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Sample records for aphthovirus

  1. Cell Entry of the Aphthovirus Equine Rhinitis A Virus Is Dependent on Endosome Acidification▿

    OpenAIRE

    Groppelli, Elisabetta; Tuthill, Tobias J.; Rowlands, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Equine rhinitis A virus (ERAV) is genetically closely related to foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), and both are now classified within the genus Aphthovirus of the family Picornaviridae. For disease security reasons, FMDV can be handled only in high-containment facilities, but these constraints do not apply to ERAV, making it an attractive alternative for the study of aphthovirus biology. Here, we show, using immunofluorescence, pharmacological agents, and dominant negative inhibitors, that...

  2. Equine rhinitis A virus and its low pH empty particle: clues towards an aphthovirus entry mechanism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias J Tuthill

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Equine rhinitis A virus (ERAV is closely related to foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV, belonging to the genus Aphthovirus of the Picornaviridae. How picornaviruses introduce their RNA genome into the cytoplasm of the host cell to initiate replication is unclear since they have no lipid envelope to facilitate fusion with cellular membranes. It has been thought that the dissociation of the FMDV particle into pentameric subunits at acidic pH is the mechanism for genome release during cell entry, but this raises the problem of how transfer across the endosome membrane of the genome might be facilitated. In contrast, most other picornaviruses form 'altered' particle intermediates (not reported for aphthoviruses thought to induce membrane pores through which the genome can be transferred. Here we show that ERAV, like FMDV, dissociates into pentamers at mildly acidic pH but demonstrate that dissociation is preceded by the transient formation of empty 80S particles which have released their genome and may represent novel biologically relevant intermediates in the aphthovirus cell entry process. The crystal structures of the native ERAV virus and a low pH form have been determined via highly efficient crystallization and data collection strategies, required due to low virus yields. ERAV is closely similar to FMDV for VP2, VP3 and part of VP4 but VP1 diverges, to give a particle with a pitted surface, as seen in cardioviruses. The low pH particle has internal structure consistent with it representing a pre-dissociation cell entry intermediate. These results suggest a unified mechanism of picornavirus cell entry.

  3. Immunogenicity of an aphthovirus chimera of the glycoprotein of vesicular stomatitis virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Grigera, P R; Garcia-Briones, M; Periolo, O; La Torre, J L; Wagner, R R

    1996-01-01

    An oligodeoxynucleotide coding for amino acids 139 through 149 of antigenic site A (ASA) of the VP1 capsid protein of the foot-and-mouth disease virus C3 serotype (FMDV C3) was inserted into three different in-frame sites of the vesicular stomatitis virus New Jersey serotype (VSV-NJ) glycoprotein (G) gene cDNA present in plasmid pKG97 under control of the bacteriophage T7 polymerase promoter. Transfection of these plasmids into CV1 cells coinfected with the T7 polymerase-expressing vaccinia v...

  4. Heterogeneity of the polyribocytidylic acid tract in aphthovirus: biochemical and biological studies of viruses carrying polyribocytidylic acid tracts of different lengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa Giomi, M P; Bergmann, I E; Scodeller, E A; Augé de Mello, P; Gomez, I; La Torre, J L

    1984-01-01

    In this paper we report a study of a sample of foot-and-mouth disease virus carrying two polyribocytidylic acid [poly(C)] tracts of different lengths. By plaque purification in tissue culture, we isolated two populations of particles, one carrying the long poly(C) tract and the other carrying only the short homopolymer. The fingerprints of both viruses were indistinguishable from each other and from that of the virus present in the original sample, suggesting that the main difference between the two types of particles is limited to the poly(C) tracts of their genomic RNAs, to the flanking sequences of the poly(C) tract, or to both. In addition, some biological properties of these viruses are reported, such as stability upon serial passages in different cell lines, plaque size, and pathogenicity for cattle. The results indicate that the size of the poly(C) tract is not directly related to the virulence of these viruses. However, the size of the homopolymer could play a role in determining their efficiency of replication, and it appears that the particles with the short poly(C) tract might have some replicative advantage over those carrying the long one. Images PMID:6088803

  5. Heterogeneity of the polyribocytidylic acid tract in aphthovirus: biochemical and biological studies of viruses carrying polyribocytidylic acid tracts of different lengths.

    OpenAIRE

    Costa Giomi, M P; Bergmann, I E; Scodeller, E A; Augé de Mello, P; Gomez, I.; La Torre, J L

    1984-01-01

    In this paper we report a study of a sample of foot-and-mouth disease virus carrying two polyribocytidylic acid [poly(C)] tracts of different lengths. By plaque purification in tissue culture, we isolated two populations of particles, one carrying the long poly(C) tract and the other carrying only the short homopolymer. The fingerprints of both viruses were indistinguishable from each other and from that of the virus present in the original sample, suggesting that the main difference between ...

  6. Foot-and-mouth disease virus L peptidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), equine rhinitis A virus (ERAV) and bovine rhinitis B virus (BRBV) comprise the genus Aphthovirus of the Picornaviridae family. Seven genera within this family, Aphthoviruses, Cardioviruses, Erboviruses (ERBV), Kobuviruses, Senecaviruses, Sapeloviruses, and Tescho...

  7. Differential IFN-alpha/beta production suppressing capacities of the leader proteins of mengovirus and foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hato, S.V.; Sorgeloos, F.; Ricour, C.; Zoll, J.; Melchers, W.J.G.; Michiels, T.; Kuppeveld, F.J.M. van

    2010-01-01

    Picornaviruses encompass a large family of RNA viruses. Some picornaviruses possess a leader (L) protein at the N-terminus of their polyprotein. The L proteins of encephalomyocarditis virus, a cardiovirus, and foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), an aphthovirus, are both dispensable for replication

  8. Characterization of a chimeric foot-and-mouth disease virus bearing bovine rhinitis B virus leader proteinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our recent study has shown that bovine rhinovirus type 2 (BRV2), a new member of the Aphthovirus genus, shares many motifs and sequence similarities with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). Despite low sequence conservation (36percent amino acid identity) and N- and C-terminus folding differences,...

  9. Foot-and-mouth disease virus utilizes an autophagic pathway during viral replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is the type species of the Aphthovirus genus, of the family Picornaviridae. Infection of cells with positive-strand RNA viruses results in a rearrangement of intracellular membranes into viral replication complexes. However, the origin of these membranes remains u...

  10. Homology modelling and analysis of structure predictions of the bovine rhinitis B virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine Rhinitis B Viruses (BRBV) are picornaviruses responsible for mild respiratory infection of cattle and probably the least characterized member of the Aphthoviruses. BRBV is the closest relative known to Foot and Mouth Disease virus (FMDV) with around a 43 percent identical polyprotein sequenc...

  11. Opatření v ohnisku výskytu slintavky a kulhavky a jeho okolí

    OpenAIRE

    MUSILOVÁ, Karolína

    2015-01-01

    This bachelor's thesis called "Control measures for an outbreak of foot and mouth disease at the point of origin and its surroundings" deals with problems concerning FMD disease occurrence in Chlebov livestock holding belonging to Reprogen JSC. FMD is extremely dangerous and highly contagious disease causing high fever that affects especially cloven-hoofed animals. A viral genus Aphthovirus is the originator, causing blisters and aphthae on intestinal tract, limbs and hairless skin, other sym...

  12. Mutational analysis of the encephalomyocarditis virus primary cleavage.

    OpenAIRE

    Hahn, H.; Palmenberg, A C

    1996-01-01

    Sixteen substitution mutations of the conserved DvExNPGP sequence, implicated in cardiovirus and aphthovirus primary polyprotein cleavage, were created in encephalomyocarditis virus cDNA, expressed, and characterized for processing activity. Nearly all the mutations severely decreased the efficiency of the primary cleavage reaction during cell-free synthesis of viral precursors, indicating a stringent requirement for the natural sequence in this processing event. When representative mutations...

  13. Bioinformatics and Molecular Analysis of the Evolutionary Relationship between Bovine Rhinitis A Viruses and Foot-And-Mouth Disease Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Rai, Devendra K.; Paul Lawrence; Steve J. Pauszek; Piccone, Maria E.; Knowles, Nick J.; Elizabeth Rieder

    2016-01-01

    Bovine rhinitis viruses (BRVs) cause mild respiratory disease of cattle. In this study, a near full-length genome sequence of a virus named RS3X (formerly classified as bovine rhinovirus type 1), isolated from infected cattle from the UK in the 1960s, was obtained and analyzed. Compared to other closely related Aphthoviruses, major differences were detected in the leader protease (Lpro), P1, 2B, and 3A proteins. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that RS3X was a member of the species bovine rhini...

  14. Genetic characterization of a novel picornavirus in turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) distinct from turkey galliviruses and megriviruses and distantly related to the members of the genus Avihepatovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boros, Akos; Nemes, Csaba; Pankovics, Péter; Kapusinszky, Beatrix; Delwart, Eric; Reuter, Gábor

    2013-07-01

    This study reports the metagenomic detection and complete genome characterization of a novel turkey picornavirus from faecal samples of healthy (1/3) and affected (6/8) commercial turkeys with enteric and/or stunting syndrome in Hungary. The virus was detected at seven of the eight farms examined. The turkey/M176-TuASV/2011/HUN genome (KC465954) was genetically different from the currently known picornaviruses of turkey origin (megriviruses and galliviruses), and showed distant phylogenetic relationship and common genomic features (e.g. uncleaved VP0 and three predicted and unrelated 2A polypeptides) to duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV) of the genus Avihepatovirus. The complete genome analysis revealed multiple distinct genome features like the presence of two in-tandem aphthovirus 2A-like sequence repeats with DxExNPG/P 'ribosome-skipping' sites (76 %, 23/30 amino acids identical), with the first aphthovirus 2A-like sequence being located at the end of the VP1 capsid protein (VP1/2A1 'ribosome-skipping' site). The phylogenetic analyses, low sequence identity (33, 32 and 36 % amino acid identity in P1, P2 and P3 regions) to DHAV, and the type II-like internal ribosome entry site suggests that this turkey picornavirus is related to, but distinct from the genus Avihepatovirus and it could be the founding member of a novel Avihepatovirus sister-clade genus. This is the third, taxonomically highly distinct picornavirus clade identified from turkeys exhibiting varied symptoms.

  15. Homology Modeling and Analysis of Structure Predictions of the Bovine Rhinitis B Virus RNA Dependent RNA Polymerase (RdRp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devendra K. Rai

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Bovine Rhinitis B Virus (BRBV is a picornavirus responsible for mild respiratory infection of cattle. It is probably the least characterized among the aphthoviruses. BRBV is the closest relative known to Foot and Mouth Disease virus (FMDV with a ~43% identical polyprotein sequence and as much as 67% identical sequence for the RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp, which is also known as 3D polymerase (3Dpol. In the present study we carried out phylogenetic analysis, structure based sequence alignment and prediction of three-dimensional structure of BRBV 3Dpol using a combination of different computational tools. Model structures of BRBV 3Dpol were verified for their stereochemical quality and accuracy. The BRBV 3Dpol structure predicted by SWISS-MODEL exhibited highest scores in terms of stereochemical quality and accuracy, which were in the range of 2Å resolution crystal structures. The active site, nucleic acid binding site and overall structure were observed to be in agreement with the crystal structure of unliganded as well as template/primer (T/P, nucleotide tri-phosphate (NTP and pyrophosphate (PPi bound FMDV 3Dpol (PDB, 1U09 and 2E9Z. The closest proximity of BRBV and FMDV 3Dpol as compared to human rhinovirus type 16 (HRV-16 and rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV 3Dpols is also substantiated by phylogeny analysis and root-mean square deviation (RMSD between C-α traces of the polymerase structures. The absence of positively charged α-helix at C terminal, significant differences in non-covalent interactions especially salt bridges and CH-pi interactions around T/P channel of BRBV 3Dpol compared to FMDV 3Dpol, indicate that despite a very high homology to FMDV 3Dpol, BRBV 3Dpol may adopt a different mechanism for handling its substrates and adapting to physiological requirements. Our findings will be valuable in the

  16. Expression and stability of foreign epitopes introduced into 3A nonstructural protein of foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinghua Li

    Full Text Available Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV is an aphthovirus that belongs to the Picornaviridae family and causes one of the most important animal diseases worldwide. The capacity of other picornaviruses to express foreign antigens has been extensively reported, however, little is known about FMDV. To explore the potential of FMDV as a viral vector, an 11-amino-acid (aa HSV epitope and an 8 aa FLAG epitope were introduced into the C-terminal different regions of 3A protein of FMDV full-length infectious cDNA clone. Recombinant viruses expressing the HSV or FLAG epitope were successfully rescued after transfection of both modified constructs. Immunofluorescence assay, Western blot and sequence analysis showed that the recombinant viruses stably maintained the foreign epitopes even after 11 serial passages in BHK-21 cells. The 3A-tagged viruses shared similar plaque phenotypes and replication kinetics to those of the parental virus. In addition, mice experimentally infected with the epitope-tagged viruses could induce tag-specific antibodies. Our results demonstrate that FMDV can be used effectively as a viral vector for the delivery of foreign tags.

  17. Molecular analysis of three Ljungan virus isolates reveals a new, close-to-root lineage of the Picornaviridae with a cluster of two unrelated 2A proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Susanne; Niklasson, Bo; Maizel, Jacob; Gorbalenya, Alexander E; Lindberg, A Michael

    2002-09-01

    Ljungan virus (LV) is a suspected human pathogen recently isolated from bank voles (Clethrionomys glareolus). In the present study, it is revealed through comparative sequence analysis that three newly determined Swedish LV genomes are closely related and possess a deviant picornavirus-like organization: 5' untranslated region-VP0-VP3-VP1-2A1-2A2-2B-2C-3A-3B-3C-3D-3' untranslated region. The LV genomes and the polyproteins encoded by them exhibit several exceptional features, such as the absence of a predicted maturation cleavage of VP0, a conserved sequence determinant in VP0 that is typically found in VP1 of other picornaviruses, and a cluster of two unrelated 2A proteins. The 2A1 protein is related to the 2A protein of cardio-, erbo-, tescho-, and aphthoviruses, and the 2A2 protein is related to the 2A protein of parechoviruses, kobuviruses, and avian encephalomyelitis virus. The unprecedented association of two structurally different 2A proteins is a feature never previously observed among picornaviruses and implies that their functions are not mutually exclusive. Secondary polyprotein processing of the LV polyprotein is mediated by proteinase 3C (3C(pro)) possessing canonical affinity to Glu and Gln at the P1 position and small amino acid residues at the P1' position. In addition, LV 3C(pro) appears to have unique substrate specificity to Asn, Gln, and Asp and to bulky hydrophobic residues at the P2 and P4 positions, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that LVs form a separate division, which, together with the Parechovirus genus, has branched off the picornavirus tree most closely to its root. The presence of two 2A proteins indicates that some contemporary picornaviruses with a single 2A may have evolved from the ancestral multi-2A picornavirus.

  18. Cleavage of Poly(A)-binding protein by coxsackievirus 2A protease in vitro and in vivo: another mechanism for host protein synthesis shutoff?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerekatte, V; Keiper, B D; Badorff, C; Cai, A; Knowlton, K U; Rhoads, R E

    1999-01-01

    Infection of cells by picornaviruses of the rhinovirus, aphthovirus, and enterovirus groups results in the shutoff of host protein synthesis but allows viral protein synthesis to proceed. Although considerable evidence suggests that this shutoff is mediated by the cleavage of eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4G by sequence-specific viral proteases (2A protease in the case of coxsackievirus), several experimental observations are at variance with this view. Thus, the cleavage of other cellular proteins could contribute to the shutoff of host protein synthesis and stimulation of viral protein synthesis. Recent evidence indicates that the highly conserved 70-kDa cytoplasmic poly(A)-binding protein (PABP) participates directly in translation initiation. We have now found that PABP is also proteolytically cleaved during coxsackievirus infection of HeLa cells. The cleavage of PABP correlated better over time with the host translational shutoff and onset of viral protein synthesis than did the cleavage of eIF4G. In vitro experiments with purified rabbit PABP and recombinant human PABP as well as in vivo experiments with Xenopus oocytes and recombinant Xenopus PABP demonstrate that the cleavage is catalyzed by 2A protease directly. N- and C-terminal sequencing indicates that cleavage occurs uniquely in human PABP at 482VANTSTQTM downward arrowGPRPAAAAAA500, separating the four N-terminal RNA recognition motifs (80%) from the C-terminal homodimerization domain (20%). The N-terminal cleavage product of PABP is less efficient than full-length PABP in restoring translation to a PABP-dependent rabbit reticulocyte lysate translation system. These results suggest that the cleavage of PABP may be another mechanism by which picornaviruses alter the rate and spectrum of protein synthesis.

  19. Toward genetics-based virus taxonomy: comparative analysis of a genetics-based classification and the taxonomy of picornaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauber, Chris; Gorbalenya, Alexander E

    2012-04-01

    Virus taxonomy has received little attention from the research community despite its broad relevance. In an accompanying paper (C. Lauber and A. E. Gorbalenya, J. Virol. 86:3890-3904, 2012), we have introduced a quantitative approach to hierarchically classify viruses of a family using pairwise evolutionary distances (PEDs) as a measure of genetic divergence. When applied to the six most conserved proteins of the Picornaviridae, it clustered 1,234 genome sequences in groups at three hierarchical levels (to which we refer as the "GENETIC classification"). In this study, we compare the GENETIC classification with the expert-based picornavirus taxonomy and outline differences in the underlying frameworks regarding the relation of virus groups and genetic diversity that represent, respectively, the structure and content of a classification. To facilitate the analysis, we introduce two novel diagrams. The first connects the genetic diversity of taxa to both the PED distribution and the phylogeny of picornaviruses. The second depicts a classification and the accommodated genetic diversity in a standardized manner. Generally, we found striking agreement between the two classifications on species and genus taxa. A few disagreements concern the species Human rhinovirus A and Human rhinovirus C and the genus Aphthovirus, which were split in the GENETIC classification. Furthermore, we propose a new supergenus level and universal, level-specific PED thresholds, not reached yet by many taxa. Since the species threshold is approached mostly by taxa with large sampling sizes and those infecting multiple hosts, it may represent an upper limit on divergence, beyond which homologous recombination in the six most conserved genes between two picornaviruses might not give viable progeny.

  20. On-site detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus using a portable, automated sample preparation and PCR system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious and economically devastating disease of farm livestock. The etiological agent, FMD virus (FMDV), is a single-stranded, positive-sense RNA virus belonging to the genus Aphthovirus within the family Picornaviridae. Rapid and accurate confirmation of the presence of FMDV is needed for effective control and eradication of the disease. An on-site detection test would be highly advantageous as the time taken to transport suspect clinical material to a central laboratory can often be lengthy, thus delaying a definitive diagnosis in the event of an outbreak. This study describes the development of a molecular assay for the detection of all seven serotypes of FMDV using novel technology, namely: Linear-After-The- Exponential (LATE)-PCR, for transfer onto a portable, easy-to-use, fully automated sample preparation and RT-PCR instrument. Primers and a mismatch tolerant probe were designed from consensus sequences in the FMDV 3D (RNA polymerase) gene to detect the target and its variants at low temperature. An internal control (IC) was included to validate negative results. After demonstrating that the LATE RT-PCR signal at end-point was proportional to number of target molecules over the range 10 to 1 million copies, the assay was compared with a one-step real-time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR) assay (also targeting the 3D) used routinely by reference laboratories. The LATE RT-PCR assay amplified RNA extracted from multiple strains of all FMDV serotypes. Of the 121 FMDV-positive samples tested, 119 were positive by both rRT-PCR and LATE RT-PCR tests while 118 had tested positive by virus isolation at the time of receipt. Twenty-eight FMDVnegative samples failed to react in all 3 tests. There were no false positive signals with RNA from other vesicular disease-causing viruses. Each FMDV-negative sample generated a signal from the IC, ruling out amplification failures. A dilution series of an FMDV reference strain demonstrated

  1. Foot & Mouth Disease & Ulcerative/Vesicular Rule-outs: Challenges Encountered in Recent Outbreaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hullinger, P

    2008-01-28

    Foot and mouth disease (FMD) is a highly infectious and contagious viral disease affecting bovidae (cattle, zebus, domestic buffaloes, yaks), sheep, goats, swine, all wild ruminants and suidae. Camelidae (camels, dromedaries, llamas, vicunas) have low susceptibility. Foot and mouth disease is caused by a RNS virus of the family Picornaviridae, genus Aphthovirus. There are seven immunologically distinct serotypes: A, O, C, SAT1, SAT2, SAT3, Asia 1. Foot and mouth disease causes significant economic loss both to countries who manage it as an endemic disease (with or without vaccination), as well as those FMD free countries which may become infected. The mortality rate is low in adult animals, but often higher in young due to myocarditis. Foot and mouth disease is endemic in parts of Asia, Africa, the Middle East and South America (sporadic outbreaks in free areas). The Office of International Epizootics (OIE), also referred to the World Organization for Animal Health maintains an official list of free countries and zones.1 The OIE Terrestrial Code (Chapter 2.2.10) provides detailed information on the categories of freedom that can be allocated to a country as well as guidelines for the surveillance for foot and mouth disease (Appendix 3.8.7). In short, countries may be completely free of FMD, free with vaccination or infected with foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV). Source of FMDV include incubating and clinically affected animals with virus present in breath, saliva, faeces, urine, milk and semen. In experimental settings virus has been detected in milk several days before the onset of clinical signs2. Additional sources of virus are meat and by-products in which pH has remained above 6.0 as well as persistently infected carrier animals. Carrier animals may include cattle and water buffalo; convalescent animals and exposed vaccinates (virus persists in the oropharynx for up to 30 months in cattle or longer in buffalo, 9 months in sheep). Pigs do not become carriers

  2. Foot & Mouth Disease & Ulcerative/Vesicular Rule-outs: Challenges Encountered in Recent Outbreaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hullinger, P

    2008-01-28

    Foot and mouth disease (FMD) is a highly infectious and contagious viral disease affecting bovidae (cattle, zebus, domestic buffaloes, yaks), sheep, goats, swine, all wild ruminants and suidae. Camelidae (camels, dromedaries, llamas, vicunas) have low susceptibility. Foot and mouth disease is caused by a RNS virus of the family Picornaviridae, genus Aphthovirus. There are seven immunologically distinct serotypes: A, O, C, SAT1, SAT2, SAT3, Asia 1. Foot and mouth disease causes significant economic loss both to countries who manage it as an endemic disease (with or without vaccination), as well as those FMD free countries which may become infected. The mortality rate is low in adult animals, but often higher in young due to myocarditis. Foot and mouth disease is endemic in parts of Asia, Africa, the Middle East and South America (sporadic outbreaks in free areas). The Office of International Epizootics (OIE), also referred to the World Organization for Animal Health maintains an official list of free countries and zones.1 The OIE Terrestrial Code (Chapter 2.2.10) provides detailed information on the categories of freedom that can be allocated to a country as well as guidelines for the surveillance for foot and mouth disease (Appendix 3.8.7). In short, countries may be completely free of FMD, free with vaccination or infected with foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV). Source of FMDV include incubating and clinically affected animals with virus present in breath, saliva, faeces, urine, milk and semen. In experimental settings virus has been detected in milk several days before the onset of clinical signs2. Additional sources of virus are meat and by-products in which pH has remained above 6.0 as well as persistently infected carrier animals. Carrier animals may include cattle and water buffalo; convalescent animals and exposed vaccinates (virus persists in the oropharynx for up to 30 months in cattle or longer in buffalo, 9 months in sheep). Pigs do not become carriers