (increased escape turning rate and acceleration). In addition, increased predator size resulted in greater responsiveness from the sharks. Among the responses, predator approach orientation had the most significant impact on escapes, such that the head-on approach, as compared to the tail-on approach, induced greater reaction distances and increased escape turning rate, speed and acceleration. Thus, the anterior binocular vision in sharks renders them less effective at detecting predators approaching from behind. However, it appears that sharks compensate by performing high-intensity escapes, likely induced by the lateral line system, or by a sudden visual flash of the predator entering their field of view. Our study reveals key aspects of escape behavior in sharks, highlighting the modulation of performance in response to predator approach. PMID:25041843

  7. On the hydrodynamic model of thermal escape from planetary atmospheres and its comparison with kinetic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, A. N.

    2016-06-01

    Parkers' model of thermal escape implies the search of solutions of one-dimensional hydrodynamic equations for an inviscid but thermally conducting gas with a critical point and vanishing temperature far from the source. The properties of solutions of this model are studied for neutral mon- and diatomic gases with the viscosity index varying from 1/2 to 1. The domains of existence and uniqueness of solutions in terms of the source Jeans escape parameter and Knudsen number are established. The solutions are found to exist only in a narrow range of the critical point Jeans parameter. The lower and upper limits of this range correspond to solutions that are dominated by either heat conduction or adiabatic expansion. Thermal escape described by Parker's model occurs in two asymptotic regimes: the low-density (LD) regime, when escape is dominated by heat conduction, and the high-density (HD) regime, when escape is dominated by adiabatic expansion. Expressions for the mass and energy escape rates in these regimes are found theoretically. The comparison of results of hydrodynamic and kinetic simulations performed in identical conditions shows that Parker's model is capable of describing thermal escape only in the HD regime, providing decent agreement with the kinetic model in terms of the atmospheric structure below the exobase and the mass and energy escape rates. In the LD regime, Parker's model predicts a much faster drop in atmospheric temperature and less extended atmospheres, and can both over- and underestimate the escape rates in orders of magnitude.

  8. Test of time: what if little Albert had escaped?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Andy P; Nightingale, Zoë C

    2009-04-01

    Watson and Rayner's (1920) ;Little Albert' experiment has become one of the most famous studies in psychology. It is a staple of many general psychology textbooks and is part of the very fabric of the discipline's folklore. Despite this fame, the study has been widely criticized in the nearly 90 years since it was published for its lack of methodological rigour. This article attempts to evaluate the contribution of the ;little Albert' study to modern clinical psychology by speculating on what theories and treatments of child anxiety would look like in a parallel universe in which the study never took place because ;little Albert' escaped from the hospital in which Watson tested him. PMID:19293325

  9. Escape and avoidance learning in the earthworm Eisenia hortensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Jeffrey Wilson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Interest in instrumental learning in earthworms dates back to 1912 when Yerkes concluded that they can learn a spatial discrimination in a T-maze. Rosenkoetter and Boice determined in the 1970s that the “learning” that Yerkes observed was probably chemotaxis and not learning at all. We examined a different form of instrumental learning: the ability to learn both to escape and to avoid an aversive stimulus. Freely moving “master” worms could turn off an aversive white light by increasing their movement; the behavior of yoked controls had no effect on the light. We demonstrate that in as few as 12 trials the behavior of the master worms comes under the control of this contingency.

  10. Energetic particle recurrence and escape during solar cycle 20

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, R. E.; Roelof, E. C.

    1980-10-01

    Low-energy solar particle data have been combined from a multi-spacecraft near-earth data set covering most of solar cycle 20 (1966-1976). Particle intensity profiles have been ordered in the natural heliographic coordinate system of the estimated high coronal connection longitude of the foot point of the interplanetary field line. The recurrence trends of approximately 1-MeV solar particles become more apparent in this coordinate system than when plotted versus time, and thereby extend the evidence for regions of continual injection and escape from the corona. Intercomparison of solar particles and solar wind streams in heliographic longitude suggests that the origin of stream-associated spatial particle events seen at 1 AU is solar rather than interplanetary.

  11. The resonance escape probability during the neutron slowing down

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three different methods were used to calculate the neutron resonance escape probability during neutron slowing down in homogeneous media : two Monte Carlo simulations and a determinist method. The first simulation is based on a natural process intervening in neutron transport, the second is a nonanalog simulation while the determinist method is based on an iterative solution of the neutron slowing down equation. The results are in a good agreement for the three methods . The second simulation was found to be more efficient than the first one for high dilutions . In fact we have attained a better figure of merite ( FOM = 1/ (sigma sup 2 ) T) by the second simulation than by the first one . 2 figs. ; 2 refs ( author )

  12. Escaping from the labyrinth. Reason and freedom in Comenius’ thought

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Cagnolati

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this essay consists in investigating in depth the fundamental work of Jan Amos Komenský, The Labirinth of the World and the Paradise of Hearth. In this work, some relevant elements such as irony, allegory, the search for his calling, are mixed up to show a sort of journey that can give the chance to understand the real world, made of irrationality and con- fusion. Komenský sets himself as a pilgrim who would like to unveil traps and false ideas so widespread amongst men. At the end of the Labirinth, Komenský recovers the evangelical mes- sage and looks at the world through different eyes. So the word of Christ can transform chaos into harmony. The pilgrim finds his way to escape and gains again his freedom at last.

  13. Will 3552 Don Quixote escape from the Solar System?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suryadi Siregar

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Asteroid 1983 SA, well known as 3552 Don Quixote, is one of Near Earth Asteroids (NEAs which is the most probable candidate for the cometary origin, or otherwise as Jupiter-Family-Comets (JFCs. The aim of this study is to investigate the possibility of 3552 Don Quixote to be ejected from the Solar System. This paper presents an orbital evolution of 100 hypothetical asteroids generated by cloning 3552 Don Quixote. Investigation of its orbital evolution is conducted by using the SWIFT subroutine package, where the gravitational perturbations of eight major planets in the Solar System are considered. Over very short time scales (220 kyr relative to the Solar System life time (10 Gyr, the asteroid 3552 Don Quixote gave an example of chaotic motion that can cause asteroid to move outward and may be followed by escaping from the Solar System. Probability of ejection within the 220 kyr time scale is 50%.

  14. Bacillus cereus immune escape: a journey within macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Seav-Ly; Ramarao, Nalini

    2013-10-01

    During bacterial infection, professional phagocytes are attracted to the site of infection, where they constitute a first line of host cell defense. Their function is to engulf and destroy the pathogens. Thus, bacteria must withstand the bactericidal activity of professional phagocytes, including macrophages to counteract the host immune system. Bacillus cereus infections are characterized by bacteremia despite the accumulation of inflammatory cells at the site of infection. This implies that the bacteria have developed means of resisting the host immune system. Bacillus cereus spores survive, germinate, and multiply in contact with macrophages, eventually producing toxins that kill these cells. However, the exact mechanism by which B. cereus evades immune attack remains unclear. This review addresses the interaction between B. cereus and macrophages, highlighting, in particular, the ways in which the bacteria escape the microbicidal activities of professional phagocytes. PMID:23827020

  15. Enzymes for improved biomass conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunecky, Roman; Himmel, Michael E.

    2016-02-02

    Disclosed herein are enzymes and combinations of the enzymes useful for the hydrolysis of cellulose and the conversion of biomass. Methods of degrading cellulose and biomass using enzymes and cocktails of enzymes are also disclosed.

  16. ESCAP holds expert group meeting on population issues facing adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This article summarizes the activities at the ESCAP Population Division Expert Group Meeting on Adolescents that was held during September-October 1997 in Bangkok, Thailand. The meeting was a follow-up to the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD). The meeting considered 1) the ICPD recommendations; 2) the recommendations contained in the Jakarta Plan of Action on Human Resource Development; and 3) the Proposals for Action on Human Resources Development for Youth in Asia and the Pacific. Participants included about 25 people from Australia, Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Philippines, Sri Lanka, and Thailand. The conference relied on 8 invited experts, two resource persons, advisors from the UNFPA Country Support Team for East and Southeast Asia, and representatives of UNFPA, the Population Council, and the East-West Center. A concern was the declining age of menarche of girls in the ESCAP region and the increasing age of marriage. During the time of menarche and marriage, girls are migrating and moving away from their family and community in rural areas. Family structure and relationships are changing. Increases are observed in adolescent premarital sexual activity, the incidence of sexually transmitted diseases, substance abuse, teenage pregnancy, and abortion. The mass media and information technologies have both a positive and a negative influence on adolescents. Parent-child communication exchanges and teacher-student exchanges are "less than ideal." Old traditions and practices change slower than people change. Boys and girls are affected differently by the sociocultural and economic environment. The societal norms set expectations for behavior that may conflict with individual beliefs and practices. Changes brought by globalization and rapid economic growth provide greater opportunity for young girls and women to obtain employment and autonomy. PMID:12293003

  17. RpoS controls the Vibrio cholerae mucosal escape response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Toftgaard Nielsen

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae causes a severe diarrhoeal disease by secreting a toxin during colonization of the epithelium in the small intestine. Whereas the initial steps of the infectious process have been intensively studied, the last phases have received little attention. Confocal microscopy of V. cholerae O1-infected rabbit ileal loops captured a distinctive stage in the infectious process: 12 h post-inoculation, bacteria detach from the epithelial surface and move into the fluid-filled lumen. Designated the "mucosal escape response," this phenomenon requires RpoS, the stationary phase alternative sigma factor. Quantitative in vivo localization assays corroborated the rpoS phenotype and showed that it also requires HapR. Expression profiling of bacteria isolated from ileal loop fluid and mucus demonstrated a significant RpoS-dependent upregulation of many chemotaxis and motility genes coincident with the emigration of bacteria from the epithelial surface. In stationary phase cultures, RpoS was also required for upregulation of chemotaxis and motility genes, for production of flagella, and for movement of bacteria across low nutrient swarm plates. The hapR mutant produced near-normal numbers of flagellated cells, but was significantly less motile than the wild-type parent. During in vitro growth under virulence-inducing conditions, the rpoS mutant produced 10- to 100-fold more cholera toxin than the wild-type parent. Although the rpoS mutant caused only a small over-expression of the genes encoding cholera toxin in the ileal loop, it resulted in a 30% increase in fluid accumulation compared to the wild-type. Together, these results show that the mucosal escape response is orchestrated by an RpoS-dependent genetic program that activates chemotaxis and motility functions. This may furthermore coincide with reduced virulence gene expression, thus preparing the organism for the next stage in its life cycle.

  18. Phenotypic mismatches reveal escape from arms-race coevolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles T Hanifin

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Because coevolution takes place across a broad scale of time and space, it is virtually impossible to understand its dynamics and trajectories by studying a single pair of interacting populations at one time. Comparing populations across a range of an interaction, especially for long-lived species, can provide insight into these features of coevolution by sampling across a diverse set of conditions and histories. We used measures of prey traits (tetrodotoxin toxicity in newts and predator traits (tetrodotoxin resistance of snakes to assess the degree of phenotypic mismatch across the range of their coevolutionary interaction. Geographic patterns of phenotypic exaggeration were similar in prey and predators, with most phenotypically elevated localities occurring along the central Oregon coast and central California. Contrary to expectations, however, these areas of elevated traits did not coincide with the most intense coevolutionary selection. Measures of functional trait mismatch revealed that over one-third of sampled localities were so mismatched that reciprocal selection could not occur given current trait distributions. Estimates of current locality-specific interaction selection gradients confirmed this interpretation. In every case of mismatch, predators were "ahead" of prey in the arms race; the converse escape of prey was never observed. The emergent pattern suggests a dynamic in which interacting species experience reciprocal selection that drives arms-race escalation of both prey and predator phenotypes at a subset of localities across the interaction. This coadaptation proceeds until the evolution of extreme phenotypes by predators, through genes of large effect, allows snakes to, at least temporarily, escape the arms race.

  19. Enzymes and muscle diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Plebani

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle disorders may result in release of muscle enzymes into the circulation and give increased serum enzyme activity. A variety of enzymes routinely determined in the clinical laboratory may be elevated, but creatine kinase is the enzyme present in the highest concentration in muscle, and in every variety of muscle disease is the serum enzyme which shows the greatest incidence and degree of elevation. Aspartate aminotransferase is the enzyme associated most significantly with inflammation. A diagnostic algorithm based on the combined measurement of creatine kinase, aspartate aminotransferase and aldolase has been found to discriminate muscular distrophies from polymyositis and other myopathies. This combination of laboratory tests has diagnostic application and thus allows the clinician to better select patients who need to have a skeletal muscle biopsy as a diagnostic procedure.

  20. Host cell killing by the West Nile Virus NS2B-NS3 proteolytic complex: NS3 alone is sufficient to recruit caspase-8-based apoptotic pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The West Nile Virus (WNV) non-structural proteins 2B and 3 (NS2B-NS3) constitute the proteolytic complex that mediates the cleavage and processing of the viral polyprotein. NS3 recruits NS2B and NS5 proteins to direct protease and replication activities. In an effort to investigate the biology of the viral protease, we cloned cDNA encoding the NS2B-NS3 proteolytic complex from brain tissue of a WNV-infected dead crow, collected from the Lower Merion area (Merion strain). Expression of the NS2B-NS3 gene cassette induced apoptosis within 48 h of transfection. Electron microscopic analysis of NS2B-NS3-transfected cells revealed ultra-structural changes that are typical of apoptotic cells including membrane blebbing, nuclear disintegration and cytoplasmic vacuolations. The role of NS3 or NS2B in contributing to host cell apoptosis was examined. NS3 alone triggers the apoptotic pathways involving caspases-8 and -3. Experimental results from the use of caspase-specific inhibitors and caspase-8 siRNA demonstrated that the activation of caspase-8 was essential to initiate apoptotic signaling in NS3-expressing cells. Downstream of caspase-3 activation, we observed nuclear membrane ruptures and cleavage of the DNA-repair enzyme, PARP in NS3-expressing cells. Nuclear herniations due to NS3 expression were absent in the cells treated with a caspase-3 inhibitor. Expression of protease and helicase domains themselves was sufficient to trigger apoptosis generating insight into the apoptotic pathways triggered by NS3 from WNV

  1. Molecular ordering of the Fas-apoptotic pathway: The Fas/APO-1 protease Mch5 is a CrmA-inhibitable protease that activates multiple Ced-3/ICE-like cysteine proteases

    OpenAIRE

    Srinivasula, Srinivasa M.; Ahmad, Manzoor; Fernandes-Alnemri, Teresa; Litwack, Gerald; Alnemri, Emad S.

    1996-01-01

    The Fas/APO-1-receptor associated cysteine protease Mch5 (MACH/FLICE) is believed to be the enzyme responsible for activating a protease cascade after Fas-receptor ligation, leading to cell death. The Fas-apoptotic pathway is potently inhibited by the cowpox serpin CrmA, suggesting that Mch5 could be the target of this serpin. Bacterial expression of proMch5 generated a mature enzyme composed of two subunits, which are derived from the precursor proenzyme by proces...

  2. Multimodal Interaction with BCL-2 Family Proteins Underlies the Pro-Apoptotic Activity of PUMA BH3

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, Amanda L.; Gavathiotis, Evripidis; LaBelle, James L.; Braun, Craig R.; Opoku-Nsiah, Kwadwo A.; Bird, Gregory H.; Walensky, Loren D.

    2013-01-01

    PUMA is a pro-apoptotic BCL-2 family member that drives the apoptotic response to a diversity of p53-dependent and independent cellular insults. Deciphering the spectrum of PUMA interactions that confer its context-dependent pro-apoptotic properties remains a high priority goal. Here, we report the synthesis of PUMA SAHBs, structurally-stabilized PUMA BH3 helices that, in addition to broadly targeting anti-apoptotic proteins, directly bind to BAX. NMR, photocrosslinking, and biochemical analy...

  3. The replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in macrophages is enhanced after phagocytosis of apoptotic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lima, Rosangela G; Van Weyenbergh, Johan; Saraiva, Elvira M. B.; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Galvão-Castro, Bernardo; Bou-Habib, Dumith Chequer

    2002-01-01

    Clearance of apoptotic cells increases macrophage secretion of antiinflammatory mediators and might modulate viral replication in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1-infected macrophages. To study this, primary macrophages were infected with HIV-1 and exposed to apoptotic cells. It was found that phagocytosis of apoptotic cells potently enhanced HIV-1 growth. The peptide Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser, which binds to integrin receptors, inhibited the uptake of apoptotic cells and the subsequent enhanc...

  4. Genes of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noelia Estévez-Calvar

    Full Text Available Bivalves play vital roles in marine, brackish, freshwater and terrestrial habitats. In recent years, these ecosystems have become affected through anthropogenic activities. The ecological success of marine bivalves is based on the ability to modify their physiological functions in response to environmental changes. One of the most important mechanisms involved in adaptive responses to environmental and biological stresses is apoptosis, which has been scarcely studied in mollusks, although the final consequence of this process, DNA fragmentation, has been frequently used for pollution monitoring. Environmental stressors induce apoptosis in molluscan cells via an intrinsic pathway. Many of the proteins involved in vertebrate apoptosis have been recognized in model invertebrates; however, this process might not be universally conserved. Mytilus galloprovincialis is presented here as a new model to study the linkage between molecular mechanisms that mediate apoptosis and marine bivalve ecological adaptations. Therefore, it is strictly necessary to identify the key elements involved in bivalve apoptosis. In the present study, six mitochondrial apoptotic-related genes were characterized, and their gene expression profiles following UV irradiation were evaluated. This is the first step for the development of potential biomarkers to assess the biological responses of marine organisms to stress. The results confirmed that apoptosis and, more specifically, the expression of the genes involved in this process can be used to assess the biological responses of marine organisms to stress.

  5. Bak apoptotic function is not directly regulated by phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, V H; Bartolo, R; Westphal, D; Alsop, A; Dewson, G; Kluck, R M

    2013-01-01

    During apoptosis, Bak and Bax permeabilize the mitochondrial outer membrane by undergoing major conformational change and oligomerization. This activation process in Bak is reported to require dephosphorylation of tyrosine-108 close to an activation trigger site. To investigate how dephosphorylation of Bak contributes to its activation and conformational change, one-dimensional isoelectric focusing (1D-IEF) and mutagenesis was used to monitor Bak phosphorylation. On 1D-IEF, Bak extracted from a range of cell types migrated as a single band near the predicted isoelectric point of 5.6 both before and after phosphatase treatment, indicating that Bak is not significantly phosphorylated at any residue. In contrast, three engineered 'phosphotagged' Bak variants showed a second band at lower pI, indicating phosphorylation. Apoptosis induced by several stimuli failed to alter Bak pI, indicating little change in phosphorylation status. In addition, alanine substitution of tyrosine-108 and other putative phosphorylation sites failed to enhance Bak activation or pro-apoptotic function. In summary, Bak is not significantly phosphorylated at any residue, and Bak activation during apoptosis does not require dephosphorylation. PMID:23303126

  6. Thyroid hormone regulation of apoptotic tissue remodeling during anuran metamorphosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Anuran metamorphosis involves systematic transformations of individual organs in a thyroid hormone (TH)-dependent manner. Morphological and cellular studies have shown that the removal of larval or gans/tissues such the tail and the tadpole intestinal epithelium is through programmed cell death or apop tosis. Recent molecular investigations suggest that TH regulates metamorphosis by regulating target gene expression through thyroid hormone receptors (TRs), which are DNA-binding transcription factors. Cloning and characterization of TH response genes show that diverse groups of early response genes are induced by TH. The products of these TH response genes are believed to directly or indirectly affect the expression and/or functions of cell death genes, which are conserved at both sequence and function levels in different animal species. A major challenge for future research lies at determining the signaling pathways leading to the activation of apoptotic processes and whether different death genes are involved in the regulation of apoptosis in different tissues/organs to effect tissue-specific transformations.

  7. Genotoxic and apoptotic effects of Goeckerman therapy for psoriasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borska, L.; Andrys, C.; Krejsek, J.; Hamakova, K.; Kremlacek, J.; Palicka, V.; Ranna, D.; Fiala, Z. [Charles University Prague, Prague (Czech Republic). Faculty of Medicine

    2010-03-15

    Goeckerman therapy (GT) for psoriasis is based on cutaneous application of crude coal tar (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)) and exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR). PAH and UVR are mutagenic, carcinogenic and immunotoxic agents that promote apoptosis. We evaluated dermal absorption of PAH as well as the genotoxic and apoptotic effects of GT in 20 patients with psoriasis, by determining numbers of chromosomal abnormalities in peripheral lymphocytes, and levels of 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHP), p53 protein and soluble FasL (sFasL) in urine and/or blood, before and after GT. Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) score was used to evaluate clinical efficacy of GT. Compared with pre-treatment levels, there was a significant increase in urine 1-OHP, indicating a high degree of dermal absorption of PAH (P <0.01). We also found a significant increase in the number of chromosomal abnormalities in peripheral blood lymphocytes (P <0.001), suggesting that GT is genotoxic; significantly increased p53 protein in plasma (P <0.05), an indicator of cell response to DNA damage; and significantly increased sFasL in serum (P <0.01), an indicator of apoptosis. The PASI score was significantly decreased after GT (P <0.001), confirming clinical benefit of this treatment. Our results demonstrate high dermal absorption of PAH during GT and provide evidence that GT promotes genotoxicity and apoptosis.

  8. Deciphering the plasma membrane hallmarks of apoptotic cells: Phosphatidylserine transverse redistribution and calcium entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez M Carmen

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During apoptosis, Ca2+-dependent events participate in the regulation of intracellular and morphological changes including phosphatidylserine exposure in the exoplasmic leaflet of the cell plasma membrane. The occurrence of phosphatidylserine at the surface of specialized cells, such as platelets, is also essential for the assembly of the enzyme complexes of the blood coagulation cascade, as demonstrated by hemorrhages in Scott syndrome, an extremely rare genetic deficiency of phosphatidylserine externalization, without other apparent pathophysiologic consequences. We have recently reported a reduced capacitative Ca2+ entry in Scott cells which may be part of the Scott phenotype. Results Taking advantage of these mutant lymphoblastoid B cells, we have studied the relationship between this mode of Ca2+ entry and phosphatidylserine redistribution during apoptosis. Ca2+ ionophore induced apoptosis in Scott but not in control cells. However, inhibition of store-operated Ca2+ channels led to caspase-independent DNA fragmentation and decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential in both control and Scott cells. Inhibition of cytochrome P450 also reduced capacitative Ca2+ entry and induced apoptosis at comparable extents in control and Scott cells. During the apoptotic process, both control and more markedly Scott cells externalized phosphatidylserine, but in the latter, this membrane feature was however dissociated from several other intracellular changes. Conclusions The present results suggest that different mechanisms account for phosphatidylserine transmembrane migration in cells undergoing stimulation and programmed death. These observations testify to the plasticity of the plasma membrane remodeling process, allowing normal apoptosis even when less fundamental functions are defective.

  9. The Apoptotic Effects of the P300 Activator on Breast Cancer and Lung Fibroblast Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Salahshoor

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: P300 is an enzyme that acetylates histones during stress. It alsoacetylates several non-histone proteins, including P53 which is the most important tumorsuppressor gene. P53 plays an important role in the apoptosis of tumor cells. Hereby,this study describes the potency of cholera toxin B subunit as a P300 activator to induceapoptosis in a breast cancer cell line (MCF-7 and a lung fibroblast cell line (MRC-5as a non-tumorigenic control sample. Methods: MCF-7 and MRC-5 were cultured in RPMI-1640 and treated with orwithout cholera toxin B subunit at the concentration of 85.43 μmol/L, based on the half-maximal inhibitory concentration index at different times (24, 48 and 72 h. Thepercentage of apoptotic cells was measured by flow cytometry. Real-time quantitativeRT-PCR was performed to estimate the mRNA expression of P300 in MCF-7 and MRC-5 with cholera toxin B subunit at different times. We used the ELISA and Bradford proteintechniques to detect levels of total and acetylated P53 protein generated in MCF-7 andMRC-5. Results: Our findings indicated that the cholera toxin B subunit effectively andsignificantly induced more apoptosis in MCF-7 compared to MRC-5. We showed thatexpression of P300 up-regulated by increasing the time of the cholera toxin B subunittreatment in MCF-7 but not in MRC-5. In addition, the acetylated and total P53protein levels increased more in MCF-7 cells than in MRC-5 cells.Conclusion: Cholera toxin B subunit induced significant cell death in MCF-7, butit could be well tolerated in MRC-5. Therefore, cholera toxin B subunit can besuggested as an anti-cancer agent.

  10. Cytoprotective and pro-apoptotic activities of native Australian herbs polyphenolic-rich extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakulnarmrat, Karunrat; Fenech, Michael; Thomas, Philip; Konczak, Izabela

    2013-01-01

    Three commercially grown native herbs unique to Australia, Tasmannia pepper leaf (Tasmannia lanceolata R. Br., Winteracea; TPL), anise myrtle (Syzygium anisatum Vickery, Craven & Biffen, Myrtaceae; AM) and lemon myrtle (Backhousia citriodora F. Muell, Myrtaceae; LM) as well as a reference sample bay leaf (Laurus nobilis L., Lauraceae; BL) were examined for potential cytoprotective properties. All native herbs exhibited greater cellular antioxidant activity as measured by the cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) assay than bay leaf and reduced the hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) induced death of hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells by 25-50%. All herb extracts reduced the proliferation of colon (HT-29; IC(50)=0.75-1.39mg/ml), stomach (AGS; IC(50)=0.59-1.88mg/ml), bladder (BL13; IC(50)=0.56-1.12mg/ml) and liver (HepG2; IC(50)=0.38-1.36mg/ml) cancer cells. No significant reduction of cell viability of non-transformed colon (CCD-18Co; IC(50)>2.0mg/ml) and mixed stomach and intestine (Hs 738.St/Int; IC(50)>2.0mg/ml) cells was observed. Flow cytometry analysis and the results of the cytokinesis block micronucleus cytome (CBMNCyt) assay conducted with respectively, promyelocytic leukaemia (HL-60) and colon adenocarcinoma (HT-29) cells suggest an increase in apoptosis following treatment with the herb extracts. The occurrence of apoptotic cells coincided with an increase in caspase-3 enzyme activity. The results of the CBMNCyt assay suggested no direct DNA damage in colon adenocarcinoma (HT-29) cells as a result of treatment with all extracts, applied at final concentrations of 0.5 and 1.0mg/ml. PMID:23017386

  11. Apoptotic cells trigger a membrane-initiated pathway to increase ABCA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fond, Aaron M; Lee, Chang Sup; Schulman, Ira G; Kiss, Robert S; Ravichandran, Kodi S

    2015-07-01

    Macrophages clear millions of apoptotic cells daily and, during this process, take up large quantities of cholesterol. The membrane transporter ABCA1 is a key player in cholesterol efflux from macrophages and has been shown via human genetic studies to provide protection against cardiovascular disease. How the apoptotic cell clearance process is linked to macrophage ABCA1 expression is not known. Here, we identified a plasma membrane-initiated signaling pathway that drives a rapid upregulation of ABCA1 mRNA and protein. This pathway involves the phagocytic receptor brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 1 (BAI1), which recognizes phosphatidylserine on apoptotic cells, and the intracellular signaling intermediates engulfment cell motility 1 (ELMO1) and Rac1, as ABCA1 induction was attenuated in primary macrophages from mice lacking these molecules. Moreover, this apoptotic cell-initiated pathway functioned independently of the liver X receptor (LXR) sterol-sensing machinery that is known to regulate ABCA1 expression and cholesterol efflux. When placed on a high-fat diet, mice lacking BAI1 had increased numbers of apoptotic cells in their aortic roots, which correlated with altered lipid profiles. In contrast, macrophages from engineered mice with transgenic BAI1 overexpression showed greater ABCA1 induction in response to apoptotic cells compared with those from control animals. Collectively, these data identify a membrane-initiated pathway that is triggered by apoptotic cells to enhance ABCA1 within engulfing phagocytes and with functional consequences in vivo. PMID:26075824

  12. Magnetically responsive enzyme powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powdered enzymes were transformed into their insoluble magnetic derivatives retaining their catalytic activity. Enzyme powders (e.g., trypsin and lipase) were suspended in various liquid media not allowing their solubilization (e.g., saturated ammonium sulfate and highly concentrated polyethylene glycol solutions, ethanol, methanol, 2-propanol) and subsequently cross-linked with glutaraldehyde. Magnetic modification was successfully performed at low temperature in a freezer (−20 °C) using magnetic iron oxides nano- and microparticles prepared by microwave-assisted synthesis from ferrous sulfate. Magnetized cross-linked enzyme powders were stable at least for two months in water suspension without leakage of fixed magnetic particles. Operational stability of magnetically responsive enzymes during eight repeated reaction cycles was generally without loss of enzyme activity. Separation of magnetically modified cross-linked powdered enzymes from reaction mixtures was significantly simplified due to their magnetic properties. - Highlights: • Cross-linked enzyme powders were prepared in various liquid media. • Insoluble enzymes were magnetized using iron oxides particles. • Magnetic iron oxides particles were prepared by microwave-assisted synthesis. • Magnetic modification was performed under low (freezing) temperature. • Cross-linked powdered trypsin and lipase can be used repeatedly for reaction

  13. HYDRATION AND ENZYME ACTIVITY

    OpenAIRE

    Poole, P.

    1984-01-01

    Hydration induced conformation and dynamic changes are followed using a variety of experimental techniques applied to hen egg white lysozyme. These changes are completed just before the onset of enzyme activity, which occurs before all polar groups are hydrated, and before monolayer coverage is attained. We suggest that these hydration induced changes are necessary for the return of enzyme activity.

  14. Directed Evolution of Enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Doucet, Nicolas; Pelletier, Joelle,

    2004-01-01

    This brief technological report presents an overview of techniques and applications in the field of directed evolution of enzyme catalysts. These techniques allow for the creation of modified enzymes that are better adapted to many industrial contexts. Recent applications in organic synthesis as well as commercial, biomedical, and environmental usage of these modified catalysts will be presented.

  15. Magnetically responsive enzyme powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pospiskova, Kristyna, E-mail: kristyna.pospiskova@upol.cz [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Palacky University, Slechtitelu 11, 783 71 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Safarik, Ivo, E-mail: ivosaf@yahoo.com [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Palacky University, Slechtitelu 11, 783 71 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Department of Nanobiotechnology, Institute of Nanobiology and Structural Biology of GCRC, Na Sadkach 7, 370 05 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic)

    2015-04-15

    Powdered enzymes were transformed into their insoluble magnetic derivatives retaining their catalytic activity. Enzyme powders (e.g., trypsin and lipase) were suspended in various liquid media not allowing their solubilization (e.g., saturated ammonium sulfate and highly concentrated polyethylene glycol solutions, ethanol, methanol, 2-propanol) and subsequently cross-linked with glutaraldehyde. Magnetic modification was successfully performed at low temperature in a freezer (−20 °C) using magnetic iron oxides nano- and microparticles prepared by microwave-assisted synthesis from ferrous sulfate. Magnetized cross-linked enzyme powders were stable at least for two months in water suspension without leakage of fixed magnetic particles. Operational stability of magnetically responsive enzymes during eight repeated reaction cycles was generally without loss of enzyme activity. Separation of magnetically modified cross-linked powdered enzymes from reaction mixtures was significantly simplified due to their magnetic properties. - Highlights: • Cross-linked enzyme powders were prepared in various liquid media. • Insoluble enzymes were magnetized using iron oxides particles. • Magnetic iron oxides particles were prepared by microwave-assisted synthesis. • Magnetic modification was performed under low (freezing) temperature. • Cross-linked powdered trypsin and lipase can be used repeatedly for reaction.

  16. 77 FR 28601 - Announcement of an Opportunity for Manufacturers and Designers of Closed Circuit Escape...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-15

    ...://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-03-08/pdf/2012-4691.pdf ), Approval Tests and Standards for Closed-Circuit Escape Respirators (CCERs) on March 8th 2012. This final rule revised and updated the requirements... Manufacturers and Designers of Closed Circuit Escape Respirators To Participate in Performance Testing Within...

  17. Unsteady motion: escape jumps in planktonic copepods, their kinematics and energetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Andersen, Anders Peter; Langlois, Vincent J.; Jakobsen, Hans Henrik

    2010-01-01

    We describe the kinematics of escape jumps in three species of 0.3–3.0 mm-sized planktonic copepods. We find similar kinematics between species with periodically alternating power strokes and passive coasting and a resulting highly fluctuating escape velocity. By direct numerical simulations, we...

  18. The Efficacy of Noncontingent Escape for Decreasing Children's Disruptive Behavior during Restorative Dental Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, Patrick M.; Allen, Keith D.; Powell, Shawn; Salama, Fouad

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of a dentist-implemented behavioral intervention in which brief escape from dental treatment was provided on a regular basis, independent of the child's behavior. Within a multiple baseline design across subjects, 5 children, ages 4 to 7 years, were provided with temporary escape from dental treatment on a fixed-time…

  19. 46 CFR 56.50-25 - Safety and relief valve escape piping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 56.50-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PIPING... or flexible pipe connections shall be fitted in escape piping. The piping shall be adequately... discharge to a common escape pipe relieving simultaneously at full capacity....

  20. Computer Self-Efficacy, Competitive Anxiety and Flow State: Escaping from Firing Online Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jon-Chao; Pei-Yu, Chiu; Shih, Hsiao-Feng; Lin, Pei-Shin; Hong, Jon-Chao

    2012-01-01

    Flow state in game playing affected by computer self-efficacy and game competitive anxiety was studied. In order to examine the effect of those constructs with high competition, this study select "Escaping from firing online game" which require college students to escape from fire and rescue people and eliminate the fire damage along the way of…

  1. The Effects of Fixed-Time Escape on Inappropriate and Appropriate Classroom Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Rachael D.; Higbee, Thomas S.

    2010-01-01

    Few studies have explored the effects of fixed-time (FT) reinforcement on escape-maintained behavior of students in a classroom setting. We measured the effects of an FT schedule on the disruptive and appropriate academic behaviors of 2 junior high students in a public school setting. Results demonstrated that FT escape from tasks resulted in a…

  2. The use of an escape contingency and a token economy to increase food acceptance.

    OpenAIRE

    Kahng, SungWoo; Boscoe, James H; Byrne, Shannon

    2003-01-01

    Escape (termination of a meal) and token-based differential reinforcement of alternative behavior were used as reinforcement to increase acceptance of food. Using a changing criterion design, the number of bites accepted and consumed was gradually increased to 15 bites per meal. These data suggest that, in some cases, escape may be a potent reinforcer for food acceptance.

  3. Assessing Scientific and Technological Enquiry Skills at Age 11 Using the E-Scape System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Dan; Collier, Chris; Howe, Alan

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on the outcomes from the "e-scape Primary Scientific and Technological Understanding Assessment Project" (2009-2010), which aimed to support primary teachers in developing valid portfolio-based tasks to assess pupils' scientific and technological enquiry skills at age 11. This was part of the wider "e-scape" project…

  4. Some autophagic and apoptotic features of programmed cell death in the anterior silk glands of the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncu, Ebru; Parlak, Osman

    2008-11-01

    Programmed cell death has been subdivided into two major groups: apoptosis and autophagic cell death. The anterior silk gland of Bombyx mori degenerates during larval-pupal metamorphosis. Our findings indicate that two types of programmed cell death features are observed during this physiological process. During the prepupal period, pyknosis of the nucleus, cell detachment,and membrane blebbing occur and they are the first signs of programmed cell death in the anterior silk glands. According to previous studies, all of these morphological appearances are common for both cell-death types. Autophagy features are also exhibited during the prepupal period. Levels of one of the lysosomal marker enzymes-acid phosphatase-are high during this period then decrease gradually. Vacuole formation begins to appear first at the basal surface of the cell, then expands to the apical surface just before the larval pupal ecdysis. After larval-pupal ecdysis, DNA fragmentation, which is the obvious biochemical marker of apoptosis, is detected in agarose gel electrophoresis, which also shows that caspase-like enzyme activities occur during the programmed cell death process of the anterior silk glands. Apoptosis and autophagic cell death interact with each other during the degeneration process of the anterior silk gland in Bombyx mori and this interaction occurs at a late phase of cell death. We suggest that apoptotic cell death only is not enough for whole gland degeneration and that more effective degeneration occurs with this cooperation. PMID:18838861

  5. Artificial Enzymes, "Chemzymes"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Jeannette; Rousseau, Cyril Andre Raphaël; Pedersen, Lavinia Georgeta M;

    2008-01-01

    Enzymes have fascinated scientists since their discovery and, over some decades, one aim in organic chemistry has been the creation of molecules that mimic the active sites of enzymes and promote catalysis. Nevertheless, even today, there are relatively few examples of enzyme models that...... successfully perform Michaelis-Menten catalysis under enzymatic conditions (i.e., aqueous medium, neutral pH, ambient temperature) and for those that do, very high rate accelerations are seldomly seen. This review will provide a brief summary of the recent developments in artificial enzymes, so called...... "Chemzymes", based on cyclodextrins and other molecules. Only the chemzymes that have shown enzyme-like activity that has been quantified by different methods will be mentioned. This review will summarize the work done in the field of artificial glycosidases, oxidases, epoxidases, and esterases, as well as...

  6. Extracellular Matrix Proteins Modulate Antimigratory and Apoptotic Effects of Doxorubicin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges Said

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Anticancer drug resistance is a multifactorial process that includes acquired and de novo drug resistances. Acquired resistance develops during treatment, while de novo resistance is the primary way for tumor cells to escape chemotherapy. Tumor microenvironment has been recently shown to be one of the important factors contributing to de novo resistance and called environment-mediated drug resistance (EMDR. Two forms of EMDR have been described: soluble factor-mediated drug resistance (SFM-DR and cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR. Anthracyclines, among the most potent chemotherapeutic agents, are widely used in clinics against hematopoietic and solid tumors. Their main mechanism of action relies on the inhibition of topoisomerase I and/or II and the induction of apoptosis. Beyond this well-known antitumor activity, it has been recently demonstrated that anthracyclines may display potent anti-invasive effects when used at subtoxic concentrations. In this paper, we will describe two particular modes of EMDR by which microenvironment may influence tumor-cell response to one of these anthracyclines, doxorubicin. The first one considers the influence of type I collagen on the antimigratory effect of doxorubicin (CAM-DR. The second considers the protection of tumor cells by thrombospondin-I against doxorubicin-induced apoptosis (SFM-DR.

  7. Plasma clouds and snowplows: Bulk plasma escape from Mars observed by MAVEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halekas, J. S.; Brain, D. A.; Ruhunusiri, S.; McFadden, J. P.; Mitchell, D. L.; Mazelle, C.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Harada, Y.; Hara, T.; Espley, J. R.; DiBraccio, G. A.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2016-02-01

    We present initial Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) observations and preliminary interpretation of bulk plasma loss from Mars. MAVEN particle and field measurements show that planetary heavy ions derived from the Martian atmosphere can escape in the form of discrete coherent structures or "clouds." The ions in these clouds are unmagnetized or weakly magnetized, have velocities well above the escape speed, and lie directly downstream from magnetic field amplifications, suggesting a "snowplow" effect. This postulated escape process, similar to that successfully used to explain the dynamics of active gas releases in the solar wind and terrestrial magnetosheath, relies on momentum transfer from the shocked solar wind protons to the planetary heavy ions, with the electrons and magnetic field acting as intermediaries. Fluxes of planetary ions on the order of 107 cm-2 s-1 can escape by this process, and if it operates regularly, it could contribute 10-20% of the current ion escape from Mars.

  8. Noise induced escape from a nonhyperbolic chaotic attractor of a periodically driven nonlinear oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhen; Li, Yang; Liu, Xianbin

    2016-06-01

    Noise induced escape from the domain of attraction of a nonhyperbolic chaotic attractor in a periodically excited nonlinear oscillator is investigated. The general mechanism of the escape in the weak noise limit is studied in the continuous case, and the fluctuational path is obtained by statistical analysis. Selecting the primary homoclinic tangency as the initial condition, the action plot is presented by parametrizing the set of escape trajectories and the global minimum gives rise to the optimal path. Results of both methods show good agreements. The entire process of escape is discussed in detail step by step using the fluctuational force. A structure of hierarchical heteroclinic crossings of stable and unstable manifolds of saddle cycles is found, and the escape is observed to take place through successive jumps through this deterministic hierarchical structure.

  9. Radiolabeled enzyme inhibitors as pancreatic scanning agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiolabeled inhibitors of the pancreatic protease enzymes trypsin and chymotrypsin: I-125-soybean inhibitor (SBI), I-125-human antitrypsin (HAT), and 3H-diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) were studied in rats for their uptake in the pancreas. The protease enzyme inhibitor, SBI, was found to retain its enzymatic activity after radio-iodine labeling by iodine-monochloride method. Assay of tissues radioactivity at 5, 15, 30, 60 min and 24 hr after iv injection in rats showed pancreas:liver (P:L) ratios of < 1.4 and pancreas:blood (P:B) ratios of < 1 at all time intervals for each compound. However, ip injection of I-125 SBI showed preferential uptake in pancreas, P:L mean ratios [anti x (range)] of 6.0 (5.5 to 6.3) and P:B mean ratios of [anti x (range)] 2.60 (1.8 to 3.4), up to 60 minutes. These ratios resemble those of Se-75-selenomethionine except that kidney values are higher. Our data suggest that radiolabeled proteins can also show similar good early pancreatic uptake when given ip by escaping immediate liver metabolism. Proteins can readily be tagged with desirable gamma-emitting radionuclides (viz. I-131, I-123, Tc-99m) compared to amino acids and may potentially be suitable for imaging the pancreas. It may be important to study both iv and ip routes of administration in evaluating the specificity/affinity of potential pancreatic radiopharmaceuticals

  10. Photochemical escape of oxygen from the Martian atmosphere: new insights from MAVEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillis, R. J.; Deighan, J.; Bougher, S. W.; Cravens, T.; Fox, J. L.; Lee, Y.; Rahmati, A.; McFadden, J. P.; Benna, M.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Elrod, M. K.; Andersson, L.; Fowler, C. M.; Curry, S.; Gröller, H.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2015-12-01

    One of the primary goals of the MAVEN mission is to characterize rates of atmospheric escape from Mars at the present epoch and relate those escape rates to solar drivers. One of the known escape processes is photochemical escape, where a) an exothermic chemical reaction in the atmosphere results in an upward-traveling neutral particle whose velocity exceeds planetary escape velocity and b) the particle is not prevented from escaping through any subsequent collisions. Because escaping hot atoms are not directly measured, models of production and transport (through the atmosphere) of such atoms must be used to constrain photochemical escape rates. These models require altitude profiles of neutral densities and electron and ion densities and temperatures, as well as compositional information, all of which are measured by MAVEN instruments at the relevant altitudes (150-300 km). For every altitude profile: Profiles of O2+ dissociative recombination (DR) rates will be calculated from electron temperature, electron density and O2+ density. Profiles of energy distributions of hot O atoms will be calculated from profiles of electron and ion temperatures. Profiles of all neutral densities will be input into models of hot O transport in order to calculate photochemical escape fluxes from DR of O2+. We will present photochemical escape fluxes as a function of several factors, in particular solar zenith angle and EUV flux. This, combined with further simulations with progressively higher EUV fluxes, will eventually enable a total integrated loss estimate over the course of Martian history and hence a determination of the impact of this loss process on the evolution of the Martian climate.

  11. Oral administration of Cr(VI) induced oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptotic cell death in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potassium dichromate (Cr(VI)) was given orally to Swiss mice for 1 and 5 days with the dose of 25, 50 and 100 mg/kg body weight per day, respectively. Oxidative stress including the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the extent of lipid peroxidation and the activity of antioxidant enzymes in liver and kidney was determined. DNA damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes was determined by single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay). Apoptotic cell death in liver was detected using transmission electron microscopy and TUNEL assay. The results indicated that administration of Cr(VI) had caused a significant increase of ROS level in liver both after 1 and 5 days of exposure, accompanied with a dose-dependent decrease in superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities. The malondialdehyde (MDA) content in liver was not changed as compared to the control animals. In contrast to the liver, no significant changes were observed in kidney on ROS, SOD, CAT and MDA as compared to the control animals. Dose- and time-dependent effects were observed on DNA damage after 1 and 5 days treatment. Significant difference was observed on the number of TUNEL positive liver cells between the control and Cr(VI) treatment groups. The apoptotic cells were also identified by characteristic ultrastructural features. The results obtained from the present study showed that Cr(VI) given orally to mice could induce dose- and time-dependent effects on DNA damage, hepatic oxidative stress and hepatocytes apoptosis. No significant oxidative stress observed in kidney in the study may suggest that the way of Cr(VI) exposure is an important factor affecting its toxicity

  12. Cyclopamine and jervine induce COX-2 overexpression in human erythroleukemia cells but only cyclopamine has a pro-apoptotic effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghezali, Lamia; Leger, David Yannick; Limami, Youness [Université de Limoges, FR 3503 GEIST, EA 1069 “Laboratoire de Chimie des Substances Naturelles”, GDR CNRS 3049, Faculté de Pharmacie, Laboratoire de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire, 2 rue du Docteur Marcland, 87025 Limoges Cedex (France); Cook-Moreau, Jeanne [Université de Limoges, FR 3503 GEIST, UMR CNRS 7276 “Contrôle de la réponse immune B et lymphoproliférations”, Faculté de Médecine, 2 rue du Docteur Marcland, 87025 Limoges Cedex (France); Beneytout, Jean-Louis [Université de Limoges, FR 3503 GEIST, EA 1069 “Laboratoire de Chimie des Substances Naturelles”, GDR CNRS 3049, Faculté de Pharmacie, Laboratoire de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire, 2 rue du Docteur Marcland, 87025 Limoges Cedex (France); Liagre, Bertrand, E-mail: bertrand.liagre@unilim.fr [Université de Limoges, FR 3503 GEIST, EA 1069 “Laboratoire de Chimie des Substances Naturelles”, GDR CNRS 3049, Faculté de Pharmacie, Laboratoire de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire, 2 rue du Docteur Marcland, 87025 Limoges Cedex (France)

    2013-04-15

    Erythroleukemia is generally associated with a very poor response and survival to current available therapeutic agents. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) has been described to play a crucial role in the proliferation and differentiation of leukemia cells, this enzyme seems to play an important role in chemoresistance in different cancer types. Previously, we demonstrated that diosgenin, a plant steroid, induced apoptosis in HEL cells with concomitant COX-2 overexpression. In this study, we investigated the antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of cyclopamine and jervine, two steroidal alkaloids with similar structures, on HEL and TF1a human erythroleukemia cell lines and, for the first time, their effect on COX-2 expression. Cyclopamine, but not jervine, inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in these cells. Both compounds induced COX-2 overexpression which was responsible for apoptosis resistance. In jervine-treated cells, COX-2 overexpression was NF-κB dependent. Inhibition of NF-κB reduced COX-2 overexpression and induced apoptosis. In addition, cyclopamine induced apoptosis and COX-2 overexpression via PKC activation. Inhibition of the PKC pathway reduced both apoptosis and COX-2 overexpression in both cell lines. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the p38/COX-2 pathway was involved in resistance to cyclopamine-induced apoptosis since p38 inhibition reduced COX-2 overexpression and increased apoptosis in both cell lines. - Highlights: ► Cyclopamine alone but not jervine induces apoptosis in human erythroleukemia cells. ► Cyclopamine and jervine induce COX-2 overexpression. ► COX-2 overexpression is implicated in resistance to cyclopamine-induced apoptosis. ► Apoptotic potential of jervine is restrained by NF-κB pathway activation. ► PKC is involved in cyclopamine-induced apoptosis and COX-2 overexpression.

  13. Escape of the martian protoatmosphere and initial water inventory

    CERN Document Server

    Erkaev, N V; Elkins-Tanton, L; Stökl, A; Odert, P; Marcq, E; Dorfi, E A; Kislyakova, K G; Kulikov, Yu N; Leitzinger, M; Güdel, M

    2013-01-01

    Latest research in planet formation indicate that Mars formed within a few million years (Myr) and remained a planetary embryo that never grew to a more massive planet. It can also be expected from dynamical models, that most of Mars' building blocks consisted of material that formed in orbital locations just beyond the ice line which could have contained ~0.1-0.2 wt. % of H2O. By using these constraints, we estimate the nebula-captured and catastrophically outgassed volatile contents during the solidification of Mars' magma ocean and apply a hydrodynamic upper atmosphere model for the study of the soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (XUV) driven thermal escape of the martian protoatmosphere during the early active epoch of the young Sun. The amount of gas that has been captured from the protoplanetary disk into the planetary atmosphere is calculated by solving the hydrostatic structure equations in the protoplanetary nebula. Depending on nebular properties such as the dust grain depletion factor, planetesimal...

  14. ESCAPE. Energy Security and ClimAte Policy Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Climate change and energy supply security policy are currently not integrated in most countries, despite possible synergies. The ESCAPE approach suggests that linking climate change policy with security of energy supply could improve climate change policy at both a national and international level. The report explores the interaction between policies of energy security and climate change and the options of inclusion of energy security issues into national and international post-2012 climate negotiations. It emphasises the importance of the US in this regard and takes a close look at US energy policy documents. It appears that current US energy policy is not directed towards reducing its reliance on imported fossil fuel, even though the government has a strong preference for this. This study shows that measures to reduce import dependency are mostly synergetic with climate policy and gives some options that can be implemented. On an international level, linkages of energy security into post-2012 climate policy may be possible in sectoral bottom-up approaches or technology frameworks. As well, inclusion of a security of supply criterion in international emission trading instruments may provide potential benefits

  15. Dynamical correlations in the escape strategy of Influenza A virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taggi, L.; Colaiori, F.; Loreto, V.; Tria, F.

    2013-03-01

    The evolutionary dynamics of human Influenza A virus presents a challenging theoretical problem. An extremely high mutation rate allows the virus to escape, at each epidemic season, the host immune protection elicited by previous infections. At the same time, at each given epidemic season a single quasi-species, that is a set of closely related strains, is observed. A non-trivial relation between the genetic (i.e., at the sequence level) and the antigenic (i.e., related to the host immune response) distances can shed light into this puzzle. In this paper we introduce a model in which, in accordance with experimental observations, a simple interaction rule based on spatial correlations among point mutations dynamically defines an immunity space in the space of sequences. We investigate the static and dynamic structure of this space and we discuss how it affects the dynamics of the virus-host interaction. Interestingly we observe a staggered time structure in the virus evolution as in the real Influenza evolutionary dynamics.

  16. Narrow escape for a stochastically gated Brownian ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reingruber, Jürgen; Holcman, David

    2010-02-17

    Molecular activation in cellular microdomains is usually characterized by a forward binding rate, which is the reciprocal of the arrival time of a ligand to a key target. Upon chemical interactions or conformational changes, a Brownian ligand may randomly switch between different states, and when target activation is possible in a specific state only, switching can significantly alter the activation process. The main goal of this paper is to study the mean time for a switching ligand to activate a small substrate, modelled as the time to exit a microdomain through a small absorbing window on the surface. We present the equations for the mean sojourn times the ligand spends in each state, and study the escape process with switching between two states in dimension one and three. When the ligand can exit in only one of the two states, we find that switching always decreases its sojourn time in the state where it can exit. Moreover, the fastest exit is obtained when the ligand diffuses most of the time in the state with the maximal diffusion coefficient, although this may imply that it spends most of the time 'hidden' in the state where it cannot exit. We discuss the physical mechanisms responsible for this apparent paradox. In dimension three we confirm our results with Brownian simulations. Finally, we suggest possible applications in cellular biology. PMID:21389363

  17. Gene delivery of the elastase inhibitor elafin protects macrophages from neutrophil elastase-mediated impairment of apoptotic cell recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Peter A; Devitt, Andrew; Kotelevtsev, Yuri; Sallenave, Jean-Michel

    2004-09-10

    The resolution of inflammation is dependent on recognition and phagocytic removal of apoptotic cells by macrophages. Receptors for apoptotic cells are sensitive to degradation by human neutrophil elastase (HNE). We show in the present study that HNE cleaves macrophage cell surface CD14 and in so doing, reduces phagocytic recognition of apoptotic lymphocytic cells (Mutu 1). Using an improved method of adenovirus-mediated transfection of macrophages with the HNE inhibitor elafin, we demonstrate that elafin overexpression prevents CD14 cleavage and restores apoptotic cell recognition by macrophages. This approach of genetic modification of macrophages could be used to restore apoptotic cell recognition in inflammatory conditions. PMID:15358543

  18. Structural insights into the transcription-independent apoptotic pathway of p53

    OpenAIRE

    Chi, Seung-Wook

    2014-01-01

    Reactivating the p53 pathway in tumors is an important strategy for anticancer therapy. In response to diverse cellular stresses, the tumor suppressor p53 mediates apoptosis in a transcriptionindependent and transcription-dependent manner. Although extensive studies have focused on the transcription-dependent apoptotic pathway of p53, the transcription-independent apoptotic pathway of p53 has only recently been discovered. Molecular interactions between p53 and Bcl-2 family proteins in the mi...

  19. Apoptotic cells trigger a membrane-initiated pathway to increase ABCA1

    OpenAIRE

    Fond, Aaron M.; Lee, Chang Sup; Schulman, Ira G.; Kiss, Robert S.; Ravichandran, Kodi S.

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages clear millions of apoptotic cells daily and, during this process, take up large quantities of cholesterol. The membrane transporter ABCA1 is a key player in cholesterol efflux from macrophages and has been shown via human genetic studies to provide protection against cardiovascular disease. How the apoptotic cell clearance process is linked to macrophage ABCA1 expression is not known. Here, we identified a plasma membrane–initiated signaling pathway that drives a rapid upregulatio...

  20. The role of airway macrophages in apoptotic cell clearance following acute and chronic lung inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabiec, Aleksander M; Hussell, Tracy

    2016-07-01

    Acute and chronic inflammatory responses in the lung are associated with the accumulation of large quantities of immune and structural cells undergoing apoptosis, which need to be engulfed by phagocytes in a process called 'efferocytosis'. Apoptotic cell recognition and removal from the lung is mediated predominantly by airway macrophages, though immature dendritic cells and non-professional phagocytes, such as epithelial cells and mesenchymal cells, can also display this function. Efficient clearance of apoptotic cells from the airways is essential for successful resolution of inflammation and the return to lung homeostasis. Disruption of this process leads to secondary necrosis of accumulating apoptotic cells, release of necrotic cell debris and subsequent uncontrolled inflammatory activation of the innate immune system by the released 'damage associated molecular patterns' (DAMPS). To control the duration of the immune response and prevent autoimmune reactions, anti-inflammatory signalling cascades are initiated in the phagocyte upon apoptotic cell uptake, mediated by a range of receptors that recognise specific phospholipids or proteins externalised on, or secreted by, the apoptotic cell. However, prolonged activation of apoptotic cell recognition receptors, such as the family of receptor tyrosine kinases Tyro3, Axl and MerTK (TAM), may delay or prevent inflammatory responses to subsequent infections. In this review, we will discuss recent advances in our understanding of the mechanism controlling apoptotic cell recognition and removal from the lung in homeostasis and during inflammation, the contribution of defective efferocytosis to chronic inflammatory lung diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma and cystic fibrosis, and implications of the signals triggered by apoptotic cells in the susceptibility to pulmonary microbial infections. PMID:26957481

  1. Effect of Transient Maternal Hypotension on Apoptotic Cell Death in Foetal Rat Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Özyürek, Hamit; Bayrak, Sibel; Pehlivanoğlu, Bilge; Atilla, Pergin; Balkancı, Zeynep Dicle; Çakar, Nur; Anlar, Banu

    2014-01-01

    Background: Intrauterine perfusion insufficiency induced by transient maternal hypotension has been reported to be associated with foetal brain malformations. However, the effects of maternal hypotension on apoptotic processes in the foetal brain have not been investigated experimentally during the intrauterine period. Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of transient maternal hypotension on apoptotic cell death in the intrauterine foetal brain. Study...

  2. Apoptotic-like programed cell death in fungi: the benefits in filamentous species

    OpenAIRE

    Shlezinger, Neta; Goldfinger, Nir; Sharon, Amir

    2012-01-01

    Studies conducted in the early 1990s showed for the first time that Saccharomyces cerevisiae can undergo cell death with hallmarks of animal apoptosis. These findings came as a surprise, since suicide machinery was unexpected in unicellular organisms. Today, apoptosis in yeast is well-documented. Apoptotic death of yeast cells has been described under various conditions and S. cerevisiae homologs of human apoptotic genes have been identified and characterized. These studies also revealed fund...

  3. Salivary apoptotic cells in oral (pre-) cancer as a potential diagnostic means

    OpenAIRE

    Kaur, Jasdeep; Politis, Constantinus; Jacobs, Reinhilde

    2015-01-01

    Background Apoptosis is a genetically programmed form of cell death which is indispensable for development and homeostasis of multi-cellular organism. Objectives The aim of this study was to find out the salivary apoptotic cells in oral precancerous and cancerous patients and furthermore to observe the potential diagnostic value of salivary apoptotic cells in detection of oral pre-cancer and cancer. Material and Methods Unsimulated saliva was collected from a group of 103 subjects diagnosed w...

  4. Impaired Clearance of Apoptotic Cells in Chronic Inflammatory Diseases: Therapeutic Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Szondy, Zsuzsa; Garabuczi, Éva; Joós, Gergely; Tsay, Gregory J.; Sarang, Zsolt

    2014-01-01

    In healthy individuals, billions of cells die by apoptosis every day. Removal of the dead cells by phagocytosis (a process called efferocytosis) must be efficient to prevent secondary necrosis and the consequent release of pro-inflammatory cell contents that damages the tissue environment and provokes autoimmunity. In addition, detection and removal of apoptotic cells generally induces an anti-inflammatory response. As a consequence improper clearance of apoptotic cells, being the result of e...

  5. Adiponectin modulates inflammatory reactions via calreticulin receptor–dependent clearance of early apoptotic bodies

    OpenAIRE

    Takemura, Yukihiro; Ouchi, Noriyuki; Shibata, Rei; Aprahamian, Tamar; Kirber, Michael T.; Summer, Ross S; Kihara, Shinji; Walsh, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are associated with chronic inflammation. Adiponectin is an adipocyte-derived hormone with antidiabetic and antiinflammatory actions. Here, we demonstrate what we believe to be a previously undocumented activity of adiponectin, facilitating the uptake of early apoptotic cells by macrophages, an essential feature of immune system function. Adiponectin-deficient (APN-KO) mice were impaired in their ability to clear apoptotic thymocytes in response to dexamethasone tr...

  6. Enzymes in Analytical Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Myer M.

    1980-01-01

    Presents tabular information concerning recent research in the field of enzymes in analytic chemistry, with methods, substrate or reaction catalyzed, assay, comments and references listed. The table refers to 128 references. Also listed are 13 general citations. (CS)

  7. Membrane Assisted Enzyme Fractionation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Linfeng

    difference. In this thesis, separations using crossflow elecro-membrane filtration (EMF) of amino acids, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and industrial enzymes from Novozymes were performed. The main objective of this study was to investigate the technological feasibility of EMF in the application of industrial...... enzyme fractionation, such as removal of a side activity from the main enzyme activity. As a proof-of-concept, amino acids were used as model solution to test the feasibility of EMF in the application of amphoteric molecule separation. A single amino acid was used to illustrate the effect of an electric...... TMP on the separation performance were very small in the investigated range. The mass transport of each enzyme can be well explained by the Extended-Nernst-Planck equation. Better separation was observed at lower feed concentration, higher solution pH in the investigated range and with a polysulfone...

  8. Escape probability of Martian atmospheric particles: controlling effects of the electromagnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, X.; Liemohn, M. W.; Nagy, A. F.; Luhmann, J. G.; Ma, Y.

    2009-12-01

    This study quantifies several factors controlling the probability of a pickup oxygen ion to escape from the Mars upper atmosphere. Our Monte Carlo model releases billions of test particles through the electromagnetic fields of a magnetohydrodynamic model solution, monitoring their motion due to gravity and the Lorentz force throughout the simulation domain, which extends from the 200 km exobase altitude to 5 Martian radii from the center. We focus on the escape chances of the ions created at low altitudes on the dayside, where most ion production is located. The simulation results show that the electromagnetic fields are the dominant factor, surpassing the deceleration of gravity, in controlling ion transport and thus determine whether particles ultimately escape Mars or return to the planet. In a simulation case in which the strongest crustal fields face the Sun at nominal solar minimum conditions, on average only 45% of isotropically distributed new-born particles at ~400 km altitude are able to escape, even with a relatively high initial energy of ~10 eV. The percentage value slightly increases to 47%, if the velocity distribution is assumed to be half-isotropic without downward moving particles. The particle kinetic energy and the local time of the crustal fields are also important factors greatly influencing the escape probability. Furthermore, there is a distinct hemispheric asymmetry in the escape probability distribution, as defined by the upstream convection electric field direction. These findings imply that electromagnetic field effects are crucial in estimating Martian atmospheric loss for comparison with photochemical escape rates

  9. Light primes the escape response of the calanoid copepod, Calanus finmarchicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, David M; Shema, Steven D; Browman, Howard I; Browne, Thomas Q; Skiftesvik, Anne Berit

    2012-01-01

    The timing and magnitude of an escape reaction is often the determining factor governing a copepod's success at avoiding predation. Copepods initiate rapid and directed escapes in response to fluid signals created by predators; however little is known about how copepods modulate their behavior in response to additional sensory input. This study investigates the effect of light level on the escape behavior of Calanus finmarchicus. A siphon flow was used to generate a consistent fluid signal and the behavioral threshold and magnitude of the escape response was quantified in the dark and in the light. The results show that C. finmarchicus initiated their escape reaction further from the siphon and traveled with greater speed in the light than in the dark. However, no difference was found in the escape distance. These results suggest that copepods use information derived from multiple sensory inputs to modulate the sensitivity and strength of the escape in response to an increase risk of predation. Population and IBM models that predict optimal vertical distributions of copepods in response to visual predators need to consider changes in the copepod's behavioral thresholds when predicting predation risk within the water column. PMID:22761834

  10. Reporter Assay for Endo/Lysosomal Escape of Toxin-Based Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Gilabert-Oriol

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein-based therapeutics with cytosolic targets are capable of exhibiting their therapeutic effect once they have escaped from the endosomes or lysosomes. In this study, the reporters—horseradish peroxidase (HRP, Alexa Fluor 488 (Alexa and ricin A-chain (RTA—were investigated for their capacity to monitor the endo/lysosomal escape of the ribosome-inactivating protein, saporin. The conjugates—saporin-HRP, Alexasaporin and saporin-KQ-RTA—were constructed, and the endo/lysosomal escape of these conjugates alone (lack of endo/lysosomal release or in combination with certain structurally-specific triterpenoidal saponins (efficient endo/lysosomal escape was characterized. HRP failed in reporting the endo/lysosomal escape of saporin. Contrastingly, Alexa Fluor 488 successfully allowed the report of the process at a toxin concentration of 1000 nM. In addition, single endo/lysosome analysis facilitated the determination of the amount of Alexasaporin released from each vesicle. RTA was also successful in reporting the endo/lysosomal escape of the enzymatically inactive mutant, saporin-KQ, but in this case, the sensitivity of the method reached a toxin concentration of 10 nM. In conclusion, the simultaneous usage of Alexa Fluor 488 and RTA as reporters may provide the possibility of monitoring the endo/lysosomal escape of protein-based therapeutics in the concentration range of 10–1000 nM.

  11. Enzyme with rhamnogalacturonase activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Kofod, L.V.; Andersen, L N; Dalboge, H; Kauppinen, M.S.; Christgau, S; Heldt-Hansen, H.P.; Christophersen, C.; Nielsen, P.M.; Voragen, A. G. J.; Schols, H.A.

    1998-01-01

    An enzyme exhibiting rhamnogalacturonase activity, capable of cleaving a rhamnogalacturonan backbone in such a manner that galacturonic acids are left as the non-reducing ends, and which exhibits activity on hairy regions from a soy bean material and/or on saponified hairy regions from a sugar beet material. The enzyme has the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:2 and is encoded by the DNA sequence of SEQ ID NO:1

  12. Overproduction of ligninolytic enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elisashvili, Vladimir; Kachlishvili, Eva; Torok, Tamas

    2014-06-17

    Methods, compositions, and systems for overproducing ligninolytic enzymes from the basidiomycetous fungus are described herein. As described, the method can include incubating a fungal strain of Cerrena unicolor IBB 303 in a fermentation system having growth medium which includes lignocellulosic material and then cultivating the fungal strain in the fermentation system under conditions wherein the fungus expresses the ligninolytic enzymes. In some cases, the lignocellulosic material is mandarin peel, ethanol production residue, walnut pericarp, wheat bran, wheat straw, or banana peel.

  13. Phagocytosis mechanism of apoptotic granulosa cells regulated by milk-fat globule-EGF factor 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naka, Mayumi; Kusakabe, Ken; Takeshita, Ai; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Ito, Yuko; Shibata, Masa-Aki; Otsuki, Yoshinori

    2009-09-01

    In the process of ovary sexual maturation, most immature ovarian follicles degrade into atretic follicles accompanied by apoptosis in granulosa cells. Macrophages can recognize apoptotic cells through specific binding with phosphatidylserine (PS), exposed on the surface of apoptotic cells, which is mediated by milk-fat globule-EGF factor 8 (MFG-E8). In the present research, we examined the involvement of the MFG-E8-dependent phagocytosis system in the atretic follicles of developing mouse ovaries. The number of atretic follicles and DNA-fragmented granulosa cells significantly increased in B6C3F1 mice during 2 to 6 weeks. Chromatin-condensed granulosa cells were engulfed by macrophages, which existed in the stroma or atretic follicles, or by neighboring normal granulosa cells. MFG-E8 mRNA increased in ovaries during 2 to 6 weeks, and immunoreactivity of MFG-E8 was detected at the surface of apoptotic cells existing around the antrum. Immunoelectron microscopic study revealed MFG-E8-positive signals on the membrane of apoptotic cells near macrophages, but apoptotic cells engulfed by neighboring granulosa cells showed few signals. Anti-Fas antibody elevated the annexin-V-positive reaction in isolated granulosa cells from 3-week-old mouse ovaries. MFG-E8 seems to act on the phagocytosis of apoptotic granulosa cells via macrophages and contribute to the regression process of atretic follicles. PMID:19784740

  14. The impact of escaped farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L. on catch statistics in Scotland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren M Green

    Full Text Available In Scotland and elsewhere, there are concerns that escaped farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L. may impact on wild salmon stocks. Potential detrimental effects could arise through disease spread, competition, or inter-breeding. We investigated whether there is evidence of a direct effect of recorded salmon escape events on wild stocks in Scotland using anglers' counts of caught salmon (classified as wild or farmed and sea trout (Salmo trutta L.. This tests specifically whether documented escape events can be associated with reduced or elevated escapes detected in the catch over a five-year time window, after accounting for overall variation between areas and years. Alternate model frameworks were somewhat inconsistent, however no robust association was found between documented escape events and higher proportion of farm-origin salmon in anglers' catch, nor with overall catch size. A weak positive correlation was found between local escapes and subsequent sea trout catch. This is in the opposite direction to what would be expected if salmon escapes negatively affected wild fish numbers. Our approach specifically investigated documented escape events, contrasting with earlier studies examining potentially wider effects of salmon farming on wild catch size. This approach is more conservative, but alleviates some potential sources of confounding, which are always of concern in observational studies. Successful analysis of anglers' reports of escaped farmed salmon requires high data quality, particularly since reports of farmed salmon are a relatively rare event in the Scottish data. Therefore, as part of our analysis, we reviewed studies of potential sensitivity and specificity of determination of farmed origin. Specificity estimates are generally high in the literature, making an analysis of the form we have performed feasible.

  15. Water Vapor Permeability of the Advanced Crew Escape Suit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bue, Grant; Kuzneth, Larry; Gillis, David; Jones, Jeffery; Daniel, Brian; Gernhardt, Michael; Hamilton, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) crewmembers are expected to return to earth wearing a suit similar to the current Advanced Crew Escape Suit (ACES). To ensure optimum cognitive performance, suited crewmembers must maintain their core body temperature within acceptable limits. There are currently several options for thermal maintenance in the post-landing phase. These include the current baseline, which uses an ammonia boiler, purge flow using oxygen in the suit, accessing sea water for liquid cooling garment (LCG) cooling and/or relying on the evaporative cooling capacity of the suit. These options vary significantly in mass, power, engineering and safety factors, with relying on the evaporative cooling capacity of the suit being the least difficult to implement. Data from previous studies indicates that the evaporative cooling capacity of the ACES was much higher than previously expected, but subsequent tests were performed for longer duration and higher metabolic rates to better define the water vapor permeability of the ACES. In these tests five subjects completed a series of tests performing low to moderate level exercise in order to control for a target metabolic rate while wearing the ACES in an environmentally controlled thermal chamber. Four different metabolic profiles at a constant temperature of 95 F and relative humidity of 50% were evaluated. These tests showed subjects were able to reject about twice as much heat in the permeable ACES as they were in an impermeable suit that had less thermal insulation. All of the heat rejection differential is attributed to the increased evaporation capability through the Gortex bladder of the suit.

  16. The calculation of the resonance escape factor of helium for Lorentzian and Voigt profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He Jian [School of Science, Henan University of Science and Technology, Luoyang 471003 (China)]. E-mail: hejian405@163.com; Zhang Qingguo [School of Science, Henan University of Science and Technology, Luoyang 471003 (China)

    2006-11-27

    The resonance escape factors of helium 10830.34 A, 10830.25 A and 10829.08 A that making up the 10830 A emission lines are calculated, for both Lorentzian profile and Voigt profile. The total number of absorbing atoms in the ground state is calculated. The dependence of the escape factors on the optical depth in the line center is considered. The resonance escape factors of helium 3889 and 3118 emission lines are discussed also. This calculation is useful in the research on the helium in the sun and remote stars from the helium emission lines.

  17. Fractional extension of Kramers rate and barrier escaping from metastable potential well

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Chun-Yang

    2015-01-01

    The reactive process of barrier escaping from the metastable potential well is studied together with the extension of Kramers' rate formula to the fractional case. Characteristic quantities are computed for an thimbleful of insight into the near barrier escaping and recrossing dynamics. Where the stationary transmission coefficient is revealed to be larger than the usual cases which implies less barrier recrossing. And the non-monotonic varying of it reveals a close dependence to the fractional exponent $\\alpha$. In most cases, the near barrier behavior of the escaping dynamics is equivalent to the diffusion in the two-dimensional non-Ohmic damping system.

  18. Role of cytokines in promoting immune escape of FasL-expressing human colon cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tong Xu; Bao-Cun Sun; Qiang Li; Xi-Shan Hao

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the potential role of cytokines in promoting Fas ligand (FasL)-expressing colon cancer cells.METHODS: Immunohistochemical SABC method was used to observe the expression of Fas receptor and ligand in SW620 colon cancer cell line and Jurkat T cells in order to provide the morphological evidence for the functions of Fas receptor and ligand. To examine the cytotoxicity of effector cells, CytoTox96(R) non-radioactive cytotoxicity assay was adopted to measure the lactate dehydrogenase-releasing value after SW620 cells were co-cultured with Jurkat T lymphocytes.RESULTS: The FasL of colon cancer SW620 cells was positive. The positive substances were distributed in the cell membrane and cytoplasm. The Fas receptor of colon cancer SW620 cells was negative. The Fas receptor and ligand of Jurkat T lymphocytes tumed out to be positive. The positive substances were distributed in the cell membrane.After phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated Jurkat T lymphocytes were co-cultured with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-plus-ionomycin-stimulated (for 48 h) SW620ceils or tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)-stimulated (for 48 h) SW620 cells or unstimulated SW620 cells for 4 h,the cytotoxicity of SW620 cells to PHA-stimulated Jurkat cells at effector-to-target ratios of 10:1, 5:1, 2.5:1, and 1.25:1was 74.6%, 40.8%, 32.4%, and 10.9% (F= 8.19, P<0.05);or 54.9%, 35.3%, 22.0%, and 10.3% (F= 11.12, P<0.05);or 14.9%, 10.5%, 6.9%, and 5.8% (F= 3.45, P<0.05).After PHA-stimulated Jurkat T lymphocytes were co-cultured with unstimulated SW620 cells for 8 h, the cytotoxicity of SW620 cells to PHA-stimulated Jurkat cells at effector-totarget ratios of 5:1, 2.5:1, and 1.25:1 from the experiment was 83.9%, 74.1%, and 28.5% (F= 137.04, P<0.05)respectively. Non-radioactive cytotoxicity assay showed that the apoptotic rate of Jurkat cells remarkably increased with the increase of planting concentration of SW620 cells and co-culture time after the SW620 cells were co

  19. Escaping the poverty trap: modeling the interplay between economic growth and the ecology of infectious disease

    CERN Document Server

    Goerg, Georg M; Hébert-Dufresne, Laurent; Althouse, Benjamin M

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics of economies and infectious disease are inexorably linked: economic well-being influences health (sanitation, nutrition, treatment capacity, etc.) and health influences economic well-being (labor productivity lost to sickness and disease). Often societies are locked into ``poverty traps'' of poor health and poor economy. Here, using a simplified coupled disease-economic model with endogenous capital growth we demonstrate the formation of poverty traps, as well as ways to escape them. We suggest two possible mechanisms of escape both motivated by empirical data: one, through an influx of capital (development aid), and another through changing the percentage of GDP spent on healthcare. We find that a large influx of capital is successful in escaping the poverty trap, but increasing health spending alone is not. Our results demonstrate that escape from a poverty trap may be possible, and carry important policy implications in the world-wide distribution of aid and within-country healthcare spending.

  20. Ceramide formation mediated by acid sphingomyelinase facilitates endosomal escape of caliciviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivanna, Vinay; Kim, Yunjeong; Chang, Kyeong-Ok

    2015-09-01

    Our recent results demonstrated that bile acids facilitate virus escape from the endosomes into the cytoplasm for successful replication of porcine enteric calicivirus (PEC). We report a novel finding that bile acids can be substituted by cold treatment for endosomal escape and virus replication. This endosomal escape by cold treatment or bile acids is associated with ceramide formation by acid sphingomyelinase (ASM). ASM catalyzes hydrolysis of sphingomyelin into ceramide, which is known to destabilize lipid bilayer. Treatment of LLC-PK cells with bile acids or cold led to ceramide formation, and small molecule antagonists or siRNA of ASM blocked ceramide formation in the endosomes and significantly reduced PEC replication. Inhibition of ASM resulted in the retention of PEC, feline calicivirus or murine norovirus in the endosomes in correlation with reduced viral replication. These results suggest the importance of viral escape from the endosomes for the replication of various caliciviruses. PMID:25985440

  1. Microcrustaceans escape behavior as an early bioindicator of copper, chromium and endosulfan toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, María Florencia; Paggi, Juan César; Gagneten, Ana María

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this work was to experimentally analyze the impact of copper, chromium and a commercial pesticide with endosulfan on the escape behavior of two copepods (Notodiaptomus conifer, Argyrodiaptomus falcifer) and three cladocerans (Daphnia magna, Pseudosida variabilis and Ceriodaphnia dubia). The experimental assays were carried out using a novel hydraulic devise designed to mimic three-speed predator capture behavior. Two concentrations, one "high" and one "low", were employed and the exposure time was 15 (±5) minutes. With two exceptions, the species exposed to heavy metals manifested higher ability to escape than controls. Both concentrations of the pesticide reduced the escape ability of cladocerans but copepods responded, in general, in a similar manner as for heavy metals. The immediate apparent advantage of low and early toxic effects is discussed and the high sensitivity of the escape behavior suggests that it could be a complementary endpoint to be used in future ecotoxicological tests. PMID:22038688

  2. Escape of photons from two fixed extreme Reissner-Nordstr\\"om black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso, Daniel; Sánchez-Hernández, Manuel; 10.1103/PhysRevD.78.104024

    2008-01-01

    We study the scattering of light (null geodesics) by two fixed extreme Reissner-Nordstr\\"om black holes, in which the gravitational attraction of their masses is exactly balanced with the electrostatic repulsion of their charges, allowing a static spacetime. We identify the set of unstable periodic orbits that constitute the fractal repeller that completely describes the chaotic escape dynamics of photons. In the framework of periodic orbit theory, the analysis of the linear stability of the unstable periodic orbits is used to obtain the main quantities of chaos that characterize the escape dynamics of the photons scattered by the black holes. In particular, the escape rate which is compared with the result obtained from numerical simulations that consider statistical ensembles of photons. We also analyze the dynamics of photons in the proximity of a perturbed black hole and give an analytical estimation for the escape rate in this system.

  3. Analytical Approximations for Calculating the Escape and Absorption of Radiation in Clumpy Dusty Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Varosi, F; Varosi, Frank; Dwek, Eli

    1999-01-01

    We present analytical approximations for the scattering, absorption and escape of non-ionizing photons from spherically symmetric two-phase clumpy media, with either a central point source of isotropic radiation, a uniform distribution of isotropic emitters, or uniformly illuminated by external sources. The analytical approximations are based on the mega-grains model of two-phase clumpy media, as proposed by Hobson & Padman, combined with escape and absorption probability formulae for homogeneous media. The accuracy of the approximations is examined by comparison with 3D Monte Carlo simulations of radiative transfer, including multiple scattering. Our studies show that the combined mega-grains and escape/absorption probability formulae provide a good approximation of the escaping and absorbed radiation fractions for a wide range of parameters characterizing the medium. A realistic test is performed by modeling the absorption of a stellar-like source of radiation by interstellar dust in a clumpy medium, an...

  4. Pizza or Pancake? Formation Models of Gas Escape Biosignatures in Terrestrial and Martian Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaccorsi, R.; Fairen, A. G.; Baker, L.; McKay, C. P.; Willson, D.

    2016-05-01

    Fine-grained sedimentary hollowed structures were imaged in Gale Crater, but no biomarkers identified to support biology. Our observation-based (gas escape) terrestrial model could inform on possible martian paleoenvironments at time of formation.

  5. Supraadditive apoptotic response of R3327-G rat prostate tumors to androgen ablation and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Androgen ablation is often combined with radiation in the treatment of patients with prostate cancer, yet, the optimal sequencing and the mechanisms governing the interaction are not understood. The objectives were to determine if cell killing via apoptosis is enhanced when the combined treatment is administered and to define the relationship of changes in this form of cell killing to tumor volume growth delay. Materials and Methods: Dunning R3327-G rat prostate tumors, grown in the flanks of Copenhagen rats, were used at a volume of approximately 1 cc. Androgen ablation was initiated by castration, and androgen restoration was achieved with 0.5 cm silastic tube implants containing testosterone. 60Co was used for irradiation. The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TUNEL) histochemical assay was used to quantify apoptosis. Results: Tumors from intact and castrate unirradiated control rats had average apoptotic indices (percent of apoptotic cells) of 0.4 and 1.0%, respectively. The apoptotic index varied only slightly over time (3 h to 28 days) after castration (range 0.75-1.43%). Irradiation of intact rats to 7 Gy resulted in a peak apoptotic response at 6 h of 2.3%. A supra additive apoptotic response was seen when castration was initiated 3 days prior to 7 Gy radiation, with peak levels of about 10.1%. When the radiation was administered at increasing times beyond 3 days after castration, the apoptotic response gradually diminished and was back to levels seen in intact rats by 28 days after castration. Tumor volume growth delay studies were consistent with, but not conclusive proof of, a supra additive effect when the combination was used. Discussion: A supra additive apoptotic response was seen when androgen ablation and radiation were used to treat androgen sensitive R3327-G rat prostate tumors. This supra additive effect was dependent on the timing of the two treatments. Further studies are required to more fully define the optimal timing and

  6. The relationship between migration and development in the ESCAP region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeldon, R

    1991-01-01

    The relationship between migration and development in the ESCAP region including southeast and south Asian countries and the Pacific island of Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Vanuatu, Kiribati, Samoa, and the Solomon Islands is discussed in terms of mobility transition and origin and destination factors. The changing patterns of mobility in Asia are further delineated in the discussion of internal movements and international movement. Emigration in the smaller countries of the Pacific are treated separately. Future predictions are that the Asia Pacific region will experience continued fertility decline and stabilization of low rates over the next 20 years. The declines will result in slow labor force growth, and increased demand for labor in traditional core and neocore countries as defined and presented in table form by Friedman will be heightened. International movements are likely to increase in large urban areas within destination countries. Tokyo and Singapore are the principal cities in Asia. Tokyo by restrictive government policy has limited immigration, but future labor shortages of unskilled labor from southeast Asia and China are expected. Singapore is already dependent on foreign labor by 10%. Current labor shortages have led to the creation of a growth triangle between Singapore, Indonesia, and Malaysia. Other cities expected to emerge as primary cities in international regional complexes with spillover into the hinterlands include the Hong Kong, Guangzhou, and Macau triangle in the Pearl River delta, Taipei and Seoul, and possibly Kuala Lumpur. Internal migration is expected to increase in the capital cities of Bangkok, Manila,j and centers such as Shanghai, Beijing, and other large cities of southeast Asia. These cities will be linked through the flows of skilled international migrants, which began in the 1960s and is expected to become a future major flow. Recreational and resource niches will be left in much of the Pacific, the Himalayan Kingdoms, and

  7. CRISPR-Cas9 Can Inhibit HIV-1 Replication but NHEJ Repair Facilitates Virus Escape

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Gang; Zhao, Na; Berkhout, Ben; Das, Atze T.

    2016-01-01

    Several recent studies demonstrated that the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated endonuclease Cas9 can be used for guide RNA (gRNA)-directed, sequence-specific cleavage of HIV proviral DNA in infected cells. We here demonstrate profound inhibition of HIV-1 replication by harnessing T cells with Cas9 and antiviral gRNAs. However, the virus rapidly and consistently escaped from this inhibition. Sequencing of the HIV-1 escape variants revealed nucleotide...

  8. Inhibition of chaotic escape from a potential well using small parametric modulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown theoretically for the first time that, depending on its period, amplitude, and initial phase, a periodic parametric modulation can suppress a chaotic escape from a potential well. The instance of the Helmholtz oscillator is used to demonstrate, by means of Melnikov close-quote s method, that parametric modulations of the linear or quadratic potential terms inhibit chaotic escape when certain resonance conditions are met. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  9. Swimming and escape behavior of copepod nauplii: implications for predator-prey interactions among copepods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Titelman, Josefin

    2001-01-01

    This study focuses on how prey behavior may affect predation risk through encounter rates and the escape success of the prey given an encounter. Temora longicornis nauplii require stronger hydrodynamic signals to elicit escape than Acartia tonsa nauplii (critical fluid deformation rates, Delta* o...... behavior of A. tonsa acts predominantly at the post-encounter stage where its sensitivity to hydrodynamic signals (i,e., low Delta*) effectively compensates for the high predator encounter rate generated by its motility....

  10. Progesterone After Estradiol Modulates Shuttle-Cage Escape by Facilitating Volition

    OpenAIRE

    Mayeaux, Darryl J.; Tandle, Sarah M.; Cilano, Sean M.; Fitzharris, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    In animal models of depression, depression is defined as performance on a learning task. That task is typically escaping a mild electric shock in a shuttle cage by moving from one side of the cage to the other. Ovarian hormones influence learning in other kinds of tasks, and these hormones are associated with depressive symptoms in humans. The role of these hormones in shuttle-cage escape learning, however, is less clear. This study manipulated estradiol and progesterone in ovariectomized fem...

  11. Choices between positive and negative reinforcement during treatment for escape-maintained behavior.

    OpenAIRE

    DeLeon, I G; Neidert, P L; Anders, B M; Rodriguez-Catter, V

    2001-01-01

    Positive reinforcement was more effective than negative reinforcement in promoting compliance and reducing escape-maintained problem behavior for a child with autism. Escape extinction was then added while the child was given a choice between positive or negative reinforcement for compliance and the reinforcement schedule was thinned. When the reinforcement requirement reached 10 consecutive tasks, the treatment effects became inconsistent and reinforcer selection shifted from a strong prefer...

  12. Angiotensin-converting enzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, P G; Rømer, F K; Cortes, D

    1984-01-01

    In order to evaluate bleomycin-associated lung damage in humans, lung function parameters and serum levels of the endothelial-bound angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) were determined by serial measurements in 11 patients who were treated for testicular cancer. None developed clinical or radiolog......In order to evaluate bleomycin-associated lung damage in humans, lung function parameters and serum levels of the endothelial-bound angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) were determined by serial measurements in 11 patients who were treated for testicular cancer. None developed clinical or...

  13. Effects of Serotonergic and Opioidergic Drugs on Escape Behaviors and Social Status of Male Crickets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyakonova, V. E.; Schürmann, F.-W.; Sakharov, D. A.

    We examined the effects of selective serotonin depletion and opioid ligands on social rank and related escape behavior of the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus. Establishment of social rank in a pair of males affected their escape reactions. Losers showed a lower and dominants a higher percentage of jumps in response to tactile cercal stimulation than before a fight. The serotonin-depleting drug α-methyltryptophan (AMTP) caused an activation of the escape reactivity in socially naive crickets. AMTP-treated animals also showed a lower ability to become dominants. With an initial 51.6+/-3.6% of wins in the AMTP group, the percentage decreased to 26+/-1.6% on day 5 after injection. The opiate receptor antagonist naloxone affected fight and escape similarly as AMTP. In contrast to naloxone, the opioid agonist [d-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4, Gly5-ol]-enkephalin decreased escape responsiveness to cercal stimulation in naive and subordinate crickets. We suggest that serotonergic and opioid systems are involved in the dominance induced depression of escape behavior.

  14. Characterizing Atmospheric Escape from Mars Today and Through Time, with MAVEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillis, R. J.; Brain, D. A.; Bougher, S. W.; Leblanc, F.; Luhmann, J. G.; Jakosky, B. M.; Modolo, R.; Fox, J.; Deighan, J.; Fang, X.; Wang, Y. C.; Lee, Y.; Dong, C.; Ma, Y.; Cravens, T.; Andersson, L.; Curry, S. M.; Schneider, N.; Combi, M.; Stewart, I.; Clarke, J.; Grebowsky, J.; Mitchell, D. L.; Yelle, R.; Nagy, A. F.; Baker, D.; Lin, R. P.

    2015-12-01

    Two of the primary goals of the MAVEN mission are to determine how the rate of escape of Martian atmospheric gas to space at the current epoch depends upon solar influences and planetary parameters and to estimate the total mass of atmosphere lost to space over the history of the planet. Along with MAVEN's suite of nine science instruments, a collection of complementary models of the neutral and plasma environments of Mars' upper atmosphere and near-space environment are an indispensable part of the MAVEN toolkit, for three primary reasons. First, escaping neutrals will not be directly measured by MAVEN and so neutral escape rates must be derived, via models, from in situ measurements of plasma temperatures and neutral and plasma densities and by remote measurements of the extended exosphere. Second, although escaping ions will be directly measured, all MAVEN measurements are limited in spatial coverage, so global models are needed for intelligent interpolation over spherical surfaces to calculate global escape rates. Third, MAVEN measurements will lead to multidimensional parameterizations of global escape rates for a range of solar and planetary parameters, but further global models informed by MAVEN data will be required to extend these parameterizations to the more extreme conditions that likely prevailed in the early solar system, which is essential for determining total integrated atmospheric loss. We describe these modeling tools and the strategies for using them in concert with MAVEN measurements to greater constrain the history of atmospheric loss on Mars.

  15. Orbital and escape dynamics in barred galaxies - I. The 2D system

    CERN Document Server

    Jung, Christof

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we use the two-dimensional (2D) version of a new analytical gravitational model in order to explore the orbital as well as the escape dynamics of the stars in a barred galaxy composed of a spherically symmetric central nucleus, a bar, a flat disk and a dark matter halo component. A thorough numerical investigation is conducted for distinguishing between bounded and escaping motion. Furthermore bounded orbits are further classified into non-escaping regular and trapped chaotic using the Smaller ALingment Index (SALI) method. Our aim is to determine the basins of escape through the two symmetrical escape channels around the Lagrange points $L_2$ and $L_3$ and also to relate them with the corresponding distribution of the escape rates of the orbits. We integrate initial conditions of orbits in several types of planes so as to obtain a more complete view of the overall orbital properties of the dynamical system. We also present evidence that the unstable manifolds which guide the orbits in and out t...

  16. Enhancing usability of augmented-reality-based mobile escape guidelines for radioactive accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When radioactive accidents occur, modern tools in information technology for emergency response are good solutions to reduce the impact. Since few information-technology-based applications were developed for people during radioactive accidents, a previous study (Tsai et al., 2012) proposed augmented-reality-based mobile escape guidelines. However, because of the lack of transparent escape routes and indoor escape guidelines, the usability of the guidelines is limited. Therefore, this study introduces route planning and mobile three-dimensional (3D) graphics techniques to address the identified problems. The proposed approach could correctly present the geographical relationship from user locations to the anticipated shelters, and quickly show the floor-plan drawings as users are in the buildings. Based on the testing results, in contrast to the previous study, this study offered better escape routes, when the participants performed self-evacuation in outdoor and indoor environments. Overall, this study is not only a useful reference for similar studies, but also a beneficial tool for emergency response during radioactive accidents. -- Highlights: ► Enhancing the efficiency when people escape from radioactive accidents. ► The spatial relationship is transparently displayed in real time. ► In contrast to a previous study, this study offers better escape guidelines

  17. Evaluation of dendritic cells loaded with apoptotic cancer cells or expressing tumour mRNA as potential cancer vaccines against leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leukemia is a clonal disorder characterized by uncontrolled proliferation of haematopoietic cells, and represents the most common form of cancer in children. Advances in therapy for childhood leukemia have relied increasingly on the use of high-dose chemotherapy often combined with stem-cell transplantation. Despite a high success rate and intensification of therapy, children still suffer from relapse and progressive disease resistant to further therapy. Thus, novel forms of therapy are required. This study focuses on dendritic cell (DC) vaccination of childhood leukemia and evaluates the in vitro efficacy of different strategies for antigen loading of professional antigen-presenting cells. We have compared DCs either loaded with apoptotic leukemia cells or transfected with mRNA from the same leukemia cell line, Jurkat E6, for their capacity to induce specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses. Monocyte-derived DCs from healthy donors were loaded with tumor antigen, matured and co-cultured with autologous T cells. After one week, T-cell responses against antigen-loaded DCs were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISPOT) assay. DCs loaded with apoptotic Jurkat E6 cells or transfected with Jurkat E6-cell mRNA were both able to elicit specific T-cell responses in vitro. IFNγ-secreting T cells were observed in both the CD4+ and CD8+ subsets. The results indicate that loading of DCs with apoptotic leukemia cells or transfection with tumour mRNA represent promising strategies for development of cancer vaccines for treatment of childhood leukemia

  18. Targeting the Anti-Apoptotic Protein c-FLIP for Cancer Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safa, Ahmad R., E-mail: asafa@iupui.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Indiana University School of Medicine, 980 W. Walnut Street, R3-C524, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Indiana University Simon Cancer Center, Indiana University School of Medicine, 980 W. Walnut Street, R3-C524, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Pollok, Karen E. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Indiana University School of Medicine, 980 W. Walnut Street, R3-C524, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Indiana University Simon Cancer Center, Indiana University School of Medicine, 980 W. Walnut Street, R3-C524, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Herman B. Wells Center for Pediatric Research, 980 W. Walnut Street, R3-C524, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States)

    2011-03-29

    Cellular FLICE (FADD-like IL-1beta-converting enzyme)-inhibitory protein (c-FLIP) is a major resistance factor and critical anti-apoptotic regulator that inhibits tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), Fas-L, and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced apoptosis as well as chemotherapy-triggered apoptosis in malignant cells. c-FLIP is expressed as long (c-FLIP{sub L}), short (c-FLIP{sub S}), and c-FLIP{sub R} splice variants in human cells. c-FLIP binds to FADD and/or caspase-8 or -10 in a ligand-dependent and-independent fashion, which in turn prevents death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) formation and subsequent activation of the caspase cascade. Moreover, c-FLIP{sub L} and c-FLIP{sub S} are known to have multifunctional roles in various signaling pathways, as well as activating and/or upregulating several cytoprotective signaling molecules. Upregulation of c-FLIP has been found in various tumor types, and its downregulation has been shown to restore apoptosis triggered by cytokines and various chemotherapeutic agents. Hence, c-FLIP is an important target for cancer therapy. For example, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that specifically knockdown the expression of c-FLIP{sub L} in diverse human cancer cell lines augmented TRAIL-induced DISC recruitment and increased the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents, thereby enhancing effector caspase stimulation and apoptosis. Moreover, small molecules causing degradation of c-FLIP as well as decreasing mRNA and protein levels of c-FLIP{sub L} and c-FLIP{sub S} splice variants have been found, and efforts are underway to develop other c-FLIP-targeted cancer therapies. This review focuses on (1) the functional role of c-FLIP splice variants in preventing apoptosis and inducing cytokine and drug resistance; (2) the molecular mechanisms that regulate c-FLIP expression; and (3) strategies to inhibit c-FLIP expression and function.

  19. Hyperthermophilic Enzymes with Industrial Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Mojsov, Kiro; Janevski, Aco; Andronikov, Darko; Zezova, Silvana

    2014-01-01

    Hyperthermophilic enzymes are typically thermostable and are optimally active at high temperatures. Hyperthermophilic enzymes are very similar to their mesophilic homologues. No single mechanism that is responsible for the remarkable stability of hyperthermophilic enzymes. Increased thermo stability must be found in a small number of highly specific alterations. In this review are described current uses and potential applications of thermophilic and hyperthermophilic enzymes as ...

  20. The ENZYME database in 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bairoch, A

    2000-01-01

    The ENZYME database is a repository of information related to the nomenclature of enzymes. In recent years it has became an indispensable resource for the development of metabolic databases. The current version contains information on 3705 enzymes. It is available through the ExPASy WWW server (http://www.expasy.ch/enzyme/ ). PMID:10592255

  1. The surface science of enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rod, Thomas Holm; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2002-01-01

    One of the largest challenges to science in the coming years is to find the relation between enzyme structure and function. Can we predict which reactions an enzyme catalyzes from knowledge of its structure-or from its amino acid sequence? Can we use that knowledge to modify enzyme function? To...... solve these problems we must understand in some detail how enzymes interact with reactants from its surroundings. These interactions take place at the surface of the enzyme and the question of enzyme function can be viewed as the surface science of enzymes. In this article we discuss how to describe...... catalysis by enzymes, and in particular the analogies between enzyme catalyzed reactions and surface catalyzed reactions. We do this by discussing two concrete examples of reactions catalyzed both in nature (by enzymes) and in industrial reactors (by inorganic materials), and show that although analogies...

  2. Relaxin has anti-apoptotic effects on human trophoblast-derived HTR-8/SV neo cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodhi, Romana S Z; Nakabayashi, Koji; Suzuki, Kaho; Yamada, Ai Y; Hazama, Rhoichi; Ebina, Yasuhiko; Yamada, Hideto

    2013-12-01

    The study was conducted to evaluate the effects of human relaxin on apoptosis in the human trophoblast derived HTR-8/SV neo cell line, which is a possible model of human extravillous trophoblasts (EVTs). HTR-8/SV neo cells, cultured in phenol red free RPMI1640 medium, were treated with different doses of human recombinant (rH2) relaxin in serum-deprived conditions. RT-PCR was used for evaluating relaxin receptor: RXFP1 and RXFP2 expression in HTR-8/SV neo cells. The cell death was examined by TUNEL assay. Furthermore, we investigated caspase-3, cleaved PARP and Bcl-2 expressions by Western blot analysis to recognize the translational effects of anti-apoptotic and pro-apoptotic proteins. RXFP1 and RXFP2 mRNA expression was observed in HTR-8/SV neo cells. Compared with untreated control cultures, treatment with rH2 relaxin, decreased TUNEL-positive rate in HTR-8/SV neo cells was observed. Western blot analysis revealed that treatment with rH2 relaxin decreased the expression of caspase-3 and cleaved PARP, but in contrast increased Bcl-2 expression in those cells. These results suggest that rH2 relaxin has anti-apoptotic effects on HTR8/SV neo cells by decreasing pro-apoptotic caspase-3 and cleaved PARP expression and up-regulating anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 expression. PMID:24070111

  3. Modafinil abrogates methamphetamine-induced neuroinflammation and apoptotic effects in the mouse striatum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Raineri

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine is a drug of abuse that can cause neurotoxic damage in humans and animals. Modafinil, a wake-promoting compound approved for the treatment of sleeping disorders, is being prescribed off label for the treatment of methamphetamine dependence. The aim of the present study was to investigate if modafinil could counteract methamphetamine-induced neuroinflammatory processes, which occur in conjunction with degeneration of dopaminergic terminals in the mouse striatum. We evaluated the effect of a toxic methamphetamine binge in female C57BL/6 mice (4 × 5 mg/kg, i.p., 2 h apart and modafinil co-administration (2 × 90 mg/kg, i.p., 1 h before the first and fourth methamphetamine injections on glial cells (microglia and astroglia. We also evaluated the striatal expression of the pro-apoptotic BAX and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins, which are known to mediate methamphetamine-induced apoptotic effects. Modafinil by itself did not cause reactive gliosis and counteracted methamphetamine-induced microglial and astroglial activation. Modafinil also counteracted the decrease in tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine transporter levels and prevented methamphetamine-induced increases in the pro-apoptotic BAX and decreases in the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein expression. Our results indicate that modafinil can interfere with methamphetamine actions and provide protection against dopamine toxicity, cell death, and neuroinflammation in the mouse striatum.

  4. Apoptotic cell-based therapies against transplant rejection: role of recipient’s dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larregina, Adriana T.

    2010-01-01

    One of the ultimate goals in transplantation is to develop novel therapeutic methods for induction of donor-specific tolerance to reduce the side effects caused by the generalized immunosuppression associated to the currently used pharmacologic regimens. Interaction or phagocytosis of cells in early apoptosis exerts potent anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects on antigen (Ag)-presenting cells (APC) like dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages. This observation led to the idea that apoptotic cell-based therapies could be employed to deliver donor-Ag in combination with regulatory signals to recipient’s APC as therapeutic approach to restrain the anti-donor response. This review describes the multiple mechanisms by which apoptotic cells down-modulate the immuno-stimulatory and pro-inflammatory functions of DC and macrophages, and the role of the interaction between apoptotic cells and APC in self-tolerance and in apoptotic cell-based therapies to prevent/treat allograft rejection and graft-versus-host disease in murine experimental systems and in humans. It also explores the role that in vivo-generated apoptotic cells could have in the beneficial effects of extracorporeal photopheresis, donor-specific transfusion, and tolerogenic DC-based therapies in transplantation. PMID:20140521

  5. Approaches to augment CAR T-cell therapy by targeting the apoptotic machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Hannah

    2016-04-15

    Chimaeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cells have shown impressive results in patients with B-cell leukaemia. Yet, in patients with lymphoma durable responses are still rare and heavy preconditioning required. Apoptosis resistance is considered a hallmark of cancer, often conveyed by a halted apoptosis signalling. Tumours regularly skew the balance of the components of the apoptotic machinery either through up-regulating anti-apoptotic proteins or silencing pro-apoptotic ones. Malignant B-cells frequently up-regulate anti-apoptotic B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) family proteins leading to therapy resistance. CAR T-cells kill tumour cells via apoptosis induction and their efficacy may be affected by the level of Bcl-2 family proteins. Hence, there is an interesting possibility to increase the effect of CAR T-cell therapy by combining it with apoptosis inhibitor blockade agents. Compounds that inhibit Bcl-2, B-cell lymphoma extra large (Bcl-xL) and Bcl-2-like protein 2 (Bcl-w), can restore execution of apoptosis in tumour cells or sensitize them to other apoptosis-dependent treatments. Hence, there is a great interest to combine such agents with CAR T-cell therapy to potentiate the effect of CAR T-cell killing. This review will focus on the potential of targeting the apoptotic machinery to sensitize tumour cells to CAR T-cell killing. PMID:27068942

  6. Attenuation of cisplatin-induced acute renal failure is associated with less apoptotic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, H; Miyaji, T; Kato, A; Fujigaki, Y; Sano, K; Hishida, A

    1999-12-01

    To clarify the pathophysiologic role of apoptosis in acute renal failure (ARF), we examined whether the attenuation of cisplatin-induced ARF is associated with the change in the degree of apoptotic cell death. The administration of cisplatin (CDDP) (6 mg/kg body weight) in rats induced ARF at day 5, as manifested by a significant increase in serum creatinine (Scr) and tubular damage. CDDP-induced apoptotic cell death was confirmed by electron microscopic examination, agarose gel electrophoresis, and increased cells positive for TaT-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling (TUNEL) in the outer medulla of the kidney. Treatment with dimethylthiourea (DMTU)--a scavenger of hydroxyl radicals--or glycine abrogated CDDP-induced increases in Scr, the tubular damage score, and the number of TUNEL-positive cells. Pretreatment with uranyl acetate (UA) induced a significant expression of Bcl-2 in the kidney and ameliorated CDDP-induced increases in Scr, the tubular damage score, and TUNEL-positive cells in the outer stripe of the outer medulla. Our findings indicate (1) that the attenuation of CDDP-induced ARF was associated with less apoptotic cell death and (2) that the induction of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 attenuated apoptosis and tubular damage. Our results suggest that apoptotic cell death may play an important role in the development of cisplatin-induced ARF. PMID:10595794

  7. Selection of apoptotic cell specific human antibodies from adult bone marrow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Grönwall

    Full Text Available Autoreactive antibodies that recognize neo-determinants on apoptotic cells in mice have been proposed to have protective, homeostatic and immunoregulatory properties, although our knowledge about the equivalent antibodies in humans has been much more limited. In the current study, human monoclonal antibodies with binding specificity for apoptotic cells were isolated from the bone marrow of healthy adults using phage display technology. These antibodies were shown to recognize phosphorylcholine (PC-associated neo-determinants. Interestingly, three of the four identified apoptotic cell-specific antibody clones were encoded by VH3 region rearrangements with germline or nearly germline configuration without evidence of somatic hypermutation. Importantly, the different identified antibody clones had diverse heavy chain CDR3 and deduced binding surfaces as suggested by structure modeling. This may suggest a potentially great heterogeneity in human antibodies recognizing PC-related epitopes on apoptotic cells. To re-construct the postulated structural format of the parental anti-PC antibody, the dominant clone was also expressed as a recombinant human polymeric IgM, which revealed a substantially increased binding reactivity, with dose-dependent and antigen-inhibitable binding of apoptotic cells. Our findings may have implication for improved prognostic testing and therapeutic interventions in human inflammatory disease.

  8. Role of membrane and cellular oxidative damage in gamma radiation induced apoptotic death in mouse thymocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Involvement of plasma membrane in the molecular mechanism of radiation-induced apoptotic death has increasingly been recognized by radiobiologists in the recent years. In present investigation, alterations in plasma membrane and the associated cytoplasmic / nuclear events were studied in apoptotic mouse thymocytes after gamma radiation exposure. The membrane oxidative damage in irradiated thymocytes was determined by thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS) method and change in membrane permeability was estimated employing fluorescein diacetate (FDA) as fluorescent probe. Radiation-induced apoptotic thymocytes showed an increase in membrane permeability as observed by leakage of FDA, while trypan blue failed to respond. Moreover, using fluorescence technique, the changes in thymocytes membrane permeability could be sensitively determined within low to moderate radiation doses (2 cGy to 2 Gy). The dose dependent increase in intra-cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was found in irradiated thymocytes determined by fluorescence method, which could sensitively detect the radiation exposure in sub cGy range. Radiation induced membrane changes were found correlated with induction of apoptotic death determined by annexin-V method, caspase-3 assay, measuring nuclear diameter using propidium iodide (PI) staining and DNA fragmentation by gel electrophoresis. It has been also shown that membrane associated events observed in radiation induced apoptotic thymocytes are prior to nuclear / cytosolic processes. The membrane lipid peroxidation, cellular oxidative damage and apoptosis in radiation treated thymocytes were significantly inhibited by membrane-localized antioxidants suggesting significant contribution of membrane damage and oxidative stress in radiation mediated apoptosis in thymocytes

  9. APOPTOTIC AND PROLIFERATIVE ACTIVITY IN OVARIAN BENIGN,BORDERLINE AND MALIGNANT TUMORS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘爱军; 陈乐真; 颜婉嫦; 邱玮璇; 赵昀; 张雅贤

    2002-01-01

    Objective.To determine the apoptotic and proliferative activities in various ovarian epithelial tumors.Methods.Formalin fixed,paraffin embedded tissues of 86 ovarian epithelial tumors,including 52 adenocarcinomas,23 borderline tumors and 11 cystadenomas,were retrieved.Apoptotic (AI) and proliferative (PI) index were estimated using the monoclonal antibodies: M30,Ki 67 and Ki S1 in these tumors.Quantitative assessment of AI and PI was estimated by calculating the percentage of positive cells among no less than 1000 tumor cells.Results.Statistically significant difference in AI was found between benign and borderline tumors or carcinomas (P=0.028,0.001,respectively).Significant differences in PI,as assessed by both Ki 67 and topo IIα,were demonstrated between carcinomas and benign or borderline tumors (both P< 0.001).Benign tumors had both low PI and AI; borderline tumors had lower PI but higher AI,while adenocarcinomas had both high proliferative and high apoptotic rates.Among borderline tumors,serous tumors had significantly lower AI and higher PI than mucinous ones.Conclusions.The results suggest that apoptotic and proliferative activities play important roles in the pathogenesis and development of ovarian borderline and malignant tumors.The high apoptotic rate in borderline tumor may explain its relatively indolent behavior while the high proliferative rate in carcinomas tends to explain its aggressive behavior.

  10. Magnetically responsive enzyme powders

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pospišková, K.; Šafařík, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 380, APR 2015 (2015), s. 197-200. ISSN 0304-8853 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD13021 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : enzyme powders * cross-linking * magnetic modification * magnetic separation * magnetic iron oxides particles * microwave-assisted synthesis Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.970, year: 2014

  11. Enzymes in Forest Soils

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Baldrian, Petr; Štursová, Martina

    Heidelberg, Dordrecht, NY: Springer, 2011 - (Shukla, G.; Varma, A.), s. 61-73 ISBN 978-3-642-14225-3 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/08/0751; GA MŠk OC08050 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : forest soils * soil ecology * enzymes Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  12. Enzymes of Saprotrophic Basidiomycetes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Baldrian, Petr

    Amsterdam: Academic Press, 2007, s. 19-41. ISBN 978-0-12-374185-1 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB600200516; GA ČR GA526/05/0168; GA MŠk LC06066 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : saprotrophic basidiomycetes * extracellular enzymes * polymers Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  13. Computational enzyme design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolon, Daniel N.

    2002-08-01

    The long-term objective of computational enzyme design is the ability to generate efficient protein catalysts for any chemical reaction. This thesis develops and experimentally validates a general computational approach for the design of enzymes with novel function. In order to include catalytic mechanism in protein design, a high-energy state (HES) rotamer (side chain representation) was constructed. In this rotamer, substrate atoms are in a HES. In addition, at least one amino acid side chain is positioned to interact favorably with substrate atoms in their HES and facilitate the reaction. Including an amino acid side chain in the HES rotamer automatically positions substrate relative to a protein scaffold and allows protein design algorithms to search for sequences capable of interacting favorably with the substrate. Because chemical similarity exists between the transition state and the high-energy state, optimizing the protein sequence to interact favorably with the HES rotamer should lead to transition state stabilization. In addition, the HES rotamer model focuses the subsequent computational active site design on a relevant phase space where an amino acid is capable of interacting in a catalytically active geometry with substrate. Using a HES rotamer model of the histidine mediated nucleophilic hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl acetate, the catalytically inert 108 residue E. coli thioredoxin as a scaffold, and the ORBIT protein design software to compute sequences, an active site scan identified two promising active site designs. Experimentally, both candidate ?protozymes? demonstrated catalytic activity significantly above background. In addition, the rate enhancement of one of these ?protozymes? was the same order of magnitude as the first catalytic antibodies. Because polar groups are frequently buried at enzyme-substrate interfaces, improved modeling of buried polar interactions may benefit enzyme design. By studying native protein structures, rules have been

  14. Structural study of TTR-52 reveals the mechanism by which a bridging molecule mediates apoptotic cell engulfment

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Yanyong; Zhao, Dongfeng; Liang, Huanhuan; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Qinwen; Wang, Xiaochen; Liu, Yingfang

    2012-01-01

    Apoptotic cells display various “eat me” signals that can be recognized through bridging molecules that cross-link the dying cells to phagocytes. This work illustrates the first full-length structure of such a bridging molecule, TTR-52. The study elucidates the binding of these bridging molecules with the apoptotic cell signals and phagocyte receptors, providing valuable new insight into the process of apoptotic cell recognition.

  15. Stimulation by pro-apoptotic valinomycin of cytosolic NADH/cytochrome c electron transport pathway-Effect of SH reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofrumento, Dario Domenico; La Piana, Gianluigi; Palmitessa, Valeria; Abbrescia, Daniela Isabel; Lofrumento, Nicola Elio

    2016-07-01

    Intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis are both characterised by the presence of cytochrome c (cyto-c) in the cytosol. We present data on the extra-mitochondrial NADH oxidation catalysed by exogenous (cytosolic) cyto-c, as a possible answer to the paradox of apoptosis being an energy-dependent program but characterized by the impairment of the respiratory chain. The reduction of molecular oxygen induced by the cytosolic NADH/cyto-c pathway is coupled to the generation of an electrochemical proton gradient available for ATP synthesis. Original findings show that SH reagents inhibit the NADH/cyto-c system with a conformational change mechanism. The mitochondrial integrity-test of sulfite oxidase unequivocally demonstrates that this enzyme (120kDa) can be released outside but exogenous cyto-c (12.5kDa) does not permeate into mitochondria. Valinomycin at 2nM stimulates both the energy-dependent reversible mitochondrial swelling and the NADH/cyto-c oxidation pathway. The pro-apoptotic activity of valinomycin, as well as to the dissipation of membrane potential, can be also ascribed to the increased activity of the NADH/cyto-c oxidation pathway useful as an additional source of energy for apoptosis. It can be speculated that the activation of the NADH/cyto-c system coupled to valinomycin-induced mitochondrial osmotic swelling may represent a strategy to activate apoptosis in confined solid tumours. PMID:27129925

  16. Anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects of Crataegus oxyacantha on isoproterenol-induced myocardial damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayan, Navin Alukkathara; Thiruchenduran, Mohana; Devaraj, Sivasitamparam Niranjali

    2012-08-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects of the alcoholic extract of the berries of Crataegus oxyacantha (AEC), a medicinal herb, on isoproterenol-induced myocardial infarction (MI) in a rat model. Three groups of Wistar albino rats, each comprising six animals, were selected for this study. Group I rats served as control. Group II rats were given isoproterenol (85 mg/kg body weight) subcutaneously on 59th and 60th days. Group III rats were given AEC (0.5 ml/100 g body weight/day), orally on a daily basis for 60 days, and isoproterenol (85 mg/kg body weight, subcutaneously) was given on 59th and 60th days. On the 61st day, the animals were sacrificed, and marker enzymes like lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase (CK) were estimated in serum. In the heart tissue sample, antioxidant status, lipid peroxidation and anti-inflammatory properties of AEC were determined. Isoproterenol significantly increased the release of LDH, CK in serum, decreased the antioxidant status in the heart along with an increase in lipid peroxidation. Nitritive stress and apoptosis were seen in isoproterenol-induced rat heart. Pre-treatment with the AEC for 60 days had a significant effect on all the above factors and maintained near normal status. The study confirms the protective effect of AEC against isoproterenol-induced inflammation and apoptosis-associated MI in rats. PMID:22350754

  17. Usefulness and Limitations of Energy Limited Escape: Titan and Other Planetary Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Robert E.; Volkov, Alexey N.; Tucker, Orenthal J.

    2015-11-01

    Because thermal conduction and IR cooling are inefficient heat transfer processes, adiabatic expansion leading to molecular escape is often the dominant cooling process for energy deposited in the upper atmosphere of planetary bodies. This led to the use of the energy-limited escape (EL) approximation in which the loss rate is roughly proportional to the heating rate, Q. In applying the EL approximation, it was also frequently assumed that the adiabatic expansion resulted in the gas outflow going sonic. Johnson et al. (2013) used molecular kinetic simulations of an atmosphere with a heated layer to show this was not necessarily the case and estimated a critical heating rate, Qc. For Q greater than ~Qc a sonic point formed below the exobase where the gas properties were collision dominated. As Q increased above ~Qc sonic escape was eventually limited by the energy and number fluxes from the below the heated layer. In that case, adiabatic cooling did dominate upper atmosphere cooling, but the escape rate did not increase with increasing Q as predicted by the EL model. Instead, the escape rate remained nearly constant and the energy per molecule carried off increased nearly monotonically with Q. For heating rates from about twice Qc to more than an order of magnitude lower, the molecular escape rate was well approximated by the energy limited rate, but the upper atmospheric structure could not be described by a fluid model with a sonic point and escape was Jeans-like although the Jeans expressions was often a poor approximation. That is, molecules escape from well below the nominal exobase and collisions remained important well above it (Tucker et al. 2009; 2013) resulting in enhanced-Jeans-like escape (Volkov et al. 2011a,b; Erwin et al. 2013). Here we give a new expression for the escape rate produced by adiabatic cooling and expansion of the upper atmosphere and apply it to atmospheric loss from an early Titan atmosphere and related atmospheres.Ref.: Erwin,J.T., et

  18. The 20S proteasome core, active within apoptotic exosome-like vesicles, induces autoantibody production and accelerates rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieudé, Mélanie; Bell, Christina; Turgeon, Julie; Beillevaire, Deborah; Pomerleau, Luc; Yang, Bing; Hamelin, Katia; Qi, Shijie; Pallet, Nicolas; Béland, Chanel; Dhahri, Wahiba; Cailhier, Jean-François; Rousseau, Matthieu; Duchez, Anne-Claire; Lévesque, Tania; Lau, Arthur; Rondeau, Christiane; Gingras, Diane; Muruve, Danie; Rivard, Alain; Cardinal, Héloise; Perreault, Claude; Desjardins, Michel; Boilard, Éric; Thibault, Pierre; Hébert, Marie-Josée

    2015-12-16

    Autoantibodies to components of apoptotic cells, such as anti-perlecan antibodies, contribute to rejection in organ transplant recipients. However, mechanisms of immunization to apoptotic components remain largely uncharacterized. We used large-scale proteomics, with validation by electron microscopy and biochemical methods, to compare the protein profiles of apoptotic bodies and apoptotic exosome-like vesicles, smaller extracellular vesicles released by endothelial cells downstream of caspase-3 activation. We identified apoptotic exosome-like vesicles as a central trigger for production of anti-perlecan antibodies and acceleration of rejection. Unlike apoptotic bodies, apoptotic exosome-like vesicles triggered the production of anti-perlecan antibodies in naïve mice and enhanced anti-perlecan antibody production and allograft inflammation in mice transplanted with an MHC (major histocompatibility complex)-incompatible aortic graft. The 20S proteasome core was active within apoptotic exosome-like vesicles and controlled their immunogenic activity. Finally, we showed that proteasome activity in circulating exosome-like vesicles increased after vascular injury in mice. These findings open new avenues for predicting and controlling maladaptive humoral responses to apoptotic cell components that enhance the risk of rejection after transplantation. PMID:26676607

  19. Proinflammatory cytokines activate the intrinsic apoptotic pathway in beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunnet, Lars G; Aikin, Reid; Tonnesen, Morten F;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Proinflammatory cytokines are cytotoxic to beta-cells and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes and islet graft failure. The importance of the intrinsic mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in cytokine-induced beta-cell death is unclear. Here, cytokine activation of the...... intrinsic apoptotic pathway and the role of the two proapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins, Bad and Bax, were examined in beta-cells. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Human and rat islets and INS-1 cells were exposed to a combination of proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1beta, interferon-gamma, and/or tumor necrosis...... factor-alpha). Activation of Bad was determined by Ser136 dephosphorylation, mitochondrial stress by changes in mitochondrial metabolic activity and cytochrome c release, downstream apoptotic signaling by activation of caspase-9 and -3, and DNA fragmentation. The inhibitors FK506 and V5 were used to...

  20. Expression of caspase-3 gene in apoptotic HL-60 cell and different human tumor cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To research the expression of caspase-3 gene in the apoptotic and the control HL-60 cells and in the different human tumor cell lines. Methods: Caspase-3 mRNA in the control and γ-radiation-induced apoptotic HL-60 cells, and in the 6 types of human tumor cell lines, was analysed by Northern blot. Results: The caspase-3 gene transcript was more highly expressed in leukemia cells HL-60, CEM, K562 and neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y than in cervical adenocarcinoma HeLa and breast carcinoma MCF7, and more highly in the radiation-induced apoptotic HL-60 than in the control HL-60 cells. Conclusion: The high level of expression of caspase-3 may aid the efforts to understand the tumor cell sensitivity to radiation, apoptosis and its inherent ability to survive

  1. Crosstalk between tumor suppressors p53 and PKCδ: Execution of the intrinsic apoptotic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashzeveg, Nurmaa; Yoshida, Kiyotsugu

    2016-07-28

    p53 and PKCδ are tumor suppressors that execute apoptotic mechanisms in response to various cellular stresses. p53 is a transcription factor that is frequently mutated in human cancers; it regulates apoptosis in transcription-dependent and -independent ways in response to genotoxic stresses. PKCδ is a serine/threonine protein kinase and mutated in human cancers. Available evidence shows that PKCδ activates p53 by direct and/or indirect mechanisms. Moreover, PKCδ is also implicated in the transcriptional regulation of p53 in response to DNA damage. Recent findings demonstrated that p53, in turn, binds onto the PKCδ promoter and induces its expression upon DNA damage to facilitate apoptosis. Both p53 and PKCδ are associated with the apoptotic mechanisms in the mitochondria by regulating Bcl-2 family proteins to provide mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization. This review discusses the crosstalk between p53 and PKCδ in the context of apoptotic cell death and cancer therapy. PMID:27130668

  2. Impaired clearance of apoptotic cells in chronic inflammatory diseases: therapeutic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsuzsa eSzondy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In healthy individuals billions of cells die by apoptosis every day. Removal of the dead cells by phagocytosis (a process called efferocytosis must be efficient to prevent secondary necrosis and the consequent release of proinflammatory cell contents that damages the tissue environment and provokes autoimmunity. In addition, detection and removal of apoptotic cells generally induces an anti-inflammatory response. As a consequence improper clearance of apoptotic cells, being the result of either genetic anomalies and /or a persistent disease state, contributes to the establishment and progression of a number of human chronic inflammatory diseases such as autoimmune and neurological disorders, inflammatory lung diseases, obesity, type 2 diabetes or atherosclerosis. During the past decade our knowledge about the mechanism of efferocytosis has significantly increased, providing therapeutic targets through which impaired phagocytosis of apoptotic cells and the consequent inflammation could be influenced in these diseases.

  3. Anti-apoptotic peptides protect against radiation-induced cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The risk of terrorist attacks utilizing either nuclear or radiological weapons has raised concerns about the current lack of effective radioprotectants. Here it is demonstrated that the BH4 peptide domain of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL can be delivered to cells by covalent attachment to the TAT peptide transduction domain (TAT-BH4) and provide protection in vitro and in vivo from radiation-induced apoptotic cell death. Isolated human lymphocytes treated with TAT-BH4 were protected against apoptosis following exposure to 15 Gy radiation. In mice exposed to 5 Gy radiation, TAT-BH4 treatment protected splenocytes and thymocytes from radiation-induced apoptotic cell death. Most importantly, in vivo radiation protection was observed in mice whether TAT-BH4 treatment was given prior to or after irradiation. Thus, by targeting steps within the apoptosis signaling pathway it is possible to develop post-exposure treatments to protect radio-sensitive tissues

  4. Anti-apoptotic signaling and failure of apoptosis in the ischemic rat hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Georg Johannes; Lassmann, Hans; Johansen, Flemming Fryd

    2007-01-01

    colchicine injection severed as a reference for classical apoptosis. Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein (NAIP) and manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) were upregulated in the majority of intact CA1 neurons paralleling the occurrence of CA1 neuronal death (days 3-7) as...... well as in a proportion of apoptosis-(<50%) and necrosis-like (<30%) CA1 neurons. Colchicine did not provoke an anti-apoptotic response in DGC at all. In addition, more than 70% of apoptosis- and necrosis-like CA1 neurons had completely lost their RCC subunits suggesting bioenergetic failure; by...... contrast, following colchicine injection, 88% of all apoptotic DGC presented RCC subunits. Thus, anti-apoptotic proteins may, in a subset of ischemic CA1 neurons, prevent cell death, while in others, affected by pronounced energy failure, they may cause secondary necrosis....

  5. Hippocampal expression of apoptotic protease activating factor-1 following diffuse axonal injury under mild hypothermia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Yang; Limin Zhang; Yunhe Zhang; Xifeng Zou; Qunxi Li; Yun Li; Jun Zhu; Jianmin Li; Aijun Fu; Qingjun Liu; Tong Chen; Zelin Sun; Zhiyong Zhang

    2011-01-01

    The influence of mild hypothermia on neural cell apoptosis remains poorly understood. Therefore, the present study established rat models of diffuse axonal injury (DAI) at 33 °C. Morris water maze results demonstrated significantly better learning and memory functions in DAI rats with hypothermia compared with DAI rats with normothermia. Expression of apoptotic protease activating factor-1 in the hippocampal CA1 region was significantly lower in the DAI hypothermia group compared with the DAI normothermia group. Expression of apoptotic protease activating factor-1 positively correlated with latency, but negatively correlated with platform location times and time of swimming in the quadrant area. Results suggested that post-traumatic mild hypothermia in a rat model of DAI could provide cerebral protection by attenuating expression of apoptotic protease activating factor-1.

  6. MAVEN Imaging UV Spectrograph Results on the Mars Atmosphere and Atmospheric Escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffin, Michael; Schneider, Nick; McClintock, Bill; Stewart, Ian; Deighan, Justin; Jain, Sonal; Clarke, John; Holsclaw, Greg; Montmessin, Franck; Lefevre, Franck; Chaufray, Jean-Yves; Stiepen, Arnaud; Crismani, Matteo; Mayyasi, Majd; Evans, Scott; Stevens, Mike; Yelle, Roger; Jakosky, Bruce

    2016-04-01

    The Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS) is one of nine science instruments aboard the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile and EvolutioN (MAVEN) spacecraft, whose payload is dedicated to exploring the upper atmosphere of Mars and understanding the magnitude and drivers of Mars' atmospheric escape rate. IUVS uses ultraviolet light to investigate the lower and upper atmosphere and ionosphere of Mars. The instrument is among the most powerful spectrographs sent to another planet, with several key capabilities: (1) separate Far-UV & Mid-UV channels for stray light control, (2) a high resolution echelle mode to resolve deuterium and hydrogen emission, (3) internal instrument pointing and scanning capabilities to allow complete mapping and nearly continuous operation, and (4) optimization for airglow studies. IUVS, along with other MAVEN instruments, obtains a comprehensive picture of the current state of the Mars upper atmosphere and ionosphere and the processes that control atmospheric escape. We present an overview of selected IUVS results, including (1) the discovery of diffuse aurora at Mars, and its contrast with previously detected discrete aurora localized near crustal magnetic fields; (2) widespread detection of mesospheric clouds; (3) Significant seasonal and short-timescale variability in thermospheric composition; (4) Global ozone maps spanning six months of seasonal evolution; and (5) mapping of the Mars H and O coronas, deriving the escape rates of H and O and their variability. This last is of particular importance for understanding the long term evolution of Mars and its atmosphere, with the observed preset escape of H potentially capable of removing a large fraction of Mars' initial water inventory, and the differential escape of O relative to H potentially providing a net source of oxidizing power to the atmosphere and planet at present, in contrast with a photochemical theory that predicts stoichiometrically balanced escape. The atmospheric and escape

  7. Temporal and ontogenetic variation in the escape response of Ameiva festiva (Squamata, Teiidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lattanzio

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Several factors have been shown to affect lizard escape behavior (flight initiation distance or FID, the distance between predator and prey when the prey initiates escape. Patterns of daily activity, such as foraging or movement behavior, vary with respect to time of day, supporting that escape responses may vary temporally as well. However, there remains scant information regarding the effects of time of day on FID. During peak activity, FID may decrease due to increased cost of giving up resources (e.g., prey or potential mates. An alternative hypothesis is that FID may increase because lizard activity in general may serve to alert a predator in advance of its approach. A lizard in this scenario may be favored to flee sooner rather than later. Moreover, juvenile and adult lizards of multiple species may differ in behavioral, ecological, and morphological traits that could influence escape decisions. I tested the effects of time of day (in 30-min intervals and age (juvenile or adult on the FID of a tropical whiptail lizard, Ameiva festiva in Costa Rica. I found that A. festiva escape responses varied with time of day such that in general, their FID decreased throughout the day. In addition, I observed a peak in FID from mid to late-morning that matches published estimates of peak activity times for A. festiva. Overall, juvenile A. festiva initiated an escape response sooner than adults, which may be related to differences in perceived risk associated with differences in size and predator experience between the two age groups. I conclude that escape responses may be contingent on both the activity level of the animal at the time of approach and its age.

  8. Comparative pick-up ion distributions at Mars and Venus: Consequences for atmospheric deposition and escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Shannon M.; Luhmann, Janet; Ma, Yingjuan; Liemohn, Michael; Dong, Chuanfei; Hara, Takuya

    2015-09-01

    Without the shielding of a substantial intrinsic dipole magnetic field, the atmospheres of Mars and Venus are particularly susceptible to similar atmospheric ion energization and scavenging processes. However, each planet has different attributes and external conditions controlling its high altitude planetary ion spatial and energy distributions. This paper describes analogous test particle simulations in background MHD fields that allow us to compare the properties and fates, precipitation or escape, of the mainly O+ atmospheric pick-up ions at Mars and Venus. The goal is to illustrate how atmospheric and planetary scales affect the upper atmospheres and space environments of our terrestrial planet neighbors. The results show the expected convection electric field-related hemispheric asymmetries in both precipitation and escape, where the degree of asymmetry at each planet is determined by the planetary scale and local interplanetary field strength. At Venus, the kinetic treatment of O+ reveals a strong nightside source of precipitation while Mars' crustal fields complicate the simple asymmetry in ion precipitation and drive a dayside source of precipitation. The pickup O+ escape pattern at both Venus and Mars exhibits low energy tailward escape, but Mars exhibits a prominent, high energy 'polar plume' feature in the hemisphere of the upward convection electric field while the Venus ion wake shows only a modest poleward concentration. The overall escape is larger at Venus than Mars (2.1 ×1025 and 4.3 ×1024 at solar maximum, respectively), but the efficiency (likelihood) of O+ escaping is 2-3 times higher at Mars. The consequences of these comparisons for pickup ion related atmospheric energy deposition, loss rates, and detection on spacecraft including PVO, VEX, MEX and MAVEN are considered. In particular, both O+ precipitation and escape show electric field controlled asymmetries that grow with energy, while the O+ fluxes and energy spectra at selected spatial

  9. Tributyltin induces apoptotic signaling in hepatocytes through pathways involving the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tri-n-butyltin is a widespread environmental toxicant, which accumulates in the liver. This study investigates whether tri-n-butyltin induces pro-apoptotic signaling in rat liver hepatocytes through pathways involving the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. Tri-n-butyltin activated the endoplasmic reticulum pathway of apoptosis, which was demonstrated by the activation of the protease calpain, its translocation to the plasma membrane, followed by cleavage of the calpain substrates, cytoskeletal protein vinculin, and caspase-12. Caspase-12 is localized to the cytoplasmic side of the endoplasmic reticulum and is involved in apoptosis mediated by the endoplasmic reticulum. Tri-n-butyltin also caused translocation of the pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and Bad from the cytosol to mitochondria, as well as changes in mitochondrial membrane permeability, events which can activate the mitochondrial death pathway. Tri-n-butyltin induced downstream apoptotic events in rat hepatocytes at the nuclear level, detected by chromatin condensation and by confocal microscopy using acridine orange. We investigated whether the tri-n-butyltin-induced pro-apoptotic events in hepatocytes could be linked to perturbation of intracellular calcium homeostasis, using confocal microscopy. Tri-n-butyltin caused changes in intracellular calcium distribution, which were similar to those induced by thapsigargin. Calcium was released from a subcellular compartment, which is likely to be the endoplasmic reticulum, into the cytosol. Cytosolic acidification, which is known to trigger apoptosis, also occurred and involved the Cl-/HCO3- exchanger. Pro-apoptotic events in hepatocytes were inhibited by the calcium chelator, Bapta-AM, and by a calpain inhibitor, which suggests that changes in intracellular calcium homeostasis are involved in tri-n-butyltin-induced apoptotic signaling in rat hepatocytes

  10. Indirect evaluation of corneal apoptosis in contact lens wearers by estimation of nitric oxide and antioxidant enzymes in tears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R P Bhatia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Contact lens induced trauma to the corneal epithelium results in increased release of inflammatory mediators. The keratocyte apoptosis is directly related to epithelial injury and has been correlated with increased production of nitric oxide. Potent antioxidant enzymes protect cells from oxidative damage by inactivating reactive oxygen species and thus inhibiting apoptosis. This study aims at determination of total nitric oxide and antioxidant enzymes in tears which will be an indirect criteria for assessing apoptosis. Materials and Methods : Nitric oxide and antioxidant enzymes were estimated in tears of 25 soft contact lens wearers and compared with 25 age and sex matched controls. Results : Statistically significant increase of nitric oxide (P< 0.001, superoxide dismutase (P< 0.001 and glutathione peroxidase (P< 0.001 levels was seen in tears of contact lens wearers as compared to controls. There was also statistically significant increase in the levels of antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (P< 0.05 and glutathione peroxidase (P< 0.01, with increase in the total duration of contact lens wear in years. Conclusions : Increase in the level of nitric oxide and antioxidant enzymes in tears of contact lens wearers suggested that contact lens wear suppresses the process of apoptosis. However, it was also postulated that the increased levels of nitric oxide balances the anti-apoptotic activities of increased levels of antioxidant enzymes by its pro-apoptotic activity leading to protective outcomes in contact lens wearers.

  11. Photocontrolled Exposure of Pro-apoptotic Peptide Sequences in LOV Proteins Modulates Bcl-2 Family Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mart, Robert J; Meah, Dilruba; Allemann, Rudolf K

    2016-04-15

    LOV domains act as biomolecular sensors for light, oxygen or the environment's redox potential. Conformational changes upon the formation of a covalent cysteinyl flavin adduct are propagated through hydrogen-bonding networks in the core of designed hybrid phototropin LOV2 domains that incorporate the Bcl homology region 3 (BH3) of the key pro-apoptotic protein BH3-interacting-domain death agonist (BID). The resulting change in conformation of a flanking amphiphilic α-helix creates a light-dependent optogenetic tool for the modulation of interactions with the anti-apoptotic B-cell leukaemia-2 (Bcl-2) family member Bcl-xL . PMID:26493687

  12. Anti-apoptotic signaling as a cytoprotective mechanism in mammalian hibernation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew N. Rouble

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In the context of normal cell turnover, apoptosis is a natural phenomenon involved in making essential life and death decisions. Apoptotic pathways balance signals which promote cell death (pro-apoptotic pathways or counteract these signals (anti-apoptotic pathways. We proposed that changes in anti-apoptotic proteins would occur during mammalian hibernation to aid cell preservation during prolonged torpor under cellular conditions that are highly injurious to most mammals (e.g. low body temperatures, ischemia. Immunoblotting was used to analyze the expression of proteins associated with pro-survival in six tissues of thirteen-lined ground squirrels, Ictidomys tridecemlineatus. The brain showed a concerted response to torpor with significant increases in the levels of all anti-apoptotic targets analyzed (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, BI-1, Mcl-1, cIAP1/2, xIAP as well as enhanced phosphorylation of Bcl-2 at S70 and T56. Heart responded similarly with most anti-apoptotic proteins elevated significantly during torpor except for Bcl-xL and xIAP that decreased and Mcl-1 that was unaltered. In liver, BI-1 increased whereas cIAP1/2 decreased. In kidney, there was an increase in BI-1, cIAP and xIAP but decreases in Bcl-xL and p-Bcl-2(T56 content. In brown adipose tissue, protein levels of BI-1, cIAP1/2, and xIAP decreased significantly during torpor (compared with euthermia whereas Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, Mcl-1 were unaltered; however, Bcl-2 showed enhanced phosphorylation at Thr56 but not at Ser70. In skeletal muscle, only xIAP levels changed significantly during torpor (an increase. The data show that anti-apoptotic pathways have organ-specific responses in hibernators with a prominent potential role in heart and brain where coordinated enhancement of anti-apoptotic proteins occurred in response to torpor.

  13. Cloning and sequencing of a DNA fragment encoding N37 apoptotic peptide derived from p53

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Objective It was reported that p53 apoptotic peptide (N37) could inhibit p73 gene through being bound with iASPP,which could induce tumor cell apoptosis. To further explore the function of N37,we constructed the cloning plasmid of DNA fragment encoding p53 (N37) apoptotic peptide by using DNA synthesis and molecular biology methods. Methods According to human p53 sequence from the GenBank database,the primer of p53(N37) gene was designed using Primer V7.0 software. The DNA fragment encoding p53 (N37) apopto...

  14. Synthesis of apoptotic chalcone analogues in HepG2 human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Cheon-Soo; Ahn, Yongchel; Lee, Dahae; Moon, Sung Won; Kim, Ki Hyun; Yamabe, Noriko; Hwang, Gwi Seo; Jang, Hyuk Jai; Lee, Heesu; Kang, Ki Sung; Lee, Jae Wook

    2015-12-15

    Eight chalcone analogues were prepared and evaluated for their cytotoxic effects in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. Compound 5 had a potent cytotoxic effect. The percentage of apoptotic cells was significantly higher in compound 5-treated cells than in control cells. Exposure to compound 5 for 24h induced cleavage of caspase-8 and -3, and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Our findings suggest that compound 5 is the active chalcone analogue that contributes to cell death in HepG2 cells via the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. PMID:26564263

  15. Amelioration of nandrolone decanoate-induced testicular and sperm toxicity in rats by taurine: Effects on steroidogenesis, redox and inflammatory cascades, and intrinsic apoptotic pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Maha A.E., E-mail: mahapharm@yahoo.com

    2015-02-01

    The wide abuse of the anabolic steroid nandrolone decanoate by athletes and adolescents for enhancement of sporting performance and physical appearance may be associated with testicular toxicity and infertility. On the other hand, taurine; a free β-amino acid with remarkable antioxidant activity, is used in taurine-enriched beverages to boost the muscular power of athletes. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of the possible protective effects of taurine on nandrolone decanoate-induced testicular and sperm toxicity in rats. To achieve this aim, male Wistar rats were randomly distributed into four groups and administered either vehicle, nandrolone decanoate (10 mg/kg/week, I.M.), taurine (100 mg/kg/day, p.o.) or combination of taurine and nandrolone decanoate, for 8 successive weeks. Results of the present study showed that taurine reversed nandrolone decanoate-induced perturbations in sperm characteristics, normalized serum testosterone level, and restored the activities of the key steroidogenic enzymes; 3β-HSD, and 17β-HSD. Moreover, taurine prevented nandrolone decanoate-induced testicular toxicity and DNA damage by virtue of its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic effects. This was evidenced by taurine-induced modulation of testicular LDH-x activity, redox markers (MDA, NO, GSH contents, and SOD activity), inflammatory indices (TNF-α, ICAM-1 levels, and MMP-9 gene expression), intrinsic apoptotic pathway (cytochrome c gene expression and caspase-3 content), and oxidative DNA damage markers (8-OHdG level and comet assay). In conclusion, at the biochemical and histological levels, taurine attenuated nandrolone decanoate-induced poor sperm quality and testicular toxicity in rats. - Highlights: • Nandrolone decanoate (ND) disrupts sperm profile and steroidogenesis in rats. • ND upregulates gene expression of inflammatory and apoptotic markers. • Taurine normalizes sperm profile and serum testosterone level

  16. Amelioration of nandrolone decanoate-induced testicular and sperm toxicity in rats by taurine: Effects on steroidogenesis, redox and inflammatory cascades, and intrinsic apoptotic pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The wide abuse of the anabolic steroid nandrolone decanoate by athletes and adolescents for enhancement of sporting performance and physical appearance may be associated with testicular toxicity and infertility. On the other hand, taurine; a free β-amino acid with remarkable antioxidant activity, is used in taurine-enriched beverages to boost the muscular power of athletes. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of the possible protective effects of taurine on nandrolone decanoate-induced testicular and sperm toxicity in rats. To achieve this aim, male Wistar rats were randomly distributed into four groups and administered either vehicle, nandrolone decanoate (10 mg/kg/week, I.M.), taurine (100 mg/kg/day, p.o.) or combination of taurine and nandrolone decanoate, for 8 successive weeks. Results of the present study showed that taurine reversed nandrolone decanoate-induced perturbations in sperm characteristics, normalized serum testosterone level, and restored the activities of the key steroidogenic enzymes; 3β-HSD, and 17β-HSD. Moreover, taurine prevented nandrolone decanoate-induced testicular toxicity and DNA damage by virtue of its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic effects. This was evidenced by taurine-induced modulation of testicular LDH-x activity, redox markers (MDA, NO, GSH contents, and SOD activity), inflammatory indices (TNF-α, ICAM-1 levels, and MMP-9 gene expression), intrinsic apoptotic pathway (cytochrome c gene expression and caspase-3 content), and oxidative DNA damage markers (8-OHdG level and comet assay). In conclusion, at the biochemical and histological levels, taurine attenuated nandrolone decanoate-induced poor sperm quality and testicular toxicity in rats. - Highlights: • Nandrolone decanoate (ND) disrupts sperm profile and steroidogenesis in rats. • ND upregulates gene expression of inflammatory and apoptotic markers. • Taurine normalizes sperm profile and serum testosterone level

  17. Nosema ceranae escapes fumagillin control in honey bees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Fone Huang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Fumagillin is the only antibiotic approved for control of nosema disease in honey bees and has been extensively used in United States apiculture for more than 50 years for control of Nosema apis. It is toxic to mammals and must be applied seasonally and with caution to avoid residues in honey. Fumagillin degrades or is diluted in hives over the foraging season, exposing bees and the microsporidia to declining concentrations of the drug. We showed that spore production by Nosema ceranae, an emerging microsporidian pathogen in honey bees, increased in response to declining fumagillin concentrations, up to 100% higher than that of infected bees that have not been exposed to fumagillin. N. apis spore production was also higher, although not significantly so. Fumagillin inhibits the enzyme methionine aminopeptidase2 (MetAP2 in eukaryotic cells and interferes with protein modifications necessary for normal cell function. We sequenced the MetAP2 gene for apid Nosema species and determined that, although susceptibility to fumagillin differs among species, there are no apparent differences in fumagillin binding sites. Protein assays of uninfected bees showed that fumagillin altered structural and metabolic proteins in honey bee midgut tissues at concentrations that do not suppress microsporidia reproduction. The microsporidia, particularly N. ceranae, are apparently released from the suppressive effects of fumagillin at concentrations that continue to impact honey bee physiology. The current application protocol for fumagillin may exacerbate N. ceranae infection rather than suppress it.

  18. Deubiquitylating enzymes and disease

    OpenAIRE

    Baker Rohan T; Taylor Matthew C; Singhal Shweta

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs) can hydrolyze a peptide, amide, ester or thiolester bond at the C-terminus of UBIQ (ubiquitin), including the post-translationally formed branched peptide bonds in mono- or multi-ubiquitylated conjugates. DUBs thus have the potential to regulate any UBIQ-mediated cellular process, the two best characterized being proteolysis and protein trafficking. Mammals contain some 80–90 DUBs in five different subfamilies, only a handful of which have been charac...

  19. Quorum quenching enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetzner, Susanne

    2015-05-10

    Bacteria use cell-to-cell communication systems based on chemical signal molecules to coordinate their behavior within the population. These quorum sensing systems are potential targets for antivirulence therapies, because many bacterial pathogens control the expression of virulence factors via quorum sensing networks. Since biofilm maturation is also usually influenced by quorum sensing, quenching these systems may contribute to combat biofouling. One possibility to interfere with quorum sensing is signal inactivation by enzymatic degradation or modification. Such quorum quenching enzymes are wide-spread in the bacterial world and have also been found in eukaryotes. Lactonases and acylases that hydrolyze N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) signaling molecules have been investigated most intensively, however, different oxidoreductases active toward AHLs or 2-alkyl-4(1H)-quinolone signals as well as other signal-converting enzymes have been described. Several approaches have been assessed which aim at alleviating virulence, or biofilm formation, by reducing the signal concentration in the bacterial environment. These involve the application or stimulation of signal-degrading bacteria as biocontrol agents in the protection of crop plants against soft-rot disease, the use of signal-degrading bacteria as probiotics in aquaculture, and the immobilization or entrapment of quorum quenching enzymes or bacteria to control biofouling in membrane bioreactors. While most approaches to use quorum quenching as antivirulence strategy are still in the research phase, the growing number of organisms and enzymes known to interfere with quorum sensing opens up new perspectives for the development of innovative antibacterial strategies. PMID:25220028

  20. IMF-induced escape of molecular ions from the Martian ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Kubota

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Since Mars does not possess a significant global intrinsic magnetic field, the solar wind interacts directly with the Martian ionosphere and can induce ion escapes from it. Phobos-2 and recent Mars Express (MEX observations have shown that the escaping ions are O+ as well as molecular O2+ and CO2+. While O+ escape can be understood by the ion pick-up of non-thermal O corona extended around the planet, regarding the heavy molecular O2+ and CO2+, which are buried in the lower ionosphere, a novel escape mechanism needs to considered. Here we attack this problem by global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD simulations. First, we clarify the global structure of the streamlines that result from the interaction with the solar wind. Then, by focusing on the streamlines that dip into the low-altitude part of the dayside ionosphere, we investigate the escape path of the molecular ions. The effects of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF on the molecular ion escape process are investigated by comparing the results with and without IMF. IMF has little effect on O+ escape via ion pick-up mediated by solar wind electron impact ionization of the O corona. O2+ and CO2+ are shoveled from the low-altitude regions of the dayside ionosphere by magnetic tension in the presence of IMF. These ions are pulled by the U-shaped field lines to the north and south poles, and at the terminator, they are concentrated in the noon–midnight meridian plane. These ions remain confined to the noon–midnight plane as they are transported to the nightside to form the tail ray. Then they escape along the streamlines open to the interplanetary space. Under a typical solar wind and IMF condition expected at Mars, O+, O2+ and CO2+ escape fluxes are 8.0 × 1023, 3.5 × 1023 and 5.0 × 1022 ion s−1, respectively, which are in good agreement with the MEX observations.

  1. PGC-1alpha is required for training-induced prevention of age-associated decline in mitochondrial enzymes in mouse skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leick, Lotte; Lyngby, Stine Secher; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen;

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that exercise training prevents an age-associated decline in skeletal muscle mitochondrial enzymes through a PGC-1alpha dependent mechanism. Whole body PGC-1alpha knock-out (KO) and littermate wildtype (WT) mice were submitted to long term...... addition, while CS activity and protein expression of cytc and SOD2 were 50-150% lower in skeletal muscle of PGC-1alpha mice than WT mice, the expression of the pro-apoptotic protein Bax and the anti-apoptotic Bcl2 was approximately 30% elevated in PGC-1alpha KO mice. In conclusion, the present findings...

  2. Approach To Deliver Two Antioxidant Enzymes with Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles into Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Hsuan; Chen, Yi-Ping; Liu, Tsang-Pai; Chien, Fan-Ching; Chou, Chih-Ming; Chen, Chien-Tsu; Mou, Chung-Yuan

    2016-07-20

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important factors in many clinical diseases. However, direct delivery of antioxidant enzymes into cells is difficult due to poor cell uptake. A proper design of delivery of enzymes by nanoparticles is very desirable for therapeutic purposes. To overcome the cell barrier problem, a designed mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN) system with attached TAT-fusion denatured enzyme for enhancing cell membrane penetration has been developed. Simultaneous delivery of two up-downstream antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase(GPx), reveals synergistic efficiency of ROS scavenging, compared to single antioxidant enzyme delivery. TAT peptide conjugation provided a facile nonendocytosis cell uptake and escape from endosome while moving and aggregating along the cytoskeleton that would allow them to be close to each other at the same time, resulting in the cellular antioxidation cascade reaction. The two-enzyme delivery shows a significant synergistic effect for protecting cells against ROS-induced cell damage and cell cycle arrest. The nanocarrier strategy for enzyme delivery demonstrates that intracellular anti-ROS cascade reactions could be regulated by multifunctional MSNs carrying image fluorophore and relevant antioxidation enzymes. PMID:27353012

  3. Evolutionary dynamics of viral escape under antibodies stress: A biophysical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chéron, Nicolas; Serohijos, Adrian W R; Choi, Jeong-Mo; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2016-07-01

    Viruses constantly face the selection pressure of antibodies, either from innate immune response of the host or from administered antibodies for treatment. We explore the interplay between the biophysical properties of viral proteins and the population and demographic variables in the viral escape. The demographic and population genetics aspect of the viral escape have been explored before; however one important assumption was the a priori distribution of fitness effects (DFE). Here, we relax this assumption by instead considering a realistic biophysics-based genotype-phenotype relationship for RNA viruses escaping antibodies stress. In this model the DFE is itself an evolvable property that depends on the genetic background (epistasis) and the distribution of biophysical effects of mutations, which is informed by biochemical experiments and theoretical calculations in protein engineering. We quantitatively explore in silico the viability of viral populations under antibodies pressure and derive the phase diagram that defines the fate of the virus population (extinction or escape from stress) in a range of viral mutation rates and antibodies concentrations. We find that viruses are most resistant to stress at an optimal mutation rate (OMR) determined by the competition between supply of beneficial mutation to facilitate escape from stressors and lethal mutagenesis caused by excess of destabilizing mutations. We then show the quantitative dependence of the OMR on genome length and viral burst size. We also recapitulate the experimental observation that viruses with longer genomes have smaller mutation rate per nucleotide. PMID:26939576

  4. The escape of ionising radiation from high-redshift dwarf galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Paardekooper, Jan-Pieter; Altay, Gabriel; Kruip, Chael

    2011-01-01

    The UV escape fraction from high-redshift galaxies plays a key role in models of cosmic reionisation. Because it is currently not possible to deduce the escape fractions during the epoch of reionisation from observations, we have to rely on numerical simulations. Our aim is to better constrain the escape fraction from high-redshift dwarf galaxies, as these are the most likely sources responsible for reionising the Universe. We employ a N-body/SPH method that includes realistic prescriptions for the physical processes that are important for the evolution of dwarf galaxies. These models are post-processed with radiative transfer to determine the escape fraction of ionising radiation. We perform a parameter study to assess the influence of the spin parameter, gas fraction and formation redshift of the galaxy and study the importance of numerical parameters as resolution, source distribution and local gas clearing. We find that the UV escape fraction from high-redshift dwarf galaxies that have formed a rotational...

  5. The Lyman Continuum Escape Fraction of Low-Mass Star-Forming Galaxies at z~1

    CERN Document Server

    Rutkowski, Michael J; Haardt, Francesco; Siana, Brian; Henry, Alaina; Rafelski, Marc; Hayes, Matthew; Salvato, Mara; Pahl, Anthony J; Mehta, Vihang; Beck, Melanie; Malkan, Matthew; Teplitz, Harry I

    2015-01-01

    To date no direct detection of Lyman continuum emission has been measured for intermediate--redshift z~1 star-forming galaxies . We combine HST grism spectroscopy with GALEX UV and ground--based optical imaging to extend the search for escaping Lyman continuum to a large (~600) sample of z~1 low-mass, moderately star-forming galaxies selected initially on H$\\alpha$ emission. The characteristic escape fraction of LyC from SFGs that populate this parameter space remains weakly constrained by previous surveys, but these faint SFGs are assumed to play a significant role in the reionization of neutral hydrogen in the intergalactic medium (IGM) at high redshift (z>6). We do not make an unambiguous detection of escaping LyC radiation from this $z\\sim1$ sample, individual non--detections to constrain the absolute Lyman continuum escape fraction, $f_{esc}$200\\AA), which are thought to be close analogs of high redshift sources of reionization. For reference, we also present an emissivity--weighted escape fraction which...

  6. Escape Distance in Ground-Nesting Birds Differs with Individual Level of Camouflage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Aggarwal, Jared K; Troscianko, Jolyon T; Stevens, Martin; Spottiswoode, Claire N

    2016-08-01

    Camouflage is one of the most widespread antipredator strategies in the animal kingdom, yet no animal can match its background perfectly in a complex environment. Therefore, selection should favor individuals that use information on how effective their camouflage is in their immediate habitat when responding to an approaching threat. In a field study of African ground-nesting birds (plovers, coursers, and nightjars), we tested the hypothesis that individuals adaptively modulate their escape behavior in relation to their degree of background matching. We used digital imaging and models of predator vision to quantify differences in color, luminance, and pattern between eggs and their background, as well as the plumage of incubating adult nightjars. We found that plovers and coursers showed greater escape distances when their eggs were a poorer pattern match to the background. Nightjars sit on their eggs until a potential threat is nearby, and, correspondingly, they showed greater escape distances when the pattern and color match of the incubating adult's plumage-rather than its eggs-was a poorer match to the background. Finally, escape distances were shorter in the middle of the day, suggesting that escape behavior is mediated by both camouflage and thermoregulation. PMID:27420787

  7. Fluctuating bottleneck model studies on kinetics of DNA escape from α-hemolysin nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Yukun; Wang, Zilin; Chen, Anpu; Zhao, Nanrong

    2015-11-14

    We have proposed a fluctuation bottleneck (FB) model to investigate the non-exponential kinetics of DNA escape from nanometer-scale pores. The basic idea is that the escape rate is proportional to the fluctuating cross-sectional area of DNA escape channel, the radius r of which undergoes a subdiffusion dynamics subjected to fractional Gaussian noise with power-law memory kernel. Such a FB model facilitates us to obtain the analytical result of the averaged survival probability as a function of time, which can be directly compared to experimental results. Particularly, we have applied our theory to address the escape kinetics of DNA through α-hemolysin nanopores. We find that our theoretical framework can reproduce the experimental results very well in the whole time range with quite reasonable estimation for the intrinsic parameters of the kinetics processes. We believe that FB model has caught some key features regarding the long time kinetics of DNA escape through a nanopore and it might provide a sound starting point to study much wider problems involving anomalous dynamics in confined fluctuating channels. PMID:26567685

  8. The First Billion Years Project: The escape fraction of ionising photons in the epoch of reionisation

    CERN Document Server

    Paardekooper, Jan-Pieter; Vecchia, Claudio Dalla

    2015-01-01

    Proto-galaxies forming in low-mass dark matter haloes are thought to provide the majority of ionising photons needed to reionise the Universe, due to their high escape fractions of ionising photons. We study how the escape fraction in high-redshift galaxies relates to the physical properties of the halo in which the galaxies form by computing escape fractions for 75801 haloes between redshifts 27 and 6 that were extracted from the FiBY project, high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamics simulations of galaxy formation. We find that the main constraint on the escape fraction is the presence of dense gas within 10 pc of the young sources that emit the majority of the ionising photons produced over the lifetime of the stellar population. This results in a strong mass dependence of the escape fraction. The lower potential well in haloes with virial mass below 10^8 solar mass results in lower column densities close to the sources that can be penetrated by the radiation from young, massive stars. In general only a ...

  9. The Escape of Ionizing Photons from OB Associations in Disk Galaxies Radiation Transfer Through Superbubbles

    CERN Document Server

    Dove, J B; Ferrara, A; Dove, James B.; Ferrara, Andrea

    1999-01-01

    By solving the time-dependent radiation transfer problem of stellar radiation through evolving superbubbles within a smoothly varying H I distribution, we have estimated the fraction of ionizing photons emitted by OB associations that escapes the H I disk of our Galaxy. We considered a coeval star-formation history and a Gaussian star-formation history with a time spread sigma_t = 2 Myr. We find that the shells of the expanding superbubbles quickly trap or attenuate the ionizing flux, such that most of the escaping radiation escapes shortly after the formation of the superbubble. Superbubbles of large associations can blowout of the H I disk and form dynamic chimneys, which allow the ionizing radiation directly to escape the H I disk. However, blowout occurs when the ionizing photon luminosity has dropped well below the association's maximum luminosity. For the coeval star-formation history, the fraction of photons that escape each side of the disk in the solar vicinity is f_esc approx 6% (the total fraction ...

  10. Fluctuating bottleneck model studies on kinetics of DNA escape from α-hemolysin nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Yukun; Wang, Zilin; Chen, Anpu; Zhao, Nanrong

    2015-11-01

    We have proposed a fluctuation bottleneck (FB) model to investigate the non-exponential kinetics of DNA escape from nanometer-scale pores. The basic idea is that the escape rate is proportional to the fluctuating cross-sectional area of DNA escape channel, the radius r of which undergoes a subdiffusion dynamics subjected to fractional Gaussian noise with power-law memory kernel. Such a FB model facilitates us to obtain the analytical result of the averaged survival probability as a function of time, which can be directly compared to experimental results. Particularly, we have applied our theory to address the escape kinetics of DNA through α-hemolysin nanopores. We find that our theoretical framework can reproduce the experimental results very well in the whole time range with quite reasonable estimation for the intrinsic parameters of the kinetics processes. We believe that FB model has caught some key features regarding the long time kinetics of DNA escape through a nanopore and it might provide a sound starting point to study much wider problems involving anomalous dynamics in confined fluctuating channels.

  11. Derepression of hTERT gene expression promotes escape from oncogene-induced cellular senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Priyanka L; Suram, Anitha; Mirani, Neena; Bischof, Oliver; Herbig, Utz

    2016-08-23

    Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) is a critical tumor-suppressing mechanism that restrains cancer progression at premalignant stages, in part by causing telomere dysfunction. Currently it is unknown whether this proliferative arrest presents a stable and therefore irreversible barrier to cancer progression. Here we demonstrate that cells frequently escape OIS induced by oncogenic H-Ras and B-Raf, after a prolonged period in the senescence arrested state. Cells that had escaped senescence displayed high oncogene expression levels, retained functional DNA damage responses, and acquired chromatin changes that promoted c-Myc-dependent expression of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase gene (hTERT). Telomerase was able to resolve existing telomeric DNA damage response foci and suppressed formation of new ones that were generated as a consequence of DNA replication stress and oncogenic signals. Inhibition of MAP kinase signaling, suppressing c-Myc expression, or inhibiting telomerase activity, caused telomere dysfunction and proliferative defects in cells that had escaped senescence, whereas ectopic expression of hTERT facilitated OIS escape. In human early neoplastic skin and breast tissue, hTERT expression was detected in cells that displayed features of senescence, suggesting that reactivation of telomerase expression in senescent cells is an early event during cancer progression in humans. Together, our data demonstrate that cells arrested in OIS retain the potential to escape senescence by mechanisms that involve derepression of hTERT expression. PMID:27503890

  12. Nifedipine treatment reduces resting calcium concentration, oxidative and apoptotic gene expression, and improves muscle function in dystrophic mdx mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Altamirano

    Full Text Available Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD is a recessive X-linked genetic disease, caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin. DMD is characterized in humans and in mdx mice by a severe and progressive destruction of muscle fibers, inflammation, oxidative/nitrosative stress, and cell death. In mdx muscle fibers, we have shown that basal ATP release is increased and that extracellular ATP stimulation is pro-apoptotic. In normal fibers, depolarization-induced ATP release is blocked by nifedipine, leading us to study the potential therapeutic effect of nifedipine in mdx muscles and its relation with extracellular ATP signaling. Acute exposure to nifedipine (10 µM decreased [Ca(2+]r, NF-κB activity and iNOS expression in mdx myotubes. In addition, 6-week-old mdx mice were treated with daily intraperitoneal injections of nifedipine, 1 mg/Kg for 1 week. This treatment lowered the [Ca(2+]r measured in vivo in the mdx vastus lateralis. We demonstrated that extracellular ATP levels were higher in adult mdx flexor digitorum brevis (FDB fibers and can be significantly reduced after 1 week of treatment with nifedipine. Interestingly, acute treatment of mdx FDB fibers with apyrase, an enzyme that completely degrades extracellular ATP to AMP, reduced [Ca(2+]r to a similar extent as was seen in FDB fibers after 1-week of nifedipine treatment. Moreover, we demonstrated that nifedipine treatment reduced mRNA levels of pro-oxidative/nitrosative (iNOS and gp91(phox/p47(phox NOX2 subunits and pro-apoptotic (Bax genes in mdx diaphragm muscles and lowered serum creatine kinase (CK levels. In addition, nifedipine treatment increased muscle strength assessed by the inverted grip-hanging test and exercise tolerance measured with forced swimming test in mdx mice. We hypothesize that nifedipine reduces basal ATP release, thereby decreasing purinergic receptor activation, which in turn reduces [Ca(2+]r in mdx skeletal muscle cells. The results in this work open new

  13. Enzyme linked immunoassay with stabilized polymer saccharide enzyme conjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callstrom, M.R.; Bednarski, M.D.; Gruber, P.R.

    1997-11-25

    An improvement in enzyme linked immunoassays is disclosed wherein the enzyme is in the form of a water soluble polymer saccharide conjugate which is stable in hostile environments. The conjugate comprises the enzyme which is linked to the polymer at multiple points through saccharide linker groups. 19 figs.

  14. Enzyme Molar Fractions: A Powerful Tool for Understanding Enzyme Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Juan L.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Deduces the relationship between reduced velocity and molar fractions for productive enzyme complexes; obtains the mathematical expression of molar fractions for an enzyme with two specific binding sites per molecule; and proposes a useful plot to follow the dependence of enzyme molar fractions with the concentration of one of its ligands. (JN)

  15. Eosinophil Granulocytes Account for Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase-Mediated Immune Escape in Human Non Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simonetta Astigiano

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO, a catabolizing enzyme of tryptophan, is supposed to play a role in tumor immune escape. Its expression in solid tumors has not yet been well elucidated: IDO can be expressed by the tumor cells themselves, or by ill-defined infiltrating cells, possibly depending on tumor type. We have investigated IDO expression in 25 cases of non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Using histochemistry and immunohistochemistry, we found that IDO was expressed not by tumor cells, but by normal cells infiltrating the peritumoral stroma. These cells were neither macrophages nor dendritic cells, and were identified as eosinophil granulocytes. The amount of IDO-positive eosinophils varied in different cases, ranging from a few cells to more than 50 per field at x200 magnification. IDO protein in NSCLC was enzymatically active. Therefore, at least in NSCLC cases displaying a large amount of these cells in the inflammatory infiltrate, IDO-positive eosinophils could exert an effective immunosuppressive action. On analyzing the 17 patients with adequate follow-up, a significant relationship was found between the amount of IDO-positive infiltrate and overall survival. This finding suggests that the degree of IDO-positive infiltrate could be a prognostic marker in NSCLC.

  16. A Case of Hepatitis B Reactivation due to the Hepatitis B Virus Escape Mutant in a Patient undergoing Chemotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunchen Wu; Hui Shi; Yun Wang; Mengji Lu; Yang Xu; Xinwen Chen

    2012-01-01

    A 62-year-old man had chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and was diagnosed with liver cirrhosis.At the time of diagnosis the patient's virologic markers were positive for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg),antibody to hepatitis B e antigen (anti-HBe) and antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc),while antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs) and HBV DNA were negative.Later the patient received chemotherapy for malignancy.However,this was interrupted due to elevated liver enzymes.At the same time HBV DNA became positive.Lamivudine (LMV) therapy was administered immediately.However,the levels of serum aminotransferase and total bilirubin (TB) were still rising.Finally the patient died of fulminant hepatic failure.A sequence revealed HBV genotype C (HBsAg subtype adw) with immune escape mutations,F8L,S34L,F41S,G44V,F93C,V96G,L110I,C149Y and F161Y.The high morbidity and mortality of this complication is one of the major obstacles to completing the standard treatment for malignancy in HBV carriers.Therefore,the relative risk of antiviral prophylactic failure should be further assessed and the optimal strategy for antiviral prophylaxis in HBsAg-positive patients with oncologic and hematologic malignancies undergoing chemotherapy should be revised.

  17. Treating Wastewater With Immobilized Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, Clifford D.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments show enzymes are immobilized on supporting materials to make biocatalyst beds for treatment of wastewater. With suitable combination of enzymes, concentrations of various inorganic and organic contaminants, including ammonia and urea, reduced significantly.

  18. CRISPR-Cas9 Can Inhibit HIV-1 Replication but NHEJ Repair Facilitates Virus Escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang; Zhao, Na; Berkhout, Ben; Das, Atze T

    2016-01-01

    Several recent studies demonstrated that the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated endonuclease Cas9 can be used for guide RNA (gRNA)-directed, sequence-specific cleavage of HIV proviral DNA in infected cells. We here demonstrate profound inhibition of HIV-1 replication by harnessing T cells with Cas9 and antiviral gRNAs. However, the virus rapidly and consistently escaped from this inhibition. Sequencing of the HIV-1 escape variants revealed nucleotide insertions, deletions, and substitutions around the Cas9/gRNA cleavage site that are typical for DNA repair by the nonhomologous end-joining pathway. We thus demonstrate the potency of CRISPR-Cas9 as an antiviral approach, but any therapeutic strategy should consider the viral escape implications. PMID:26796669

  19. The effect of transportation suit induced heat stress on helicopter underwater escape preparation and task performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taber, Michael J; Dies, Natalie F; Cheung, Stephen S

    2011-11-01

    Although essential in an emergency such as a helicopter ditching, mandatory survival suits worn by civilian personnel may lead to heat strain during a normal flight. To explore the possibility that wearing a helicopter transportation suit impairs emergency performance, 11 individuals completed underwater escape procedures immediately following a pre-recorded emergency announcement (randomly played between 50 and 90 min) in two ambient temperature conditions (Thermoneutral = 21 °C and Hot = 34 °C). Mean skin and rectal temperatures were recorded throughout the trials, while situation awareness and thermal sensation/comfort were recorded on completion of trials. Results indicate that although mean skin and rectal temperatures were significantly higher at the end of both trials, escape procedures were not impaired. It can therefore be concluded that although conditions inside an offshore transport helicopter are perceived as being hot and uncomfortable, no deficits in escape performance should be expected in the first 90 min of flight. PMID:21439548

  20. Role of Energy Exchange in the Deterministic Escape of a Coupled Nonlinear Oscillator Chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider the deterministic escape of a chain of harmonically coupled units from a metastable state over a cubic potential barrier. The underlying dynamics is conservative and noise-free. The supply of a sufficient total energy transforms the chain into the nonlinear regime from which an initially, nearly uniform lattice configuration becomes unstable, yielding a redistribution of energy. In an early stage of the dynamics, we estimate the degree of energy exchange enabling the coupled system to form strongly localized modes which eventually grow into a critical nucleus. Upon passing this transition state, the nonlinear chain performs a collective, deterministic escape. We analyze the associated nonlinear dynamics in phase space and relate the escape to diffusion in a separatrix layer. (author)

  1. Precipitation of Energetic Neutral Atoms and Induced Non-Thermal Escape Fluxes from the Martian Atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Lewkow, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    The precipitation of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs), produced through charge exchange (CX) collisions between solar wind (SW) ions and thermal atmospheric gases, is investigated. Subsequent induced non-thermal escape fluxes have been carried out for the Martian atmosphere. Detailed modeling of the ENA energy input and determination of connections between parameters of precipitating ENAs and resulting escape fluxes, reflection coefficients of fast atoms from the Mars atmosphere, and altitude dependent ENA energy distributions are established using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the precipitation process with accurate quantum mechanical (QM) cross sections. Detailed descriptions of secondary hot (SH) atoms and molecules induced by ENAs have been obtained for a better understanding of the mechanisms responsible for atmospheric escape and evolution. The effects of using isotropic hard sphere (HS) cross sections as compared to realistic, anisotropic quantum cross sections are examined for energy-deposition profil...

  2. Mitotic cells contract actomyosin cortex and generate pressure to round against or escape epithelial confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorce, Barbara; Escobedo, Carlos; Toyoda, Yusuke; Stewart, Martin P.; Cattin, Cedric J.; Newton, Richard; Banerjee, Indranil; Stettler, Alexander; Roska, Botond; Eaton, Suzanne; Hyman, Anthony A.; Hierlemann, Andreas; Müller, Daniel J.

    2015-11-01

    Little is known about how mitotic cells round against epithelial confinement. Here, we engineer micropillar arrays that subject cells to lateral mechanical confinement similar to that experienced in epithelia. If generating sufficient force to deform the pillars, rounding epithelial (MDCK) cells can create space to divide. However, if mitotic cells cannot create sufficient space, their rounding force, which is generated by actomyosin contraction and hydrostatic pressure, pushes the cell out of confinement. After conducting mitosis in an unperturbed manner, both daughter cells return to the confinement of the pillars. Cells that cannot round against nor escape confinement cannot orient their mitotic spindles and more likely undergo apoptosis. The results highlight how spatially constrained epithelial cells prepare for mitosis: either they are strong enough to round up or they must escape. The ability to escape from confinement and reintegrate after mitosis appears to be a basic property of epithelial cells.

  3. European policymaking on the tobacco advertising ban: the importance of escape routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamini, Sandra; Versluis, Esther; Maarse, Hans

    2011-01-01

    This article analyses the European Union policymaking process regarding tobacco advertising. While others already highlighted the importance of intergovernmental bargaining between member states to explain the outcome of the tobacco advertising case, the main aim of this article is to identify the use of escape routes by the Commission, the European Parliament, the Council and interest groups that played an important role in overcoming the deadlock. When looking at the different institutions that structure policymaking, we argue that indeed focusing on escape routes provides a clear insight in the process and in what strategies were necessary to 'make Europe work'. In the end, it appears to be a combination of escape routes that resulted in the final decision. PMID:20199714

  4. The diurnal and solar cycle variation of the charge exchange induced hydrogen escape flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, L. J.; Tinsley, B. A.

    1978-01-01

    On the basis of ion temperature and density data at specific points and times in June 1969 provided by the OGO 6 satellite, and altitude profiles of the ion and electron temperature and concentration provided by the Arecibo radar facility over the period February 1972-April 1974, the diurnal and solar cycle variation of the charge-exchange-induced hydrogen escape flux was investigated. It was calculated that for low to moderate solar activity at Arecibo, the diurnal ratio of the maximum-to-minimum charge-exchange-induced hydrogen escape flux was approximately 6 with a peak around noon and a minimum somewhere between 0100 and 0300 h LT. This study of a limited amount of OGO 6 and Arecibo data seems to indicate that the charge-exchange-induced hydrogen escape flux increases as the F(10.7) flux increases for low to moderate solar activity.

  5. Escape and collision dynamics in the planar equilateral restricted four-body problem

    CERN Document Server

    Zotos, Euaggelos E

    2016-01-01

    We consider the planar circular equilateral restricted four body-problem where a test particle of infinitesimal mass is moving under the gravitational attraction of three primary bodies which move on circular orbits around their common center of gravity, such that their configuration is always an equilateral triangle. The case where all three primaries have equal masses is numerically investigated. A thorough numerical analysis takes place in the configuration $(x,y)$ as well as in the $(x,C)$ space in which we classify initial conditions of orbits into four main categories: (i) bounded regular orbits, (ii) trapped chaotic orbits, (iii) escaping orbits and (iv) collision orbits. Interpreting the collision motion as leaking in the phase space we related our results to both chaotic scattering and the theory of leaking Hamiltonian systems. We successfully located the escape and the collision basins and we managed to correlate them with the corresponding escape and collision times of orbits. We hope our contribut...

  6. The great escape: the role of self-esteem and self-related cognition in terror management

    OpenAIRE

    Wisman, Arnaud; Heflick, Nathan A; Goldenberg, Jamie L.

    2015-01-01

    Integrating terror management theory and objective self-awareness theory, we propose the existential escape hypothesis, which states that people with low self-esteem should be especially prone to escaping self-awareness as a distal response to thoughts of death. This is because they lack the means to bolster the self as a defense, and the propensity to bolster the self reduces the motivation to escape from self-awareness. Five studies supported this hypothesis. Individuals low,...

  7. Gingerol sensitizes TRAIL-induced apoptotic cell death of glioblastoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dae-Hee, E-mail: leedneo@gmail.com [Departments of Surgery and Pharmacology and Cell Biology, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Kim, Dong-Wook [Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Cancer Biology, University of VA (United States); Jung, Chang-Hwa [Division of Metabolism and Functionality Research, Korea Food Research Institute (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yong J. [Departments of Surgery and Pharmacology and Cell Biology, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Park, Daeho, E-mail: daehopark@gist.ac.kr [School of Life Sciences, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most lethal and aggressive astrocytoma of primary brain tumors in adults. Although there are many clinical trials to induce the cell death of glioblastoma cells, most glioblastoma cells have been reported to be resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Here, we showed that gingerol as a major component of ginger can induce TRAIL-mediated apoptosis of glioblastoma. Gingerol increased death receptor (DR) 5 levels in a p53-dependent manner. Furthermore, gingerol decreased the expression level of anti-apoptotic proteins (survivin, c-FLIP, Bcl-2, and XIAP) and increased pro-apoptotic protein, Bax and truncate Bid, by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). We also found that the sensitizing effects of gingerol in TRAIL-induced cell death were blocked by scavenging ROS or overexpressing anti-apoptotic protein (Bcl-2). Therefore, we showed the functions of gingerol as a sensitizing agent to induce cell death of TRAIL-resistant glioblastoma cells. This study gives rise to the possibility of applying gingerol as an anti-tumor agent that can be used for the purpose of combination treatment with TRAIL in TRAIL-resistant glioblastoma tumor therapy. - Highlights: • Most GBM cells have been reported to be resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. • Gingerol enhances the expression level of anti-apoptotic proteins by ROS. • Gingerol enhances TRAIL-induced apoptosis through actions on the ROS–Bcl2 pathway.

  8. Cloning and analysis of a defender against apoptotic cell death (DAD1) homologue from tomato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeberichts, F.A.; Woltering, E.J.

    2001-01-01

    A cDNA clone homologous to the human defender against apoptotic cell death (DAD1) gene, which is believed to be a conserved inhibitor of programmed cell death, was isolated from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum cv. Prisca). The 351 basepairs open reading frame predicted a 116 amino acid protein seque

  9. Investigation of apoptotic events at molecular level induced by SERS guided targeted theranostic nanoprobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Nisha; Nair, Lakshmi V; Karunakaran, Varsha; Joseph, Manu M; Nair, Jyothi B; N, Ramya A; Jayasree, Ramapurath S; Maiti, Kaustabh Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Herein, we have examined distinctive structural and functional variations of cellular components during apoptotic cell death induced by a targeted theranostic nanoprobe, MMP-SQ@GNR@LAH-DOX, which acted as a SERS "on/off" probe in the presence of a MMP protease and executed synergistic photothermal chemotherapy, as reflected by the SERS fingerprinting, corresponding to the phosphodiester backbone of DNA. PMID:27211810

  10. Gingerol sensitizes TRAIL-induced apoptotic cell death of glioblastoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most lethal and aggressive astrocytoma of primary brain tumors in adults. Although there are many clinical trials to induce the cell death of glioblastoma cells, most glioblastoma cells have been reported to be resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Here, we showed that gingerol as a major component of ginger can induce TRAIL-mediated apoptosis of glioblastoma. Gingerol increased death receptor (DR) 5 levels in a p53-dependent manner. Furthermore, gingerol decreased the expression level of anti-apoptotic proteins (survivin, c-FLIP, Bcl-2, and XIAP) and increased pro-apoptotic protein, Bax and truncate Bid, by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). We also found that the sensitizing effects of gingerol in TRAIL-induced cell death were blocked by scavenging ROS or overexpressing anti-apoptotic protein (Bcl-2). Therefore, we showed the functions of gingerol as a sensitizing agent to induce cell death of TRAIL-resistant glioblastoma cells. This study gives rise to the possibility of applying gingerol as an anti-tumor agent that can be used for the purpose of combination treatment with TRAIL in TRAIL-resistant glioblastoma tumor therapy. - Highlights: • Most GBM cells have been reported to be resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. • Gingerol enhances the expression level of anti-apoptotic proteins by ROS. • Gingerol enhances TRAIL-induced apoptosis through actions on the ROS–Bcl2 pathway

  11. Skeletal muscle stem cells express anti-apoptotic ErbB receptors during activation from quiescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To be effective for tissue repair, satellite cells (the stem cells of adult muscle) must survive the initial activation from quiescence. Using an in vitro model of satellite cell activation, we show that erbB1, erbB2 and erbB3, members of the EGF receptor tyrosine kinase family, appear on satellite cells within 6 h of activation. We show that signalling via erbB2 provides an anti-apoptotic survival mechanism for satellite cells during the first 24 h, as they progress to a proliferative state. Inhibition of erbB2 signalling with AG825 reduced satellite cell numbers, concomitant with elevated caspase-8 activation and TUNEL labelling of apoptotic satellite cells. In serum-free conditions, satellite cell apoptosis could be largely prevented by a mixture of erbB1, erbB3 and erbB4 ligand growth factors, but not by neuregulin alone (erbB3/erbB4 ligand). Furthermore, using inhibitors specific to discrete intracellular signalling pathways, we identify MEK as a pro-apoptotic mediator, and the erbB-regulated factor STAT3 as an anti-apoptotic mediator during satellite cell activation. These results implicate erbB2 signalling in the preservation of a full compliment of satellite cells as they activate in the context of a damaged muscle

  12. Reversal of Apoptotic Resistance by Lycium barbarum Glycopeptide 3 in Aged T Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONG-GUO YUAN; HONG-BIN DENG; LI-HUI CHEN; DIAN-DONG LI; QI-YANG HE

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study whether Lycium barbarian glycopeptide 3 (LBGP3) affects T cell apeptosis in aged mice. Methods LBGP3 was purified with DEAE cellulose and Sephadex columns. Apoptotic "sub-Gl peak" was detected by flow cytometry and DNA ladder was resolved by agarose gel electrophoresis. Levels of IFN-γ, and IL-10 were measured with specific kits and mRNA expression was detected by RT-PCR. Apoptosis-related proteins of FLIP, FasL, and Bcl-2 were determined by Western blotting. Resdts LBGP3 was purified from Fructus Lycii water extracts and identified as a 41 kD glycopeptide.Treatment with 200 μg/mL LBGP3 increased the apoptotic rate of T cells from aged mice and showed a similar DNA ladder pattern to that in young T ceils. The reversal of apoptotic resistance was involved in down-regulating the expression of Bcl-2 and FLIP, and up-regulating the expression of FasL. Conclusion Lycium barbarum glycopeptide 3 reverses apoptotic resistance of aged T cells by modulating the expression of apoptosis-related molecules.

  13. Expression of defender against apoptotic death (DAD-1) in iris and dianthus petals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kop, van der D.A.M.; Ruys, G.; Dees, D.; Schoot, van der C.; Boer, de A.D.; Doorn, van W.G.

    2003-01-01

    The gene defender against apoptotic death (DAD-1) prevents programmed cell death in animal cells. We investigated the expression pattern of DAD-1 in petals of iris (Iris x hollandica cv. Blue Magic) and carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus cv. Etarro). DAD-1 expression in Iris petals was strongly reduce

  14. Relationship between apoptotic markers in semen from fertile men and demographic, hormonal and seminal characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O Specht, Ina; Spanò, Marcello; S Hougaard, Karin; C Manicardi, Gian; Bizzaro, Davide; Toft, Gunnar; Giwercman, Aleksander; E Bonde, Jens-Peter

    2012-01-01

    World Health Organization. Immunofluorescence coupled to flow cytometry was utilized for detection of apoptotic markers in the sperm cell. DNA damage was assessed by flow cytometry using both the sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA) and the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labelling...

  15. Unexpected requirement for ELMO1 in clearance of apoptotic germ cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Michael R; Zheng, Shuqiu; Park, Daeho; Woodson, Robin I; Reardon, Michael A; Juncadella, Ignacio J; Kinchen, Jason M; Zhang, Jun; Lysiak, Jeffrey J; Ravichandran, Kodi S

    2010-09-16

    Apoptosis and the subsequent clearance of dying cells occurs throughout development and adult life in many tissues. Failure to promptly clear apoptotic cells has been linked to many diseases. ELMO1 is an evolutionarily conserved cytoplasmic engulfment protein that functions downstream of the phosphatidylserine receptor BAI1, and, along with DOCK1 and the GTPase RAC1, promotes internalization of the dying cells. Here we report the generation of ELMO1-deficient mice, which we found to be unexpectedly viable and grossly normal. However, they had a striking testicular pathology, with disrupted seminiferous epithelium, multinucleated giant cells, uncleared apoptotic germ cells and decreased sperm output. Subsequent in vitro and in vivo analyses revealed a crucial role for ELMO1 in the phagocytic clearance of apoptotic germ cells by Sertoli cells lining the seminiferous epithelium. The engulfment receptor BAI1 and RAC1 (upstream and downstream of ELMO1, respectively) were also important for Sertoli-cell-mediated engulfment. Collectively, these findings uncover a selective requirement for ELMO1 in Sertoli-cell-mediated removal of apoptotic germ cells and make a compelling case for a relationship between engulfment and tissue homeostasis in vivo. PMID:20844538

  16. Cytotoxicity and apoptotic effects of nickel oxide nanoparticles in cultured HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to observe the cytotoxicity and apoptotic effects of nickel oxide nanoparticles on human cervix epithelioid carcinoma cell line (HeLa). Nickel oxide precursors were synthesized by an nickel sulphate-excess urea reaction in boiling aqueous solution. The synthesized NiO nanoparticles (< 200 nm) were investigated by X-ray diffraction analysis and transmission electron microscopy techniques. For cytotoxicity experiments, HeLa cells were incubated in 50-500 micro g/ml NiO for 2, 6, 12 and 16 hours. The viable cells were counted with a haemacytometer using light microscopy. The cytotoxicity was observed low in 50-200 micro g/ml concentration for 16 h, but high in 400-500 micro g/ml concentration for 2-6 h. HeLa cells cytoplasm membrane was lysed and detached from the well surface in 400 micro g/ml concentration NiO nanoparticles. Double staining and M30 immunostaining were performed to quantify the number of apoptotic cells in culture on the basis of apoptotic cell nuclei scores. The apoptotic effect was observed 20% for 16 h incubation. (authors)

  17. Antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects of Uncaria tomentosa in human medullary thyroid carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinner, Beate; Li, Zeng Xia; Haas, Helga; Siegl, Veronika; Sturm, Sonja; Stuppner, Hermann; Pfragner, Roswitha

    2009-11-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), a rare calcitonin-producing tumor, is derived from parafollicular C-cells of the thyroid and is characterized by constitutive Bcl-2 overexpression. The tumor is relatively insensitive to radiation therapy as well as conventional chemotherapy. To date, the only curative treatment is the early and complete surgical removal of all neoplastic tissue. In this study, the antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects of fractions obtained from Uncaria tomentosa (Willd.) DC, commonly known as uña de gato or cat's claw were investigated. Cell growth of MTC cells as well as enzymatic activity of mitochondrial dehydrogenase was markedly inhibited after treatment with different fractions of the plant. Furthermore, there was an increase in the expressions of caspase-3 and -7 and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) fraction, while bcl-2 overexpression remained constant. In particular, the alkaloids isopterpodine and pteropodine of U. tomentosa exhibited a significant pro-apoptotic effect on MTC cells, whereas the alkaloid-poor fraction inhibited cell proliferation but did not show any pro-apoptotic effects. These promising results indicate the growth-restraining and apoptotic potential of plant extracts against neuroendocrine tumors, which may add to existing therapies for cancer. PMID:20032400

  18. Boolean model of Yeast Apoptosis as a tool to study yeast and human apoptotic regulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MarijaCvijovic

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Programmed cell death (PCD is an essential cellular mechanism that is evolutionary conserved, mediated through various pathways and acts by integrating different stimuli. Many diseases such as neurodegenerative diseases and cancers are found to be caused by, or associated with, regulations in the cell death pathways. Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is a unicellular eukaryotic organism that shares with human cells components and pathways of the PCD and is therefore used as a model organism. Boolean modelling is becoming promising approach to capture qualitative behaviour and describe essential properties of such complex networks. Here we present large literature-based and to our knowledge first Boolean model that combines pathways leading to apoptosis (a type of PCD in yeast. Analysis of the yeast model confirmed experimental findings of anti-apoptotic role of Bir1p and pro-apoptotic role of Stm1p and revealed activation of the stress protein kinase Hog proposing the maximal level of activation upon heat stress. In addition we extended the yeast model and created an in silico humanized yeast in which human pro- and anti-apoptotic regulators Bcl-2 family and Valosin-contain protein (VCP are included in the model. We showed that accumulation of Bax in in silico humanized yeast shows apoptotic markers and that VCP is essential target of Akt Signaling. The presented Boolean model provides comprehensive description of yeast apoptosis network behaviour. Extended model of humanized yeast gives new insights of how complex human disease like neurodegenration can initially be tested.

  19. Cytotoxicity and apoptotic effects of nickel oxide nanoparticles in cultured HeLa cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kezban Ada

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to observe the cytotoxicity and apoptotic effects of nickel oxide nanoparticles on humancervix epithelioid carcinoma cell line (HeLa. Nickel oxide precursors were synthesized by an nickel sulphate-excess ureareaction in boiling aqueous solution. The synthesized NiO nanoparticles (<200 nm were investigated by X-ray diffractionanalysis and transmission electron microscopy techniques. For cytotoxicity experiments, HeLa cells were incubated in50-500 μg/mL NiO for 2, 6, 12 and 16 hours. The viable cells were counted with a haemacytometer using light microscopy.The cytotoxicity was observed low in 50-200 μg/mL concentration for 16 h, but high in 400-500 μg/mL concentration for2-6 h. HeLa cells' cytoplasm membrane was lysed and detached from the well surface in 400 μg/mL concentration NiOnanoparticles. Double staining and M30 immunostaining were performed to quantify the number of apoptotic cells in cultureon the basis of apoptotic cell nuclei scores. The apoptotic effect was observed 20% for 16 h incubation.

  20. The calcimimetic R-568 induces apoptotic cell death in prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Guangming

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased serum level of parathyroid hormone (PTH was found in metastatic prostate cancers. Calcimimetic R-568 was reported to reduce PTH expression, to suppress cell proliferation and to induce apoptosis in parathyroid cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of R-568 on cellular survival of prostate cancer cells. Methods Prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP and PC-3 were used in this study. Cellular survival was determined with MTT, trypan blue exclusion and fluorescent Live/Death assays. Western blot assay was utilized to assess apoptotic events induced by R-568 treatment. JC-1 staining was used to evaluate mitochondrial membrane potential. Results In cultured prostate cancer LNCaP and PC-3 cells, R-568 treatment significantly reduced cellular survival in a dose- and time-dependent manner. R-568-induced cell death was an apoptotic event, as evidenced by caspase-3 processing and PARP cleavage, as well as JC-1 color change in mitochondria. Knocking down calcium sensing receptor (CaSR significantly reduced R-568-induced cytotoxicity. Enforced expression of Bcl-xL gene abolished R-568-induced cell death, while loss of Bcl-xL expression led to increased cell death in R-568-treated LNCaP cells,. Conclusion Taken together, our data demonstrated that calcimimetic R-568 triggers an intrinsic mitochondria-related apoptotic pathway, which is dependent on the CaSR and is modulated by Bcl-xL anti-apoptotic pathway.

  1. ImmunoPET imaging of phosphatidylserine in pro-apoptotic therapy treated tumor models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An immunoPET imaging probe for the detection of phosphatidylserine was developed and tested in animal models of human cancer treated with pro-apoptotic therapy. We hypothesized that the relatively long plasma half-life of a probe based on a full-length antibody coupled with a residualizing radionuclide would be able to catch the wave of drug-induced apoptosis and lead to a specific accumulation in apoptotic tumor tissue. Methods: The imaging probe is based on a 89Zr-labeled monoclonal antibody PGN635 targeting phosphatidylserine. The probe was evaluated pre-clinically in four tumor xenograft models: one studied treatment with paclitaxel to trigger the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, and three others interrogated treatment with an agonistic death-receptor monoclonal antibody to engage the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. Results: High accumulation of 89Zr-PGN635 was observed in treated tumors undergoing apoptosis reaching 30 %ID/g and tumor-to-blood ratios up to 13. The tumor uptake in control groups treated with vehicle or imaged with a non-binding antibody probe was significantly lower. Conclusions: The results demonstrate the ability of 89Zr-PGN635 to image drug-induced apoptosis in animal models and corroborate our hypothesis that radiolabeled antibodies binding to intracellular targets transiently exposed on the cell surface during apoptosis can be employed for detection of tumor response to therapy.

  2. Caspase dependent apoptotic inhibition of melanoma and lung cancer cells by tropical Rubus extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Blassan Plackal Adimuriyil; Abrahamse, Heidi; Hemmaragala, Nanjundaswamy M

    2016-05-01

    Rubus fairholmianus Gard. inhibits human melanoma (A375) and lung cancer (A549) cell growth by the caspase dependent apoptotic pathway. Herbal products have a long history of clinical use and acceptance. They are freely available natural compounds that can be safely used to prevent various ailments. The plants and plant derived products became the basis of traditional medicine system throughout the world for thousands of years. The effects of R. fairholmianus root acetone extract (RFRA) on the proliferation of A375 and A549 cells was examined in this study. RFRA led to a decrease in cell viability, proliferation and an increase in cytotoxicity in a dose dependent manner when compared with control and normal skin fibroblast cells (WS1). The morphology of treated cells supported apoptotic cell death. Annexin V/propidium iodide staining indicated that RFRA induced apoptosis in A375 and A549 cells and the percentages of early and late apoptotic populations significantly increased. Moreover, the apoptotic inducing ability of RFRA when analysing effector caspase 3/7 activity, indicated a marked increase in treated cells. In summary, we have shown the anticancer effects of RFRA in A375 and A549 cancer cells via induction of caspase dependent apoptosis in vitro. The extract is more effective against melanoma; which may suggest the usefulness of RFRA-based anticancer therapies. PMID:27133056

  3. Apoptotic Susceptibility to DNA Damage of Pluripotent Stem Cells Facilitates Pharmacologic Purging of Teratoma Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Alyson J.; Nelson, Natalie G.; Oommen, Saji; Hartjes, Katherine A.; Folmes, Clifford D.; Terzic, Andre; Nelson, Timothy J.

    2012-01-01

    The pluripotent cell-purging assay validated herein demonstrates that pluripotent cells are selectively hypersensitive to DNA damage-induced apoptosis as a function of the specific apoptotic inducer protein Puma. Risk of dysregulated growth is decreased and the safety profile of transplant-ready, bioengineered progenitor cells is augmented.

  4. Synchronous activity lowers the energetic cost of nest escape for sea turtle hatchlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusli, Mohd Uzair; Booth, David T; Joseph, Juanita

    2016-05-15

    A potential advantage of group movement in animals is increased locomotion efficiency. This implies a reduced energetic cost for individuals that occur in larger groups such as herds, flocks and schools. When chelonian hatchlings hatch in the underground nest with finite energy for their post-hatching dispersal phase, they face the challenge of minimizing energetic expenditure while escaping the nest. The term 'social facilitation' has been used to describe the combined digging effort of sea turtle hatchlings during nest escape. Given that in a normal clutch, a substantial part of the energy reserve within the residual yolk is used by hatchlings in the digging out process, a decreased cohort size may reduce the energy reserve available to cross the beach and sustain the initial swimming frenzy. This hypothesis was experimentally tested by varying cohort size in hatchling green turtles (Chelonia mydas) and measuring energy expenditure during the nest escape process using open-flow respirometry. The energetic cost of escaping through 40 cm of sand was calculated to vary between 4.4 and 28.3 kJ per individual, the cost decreasing as the number of individuals in the cohort increased. This represents 11-68% of the energy contained in a hatchling's residual yolk at hatching. The reduced energetic cost associated with large cohorts resulted from both a lower metabolic rate per individual and a shortened nest escape time. We conclude that synchronous digging activity of many hatchlings during nest escape evolved not only to facilitate rapid nest emergence but also to reduce the energetic cost to individuals. PMID:27207954

  5. Generalized Jeans' Escape of Pick-Up Ions in Quasi-Linear Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, T. E.; Khazanov, G. V.

    2011-01-01

    Jeans escape is a well-validated formulation of upper atmospheric escape that we have generalized to estimate plasma escape from ionospheres. It involves the computation of the parts of particle velocity space that are unbound by the gravitational potential at the exobase, followed by a calculation of the flux carried by such unbound particles as they escape from the potential well. To generalize this approach for ions, we superposed an electrostatic ambipolar potential and a centrifugal potential, for motions across and along a divergent magnetic field. We then considered how the presence of superthermal electrons, produced by precipitating auroral primary electrons, controls the ambipolar potential. We also showed that the centrifugal potential plays a small role in controlling the mass escape flux from the terrestrial ionosphere. We then applied the transverse ion velocity distribution produced when ions, picked up by supersonic (i.e., auroral) ionospheric convection, relax via quasi-linear diffusion, as estimated for cometary comas [1]. The results provide a theoretical basis for observed ion escape response to electromagnetic and kinetic energy sources. They also suggest that super-sonic but sub-Alfvenic flow, with ion pick-up, is a unique and important regime of ion-neutral coupling, in which plasma wave-particle interactions are driven by ion-neutral collisions at densities for which the collision frequency falls near or below the gyro-frequency. As another possible illustration of this process, the heliopause ribbon discovered by the IBEX mission involves interactions between the solar wind ions and the interstellar neutral gas, in a regime that may be analogous [2].

  6. Oxygen Pickup Ions at Mars: Model Comparisons with MAVEN Data and Implications for Oxygen Escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravens, Tom; Rahmati, Ali; Larsen, Davin; Lillis, Rob; Connerney, Jack; Halekas, Jasper; Bougher, Stephen W.

    2015-04-01

    A major source of atmospheric escape on Mars is the dissociative recombination of O2+ in the ionosphere, which creates oxygen atoms with energies exceeding the escape energy. These atoms are the source of the hot oxygen exosphere of Mars, which extends to tens of Martian radii. Direct measurement of the distant oxygen exosphere, which is mainly populated with escaping neutral oxygen atoms, is difficult due to the very low densities at these distances. However, ionization of these atoms creates pickup ions that are accelerated by the solar wind convective electric field to high energies, allowing them to be measured by the SEP (Solar Energetic Particle) instrument onboard the MAVEN (Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN) spacecraft.We modeled the hot oxygen at Mars and its interaction with the solar wind using Monte Carlo and test particle methods and using densities and temperatures from the MTGCM (Mars Thermospheric General Circulation Model). The distribution function of hot oxygen atoms at 300 km is calculated using a two-stream method, and the Liouville theorem extends this distribution for the gravitationally bound and escaping parts to high altitudes. We determined the O+ flux upstream of Mars as a function of energy, and separate it into parts due both the gravitationally bound and the escaping oxygen. Significant fluxes of O+ ions are predicted for energies greater than 60 keV and have been observed by the SEP instrument, even when MAVEN was several Martian radii away from the planet. These data-model comparisons will be presented and then interpreted in terms of the escape of oxygen from Mars.

  7. Early low-titer neutralizing antibodies impede HIV-1 replication and select for virus escape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine J Bar

    Full Text Available Single genome sequencing of early HIV-1 genomes provides a sensitive, dynamic assessment of virus evolution and insight into the earliest anti-viral immune responses in vivo. By using this approach, together with deep sequencing, site-directed mutagenesis, antibody adsorptions and virus-entry assays, we found evidence in three subjects of neutralizing antibody (Nab responses as early as 2 weeks post-seroconversion, with Nab titers as low as 1∶20 to 1∶50 (IC(50 selecting for virus escape. In each of the subjects, Nabs targeted different regions of the HIV-1 envelope (Env in a strain-specific, conformationally sensitive manner. In subject CH40, virus escape was first mediated by mutations in the V1 region of the Env, followed by V3. HIV-1 specific monoclonal antibodies from this subject mapped to an immunodominant region at the base of V3 and exhibited neutralizing patterns indistinguishable from polyclonal antibody responses, indicating V1-V3 interactions within the Env trimer. In subject CH77, escape mutations mapped to the V2 region of Env, several of which selected for alterations of glycosylation. And in subject CH58, escape mutations mapped to the Env outer domain. In all three subjects, initial Nab recognition was followed by sequential rounds of virus escape and Nab elicitation, with Nab escape variants exhibiting variable costs to replication fitness. Although delayed in comparison with autologous CD8 T-cell responses, our findings show that Nabs appear earlier in HIV-1 infection than previously recognized, target diverse sites on HIV-1 Env, and impede virus replication at surprisingly low titers. The unexpected in vivo sensitivity of early transmitted/founder virus to Nabs raises the possibility that similarly low concentrations of vaccine-induced Nabs could impair virus acquisition in natural HIV-1 transmission, where the risk of infection is low and the number of viruses responsible for transmission and productive clinical

  8. Lorentz alpha orbit calculation in search of position suitable for escaping alpha particle diagnostics in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Lorentz orbit code is developed to understand escaping alpha particle orbits and to contribute to the design of an escaping alpha particle probe in ITER. The code follows the full gyromotion of an alpha particle in ITER equilibrium, considering the toroidal field magnetic field ripple produced by the finite number of toroidal field coils as well as full three-dimensional first wall panels placed at the outboard side of the torus. It is shown that alpha particles that exist in the peripheral region and have banana orbits intersect the first wall placed at the outboard side on the lower plane. (author)

  9. Rate of escape of random walks on wreath products and related groups

    OpenAIRE

    Revelle, David

    2003-01-01

    This article examines the rate of escape for a random walk on $G\\wr \\Z$ and proves laws of the iterated logarithm for both the inner and outer radius of escape. The class of G for which these results hold includes finite, G as well as groups of the form $H\\wr \\Z$, so the construction can be iterated. Laws of the iterated logarithm are also found for random walk on Baumslag--Solitar groups and a discrete version of the Sol geometry.

  10. Ultra-fast escape of a deformable jet-propelled body

    OpenAIRE

    Weymouth, G. D.; Triantafyllou, M. S.

    2013-01-01

    In this work a cephalopod-like deformable body that fills an internal cavity with fluid and expels it to propel an escape manoeuvre, while undergoing a drastic external shape change through shrinking, is shown to employ viscous as well as mainly inviscid hydrodynamic mechanisms to power an impressively fast start. First, we show that recovery of added-mass energy enables a shrinking rocket in a dense inviscid flow to achieve greater escape speed than an identical rocket in a vacuum. Next, we ...

  11. Escape of a driven particle from a metastable state: A semiclassical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Pradipta; Shit, Anindita; Chattopadhyay, Sudip; Chaudhuri, Jyotipratim Ray

    2010-06-28

    In this article we explore the dynamics of escape of a particle in the semiclassical regime by driving the particle externally. We demonstrate that under suitable approximations the semiclassical escape rate essentially assumes the structure of classical Kramers rate. Both internal (due to thermal bath) as well as external noises (due to driving) are being considered. The noises are stationary, Gaussian, and are characterized by arbitrary decaying memory kernel. Finally, we subject our formulation to rigorous numerical test under variedly changing conditions of the parameters. PMID:20590205

  12. Cubic Polynomial Maps with Periodic Critical Orbit, Part II: Escape Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Bonifant, Araceli; Milnor, John

    2009-01-01

    The parameter space $\\mathcal{S}_p$ for monic centered cubic polynomial maps with a marked critical point of period $p$ is a smooth affine algebraic curve whose genus increases rapidly with $p$. Each $\\mathcal{S}_p$ consists of a compact connectedness locus together with finitely many escape regions, each of which is biholomorphic to a punctured disk and is characterized by an essentially unique Puiseux series. This note will describe the topology of $\\mathcal{S}_p$, and of its smooth compactification, in terms of these escape regions. It concludes with a discussion of the real sub-locus of $\\mathcal{S}_p$.

  13. Assessment of mortality of Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) escaping from a trawl

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krafft, Bjørn A.; Krag, Ludvig Ahm

    2015-01-01

    The overall purpose of this study was to estimate the mortality of Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) that escape from the most common mesh size used for codends (16mm) in the current commercial fishery. The experiment was carried out off the South Orkney Islands (60°35′S, 45°30′W) using a covered...... codend sampling technique for retaining escaped krill, which thereafter were observed in holding tanks to monitor their mortality rate. Our results suggest that krill with smaller body lengths suffered higher mortality. However, sampling depth, haul duration and catch accumulation as well as handling...

  14. The combined application of biological therapy and methotrexate in case of escape phenomenon progressing

    OpenAIRE

    Ponich E.S.; Kruglova L.S.; Babushkin A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: the study of the efficacy of methotrexate in patients with the "escape effect" during the ustekinumab therapy. Materials and Methods. The results of methotrexate at a dose of 15-20mg/week in treatment of 4 patients receiving biologic and developed "escape effect". Ustekinumab is used as a hypodermic injection at a dose of 45 mg for a body weight of a patient no more than 100 kg, and 90 mg of body weight over 100 kg, at the zero week, the 4th week and then every 12 weeks. Patients control...

  15. SIRT1 inhibition restores apoptotic sensitivity in p53-mutated human keratinocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbert, Katharine J.; Cook, Anthony L., E-mail: Anthony.Cook@utas.edu.au; Snow, Elizabeth T., E-mail: elizabeth.snow@utas.edu.au

    2014-06-15

    Mutations to the p53 gene are common in UV-exposed keratinocytes and contribute to apoptotic resistance in skin cancer. P53-dependent activity is modulated, in part, by a complex, self-limiting feedback loop imposed by miR-34a-mediated regulation of the lysine deacetylase, SIRT1. Expression of numerous microRNAs is dysregulated in squamous and basal cell carcinomas; however the contribution of specific microRNAs to the pathogenesis of skin cancer remains untested. Through use of RNAi, miRNA target site blocking oligonucleotides and small molecule inhibitors, this study explored the influence of p53 mutational status, SIRT1 activity and miR-34a levels on apoptotic sensitivity in primary (NHEK) and p53-mutated (HaCaT) keratinocyte cell lines. SIRT1 and p53 are overexpressed in p53-mutated keratinocytes, whilst miR-34a levels are 90% less in HaCaT cells. HaCaTs have impaired responses to p53/SIRT1/miR-34a axis manipulation which enhanced survival during exposure to the chemotherapeutic agent, camptothecin. Inhibition of SIRT1 activity in this cell line increased p53 acetylation and doubled camptothecin-induced cell death. Our results demonstrate that p53 mutations increase apoptotic resistance in keratinocytes by interfering with miR-34a-mediated regulation of SIRT1 expression. Thus, SIRT1 inhibitors may have a therapeutic potential for overcoming apoptotic resistance during skin cancer treatment. - Highlights: • Impaired microRNA biogenesis promotes apoptotic resistance in HaCaT keratinocytes. • TP53 mutations suppress miR-34a-mediated regulation of SIRT1 expression. • SIRT1 inhibition increases p53 acetylation in HaCaTs, restoring apoptosis.

  16. Pro‑apoptotic effects of pycnogenol on HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harati, Kamran; Slodnik, Pawel; Chromik, Ansgar Michael; Behr, Björn; Goertz, Ole; Hirsch, Tobias; Kapalschinski, Nicolai; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; Kolbenschlag, Jonas; Uhl, Waldemar; Lehnhardt, Marcus; Daigeler, Adrien

    2015-04-01

    Complete surgical resection with clear margins remains the mainstay of therapy for localised fibrosarcomas. Nevertheless, metastatic fibrosarcomas still represent a therapeutic dilemma. Commonly used chemotherapeutic agents like doxorubicin have proven to be effective in pycnogenol and its constituents on human fibrosarcoma cells (HT1080). Ten healthy subjects (six females, four males, mean age 24.8 ± 6 years) received a single dose of 300 mg pycnogenol orally. Blood plasma samples were obtained before and 6 h after intake of pycnogenol. HT1080 cells were treated with these plasma samples. Additionally, HT1080 were incubated separately with catechin, epicatechin and taxifolin that are known as the main constituents of pycnogenol. Vital, apoptotic and necrotic cells were quantified using flow cytometric analysis. Gene expression was analyzed by RNA microarray. The results showed that single application of taxifolin, catechin and epicatechin reduced cell viability of HT1080 cells only moderately. A single dose of 300 mg pycnogenol given to 10 healthy adults produced plasma samples that led to significant apoptotic cell death ex vivo whereas pycnogenol-negative serum displayed no apoptotic activity. Microarray analysis revealed remarkable expression changes induced by pycnogenol in a variety of genes, which are involved in different apoptotic pathways of cancer cells [Janus kinase 1 (JAK1), DUSP1, RHOA, laminin γ1 (LAMC1), fibronectin 1 (FN1), catenin α1 (CTNNA1), ITGB1]. In conclusion, metabolised pycnogenol induces apoptosis in human fibrosarcoma cells. Pycnogenol exhibits its pro-apoptotic activity as a mixture and is more effective than its main constituents catechin, epicatechin and taxifolin indicating that the metabolised components interact synergistically. These results provide experimental support for in vivo trials assessing the effect of the pine bark extract pycnogenol. PMID:25625225

  17. SIRT1 inhibition restores apoptotic sensitivity in p53-mutated human keratinocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutations to the p53 gene are common in UV-exposed keratinocytes and contribute to apoptotic resistance in skin cancer. P53-dependent activity is modulated, in part, by a complex, self-limiting feedback loop imposed by miR-34a-mediated regulation of the lysine deacetylase, SIRT1. Expression of numerous microRNAs is dysregulated in squamous and basal cell carcinomas; however the contribution of specific microRNAs to the pathogenesis of skin cancer remains untested. Through use of RNAi, miRNA target site blocking oligonucleotides and small molecule inhibitors, this study explored the influence of p53 mutational status, SIRT1 activity and miR-34a levels on apoptotic sensitivity in primary (NHEK) and p53-mutated (HaCaT) keratinocyte cell lines. SIRT1 and p53 are overexpressed in p53-mutated keratinocytes, whilst miR-34a levels are 90% less in HaCaT cells. HaCaTs have impaired responses to p53/SIRT1/miR-34a axis manipulation which enhanced survival during exposure to the chemotherapeutic agent, camptothecin. Inhibition of SIRT1 activity in this cell line increased p53 acetylation and doubled camptothecin-induced cell death. Our results demonstrate that p53 mutations increase apoptotic resistance in keratinocytes by interfering with miR-34a-mediated regulation of SIRT1 expression. Thus, SIRT1 inhibitors may have a therapeutic potential for overcoming apoptotic resistance during skin cancer treatment. - Highlights: • Impaired microRNA biogenesis promotes apoptotic resistance in HaCaT keratinocytes. • TP53 mutations suppress miR-34a-mediated regulation of SIRT1 expression. • SIRT1 inhibition increases p53 acetylation in HaCaTs, restoring apoptosis

  18. Quantifying factors determining the rate of CTL escape and reversion during acute and chronic phases of HIV infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganusov, Vitaly V [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Korber, Bette M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Perelson, Alan S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) often evades cytotoxic T cell (CTL) responses by generating variants that are not recognized by CTLs. However, the importance and quantitative details of CTL escape in humans are poorly understood. In part, this is because most studies looking at escape of HIV from CTL responses are cross-sectional and are limited to early or chronic phases of the infection. We use a novel technique of single genome amplification (SGA) to identify longitudinal changes in the transmitted/founder virus from the establishment of infection to the viral set point at 1 year after the infection. We find that HIV escapes from virus-specific CTL responses as early as 30-50 days since the infection, and the rates of viral escapes during acute phase of the infection are much higher than was estimated in previous studies. However, even though with time virus acquires additional escape mutations, these late mutations accumulate at a slower rate. A poor correlation between the rate of CTL escape in a particular epitope and the magnitude of the epitope-specific CTL response suggests that the lower rate of late escapes is unlikely due to a low efficacy of the HIV-specific CTL responses in the chronic phase of the infection. Instead, our results suggest that late and slow escapes are likely to arise because of high fitness cost to the viral replication associated with such CTL escapes. Targeting epitopes in which virus escapes slowly or does not escape at all by CTL responses may, therefore, be a promising direction for the development of T cell based HIV vaccines.

  19. Self-awareness review Part 2: Changing or escaping the self

    OpenAIRE

    Morin, Alain

    2003-01-01

    When we become self-aware we see who we are and what we would like to be. What do we do? Do we change who we are? Or do we escape self-awareness by watching TV—or worst, by drinking alcohol, doing drugs, or committing suicide?

  20. Pleiotropic effects of hemagglutinin amino acid substitutions of H5 influenza escape mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study we assessed pleiotropic characteristics of the antibody-selected mutations. We examined pH optimum of fusion, temperatures of HA heat inactivation, and in vitro and in vivo replication kinetics of the previously obtained influenza H5 escape mutants. Our results showed that HA1 N142K mutation significantly lowered the pH of fusion optimum. Mutations of the escape mutants located in the HA lateral loop significantly affected H5 HA thermostability (P<0.05). HA changes at positions 131, 144, 145, and 156 and substitutions at positions 131, 142, 145, and 156 affected the replicative ability of H5 escape mutants in vitro and in vivo, respectively. Overall, a co-variation between antigenic specificity and different HA phenotypic properties has been demonstrated. We believe that the monitoring of pleiotropic effects of the HA mutations found in H5 escape mutants is essential for accurate prediction of mutants with pandemic potential. - Highlights: • HA1 N142K mutation significantly lowered the pH of fusion optimum. • Mutations located in the HA lateral loop significantly affected H5 HA thermostability. • HA changes at positions 131, 142, 144, 145, and 156 affected the replicative ability of H5 mutants. • Acquisition of glycosylation site could lead to the emergence of multiple pleiotropic effects

  1. Panic escape polyethism in worker and soldier Coptotermes formosanus (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cai; Henderson, Gregg; Gautam, Bal K; Chen, Jie; Bhatta, Dependra

    2016-04-01

    Termites were the first animal to form societies. Two hundred million years of evolution provide for a multitude of innate social behaviors that can be experimentally dissected. These fine-tuned patterns of behavior are especially interesting when observing group decision making in the panic mode. In this study, we examined behavioral patterns of termites under panic conditions to gain insight into how an escape flow self-organizes. One hundred worker and 10 soldier Coptotermes formosanus were released into agar plates. After a disturbance was created most workers followed each other and ran along the wall of dishes, thus forming a unidirectional escape flow, whereas soldiers showed a significantly higher frequency of moving to the center of the arena or on periphery of the escape flow as compared to workers. Agonistic behavior was usually observed as soldiers moved to center or periphery. This is the first report on the behavioral repertoire of termites when panicked, with details on the behavioral polymorphism of workers and soldiers during an escape. PMID:25630524

  2. Using Stochastic Effciency Analysis To Factor Distribution Of Weed Escapes Into Weed Management Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeds in patches may be more easily managed than the same number of weeds spread throughout the field. We explored choosing weed management strategies based on both net return and the distribution of weed escapes within a field. Expected net returns with several different postemergence herbicides of...

  3. Monoclonal antibody-escape variant of dengue virus serotype 1: Genetic composition and envelope protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chem, Y K; Chua, K B; Malik, Y; Voon, K

    2015-06-01

    Monoclonal antibody-escape variant of dengue virus type 1 (MabEV DEN-1) was discovered and isolated in an outbreak of dengue in Klang Valley, Malaysia from December 2004 to March 2005. This study was done to investigate whether DEN152 (an isolate of MabEV DEN-1) is a product of recombination event or not. In addition, the non-synonymous mutations that correlate with the monoclonal antibody-escape variant were determined in this study. The genomes of DEN152 and two new DEN-1 isolates, DENB04 and DENK154 were completely sequenced, aligned, and compared. Phylogenetic tree was plotted and the recombination event on DEN152 was investigated. DEN152 is sub-grouped under genotype I and is closely related genetically to a DEN-1 isolated in Japan in 2004. DEN152 is not a recombinant product of any parental strains. Four amino acid substitutions were unique only to DEN 152. These amino acid substitutions were (Ser)[326](Leu), (Ser)[340](Leu) at the deduced E protein, (Ile)[250](Thr) at NS1 protein, and (Thr)[41](Ser) at NS5 protein. Thus, DEN152 is an isolate of the emerging monoclonal antibody-escape variant DEN-1 that escaped diagnostic laboratory detection. PMID:26691263

  4. Tumor cell survival and immune escape mechanisms in classical Hodgkin lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cell survival and immune escape mechanisms in classical Hodgkin lymphoma The nature of classical Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), a minority of tumor cells in a reactive background and loss of B cell phenotype, decides its dependence on the microenvironment for signals to contribute to survival and prol

  5. Feedback-regulated escape of LyC photons from mini-haloes during reionisation

    CERN Document Server

    Kimm, Taysun; Haehnelt, Martin; Rosdahl, Joakim; Devriendt, Julien; Slyz, Adrianne

    2016-01-01

    Reionisation in the early Universe is likely driven by dwarf galaxies. Using cosmological, zoom-in, radiation-hydrodynamic simulations, we study the escape of Lyman continuum (LyC) photons from mini-haloes with $M_{\\rm halo} \\le 10^8\\,M_\\odot$. Our simulations include a new thermo-turbulent star formation model, non-equilibrium chemistry, and relevant stellar feedback processes (photoionisation by young massive stars, radiation pressure, and mechanical supernova explosions). We find that the photon number-weighted mean escape fraction in mini-haloes is higher ($\\sim20$-$40\\%$) than that in atomic-cooling haloes, although the instantaneous fraction in individual haloes varies significantly. The escape fraction from Pop III stars is found to be significant ($\\ge10\\%$) only when the mass is greater than $\\sim$100\\,\\msun. Because star formation is stochastic and dominated by a few gas clumps, the escape fraction is generally determined by radiation feedback (heating due to photo-ionisation), rather than supernova...

  6. Pleiotropic effects of hemagglutinin amino acid substitutions of H5 influenza escape mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudneva, Irina A.; Timofeeva, Tatiana A.; Ignatieva, Anna V.; Shilov, Aleksandr A.; Krylov, Petr S. [D.I. Ivanovsky Institute of Virology, 123098 Moscow (Russian Federation); Ilyushina, Natalia A., E-mail: Natalia.Ilyushina@fda.hhs.gov [FDA CDER, 29 Lincoln Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Kaverin, Nikolai V., E-mail: nik.kaverin@gmail.com [D.I. Ivanovsky Institute of Virology, 123098 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-15

    In the present study we assessed pleiotropic characteristics of the antibody-selected mutations. We examined pH optimum of fusion, temperatures of HA heat inactivation, and in vitro and in vivo replication kinetics of the previously obtained influenza H5 escape mutants. Our results showed that HA1 N142K mutation significantly lowered the pH of fusion optimum. Mutations of the escape mutants located in the HA lateral loop significantly affected H5 HA thermostability (P<0.05). HA changes at positions 131, 144, 145, and 156 and substitutions at positions 131, 142, 145, and 156 affected the replicative ability of H5 escape mutants in vitro and in vivo, respectively. Overall, a co-variation between antigenic specificity and different HA phenotypic properties has been demonstrated. We believe that the monitoring of pleiotropic effects of the HA mutations found in H5 escape mutants is essential for accurate prediction of mutants with pandemic potential. - Highlights: • HA1 N142K mutation significantly lowered the pH of fusion optimum. • Mutations located in the HA lateral loop significantly affected H5 HA thermostability. • HA changes at positions 131, 142, 144, 145, and 156 affected the replicative ability of H5 mutants. • Acquisition of glycosylation site could lead to the emergence of multiple pleiotropic effects.

  7. Function-Based Modification of Check-In/Check-Out to Influence Escape-Maintained Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgus, Stephen P.; Fallon, Lindsay M.; Feinberg, Adam B.

    2016-01-01

    Prior research has suggested Check-In/Check-Out (CICO) effectiveness is linked to the function of problem behavior. Though effective for students whose misbehavior occurs to gain attention, findings are equivocal for behavior that occurs to escape academic tasks. The purpose of this study was to therefore evaluate a modification to CICO, wherein…

  8. The dynamics of a rapidly escaping atmosphere - Applications to the evolution of earth and Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, A. J.; Donahue, T. M.; Walker, J. C. G.

    1981-01-01

    A simple model for the rapid escape of a hydrogen thermosphere is presented in order to establish the energy-limited flux of escaping particles. The model assumes that the atmosphere is tightly bound by gravity at the lower boundary, that all the EUV is absorbed in a narrow region where the optical depth is unity, and that the main source of heating is solar EUV. The flux is limited by the amount of EUV energy absorbed, which is in turn controlled by the radial extent of the thermosphere. It is found that, regardless of the amount of hydrogen in the thermosphere, the low temperatures which accompany rapid escape limit its extent and thus constrain the flux. The results are applied to the earth and Venus, showing that the escape of hydrogen from these planets would have been energy-limiting if their primordial atmospheres contained total hydrogen mixing ratios exceeding only a few percent. This conclusion places a constraint on the theory of the origin and evolution of the planets.

  9. Low-energy gamma-ray spectroscopy using an X-ray-escape gated proportional counter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregers Hansen, P.; Nielsen, H.L.; Williams, E.T.; Wilsky, K.

    1965-01-01

    The utility of a gas-filled proportional counter in low-energy γ spectroscopy is greatly increased if it is operated in coincidence with an escaping fluorescent X-ray. An apparatus, having an efficiency greater than 10% of singles, is described and several examples are given. An efficiency curve is...

  10. Revealing the escape mechanism of three-dimensional orbits in a tidally limited star cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Zotos, Euaggelos E

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work is to explore the escape process of three-dimensional orbits in a star cluster rotating around its parent galaxy in a circular orbit. The gravitational field of the cluster is represented by a smooth, spherically symmetric Plummer potential, while the tidal approximation was used to model the steady tidal field of the galaxy. We conduct a thorough numerical analysis distinguishing between regular and chaotic orbits as well as between trapped and escaping orbits, considering only unbounded motion for several energy levels. It is of particular interest to locate the escape basins towards the two exit channels and relate them with the corresponding escape times of the orbits. For this purpose, we split our investigation into three cases depending on the initial value of the $z$ coordinate which was used for launching the stars. The most noticeable finding is that the majority of stars initiated very close to the primary $(x,y)$ plane move in chaotic orbits and they remain trapped for vast ti...

  11. The decline of the European eel Anguilla anguilla: quantifying and managing escapement to support conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilotta, G S; Sibley, P; Hateley, J; Don, A

    2011-01-01

    A method was developed to quantify the number and biomass of European eels Anguilla anguilla escaping to the ocean for breeding. The non-intrusive method, involving a fixed-position, high-frequency multi-beam sonar, permitted constant surveillance of A. anguilla movements throughout their 5 month escapement season (July to December). During this period, >1000 individuals were monitored escaping to the Atlantic Ocean from their freshwater habitat in the River Huntspill study site (Somerset, U.K.). The total length of each fish was measured using the sonar software. These measurements were then converted to an estimate of mass using a length:mass regression relationship derived from historical fyke-net data from this site, comprising c. 500 A. anguilla length:mass measurements collected over a 10 year period. The net biomass of escapement from the study site was equivalent to c. 6 kg ha⁻¹ year⁻¹, lower than the present European target which would require at least 7 kg ha⁻¹ year⁻¹ from this habitat. These findings demonstrate the capabilities of this monitoring technique and its usefulness both as a tool to assess the compliance with conservation targets and as a tool to evaluate the success of conservation measures for elusive aquatic species such as A. anguilla. PMID:21235544

  12. Escaping the Poverty Trap in Latin America: The Role of Family Factors

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    Much like an inherited trait, poverty trends to pass from parent to child. How prevalent is this "curse of the poor," why do some escape it, and how can we help improve the odds? This study sets out to gauge the extent of this "Intergenerational transmiss

  13. Co-lethality studied as an asset against viral drug escape: the HIV protease case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ollivier Emmanuelle

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Co-lethality, or synthetic lethality is the documented genetic situation where two, separately non-lethal mutations, become lethal when combined in one genome. Each mutation is called a "synthetic lethal" (SL or a co-lethal. Like invariant positions, SL sets (SL linked couples are choice targets for drug design against fast-escaping RNA viruses: mutational viral escape by loss of affinity to the drug may induce (synthetic lethality. Results From an amino acid sequence alignment of the HIV protease, we detected the potential SL couples, potential SL sets, and invariant positions. From the 3D structure of the same protein we focused on the ones that were close to each other and accessible on the protein surface, to possibly bind putative drugs. We aligned 24,155 HIV protease amino acid sequences and identified 290 potential SL couples and 25 invariant positions. After applying the distance and accessibility filter, three candidate drug design targets of respectively 7 (under the flap, 4 (in the cantilever and 5 (in the fulcrum amino acid positions were found. Conclusions These three replication-critical targets, located outside of the active site, are key to our anti-escape strategy. Indeed, biological evidence shows that 2/3 of those target positions perform essential biological functions. Their mutational variations to escape antiviral medication could be lethal, thus limiting the apparition of drug-resistant strains. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Arcady Mushegian, Shamil Sunyaev and Claus Wilke.

  14. SUSCEPTIBILITY TO GLYPHOSATE OF WEED ESCAPES IN GLYPHOSATE-TOLERANT SOYBEAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plots of glyphosate-tolerant soybeans at twelve locations in five states were monitored for weed escapes. Seeds were collected from each of these sites in the glyphosate and non-treated weedy check plots. These seeds were planted and grown in a greenhouse and then sprayed one time with 10% of a stan...

  15. Leptin is an anti-apoptotic effector in placental cells involving p53 downregulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayelén Rayen Toro

    Full Text Available Leptin, a peripheral signal synthetized by the adipocyte to regulate energy metabolism, can also be produced by placenta, where it may work as an autocrine hormone. We have previously demonstrated that leptin promotes proliferation and survival of trophoblastic cells. In the present work, we aimed to study the molecular mechanisms that mediate the survival effect of leptin in placenta. We used the human placenta choriocarcinoma BeWo and first trimester Swan-71 cell lines, as well as human placental explants. We tested the late phase of apoptosis, triggered by serum deprivation, by studying the activation of Caspase-3 and DNA fragmentation. Recombinant human leptin added to BeWo cell line and human placental explants, showed a decrease on Caspase-3 activation. These effects were dose dependent. Maximal effect was achieved at 250 ng leptin/ml. Moreover, inhibition of endogenous leptin expression with 2 µM of an antisense oligonucleotide, reversed Caspase-3 diminution. We also found that the cleavage of Poly [ADP-ribose] polymerase-1 (PARP-1 was diminished in the presence of leptin. We analyzed the presence of low DNA fragments, products from apoptotic DNA cleavage. Placental explants cultivated in the absence of serum in the culture media increased the apoptotic cleavage of DNA and this effect was prevented by the addition of 100 ng leptin/ml. Taken together these results reinforce the survival effect exerted by leptin on placental cells. To improve the understanding of leptin mechanism in regulating the process of apoptosis we determined the expression of different intermediaries in the apoptosis cascade. We found that under serum deprivation conditions, leptin increased the anti-apoptotic BCL-2 protein expression, while downregulated the pro-apoptotic BAX and BID proteins expression in Swan-71 cells and placental explants. In both models leptin augmented BCL-2/BAX ratio. Moreover we have demonstrated that p53, one of the key cell cycle

  16. Copper induced immunotoxicity promote differential apoptotic pathways in spleen and thymus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Copper-induced ROS generation and mitochondrial trans-membrane potential changes result in different consequences in spleen and thymus. ► Inflammation appeared in both the spleen and thymus after to copper treatment. ► Apoptosis in the spleen appears to follow a p53-independent pathway. ► Apoptosis in the thymus appears to follow a p53-dependent intrinsic and extrinsic pathway. ► In both the spleen and thymus, the CD4+ T cell population decreased and CD8+ T cell population increased after copper treatment. - Abstract: Inorganic copper, such as that in drinking water and copper supplements, largely bypasses the liver and enters the free copper pool of the blood directly and that promote immunosuppression. Nevertheless, the signaling pathways underlying copper-induced immune cell death remains largely unclear. According to our previous in vivo report, to evaluate the further details of the apoptotic mechanism, we have investigated how copper regulates apoptotic pathways in spleen and thymus. We have analyzed different protein expression by western blotting and immunohistochemistry and mRNA expression by RT-PCR and gel electrophoresis. We also have measured mitochondrial trans-membrane potential, ROS and CD4+ and CD8+ population by flow cytometry. Sub lethal doses of copper in spleen and thymus of in vivo Swiss albino mice promote different apoptotic pathways. In case of spleen, ROS generation and mitochondrial trans-membrane potential changes promotes intrinsic pathway of apoptosis that was p53 independent, ultimately leads to decrease in CD4+ T cell population and increase in CD8+ T cell population. However in case of thymus, ROS generation and mitochondrial trans-membrane potential changes lead to death receptor that regulate extrinsic and intrinsic pathways of apoptosis and the apoptotic mechanism which was p53 dependent. Due to copper treatment, thymic CD4+ T cell population decreased and CD8+ T cell population was increased or

  17. Hydrodynamics of C-Start Escape Responses of Fish as Studied with Simple Physical Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, William C; Wen, Li; Lauder, George V

    2015-10-01

    One of the most-studied unsteady locomotor behaviors exhibited by fishes is the c-start escape response. Although the kinematics of these responses have been studied extensively and two well-defined kinematic stages have been documented, only a few studies have focused on hydrodynamic patterns generated by fishes executing escape behaviors. Previous work has shown that escape responses by bluegill sunfish generate three distinct vortex rings, each with central orthogonal jet flows, and here we extend this conclusion to two other species: stickleback and mosquitofish. Jet #1 is formed by the tail during Stage 1, and moves in the same direction as Stage-2 movement of the fish, thereby reducing final escape-velocity but also rotating the fish. Jet #2, in contrast, moves approximately opposite to the final direction of the fish's motion and contains the bulk of the total fluid-momentum powering the escape response. Jet #3 forms during Stage 2 in the mid-body region and moves in a direction approximately perpendicular to jets 1 and 2, across the direction of movement of the body. In this study, we used a mechanical controller to impulsively move passively flexible plastic panels of three different stiffnesses in heave, pitch, and heave + pitch motions to study the effects of stiffness on unsteady hydrodynamics of escape. We were able to produce kinematics very similar to those of fish c-starts and also to reproduce the 3-jet hydrodynamic pattern of the c-start using a panel of medium flexural stiffness and the combined heave + pitch motion. This medium-stiffness panel matched the measured stiffness of the near-tail region of fish bodies. This motion also produced positive power when the panel straightened during stage 2 of the escape response. More flexible and stiffer panels resulted in non-biological kinematics and patterns of flow for all motions. The use of simple flexible models with a mechanical controller and program of fish-like motion is a promising approach

  18. Antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of selective phenolic acids on T47D human breast cancer cells: potential mechanisms of action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oncoprotective role of food-derived polyphenol antioxidants has been described but the implicated mechanisms are not yet clear. In addition to polyphenols, phenolic acids, found at high concentrations in a number of plants, possess antioxidant action. The main phenolic acids found in foods are derivatives of 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and 4-hydroxycinnamic acid. This work concentrates on the antiproliferative action of caffeic acid, syringic acid, sinapic acid, protocatechuic acid, ferulic acid and 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylacetic acid (PAA) on T47D human breast cancer cells, testing their antioxidant activity and a number of possible mechanisms involved (interaction with membrane and intracellular receptors, nitric oxide production). The tested compounds showed a time-dependent and dose-dependent inhibitory effect on cell growth with the following potency: caffeic acid > ferulic acid = protocatechuic acid = PAA > sinapic acid = syringic acid. Caffeic acid and PAA were chosen for further analysis. The antioxidative activity of these phenolic acids in T47D cells does not coincide with their inhibitory effect on tumoral proliferation. No interaction was found with steroid and adrenergic receptors. PAA induced an inhibition of nitric oxide synthase, while caffeic acid competes for binding and results in an inhibition of aryl hydrocarbon receptor-induced CYP1A1 enzyme. Both agents induce apoptosis via the Fas/FasL system. Phenolic acids exert a direct antiproliferative action, evident at low concentrations, comparable with those found in biological fluids after ingestion of foods rich in phenolic acids. Furthermore, the direct interaction with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, the nitric oxide synthase inhibition and their pro-apoptotic effect provide some insights into their biological mode of action

  19. Molecular and Computational Studies on Apoptotic Pathway Regulator, Bcl-2 Gene from Breast Cancer Cell Line MCF-7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Pragya; Khan, M J

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a dreadful disease constituting abnormal growth and proliferation of malignant cells in the body. Next to lung cancer, breast cancer is the most common form of cancer affecting women. The apoptotic pathway regulators, B cell lymphoma family of protein, play a key role in various malignancies defining cancer and their constitutive expression plays an integral role in breast cancer chemotherapy. The research work discusses the identification and molecular cloning of a B cell lymphoma like gene from human breast cancer cell line. The open reading frame of the gene consisted of 965 nucleotides, encoding a protein of 380 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 42.5 kilodalton. The predicted physiochemical properties of the gene were as follows: Isoelectric point - 9.49, molecular formula - C1893H3004N534O548S16, total number of negatively charged residues, (Aspartate+Glutamate) - 26, total number of positively charged residues, (Arginine+Lysine)-39, instability index-42.08 (unstable protein) and grand average of hydropathicity is -0.202. Additionally, phobius prediction suggested non-cytoplasmic localization of the putative protein. The presence of secondary structure in the protein was determined by Memsat program. A 3 dimensional protein homology model was generated using threading based method of protein modeling for structural and functional annotation of the putative protein. Future prospects accounts for the biochemical characterization of the enzyme including in vitro assays on breast cancer cell line would establish the functional characteristics of the protein and its physiological mechanisms in breast cancer development and its therapeutic-target role in future. PMID:27168686

  20. Molecular and computational studies on apoptotic pathway regulator, Bcl-2 gene from breast cancer cell line MCF-7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pragya Tiwari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a dreadful disease constituting abnormal growth and proliferation of malignant cells in the body. Next to lung cancer, breast cancer is the most common form of cancer affecting women. The apoptotic pathway regulators, B cell lymphoma family of protein, play a key role in various malignancies defining cancer and their constitutive expression plays an integral role in breast cancer chemotherapy. The research work discusses the identification and molecular cloning of a B cell lymphoma like gene from human breast cancer cell line. The open reading frame of the gene consisted of 965 nucleotides, encoding a protein of 380 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 42.5 kilodalton. The predicted physiochemical properties of the gene were as follows: Isoelectric point - 9.49, molecular formula - C1893H3004N534O548S16, total number of negatively charged residues, (Aspartate+Glutamate - 26, total number of positively charged residues, (Arginine+Lysine-39, instability index-42.08 (unstable protein and grand average of hydropathicity is -0.202. Additionally, phobius prediction suggested non-cytoplasmic localization of the putative protein. The presence of secondary structure in the protein was determined by Memsat program. A 3 dimensional protein homology model was generated using threading based method of protein modeling for structural and functional annotation of the putative protein. Future prospects accounts for the biochemical characterization of the enzyme including in vitroassays on breast cancer cell line would establish the functional characteristics of the protein and its physiological mechanisms in breast cancer development and its therapeutic-target role in future.

  1. Molecular and Computational Studies on Apoptotic Pathway Regulator, Bcl-2 Gene from Breast Cancer Cell Line MCF-7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Pragya; Khan, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a dreadful disease constituting abnormal growth and proliferation of malignant cells in the body. Next to lung cancer, breast cancer is the most common form of cancer affecting women. The apoptotic pathway regulators, B cell lymphoma family of protein, play a key role in various malignancies defining cancer and their constitutive expression plays an integral role in breast cancer chemotherapy. The research work discusses the identification and molecular cloning of a B cell lymphoma like gene from human breast cancer cell line. The open reading frame of the gene consisted of 965 nucleotides, encoding a protein of 380 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 42.5 kilodalton. The predicted physiochemical properties of the gene were as follows: Isoelectric point - 9.49, molecular formula - C1893H3004N534O548S16, total number of negatively charged residues, (Aspartate+Glutamate) - 26, total number of positively charged residues, (Arginine+Lysine)-39, instability index-42.08 (unstable protein) and grand average of hydropathicity is -0.202. Additionally, phobius prediction suggested non-cytoplasmic localization of the putative protein. The presence of secondary structure in the protein was determined by Memsat program. A 3 dimensional protein homology model was generated using threading based method of protein modeling for structural and functional annotation of the putative protein. Future prospects accounts for the biochemical characterization of the enzyme including in vitro assays on breast cancer cell line would establish the functional characteristics of the protein and its physiological mechanisms in breast cancer development and its therapeutic-target role in future.

  2. Histone demethylase Jmjd3 regulates osteoblast apoptosis through targeting anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and pro-apoptotic protein Bim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Di; Okamura, Hirohiko; Teramachi, Jumpei; Haneji, Tatsuji

    2016-04-01

    Posttranslational modifications including histone methylation regulate gene transcription through directly affecting the structure of chromatin. Trimethylation of histone H3K27 (H3K27me3) contributes to gene silencing and the histone demethylase Jumonji domain-containing 3 (Jmjd3) specifically removes the methylation of H3K27me3, followed by the activation of gene expression. In the present study, we explored the roles of Jmjd3 in regulating osteoblast apoptosis. Knockdown of Jmjd3 promoted osteoblast apoptosis induced by serum deprivation with decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and increased levels of caspase-3 activation, PARP cleavage, and DNA fragmentation. B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2), an anti-apoptotic protein, was down-regulated by knockdown of Jmjd3 through retaining H3K27me3 on its promoter region. Knockdown of Jmjd3 increased the pro-apoptotic activity of Bim through inhibiting ERK-dependent phosphorylation of Bim. Protein kinase D1 (PKD1), which stimulates ERK phosphorylation, decreased in the Jmjd3-knockdown cells and introduction of PKD1 relieved osteoblast apoptosis in the Jmjd3-knockdown cells through increasing ERK-regulated Bim phosphorylation. These results suggest that Jmjd3 regulates osteoblast apoptosis through targeting Bcl-2 expression and Bim phosphorylation. PMID:26795455

  3. Leptin suppresses non-apoptotic cell death in ischemic rat cardiomyocytes by reduction of iPLA{sub 2} activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takatani-Nakase, Tomoka, E-mail: nakase@mukogawa-u.ac.jp; Takahashi, Koichi, E-mail: koichi@mukogawa-u.ac.jp

    2015-07-17

    Caspase-independent, non-apoptotic cell death is an important therapeutic target in myocardial ischemia. Leptin, an adipose-derived hormone, is known to exhibit cytoprotective effects on the ischemic heart, but the mechanisms are poorly understood. In this research, we found that pretreatment of leptin strongly suppressed ischemic-augmented nuclear shrinkage and non-apoptotic cell death on cardiomyocytes. Leptin was also shown to significantly inhibit the activity of iPLA{sub 2}, which is considered to play crucial roles in non-apoptotic cell death, resulting in effective prevention of ischemia-induced myocyte death. These findings provide the first evidence of a protective mechanism of leptin against ischemia-induced non-apoptotic cardiomyocyte death. - Highlights: • Myocardial ischemia-model induces in caspase-independent, non-apoptotic cell death. • Leptin strongly inhibits ischemic-augmented non-apoptotic cell death. • Leptin reduces iPLA{sub 2} activity, leading to avoidance of non-apoptotic cell death.

  4. Leptin suppresses non-apoptotic cell death in ischemic rat cardiomyocytes by reduction of iPLA2 activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caspase-independent, non-apoptotic cell death is an important therapeutic target in myocardial ischemia. Leptin, an adipose-derived hormone, is known to exhibit cytoprotective effects on the ischemic heart, but the mechanisms are poorly understood. In this research, we found that pretreatment of leptin strongly suppressed ischemic-augmented nuclear shrinkage and non-apoptotic cell death on cardiomyocytes. Leptin was also shown to significantly inhibit the activity of iPLA2, which is considered to play crucial roles in non-apoptotic cell death, resulting in effective prevention of ischemia-induced myocyte death. These findings provide the first evidence of a protective mechanism of leptin against ischemia-induced non-apoptotic cardiomyocyte death. - Highlights: • Myocardial ischemia-model induces in caspase-independent, non-apoptotic cell death. • Leptin strongly inhibits ischemic-augmented non-apoptotic cell death. • Leptin reduces iPLA2 activity, leading to avoidance of non-apoptotic cell death

  5. Escape of HIV-1-infected dendritic cells from TRAIL-mediated NK cell cytotoxicity during NK-DC cross-talk--a pivotal role of HMGB1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Thérèse Melki

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Early stages of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1 infection are associated with local recruitment and activation of important effectors of innate immunity, i.e. natural killer (NK cells and dendritic cells (DCs. Immature DCs (iDCs capture HIV-1 through specific receptors and can disseminate the infection to lymphoid tissues following their migration, which is associated to a maturation process. This process is dependent on NK cells, whose role is to keep in check the quality and the quantity of DCs undergoing maturation. If DC maturation is inappropriate, NK cells will kill them ("editing process" at sites of tissue inflammation, thus optimizing the adaptive immunity. In the context of a viral infection, NK-dependent killing of infected-DCs is a crucial event required for early elimination of infected target cells. Here, we report that NK-mediated editing of iDCs is impaired if DCs are infected with HIV-1. We first addressed the question of the mechanisms involved in iDC editing, and we show that cognate NK-iDC interaction triggers apoptosis via the TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL-Death Receptor 4 (DR4 pathway and not via the perforin pathway. Nevertheless, once infected with HIV-1, DC(HIV become resistant to NK-induced TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. This resistance occurs despite normal amounts of TRAIL released by NK cells and comparable DR4 expression on DC(HIV. The escape of DC(HIV from NK killing is due to the upregulation of two anti-apoptotic molecules, the cellular-Flice like inhibitory protein (c-FLIP and the cellular inhibitor of apoptosis 2 (c-IAP2, induced by NK-DC(HIV cognate interaction. High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1, an alarmin and a key mediator of NK-DC cross-talk, was found to play a pivotal role in NK-dependent upregulation of c-FLIP and c-IAP2 in DC(HIV. Finally, we demonstrate that restoration of DC(HIV susceptibility to NK-induced TRAIL killing can be obtained either by silencing c-FLIP and c-IAP2 by specific

  6. Escapism among players of MMORPGs--conceptual clarification, its relation to mental health factors, and development of a new measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagström, David; Kaldo, Viktor

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies show that the concept of escapism needs to be clarified and that its relation to problematic online gaming and other factors needs further examination. This study uses well-established, basic learning theory to clarify the concept of escapism, and examines its relation to problematic gaming, psychological distress, and satisfaction with life among players of massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPGs). MMORPG players (n=201) answered an online questionnaire where these factors were measured and correlated with a previously developed scale on motivation to play (MTPI), including extra items to cover positive and negative aspects of escapism. Factor analysis and construct validation show that positive aspects of escapism are theoretically and empirically unstable and that escapism is best clarified as purely "negative escapism," corresponding to playing being negatively reinforced as a way of avoiding everyday hassles and distress. Negative escapism had a stronger relationship to symptoms of Internet addiction, psychological distress, and life satisfaction than other variables and other more positive motivations to play. Future studies should use the revised subscale for escapism (in the MTPI-R) presented in the present study, for example when screening for Internet addiction. PMID:24003967

  7. Escape fraction of ionizing photons during reionization: Effects due to supernova feedback and runaway ob stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fraction of hydrogen ionizing photons escaping from galaxies into the intergalactic medium is a critical ingredient in the theory of reionization. We use two zoomed-in, high-resolution (4 pc), cosmological radiation hydrodynamic simulations with adaptive mesh refinement to investigate the impact of two physical mechanisms (supernova, SN, feedback, and runaway OB stars) on the escape fraction (f esc) at the epoch of reionization (z ≥ 7). We implement a new, physically motivated SN feedback model that can approximate the Sedov solutions at all (from the free expansion to snowplow) stages. We find that there is a significant time delay of about ten million years between the peak of star formation and that of escape fraction, due to the time required for the build-up and subsequent destruction of the star-forming cloud by SN feedback. Consequently, the photon number-weighted mean escape fraction for dwarf galaxies in halos of mass 108-1010.5 M ☉ is found to be 〈fesc〉∼11%, although instantaneous values of f esc > 20% are common when star formation is strongly modulated by the SN explosions. We find that the inclusion of runaway OB stars increases the mean escape fraction by 22% to 〈fesc〉∼14%. As SNe resulting from runaway OB stars tend to occur in less dense environments, the feedback effect is enhanced and star formation is further suppressed in halos with Mvir≳109 M⊙ in the simulation with runaway OB stars compared with the model without them. While both our models produce enough ionizing photons to maintain a fully ionized universe at z ≤ 7 as observed, a still higher amount of ionizing photons at z ≥ 9 appears necessary to accommodate the high observed electron optical depth inferred from cosmic microwave background observations.

  8. Pregabalin attenuates place escape/avoidance behavior in a rat model of spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baastrup, Cathrine; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Finnerup, Nanna Brix

    2011-01-25

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) pain in humans is difficult to treat, and the lack of valid methods to measure behavior comparable to the complex human pain experience preclinically represents an important obstacle to finding better treatments for this type of central pain. The place escape/avoidance paradigm (PEAP) relies on the active choice of an animal between its natural preference for a dark environment or pain relief, and it has been suggested to measure the affective-motivational component of pain. We have modified the method to a T10 spinal cord contusion model (SCC) of at-level central neuropathic pain in Sprague-Dawley rats. In order to demonstrate sensitivity to change in escape/avoidance behavior and thus the applicability of the PEAP method to predict drug efficacy, we investigated the effect of pregabalin (30 mg/kg) treatment in a randomized design. SCC animals displayed increased escape/avoidance behavior postinjury, indicating at-level mechanical hypersensitivity. Second, we found no correlation between state anxiety levels in SCC animals (elevated plus maze) and PEAP behavior, suggesting that the PEAP measurement is not biased by differences in anxiety levels. Third, we demonstrated a decrease in escape/avoidance behavior in response to treatment with the analgesic drug pregabalin. Thus, the PEAP may be applicable as a surrogate correlate of human pain. In conclusion, the primary finding in this study was a sensitivity to change in escape/avoidance behavior induced by pharmacological modulation with analgesics, supporting the use of the PEAP as a central outcome measure in preclinical SCI pain research. PMID:21070753

  9. Oxygen escape from the Earth during geomagnetic reversals: Implications to mass extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yong; Pu, Zuyin; Zong, Qiugang; Wan, Weixing; Ren, Zhipeng; Fraenz, Markus; Dubinin, Eduard; Tian, Feng; Shi, Quanqi; Fu, Suiyan; Hong, Minghua

    2014-05-01

    The evolution of life is affected by variations of atmospheric oxygen level and geomagnetic field intensity. Oxygen can escape into interplanetary space as ions after gaining momentum from solar wind, but Earth's strong dipole field reduces the momentum transfer efficiency and the ion outflow rate, except for the time of geomagnetic polarity reversals when the field is significantly weakened in strength and becomes Mars-like in morphology. The newest databases available for the Phanerozoic era illustrate that the reversal rate increased and the atmospheric oxygen level decreased when the marine diversity showed a gradual pattern of mass extinctions lasting millions of years. We propose that accumulated oxygen escape during an interval of increased reversal rate could have led to the catastrophic drop of oxygen level, which is known to be a cause of mass extinction. We simulated the oxygen ion escape rate for the Triassic-Jurassic event, using a modified Martian ion escape model with an input of quiet solar wind inferred from Sun-like stars. The results show that geomagnetic reversal could enhance the oxygen escape rate by 3-4 orders only if the magnetic field was extremely weak, even without consideration of space weather effects. This suggests that our hypothesis could be a possible explanation of a correlation between geomagnetic reversals and mass extinction. Therefore, if this causal relation indeed exists, it should be a "many-to-one" scenario rather the previously considered "one-to-one", and planetary magnetic field should be much more important than previously thought for planetary habitability.

  10. Changing the habitat: the evolution of intercorrelated traits to escape from predators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikolajewski, D J; Scharnweber, K; Jiang, B; Leicht, S; Mauersberger, R; Johansson, F

    2016-07-01

    Burst escape speed is an effective and widely used behaviour for evading predators, with burst escape speed relying on several different morphological features. However, we know little about how behavioural and underlying morphological attributes change in concert as a response to changes in selective predation regime. We studied intercorrelated trait differentiation of body shape and burst-swim-mediating morphology in response to a habitat shift-related reduction in burst escape speed using larvae of the dragonfly genus Leucorrhinia. Species in this genus underwent a well-known habitat shift from predatory fish lakes (fish lakes) to predatory fish-free lakes dominated by large predatory dragonflies (dragonfly lakes) accompanied by relaxed selection on escape burst speed. Results revealed that species from fish lakes that possess faster burst speed have evolved a suite of functionally intercorrelated traits, expressing a wider abdomen, a higher abdominal muscles mass and a larger branchial chamber compared with species from dragonfly lakes. In contrast, populations within species did not show significant differences in muscle mass and branchial chamber size between lake types in three of the species. High multicollinearity among variables suggests that traits have evolved in concert rather than independently when Leucorrhinia shifted from fish lakes to dragonfly lakes. Thus, relaxed selection on burst escape speed in dragonfly-lake species resulted in a correlated reduction of abdominal muscles and a smaller branchial chamber, likely to save production and/or maintenance costs. Our results highlight the importance of studying integrated behavioural and morphological traits to fully understand the evolution of complex phenotypes. PMID:27062155

  11. Vaccine escape recombinants emerge after pneumococcal vaccination in the United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela B Brueggemann

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7 was introduced in the United States (US in 2000 and has significantly reduced invasive pneumococcal disease; however, the incidence of nonvaccine serotype invasive disease, particularly due to serotype 19A, has increased. The serotype 19A increase can be explained in part by expansion of a genotype that has been circulating in the US prior to vaccine implementation (and other countries since at least 1990, but also by the emergence of a novel "vaccine escape recombinant" pneumococcal strain. This strain has a genotype that previously was only associated with vaccine serotype 4, but now expresses a nonvaccine serotype 19A capsule. Based on prior evidence for capsular switching by recombination at the capsular locus, the genetic event that resulted in this novel serotype/genotype combination might be identifiable from the DNA sequence of individual pneumococcal strains. Therefore, the aim of this study was to characterise the putative recombinational event(s at the capsular locus that resulted in the change from a vaccine to a nonvaccine capsular type. Sequencing the capsular locus flanking regions of 51 vaccine escape (progeny, recipient, and putative donor pneumococci revealed a 39 kb recombinational fragment, which included the capsular locus, flanking regions, and two adjacent penicillin-binding proteins, and thus resulted in a capsular switch and penicillin nonsusceptibility in a single genetic event. Since 2003, 37 such vaccine escape strains have been detected, some of which had evolved further. Furthermore, two new types of serotype 19A vaccine escape strains emerged in 2005. To our knowledge, this is the first time a single recombinational event has been documented in vivo that resulted in both a change of serotype and penicillin nonsusceptibility. Vaccine escape by genetic recombination at the capsular locus has the potential to reduce PCV7 effectiveness in the longer term.

  12. TRPV1 stimulation triggers apoptotic cell death of rat cortical neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) functions as a polymodal nociceptor and is activated by several vanilloids, including capsaicin, protons and heat. Although TRPV1 channels are widely distributed in the brain, their roles remain unclear. Here, we investigated the roles of TRPV1 in cytotoxic processes using TRPV1-expressing cultured rat cortical neurons. Capsaicin induced severe neuronal death with apoptotic features, which was completely inhibited by the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine and was dependent on extracellular Ca2+ influx. Interestingly, nifedipine, a specific L-type Ca2+ channel blocker, attenuated capsaicin cytotoxicity, even when applied 2-4 h after the capsaicin. ERK inhibitor PD98059 and several antioxidants, but not the JNK and p38 inhibitors, attenuated capsaicin cytotoxicity. Together, these data indicate that TRPV1 activation triggers apoptotic cell death of rat cortical cultures via L-type Ca2+ channel opening, Ca2+ influx, ERK phosphorylation, and reactive oxygen species production.

  13. Investigation of apoptotic events at molecular level induced by SERS guided targeted theranostic nanoprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Nisha; Nair, Lakshmi V.; Karunakaran, Varsha; Joseph, Manu M.; Nair, Jyothi B.; N, Ramya A.; Jayasree, Ramapurath S.; Maiti, Kaustabh Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Herein, we have examined distinctive structural and functional variations of cellular components during apoptotic cell death induced by a targeted theranostic nanoprobe, MMP-SQ@GNR@LAH-DOX, which acted as a SERS ``on/off'' probe in the presence of a MMP protease and executed synergistic photothermal chemotherapy, as reflected by the SERS fingerprinting, corresponding to the phosphodiester backbone of DNA.Herein, we have examined distinctive structural and functional variations of cellular components during apoptotic cell death induced by a targeted theranostic nanoprobe, MMP-SQ@GNR@LAH-DOX, which acted as a SERS ``on/off'' probe in the presence of a MMP protease and executed synergistic photothermal chemotherapy, as reflected by the SERS fingerprinting, corresponding to the phosphodiester backbone of DNA. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr03385g

  14. Pro-apoptotic NOXA is implicated in atmospheric-pressure plasma-induced melanoma cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishaq, M.; Bazaka, K.; Ostrikov, K.

    2015-11-01

    Atmospheric-pressure plasma (APP) has been successfully used to treat several types of cancers in vivo and in vitro, with the effect being primarily attributed to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the mechanisms by which APP induces apoptosis in cancer cells require further elucidation. In this study, the effects of APP on the expression of 500 genes in melanoma Mel007 cancer cells were examined. Pro-apoptotic phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate-induced protein (PMAIP1), also known as NOXA, was highly expressed as a result of APP treatment in a dose-dependent manner. Blocking of ROS using scavenger NAC or silencing of NOXA gene by RNA interference inhibited the APP-induced NOXA genes upregulation and impaired caspases 3/7 mediated apoptosis, confirming the important role plasma-generated ROS species and pro-apoptotic NOXA play in APP-induced cancer cell death.

  15. Proposed Pharmacological Countermeasures Against Apoptotic Cell Death in Experimental Models Mimicking Space Environment Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lulli, Matteo; Papucci, Laura; Witort, Ewa; Donnini, Martino; Lapucci, Andrea; Lazzarano, Stefano; Mazzoni, Tiziano; Simoncini, Madine; Falciani, Piergiuseppe; Capaccioli, Sergio

    2008-06-01

    Several damaging agents have been suggested to affect human vision during long term space travels. Recently, apoptosis induced by DNA-damaging agents has emerged as frequent pathogenetic mechanism of ophthalmologic pathologies. Here, we propose two countermeasures: coenzyme Q10 and bcl-2 downregulation preventing antisense oligoribonucleotides (ORNs), aimed to inhibit cellular apoptotic death. Our studies have been carried out on retina and neuronal cultured cells treated with the following apoptotic stimuli mimicking space environment: a several-day exposure to either 3H-labeled tymidine or to the genotoxic drug doxorubicin, UV irradiation, hypoxia and glucose/growth factor starvation (Locke medium). The preliminary results clearly indicate that CoQ10, as well as bcl-2 down-regulation preventing ORNs, significantly counteract apoptosis in response to different DNA damaging agents in cultured eye and in neuronal cells. This supports the possibility that both could be optimal countermeasures against ophthalmologic lesions during space explorations.

  16. The anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family are attractive tumor-associated antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Straten, Per thor; Andersen, Mads Hald

    2010-01-01

    Anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family (Bcl-2, Bcl-X(L) and Mcl-2) are pivotal regulators of apoptotic cell death. They are all highly overexpressed in cancers of different origin in which they enhance the survival of the cancer cells. Consequently, they represent prime candidates for anti......, spontaneous cellular immune responses against the Bcl-2 family proteins have been identified as frequent features in cancer patients underscoring that these proteins are natural targets for the immune system. Thus, Bcl-2 family may serve as an important and widely applicable target for anti......-cancer immunotherapeutic strategies, alone or in the combination with conventional therapy. Here, we summarize the current knowledge of Bcl-2 family proteins as T-cell antigens, which has set the stage for the first explorative trial using these antigens in therapeutic vaccinations against cancer, and discuss future...

  17. The apoptotic effects of escin in the H-Ras transformed 5RP7 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güney, G; Kutlu, H M; Işcan, A

    2013-06-01

    Extracts of Aesculus hippocastanum L. (horse chestnut) seed have been used in the treatment of chronic venous insufficiency, edema and hemorrhoids. Most of the beneficial effects of horse chestnut are attributed to its principal component β-escin or escin. We have evaluated the cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of escin in the H-Ras 5RP7 cell line by analyzing cell growth inhibition, apoptosis and caspase-3 dependent activity. We have also shown structural and ultrastructural changes in these cell using confocal and transmission electron microscopy. The results indicated that escin has significant inhibitory effects on cell growth and the percentage of apoptotic cells increased after treatment with escin, and the micrographs confirmed that escin damaged these cells and induced apoptosis. PMID:22911540

  18. Cocaine Causes Apoptotic Death in Rat Mesencephalon and Striatum Primary Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucilia B. Lepsch

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To study cocaine’s toxic effects in vitro, we have used primary mesencephalic and striatal cultures from rat embryonic brain. Treatment with cocaine causes a dramatic increase in DNA fragmentation in both primary cultures. The toxicity induced by cocaine was paralleled with a concomitant decrease in the microtubule associated protein 2 (MAP2 and/or neuronal nucleus protein (NeuN staining. We also observed in both cultures that the cell death caused by cocaine was induced by an apoptotic mechanism, confirmed by TUNEL assay. Therefore, the present paper shows that cocaine causes apoptotic cell death and inhibition of the neurite prolongation in striatal and mesencephalic cell culture. These data suggest that if similar neuronal damage could be produced in the developing human brain, it could account for the qualitative or quantitative defects in neuronal pathways that cause a major handicap in brain function following prenatal exposure to cocaine.

  19. Nucleo-cytoplasmic communication in apoptotic response to genotoxic and inflammatory stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jean Y. J. WANG

    2005-01-01

    Genotoxic agents or inflammatory cytokines activate cellular stress responses and trigger programmed cell death.We have identified a signal transduction module, including three nuclear proteins that participate in the regulation of cell death induced by chemotherapeutic agents and tumor necrosis factor (TNF). In this nuclear signaling module, retinoblastoma protein (Rb) functions as an inhibitor of apoptotic signal transduction. Inactivation of Rb by phosphorylation or caspase-dependent cleavage/degradation is required for cell death to occur. Rb inhibits the Abl tyrosine kinase. Thus,Rb inactivation is a pre-requisite for Abl activation by DNA damage or TNF. Activation of nuclear Abl and its downstream effector p73 induces mitochondriadependent cell death. The involvement of these nuclear signal transducers in TNF induced apoptosis, which does not require new gene expression, indicates that nuclear events other than transcription can contribute to extrinsic apoptotic signal transduction.

  20. Modulation of Apoptotic Pathways by Human Papillomaviruses (HPV: Mechanisms and Implications for Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Hsiang Yuan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The ability of the host to trigger apoptosis in infected cells is perhaps the most powerful tool by which viruses can be cleared from the host organism. To avoid elimination by this mechanism, human papillomaviruses (HPV have developed several mechanisms that enable the cells they infect to elude both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptosis. In this manuscript, we review the current literature regarding how HPV-infected cells avoid apoptosis and the molecular mechanisms involved in these events. In particular, we will discuss the modifications in intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways caused by proteins encoded by HPV early genes. Many of the current efforts regarding anti-cancer drug development are focused on directing tumor cells to undergo apoptosis. However, the ability of HPV-infected cells to resist apoptotic signals renders such therapies ineffective. Possible mechanisms for overcoming the resistance of HPV-infected tumor cells to anticancer drugs will be discussed.