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Sample records for aplysia

  1. Developmental transcriptome of Aplysia californica'

    KAUST Repository

    Heyland, Andreas

    2010-12-06

    Genome-wide transcriptional changes in development provide important insight into mechanisms underlying growth, differentiation, and patterning. However, such large-scale developmental studies have been limited to a few representatives of Ecdysozoans and Chordates. Here, we characterize transcriptomes of embryonic, larval, and metamorphic development in the marine mollusc Aplysia californica and reveal novel molecular components associated with life history transitions. Specifically, we identify more than 20 signal peptides, putative hormones, and transcription factors in association with early development and metamorphic stages-many of which seem to be evolutionarily conserved elements of signal transduction pathways. We also characterize genes related to biomineralization-a critical process of molluscan development. In summary, our experiment provides the first large-scale survey of gene expression in mollusc development, and complements previous studies on the regulatory mechanisms underlying body plan patterning and the formation of larval and juvenile structures. This study serves as a resource for further functional annotation of transcripts and genes in Aplysia, specifically and molluscs in general. A comparison of the Aplysia developmental transcriptome with similar studies in the zebra fish Danio rerio, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, and other studies on molluscs suggests an overall highly divergent pattern of gene regulatory mechanisms that are likely a consequence of the different developmental modes of these organisms. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  2. Functional Neuroanatomy of the Rhinophore of Aplysia punctata

    OpenAIRE

    Rössler Wolfgang; Wertz Adrian; Obermayer Malu; Bickmeyer Ulf

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background For marine snails, olfaction represents a crucial sensory modality for long-distance reception, as auditory and visual information is limited. The posterior tentacle of Aplysia, the rhinophore, is a chemosensory organ and several behavioural studies showed that the rhinophores can detect pheromones, initiate orientation and locomotion toward food. However the functional neuroanatomy of the rhinophore is not yet clear. Here we apply serotonin-immunohistochemistry and fluore...

  3. Effects of Hypergravity on Statocyst Development in Embryonic Aplysia californica

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    Pedrozo, Hugo A.; Wiederhold, Michael L.

    1994-01-01

    Aplysia californica is a marine gastropod mollusc with bilaterally paired statocysts as gravity-reccptor organs. Data from three experiments in which embryonic Aplysia californica were exposed to 2 x g arc discussed. The experimental groups were exposed to excess gravity until hatching (9-12 day), whereas control groups were maintained at normal gravity. Body diameter was measured before exposure to 2 x g. Statocyst, statolith and body diameter were each determined for samples of 20 embryos from each group on successive days. Exposure to excess gravity led to an increase in body size. Statocyst size was not affected by exposure to 2 x g. Statolith size decreased with treatment as indicated by smaller statolith-to-body ratios observed in the 2 x g group in all three experiments. Mean statolith diameter was significantly smaller for the 2 x g group in Experiment 1 but not in Experiments 2 and 3. Defective statocysts, characterized by very small or no statoliths, were found in the 2 x g group in Experiments 1 and 2.

  4. Phylogeny of the sea hares in the aplysia clade based on mitochondrial DNA sequence data

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    Medina, Monica; Collins, Timothy; Walsh, Patrick J.

    2004-02-20

    Sea hare species within the Aplysia clade are distributed worldwide. Their phylogenetic and biogeographic relationships are, however, still poorly known. New molecular evidence is presented from a portion of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase c subunit 1 gene (cox1) that improves our understanding of the phylogeny of the group. Based on these data a preliminary discussion of the present distribution of sea hares in a biogeographic context is put forward. Our findings are consistent with only some aspects of the current taxonomy and nomenclatural changes are proposed. The first, is the use of a rank free classification for the different Aplysia clades and subclades as opposed to previously used genus and subgenus affiliations. The second, is the suggestion that Aplysia brasiliana (Rang, 1828) is a junior synonym of Aplysia fasciata (Poiret, 1789). The third, is the elimination of Neaplysia since its only member is confirmed to be part of the large Varria clade.

  5. Functional neuroanatomy of the rhinophore of Aplysia punctata

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    Rössler Wolfgang

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For marine snails, olfaction represents a crucial sensory modality for long-distance reception, as auditory and visual information is limited. The posterior tentacle of Aplysia, the rhinophore, is a chemosensory organ and several behavioural studies showed that the rhinophores can detect pheromones, initiate orientation and locomotion toward food. However the functional neuroanatomy of the rhinophore is not yet clear. Here we apply serotonin-immunohistochemistry and fluorescent markers in combination with confocal microscopy as well as optical recording techniques to elucidate the structure and function of the rhinophore of the sea slug Aplysia punctata. Results With anatomical techniques an overview of the neuroanatomical organization of the rhinophore is presented. Labelling with propidium iodide revealed one layer of cell nuclei in the sensory epithelium and densely packed cell nuclei beneath the groove of the rhinophore, which extends to about two third of the total length of the rhinophore. Serotonin immunoreactivity was found within the olfactory glomeruli underneath the epithelium as well as in the rhinophore ganglion. Retrograde tracing from the rhinophore ganglion with 4-(4-(dihexadecylaminostyryl-N-methylpyridinium iodide (DiA demonstrated the connection of glomeruli with the ganglion. Around 36 glomeruli (mean diameter 49 μm were counted in a single rhinophore. Fluorimetric measurements of intracellular Ca2+ levels using Fura-2 AM loading revealed Ca2+-responses within the rhinophore ganglion to stimulation with amino acids. Bath application of different amino acids revealed differential responses at different positions within the rhinophore ganglion. Conclusion Our neuroanatomical study revealed the number and position of glomeruli in the rhinophore and the rhinophore ganglion as processing stage of sensory information. Serotonin-immunoreactive processes were found extensively within the rhinophore, but was not

  6. Neurogenesis of cephalic sensory organs of Aplysia californica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wollesen, Tim; Wanninger, Andreas; Klussmann-Kolb, Annette

    2007-01-01

    The opisthobranch gastropod Aplysia californica serves as a model organism in experimental neurobiology because of its simple and well-known nervous system. However, its nervous periphery has been less intensely studied. We have reconstructed the ontogeny of the cephalic sensory organs (labial...... microscopy to analyze the ciliary distribution of these sensory epithelia. Labial tentacles and the lip develop during metamorphosis, whereas rhinophores appear significantly later, in stage 10 juveniles. Our study has revealed immunoreactivity against FMRFamides and serotonin in all major nerves. The common...... labial nerve develops first, followed by the labial tentacle base nerve, oral nerve, and rhinophoral nerve. We have also identified previously undescribed neuronal pathways and other FMRFamide-like-immunoreactive neuronal elements, such as peripheral ganglia and glomerulus-like structures, and two groups...

  7. Aging in Sensory and Motor Neurons Results in Learning Failure in Aplysia californica.

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    Andrew T Kempsell

    Full Text Available The physiological and molecular mechanisms of age-related memory loss are complicated by the complexity of vertebrate nervous systems. This study takes advantage of a simple neural model to investigate nervous system aging, focusing on changes in learning and memory in the form of behavioral sensitization in vivo and synaptic facilitation in vitro. The effect of aging on the tail withdrawal reflex (TWR was studied in Aplysia californica at maturity and late in the annual lifecycle. We found that short-term sensitization in TWR was absent in aged Aplysia. This implied that the neuronal machinery governing nonassociative learning was compromised during aging. Synaptic plasticity in the form of short-term facilitation between tail sensory and motor neurons decreased during aging whether the sensitizing stimulus was tail shock or the heterosynaptic modulator serotonin (5-HT. Together, these results suggest that the cellular mechanisms governing behavioral sensitization are compromised during aging, thereby nearly eliminating sensitization in aged Aplysia.

  8. Regulation of statoconia mineralization in Aplysia californica in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrozo, H. A.; Schwartz, Z.; Dean, D. D.; Wiederhold, M. L.; Boyan, B. D.

    1996-01-01

    Statoconia are calcium carbonate inclusions in the lumen of the gravity-sensing organ, the statocyst, of Aplysia californica. The aim of the present study was to examine the role of carbonic anhydrase and urease in statoconia mineralization in vitro. The experiments were performed using a previously described culture system (Pedrozo et al., J. Comp. Physiol. (A) 177:415-425). Inhibition of carbonic anhydrase by acetazolamide decreased statoconia production and volume, while inhibition of urease by acetohydroxamic acid reduced total statoconia number, but had no affect on statoconia volume. Inhibition of carbonic anhydrase initially increased and then decreased the statocyst pH, whereas inhibition of urease decreased statocyst pH at all times examined; simultaneous addition of both inhibitors also decreased pH. These effects were dose and time dependent. The results show that carbonic anhydrase and urease are required for statoconia formation and homeostasis, and for regulation of statocyst pH. This suggests that these two enzymes regulate mineralization at least partially through regulation of statocyst pH.

  9. Serotonin- and Training-Induced Dynamic Regulation of CREB2 in "Aplysia"

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    Liu, Rong-Yu; Shah, Shreyansh; Cleary, Leonard J.; Byrne, John H.

    2011-01-01

    Long-term memory and plasticity, including long-term synaptic facilitation (LTF) of the "Aplysia" sensorimotor synapse, depend on the activation of transcription factors that regulate genes necessary for synaptic plasticity. In the present study we found that treatment with 5-HT and behavioral training produce biphasic changes in the expression of…

  10. Extending In Vitro Conditioning in "Aplysia" to Analyze Operant and Classical Processes in the Same Preparation

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    Brembs, Bjorn; Baxter, Douglas A.; Byrne, John H.

    2004-01-01

    Operant and classical conditioning are major processes shaping behavioral responses in all animals. Although the understanding of the mechanisms of classical conditioning has expanded significantly, the understanding of the mechanisms of operant conditioning is more limited. Recent developments in "Aplysia" are helping to narrow the gap in the…

  11. Occurrence of the alien sea hare Aplysia dactylomela Rang, 1828 (Opisthobranchia, Aplysiidae in Malta

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    P.J. SCHEMBRI

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The alien sea hare Aplysia dactylomela, which is already established in several localities in the centraland eastern Mediterranean, is recorded for the first time from Malta on the basis of a specimen photographedat Cirkewwa (northern Malta. It is hypothesised that the occurrence of this species in Malta isa recent event and may be due to range expansion of the species.

  12. Feeding Behavior of Aplysia: A Model System for Comparing Cellular Mechanisms of Classical and Operant Conditioning

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    Baxter, Douglas A.; Byrne, John H.

    2006-01-01

    Feeding behavior of Aplysia provides an excellent model system for analyzing and comparing mechanisms underlying appetitive classical conditioning and reward operant conditioning. Behavioral protocols have been developed for both forms of associative learning, both of which increase the occurrence of biting following training. Because the neural…

  13. Connecting Model Species to Nature: Predator-Induced Long-Term Sensitization in "Aplysia Californica"

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    Mason, Maria J.; Watkins, Amanda J.; Wakabayashi, Jordann; Buechler, Jennifer; Pepino, Christine; Brown, Michelle; Wright, William G.

    2014-01-01

    Previous research on sensitization in "Aplysia" was based entirely on unnatural noxious stimuli, usually electric shock, until our laboratory found that a natural noxious stimulus, a single sublethal lobster attack, causes short-term sensitization. We here extend that finding by demonstrating that multiple lobster attacks induce…

  14. Neurons controlling Aplysia feeding inhibit themselves by continuous NO production.

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    Nimrod Miller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neural activity can be affected by nitric oxide (NO produced by spiking neurons. Can neural activity also be affected by NO produced in neurons in the absence of spiking? METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Applying an NO scavenger to quiescent Aplysia buccal ganglia initiated fictive feeding, indicating that NO production at rest inhibits feeding. The inhibition is in part via effects on neurons B31/B32, neurons initiating food consumption. Applying NO scavengers or nitric oxide synthase (NOS blockers to B31/B32 neurons cultured in isolation caused inactive neurons to depolarize and fire, indicating that B31/B32 produce NO tonically without action potentials, and tonic NO production contributes to the B31/B32 resting potentials. Guanylyl cyclase blockers also caused depolarization and firing, indicating that the cGMP second messenger cascade, presumably activated by the tonic presence of NO, contributes to the B31/B32 resting potential. Blocking NO while voltage-clamping revealed an inward leak current, indicating that NO prevents this current from depolarizing the neuron. Blocking nitrergic transmission had no effect on a number of other cultured, isolated neurons. However, treatment with NO blockers did excite cerebral ganglion neuron C-PR, a command-like neuron initiating food-finding behavior, both in situ, and when the neuron was cultured in isolation, indicating that this neuron also inhibits itself by producing NO at rest. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Self-inhibitory, tonic NO production is a novel mechanism for the modulation of neural activity. Localization of this mechanism to critical neurons in different ganglia controlling different aspects of a behavior provides a mechanism by which a humeral signal affecting background NO production, such as the NO precursor L-arginine, could control multiple aspects of the behavior.

  15. Candidate chemoreceptor subfamilies differentially expressed in the chemosensory organs of the mollusc Aplysia

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    Cummins Scott F

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Marine molluscs, as is the case with most aquatic animals, rely heavily on olfactory cues for survival. In the mollusc Aplysia californica, mate-attraction is mediated by a blend of water-borne protein pheromones that are detected by sensory structures called rhinophores. The expression of G protein and phospholipase C signaling molecules in this organ is consistent with chemosensory detection being via a G-protein-coupled signaling mechanism. Results Here we show that novel multi-transmembrane proteins with similarity to rhodopsin G-protein coupled receptors are expressed in sensory epithelia microdissected from the Aplysia rhinophore. Analysis of the A. californica genome reveals that these are part of larger multigene families that possess features found in metazoan chemosensory receptor families (that is, these families chiefly consist of single exon genes that are clustered in the genome. Phylogenetic analyses show that the novel Aplysia G-protein coupled receptor-like proteins represent three distinct monophyletic subfamilies. Representatives of each subfamily are restricted to or differentially expressed in the rhinophore and oral tentacles, suggesting that they encode functional chemoreceptors and that these olfactory organs sense different chemicals. Those expressed in rhinophores may sense water-borne pheromones. Secondary signaling component proteins Gαq, Gαi, and Gαo are also expressed in the rhinophore sensory epithelium. Conclusion The novel rhodopsin G-protein coupled receptor-like gene subfamilies identified here do not have closely related identifiable orthologs in other metazoans, suggesting that they arose by a lineage-specific expansion as has been observed in chemosensory receptor families in other bilaterians. These candidate chemosensory receptors are expressed and often restricted to rhinophores and oral tentacles, lending support to the notion that water-borne chemical detection in Aplysia involves

  16. Aplysia synapse associated protein (APSAP): identification, characterization, and selective interactions with Shaker-type potassium channels

    OpenAIRE

    Reissner, Kathryn J.; Boyle, Heather D.; Ye, Xiaojing; Carew, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    The vertebrate post-synaptic density (PSD) is a region of high molecular complexity in which dynamic protein interactions modulate receptor localization and synaptic function. Members of the membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) family of proteins represent a major structural and functional component of the vertebrate PSD. In order to investigate the expression and significance of orthologous PSD components associated with the Aplysia sensory neuron-motor neuron synapse, we have cloned...

  17. Behavioral aging is associated with reduced sensory neuron excitability in Aplysia californica

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    Andrew T Kempsell

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Invertebrate models have advantages for understanding the basis of behavioral aging due to their simple nervous systems and short lifespans. The potential usefulness of Aplysia californica in aging research is apparent from its long history of neurobiological research, but it has been underexploited in this model use. Aging of simple reflexes at both single sensory neuron and neural circuit levels was studied to connect behavioral aging to neurophysiological aging. The tail withdrawal reflex (TWR, righting reflex, and biting response were measured throughout sexual maturity in three cohorts of hatchery-reared animals of known age. Reflex times increased and reflex amplitudes decreased significantly during aging. Aging in sensory neurons of animals with deficits in measures of the TWR and biting response resulted in significantly reduced excitability in old animals compared to their younger siblings. The threshold for firing increased while the number of action potentials in response to depolarizing current injection decreased during aging in sensory neurons, but not in tail motoneurons. Glutamate receptor-activated responses in sensory neurons also decreased with aging. In old tail motoneurons, the amplitude of evoked EPSPs following tail shock decreased, presumably due to reduced sensory neuron excitability during aging. The results were used to develop stages of aging relevant to both hatchery-reared and wild-caught Aplysia. Aplysia is a viable aging model in which the contributions of differential aging of components of neural circuits may be assessed.

  18. Critical Role of the Circadian Clock in Memory Formation: Lessons from Aplysia

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    Lisa Carlson Lyons

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Unraveling the complexities of learning and the formation of memory requires identification of the cellular and molecular processes through which neural plasticity arises as well as recognition of the conditions or factors through which those processes are modulated. With its relatively simple nervous system, the marine mollusk Aplysia californica has proven an outstanding model system for studies of memory formation and identification of the molecular mechanisms underlying learned behaviors, including classical and operant associative learning paradigms and non-associative behaviors. In vivo behavioral studies in Aplysia have significantly furthered our understanding of how the endogenous circadian clock modulates memory formation. Sensitization of the tail-siphon withdrawal reflex represents a defensive non-associative learned behavior for which the circadian clock strongly modulates intermediate and long-term memory formation. Likewise, Aplysia exhibit circadian rhythms in long-term memory, but not short-term memory, for an operant associative learning paradigm. This review focuses on circadian modulation of intermediate and long-term memory and the putative mechanisms through which this modulation occurs. Additionally, potential functions and the adaptive advantages of time of day pressure on memory formation are considered. The influence of the circadian clock on learning and memory crosses distant phylogeny highlighting the evolutionary importance of the circadian clock on metabolic, physiological and behavioral processes. Thus, studies in a simple invertebrate model system have and will continue to provide critical mechanistic insights to complementary processes in higher organisms.

  19. mtDNA ribosomal gene phylogeny of sea hares in the genus Aplysia (Gastropoda, Opisthobranchia, Anaspidea): Implications for comparative neurobiology

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    Medina, Monica; Collins, Timothy M.; Walsh, Patrick J.

    2000-08-10

    Sea hares within the genus Aplysia are important neurobiological model organisms, and as studies based on different Aplysia species appear in the literature, a phylogenetic framework has become essential. We present a phylogenetic hypothesis for this genus, based on portions of two mitochondrial genes (12S and 16S). In addition, we reconstruct the evolution of several behavioral characters of interest to neurobiologists in order to illustrate the potential benefits of a phylogeny for the genus Aplysia. These benefits include the determination of ancestral traits, the direction and timing of evolution of characters, prediction of the distribution of traits, and identification of cases of independent acquisition of traits within lineages. This last benefit may prove especially useful in understanding the linkage between behaviors and their underlying neurological basis.

  20. mtDNA ribosomal gene phylogeny of sea hares in the genus Aplysia (Gastropoda, Opisthobranchia, Anaspidea): implications for comparative neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, M; Collins, T M; Walsh, P J

    2001-01-01

    Sea hares within the genus Aplysia are important neurobiological model organisms; as more studies based on different Aplysia species are appearing in the literature, a phylogenetic framework has become essential. We present a phylogenetic hypothesis for this genus, based on portions of two mitochondrial genes (12S and 16S). In addition, we reconstruct the evolution of several behavioral characters of interest to neurobiologists to illustrate the potential benefits of a phylogeny for the genus Aplysia. These benefits include determination of ancestral traits, direction and timing of evolution of characters, prediction of the distribution of traits, and identification of cases of independent acquisition of traits within lineages. This last benefit may prove especially useful in understanding the linkage between behaviors and their underlying neurological bases. PMID:12116938

  1. Calcium-Activated Proteases Are Critical for Refilling Depleted Vesicle Stores in Cultured Sensory-Motor Synapses of "Aplysia"

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    Khoutorsky, Arkady; Spira, Micha E.

    2005-01-01

    "Aplysia" motoneurons cocultured with a presynaptic sensory neuron exhibit homosynaptic depression when stimulated at low frequencies. A single bath application of serotonin (5HT) leads within seconds to facilitation of the depressed synapse. The facilitation is attributed to mobilization of neurotransmitter-containing vesicles from a feeding…

  2. Reinforcement in an in Vitro Analog of Appetitive Classical Conditioning of Feeding Behavior in "Aplysia": Blockade by a Dopamine Antagonist

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    Reyes, Fredy D.; Mozzachiodi, Riccardo; Baxter, Douglas A.; Byrne, John H.

    2005-01-01

    In a recently developed in vitro analog of appetitive classical conditioning of feeding in "Aplysia," the unconditioned stimulus (US) was electrical stimulation of the esophageal nerve (En). This nerve is rich in dopamine (DA)-containing processes, which suggests that DA mediates reinforcement during appetitive conditioning. To test this…

  3. PKA and PKC Are Required for Long-Term but Not Short-Term in Vivo Operant Memory in "Aplysia"

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    Michel, Maximilian; Green, Charity L.; Lyons, Lisa C.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the involvement of PKA and PKC signaling in a negatively reinforced operant learning paradigm in "Aplysia", learning that food is inedible (LFI). In vivo injection of PKA or PKC inhibitors blocked long-term LFI memory formation. Moreover, a persistent phase of PKA activity, although not PKC activity, was necessary for long-term…

  4. Possible Contributions of a Novel Form of Synaptic Plasticity in "Aplysia" to Reward, Memory, and Their Dysfunctions in Mammalian Brain

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    Hawkins, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies in "Aplysia" have identified a new variation of synaptic plasticity in which modulatory transmitters enhance spontaneous release of glutamate, which then acts on postsynaptic receptors to recruit mechanisms of intermediate- and long-term plasticity. In this review I suggest the hypothesis that similar plasticity occurs in…

  5. Effects of Aversive Stimuli beyond Defensive Neural Circuits: Reduced Excitability in an Identified Neuron Critical for Feeding in "Aplysia"

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    Shields-Johnson, Maria E.; Hernandez, John S.; Torno, Cody; Adams, Katherine M.; Wainwright, Marcy L.; Mozzachiodi, Riccardo

    2013-01-01

    In "Aplysia," repeated trials of aversive stimuli produce long-term sensitization (LTS) of defensive reflexes and suppression of feeding. Whereas the cellular underpinnings of LTS have been characterized, the mechanisms of feeding suppression remained unknown. Here, we report that LTS training induced a long-term decrease in the excitability of…

  6. Nitric Oxide and Histamine Signal Attempts to Swallow: A Component of Learning that Food Is Inedible in "Aplysia"

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    Katzoff, Ayelet; Miller, Nimrod; Susswein, Abraham J.

    2010-01-01

    Memory that food is inedible in "Aplysia" arises from training requiring three contingent events. Nitric oxide (NO) and histamine are released by a neuron responding to one of these events, attempts to swallow food. Since NO release during training is necessary for subsequent memory and NO substitutes for attempts to swallow, it was suggested that…

  7. Chronic sleep deprivation differentially affects short and long-term operant memory in Aplysia.

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    Krishnan, Harini C; Noakes, Eric J; Lyons, Lisa C

    2016-10-01

    The induction, formation and maintenance of memory represent dynamic processes modulated by multiple factors including the circadian clock and sleep. Chronic sleep restriction has become common in modern society due to occupational and social demands. Given the impact of cognitive impairments associated with sleep deprivation, there is a vital need for a simple animal model in which to study the interactions between chronic sleep deprivation and memory. We used the marine mollusk Aplysia californica, with its simple nervous system, nocturnal sleep pattern and well-characterized learning paradigms, to assess the effects of two chronic sleep restriction paradigms on short-term (STM) and long-term (LTM) associative memory. The effects of sleep deprivation on memory were evaluated using the operant learning paradigm, learning that food is inedible, in which the animal associates a specific netted seaweed with failed swallowing attempts. We found that two nights of 6h sleep deprivation occurring during the first or last half of the night inhibited both STM and LTM. Moreover, the impairment in STM persisted for more than 24h. A milder, prolonged sleep deprivation paradigm consisting of 3 consecutive nights of 4h sleep deprivation also blocked STM, but had no effect on LTM. These experiments highlight differences in the sensitivity of STM and LTM to chronic sleep deprivation. Moreover, these results establish Aplysia as a valid model for studying the interactions between chronic sleep deprivation and associative memory paving the way for future studies delineating the mechanisms through which sleep restriction affects memory formation.

  8. Localization of GABA-like immunoreactivity in the central nervous system of Aplysia californica.

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    Díaz-Ríos, M; Suess, E; Miller, M W

    1999-10-18

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is present in the central nervous system of Aplysia californica (Gastropoda, Opisthobranchia) where its role as a neurotransmitter is supported by pharmacological, biochemical, and anatomical investigations. In this study, the distribution of GABA-immunoreactive (GABAi) neurons and fiber systems in Aplysia was examined by using wholemount immunohistochemistry and nerve backfill methods. GABAi neurons were located in the buccal, cerebral, and pedal ganglia. Major commissural fiber systems were present in each of these ganglia, whereas more limited fiber systems were observed in the ganglionic connectives. Some of the interganglionic fibers were found to originate from two unpaired GABAi neurons, one in the buccal ganglion and one in the right pedal ganglion, each of which exhibited bilateral projections. No GABAi fibers were found in the nerves that innervate peripheral sensory, motor, or visceral organs. Although GABAi cells were not observed in the pleural or abdominal ganglia, these ganglia did receive limited projections of GABAi fibers originating from neurons in the pedal ganglia. The distribution of GABAi neurons suggests that this transmitter system may be primarily involved in coordinating certain bilateral central pattern generator (CPG) systems related to feeding and locomotion. In addition, the presence of specific interganglionic GABAi projections also suggests a role in the regulation or coordination of circuits that produce components of complex behaviors. PMID:10524338

  9. Hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channels in Aplysia: Contribution to classical conditioning

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    Yang, Qizong; Kuzyk, Pavlo; Antonov, Igor; Bostwick, Caleb J.; Kohn, Andrea B.; Moroz, Leonid L.; Hawkins, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated cation (HCN) channels are critical regulators of neuronal excitability, but less is known about their possible roles in synaptic plasticity and memory circuits. Here, we characterized the HCN gene organization, channel properties, distribution, and involvement in associative and nonassociative forms of learning in Aplysia californica. Aplysia has only one HCN gene, which codes for a channel that has many similarities to the mammalian HCN channel. The cloned acHCN gene was expressed in Xenopus oocytes, which displayed a hyperpolarization-induced inward current that was enhanced by cGMP as well as cAMP. Similarly to its homologs in other animals, acHCN is permeable to K+ and Na+ ions, and is selectively blocked by Cs+ and ZD7288. We found that acHCN is predominantly expressed in inter- and motor neurons, including LFS siphon motor neurons, and therefore tested whether HCN channels are involved in simple forms of learning of the siphon-withdrawal reflex in a semiintact preparation. ZD7288 (100 μM) significantly reduced an associative form of learning (classical conditioning) but had no effect on two nonassociative forms of learning (intermediate-term sensitization and unpaired training) or baseline responses. The HCN current is enhanced by nitric oxide (NO), which may explain the postsynaptic role of NO during conditioning. HCN current in turn enhances the NMDA-like current in the motor neurons, suggesting that HCN channels contribute to conditioning through this pathway. PMID:26668355

  10. Hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channels in Aplysia: Contribution to classical conditioning.

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    Yang, Qizong; Kuzyk, Pavlo; Antonov, Igor; Bostwick, Caleb J; Kohn, Andrea B; Moroz, Leonid L; Hawkins, Robert D

    2015-12-29

    Hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated cation (HCN) channels are critical regulators of neuronal excitability, but less is known about their possible roles in synaptic plasticity and memory circuits. Here, we characterized the HCN gene organization, channel properties, distribution, and involvement in associative and nonassociative forms of learning in Aplysia californica. Aplysia has only one HCN gene, which codes for a channel that has many similarities to the mammalian HCN channel. The cloned acHCN gene was expressed in Xenopus oocytes, which displayed a hyperpolarization-induced inward current that was enhanced by cGMP as well as cAMP. Similarly to its homologs in other animals, acHCN is permeable to K(+) and Na(+) ions, and is selectively blocked by Cs(+) and ZD7288. We found that acHCN is predominantly expressed in inter- and motor neurons, including LFS siphon motor neurons, and therefore tested whether HCN channels are involved in simple forms of learning of the siphon-withdrawal reflex in a semiintact preparation. ZD7288 (100 μM) significantly reduced an associative form of learning (classical conditioning) but had no effect on two nonassociative forms of learning (intermediate-term sensitization and unpaired training) or baseline responses. The HCN current is enhanced by nitric oxide (NO), which may explain the postsynaptic role of NO during conditioning. HCN current in turn enhances the NMDA-like current in the motor neurons, suggesting that HCN channels contribute to conditioning through this pathway.

  11. Habituation in the tail withdrawal reflex circuit is impaired during aging in Aplysia californica

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    Andrew T Kempsell

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of putative contributors to age-related memory loss are poorly understood. The tail withdrawal circuit of the sea hare, a straightforward neural model, was used to investigate the aging characteristics of rudimentary learning. The simplicity of this neuronal circuit permits attribution of declines in the function of specific neurons to aging declines. Memory was impaired in advanced age animals compared to their performance at the peak of sexual maturity, with habituation training failing to attenuate the tail withdrawal response or to reduce tail motoneuron excitability, as occurred in peak maturity siblings. Baseline motoneuron excitability of aged animals was significantly lower, perhaps contributing to a smaller scope for attenuation. Conduction velocity in afferent fibers to tail sensory neurons decreased during aging. The findings suggest that age-related changes in tail sensory and motor neurons result in deterioration of a simple form of learning in Aplysia.

  12. Associative conditioning analog selectively increases cAMP levels of tail sensory neurons in Aplysia.

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    Ocorr, K A; Walters, E T; Byrne, J H

    1985-04-01

    Bilateral clusters of sensory neurons in the pleural ganglia of Aplysia contain cells involved in a defensive tail withdrawal reflex. These cells exhibit heterosynaptic facilitation in response to noxious skin stimulation that can be mimicked by the application of serotonin. Recently it has been shown that this facilitation can be selectively amplified by the application of a classical conditioning procedure to individual sensory neurons. We now report that an analog of this classical conditioning paradigm produces a selective amplification of the cAMP content of isolated sensory neuron clusters. The enhancement is achieved within a single trial and appears to be localized to the sensory neurons. These results indicate that a pairing-specific enhancement of cAMP levels may be a biochemical mechanism for associative neuronal modifications and perhaps learning.

  13. Localization of Biogenic Amines in the Foregut of Aplysia californica: Catecholaminergic and Serotonergic Innervation

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    Martínez-Rubio, Clarissa; Serrano, Geidy E.; Miller, Mark W.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the catecholaminergic and serotonergic innervation of the foregut of Aplysia californica, a model system in which the control of feeding behaviors can be investigated at the cellular level. Similar numbers (15-25) of serotonin-like-immunoreactive (5HTli) and tyrosine hydroxylase-like-immunoreactive (THli) fibers were present in each (bilateral) esophageal nerve (En), the major source of pregastric neural innervation in this system. The majority of En 5HTli and THli fibers originated from the anterior branch (En2), which innervates the pharynx and the anterior esophagus. Fewer fibers were present in the posterior branch (En1), which innervates the majority of the esophagus and the crop. Backfills of the two En branches toward the central nervous system (CNS) labeled a single, centrifugally projecting serotonergic fiber, originating from the metacerebral cell (MCC). The MCC fiber projected only to En2. No central THli neurons were found to project to the En. Surveys of the pharynx and esophagus revealed major differences between their patterns of catecholaminergic (CA) and serotonergic innervation. Whereas THli fibers and cell bodies were distributed throughout the foregut, 5HTli fibers were present in restricted plexi, and no 5HTli somata were detected. Double-labeling experiments in the periphery revealed THli neurons projecting toward the buccal ganglion via En2. Other afferents received dense perisomatic serotonergic innervation. Finally, qualitative and quantitative differences were observed between the buccal motor programs (BMPs) produced by stimulation of the two En branches. These observations increase our understanding of aminergic contributions to the pregastric regulation of Aplysia feeding behaviors. PMID:19330814

  14. Transcriptional regulation of long-term memory in the marine snail Aplysia

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    Lee Yong-Seok

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Whereas the induction of short-term memory involves only covalent modifications of constitutively expressed preexisting proteins, the formation of long-term memory requires gene expression, new RNA, and new protein synthesis. On the cellular level, transcriptional regulation is thought to be the starting point for a series of molecular steps necessary for both the initiation and maintenance of long-term synaptic facilitation (LTF. The core molecular features of transcriptional regulation involved in the long-term process are evolutionally conserved in Aplysia, Drosophila, and mouse, and indicate that gene regulation by the cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB acting in conjunction with different combinations of transcriptional factors is critical for the expression of many forms of long-term memory. In the marine snail Aplysia, the molecular mechanisms that underlie the storage of long-term memory have been extensively studied in the monosynaptic connections between identified sensory neuron and motor neurons of the gill-withdrawal reflex. One tail shock or one pulse of serotonin (5-HT, a modulatory transmitter released by tail shocks, produces a transient facilitation mediated by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase leading to covalent modifications in the sensory neurons that results in an enhancement of transmitter release and a strengthening of synaptic connections lasting minutes. By contrast, repeated pulses of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT induce a transcription- and translation-dependent long-term facilitation (LTF lasting more than 24 h and trigger the activation of a family of transcription factors in the presynaptic sensory neurons including ApCREB1, ApCREB2 and ApC/EBP. In addition, we have recently identified novel transcription factors that modulate the expression of ApC/EBP and also are critically involved in LTF. In this review, we examine the roles of these transcription factors during consolidation of LTF induced

  15. Gastropod arginine kinases from Cellana grata and Aplysia kurodai. Isolation and cDNA-derived amino acid sequences.

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    Suzuki, T; Inoue, N; Higashi, T; Mizobuchi, R; Sugimura, N; Yokouchi, K; Furukohri, T

    2000-12-01

    Arginine kinase (AK) was isolated from the radular muscle of the gastropod molluscs Cellana grata (subclass Prosobranchia) and Aplysia kurodai (subclass Opisthobranchia), respectively, by ammonium sulfate fractionation, Sephadex G-75 gel filtration and DEAE-ion exchange chromatography. The denatured relative molecular mass values were estimated to be 40 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The isolated enzyme from Aplysia gave a Km value of 0.6 mM for arginine and a Vmax value of 13 micromole Pi min(-1) mg protein(-1) for the forward reaction. These values are comparable to other molluscan AKs. The cDNAs encoding Cellana and Aplysia AKs were amplified by polymerase chain reaction, and the nucleotide sequences of 1,608 and 1,239 bp, respectively, were determined. The open reading frame for Cellana AK is 1044 nucleotides in length and encodes a protein with 347 amino acid residues, and that for A. kurodai is 1077 nucleotides and 354 residues. The cDNA-derived amino acid sequences were validated by chemical sequencing of internal lysyl endopeptidase peptides. The amino acid sequences of Cellana and Aplysia AKs showed the highest percent identity (66-73%) with those of the abalone Nordotis and turbanshell Battilus belonging to the same class Gastropoda. These AK sequences still have a strong homology (63-71%) with that of the chiton Liolophura (class Polyplacophora), which is believed to be one of the most primitive molluscs. On the other hand, these AK sequences are less homologous (55-57%) with that of the clam Pseudocardium (class Bivalvia), suggesting that the biological position of the class Polyplacophora should be reconsidered. PMID:11281267

  16. Parallel somatic and synaptic processing in the induction of intermediate-term and long-term synaptic facilitation in Aplysia

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    Sherff, Carolyn M.; Carew, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    The induction of different phases of memory depends on the amount and patterning of training, raising the question of whether specific training patterns engage different cellular mechanisms and whether these mechanisms operate in series or in parallel. We examined these questions by using a cellular model of memory formation: facilitation of the tail sensory neuron-motor neuron synapses by serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) in the CNS of Aplysia. We studied facilitation in two temporal dom...

  17. Complete DNA sequence of the mitochondrial genome of the sea-slug, Aplysia californica: conservation of the gene order in Euthyneura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Bjarne; Kohn, Andrea B; Nahir, Ben; McFadden, Catherine S; Moroz, Leonid L

    2006-02-01

    We have sequenced and characterized the complete mitochondrial genome of the sea slug, Aplysia californica, an important model organism in experimental biology and a representative of Anaspidea (Opisthobranchia, Gastropoda). The mitochondrial genome of Aplysia is in the small end of the observed sizes of animal mitochondrial genomes (14,117 bp, NCBI Accession No. NC_005827). The Aplysia genome, like most other mitochondrial genomes, encodes genes for 2 ribosomal subunit RNAs (small and large rRNAs), 22 tRNAs, and 13 protein subunits (cytochrome c oxidase subunits 1-3, cytochrome b apoenzyme, ATP synthase subunits 6 and 8, and NADH dehydrogenase subunits 1-6 and 4L). The gene order is virtually identical between opisthobranchs and pulmonates, with the majority of differences arising from tRNA translocations. In contrast, the gene order from representatives of basal gastropods and other molluscan classes is significantly different from opisthobranchs and pulmonates. The Aplysia genome was compared to all other published molluscan mitochondrial genomes and phylogenetic analyses were carried out using a concatenated protein alignment. Phylogenetic analyses using maximum likelihood based analyses of the well aligned regions of the protein sequences support both monophyly of Euthyneura (a group including both the pulmonates and opisthobranchs) and Opisthobranchia (as a more derived group). The Aplysia mitochondrial genome sequenced here will serve as an important platform in both comparative and neurobiological studies using this model organism. PMID:16230032

  18. A novel fibroblast growth factor receptor family member promotes neuronal outgrowth and synaptic plasticity in aplysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollak, Daniela D; Minh, Bui Quang; Cicvaric, Ana; Monje, Francisco J

    2014-11-01

    Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF) Receptors (FGFRs) regulate essential biological processes, including embryogenesis, angiogenesis, cellular growth and memory-related long-term synaptic plasticity. Whereas canonical FGFRs depend exclusively on extracellular Immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains for ligand binding, other receptor types, including members of the tropomyosin-receptor-kinase (Trk) family, use either Ig-like or Leucine-Rich Repeat (LRR) motifs, or both. Little is known, however, about the evolutionary events leading to the differential incorporation of LRR domains into Ig-containing tyrosine kinase receptors. Moreover, although FGFRs have been identified in many vertebrate species, few reports describe their existence in invertebrates. Information about the biological relevance of invertebrate FGFRs and evolutionary divergences between them and their vertebrate counterparts is therefore limited. Here, we characterized ApLRRTK, a neuronal cell-surface protein recently identified in Aplysia. We unveiled ApLRRTK as the first member of the FGFRs family deprived of Ig-like domains that instead contains extracellular LRR domains. We describe that ApLRRTK exhibits properties typical of canonical vertebrate FGFRs, including promotion of FGF activity, enhancement of neuritic outgrowth and signaling via MAPK and the transcription factor CREB. ApLRRTK also enhanced the synaptic efficiency of neurons known to mediate in vivo memory-related defensive behaviors. These data reveal a novel molecular regulator of neuronal function in invertebrates, provide the first evolutionary linkage between LRR proteins and FGFRs and unveil an unprecedented mechanism of FGFR gene diversification in primeval central nervous systems.

  19. Morphology, innervation, and peripheral sensory cells of the siphon of aplysia californica.

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    Carrigan, Ian D; Croll, Roger P; Wyeth, Russell C

    2015-11-01

    The siphon of Aplysia californica has several functions, including involvement in respiration, excretion, and defensive inking. It also provides sensory input for defensive withdrawals that have been studied extensively to examine mechanisms that underlie learning. To better understand the neuronal bases of these functions, we used immunohistochemistry to catalogue peripheral cell types and innervation of the siphon in stage 12 juveniles (chosen to allow observation of tissues in whole-mounts). We found that the siphon nerve splits into three major branches, leading ultimately to a two-part FMRFamide-immunoreactive plexus and an apparently separate tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive plexus. Putative sensory neurons included four distinct types of tubulin-immunoreactive bipolar cells (one likely also tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive) that bore ciliated dendrites penetrating the epithelium. A fifth bipolar neuron type (tubulin- and FMRFamide-immunoreactive) occurred deeper in the tissue, associated with part of the FMRFamide-immunoreactive plexus. Our observations emphasize the structural complexity of the peripheral nervous system of the siphon, and the importance of direct tests of the various components to better understand the functioning of the entire organ, including its role in defensive withdrawal responses.

  20. New ultrastructural aspects of the spermatozoon of Aplysia depilans (Gastropoda, Opisthobranchia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vita, P; Corral, L; Azevedo, C

    2001-01-01

    The spermatozoon of the sea hare Aplysia depilans was studied under scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Previous descriptions of this sperm and related species, both from light and electron microscopy, were inconsistent with each other. These descriptions include A. depilans, A. punctata, A. fasciata, A. kurodai and Bursatella leachiplei. Several detailed micrographs provide a new ultrastructural model and reveal new aspects such as the presence of acrosome and the absence of a glycogen piece, therefore the modified dense ring is the terminal structure. Results also show that previous models are incorrect in many aspects. The spermatozoon is a long slender uniflagellated cell with a complex helical structure and a length of approximately 165 microm. Observed in SEM the spermatozoon has an undifferentiated head and tail. The nucleus is cord-shaped and helically intertwined with the axoneme/mitochondrial derivative complex. The mitochondrial derivative has only one glycogen helix. Glycogen presence was demonstrated by Thiéry's method. Typical heterobranchia spermatozoa features are recognised. From bibliographic analysis, a high degree of similarity was found with the sperm of Pleurobranchea maculata (Notaspidea). PMID:11686398

  1. Cytochemical localisation of lysosomal enzymes and acidic mucopolysaccharides in the salivary glands of Aplysia depilans (Opisthobranchia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo-da-Cunha, A

    2002-04-01

    Three types of secretory cells were reported in the salivary glands of Aplysia depilans: granular cells, vacuolated cells and mucocytes. To improve the characterisation of these cells, cytochemical methods for the detection of lysosomal enzymes and acidic mucopolysaccharides were applied. In granular cells, acid phosphatase and arylsulphatase were present in small lysosomes and in some secretory granules. The secretory granules could have received these enzymes after fusion with the small lysosomes that were frequently found very close to them. These cells were not stained with colloidal iron because they do not contain acidic mucopolysaccharides. In vacuolated cells, acid phosphatase and arylsulphatase were detected in lysosomes but not in the secretory vacuoles. Colloidal iron staining revealed the presence of acidic mucopolysaccharides in the vacuoles and in the Golgi apparatus of these cells. In mucocytes, lysosomes were very rare, but the secretion of these cells was very rich in acidic mucopolysaccharides. The filamentous network within the secretory vesicles was completely covered with iron particles, but practically no particles were observed over the granular masses attached to the membrane of the vesicles. Iron particles were also found in the trans-face cisternae of the U-shaped Golgi stacks, but were not seen in the cis-face cisternae or in the rough endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:12117284

  2. Light and electron microscopy studies of the oesophagus and crop epithelium in Aplysia depilans (Mollusca, Opisthobranchia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo-da-Cunha, Alexandre; Batista-Pinto, Carla

    2005-12-01

    The oesophagus and crop epithelium of Aplysia depilans consist in a single layer of columnar cells with apical microvilli, and some of them also possess cilia. Cell membrane invaginations, small vesicles, multivesicular bodies and many dense lysosomes were observed in the apical region of the cytoplasm. In most cells, a very large lipid droplet was observed above the nucleus and a smaller one was frequently found below the nucleus; glycogen granules are also present. Considering these ultrastructural features, it seems that these cells collect nutritive substances from the lumen by endocytosis, digest them in the apical lysosomes and store the resulting products. The cell bodies of mucus secreting flask-shaped cells are subepithelial in the oesophagus and intraepithelial in the crop. Histochemistry methods showed that the secretion stored in these cells contains acidic polysaccharides. Secretory vesicles with thin electron-dense filaments scattered in an electron-lucent background fill most of these cells, and the basal nucleus is surrounded by dilated rough endoplasmic reticulum cisternae containing small tubular structures. Considering the relatively low number of secretory cells, mucus production cannot be high. Moreover, since protein secreting cells were not observed in either oesophagus or crop, extracellular digestion in the lumen of these anterior segments of the digestive tract most probably depend on the enzymes secreted by the salivary and digestive glands. PMID:16260017

  3. Stomach of Aplysia depilans (Mollusca, Opisthobranchia): a histochemical, ultrastructural, and cytochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo-da-Cunha, Alexandre; Batista-Pinto, Carla

    2003-06-01

    We report the results of a morphological, histochemical, and cytochemical characterization of the Aplysia depilans stomach, an organ little studied in opisthobranchs. Very thin ciliated cells with microvilli on their apical surfaces are predominant in the epithelium lining the lumen of the stomach. Many lysosomes with a strong arylsulphatase activity were present in the apical regions of these cells that could also contain some lipid droplets and glycogen. Small peroxisomes were observed, usually around lipid droplets or mitochondria. Bottle-shaped secretory cells are very common in this epithelium and produce a secretion rich in proteins and acidic mucopolysaccharides. Most of the cytoplasm of these mucus-producing cells was filled with a very high number of granules and the nucleus is dislocated to the basal region. Cisternae of rough endoplasmic reticulum were abundant around the nucleus and several Golgi stacks were also present in this area. In spite of the variation in the electron density of the granules, only one type of secretory cell seems to be present in the stomach epithelium, since granules with very different electron densities were frequently found in the same cell. A few neurons were also found in the stomach epithelium of this species. Fibrocytes, muscle cells, nerves, and amebocytes were observed in the connective tissue of the stomach wall. PMID:12655617

  4. The digestive cells of the hepatopancreas in Aplysia depilans (Mollusca, Opisthobranchia): ultrastructural and cytochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo-da-Cunha, A

    2000-02-01

    Digestive cells are the most abundant cell type in the digestive diverticula of Aplysia depilans. These are tall columnar or club shaped cells, covered with microvilli on their apical surface. A large number of endocytic vesicles containing electron-dense substances can be found in the apical zone, but the presence of many heterolysosomes of large diameter is the main feature of these cells. Glycogen particles and some lipid droplets were also observed. Peroxisomes with a circular or oval profile were common, but crystalline nucleoids were not detected in them, although a dense spot in the matrix was observed in a few cases. These organelles were strongly stained after cytochemical detection of catalase activity. The Golgi stacks are formed by 4 or 5 cisternae, with dilated zones containing electron dense material. Arylsulphatase activity was detected in the Golgi stacks and also in lysosomes. Cells almost entirely occupied by a very large vacuole containing a residual dense mass seem to be digestive cells in advanced stages of maturation. The observation of semithin and ultrathin sections indicates that these very large vacuoles are the result of a fusion among the smaller lysosomes. Some images suggest that the content of these large vacuoles is extruded into the lumen of the digestive diverticula. PMID:10798317

  5. Role of nitric oxide in classical conditioning of siphon withdrawal in Aplysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonov, Igor; Ha, Thomas; Antonova, Irina; Moroz, Leonid L; Hawkins, Robert D

    2007-10-10

    Nitric oxide (NO) is thought to be involved in several forms of learning in vivo and synaptic plasticity in vitro, but very little is known about the role of NO during physiological forms of plasticity that occur during learning. We addressed that question in a simplified preparation of the Aplysia siphon-withdrawal reflex. We first used in situ hybridization to show that the identified L29 facilitator neurons express NO synthase. Furthermore, exogenous NO produced facilitation of sensory-motor neuron EPSPs, and an inhibitor of NO synthase or an NO scavenger blocked behavioral conditioning. Application of the scavenger to the ganglion or injection into a sensory neuron blocked facilitation of the EPSP and changes in the sensory-neuron membrane properties during conditioning. Injection of the scavenger into the motor neuron reduced facilitation without affecting sensory neuron membrane properties, and injection of an inhibitor of NO synthase had no effect. Postsynaptic injection of an inhibitor of exocytosis had effects similar to injection of the scavenger. However, changes in the shape of the EPSP during conditioning were not consistent with postsynaptic AMPA-like receptor insertion but were mimicked by presynaptic spike broadening. These results suggest that NO makes an important contribution during conditioning and acts directly in both the sensory and motor neurons to affect different processes of facilitation at the synapses between them. In addition, they suggest that NO does not come from either the sensory or motor neurons but rather comes from another source, perhaps the L29 interneurons.

  6. Distinct expression patterns of glycoprotein hormone subunits in the lophotrochozoan Aplysia: implications for the evolution of neuroendocrine systems in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyland, Andreas; Plachetzki, David; Donelly, Evonne; Gunaratne, Dinuka; Bobkova, Yelena; Jacobson, John; Kohn, Andrea B; Moroz, Leonid L

    2012-11-01

    Glycoprotein hormones (GPHs) comprise a group of signaling molecules critical for major metabolic and reproductive functions. In vertebrates they include chorionic gonadotropin, LH, FSH, and TSH. The active hormones are characterized by heterodimerization between a common α and hormone-specific β subunit, which activate leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein coupled receptors. To date, genes referred to as GPHα2 and GPHβ5 have been the only glycoprotein hormone subunits identified in invertebrates, suggesting that other GPHα and GPHβ subunits diversified during vertebrate evolution. Still the functions of GPHα2 and GPHβ5 remain largely unknown for both vertebrates and invertebrates. To further understand the evolution and putative function of these subunits, we cloned and analyzed phylogenetically two glycoprotein subunits, AcaGPHα and AcaGPHβ, from the sea hare Aplysia californica. Model based three-dimensional predictions of AcaGPHβ confirm the presence of a complete cysteine knot, two hairpin loops, and a long loop. As in the human GPHβ5 subunit the seatbelt structure is absent in AcaGPHβ. We also found that AcaGPHα and AcaGPHβ subunits are expressed in larval stages of Aplysia, and we present a detailed expression map of the subunits in the adult central nervous system using in situ hybridizations. Both subunits are expressed in subpopulations of pleural and buccal mechanosensory neurons, suggesting a neuronal modulatory function of these subunits in Aplysia. Furthermore it supports the model of a relatively diffuse neuroendocrine-like system in molluscs, where specific primary sensory neurons release peptides extrasynaptically (paracrine secretion). This is in contrast to vertebrates and insects, in which releasing and stimulating factor from centralized sensory regions of the central nervous system ultimately regulate hormone release in peripheral glands.

  7. The Tail-Elicited Tail Withdrawal Reflex of "Aplysia" Is Mediated Centrally at Tail Sensory-Motor Synapses and Exhibits Sensitization across Multiple Temporal Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philips, Gary T.; Sherff, Carolyn M.; Menges, Steven A.; Carew, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    The defensive withdrawal reflexes of "Aplysia californica" have provided powerful behavioral systems for studying the cellular and molecular basis of memory formation. Among these reflexes the (T-TWR) has been especially useful. In vitro studies examining the monosynaptic circuit for the T-TWR, the tail sensory-motor (SN-MN) synapses, have…

  8. Asymmetric localization of natural antisense RNA of neuropeptide sensorin in Aplysia sensory neurons during aging and activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beena eKadakkuzha

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite the advances in our understanding of transcriptome, regulation and function of its noncoding components continue to be poorly understood. Here we searched for natural antisense transcript for sensorin (NAT-SRN, a neuropeptide expressed in the presynaptic sensory neurons of gill-withdrawal reflex of the marine snail Aplysia californica. Sensorin (SRN has a key role in learning and long-term memory storage in Aplysia. We have identified NAT-SRN in the central nervous system (CNS and have confirmed its expression by northern blotting and fluorescent RNA in situ hybridization. Quantitative analysis of NAT-SRN in micro dissected cell bodies and processes of sensory neurons suggest that NAT-SRN is present in the distal neuronal processes along with sense transcripts. Importantly, aging is associated with reduced levels of NAT-SRN in sensory neuron processes. Furthermore, we find that forskolin, an activator of CREB signaling, differentially alters the distribution of SRN and NAT-SRN. These studies reveal novel insights into physiological regulation of natural antisense RNAs.

  9. Implication of dopaminergic modulation in operant reward learning and the induction of compulsive-like feeding behavior in Aplysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bédécarrats, Alexis; Cornet, Charles; Simmers, John; Nargeot, Romuald

    2013-06-01

    Feeding in Aplysia provides an amenable model system for analyzing the neuronal substrates of motivated behavior and its adaptability by associative reward learning and neuromodulation. Among such learning processes, appetitive operant conditioning that leads to a compulsive-like expression of feeding actions is known to be associated with changes in the membrane properties and electrical coupling of essential action-initiating B63 neurons in the buccal central pattern generator (CPG). Moreover, the food-reward signal for this learning is conveyed in the esophageal nerve (En), an input nerve rich in dopamine-containing fibers. Here, to investigate whether dopamine (DA) is involved in this learning-induced plasticity, we used an in vitro analog of operant conditioning in which electrical stimulation of En substituted the contingent reinforcement of biting movements in vivo. Our data indicate that contingent En stimulation does, indeed, replicate the operant learning-induced changes in CPG output and the underlying membrane and synaptic properties of B63. Significantly, moreover, this network and cellular plasticity was blocked when the input nerve was stimulated in the presence of the DA receptor antagonist cis-flupenthixol. These results therefore suggest that En-derived dopaminergic modulation of CPG circuitry contributes to the operant reward-dependent emergence of a compulsive-like expression of Aplysia's feeding behavior. PMID:23685764

  10. A cellular model of memory reconsolidation involves reactivation-induced destabilization and restabilization at the sensorimotor synapse in Aplysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sue-Hyun; Kwak, Chuljung; Shim, Jaehoon; Kim, Jung-Eun; Choi, Sun-Lim; Kim, Hyoung F; Jang, Deok-Jin; Lee, Jin-A; Lee, Kyungmin; Lee, Chi-Hoon; Lee, Young-Don; Miniaci, Maria Concetta; Bailey, Craig H; Kandel, Eric R; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2012-08-28

    The memory reconsolidation hypothesis suggests that a memory trace becomes labile after retrieval and needs to be reconsolidated before it can be stabilized. However, it is unclear from earlier studies whether the same synapses involved in encoding the memory trace are those that are destabilized and restabilized after the synaptic reactivation that accompanies memory retrieval, or whether new and different synapses are recruited. To address this issue, we studied a simple nonassociative form of memory, long-term sensitization of the gill- and siphon-withdrawal reflex in Aplysia, and its cellular analog, long-term facilitation at the sensory-to-motor neuron synapse. We found that after memory retrieval, behavioral long-term sensitization in Aplysia becomes labile via ubiquitin/proteasome-dependent protein degradation and is reconsolidated by means of de novo protein synthesis. In parallel, we found that on the cellular level, long-term facilitation at the sensory-to-motor neuron synapse that mediates long-term sensitization is also destabilized by protein degradation and is restabilized by protein synthesis after synaptic reactivation, a procedure that parallels memory retrieval or retraining evident on the behavioral level. These results provide direct evidence that the same synapses that store the long-term memory trace encoded by changes in the strength of synaptic connections critical for sensitization are disrupted and reconstructed after signal retrieval.

  11. Age-related deficits in synaptic plasticity rescued by activating PKA or PKC in sensory neurons of Aplysia californica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew T Kempsell

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Brain aging is associated with declines in synaptic function that contribute to memory loss, including reduced postsynaptic response to neurotransmitters and decreased neuronal excitability. To understand how aging affects memory in a simple neural circuit, we studied neuronal proxies of memory for sensitization in mature versus advanced age Aplysia. Glutamate- (L-Glu- evoked excitatory currents were facilitated by the neuromodulator serotonin (5-HT in sensory neurons (SN isolated from mature but not aged animals. Activation of PKA and PKC signaling rescued facilitation of L-Glu currents in aged SN. Similarly, PKA and PKC activators restored increased excitability in aged tail SN. These results suggest that altered synaptic plasticity during aging involves defects in second messenger systems

  12. Dactyloditerpenol acetate, a new prenylbisabolane-type diterpene from Aplysia dactylomela with significant in vitro anti-neuroinflammatory activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Romero, Carlos; Mayer, Alejandro M. S.; Rodríguez, Abimael D.

    2014-01-01

    A new regular diterpene possessing an unusual 1,6-anti-3-methylcyclohex-2-en-1-ol ring system, dactyloditerpenol acetate (1), has been extracted from the tropical sea hare Aplysia dactylomela and its stereostructure elucidated by spectroscopic methods. The absolute configuration of 1 was determined as 1S, 6S, 7R, 10S, and 11R by application of Kishi’s method for the assignment of absolute configuration of alcohols. The new diterpene potently inhibited in vitro thromboxane B2 (TXB2) (IC50 0.4 μM) and superoxide anion (O2−) (IC50 1 μM) generation from E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated rat neonatal microglia, with concomitant low short-term toxicity. PMID:24279991

  13. Inhibition of ACh release at an Aplysia synapse by neurotoxic phospholipases A2: specific receptors and mechanisms of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossier, P; Lambeau, G; Lazdunski, M; Baux, G

    1995-01-01

    1. Monochain (OS2) and multichain (taipoxin) neurotoxic phospholipases A2 (PLA2), purified from taipan snake venom, both inhibited ACh release at a concentration of 20 nM (90% inhibition in 2 h) at an identified synapse from buccal ganglion of Aplysia californica. 2. The Na+ current was unchanged upon application of either OS2 or taipoxin. Conversely, presynaptic K+ currents (IA and IK) were increased by taipoxin but not by OS2. In addition, OS2 induced a significant decrease of the presynaptic Ca2+ current (30%) while taipoxin increased this latter current by 20-30%. 3. Bee venom PLA2, another monochain neurotoxic PLA2, also inhibited ACh release while non-toxic enzymatically active PLA2s like OS1 (also purified from taipan snake venom) or porcine pancreatic PLA2 elicited a much weaker inhibition of ACh release, suggesting a specific action of neurotoxic PLA2s versus non-toxic PLA2s on ACh release. 4. Using iodinated OS2, specific high affinity binding sites with molecular masses of 140 and 18 kDa have been identified on Aplysia ganglia. The maximal binding capacities were 55 and 300-400 fmol (mg protein)-1 for membrane preparations from whole and buccal ganglia, respectively. These binding sites are of high affinity for neurotoxic PLA2s (Kd values, 100-800 pM) and of very low affinity for non-toxic PLA2s (Kd values in the micromolar range), thus indicating that these binding sites are presumably involved in the blockade of ACh release by neurotoxic PLA2s. Images Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:8583413

  14. Cloning of the non-neuronal intermediate filament protein of the gastropod Aplysia californica; identification of an amino acid residue essential for the IFA epitope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemer, D; Dodemont, H; Weber, K

    1991-12-01

    We describe the isolation and characterization of a full-length cDNA corresponding to the larger non-neuronal (nn) intermediate filament (IF) protein of the gastropod Aplysia californica. Comparison of the sequences of the nn-IF proteins from Aplysia californica and Helix aspersa shows a strong evolutionary drift. At a 72% sequence identity level, the IF proteins of Opisthobranchia and Pulmonata show a larger distance than vimentins from Xenopus and mammals. The sequence comparison of the two snail proteins provides an important step in understanding the epitope of the monoclonal antibody IFA mapped by previous studies to the consensus sequence at the carboxy-terminal end of the rod domain of IF proteins. We identify for the first time in a naturally occurring IF protein a single amino acid exchange which leads to the loss of the epitope. The consensus sequence YRKLLEGEE present in IFA-positive proteins such as the Helix IF protein is changed in the IFA-negative Aplysia protein only by the conservative substitution of the arginine (R) by a lysine (K). Thus, the IFA epitope is not a necessity of IF structure, and its presence or absence on different IF proteins reflects only small changes in an otherwise conserved consensus sequence. Consequently, lack of IFA reactivity does not exclude the presence of IF. This result predicts that IF are much more universally expressed in lower eukaryotes than currently expected from immunological results with the monoclonal antibody IFA. PMID:1724961

  15. Change in excitability of a putative decision-making neuron in Aplysia serves as a mechanism in the decision not feed following food satiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Kathy J.; Wainwright, Marcy L.; Mozzachiodi, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    Although decision making is a ubiquitous function, the understanding of its underlying mechanisms remains limited, particularly at the single-cell level. In this study, we used the decision not to feed that follows satiation in the marine mollusk Aplysia to examine the role of putative decision-making neuron B51 in this process. B51 is a neuron in the feeding neural circuit that exhibits decision-making characteristics in vitro, which bias the circuit toward producing the motor programs responsible for biting behavior. Once satiated, Aplysia decided not to bite for a prolonged period of time (≥ 24 h) when presented with a food stimulus that normally elicits feeding in non-satiated animals. Twenty-four hours after satiation, suppressed feeding was accompanied by a significant decrease of B51 excitability compared to the control group of unfed animals. No differences were measured in B51 resting membrane properties or synaptic input to B51 between the satiated and control groups. When B51 properties were measured at a time point in which feeding had recovered from the suppressive effects of satiation (i.e., 96 h after satiation), no difference in B51 excitability was observed between satiated and control groups. These findings indicate that B51 excitability changes in a manner that is coherent with the modifications in biting resulting from food satiation, thus implicating this neuron as a site of plasticity underlying the decision not to bite following food satiation in Aplysia. PMID:25527117

  16. Toxic, antimicrobial and hemagglutinating activities of the purple fluid of the sea hare Aplysia dactylomela Rang, 1828

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melo V.M.M.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial, hemagglutinating and toxic activities of the purple fluid of the sea hare Aplysia dactylomela are described. Intact or dialyzed purple fluid inhibited the growth of species of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and the action was not bactericidal but bacteriostatic. The active factor or factors were heat labile and sensitive to extreme pH values. The fluid preferentially agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes and, to a lesser extent, human blood cells, and this activity was inhibited by the glycoprotein fetuin, a fact suggesting the presence of a lectin. The fluid was also toxic to brine shrimp nauplii (LD50 141.25 µg protein/ml and to mice injected intraperitoneally (LD50 201.8 ± 8.6 mg protein/kg, in a dose-dependent fashion. These toxic activities were abolished when the fluid was heated. Taken together, the data suggest that the activities of the purple fluid are due primarily to substance(s of a protein nature which may be involved in the chemical defense mechanism of this sea hare.

  17. Release properties of individual presynaptic boutons expressed during homosynaptic depression and heterosynaptic facilitation of the Aplysia sensorimotor synapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy eMalkinson

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Much of what we know about the mechanisms underlying Homosynaptic Depression (HSD and heterosynaptic facilitation is based on intracellular recordings of integrated postsynaptic potentials. This methodological approach views the presynaptic apparatus as a single compartment rather than taking a more realistic representation reflecting the fact that it is made up of tens to hundreds of individual and independent Presynaptic Release Boutons (PRBs. Using cultured Aplysia sensorimotor synapses, we reexamined HSD and its dishabituation by imaging the release properties of individual PRBs. We find that the PRB population is heterogeneous and can be clustered into three groups: approximately 25% of the PRBs consistently release neurotransmitter throughout the entire habituation paradigm (35 stimuli, 0.05Hz and have a relatively high quantal content, 36% of the PRBs display intermittent failures only after the tenth stimulation, and 39% are low quantal-content PRBs that exhibit intermittent release failures from the onset of the habituation paradigm. 5HT-induced synaptic dishabituation by a single 5HT application was generated by the enhanced recovery of the quantal content of the habituated PRBs and did not involve the recruitment of new release boutons. The characterization of the PRB population as heterogeneous in terms of its temporal pattern of release-probability and quantal content provides new insights into the mechanisms underlying HSD and its dishabituation.

  18. MicroRNA-22 Gates Long-Term Heterosynaptic Plasticity in Aplysia through Presynaptic Regulation of CPEB and Downstream Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdinando Fiumara

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The maintenance phase of memory-related long-term facilitation (LTF of synapses between sensory and motor neurons of the gill-withdrawal reflex of Aplysia depends on a serotonin (5-HT-triggered presynaptic upregulation of CPEB, a functional prion that regulates local protein synthesis at the synapse. The mechanisms whereby serotonin regulates CPEB levels in presynaptic sensory neurons are not known. Here, we describe a sensory neuron-specific microRNA 22 (miR-22 that has multiple binding sites on the mRNA of CPEB and inhibits it in the basal state. Serotonin triggers MAPK/Erk-dependent downregulation of miR-22, thereby upregulating the expression of CPEB, which in turn regulates, through functional CPE elements, the presynaptic expression of atypical PKC (aPKC, another candidate regulator of memory maintenance. Our findings support a model in which the neurotransmitter-triggered downregulation of miR-22 coordinates the regulation of genes contributing synergistically to the long-term maintenance of memory-related synaptic plasticity.

  19. Aplysia cell adhesion molecule and a novel protein kinase C activity in the postsynaptic neuron are required for presynaptic growth and initial formation of specific synapses

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Jiang-Yuan; Chen, Yang; Bougie, Joanna K; Sossin, Wayne S.; Schacher, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    To explore the role of both Aplysia cell adhesion molecule (ApCAM) and activity of specific protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms in the initial formation of sensory neuron synapses with specific postsynaptic targets (L7 but not L11), we examined presynaptic growth, initial synapse formation, and the expression of the presynaptic neuropeptide sensorin following cell-specific reduction of ApCAM or of a novel PKC activity. Synapse formation between sensory neurons and L7 begins by 3 h after plating a...

  20. Molecular Cloning, Expression Pattern, and Immunocytochemical Localization of a Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone-like Molecule in the Gastropod Mollusk, Aplysia californica

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Lihong; Tello, Javier A.; Zhang, Weimin; Tsai, Pei-San

    2007-01-01

    Successful reproduction in vertebrates depends upon the actions of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). Despite the wide presence of GnRH in Phylum Chordata, GnRH has not been isolated in protostomes other than the common octopus. To provide information on the evolution of this critical hormone, we isolated the full-length cDNA of a GnRH-like molecule from the central nervous system of a gastropod mollusk, the sea hare Aplysia californica. The open reading frame of this cDNA encodes a prote...

  1. Myogenesis in Aplysia californica (Cooper, 1863) (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Opisthobranchia) with special focus on muscular remodeling during metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollesen, Tim; Wanninger, Andreas; Klussmann-Kolb, Annette

    2008-07-01

    To date only few comparative approaches tried to reconstruct the ontogeny of the musculature in invertebrates. This may be due to the difficulties involved in reconstructing three dimensionally arranged muscle systems by means of classical histological techniques combined with light or transmission electron microscopy. Within the scope of the present study we investigated the myogenesis of premetamorphic, metamorphic, and juvenile developmental stages of the anaspidean opisthobranch Aplysia californica using fluorescence F-actin-labeling in conjunction with modern confocal laser scanning microscopy. We categorized muscles with respect to their differentiation and degeneration and found three true larval muscles that differentiate during the embryonic and veliger phase and degenerate during or slightly after metamorphosis. These are the larval retractor, the accessory larval retractor, and the metapodial retractor muscle. While the pedal retractor muscle, some transversal mantle fibers and major portions of the cephalopedal musculature are continued and elaborated during juvenile and adult life, the buccal musculature and the anterior retractor muscle constitute juvenile/adult muscles which differentiate during or after metamorphosis. The metapodial retractor muscle has never been reported for any other gastropod taxon. Our findings indicate that the late veliger larva of A. californica shares some common traits with veligers of other gastropods, such as a larval retractor muscle. However, the postmetamorphic stages exhibit only few congruencies with other gastropod taxa investigated to date, which is probably due to common larval but different adult life styles within gastropods. Accordingly, this study provides further evidence for morphological plasticity in gastropod myogenesis and stresses the importance of ontogenetic approaches to understand adult conditions and life history patterns. PMID:18157859

  2. Ultrastructural and cytochemical aspects of the basophilic cells in the hepatopancreas ofAplysia depilans(Mollusca, Opisthobranchia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo-da-Cunha, A

    1999-02-01

    The basophilic cells ofAplysia depilanshave a pyramidal shape and a large nucleus usually located near the center or in the basal half of the cell. The nucleus possesses several clumps of condensed chromatin and a prominent nucleolus. The great profusion of rough endoplasmic reticulum cisterns in a major feature of these cells. Secretion granules are accumulated in the apical zone, and arylsulphatase was detected in some of them. In some basophilic cells a very substantial part of the cell volume was occupied by clear vacuoles, some of them reaching 9 mum. However, in other cells only a few vacuoles were observed. Probably the cells with just a few vacuoles are still young, and after a progressive accumulation, the vacuoles become abundant in old cells. The presence of a dark nucleus in the cells with a large number of vacuoles suggests that they are in a final stage of their life. Arylsulphatase was detected in the vacuoles and also in small secondary lysosomes containing substances in digestion. Bundles of tubules with 50 nm in diameter were found within some cisterns of rough endoplasmic reticulum. A cell fraction enriched in mannitol oxidase, extracted from the hepatopancreas of a terrestrial slug, consisted in very similar tubular structures. Using a histochemical method, mannitol oxidase was detected in the basophilic cells ofA. depilans, and it may be associated with the tubular structures of the endoplasmic reticulum. This is the first report of mannitol oxidase in opisthobranch molluscs. Almost spherical peroxisomes with a small nucleoid were abundant in these cells. The nucleoids presented a rectangular section, but a crystalline structure was not evident. The peroxisomes were stained after the cytochemical detection of catalase activity. PMID:18627851

  3. Synaptobrevin/vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP) of Aplysia californica: structure and proteolysis by tetanus toxin and botulinal neurotoxins type D and F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, S; Hu, Y; Binz, T; Kalkuhl, A; Kurazono, H; Tamura, T; Jahn, R; Kandel, E; Niemann, H

    1994-01-01

    Synaptobrevin/vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP) and syntaxin are potential vesicle donor and target membrane receptors of a docking complex that requires N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF) and soluble NSF-attachment proteins as soluble factors for vesicle fusion with target membranes. Members of this docking complex are the target of clostridial neurotoxins that act as zinc-dependent proteases. Molecular cloning of the Aplysia californica synaptobrevin cDNA revealed a 180-residue polypeptide (M(r), 19,745) with a central transmembrane region and an atypically large C-terminal intravesicular domain. This polypeptide integrates into membranes at both the co- and posttranslational level, as shown by modification of an artificially introduced N-glycosylation site. The soluble and membrane-anchored forms of synaptobrevin are cleaved by the light chains of the botulinal toxins type D and F and by tetanus toxin involving the peptide bonds Lys49-Ile50, Gln48-Lys49, and Gln66-Phe67, respectively. The active center of teh tetanus toxin light chain was identified by site-specific mutagenesis. His233, His237, Glu234, and Glu270/271 are essential to this proteolytic activity. Modification of histidine residues resulted in loss of zinc binding, whereas a replacement of Glu234 only slightly reduced the zinc content. Images PMID:8197120

  4. A gonadotropin-releasing hormone-like molecule modulates the activity of diverse central neurons in a gastropod mollusk, Aplysia californica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biao eSun

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In vertebrates, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH is a crucial decapeptide that activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axis to ensure successful reproduction. Recently, a GnRH-like molecule has been isolated from a gastropod mollusk, Aplysia californica. This GnRH (ap-GnRH is deduced to be an undecapeptide, and its function remains to be explored. Our previous study demonstrated that ap-GnRH did not stimulate a range of reproductive parameters. Instead, it affected acute behavioral and locomotive changes unrelated to reproduction. In this study, we used electrophysiology and retrograde tracing to further explore the central role of ap-GnRH. Sharp electrode intracellular recordings revealed that ap-GnRH had diverse effects on central neurons that ranged from excitatory, inhibitory, to the alteration of membrane potential. Unexpectedly, extracellular recordings revealed that ap-GnRH suppressed the onset of electrical afterdischarge (AD in bag cell neurons, suggesting an inhibitory effect on female reproduction. Lastly, using immunocytochemistry (ICC coupled with nickel-backfill, we demonstrated that some ap-GnRH neurons projected to efferent nerves known to innervate the foot and parapodia, suggesting ap-GnRH may directly modulate the motor output of these peripheral tissues. Overall, our results suggested that in A. californica, ap-GnRH more likely functioned as a central modulator of complex behavior and motor regulation rather than as a conventional reproductive stimulator.

  5. Comprehensive enzymatic analysis of the amylolytic system in the digestive fluid of the sea hare, Aplysia kurodai: Unique properties of two α-amylases and two α-glucosidases

    OpenAIRE

    Akihiko Tsuji; Nami Nishiyama; Miki Ohshima; Saori Maniwa; Shuji Kuwamura; Masataka Shiraishi; Keizo Yuasa

    2014-01-01

    Sea lettuce (Ulva pertusa) is a nuisance species of green algae that is found all over the world. East-Asian species of the marine gastropod, the sea hare Aplysia kurodai, shows a clear feeding preference for sea lettuce. Compared with cellulose, sea lettuce contains a higher amount of starch as a storage polysaccharide. However, the entire amylolytic system in the digestive fluid of A. kurodai has not been studied in detail. We purified α-amylases and α-glucosidases from the digestive fluid ...

  6. Evaluation of the cholinomimetic actions of trimethylsulfonium, a compound present in the midgut gland of the sea hare Aplysia brasiliana (Gastropoda, Opisthobranchia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M. Kerchove

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Trimethylsulfonium, a compound present in the midgut gland of the sea hare Aplysia brasiliana, negatively modulates vagal response, indicating a probable ability to inhibit cholinergic responses. In the present study, the pharmacological profile of trimethylsulfonium was characterized on muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. In rat jejunum the contractile response induced by trimethylsulfonium (pD2 = 2.46 ± 0.12 and maximal response = 2.14 ± 0.32 g was not antagonized competitively by atropine. The maximal response (Emax to trimethylsulfonium was diminished in the presence of increasing doses of atropine (P<0.05, suggesting that trimethylsulfonium-induced contraction was not related to muscarinic stimulation, but might be caused by acetylcholine release due to presynaptic stimulation. Trimethylsulfonium displaced [³H]-quinuclidinyl benzilate from rat cortex membranes with a low affinity (Ki = 0.5 mM. Furthermore, it caused contraction of frog rectus abdominis muscles (pD2 = 2.70 ± 0.06 and Emax = 4.16 ± 0.9 g, which was competitively antagonized by d-tubocurarine (1, 3 or 10 µM with a pA2 of 5.79, suggesting a positive interaction with nicotinic receptors. In fact, trimethylsulfonium displaced [³H]-nicotine from rat diaphragm muscle membranes with a Ki of 27.1 µM. These results suggest that trimethylsulfonium acts as an agonist on nicotinic receptors, and thus contracts frog skeletal rectus abdominis muscle and rat jejunum smooth muscle via stimulation of postjunctional and neuronal prejunctional nicotinic cholinoreceptors, respectively.

  7. Evaluation of the cholinomimetic actions of trimethylsulfonium, a compound present in the midgut gland of the sea hare Aplysia brasiliana (Gastropoda, Opisthobranchia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerchove, C M; Markus, R P; Freitas, J C; Costa-Lotufo, L V

    2002-04-01

    Trimethylsulfonium, a compound present in the midgut gland of the sea hare Aplysia brasiliana, negatively modulates vagal response, indicating a probable ability to inhibit cholinergic responses. In the present study, the pharmacological profile of trimethylsulfonium was characterized on muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. In rat jejunum the contractile response induced by trimethylsulfonium (pD2 = 2.46 +/- 0.12 and maximal response = 2.14 +/- 0.32 g) was not antagonized competitively by atropine. The maximal response (Emax) to trimethylsulfonium was diminished in the presence of increasing doses of atropine (P<0.05), suggesting that trimethylsulfonium-induced contraction was not related to muscarinic stimulation, but might be caused by acetylcholine release due to presynaptic stimulation. Trimethylsulfonium displaced [3H]-quinuclidinyl benzilate from rat cortex membranes with a low affinity (Ki = 0.5 mM). Furthermore, it caused contraction of frog rectus abdominis muscles (pD2 = 2.70 +/- 0.06 and Emax = 4.16 +/- 0.9 g), which was competitively antagonized by d-tubocurarine (1, 3 or 10 microM) with a pA2 of 5.79, suggesting a positive interaction with nicotinic receptors. In fact, trimethylsulfonium displaced [3H]-nicotine from rat diaphragm muscle membranes with a Ki of 27.1 microM. These results suggest that trimethylsulfonium acts as an agonist on nicotinic receptors, and thus contracts frog skeletal rectus abdominis muscle and rat jejunum smooth muscle via stimulation of postjunctional and neuronal prejunctional nicotinic cholinoreceptors, respectively. PMID:11960200

  8. H-deficient Bombay and para-Bombay red blood cells are most strongly agglutinated by the galactophilic lectins of Aplysia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa that detect I and P1 antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilboa-Garber, N; Sudakevitz, D; Levene, C; Rahimi-Levene, N; Yahalom, V

    2006-01-01

    The galactophilic lectins Aplysia gonad lectin (AGL) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa lectin (PA-IL), which detect human I and P1 RBC antigens, were examined for hemagglutination of H+ (group O and B) and H-deficient (Bombay and para-Bombay phenotype) RBCs. The results were compared with those obtained using two other galactophilic lectins, Maclura pomifera lectin (MPL) and Arachis hypogaea (peanut) agglutinin (PNA), which share T-antigen affinity, and two fucose-binding H-specific lectins, Ulex europaeus (UEA-I) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa lectin (PA-IIL), as well as with those achieved with anti-I serum. The results revealed that, in contrast to UEA-I and PA-IIL, which preferentially agglutinated H+ RBCs, and to MPL and PNA, which similarly agglutinated all examined RBCs, AGL, PA-IL, and the anti-I serum agglutinated the H-deficient RBCs more strongly than did the H+ RBCs. These findings could be attributed to increased levels of I and P1 antigens on those RBCs resulting from the use of the free common H-type 2 precursor for their synthesis. Since both PA-IL and PA-IIL are regarded as potential pathogen adhesins, it would be interesting to statistically compare the sensitivities of individuals of H+ and H-deficient RBC populations to P. aeruginosa infections.

  9. Comprehensive enzymatic analysis of the amylolytic system in the digestive fluid of the sea hare, Aplysia kurodai: Unique properties of two α-amylases and two α-glucosidases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiko Tsuji

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sea lettuce (Ulva pertusa is a nuisance species of green algae that is found all over the world. East-Asian species of the marine gastropod, the sea hare Aplysia kurodai, shows a clear feeding preference for sea lettuce. Compared with cellulose, sea lettuce contains a higher amount of starch as a storage polysaccharide. However, the entire amylolytic system in the digestive fluid of A. kurodai has not been studied in detail. We purified α-amylases and α-glucosidases from the digestive fluid of A. kurodai and investigated the synergistic action of these enzymes on sea lettuce. A. kurodai contain two α-amylases (59 and 80 kDa and two α-glucosidases (74 and 86 kDa. The 59-kDa α-amylase, but not the 80-kDa α-amylase, was markedly activated by Ca2+ or Cl−. Both α-amylases degraded starch and maltoheptaose, producing maltotriose, maltose, and glucose. Glucose production from starch was higher with 80-kDa α-amylase than with 59-kDa α-amylase. Kinetic analysis indicated that 74-kDa α-glucosidase prefers short α-1,4-linked oligosaccharide, whereas 86-kDa α-glucosidase prefers large α-1,6 and α-1,4-linked polysaccharides such as glycogen. When sea lettuce was used as a substrate, a 2-fold greater amount of glucose was released by treatment with 59-kDa α-amylase and 74-kDa α-glucosidase than by treatment with 45-kDa cellulase and 210-kDa β-glucosidase of A. kurodai. Unlike mammals, sea hares efficiently digest sea lettuce to glucose by a combination of two α-amylases and two α-glucosidases in the digestive fluids without membrane-bound maltase–glucoamylase and sucrase–isomaltase complexes.

  10. Habituation in the Tail Withdrawal Reflex Circuit is Impaired During Aging in Aplysia californica

    OpenAIRE

    Kempsell, Andrew T; Fieber, Lynne A.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of putative contributors to age-related memory loss are poorly understood. The tail withdrawal circuit of the sea hare, a straightforward neural model, was used to investigate the aging characteristics of rudimentary learning. The simplicity of this neuronal circuit permits attribution of declines in the function of specific neurons to aging declines. Memory was impaired in advanced age animals compared to their performance at the peak of sexual maturity, with habituation traini...

  11. Reexamination of the gill withdrawal reflex of Aplysia californica Cooper (Gastropoda; Opisthobranchia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, J L; Edstrom, J; Lukowiak, K

    1989-06-01

    The gill withdrawal reflex (GWR), an important model system for neural mechanisms of learning, varies in form and amplitude within as well as between preparations and is therefore a heterogeneous collection of action patterns, not a reflex. At least 4 action patterns occur in response to mechanical stimulation of the siphon. It is often impossible to categorize a particular movement unambiguously. All may occur spontaneously. Gill movements may be described as combinations of 10 actions; 4 involving vein movements are described here. All actions and action patterns can occur in preparations lacking the central nervous system. Some vein movements may generate considerable force without markedly altering gill area. It is suggested that this explains why some early studies failed to identify the important role of the peripheral nervous system in the GWR. Studies based on the assumption that the GWR involves a single type of movement controlled by cells of the parietovisceral ganglion require reevaluation. PMID:2544202

  12. Taxonomy Icon Data: Kuroda's sea hare [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available .png Aplysia_kurodai_S.png Aplysia_kurodai_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Aplysia+k...urodai&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Aplysia+kurodai&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Aplysia+kurodai&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/i...con.cgi?i=Aplysia+kurodai&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=14 ...

  13. From Aplysia to the constitution: evolution of concepts in behavior analysis / Da Aplysia à constituição: evolução de conceitos na análise do comportamento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Claudio Todorov

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the evolution of concepts in behavior analysis, especially in the writings of Skinner, from the definition of operant behavior and reinforcement contingency to processes of selection by consequences, following the development of a conceptual language that covers both the behavior of molluscs and the metacontingencies included in the constitution of a country. Skinner's first papers used the terminology developed by Pavlov in his studies of conditioned reflexes to deal with behavior in general. From Skinner's doctoral dissertation to the papers published in the 80's there was an evolution, followed by the field of behavior analysis, which today uses the same, sophisticated language to deal with complex issues like cultural practices and the survival of cultures.

  14. Da Aplysia à constituição: evolução de conceitos na análise do comportamento From Aplysia to the constitution: evolution of concepts in behavior analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Claudio Todorov

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se apresentar a evolução de conceitos na análise do comportamento, especialmente nos trabalhos de Skinner, desde a definição do conceito de operante, de contingência de reforço, até os processos de seleção por conseqüências, seguindo o desenvolvimento de uma linguagem teórica que abarca desde o comportamento de moluscos até o texto da Constituição, enquanto metacontingência. Os trabalhos iniciais de Skinner usavam a linguagem desenvolvida por Pavlov no estudo de reflexos condicionados para abranger todo o comportamento. De sua dissertação de doutorado até os trabalhos publicados nos anos 1980, Skinner evoluiu e com ele toda a análise do comportamento, que hoje usa a mesma linguagem mais sofisticada para abordar temas complexos como práticas culturais e a sobrevivência de culturas.This work presents the evolution of concepts in behavior analysis, especially in the writings of Skinner, from the definition of operant behavior and reinforcement contingency to processes of selection by consequences, following the development of a conceptual language that covers both the behavior of molluscs and the metacontingencies included in the constitution of a country. Skinner's first papers used the terminology developed by Pavlov in his studies of conditioned reflexes to deal with behavior in general. From Skinner's doctoral dissertation to the papers published in the 80's there was an evolution, followed by the field of behavior analysis, which today uses the same, sophisticated language to deal with complex issues like cultural practices and the survival of cultures.

  15. DIETARY NITROGEN AVAILABILITY IN MACROALGAE AFFECTS GROWTH OF THE SEA HARE APLYSIA CALIFORNICA (OPISTHOBRANCHIA:ANASPIDEA). (R830414)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  16. MOLECULAR-BIOLOGY OF CLOSTRIDIAL TOXINS - EXPRESSION OF MESSENGER-RNAS ENCODING TETANUS AND BOTULINUM NEUROTOXINS IN APLYSIA NEURONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MOCHIDA, S; POULAIN, B; EISEL, U; BINZ, T; KURAZONO, H; NIEMANN, H; TAUC, L

    1990-01-01

    mRNAs encoding the light chain of tetanus and botulinum neurotoxins were transcribed, in vitro, from the cloned and specifically truncated genes of Clostridium tetani and Clostridium botulinum, respectively, and injected into presynaptic identified cholinergic neurons of the buccal ganglia of Aplysi

  17. Myogenesis in Aplysia californica (Cooper, 1863) (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Opisthobranchia) with special focus on muscular remodeling during metamorphosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wollesen, Tim; Wanninger, Andreas; Klussmann-Kolb, Annette

    2008-01-01

    To date only few comparative approaches tried to reconstruct the ontogeny of the musculature in invertebrates. This may be due to the difficulties involved in reconstructing three dimensionally arranged muscle systems by means of classical histological techniques combined with light or transmissi...... the importance of ontogenetic approaches to understand adult conditions and life history patterns....

  18. Enhancement of synchronization in a hybrid neural circuit by spike timing dependent plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Nowotny, Thomas; Zhigulin, Valentin P.; Selverston, Allan I; Abarbanel, Henry D.I.; Rabinovich, Mikhail I.

    2003-01-01

    Synchronization of neural activity is fundamental for many functions of the brain. We demonstrate that spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) enhances synchronization (entrainment) in a hybrid circuit composed of a spike generator, a dynamic clamp emulating an excitatory plastic synapse, and a chemically isolated neuron from the Aplysia abdominal ganglion. Fixed-phase entrainment of the Aplysia neuron to the spike generator is possible for a much wider range of frequency ratios and is more ...

  19. Isoform Specificity of Protein Kinase Cs in Synaptic Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sossin, Wayne S.

    2007-01-01

    Protein kinase Cs (PKCs) are implicated in many forms of synaptic plasticity. However, the specific isoform(s) of PKC that underlie(s) these events are often not known. We have used "Aplysia" as a model system in order to investigate the isoform specificity of PKC actions due to the presence of fewer isoforms and a large number of documented…

  20. Chemical composition of inks of diverse marine molluscs suggests convergent chemical defenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derby, Charles D; Kicklighter, Cynthia E; Johnson, P M; Zhang, Xu

    2007-05-01

    Some marine molluscs, notably sea hares, cuttlefish, squid, and octopus, release ink when attacked by predators. The sea hare Aplysia californica releases secretions from the ink gland and opaline gland that protect individuals from injury or death from predatory spiny lobsters through a combination of mechanisms that include chemical deterrence, sensory disruption, and phagomimicry. The latter two mechanisms are facilitated by millimolar concentrations of free amino acids (FAA) in sea hare ink and opaline, which stimulate the chemosensory systems of predators, ultimately leading to escape by sea hares. We hypothesize that other inking molluscs use sensory disruption and/or phagomimicry as a chemical defense. To investigate this, we examined concentrations of 21 FAA and ammonium in the defensive secretions of nine species of inking molluscs: three sea hares (Aplysia californica, Aplysia dactylomela, Aplysia juliana) and six cephalopods (cuttlefish: Sepia officinalis; squid: Loligo pealei, Lolliguncula brevis, Dosidicus gigas; octopus: Octopus vulgaris, Octopus bimaculoides). We found millimolar levels of total FAA and ammonium in these secretions, and the FAA in highest concentration were taurine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, alanine, and lysine. Crustaceans and fish, which are major predators of these molluscs, have specific receptor systems for these FAA. Our chemical analysis supports the hypothesis that inking molluscs have the potential to use sensory disruption and/or phagomimicry as a chemical defense. PMID:17393278

  1. Activity-Dependent Calpain Activation Plays a Critical Role in Synaptic Facilitation and Post-Tetanic Potentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoutorsky, Arkady; Spira, Micha E.

    2009-01-01

    Synaptic facilitation and post-tetanic potentiation (PTP) are believed to necessitate active regeneration of the release machinery and supply of synaptic vesicles to a ready-releasable site. The prevailing hypothesis assumes that synapsins play pivotal roles in these processes. Using a cholinergic synapse formed between cultured "Aplysia" neurons…

  2. アメフラシとタツナミガイ(軟体動物)の和歌山県白浜町瀬戸漁港船揚場における5月下旬の夜間出現

    OpenAIRE

    久保田, 信

    2014-01-01

    In late May, 2014, Aplysia (Varria) kurodai and Dollabella auricularia (Mollusca) appeared at only night, changing from former behaviour of these species, probably showed an intrinsically nocturnal characteristics after spawning season is over at wharf of the Seto fishing harbor, Shirahama, Wakayama, Japan.

  3. Proximate composition of marine invertebrates from tropical coastal waters, with emphasis on the relationship between nitrogen and protein contents

    OpenAIRE

    Graciela S Diniz; Elisabete Barbarino; João Oiano-Neto; Sidney Pacheco; Sergio O. Lourenço

    2014-01-01

    The chemical profiles of Desmapsamma anchorata, Hymeniacidon heliophila (Porifera), Bunodosoma caissarum, Renilla muelleri (Cnidaria), Aplysia brasiliana, Eledone massyae, Isognomon bicolor (Mollusca), Echinaster brasiliensis, Echinometra lucunter, Holothuria grisea, Lytechinus variegatus (Echinodermata), and Phallusia nigra (Chordata) were determined. Hydrosoluble protein was the most abundant class of substances for all species, except for the ascidian Phallusia nigra, in which the carbohyd...

  4. Do Different Neurons Age Differently? Direct Genome-Wide Analysis of Aging in Single Identified Cholinergic Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Moroz, Leonid L.; Kohn, Andrea B.

    2010-01-01

    Aplysia californica is a powerful experimental system to study the entire scope of genomic and epigenomic regulation at the resolution of single functionally characterized neurons and is an emerging model in the neurobiology of aging. First, we have identified and cloned a number of evolutionarily conserved genes that are age-related, including components of apoptosis and chromatin remodeling. Second, we performed gene expression profiling of different identified cholinergic neurons between y...

  5. Carbachol can be released at a cholinergic ganglionic synapse as a false transmitter.

    OpenAIRE

    Baux, G; Tauc, L

    1983-01-01

    Carbachol was injected into a presynaptic cholinergic neuron in the buccal ganglion of Aplysia and the quantal aspects of the Cl- -dependent postsynaptic response to a prolonged stimulation were analyzed by a statistical fluctuation method. The calculated amplitude of the miniature postsynaptic current was increased with respect to control. Statistical fluctuation analysis was also used to analyze the postsynaptic response obtained during ionophoretic application of acetylcholine and carbacho...

  6. Synapse- and Stimulus-Specific Local Translation During Long-Term Neuronal Plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Dan Ohtan; Kim, Sang Mok; Zhao, Yali; Hwang, Hongik; Miura, Satoru K.; Sossin, Wayne S.; Martin, Kelsey C.

    2009-01-01

    Long-term memory and synaptic plasticity require changes in gene expression and yet can occur in a synapse-specific manner. mRNA localization and regulated translation at synapses are thus critical for establishing synapse specificity. Using live cell microscopy of photoconvertible fluorescent protein translational reporters, we directly visualized local translation at synapses during long-term facilitation of Aplysia sensory-motor synapses. Translation of the reporter required multiple appli...

  7. Presynaptic transmitter content controls the number of quanta released at a neuro-neuronal cholinergic synapse.

    OpenAIRE

    Poulain, B; Baux, G; Tauc, L

    1986-01-01

    In the buccal ganglion of Aplysia the overloading of the cholinergic presynaptic neuron by exogenous acetylcholine (AcCho) led to an enhancement of the postsynaptic response. The deprivation of choline in the presynaptic neuron by extra- and/or intracellularly applied choline oxidase to prevent AcCho synthesis resulted in a decrease of the postsynaptic response. In both cases, the size of the calculated miniature postsynaptic current (i.e., the size of the quantum) remained unchanged. It was ...

  8. Spatial Regulation of Gene Expression in Neurons During Synapse Formation and Synaptic Plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sangmok

    2013-01-01

    mRNA localization and regulated translation allow individual neurons to locally regulate the proteome of each of their many subcellular compartments. To investigate the spatial regulation of gene expression during synaptic plasticity, we used a translational reporter system to demonstrate synapse- and stimulus-specific translation during long-term facilitation of Aplysia sensory-motor synapse. These studies revealed a role for a retrograde signal from the postsynaptic motor neuron in regulati...

  9. Opposite actions of nitric oxide on cholinergic synapses: which pathways?

    OpenAIRE

    Mothet, J P; Fossier, P; Tauc, L; Baux, G

    1996-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) produced opposite effects on acetylcholine (ACh) release in identified neuroneuronal Aplysia synapses depending on the excitatory or the inhibitory nature of the synapse. Extracellular application of the NO donor, SIN-1, depressed the inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) and enhanced the excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) evoked by presynaptic action potentials (1/60 Hz). Application of a membrane-permeant cGMP analog mimicked the effect of SIN-1 suggesting the par...

  10. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U11481-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AY279095 |pid:none) Aplysia californica vanilloid rece... 35 6.2 DQ390461_1( DQ390461 |pid:none) Transmissible gastroenteritis... Bacillus cereus 03BB102, comple... 35 6.2 DQ201447_1( DQ201447 |pid:none) Transmissible gastroenteritis...34093_1( Z34093 |pid:none) Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (P... 35 6.2 >(Q8T638) RecName: Full=Des-meth

  11. A neuron-in-capillary platform for facile collection and mass spectrometric characterization of a secreted neuropeptide

    OpenAIRE

    Chang Young Lee; Yi Fan; Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Sook Yoon; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2016-01-01

    The integration of microfluidic devices—which efficiently handle small liquid volumes—with separations/mass spectrometry (MS) is an effective approach for profiling the neurochemistry occurring in selected neurons. Interfacing the microfluidic cell culture to the mass spectrometer is challenging because of geometric and scaling issues. Here we demonstrate the hyphenation of a neuron-in-capillary platform to a solid phase extraction device and off-line MS. A primary neuronal culture of Aplysia...

  12. Cycle-to-cycle variability as an optimal behavioral strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Brezina, Vladimir; Proekt, Alex; Weiss, Klaudiusz R.

    2006-01-01

    Aplysia feeding behavior is highly variable from cycle to cycle. In some cycles, when the variability causes a mismatch between the animal's movements and the requirements of the feeding task, the variability makes the behavior unsuccessful. We propose that the behavior is variable nevertheless because the variability serves a higher-order functional purpose. When the animal is faced with a new and only imperfectly known feeding task in each cycle, the variability implements a trial-and-error...

  13. In vitro antibacterial, alpha-amylase inhibition potential of three nudibranchs extracts from South East coast of India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giji Sadhasivam; Arumugam Muthuvel; Wanjale Mrunal Vitthal; Abirami Pachaiyappan; Mohan Kumar; Balasubramanian Thangavel

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To study the antibacterial and antiamylase properties of methanol and acetone extracts of nudibranchs including Bursatella leachii (B. leachii), Kalinga ornata (K. ornata),Aplysia sp. Methods: Crude methanol and acetone extracts of sea slugs were tested for inhibition of fish bacterial pathogens' growth through disc diffusion method. The activity was measured based on the formation of inhibition zone around the disc impregnated with crude extracts. The α-amylase inhibitory effect was also measured calorimetrically. The chemical fingerprinting of the extract was recorded with HPTLC and GC-MS. Results: The solvent extracts of all the three sea slugs showed antibacterial property. The maximum zone of inhibition (>15-20 mm) was recorded for methanol and acetone extracts of K.ornata. The methanol extract of Aplysia sp. exhibited 93% inhibition against α-amylase, following by B. leachii (methanol) 70.6% and K. ornata (methanol) 49.03% inhibition respectively. The acetone extracts didn' t show any notable inhibition. The presence of free amino acids like lysine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, arginine etc., terpenoids and pigents were confirmed through HPTLC analysis. The presence of siloxanes and propanoic acid were also revealed through GC-MS. Conclusions: This study suggests that further scrutinisation of the B. leachii, K. ornata and Aplysia sp. will pave the way for development of antibacterial and α-amylase inhibitory agent for therapeutic application.

  14. In vitro antibacterial, alpha-amylase inhibition potential of three nudibranchs extracts from South East coast of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giji Sadhasivam

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the antibacterial and antiamylase properties of methanol and acetone extracts of nudibranchs including Bursatella leachii (B. leachii, Kalinga ornata (K. ornata, Aplysia sp. Methods: Crude methanol and acetone extracts of sea slugs were tested for inhibition of fish bacterial pathogens' growth through disc diffusion method. The activity was measured based on the formation of inhibition zone around the disc impregnated with crude extracts. The α-amylase inhibitory effect was also measured calorimetrically. The chemical fingerprinting of the extract was recorded with HPTLC and GC-MS. Results: The solvent extracts of all the three sea slugs showed antibacterial property. The maximum zone of inhibition (>15-20 mm was recorded for methanol and acetone extracts of K. ornata. The methanol extract of Aplysia sp. exhibited 93% inhibition against α-amylase, following by B. leachii (methanol 70.6% and K. ornata (methanol 49.03% inhibition respectively. The acetone extracts didn' t show any notable inhibition. The presence of free amino acids like lysine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, arginine etc., terpenoids and pigents were confirmed through HPTLC analysis. The presence of siloxanes and propanoic acid were also revealed through GC-MS. Conclusions: This study suggests that further scrutinisation of the B. leachii, K. ornata and Aplysia sp. will pave the way for development of antibacterial and α-amylase inhibitory agent for therapeutic application.

  15. Acid phosphatase localization in neurons of Bulla gouldiana (Gastropoda: Opisthobranchia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, L J; Fisher, S K

    1975-01-01

    The organization of the ganglia and the ultrastructure of the neurons of Bulla gouldiana are similar to those described for other molluscs. Acid phosphatase positive reactions were found in the large pigmented granules, small dense bodies, multivesicular bodies, and Golgi lamellae and associated vesicles. The small dense bodies and multivesicular bodies may be stages in the formation of the larger pigmented granules which are interpreted as lysosomes. Comparison is made between the pigmented granules in Bulla and the lipofuscin bodies of vertebrate neurons. The possible involvement of these pigmented granules in the hyperpolarization of Bulla and Aplysia neurons to light is discussed. PMID:1122539

  16. Single Memristor Logic Gates: From NOT to a Full Adder

    OpenAIRE

    Gale, Ella

    2015-01-01

    Memristors have been suggested as a novel route to neuromorphic computing based on the similarity between them and neurons (specifically synapses and ion pumps). The d.c. action of the memristor is a current spike which imparts a short-term memory to the device. Here it is demonstrated that this short-term memory works exactly like habituation (e.g. in \\emph{Aplysia}). We elucidate the physical rules, based on energy conservation, governing the interaction of these current spikes: summation, ...

  17. Infrared neural stimulation (INS) inhibits electrically evoked neural responses in the deaf white cat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Claus-Peter; Rajguru, Suhrud M.; Robinson, Alan; Young, Hunter K.

    2014-03-01

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) has been used in the past to evoke neural activity from hearing and partially deaf animals. All the responses were excitatory. In Aplysia californica, Duke and coworkers demonstrated that INS also inhibits neural responses [1], which similar observations were made in the vestibular system [2, 3]. In deaf white cats that have cochleae with largely reduced spiral ganglion neuron counts and a significant degeneration of the organ of Corti, no cochlear compound action potentials could be observed during INS alone. However, the combined electrical and optical stimulation demonstrated inhibitory responses during irradiation with infrared light.

  18. PKA-activated ApAF–ApC/EBP heterodimer is a key downstream effector of ApCREB and is necessary and sufficient for the consolidation of long-term facilitation

    OpenAIRE

    LEE, Jin-A; Lee, Sue-Hyun; Lee, Changhoon; Chang, Deok-Jin; Lee, Yong; Kim, Hyoung; Cheang, Ye-Hwang; Ko, Hyoung-Gon; Lee, Yong-Seok; Jun, Heejung; Bartsch, Dusan; Kandel, Eric R.; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2006-01-01

    Long-term memory requires transcriptional regulation by a combination of positive and negative transcription factors. Aplysia activating factor (ApAF) is known to be a positive transcription factor that forms heterodimers with ApC/EBP and ApCREB2. How these heterodimers are regulated and how they participate in the consolidation of long-term facilitation (LTF) has not, however, been characterized. We found that the functional activation of ApAF required phosphorylation of ApAF by PKA on Ser-2...

  19. 細胞外電位と細胞内電位の微分波形との関係

    OpenAIRE

    猪股, 孝四郎; 太田, 勲; 倉橋, 昌司; イノマタ, コウシロウ; オオタ, イサオ; クラハシ, マサシ; Koshiro, INOMATA; Isao, OOTA; Masashi, KURAHASHI

    2005-01-01

    Intracellular and extracellular potentials from one cell that spontaneously discharged in the Aplysia abdominal ganglion (R10, 11, 12, L10, 12, 13) were recorded simultaneously and summarized as follows: 1. The amplitude of intracellular action potential was 50-70mV and the amplitude of extracellular potential was about 0.3mV. 2. The pattern of extracellular action potential was similar to the differential pattern of intracellular action potential. 3. In the time course, there was a time lag ...

  20. Analysis of neuropeptides using capillary zone electrophoresis with multichannel fluorescence detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweedler, Jonathan V.; Shear, Jason B.; Fishman, Harvey A.; Zare, Richard N.; Scheller, Richard H.

    1991-12-01

    Capillary zone electrophoresis is fast becoming one of the most sensitive separation schemes for sampling complex microenvironments. A unique detection scheme is developed in which a charge-coupled device (CCD) detects laser induced fluorescence from an axially illuminated electrophoresis capillary. The fluorescence from an analyte band is measured over a several centimeter section of the capillary, greatly increasing the observation time of the fluorescently tagged band. The sensitivity of the system is in the 1-8 X 10-20 mol range for derivatized amino acids and peptides. Subattomole quantities of bag cell neuropeptides collected from the giant marine mollusk Aplysia californica can be measured.

  1. Identification of a human homologue of the vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP)-associated protein of 33 kDa (VAP-33): a broadly expressed protein that binds to VAMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, M L; Klip, A; Trimble, W S

    1998-01-01

    We report the identification of a human homologue of the vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP)-associated protein (hVAP-33) that has been implicated in neuronal exocytosis in Aplysia californica. This hVAP-33 shared 50% amino acid identity with the A. californica form and had similar length, structural organization and VAMP-binding abilities. However, in contrast with the neuron-specific expression seen in A. californica, hVAP-33 was broadly expressed, suggesting possible roles in vesicle fusion in both neuronal and non-neuronal cells. PMID:9657962

  2. Biogeographical homogeneity in the eastern Mediterranean Sea - I: the opisthobranchs (Mollusca: Gastropoda from Lebanon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. CROCETTA

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A reviewed knowledge of the opisthobranch species from Lebanon (eastern Mediterranean Sea, based on literature records (scattered throughout various papers published over a period of more than 150 years and recently collected material (1999-2002 within the CEDRE framework and other samples, is presented, yielding a total number of 35 taxa recorded from the Lebanese shores identified to species level. Special emphasis has mainly been given to the alien species, for which scattered notes are also given. The known opisthobranch biota is composed of 22 native (~ 63%, 12 alien (~ 34% and one cryptogenic (~ 3% taxa. Eleven of these (Berthella aurantiaca, B. ocellata, Aplysia fasciata, Felimare picta, Felimida britoi, F. luteorosea, F. purpurea, Phyllidia flava, Dendrodoris grandiflora, D. limbata and Aeolidiella alderi constitute new records for the Lebanese fauna, whilst the examined material of a further seven species (Elysia grandifolia, Pleurobranchus forskalii, Aplysia dactylomela, Bursatella leachii, Syphonota geographica, Goniobranchus annulatus, Flabellina rubrolineata anecdotally cited from Lebanon on the basis of the samples here studied, is here first explained. One additional taxon belonging to the genus Haminoea has been identified to genus level only. Despite the searching effort poning the basis of the material analyzed here, data reported clearly suggest that strong investments are still needed for a better understanding of the eastern Mediterranean opisthobranch fauna.

  3. Compostos biologicamente ativos em invertebrados marinhos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos de Freitas

    1980-12-01

    Full Text Available The author has reviewed the classification, the nomenclature and the ecological aspects of biologically active compounds, emphasizing the Freyvogel & Perret's (1973 concepts of venomous and poisonous organisms. The literature involving the phyla Annelida, Mollusca and Arthropoda was also reviewed. The author's pharmacological studies performed with the polychaete Eurytlioe camplanata, which revealed a dializable principle, active in the guinea pig's ileum and dorsal muscle ot polvchaete itself are also commented. This principle differs from Acetylcholine and Serotonin. Pharmacologically studies in the sea-hares (genus Aplysia were also focused, including the author's contribution. In the glands os Aplysia brasiliana, namely the mid-gut-gland, the opaline gland and the purple gland, the author confirmed presence of cholinesters, which are discussed in the review. Toxicity of Arthropods are also discussed, mainly in decapod crustaceans. In some Brazilian crabs studies revealed a pharmacological activity of the gastric secretion expelled with an apparently defensive purpose and its ecological importance is focused in terms of the community. The relatively scarce studies of chemical ecology of marine organisms in Latin America and the importance of these studies were finally emphasized.

  4. Associative learning in invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Robert D; Byrne, John H

    2015-05-01

    This work reviews research on neural mechanisms of two types of associative learning in the marine mollusk Aplysia, classical conditioning of the gill- and siphon-withdrawal reflex and operant conditioning of feeding behavior. Basic classical conditioning is caused in part by activity-dependent facilitation at sensory neuron-motor neuron (SN-MN) synapses and involves a hybrid combination of activity-dependent presynaptic facilitation and Hebbian potentiation, which are coordinated by trans-synaptic signaling. Classical conditioning also shows several higher-order features, which might be explained by the known circuit connections in Aplysia. Operant conditioning is caused in part by a different type of mechanism, an intrinsic increase in excitability of an identified neuron in the central pattern generator (CPG) for feeding. However, for both classical and operant conditioning, adenylyl cyclase is a molecular site of convergence of the two signals that are associated. Learning in other invertebrate preparations also involves many of the same mechanisms, which may contribute to learning in vertebrates as well. PMID:25877219

  5. Single-neuron transcriptome and methylome sequencing for epigenomic analysis of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroz, Leonid L; Kohn, Andrea B

    2013-01-01

    Enormous heterogeneity in transcription and signaling is the feature that slows down progress in our understanding of the mechanisms of normal aging and age-related diseases. This is critical for neurobiology of aging where the enormous diversity of neuronal populations presents a significant challenge in experimental design. Here, we introduce Aplysia as a model for genomic analysis of aging at the single-cell level and provide protocols for integrated transcriptome and methylome profiling of individually identified neurons during the aging process. These single-cell RNA-seq and DNA methylation assays (methyl-capture/methyl enrichment) are compatible with all major next generation sequencing platforms (we used Roche/454 and SOLiD/Life Technologies as illustrative examples) and can be used to integrate an epigenetic signature with transcriptional output. The described sequencing library construction protocol provides both quantitative and directional information from transcriptional profiling of individual cells. Our results also confirm that different copies of DNA in polyploid Aplysia neurons behave similarly with respect to their DNA methylation.

  6. A neuron-in-capillary platform for facile collection and mass spectrometric characterization of a secreted neuropeptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang Young; Fan, Yi; Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Yoon, Sook; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2016-06-01

    The integration of microfluidic devices—which efficiently handle small liquid volumes—with separations/mass spectrometry (MS) is an effective approach for profiling the neurochemistry occurring in selected neurons. Interfacing the microfluidic cell culture to the mass spectrometer is challenging because of geometric and scaling issues. Here we demonstrate the hyphenation of a neuron-in-capillary platform to a solid phase extraction device and off-line MS. A primary neuronal culture of Aplysia californica neurons was established directly inside a cylindrical polyimide capillary. The approach also uses a particle-embedded monolith to condition neuropeptide releasates collected from several Aplysia neurons cultured in the capillary, with the subsequent characterization of released peptides via MS. This system presents a number of advances compared to more traditional microfluidic devices fabricated with polydimethylsiloxane. These include low cost, easy access to cell culture, rigidity, ease of transport, and minimal fluid handling. The cylindrical geometry of the platform allows convenient interface with a wide range of analytical tools that utilize capillary columns.

  7. Cloning and Characterization of an Abalone (Haliotis discus hannai) Actin Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Hongming; XU Wei; MAI Kangsen; LIUFU Zhiguo; CHEN Hong

    2004-01-01

    An actin encoding gene was cloned by using RT-PCR, 3' RACE and 5' RACE from abalone Haliotis discus hannai. The full length of the gene is 1532 base pairs, which contains a long 3' untranslated region of 307 base pairs and 79 base pairs of 5' untranslated sequence. The open reading frame encodes 376 amino acid residues. Sequence comparison with those of human and other mollusks showed high conservation among species at amino acid level. The identities was 96%, 97% and 96% respectively compared with Aplysia californica, Biomphalaria glabrata and Homo sapience β-actin. It is also indicated that this actin is more similar to the human cytoplasmic actin(β-actin)than to human muscle actin.

  8. Biophysical discussions: ionic channels in membranes held at Airlie, Virginia on 2-5 October 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-10-05

    Partial contents include: Light-activated channels in limulus ventral photoreceptors; Paramagnetic hydrophobic ions as probes for electrically active conformational transitions in Ion channels; Acetylcholine receptor. Dynamic properties; Acetylcholine-activated channel current-voltage relations in symmetrical Na(+) solutions; A molecular model for an acetylcholine binding site. Ion channel and the bilayer helices of the acetylcholine receptor assigned using single group rotation theory and electrostatic interactions; Effects of halothane on the acetylcholine receptor channel in cultured xenopus myocytes; Deuterium oxide effects frog endplate channels; Activation and inactivation kinetics or torpedo Californica acetylcholine receptor in reconstituted membranes; Acetylcholine-induced K(+) current in amphibian atrial cells; Functional reconstitution of rat striatal dopamine agonist receptors into artificial lipid bimolecular membranes; Blocking kinetics at excitatory acetylcholine responses on Aplysia Neurons; The secondary structure of Acetycholine receptor reconstituted in a single lipid component as determined by raman spectroscopy; Molecular and cellular mapping of the voltage-dependent Na(+) channel.

  9. New Mediterranean Biodiversity Records (June 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. NICOLAIDOU

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The present work reports on the extended distribution of nineteen species in the Mediterranean. These are: Upeneus pori(Fish:Turkey, Bursatella leachii (Mollusca, Opisthobranchia: eastern coast of Spain, Sparisoma cretense (Fish: Ionian coastof Greece, Pseudobryopsis myura (Chlorophyta: Turkey, Aplysia dactylomela (Mollusca, Opisthobranchia: Karpathos island,and Kyklades Archipelago, Greece, Asparagopsis armata and Botryocladia madagascariensis (Rhodophyta: South Peloponnesos,Greece, Oxynotus centrina (Fish: Greece, Caulerpa racemosa var. cylindracea (Chlorophyta , Stypopodium schimperi(Phaeophyta Siganus luridus and Stephanolepis diaspros (Fish Percnon gibbesi (Decapoda, Brachyura (Kyklades Archipelago,Greece, Cerithium scabridum (Mollusca, Prosobranchia: Anavissos: Greece and Cerithium renovatum (Mollusca, Prosobranchia:N. Κriti, Cassiopea andromeda (Scyphomedusa: Rhodos Island, Greece, Abra tenuis (Mollusca Bivalvia: VouliagmeniLake, Greece Lagocephalus lagocephalus (Fish: Calabrian coast, Italy and Plocamopherus ocellatus (Mollusca, Opisthobranchia:İskenderun Bay, Turkey.

  10. AcEST: DK955788 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oryza sati... 67 6e-11 sp|Q3TZZ7|ESYT2_MOUSE Extended synaptotagmin-2 OS=Mus musculus G... 66 1e-10 sp|Q9ZT4...848_DICDI Probable serine/threonine-protein kinase D... 65 3e-10 sp|A0FGR8|ESYT2_HUMAN Extended synaptotagmi...p|P41823|SY65_APLCA Synaptotagmin-1 OS=Aplysia californica GN=S... 60 7e-09 sp|Q5M7N9|ESYT3_XENTR Extended s...ynaptotagmin-3 OS=Xenopus tropic... 60 7e-09 sp|Q7ZWU7|EST2B_XENLA Extended synaptotagmin-2-B OS=Xenopus lae...v... 60 9e-09 sp|Q5FWL4|EST2A_XENLA Extended synaptotagmin-2-A OS=Xenopus laev... 60 9e-09 sp|P48231|TCB2_YE

  11. AcEST: DK961580 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available naptotagmin-1 OS=Aplysia californica GN=S... 73 1e-12 sp|Q3TZZ7|ESYT2_MOUSE Extended synaptotagmin-2 OS=Mus ...musculus G... 73 1e-12 sp|A0FGR8|ESYT2_HUMAN Extended synaptotagmin-2 OS=Homo sap...Synaptotagmin-B OS=Discopyge ommata GN=P65-... 63 1e-09 sp|A0FGR9|ESYT3_HUMAN Extended synaptotagmin-3 OS=Ho...DYDRIGTSEPIG 388 >sp|Q3TZZ7|ESYT2_MOUSE Extended synaptotagmin-2 OS=Mus musculus GN=Fam62b PE=1 SV=1 Length ...-NNEVTEVLIKLFDKD 631 + P WNE + + + E+ I+LFD+D Sbjct: 355 KENLSPKWNEVYEALVYEHPGQELEIELFDED 386 >sp|A0FGR8|ESYT2_HUMAN Extended

  12. AcEST: DK955033 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available musculus G... 53 8e-07 sp|P41823|SY65_APLCA Synaptotagmin-1 OS=Aplysia californica GN=S... 53 8e-07 sp|Q5M7N9|ESYT3_XENTR Extended... synaptotagmin-3 OS=Xenopus tropic... 53 8e-07 sp|A0FGR8|ESYT2_HUMAN Extended synapto...tagmin-2 OS=Homo sapiens G... 53 8e-07 sp|Q3TZZ7|ESYT2_MOUSE Extended synaptotagm...in-2 OS=Mus musculus GN=Itsn2 PE=... 50 5e-06 sp|A0FGR9|ESYT3_HUMAN Extended synaptotagmin-3 OS=Homo sapiens...tis elegans G... 47 4e-05 sp|Q5DTI8|ESYT3_MOUSE Extended synaptotagmin-3 OS=Mus musculus G... 47 4e-05 sp|P4

  13. AcEST: DK954129 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. AcEST: DK953789 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 5_APLCA Synaptotagmin-1 OS=Aplysia californica GN=S... 73 1e-12 sp|Q3TZZ7|ESYT2_MOUSE Extended synaptotagmin...-2 OS=Mus musculus G... 73 1e-12 sp|A0FGR8|ESYT2_HUMAN Extended synaptotagmin-2 O...Y62_DISOM Synaptotagmin-B OS=Discopyge ommata GN=P65-... 63 1e-09 sp|A0FGR9|ESYT3_HUMAN Extended synaptotagm...-LDIHVFDQEKHGSDEAMG 299 +P + L I V D ++ G+ E +G Sbjct: 361 VPFEQIQKVTLIITVVDYDRIGTSEPIG 388 >sp|Q3TZZ7|ESYT2_MOUSE Extended...+ E+ I+LFD+D Sbjct: 355 KENLSPKWNEVYEALVYEHPGQELEIELFDED 386 >sp|A0FGR8|ESYT2_HUMAN Extended synaptotagmin-2

  16. Photobacterium swingsii sp. nov., isolated from marine organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Gil, Bruno; Roque, Ana; Rotllant, Guiomar; Peinado, Lauro; Romalde, Jesus L; Doce, Alejandra; Cabanillas-Beltrán, Hector; Chimetto, Luciane A; Thompson, Fabiano L

    2011-02-01

    Six Gram-negative coccobacilli were isolated from Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) from Mexico and haemolymph of spider crabs (Maja brachydactyla) from Spain. All of the isolates grew as small green colonies on thiosulphate-citrate-bile salts-sucrose (TCBS) agar and were facultatively anaerobic, oxidase-positive and sensitive to the vibriostatic agent O/129. Repetitive palindromic PCR analysis revealed a high degree of genomic homogeneity among the isolates. Several phenotypic traits differentiated the isolates from the type strains of species of the genus Photobacterium. DNA-DNA relatedness between two representative isolates and their closest phylogenetic neighbours by 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, Photobacterium aplysiae CAIM 14(T) and Photobacterium frigidiphilum CAIM 20(T), was 44.01-53.85 %. We propose a novel species of the genus Photobacterium to accommodate the six isolates, with the name Photobacterium swingsii sp. nov. The type strain is CAIM 1393(T) (=CECT 7576(T)). PMID:20228205

  17. Changing gears from chemical adhesion of cells to flat substrata toward engulfment of micro-protrusions by active mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai, Aviad; Kamber, Dotan; Malkinson, Guy; Erez, Hadas; Mazurski, Noa; Shappir, Joseph; Spira, Micha E.

    2009-12-01

    Microelectrode arrays increasingly serve to extracellularly record in parallel electrical activity from many excitable cells without inflicting damage to the cells by insertion of microelectrodes. Nevertheless, apart from rare cases they suffer from a low signal to noise ratio. The limiting factor for effective electrical coupling is the low seal resistance formed between the plasma membrane and the electronic device. Using transmission electron microscope analysis we recently reported that cultured Aplysia neurons engulf protruding micron size gold spines forming tight apposition which significantly improves the electrical coupling in comparison with flat electrodes (Hai et al 2009 Spine-shaped gold protrusions improve the adherence and electrical coupling of neurons with the surface of micro-electronic devices J. R. Soc. Interface 6 1153-65). However, the use of a transmission electron microscope to measure the extracellular cleft formed between the plasma membrane and the gold-spine surface may be inaccurate as chemical fixation may generate structural artifacts. Using live confocal microscope imaging we report here that cultured Aplysia neurons engulf protruding spine-shaped gold structures functionalized by an RGD-based peptide and to a significantly lesser extent by poly-l-lysine. The cytoskeletal elements actin and associated protein cortactin are shown to organize around the stalks of the engulfed gold spines in the form of rings. Neurons grown on the gold-spine matrix display varying growth patterns but maintain normal electrophysiological properties and form functioning synapses. It is concluded that the matrices of functionalized gold spines provide an improved substrate for the assembly of neuro-electronic hybrids.

  18. Molecular recognition of neonicotinoid insecticides: the determinants of life or death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomizawa, Motohiro; Casida, John E

    2009-02-17

    Until the mid-20th century, pest insect control in agriculture relied on largely inorganic and botanical insecticides, which were inadequate. Then, the remarkable insecticidal properties of several organochlorines, organophosphates, methylcarbamates, and pyrethroids were discovered, leading to an arsenal of synthetic organics. The effectiveness of these insecticides, however, diminished over time due to the emergence of resistant insect strains with less sensitive molecular targets in their nervous systems. This created a critical need for a new type of neuroactive insecticide with a different yet highly sensitive target. Nicotine in tobacco extract was for centuries the best available agent to prevent sucking insects from damaging crops, although this alkaloid was hazardous to people and not very effective. The search for unusual structures and optimization revealed a new class of potent insecticides, known as neonicotinoids, which are similar to nicotine in their structure and action as agonists of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR). Fortunately, neonicotinoids are much more toxic to insects than mammals due in large part to differences in their binding site interactions at the corresponding nAChRs. This Account discusses the progress that has been made in defining the structural basis of neonicotinoid and nicotinoid potency and selectivity. The findings are based on comparisons of two acetylcholine binding proteins (AChBPs) with distinct pharmacological profiles that serve as structural surrogates for the extracellular ligand-binding domain of the nAChRs. Saltwater mollusk (Aplysia californica) AChBP has high neonicotinoid sensitivity, whereas freshwater snail (Lymnaea stagnalis) AChBP has low neonicotinoid and high nicotinoid sensitivities, pharmacologies reminiscent of insect and vertebrate nAChR subtypes, respectively. The ligand-receptor interactions for these AChBPs were established by photoaffinity labeling and X-ray crystallography. Both

  19. Proximate composition of marine invertebrates from tropical coastal waters, with emphasis on the relationship between nitrogen and protein contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciela S Diniz

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The chemical profiles of Desmapsamma anchorata, Hymeniacidon heliophila (Porifera, Bunodosoma caissarum, Renilla muelleri (Cnidaria, Aplysia brasiliana, Eledone massyae, Isognomon bicolor (Mollusca, Echinaster brasiliensis, Echinometra lucunter, Holothuria grisea, Lytechinus variegatus (Echinodermata, and Phallusia nigra (Chordata were determined. Hydrosoluble protein was the most abundant class of substances for all species, except for the ascidian Phallusia nigra, in which the carbohydrate content was higher. The percentages of hydrosoluble protein (dry weight, dw varied widely among the invertebrates, ranging from 5.88% (R. muelleri to 47.6% (Eledone massyae of the dw .The carbohydrate content fluctuated from 1.3% (R. muelleri to 18.4% (Aplysia brasiliana of the dw. For most of the species, lipid was the second most abundant class of substances, varying from 2.8% (R. muelleri to 25.3% (Echinaster brasiliensis of the dw. Wide variations were also found for the invertebrates nitrogen content, with the lowest value recorded in the cnidarian R. muelleri (2.02% of the dw and the highest in the molluscan E. massyae (12.7% of the dw. The phosphorus content of the dw varyed from 0.24% (R. muelleri to 1.16% (E. massyae. The amino acid composition varied largely among the species, but for most of the species glycine, arginine, glutamic acid, and aspartic acid were the most abundant amino acids, with histidine and tyrosine among the less abundant amino acids. The actual content of total protein in the samples was calculated by the sum of amino acid residues, establishing dw values that fluctuated from 11.1% (R. muelleri to 66.7% (E. massyae. The proteinaceous nitrogen content was high in all species, with an average value of 97.3% of the total nitrogen. From data of total amino acid residues and total nitrogen, specific nitrogen-to-protein conversion factors were calculated for each species. The nitrogen-to-protein conversion factors ranged from 5.10 to

  20. A feasibility study of multi-site,intracellular recordings from mammalian neurons by extracellular gold mushroom-shaped microelectrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojovan, Silviya M.; Rabieh, Noha; Shmoel, Nava; Erez, Hadas; Maydan, Eilon; Cohen, Ariel; Spira, Micha E.

    2015-01-01

    The development of multi-electrode array platforms for large scale recording of neurons is at the forefront of neuro-engineering research efforts. Recently we demonstrated, at the proof-of-concept level, a breakthrough neuron-microelectrode interface in which cultured Aplysia neurons tightly engulf gold mushroom-shaped microelectrodes (gMμEs). While maintaining their extracellular position, the gMμEs record synaptic- and action-potentials with characteristic features of intracellular recordings. Here we examined the feasibility of using gMμEs for intracellular recordings from mammalian neurons. To that end we experimentally examined the innate size limits of cultured rat hippocampal neurons to engulf gMμEs and measured the width of the “extracellular” cleft formed between the neurons and the gold surface. Using the experimental results we next analyzed the expected range of gMμEs-neuron electrical coupling coefficients. We estimated that sufficient electrical coupling levels to record attenuated synaptic- and action-potentials can be reached using the gMμE-neuron configuration. The definition of the engulfment limits of the gMμEs caps diameter at ≤2–2.5 μm and the estimated electrical coupling coefficients from the simulations pave the way for rational development and application of the gMμE based concept for in-cell recordings from mammalian neurons. PMID:26365404

  1. Unraveling the complexities of circadian and sleep interactions with memory formation through invertebrate research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian eMichel

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Across phylogeny, the endogenous biological clock has been recognized as providing adaptive advantages to organisms through coordination of physiological and behavioral processes. Recent research has emphasized the role of circadian modulation of memory in generating peaks and troughs in cognitive performance. The circadian clock along with homeostatic processes also regulates sleep, which itself impacts the formation and consolidation of memory. Thus, the circadian clock, sleep and memory form a triad with ongoing dynamic interactions. With technological advances and the development of a global 24/7 society, understanding the mechanisms underlying these connections becomes pivotal for development of therapeutic treatments for memory disorders and to address issues in cognitive performance arising from non-traditional work schedules. Invertebrate models, such as Drosophila melanogaster and the mollusks Aplysia and Lymnaea, have proven invaluable tools for identification of highly conserved molecular processes in memory. Recent research from invertebrate systems has outlined the influence of sleep and the circadian clock upon synaptic plasticity. In this review, we discuss the effects of the circadian clock and sleep on memory formation in invertebrates drawing attention to the potential of in vivo and in vitro approaches that harness the power of simple invertebrate systems to correlate individual cellular processes with complex behaviors. In conclusion, this review highlights how studies in invertebrates with relatively simple nervous systems can provide mechanistic insights into corresponding behaviors in higher organisms and can be used to outline possible therapeutic options to guide further targeted inquiry.

  2. Unraveling the complexities of circadian and sleep interactions with memory formation through invertebrate research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Maximilian; Lyons, Lisa C

    2014-01-01

    Across phylogeny, the endogenous biological clock has been recognized as providing adaptive advantages to organisms through coordination of physiological and behavioral processes. Recent research has emphasized the role of circadian modulation of memory in generating peaks and troughs in cognitive performance. The circadian clock along with homeostatic processes also regulates sleep, which itself impacts the formation and consolidation of memory. Thus, the circadian clock, sleep and memory form a triad with ongoing dynamic interactions. With technological advances and the development of a global 24/7 society, understanding the mechanisms underlying these connections becomes pivotal for development of therapeutic treatments for memory disorders and to address issues in cognitive performance arising from non-traditional work schedules. Invertebrate models, such as Drosophila melanogaster and the mollusks Aplysia and Lymnaea, have proven invaluable tools for identification of highly conserved molecular processes in memory. Recent research from invertebrate systems has outlined the influence of sleep and the circadian clock upon synaptic plasticity. In this review, we discuss the effects of the circadian clock and sleep on memory formation in invertebrates drawing attention to the potential of in vivo and in vitro approaches that harness the power of simple invertebrate systems to correlate individual cellular processes with complex behaviors. In conclusion, this review highlights how studies in invertebrates with relatively simple nervous systems can provide mechanistic insights into corresponding behaviors in higher organisms and can be used to outline possible therapeutic options to guide further targeted inquiry.

  3. Serotonin-like immunoreactivity in the central and peripheral nervous systems of the interstitial acochlidean Asperspina sp. (Opisthobranchia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochberg, Rick

    2007-08-01

    Species of Acochlidea are common members of the marine interstitial environment and defined in part by their minuscule size and highly divergent morphology relative to other benthic opisthobranchs. Despite these differences, acochlideans such as species of Asperspina display many plesiomorphic characteristics, including an unfused condition of their neural ganglia. To gain insight into the distribution of specific neural subsets within acochlidean ganglia, a species of Asperspina was studied by using anti-serotonin immunohistochemistry and epifluorescence and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Results reveal similarities between Asperspina and larger opisthobranchs in the general distribution of serotonergic perikarya in the central nervous system. Specifically, the arrangement of perikarya into regional clusters within the cerebral and pedal ganglia and the absence of immunoreactive perikarya in the pleural ganglia are similar to the model species of Aplysia californica, Pleurobranchaea californica, and Tritonia diomedea. Moreover, serotonergic innervation of the rhinophores in all opisthobranchs, including Asperspina sp., originates from the cerebral ganglion instead of directly from the rhinophoral ganglion. Serotonergic innervation of the body wall, including the epithelium, muscles, and pedal sole, appears to arise exclusively from pedal and accessory ganglia. These observations indicate a general conservation of serotonin-like immunoreactivity in the central and peripheral nervous systems of acochlidean and other benthic opisthobranchs. PMID:17679719

  4. Functional neuroanatomy of the rhinophore of Archidoris pseudoargus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertz, Adrian; Rössler, Wolfgang; Obermayer, Malu; Bickmeyer, Ulf

    2007-06-01

    For sea slugs, chemosensory information represents an important sensory modality, because optical and acoustical information are limited. In the present study, we focussed on the neuroanatomy of the rhinophores and processing of olfactory stimuli in the rhinophore ganglion of Archidoris pseudoargus, belonging to the order of Nudibranchia in the subclass of Opisthobranchia. Histological techniques, fluorescent markers, and immunohistochemistry were used to analyse neuroanatomical features of the rhinophore. A large ganglion and a prominent central lymphatic channel are surrounded by longitudinal muscles. Many serotonin-immunoreactive (IR) processes were found around the centre and between the ganglion and the highly folded lobes of the rhinophore, but serotonin-IR cell bodies were absent inside the rhinophore. In contrast to the conditions recently found in Aplysia punctata, we found no evidence for the presence of olfactory glomeruli within the rhinophore. Using calcium-imaging techniques with Fura II as a calcium indicator, we found differential calcium responses in various regions within the ganglion to stimulation of the rhinophore with different amino acids. The lack of glomeruli in the rhinophores induces functional questions about processing of chemical information in the rhinophore.

  5. PKC in motorneurons underlies self-learning, a form of motor learning in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colomb, Julien; Brembs, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Tethering a fly for stationary flight allows for exquisite control of its sensory input, such as visual or olfactory stimuli or a punishing infrared laser beam. A torque meter measures the turning attempts of the tethered fly around its vertical body axis. By punishing, say, left turning attempts (in a homogeneous environment), one can train a fly to restrict its behaviour to right turning attempts. It was recently discovered that this form of operant conditioning (called operant self-learning), may constitute a form of motor learning in Drosophila. Previous work had shown that Protein Kinase C (PKC) and the transcription factor dFoxP were specifically involved in self-learning, but not in other forms of learning. These molecules are specifically involved in various forms of motor learning in other animals, such as compulsive biting in Aplysia, song-learning in birds, procedural learning in mice or language acquisition in humans. Here we describe our efforts to decipher which PKC gene is involved in self-learning in Drosophila. We also provide evidence that motorneurons may be one part of the neuronal network modified during self-learning experiments. The collected evidence is reminiscent of one of the simplest, clinically relevant forms of motor learning in humans, operant reflex conditioning, which also relies on motorneuron plasticity. PMID:27168980

  6. Do different neurons age differently? Direct genome-wide analysis of aging in single identified cholinergic neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid L Moroz

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Aplysia californica is a powerful experimental system to study the entire scope of genomic and epigenomic regulation at the resolution of single functionally characterized neurons and is an emerging model in the neurobiology of aging. First, we have identified and cloned a number of evolutionarily conserved genes that are age-related, including components of apoptosis and chromatin remodeling. Second, we performed gene expression profiling of different identified cholinergic neurons between young and aged animals. Our initial analysis indicates that two cholinergic neurons (R2 and LPl1 revealed highly differential genome-wide changes following aging suggesting that on the molecular scale different neurons indeed age differently. Each of neurons tested has a unique subset of genes differentially expressed in older animals, and the majority of differently expressed genes (including those related to apoptosis and Alzheimer’s disease are found in aging neurons of one but not another type. The performed analysis allows us to implicate (i cell specific changes in histones, (ii DNA methylation and (iii regional relocation of RNAs as key processes underlying age-related changes in neuronal functions and synaptic plasticity. These mechanisms can fine-tune the dynamics of long-term chromatin remodeling, or control weakening and the loss of synaptic connections in aging. At the same time our genomic tests revealed evolutionarily conserved gene clusters associated with aging (e.g. apoptosis-, telomere- and redox- dependent processes, insulin and estrogen signaling and water channels.

  7. Single-cell semiconductor sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Andrea B; Moroz, Tatiana P; Barnes, Jeffrey P; Netherton, Mandy; Moroz, Leonid L

    2013-01-01

    RNA-seq or transcriptome analysis of individual cells and small-cell populations is essential for virtually any biomedical field. It is especially critical for developmental, aging, and cancer biology as well as neuroscience where the enormous heterogeneity of cells present a significant methodological and conceptual challenge. Here we present two methods that allow for fast and cost-efficient transcriptome sequencing from ultra-small amounts of tissue or even from individual cells using semiconductor sequencing technology (Ion Torrent, Life Technologies). The first method is a reduced representation sequencing which maximizes capture of RNAs and preserves transcripts' directionality. The second, a template-switch protocol, is designed for small mammalian neurons. Both protocols, from cell/tissue isolation to final sequence data, take up to 4 days. The efficiency of these protocols has been validated with single hippocampal neurons and various invertebrate tissues including individually identified neurons within a simpler memory-forming circuit of Aplysia californica and early (1-, 2-, 4-, 8-cells) embryonic and developmental stages from basal metazoans.

  8. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Molecular Distributions in Cultured Neurons and Their Processes: Comparative Analysis of Sample Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Kevin R.; Li, Zhen; Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2012-11-01

    Neurons often exhibit a complex chemical distribution and topography; therefore, sample preparation protocols that preserve structures ranging from relatively large cell somata to small neurites and growth cones are important factors in secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) imaging studies. Here, SIMS was used to investigate the subcellular localization of lipids and lipophilic species in neurons from Aplysia californica. Using individual neurons cultured on silicon wafers, we compared and optimized several SIMS sampling approaches. After an initial step to remove the high salt culturing media, formaldehyde, paraformaldehyde, and glycerol, and various combinations thereof, were tested for their ability to achieve cell stabilization during and after the removal of extracellular media. These treatments improved the preservation of cellular morphology as visualized with SIMS imaging. For analytes >250 Da, coating the cell surface with a 3.2 nm-thick gold layer increased the ion intensity; multiple analytes previously not observed or observed at low abundance were detected, including intact cholesterol and vitamin E molecular ions. However, once a sample was coated, many of the lower molecular mass (cultured neurons over a broad mass range with enhanced image contrast.

  9. Fast and slow activation kinetics of voltage-gated sodium channels in molluscan neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilly, W F; Gillette, R; McFarlane, M

    1997-05-01

    Whole cell patch-clamp recordings of Na current (I(Na)) were made under identical experimental conditions from isolated neurons from cephalopod (Loligo, Octopus) and gastropod (Aplysia, Pleurobranchaea, Doriopsilla) species to compare properties of activation gating. Voltage dependence of peak Na conductance (gNa) is very similar in all cases, but activation kinetics in the gastropod neurons studied are markedly slower. Kinetic differences are very pronounced only over the voltage range spanned by the gNa-voltage relation. At positive and negative extremes of voltage, activation and deactivation kinetics of I(Na) are practically indistinguishable in all species studied. Voltage-dependent rate constants underlying activation of the slow type of Na channel found in gastropods thus appear to be much more voltage dependent than are the equivalent rates in the universally fast type of channel that predominates in cephalopods. Voltage dependence of inactivation kinetics shows a similar pattern and is representative of activation kinetics for the two types of Na channels. Neurons with fast Na channels can thus make much more rapid adjustments in the number of open Na channels at physiologically relevant voltages than would be possible with only slow Na channels. This capability appears to be an adaptation that is highly evolved in cephalopods, which are well known for their high-speed swimming behaviors. Similarities in slow and fast Na channel subtypes in molluscan and mammalian neurons are discussed. PMID:9163364

  10. Atomic interactions of neonicotinoid agonists with AChBP: Molecular recognition of the distinctive electronegative pharmacophore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talley, Todd T.; Harel, Michal; Hibbs, Ryan E.; Radi, Zoran; Tomizawa, Motohiro; Casida, John E.; Taylor, Palmer (UCB); (UCSD)

    2008-07-28

    Acetylcholine-binding proteins (AChBPs) from mollusks are suitable structural and functional surrogates of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors when combined with transmembrane spans of the nicotinic receptor. These proteins assemble as a pentamer with identical ACh binding sites at the subunit interfaces and show ligand specificities resembling those of the nicotinic receptor for agonists and antagonists. A subset of ligands, termed the neonicotinoids, exhibit specificity for insect nicotinic receptors and selective toxicity as insecticides. AChBPs are of neither mammalian nor insect origin and exhibit a distinctive pattern of selectivity for the neonicotinoid ligands. We define here the binding orientation and determinants of differential molecular recognition for the neonicotinoids and classical nicotinoids by estimates of kinetic and equilibrium binding parameters and crystallographic analysis. Neonicotinoid complex formation is rapid and accompanied by quenching of the AChBP tryptophan fluorescence. Comparisons of the neonicotinoids imidacloprid and thiacloprid in the binding site from Aplysia californica AChBP at 2.48 and 1.94 {angstrom} in resolution reveal a single conformation of the bound ligands with four of the five sites occupied in the pentameric crystal structure. The neonicotinoid electronegative pharmacophore is nestled in an inverted direction compared with the nicotinoid cationic functionality at the subunit interfacial binding pocket. Characteristic of several agonists, loop C largely envelops the ligand, positioning aromatic side chains to interact optimally with conjugated and hydrophobic regions of the neonicotinoid. This template defines the association of interacting amino acids and their energetic contributions to the distinctive interactions of neonicotinoids.

  11. The rates of protein synthesis and degradation account for the differential response of neurons to spaced and massed training protocols.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faisal Naqib

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The sensory-motor neuron synapse of Aplysia is an excellent model system for investigating the biochemical changes underlying memory formation. In this system, training that is separated by rest periods (spaced training leads to persistent changes in synaptic strength that depend on biochemical pathways that are different from those that occur when the training lacks rest periods (massed training. Recently, we have shown that in isolated sensory neurons, applications of serotonin, the neurotransmitter implicated in inducing these synaptic changes during memory formation, lead to desensitization of the PKC Apl II response, in a manner that depends on the method of application (spaced versus massed. Here, we develop a mathematical model of this response in order to gain insight into how neurons sense these different training protocols. The model was developed incrementally, and each component was experimentally validated, leading to two novel findings: First, the increased desensitization due to PKA-mediated heterologous desensitization is coupled to a faster recovery than the homologous desensitization that occurs in the absence of PKA activity. Second, the model suggests that increased spacing leads to greater desensitization due to the short half-life of a hypothetical protein, whose production prevents homologous desensitization. Thus, we predict that the effects of differential spacing are largely driven by the rates of production and degradation of proteins. This prediction suggests a powerful mechanism by which information about time is incorporated into neuronal processing.

  12. A new photosensory function for simple photoreceptors, the intrinsically photoresponsive neurons of the sea slug Onchidium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsukasa Gotow

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Simple photoreceptors, namely intrinsically light-sensitive neurons without microvilli and/or cilia, have long been known to exist in the central ganglia of crayfish, Aplysia, Onchidium, and Helix. These simple photoreceptors are not only first-order photosensory cells, but also second-order neurons (interneurons, relaying several kinds of sensory synaptic inputs. Another important issue is that the photoresponses of these simple photoreceptors show very slow kinetics and little adaptation. These characteristics suggest that the simple photoreceptors of the Onchidium have a function in non-image-forming vision, different from classical eye photoreceptors used for cording dynamic images of vision. The cited literature provides evidence that the depolarizing and hyperpolarizing photoresponses of simple photoreceptors play a role in the long-lasting potentiation of synaptic transmission of excitatory and inhibitory sensory inputs, and as well as in the potentiation and the suppression of the subsequent behavioral outputs. In short, we suggest that simple photoreceptors operate in the general potentiation of synaptic transmission and subsequent motor output; i.e., they perform a new photosensory function.

  13. Functional expression of soluble forms of human CD38 in Escherichia coli and Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryxell, K B; O'Donoghue, K; Graeff, R M; Lee, H C; Branton, W D

    1995-06-01

    Cyclic adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribose (cADPR), a metabolite of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+), mobilizes calcium from intracellular stores in many cells. The synthesis of cADPR from NAD+ and its subsequent hydrolysis to ADPR is catalyzed by an ADP-ribosyl cyclase and a cADPR hydrolase, respectively. The ADP-ribosyl cyclase cloned from the ovotestis of the marine invertebrate Aplysia californica has amino acid sequence homology to the human lymphocyte surface antigen CD38. CD38 has been shown to catalyze both the formation and the hydrolysis of cADPR. In this study, we produced soluble, enzymatically active CD38 using recombinant expression techniques in bacteria and yeast. We engineered a gene coding for a soluble form of CD38 by excision of the region of the gene coding for the N-terminal amino acids representing the putative membrane spanning sequence and short putative intracellular sequence. For expression in bacteria (Escherichia coli), this construct was cloned into the pFlag-1 plasmid which allows induced, periplasmic expression and relatively simple purification of the soluble CD38. For expression in yeast (Pichia pastoris) the CD38 sequence was further modified to eliminate four putative N-linked glycosylation sites and the resulting construct was expressed as a secreted protein. Both systems produce soluble enzymes of approximately 30 kDa and both recombinant enzymes display similar cyclase and hydrolase activities. PMID:7663169

  14. New Invertebrate Vectors of Okadaic Acid from the North Atlantic Waters—Portugal (Azores and Madeira and Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Silva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Okadaic acid and its analogues are potent phosphatase inhibitors that cause Diarrheic Shellfish Poisoning (DSP through the ingestion of contaminated shellfish by humans. This group of toxins is transmitted worldwide but the number of poisoning incidents has declined over the last 20 years due to legislation and monitoring programs that were implemented for bivalves. In the summer of 2012 and 2013, we collected a total of 101 samples of 22 different species that were made up of benthic and subtidal organisms such echinoderms, crustaceans, bivalves and gastropods from Madeira, São Miguel Island (Azores archipelago and the northwestern coast of Morocco. The samples were analyzed by UPLC-MS/MS. Our main objective was to detect new vectors for these biotoxins. We can report nine new vectors for these toxins in the North Atlantic: Astropecten aranciacus, Arbacia lixula, Echinaster sepositus, Holothuria sanctori, Ophidiaster ophidianus, Onchidella celtica, Aplysia depilans, Patella spp., and Stramonita haemostoma. Differences in toxin contents among the species were found. Even though low concentrations were detected, the levels of toxins that were present, especially in edible species, indicate the importance of these types of studies. Routine monitoring should be extended to comprise a wider number of vectors other than for bivalves of okadaic acid and its analogues.

  15. New Invertebrate Vectors of Okadaic Acid from the North Atlantic Waters—Portugal (Azores and Madeira) and Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Marisa; Rodriguez, Inés; Barreiro, Aldo; Kaufmann, Manfred; Neto, Ana Isabel; Hassouani, Meryem; Sabour, Brahim; Alfonso, Amparo; Botana, Luis M.; Vasconcelos, Vitor

    2015-01-01

    Okadaic acid and its analogues are potent phosphatase inhibitors that cause Diarrheic Shellfish Poisoning (DSP) through the ingestion of contaminated shellfish by humans. This group of toxins is transmitted worldwide but the number of poisoning incidents has declined over the last 20 years due to legislation and monitoring programs that were implemented for bivalves. In the summer of 2012 and 2013, we collected a total of 101 samples of 22 different species that were made up of benthic and subtidal organisms such echinoderms, crustaceans, bivalves and gastropods from Madeira, São Miguel Island (Azores archipelago) and the northwestern coast of Morocco. The samples were analyzed by UPLC-MS/MS. Our main objective was to detect new vectors for these biotoxins. We can report nine new vectors for these toxins in the North Atlantic: Astropecten aranciacus, Arbacia lixula, Echinaster sepositus, Holothuria sanctori, Ophidiaster ophidianus, Onchidella celtica, Aplysia depilans, Patella spp., and Stramonita haemostoma. Differences in toxin contents among the species were found. Even though low concentrations were detected, the levels of toxins that were present, especially in edible species, indicate the importance of these types of studies. Routine monitoring should be extended to comprise a wider number of vectors other than for bivalves of okadaic acid and its analogues. PMID:26670254

  16. In Vitro Studies of Neuronal Networks and Synaptic Plasticity in Invertebrates and in Mammals Using Multielectrode Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Massobrio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain functions are strictly dependent on neural connections formed during development and modified during life. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying synaptogenesis and plastic changes involved in learning and memory have been analyzed in detail in simple animals such as invertebrates and in circuits of mammalian brains mainly by intracellular recordings of neuronal activity. In the last decades, the evolution of techniques such as microelectrode arrays (MEAs that allow simultaneous, long-lasting, noninvasive, extracellular recordings from a large number of neurons has proven very useful to study long-term processes in neuronal networks in vivo and in vitro. In this work, we start off by briefly reviewing the microelectrode array technology and the optimization of the coupling between neurons and microtransducers to detect subthreshold synaptic signals. Then, we report MEA studies of circuit formation and activity in invertebrate models such as Lymnaea, Aplysia, and Helix. In the following sections, we analyze plasticity and connectivity in cultures of mammalian dissociated neurons, focusing on spontaneous activity and electrical stimulation. We conclude by discussing plasticity in closed-loop experiments.

  17. Protein phosphatase-dependent circadian regulation of intermediate-term associative memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Maximilian; Gardner, Jacob S; Green, Charity L; Organ, Chelsea L; Lyons, Lisa C

    2013-03-01

    The endogenous circadian clock is a principal factor modulating memory across species. Determining the processes through which the circadian clock modulates memory formation is a key issue in understanding and identifying mechanisms to improve memory. We used the marine mollusk Aplysia californica to investigate circadian modulation of intermediate-term memory (ITM) and the mechanisms through which the circadian clock phase specifically suppresses memory using the operant learning paradigm, learning that food is inedible. We found that ITM, a temporally and mechanistically distinct form of memory, is rhythmically expressed under light-dark and constant conditions when induced by either massed or spaced training. Strong circadian regulation of ITM occurs with memory exhibited only by animals trained during the early subjective day; no apparent memory is expressed when training occurs during the late subjective day or night. Given the necessity of multiple persistent kinase cascades for ITM, we investigated whether protein phosphatase activity affected circadian modulation. Inhibition of protein phosphatases 1 and 2A blocked ITM when animals were trained during the early (subjective) day while resulting in phase-specific memory rescue when animals were trained late in the subjective day and early night. In contrast, inhibition of calcineurin did not block ITM when animals were trained during the early day and permitted ITM when animals were trained during the late subjective day, early evening, and throughout the night. These results demonstrate that levels of protein phosphatase activity are critical regulators of ITM and one mechanism through which the circadian clock regulates memory formation.

  18. In vitro studies of neuronal networks and synaptic plasticity in invertebrates and in mammals using multielectrode arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massobrio, Paolo; Tessadori, Jacopo; Chiappalone, Michela; Ghirardi, Mirella

    2015-01-01

    Brain functions are strictly dependent on neural connections formed during development and modified during life. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying synaptogenesis and plastic changes involved in learning and memory have been analyzed in detail in simple animals such as invertebrates and in circuits of mammalian brains mainly by intracellular recordings of neuronal activity. In the last decades, the evolution of techniques such as microelectrode arrays (MEAs) that allow simultaneous, long-lasting, noninvasive, extracellular recordings from a large number of neurons has proven very useful to study long-term processes in neuronal networks in vivo and in vitro. In this work, we start off by briefly reviewing the microelectrode array technology and the optimization of the coupling between neurons and microtransducers to detect subthreshold synaptic signals. Then, we report MEA studies of circuit formation and activity in invertebrate models such as Lymnaea, Aplysia, and Helix. In the following sections, we analyze plasticity and connectivity in cultures of mammalian dissociated neurons, focusing on spontaneous activity and electrical stimulation. We conclude by discussing plasticity in closed-loop experiments.

  19. New Invertebrate Vectors of Okadaic Acid from the North Atlantic Waters--Portugal (Azores and Madeira) and Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Marisa; Rodriguez, Inés; Barreiro, Aldo; Kaufmann, Manfred; Isabel Neto, Ana; Hassouani, Meryem; Sabour, Brahim; Alfonso, Amparo; Botana, Luis M; Vasconcelos, Vitor

    2015-12-01

    Okadaic acid and its analogues are potent phosphatase inhibitors that cause Diarrheic Shellfish Poisoning (DSP) through the ingestion of contaminated shellfish by humans. This group of toxins is transmitted worldwide but the number of poisoning incidents has declined over the last 20 years due to legislation and monitoring programs that were implemented for bivalves. In the summer of 2012 and 2013, we collected a total of 101 samples of 22 different species that were made up of benthic and subtidal organisms such echinoderms, crustaceans, bivalves and gastropods from Madeira, São Miguel Island (Azores archipelago) and the northwestern coast of Morocco. The samples were analyzed by UPLC-MS/MS. Our main objective was to detect new vectors for these biotoxins. We can report nine new vectors for these toxins in the North Atlantic: Astropecten aranciacus, Arbacia lixula, Echinaster sepositus, Holothuria sanctori, Ophidiaster ophidianus, Onchidella celtica, Aplysia depilans, Patella spp., and Stramonita haemostoma. Differences in toxin contents among the species were found. Even though low concentrations were detected, the levels of toxins that were present, especially in edible species, indicate the importance of these types of studies. Routine monitoring should be extended to comprise a wider number of vectors other than for bivalves of okadaic acid and its analogues. PMID:26670254

  20. Functional Authentication of a Novel Gastropod Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Receptor Reveals Unusual Features and Evolutionary Insight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanaugh, Scott I.

    2016-01-01

    A gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-like molecule was previously identified in a gastropod, Aplysia californica, and named ap-GnRH. In this study, we cloned the full-length cDNA of a putative ap-GnRH receptor (ap-GnRHR) and functionally authenticated this receptor as a bona fide ap-GnRHR. This receptor contains two potential translation start sites, each accompanied by a Kozak sequence, suggesting the translation of a long and a short form of the receptor is possible. The putative ap-GnRHR maintains the conserved structural motifs of GnRHR-like receptors and shares 45% sequence identity with the octopus GnRHR. The expression of the putative ap-GnRHR short form is ubiquitous in all tissues examined, whereas the long form is only expressed in parts of the central nervous system, osphradium, small hermaphroditic duct, and ovotestis. The cDNA encoding the long or the short receptor was transfected into the Drosophila S2 cell line and subject to a radioreceptor assay using 125I-labeled ap-GnRH as the radioligand. Further, the transfected cells were treated with various concentrations of ap-GnRH and measured for the accumulation of cAMP and inositol monophosphate (IP1). Radioreceptor assay revealed that only the long receptor bound specifically to the radioligand. Further, only the long receptor responded to ap-GnRH with an increased accumulation of IP1, but not cAMP. Our studies show that despite the more prevalent expression of the short receptor, only the long receptor is the functional ap-GnRHR. Importantly, this is only the second report on the authentication of a protostome GnRHR, and based on the function and the phylogenetic grouping of ap-GnRHR, we suggest that this receptor is more similar to protostome corazonin receptors than chordate GnRHRs. PMID:27467252

  1. Bioactive molecules from sea hares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, H; Sakai, R; Jimbo, M

    2006-01-01

    Sea hares, belonging to the order Opisthobranchia, subclass Gastropoda, are mollusks that have attracted many researchers who are interested in the chemical defense mechanisms of these soft and "shell-less" snails. Numbers of small molecules of dietary origin have been isolated from sea hares and some have ecologically relevant activities, such as fish deterrent activity or toxicity. Recently, however, greater attention has been paid to biomedically interesting sea hare isolates such as dolastatins, a series of antitumor peptide/macrolides isolated from Dolabella auricularia. Another series of bioactive peptide/macrolides, as represented by aplyronines, have been isolated from sea hares in Japanese waters. Although earlier studies indicated the potent antitumor activity of aplyronines, their clinical development has never been conducted because of the minute amount of compound available from the natural source. Recent synthetic studies, however, have made it possible to prepare these compounds and analogs for a structure-activity relationship study, and started to uncover their unique action mechanism towards their putative targets, microfilaments. Here, recent findings of small antitumor molecules isolated from Japanese sea hares are reviewed. Sea hares are also known to produce cytotoxic and antimicrobial proteins. In contrast to the small molecules of dietary origin, proteins are the genetic products of sea hares and they are likely to have some primary physiological functions in addition to ecological roles in the sea hare. Based on the biochemical properties and phylogenetic analysis of these proteins, we propose that they belong to one family of molecule, the "Aplysianin A family," although their molecular weights are apparently divided into two groups. Interestingly, the active principles in Aplysia species and Dolabella auricularia were shown to be L-amino acid oxidase (LAAO), a flavin enzyme that oxidizes an alpha-amino group of the substrate with

  2. P-glycoprotein and its inducible expression in three bivalve species after exposure to Prorocentrum lima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lu; Liu, Su-Li; Zheng, Jian-Wei; Li, Hong-Ye; Liu, Jie-Sheng; Yang, Wei-Dong

    2015-12-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp or ABCB1) belongs to the family of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters responsible for multixenobiotic resistance (MXR) in aquatic organisms. To provide more information of P-gp in shellfish, in this study, complete cDNA of P-gp in three bivalve species including Ruditapes philippinarum, Scapharca subcrenata and Tegillarca granosa were cloned and its expressions in gill, digestive gland, adductor muscle and mantle of the three bivalves were detected after exposure to Prorocentrum lima, a toxogenic dinoflagellate. The complete sequences of R. philippinarum, S. subcrenata and T. granosa P-gp showed high homology with MDR/P-gp/ABCB proteins from other species, having a typical sequence organization as full transporters from the ABCB family. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the amino acid sequences of P-gp from S. subcrenata and T. granosa had a closest relationship, forming an independent branch, then grouping into the other branch with Mytilus californianus, Mytilus galloprovincialis and Crassostrea gigas. However, P-gp sequences from R. philippinarum were more similar to the homologs from the more distantly related Aplysia californica than to homologs from S. subcrenata and T. granosa, suggesting that bivalves P-gp might have different paralogs. P-glycoprotein expressed in all detected tissues but there were large differences between them. After exposure to P. lima, the expression of P-gp changed in the four tissues in varying degrees within the same species and between different species, but the changes in mRNA and protein level were not always synchronous.

  3. Sea urchin coelomocytes are resistant to a variety of DNA damaging agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loram, Jeannette; Raudonis, Renee; Chapman, Jecar; Lortie, Mae [Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences, St. George' s, Bermuda, GE 01 (Bermuda); Bodnar, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.bodnar@bios.edu [Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences, St. George' s, Bermuda, GE 01 (Bermuda)

    2012-11-15

    Increasing anthropogenic activities are creating environmental pressures that threaten marine ecosystems. Effective environmental health assessment requires the development of rapid, sensitive, and cost-effective tools to predict negative impacts at the individual and ecosystem levels. To this end, a number of biological assays using a variety of cells and organisms measuring different end points have been developed for biomonitoring programs. The sea urchin fertilization/development test has been useful for evaluating environmental toxicology and it has been proposed that sea urchin coelomocytes represent a novel cellular biosensor of environmental stress. In this study we investigated the sensitivity of coelomocytes from the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus to a variety of DNA-damaging agents including ultraviolet (UV) radiation, hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), methylmethane sulfonate (MMS) and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP). LD{sub 50} values determined for coelomocytes after 24 h of exposure to these DNA damaging agents indicated a high level of resistance to all treatments. Significant increases in the formation of apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP or abasic) sites in DNA were only detected using high doses of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, MMS and UV radiation. Comparison of sea urchin coelomocytes with hemocytes from the gastropod mollusk Aplysia dactylomela and the decapod crustacean Panulirus argus indicated that sensitivity to different DNA damaging agents varies between species. The high level of resistance to genotoxic agents suggests that DNA damage may not be an informative end point for environmental health assessment using sea urchin coelomocytes however, natural resistance to DNA damaging agents may have implications for the occurrence of neoplastic disease in these animals.

  4. Physiological, Molecular and Genetic Mechanisms of Long-Term Habituation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calin-Jageman, Robert J

    2009-09-12

    Work funded on this grant has explored the mechanisms of long-term habituation, a ubiquitous form of learning that plays a key role in basic cognitive functioning. Specifically, behavioral, physiological, and molecular mechanisms of habituation have been explored using a simple model system, the tail-elicited siphon-withdrawal reflex (T-SWR) in the marine mollusk Aplysia californica. Substantial progress has been made on the first and third aims, providing some fundamental insights into the mechanisms by which memories are stored. We have characterized the physiological correlates of short- and long-term habituation. We found that short-term habituation is accompanied by a robust sensory adaptation, whereas long-term habituation is accompanied by alterations in sensory and interneuron synaptic efficacy. Thus, our data indicates memories can be shifted between different sites in a neural network as they are consolidated from short to long term. At the molecular level, we have accomplished microarray analysis comparing gene expression in both habituated and control ganglia. We have identified a network of putatively regulated transcripts that seems particularly targeted towards synaptic changes (e.g. SNAP25, calmodulin) . We are now beginning additional work to confirm regulation of these transcripts and build a more detailed understanding of the cascade of molecular events leading to the permanent storage of long-term memories. On the third aim, we have fostered a nascent neuroscience program via a variety of successful initiatives. We have funded over 11 undergraduate neuroscience scholars, several of whom have been recognized at national and regional levels for their research. We have also conducted a pioneering summer research program for community college students which is helping enhance access of underrepresented groups to life science careers. Despite minimal progress on the second aim, this project has provided a) novel insight into the network mechanisms by

  5. Nucleolar integrity is required for the maintenance of long-term synaptic plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim D Allen

    Full Text Available Long-term memory (LTM formation requires new protein synthesis and new gene expression. Based on our work in Aplysia, we hypothesized that the rRNA genes, stimulation-dependent targets of the enzyme Poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1, are primary effectors of the activity-dependent changes in synaptic function that maintain synaptic plasticity and memory. Using electrophysiology, immunohistochemistry, pharmacology and molecular biology techniques, we show here, for the first time, that the maintenance of forskolin-induced late-phase long-term potentiation (L-LTP in mouse hippocampal slices requires nucleolar integrity and the expression of new rRNAs. The activity-dependent upregulation of rRNA, as well as L-LTP expression, are poly(ADP-ribosylation (PAR dependent and accompanied by an increase in nuclear PARP-1 and Poly(ADP ribose molecules (pADPr after forskolin stimulation. The upregulation of PARP-1 and pADPr is regulated by Protein kinase A (PKA and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK--two kinases strongly associated with long-term plasticity and learning and memory. Selective inhibition of RNA Polymerase I (Pol I, responsible for the synthesis of precursor rRNA, results in the segmentation of nucleoli, the exclusion of PARP-1 from functional nucleolar compartments and disrupted L-LTP maintenance. Taken as a whole, these results suggest that new rRNAs (28S, 18S, and 5.8S ribosomal components--hence, new ribosomes and nucleoli integrity--are required for the maintenance of long-term synaptic plasticity. This provides a mechanistic link between stimulation-dependent gene expression and the new protein synthesis known to be required for memory consolidation.

  6. New Mediterranean Biodiversity Records (October, 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. KATSANEVAKIS

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Collective Article ‘New Mediterranean Biodiversity Records’ of the Mediterranean Marine Science journal offers the means to publish biodiversity records in the Mediterranean Sea. The current article is divided in two parts, for records of alien and native species respectively. The new records of alien species include: the red alga Asparagopsis taxiformis (Crete and Lakonicos Gulf (Greece; the red alga Grateloupia turuturu (along the Israeli Mediterranean shore; the mantis shrimp Clorida albolitura (Gulf of Antalya, Turkey; the mud crab Dyspanopeus sayi (Mar Piccolo of Taranto, Ionian Sea; the blue crab Callinectes sapidus (Chios Island, Greece; the isopod Paracerceis sculpta (northern Aegean Sea, Greece; the sea urchin Diadema setosum (Gökova Bay, Turkey; the molluscs Smaragdia souverbiana, Murex forskoehlii, Fusinus verrucosus, Circenita callipyga, and Aplysia dactylomela (Syria; the cephalaspidean mollusc Haminoea cyanomarginata (Baia di Puolo, Massa Lubrense, Campania, southern Italy; the topmouth gudgeon Pseudorasbora parva (Civitavecchia, Tyrrhenian Sea; the fangtooth moray Enchelycore anatine (Plemmirio marine reserve, Sicily; the silver-cheeked toadfish Lagocephalus sceleratus (Saros Bay, Turkey; and Ibiza channel, Spain; the Indo-Pacific ascidian Herdmania momusin Kastelorizo Island (Greece; and the foraminiferal Clavulina multicam erata (Saronikos Gulf, Greece. The record of L. sceleratus in Spain consists the deepest (350-400m depth record of the species in the Mediterranean Sea. The new records of native species include: first record of the ctenophore Cestum veneris in Turkish marine waters; the presence of Holothuria tubulosa and Holothuria polii in the Bay of Igoumenitsa (Greece; the first recorded sighting of the bull ray Pteromylaeus bovinus in Maltese waters; and a new record of the fish Lobotes surinamensis from Maliakos Gulf. 

  7. New Mediterranean Biodiversity Records (December 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. THESSALOU-LEGAKI

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents records extending or confirming the distribution of Mediterranean species. Three alien algae are included, namely Codium taylorii reported for the first time from the Aegean and Turkey (Izmir Gulf, Caulerpa racemosa var. cylindracea (Karpathos and Chalki Isl., Aegean Sea and Ganonema farinosum (Karpathos Isl., Aegean Sea. As far as animals are concerned, Litarachna divergens (Acari: Hydrachnidia was recorded (Side, Eastern Mediterranean and represents a new amendment at genus level for Turkish fauna. Other invertebrates include alien species such as the crabs Dyspanopeus sayi (Lago Fusaro, SW Italy, Percnon gibbesi (Larnaca, Cyprus; Karpathos and Chalki Isl., Aegean Sea and Callinectes sapidus (Voda estuary, NW Greece, the nudibranch Aplysia dactylomela (Boka Kotorska Bay, Montenegro, the gastropod Conomurex persicus (Karpathos and ChalkiIsl., Aegean Sea and the bryozoan Electra tenella (Livorno harbour and Messina Straits area. The alien fish Siganus luridus, Siganus rivulatus, Fistularia commersonii, Sphyraena chrysotaenia and Sargocentron rubrum are also reported from the islands of Karpathos and Chalki, and Pteragogus pelycus from Heraklion Bay, Crete. In addition, new localities for four rare Mediterranean inhabitants are given: the cephalopod Thysanoteuthis rhombus (NW Sardinia and the fish: Lampris guttatus (Calabria, S Italy, Petromyzon marinus (Gokova Bay and Remora australis (Saronikos Gulf, while the opisthobranch gastropod Cerberilla bernadettae is reported for the first time from the E Mediterranean (Cyprus. Finally, three species of the Aegean ascidiofauna are recorded for the first time: Lissoclinum perforatum, Ciona roulei and Ecteinascidia turbinata. Furthermore, it was established that Phallusia nigra has extended its distributional range to the north of the Aegean Sea.

  8. Spike-adding in parabolic bursters: The role of folded-saddle canards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desroches, Mathieu; Krupa, Martin; Rodrigues, Serafim

    2016-09-01

    The present work develops a new approach to studying parabolic bursting, and also proposes a novel four-dimensional canonical and polynomial-based parabolic burster. In addition to this new polynomial system, we also consider the conductance-based model of the Aplysia R15 neuron known as the Plant model, and a reduction of this prototypical biophysical parabolic burster to three variables, including one phase variable, namely the Baer-Rinzel-Carillo (BRC) phase model. Revisiting these models from the perspective of slow-fast dynamics reveals that the number of spikes per burst may vary upon parameter changes, however the spike-adding process occurs in an explosive fashion that involves special solutions called canards. This spike-adding canard explosion phenomenon is analysed by using tools from geometric singular perturbation theory in tandem with numerical bifurcation techniques. We find that the bifurcation structure persists across all considered systems, that is, spikes within the burst are incremented via the crossing of an excitability threshold given by a particular type of canard orbit, namely the true canard of a folded-saddle singularity. However there can be a difference in the spike-adding transitions in parameter space from one case to another, according to whether the process is continuous or discontinuous, which depends upon the geometry of the folded-saddle canard. Using these findings, we construct a new polynomial approximation of the Plant model, which retains all the key elements for parabolic bursting, including the spike-adding transitions mediated by folded-saddle canards. Finally, we briefly investigate the presence of spike-adding via canards in planar phase models of parabolic bursting, namely the theta model by Ermentrout and Kopell.

  9. Neuromolecular Imaging Shows Temporal Synchrony Patterns between Serotonin and Movement within Neuronal Motor Circuits in the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia A. Broderick

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The present discourse links the electrical and chemical properties of the brain with neurotransmitters and movement behaviors to further elucidate strategies to diagnose and treat brain disease. Neuromolecular imaging (NMI, based on electrochemical principles, is used to detect serotonin in nerve terminals (dorsal and ventral striata and somatodendrites (ventral tegmentum of reward/motor mesocorticolimbic and nigrostriatal brain circuits. Neuronal release of serotonin is detected at the same time and in the same animal, freely moving and unrestrained, while open-field behaviors are monitored via infrared photobeams. The purpose is to emphasize the unique ability of NMI and the BRODERICK PROBE® biosensors to empirically image a pattern of temporal synchrony, previously reported, for example, in Aplysia using central pattern generators (CPGs, serotonin and cerebral peptide-2. Temporal synchrony is reviewed within the context of the literature on central pattern generators, neurotransmitters and movement disorders. Specifically, temporal synchrony data are derived from studies on psychostimulant behavior with and without cocaine while at the same time and continuously, serotonin release in motor neurons within basal ganglia, is detected. The results show that temporal synchrony between the neurotransmitter, serotonin and natural movement occurs when the brain is NOT injured via, e.g., trauma, addictive drugs or psychiatric illness. In striking contrast, in the case of serotonin and cocaine-induced psychostimulant behavior, a different form of synchrony and also asynchrony can occur. Thus, the known dysfunctional movement behavior produced by cocaine may well be related to the loss of temporal synchrony, the loss of the ability to match serotonin in brain with motor activity. The empirical study of temporal synchrony patterns in humans and animals may be more relevant to the dynamics of motor circuits and movement behaviors than are studies of

  10. Vibrational dynamics of thiocyanate and selenocyanate bound to horse heart myoglobin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maj, Michał; Oh, Younjun; Park, Kwanghee; Lee, Jooyong; Cho, Minhaeng, E-mail: mcho@korea.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Kwak, Kyung-Won [Department of Chemistry, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756, SouthKorea (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-21

    The structure and vibrational dynamics of SCN- and SeCN-bound myoglobin have been investigated using polarization-controlled IR pump-probe measurements and quantum chemistry calculations. The complexes are found to be in low and high spin states, with the dominant contribution from the latter. In addition, the Mb:SCN high spin complex exhibits a doublet feature in the thiocyanate stretch IR absorption spectra, indicating two distinct molecular conformations around the heme pocket. The binding mode of the high spin complexes was assigned to occur through the nitrogen atom, contrary to the binding through the sulfur atom that was observed in myoglobin derived from Aplysia Limacina. The vibrational energy relaxation process has been found to occur substantially faster than those of free SCN{sup −} and SeCN{sup −} ions and neutral SCN- and SeCN-derivatized molecules reported previously. This supports the N-bound configurations of MbNCS and MbNCSe, because S- and Se-bound configurations are expected to have significantly long lifetimes due to the insulation effect by heavy bridge atom like S and Se in such IR probes. Nonetheless, even though their lifetimes are much shorter than those of corresponding free ions in water, the vibrational lifetimes determined for MbNCS and MbNCSe are still fairly long compared to those of azide and cyanide myoglobin systems studied before. Thus, thiocyanate and selenocyanate can be good local probes of local electrostatic environment in the heme pocket. The globin dependence on binding mode and vibrational dynamics is also discussed.

  11. Vibrational dynamics of thiocyanate and selenocyanate bound to horse heart myoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maj, Michał; Oh, Younjun; Park, Kwanghee; Lee, Jooyong; Kwak, Kyung-Won; Cho, Minhaeng

    2014-06-01

    The structure and vibrational dynamics of SCN- and SeCN-bound myoglobin have been investigated using polarization-controlled IR pump-probe measurements and quantum chemistry calculations. The complexes are found to be in low and high spin states, with the dominant contribution from the latter. In addition, the Mb:SCN high spin complex exhibits a doublet feature in the thiocyanate stretch IR absorption spectra, indicating two distinct molecular conformations around the heme pocket. The binding mode of the high spin complexes was assigned to occur through the nitrogen atom, contrary to the binding through the sulfur atom that was observed in myoglobin derived from Aplysia Limacina. The vibrational energy relaxation process has been found to occur substantially faster than those of free SCN- and SeCN- ions and neutral SCN- and SeCN-derivatized molecules reported previously. This supports the N-bound configurations of MbNCS and MbNCSe, because S- and Se-bound configurations are expected to have significantly long lifetimes due to the insulation effect by heavy bridge atom like S and Se in such IR probes. Nonetheless, even though their lifetimes are much shorter than those of corresponding free ions in water, the vibrational lifetimes determined for MbNCS and MbNCSe are still fairly long compared to those of azide and cyanide myoglobin systems studied before. Thus, thiocyanate and selenocyanate can be good local probes of local electrostatic environment in the heme pocket. The globin dependence on binding mode and vibrational dynamics is also discussed.

  12. Sea urchin coelomocytes are resistant to a variety of DNA damaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increasing anthropogenic activities are creating environmental pressures that threaten marine ecosystems. Effective environmental health assessment requires the development of rapid, sensitive, and cost-effective tools to predict negative impacts at the individual and ecosystem levels. To this end, a number of biological assays using a variety of cells and organisms measuring different end points have been developed for biomonitoring programs. The sea urchin fertilization/development test has been useful for evaluating environmental toxicology and it has been proposed that sea urchin coelomocytes represent a novel cellular biosensor of environmental stress. In this study we investigated the sensitivity of coelomocytes from the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus to a variety of DNA-damaging agents including ultraviolet (UV) radiation, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), methylmethane sulfonate (MMS) and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP). LD50 values determined for coelomocytes after 24 h of exposure to these DNA damaging agents indicated a high level of resistance to all treatments. Significant increases in the formation of apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP or abasic) sites in DNA were only detected using high doses of H2O2, MMS and UV radiation. Comparison of sea urchin coelomocytes with hemocytes from the gastropod mollusk Aplysia dactylomela and the decapod crustacean Panulirus argus indicated that sensitivity to different DNA damaging agents varies between species. The high level of resistance to genotoxic agents suggests that DNA damage may not be an informative end point for environmental health assessment using sea urchin coelomocytes however, natural resistance to DNA damaging agents may have implications for the occurrence of neoplastic disease in these animals.

  13. Deep mRNA sequencing of the Tritonia diomedea brain transcriptome provides access to gene homologues for neuronal excitability, synaptic transmission and peptidergic signalling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Senatore

    Full Text Available The sea slug Tritonia diomedea (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Nudibranchia, has a simple and highly accessible nervous system, making it useful for studying neuronal and synaptic mechanisms underlying behavior. Although many important contributions have been made using Tritonia, until now, a lack of genetic information has impeded exploration at the molecular level.We performed Illumina sequencing of central nervous system mRNAs from Tritonia, generating 133.1 million 100 base pair, paired-end reads. De novo reconstruction of the RNA-Seq data yielded a total of 185,546 contigs, which partitioned into 123,154 non-redundant gene clusters (unigenes. BLAST comparison with RefSeq and Swiss-Prot protein databases, as well as mRNA data from other invertebrates (gastropod molluscs: Aplysia californica, Lymnaea stagnalis and Biomphalaria glabrata; cnidarian: Nematostella vectensis revealed that up to 76,292 unigenes in the Tritonia transcriptome have putative homologues in other databases, 18,246 of which are below a more stringent E-value cut-off of 1x10-6. In silico prediction of secreted proteins from the Tritonia transcriptome shotgun assembly (TSA produced a database of 579 unique sequences of secreted proteins, which also exhibited markedly higher expression levels compared to other genes in the TSA.Our efforts greatly expand the availability of gene sequences available for Tritonia diomedea. We were able to extract full length protein sequences for most queried genes, including those involved in electrical excitability, synaptic vesicle release and neurotransmission, thus confirming that the transcriptome will serve as a useful tool for probing the molecular correlates of behavior in this species. We also generated a neurosecretome database that will serve as a useful tool for probing peptidergic signalling systems in the Tritonia brain.

  14. [Memory: clinico-pathologic data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duyckaerts, C; Suarez, S; Hauw, J J

    1998-01-01

    Synaptic modifications are probably the basis of the memory processes that take place in the central nervous system. They have been studied in Aplysia or in hippocampal slices. How these minute alterations of the synaptic strength are integrated in larger neural systems is still poorly understood. In man, hippocampal lesions, when bilateral, cause a deficit in anterograde episodic memory. The loss of previously acquired memories (retrograde amnesia) is limited. Procedural memory is spared. Young patients with hippocampal lesions remain able to learn how to read or to write (abilities that belong to semantic memories). Recordings obtained with intracerebral electrodes have shown that some neurons of the hippocampus act as "place cells". They fire when the animal is in a specific place of the experimental maze, an observation that suggests that the hippocampus acts as a map that may also be viewed as a context indicator (a "cognitive map"). Computer models have been devised to test the hypothesis that the hippocampus recorded the map of the activated synapses at a particular moment in time. This pattern of activity could secondarily be transferred to the isocortex during a process known as consolidation. The frontal lobe plays a role in attention, which greatly influences the memory process. It also plays a role in the various strategies that are used to recall a memory and in the analysis of the quality of the recall (metamemory). An asymmetry has been shown by the PET-scan: the left frontal lobe is activated during acquisition, and the right one during recall. The ability to integrate one's own memories in one's own history and consciousness (self-awareness or "autonoesis") also depends on the activity of the prefrontal region. The loss of acquired memories (retrograde amnesia) is most often observed in cases of large lesions of the anterior part of the temporal lobe. Partial amnesias are difficult to separate from possibly localized deficits of a cognitive

  15. A critical period for gravitational effects on otolith formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiederhold, M.; Harrison, J.

    Gravity and linear acceleration are sensed in fish by the saccule, utricle (as in mammals) and lagena, each with a solid otolith. Previous experiments in which eggs or larvae of a marine mollusk ( plysia) or fish larvae were raised on aA centrifuge, demonstrated that the size of the otolith or statoconia (in Aplysia) were reduced, in a graded manner, as the gfield was increased, suggesting that some- control mechanism was acting to normalize the weight of the mass. Pre-mated adult female swordtail fish (Xiphophorus helleri) were flown in the CEBAS aquarium system on space shuttle missions STS 89 and STS-90 (Neurolab). Developing- larvae were removed from the adult ovaries after shuttle landing. Otolith sizes were compared between ground- and flight -reared larvae of similar sizes. For later-stage swordtail larvae, with spine lengths from 3 to 6 mm from STS-90 (16 days), the growth of the otolith with increasing spine length was significantly greater in the flight - reared fish for all three otoliths, from the saccule (saggita), utricle (lapillus) and lagena (astericus). However, juvenile fish, 1 cm long at launch, showed no significant difference in otolith size between flight - and ground-reared animals. In very early stage larvae from STS-89 (9 days), with spine length of 1.5 to 3.5 mm, the utricular and saccular otoliths were actually larger in the ground-reared larvae. Thus, it appears that late-stage fish embryos reared in space do produce larger-than - normal otoliths, apparently in an attempt to c mpensate for the reduced weight ofo the test mass in space. However, the results from very early-stage larvae and juvenile fish suggest that there is a fairly short critical period during which altered gravity can affect the size of the test mass. Recent studies on the development of the inner ear of the zebrafish (Danio raria) may explain the critical period for gravitational effects on otolith growth. By 16 hours after zebrafish fertilization (at 28.5 o

  16. Construction of a medicinal leech transcriptome database and its application to the identification of leech homologs of neural and innate immune genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wincker Patrick

    2010-06-01

    evolutionarily conserved sequences, representing all known pathways involved in these important functions. Conclusions The sequences obtained for Hirudo transcripts represent the first major database of genes expressed in this important model system. Comparison of translated open reading frames (ORFs with the other openly available leech datasets, the genome and transcriptome of Helobdella robusta, shows an average identity at the amino acid level of 58% in matched sequences. Interestingly, comparison with other available Lophotrochozoans shows similar high levels of amino acid identity, where sequences match, for example, 64% with Capitella capitata (a polychaete and 56% with Aplysia californica (a mollusk, as well as 58% with Schistosoma mansoni (a platyhelminth. Phylogenetic comparisons of putative Hirudo innate immune response genes present within the Hirudo transcriptome database herein described show a strong resemblance to the corresponding mammalian genes, indicating that this important physiological response may have older origins than what has been previously proposed.

  17. ENZYME KINETICS OF APLYSIN METABOLISM IN RAT LIVER MICROSOMES%海兔素在大鼠肝微粒体中的酶促反应动力学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丰暖; 梁惠; 马爱国; 张辉珍

    2015-01-01

    Objective To establish a HPLC method for the determination of aplysin in rat liver microsome, and study the enzyme kinetics of aplysin metabolism in rat liver microsome, as well as the effect of CYP3A inhibitor ketoconazole. Methods A HPLC method was developed for the determination of aplysin. Aplysin was incubated in rat liver microsome for 30 min. The effects of different incubation times and liver microsomal protein concentrations on alysin metabolism were observed. Lineweave-Burk graphic method was used to calculate the enzyme kinetic parameters. Ketoconazole (0.5, 2, 5, 10, 20, 40 mg/L) was used to inhibit the metabolism of aplysin in vitro. Results The linear range of aplysia standard curve was 0.5-100 mg/L. The intra- and inter-day RSDs were less than 3.18%. The recovery rate was 96.19%-97.83%, and a good stability at room temperature for 24 h or at -200C for a week was confirmed. The best incubation conditions for aplysin metabolism in rat liver microsome were 30 min for incubation time and 1 mg/mL for protein concentration. The enzyme kinetic parameters were as follows: Km 19.72 mg/L, Vmax 0.35 mg/min/g protein, CLint 17.75 ml/(min·g) protein. Ketoconazole was inhibitory to the metabolism of aplysin in vitro. Conclusion The established HPLC method is fast, simple, specific and sensitive and applicable in the study of the enzyme kinetics of aplysin metabolism in rat liver microsome. CYP3A may be involved in the metabolism of aplysin.%目的建立测定大鼠肝微粒体孵育液中海兔素含量的高效液相色谱法(HPLC),研究海兔素在大鼠肝微粒体中代谢的酶动力学以及CYP3A特异性抑制剂酮康唑对其代谢反应的影响。方法考察不同孵育时间、肝微粒体蛋白浓度、海兔素浓度对代谢反应的影响,并采用双倒数作图法计算海兔素的酶促反应动力学参数;观察不同浓度酮康唑(0.5,2,5,10,20,40 mg/L)对海兔素体外代谢的影响。结果海兔素的