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Sample records for aphid acrythociphon pisum

  1. Orally Delivered Scorpion Antimicrobial Peptides Exhibit Activity against Pea Aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum and Its Bacterial Symbionts

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    Karen Luna-Ramirez

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aphids are severe agricultural pests that damage crops by feeding on phloem sap and vectoring plant pathogens. Chemical insecticides provide an important aphid control strategy, but alternative and sustainable control measures are required to avoid rapidly emerging resistance, environmental contamination, and the risk to humans and beneficial organisms. Aphids are dependent on bacterial symbionts, which enable them to survive on phloem sap lacking essential nutrients, as well as conferring environmental stress tolerance and resistance to parasites. The evolution of aphids has been accompanied by the loss of many immunity-related genes, such as those encoding antibacterial peptides, which are prevalent in other insects, probably because any harm to the bacterial symbionts would inevitably affect the aphids themselves. This suggests that antimicrobial peptides (AMPs could replace or at least complement conventional insecticides for aphid control. We fed the pea aphids (Acyrthosiphon pisum with AMPs from the venom glands of scorpions. The AMPs reduced aphid survival, delayed their reproduction, displayed in vitro activity against aphid bacterial symbionts, and reduced the number of symbionts in vivo. Remarkably, we found that some of the scorpion AMPs compromised the aphid bacteriome, a specialized organ that harbours bacterial symbionts. Our data suggest that scorpion AMPs holds the potential to be developed as bio-insecticides, and are promising candidates for the engineering of aphid-resistant crops.

  2. Escherichia coli K-12 pathogenicity in the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, reveals reduced antibacterial defense in aphids.

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    Altincicek, Boran; Ter Braak, Bas; Laughton, Alice M; Udekwu, Klas I; Gerardo, Nicole M

    2011-10-01

    To better understand the molecular basis underlying aphid immune tolerance to beneficial bacteria and immune defense to pathogenic bacteria, we characterized how the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum responds to Escherichia coli K-12 infections. E. coli bacteria, usually cleared in the hemolymph of other insect species, were capable of growing exponentially and killing aphids within a few days. Red fluorescence protein expressing E. coli K-12 laboratory strain multiplied in the aphid hemolymph as well as in the digestive tract, resulting in death of infected aphids. Selected gene deletion mutants of the E. coli K-12 predicted to have reduced virulence during systemic infections showed no difference in either replication or killing rate when compared to the wild type E. coli strain. Of note, however, the XL1-Blue E. coli K-12 strain exhibited a significant lag phase before multiplying and killing aphids. This bacterial strain has recently been shown to be more sensitive to oxidative stress than other E. coli K-12 strains, revealing a potential role for reactive oxygen species-mediated defenses in the otherwise reduced aphid immune system. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Respiratory metabolism of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum (Hemipetra: Aphididae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sláma, Karel; Jedlička, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 109, č. 4 (2012), s. 491-502 ISSN 1210-5759 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP522/09/P382 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Hemiptera * Aphididae * Acyrthosiphon pisum Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 0.918, year: 2012 http://www.eje.cz/scripts/viewabstract.php?abstract=1734

  4. occurrence of the pea aphid, acyrthosiphon pisum (harris)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    alfalfa (Medicago sativa), clover (Trifolium sp.) and other leguminous crops ... holocyclic life cycle (i.e., it reproduces parthenogenetically ... Table 1. Plant species infested by pea aphid at Adet and. Wondata, Ethiopia, in 1999/2000. Host plant species. Total. Number of plants. Vetch Clover Lupine. Alfalfa. Infested plants.

  5. Strategies used by two apterous strains of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum for passive dispersal

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    Yi Zhang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Wingless forms of aphids are relatively sedentary, and have a limited ability to migrate or disperse. However, they can drop off hosts or walk away if disturbed, or their food quality or quantity become deteriorated. Earlier, we found that the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum (Harris, 1776, could use differed strategies to escape danger and locate new host plants. To determine the mechanisms behind the different strategies, we undertook a series of studies including the aphids' host location, energy reserves under starvation, glycogenesis, sugar assimilation, olfactory and probing behaviors. We found that in our controlled laboratory conditions, one strain (local laboratory strain moved longer distances and dispersed wider ranges, and correspondingly these aphids assimilated more sugars, synthesized more glycogen, and moved faster than another strain (collected from Gansu Province, northwestern China. However, the latter strain could locate the host faster, probed leaves more frequently, and identified plant leaves more accurately than the former strain after they were starved. Our results explained how flightless or wingless insects adapt to fit biotic and abiotic challenges in the complex processes of natural selection.

  6. Oral activity of FMRFamide-related peptides on the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum (Hemiptera: Aphididae) and degradation by enzymes from the aphid gut.

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    Down, Rachel E; Matthews, H June; Audsley, Neil

    2011-11-10

    Insect myosuppressins and myosuppressin analogues were tested for oral toxicity against the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum (Harris) by incorporation into an artificial diet. Acyrthosiphon pisum myosuppressin (Acypi-MS) and leucomyosuppressin (LMS) had significant dose-dependent effects (0.1-0.5μg peptide/μl diet) on feeding suppression, mortality, reduced growth and fecundity compared with control insects, but Acypi-MS was more potent than LMS. One hundred percent of aphids had died after 10days of feeding on 0.5μg Acypi-MS/μl diet whereas 40% of aphids feeding on 0.5μg LMS/μl diet were still alive after 13days. Myosuppressins were degraded by aphid gut enzymes; degradation was most likely due to a carboxypeptidase-like protease, an aminopeptidase and a cathepsin L cysteine protease. The estimated half-life of Acypi-MS in a gut extract was 30min, whereas LMS was degraded more slowly (t½=54min). No toxicity was observed when the analogues δR(9) LMS and citrolline(9) Acypi-MS or FMRFamide were fed to the pea aphid. These findings not only help to better understand the biological effects of myosuppressins in aphids but also demonstrate the potential use of myosuppressins in a strategy to control aphid pests. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of temperature and cultivar on pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum (Hemiptera: Aphididae) life history.

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    Morgan, D; Walters, K F; Aegerter, J N

    2001-02-01

    Life history parameters of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum were studied at five constant temperatures on two cultivars of peas, Scout and Sancho. The development and mortality of juveniles and the life-span, age-specific fecundity and survivorship of adult aphids were recorded and used to construct life tables. The juvenile development period (from birth to adulthood) was longest at 11.9 degrees C (16.8 days on cv. Scout and 16.2 days on cv. Sancho) and shortest at 26.7 degrees C (8.5 days on cv. Scout and 8.8 days on cv. Sancho). At all temperatures, except 26.7 degrees C, juveniles developed faster on cv. Sancho than on cv. Scout. On both pea varieties juvenile mortality was highest at temperatures above 19.6 degrees C and lowest at 19.6 degrees C. Highest cumulative juvenile mortality was recorded on cv. Scout at 26.7 degrees C when only 9% of aphids survived from birth to reproductively mature adults. Fecundity rates were unaffected by temperature in the range tested on cv. Sancho but increased with increasing temperatures between 11.9 and 19.6 degrees C on cv. Scout. These differences in life history parameters were reflected in the population growth (rm) of aphids on both pea cultivars which increased with increasing temperatures between 11.9 and 23.1 degrees C on cv. Sancho and 11.9 and 19.6 degrees C on cv. Scout, declining thereafter. Population growth was consistently greater at all temperatures for aphids reared on cv. Sancho than those reared on cv. Scout.

  8. Gene Expression Analysis of Parthenogenetic Embryonic Development of the Pea Aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, Suggests That Aphid Parthenogenesis Evolved from Meiotic Oogenesis

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    Srinivasan, Dayalan G.; Abdelhady, Ahmed; Stern, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Aphids exhibit a form of phenotypic plasticity, called polyphenism, in which genetically identical females reproduce sexually during one part of the life cycle and asexually (via parthenogenesis) during the remainder of the life cycle. The molecular basis for aphid parthenogenesis is unknown. Cytological observations of aphid parthenogenesis suggest that asexual oogenesis evolved either through a modification of meiosis or from a mitotic process. As a test of these alternatives, we assessed the expression levels and expression patterns of canonical meiotic recombination and germline genes in the sexual and asexual ovaries of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum. We observed expression of all meiosis genes in similar patterns in asexual and sexual ovaries, with the exception that some genes encoding Argonaute-family members were not expressed in sexual ovaries. In addition, we observed that asexual aphid tissues accumulated unspliced transcripts of Spo11, whereas sexual aphid tissues accumulated primarily spliced transcripts. In situ hybridization revealed Spo11 transcript in sexual germ cells and undetectable levels of Spo11 transcript in asexual germ cells. We also found that an obligately asexual strain of pea aphid produced little spliced Spo11 transcript. Together, these results suggest that parthenogenetic oogenesis evolved from a meiosis-like, and not a mitosis-like, process and that the aphid reproductive polyphenism may involve a modification of Spo11 gene activity. PMID:25501006

  9. Gene expression analysis of parthenogenetic embryonic development of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, suggests that aphid parthenogenesis evolved from meiotic oogenesis.

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    Srinivasan, Dayalan G; Abdelhady, Ahmed; Stern, David L

    2014-01-01

    Aphids exhibit a form of phenotypic plasticity, called polyphenism, in which genetically identical females reproduce sexually during one part of the life cycle and asexually (via parthenogenesis) during the remainder of the life cycle. The molecular basis for aphid parthenogenesis is unknown. Cytological observations of aphid parthenogenesis suggest that asexual oogenesis evolved either through a modification of meiosis or from a mitotic process. As a test of these alternatives, we assessed the expression levels and expression patterns of canonical meiotic recombination and germline genes in the sexual and asexual ovaries of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum. We observed expression of all meiosis genes in similar patterns in asexual and sexual ovaries, with the exception that some genes encoding Argonaute-family members were not expressed in sexual ovaries. In addition, we observed that asexual aphid tissues accumulated unspliced transcripts of Spo11, whereas sexual aphid tissues accumulated primarily spliced transcripts. In situ hybridization revealed Spo11 transcript in sexual germ cells and undetectable levels of Spo11 transcript in asexual germ cells. We also found that an obligately asexual strain of pea aphid produced little spliced Spo11 transcript. Together, these results suggest that parthenogenetic oogenesis evolved from a meiosis-like, and not a mitosis-like, process and that the aphid reproductive polyphenism may involve a modification of Spo11 gene activity.

  10. Neonicotinoid binding, toxicity and expression of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits in the aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum.

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    Emiliane Taillebois

    Full Text Available Neonicotinoid insecticides act on nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and are particularly effective against sucking pests. They are widely used in crops protection to fight against aphids, which cause severe damage. In the present study we evaluated the susceptibility of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum to the commonly used neonicotinoid insecticides imidacloprid (IMI, thiamethoxam (TMX and clothianidin (CLT. Binding studies on aphid membrane preparations revealed the existence of high and low-affinity binding sites for [3H]-IMI (Kd of 0.16 ± 0.04 nM and 41.7 ± 5.9 nM and for the nicotinic antagonist [125I]-α-bungarotoxin (Kd of 0.008 ± 0.002 nM and 1.135 ± 0.213 nM. Competitive binding experiments demonstrated that TMX displayed a higher affinity than IMI for [125I]-α-bungarotoxin binding sites while CLT affinity was similar for both [125I]-α-bungarotoxin and [3H]-IMI binding sites. Interestingly, toxicological studies revealed that at 48 h, IMI (LC50 = 0.038 µg/ml and TMX (LC50 = 0.034 µg/ml were more toxic than CLT (LC50 = 0.118 µg/ml. The effect of TMX could be associated to its metabolite CLT as demonstrated by HPLC/MS analysis. In addition, we found that aphid larvae treated either with IMI, TMX or CLT showed a strong variation of nAChR subunit expression. Using semi-quantitative PCR experiments, we detected for all insecticides an increase of Apisumα10 and Apisumβ1 expressions levels, whereas Apisumβ2 expression decreased. Moreover, some other receptor subunits seemed to be differently regulated according to the insecticide used. Finally, we also demonstrated that nAChR subunit expression differed during pea aphid development. Altogether these results highlight species specificity that should be taken into account in pest management strategies.

  11. Neonicotinoid Binding, Toxicity and Expression of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subunits in the Aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum

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    Taillebois, Emiliane; Beloula, Abdelhamid; Quinchard, Sophie; Jaubert-Possamai, Stéphanie; Daguin, Antoine; Servent, Denis; Tagu, Denis

    2014-01-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides act on nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and are particularly effective against sucking pests. They are widely used in crops protection to fight against aphids, which cause severe damage. In the present study we evaluated the susceptibility of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum to the commonly used neonicotinoid insecticides imidacloprid (IMI), thiamethoxam (TMX) and clothianidin (CLT). Binding studies on aphid membrane preparations revealed the existence of high and low-affinity binding sites for [3H]-IMI (Kd of 0.16±0.04 nM and 41.7±5.9 nM) and for the nicotinic antagonist [125I]-α-bungarotoxin (Kd of 0.008±0.002 nM and 1.135±0.213 nM). Competitive binding experiments demonstrated that TMX displayed a higher affinity than IMI for [125I]-α-bungarotoxin binding sites while CLT affinity was similar for both [125I]-α-bungarotoxin and [3H]-IMI binding sites. Interestingly, toxicological studies revealed that at 48 h, IMI (LC50 = 0.038 µg/ml) and TMX (LC50 = 0.034 µg/ml) were more toxic than CLT (LC50 = 0.118 µg/ml). The effect of TMX could be associated to its metabolite CLT as demonstrated by HPLC/MS analysis. In addition, we found that aphid larvae treated either with IMI, TMX or CLT showed a strong variation of nAChR subunit expression. Using semi-quantitative PCR experiments, we detected for all insecticides an increase of Apisumα10 and Apisumβ1 expressions levels, whereas Apisumβ2 expression decreased. Moreover, some other receptor subunits seemed to be differently regulated according to the insecticide used. Finally, we also demonstrated that nAChR subunit expression differed during pea aphid development. Altogether these results highlight species specificity that should be taken into account in pest management strategies. PMID:24801634

  12. Modification of Cry4Aa toward Improved Toxin Processing in the Gut of the Pea Aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum.

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    Michael A Rausch

    Full Text Available Aphids are sap-sucking insects (order: Hemiptera that cause extensive damage to a wide range of agricultural crops. Our goal was to optimize a naturally occurring insecticidal crystalline (Cry toxins produced by the soil-dwelling bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis for use against the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum. On the basis that activation of the Cry4Aa toxin is a rate-limiting factor contributing to the relatively low aphicidal activity of this toxin, we introduced cathepsin L and cathepsin B cleavage sites into Cry4Aa for rapid activation in the aphid gut environment. Incubation of modified Cry4Aa and aphid proteases in vitro demonstrated enhanced processing of the toxin into the active form for some of the modified constructs relative to non-modified Cry4Aa. Aphids fed artificial diet with toxin at a final concentration of 125 μg/ml showed enhanced mortality after two days for one of the four modified constructs. Although only modest toxin improvement was achieved by use of this strategy, such specific toxin modifications designed to overcome factors that limit aphid toxicity could be applied toward managing aphid populations via transgenic plant resistance.

  13. Chemical Composition and Behavioral Effects of Five Plant Essential Oils on the Green Pea Aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum (Harris) (Homoptera: Aphididae).

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    Kasmi, Abir; Hammami, Majdi; Raoelison, Emmanuel G; Abderrabba, Manef; Bouajila, Jalloul; Ducamp, Christine

    2017-05-01

    Essential oils (EOs) from Schinus molle, Helichrysum gymnocephalum, Cedrelopsis grevei and Melaleuca viridiflora, four aromatic and medicinal plants, are commonly used in folk medicine. EOs were characterized by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and quantified by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID); then evaluated for their behavioral effects on adults of the green pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum (Harris) using a Perspex four-armed olfactometer in order to test the compatibility of their use as phytoinsecticides to control this insect pest. Our results showed that the EOs from the leaves of S. molle, M. viridiflora and C. grevei did not change aphids' behavior. However, S. molle fruits EO seemed to be attractive while H. gymnocephalum leaves EO exhibited repellency towards aphids at a dose of 10 μl. The major compounds in S. molle fruits EO were 6-epi-shyobunol (16.22%) and d-limonene (15.35%). While, in H. gymnocephalum leaves EO, 1,8-cineole was the main compound (47.4%). The difference in aphids' responses to these two EOs could be attributed to the differences in their compositions. Our findings suggest that these two EOs have potential applications for the integrated pest management of A. pisum (Harris). © 2017 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zurich, Switzerland.

  14. The aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum exhibits a greater survival after a heat shock when parasitized by the wasp Aphidius ervi.

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    Trotta, Vincenzo; Forlano, Pierluigi; Falabella, Patrizia; Battaglia, Donatella; Fanti, Paolo

    2018-02-01

    The pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum is a common pest of many species of legumes and its parasitoid Aphidius ervi is regarded as a successful biocontrol agent. In this study, we report a greater survival rate of parasitized aphids compared with unparasitized ones, after exposure to a very high temperature (39°C for 30min). After the heat shock, the survival of unparasitized aphids decreases according to their age at the heat shock treatment, suggesting a different adaptation of the aphid life stage to the different microclimatic conditions they experience. Survival of parasitized aphids does not change according to the time of the heat shock treatment, but it is always significantly higher compared with the unparasitized ones. Parasitized aphids are very quickly subjected to a wide range of physiological modifications and the observed increased survival could be a consequence of these modifications before the heat shock treatment. The possible explanations as well as the possible adaptive nature of the observed phenomenon are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of Manduca sexta allatostatin and an analog on the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum (Hemiptera: Aphididae) and degradation by enzymes from the aphid gut.

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    Down, Rachel E; Matthews, H June; Audsley, Neil

    2010-03-01

    The C-type allatostatin, Manduca sexta allatostatin (Manse-AS) and the analog delta R(3)delta R(5)Manse-AS, where R residues were replaced by their d-isomers, were tested for oral toxicity against the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum (Harris) by incorporation into an artificial diet. Both peptides had significant dose-dependent feeding suppression effects, resulting in mortality, reduced growth and fecundity compared with control insects. The delta R(3)delta R(5)Manse-AS analog had an estimated LC(50) of 0.18 microg/microl diet, and was more potent than Manse-AS. At a dose of 0.35 microg delta R(3)delta R(5)Manse-AS/microl diet, 98% of aphids were dead within 3 days, at a rate similar to those aphids that had been starved (no diet controls). On comparison, it required 13 days and three times the dose of Manse-AS fed to aphids to attain 96% mortality. It is possible that the feeding suppression effects of Manse-AS on aphids are due to the inhibition of gut motility. The estimated half-life of Manse-AS when incubated with a gut extract from A. pisum was 54 min. Degradation was most likely due to cathepsin L cysteine and/or trypsin-like proteases, by an unidentified glutamine-specific protease and by a carboxypeptidase-like enzyme. The d-isomers of R in the Manse-AS analog appeared to prevent hydrolysis by cathepsin L cysteine and trypsin-like enzymes, and enhance its half-life (145 min). However delta R(3)delta R(5)Manse-AS was cleaved by enzymes with carboxypeptidase-like and chymotrypsin-like activity. The increased stability of the Manse-AS analog may explain its enhanced feeding suppression effects when continually fed to aphids, and demonstrates the potential use of Manse-AS in a strategy to control aphid pests. (c) 2009. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Characterisation, analysis of expression and localisation of circadian clock genes from the perspective of photoperiodism in the aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum.

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    Barberà, Miquel; Collantes-Alegre, Jorge Mariano; Martínez-Torres, David

    2017-04-01

    Aphids are typical photoperiodic insects that switch from viviparous parthenogenetic reproduction typical of long day seasons to oviparous sexual reproduction triggered by the shortening of photoperiod in autumn yielding an overwintering egg in which an embryonic diapause takes place. While the involvement of the circadian clock genes in photoperiodism in mammals is well established, there is still some controversy on their participation in insects. The availability of the genome of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum places this species as an excellent model to investigate the involvement of the circadian system in the aphid seasonal response. In the present report, we have advanced in the characterisation of the circadian clock genes and showed that these genes display extensive alternative splicing. Moreover, the expression of circadian clock genes, analysed at different moments of the day, showed a robust cycling of central clock genes period and timeless. Furthermore, the rhythmic expression of these genes was shown to be rapidly dampened under DD (continuous darkness conditions), thus supporting the model of a seasonal response based on a heavily dampened circadian oscillator. Additionally, increased expression of some of the circadian clock genes under short-day conditions suggest their involvement in the induction of the aphid seasonal response. Finally, in situ localisation of transcripts of genes period and timeless in the aphid brain revealed the site of clock neurons for the first time in aphids. Two groups of clock cells were identified: the Dorsal Neurons (DN) and the Lateral Neurons (LN), both in the protocerebrum. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The Effects of Bean Leafroll Virus on Life History Traits and Host Selection Behavior of Specialized Pea Aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum, Hemiptera: Aphididae) Genotypes.

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    Davis, T S; Wu, Y; Eigenbrode, S D

    2017-02-01

    Intraspecific specialization by insect herbivores on different host plant species contributes to the formation of genetically distinct "host races," but the effects of plant virus infection on interactions between specialized herbivores and their host plants have barely been investigated. Using three genetically and phenotypically divergent pea aphid clones (Acyrthosiphon pisum L.) adapted to either pea (Pisum sativum L.) or alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), we tested how infection of these hosts by an insect-borne phytovirus (Bean leafroll virus; BLRV) affects aphid performance and preference. Four important findings emerged: 1) mean aphid survival rate and intrinsic rate of population growth (Rm) were increased by 15% and 14%, respectively, for aphids feeding on plants infected with BLRV; 2) 34% of variance in survival rate was attributable to clone × host plant interactions; 3) a three-way aphid clone × host plant species × virus treatment significantly affected intrinsic rates of population growth; and 4) each clone exhibited a preference for either pea or alfalfa when choosing between noninfected host plants, but for two of the three clones tested these preferences were modestly reduced when selecting among virus-infected host plants. Our studies show that colonizing BLRV-infected hosts increased A. pisum survival and rates of population growth, confirming that the virus benefits A. pisum. BLRV transmission affected aphid discrimination of host plant species in a genotype-specific fashion, and we detected three unique "virus-association phenotypes," with potential consequences for patterns of host plant use by aphid populations and crop virus epidemiology. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Biostable multi-Aib analogs of tachykinin-related peptides demonstrate potent oral aphicidal activity in the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum (Hemiptera: Aphidae)

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    The tachykinin-related peptides (TRPs) are multifunctional neuropeptides found in a variety of arthropod species, including the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum (Hemiptera: Aphidae). Two novel biostable TRP analogs containing multiple, sterically-hindered Aib residues were synthesized and found to exhi...

  19. Dickeya dadantii, a plant pathogenic bacterium producing Cyt-like entomotoxins, causes septicemia in the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum.

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    Denis Costechareyre

    Full Text Available Dickeya dadantii (syn. Erwinia chrysanthemi is a plant pathogenic bacteria that harbours a cluster of four horizontally-transferred, insect-specific toxin genes. It was recently shown to be capable of causing an acute infection in the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum (Insecta: Hemiptera. The infection route of the pathogen, and the role and in vivo expression pattern of these toxins, remain unknown. Using bacterial numeration and immunolocalization, we investigated the kinetics and the pattern of infection of this phytopathogenic bacterium within its insect host. We compared infection by the wild-type strain and by the Cyt toxin-deficient mutant. D. dadantii was found to form dense clusters in many luminal parts of the aphid intestinal tract, including the stomach, from which it invaded internal tissues as early as day 1 post-infection. Septicemia occurred soon after, with the fat body being the main infected tissue, together with numerous early infections of the embryonic chains showing embryonic gut and fat body as the target organs. Generalized septicemia led to insect death when the bacterial load reached about 10(8 cfu. Some individual aphids regularly escaped infection, indicating an effective partial immune response to this bacteria. Cyt-defective mutants killed insects more slowly but were capable of localisation in any type of tissue. Cyt toxin expression appeared to be restricted to the digestive tract where it probably assisted in crossing over the first cell barrier and, thus, accelerating bacterial diffusion into the aphid haemocel. Finally, the presence of bacteria on the surface of leaves hosting infected aphids indicated that the insects could be vectors of the bacteria.

  20. Characterization of non-LTR retrotransposable TRAS elements in the aphids Acyrthosiphon pisum and Myzus persicae (Aphididae, Hemiptera).

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    Monti, Valentina; Serafini, Chiara; Manicardi, Gian Carlo; Mandrioli, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    A non-LTR TRAS retrotransposon (identified as TRASAp1) has been amplified in the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum and its presence has been assessed also in the peach potato aphid Myzus persicae. This TRAS element possesses 2 overlapping ORFs (a gag-ORF1 and a pol-ORF2 containing the reverse transcriptase and the endonuclease domains) that show a similarity ranging from 40% to 48% to proteins coded by other TRAS elements identified in insects (including the beetle Tribolium castaneum and the moth Bombyx mori). The study of the TRAS chromosomal insertion sites, performed by standard fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and fiber FISH, showed that TRAS elements were located in a subtelomeric position, just before the telomeric (TTAGG) n repeats. In both the aphid species, TRAS elements were present at all termini of autosomes, but the 2 X chromosome telomeres show a clear-cut structural difference. Indeed, cromomycin A3 staining, together with FISH using a TRAS probe, revealed that TRAS signals only occur at the telomere opposite to the NOR-bearing one. Lastly, the analysis of the distribution of TRAS retrotransposons in a M. persicae strain possessing spontaneous fragmentations of the X chromosomes assessed that TRAS elements were not involved in the healing of de novo telomeres.

  1. Triterpene saponins of Quillaja saponaria show strong aphicidal and deterrent activity against the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum.

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    De Geyter, Ellen; Smagghe, Guy; Rahbé, Yvan; Geelen, Danny

    2012-02-01

    Saponins are a class of secondary plant metabolites consisting of a sugar moiety glycosidically linked to a hydrophobic aglycone (sapogenin) that often possess insecticidal activities. Four saponins were selected: two triterpene saponins, Q. saponaria saponins and aescin, and two steroidal saponins, digitonin and diosgenin. Their effects were investigated on an important pest species and a model piercing-sucking insect, the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum. The triterpene Q. saponaria saponins bark saponin received special attention because of its high activity. Aphids were challenged by oral and contact exposure to demonstrate aphicidal activities, and in choice experiments to support use as a natural deterrent. When aphids were exposed to supplemented artificial diet for 3 days, a strong aphicidal activity was recorded for three of the four saponins, with an LC50 of 0.55 mg mL(-1) for Q. saponaria saponins, 0.62 mg mL(-1) for aescin and 0.45 mg mL(-1) for digitonin. The LT50 values ranged between 1 and 4 days, depending on the dose. For diosgenin, only low toxicity (14%) was scored for concentrations up to 5 mg mL(-1). In choice experiments with treated diet, a deterrence index of 0.97 was scored for Q. saponaria saponins at 1 mg mL(-1). In contrast, direct contact showed no repellent effect. Spraying of faba bean plants with Q. saponaria saponins resulted in an LC50 of 8.2 mg mL(-1). Finally, histological analysis in aphids fed with Q. saponaria saponins demonstrated strong aberrations of the aphid gut epithelium, and exposure of midgut CF-203 cell lines to Q. saponaria saponins in vitro confirmed the cytotoxic effect. The present insect experiments provide strong evidence that saponins, as tested here with triterpene Q. saponaria saponins, can be useful as natural aphicides and deterrents. Furthermore, the insect midgut epithelium is suggested to be a primary target of saponin activity. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Identification of the prothoracicotropic hormone (Ptth) coding gene and localization of its site of expression in the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberà, M; Martínez-Torres, D

    2017-10-01

    Insect hormones control essential aspects of physiology, behaviour and development in insects. The majority of insect hormones are peptide hormones that perform a highly diverse catalogue of functions. Prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH) is a brain neuropeptide hormone whose main function is to stimulate the secretion of ecdysone (the moulting hormone) by the prothoracic glands in insect larvae thus playing a key role in the control of moulting and metamorphosis. Moreover, both PTTH release or blockade have been reported to act as a switch to terminate or initiate larval and pupal diapauses. In insects, diapause is a prevalent response often regulated by the photoperiod. It has been shown that PTTH participates as an output of the circadian clock and a role in photoperiodic processes is suggested in some insect species. Aphids (Hemiptera: Aphididae) reproduce by cyclical parthenogenesis with a sexual phase, induced by short photoperiods, that leads to the production of diapausing eggs. With the availability of the pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) genome, efforts to identify and characterize genes relevant to essential aspects of aphid biology have multiplied. In spite of its relevance, several genomic and transcriptomic studies on aphid neuropeptides failed to detect aphid PTTH amongst them. Here we report on the first identification of the aphid PTTH coding gene and the neuroanatomical localization of its expression in the aphid brain. © 2017 The Royal Entomological Society.

  3. Antifeedant activity and high mortality in the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum (Hemiptera: Aphidae) induced by biostable insect kinin analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smagghe, Guy; Mahdian, Kamran; Zubrzak, Pawel; Nachman, Ronald J

    2010-03-01

    The insect kinins are multifunctional neuropeptides found in a variety of arthropod species, including the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum (Hemiptera: Aphidae). A series of biostable insect kinin analogs based on the shared C-terminal pentapeptide core region were fed in solutions of artificial diet to the pea aphid over a period of 3 days and evaluated for antifeedant and aphicidal activity. The analogs contained either alpha,alpha-disubstituted or beta-amino acids in key positions to enhance resistance to tissue-bound peptidases and retain activity in a number of insect kinin bioassays and/or on expressed receptors. Three of the biostable analogs demonstrated antifeedant activity, with a marked reduction in honeydew formation observed after 1 day, and very high mortality. In contrast, an unmodified, parent insect kinin and two other analogs containing some of the same structural components that promote biostability are inactive. The most active analog, double Aib analog K-Aib-1 ([Aib]FF[Aib]WGa), featured aphicidal activity calculated at an LC(50) of 0.063 nmol/microl (0.048 microg/microl) and an LT(50) of 1.68 days, matching the potency of some commercially available aphicides. The mechanism of this activity has yet to be established. The aphicidal activity of the biostable insect kinin analogs may result from different potential mechanisms as disruption of digestive processes by interfering with gut motility patterns, digestive enzyme release, and/or with fluid cycling in the gut, and also nutrient transport across the gut itself; all processes shown to be regulated by the insect kinins in other insects. However the mechanism(s) is(are) not yet known. The active insect kinin analogs represent potential leads in the development of selective, environmentally friendly pest aphid control agents. (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Functional characterization of the adipokinetic hormone in the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jedlička, Pavel; Steinbauerová, V.; Šimek, Petr; Zahradníčková, Helena

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 162, č. 1 (2012), s. 51-58 ISSN 1095-6433 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP522/09/P382 Grant - others:European Union FP7(CZ) MOBITAG, GA 229518 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : adipokinetic hormone * Acyrthosiphon pisum * neuropeptide Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.167, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1095643312000256

  5. Identification of distinct quantitative trait loci associated with defence against the closely related aphids Acyrthosiphon pisum and A. kondoi in Medicago truncatula

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Su-Min

    2012-03-21

    Aphids are a major family of plant insect pests. Medicago truncatula and Acyrthosiphon pisum (pea aphid, PA) are model species with a suite of resources available to help dissect the mechanism underlying plant-aphid interactions. A previous study focused on monogenic and relatively strong resistance in M. truncatula to PA and other aphid species. In this study a moderate resistance to PA was characterized in detail in the M. truncatula line A17 and compared with the highly susceptible line A20 and the more resistant line Jester. The results show that PA resistance in A17 involves both antibiosis and tolerance, and that resistance is phloem based. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis using a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population (n=114) from a cross between A17 and A20 revealed that one locus, which co-segregated with AIN (Acyrthosiphon-induced necrosis) on chromosome 3, is responsible for the reduction of aphid biomass (indicator of antibiosis) for both PA and bluegreen aphid (BGA, A. kondoi), albeit to a lesser degree for PA than BGA. Interestingly, two independent loci on chromosomes 5 and 3 were identified for the plant biomass reduction (indicator of plant tolerance) by PA and BGA, respectively, demonstrating that the plant\\'s tolerance response to these two closely related aphid species is distinct. Together with previously identified major resistant (R) genes, the QTLs identified in this study are powerful tools to understand fully the spectrum of plant defence against sap-sucking insects and provide opportunities for breeders to generate effective and sustainable strategies for aphid control. 2012 The Author.

  6. Efficacy of different chemicals for the control of aphid (acyrthosiphon pisum) on guar (cymopisis tetragonolobus) crop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Din, Q.M.U.; Hussain, I.; Abbas, G.; Abbas, Z.

    2009-01-01

    An experiment was carried out to evaluate the efficacy of different chemicals far the control of aphid on guar crop at Adaptive Research Farm Karor during the three successive kharif seasons i.e. 2006-07 and 2008. The experiments were laid out in Randomized Complete Block Design with three replications and five treatments viz T1=control, T2 Bifenthrin at the rate 375 ml ha/sup -1/, T3=Primore 50PP at the rate 850 ml ha/sup -1/ T4=Furathiocrab at the rate 750 ml ha/sup -1/ and T5=Carbosulfan at the rate 1250 ml ha/sup -1/. All the treatments (T4) caused significant decrease in the Pest population as compared to the control. Treatment (T4) where Furathiocrab was applied at the rate. 750 ml ha/sup -1/ during the years 2006, 2007 and 2008 respectively. (author)

  7. Effects of biological insecticides NeemAzal T/S and Pyrethrum FS EC and their interaction with organic products in treatments of pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum (Harris (Hemiptera: Aphididae on Pisum sativum (L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivelina Nikolova

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy and effects of two biological insecticides, NeemAzal T/S® and Pyrethrum FS EC, applied individually and in combination with Polyversum (a biological growth regulator and fungicide and Biofa (an organic foliar fertilizer, in controlling Acyrthosyphon pisum population density were studied. Nurelle D (a synthetic insecticide, applied alone and in combination with Flordimex 420 (a synthetic growth regulator, was used as a standard. The products were applied once (at budding stage or twice (at budding and flowering stages. Twenty-four variants were studied. The interaction of Pyrethrum with Biofa was the most efficient variant of the biological products, causing a reduction in aphid density that reached 48.2% after double treatment, while Pyrethrum+Polyversum (42.5% was the second most successful treatment. The combination of Pyrethrum with Biofa achieved the highest efficacy and synergism and their efficacy approached that of the synthetic insecticide.

  8. Antifeedant Activity and High Mortality in the Pea Aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum (Hemiptera: Aphidae) Induced by Biostable Insect Kinin Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    modulate digestive enzyme release [13,14,20,33,28,41], and inter- estingly they can also inhibit weight gain in larvae of the tobacco budworm (Heliothis...modern insecticides, making a search for alternative strategies urgent [7]. Furthermore aphids are not sensitive to the toxins from the bacterium Bacillus ...Life Sci 2003;17:61–4. [14] Harshini S, Nachman RJ, Sreekumar S. Inhibition of digestive enzyme release by neuropeptides in larvae of Opisinia

  9. Aphid resistance in florist's chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... SAE is readily toxic when ingested by the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, and the cotton aphid, Aphis gossypii. We transformed chrysanthemum genotype 1581 by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation with the SAE gene under the control of the chrysanthemum RbcS promoter to induce aphid resistance.

  10. Comparative transcriptomic analyses revealed divergences of two agriculturally important aphid species

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Dahai; Liu, Qi; Jones, Huw D; Bruce, Toby; Xia, Lanqin

    2014-01-01

    Background Grain aphid (Sitobion avenae F) and pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) are two agriculturally important pest species, which cause significant yield losses to crop plants each year by inflicting damage both through the direct effects of feeding and by vectoring debilitating plant viruses. Although a close phylogenetic relationship between grain aphid and pea aphid was proposed, the biological variations between these two aphid species are obvious. While the host ranges of grain aphid i...

  11. Aphids, predators and parasitoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhams, L J; Birkett, M A; Powell, W; Woodcock, C M

    1999-01-01

    A number of studies have demonstrated the role of herbivore-induced release of plant volatiles in mediating foraging behaviour of aphid parasitoids, particularly with the parasitoid Aphidius ervi, its aphid host Acyrthosiphon pisum and the aphid food plant Vicia faba. These studies have shown that feeding by the aphid alters the composition of volatiles released by the plant and that these compounds act as synomones for the foraging parasitoid. Of particular interest is the species-specificity of the herbivore-induced synomones associated with different aphids feeding on V. faba. Aphids employ various pheromones that mediate behaviour, particularly mating and alarm responses. These pheromones play important roles in reproduction and defence against predation and parasitism. Many species of aphids reproduce sexually on their primary hosts during the autumn and the sexual females produce a pheromone that attracts males. The sex pheromones for a number of aphid species have been identified and laboratory and field studies have shown that synthetic material can act as a kairomone in attracting predators and parasitoids. The aphid alarm pheromone is released from the cornicles of aphids when they are attacked by predators or parasitoids. The activity of the main alarm pheromone component, (E)-beta-farnesene, is inhibited by the related sesquiterpene hydrocarbon beta-caryophyllene, which is reported to attract the lacewing Chrysoperla carnea. In addition, electrophysiological studies have shown that the seven-spot ladybird, Coccinella septempunctata, possesses specific olfactory receptors for (E)-beta-farnesene and beta-caryophyllene. Laboratory studies show these compounds to have behavioural activity with C. septempunctata, suggesting that they may be involved in prey location.

  12. Thiamine treatments alleviate aphid infestations in barley and pea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Afaf M; Jonsson, Lisbeth M V

    2013-10-01

    Treatment of plants with thiamine (Vitamin B1) has before been shown to activate plant defence against microorganisms. Here, we have studied the effects of thiamine treatments of plants on aphid reproduction and behaviour. The work was mainly carried out with bird cherry-oat aphid (Rhopalosiphum padi L.) on barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). Aphid population growth and aphid acceptance on plants grown from seeds soaked in a 150μM thiamine solution were reduced to ca. 60% of that on control plants. R. padi life span and the total number of offspring were reduced on barley plants treated with thiamine. Healthy aphids and aphids infected with the R. padi virus were similarly affected. Spraying or addition of thiamine at 150μM to nutrient solutions likewise resulted in reduced aphid population growth to ca. 60%, as did plant exposure to thiamine odour at 4mM. Thiamine treatments resulted in reduced aphid population growth also when tested with grain aphid (Sitobion avenae F.) on barley and pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum H.) on pea (Pisum sativum L.). There was no direct effect of thiamine on aphid reproduction or thiamine odour on aphid behaviour, as evaluated using artificial diets and by olfactometer tests, respectively. Two gene sequences regulated by salicylic acid showed higher transcript abundance and one gene sequence regulated by methyl jasmonate showed lower transcript abundance in thiamine-treated plants but not in control plants after aphid infestation. These results suggest that the aphid antibiosis and antixenosis effects may be related to priming of defence, but more studies are needed to explain the effects against aphids. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Angiotensin-converting enzymes modulate aphid-plant interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Luo, Lan; Lu, Hong; Chen, Shaoliang; Kang, Le; Cui, Feng

    2015-03-06

    Angiotensin-converting enzymes (ACEs) are key components of the renin-angiotensin system in mammals. However, the function of ACE homologs in insect saliva is unclear. Aphids presumably deliver effector proteins via saliva into plant cells to maintain a compatible insect-plant interaction. In this study, we showed that ACE modulates aphid-plant interactions by affecting feeding behavior and survival of aphids on host plants. Three ACE genes were identified from the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum genome. ACE1 and ACE2 were highly expressed in the salivary glands and are predicted to function as secretory proteins. The ACE2 transcript level decreased in aphids fed on artificial diet compared with aphids fed on Vicia faba. The knockdown of the expression of each ACE by RNAi failed to affect aphid survival. When ACE1 and ACE2 were simultaneously knocked down, aphid feeding was enhanced. Aphids required less time to find the phloem sap and showed longer passive ingestion. However, the simultaneous knockdown of ACE1 and ACE2 resulted in a higher mortality rate than the control group when aphids were fed on plants. These results indicated that ACE1 and ACE2 function together to modulate A. pisum feeding and survival on plants.

  14. Parasitic wasp responses to symbiont-based defense in aphids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Kerry M

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent findings indicate that several insect lineages receive protection against particular natural enemies through infection with heritable symbionts, but little is yet known about whether enemies are able to discriminate and respond to symbiont-based defense. The pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, receives protection against the parasitic wasp, Aphidius ervi, when infected with the bacterial symbiont Hamiltonella defensa and its associated bacteriophage APSE (Acyrthosiphon pisum secondary endosymbiont. Internally developing parasitoid wasps, such as A. ervi, use maternal and embryonic factors to create an environment suitable for developing wasps. If more than one parasitoid egg is deposited into a single aphid host (superparasitism, then additional complements of these factors may contribute to the successful development of the single parasitoid that emerges. Results We performed experiments to determine if superparasitism is a tactic allowing wasps to overcome symbiont-mediated defense. We found that the deposition of two eggs into symbiont-protected aphids significantly increased rates of successful parasitism relative to singly parasitized aphids. We then conducted behavioral assays to determine whether A. ervi selectively superparasitizes H. defensa-infected aphids. In choice tests, we found that A. ervi tends to deposit a single egg in uninfected aphids, but two or more eggs in H. defensa-infected aphids, indicating that oviposition choices may be largely determined by infection status. Finally, we identified differences in the quantity of the trans-β-farnesene, the major component of aphid alarm pheromone, between H. defensa-infected and uninfected aphids, which may form the basis for discrimination. Conclusions Here we show that the parasitic wasp A. ervi discriminates among symbiont-infected and uninfected aphids, and changes its oviposition behavior in a way that increases the likelihood of overcoming symbiont

  15. Implications of predator foraging on aphid pathogen dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, H E; Pell, J K; Clark, S J; Alderson, P G

    1998-05-01

    The foraging behavior of starved and nonstarved second and fourth instar Coccinella septempunctata larvae on dead Acyrthosiphon pisum aphids, either infected with the entomopathogenic fungus Erynia neoaphidis (sporulating) or uninfected, was examined. Larvae searched for longer and fed less when presented with infected rather than uninfected A. pisum. Although no sporulating infected aphids were completely consumed, both adult and larval ladybirds can still be considered as intraguild predators. In a further study, fourth instar larvae fed on dying infected, dead infected (not sporulating), and dead uninfected aphids for similar periods of time but again the infected aphids were seldom entirely consumed. Live uninfected aphids were fed upon for significantly longer than any other prey. Infected aphids which were damaged at an early stage of infection (0, 1, or 2 days after inoculation) did not sporulate, whereas damaged moribund aphids (3 days after inoculation) did subsequently sporulate. Damaged sporulating cadavers continued to sporulate. However, damage to moribund and sporulating infected aphids, both mechanical or due to C. septempunctata feeding, reduced the number of conidia subsequently produced. Larval feeding caused the most significant reduction. Under laboratory conditions, C. septempunctata foraging on infected aphids did, therefore, reduce the pathogen density. However, conidia produced from a damaged cadaver resulted in levels of transmission to healthy aphids comparable to that resulting from an intact cadaver. Furthermore, the presence of a foraging adult ladybird resulted in a significant increase in transmission of the fungus to healthy aphids. Preliminary studies to assess the potential of other aphid natural enemies as intraguild predators illustrated that adults of the generalist carabid, Pterostichus madidus, entirely consumed sporulating cadavers. Third instar lacewing, Chrysoperla carnea, and hoverfly, Episyrphus balteatus, larvae never

  16. Interactions between extrafloral nectaries, aphids and ants: are there competition effects between plant and homopteran sugar sources?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engel, V.; Fischer, M.D.; Wäckers, F.L.; Volkl, W.

    2001-01-01

    Broad bean (Vicia faba), an annual plant bearing extrafloral nectaries (EFN) at the base of the upper leaves, is regularly infested by two aphid species, Aphis fabae and Acyrthosiphon pisum. EFN and A. fabae are commonly attended by the ant, Lasius niger, while Ac. pisum usually remains uninfested.

  17. Pisum sativum L.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-08-04

    Aug 4, 2009 ... To assess the genetic relations in Pisum genus and to examine putative duplicate accessions, 20 pea varieties (Pisum sativum ..... Two accessions of ssp. asiaticum (No. 20 and 45) origin- nated from Tajikistan and Egypt, respectively, were assigned to the ssp. arven-se collection. Also, one acces- sion of ...

  18. Short Communication: Occurrence of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The occurrence of pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum (Harris) (Homoptera: Aphididae), on wild annual and perennial leguminous plants was studied at two locations (Adet and Wondata) in West Gojam, Ethiopia in 1999/2000 seasons. Annual and perennial leguminous wild or volunteer plants encountered in the study areas ...

  19. Seed treatments with thiamine reduce the performance of generalist and specialist aphids on crop plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, A M; Fatehi, J; Jonsson, L M V

    2018-02-01

    Thiamine is a vitamin that has been shown to act as a trigger to activate plant defence and reduce pathogen and nematode infection as well as aphid settling and reproduction. We have here investigated whether thiamine treatments of seeds (i.e. seed dressing) would increase plant resistance against aphids and whether this would have different effects on a generalist than on specialist aphids. Seeds of wheat, barley, oat and pea were treated with thiamine alone or in combination with the biocontrol bacteria Pseudomonas chlororaphis MA 342 (MA 342). Plants were grown in climate chambers. The effects of seed treatment on fecundity, host acceptance and life span were studied on specialist aphids bird cherry-oat aphid (Rhopalosiphum padi L.) and pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum Harris) and on the generalist green peach aphid (Myzus persicae, Sulzer). Thiamine seed treatments reduced reproduction and host acceptance of all three aphid species. The number of days to reproduction, the length of the reproductive life, the fecundity and the intrinsic rate of increase were found reduced for bird cherry-oat aphid after thiamine treatment of the cereal seeds. MA 342 did not have any effect in any of the plant-aphid combinations, except a weak decrease of pea aphid reproduction on pea. The results show that there are no differential effects of either thiamine or MA 342 seed treatments on specialist and generalist aphids and suggest that seed treatments with thiamine has a potential in aphid pest management.

  20. Mechanisms Underlying the Nonconsumptive Effects of Parasitoid Wasps on Aphids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingerslew, K S; Finke, D L

    2017-02-01

    Natural enemies need not consume herbivores to suppress herbivore populations. Behavioral interactions can adversely impact herbivore fitness from reduced time feeding, investment in defense, or injury from failed attacks. The importance of such "nonconsumptive effects" for herbivore suppression may vary across species based on the specificity and intensity of the herbivore defensive response. In a series of manipulative studies, we quantified the nature and consequences of nonconsumptive interactions between two parasitoid wasps, Aphidius ervi Haliday and Aphidius colemani Viereck, on two aphid species, pea aphids (Acyrthosiphon pisum (Harris)) and green peach aphids (Myzus persicae (Sulzer)). Both wasps successfully parasitize green peach aphids, but only A. ervi parasitizes pea aphids. We observed A. ervi antennating and stinging pea aphids and documented a decrease in pea aphid longevity in response to stinging even when the aphid survived the interaction and no mummy formed. The primary defensive tactic of pea aphids in response to either wasp species was dropping from the host plant. Both wasp species antennated and stung green peach aphids, but they elicited unique defensive behaviors. Green peach aphids kicked or emitted cornicle secretions in response to A. colemani but spent more time off the plant in the presence of A. ervi. Green peach aphid longevity and fecundity were not affected by wasp stings when the aphid survived and no mummy formed. Our study demonstrates the complexity of behavioral interactions between parasitoids and their potential hosts and contributes to a mechanistic understanding of variation in the nonconsumptive suppression of herbivore populations. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Plant genetic variation mediates an indirect ecological effect between belowground earthworms and aboveground aphids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Akanksha; Braun, Julia; Decker, Emilia; Hans, Sarah; Wagner, Agnes; Weisser, Wolfgang W; Zytynska, Sharon E

    2014-10-21

    Interactions between aboveground and belowground terrestrial communities are often mediated by plants, with soil organisms interacting via the roots and aboveground organisms via the shoots and leaves. Many studies now show that plant genetics can drive changes in the structure of both above and belowground communities; however, the role of plant genetic variation in mediating aboveground-belowground interactions is still unclear. We used an earthworm-plant-aphid model system with two aphid species (Aphis fabae and Acyrthosiphon pisum) to test the effect of host-plant (Vicia faba) genetic variation on the indirect interaction between the belowground earthworms (Eisenia veneta) on the aboveground aphid populations. Our data shows that host-plant variety mediated an indirect ecological effect of earthworms on generalist black bean aphids (A. fabae), with earthworms increasing aphid growth rate in three plant varieties but decreasing it in another variety. We found no effect of earthworms on the second aphid species, the pea aphid (A. pisum), and no effect of competition between the aphid species. Plant biomass was increased when earthworms were present, and decreased when A. pisum was feeding on the plant (mediated by plant variety). Although A. fabae aphids were influenced by the plants and worms, they did not, in turn, alter plant biomass. Previous work has shown inconsistent effects of earthworms on aphids, but we suggest these differences could be explained by plant genetic variation and variation among aphid species. This study demonstrates that the outcome of belowground-aboveground interactions can be mediated by genetic variation in the host-plant, but depends on the identity of the species involved.

  2. Toxin delivery by the coat protein of an aphid-vectored plant virus provides plant resistance to aphids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonning, Bryony C; Pal, Narinder; Liu, Sijun; Wang, Zhaohui; Sivakumar, S; Dixon, Philip M; King, Glenn F; Miller, W Allen

    2014-01-01

    The sap-sucking insects (order Hemiptera), including aphids, planthoppers, whiteflies and stink bugs, present one of the greatest challenges for pest management in global agriculture. Insect neurotoxins offer an alternative to chemical insecticides for controlling these pests, but require delivery into the insect hemocoel. Here we use the coat protein of a luteovirus, an aphid-vectored plant virus, to deliver a spider-derived, insect-specific toxin that acts within the hemocoel. The luteovirid coat protein is sufficient for delivery of fused proteins into the hemocoel of pea aphids, Acyrthosiphon pisum, without virion assembly. We show that when four aphid pest species-A. pisum, Rhopalosiphum padi, Aphis glycines and Myzus persicae-feed on a recombinant coat protein-toxin fusion, either in an experimental membrane sachet or in transgenic Arabidopsis plants, they experience significant mortality. Aphids fed on these fusion proteins showed signs of neurotoxin-induced paralysis. Luteovirid coat protein-insect neurotoxin fusions represent a promising strategy for transgenic control of aphids and potentially other hemipteran pests.

  3. Tetramorium tsushimae Ants Use Methyl Branched Hydrocarbons of Aphids for Partner Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Itaru; Hayashi, Masayuki; Nakamuta, Kiyoshi

    2017-10-01

    In mutualisms, partner discrimination is often the most important challenge for interacting organisms. The interaction between ants and aphids is a model system for studying mutualisms; ants are provided with honeydew by aphids and, in turn, the ants offer beneficial services to the aphids. To establish and maintain this system, ants must discriminate mutualistic aphid species correctly. Although recent studies have shown that ants recognize aphids as mutualistic partners based on their cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs), it was unclear which CHCs are involved in recognition. Here, we tested whether the n-alkane or methylalkane fraction, or both, of aphid CHCs were utilized as partner recognition cues by measuring ant aggressiveness toward these fractions. When workers of Tetramorium tsushimae ants were presented with dummies coated with n-alkanes of their mutualistic aphid Aphis craccivora, ants displayed higher levels of aggression than to dummies treated with total CHCs or methyl alkanes of A. craccivora; responses to dummies treated with n-alkanes of A. craccivora were similar to those to control dummies or dummies treated with the CHCs of the non-mutualistic aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum. By contrast, ants exhibited lower aggression to dummies treated with either total CHCs or the methylalkane fraction of the mutualistic aphid than to control dummies or dummies treated with CHCs of the non-mutualistic aphid. These results suggest that T. tsushimae ants use methylalkanes of the mutualistic aphid's CHCs to recognize partners, and that these ants do not recognize aphids as partners on the basis of n-alkanes.

  4. Aphid-encoded variability in susceptibility to a parasitoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Adam J; Ritter, Shannon G; Doremus, Matthew R; Russell, Jacob A; Oliver, Kerry M

    2014-06-10

    Many animals exhibit variation in resistance to specific natural enemies. Such variation may be encoded in their genomes or derived from infection with protective symbionts. The pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, for example, exhibits tremendous variation in susceptibility to a common natural enemy, the parasitic wasp Aphidius ervi. Pea aphids are often infected with the heritable bacterial symbiont, Hamiltonella defensa, which confers partial to complete resistance against this parasitoid depending on bacterial strain and associated bacteriophages. That previous studies found that pea aphids without H. defensa (or other symbionts) were generally susceptible to parasitism, together with observations of a limited encapsulation response, suggested that pea aphids largely rely on infection with H. defensa for protection against parasitoids. However, the limited number of uninfected clones previously examined, and our recent report of two symbiont-free resistant clones, led us to explicitly examine aphid-encoded variability in resistance to parasitoids. After rigorous screening for known and unknown symbionts, and microsatellite genotyping to confirm clonal identity, we conducted parasitism assays using fifteen clonal pea aphid lines. We recovered significant variability in aphid-encoded resistance, with variation levels comparable to that contributed by H. defensa. Because resistance can be costly, we also measured aphid longevity and cumulative fecundity of the most and least resistant aphid lines under permissive conditions, but found no trade-offs between higher resistance and these fitness parameters. These results indicate that pea aphid resistance to A. ervi is more complex than previously appreciated, and that aphids employ multiple tactics to aid in their defense. While we did not detect a tradeoff, these may become apparent under stressful conditions or when resistant and susceptible aphids are in direct competition. Understanding sources and amounts of

  5. Ants Learn Aphid Species as Mutualistic Partners: Is the Learning Behavior Species-Specific?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Masayuki; Nakamuta, Kiyoshi; Nomura, Masashi

    2015-12-01

    In ant-aphid associations, many aphid species provide ants with honeydew and are tended by ants, whereas others are never tended and are frequently preyed upon by ants. In these relationships, ants must have the ability to discriminate among aphid species, with mutualistic aphids being accepted as partners rather than prey. Although ants reportedly use cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) of aphids to differentiate between mutualistic and non-mutualistic species, it is unclear whether the ability to recognize mutualistic aphid species as partners is innate or involves learning. Therefore, we tested whether aphid recognition by ants depends on learning, and whether the learning behavior is species-specific. When workers of the ant Tetramorium tsushimae had previously tended the cowpea aphid, Aphis craccivora, they were less aggressive toward this species. In addition, ants also reduced their aggressiveness toward another mutualistic aphid species, Aphis fabae, after tending A. craccivora, whereas ants remained aggressive toward the non-mutualistic aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, regardless of whether or not they had previous experience in tending A. craccivora. When ants were offered glass dummies treated with CHCs of these aphid species, ants that had tended A. craccivora displayed reduced aggression toward CHCs of A. craccivora and A. fabae. Chemical analyses showed the similarity of the CHC profiles between A. craccivora and A. fabae but not with A. pisum. These results suggest that aphid recognition of ants involves learning, and that the learning behavior may not be species-specific because of the similarity of CHCs between different aphid species with which they form mutualisms.

  6. Diversity, frequency, and geographic distribution of facultative bacterial endosymbionts in introduced aphid pests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepúlveda, Daniela A; Zepeda-Paulo, Francisca; Ramírez, Claudio C; Lavandero, Blas; Figueroa, Christian C

    2017-06-01

    Facultative bacterial endosymbionts in insects have been under intense study during the last years. Endosymbionts can modify the insect's phenotype, conferring adaptive advantages under environmental stress. This seems particularly relevant for a group of worldwide agricultural aphid pests, because endosymbionts modify key fitness-related traits, including host plant use, protection against natural enemies and heat tolerance. Aimed to understand the role of facultative endosymbionts on the success of introduced aphid pests, the distribution and abundance of 5 facultative endosymbionts (Hamiltonella defensa, Regiella insecticola, Serratia symbiotica, Rickettsia and Spiroplasma) were studied and compared in 4 cereal aphids (Sitobion avenae, Diuraphis noxia, Metopolophium dirhodum and Schizaphis graminium) and in the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum complex from 2 agroclimatic zones in Chile. Overall, infections with facultative endosymbionts exhibited a highly variable and characteristic pattern depending on the aphid species/host race and geographic zone, which could explain the success of aphid pest populations after their introduction. While S. symbiotica and H. defensa were the most frequent endosymbionts carried by the A. pisum pea-race and A. pisum alfalfa-race aphids, respectively, the most frequent facultative endosymbiont carried by all cereal aphids was R. insecticola. Interestingly, a highly variable composition of endosymbionts carried by S. avenae was also observed between agroclimatic zones, suggesting that endosymbionts are responding differentially to abiotic variables (temperature and precipitations). In addition, our findings constitute the first report of bacterial endosymbionts in cereal aphid species not screened before, and also the first report of aphid endosymbionts in Chile. © 2016 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  7. Aphid Heritable Symbiont Exploits Defensive Mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doremus, Matthew R; Oliver, Kerry M

    2017-04-15

    Insects and other animals commonly form symbioses with heritable bacteria, which can exert large influences on host biology and ecology. The pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum , is a model for studying effects of infection with heritable facultative symbionts (HFS), and each of its seven common HFS species has been reported to provide resistance to biotic or abiotic stresses. However, one common HFS, called X-type, rarely occurs as a single infection in field populations and instead typically superinfects individual aphids with Hamiltonella defensa , another HFS that protects aphids against attack by parasitic wasps. Using experimental aphid lines comprised of all possible infection combinations in a uniform aphid genotype, we investigated whether the most common strain of X-type provides any of the established benefits associated with aphid HFS as a single infection or superinfection with H. defensa We found that X-type does not confer protection to any tested threats, including parasitoid wasps, fungal pathogens, or thermal stress. Instead, component fitness assays identified large costs associated with X-type infection, costs which were ameliorated in superinfected aphids. Together these findings suggest that X-type exploits the aphid/ H. defensa mutualism and is maintained primarily as a superinfection by "hitchhiking" via the mutualistic benefits provided by another HFS. Exploitative symbionts potentially restrict the functions and distributions of mutualistic symbioses with effects that extend to other community members. IMPORTANCE Maternally transmitted bacterial symbionts are widespread and can have major impacts on the biology of arthropods, including insects of medical and agricultural importance. Given that host fitness and symbiont fitness are tightly linked, inherited symbionts can spread within host populations by providing beneficial services. Many insects, however, are frequently infected with multiple heritable symbiont species, providing potential

  8. Stem nematode counteracts plant resistance of aphids in alfalfa, Medicago sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Ricardo A; Spears, Lori R

    2014-10-01

    Plants are exploited by a diverse community of insect herbivores and phytopathogens that interact indirectly through plant-mediated interactions. Generally, plants are thought to respond to insects and pathogens through different defensive signaling pathways. As plants are selected for resistance to one phytophagous organism type (insect vs. pathogen) in managed systems, it is not clear how this selection may affect community interactions. This study examined the effect of nematode-resistant varieties on aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) suppression, and then determined how infection by the stem nematode, Ditylenchus dipsaci, mediated ecological effects on aphids and on plant defense proteins. Four alfalfa (Medicago sativa) varieties were selected with resistance to nematodes only (+,-), aphids only (-,+), nematodes and aphids (+,+), and susceptibility to nematodes and aphids (-,-). Field and greenhouse experiments were conducted to isolate the effect of nematode infection and aphid abundance on each variety. We found that varieties resistant to nematode, regardless of aphid resistance, had the lowest aphid counts, suggesting possible cross-resistance. Aphid abundance, however, increased when plants were exposed to nematodes. Resistant varieties were associated with elevated saponins but these compounds were not affected by insect or pathogen feeding. Concentrations of peroxidases and trypsin inhibitors, however, were increased in nematode resistant varieties when exposed to nematodes and aphids, respectively. The patterns of plant defense were variable, and a combination of resistance traits and changes in nutrient availability may drive positive interactions between nematodes and aphids aboveground.

  9. Faba bean forisomes can function in defence against generalist aphids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Ortega, Karla J; Walker, Gregory P

    2015-06-01

    Phloem sieve elements have shut-off mechanisms that prevent loss of nutrient-rich phloem sap when the phloem is damaged. Some phloem proteins such as the proteins that form forisomes in legume sieve elements are one such mechanism and in response to damage, they instantly form occlusions that stop the flow of sap. It has long been hypothesized that one function of phloem proteins is defence against phloem sap-feeding insects such as aphids. This study provides the first experimental evidence that aphid feeding can induce phloem protein occlusion and that the aphid-induced occlusions inhibit phloem sap ingestion. The great majority of phloem penetrations in Vicia faba by the generalist aphids Myzus persicae and Macrosiphum euphorbiae triggered forisome occlusion and the aphids eventually withdrew their stylets without ingesting phloem sap. This contrasts starkly with a previous study on the legume-specialist aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, where penetration of faba bean sieve elements did not trigger forisome occlusion and the aphids readily ingested phloem sap. Next, forisome occlusion was demonstrated to be the cause of failed phloem ingestion attempts by M. persicae: when occlusion was inhibited by the calcium channel blocker lanthanum, M. persicae readily ingested faba bean phloem sap. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Chromosomal mapping reveals a dynamic organization of the histone genes in aphids (Hemiptera: Aphididae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mandrioli

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite their involvement in different processes, histone genes have been analysed in few insects. In order to improve the knowledge about this important gene family, genes coding for histones have been analysed in the aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum showing that at the amino acid level, aphid histones are highly conserved. In particular, data from A. pisum confirm that H1 is the most variable of the five histones, whereas histones H3 and H4 are highly conserved with the H3 almost identical from insects to vertebrates. A. pisum histone genes are organized in a quintet with the H1 gene followed by H2A and H2B genes that are adjacent and transcribed in same directions, in the opposite strand in respect to the H1 gene. At the 3’ end of the histone cluster, genes H3 and H4 constitute an oppositely transcribed pair. The span of the aphid histone genes (more than 7 kb is greater than the average length of the histone cluster till now reported in insects (about 5 kb. Furthermore, spacers that separate the aphid histone genes vary in length. The histone genes have been mapped in A. pisum and successively in the aphids Myzus persicae and Rhopalosiphum padi showing that they are present in a single large cluster located in an interstitial position of autosomes 1, differently from what reported in the Russian wheat aphid Diuraphis noxia, where histone genes have been localized in a telomere of the two X chromosomes suggesting a dynamic organization of this multigene family in aphids.

  11. Dropping Behavior in the Pea Aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae): How Does Environmental Context Affect Antipredator Responses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Katharine V; Preisser, Evan L

    2016-01-01

    The pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum : Harris (Hemiptera: Aphididae) is a phloem-feeding insect whose antipredator defenses include kicking, walking away, and dropping from the plant. Aphid dropping, a risky and energetically costly antipredator behavior, can be increased by the release of aphid alarm pheromone; there is also evidence that insect density and plant health can affect the likelihood of aphids engaging in this behavior. We investigated whether interactions between alarm cues, insect density, and plant health can alter the dropping behavior of aphids in response to an artificial disturbance. The presence of the alarm pheromone E-β-farnesene resulted in a nearly 15-fold increase in aphid dropping behavior; the other two factors, however, did not affect dropping and none of the two- or three-way interactions were significant. This was surprising because aphids affected plant health: production of new plant biomass after 5 d of exposure to high aphid densities was 50% lower than in the control treatment. This research adds to our understanding of the factors affecting aphid antipredator behavior; the fact that neither aphid density nor feeding period impacted dropping may reflect the high energetic costs of this activity and an unwillingness to use it in any but the riskiest situations. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America.

  12. The effect of predators and hymenopterous parasites on population fluctuations of alfalfa aphids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassoulian, Gh Reza

    2005-01-01

    Among alfalfa pests in Iran three aphid species, green alfalfa aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum Harris spotted alfalfa aphid Therioaphis trifolii forma maculata Buckton and blue alfalfa aphid, Acyrthosiphon kondoi Shinji are important pests. The green alfalfa aphid can be observed all along the growing season particularly from late May to mid June at Karaj climate conditions. During this period, the mean monthly maximum temperature and relative humidity were about 28 degrees C and 60-65% respectively. This aphid overwinters as nymph and viviparous female. Sexual forms and eggs could not be seen under field conditions. Spotted alfalfa aphid, Therioaphis trifolii fonna maculata is the most prevalent aphid in summer time, when the mean monthly maximum temperature and relative humidity are about 33-34 degrees C and 44-58% respectively. Sexual individuals have been observed in the laboratory but not in the field. Among predators (Coccinella septempunctata, Adonia variegata, Syrphus cinctus, S. corolae, S. grassulariae, Chrysoperla carnea and Nabis capsiformis) one coccinellid species, C. septempunctata, had greatest impact on fluctuations of population. Among hymenopterous parasitoids two species have been collected from alfalfa field they were Aphidius ervi and Praon palitans. These parasitoids destroyed a good percent of aphids and statistically proved to lower aphid populations significantly.

  13. Social aggregation in pea aphids: experiment and random walk modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Christa; Paige, John; Warner, Olivia; Mayhew, Benjamin; Sutley, Ryan; Lam, Matthew; Bernoff, Andrew J; Topaz, Chad M

    2013-01-01

    From bird flocks to fish schools and ungulate herds to insect swarms, social biological aggregations are found across the natural world. An ongoing challenge in the mathematical modeling of aggregations is to strengthen the connection between models and biological data by quantifying the rules that individuals follow. We model aggregation of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum. Specifically, we conduct experiments to track the motion of aphids walking in a featureless circular arena in order to deduce individual-level rules. We observe that each aphid transitions stochastically between a moving and a stationary state. Moving aphids follow a correlated random walk. The probabilities of motion state transitions, as well as the random walk parameters, depend strongly on distance to an aphid's nearest neighbor. For large nearest neighbor distances, when an aphid is essentially isolated, its motion is ballistic with aphids moving faster, turning less, and being less likely to stop. In contrast, for short nearest neighbor distances, aphids move more slowly, turn more, and are more likely to become stationary; this behavior constitutes an aggregation mechanism. From the experimental data, we estimate the state transition probabilities and correlated random walk parameters as a function of nearest neighbor distance. With the individual-level model established, we assess whether it reproduces the macroscopic patterns of movement at the group level. To do so, we consider three distributions, namely distance to nearest neighbor, angle to nearest neighbor, and percentage of population moving at any given time. For each of these three distributions, we compare our experimental data to the output of numerical simulations of our nearest neighbor model, and of a control model in which aphids do not interact socially. Our stochastic, social nearest neighbor model reproduces salient features of the experimental data that are not captured by the control.

  14. Bacteria may contribute to distant species recognition in ant-aphid mutualistic relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Christophe Y; Detrain, Claire; Thonart, Philippe; Haubruge, Eric; Francis, Frédéric; Verheggen, François J; Lognay, Georges C

    2017-04-01

    Mutualistic interactions between ant and aphid species have been the subject of considerable historical and contemporary investigations, the primary benefits being cleaning and protection for the aphids and carbohydrate-rich honeydew for the ants. Questions remained, however, as to the volatile semiochemical factor influencing this relationship. A recent study highlighted the role of bacterial honeydew volatile compounds in ant attraction. Here, ant's ability to distantly discriminate 2 aphid species was investigated based on bacterial honeydew semiochemicals emissions using a two-way olfactometer. Both the mutualistic aphid Aphis fabae L. and the nonmyrmecophilous aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum Harris were found to be attractive for the ant Lasius niger L. The level of attraction was similar in both assays (control vs. one of the aphid species). However, when given a choice between these 2 aphid species, ants showed a significant preference for Aphis fabae. Honeydew volatiles, mostly from bacterial origins, are known to be a key element in ant attraction. Using the same olfactometry protocol, the relative attractiveness of volatiles emitted by honeydews collected from each aphid species and by bacteria isolated from each honeydew was investigated. Again, ants significantly preferred volatiles released by Aphis fabae honeydew and bacteria. This information suggests that microbial honeydew volatiles enable ants to distantly discriminate aphid species. These results strengthen the interest of studying the occurrence and potential impact of microorganisms in insect symbioses. © 2015 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  15. Genome sequence of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richards, S.; Gibbs, R. A.; Gerardo, N. M.

    2010-01-01

    highlight findings from whole genome analysis that may be related to these unusual biological features. These findings include discovery of extensive gene duplication in more than 2000 gene families as well as loss of evolutionarily conserved genes. Gene family expansions relative to other published genomes...

  16. Genetic diversity in European Pisum germplasm collections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jing, R.; Ambrose, M.A.; Knox, M.R.; Smykal, P.; Hybl, M.; Ramos, A.; Caminero, C.; Burstin, J.; Duc, G.; Soest, van L.J.; Swiecicki, W.K.; Pereira, M.G.; Vishnyakova, M.; Davenport, G.F.; Flavell, A.J.; Ellis, T.

    2012-01-01

    The distinctness of, and overlap between, pea genotypes held in several Pisum germplasm collections has been used to determine their relatedness and to test previous ideas about the genetic diversity of Pisum. Our characterisation of genetic diversity among 4,538 Pisum accessions held in 7 European

  17. Antibiotics, primary symbionts and wing polyphenism in three aphid species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardie, Jim; Leckstein, Peter

    2007-08-01

    The possible role of the primary Buchnera symbionts in wing polyphenism is examined in three aphid species. Presumptive winged aphids were fed on antibiotic-treated beans to destroy these symbionts. As previously reported, this leads to inhibited growth and low/zero fecundity. When such treatment is applied to the short-day-induced gynoparae (the winged autumn migrant) of the black bean aphid, Aphis fabae, it also causes many insects to develop as wingless or winged/wingless intermediate adult forms (apterisation). However, whilst antibiotic treatment of crowd-induced, long-day winged forms of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum (a green and a pink clone) and the vetch aphid, Megoura viciae has similar effects on size and fecundity, it does not affect wing development. Food deprivation also promotes apterisation in A. fabae gynoparae but not in the crowd-induced winged morphs of the other two species. Thus, it appears that apterisation in A. fabae is not a direct effect of antibiotic treatment or a novel role for symbionts but is most likely related to impaired nutrition induced by the loss of the symbiont population.

  18. Studies on the quantitative uptake of 32P-labelled Trakephone by aphids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, S.

    1978-01-01

    The present paper reports methodical studies concerning the quantitative uptake of active substances by Acyrthosiphon pisum (Harris) and Aphis fabae Scop. on Vicia faba L. enriched by 32 P-labelled Trakephone. Aphids increasing in size were found to take up rising quantities of active substance. The uptake is the more continuous the more sessile the pests are. Feeding is delayed by the presence of Trakephone in the plant. The quantification of the active substance amounts is only practical in parts per million using the weight of the aphids. Higher concentrations of active substances in the plant will increase the uptake by the aphids. The autoradiogram qualitatively demonstrates the beginning of the uptake of active substances. It may be taken into consideration for examining the repellent properties of chemical compounds towards aphids. (author)

  19. Coping with shorter days: do phenology shifts constrain aphid fitness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joschinski, Jens; Hovestadt, Thomas; Krauss, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Climate change can alter the phenology of organisms. It may thus lead seasonal organisms to face different day lengths than in the past, and the fitness consequences of these changes are as yet unclear. To study such effects, we used the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum as a model organism, as it has obligately asexual clones which can be used to study day length effects without eliciting a seasonal response. We recorded life-history traits under short and long days, both with two realistic temperature cycles with means differing by 2 °C. In addition, we measured the population growth of aphids on their host plant Pisum sativum. We show that short days reduce fecundity and the length of the reproductive period of aphids. Nevertheless, this does not translate into differences at the population level because the observed fitness costs only become apparent late in the individual's life. As expected, warm temperature shortens the development time by 0.7 days/°C, leading to faster generation times. We found no interaction of temperature and day length. We conclude that day length changes cause only relatively mild costs, which may not decelerate the increase in pest status due to climate change.

  20. Coping with shorter days: do phenology shifts constrain aphid fitness?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Joschinski

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Climate change can alter the phenology of organisms. It may thus lead seasonal organisms to face different day lengths than in the past, and the fitness consequences of these changes are as yet unclear. To study such effects, we used the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum as a model organism, as it has obligately asexual clones which can be used to study day length effects without eliciting a seasonal response. We recorded life-history traits under short and long days, both with two realistic temperature cycles with means differing by 2 °C. In addition, we measured the population growth of aphids on their host plant Pisum sativum. We show that short days reduce fecundity and the length of the reproductive period of aphids. Nevertheless, this does not translate into differences at the population level because the observed fitness costs only become apparent late in the individual’s life. As expected, warm temperature shortens the development time by 0.7 days/°C, leading to faster generation times. We found no interaction of temperature and day length. We conclude that day length changes cause only relatively mild costs, which may not decelerate the increase in pest status due to climate change.

  1. The Cellular Immune Response of the Pea Aphid to Foreign Intrusion and Symbiotic Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Antonin; Anselme, Caroline; Ravallec, Marc; Rebuf, Christian; Simon, Jean-Christophe; Gatti, Jean-Luc; Poirié, Marylène

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) has low immune defenses. However, its immune components are largely undescribed, and notably, extensive characterization of circulating cells has been missing. Here, we report characterization of five cell categories in hemolymph of adults of the LL01 pea aphid clone, devoid of secondary symbionts (SS): prohemocytes, plasmatocytes, granulocytes, spherulocytes and wax cells. Circulating lipid-filed wax cells are rare; they otherwise localize at the basis of the cornicles. Spherulocytes, that are likely sub-cuticular sessile cells, are involved in the coagulation process. Prohemocytes have features of precursor cells. Plasmatocytes and granulocytes, the only adherent cells, can form a layer in vivo around inserted foreign objects and phagocytize latex beads or Escherichia coli bacteria injected into aphid hemolymph. Using digital image analysis, we estimated that the hemolymph from one LL01 aphid contains about 600 adherent cells, 35% being granulocytes. Among aphid YR2 lines differing only in their SS content, similar results to LL01 were observed for YR2-Amp (without SS) and YR2-Ss (with Serratia symbiotica), while YR2-Hd (with Hamiltonella defensa) and YR2(Ri) (with Regiella insecticola) had strikingly lower adherent hemocyte numbers and granulocyte proportions. The effect of the presence of SS on A. pisum cellular immunity is thus symbiont-dependent. Interestingly, Buchnera aphidicola (the aphid primary symbiont) and all SS, whether naturally present, released during hemolymph collection, or artificially injected, were internalized by adherent hemocytes. Inside hemocytes, SS were observed in phagocytic vesicles, most often in phagolysosomes. Our results thus raise the question whether aphid symbionts in hemolymph are taken up and destroyed by hemocytes, or actively promote their own internalization, for instance as a way of being transmitted to the next generation. Altogether, we demonstrate here a

  2. Coping with shorter days: do phenology shifts constrain aphid fitness?

    OpenAIRE

    Joschinski, Jens; Hovestadt, Thomas; Krauss, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Climate change can alter the phenology of organisms. It may thus lead seasonal organisms to face different day lengths than in the past, and the fitness consequences of these changes are as yet unclear. To study such effects, we used the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum as a model organism, as it has obligately asexual clones which can be used to study day length effects without eliciting a seasonal response. We recorded life-history traits under short and long days, both with two realistic temp...

  3. Aphid wing induction and ecological costs of alarm pheromone emission under field conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Hatano

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum Harris, (Homoptera: Aphididae releases the volatile sesquiterpene (E-beta-farnesene (EBF when attacked by a predator, triggering escape responses in the aphid colony. Recently, it was shown that this alarm pheromone also mediates the production of the winged dispersal morph under laboratory conditions. The present work tested the wing-inducing effect of EBF under field conditions. Aphid colonies were exposed to two treatments (control and EBF and tested in two different environmental conditions (field and laboratory. As in previous experiments aphids produced higher proportion of winged morphs among their offspring when exposed to EBF in the laboratory but even under field conditions the proportion of winged offspring was higher after EBF application (6.84+/-0.98% compared to the hexane control (1.54+/-0.25%. In the field, the proportion of adult aphids found on the plant at the end of the experiment was lower in the EBF treatment (58.1+/-5.5% than in the control (66.9+/-4.6%, in contrast to the climate chamber test where the numbers of adult aphids found on the plant at the end of the experiment were, in both treatments, similar to the numbers put on the plant initially. Our results show that the role of EBF in aphid wing induction is also apparent under field conditions and they may indicate a potential cost of EBF emission. They also emphasize the importance of investigating the ecological role of induced defences under field conditions.

  4. Aphid symbionts and endogenous resistance traits mediate competition between rival parasitoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Laura J; Kopco, James; Harmon, Jason P; Oliver, Kerry M

    2017-01-01

    Insects use endogenous mechanisms and infection with protective symbionts to thwart attacks from natural enemies. Defenses that target specific enemies, however, potentially mediate competition between rivals and thereby impact community composition. Following its introduction to North America to control pea aphids (Acyrthosiphon pisum), the parasitoid Aphidius ervi competitively displaced other parasitoids, except for the native Praon pequodorum. The pea aphid exhibits tremendous clonal variation in resistance to A. ervi, primarily through infection with the heritable bacterial symbiont Hamiltonella defensa, although some symbiont-free aphid genotypes encode endogenous resistance. Interestingly, H. defensa strains and aphid genotypes that protect against A. ervi, provide no protection against the closely related, P. pequodorum. Given the specificity of aphid defenses, we hypothesized that aphid resistance traits may contribute to the continued persistence of P. pequodorum. We conducted multiparasitism assays to determine whether aphid resistance traits mediate internal competition between these two solitary parasitoid species, but found this was not the case; P. pequodorum was the successful internal competitor across lines varying in susceptibility to A. ervi. Next, to determine whether resistance traits influence competitive interactions resulting in the stable persistence of P. pequodorum, we established replicated cages varying in the proportion of resistant aphids and recorded successful parasitism for each wasp species over time. As expected, A. ervi outcompeted P. pequodorum in cages containing only susceptible aphids. However, P. pequodorum not only persisted, but was the superior competitor in populations containing any proportion (20-100%) of resistant aphids (20-100%). Smaller scale, better replicated competition cage studies corroborated this finding, and no-competition and behavioral assays provide insight into the processes mediating competition

  5. Modulation of Legume Defense Signaling Pathways by Native and Non-native Pea Aphid Clones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Arcos, Carlos; Reichelt, Michael; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Kunert, Grit

    2016-01-01

    The pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) is a complex of at least 15 genetically different host races that are native to specific legume plants, but can all develop on the universal host plant Vicia faba. Despite much research, it is still unclear why pea aphid host races (biotypes) are able to colonize their native hosts while other host races are not. All aphids penetrate the plant and salivate into plant cells when they test plant suitability. Thus plants might react differently to the various pea aphid host races. To find out whether legume species vary in their defense responses to different pea aphid host races, we measured the amounts of salicylic acid (SA), the jasmonic acid-isoleucine conjugate (JA-Ile), other jasmonate precursors and derivatives, and abscisic acid (ABA) in four different species (Medicago sativa, Trifolium pratense, Pisum sativum, V. faba) after infestation by native and non-native pea aphid clones of various host races. Additionally, we assessed the performance of the clones on the four plant species. On M. sativa and T. pratense, non-native clones that were barely able to survive or reproduce, triggered a strong SA and JA-Ile response, whereas infestation with native clones led to lower levels of both phytohormones. On P. sativum, non-native clones, which survived or reproduced to a certain extent, induced fluctuating SA and JA-Ile levels, whereas the native clone triggered only a weak SA and JA-Ile response. On the universal host V. faba all aphid clones triggered only low SA levels initially, but induced clone-specific patterns of SA and JA-Ile later on. The levels of the active JA-Ile conjugate and of the other JA-pathway metabolites measured showed in many cases similar patterns, suggesting that the reduction in JA signaling was due to an effect upstream of OPDA. ABA levels were downregulated in all aphid clone-plant combinations and were therefore probably not decisive factors for aphid-plant compatibility. Our results suggest that A

  6. The phytopathogen Dickeya dadantii (Erwinia chrysanthemi 3937) is a pathogen of the pea aphid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier, Anne-Marie; Duport, Gabrielle; Pagès, Sylvie; Condemine, Guy; Rahbé, Yvan

    2006-03-01

    Dickeya dadantii (Erwinia chrysanthemi) is a phytopathogenic bacterium causing soft rot diseases on many crops. The sequencing of its genome identified four genes encoding homologues of the Cyt family of insecticidal toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis, which are not present in the close relative Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. atrosepticum. The pathogenicity of D. dadantii was tested on the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum, and the bacterium was shown to be highly virulent for this insect, either by septic injury or by oral infection. The lethal inoculum dose was calculated to be as low as 10 ingested bacterial cells. A D. dadantii mutant with the four cytotoxin genes deleted showed a reduced per os virulence for A. pisum, highlighting the potential role of at least one of these genes in pathogenicity. Since only one bacterial pathogen of aphids has been previously described (Erwinia aphidicola), other species from the same bacterial group were tested. The pathogenic trait for aphids was shown to be widespread, albeit variable, within the phytopathogens, with no link to phylogenetic positioning in the Enterobacteriaceae. Previously characterized gut symbionts from thrips (Erwinia/Pantoea group) were also highly pathogenic to the aphid, whereas the potent entomopathogen Photorhabdus luminescens was not. D. dadantii is not a generalist insect pathogen, since it has low pathogenicity for three other insect species (Drosophila melanogaster, Sitophilus oryzae, and Spodoptera littoralis). D. dadantii was one of the most virulent aphid pathogens in our screening, and it was active on most aphid instars, except for the first one, probably due to anatomical filtering. The observed difference in virulence toward apterous and winged aphids may have an ecological impact, and this deserves specific attention in future research.

  7. Aphid salivary proteases are capable of degrading sieve-tube proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furch, Alexandra C U; van Bel, Aart J E; Will, Torsten

    2015-02-01

    Sieve tubes serve as transport conduits for photo-assimilates and other resources in angiosperms and are profitable targets for piercing-sucking insects such as aphids. Sieve-tube sap also contains significant amounts of proteins with diverse functions, for example in signalling, metabolism, and defence. The identification of salivary proteases in Acyrthosiphon pisum led to the hypothesis that aphids might be able to digest these proteins and by doing so suppress plant defence and access additional nitrogen sources. Here, the scarce knowledge of proteases in aphid saliva is briefly reviewed. In order to provide a better platform for discussion, we conducted a few tests on in vitro protease activity and degradation of sieve-tube sap proteins of Cucurbita maxima by watery saliva. Inhibition of protein degradation by EDTA indicates the presence of different types of proteases (e.g. metalloproteses) in saliva of A. pisum. Proteases in the watery saliva from Macrosiphum euphorbiae and A. pisum were able to degrade the most abundant phloem protein, which is phloem protein 1. Our results provide support for the breakdown of sieve-element proteins by aphid saliva in order to suppress/neutralize the defence responses of the plant and to make proteins of sieve-tube sap accessible as a nitrogen source, as is discussed in detail. Finally, we discuss whether glycosylation of sieve-element proteins and the presence of protease inhibitors may confer partial protection against the proteolytic activity of aphid saliva. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Expression differences in Aphidius ervi (Hymenoptera: Braconidae females reared on different aphid host species

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    Gabriel I. Ballesteros

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms that allow generalist parasitoids to exploit many, often very distinct hosts are practically unknown. The wasp Aphidius ervi, a generalist koinobiont parasitoid of aphids, was introduced from Europe into Chile in the late 1970s to control agriculturally important aphid species. A recent study showed significant differences in host preference and host acceptance (infectivity depending on the host A. ervi were reared on. In contrast, no genetic differentiation between A. ervi populations parasitizing different aphid species and aphids of the same species reared on different host plants was found in Chile. Additionally, the same study did not find any fitness effects in A. ervi if offspring were reared on a different host as their mothers. Here, we determined the effect of aphid host species (Sitobion avenae versus Acyrthosiphon pisum reared on two different host plants alfalfa and pea on the transcriptome of adult A. ervi females. We found a large number of differentially expressed genes (between host species: head: 2,765; body: 1,216; within the same aphid host species reared on different host plants: alfalfa versus pea: head 593; body 222. As expected, the transcriptomes from parasitoids reared on the same host species (pea aphid but originating from different host plants (pea versus alfalfa were more similar to each other than the transcriptomes of parasitoids reared on a different aphid host and host plant (head: 648 and 1,524 transcripts; body: 566 and 428 transcripts. We found several differentially expressed odorant binding proteins and olfactory receptor proteins in particular, when we compared parasitoids from different host species. Additionally, we found differentially expressed genes involved in neuronal growth and development as well as signaling pathways. These results point towards a significant rewiring of the transcriptome of A. ervi depending on aphid-plant complex where parasitoids develop, even if

  9. Taxonomy Icon Data: pea aphid [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available sum_NL.png Acyrthosiphon_pisum_S.png Acyrthosiphon_pisum_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.c...gi?i=Acyrthosiphon+pisum&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Acyrthosiphon+pisum&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxono...my_icon/icon.cgi?i=Acyrthosiphon+pisum&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Acyrthosiphon+pisum&t=NS ...

  10. Solid-phase microextraction-based cuticular hydrocarbon profiling for intraspecific delimitation in Acyrthosiphon pisum.

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    Nan Chen

    Full Text Available Insect cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs play critical roles in reducing water loss and chemical communication. Species-specific CHC profiles have been used increasingly as an excellent character for species classification. However, considerably less is known about their potential for population delimitation within species. The aims of this study were to develop a solid-phase microextraction (SPME-based CHC collection method and to investigate whether CHC profiles could serve as potential chemotaxonomic tools for intraspecific delimitation in Acyrthosiphon pisum. Optimization of fibers for SPME sampling revealed that 7 μm polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS demonstrated the most efficient adsorption of CHCs among five different tested fibers. SPME sampling showed good reproducibility with repeated collections of CHCs from a single aphid. Validation of SPME was performed by comparing CHC profiles with those from conventional hexane extractions. The two methods showed no qualitative differences in CHCs, although SPME appeared to extract relatively fewer short-chained CHCs. While CHC profiles of a given population differed among developmental stages, wing dimorphism types, and host plants, wingless adult aphids showed very low variance in relative proportions of individual CHC components. Reproducibility of CHC profiles was explored further to classify wingless adult morphs of A. pisum from five different geographic regions that showed no variation in mitochondrial COI gene sequences. Our results demonstrate that CHC profiles are useful in intraspecific delimitation in the field of insect chemotaxonomy.

  11. Solid-phase microextraction-based cuticular hydrocarbon profiling for intraspecific delimitation in Acyrthosiphon pisum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nan; Bai, Yu; Fan, Yong-Liang

    2017-01-01

    Insect cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) play critical roles in reducing water loss and chemical communication. Species-specific CHC profiles have been used increasingly as an excellent character for species classification. However, considerably less is known about their potential for population delimitation within species. The aims of this study were to develop a solid-phase microextraction (SPME)-based CHC collection method and to investigate whether CHC profiles could serve as potential chemotaxonomic tools for intraspecific delimitation in Acyrthosiphon pisum. Optimization of fibers for SPME sampling revealed that 7 μm polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) demonstrated the most efficient adsorption of CHCs among five different tested fibers. SPME sampling showed good reproducibility with repeated collections of CHCs from a single aphid. Validation of SPME was performed by comparing CHC profiles with those from conventional hexane extractions. The two methods showed no qualitative differences in CHCs, although SPME appeared to extract relatively fewer short-chained CHCs. While CHC profiles of a given population differed among developmental stages, wing dimorphism types, and host plants, wingless adult aphids showed very low variance in relative proportions of individual CHC components. Reproducibility of CHC profiles was explored further to classify wingless adult morphs of A. pisum from five different geographic regions that showed no variation in mitochondrial COI gene sequences. Our results demonstrate that CHC profiles are useful in intraspecific delimitation in the field of insect chemotaxonomy. PMID:28859151

  12. Specificity of Multi-Modal Aphid Defenses against Two Rival Parasitoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Adam J.; Kim, Kyungsun L.; Harmon, Jason P.; Oliver, Kerry M.

    2016-01-01

    Insects are often attacked by multiple natural enemies, imposing dynamic selective pressures for the development and maintenance of enemy-specific resistance. Pea aphids (Acyrthosiphon pisum) have emerged as models for the study of variation in resistance against natural enemies, including parasitoid wasps. Internal defenses against their most common parasitoid wasp, Aphidius ervi, are sourced through two known mechanisms– 1) endogenously encoded resistance or 2) infection with the heritable bacterial symbiont, Hamiltonella defensa. Levels of resistance can range from nearly 0–100% against A. ervi but varies based on aphid genotype and the strain of toxin-encoding bacteriophage (called APSE) carried by Hamiltonella. Previously, other parasitoid wasps were found to commonly attack this host, but North American introductions of A. ervi have apparently displaced all other parasitoids except Praon pequodorum, a related aphidiine braconid wasp, which is still found attacking this host in natural populations. To explain P. pequodorum’s persistence, multiple studies have compared direct competition between both wasps, but have not examined specificity of host defenses as an indirectly mediating factor. Using an array of experimental aphid lines, we first examined whether aphid defenses varied in effectiveness toward either wasp species. Expectedly, both types of aphid defenses were effective against A. ervi, but unexpectedly, were completely ineffective against P. pequodorum. Further examination showed that P. pequodorum wasps suffered no consistent fitness costs from developing in even highly ‘resistant’ aphids. Comparison of both wasps’ egg-larval development revealed that P. pequodorum’s eggs have thicker chorions and hatch two days later than A. ervi’s, likely explaining their differing abilities to overcome aphid defenses. Overall, our results indicate that aphids resistant to A. ervi may serve as reservoirs for P. pequodorum, hence contributing to

  13. Circulative Nonpropagative Aphid Transmission of Nanoviruses: an Oversimplified View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicard, Anne; Zeddam, Jean-Louis; Yvon, Michel; Michalakis, Yannis; Gutiérrez, Serafin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Plant virus species of the family Nanoviridae have segmented genomes with the highest known number of segments encapsidated individually. They thus likely represent the most extreme case of the so-called multipartite, or multicomponent, viruses. All species of the family are believed to be transmitted in a circulative nonpropagative manner by aphid vectors, meaning that the virus simply crosses cellular barriers within the aphid body, from the gut to the salivary glands, without replicating or even expressing any of its genes. However, this assumption is largely based on analogy with the transmission of other plant viruses, such as geminiviruses or luteoviruses, and the details of the molecular and cellular interactions between aphids and nanoviruses are poorly investigated. When comparing the relative frequencies of the eight genome segments in populations of the species Faba bean necrotic stunt virus (FBNSV) (genus Nanovirus) within host plants and within aphid vectors fed on these plants, we unexpectedly found evidence of reproducible changes in the frequencies of some specific segments. We further show that these changes occur within the gut during early stages of the virus cycle in the aphid and not later, when the virus is translocated into the salivary glands. This peculiar observation, which was similarly confirmed in three aphid vector species, Acyrthosiphon pisum, Aphis craccivora, and Myzus persicae, calls for revisiting of the mechanisms of nanovirus transmission. It reveals an unexpected intimate interaction that may not fit the canonical circulative nonpropagative transmission. IMPORTANCE A specific mode of interaction between viruses and arthropod vectors has been extensively described in plant viruses in the three families Luteoviridae, Geminiviridae, and Nanoviridae, but never in arboviruses of animals. This so-called circulative nonpropagative transmission contrasts with the classical biological transmission of animal arboviruses in that

  14. Silencing of a lipase maturation factor 2-like gene by wheat-mediated RNAi reduces the survivability and reproductive capacity of the grain aphid, Sitobion avenae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lanjie; Hou, Qiling; Zhao, Yanjie; Lu, Lihua; Li, Baoyun; Ni, Zhongfu; Liang, Rongqi

    2017-07-01

    Lipase maturation factor (LMF) family proteins are required for the maturation and transport of active lipoprotein lipases. However, the specific roles of LMF2 remain unknown. In this study, a grain aphid lmf2-like gene fragment was cloned and was highly similar in sequence to a homologous gene in the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum. An RNAi vector was constructed with this fragment and used for wheat transformation. The expression of the lmf2-like gene in aphid, as well as the growth and reproduction of the aphids, was analyzed after feeding on the transgenic wheat. There were no significant differences in the expression of the lmf2-like gene over development. The expression of the lmf2-like gene was significantly reduced by 27.6% on the fifth day, and 57.6% on the 10th day after feeding. The total number of aphids produced on the transgenic plants was less than the number produced on control plants, and the difference became significant or after 2 weeks. The molting numbers were also reduced in the aphids reared on the transgenic plants. Our findings indicate that lmf2-like genes may have potential as a target gene for the control of grain aphids and show that feeding aphids with wheat expressing lmf2-like RNAi resulted in significant reductions in survival and reproduction. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. To feed or not to feed: plant factors located in the epidermis, mesophyll, and sieve elements influence pea aphid's ability to feed on legume species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzkopf, Alexander; Rosenberger, Daniel; Niebergall, Martin; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Kunert, Grit

    2013-01-01

    The pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum Harris), a legume specialist, encompasses at least 11 genetically distinct sympatric host races. Each host race shows a preference for a certain legume species. Six pea aphid clones from three host races were used to localize plant factors influencing aphid probing and feeding behavior on four legume species. Aphid performance was tested by measuring survival and growth. The location of plant factors influencing aphid probing and feeding was determined using the electrical penetration graph (EPG) technique. Every aphid clone performed best on the plant species from which it was originally collected, as well as on Vicia faba. On other plant species, clones showed intermediate or poor performance. The most important plant factors influencing aphid probing and feeding behavior were localized in the epidermis and sieve elements. Repetitive puncturing of sieve elements might be relevant for establishing phloem feeding, since feeding periods appear nearly exclusively after these repetitive sieve element punctures. A combination of plant factors influences the behavior of pea aphid host races on different legume species and likely contributes to the maintenance of these races.

  16. Characterization of Arabidopsis Transcriptional Responses to Different Aphid Species Reveals Genes that Contribute to Host Susceptibility and Non-host Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaouannet, Maëlle; Morris, Jenny A.; Hedley, Peter E.; Bos, Jorunn I. B.

    2015-01-01

    Aphids are economically important pests that display exceptional variation in host range. The determinants of diverse aphid host ranges are not well understood, but it is likely that molecular interactions are involved. With significant progress being made towards understanding host responses upon aphid attack, the mechanisms underlying non-host resistance remain to be elucidated. Here, we investigated and compared Arabidopsis thaliana host and non-host responses to aphids at the transcriptional level using three different aphid species, Myzus persicae, Myzus cerasi and Rhopalosiphum pisum. Gene expression analyses revealed a high level of overlap in the overall gene expression changes during the host and non-host interactions with regards to the sets of genes differentially expressed and the direction of expression changes. Despite this overlap in transcriptional responses across interactions, there was a stronger repression of genes involved in metabolism and oxidative responses specifically during the host interaction with M. persicae. In addition, we identified a set of genes with opposite gene expression patterns during the host versus non-host interactions. Aphid performance assays on Arabidopsis mutants that were selected based on our transcriptome analyses identified novel genes contributing to host susceptibility, host defences during interactions with M. persicae as well to non-host resistance against R. padi. Understanding how plants respond to aphid species that differ in their ability to infest plant species, and identifying the genes and signaling pathways involved, is essential for the development of novel and durable aphid control in crop plants. PMID:25993686

  17. Characterization of Arabidopsis Transcriptional Responses to Different Aphid Species Reveals Genes that Contribute to Host Susceptibility and Non-host Resistance.

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    Maëlle Jaouannet

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Aphids are economically important pests that display exceptional variation in host range. The determinants of diverse aphid host ranges are not well understood, but it is likely that molecular interactions are involved. With significant progress being made towards understanding host responses upon aphid attack, the mechanisms underlying non-host resistance remain to be elucidated. Here, we investigated and compared Arabidopsis thaliana host and non-host responses to aphids at the transcriptional level using three different aphid species, Myzus persicae, Myzus cerasi and Rhopalosiphum pisum. Gene expression analyses revealed a high level of overlap in the overall gene expression changes during the host and non-host interactions with regards to the sets of genes differentially expressed and the direction of expression changes. Despite this overlap in transcriptional responses across interactions, there was a stronger repression of genes involved in metabolism and oxidative responses specifically during the host interaction with M. persicae. In addition, we identified a set of genes with opposite gene expression patterns during the host versus non-host interactions. Aphid performance assays on Arabidopsis mutants that were selected based on our transcriptome analyses identified novel genes contributing to host susceptibility, host defences during interactions with M. persicae as well to non-host resistance against R. padi. Understanding how plants respond to aphid species that differ in their ability to infest plant species, and identifying the genes and signaling pathways involved, is essential for the development of novel and durable aphid control in crop plants.

  18. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of seasonal photoperiodism in the pea aphid

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    Gauthier J-P

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aphid adaptation to harsh winter conditions is illustrated by an alternation of their reproductive mode. Aphids detect photoperiod shortening by sensing the length of the night and switch from viviparous parthenogenesis in spring and summer, to oviparous sexual reproduction in autumn. The photoperiodic signal is transduced from the head to the reproductive tract to change the fate of the future oocytes from mitotic diploid embryogenesis to haploid formation of gametes. This process takes place in three consecutive generations due to viviparous parthenogenesis. To understand the molecular basis of the switch in the reproductive mode, transcriptomic and proteomic approaches were used to detect significantly regulated transcripts and polypeptides in the heads of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum. Results The transcriptomic profiles of the heads of the first generation were slightly affected by photoperiod shortening. This suggests that trans-generation signalling between the grand-mothers and the viviparous embryos they contain is not essential. By analogy, many of the genes and some of the proteins regulated in the heads of the second generation are implicated in visual functions, photoreception and cuticle structure. The modification of the cuticle could be accompanied by a down-regulation of the N-β-alanyldopamine pathway and desclerotization. In Drosophila, modification of the insulin pathway could cause a decrease of juvenile hormones in short-day reared aphids. Conclusion This work led to the construction of hypotheses for photoperiodic regulation of the switch of the reproductive mode in aphids.

  19. Serratia symbiotica from the aphid Cinara cedri: a missing link from facultative to obligate insect endosymbiont.

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    Araceli Lamelas

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The genome sequencing of Buchnera aphidicola BCc from the aphid Cinara cedri, which is the smallest known Buchnera genome, revealed that this bacterium had lost its symbiotic role, as it was not able to synthesize tryptophan and riboflavin. Moreover, the biosynthesis of tryptophan is shared with the endosymbiont Serratia symbiotica SCc, which coexists with B. aphidicola in this aphid. The whole-genome sequencing of S. symbiotica SCc reveals an endosymbiont in a stage of genome reduction that is closer to an obligate endosymbiont, such as B. aphidicola from Acyrthosiphon pisum, than to another S. symbiotica, which is a facultative endosymbiont in this aphid, and presents much less gene decay. The comparison between both S. symbiotica enables us to propose an evolutionary scenario of the transition from facultative to obligate endosymbiont. Metabolic inferences of B. aphidicola BCc and S. symbiotica SCc reveal that most of the functions carried out by B. aphidicola in A. pisum are now either conserved in B. aphidicola BCc or taken over by S. symbiotica. In addition, there are several cases of metabolic complementation giving functional stability to the whole consortium and evolutionary preservation of the actors involved.

  20. Arabidopsis thaliana—Aphid Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Joe; Singh, Vijay; Shah, Jyoti

    2012-01-01

    Aphids are important pests of plants that use their stylets to tap into the sieve elements to consume phloem sap. Besides the removal of photosynthates, aphid infestation also alters source-sink patterns. Most aphids also vector viral diseases. In this chapter, we will summarize on recent significant findings in plant-aphid interaction, and how studies involving Arabidopsis thaliana and Myzus persicae (Sülzer), more commonly known as the green peach aphid (GPA), are beginning to provide important insights into the molecular basis of plant defense and susceptibility to aphids. The recent demonstration that expression of dsRNA in Arabidopsis can be used to silence expression of genes in GPA has further expanded the utility of Arabidopsis for evaluating the contribution of the aphid genome-encoded proteins to this interaction. PMID:22666177

  1. Worldwide populations of the aphid Aphis craccivora are infected with diverse facultative bacterial symbionts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Cristina M; Asplen, Mark K; Desneux, Nicolas; Heimpel, George E; Hopper, Keith R; Linnen, Catherine R; Oliver, Kerry M; Wulff, Jason A; White, Jennifer A

    2014-01-01

    Facultative bacterial endosymbionts can play an important role in the evolutionary trajectory of their hosts. Aphids (Hemiptera: Aphididae) are infected with a wide variety of facultative endosymbionts that can confer ecologically relevant traits, which in turn may drive microevolutionary processes in a dynamic selective environment. However, relatively little is known about how symbiont diversity is structured in most aphid species. Here, we investigate facultative symbiont species richness and prevalence among world-wide populations of the cowpea aphid, Aphis craccivora Koch. We surveyed 44 populations of A. craccivora, and detected 11 strains of facultative symbiotic bacteria, representing six genera. There were two significant associations between facultative symbiont and aphid food plant: the symbiont Arsenophonus was found at high prevalence in A. craccivora populations collected from Robinia sp. (locust), whereas the symbiont Hamiltonella was almost exclusively found in A. craccivora populations from Medicago sativa (alfalfa). Aphids collected from these two food plants also had divergent mitochondrial haplotypes, potentially indicating the formation of specialized aphid lineages associated with food plant (host-associated differentiation). The role of facultative symbionts in this process remains to be determined. Overall, observed facultative symbiont prevalence in A. craccivora was lower than that of some other well-studied aphids (e.g., Aphis fabae and Acyrthosiphon pisum), possibly as a consequence of A. craccivora's almost purely parthenogenetic life history. Finally, most (70 %) of the surveyed populations were polymorphic for facultative symbiont infection, indicating that even when symbiont prevalence is relatively low, symbiont-associated phenotypic variation may allow population-level evolutionary responses to local selection.

  2. Natural occurrence of entomophthoroid fungi of aphid pests on Medicago sativa L. in Argentina

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    Romina G Manfrino

    Full Text Available Four species of entomophthoroid fungi, Pandora neoaphidis (Entomophthorales: Entomophthoraceae, Zoophthora radicans (Entomophthorales: Entomophthoraceae, Entomophthora planchoniana (Entomophthorales: Entomophthoraceae and Neozygites fresenii (Neozygitales: Neozygitaceae were found to infect Aphis craccivora, Therioaphis trifolii, and Acyrthosiphon pisum and unidentified species of Acyrthosiphon on lucerne in Argentina. Samples were collected from five sites (Ceres, Rafaela, Sarmiento, Monte Vera and Bernardo de Irigoyen in the province of Santa Fe. In this study, Zoophthora radicans was the most important pathogen and was recorded mainly on Acyrthosiphon sp. Zoophthora radicans was successfully isolated and maintained in pure cultures. This study is the first report of entomophthoroid fungi infecting lucerne (Medicago sativa L. aphids in Argentina.

  3. Attraction of two lacewing species to volatiles produced by host plants and aphid prey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, J.; Obrycki, J. J.; Ochieng, Samuel A.; Baker, Thomas C.; Pickett, J. A.; Smiley, D.

    2005-06-01

    It is well documented that host-related odors enable many species of parasitoids and predatory insects to locate their prey and prey habitats. This study reports the first characterization of prey and prey host odor reception in two species of lacewings, Chrysoperla carnea (Say) and Chrysopa oculata L. 2-Phenylethanol, one of the volatiles emitted from their prey’s host plants (alfalfa and corn) evoked a significant EAG response from antennae of C. carnea. Traps baited with this compound attracted high numbers of adult C. carnea, which were predominantly females. One of the sex pheromone components (1R,4aS,7S,7aR)-nepetalactol of an aphid species, Acyrthosiphon pisum (Harris) attracted only C. oculata adults. Single sensillum recordings showed that the olfactory neurons of C. carnea responded to both 2-phenylethanol and aphid sex pheromone components, but those of C. oculata only responded to the latter.

  4. The interplay between density- and trait-mediated effects in predator-prey interactions: a case study in aphid wing polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunert, Grit; Weisser, Wolfgang W

    2003-04-01

    Natural enemies not only influence prey density but they can also cause the modification of traits in their victims. While such non-lethal effects can be very important for the dynamic and structure of prey populations, little is known about their interaction with the density-mediated effects of natural enemies. We investigated the relationship between predation rate, prey density and trait modification in two aphid-aphid predator interactions. Pea aphids (Acyrthosiphon pisum, Harris) have been shown to produce winged dispersal morphs in response to the presence of ladybirds or parasitoid natural enemies. This trait modification influences the ability of aphids to disperse and to colonise new habitats, and hence has a bearing on the population dynamics of the prey. In two experiments we examined wing induction in pea aphids as a function of the rate of predation when hoverfly larvae (Episyrphus balteatus) and lacewing larvae (Chrysoperla carnea) were allowed to forage in pea aphid colonies. Both hoverfly and lacewing larvae caused a significant increase in the percentage of winged morphs among offspring compared to control treatments, emphasising that wing induction in the presence of natural enemies is a general response in pea aphids. The percentage of winged offspring was, however, dependent on the rate of predation, with a small effect of predation on aphid wing induction at very high and very low predation rates, and a strong response of aphids at medium predation rates. Aphid wing induction was influenced by the interplay between predation rate and the resultant prey density. Our results suggests that density-mediated and trait-mediated effects of natural enemies are closely connected to each other and jointly determine the effect of natural enemies on prey population dynamics.

  5. The Influence of Lead on Generation of Signalling Molecules and Accumulation of Flavonoids in Pea Seedlings in Response to Pea Aphid Infestation

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    Agnieszka Woźniak

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of an abiotic factor, i.e., lead at various concentrations (low causing a hormesis effect and causing high toxicity effects, on the generation of signalling molecules in pea (Pisum sativum L. cv. Cysterski seedlings and then during infestation by the pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum Harris. The second objective was to verify whether the presence of lead in pea seedling organs and induction of signalling pathways dependent on the concentration of this metal trigger defense responses to A. pisum. Therefore, the profile of flavonoids and expression levels of genes encoding enzymes of the flavonoid biosynthesis pathway (phenylalanine ammonialyase and chalcone synthase were determined. A significant accumulation of total salicylic acid (TSA and abscisic acid (ABA was recorded in the roots and leaves of pea seedlings growing on lead-supplemented medium and next during infestation by aphids. Increased generation of these phytohormones strongly enhanced the biosynthesis of flavonoids, including a phytoalexin, pisatin. This research provides insights into the cross-talk between the abiotic (lead and biotic factor (aphid infestation on the level of the generation of signalling molecules and their role in the induction of flavonoid biosynthesis.

  6. The Influence of Lead on Generation of Signalling Molecules and Accumulation of Flavonoids in Pea Seedlings in Response to Pea Aphid Infestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woźniak, Agnieszka; Drzewiecka, Kinga; Kęsy, Jacek; Marczak, Łukasz; Narożna, Dorota; Grobela, Marcin; Motała, Rafał; Bocianowski, Jan; Morkunas, Iwona

    2017-08-24

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of an abiotic factor, i.e., lead at various concentrations (low causing a hormesis effect and causing high toxicity effects), on the generation of signalling molecules in pea ( Pisum sativum L. cv. Cysterski) seedlings and then during infestation by the pea aphid ( Acyrthosiphon pisum Harris). The second objective was to verify whether the presence of lead in pea seedling organs and induction of signalling pathways dependent on the concentration of this metal trigger defense responses to A. pisum . Therefore, the profile of flavonoids and expression levels of genes encoding enzymes of the flavonoid biosynthesis pathway (phenylalanine ammonialyase and chalcone synthase) were determined. A significant accumulation of total salicylic acid (TSA) and abscisic acid (ABA) was recorded in the roots and leaves of pea seedlings growing on lead-supplemented medium and next during infestation by aphids. Increased generation of these phytohormones strongly enhanced the biosynthesis of flavonoids, including a phytoalexin, pisatin. This research provides insights into the cross-talk between the abiotic (lead) and biotic factor (aphid infestation) on the level of the generation of signalling molecules and their role in the induction of flavonoid biosynthesis.

  7. Sexual and asexual oogenesis require the expression of unique and shared sets of genes in the insect Acyrthosiphon pisum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallot, Aurore; Shigenobu, Shuji; Hashiyama, Tomomi; Jaubert-Possamai, Stéphanie; Tagu, Denis

    2012-02-15

    Although sexual reproduction is dominant within eukaryotes, asexual reproduction is widespread and has evolved independently as a derived trait in almost all major taxa. How asexuality evolved in sexual organisms is unclear. Aphids, such as Acyrthosiphon pisum, alternate between asexual and sexual reproductive means, as the production of parthenogenetic viviparous females or sexual oviparous females and males varies in response to seasonal photoperiodism. Consequently, sexual and asexual development in aphids can be analyzed simultaneously in genetically identical individuals. We compared the transcriptomes of aphid embryos in the stages of development during which the trajectory of oogenesis is determined for producing sexual or asexual gametes. This study design aimed at identifying genes involved in the onset of the divergent mechanisms that result in the sexual or asexual phenotype. We detected 33 genes that were differentially transcribed in sexual and asexual embryos. Functional annotation by gene ontology (GO) showed a biological signature of oogenesis, cell cycle regulation, epigenetic regulation and RNA maturation. In situ hybridizations demonstrated that 16 of the differentially-transcribed genes were specifically expressed in germ cells and/or oocytes of asexual and/or sexual ovaries, and therefore may contribute to aphid oogenesis. We categorized these 16 genes by their transcription patterns in the two types of ovaries; they were: i) expressed during sexual and asexual oogenesis; ii) expressed during sexual and asexual oogenesis but with different localizations; or iii) expressed only during sexual or asexual oogenesis. Our results show that asexual and sexual oogenesis in aphids share common genetic programs but diverge by adapting specificities in their respective gene expression profiles in germ cells and oocytes.

  8. Sexual and asexual oogenesis require the expression of unique and shared sets of genes in the insect Acyrthosiphon pisum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallot Aurore

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although sexual reproduction is dominant within eukaryotes, asexual reproduction is widespread and has evolved independently as a derived trait in almost all major taxa. How asexuality evolved in sexual organisms is unclear. Aphids, such as Acyrthosiphon pisum, alternate between asexual and sexual reproductive means, as the production of parthenogenetic viviparous females or sexual oviparous females and males varies in response to seasonal photoperiodism. Consequently, sexual and asexual development in aphids can be analyzed simultaneously in genetically identical individuals. Results We compared the transcriptomes of aphid embryos in the stages of development during which the trajectory of oogenesis is determined for producing sexual or asexual gametes. This study design aimed at identifying genes involved in the onset of the divergent mechanisms that result in the sexual or asexual phenotype. We detected 33 genes that were differentially transcribed in sexual and asexual embryos. Functional annotation by gene ontology (GO showed a biological signature of oogenesis, cell cycle regulation, epigenetic regulation and RNA maturation. In situ hybridizations demonstrated that 16 of the differentially-transcribed genes were specifically expressed in germ cells and/or oocytes of asexual and/or sexual ovaries, and therefore may contribute to aphid oogenesis. We categorized these 16 genes by their transcription patterns in the two types of ovaries; they were: i expressed during sexual and asexual oogenesis; ii expressed during sexual and asexual oogenesis but with different localizations; or iii expressed only during sexual or asexual oogenesis. Conclusions Our results show that asexual and sexual oogenesis in aphids share common genetic programs but diverge by adapting specificities in their respective gene expression profiles in germ cells and oocytes.

  9. Aphid thermal tolerance is governed by a point mutation in bacterial symbionts.

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    Helen E Dunbar

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Symbiosis is a ubiquitous phenomenon generating biological complexity, affecting adaptation, and expanding ecological capabilities. However, symbionts, which can be subject to genetic limitations such as clonality and genomic degradation, also impose constraints on hosts. A model of obligate symbiosis is that between aphids and the bacterium Buchnera aphidicola, which supplies essential nutrients. We report a mutation in Buchnera of the aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum that recurs in laboratory lines and occurs in field populations. This single nucleotide deletion affects a homopolymeric run within the heat-shock transcriptional promoter for ibpA, encoding a small heat-shock protein. This Buchnera mutation virtually eliminates the transcriptional response of ibpA to heat stress and lowers its expression even at cool or moderate temperatures. Furthermore, this symbiont mutation dramatically affects host fitness in a manner dependent on thermal environment. Following a short heat exposure as juveniles, aphids bearing short-allele symbionts produced few or no progeny and contained almost no Buchnera, in contrast to aphids bearing symbionts without the deletion. Conversely, under constant cool conditions, aphids containing symbionts with the short allele reproduced earlier and maintained higher reproductive rates. The short allele has appreciable frequencies in field populations (up to 20%, further supporting the view that lowering of ibpA expression improves host fitness under some conditions. This recurring Buchnera mutation governs thermal tolerance of aphid hosts. Other cases in which symbiont microevolution has a major effect on host ecological tolerance are likely to be widespread because of the high mutation rates of symbiotic bacteria and their crucial roles in host metabolism and development.

  10. Dropping behaviour of pea aphid nymphs increases their development time and reduces their reproductive capacity as adults

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    Barbara Agabiti

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Many aphid species, including the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum, exhibit a behaviour where they drop or fall from their host plant, a commonly used strategy to avoid predation, parasitism or physical disturbance. We hypothesised that there was a physiological non-consumptive cost due to such dropping behaviour because aphids would expend energy re-establishing themselves on a host plant and also lose feeding time. Methods. We evaluated this non-consumptive cost by determining the development time and reproductive potential of pea aphids that whilst developing as nymphs had regularly dropped to the ground following dislodgment from their host plant. Using a microcosm approach, in a replicated and balanced laboratory experiment, we caused aphid dropping behaviour by tapping the plants on which they were feeding. Results. The results demonstrated that disturbance by dropping behaviour increased nymphal development time and reduced their subsequent reproductive capacity as adults. Discussion. We conclude that dropping behaviour had a strong negative effect on the development of nymphs and their subsequent reproductive capacity. This implies that the physiological cost of such a behaviour choice is substantial, and that such avoidance strategies require a trade-off which reduces the capacity of a population to increase.

  11. Insulin-related peptide 5 is involved in regulating embryo development and biochemical composition in pea aphid with wing polyphenism

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    Shan-Shan eGuo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In aphids there is a fecundity-dispersal trade-off between wingless and winged morphs. Recent research on the molecular mechanism of wing morphs associated with dispersal reveals that insulin receptors in the insulin signaling (IS pathway regulate alteration of wing morphs in planthoppers. However, little is known about whether genes in the IS pathway are involved in developmental regulation in aphid nymphs with different wing morphs. In this study, we show that expression of the insulin-related peptide 5 gene (Apirp5 affects biochemical composition and embryo development of wingless pea aphids, Acyrthosiphon pisum. After comparing expression levels of major genes in the IS pathway between third instar winged and wingless nymphs, we found that Apirp5 showed higher expression in head and thorax of the wingless nymphs than in the winged nymphs. Although microinjection treatment affects physical performance in aphids, nymphs with RNA interference of Apirp5 had less weight, smaller embryo size and higher carbohydrate and protein contents compared to control group. Comparison between winged and wingless nymphs showed a similar trend. These results indicate that Apirp5 is involved in embryo development and metabolic regulation in wing dimorphic pea aphid.

  12. Morphological variation of Aphidius ervi Haliday (Hymenoptera: Braconidae associated with different aphid hosts

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    Cinthya M. Villegas

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Parasitoids are frequently used in biological control due to the fact that they are considered host specific and highly efficient at attacking their hosts. As they spend a significant part of their life cycle within their hosts, feeding habits and life history of their host can promote specialization via host-race formation (sequential radiation. The specialized host races from different hosts can vary morphologically, behaviorally and genetically. However, these variations are sometimes inconspicuous and require more powerful tools in order to detect variation such as geometric morphometrics analysis. Methods We examined Aphidius ervi, an important introduced biological control agent in Chile associated with a great number of aphid species, which are exploiting different plant hosts and habitats. Several combinations (biotypes of parasitoids with various aphid/host plant combinations were analyzed in order to obtain measures of forewing shape and size. To show the differences among defined biotypes, we chose 13 specific landmarks on each individual parasitoid wing. The analysis of allometric variation calculated in wing shape and size over centroid size (CS, revealed the allometric changes among biotypes collected from different hosts. To show all differences in shape of forewings, we made seven biotype pairs using an outline-based geometric morphometrics comparison. Results The biotype A. pis_pea (Acyrthosiphon pisum on pea was the extreme wing size in this study compared to the other analyzed biotypes. Aphid hosts have a significant influence in the morphological differentiation of the parasitoid forewing, splitting biotypes in two groups. The first group consisted of biotypes connected with Acyrthosiphon pisum on legumes, while the second group is composed of biotypes connected with aphids attacking cereals, with the exception of the R. pad_wheat (Rhopalosiphum padi on wheat biotype. There was no significant effect of plant

  13. The impacts of climate change and belowground herbivory on aphids via primary metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryalls, James M. W.

    Global climate and atmospheric change (summarised as climate change for brevity) may alter patterns of crop damage by insect herbivores, but little is known about how multiple climate change factors, acting in tandem, shape such interactions. Crucially, the specific plant-mediated mechanisms underpinning these effects remain largely unknown. Moreover, research into the effects of climate change on leguminous plant species, which have the ability to fix atmospheric nitrogen (N2) via their association with root nodule-dwelling rhizobial bacteria, and their associated insect herbivores, is surprisingly scarce considering their increasing importance in terrestrial ecosystems worldwide. Using a model legume, lucerne, otherwise known as alfalfa, Medicago sativa (Fabaceae), and a model pest species, the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum (Hemiptera: Aphididae), this work addresses how predicted changes in carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations, temperature and rainfall patterns as well as interactions with other organisms, including the root-feeding weevil Sitona discoideus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), might shape legume-feeding aphid populations in the future. Recent literature on the impacts of climate change on aphids and the biology and trophic interactions of lucerne aphids specifically were synthesised in chapters one and two, respectively. These chapters highlighted the importance of the interactions between multiple abiotic and biotic variables in shaping aphid population dynamics. Empirical research chapters three to six, using up to five lucerne genotypes (i.e. cultivars) in glasshouse and field experiments, addressed how A. pisum responded to the isolated and combined effects of climate change and root herbivory. In particular, chapter three determined the effects of elevated temperatures (eT) and elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations (eCO2) on root-feeding S. discoideus larvae and their interaction with A. pisum. Chapter four addressed whether the effects of eT, e

  14. Bioactivity of flours of seeds of leguminous crops Pisum sativum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bioactivity of flours of seeds of leguminous crops Pisum sativum, Phaseolus vulgaris and Glycine max used as botanical insecticides against Sitophilus oryzae Linnaeus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) on sorghum grains.

  15. Acyrthosiphon pisum (Harris) (Homoptera: Aphididae) infestation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plant height, plant density per 0.25 m2, number of pea aphids and parasitoids per plant, ladybird beetles per plot, and finally grain yield per plot were recorded. Based on the results of the ANOVA, plant height was significantly different between treated and untreated plots especially after the vegetative stage. The density of ...

  16. Amino acid-mediated impacts of elevated carbon dioxide and simulated root herbivory on aphids are neutralized by increased air temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryalls, James M W; Moore, Ben D; Riegler, Markus; Gherlenda, Andrew N; Johnson, Scott N

    2015-02-01

    Changes in host plant quality, including foliar amino acid concentrations, resulting from global climate change and attack from multiple herbivores, have the potential to modify the pest status of insect herbivores. This study investigated how mechanically simulated root herbivory of lucerne (Medicago sativa) before and after aphid infestation affected the pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) under elevated temperature (eT) and carbon dioxide concentrations (eCO2). eT increased plant height and biomass, and eCO2 decreased root C:N. Foliar amino acid concentrations and aphid numbers increased in response to eCO2, but only at ambient temperatures, demonstrating the ability of eT to negate the effects of eCO2. Root damage reduced aboveground biomass, height, and root %N, and increased root %C and C:N, most probably via decreased biological nitrogen fixation. Total foliar amino acid concentrations and aphid colonization success were higher in plants with roots cut early (before aphid arrival) than those with roots cut late (after aphid arrival); however, this effect was counteracted by eT. These results demonstrate the importance of amino acid concentrations for aphids and identify individual amino acids as being potential factors underpinning aphid responses to eT, eCO2, and root damage in lucerne. Incorporating trophic complexity and multiple climatic factors into plant-herbivore studies enables greater insight into how plants and insects will interact in the future, with implications for sustainable pest control and future crop security. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  17. New Records of Aphid Fauna in Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Kaygin, Azize Toper; Gorur, Gazi; Cota, Figen

    2010-01-01

    Three aphid species were identified as new records for Turkey aphid fauna from Bartin province. These species are Ceruraphis viburnicola (Gillette) (Hemiptera: Aphididae), Dysaphis apiifolia (Theobald) (Hemiptera: Aphididae) and Macrosiphum mordvilkoi Miyazaki (Hemiptera: Aphididae). These records increase the recorded aphid-fauna of Turkey to 433 species.

  18. Do aphid carcasses on the backs of larvae of green lacewing work as chemical mimicry against aphid-tending ants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Masayuki; Choh, Yasuyuki; Nakamuta, Kiyoshi; Nomura, Masashi

    2014-06-01

    Ants attack and exclude natural enemies of aphids in ant-aphid mutualisms. However, larvae of the green lacewing, Mallada desjardinsi, prey on the cowpea aphid, Aphis craccivora, without exclusion by aphid-tending ants. Lacewing larvae are protected from ants by carrying aphid carcasses on their backs. Here, we tested whether cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) of aphid carcasses affected the aggressiveness of aphid-tending ants. Aphid carcasses were washed with n-hexane to remove lipids. Lacewing larvae with washed aphid carcasses were attacked by aphid-tending ants more frequently than those with untreated aphid carcasses. We measured the aggressiveness of aphid-tending ants to lacewing larvae that were either carrying a piece of cotton wool (a dummy aphid carcass) treated with CHCs from aphids or lacewing larvae, or carrying aphid carcasses. The rates of attack by ants on lacewing larvae carrying CHCs of aphids or aphid carcasses were lower than that of attack on lacewing larvae with conspecific CHCs. Chemical analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry showed similarity of CHCs between aphids and aphid carcasses. These results suggest that aphid carcasses on the backs of lacewing larvae function via chemical camouflage to limit attacks by aphid-tending ants.

  19. Efficacy of Chemical Mimicry by Aphid Predators Depends on Aphid-Learning by Ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Masayuki; Nomura, Masashi; Nakamuta, Kiyoshi

    2016-03-01

    Chemical mimicry is an effective strategy when signal receivers recognize and discriminate models by relying on chemical cues. Some aphid enemies mimic the cuticular chemicals of aphids through various means thus avoiding detection and attack by aphid-tending ants. However, because ants have been reported to learn the chemical signatures of aphids in order to distinguish the aphids, the efficacy of chemical mimicry is predicted to depend on the experience of the ants that had tended aphids. The present study tested this hypothesis using two predator species: larvae of the green lacewing Mallada desjardinsi, and larvae of the ladybeetle Scymnus posticalis. Lacewing larvae carry the carcasses of aphids on which they have preyed upon their backs, and these function via chemical camouflage to reduce the aggressiveness of aphid-tending ants toward the larvae. Ladybeetle larvae reportedly produce a covering of wax structures, and their chemicals appear to attenuate ant aggression. We examined whether the behavior of the ant Tetramorium tsushimae toward these predators changed depending on their aphid-tending experience. Ants moderated their aggressiveness toward both predators when they had previously tended aphids, indicating that chemical mimicry by both aphid predators is dependent on previous experience of the ants in tending aphids. Chemical mimicry by the predators of ant-tended aphids is therefore considered to exploit learning-dependent aphid recognition systems of ants.

  20. Quantitation and localization of pospiviroids in aphids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bogaert, N; De Jonghe, K; Van Damme, E J M; Maes, M; Smagghe, G

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the potential role of aphids in viroid transmission was explored. Apterous aphids were fed on pospiviroid-infected plants and viroid targets in the aphids were consequently quantified through RT-qPCR and localized within the aphid body using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Based on the analytical sensitivity test, the limit of detection (LOD) was estimated at 1.69×10(6) viroid copies per individual aphid body. To localize the viroids in the aphids, a pospiviroid-generic Cy5-labelled probe was used and the fluorescent signal was determined by confocal microscopy. Viroids were clearly observed in the aphid's stylet and stomach, but not in the embryos. Viroids were detected in 29% of the aphids after a 24h feeding period, which suggests only a partial and low concentration viroid uptake by the aphid population including viroid concentrations under the LOD. However, these results show that viroids can be ingested by aphids while feeding on infected plants, thus potentially increasing the transmission risk. The combination of FISH and RT-qPCR provides reliable and fast localization and quantitation of viroid targets in individual aphids and thus constitutes a valuable tool in future epidemiological research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Monitoring of aphid flight activities in seed potato crops in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andja Vucetic

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Aphid flight activities in seed potato fields have been studied by the yellow water traps. It is a good method for monitoring aphids as vectors of viruses, but this study also showed it is a suitable method for insect-diversity research. During the four-year studies, over 11.500 specimens were collected and a total of 107 different taxa of aphids were identified. The most abundant species were polyphagous species, such as: Acyrthosiphon pisum (Haris, Aphis fabae Scopoli, Aphis gossypii Glover and Brachycaudus helichrysi (Kaltenbach. The results of the studies show that diversity of aphids in different regions of Serbia is similar regardless of the altitude and the diversity of terrain. At most sites it ranged from 2 to 3. The highest value was recorded in Begeč, locality in northern part of Serbia, in year 2008, and it was 2.92. The maximum values of the Shannon-Weaver diversity index at all sites were recorded in the first weeks of the monitoring of aphid flight activities. Morisita-Horn similarity index shows no significant differences between sites regardless of altitudes. The sites are grouped by year, not by similarity of relief. In spite of these results, the Chi-square analysis showed highly significant difference in vector frequencies among seasons and sites with more pronounced differences for PVY. As a consequence of differences in vector frequencies, the vector pressure index in some regions was different also. The number of vectors and vector pressure index vary depending on the altitude of localities. At localities at altitudes under 1000 m, they were high. The highest index was at Kotraža, locality in central part of Serbia, in 2007, when PVY index exceeded the value of 180, while for PLRV it was 60. At high altitudes on mountain Golija, above 1100 m, the number of aphids was low, as well as the vector pressure index which indicates that these regions are suitable for producing virus-free seed potato.

  2. Plant immunity in plant–aphid interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaouannet, Maëlle; Rodriguez, Patricia A.; Lenoir, Camille J. G.; MacLeod, Ruari; Escudero-Martinez, Carmen; Bos, Jorunn I.B.

    2014-01-01

    Aphids are economically important pests that cause extensive feeding damage and transmit viruses. While some species have a broad host range and cause damage to a variety of crops, others are restricted to only closely related plant species. While probing and feeding aphids secrete saliva, containing effectors, into their hosts to manipulate host cell processes and promote infestation. Aphid effector discovery studies pointed out parallels between infection and infestation strategies of plant pathogens and aphids. Interestingly, resistance to some aphid species is known to involve plant resistance proteins with a typical NB-LRR domain structure. Whether these resistance proteins indeed recognize aphid effectors to trigger ETI remains to be elucidated. In addition, it was recently shown that unknown aphid derived elicitors can initiate reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and callose deposition and that these responses were dependent on BAK1 (BRASSINOSTERIOD INSENSITIVE 1-ASSOCIATED RECEPTOR KINASE 1) which is a key component of the plant immune system. In addition, BAK-1 contributes to non-host resistance to aphids pointing to another parallel between plant-pathogen and – aphid interactions. Understanding the role of plant immunity and non-host resistance to aphids is essential to generate durable and sustainable aphid control strategies. Although insect behavior plays a role in host selection and non-host resistance, an important observation is that aphids interact with non-host plants by probing the leaf surface, but are unable to feed or establish colonization. Therefore, we hypothesize that aphids interact with non-host plants at the molecular level, but are potentially not successful in suppressing plant defenses and/or releasing nutrients. PMID:25520727

  3. SOYBEAN.APHID.SD.2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infestations by soybean aphid (SA) can reduce soybean yield. Thus, SA-resistant soybean may be useful in reducing infestations and limiting yield loss. Expression of resistance was characterized among 746 soybean accessions in 56 growth chamber tests at the North Central Agricultural Research Labo...

  4. Altruistic defence behaviours in aphids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brodeur Jacques

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Altruistic anti-predatory behaviours pose an evolutionary problem because they are costly to the actor and beneficial to the recipients. Altruistic behaviours can evolve through indirect fitness benefits when directed toward kin. The altruistic nature of anti-predatory behaviours is often difficult to establish because the actor can obtain direct fitness benefits, or the behaviour could result from selfish coercion by others, especially in eusocial animals. Non-eusocial parthenogenetically reproducing aphids form colonies of clone-mates, which are ideal to test the altruistic nature of anti-predatory defence behaviours. Many aphids release cornicle secretions when attacked by natural enemies such as parasitoids. These secretions contain an alarm pheromone that alerts neighbours (clone-mates of danger, thereby providing indirect fitness benefits to the actor. However, contact with cornicle secretions also hampers an attacker and could provide direct fitness to the actor. Results We tested the hypothesis that cornicle secretions are altruistic by assessing direct and indirect fitness consequences of smearing cornicle secretions onto an attacker, and by manipulating the number of clone-mates that could benefit from the behaviour. We observed parasitoids, Aphidius rhopalosiphi, foraging singly in patches of the cereal aphid Sitobion avenae of varied patch size (2, 6, and 12 aphids. Aphids that smeared parasitoids did not benefit from a reduced probability of parasitism, or increase the parasitoids' handling time. Smeared parasitoids, however, spent proportionately more time grooming and less time foraging, which resulted in a decreased host-encounter and oviposition rate within the host patch. In addition, individual smearing rate increased with the number of clone-mates in the colony. Conclusions Cornicle secretions of aphids were altruistic against parasitoids, as they provided no direct fitness benefits to secretion

  5. Comparative analysis of genome sequences from four strains of the Buchnera aphidicola Mp endosymbion of the green peach aphid, Myzus persicae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhijie; Jones, Derek H; Khuri, Sawsan; Tsinoremas, Nicholas F; Wyss, Tania; Jander, Georg; Wilson, Alex C C

    2013-12-24

    Myzus persicae, the green peach aphid, is a polyphagous herbivore that feeds from hundreds of species of mostly dicot crop plants. Like other phloem-feeding aphids, M. persicae rely on the endosymbiotic bacterium, Buchnera aphidicola (Buchnera Mp), for biosynthesis of essential amino acids and other nutrients that are not sufficiently abundant in their phloem sap diet. Tobacco-specialized M. persicae are typically red and somewhat distinct from other lineages of this species. To determine whether the endosymbiotic bacteria of M. persicae could play a role in tobacco adaptation, we sequenced the Buchnera Mp genomes from two tobacco-adapted and two non-tobacco M. persicae lineages. With a genome size of 643.5 kb and 579 predicted genes, Buchnera Mp is the largest Buchnera genome sequenced to date. No differences in gene content were found between the four sequenced Buchnera Mp strains. Compared to Buchnera APS from the well-studied pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, Buchnera Mp has 21 additional genes. These include genes encoding five enzymes required for biosynthesis of the modified nucleoside queosine, the heme pathway enzyme uroporphyrinogen III synthase, and asparaginase. Asparaginase, which is also encoded by the genome of the aphid host, may allow Buchnera Mp to synthesize essential amino acids from asparagine, a relatively abundant phloem amino acid. Together our results indicate that the obligate intracellular symbiont Buchnera aphidicola does not contribute to the adaptation of Myzus persicae to feeding on tobacco.

  6. Aphid alarm pheromone as a cue for ants to locate aphid partners.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François J Verheggen

    Full Text Available The mutualistic relationships that occur between myrmecophilous aphids and ants are based on the rich food supply that honeydew represents for ants and on the protection they provide against aphid natural enemies. While aphid predators and parasitoids actively forage for oviposition sites by using aphid semiochemicals, scouts of aphid-tending ant species would also benefit from locating honeydew resources by orienting toward aphid pheromone sources. The present study aims to provide additional information on the use of Aphis fabae alarm pheromone, i.e. (E-β-farnesene (EβF, by ant scouts. The perception and behavioral impact of EβF on Lasius niger were investigated using electroantennography and two bio-assays measuring their attraction and orientation towards aphid semiochemicals. Pronounced electrical depolarizations were observed from L. niger scout antennae to stimulations of A. fabae alarm pheromone, while other sesquiterpenes elicited weak or no responses. L. niger scouts were significantly attracted toward EβF in a four-arm olfactometer, as well as in an two-choice bioassay. These laboratory results suggest for the first time that low amounts of aphid alarm pheromone can be used by L. niger scouts as a cue indicating the presence of aphid colonies and could therefore mediate the aphid-ant partnership in the field.

  7. Aphid-proof plants: biotechnology-based approaches for aphid control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Torsten; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Aphids are economically significant agricultural pests that are responsible for large yield losses in many different crops. Because the use of insecticides is restricted in the context of integrated pest management and aphids develop resistance against them rapidly, new biotechnology-based approaches are required for aphid control. These approaches focus on the development of genetically modified aphid-resistant plants that express protease inhibitors, dsRNA, antimicrobial peptides, or repellents, thus addressing different levels of aphid-plant interactions. However, a common goal is to disturb host plant acceptance by aphids and to disrupt their ability to take nutrition from plants. The defense agents negatively affect different fitness-associated parameters such as growth, reproduction, and survival, which therefore reduce the impact of infestations. The results from several different studies suggest that biotechnology-based approaches offer a promising strategy for aphid control.

  8. Halloween genes and nuclear receptors in ecdysteroid biosynthesis and signalling in the pea aphid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiaens, O; Iga, M; Velarde, R A; Rougé, P; Smagghe, G

    2010-03-01

    The pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) is the first whole genome sequenced insect with a hemimetabolic development and an emerging model organism for studies in ecology, evolution and development. The insect steroid moulting hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) controls and coordinates development in insects, especially the moulting/metamorphosis process. We, therefore present here a comprehensive characterization of the Halloween genes phantom, disembodied, shadow, shade, spook and spookiest, coding for the P450 enzymes that control the biosynthesis of 20E. Regarding the presence of nuclear receptors in the pea aphid genome, we found 19 genes, representing all of the seven known subfamilies. The annotation and phylogenetic analysis revealed a strong conservation in the class of Insecta. But compared with other sequenced insect genomes, three orthologues are missing in the Acyrthosiphon genome, namely HR96, PNR-like and Knirps. We also cloned the EcR, Usp, E75 and HR3. Finally, 3D-modelling of the ligand-binding domain of Ap-EcR exhibited the typical canonical structural scaffold with 12 alpha-helices associated with a short hairpin of two antiparallel beta-strands. Upon docking, 20E was located in the hormone-binding groove, supporting the hypothesis that EcR has a role in 20E signalling.

  9. Multi-modal defences in aphids offer redundant protection and increased costs likely impeding a protective mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Adam J; Doremus, Matthew R; Kraft, Laura J; Kim, Kyungsun L; Oliver, Kerry M

    2018-03-01

    The pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, maintains extreme variation in resistance to its most common parasitoid wasp enemy, Aphidius ervi, which is sourced from two known mechanisms: protective bacterial symbionts, most commonly Hamiltonella defensa, or endogenously encoded defences. We have recently found that individual aphids may employ each defence individually, occasionally both defences together, or neither. In field populations, Hamiltonella-infected aphids are found at low to moderate frequencies and while less is known about the frequency of resistant genotypes, they show up less often than susceptible genotypes in field collections. To better understand these patterns, we sought to compare the strengths and costs of both types of defence, individually and together, in order to elucidate the selective pressures that maintain multi-modal defence mechanisms or that may favour one over the other. We experimentally infected five aphid genotypes (two lowly and three highly resistant), each with two symbiont strains, Hamiltonella-APSE8 (moderate protection) and Hamiltonella-APSE3 (high protection). This resulted in three sublines per genotype: uninfected, +APSE8 and +APSE3. Each of the 15 total sublines was first subjected to a parasitism assay to determine its resistance phenotype and in a second experiment, a subset was chosen to compare fitness (fecundity and survivorship) in the presence and absence of parasitism. In susceptible aphid genotypes, parasitized sublines infected with Hamiltonella generally showed increased protection with direct fitness benefits, but clear infection costs to fitness in the absence of parasitism. In resistant genotypes, Hamiltonella infection rarely conferred additional protection, often further reduced fecundity and survivorship when enemy challenged, and resulted in constitutive fitness costs in the absence of parasitism. We also identified strong aphid genotype × symbiont-strain interactions, such that the best defensive

  10. A functional genomics approach identifies candidate effectors from the aphid species Myzus persicae (green peach aphid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorunn I B Bos

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Aphids are amongst the most devastating sap-feeding insects of plants. Like most plant parasites, aphids require intimate associations with their host plants to gain access to nutrients. Aphid feeding induces responses such as clogging of phloem sieve elements and callose formation, which are suppressed by unknown molecules, probably proteins, in aphid saliva. Therefore, it is likely that aphids, like plant pathogens, deliver proteins (effectors inside their hosts to modulate host cell processes, suppress plant defenses, and promote infestation. We exploited publicly available aphid salivary gland expressed sequence tags (ESTs to apply a functional genomics approach for identification of candidate effectors from Myzus persicae (green peach aphid, based on common features of plant pathogen effectors. A total of 48 effector candidates were identified, cloned, and subjected to transient overexpression in Nicotiana benthamiana to assay for elicitation of a phenotype, suppression of the Pathogen-Associated Molecular Pattern (PAMP-mediated oxidative burst, and effects on aphid reproductive performance. We identified one candidate effector, Mp10, which specifically induced chlorosis and local cell death in N. benthamiana and conferred avirulence to recombinant Potato virus X (PVX expressing Mp10, PVX-Mp10, in N. tabacum, indicating that this protein may trigger plant defenses. The ubiquitin-ligase associated protein SGT1 was required for the Mp10-mediated chlorosis response in N. benthamiana. Mp10 also suppressed the oxidative burst induced by flg22, but not by chitin. Aphid fecundity assays revealed that in planta overexpression of Mp10 and Mp42 reduced aphid fecundity, whereas another effector candidate, MpC002, enhanced aphid fecundity. Thus, these results suggest that, although Mp10 suppresses flg22-triggered immunity, it triggers a defense response, resulting in an overall decrease in aphid performance in the fecundity assays. Overall, we

  11. Spruce aphid (Elatobium abietinum Walker) (Hemiptera: Aphididae) [Chapter XXIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ann M. Lynch

    2014-01-01

    Elatobium abietinum Walker is a spruce-feeding aphid that in Europe is referred to as the green spruce aphid (Day et al., 1998a) (Fig. 1). However, in North America E. abietinum is known simply as the spruce aphid, while the common name "green spruce aphid" refers to a different species, Cinara fornacula Hottes (Hemiptera: Aphididae) (http://www.entsoc.org/...

  12. Aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae) species determined on herbaceous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-06-17

    Jun 17, 2009 ... As a result, total of 28 aphid species belonging to 14 genus and 4 tribes of the super family. Aphidoidea were determined. ... species of Aphidoidea family attack various plants, infest- ing leaves, terms, fruits and roots ... Aphids were collected from their host plants with a fine brush and put in to a tube which ...

  13. The genome of Diuraphis noxia, a global aphid pest of small grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Scott J; Nickerson, Michael L; Dean, Michael; Song, Yan; Hoyt, Peter R; Rhee, Hwanseok; Kim, Changhoon; Puterka, Gary J

    2015-06-05

    The Russian wheat aphid, Diuraphis noxia Kurdjumov, is one of the most important pests of small grains throughout the temperate regions of the world. This phytotoxic aphid causes severe systemic damage symptoms in wheat, barley, and other small grains as a direct result of the salivary proteins it injects into the plant while feeding. We sequenced and de novo assembled the genome of D. noxia Biotype 2, the strain most virulent to resistance genes in wheat. The assembled genomic scaffolds span 393 MB, equivalent to 93% of its 421 MB genome, and contains 19,097 genes. D. noxia has the most AT-rich insect genome sequenced to date (70.9%), with a bimodal CpG(O/E) distribution and a complete set of methylation related genes. The D. noxia genome displays a widespread, extensive reduction in the number of genes per ortholog group, including defensive, detoxification, chemosensory, and sugar transporter groups in comparison to the Acyrthosiphon pisum genome, including a 65% reduction in chemoreceptor genes. Thirty of 34 known D. noxia salivary genes were found in this assembly. These genes exhibited less homology with those salivary genes commonly expressed in insect saliva, such as glucose dehydrogenase and trehalase, yet greater conservation among genes that are expressed in D. noxia saliva but not detected in the saliva of other insects. Genes involved in insecticide activity and endosymbiont-derived genes were also found, as well as genes involved in virus transmission, although D. noxia is not a viral vector. This genome is the second sequenced aphid genome, and the first of a phytotoxic insect. D. noxia's reduced gene content of may reflect the influence of phytotoxic feeding in shaping the D. noxia genome, and in turn in broadening its host range. The presence of methylation-related genes, including cytosine methylation, is consistent with other parthenogenetic and polyphenic insects. The D. noxia genome will provide an important contrast to the A. pisum genome and

  14. Analysis of new aphid lethal paralysis virus (ALPV) isolates suggests evolution of two ALPV species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sijun; Vijayendran, Diveena; Carrillo-Tripp, Jimena; Miller, W Allen; Bonning, Bryony C

    2014-12-01

    Aphid lethal paralysis virus (ALPV; family Dicistroviridae) was first isolated from the bird cherry-oat aphid, Rhopalosiphum padi. ALPV-like virus sequences have been reported from many insects and insect predators. We identified a new isolate of ALPV (ALPV-AP) from the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, and a new isolate (ALPV-DvV) from western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera. ALPV-AP has an ssRNA genome of 9940 nt. Based on phylogenetic analysis, ALPV-AP was closely related to ALPV-AM, an ALPV isolate from honeybees, Apis mellifera, in Spain and Brookings, SD, USA. The distinct evolutionary branches suggested the existence of two lineages of the ALPV virus. One consisted of ALPV-AP and ALPV-AM, whilst all other isolates of ALPV grouped into the other lineage. The similarity of ALPV-AP and ALPV-AM was up to 88 % at the RNA level, compared with 78-79 % between ALPV-AP and other ALPV isolates. The sequence identity of proteins between ALPV-AP and ALPV-AM was 98-99 % for both ORF1 and ORF2, whilst only 85-87 % for ORF1 and 91-92 % for ORF2 between ALPV-AP and other ALPV isolates. Sequencing of RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) products and cDNA clones of the virus genome revealed sequence variation in the 5' UTRs and in ORF1, indicating that ALPV may be under strong selection pressure, which could have important biological implications for ALPV host range and infectivity. Our results indicated that ALPV-like viruses infect insects in the order Coleoptera, in addition to the orders Hemiptera and Hymenoptera, and we propose that ALPV isolates be classified as two separate viral species. © 2014 The Authors.

  15. Developmental origin and evolution of bacteriocytes in the aphid-Buchnera symbiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Braendle

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Symbiotic relationships between bacteria and insect hosts are common. Although the bacterial endosymbionts have been subjected to intense investigation, little is known of the host cells in which they reside, the bacteriocytes. We have studied the development and evolution of aphid bacteriocytes, the host cells that contain the endosymbiotic bacteria Buchnera aphidicola. We show that bacteriocytes of Acyrthosiphon pisum express several gene products (or their paralogues: Distal-less, Ultrabithorax/Abdominal-A, and Engrailed. Using these markers, we find that a subpopulation of the bacteriocytes is specified prior to the transmission of maternal bacteria to the embryo. In addition, we discovered that a second population of cells is recruited to the bacteriocyte fate later in development. We experimentally demonstrate that bacteriocyte induction and proliferation occur independently of B. aphidicola. Major features of bacteriocyte development, including the two-step recruitment of bacteriocytes, have been conserved in aphids for 80-150 million years. Furthermore, we have investigated two cases of evolutionary loss of bacterial symbionts: in one case, where novel extracellular, eukaryotic symbionts replaced the bacteria, the bacteriocyte is maintained; in another case, where symbionts are absent, the bacteriocytes are initiated but not maintained. The bacteriocyte represents an evolutionarily novel cell fate, which is developmentally determined independently of the bacteria. Three of five transcription factors we examined show novel expression patterns in bacteriocytes, suggesting that bacteriocytes may have evolved to express many additional transcription factors. The evolutionary transition to a symbiosis in which bacteria and an aphid cell form a functional unit, similar to the origin of plastids, has apparently involved extensive molecular adaptations on the part of the host cell.

  16. Aphid incidence and its correlation with different environmental factors

    OpenAIRE

    Hasan, M.R; Ahmad, M.; Rahman, M.H; Haque, M.A

    2009-01-01

    The aphid incidence and its correlation with environmental factors were studied. Mustard variety “Sampad” was used as test crop. Aphid incidence varied significantly at various parts of mustard plant and time of the day. The highest number of aphid was observed in the vegetative parts of the mustard plant in the morning. High cloudiness, relative humidity and dew point favoured the aphid population and slight rain fall quickly declined the aphid population. Among the different environmental f...

  17. Ant Larval Demand Reduces Aphid Colony Growth Rates in an Ant-Aphid Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M. Cook

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Ants often form mutualistic interactions with aphids, soliciting honeydew in return for protective services. Under certain circumstances, however, ants will prey upon aphids. In addition, in the presence of ants aphids may increase the quantity or quality of honeydew produced, which is costly. Through these mechanisms, ant attendance can reduce aphid colony growth rates. However, it is unknown whether demand from within the ant colony can affect the ant-aphid interaction. In a factorial experiment, we tested whether the presence of larvae in Lasius niger ant colonies affected the growth rate of Aphis fabae colonies. Other explanatory variables tested were the origin of ant colonies (two separate colonies were used and previous diet (sugar only or sugar and protein. We found that the presence of larvae in the ant colony significantly reduced the growth rate of aphid colonies. Previous diet and colony origin did not affect aphid colony growth rates. Our results suggest that ant colonies balance the flow of two separate resources from aphid colonies- renewable sugars or a protein-rich meal, depending on demand from ant larvae within the nest. Aphid payoffs from the ant-aphid interaction may change on a seasonal basis, as the demand from larvae within the ant colony waxes and wanes.

  18. Potato aphid salivary proteome: enhanced salivation using resorcinol and identification of aphid phosphoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Ritu; Atamian, Hagop S; Shen, Zhouxin; Briggs, Steven P; Kaloshian, Isgouhi

    2015-04-03

    Aphids deliver saliva into plants and acquire plant sap for their nourishment using a specialized mouthpart or stylets. Aphid saliva is of great importance because it contains effectors that are involved in modulating host defense and metabolism. Although profiling aphid salivary glands and identifying secreted proteins have been successfully used, success in direct profiling of aphid saliva have been limited due to scarcity of saliva collected in artificial diets. Here we present the use of a neurostimulant, resorcinol, for inducing aphid salivation. Saliva of potato aphids (Macrosiphum euphorbiae), maintained on tomato, was collected in resorcinol diet. Salivary proteins were identified using mass spectrometry and compared with the existing M. euphorbiae salivary proteome collected in water. Comparative analysis was also performed with existing salivary proteomes from additional aphid species. Most of the proteins identified in the resorcinol diet were also present in the water diet and represented proteins with a plethora of functions in addition to a large number of unknowns. About half of the salivary proteins were not predicted for secretion or had canonical secretion signal peptides. We also analyzed the phosphorylation states of M. euphorbiae salivary proteins and identified three known aphid effectors, Me_WB01635/Mp1, Me10/Mp58, and Me23 that carry phosphorylation marks. In addition to insect proteins, tomato host proteins were also identified in aphid saliva. Our results indicate that aphid saliva is complex and provides a rich resource for functional characterization of effectors.

  19. Glucosinolates from Host Plants Influence Growth of the Parasitic Plant Cuscuta gronovii and Its Susceptibility to Aphid Feeding1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic plants acquire diverse secondary metabolites from their hosts, including defense compounds that target insect herbivores. However, the ecological implications of this phenomenon, including the potential enhancement of parasite defenses, remain largely unexplored. We studied the translocation of glucosinolates from the brassicaceous host plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) into parasitic dodder vines (Convolvulaceae; Cuscuta gronovii) and its effects on the parasite itself and on dodder-aphid interactions. Aliphatic and indole glucosinolates reached concentrations in parasite tissues higher than those observed in corresponding host tissues. Dodder growth was enhanced on cyp79B2 cyp79B3 hosts (without indole glucosinolates) but inhibited on atr1D hosts (with elevated indole glucosinolates) relative to wild-type hosts, which responded to parasitism with localized elevation of indole and aliphatic glucosinolates. These findings implicate indole glucosinolates in defense against parasitic plants. Rates of settling and survival on dodder vines by pea aphids (Acyrthosiphon pisum) were reduced significantly when dodder parasitized glucosinolate-producing hosts (wild type and atr1D) compared with glucosinolate-free hosts (cyp79B2 cyp79B3 myb28 myb29). However, settling and survival of green peach aphids (Myzus persicae) were not affected. M. persicae population growth was actually reduced on dodder parasitizing glucosinolate-free hosts compared with wild-type or atr1D hosts, even though stems of the former contain less glucosinolates and more amino acids. Strikingly, this effect was reversed when the aphids fed directly upon Arabidopsis, which indicates an interactive effect of parasite and host genotype on M. persicae that stems from host effects on dodder. Thus, our findings indicate that glucosinolates may have both direct and indirect effects on dodder-feeding herbivores. PMID:27482077

  20. Transgenerational effects and the cost of ant tending in aphids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegelaar, Karolina; Glinwood, Robert; Pettersson, Jan; Leimar, Olof

    2013-11-01

    In mutualistic interactions, partners obtain a net benefit, but there may also be costs associated with the provision of benefits for a partner. The question of whether aphids suffer such costs when attended by ants has been raised in previous work. Transgenerational effects, where offspring phenotypes are adjusted based on maternal influences, could be important in the mutualistic interaction between aphids and ants, in particular because aphids have telescoping generations where two offspring generations can be present in a mature aphid. We investigated the immediate and transgenerational influence of ant tending on aphid life history and reproduction by observing the interaction between the facultative myrmecophile Aphis fabae and the ant Lasius niger over 13 aphid generations in the laboratory. We found that the effect of ant tending changes dynamically over successive aphid generations after the start of tending. Initially, total aphid colony weight, aphid adult weight and aphid embryo size decreased compared with untended aphids, consistent with a cost of ant association, but these differences disappeared within four generations of interaction. We conclude that transgenerational effects are important in the aphid-ant interactions and that the costs for aphids of being tended by ants can vary over generations.

  1. Genotype x Environment Interaction for Yield in Field Pea ( Pisum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, sixteen genotypes of field pea (Pisum sativum L.) were tested over locations (Shambu and Arjo) for three years (2000-2002) and at Gedo (2002) with the objectives of identifying high yielding, stable and adaptable varieties for the Western highlands of Ethiopia. Regression and additive main and multiplication ...

  2. Plant-aphid interactions: molecular and ecological perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goggin, Fiona L

    2007-08-01

    Many aphids are major agricultural pests because of their unparalleled reproductive capacity and their ability to manipulate host plant physiology. Aphid population growth and its impact on plant fitness are strongly influenced by interactions with other organisms, including plant pathogens, endophytes, aphid endosymbionts, predators, parasitoids, ants, and other herbivores. Numerous molecular and genomic resources have recently been developed to identify sources of aphid resistance in plants, as well as potentially novel targets for control in aphids. Moreover, the same model systems that are used to explore direct molecular interactions between plants and aphids can be utilized to study the ecological context in which they occur.

  3. Thermal tolerance and resource partitioning in aphids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dixon, Anthony F. G.

    XCII, - (2009), s. 171-173 ISSN 0370-4327 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : aphids * coexistence * food quality * resource partitioning * thermal tolerance Subject RIV: EG - Zoology

  4. Long range migration of aphids into Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiktelius, Staffan

    1984-09-01

    A five year study of migration of aphids across the southern part of the Baltic Sea is reported. The aphids were caught in a suction trap placed on a lighthouse 50 m from the shoreline. Large sections of the results are presented as case studies i.e. catches of aphids from periods containing at least three consecutive days with a southerly gradient wind. Some periods contained large and diverse catches and it is assumed that aphids regularly cross the Baltic Sea. The catches was largest on days when a cold front passed the trapping site within a period. More Myzus persicae were caught on days when the wind was southerly than on days with a northerly wind direction.

  5. Pyramiding different aphid-resistance genes in elite soybean germplasm to combat dynamic aphid populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    The soybean aphid, an invasive species, has posed a significant threat to soybean production in North America since 2001. Use of resistant cultivars is an effective tactic to protect soybean yield. However, the variability and dynamics of aphid populations could limit the effectiveness of host-resis...

  6. AphID (Lucid key) http://AphID.AphidNet.org

    Science.gov (United States)

    This peer-reviewed web site concentrates on the 66 adult alate and apterous aphids that are the world's most cosmopolitan and polyphagous species. The site includes fact sheets about the various aphids species, a glossary of terms helpful to the student, hundreds of photographs and illustrations, a...

  7. Expansion of genes encoding piRNA-associated argonaute proteins in the pea aphid: diversification of expression profiles in different plastic morphs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao-Ling Lu

    Full Text Available Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs are known to regulate transposon activity in germ cells of several animal models that propagate sexually. However, the role of piRNAs during asexual reproduction remains almost unknown. Aphids that can alternate sexual and asexual reproduction cycles in response to seasonal changes of photoperiod provide a unique opportunity to study piRNAs and the piRNA pathway in both reproductive modes. Taking advantage of the recently sequenced genome of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum, we found an unusually large lineage-specific expansion of genes encoding the Piwi sub-clade of Argonaute proteins. In situ hybridisation showed differential expressions between the duplicated piwi copies: while Api-piwi2 and Api-piwi6 are "specialised" in germ cells their most closely related copy, respectively Api-piwi5 and Api-piwi3, are expressed in the somatic cells. The differential expression was also identified in duplicated ago3: Api-ago3a in germ cells and Api-ago3b in somatic cells. Moreover, analyses of expression profiles of the expanded piwi and ago3 genes by semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed that expressions varied according to the reproductive types. These specific expression patterns suggest that expanded aphid piwi and ago3 genes have distinct roles in asexual and sexual reproduction.

  8. Community-wide impact of an exotic aphid on introduced tall goldenrod

    OpenAIRE

    ANDO, YOSHINO; UTSUMI, SHUNSUKE; OHGUSHI, TAKAYUKI

    2011-01-01

    1. The aphid Uroleucon nigrotuberculatum Olive, which is specialised to the tall goldenrod, Solidago altissima L., in its native range, has become a dominant species on the introduced tall goldenrod in Japan. How this exotic aphid influenced arthropod communities on the introduced tall goldenrod in aphid-present (spring) and aphid-absent (autumn) seasons was examined, using an aphid removal experiment. 2. In spring, aphid presence increased ant abundance because aphid honeydew attracted forag...

  9. Host plant resistance to aphids in cultivated crops: genetic and molecular bases, and interactions with aphid populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogimont, Catherine; Bendahmane, Abdelhafid; Chovelon, Véronique; Boissot, Nathalie

    2010-01-01

    Host plant resistance is an efficient and environmentally friendly means of controlling insects, including aphids, but resistant-breaking biotypes have occurred in several plant-aphid systems. Our review of the genetic and molecular bases of aphid resistance in crop species emphasizes the limited number of aphid resistance genes and alleles. Inheritance of aphid resistance may be monogenic (dominant or recessive genes) or polygenic. Two dominant, aphid resistance genes have been isolated to date. They both encode NBS-LRR proteins involved in the specific recognition of aphids. Strategies to ensure aphid resistance effectiveness and durability are discussed. Innovative research activities are proposed. Copyright 2010 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Ability of systemic insecticide dimethoate to prevent aphid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Weekly collection of aphids at both sites showcrl a predominance of Myzus persicae (Sul.), the principle vector of most potato viruses. Dimethoate controlled aphids at Kalengyere but not at Namulonge. As a result, seed potatoes obtained from Kalengyere and grown at Namulonge acquired the aphid-transmitled PLRV in ...

  11. Whitefly and aphid inducible promoters of Arabidopsis thaliana L.

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    NEERAJ KUMAR DUBEY

    2018-02-16

    Feb 16, 2018 ... After 2, 24, 48, 72 and 96 h of aphid infesta- tion, aphids were removed with a fine brush and the leaves were used for RNA isolation. For aphid (M. nicotinae) infestation treatment of the T2 transgenic tobacco plant, leaf disks of a 10-mm diameter were cut, transferred to agar plate, and challenged with.

  12. Loss of aphid transmissibility of plum pox virus isolates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamenova, I.; Lohuis, H.; Peters, D.

    2002-01-01

    The aphid transmissibility of seven Plum pox virus (PPV) isolates and the amino acid sequences of their coat proteins were analysed Two aphid transmissible isolates PPV-A and PPV-P contained the DAG amino triplet, while DAL or NAG replaced this triplet in the coat proteins of non-aphid transmissible

  13. Effect of 2 MHz ultrasound irradiation on Pisum sativum roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.W.; Voorhees, S.M.; Carstensen, E.L.; Kaufman, G.E.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of 2 MHz ultrasound at intensity levels from 2.5 to 22 W/cm 2 on the growth rate and mitotic index of Pisum sativum roots was studied. The ultrasound produced an immediate reduction in the growth rate on the first postexposure day, followed by a gradual recovery to the control value. Ultrasound reduced the root meristem mitotic index. Intensity- and time-dependent relations were found for the growth rate and mitotic index reductions

  14. Root-lesion nematodes suppress cabbage aphid population development by reducing aphid daily reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. H. Gera eHol

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Empirical studies have shown that belowground feeding herbivores can affect the performance of aboveground herbivores in different ways. Often the critical life-history parameters underlying the observed performance effects remain unexplored. In order to better understand the cause for the observed effects on aboveground herbivores, these ecological mechanisms must be better understood. In this study we combined empirical experiments with a modelling approach to analyse the effect of two root feeding endoparasitic nematodes with different feeding strategies on the population growth of the aboveground feeding specialist aphid Brevicoryne brassicae on Brassica nigra. The aim was to test whether emerging differences in life history characteristics (days until reproduction, daily reproduction would be sufficient to explain observed differences in aphid population development on plants with and without two species of nematodes. Aphid numbers were lower on plants with Pratylenchus penetrans in comparison to aphid numbers on plants with Meloidogyne spp. A dedicated experiment showed that aphid daily reproduction was lower on plants with P. penetrans (3.08 offspring per female per day in comparison to both uninfested plants and plants with Meloidogyne spp. (3.50 offspring per female per day. The species-specific reduction of aphid reproduction appeared independent of changes in amino acids, soluble sugars or the glucosinolate sinigrin in the phloem. An individual-based model revealed that relatively small differences in reproduction rate per female were sufficient to yield a similar difference in aphid populations as was found in the empirical experiments.

  15. Pre-pupation behaviour of the aphid parasitoid Aphidius ervi (Haliday) and its consequences for pre-imaginal learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Ibáñez, Cristián; Villagra, Cristian A.; Niemeyer, Hermann M.

    2007-07-01

    Olfactory learning may occur at different stages of insect ontogeny. In parasitoid wasps, it has been mostly shown at adult emergence, whilst it remains controversial at pre-imaginal stages. We followed larval growth of the parasitoid wasp, Aphidius ervi Haliday, inside the host aphid, Acyrthosiphom pisum Harris, and characterised in detail the behaviour of third instar larvae. We found that just before cocoon spinning begins, the third instar larva bites a hole through the ventral side of the mummified aphid exoskeleton. We then evaluated whether this period of exposure to the external environment represented a sensitive stage for olfactory learning. In our first experiment, the third instar larvae were allowed to spin their cocoon on the host plant ( Vicia faba L.) surface or on a plastic plate covering the portion of the host plant exposed to the ventral opening. Recently emerged adults of the first group showed a preference for plant volatiles in a glass Y-olfactometer, whereas no preference was found in adults of the second group. In a second experiment, during the period in which the aphid carcass remains open or is being sealed by cocoon spinning, third instar larvae were exposed for 24 h to either vanilla odours or water vapours as control. In this experiment, half of the parasitoid larvae were later excised from the mummy to avoid further exposure to vanilla. Adult parasitoids exposed to vanilla during the larval ventral opening of the mummy showed a significant preference for vanilla odours in the olfactometer, regardless of excision from the mummy. The larval behaviour described and the results of the manipulations performed are discussed as evidences for the acquisition of olfactory memory during the larval stage and its persistence through metamorphosis.

  16. Acyrthosiphon pisum AQP2: a multifunctional insect aquaglyceroporin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wallace, I. S.; Shakesby, A. J.; Hwang, J. H.; Choi, W. G.; Martínková, Natália; Douglas, A. E.; Roberts, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 1818, č. 3 (2012), s. 627-635 ISSN 0005-2736 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : aphid * Buchnera aphidicola * channel proteins * osmoregulation * phylogeny Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.389, year: 2012

  17. Improvement of wheat for resistance to Russian Wheat Aphid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinyua, M.; Malinga, J.N.; Wanyama, J.; Karanja, L.; Njau, P.; Leo, T.; Alomba, E.

    2001-01-01

    Breeding for resistance against Russian wheat aphid in Kenya is reported. Results of six of the lines were found to have high to moderate resistance to Russian wheat aphid. Popular lines were susceptible in the greenhouse when subjected to aphid pressure but showed moderate susceptibility when screened under field conditions, indicating that in years or location with low aphid pressure farmers may still get a crop. However in areas of high aphid pressure or bad years they may lose their crop. Consequently, developing resistant/torerant varieties is urgent

  18. Effects of aposymbiotic and symbiotic aphids on parasitoid progeny development and adult oviposition behavior within aphid instars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Rui-Xia; Meng, Ling; Li, Bao-Ping

    2010-04-01

    This study aims at exploring the potential relationship between aphidiine parasitoid development and the primary endosymbiont in aphids by focusing on specific aphid instars and the relative effects on parasitoid oviposition behavior and progeny development. Lysiphlebus ambiguus (Aphidiidae, Hymenoptera) is a solitary parasitoid of several species of aphids, including Aphis fabae. In this study, A. fabae was treated with antibiotic rifampicin to obtain aposymbiotic hosts and exposed to parasitism. L. ambiguus launched significantly more attacks on symbiotic L(2) (the second instar), aposymbiotic L(3) (the third instar) and L(4) (the forth instar) hosts than on the corresponding hosts at the same age. L. ambiguus also parasitized more L(1) aphids compared with adults irrespective of whether the aphid was asymbiotic or not. Pupa mortality rate of parasitoid progeny was significantly lower from aposymbiotic hosts than from the corresponding symbiotics at all stages. Female-biased parasitoid progeny was produced from aposymbiotic aphids without respect to host ages, but female progeny increased linearly with host ages at parasitism from symbiotic aphids. Body size of parasitoid progeny increased linearly with host instars at parasitism in symbiotic aphids but did not significantly change across host instars in aposymbiotic aphids. The offspring parasitoids turned out to be generally large in body size from attacking aposymbiotic aphids compared with the symbiotics. Development time of egg-to-adult of parasitoid progeny decreased with host instars in both symbiotic and aposymbiotic aphids but was generally much longer in aposymbiotic aphids than in symbiotic aphids. Our study suggests that age or body size of host aphids may not be the only cue exercised by L. ambiguus to evaluate host quality and that offspring parasitoids may be able to compensate for the nutrition stress associated with disruption of primary endosymbiotc bacteria in aposymbiotic aphids.

  19. Manipulation of parasitoids for aphid pest management: progress and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Wilf; Pickett, John A

    2003-02-01

    This paper describes research at IACR-Rothamsted on aphid parasitoid responses to semiochemical foraging stimuli, aimed at developing novel ways of manipulating these behaviours to overcome ecological constraints to biological and integrated pest control. Female parasitoids respond both to aphid sex pheromones acting as kairomones, and to aphid-induced plant volatiles, acting as synomones. A range of economically important parasitoid species respond to aphid sex pheromones, and their potential for enhancing parasitization of aphid populations has been demonstrated in the field. Commercial production of the pheromone from the plant Nepeta cataria L has been developed and strategies for its use in arable crops are being investigated. Aphid-induced plant volatiles are released systemically throughout the plant and are aphid species specific, probably induced by elicitors in aphid saliva. Aphid-infested plants can induce uninfested neighbours to release damage-related volatiles, plant-to-plant communication occurring via the rhizosphere. The plant compound cis-jasmone has been identified as a plant signal with potential for aphid control, inducing plant defence mechanisms that both deter colonising aphids and attract parasitoids and predators. Such compounds may represent a new generation of crop protectants and their further investigation and development will be aided by the tools generated by genomic and post-genomic biology.

  20. Partial aphid resistance in lettuce negatively affects parasitoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanteigne, Marie-Eve; Brodeur, Jacques; Jenni, Sylvie; Boivin, Guy

    2014-10-01

    This study investigated the effects of partial plant resistance on the lettuce aphid Nasonovia ribisnigri (Mosley) (Hemiptera: Aphididae), a major pest of cultivated lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), and one of its parasitoids, Aphidius ervi Haliday (Hymenoptera: Braconidae). Aphids were reared on susceptible (L. sativa variety Estival; S) or partially resistant (Lactuca serriola L. PI 491093; PR) lettuce, and next parasitized by A. ervi females. Fitness proxies were measured for both aphids and parasitoids. Developmental time to adult stage took longer for alate and apterous aphids (an average of 3.5 and 1.5 additional days, respectively) on PR than on S lettuce, and fecundity of alate aphids reared on PR lettuce was reduced by 37.8% relative to those reared on S lettuce. Size (tibia length) and weight of aphids reared on PR lettuce were lower than for aphids reared on S lettuce from the third and second instar onward, respectively. Parasitism of aphids reared on PR plants resulted in lower parasitoid offspring emergence (-49.9%), lower adult female (-30.3%) and male (-27.5%) weight, smaller adult female (-17.5%) and male (-11.9%) size, and lower female fecundity (37.8% fewer eggs) than when parasitoids developed from aphids reared on S plants. Our results demonstrate that partial aphid resistance in lettuce negatively affects both the second and third trophic levels. Host plant resistance in cultivated lettuce may therefore create an ecological sink for aphid parasitoids.

  1. Short-term consequences of reproductive mode variation on the genetic architecture of energy metabolism and life-history traits in the pea aphid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artacho, P; Figueroa, C C; Cortes, P A; Simon, J-C; Nespolo, R F

    2011-07-01

    Cyclically parthenogenetic animals such as aphids are able alternating sexual and asexual reproduction during its life cycle, and represent good models for studying short-term evolutionary consequences of sex. In aphids, different morphs, whether sexual or asexual, winged or wingless, are produced in response to specific environmental cues. The production of these morphs could imply a differential energy investment between the two reproductive phases (i.e., sexual and asexual), which can also be interpreted in terms of changes in genetic variation and/or trade-offs between the associated traits. In this study we compared the G-matrices of energy metabolism, life-history traits and morph production in 10 clonal lineages (genotypes) of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, during both sexual and asexual phases. The heritabilities (broad-sense) were significant for almost all traits in both phases; however the only significant genetic correlation we found was a positive correlation between resting metabolic rate and production of winged parthenogenetic females during the asexual phase. These results suggest the pea aphid shows some lineage specialization in terms of energy costs, but a higher specialization in the production of the different morphs (e.g., winged parthenogenetic females). Moreover, the production of winged females during the asexual phase appears to be more costly than wingless females. Finally, the structures of genetic variance-covariance matrices differed between both phases. These differences were mainly due to the correlation between resting metabolic rate and winged parthenogenetic females in the asexual phase. This structural difference would be indicating that energy allocation rules changes between phases, emphasizing the dispersion role of asexual morphs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Plant-aphid interactions under elevated CO2: some cues from aphid feeding behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Cheng eSun

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Although the increasing concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 accelerates the accumulation of carbohydrates and increases the biomass and yield of C3 crop plants, it also reduces their nitrogen status. The consequent changes in primary and secondary metabolites affect the palatability of host plants and the feeding of herbivorous insects. Aphids are phloem feeders and are considered the only feeding guild that positively responds to elevated CO2. In this review, we consider how elevated CO2 modifies host defenses, nutrients, and water-use efficiency by altering concentrations of the phytohormones jasmonic acid, salicylic acid, ethylene, and abscisic acid. We will describe how these elevated CO2-induced changes in defenses, nutrients, and water status facilitate specific stages of aphid feeding, including penetration, phloem-feeding, and xylem absorption. We conclude that a better understanding of the effects of elevated CO2 on aphids and on aphid damage to crop plants will require research on the molecular aspects of the interaction between plant and aphid but also research on aphid interactions with their intra- and inter-specific competitors and with their natural enemies.

  3. Chemical Ecology and Sociality in Aphids: Opportunities and Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbot, Patrick; Tooker, John; Lawson, Sarah P

    2018-04-10

    Aphids have long been recognized as good phytochemists. They are small sap-feeding plant herbivores with complex life cycles that can involve cyclical parthenogenesis and seasonal host plant alternation, and most are plant specialists. Aphids have distinctive traits for identifying and exploiting their host plants, including the expression of polyphenisms, a form of discrete phenotypic plasticity characteristic of insects, but taken to extreme in aphids. In a relatively small number of species, a social polyphenism occurs, involving sub-adult "soldiers" that are behaviorally or morphologically specialized to defend their nestmates from predators. Soldiers are sterile in many species, constituting a form of eusociality and reproductive division of labor that bears striking resemblances with other social insects. Despite a wealth of knowledge about the chemical ecology of non-social aphids and their phytophagous lifestyles, the molecular and chemoecological mechanisms involved in social polyphenisms in aphids are poorly understood. We provide a brief primer on aspects of aphid life cycles and chemical ecology for the non-specialists, and an overview of the social biology of aphids, with special attention to chemoecological perspectives. We discuss some of our own efforts to characterize how host plant chemistry may shape social traits in aphids. As good phytochemists, social aphids provide a bridge between the study of insect social evolution sociality, and the chemical ecology of plant-insect interactions. Aphids provide many promising opportunities for the study of sociality in insects, and to understand both the convergent and novel traits that characterize complex sociality on plants.

  4. Mechanisms and evolution of plant resistance to aphids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Züst, Tobias; Agrawal, Anurag A

    2016-01-06

    Aphids are important herbivores of both wild and cultivated plants. Plants rely on unique mechanisms of recognition, signalling and defence to cope with the specialized mode of phloem feeding by aphids. Aspects of the molecular mechanisms underlying aphid-plant interactions are beginning to be understood. Recent advances include the identification of aphid salivary proteins involved in host plant manipulation, and plant receptors involved in aphid recognition. However, a complete picture of aphid-plant interactions requires consideration of the ecological outcome of these mechanisms in nature, and the evolutionary processes that shaped them. Here we identify general patterns of resistance, with a special focus on recognition, phytohormonal signalling, secondary metabolites and induction of plant resistance. We discuss how host specialization can enable aphids to co-opt both the phytohormonal responses and defensive compounds of plants for their own benefit at a local scale. In response, systemically induced resistance in plants is common and often involves targeted responses to specific aphid species or even genotypes. As co-evolutionary adaptation between plants and aphids is ongoing, the stealthy nature of aphid feeding makes both the mechanisms and outcomes of these interactions highly distinct from those of other herbivore-plant interactions.

  5. Trial to control woolly aphid by earwigs

    OpenAIRE

    Trautmann, Martin; Scheer, Christian

    2006-01-01

    In years of disadvantageous atmospheric conditions natural control of woolly aphid by its parasite A. mali is insufficient in the majority of cases. In organic fruit-growing a chemical control is not possible. Settlements of earwigs showed a complete and lasting control of the pest in the year of testing, 2005. Fruitdamages were not found.

  6. Aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae) species determined on herbaceous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed to find out the Aphidoidea species feeding on herbaceous and shrub plants of Bartýn province. As a result, total of 28 aphid species belonging to 14 genus and 4 tribes of the super family Aphidoidea were determined. Of these determined species, Aphis fabae Scopoli, Aphis farinosa J. F. Gmelin, Aphis ...

  7. Pathogenicity of conidia-based preparations of entomopathogenic fungi against the greenhouse pest aphids: green peach aphid, melon aphid, and foxglove aphid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeking new isolates of entomopathogenic fungi with greater virulence against greenhouse aphid pests than those currently registered in North America for control of these insects, single-dose screening assays of 44 selected fungal isolates and 4 commercially available strains were conducted against ...

  8. Aphid parasitoids (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Aphidiinae) from Thailand

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Starý, Petr; Rakhshani, E.; Tomanović, Ž.; Kavallieratos, N. G.; Sharkey, M.

    -, č. 2498 (2010), s. 47-52 ISSN 1175-5326 Grant - others:Ministry of Science of the Republic of Serbia(CS) 143006B; U. S. National Science Foundation(US) DEB 0542864 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : aphids * parasitoids * biodiversity Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.853, year: 2010

  9. Aphid egg protection by ants: a novel aspect of the mutualism between the tree-feeding aphid Stomaphis hirukawai and its attendant ant Lasius productus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Kenji; Yashiro, Toshihisa

    2006-10-01

    Aphids often form mutualistic associations with ants, in which the aphids provide the ants with honeydew and the ants defend the aphids from predators. In this paper, we report aphid egg protection by ants as a novel aspect of the deeply interdependent relationship between a tree-feeding aphid and its attendant ant. The ant Lasius productus harbours oviparous females, males, and eggs of the hinoki cypress-feeding aphid Stomaphis hirukawai in its nests in winter. We investigated the behaviour of ants kept with aphid eggs in petri dishes to examine whether the ants recognise the aphid eggs and tend them or only provide a refuge for the aphids. Workers carried almost all of the aphid eggs into the nest within 24 h. The ants indiscriminately tended aphid eggs collected from their own colonies and those from other ant colonies. The ants cleaned the eggs and piled them up in the nest, and egg tending by ants dramatically increased aphid egg survival rates. Starving the ants showed no significant effect on aphid egg survivorship. Without ants, aphid eggs were rapidly killed by fungi. These results suggested that grooming by the ants protected the aphid eggs, at least, against pathogenic fungi. This hygienic service afforded by the ants seems indispensable for egg survival of these aphids in an environment rich in potentially pathogenic microorganisms.

  10. Evolutionary ecology of the interactions between aphids and their parasitoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Ralec, Anne; Anselme, Caroline; Outreman, Yannick; Poirié, Marylène; van Baaren, Joan; Le Lann, Cécile; van Alphen, Jacques J-M

    2010-01-01

    Many organisms, including entomopathogenous fungi, predators or parasites, use aphids as ressources. Parasites of aphids are mostly endoparasitoid insects, i.e. insects which lay eggs inside the body of an other insect which will die as a result of their development. In this article, we review the consequences of the numerous pecularities of aphid biology and ecology for their endoparasitoids, notably the Aphidiinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae). We first examine the various mechanisms used by aphids for defence against these enemies. We then explore the strategies used by aphidiine parasitoids to exploit their aphid hosts. Finally, we consider the responses of both aphids and parasitoids to ecological constraints induced by seasonal cycles and to environmental variations linked to host plants and climate. The fundamental and applied interest of studying these organisms is discussed. Copyright 2010 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Research on recognition methods of aphid objects in complex backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hui-Yan; Zhang, Ji-Hong

    2009-07-01

    In order to improve the recognition accuracy among the kinds of aphids in the complex backgrounds, the recognition method among kinds of aphids based on Dual-Tree Complex Wavelet Transform (DT-CWT) and Support Vector Machine (Libsvm) is proposed. Firstly the image is pretreated; secondly the aphid images' texture feature of three crops are extracted by DT-CWT in order to get the training parameters of training model; finally the training model could recognize aphids among the three kinds of crops. By contrasting to Gabor wavelet transform and the traditional extracting texture's methods based on Gray-Level Co-Occurrence Matrix (GLCM), the experiment result shows that the method has a certain practicality and feasibility and provides basic for aphids' recognition between the identification among same kind aphid.

  12. Solenopsis invicta virus 3: mapping of structural proteins, ribosomal frameshifting, and similarities to Acyrthosiphon pisum virus and Kelp fly virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M Valles

    Full Text Available Solenopsis invicta virus 3 (SINV-3 is a positive-sense single-stranded RNA virus that infects the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta. We show that the second open reading frame (ORF of the dicistronic genome is expressed via a frameshifting mechanism and that the sequences encoding the structural proteins map to both ORF2 and the 3' end of ORF1, downstream of the sequence that encodes the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. The genome organization and structural protein expression strategy resemble those of Acyrthosiphon pisum virus (APV, an aphid virus. The capsid protein that is encoded by the 3' end of ORF1 in SINV-3 and APV is predicted to have a jelly-roll fold similar to the capsid proteins of picornaviruses and caliciviruses. The capsid-extension protein that is produced by frameshifting, includes the jelly-roll fold domain encoded by ORF1 as its N-terminus, while the C-terminus encoded by the 5' half of ORF2 has no clear homology with other viral structural proteins. A third protein, encoded by the 3' half of ORF2, is associated with purified virions at sub-stoichiometric ratios. Although the structural proteins can be translated from the genomic RNA, we show that SINV-3 also produces a subgenomic RNA encoding the structural proteins. Circumstantial evidence suggests that APV may also produce such a subgenomic RNA. Both SINV-3 and APV are unclassified picorna-like viruses distantly related to members of the order Picornavirales and the family Caliciviridae. Within this grouping, features of the genome organization and capsid domain structure of SINV-3 and APV appear more similar to caliciviruses, perhaps suggesting the basis for a "Calicivirales" order.

  13. Presence of the Aphid, Chaetosiphon fragaefolii, on Strawberry in Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    C?dola, Claudia; Grecob, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    Seasonal abundance of the strawberry aphid complex under different agronomic practices in the outskirts of La Plata, Argentina was studied on strawberry, Fragaria x ananassa Duchesne (Rosales: Rosaceae). Aphid densities were low in strawberry fields in which insecticides and fungicides were used. In addition to Aphis gossypii, Aphis fabae, Mysus persicae and Macrosiphum euphorbiae, the aphid, Chaetosiphon fragaefolii (Cockerell) (Homoptera: Aphididae), was recorded for the first time in this ...

  14. Aphid Species Affect Foraging Behavior of Coccinella septempunctata (Coccinellidae: Coleoptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Muhammad Umar; Qadri, Hafiz Faqir Hussain; Khan, Muhammad Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    Flowers are admirable in scenic good looks and artistic beautification. These are also playing necessary roles in therapeutic preparations. Aphid is an important sucking pest of various flowers in ornamental territories and it is generally controlled by predators, so it was necessary to evaluate which aphid species affect the predator more or less. Biocontrol agent Coccinella septempunctata was used against cosmos aphid (Aphis spiraecola, rose aphid (Macrosiphum rosea), gul e ashrafi aphid (Aphis fabae), kaner aphid (Aphis nerii), chandni aphid (Sitobion avenae), dahlia aphid (Myzus persicae) and annual chrysanthemum aphid (Macrosiphoniella sanborni). The grub of C. septempunctata consumed 283.8±9.04 M. rosea, 487.7±12.6 M. sanborni, 432.75±16.02 A. spiraecola, 478.2±8.07 A. fabae, 552.3±9.04 M. persicae, 142±1.32 A. nerii and 498.5±13.09 S. avenae in its whole larval life. The M. persicae and M. rosea consuming grubs showed 100% adult emergence while, M. sanborni, A. spiraecola, A. fabae and S. avenae showed 96.58, 89.02, 94.78 and 75.45% adult emergence, respectively. The C. septempunctata has significant predatory potential against A. spiraecola, M. rosea, A. fabae, S. avenae, M. persicae and M. sanborni except A. nerii. Thus, further studies are needed to find out alternate predator to control A. nerii on ornamentals.

  15. On the evolution of dispersal and altruism in aphids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbot, Patrick

    2009-10-01

    How competitive interactions and population structure promote or inhibit cooperation in animal groups remains a key challenge in social evolution. In eusocial aphids, there is no single explanation for what predisposes some lineages of aphids to sociality, and not others. Because the assumption has been that most aphid species occur in essentially clonal groups, the roles of intra- and interspecific competition and population structure in aphid sociality have been given little consideration. Here, I used microsatellites to evaluate the patterns of variation in the clonal group structure of both social and nonsocial aphid species. Multiclonal groups are consistent features across sites and host plants, and all species-social or not-can be found in groups composed of large fractions of multiple clones, and even multiple species. Between-group dispersal in gall-forming aphids is ubiquitous, implying that factors acting ultimately to increase between-clone interactions and decrease within-group relatedness were present in aphids prior to the origins of sociality. By demonstrating that between-group dispersal is common in aphids, and thus interactions between clones are also common, these results suggest that understanding the ecological dynamics of dispersal and competition may offer unique insights into the evolutionary puzzle of sociality in aphids.

  16. Watery Saliva Secreted by the Grain Aphid Sitobion avenae Stimulates Aphid Resistance in Wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Fan, Jia; Francis, Frédéric; Chen, Julian

    2017-10-11

    Infestation with Sitobion avenae induces localized defense responses in wheat; in this study, the role of S. avenae watery saliva in resistance induction was examined by infiltrating aphid saliva into wheat leaves. After feeding S. avenae on an artificial diet for 48 h, we first collected watery saliva from them and then separated the salivary proteins using one-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Gene expression studies showed that infiltration of S. avenae watery saliva in wheat leaves induced a strong salicylic acid-responsive defense but moderate jasmonic acid-dependent defense. Feeding on wheat leaves infiltrated with aphid saliva, compared with untreated leaves, significantly decreased the number of nymphs produced per day and the intrinsic rate of increase of the population of S. avenae. In a choice test against untreated wheat, saliva-infiltrated wheat had repellent effects on aphids. Additionally, electrical penetration graph results showed that the feeding behavior of S. avenae on saliva-treated wheat was negatively affected compared with that on untreated wheat. These findings provided direct evidence that salivary components of S. avenae are involved in the induction of wheat resistance against aphids and further demonstrated the important roles of watery saliva in aphid-plant interactions.

  17. Potato aphid Macrosiphum euphorbiae performance is determined by aphid genotype and not mycorrhizal fungi or water availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karley, Alison Jane; Emslie-Smith, Matthew; Bennett, Alison Elizabeth

    2017-12-01

    Intra- and interspecific variation in plant and insect traits can alter the strength and direction of insect-plant interactions, with outcomes modified by soil biotic and abiotic conditions. We used the potato aphid (Macrosiphum euphorbiae Thomas) feeding on cultivated Solanum tuberosum and wild Solanum berthaulti to study the impact of water availability and plant mutualistic arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi on aphid performance and susceptibility to a parasitoid wasp (Aphidius ervi Haliday). Plants were grown under glass with live or sterile AM fungal spores and supplied with sufficient or reduced water supply. Plants were infested with 1 of 3 genotypes of M. euphorbiae or maintained as aphid-free controls; aphid abundance was scored after 1 week, after which aphid susceptibility to A. ervi was assayed ex planta. Solanum tuberosum accumulated c. 20% more dry mass than S. berthaultii, and root mass of S. berthaultii was smallest under reduced water supply in the presence of AM fungi. Aphid abundance was lowest on S. berthaultii and highest for genotype "2" aphids; genotype "1" aphid density was particularly reduced on S. berthaultii. Aphid genotype "1" exhibited low susceptibility to parasitism and was attacked less frequently than the other two more susceptible aphid genotypes. Neither AM fungi nor water availability affected insect performance. Our study suggests a fitness trade-off in M. euphorbiae between parasitism resistance and aphid performance on poor quality Solanum hosts that warrants further exploration, and indicates the importance of accounting for genotype identity in determining the outcome of multitrophic interactions. © 2017 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  18. Genetic improvement of field pea (Pisum sativum L. in Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosev Valentin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Field pea attained greater importance as a cultivated plant in Bulgaria at the beginning of the 20th century. Until 1964, only breeding for forage was in use, with developed winter varieties №5 and Pleven 2. Recently, field pea achieved the greatest increase (283.3% in the sown areas, since the variety structure was updated annually. There are 10 registered varieties in total, with 7 spring and 3 winter ones. The composition of the Bulgarian Pisum collections is highly variable, with accessions of diverse status. The greatest efficiency is obtained in a combination of bulk method in the early generations and certain features of pedigree, single seed method, with possible modifications and inclusion of the mutational variability.

  19. Effect of Intercropping Collard with Beans or Onions on Aphid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... resistance and pollution to the environment. This study was therefore, an attempt to look into alternative and environmentally friendly ways of controlling aphids in collard. To achieve this, two studies were conducted in Kenya to determine the effects of intercropping and nitrogen fertilization on aphid population on collard ...

  20. New aphid (Aphidoidea) records for the Netherlands (1984-2005)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piron, P.G.M.

    2009-01-01

    Presented are 18 species.of aphids in combination with their food-plants found in The Netherlands from 1984 to 2005 not earlier described here. Among these are well-known species that are caught with the high suction trap andlor MOERICKE yellow water traps and aphids new for The Netherlands. The

  1. Molecular sabotage of plant defense by aphid saliva

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Will, T.; Tjallingii, W.F.; Thönnessen, A.; Bel, van A.J.E.

    2007-01-01

    Aphids, which constitute one of the most important groups of agricultural pests, ingest nutrients from sieve tubes, the photoassimilate transport conduits in plants. Aphids are able to successfully puncture sieve tubes with their piercing mouthparts (stylets) and ingest phloem sap without eliciting

  2. Detection of novel QTLs for foxglove aphid resistance in soybean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxglove aphid, Aulacorthum solani (Kaltenbach), is a Hemipteran insect that infected a wide variety of plants worldwide and caused serious yield losses in crops. The objective of this study was to identify the putative QTL for foxglove aphid resistance in wild soybean, PI 366121, (Glycine soja Sieb...

  3. Evaluation on the resistance to aphids of wheat germplasm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A collection of more than 200 wheat lines from the main wheat-producing areas of China was evaluated for resistance to wheat aphids, using fuzzy recognition technique in five field experiments over 2 years. The results show that susceptibility to wheat aphids was exhibited in most of the lines tested, and no immune and ...

  4. Saliva fractions from South African Russian wheat aphid biotypes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Russian wheat aphid (RWA), Diuraphis noxia (Kurdjomov, 1913), is a notorious pest that reduces yield in wheat. Nevertheless, the source of eliciting activity during RWA–wheat interaction has not been established. This paper reports on the isolation of eliciting activity in aphid saliva that is capable of inducing ...

  5. The resistance of lettuce to the aphid Nasonovia ribisnigri

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helden, van M.

    1995-01-01

    The resistance of lettuce to the aphid Nasonovia ribisnigri is based on a single, dominant gene, the Nr-gene. On the resistant plant aphids died within a few days, without any honeydew production. Transfer-experiments with a short stay on a resistant plant followed by a

  6. Two odorant-binding proteins mediate the behavioural response of aphids to the alarm pheromone (E-ß-farnesene and structural analogues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Feng Sun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Aphids are agricultural pests of great economical interest. Alternatives to insecticides, using semiochemicals, are of difficult applications. In fact, sex pheromones are of little use as aphids reproduce partenogenetically most of the time. Besides, the alarm pheromone, (E-ß-farnesene for a great number of species, is difficult to synthesize and unstable in the environment. The search for novel semiochemicals to be used in population control can be efficiently approached through the study of the olfactory system at the biochemical level. Recently odorant-binding proteins (OBPs have been shown to play a central role in olfactory recognition, thus becoming the target of choice for designing new semiochemicals. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To address the question of how the alarm message is recognised at the level of OBPs, we have tested 29 compounds, including (E-ß-farnesene, in binding assays with 6 recombinant proteins and in behaviour experiments. We have found that good repellents bind OBP3 and/or OBP7, while non repellents present different spectra of binding. These results have been verified with two species of aphids, Acyrthosiphon pisum and Myzus persicae, both using (E-ß-farnesene as the alarm pheromone. CONCLUSIONS: Our results represent further support to the idea (so far convincingly demonstrated only in Drosophila that OBPs are involved in decoding the chemical information of odorants and pheromones, and for the first time provide such evidence in other insect species and using wild-type insects. Moreover, the data offer guidelines and protocols for the discovery of potential alarm pheromones, using ligand-binding assays as a preliminary screening before subjecting selected compounds to behaviour tests.

  7. Molecular basis and ecological relevance of aphid body colors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchida, Tsutomu

    2016-10-01

    Aphids are small phloem sap-feeding insects, and show color polymorphism even within the same species. Crossing experiments have revealed the inheritance pattern of the body color. Coloration of aphids is determined by mainly three pigments, melanin, carotenoid, and aphin, and is influenced by both abiotic and biotic environmental factors. Aphid body colors also seem to correspond with specific biological functions under various environments. Partly due to the presence of natural enemies in the environment, a variety of physiological and behavioral responses have evolved in each color form. Thus, predation is one of the most significant external factors for maintaining body color polymorphisms. In addition, endosymbiont infections also influence aphid body color and prey-predator interactions. However, many unsolved questions remain regarding the molecular basis for and biological functions of aphid body colors. Further work, including the development of molecular techniques for comprehensive functional analysis, is needed in these areas. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Ants farm subterranean aphids mostly in single clone groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivens, Aniek B.F.; Kronauer, Daniel Jan Christoph; Pen, Ido

    2012-01-01

    a single aphid species, a significantly higher percentage than expected from a random distribution. Over 60% of these single-species mounds had a single aphid clone, and clones tended to persist across subsequent years. Whenever multiple species/clones co-occurred in the same mound, they were spatially...... separated with more than 95% of the aphid chambers containing individuals of a single clone. Conclusions L. flavus “husbandry” is characterized by low aphid “livestock” diversity per colony, especially at the nest-chamber level, but it lacks the exclusive monocultures known from other cultivation mutualisms...... benefitting the domesticated aphids as long as their clone-mates reproduce successfully. The cost-benefit logic of this type of polyculture husbandry has striking analogies with human farming practices based on slaughtering young animals for meat to maximize milk-production by a carefully regulated adult...

  9. The Leucine-Rich Repeat Receptor-Like Kinase BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE1-ASSOCIATED KINASE1 and the Cytochrome P450 PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT3 Contribute to Innate Immunity to Aphids in Arabidopsis1[C][W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, David C.; Drurey, Claire; Zipfel, Cyril; Hogenhout, Saskia A.

    2014-01-01

    The importance of pathogen-associated molecular pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) against microbial pathogens has been recently demonstrated. However, it is currently unclear if this layer of immunity mediated by surface-localized pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) also plays a role in basal resistance to insects, such as aphids. Here, we show that PTI is an important component of plant innate immunity to insects. Extract of the green peach aphid (GPA; Myzus persicae) triggers responses characteristic of PTI in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Two separate eliciting GPA-derived fractions trigger induced resistance to GPA that is dependent on the leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE1-ASSOCIATED KINASE1 (BAK1)/SOMATIC-EMBRYOGENESIS RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE3, which is a key regulator of several leucine-rich repeat-containing PRRs. BAK1 is required for GPA elicitor-mediated induction of reactive oxygen species and callose deposition. Arabidopsis bak1 mutant plants are also compromised in immunity to the pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum), for which Arabidopsis is normally a nonhost. Aphid-derived elicitors induce expression of PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT3 (PAD3), a key cytochrome P450 involved in the biosynthesis of camalexin, which is a major Arabidopsis phytoalexin that is toxic to GPA. PAD3 is also required for induced resistance to GPA, independently of BAK1 and reactive oxygen species production. Our results reveal that plant innate immunity to insects may involve early perception of elicitors by cell surface-localized PRRs, leading to subsequent downstream immune signaling. PMID:24586042

  10. Aphid Identification and Counting Based on Smartphone and Machine Vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suo Xuesong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Exact enumeration of aphids before the aphids outbreak can provide basis for precision spray. This paper designs counting software that can be run on smartphones for real-time enumeration of aphids. As a first step of the method used in this paper, images of the yellow sticky board that is aiming to catch insects are segmented from complex background by using GrabCut method; then the images will be normalized by perspective transformation method. The second step is the pretreatment on the images; images of aphids will be segmented by using OSTU threshold method after the effect of random illumination is eliminated by single image difference method. The last step of the method is aphids’ recognition and counting according to area feature of aphids after extracting contours of aphids by contour detection method. At last, the result of the experiment proves that the effect of random illumination can be effectively eliminated by using single image difference method. The counting accuracy in greenhouse is above 95%, while it can reach 92.5% outside. Thus, it can be seen that the counting software designed in this paper can realize exact enumeration of aphids under complicated illumination which can be used widely. The design method proposed in this paper can provide basis for precision spray according to its effective detection insects.

  11. Native aphids of New Zealand--diversity and host associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teulon, D A J; Stufkens, M A W; Drayton, G M; Maw, H E L; Scott, I A W; Bulman, S R; Carver, M; Von Dohlen, C D; Eastop, V F; Foottit, R G

    2013-01-01

    At least 15 species of aphids are now recognised as New Zealand natives and most of these are very likely to be endemic. Most native aphids belong in the subfamily Aphidinae (Aphidini), with a possible single species in Aphidinae-Macrosiphini, at least two in Neophyllaphidinae and one in Taiwanaphidinae. With one exception, native aphids are restricted to a single host plant genus, and these hosts are from 13 genera and 12 plant families in the Pinales and Angiospermae-Eudicotyledonae, suggesting that the aphids are a remnant fauna. No known native aphids have host plants from the Pteridophyta or Angiospermae-Monocotyledonae, with the possible exception of two possibly native species extracted from native tussock grassland turfs. Most host plant genera have some degree of Gondwanan distribution, but only two indigenous species are found on large forest trees and only one host is deciduous. Native aphids have been recorded from sea level to the subalpine zone, reflecting their host plant distributions. Sexual reproduction, followed by several parthenogenetic generations on the same host plant, appears to be the norm for most species. Eggs appear to be used for surviving winter conditions in some species and summer conditions in others. Native aphid distribution and abundance varies with five species considered to be scarce, one species localised, two species sparse and three relatively common based on current knowledge.

  12. Multiple cues for winged morph production in an aphid metacommunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Mehrparvar

    Full Text Available Environmental factors can lead individuals down different developmental pathways giving rise to distinct phenotypes (phenotypic plasticity. The production of winged or unwinged morphs in aphids is an example of two alternative developmental pathways. Dispersal is paramount in aphids that often have a metapopulation structure, where local subpopulations frequently go extinct, such as the specialized aphids on tansy (Tanacetum vulgare. We conducted various experiments to further understand the cues involved in the production of winged dispersal morphs by the two dominant species of the tansy aphid metacommunity, Metopeurum fuscoviride and Macrosiphoniella tanacetaria. We found that the ant-tended M. fuscoviride produced winged individuals predominantly at the beginning of the season while the untended M. tanacetaria produced winged individuals throughout the season. Winged mothers of both species produced winged offspring, although in both species winged offspring were mainly produced by unwinged females. Crowding and the presence of predators, effects already known to influence wing production in other aphid species, increased the percentage of winged offspring in M. tanacetaria, but not in M. fuscoviride. We find there are also other factors (i.e. temporal effects inducing the production of winged offspring for natural aphid populations. Our results show that the responses of each aphid species are due to multiple wing induction cues.

  13. Role of the aphid species and their feeding locations in parasitization behavior of Aphelinus abdominalis, a parasitoid of the lettuce aphid Nasonovia ribisnigri

    OpenAIRE

    Shrestha, Govinda; Skovg?rd, Henrik; Reddy, Gadi V. P.; Steenberg, Tove; Enkegaard, Annie

    2017-01-01

    Aphid species feeding on lettuce occupy distinct feeding sites: the lettuce aphid Nasonovia ribisnigri prefers to feed on heart leaves, whereas the potato aphid Macrosiphum euphorbiae feeds only on outer leaves. The aphid parasitoid Aphelinus abdominalis, known to be able to regulate M. euphorbiae on many crops, has recently been indicated as a promising biocontrol candidate also for use against N. ribisnigri, a major pest of lettuce. This study therefore examined A. abdominalis parasitizatio...

  14. Bacterial Communities of Two Parthenogenetic Aphid Species Cocolonizing Two Host Plants across the Hawaiian Islands ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ryan T.; Bressan, Alberto; Greenwell, April M.; Fierer, Noah

    2011-01-01

    Aphids (Hemiptera: Aphididae) have been the focus of several studies with respect to their interactions with inherited symbionts, but bacterial communities of most aphid species are still poorly characterized. In this research, we used bar-coded pyrosequencing to characterize bacterial communities in aphids. Specifically, we examined the diversity of bacteria in two obligately parthenogenetic aphid species (the melon aphid, Aphis gossypii, and the cardamom aphid, Pentalonia caladii) cocolonizing two plant species (taro, Colocasia esculenta, and ginger, Alpinia purpurata) across four Hawaiian Islands (Hawaii, Kauai, Maui, and Oahu). Results from this study revealed that heritable symbionts dominated the bacterial communities for both aphid species. The bacterial communities differed significantly between the two species, and A. gossypii harbored a more diverse bacterial community than P. caladii. The bacterial communities also differed across aphid populations sampled from the different islands; however, communities did not differ between aphids collected from the two host plants. PMID:21965398

  15. Bacterial communities of two parthenogenetic aphid species cocolonizing two host plants across the Hawaiian Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ryan T; Bressan, Alberto; Greenwell, April M; Fierer, Noah

    2011-12-01

    Aphids (Hemiptera: Aphididae) have been the focus of several studies with respect to their interactions with inherited symbionts, but bacterial communities of most aphid species are still poorly characterized. In this research, we used bar-coded pyrosequencing to characterize bacterial communities in aphids. Specifically, we examined the diversity of bacteria in two obligately parthenogenetic aphid species (the melon aphid, Aphis gossypii, and the cardamom aphid, Pentalonia caladii) cocolonizing two plant species (taro, Colocasia esculenta, and ginger, Alpinia purpurata) across four Hawaiian Islands (Hawaii, Kauai, Maui, and Oahu). Results from this study revealed that heritable symbionts dominated the bacterial communities for both aphid species. The bacterial communities differed significantly between the two species, and A. gossypii harbored a more diverse bacterial community than P. caladii. The bacterial communities also differed across aphid populations sampled from the different islands; however, communities did not differ between aphids collected from the two host plants.

  16. Establishment of in vitro soybean aphids, Aphis glycines (Hemiptera: Aphididae): a tool to facilitate studies of aphid symbionts, plant-insect interactions and insecticide efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunadi, Andika; Bansal, Raman; Finer, John J; Michel, Andy

    2017-06-01

    Studies on plant-insect interactions of the soybean aphid, Aphis glycines (Matsumura), can be influenced by environmental fluctuations, status of the host plant and variability in microbial populations. Maintenance of aphids on in vitro-grown plants minimizes environmental fluctuations, provides uniform host materials and permits the selective elimination of aphid-associated microbes for more standardized controls in aphid research. Aphids were reared on sterile, in vitro-grown soybean seedlings germinated on plant tissue culture media amended with a mixture of antimicrobials. For initiation and maintenance of in vitro aphid colonies, single aphids were inoculated onto single in vitro seedlings. After three rounds of transfer of 'clean' aphids to fresh in vitro seedlings, contamination was no longer observed, and aphids performed equally well when compared with those reared on detached leaves. The addition of the insecticides thiamethoxam and chlorantraniliprole to the culture medium confirmed uptake and caused significant mortality to the in vitro aphids. The use of the antimicrobial mixture removed the associated bacteria Arsenophonus but retained Buchnera and Wolbachia within the in vitro aphids. The in vitro aphid system is a novel and highly useful tool to understand insecticidal efficacy and expand our knowledge of tritrophic interactions among plants, insects and symbionts. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Impact of Rag1 aphid resistant soybeans on Binodoxys communis (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), a parasitoid of soybean aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghising, Kiran; Harmon, Jason P; Beauzay, Patrick B; Prischmann-Voldseth, Deirdre A; Helms, Ted C; Ode, Paul J; Knodel, Janet J

    2012-04-01

    Multiple strategies are being developed for pest management of the soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura; however, there has been little published research thus far to determine how such strategies may influence each other, thereby complicating their potential effectiveness. A susceptible soybean (Glycine max L.) variety without the Rag1 gene and a near isogenic resistant soybean variety with the Rag1 gene were evaluated in the laboratory for their effects on the fitness of the soybean aphid parasitoid, Binodoxys communis (Gahan). The presence or absence of the Rag1 gene was verified by quantifying soybean aphid growth. To test for fitness effects, parasitoids were allowed to attack soybean aphids on either a susceptible or resistant plant for 24 h and then aphids were kept on the same plant throughout parasitoid development. Parasitoid fitness was measured by mummy and adult parasitoid production, adult parasitoid emergence, development time, and adult size. Parasitoids that attacked soybean aphids on susceptible plants produced more mummies, more adult parasitoids, and had a higher emergence rate compared with those on resistant plants. Adult parasitoids that emerged from resistant plants took 1 d longer and were smaller compared with those from susceptible plants. This study suggests that biological control by B. communis may be compromised when host plant resistance is widely used for pest management of soybean aphids.

  18. The Green Lacewing, Chrysoperla carnea: Preference between Lettuce Aphids, Nasonovia ribisnigri, and Western Flower Thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis

    OpenAIRE

    Shrestha, Govinda; Enkegaard, Annie

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the prey preference of 3rd instar green lacewing, Chrysoperla carnea Stephens (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae), between western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), and lettuce aphids, Nasonovia ribisnigri (Mosley) (Hemiptera: Aphididae) in laboratory experiments at 25 ? 1? C and 70 ? 5% RH with five prey ratios (10 aphids:80 thrips, 25 aphids:65 thrips, 45 aphids:45 thrips, 65 aphids:25 thrips, and 80 aphids:10 thrips). Third instar...

  19. UV-B impact on aphid performance mediated by plant quality and plant changes induced by aphids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlmann, F; Müller, C

    2010-07-01

    Plants face various abiotic and biotic environmental factors and therefore need to adjust their phenotypic traits on several levels. UV-B radiation is believed to impact herbivorous insects via host plant changes. Plant responses to abiotic challenges (UV-B radiation) and their interaction with two aphid species were explored in a multifactor approach. Broccoli plants [Brassica oleracea L. convar. botrytis (L.), Brassicaceae] were grown in two differently covered greenhouses, transmitting either 80% (high UV-B) or 4% (low UV-B) of ambient UV-B. Three-week-old plants were infested with either specialist cabbage aphids [Brevicoryne brassicae (L.), Sternorrhyncha, Aphididae] or generalist green peach aphids [Myzus persicae (Sulzer), Sternorrhyncha, Aphididae]. Plants grown under high-UV-B intensities were smaller and had higher flavonoid concentrations. Furthermore, these plants had reduced cuticular wax coverage, whereas amino acid concentrations of the phloem sap were little influenced by different UV-B intensities. Cabbage aphids reproduced less on plants grown under high UV-B than on plants grown under low UV-B, whereas reproduction of green peach aphids in both plant light sources was equally poor. These results are likely related to the different specialisation-dependent sensitivities of the two species. The aphids also affected plant chemistry. High numbers of cabbage aphid progeny on low-UV-B plants led to decreased indolyl glucosinolate concentrations. The induced change in these glucosinolates may depend on an infestation threshold. UV-B radiation considerably impacts plant traits and subsequently affects specialist phloem-feeding aphids, whereas aphid growth forces broccoli to generate specific defence responses.

  20. Selenium and phosphorus interaction in pea (pisum sativum L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Mahendra; Bhandari, D.K.

    1975-01-01

    The interaction of selenium and phosphorus on the dry matter yield and concentration and uptake of phosphorus, sulfur and selenium was studied in pea (Pisum sativnum) var. T 163. The fertilizer was tagged with P 32 . It was observed that increased concentration of applied selenium in soil decreased the dry matter yield and increased the concentration and uptake of total P, soil P and selenium in pea plants. Increased concentration of P alone increased dry matter yield, concentration and uptake of total, soil and fertilizer P and selenium which was beyond safe limits, and decreased concentration and uptake of sulphur. Selenium and phosphorus showed strong synergetic relationship by increasing the concentration of each other in plants while both showed antagonistic effect on the concentration of sulphur. Phosphorus compensated the toxic effect of selenium and improved the growth and dry matter yield of pea plants. The highest selenium concentration of 22.4 ppm was observed in 100 ppm phosphorus with 5 ppm selenium treated pots while lowest (0.10 ppm) in control. (author)

  1. Fertility improvement in pea (Pisum sativum L.) autotetraploids -mutation breeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, H.; Mercykuty, V.C.; Srivastava, C.P. [Banaras Hindu Univ., Varanasi (India). Dept. of Genetics and Plant Breeding

    1995-12-31

    C{sub 2} seeds of autotetraploids (colchicine-induced) of two diverse genotypes, T 163 and 5064-S, of pea (Pisum sativum L.) and their corresponding diploids were irradiated with 10 kR gamma-ray. Autotetraploids showed a high seed-sterility as compared to diploids. Seed fertility increased in M{sub 2} as compared to M{sub 1}. Both quadrivalent and bivalent frequencies decreased in the M{sub 1} generation of autotetraploids in relation to their respective controls. However, a positive shift in the mean bivalent formation was noted at the cost of other configurations in C{sub 3}-M{sub 2} with respect to C{sub 2}-M{sub 1} and varied with the genotype. In the M{sub 2} generation of autotetraploids, the variability was relatively higher for the number of pods per plant and seed yield per plant. Although the mean values for pods per plant, number of seeds per pod and seed yield per plant remained more or less parallel in autotetraploids in M{sub 1} and M{sub 2} generations, there was an increase in the upper range limit probably due to micromutation for these characters in M{sub 2}. (author). 15 refs, 2 tabs.

  2. Further characterization of ribosome binding to thylakoid membranes. [Pisum sativum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurewitz, J.; Jagendorf, A.T.

    1987-05-01

    Previous work indicated more polysomes bound to pea (Pisum sativum cv Progress No. 9) thylakoids in light than in the dark, in vivo. With isolated intact chloroplasts incubated in darkness, addition of MgATP had no effect but 24 to 74% more RNA was thylakoid-bound at pH 8.3 than at pH 7. Thus, the major effect of light on ribosome-binding in vivo may be due to higher stroma pH. In isolated pea chloroplasts, initiation inhibitors (pactamycin and kanamycin) decreased the extent of RNA binding, and elongation inhibitors (lincomycin and streptomycin) increased it. Thus, cycling of ribosomes is controlled by translation, initiation, and termination. Bound RNA accounted for 19 to 24% of the total chloroplast RNA and the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)leucine into thylakoids was proportional to the amount of this bound RNA. These data support the concept that stroma ribosomes are recruited into thylakoid polysomes, which are active in synthesizing thylakoid proteins.

  3. Evaluation of SRAP markers for mapping of Pisum sativum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Fernanda Guindon

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Linkage maps have become important tools for genetic studies. With the aim of evaluating the SRAP (sequence-related amplified polymorphism technique for linkage mapping in Pisum sativum L., a F2 mapping population derived from an initial cross between cvs. DDR11 and Zav25 was generated. A total of 25 SRAP primer combinations were evaluated in 45 F2 plants and both parental lines, generating 208 polymorphic bands/markers. The markers were analyzed by the chi-square goodness-of-fit test to check the expected Mendelian segregation ratio. The resulting linkage map consists of 112 genetic markers distributed in 7 linkage groups (LGs, covering a total of 528.8 cM. The length of the LGs ranged from 47.6 to 144.3 cM (mean 75.54 cM, with 9 to 34 markers. The linkage map developed in this study indicates that the SRAP marker system could be applied to mapping studies of pea.

  4. Transient protein expression in three Pisum sativum (green pea) varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Brian J; Fujiki, Masaaki; Mett, Valentina; Kaczmarczyk, Jon; Shamloul, Moneim; Musiychuk, Konstantin; Underkoffler, Susan; Yusibov, Vidadi; Mett, Vadim

    2009-02-01

    The expression of proteins in plants both transiently and via permanently transformed lines has been demonstrated by a number of groups. Transient plant expression systems, due to high expression levels and speed of production, show greater promise for the manufacturing of biopharmaceuticals when compared to permanent transformants. Expression vectors based on a tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) are the most commonly utilized and the primary plant used, Nicotiana benthamiana, has demonstrated the ability to express a wide range of proteins at levels amenable to purification. N. benthamiana has two limitations for its use; one is its relatively slow growth, and the other is its low biomass. To address these limitations we screened a number of legumes for transient protein expression. Using the alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) and the cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) vectors, delivered via Agrobacterium, we were able to identify three Pisum sativum varieties that demonstrated protein expression transiently. Expression levels of 420 +/- 26.24 mg GFP/kgFW in the green pea variety speckled pea were achieved. We were also able to express three therapeutic proteins indicating promise for this system in the production of biopharmaceuticals.

  5. Biological control of tortricids and aphids in strawberries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigsgaard, Lene; Enkegaard, Annie; Eilenberg, Jørgen

    Cropping practice and biological control can contribute to reduced pesticide use in strawberries. Organic strawberries are less attacked by strawberry tortricid and buckwheat flower strips can augment its natural enemies. Against shallot aphid the two-spot ladybird is promising....

  6. New genus and species of the extinct aphid family Szelegiewicziidae and their implications for aphid evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegierek, Piotr; Żyła, Dagmara; Homan, Agnieszka; Cai, Chenyang; Huang, Diying

    2017-10-24

    Recently, we are witnessing an increased appreciation for the importance of the fossil record in phylogenetics and testing various evolutionary hypotheses. However, this approach brings many challenges, especially for such a complex group as aphids and requires a thorough morphological analysis of the extinct groups. The extinct aphid family Szelegiewicziidae is supposed to be one of the oviparous lineages in aphid evolution. New material from the rock fossil deposits of Shar Teg (Upper Jurassic of Mongolia), Baissa (Lower Cretaceous of Siberia-Russia), and Burmese amber (Upper Cretaceous of Myanmar) allowed us to undertake a more detailed examination of the morphological features and carry out an analysis of the taxonomical composition and evolution of the family. This led us to the conclusion that evolution of the body plan and wing structure was similar in different, often not closely related groups, probably as a result of convergence. Additionally, we present a description of a new genus and two species (Tinaphis mongolica Żyła &Wegierek, sp. nov., and Feroorbis burmensis Wegierek & Huang, gen. et sp. nov.) that belong to this family.

  7. New genus and species of the extinct aphid family Szelegiewicziidae and their implications for aphid evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegierek, Piotr; Żyła, Dagmara; Homan, Agnieszka; Cai, Chenyang; Huang, Diying

    2017-12-01

    Recently, we are witnessing an increased appreciation for the importance of the fossil record in phylogenetics and testing various evolutionary hypotheses. However, this approach brings many challenges, especially for such a complex group as aphids and requires a thorough morphological analysis of the extinct groups. The extinct aphid family Szelegiewicziidae is supposed to be one of the oviparous lineages in aphid evolution. New material from the rock fossil deposits of Shar Teg (Upper Jurassic of Mongolia), Baissa (Lower Cretaceous of Siberia-Russia), and Burmese amber (Upper Cretaceous of Myanmar) allowed us to undertake a more detailed examination of the morphological features and carry out an analysis of the taxonomical composition and evolution of the family. This led us to the conclusion that evolution of the body plan and wing structure was similar in different, often not closely related groups, probably as a result of convergence. Additionally, we present a description of a new genus and two species ( Tinaphis mongolica Żyła &Wegierek, sp. nov., and Feroorbis burmensis Wegierek & Huang, gen. et sp. nov.) that belong to this family.

  8. Mulches reduce aphid-borne viruses and whiteflies in cantaloupe

    OpenAIRE

    Summers, Charles G.; Mitchell, Jeffrey P.; Stapleton, James J.

    2005-01-01

    We compared reflective plastic and wheat straw mulches with conventional bare soil for managing aphid-borne virus diseases and silverleaf whitefly in cantaloupe. The occurrence of aphid-borne virus diseases was significantly reduced with both mulches as opposed to bare soil, and reflective plastic performed better than wheat straw. Silverleaf whitefly numbers, both adults and nymphs, were reduced equally by plastic mulch and wheat straw, and were significantly lower than with bare soil. Refle...

  9. Aphids alter host-plant nitrogen isotope fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Alex C. C.; Sternberg, Leonel da S. L.; Hurley, Katherine B.

    2011-01-01

    Plant sap-feeding insects and blood-feeding parasites are frequently depleted in 15N relative to their diet. Unfortunately, most fluid-feeder/host nitrogen stable-isotope studies simply report stable-isotope signatures, but few attempt to elucidate the mechanism of isotopic trophic depletion. Here we address this deficit by investigating the nitrogen stable-isotope dynamics of a fluid-feeding herbivore-host plant system: the green peach aphid, Myzus persicae, feeding on multiple brassicaceous host plants. M. persicae was consistently more than 6‰ depleted in 15N relative to their hosts, although aphid colonized plants were 1.5‰ to 2.0‰ enriched in 15N relative to uncolonized control plants. Isotopic depletion of aphids relative to hosts was strongly related to host nitrogen content. We tested whether the concomitant aphid 15N depletion and host 15N enrichment was coupled by isotopic mass balance and determined that aphid 15N depletion and host 15N enrichment are uncoupled processes. We hypothesized that colonized plants would have higher nitrate reductase activity than uncolonized plants because previous studies had demonstrated that high nitrate reductase activity under substrate-limiting conditions can result in increased plant δ15N values. Consistent with our hypothesis, nitrate reductase activity in colonized plants was twice that of uncolonized plants. This study offers two important insights that are likely applicable to understanding nitrogen dynamics in fluid-feeder/host systems. First, isotopic separation of aphid and host depends on nitrogen availability. Second, aphid colonization alters host nitrogen metabolism and subsequently host nitrogen stable-isotope signature. Notably, this work establishes a metabolic framework for future hypothesis-driven studies focused on aphid manipulation of host nitrogen metabolism. PMID:21646532

  10. Aphid performance changes with plant defense mediated by Cucumber mosaic virus titer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaobin; Gao, Yang; Yan, Shuo; Tang, Xin; Zhou, Xuguo; Zhang, Deyong; Liu, Yong

    2016-04-22

    Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) causes appreciable losses in vegetables, ornamentals and agricultural crops. The green peach aphid, Myzus persicae Sulzer (Aphididae) is one of the most efficient vectors for CMV. The transmission ecology of aphid-vectored CMV has been well investigated. However, the detailed description of the dynamic change in the plant-CMV-aphid interaction associated with plant defense and virus epidemics is not well known. In this report, we investigated the relationship of virus titer with plant defense of salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) during the different infection time and their interaction with aphids in CMV-infected tobacco plants. Our results showed that aphid performance changed with virus titer and plant defense on CMV-inoculated plants. At first, plant defense was low and aphid number increased gradually. The plant defense of SA signaling pathway was induced when virus titer was at a high level, and aphid performance was correspondingly reduced. Additionally, the winged aphids were increased. Our results showed that aphid performance was reduced due to the induced plant defense mediated by Cucumber mosaic virus titer. Additionally, some wingless aphids became to winged aphids. In this way CMV could be transmitted with the migration of winged aphids. We should take measures to prevent aphids in the early stage of their occurrence in the field to prevent virus outbreak.

  11. Host Plants Indirectly Influence Plant Virus Transmission by Altering Gut Cysteine Protease Activity of Aphid Vectors*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Patricia V.; Ghanim, Murad; Rebelo, Ana Rita; Santos, Rogerio S.; Orsburn, Benjamin C.; Gray, Stewart

    2017-01-01

    The green peach aphid, Myzus persicae, is a vector of the Potato leafroll virus (PLRV, Luteoviridae), transmitted exclusively by aphids in a circulative manner. PLRV transmission efficiency was significantly reduced when a clonal lineage of M. persicae was reared on turnip as compared with the weed physalis, and this was a transient effect caused by a host-switch response. A trend of higher PLRV titer in physalis-reared aphids as compared with turnip-reared aphids was observed at 24 h and 72 h after virus acquisition. The major difference in the proteomes of these aphids was the up-regulation of predicted lysosomal enzymes, in particular the cysteine protease cathepsin B (cathB), in aphids reared on turnip. The aphid midgut is the site of PLRV acquisition, and cathB and PLRV localization were starkly different in midguts of the aphids reared on the two host plants. In viruliferous aphids that were reared on turnip, there was near complete colocalization of cathB and PLRV at the cell membranes, which was not observed in physalis-reared aphids. Chemical inhibition of cathB restored the ability of aphids reared on turnip to transmit PLRV in a dose-dependent manner, showing that the increased activity of cathB and other cysteine proteases at the cell membrane indirectly decreased virus transmission by aphids. Understanding how the host plant influences virus transmission by aphids is critical for growers to manage the spread of virus among field crops. PMID:27932519

  12. The Protease Inhibitor CI2c Gene Induced by Bird Cherry-Oat Aphid in Barley Inhibits Green Peach Aphid Fecundity in Transgenic Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losvik, Aleksandra; Beste, Lisa; Mehrabi, Sara; Jonsson, Lisbeth

    2017-06-20

    Aphids are phloem feeders that cause large damage globally as pest insects. They induce a variety of responses in the host plant, but not much is known about which responses are promoting or inhibiting aphid performance. Here, we investigated whether one of the responses induced in barley by the cereal aphid, bird cherry-oat aphid ( Rhopalosiphum padi L.) affects aphid performance in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana L. A barley cDNA encoding the protease inhibitor CI2c was expressed in A. thaliana and aphid performance was studied using the generalist green peach aphid ( Myzus persicae Sulzer). There were no consistent effects on aphid settling or preference or on parameters of life span and long-term fecundity. However, short-term tests with apterous adult aphids showed lower fecundity on three of the transgenic lines, as compared to on control plants. This effect was transient, observed on days 5 to 7, but not later. The results suggest that the protease inhibitor is taken up from the tissue during probing and weakly inhibits fecundity by an unknown mechanism. The study shows that a protease inhibitor induced in barley by an essentially monocot specialist aphid can inhibit a generalist aphid in transgenic Arabidopsis.

  13. The Protease Inhibitor CI2c Gene Induced by Bird Cherry-Oat Aphid in Barley Inhibits Green Peach Aphid Fecundity in Transgenic Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Losvik

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Aphids are phloem feeders that cause large damage globally as pest insects. They induce a variety of responses in the host plant, but not much is known about which responses are promoting or inhibiting aphid performance. Here, we investigated whether one of the responses induced in barley by the cereal aphid, bird cherry-oat aphid (Rhopalosiphum padi L. affects aphid performance in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana L. A barley cDNA encoding the protease inhibitor CI2c was expressed in A. thaliana and aphid performance was studied using the generalist green peach aphid (Myzus persicae Sulzer. There were no consistent effects on aphid settling or preference or on parameters of life span and long-term fecundity. However, short-term tests with apterous adult aphids showed lower fecundity on three of the transgenic lines, as compared to on control plants. This effect was transient, observed on days 5 to 7, but not later. The results suggest that the protease inhibitor is taken up from the tissue during probing and weakly inhibits fecundity by an unknown mechanism. The study shows that a protease inhibitor induced in barley by an essentially monocot specialist aphid can inhibit a generalist aphid in transgenic Arabidopsis.

  14. Aggressive mimicry coexists with mutualism in an aphid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Adrián; Fürstenau, Benjamin; Quero, Carmen; Pérez-Hidalgo, Nicolás; Carazo, Pau; Font, Enrique; Martínez-Torres, David

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the evolutionary transition from interspecific exploitation to cooperation is a major challenge in evolutionary biology. Ant–aphid relationships represent an ideal system to this end because they encompass a coevolutionary continuum of interactions ranging from mutualism to antagonism. In this study, we report an unprecedented interaction along this continuum: aggressive mimicry in aphids. We show that two morphs clonally produced by the aphid Paracletus cimiciformis during its root-dwelling phase establish relationships with ants at opposite sides of the mutualism–antagonism continuum. Although one of these morphs exhibits the conventional trophobiotic (mutualistic) relationship with ants of the genus Tetramorium, aphids of the alternative morph are transported by the ants to their brood chamber and cared for as if they were true ant larvae. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses reveal that the innate cuticular hydrocarbon profile of the mimic morph resembles the profile of ant larvae more than that of the alternative, genetically identical nonmimic morph. Furthermore, we show that, once in the brood chamber, mimic aphids suck on ant larva hemolymph. These results not only add aphids to the limited list of arthropods known to biosynthesize the cuticular chemicals of their deceived hosts to exploit their resources but describe a remarkable case of plastic aggressive mimicry. The present work adds a previously unidentified dimension to the classical textbook paradigm of aphid–ant relationships by showcasing a complex system at the evolutionary interface between cooperation and exploitation. PMID:25583474

  15. Does aphid salivation affect phloem sieve element occlusion in vivo?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Ortega, Karla J; Walker, G P

    2013-12-01

    To protect against loss of photo-assimilate-rich phloem sap, plants have evolved several mechanisms to plug phloem sieve tubes in response to damage. In many Fabaceae, each sieve element contains a discrete proteinaceous body called a forisome, which, in response to damage, rapidly transforms from a condensed configuration that does not impede the flow of sap to a dispersed configuration that plugs the sieve element. Aphids and other specialized phloem sap feeders can ingest phloem sap from a single sieve element for hours or days, and to do this, they must be able to suppress or reverse phloem plugging. A recent study provided in vitro evidence that aphid saliva can reverse forisome plugs. The present study tested this hypothesis in vivo by inducing forisome plugs which triggered aphids to switch behaviour from phloem sap ingestion to salivation into the sieve element. After salivating into the sieve element for various periods of time, the aphids were instantaneously cryofixed (freeze fixed) in situ on their leaf. The state of the forisome was then determined in the penetrated sieve element and in nearby non-penetrated sieve elements which served as controls for sieve elements not subjected to direct aphid salivation. Forisomes were almost always in close contact with the stylet tips and thus came into direct contact with the saliva. Nonetheless, forisome plugs in the penetrated sieve element did not revert back to a non-plugging state any faster than those in neighbouring sieve elements that were not subjected to direct aphid salivation.

  16. Aphid Polyphenisms: Trans-generational Developmental Regulation through Viviparity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kota eOgawa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyphenism, in which multiple discrete phenotypes develop from a single genotype, is considered to have contributed to the evolutionary success of aphids. Of the various polyphenisms observed in the complex life cycle of aphids, the reproductive and wing polyphenisms seen in most aphid species are conspicuous. In reproductive polyphenism, the reproductive modes can change between viviparous parthenogenesis and sexual reproduction in response to the photoperiod. Under short-day conditions in autumn, sexual morphs (males and oviparous females are produced parthenogenetically. Winged polyphenism is observed in viviparous generations during summer, when winged or wingless (flightless aphids are produced depending on a variety of environmental conditions (e.g. density, predators. Here, we review the physiological mechanisms underlying reproductive and wing polyphenism in aphids. In reproductive polyphenism, morph determination (male, oviparous or viviparous female within mother aphids is regulated by juvenile hormone (JH titers in the mothers. In wing polyphenism, although JH is considered to play an important role in phenotype determination (winged or wingless, the role is still controversial. In both cases, the acquisition of viviparity in Aphididae is considered to be the basis for maternal regulation of these polyphenisms, and through which environmental cues can be transferred to developing embryos through the physiological state of the mother. Although the mechanisms by which mothers alter the developmental programs of their progeny have not yet been clarified, continued developments in molecular biology will likely unravel these questions.

  17. Danish Rhizobium leguminosarum strains nodulating ‘Afghanistan’ pea (Pisum sativum)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Erik Steen; Sørensen, Lasse Holst; Engvild, Kjeld Christensen

    1986-01-01

    A wild pea (Pisum sativum L.) native to Afghanistan normally known to be resisant to nodulation with European strains of Rhizobium leguminosarum was nodulated early and effectively in field soil in Denmark. Isolates from nodules formed effective nodules abundantly on 'Afghanistan' on reinfection ...... pattern with Rhizobium leguminosarum strains isolated from a modern pea variety cultivated in the same field.......A wild pea (Pisum sativum L.) native to Afghanistan normally known to be resisant to nodulation with European strains of Rhizobium leguminosarum was nodulated early and effectively in field soil in Denmark. Isolates from nodules formed effective nodules abundantly on 'Afghanistan' on reinfection...

  18. Aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae) species determined in Çanakkale Province with a new record for the aphid fauna of Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    KÖK, Şahin; KASAP, İsmail; ÖZDEMİR, Işıl

    2016-01-01

    As a result of a study conducted to determine aphid species on herbaceous plants, shrubs and trees in cultivated and uncultivated areas from 2013 to 2015 in Çanakkale Province, Turkey, 39 species and one subspecies in 24 genera of Aphididae family were determined. Of these species, Aphis sedi Kaltenbach, 1843 collected from Lampranthus sp. (Aizoaceae) was new record for the aphid fauna of Turkey. Also, Helianthus annuus L. (Asteraceae) and Pimpinella saxifraga L. (Apiaceae) were determined as...

  19. Constitutive emission of the aphid alarm pheromone, (E)-β-farnesene, from plants does not serve as a direct defense against aphids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunert, Grit; Reinhold, Carolina; Gershenzon, Jonathan

    2010-11-23

    The sesquiterpene, (E)-β-farnesene (EBF), is the principal component of the alarm pheromone of many aphid species. Released when aphids are attacked by enemies, EBF leads aphids to undertake predator avoidance behaviors and to produce more winged offspring that can leave the plant. Many plants also release EBF as a volatile, and so it has been proposed that this compound could act to defend plants against aphid infestation by 1) deterring aphids from settling, 2) reducing aphid performance due to frequent interruption of feeding and 3) inducing the production of more winged offspring. Here we tested the costs and benefits of EBF as a defense against the green peach aphid, Myzus persicae, using transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana lines engineered to continuously emit EBF. No metabolic costs of EBF synthesis could be detected in these plants as they showed no differences in growth or seed production from wild-type controls under two fertilizer regimes. Likewise, no evidence was found for the ability of EBF to directly defend the plant against aphids. EBF emission did not significantly repel winged or wingless morphs from settling on plants. Nor did EBF reduce aphid performance, measured as reproduction, or lead to an increase in the proportion of winged offspring. The lack of any defensive effect of EBF in this study might be due to the fact that natural enemy attack on individual aphids leads to a pulsed emission, but the transgenic lines tested continuously produce EBF to which aphids may become habituated. Thus our results provide no support for the hypothesis that plant emission of the aphid alarm pheromone EBF is a direct defense against aphids. However, there is scattered evidence elsewhere in the literature suggesting that EBF emission might serve as an indirect defense by attracting aphid predators.

  20. Constitutive emission of the aphid alarm pheromone, (E-β-farnesene, from plants does not serve as a direct defense against aphids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gershenzon Jonathan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sesquiterpene, (E-β-farnesene (EBF, is the principal component of the alarm pheromone of many aphid species. Released when aphids are attacked by enemies, EBF leads aphids to undertake predator avoidance behaviors and to produce more winged offspring that can leave the plant. Many plants also release EBF as a volatile, and so it has been proposed that this compound could act to defend plants against aphid infestation by 1 deterring aphids from settling, 2 reducing aphid performance due to frequent interruption of feeding and 3 inducing the production of more winged offspring. Here we tested the costs and benefits of EBF as a defense against the green peach aphid, Myzus persicae, using transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana lines engineered to continuously emit EBF. Results No metabolic costs of EBF synthesis could be detected in these plants as they showed no differences in growth or seed production from wild-type controls under two fertilizer regimes. Likewise, no evidence was found for the ability of EBF to directly defend the plant against aphids. EBF emission did not significantly repel winged or wingless morphs from settling on plants. Nor did EBF reduce aphid performance, measured as reproduction, or lead to an increase in the proportion of winged offspring. Conclusions The lack of any defensive effect of EBF in this study might be due to the fact that natural enemy attack on individual aphids leads to a pulsed emission, but the transgenic lines tested continuously produce EBF to which aphids may become habituated. Thus our results provide no support for the hypothesis that plant emission of the aphid alarm pheromone EBF is a direct defense against aphids. However, there is scattered evidence elsewhere in the literature suggesting that EBF emission might serve as an indirect defense by attracting aphid predators.

  1. Agronomy of strip intercropping broccoli with alyssum for biological control of aphids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organic broccoli growers in California typically control aphids by intercropping broccoli with strips of alyssum (Lobularia maritima (L.) Desv.) which attracts hoverflies (Diptera: Syrphidae) that are important predators of aphids. A three year study with transplanted organic broccoli in Salinas, ...

  2. Preparing soft-bodied arthropods for microscope examination: Aphids (Insecta: Hemiptera: Aphididae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proper identification of aphids (Hemiptera: Aphididae) require preparation of the specimen on a microscope slide. This training video provides visual instruction on how to prepare aphid specimens on microscope slides for examination and indentification. Steps ranging from collection, specimen clear...

  3. Phloem protein partners of Cucurbit aphid borne yellows virus: possible involvement of phloem proteins in virus transmission by aphids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencharki, B; Boissinot, S; Revollon, S; Ziegler-Graff, V; Erdinger, M; Wiss, L; Dinant, S; Renard, D; Beuve, M; Lemaitre-Guillier, C; Brault, V

    2010-06-01

    Poleroviruses are phytoviruses strictly transmitted by phloem-feeding aphids in a circulative and nonpropagative mode. During ingestion, aphids sample virions in sieve tubes along with sap. Therefore, any sap protein bound to virions will be acquired by the insects and could potentially be involved in the transmission process. By developing in vitro virus-overlay assays on sap proteins collected from cucumber, we observed that approximately 20 proteins were able to bind to purified particles of Cucurbit aphid borne yellows virus (CABYV). Among them, eight proteins were identified by mass spectrometry. The role of two candidates belonging to the PP2-like family (predominant lectins found in cucurbit sap) in aphid transmission was further pursued by using purified orthologous PP2 proteins from Arabidopsis. Addition of these proteins to the virus suspension in the aphid artificial diet greatly increased virus transmission rate. This shift was correlated with an increase in the number of viral genomes in insect cells and with an increase of virion stability in vitro. Surprisingly, increase of the virus transmission rate was also monitored after addition of unrelated proteins in the aphid diet, suggesting that any soluble protein at sufficiently high concentration in the diet and acquired together with virions could stimulate virus transmission.

  4. Pea (Pisum sativum L. in the Genomic Era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Redden

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Pea (Pisum sativum L. was the original model organism used in Mendel’s discovery (1866 of the laws of inheritance, making it the foundation of modern plant genetics. However, subsequent progress in pea genomics has lagged behind many other plant species. Although the size and repetitive nature of the pea genome has so far restricted its sequencing, comprehensive genomic and post genomic resources already exist. These include BAC libraries, several types of molecular marker sets, both transcriptome and proteome datasets and mutant populations for reverse genetics. The availability of the full genome sequences of three legume species has offered significant opportunities for genome wide comparison revealing synteny and co-linearity to pea. A combination of a candidate gene and colinearity approach has successfully led to the identification of genes underlying agronomically important traits including virus resistances and plant architecture. Some of this knowledge has already been applied to marker assisted selection (MAS programs, increasing precision and shortening the breeding cycle. Yet, complete translation of marker discovery to pea breeding is still to be achieved. Molecular analysis of pea collections has shown that although substantial variation is present within the cultivated genepool, wild material offers the possibility to incorporate novel traits that may have been inadvertently eliminated. Association mapping analysis of diverse pea germplasm promises to identify genetic variation related to desirable agronomic traits, which are historically difficult to breed for in a traditional manner. The availability of high throughput ‘omics’ methodologies offers great promise for the development of novel, highly accurate selective breeding tools for improved pea genotypes that are sustainable under current and future climates and farming systems.

  5. National Plant Diagnostic Network, Taxonomic training videos: Introduction to AphID

    Science.gov (United States)

    Training is a critical part of aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae) identification. This video provides visual instruction on the use of the expert system, AphID, for aphid examination and identification. The video demonstrates the use of different training modules that allow the user to gain familiarity wi...

  6. Aphidius gifuensis: a promising parasitoid for biological control of two important aphid species in sweet pepper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Messelink, G.J.; Bloemhard, C.M.J.; Hoogerbrugge, H.; Schelt, van J.

    2011-01-01

    The parasitoid Aphidius gifuensis is able to parasitize both the green peach aphid Myzus persicae and the foxglove aphid Aulacorthum solani in sweet pepper. In a greenhouse experiment we showed that rates of parasitism on green peach aphids alone were equal to the commonly used Aphidius colemani,

  7. Comparison of transmission efficiency of different isolates of Potato virus Y among three aphid vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potato virus Y (PVY) strains are transmitted by different aphid species in a non-persistent, non-circulative manner. Green peach aphid (GPA, Myzus persicae Sulzer; Aphididae, Macrosiphini) is the most efficient vector in laboratory studies, but potato aphid (PA, Macrosiphum euphorbiae Thomas; Aphidi...

  8. Suppression of plant defenses by a Myzus persicae (green peach aphid) salivary effector protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elzinga, Dezi A; De Vos, Martin; Jander, Georg

    2014-07-01

    The complex interactions between aphids and their host plant are species-specific and involve multiple layers of recognition and defense. Aphid salivary proteins, which are released into the plant during phloem feeding, are a likely mediator of these interactions. In an approach to identify aphid effectors that facilitate feeding from host plants, eleven Myzus persicae (green peach aphid) salivary proteins and the GroEL protein of Buchnera aphidicola, a bacterial endosymbiont of this aphid species, were expressed transiently in Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco). Whereas two salivary proteins increased aphid reproduction, expression of three other aphid proteins and GroEL significantly decreased aphid reproduction on N. tabacum. These effects were recapitulated in stable transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants. Further experiments with A. thaliana expressing Mp55, a salivary protein that increased aphid reproduction, showed lower accumulation of 4-methoxyindol-3-ylmethylglucosinolate, callose and hydrogen peroxide in response to aphid feeding. Mp55-expressing plants also were more attractive for aphids in choice assays. Silencing Mp55 gene expression in M. persicae using RNA interference approaches reduced aphid reproduction on N. tabacum, A. thaliana, and N. benthamiana. Together, these results demonstrate a role for Mp55, a protein with as-yet-unknown molecular function, in the interaction of M. persicae with its host plants.

  9. National Plant Diagnostic Network, Taxonomic training videos: Aphids under the microscope - overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Training is a critical part of aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae) identification. This training video provides provides an overview of general aphid morphology by using a compound microscope. The narrator discusses and highlights structures on the aphid that are important to make a species identification....

  10. Effects on the non-target aphid Aphis Gossypii Glover (Homoptera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    bych76-zhjh77

    2012-05-22

    May 22, 2012 ... parasitoids and their honeydew is an important energy source for several arthropods. Analyses of the impact of transgenic plants expressing Cry toxins on aphids gave variable results ranging from minor negative effects on aphid survival and fecundity to significant beneficial effects on aphid populations ...

  11. Variable isotopic compositions of host plant populations preclude assessment of aphid overwintering sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura) is a pest of soybean in the northern Midwest whose migratory patterns have been difficult to quantify. Improved knowledge of soybean aphid overwintering sites could facilitate the development of control efforts with exponential impacts on aphid densities on a...

  12. Aphid Transmission of the Ontario Isolate of Plum Pox Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, D Thomas; Vickers, Patricia M; Bittner, Lori A; Stobbs, Lorne W; Foottit, Robert G

    2015-10-01

    Utilization of timed virus acquisition access probes in studies of plum pox virus (PPV) transmission by aphids demonstrated that endemic species transmitted the virus readily from plum, Prunus domestica (L.) Batsch; peach, P. persica (L.); or dwarf flowering almond, P. glandulosa Thunberg., to peach seedlings. The green peach aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer), was shown to be the most efficient vector. Acquisition of virus by green peach aphids from infected peach leaves resulted in 18-28% infected peach seedlings, while aphids previously fed on infected leaves of plum transferred virus to 36% of peach seedlings. Although the spirea aphid, Aphis spiraecola (Patch), was a less efficient vector than M. persicae it is perhaps more important for the spread of PPV due to its greater abundance and occurrence earlier in the season when peach trees are thought to be more susceptible to infection. Virus transmission rates varied depending on the virus source and healthy test plant species. In contrast to many previous studies, aphid inoculation of the experimental host Nicotiana benthamiana Domin occurred at a low rate, never exceeding 4%. Acquisition of PPV by M. persicae from infected peach fruit was greatly reduced compared with acquisition from leaves. The results of this research indicate that the Ontario isolate of PPV-D is readily transmissible by aphids to peach and natural spread of the virus needs to be considered in future management or eradication programs. © Her Majesty in Right of Canada, as represented by the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America.

  13. Cereal aphid colony turnover and persistence in winter wheat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linton Winder

    Full Text Available An understanding of spatial and temporal processes in agricultural ecosystems provides a basis for rational decision-making with regards to the management and husbandry of crops, supporting the implementation of integrated farming strategies. In this study we investigated the spatial and temporal distribution of aphid pests (Sitobion avenae and Metopolophium dirhodum within winter wheat fields. Using an intensive sampling programme we investigated distributions at both the small (single shoot and large (field scales. Within two fields, a grid with 82 locations was established (area 120 m by 168 m. At each location, 25 shoots were individually marked and aphid counts by observation conducted on 21 and 22 occasions as the crop matured, resulting in 43,050 and 45,100 counts being conducted in the two fields respectively. We quantified field scale spatial distributions, demonstrating that spatial pattern generally emerged, with temporal stability being both species- and field- dependent. We then measured turnover of colonies at the small (individual shoot and large (field scales by comparing consecutive pairs of sampling occasions. Four turnover categories were defined: Empty (no aphids recorded on either occasion; Colonised (aphids recorded on the second occasion but not the first; Extinction (aphids recorded on the first occasion but not the second; Stable (aphids recorded on both occasions. At the field scale, population stability soon established, but, at the small scale there was a consistently high proportion of unoccupied shoots with considerable colonisation and extinction and low stability. The redistribution of aphids within the crop at the local scale is a vulnerability which could be used to disrupt population development--by mediating exposure to ground-active natural enemies and by incurring a metabolic cost caused by the physiological demands to re-establish on a nearby host plant.

  14. Role of LLD, a new locus for leaflet/pinna morphogenesis in Pisum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Properties of a mutant at the LLD (LEAF-LET DEVELOPMENT) locus in pea Pisum sativum L. are reported in this paper. Plants homozygous for the Mendelian recessive mutation lld bear leaves in which a few to many leaflets are incompletely developed. Opposite pinnae of rachis nodes often formed fused incompletely ...

  15. Effect of exogenous flavonoids on nodulation of pea (Pisum sativum L.)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novák, Karel; Chovanec, Pavel; Škrdleta, Vladimír; Kropáčová, M.; Lisá, Ludmila; Němcová, M.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 375 (2002), s. 1735-1745 ISSN 0022-0957 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/00/0937 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : flavonoids * nod gene * pisum Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.852, year: 2002

  16. Danish Rhizobium leguminosarum strains nodulating ‘Afghanistan’ pea (Pisum sativum)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Erik Steen; Sørensen, Lasse Holst; Engvild, Kjeld Christensen

    1986-01-01

    A wild pea (Pisum sativum L.) native to Afghanistan normally known to be resisant to nodulation with European strains of Rhizobium leguminosarum was nodulated early and effectively in field soil in Denmark. Isolates from nodules formed effective nodules abundantly on 'Afghanistan' on reinfection...... pattern with Rhizobium leguminosarum strains isolated from a modern pea variety cultivated in the same field....

  17. New Pea (Pisum sativum L. Accesions Obtained at V.R.D.S. Buzau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costel Vinatoru

    2016-11-01

    • Wendy J. Dahl, Lauren M. Foster and Robert T. Tyler (2012. Review of the health benefits of peas (Pisum sativum L.. British Journal of Nutrition, 108, pp S3-S10. doi:10.1017/S0007114512000852. 13 December 2011

  18. [Allele polymorphism of microsatellite loci in pea Pisum sativum L. lines, varieties, and mutants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dribnokhodova, O P; Gostimskiĭ, S A

    2009-07-01

    Interlinear polymorphism at 23 microsatellite loci was studied in 40 Pisum sativum lines, varieties, and mutants and proved to be high, 61.6% on average. Varieties bred for different end uses substantially differed in the extent of polymorphism and allele composition. Polymorphism of microsatellite loci was shown to be suitable for developing passports of industrial pea varieties.

  19. Mechanisms regulating caste differentiation in an aphid social system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibao, Harunobu; Kutsukake, Mayako; Matsuyama, Shigeru; Fukatsu, Takema; Shimada, Masakazu

    2010-01-01

    For evolution and maintenance of the social systems of insect colonies, caste production should be controlled in response to external cues so that caste ratio in the colony is kept at an optimal range. Recent developments using artificial diet rearing techniques have revealed an underlying mechanism for adaptive control of caste production in a social aphid, Tuberaphis styraci, which has a sterile soldier caste in the 2(nd) instar. Aphid density was the proximate cue that acts on 1(st) instar nymphs and embryos to induce soldier differentiation. The final determination of soldier differentiation occurred postnatally, probably at a late 1(st) instar stage. Direct contact stimuli from live non-soldier aphids mediated the density effect. While coexisting non-soldiers facilitated soldier differentiation in 1(st) instar nymphs, coexisting soldiers acted to suppress such differentiation. These results suggest that caste production in aphid colonies is controlled by positive and negative feedback mechanisms consisting of density-dependent induction and suppression of soldier differentiation. Here, we demonstrate the mechanisms that coordinate aphid society, and provide a striking case of clonal superorganism system where simple responses of colony members to local extrinsic stimuli are integrated into a highly organized regulation of the whole colony.

  20. Predicting the occurrence of alate aphids in Brassicaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Jorge Cividanes

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to predict the occurrence of alates of Brevicoryne brassicae, Lipaphis erysimi, and Myzus persicae (Hemiptera, Aphididae in Brassicaceae. The alate aphids were collected in yellow water traps from July 1997 to August 2005. Aphid population peaks were predicted using a degree‑day model. The meteorological factors, temperature, air relative humidity, rainfall, and sunshine hours, were used to provide precision indexes to evaluate the best predictor for the date of the first capture of alate aphids by the traps. The degree‑day model indicated that the peak population of the evaluated aphid species can be predicted using one of the following biofix dates: January 1st, June 1st, and the date of the first capture of the alate aphid species by the yellow water traps. The best predictor of B. brassicae occurrence is the number of days with minimum temperature >15°C, and of L. erysimi and M. persicae, the number of days with rainfall occurrence.

  1. Aphid sex pheromones: from discovery to commercial production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkett, Michael A; Pickett, John A

    2003-03-01

    This review charts the progress made with aphid sex pheromone chemistry, from initial identification of cyclopentanoid nepetalactones, for example (4aS,7S,7aR)-nepetalactone (1). and (1R,4aS,7S,7aR)-nepetalactol (2). to commercial production from a renewable non-food crop, the catmint, Nepeta cataria (Lamiaceae). The availability of aphid sex pheromone components is now facilitating the development of new aphid pest control strategies, incorporating the use of other semiochemicals, particularly in the manipulation of populations of aphid parasitoids and aphid predators such as lacewings, which can utilise the nepetalactones and closely related molecules to locate their hosts and prey. This is the first example of a plant resource being developed as a feedstock for the production of a commercially valuable insect pheromone. The development of a plant-based production route highlights the tremendous potential that higher plants offer as cheap and renewable resources for the production of insect semiochemicals, through the wide array of secondary metabolites that they can generate.

  2. Virulent Diuraphis noxia Aphids Over-Express Calcium Signaling Proteins to Overcome Defenses of Aphid-Resistant Wheat Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Deepak K; Chandran, Predeesh; Timm, Alicia E; Aguirre-Rojas, Lina; Smith, C Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Russian wheat aphid, Diuraphis noxia, an invasive phytotoxic pest of wheat, Triticum aestivum, and barley, Hordeum vulgare, causes huge economic losses in Africa, South America, and North America. Most acceptable and ecologically beneficial aphid management strategies include selection and breeding of D. noxia-resistant varieties, and numerous D. noxia resistance genes have been identified in T. aestivum and H. vulgare. North American D. noxia biotype 1 is avirulent to T. aestivum varieties possessing Dn4 or Dn7 genes, while biotype 2 is virulent to Dn4 and avirulent to Dn7. The current investigation utilized next-generation RNAseq technology to reveal that biotype 2 over expresses proteins involved in calcium signaling, which activates phosphoinositide (PI) metabolism. Calcium signaling proteins comprised 36% of all transcripts identified in the two D. noxia biotypes. Depending on plant resistance gene-aphid biotype interaction, additional transcript groups included those involved in tissue growth; defense and stress response; zinc ion and related cofactor binding; and apoptosis. Activation of enzymes involved in PI metabolism by D. noxia biotype 2 aphids allows depletion of plant calcium that normally blocks aphid feeding sites in phloem sieve elements and enables successful, continuous feeding on plants resistant to avirulent biotype 1. Inhibition of the key enzyme phospholipase C significantly reduced biotype 2 salivation into phloem and phloem sap ingestion.

  3. Aphidophagous parasitoids can forage wheat crops before aphid infestation, Parana State, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceolin Bortolotto, Orcial; de Oliveira Menezes Júnior, Ayres; Thibes Hoshino, Adriano

    2015-01-01

    Aphid parasitoids are common in Brazilian wheat fields, and parasitize aphids at the wheat tillering stage. However, there is little information available about when this natural enemy occurs in wheat crops. This study investigated the initial occurrence of aphid parasitoids in four commercial wheat crops in northern Paraná during the 2009 crop season. We installed two Malaise traps at each wheat farm, and 400 tillers were assessed weekly in each field for aphid abundance. During this study, we captured 4,355 aphid parasitoids and 197 aphids. Three species of braconid parasitoids were identified, including Aphidius colemani (Viereck 1912), Lysiphlebus testaceipes (Cresson 1880), and Diaeretiella rapae (McIntosh 1855). The aphids species identified were Rhopalosiphum padi (Linnaeus 1758) and Sitobion avenae (Fabricius 1775). This study showed that aphid parasitoids are present in wheat crops even when aphid densities are low, and in one farm, occurred before the aphids colonization. These reports can justified the high efficiency of these natural enemies against aphids in wheat fields. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  4. Detecting aphid predation by earwigs in organic citrus orchards using molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeu-Dalmau, C; Piñol, J; Agustí, N

    2012-10-01

    Aphids (Hemiptera: Aphidoidea) can damage citrus trees via direct damage to leaves and flowers or via the indirect transmission of viruses. Predators such as the European earwig, Forficula auricularia Linnaeus (Dermaptera: Forficulidae), may assist in keeping aphid populations under control in citrus orchards. Group-specific primers were developed to detect aphid DNA in earwigs, in order to determine earwig predation rates in aphids in Mediterranean organic citrus trees. These primers were designed in accordance with the alignment of comparable sequences of aphids and earwigs, and they amplified a 224 bp fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) region. Following the consumption of three to five Aphis spiraecola Patch, aphid DNA was still detectable in 50% of earwigs one day after the ingestion. When predation was evaluated in the field, aphid DNA was detected in earwigs in May, June and July but not in April and August. The most interesting result is that of May, when aphid abundance was very low but 30% of the earwigs tested positive for aphid DNA. This finding suggests that earwigs are important aphid predators in citrus orchards, as they probably alter aphid dynamics as a result of early seasonal pressure on this pest.

  5. The genetic diversity and evolution of field pea (Pisum studied by high throughput retrotransposon based insertion polymorphism (RBIP marker analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smýkal Petr

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genetic diversity of crop species is the result of natural selection on the wild progenitor and human intervention by ancient and modern farmers and breeders. The genomes of modern cultivars, old cultivated landraces, ecotypes and wild relatives reflect the effects of these forces and provide insights into germplasm structural diversity, the geographical dimension to species diversity and the process of domestication of wild organisms. This issue is also of great practical importance for crop improvement because wild germplasm represents a rich potential source of useful under-exploited alleles or allele combinations. The aim of the present study was to analyse a major Pisum germplasm collection to gain a broad understanding of the diversity and evolution of Pisum and provide a new rational framework for designing germplasm core collections of the genus. Results 3020 Pisum germplasm samples from the John Innes Pisum germplasm collection were genotyped for 45 retrotransposon based insertion polymorphism (RBIP markers by the Tagged Array Marker (TAM method. The data set was stored in a purpose-built Germinate relational database and analysed by both principal coordinate analysis and a nested application of the Structure program which yielded substantially similar but complementary views of the diversity of the genus Pisum. Structure revealed three Groups (1-3 corresponding approximately to landrace, cultivar and wild Pisum respectively, which were resolved by nested Structure analysis into 14 Sub-Groups, many of which correlate with taxonomic sub-divisions of Pisum, domestication related phenotypic traits and/or restricted geographical locations. Genetic distances calculated between these Sub-Groups are broadly supported by principal coordinate analysis and these, together with the trait and geographical data, were used to infer a detailed model for the domestication of Pisum. Conclusions These data provide a clear picture

  6. Association of the Root Aphid Parasitoids Aclitus sappaphis and Paralipsis eikoae (Hymenoptera, Aphidiidae) with the Aphid-attending Ants Pheidole fervida and Lasius niger (Hymenoptera, Formicidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Hajimu, TAKADA; Yoshiaki, HASHIMOTO; Laboratory of Entomology, Faculty of Agriculture, Kyoto Prefectural University; Laboratory of Entomology, Faculty of Agriculture, Kyoto Prefectural University:(Present address)Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kobe University

    1985-01-01

    The association of two aphidiid parasitoids of a root aphid (Sappaphis piri MATSUMURA) on wormwood, Aclitus sappaphis TAKADA & SHIGA and Paralipsis eikoae (YASUMATSU), with two aphid-attending ants, Pheidole fervida FR. SMITH and Lasius niger (LINNE), was examined experimentally. The oviposition behavior of A. sappaphis was also observed. A single female parasitoid of each species was released on an aphid colony attended by workers (and soldiers) of either of the two ants, and her behavior an...

  7. Metabolomic profiling of the response of susceptible and resistant soybean strains to foxglove aphid, Aulacorthum solani Kaltenbach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Dan; Akashi, Hiromichi; Sugimoto, Masahiro; Tomita, Masaru; Soga, Tomoyoshi

    2013-04-15

    Aphid infection reduces soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) yield. Consequently, cultivation of aphid-resistant strains is a promising approach to pest control, and understanding the resistance mechanism is of importance. Here, we characterized the resistance of soybeans to foxglove aphid, Aulacorthum solani Kaltenbach, at the metabolite level. First, we evaluated aphid mortality and settlement rates on the leaves of two soybean strains, 'Tohoku149' and 'Suzuyutaka', and found that the former had strong resistance soon after introduction of the aphids. The metabolomic response to aphid introduction was analyzed using capillary electrophoresis-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. We found the following three features in the profiles: (1) concentrations of citrate, amino acids, and their intermediates were intrinsically higher for Tohoku149 than Suzuyutaka, (2) concentrations of several metabolites producing secondary metabolites, such as flavonoids and alkaloids, drastically changed 6h after aphid introduction, and (3) concentrations of TCA cycle metabolites increased in Tohoku149 48 h after aphid introduction. We also profiled free amino acids in aphids reared on both soybean strains and under starvation, and found that the profile of the aphids on Tohoku149 was similar to that of the starved aphids, but different to that of aphids on Suzuyutaka. These tests confirmed that aphids suck phloem sap even from Tohoku149. This study demonstrates the metabolomic profiles of both soybean strains and aphids, which will contribute to the molecular level understanding of mechanisms of soybean resistance to aphids. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Response of pea (Pisum sativum L.) different morphotypes to the effect of ozone and UV-B radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Juozaitytė, Rima

    2010-01-01

    Work hypothesis: Different pea (Pisum sativum L.) morphotypes respond differently to various anthropogenic factors. This can be related with an alteration of plant metabolism and with changes of photosynthetic pigments and biochemical indexes. Work aim and the tasks: To investigate the effects of ozone and UV-B radiation on different pea (Pisum sativum L.) morphotypes under changing climatic conditions and to measure plant reaction to the effects of ozone and UV-B radiation. 1.To inve...

  9. INFLUENCE OF NOSTOC VAUCHER EX BORNET ET FLAHAULT STRAINS ON GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT OF PISUM SATIVUM L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maltsev Ye. I.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the positive impact of cultures cyanobacteria genus Nostoc Vaucher ex Bornet et Flahault on growth and development of higher plants as an example Pisum sativum L. All the Nostoc species have a positive effect on the viability, germination energy, and biometric characteristics of Pisum sativum. The greatest positive influence was registered for N. entophytum Born. et. Flah. and N. linckia (Roth Bornetet Flahault f. linckia.

  10. Aphid infestation affecting the biogeochemistry of European beech saplings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalzik, B.; Levia, D. F., Jr.; Bischoff, S.; Näthe, K.

    2014-12-01

    Mass outbreaks of herbivore insects are known to perturb the functional properties of forests. However, it is less clear how endemic to moderate aboveground herbivory affects the vertical flow of nutrients from tree canopies to the soil. Here, we report on the effects of low to moderate infestation levels of the woolly beech aphid (Phyllaphis fagi L.) on the nutrient dynamics and hydrology of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.). In a potted sapling experiment, we followed the vertical dynamics of nutrients via throughfall (TF), stemflow (SF) and litter leachates (LL) collected over ten weeks underneath infested and uninfested control trees. Aphid infestation amplifies the fluxes of K+, Mn2+ and particulate nitrogen (0.45μm aphid abundance by 26 and 16%, respectively. Differences in canopy-derived dissolved nitrogen and carbon compounds, sulfur (S), Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+ were aphid abundance on nutrient dynamics was most notable in TF and SF and diminished in LL.Aphid infestation greatly altered the SF fluxes of DOC, K+, Mn2+, DON and sulfur-species, which were significantly concentrated at the tree base by "funneling" the rainfall through the canopy biomass to the trunk. Normalized to one square meter, water and nutrient fluxes were amplified by a factor of up to 200 compared to TF.Imaging of leaf surfaces by scanning electron microscopy exhibited notable differences of the surface morphology and microbiology of control, lightly infested, and heavily infested leaves. This observation might point to an aphid-mediated alteration of the phyllosphere ecology triggering the microbial uptake of NH4-N and SO4-S and its transformation to particulate N by magnified biomass growth of the phyllosphere microflora, consequently changing the chemical partitioning and temporal availability of nitrogen.

  11. Selection of entomopathogenic fungi for aphid control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Van Hanh; Hong, Suk Il; Kim, Keun

    2007-12-01

    Twelve strains of entomopathogenic fungi such as Lecanicillium lecanii, Paecilomyces farinosus, Beauveria bassiana, Metarhizium anisopliae, Cordyceps scarabaeicola, and Nomuraea rileyi were screened for aphid control. At 25 degrees C and 75% relative humidity (RH), among tested entomopathogenic fungi, L. lecanii 41185 showed the highest virulent pathogenicity for both Myzus persicae and Aphis gossypii, and their control values were both nearly 100% 5 and 2 d after treatment, respectively. Moreover, at an RH of 45% and in a wide temperature range (20-30 degrees C), L. lecanii 41185 also exhibited the highest virulence to M. persicae. The control value of M. persicae and the 50% lethal time (LT50) decreased significantly as the applied conidial concentration increased. The 50% lethal concentration (LC50) of the conidial suspension of this fungus was determined to be 6.55x10(5) conidia/ml. The control values of M. persicae resulting from the application of 1x10(7) and 1x10(8) conidia/ml were nearly the same and were significantly higher than that of 1x10(6) conidia/ml. The tested entomopathogenic fungi grew in a broad temperature range (15-30 degrees C). Lecanicillium strains showed optimum growth at 25 degrees C. The aerial conidia of Lecanicillium strains also could germinate in a broad temperature range (15-30 degrees C) and L. lecanii 41185 was the only strain with conidial germination at 35 degrees C.

  12. The NIa-Pro protein of Turnip mosaic virus improves growth and reproduction of the aphid vector, Myzus persicae (green peach aphid).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casteel, Clare L; Yang, Chunling; Nanduri, Ananya C; De Jong, Hannah N; Whitham, Steven A; Jander, Georg

    2014-02-01

    Many plant viruses depend on aphids and other phloem-feeding insects for transmission within and among host plants. Thus, viruses may promote their own transmission by manipulating plant physiology to attract aphids and increase aphid reproduction. Consistent with this hypothesis, Myzus persicae (green peach aphids) prefer to settle on Nicotiana benthamiana infected with Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) and fecundity on virus-infected N. benthamiana and Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) is higher than on uninfected controls. TuMV infection suppresses callose deposition, an important plant defense, and increases the amount of free amino acids, the major source of nitrogen for aphids. To investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms of this phenomenon, 10 TuMV genes were over-expressed in plants to determine their effects on aphid reproduction. Production of a single TuMV protein, nuclear inclusion a-protease domain (NIa-Pro), increased M. persicae reproduction on both N. benthamiana and Arabidopsis. Similar to the effects that are observed during TuMV infection, NIa-Pro expression alone increased aphid arrestment, suppressed callose deposition and increased the abundance of free amino acids. Together, these results suggest a function for the TuMV NIa-Pro protein in manipulating the physiology of host plants. By attracting aphid vectors and promoting their reproduction, TuMV may influence plant-aphid interactions to promote its own transmission. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Spatial and Temporal Dynamics of Aphids (Hemiptera: Aphididae) in the Columbia Basin and Northeastern Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Mathew L; Rondon, Silvia I; Walenta, Darrin L; Zeb, Qamar; Murphy, Alexzandra F

    2017-08-01

    Aphid species, such as the potato aphid, Macrosiphum euphorbiae Thomas, and the green peach aphid, Myzus persicae Sulzer, are routinely considered the most important pests of potatoes. Potato aphid, green peach aphid, and more recently, other aphids such as the bird cherry-oat aphid Rhopalosiphum padi L. have been identified as vectors of multiple plant pathogenic viruses in potatoes. Since 2006, an area-wide trapping network consisting of ∼60 sites was developed through collaboration between researchers, extension faculty, and stakeholders, to monitor aphid populations in the Columbia Basin of Oregon (Umatilla and Morrow counties) and in northeastern Oregon (Union and Baker counties). Over a 9-yr period (2006 to 2014), aphid specimens were collected weekly using yellow bucket traps and specimens were then identified and counted to determine population levels during the growing season (May-September). Thus, aphid population data were compiled and subjected to spatial and temporal distribution analysis. Weather data, obtained from an established network of weather stations located in the monitoring areas, were used in a nonparametric multiplicative regression analysis to determine which abiotic variables may impact aphid populations. Weather conditions were characterized using confidence intervals (CIs) established based on weather data from 1999 to 2005 for each environmental variable. Aphid populations were found to have a heterogeneous distribution in most years; a few sites had high aphid populations while low numbers were observed at most sites; aphids were also found to correlate with several abiotic variables, namely, elevation, previous season temperature, and previous season dew point. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Persistence and transgenerational effect of plant-mediated RNAi in aphids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, A D; Wouters, R H M; Mugford, S T; Hogenhout, S A

    2015-02-01

    Plant-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) has been successfully used as a tool to study gene function in aphids. The persistence and transgenerational effects of plant-mediated RNAi in the green peach aphid (GPA) Myzus persicae were investigated, with a focus on three genes with different functions in the aphid. Rack1 is a key component of various cellular processes inside aphids, while candidate effector genes MpC002 and MpPIntO2 (Mp2) modulate aphid-plant interactions. The gene sequences and functions did not affect RNAi-mediated down-regulation and persistence levels in the aphids. Maximal reduction of gene expression was ~70% and this was achieved at between 4 d and 8 d of exposure of the aphids to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-producing transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana. Moreover, gene expression levels returned to wild-type levels within ~6 d after removal of the aphids from the transgenic plants, indicating that a continuous supply of dsRNA is required to maintain the RNAi effect. Target genes were also down-regulated in nymphs born from mothers exposed to dsRNA-producing transgenic plants, and the RNAi effect lasted twice as long (12-14 d) in these nymphs. Investigations of the impact of RNAi over three generations of aphids revealed that aphids reared on dsMpC002 transgenic plants experienced a 60% decline in aphid reproduction levels compared with a 40% decline of aphids reared on dsRack1 and dsMpPIntO2 plants. In a field setting, a reduction of the aphid reproduction by 40-60% would dramatically decrease aphid population growth, contributing to a substantial reduction in agricultural losses. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  15. Orange oil effect in the control of fennel aphid

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanildo Cavalcanti de Albuquerque; Luciano de Medeiros Pereira Brito; Carlos Henrique de Brito; Edson Batista Lopes; Jacinto de Luna Batista

    2009-01-01

    In the properties where fennel is grown, in the states of Bahia, Sergipe, Pernambuco and Paraiba, at the Northeast of Brazil, a high rate of usage of pesticides in the crop, aiming to control the aphid Hyadaphis foeniculi. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of orange oil Prev-Am (sodium tetraborohydrate decahydrate), in the control of H. foeniculi aphid of the fennel crop. The trial was conducted in a fennel field located in Lagoa Seca Experimental Station, belonging to the ...

  16. Long-term phenological trends, species accumulation rates, aphid traits and climate: five decades of change in migrating aphids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, James R; Alderson, Lynda; Izera, Daniela; Kruger, Tracey; Parker, Sue; Pickup, Jon; Shortall, Chris R; Taylor, Mark S; Verrier, Paul; Harrington, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Aphids represent a significant challenge to food production. The Rothamsted Insect Survey (RIS) runs a network of 12·2-m suction-traps throughout the year to collect migrating aphids. In 2014, the RIS celebrated its 50th anniversary. This paper marks that achievement with an extensive spatiotemporal analysis and the provision of the first British annotated checklist of aphids since 1964. Our main aim was to elucidate mechanisms that advance aphid phenology under climate change and explain these using life-history traits. We then highlight emerging pests using accumulation patterns. Linear and nonlinear mixed-effect models estimated the average rate of change per annum and effects of climate on annual counts, first and last flights and length of flight season since 1965. Two climate drivers were used: the accumulated day degrees above 16 °C (ADD16) indicated the potential for migration during the aphid season; the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) signalled the severity of the winter before migration took place. All 55 species studied had earlier first flight trends at rate of β = -0·611 ± SE 0·015 days year(-1). Of these species, 49% had earlier last flights, but the average species effect appeared relatively stationary (β = -0·010 ± SE 0·022 days year(-1)). Most species (85%) showed increasing duration of their flight season (β = 0·336 ± SE 0·026 days year(-1)), even though only 54% increased their log annual count (β = 0·002 ± SE aphid phenology in a spatiotemporal context. Early in the year when the first aphids were migrating, the effect of the winter NAO was highly significant. Further into the year, ADD16 was a strong predictor. Latitude had a near linear effect on first flights, whereas longitude produced a generally less-clear effect on all responses. Aphids that are anholocyclic (permanently parthenogenetic) or are monoecious (non-host-alternating) were advancing their phenology faster than those that were not

  17. First report of Pandora neoaphidis resting spore formation in vivo in aphid hosts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clara Scorsetti, Ana; Jensen, Annette Bruun; Lopez Lastra, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    The entomopathogenic fungus Pandora neoaphidis is a recognized pathogen of aphids, causes natural epizootics in aphid populations, and interacts and competes with aphid predators and parasitoids. Survival of entomophthoralean fungi in periods of unsuitable weather conditions or lack of appropriat...

  18. Inventory and assessment of foliar natural enemies of the soybean aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae) in South Dakota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesler, Louis S

    2014-06-01

    Soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura) (Hemiptera: Aphididae) is a major pest of soybean in northern production regions of North America, and insecticides have been the primary management approach while alternative methods are developed. Knowledge of arthropod natural enemies and their impact on soybean aphid is critical for developing biological control as a management tool. Soybean is a major field crop in South Dakota, but information about its natural enemies and their impact on soybean aphid is lacking. Thus, this study was conducted in field plots in eastern South Dakota during July and August of 2004 and 2005 to characterize foliar-dwelling, arthropod natural enemies of soybean aphid, and it used exclusion techniques to determine impact of natural enemies and ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) on soybean aphid densities. In open field plots, weekly soybean aphid densities reached a plateau of several hundred aphids per plant in 2004, and peaked at roughly 400 aphids per plant in 2005. Despite these densities, a relatively high frequency of aphid-infested plants lacked arthropod natural enemies. Lady beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) were most abundant, peaking at 90 and 52% of all natural enemies sampled in respective years, and Harmonia axyridis Pallas was the most abundant lady beetle. Green lacewings (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) were abundant in 2005, due mainly to large numbers of their eggs. Abundances of arachnids and coccinellid larvae correlated with soybean aphid densities each year, and chrysopid egg abundance was correlated with aphid density in 2005. Three-week cage treatments of artificially infested soybean plants in 2004 showed that noncaged plants had fewer soybean aphids than caged plants, but abundance of soybean aphid did not differ among open cages and ones that provided partial or total exclusion of natural enemies. In 2005, plants within open cages had fewer soybean aphids than those within cages that excluded natural enemies, and aphid

  19. Parasitoid- and hyperparasitoid-mediated seasonal dynamics of the cabbage aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nematollahi, Mohammad Reza; Fathipour, Yaghoub; Talebi, Ali Asghar; Karimzadeh, Javad; Zalucki, Myron Philip

    2014-12-01

    The population dynamics of the cabbage aphid, Brevicoryne brassicae (L.), its parasitoid, Diaeretiella rapae McIntosh, and hyperparasitoids, Pachyneuron spp., were quantified under field conditions during 2011-2013, by examining synchronization, parasitoid: aphid ratio, possible effect of density on the finite rate of increase, and spatial coincidence. The rates of parasitism and hyperparasitism were based on rearing field-collected mummies and live parasitized aphids, and density of the aphid were estimated using heat extraction and subsampling techniques. Only one parasitoid, D. rapae (80% on average), and two hyperparasitoid species from the genus of Pachyneuron (6.5% on average), namely Pachyneuron aphidis (Bouché) and Pachyneuron groenlandicum (Holmgren), were reared from the aphid mummies. Significant Pearson's time lagged correlations for percentage parasitism versus aphid density and for percentage hyperparasitism versus mummy density indicated that 2-3 wk is needed for D. rapae and Pachyneuron spp. to show impact on their respective host's population. In early spring, the parasitoid: aphid ratio was low (0.11 on average) while aphid density was increasing. Based on Taylor's power law, D. rapae and Pachyneuron spp., as well as B. brassicae, had an aggregated distribution among canola plants. Moreover, a high degree of spatial overlap was found between D. rapae and B. brassicae and between Pachyneuron spp. and D. rapae. In general, the parasitoid had good spatial coincidence with its aphid host but because of a lack of parasitoid-host synchronization and low parasitoid: aphid ratio, impact on the host population was low.

  20. High susceptibility of Bt maize to aphids enhances the performance of parasitoids of lepidopteran pests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina A Faria

    Full Text Available Concerns about possible undesired environmental effects of transgenic crops have prompted numerous evaluations of such crops. So-called Bt crops receive particular attention because they carry bacteria-derived genes coding for insecticidal proteins that might negatively affect non-target arthropods. Here we show a remarkable positive effect of Bt maize on the performance of the corn leaf aphid Rhopalosiphum maidis, which in turn enhanced the performance of parasitic wasps that feed on aphid honeydew. Within five out of six pairs that were evaluated, transgenic maize lines were significantly more susceptible to aphids than their near-isogenic equivalents, with the remaining pair being equally susceptible. The aphids feed from the phloem sieve element content and analyses of this sap in selected maize lines revealed marginally, but significantly higher amino acid levels in Bt maize, which might partially explain the observed increased aphid performance. Larger colony densities of aphids on Bt plants resulted in an increased production of honeydew that can be used as food by beneficial insects. Indeed, Cotesia marginiventris, a parasitoid of lepidopteran pests, lived longer and parasitized more pest caterpillars in the presence of aphid-infested Bt maize than in the presence of aphid-infested isogenic maize. Hence, depending on aphid pest thresholds, the observed increased susceptibility of Bt maize to aphids may be either a welcome or an undesirable side effect.

  1. Host Plants Indirectly Influence Plant Virus Transmission by Altering Gut Cysteine Protease Activity of Aphid Vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Patricia V; Ghanim, Murad; Alexander, Mariko; Rebelo, Ana Rita; Santos, Rogerio S; Orsburn, Benjamin C; Gray, Stewart; Cilia, Michelle

    2017-04-01

    The green peach aphid, Myzus persicae , is a vector of the Potato leafroll virus (PLRV, Luteoviridae), transmitted exclusively by aphids in a circulative manner. PLRV transmission efficiency was significantly reduced when a clonal lineage of M. persicae was reared on turnip as compared with the weed physalis, and this was a transient effect caused by a host-switch response. A trend of higher PLRV titer in physalis-reared aphids as compared with turnip-reared aphids was observed at 24 h and 72 h after virus acquisition. The major difference in the proteomes of these aphids was the up-regulation of predicted lysosomal enzymes, in particular the cysteine protease cathepsin B (cathB), in aphids reared on turnip. The aphid midgut is the site of PLRV acquisition, and cathB and PLRV localization were starkly different in midguts of the aphids reared on the two host plants. In viruliferous aphids that were reared on turnip, there was near complete colocalization of cathB and PLRV at the cell membranes, which was not observed in physalis-reared aphids. Chemical inhibition of cathB restored the ability of aphids reared on turnip to transmit PLRV in a dose-dependent manner, showing that the increased activity of cathB and other cysteine proteases at the cell membrane indirectly decreased virus transmission by aphids. Understanding how the host plant influences virus transmission by aphids is critical for growers to manage the spread of virus among field crops. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Effects of thiamethoxam seed treatments on soybean aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae) feeding behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamm, M D; Heng-Moss, T M; Baxendale, F P; Reese, J C; Siegfried, B D; Hunt, T E; Gaussoin, R E; Blankenship, E E

    2013-12-01

    Since its discovery in North America in 2000, the soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura (Hemiptera: Aphididae), has rapidly become an important pest of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill], sometimes resulting in significant yield losses. Previous research has documented the toxicity of neonicotinoid seed treatments to soybean aphids, but control under field conditions has been inconsistent. Imidacloprid, a popular neonicotinoid insecticide, has been shown to exhibit antifeedant effects on aphids. Antifeedant activity has not been demonstrated for other neonicotinoids, including thiamethoxam. This research investigated the effects of a thiamethoxam seed treatment on soybean aphid feeding behavior by using electronic penetration graphs (EPG) to visualize stylet penetration behavior. Soybean aphid feeding behavior was assessed for 9 h on thiamethoxam-treated and untreated soybeans (V2 and V4 stages). Because results were inconclusive from initial experiments, a study was conducted to document the effects of thiamethoxam-treated soybeans on soybean aphid survival. The seed treatment was shown to negatively affect aphid survival at 4, 8, and 11 d after aphid introduction. A subsequent EPG study then was designed to document soybean aphid feeding behavior for 15 h, after an initial exposure of 9 h to thiamethoxam-treated soybeans. In this study, the exposed aphids exhibited significant differences in feeding behavior compared with those aphids feeding on untreated soybeans. Soybean aphids on thiamethoxam-treated soybeans spent significantly less time feeding in the sieve element phase, with a greater duration of nonprobing events. These studies suggest soybean aphids are unable to ingest phloem sap, which may be another important element in seed treatment protection.

  3. Ecological specialization in Diaeretiella rapae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Aphidiinae) on aphid species from wild and cultivated plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navasse, Y; Derocles, S A P; Plantegenest, M; Le Ralec, A

    2018-04-01

    Diaeretiella rapae is an aphid parasitoid with potential for use in biological control strategies. However, several recent genetic studies have challenged the long held view that it is a generalist parasitoid. We investigated its ecological specialization and ability to use resources in cultivated and uncultivated areas. Ecological specialization would reduce its ability to exploit the diversity of aphid species, particularly in uncultivated areas, and to control pest aphids. Four D. rapae strains were studied, three reared on pest aphids on Brassicaceae and one strain on a non-pest aphid on Chenopodiaceae. For each strain, we performed host-switching experiments, with a total of six aphid species, five of which D. rapae parasitizes in France. We tested cross-breeding ability between strains to detect potential reproductive isolation linked to aphid host species in D. rapae. The strain reared on non-pest aphids was able to develop on aphid species from both cultivated and uncultivated plants. The strains reared on pest aphids, however, exclusively parasitized aphid species on cultivated Brassicaceae. In addition, reproductive isolation was detected between strains from uncultivated and cultivated plants. Thus, the D. rapae populations examined here appear to be showing ecological specialization or they may even be composed of a complex of cryptic species related to the aphid hosts. The role of Chenopodium album as a reservoir for D. rapae, by providing a habitat for non-pest aphids on which it can feed, appears to be severely limited, and thus its efficiency to maintain local populations of D. rapae in the vicinity of crops is questionable.

  4. Contribution of Noncolonizing Aphids to Potato Virus Y Prevalence in Potato in Idaho.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Shaonpius; Wenninger, Erik J; Hutchinson, Pamela J S; Weibe, Monica A; Eigenbrode, Sanford D; Bosque-Pérez, Nilsa A

    2016-12-01

    Potato virus Y (PVY) is a major concern for potato production in the United States given its impact on both crop quality and yield. Although green peach aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer), is the most efficient PVY vector, it may be less abundant in potato-growing areas of Idaho relative to non-potato-colonizing aphid vectors of PVY that may disperse from nearby cereal fields and other crops. A field study was conducted during 2012-2013 to examine if noncolonizing aphids disperse to nearby potato fields as cereal crops dry down before harvest. The aphid fauna was sampled weekly in four different potato fields in south-central and southeastern Idaho using yellow sticky traps and yellow pan traps. Potato fields were chosen with an adjacent cereal field such that the prevailing westerly wind would facilitate aphid dispersal from cereal fields to potato. Non-potato-colonizing aphids sampled included 10 cereal aphid species, the most abundant of which were Rhopalosiphum padi L. and Metopolophium dirhodum (Walker). More than 35 species from noncereal hosts also were found. Overall, green peach aphid abundance was relatively low, ranging from 0.5-2.5% of the total aphid capture between years and among fields. In both years and all locations, cereal aphid abundance peaked in mid- to late July (cereal ripening stage) and decreased thereafter as cereal crops dried. PVY prevalence in the potato fields increased following these increases in aphid abundance. This study suggests that cereal aphids and other noncolonizing aphids are important contributors to PVY prevalence in potato in southern Idaho. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Drought response and genetic diversity in Pisum fulvum, a wild relative of domesticated pea

    OpenAIRE

    Naim-Feil, Erez; Toren, Maya; Aubert, Gregoire; Rubinstein, Mor; Rosen, Ada; Eshed, Ravit; Sherman, Amir; Ophir, Ron; Saranga, Yehoshua; Abbo, Shahal

    2017-01-01

    Productivity of grain crops in semi-arid environments is often affected by drought, which is likely to increase due to predicted climate changes. Wild pea (Pisum fulvum, Pf) accessions sampled across its ecological amplitude in Israel (350-850 mm annual precipitation) were used to assess the genetic diversity for drought responses. We hypothesized that native species evolving under east Mediterranean climate carry adaptive traits to cope with drought stress. Accessions were classified accordi...

  6. Drought response and genetic diversity in Pisum fulvum, a wild relative of domesticated pea

    OpenAIRE

    Naim-Feil, Erez; Toren, Maya; Aubert, Gregoire; Sherman, Amir; Ophir, Ron; Saranga, Yehoshuo; Abbo, Shahal

    2017-01-01

    Productivity of grain crops in semi-arid areas is often affected by drought, which is likely to increase due to climate changes. A collection of 160 wild pea (Pisum fulvum, Pf) accessions was assembled from across its ecological range in Israel (350-850 mm annual precipitation) and used to assess genetic diversity in this taxon. A range of penology and other morpho-physiological traits was documented. We hypothesized that native species evolving under east Mediterranean climate carry adaptive...

  7. Shallot aphids, Myzus ascalonicus, in strawberry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enkegaard, Annie; Sigsgaard, Lene; Kristensen, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    to either inoculative or inundative biocontrol of shallot aphids in strawberry. The three predators studied were the green lacewing, Chrysoperla carnea Steph. (Neuroptera: Chrysopi-dae), the two-spotted lady beetle, Adalia bipunctata L. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), and the gall midge Aphidoletes aphidimyza...

  8. Stability of soybean aphid resistance in soybean across different temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    The soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura, is the most important insect pest posing a threat to soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merr., grain production in the United States. Soybean cultivars with resistance are currently being deployed to aid in management of the pest. Temperature has been reported to ...

  9. Resistance source to cowpea aphid (Aphis craccivora Koch) in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study evaluated the resistance of 7 varieties of the broad bean Vicia faba L. to cowpea aphid, Aphis craccivora Koch, 1854. These landraces from the region of Biskra (in the south of Algeria) were selected in an initial field trial and subjected to further testing in the greenhouse. Landrace V51 proved to be the ...

  10. Presence of the aphid, Chaetosiphon fragaefolii, on strawberry in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cédola, Claudia; Grecob, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    Seasonal abundance of the strawberry aphid complex under different agronomic practices in the outskirts of La Plata, Argentina was studied on strawberry, Fragaria x ananassa Duchesne (Rosales: Rosaceae). Aphid densities were low in strawberry fields in which insecticides and fungicides were used. In addition to Aphis gossypii, Aphis fabae, Mysus persicae and Macrosiphum euphorbiae, the aphid, Chaetosiphon fragaefolii (Cockerell) (Homoptera: Aphididae), was recorded for the first time in this horticultural area. Life history and some demographic parameters were calculated for C. fragaefolii. The mean duration of nymphal stages was 10.44 days, the oviposition period was 11.8 days, and the mean number of nymph/female/day was 2.4 +/- 0.3. Demographic parameters analyzed included the net reproductive rate R(o) = 14.55 +/- 0.096 nymph/female, generation time T=16.91 +/- 0.035 days, and the intrinsic rate of increase r(m) = 0.158 +/- (0.004). No parasites were found associated with C. fragaefolli. The pathogenic fungus, Entomophthora planchoniana Cornu (Zygomycetes: Entomophthorales) was the main mortality factor. Although aphids are not the main pests in strawberry fields, C. fragaefolii can be a serious problem because it can transmit several virus diseases of strawberry. Greater knowledge of life history traits and mortality factors of this species is needed in order to design appropriate control strategies.

  11. Recent characterization of cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Woodiness disease is the most important disorder of passion fruit worldwide. The causal agent in Brazil is the Cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV), and despite the economic relevance of passion fruit for agriculture there have been recently very few studies about this virus in Brazil and worldwide. This work reveals ...

  12. Control of whiteflies and aphids in tomato ( Solanum lycopersicum L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Whitefly (Bemisia tabaci, Homoptera: Aleyrodidae) and aphid (Homoptera) on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) are economically important insect pests that are difficult to manage due to their resistance to a wide range of chemical pesticides. Field experiments were conducted to assess the effects of fermented plant ...

  13. Is the response of aphids to alarm pheromone stable?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Thieme, T.; Dixon, Anthony F. G.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 139, č. 10 (2015), s. 741-746 ISSN 0931-2048 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : (E)-β-farnesene * dropping response * habituation * Leguminosae * pea aphid Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.517, year: 2015

  14. Predator efficiency reconsidered for a ladybird-aphid system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kindlmann, Pavel; Yasuda, H.; Kajita, Y.; Sato, S.; Dixon, Anthony F. G.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 3, mar (2015), s. 27 ISSN 2296-701X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415; GA ČR GB14-36098G Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : biological control * generation time ratio * population dynamics * predator-prey systems * ladybirds * aphids Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  15. Resistance source to cowpea aphid (Aphis craccivora Koch) in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-07-18

    Jul 18, 2008 ... The present study evaluated the resistance of 7 varieties of the broad bean Vicia faba L. to cowpea aphid, Aphis craccivora Koch, 1854. These landraces from the region of Biskra (in the south of Algeria) were selected in an initial field trial and subjected to further testing in the greenhouse. Landrace V51.

  16. Sugarcane aphid spatial distribution in grain sorghum fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorghum is an important summer grain crop in the United States. In 2014, the U.S. produced 432 million bushels of sorghum valued at $1.67 billion on more than 6 million acres. The sugarcane aphid, Melanaphis sacchari (Zehntner), was discovered in damaging numbers in grain sorghum, Sorghum bicolor ...

  17. Enhancement of resistance to aphids by introducing the snowdrop ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The toxicity of GNA-expressing plants to aphids has also been studied. The independently derived plants were subjected to molecular analyses. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern blot analyses confirmed that the gna gene was integrated into maize genome and inherited to the following generations.

  18. Aspects of the Biology of the Carrot Aphid Chomaphis (dysaphis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1958), and often covered with soil. Although C.foeniculus has hitherto not been reported from Uganda, recent observations at. Makerere University Agricultural Research In- stitute, Kabanyolo (MUARIK), suggest that sig- nificant infestation of carrots by the aphid oc- curs in the country. Given this pest potential (a.

  19. Diversity of cereal aphid parasitoids in simple and complex landscapes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollhardt, I.M.G.; Tscharntke, T.; Wackers, F.L.; Bianchi, F.J.J.A.; Thies, C.

    2008-01-01

    Structurally complex landscapes may enhance local species richness and interactions, which is possibly due to a higher species pool in complex landscapes. This hypothesis was tested using cereal aphid parasitoids (Hymenoptera, Aphidiidae) by comparing 12 winter wheat fields in structurally complex

  20. Trichoderma harzianum enhances tomato indirect defense against aphids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, Mariangela; Cascone, Pasquale; Chiusano, Maria Luisa; Colantuono, Chiara; Lorito, Matteo; Pennacchio, Francesco; Rao, Rosa; Woo, Sheridan Lois; Guerrieri, Emilio; Digilio, Maria Cristina

    2017-12-01

    Many fungal root symbionts of the genus Trichoderma are well-known for their beneficial effects on agronomic performance and protection against plant pathogens; moreover, they may enhance protection from insect pests, by triggering plant resistance mechanisms. Defense barriers against insects are induced by the activation of metabolic pathways involved in the production of defense-related plant compounds, either directly active against herbivore insects, or exerting an indirect effect, by increasing the attraction of herbivore natural enemies. In a model system composed of the tomato plant, the aphid Macrosiphum euphorbiae and the parasitoid Aphidius ervi, plant metabolic changes induced by Trichoderma harzianum and their effects on higher trophic levels have been assessed. T. harzianum T22 treatments induce a primed state that upon aphid attacks leads to an increased attraction of aphid parasitoids, mediated by the enhanced production of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are known to induce Aphidius ervi flight. Transcriptome sequencing of T22-treated plants infested by aphids showed a remarkable upregulation of genes involved in terpenoids biosynthesis and salicylic acid pathway, which are consistent with the observed flight response of A. ervi and the VOC bouquet profile underlying this behavioral response. © 2017 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  1. Bird cherry-oat aphid: do we have resistance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird cherry-oat aphid (BCOA), Rhopalosiphum padi (L.), is a highly efficient, non-propagative, persistent vector of the phloem limited leutovirus BYD-PAV. BYD is the most important viral disease of cereal grains in the world and PAV is the most prevalent strain of BYD in North America. Not all BCO...

  2. Local predators attack exotic aphid Brachycaudus divaricatae in Lithuania

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Danilov, J.; Rakauskas, R.; Havelka, Jan; Starý, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 69, č. 2 (2016), s. 263-269 ISSN 1721-8861 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Prunus * Aphids * Brachycaudus divaricatae Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.051, year: 2016 http://www.bulletinofinsectology.org/pdfarticles/vol69-2016-263-269danilov.pdf

  3. Suitability of an artificial diet for rape aphid, Brevicoryne brassicae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-09-15

    Sep 15, 2009 ... discs (a) and artificial diet (b). structure of our testing material and show just the effect of that. The results in this investigation showed that this artificial diet can support all life stages of B. brassicae and this aphid can be established on that. The compare- son of results with life table parameters that Francisco.

  4. Transgenic plants expressing the coat protein gene of cowpea aphid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV) is a potyvirus that infects cowpea causing significant yield reduction. However, there is no durable natural resistance to the virus within the crop and genetic engineering for virus resistance was not possible because of a lack of an efficient, reliable and reproducible cowpea ...

  5. Molecular characterization of aphid resistance in black raspberry germplasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black raspberry is a minor but lucrative crop with most of the acreage in the U.S. found in Oregon. Rapid decline of plantings results from virus infection vectored by the North American large raspberry aphid and is the most limiting factor for growing black raspberry. Existing cultivars are suscept...

  6. Plant-generated artificial small RNAs mediated aphid resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyan Guo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: RNA silencing is an important mechanism for regulation of endogenous gene expression and defense against genomic intruders in plants. This natural defense system was adopted to generate virus-resistant plants even before the mechanism of RNA silencing was unveiled. With the clarification of that mechanism, transgenic antiviral plants were developed that expressed artificial virus-specific hairpin RNAs (hpRNAs or microRNAs (amiRNAs in host plants. Previous works also showed that plant-mediated RNA silencing technology could be a practical method for constructing insect-resistant plants by expressing hpRNAs targeting essential genes of insects. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we chose aphid Myzus persicae of order Hemiptera as a target insect. To screen for aphid genes vulnerable to attack by plant-mediated RNA silencing to establish plant aphid resistance, we selected nine genes of M. persicae as silencing targets, and constructed their hpRNA-expressing vectors. For the acetylcholinesterase 2 coding gene (MpAChE2, two amiRNA-expressing vectors were also constructed. The vectors were transformed into tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanti. Insect challenge assays showed that most of the transgenic plants gained aphid resistance, among which those expressing hpRNAs targeting V-type proton ATPase subunit E-like (V-ATPaseE or tubulin folding cofactor D (TBCD genes displayed stronger aphicidal activity. The transgenic plants expressing amiRNAs targeting two different sites in the MpAChE2 gene exhibited better aphid resistance than the plants expressing MpAChE2-specific hpRNA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicated that plant-mediated insect-RNA silencing might be an effective way to develop plants resistant to insects with piercing-sucking mouthparts, and both the selection of vulnerable target genes and the biogenetic type of the small RNAs were crucial for the effectiveness of aphid control. The expression of

  7. Transcriptomic responses of the aphid Myzus persicae nicotianae Blackman (Hemiptera: Aphididae to insecticides: Analyses in the single Chilean clone of the tobacco aphid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Cabrera-Brandt

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The tobacco aphid Myzus persicae nicotianae Blackman is a subspecies of the highly polyphagous and agricultural pest Myzus persicae (Sulzer. For its control, insecticide applications are widely used, but resistance to numerous molecules has been reported, displaying at least three insecticide resistance mechanisms, including: (i elevated carboxylesterases (E-Carb, (ii modification of the acetylcholinesterase (MACE, and (iii kdr and super-kdr insensitivity mutations. In Chile, populations of the tobacco aphid are characterized by the presence of a single predominant clone, which is also present in high proportions in other countries of the Americas. This aphid clone exhibits low levels of carboxylesterase activity and is kdr susceptible, but the MACE mechanism of insecticide resistance has not been studied. In order to characterize the tobacco aphid in terms of the MACE mechanism and to identify a preliminary group of aphid genes putatively involved in insecticide resistance, a cDNA microarray was used to study the transcriptomic responses when aphids are sprayed with a carbamate insecticide. The single Chilean clone of the tobacco aphid was characterized as MACE susceptible, but we found 38 transcripts significantly regulated by insecticide exposure (13 up- and 25 down-regulated genes. The expression of six of them was validated by qRT-PCR experiments at several time points (6, 12, 18, 24, 30, 36, and 42 h after insecticide application. This mutational and transcriptomic characterization of the tobacco aphid responding to insecticide spray opens new hypotheses in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying insecticide resistance.

  8. Ant mimicry by an aphid parasitoid, Lysiphlebus fabarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasekh, Arash; Michaud, J P; Kharazi-Pakdel, Aziz; Allahyari, Hossein

    2010-01-01

    In Iran, Lysiphlebus fabarum (Marshall) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Aphidiinae) is a uniparental parasitoid of the black bean aphid, Aphis fabae Scopoli (Hemiptera: Aphididae), that possesses various highly evolved adaptations for foraging within ant-tended aphid colonies. Direct observations and video recordings were used to analyze the behavior of individual females foraging for A. fabae on bean leaf disks in open arenas in the laboratory. Females exploited aphids as hosts and as a source of food, allocating within-patch time as follows: resting - 10.4%, grooming - 8.2%, searching - 11.5%, antennation (host recognition) - 7.5%, antennation (honeydew solicitation mimicking ants) - 31.9%, abdominal bending (attack preparation) 19.7%, probing with the ovipositor (attack) - 10.8%. The mean handling time for each aphid encountered was 2.0 ± 0.5 min. Females encountered an average of 47.4 ± 6.4 aphids per hour, but laid only 1.2 eggs per hour. The ovipositor insertion time for parasitism ranged from 2 sec to longer than a minute, but most insertions did not result in an egg being laid. A. fabae defensive behaviors included kicking, raising and swiveling the body, and attempts to smear the attacker with cornicle secretions, sometimes with lethal results. Food deprivation for 4-6 h prior to testing increased the frequency of ant mimcry by L. fabarum. Females also used ant-like antennation to reduce A. fabae defensive behavior, e.g. the frequency of kicking. L. fabarum attacks primed A. fabae to be more responsive to subsequent honeydew solicitation, such that experienced females improved their feeding success by alternating between the roles of parasitoid and ant mimic. These results reveal the possibility for mutualisms to evolve between L. fabarum and the ant species that tend A. fabae, since L. fabarum receive ant protection for their progeny and may benefit the ants by improving A. fabae responsiveness to honeydew solicitation.

  9. High throughput phenotyping for aphid resistance in large plant collections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phloem-feeding insects are among the most devastating pests worldwide. They not only cause damage by feeding from the phloem, thereby depleting the plant from photo-assimilates, but also by vectoring viruses. Until now, the main way to prevent such problems is the frequent use of insecticides. Applying resistant varieties would be a more environmental friendly and sustainable solution. For this, resistant sources need to be identified first. Up to now there were no methods suitable for high throughput phenotyping of plant germplasm to identify sources of resistance towards phloem-feeding insects. Results In this paper we present a high throughput screening system to identify plants with an increased resistance against aphids. Its versatility is demonstrated using an Arabidopsis thaliana activation tag mutant line collection. This system consists of the green peach aphid Myzus persicae (Sulzer and the circulative virus Turnip yellows virus (TuYV. In an initial screening, with one plant representing one mutant line, 13 virus-free mutant lines were identified by ELISA. Using seeds produced from these lines, the putative candidates were re-evaluated and characterized, resulting in nine lines with increased resistance towards the aphid. Conclusions This M. persicae-TuYV screening system is an efficient, reliable and quick procedure to identify among thousands of mutated lines those resistant to aphids. In our study, nine mutant lines with increased resistance against the aphid were selected among 5160 mutant lines in just 5 months by one person. The system can be extended to other phloem-feeding insects and circulative viruses to identify insect resistant sources from several collections, including for example genebanks and artificially prepared mutant collections.

  10. A survey of aphid parasitoids (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Aphidiinae) of Southeastern Europe and their aphid-plant associations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kavallieratos, N. G.; Tomanovic, K.; Starý, Petr; Athanassiou, CH. G.; Sarlis, G. P.; Petrovic, O.; Niketic, M.; Veroniki, M. A.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 3 (2004), s. 527-563 ISSN 0003-6862 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA6007106; GA AV ČR IBS5007102 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5007907 Keywords : Aphidiinae * parasitoid -aphid-plant associations * faunistic complexes Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.448, year: 2004

  11. Dicty_cDB: SLA124 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FP_125701 Acyrthosiphon pisum, Pea Aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum cDNA clone WHAP020_G...AA22DB11 5', mRNA sequence. 202 2e-49 2 CF588057 |CF588057.1 USDA-FP_121200-058 Acyrthosiphon pisum, Pea Aphid...86814 |CN586814.1 USDA-FP_129886 Acyrthosiphon pisum, Pea Aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum cDNA clone WHAP090_B10,

  12. Arabidopsis thaliana - Myzus persicae interaction: shaping the understanding of plant defense against phloem-feeding aphids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe eLouis

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The phloem provides a unique niche for several organisms. Aphids are a large group of Hemipteran insects that utilize stylets present in their mouthparts to pierce sieve elements and drink large volumes of phloem sap. In addition, many aphids also vector viral diseases. Myzus persicae, commonly known as the green peach aphid (GPA, is an important pest of a large variety of plants that includes Arabidopsis thaliana. This review summarizes recent studies that have exploited the compatible interaction between Arabidopsis and GPA to understand the molecular and physiological mechanisms utilized by plants to control aphid infestation, as well as genes and mechanisms that contribute to susceptibility. In addition, recent efforts to identify aphid-delivered elicitors of plant defenses and novel aphid salivary components that facilitate infestation are also discussed.

  13. Role of the aphid species and their feeding locations in parasitization behavior of Aphelinus abdominalis, a parasitoid of the lettuce aphid Nasonovia ribisnigri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Govinda; Skovgård, Henrik; Reddy, Gadi V. P.; Steenberg, Tove; Enkegaard, Annie

    2017-01-01

    Aphid species feeding on lettuce occupy distinct feeding sites: the lettuce aphid Nasonovia ribisnigri prefers to feed on heart leaves, whereas the potato aphid Macrosiphum euphorbiae feeds only on outer leaves. The aphid parasitoid Aphelinus abdominalis, known to be able to regulate M. euphorbiae on many crops, has recently been indicated as a promising biocontrol candidate also for use against N. ribisnigri, a major pest of lettuce. This study therefore examined A. abdominalis parasitization preference between N. ribisnigri and M. euphorbiae and its ability to parasitize aphids feeding on different parts of lettuce plants. In addition, life history traits of A. abdominalis on these aphid species were investigated. In no-choice laboratory experiments on leaf discs and 24 h exposure, A. abdominalis successfully parasitized 54% and 60% of the offered N. ribisnigri and M. euphorbiae, respectively, with no significant difference. In the corresponding choice experiment, however, A. abdominalis had a tendency for a significantly higher preference for M. euphorbiae (38%) compared to N. ribisnigri (30%). Growth chamber experiments on whole plants demonstrated that A. abdominalis was able to parasitize aphids, regardless of their feeding locations on lettuce plants. However, aphid feeding behavior had a significant effect on the parasitization rate. A. abdominalis parasitized significantly higher percentages of M. euphorbiae or N. ribisnigri when aphids were exposed separately to parasitoids on whole lettuce plants as compared with N. ribisnigri exposed only on heart leaf. A significant preference of A. abdominalis for M. euphorbiae compared to N. ribisnigri was also observed in the growth chamber choice experiment. A high percentage of adult emergence (> 84%) and female-biased sex ratio (> 83%) were found irrespective of the aphid species. PMID:28854232

  14. Role of the aphid species and their feeding locations in parasitization behavior of Aphelinus abdominalis, a parasitoid of the lettuce aphid Nasonovia ribisnigri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Govinda; Skovgård, Henrik; Reddy, Gadi V P; Steenberg, Tove; Enkegaard, Annie

    2017-01-01

    Aphid species feeding on lettuce occupy distinct feeding sites: the lettuce aphid Nasonovia ribisnigri prefers to feed on heart leaves, whereas the potato aphid Macrosiphum euphorbiae feeds only on outer leaves. The aphid parasitoid Aphelinus abdominalis, known to be able to regulate M. euphorbiae on many crops, has recently been indicated as a promising biocontrol candidate also for use against N. ribisnigri, a major pest of lettuce. This study therefore examined A. abdominalis parasitization preference between N. ribisnigri and M. euphorbiae and its ability to parasitize aphids feeding on different parts of lettuce plants. In addition, life history traits of A. abdominalis on these aphid species were investigated. In no-choice laboratory experiments on leaf discs and 24 h exposure, A. abdominalis successfully parasitized 54% and 60% of the offered N. ribisnigri and M. euphorbiae, respectively, with no significant difference. In the corresponding choice experiment, however, A. abdominalis had a tendency for a significantly higher preference for M. euphorbiae (38%) compared to N. ribisnigri (30%). Growth chamber experiments on whole plants demonstrated that A. abdominalis was able to parasitize aphids, regardless of their feeding locations on lettuce plants. However, aphid feeding behavior had a significant effect on the parasitization rate. A. abdominalis parasitized significantly higher percentages of M. euphorbiae or N. ribisnigri when aphids were exposed separately to parasitoids on whole lettuce plants as compared with N. ribisnigri exposed only on heart leaf. A significant preference of A. abdominalis for M. euphorbiae compared to N. ribisnigri was also observed in the growth chamber choice experiment. A high percentage of adult emergence (> 84%) and female-biased sex ratio (> 83%) were found irrespective of the aphid species.

  15. Role of the aphid species and their feeding locations in parasitization behavior of Aphelinus abdominalis, a parasitoid of the lettuce aphid Nasonovia ribisnigri.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govinda Shrestha

    Full Text Available Aphid species feeding on lettuce occupy distinct feeding sites: the lettuce aphid Nasonovia ribisnigri prefers to feed on heart leaves, whereas the potato aphid Macrosiphum euphorbiae feeds only on outer leaves. The aphid parasitoid Aphelinus abdominalis, known to be able to regulate M. euphorbiae on many crops, has recently been indicated as a promising biocontrol candidate also for use against N. ribisnigri, a major pest of lettuce. This study therefore examined A. abdominalis parasitization preference between N. ribisnigri and M. euphorbiae and its ability to parasitize aphids feeding on different parts of lettuce plants. In addition, life history traits of A. abdominalis on these aphid species were investigated. In no-choice laboratory experiments on leaf discs and 24 h exposure, A. abdominalis successfully parasitized 54% and 60% of the offered N. ribisnigri and M. euphorbiae, respectively, with no significant difference. In the corresponding choice experiment, however, A. abdominalis had a tendency for a significantly higher preference for M. euphorbiae (38% compared to N. ribisnigri (30%. Growth chamber experiments on whole plants demonstrated that A. abdominalis was able to parasitize aphids, regardless of their feeding locations on lettuce plants. However, aphid feeding behavior had a significant effect on the parasitization rate. A. abdominalis parasitized significantly higher percentages of M. euphorbiae or N. ribisnigri when aphids were exposed separately to parasitoids on whole lettuce plants as compared with N. ribisnigri exposed only on heart leaf. A significant preference of A. abdominalis for M. euphorbiae compared to N. ribisnigri was also observed in the growth chamber choice experiment. A high percentage of adult emergence (> 84% and female-biased sex ratio (> 83% were found irrespective of the aphid species.

  16. Impacts of thiamethoxam seed treatment and host plant resistance on the soybean aphid fungal pathogen, Pandora neoaphidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Karrie A; Ragsdale, David W

    2011-12-01

    Since the introduction of soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura, from Asia, insecticide use in soybean has increased substantially in the north central United States. Insecticide seed treatments and aphid resistant soybean varieties are management tactics that may reduce reliance on foliar applications of broad-spectrum insecticides. Exploring potential nontarget impacts of these technologies will be an important step in incorporating them into aphid management programs. We investigated impacts of thiamethoxam seed treatment and Rag1 aphid resistant soybean on a fungal pathogen of soybean aphid, Pandora neoaphidis (Remaudière & Hennebert) Humber, via open plot and cage studies. We found that although thiamethoxam seed treatment did significantly lower aphid pressure in open plots compared with an untreated control, this reduction in aphid density translated into nonsignificant decreases in fungal disease prevalence in aphids. Furthermore, when aphid densities were approximately equal in seed treated and untreated soybean, no impact on aphid fungal disease was observed. In open plots, Rag1 resistant soybean experienced lower aphid pressure and aphid disease prevalence compared with a nonresistant isoline. However, in cages when aphid densities were equivalent in both resistant and susceptible soybean, resistance had no impact on aphid disease prevalence. The addition of thiamethoxam seed treatment to resistant soybean yielded aphid densities and aphid disease prevalence similar to untreated, resistant soybean. These studies provide evidence that thiamethoxam seed treatments and Rag1 resistance can impact P. neoaphidis via decreased aphid densities; however, this impact is minimal, implying use of seed treatments and host plant resistance are compatible with P. neoaphidis.

  17. Abyssnian pea (Lathyrus schaeferi Kosterin pro Pisum abyssinicum A. Br. – a problematic taxon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. E. Kosterin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This is an English translation of a paper published in Russian (but with proper Latin formulations at taxonomical novelties to make them validly published on March 15, 2017 in Vavilov Journal of Genetics and Plant Breeding, Vol. 22 (2: 158-169. The Abyssinian pea (Pisum abyssinicum A. Br., concerned in this review, is known from Ethiopia and Yemen, where it is cultivated along with the common pea (Pisum sativum L. subsp. sativum. The continuously reproduced notion of its possible spontaneous occurrence in the wild ascends to suppositions made in the XIX century and is not based on any actual data. P. abyssinicum is of practical interest owing to its extra early ripening and resistance to bacterial blight. Morphologically it is very similar to P. sativum but its crossability with it is bad as either seed or pollen parent. Traditionally this reproductive barrier was associated with karyological differences. The Abyssinian pea karyotype is variable as 1–2 reciprocal translocations were reported. At the same time there are accessions not differing from the standard karyotype of P. sativum with respect to reciprocal translocations, yet their crossability with the latter is very low and the pollen fertility of F1 and F2 hybrids is lowered. Data were reported on influence of the region of Linkage Group III, containing a gene known to participate in the conflict of nucleus and plastids in remote crosses of peas, on the pollen fertility of hybrids with abyssinian pea. With their karyological variability, the known accessions of the Abyssinian pea are very close to each other genetically, as they diverged just about 4 000 years ago. The presence of alleles of molecular markers common with Pisum fulvum Sibth. et Smith on the one hand and with P. sativum L. subsp. elatius (Bieb. Schmalh. on the other hand evidences in favour of an old hypotheses by L.I. Govorov that the Abyssinian pea originated from their spontaneous hybrid. This spontaneous cross may

  18. Aphid secondary symbionts do not affect prey attractiveness to two species of predatory lady beetles

    OpenAIRE

    Kovacs, Jennifer L.; Wolf, Candice; Voisin, Den?; Wolf, Seth

    2017-01-01

    Heritable symbionts have been found to mediate interactions between host species and their natural enemies in a variety of organisms. Aphids, their facultative symbionts, and their potential fitness effects have been particularly well-studied. For example, the aphid facultative symbiont Regiella can protect its host from infection from a fungal pathogen, and aphids with Hamiltonella are less likely to be parasitized by parasitic wasps. Recent work has also found there to be negative fitness e...

  19. Potential Overwintering Locations of Soybean Aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae) Colonizing Soybean in Ohio and Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossley, Michael S; Hogg, David B

    2015-04-01

    Soybean aphids, Aphis glycines Matsumura, depend on long-distance, wind-aided dispersal to complete their life cycle. Despite our general understanding of soybean aphid biology, little is explicitly known about dispersal of soybean aphids between winter and summer hosts in North America. This study compared genotypic diversity of soybean aphids sampled from several overwintering locations in the Midwest and soybean fields in Ohio and Wisconsin to test the hypothesis that these overwintering locations are sources of the soybean colonists. In addition, air parcel trajectory analyses were used to demonstrate the potential for long-distance dispersal events to occur to or from these overwintering locations. Results suggest that soybean aphids from overwintering locations along the Illinois-Iowa border and northern Indiana-Ohio are potential colonists of soybean in Ohio and Wisconsin, but that Ohio is also colonized by soybean aphids from other unknown overwintering locations. Soybean aphids in Ohio and Wisconsin exhibit a small degree of population structure that is not associated with the locations of soybean fields in which they occur, but that may be related to specific overwintering environments, multiple introductions to North America, or spatial variation in aphid phenology. There may be a limited range of suitable habitat for soybean aphid overwintering, in which case management of soybean aphids may be more effective at their overwintering sites. Further research efforts should focus on discovering more overwintering locations of soybean aphid in North America, and the relative impact of short- and long-distance dispersal events on soybean aphid population dynamics. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Impact of fertilization and granular insecticides on the incidence of tobacco aphid, myzus persicae (sulz)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razaq, A.; Hussain, N.; Khalil, S.K.; Alamzeb

    1989-01-01

    Field studies were conducted on the control of tobacco aphid, Myzus persicase (Sulz) with four granular insecticides, viz, Furadan 3% G, Diazinon 5% g, Thiodan 5% g and Larsban 5% g, with and without NPK fertilization. The aphid population was significantly higher in the fertilized plots compared to the non-fertilized ones. All the four insecticides significantly reduced the aphids density compared to the check. Furada 3% gave best results for the control of this pest. (author)

  1. Sugarcane Aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae): A New Pest on Sorghum in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowling, Robert D; Brewer, Michael J; Kerns, David L; Gordy, John; Seiter, Nick; Elliott, Norman E; Buntin, G David; Way, M O; Royer, T A; Biles, Stephen; Maxson, Erin

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, the sugarcane aphid, Melanaphis sacchari (Zehntner) (Hemiptera: Aphididae), a new invasive pest of sorghum species in North America, was confirmed on sorghum in 4 states and 38 counties in the United States. In 2015, the aphid was reported on sorghum in 17 states and over 400 counties as well as all sorghum-producing regions in Mexico. Ability to overwinter on living annual and perennial hosts in southern sorghum-producing areas and wind-aided movement of alate aphids appear to be the main factors in its impressive geographic spread in North America. Morphological characteristics of the sugarcane aphid include dark tarsi, cornicles, and antennae, allowing easy differentiation from other aphids on the crop. Sugarcane aphid damages sorghum by removing sap and covering plants with honeydew, causing general plant decline and yield loss. Honeydew and sooty mold can disrupt harvesting. The aphid's high reproductive rate on susceptible sorghum hybrids has resulted in reports of yield loss ranging from 10% to greater than 50%. In response, a combination of research-based data and field observations has supported development of state extension identification, scouting, and treatment guides that aid in initiating insecticide applications to prevent yield losses. Highly efficacious insecticides have been identified and when complemented by weekly scouting and use of thresholds, economic loss by sugarcane aphid can be minimized. Some commercial sorghum hybrids are partially resistant to the aphid, and plant breeders have identified other lines with sugarcane aphid resistance. A very diverse community of predators and parasitoids of sugarcane aphid has been identified, and their value to limit sugarcane aphid population growth is under investigation.

  2. Host Preference between Symbiotic and Aposymbiotic Aphis fabae, by the Aphid Parasitoid, Lysiphlebus ambiguus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Rui-Xia; Meng, Ling; Mills, Nickolas J; Li, Baoping

    2011-01-01

    Few empirical studies have directly explored the association between Buchnera aphidicola (Enterobacteriales: Enterobacteriaceae), the primary endosymbiont of aphids, and the life history strategies of aphid parasitoids. A series of paired-choice experiments were conducted to explore the preference of the parasitoid Lysiphlebus ambiguus Halliday (Hymenoptera: Aphididae) for symbiotic and aposymbiotic Aphis fabae Scopoli (Hemiptera: Aphididae) and the suitability of these hosts for parasitoid development. When given a choice between symbiotic and aposymbiotic aphids of the same instar, the parasitoid significantly preferred symbiotic over aposymbiotic aphids only during the later instars (L4 and adult). The suitability of aposymbiotic aphids for parasitoid development was equal to that of symbiotic aphids in terms of survivorship and sex ratio, but was significantly lower than that of symbiotic aphids for L4 and adult instars in development rate and/or female adult size. When given a choice between similar-sized symbiotic L2 and aposymbiotic L4 aphids, the parasitoid preferred the former. No significant differences in preference or host suitability were demonstrated when the parasitoid was given a choice between different instars of aposymbiotic aphids. While parasitoid lifetime fecundity increased with aphid instar at the time of oviposition, there was no significant influence of previous development from symbiotic versus aposymbiotic aphids. These results suggest that while L. ambiguus can discriminate between symbiotic and aposymbiotic A. fabae during later instars and when the aphids are of a similar size, the primary endosymbiont is not needed for successful parasitoid development; and its absence only compromises parasitoid growth reared from later instar aposymbiotic host. PMID:21870967

  3. Aphids (Homoptera, Aphidodea inhabiting the trees Crataegus x media Bechst. in the urban green area. Part II. Domination and frequency of aphids, their enemies and the damage caused by aphids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Sławińska

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The studies were conducted in Lublin in the years 1999-2001 in two sites (street and park ones on the trees Crataegus x inedia Bechst. The purpose was to determine the domination and frequency of particular aphid species, their effect on the decorative character of plants as well as the occurrence of the aphidophagous in aphid colonies. It was found out that A. pomi was the dominating species in both sites. The decorative character of the studied trees was lowered by aphids A. pomi and aphids from the genus Dysaphis. Aphids from the genus Dysaphis also caused changes in the chemical composition of the injured plant parts. The presence of predatory arthropods was observed in aphid colonies occurring on hawthorn. The most numerous of these were the larvae of Syrphidae and Coccinellidae. The culture of parasitized aphids gave numerous flights of parasitoids and hyperparasitoids. Greater number of both predators and parasitoids of I and II grades were observed in the street site as compared to the park site.

  4. Ecological effects of aphid abundance, genotypic variation, and contemporary evolution on plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turley, Nash E; Johnson, Marc T J

    2015-07-01

    Genetic variation and contemporary evolution within populations can shape the strength and nature of species interactions, but the relative importance of these forces compared to other ecological factors is unclear. We conducted a field experiment testing the effects of genotypic variation, abundance, and presence/absence of green peach aphids (Myzus persicae) on the growth, leaf nitrogen, and carbon of two plant species (Brassica napus and Solanum nigrum). Aphid genotype affected B. napus but not S. nigrum biomass explaining 20 and 7% of the total variation, respectively. Averaging across both plant species, the presence/absence of aphids had a 1.6× larger effect size (Cohen's d) than aphid genotype, and aphid abundance had the strongest negative effects on plant biomass explaining 29% of the total variation. On B. napus, aphid genotypes had different effects on leaf nitrogen depending on their abundance. Aphids did not influence leaf nitrogen in S. nigrum nor leaf carbon in either species. We conducted a second experiment in the field to test whether contemporary evolution could affect plant performance. Aphid populations evolved in as little as five generations, but the rate and direction of this evolution did not consistently vary between plant species. On one host species (B. napus), faster evolving populations had greater negative effects on host plant biomass, with aphid evolutionary rate explaining 23% of the variation in host plant biomass. Together, these results show that genetic variation and evolution in an insect herbivore can play important roles in shaping host plant ecology.

  5. Aphid secondary symbionts do not affect prey attractiveness to two species of predatory lady beetles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Kovacs

    Full Text Available Heritable symbionts have been found to mediate interactions between host species and their natural enemies in a variety of organisms. Aphids, their facultative symbionts, and their potential fitness effects have been particularly well-studied. For example, the aphid facultative symbiont Regiella can protect its host from infection from a fungal pathogen, and aphids with Hamiltonella are less likely to be parasitized by parasitic wasps. Recent work has also found there to be negative fitness effects for the larvae of two species of aphidophagous lady beetles that consumed aphids with facultative symbionts. In both species, larvae that consumed aphids with secondary symbionts were significantly less likely to survive to adulthood. In this study we tested whether adult Harmonia axyridis and Hippodamia convergens lady beetles avoided aphids with symbionts in a series of choice experiments. Adults of both lady beetle species were as likely to choose aphids with symbionts as those without, despite the potential negative fitness effects associated with consuming aphids with facultative symbionts. This may suggest that under natural conditions aphid secondary symbionts are not a significant source of selection for predatory lady beetles.

  6. Aphid secondary symbionts do not affect prey attractiveness to two species of predatory lady beetles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Candice; Voisin, Dené; Wolf, Seth

    2017-01-01

    Heritable symbionts have been found to mediate interactions between host species and their natural enemies in a variety of organisms. Aphids, their facultative symbionts, and their potential fitness effects have been particularly well-studied. For example, the aphid facultative symbiont Regiella can protect its host from infection from a fungal pathogen, and aphids with Hamiltonella are less likely to be parasitized by parasitic wasps. Recent work has also found there to be negative fitness effects for the larvae of two species of aphidophagous lady beetles that consumed aphids with facultative symbionts. In both species, larvae that consumed aphids with secondary symbionts were significantly less likely to survive to adulthood. In this study we tested whether adult Harmonia axyridis and Hippodamia convergens lady beetles avoided aphids with symbionts in a series of choice experiments. Adults of both lady beetle species were as likely to choose aphids with symbionts as those without, despite the potential negative fitness effects associated with consuming aphids with facultative symbionts. This may suggest that under natural conditions aphid secondary symbionts are not a significant source of selection for predatory lady beetles. PMID:28880922

  7. Aphid secondary symbionts do not affect prey attractiveness to two species of predatory lady beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Jennifer L; Wolf, Candice; Voisin, Dené; Wolf, Seth

    2017-01-01

    Heritable symbionts have been found to mediate interactions between host species and their natural enemies in a variety of organisms. Aphids, their facultative symbionts, and their potential fitness effects have been particularly well-studied. For example, the aphid facultative symbiont Regiella can protect its host from infection from a fungal pathogen, and aphids with Hamiltonella are less likely to be parasitized by parasitic wasps. Recent work has also found there to be negative fitness effects for the larvae of two species of aphidophagous lady beetles that consumed aphids with facultative symbionts. In both species, larvae that consumed aphids with secondary symbionts were significantly less likely to survive to adulthood. In this study we tested whether adult Harmonia axyridis and Hippodamia convergens lady beetles avoided aphids with symbionts in a series of choice experiments. Adults of both lady beetle species were as likely to choose aphids with symbionts as those without, despite the potential negative fitness effects associated with consuming aphids with facultative symbionts. This may suggest that under natural conditions aphid secondary symbionts are not a significant source of selection for predatory lady beetles.

  8. Aphid Infestation Increases Fusarium langsethiae and T-2 and HT-2 Mycotoxins in Wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakulic, Jassy; Ajigboye, Olubukola; Swarup, Ranjan; Bruce, Toby; Ray, Rumiana V

    2016-11-15

    Fusarium langsethiae is a fungal pathogen of cereal crops that is an increasing problem in northern Europe, but much of its epidemiology is poorly understood. The species produces the mycotoxins T-2 and HT-2, which are highly toxic. It was hypothesized that grain aphids, Sitobion avenae, may transmit F. langsethiae inoculum between wheat plants, and a series of transmission experiments and volatile chemical analyses was performed to test this. Manual translocation of aphids from inoculated to uninfected hosts resulted in pathogen DNA accumulation in hosts. However, the free movement of wingless aphids from infected to healthy plants did not. The addition of winged aphids reared on F. langsethiae-inoculated wheat seedlings to wheat plants also did not achieve successful pathogen transfer. While our data suggested that aphid transmission of the pathogen was not very efficient, we observed an increase in disease when aphids were present. After seedling inoculation, an increase in pathogen DNA accumulation in seedling leaves was observed upon treatment with aphids. Furthermore, the presence of aphids on wheat plants with F. langsethiae-inoculated ears not only led to a rise in the amount of F. langsethiae DNA in infected grain but also to an increase in the concentrations of T-2 and HT-2 toxins, with more than 3-fold higher toxin levels than diseased plants without aphids. This work highlights that aphids increase the susceptibility of wheat host plants to F. langsethiae and that aphid infestation is a risk factor for accumulating increased levels of T-2 and HT-2 in wheat products. Fusarium langsethiae is shown here to cause increased contamination levels of grain with toxins produced by fungus when aphids share the host plant. This effect has also recently been demonstrated with Fusarium graminearum, yet the two fungal species show stark differences in their effect on aphid populations. In both cases, aphids improve the ability of the pathogens to cause and initiate

  9. Comparative transcriptomics and proteomics of three different aphid species identifies core and diverse effector sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Peter; Cock, Peter J A; Bos, Jorunn

    2016-03-02

    Aphids are phloem-feeding insects that cause significant economic losses to agriculture worldwide. While feeding and probing these insects deliver molecules, called effectors, inside their host to enable infestation. The identification and characterization of these effectors from different species that vary in their host range is an important step in understanding the infestation success of aphids and aphid host range variation. This study employs a multi-disciplinary approach based on transcriptome sequencing and proteomics to identify and compare effector candidates from the broad host range aphid Myzus persicae (green peach aphid) (genotypes O, J and F), and narrow host range aphids Myzus cerasi (black cherry aphid) and Rhopalosiphum padi (bird-cherry oat aphid). Using a combination of aphid transcriptome sequencing on libraries derived from head versus body tissues as well as saliva proteomics we were able to predict candidate effectors repertoires from the different aphid species and genotypes. Among the identified conserved or core effector sets, we identified a significant number of previously identified aphid candidate effectors indicating these proteins may be involved in general infestation strategies. Moreover, we identified aphid candidate effector sequences that were specific to one species, which are interesting candidates for further validation and characterization with regards to species-specific functions during infestation. We assessed our candidate effector repertoires for evidence of positive selection, and identified 49 candidates with DN/DS ratios >1. We noted higher rates of DN/DS ratios in predicted aphid effectors than non-effectors. Whether this reflects positive selection due to co-evolution with host plants, or increased neofunctionalization upon gene duplication remains to be investigated. Our work provides a comprehensive overview of the candidate effector repertoires from three different aphid species with varying host ranges

  10. First survey on ecological host range of aphid pathogenic fungi (Phylum Entomophthoromycota) in Tunisia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ben Fekih, Ibtissem; Boukhris-Bouhachem, Sonia; Allagui, Mohamed Bechir

    2015-01-01

    Summary. The natural occurrence of fungal pathogens of aphids and their ecological host range was investigated in Tunisia from 2009 to 2012. The survey focused on aphid infesting different crops and weeds and included 10 different aphid species. Samples were collected from eight agricultural crops...... C. obscurus and N. fresenii were sporadically present on a limited number of aphid species. This study is the first survey on ecological host range of entomophthoralean fungi in Tunisia, and the first documentation of C. obscurus and N. fresenii to occur in Tunisia and Maghreb Region....

  11. A dietary test of putative deleterious sterols for the aphid Myzus persicae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvaine, Sophie; Faure, Marie-Line; Grebenok, Robert J; Behmer, Spencer T; Douglas, Angela E

    2014-01-01

    The aphid Myzus persicae displays high mortality on tobacco plants bearing a transgene which results in the accumulation of the ketosteroids cholestan-3-one and cholest-4-en-3-one in the phloem sap. To test whether the ketosteroids are the basis of the plant resistance to the aphids, M. persicae were reared on chemically-defined diets with different steroid contents at 0.1-10 µg ml(-1). Relative to sterol-free diet and dietary supplements of the two ketosteroids and two phytosterols, dietary cholesterol significantly extended aphid lifespan and increased fecundity at one or more dietary concentrations tested. Median lifespan was 50% lower on the diet supplemented with cholest-4-en-3-one than on the cholesterol-supplemented diet. Aphid feeding rate did not vary significantly across the treatments, indicative of no anti-feedant effect of any sterol/steroid. Aphids reared on diets containing equal amounts of cholesterol and cholest-4-en-3-one showed fecundity equivalent to aphids on diets containing only cholesterol. Aphids were reared on diets that reproduced the relative steroid abundance in the phloem sap of the control and modified tobacco plants, and their performance on the two diet formulations was broadly equivalent. We conclude that, at the concentrations tested, plant ketosteroids support weaker aphid performance than cholesterol, but do not cause acute toxicity to the aphids. In plants, the ketosteroids may act synergistically with plant factors absent from artificial diets but are unlikely to be solely responsible for resistance of modified tobacco plants.

  12. Chemical and physiological changes caused by aphids feeding on their host plants*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cichocka Elżbieta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We present significant information about damage caused to plants by the feeding of piercing–sucking insects, based on the example of aphids. Research concerning the impact of aphids on their host plants was already being carried out in the 1950s in the 20th century, but it is still being undertaken as it is very important. Aphid feeding causes deformation of plant tissues, disorders in plant metabolism and changes in the amount of various compounds in plant tissues. Plant viruses are transmitted in aphid saliva.

  13. New data on aphid fauna (Hemiptera, Aphididae) in Algeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laamari, Malik; d’Acier, Armelle Coeur; Jousselin, Emmanuelle

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A survey of aphids was carried out during the period 2008-2011 in different regions of Algeria by collecting and identifying aphids and their host plants. Aphids were collected from 46 host plants. Forty-six species were reported including thirty-six species which were recorded for the first time in this country and thirty species which were recorded for the first time in the Maghreb (North Africa). This study extends the number of known Algerian aphid to 156 species. PMID:24039520

  14. NDVI to Detect Sugarcane Aphid Injury to Grain Sorghum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, N C; Backoulou, G F; Brewer, M J; Giles, K L

    2015-06-01

    Multispectral remote sensing has potential to provide quick and inexpensive information on sugarcane aphid, Melanaphis sacchari (Zehntner), pest status in sorghum fields. We describe a study conducted to determine if injury caused by sugarcane aphid to sorghum plants in fields of grain sorghum could be detected using multispectral remote sensing from a fixed wing aircraft. A study was conducted in commercial grain sorghum fields in the Texas Gulf Coast region in June 2014. Twenty-six commercial grain sorghum fields were selected and rated for the level of injury to sorghum plants in the field caused by sugarcane aphid. Plant growth stage ranged from 5.0 (watery ripe) to 7.0 (hard dough) among fields; and plant injury rating from sugarcane aphid ranged from 1.0 (little or no injury) to 4.0 (>40% of plants displaying injury) among fields. The normalized differenced vegetation index (NDVI) is calculated from light reflectance in the red and near-infrared wavelength bands in multispectral imagery and is a common index of plant stress. High NDVI indicates low levels of stress and low NDVI indicates high stress. NDVI ranged from -0.07 to 0.26 among fields. The correlation between NDVI and plant injury rating was negative and significant, as was the correlation between NDVI and plant growth stage. The negative correlation of NDVI with injury rating indicated that plant stress increased with increasing plant injury. Reduced NDVI with increasing plant growth probably resulted from reduced photosynthetic activity in more mature plants. The correlation between plant injury rating and plant growth stage was positive and significant indicating that plant injury from sugarcane aphid increased as plants matured. The partial correlation of NDVI with plant injury rating was negative and significant indicating that NDVI decreased with increasing plant injury after adjusting for its association with plant growth stage. We demonstrated that remotely sensed imagery acquired from grain

  15. Coexistence of three specialist aphids on common milkweed, Asclepias syriaca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R A; Mooney, K A; Agrawal, A A

    2008-08-01

    Coexistence of host-specific herbivores on plants is believed to be governed by interspecific interactions, but few empirical studies have systematically unraveled these dynamics. We investigated the role of several factors in promoting coexistence among the aphids Aphis nerii, Aphis asclepiadis, and Myzocallis asclepiadis that all specialize on common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca). Competitive exclusion is thought to occur when interspecific competition is stronger than intraspecific competition. Consequently, we investigated whether predators, mutualists, or resource quality affected the strength of intra- vs. interspecific competition among aphids in factorial manipulations of competition with exposure to predation, ants, and variable plant genotypes in three separate experiments. In the predation x competition experiment, predators reduced aphid per capita growth by 66%, but the strength of intra- and interspecific competition did not depend on predators. In the ants x competition experiment, ants reduced per capita growth of A. nerii and M. asclepiadis (neither of which were mutualists with ants) by approximately one-half. In so doing, ants ameliorated the negative effects of these competitors on ant-tended A. asclepiadis by two-thirds, representing a novel benefit of ant-aphid mutualism. Nevertheless, ants alone did not explain the persistence of competitively inferior A. asclepiadis as, even in the presence of ants, interspecific competition remained stronger than intraspecific competition. In the plant genotype x competition experiment, both A. asclepiadis and M. asclepiadis were competitively inferior to A. nerii, with the strength of interspecific competition exceeding that of intraspecific competition by 83% and 23%, respectively. Yet these effects differed among milkweed genotypes, and there were one or more plant genotypes for each aphid species where coexistence was predicted. A synthesis of our results shows that predators play little or no role in

  16. Evidence of indirect symbiont conferred protection against the predatory lady beetle Harmonia axyridis in the pea aphid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Jennifer L; Wolf, Candice; Voisin, Dené; Wolf, Seth

    2017-07-11

    Defensive symbionts can provide significant fitness advantages to their hosts. Facultative symbionts can protect several species of aphid from fungal pathogens, heat shock, and parasitism by parasitoid wasps. Previous work found that two of these facultative symbionts can also indirectly protect pea aphids from predation by the lady beetle Hippocampus convergens. When aphids reproduce asexually, there is extremely high relatedness among aphid clone-mates and often very limited dispersal. Under these conditions, symbionts may indirectly protect aphid clone-mates from predation by negatively affecting the survival of a predator after the consumption of aphids harboring the same vertically transmitted facultative symbionts. In this study, we wanted to determine whether this indirect protection extended to another lady beetle species, Harmonia axyridis. We fed Ha. axyridis larvae aphids from one of four aphid sub-clonal symbiont lines which all originated from the same naturally symbiont free clonal aphid lineage. Three of the sub-clonal lines harbor different facultative symbionts that were introduced to the lines via microinjection. Therefore these sub-clonal lineages vary primarily in their symbiont composition, not their genetic background. We found that aphid facultative symbionts affected larval survival as well as pupal survival in their predator Ha. axyridis. Additionally, Ha. axyridis larvae fed aphids with the Regiella symbiont had significantly longer larval developmental times than beetle larvae fed other aphids, and females fed aphids with the Regiella symbiont as larvae weighed less as adults. These fitness effects were different from those previously found in another aphid predator Hi. convergens suggesting that the fitness effects may not be the same in different aphid predators. Overall, our findings suggest that some aphid symbionts may indirectly benefit their clonal aphid hosts by negatively impacting the development and survival of a lady beetle

  17. Evidence of indirect symbiont conferred protection against the predatory lady beetle Harmonia axyridis in the pea aphid

    OpenAIRE

    Kovacs, Jennifer L.; Wolf, Candice; Voisin, Den?; Wolf, Seth

    2017-01-01

    Background Defensive symbionts can provide significant fitness advantages to their hosts. Facultative symbionts can protect several species of aphid from fungal pathogens, heat shock, and parasitism by parasitoid wasps. Previous work found that two of these facultative symbionts can also indirectly protect pea aphids from predation by the lady beetle Hippocampus convergens. When aphids reproduce asexually, there is extremely high relatedness among aphid clone-mates and often very limited disp...

  18. Effects of Entomopathogenic Nematodes on the Development of Root-knot Nematode and Aphid, and on the Parasitism of Aphid Parasitoid in Tobacco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Yu-kun

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Entomopathogenic nematodes(EPN which is recognized as a kind of potential biological control material have been paid more and more attention in recent years. In the present study, we selected tobacco(Nicotiana tabacum as the object to study the effects of EPN (Steinernema carpocapsae and Heterorhabditis bacteriophoraon the development of root-knot nematodes and aphid (Myzus persicae, and on the parasitism of aphid parasitoid (Aphidius gifuensis in tobacco. The results showed that (1Under the condition of the artificial removal of aphids, the number of egg per plant was significantly lower under the EPN treatments than control treatment(PS. carpocapsae treatment than the other treatments(PH. bacteriophora cadaver treatment were 89.6 individual·plant-1 and 0.996 g·plant-1, 99.8 individual·plant-1 and 3.258 g·plant-1, 76.6 individual·plant-1 and 1.643 g·plant-1, respectively, indicating that EPN treatment could decrease the number of aphids per mass; (3On the first three observation dates, the number of aphid mummies was significantly lower under S. carpocapsae cadaver treatment than H. bacteriophora cadaver treatment. The results indicated that EPN treatments in tobacco could affect the development of root-knot nematode, and had impact on the development of aphids and the activities of aphid parasitoid by "bottom-up" approach, and these effects were affected by the species of EPN.

  19. Soybean aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae) response to soybean plant defense: stress levels, tradeoffs, and cross-virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enders, Laramy; Bickel, Ryan; Brisson, Jennifer; Heng-Moss, Tiffany; Siegfried, Blair; Zera, Anthony; Miller, Nick

    2014-02-01

    A variety of management methods to control the soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura) have been investigated since its invasion into North America in 2000, among them plant resistance has emerged as a viable option for reducing aphid damage to soybeans and preventing outbreaks. Plant resistance methods often use natural soybean plant defenses that impose stress on aphids by reducing fitness and altering behavior. Research efforts have heavily focused on identification and development of aphid resistant soybean varieties, leaving much unknown about soybean aphid response to stressful host plant defenses. In this study, we aimed to 1) evaluate lifetime fitness consequences and phenotypic variation in response to host plant-induced stress and 2) investigate whether trade-offs involving fitness costs and/or cross-virulence to multiple antibiotic soybean varieties exists. We compared aphid survival and reproduction during and after a short period of exposure to soybeans with the Rag2 resistance gene and measured aphid clonal variation in response to Rag2 soybeans. In addition, we measured the performance of Rag2 virulent and avirulent aphids on five soybean varieties with various forms of antibiotic resistance. Our results indicate that plant defenses impose high levels of stress and have long-term fitness consequences, even after aphids are removed from resistant plants. We identified one aphid clone that was able to colonize Rag2 among the seven clones tested, suggesting that virulent genotypes may be prevalent in natural populations. Finally, although we did not find evidence of cross-virulence to multiple antibiotic soybean varieties, our results suggest independent mechanisms of aphid virulence to Rag1 and Rag2 that may involve fitness costs.

  20. Indian Bt Cotton Varieties Do Not Affect the Performance of Cotton Aphids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawo, Nora C.; Wäckers, Felix L.; Romeis, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    Cotton varieties expressing Cry proteins derived from the soil bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are grown worldwide for the management of pest Lepidoptera. To prevent non-target pest outbreaks and to retain the biological control function provided by predators and parasitoids, the potential risk that Bt crops may pose to non-target arthropods is addressed prior to their commercialization. Aphids play an important role in agricultural systems since they serve as prey or host to a number of predators and parasitoids and their honeydew is an important energy source for several arthropods. To explore possible indirect effects of Bt crops we here examined the impact of Bt cotton on aphids and their honeydew. In climate chambers we assessed the performance of cotton aphids, Aphis gossypii Glover (Hemiptera: Aphididae) when grown on three Indian Bt (Cry1Ac) cotton varieties (MECH 12, MECH 162, MECH 184) and their non-transformed near isolines. Furthermore, we examined whether aphids pick up the Bt protein and analyzed the sugar composition of aphid honeydew to evaluate its suitability for honeydew-feeders. Plant transformation did not have any influence on aphid performance. However, some variation was observed among the three cotton varieties which might partly be explained by the variation in trichome density. None of the aphid samples contained Bt protein. As a consequence, natural enemies that feed on aphids are not exposed to the Cry protein. A significant difference in the sugar composition of aphid honeydew was detected among cotton varieties as well as between transformed and non-transformed plants. However, it is questionable if this variation is of ecological relevance, especially as honeydew is not the only sugar source parasitoids feed on in cotton fields. Our study allows the conclusion that Bt cotton poses a negligible risk for aphid antagonists and that aphids should remain under natural control in Bt cotton fields. PMID:19279684

  1. The Process of Aphid Egg-Laying and the Little Known Role of the Coccinellidae in Aphid Egg Destruction in Poland – Preliminary Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubiarz Magdalena

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available No detailed studies have been conducted in Poland with regard to aphid eggs or egg survival in particular. So far, no studies have been conducted concerning the role of ladybird beetles in reducing the number of aphid eggs in spring, before the development of leaves, and in autumn, after the leaves have been shed. At these times, other developmental stages of aphids are unavailable as food for the ladybirds. The paper presents the preliminary results of a three-year study on the process of aphid egg-laying (especially Chaetosiphon tetrarhodum, Macrosiphum rosae, Metopolophium dirhodum, and Maculolachnus submacula. The paper also deals with the little known role of ladybirds in aphid egg destruction. Research was conducted in Otrębusy (Western Mazovia, Poland, in the years 2008-2010, on the rugosa rose and on the dog rose. In the years 2011-2013, in Otrębusy, the occurrence of M. submacula was also observed on the ornamental grandiflora rose. Furthermore, in the years 2003-2004, observations were conducted on the pedunculate oak in Polesie National Park and in the town of Puławy (Lublin Region, Poland. The observations which took place in Puławy focused on egglaying of aphids representing the genera Phylloxera and Lachnus. The study investigated aphid oviposition sites. Data was collected on the number of aphid eggs noted on the studied plants. The study also showed, that sometimes winter eggs of aphids could provide nutrition for ladybirds. This was especially true in autumn when ladybird beetles were preparing for hibernation.

  2. Fine mapping of the soybean aphid resistance genes Rag6 and Rag3c from glycine soja 85-32

    Science.gov (United States)

    The soybean aphid, an invasive species, has significantly threatened soybean production in North America since 2001. Host-plant resistance is known as an ideal management of aphids. Two novel aphid-resistant loci, Rag6 and Rag3c, from the Glycine soja accession 85-32, were previously detected in a 1...

  3. Impact of aphid alarm pheromone release on virus transmission efficiency: When pest control strategy could induce higher virus dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fang-Jing; Bosquée, Emilie; Liu, Ying-Jie; Chen, Ju-Lian; Yong, Liu; Francis, Frédéric

    2016-09-01

    Aphids cause serious damages to crops not only by tacking sap but also by transmitting numerous viruses. To develop biological control, the aphid alarm pheromone, namely E-β-farnesene (EβF), has been demonstrated to be efficient to repel aphids and as attract beneficials, making it a potential tool to control aphid pests. Considering aphids also as virus vectors, changes of their behavior could also interfere with the virus acquisition and transmission process. Here, a combination of two aphid species and two potato virus models were selected to test the influence of EβF release on aphid and virus dispersion under laboratory conditions. EβF release was found to significantly decrease the population of Myzus persicae and Macrosiphum euphorbiae around the infochemical releaser but simultaneously also increasing the dispersal of Potato Virus Y (PVY). At the opposite, no significant difference for Potato Leaf Roll Virus (PLRV) transmission efficiency was observed with similar aphid alarm pheromone releases for none of the aphid species. These results provide some support to carefully consider infochemical releasers not only for push-pull strategy and pest control but also to include viral disease in a the plant protection to aphids as they are also efficient virus vectors. Impact of aphid kinds and transmission mechanisms will be discussed according to the large variation found between persistent and non persistent potato viruses and interactions with aphids and related infochemicals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. 77 FR 46373 - Field Release of Aphelinus glycinis for the Biological Control of the Soybean Aphid in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-03

    ... of the Soybean Aphid in the Continental United States; Availability of an Environmental Assessment... for the biological control of the soybean aphid, Aphis glycines, in the continental United States. We... INFORMATION: Background The soybean aphid, Aphis glycinis, which is native to Asia, was found in North America...

  5. Status Of Cotton Aphid, Aphis gssypii

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    They call for a strict national effort to regulate the influx of pesticides on the market, and ensure safe insecticide types and usage, as well as manage resistance in all concerned major insect pests. Les caractéristiques de répartition en groupes électrophorétiques et les analyses quantitatives de carboxylestérases de l'aphidé ...

  6. Host Plant Specialization in the Sugarcane Aphid Melanaphis sacchari.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Nibouche

    Full Text Available Most aphids are highly specialized on one or two related plant species and generalist species often include sympatric populations adapted to different host plants. Our aim was to test the hypothesis of the existence of host specialized lineages of the aphid Melanaphis sacchari in Reunion Island. To this end, we investigated the genetic diversity of the aphid and its association with host plants by analyzing the effect of wild sorghum Sorghum bicolor subsp. verticilliflorum or sugarcane as host plants on the genetic structuring of populations and by performing laboratory host transfer experiments to detect trade-offs in host use. Genotyping of 31 samples with 10 microsatellite loci enabled identification of 13 multilocus genotypes (MLG. Three of these, Ms11, Ms16 and Ms15, were the most frequent ones. The genetic structure of the populations was linked to the host plants. Ms11 and Ms16 were significantly more frequently observed on sugarcane, while Ms15 was almost exclusively collected in colonies on wild sorghum. Laboratory transfer experiments demonstrated the existence of fitness trade-offs. An Ms11 isofemale lineage performed better on sugarcane than on sorghum, whereas an Ms15 lineage developed very poorly on sugarcane, and two Ms16 lineages showed no significant difference in performances between both hosts. Both field and laboratory results support the existence of host plant specialization in M. sacchari in Reunion Island, despite low genetic differentiation. This study illustrates the ability of asexual aphid lineages to rapidly undergo adaptive changes including shifting from one host plant to another.

  7. Scaling up population dynamic processes in a ladybird–aphid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Houdková, Kateřina; Kindlmann, Pavel

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 48, - (2006), s. 323-332 ISSN 1438-3896 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GEDIV/06/E013; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06073; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA6087301; GA ČR(CZ) GD206/03/H034 Keywords : Aphids * Egg window * Ladybirds * Metapopulation * Model * Population dynamics Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.534, year: 2006

  8. Alfalfa Leaf Curl Virus: an Aphid-Transmitted Geminivirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roumagnac, Philippe; Granier, Martine; Bernardo, Pauline; Deshoux, Maëlle; Ferdinand, Romain; Galzi, Serge; Fernandez, Emmanuel; Julian, Charlotte; Abt, Isabelle; Filloux, Denis; Mesléard, François; Varsani, Arvind; Blanc, Stéphane; Martin, Darren P; Peterschmitt, Michel

    2015-09-01

    The family Geminiviridae comprises seven genera differentiated by genome organization, sequence similarity, and insect vector. Capulavirus, an eighth genus, has been proposed to accommodate two newly discovered highly divergent geminiviruses that presently have no known vector. Alfalfa leaf curl virus, identified here as a third capulavirus, is shown to be transmitted by Aphis craccivora. This is the first report of an aphid-transmitted geminivirus. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. The effect of co-infestation by conspecific and heterospecific aphids on the feeding behaviour of Nasonovia ribisnigri on resistant and susceptible lettuce cultivars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeke, ten Cindy J.M.; Dicke, Marcel; Loon, van Joop J.A.

    2017-01-01

    Aphid saliva can suppress the blocking of sieve elements, a reaction that plants employ to inhibit aphid feeding, but aphid saliva can also elicit plant defence responses. Such plant responses might affect interactions between different aphid species and intraspecifically, e.g. among different

  10. Change in particle size of pectin reacted with pectinesterase isozymes from pea (Pisum sativum L.) sprout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, C M; Wu, M C; Chang, W H; Chang, H M

    2001-09-01

    Four pectinesterase (PE) isozymes were isolated by CM-Sepharose CL-6B chromatography from etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L.) sprouts and then reacted with citrus pectin (degree of esterification = 68%, 30-100 kDa) to observe the change in pectin particle size using a laser particle size analyzer. After incubation of a pectin-PE mixture (pH 6.5) at 30 degrees C for 4 h, PE 1 was observed to catalyze the transacylation reaction most remarkably, increasing the particle size from approximately 50-70 to approximately 250-350 nm, followed by PE 3, PE 2, and PE 4.

  11. Isolation and Characterization of Novel EST-Derived Genic Markers in Pisum sativum (Fabaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalu Jain

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Novel markers were developed for pea (Pisum sativum from pea expressed sequence tags (ESTs having significant homology to Medicago truncatula gene sequences to investigate genetic diversity, linkage mapping, and cross-species transferability. Methods and Results: Seventy-seven EST-derived genic markers were developed through comparative mapping between M. truncatula and P. sativum in which 75 markers produced PCR products and 33 were polymorphic among 16 pea genotypes. Conclusions: The novel markers described here will be useful for future genetic studies of P. sativum; their amplification in lentil (Lens culinaris demonstrates their potential for use in closely related species.

  12. Market of Plant Varieties in Ukraine: Green Pea (Pisum sativum L partim

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. В. Свинарчук

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The article reflects economical value of a valuable food crop, field pea used chiefly as a vegetable (Pisum sativum L partim, its origin and distribution both in the worldwide scale and in our country, establishment of its varietal resources. Exhausting description is provided to new varieties of pea used chiefly as a vegetable, which have been listed in the State Register of Varieties Suitable for Dissemination in Ukraine in 20010-2011 for the harvest in 2012, and for which official description is available.

  13. Soybean Aphid Infestation Induces Changes in Fatty Acid Metabolism in Soybean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Kanobe

    Full Text Available The soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura is one of the most important insect pests of soybeans in the North-central region of the US. It has been hypothesized that aphids avoid effective defenses by inhibition of jasmonate-regulated plant responses. Given the role fatty acids play in jasmonate-induced plant defenses, we analyzed the fatty acid profile of soybean leaves and seeds from aphid-infested plants. Aphid infestation reduced levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids in leaves with a concomitant increase in palmitic acid. In seeds, a reduction in polyunsaturated fatty acids was associated with an increase in stearic acid and oleic acid. Soybean plants challenged with the brown stem rot fungus or with soybean cyst nematodes did not present changes in fatty acid levels in leaves or seeds, indicating that the changes induced by aphids are not a general response to pests. One of the polyunsaturated fatty acids, linolenic acid, is the precursor of jasmonate; thus, these changes in fatty acid metabolism may be examples of "metabolic hijacking" by the aphid to avoid the induction of effective defenses. Based on the changes in fatty acid levels observed in seeds and leaves, we hypothesize that aphids potentially induce interference in the fatty acid desaturation pathway, likely reducing FAD2 and FAD6 activity that leads to a reduction in polyunsaturated fatty acids. Our data support the idea that aphids block jasmonate-dependent defenses by reduction of the hormone precursor.

  14. Risk to native Uroleucon aphids (Hemiptera: Aphididae) from non-native lady beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aphids in the genus Uroleucon Mordvilko (Hemiptera: Aphididae) are native herbivores that feed on goldenrod (Solidago spp.) and other Asteraceae in North America. The aphids are potential prey for a wide variety of natural enemies, including native and non-native species of lady beetles (Coleoptera...

  15. Plant resistance in sorghums to the sugarcane aphid Melanaphis sacchari (Hemiptera: Aphididae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    We evaluated ten sorghum lines that were near or in commercial release with the intent of identifying phenotypic expression of host-plant resistance to the sugarcane aphid. Two of the ten entries OL2042 and SP7715 expressed a high degree of resistance to the sugarcane aphid with damage ratings <3.0...

  16. Newly identified resistance to soybean aphid (Aphis glycines) in soybean plant introduction lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Host-plant resistance is potentially efficacious in managing the soybean aphid (SA, Aphis glycines Matsumura), a major invasive pest in northern soybean-production regions of North America. However, development of aphid-resistant soybean has been complicated by the presence of virulent SA biotypes,...

  17. Towards efficient multi-scale methods for monitoring sugarcane aphid infestations in sorghum

    Science.gov (United States)

    We discuss approaches and issues involved with developing optimal monitoring methods for sugarcane aphid infestations (SCA) in grain sorghum. We discuss development of sequential sampling methods that allow for estimation of the number of aphids per sample unit, and statistical decision making rela...

  18. Identification of conditions for successful aphid control by ladybirds in greenhouses

    Science.gov (United States)

    As part of my research on the mass production and augmentative release of ladybirds, I reviewed the primary research literature to test the prediction that ladybirds are effective aphid predators in greenhouses. Aphid population reduction exceeded 50% in most studies and ladybird release rates usual...

  19. Identificatoin and confirmation of resistance against soybean aphid (Aphis glycines) in eight wild soybean lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    The development and use of aphid-resistant soybean (Glycine max) cultivars has been complicated by the presence of multiple virulent biotypes of the soybean aphid (SA, Aphis glycines Matsumura). Ultimately, a variety of unique resistance sources may be needed to develop cultivars with a broad spectr...

  20. Characterization and genetics of multiple soybean aphid biotype resistance in five soybean plant introductions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura) is the most important soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] insect pest in the USA. The objectives of this study were to characterize the resistance expressed in the five plant introductions (PIs) to four soybean aphid biotypes, determine the mode of resistance in...

  1. Validation of a hairy roots system to study soybean-soybean aphid interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morriss, Stephanie C.; Studham, Matthew E.; Tylka, Gregory L.

    2017-01-01

    The soybean aphid (Aphis glycines) is one of the main insect pests of soybean (Glycine max) worldwide. Genomics approaches have provided important data on transcriptome changes, both in the insect and in the plant, in response to the plant-aphid interaction. However, the difficulties to transform soybean and to rear soybean aphid on artificial media have hindered our ability to systematically test the function of genes identified by those analyses as mediators of plant resistance to the insect. An efficient approach to produce transgenic soybean material is the production of transformed hairy roots using Agrobacterium rhizogenes; however, soybean aphids colonize leaves or stems and thus this approach has not been utilized. Here, we developed a hairy root system that allowed effective aphid feeding. We show that this system supports aphid performance similar to that observed in leaves. The use of hairy roots to study plant resistance is validated by experiments showing that roots generated from cotyledons of resistant lines carrying the Rag1 or Rag2 resistance genes are also resistant to aphid feeding, while related susceptible lines are not. Our results demonstrate that hairy roots are a good system to study soybean aphid-soybean interactions, providing a quick and effective method that could be used for functional analysis of the resistance response to this insect. PMID:28358854

  2. The Effects of Aphid Traits on Parasitoid Host Use and Specialist Advantage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagic, Vesna; Petrović-Obradović, Olivera; Fründ, Jochen; Kavallieratos, Nickolas G; Athanassiou, Christos G; Starý, Petr; Tomanović, Željko

    2016-01-01

    Specialization is a central concept in ecology and one of the fundamental properties of parasitoids. Highly specialized parasitoids tend to be more efficient in host-use compared to generalized parasitoids, presumably owing to the trade-off between host range and host-use efficiency. However, it remains unknown how parasitoid host specificity and host-use depends on host traits related to susceptibility to parasitoid attack. To address this question, we used data from a 13-year survey of interactions among 142 aphid and 75 parasitoid species in nine European countries. We found that only aphid traits related to local resource characteristics seem to influence the trade-off between host-range and efficiency: more specialized parasitoids had an apparent advantage (higher abundance on shared hosts) on aphids with sparse colonies, ant-attendance and without concealment, and this was more evident when host relatedness was included in calculation of parasitoid specificity. More traits influenced average assemblage specialization, which was highest in aphids that are monophagous, monoecious, large, highly mobile (easily drop from a plant), without myrmecophily, habitat specialists, inhabit non-agricultural habitats and have sparse colonies. Differences in aphid wax production did not influence parasitoid host specificity and host-use. Our study is the first step in identifying host traits important for aphid parasitoid host specificity and host-use and improves our understanding of bottom-up effects of aphid traits on aphid-parasitoid food web structure.

  3. GroEL from the endosymbiont Buchnera aphidicola betrays the aphid by triggering plant defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Ritu; Atamian, Hagop S.; Shen, Zhouxin; Briggs, Steven P.; Kaloshian, Isgouhi

    2014-01-01

    Aphids are sap-feeding plant pests and harbor the endosymbiont Buchnera aphidicola, which is essential for their fecundity and survival. During plant penetration and feeding, aphids secrete saliva that contains proteins predicted to alter plant defenses and metabolism. Plants recognize microbe-associated molecular patterns and induce pattern-triggered immunity (PTI). No aphid-associated molecular pattern has yet been identified. By mass spectrometry, we identified in saliva from potato aphids (Macrosiphum euphorbiae) 105 proteins, some of which originated from Buchnera, including the chaperonin GroEL. Because GroEL is a widely conserved bacterial protein with an essential function, we tested its role in PTI. Applying or infiltrating GroEL onto Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves induced oxidative burst and expression of PTI early marker genes. These GroEL-induced defense responses required the known coreceptor BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE 1-ASSOCIATED RECEPTOR KINASE 1. In addition, in transgenic Arabidopsis plants, inducible expression of groEL activated PTI marker gene expression. Moreover, Arabidopsis plants expressing groEL displayed reduced fecundity of the green peach aphid (Myzus persicae), indicating enhanced resistance against aphids. Furthermore, delivery of GroEL into tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) or Arabidopsis through Pseudomonas fluorescens, engineered to express the type III secretion system, also reduced potato aphid and green peach aphid fecundity, respectively. Collectively our data indicate that GroEL is a molecular pattern that triggers PTI. PMID:24927572

  4. Screening of sorghum lines for resistance against sugarcane aphid, Melanaphis sacchari (Zehnter)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The sugarcane aphid Melanaphis sacchari (Zehnter) has emerged as the most significant threat to sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) production in the United States. Since 2013, discovery of aphid resistant germplasm has been a priority all stakeholders involved. We screened twenty three differen...

  5. Mind your elders: wild soybean’s contribution to soybean aphid resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currently, biotype 4 soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsamura, SBA) is the most virulent SBA biotype. Overcoming the most aphid resistant genes, SBA biotype 4 has become the greatest challenge in utilizing plant resistance in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.]. Soybean’s wild ancestor Glycine soja (Sie...

  6. Variable Isotopic Compositions of Host Plant Populations Preclude Assessment of Aphid Overwintering Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S. Crossley

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura is a pest of soybean in the northern Midwest whose migratory patterns have been difficult to quantify. Improved knowledge of soybean aphid overwintering sites could facilitate the development of control efforts with exponential impacts on aphid densities on a regional scale. In this preliminary study, we explored the utility of variation in stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen to distinguish soybean aphid overwintering origins. We compared variation in bulk 13C and 15N content in buckthorn (Rhamnus cathartica L. and soybean aphids in Wisconsin, among known overwintering locations in the northern Midwest. Specifically, we looked for associations between buckthorn and environmental variables that could aid in identifying overwintering habitats. We detected significant evidence of correlation between the bulk 13C and 15N signals of soybean aphids and buckthorn, despite high variability in stable isotope composition within and among buckthorn plants. Further, the 15N signal in buckthorn varied predictably with soil composition. However, lack of sufficient differentiation of geographic areas along axes of isotopic and environmental variation appears to preclude the use of carbon and nitrogen isotopic signals as effective predictors of likely aphid overwintering sites. These preliminary data suggest the need for future work that can further account for variability in 13C and 15N within/among buckthorn plants, and that explores the utility of other stable isotopes in assessing likely aphid overwintering sites.

  7. Aphidoletes aphidimyza oviposition behaviour when multiple aphid pests are present in the greenhouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    The generalist aphid predator Aphidoletes aphidimyza was investigated for oviposition behaviour on the pest aphids Myzus persicae and Aulacorthum solani in greenhouse trials. Oviposition was significantly lower on A. solani than M. persicae. Myzus persicae were concentrated at the growing points of ...

  8. Association mapping of aphid resistance in USDA cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp.) core collection using SNPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowpea aphid (CPA; Aphis craccivora) is a destructive insect pest of cowpea, as well as other legume crops including alfalfa, beans, chickpea, lentils, lupins and peanuts. The utilization of aphid resistance in cowpea breeding is one of the most efficient and environmental friendly methods to contro...

  9. Contact Bioassay of an Endemic Plant to Ethiopia on Three Aphid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Based on this, extracts from birbira with water or chloroform were assayed on three aphid species. Substance extracted both by water and chloroform caused significantly higher mortality on the three aphid species than the residue in chloroform and the untreated control. The LC50 amounts of water and chloroform extracts, ...

  10. New Sources of Resistance in Cowpea to the Cowpea Aphid (Aphis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twenty-two advanced breeding genotypes of cowpea were evaluated for their responses to infes-tation by the cowpea aphid, Aphis craccivora Koch. The aim of the study was to identify geno-type(s) of cowpea resistant to A. craccivora to be used as breeding line(s). Seedling screening technique and aphid growth and ...

  11. (E)-β-farnesene synthase genes affect aphid (Myzus persicae) infestation in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiudao; Jones, Huw D; Ma, Youzhi; Wang, Genping; Xu, Zhaoshi; Zhang, Baoming; Zhang, Yongjun; Ren, Guangwei; Pickett, John A; Xia, Lanqin

    2012-03-01

    Aphids are major agricultural pests which cause significant yield losses of the crop plants each year. (E)-β-farnesene (EβF) is the alarm pheromone involved in the chemical communication between aphids and particularly in the avoidance of predation. In the present study, two EβF synthase genes were isolated from sweet wormwood and designated as AaβFS1 and AaβFS2, respectively. Overexpression of AaβFS1 or AaβFS2 in tobacco plants resulted in the emission of EβF ranging from 1.55 to 4.65 ng/day/g fresh tissues. Tritrophic interactions involving the peach aphids (Myzus persicae), predatory lacewings (Chrysopa septempunctata) demonstrated that the transgenic tobacco expressing AaβFS1 and AaβFS2 could repel peach aphids, but not as strongly as expected. However, AaβFS1 and AaβFS2 lines exhibited strong and statistically significant attraction to lacewings. Further experiments combining aphids and lacewing larvae in an octagon arrangement showed transgenic tobacco plants could repel aphids and attract lacewing larvae, thus minimizing aphid infestation. Therefore, we demonstrated a potentially valuable strategy of using EβF synthase genes from sweet wormwood for aphid control in tobacco or other economic important crops in an environmentally benign way.

  12. Selection by phage display of a mustard chymotrypsin inhibitor toxic to pea aphid.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ceci, L.R.; Volpicella, M.; Conti, S.; Gallerani, R.; Beekwilder, M.J.; Jongsma, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    The mustard trypsin inhibitor, MTI-2, is a potent inhibitor of trypsin with no activity towards chymotrypsin. MTI-2 is toxic for lepidopteran insects, but has low activity against aphids. In an attempt to improve the activity of the inhibitor towards aphids, a library of inhibitor variants was

  13. Utilization of ladybird beetles to curb aphids in strawberry high tunnels: preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Native and exotic aphid species continue to pose a threat to the successful cultivation of small fruits in greenhouses, glasshouses, and high tunnels throughout the World. There is considerable interest in using biological controls (predators and parasitoids) to manage aphids in lieu of synthetic in...

  14. National Plant Diagnostic Network, Taxonomic training videos: Aphids under the microscope - Aphis gossypii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Training is a critical part of aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae) identification. This video provides provides training to identify the cotton aphid, Aphis gossypii, using a compound microscope and an electronic identification key called “LUCID.” The video demonstrates key morphological structures that ca...

  15. National Plant Diagnostic Network, Taxonomic training videos: Aphids under the microscope - Myzus persicae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Training is a critical part of aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae) identification. This video provides provides training to identify the green peach aphid, Myzus persicae, using a compound microscope and an electronic identification key called “LUCID.” The video demonstrates key morphological structures t...

  16. National Plant Diagnostic Network, Taxonomic training videos: Aphids under the microscope - Cerataphis brasiliensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Training is a critical part of aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae) identification. This video provides provides training to identify the palm aphid, Cerataphis brasiliensis, using a compound microscope and an electronic identification key called “LUCID.” The video demonstrates key morphological structures...

  17. First report on the entomopathogenic genus Neozygites (Entomophthoromycota) and Neozygites osornensis on aphids in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    The genus Neozygites has been known in Brazil until now only on mites, and this is its first report on aphids in Brazil. Tree-dwelling aphids (Cinara sp.) on a cypress tree were regularly monitored for entomopathogenic fungi in the city of Terezópolis de Goiás in Central Brazil between July 2014 and...

  18. Fitness trade-off in peach-potato aphids (Myzus persicae) between insecticide resistance and vulnerability to parasitoid attack at several spatial scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, S P; Denholm, I; Poppy, G M; Thompson, R; Powell, W

    2011-12-01

    Insecticide-resistant clones of the peach-potato aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer), have previously been shown to have a reduced response to aphid alarm pheromone compared to susceptible ones. The resulting vulnerability of susceptible and resistant aphids to attack by the primary endoparasitoid, Diaeretiella rapae (McIntosh), was investigated across three spatial scales. These scales ranged from aphids confined on individual leaves exposed to single female parasitoids, to aphids on groups of whole plants exposed to several parasitoids. In all experiments, significantly fewer aphids from insecticide-susceptible clones became parasitised compared to insecticide-resistant aphids. Investigations of aphid movement showed at the largest spatial scale that more susceptible aphids than resistant aphids moved from their inoculation leaves to other leaves on the same plant after exposure to parasitoids. The findings imply that parasitoids, and possibly other natural enemies, can influence the evolution and dynamics of insecticide resistance through pleiotropic effects of resistance genes on important behavioural traits.

  19. Spectral Detection of Soybean Aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae) and Confounding Insecticide Effects in Soybean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Tavvs Micael

    Soybean aphid, Aphis glycines (Hemiptera: Aphididae) is the primary insect pest of soybean in the northcentral United States. Soybean aphid may cause stunted plants, leaf discoloration, plant death, and decrease soybean yield by 40%. Sampling plans have been developed for supporting soybean aphid management. However, growers' perception about time involved in direct insect counts has been contributing to a lower adoption of traditional pest scouting methods and may be associated with the use of prophylactic insecticide applications in soybean. Remote sensing of plant spectral (light-derived) responses to soybean aphid feeding is a promising alternative to estimate injury without direct insect counts and, thus, increase adoption and efficiency of scouting programs. This research explored the use of remote sensing of soybean reflectance for detection of soybean aphids and showed that foliar insecticides may have implications for subsequent use of soybean spectral reflectance for pest detection. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  20. Predatory behavior of Pseudodorus clavatus (Diptera, Syrphidae on aphids tended by ants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Bächtold

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Predatory behavior of Pseudodorus clavatus (Diptera, Syrphidae on aphids tended by ants. In this study, we examined the interactions between myrmecophilous aphids, their ant-guards and a predatory syrphid species, Pseudodorus clavatus (F.. Larvae of this predator were found in the colonies of three aphid species: Aphis gossypii, A. spiraecola and Toxoptera sp., which were tended by eight ant species, especially Camponotus. Hoverfly larvae managed to infiltrate the aphid colonies and consume nymphs. Predator larvae exhibited inconspicuous movements and were not detected by ants which were commonly observed touching and antennating the larvae they come into contact. These results suggest that behavioral and chemical cues are involved in the infiltration and on the successful predation of syrphids upon aphids.

  1. The effect of co-infestation by conspecific and heterospecific aphids on the feeding behaviour of Nasonovia ribisnigri on resistant and susceptible lettuce cultivars

    OpenAIRE

    Broeke, ten, Cindy J.M.; Dicke, Marcel; Loon, van, Joop J.A.

    2017-01-01

    Aphid saliva can suppress the blocking of sieve elements, a reaction that plants employ to inhibit aphid feeding, but aphid saliva can also elicit plant defence responses. Such plant responses might affect interactions between different aphid species and intraspecifically, e.g. among different biotypes. The objectives of our study were to investigate if feeding behaviour and performance of two biotypes of the lettuce aphid Nasonovia ribisnigri are affected by (1) feeding by the other biotype ...

  2. Overexpression of IRM1 enhances resistance to aphids in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Zhang, Zhao; Visser, Richard G F; Broekgaarden, Colette; Vosman, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Aphids are insects that cause direct damage to crops by the removal of phloem sap, but more importantly they spread devastating viruses. Aphids use their sophisticated mouthpart (i.e. stylet) to feed from the phloem sieve elements of the host plant. To identify genes that affect host plant resistance to aphids, we previously screened an Arabidopsis thaliana activation tag mutant collection. In such mutants, tagged genes are overexpressed by a strong 35S enhancer adjacent to the natural promoter, resulting in a dominant gain-of-function phenotype. We previously identified several of these mutants on which the aphid Myzus persicae showed a reduced population development compared with wild type. In the present study we show that the gene responsible for the phenotype of one of the mutants is At5g65040 and named this gene Increased Resistance to Myzus persicae 1 (IRM1). Overexpression of the cloned IRM1 gene conferred a phenotype identical to that of the original mutant. Conversely, an IRM1 knockout mutant promoted aphid population development compared to the wild type. We performed Electrical Penetration Graph analysis to investigate how probing and feeding behaviour of aphids was affected on plants that either overexpressed IRM1 or contained a knockout mutation in this gene. The EPG results indicated that the aphids encounter resistance factors while reaching for the phloem on the overexpressing line. This resistance mechanism also affected other aphid species and is suggested to be of mechanical nature. Interestingly, genetic variation for IRM1 expression in response to aphid attack was observed. Upon aphid attack the expression of IRM1 was initially (after 6 hours) induced in ecotype Wassilewskija followed by suppression. In Columbia-0, IRM1 expression was already suppressed six hours after the start of the infestation. The resistance conferred by the overexpression of IRM1 in A. thaliana trades off with plant growth.

  3. Overexpression of IRM1 enhances resistance to aphids in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Chen

    Full Text Available Aphids are insects that cause direct damage to crops by the removal of phloem sap, but more importantly they spread devastating viruses. Aphids use their sophisticated mouthpart (i.e. stylet to feed from the phloem sieve elements of the host plant. To identify genes that affect host plant resistance to aphids, we previously screened an Arabidopsis thaliana activation tag mutant collection. In such mutants, tagged genes are overexpressed by a strong 35S enhancer adjacent to the natural promoter, resulting in a dominant gain-of-function phenotype. We previously identified several of these mutants on which the aphid Myzus persicae showed a reduced population development compared with wild type. In the present study we show that the gene responsible for the phenotype of one of the mutants is At5g65040 and named this gene Increased Resistance to Myzus persicae 1 (IRM1. Overexpression of the cloned IRM1 gene conferred a phenotype identical to that of the original mutant. Conversely, an IRM1 knockout mutant promoted aphid population development compared to the wild type. We performed Electrical Penetration Graph analysis to investigate how probing and feeding behaviour of aphids was affected on plants that either overexpressed IRM1 or contained a knockout mutation in this gene. The EPG results indicated that the aphids encounter resistance factors while reaching for the phloem on the overexpressing line. This resistance mechanism also affected other aphid species and is suggested to be of mechanical nature. Interestingly, genetic variation for IRM1 expression in response to aphid attack was observed. Upon aphid attack the expression of IRM1 was initially (after 6 hours induced in ecotype Wassilewskija followed by suppression. In Columbia-0, IRM1 expression was already suppressed six hours after the start of the infestation. The resistance conferred by the overexpression of IRM1 in A. thaliana trades off with plant growth.

  4. Effect of plant nutrition on aphid size, prey consumption, and life history characteristics of green lacewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqueel, Muhammad A; Collins, Catherine M; Raza, Abu-bakar M; Ahmad, Shahbaz; Tariq, Muhammad; Leather, Simon R

    2014-02-01

    Plant quality can directly and indirectly affect the third trophic level. The predation by all the instars of green lacewing, Chrysoperla carnea (S.) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) on the cereal aphids, Rhopalosiphum padi (L.), and Sitobion avenae (F.) at varying nitrogen fertilizer levels was calculated under laboratory conditions. Wheat plants were grown on four nitrogen fertilizer levels and aphids were fed on these plants and subsequently offered as food to the C. carnea. Aphid densities of 10, 30, and 90 were offered to first, second, and third instar larvae of green lacewing. Increased nitrogen application improved nitrogen contents of the plants and also the body weight of cereal aphids feeding on them. Aphid consumption by green lacewings was reduced with the increase in nitrogen content in the host plants of aphids. Predation of both aphid species by first, second, and third instars larvae of C. carnea was highest on aphids reared on plants with the lowest rate of fertilization, suggesting a compensatory consumption to overcome reduced biomass (lower aphid size). Total biomass devoured by C. carnea on all nitrogen fertilizer treatments was not statistically different. Additionally, the heavier host prey influenced by the plant nutrition had an effect on the life history characteristics of green lacewings. The larval duration, pupal weight, pupal duration, fecundity, and male and female longevity were significantly affected by the level of nitrogen fertilization to the aphid's host plants, except for pupal duration when fed on S. avenae. This study showed that quantity of prey supplied to the larvae affects the prey consumption and thereafter the life history characteristics of green lacewings. © 2013 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  5. Parasitization of commercially available parasitoid species against the lettuce aphid, Nasonovia ribisnigri (Hemiptera: Aphididae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, G; Skovgård, H; Enkegaard, A

    2014-12-01

    The lettuce aphid, Nasonovia ribisnigri (Mosley), is an economically important pest of lettuce worldwide. Little documentation exists for the control efficacy of aphid parasitoids against N. ribisnigri. This laboratory study evaluated three commercially available parasitoid species: Aphidius colemani (Viereck), Lysiphlebus testaceipes (Cresson), and Aphelinus abdominalis (Dalman) for their mortality impact on N. ribisnigri. The green peach aphid Myzus persicae (Sulzer) was included as a reference aphid. The study showed that A. abdominalis successfully parasitized 39 and 13% of the offered N. ribisnigri and M. persicae, respectively, within a 24-h exposure period. In contrast, none of the lettuce aphids exposed to Ap. colemani or L. testaceipes were successfully parasitized, whereas 60 and 3.5% of M. persicae, respectively, were successfully parasitized within a 6-h exposure period. Lettuce aphid mortality due to incomplete parasitization was 26 and 31% when exposed to Ap. colemani and L. testaceipes, respectively, with corresponding values for M. persicae being 5 and 10%, respectively. Mortality as a result of incomplete parasitization when aphids were exposed to A. abdominalis was low for both aphid species. The total mortality inflicted by A. abdominalis within a 24-h exposure period was 51% for the lettuce aphids and significantly less (19%) for green peach aphids. In contrast, Ap. colemani inflicted a higher mortality in M. persicae (65%) compared with N. ribisnigri (26%) within a 6-h exposure period. L. testaceipes caused a greater mortality in N. ribisnigri as compared with M. persicae. This study concludes that A. abdominalis has the potential to be used against N. ribisnigri in inoculative biocontrol programs as compared with the other parasitoid species based on successful parasitization.

  6. Rhizobium anhuiense sp. nov., isolated from effective nodules of Vicia faba and Pisum sativum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu Jing; Zheng, Wen Tao; Everall, Isobel; Young, J Peter W; Zhang, Xiao Xia; Tian, Chang Fu; Sui, Xin Hua; Wang, En Tao; Chen, Wen Xin

    2015-09-01

    Four rhizobia-like strains, isolated from root nodules of Pisum sativum and Vicia faba grown in Anhui and Jiangxi Provinces of China, were grouped into the genus Rhizobium but were distinct from all recognized species of the genus Rhizobium by phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA and housekeeping genes. The combined sequences of the housekeeping genes atpD, recA and glnII for strain CCBAU 23252(T) showed 86.9 to 95% similarity to those of known species of the genus Rhizobium. All four strains had nodC and nifH genes and could form effective nodules with Pisum sativum and Vicia faba, and ineffective nodules with Phaseolus vulgaris, but did not nodulate Glycine max, Arachis hypogaea, Medicago sativa, Trifolium repens or Lablab purpureus in cross-nodulation tests. Fatty acid composition, DNA-DNA relatedness and a series of phenotypic tests also separated these strains from members of closely related species. Based on all the evidence, we propose a novel species, Rhizobium anhuiense sp. nov., and designate CCBAU 23252(T) ( = CGMCC 1.12621(T) = LMG 27729(T)) as the type strain. This strain was isolated from a root nodule of Vicia faba and has a DNA G+C content of 61.1 mol% (Tm).

  7. The Endosymbiont Arsenophonus Provides a General Benefit to Soybean Aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae) Regardless of Host Plant Resistance (Rag).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulff, Jason A; White, Jennifer A

    2015-06-01

    Soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura (Hemiptera: Aphididae), invokes substantial chemical treatment and economic cost in North America. Resistant soybean genotypes hold promise as a low-impact control methodology, but soybean aphid "biotypes" capable of development on resistant soy cast doubt on the durability of soy resistance. We hypothesized that variation in soybean aphid ability to colonize resistant soy is partially attributable to a bacterial symbiont of soybean aphid, Arsenophonus. We used microinjection to manipulate Arsenophonus infection in both virulent and avirulent aphid biotypes, resulting in five pairs of infected versus uninfected isolines. These isolines were subjected to various population growth rate assays on resistant Rag versus susceptible soybean. We found that aphid virulence on Rag soybean was not dependent on Arsenophonus: virulent aphid biotypes performed well on Rag soybean, and avirulent aphid biotypes performed poorly on Rag soybean, regardless of whether Arsenophonus was present or not. However, we did find that Arsenophonus-infected clones on average performed significantly better than their paired uninfected isolines. This pattern was not consistently evident on every date for every clone, either in the population assays nor when we compared lifetime fecundity of individual aphids in a separate experiment. Nevertheless, this overall benefit for infected aphids may be sufficient to explain the high frequency of Arsenophonus infection in soybean aphids. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. The green lacewing, Chrysoperla carnea: preference between lettuce aphids, Nasonovia ribisnigri, and Western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Govinda; Enkegaard, Annie

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the prey preference of 3(rd) instar green lacewing, Chrysoperla carnea Stephens (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae), between western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), and lettuce aphids, Nasonovia ribisnigri (Mosley) (Hemiptera: Aphididae) in laboratory experiments at 25 ± 1° C and 70 ± 5% RH with five prey ratios (10 aphids:80 thrips, 25 aphids:65 thrips, 45 aphids:45 thrips, 65 aphids:25 thrips, and 80 aphids:10 thrips). Third instar C. carnea larvae readily preyed upon both thrips and aphids, with thrips mortality varying between 40 and 90%, and aphid mortality between 52 and 98%. Chrysoperla carnea had a significant preference for N. ribisnigri at two ratios (10 aphids:80 thrips, 65 aphids:25 thrips), but no preference for either prey at the other ratios. There was no significant linear relationship between preference index and prey ratio, but a significant intercept of the linear regression indicated an overall preference of C. carnea for aphids with a value of 0.651 ± 0.054. The possible implications of these findings for control of N. ribisnigri and F. occidentalis by C. carnea are discussed.

  9. Boron, cobalt and molybdenum in the knottiness and production on pea (Pisum sativum L.) cv Bolero culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira Junior, A.; Teixeira, N.T.; Maluf, C.E.; Campos, M.F. de

    1989-01-01

    The test carried out to study the effect of Boron, Cobalt and Molybdenum on the knottiness and production of the pea (Pisum sativum L.)cv Bolero culture, in controlled conditions. The results showed that Boron didn't affect the knottiness and it increased the production, while, Cobalt and Molybdenum promoted significant increase in the knottiness and productivity. (author) [pt

  10. Phylogenetic reconstruction at the species and intraspecies levels in the genus Pisum (L.) (peas) using a histone H1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaytseva, Olga O; Bogdanova, Vera S; Kosterin, Oleg E

    2012-08-10

    A phylogenetic analysis of the genus Pisum (peas), embracing diverse wild and cultivated forms, which evoke problems with species delimitation, was carried out based on a gene coding for histone H1, a protein that has a long and variable functional C-terminal domain. Phylogenetic trees were reconstructed on the basis of the coding sequence of the gene His5 of H1 subtype 5 in 65 pea accessions. Early separation of a clear-cut wild species Pisum fulvum is well supported, while cultivated species Pisum abyssinicum appears as a small branch within Pisum sativum. Another robust branch within P. sativum includes some wild and almost all cultivated representatives of P. sativum. Other wild representatives form diverse but rather subtle branches. In a subset of accessions, PsbA-trnH chloroplast intergenic spacer was also analysed and found less informative than His5. A number of accessions of cultivated peas from remote regions have a His5 allele of identical sequence, encoding an electrophoretically slow protein product, which earlier attracted attention as likely positively selected in harsh climate conditions. In PsbA-trnH, a 8bp deletion was found, which marks cultivated representatives of P. sativum. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Calcium-calmodulin signalling is involved in light-induced acidification by epidermal leaf cells of pea, Pisum sativum L.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elzenga, JTM; Staal, M; Prins, HBA

    1997-01-01

    Pathways of signal transduction of red and blue light-dependent acidification by leaf epidermal cells were studied using epidermal strips of the Argenteum mutant of Pisum sativum. In these preparations the contribution of guard cells to the acidification is minimal. The hydroxypyridine nifedipine, a

  12. Organic fertilization alters the community composition of root associated fungi in Pisum sativum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, L.; Nicolaisen, M.; Ravnskov, S.

    2013-01-01

    of the present study was to examine the response of communities of root associated fungi in Pisum sativum to Protamylasse, an organic fertilizer used in pea production. Plants were grown in pots with field soil amended with four different levels of Protamylasse. 454 pyrosequencing was employed to examine...

  13. Survey of aphid population in a yellow passion fruit crop and its relationship on the spread Cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus in a subtropical region of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcêz, Renata Maia; Chaves, Alexandre Levi Rodrigues; Eiras, Marcelo; Meletti, Laura Maria Molina; de Azevedo Filho, Joaquim Adelino; da Silva, Leonardo Assis; Colariccio, Addolorata

    2015-01-01

    Passion fruit woodiness may be caused by Cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV) and is currently the major passion fruit disease in Brazil. To assess the virus-vector-host interactions, a newly introduced golden passion fruit plantation located in eastern region of São Paulo State, Brazil, was monitored. Dissemination of CABMV was determined analyzing golden passion fruit plants monthly for 18 months by PTA-ELISA. Seasonality and aphid fauna diversity was determined by identification of the captured species using yellow sticky, yellow water-pan and green tile traps. Population composition of the aphid species was determined using the descriptive index of occurrence, dominance and general classification and overlap of species in the R program. Analyses of species grouping afforded to recognize 14 aphid species. The genus Aphis represented 55.42 % of the species captured. Aphid species formed two distinct clusters, one of which was characterized by the diversity of polyphagous species that presented high potential to spread CABMV. The low abundance and diversity of aphid species did not interfere negatively in the CABMV epidemiology. The genus Aphis, particularly Aphis fabae/solanella and A. gossypii, was crucial in the spread of CABMV in passion fruit orchards in the eastern State of São Paulo.

  14. A trio of viral proteins tunes aphid-plant interactions in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westwood, Jack H; Groen, Simon C; Du, Zhiyou; Murphy, Alex M; Anggoro, Damar Tri; Tungadi, Trisna; Luang-In, Vijitra; Lewsey, Mathew G; Rossiter, John T; Powell, Glen; Smith, Alison G; Carr, John P

    2013-01-01

    Virus-induced deterrence to aphid feeding is believed to promote plant virus transmission by encouraging migration of virus-bearing insects away from infected plants. We investigated the effects of infection by an aphid-transmitted virus, cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), on the interaction of Arabidopsis thaliana, one of the natural hosts for CMV, with Myzus persicae (common names: 'peach-potato aphid', 'green peach aphid'). Infection of Arabidopsis (ecotype Col-0) with CMV strain Fny (Fny-CMV) induced biosynthesis of the aphid feeding-deterrent 4-methoxy-indol-3-yl-methylglucosinolate (4MI3M). 4MI3M inhibited phloem ingestion by aphids and consequently discouraged aphid settling. The CMV 2b protein is a suppressor of antiviral RNA silencing, which has previously been implicated in altering plant-aphid interactions. Its presence in infected hosts enhances the accumulation of CMV and the other four viral proteins. Another viral gene product, the 2a protein (an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase), triggers defensive signaling, leading to increased 4MI3M accumulation. The 2b protein can inhibit ARGONAUTE1 (AGO1), a host factor that both positively-regulates 4MI3M biosynthesis and negatively-regulates accumulation of substance(s) toxic to aphids. However, the 1a replicase protein moderated 2b-mediated inhibition of AGO1, ensuring that aphids were deterred from feeding but not poisoned. The LS strain of CMV did not induce feeding deterrence in Arabidopsis ecotype Col-0. Inhibition of AGO1 by the 2b protein could act as a booby trap since this will trigger antibiosis against aphids. However, for Fny-CMV the interplay of three viral proteins (1a, 2a and 2b) appears to balance the need of the virus to inhibit antiviral silencing, while inducing a mild resistance (antixenosis) that is thought to promote transmission. The strain-specific effects of CMV on Arabidopsis-aphid interactions, and differences between the effects of Fny-CMV on this plant and those seen previously in tobacco

  15. Association between patterns in agricultural landscapes and the abundance of wheat aphids and their natural enemies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-He Liu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Effect of different landscape patterns on insect distribution and diversity was determined by studying wheat fields in complex and simple agricultural landscapes. We studied the influence of simple and complex agricultural landscapes on wheat aphids and their natural enemies in terms of the time of migration, abundance, population growth rate of the aphids and parasitoid abundance. The results indicate that the diversity of natural enemies is greater in the complex agricultural landscape and the effect of natural enemies on the abundance of wheat aphids was greater in the complex non-crop habitat. Wheat aphid hyperparasitoid populations differed in different agricultural landscapes with a greater number of parasites in complex agricultural landscapes. Resident times of predatory natural enemies differ in simple and complex agricultural landscapes. The number and types of predatory natural enemies are higher in complex than simple agricultural landscapes. Aphid population growth rates and the maximum population densities of wheat aphids differed significantly in simple and complex landscapes. Maximum population densities of different wheat aphids were very different in simple and complex landscape structures. The population growth rates and maximum population densities of the different predatory natural enemies and hyperparasitoids differed greatly.

  16. Redox Control of Aphid Resistance through Altered Cell Wall Composition and Nutritional Quality1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasool, Brwa; Marcus, Sue E.

    2017-01-01

    The mechanisms underpinning plant perception of phloem-feeding insects, particularly aphids, remain poorly characterized. Therefore, the role of apoplastic redox state in controlling aphid infestation was explored using transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants that have either high (PAO) or low (TAO) ascorbate oxidase (AO) activities relative to the wild type. Only a small number of leaf transcripts and metabolites were changed in response to genotype, and cell wall composition was largely unaffected. Aphid fecundity was decreased significantly in TAO plants compared with other lines. Leaf sugar levels were increased and maximum extractable AO activities were decreased in response to aphids in all genotypes. Transcripts encoding the Respiratory Burst Oxidase Homolog F, signaling components involved in ethylene and other hormone-mediated pathways, photosynthetic electron transport components, sugar, amino acid, and cell wall metabolism, were increased significantly in the TAO plants in response to aphid perception relative to other lines. The levels of galactosylated xyloglucan were decreased significantly in response to aphid feeding in all the lines, the effect being the least in the TAO plants. Similarly, all lines exhibited increases in tightly bound (1→4)-β-galactan. Taken together, these findings identify AO-dependent mechanisms that limit aphid infestation. PMID:28743764

  17. Redox Control of Aphid Resistance through Altered Cell Wall Composition and Nutritional Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasool, Brwa; McGowan, Jack; Pastok, Daria; Marcus, Sue E; Morris, Jenny A; Verrall, Susan R; Hedley, Peter E; Hancock, Robert D; Foyer, Christine H

    2017-09-01

    The mechanisms underpinning plant perception of phloem-feeding insects, particularly aphids, remain poorly characterized. Therefore, the role of apoplastic redox state in controlling aphid infestation was explored using transgenic tobacco ( Nicotiana tabacum ) plants that have either high (PAO) or low (TAO) ascorbate oxidase (AO) activities relative to the wild type. Only a small number of leaf transcripts and metabolites were changed in response to genotype, and cell wall composition was largely unaffected. Aphid fecundity was decreased significantly in TAO plants compared with other lines. Leaf sugar levels were increased and maximum extractable AO activities were decreased in response to aphids in all genotypes. Transcripts encoding the Respiratory Burst Oxidase Homolog F, signaling components involved in ethylene and other hormone-mediated pathways, photosynthetic electron transport components, sugar, amino acid, and cell wall metabolism, were increased significantly in the TAO plants in response to aphid perception relative to other lines. The levels of galactosylated xyloglucan were decreased significantly in response to aphid feeding in all the lines, the effect being the least in the TAO plants. Similarly, all lines exhibited increases in tightly bound (1→4)-β-galactan. Taken together, these findings identify AO-dependent mechanisms that limit aphid infestation. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Plant genotype shapes ant-aphid interactions: implications for community structure and indirect plant defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Kailen A; Agrawal, Anurag A

    2008-06-01

    Little is known about the mechanisms by which plant genotype shapes arthropod community structure. In a field experiment, we measured the effects of milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) genotype and ants on milkweed arthropods. Populations of the ant-tended aphid Aphis asclepiadis and the untended aphid Myzocallis asclepiadis varied eight- to 18-fold among milkweed genotypes, depending on aphid species and whether ants were present. There was no milkweed effect on predatory arthropods. Ants increased Aphis abundance 59%, decreased Myzocallis abundance 52%, and decreased predator abundance 56%. Milkweed genotype indirectly influenced ants via direct effects on Aphis and Myzocallis abundance. Milkweed genotype also modified ant-aphid interactions, influencing the number of ants attracted per Aphis and Myzocallis. While ant effects on Myzocallis were consistently negative, effects on Aphis ranged from antagonistic to mutualistic among milkweed genotypes. As a consequence of milkweed effects on ant-aphid interactions, ant abundance varied 13-fold among milkweed genotypes, and monarch caterpillar survival was negatively correlated with genetic variation in ant abundance. We speculate that heritable variation in milkweed phloem sap drives these effects on aphids, ants, and caterpillars. In summary, milkweed exerts genetic control over the interactions between aphids and an ant that provides defense against foliage-feeding caterpillars.

  19. Differential Expression of Superoxide Dismutase Genes in Aphid-Stressed Maize (Zea mays L.) Seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sytykiewicz, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the expression patterns of superoxide dismutase genes (sod2, sod3.4, sod9 and sodB) in seedling leaves of the Zea mays L. Tasty Sweet (susceptible) and Ambrozja (relatively resistant) cultivars infested with one of two hemipteran species, namely monophagous Sitobion avenae F. (grain aphid) or oligophagous Rhopalosiphum padi L. (bird cherry-oat aphid). Secondarily, aphid-elicited alternations in the antioxidative capacity towards DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) radical in insect-stressed plants were evaluated. Comprehensive comparison of expression profiles of the four sod genes showed that both insect species evoked significant upregulation of three genes sod2, sod3.4 and sod9). However, aphid infestation affected non-significant fluctuations in expression of sodB gene in seedlings of both maize genotypes. The highest levels of transcript accumulation occurred at 8 h (sod2 and sod3.4) or 24 h (sod9) post-infestation, and aphid-induced changes in the expression of sod genes were more dramatic in the Ambrozja cultivar than in the Tasty Sweet variety. Furthermore, bird cherry-oat aphid colonization had a more substantial impact on levels of DPPH radical scavenging activity in infested host seedlings than grain aphid colonization. Additionally, Ambrozja plants infested by either hemipteran species showed markedly lower antioxidative capacity compared with attacked Tasty Sweet plants. PMID:24722734

  20. AtWRKY22 promotes susceptibility to aphids and modulates salicylic acid and jasmonic acid signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloth, Karen J; Wiegers, Gerrie L; Busscher-Lange, Jacqueline; van Haarst, Jan C; Kruijer, Willem; Bouwmeester, Harro J; Dicke, Marcel; Jongsma, Maarten A

    2016-05-01

    Aphids induce many transcriptional perturbations in their host plants, but the signalling cascades responsible and the effects on plant resistance are largely unknown. Through a genome-wide association (GWA) mapping study in Arabidopsis thaliana, we identified WRKY22 as a candidate gene associated with feeding behaviour of the green peach aphid, Myzus persicae The transcription factor WRKY22 is known to be involved in pathogen-triggered immunity, and WRKY22 gene expression has been shown to be induced by aphids. Assessment of aphid population development and feeding behaviour on knockout mutants and overexpression lines showed that WRKY22 increases susceptibility to M. persicae via a mesophyll-located mechanism. mRNA sequencing analysis of aphid-infested wrky22 knockout plants revealed the up-regulation of genes involved in salicylic acid (SA) signalling and down-regulation of genes involved in plant growth and cell-wall loosening. In addition, mechanostimulation of knockout plants by clip cages up-regulated jasmonic acid (JA)-responsive genes, resulting in substantial negative JA-SA crosstalk. Based on this and previous studies, WRKY22 is considered to modulate the interplay between the SA and JA pathways in response to a wide range of biotic and abiotic stimuli. Its induction by aphids and its role in suppressing SA and JA signalling make WRKY22 a potential target for aphids to manipulate host plant defences. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  1. Characterization of Peroxidase Changes in Tolerant and Susceptible Soybeans Challenged by Soybean Aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchi-Werle, L; Heng-Moss, T M; Hunt, T E; Baldin, E L L; Baird, L M

    2014-10-01

    Changes in protein content, peroxidase activity, and isozyme profiles in response to soybean aphid feeding were documented at V1 (fully developed leaves at unifoliate node, first trifoliate leaf unrolled) and V3 (fully developed leaf at second trifoliate node, third trifoliate leaf unrolled) stages of soybean aphid-tolerant (KS4202) and -susceptible (SD76R) soybeans. Protein content was similar between infested and control V1 and V3 stage plants for both KS4202 and SD76R at 6, 16, and 22 d after aphid introduction. Enzyme kinetics studies documented that control and aphid-infested KS4202 V1 stage and SD76R V1 and V3 stages had similar levels of peroxidase activity at the three time points evaluated. In contrast, KS4202 aphid-infested plants at the V3 stage had significantly higher peroxidase activity levels than control plants at 6 and 22 d after aphid introduction. The differences in peroxidase activity observed between infested and control V3 stage KS4202 plants at these two time points suggest that peroxidases may be playing multiple roles in the tolerant plant. Native gels stained for peroxidase were able to detect differences in the isozyme profiles of aphid-infested and control plants for both KS4202 and SD76R. © 2014 Entomological Society of America.

  2. Indirect effect of a transgenic wheat on aphids through enhanced powdery mildew resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone von Burg

    Full Text Available In agricultural ecosystems, arthropod herbivores and fungal pathogens are likely to colonise the same plant and may therefore affect each other directly or indirectly. The fungus that causes powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis tritici and cereal aphids are important pests of wheat but interactions between them have seldom been investigated. We studied the effects of powdery mildew of wheat on two cereal aphid species, Metopolophium dirhodum and Rhopalosiphum padi. We hypothesized that aphid number and size will be smaller on powdery mildew-infected plants than on non-infected plants. In a first experiment we used six commercially available wheat varieties whereas in the second experiment we used a genetically modified (GM mildew-resistant wheat line and its non-transgenic sister line. Because the two lines differed only in the presence of the transgene and in powdery mildew resistance, experiment 2 avoided the confounding effect of variety. In both experiments, the number of M. dirhodum but not of R. padi was reduced by powdery mildew infection. Transgenic mildew-resistant lines therefore harboured bigger aphid populations than the non-transgenic lines. For both aphid species individual size was mostly influenced by aphid number. Our results indicate that plants that are protected from a particular pest (powdery mildew became more favourable for another pest (aphids.

  3. Differential expression of superoxide dismutase genes in aphid-stressed maize (Zea mays L. seedlings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubert Sytykiewicz

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the expression patterns of superoxide dismutase genes (sod2, sod3.4, sod9 and sodB in seedling leaves of the Zea mays L. Tasty Sweet (susceptible and Ambrozja (relatively resistant cultivars infested with one of two hemipteran species, namely monophagous Sitobion avenae F. (grain aphid or oligophagous Rhopalosiphum padi L. (bird cherry-oat aphid. Secondarily, aphid-elicited alternations in the antioxidative capacity towards DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical in insect-stressed plants were evaluated. Comprehensive comparison of expression profiles of the four sod genes showed that both insect species evoked significant upregulation of three genes sod2, sod3.4 and sod9. However, aphid infestation affected non-significant fluctuations in expression of sodB gene in seedlings of both maize genotypes. The highest levels of transcript accumulation occurred at 8 h (sod2 and sod3.4 or 24 h (sod9 post-infestation, and aphid-induced changes in the expression of sod genes were more dramatic in the Ambrozja cultivar than in the Tasty Sweet variety. Furthermore, bird cherry-oat aphid colonization had a more substantial impact on levels of DPPH radical scavenging activity in infested host seedlings than grain aphid colonization. Additionally, Ambrozja plants infested by either hemipteran species showed markedly lower antioxidative capacity compared with attacked Tasty Sweet plants.

  4. Evidence for Soybean Aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae) Resistance to Pyrethroid Insecticides in the Upper Midwestern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Anthony A; Menger-Anderson, James; Silverstein, Celia; Potter, Bruce D; MacRae, Ian V; Hodgson, Erin W; Koch, Robert L

    2017-10-01

    Soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura (Hemiptera: Aphididae), is a damaging invasive pest of soybean in the upper Midwest. Threshold-based insecticide applications are the primary control method for soybean aphid, but few insecticide groups are available (i.e., pyrethroids, organophosphates, and neonicotinoids). To quantify current levels of soybean aphid susceptibility to pyrethroids in the upper Midwest and monitor for insecticide resistance, leaf-dip bioassays were performed with λ-cyhalothrin in 2013-2015, and glass-vial bioassays were performed with λ-cyhalothrin and bifenthrin in 2015 and 2016. Soybean aphids were collected from 27 population-years in Minnesota and northern Iowa, and were compared with a susceptible laboratory colony with no known insecticide exposure since discovery of soybean aphid in North America in 2000. Field-collected aphids from some locations in leaf-dip and glass-vial bioassays had significantly lower rates of insecticide-induced mortality compared with the laboratory population, although field population susceptibility varied by year. In response to sublethal concentrations of λ-cyhalothrin, adult aphids from some locations required higher concentrations of insecticide to reduce nymph production compared with the laboratory population. The most resistant field population demonstrated 39-fold decreased mortality compared with the laboratory population. The resistance documented in this study, although relatively low for most field populations, indicates that there has been repeated selection pressure for pyrethroid resistance in some soybean aphid populations. Integrated pest management and insecticide resistance management should be practiced to slow further development of soybean aphid resistance to pyrethroids. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Does Aphid Infestation Interfere with Indirect Plant Defense against Lepidopteran Caterpillars in Wild Cabbage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yehua; Weldegergis, Berhane T; Chamontri, Surachet; Dicke, Marcel; Gols, Rieta

    2017-05-01

    Attraction of parasitoids to plant volatiles induced by multiple herbivory depends on the specific combinations of attacking herbivore species, especially when their feeding modes activate different defense signalling pathways as has been reported for phloem feeding aphids and tissue feeding caterpillars. We studied the effects of pre-infestation with non-host aphids (Brevicoryne brassicae) for two different time periods on the ability of two parasitoid species to discriminate between volatiles emitted by plants infested by host caterpillars alone and those emitted by plants infested with host caterpillars plus aphids. Using plants originating from three chemically distinct wild cabbage (Brassica oleracea) populations, Diadegma semiclausum switched preference for dually infested plants to preference for plants infested with Plutella xylostella hosts alone when the duration of pre-aphid infestation doubled from 7 to 14 days. Microplitis mediator, a parasitoid of Mamestra brassicae caterpillars, preferred dually-infested plants irrespective of aphid-infestation duration. Separation of the volatile blends emitted by plants infested with hosts plus aphids or with hosts only was poor, based on multivariate statistics. However, emission rates of individual compounds were often reduced in plants infested with aphids plus hosts compared to those emitted by plants infested with hosts alone. This effect depended on host caterpillar species and plant population and was little affected by aphid infestation duration. Thus, the interactive effect of aphids and hosts on plant volatile production and parasitoid attraction can be dynamic and parasitoid specific. The characteristics of the multi-component volatile blends that determine parasitoid attraction are too complex to be deduced from simple correlative statistical analyses.

  6. Soil pathogen-aphid interactions under differences in soil organic matter and mineral fertilizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gils, Stijn; Tamburini, Giovanni; Marini, Lorenzo; Biere, Arjen; van Agtmaal, Maaike; Tyc, Olaf; Kos, Martine; Kleijn, David; van der Putten, Wim H

    2017-01-01

    There is increasing evidence showing that microbes can influence plant-insect interactions. In addition, various studies have shown that aboveground pathogens can alter the interactions between plants and insects. However, little is known about the role of soil-borne pathogens in plant-insect interactions. It is also not known how environmental conditions, that steer the performance of soil-borne pathogens, might influence these microbe-plant-insect interactions. Here, we studied effects of the soil-borne pathogen Rhizoctonia solani on aphids (Sitobion avenae) using wheat (Triticum aestivum) as a host. In a greenhouse experiment, we tested how different levels of soil organic matter (SOM) and fertilizer addition influence the interactions between plants and aphids. To examine the influence of the existing soil microbiome on the pathogen effects, we used both unsterilized field soil and sterilized field soil. In unsterilized soil with low SOM content, R. solani addition had a negative effect on aphid biomass, whereas it enhanced aphid biomass in soil with high SOM content. In sterilized soil, however, aphid biomass was enhanced by R. solani addition and by high SOM content. Plant biomass was enhanced by fertilizer addition, but only when SOM content was low, or in the absence of R. solani. We conclude that belowground pathogens influence aphid performance and that the effect of soil pathogens on aphids can be more positive in the absence of a soil microbiome. This implies that experiments studying the effect of pathogens under sterile conditions might not represent realistic interactions. Moreover, pathogen-plant-aphid interactions can be more positive for aphids under high SOM conditions. We recommend that soil conditions should be taken into account in the study of microbe-plant-insect interactions.

  7. A Secreted MIF Cytokine Enables Aphid Feeding and Represses Plant Immune Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naessens, Elodie; Dubreuil, Géraldine; Giordanengo, Philippe; Baron, Olga Lucia; Minet-Kebdani, Naïma; Keller, Harald; Coustau, Christine

    2015-07-20

    Aphids attack virtually all plant species and cause serious crop damages in agriculture. Despite their dramatic impact on food production, little is known about the molecular processes that allow aphids to exploit their host plants. To date, few aphid salivary proteins have been identified that are essential for aphid feeding, and their nature and function remain largely unknown. Here, we show that a macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is secreted in aphid saliva. In vertebrates, MIFs are important pro-inflammatory cytokines regulating immune responses. MIF proteins are also secreted by parasites of vertebrates, including nematodes, ticks, and protozoa, and participate in the modulation of host immune responses. The finding that a plant parasite secretes a MIF protein prompted us to question the role of the cytokine in the plant-aphid interaction. We show here that expression of MIF genes is crucial for aphid survival, fecundity, and feeding on a host plant. The ectopic expression of aphid MIFs in leaf tissues inhibits major plant immune responses, such as the expression of defense-related genes, callose deposition, and hypersensitive cell death. Functional complementation analyses in vivo allowed demonstrating that MIF1 is the member of the MIF protein family that allows aphids to exploit their host plants. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a cytokine that is secreted by a parasite to modulate plant immune responses. Our findings suggest a so-far unsuspected conservation of infection strategies among parasites of animal and plant species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Rapid evolution of symbiont-mediated resistance compromises biological control of aphids by parasitoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käch, Heidi; Mathé-Hubert, Hugo; Dennis, Alice B; Vorburger, Christoph

    2018-02-01

    There is growing interest in biological control as a sustainable and environmentally friendly way to control pest insects. Aphids are among the most detrimental agricultural pests worldwide, and parasitoid wasps are frequently employed for their control. The use of asexual parasitoids may improve the effectiveness of biological control because only females kill hosts and because asexual populations have a higher growth rate than sexuals. However, asexuals may have a reduced capacity to track evolutionary change in their host populations. We used a factorial experiment to compare the ability of sexual and asexual populations of the parasitoid Lysiphlebus fabarum to control caged populations of black bean aphids ( Aphis fabae ) of high and low clonal diversity. The aphids came from a natural population, and one-third of the aphid clones harbored Hamiltonella defensa , a heritable bacterial endosymbiont that increases resistance to parasitoids. We followed aphid and parasitoid population dynamics for 3 months but found no evidence that the reproductive mode of parasitoids affected their effectiveness as biocontrol agents, independent of host clonal diversity. Parasitoids failed to control aphids in most cases, because their introduction resulted in strong selection for clones protected by H. defensa . The increasingly resistant aphid populations escaped control by parasitoids, and we even observed parasitoid extinctions in many cages. The rapid evolution of symbiont-conferred resistance in turn imposed selection on parasitoids. In cages where asexual parasitoids persisted until the end of the experiment, they became dominated by a single genotype able to overcome the protection provided by H. defensa . Thus, there was evidence for parasitoid counteradaptation, but it was generally too slow for parasitoids to regain control over aphid populations. It appears that when pest aphids possess defensive symbionts, the presence of parasitoid genotypes able to overcome

  9. A dietary test of putative deleterious sterols for the aphid Myzus persicae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Bouvaine

    Full Text Available The aphid Myzus persicae displays high mortality on tobacco plants bearing a transgene which results in the accumulation of the ketosteroids cholestan-3-one and cholest-4-en-3-one in the phloem sap. To test whether the ketosteroids are the basis of the plant resistance to the aphids, M. persicae were reared on chemically-defined diets with different steroid contents at 0.1-10 µg ml(-1. Relative to sterol-free diet and dietary supplements of the two ketosteroids and two phytosterols, dietary cholesterol significantly extended aphid lifespan and increased fecundity at one or more dietary concentrations tested. Median lifespan was 50% lower on the diet supplemented with cholest-4-en-3-one than on the cholesterol-supplemented diet. Aphid feeding rate did not vary significantly across the treatments, indicative of no anti-feedant effect of any sterol/steroid. Aphids reared on diets containing equal amounts of cholesterol and cholest-4-en-3-one showed fecundity equivalent to aphids on diets containing only cholesterol. Aphids were reared on diets that reproduced the relative steroid abundance in the phloem sap of the control and modified tobacco plants, and their performance on the two diet formulations was broadly equivalent. We conclude that, at the concentrations tested, plant ketosteroids support weaker aphid performance than cholesterol, but do not cause acute toxicity to the aphids. In plants, the ketosteroids may act synergistically with plant factors absent from artificial diets but are unlikely to be solely responsible for resistance of modified tobacco plants.

  10. Differential Life History Trait Associations of Aphids with Nonpersistent Viruses in Cucurbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelella, G M; Egel, D S; Holland, J D; Nemacheck, J A; Williams, C E; Kaplan, I

    2015-06-01

    The diversity of vectors and fleeting nature of virus acquisition and transmission renders nonpersistent viruses a challenge to manage. We assessed the importance of noncolonizing versus colonizing vectors with a 2-yr survey of aphids and nonpersistent viruses on commercial pumpkin farms. We quantified aphid alightment using pan traps, while testing leaf samples with multiplex RT-PCR targeting cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV), watermelon mosaic virus (WMV), and papaya ringspot virus (PRSV). Overall, we identified 53 aphid species (3,899 individuals), from which the melon aphid, Aphis gossypii Glover, a pumpkin-colonizing species, predominated (76 and 37% of samples in 2010 and 2011, respectively). CMV and ZYMV were not detected, but WMV and PRSV were prevalent, both regionally (WMV: 28/29 fields, PRSV: 21/29 fields) and within fields (infection rates = 69 and 55% for WMV in 2010 and 2011; 28 and 25% for PRSV in 2010 and 2011). However, early-season samples showed extremely low infection levels, suggesting cucurbit viruses are not seed-transmitted and implicating aphid activity as a causal factor driving virus spread. Interestingly, neither noncolonizer and colonizer alightment nor total aphid alightment were good predictors of virus presence, but community analyses revealed species-specific relationships. For example, cowpea aphid (Aphis craccivora Koch) and spotted alfalfa aphid (Therioaphis trifolii Monell f. maculata) were associated with PRSV infection, whereas the oleander aphid (Aphis nerii Bover de Fonscolombe) was associated with WMV spread within fields. These outcomes highlight the need for tailored management plans targeting key vectors of nonpersistent viruses in agricultural systems. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Host settling behavior, reproductive performance, and effects on plant growth of an exotic cereal aphid, Metopolophium festucae subsp. cerealium (Hemiptera: Aphididae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, T S; Wu, Y; Eigenbrode, S D

    2014-06-01

    The cereal aphid Metopolophium festucae subsp. cerealium (Stroyan) is a recent addition to North America, but little is known about this species in its exotic habitat. We surveyed aphid populations for 3 years (2011-2013) to investigate changes in aphid density in the Pacific Northwest United States. We tested aphid host settling preference and fecundity on eight grass species, four native grasses (bluebunch wheatgrass, blue wild rye, Idaho fescue, and rough fescue) and four cereal crops (corn, wheat, barley, and oat), and evaluated the effects of aphid feeding on plant biomass. Four important findings emerged: 1) aphid prevalence in sweep net samples increased from 2011 to 2012, but remained stable from 2012 to 2013; 2) aphids preferentially settled on wheat and avoided corn, but aphids did not discriminate between barley, oat, and native grasses; 3) aphid fecundity was high on wheat and barley, intermediate on oat and blue wild rye, low on Idaho fescue, rough fescue, and bluebunch wheatgrass, and aphids did not reproduce at all on corn; and 4) barley, corn, oats, Idaho fescue, and blue wild rye were not susceptible to aphid feeding damage, but wheat, rough fescue, and bluebunch wheatgrass were susceptible to aphid feeding damage. Our results suggest that wheat and barley are preferred by M. festucae cerealium, and that aphids reproduce most rapidly on these hosts and cause significant reductions in wheat but not barley growth. Also, M. festucae cerealium appears capable of surviving on native grasses, although only bluebunch wheatgrass and rough fescue were susceptible to aphid feeding damage.

  12. Sugarcane Aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae): A New Pest on Sorghum in North America

    OpenAIRE

    Bowling, Robert D.; Brewer, Michael J.; Kerns, David L.; Gordy, John; Seiter, Nick; Elliott, Norman E.; Buntin, G. David; Way, M. O.; Royer, T. A.; Biles, Stephen; Maxson, Erin

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, the sugarcane aphid, Melanaphis sacchari (Zehntner) (Hemiptera: Aphididae), a new invasive pest of sorghum species in North America, was confirmed on sorghum in 4 states and 38 counties in the United States. In 2015, the aphid was reported on sorghum in 17 states and over 400 counties as well as all sorghum-producing regions in Mexico. Ability to overwinter on living annual and perennial hosts in southern sorghum-producing areas and wind-aided movement of alate aphids appear to be th...

  13. Orco mediates olfactory behaviors and winged morph differentiation induced by alarm pheromone in the grain aphid, Sitobion avenae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jia; Zhang, Yong; Francis, Frédéric; Cheng, Dengfa; Sun, Jingrun; Chen, Julian

    2015-09-01

    Olfaction is crucial for short distance host location and pheromone detection by insects. Complexes of olfactory receptors (ORs) are composed of odor-specific ORs and OR co-receptors (Orco). Orcos are widely co-expressed with odor-specific ORs and are conserved across insect taxa. A number of Orco orthologs have been studied to date, although none has been identified in cereal aphids. In this study, an Orco gene ortholog was cloned from the grain aphid, Sitobion avenae, and named "SaveOrco"; RNA interference (RNAi) reduced the expression of SaveOrco to 34.11% in aphids, resulting in weaker EAG (electroantennogram) responses to plant volatiles (Z-3-hexene-1-ol; methyl salicylate, MeSA) and aphid alarm pheromone (E-β-farnesene, EBF). Aphid wing differentiation induced by EBF was investigated in both RNAi treated and untreated aphids. EBF induced production of winged aphids in both pre-natal and post-natal periods in untreated aphids, but no such induction was observed in the RNAi-treated aphids. We conclude that SaveOrco is crucial for the aphid's response to pheromones and other volatiles, and is involved in wing differentiation triggered by EBF. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Aphid parasitoid (Hymenoptera:Braconidae: Aphidiinae) in wetland habitats in western Palearctic: key and associated aphid parasitoid guilds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomanović, Ž.; Starý, Petr; Kavallieratos, N. G.; Gagić, V.; Plećaš, M.; Janković, M.; Rakhshani, E.; Ćetković, A.; Petrović, A.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 48, 1-2 (2012), s. 189-198 ISSN 0037-9271 Grant - others:The Ministry of Science and Technological Development of the Republic of Serbia(RS) 043001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : aphid parasitoids * tritrophic interactions * wetlands Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.529, year: 2012 http://zoologie.umh.ac.be/asef/pdf/2012_48_01_02/full/Tomanovic_et_al_2012_ASEF_48_1_2_189_198_full.pdf

  15. Age-dependent variation in membrane lipid synthesis in leaves of garden pea (Pisum sativum L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellgren, Lars; Sandelius, A.S.

    2001-01-01

    To study membrane lipid synthesis during the lifespan of a dicotyledon leaf, the second oldest leaf of 10-40-d-old plants of garden pea (Pisum sativum L.) was labelled with [1-C- 14]acetate and the distribution of radioactivity between the major membrane lipids was followed for 3 d....... In the expanding second oldest leaf of 10-d-old plants, acetate was primarily allocated into phosphatidylcholine (PC) during the first 4 h of labelling. During the following 3 d, labelling of PC decreased and monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) became the most radioactive lipid. In the fully expanded second oldest...... leaf of older plants, acetate was predominantly allocated into phosphatidylglycerol (PG), which remained the major radiolabelled lipid during the 3 d studied. The proportion of radioactivity recovered in MGDG decreased with increasing plant age up to 20 d, suggesting that, in expanded leaves, MGDG...

  16. Effect of ethephon and UV irradiation on auxin destruction in Little Marvel dwarf pea (Pisum satirum)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, E.W.; De Morrow, J.M.; Richard, L.B.; O'Connor, M.N.

    1979-01-01

    Treatment of 'Little Marvel' dwarf pea (Pisum sativum) seeds with 3 ppm ethephon was followed by subsequent exposure to: 1. complete darkness; 2. visible light; and 3. ultraviolet irradiation (UV). Cell free extracts of distal root, root tip, proximal stem, and leaf tissues (20-day-old) were assayed for IAA-I- 14 C destruction. Distal root and root tip tissue extracts of ethephon-treated seeds and subsequent exposure of the seedlings to UV showed marked IAA-I- 14 C destruction compared to proximal stem and leaf cell-free extracts. The present study suggests that IAA-I- 14 C destruction may be enzymic in nature and different in all four tissues (root tip, dorsal root, proximal stem, and leaf) depending upon the exposure treatment (dark, visible lights and UV), with or without ethephon pretreatment. (orig.) [de

  17. Physiological responses of PEA (Pisum sativum cv. meteor) to irrigation salinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahid, M.A.; Pervez, M.A.; Balal, R.M.; Azhar, N.; Shahzad, J.; Ubaidullah

    2008-01-01

    The effects of irrigation water or soil salinity on physiological aspects of pea (Pisum sativum cv.Meteor) were contrived. Ten weeks old pea plants were treated with NaCl at 0, 40, 90 and 140 mM in nutrient solution Plants were grown in controlled environment and harvested at each 3 days interval for decisiveness 0 physiological parameters. Photosynthetic rate, relative water content, stomatal conductance and chlorophyll contents reduced by increasing the NaCI concentration while CO/sub 2/ concentration and free proline content intensified. By experiment it was adumbrated that high salinity level along with prolonged accentuate duration is more drastic to pea plants physiology. Results also exhibited that pea plants could indulge 40 and 90 mM NaCl but are sensitive to 140 mM. (author)

  18. Cultivar and Rhizobium Strain Effects on the Symbiotic Performance of Pea (Pisum sativum)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skøt, Leif

    1983-01-01

    The symbiotic performance of four pea (Pisum sativum L.) cultivars in combination with each of four strains of Rhizobium leguminosarum was studied in growth chamber experiments in order to estimate the effects of cultivars, strains and cultivar × strain interaction on the variation in dry weight, N...... content and dry weight/N ratio. At harvest 63 days after planting, cultivars accounted for 75% of the variation in dry weight, while the Rhizobium strains accounted for 63% of the variation in N-content and 70% of the variation in dry weight/N ratio. Cultivar × strain interactions were statistically...... significant, but of minor quantitative importance, accounting for 5–15% of the total variation. Rhizobium strains also influenced the partitioning of N between reproductive and vegetative plant parts and between root and shoot biomass....

  19. The effect of salinity on seed germination and growth parameters of field pea (Pisum sativum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovičić Dušica

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Field pea (Pisum sativum L. seed contains a large amount of proteins, amino acids, sugars, carbohydrates, vitamins A and C, calcium and phosphorous, and hence it is widely used for many purposes. Although field pea has moderate requirements for its growth, it is sensitive to increased salt content in soil. This research included eight varieties (Javor, Jantar, Partner, Kristal, Pionir, Junior, Trezor, Dukat developed at Institute of Field and Vegetable Crops in Novi Sad. Sodium chloride solutions of various concentrations (0, 50, 100 and 150 mM were added in growing media to simulate saline conditions. The following were subsequently determined: seed germination, seedling length, fresh and dry weight of seedlings and 1000-seed weight. Among the analyzed varieties, variety Jantar expressed a high level of tolerance to increased salt content in growing media under laboratory conditions.

  20. Genetic background and agronomic value of leaf types in pea (Pisum sativum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikić Aleksandar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pea (Pisum sativum L. has a compound leaf like many other legume species. The 'semi-leafless' pea (afaf tltl, with all leaflets transformed into tendrils, is considered one of the most important achievements in pea breeding, due to a significantly enhanced standing ability and equally efficient dry matter production in comparison to normal-leafed genotypes (AFAF TLTL. 'Semi-leafless' cultivars provide high and stable grain yield and are dominant in the modern dry pea production worldwide. There are also 'semi-leafless' cultivars that are autumn-sown and those for forage production. The genotypes with all tendrils transformed into leaflets (afaf tltl, called 'acacia' or 'tendril-less', are extremely prone to lodging and may have importance in breeding for forage production. Little is known about the potential agronomic value of 'acacia-tendril-less' (afaf tltl genotypes.

  1. Suitability of some green pea (Pisum sativum L. varieties for processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jokanović Marija R.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Green pea (Pisum sativum L. has a long tradition in Serbia and Montenegro as a processing crop. Short growing season, relatively simple production, pleasant taste and high nutritional value stimulate both production and consumption of peas. The objective of this paper is to present the main characteristics of two pea varieties, domestic cultivar Tamis and imported cultivar Jof and the influence of prolonged time between harvest and processing on the changes of main characteristics. Both cultivars have grains of very high quality that can be used for industrial processing as well as for garden growing (the green market. In the present paper the results of one-year study are shown: cultivar characteristics, growing season length, and physico-chemical (tenderometer value (TM, dry matter, alcohol insoluble solids (AIS, sugar and starch measurements for texture determination. According to the results, the optimal way of processing for each variety was recommended. .

  2. SSR genetic linkage map construction of pea (Pisum sativum L. based on Chinese native varieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuelian Sun

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Simple sequence repeat (SSR markers have previously been applied to linkage mapping of the pea (Pisum sativum L. genome. However, the transferability of existing loci to the molecularly distinct Chinese winter pea gene pool was limited. A novel set of pea SSR markers was accordingly developed. Together with existing SSR sequences, the genome of the G0003973 (winter hardy × G0005527 (cold sensitive cross was mapped using 190 F2 individuals. In total, 157 SSR markers were placed in 11 linkage groups with an average interval of 9.7 cM and total coverage of 1518 cM. The novel markers and genetic linkage map will be useful for marker-assisted pea breeding.

  3. Cyclical parthenogenesis and viviparity in aphids as evolutionary novelties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Gregory K

    2012-09-01

    Evolutionary novelties represent challenges to biologists, particularly those who would like to understand the developmental and genetic changes responsible for their appearance. Most modern aphids possess two apparent evolutionary novelties: cyclical parthenogenesis (a life cycle with both sexual and asexual phases) and viviparity (internal development and live birth of progeny) in their asexual phase. Here I discuss the evolution of these apparent novelties from a developmental standpoint. Although a full understanding of the evolution of cyclical parthenogenesis and viviparity in aphids can seem a daunting task, these complex transitions can at least be broken down into a handful of steps. I argue that these should include the following: a differentiation of two developmentally distinct oocytes; de novo synthesis of centrosomes and modification of meiosis during asexual oogenesis; a loss or bypass of any cell cycle arrest and changes in key developmental events during viviparous oogenesis; and a change in how mothers specify the sexual vs. asexual fates of their progeny. Grappling with the nature of such steps and the order in which they occurred ought to increase our understanding and reduce the apparent novelty of complex evolutionary transitions. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Day length constrains the time budget of aphid predators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joschinski, Jens; Kiess, Tim; Krauss, Jochen

    2017-07-20

    Phenology shifts and range expansions cause organisms to experience novel day length - temperature correlations. Depending on the temporal niche, organisms may benefit or suffer from changes in day length, thus potentially affecting phenological adaptation. We assessed the impact of day length changes on larvae of Chrysoperla carnea (Stephens) and Episyrphus balteatus (De Geer), both of which prey on aphids. Larvae of E. balteatus are night-active, whereas those of C. carnea appear to be crepuscular. We subjected both species in climate chambers to day lengths of 16 : 8 L : D and, to circumvent diapause responses, 20 : 4 L : D. We recorded development times and predation rates of both species. E. balteatus grew 13% faster in the 16 : 8 L : D treatment and preyed on significantly more aphids. In contrast, C. carnea grew 13% faster in the 20 : 4 L : D treatment and higher predation rates in 20 : 4 L : D were marginally significant. Our results show that day length affects development and predation, but that the direction depends on species. Such differences in the use of day length may alter the efficiency of biocontrol agents in a changing climate. © 2017 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  5. Nitrogen-Mediated Interaction: A Walnut-Aphid-Parasitoid System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mace, Kevi C; Mills, Nicholas J

    2016-08-01

    The effects of plant quality on natural enemies are often overlooked in planning and executing biological control programs for insect pests in agriculture. Plant quality, however, could help to explain some of the observed variation in effectiveness of biological control, as it can indirectly influence natural enemy populations. In this study, we used the walnut aphid Chromaphis juglandicola (Kaltenbach) to address the effect of increased nitrogen availability to the host plant on parasitism by the specialist parasitoid Trioxys pallidus (Haliday). In laboratory experiments with walnut seedlings, a higher chlorophyll content index of the foliage in response to added nitrogen was correlated with a decrease in the number of mummies produced by female parasitoids over a 24-h period but an increase in the proportion and the size of female offspring. In field sampling of walnut orchards, there was no relationship between the percent parasitism of walnut aphids by T. pallidus and the chlorophyll content index of the trees. Nitrogen fertilizer and plant quality can clearly affect biological control and should be given greater consideration in integrated pest management. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Do asexual morphs of the peach-potato aphid, Myzus persicae, utilise the aphid sex pheromone? Behavioural and electrophysiological responses of M. persicae virginoparae to (4aS,7S,7aR)-nepetalactone and its effect on aphid performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Grandon, G Mandela; Woodcock, Christine M; Poppy, Guy M

    2013-08-01

    The aphid sex pheromone component (4aS,7S,7aR)-nepetalactone is considered to be a potential tool for enhancing biological control of aphids. Studies have confirmed its potential to attract parasitoids, increase parasitism rates in the field and also alter the spatial distribution of parasitoids. An important aspect that has been overlooked is the impact that the introduction of nepetalactone may have on aphid populations already present in field or glasshouse environments. The most prevalent pest aphid populations in glasshouse and field environments are the asexual morphs, which are capable of exponential growth if populations are not controlled. The short-term implications of the sex pheromone on asexual aphids were observed through their behavioural response. Using Y-tube olfactometry, it is shown that virginoparae of the peach-potato aphid, Myzus persicae, are repelled by high concentrations of nepetalactone. Long-term effects of the pheromone which may span the aphid's life, or even generations, were assessed via mean relative growth rate (MRGR) and the intrinsic rate of natural increase (rm). Electroantennography also demonstrated that asexual female aphids are able to detect aphid sex pheromone components. To our knowledge, this is the first time it has been reported that M. persicae virginoparae are able to detect aphid sex pheromone components or that their behavioural response and/or performance has been studied. The implications of these results and their significance in understanding semiochemical communication are discussed.

  7. Shelf Life Extension of Maple pea (Pisum sativum var. arvense L. Spread Using Sous Vide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ķirse Asnate

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effect of sous vide packaging on the shelf life of maple pea (Pisum sativum var. arvense L. spread. Pea spreads were made of ground re-hydrated cooked maple peas ‘Bruno’ (Pisum sativum var. arvense L., to which salt, citric acid, oil, and spices were added. Pea spread was stored in polyamide/polyethylene (PA/PE film pouches, packaged in vacuum and hermetically sealed. Pea spread pouches were heat treated in a water bath, then rapidly cooled in ice-water and stored at 4.0 ± 0.5 °C. Sous vide was applied in three different heat regimens +(65.0; 80.0 and 100.0 ± 0.5 °C with cooking times 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 min at a constant temperature. Total plate count was determined according to ISO 4833-1:2014 on Plate Count Agar and Enterobacteriaceae determination was performed in accordance with ISO 21528-2:2004 on Violet Red Bile Glucose Agar. Total plate count in pea spread without thermal treatment was 3.41 log10 CFU g−1, in all sous vide packaged pea spread samples microbial contamination was significantly lower (p < 0.05. Enterobacteriaceae were not detected in any samples. It is possible to extend the shelf life of sous vide maple pea spread up to 14 weeks when stored at 4.0 ± 0.5 °C.

  8. Genetic Variation Controlling Wrinkled Seed Phenotypes in Pisum: How Lucky Was Mendel?

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    Tracey Rayner

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the traits studied by Mendel in pea (Pisum sativum L. was the wrinkled-seeded phenotype, and the molecular basis for a mutation underlying this phenotype was discovered in the 1990s. Although the starch-branching enzyme gene mutation identified at the genetic locus r is most likely to be that in seeds available to Mendel in the mid-1800s, it has remained an open question as to whether or not additional natural mutations in this gene exist within Pisum germplasm collections. Here, we explore this question and show that all but two wrinkled-seeded variants in one such collection correspond to either the mutant allele described previously for the r locus or a mutation at a second genetic locus, rb, affecting the gene encoding the large subunit of Adenosine diphosphoglucose (ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase; the molecular basis for the rb mutation is described here. The genetic basis for the phenotype of one (JI 2110 of the two lines which are neither r nor rb has been studied in crosses with a round-seeded variant (JI 281; for which extensive genetic marker data were expected. In marked contrast to the trait studied by Mendel and the rb phenotype; the data suggest that the wrinkled-seeded phenotype in JI 2110 is maternally determined, controlled by two genetic loci, and the extent to which it is manifested is very sensitive to the environment. Metabolite analysis of the cotyledons of JI 2110 revealed a profile for sucrose and sucrose-derived compounds that was more similar to that of wild-type round-seeded, than that of wrinkled-seeded r, pea lines. However, the metabolite profile of the seed coat (testa of JI 2110 was distinct from that of other round-seeded genotypes tested which, together with analysis of recombinant inbred progeny lines, suggests an explanation for the seed phenotype.

  9. Dicty_cDB: CHL651 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available uence. 32 5.2 2 CN583755 |CN583755.1 USDA-FP_126820 Acyrthosiphon pisum, Pea Aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum cDNA ...cyrthosiphon pisum cDNA clone ID0AAA28CE105', mRNA sequence. 32 5.2 2 CN585277 |CN585277.1 USDA-FP_128347 Ac...yrthosiphon pisum, Pea Aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum cDNA clone WHAP070_F07, mRNA seq

  10. Effect of Bt-cotton on chrysopids, ladybird beetles and their prey: aphids and whiteflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellet, M A; Schoeman, A S

    2007-06-01

    The effect of Bt-cotton, i.e. genetically modified cotton that contain genes expressing delta-endotoxin, on aphid, whitefly, chrysopid and coccinellid populations was determined with a two-year field study at a cotton farm near Marble Hall, South Africa. Although Bt-cotton is lepidopteran specific, non-lepidopteran arthropod populations may be indirectly influenced by the endotoxin. Abundance of aphid, whitefly, chrysopid and coccinellid populations and predator-prey interactions were used as measures to determine possible effects on the populations under investigation. The cultivation of Bt-cotton had no effect on aphid, whitefly, chrysopid or coccinellid abundance. Positive density dependent interactions occurred between aphids and coccinellids which were not influenced by Bt-cotton. A significant relationship between whitefly and coccinellid abundance, i.e. predator-prey reaction, occurred in the control and sprayed non-Bt cotton fields but was absent from the Bt-cotton fields.

  11. Characterisation and cross-amplification of polymorphic microsatellite loci in ant-associated root-aphids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivens, A.B.F.; Kronauer, Daniel Jan Christoph; Boomsma, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    Twenty-six polymorphic microsatellite loci were developed for four species of ant-associated root-aphids: Geoica utricularia, Forda marginata, Tetraneura ulmi and Anoecia corni. We found up to 9 alleles per locus, with an average of 4.8. We also report polymorphic cross-amplification of eleven...... of these markers between different pairs of study species. Furthermore, we tested previously published aphid microsatellites and found one locus developed for Pemphigus bursarius to be polymorphic in G. utricularia. These microsatellite markers will be useful to study the population structure of aphids associated...... with the ant Lasius flavus and possibly other ants. Such studies are relevant because: 1. L. flavus mounds and their associated flora and fauna are often key components in protected temperate grasslands, and 2. L. flavus and its diverse community of root-aphids provide an interesting model system for studying...

  12. Foraging behaviour at the fourth trophic level: a comparative study of host location in aphid hyperparasitoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buitenhuis, R.; Vet, L.E.M.; Boivin, G.; Brodeur, J.

    2005-01-01

    In studies of foraging behaviour in a multitrophic context, the fourth trophic level has generally been ignored. We used four aphid hyperparasitoid species: Dendrocerus carpenteri (Curtis) (Hymenoptera: Megaspilidae), Asaphes suspensus Walker (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae), Alloxysta victrix (Westwood)

  13. Heterodera schachtii nematodes interfere with aphid-plant relations on Brassica oleracea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hol, W.H.G.; Boer, de W.; Termorshuizen, A.J.; Meyer, K.M.; Schneider, J.H.M.; Putten, van der W.H.; Dam, N.M.

    2013-01-01

    Aboveground and belowground herbivore species modify plant defense responses differently. Simultaneous attack can lead to non-additive effects on primary and secondary metabolite composition in roots and shoots. We previously found that aphid (Brevicoryne brassicae) population growth on Brassica

  14. Kaolin particle films suppress many apple pests, disrupt natural enemies and promote woolly apple aphid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Markó, V.; Blommers, L.H.M.; Bogya, S.; Helsen, H.H.M.

    2008-01-01

    Multiple applications of hydrophobic kaolin particle film in apple orchards suppressed numbers of blossom weevil (Anthonomus pomorum), brown leaf weevil (Phyllobius oblongus), attelabid weevil (Caenorhinus pauxillus), leafhoppers (Empoasca vitis and Zygina flammigera) and green apple aphid (Aphis

  15. Reproduction and dispersal in an ant-associated root aphid community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivens, A.B.F.; Kronauer, Daniel Jan Christoph; Pen, I.

    2012-01-01

    Clonal organisms with occasional sex are important for our general understanding of the costs and benefits that maintain sexual reproduction. Cyclically parthenogenetic aphids are highly variable in their frequency of sexual reproduction. However, studies have mostly focused on free-living aphids...... viscosity is high and winged aphids rare, consistent with infrequent horizontal transmission between ant host colonies. The absence of the primary host shrub (Pistacia) may explain the absence of sex in three of the studied species, but elm trees (Ulmus) that are primary hosts of the fourth species (T...... to L. flavus populations, so that all four root aphid species would have realistic opportunities for completing their sexual life cycle....

  16. The polerovirus minor capsid protein determines vector specificity and intestinal tropism in the aphid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brault, Véronique; Périgon, Sophie; Reinbold, Catherine; Erdinger, Monique; Scheidecker, Danièle; Herrbach, Etienne; Richards, Ken; Ziegler-Graff, Véronique

    2005-08-01

    Aphid transmission of poleroviruses is highly specific, but the viral determinants governing this specificity are unknown. We used a gene exchange strategy between two poleroviruses with different vectors, Beet western yellows virus (BWYV) and Cucurbit aphid-borne yellows virus (CABYV), to analyze the role of the major and minor capsid proteins in vector specificity. Virus recombinants obtained by exchanging the sequence of the readthrough domain (RTD) between the two viruses replicated in plant protoplasts and in whole plants. The hybrid readthrough protein of chimeric viruses was incorporated into virions. Aphid transmission experiments using infected plants or purified virions revealed that vector specificity is driven by the nature of the RTD. BWYV and CABYV have specific intestinal sites in the vectors for endocytosis: the midgut for BWYV and both midgut and hindgut for CABYV. Localization of hybrid virions in aphids by transmission electron microscopy revealed that gut tropism is also determined by the viral origin of the RTD.

  17. All 37 Mitochondrial Genes of Aphid Aphis craccivora Obtained from Transcriptome Sequencing: Implications for the Evolution of Aphids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Nan; Zhang, Hao; Li, Hu; Cai, Wanzhi

    2016-01-01

    The availability of mitochondrial genome data for Aphididae, one of the economically important insect pest families, in public databases is limited. The advent of next generation sequencing technology provides the potential to generate mitochondrial genome data for many species timely and cost-effectively. In this report, we used transcriptome sequencing technology to determine all the 37 mitochondrial genes of the cowpea aphid, Aphis craccivora. This method avoids the necessity of finding suitable primers for long PCRs or primer-walking amplicons, and is proved to be effective in obtaining the whole set of mitochondrial gene data for insects with difficulty in sequencing mitochondrial genome by PCR-based strategies. Phylogenetic analyses of aphid mitochondrial genome data show clustering based on tribe level, and strongly support the monophyly of the family Aphididae. Within the monophyletic Aphidini, three samples from Aphis grouped together. In another major clade of Aphididae, Pterocomma pilosum was recovered as a potential sister-group of Cavariella salicicola, as part of Macrosiphini.

  18. All 37 Mitochondrial Genes of Aphid Aphis craccivora Obtained from Transcriptome Sequencing: Implications for the Evolution of Aphids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Song

    Full Text Available The availability of mitochondrial genome data for Aphididae, one of the economically important insect pest families, in public databases is limited. The advent of next generation sequencing technology provides the potential to generate mitochondrial genome data for many species timely and cost-effectively. In this report, we used transcriptome sequencing technology to determine all the 37 mitochondrial genes of the cowpea aphid, Aphis craccivora. This method avoids the necessity of finding suitable primers for long PCRs or primer-walking amplicons, and is proved to be effective in obtaining the whole set of mitochondrial gene data for insects with difficulty in sequencing mitochondrial genome by PCR-based strategies. Phylogenetic analyses of aphid mitochondrial genome data show clustering based on tribe level, and strongly support the monophyly of the family Aphididae. Within the monophyletic Aphidini, three samples from Aphis grouped together. In another major clade of Aphididae, Pterocomma pilosum was recovered as a potential sister-group of Cavariella salicicola, as part of Macrosiphini.

  19. Aphids (Homoptera, Aphidodea inhabiting the trees Crataegus x media Bechst. in the urban green area. Part I. The population dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bożena Jaśkiwicz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The studies were conducted in the years 1999-2001 in the green areas of Lublin, on the trees of Crataegus x media Bechst. The purpose of the studies was to establish the species composition and the population dynamics of aphids inhabiting hawthorn in the street and park sites. The studies found out the presence of four aphid species on the examined trees, namely Aphis pomi De Geer, aphids from the genus Dysaphis Börn., Ovatus crataegarius (Walk. and Rhopalosiphum insertum (Walk.. More aphid species and bigger populations were found in the street site (A as compa red with the park site (B.The weather conditions (air temperatures of over 30°C and stormy rainfalls limited the population of all aphid species. On the other hand, a mild winter and a warm spring with the rainfalls within the norm caused that the number of aphids decreased considerably.

  20. Arabidopsis thaliana-Myzus persicae interaction: shaping the understanding of plant defense against phloem-feeding aphids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Joe; Shah, Jyoti

    2013-01-01

    The phloem provides a unique niche for several organisms. Aphids are a large group of Hemipteran insects that utilize stylets present in their mouthparts to pierce sieve elements and drink large volumes of phloem sap. In addition, many aphids also vector viral diseases. Myzus persicae, commonly known as the green peach aphid (GPA), is an important pest of a large variety of plants that includes Arabidopsis thaliana. This review summarizes recent studies that have exploited the compatible interaction between Arabidopsis and GPA to understand the molecular and physiological mechanisms utilized by plants to control aphid infestation, as well as genes and mechanisms that contribute to susceptibility. In addition, recent efforts to identify aphid-delivered elicitors of plant defenses and novel aphid salivary components that facilitate infestation are also discussed.

  1. Mapping novel aphid resistance QTL from wild soybean, Glycine soja 85-32.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shichen; Zhang, Zhongnan; Bales, Carmille; Gu, Cuihua; DiFonzo, Chris; Li, Ming; Song, Qijian; Cregan, Perry; Yang, Zhenyu; Wang, Dechun

    2017-09-01

    Two novel QTLs conferring aphid resistance were mapped and validated on soybean chromosomes 8 and 16, respectively. Closely linked markers were developed to assist breeding for aphid resistance. Soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura, is a highly destructive pest for soybean production. E08934, a soybean advanced breeding line derived from the wild soybean Glycine soja 85-32, has shown strong resistance to aphids. To dissect the genetic basis of aphid resistance in E08934, a mapping population (070020) consisting of 140 F 3 -derived lines was developed by crossing E08934 with an aphid-susceptible line E00003. This mapping population was evaluated for aphid resistance in a greenhouse trial in 2010 and three field trials in 2009, 2010, and 2011, respectively. The broad-sense heritability across the field trials was 0.84. In the mapping population 070020, two major quantitative trait loci (QTL) were detected as significantly associated with aphid resistance, and designated as Rag6 and Rag3c, respectively. Rag6 was mapped to a 10.5 centiMorgan (cM) interval between markers MSUSNP08-2 and Satt209 on chromosome 8, explaining 19.5-46.4% of the phenotypic variance in different trials. Rag3c was located at a 7.5 cM interval between markers MSUSNP16-10 and Sat_370 on chromosome 16, explaining 12.5-22.9% of the phenotypic variance in different trials. Rag3c had less resistance effect than Rag6 across all the trials. Furthermore, Rag6 and Rag3c were confirmed in two validation populations with different genetic backgrounds. No significant interaction was detected between Rag6 and Rag3c in either the mapping population or the validation populations. Both Rag6 and Rag3c were indicated as conferring antibiosis resistance to aphids by a no-choice test. The new aphid-resistance gene(s) derived from the wild germplasm G. soja 85-32 are valuable in improving soybeans for aphid resistance.

  2. Comparative transcriptome analysis of Gossypium hirsutum L. in response to sap sucking insects: aphid and whitefly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Neeraj Kumar; Goel, Ridhi; Ranjan, Alok; Idris, Asif; Singh, Sunil Kumar; Bag, Sumit K; Chandrashekar, Krishnappa; Pandey, Kapil Deo; Singh, Pradhyumna Kumar; Sawant, Samir V

    2013-04-11

    Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) is a major fiber crop that is grown worldwide; it faces extensive damage from sap-sucking insects, including aphids and whiteflies. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis was performed to understand the molecular details of interaction between Gossypium hirsutum L. and sap-sucking pests, namely Aphis gossypii (Aphid) and Bemisia tabacci (Whiteflies). Roche's GS-Titanium was used to sequence transcriptomes of cotton infested with aphids and whiteflies for 2 h and 24 h. A total of 100935 contigs were produced with an average length of 529 bp after an assembly in all five selected conditions. The Blastn of the non-redundant (nr) cotton EST database resulted in the identification of 580 novel contigs in the cotton plant. It should be noted that in spite of minimal physical damage caused by the sap-sucking insects, they can change the gene expression of plants in 2 h of infestation; further change in gene expression due to whiteflies is quicker than due to aphids. The impact of the whitefly 24 h after infestation was more or less similar to that of the aphid 2 h after infestation. Aphids and whiteflies affect many genes that are regulated by various phytohormones and in response to microbial infection, indicating the involvement of complex crosstalk between these pathways. The KOBAS analysis of differentially regulated transcripts in response to aphids and whiteflies indicated that both the insects induce the metabolism of amino acids biosynthesis specially in case of whiteflies infestation at later phase. Further we also observed that expression of transcript related to photosynthesis specially carbon fixation were significantly influenced by infestation of Aphids and Whiteflies. A comparison of different transcriptomes leads to the identification of differentially and temporally regulated transcripts in response to infestation by aphids and whiteflies. Most of these differentially expressed contigs were related to genes involved in biotic

  3. A Trio of Viral Proteins Tunes Aphid-Plant Interactions in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhiyou; Murphy, Alex M.; Anggoro, Damar Tri; Tungadi, Trisna; Luang-In, Vijitra; Lewsey, Mathew G.; Rossiter, John T.; Powell, Glen; Smith, Alison G.; Carr, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Background Virus-induced deterrence to aphid feeding is believed to promote plant virus transmission by encouraging migration of virus-bearing insects away from infected plants. We investigated the effects of infection by an aphid-transmitted virus, cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), on the interaction of Arabidopsis thaliana, one of the natural hosts for CMV, with Myzus persicae (common names: ‘peach-potato aphid’, ‘green peach aphid’). Methodology/Principal Findings Infection of Arabidopsis (ecotype Col-0) with CMV strain Fny (Fny-CMV) induced biosynthesis of the aphid feeding-deterrent 4-methoxy-indol-3-yl-methylglucosinolate (4MI3M). 4MI3M inhibited phloem ingestion by aphids and consequently discouraged aphid settling. The CMV 2b protein is a suppressor of antiviral RNA silencing, which has previously been implicated in altering plant-aphid interactions. Its presence in infected hosts enhances the accumulation of CMV and the other four viral proteins. Another viral gene product, the 2a protein (an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase), triggers defensive signaling, leading to increased 4MI3M accumulation. The 2b protein can inhibit ARGONAUTE1 (AGO1), a host factor that both positively-regulates 4MI3M biosynthesis and negatively-regulates accumulation of substance(s) toxic to aphids. However, the 1a replicase protein moderated 2b-mediated inhibition of AGO1, ensuring that aphids were deterred from feeding but not poisoned. The LS strain of CMV did not induce feeding deterrence in Arabidopsis ecotype Col-0. Conclusions/Significance Inhibition of AGO1 by the 2b protein could act as a booby trap since this will trigger antibiosis against aphids. However, for Fny-CMV the interplay of three viral proteins (1a, 2a and 2b) appears to balance the need of the virus to inhibit antiviral silencing, while inducing a mild resistance (antixenosis) that is thought to promote transmission. The strain-specific effects of CMV on Arabidopsis-aphid interactions, and differences between

  4. Tracking the global dispersal of a cosmopolitan insect pest, the peach potato aphid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasprowicz Louise

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Global commerce and human transportation are responsible for the range expansion of various insect pests such as the plant sucking aphids. High resolution DNA markers provide the opportunity to examine the genetic structure of aphid populations, identify aphid genotypes and infer their evolutionary history and routes of expansion which is of value in developing management strategies. One of the most widespread aphid species is the peach-potato aphid Myzus persicae, which is considered as a serious pest on various crops in many parts of the world. The present study examined the genetic variation of this aphid at a world scale and then related this to distribution patterns. In particular, 197 aphid parthenogenetic lineages from around the world were analysed with six microsatellite loci. Results Bayesian clustering and admixture analysis split the aphid genotypes into three genetic clusters: European M. persicae persicae, New Zealand M. persicae persicae and Global M. persicae nicotianae. This partition was supported by FST and genetic distance analyses. The results showed two further points, a possible connection between genotypes found in the UK and New Zealand and globalization of nicotianae associated with colonisation of regions where tobacco is not cultivated. In addition, we report the presence of geographically widespread clones and for the first time the presence of a nicotianae genotype in the Old and New World. Lastly, heterozygote deficiency was detected in some sexual and asexual populations. Conclusion The study revealed important genetic variation among the aphid populations we examined and this was partitioned according to region and host-plant. Clonal selection and gene flow between sexual and asexual lineages are important factors shaping the genetic structure of the aphid populations. In addition, the results reflected the globalization of two subspecies of M. persicae with successful clones being spread at

  5. Trophic transfer of soil arsenate and associated toxic effects in a plant-aphid-parasitoid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y. S.; Wee, J.; Lee, M.; Hong, J.; Cho, K.

    2017-12-01

    Terrestrial toxic effects of soil arsenic were studied using a model system consisting of soil which artificially treated with arsenic, Capsicum annum,Myzus persicae and Aphidus colemani. We investigated the transfer of arsenic in a soil-plant-aphid system and toxic effect of elevated arsenic through a plant-aphid-parasitoid system. To remove the effect of poor plant growth on aphid performance, test concentrations which have a no effect on health plant growth were selected. Arsenic concentration of growth medium, plant tissues (root, stem, leaf) aphids were measured to observe the arsenic transfer. Correlation matrix was made with arsenic in growth medium which extracted with three extractants (aquaregia, 0.01 M CaCl2 and deionized water), arsenic in plant tissues and plant performance. Toxic effects of elevated arsenic concentrations on each species were investigated at population level. Studied plant performances were dry weight of each tissue, elongation of roots and stems, area of leaves, chlorophyll content of leaves, protein content of leaves and sugar content of leaves. Mean development time, fecundity and honeydew excretion of the aphids and host choice capacity and parasitism success of the parasitoids were examined. In addition, enzyme activities of the plants and the aphids against reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by arsenic stress were also investigated. The results suggest that arsenic concentration in plant tissues and aphids were elevated with increased concentration of arsenic in soil. Decreased fecundity and honeydew excretion of aphids were observed and decreased eclosion rate of parasitoids were observed with increased arsenic treatment in growth medium. The results showed low concentration of arsenic in soil can transfer through food chain and can impact on higher trophic level species.

  6. Water stress and aphid feeding differentially influence metabolite composition in Arabidopsis thaliana (L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga Mewis

    Full Text Available Little is known about how drought stress influences plant secondary metabolite accumulation and how this affects plant defense against different aphids. We therefore cultivated Arabidopsis thaliana (L. plants under well-watered, drought, and water-logged conditions. Two aphid species were selected for this study: the generalist Myzus persicae (Sulzer and the crucifer specialist Brevicoryne brassicae (L.. Metabolite concentrations in the phloem sap, which influence aphid growth, changed particularly under drought stress. Levels of sucrose and several amino acids, such as glutamic acid, proline, isoleucine, and lysine increased, while concentrations of 4-methoxyindol-3-ylmethyl glucosinolate decreased. M. persicae population growth was highest on plants under drought stress conditions. However, B. brassicae did not profit from improved phloem sap quality under drought stress and performed equally in all water treatments. Water stress and aphids generally had an opposite effect on the accumulation of secondary metabolites in the plant rosettes. Drought stress and water-logging led to increased aliphatic glucosinolate and flavonoid levels. Conversely, aphid feeding, especially of M. persicae, reduced levels of flavonoids and glucosinolates in the plants. Correspondingly, transcript levels of aliphatic biosynthetic genes decreased after feeding of both aphid species. Contrary to M. persicae, drought stress did not promote population growth of B. brassicae on these plants. The specialist aphid induced expression of CYP79B2, CYP79B3, and PAD3 with corresponding accumulation of indolyl glucosinolates and camalexin. This was distinct from M. persicae, which did not elicit similarly strong camalexin accumulation, which led to the hypothesis of a specific defense adaptations against the specialist aphid.

  7. Water stress and aphid feeding differentially influence metabolite composition in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewis, Inga; Khan, Mohammed A M; Glawischnig, Erich; Schreiner, Monika; Ulrichs, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about how drought stress influences plant secondary metabolite accumulation and how this affects plant defense against different aphids. We therefore cultivated Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) plants under well-watered, drought, and water-logged conditions. Two aphid species were selected for this study: the generalist Myzus persicae (Sulzer) and the crucifer specialist Brevicoryne brassicae (L.). Metabolite concentrations in the phloem sap, which influence aphid growth, changed particularly under drought stress. Levels of sucrose and several amino acids, such as glutamic acid, proline, isoleucine, and lysine increased, while concentrations of 4-methoxyindol-3-ylmethyl glucosinolate decreased. M. persicae population growth was highest on plants under drought stress conditions. However, B. brassicae did not profit from improved phloem sap quality under drought stress and performed equally in all water treatments. Water stress and aphids generally had an opposite effect on the accumulation of secondary metabolites in the plant rosettes. Drought stress and water-logging led to increased aliphatic glucosinolate and flavonoid levels. Conversely, aphid feeding, especially of M. persicae, reduced levels of flavonoids and glucosinolates in the plants. Correspondingly, transcript levels of aliphatic biosynthetic genes decreased after feeding of both aphid species. Contrary to M. persicae, drought stress did not promote population growth of B. brassicae on these plants. The specialist aphid induced expression of CYP79B2, CYP79B3, and PAD3 with corresponding accumulation of indolyl glucosinolates and camalexin. This was distinct from M. persicae, which did not elicit similarly strong camalexin accumulation, which led to the hypothesis of a specific defense adaptations against the specialist aphid.

  8. Water Stress and Aphid Feeding Differentially Influence Metabolite Composition in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewis, Inga; Khan, Mohammed A. M.; Glawischnig, Erich; Schreiner, Monika; Ulrichs, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about how drought stress influences plant secondary metabolite accumulation and how this affects plant defense against different aphids. We therefore cultivated Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) plants under well-watered, drought, and water-logged conditions. Two aphid species were selected for this study: the generalist Myzus persicae (Sulzer) and the crucifer specialist Brevicoryne brassicae (L.). Metabolite concentrations in the phloem sap, which influence aphid growth, changed particularly under drought stress. Levels of sucrose and several amino acids, such as glutamic acid, proline, isoleucine, and lysine increased, while concentrations of 4-methoxyindol-3-ylmethyl glucosinolate decreased. M. persicae population growth was highest on plants under drought stress conditions. However, B. brassicae did not profit from improved phloem sap quality under drought stress and performed equally in all water treatments. Water stress and aphids generally had an opposite effect on the accumulation of secondary metabolites in the plant rosettes. Drought stress and water-logging led to increased aliphatic glucosinolate and flavonoid levels. Conversely, aphid feeding, especially of M. persicae, reduced levels of flavonoids and glucosinolates in the plants. Correspondingly, transcript levels of aliphatic biosynthetic genes decreased after feeding of both aphid species. Contrary to M. persicae, drought stress did not promote population growth of B. brassicae on these plants. The specialist aphid induced expression of CYP79B2, CYP79B3, and PAD3 with corresponding accumulation of indolyl glucosinolates and camalexin. This was distinct from M. persicae, which did not elicit similarly strong camalexin accumulation, which led to the hypothesis of a specific defense adaptations against the specialist aphid. PMID:23144921

  9. Russian wheat aphid, Diuraphis noxia in the Czech Republic – cause of the significant population decrease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Havelka, Jan; Žurovcová, Martina; Rychlý, S.; Starý, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 138, č. 4 (2014), s. 273-280 ISSN 0931-2048 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/09/ 1940 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : alien aphid species * anholocyclic populations * aphids overwintering mortality Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.650, year: 2014 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jen.12068/pdf

  10. Winter treatments against the woolly apple aphid (Eriosoma lanigerum): products and timing of applications

    OpenAIRE

    Kelderer, Markus; Lardschneider, Ewald; Casera, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    In organic apple growing the woolly apple aphid (Eriosoma lanigerum) is still an unsolved problem. Various approaches to use beneficial insects were not really effective. Only winter treatments with mineral oils showed partial and fluctuating success. In 2006 and 2007 field trials were carried out to evaluate the efficacy of winter treatments to control woolly apple aphids. The efficacy of several products (different mineral oils, lime sulphur, and lime sulphur + mineral oil) w...

  11. Relationship between the abundance of aphids and their natural enemies in cereal fields and landscape composition

    OpenAIRE

    Diab Al Hassan; Nicolas Parisey; Françoise Burel; Manuel Plantegenest; Pavel Kindlmann; Alain Butet

    2013-01-01

    We investigated, over the course of two years, the association between the abundance of aphids and their natural carabid enemies and landscape, which may help in the development of effective strategies for reducing the incidence of aphid outbreaks in agricultural crops. This was undertaken in 12 wheat and 12 maize fields each year in an agricultural landscape in western France. Our study area was characterized by hedgerows surrounding arable fields and permanent grassland. Some areas have not...

  12. Aphids and parasitoids on willows and poplars in southeastern Europe (Homoptera: Aphidoidea; Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Aphidiinae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomanovic, Ž.; Kavallieratos, N. G.; Starý, Petr; Petrovic-Obradovic, O.; Tomanovic, S.; Jovanović, S.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 113, č. 4 (2006), s. 174-180 ISSN 1861-3829 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IBS5007102 Grant - others:Ministry of Science and Environmental Protection of the Republic of Serbia(CS) 143006B; Ministry of Science and Environmental Protection of the Republic of Serbia(CS) 145002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : agroecosystems * aphids * aphid parasitoid s Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  13. The Polerovirus Minor Capsid Protein Determines Vector Specificity and Intestinal Tropism in the Aphid

    OpenAIRE

    Brault, Véronique; Périgon, Sophie; Reinbold, Catherine; Erdinger, Monique; Scheidecker, Danièle; Herrbach, Etienne; Richards, Ken; Ziegler-Graff, Véronique

    2005-01-01

    Aphid transmission of poleroviruses is highly specific, but the viral determinants governing this specificity are unknown. We used a gene exchange strategy between two poleroviruses with different vectors, Beet western yellows virus (BWYV) and Cucurbit aphid-borne yellows virus (CABYV), to analyze the role of the major and minor capsid proteins in vector specificity. Virus recombinants obtained by exchanging the sequence of the readthrough domain (RTD) between the two viruses replicated in pl...

  14. Cucumber Plants Baited with Methyl Salicylate Accelerates Scymnus (Pullus) sodalis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) Visiting to Reduce Cotton Aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae) Infestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Y J; Hwang, S Y

    2017-10-01

    The cotton aphid, Aphis gossypii (Glover) (Hemiptera: Aphididae), is a major pest of many crops worldwide and a major cucumber plant pest in Taiwan. Because cotton aphids rapidly develop insecticide resistance and because of the insecticide residue problem, a safe and sustainable method is required to replace conventional chemical control methods. Methyl salicylate (MeSA), a herbivore-induced plant volatile, has been shown to affect aphids' behavior and attract the natural enemies of aphids for reducing their population. Therefore, this study examined the direct effects of MeSA on cotton aphids' settling preference, population development, and attractiveness to natural enemies. The efficiency of using MeSA and the commercial insecticide pymetrozine for reducing the cotton aphid population in laboratory and outdoor cucumber plant pot was also examined. The results showed no difference in winged aphids' settling preference and population development between the MeSA and blank treatments. Cucumber plants infested with cotton aphids and baited with 0.1% or 10% MeSA contained significantly higher numbers of the natural enemy of cotton aphids, namely Scymnus (Pullus) sodalis (Weise) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), and MeSA-treated cucumber plants contained a lower number of aphids. Significantly lower cotton aphid numbers were found on cucumber plants within a 10-m range of MeSA application. In addition, fruit yield showed no difference between the MeSA and pymetrozine treatments. According to our findings, 0.1% MeSA application can replace insecticides as a cotton aphid control tool. However, large-scale experiments are necessary to confirm its efficiency and related conservation biological control strategies before further use. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Root Exudation by Aphid Leaf Infestation Recruits Root-Associated Paenibacillus spp. to Lead Plant Insect Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bora; Song, Geun Cheol; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2016-03-01

    Aphids are a large group of hemipteran pests that affect the physiology, growth, and development of plants by using piercing mouthparts to consume fluids from the host. Based an recent data, aphids modulate the microbiomes of plants and thereby affect the overall outcome of the biological interaction. However, in a few reports, aboveground aphids manipulate the metabolism of the host and facilitate infestations by rhizosphere bacteria (rhizobacteria). In this study, we evaluated whether aphids alter the plant resistance that is mediated by the bacterial community of the root system. The rhizobacteria were affected by aphid infestation of pepper, and a large population of gram-positive bacteria was detected. Notably, Paenibacillus spp. were the unique gram-positive bacteria to respond to changes induced by the aphids. Paenibacillus polymyxa E681 was used as a rhizobacterium model to assess the recruitment of bacteria to the rhizosphere by the phloem-sucking of aphids and to test the effect of P. polymyxa on the susceptibility of plants to aphids. The root exudates secreted from peppers infested with aphids increased the growth rate of P. polymyxa E681. The application of P. polymyxa E681 to pepper roots promoted the colonization of aphids within 2 days of inoculation. Collectively, our results suggest that aphid infestation modulated the root exudation, which led to the recruitment of rhizobacteria that manipulated the resistance of peppers to aphids. In this study, new information is provided on how the infestation of insects is facilitated through insect-derived modulation of plant resistance with the attraction of gram-positive rhizobacteria.

  16. Modeling distribution and abundance of soybean aphid in soybean fields using measurements from the surrounding landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahlai, C A; Sikkema, S; Hallett, R H; Newman, J; Schaafsma, A W

    2010-02-01

    Soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura) is a severe pest of soybean in central North America. Outbreaks of the aphid in Ontario are often spotty in distribution, with some geographical areas affected severely and others with few or no aphid populations occurring in soybean for the duration of the season. A. glycines spend summers on soybean and overwinter on buckthorn, a shrub that is widespread in southern Ontario and is commonly found in agricultural hedgerows and at the margins of woodlots. A. glycines likely use both short distance migratory flights from buckthorn and longer distance dispersal flights in the search for acceptable summer hosts. This study aims to model colonization of soybean fields by A. glycines engaged in early-season migration from overwintering hosts. Akaike's information criterion (AIC) was used to rank numerous competing linear and probit models using field parameters to predict aphid presence, colonization, and density. The variable that best modeled aphid density in soybean fields in the early season was the ratio of buckthorn density to field area, although dramatic differences in relationships between the parameters were observed between study years. This study has important applications in predicting areas that are at elevated risk of developing economically damaging populations of soybean aphid and which may act as sources for further infestation.

  17. Expression Profiling of Selected Glutathione Transferase Genes in Zea mays (L.) Seedlings Infested with Cereal Aphids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sytykiewicz, Hubert; Chrzanowski, Grzegorz; Czerniewicz, Paweł; Sprawka, Iwona; Łukasik, Iwona; Goławska, Sylwia; Sempruch, Cezary

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this report was to evaluate the expression patterns of selected glutathione transferase genes (gst1, gst18, gst23 and gst24) in the tissues of two maize (Zea mays L.) varieties (relatively resistant Ambrozja and susceptible Tasty Sweet) that were colonized with oligophagous bird cherry-oat aphid (Rhopalosiphum padi L.) or monophagous grain aphid (Sitobion avenae L.). Simultaneously, insect-triggered generation of superoxide anion radicals (O2•−) in infested Z. mays plants was monitored. Quantified parameters were measured at 1, 2, 4, 8, 24, 48 and 72 h post-initial aphid infestation (hpi) in relation to the non-infested control seedlings. Significant increases in gst transcript amounts were recorded in aphid-stressed plants in comparison to the control seedlings. Maximal enhancement in the expression of the gst genes in aphid-attacked maize plants was found at 8 hpi (gst23) or 24 hpi (gst1, gst18 and gst24) compared to the control. Investigated Z. mays cultivars formed excessive superoxide anion radicals in response to insect treatments, and the highest overproduction of O2•− was noted 4 or 8 h after infestation, depending on the aphid treatment and maize genotype. Importantly, the Ambrozja variety could be characterized as having more profound increments in the levels of gst transcript abundance and O2•− generation in comparison with the Tasty Sweet genotype. PMID:25365518

  18. Evaluation of late vegetative and reproductive stage soybeans for resistance to soybean aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochaska, T J; Pierson, L M; Baldin, E L L; Hunt, T E; Heng-Moss, T M; Reese, J C

    2013-04-01

    The soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura, has become the most significant soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] insect pest in the north central soybean production region of North America. The objectives of this research were to measure selected genotypes for resistance to the soybean aphid in the later vegetative and reproductive stages under field conditions, and confirm the presence of tolerance in KS4202. The results from 2007 to 2011 indicate that KS4202 can support aphid populations with minimal yield loss at levels where significant yield loss would be expected in most other genotypes. The common Nebraska cultivar, 'Asgrow 2703', appears to show signs of tolerance as well. None of the yield parameters were significantly different between the aphid infested and noninfested treatments. Based on our results, genotypes may compensate for aphid feeding in different ways. Asgrow 2703 appears to produce a similar number of seeds as its noninfested counterpart, although the seeds produced are slightly smaller. Field evaluation of tolerance in KS4202 indicated a yield loss of only 13% at 34,585-53,508 cumulative aphid-days, when 24-36% yield loss would have been expected.

  19. Testing the physiological barriers to viral transmission in aphids using microinjection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamborindeguy, Cecilia; Gray, Stewart; Jander, Georg

    2008-05-14

    Potato loafroll virus (PLRV), from the family Luteoviridae infects solanaceous plants. It is transmitted by aphids, primarily, the green peach aphid. When an uninfected aphid feeds on an infected plant it contracts the virus through the plant phloem. Once ingested, the virus must pass from the insect gut to the hemolymph (the insect blood ) and then must pass through the salivary gland, in order to be transmitted back to a new plant. An aphid may take up different viruses when munching on a plant, however only a small fraction will pass through the gut and salivary gland, the two main barriers for transmission to infect more plants. In the lab, we use physalis plants to study PLRV transmission. In this host, symptoms are characterized by stunting and interveinal chlorosis (yellowing of the leaves between the veins with the veins remaining green). The video that we present demonstrates a method for performing aphid microinjection on insects that do not vector PLVR viruses and tests whether the gut is preventing viral transmission. The video that we present demonstrates a method for performing Aphid microinjection on insects that do not vector PLVR viruses and tests whether the gut or salivary gland is preventing viral transmission.

  20. Aphid Parasitoid Mothers Don't Always Know Best through the Whole Host Selection Process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin Chesnais

    Full Text Available Parasitoid host selection behaviour has been extensively studied in experimentally simplified tritrophic systems formed by one single food chain (one plant, one herbivore and one parasitoid species. The "Mother knows best" hypothesis predicts that the preference for a plant-host complex should be positively correlated with plant quality for offspring performance. We studied the host selection behaviour of the generalist endoparasitoid Aphidius matricariae towards the black bean aphid Aphis fabae in the intercrop system including Vicia faba as a focal plant and its companion plant Camelina sativa. Dual-choice laboratory bioassays revealed that parasitoid females preferred to orientate towards (1 the plant-aphid complex over the non-infested plant whatever the complex (2 the C. sativa-A. fabae complex over the V. faba-A. fabae complex. In dual choice attack rate bioassays, parasitoid females showed more interest towards the aphids on C. sativa but paradoxically chose to oviposit more in aphids on V. faba. Ultimately, parasitoids that had developed on the V. faba-A. fabae complex exhibited better fitness parameters. By demonstrating that parasitoid females were able to discriminate the aphid host that offered the highest fitness to their offspring but selected beforehand the least suitable plant-aphid complex, we provide key insight into the disruption in their host selection behaviour potentially triggered by diverse habitats. This suggests that the "Mother knows best" hypothesis could be thwarted by increasing the complexity of the studied systems.

  1. Expression profiling of selected glutathione transferase genes in Zea mays (L.) seedlings infested with cereal aphids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sytykiewicz, Hubert; Chrzanowski, Grzegorz; Czerniewicz, Paweł; Sprawka, Iwona; Łukasik, Iwona; Goławska, Sylwia; Sempruch, Cezary

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this report was to evaluate the expression patterns of selected glutathione transferase genes (gst1, gst18, gst23 and gst24) in the tissues of two maize (Zea mays L.) varieties (relatively resistant Ambrozja and susceptible Tasty Sweet) that were colonized with oligophagous bird cherry-oat aphid (Rhopalosiphum padi L.) or monophagous grain aphid (Sitobion avenae L.). Simultaneously, insect-triggered generation of superoxide anion radicals (O2•-) in infested Z. mays plants was monitored. Quantified parameters were measured at 1, 2, 4, 8, 24, 48 and 72 h post-initial aphid infestation (hpi) in relation to the non-infested control seedlings. Significant increases in gst transcript amounts were recorded in aphid-stressed plants in comparison to the control seedlings. Maximal enhancement in the expression of the gst genes in aphid-attacked maize plants was found at 8 hpi (gst23) or 24 hpi (gst1, gst18 and gst24) compared to the control. Investigated Z. mays cultivars formed excessive superoxide anion radicals in response to insect treatments, and the highest overproduction of O2•- was noted 4 or 8 h after infestation, depending on the aphid treatment and maize genotype. Importantly, the Ambrozja variety could be characterized as having more profound increments in the levels of gst transcript abundance and O2•- generation in comparison with the Tasty Sweet genotype.

  2. Aphid Sex Pheromone Compounds Interfere with Attraction of Common Green Lacewings to Floral Bait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koczor, Sándor; Szentkirályi, Ferenc; Pickett, John A; Birkett, Michael A; Tóth, Miklós

    2015-06-01

    Common green lacewings (Chrysoperla carnea complex) form a group of generalist predators important for biological control. Several reports show attraction of these insects to plant volatiles, and a highly attractive ternary compound floral bait has been developed. With aphids being a preferred prey of larvae, one might expect these lacewings to be attracted to aphid semiochemicals, for instance, to aphid sex pheromones, as found for several other green lacewing species. However, in a previous study, we found that traps containing aphid sex pheromone compounds (1R,4aS,7S,7aR)-nepetalactol (NEPOH), (4aS,7S,7aR)-nepetalactone (NEPONE), and a ternary floral bait attracted fewer individuals than those containing the ternary floral bait alone. In the present study, possible causes for this effect of NEPOH and NEPONE on trap capture were studied. We established that C. carnea complex catches in traps with a ternary floral lure were not influenced by the presence of Chrysopa formosa individuals in traps (attracted by NEPOH and NEPONE) or by synthetic skatole (a characteristic component of Chrysopa defense secretion). A direct negative effect of NEPOH and NEPONE on attraction of C. carnea complex was found, suggesting active avoidance of these aphid sex pheromone components. This finding is surprising as the larvae of these lacewings prey preferentially on aphids. Possible mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are discussed.

  3. Aphid Parasitoid Mothers Don't Always Know Best through the Whole Host Selection Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnais, Quentin; Ameline, Arnaud; Doury, Géraldine; Le Roux, Vincent; Couty, Aude

    2015-01-01

    Parasitoid host selection behaviour has been extensively studied in experimentally simplified tritrophic systems formed by one single food chain (one plant, one herbivore and one parasitoid species). The "Mother knows best" hypothesis predicts that the preference for a plant-host complex should be positively correlated with plant quality for offspring performance. We studied the host selection behaviour of the generalist endoparasitoid Aphidius matricariae towards the black bean aphid Aphis fabae in the intercrop system including Vicia faba as a focal plant and its companion plant Camelina sativa. Dual-choice laboratory bioassays revealed that parasitoid females preferred to orientate towards (1) the plant-aphid complex over the non-infested plant whatever the complex (2) the C. sativa-A. fabae complex over the V. faba-A. fabae complex. In dual choice attack rate bioassays, parasitoid females showed more interest towards the aphids on C. sativa but paradoxically chose to oviposit more in aphids on V. faba. Ultimately, parasitoids that had developed on the V. faba-A. fabae complex exhibited better fitness parameters. By demonstrating that parasitoid females were able to discriminate the aphid host that offered the highest fitness to their offspring but selected beforehand the least suitable plant-aphid complex, we provide key insight into the disruption in their host selection behaviour potentially triggered by diverse habitats. This suggests that the "Mother knows best" hypothesis could be thwarted by increasing the complexity of the studied systems.

  4. Characterization of an aphid-specific, cysteine-rich protein enriched in salivary glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kun; Wang, Wei; Luo, Lan; Chen, Jun; Guo, Ya; Cui, Feng

    2014-05-01

    Aphids secrete saliva into the phloem during their infestation of plants. Previous studies have identified numerous saliva proteins, but little is known about the characteristics (physical and chemical) and functions of these proteins in aphid-plant interactions. This study characterized an unknown protein (ACYPI39568) that was predicted to be enriched in the salivary glands of pea aphid. This protein belongs to an aphid-specific, cysteine-rich protein family that contains 14 conserved cysteines. ACYPI39568 is a monomeric globular protein with a high beta strand extent. The binding stoichiometric ratios for Zn(2+) and ACYPI39568 were approximately 3:1 and 1:1 at two binding sites. ACYPI39568 was predominantly expressed in the first instar stage and in the salivary glands. Aphids required more ACYPI39568 when feeding on plants than when feeding on an artificial diet. However, the interference of ACYPI39568 expression did not affect the survival rate of aphids on plants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. High-throughput phenotyping of plant resistance to aphids by automated video tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloth, Karen J; Ten Broeke, Cindy Jm; Thoen, Manus Pm; Hanhart-van den Brink, Marianne; Wiegers, Gerrie L; Krips, Olga E; Noldus, Lucas Pjj; Dicke, Marcel; Jongsma, Maarten A

    2015-01-01

    Piercing-sucking insects are major vectors of plant viruses causing significant yield losses in crops. Functional genomics of plant resistance to these insects would greatly benefit from the availability of high-throughput, quantitative phenotyping methods. We have developed an automated video tracking platform that quantifies aphid feeding behaviour on leaf discs to assess the level of plant resistance. Through the analysis of aphid movement, the start and duration of plant penetrations by aphids were estimated. As a case study, video tracking confirmed the near-complete resistance of lettuce cultivar 'Corbana' against Nasonovia ribisnigri (Mosely), biotype Nr:0, and revealed quantitative resistance in Arabidopsis accession Co-2 against Myzus persicae (Sulzer). The video tracking platform was benchmarked against Electrical Penetration Graph (EPG) recordings and aphid population development assays. The use of leaf discs instead of intact plants reduced the intensity of the resistance effect in video tracking, but sufficiently replicated experiments resulted in similar conclusions as EPG recordings and aphid population assays. One video tracking platform could screen 100 samples in parallel. Automated video tracking can be used to screen large plant populations for resistance to aphids and other piercing-sucking insects.

  6. Characterization of the natural enemy community attacking cotton aphid in the Bt cotton ecosystem in Northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Abid; Desneux, Nicolas; Lu, Yanhui; Liu, Bing; Wu, Kongming

    2016-01-01

    Planting Bt cotton in China since 1997 has led to important changes in the natural enemy communities occurring in cotton, however their specific effect on suppressing the cotton aphids (being notorious in conventional cotton ecosystem) has not been fully documented yet. We observed strong evidence for top-down control of the aphid population, e.g. the control efficiency of natural enemies on cotton aphid increased significantly in open field cages compared to exclusion cages, accounted for 60.2, 87.2 and 76.7% in 2011, 2012 and 2013 season, respectively. The cotton aphid populations peaked in early June to late July (early and middle growth stages) in open field cotton survey from 2011 to 2013. The population densities of cotton aphids and natural enemies were highest on middle growth stage while lowest densities were recorded on late stage for aphids and on early plant stage for natural enemies. Aphid parasitoids (Trioxys spp., Aphidius gifuensis), coccinellids and spiders were key natural enemies of cotton aphid. Briefly, natural enemies can suppress aphid population increase from early to middle plant growth stages by providing biocontrol services in Chinese Bt cotton. PMID:27075171

  7. Characterization of the natural enemy community attacking cotton aphid in the Bt cotton ecosystem in Northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Abid; Desneux, Nicolas; Lu, Yanhui; Liu, Bing; Wu, Kongming

    2016-04-14

    Planting Bt cotton in China since 1997 has led to important changes in the natural enemy communities occurring in cotton, however their specific effect on suppressing the cotton aphids (being notorious in conventional cotton ecosystem) has not been fully documented yet. We observed strong evidence for top-down control of the aphid population, e.g. the control efficiency of natural enemies on cotton aphid increased significantly in open field cages compared to exclusion cages, accounted for 60.2, 87.2 and 76.7% in 2011, 2012 and 2013 season, respectively. The cotton aphid populations peaked in early June to late July (early and middle growth stages) in open field cotton survey from 2011 to 2013. The population densities of cotton aphids and natural enemies were highest on middle growth stage while lowest densities were recorded on late stage for aphids and on early plant stage for natural enemies. Aphid parasitoids (Trioxys spp., Aphidius gifuensis), coccinellids and spiders were key natural enemies of cotton aphid. Briefly, natural enemies can suppress aphid population increase from early to middle plant growth stages by providing biocontrol services in Chinese Bt cotton.

  8. Overexpression and Down-Regulation of Barley Lipoxygenase LOX2.2 Affects Jasmonate-Regulated Genes and Aphid Fecundity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Losvik

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aphids are pests on many crops and depend on plant phloem sap as their food source. In an attempt to find factors improving plant resistance against aphids, we studied the effects of overexpression and down-regulation of the lipoxygenase gene LOX2.2 in barley (Hordeum vulgare L. on the performance of two aphid species. A specialist, bird cherry-oat aphid (Rhopalosiphum padi L. and a generalist, green peach aphid (Myzus persicae Sulzer were studied. LOX2.2 overexpressing lines showed up-regulation of some other jasmonic acid (JA-regulated genes, and antisense lines showed down-regulation of such genes. Overexpression or suppression of LOX2.2 did not affect aphid settling or the life span on the plants, but in short term fecundity tests, overexpressing plants supported lower aphid numbers and antisense plants higher aphid numbers. The amounts and composition of released volatile organic compounds did not differ between control and LOX2.2 overexpressing lines. Up-regulation of genes was similar for both aphid species. The results suggest that LOX2.2 plays a role in the activation of JA-mediated responses and indicates the involvement of LOX2.2 in basic defense responses.

  9. Assessment of patch quality by aphidophagous ladybirds: laboratory study on the minimum density of aphids required for oviposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. C. Das

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Many studies indicate that there is a density of aphids below which ladybirds are unlikely to lay eggs. This is adaptive as theory indicates that a certain minimum population density of aphids is required if hatchling larvae are to survive. The responses of gravid females of the two spot ladybird, Adalia bipunctata (L. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae, recorded over a period of an hour, to colonies of 5 and 50 pea aphids on bean plants and similar plants each previously infested with the same number of aphids for 48 hours were determined. Proportionally more of the ladybirds on plants with 50 aphids or that were previously infested with the same number of aphids for 48 hours laid eggs and larger clusters of eggs, and were less active than those on plants that were infested with or had previously been infested with five aphids. That is, gravid females showed similar oviposition and activity responses to aphid abundance and different levels of honeydew contamination. This indicates that honeydew contamination may be an important cue used by ladybirds when locating and assessing the abundance of prey in aphid colonies.

  10. Precision assessment of some supervised and unsupervised algorithms for genotype discrimination in the genus Pisum using SSR molecular data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiri, Jaber; Naghavi, Mohammad Reza; Kayvanjoo, Amir Hossein; Nasiri, Mojtaba; Ebrahimi, Mansour

    2015-03-07

    For the first time, prediction accuracies of some supervised and unsupervised algorithms were evaluated in an SSR-based DNA fingerprinting study of a pea collection containing 20 cultivars and 57 wild samples. In general, according to the 10 attribute weighting models, the SSR alleles of PEAPHTAP-2 and PSBLOX13.2-1 were the two most important attributes to generate discrimination among eight different species and subspecies of genus Pisum. In addition, K-Medoids unsupervised clustering run on Chi squared dataset exhibited the best prediction accuracy (83.12%), while the lowest accuracy (25.97%) gained as K-Means model ran on FCdb database. Irrespective of some fluctuations, the overall accuracies of tree induction models were significantly high for many algorithms, and the attributes PSBLOX13.2-3 and PEAPHTAP could successfully detach Pisum fulvum accessions and cultivars from the others when two selected decision trees were taken into account. Meanwhile, the other used supervised algorithms exhibited overall reliable accuracies, even though in some rare cases, they gave us low amounts of accuracies. Our results, altogether, demonstrate promising applications of both supervised and unsupervised algorithms to provide suitable data mining tools regarding accurate fingerprinting of different species and subspecies of genus Pisum, as a fundamental priority task in breeding programs of the crop. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparative analysis of Solanum stoloniferum responses to probing by the green peach aphid Myzus persicae and the potato aphid Macrosiphum euphorbiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Adriana E; Broglia, Viviana G; Alberti D'Amato, Anahí M; Wouters, Doret; van der Vossen, Edwin; Garzo, Elisa; Tjallingii, W Fred; Dicke, Marcel; Vosman, Ben

    2013-04-01

    Plants protect themselves against aphid attacks by species-specific defense mechanisms. Previously, we have shown that Solanum stoloniferum Schlechtd has resistance factors to Myzus persicae Sulzer (Homoptera: Aphididae) at the epidermal/mesophyll level that are not effective against Macrosiphum euphorbiae Thomas (Homoptera: Aphididae). Here, we compare the nymphal mortality, the pre-reproductive development time, and the probing behavior of M. persicae and M. euphorbiae on S. stoloniferum and Solanum tuberosum L. Furthermore, we analyze the changes in gene expression in S. stoloniferum 96 hours post infestation by either aphid species. Although the M. euphorbiae probing behavior shows that aphids encounter more probing constrains on phloem activities-longer probing and salivation time- on S. stoloniferum than on S. tuberosum, the aphids succeeded in reaching a sustained ingestion of phloem sap on both plants. Probing by M. persicae on S. stoloniferum plants resulted in limited feeding only. Survival of M. euphorbiae and M. persicae was affected on young leaves, but not on senescent leaves of S. stoloniferum. Infestation by M. euphorbiae changed the expression of more genes than M. persicae did. At the systemic level both aphids elicited a weak response. Infestation of S. stoloniferum plants with a large number of M. persicae induced morphological changes in the leaves, leading to the development of pustules that were caused by disrupted vascular parenchyma and surrounding tissue. In contrast, an infestation by M. euphorbiae had no morphological effects. Both plant species can be regarded as good host for M. euphorbiae, whereas only S. tuberosum is a good host for M. persicae and S. stoloniferum is not. Infestation of S. stoloniferum by M. persicae or M. euphorbiae changed the expression of a set of plant genes specific for each of the aphids as well as a set of common genes. © 2012 The Authors Insect Science © 2012 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of

  12. Alternaria toxin-induced resistance against rose aphids and olfactory response of aphids to toxin-induced volatiles of rose plants*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fa-zhong; Li, Li; Yang, Bin

    2012-01-01

    The search for active toxins for managing weeds or plant diseases is believed to be a promising avenue of investigation. However, the effects of Alternaria toxins on insects have just begun to be investigated. Bioactivities of toxins from four strains of Alternaria alternata on Rosa chinensis and rose aphid Macrosiphum rosivorum were tested in the present study. At a concentration of 50.0 μg/ml, the crude extract (toxin) of strain 7484 was found not to be harmful to rose plants with excised leaf-puncture method (P≥0.079), and rose plants showed enhanced resistance to rose aphids when this Alternaria toxin was sprayed on the plants (P≤0.001). However, this toxin caused no detrimental effects on aphids in insecticidal bioassay at a concentration of 10.0 to 160.0 μg/ml (P≥0.096). Therefore, the Alternaria toxin had significantly induced the resistance of rose plants against rose aphids, demonstrating that the resistance mechanism triggered by the Alternaria toxin in the rose plant may also be used by the plant to defend itself against insects. Further bioassays aimed to discover the olfactory responses of aphids to the toxin-induced volatiles of host plants. The aphids were significantly more attracted to both volatiles emitted and collected from control rose plants than to both volatiles emitted and collected from the toxin-treated rose plants (P≤0.014). This result showed that the toxin-induced resistance related to the volatile changes of host plants. PMID:22302426

  13. An annotated checklist of the Aphids (Hemiptera: Aphidomorpha of Poland

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    Wojciechowski Wacław

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a comprehensive compilation of 764 taxa (species and subspecies, distributed over 167 genera, belonging to 17 subfamilies, three families and three superfamilies of Aphidomorpha recorded to date from Poland. The systematic positions of 19 taxa have been revised in accordance with recent changes in nomenclature. The presence in the Polish aphidofauna of Drepanosiphum oregonensis and Coloradoa huculaki, previously included without any distribution data in checklists of Polish aphids, has been confirmed. One species Sitobion (Sitobion alopecuri is recognized as being new to Poland. At least 44 species (6% of local fauna of Aphidomorpha are alien to Poland; among them 11 species collected from plants imported or cultivated in indoor conditions are listed.

  14. Dicty_cDB: AFK884 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ', mRNA sequence. 48 4e-13 3 CN584208 |CN584208.1 USDA-FP_127276 Acyrthosiphon pisum, Pea Aphid Acyrthosipho...FP_128086 Acyrthosiphon pisum, Pea Aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum cDNA clone WHAP067_B09, mRNA sequence. 42 4e-11

  15. Dicty_cDB: FC-AD19 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 587535.1 USDA-FP_120500-088 Acyrthosiphon pisum, Pea Aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum cDNA clone WHAP-002_A12 5', m...RNA sequence. 50 0.032 1 CF587974 |CF587974.1 USDA-FP_121100-062 Acyrthosiphon pisum, Pea Aphid

  16. Shallot aphids, Myzus ascalonicus, in strawberry: biocontrol potential of three predators and three parasitoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enkegaard, Annie; Sigsgaard, Lene; Kristensen, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    The parasitization capacity of 3 parasitoids and the predation capacity of 3 predators towards the shallot aphid, Myzus ascalonicus Doncaster (Homoptera: Aphididae), on strawberry, Fragaria x ananassa Duchesne (Rosales: Rosaceae) cv. Honeoye, were examined in laboratory experiments. In Petri dish assays, both Aphidius colemani Viereck (Hymenoptera: Aphidiidae) and A. ervi Haliday readily stung shallot aphids, with no significant difference in stinging frequency between the two species. A. ervi induced a significantly higher mortality (79.0 ± 7.2%) in terms of stung aphids compared with A. colemani (55.3 ± 4.1%); however, only a minor fraction (2.7 ± 1.8% and 7.1 ± 3.1%, respectively) of the killed aphids resulted in formation of mummies, presumably due to a physiological response to parasitism. The low percentage of mummification precludes the use of either Aphidius species in anything but inundative biocontrol. In similar set-ups, Aphelinus abdominalis (Dalman) (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae) killed almost half (49.6 ± 5.3%) of the exposed aphids through host feeding. In addition, 23.2 ± 7.3% of non-host-fed aphids developed into mummified aphids, and 38.1 ± 13.2% of non-host-fed aphids died from other parasitoid-induced causes. However, the host feeding rate was reduced to only 1.2 ± 0.8%, and no significant parasitization mortality was observed on strawberry plants, suggesting that host plants interfered with A. abdominalis activity. This parasitoid does not, therefore, seem to be suited to either inoculative or inundative biocontrol of shallot aphids in strawberry. The three predators studied were the green lacewing, Chrysoperla carnea Steph. (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae), the two-spotted lady beetle, Adalia bipunctata L. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), and the gall midge Aphidoletes aphidimyza (Rondani) (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae). Third instars of all 3 predators readily preyed upon the shallot aphid in Petri dish set-ups with significant differences in daily

  17. The ethylene response factor Pti5 contributes to potato aphid resistance in tomato independent of ethylene signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chengjun; Avila, Carlos A.; Goggin, Fiona L.

    2015-01-01

    Ethylene response factors (ERFs) comprise a large family of transcription factors that regulate numerous biological processes including growth, development, and response to environmental stresses. Here, we report that Pti5, an ERF in tomato [Solanum lycopersicum (Linnaeus)] was transcriptionally upregulated in response to the potato aphid Macrosiphum euphorbiae (Thomas), and contributed to plant defences that limited the population growth of this phloem-feeding insect. Virus-induced gene silencing of Pti5 enhanced aphid population growth on tomato, both on an aphid-susceptible cultivar and on a near-isogenic genotype that carried the Mi-1.2 resistance (R) gene. These results indicate that Pti5 contributes to basal resistance in susceptible plants and also can synergize with other R gene-mediated defences to limit aphid survival and reproduction. Although Pti5 contains the ERF motif, induction of this gene by aphids was independent of ethylene, since the ACC deaminase (ACD) transgene, which inhibits ethylene synthesis, did not diminish the responsiveness of Pti5 to aphid infestation. Furthermore, experiments with inhibitors of ethylene synthesis revealed that Pti5 and ethylene have distinctly different roles in plant responses to aphids. Whereas Pti5 contributed to antibiotic plant defences that limited aphid survival and reproduction on both resistant (Mi-1.2+) and susceptible (Mi-1.2–) genotypes, ethylene signalling promoted aphid infestation on susceptible plants but contributed to antixenotic defences that deterred the early stages of aphid host selection on resistant plants. These findings suggest that the antixenotic defences that inhibit aphid settling and the antibiotic defences that depress fecundity and promote mortality are regulated through different signalling pathways. PMID:25504643

  18. The ethylene response factor Pti5 contributes to potato aphid resistance in tomato independent of ethylene signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chengjun; Avila, Carlos A; Goggin, Fiona L

    2015-02-01

    Ethylene response factors (ERFs) comprise a large family of transcription factors that regulate numerous biological processes including growth, development, and response to environmental stresses. Here, we report that Pti5, an ERF in tomato [Solanum lycopersicum (Linnaeus)] was transcriptionally upregulated in response to the potato aphid Macrosiphum euphorbiae (Thomas), and contributed to plant defences that limited the population growth of this phloem-feeding insect. Virus-induced gene silencing of Pti5 enhanced aphid population growth on tomato, both on an aphid-susceptible cultivar and on a near-isogenic genotype that carried the Mi-1.2 resistance (R) gene. These results indicate that Pti5 contributes to basal resistance in susceptible plants and also can synergize with other R gene-mediated defences to limit aphid survival and reproduction. Although Pti5 contains the ERF motif, induction of this gene by aphids was independent of ethylene, since the ACC deaminase (ACD) transgene, which inhibits ethylene synthesis, did not diminish the responsiveness of Pti5 to aphid infestation. Furthermore, experiments with inhibitors of ethylene synthesis revealed that Pti5 and ethylene have distinctly different roles in plant responses to aphids. Whereas Pti5 contributed to antibiotic plant defences that limited aphid survival and reproduction on both resistant (Mi-1.2+) and susceptible (Mi-1.2-) genotypes, ethylene signalling promoted aphid infestation on susceptible plants but contributed to antixenotic defences that deterred the early stages of aphid host selection on resistant plants. These findings suggest that the antixenotic defences that inhibit aphid settling and the antibiotic defences that depress fecundity and promote mortality are regulated through different signalling pathways. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  19. Toxicity of newly isolated piperideine alkaloids from the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta Buren, against the green peach aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The green peach aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer), is a major insect pest of many agronomic and horticultural crops and is distributed worldwide Aphid management is often based on application of insecticides. However, the aphid is now resistant to many of these and much interest has recently develope...

  20. Molecular systematics of aphids (Homoptera: Aphididae): new insights from the long-wavelength opsin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Rivas, Benjamín; Moya, Andrés; Martínez-Torres, David

    2004-01-01

    Viviparous aphids (Aphididae) constitute a monophyletic group within the Homoptera with more than 4000 extant species worldwide but higher diversity in temperate regions. Several aspects of their biology account for attention paid to this group of insects. Their plant-sap-sucking way of feeding with many species transmitting viruses to crop plants has important implications on crop management strategies. Cyclical parthenogenesis associated in many groups to host alternation and elaborate polyphenisms is of special interests for evolutionists. Finally, the ancient association of most aphid species with intracellular endosymbiotic bacteria (Buchnera sp.) has also received much attention from evolutionists interested in mechanisms involved in the symbiotic process. Knowing the phylogenetic relationships among major aphid taxa is of special interest to evolutionists interested in the above issues. However, until recently, molecular approaches to aphid phylogeny were absent and discussions on the evolution of aphid life-cycles and on evolutionary aspects of their symbiotic association with Buchnera were framed by morphology-based phylogenies. Recently, two reports using molecular approaches attempted to address the yet unresolved phylogeny of Aphididae with limited although somehow different conclusions. In the present report we study the utility of the long-wave opsin gene in resolving phylogenetic relationships among seven subfamilies within the Aphididae. Our results corroborate some previously proposed relationships and suggest a revision of some others. In particular, our data support grouping the analysed aphid species into three main clades, being the subfamily Lachninae one of them, which contradicts its generally accepted sistership relationship with the subfamily Aphidinae. Moreover, our data also suggest a basal position of Lachninae which has implications on current discussions about the ancestrality of conifer-feeding in modern aphids.

  1. Pest control of aphids depends on landscape complexity and natural enemy interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily A. Martin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aphids are a major concern in agricultural crops worldwide, and control by natural enemies is an essential component of the ecological intensification of agriculture. Although the complexity of agricultural landscapes is known to influence natural enemies of pests, few studies have measured the degree of pest control by different enemy guilds across gradients in landscape complexity. Here, we use multiple natural-enemy exclosures replicated in 18 fields across a gradient in landscape complexity to investigate (1 the strength of natural pest control across landscapes, measured as the difference between pest pressure in the presence and in the absence of natural enemies; (2 the differential contributions of natural enemy guilds to pest control, and the nature of their interactions across landscapes. We show that natural pest control of aphids increased up to six-fold from simple to complex landscapes. In the absence of pest control, aphid population growth was higher in complex than simple landscapes, but was reduced by natural enemies to similar growth rates across all landscapes. The effects of enemy guilds were landscape-dependent. Particularly in complex landscapes, total pest control was supplied by the combined contribution of flying insects and ground-dwellers. Birds had little overall impact on aphid control. Despite evidence for intraguild predation of flying insects by ground-dwellers and birds, the overall effect of enemy guilds on aphid control was complementary. Understanding pest control services at large spatial scales is critical to increase the success of ecological intensification schemes. Our results suggest that, where aphids are the main pest of concern, interactions between natural enemies are largely complementary and lead to a strongly positive effect of landscape complexity on pest control. Increasing the availability of seminatural habitats in agricultural landscapes may thus benefit not only natural enemies, but also the

  2. Rapid Cold Hardening Capacity and Its Impact on Performance of Russian Wheat Aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeidi, Fatemeh; Moharramipour, Saeid; Mikani, Azam

    2017-08-01

    The Russian wheat aphid, Diuraphis noxia (Kurdjumov), is one of the most important pests of wheat and barley in most wheat-producing countries. Rapid cold hardiness (RCH) is a capacity of insects to develop, within hours, protection against subfreezing temperatures that plays an important role in aphid survival in response to sudden decreases in air temperature. In this research, we investigated the duration and rate of cooling on the induction of RCH of D. noxia and the costs of RCH on aphid development and fecundity. By transferring aphids directly from 20 °C to a range of subzero temperatures for 2 h, the lower lethal temperature for 80% mortality (LT80) was determined to be - 11.9 °C. Preconditioning the aphids at 0 °C for 1-3 h prior to exposure at (LT80) (-11.9 °C) resulted in a sharp increase in survival, with little change with longer durations of preconditioning. The slowest cooling rate (0.05 °C/min) increased survival fourfold, whereas rates from 0.1 to 1 °C/min increased survival twofold compared with a direct transfer to 0 °C, regardless of aphid stage used. Deleterious effects of RCH were not observed on aphid development, longevity, or fecundity. The present study indicates that RCH is induced in D. noxia in just a few hours in response to sudden lowering of temperatures to freezing, with little or no cost in reproductive capacity. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Seasonal phenology and species composition of the aphid fauna in a northern crop production area.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha M Kirchner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The species diversity of aphids and seasonal timing of their flight activity can have significant impacts on crop production, as aphid species differ in their ability to transmit plant viruses and flight timing affects virus epidemiology. The aim of the study was to characterise the species composition and phenology of aphid fauna in Finland in one of the northernmost intensive crop production areas of the world (latitude 64°. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Flight activity was monitored in four growing seasons (2007-010 using yellow pan traps (YPTs placed in 4-8 seed potato fields and a Rothamsted suction trap. A total of 58,528 winged aphids were obtained, identified to 83 taxa based on morphology, and 34 species were additionally characterised by DNA barcoding. Seasonal flight activity patterns analysed based on YPT catch fell into three main phenology clusters. Monoecious taxa showed early or middle-season flight activity and belonged to species living on shrubs/trees or herbaceous plants, respectively. Heteroecious taxa occurred over the entire potato growing season (ca. 90 days. Abundance of aphids followed a clear 3-year cycle based on suction trap data covering a decade. Rhopalosiphum padi occurring at the end of the potato growing season was the most abundant species. The flight activity of Aphis fabae, the main vector of Potato virus Y in the region, and Aphis gossypii peaked in the beginning of potato growing season. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Detailed information was obtained on phenology of a large number aphid species, of which many are agriculturally important pests acting as vectors of plant viruses. Aphis gossypii is known as a pest in greenhouses, but our study shows that it occurs also in the field, even far in the north. The novel information on aphid phenology and ecology has wide implications for prospective pest management, particularly in light of climate change.

  4. Selective and irreversible inhibitors of aphid acetylcholinesterases: steps toward human-safe insecticides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Ping Pang

    Full Text Available Aphids, among the most destructive insects to world agriculture, are mainly controlled by organophosphate insecticides that disable the catalytic serine residue of acetylcholinesterase (AChE. Because these agents also affect vertebrate AChEs, they are toxic to non-target species including humans and birds. We previously reported that a cysteine residue (Cys, found at the AChE active site in aphids and other insects but not mammals, might serve as a target for insect-selective pesticides. However, aphids have two different AChEs (termed AP and AO, and only AP-AChE carries the unique Cys. The absence of the active-site Cys in AO-AChE might raise concerns about the utility of targeting that residue. Herein we report the development of a methanethiosulfonate-containing small molecule that, at 6.0 microM, irreversibly inhibits 99% of all AChE activity extracted from the greenbug aphid (Schizaphis graminum without any measurable inhibition of the human AChE. Reactivation studies using beta-mercaptoethanol confirm that the irreversible inhibition resulted from the conjugation of the inhibitor to the unique Cys. These results suggest that AO-AChE does not contribute significantly to the overall AChE activity in aphids, thus offering new insight into the relative functional importance of the two insect AChEs. More importantly, by demonstrating that the Cys-targeting inhibitor can abolish AChE activity in aphids, we can conclude that the unique Cys may be a viable target for species-selective agents to control aphids without causing human toxicity and resistance problems.

  5. Internode length in Pisum. Gene na may block gibberellin synthesis between ent-7. cap alpha. -hydroxykaurenoic acid and biggerellin A/sub 12/-aldehyde. [Pisum sativum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingram, T.J.; Reid, J.B.

    1987-04-01

    The elongation response of the gibberellin (GA) deficient genotypes na, ls, and lh of peas (Pisum sativum L.) to a range of GA-precursors was examined. Plants possessing gene na did not respond to precursors in the GA biosynthetic pathway prior to GA/sub 12/-aldehyde. In contrast, plants possessing lh and ls responded as well as wild-type plants (dwarfed with AMO-1618) to these compounds. The results suggest that GA biosynthesis is blocked prior to ent-kaurene in the lh and ls mutants and between ent-7..cap alpha..-hydroxykaurenoic acid and GA/sub 12/-aldehyde in the na mutant. Feeds of ent(/sup 3/H)kaurenoic acid and (/sup 2/H)GA/sub 12/-aldehyde to a range of genotypes supported the above conclusions. The na line WL1766 was shown by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to metabolize(/sup 2/H)GA/sub 12/-aldehyde to a number of (/sup 2/H)C/sub 19/-GAs including GA/sub 1/. However, there was no indication in na genotypes for the metabolism of ent-(/sup 3/H)kaurenoic acid to these GAs. In contrast, the expanding shoot tissue of all Na genotypes examined metabolized ent-(/sup 3/H)kaurenoic acid to radioactive compounds that co-chromatographed with GA/sub 1/, GA/sub 8/, GA/sub 20/, and GA/sub 29/. However, insufficient material was present for unequivocal identification of the metabolites. The radioactive profiles from HPLC of extracts of the node treated with ent-(/sup 3/H)kaurenoic acid were similar for both Na and na plants and contained ent-16..cap alpha..,17-dihydroxykaurenoic acid and ent-6..cap alpha..,7..cap alpha..,16..beta..,17-tetrahydroxykaurenoic acid (both characterized by GC-MS), suggesting that the metabolites arose from side branches of the main GA-biosynthetic pathway. Thus, both Na and na plants appear capable of ent-7..cap alpha..-hydroxylation.

  6. The mitochondrial genome of the Russian wheat aphid Diuraphis noxia: large repetitive sequences between trnE and trnF in aphids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Ma, Chuan; Edwards, Owain; Fuller, Susan; Kang, Le

    2014-01-01

    To characterize aphid mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) features, we sequenced the complete mitogenome of the Russian wheat aphid, Diuraphis noxia. The 15,784-bp mitogenome with a high A+T content (84.76%) and strong C skew (-0.26) was arranged in the same gene order as that of the ancestral insect. Unlike typical insect mitogenomes, D. noxia possessed a large tandem repeat region (644 bp) located between trnE and trnF. Sequencing partial mitogenome of the cotton aphid (Aphis gossypii) further confirmed the presence of the large repeat region in aphids, but with different repeat length and copy number. Another motif (58 bp) tandemly repeated 2.3 times in the control region of D. noxia. All repeat units in D. noxia could be folded into stem-loop secondary structures, which could further promote an increase in copy numbers. Characterization of the D. noxia mitogenome revealed distinct mitogenome architectures, thus advancing our understanding of insect mitogenomic diversities and evolution. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Host selection and probing behavior of the poplar aphid Chaitophorus leucomelas (Sternorrhyncha: Aphididae) on two poplar hybrids with contrasting susceptibility to aphids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios-San Martín, Joceline; Quiroz, Andrés; Verdugo, Jaime A; Parra, Leonardo; Hormazabal, Emilio; Astudillo, Luis A; Rojas-Herrera, Marcelo; Ramírez, Claudio C

    2014-02-01

    Poplars are frequently attacked by aphids. The differential susceptibility of poplar hybrids to the aphid Chaitophorus leucomelas Koch (Sternorrhyncha: Aphididae) has been described, but the mechanism underlying this pattern is unknown. This work tested the hypothesis that poplar resistance to this aphid is associated with the presence of volatiles and secondary plant compounds that affect host selection and feeding behavior. This hypothesis was tested by studying the host choice and feeding behavior of C. leucomelas on two poplar hybrids with contrasting susceptibilities to this aphid ([Populus trichocarpa Torrey & Gray x Populus deltoides Bartram ex Marshall] x P. deltoides [TD x D], and [P. trichocarpa x Populus maximowiczii Henry] x [P. trichocarpa x P. maximowiczii] [TM x TM]). The results showed that C. leucomelas rejected leaves of the TM x TM hybrid and did not prefer odors from either hybrid. Electronic monitoring of the probing behavior of C. leucomelas suggested the involvement of antifeedant factors in the TM x TM hybrid. In addition, the chemical characterization of volatiles, epicuticular waxes, and internal phenols of leaves from both poplar hybrids revealed that TM x TM had a higher abundance of monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, n-alkanes, and phenols. These results are discussed in terms of their contribution to poplar breeding programs aimed at enhancing insect resistance.

  8. Weed host specificity of the aphid, Aphis spiraecola: developmental and reproductive performance of aphids in relation to plant growth and leaf chemicals of the Siam weed, Chromolaena odorata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwala, B K; Das, Jhuma

    2012-01-01

    Density, distribution, and nutritional quality of plants are the causal basis of host plant selection in aphids. Nutritional qualities of a plant vary according to its growth stage and also in response to seasonal variation. How host plant growth stages shape aphid performance was studied in Aphis spiraecola Patch (Homoptera: Aphididae) on the perennial Siam weed, Chromolaena odorata (L.) King and Robinson (Asterales: Asteraceae). This plant species is the preferred host in the hot and humid tropical parts of northeast and southern India. Variations in developmental and reproductive performances in apterous viviparous female aphids were recorded in relation to differences in leaf chemicals in different growth stages of C. odorata. Aphids reproduced at higher rates in the vegetative stage of C. odorata when developmental time was shortest, and fecundity was higher in a longer reproductive time. Intrinsic rate of increase and net reproductive rate were also recorded to be higher in the vegetative stage of the weed host. In the vegetative stage, leaves contained higher quantity of proteins and nitrogen, which are vital for insect reproduction. Results of this study have demonstrated that A spiraecola showed synchronization of its developmental and reproductive performances to growth stages of C. odorata, which occur in high abundance in the study area.

  9. Preference and performance of the hyperparasitoid Syrphophagus aphidivorus (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae): fitness consequences of selecting hosts in live aphids or aphid mummies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buitenhuis, R.; Boivin, G.; Vet, L.E.M.; Brodeur, J.

    2004-01-01

    1. Theoretical models predict that ovipositional decisions of parasitoid females should lead to the selection of the most profitable host for parasitoid development. Most parasitoid species have evolved specific adaptations to exploit a single host stage. However, females of the aphid

  10. Application of SNPs to improve yield of Pisum sativum L. (pea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmood, Ansar; Murtaza, Ghulam

    2017-06-01

    Nanotechnology opens an enormous scope of novel application in the fields of biotechnology and agricultural industries, because nanoparticles (NPs) have unique physicochemical properties, i.e. high surface area, high reactivity, tunable pore size and particle morphology. Present study was carried out to determine the role of silver NPs (SNPs) to improve yield of Pisum sativum L. SNPs (10-100 nm) were synthesised by green method using extract of Berberis lycium Royle. Pea seeds were soaked and seedling were foliage sprayed by 0, 30, 60 and 90 ppm SNPs. The experiment was arranged as split-split plot randomised complete block design with three replicates. The application of SNPs enhanced significantly number of seeds pod -1 , number of pods plant -1 , hundred seed weight, biological yield and green pod yield over control. The highest yield was found when 60 ppm SNPs were applied. However, exposure to 90 ppm SNPs, the yield of the pea decreased significantly as compared with 30 and 60 ppm. This research shows that SNPs have definite ability to improve growth and yield of crops. Nevertheless, a comprehensive experimentation is needed to establish the most appropriate concentration, size and mode of application of SNPs for higher growth and maximum yield of pea.

  11. Gamma-ray induced mutations in Pisum arvense (L.s.s.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaranowski, J.K.

    1976-01-01

    The subject of the studies was the progeny of seven lines of field pea, treated with gamma rays (at the doses of 1, 6, 12, 15, 50 kR) in the generations M 2 - M 4 . Of the total number of analysed 15630 plants 249 mutants have been isolated which constituted 1.59% of the total population. The mutation frequency was significantly different depending on the line under study and on the radiation dose. In the mutation spectrum lethal and semilethal mutations were prevalent. The cause of these phenomena were either chlorophyll aberrations or disturbances in the development, growth and morphology of plants. These mutations died in different periods of vegetation or did not come to flowering and died. A number of morphologic-developmental mutations have been isolated; their genotypes have been established, cytologically examined and characterized. Some of the isolated fertile mutations are similar to those obtained at other research centres (e.g., cirrhifolialis, viciaefolialis, fasciata), others seem to be original (eg. pumilio, celeriter crescens, gynaecei, multiplicis). It is necessary, however, to perform identification tests to introduce these mutations into the Pisum Genebank, the more so, as most of papers on mutations concerned edible and garden peas (P. sativum L.), and in our work we considered field forms (P. arvense L.s.s.). (author)

  12. Cloning, overexpression, purification and preliminary crystallographic studies of a mitochondrial type II peroxiredoxin from Pisum sativum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barranco-Medina, Sergio [Departamento de Bioquímica, Biología Molecular y Celular de Plantas, Estación Experimental del Zaidín, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, E-18008 Granada (Spain); López-Jaramillo, Francisco Javier, E-mail: fjljara@ugr.es [Instituto de Biotecnología, Campus Fuentenueva, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Bernier-Villamor, Laura [Departamento de Bioquímica, Biología Molecular y Celular de Plantas, Estación Experimental del Zaidín, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, E-18008 Granada (Spain); Sevilla, Francisca [Departamento de Biología del Estrés y Patología Vegetal, Centro de Edafología y Biología Aplicada del Segura, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, E-30080 Murcia (Spain); Lázaro, Juan-José [Departamento de Bioquímica, Biología Molecular y Celular de Plantas, Estación Experimental del Zaidín, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, E-18008 Granada (Spain)

    2006-07-01

    The isolation, purification, crystallization and molecular-replacement solution of mitochondrial type II peroxiredoxin from P. sativum is reported. A cDNA encoding an open reading frame of 199 amino acids corresponding to a type II peroxiredoxin from Pisum sativum with its transit peptide was isolated by RT-PCR. The 171-amino-acid mature protein (estimated molecular weight 18.6 kDa) was cloned into the pET3d vector and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein was purified and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique. A full data set (98.2% completeness) was collected using a rotating-anode generator to a resolution of 2.8 Å from a single crystal flash-cooled at 100 K. X-ray data revealed that the protein crystallizes in space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 61.88, b = 66.40, c = 77.23 Å, α = 102.90, β = 104.40, γ = 99.07°, and molecular replacement using a theoretical model predicted from the primary structure as a search model confirmed the presence of six molecules in the unit cell as expected from the Matthews coefficient. Refinement of the structure is in progress.

  13. NADH induces the generation of superoxide radicals in leaf peroxisomes. [Pisum sativum L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    del Rio, L.A.; Sandalio, L.M.; Palma, J.M. (Unidad de Bioquimica Vegetal, Granada (Spain)); Fernandez, V.M.; Ruperez, F.L. (Instituto de Catalisis, Madrid (Spain))

    1989-03-01

    In peroxisomes isolated from pea leaves (Pisum sativum L.) the production of superoxide free radicals (O{sub 2}{sup {minus}}) by xanthine and NADH was investigated. In peroxisomal membranes, 100 micromolar NADH induced the production of O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} radicals. In the soluble fractions of peroxisomes, no generation of O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} radicals was observed by incubation with either NADH or xanthine, although xanthine oxidase was found located predominantly in the matrix of peroxisomes. The failure of xanthine to induce superoxide generation was probably due to the inability to fully suppress the endogenous Mn-superoxide dismutase activity by inhibitors which were inactive against xanthine oxidase. The generation of superoxide radicals in leaf peroxisomes together with the recently described production of these oxygen radicals in glyoxysomes suggests that O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} generation could be a common metabolic property of peroxisomes and further supports the existence of active oxygen-related roles for peroxisomes in cellular metabolism.

  14. Development and Characterization of 37 Novel EST-SSR Markers in Pisum sativum (Fabaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Zhuang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Simple sequence repeat markers were developed based on expressed sequence tags (EST-SSR and screened for polymorphism among 23 Pisum sativum individuals to assist development and refinement of pea linkage maps. In particular, the SSR markers were developed to assist in mapping of white mold disease resistance quantitative trait loci. Methods and Results: Primer pairs were designed for 46 SSRs identified in EST contiguous sequences assembled from a 454 pyrosequenced transcriptome of the pea cultivar, ‘LIFTER’. Thirty-seven SSR markers amplified PCR products, of which 11 (30% SSR markers produced polymorphism in 23 individuals, including parents of recombinant inbred lines, with two to four alleles. The observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0 to 0.43 and from 0.31 to 0.83, respectively. Conclusions: These EST-SSR markers for pea will be useful for refinement of pea linkage maps, and will likely be useful for comparative mapping of pea and as tools for marker-based pea breeding.

  15. Evaluation of genetic divergence and heritability in pea (Pisum sativum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Georgieva

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available An experiment on genetic evaluation of five genotypes of forage pea (Glyans, Svit, Kamerton, Modus, Pleven 4 was conducted during 2012-2014 period. Analysis of variance showed significant differences among genotypes for the traits pod width, seeds per plant, seed weight per plant and 1000 seed weight. The estimates of genetic parameters of five varieties of Pisum sativum L. indicated a good amount of genetic variation in the experimental materials under investigation. Moderate phenotypic and genotypic coefficients of variation were observed for most of traits except pod length and pod width. For the traits studied seeds per plant, seed weight per plant and plant height were found high heritability along with high genetic gain indicating preponderance of additive effects. Therefore, selection programme based on these characters would be more effective in improving yield parameters of forage pea. The seed yield was positively and significantly correlated with 1000 seed weight and pod stem, which suggested the possibilities of improving seed yield by simultaneous improvement of these traits.

  16. Phytochrome regulation of gibberellin metabolism in shoots of dwarf Pisum sativum L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campell, B.R.

    1986-01-01

    To study the effect of light on the recessive dwarfing allele, le, of Pisum sativum L., etiolated, paclobutrazol treated LeLe (cv. Alaska) and lele (cv. Progress) pea seedlings were transferred to different light regimes. The growth response of both genotypes to applications of GA/sub 1/, GA/sub 20/, and steviol was measured over 48 hours using position transducers. Both genotypes responded to GA/sub 1/ under red irradiation and in darkness. The LeLe plants grew in response to steviol and GA/sub 20/ under red irradiation and in darkness. The lele plants responded to steviol and GA/sub 20/ in darkness, but showed a much smaller response when red irradiated. The red effect on lele plants was reversible by far-red irradiation. (/sup 3/H)GA/sub 20/ was applied to nana pea seedlings, homozygous for le, grown under different light regimes. Radioactive metabolites were later extracted from the shoots of the treated plants. Both the free acid and conjugate pools were analyzed by reversed phase HPLC, and some radioactive metabolites were tentatively identified by comparing their retention times to those of authentic (/sup 3/H)GAs.

  17. Comportement agronomique d'une collection de pois (Pisum sativum L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouslama, M.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Agronomical Behaviour of a Pea Collection (Pisum sativum L.. This experience was achieved under greenhouse conditions. Twelve genotypes of pea were used (Asgrow, Jumbo, Lincoln, Merveille de Kelvedon, Purser, Rajai Torpe, Snajor Kosep, Korai,Wando, Rondo, local genotype, Major Kosep Korai and Surgevil. They were cultivated on peat during 5.5 months (from October to April. Some agronomical parameters were studied: resistance to diseases, (Powdery-mildew, mildew, top yellow virus, anthracnose, browning, fresh matter, number of branches/plant, number of flowers/plant, number of pods/ plant and the yield of grains /plant. Results showed that only the genotype Purser is resistant to all diseases and Surgevil is sensitive only to the Top Yellow virus. The local genotype is sensitive to three frequent diseases (Powdery-mildew, mildew and Anthracnose. With regard to vegetative growth, the highest yield of fresh matter do not contribute towards a high fertility rate. In fact, only the genotypes having a weak yield of fresh matter (Snajor Kosep Korai, Asgrow, Major Kosep Korai, Rajai Torpe and Purser have the most important rate of fertility (> 30%. Within this group, the most important yield (> 9 g/plant is a result of high: number of pods/plant (7.5 to 21.6 and of grains/pod (2.8 to 4.92. Finally, genotype Purser should be retained for farmers and programs of genetic amelioration for its resistance to diseases and agronomical performances.

  18. Profile and Functional Properties of Seed Proteins from Six Pea (Pisum sativum Genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola Ristic

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Extractability, extractable protein compositions, technological-functional properties of pea (Pisum sativum proteins from six genotypes grown in Serbia were investigated. Also, the relationship between these characteristics was presented. Investigated genotypes showed significant differences in storage protein content, composition and extractability. The ratio of vicilin:legumin concentrations, as well as the ratio of vicilin + convicilin: Legumin concentrations were positively correlated with extractability. Our data suggest that the higher level of vicilin and/or a lower level of legumin have a positive influence on protein extractability. The emulsion activity index (EAI was strongly and positively correlated with the solubility, while no significant correlation was found between emulsion stability (ESI and solubility, nor between foaming properties and solubility. No association was evident between ESI and EAI. A moderate positive correlation between emulsion stability and foam capacity was observed. Proteins from the investigated genotypes expressed significantly different emulsifying properties and foam capacity at different pH values, whereas low foam stability was detected. It appears that genotype has considerable influence on content, composition and technological-functional properties of pea bean proteins. This fact can be very useful for food scientists in efforts to improve the quality of peas and pea protein products.

  19. Organic meat quality of dual purpose young bulls supplemented with pea (Pisum sativum L.) or soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corazzin, Mirco; Piasentier, Edi; Saccà, Elena; Bazzoli, Ilario; Bovolenta, Stefano

    2018-02-01

    One of the main constraints established by organic legislation that limits the development of the rearing of young bulls is the ban on the use of genetically modified organisms (GMO). Most of the worldwide cultivated soybean is GMO, therefore the use of alternative protein sources should be evaluated. In this study, the effect of dietary substitution of soybean with pea (Pisum sativum L.) on carcass characteristics and meat quality of dual purpose young bulls reared following the organic method was investigated. Twenty-four young bulls of Rendena breed were randomly assigned to two diet treatments differing in protein supplement (soybean (SB) or field pea (FP)). Carcass characteristics and meat chemical composition, colour, cooking loss and Warner-Bratzler shear force did not differ between groups. Regarding meat fatty acid composition, SB showed higher concentrations of C18:0 and C18:1 t and lower C16:1n-9c, C14:0, C17:1n-9c and C18:1n-9c than FP. In descriptive sensory analysis, trained judges were not able to differentiate meats from SB and FP, which also had similar overall liking expressed by consumers. The results of this study indicate that FP can replace SB in the diet of dual purpose young bulls with only a minor influence on fatty acid composition and no effect on carcass characteristics and meat quality. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Isolation of lectin and albumin from Pisum sativum var. macrocarpon ser. cv. sugar snap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, X; Ng, T B

    2001-01-01

    A mannose- and glucose-binding lectin bearing considerable sequence similarity to other legume lectins was isolated using a simple procedure, from legumes of the sugar snap Pisum sativum var. macrocarpon. The lectin was unadsorbed on Affi-gel blue gel and Q-Sepharose in 10 mM Tris-HCl buffer (pH 7.2) and adsorbed on SP-Toyopearl in 50 mM NaOAc buffer (pH 5). An albumin could also be purified at the same time. It was unadsorbed on Affi-gel Blue gel, adsorbed on Q-Sepharose and unadsorbed on SP-Toyopearl under the aforementioned chromatographic conditions. The lectin was almost identical in N-terminal sequences of its alpha- and beta-subunit to lectin from P. sativum L. var. Feltham First except for the 19th N-terminal residue of the beta-subunit. The lectin was devoid of antifungal activity. Out of the 15 N-terminal amino acids examined in pea albumin, three were different between the two varieties of P. sativum.

  1. [Correlation between growth of callus and a number of nodule for pea Pisum sativum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Iu P

    2012-01-01

    The processes of nodulation and callusing were studied for pea Pisum sativum in a comparative aspect. Seven varieties of pea plants were used. The nodulation was characterized by the number of nodules and their mass per one plant. The frequency ratio of nodules of various weights was described by the Lorentz equation. The growth of callus was described using equation of the S-dependence. It has been shown that plants can produce maximal (optimum for nitrogen fixation) mass of nodules by an increase either in the nodules number or in the mass of each nodule. This feature is specific to the varieties of peas. It has been also found that the plants of the pea varieties, which have a large number of nodules, produce calluses of maximum size. Small calluses are characteristic of the varieties having plants with small amounts of large nodules. The data obtained has been interpreted on the assumption that the nodulation is underlined by both differentiation and proliferation, whereas the callusing is due only to the proliferation process.

  2. Agronomical factors influencing the legumin/vicilin ratio in pea (Pisum sativum L.) seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Cécile; Dehon, Lydie; Bourgeois, Audrey; Verhaeghe-Cartrysse, Christine; Blecker, Christophe

    2012-06-01

    Many research studies have investigated the impact of agronomical factors on the protein content of pea (Pisum sativum). This study aimed to establish if a correlation exists between protein content and legumin/vicilin (L/V) ratio in pea seeds and to identify agronomical factors that have an impact on this ratio. The L/V ratio was positively correlated with protein content (r = 0.58, P ≤ 0.01), but no linear regression was applicable (adjusted R(2) = 0.31). Both variety and cultivation year had a highly significant effect on the ratio (P varieties being less sensitive to climatic conditions than others. Cultivation location had a highly significant effect (P pea varieties independently. Varieties with a stable L/V ratio can prove to be useful in the food industry. Other agronomical factors (soil type and seeding density) should be considered for the production of pea seeds with a specific L/V ratio. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Distribution of fatty acids in triacylglycerols and phospholipids from peas (Pisum sativum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Hiromi; Tomiyama, Yuka; Tanaka, Megumi; Mizushina, Yoshiyuki

    2007-11-01

    The fatty acid distribution of triacylglycerols (TAG) and major phospholipids (PL) obtained from four varieties of peas (Pisum sativum) was investigated. The total lipids extracted from the peas were separated by thin layer chromatography into seven fractions. The major lipid components were PL (52.2-61.3%) and TAG (31.2-40.3%), while hydrocarbons, steryl esters, free fatty acids and diacylglycerols (sn-1,3 and sn-1,2) were also present in minor proportions (5.6-9.2%). The main PL components isolated from the four varieties were phosphatidylcholine (42.3-49.2%), phosphatidylinositol (23.3-25.2%) and phosphatidylethanolamine (17.7-20.5%). Significant differences (P pea varieties. Phosphatidylinositol was unique in that it had the highest saturated fatty acid content among the three PL. However, the principal characteristics of the fatty acid distribution in the TAG and three PL were evident among the four varieties: unsaturated fatty acids were predominantly located in the sn-2 position while saturated fatty acids primarily occupied the sn-1 or sn-3 position in the oils of the peas. These results should be useful to both producers and consumers for the manufacture of pea foods in Japan. Copyright © 2007 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Genetic characterization of pea (Pisum sativum) germplasm from Turkey using morphological and SSR markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarikamiş, G; Yanmaz, R; Ermiş, S; Bakir, M; Yüksel, C

    2010-03-30

    The need for the conservation of plant genetic resources has been widely accepted. Germplasm characterization and evaluation yield information for more efficient utilization of these valuable resources. The aim of the present study was to characterize the pea germplasm conserved at the Aegean Agricultural Research Institute of Turkey using morphological and simple sequence repeat (SSR)-based molecular approaches. Genetic characterization of 30 pea genotypes collected from different regions of Turkey and 10 commercial pea cultivars was performed using the criteria of the International Union for the Protection of New Varieties of Plants (UPOV) (TG 7/9 Pisum sativum), and with 10 SSR markers. We originally tested 15 SSR markers; 10 of these markers were selected on the basis of high polymorphism information content in the molecular assays. Sixty-one alleles were detected at the 10 loci. The number of alleles per SSR locus ranged from 3 (PVSBE2) to 12 (AB53), with a mean of 6.1 alleles. The most informative loci were AB53 (12 alleles), AA355 (9 alleles), AD270 (8 alleles), A9 (7 alleles), AD61 (7 alleles), and AB25 (6 alleles). The UPGMA dendrogram defined by SSR markers revealed genetic relatedness of the pea genotypes. These findings can be used to guide future breeding studies and germplasm management of these pea genotypes.

  5. Conserved thioredoxin fold is present in Pisum sativum L. sieve element occlusion-1 protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umate, Pavan; Tuteja, Renu

    2010-01-01

    Homology-based three-dimensional model for Pisum sativum sieve element occlusion 1 (Ps.SEO1) (forisomes) protein was constructed. A stretch of amino acids (residues 320 to 456) which is well conserved in all known members of forisomes proteins was used to model the 3D structure of Ps.SEO1. The structural prediction was done using Protein Homology/analogY Recognition Engine (PHYRE) web server. Based on studies of local sequence alignment, the thioredoxin-fold containing protein [Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP) code d1o73a_], a member of the glutathione peroxidase family was selected as a template for modeling the spatial structure of Ps.SEO1. Selection was based on comparison of primary sequence, higher match quality and alignment accuracy. Motif 1 (EVF) is conserved in Ps.SEO1, Vicia faba (Vf.For1) and Medicago truncatula (MT.SEO3); motif 2 (KKED) is well conserved across all forisomes proteins and motif 3 (IGYIGNP) is conserved in Ps.SEO1 and Vf.For1. PMID:20404566

  6. Purification and characterization of ornithine transcarbamylase from pea (Pisum sativum L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocum, R. D.; Richardson, D. P.

    1991-01-01

    Pea (Pisum sativum) ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) was purified to homogeneity from leaf homogenates in a single-step procedure, using delta-N-(phosphonacetyl)-L-ornithine-Sepharose 6B affinity chromatography. The 1581-fold purified OTC enzyme exhibited a specific activity of 139 micromoles citrulline per minute per milligram of protein at 37 degrees C, pH 8.5. Pea OTC represents approximately 0.05% of the total soluble protein in the leaf. The molecular weight of the native enzyme was approximately 108,200, as estimated by Sephacryl S-200 gel filtration chromatography. The purified protein ran as a single molecular weight band of 36,500 in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. These results suggest that the pea OTC is a trimer of identical subunits. The overall amino acid composition of pea OTC is similar to that found in other eukaryotic and prokaryotic OTCs, but the number of arginine residues is approximately twofold higher. The increased number of arginine residues probably accounts for the observed isoelectric point of 7.6 for the pea enzyme, which is considerably more basic than isoelectric point values that have been reported for other OTCs.

  7. De Novo Assembly of the Pea (Pisum sativum L. Nodule Transcriptome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir A. Zhukov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The large size and complexity of the garden pea (Pisum sativum L. genome hamper its sequencing and the discovery of pea gene resources. Although transcriptome sequencing provides extensive information about expressed genes, some tissue-specific transcripts can only be identified from particular organs under appropriate conditions. In this study, we performed RNA sequencing of polyadenylated transcripts from young pea nodules and root tips on an Illumina GAIIx system, followed by de novo transcriptome assembly using the Trinity program. We obtained more than 58,000 and 37,000 contigs from “Nodules” and “Root Tips” assemblies, respectively. The quality of the assemblies was assessed by comparison with pea expressed sequence tags and transcriptome sequencing project data available from NCBI website. The “Nodules” assembly was compared with the “Root Tips” assembly and with pea transcriptome sequencing data from projects indicating tissue specificity. As a result, approximately 13,000 nodule-specific contigs were found and annotated by alignment to known plant protein-coding sequences and by Gene Ontology searching. Of these, 581 sequences were found to possess full CDSs and could thus be considered as novel nodule-specific transcripts of pea. The information about pea nodule-specific gene sequences can be applied for gene-based markers creation, polymorphism studies, and real-time PCR.

  8. Cloning, overexpression, purification and preliminary crystallographic studies of a mitochondrial type II peroxiredoxin from Pisum sativum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barranco-Medina, Sergio; López-Jaramillo, Francisco Javier; Bernier-Villamor, Laura; Sevilla, Francisca; Lázaro, Juan-José

    2006-01-01

    The isolation, purification, crystallization and molecular-replacement solution of mitochondrial type II peroxiredoxin from P. sativum is reported. A cDNA encoding an open reading frame of 199 amino acids corresponding to a type II peroxiredoxin from Pisum sativum with its transit peptide was isolated by RT-PCR. The 171-amino-acid mature protein (estimated molecular weight 18.6 kDa) was cloned into the pET3d vector and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein was purified and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique. A full data set (98.2% completeness) was collected using a rotating-anode generator to a resolution of 2.8 Å from a single crystal flash-cooled at 100 K. X-ray data revealed that the protein crystallizes in space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 61.88, b = 66.40, c = 77.23 Å, α = 102.90, β = 104.40, γ = 99.07°, and molecular replacement using a theoretical model predicted from the primary structure as a search model confirmed the presence of six molecules in the unit cell as expected from the Matthews coefficient. Refinement of the structure is in progress

  9. Silencing the expression of the salivary sheath protein causes transgenerational feeding suppression in the aphid Sitobion avenae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdellatef, Eltayb; Will, Torsten; Koch, Aline; Imani, Jafargholi; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Kogel, Karl-Heinz

    2015-08-01

    Aphids produce gel saliva during feeding which forms a sheath around the stylet as it penetrates through the apoplast. The sheath is required for the sustained ingestion of phloem sap from sieve elements and is thought to form when the structural sheath protein (SHP) is cross-linked by intermolecular disulphide bridges. We investigated the possibility of controlling aphid infestation by host-induced gene silencing (HIGS) targeting shp expression in the grain aphid Sitobion avenae. When aphids were fed on transgenic barley expressing shp double-stranded RNA (shp-dsRNA), they produced significantly lower levels of shp mRNA compared to aphids feeding on wild-type plants, suggesting that the transfer of inhibitory RNA from the plant to the insect was successful. shp expression remained low when aphids were transferred from transgenic plants and fed for 1 or 2 weeks, respectively, on wild-type plants, confirming that silencing had a prolonged impact. Reduced shp expression correlated with a decline in growth, reproduction and survival rates. Remarkably, morphological and physiological aberrations such as winged adults and delayed maturation were maintained over seven aphid generations feeding on wild-type plants. Targeting shp expression therefore appears to cause strong transgenerational effects on feeding, development and survival in S. avenae, suggesting that the HIGS technology has a realistic potential for the control of aphid pests in agriculture. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Resistance of Endophyte-Infected Plants of Tall Fescue and Perennial Ryegrass to the Russian Wheat Aphid (Homoptera: Aphididae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    S.L. Clement; K.S. Pike; W.J. Kaiser; A. Dan Wilson

    1991-01-01

    Fewer aphids of the Russian wheat aphid, (Mordvilko), were found on tall fescue and perennial ryegrass plants harboring systemic fungal endophytes than on endophyte-free plants in laboratory tests. These results indicate that enhanced resistance in some perennial grasses to D. noxia is associated with the presence of endophytic fungi.

  11. Assessment of fennel aphids (Hemiptera: Aphididae) and their predators in fennel intercropped with cotton with colored fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalho, F S; Fernandes, F S; Nascimento, A R B; Nascimento Júnior, J L; Malaquias, J B; Silva, C A D

    2012-02-01

    The fennel aphid, Hyadaphis foeniculi (Passerini) (Hemiptera: Aphididae) is a major pest of fennel, Foeniculum vulgare Miller in northeast region of Brazil. We hypothesize that intercropping can be used as an alternative pest management strategy to reduce aphid yield loss in fennel. Thus, we investigated the severity of fennel plant damage in relation to infestation by the fennel aphid and predation by Cycloneda sanguinea (L.) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) (spotless lady beetle), green lacewing, Chrysoperla carnea (Stephens) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae), and Scymnus spp. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) in sole fennel plots and plots of fennel intercropped with cotton with colored fibers. The fennel aphid populations in nontreated plots were significantly larger in sole fennel plots than in intercropped plots. The highest densities of C. sanguinea, green lacewings and Scymnus spp., associated with the suppression of fennel aphid populations was found in fennel in the intercropping systems. Fennel aphids reduced the fennel seed yield by 80% in the sole fennel plots compared with approximately 30% for all intercropping systems. The results obtained in this research are of practical significance for designing appropriate strategies for fennel aphid control in fennel-cotton intercropping systems. In summary, intercropping fennel with cotton with colored fibers apparently promoted biocontrol of fennel aphid in fennel.

  12. Resistance to lettuce aphid (Nasonovia ribisnigri) biotype 0 in wild lettuce accessions PI 491093 and PI 274378

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lettuce aphid, Nasonovia ribisnigri Mosley (Homoptera : Aphididae), is a major insect pest of lettuce, Lactuca sativa L, in many commercial lettuce productions areas around the world. Resistance to lettuce aphid was first reported in Lactuca virosa L. accession IVT 280 and characterized as complete,...

  13. Resistance to a new biotype of the lettuce aphid Nasonovia ribisnigri in Lactuca virosa accession IVT280

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeke, ten C.J.M.; Dicke, M.; Loon, van J.J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Host plant resistance is an effective protection strategy to control aphids in many crops. However, the evolution of insensitive aphid biotypes necessitates the search for new resistance sources. Wild relatives of crop plants can be important sources for resistance genes to be introgressed into new

  14. Role of syrphid larvae and other predators in suppressing aphid infestations in organic lettuce on California's Central Coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Hugh A; Chaney, William E; Bensen, Tiffany A

    2008-10-01

    Organic lettuce, Lactuca sativa L., growers on the Central Coast of California rely on conservation biological control to manage Nasonovia ribisnigri Mosley (Hemiptera: Aphididae) and other aphid pests of lettuce. In 2006, we carried out five replicated field trials to determine the importance of syrphid larvae in the suppression of N. ribisnigri and other aphids infesting organic romaine lettuce. We used Entrust, a spinosad-based insecticide approved for use on organic farms, to suppress syrphid larvae in aphid-infested romaine. Romaine treated with Entrust was unmarketable at harvest because of aphid infestation, whereas insecticide-free romaine was marketable. Syrphid larvae composed 85% or more of total predators in most trials, and they were the only predators consistently recovered from romaine that was infested with aphids early and largely aphid-free by harvest. The species mix of nonsyrphid predators varied from site to site. Applications of Entrust suppressed nonsyrphid predators in two trials, and so was an imperfect tool for selectively suppressing syrphid larvae. The relative importance of syrphid larvae and other predators in the conservation biological control of aphids in organic romaine is discussed. We conclude that syrphid larvae are primarily responsible for the suppression of aphids in organic romaine on California's Central Coast.

  15. Distribution, host plants and natural enemies of sugar beet root aphid (Pemphigus fuscicornis In Slovakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tóth Peter

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available During 2003-2004, field surveys were realized to observe the distribution of sugar beet aphid, Pemphigus fuscicornis (K o c h (Sternorrhyncha Pemphigidae in southwestern Slovakia. The research was carried out at 60 different localities with altitudes 112-220 m a. s. l. Sugar beet root aphid was recorded at 30 localities. The aphid was recorded in Slovakia for the first time, but its occurrence was predicted and symptoms and harmfulness overlooked by now. The presence of P. fuscicornis was investigated on roots of various plants from Chenopodiaceae. The most important host plants were various species of lambsquarters (above all Chenopodium album. Furthermore sugar beet (Beta vulgaris provar. altissima, red beet (B. vulgaris provar. conditiva and oraches (Atriplex spp act as host plants. Infestation of sugar beet by P. fuscicornis never exceeded 5% at single locality in Slovakia. Dry and warm weather create presumptions for strong harmfulness. In Slovakia, Chenopodium album is a very important indicator of sugar beet aphid presence allowing evaluation of control requirements. During the study, the larvae of Thaumatomyia glabra (Diptera: Chloropidae were detected as important natural enemies of sugar beet aphid. The species occurred at each location evaluated.

  16. Gene expression profiles responses to aphid feeding in chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum morifolium).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xiaolong; Shao, Yafeng; Jiang, Jiafu; Ren, Liping; Chen, Fadi; Fang, Weimin; Guan, Zhiyong; Chen, Sumei

    2014-12-02

    Chrysanthemum is an important ornamental plant all over the world. It is easily attacked by aphid, Macrosiphoniella sanbourni. The molecular mechanisms of plant defense responses to aphid are only partially understood. Here, we investigate the gene expression changes in response to aphid feeding in chrysanthemum leaf by RNA-Seq technology. Three libraries were generated from pooled leaf tissues of Chrysanthemum morifolium 'nannongxunzhang' that were collected at different time points with (Y) or without (CK) aphid infestations and mock puncture treatment (Z), and sequenced using an Illumina HiSeqTM 2000 platform. A total of 7,363,292, 7,215,860 and 7,319,841 clean reads were obtained in library CK, Y and Z, respectively. The proportion of clean reads was >97.29% in each library. Approximately 76.35% of the clean reads were mapped to a reference gene database including all known chrysanthemum unigene sequences. 1,157, 527 and 340 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified in the comparison of CK-VS-Y, CK-VS-Z and Z-VS-Y, respectively. These DEGs were involved in phytohormone signaling, cell wall biosynthesis, photosynthesis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) pathway and transcription factor regulatory networks, and so on. Changes in gene expression induced by aphid feeding are shown to be multifaceted. There are various forms of crosstalk between different pathways those genes belonging to, which would allow plants to fine-tune its defense responses.

  17. Potential Host Manipulation by the Aphid Parasitoid Aphidius avenae to Enhance Cold Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, Lucy; Androdias, Annabelle; Franco, Thomas; Pierre, Jean-Sébastien; Burel, Françoise; van Baaren, Joan

    2016-01-01

    During parasitoid development, the immature parasitoid is confined to the host species. As a result, any potential to modify the physiology or behaviour of the host could play an important role in parasitoid fitness. The potential for host manipulation by the aphid parasitoid Aphidius avenae to increase cold thermotolerance was investigated using the aphid host species Metopolophium dirhodum and Sitobion avenae. Aphids were parasitized at L3/L4 instar stage (5 d old) and allowed to develop into pre-reproductive adults (10 d old) containing a 5 d old parasitoid larva. A control group was created of non-parasitized pre-reproductive adults (10 d old). The inherent physiological thermotolerance (LT50) and potential behavioural thermoregulation (behaviour in a declining temperature regime) of parasitized and non-parasitized aphids were investigated. Results revealed no effect of parasitism on the physiological thermotolerance of S. avenae and M. dirhodum. Significant differences in the behaviour of parasitized and non-parasitized aphids were observed, in addition to differences between host species, and such behaviours are discussed in view of the potential for host manipulation. PMID:28006018

  18. Unravelling mycorrhiza-induced wheat susceptibility to the English grain aphid Sitobion avenae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Amma L.; Wellham, Peter A. D.; Aradottir, Gudbjorg I.; Gange, Alan C.

    2017-04-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are root symbionts that can increase or decrease aphid growth rates and reproduction, but the reason by which this happens is unknown. To investigate the underlying mechanisms of this interaction, we examined the effect of AM fungi on the English Grain aphid (Sitobion avenae) development, reproduction, attraction, settlement and feeding behaviour on two naturally susceptible varieties Triticum aestivum (L.) variety Solstice and T. monococcum MDR037, and two naturally resistant lines, T. monococcum MDR045 and MDR049. Mycorrhizal colonisation increased the attractiveness of T. aestivum var. Solstice to aphids, but there was no effect on aphid development on this variety. Using the Electrical Penetration Graph (EPG) technique, we found that mycorrhizal colonisation increased aphid phloem feeding on T. monococcum MDR037 and MDR045, colonisation also increased growth rate and reproductive success of S. avenae on these varieties. Mycorrhizas increased vascular bundle size, demonstrating that these fungi can influence plant anatomy. We discuss if and how this could be related to an enhanced success rate in phloem feeding in two varieties. Overall, we present and discuss how mycorrhizal fungi can affect the feeding behaviour of S. avenae in wheat, inducing susceptibility in a resistant variety.

  19. SIEVE ELEMENT-LINING CHAPERONE1 Restricts Aphid Feeding on Arabidopsis during Heat Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloth, Karen J; Busscher-Lange, Jacqueline; Wiegers, Gerrie L; Kruijer, Willem; Buijs, Gonda; Meyer, Rhonda C; Albrectsen, Benedicte R; Bouwmeester, Harro J; Dicke, Marcel; Jongsma, Maarten A

    2017-10-01

    The role of phloem proteins in plant resistance to aphids is still largely elusive. By genome-wide association mapping of aphid behavior on 350 natural Arabidopsis thaliana accessions, we identified the small heat shock-like SIEVE ELEMENT-LINING CHAPERONE1 ( SLI1 ). Detailed behavioral studies on near-isogenic and knockout lines showed that SLI1 impairs phloem feeding. Depending on the haplotype, aphids displayed a different duration of salivation in the phloem. On sli1 mutants, aphids prolonged their feeding sessions and ingested phloem at a higher rate than on wild-type plants. The largest phenotypic effects were observed at 26°C, when SLI1 expression is upregulated. At this moderately high temperature, sli1 mutants suffered from retarded elongation of the inflorescence and impaired silique development. Fluorescent reporter fusions showed that SLI1 is confined to the margins of sieve elements where it lines the parietal layer and colocalizes in spherical bodies around mitochondria. This localization pattern is reminiscent of the clamp-like structures observed in previous ultrastructural studies of the phloem and shows that the parietal phloem layer plays an important role in plant resistance to aphids and heat stress. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  20. Systemic response to aphid infestation by Myzus persicae in the phloem of Apium graveolens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divol, Fanchon; Vilaine, Françoise; Thibivilliers, Sandra; Amselem, Joëlle; Palauqui, Jean-Christophe; Kusiak, Chantal; Dinant, Sylvie

    2005-03-01

    Little is known about the molecular processes involved in the phloem response to aphid feeding. We investigated molecular responses to aphid feeding on celery (Apium graveolenscv. Dulce) plants infested with the aphid Myzus persicae, as a means of identifying changes in phloem function. We used celery as our model species as it is easy to separate the phloem from the surrounding tissues in the petioles of mature leaves of this species. We generated a total of 1187 expressed sequence tags (ESTs), corresponding to 891 non-redundant genes. We analysed these ESTs in silico after cDNA macroarray hybridisation. Aphid feeding led to significant increase in RNA accumulation for 126 different genes. Different patterns of deregulation were observed, including transitory or stable induction 3 or 7 days after infestation. The genes affected belonged to various functional categories and were induced systemically in the phloem after infestation. In particular, genes involved in cell wall modification, water transport, vitamin biosynthesis, photosynthesis, carbon assimilation and nitrogen and carbon mobilisation were up-regulated in the phloem. Further analysis of the response in the phloem or xylem suggested that a component of the response was developed more specifically in the phloem. However, this component was different from the stress responses in the phloem driven by pathogen infection. Our results indicate that the phloem is actively involved in multiple adjustments, recruiting metabolic pathways and in structural changes far from aphid feeding sites. However, they also suggest that the phloem displays specific mechanisms that may not be induced in other tissues.

  1. Potential Host Manipulation by the Aphid Parasitoid Aphidius avenae to Enhance Cold Tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy Alford

    Full Text Available During parasitoid development, the immature parasitoid is confined to the host species. As a result, any potential to modify the physiology or behaviour of the host could play an important role in parasitoid fitness. The potential for host manipulation by the aphid parasitoid Aphidius avenae to increase cold thermotolerance was investigated using the aphid host species Metopolophium dirhodum and Sitobion avenae. Aphids were parasitized at L3/L4 instar stage (5 d old and allowed to develop into pre-reproductive adults (10 d old containing a 5 d old parasitoid larva. A control group was created of non-parasitized pre-reproductive adults (10 d old. The inherent physiological thermotolerance (LT50 and potential behavioural thermoregulation (behaviour in a declining temperature regime of parasitized and non-parasitized aphids were investigated. Results revealed no effect of parasitism on the physiological thermotolerance of S. avenae and M. dirhodum. Significant differences in the behaviour of parasitized and non-parasitized aphids were observed, in addition to differences between host species, and such behaviours are discussed in view of the potential for host manipulation.

  2. Potential Host Manipulation by the Aphid Parasitoid Aphidius avenae to Enhance Cold Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, Lucy; Androdias, Annabelle; Franco, Thomas; Pierre, Jean-Sébastien; Burel, Françoise; van Baaren, Joan

    2016-01-01

    During parasitoid development, the immature parasitoid is confined to the host species. As a result, any potential to modify the physiology or behaviour of the host could play an important role in parasitoid fitness. The potential for host manipulation by the aphid parasitoid Aphidius avenae to increase cold thermotolerance was investigated using the aphid host species Metopolophium dirhodum and Sitobion avenae. Aphids were parasitized at L3/L4 instar stage (5 d old) and allowed to develop into pre-reproductive adults (10 d old) containing a 5 d old parasitoid larva. A control group was created of non-parasitized pre-reproductive adults (10 d old). The inherent physiological thermotolerance (LT50) and potential behavioural thermoregulation (behaviour in a declining temperature regime) of parasitized and non-parasitized aphids were investigated. Results revealed no effect of parasitism on the physiological thermotolerance of S. avenae and M. dirhodum. Significant differences in the behaviour of parasitized and non-parasitized aphids were observed, in addition to differences between host species, and such behaviours are discussed in view of the potential for host manipulation.

  3. An effective molecular approach for assessing cereal aphid-parasitoid-endosymbiont networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhengpei; Vollhardt, Ines M G; Girtler, Susanne; Wallinger, Corinna; Tomanovic, Zeljko; Traugott, Michael

    2017-06-09

    Molecular approaches are increasingly being used to analyse host-parasitoid food webs as they overcome several hurdles inherent to conventional approaches. However, such studies have focused primarily on the detection and identification of aphids and their aphidiid primary parasitoids, largely ignoring primary parasitoid-hyperparasitoid interactions or limiting these to a few common species within a small geographical area. Furthermore, the detection of bacterial secondary endosymbionts has not been considered in such assays despite the fact that endosymbionts may alter aphid-parasitoid interactions, as they can confer protection against parasitoids. Here we present a novel two-step multiplex PCR (MP-PCR) protocol to assess cereal aphid-primary parasitoid-hyperparasitoid-endosymbiont interactions. The first step of the assay allows detection of parasitoid DNA at a general level (24 primary and 16 hyperparasitoid species) as well as the species-specific detection of endosymbionts (3 species) and cereal aphids (3 species). The second step of the MP-PCR assay targets seven primary and six hyperparasitoid species that commonly occur in Central Europe. Additional parasitoid species not covered by the second-step of the assay can be identified via sequencing 16S rRNA amplicons generated in the first step of the assay. The approach presented here provides an efficient, highly sensitive, and cost-effective (~consumable costs of 1.3 € per sample) tool for assessing cereal aphid-parasitoid-endosymbiont interactions.

  4. Predation determines different selective pressure on pea aphid host races in a complex agricultural mosaic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adalbert Balog

    Full Text Available Field assessments were conducted to examine the interplay between host plant and predation in complex agricultural mosaic on pea aphid clover and alfalfa races. In one experiment, we examined the relative fitness on clover race (CR and alfalfa race (AR pea aphids on broad bean, red clover and alfalfa alone. But because clover is typically grown in a more complex agricultural mosaic with alfalfa and broad bean, a second experiment was conducted to assess the fitness consequences under predation in a more complex agricultural field setting that also included potential apparent competition with AR pea aphids. In a third experiment we tested for the effect of differential host race density on the fitness of the other host race mediated by a predator effect. CR pea aphids always had fitness losses when on broad bean (had lower fitness on broad bean relative to red clover and fitness benefits when on red clover (higher fitness on red clover relative to broad bean, whether or not in apparent competition with alfalfa race aphids on bean and alfalfa. AR suffered fitness loss on both alfalfa and bean in apparent competition with CR on clover. Therefore we can conclude that the predation rate between host races was highly asymmetrical. The complexity of the agricultural mosaic thus can influence prey selection by predators on different host plants. These may have evolutionary consequences through context dependent fitness benefits on particular host plants.

  5. Aphid effects on rhizosphere microorganisms and microfauna depend more on barley growth phase than on soil fertilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Mette Vestergård; Strandmark, Lisa Bjørnlund; Christensen, Søren

    2004-01-01

    bacteria and fungal feeding nematodes 1 week before spike emergence. Before spike emergence, aphids reduced belowground respiration in NP treatments. These findings strongly indicate that aphids reduced allocation of photoassimilates to roots and deposition of root exudates in the growth phase of the plant......This paper gives the first reports on aphid effects on rhizosphere organisms as influenced by soil nutrient status and plant development. Barley plants grown in pots fertilized with N but without P (N), with N and P (NP), or not fertilized (0) were sampled in the early growth phase (day 25), 1 week....... Contrary to this, 1 week after spike emergence numbers of bacteria, fungal feeding nematodes and Protozoa were higher in rhizospheres of plants subjected to aphids probably because aphids enhanced root mortality and root decomposition. Protozoa and bacterial feeding nematodes were stimulated at different...

  6. Laboratory and semi-field evaluation of Beauveria bassiana (Ascomycota: Hypocreales) against the lettuce aphid, Nasonovia ribisnigri (Hemiptera: Aphididae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shrestha, Govinda; Enkegaard, Annie; Steenberg, Tove

    2015-01-01

    The lettuce aphid, Nasonovia ribisnigri (Mosley), is an economically important pest of lettuce worldwide. The entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana strain GHA has recently been reported as a potential biocontrol candidate for use against the lettuce aphid. This study provides information...... on the mortality inflicted by B. bassiana when applied against different life stages of the lettuce aphid under laboratory conditions and how fungus infection affects the aphid fecundity. In addition, temporal changes in persistence of fungus inoculum applied to foliage of young lettuce plants under semi......-field conditions was analysed. Immature life stages were generally the least susceptible to fungal infection and the susceptibility of all stages was dose-dependent, with the highest mortality occurring at the highest dose. B. bassiana significantly affected the rate of nymph production by the lettuce aphid...

  7. Identification of top-down forces regulating cotton aphid population growth in transgenic Bt cotton in central China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Han

    Full Text Available The cotton aphid Aphis gossypii Glover is the main aphid pest in cotton fields in the Yangtze River Valley Cotton-planting Zone (YRZ in central China. Various natural enemies may attack the cotton aphid in Bt cotton fields but no studies have identified potential specific top-down forces that could help manage this pest in the YRZ in China. In order to identify possibilities for managing the cotton aphid, we monitored cotton aphid population dynamics and identified the effect of natural enemies on cotton aphid population growth using various exclusion cages in transgenic Cry1Ac (Bt+CpTI (Cowpea trypsin inhibitor cotton field in 2011. The aphid population growth in the open field (control was significantly lower than those protected or restricted from exposure to natural enemies in the various exclusion cage types tested. The ladybird predator Propylaea japonica Thunberg represented 65% of Coccinellidae predators, and other predators consisted mainly of syrphids (2.1% and spiders (1.5%. The aphid parasitoids Aphidiines represented 76.7% of the total count of the natural enemy guild (mainly Lysiphlebia japonica Ashmead and Binodoxys indicus Subba Rao & Sharma. Our results showed that P. japonica can effectively delay the establishment and subsequent population growth of aphids during the cotton growing season. Aphidiines could also reduce aphid density although their impact may be shadowed by the presence of coccinellids in the open field (likely both owing to resource competition and intraguild predation. The implications of these results are discussed in a framework of the compatibility of transgenic crops and top-down forces exerted by natural enemy guild.

  8. Salicylic acid-induced changes in physiological parameters and genes of the flavonoid biosynthesis pathway in Artemisia vulgaris and Dendranthema nankingense during aphid feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y; Xia, X L; Jiang, J F; Chen, S M; Chen, F D; Lv, G S

    2016-02-19

    Phloem-feeding aphids cause serious damage to plants. The mechanisms of plant-aphid interactions are only partially understood and involve multiple pathways, including phytohormones. In order to investigate whether salicylic acid (SA) is involved and how it plays a part in the defense response to the aphid Macrosiphoniella sanbourni, physiological changes and gene expression profiles in response to aphid inoculation with or without SA pretreatment were compared between the aphid-resistant Artemisia vulgaris 'Variegata' and the susceptible chrysanthemum, Dendranthema nankingense. Changes in levels of reactive oxygen species, malondialdehyde (MDA), and flavonoids, and in the expression of genes involved in flavonoid biosynthesis, including PAL (phenylalanine ammonia-lyase), CHS (chalcone synthase), CHI (chalcone isomerase), F3H (flavanone 3-hydroxylase), F3'H (flavanone 3'-hydroxylase), and DFR (dihydroflavonol reductase), were investigated. Levels of hydrogen peroxide, superoxide anions, MDA, and flavonoids, and their related gene expression, increased after aphid infestation and SA pretreatment followed by aphid infestation; the aphid-resistant A. vulgaris exhibited a more rapid response than the aphid-susceptible D. nankingense to SA treatment and aphid infestation. Taken together, our results suggest that SA could be used to increase aphid resistance in the chrysanthemum.

  9. Potential candidates for biological control of the black bean aphid Aphis fabae in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanković, S.S.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The black bean aphid is widely spread aphid species in the Palaearctic, known to attack over 1150 plant species. Because some of the host plants are of great agricultural interest, Aphis fabae represent a very important pest. We assembled all data concerning the presence of this pest and connected it in tritrophic associations. In the period of 24 years investigation on the territory of Serbia it has been recorded in 107 trophic associations. In total there are 145 findings of A. fabae parasitized by 19 taxa of Aphidiinae (Brackonidae from seven genera. The most suitable biocontrol agents for the black bean aphid are Lysiphlebus fabarum, Binodoxys angelicae, Lipolesis gracilis and the introduced species Lysiphlebus testaceipes.

  10. Wheat Nitrogen Fertilisation Effects on the Performance of the Cereal Aphid Metopolophium dirhodum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan F. J. Gash

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The effects of five rates of nitrogen fertiliser applications on the performance of the cereal aphid Metopolophium dirhodum on winter wheat, within the range of rates recommended for UK crops, were investigated over two seasons in field-grown crops and also on plants grown in the glasshouse. Longevity was unaffected by the level of fertilisation, but aphid intrinsic rate of increase and fecundity increased with each level applied. In the second field season, when a higher upper limit was used, many of these increases were significant. A previously unreported finding for this species was that there was a significant decrease in fecundity for the highest rate of fertilisation. Results for the glasshouse-reared aphids followed a similar pattern to those in the field, and overall they underline recent reports in the literature of the negative effects of high nutrient concentrations on the performance of herbivorous insects. The underlying reasons for these are discussed.

  11. Host Plant Volatiles and the Sexual Reproduction of the Potato Aphid, Macrosiphum euphorbiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Hurley

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In late summer, heteroecious aphids, such as the potato aphid, Macrosiphum euphorbiae, move from their secondary summer host plants to primary host plants, where the sexual oviparae mate and lay diapausing eggs. We tested the hypothesis that volatiles of the primary host, Rosa rugosa, would attract the gynoparae, the parthenogenetic alate morph that produce oviparae, as well as the alate males foraging for suitable mates. In wind tunnel assays, both gynoparae and males oriented towards and reached rose cuttings significantly more often than other odour sources, including potato, a major secondary host. The response of males was as high to rose cuttings alone as to potato with a calling virgin oviparous female. These findings are discussed within the seasonal ecology of host alternating aphids.

  12. Determination of 4-Chloroindole-3-Acetic Acid Methyl Ester in Lathyrus Vicia and Pisum by Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvild, Kjeld Christensen; Egsgaard, Helge; Larsen, Elfinn

    1980-01-01

    4-Chloroindole-3-acetic acid methyl ester was identified unequivocally in Lathyrus latifolius L., Vicia faba L. and Pisum sativum L. by thin layer chromatography, gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The gas chromatographic system was able to separate underivatized chloroindole-3-acetic acid...... methyl ester isomers. The quantitative determination of 4-chloroindole-3-acetic acid methyl ester in immature seeds of these three species was performed by gas chromatography – mass spectrometry using deuterium labelled 4-chloro-indole-3-acetic acid methyl ester as an internal standard. P. sativum...

  13. The influence of rate and time of nitrate supply on nitrogen fixation and yield in pea (Pisum sativum L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Erik Steen

    1986-01-01

    The influence of nitrate N supply on dry matter production, N content and symbiotic nitrogen fixation in soil-grown pea (Pisum sativum L.) was studied in a pot experiment by means of15N fertilizer dilution. In pea receiving no fertilizer N symbiotic nitrogen fixation, soil and seed-borne N...... contributed with 82, 13 and 5% of total plant N, respectively. The supply of low rates of nitrate fertilizer at sowing (“starter N”) increased the vegetative dry matter production, but not the seed yield significantly. Nitrogen fixation was not significantly decreased by the lower rates of nitrate but higher...

  14. Increased Susceptibility to Aphids of Flowering Wheat Plants Exposed to Low Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacoste, C; Nansen, C; Thompson, S; Moir-Barnetson, L; Mian, A; McNee, M; Flower, K C

    2015-06-01

    Frost is known to directly affect flowering wheat plants (Triticum aestivum L.) and lead to reduced grain yield. Additionally, it may increase wheat susceptibility to economically important pests, such as aphids (Hemiptera: Aphididae). Wheat plants at flowering stage were exposed to one of the three temperature treatments: ambient (11-12°C), 0°C, and -3°C for 60 min. Preference (3-choice) and performance (no-choice) bioassays with aphids (Rhopalosiphum padi L.) were conducted 1, 3, 6, and 12 d after temperature treatments to assess effects of temperature-induced stress over time. As an initial feasibility study of using remote sensing technologies to detect frost-induced stress in flowering wheat plants, hyperspectral imaging data were acquired from wheat plants used in preference bioassays. Element analysis of wheat plants was included to determine the effect of temperature-induced stress on the nutritional composition of flowering wheat plants. The results from this study support the following cause-effect scenario: a 60-min exposure to low temperatures caused a significant decrease in potassium and copper content of wheat plants 6 d after temperature exposure, and it coincided with a marked increase in preference by aphids of wheat plants. The preference exhibited by aphids correlated positively with performance of aphids, so the preference-performance hypothesis was confirmed and possibly driven by potassium and copper content of wheat plants. In addition, we demonstrated that hyperspectral imaging data can be used to detect frost-induced susceptibility to aphid infestation in flowering wheat plants. These findings justify further research into airborne remote sensing of frost-induced stress and the possible secondary effects on crop susceptibility to arthropod pests. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. The role of natural enemy foraging guilds in controlling cereal aphids in Michigan wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarzoda, Shahlo; Bahlai, Christine A; Fox, Aaron F; Landis, Douglas A

    2014-01-01

    Insect natural enemies (predators and parasitoids) provide important ecosystem services by suppressing populations of insect pests in many agricultural crops. However, the role of natural enemies against cereal aphids in Michigan winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is largely unknown. The objectives of this research were to characterize the natural enemy community in wheat fields and evaluate the role of different natural enemy foraging guilds (foliar-foraging versus ground-dwelling predators) in regulating cereal aphid population growth. We investigated these objectives during the spring and summer of 2012 and 2013 in four winter wheat fields on the Michigan State University campus farm in East Lansing, Michigan. We monitored and measured the impact of natural enemies by experimentally excluding or allowing their access to wheat plants infested with Rhopalosiphum padi (L.) and Sitobion avenae (F.) (Hemiptera: Aphidae). Our results indicate that the natural enemy community in the wheat fields consisted mostly of foliar-foraging and ground-dwelling predators with relatively few parasitoids. In combination, these natural enemy groups were very effective at reducing cereal aphid populations. We also investigated the role of each natural enemy foraging guild (foliar-foraging versus ground-dwelling predators) independently. Overall, our results suggest that, in combination, natural enemies can almost completely halt early-season aphid population increase. Independently, ground-dwelling predators were more effective at suppressing cereal aphid populations than foliar-foraging predators under the conditions we studied. Our results differ from studies in Europe and the US Great Plains where foliar foraging predators and parasitoids are frequently more important cereal aphid natural enemies.

  16. The role of natural enemy foraging guilds in controlling cereal aphids in Michigan wheat.

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    Shahlo Safarzoda

    Full Text Available Insect natural enemies (predators and parasitoids provide important ecosystem services by suppressing populations of insect pests in many agricultural crops. However, the role of natural enemies against cereal aphids in Michigan winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L. is largely unknown. The objectives of this research were to characterize the natural enemy community in wheat fields and evaluate the role of different natural enemy foraging guilds (foliar-foraging versus ground-dwelling predators in regulating cereal aphid population growth. We investigated these objectives during the spring and summer of 2012 and 2013 in four winter wheat fields on the Michigan State University campus farm in East Lansing, Michigan. We monitored and measured the impact of natural enemies by experimentally excluding or allowing their access to wheat plants infested with Rhopalosiphum padi (L. and Sitobion avenae (F. (Hemiptera: Aphidae. Our results indicate that the natural enemy community in the wheat fields consisted mostly of foliar-foraging and ground-dwelling predators with relatively few parasitoids. In combination, these natural enemy groups were very effective at reducing cereal aphid populations. We also investigated the role of each natural enemy foraging guild (foliar-foraging versus ground-dwelling predators independently. Overall, our results suggest that, in combination, natural enemies can almost completely halt early-season aphid population increase. Independently, ground-dwelling predators were more effective at suppressing cereal aphid populations than foliar-foraging predators under the conditions we studied. Our results differ from studies in Europe and the US Great Plains where foliar foraging predators and parasitoids are frequently more important cereal aphid natural enemies.

  17. Polyphyly of the extinct family Oviparosiphidae and its implications for inferring aphid evolution (Hemiptera, Sternorrhyncha.

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    Dagmara Żyła

    Full Text Available Aphidoidea, the so-called "true aphids" are one of the most challenging groups in terms of solving the phylogenetic relationships. Morphology-based analyses were strongly affected by widespread homoplasy, while the molecular-based attempts struggled with the lack of sufficient phylogenetic signal. Despite significant improvements, the higher classification still remains unresolved and rather controversial. However, the use of the fossil record, one of the most valuable sources of information, was mainly limited to calibration of a phylogenetic tree, without a direct inclusion into the analysis. The extinct family Oviparosiphidae has long been considered as the common ancestor of all recent Aphidoidea and it was used as a calibration point in several analyses, but it has been never analyzed in a phylogenetic context. The family has been treated as a monophyletic group purely based on the simultaneous presence of two abdominal structures, ovipositor and siphunculi. However, it has been shown recently that at least one more extinct lineage, present at the same time, was characterized by the same features. For these reasons, we performed a maximum parsimony analysis using morphological data for extinct aphid taxa to prove the monophyly of Oviparosiphidae. Our analysis shows that the presumed ancestor lineage of recent aphids is a polyphyletic group. Our results support the hypothesis of an early Mesozoic rapid radiation of aphids, which led to several different lineages characterized by both ovipositor and siphunculi. The results indicate the necessity of examining the other extinct families, and shows that the diversity of aphids before the Cretaceous Terrestrial Revolution (KTR was higher than expected. Even though there is not enough data to perform a formal analysis, fossils seem to suggest a significant impact of the KTR on aphid diversification. Additionally, we have made a redescription of two genera and description of a new species

  18. Indigenous Aphid Predators Show High Levels of Preadaptation to a Novel Prey, Melanaphis sacchari (Hemiptera: Aphididae).

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    Colares, Felipe; Michaud, J P; Bain, Clint L; Torres, Jorge B

    2015-12-01

    The performance of four aphid predators, Hippodamia convergens Guerin-Meneville, Coleomegilla maculata DeGeer, Chrysoperla carnea Stephens and Orius insidiosus Say was compared on three prey species: Schizaphis graminum Rondani, Melanaphis sacchari (Zehntner), and Ephestia kuehniella Zeller eggs. Species predatory in both life stages (all except Ch. carnea) were reared on E. kuehniella eggs and switched to aphid prey for assessment of reproduction. Differences were greater between the E. kuehniella and aphid diets than between the two aphid species. Juvenile survival was high for all predators on all prey, except for O. insidiosus, which had survival on E. kuehniella > S. graminum > M. sacchari. The fastest development of Ch. carnea and O. insidiosus was obtained on E. kuehniella, whereas H. convergens developed fastest on S. graminum, and C. maculata did not differ among diets. S. graminum also yielded the largest H. convergens adults, whereas the largest adults of other predators were obtained on E. kuehniella. Female fecundity and egg viability were similarly high on both aphid diets for H. convergens and C. maculata, whereas, on E. kuehniella, 50% of the former entered reproductive diapause and the latter species had reduced fecundity. Reproductive success of Ch. carnea was S. graminum = M. sacchari > E. kuehniella, but it was similar among treatments for O. insidiosus, although female infertility ranged from 25 to 37.5%. We concluded that all the predators studied are preadapted to utilize sugarcane aphid as prey and have excellent potential to provide sustainable biological control of this newly invasive pest. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Methyl salicylate, a soybean aphid-induced plant volatile attractive to the predator Coccinella septempunctata.

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    Zhu, Junwei; Park, Kye-Chung

    2005-08-01

    Induced volatiles provide a signal to foraging predatory insects about the location of their prey. In Iowa, early in the growing season of soybean, Glycine max, many predacious seven-spotted lady beetles, Coccinella septempunctata, were observed on plants with heavy infestations of soybean aphid, Aphis glycines. We studied whether the attraction of this beetle is caused by the release of specific volatile compounds of soybean plants infested by aphids. Volatile compounds emitted by soybean plants infested by aphids were compared with those of undamaged, uninfested, and artificially damaged plants. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses revealed consistent differences in the profiles of volatile compounds between aphid-infested soybean plants and undamaged ones. Significantly more methyl salicylate was released from infested plants at both the V1 and V2 plant growth stages. However, release patterns of two other induced plant volatiles, (D)-limonene and (E,E)-alpha-farnesene, differed between the two plant growth stages. Gas chromatographic-electroantennographic detection of volatile extracts from infested soybean plants showed that methyl salicylate elicited significant electrophysiological responses in C. septempunctata. In field tests, traps baited with methyl salicylate were highly attractive to adult C. septempunctata, whereas 2-phenylethanol was most attractive to the lacewing Chrysoperla carnea and syrphid flies. Another common lady beetle, the multicolored Asian lady beetle, Harmonia axyridis, showed no preference for the compounds. These results indicate that C. septempunctata may use methyl salicylate as the olfactory cue for prey location. We also tested the attractiveness of some selected soybean volatiles to alate soybean aphids in the field, and results showed that traps baited with benzaldehyde caught significantly higher numbers of aphids.

  20. Relationship between the abundance of aphids and their natural enemies in cereal fields and landscape composition

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    Diab Al Hassan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated, over the course of two years, the association between the abundance of aphids and their natural carabid enemies and landscape, which may help in the development of effective strategies for reducing the incidence of aphid outbreaks in agricultural crops. This was undertaken in 12 wheat and 12 maize fields each year in an agricultural landscape in western France. Our study area was characterized by hedgerows surrounding arable fields and permanent grassland. Some areas have not changed much for several decades, while field enlargement and removal of hedges occurred in some areas following agricultural intensification. This paper aims to determine if the abundance of aphids in crops (either directly, or indirectly via their natural enemies is associated with the landscape around fields and if so, is it dependent on the landscape scale considered. We observed that the abundance of aphids in fields was associated with landscape composition at a large scale (500 m and 800 m. There was a positive correlation between the abundance of aphids and the proportion of the area under woodland and grassland at these scales. There was a negative correlation between the abundance of carabids and the proportion of grassland and hedgerow around crop fields. The species richness of carabids was positively correlated with the proportion of hedgerows. We found that the abundance of aphids in wheat fields was negatively and in maize fields positively associated with the proportion under grass strips. At a large scale carabid abundance in both types of culture was positively correlated with the proportion under grass strips.