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Sample records for aperture-based intensity modulation

  1. Postoperative Irradiation of Gynecologic Malignancies: Improving Treatment Delivery Using Aperture-Based Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadeau, Sylvain; Bouchard, Myriam; Germain, Isabelle; Raymond, Paul-Emile; Beaulieu, Frederic; Beaulieu, Luc; Roy, Rene; Gingras, Luc

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate dosimetric and treatment delivery advantages of aperture-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy (AB-IMRT) for the treatment of patients receiving whole pelvic radiotherapy for gynecologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients undergoing pelvic radiotherapy after resection of endometrial cancers were selected. A 45-Gy dose was prescribed to the target volume delineated on a planning CT scan. An in-house inverse planning system, Ballista, was used to develop a treatment plan using aperture-based multileaf collimator segments. This approach was compared with conventional four-field, enlarged four-field, and static beamlet-based IMRT (BB-IMRT) techniques in terms of target coverage, dose-volume histogram statistics for surrounding normal tissues, and numbers of segments and monitor units (MU). Results: Three quarters (76.4%) of the planning target volume received the prescription dose with conventional four-field plans. With adequate target coverage, the Ballista plans significantly reduced the volume of bowel and bladder irradiated at the prescribed dose (p < 0.001), whereas the two approaches provided equivalent results for the rectum (p 0.5). On the other hand, AB-IMRT and BB-IMRT plans showed only small differences in dose-volume histogram statistics of unknown clinical impact, whereas Ballista plan delivery required on average 73% and 59% fewer segments and MU, respectively. Conclusion: With respect to conventional techniques, AB-IMRT for the treatment of gynecologic malignancies provides dosimetric advantages similar to those with BB-IMRT but with clear treatment delivery improvements

  2. Comparison of anisotropic aperture based intensity modulated radiotherapy with 3D-conformal radiotherapy for the treatment of large lung tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonova, Anna; Abo-Madyan, Yasser; El-Haddad, Mostafa; Welzel, Grit; Polednik, Martin; Boggula, Ramesh; Wenz, Frederik; Lohr, Frank

    2012-02-01

    IMRT allows dose escalation for large lung tumors, but respiratory motion may compromise delivery. A treatment plan that modulates fluence predominantly in the transversal direction and leaves the fluence identical in the direction of the breathing motion may reduce this problem. Planning-CT-datasets of 20 patients with Stage I-IV non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) formed the basis of this study. A total of two IMRT plans and one 3D plan were created for each patient. Prescription dose was 60 Gy to the CTV and 70 Gy to the GTV. For the 3D plans an energy of 18 MV photons was used. IMRT plans were calculated for 6 MV photons with 13 coplanar and with 17 noncoplanar beams. Robustness of the used method of anisotropic modulation toward breathing motion was tested in a 13-field IMRT plan. As a consequence of identical prescription doses, mean target doses were similar for 3D and IMRT. Differences between 3D and 13- and 17-field IMRT were significant for CTV Dmin (43 Gy vs. 49.1 Gy vs. 48.6 Gy; p3D: 12.5 Gy vs. 14.8 Gy vs. 15.8 Gy: p3D-plans. Heart D(max) was only marginally reduced with IMRT (3D vs. 13- vs. 17-field IMRT: 38.2 Gy vs. 36.8 Gy vs. 37.8 Gy). Simulated breathing motion caused only minor changes in the IMRT dose distribution (~0.5-1 Gy). Anisotropic modulation of IMRT improves dose delivery over 3D-RT and renders IMRT plans robust toward breathing induced organ motion, effectively preventing interplay effects. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. First Clinical Release of an Online, Adaptive, Aperture-Based Image-Guided Radiotherapy Strategy in Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy to Correct for Inter- and Intrafractional Rotations of the Prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutschmann, Heinz; Kametriser, Gerhard; Steininger, Philipp; Scherer, Philipp; Schöller, Helmut; Gaisberger, Christoph; Mooslechner, Michaela; Mitterlechner, Bernhard; Weichenberger, Harald; Fastner, Gert; Wurstbauer, Karl; Jeschke, Stephan; Forstner, Rosemarie; Sedlmayer, Felix

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We developed and evaluated a correction strategy for prostate rotations using direct adaptation of segments in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Method and Materials: Implanted fiducials (four gold markers) were used to determine interfractional translations, rotations, and dilations of the prostate. We used hybrid imaging: The markers were automatically detected in two pretreatment planar X-ray projections; their actual position in three-dimensional space was reconstructed from these images at first. The structure set comprising prostate, seminal vesicles, and adjacent rectum wall was transformed accordingly in 6 degrees of freedom. Shapes of IMRT segments were geometrically adapted in a class solution forward-planning approach, derived within seconds on-site and treated immediately. Intrafractional movements were followed in MV electronic portal images captured on the fly. Results: In 31 of 39 patients, for 833 of 1013 fractions (supine, flat couch, knee support, comfortably full bladder, empty rectum, no intraprostatic marker migrations >2 mm of more than one marker), the online aperture adaptation allowed safe reduction of margins clinical target volume–planning target volume (prostate) down to 5 mm when only interfractional corrections were applied: Dominant L-R rotations were found to be 5.3° (mean of means), standard deviation of means ±4.9°, maximum at 30.7°. Three-dimensional vector translations relative to skin markings were 9.3 ± 4.4 mm (maximum, 23.6 mm). Intrafractional movements in 7.7 ± 1.5 min (maximum, 15.1 min) between kV imaging and last beam’s electronic portal images showed further L-R rotations of 2.5° ± 2.3° (maximum, 26.9°), and three-dimensional vector translations of 3.0 ±3.7 mm (maximum, 10.2 mm). Addressing intrafractional errors could further reduce margins to 3 mm. Conclusion: We demonstrated the clinical feasibility of an online adaptive image-guided, intensity-modulated prostate protocol on a standard

  4. First clinical release of an online, adaptive, aperture-based image-guided radiotherapy strategy in intensity-modulated radiotherapy to correct for inter- and intrafractional rotations of the prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutschmann, Heinz; Kametriser, Gerhard; Steininger, Philipp; Scherer, Philipp; Schöller, Helmut; Gaisberger, Christoph; Mooslechner, Michaela; Mitterlechner, Bernhard; Weichenberger, Harald; Fastner, Gert; Wurstbauer, Karl; Jeschke, Stephan; Forstner, Rosemarie; Sedlmayer, Felix

    2012-08-01

    We developed and evaluated a correction strategy for prostate rotations using direct adaptation of segments in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Implanted fiducials (four gold markers) were used to determine interfractional translations, rotations, and dilations of the prostate. We used hybrid imaging: The markers were automatically detected in two pretreatment planar X-ray projections; their actual position in three-dimensional space was reconstructed from these images at first. The structure set comprising prostate, seminal vesicles, and adjacent rectum wall was transformed accordingly in 6 degrees of freedom. Shapes of IMRT segments were geometrically adapted in a class solution forward-planning approach, derived within seconds on-site and treated immediately. Intrafractional movements were followed in MV electronic portal images captured on the fly. In 31 of 39 patients, for 833 of 1013 fractions (supine, flat couch, knee support, comfortably full bladder, empty rectum, no intraprostatic marker migrations >2 mm of more than one marker), the online aperture adaptation allowed safe reduction of margins clinical target volume-planning target volume (prostate) down to 5 mm when only interfractional corrections were applied: Dominant L-R rotations were found to be 5.3° (mean of means), standard deviation of means ±4.9°, maximum at 30.7°. Three-dimensional vector translations relative to skin markings were 9.3 ± 4.4 mm (maximum, 23.6 mm). Intrafractional movements in 7.7 ± 1.5 min (maximum, 15.1 min) between kV imaging and last beam's electronic portal images showed further L-R rotations of 2.5° ± 2.3° (maximum, 26.9°), and three-dimensional vector translations of 3.0 ±3.7 mm (maximum, 10.2 mm). Addressing intrafractional errors could further reduce margins to 3 mm. We demonstrated the clinical feasibility of an online adaptive image-guided, intensity-modulated prostate protocol on a standard linear accelerator to correct 6 degrees of freedom of

  5. Intensity modulated conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noel, Georges; Moty-Monnereau, Celine; Meyer, Aurelia; David, Pauline; Pages, Frederique; Muller, Felix; Lee-Robin, Sun Hae; David, Denis Jean

    2006-12-01

    This publication reports the assessment of intensity-modulated conformal radiotherapy (IMCR). This assessment is based on a literature survey which focussed on indications, efficiency and safety on the short term, on the risk of radio-induced cancer on the long term, on the role in the therapeutic strategy, on the conditions of execution, on the impact on morbidity-mortality and life quality, on the impact on the health system and on public health policies and program. This assessment is also based on the opinion of a group of experts regarding the technical benefit of IMCR, its indications depending on the cancer type, safety in terms of radio-induced cancers, and conditions of execution. Before this assessment, the report thus indicates indications for which the use of IMCR can be considered as sufficient or not determined. It also proposes a technical description of IMCR and helical tomo-therapy, discusses the use of this technique for various pathologies or tumours, analyses the present situation of care in France, and comments the identification of this technique in foreign classifications

  6. Light intensity modulation in phototherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukyanovich, P. A.; Zon, B. A.; Kunin, A. A.; Pankova, S. N.

    2015-04-01

    A hypothesis that blocking ATP synthesis is one of the main causes of the stimulating effect is considered based on analysis of the primary photostimulation mechanisms. The light radiation intensity modulation is substantiated and the estimates of such modulation parameters are made. An explanation is offered to the stimulation efficiency decrease phenomenon at the increase of the radiation dose during the therapy. The results of clinical research of the medical treatment in preventive dentistry are presented depending on the spectrum and parameters of the light flux modulation.

  7. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffman, Thomas E; Glatstein, Eli

    2002-07-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is an increasingly popular technical means of tightly focusing the radiation dose around a cancer. As with stereotactic radiotherapy, IMRT uses multiple fields and angles to converge on the target. The potential for total dose escalation and for escalation of daily fraction size to the gross cancer is exciting. The excitement, however, has greatly overshadowed a range of radiobiological and clinical concerns.

  8. Fan beam intensity modulated proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Patrick M.

    A fan beam proton therapy is developed which delivers intensity modulated proton therapy using distal edge tracking. The system may be retrofit onto existing proton therapy gantries without alterations to infrastructure in order to improve treatments through intensity modulation. A novel range and intensity modulation system is designed using acrylic leaves that are inserted or retracted from subsections of the fan beam. Leaf thicknesses are chosen in a base-2 system and motivated in a binary manner. Dose spots from individual beam channels range between 1 and 5 cm. Integrated collimators attempting to limit crosstalk among beam channels are investigated, but found to be inferior to uncollimated beam channel modulators. A treatment planning system performing data manipulation in MATLAB and dose calculation in MCNPX is developed. Beamlet dose is calculated on patient CT data and a fan beam source is manually defined to produce accurate results. An energy deposition tally follows the CT grid, allowing straightforward registration of dose and image data. Simulations of beam channels assume that a beam channel either delivers dose to a distal edge spot or is intensity modulated. A final calculation is performed separately to determine the deliverable dose accounting for all sources of scatter. Treatment plans investigate the effects that varying system parameters have on dose distributions. Beam channel apertures may be as large as 20 mm because the sharp distal falloff characteristic of proton dose provides sufficient intensity modulation to meet dose objectives, even in the presence of coarse lateral resolution. Dose conformity suffers only when treatments are delivered from less than 10 angles. Jaw widths of 1--2 cm produce comparable dose distributions, but a jaw width of 4 cm produces unacceptable target coverage when maintaining critical structure avoidance. Treatment time for a prostate delivery is estimated to be on the order of 10 minutes. Neutron production

  9. Intensity-modulated arc therapy simplified

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Eugene; Chen, Jeff Z.; Greenland, Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: We present a treatment planning strategy for intensity-modulated radiation therapy using gantry arcs with dynamic multileaf collimator, previously termed intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT). Methods and Materials: The planning strategy is an extension of the photon bar arc and asymmetric arc techniques and is classified into three levels of complexity, with increasing number of gantry arcs. This principle allows us to generalize the analysis of the number of arcs required for intensity modulation for a given treatment site. Using a phantom, we illustrate how the current technique is more flexible than the photon bar arc technique. We then compare plans from our strategy with conventional three-dimensional conformal treatment plans for three sites: prostate (prostate plus seminal vesicles), posterior pharyngeal wall, and chest wall. Results: Our strategy generates superior IMAT treatment plans compared to conventional three-dimensional conformal plans. The IMAT plans spare critical organs well, and the trade-off for simplicity is that the dose uniformity in the target volume may not rival that of true inverse treatment plans. Conclusions: The analyses presented in this paper give a better understanding of IMAT plans. Our strategy is easier to understand and more efficient in generating plans than inverse planning systems; our plans are also simpler to modify, and quality assurance is more intuitive

  10. Fan-beam intensity modulated proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Patrick; Westerly, David; Mackie, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a concept for a proton therapy system capable of delivering intensity modulated proton therapy using a fan beam of protons. This system would allow present and future gantry-based facilities to deliver state-of-the-art proton therapy with the greater normal tissue sparing made possible by intensity modulation techniques. A method for producing a divergent fan beam of protons using a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles is described and particle transport through the quadrupole doublet is simulated using a commercially available software package. To manipulate the fan beam of protons, a modulation device is developed. This modulator inserts or retracts acrylic leaves of varying thickness from subsections of the fan beam. Each subsection, or beam channel, creates what effectively becomes a beam spot within the fan area. Each channel is able to provide 0-255 mm of range shift for its associated beam spot, or stop the beam and act as an intensity modulator. Results of particle transport simulations through the quadrupole system are incorporated into the MCNPX Monte Carlo transport code along with a model of the range and intensity modulation device. Several design parameters were investigated and optimized, culminating in the ability to create topotherapy treatment plans using distal-edge tracking on both phantom and patient datasets. Beam transport calculations show that a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles can be used to create a divergent fan beam of 200 MeV protons over a distance of 2.1 m. The quadrupole lengths were 30 and 48 cm, respectively, with transverse field gradients less than 20 T/m, which is within the range of water-cooled magnets for the quadrupole radii used. MCNPX simulations of topotherapy treatment plans suggest that, when using the distal edge tracking delivery method, many delivery angles are more important than insisting on narrow beam channel widths in order to obtain conformal target coverage. Overall, the sharp distal

  11. Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with compensators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salz, H.; Wiezorek, T.; Scheithauer, M.; Kleen, W.; Schwedas, M.; Wendt, T.G.

    2002-01-01

    The irradiation with intensity-modulated fields is possible with static as well as dynamic methods. In our university hospital, the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with compensators was prepared and used for the first time for patient irradiation in July 2001. The compensators consist of a mixture of tin granulate and wax, which is filled in a milled negative mould. The treatment planning is performed with Helax-TMS (MDS Nordion). An additional software is used for editing the modulation matrix ('Modifix'). Before irradiation of the first patient, extensive measurements have been carried out in terms of quality assurance of treatment planning and production of compensators. The results of the verification measurements have shown that IMRT with compensators possesses high spatial and dosimetric exactness. The calculated dose distributions are applied correctly. The accuracy of the calculated monitor units is normally better than 3%; in small volumes, further dosimetric inaccuracies between calculated and measured dose distributions are mostly less than 3%. Therefore, the compensators contribute to the achievement of high-level IMRT even when apparatuses without MLC are used. This paper describes the use of the IMRT with compensators, presents the limits of this technology, and discusses the first practical experiences. (orig.) [de

  12. Dosimetric comparison between intensity modulated brachytherapy versus external beam intensity modulated radiotherapy for cervix cancer: a treatment planning study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subramani, V.; Sharma, D.N.; Jothy Basu, K.S.; Rath, G.K.; Gopishankar, N.

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the dosimetric superiority of intensity modulated brachytherapy (IMBT) based on inverse planning optimization technique with classical brachytherapy optimization and also with external beam intensity modulated radiotherapy planning technique in patients of cervical carcinoma

  13. Collimator setting optimization in intensity modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M.; Hoban, P.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The aim of this study was to investigate the role of collimator angle and bixel size settings in IMRT when using the step and shoot method of delivery. Of particular interest is minimisation of the total monitor units delivered. Beam intensity maps with bixel size 10 x 10 mm were segmented into MLC leaf sequences and the collimator angle optimised to minimise the total number of MU's. The monitor units were estimated from the maximum sum of positive-gradient intensity changes along the direction of leaf motion. To investigate the use of low resolution maps at optimum collimator angles, several high resolution maps with bixel size 5 x 5 mm were generated. These were resampled into bixel sizes, 5 x 10 mm and 10 x 10 mm and the collimator angle optimised to minimise the RMS error between the original and resampled map. Finally, a clinical IMRT case was investigated with the collimator angle optimised. Both the dose distribution and dose-volume histograms were compared between the standard IMRT plan and the optimised plan. For the 10 x 10 mm bixel maps there was a variation of 5% - 40% in monitor units at the different collimator angles. The maps with a high degree of radial symmetry showed little variation. For the resampled 5 x 5 mm maps, a small RMS error was achievable with a 5 x 10 mm bixel size at particular collimator positions. This was most noticeable for maps with an elongated intensity distribution. A comparison between the 5 x 5 mm bixel plan and the 5 x 10 mm showed no significant difference in dose distribution. The monitor units required to deliver an intensity modulated field can be reduced by rotating the collimator and aligning the direction of leaf motion with the axis of the fluence map that has the least intensity. Copyright (2001) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  14. Exercise Intensity Modulation of Hepatic Lipid Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio S. Lira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipid metabolism in the liver is complex and involves the synthesis and secretion of very low density lipoproteins (VLDL, ketone bodies, and high rates of fatty acid oxidation, synthesis, and esterification. Exercise training induces several changes in lipid metabolism in the liver and affects VLDL secretion and fatty acid oxidation. These alterations are even more conspicuous in disease, as in obesity, and cancer cachexia. Our understanding of the mechanisms leading to metabolic adaptations in the liver as induced by exercise training has advanced considerably in the recent years, but much remains to be addressed. More recently, the adoption of high intensity exercise training has been put forward as a means of modulating hepatic metabolism. The purpose of the present paper is to summarise and discuss the merit of such new knowledge.

  15. Intensity modulated radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riou, O.; Fenoglietto, P.; Lemanski, C.; Azria, D.

    2012-01-01

    Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is a technique allowing dose escalation and normal tissue sparing for various cancer types. For breast cancer, the main goals when using IMRT were to improve dose homogeneity within the breast and to enhance coverage of complex target volumes. Nonetheless, better heart and lung protections are achievable with IMRT as compared to standard irradiation for difficult cases. Three prospective randomized controlled trials of IMRT versus standard treatment showed that a better breast homogeneity can translate into better overall cosmetic results. Dosimetric and clinical studies seem to indicate a benefit of IMRT for lymph nodes irradiation, bilateral treatment, left breast and chest wall radiotherapy, or accelerated partial breast irradiation. The multiple technical IMRT solutions available tend to indicate a widespread use for breast irradiation. Nevertheless, indications for breast IMRT should be personalized and selected according to the expected benefit for each individual. (authors)

  16. Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in bilateral retinoblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atalar, Banu; Ozyar, Enis; Gunduz, Kaan; Gungor, Gorkem

    2010-01-01

    External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for retinoblastoma has traditionally been done with conventional radiotherapy techniques which resulted high doses to the surrounding normal tissues. A 20 month-old girl with group D bilateral retinoblastoma underwent intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to both eyes after failing chemoreduction and focal therapies including cryotherapy and transpupillary thermotherapy. In this report, we discuss the use of IMRT as a method for reducing doses to adjacent normal tissues while delivering therapeutic doses to the tumour tissues compared with 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). At one year follow-up, the patient remained free of any obvious radiation complications. Image guided IMRT provides better dose distribution than 3DCRT in retinoblastoma eyes, delivering the therapeutic dose to the tumours and minimizing adjacent tissue damage

  17. Inverse planning of intensity modulated proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nill, S.; Oelfke, U.; Bortfeld, T.

    2004-01-01

    A common requirement of radiation therapy is that treatment planning for different radiation modalities is devised on the basis of the same treatment planning system (TPS). The present study presents a novel multi-modal TPS with separate modules for the dose calculation, the optimization engine and the graphical user interface, which allows to integrate different treatment modalities. For heavy-charged particles, both most promising techniques, the distal edge tracking (DET) and the 3-dimensional scanning (3D) technique can be optimized. As a first application, the quality of optimized intensity-modulated treatment plans for photons (IMXT) and protons (IMPT) was analyzed in one clinical case on the basis of the achieved physical dose distributions. A comparison of the proton plans with the photon plans showed no significant improvement in terms of target volume dose, however there was an improvement in terms of organs at risk as well as a clear reduction of the total integral dose. For the DET technique, it is possible to create a treatment plan with almost the same quality of the 3D technique, however with a clearly reduced number (factor of 5) of beam spots as well as a reduced optimization time. Due to its modular design, the system can be easily expanded to more sophisticated dose-calculation algorithms or to modeling of biological effects. (orig.) [de

  18. Film Dosimetry for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benites-Rengifo, J.; Martinez-Davalos, A.; Celis, M.; Larraga, J.

    2004-01-01

    Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) is an oncology treatment technique that employs non-uniform beam intensities to deliver highly conformal radiation to the targets while minimizing doses to normal tissues and critical organs. A key element for a successful clinical implementation of IMRT is establishing a dosimetric verification process that can ensure that delivered doses are consistent with calculated ones for each patient. To this end we are developing a fast quality control procedure, based on film dosimetry techniques, to be applied to the 6 MV Novalis linear accelerator for IMRT of the Instituto Nacional de Neurologia y Neurocirugia (INNN) in Mexico City. The procedure includes measurements of individual fluence maps for a limited number of fields and dose distributions in 3D using extended dose-range radiographic film. However, the film response to radiation might depend on depth, energy and field size, and therefore compromise the accuracy of measurements. In this work we present a study of the dependence of Kodak EDR2 film's response on the depth, field size and energy, compared with those of Kodak XV2 film. The first aim is to devise a fast and accurate method to determine the calibration curve of film (optical density vs. doses) commonly called a sensitometric curve. This was accomplished by using three types of irradiation techniques: Step-and-shoot, dynamic and static fields

  19. Single-energy intensity modulated proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farace, Paolo; Righetto, Roberto; Cianchetti, Marco

    2015-09-01

    In this note, an intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) technique, based on the use of high single-energy (SE-IMPT) pencil beams, is described. The method uses only the highest system energy (226 MeV) and only lateral penumbra to produce dose gradient, as in photon therapy. In the study, after a preliminary analysis of the width of proton pencil beam penumbras at different depths, SE-IMPT was compared with conventional IMPT in a phantom containing titanium inserts and in a patient, affected by a spinal chordoma with fixation rods. It was shown that SE-IMPT has the potential to produce a sharp dose gradient and that it is not affected by the uncertainties produced by metal implants crossed by the proton beams. Moreover, in the chordoma patient, target coverage and organ at risk sparing of the SE-IMPT plan resulted comparable to that of the less reliable conventional IMPT technique. Robustness analysis confirmed that SE-IMPT was not affected by range errors, which can drastically affect the IMPT plan. When accepting a low-dose spread as in modern photon techniques, SE-IMPT could be an option for the treatment of lesions (e.g. cervical bone tumours) where steep dose gradient could improve curability, and where range uncertainty, due for example to the presence of metal implants, hampers conventional IMPT.

  20. Single-energy intensity modulated proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farace, Paolo; Righetto, Roberto; Cianchetti, Marco

    2015-10-07

    In this note, an intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) technique, based on the use of high single-energy (SE-IMPT) pencil beams, is described.The method uses only the highest system energy (226 MeV) and only lateral penumbra to produce dose gradient, as in photon therapy. In the study, after a preliminary analysis of the width of proton pencil beam penumbras at different depths, SE-IMPT was compared with conventional IMPT in a phantom containing titanium inserts and in a patient, affected by a spinal chordoma with fixation rods.It was shown that SE-IMPT has the potential to produce a sharp dose gradient and that it is not affected by the uncertainties produced by metal implants crossed by the proton beams. Moreover, in the chordoma patient, target coverage and organ at risk sparing of the SE-IMPT plan resulted comparable to that of the less reliable conventional IMPT technique. Robustness analysis confirmed that SE-IMPT was not affected by range errors, which can drastically affect the IMPT plan.When accepting a low-dose spread as in modern photon techniques, SE-IMPT could be an option for the treatment of lesions (e.g. cervical bone tumours) where steep dose gradient could improve curability, and where range uncertainty, due for example to the presence of metal implants, hampers conventional IMPT.

  1. Single-energy intensity modulated proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farace, Paolo; Righetto, Roberto; Cianchetti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    In this note, an intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) technique, based on the use of high single-energy (SE-IMPT) pencil beams, is described.The method uses only the highest system energy (226 MeV) and only lateral penumbra to produce dose gradient, as in photon therapy. In the study, after a preliminary analysis of the width of proton pencil beam penumbras at different depths, SE-IMPT was compared with conventional IMPT in a phantom containing titanium inserts and in a patient, affected by a spinal chordoma with fixation rods.It was shown that SE-IMPT has the potential to produce a sharp dose gradient and that it is not affected by the uncertainties produced by metal implants crossed by the proton beams. Moreover, in the chordoma patient, target coverage and organ at risk sparing of the SE-IMPT plan resulted comparable to that of the less reliable conventional IMPT technique. Robustness analysis confirmed that SE-IMPT was not affected by range errors, which can drastically affect the IMPT plan.When accepting a low-dose spread as in modern photon techniques, SE-IMPT could be an option for the treatment of lesions (e.g. cervical bone tumours) where steep dose gradient could improve curability, and where range uncertainty, due for example to the presence of metal implants, hampers conventional IMPT. (note)

  2. Longitudinal density modulation and energy conversion in intense beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, J. R.; Neumann, J. G.; Tian, K.; O'Shea, P. G.

    2007-01-01

    Density modulation of charged particle beams may occur as a consequence of deliberate action, or may occur inadvertently because of imperfections in the particle source or acceleration method. In the case of intense beams, where space charge and external focusing govern the beam dynamics, density modulation may, under some circumstances, be converted to velocity modulation, with a corresponding conversion of potential energy to kinetic energy. Whether this will occur depends on the properties of the beam and the initial modulation. This paper describes the evolution of discrete and continuous density modulations on intense beams and discusses three recent experiments related to the dynamics of density-modulated electron beams

  3. Intensity-modulated three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, Radhe

    1996-01-01

    Optimized intensity-modulated treatments one of the important advances in photon radiotherapy. Intensity modulation provides a greatly increased control over dose distributions. Such control can be maximally exploited to achieve significantly higher levels of conformation to the desired clinical objectives using sophisticated optimization techniques. Safe, rapid and efficient delivery of intensity-modulated treatments has become feasible using a dynamic multi-leaf collimator under computer control. The need for all other field shaping devices such as blocks, wedges and compensators is eliminated. Planning and delivery of intensity-modulated treatments is amenable to automation and development of class solutions for each treatment site and stage which can be implemented not only at major academic centers but on a wide scale. A typical treatment involving as many as 10 fields can be delivered in times shorter than much simpler conventional treatments. The main objective of the course is to give an overview of the current state of the art of planning and delivery methods of intensity-modulated treatments. Specifically, the following topics will be covered using representative optimized plans and treatments: 1. A typical procedure for planning and delivering an intensity-modulated treatment. 2. Quantitative definition of criteria (i.e., the objective function) of optimization of intensity-modulated treatments. Clinical relevance of objectives and the dependence of the quality of optimized intensity-modulated plans upon whether the objectives are stated purely in terms of simple dose or dose-volume criteria or whether they incorporate biological indices. 3. Importance of the lateral transport of radiation in the design of intensity-modulated treatments. Impact on dose homogeneity and the optimum choice of margins. 4. Use of intensity-modulated treatments in escalation of tumor dose for the same or lower normal tissue dose. Fractionation of intensity-modulated treatments

  4. Intensity-modulated three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, Radhe

    1997-01-01

    Optimized intensity-modulated treatments one of the important advances in photon radiotherapy. Intensity modulation provides a greatly increased control over dose distributions. Such control can be maximally exploited to achieve significantly higher levels of conformation to the desired clinical objectives using sophisticated optimization techniques. Safe, rapid and efficient delivery of intensity-modulated treatments has become feasible using a dynamic multi-leaf collimator under computer control. The need for all other field shaping devices such as blocks, wedges and compensators is eliminated. Planning and delivery of intensity-modulated treatments is amenable to automation and development of class solutions for each treatment site and stage which can be implemented not only at major academic centers but on a wide scale. A typical treatment involving as many as 10 fields can be delivered in times shorter than much simpler conventional treatments. The main objective of the course is to give an overview of the current state of the art of planning and delivery methods of intensity-modulated treatments. Specifically, the following topics will be covered using representative optimized plans and treatments: 1. A typical procedure for planning and delivering an intensity-modulated treatment. 2. Quantitative definition of criteria (i.e., the objective function) of optimization of intensity-modulated treatments. Clinical relevance of objectives and the dependence of the quality of optimized intensity-modulated plans upon whether the objectives are stated purely in terms of simple dose or dose-volume criteria or whether they incorporate biological indices. 3. Importance of the lateral transport of radiation in the design of intensity-modulated treatments. Impact on dose homogeneity and the optimum choice of margins. 4. Use of intensity-modulated treatments in escalation of tumor dose for the same or lower normal tissue dose. Fractionation of intensity-modulated treatments

  5. Implementation of intensity modulation with dynamic multileaf collimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, J W; Yu, C; Jaffray, D [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The computer-controlled multileaf collimator (MLC) marks one of the most important advances in radiation therapy. The device efficiently replaces manual blocking to shape fields and can be used to modulate beam intensity. The results of a research programme at William Beaumont Hospital, aimed at bringing dynamic intensity modulation into clinical use, are discussed.

  6. Analysis of small-signal intensity modulation of semiconductor ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper demonstrates theoretical characterization of intensity modulation of semiconductor lasers (SL's). The study is based on a small-signal model to solve the laser rate equations taking into account suppression of optical gain. Analytical forms of the small-signal modulation response and modulation bandwidth are ...

  7. Modulation instability of an intense laser beam in an unmagnetized ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The modulation instability of an intense circularly polarized laser beam propagating in an unmagnetized, cold electron–positron–ion plasma is investigated. Adopting a generalized Karpman method, a three-dimensional nonlinear equation is shown to govern the laser field. Then the conditions for modulation instability and ...

  8. Potential clinical efficacy of intensity-modulated conformal therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meeks, Sanford L.; Buatti, John M.; Bova, Francis J.; Friedman, William A.; Mendenhall, William M.; Zlotecki, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the potential benefit of using intensity-modulated conformal therapy for a variety of lesions currently treated with stereotactic radiosurgery or conventional radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Intensity-modulated conformal treatment plans were generated for small intracranial lesions, as well as head and neck, lung, breast, and prostate cases, using the Peacock Plan[reg] treatment-planning system (Nomos Corporation). For small intracranial lesions, intensity-modulated conformal treatment plans were compared with stereotactic radiosurgery treatment plans generated for patient treatment at the University of Florida Shands Cancer Center. For other sites (head and neck, lung, breast, and prostate), plans generated using the Peacock Plan[reg] were compared with conventional treatment plans, as well as beam's-eye-view conformal treatment plans. Plan comparisons were accomplished through conventional qualitative review of two-dimensional (2D) dose distributions in conjunction with quantitative techniques, such as dose-volume histograms, dosimetric statistics, normal tissue complication probabilities, tumor control probabilities, and objective numerical scoring. Results: For small intracranial lesions, there is little difference between intensity-modulated conformal treatment planning and radiosurgery treatment planning in the conformation of high isodose lines with the target volume. However, stereotactic treatment planning provides a steeper dose gradient outside the target volume and, hence, a lower normal tissue toxicity index. For extracranial sites, objective numerical scores for beam's-eye-view and intensity-modulated conformal planning techniques are superior to scores for conventional treatment plans. The beam's-eye-view planning technique prevents geographic target misses and better excludes healthy tissues from the treatment portal. Compared with scores for the beam's-eye-view planning technique, scores for

  9. Optimal field splitting for large intensity-modulated fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamath, Srijit; Sahni, Sartaj; Ranka, Sanjay; Li, Jonathan; Palta, Jatinder

    2004-01-01

    The multileaf travel range limitations on some linear accelerators require the splitting of a large intensity-modulated field into two or more adjacent abutting intensity-modulated subfields. The abutting subfields are then delivered as separate treatment fields. This workaround not only increases the treatment delivery time but it also increases the total monitor units (MU) delivered to the patient for a given prescribed dose. It is imperative that the cumulative intensity map of the subfields is exactly the same as the intensity map of the large field generated by the dose optimization algorithm, while satisfying hardware constraints of the delivery system. In this work, we describe field splitting algorithms that split a large intensity-modulated field into two or more intensity-modulated subfields with and without feathering, with optimal MU efficiency while satisfying the hardware constraints. Compared to a field splitting technique (without feathering) used in a commercial planning system, our field splitting algorithm (without feathering) shows a decrease in total MU of up to 26% on clinical cases and up to 63% on synthetic cases

  10. The pitfalls of dosimetric commissioning for intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohyama, Naoki; Kodama, Takashi; Hatano, K.

    2013-01-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) allows higher radiation dose to be focused to the target volumes while minimizing the dose to OAR. To start of clinical treatment in IMRTvwe must perform commissioning strictly than 3D-conformal radiotherapy (CRT). In this report, pitfalls of dosimetric commissioning for intensity modulated radiation therapy were reviewed. Multileaf collimator (MLC) offsets and MLC transmissions are important parameters in commissioning of RTPS for IMRT. Correction of depth scaling and fluence scaling is necessary for dose measurement using solid phantom. (author)

  11. Light induced modulation instability of surfaces under intense illumination

    KAUST Repository

    Burlakov, V. M.

    2013-12-17

    We show that a flat surface of a polymer in rubber state illuminated with intense electromagnetic radiation is unstable with respect to periodic modulation. Initial periodic perturbation is amplified due to periodic thermal expansion of the material heated by radiation. Periodic heating is due to focusing-defocusing effects caused by the initial surface modulation. The surface modulation has a period longer than the excitation wavelength and does not require coherent light source. Therefore, it is not related to the well-known laser induced periodic structures on polymer surfaces but may contribute to their formation and to other phenomena of light-matter interaction.

  12. Intensity modulated tangential beam irradiation of the intact breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, L.; Hunt, M.; Chui, C.; Forster, K.; Lee, H.; Lutz, W.; Yahalom, J.; Kutcher, G.J.; McCormick, B.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential benefits of intensity modulated tangential beams in the irradiation of the intact breast. The primary goal was to develop an intensity modulated treatment which would substantially decrease the dose to coronary arteries, lung and contralateral breast while still using a standard tangential beam arrangement. Improved target dose homogeneity, within the limits imposed by opposed fields, was also desired. Since a major goal of the study was the development of a technique which was practical for use on a large population of patients, the design of 'standard' intensity profiles analogous in function to conventional wedges was also investigated. Materials and Methods: Three dimensional treatment planning was performed using both conventional and intensity modulated tangential beams. Plans were developed for both the right and left breast for a range of patient sizes and shapes. For each patient, PTV, lung, heart, origin and peripheral branches of the coronary artery, and contralateral breast were contoured. Optimum tangential beam direction and shape were designed using Beams-Eye-View display and then used for both the conventional and intensity modulated plans. For the conventional plan, the optimum wedge combination and beam weighting were chosen based on the dose distribution in a single transverse plane through the field center. Intensity modulated plans were designed using an algorithm which allows the user to specify the prescribed, maximum and minimum acceptable doses and dose volume constraints for each organ of interest. Plans were compared using multiple dose distributions and DVHs. Results: Significant improvements in the doses to critical structures were achieved using the intensity modulated plan. Coronary artery dose decreased substantially for patients treated to the left breast. Ipsilateral lung and contralateral breast doses decreased for all patients. For one patient treated to

  13. Variable aperture-based ptychographical iterative engine method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Aihui; Kong, Yan; Meng, Xin; He, Xiaoliang; Du, Ruijun; Jiang, Zhilong; Liu, Fei; Xue, Liang; Wang, Shouyu; Liu, Cheng

    2018-02-01

    A variable aperture-based ptychographical iterative engine (vaPIE) is demonstrated both numerically and experimentally to reconstruct the sample phase and amplitude rapidly. By adjusting the size of a tiny aperture under the illumination of a parallel light beam to change the illumination on the sample step by step and recording the corresponding diffraction patterns sequentially, both the sample phase and amplitude can be faithfully reconstructed with a modified ptychographical iterative engine (PIE) algorithm. Since many fewer diffraction patterns are required than in common PIE and the shape, the size, and the position of the aperture need not to be known exactly, this proposed vaPIE method remarkably reduces the data acquisition time and makes PIE less dependent on the mechanical accuracy of the translation stage; therefore, the proposed technique can be potentially applied for various scientific researches. (2018) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  14. Variable aperture-based ptychographical iterative engine method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Aihui; Kong, Yan; Meng, Xin; He, Xiaoliang; Du, Ruijun; Jiang, Zhilong; Liu, Fei; Xue, Liang; Wang, Shouyu; Liu, Cheng

    2018-02-01

    A variable aperture-based ptychographical iterative engine (vaPIE) is demonstrated both numerically and experimentally to reconstruct the sample phase and amplitude rapidly. By adjusting the size of a tiny aperture under the illumination of a parallel light beam to change the illumination on the sample step by step and recording the corresponding diffraction patterns sequentially, both the sample phase and amplitude can be faithfully reconstructed with a modified ptychographical iterative engine (PIE) algorithm. Since many fewer diffraction patterns are required than in common PIE and the shape, the size, and the position of the aperture need not to be known exactly, this proposed vaPIE method remarkably reduces the data acquisition time and makes PIE less dependent on the mechanical accuracy of the translation stage; therefore, the proposed technique can be potentially applied for various scientific researches.

  15. Fixed or adapted conditioning intensity for repeated conditioned pain modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoegh, M; Petersen, K K; Graven-Nielsen, T

    2017-12-29

    Aims Conditioned pain modulation (CPM) is used to assess descending pain modulation through a test stimulation (TS) and a conditioning stimulation (CS). Due to potential carry-over effects, sequential CPM paradigms might alter the intensity of the CS, which potentially can alter the CPM-effect. This study aimed to investigate the difference between a fixed and adaptive CS intensity on CPM-effect. Methods On the dominant leg of 20 healthy subjects the cuff pressure detection threshold (PDT) was recorded as TS and the pain tolerance threshold (PTT) was assessed on the non-dominant leg for estimating the CS. The difference in PDT before and during CS defined the CPM-effect. The CPM-effect was assessed four times using a CS with intensities of 70% of baseline PTT (fixed) or 70% of PTT measured throughout the session (adaptive). Pain intensity of the conditioning stimulus was assessed on a numeric rating scale (NRS). Data were analyzed with repeated-measures ANOVA. Results No difference was found comparing the four PDTs assessed before CSs for the fixed and the adaptive paradigms. The CS pressure intensity for the adaptive paradigm was increasing during the four repeated assessments (P CPM-effect was higher using the fixed condition compared with the adaptive condition (P CPM paradigms using a fixed conditioning stimulus produced an increased CPM-effect compared with adaptive and increasing conditioning intensities.

  16. Energy and intensity modulated radiation therapy with electrons

    OpenAIRE

    Olofsson, Lennart

    2005-01-01

    In recent years intensity modulated radiation therapy with photons (xIMRT) has gained attention due to its ability to reduce the dose in the tissues close to the tumour volume. However, this technique also results in a large low dose volume. Electron IMRT (eIMRT) has the potential to reduce the integral dose to the patient due to the dose fall off in the electron depth dose curves. This dose fall off makes it possible to modulate the dose distribution in the direction of the beam by selecting...

  17. Dosimetric Uncertainties in Verification of Intensity Modulated Photon Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurkovic, S.

    2010-01-01

    The doctoral thesis presents method for the calculation of the compensators' shape to modulate linear accelerators' beams. Characteristic of the method is more strict calculation of the scattered radiation in beams with an inhomogeneous cross-section than it was before. Method could be applied in various clinical situations. It's dosimetric verification was made in phantoms, measuring dose distributions using ionization chambers as well as radiographic film. Therefore, ionization chambers were used for the evaluation of modulator shape and film was used for the evaluation of two-dimensional dose distributions. It is well known that dosimetry of the intensity modulated photon beams is rather complicated regarding inhomogeneity of the dose distribution. The main reason for that is the beam modulator which changes spectral distribution of the beam. Possibility of use different types of detectors for the measurements of dose distributions in modulated photon beams and their accuracy were examined. Small volume ionization chambers, different diodes and amorphus silicon detector and radigraphic film were used. Measured dose distributions were compared between each other as well as with distributions simulated using Monte Carlo particle transport algorithm. In this way the most accurate method for the verification of modulate photon beams is suggested. (author)

  18. Subcarrier intensity modulation for MIMO visible light communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Yasin; Akan, Aydin

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, subcarrier intensity modulation (SIM) is investigated for multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) visible light communication (VLC) systems. A new modulation scheme called DC-aid SIM (DCA-SIM) is proposed for the spatial modulation (SM) transmission plan. Then, DCA-SIM is extended for multiple subcarrier case which is called DC-aid Multiple Subcarrier Modulation (DCA-MSM). Bit error rate (BER) performances of the considered system are analyzed for different MIMO schemes. The power efficiencies of DCA-SIM and DCA-MSM are shown in correlated MIMO VLC channels. The upper bound BER performances of the proposed models are obtained analytically for PSK and QAM modulation types in order to validate the simulation results. Additionally, the effect of power imbalance method on the performance of SIM is studied and remarkable power gains are obtained compared to the non-power imbalanced cases. In this work, Pulse amplitude modulation (PAM) and MSM-Index are used as benchmarks for single carrier and multiple carrier cases, respectively. And the results show that the proposed schemes outperform PAM and MSM-Index for considered single carrier and multiple carrier communication scenarios.

  19. Intensity position modulation for free-space laser communication system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jangjoo, Alireza; Faghihi, F.

    2004-12-01

    In this research a novel modulation technique for free-space laser communication system called Intensity Position Modulation (IPM) is carried out. According to TEM00 mode of a laser beam and by linear fitting on the Gaussian function as an approximation, the variation of linear part on the reverse biased pn photodiode produced alternating currents which contain the information. Here, no characteristic property of the beam as intensity or frequency is changed and only the beam position moves laterally. We demonstrated that in this method no bandwidth is required, so it is possible to reduce the background radiation noise by narrowband filtering of the carrier. The fidelity of the analog voice communication system which is made upon the IPM is satisfactory and we are able to transmit the audio signals up to 1Km.

  20. Conformal radiotherapy by intensity modulation of pediatrics tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leseur, J.; Le Prise, E.; Carrie, C.; Bernier, V.; Beneyton, V.; Mahe, M.A.; Supiot, S.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study is to take stock on the validated and potential indications of the conformal radiotherapy with intensity modulation ( intensity modulated radiotherapy I.M.R.T.) in pediatrics and to propose recommendations for its use as well as the adapted dose constraints. About 40 to 50% of children treated for a cancer are irradiated. The I.M.R.T., by linear accelerator or helical tomo-therapy has for aim to give a homogenous dose to the target volume and to save organs at risk. Its use in pediatrics seems particularly interesting because of the complexity of target volumes and the closeness of organs at risk. In compensation for these positive elements, the importance of low doses irradiation given in big volumes makes fear event consequences on growth and an increased incidence of secondary cancers in children suffering from tumors with high cure rates and long life expectancy. (N.C.)

  1. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy: first reported treatment in Australasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corry, J.; Joon, D.L.; Hope, G.; Smylie, J.; Henkul, Z.; Wills, J.; Cramb, J.; Towns, S.; Archer, P.

    2002-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is an exciting new advance in the practice of radiation oncology. It is the use of non-uniform radiation beams to achieve conformal dose distributions. As a result of the high initial capital costs and the time and complexity of planning, IMRT is not yet a widely available clinical treatment option. We describe the process involved in applying this new technology to a case of locally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  2. Super Unit Cells in Aperture-Based Metamaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Tanasković

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An important class of electromagnetic metamaterials are aperture-based metasurfaces. Examples include extraordinary optical transmission arrays and double fishnets with negative refractive index. We analyze a generalization of such metamaterials where a simple aperture is now replaced by a compound object formed by superposition of two or more primitive objects (e.g., rectangles, circles, and ellipses. Thus obtained “super unit cell” shows far richer behavior than the subobjects that comprise it. We show that nonlocalities introduced by overlapping simple subobjects can be used to produce large deviations of spectral dispersion even for small additive modifications of the basic geometry. Technologically, some super cells may be fabricated by simple spatial shifting of the existing photolithographic masks. In our investigation we applied analytical calculations and ab initio finite element modeling to prove the possibility to tailor the dispersion including resonances for plasmonic nanocomposites by adjusting the local geometry and exploiting localized interactions at a subwavelength level. Any desired form could be defined using simple primitive objects, making the situation a geometrical analog of the case of series expansion of a function. Thus an additional degree of tunability of metamaterials is obtained. The obtained designer structures can be applied in different fields like waveguiding and sensing.

  3. Aperture-based antihydrogen gravity experiment: Parallel plate geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, J. R.; Hedlof, R. M.; Ordonez, C. A. [Department of Physics, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    An analytical model and a Monte Carlo simulation are presented of an experiment that could be used to determine the direction of the acceleration of antihydrogen due to gravity. The experiment would rely on methods developed by existing antihydrogen research collaborations. The configuration consists of two circular, parallel plates that have an axis of symmetry directed away from the center of the earth. The plates are separated by a small vertical distance, and include one or more pairs of circular barriers that protrude from the upper and lower plates, thereby forming an aperture between the plates. Antihydrogen annihilations that occur just beyond each barrier, within a “shadow” region, are asymmetric on the upper plate relative to the lower plate. The probability for such annihilations is determined for a point, line and spheroidal source of antihydrogen. The production of 100,000 antiatoms is predicted to be necessary for the aperture-based experiment to indicate the direction of free fall acceleration of antimatter, provided that antihydrogen is produced within a sufficiently small antiproton plasma at a temperature of 4 K.

  4. Aperture-based antihydrogen gravity experiment: Parallel plate geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, J. R.; Hedlof, R. M.; Ordonez, C. A.

    2013-10-01

    An analytical model and a Monte Carlo simulation are presented of an experiment that could be used to determine the direction of the acceleration of antihydrogen due to gravity. The experiment would rely on methods developed by existing antihydrogen research collaborations. The configuration consists of two circular, parallel plates that have an axis of symmetry directed away from the center of the earth. The plates are separated by a small vertical distance, and include one or more pairs of circular barriers that protrude from the upper and lower plates, thereby forming an aperture between the plates. Antihydrogen annihilations that occur just beyond each barrier, within a "shadow" region, are asymmetric on the upper plate relative to the lower plate. The probability for such annihilations is determined for a point, line and spheroidal source of antihydrogen. The production of 100,000 antiatoms is predicted to be necessary for the aperture-based experiment to indicate the direction of free fall acceleration of antimatter, provided that antihydrogen is produced within a sufficiently small antiproton plasma at a temperature of 4 K.

  5. Aperture-based antihydrogen gravity experiment: Parallel plate geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Rocha

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available An analytical model and a Monte Carlo simulation are presented of an experiment that could be used to determine the direction of the acceleration of antihydrogen due to gravity. The experiment would rely on methods developed by existing antihydrogen research collaborations. The configuration consists of two circular, parallel plates that have an axis of symmetry directed away from the center of the earth. The plates are separated by a small vertical distance, and include one or more pairs of circular barriers that protrude from the upper and lower plates, thereby forming an aperture between the plates. Antihydrogen annihilations that occur just beyond each barrier, within a “shadow” region, are asymmetric on the upper plate relative to the lower plate. The probability for such annihilations is determined for a point, line and spheroidal source of antihydrogen. The production of 100,000 antiatoms is predicted to be necessary for the aperture-based experiment to indicate the direction of free fall acceleration of antimatter, provided that antihydrogen is produced within a sufficiently small antiproton plasma at a temperature of 4 K.

  6. Intensity-modulated tangential beam irradiation of the intact breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, L.; Hunt, M.; Chui, C.; Spirou, S.; Forster, K.; Lee, H.; Yahalom, J.; Kutcher, G.J.; McCormick, B.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential benefits of intensity modulated tangential beams in the irradiation of the intact breast. Methods and Materials: Three-dimensional treatment planning was performed on five left and five right breasts using standard wedged and intensity modulated (IM) tangential beams. Optimal beam parameters were chosen using beams-eye-view display. For the standard plans, the optimal wedge angles were chosen based on dose distributions in the central plane calculated without inhomogeneity corrections, according to our standard protocol. Intensity-modulated plans were generated using an inverse planning algorithm and a standard set of target and critical structure optimization criteria. Plans were compared using multiple dose distributions and dose volume histograms for the planning target volume (PTV), ipsilateral lung, coronary arteries, and contralateral breast. Results: Significant improvements in the doses to critical structures were achieved using intensity modulation. Compared with a standard-wedged plan prescribed to 46 Gy, the dose from the IM plan encompassing 20% of the coronary artery region decreased by 25% (from 36 to 27 Gy) for patients treated to the left breast; the mean dose to the contralateral breast decreased by 42% (from 1.2 to 0.7 Gy); the ipsilateral lung volume receiving more than 46 Gy decreased by 30% (from 10% to 7%); the volume of surrounding soft tissue receiving more than 46 Gy decreased by 31% (from 48% to 33%). Dose homogeneity within the target volume improved greatest in the superior and inferior regions of the breast (approximately 8%), although some decrease in the medial and lateral high-dose regions (approximately 4%) was also observed. Conclusion: Intensity modulation with a standard tangential beam arrangement significantly reduces the dose to the coronary arteries, ipsilateral lung, contralateral breast, and surrounding soft tissues. Improvements in dose homogeneity throughout the target volume can also be

  7. Pump-to-Signal Intensity Modulation Transfer in Saturated- Gain Fiber Optical Parametric Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lali-Dastjerdi, Zohreh; Lund-Hansen, Toke; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2011-01-01

    The pump-to-signal intensity modulation transfer in saturated degenerate FOPAs is numerically investigated over the whole gain bandwidth. The intensity modulation transfer decreases and the OSNR improves when the amplifier operates in the saturation regime....

  8. Quality control of specific patient in radiotherapy with modulated intensity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aberbuj, P D; Tapia Coca, R C

    2012-01-01

    In this work we comment the details of the patient specific quality controls of the first Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy treatment done at Roffo Institute. These controls consisted in two sets of measurements: absolute dose with ionization chamber and relative dose with two dosimetric systems (Gafchromic EBT2 radiochromic films and the PTW 729 ionization chambers array). Two of the filters did not pass the dosimetrical tests, and they were manufactured again. The new filters passed the tests. For the relative two-dimensional measurements the radiochromic films had a better performance than the array due to their higher spatial resolution (author)

  9. Dose profile analysis of small fields in intensity modulated radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medel B, E. [IMSS, Centro Medico Nacional Manuel Avila Camacho, Calle 2 Nte. 2004, Barrio de San Francisco, 72090 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); Tejeda M, G.; Romero S, K., E-mail: romsakaren@gmail.com [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Facultad de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas, Av. San Claudio y 18 Sur, Ciudad Universitaria, 72570 Puebla, Pue.(Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Small field dosimetry is getting a very important worldwide task nowadays. The use of fields of few centimeters is more common with the introduction of sophisticated techniques of radiation therapy, as Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT). In our country the implementation of such techniques is just getting started and whit it the need of baseline data acquisition. The dosimetry under small field conditions represents a challenge for the physicists community. In this work, a dose profile analysis was done, using various types of dosimeters for further comparisons. This analysis includes the study of quality parameters as flatness, symmetry, penumbra, and other in-axis measurements. (Author)

  10. Linear algebraic methods applied to intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooks, S M; Xing, L

    2001-10-01

    Methods of linear algebra are applied to the choice of beam weights for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). It is shown that the physical interpretation of the beam weights, target homogeneity and ratios of deposited energy can be given in terms of matrix equations and quadratic forms. The methodology of fitting using linear algebra as applied to IMRT is examined. Results are compared with IMRT plans that had been prepared using a commercially available IMRT treatment planning system and previously delivered to cancer patients.

  11. Quality assurance of intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palta, Jatinder R; Liu, Chihray; Li, Jonathan G

    2008-01-01

    The current paradigm for the quality assurance (QA) program for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) includes QA of the treatment planning system, QA of the delivery system, and patient-specific QA. Although the IMRT treatment planning and delivery system is the same as for conventional three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, it has more parameters to coordinate and verify. Because of complex beam intensity modulation, each IMRT field often includes many small irregular off-axis fields, resulting in isodose distributions for each IMRT plan that are more conformal than those from conventional treatment plans. Therefore, these features impose a new and more stringent set of QA requirements for IMRT planning and delivery. The generic test procedures to validate dose calculation and delivery accuracy for both treatment planning and IMRT delivery have to be customized for each type of IMRT planning and delivery strategy. The rationale for such an approach is that the overall accuracy of IMRT delivery is incumbent on the piecewise uncertainties in both the planning and delivery processes. The end user must have well-defined evaluation criteria for each element of the planning and delivery process. Such information can potentially be used to determine a priori the accuracy of IMRT planning and delivery.

  12. Quality Assurance of Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palta, Jatinder R.; Liu, Chihray; Li, Jonathan G.

    2008-01-01

    The current paradigm for the quality assurance (QA) program for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) includes QA of the treatment planning system, QA of the delivery system, and patient-specific QA. Although the IMRT treatment planning and delivery system is the same as for conventional three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, it has more parameters to coordinate and verify. Because of complex beam intensity modulation, each IMRT field often includes many small irregular off-axis fields, resulting in isodose distributions for each IMRT plan that are more conformal than those from conventional treatment plans. Therefore, these features impose a new and more stringent set of QA requirements for IMRT planning and delivery. The generic test procedures to validate dose calculation and delivery accuracy for both treatment planning and IMRT delivery have to be customized for each type of IMRT planning and delivery strategy. The rationale for such an approach is that the overall accuracy of IMRT delivery is incumbent on the piecewise uncertainties in both the planning and delivery processes. The end user must have well-defined evaluation criteria for each element of the planning and delivery process. Such information can potentially be used to determine a priori the accuracy of IMRT planning and delivery

  13. Comparison of simple and complex liver intensity modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Mark T; Purdie, Thomas G; Eccles, Cynthia L; Sharpe, Michael B; Dawson, Laura A

    2010-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) may allow improvement in plan quality for treatment of liver cancer, however increasing radiation modulation complexity can lead to increased uncertainties and requirements for quality assurance. This study assesses whether target coverage and normal tissue avoidance can be maintained in liver cancer intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans by systematically reducing the complexity of the delivered fluence. An optimal baseline six fraction individualized IMRT plan for 27 patients with 45 liver cancers was developed which provided a median minimum dose to 0.5 cc of the planning target volume (PTV) of 38.3 Gy (range, 25.9-59.5 Gy), in 6 fractions, while maintaining liver toxicity risk <5% and maximum luminal gastrointestinal structure doses of 30 Gy. The number of segments was systematically reduced until normal tissue constraints were exceeded while maintaining equivalent dose coverage to 95% of PTV (PTVD95). Radiotherapy doses were compared between the plans. Reduction in the number of segments was achieved for all 27 plans from a median of 48 segments (range 34-52) to 19 segments (range 6-30), without exceeding normal tissue dose objectives and maintaining equivalent PTVD95 and similar PTV Equivalent Uniform Dose (EUD(-20)) IMRT plans with fewer segments had significantly less monitor units (mean, 1892 reduced to 1695, p = 0.012), but also reduced dose conformity (mean, RTOG Conformity Index 1.42 increased to 1.53 p = 0.001). Tumour coverage and normal tissue objectives were maintained with simplified liver IMRT, at the expense of reduced conformity

  14. Pump-To-Signal Intensity Modulation Transfer Characteristics in FOPAs: Modulation Frequency and Saturation Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lali-Dastjerdi, Zohreh; Cristofori, Valentina; Lund-Hansen, Toke

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports a comprehensive study of pump- to-signal intensity modulation transfer (IMT) in single-pump fiber optic parametric amplifiers (FOPAs). In particular, the IMT is studied for the first time for high-frequency fluctuations of the pump as well as in the saturated gain regime. The IMT...... cut-off frequency in typical single-pump FOPAs is around 100–200 GHz. The possibilities to shift this frequency based on dispersion and nonlinearities involved in the parametric gain are discussed. The severe IMT to the signal at low modulation frequencies can be suppressed by more than 50...

  15. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy clinical evidence and techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Nishimura, Yasumasa

    2015-01-01

    Successful clinical use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) represents a significant advance in radiation oncology. Because IMRT can deliver high-dose radiation to a target with a reduced dose to the surrounding organs, it can improve the local control rate and reduce toxicities associated with radiation therapy. Since IMRT began being used in the mid-1990s, a large volume of clinical evidence of the advantages of IMRT has been collected. However, treatment planning and quality assurance (QA) of IMRT are complicated and difficult for the clinician and the medical physicist. This book, by authors renowned for their expertise in their fields, provides cumulative clinical evidence and appropriate techniques for IMRT for the clinician and the physicist. Part I deals with the foundations and techniques, history, principles, QA, treatment planning, radiobiology and related aspects of IMRT. Part II covers clinical applications with several case studies, describing contouring and dose distribution with cl...

  16. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Primary Brain Tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong-min Wang

    2004-01-01

    Radiation therapy has been used to treat primary brain tumors as standard primary and/or adjunctive therapies for decades. It is difficult for conventional radiotherapy to deliver a lethal dose of radiation to the tumors while sparing surrounding normal brain due to complicated structures and multifunction in human brain. With the understanding of radiation physics and computer technology, a number of novel and more precise radiotherapies have been developed in recent years. Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is one of these strategies. The use of IMRT in the treatment of primary brain tumors is being increasing nowadays. It shows great promise for some of primary brain tumors and also presents some problems, This review highlights current IMRT in the treatment of mainly primary brain tumors.

  17. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy for cancers in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leseur, J.; Le Prise, E.; Leseur, J.; Carrie, C.; Beneyton, V.; Bernier, V.; Beneyton, V.; Mahee, M.A.; Supiot, S.

    2009-01-01

    Approximately 40-50% of children with cancer will be irradiated during their treatment. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (I.M.R.T.) by linear accelerator or helical tomo-therapy improves dose distribution in target volumes and normal tissue sparing. This technology could be particularly useful for pediatric patients to achieve an optimal dose distribution in complex volumes close to critical structures. The use of I.M.R.T. can increase the volume of tissue receiving low-dose radiation, and consequently carcinogenicity in childhood population with a good overall survival and long period of life expectancy. This review will present the current and potential I.M.R.T. indications for cancers in childhood, and discuss the benefits and problems of this technology aiming to define recommendations in the use of I.M.R.T. and specific doses constraints in Pediatrics. (authors)

  18. Effects of intensity-modulated radiotherapy on human oral microflora

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao Ziyang; Tang Zisheng; Jiang Yuntao; Ma Rui; Liu Zheng; Huang Zhengwei; Yan Chao

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate changes in the biodiversity of the oral microflora of patients with head and neck cancer treated with postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or conventional radiotherapy (CRT). Pooled dental plaque samples were collected during the radiation treatment from patients receiving IMRT (n=13) and CRT (n=12). Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was used to analyze the temporal variation of these plaque samples. The stimulated and unstimulated salivary flow rates were also compared between IMRT and CRT patients. Reductions in the severity of hyposalivation were observed in IMRT patients compared with CRT patients. We also observed that the temporal stability of the oral ecosystem was significantly higher in the IMRT group (69.96±7.82%) than in the CRT group (51.98±10.45%) (P<0.05). The findings of the present study suggest that IMRT is more conducive to maintaining the relative stability of the oral ecosystem than CRT. (author)

  19. Cervix carcinomas: place of intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barillot, I.

    2009-01-01

    While indications of modulated intensity radiation therapy (I.M.R.T.) are perfectly defined in head and neck and prostate cancer patients, this technique remains under evaluation for gynecologic tumours. The implementation of conformal three dimensional radiotherapy in the late 1990 has been the first important step for optimisation of treatment of cervix carcinomas, as it permitted a better target coverage with a significant reduction of the bladder dose. However, this technique often leads to an irradiation of a larger volume of rectum in locally advanced stages and could only spare a limited amount of intestine. I.R.M.T. is one of the optimisation methods potentially efficient for a better sparing of digestive tract during irradiation of cervix carcinomas. The aim of this literature review is to provide the arguments supporting this hypothesis, and to define the place of this technique for dose escalation. (authors)

  20. Clinical implementation and quality assurance for intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, C.-M.; Price, R.; McNeeley, S.; Chen, L.; Li, J.S.; Wang, L.; Ding, M.; Fourkal, E.; Qin, L.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the clinical implementation and quality assurance (QA) for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) based on the experience at Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, USA. We will review our procedures for the clinical implementation of the IMRT technique and the requirements for patient immobilization, target delineation, treatment optimization, beam delivery and system administration. We will discuss the dosimetric requirements and measurement procedures for beam commissioning and dosimetry verification for IMRT. We will examine the details of model-based dose calculation for IMRT treatment planning and the potential problems with such dose calculation algorithms. We will discuss the effect of beam delivery systems on the actual dose distributions received by the patients and the methods to incorporate such effects in the treatment optimization process. We will investigate the use of the Monte Carlo method for dose calculation and treatment verification for IMRT

  1. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy -the State of the Art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, C.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: In the last two decades of the last century, the development of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) has substantially reduces the volume of critical organs irradiated to high doses, and has permitted the increase of tumor dose without concomitant increase in normal tissue complication. At Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, a clinical trial in cancer of the prostate has accrued >1600 patient and the prescription dose has been escalated to 81 Gy with 3D-CRT, and to 86.4 Gy using intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), with promising results. 3D-CRT and IMRT involves the delineation of target and non-target structures from patient-specific 3D image data-sets (primarily CT, sometimes supplemented with MRI, PET etc.), the calculation and display of 3D dose distributions, the analysis and evaluation of structure-specific dose-volume data (DVH-dose volume histogram), radiation delivery with computer-controlled multileaf collimators (MLC), and treatment verification with electronic portal images. However, the dose distribution conformality achieved with 3D-CRT can be further improved by the use of computer-optimized IMRT. In addition, the treatment design phase of 3D-CRT involves several iterative steps and can be time-consuming, particularly when the anatomical geometry is complex. Thus, IMRT is an incremental advance from 3D-CRT with two key enhancements: 1) computerized iterative treatment plan optimization, and 2) the use of intensity-modulated radiation beams. To deliver the IM beams, one efficacious approach is to use MLC in the dynamic mode, using the so-called sliding-window technique, i.e. the leaves of the MLC are in motion while the radiation is being delivered. Since 1995, we have treated over 1500 patients with IMRT. This discussion shall describe the physical aspects of IMRT, emphasizing those features and benefits unique to this approach. Pertinent clinical results will also be briefly presented

  2. Intensity modulated operating mode of the rotating gamma system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Bishwambhar; Gulyas, Laszlo; Medlin, Donald; Koroknai, Tibor; Takacs, David; Filep, Gyorgy; Panko, Peter; Godo, Bence; Hollo, Tamas; Zheng, Xiao Ran; Fedorcsak, Imre; Dobai, Jozsef; Bognar, Laszlo; Takacs, Endre

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this work was to explore two novel operation modalities of the rotating gamma systems (RGS) that could expand its clinical application to lesions in close proximity to critical organs at risk (OAR). The approach taken in this study consists of two components. First, a Geant4-based Monte Carlo (MC) simulation toolkit is used to model the dosimetric properties of the RGS Vertex 360™ for the normal, intensity modulated radiosurgery (IMRS), and speed modulated radiosurgery (SMRS) operation modalities. Second, the RGS Vertex 360™ at the Rotating Gamma Institute in Debrecen, Hungary is used to collect experimental data for the normal and IMRS operation modes. An ion chamber is used to record measurements of the absolute dose. The dose profiles are measured using Gafchromic EBT3 films positioned within a spherical water equivalent phantom. A strong dosimetric agreement between the measured and simulated dose profiles and penumbra was found for both the normal and IMRS operation modes for all collimator sizes (4, 8, 14, and 18 mm diameter). The simulated falloff and maximum dose regions agree better with the experimental results for the 4 and 8 mm diameter collimators. Although the falloff regions align well in the 14 and 18 mm collimators, the maximum dose regions have a larger difference. For the IMRS operation mode, the simulated and experimental dose distributions are ellipsoidal, where the short axis aligns with the blocked angles. Similarly, the simulated dose distributions for the SMRS operation mode also adopt an ellipsoidal shape, where the short axis aligns with the angles where the orbital speed is highest. For both modalities, the dose distribution is highly constrained with a sharper penumbra along the short axes. Dose modulation of the RGS can be achieved with the IMRS and SMRS modes. By providing a highly constrained dose distribution with a sharp penumbra, both modes could be clinically applicable for the treatment of lesions in close

  3. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy. Development of the technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafailovici, L.; Alva, R.; Chiozza, J.; Donato, H.; Falomo, S.; Cardiello, C.; Furia, O.; Martinez, A.; Filomia, M.L.; Sansogne, R.; Arbiser, S.; Dosoretz, B.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) is a result of advances in computer sciences that allowed the development of new technology related to planning and radiation therapy. IMRT was developed to homogenize the dose in the target volumes and decrease the dose in the surrounding healthy tissue. Using a software with high calculation capacity a simultaneous irradiation with different doses in a given volume is achieved. IMRT is based on internal planning. Material and methods: 628 patients were treated with IMRT in prostate lesions, head and neck, breast, thorax, abdomen and brain since August 2008. The software for IMRT is the XIO CMS and the accelerator used is a Varian Clinac 6 / 100. IMRT requires a first simulation, where immobilization systems are selected (mats, thermoplastic masks, among others) and the demarcation of the target structures, healthy tissue and dose prescription by a tattoo. Images of CT / MRI are merged when necessary. Once the system made the treatment optimization, this one is regulated by modulators. These are produced by numerical control machines from digital files produced by software. In a second modulation the planned irradiation is checked and tattoo is carried out according with this. We have a strict process of quality assurance to assess the viability of the plan before its implementation. We use the Map Check it possible to compare the dose on the central axis and the distribution in the whole plane regarding to that generated by the planning system. From 03/2008 the virtual simulation process was implemented integrating the described stages. Results and Conclusions: IMRT is a complex technique. The meticulous planning, implementation of process and quality control allows the use of this technique in a reliable and secure way. With IMRT we achieved a high level of dose conformation, less irradiation of healthy tissue, lower rates of complications and the dose escalation for some tumors. (authors) [es

  4. Random and systematic beam modulator errors in dynamic intensity modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsai, Homayon; Cho, Paul S; Phillips, Mark H; Giansiracusa, Robert S; Axen, David

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports on the dosimetric effects of random and systematic modulator errors in delivery of dynamic intensity modulated beams. A sliding-widow type delivery that utilizes a combination of multileaf collimators (MLCs) and backup diaphragms was examined. Gaussian functions with standard deviations ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 mm were used to simulate random positioning errors. A clinical example involving a clival meningioma was chosen with optic chiasm and brain stem as limiting critical structures in the vicinity of the tumour. Dose calculations for different modulator fluctuations were performed, and a quantitative analysis was carried out based on cumulative and differential dose volume histograms for the gross target volume and surrounding critical structures. The study indicated that random modulator errors have a strong tendency to reduce minimum target dose and homogeneity. Furthermore, it was shown that random perturbation of both MLCs and backup diaphragms in the order of σ = 1 mm can lead to 5% errors in prescribed dose. In comparison, when MLCs or backup diaphragms alone was perturbed, the system was more robust and modulator errors of at least σ = 1.5 mm were required to cause dose discrepancies greater than 5%. For systematic perturbation, even errors in the order of ±0.5 mm were shown to result in significant dosimetric deviations

  5. Rate adaptive multilevel coded modulation with high coding gain in intensity modulation direct detection optical communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Fei; Liu, Bo; Zhang, Lijia; Xin, Xiangjun; Zhang, Qi; Tian, Qinghua; Tian, Feng; Wang, Yongjun; Rao, Lan; Ullah, Rahat; Zhao, Feng; Li, Deng'ao

    2018-02-01

    A rate-adaptive multilevel coded modulation (RA-MLC) scheme based on fixed code length and a corresponding decoding scheme is proposed. RA-MLC scheme combines the multilevel coded and modulation technology with the binary linear block code at the transmitter. Bits division, coding, optional interleaving, and modulation are carried out by the preset rule, then transmitted through standard single mode fiber span equal to 100 km. The receiver improves the accuracy of decoding by means of soft information passing through different layers, which enhances the performance. Simulations are carried out in an intensity modulation-direct detection optical communication system using MATLAB®. Results show that the RA-MLC scheme can achieve bit error rate of 1E-5 when optical signal-to-noise ratio is 20.7 dB. It also reduced the number of decoders by 72% and realized 22 rate adaptation without significantly increasing the computing time. The coding gain is increased by 7.3 dB at BER=1E-3.

  6. Prone Breast Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: 5-Year Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osa, Etin-Osa O.; DeWyngaert, Keith; Roses, Daniel; Speyer, James; Guth, Amber; Axelrod, Deborah; Fenton Kerimian, Maria; Goldberg, Judith D.; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To report the 5-year results of a technique of prone breast radiation therapy delivered by a regimen of accelerated intensity modulated radiation therapy with a concurrent boost to the tumor bed. Methods and Materials: Between 2003 and 2006, 404 patients with stage I-II breast cancer were prospectively enrolled into 2 consecutive protocols, institutional trials 03-30 and 05-181, that used the same regimen of 40.5 Gy/15 fractions delivered to the index breast over 3 weeks, with a concomitant daily boost to the tumor bed of 0.5 Gy (total dose 48 Gy). All patients were treated after segmental mastectomy and had negative margins and nodal assessment. Patients were set up prone: only if lung or heart volumes were in the field was a supine setup attempted and chosen if found to better spare these organs. Results: Ninety-two percent of patients were treated prone, 8% supine. Seventy-two percent had stage I, 28% stage II invasive breast cancer. In-field lung volume ranged from 0 to 228.27 cm 3 , mean 19.65 cm 3 . In-field heart volume for left breast cancer patients ranged from 0 to 21.24 cm 3 , mean 1.59 cm 3 . There was no heart in the field for right breast cancer patients. At a median follow-up of 5 years, the 5-year cumulative incidence of isolated ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence was 0.82% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.65%-1.04%). The 5-year cumulative incidence of regional recurrence was 0.53% (95% CI 0.41%-0.69%), and the 5-year overall cumulative death rate was 1.28% (95% CI 0.48%-3.38%). Eighty-two percent (95% CI 77%-85%) of patients judged their final cosmetic result as excellent/good. Conclusions: Prone accelerated intensity modulated radiation therapy with a concomitant boost results in excellent local control and optimal sparing of heart and lung, with good cosmesis. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 1005, a phase 3, multi-institutional, randomized trial is ongoing and is evaluating the equivalence of a similar dose and fractionation

  7. Prone Breast Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: 5-Year Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osa, Etin-Osa O.; DeWyngaert, Keith [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Roses, Daniel [Department of Surgery, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Speyer, James [Department of Medical Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Guth, Amber; Axelrod, Deborah [Department of Surgery, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Fenton Kerimian, Maria [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Goldberg, Judith D. [Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Formenti, Silvia C., E-mail: Silvia.formenti@nyumc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To report the 5-year results of a technique of prone breast radiation therapy delivered by a regimen of accelerated intensity modulated radiation therapy with a concurrent boost to the tumor bed. Methods and Materials: Between 2003 and 2006, 404 patients with stage I-II breast cancer were prospectively enrolled into 2 consecutive protocols, institutional trials 03-30 and 05-181, that used the same regimen of 40.5 Gy/15 fractions delivered to the index breast over 3 weeks, with a concomitant daily boost to the tumor bed of 0.5 Gy (total dose 48 Gy). All patients were treated after segmental mastectomy and had negative margins and nodal assessment. Patients were set up prone: only if lung or heart volumes were in the field was a supine setup attempted and chosen if found to better spare these organs. Results: Ninety-two percent of patients were treated prone, 8% supine. Seventy-two percent had stage I, 28% stage II invasive breast cancer. In-field lung volume ranged from 0 to 228.27 cm{sup 3}, mean 19.65 cm{sup 3}. In-field heart volume for left breast cancer patients ranged from 0 to 21.24 cm{sup 3}, mean 1.59 cm{sup 3}. There was no heart in the field for right breast cancer patients. At a median follow-up of 5 years, the 5-year cumulative incidence of isolated ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence was 0.82% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.65%-1.04%). The 5-year cumulative incidence of regional recurrence was 0.53% (95% CI 0.41%-0.69%), and the 5-year overall cumulative death rate was 1.28% (95% CI 0.48%-3.38%). Eighty-two percent (95% CI 77%-85%) of patients judged their final cosmetic result as excellent/good. Conclusions: Prone accelerated intensity modulated radiation therapy with a concomitant boost results in excellent local control and optimal sparing of heart and lung, with good cosmesis. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 1005, a phase 3, multi-institutional, randomized trial is ongoing and is evaluating the equivalence of a similar dose and

  8. Benchmarking Dosimetric Quality Assessment of Prostate Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senthi, Sashendra, E-mail: sasha.senthi@petermac.org [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Center, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Gill, Suki S. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Center, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Haworth, Annette; Kron, Tomas; Cramb, Jim [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Center, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Rolfo, Aldo [Radiation Therapy Services, Peter MacCallum Cancer Center, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Thomas, Jessica [Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, Peter MacCallum Cancer Center, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Duchesne, Gillian M. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Center, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Hamilton, Christopher H.; Joon, Daryl Lim [Radiation Oncology Department, Austin Repatriation Hospital, Heidelberg, VIC (Australia); Bowden, Patrick [Radiation Oncology Department, Tattersall' s Cancer Center, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Foroudi, Farshad [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Center, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To benchmark the dosimetric quality assessment of prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy and determine whether the quality is influenced by disease or treatment factors. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the data from 155 consecutive men treated radically for prostate cancer using intensity-modulated radiotherapy to 78 Gy between January 2007 and March 2009 across six radiotherapy treatment centers. The plan quality was determined by the measures of coverage, homogeneity, and conformity. Tumor coverage was measured using the planning target volume (PTV) receiving 95% and 100% of the prescribed dose (V{sub 95%} and V{sub 100%}, respectively) and the clinical target volume (CTV) receiving 95% and 100% of the prescribed dose. Homogeneity was measured using the sigma index of the PTV and CTV. Conformity was measured using the lesion coverage factor, healthy tissue conformity index, and the conformity number. Multivariate regression models were created to determine the relationship between these and T stage, risk status, androgen deprivation therapy use, treatment center, planning system, and treatment date. Results: The largest discriminatory measurements of coverage, homogeneity, and conformity were the PTV V{sub 95%}, PTV sigma index, and conformity number. The mean PTV V{sub 95%} was 92.5% (95% confidence interval, 91.3-93.7%). The mean PTV sigma index was 2.10 Gy (95% confidence interval, 1.90-2.20). The mean conformity number was 0.78 (95% confidence interval, 0.76-0.79). The treatment center independently influenced the coverage, homogeneity, and conformity (all p < .0001). The planning system independently influenced homogeneity (p = .038) and conformity (p = .021). The treatment date independently influenced the PTV V{sub 95%} only, with it being better at the start (p = .013). Risk status, T stage, and the use of androgen deprivation therapy did not influence any aspect of plan quality. Conclusion: Our study has benchmarked measures

  9. Benchmarking Dosimetric Quality Assessment of Prostate Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senthi, Sashendra; Gill, Suki S.; Haworth, Annette; Kron, Tomas; Cramb, Jim; Rolfo, Aldo; Thomas, Jessica; Duchesne, Gillian M.; Hamilton, Christopher H.; Joon, Daryl Lim; Bowden, Patrick; Foroudi, Farshad

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To benchmark the dosimetric quality assessment of prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy and determine whether the quality is influenced by disease or treatment factors. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the data from 155 consecutive men treated radically for prostate cancer using intensity-modulated radiotherapy to 78 Gy between January 2007 and March 2009 across six radiotherapy treatment centers. The plan quality was determined by the measures of coverage, homogeneity, and conformity. Tumor coverage was measured using the planning target volume (PTV) receiving 95% and 100% of the prescribed dose (V 95% and V 100% , respectively) and the clinical target volume (CTV) receiving 95% and 100% of the prescribed dose. Homogeneity was measured using the sigma index of the PTV and CTV. Conformity was measured using the lesion coverage factor, healthy tissue conformity index, and the conformity number. Multivariate regression models were created to determine the relationship between these and T stage, risk status, androgen deprivation therapy use, treatment center, planning system, and treatment date. Results: The largest discriminatory measurements of coverage, homogeneity, and conformity were the PTV V 95% , PTV sigma index, and conformity number. The mean PTV V 95% was 92.5% (95% confidence interval, 91.3–93.7%). The mean PTV sigma index was 2.10 Gy (95% confidence interval, 1.90–2.20). The mean conformity number was 0.78 (95% confidence interval, 0.76–0.79). The treatment center independently influenced the coverage, homogeneity, and conformity (all p 95% only, with it being better at the start (p = .013). Risk status, T stage, and the use of androgen deprivation therapy did not influence any aspect of plan quality. Conclusion: Our study has benchmarked measures of coverage, homogeneity, and conformity for the treatment of prostate cancer using IMRT. The differences seen between centers and planning systems and the coverage

  10. Outcome after intensity modulated radiotherapy for anaplastic thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Xiayun; Li, Duanshu; Hu, Chaosu; Wang, Zhuoying; Ying, Hongmei; Wu, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is a malignancy with one of the highest fatality rates. We reviewed our recent clinical experience with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) combined with surgery and chemotherapy for the management of ATC. 13 patients with ATC who were treated by IMRT in our institution between October 2008 and February 2011, have been analyzed. The target volume for IMRT was planned to include Gross tumor volume (GTV): primary tumor plus any N + disease (66 Gy/33 F/6.6 W), with elective irradiation of thyroid bed, bilateral level II through VI and mediastinal lymph nodes to the level of the carina (54-60 Gy). Seven patients received surgical intervention and eleven patients had chemotherapy. The median radiotherapy dose to GTV was 60 Gy/30 fractions/6 weeks. The median survival time of the 13 patients was 9 months. The direct causes of death were distant metastases (75%) and progression of the locoregional disease (25%). Ten patients were spared dyspnea and tracheostomy because their primary neck lesion did not progress. The results showed that IMRT combined by surgery and chemotherapy for ATC might be beneficial to improve locoregional control. Further new therapies are needed to control metastases

  11. Current status of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatano, Kazuo; Araki, Hitoshi; Sakai, Mitsuhiro

    2007-01-01

    External-beam radiation therapy has been one of the treatment options for prostate cancer. The dose response has been observed for a dose range of 64.8-81 Gy. The problem of external-beam radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer is that as the dose increases, adverse effects also increase. Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) has enabled us to treat patients with up to 72-76 Gy to the prostate, with a relatively acceptable risk of late rectal bleeding. Recently, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has been shown to deliver a higher dose to the target with acceptable low rates of rectal and bladder complications. The most important things to keep in mind when using an IMRT technique are that there is a significant trade-off between coverage of the target, avoidance of adjacent critical structures, and the inhomogeneity of the dose within the target. Lastly, even with IMRT, it should be kept in mind that a ''perfect'' plan that creates completely homogeneous coverage of the target volume and zero or small dose to the adjacent organs at risk is not always obtained. Participating in many treatment planning sessions and arranging the beams and beam weights create the best approach to the best IMRT plan. (author)

  12. Norwegian Oncologists' Expectations of Intensity-modulated Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muren, Ludvig P.; Mella, Olav; Hafslund, Rune; Dahl, Olav

    2002-01-01

    Although intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) may increase the therapeutic ratio of radiotherapy for a range of malignancies, only a few IMRT treatments have yet been performed in the Nordic countries. The scores derived from a national survey to assess Norwegian oncologists' expectations of IMRT are presented. A questionnaire was distributed to all consultants in oncology at Norwegian radiotherapy clinics. Summary scores of daily general radiotherapy workload (DGRTW), acquaintance with IMRT (AI) and expectations of IMRT (EI) were derived. Thirty-nine questionnaires (67%) were returned from a total of 58 oncologists. The oncologists' scores on the AI scale (mean score: 7.5 out of 21) were rather low. Their AI scores were found to be positively correlated with their DGRTW. Higher scores on the EI scale were documented (mean score: 6.2 out of 14): 15 oncologists (39%) rated IMRT as one of the three major contributors to potentially increased cancer survival. Oncologists treating patients with prostate, head and neck, gastrointestinal and CNS tumours had higher EI scores than the other oncologists (7.7 vs. 5.1; p=0.01). The Norwegian radiation oncologists' expectations of IMRT are high in terms of both the potential clinical benefit and the rate of implementation. This should encourage the radiotherapy communities to continue (or rapidly initiate) their efforts in providing the routines required for safe implementation of IMRT

  13. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy for anal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peiffert, D.; Moreau-Claeys, M.V.; Tournier-Rangeard, L.; Huger, S.; Marchesi, V.

    2011-01-01

    Anal canal carcinoma are highly curable by irradiation, combined with chemotherapy in locally advanced disease, with preservation of sphincter function. The clinical target volume for the nodes is extended, often including the inguinal nodes, which is not usual for other pelvic tumours. Acute and late effects are correlated with the volume and dose delivered to organs at risk, i. e. small bowel, bladder and increased by concomitant chemotherapy. Intensity modulated irradiation (IMRT) makes it possible to optimize the dose distribution in this 'complex U shaped' volume, while maintaining the dose distribution for the target volumes. The conversion from conformal irradiation to IMRT necessitates good knowledge of the definition and skills to delineate target volumes and organs at risk, including new volumes needed to optimize the dose distribution. Dosimetric and clinical benefits of IMRT are described, based on early descriptions and evidence-based publication. The growing development of IMRT in anal canal radiotherapy must be encouraged, and long-term benefits should be soon published. Radiation oncologists should precisely learn IMRT recommendations before starting the technique, and evaluate its early and late results for adverse effects, but also for long-term tumour control. (authors)

  14. Dosimetric verification of the intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Huawei; Jia Mingxuan; Wu Rong; Xiao Fuda; Dong Xiaoqi

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the methods of the dosimetric verification in the intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and insure correct execution of the IMRT planning in the clinical practice. Methods: The CMSFOCUS9200 inverse planning system was used to provide optimized 5-field IMRT treatment plans for the patients. A phantom was made from true water-equivalent material. The doses of the interesting points and isodose distributions of the interesting planes in the phantom were calculated using patients' treatment plan. The phantom was placed on the couch of the accelerator and was irradiated using the phantom's treatment planning data. The doses of interesting points were measured using a 0.23 cc chamber and the isodose distributions of interesting planes were measured using RIT 113 film dosimetry system in the phantom. The results were compared with those from calculation in planning system for verification. Results: The doses and isodose distributions measured by the chamber and the film were consistent with those predicted by the planning. The error between the measured dose and calculated dose in the interesting points was less than 3%. Conclusion: The dosimetric verification of IMRT is a reliable measure in the course of its implementation. (authors)

  15. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy in Childhood Ependymoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, Thomas M.; Chintagumpala, Murali; Okcu, M. Fatih; Chiu, J. Kam; Teh, Bin S.; Woo, Shiao Y.; Paulino, Arnold C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the patterns of failure after intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for localized intracranial ependymoma. Methods and Materials: From 1994 to 2005, 22 children with pathologically proven, localized, intracranial ependymoma were treated with adjuvant IMRT. Of the patients, 12 (55%) had an infratentorial tumor and 14 (64%) had anaplastic histology. Five patients had a subtotal resection (STR), as evidenced by postoperative magnetic resonance imaging. The clinical target volume encompassed the tumor bed and any residual disease plus margin (median dose 54 Gy). Median follow-up for surviving patients was 39.8 months. Results: The 3-year overall survival rate was 87% ± 9%. The 3-year local control rate was 68% ± 12%. There were six local recurrences, all in the high-dose region of the treatment field. Median time to recurrence was 21.7 months. Of the 5 STR patients, 4 experienced recurrence and 3 died. Patients with a gross total resection had significantly better local control (p = 0.024) and overall survival (p = 0.008) than those with an STR. At last follow-up, no patient had developed visual loss, brain necrosis, myelitis, or a second malignancy. Conclusions: Treatment with IMRT provides local control and survival rates comparable with those in historic publications using larger treatment volumes. All failures were within the high-dose region, suggesting that IMRT does not diminish local control. The degree of surgical resection was shown to be significant for local control and survival

  16. MIMO Intensity-Modulation Channels: Capacity Bounds and High SNR Characterization

    KAUST Repository

    Chaaban, Anas; Rezki, Zouheir; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2016-01-01

    The capacity of MIMO intensity modulation channels is studied. The nonnegativity of the transmit signal (intensity) poses a challenge on the precoding of the transmit signal, which limits the applicability of classical schemes in this type

  17. Light induced modulation instability of surfaces under intense illumination

    KAUST Repository

    Burlakov, V. M.; Foulds, Ian G.; Goriely, A.

    2013-01-01

    heated by radiation. Periodic heating is due to focusing-defocusing effects caused by the initial surface modulation. The surface modulation has a period longer than the excitation wavelength and does not require coherent light source. Therefore

  18. Analysis of small-signal intensity modulation of semiconductor ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Computer simulation of the model is applied to 1.55-µm ... Semiconductor laser; small-signal modulation; modulation response; gain suppression. ... originates from intraband relaxation processes of charge carriers that extend for times as ...

  19. Iterative regularization in intensity-modulated radiation therapy optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, Fredrik; Forsgren, Anders

    2006-01-01

    A common way to solve intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) optimization problems is to use a beamlet-based approach. The approach is usually employed in a three-step manner: first a beamlet-weight optimization problem is solved, then the fluence profiles are converted into step-and-shoot segments, and finally postoptimization of the segment weights is performed. A drawback of beamlet-based approaches is that beamlet-weight optimization problems are ill-conditioned and have to be regularized in order to produce smooth fluence profiles that are suitable for conversion. The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to explain the suitability of solving beamlet-based IMRT problems by a BFGS quasi-Newton sequential quadratic programming method with diagonal initial Hessian estimate, and second, to empirically show that beamlet-weight optimization problems should be solved in relatively few iterations when using this optimization method. The explanation of the suitability is based on viewing the optimization method as an iterative regularization method. In iterative regularization, the optimization problem is solved approximately by iterating long enough to obtain a solution close to the optimal one, but terminating before too much noise occurs. Iterative regularization requires an optimization method that initially proceeds in smooth directions and makes rapid initial progress. Solving ten beamlet-based IMRT problems with dose-volume objectives and bounds on the beamlet-weights, we find that the considered optimization method fulfills the requirements for performing iterative regularization. After segment-weight optimization, the treatments obtained using 35 beamlet-weight iterations outperform the treatments obtained using 100 beamlet-weight iterations, both in terms of objective value and of target uniformity. We conclude that iterating too long may in fact deteriorate the quality of the deliverable plan

  20. Prostate Bed Motion During Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klayton, Tracy; Price, Robert; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Sobczak, Mark; Greenberg, Richard; Li, Jinsheng; Keller, Lanea; Sopka, Dennis; Kutikov, Alexander; Horwitz, Eric M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Conformal radiation therapy in the postprostatectomy setting requires accurate setup and localization of the prostatic fossa. In this series, we report prostate bed localization and motion characteristics, using data collected from implanted radiofrequency transponders. Methods and Materials: The Calypso four-dimensional localization system uses three implanted radiofrequency transponders for daily target localization and real-time tracking throughout a course of radiation therapy. We reviewed the localization and tracking reports for 20 patients who received ultrasonography-guided placement of Calypso transponders within the prostate bed prior to a course of intensity-modulated radiation therapy at Fox Chase Cancer Center. Results: At localization, prostate bed displacement relative to bony anatomy exceeded 5 mm in 9% of fractions in the anterior-posterior (A-P) direction and 21% of fractions in the superior-inferior (S-I) direction. The three-dimensional vector length from skin marks to Calypso alignment exceeded 1 cm in 24% of all 652 fractions with available setup data. During treatment, the target exceeded the 5-mm tracking limit for at least 30 sec in 11% of all fractions, generally in the A-P or S-I direction. In the A-P direction, target motion was twice as likely to move posteriorly, toward the rectum, than anteriorly. Fifteen percent of all treatments were interrupted for repositioning, and 70% of patients were repositioned at least once during their treatment course. Conclusion: Set-up errors and motion of the prostatic fossa during radiotherapy are nontrivial, leading to potential undertreatment of target and excess normal tissue toxicity if not taken into account during treatment planning. Localization and real-time tracking of the prostate bed via implanted Calypso transponders can be used to improve the accuracy of plan delivery.

  1. SU-E-T-409: Intensity Modulated Robotic Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, B; Jin, L; Li, J; Chen, L; Ma, C; Fan, J; Zhang, C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: As compared with the IRIS-based models, the MLC-based CyberKnife system allows more efficient treatment delivery due to its improved coverage of large lesions and intensity modulation. The treatment delivery efficiency is mainly determined by the number of selected nodes. This study aimed to demonstrate that relatively small sets of optimally selected nodes could produce high-quality plans. Methods: The full body path of the CyberKnife system consists of 110 nodes, from which we selected various sets for 4 prostate cancer cases using our in-house beamselection software. With the selected nodes we generated IMRT plans using our in-house beamlet-based inverse-planning optimization program. We also produced IMRT plans using the MultiPlan treatment planning system (version 5.0) for the same cases. Furthermore, the nodes selected by MultiPlan were used to produce plans with our own optimization software so that we could compare the quality of the selected sets of nodes. Results: Our beam-selection program selected one node-set for each case, with the number of nodes ranging from 23 to 34. The IMRT plans based on the selected nodes and our in-house optimization program showed adequate target coverage, with favorable critical structure sparing for the cases investigated. Compared with the plans using the nodes selected by MultiPlan, the plans generated with our selected beams provided superior rectum/bladder sparing for 75% of the cases. The plans produced by MultiPlan with various numbers of nodes also suggested that the plan quality was not compromised significantly when the number of nodes was reduced. Conclusion: Our preliminary results showed that with beamletbased planning optimization, one could produce high-quality plans with an optimal set of nodes for MLC-based robotic radiotherapy. Furthermore, our beam-selection strategy could help further improve critical structure sparing

  2. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Resected Mesothelioma: The Duke Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miles, Edward F.; Larrier, Nicole A.; Kelsey, Christopher R.; Hubbs, Jessica L.; Ma Jinli; Yoo, Sua; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the safety and efficacy of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) after extrapleural pneumonectomy for malignant pleural mesothelioma. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients underwent IMRT after extrapleural pneumonectomy between July 2005 and February 2007 at Duke University Medical Center. The clinical target volume was defined as the entire ipsilateral hemithorax, chest wall incisions, including drain sites, and involved nodal stations. The dose prescribed to the planning target volume was 40-55 Gy (median, 45). Toxicity was graded using the modified Common Toxicity Criteria, and the lung dosimetric parameters from the subgroups with and without pneumonitis were compared. Local control and survival were assessed. Results: The median follow-up after IMRT was 9.5 months. Of the 13 patients, 3 (23%) developed Grade 2 or greater acute pulmonary toxicity (during or within 30 days of IMRT). The median dosimetric parameters for those with and without symptomatic pneumonitis were a mean lung dose (MLD) of 7.9 vs. 7.5 Gy (p = 0.40), percentage of lung volume receiving 20 Gy (V 20 ) of 0.2% vs. 2.3% (p = 0.51), and percentage of lung volume receiving 5 Gy (V 20 ) of 92% vs. 66% (p = 0.36). One patient died of fatal pulmonary toxicity. This patient received a greater MLD (11.4 vs. 7.6 Gy) and had a greater V 20 (6.9% vs. 1.9%), and V 5 (92% vs. 66%) compared with the median of those without fatal pulmonary toxicity. Local and/or distant failure occurred in 6 patients (46%), and 6 patients (46%) were alive without evidence of recurrence at last follow-up. Conclusions: With limited follow-up, 45-Gy IMRT provides reasonable local control for mesothelioma after extrapleural pneumonectomy. However, treatment-related pulmonary toxicity remains a significant concern. Care should be taken to minimize the dose to the remaining lung to achieve an acceptable therapeutic ratio

  3. Ultrasound-based guidance of intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fung, Albert Y.C.; Ayyangar, Komanduri M.; Djajaputra, David; Nehru, Ramasamy M.; Enke, Charles A.

    2006-01-01

    In ultrasound-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of prostate cancer, ultrasound imaging ascertains the anatomical position of patients during x-ray therapy delivery. The ultrasound transducers are made of piezoelectric ceramics. The same crystal is used for both ultrasound production and reception. Three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound devices capture and correlate series of 2-dimensional (2D) B-mode images. The transducers are often arranged in a convex array for focusing. Lower frequency reaches greater depth, but results in low resolution. For clear image, some gel is usually applied between the probe and the skin contact surface. For prostate positioning, axial and sagittal scans are performed, and the volume contours from computed tomography (CT) planning are superimposed on the ultrasound images obtained before radiation delivery at the linear accelerator. The planning volumes are then overlaid on the ultrasound images and adjusted until they match. The computer automatically deduces the offset necessary to move the patient so that the treatment area is in the correct location. The couch is translated as needed. The currently available commercial equipment can attain a positional accuracy of 1-2 mm. Commercial manufacturer designs differ in the detection of probe coordinates relative to the isocenter. Some use a position-sensing robotic arm, while others have infrared light-emitting diodes or pattern-recognition software with charge-couple-device cameras. Commissioning includes testing of image quality and positional accuracy. Ultrasound is mainly used in prostate positioning. Data for 7825 daily fractions of 234 prostate patients indicated average 3D inter-fractional displacement of about 7.8 mm. There was no perceivable trend of shift over time. Scatter plots showed slight prevalence toward superior-posterior directions. Uncertainties of ultrasound guidance included tissue inhomogeneities, speckle noise, probe pressure, and inter

  4. Intensity modulated radiotherapy for elderly bladder cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, Chen-Hsi; Wang, Li-Ying; Hsieh, Yen-Ping; Shueng, Pei-Wei; Chung, Shiu-Dong; Chan, Pei-Hui; Lai, Siu-Kai; Chang, Hsiao-Chun; Hsiao, Chi-Huang; Wu, Le-Jung; Chong, Ngot-Swan; Chen, Yu-Jen

    2011-01-01

    To review our experience and evaluate treatment planning using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and helical tomotherapy (HT) for the treatment of elderly patients with bladder cancer. From November 2006 through November 2009, we enrolled 19 elderly patients with histologically confirmed bladder cancer, 9 in the IMRT and 10 in the HT group. The patients received 64.8 Gy to the bladder with or without concurrent chemotherapy. Conventional 4-field 'box' pelvic radiation therapy (2DRT) plans were generated for comparison. The median patient age was 80 years old (range, 65-90 years old). The median survival was 21 months (5 to 26 months). The actuarial 2-year overall survival (OS) for the IMRT vs. the HT group was 26.3% vs .37.5%, respectively; the corresponding values for disease-free survival were 58.3% vs. 83.3%, respectively; for locoregional progression-free survival (LRPFS), the values were 87.5% vs. 83.3%, respectively; and for metastases-free survival, the values were 66.7% vs. 60.0%, respectively. The 2-year OS rates for T1, 2 vs. T3, 4 were 66.7% vs. 35.4%, respectively (p = 0.046). The 2-year OS rate was poor for those whose RT completion time greater than 8 weeks when compared with the RT completed within 8 wks (37.9% vs. 0%, p = 0.004). IMRT and HT provide good LRPFS with tolerable toxicity for elderly patients with invasive bladder cancer. IMRT and HT dosimetry and organ sparing capability were superior to that of 2DRT, and HT provides better sparing ability than IMRT. The T category and the RT completion time influence OS rate

  5. Intensity modulated radiotherapy for elderly bladder cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Ngot-Swan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To review our experience and evaluate treatment planning using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT and helical tomotherapy (HT for the treatment of elderly patients with bladder cancer. Methods From November 2006 through November 2009, we enrolled 19 elderly patients with histologically confirmed bladder cancer, 9 in the IMRT and 10 in the HT group. The patients received 64.8 Gy to the bladder with or without concurrent chemotherapy. Conventional 4-field "box" pelvic radiation therapy (2DRT plans were generated for comparison. Results The median patient age was 80 years old (range, 65-90 years old. The median survival was 21 months (5 to 26 months. The actuarial 2-year overall survival (OS for the IMRT vs. the HT group was 26.3% vs .37.5%, respectively; the corresponding values for disease-free survival were 58.3% vs. 83.3%, respectively; for locoregional progression-free survival (LRPFS, the values were 87.5% vs. 83.3%, respectively; and for metastases-free survival, the values were 66.7% vs. 60.0%, respectively. The 2-year OS rates for T1, 2 vs. T3, 4 were 66.7% vs. 35.4%, respectively (p = 0.046. The 2-year OS rate was poor for those whose RT completion time greater than 8 weeks when compared with the RT completed within 8 wks (37.9% vs. 0%, p = 0.004. Conclusion IMRT and HT provide good LRPFS with tolerable toxicity for elderly patients with invasive bladder cancer. IMRT and HT dosimetry and organ sparing capability were superior to that of 2DRT, and HT provides better sparing ability than IMRT. The T category and the RT completion time influence OS rate.

  6. Quality assurance of patients for intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Sang Min; Yi, Byong Yong; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jong Hoon; Ahn, Seung Do; Lee, Sang Wook

    2002-01-01

    To establish and verify the proper and the practical IMRT (intensity-modulated radiation therapy) patient QA (Quality Assurance). An IMRT QA which consists of 3 steps and 16 items were designed and examined the validity of the program by applying to 9 patients, 12 IMRT cases of various sites. The three step QA program consists of RTP related QA, treatment information flow QA, and a treatment delivery QA procedure. The evaluation of organ constraints, the validity of the point dose, and the dose distribution are major issues in the RTP related QA procedure. The leaf sequence file generation, the evaluation of the MLC control file, the comparison of the dry run film, and the IMRT field simulate image were included in the treatment information flow procedure QA. The patient setup QA, the verification of the IMRT treatment fields to the patients, and the examination of the data in the Record and Verify system make up the treatment delivery QA procedure. The point dose measurement results of 10 cases showed good agreement with the RTP calculation within 3%. One case showed more than a 3% difference and the other case showed more than 5%, which was out side the tolerance level. We could not find any differences of more than 2 mm between the RTP leaf sequence and the dry run film. Film dosimetry and the dose distribution from the phantom plan showed the same tendency, but quantitative analysis was not possible because of the film dosimetry nature. No error had been found from the MLC control file and one mis-registration case was found before treatment. This study shows the usefulness and the necessity of the IMRT patient QA program. The whole procedure of this program should be performed, especially by institutions that have just started to accumulate experience. But, the program is too complex and time consuming. Therefore, we propose practical and essential QA items for institutions in which the IMRT is performed as a routine procedure

  7. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With Dose Painting to Treat Rhabdomyosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Joanna C.; Dharmarajan, Kavita V.; Wexler, Leonard H.; La Quaglia, Michael P.; Happersett, Laura; Wolden, Suzanne L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To examine local control and patterns of failure in rhabdomyosarcoma patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (RT) with dose painting (DP-IMRT). Patients and Methods: A total of 41 patients underwent DP-IMRT with chemotherapy for definitive treatment. Nineteen also underwent surgery with or without intraoperative RT. Fifty-six percent had alveolar histologic features. The median interval from beginning chemotherapy to RT was 17 weeks (range, 4-25). Very young children who underwent second-look procedures with or without intraoperative RT received reduced doses of 24-36 Gy in 1.4-1.8-Gy fractions. Young adults received 50.4 Gy to the primary tumor and lower doses of 36 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions to at-risk lymph node chains. Results: With 22 months of median follow-up, the actuarial local control rate was 90%. Patients aged ≤7 years who received reduced overall and fractional doses had 100% local control, and young adults had 79% (P=.07) local control. Three local failures were identified in young adults whose primary target volumes had received 50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions. Conclusions: DP-IMRT with lower fractional and cumulative doses is feasible for very young children after second-look procedures with or without intraoperative RT. DP-IMRT is also feasible in adolescents and young adults with aggressive disease who would benefit from prophylactic RT to high-risk lymph node chains, although dose escalation might be warranted for improved local control. With limited follow-up, it appears that DP-IMRT produces local control rates comparable to those of sequential IMRT in patients with rhabdomyosarcoma.

  8. Linear energy transfer incorporated intensity modulated proton therapy optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wenhua; Khabazian, Azin; Yepes, Pablo P.; Lim, Gino; Poenisch, Falk; Grosshans, David R.; Mohan, Radhe

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of incorporating linear energy transfer (LET) into the optimization of intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans. Because increased LET correlates with increased biological effectiveness of protons, high LETs in target volumes and low LETs in critical structures and normal tissues are preferred in an IMPT plan. However, if not explicitly incorporated into the optimization criteria, different IMPT plans may yield similar physical dose distributions but greatly different LET, specifically dose-averaged LET, distributions. Conventionally, the IMPT optimization criteria (or cost function) only includes dose-based objectives in which the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is assumed to have a constant value of 1.1. In this study, we added LET-based objectives for maximizing LET in target volumes and minimizing LET in critical structures and normal tissues. Due to the fractional programming nature of the resulting model, we used a variable reformulation approach so that the optimization process is computationally equivalent to conventional IMPT optimization. In this study, five brain tumor patients who had been treated with proton therapy at our institution were selected. Two plans were created for each patient based on the proposed LET-incorporated optimization (LETOpt) and the conventional dose-based optimization (DoseOpt). The optimized plans were compared in terms of both dose (assuming a constant RBE of 1.1 as adopted in clinical practice) and LET. Both optimization approaches were able to generate comparable dose distributions. The LET-incorporated optimization achieved not only pronounced reduction of LET values in critical organs, such as brainstem and optic chiasm, but also increased LET in target volumes, compared to the conventional dose-based optimization. However, on occasion, there was a need to tradeoff the acceptability of dose and LET distributions. Our conclusion is that the

  9. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy for neoadjuvant treatment of gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knab, Brian; Rash, Carla; Farrey, Karl; Jani, Ashesh B.

    2006-01-01

    Radiation therapy plays an integral role in the treatment of gastric cancer in the postsurgery setting, the inoperable/palliative setting, and, as in the case of the current report, in the setting of neoadjuvant therapy prior to surgery. Typically, anterior-posterior/posterior-anterior (AP/PA) or 3-field techniques are used. In this report, we explore the use of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment in a patient whose care was transferred to our institution after 3-field radiotherapy (RT) was given to a dose of 30 Gy at an outside institution. If the 3-field plan were continued to 50 Gy, the volume of irradiated liver receiving greater than 30 Gy would have been unacceptably high. To deliver the final 20 Gy, an opposed parallel AP/PA plan and an IMRT plan were compared to the initial 3-field technique for coverage of the target volume as well as dose to the kidneys, liver, small bowel, and spinal cord. Comparison of the 3 treatment techniques to deliver the final 20 Gy revealed reduced median and maximum dose to the whole kidney with the IMRT plan. For this 20-Gy boost, the volume of irradiated liver was lower for both the IMRT plan and the AP/PA plan vs. the 3-field plan. Comparing the IMRT boost plan to the AP/PA boost-dose range ( 10 Gy) in comparison to the AP/PA plan. The IMRT boost plan also irradiated a smaller volume of the small bowel compared to both the 3-field plan and the AP/PA plan, and also delivered lower dose to the spinal cord in comparison to the AP/PA plan. Comparison of the composite plans revealed reduced dose to the whole kidney using IMRT. The V20 for the whole kidney volume for the composite IMRT plan was 30% compared to approximately 60% for the composite AP/PA plan. Overall, the dose to the liver receiving greater than 30 Gy was lower for the composite IMRT plan and was well below acceptable limits. In conclusion, our study suggests a dosimetric benefit of IMRT over conventional planning, and suggests an important role for

  10. Pleural Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.; Zauderer, Marjorie G.; Laser, Benjamin; Krug, Lee M.; Yorke, Ellen; Sima, Camelia S.; Rimner, Andreas; Flores, Raja; Rusch, Valerie

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma who are unable to undergo pneumonectomy, it is difficult to deliver tumoricidal radiation doses to the pleura without significant toxicity. We have implemented a technique of using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to treat these patients, and we report the feasibility and toxicity of this approach. Methods and Materials: Between 2005 and 2010, 36 patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma and two intact lungs (i.e., no previous pneumonectomy) were treated with pleural IMRT to the hemithorax (median dose, 46.8 Gy; range, 41.4–50.4) at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Results: Of the 36 patients, 56% had right-sided tumors. The histologic type was epithelial in 78%, sarcomatoid in 6%, and mixed in 17%, and 6% had Stage I, 28% had Stage II, 33% had Stage III, and 33% had Stage IV. Thirty-two patients (89%) received induction chemotherapy (mostly cisplatin and pemetrexed); 56% underwent pleurectomy/decortication before IMRT and 44% did not undergo resection. Of the 36 patients evaluable for acute toxicity, 7 (20%) had Grade 3 or worse pneumonitis (including 1 death) and 2 had Grade 3 fatigue. In 30 patients assessable for late toxicity, 5 had continuing Grade 3 pneumonitis. For patients treated with surgery, the 1- and 2-year survival rate was 75% and 53%, and the median survival was 26 months. For patients who did not undergo surgical resection, the 1- and 2-year survival rate was 69% and 28%, and the median survival was 17 months. Conclusions: Treating the intact lung with pleural IMRT in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma is a safe and feasible treatment option with an acceptable rate of pneumonitis. Additionally, the survival rates were encouraging in our retrospective series, particularly for the patients who underwent pleurectomy/decortication. We have initiated a Phase II trial of induction chemotherapy with pemetrexed and cisplatin with or without pleurectomy

  11. Pleural Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenzweig, Kenneth E., E-mail: ken.rosenzweig@mountsinai.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Zauderer, Marjorie G. [Department of Medicine, Thoracic Oncology Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Laser, Benjamin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI (United States); Krug, Lee M. [Department of Medicine, Thoracic Oncology Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Yorke, Ellen [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Sima, Camelia S. [Department of Epidemiology/Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Rimner, Andreas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Flores, Raja [Department of Surgery, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Rusch, Valerie [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: In patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma who are unable to undergo pneumonectomy, it is difficult to deliver tumoricidal radiation doses to the pleura without significant toxicity. We have implemented a technique of using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to treat these patients, and we report the feasibility and toxicity of this approach. Methods and Materials: Between 2005 and 2010, 36 patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma and two intact lungs (i.e., no previous pneumonectomy) were treated with pleural IMRT to the hemithorax (median dose, 46.8 Gy; range, 41.4-50.4) at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Results: Of the 36 patients, 56% had right-sided tumors. The histologic type was epithelial in 78%, sarcomatoid in 6%, and mixed in 17%, and 6% had Stage I, 28% had Stage II, 33% had Stage III, and 33% had Stage IV. Thirty-two patients (89%) received induction chemotherapy (mostly cisplatin and pemetrexed); 56% underwent pleurectomy/decortication before IMRT and 44% did not undergo resection. Of the 36 patients evaluable for acute toxicity, 7 (20%) had Grade 3 or worse pneumonitis (including 1 death) and 2 had Grade 3 fatigue. In 30 patients assessable for late toxicity, 5 had continuing Grade 3 pneumonitis. For patients treated with surgery, the 1- and 2-year survival rate was 75% and 53%, and the median survival was 26 months. For patients who did not undergo surgical resection, the 1- and 2-year survival rate was 69% and 28%, and the median survival was 17 months. Conclusions: Treating the intact lung with pleural IMRT in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma is a safe and feasible treatment option with an acceptable rate of pneumonitis. Additionally, the survival rates were encouraging in our retrospective series, particularly for the patients who underwent pleurectomy/decortication. We have initiated a Phase II trial of induction chemotherapy with pemetrexed and cisplatin with or without pleurectomy

  12. Simultaneous beam geometry and intensity map optimization in intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eva K.; Fox, Tim; Crocker, Ian

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: In current intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan optimization, the focus is on either finding optimal beam angles (or other beam delivery parameters such as field segments, couch angles, gantry angles) or optimal beam intensities. In this article we offer a mixed integer programming (MIP) approach for simultaneously determining an optimal intensity map and optimal beam angles for IMRT delivery. Using this approach, we pursue an experimental study designed to (a) gauge differences in plan quality metrics with respect to different tumor sites and different MIP treatment planning models, and (b) test the concept of critical-normal-tissue-ring-a tissue ring of 5 mm thickness drawn around the planning target volume (PTV)-and its use for designing conformal plans. Methods and Materials: Our treatment planning models use two classes of decision variables to capture the beam configuration and intensities simultaneously. Binary (0/1) variables are used to capture 'on' or 'off' or 'yes' or 'no' decisions for each field, and nonnegative continuous variables are used to represent intensities of beamlets. Binary and continuous variables are also used for each voxel to capture dose level and dose deviation from target bounds. Treatment planning models were designed to explicitly incorporate the following planning constraints: (a) upper/lower/mean dose-based constraints, (b) dose-volume and equivalent-uniform-dose (EUD) constraints for critical structures, (c) homogeneity constraints (underdose/overdose) for PTV, (d) coverage constraints for PTV, and (e) maximum number of beams allowed. Within this constrained solution space, five optimization strategies involving clinical objectives were analyzed: optimize total intensity to PTV, optimize total intensity and then optimize conformity, optimize total intensity and then optimize homogeneity, minimize total dose to critical structures, minimize total dose to critical structures and optimize conformity

  13. Long-term Modulation of Cosmic Ray Intensity in relation to Sunspot ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    it should be more closely connected with cosmic ray modulation than with other solar characteristics (sunspot numbers or coronal emission intensity). The intensity of galactic cosmic rays varies inversely with sunspot numbers, having their maximum intensity at the minimum of the 11-year sunspot cycle (Forbush 1954, 1958) ...

  14. Intensity-based fibre-optic sensing system using contrast modulation of subcarrier interference pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamovsky, G.; Sherer, T. N.; Maitland, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    A novel technique to compensate for unwanted intensity losses in a fiber-optic sensing system is described. The technique involves a continuous sinusoidal modulation of the light source intensity at radio frequencies and an intensity sensor placed in an unbalanced interferometer. The system shows high sensitivity and stability.

  15. Comparative analysis of 60Co intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, Christopher; Romeijn, H Edwin; Lynch, Bart; Dempsey, James F; Men, Chunhua; Aleman, Dionne M

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we perform a scientific comparative analysis of using 60 Co beams in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). In particular, we evaluate the treatment plan quality obtained with (i) 6 MV, 18 MV and 60 Co IMRT; (ii) different numbers of static multileaf collimator (MLC) delivered 60 Co beams and (iii) a helical tomotherapy 60 Co beam geometry. We employ a convex fluence map optimization (FMO) model, which allows for the comparison of plan quality between different beam energies and configurations for a given case. A total of 25 clinical patient cases that each contain volumetric CT studies, primary and secondary delineated targets, and contoured structures were studied: 5 head-and-neck (H and N), 5 prostate, 5 central nervous system (CNS), 5 breast and 5 lung cases. The DICOM plan data were anonymized and exported to the University of Florida optimized radiation therapy (UFORT) treatment planning system. The FMO problem was solved for each case for 5-71 equidistant beams as well as a helical geometry for H and N, prostate, CNS and lung cases, and for 3-7 equidistant beams in the upper hemisphere for breast cases, all with 6 MV, 18 MV and 60 Co dose models. In all cases, 95% of the target volumes received at least the prescribed dose with clinical sparing criteria for critical organs being met for all structures that were not wholly or partially contained within the target volume. Improvements in critical organ sparing were found with an increasing number of equidistant 60 Co beams, yet were marginal above 9 beams for H and N, prostate, CNS and lung. Breast cases produced similar plans for 3-7 beams. A helical 60 Co beam geometry achieved similar plan quality as static plans with 11 equidistant 60 Co beams. Furthermore, 18 MV plans were initially found not to provide the same target coverage as 6 MV and 60 Co plans; however, adjusting the trade-offs in the optimization model allowed equivalent target coverage for 18 MV. For plans with comparable

  16. Ultra-fine metal gate operated graphene optical intensity modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Rai; Hori, Yosuke; Tsuchizawa, Tai; Warabi, Kaori; Kobayashi, Yuzuki; Harada, Yuichi; Hibino, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Nakajima, Hirochika; Yamada, Koji

    2016-12-01

    A graphene based top-gate optical modulator on a standard silicon photonic platform is proposed for the future optical telecommunication networks. On the basis of the device simulation, we proposed that an electro-absorption light modulation can be realized by an ultra-narrow metal top-gate electrode (width less than 400 nm) directly located on the top of a silicon wire waveguide. The designed structure also provides excellent features such as carrier doping and waveguide-planarization free fabrication processes. In terms of the fabrication, we established transferring of a CVD-grown mono-layer graphene sheet onto a CMOS compatible silicon photonic sample followed by a 25-nm thick ALD-grown Al2O3 deposition and Source-Gate-Drain electrodes formation. In addition, a pair of low-loss spot-size converter for the input and output area is integrated for the efficient light source coupling. The maximum modulation depth of over 30% (1.2 dB) is observed at a device length of 50 μm, and a metal width of 300 nm. The influence of the initial Fermi energy obtained by experiment on the modulation performance is discussed with simulation results.

  17. Direct UV written Michelson interferometer for RZ signal generation using phase-to-intensity modulation conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peucheret, Christophe; Geng, Yan; Zsigri, Beata

    2005-01-01

    An integrated Michelson delay interferometer structure making use of waveguide gratings as reflective elements is proposed and fabricated by direct ultraviolet writing. Successful return-to-zero alternate-mark-inversion signal generation using phase-to-intensity modulation conversion...

  18. Detection of an intense polychromatic gamma beam modulated at 3000 MHz; Detection d'un faisceau intense de gammas polychromatiques module a 3000 MHz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beil, H; Veyssiere, A; Daujat, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-07-01

    This paper presents two methods of detection of a {gamma} beam modulated at very high frequencies. The intense modulated beam is created by means of Bremsstrahlung in a gold-target, the latter having been placed in the emerging electron beam of the Linac at Saclay. A tentative interpretation of the physical phenomena involved in the detection processes is also given. The empirical data agree reasonably well with numerical evaluations based on well established theoretical concepts concerning these phenomena. (authors) [French] Cet article presente deux facons de detecter un faisceau de {gamma} module a haute frequence. Le faisceau intense de {gamma} est cree par l'impact d'electrons (acceleres dans un accelerateur lineaire) sur une cible en or. Une tentative d'interpretation des phenomenes physiques mis en cause dans le processus de detection est donnee et les valeurs experimentales trouvees s'accordent raisonnablement bien avec les valeurs calculees a partir des considerations theoriques des phenomenes. (auteurs)

  19. Equatorial noise emissions with quasiperiodic modulation of wave intensity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němec, F.; Santolík, Ondřej; Hrbáčková, Zuzana; Pickett, J. S.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 120, č. 4 (2015), s. 2649-2661 ISSN 2169-9380 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH11122 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : equatorial noise * magnetosonic waves * quasiperiodic modulation Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.318, year: 2015 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2014JA020816/full

  20. Intensity modulation of cutaneous electrical stimulation: : EPs and subjective ratings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heide, E.M.; Buitenweg, Jan R.; Marani, Enrico; Rutten, Wim

    2006-01-01

    Chronic pain research is increasingly focused on the neuroplastic mechanisms underlying subjective pain experience. The latter is often measured using reported pain intensity, e.g. using a numeric rating scale (NRS). Evoked Potentials (EPs) reflect the cortical representation of applied stimuli and

  1. A proton beam delivery system for conformal therapy and intensity modulated therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Qingchang

    2001-01-01

    A scattering proton beam delivery system for conformal therapy and intensity modulated therapy is described. The beam is laterally spread out by a dual-ring double scattering system and collimated by a program-controlled multileaf collimator and patient specific fixed collimators. The proton range is adjusted and modulated by a program controlled binary filter and ridge filters

  2. Emotional Intensity Modulates the Integration of Bimodal Angry Expressions: ERP Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihui Pan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Integration of information from face and voice plays a central role in social interactions. The present study investigated the modulation of emotional intensity on the integration of facial-vocal emotional cues by recording EEG for participants while they were performing emotion identification task on facial, vocal, and bimodal angry expressions varying in emotional intensity. Behavioral results showed the rates of anger and reaction speed increased as emotional intensity across modalities. Critically, the P2 amplitudes were larger for bimodal expressions than for the sum of facial and vocal expressions for low emotional intensity stimuli, but not for middle and high emotional intensity stimuli. These findings suggested that emotional intensity modulates the integration of facial-vocal angry expressions, following the principle of Inverse Effectiveness (IE in multimodal sensory integration.

  3. Measuring high-frequency responses of an electro-optic phase modulator based on dispersion induced phase modulation to intensity modulation conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shangjian; Wang, Heng; Wang, Yani; Zou, Xinhai; Zhang, Yali; Liu, Shuang; Liu, Yong

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the phase modulation to intensity modulation conversion in dispersive fibers for measuring frequency responses of electro-optic phase modulators, and demonstrate two typical measurements with cascade path and fold-back path. The measured results achieve an uncertainty of less than 2.8% within 20 GHz. Our measurements show stable and repeatable results because the optical carrier and its phase-modulated sidebands are affected by the same fiber impairments. The proposed method requires only dispersive fibers and works without any small-signal assumption, which is applicable for swept frequency measurement at different driving levels and operating wavelengths.

  4. Markov modulated Poisson process models incorporating covariates for rainfall intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayakaran, R; Ramesh, N I

    2013-01-01

    Time series of rainfall bucket tip times at the Beaufort Park station, Bracknell, in the UK are modelled by a class of Markov modulated Poisson processes (MMPP) which may be thought of as a generalization of the Poisson process. Our main focus in this paper is to investigate the effects of including covariate information into the MMPP model framework on statistical properties. In particular, we look at three types of time-varying covariates namely temperature, sea level pressure, and relative humidity that are thought to be affecting the rainfall arrival process. Maximum likelihood estimation is used to obtain the parameter estimates, and likelihood ratio tests are employed in model comparison. Simulated data from the fitted model are used to make statistical inferences about the accumulated rainfall in the discrete time interval. Variability of the daily Poisson arrival rates is studied.

  5. Electroactive subwavelength gratings (ESWGs) from conjugated polymers for color and intensity modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuvana, Thiruvelu; Kim, Byeonggwan; Yang, Xu; Shin, Haijin; Kim, Eunkyoung

    2012-05-01

    Subwavelength gratings with electroactive polymers such as poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and poly(3,4-propylenedioxythiophene-phenylene) (P(ProDOT-Ph)) controlled the color intensity for various visible colors of diffracted light in a single device. Under the illumination of a white light, at a fixed angle of incidence, the color intensity of the diffracted light was reversibly switched from the maximum value down to 15% (85% decrease) by applying -2 to 2 V due to electrochemical (EC) reaction. All spectral colors including red, green, and blue were generated by changing the angle of incidence, and the intensity of each color was modulated electrochemically at a single EC device. With electroactive subwavelength gratings (ESWGs) of P3HT, the maximum modulation of the color intensity was observed in the red-yellow quadrant in the CIE color plot, whereas for the ESWGs of P(ProDOT-Ph), the maximum modulation of the color intensity was observed in the yellow-green and green-blue quadrants. Both ESWGs showed a memory effect, keeping their color and intensity even after power was turned off for longer than 40 hours.Subwavelength gratings with electroactive polymers such as poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and poly(3,4-propylenedioxythiophene-phenylene) (P(ProDOT-Ph)) controlled the color intensity for various visible colors of diffracted light in a single device. Under the illumination of a white light, at a fixed angle of incidence, the color intensity of the diffracted light was reversibly switched from the maximum value down to 15% (85% decrease) by applying -2 to 2 V due to electrochemical (EC) reaction. All spectral colors including red, green, and blue were generated by changing the angle of incidence, and the intensity of each color was modulated electrochemically at a single EC device. With electroactive subwavelength gratings (ESWGs) of P3HT, the maximum modulation of the color intensity was observed in the red-yellow quadrant in the CIE color plot, whereas for the

  6. A method of simulating intensity modulation-direct detection WDM systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Jing; YAO Jian-quan; LI En-bang

    2005-01-01

    In the simulation of Intensity Modulation-Direct Detection WDM Systems,when the dispersion and nonlinear effects play equally important roles,the intensity fluctuation caused by cross-phase modulation may be overestimated as a result of the improper step size.Therefore,the step size in numerical simulation should be selected to suppress false XPM intensity modulation (keep it much less than signal power).According to this criterion,the step size is variable along the fiber.For a WDM system,the step size depends on the channel separation.Different type of transmission fiber has different step size.In the split-step Fourier method,this criterion can reduce simulation time,and when the step size is bigger than 100 meters,the simulation accuracy can also be improved.

  7. Conformal radiotherapy by intensity modulation of pediatrics tumors; Radiotherapie conformationnelle par modulation d'intensite des tumeurs pediatriques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leseur, J.; Le Prise, E. [Centre Eugene-Marquis, 35 - Rennes (France); Carrie, C. [Centre Leon Berard, 69 - Lyon (France); Bernier, V. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, 54 - Nancy (France); Beneyton, V. [Centre Paul-Strauss, 67 - Strasbourg (France); Mahe, M.A.; Supiot, S. [Centre Rene-Gauducheau, 44 - Nantes (France)

    2009-10-15

    The objective of this study is to take stock on the validated and potential indications of the conformal radiotherapy with intensity modulation ( intensity modulated radiotherapy I.M.R.T.) in pediatrics and to propose recommendations for its use as well as the adapted dose constraints. About 40 to 50% of children treated for a cancer are irradiated. The I.M.R.T., by linear accelerator or helical tomo-therapy has for aim to give a homogenous dose to the target volume and to save organs at risk. Its use in pediatrics seems particularly interesting because of the complexity of target volumes and the closeness of organs at risk. In compensation for these positive elements, the importance of low doses irradiation given in big volumes makes fear event consequences on growth and an increased incidence of secondary cancers in children suffering from tumors with high cure rates and long life expectancy. (N.C.)

  8. Effects of excitation intensity on the photocurrent response of thin film silicon solar modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Q.; Shumka, A.; Trask, J.

    1986-01-01

    Photocurrent responses of amorphous thin film silicon solar modules at room temperature were studied at different excitation intensities using various monochromatic light sources. Photocurrent imaging techniques have been effectively used to locate rapidly, and non-destructively, failure and defect sites in the multilayer thin film device. Differences observed in the photocurrent response characteristics for two different cells in the same amorphous thin film silicon solar module suggest the possibility of the formation of dissimilarly active devices, even though the module is processed in the same fabrication process. Possible mechanisms are discussed.

  9. Predicting the effects of organ motion on the dose delivered by dynamic intensity modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, C.X.; Jaffray, David; Martinez, A.A.; Wong, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Computer-optimized treatment plans, aimed to enhance tumor control and reduce normal tissue complication, generally require non-uniform beam intensities. One of the techniques for delivering intensity-modulated beams is the use of dynamic multileaf collimation, where the beam aperture and field shape change during irradiation. When intensity-modulated beams are delivered with dynamic collimation, intra-treatment organ motion may not only cause geometric misses at the field boundaries but also create hot and cold spots in the target. The mechanism for producing such effects has not been well understood. This study analyzes the dosimetric effects of intra-treatment organ motion on dynamic intensity modulation. A numerical method is developed for predicting the intensity distributions in a moving target before dose is delivered with dynamic intensity modulation. Material and Methods: In the numerical algorithm, the change in position and shape of the beam aperture with time were modeled as a three-dimensional 'tunnel', with the shape of the field aperture described in the x-y plane and its temporal position shown in the z-dimension. A point in the target had to be in the tunnel in order to receive irradiation and the dose to the point was proportional to the amount of time that this point stayed in the tunnel. Since each point in the target were analyzed separately, non-rigid body variations could easily be handled. The dependency of the dose variations on all parameters involved, including the speed of collimator motion, the frequency and amplitude of the target motion, and the size of the field segments, was analyzed. The algorithm was verified by irradiating moving phantoms with beams of dynamically modulated intensities. Predictions were also made for a treatment of a thoracic tumor using a dynamic wedge. The changes of target position with time were based on the MRI images of the chest region acquired using fast MRI scans in a cine fashion for a duration

  10. Head and neck intensity modulated radiation therapy leads to an increase of opportunistic oral pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurhuis, Jennifer M.; Stokman, Monique A.; Witjes, Max J. H.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; van Winkelhoff, Arie J.; Vissink, Arjan; Spijkervet, Frederik K. L.

    Objectives: The introduction of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has led to new possibilities in the treatment of head and neck cancer (HNC). Limited information is available on how this more advanced radiation technique affects the oral microflora. In a prospective study we assessed the

  11. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy: overlapping co-axial modulated fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalfe, P; Tangboonduangjit, P; White, P

    2004-01-01

    The Varian multi-leaf collimator has a 14.5 cm leaf extension limit from each carriage. This means the target volumes in the head and neck region are sometimes too wide for standard width-modulated fields to provide adequate dose coverage. A solution is to set up asymmetric co-axial overlapping fields. This protects the MLC carriage while in return the MLC provides modulated dose blending in the field overlap region. Planar dose maps for coincident fields from the Pinnacle radiotherapy treatment planning system are compared with planar dose maps reconstructed from radiographic film and electronic portal images. The film and portal images show small leaf-jaw matchlines at each field overlap border. Linear profiles taken across each image show that the observed leaf-jaw matchlines from the accelerator images are not accounted for by the treatment planning system. Dose difference between film reconstructed electronic portal images and planning system are about 2.5 cGy in a modulated field at d max . While the magnitude of the dose differences are small improved round end leaf modelling combined with a finer dose calculation grid may minimize the discrepancy between calculated and delivered dose

  12. Intensity-Modulated Advanced X-ray Source (IMAXS) for Homeland Security Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langeveld, Willem G. J.; Johnson, William A.; Owen, Roger D.; Schonberg, Russell G.

    2009-01-01

    X-ray cargo inspection systems for the detection and verification of threats and contraband require high x-ray energy and high x-ray intensity to penetrate dense cargo. On the other hand, low intensity is desirable to minimize the radiation footprint. A collaboration between HESCO/PTSE Inc., Schonberg Research Corporation and Rapiscan Laboratories, Inc. has been formed in order to design and build an Intensity-Modulated Advanced X-ray Source (IMAXS). Such a source would allow cargo inspection systems to achieve up to two inches greater imaging penetration capability, while retaining the same average radiation footprint as present fixed-intensity sources. Alternatively, the same penetration capability can be obtained as with conventional sources with a reduction of the average radiation footprint by about a factor of three. The key idea is to change the intensity of the source for each x-ray pulse based on the signal strengths in the inspection system detector array during the previous pulse. In this paper we describe methods to accomplish pulse-to-pulse intensity modulation in both S-band (2998 MHz) and X-band (9303 MHz) linac sources, with diode or triode (gridded) electron guns. The feasibility of these methods has been demonstrated. Additionally, we describe a study of a shielding design that would allow a 6 MV X-band source to be used in mobile applications.

  13. Parameter study for polymer solar modules based on various cell lengths and light intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slooff, L.H.; Burgers, A.R.; Bende, E.E.; Kroon, J.M. [ECN Solar Energy, P.O. Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Veenstra, S.C. [ECN Solar Energy, Solliance, High Tech Campus 5, P63, 5656AE Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2013-10-15

    Polymer solar cells may be applied in portable electronic devices, where light intensity and spectral distribution of the illuminating source can be very different compared to outdoor applications. As the power output of solar cells depends on temperature, light intensity and spectrum, the design of the module must be optimized for the specific illumination conditions in the different applications. The interconnection area between cells in a module must be as narrow as possible to maximize the active area, also called geometrical fill factor, of the module. Laser scribing has the potential to realize this. The optimal width of the interconnection zone depends both on technological limitations, e.g. laser scribe width and the minimal distance between scribes, and electrical limitations like resistive losses. The latter depends on the generated current in the cell and thus also on illumination intensity. Besides that, also the type of junction, i.e. a single or tandem junction, will influence the optimal geometry. In this paper a calculation model is presented that can be used for electrical modeling of polymer cells and modules in order to optimize the performance for the specific illumination conditions.

  14. Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Versus Intensity Modulated Photon Radiation Therapy for Oropharyngeal Cancer: First Comparative Results of Patient-Reported Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sio, Terence T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States); Lin, Huei-Kai; Shi, Qiuling [Department of Symptom Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gunn, G. Brandon [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Cleeland, Charles S. [Department of Symptom Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lee, J. Jack; Hernandez, Mike [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Blanchard, Pierre; Thaker, Nikhil G.; Phan, Jack; Rosenthal, David I.; Garden, Adam S.; Morrison, William H.; Fuller, C. David [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mendoza, Tito R. [Department of Symptom Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wang, Xin Shelley [Department of Symptom Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Frank, Steven J., E-mail: sjfrank@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: We hypothesized that patients with oropharyngeal cancer treated with intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) would have lower symptom burdens, as measured by patient-reported outcome (PRO) surveys, than patients treated with intensity modulated photon therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Patients were treated for oropharyngeal cancer from 2006 to 2015 through prospective registries with concurrent chemotherapy and IMPT or chemotherapy and IMRT and completed the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory for Head and Neck Cancer (MDASI-HN) module at various times before treatment (baseline), during treatment (acute phase), within the first 3 months after treatment (subacute phase), and afterward (chronic phase). Individual symptoms and the top 5 and top 11 most severe symptoms were summarized and compared between the radiation therapy modalities. Results: PRO data were collected and analyzed from 35 patients treated with chemotherapy and IMPT and from 46 treated with chemotherapy and IMRT. The baseline symptom burdens were similar between both groups. The overall top 5 symptoms were food taste problems (mean score 4.91 on a 0-10 scale), dry mouth (4.49), swallowing/chewing difficulties (4.26), lack of appetite (4.08), and fatigue (4.00). Among the top 11 symptoms, changes in taste and appetite during the subacute and chronic phases favored IMPT (all P<.048). No differences in symptom burden were detected between modalities during the acute and chronic phases by top-11 symptom scoring. During the subacute phase, the mean (±standard deviation) top 5 MDASI scores were 5.15 ± 2.66 for IMPT versus 6.58 ± 1.98 for IMRT (P=.013). Conclusions: According to the MDASI-HN, symptom burden was lower among the IMPT patients than among the IMRT patients during the subacute recovery phase after treatment. A prospective randomized clinical trial is underway to define the value of IMPT for the management of head and neck tumors.

  15. Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Versus Intensity Modulated Photon Radiation Therapy for Oropharyngeal Cancer: First Comparative Results of Patient-Reported Outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sio, Terence T.; Lin, Huei-Kai; Shi, Qiuling; Gunn, G. Brandon; Cleeland, Charles S.; Lee, J. Jack; Hernandez, Mike; Blanchard, Pierre; Thaker, Nikhil G.; Phan, Jack; Rosenthal, David I.; Garden, Adam S.; Morrison, William H.; Fuller, C. David; Mendoza, Tito R.; Mohan, Radhe; Wang, Xin Shelley; Frank, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We hypothesized that patients with oropharyngeal cancer treated with intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) would have lower symptom burdens, as measured by patient-reported outcome (PRO) surveys, than patients treated with intensity modulated photon therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Patients were treated for oropharyngeal cancer from 2006 to 2015 through prospective registries with concurrent chemotherapy and IMPT or chemotherapy and IMRT and completed the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory for Head and Neck Cancer (MDASI-HN) module at various times before treatment (baseline), during treatment (acute phase), within the first 3 months after treatment (subacute phase), and afterward (chronic phase). Individual symptoms and the top 5 and top 11 most severe symptoms were summarized and compared between the radiation therapy modalities. Results: PRO data were collected and analyzed from 35 patients treated with chemotherapy and IMPT and from 46 treated with chemotherapy and IMRT. The baseline symptom burdens were similar between both groups. The overall top 5 symptoms were food taste problems (mean score 4.91 on a 0-10 scale), dry mouth (4.49), swallowing/chewing difficulties (4.26), lack of appetite (4.08), and fatigue (4.00). Among the top 11 symptoms, changes in taste and appetite during the subacute and chronic phases favored IMPT (all P<.048). No differences in symptom burden were detected between modalities during the acute and chronic phases by top-11 symptom scoring. During the subacute phase, the mean (±standard deviation) top 5 MDASI scores were 5.15 ± 2.66 for IMPT versus 6.58 ± 1.98 for IMRT (P=.013). Conclusions: According to the MDASI-HN, symptom burden was lower among the IMPT patients than among the IMRT patients during the subacute recovery phase after treatment. A prospective randomized clinical trial is underway to define the value of IMPT for the management of head and neck tumors.

  16. Intensity modulated radiation therapy using laser-accelerated protons: a Monte Carlo dosimetric study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourkal, E; Li, J S; Xiong, W; Nahum, A; Ma, C-M

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we present Monte Carlo studies of intensity modulated radiation therapy using laser-accelerated proton beams. Laser-accelerated protons coming out of a solid high-density target have broad energy and angular spectra leading to dose distributions that cannot be directly used for therapeutic applications. Through the introduction of a spectrometer-like particle selection system that delivers small pencil beams of protons with desired energy spectra it is feasible to use laser-accelerated protons for intensity modulated radiotherapy. The method presented in this paper is a three-dimensional modulation in which the proton energy spectrum and intensity of each individual beamlet are modulated to yield a homogeneous dose in both the longitudinal and lateral directions. As an evaluation of the efficacy of this method, it has been applied to two prostate cases using a variety of beam arrangements. We have performed a comparison study between intensity modulated photon plans and those for laser-accelerated protons. For identical beam arrangements and the same optimization parameters, proton plans exhibit superior coverage of the target and sparing of neighbouring critical structures. Dose-volume histogram analysis of the resulting dose distributions shows up to 50% reduction of dose to the critical structures. As the number of fields is decreased, the proton modality exhibits a better preservation of the optimization requirements on the target and critical structures. It is shown that for a two-beam arrangement (parallel-opposed) it is possible to achieve both superior target coverage with 5% dose inhomogeneity within the target and excellent sparing of surrounding tissue

  17. Conceptual source design and dosimetric feasibility study for intravascular treatment: a proposal for intensity modulated brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Si Yong; Han, Eun Young; Palta, Jatinder R.; Ha, Sung W.

    2003-01-01

    To propose a conceptual design of a novel source for intensity modulated brachytherapy. The source design incorporates both radioactive and shielding materials (stainless steel or tungsten), to provide an asymmetric dose intensity in the azimuthal direction. The intensity modulated intravascular brachytherapy was performed by combining a series of dwell positions and times, distributed along the azimuthal coordinates. Two simple designs for the beta-emitting sources, with similar physical dimensions to a 90 Sr/Y Novoste Beat-Cath source, were considered in the dosimetric feasibility study. In the first design, the radioactive and materials each occupy half of the cylinder and in the second, the radioactive material occupies only a quarter of the cylinder. The radial and azimuthal dose distributions around each source were calculated using the MCNP Monte Carlo code. The preliminary hypothetical simulation and optimization results demonstrated the 87% difference between the maximum and minimum doses to the lumen wall, due to off-centering of the radiation source, could be reduced to less than 7% by optimizing the azimuthal dwell positions and times of the partially shielded intravascular brachytherapy sources. The novel brachytherapy source design, and conceptual source delivery system, proposed in this study show promising dosimetric characteristics for the realization of intensity modulated brachytherapy in intravascular treatment. Further development of this concept will center on building a delivery system that can precisely control the angular motion of a radiation source in a small-diameter catheter

  18. Conceptual source design and dosimetric feasibility study for intravascular treatment: a proposal for intensity modulated brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Si Yong; Han, Eun Young; Palta, Jatinder R. [College of Medicine, Florida Univ., Florida (United States); Ha, Sung W. [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-06-01

    To propose a conceptual design of a novel source for intensity modulated brachytherapy. The source design incorporates both radioactive and shielding materials (stainless steel or tungsten), to provide an asymmetric dose intensity in the azimuthal direction. The intensity modulated intravascular brachytherapy was performed by combining a series of dwell positions and times, distributed along the azimuthal coordinates. Two simple designs for the beta-emitting sources, with similar physical dimensions to a {sub 90}Sr/Y Novoste Beat-Cath source, were considered in the dosimetric feasibility study. In the first design, the radioactive and materials each occupy half of the cylinder and in the second, the radioactive material occupies only a quarter of the cylinder. The radial and azimuthal dose distributions around each source were calculated using the MCNP Monte Carlo code. The preliminary hypothetical simulation and optimization results demonstrated the 87% difference between the maximum and minimum doses to the lumen wall, due to off-centering of the radiation source, could be reduced to less than 7% by optimizing the azimuthal dwell positions and times of the partially shielded intravascular brachytherapy sources. The novel brachytherapy source design, and conceptual source delivery system, proposed in this study show promising dosimetric characteristics for the realization of intensity modulated brachytherapy in intravascular treatment. Further development of this concept will center on building a delivery system that can precisely control the angular motion of a radiation source in a small-diameter catheter.

  19. Influence of stimulus intensity on the soleus H-reflex amplitude and modulation during locomotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Erik B; Alkjær, Tine; Raffalt, Peter C

    2013-01-01

    -reflex methodology itself. Accordingly, the purpose of the present study was to study the effect on the soleus H-reflex during walking and running using stimulus intensities normally considered too high (up to 45% Mmax). Using M-waves of 25-45% Mmax as opposed to 5-25% Mmax showed a significant suppression...... of the peak H-reflex during the stance phase of walking, while no changes were observed during running. No differences were observed regarding modulation pattern. So a possible use of too high stimulus intensity cannot explain the differences mentioned. The surprising result in running may be explained...

  20. Application of high power modulated intense relativistic electron beams for development of Wake Field Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, M.

    1989-01-01

    This final Progress Report addresses DOE-sponsored research on the development of future high-gradient particle accelerators. The experimental and the theoretical research, which lasted three years, investigated the Two Beam Accelerator (TBA). This high-voltage-gradient accelerator was powered by a modulated intense relativistic electron beam (MIREB) of power >10 10 watts. This research was conceived after a series of successful experiments performed at NRL generating and using MIREBs. This work showed that an RF structure could be built which was directly powered by a modulated intense relativistic electron beam. This structure was then used to accelerate a second electron beam. At the end of the three year project the proof-of-principle accelerator demonstrated the generation of a high current beam of electrons with energy >60 MeV. Scaling laws needed to design practical devices for future applications were also derived

  1. Sparing functional anatomical structures during intensity-modulated radiotherapy: an old problem, a new solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wenyong; Han, Guang; Wei, Shaozhong; Hu, Desheng

    2014-08-01

    During intensity-modulated radiotherapy, an organ is usually assumed to be functionally homogeneous and, generally, its anatomical and spatial heterogeneity with respect to radiation response are not taken into consideration. However, advances in imaging and radiation techniques as well as an improved understanding of the radiobiological response of organs have raised the possibility of sparing the critical functional structures within various organs at risk during intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Here, we discuss these structures, which include the critical brain structure, or neural nuclei, and the nerve fiber tracts in the CNS, head and neck structures related to radiation-induced salivary and swallowing dysfunction, and functional structures in the heart and lung. We suggest that these structures can be used as potential surrogate organs at risk in order to minimize their radiation dose and/or irradiated volume without compromising the dose coverage of the target volume during radiation treatment.

  2. Implementation of intensity-modulated conformational radiotherapy for cervical cancers at the Alexis Vautrin Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renard-Oldrini, Sophie

    2010-01-01

    As platinum salt based concomitant conformational radiotherapy and chemotherapy have been used as a standard treatment for cervical cancers but resulted in digestive and haematological toxicities, this research thesis reports the application of intensity-modulated conformational radiation therapy. After having recalled some epidemiological, anatomical aspects, diagnosis and treatments aspects regarding cervical cancer, the author presents this last treatment technique (principles, benefits, practical implementation). The author discusses results obtained by an experiment during which seven patients have been treated by simple conformational radiation therapy, and four by intensity-modulated conformational radiation therapy. Results are discussed in terms of volumes (clinical target volume, growth target volume, planned target volume), dosimetric results, toxicities (urine and skin), weight loss [fr

  3. Optical Intensity Modulation in an LiNbO3 Slab-Coupled Waveguide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalin Lu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical intensity modulation has been demonstrated through switching the optical beam between the main core waveguide and a closely attached leaky slab waveguide by applying a low-voltage electrical field. Theory for simulating such an LiNbO3 slab-coupled waveguide structure was suggested, and the result indicates the possibility of making the spatial guiding mode large, circular and symmetric, which further allows the potential to significantly reduce the coupling losses with adjacent lasers and optical networks. Optical intensity modulation using electro-optic effect was experimentally demonstrated in a 5 cm long waveguide fabricated by using a procedure of soft proton exchange and then an overgrowth of thin LN film on top of a c-cut LiNbO3 wafer.

  4. Conformal radiation therapy with or without intensity modulation in the treatment of localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maingon, P.; Truc, G.; Bosset, M.; Peignaux, K.; Ammor, A.; Bolla, M.

    2005-01-01

    Conformal radiation therapy has now to be considered as a standard treatment of localized prostatic adenocarcinomas. Using conformational methods and intensity modulated radiation therapy requires a rigorous approach for their implementation in routine, focused on the reproducibility of the treatment, target volume definitions, dosimetry, quality control, setup positioning. In order to offer to the largest number of patients high-dose treatment, the clinicians must integrate as prognostic factors accurate definition of microscopic extension as well as the tolerance threshold of critical organs. High-dose delivery is expected to be most efficient in intermediary risks and locally advanced diseases. Intensity modulated radiation therapy is specifically dedicated to dose escalation. Perfect knowledge of classical constraints of conformal radiation therapy is required. Using such an approach in routine needs a learning curve including the physicists and a specific quality assurance program. (author)

  5. Performance Characteristics Of An Intensity Modulated Advanced X-Ray Source (IMAXS) For Homeland Security Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langeveld, Willem G. J.; Brown, Craig; Condron, Cathie; Ingle, Mike; Christensen, Phil A.; Johnson, William A.; Owen, Roger D.; Hernandez, Michael; Schonberg, Russell G.; Ross, Randy

    2011-01-01

    X-ray cargo inspection systems for the detection and verification of threats and contraband must address stringent, competitive performance requirements. High x-ray intensity is needed to penetrate dense cargo, while low intensity is desirable to minimize the radiation footprint, i.e. the size of the controlled area, required shielding and the dose to personnel. In a collaborative effort between HESCO/PTSE Inc., XScell Corp., Stangenes Industries, Inc. and Rapiscan Laboratories, Inc., an Intensity Modulated Advanced X-ray Source (IMAXS) was designed and produced. Cargo inspection systems utilizing such a source have been projected to achieve up to 2 inches steel-equivalent greater penetration capability, while on average producing the same or smaller radiation footprint as present fixed-intensity sources. Alternatively, the design can be used to obtain the same penetration capability as with conventional sources, but reducing the radiation footprint by about a factor of three. The key idea is to anticipate the needed intensity for each x-ray pulse by evaluating signal strength in the cargo inspection system detector array for the previous pulse. The IMAXS is therefore capable of changing intensity from one pulse to the next by an electronic signal provided by electronics inside the cargo inspection system detector array, which determine the required source intensity for the next pulse. We report on the completion of a 9 MV S-band (2998 MHz) IMAXS source and comment on its performance.

  6. Chemotherapy and intensity modulated conformational radiotherapy for locally advanced pancreas cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huguet, F.; Wu, A.; Zhang, Z.; Winston, C.; Reidy, D.; Ho, A.; Allen, P.; Karyn, G.

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a retrospective study of the tolerance and survival of 48 patients who have been treated by a chemotherapy followed by a chemotherapy concomitant with an intensity-modulated radiotherapy for a locally advanced pancreas cancer. Results are discussed in terms of toxicity, cancer response, operability, survival rate. Tolerance is good. Local control rates, global survival rates and secondary resection rates are promising. Short communication

  7. Solar intensity measurement using a thermoelectric module; experimental study and mathematical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahbar, Nader; Asadi, Amin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Solar intensity could be explained as a linear function of voltage and ambient temperature. • The maximum output voltage is approximately 120 mV which was occurred in midday. • The average value of the heat-sink thermal resistance could be measured with this device. • The average values of total heat transfer coefficients could be measured with this device. • Two correlations were proposed to predict the solar intensity with the accuracy of 10%. - Abstract: The present study is intended to design, manufacture, and modeling an inexpensive pyranometer using a thermoelectric module. The governing equations relating the solar intensity, output voltage, and ambient temperature have been derived by applying the mathematical and thermodynamic models. According to the thermodynamics modeling, the output voltage is a function of solar intensity, ambient temperature, internal parameters of thermoelectric module, convection and radiation coefficients, and geometrical characteristics of the setup. Moreover, the solar intensity can be considered as a linear function of voltage and ambient temperature within an acceptable range of accuracy. The experiments have been carried out on a typical winter day under climatic conditions of Semnan (35°33′N, 53°23′E), Iran. The results also indicated that the output voltage is dependent on the solar intensity and its maximum value was 120 mV. Finally, based on the experimental results, two correlations, with the accuracy of 10%, have been proposed to predict the solar intensity as a function of output voltage and ambient temperature. The average values of total heat transfer coefficient and thermal resistance of the heat-sink have been also calculated according to the thermodynamic modeling and experimental results.

  8. Feasibility of a unified approach to intensity-modulated radiation therapy and volume-modulated arc therapy optimization and delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoover, Douglas A.; Chen, Jeff Z.; MacFarlane, Michael; Wong, Eugene; Battista, Jerry J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To study the feasibility of unified intensity-modulated arc therapy (UIMAT) which combines intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) optimization and delivery to produce superior radiation treatment plans, both in terms of dose distribution and efficiency of beam delivery when compared with either VMAT or IMRT alone. Methods: An inverse planning algorithm for UIMAT was prototyped within the PINNACLE treatment planning system (Philips Healthcare). The IMRT and VMAT deliveries are unified within the same arc, with IMRT being delivered at specific gantry angles within the arc. Optimized gantry angles for the IMRT and VMAT phases are assigned automatically by the inverse optimization algorithm. Optimization of the IMRT and VMAT phases is done simultaneously using a direct aperture optimization algorithm. Five treatment plans each for prostate, head and neck, and lung were generated using a unified optimization technique and compared with clinical IMRT or VMAT plans. Delivery verification was performed with an ArcCheck phantom (Sun Nuclear) on a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator (Varian Medical Systems). Results: In this prototype implementation, the UIMAT plans offered the same target dose coverage while reducing mean doses to organs at risk by 8.4% for head-and-neck cases, 5.7% for lung cases, and 3.5% for prostate cases, compared with the VMAT or IMRT plans. In addition, UIMAT can be delivered with similar efficiency as VMAT. Conclusions: In this proof-of-concept work, a novel radiation therapy optimization and delivery technique that interlaces VMAT or IMRT delivery within the same arc has been demonstrated. Initial results show that unified VMAT/IMRT has the potential to be superior to either standard IMRT or VMAT

  9. Comparison study of intensity modulated arc therapy using single or multiple arcs to intensity modulated radiation therapy for high-risk prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashamalla, Hani; Tejwani, Ajay; Parameritis, Loannis; Swamy, Uma; Luo, Pei Ching; Guirguis, Adel; Lavaf, Amir

    2013-01-01

    Intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) is a form of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) that delivers dose in single or multiple arcs. We compared IMRT plans versus single-arc field (1ARC) and multi-arc fields (3ARC) IMAT plans in high-risk prostate cancer. Sixteen patients were studied. Prostate (PTV P ), right pelvic (PTV RtLN ) and left pelvic lymph nodes (PTV LtLN ), and organs at risk were contoured. PTVP, PTV RtLN , and PTV LtLN received 50.40 Gy followed by a boost to PTV B of 28.80 Gy. Three plans were per patient generated: IMRT, 1ARC, and 3ARC. We recorded the dose to the PTV, the mean dose (D MEAN ) to the organs at risk, and volume covered by the 50% isodose. Efficiency was evaluated by monitor units (MU) and beam on time (BOT). Conformity index (CI), Paddick gradient index, and homogeneity index (HI) were also calculated. Average Radiation Therapy Oncology Group CI was 1.17, 1.20, and 1.15 for IMRT, 1ARC, and 3ARC, respectively. The plans' HI were within 1% of each other. The D MEAN of bladder was within 2% of each other. The rectum D MEAN in IMRT plans was 10% lower dose than the arc plans (p < 0.0001). The GI of the 3ARC was superior to IMRT by 27.4% (p = 0.006). The average MU was highest in the IMRT plans (1686) versus 1ARC (575) versus 3ARC (1079). The average BOT was 6 minutes for IMRT compared to 1.3 and 2.9 for 1ARC and 3ARC IMAT (p < 0.05). For high-risk prostate cancer, IMAT may offer a favorable dose gradient profile, conformity, MU and BOT compared to IMRT.

  10. Dosimetric advantages of intensity-modulated proton therapy for oropharyngeal cancer compared with intensity-modulated radiation: A case-matched control analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holliday, Emma B. [Division of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Kocak-Uzel, Esengul [Division of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Radiation Therapy, Beykent University, Istanbul (Turkey); Feng, Lei [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Thaker, Nikhil G.; Blanchard, Pierre; Rosenthal, David I.; Gunn, G. Brandon; Garden, Adam S. [Division of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Frank, Steven J., E-mail: sjfrank@mdanderson.org [Division of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-10-01

    A potential advantage of intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) over intensity-modulated (photon) radiation therapy (IMRT) in the treatment of oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC) is lower radiation dose to several critical structures involved in the development of nausea and vomiting, mucositis, and dysphagia. The purpose of this study was to quantify doses to critical structures for patients with OPC treated with IMPT and compare those with doses on IMRT plans generated for the same patients and with a matched cohort of patients actually treated with IMRT. In this study, 25 patients newly diagnosed with OPC were treated with IMPT between 2011 and 2012. Comparison IMRT plans were generated for these patients and for additional IMRT-treated controls extracted from a database of patients with OPC treated between 2000 and 2009. Cases were matched based on the following criteria, in order: unilateral vs bilateral therapy, tonsil vs base of tongue primary, T-category, N-category, concurrent chemotherapy, induction chemotherapy, smoking status, sex, and age. Results showed that the mean doses to the anterior and posterior oral cavity, hard palate, larynx, mandible, and esophagus were significantly lower with IMPT than with IMRT comparison plans generated for the same cohort, as were doses to several central nervous system structures involved in the nausea and vomiting response. Similar differences were found when comparing dose to organs at risks (OARs) between the IMPT cohort and the case-matched IMRT cohort. In conclusion, these findings suggest that patients with OPC treated with IMPT may experience fewer and less severe side effects during therapy. This may be the result of decreased beam path toxicities with IMPT due to lower doses to several dysphagia, odynophagia, and nausea and vomiting–associated OARs. Further study is needed to evaluate differences in long-term disease control and chronic toxicity between patients with OPC treated with IMPT in comparison to

  11. Adjuvant intensity-modulated proton therapy in malignant pleural mesothelioma. A comparison with intensity-modulated radiotherapy and a spot size variation assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorentini, S. [Agenzia Provinciale per la Protonterapia (ATreP), Trento (Italy); Padova Univ. (Italy). Medical Physics School; Amichetti, M.; Fellin, F.; Schwarz, M. [Agenzia Provinciale per la Protonterapia (ATreP), Trento (Italy); Spiazzi, L. [Brescia Hospital (Italy). Medical Physics Dept.; Tonoli, S.; Magrini, S.M. [Brescia Hospital (Italy). Radiation Oncology Dept.

    2012-03-15

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is the state-of-the-art treatment for patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). The goal of this work was to assess whether intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) could further improve the dosimetric results allowed by IMRT. We re-planned 7 MPM cases using both photons and protons, by carrying out IMRT and IMPT plans. For both techniques, conventional dose comparisons and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) analysis were performed. In 3 cases, additional IMPT plans were generated with different beam dimensions. IMPT allowed a slight improvement in target coverage and clear advantages in dose conformity (p < 0.001) and dose homogeneity (p = 0.01). Better organ at risk (OAR) sparing was obtained with IMPT, in particular for the liver (D{sub mean} reduction of 9.5 Gy, p = 0.001) and ipsilateral kidney (V{sub 20} reduction of 58%, p = 0.001), together with a very large reduction of mean dose for the contralateral lung (0.2 Gy vs 6.1 Gy, p = 0.0001). NTCP values for the liver showed a systematic superiority of IMPT with respect to IMRT for both the esophagus (average NTCP 14% vs. 30.5%) and the ipsilateral kidney (p = 0.001). Concerning plans obtained with different spot dimensions, a slight loss of target coverage was observed along with sigma increase, while maintaining OAR irradiation always under planning constraints. Results suggest that IMPT allows better OAR sparing with respect to IMRT, mainly for the liver, ipsilateral kidney, and contralateral lung. The use of a spot dimension larger than 3 x 3 mm (up to 9 x 9 mm) does not compromise dosimetric results and allows a shorter delivery time.

  12. Intensity-dependent nonlinear optical properties in a modulation-doped single quantum well

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ungan, F.

    2011-01-01

    In the present work, the changes in the intersubband optical absorption coefficients and the refractive index in a modulation-doped quantum well have been investigated theoretically. Within the envelope function approach and the effective mass approximation, the electronic structure of the quantum well is calculated from the self-consistent numerical solution of the coupled Schroedinger-Poisson equations. The analytical expressions of optical properties are obtained by using the compact density-matrix approach. The numerical results GaAs/Al x Ga 1-x As are presented for typical modulation-doped quantum well system. The linear, third-order nonlinear and total absorption and refractive index changes depending on the doping concentration are investigated as a function of the incident optical intensity and structure parameters, such as quantum well width and stoichiometric ratio. The results show that the doping concentration, the structure parameters and the incident optical intensity have a great effect on the optical characteristics of these structures. - Highlights: → The doping concentration has a great effect on the optical characteristics of these structures. → The structure parameters have a great effect on the optical properties of these structures. → The total absorption coefficients reduced as the incident optical intensity increases. → The RICs reduced as the incident optical intensity increases.

  13. Constant-intensity waves and their modulation instability in non-Hermitian potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makris, K. G.; Musslimani, Z. H.; Christodoulides, D. N.; Rotter, S.

    2015-07-01

    In all of the diverse areas of science where waves play an important role, one of the most fundamental solutions of the corresponding wave equation is a stationary wave with constant intensity. The most familiar example is that of a plane wave propagating in free space. In the presence of any Hermitian potential, a wave's constant intensity is, however, immediately destroyed due to scattering. Here we show that this fundamental restriction is conveniently lifted when working with non-Hermitian potentials. In particular, we present a whole class of waves that have constant intensity in the presence of linear as well as of nonlinear inhomogeneous media with gain and loss. These solutions allow us to study the fundamental phenomenon of modulation instability in an inhomogeneous environment. Our results pose a new challenge for the experiments on non-Hermitian scattering that have recently been put forward.

  14. Dose determination in radiotherapy for photon beams modified by static intensity modulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellanos Lopez, M.E.

    1998-01-01

    The static intensity modulators, used in radiotherapy, modify the spectral composition of the beam and lead to specific problems of the dose calculation. The aim of this work was to establish a three dimensional calculation, global and accurate, adapted to the primary-diffused separation algorithm and valid for any static modulator type. A theoretical study, experimentally verified, allowed the evaluation of the primary fluence, resulting from metallic sheets placed between photons beams of 6 to 23 MV nominal energy. It has been showed that the diffused, coming from the modulators, could be neglected for weak thickness and for the relative dose variation. In return it leads to significant variations of many % on the absolute dose and must be take into account for the bigger thicknesses. Corrective methods for the primary fluence have been proposed. From the energy spectra of the beam, the metallic modulator influence has been studied on the primary and diffused components of the dose and improvements of the calculation method have been proposed. These improvements are based on the modulator representation as a transmission matrix and on semi-empirical corrective factors. (A.L.B.)

  15. Role of beam orientation optimization in intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pugachev, Andrei; Li, Jonathan G.; Boyer, Arthur L.; Hancock, Steven L.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Donaldson, Sarah S.; Lei Xing

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the role of beam orientation optimization in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and to examine the potential benefits of noncoplanar intensity-modulated beams. Methods and Materials: A beam orientation optimization algorithm was implemented. For this purpose, system variables were divided into two groups: beam position (gantry and table angles) and beam profile (beamlet weights). Simulated annealing was used for beam orientation optimization and the simultaneous iterative inverse treatment planning algorithm (SIITP) for beam intensity profile optimization. Three clinical cases were studied: a localized prostate cancer, a nasopharyngeal cancer, and a paraspinal tumor. Nine fields were used for all treatments. For each case, 3 types of treatment plan optimization were performed: (1) beam intensity profiles were optimized for 9 equiangular spaced coplanar beams; (2) orientations and intensity profiles were optimized for 9 coplanar beams; (3) orientations and intensity profiles were optimized for 9 noncoplanar beams. Results: For the localized prostate case, all 3 types of optimization described above resulted in dose distributions of a similar quality. For the nasopharynx case, optimized noncoplanar beams provided a significant gain in the gross tumor volume coverage. For the paraspinal case, orientation optimization using noncoplanar beams resulted in better kidney sparing and improved gross tumor volume coverage. Conclusion: The sensitivity of an IMRT treatment plan with respect to the selection of beam orientations varies from site to site. For some cases, the choice of beam orientations is important even when the number of beams is as large as 9. Noncoplanar beams provide an additional degree of freedom for IMRT treatment optimization and may allow for notable improvement in the quality of some complicated plans

  16. An optimal algorithm for configuring delivery options of a one-dimensional intensity-modulated beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luan Shuang; Chen, Danny Z; Zhang, Li; Wu Xiaodong; Yu, Cedric X

    2003-01-01

    The problem of generating delivery options for one-dimensional intensity-modulated beams (1D IMBs) arises in intensity-modulated radiation therapy. In this paper, we present an algorithm with the optimal running time, based on the 'rightmost-preference' method, for generating all distinct delivery options for an arbitrary 1D IMB. The previously best known method for generating delivery options for a 1D IMB with N left leaf positions and N right leaf positions is a 'brute-force' solution, which first generates all N! possible combinations of the left and right leaf positions and then removes combinations that are not physically allowed delivery options. Compared with the brute-force method, our algorithm has several advantages: (1) our algorithm runs in an optimal time that is linearly proportional to the total number of distinct delivery options that it actually produces. Note that for a 1D IMB with multiple peaks, the total number of distinct delivery options in general tends to be considerably smaller than the worst case N!. (2) Our algorithm can be adapted to generating delivery options subject to additional constraints such as the 'minimum leaf separation' constraint. (3) Our algorithm can also be used to generate random subsets of delivery options; this feature is especially useful when the 1D IMBs in question have too many delivery options for a computer to store and process. The key idea of our method is that we impose an order on how left leaf positions should be paired with right leaf positions. Experiments indicated that our rightmost-preference algorithm runs dramatically faster than the brute-force algorithm. This implies that our algorithm can handle 1D IMBs whose sizes are substantially larger than those handled by the brute-force method. Applications of our algorithm in therapeutic techniques such as intensity-modulated arc therapy and 2D modulations are also discussed

  17. Accommodating practical constraints for intensity modulated radiation therapy by means of compensators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, Juergen

    2002-01-01

    The thesis deals with the practical implementation of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) generated by means of patient specific metal compensators. An elaborate comparison between several compensator-machining techniques, with respect to their suitability for production within a hospital workshop, is presented. The limitations associated with the selected compensator manufacturing technique are identified and implemented as constraints in an existing inverse treatment-planning algorithm. In order to obtain the profile of a compensator, which produces a desired intensity distribution, inverse modeling of the radiation attenuation within the compensator is required. Two novel and independent approaches, based on deconvolution and system identification, are proposed to accomplish this. To compare the approach with the 'rival' state of the art beam modulation technique, a theoretical and experimental examination of the modulated fields generated by manufactured compensators and multileaf collimators is presented. This comparison focused on the achievable resolution of the intensity modulated beams in lateral and longitudinal directions. To take into account the characteristics of a clinical environment the suitability of the most common commercially available treatment couch systems for IMRT treatments is studied. An original rule based advisory system is developed to alert the operator of any potential collision of the beam with the movable supporting structures of the treatment couch. The system is capable of finding alternative positions for the supporting frames and, if necessary, can suggest alternative beam directions. Finally, a head and neck phantom is designed for gel dosimetry to assess IMRT treatment delivery techniques. The phantom is based on a simplistic but realistic design and contains the main anatomical features

  18. Conditioned pain modulation is affected by occlusion cuff conditioning stimulus intensity, but not duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A; Pedler, A

    2018-01-01

    Various conditioned pain modulation (CPM) methodologies have been used to investigate diffuse noxious inhibitory control pain mechanisms in healthy and clinical populations. Occlusion cuff parameters have been poorly studied. We aimed to investigate whether occlusion cuff intensity and/or duration influenced CPM magnitudes. We also investigated the role of physical activity levels on CPM magnitude. Two studies were performed to investigate the role of intensity and duration of occlusion cuff conditioning stimulus on test stimulus (tibialis anterior pressure pain thresholds). In Study 1, conditioning stimulus intensity of 2/10 or 5/10 (duration CPM magnitude. In Study 1, 27 healthy volunteers (mean ± SD: 24.9 years (±4.5); eight female) demonstrated that an occlusion cuff applied to the upper arm eliciting 5/10 local pain resulted in a significant (mean ± SD: 17% ± 46%) increase in CPM magnitude, when compared to 2/10 intensity (-3% ± 38%, p = 0.026), whereas in Study 2, 25 healthy volunteers (22.5 years (±2.7); 13 female) demonstrated that 3 min of 2/10 CS intensity did not result in a significant change in CPM (p = 0.21). There was no significant relationship between physical activity levels and CPM in either study (p > 0.22). This study demonstrated that an occlusion cuff of 5/10 conditioning stimulus intensity, when compared to 2/10, significantly increased CPM magnitude. Maintaining 2/10 conditioning stimulus for 3 min did not increase CPM magnitude. Dysfunctional conditioned pain modulation (CPM) has been associated with poor health outcomes. Various factors can influence CPM outcomes. The role of occlusion cuff conditioning stimulus intensity and duration has not been previously investigated. Intensity (5/10), but not duration of lower intensity (2/10) conditioning stimulus, affects CPM magnitude. © 2017 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  19. Description and operation of the LEDA beam-position/intensity measurement module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, C.R.; Stettler, M.W.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the specification, design and preliminary operation of the beam-position/intensity measurement module being built for the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) and Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) projects at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The module, based on the VXI footprint, is divided into three sections: first, the analog front-end which consists of logarithmic amplifiers, anti-alias filters, and digitizers; second, the digital-to-analog section for monitoring signals on the front panel; and third, the DSP, error correction, and VXI-interface section. Beam position is calculated based on the log-ratio transfer function. The module has four, 2-MHz, IF inputs suitable for two-axis position measurements. It has outputs in both digital and analog format for x- and y-position and beam intensity. Real-time error-correction is performed on the four input signals after they are digitized and before calculating the beam position to compensate for drift, offsets, gain non-linearities, and other systematic errors. This paper also describes how the on-line error-correction is implemented digitally and algorithmically

  20. Some aspects of the design of intensity modulated beams for breast radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, PM; Hansen, VN; Swindell, W

    1995-01-01

    An electronic portal imaging system has been used to design intensity modulated beams to achieve compensation for missing tissue and tissue heterogeneity in tangential irradiation of the breast. A portal image of the breast is calibrated for radiological thickness and an estimate of the outline of lung and soft tissue is made. This is used with the desired dose prescription to design intensity modulated beams, IMBs. The practical implementation of the IMBs may be achieved using a multileaf collimator, MLC. The leaves of the MLC may be scanned dynamically or a set of multiple static fields may be used. We have compared the uniformity of the achievable dose distribution for both cases. In the static case, the effects of varying the number of fields and their relative intensities have been investigated. The use of scanning leaves yields a dose distribution which is close to optimal. Multiple static fields produce results close to optimal if a large number, typically 30 are used. However, even for the more practicable case of 5 fields, the hot and cold spots are significantly reduced compared to a simple wedge. When studying the optimum intensity distribution for the set of static fields, it was found that having the first field with a large intensity irradiating the whole target volume and a set of 'top-up' fields of equal magnitude was best. This study suggests that an MLC may indeed be used to deliver IMBs for radiotherapy of the breast. We can presently deliver the multiple static field technique. For the small number of beams which are presently deliverable, an improvement of dosimetry over the use of a simple wedge is indicated. In the future, with the scanning leaves technique, dose distributions with greatly reduced dose inhomogeneities should be achievable

  1. Independent monitor unit calculation for intensity modulated radiotherapy using the MIMiC multileaf collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhe; Xing Lei; Nath, Ravinder

    2002-01-01

    A self-consistent monitor unit (MU) and isocenter point-dose calculation method has been developed that provides an independent verification of the MU for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using the MIMiC (Nomos Corporation) multileaf collimator. The method takes into account two unique features of IMRT using the MIMiC: namely the gantry-dynamic arc delivery of intensity modulated photon beams and the slice-by-slice dose delivery for large tumor volumes. The method converts the nonuniform beam intensity planned at discrete gantry angles of 5 deg. or 10 deg. into conventional nonmodulated beam intensity apertures of elemental arc segments of 1 deg. This approach more closely simulates the actual gantry-dynamic arc delivery by MIMiC. Because each elemental arc segment is of uniform intensity, the MU calculation for an IMRT arc is made equivalent to a conventional arc with gantry-angle dependent beam apertures. The dose to the isocenter from each 1 deg. elemental arc segment is calculated by using the Clarkson scatter summation technique based on measured tissue-maximum-ratio and output factors, independent of the dose calculation model used in the IMRT planning system. For treatments requiring multiple treatment slices, the MU for the arc at each treatment slice takes into account the MU, leakage and scatter doses from other slices. This is achieved by solving a set of coupled linear equations for the MUs of all involved treatment slices. All input dosimetry data for the independent MU/isocenter point-dose calculation are measured directly. Comparison of the MU and isocenter point dose calculated by the independent program to those calculated by the Corvus planning system and to direct measurements has shown good agreement with relative difference less than ±3%. The program can be used as an independent initial MU verification for IMRT plans using the MIMiC multileaf collimators

  2. Retrospective evaluation of dosimetric quality for prostate carcinomas treated with 3D conformal, intensity modulated and volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowe, Scott B [Science and Engineering Faculty, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Kairn, Tanya [Science and Engineering Faculty, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Premion, Wesley Medical Centre, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Middlebrook, Nigel; Hill, Brendan; Christie, David R H; Knight, Richard T [Premion, Wesley Medical Centre, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Kenny, John [Australian Clinical Dosimetry Services, Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Langton, Christian M; Trapp, Jamie V [Science and Engineering Faculty, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

    2013-12-15

    This study examines and compares the dosimetric quality of radiotherapy treatment plans for prostate carcinoma across a cohort of 163 patients treated across five centres: 83 treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), 33 treated with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and 47 treated with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Treatment plan quality was evaluated in terms of target dose homogeneity and organs at risk (OAR), through the use of a set of dose metrics. These included the mean, maximum and minimum doses; the homogeneity and conformity indices for the target volumes; and a selection of dose coverage values that were relevant to each OAR. Statistical significance was evaluated using two-tailed Welch's T-tests. The Monte Carlo DICOM ToolKit software was adapted to permit the evaluation of dose metrics from DICOM data exported from a commercial radiotherapy treatment planning system. The 3DCRT treatment plans offered greater planning target volume dose homogeneity than the other two treatment modalities. The IMRT and VMAT plans offered greater dose reduction in the OAR: with increased compliance with recommended OAR dose constraints, compared to conventional 3DCRT treatments. When compared to each other, IMRT and VMAT did not provide significantly different treatment plan quality for like-sized tumour volumes. This study indicates that IMRT and VMAT have provided similar dosimetric quality, which is superior to the dosimetric quality achieved with 3DCRT.

  3. Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Spine Radiosurgery: Superior Treatment Planning and Delivery Compared to Static Beam Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zach, Leor; Tsvang, Lev; Alezra, Dror; Ben Ayun, Maoz; Harel, Ran

    2016-01-01

    Spine stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) delivers an accurate and efficient high radiation dose to vertebral metastases in 1-5 fractions. We aimed to compare volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to static beam intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for spine SRS. Ten spine lesions of previously treated SRS patients were planned retrospectively using both IMRT and VMAT with a prescribed dose of 16 Gy to 100% of the planning target volume (PTV). The plans were compared for conformity, homogeneity, treatment delivery time, and safety (spinal cord dose). All evaluated parameters favored the VMAT plan over the IMRT plans. D min in the IMRT was significantly lower than in the VMAT plan (7.65 Gy/10.88 Gy, p DSC) was found to be significantly better for the VMAT plans compared to the IMRT plans (0.77/0.58, resp., p  value < 0.01), and an almost 50% reduction in the net treatment time was calculated for the VMAT compared to the IMRT plans (6.73 min/12.96 min, p < 0.001). In our report, VMAT provides better conformity, homogeneity, and safety profile. The shorter treatment time is a major advantage and not only provides convenience to the painful patient but also contributes to the precision of this high dose radiation therapy.

  4. Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Spine Radiosurgery: Superior Treatment Planning and Delivery Compared to Static Beam Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leor Zach

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Spine stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS delivers an accurate and efficient high radiation dose to vertebral metastases in 1–5 fractions. We aimed to compare volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT to static beam intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT for spine SRS. Methods and Materials. Ten spine lesions of previously treated SRS patients were planned retrospectively using both IMRT and VMAT with a prescribed dose of 16 Gy to 100% of the planning target volume (PTV. The plans were compared for conformity, homogeneity, treatment delivery time, and safety (spinal cord dose. Results. All evaluated parameters favored the VMAT plan over the IMRT plans. Dmin in the IMRT was significantly lower than in the VMAT plan (7.65 Gy/10.88 Gy, p<0.001, the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC was found to be significantly better for the VMAT plans compared to the IMRT plans (0.77/0.58, resp., p  value<0.01, and an almost 50% reduction in the net treatment time was calculated for the VMAT compared to the IMRT plans (6.73 min/12.96 min, p<0.001. Conclusions. In our report, VMAT provides better conformity, homogeneity, and safety profile. The shorter treatment time is a major advantage and not only provides convenience to the painful patient but also contributes to the precision of this high dose radiation therapy.

  5. Whole-brain hippocampal sparing radiation therapy: Volume-modulated arc therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Katrina; Lenards, Nishele; Holson, Janice

    2016-01-01

    The hippocampus is responsible for memory and cognitive function. An ongoing phase II clinical trial suggests that sparing dose to the hippocampus during whole-brain radiation therapy can help preserve a patient's neurocognitive function. Progressive research and advancements in treatment techniques have made treatment planning more sophisticated but beneficial for patients undergoing treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate and compare hippocampal sparing whole-brain (HS-WB) radiation therapy treatment planning techniques using volume-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). We randomly selected 3 patients to compare different treatment techniques that could be used for reducing dose to the hippocampal region. We created 2 treatment plans, a VMAT and an IMRT, from each patient's data set and planned on the Eclipse 11.0 treatment planning system (TPS). A total of 6 plans (3 IMRT and 3 VMAT) were created and evaluated for this case study. The physician contoured the hippocampus as per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0933 protocol atlas. The organs at risk (OR) were contoured and evaluated for the plan comparison, which included the spinal cord, optic chiasm, the right and left eyes, lenses, and optic nerves. Both treatment plans produced adequate coverage on the planning target volume (PTV) while significantly reducing dose to the hippocampal region. The VMAT treatment plans produced a more homogenous dose distribution throughout the PTV while decreasing the maximum point dose to the target. However, both treatment techniques demonstrated hippocampal sparing when irradiating the whole brain.

  6. The intertropical convergence zone modulates intense hurricane strikes on the western North Atlantic margin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hengstum, Peter J; Donnelly, Jeffrey P; Fall, Patricia L; Toomey, Michael R; Albury, Nancy A; Kakuk, Brian

    2016-02-24

    Most Atlantic hurricanes form in the Main Development Region between 9°N to 20°N along the northern edge of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). Previous research has suggested that meridional shifts in the ITCZ position on geologic timescales can modulate hurricane activity, but continuous and long-term storm records are needed from multiple sites to assess this hypothesis. Here we present a 3000 year record of intense hurricane strikes in the northern Bahamas (Abaco Island) based on overwash deposits in a coastal sinkhole, which indicates that the ITCZ has likely helped modulate intense hurricane strikes on the western North Atlantic margin on millennial to centennial-scales. The new reconstruction closely matches a previous reconstruction from Puerto Rico, and documents a period of elevated intense hurricane activity on the western North Atlantic margin from 2500 to 1000 years ago when paleo precipitation proxies suggest that the ITCZ occupied a more northern position. Considering that anthropogenic warming is predicted to be focused in the northern hemisphere in the coming century, these results provide a prehistoric analog that an attendant northern ITCZ shift in the future may again return the western North Atlantic margin to an active hurricane interval.

  7. Simulation of novel intensity modulated cascaded coated LPFG sensor based on PMTP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wenbin; Gu, Zhengtian; Lin, Qiang; Sang, Jiangang

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents a novel intensity modulated cascaded long-period fiber grating (CLPFG) sensor which is cascaded by two same coated long-period fiber gratings (LPFGs) operating at the phase-matching turning point (PMTP). The sensor combines the high sensitivity of LPFG operating at PMTP and the narrow bandwidth of interference attenuation band of CLPFG, so a higher response to small change of the surrounding refractive index (SRI) can be obtained by intensity modulation. Based on the coupled-mode theory, the grating parameters of the PMTP of a middle odd order cladding mode of a single LPFG are calculated. Then this two same LPFGs are cascaded into a CLPFG, and the optical transmission spectrum of the CLPFG is calculated by transfer matrix method. A resonant wavelength of a special interference attenuation band whose intensity has the highest response to SRI, is selected form CLPFG’s spectrum, and setting the resonant wavelength as the operating wavelength of the sensor. Furthermore, the simulation results show that the resolution of SRI of this CLPFG is available to 1.97 × 10-9 by optimizing the film optical parameters, which is about three orders of magnitude higher than coated dual-peak LPFG and cascaded LPFG sensors. It is noteworthy that the sensor is also sensitive to the refractive index of coat, so that the sensor is expected to be applied to detections of gas, PH value, humidity and so on, in the future.

  8. Speed-dependent modulation of wing muscle recruitment intensity and kinematics in two bat species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konow, Nicolai; Cheney, Jorn A; Roberts, Thomas J; Iriarte-Díaz, Jose; Breuer, Kenneth S; Waldman, J Rhea S; Swartz, Sharon M

    2017-05-15

    Animals respond to changes in power requirements during locomotion by modulating the intensity of recruitment of their propulsive musculature, but many questions concerning how muscle recruitment varies with speed across modes of locomotion remain unanswered. We measured normalized average burst EMG (aEMG) for pectoralis major and biceps brachii at different flight speeds in two relatively distantly related bat species: the aerial insectivore Eptesicus fuscus , and the primarily fruit-eating Carollia perspicillata These ecologically distinct species employ different flight behaviors but possess similar wing aspect ratio, wing loading and body mass. Because propulsive requirements usually correlate with body size, and aEMG likely reflects force, we hypothesized that these species would deploy similar speed-dependent aEMG modulation. Instead, we found that aEMG was speed independent in E. fuscus and modulated in a U-shaped or linearly increasing relationship with speed in C. perspicillata This interspecific difference may be related to differences in muscle fiber type composition and/or overall patterns of recruitment of the large ensemble of muscles that participate in actuating the highly articulated bat wing. We also found interspecific differences in the speed dependence of 3D wing kinematics: E. fuscus modulates wing flexion during upstroke significantly more than C. perspicillata Overall, we observed two different strategies to increase flight speed: C. perspicillata tends to modulate aEMG, and E. fuscus tends to modulate wing kinematics. These strategies may reflect different requirements for avoiding negative lift and overcoming drag during slow and fast flight, respectively, a subject we suggest merits further study. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  9. Dosimetric Comparison of Three-Dimensional Conformal Proton Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy, and Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Treatment of Pediatric Craniopharyngiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehling, Nicholas S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Grosshans, David R., E-mail: dgrossha@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Bluett, Jaques B. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Palmer, Matthew T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Song, Xiaofei; Amos, Richard A.; Sahoo, Narayan [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Meyer, Jeffrey J.; Mahajan, Anita; Woo, Shiao Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Cranial irradiation in pediatric patients is associated with serious long-term adverse effects. We sought to determine whether both three-dimensional conformal proton radiotherapy (3D-PRT) and intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) compared with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) decrease integral dose to brain areas known to harbor neuronal stem cells, major blood vessels, and other normal brain structures for pediatric patients with craniopharyngiomas. Methods and Materials: IMRT, forward planned, passive scattering proton, and IMPT plans were generated and optimized for 10 pediatric patients. The dose was 50.4 Gy (or cobalt Gy equivalent) delivered in 28 fractions with the requirement for planning target volume (PTV) coverage of 95% or better. Integral dose data were calculated from differential dose-volume histograms. Results: The PTV target coverage was adequate for all modalities. IMRT and IMPT yielded the most conformal plans in comparison to 3D-PRT. Compared with IMRT, 3D-PRT and IMPT plans had a relative reduction of integral dose to the hippocampus (3D-PRT, 20.4; IMPT, 51.3%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), dentate gyrus (27.3, 75.0%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), and subventricular zone (4.5, 57.8%{sup Asterisk-Operator }). Vascular organs at risk also had reduced integral dose with the use of proton therapy (anterior cerebral arteries, 33.3{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 100.0%{sup Asterisk-Operator }; middle cerebral arteries, 25.9%{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 100%{sup Asterisk-Operator }; anterior communicating arteries, 30.8{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 41.7%{sup Asterisk-Operator }; and carotid arteries, 51.5{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 77.6{sup Asterisk-Operator }). Relative reduction of integral dose to the infratentorial brain (190.7{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 109.7%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), supratentorial brain without PTV (9.6, 26.8%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), brainstem (45.6, 22.4%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), and whole brain without PTV (19.4{sup Asterisk

  10. Layered ACO-OFDM for intensity-modulated direct-detection optical wireless transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Qian, Chen; Guo, Xuhan; Wang, Zhaocheng; Cunningham, David G; White, Ian H

    2015-05-04

    Layered asymmetrically clipped optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (ACO-OFDM) with high spectral efficiency is proposed in this paper for optical wireless transmission employing intensity modulation with direct detection. In contrast to the conventional ACO-OFDM, which only utilizes odd subcarriers for modulation, leading to an obvious spectral efficiency loss, in layered ACO-OFDM, the subcarriers are divided into different layers and modulated by different kinds of ACO-OFDM, which are combined for simultaneous transmission. In this way, more subcarriers are used for data transmission and the spectral efficiency is improved. An iterative receiver is also proposed for layered ACO-OFDM, where the negative clipping distortion of each layer is subtracted once it is detected so that the signals from different layers can be recovered. Theoretical analysis shows that the proposed scheme can improve the spectral efficiency by up to 2 times compared with conventional ACO-OFDM approaches with the same modulation order. Meanwhile, simulation results confirm a considerable signal-to-noise ratio gain over ACO-OFDM at the same spectral efficiency.

  11. Optical intensity modulation direct detection versus heterodyne detection: A high-SNR capacity comparison

    KAUST Repository

    Chaaban, Anas

    2016-09-15

    An optical wireless communications system which employs either intensity-modulation and direct-detection (IM-DD) or heterodyne detection (HD) is considered. IM-DD has lower complexity and cost than HD, but on the other hand, has lower capacity. It is therefore interesting to investigate the capacity gap between the two systems. The main focus of this paper is to investigate this gap at high SNR. Bounds on this gap are established for two cases: between IM-DD and HD, and between IM-DD and an HD-PAM which is an HD system employing pulse-amplitude modulation (PAM). While the gap between IM-DD and HD increases as the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) increases, the gap between IM-DD and an HD-PAM is upper bounded by a constant at high SNR. © 2015 IEEE.

  12. Optical intensity modulation direct detection versus heterodyne detection: A high-SNR capacity comparison

    KAUST Repository

    Chaaban, Anas; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2016-01-01

    An optical wireless communications system which employs either intensity-modulation and direct-detection (IM-DD) or heterodyne detection (HD) is considered. IM-DD has lower complexity and cost than HD, but on the other hand, has lower capacity. It is therefore interesting to investigate the capacity gap between the two systems. The main focus of this paper is to investigate this gap at high SNR. Bounds on this gap are established for two cases: between IM-DD and HD, and between IM-DD and an HD-PAM which is an HD system employing pulse-amplitude modulation (PAM). While the gap between IM-DD and HD increases as the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) increases, the gap between IM-DD and an HD-PAM is upper bounded by a constant at high SNR. © 2015 IEEE.

  13. Breast-conserving radiation therapy using combined electron and intensity-modulated radiotherapy technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.G.; Williams, S.S.; Goffinet, D.R.; Boer, A.L.; Xing, L.

    2000-01-01

    An electron beam with appropriate energy was combined with four intensity modulated photon beams. The direction of the electron beam was chosen to be tilted 10-20 laterally from the anteroposterior direction. Two of the intensity-modulated photon beams had the same gantry angles as the conventional tangential fields, whereas the other two beams were rotated 15-25' toward the anteroposterior directions from the first two photon beams. An iterative algorithm was developed which optimizes the weight of the electron beam as well as the fluence profiles of the photon beams for a given patient. Two breast cancer patients with early-stage breast tumors were planned with the new technique and the results were compared with those from 3D planning using tangential fields as well as 9-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques. The combined electron and IMRT plans showed better dose conformity to the target with significantly reduced dose to the ipsilateral lung and, in the case of the left-breast patient, reduced dose to the heart, than the tangential field plans. In both the right-sided and left-sided breast plans, the dose to other normal structures was similar to that from conventional plans and was much smaller than that from the 9-field IMRT plans. The optimized electron beam provided between 70 to 80% of the prescribed dose at the depth of maximum dose of the electron beam. The combined electron and IMRT technique showed improvement over the conventional treatment technique using tangential fields with reduced dose to the ipsilateral lung and the heart. The customized beam directions of the four IMRT fields also kept the dose to other critical structures to a minimum. (author)

  14. Clinical Outcomes of Intensity-Modulated Pelvic Radiation Therapy for Carcinoma of the Cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasselle, Michael D.; Rose, Brent S.; Kochanski, Joel D.; Nath, Sameer K.; Bafana, Rounak; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Hasan, Yasmin; Roeske, John C.; Mundt, Arno J.; Mell, Loren K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate disease outcomes and toxicity in cervical cancer patients treated with pelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: We included all patients with Stage I-IVA cervical carcinoma treated with IMRT at three different institutions from 2000-2007. Patients treated with extended field or conventional techniques were excluded. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans were designed to deliver 45 Gy in 1.8-Gy daily fractions to the planning target volume while minimizing dose to the bowel, bladder, and rectum. Toxicity was graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group system. Overall survival and disease-free survival were estimated by use of the Kaplan-Meier method. Pelvic failure, distant failure, and late toxicity were estimated by use of cumulative incidence functions. Results: The study included 111 patients. Of these, 22 were treated with postoperative IMRT, 8 with IMRT followed by intracavitary brachytherapy and adjuvant hysterectomy, and 81 with IMRT followed by planned intracavitary brachytherapy. Of the patients, 63 had Stage I-IIA disease and 48 had Stage IIB-IVA disease. The median follow-up time was 27 months. The 3-year overall survival rate and the disease-free survival rate were 78% (95% confidence interval [CI], 68-88%) and 69% (95% CI, 59-81%), respectively. The 3-year pelvic failure rate and the distant failure rate were 14% (95% CI, 6-22%) and 17% (95% CI, 8-25%), respectively. Estimates of acute and late Grade 3 toxicity or higher were 2% (95% CI, 0-7%) and 7% (95% CI, 2-13%), respectively. Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy is associated with low toxicity and favorable outcomes, supporting its safety and efficacy for cervical cancer. Prospective clinical trials are needed to evaluate the comparative efficacy of IMRT vs. conventional techniques.

  15. Local failure patterns for patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma after intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jia-xin; Huang, Shao-min; Jiang, Xin-hua; Ouyang, Bin; Han, Fei; Liu, Shuai; Wen, Bi-xiu; Lu, Tai-xiang

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the clinical feature and the local failure patterns after intensity-modulated radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Between March 2007 and July 2009, 710 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma were treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. The magnetic resonance imagings obtained at recurrence were registered with the original planning computed tomography for dosimetry analysis. With a median follow-up of 38 months, 34 patients have developed local recurrence (32 cases valid). The incidence of invasion to nasopharynx, parapharyngeal space and the retropharyngeal space by the primary tumors was 100%, 75.0% and 62.5%, respectively, but 78.1%, 34.4% and 21.9% at recurrence, respectively. The rate of invasion to ethmoid sinus was 3.1% by the primary tumors but 28.1% at recurrence (p = 0.005). The topographic analysis of the local failure patterns showed 'central' in 16 patients; 'marginal' in 9; and 'outside' in 7. The median volumes of primary gross tumor were 45.84 cm 3 in the central failure group, 29.44 cm 3 in the marginal failure group, and 21.52 cm 3 in the outside failure group, respectively (p = 0.012), and the median volumes of primary clinical target1 were 87.28 cm 3 , 61.90 cm 3 and 58.74 cm 3 in the three groups, respectively (p = 0.033). In patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy, the recurrent tumors had their unique characteristic and regularity of invasion to adjacent structures. 'Central' failure was the major local failure pattern. The volumes of primary gross tumor and clinical target1 were significantly correlated with recurrent patterns. Employ more aggressive approaches to tumor cells which will be insensitive to radiotherapy may be an effective way to reduce the central failure

  16. Performance analysis of subcarrier intensity modulation using rectangular QAM over Malaga turbulence channels with integer and non-integerβ

    KAUST Repository

    Alheadary, Wael Ghazy; Park, Kihong; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we derive the performances of optical wireless communication system utilizing adaptive subcarrier intensity modulation over the Malaga turbulent channel. More specifically, analytical closed-form solutions and asymptotic results

  17. Laser Noise and its Impact on the Performance of Intensity-Modulation with Direct-Detection Analog Photonic Links

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Urick, Vincent J; Devgan, Preetpaul S; McKinney, Jason D; Dexter, James L

    2007-01-01

    The equations for radio-frequency gain, radio-frequency noise figure, compression dynamic range and spurious-free dynamic range are derived for an analog photonic link employing intensity modulation and direct detection...

  18. Radiochromic film in the dosimetric verification of intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yingjuan; Huang Shaomin; Deng Xiaowu

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Objective To investigate the dose-response behavior of a new type of radio- chromic film( GAFCHROMIC EBT) and explore the clinical application means and precision of dosage measurement, which can be applied for: (1) plan-specific dosimetric verification for intensity modulated radiation therapy, (2) to simplify the process of quality assurance using traditional radiographic film dosimetric system and (3) to establish a more reliable, more efficient dosimetric verification system for intensity modulated radiation therapy. Methods: (1) The step wedge calibration technique was used to calibrate EBT radiochromic film and EDR2 radiographic film. The dose characteristics, the measurement consistency and the quality assurance process between the two methods were compared. (2) The in-phantom dose-measurement based verification technique has been adopted. Respectively, EBT film and EDR2 film were used to measure the same dose plane of IMRT treatment plans. The results of the dose map, dose profiles and iso- dose curves were compared with those calculated by CORVUS treatment planning system to evaluate the function of EBT film for dosimetric verification for intensity modulated radiation therapy. Results: (1) Over the external beam dosimetric range of 0-500 cGy, EBT/VXR-16 and EDR2/VXR-16 film dosimetric system had the same measurement consistency with the measurement variability less then 0.70%. The mean measurement variability of these two systems was 0.37% and 0.68%, respectively. The former proved to be the superior modality at measurement consistency, reliability, and efficiency over dynamic clinical dose range , furthermore, its quality assurance showed less process than the latter. (2) The dosimetric verification of IMRT plane measured with EBT film was quite similar to that with EDR2 film which was processed under strict quality control. In a plane of the phantom, the maximal dose deviation off axis between EBT film measurement and the TPS calculation was

  19. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy: a review with a physics perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Byungchul

    2018-03-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has been considered the most successful development in radiation oncology since the introduction of computed tomography into treatment planning that enabled three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in 1980s. More than three decades have passed since the concept of inverse planning was first introduced in 1982, and IMRT has become the most important and common modality in radiation therapy. This review will present developments in inverse IMRT treatment planning and IMRT delivery using multileaf collimators, along with the associated key concepts. Other relevant issues and future perspectives are also presented.

  20. Evidence-based review: Quality of life following head and neck intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott-Brown, Martin; Miah, Aisha; Harrington, Kevin; Nutting, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Inverse planned Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can minimize the dose to normal structures and therefore can reduce long-term radiotherapy-related morbidity and may improve patients' long-term quality of life. Despite overwhelming evidence that IMRT can reduce late functional deficits in patients with head and neck cancer, treated with radiotherapy, a review of the published literature produced conflicting results with regard to quality of life outcomes. Following a critical appraisal of the literature, reasons for the discrepant outcomes are proposed.

  1. MIMO Intensity-Modulation Channels: Capacity Bounds and High SNR Characterization

    KAUST Repository

    Chaaban, Anas

    2016-10-01

    The capacity of MIMO intensity modulation channels is studied. The nonnegativity of the transmit signal (intensity) poses a challenge on the precoding of the transmit signal, which limits the applicability of classical schemes in this type of channels. To resolve this issue, capacity lower bounds are developed by using precoding-free schemes. This is achieved by channel inversion or QR decomposition to convert the MIMO channel to a set of parallel channels. The achievable rate of a DC-offset SVD based scheme is also derived as a benchmark. Then, a capacity upper bound is derived and is shown to coincide with the achievable rate of the QR decomposition based scheme at high SNR, consequently characterizing the high-SNR capacity of the channel. The high-SNR gap between capacity and the achievable rates of the channel inversion and the DC-offset SVD based schemes is also characterized. Finally, the ergodic capacity of the channel is also briefly discussed.

  2. 'Tongue-and-groove' effect in intensity modulated radiotherapy with static multileaf collimator fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Que, W; Kung, J; Dai, J

    2004-01-01

    The 'tongue-and-groove problem' in step-and-shoot delivery of intensity modulated radiotherapy is investigated. A 'tongue-and-groove' index (TGI) is introduced to quantify the 'tongue-and-groove' effect in step-and-shoot delivery. Four different types of leaf sequencing methods are compared. The sliding window method and the reducing level method use the same number of field segments to deliver the same intensity map, but the TGI is much less for the reducing level method. The leaf synchronization method of Van Santvoort and Heijmen fails in step-and-shoot delivery, but a new method inspired by the method of Van Santvoort and Heijmen is shown to eliminate 'tongue-and-groove' underdosage completely

  3. A Comparison of Helical Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy, and 3D-Conformal Radiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poppe, Matthew M.; Narra, Venkat; Yue, Ning J.; Zhou Jinghao; Nelson, Carl; Jabbour, Salma K.

    2011-01-01

    We assessed dosimetric differences in pancreatic cancer radiotherapy via helical intensity-modulated radiotherapy (HIMRT), linac-based IMRT, and 3D-conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) with regard to successful plan acceptance and dose to critical organs. Dosimetric analysis was performed in 16 pancreatic cases that were planned to 54 Gy; both post-pancreaticoduodenectomy (n = 8) and unresected (n = 8) cases were compared. Without volume modification, plans met constraints 75% of the time with HIMRT and IMRT and 13% with 3D-CRT. There was no statistically significantly improvement with HIMRT over conventional IMRT in reducing liver V35, stomach V45, or bowel V45. HIMRT offers improved planning target volume (PTV) dose homogeneity compared with IMRT, averaging a lower maximum dose and higher volume receiving the prescription dose (D100). HIMRT showed an increased mean dose over IMRT to bowel and liver. Both HIMRT and IMRT offer a statistically significant improvement over 3D-CRT in lowering dose to liver, stomach, and bowel. The results were similar for both unresected and resected patients. In pancreatic cancer, HIMRT offers improved dose homogeneity over conventional IMRT and several significant benefits to 3D-CRT. Factors to consider before incorporating IMRT into pancreatic cancer therapy are respiratory motion, dose inhomogeneity, and mean dose.

  4. The velocity of light intensity increase modulates the photoprotective response in coastal diatoms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasco Giovagnetti

    Full Text Available In aquatic ecosystems, the superimposition of mixing events to the light diel cycle exposes phytoplankton to changes in the velocity of light intensity increase, from diurnal variations to faster mixing-related ones. This is particularly true in coastal waters, where diatoms are dominant. This study aims to investigate if coastal diatoms differently activate the photoprotective responses, xanthophyll cycle (XC and non-photochemical fluorescence quenching (NPQ, to cope with predictable light diel cycle and unpredictable mixing-related light variations. We compared the effect of two fast light intensity increases (simulating mixing events with that of a slower increase (corresponding to the light diel cycle on the modulation of XC and NPQ in the planktonic coastal diatom Pseudo-nitzschia multistriata. During each light treatment, the photon flux density (PFD progressively increased from darkness to five peaks, ranging from 100 to 650 µmol photons m-2 s-1. Our results show that the diel cycle-related PFD increase strongly activates XC through the enhancement of the carotenoid biosynthesis and induces a moderate and gradual NPQ formation over the light gradient. In contrast, during mixing-related PFD increases, XC is less activated, while higher NPQ rapidly develops at moderate PFD. We observe that together with the light intensity and its increase velocity, the saturation light for photosynthesis (Ek is a key parameter in modulating photoprotection. We propose that the capacity to adequately regulate and actuate alternative photoprotective 'safety valves' in response to changing velocity of light intensity increase further enhances the photophysiological flexibility of diatoms. This might be an evolutionary outcome of diatom adaptation to turbulent marine ecosystems characterized by unpredictable mixing-related light changes over the light diel cycle.

  5. Dosimetric and QA aspects of Konrad inverse planning system for commissioning intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deshpande Shrikant

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT planning is performed using the Konrad inverse treatment planning system and the delivery of the treatment by using Siemens Oncor Impression Plus linear accelerator (step and shoot, which has been commissioned recently. The basic beam data required for commissioning the system were generate. The quality assurance of relative and absolute dose distribution was carried out before clinical implementation. The salient features of Konrad planning system, like dependence of grid size on dose volume histogram (DVH, number of intensity levels and step size in sequencer, are studied quantitatively and qualitatively. To verify whether the planned dose [from treatment planning system (TPS] and delivered dose are the same, the absolute dose at a point is determined using CC01 ion chamber and the axial plane dose distribution is carried out using Kodak EDR2 in conjunction with OmniPro IMRT Phantom and OmniPro IMRT software from Scanditronix Wellhofer. To obtain the optimum combination in leaf sequencer module, parameters like number of intensity levels, step size are analyzed. The difference between pixel values of optimum fluence profile and the fluence profile obtained for various combinations of number of intensity levels and step size is compared and plotted. The calculations of the volume of any RT structure in the dose volume histogram are compared using grid sizes 3 mm and 4 mm. The measured and planned dose at a point showed good agreement (< 3% except for a few cases wherein the chamber was placed in a relatively high dose gradient region. The axial plane dose distribution using film dosimetry shows excellent agreement (correlation coefficient> 0.97 in all the cases. In the leaf sequencer module, the combination of number of intensity level 7 with step size of 3 is the optimal solution for obtaining deliverable segments. The RT structure volume calculation is found to be more accurate with grid size of

  6. Advanced intensity-modulation continuous-wave lidar techniques for ASCENDS CO2 column measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Joel F.; Lin, Bing; Nehrir, Amin R.; Harrison, F. W.; Obland, Michael D.; Meadows, Byron

    2015-10-01

    Global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity- Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space to meet the ASCENDS measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud contamination. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of optically thin clouds, thereby eliminating the need to correct for sidelobe bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. A comparison of BPSK and linear swept-frequency is also discussed in this paper. These results are extended to include Richardson-Lucy deconvolution techniques to extend the resolution of the lidar beyond that implied by limit of the bandwidth of the modulation, where it is shown useful for making tree canopy measurements.

  7. Advanced Intensity-Modulation Continuous-Wave Lidar Techniques for ASCENDS O2 Column Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Joel F.; Lin, Bing; Nehrir, Amin R.; Harrison, F. Wallace; Obland, Michael D.; Meadows, Byron

    2015-01-01

    Global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity- Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space to meet the ASCENDS measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud contamination. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of optically thin clouds, thereby eliminating the need to correct for sidelobe bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. A comparison of BPSK and linear swept-frequency is also discussed in this paper. These results are extended to include Richardson-Lucy deconvolution techniques to extend the resolution of the lidar beyond that implied by limit of the bandwidth of the modulation, where it is shown useful for making tree canopy measurements.

  8. Intensity Modulation Techniques for Continuous-Wave Lidar for Column CO2 Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, J. F.; Lin, B.; Obland, M. D.; Kooi, S. A.; Fan, T. F.; Meadows, B.; Browell, E. V.; Erxleben, W. H.; McGregor, D.; Dobler, J. T.; Pal, S.; O'Dell, C.

    2017-12-01

    Global and regional atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission and the Atmospheric Carbon and Transport (ACT) - America project are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space and airborne platforms to meet the ASCENDS and ACT-America science measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) and Linear Swept Frequency modulations to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud returns. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of optically thin clouds, thereby eliminating bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that take advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques and provides very high (at sub-meter level) range resolution. We compare BPSK to linear swept frequency and introduce a new technique to eliminate sidelobes in situations from linear swept frequency where the SNR is high with results that rival BPSK. We also investigate the effects of non-linear modulators, which can in some circumstances degrade the orthogonality of the waveforms, and show how to avoid this. These techniques are used in a new data processing architecture written in

  9. Direct aperture optimization as a means of reducing the complexity of intensity modulated radiation therapy plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broderick, Maria; Leech, Michelle; Coffey, Mary

    2009-01-01

    Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) is a means of delivering radiation therapy where the intensity of the beam is varied within the treatment field. This is done by dividing a large beam into many small beamlets. Dose constraints are assigned to both the target and sensitive structures and computerised inverse optimization is performed to find the individual weights of this large number of beamlets. The computer adjusts the intensities of these beamlets according to the required planning dose objectives. The optimized intensity patterns are then decomposed into a series of deliverable multi leaf collimator (MLC) shapes in the sequencing step. One of the main problems of IMRT, which becomes even more apparent as the complexity of the IMRT plan increases, is the dramatic increase in the number of Monitor Units (MU) required to deliver a fractionated treatment. The difficulty with this increase in MU is its association with increased treatment times and a greater leakage of radiation from the MLCs increasing the total body dose and the risk of secondary cancers in patients. Therefore one attempts to find ways of reducing these MU without compromising plan quality. The design of inverse planning systems where the beam is divided into small beamlets to produce the required intensity map automatically introduces complexity into IMRT treatment planning. Plan complexity is associated with many negative factors such as dosimetric uncertainty and delivery issues A large search space is required necessitating much computing power. However, the limitations of the delivery technology are not taken into consideration when designing the ideal intensity map therefore a further step termed the sequencing step is required to convert the ideal intensity map into a deliverable one. Many approaches have been taken to reduce the complexity. These include setting intensity limits, putting penalties on the cost function and using smoothing filters Direct Aperture optimization

  10. Direct aperture optimization as a means of reducing the complexity of intensity modulated radiation therapy plans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coffey Mary

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT is a means of delivering radiation therapy where the intensity of the beam is varied within the treatment field. This is done by dividing a large beam into many small beamlets. Dose constraints are assigned to both the target and sensitive structures and computerised inverse optimization is performed to find the individual weights of this large number of beamlets. The computer adjusts the intensities of these beamlets according to the required planning dose objectives. The optimized intensity patterns are then decomposed into a series of deliverable multi leaf collimator (MLC shapes in the sequencing step. One of the main problems of IMRT, which becomes even more apparent as the complexity of the IMRT plan increases, is the dramatic increase in the number of Monitor Units (MU required to deliver a fractionated treatment. The difficulty with this increase in MU is its association with increased treatment times and a greater leakage of radiation from the MLCs increasing the total body dose and the risk of secondary cancers in patients. Therefore one attempts to find ways of reducing these MU without compromising plan quality. The design of inverse planning systems where the beam is divided into small beamlets to produce the required intensity map automatically introduces complexity into IMRT treatment planning. Plan complexity is associated with many negative factors such as dosimetric uncertainty and delivery issues A large search space is required necessitating much computing power. However, the limitations of the delivery technology are not taken into consideration when designing the ideal intensity map therefore a further step termed the sequencing step is required to convert the ideal intensity map into a deliverable one. Many approaches have been taken to reduce the complexity. These include setting intensity limits, putting penalties on the cost function and using smoothing filters Direct

  11. Direct aperture optimization as a means of reducing the complexity of intensity modulated radiation therapy plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broderick, Maria; Leech, Michelle; Coffey, Mary [Division of Radiation Therapy, School of Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2009-02-16

    Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) is a means of delivering radiation therapy where the intensity of the beam is varied within the treatment field. This is done by dividing a large beam into many small beamlets. Dose constraints are assigned to both the target and sensitive structures and computerised inverse optimization is performed to find the individual weights of this large number of beamlets. The computer adjusts the intensities of these beamlets according to the required planning dose objectives. The optimized intensity patterns are then decomposed into a series of deliverable multi leaf collimator (MLC) shapes in the sequencing step. One of the main problems of IMRT, which becomes even more apparent as the complexity of the IMRT plan increases, is the dramatic increase in the number of Monitor Units (MU) required to deliver a fractionated treatment. The difficulty with this increase in MU is its association with increased treatment times and a greater leakage of radiation from the MLCs increasing the total body dose and the risk of secondary cancers in patients. Therefore one attempts to find ways of reducing these MU without compromising plan quality. The design of inverse planning systems where the beam is divided into small beamlets to produce the required intensity map automatically introduces complexity into IMRT treatment planning. Plan complexity is associated with many negative factors such as dosimetric uncertainty and delivery issues A large search space is required necessitating much computing power. However, the limitations of the delivery technology are not taken into consideration when designing the ideal intensity map therefore a further step termed the sequencing step is required to convert the ideal intensity map into a deliverable one. Many approaches have been taken to reduce the complexity. These include setting intensity limits, putting penalties on the cost function and using smoothing filters Direct Aperture optimization

  12. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Sinonasal Cancer: Improved Outcome Compared to Conventional Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dirix, Piet; Vanstraelen, Bianca; Jorissen, Mark; Vander Poorten, Vincent; Nuyts, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate clinical outcome and toxicity of postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Methods and Materials: Between 2003 and 2008, 40 patients with cancer of the paranasal sinuses (n = 34) or nasal cavity (n = 6) received postoperative IMRT to a dose of 60 Gy (n = 21) or 66 Gy (n = 19). Treatment outcome and toxicity were retrospectively compared with that of a previous patient group (n = 41) who were also postoperatively treated to the same doses but with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy without intensity modulation, from 1992 to 2002. Results: Median follow-up was 30 months (range, 4-74 months). Two-year local control, overall survival, and disease-free survival were 76%, 89%, and 72%, respectively. Compared to the three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy treatment, IMRT resulted in significantly improved disease-free survival (60% vs. 72%; p = 0.02). No grade 3 or 4 toxicity was reported in the IMRT group, either acute or chronic. The use of IMRT significantly reduced the incidence of acute as well as late side effects, especially regarding skin toxicity, mucositis, xerostomia, and dry-eye syndrome. Conclusions: Postoperative IMRT for sinonasal cancer significantly improves disease-free survival and reduces acute as well as late toxicity. Consequently, IMRT should be considered the standard treatment modality for malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses.

  13. Dosimetric comparison of three-dimensional conformal and intensity modulated radiotherapy in brain glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Jie; Zhang Guifang; Bai Tong; Yin Yong; Fan Tingyong; Wu Chaoxia

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the dosimetry advantages of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)of brain glioma compared with that of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (SD CRT). Methods: Ten patients with brain glioma were enrolled in this study. Three-dimensional conf0rmal and intensity modulated radiotherapy plans were performed for each patient. The dose distributions of target volume and normal tissues, conformal index (CI) and heterogeneous index (HI) were analyzed using the dose-volume histogram (DVH). The prescription dose was 60 Gy in 30 fractions. Results: IMRT plans decrease the maximum dose and volume of brainstem, mean dose of affected side parotid and maximum dose of spinal-cord. The CI for PTV of IMRT was superior to that of SD CRT, the HI for PTV has no statistical significance of the two model plans. Conclusions: IMRT plans can obviously decrease the dose and volume of brainstem. IMRT is a potential method in the treatment of brain glioma, and dose escalation was possible in patients with brain glioma. (authors)

  14. Validation of intensity modulated radiation therapy patient plans with portal images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delpon, G.; Warren, S.; Mahe, D.; Gaudaire, S.; Lisbona, A.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this study was to show the feasibility of step and shoot intensity-modulated radiation therapy pre-treatment quality control for patients using the electronic portal imaging device (iViewGT) fitted on a Sli+ linac (Elekta Oncology Systems, Crawley, UK) instead of radiographic films. Since the beginning of intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatments, the dosimetric quality control necessary before treating each new patient has been a time-consuming and therefore costly obligation. In order to fully develop this technique, it seems absolutely essential to reduce the cost of these controls, especially the linac time. Up to now, verification of the relative dosimetry field by field has been achieved by acquiring radiographic films in the isocenter plane and comparing them to the results of the XiO planning system (Computerized Medical Systems, Missouri, USA) using RIT113 v4.1 software (Radiological Imaging Technology, Colorado, USA). A qualitative and quantitative evaluation was realised for every field of every patient. A quick and simple procedure was put into place to be able to make the same verifications using portal images. This new technique is not a modification of the overall methodology of analysis. The results achieved by comparing the measurement with the electronic portal imaging device and the calculation with the treatment planning system were in line with those achieved with the films for all indicators we studied (isodoses, horizontal and vertical dose profiles and gamma index). (authors)

  15. [Positioning errors of CT common rail technique in intensity-modulated radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Fei; Xu, Zihai; Mo, Li; Zhu, Chaohua; Chen, Chaomin

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate the value of CT common rail technique for application in intensity-modulated radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Twenty-seven NPC patients underwent Somatom CT scans using the Siemens CTVision system prior to the commencement of the radiotherapy sessions. The acquired CT images were registered with the planning CT images using the matching function of the system to obtain the linear set-up errors of 3 directions, namely X (left to right), Y (superior to inferior), and Z (anterior to posterior). The errors were then corrected online on the moving couch. The 27 NPC patients underwent a total of 110 CT scans and the displacement deviations of the X, Y and Z directions were -0.16∓1.68 mm, 0.25∓1.66 mm, and 0.33∓1.09 mm, respectively. CT common rail technique can accurately and rapidly measure the space error between the posture and the target area to improve the set-up precision of intensity-modulated radiotherapy for NPC.

  16. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy for pituitary adenomas: The preliminary report of Cleveland Clinic experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackley, Heath B.; Reddy, Chandana A. M.S.; Lee, S.-Y.; Harnisch, Gayle A.; Mayberg, Marc R.; Hamrahian, Amir H.; Suh, John H.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is being increasingly used for the treatment of pituitary adenomas. However, there have been few published data on the short- and long-term outcomes of this treatment. This is the initial report of Cleveland Clinic's experience. Methods and Materials: Between February 1998 and December 2003, 34 patients with pituitary adenomas were treated with IMRT. A retrospective chart review was conducted for data analysis. Results: With a median follow-up of 42.5 months, the treatment has proven to be well tolerated, with performance status remaining stable in 90% of patients. Radiographic local control was 89%, and among patients with secretory tumors, 100% had a biochemical response. Only 1 patient required salvage surgery for progressive disease, giving a clinical progression free survival of 97%. The only patient who received more than 46 Gy experienced optic neuropathy 8 months after radiation. Smaller tumor volume significantly correlated with subjective improvements in nonvisual neurologic complaints (p = 0.03), and larger tumor volume significantly correlated with subjective worsening of visual symptoms (p = 0.05). New hormonal supplementation was required for 40% of patients. Younger patients were significantly more likely to require hormonal supplementation (p 0.03). Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy is a safe and effective treatment for pituitary adenomas over the short term. Longer follow-up is necessary to determine if IMRT confers any advantage with respect to either tumor control or toxicity over conventional radiation modalities

  17. A comparison of the quality assurance of four dosimetric tools for intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Jaeman; Baek, Taesung; Lee, Boram; Shin, Dongho; Park, Sung Yong; Park, Jeonghoon; Lim, Young Kyung; Lee, Se Byeong; Kim, Jooyoung; Yoon, Myonggeun

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to compare the quality assurance (QA) results of four dosimetric tools used for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and to suggest universal criteria for the passing rate in QA, irrespective of the dosimetric tool used. Thirty fields of IMRT plans from five patients were selected, followed by irradiation onto radiochromic film, a diode array (Mapcheck), an ion chamber array (MatriXX) and an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) for patient-specific QA. The measured doses from the four dosimetric tools were compared with the dose calculated by the treatment planning system. The passing rates of the four dosimetric tools were calculated using the gamma index method, using as criteria a dose difference of 3% and a distance-to-agreement of 3 mm. The QA results based on Mapcheck, MatriXX and EPID showed good agreement, with average passing rates of 99.61%, 99.04% and 99.29%, respectively. However, the average passing rate based on film measurement was significantly lower, 95.88%. The average uncertainty (1 standard deviation) of passing rates for 6 intensity modulated fields was around 0.31 for film measurement, larger than those of the other three dosimetric tools. QA results and consistencies depend on the choice of dosimetric tool. Universal passing rates should depend on the normalization or inter-comparisons of dosimetric tools if more than one dosimetric tool is used for patient specific QA

  18. A comparison of the quality assurance of four dosimetric tools for intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Jaeman; Baek, Taesung; Lee, Boram; Shin, Dongho; Park, Sung Yong; Park, Jeonghoon; Lim, Young Kyung; Lee, Se Byeong; Kim, Jooyoung; Yoon, Myonggeun

    2015-09-01

    This study was designed to compare the quality assurance (QA) results of four dosimetric tools used for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and to suggest universal criteria for the passing rate in QA, irrespective of the dosimetric tool used. Thirty fields of IMRT plans from five patients were selected, followed by irradiation onto radiochromic film, a diode array (Mapcheck), an ion chamber array (MatriXX) and an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) for patient-specific QA. The measured doses from the four dosimetric tools were compared with the dose calculated by the treatment planning system. The passing rates of the four dosimetric tools were calculated using the gamma index method, using as criteria a dose difference of 3% and a distance-to-agreement of 3 mm. The QA results based on Mapcheck, MatriXX and EPID showed good agreement, with average passing rates of 99.61%, 99.04% and 99.29%, respectively. However, the average passing rate based on film measurement was significantly lower, 95.88%. The average uncertainty (1 standard deviation) of passing rates for 6 intensity modulated fields was around 0.31 for film measurement, larger than those of the other three dosimetric tools. QA results and consistencies depend on the choice of dosimetric tool. Universal passing rates should depend on the normalization or inter-comparisons of dosimetric tools if more than one dosimetric tool is used for patient specific QA.

  19. Whole-brain hippocampal sparing radiation therapy: Volume-modulated arc therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Katrina, E-mail: Trinabena23@gmail.com; Lenards, Nishele; Holson, Janice

    2016-04-01

    The hippocampus is responsible for memory and cognitive function. An ongoing phase II clinical trial suggests that sparing dose to the hippocampus during whole-brain radiation therapy can help preserve a patient's neurocognitive function. Progressive research and advancements in treatment techniques have made treatment planning more sophisticated but beneficial for patients undergoing treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate and compare hippocampal sparing whole-brain (HS-WB) radiation therapy treatment planning techniques using volume-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). We randomly selected 3 patients to compare different treatment techniques that could be used for reducing dose to the hippocampal region. We created 2 treatment plans, a VMAT and an IMRT, from each patient's data set and planned on the Eclipse 11.0 treatment planning system (TPS). A total of 6 plans (3 IMRT and 3 VMAT) were created and evaluated for this case study. The physician contoured the hippocampus as per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0933 protocol atlas. The organs at risk (OR) were contoured and evaluated for the plan comparison, which included the spinal cord, optic chiasm, the right and left eyes, lenses, and optic nerves. Both treatment plans produced adequate coverage on the planning target volume (PTV) while significantly reducing dose to the hippocampal region. The VMAT treatment plans produced a more homogenous dose distribution throughout the PTV while decreasing the maximum point dose to the target. However, both treatment techniques demonstrated hippocampal sparing when irradiating the whole brain.

  20. SU-E-T-449: Hippocampal Sparing Radiotherapy Using Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, S [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Gangdong-gu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, D; Chung, W [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Gangdong-gu (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, M [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The hippocampus sparing during the cranial irradiation has become interesting because it may mitigate radiation-induced neurocognitive toxicity. Herein we report our preliminary study for sparing the hippocampus with and without tilling condition for patient with brain metastases. Methods: Ten patients previously treated with whole brain were reviewed. Five patients tilted the head to around 30 degrees and others were treated without tilting. Treatment plans of linear accelerator (Linac)-based volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were generated for prescription dose of 30 Gy in 15 fractions. Hippocampal avoidance regions were created with 5-mm volumetric expansion around the hippocampus. Whole brain, hippocampus and hippocampal avoidance volume were 1372cm3, 6cm3 and 30cm3 and hippocampal avoidance volume was 2.2% of the whole brain planned target volume in average. Organs at risk (OARs) are hippocampus, eyes, lens, and cochleae. Coverage index (CVI), conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI) and mean dose to OARs were used to compare dose characteristic of tilted and non-tilted cases. Results: In IMRT, when CI, CVI and HI of whole brain were 0.88, 0.09 and 0.98 in both tilted and non-tilted cases, absorbed dose of hippocampal avoidance volume in tilted cases were 10% lower than non-tilted cases. Doses in other OARs such as eyes, lens, and cochleae were also decreased about 20% when tilting the head. When CI, HI and CVI in VMAT were 0.9, 0.08 and 0.99, the dose-decreased ratio of OARs in both with and without tilting cases were almost the same with IMRT. But absolute dose of hippocampal avoidance volume in VMAT was 30% lower than IMRT. Conclusion: This study confirms that dose to hippocampus decreases if patients tilt the head. When treating the whole brain with head tilted, patients can acquire the same successful treatment Result and also preserve their valuable memory.

  1. Cardiac Exposure in the Dynamic Conformal Arc Therapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy of Lung Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Ming

    Full Text Available To retrospectively evaluate the cardiac exposure in three cohorts of lung cancer patients treated with dynamic conformal arc therapy (DCAT, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT, or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT at our institution in the past seven years.A total of 140 lung cancer patients were included in this institutional review board approved study: 25 treated with DCAT, 70 with IMRT and 45 with VMAT. All plans were generated in a same commercial treatment planning system and have been clinically accepted and delivered. The dose distribution to the heart and the effects of tumor laterality, the irradiated heart volume and the beam-to-heart distance on the cardiac exposure were investigated.The mean dose to the heart among all 140 plans was 4.5 Gy. Specifically, the heart received on average 2.3, 5.2 and 4.6 Gy in the DCAT, IMRT and VMAT plans, respectively. The mean heart doses for the left and right lung tumors were 4.1 and 4.8 Gy, respectively. No patients died with evidence of cardiac disease. Three patients (2% with preexisting cardiac condition developed cardiac disease after treatment. Furthermore, the cardiac exposure was found to increase linearly with the irradiated heart volume while decreasing exponentially with the beam-to-heart distance.Compared to old technologies for lung cancer treatment, modern radiotherapy treatment modalities demonstrated better heart sparing. But the heart dose in lung cancer radiotherapy is still higher than that in the radiotherapy of breast cancer and Hodgkin's disease where cardiac complications have been extensively studied. With strong correlations of mean heart dose with beam-to-heart distance and irradiated heart volume, cautions should be exercised to avoid long-term cardiac toxicity in the lung cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy.

  2. Quantitative comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy and intensity modulated radiotherapy plan quality in sino-nasal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankaralingam, Marimuthu; Glegg, Martin; Smith, Suzanne; James, Allan; Rizwanullah, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare various dosimetric parameters of dynamic mlc intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans for sino-nasal cancers, which are rare and complex tumors to treat with radiotherapy. IMRT using five fields, coplanar in the sagittal plane and VMAT employing two coplanar arc plans were created for five patients. The plans were assessed by comparing Conformity Index and Sigma Index (dose homogeneity) in the Planning Target Volume (PTV) and through comparison of dose-volume characteristics to the following organs at risk (OARs): Spinal cord, brainstem, eye, ipsilateral and contralateral optic nerve and the volume of brain receiving 10% of the prescribed dose (V 10% ). The total monitor units required to deliver the plan were also compared. Conformity Index was found to be superior in VMAT plans for three patients and in IMRT plans for two patients. Dose homogeneity within the PTV was better with VMAT plans for all five cases. The mean difference in Sigma Index was 0.68%. There was no significant difference in dose between IMRT and VMAT plans for any of the OARs assessed in these patients. The monitor units were significantly reduced in the VMAT plan in comparison to the IMRT plan for four out of five patients, with mean reduction of 66%. It was found in this study that for the treatment of sino-nasal cancer, VMAT produced minimal, and statistically insignificant improvement in dose homogeneity within the PTV when compared with IMRT. VMAT plans were delivered using significantly fewer monitor units. We conclude in this study that VMAT does not offer significant improvement of treatment for sino-nasal cancer over the existing IMRT techniques, but the findings may change with a larger sample of patients in this rare condition. (author)

  3. Comparative analysis of volumetric-modulated arc therapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy for base of tongue cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nithya, L.; Arulraj, Kumar; Rathinamuthu, Sasikumar; Pandey, Manish Bhushan; Nambi Raj, N. Arunai

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the various dosimetric parameters of dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans for base of tongue cases. All plans were done in Monaco planning system for Elekta synergy linear accelerator with 80 MLC. IMRT plans were planned with nine stationary beams, and VMAT plans were done for 360° arc with single arc or dual arc. The dose to the planning target volumes (PTV) for 70, 63, and 56 Gy was compared. The dose to 95, 98, and 50% volume of PTV were analyzed. The homogeneity index (HI) and the conformity index (CI) of the PTV 70 were also analyzed. IMRT and VMAT plan showed similar dose coverage, HI, and CI. Maximum dose and dose to 1-cc volume of spinal cord, planning risk volume (PRV) cord, and brain stem were compared. IMRT plan and VMAT plan showed similar results except for the 1 cc of PRV cord that received slightly higher dose in VMAT plan. Mean dose and dose to 50% volume of right and left parotid glands were analyzed. VMAT plan gave better sparing of parotid glands than IMRT. In normal tissue dose analyses VMAT was better than IMRT. The number of monitor units (MU) required for delivering the good quality of the plan and the time required to deliver the plan for IMRT and VMAT were compared. The number of MUs for VMAT was higher than that of IMRT plans. However, the delivery time was reduced by a factor of two for VMAT compared with IMRT. VMAT plans yielded good quality of the plan compared with IMRT, resulting in reduced treatment time and improved efficiency for base of tongue cases. (author)

  4. Whole-brain hippocampal sparing radiation therapy: Volume-modulated arc therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Katrina; Lenards, Nishele; Holson, Janice

    2016-01-01

    The hippocampus is responsible for memory and cognitive function. An ongoing phase II clinical trial suggests that sparing dose to the hippocampus during whole-brain radiation therapy can help preserve a patient׳s neurocognitive function. Progressive research and advancements in treatment techniques have made treatment planning more sophisticated but beneficial for patients undergoing treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate and compare hippocampal sparing whole-brain (HS-WB) radiation therapy treatment planning techniques using volume-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). We randomly selected 3 patients to compare different treatment techniques that could be used for reducing dose to the hippocampal region. We created 2 treatment plans, a VMAT and an IMRT, from each patient׳s data set and planned on the Eclipse 11.0 treatment planning system (TPS). A total of 6 plans (3 IMRT and 3 VMAT) were created and evaluated for this case study. The physician contoured the hippocampus as per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0933 protocol atlas. The organs at risk (OR) were contoured and evaluated for the plan comparison, which included the spinal cord, optic chiasm, the right and left eyes, lenses, and optic nerves. Both treatment plans produced adequate coverage on the planning target volume (PTV) while significantly reducing dose to the hippocampal region. The VMAT treatment plans produced a more homogenous dose distribution throughout the PTV while decreasing the maximum point dose to the target. However, both treatment techniques demonstrated hippocampal sparing when irradiating the whole brain. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparative analysis of volumetric-modulated arc therapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy for base of tongue cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Nithya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the various dosimetric parameters of dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT plans with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT plans for base of tongue cases. All plans were done in Monaco planning system for Elekta synergy linear accelerator with 80 MLC. IMRT plans were planned with nine stationary beams, and VMAT plans were done for 360° arc with single arc or dual arc. The dose to the planning target volumes (PTV for 70, 63, and 56 Gy was compared. The dose to 95, 98, and 50% volume of PTV were analyzed. The homogeneity index (HI and the conformity index (CI of the PTV 70 were also analyzed. IMRT and VMAT plan showed similar dose coverage, HI, and CI. Maximum dose and dose to 1-cc volume of spinal cord, planning risk volume (PRV cord, and brain stem were compared. IMRT plan and VMAT plan showed similar results except for the 1 cc of PRV cord that received slightly higher dose in VMAT plan. Mean dose and dose to 50% volume of right and left parotid glands were analyzed. VMAT plan gave better sparing of parotid glands than IMRT. In normal tissue dose analyses VMAT was better than IMRT. The number of monitor units (MU required for delivering the good quality of the plan and the time required to deliver the plan for IMRT and VMAT were compared. The number of MUs for VMAT was higher than that of IMRT plans. However, the delivery time was reduced by a factor of two for VMAT compared with IMRT. VMAT plans yielded good quality of the plan compared with IMRT, resulting in reduced treatment time and improved efficiency for base of tongue cases.

  6. Dosimetric analysis of testicular doses in prostate intensity-modulated and volumetric-modulated arc radiation therapy at different energy levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onal, Cem, E-mail: hcemonal@hotmail.com; Arslan, Gungor; Dolek, Yemliha; Efe, Esma

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the incidental testicular doses during prostate radiation therapy with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) at different energies. Dosimetric data of 15 patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer who were treated with radiotherapy were analyzed. The prescribed dose was 78 Gy in 39 fractions. Dosimetric analysis compared testicular doses generated by 7-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy and volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy with a single arc at 6, 10, and 15 MV energy levels. Testicular doses calculated from the treatment planning system and doses measured from the detectors were analyzed. Mean testicular doses from the intensity-modulated radiotherapy and volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy per fraction calculated in the treatment planning system were 16.3 ± 10.3 cGy vs 21.5 ± 11.2 cGy (p = 0.03) at 6 MV, 13.4 ± 10.4 cGy vs 17.8 ± 10.7 cGy (p = 0.04) at 10 MV, and 10.6 ± 8.5 cGy vs 14.5 ± 8.6 cGy (p = 0.03) at 15 MV, respectively. Mean scattered testicular doses in the phantom measurements were 99.5 ± 17.2 cGy, 118.7 ± 16.4 cGy, and 193.9 ± 14.5 cGy at 6, 10, and 15 MV, respectively, in the intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans. In the volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy plans, corresponding testicular doses per course were 90.4 ± 16.3 cGy, 103.6 ± 16.4 cGy, and 139.3 ± 14.6 cGy at 6, 10, and 15 MV, respectively. In conclusions, this study was the first to measure the incidental testicular doses by intensity-modulated radiotherapy and volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy plans at different energy levels during prostate-only irradiation. Higher photon energy and volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy plans resulted in higher incidental testicular doses compared with lower photon energy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans.

  7. Subliminal action priming modulates the perceived intensity of sensory action consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenner, Max-Philipp; Bauer, Markus; Sidarus, Nura; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Haggard, Patrick; Dolan, Raymond J

    2014-02-01

    The sense of control over the consequences of one's actions depends on predictions about these consequences. According to an influential computational model, consistency between predicted and observed action consequences attenuates perceived stimulus intensity, which might provide a marker of agentic control. An important assumption of this model is that these predictions are generated within the motor system. However, previous studies of sensory attenuation have typically confounded motor-specific perceptual modulation with perceptual effects of stimulus predictability that are not specific to motor action. As a result, these studies cannot unambiguously attribute sensory attenuation to a motor locus. We present a psychophysical experiment on auditory attenuation that avoids this pitfall. Subliminal masked priming of motor actions with compatible prime-target pairs has previously been shown to modulate both reaction times and the explicit feeling of control over action consequences. Here, we demonstrate reduced perceived loudness of tones caused by compatibly primed actions. Importantly, this modulation results from a manipulation of motor processing and is not confounded by stimulus predictability. We discuss our results with respect to theoretical models of the mechanisms underlying sensory attenuation and subliminal motor priming. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Subliminal action priming modulates the perceived intensity of sensory action consequences☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenner, Max-Philipp; Bauer, Markus; Sidarus, Nura; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Haggard, Patrick; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2014-01-01

    The sense of control over the consequences of one’s actions depends on predictions about these consequences. According to an influential computational model, consistency between predicted and observed action consequences attenuates perceived stimulus intensity, which might provide a marker of agentic control. An important assumption of this model is that these predictions are generated within the motor system. However, previous studies of sensory attenuation have typically confounded motor-specific perceptual modulation with perceptual effects of stimulus predictability that are not specific to motor action. As a result, these studies cannot unambiguously attribute sensory attenuation to a motor locus. We present a psychophysical experiment on auditory attenuation that avoids this pitfall. Subliminal masked priming of motor actions with compatible prime–target pairs has previously been shown to modulate both reaction times and the explicit feeling of control over action consequences. Here, we demonstrate reduced perceived loudness of tones caused by compatibly primed actions. Importantly, this modulation results from a manipulation of motor processing and is not confounded by stimulus predictability. We discuss our results with respect to theoretical models of the mechanisms underlying sensory attenuation and subliminal motor priming. PMID:24333539

  9. A comparison of three optimization algorithms for intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pflugfelder, D.; Wilkens, J.J.; Nill, S.; Oelfke, U.

    2008-01-01

    In intensity modulated treatment techniques, the modulation of each treatment field is obtained using an optimization algorithm. Multiple optimization algorithms have been proposed in the literature, e.g. steepest descent, conjugate gradient, quasi-Newton methods to name a few. The standard optimization algorithm in our in-house inverse planning tool KonRad is a quasi-Newton algorithm. Although this algorithm yields good results, it also has some drawbacks. Thus we implemented an improved optimization algorithm based on the limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (L-BFGS) routine. In this paper the improved optimization algorithm is described. To compare the two algorithms, several treatment plans are optimized using both algorithms. This included photon (IMRT) as well as proton (IMPT) intensity modulated therapy treatment plans. To present the results in a larger context the widely used conjugate gradient algorithm was also included into this comparison. On average, the improved optimization algorithm was six times faster to reach the same objective function value. However, it resulted not only in an acceleration of the optimization. Due to the faster convergence, the improved optimization algorithm usually terminates the optimization process at a lower objective function value. The average of the observed improvement in the objective function value was 37%. This improvement is clearly visible in the corresponding dose-volume-histograms. The benefit of the improved optimization algorithm is particularly pronounced in proton therapy plans. The conjugate gradient algorithm ranked in between the other two algorithms with an average speedup factor of two and an average improvement of the objective function value of 30%. (orig.)

  10. Clinical Realization of Sector Beam Intensity Modulation for Gamma Knife Radiosurgery: A Pilot Treatment Planning Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Lijun; Mason, Erica; Sneed, Penny K.; McDermott, Michael; Polishchuk, Alexei; Larson, David A.; Sahgal, Arjun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the clinical feasibility and potential benefits of sector beam intensity modulation (SBIM) specific to Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS). Methods and Materials: SBIM is based on modulating the confocal beam intensities from individual sectors surrounding an isocenter in a nearly 2π geometry. This is in contrast to conventional GKSRS delivery, in which the beam intensities from each sector are restricted to be either 0% or 100% and must be identical for any given isocenter. We developed a SBIM solution based on available clinical planning tools, and we tested it on a cohort of 12 clinical cases as a proof of concept study. The SBIM treatment plans were compared with the original clinically delivered treatment plans to determine dosimetric differences. The goal was to investigate whether SBIM would improve the dose conformity for these treatment plans without prohibitively lengthening the treatment time. Results: A SBIM technique was developed. On average, SBIM improved the Paddick conformity index (PCI) versus the clinically delivered plans (clinical plan PCI = 0.68 ± 0.11 vs SBIM plan PCI = 0.74 ± 0.10, P=.002; 2-tailed paired t test). The SBIM plans also resulted in nearly identical target volume coverage (mean, 97 ± 2%), total beam-on times (clinical plan 58.4 ± 38.9 minutes vs SBIM 63.5 ± 44.7 minutes, P=.057), and gradient indices (clinical plan 3.03 ± 0.27 vs SBIM 3.06 ± 0.29, P=.44) versus the original clinical plans. Conclusion: The SBIM method is clinically feasible with potential dosimetric gains when compared with conventional GKSRS

  11. Contribution of PET and PET/CT in CTV/PTV-modulation for planning of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oehler, W.; Baum, R.P.

    2004-01-01

    PET and PET/CT enlarge the possibilities of purely anatomic imaging by opening up new horizons in determining the metabolic and molecular properties of tumors. This enables to determine the spread of tumors with higher accuracy, especially concerning the primary staging and the diagnosis of recurrences. Patients with locoregional disease which are curable by surgery or local radiotherapy (eventually in combination with chemotherapy) can be differentiated from those patients, where only palliative treatment is indicated. Novel nuclear medicine procedures, which use specific tracers, open the door for the molecular treatment of tumors. This will be especially important for radiation oncology. In future it will be possible to define specific tumor areas within a morphologically homogeneous tumor (e.g. areas of tumor hypoxia, increased local tumor stem cell concentration, tumor parts with higher proliferative activity etc.). With IMRT (intensity modulated radiotherapy) we have already now the opportunity, to concentrate the dose to these specific tumor areas, without overloading normal tissues and organs at risk. (orig.)

  12. Dosimetric aspects of breast radiotherapy with three-dimensional and intensity-modulated radiotherapy helical tomotherapy planning modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, Poonam [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Service of Radiation Therapy, University of Wisconsin Aspirus Cancer Center, Wisconsin Rapids, WI (United States); Yan, Yue, E-mail: yyan5@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Ignatowski, Tasha [Service of Radiation Therapy, University of Wisconsin Aspirus Cancer Center, Wisconsin Rapids, WI (United States); Olson, Anna [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Service of Radiation Therapy, University of Wisconsin Aspirus Cancer Center, Wisconsin Rapids, WI (United States)

    2017-04-01

    In this work, we investigated the dosimetric differences between the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans and the three-dimensional (3D) helical plans based on the TomoTherapy system. A total of 15 patients with supine setup were randomly selected from the data base. For patients with lumpectomy planning target volume (PTV), regional lymph nodes were also included as part of the target. For dose sparing, the significant differences between the helical IMRT and helical 3D were only found in the heart and contralateral breast. For the dose to the heart, helical IMRT reduced the maximum point dose by 6.98 Gy compared to the helical 3D plan (p = 0.01). For contralateral breast, the helical IMRT plans significantly reduced the maximum point dose by 5.6 Gy compared to the helical 3D plan. However, compared to the helical 3D plan, the helical IMRT plan increased the volume for lower dose (13.08% increase in V{sub 5} {sub Gy}, p = 0.01). In general, there are no significant differences in dose sparing between helical IMRT and helical 3D plans.

  13. Dosimetric aspects of breast radiotherapy with three-dimensional and intensity-modulated radiotherapy helical tomotherapy planning modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Poonam; Yan, Yue; Ignatowski, Tasha; Olson, Anna

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we investigated the dosimetric differences between the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans and the three-dimensional (3D) helical plans based on the TomoTherapy system. A total of 15 patients with supine setup were randomly selected from the data base. For patients with lumpectomy planning target volume (PTV), regional lymph nodes were also included as part of the target. For dose sparing, the significant differences between the helical IMRT and helical 3D were only found in the heart and contralateral breast. For the dose to the heart, helical IMRT reduced the maximum point dose by 6.98 Gy compared to the helical 3D plan (p = 0.01). For contralateral breast, the helical IMRT plans significantly reduced the maximum point dose by 5.6 Gy compared to the helical 3D plan. However, compared to the helical 3D plan, the helical IMRT plan increased the volume for lower dose (13.08% increase in V 5 Gy , p = 0.01). In general, there are no significant differences in dose sparing between helical IMRT and helical 3D plans.

  14. Capacity Bounds and High-SNR Capacity of MIMO Intensity-Modulation Optical Channels

    KAUST Repository

    Chaaban, Anas

    2018-02-19

    The capacity of the intensity modulation direct detection multiple-input multiple-output channel is studied. Therein, the nonnegativity constraint of the transmit signal limits the applicability of classical schemes, including precoding. Thus, new ways are required for deriving capacity bounds for this channel. To this end, capacity lower bounds are developed in this paper by deriving the achievable rates of two precodingfree schemes: Channel inversion and QR decomposition. The achievable rate of a DC-offset SVD-based scheme is also derived as a benchmark. Then, capacity upper bounds are derived and compared against the lower bounds. As a result, the capacity at high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is characterized for the case where the number of transmit apertures is not larger than the number of receive apertures, and is shown to be achievable by the QR decomposition scheme. This is shown for a channel with average intensity or peak intensity constraints. Under both constraints, the high-SNR capacity is approximated within a small gap. Extensions to a channel with more transmit apertures than receive apertures are discussed, and capacity bounds for this case are derived.

  15. Capacity Bounds and High-SNR Capacity of MIMO Intensity-Modulation Optical Channels

    KAUST Repository

    Chaaban, Anas; Rezki, Zouheir; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2018-01-01

    The capacity of the intensity modulation direct detection multiple-input multiple-output channel is studied. Therein, the nonnegativity constraint of the transmit signal limits the applicability of classical schemes, including precoding. Thus, new ways are required for deriving capacity bounds for this channel. To this end, capacity lower bounds are developed in this paper by deriving the achievable rates of two precodingfree schemes: Channel inversion and QR decomposition. The achievable rate of a DC-offset SVD-based scheme is also derived as a benchmark. Then, capacity upper bounds are derived and compared against the lower bounds. As a result, the capacity at high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is characterized for the case where the number of transmit apertures is not larger than the number of receive apertures, and is shown to be achievable by the QR decomposition scheme. This is shown for a channel with average intensity or peak intensity constraints. Under both constraints, the high-SNR capacity is approximated within a small gap. Extensions to a channel with more transmit apertures than receive apertures are discussed, and capacity bounds for this case are derived.

  16. A CMOS Luminescence Intensity and Lifetime Dual Sensor Based on Multicycle Charge Modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Guoqing; Sonkusale, Sameer R

    2018-06-01

    Luminescence plays an important role in many scientific and industrial applications. This paper proposes a novel complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) sensor chip that can realize both luminescence intensity and lifetime sensing. To enable high sensitivity, we propose parasitic insensitive multicycle charge modulation scheme for low-light lifetime extraction benefiting from simplicity, accuracy, and compatibility with deeply scaled CMOS process. The designed in-pixel capacitive transimpedance amplifier (CTIA) based structure is able to capture the weak luminescence-induced voltage signal by accumulating photon-generated charges in 25 discrete gated 10-ms time windows and 10-μs pulsewidth. A pinned photodiode on chip with 1.04 pA dark current is utilized for luminescence detection. The proposed CTIA-based circuitry can achieve 2.1-mV/(nW/cm 2 ) responsivity and 4.38-nW/cm 2 resolution at 630 nm wavelength for intensity measurement and 45-ns resolution for lifetime measurement. The sensor chip is employed for measuring time constants and luminescence lifetimes of an InGaN-based white light-emitting diode at different wavelengths. In addition, we demonstrate accurate measurement of the lifetime of an oxygen sensitive chromophore with sensitivity to oxygen concentration of 7.5%/ppm and 6%/ppm in both intensity and lifetime domain. This CMOS-enabled oxygen sensor was then employed to test water quality from different sources (tap water, lakes, and rivers).

  17. Dose to Larynx Predicts for Swallowing Complications After Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caglar, Hale B.; Tishler, Roy B.; Othus, Megan; Burke, Elaine; Li Yi; Goguen, Laura; Wirth, Lori J.; Haddad, Robert I.; Norris, Carl M.; Court, Laurence E.; Aninno, Donald J. D.; Posner, Marshall R.; Allen, Aaron M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate early swallowing after intensity-modulated radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and determine factors correlating with aspiration and/or stricture. Methods and Materials: Consecutive patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy between September 2004 and August 2006 at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women's Hospital were evaluated with institutional review board approval. Patients underwent swallowing evaluation after completion of therapy; including video swallow studies. The clinical- and treatment-related variables were examined for correlation with aspiration or strictures, as well as doses to the larynx, pharyngeal constrictor muscles, and cervical esophagus. The correlation was assessed with logistic regression analysis. Results: A total of 96 patients were evaluated. Their median age was 55 years, and 79 (82%) were men. The primary site of cancer was the oropharynx in 43, hypopharynx/larynx in 17, oral cavity in 13, nasopharynx in 11, maxillary sinus in 2, and unknown primary in 10. Of the 96 patients, 85% underwent definitive RT and 15% postoperative RT. Also, 28 patients underwent induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemotherapy, 59 received concurrent chemotherapy, and 9 patients underwent RT alone. The median follow-up was 10 months. Of the 96 patients, 31 (32%) had clinically significant aspiration and 36 (37%) developed a stricture. The radiation dose-volume metrics, including the volume of the larynx receiving ≥50 Gy (p = 0.04 and p = 0.03, respectively) and volume of the inferior constrictor receiving ≥50 Gy (p = 0.05 and p = 0.02, respectively) were significantly associated with both aspiration and stricture. The mean larynx dose correlated with aspiration (p = 0.003). Smoking history was the only clinical factor to correlate with stricture (p = 0.05) but not aspiration. Conclusion: Aspiration and stricture are common side effects after

  18. Interfractional Dose Variations in Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With Breath-Hold for Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Mitsuhiro [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Shibuya, Keiko, E-mail: kei@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Nakamura, Akira [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Shiinoki, Takehiro [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto (Japan); Matsuo, Yukinori [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Nakata, Manabu [Clinical Radiology Service Division, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto (Japan); Sawada, Akira; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the interfractional dose variations for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (RT) combined with breath-hold (BH) at end-exhalation (EE) for pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 10 consecutive patients with pancreatic cancer were enrolled. Each patient was fixed in the supine position on an individualized vacuum pillow with both arms raised. Computed tomography (CT) scans were performed before RT, and three additional scans were performed during the course of chemoradiotherapy using a conventional RT technique. The CT data were acquired under EE-BH conditions (BH-CT) using a visual feedback technique. The intensity-modulated RT plan, which used five 15-MV coplanar ports, was designed on the initial BH-CT set with a prescription dose of 39 Gy at 2.6 Gy/fraction. After rigid image registration between the initial and subsequent BH-CT scans, the dose distributions were recalculated on the subsequent BH-CT images under the same conditions as in planning. Changes in the dose-volume metrics of the gross tumor volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV = GTV + 5 mm), stomach, and duodenum were evaluated. Results: For the GTV and clinical target volume (CTV), the 95th percentile of the interfractional variations in the maximal dose, mean dose, dose covering 95% volume of the region of structure, and percentage of the volume covered by the 90% isodose line were within {+-}3%. Although the volume covered by the 39 Gy isodose line for the stomach and duodenum did not exceed 0.1 mL at planning, the volume covered by the 39 Gy isodose line for these structures was up to 11.4 cm{sup 3} and 1.8 cm{sup 3}, respectively. Conclusions: Despite variations in the gastrointestinal state and abdominal wall position at EE, the GTV and CTV were mostly ensured at the planned dose, with the exception of 1 patient. Compared with the duodenum, large variations in the stomach volume receiving high-dose radiation were observed, which might be beyond the

  19. Comparison of the efficacy of intensity modulated radiotherapy delivered by competing technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seco, Joao Carlos

    2003-01-01

    The project involved the study and comparison of the various intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivery techniques. IMRT can be delivered via (i) the NOMOS MIMiC tomotherapy device, (ii) the dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC), and (iii) the technique of multiple-static fields (MSF) using a multileaf collimator (MLC). To evaluate the relative benefits and limitations of the different methods of delivering IMRT an inverse-planning simulation code was developed. The simulation uses two distinct beam models: (a) the PEACOCK pencil-beam model based on the double Gaussian convolution for the MIMiC, and (b) the macropencil beam model (with the extended source model included to correct for the output factor) which is used for the DMLC and MSF-MLC delivery techniques. The process of delivering an IMRT treatment may involve various beam-modifying techniques such as multileaf collimators, the NOMOS MIMiC, blocks, wedges, etc. The constraints associated with the IMRT delivery technique are usually neglected in the process of obtaining the 'optimal' inverse treatment plan. Consequently, dose optimization may be significantly reduced when the 'optimal' beam profiles are converted to leaf/diaphragm positions via a leaf-sequencing interpreter. The work developed assessed the effects on the optimum treatment plan of the following leaf-sequencing algorithms: MSF-MLC, DMLC, and NOMOS MIMiC. An increase of 2.5%, 3.7% and 5.7% was observed for the PTV dose, when delivering a fluence profile with the DMLC, MSF, and NOMOS MIMiC techniques, respectively. An intensity-modulated beam optimization algorithm was developed to incorporate the delivery constraints into the optimization cycle. The optimization algorithm was based on the quasi-Newton method of iteratively solving minimization problems. The developed algorithm iteratively corrects the incident, pencil-beam-like fluence to incorporate the delivery constraints. In the case of the DMLC and MSF the optimization converged

  20. Advanced Intensity-Modulation Continuous-Wave Lidar Techniques for Column CO2 Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, J. F.; Lin, B.; Obland, M. D.; Liu, Z.; Kooi, S. A.; Fan, T. F.; Nehrir, A. R.; Meadows, B.; Browell, E. V.

    2016-12-01

    Advanced Intensity-Modulation Continuous-Wave Lidar Techniques for Column CO2 MeasurementsJoel F. Campbell1, Bing Lin1, Michael D. Obland1, Zhaoyan Liu1, Susan Kooi2, Tai-Fang Fan2, Amin R. Nehrir1, Byron Meadows1, Edward V. Browell31NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA 23681 2SSAI, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA 23681 3STARSS-II Affiliate, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA 23681 AbstractGlobal and regional atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission and the Atmospheric Carbon and Transport (ACT) - America project are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space and airborne platforms to meet the ASCENDS and ACT-America science measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud returns. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of optically thin clouds, thereby minimizing bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new sub-meter hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. These techniques are used in a new data processing

  1. Motivational intensity modulates the effects of positive emotions on set shifting after controlling physiological arousal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ya; Siu, Angela F Y

    2015-12-01

    Recent research on the construct of emotion suggests the integration of a motivational dimension into the traditional two-dimension (subjective valence and physiological arousal) model. The motivational intensity of an emotional state should be taken into account while investigating the emotion-cognition relationship. This study examined how positive emotional states varying in motivational intensity influenced set shifting, after controlling the potential confounding impacts of physiological arousal. In Experiment 1, 155 volunteers performed a set-shifting task after being randomly assigned to five states: high- vs. low-motivating positive affect (interest vs. serenity), high- vs. low-motivating negative affect (disgust vs. anxiety), and neutral state. Eighty-five volunteers participated in Experiment 2, which further examined the effects of higher vs. lower degree of interest. Both experiments measured and compared participants' physiological arousal (blood pressure and pulse rate) under the normal and experimental conditions as the covariate. Results showed no difference in switching performance between the neutral and serenity groups. As compared with the neutral state, the high-motivating positive affect significantly increased set-switching reaction time costs, but reduced error rate costs; the higher the motivational intensity, the greater the time-costs impairment. This indicates a role of the high-motivating positive affect in regulating the balance between the flexible and stable cognitive control. Motivational intensity also modulated the effects of negative emotional states, i.e., disgust caused a larger increase in time costs than anxiety. Further exploration into neurobiological mechanisms that may mediate the emotional effects on set shifting is warranted. © 2015 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy with simultaneous modulated accelerated boost technique and chemotherapy in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fareed, Muhammad M; AlAmro, Abdullah S; Bayoumi, Yasser; Tunio, Mutahir A; Ismail, Abdul S; Akasha, Rashad; Mubasher, Mohamed; Al Asiri, Mushabbab

    2013-01-01

    To present our experience of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with simultaneous modulated accelerated radiotherapy (SMART) boost technique in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Sixty eight patients of NPC were treated between April 2006 and December 2011 including 45 males and 23 females with mean age of 46 (range 15–78). Stage distribution was; stage I 3, stage II 7, stage III 26 and stage IV 32. Among 45 (66.2%) evaluated patients for presence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), 40 (88.8%) were positive for EBV. Median radiation doses delivered to gross tumor volume (GTV) and positive neck nodes were 66–70 Gy, 63 Gy to clinical target volume (CTV) and 50.4 Gy to clinically negative neck. In addition 56 (82.4%) patients with bulky tumors (T4/N2+) received neoadjuvant chemotherapy 2–3 cycles (Cisplatin/Docetaxel or Cisplatin/Epirubicin or Cisplatin/5 Flourouracil). Concurrent chemotherapy with radiation was weekly Cisplatin 40 mg/m 2 (40 patients) or Cisplatin 100 mg/m 2 (28 patients). With a median follow up of 20 months (range 3–43), one patient developed local recurrence, two experienced regional recurrences and distant failure was seen in 3 patients. Estimated 3 year disease free survival (DFS) was 94%. Three year DFS for patients with EBV was 100% as compared to 60% without EBV (p = 0.0009). Three year DFS for patients with undifferentiated histology was 98% as compared to 82% with other histologies (p = 0.02). Acute grade 3 toxicity was seen as 21 (30.9%) having G-III mucositis and 6 (8.8%) with G-III skin reactions. Late toxicity was minimal and loss of taste was seen in 3 patients (7.5%) at time of analysis. IMRT with SMART in combination with chemotherapy is feasible and effective in terms of both the clinical response and safety profile. EBV, histopathology and nodal involvement were found important prognostic factors for locoregional recurrence

  3. Modeling and Validation of Performance Limitations for the Optimal Design of Interferometric and Intensity-Modulated Fiber Optic Displacement Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moro, Erik A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-07

    Optical fiber sensors offer advantages over traditional electromechanical sensors, making them particularly well-suited for certain measurement applications. Generally speaking, optical fiber sensors respond to a desired measurand through modulation of an optical signal's intensity, phase, or wavelength. Practically, non-contacting fiber optic displacement sensors are limited to intensity-modulated and interferometric (or phase-modulated) methodologies. Intensity-modulated fiber optic displacement sensors relate target displacement to a power measurement. The simplest intensity-modulated sensor architectures are not robust to environmental and hardware fluctuations, since such variability may cause changes in the measured power level that falsely indicate target displacement. Differential intensity-modulated sensors have been implemented, offering robustness to such intensity fluctuations, and the speed of these sensors is limited only by the combined speed of the photodetection hardware and the data acquisition system (kHz-MHz). The primary disadvantages of intensity-modulated sensing are the relatively low accuracy (?m-mm for low-power sensors) and the lack of robustness, which consequently must be designed, often with great difficulty, into the sensor's architecture. White light interferometric displacement sensors, on the other hand, offer increased accuracy and robustness. Unlike their monochromatic-interferometer counterparts, white light interferometric sensors offer absolute, unambiguous displacement measurements over large displacement ranges (cm for low-power, 5 mW, sources), necessitating no initial calibration, and requiring no environmental or feedback control. The primary disadvantage of white light interferometric displacement sensors is that their utility in dynamic testing scenarios is limited, both by hardware bandwidth and by their inherent high-sensitivity to Doppler-effects. The decision of whether to use either an intensity-modulated

  4. Feasibility of intensity-modulated and image-guided radiotherapy for locally advanced esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Nam P; Desai, Anand; Smith-Raymond, Lexie; Jang, Siyoung; Vock, Jacqueline; Vinh-Hung, Vincent; Chi, Alexander; Vos, Paul; Pugh, Judith; Vo, Richard A; Ceizyk, Misty

    2014-01-01

    In this study the feasibility of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and tomotherapy-based image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) for locally advanced esophageal cancer was assessed. A retrospective study of ten patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer who underwent concurrent chemotherapy with IMRT (1) and IGRT (9) was conducted. The gross tumor volume was treated to a median dose of 70 Gy (62.4-75 Gy). At a median follow-up of 14 months (1-39 months), three patients developed local failures, six patients developed distant metastases, and complications occurred in two patients (1 tracheoesophageal fistula, 1 esophageal stricture requiring repeated dilatations). No patients developed grade 3-4 pneumonitis or cardiac complications. IMRT and IGRT may be effective for the treatment of locally advanced esophageal cancer with acceptable complications

  5. Analysis of Factors Influencing the Development of Xerostomia during Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Ken; Stevens, Jason; Yepes, Juan Fernando; Randall, Marcus E.; Kudrimoti, Mahesh; Feddock, Jonathan; Xi, Jing; Kryscio, Richard J.; Miller, Craig S.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Factors influencing xerostomia during intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) were assessed. METHODS A 6-week study of 32 head and neck cancer (HNC) patients was performed. Subjects completed the Xerostomia Inventory (XI) and provided stimulated saliva (SS) at baseline, week two and at end of IMRT. Influence of SS flow rate (SSFR), calcium and mucin 5b (MUC5b) concentrations and radiation dose on xerostomia was determined. RESULTS HNC subjects experienced mean SSFR decline of 36% by visit two (N=27; p=0.012) and 57% by visit three (N=20; p=0.0004), Concentrations of calcium and MUC5b increased, but not significantly during IMRT (p>0.05). Xerostomia correlated most with decreasing salivary flow rate as determined by Spearman correlations (pxerostomia. PMID:23523462

  6. American Society of Radiation Oncology Recommendations for Documenting Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, Timothy; Das, Rupak; Low, Daniel; Yin Fangfang; Balter, James; Palta, Jatinder; Eifel, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for approximately a decade, a lack of adequate guidelines for documenting these treatments persists. Proper IMRT treatment documentation is necessary for accurate reconstruction of prior treatments when a patient presents with a marginal recurrence. This is especially crucial when the follow-up care is managed at a second treatment facility not involved in the initial IMRT treatment. To address this issue, an American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) workgroup within the American ASTRO Radiation Physics Committee was formed at the request of the ASTRO Research Council to develop a set of recommendations for documenting IMRT treatments. This document provides a set of comprehensive recommendations for documenting IMRT treatments, as well as image-guidance procedures, with example forms provided.

  7. Stereotactic Image-Guided Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Using the HI-ART II Helical Tomotherapy System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, Timothy W.; Hudes, Richard; Dziuba, Sylwester; Kazi, Abdul; Hall, Mark; Dawson, Dana

    2008-01-01

    The highly integrated adaptive radiation therapy (HI-ART II) helical tomotherapy unit is a new radiotherapy machine designed to achieve highly precise and accurate treatments at all body sites. The precision and accuracy of the HI-ART II is similar to that provided by stereotactic radiosurgery systems, hence the historical distinction between external beam radiotherapy and stereotactic procedures based on differing precision requirements is removed for this device. The objectives of this work are: (1) to describe stereotactic helical tomotherapy processes (SRS, SBRT); (2) to show that the precision and accuracy of the HI-ART meet the requirements defined for SRS and SBRT; and (3) to describe the clinical implementation of a stereotactic image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) system that incorporates optical motion management

  8. A new deconvolution approach to robust fluence for intensity modulation under geometrical uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pengcheng; De Crevoisier, Renaud; Simon, Antoine; Haigron, Pascal; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis; Li, Baosheng; Shu, Huazhong

    2013-09-01

    This work addresses random geometrical uncertainties that are intrinsically observed in radiation therapy by means of a new deconvolution method combining a series expansion and a Butterworth filter. The method efficiently suppresses high-frequency components by discarding the higher order terms of the series expansion and then filtering out deviations on the field edges. An additional approximation is made in order to set the fluence values outside the field to zero in the robust profiles. This method is compared to the deconvolution kernel method for a regular 2D fluence map, a real intensity-modulated radiation therapy field, and a prostate case. The results show that accuracy is improved while fulfilling clinical planning requirements.

  9. A new deconvolution approach to robust fluence for intensity modulation under geometrical uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Pengcheng; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis; Shu Huazhong; De Crevoisier, Renaud; Simon, Antoine; Haigron, Pascal; Li Baosheng

    2013-01-01

    This work addresses random geometrical uncertainties that are intrinsically observed in radiation therapy by means of a new deconvolution method combining a series expansion and a Butterworth filter. The method efficiently suppresses high-frequency components by discarding the higher order terms of the series expansion and then filtering out deviations on the field edges. An additional approximation is made in order to set the fluence values outside the field to zero in the robust profiles. This method is compared to the deconvolution kernel method for a regular 2D fluence map, a real intensity-modulated radiation therapy field, and a prostate case. The results show that accuracy is improved while fulfilling clinical planning requirements. (paper)

  10. Matching Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy to an Anterior Low Neck Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amdur, Robert J.; Liu, Chihray; Li, Jonathan; Mendenhall, William; Hinerman, Russell

    2007-01-01

    When using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to treat head and neck cancer with the primary site above the level of the larynx, there are two basic options for the low neck lymphatics: to treat the entire neck with IMRT, or to match the IMRT plan to a conventional anterior 'low neck' field. In view of the potential advantages of using a conventional low neck field, it is important to look for ways to minimize or manage the problems of matching IMRT to a conventional radiotherapy field. Treating the low neck with a single anterior field and the standard larynx block decreases the dose to the larynx and often results in a superior IMRT plan at the primary site. The purpose of this article is to review the most applicable studies and to discuss our experience with implementing a technique that involves moving the position of the superior border of the low neck field several times during a single treatment fraction

  11. Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for pediatric cancer patients: The advantage and fear of second malignant neoplasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaghloul, M.S.

    2013-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy is used for delivering more efficient homogenous dose to the target and lowering of dose to the surrounding normal tissues. However, a second malignant neoplasm may develop after prolonged latent period. The use of modern precise radiotherapy techniques in the pediatric age group has many controversial issues in spite of its proven dosimetric distribution advantages and the considerable decrease of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). This concern is due to many factors; mainly the exposure of a larger volume of normal tissues to low dose radiotherapy. Children have more proliferating tissues compared to the adults. However, the epidemiological data did not detect an increase in the incidence of radiation-induced second malignancy. This issue is still controversial as IMRT and other precise radiotherapy techniques were not widely used except recently. This may entail a thorough careful follow up for children treated with these techniques to detect any incidence increase

  12. Locally Advanced Oncocytic Carcinoma of the Nasal Cavity Treated With Surgery and Intensity-modulated Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Wen Hu

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Oncocytic carcinomas of the nasal cavity are extremely rare. We report 1 patient whose primary tumor and neck lymphadenopathies were under control nearly 2 years after combined surgery and radiotherapy. An 80-year-old man with a history of nasal oncocytoma had received excision twice previously. Computed tomography demonstrated locally advanced recurrent tumor invading the paranasal sinuses and orbit with lymphadenopathies in the right neck. Skull base surgery was performed. Pathological examination revealed oncocytic carcinoma. Positron emission tomography showed hypermetabolic lesions in the surgical bed and right neck. The patient subsequently received intensity-modulated radiotherapy to the primary site and the whole neck. Follow-up computed tomography 4 months later showed marked shrinkage of the neck lymphadenopathies. There was no progression after nearly 2 years. Although these tumors have historically been regarded as radioresistant, the combined treatment of surgery followed by radiotherapy may offer the best chance for control of locally advanced disease.

  13. A method of segment weight optimization for intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pei Xi; Cao Ruifen; Jing Jia; Cheng Mengyun; Zheng Huaqing; Li Jia; Huang Shanqing; Li Gui; Song Gang; Wang Weihua; Wu Yican; FDS Team

    2011-01-01

    The error caused by leaf sequencing often leads to planning of Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) arrange system couldn't meet clinical demand. The optimization approach in this paper can reduce this error and improve efficiency of plan-making effectively. Conjugate Gradient algorithm was used to optimize segment weight and readjust segment shape, which could minimize the error anterior-posterior leaf sequencing eventually. Frequent clinical cases were tasted by precise radiotherapy system, and then compared Dose-Volume histogram between target area and organ at risk as well as isodose line in computed tomography (CT) film, we found that the effect was improved significantly after optimizing segment weight. Segment weight optimizing approach based on Conjugate Gradient method can make treatment planning meet clinical request more efficiently, so that has extensive application perspective. (authors)

  14. Introducing an on-line adaptive procedure for prostate image guided intensity modulate proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M; Westerly, D C; Mackie, T R

    2011-08-07

    With on-line image guidance (IG), prostate shifts relative to the bony anatomy can be corrected by realigning the patient with respect to the treatment fields. In image guided intensity modulated proton therapy (IG-IMPT), because the proton range is more sensitive to the material it travels through, the realignment may introduce large dose variations. This effect is studied in this work and an on-line adaptive procedure is proposed to restore the planned dose to the target. A 2D anthropomorphic phantom was constructed from a real prostate patient's CT image. Two-field laterally opposing spot 3D-modulation and 24-field full arc distal edge tracking (DET) plans were generated with a prescription of 70 Gy to the planning target volume. For the simulated delivery, we considered two types of procedures: the non-adaptive procedure and the on-line adaptive procedure. In the non-adaptive procedure, only patient realignment to match the prostate location in the planning CT was performed. In the on-line adaptive procedure, on top of the patient realignment, the kinetic energy for each individual proton pencil beam was re-determined from the on-line CT image acquired after the realignment and subsequently used for delivery. Dose distributions were re-calculated for individual fractions for different plans and different delivery procedures. The results show, without adaptive, that both the 3D-modulation and the DET plans experienced delivered dose degradation by having large cold or hot spots in the prostate. The DET plan had worse dose degradation than the 3D-modulation plan. The adaptive procedure effectively restored the planned dose distribution in the DET plan, with delivered prostate D(98%), D(50%) and D(2%) values less than 1% from the prescription. In the 3D-modulation plan, in certain cases the adaptive procedure was not effective to reduce the delivered dose degradation and yield similar results as the non-adaptive procedure. In conclusion, based on this 2D phantom

  15. Intensity-modulated photon arc therapy for treatment of pleural mesothelioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobler, Matt; Watson, Gordon; Leavitt, Dennis

    2002-01-01

    Radiotherapy plays a key role in the definitive or adjuvant management of patients with mesothelioma of the pleural surface. Many patients are referred for radiation with intact lung following biopsy or subtotal pleurectomy. Delivery of efficacious doses of radiation to the pleural lining while avoiding lung parenchyma toxicity has been a difficult technical challenge. Using opposed photon fields produce doses in lung that result in moderate-to-severe pulmonary toxicity in 100% of patients treated. Combined photon-electron beam treatment, at total doses of 4250 cGy to the pleural surface, results in two-thirds of the lung volume receiving over 2100 cGy. We have developed a technique using intensity-modulated photon arc therapy (IMRT) that significantly improves the dose distribution to the pleural surface with concomitant decrease in dose to lung parenchyma compared to traditional techniques. IMRT treatment of the pleural lining consists of segments of photon arcs that can be intensity modulated with varying beam weights and multileaf positions to produce a more uniform distribution to the pleural surface, while at the same time reducing the overall dose to the lung itself. Computed tomography (CT) simulation is critical for precise identification of target volumes as well as critical normal structures (lung and heart). Rotational arc trajectories and individual leaf positions and weightings are then defined for each CT plane within the patient. This paper will describe the proposed rotational IMRT technique and, using simulated isodose distributions, show the improved potential for sparing of dose to the critical structures of the lung, heart, and spinal cord

  16. Dynamic intensity-modulated non-coplanar arc radiotherapy (INCA) for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krayenbuehl, Jerome; Davis, J. Bernard; Ciernik, I. Frank

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: To define the potential advantages of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) applied using a non-coplanar dynamic arc technique for the treatment of head and neck cancer. Materials and methods: External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) was planned in ten patients with head and neck cancer using coplanar IMRT and non-coplanar arc techniques, termed intensity modulated non-coplanar arc EBRT (INCA). Planning target volumes (PTV1) of first order covered the gross tumor volume and surrounding clinical target volume treated with 68-70 Gy, whereas PTV2 covered the elective lymph nodes with 54-55 Gy using a simultaneous internal boost. Treatment plan comparison between IMRT and INCA was carried out using dose-volume histogram and 'equivalent uniform dose' (EUD). Results: INCA resulted in better dose coverage and homogeneity of the PTV1, PTV2, and reduced dose delivered to most of the organs at risk (OAR). For the parotid glands, a reduction of the mean dose of 2.9 (±2.0) Gy was observed (p 0.002), the mean dose to the larynx was reduced by 6.9 (±2.9) Gy (p 0.003), the oral mucosa by 2.4 (±1.1) Gy (p < 0.001), and the maximal dose to the spinal cord by 3.2 (±1.7) Gy (p = 0.004). The mean dose to the brain was increased by 3.0 (±1.4) Gy (p = 0.002) and the mean lung dose increased by 0.2 (±0.4) Gy (p = 0.87). The EUD suggested better avoidance of the OAR, except for the lung, and better coverage and dose uniformity were achieved with INCA compared to IMRT. Conclusion: Dose delivery accuracy with IMRT using a non-coplanar dynamic arc beam geometry potentially improves treatment of head and neck cancer

  17. Intensity Modulated Neutron Radiotherapy for the Treatment of Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santanam, Lakshmi; He, Tony; Yudelev, Mark; Forman, Jeffrey D.; Orton, Colin G.; Heuvel, Frank van den; Maughan, Richard L.; Burmeister, Jay

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigates the enhanced conformality of neutron dose distributions obtainable through the application of intensity modulated neutron radiotherapy (IMNRT) to the treatment of prostate adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: An in-house algorithm was used to optimize individual segments for IMNRT generated using an organ-at-risk (OAR) avoidance approach. A number of beam orientation schemes were investigated in an attempt to approach an optimum solution. The IMNRT plans were created retrospectively for 5 patients previously treated for prostate adenocarcinoma using fast neutron therapy (FNT), and a comparison of these plans is presented. Dose distributions and dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were analyzed and plans were evaluated based on percentage volumes of rectum and bladder receiving 95%, 80%, and 50% (V 95 , V 80 , V 50 ) of the prescription dose, and on V 60 for both the femoral heads and GM muscle group. Results: Plans were normalized such that the IMNRT DVHs for prostate and seminal vesicles were nearly identical to those for conventional FNT plans. Use of IMNRT provided reductions in rectum V 95 and V 80 of 10% (2-27%) and 13% (5-28%), respectively, and reductions in bladder V 95 and V 80 of 12% (3-26%) and 4% (7-10%), respectively. The average decrease in V 60 for the femoral heads was 4.5% (1-18%), with no significant change in V 60 for the GM muscle group. Conclusions: This study provides the first analysis of the application of intensity modulation to neutron radiotherapy. The IMNRT technique provides a substantial reduction in normal tissue dose in the treatment of prostate cancer. This reduction should result in a significant clinical advantage for this and other treatment sites

  18. Intensity modulated radiotherapy for sinonasal malignancies with a focus on optic pathway preservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To assess if intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT can possibly lead to improved local control and lower incidence of vision impairment/blindness in comparison to non-IMRT techniques when treating sinonasal malignancies; what is the most optimal dose constraints for the optic pathway; and the impact of different IMRT strategies on optic pathway sparing in this setting. Methods and materials A literature search in the PubMed databases was conducted in July, 2012. Results Clinical studies on IMRT and 2D/3D (2 dimensional/3 dimensional RT for sinonasal malignancies suggest improved local control and lower incidence of severe vision impairment with IMRT in comparison to non-IMRT techniques. As observed in the non-IMRT studies, blindness due to disease progression may occur despite a lack of severe toxicity possibly due to the difficulty of controlling locally very advanced disease with a dose ≤ 70 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy’s influence on the the risk of severe optic toxicity after radiotherapy is unclear. A maximum dose of ≤ 54 Gy with conventional fractionation to the optic pathway may decrease the risk of blindness. Increased magnitude of intensity modulation through increasing the number of segments, beams, and using a combination of coplanar and non-coplanar arrangements may help increase dose conformality and optic pathway sparing when IMRT is used. Conclusion IMRT optimized with appropriate strategies may be the treatment of choice for the most optimal local control and optic pathway sparing when treating sinonasal malignancy.

  19. Patterns of Failure and Toxicity after Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenfeld, Gordon O.; Amdur, Robert J.; Morris, Christopher G.; Li, Jonathan G.; Hinerman, Russell W.; Mendenhall, William M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the outcome of patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the charts of 100 consecutive patients treated with IMRT for squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx (64%), nasopharynx (16%), hypopharynx (14%), and larynx (6%). Most patients were treated with a concomitant boost schedule to 72 Gy. Of the 100 patients, 54 (54%) received adjuvant chemotherapy, mostly concurrent cisplatin. The dosimetry plans for patients with either locoregional failure or Grade 4-5 complications were reviewed and fused over the computed tomography images corresponding with the location of the event. Marginal failures were defined as those that occurred at a region of high-dose falloff, where conventional fields would have provided better coverage. Results: The median follow-up of living patients was 3.1 years (range, 1-5.2 years). The 3-year rate of local control, locoregional control, freedom from relapse, cause-specific survival, and overall survival for all patients was 89%, 87%, 72%, 78%, and 71%, respectively. The 3-year rate of freedom from relapse, cause-specific survival, and overall survival for the 64 oropharynx patients was 86%, 92%, and 84%, respectively. Of the 10 local failures, 2 occurred at the margin of the high-dose planning target volume. Both regional failures occurred within the planning target volume. No locoregional failures occurred outside the planning target volume. Of the 100 patients, 8 and 5 had Grade 4 and 5 complications from treatment, respectively. All patients with Grade 5 complications had received adjuvant chemotherapy. No attempt was made to discriminate between the complications from IMRT and other aspects of the patients' treatment. Conclusion: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy did not compromise the outcome compared with what we have achieved with conventional techniques. The 2 cases of recurrence in the high-dose gradient region highlight the

  20. VERIDOS: a new tool for quality assurance for intensity modulated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiezorek, Tilo; Schwedas, Michael; Scheithauer, Marcel; Salz, Henning; Bellemann, Matthias; Wendt, Thomas G

    2002-12-01

    The use of intensity modulated radiation fields needs an extended quality assurance concept. This consists of a linac related part and a case related part. Case related means the verification of an individual treatment plan, optimized on a CT data set of an individual patient and prepared for the treatment of this patient. This part of the quality assurance work is usually time consuming, delivers only partially quantitative results and is uncomfortable without additional help. It will be shown in this paper how the software VERIDOS will improve the optimization of the case related part of the quality assurance work. The main function of the software is the quantitative comparison of the calculated dose distribution from the treatment planning software with the measured dose distribution of an irradiated phantom. Several additional functions will be explained. Two self-developed phantoms made of RW3 (solid water) and GAFCHROMIC films or Kodak EDR2 films for the measurement of the dose distributions were used. VERIDOS was tested with the treatment planning systems Helay-TMS and Brainscan. VERIDOS is a suitable tool for the import of calculated dose matrices from the treatment planning systems Helax-TMS and Brainscan and of measured dose matrices exported from the dosimetry software Mephysto (PTW). The import from other treatment planning systems and scanning software applications for film dosimetry is generally possible. In such case the import function has to be adapted to the special header of the import matrix. All other functions of this software tool like normalization (automatically, manually), working with corrections (ground substraction, factors), overlay/comparison of dose distributions, difference matrix, cutting function (profiles) and export functions work reliable. VERIDOS improves the optimization of the case related part of the quality assurance work for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The diverse functions of the software offer the

  1. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Craniospinal Irradiation: Target Volume Considerations, Dose Constraints, and Competing Risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, William; Filion, Edith; Roberge, David; Freeman, Carolyn R.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To report the results of an analysis of dose received to tissues and organs outside the target volume, in the setting of spinal axis irradiation for the treatment of medulloblastoma, using three treatment techniques. Methods and Materials: Treatment plans (total dose, 23.4 Gy) for a standard two-dimensional (2D) technique, a three-dimensional (3D) technique using a 3D imaging-based target volume, and an intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique, were compared for 3 patients in terms of dose-volume statistics for target coverage, as well as organ at risk (OAR) and overall tissue sparing. Results: Planning target volume coverage and dose homogeneity was superior for the IMRT plans for V 95% (IMRT, 100%; 3D, 96%; 2D, 98%) and V 107% (IMRT, 3%; 3D, 38%; 2D, 37%). In terms of OAR sparing, the IMRT plan was better for all organs and whole-body contour when comparing V 10Gy , V 15Gy , and V 20Gy . The 3D plan was superior for V 5Gy and below. For the heart and liver in particular, the IMRT plans provided considerable sparing in terms of V 10Gy and above. In terms of the integral dose, the IMRT plans were superior for liver (IMRT, 21.9 J; 3D, 28.6 J; 2D, 38.6 J) and heart (IMRT, 9 J; 3D, 14.1J; 2D, 19.4 J), the 3D plan for the body contour (IMRT, 349 J; 3D, 337 J; 2D, 555 J). Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy is a valid treatment option for spinal axis irradiation. We have shown that IMRT results in sparing of organs at risk without a significant increase in integral dose

  2. [Intensity modulated radiation therapy for patients with gynecological malignancies after hysterectomy and chemotherapy/radiotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhen-yun; Ma, Yue-bing; Sheng, Xiu-gui; Zhang, Xiao-ling; Xue, Li; Song, Qu-qing; Liu, Nai-fu; Miao, Hua-qin

    2007-04-01

    To investigate the value of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for patient with gynecological malignancies after treatment of hysterectomy and chemotherapy/radiotherapy. All 32 patients with cervical or endometrial cancer after hysterectomy received full course IMRT after 1 to 3 cycles of chemotherapy (Karnofsky performance status(KPS) > or =70). Seventeen of these patients underwent postoperative preventive irradiation and the other 15 patients were pelvic wall recurrence and/or retroperitoneal lymph node metastasis, though postoperative radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy had been given after operation. The median dose delivered to the PTV was 56.8 Gy for preventive irradiation, and 60.6 Gy for pelvic wall recurrence or retroperioneal lymph node metastasis irradiation. It was required that 90% of iso-dose curve could covere more than 99% of GTV. However, The mean dose irradiated to small intestine, bladder, rectum, kidney and spinal cord was 21.3 Gy, 37.8 Gy, 35.3 Gy, 8.5 Gy, 22.1 Gy, respectively. Fourteen patients presented grade I (11 patients) or II (3 patients) digestive tract side-effects, Five patients developed grade I or II bone marrow depression. Twelve patients had grade I skin reaction. The overall 1-year survival rate was 100%. The 2- and 3- year survival rate for preventive irradiation were both 100%, but which was 5/7 and 3/6 for the patients with pelvic wall recurrence or retroperioneal lymph node metastasis. Intensity modulated radiation therapy can provide a better dose distribution than traditional radiotherapy for both prevention and pelvic wall recurrence or retroperioneal lymph node metastasis. The toxicity is tolerable. The adjacent organs at risk can well be protected.

  3. Normal liver tissue sparing by intensity-modulated proton stereotactic body radiotherapy for solitary liver tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, Joergen B. B.; Hansen, Anders T.; Lassen, Yasmin; Grau, Cai; Hoeyer, Morten; Muren, Ludvig P.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is often the preferred treatment for the advanced liver tumours which owing to tumour distribution, size and multi-focality are out of range of surgical resection or radiofrequency ablation. However, only a minority of patients with liver tumours may be candidates for conventional SBRT because of the limited radiation tolerance of normal liver, intestine and other normal tissues. Due to the favourable depth-dose characteristics of protons, intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) may be a superior alternative to photon-based SBRT. The purpose of this treatment planning study was therefore to investigate the potential sparing of normal liver by IMPT compared to photon-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for solitary liver tumours. Material and methods. Ten patients with solitary liver metastasis treated at our institution with multi-field SBRT were retrospectively re-planned with IMRT and proton pencil beam scanning techniques. For the proton plans, two to three coplanar fields were used in contrast to five to six coplanar and non-coplanar photon fields. The same planning objectives were used for both techniques. A risk adapted dose prescription to the PTV surface of 12.5-16.75 Gy x 3 was used. Results. The spared liver volume for IMPT was higher compared to IMRT in all 10 patients. At the highest prescription dose level, the median liver volume receiving less than 15 Gy was 1411 cm 3 for IMPT and 955 cm 3 for IMRT (p D 15 Gy > 700 cm 3 constraint. For the D mean = 15 Gy constraint, nine of 10 cases could be treated at the highest dose level using IMPT whereas with IMRT, only two cases met this constraint at the highest dose level and six at the lowest dose level. Conclusion. A considerable sparing of normal liver tissue can be obtained using proton-based SBRT for solitary liver tumours

  4. Radiation-Induced Cancers From Modern Radiotherapy Techniques: Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Versus Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Myonggeun; Ahn, Sung Hwan; Kim, Jinsung; Shin, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Yong; Lee, Se Byeong; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess and compare secondary cancer risk resulting from intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and proton therapy in patients with prostate and head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy and proton therapy in the scattering mode were planned for 5 prostate caner patients and 5 head-and-neck cancer patients. The secondary doses during irradiation were measured using ion chamber and CR-39 detectors for IMRT and proton therapy, respectively. Organ-specific radiation-induced cancer risk was estimated by applying organ equivalent dose to dose distributions. Results: The average secondary doses of proton therapy for prostate cancer patients, measured 20-60cm from the isocenter, ranged from 0.4 mSv/Gy to 0.1 mSv/Gy. The average secondary doses of IMRT for prostate patients, however, ranged between 3 mSv/Gy and 1 mSv/Gy, approximately one order of magnitude higher than for proton therapy. Although the average secondary doses of IMRT were higher than those of proton therapy for head-and-neck cancers, these differences were not significant. Organ equivalent dose calculations showed that, for prostate cancer patients, the risk of secondary cancers in out-of-field organs, such as the stomach, lungs, and thyroid, was at least 5 times higher for IMRT than for proton therapy, whereas the difference was lower for head-and-neck cancer patients. Conclusions: Comparisons of organ-specific organ equivalent dose showed that the estimated secondary cancer risk using scattering mode in proton therapy is either significantly lower than the cases in IMRT treatment or, at least, does not exceed the risk induced by conventional IMRT treatment.

  5. Patterns of local-regional failure after primary intensity modulated radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, Fangfang; Ying, Hongmei; Du, Chengrun; Huang, Shuang; Zhou, Junjun; Chen, Junchao; Sun, Lining; Chen, Xiaohui; Hu, Chaosu

    2014-01-01

    To analyze patterns of local-regional failure after primary intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). A total of 370 non-metastatic NPC patients consecutively treated with IMRT (with or without chemotherapy) were analyzed. Radiotherapy was administered using a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) technique at the total prescribed dose of 66-70.4Gy (2.0-2.2Gy per fraction). The location and extent of local-regional failures were transferred to the pretreatment planning computed tomography (CT) for dosimetric analysis. The dose of radiation received by V recur (volume of recurrence) was calculated and analyzed with dose-volume histogram (DVH). Failures were classified as: 'in field' if 95% of V recur was within the 95% isodose, 'marginal' if 20% to 95% of V recur was within the 95% isodose, or 'outside' if less than 20% of V recur was inside the 95% isodose. With a median follow up of 26 months, 25 local-regional failures were found in 18 patients. The 1- and 2-year actuarial local-regional control rates for all patients were 99.7% and 95.5% respectively. Among the 22 local–regional failures with available diagnostic images, 16 (64%) occurred within the 95% isodose lines and were considered in-field failures; 3 (12%) were marginal and 3 (12%) were outside-field failures. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy provides excellent local-regional control for NPC. In-field failures are the main patterns for local-regional recurrence. Reducing the coverage of critical adjacent tissues in CTV purposefully for potential subclinical diseases was worth of study. Great attention in all IMRT steps is necessary to reduce potential causes of marginal failures. More studies about radioresistance are needed to reduce in-field failures

  6. Intensity-modulated Radiosurgery for patients with brain metastases: a mature outcomes analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Samuel J; Choi, Mehee; Fuller, Clifton D; Salter, Bill J; Fuss, Martin

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of patients with brain metastases treated by tomotherapeutic Intensity-modulated Radiosurgery (IMRS). Using retrospective chart review, we analyzed the outcomes of 78 patients (age 33-83 years, median 57 years) who underwent 111 sessions of IMRS (1 to 7 sessions per patient, median 1) for brain metastases (1 to 4 targets per IMRS session, median 1) treated between 2000 and 2005 using a serial tomotherapeutic intensity-modulated radiotherapy treatment (IMRT) planning and delivery system (Peacock, Nomos Corp., Cranberry Township, PA). Treatment planning was performed using an inverse treatment planning optimization algorithm that was optimized for IMRS. A median prescription dose of 15 Gy in combination with WBI, and median 20 Gy for IMRS alone was delivered using 2-4 couch angles over 4-24 rotational arcs. Overall survival was calculated using Kaplan-Meier analysis. To determine the effects of prognostic variables on survival, univariate and multivariate analyses using proportional hazards were performed to assess the effects of age, tumor size, the combination with whole brain irradiation, presence of multiple brain metastases, and presence of extracranial disease. The median overall survival was 6.5 months (95% CI, 5.5-7.9). One- and two-year survival rates were 24% and 10%. In multivariate analyses, age greater than 60 years was the only statistically significant variable that affected survival (hazard rate 1.29, p=0.049). We conclude that tomotherapeutic IMRS is safe and effective to treat patients with brain metastases.

  7. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy: not a dry eye in the house

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, Anthony; Arnold, Belinda; Capp, Anne; Fox, Chris; Metcalfe, Peter; Chapman, Alison; Tangboonduangjit, Puangpeng

    2004-01-01

    Inverse planned intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has been applied to patients in a conformal fashion in order to avoid the lacrimal gland. In the present study, we report a patient in which a potential planned dose of 63 Gy to the lacrimal gland for a conventional plan was reduced to 12 Gy to the lacrimal gland for the IMRT plan. Dose objective inverse planning was provided using a Pinnacle treatment planning computer and treatment was delivered using a Varian dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) on a Varian linear accelerator. Because multiple MLC segments are used to deliver the modulated treatment, conventional dose checks by manual calculation are not practical. To aid in an alternative dosimetric verification process, the Pinnacle planning computer has two unique dose tools, which provide axial and beams eye view doses on user-specified check phantoms. The combined field axial dose tool matched our ion chamber dose checks within ± 2.4% at the isocentre. The individual beams eye view dose tool matched film dose maps within ± 3% in the umbra Copyright (2004) Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

  8. Sequential attack with intensity modulation on the differential-phase-shift quantum-key-distribution protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsurumaru, Toyohiro

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the security of the differential-phase-shift quantum-key-distribution (DPSQKD) protocol by introducing an improved version of the so-called sequential attack, which was originally discussed by Waks et al. [Phys. Rev. A 73, 012344 (2006)]. Our attack differs from the original form of the sequential attack in that the attacker Eve modulates not only the phases but also the amplitude in the superposition of the single-photon states which she sends to the receiver. Concentrating especially on the 'discretized Gaussian' intensity modulation, we show that our attack is more effective than the individual attack, which had been the best attack up to present. As a result of this, the recent experiment with communication distance of 100 km reported by Diamanti et al. [Opt. Express 14, 13073 (2006)] turns out to be insecure. Moreover, it can be shown that in a practical experimental setup which is commonly used today, the communication distance achievable by the DPSQKD protocol is less than 95 km

  9. Linear Energy Transfer-Guided Optimization in Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy: Feasibility Study and Clinical Potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giantsoudi, Drosoula, E-mail: dgiantsoudi@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Grassberger, Clemens; Craft, David; Niemierko, Andrzej; Trofimov, Alexei; Paganetti, Harald [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility and potential clinical benefit of linear energy transfer (LET) guided plan optimization in intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT). Methods and Materials: A multicriteria optimization (MCO) module was used to generate a series of Pareto-optimal IMPT base plans (BPs), corresponding to defined objectives, for 5 patients with head-and-neck cancer and 2 with pancreatic cancer. A Monte Carlo platform was used to calculate dose and LET distributions for each BP. A custom-designed MCO navigation module allowed the user to interpolate between BPs to produce deliverable Pareto-optimal solutions. Differences among the BPs were evaluated for each patient, based on dose–volume and LET–volume histograms and 3-dimensional distributions. An LET-based relative biological effectiveness (RBE) model was used to evaluate the potential clinical benefit when navigating the space of Pareto-optimal BPs. Results: The mean LET values for the target varied up to 30% among the BPs for the head-and-neck patients and up to 14% for the pancreatic cancer patients. Variations were more prominent in organs at risk (OARs), where mean LET values differed by a factor of up to 2 among the BPs for the same patient. An inverse relation between dose and LET distributions for the OARs was typically observed. Accounting for LET-dependent variable RBE values, a potential improvement on RBE-weighted dose of up to 40%, averaged over several structures under study, was noticed during MCO navigation. Conclusions: We present a novel strategy for optimizing proton therapy to maximize dose-averaged LET in tumor targets while simultaneously minimizing dose-averaged LET in normal tissue structures. MCO BPs show substantial LET variations, leading to potentially significant differences in RBE-weighted doses. Pareto-surface navigation, using both dose and LET distributions for guidance, provides the means for evaluating a large variety of deliverable plans and aids in

  10. Linear Energy Transfer-Guided Optimization in Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy: Feasibility Study and Clinical Potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Grassberger, Clemens; Craft, David; Niemierko, Andrzej; Trofimov, Alexei; Paganetti, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility and potential clinical benefit of linear energy transfer (LET) guided plan optimization in intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT). Methods and Materials: A multicriteria optimization (MCO) module was used to generate a series of Pareto-optimal IMPT base plans (BPs), corresponding to defined objectives, for 5 patients with head-and-neck cancer and 2 with pancreatic cancer. A Monte Carlo platform was used to calculate dose and LET distributions for each BP. A custom-designed MCO navigation module allowed the user to interpolate between BPs to produce deliverable Pareto-optimal solutions. Differences among the BPs were evaluated for each patient, based on dose–volume and LET–volume histograms and 3-dimensional distributions. An LET-based relative biological effectiveness (RBE) model was used to evaluate the potential clinical benefit when navigating the space of Pareto-optimal BPs. Results: The mean LET values for the target varied up to 30% among the BPs for the head-and-neck patients and up to 14% for the pancreatic cancer patients. Variations were more prominent in organs at risk (OARs), where mean LET values differed by a factor of up to 2 among the BPs for the same patient. An inverse relation between dose and LET distributions for the OARs was typically observed. Accounting for LET-dependent variable RBE values, a potential improvement on RBE-weighted dose of up to 40%, averaged over several structures under study, was noticed during MCO navigation. Conclusions: We present a novel strategy for optimizing proton therapy to maximize dose-averaged LET in tumor targets while simultaneously minimizing dose-averaged LET in normal tissue structures. MCO BPs show substantial LET variations, leading to potentially significant differences in RBE-weighted doses. Pareto-surface navigation, using both dose and LET distributions for guidance, provides the means for evaluating a large variety of deliverable plans and aids in

  11. Clinically practical intensity modulation for complex head and neck lesions using multiple, static MLC fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verhey, L.J.; Xia, P.; Akazawa, P.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: A number of different beam delivery methods have been proposed for implementing intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), including fixed gantry with multiple static MLC fields (MSMLC - often referred to as 'stop and shoot'), fixed gantry with dynamic MLC (DMLC), intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT), Tomotherapy and Peacock MIMiC. Using two complex head and neck cases as examples, we have compared dose distributions achievable with 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) to those which can be achieved using IMRT delivered with MSMLC, DMLC and Peacock MIMiC. The goal is to demonstrate the potential value of IMRT in the treatment of complex lesions in the head and neck and to determine whether MSMLC, the simplest of the proposed IMRT methods, can produce dose distributions which are competitive with dynamic IMRT methods and which can be implemented in clinically acceptable times. Materials and Methods: Two patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma were selected from the archives of the Department of Radiation Oncology at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). These patients were previously planned and treated with CT-based 3-D treatment planning methods which are routinely used at UCSF, including non-axial beam directions and partial transmission blocks when indicated. The CT data tapes were then read into a test version of CORVUS, an inverse treatment planning program being developed by NOMOS Corporation, target volumes and critical normal structures were outlined on axial CT slices and dose goals and limits were defined for the targets and normal tissues of interest. Optimized dose plans were then obtained for each delivery method including MSMLC (4 or 5 hand-selected beams with 3 levels of intensity), DMLC (9 evenly spaced axial beams with 10 levels of intensity) and Peacock MIMiC (55 axial beams spanning 270 degrees with 10 levels of intensity). Dose-volume histograms (DVH's) for all IMRT plans were then compared with the 3DCRT plans. Treatment

  12. The effect of positive affect on conflict resolution: Modulated by approach-motivational intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ya; Wang, Zhenhong; Quan, Sixiang; Li, Mingjun

    2017-01-01

    The motivational dimensional model of affect proposes that the influence of positive affect on cognitive processing is modulated by approach-motivational intensity. The present research extended this model by examining the influence of positive affect varying in approach-motivational intensity on conflict resolution-the ability to resolve interference from task-irrelevant distractors in order to focus on the target. The global-local task (Experiment 1) and letter-Flanker task (Experiment 2) were used to measure conflict resolution. Additionally, the 4:2 mapping design that assigns two kinds of task-relevant stimuli to one response key and two more to another response key was used in these two tasks to dissociate stimulus and response conflict. Results showed that positive affect varying in approach motivation had opposite influences on conflict resolution. The opposite influences are primarily reflected in low approach-motivated positive affect impairing, while high approach-motivated positive affect facilitating the resolution of response conflict. Conversely, the stimulus conflict was slightly influenced. These findings highlight the utility of distinguishing stimulus and response conflict in future research.

  13. On the Capacity Region of the Intensity-Modulation Direct-Detection Optical Broadcast Channel

    KAUST Repository

    Chaaban, Anas

    2015-08-11

    The capacity of the intensity-modulation direct-detection free-space optical broadcast channel (OBC) is investigated. The Gaussian model with input-independent Gaussian noise is used, with both average and peak intensity constraints. An outer bound on the capacity region is derived by adapting Bergmans\\' approach to the OBC. Inner bounds are derived by using superposition coding with either truncated-Gaussian distributions or discrete distributions. While the discrete input distribution achieves higher rates than the truncated-Gaussian distribution, the latter allows expressing the achievable rate region in a closed form. At high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), it is shown that the truncated-Gaussian distribution is nearly optimal. It achieves the symmetric-capacity within a constant gap (independent of SNR), which approaches half a bit as the number of users grows large. It also achieves the capacity region within a constant gap, which depends on the number of users. At low SNR, it is shown that on-off keying with time-division multiple-access (TDMA) is optimal, as it achieves any point on the boundary of the developed outer bound. This is interesting in practice since both OOK and TDMA have low complexity. At moderate SNR (typically [0,8] dB), a discrete distribution with a small alphabet size achieves a fairly good performance in terms of symmetric rate.

  14. On the Capacity of the Intensity-Modulation Direct-Detection Optical Broadcast Channel

    KAUST Repository

    Chaaban, Anas; Rezki, Zouheir; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2016-01-01

    The capacity of the intensity-modulation directdetection optical broadcast channel (OBC) is investigated, under both average and peak intensity constraints. An outer bound on the capacity region is derived by adapting Bergmans’ approach to the OBC. Inner bounds are derived by using superposition coding with either truncated-Gaussian (TG) distributions or discrete distributions. While the discrete distribution achieves higher rates, the TG distribution leads to a simpler representation of the achievable rate region. At high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), it is shown that the TG distribution is nearly optimal. It achieves the symmetric-capacity within a constant gap (independent of SNR), which approaches half a bit as the number of users grows. It also achieves the capacity region within a constant gap. At low SNR, it is shown that on-off keying (OOK) with time-division multipleaccess (TDMA) is optimal. This is interesting in practice since both OOK and TDMA have low complexity. At moderate SNR (typically [0,8] dB), a discrete distribution with a small alphabet size achieves fairly good performance.

  15. Modulating laser intensity profile ellipticity for microstructural control during metal additive manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roehling, Tien T.; Wu, Sheldon S.Q.; Khairallah, Saad A.; Roehling, John D.; Soezeri, S. Stefan; Crumb, Michael F.; Matthews, Manyalibo J.

    2017-01-01

    Additively manufactured (AM) metals are often highly textured, containing large columnar grains that initiate epitaxially under steep temperature gradients and rapid solidification conditions. These unique microstructures partially account for the massive property disparity existing between AM and conventionally processed alloys. Although equiaxed grains are desirable for isotropic mechanical behavior, the columnar-to-equiaxed transition remains difficult to predict for conventional solidification processes, and much more so for AM. In this study, the effects of laser intensity profile ellipticity on melt track macrostructures and microstructures were studied in 316L stainless steel. Experimental results were supported by temperature gradients and melt velocities simulated using the ALE3D multi-physics code. As a general trend, columnar grains preferentially formed with increasing laser power and scan speed for all beam profiles. However, when conduction mode laser heating occurs, scan parameters that result in coarse columnar microstructures using Gaussian profiles produce equiaxed or mixed equiaxed-columnar microstructures using elliptical profiles. By modulating spatial laser intensity profiles on the fly, site-specific microstructures and properties can be directly engineered into additively manufactured parts.

  16. Direct-aperture optimization applied to selection of beam orientations in intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedford, J L; Webb, S

    2007-01-01

    Direct-aperture optimization (DAO) was applied to iterative beam-orientation selection in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), so as to ensure a realistic segmental treatment plan at each iteration. Nested optimization engines dealt separately with gantry angles, couch angles, collimator angles, segment shapes, segment weights and wedge angles. Each optimization engine performed a random search with successively narrowing step sizes. For optimization of segment shapes, the filtered backprojection (FBP) method was first used to determine desired fluence, the fluence map was segmented, and then constrained direct-aperture optimization was used thereafter. Segment shapes were fully optimized when a beam angle was perturbed, and minimally re-optimized otherwise. The algorithm was compared with a previously reported method using FBP alone at each orientation iteration. An example case consisting of a cylindrical phantom with a hemi-annular planning target volume (PTV) showed that for three-field plans, the method performed better than when using FBP alone, but for five or more fields, neither method provided much benefit over equally spaced beams. For a prostate case, improved bladder sparing was achieved through the use of the new algorithm. A plan for partial scalp treatment showed slightly improved PTV coverage and lower irradiated volume of brain with the new method compared to FBP alone. It is concluded that, although the method is computationally intensive and not suitable for searching large unconstrained regions of beam space, it can be used effectively in conjunction with prior class solutions to provide individually optimized IMRT treatment plans

  17. On the Capacity of the Intensity-Modulation Direct-Detection Optical Broadcast Channel

    KAUST Repository

    Chaaban, Anas

    2016-01-12

    The capacity of the intensity-modulation directdetection optical broadcast channel (OBC) is investigated, under both average and peak intensity constraints. An outer bound on the capacity region is derived by adapting Bergmans’ approach to the OBC. Inner bounds are derived by using superposition coding with either truncated-Gaussian (TG) distributions or discrete distributions. While the discrete distribution achieves higher rates, the TG distribution leads to a simpler representation of the achievable rate region. At high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), it is shown that the TG distribution is nearly optimal. It achieves the symmetric-capacity within a constant gap (independent of SNR), which approaches half a bit as the number of users grows. It also achieves the capacity region within a constant gap. At low SNR, it is shown that on-off keying (OOK) with time-division multipleaccess (TDMA) is optimal. This is interesting in practice since both OOK and TDMA have low complexity. At moderate SNR (typically [0,8] dB), a discrete distribution with a small alphabet size achieves fairly good performance.

  18. Beyond bixels: Generalizing the optimization parameters for intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markman, Jerry; Low, Daniel A.; Beavis, Andrew W.; Deasy, Joseph O.

    2002-01-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning systems optimize fluence distributions by subdividing the fluence distribution into rectangular bixels. The algorithms typically optimize the fluence intensity directly, often leading to fluence distributions with sharp discontinuities. These discontinuities may yield difficulties in delivery of the fluence distribution, leading to inaccurate dose delivery. We have developed a method for decoupling the bixel intensities from the optimization parameters; either by introducing optimization control points from which the bixel intensities are interpolated or by parametrizing the fluence distribution using basis functions. In either case, the number of optimization search parameters is reduced from the direct bixel optimization method. To illustrate the concept, the technique is applied to two-dimensional idealized head and neck treatment plans. The interpolation algorithms investigated were nearest-neighbor, linear and cubic spline, and radial basis functions serve as the basis function test. The interpolation and basis function optimization techniques were compared against the direct bixel calculation. The number of optimization parameters were significantly reduced relative to the bixel optimization, and this was evident in the reduction of computation time of as much as 58% from the full bixel optimization. The dose distributions obtained using the reduced optimization parameter sets were very similar to the full bixel optimization when examined by dose distributions, statistics, and dose-volume histograms. To evaluate the sensitivity of the fluence calculations to spatial misalignment caused either by delivery errors or patient motion, the doses were recomputed with a 1 mm shift in each beam and compared to the unshifted distributions. Except for the nearest-neighbor algorithm, the reduced optimization parameter dose distributions were generally less sensitive to spatial shifts than the bixel

  19. Intensity modulated radiation therapy: Analysis of patient specific quality control results, experience of Rene-Gauducheau Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiavassa, S.; Brunet, G.; Gaudaire, S.; Munos-Llagostera, C.; Delpon, G.; Lisbona, A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. - Systematic verifications of patient's specific intensity-modulated radiation treatments are usually performed with absolute and relative measurements. The results constitute a database which allows the identification of potential systematic errors. Material and methods. - We analyzed 1270 beams distributed in 232 treatment plans. Step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiation treatments were performed with a Clinac (6 and 23 MV) and sliding window intensity-modulated radiation treatments with a Novalis (6 MV). Results. - The distributions obtained do not show systematic error and all the control meet specified tolerances. Conclusion. - These results allow us to reduce controls specific patients for treatments performed under identical conditions (location, optimization and segmentation parameters of treatment planning system, etc.). (authors)

  20. The field-matching problem as it applies to the peacock three dimensional conformal system for intensity modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carol, Mark; Grant, Walter H.; Bleier, Alan R.; Kania, Alex A.; Targovnik, Harris S.; Butler, E. Brian; Shiao, W. Woo

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated beam systems have been developed as a means of creating a high-dose region that closely conforms to the prescribed target volume while also providing specific sparing of organs at risk within complex treatment geometries. The slice-by-slice treatment paradigm used by one such system for delivering intensity modulated fields introduces regions of dose nonuniformity where each pair of treatment slices abut. A study was designed to evaluate whether or not the magnitude of the nonuniformity that results from this segmental delivery paradigm is significant relative to the overall dose nonuniformity present in the intensity modulation technique itself. An assessment was also made as to the increase in nonuniformity that would result if errors were made in indexing during treatment delivery. Methods and Materials: Treatment plans were generated to simulate correctly indexed and incorrectly indexed treatments of 4, 10, and 18 cm diameter targets. Indexing errors of from 0.1 to 2.0 mm were studied. Treatment plans were also generated for targets of the same diameter but of lengths that did not require indexing of the treatment couch. Results: The nonuniformity that results from the intensity modulation delivery paradigm is 11-16% for targets where indexing is not required. Correct indexing of the couch adds an additional 1-2% in nonuniformity. However, a couch indexing error of as little as 1 mm can increase the total nonuniformity to as much as 25%. All increases in nonuniformity from indexing are essentially independent of target diameter. Conclusions: The dose nonuniformity introduced by the segmental strip delivery paradigm is small relative to the nonuniformity present in the intensity modulation paradigm itself. A positioning accuracy of better than 0.5 mm appears to be required when implementing segmental intensity modulated treatment plans

  1. Polymer gel measurement of dose homogeneity in the breast: comparing MLC intensity modulation with standard wedged delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Love, P A; Evans, P M; Leach, M O; Webb, S

    2003-01-01

    Polymer gel dosimetry has been used to measure the radiotherapy dose homogeneity in a breast phantom for two different treatment methods. The first 'standard' method uses two tangential wedged fields while the second method has three static fields shaped by multileaf collimators (MLCs) in addition to the standard wedged fields to create intensity modulated fields. Gel dose distributions from the multileaf modulation treatment show an improved dose uniformity in comparison to the standard treatment with a decreased volume receiving doses over 105%

  2. Intensity-modulated stereotactic radiosurgery using dynamic micro-multileaf collimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedict, Stanley H.; Cardinale, Robert M.; Wu Qiuwen; Zwicker, Robert D.; Broaddus, William C.; Mohan, Radhe

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: The implementation of dynamic leaf motion on a micro-multileaf collimator system provides the capability for intensity-modulated stereotactic radiosurgery (IMSRS), and the consequent potential for improved dose distributions for irregularly shaped tumor volumes adjacent to critical organs. This study explores the use of IMSRS to provide improved tumor coverage and normal tissue sparing for small cranial tumors relative to plans based on multiple fixed uniform-intensity beams or traditional circular collimator arc-based stereotactic techniques. Methods and Materials: Four patient cases involving small brain lesions are presented and analyzed. The cases were chosen to include a representative selection of target shapes, number of targets, and adjacent critical areas. Patient plans generated for these comparisons include standard arcs with multiple circular collimators, and fixed noncoplanar static fields with uniform-intensity beams and IMSRS. Parameters used for evaluation of the plans include the percentage of irradiated volume to tumor volume (PITV), normal tissue dose-volume histograms, and dose-homogeneity ratios. All IMSRS plans were computed using previously established IMRT techniques adapted for use with the BrainLAB M3 micro-multileaf collimator. The algorithms comprising the IMRT system for optimization of intensity distributions and conversion into leaf trajectories of the BrainLab M3 were developed at our institution. The ADAC Pinnacle 3 radiation treatment-planning system was used for dose calculations and for input of contours for target volumes and normal critical structures. Results: For all cases, the IMSRS plans showed a high degree of conformity of the dose distribution with the target shape. The IMSRS plans provided either (1) a smaller volume of normal tissue irradiated to significant dose levels, generally taken as doses greater than 50% of the prescription, or (2) a lower dose to an important adjacent critical organ. The reduction in

  3. Spinal cordd biological safety comparison of intensity modulated radiotherapy and conventional radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xilinbaoleri; Xu Wanlong; Chen Gang; Liu Hao; Wang Ruozheng; Bai Jingping

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To compare the spine intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and the conventional radiation therapy on the beagle spinal cord neurons, in order to prove the biological safety of IMRT of the spinal cord. Methods: Twelve selected purebred beagles were randomly divided into 2 groups. A beagle clinical model of tumor was mimiced in the ninth and tenth thoracic vertebrae. Then the beagles were irradiated by 2 different models of intensity modulated radiotherapy and conventional radiation therapy, with the total irradiation doses of 50 and 70 Gy. The samples of spinal cord were taken out from the same position of the nine and tenth thoracic vertebrae at the third month after radiation.All the samples were observed by the electron microscope, and the Fas and HSP70 expression in spinal cord neurons were evaluated by immunohistochemistry method. Terminal deoxynucleatidyl transferase mediated dUTP nick and labeling (TUNEL) technique was used to examine the apoptotic cells in the spinal cord. Results: The neurons in the spinal cord of IMRT group were mainly reversible injury, and those in the conventional radiation therapy were mainly apoptosis. Compared with the conventional radiation therapy group [50 Gy group, (7.3 ± 1.1)%; 70 Gy group, (11.3 ± 1.4)%], the apoptosis rate of the spinal cord neurons of the intensity modulated radiotherapy group [50 Gy group, (1.2 ± 0.7)%; 70 Gy group (2.5 ± 0.8)%] was much lower[(50 Gy group, t=0.022, P<0.05; 70 Gy group, t=0.017, P<0.05)]. The expression levels of Fas in the IMPT group (50 Gy group, 4.6 ± 0.8; 70 Gy group, 7.4 ± 1.1) were also much lowerthan those in the other group (50 Gy group, 15.1 ± 6.4; 70 Gy group, 19.3 ± 7.6. 50 Gy group, t=0.231, P<0.05; 70 Gy group, t=0.457, P<0.05), while the expression levels of HSP70 in the IMPT group (50 Gy group, 9.1 ± 0.8; 70 Gy group, 7.3 ± 1.4)were much higher than those in the conventional radiation therapy group (50 Gy group, 2.1 ± 0.9; 70 Gy group, 1.7 ± 0

  4. Intensity modulated radiotherapy with fixed collimator jaws for locoregional left-sided breast cancer irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juanqi; Yang, Zhaozhi; Hu, Weigang; Chen, Zhi; Yu, Xiaoli; Guo, Xiaomao

    2017-05-16

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with the fixed collimator jaws technique (FJT) for the left breast and regional lymph node. The targeted breast tissue and the lymph nodes, and the normal tissues were contoured for 16 left-sided breast cancer patients previously treated with radiotherapy after lumpectomy. For each patient, treatment plans using different planning techniques, i.e., volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), tangential IMRT (tangential-IMRT), and IMRT with FJT (FJT-IMRT) were developed for dosimetric comparisons. A dose of 50Gy was prescribed to the planning target volume. The dose-volume histograms were generated, and the paired t-test was used to analyze the dose differences. FJT-IMRT had similar mean heart volume receiving 30Gy (V30 Gy) with tangential-IMRT (1.5% and 1.6%, p = 0.41), but inferior to the VMAT (0.8%, p < 0.001). In the average heart mean dose comparison, FJT-IMRT had the lowest value, and it was 0.6Gy lower than that for the VMAT plans (p < 0.01). A significant dose increase in the contralateral breast and lung was observed in VMAT plans. Compared with tangential-IMRT and VMAT plans, FJT-IMRT reduced the mean dose of thyroid, humeral head and cervical esophageal by 47.6% (p < 0.01) and 45.7% (p < 0.01), 74.3% (p =< 0.01) and 73% (p =< 0.01), and 26.7% (p =< 0.01) and 29.2% (p =< 0.01). In conclusion, compared with tangential-IMRT and VMAT, FJT-IMRT plan has the lowest thyroid, humeral head and cervical esophageal mean dose and it can be a reasonable treatment option for a certain subgroup of patients, such as young left-breast cancer patients and/or patients with previous thyroid disease.

  5. Sensitivity of intensity modulated proton therapy plans to changes in patient weight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albertini, Francesca; Bolsi, Alessandra; Lomax, Antony J.; Rutz, Hans Peter; Timmerman, Beate; Goitein, Gudrun

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: A retrospective study to investigate the sensitivity of intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) to changes in body weight occurring during the course of radiotherapy for patients treated in the sacral region. Materials and methods: During therapy, important weight gain and loss were observed for two patients treated to para-spinal tumors, which resulted in both patients being re-scanned and re-planned. Both patients were treated as part of their therapy, with a narrow-angle IMPT (NA-IMPT) plan delivering a 'dose hole' around the cauda equina (CE), which was mainly formed through modulation of Bragg peaks in depth. To investigate the impact of these weight changes on the proton range and delivered dose, the nominal fields were re-calculated on the new CT data sets. Results were analyzed by comparing these new plans with those originally delivered and by calculating changes in range and delivered doses in target volumes and normal tissues. Results: Maximum differences in proton range in the CE region of up to +8 mm and -13 mm, respectively, for the patient who gained weight and for the patient who lost weight, increased the maximum dose to the CE by only 2%. This indicates that both IMPT plans were relatively insensitive to substantial range uncertainties. Even greater differences in range (16 mm) in the planning target volume only slightly affected its dose homogeneity (differences in V 90% of 6% in the worst case). Nevertheless, some large undesired local dose differences were observed. Conclusions: We demonstrated, that, at least for the two analyzed cases, NA-IMPT plans are less sensitive to weight variations than one may expect. Still, we would advise to calculate new plans in case of substantial change in weight for patients treated in the sacral region, primarily due to the presence of new hot/cold area

  6. Study on the possibility of using a 60 Co therapeutical unity in Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantas, Samuel Cesar

    2009-06-01

    With the increasing advances in complex treatment techniques, there is a tendency to obtain more sophisticated equipment to deliver the dose. The use of 3D conformal radiotherapy is now routine in many radiotherapy facilities as well as the utilization of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Both are usually implemented using linear accelerators equipped with multi leaves collimators, which create the conformity and the fluence distributions required. However, the complexity of increasingly sophisticated equipment, such as linear accelerators, requires a frequent quality control of their operation, as well as a detailed and constant maintenance. Even carrying out these procedures, the accelerators may present technical problems interrupting for a long time a treatment using the IMRT technique. Despite the clear practical and technological advantages that linear accelerators have on 60 Co irradiators, these devices occupy an important place in radiotherapy, mainly due to the low cost of equipment installation and maintenance when compared to those required by accelerators. Many radiotherapy facilities that work with IMRT have tele therapeutic isocentric 60 Co units. In principle, such equipment would be able to be used for treatment with IMRT using compensating blocks to modulate the beam. This study investigates this possibility and shows that it is feasible. The comparison of treatment plans of a head-and-neck cancer and other of a cancer of the central nervous system, based on a 60 Co irradiator and a Linac 2300 C/D, presented advantages for the 60 Co irradiator. Furthermore; the delivery of dose obtained with the two systems showed themselves equivalent when compared to their respective plans. (author)

  7. Estimating the costs of intensity-modulated and 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, J H E; McGowan, T; Redmond-Misner, R; Beca, J; Warde, P; Gutierrez, E; Hoch, J S

    2016-06-01

    Radiotherapy is a common treatment for many cancers, but up-to-date estimates of the costs of radiotherapy are lacking. In the present study, we estimated the unit costs of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (imrt) and 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-crt) in Ontario. An activity-based costing model was developed to estimate the costs of imrt and 3D-crt in prostate cancer. It included the costs of equipment, staff, and supporting infrastructure. The framework was subsequently adapted to estimate the costs of radiotherapy in breast cancer and head-and-neck cancer. We also tested various scenarios by varying the program maturity and the use of volumetric modulated arc therapy (vmat) alongside imrt. From the perspective of the health care system, treating prostate cancer with imrt and 3D-crt respectively cost $12,834 and $12,453 per patient. The cost of radiotherapy ranged from $5,270 to $14,155 and was sensitive to analytic perspective, radiation technique, and disease site. Cases of head-and-neck cancer were the most costly, being driven by treatment complexity and fractions per treatment. Although imrt was more costly than 3D-crt, its cost will likely decline over time as programs mature and vmat is incorporated. Our costing model can be modified to estimate the costs of 3D-crt and imrt for various disease sites and settings. The results demonstrate the important role of capital costs in studies of radiotherapy cost from a health system perspective, which our model can accommodate. In addition, our study established the need for future analyses of imrt cost to consider how vmat affects time consumption.

  8. Integral test phantom for dosimetric quality assurance of image guided and intensity modulated stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letourneau, Daniel; Keller, Harald; Sharpe, Michael B.; Jaffray, David A.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a dosimetric phantom quality assurance (QA) of linear accelerators capable of cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guided and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT). This phantom is to be used in an integral test to quantify in real-time both the performance of the image guidance and the dose delivery systems in terms of dose localization. The prototype IG-IMRT QA phantom consisted of a cylindrical imaging phantom (CatPhan) combined with an array of 11 radiation diodes mounted on a 10 cm diameter disk, oriented perpendicular to the phantom axis. Basic diode response characterization was performed for 6 and 18 MV photons. The diode response was compared to planning system calculations in the open and penumbrae regions of simple and complex beam arrangements. The clinical use of the QA phantom was illustrated in an integral test of an IG-IMRT treatment designed for a clinical spinal radiosurgery case. The sensitivity of the phantom to multileaf collimator (MLC) calibration and setup errors in the clinical setting was assessed by introducing errors in the IMRT plan or by displacing the phantom. The diodes offered good response linearity and long-term reproducibility for both 6 and 18 MV. Axial dosimetry of coplanar beams (in a plane containing the beam axes) was made possible with the nearly isoplanatic response of the diodes over 360 deg. of gantry (usually within ±1%). For single beam geometry, errors in phantom placement as small as 0.5 mm could be accurately detected (in gradient ≥1%/mm). In clinical setting, MLC systematic errors of 1 mm on a single MLC bank introduced in the IMRT plan were easily detectable with the QA phantom. The QA phantom demonstrated also sufficient sensitivity for the detection of setup errors as small as 1 mm for the IMRT delivery. These results demonstrated that the prototype can accurately and efficiently verify the entire IG-IMRT process. This tool, in conjunction with image guidance capabilities

  9. Dose deviations caused by positional inaccuracy of multileaf collimator in intensity modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H.C.; Chui, C.S.; Tsai, H.Y.; Chen, C.H.; Tsai, L.F.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Multileaf collimator (MLC) is currently a widely used system in the delivery of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The accuracy of the multileaf position plays an important role in the final outcome of the radiation treatment. According to ICRU recommendation, a dose inaccuracy over than 5% of prescribed dose affects treatment results. In order to quantify the influence of leaf positional errors on dose distribution, we set different MLC positional inaccuracy from 0 to 6 mm for step-and-shoot IMRT in clinical cases. Two-dimensional dose distributions of radiotherapy plans with different leaf displacements generated with a commercial treatment planning system. And verification films were used to measure two-dimensional dose distributions. Then a computerized dose comparison system will be introduced to analyze the dose deviations. Materials/methods: We assumed MLC positional inaccuracy from 0 to 6 mm for step-and-shoot IMRT in clinical cases by simulating the different leaf displacements with a commercial treatment planning system. Then we transferred the treatment plans with different leaf offset that may be happened in clinical situation to linear accelerator. Verification films (Kodat EDR2) were well positioned within solid water phantoms to be irradiated by the simulated plans. The films were scanned to display two-dimensional dose distributions. Finally, we compared with the dose distributions with MLC positional inaccuracy by a two-dimensional dose comparison software to analyze the deviations in Gamma indexes and normalized agreement test (NAT) values. Results: In general, the data show that larger leaf positional error induces larger dose error. More fields used for treatment generate lesser errors. Besides, leaf position relative to a field influences the degree of dose error. A leaf lying close to the border of a field leads to a more significant dose deviation than a leaf in the center. Algorithms for intensity modulation also affect

  10. Integral test phantom for dosimetric quality assurance of image guided and intensity modulated stereotactic radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Létourneau, Daniel; Keller, Harald; Sharpe, Michael B; Jaffray, David A

    2007-05-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a dosimetric phantom quality assurance (QA) of linear accelerators capable of cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guided and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT). This phantom is to be used in an integral test to quantify in real-time both the performance of the image guidance and the dose delivery systems in terms of dose localization. The prototype IG-IMRT QA phantom consisted of a cylindrical imaging phantom (CatPhan) combined with an array of 11 radiation diodes mounted on a 10 cm diameter disk, oriented perpendicular to the phantom axis. Basic diode response characterization was performed for 6 and 18 MV photons. The diode response was compared to planning system calculations in the open and penumbrae regions of simple and complex beam arrangements. The clinical use of the QA phantom was illustrated in an integral test of an IG-IMRT treatment designed for a clinical spinal radiosurgery case. The sensitivity of the phantom to multileaf collimator (MLC) calibration and setup errors in the clinical setting was assessed by introducing errors in the IMRT plan or by displacing the phantom. The diodes offered good response linearity and long-term reproducibility for both 6 and 18 MV. Axial dosimetry of coplanar beams (in a plane containing the beam axes) was made possible with the nearly isoplanatic response of the diodes over 360 degrees of gantry (usually within +/-1%). For single beam geometry, errors in phantom placement as small as 0.5 mm could be accurately detected (in gradient > or = 1% /mm). In clinical setting, MLC systematic errors of 1 mm on a single MLC bank introduced in the IMRT plan were easily detectable with the QA phantom. The QA phantom demonstrated also sufficient sensitivity for the detection of setup errors as small as 1 mm for the IMRT delivery. These results demonstrated that the prototype can accurately and efficiently verify the entire IG-IMRT process. This tool, in conjunction with image guidance

  11. Computer-assisted selection of coplanar beam orientations in intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugachev, A.; Xing, L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States)]. E-mail: lei@reyes.stanford.edu

    2001-09-01

    In intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the incident beam orientations are often determined by a trial and error search. The conventional beam's-eye view (BEV) tool becomes less helpful in IMRT because it is frequently required that beams go through organs at risk (OARs) in order to achieve a compromise between the dosimetric objectives of the planning target volume (PTV) and the OARs. In this paper, we report a beam's-eye view dosimetrics (BEVD) technique to assist in the selection of beam orientations in IMRT. In our method, each beam portal is divided into a grid of beamlets. A score function is introduced to measure the 'goodness' of each beamlet at a given gantry angle. The score is determined by the maximum PTV dose deliverable by the beamlet without exceeding the tolerance doses of the OARs and normal tissue located in the path of the beamlet. The overall score of the gantry angle is given by a sum of the scores of all beamlets. For a given patient, the score function is evaluated for each possible beam orientation. The directions with the highest scores are then selected as the candidates for beam placement. This procedure is similar to the BEV approach used in conventional radiation therapy, except that the evaluation by a human is replaced by a score function to take into account the intensity modulation. This technique allows one to select beam orientations without the excessive computing overhead of computer optimization of beam orientation. It also provides useful insight into the problem of selection of beam orientation and is especially valuable for complicated cases where the PTV is surrounded by several sensitive structures and where it is difficult to select a set of 'good' beam orientations. Several two-dimensional (2D) model cases were used to test the proposed technique. The plans obtained using the BEVD-selected beam orientations were compared with the plans obtained using equiangular spaced beams. For

  12. VERIDOS: A new tool for quality assurance for intensity modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiezorek, T.; Schwedas, M.; Scheithauer, M.; Salz, H.; Wendt, T.G.; Bellemann, M.

    2002-01-01

    Background: The use of intensity modulated radiation fields needs an extended quality assurance concept. This consists of a linac related part and a case related part. Case related means the verification of an individual treatment plan, optimized on a CT data set of an individual patient and prepared for the treatment of this patient. This part of the quality assurance work is usually time consuming, delivers only partially quantitative results and is uncomfortable without additional help. It will be shown in this paper how the software VERIDOS will improve the optimization of the case related part of the quality assurance work. Material and Methods: The main function of the software is the quantitative comparison of the calculated dose distribution from the treatment planning software with the measured dose distribution of an irradiated phantom. Several additional functions will be explained. Two self-developed phantoms made of RW3 (solid water) and GAFCHROMIC films or Kodak EDR2 films for the measurement of the dose distributions were used. VERIDOS was tested with the treatment planning systems Helax-TMS and Brainscan. Results: VERIDOS is a suitable tool for the import of calculated dose matrices from the treatment planning systems Helax-TMS and Brainscan and of measured dose matrices exported from the dosimetry software Mephysto (PTW). The import from other treatment planning systems and scanning software applications for film dosimetry is generally possible. In such case the import function has to be adapted to the special header of the import matrix. All other functions of this software tool like normalization (automatically, manually), working with corrections (ground substraction, factors), overlay/comparison of dose distributions, difference matrix, cutting function (profiles) and export functions work reliable. Conclusions: VERIDOS improves the optimization of the case related part of the quality assurance work for intensity modulated radiation therapy

  13. Three-Dimensional Dosimetric Validation of a Magnetic Resonance Guided Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rankine, Leith J., E-mail: Leith_Rankine@med.unc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Mein, Stewart [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Cai, Bin; Curcuru, Austen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Juang, Titania; Miles, Devin [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Mutic, Sasa; Wang, Yuhe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Oldham, Mark [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Li, H. Harold, E-mail: hli@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: To validate the dosimetric accuracy of a commercially available magnetic resonance guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (MRgIMRT) system using a hybrid approach: 3-dimensional (3D) measurements and Monte Carlo calculations. Methods and Materials: We used PRESAGE radiochromic plastic dosimeters with remote optical computed tomography readout to perform 3D high-resolution measurements, following a novel remote dosimetry protocol. We followed the intensity modulated radiation therapy commissioning recommendations of American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 119, adapted to incorporate 3D data. Preliminary tests (“AP” and “3D-Bands”) were delivered to 9.5-cm usable diameter cylindrical PRESAGE dosimeters to validate the treatment planning system (TPS) for nonmodulated deliveries; assess the sensitivity, uniformity, and rotational symmetry of the PRESAGE dosimeters; and test the robustness of the remote dosimetry protocol. Following this, 4 clinical MRgIMRT plans (“MultiTarget,” “Prostate,” “Head/Neck,” and “C-Shape”) were measured using 13-cm usable diameter PRESAGE dosimeters. For all plans, 3D-γ (3% or 3 mm global, 10% threshold) passing rates were calculated and 3D-γ maps were examined. Point doses were measured with an IBA-CC01 ionization chamber for validation of absolute dose. Finally, by use of an in-house-developed, GPU-accelerated Monte Carlo algorithm (gPENELOPE), we independently calculated dose for all 6 Task Group 119 plans and compared against the TPS. Results: For PRESAGE measurements, 3D-γ analysis yielded passing rates of 98.7%, 99.2%, 98.5%, 98.0%, 99.2%, and 90.7% for AP, 3D-Bands, MultiTarget, Prostate, Head/Neck, and C-Shape, respectively. Ion chamber measurements were within an average of 0.5% (±1.1%) from the TPS dose. Monte Carlo calculations demonstrated good agreement with the TPS, with a mean 3D-γ passing rate of 98.5% ± 1.9% using a stricter 2%/2-mm criterion. Conclusions: We

  14. Three-Dimensional Dosimetric Validation of a Magnetic Resonance Guided Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rankine, Leith J.; Mein, Stewart; Cai, Bin; Curcuru, Austen; Juang, Titania; Miles, Devin; Mutic, Sasa; Wang, Yuhe; Oldham, Mark; Li, H. Harold

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To validate the dosimetric accuracy of a commercially available magnetic resonance guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (MRgIMRT) system using a hybrid approach: 3-dimensional (3D) measurements and Monte Carlo calculations. Methods and Materials: We used PRESAGE radiochromic plastic dosimeters with remote optical computed tomography readout to perform 3D high-resolution measurements, following a novel remote dosimetry protocol. We followed the intensity modulated radiation therapy commissioning recommendations of American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 119, adapted to incorporate 3D data. Preliminary tests (“AP” and “3D-Bands”) were delivered to 9.5-cm usable diameter cylindrical PRESAGE dosimeters to validate the treatment planning system (TPS) for nonmodulated deliveries; assess the sensitivity, uniformity, and rotational symmetry of the PRESAGE dosimeters; and test the robustness of the remote dosimetry protocol. Following this, 4 clinical MRgIMRT plans (“MultiTarget,” “Prostate,” “Head/Neck,” and “C-Shape”) were measured using 13-cm usable diameter PRESAGE dosimeters. For all plans, 3D-γ (3% or 3 mm global, 10% threshold) passing rates were calculated and 3D-γ maps were examined. Point doses were measured with an IBA-CC01 ionization chamber for validation of absolute dose. Finally, by use of an in-house-developed, GPU-accelerated Monte Carlo algorithm (gPENELOPE), we independently calculated dose for all 6 Task Group 119 plans and compared against the TPS. Results: For PRESAGE measurements, 3D-γ analysis yielded passing rates of 98.7%, 99.2%, 98.5%, 98.0%, 99.2%, and 90.7% for AP, 3D-Bands, MultiTarget, Prostate, Head/Neck, and C-Shape, respectively. Ion chamber measurements were within an average of 0.5% (±1.1%) from the TPS dose. Monte Carlo calculations demonstrated good agreement with the TPS, with a mean 3D-γ passing rate of 98.5% ± 1.9% using a stricter 2%/2-mm criterion. Conclusions: We

  15. Intensity-Modulated Whole Abdominal Radiotherapy After Surgery and Carboplatin/Taxane Chemotherapy for Advanced Ovarian Cancer: Phase I Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochet, Nathalie; Sterzing, Florian; Jensen, Alexandra D.; Dinkel, Julien; Herfarth, Klaus K.; Schubert, Kai; Eichbaum, Michael H.; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Debus, Juergen; Harms, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility and toxicity of consolidative intensity-modulated whole abdominal radiotherapy (WAR) after surgery and chemotherapy in high-risk patients with advanced ovarian cancer. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with optimally debulked ovarian cancer International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage IIIc were treated in a Phase I study with intensity-modulated WAR up to a total dose of 30 Gy in 1.5-Gy fractions as consolidation therapy after adjuvant carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy. Treatment was delivered using intensity-modulated radiotherapy in a step-and-shoot technique (n = 3) or a helical tomotherapy technique (n = 7). The planning target volume included the entire peritoneal cavity and the pelvic and para-aortal node regions. Organs at risk were kidneys, liver, heart, vertebral bodies, and pelvic bones. Results: Intensity-modulated WAR resulted in an excellent coverage of the planning target volume and an effective sparing of the organs at risk. The treatment was well tolerated, and no severe Grade 4 acute side effects occurred. Common Toxicity Criteria Grade III toxicities were as follows: diarrhea (n = 1), thrombocytopenia (n = 1), and leukopenia (n = 3). Radiotherapy could be completed by all the patients without any toxicity-related interruption. Median follow-up was 23 months, and 4 patients had tumor recurrence (intraperitoneal progression, n = 3; hepatic metastasis, n = 1). Small bowel obstruction caused by adhesions occurred in 3 patients. Conclusions: The results of this Phase I study showed for the first time, to our knowledge, the clinical feasibility of intensity-modulated whole abdominal radiotherapy, which could offer a new therapeutic option for consolidation treatment of advanced ovarian carcinoma after adjuvant chemotherapy in selected subgroups of patients. We initiated a Phase II study to further evaluate the toxicity of this intensive multimodal treatment.

  16. Intensity-modulated whole abdominal radiotherapy after surgery and carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy for advanced ovarian cancer: phase I study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochet, Nathalie; Sterzing, Florian; Jensen, Alexandra D; Dinkel, Julien; Herfarth, Klaus K; Schubert, Kai; Eichbaum, Michael H; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Debus, Juergen; Harms, Wolfgang

    2010-04-01

    To assess the feasibility and toxicity of consolidative intensity-modulated whole abdominal radiotherapy (WAR) after surgery and chemotherapy in high-risk patients with advanced ovarian cancer. Ten patients with optimally debulked ovarian cancer International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage IIIc were treated in a Phase I study with intensity-modulated WAR up to a total dose of 30 Gy in 1.5-Gy fractions as consolidation therapy after adjuvant carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy. Treatment was delivered using intensity-modulated radiotherapy in a step-and-shoot technique (n = 3) or a helical tomotherapy technique (n = 7). The planning target volume included the entire peritoneal cavity and the pelvic and para-aortal node regions. Organs at risk were kidneys, liver, heart, vertebral bodies, and pelvic bones. Intensity-modulated WAR resulted in an excellent coverage of the planning target volume and an effective sparing of the organs at risk. The treatment was well tolerated, and no severe Grade 4 acute side effects occurred. Common Toxicity Criteria Grade III toxicities were as follows: diarrhea (n = 1), thrombocytopenia (n = 1), and leukopenia (n = 3). Radiotherapy could be completed by all the patients without any toxicity-related interruption. Median follow-up was 23 months, and 4 patients had tumor recurrence (intraperitoneal progression, n = 3; hepatic metastasis, n = 1). Small bowel obstruction caused by adhesions occurred in 3 patients. The results of this Phase I study showed for the first time, to our knowledge, the clinical feasibility of intensity-modulated whole abdominal radiotherapy, which could offer a new therapeutic option for consolidation treatment of advanced ovarian carcinoma after adjuvant chemotherapy in selected subgroups of patients. We initiated a Phase II study to further evaluate the toxicity of this intensive multimodal treatment.

  17. Light intensity modulates the response of two Antarctic diatom species to ocean acidification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmin Pascale Heiden

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available It is largely unknown how rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations and changes in the upper mixed layer depth, with its subsequent effects on light availability will affect phytoplankton physiology in the Southern Ocean. Linking seasonal variations in the availability of CO2 and light to abundances and physiological traits of key phytoplankton species could aid to understand their abilities to acclimate to predicted future climatic conditions. To investigate the combined effects of CO2 and light on two ecologically relevant Antarctic diatoms (Fragilariopsis curta and Odontella weisflogii a matrix of three light intensities (LL=20, ML=200, HL=500 µmol photons m-2 s-1 and three pCO2 levels (low=180, ambient=380, high=1000 µatm was applied assessing their effects on growth, particulate organic carbon (POC fixation and photophysiology. Under ambient pCO2, POC production rates were highest already at low light in Fragilariopsis, indicating saturation of photosynthesis, while in Odontella highest rates were only reached at medium irradiances. In both species ocean acidification did not stimulate, but rather inhibited, growth and POC production under low and medium light. This effect was, however, amended under high growth irradiances. Low pCO2 levels inhibited growth and POC production in both species at low and medium light, and further decreased absETRs under high light. Our results suggest that Southern Ocean diatoms were sensitive to changes in pCO2, showing species-specific responses, which were further modulated by light intensity. The two diatom species represent distinct ecotypes and revealed discrete physiological traits that matched their seasonal occurrence with the related physical conditions in Antarctic coastal waters.

  18. A particle swarm optimization algorithm for beam angle selection in intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yongjie; Yao Dezhong; Yao, Jonathan; Chen Wufan

    2005-01-01

    Automatic beam angle selection is an important but challenging problem for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning. Though many efforts have been made, it is still not very satisfactory in clinical IMRT practice because of overextensive computation of the inverse problem. In this paper, a new technique named BASPSO (Beam Angle Selection with a Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm) is presented to improve the efficiency of the beam angle optimization problem. Originally developed as a tool for simulating social behaviour, the particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm is a relatively new population-based evolutionary optimization technique first introduced by Kennedy and Eberhart in 1995. In the proposed BASPSO, the beam angles are optimized using PSO by treating each beam configuration as a particle (individual), and the beam intensity maps for each beam configuration are optimized using the conjugate gradient (CG) algorithm. These two optimization processes are implemented iteratively. The performance of each individual is evaluated by a fitness value calculated with a physical objective function. A population of these individuals is evolved by cooperation and competition among the individuals themselves through generations. The optimization results of a simulated case with known optimal beam angles and two clinical cases (a prostate case and a head-and-neck case) show that PSO is valid and efficient and can speed up the beam angle optimization process. Furthermore, the performance comparisons based on the preliminary results indicate that, as a whole, the PSO-based algorithm seems to outperform, or at least compete with, the GA-based algorithm in computation time and robustness. In conclusion, the reported work suggested that the introduced PSO algorithm could act as a new promising solution to the beam angle optimization problem and potentially other optimization problems in IMRT, though further studies need to be investigated

  19. Intensity Modulation: A Novel Approach to Percept Control in Spinal Cord Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Daniel; Tyler, Dustin; Sweet, Jennifer; Miller, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) can be effective for neuropathic pain, but clinical benefit is sometimes inadequate or is offset by stimulation-induced side-effects, and response can be inconsistent among patients. Intensity-modulated stimulation (IMS) is an alternative to tonic stimulation (TS) that involves continuous variation of stimulation intensity in a sinusoidal pattern between two different values, sequentially activating distinct axonal populations to produce an effect that resembles natural physiological signals. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of IMS on the clinical effect of SCS. Seven patients undergoing a percutaneous SCS trial for postlaminectomy syndrome were enrolled. Thresholds for perception, pain relief, and discomfort were measured and used to create patient-specific models of axonal activation and charge delivery for both TS and IMS. All participants underwent three two-min periods of blinded stimulation using TS, IMS, and placebo, and were asked to describe the effect on quality of the sensory percept and pain relief. All participants perceived IMS differently from placebo, and five noted significant differences from TS that resulted in a more comfortable sensation. TS was described as electric and tingling, whereas IMS was described as producing a focal area of deep pressure with a sense of motion away from that focus. The anatomic location of coverage was similar between the two forms of stimulation, although one participant reported better lower back coverage with IMS. Computer modeling revealed that, compared with TS, IMS involved 36.4% less charge delivery and produced 78.7% less suprathreshold axonal activation. IMS for SCS is feasible, produces a more comfortable percept than conventional TS, and appears to provide a similar degree of pain relief with significantly lower energy requirements. Further studies are necessary to determine whether this represents an effective alternative to tonic SCS for treatment of

  20. Progress in Y-00 physical cipher for Giga bit/sec optical data communications (intensity modulation method)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, Osamu; Futami, Fumio

    2014-10-01

    To guarantee a security of Cloud Computing System is urgent problem. Although there are several threats in a security problem, the most serious problem is cyber attack against an optical fiber transmission among data centers. In such a network, an encryption scheme on Layer 1(physical layer) with an ultimately strong security, a small delay, and a very high speed should be employed, because a basic optical link is operated at 10 Gbit/sec/wavelength. We have developed a quantum noise randomied stream cipher so called Yuen- 2000 encryption scheme (Y-00) during a decade. This type of cipher is a completely new type random cipher in which ciphertext for a legitimate receiver and eavesdropper are different. This is a condition to break the Shannon limit in theory of cryptography. In addition, this scheme has a good balance on a security, a speed and a cost performance. To realize such an encryption, several modulation methods are candidates such as phase-modulation, intensity-modulation, quadrature amplitude modulation, and so on. Northwestern university group demonstrated a phase modulation system (α=η) in 2003. In 2005, we reported a demonstration of 1 Gbit/sec system based on intensity modulation scheme(ISK-Y00), and gave a design method for quadratic amplitude modulation (QAM-Y00) in 2005 and 2010. An intensity modulation scheme promises a real application to a secure fiber communication of current data centers. This paper presents a progress in quantum noise randomized stream cipher based on ISK-Y00, integrating our theoretical and experimental achievements in the past and recent 100 Gbit/sec(10Gbit/sec × 10 wavelengths) experiment.

  1. Minimising contralateral breast dose in post-mastectomy intensity-modulated radiotherapy by incorporating conformal electron irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laan, Hans Paul; Korevaar, Erik W; Dolsma, Willemtje; Maduro, John H; Langendijk, Johannes A

    PURPOSE: To assess the potential benefit of incorporating conformal electron irradiation in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for loco-regional post-mastectomy RT. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Ten consecutive patients that underwent left-sided mastectomy were selected for this comparative planning

  2. Trends in intensity modulated radiation therapy use for locally advanced rectal cancer at National Comprehensive Cancer Network centers

    OpenAIRE

    Marsha Reyngold, MD, PhD; Joyce Niland, PhD; Anna ter Veer, MS; Tanios Bekaii-Saab, MD; Lily Lai, MD; Joshua E. Meyer, MD; Steven J. Nurkin, MD, MS; Deborah Schrag, MD, MPH; John M. Skibber, MD, FACS; Al B. Benson, MD; Martin R. Weiser, MD; Christopher H. Crane, MD; Karyn A. Goodman, MD, MS

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has been rapidly incorporated into clinical practice because of its technological advantages over 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (CRT). We characterized trends in IMRT utilization in trimodality treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer at National Comprehensive Cancer Network cancer centers between 2005 and 2011. Methods and materials: Using the prospective National Comprehensive Cancer Network Colorectal Cancer Database, ...

  3. Anal wall sparing effect of an endorectal balloon in 3D conformal and intensity-modulated prostate radiotherapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeenk, R.J.; Lin, E.N.J.T. van; Kollenburg, P. van; Kunze-Busch, M.C.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To investigate the anal wall (Awall) sparing effect of an endorectal balloon (ERB) in 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In 24 patients with localized prostate carcinoma, two planning

  4. SU-F-T-209: Multicriteria Optimization Algorithm for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Using Pencil Proton Beam Scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltran, C; Kamal, H [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To provide a multicriteria optimization algorithm for intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning. Methods: Intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning requires efficient optimization algorithms to overcome the uncertainties in the Bragg peaks locations. This work is focused on optimization algorithms that are based on Monte Carlo simulation of the treatment planning and use the weights and the dose volume histogram (DVH) control points to steer toward desired plans. The proton beam treatment planning process based on single objective optimization (representing a weighted sum of multiple objectives) usually leads to time-consuming iterations involving treatment planning team members. We proved a time efficient multicriteria optimization algorithm that is developed to run on NVIDIA GPU (Graphical Processing Units) cluster. The multicriteria optimization algorithm running time benefits from up-sampling of the CT voxel size of the calculations without loss of fidelity. Results: We will present preliminary results of Multicriteria optimization for intensity modulated proton therapy based on DVH control points. The results will show optimization results of a phantom case and a brain tumor case. Conclusion: The multicriteria optimization of the intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning provides a novel tool for treatment planning. Work support by a grant from Varian Inc.

  5. SU-F-T-209: Multicriteria Optimization Algorithm for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Using Pencil Proton Beam Scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltran, C; Kamal, H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a multicriteria optimization algorithm for intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning. Methods: Intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning requires efficient optimization algorithms to overcome the uncertainties in the Bragg peaks locations. This work is focused on optimization algorithms that are based on Monte Carlo simulation of the treatment planning and use the weights and the dose volume histogram (DVH) control points to steer toward desired plans. The proton beam treatment planning process based on single objective optimization (representing a weighted sum of multiple objectives) usually leads to time-consuming iterations involving treatment planning team members. We proved a time efficient multicriteria optimization algorithm that is developed to run on NVIDIA GPU (Graphical Processing Units) cluster. The multicriteria optimization algorithm running time benefits from up-sampling of the CT voxel size of the calculations without loss of fidelity. Results: We will present preliminary results of Multicriteria optimization for intensity modulated proton therapy based on DVH control points. The results will show optimization results of a phantom case and a brain tumor case. Conclusion: The multicriteria optimization of the intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning provides a novel tool for treatment planning. Work support by a grant from Varian Inc.

  6. A new Monte Carlo-based treatment plan optimization approach for intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongbao; Tian, Zhen; Shi, Feng; Song, Ting; Wu, Zhaoxia; Liu, Yaqiang; Jiang, Steve; Jia, Xun

    2015-04-07

    Intensity-modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) plan optimization needs beamlet dose distributions. Pencil-beam or superposition/convolution type algorithms are typically used because of their high computational speed. However, inaccurate beamlet dose distributions may mislead the optimization process and hinder the resulting plan quality. To solve this problem, the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation method has been used to compute all beamlet doses prior to the optimization step. The conventional approach samples the same number of particles from each beamlet. Yet this is not the optimal use of MC in this problem. In fact, there are beamlets that have very small intensities after solving the plan optimization problem. For those beamlets, it may be possible to use fewer particles in dose calculations to increase efficiency. Based on this idea, we have developed a new MC-based IMRT plan optimization framework that iteratively performs MC dose calculation and plan optimization. At each dose calculation step, the particle numbers for beamlets were adjusted based on the beamlet intensities obtained through solving the plan optimization problem in the last iteration step. We modified a GPU-based MC dose engine to allow simultaneous computations of a large number of beamlet doses. To test the accuracy of our modified dose engine, we compared the dose from a broad beam and the summed beamlet doses in this beam in an inhomogeneous phantom. Agreement within 1% for the maximum difference and 0.55% for the average difference was observed. We then validated the proposed MC-based optimization schemes in one lung IMRT case. It was found that the conventional scheme required 10(6) particles from each beamlet to achieve an optimization result that was 3% difference in fluence map and 1% difference in dose from the ground truth. In contrast, the proposed scheme achieved the same level of accuracy with on average 1.2 × 10(5) particles per beamlet. Correspondingly, the computation

  7. Density overwrites of internal tumor volumes in intensity modulated proton therapy plans for mobile lung tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botas, Pablo; Grassberger, Clemens; Sharp, Gregory; Paganetti, Harald

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate internal tumor volume density overwrite strategies to minimize intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plan degradation of mobile lung tumors. Four planning paradigms were compared for nine lung cancer patients. Internal gross tumor volume (IGTV) and internal clinical target volume (ICTV) structures were defined encompassing their respective volumes in every 4DCT phase. The paradigms use different planning CT (pCT) created from the average intensity projection (AIP) of the 4DCT, overwriting the density within the IGTV to account for movement. The density overwrites were: (a) constant filling with 100 HU (C100) or (b) 50 HU (C50), (c) maximum intensity projection (MIP) across phases, and (d) water equivalent path length (WEPL) consideration from beam’s-eye-view. Plans were created optimizing dose-influence matrices calculated with fast GPU Monte Carlo (MC) simulations in each pCT. Plans were evaluated with MC on the 4DCTs using a model of the beam delivery time structure. Dose accumulation was performed using deformable image registration. Interplay effect was addressed applying 10 times rescanning. Significantly less DVH metrics degradation occurred when using MIP and WEPL approaches. Target coverage (D99≥slant 70 Gy(RBE)) was fulfilled in most cases with MIP and WEPL (D{{99}WEPL}=69.2+/- 4.0 Gy (RBE)), keeping dose heterogeneity low (D5-D{{95}WEPL}=3.9+/- 2.0 Gy(RBE)). The mean lung dose was kept lowest by the WEPL strategy, as well as the maximum dose to organs at risk (OARs). The impact on dose levels in the heart, spinal cord and esophagus were patient specific. Overall, the WEPL strategy gives the best performance and should be preferred when using a 3D static geometry for lung cancer IMPT treatment planning. Newly available fast MC methods make it possible to handle long simulations based on 4D data sets to perform studies with high accuracy and efficiency, even prior to individual treatment planning.

  8. An Ensemble Approach to Knowledge-Based Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiahan Zhang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge-based planning (KBP utilizes experienced planners’ knowledge embedded in prior plans to estimate optimal achievable dose volume histogram (DVH of new cases. In the regression-based KBP framework, previously planned patients’ anatomical features and DVHs are extracted, and prior knowledge is summarized as the regression coefficients that transform features to organ-at-risk DVH predictions. In our study, we find that in different settings, different regression methods work better. To improve the robustness of KBP models, we propose an ensemble method that combines the strengths of various linear regression models, including stepwise, lasso, elastic net, and ridge regression. In the ensemble approach, we first obtain individual model prediction metadata using in-training-set leave-one-out cross validation. A constrained optimization is subsequently performed to decide individual model weights. The metadata is also used to filter out impactful training set outliers. We evaluate our method on a fresh set of retrospectively retrieved anonymized prostate intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT cases and head and neck IMRT cases. The proposed approach is more robust against small training set size, wrongly labeled cases, and dosimetric inferior plans, compared with other individual models. In summary, we believe the improved robustness makes the proposed method more suitable for clinical settings than individual models.

  9. Interobserver Delineation variation using CT versus combined CT + MRI in intensity- modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villeirs, G.M.; Verstraete, K.L.; Vaerenbergh, K. van; Vakaet, L.; Bral, S.; Claus, F.; Neve, W.J. de; Meerleer, G.O. de

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: to quantify interobserver variation of prostate and seminal vesicle delineations using CT only versus CT + MRI in consensus reading with a radiologist. Material and methods: the prostate and seminal vesicles of 13 patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostatic adenocarcinoma were retrospectively delineated by three radiation oncologists on CT only and on CT + MRI in consensus reading with a radiologist. The volumes and margin positions were calculated and intermodality and interobserver variations were assessed for the clinical target volume (CTV), seminal vesicles, prostate and three prostatic subdivisions (apical, middle and basal third). Results: using CT + MRI as compared to CT alone, the mean CTV, prostate and seminal vesicle volumes significantly decreased by 6.54%, 5.21% and 10.47%, respectively. More importantly, their standard deviations significantly decreased by 63.06%, 62.65% and 44.83%, respectively. The highest level of variation was found at the prostatic apex, followed by the prostatic base and seminal vesicles. Conclusion: addition of MRI to CT in consensus reading with a radiologist results in a moderate decrease of the CTV, but an important decrease of the interobserver delineation variation, especially at the prostatic apex. (orig.)

  10. Improved Beam Angle Arrangement in Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Treatment Planning for Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Wenhua; Lim, Gino J.; Li, Yupeng; Zhu, X. Ronald; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigates potential gains of an improved beam angle arrangement compared to a conventional fixed gantry setup in intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) treatment for localized prostate cancer patients based on a proof of principle study. Materials and Methods: Three patients with localized prostate cancer retrospectively selected from our institution were studied. For each patient, IMPT plans were designed using two, three and four beam angles, respectively, obtained from a beam angle optimization algorithm. Those plans were then compared with ones using two lateral parallel-opposed beams according to the conventional planning protocol for localized prostate cancer adopted at our institution. Results: IMPT plans with two optimized angles achieved significant improvements in rectum sparing and moderate improvements in bladder sparing against those with two lateral angles. Plans with three optimized angles further improved rectum sparing significantly over those two-angle plans, whereas four-angle plans found no advantage over three-angle plans. A possible three-beam class solution for localized prostate patients was suggested and demonstrated with preserved dosimetric benefits because individually optimized three-angle solutions were found sharing a very similar pattern. Conclusions: This study has demonstrated the potential of using an improved beam angle arrangement to better exploit the theoretical dosimetric benefits of proton therapy and provided insights of selecting quality beam angles for localized prostate cancer treatment

  11. Three-dimensional cluster formation and structure in heterogeneous dose distribution of intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Ming; Wei, Jie; Narayanasamy, Ganesh; Yuan, Yading; Lo, Yeh-Chi; Peñagarícano, José A

    2018-05-01

    To investigate three-dimensional cluster structure and its correlation to clinical endpoint in heterogeneous dose distributions from intensity modulated radiation therapy. Twenty-five clinical plans from twenty-one head and neck (HN) patients were used for a phenomenological study of the cluster structure formed from the dose distributions of organs at risks (OARs) close to the planning target volumes (PTVs). Initially, OAR clusters were searched to examine the pattern consistence among ten HN patients and five clinically similar plans from another HN patient. Second, clusters of the esophagus from another ten HN patients were scrutinized to correlate their sizes to radiobiological parameters. Finally, an extensive Monte Carlo (MC) procedure was implemented to gain deeper insights into the behavioral properties of the cluster formation. Clinical studies showed that OAR clusters had drastic differences despite similar PTV coverage among different patients, and the radiobiological parameters failed to positively correlate with the cluster sizes. MC study demonstrated the inverse relationship between the cluster size and the cluster connectivity, and the nonlinear changes in cluster size with dose thresholds. In addition, the clusters were insensitive to the shape of OARs. The results demonstrated that the cluster size could serve as an insightful index of normal tissue damage. The clinical outcome of the same dose-volume might be potentially different. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Influence of intensity-modulated radiation therapy on parotid function in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Tiantian; Wu Shaoxiong; Han Fei; Lu Lixia; Huang Shaomin; Deng Xiaowu; Lu Taixiang; Zhao Chong

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) on parotid function in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods: Eighty-three NPC patients received prima- ry IMRT between 2001 and 2003. Xerostomia before radiotherapy, at the end of radiotherapy, at 6-month, 1-, 2-,3-,4- and 5-year after radiotherapy were investigated, respectively. The relation between xerostomia and parotid dose distribution was analyzed. Results: Of all the patients, 4, 31, 31 and 17 had stage I, II, III and IV A disease, respectively. Sixteen patients received chemo-radiotherapy. The median followed-up time was 65 months. The 5-year local control and regional control rate were 96% and 95%, respectively. The 5- year overall survival rate was 80%. The mild xerostomia rate at the seven time points was 42%, 51%, 71%, 77%, 58%, 38% and 26%. The corresponding moderate xerostomia rate was 52%, 53%, 21%, 8%, 3%, 2% and 2%, respectively. No serious xerostomia was observed. The mean dose of the bilateral parotid glands was 34.34 Gy. Xerostomia at 6-month after radiotherapy was positively correlated with the mean dose of the parotid glands, and D 50 was the independent factor in predicting the xerostomia. Parotid function was well protected when the mean dose and D 50 were no more than 33 Gy and 29 Gy, respectively. Conclusions: IMRT can improve the local-regional control of NPC and protect the parotid glands from radiation-induced injury. (authors)

  13. Segmental and dynamic intensity-modulated radiotherapy delivery techniques for micro-multileaf collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agazaryan, Nzhde; Solberg, Timothy D.

    2003-01-01

    A leaf sequencing algorithm has been implemented to deliver segmental and dynamic multileaf collimated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (SMLC-IMRT and DMLC-IMRT, respectively) using a linear accelerator equipped with a micro-multileaf collimator (mMLC). The implementation extends a previously published algorithm for the SMLC-IMRT to include the dynamic MLC-IMRT method and several dosimetric considerations. The algorithm has been extended to account for the transmitted radiation and minimize the leakage between opposing and neighboring leaves. The underdosage problem associated with the tongue-and-groove design of the MLC is significantly reduced by synchronizing the MLC leaf movements. The workings of the leaf sequencing parameters have been investigated and the results of the planar dosimetric investigations show that the sequencing parameters affect the measured dose distributions as intended. Investigations of clinical cases suggest that SMLC and DMLC delivery methods produce comparable results with leaf sequences obtained by root-mean-square (RMS) errors specification of 1.5% and lower, approximately corresponding to 20 or more segments. For SMLC-IMRT, there is little to be gained by using an RMS error specification smaller than 2%, approximately corresponding to 15 segments; however, more segments directly translate to longer treatment time and more strain on the MLC. The implemented leaf synchronization method does not increase the required monitor units while it reduces the measured TG underdoses from a maximum of 12% to a maximum of 3% observed with single field measurements of representative clinical cases studied

  14. Ways of improving the quality of planning radiotherapy with modulated intensity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khvorostenko, M.I.; Kikhtenko, I.N.; Khvorostenko, Yu.M.; Volokitin, S.V.; Sklyar, N.V.

    2017-01-01

    3D planning standards do not exclude the presence of sections of the tumor with absorbed dose less than planned, which is considered as a prerequisite for relapse. To improve radiation therapy outcomes in cancer patients through the enhancing (intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) radiation planning quality, identifying areas of the tumor with minimal optical density exposed to lower absorbed dose in comparison with the planned one and assessment of the ways to eliminate it. Due to identified locations with a minimum optical density and the absorbed dose lower than the planned one, the ''resale'' was carried out. It was aimed to achieve the values recorded in the plan. The percentage of coverage isodose GTV and PTV was increased; on the area, where the total focal dose was lower than the planned, the dose absorbed was increased in comparison with the recorded one. Assessment of the tumor areas with minimal optical density makes it possible to detect areas with likely lower value of the total focal dose in comparison with the target on; correction of the total focal dose in these areas will improve the quality of radiation therapy.

  15. A comparison of morbidity following conformal versus intensity-modulated radiotherapy for urinary bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søndergaard, Jimmi; Holmberg, Mats; Jakobsen, Annette Ross; Agerbæk, Mads; Muren, Ludvig Paul; Høyer, Morten

    2014-10-01

    In radiotherapy (RT) of urinary bladder cancer, the use of intensity-modulated RT (IMRT) opens for sparing of considerable intestinal volumes. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the acute and late toxicities following either conformal RT (CRT) or IMRT for bladder cancer, and to correlate the toxicities to dose-volume parameters. The study included 116 consecutively treated patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer who received either CRT (n = 66) or IMRT (n = 50) during 2007-2010. Acute side effects were retrospectively collected whereas late effects were assessed by a cross-sectional evaluation by telephone interview of 44 recurrence-free patients. Acute and late toxicities were scored according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Event (CTCAE) version 3.0. Acute diarrhoea grade ≥ 2 was more frequent in patients treated by CRT (56%) compared to IMRT (30%) (p = 0.008). Logistic regression analysis showed a correlation between acute diarrhoea and bowel cavity dose-volume parameters in the 10-50 Gy range. Severe late toxicity (grade ≥ 3) was recorded in 10% of the total cohort, with no statistical difference between the IMRT and CRT groups. Patients treated with IMRT for bladder cancer had significantly less acute diarrhoea compared to those treated with CRT, but there was no significant difference in late morbidity between the groups. The risk of acute diarrhoea was related to the volume of bowel irradiated.

  16. Meningioma Causing Visual Impairment: Outcomes and Toxicity After Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maclean, Jillian, E-mail: jillian.maclean@uclh.nhs.uk [Radiotherapy Department, University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Fersht, Naomi [Radiotherapy Department, University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Bremner, Fion [Neuro-Ophthalmology Department, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London (United Kingdom); Stacey, Chris; Sivabalasingham, Suganya [Radiotherapy Department, University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Short, Susan [Radiotherapy Department, University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, St James University Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate ophthalmologic outcomes and toxicity of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in patients with meningiomas causing visual deficits. Methods and Materials: A prospective observational study with formal ophthalmologic and clinical assessment of 30 consecutive cases of meningioma affecting vision treated with IMRT from 2007 to 2011. Prescriptions were 50.4 Gy to mean target dose in 28 daily fractions. The median follow-up time was 28 months. Twenty-six meningiomas affected the anterior visual pathway (including 3 optic nerve sheath meningiomas); 4 were posterior to the chiasm. Results: Vision improved objectively in 12 patients (40%). Improvements were in visual field (5/16 patients), color vision (4/9 patients), acuity (1/15 patients), extraocular movements (3/11 patients), ptosis (1/5 patients), and proptosis (2/6 patients). No predictors of clinical response were found. Two patients had minor reductions in tumor dimensions on magnetic resonance imaging, 1 patient had radiological progression, and the other patients were stable. One patient experienced grade 2 keratitis, 1 patient had a minor visual field loss, and 5 patients had grade 1 dry eye. Conclusion: IMRT is an effective method for treating meningiomas causing ophthalmologic deficits, and toxicity is minimal. Thorough ophthalmologic assessment is important because clinical responses often occur in the absence of radiological change.

  17. A novel linear programming approach to fluence map optimization for intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romeijn, H Edwin; Ahuja, Ravindra K; Dempsey, James F; Kumar, Arvind; Li, Jonathan G

    2003-01-01

    We present a novel linear programming (LP) based approach for efficiently solving the intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) fluence-map optimization (FMO) problem to global optimality. Our model overcomes the apparent limitations of a linear-programming approach by approximating any convex objective function by a piecewise linear convex function. This approach allows us to retain the flexibility offered by general convex objective functions, while allowing us to formulate the FMO problem as a LP problem. In addition, a novel type of partial-volume constraint that bounds the tail averages of the differential dose-volume histograms of structures is imposed while retaining linearity as an alternative approach to improve dose homogeneity in the target volumes, and to attempt to spare as many critical structures as possible. The goal of this work is to develop a very rapid global optimization approach that finds high quality dose distributions. Implementation of this model has demonstrated excellent results. We found globally optimal solutions for eight 7-beam head-and-neck cases in less than 3 min of computational time on a single processor personal computer without the use of partial-volume constraints. Adding such constraints increased the running times by a factor of 2-3, but improved the sparing of critical structures. All cases demonstrated excellent target coverage (>95%), target homogeneity (<10% overdosing and <7% underdosing) and organ sparing using at least one of the two models

  18. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy to bilateral lower limb extremities concurrently: a planning case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzgerald, Emma, E-mail: emmafitz1390@gmail.com; Miles, Wesley; Fenton, Paul; Frantzis, Jim [Radiation Oncology, Epworth HealthCare, Victoria (Australia)

    2014-09-15

    Non-melanomatous skin cancers represent 80% of all newly diagnosed cancers in Australia with basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) being the most common. A previously healthy 71-year-old woman presented with widespread and tender superficial skin cancers on the lower bilateral limbs. External beam radiation therapy through the use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) was employed as the treatment modality of choice as this technique provides conformal dose distribution to a three-dimensional treatment volume while reducing toxicity to surrounding tissues. The patient was prescribed a dose of 60 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV) with 1.0 cm bolus over the ventral surface of each limb. The beam arrangement consisted of six treatment fields that avoided entry and exit through the contralateral limb. The treatment plans met the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) guidelines and produced highly conformal dosimetric results. Skin toxicity was measured against the National Cancer Institute: Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (NCI: CTCAE) version 3. A well-tolerated treatment was delivered with excellent results given the initial extent of the disease. This case study has demonstrated the feasibility and effectiveness of IMRT for skin cancers as an alternative to surgery and traditional superficial radiation therapy, utilising a complex PTV of the extremities for patients with similar presentations.

  19. Comparison of two heterogeneity correction algorithms in pituitary gland treatments with intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albino, Lucas D.; Santos, Gabriela R.; Ribeiro, Victor A.B.; Rodrigues, Laura N.; Weltman, Eduardo; Braga, Henrique F.

    2013-01-01

    The dose accuracy calculated by a treatment planning system is directly related to the chosen algorithm. Nowadays, several calculation doses algorithms are commercially available and they differ in calculation time and accuracy, especially when individual tissue densities are taken into account. The aim of this study was to compare two different calculation algorithms from iPlan®, BrainLAB, in the treatment of pituitary gland tumor with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). These tumors are located in a region with variable electronic density tissues. The deviations from the plan with no heterogeneity correction were evaluated. To initial validation of the data inserted into the planning system, an IMRT plan was simulated in a anthropomorphic phantom and the dose distribution was measured with a radiochromic film. The gamma analysis was performed in the film, comparing it with dose distributions calculated with X-ray Voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) algorithm and pencil beam convolution (PBC). Next, 33 patients plans, initially calculated by PBC algorithm, were recalculated with XVMC algorithm. The treatment volumes and organs-at-risk dose-volume histograms were compared. No relevant differences were found in dose-volume histograms between XVMC and PBC. However, differences were obtained when comparing each plan with the plan without heterogeneity correction. (author)

  20. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma parotid sparing with euivalent uiform dose optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue Weiyou; Dai Jianrong; Gao Li

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of an euivalent uiform dose (EUD) based optimization algorithm in sparing the parotids of patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) when they are treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods: 12 patients were randomly selected from the NPC patients who received IMRT treatments. For these patients, the treatment plans were designed with physical optimization constraints (dose/dose-volume constraints). Based on these plans, new plans were designed through replacing the physical constraints with maximum EUD for parotids, while keeping the physical objectives for targets and other organs at risk(OARs) unchanged. Comparison was then made between the new plan, which had EUD constraints to parotids, and the former for each individual patient. Results: While maintaining the dose to the targets and the other OARs un- changed, optimization with EUD constraints to parotids decreased the mean dose and V 30 of parotids significantly, simultaneously, the dose of target volume and other organs at risk keep stable, the values of probability were less than 0.05 by T-test. Conclusions: The doses to parotids can be reduced through optimization with EUD constraints. This finding is quite helpful to reduce the occurrence rate of parotid complications, and to provide spaces for escalating target dose. (authors)

  1. Development of a quality control system in intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Roberto Salomon de; Braz, Delson

    2013-01-01

    The more complex the technique of radiotherapy is, the more refined the quality control must be. The technique of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) is one of the technological innovations that gained space in the whole worlds in the last decade whose parameters of quality control are not fully established yet. The present work developed a phantom for quality control in IMRT to be implemented in the routine of the Radiotherapy Quality Control Program (PQRT) of the Brazilian National Cancer Institute (INCa). The device consists of a block formed by several polystyrene slice with TDLs and radiochromic film inserted. It should be sent (or taken) to the Program participating institutions to be irradiated under certain conditions and then be returned to the PQRT., where the discrepancy degree between the planned treatment and those effectively delivered will be evaluated. The system was validated through the test cases and the pilot program preformed in nine radiotherapy centers that perform IMRT in the southeast region of Brazil. (author)

  2. Improved Planning Time and Plan Quality Through Multicriteria Optimization for Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craft, David L.; Hong, Theodore S.; Shih, Helen A.; Bortfeld, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To test whether multicriteria optimization (MCO) can reduce treatment planning time and improve plan quality in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Ten IMRT patients (5 with glioblastoma and 5 with locally advanced pancreatic cancers) were logged during the standard treatment planning procedure currently in use at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). Planning durations and other relevant planning information were recorded. In parallel, the patients were planned using an MCO planning system, and similar planning time data were collected. The patients were treated with the standard plan, but each MCO plan was also approved by the physicians. Plans were then blindly reviewed 3 weeks after planning by the treating physician. Results: In all cases, the treatment planning time was vastly shorter for the MCO planning (average MCO treatment planning time was 12 min; average standard planning time was 135 min). The physician involvement time in the planning process increased from an average of 4.8 min for the standard process to 8.6 min for the MCO process. In all cases, the MCO plan was blindly identified as the superior plan. Conclusions: This provides the first concrete evidence that MCO-based planning is superior in terms of both planning efficiency and dose distribution quality compared with the current trial and error–based IMRT planning approach.

  3. Australia-wide comparison of intensity modulated radiation therapy prostate plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skala, M.; Holloway, L.; Bailey, M.; Kneebone, A.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of Australian centres to produce high-dose intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) prostate plans, and to compare the planning parameters and resultant dose distributions. Five Australian radiation therapy departments were invited to participate. Each centre received an identical 5 mm-slice CT data set complete with contours of the prostate, seminal vesicles, rectum, bladder, femoral heads and body outline. The planning team was asked to produce the best plan possible, using published Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Centre prescription and dose constraints. Three centres submitted plans for evaluation. All plans covered the planning target volume adequately; however, only one plan met all the critical organ dose constraints. Although the planning parameters, beam arrangements and planning systems were different for each centre, the resulting plans were similar. In Australia, IMRT for prostate cancer is in the early stages of implementation, with routine use limited to a few centres. Copyright (2005) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  4. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy significantly reduces xerostomia compared with conventional radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braam, Petra M.; Terhaard, Chris H.J. M.D.; Roesink, Judith M.; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P.J.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Xerostomia is a severe complication after radiotherapy for oropharyngeal cancer, as the salivary glands are in close proximity with the primary tumor. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) offers theoretical advantages for normal tissue sparing. A Phase II study was conducted to determine the value of IMRT for salivary output preservation compared with conventional radiotherapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 56 patients with oropharyngeal cancer were prospectively evaluated. Of these, 30 patients were treated with IMRT and 26 with CRT. Stimulated parotid salivary flow was measured before, 6 weeks, and 6 months after treatment. A complication was defined as a stimulated parotid flow rate <25% of the preradiotherapy flow rate. Results: The mean dose to the parotid glands was 48.1 Gy (SD 14 Gy) for CRT and 33.7 Gy (SD 10 Gy) for IMRT (p < 0.005). The mean parotid flow ratio 6 weeks and 6 months after treatment was respectively 41% and 64% for IMRT and respectively 11% and 18% for CRT. As a result, 6 weeks after treatment, the number of parotid flow complications was significantly lower after IMRT (55%) than after CRT (87%) (p = 0.002). The number of complications 6 months after treatment was 56% for IMRT and 81% for CRT (p = 0.04). Conclusions: IMRT significantly reduces the number of parotid flow complications for patients with oropharyngeal cancer

  5. In vivo measurements with MOSFET detectors in oropharynx and nasopharynx intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcie, Serge; Charpiot, Elisabeth; Bensadoun, Rene-Jean; Ciais, Gaston; Herault, Joel; Costa, Andre; Gerard, Jean-Pierre

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of in vivo measurements with metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters for oropharynx and nasopharynx intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: During a 1-year period, in vivo measurements of the dose delivered to one or two points of the oral cavity by IMRT were obtained with MOSFET dosimeters. Measurements were obtained during each session of 48 treatment plans for 21 patients, all of whom were fitted with a custom-made mouth plate. Calculated and measured values were compared. Results: A total of 344 and 452 measurements were performed for the right and left sides, respectively, of the oral cavity. Seventy percent of the discrepancies between calculated and measured values were within ±5%. Uncertainties were due to interfraction patient positions, intrafraction patient movements, and interfraction MOSFET positions. Nevertheless, the discrepancies between the measured and calculated means were within ±5% for 92% and 95% of the right and left sides, respectively. Comparison of these discrepancies and the discrepancies between calculated values and measurements made on a phantom revealed that all differences were within ±5%. Conclusion: Our experience demonstrates the feasibility of in vivo measurements with MOSFET dosimeters for oropharynx and nasopharynx IMRT

  6. PET/CT scanning guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy in treatment of recurrent ovarian cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Xue-lian, E-mail: duxuelian23800@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan 250117 (China); Shandong Academy of Medical Science, Jinan 250012 (China); Jiang, Tao, E-mail: melody23800@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan 250117 (China); Shandong Academy of Medical Science, Jinan 250012 (China); Sheng, Xiu-gui, E-mail: jnsd2000@yahoo.cn [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan 250117 (China); Shandong Academy of Medical Science, Jinan 250012 (China); Li, Qing-shui, E-mail: lqs1966@126.com [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan 250117 (China); Shandong Academy of Medical Science, Jinan 250012 (China); Wang, Cong, E-mail: jnwc1981@hotmail.com [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan 250117 (China); Shandong Academy of Medical Science, Jinan 250012 (China); Yu, Hao, E-mail: jnyh2200@sina.com [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan 250117 (China); Shandong Academy of Medical Science, Jinan 250012 (China)

    2012-11-15

    Objective: This study was undertaken to evaluate the clinical contribution of positron emission tomography using {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose and integrated computer tomography (FDG-PET/CT) guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for treatment of recurrent ovarian cancer. Materials and methods: Fifty-eight patients with recurrent ovarian cancer from 2003 to 2008 were retrospectively studied. In these patients, 28 received PET/CT guided IMRT (PET/CT-IMRT group), and 30 received CT guided IMRT (CT-IMRT group). Treatment plans, tumor response, toxicities and survival were evaluated. Results: Changes in GTV delineation were found in 10 (35.7%) patients based on PET-CT information compared with CT data, due to the incorporation of additional lymph node metastases and extension of the metastasis tumor. PET/CT guided IMRT improved tumor response compared to CT-IMRT group (CR: 64.3% vs. 46.7%, P = 0.021; PR: 25.0% vs. 13.3%, P = 0.036). The 3-year overall survival was significantly higher in the PET-CT/IMRT group than control (34.1% vs. 13.2%, P = 0.014). Conclusions: PET/CT guided IMRT in recurrent ovarian cancer patients improved the delineation of GTV and reduce the likelihood of geographic misses and therefore improve the clinical outcome.

  7. Improved Outcomes with Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Combined with Temozolomide for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel J. Aherne

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is optimally treated by maximal debulking followed by combined chemoradiation. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT is gaining widespread acceptance in other tumour sites, although evidence to support its use over three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT in the treatment of gliomas is currently lacking. We examined the survival outcomes for patients with GBM treated with IMRT and Temozolomide. Methods and Materials. In all, 31 patients with GBM were treated with IMRT and 23 of these received chemoradiation with Temozolomide. We correlated survival outcomes with patient functional status, extent of surgery, radiation dose, and use of chemotherapy. Results. Median survival for all patients was 11.3 months, with a median survival of 7.2 months for patients receiving 40.05 Gray (Gy and a median survival of 17.4 months for patients receiving 60 Gy. Conclusions. We report one of the few series of IMRT in patients with GBM. In our group, median survival for those receiving 60 Gy with Temozolomide compared favourably to the combined therapy arm of the largest randomised trial of chemoradiation versus radiation to date (17.4 months versus 14.6 months. We propose that IMRT should be considered as an alternative to 3DCRT for patients with GBM.

  8. Improved outcomes with intensity modulated radiation therapy combined with temozolomide for newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aherne, Noel J; Benjamin, Linus C; Horsley, Patrick J; Silva, Thomaz; Wilcox, Shea; Amalaseelan, Julan; Dwyer, Patrick; Tahir, Abdul M R; Hill, Jacques; Last, Andrew; Hansen, Carmen; McLachlan, Craig S; Lee, Yvonne L; McKay, Michael J; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is optimally treated by maximal debulking followed by combined chemoradiation. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is gaining widespread acceptance in other tumour sites, although evidence to support its use over three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) in the treatment of gliomas is currently lacking. We examined the survival outcomes for patients with GBM treated with IMRT and Temozolomide. Methods and Materials. In all, 31 patients with GBM were treated with IMRT and 23 of these received chemoradiation with Temozolomide. We correlated survival outcomes with patient functional status, extent of surgery, radiation dose, and use of chemotherapy. Results. Median survival for all patients was 11.3 months, with a median survival of 7.2 months for patients receiving 40.05 Gray (Gy) and a median survival of 17.4 months for patients receiving 60 Gy. Conclusions. We report one of the few series of IMRT in patients with GBM. In our group, median survival for those receiving 60 Gy with Temozolomide compared favourably to the combined therapy arm of the largest randomised trial of chemoradiation versus radiation to date (17.4 months versus 14.6 months). We propose that IMRT should be considered as an alternative to 3DCRT for patients with GBM.

  9. Statistical process control analysis for patient quality assurance of intensity modulated radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Rena; Kim, Kyubo; Cho, Samju; Lim, Sangwook; Lee, Suk; Shim, Jang Bo; Huh, Hyun Do; Lee, Sang Hoon; Ahn, Sohyun

    2017-11-01

    This study applied statistical process control to set and verify the quality assurances (QA) tolerance standard for our hospital's characteristics with the criteria standards that are applied to all the treatment sites with this analysis. Gamma test factor of delivery quality assurances (DQA) was based on 3%/3 mm. Head and neck, breast, prostate cases of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric arc radiation therapy (VMAT) were selected for the analysis of the QA treatment sites. The numbers of data used in the analysis were 73 and 68 for head and neck patients. Prostate and breast were 49 and 152 by MapCHECK and ArcCHECK respectively. C p value of head and neck and prostate QA were above 1.0, C pml is 1.53 and 1.71 respectively, which is close to the target value of 100%. C pml value of breast (IMRT) was 1.67, data values are close to the target value of 95%. But value of was 0.90, which means that the data values are widely distributed. C p and C pml of breast VMAT QA were respectively 1.07 and 2.10. This suggests that the VMAT QA has better process capability than the IMRT QA. Consequently, we should pay more attention to planning and QA before treatment for breast Radiotherapy.

  10. A Monte Carlo dosimetric quality assurance system for dynamic intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takegawa, Hideki; Yamamoto, Tokihiro; Miyabe, Yuki; Teshima, Teruki; Kunugi, Tomoaki; Yano, Shinsuke; Mizowaki, Takashi; Nagata, Yasushi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2005-01-01

    We are developing a Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation system, which can resolve dosimetric issues derived from multileaf collimator (MLC) design for routine dosimetric quality assurance (QA) of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The treatment head of the medical linear accelerator equipped with MLC was modeled using the EGS4 MC code. A graphical user interface (GUI) application was developed to implement MC dose computation in the CT-based patient model and compare the MC calculated results with those of a commercial radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP) system, Varian Eclipse. To reduce computation time, the EGS4 MC code has been parallelized on massive parallel processing (MPP) system using the message passing interface (MPI). The MC treatment head model and MLC model were validated by the measurement data sets of percentage depth dose (PDD) and off-center ratio (OCR) in the water phantom and the film measurements for the static and dynamic test patterns, respectively. In the treatment head model, the MC calculated results agreed with those of measurements for both of PDD and OCR. The MC could reproduce all of the MLC dosimetric effects. A quantitative comparison between the results of MC and Eclipse was successfully performed with the GUI application. Parallel speed-up became almost linear. An MC dosimetric QA system for dynamic IMRT has been developed, however there were large dose discrepancies between the MC and the measurement in the MLC model simulation, which are now being investigated. (author)

  11. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Postoperative Treatment of Oral Cavity Cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, Daniel R.; Zhung, Joanne E.; Gomez, Jennifer; Chan, Kelvin; Wu, Abraham J.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Pfister, David G.; Shaha, Ashok; Shah, Jatin P.; Kraus, Dennis H.; Wong, Richard J.; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To present our single-institution experience of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for oral cavity cancer. Methods and Materials: Between September 2000 and December 2006, 35 patients with histologically confirmed squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity underwent surgery followed by postoperative IMRT. The sites included were buccal mucosa in 8, oral tongue in 11, floor of the mouth in 9, gingiva in 4, hard palate in 2, and retromolar trigone in 1. Most patients had Stage III-IV disease (80%). Ten patients (29%) also received concurrent postoperative chemotherapy with IMRT. The median prescribed radiation dose was 60 Gy. Results: The median follow-up for surviving patients was 28.1 months (range, 11.9-85.1). Treatment failure occurred in 11 cases as follows: local in 4, regional in 2, and distant metastases in 5. Of the 5 patients with distant metastases, 2 presented with dermal metastases. The 2- and 3-year estimates of locoregional progression-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival were 84% and 77%, 85% and 85%, 70% and 64%, and 74% and 74%, respectively. Acute Grade 2 or greater dermatitis, mucositis, and esophageal reactions were experienced by 54%, 66%, and 40% of the patients, respectively. Documented late complications included trismus (17%) and osteoradionecrosis (5%). Conclusion: IMRT as an adjuvant treatment after surgical resection for oral cavity tumors is feasible and effective, with promising results and acceptable toxicity

  12. Radiochemoimmunotherapy with intensity-modulated concomitant boost: interim analysis of the REACH trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, Alexandra D; Krauss, Jürgen; Potthoff, Karin; Simon, Christian; Nikoghosyan, Anna V; Lossner, Karen; Debus, Jürgen; Münter, Marc W

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate efficacy and toxicity clinical in the intensified treatment of locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) with the combination of chemotherapy, the EGFR antibody cetuximab, and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in a concomitant boost concept. REACH is a prospective, bi-centric phase II trial of carboplatin/5-FU and cetuximab weekly combined with IMRT. Primary endpoint is locoregional control, secondary endpoints include acute radiation effects and adverse events. Evaluation of disease response is carried out according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST); toxicity is assessed using NCI CTC v 3.0. Treatment was tolerated moderately well, acneiforme erythema occurred in 74.1% (grade II/III), mucositis grade III in 28.6%, and radiation dermatitis grade III in 14.3%. Higher-grade side-effects resolved quickly until the first follow-up post treatment. Objective response rates were promising with 28.6% CR at first follow-up and 92.9% thereafter. The combination of standard carboplatin/5-FU and cetuximab is feasible and results in promising objective response rates. The use of an IMRT concomitant boost is practicable in a routine clinical setting resulting in only moderate overall toxicity of the regimen.

  13. Rational use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy: the importance of clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Neve, Wilfried; De Gersem, Werner; Madani, Indira

    2012-01-01

    During the last 2 decades, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) became a standard technique despite its drawbacks of volume delineation, planning, robustness of delivery, challenging quality assurance, and cost as compared with non-IMRT. The theoretic advantages of IMRT dose distributions are generally accepted, but the clinical advantages remain debatable because of the lack of clinical assessment of the effort that is required to overshadow the disadvantages. Rational IMRT use requires a positive advantage/drawback balance. Only 5 randomized clinical trials (RCTs), 3 in the breast and 2 in the head and neck, which compare IMRT with non-IMRT (2-dimensional technique in four fifths of the trials), have been published (as of March 2011), and all had toxicity as the primary endpoint. More than 50 clinical trials compared results of IMRT-treated patients with a non-IMRT group, mostly historical controls. RCTs systematically showed a lower toxicity in IMRT-treated patients, and the non-RCTs confirmed these findings. Toxicity reduction, counterbalancing the drawbacks of IMRT, was convincing for breast and head and neck IMRT. For other tumor sites, the arguments favoring IMRT are weaker because of the inability to control bias outside the randomized setting. For anticancer efficacy endpoints, like survival, disease-specific survival, or locoregional control, the balance between advantages and drawbacks is fraught with uncertainties because of the absence of robust clinical data. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A modified method of planning and delivery for dynamic multileaf collimator intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dogan, Nesrin; Leybovich, Leonid B.; Sethi, Anil; Krasin, Matthew; Emami, Bahman

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a modified planning and delivery technique that reduces dose nonuniformity for tomographic delivery of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: The NOMOS-CORVUS system delivers IMRT in a tomographic paradigm. This type of delivery is prone to create multiple dose nonuniformity regions at the arc abutment regions. The modified technique was based on the cyclical behavior of arc positions as a function of a target length. With the modified technique, two plans are developed for the same patient, one with the original target and the second with a slightly increased target length and the abutment regions shifted by ∼5 mm compared to the first plan. Each plan is designed to deliver half of the target prescription dose delivered on alternate days, resulting in periodic shifts of abutment regions. This method was experimentally tested in phantoms with and without intentionally introduced errors in couch indexing. Results: With the modified technique, the degree of dose nonuniformity was reduced. For example, with 1 mm error in couch indexing, the degree of dose nonuniformity changed from ∼25% to ∼12%. Conclusion: Use of the modified technique reduces dose nonuniformity due to periodic shifts of abutment regions during treatment delivery

  15. Magnetic resonance assessment of prostate localization variability in intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villeirs, Geert M.; Meerleer, Gert O. de; Verstraete, Koenraad L.; Neve, Wilfried J. de

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To measure prostate motion with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during a course of intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and materials: Seven patients with prostate carcinoma were scanned supine on a 1.5-Tesla MRI system with weekly pretreatment and on-treatment HASTE T2-weighted images in 3 orthogonal planes. The bladder and rectal volumes and position of the prostatic midpoint (PMP) and margins relative to the bony pelvis were measured. Results: All pretreatment positions were at the mean position as computed from the on-treatment scans in each patient. The PMP variability (given as 1 SD) in the anterior-posterior (AP), superior-inferior (SI), and right-left (RL) directions was 2.6, 2.4, and 1.0 mm, respectively. The largest variabilities occurred at the posterior (3.2 mm), superior (2.6 mm), and inferior (2.6 mm) margins. A strong correlation was found between large rectal volume (>95th percentile) and anterior PMP displacement. A weak correlation was found between bladder volume and superior PMP displacement. Conclusions: All pretreatment positions were representative of the subsequent on-treatment positions. A clinical target volume (CTV) expansion of 5.3 mm in any direction was sufficient to ascertain a 95% coverage of the CTV within the planning target volume (PTV), provided that a rectal suppository is administered to avoid rectal overdistension and that the patient has a comfortably filled bladder (<300 mL)

  16. Intensity modulated radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy for larynx preservation of advanced resectable hypopharyngeal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Hsing-Lung

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To analyze the rate of larynx preservation in patients of locally advanced hypopharyngeal cancer treated with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT plus concurrent chemotherapy, and compare the results with patients treated with primary surgery. Methods Between January 2003 and November 2007, 14 patients were treated with primary surgery and 33 patients were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT using IMRT technique. Survival rate, larynx preservation rate were calculated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Multivariate analysis was conducted for significant prognostic factors with Cox-regression method. Results The median follow-up was 19.4 months for all patients, and 25.8 months for those alive. The 5-year overall survival rate was 33% and 44% for primary surgery and definitive CCRT, respectively (p = 0.788. The 5-year functional larynx-preservation survival after IMRT was 40%. Acute toxicities were common, but usually tolerable. The rates of treatment-related mucositis (≥ grade 2 and pharyngitis (≥ grade 3 were higher in the CCRT group. For multivariate analysis, treatment response and cricoid cartilage invasion strongly correlated with survival. Conclusions IMRT plus concurrent chemotherapy may preserve the larynx without compromising survival. Further studies on new effective therapeutic agents are essential.

  17. Conformal intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) delivered by robotic linac - testing IMRT to the limit?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, S.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper it is proposed that intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) could be delivered optimally by a short-length linac mounted on a robotic arm. The robot would allow the linac to 'plant' narrow pencils of photon radiation with any orientation (excluding zones within which the linac and couch might collide) relative to the planning target volume (PTV). The treatment is specified by the trajectory of the robot and by the number of monitor units (MUs) delivered at each robotic orientation. An inverse-planning method to determine the optimum robotic trajectory is presented. It is shown that for complex PTVs, specifically those with concavities in their outline, the conformality of the treatment is improved by the use of a complex trajectory in comparison with a less complex constrained trajectory and this improvement is quantified. It is concluded that robotic linac delivery would lead to a great flexibility in those IMRT treatments requiring very complicated dose distributions with complex 3D shapes. However, even using very fast computers, the goal of determining whether robotic linac delivery is the ultimate IMRT cannot be conclusively reached at present. (author)

  18. Flow angle dependent photoacoustic Doppler power spectra under intensity-modulated continuous wave laser excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Tong

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Photoacoustic Doppler (PAD power spectra showing an evident Doppler shift represent the major characteristics of the continuous wave-excited or burst wave-excited versions of PAD flow measurements. In this paper, the flow angle dependences of the PAD power spectra are investigated using an experiment setup that was established based on intensity-modulated continuous wave laser excitation. The setup has an overall configuration that is similar to a previously reported configuration, but is more sophisticated in that it accurately aligns the laser illumination with the ultrasound detection process, and in that it picks up the correct sample position. In the analysis of the power spectra data, we find that the background power spectra can be extracted by combining the output signals from the two channels of the lock-in amplifier, which is very useful for identification of the PAD power spectra. The power spectra are presented and analyzed in opposite flow directions, at different flow speeds, and at different flow angles. The power spectra at a 90° flow angle show the unique properties of symmetrical shapes due to PAD broadening. For the other flow angles, the smoothed power spectra clearly show a flow angle cosine relationship.

  19. A fast optimization algorithm for multicriteria intensity modulated proton therapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Wei; Craft, David; Madden, Thomas M.; Zhang, Kewu; Kooy, Hanne M.; Herman, Gabor T.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To describe a fast projection algorithm for optimizing intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans and to describe and demonstrate the use of this algorithm in multicriteria IMPT planning. Methods: The authors develop a projection-based solver for a class of convex optimization problems and apply it to IMPT treatment planning. The speed of the solver permits its use in multicriteria optimization, where several optimizations are performed which span the space of possible treatment plans. The authors describe a plan database generation procedure which is customized to the requirements of the solver. The optimality precision of the solver can be specified by the user. Results: The authors apply the algorithm to three clinical cases: A pancreas case, an esophagus case, and a tumor along the rib cage case. Detailed analysis of the pancreas case shows that the algorithm is orders of magnitude faster than industry-standard general purpose algorithms (MOSEK's interior point optimizer, primal simplex optimizer, and dual simplex optimizer). Additionally, the projection solver has almost no memory overhead. Conclusions: The speed and guaranteed accuracy of the algorithm make it suitable for use in multicriteria treatment planning, which requires the computation of several diverse treatment plans. Additionally, given the low memory overhead of the algorithm, the method can be extended to include multiple geometric instances and proton range possibilities, for robust optimization.

  20. Dosimetric comparison of intensity modulated radiotherapy techniques and standard wedged tangents for whole breast radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fong, Andrew; Bromley, Regina; Beat, Mardi; Vien, Din; Dineley, Jude; Morgan, Graeme

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Prior to introducing intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT) into our department we undertook a comparison of the dose parameters of several IMRT techniques and standard wedged tangents (SWT). Our aim was to improve the dose distribution to the breast and to decrease the dose to organs at risk (OAR): heart, lung and contralateral breast (Contra Br). Treatment plans for 20 women (10 right-sided and 10 left-sided) previously treated with SWT for WBRT were used to compare (a) SWT; (b) electronic compensators IMRT (E-IMRT); (c) tangential beam IMRT (T-IMRT); (d) coplanar multi-field IMRT (CP-IMRT); and (e) non-coplanar multi-field IMRT (NCP-IMRT). Plans for the breast were compared for (i) dose homogeneity (DH); (ii) conformity index (CI); (iii) mean dose; (iv) maximum dose; (v) minimum dose; and dose to OAR were calculated (vi) heart; (vii) lung and (viii) Contra Br. Compared with SWT, all plans except CP-IMRT gave improvement in at least two of the seven parameters evaluated. T-IMRT and NCP-IMRT resulted in significant improvement in all parameters except DH and both gave significant reduction in doses to OAR. As on initial evaluation NCP-IMRT is likely to be too time consuming to introduce on a large scale, T-IMRT is the preferred technique for WBRT for use in our department.

  1. Comparison of optimization algorithms in intensity-modulated radiation therapy planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Rachel

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy is used to better conform the radiation dose to the target, which includes avoiding healthy tissue. Planning programs employ optimization methods to search for the best fluence of each photon beam, and therefore to create the best treatment plan. The Computational Environment for Radiotherapy Research (CERR), a program written in MATLAB, was used to examine some commonly-used algorithms for one 5-beam plan. Algorithms include the genetic algorithm, quadratic programming, pattern search, constrained nonlinear optimization, simulated annealing, the optimization method used in Varian EclipseTM, and some hybrids of these. Quadratic programing, simulated annealing, and a quadratic/simulated annealing hybrid were also separately compared using different prescription doses. The results of each dose-volume histogram as well as the visual dose color wash were used to compare the plans. CERR's built-in quadratic programming provided the best overall plan, but avoidance of the organ-at-risk was rivaled by other programs. Hybrids of quadratic programming with some of these algorithms seems to suggest the possibility of better planning programs, as shown by the improved quadratic/simulated annealing plan when compared to the simulated annealing algorithm alone. Further experimentation will be done to improve cost functions and computational time.

  2. Automation of the solution type of intensity modulated radiation therapy with direct planning neoplastic breast lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuente Rosales, Liset De La; Larrinaga Cortina, Eduardo Francisco

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer ranks first among the lesions malignancies involving the Cuban women and the second in mortality only surpassed by lung injury. The breast-conserving surgery is becoming less appeal, with an increase in the choice of radiotherapy to the breast operated, and the surgical bed. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy, IMRT has demonstrated better results in the dose distribution for irradiation dimensional treatment breast shaping, 3DCRT. We developed a MATLAB application to obtain the solution type to direct planning IMRT for breast neoplasm. The technique was implemented in the Planning System Treatment Plus Theraplan v3.8 and Precise1 ELEKTA linear accelerator. Static segments are constructed for each portal of incidence and Excel files are exported as the positions of the blades. The technique was validated with a patient, which he performed a radiographic study of computerized axial tomography planning purposes. The standard solution built is consistent with those reported internationally and consists of a segment type and at least two segments of type B. The assignment of the relative weights of the segments is done manually by trial and error procedure, with the general rule of 90% by weight assigned to segment A and the remaining 10% divided equally between B-type segments IMRT breast obtained in a dose 17% homogeneity better than 3DCRT and reduced the average dose in the lung ipsilateral 15%. (author)

  3. The Role of Pretreatment FDG-PET in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Wen-Shan; Wu, Ming-Fang; Tseng, Hsien-Chun; Liu, Jung-Tung; Weng, Jui-Hung; Li, Yueh-Chun; Lee, Jong-Kang

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Pretreatment with 2- [ 18 F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ( 18 F-FDG-PET) was evaluated as a predictor of local failure-free survival (LFFS), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) in patients with nonkeratinizing nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) alone or concurrently with chemotherapy (CCRT). Patients and Methods: Seventy-five M0 NPC patients who received FDG-PET before treatment were analyzed. The primary tumor FDG uptake was measured as the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax). The LFFS, DFS, and OS were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and the differences were evaluated on log-rank test. The prognostic significance was assessed by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: Eighteen patients received IMRT alone and 57 received CCRT. The mean SUVmax was significantly higher in 12 patients with locoregional or distant failure than in those without failure (p 18 F-FDG uptake (SUVmax >5) indicates poor outcome in patients with NPC.

  4. Multicentre quality assurance of intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans: a precursor to clinical trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M. J.; Bailey, M. J.; Forstner, D.; Metcalfe, P. E

    2007-01-01

    Full text: A multicentre planning study comparing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans for the treatment of a head and neck cancer has been carried out. Three Australian radiotherapy centres, each with a different planning system, were supplied a fully contoured CT dataset and requested to generate an IMRT plan in accordance with the requirements of an IMRT-based radiation therapy oncology group clinical trial. Plan analysis was carried out using software developed specifically for reviewing multicentre clinical trial data. Two out of the three plans failed to meet the prescription requirements with one misinterpreting the prescription and the third failed to meet one of the constraints. Only one plan achieved all of the dose objectives for the critical structures and normal tissues. Although each centre used very similar planning parameters and beam arrangements the resulting plans were quite different. The subjective interpretation and application of the prescription and planning objectives emphasize one of the many difficulties in carrying out multicentre IMRT planning studies. The treatment prescription protocol in a clinical trial must be both lucid and unequivocally stated to avoid misinterpretation. Australian radiotherapy centres must show that they can produce a quality IMRT plan and that they can adhere to protocols for IMRT planning before using it in a clinical trial

  5. A fast optimization algorithm for multicriteria intensity modulated proton therapy planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Craft, David; Madden, Thomas M; Zhang, Kewu; Kooy, Hanne M; Herman, Gabor T

    2010-09-01

    To describe a fast projection algorithm for optimizing intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans and to describe and demonstrate the use of this algorithm in multicriteria IMPT planning. The authors develop a projection-based solver for a class of convex optimization problems and apply it to IMPT treatment planning. The speed of the solver permits its use in multicriteria optimization, where several optimizations are performed which span the space of possible treatment plans. The authors describe a plan database generation procedure which is customized to the requirements of the solver. The optimality precision of the solver can be specified by the user. The authors apply the algorithm to three clinical cases: A pancreas case, an esophagus case, and a tumor along the rib cage case. Detailed analysis of the pancreas case shows that the algorithm is orders of magnitude faster than industry-standard general purpose algorithms (MOSEK'S interior point optimizer, primal simplex optimizer, and dual simplex optimizer). Additionally, the projection solver has almost no memory overhead. The speed and guaranteed accuracy of the algorithm make it suitable for use in multicriteria treatment planning, which requires the computation of several diverse treatment plans. Additionally, given the low memory overhead of the algorithm, the method can be extended to include multiple geometric instances and proton range possibilities, for robust optimization.

  6. Improved genetic algorithm in optimization of beam orientation in intensity modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni Xinye; Yang Jianhua; Sun Suping; Yao Yi

    2009-01-01

    Objective: At present beam orientation selection in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is mainly based on empiric knowledge. This study is to evaluate the feasibility of automated beam angle selection. Methods: Genetic algorithm technique which based on beam eye view dose measurement (BEVD-GA) was tested on two clinical cases, including a spine column cancer and a lung cancer. Three plans were obtained under the following different beam configurations: five equiangular-spaced beams, five beams with GA-selected, and five beams with BEVD-GA-selected beams. Then the dose distribution was compared among the three plans. Results: The method, restricting the range of genetic algorithm followed by carrying through genetic operations, not only shortened the optimization time, but also improved the optimization effect. For spine column cancer and lung cancer, the best IMRT plans were obtained with BEVD-GA-selected beams, which used automated beam orientation selection. Conclusions: Comparing with the conventional manual beam orientation selection, beam orientation optimization which is feasible in IMRT planning may significantly improve the efficiency and result. (authors)

  7. Multibeam tomotherapy: A new treatment unit devised for multileaf collimation, intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achterberg, Nils; Mueller, Reinhold G.

    2007-01-01

    A fully integrated system for treatment planning, application, and verification for automated multileaf collimator (MLC) based, intensity-modulated, image-guided, and adaptive radiation therapy (IMRT, IGRT and ART, respectively) is proposed. Patient comfort, which was the major development goal, will be achieved through a new unit design and short treatment times. Our device for photon beam therapy will consist of a new dual energy linac with five fixed treatment heads positioned evenly along one plane but one electron beam generator only. A minimum of moving parts increases technical reliability and reduces motion times to a minimum. Motion is allowed solely for the MLCs, the robotic patient table, and the small angle gantry rotation of ±36 deg. . Besides sophisticated electron beam guidance, this compact setup can be built using existing modules. The flattening-filter-free treatment heads are characterized by reduced beam-on time and contain apertures restricted in one dimension to the area of maximum primary fluence output. In the case of longer targets, this leads to a topographic intensity modulation, thanks to the combination of ''step and shoot'' MLC delivery and discrete patient couch motion. Owing to the limited number of beam directions, this multislice cone beam serial tomotherapy is referred to as ''multibeam tomotherapy.'' Every patient slice is irradiated by one treatment head at any given moment but for one subfield only. The electron beam is then guided to the next head ready for delivery, while the other heads are preparing their leaves for the next segment. The ''Multifocal MLC-positioning'' algorithm was programmed to enable treatment planning and optimize treatment time. We developed an overlap strategy for the longitudinally adjacent fields of every beam direction, in doing so minimizing the field match problem and the effects of possible table step errors. Clinical case studies show for the same or better planning target volume coverage

  8. Functional avoidance of lung in plan optimization with an aperture-based inverse planning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    St-Hilaire, Jason; Lavoie, Caroline; Dagnault, Anne; Beaulieu, Frederic; Morin, Francis; Beaulieu, Luc; Tremblay, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To implement SPECT-based optimization in an anatomy-based aperture inverse planning system for the functional avoidance of lung in thoracic irradiation. Material and methods: SPECT information has been introduced as a voxel-by-voxel modulation of lung importance factors proportionally to the local perfusion count. Fifteen cases of lung cancer have been retrospectively analyzed by generating angle-optimized non-coplanar plans, comparing a purely anatomical approach and our functional approach. Planning target volume coverage and lung sparing have been compared. Statistical significance was assessed by a Wilcoxon matched pairs test. Results: For similar target coverage, perfusion-weighted volume receiving 10 Gy was reduced by a median of 2.2% (p = 0.022) and mean perfusion-weighted lung dose, by a median of 0.9 Gy (p = 0.001). A separate analysis of patients with localized or non-uniform hypoperfusion could not show which would benefit more from SPECT-based treatment planning. Redirection of dose sometimes created overdosage regions in the target volume. Plans consisted of a similar number of segments and monitor units. Conclusions: Angle optimization and SPECT-based modulation of importance factors allowed for functional avoidance of the lung while preserving target coverage. The technique could be also applied to implement PET-based modulation inside the target volume, leading to a safer dose escalation.

  9. Characterization of a commercial multileaf collimator used for intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low, Daniel A.; Sohn, Jason W.; Klein, Eric E.; Markman, Jerry; Mutic, Sasa; Dempsey, James F.

    2001-01-01

    The characteristics of a commercial multileaf collimator (MLC) to deliver static and dynamic multileaf collimation (SMLC and DMLC, respectively) were investigated to determine their influence on intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning and quality assurance. The influence of MLC leaf positioning accuracy on sequentially abutted SMLC fields was measured by creating abutting fields with selected gaps and overlaps. These data were also used to measure static leaf positioning precision. The characteristics of high leaf-velocity DMLC delivery were measured with constant velocity leaf sequences starting with an open field and closing a single leaf bank. A range of 1-72 monitor units (MU) was used providing a range of leaf velocities. The field abutment measurements yielded dose errors (as a percentage of the open field max dose) of 16.7±0.7% mm-1 and 12.8±0.7% mm-1 for 6 MV and 18 MV photon beams, respectively. The MLC leaf positioning precision was 0.080±0.018 mm (single standard deviation) highlighting the excellent delivery hardware tolerances for the tested beam delivery geometry. The high leaf-velocity DMLC measurements showed delivery artifacts when the leaf sequence and selected monitor units caused the linear accelerator to move the leaves at their maximum velocity while modulating the accelerator dose rate to deliver the desired leaf and MU sequence (termed leaf-velocity limited delivery). According to the vendor, a unique feature to their linear accelerator and MLC is that the dose rate is reduced to provide the correct cm MU-1 leaf velocity when the delivery is leaf-velocity limited. However, it was found that the system delivered roughly 1 MU per pulse when the delivery was leaf-velocity limited causing dose profiles to exhibit discrete steps rather than a smooth dose gradient. The root mean square difference between the steps and desired linear gradient was less than 3% when more than 4 MU were used. The average dose per MU was

  10. Radiotherapy of prostate cancer with or without intensity modulated beams: a planning comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meerleer, Gert O. de; Vakaet, Luc A.M.L.; Gersem, Werner R.T. de; Wagter, Carlos de; Naeyer, Bart de; Neve, Wilfried de

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) by static segmented beams allows the dose to the main portion of the prostate target to escalate while keeping the maximal dose at the anterior rectal wall at 72 Gy. The value of such IMRT plans was analyzed by comparison with non-IMRT plans using the same beam incidences. Methods and Materials: We performed a planning study on the CT data of 32 consecutive patients with localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Three fields in the transverse plane with gantry angles of 0 deg. , 116 deg. , and 244 deg. were isocentered at the center of gravity of the target volume (prostate and seminal vesicles). The geometry of the beams was determined by beam's eye view autocontouring of the target volume with a margin of 1.5 cm. In study 1, the beam weights were determined by a human planner (3D-man) or by computer optimization using a biological objective function with (3D-optim-lim) or without (3D-optim-unlim) a physical term to limit target dose inhomogeneity. In study 2, the 3 beam incidences mentioned above were used and in-field uniform segments were added to allow IMRT. Plans with (IMRT-lim) or without (IMRT-unlim) constraints on target dose inhomogeneity were compared. In the IMRT-lim plan, target dose inhomogeneity was constrained between 15% and 20%. After optimization, plans in both studies were normalized to a maximal rectal dose of 72 Gy. Biological (tumor control probability [TCP], normal tissue complication probability [NTCP]) and physical indices for tumor control and normal tissue complication probabilities were computed, as well as the probability of the uncomplicated local control (P+). Results: The IMRT-lim plan was superior to all other plans concerning TCP (p =no. 89%). For bladder, maximal bladder dose was significantly higher in the IMRT-unlim plan compared to all other plans (p no. <=no. 0.0001). P+ was significantly higher in both IMRT-plans than in all other plans. The 3D

  11. Intensity Modulated Proton Beam Radiation for Brachytherapy in Patients With Cervical Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clivio, Alessandro [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Kluge, Anne [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Cozzi, Luca, E-mail: lucozzi@iosi.ch [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Köhler, Christhardt [Department of Gynecology, Charité University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Neumann, Oliver [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Vanetti, Eugenio [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Wlodarczyk, Waldemar; Marnitz, Simone [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité University Hospital, Berlin (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) in patients with cervical cancer in terms of coverage, conformity, and dose–volume histogram (DVH) parameters correlated with recommendations from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Eleven patients with histologically proven cervical cancer underwent primary chemoradiation for the pelvic lymph nodes, the uterus, the cervix, and the parametric region, with a symmetric margin of 1 cm. The prescription was for 50.4 Gy, with 1.8 Gy per fraction. The prescribed dose to the parametria was 2.12 Gy up to 59.36 Gy in 28 fractions as a simultaneous boost. For several reasons, the patients were unable to undergo brachytherapy. As an alternative, IMPT was planned with 5 fractions of 6 Gy to the cervix, including the macroscopic tumor with an MRI-guided target definition, with an isotropic margin of 5 mm for planning target volume (PTV) definition. Groupe-Europeen de Curietherapie and European society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO) criteria were used for DVH evaluation. Reference comparison plans were optimized for volumetric modulated rapid arc (VMAT) therapy with the RapidArc (RA). Results: The dose to the high-risk volume was calculated with α/β = 10 with 89.6 Gy. For IMPT, the clinical target volume showed a mean dose of 38.2 ± 5.0 Gy (35.0 ±1.8 Gy for RA). The D{sub 98%} was 31.9 ± 2.6 Gy (RA: 30.8 ± 1.0 Gy). With regard to the organs at risk, the 2Gy Equivalent Dose (EQD2) (α/β = 3) to 2 cm{sup 3} of the rectal wall, sigmoid wall, and bladder wall was 62.2 ± 6.4 Gy, 57.8 ± 6.1 Gy, and 80.6 ± 8.7 Gy (for RA: 75.3 ± 6.1 Gy, 66.9 ± 6.9 Gy, and 89.0 ± 7.2 Gy, respectively). For the IMPT boost plans in combination with external beam radiation therapy, all DVH parameters correlated with <5% risk for grades 2 to 4 late gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity. Conclusion: In patients who are not eligible for brachytherapy, IMPT as a boost

  12. Chemotherapy and intensity modulated conformational radiotherapy for locally advanced pancreas cancers; Chimiotherapie et radiotherapie conformationnelle avec modulation d'intensite pour les cancers du pancreas localement evolues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huguet, F. [Hopital Tenon, Paris (France); Wu, A.; Zhang, Z.; Winston, C.; Reidy, D.; Ho, A.; Allen, P.; Karyn, G. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York (United States)

    2011-10-15

    The authors report a retrospective study of the tolerance and survival of 48 patients who have been treated by a chemotherapy followed by a chemotherapy concomitant with an intensity-modulated radiotherapy for a locally advanced pancreas cancer. Results are discussed in terms of toxicity, cancer response, operability, survival rate. Tolerance is good. Local control rates, global survival rates and secondary resection rates are promising. Short communication

  13. Contribution of inter-muscular synchronization in the modulation of tremor intensity in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xin; Hao, Man-Zhao; Wei, Ming; Xiao, Qin; Lan, Ning

    2015-12-01

    frequency, indicating that the neuromechanical coupling in peripheral neuromuscular system was stronger at tremor frequency. Both paired and pool-averaged coherences are more consistent indexes to correlate to tremor intensity in a group of upper extremity muscles of PD patients. The central drive at tremor frequency contributes mainly to synchronize peripheral muscles in the modulation of tremor intensity.

  14. Cardiorespiratory fitness modulates the acute flow-mediated dilation response following high-intensity but not moderate-intensity exercise in elderly men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Tom G; Perissiou, Maria; Windsor, Mark; Russell, Fraser; Golledge, Jonathan; Green, Daniel J; Askew, Christopher D

    2017-05-01

    Impaired endothelial function is observed with aging and in those with low cardiorespiratory fitness (V̇o 2peak ). Improvements in endothelial function with exercise training are somewhat dependent on the intensity of exercise. While the acute stimulus for this improvement is not completely understood, it may, in part, be due to the flow-mediated dilation (FMD) response to acute exercise. We examined the hypothesis that exercise intensity alters the brachial (systemic) FMD response in elderly men and is modulated by V̇o 2peak Forty-seven elderly men were stratified into lower (V̇o 2peak = 24.3 ± 2.9 ml·kg -1 ·min -1 ; n = 27) and higher fit groups (V̇o 2peak = 35.4 ± 5.5 ml·kg -1 ·min -1 ; n = 20) after a test of cycling peak power output (PPO). In randomized order, participants undertook moderate-intensity continuous exercise (MICE; 40% PPO) or high-intensity interval cycling exercise (HIIE; 70% PPO) or no-exercise control. Brachial FMD was assessed at rest and 10 and 60 min after exercise. FMD increased after MICE in both groups {increase of 0.86% [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.17-1.56], P = 0.01} and normalized after 60 min. In the lower fit group, FMD was reduced after HIIE [reduction of 0.85% (95% CI, 0.12-1.58), P = 0.02] and remained decreased at 60 min. In the higher fit group, FMD was unchanged immediately after HIIE and increased after 60 min [increase of 1.52% (95% CI, 0.41-2.62), P exercise control, FMD was reduced in both groups after 60 min ( P = 0.05). Exercise intensity alters the acute FMD response in elderly men and V̇o 2peak modulates the FMD response following HIIE but not MICE. The sustained decrease in FMD in the lower fit group following HIIE may represent a signal for vascular adaptation or endothelial fatigue. NEW & NOTEWORTHY This study is the first to show that moderate-intensity continuous cycling exercise increased flow-mediated dilation (FMD) transiently before normalization of FMD after 1 h, irrespective of

  15. Inverse treatment planning for intensity modulated radiation therapy: CDVH treatment prescription with integral cost function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carol, M.P.; Nash, R.; Campbell, R.C.; Huber, R.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Inverse planning is a required approach when dealing with the complexity of variables present in an intensity modulated plan. However, an inverse planning system is only as useful as it is 1) easy to use and 2) predictable in its result. This is especially the case when the target goals and structure limits specified by the user all cannot be achieved. We have previously developed two interfaces for specifying how such conflicts should be resolved when they occur, that, although allowing a range of results to be obtained, still require 'trial and error' on the part of the user and are case dependent. A new method is explored with goals of allowing the desired results to be specified in an intuitive manner and producing predictable results that are case independent. Materials and Methods: Target goals and structure limits are specified by entering partial volume data: goal/limit, % under/over goal/limit, minimum, maximum. This data is converted to a CDVH curve for each target/structure. During the simulated annealing process used to produce an optimized solution, the actual CDVHs are compared to the desired CDVHs after each iteration and a cost is computed for the difference between the curves. For each curve, the cost is proportional to the difference in area between the desired and actual curves. This cost is controlled by three variables: offset (amount of difference before there is any cost), scale (the range the cost can take) and shape (the shape of the curve for difference versus cost). A range of values were explored for these variables in order to determine if predictable trade-offs would be made automatically by the system. The cost function was tested against a range of cases: a highly irregularly shaped intracranial lesion, a head and neck case with three target volumes with different prescriptions, and a prostate cancer. Results: By varying the values assigned to the control variables, a variety of predictable results could be

  16. Three dimensional intensity modulated brachytherapy (IMBT): Dosimetry algorithm and inverse treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Chengyu; Guo Bingqi; Cheng, Chih-Yao; Esquivel, Carlos; Eng, Tony; Papanikolaou, Niko

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The feasibility of intensity modulated brachytherapy (IMBT) to improve dose conformity for irregularly shaped targets has been previously investigated by researchers by means of using partially shielded sources. However, partial shielding does not fully explore the potential of IMBT. The goal of this study is to introduce the concept of three dimensional (3D) intensity modulated brachytherapy and solve two fundamental issues regarding the application of 3D IMBT treatment planning: The dose calculation algorithm and the inverse treatment planning method. Methods: A 3D IMBT treatment planning system prototype was developed using the MATLAB platform. This system consists of three major components: (1) A comprehensive IMBT source calibration method with dosimetric inputs from Monte Carlo (EGSnrc) simulations; (2) a ''modified TG-43'' (mTG-43) dose calculation formalism for IMBT dosimetry; and (3) a physical constraint based inverse IMBT treatment planning platform utilizing a simulated annealing optimization algorithm. The model S700 Axxent electronic brachytherapy source developed by Xoft, Inc. (Fremont, CA), was simulated in this application. Ten intracavitary accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) cases were studied. For each case, an ''isotropic plan'' with only optimized source dwell time and a fully optimized IMBT plan were generated and compared to the original plan in various dosimetric aspects, such as the plan quality, planning, and delivery time. The issue of the mechanical complexity of the IMBT applicator is not addressed in this study. Results: IMBT approaches showed superior plan quality compared to the original plans and the isotropic plans to different extents in all studied cases. An extremely difficult case with a small breast and a small distance to the ribs and skin, the IMBT plan minimized the high dose volume V 200 by 16.1% and 4.8%, respectively, compared to the original and the isotropic plans. The conformity index for the

  17. Three dimensional intensity modulated brachytherapy (IMBT): Dosimetry algorithm and inverse treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi Chengyu; Guo Bingqi; Cheng, Chih-Yao; Esquivel, Carlos; Eng, Tony; Papanikolaou, Niko [Cancer Therapy and Research Center, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Oklahoma University Health Science Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73104 (United States); Cancer Therapy and Research Center, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: The feasibility of intensity modulated brachytherapy (IMBT) to improve dose conformity for irregularly shaped targets has been previously investigated by researchers by means of using partially shielded sources. However, partial shielding does not fully explore the potential of IMBT. The goal of this study is to introduce the concept of three dimensional (3D) intensity modulated brachytherapy and solve two fundamental issues regarding the application of 3D IMBT treatment planning: The dose calculation algorithm and the inverse treatment planning method. Methods: A 3D IMBT treatment planning system prototype was developed using the MATLAB platform. This system consists of three major components: (1) A comprehensive IMBT source calibration method with dosimetric inputs from Monte Carlo (EGSnrc) simulations; (2) a ''modified TG-43'' (mTG-43) dose calculation formalism for IMBT dosimetry; and (3) a physical constraint based inverse IMBT treatment planning platform utilizing a simulated annealing optimization algorithm. The model S700 Axxent electronic brachytherapy source developed by Xoft, Inc. (Fremont, CA), was simulated in this application. Ten intracavitary accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) cases were studied. For each case, an ''isotropic plan'' with only optimized source dwell time and a fully optimized IMBT plan were generated and compared to the original plan in various dosimetric aspects, such as the plan quality, planning, and delivery time. The issue of the mechanical complexity of the IMBT applicator is not addressed in this study. Results: IMBT approaches showed superior plan quality compared to the original plans and the isotropic plans to different extents in all studied cases. An extremely difficult case with a small breast and a small distance to the ribs and skin, the IMBT plan minimized the high dose volume V{sub 200} by 16.1% and 4.8%, respectively, compared to the original and the

  18. Three dimensional intensity modulated brachytherapy (IMBT): dosimetry algorithm and inverse treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chengyu; Guo, Bingqi; Cheng, Chih-Yao; Esquivel, Carlos; Eng, Tony; Papanikolaou, Niko

    2010-07-01

    The feasibility of intensity modulated brachytherapy (IMBT) to improve dose conformity for irregularly shaped targets has been previously investigated by researchers by means of using partially shielded sources. However, partial shielding does not fully explore the potential of IMBT. The goal of this study is to introduce the concept of three dimensional (3D) intensity modulated brachytherapy and solve two fundamental issues regarding the application of 3D IMBT treatment planning: The dose calculation algorithm and the inverse treatment planning method. A 3D IMBT treatment planning system prototype was developed using the MATLAB platform. This system consists of three major components: (1) A comprehensive IMBT source calibration method with dosimetric inputs from Monte Carlo (EGSnrc) simulations; (2) a "modified TG-43" (mTG-43) dose calculation formalism for IMBT dosimetry; and (3) a physical constraint based inverse IMBT treatment planning platform utilizing a simulated annealing optimization algorithm. The model S700 Axxent electronic brachytherapy source developed by Xoft, Inc. (Fremont, CA), was simulated in this application. Ten intracavitary accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) cases were studied. For each case, an "isotropic plan" with only optimized source dwell time and a fully optimized IMBT plan were generated and compared to the original plan in various dosimetric aspects, such as the plan quality, planning, and delivery time. The issue of the mechanical complexity of the IMBT applicator is not addressed in this study. IMBT approaches showed superior plan quality compared to the original plans and tht isotropic plans to different extents in all studied cases. An extremely difficult case with a small breast and a small distance to the ribs and skin, the IMBT plan minimized the high dose volume V200 by 16.1% and 4.8%, respectively, compared to the original and the isotropic plans. The conformity index for the target was increased by 0.13 and 0

  19. Intensity modulated radiation-therapy for preoperative posterior abdominal wall irradiation of retroperitoneal liposarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossi, Alberto; De Wever, Ivo; Van Limbergen, Erik; Vanstraelen, Bianca

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Preoperative external-beam radiation therapy (preop RT) in the management of Retroperitoneal Liposarcomas (RPLS) typically involves the delivery of radiation to the entire tumor mass: yet this may not be necessary. The purpose of this study is to evaluate a new strategy of preop RT for RPLS in which the target volume is limited to the contact area between the tumoral mass and the posterior abdominal wall. Methods and Materials: Between June 2000 and Jan 2005, 18 patients with the diagnosis of RPLS have been treated following a pilot protocol of pre-op RT, 50 Gy in 25 fractions of 2 Gy/day. The Clinical Target Volume (CTV) has been limited to the posterior abdominal wall, region at higher risk for local relapse. A Three-Dimensional conformal (3D-CRT) and an Intensity Modulated (IMRT) plan were generated and compared; toxicity was reported following the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0. Results: All patients completed the planned treatment and the acute toxicity was tolerable: 2 patients experienced Grade 3 and 1 Grade 2 anorexia while 2 patients developed Grade 2 nausea. IMRT allows a better sparing of the ipsilateral and the contralateral kidney. All tumors were successfully resected without major complications. At a median follow-up of 27 months 2 patients developed a local relapse and 1 lung metastasis. Conclusions: Our strategy of preop RT is feasible and well tolerated: the rate of resectability is not compromised by limiting the preop CTV to the posterior abdominal wall and a better critical-structures sparing is obtained with IMRT

  20. Toxicity after intensity-modulated, image-guided radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flentje, Michael; Guckenberger, Matthias; Ok, Sami; Polat, Buelent; Sweeney, Reinhart A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate toxicity after dose-escalated radiotherapy for prostate cancer using intensity-modulated treatment planning (IMRT) and image-guided treatment (IGRT) delivery. Patients and Methods: 100 patients were treated with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) IMRT for prostate cancer: doses of 76.23 Gy and 60 Gy in 33 fractions were prescribed to the prostate and the seminal vesicles, respectively, for intermediate- and high-risk patients (n = 74). The total dose was 73.91 Gy in 32 fractions for low-risk patients and after transurethral resection of the prostate (n = 26). The pelvic lymphatics were treated with 46 Gy in 25 fractions in patients with high risk of lymph node metastases using an SIB to the prostate (n = 25). IGRT was practiced with cone-beam computed tomography. Acute and late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity was evaluated prospectively (CTCAE v3.0). Results: Treatment was completed as planned by all patients. Acute GI and GU toxicity grade ≥ 2 was observed in 12% and 42% of the patients, respectively, with 4% suffering from GU toxicity grade 3. 6 weeks after treatment, the incidence of acute toxicity grade ≥ 2 had decreased to 12%. With a median follow-up of 26 months, late GI and GU toxicity grade ≥ 2 was seen in 1.5% and 7.7% of the patients at 24 months. Four patients developed late toxicity grade 3 (GI n = 1; GU n = 3). Presence of acute GI and GU toxicity was significantly associated with late GI (p = 0.0007) and GU toxicity (p = 0.006). Conclusion: High-dose radiotherapy for prostate cancer using IMRT and IGRT resulted in low rates of acute toxicity and preliminary results of late toxicity are promising. (orig.)

  1. Reduced Acute Bowel Toxicity in Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuelian, Jason M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Callister, Matthew D., E-mail: Callister.matthew@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Ashman, Jonathan B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Young-Fadok, Tonia M. [Division of Colorectal Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Borad, Mitesh J. [Division of Hematology-Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Gunderson, Leonard L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: We have previously shown that intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can reduce dose to small bowel, bladder, and bone marrow compared with three-field conventional radiotherapy (CRT) technique in the treatment of rectal cancer. The purpose of this study was to review our experience using IMRT to treat rectal cancer and report patient clinical outcomes. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was conducted of patients with rectal cancer who were treated at Mayo Clinic Arizona with pelvic radiotherapy (RT). Data regarding patient and tumor characteristics, treatment, acute toxicity according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v 3.0, tumor response, and perioperative morbidity were collected. Results: From 2004 to August 2009, 92 consecutive patients were treated. Sixty-one (66%) patients were treated with CRT, and 31 (34%) patients were treated with IMRT. All but 2 patients received concurrent chemotherapy. There was no significant difference in median dose (50.4 Gy, CRT; 50 Gy, IMRT), preoperative vs. postoperative treatment, type of concurrent chemotherapy, or history of previous pelvic RT between the CRT and IMRT patient groups. Patients who received IMRT had significantly less gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. Sixty-two percent of patients undergoing CRT experienced {>=}Grade 2 acute GI side effects, compared with 32% among IMRT patients (p = 0.006). The reduction in overall GI toxicity was attributable to fewer symptoms from the lower GI tract. Among CRT patients, {>=}Grade 2 diarrhea and enteritis was experienced among 48% and 30% of patients, respectively, compared with 23% (p = 0.02) and 10% (p = 0.015) among IMRT patients. There was no significant difference in hematologic or genitourinary acute toxicity between groups. In addition, pathologic complete response rates and postoperative morbidity between treatment groups did not differ significantly. Conclusions: In the management of rectal cancer, IMRT is associated with a

  2. Beam angle optimization for intensity-modulated radiation therapy using a guided pattern search method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, Humberto; Dias, Joana M; Ferreira, Brígida C; Lopes, Maria C

    2013-01-01

    Generally, the inverse planning of radiation therapy consists mainly of the fluence optimization. The beam angle optimization (BAO) in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) consists of selecting appropriate radiation incidence directions and may influence the quality of the IMRT plans, both to enhance better organ sparing and to improve tumor coverage. However, in clinical practice, most of the time, beam directions continue to be manually selected by the treatment planner without objective and rigorous criteria. The goal of this paper is to introduce a novel approach that uses beam’s-eye-view dose ray tracing metrics within a pattern search method framework in the optimization of the highly non-convex BAO problem. Pattern search methods are derivative-free optimization methods that require a few function evaluations to progress and converge and have the ability to better avoid local entrapment. The pattern search method framework is composed of a search step and a poll step at each iteration. The poll step performs a local search in a mesh neighborhood and ensures the convergence to a local minimizer or stationary point. The search step provides the flexibility for a global search since it allows searches away from the neighborhood of the current iterate. Beam’s-eye-view dose metrics assign a score to each radiation beam direction and can be used within the pattern search framework furnishing a priori knowledge of the problem so that directions with larger dosimetric scores are tested first. A set of clinical cases of head-and-neck tumors treated at the Portuguese Institute of Oncology of Coimbra is used to discuss the potential of this approach in the optimization of the BAO problem. (paper)

  3. Replanning During Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Improved Quality of Life in Patients With Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Haihua; Hu Wei; Wang Wei; Chen Peifang; Ding Weijun; Luo Wei

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Anatomic and dosimetric changes have been reported during intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of replanning on quality of life (QoL) and clinical outcomes during the course of IMRT for NPC patients. Methods and Materials: Between June 2007 and August 2011, 129 patients with NPC were enrolled. Forty-three patients received IMRT without replanning, while 86 patients received IMRT replanning after computed tomography (CT) images were retaken part way through therapy. Chinese versions of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire C30 and Head and Neck Quality of Life Questionnaire 35 were completed before treatment began and at the end of treatment and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after the completion of treatment. Overall survival (OS) data were compared using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: IMRT replanning had a profound impact on the QoL of NPC patients, as determined by statistically significant changes in global QoL and other QoL scales. Additionally, the clinical outcome comparison indicates that replanning during IMRT for NPC significantly improved 2-year local regional control (97.2% vs 92.4%, respectively, P=.040) but did not improve 2-year OS (89.8% vs 82.2%, respectively, P=.475). Conclusions: IMRT replanning improves QoL as well as local regional control in patients with NPC. Future research is needed to determine the criteria for replanning for NPC patients undergoing IMRT.

  4. Patterns of relapse following surgery and postoperative intensity modulated radiotherapy for oral and oropharyngeal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collan, Juhani; Vaalavirta, Leila; Kajanti, Mikael; Tenhunen, Mikko; Saarilahti, Kauko (Dept. of Oncology, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital, and Univ. of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland)), E-mail: kauko.saarilahti@hus.fi; Lundberg, Marie; Baeck, Leif; Maekitie, Antti (Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital, and Univ. of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland))

    2011-10-15

    Background. To investigate the patterns of relapse following intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) given after radical surgery for oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer. Patients and methods. One hundred and two patients with oral or oropharyngeal cancer were treated with radical surgery followed by IMRT up to a mean total dose of 60 Gy between years 2001 and 2007. Thirty-nine of the patients (%) also received concomitant weekly cisplatin. Forty of the patients had oral and 62 had oropharyngeal cancer. Data on the tumour, patient and treatment factors were collected. Following therapy the patients were followed by clinical examination, endoscopy and MRI/CT at 2- to 3-months interval up to 2 years and thereafter at 6-month intervals. Results. The mean follow-up time of the patients was 55 months (range, 26-106 months). The rate for local tumour control for the whole cohort was 92.2%: 87.5% for oral cancer patients and 96.7% for oropharyngeal cancer patients. The 5-year disease specific survival was 90.2% and 5-year overall survival 84.3%. During the follow-up eight locoregional recurrences were observed, three at the primary tumour site and one at regional nodal site and four at both sites. The mean time to primary tumour recurrence was seven months (range, 2-10 months) and to nodal recurrence seven months (range, 2-12 months). Distant metastasis occurred in six (6%) patients. The factors associated with poor prognosis were the primary tumour size and tumour site with oral cancers having worse outcome. The treatment was well tolerated with no unexpected toxicities. The most frequent late toxicity was dysphagia necessitating permanent PEG in five patients. This was correlated with the advanced primary tumour size and resulting in wide tumour excision and reconstruction. Conclusions. Surgery combined with postoperative radiotherapy given as IMRT results in low level of tumour recurrence

  5. Dysphagia in head and neck cancer patients following intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peponi, Evangelia; Glanzmann, Christoph; Willi, Bettina; Huber, Gerhard; Studer, Gabriela

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the objective and subjective long term swallowing function, and to relate dysphagia to the radiation dose delivered to the critical anatomical structures in head and neck cancer patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT, +/- chemotherapy), using a midline protection contour (below hyoid, ~level of vertebra 2/3). 82 patients with stage III/IV squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx, oropharynx, or hypopharynx, who underwent successful definitive (n = 63, mean dose 68.9Gy) or postoperative (n = 19, mean dose 64.2Gy) simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) -IMRT either alone or in combination with chemotherapy (85%) with curative intent between January 2002 and November 2005, were evaluated retrospectively. 13/63 definitively irradiated patients (21%) presented with a total gross tumor volume (tGTV) >70cc (82-173cc; mean 106cc). In all patients, a laryngo-pharyngeal midline sparing contour outside of the PTV was drawn. Dysphagia was graded according subjective patient-reported and objective observer-assessed instruments. All patients were re-assessed 12 months later. Dose distribution to the swallowing structures was calculated. At the re-assessment, 32-month mean post treatment follow-up (range 16-60), grade 3/4 objective toxicity was assessed in 10%. At the 32-month evaluation as well as at the last follow up assessment mean 50 months (16-85) post-treatment, persisting swallowing dysfunction grade 3 was subjectively and objectively observed in 1 patient (1%). The 5-year local control rate of the cohort was 75%; no medial marginal failures were observed. Our results show that sparing the swallowing structures by IMRT seems effective and relatively safe in terms of avoidance of persistent grade 3/4 late dysphagia and local disease control

  6. Accelerated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy to Breast in Prone Position: Dosimetric Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Wyngaert, J. Keith; Jozsef, Gabor; Mitchell, James; Rosenstein, Barry; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To report the physics and dosimetry results of a trial of accelerated intensity-modulated radiotherapy to the whole breast with a concomitant boost to the tumor bed in patients treated in the prone position. Methods and Materials: Patients underwent computed tomography planning and treatment in the prone position on a dedicated treatment platform. The platform has an open aperture on the side to allow for the index breast to fall away from the chest wall. Noncontrast computed tomography images were acquired at 2.5- or 3.75-mm-thick intervals, from the level of the mandible to below the diaphragm. A dose of 40.5 Gy was delivered to the entire breast at 2.7-Gy fractions in 15 fractions. An additional dose of 0.5 Gy was delivered as a concomitant boost to the lumpectomy site, with a 1-cm margin, using inverse planning, for a total dose of 48 Gy in 15 fractions. No more than 10% of the heart and lung volume was allowed to receive >18 and >20 Gy, respectively. Results: Between September 2003 and August 2005, 91 patients were enrolled in the study. The median volume of heart that received ≥18 Gy was 0.5%, with a maximal value of 4.7%. The median volume of ipsilateral lung that received ≥20 Gy was 0.8%, with a maximum of 7.2%. Conclusion: This technique for whole breast radiotherapy is feasible and enables an accelerated regimen in the prone position while sparing the lung and heart

  7. Impact of pelvic nodal irradiation with intensity-modulated radiotherapy on treatment of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, Robert A.; Hannoun-Levi, Jean-Michel; Horwitz, Eric; Buyyounouski, Mark; Ruth, Karen J.; Ma, C.-M.; Pollack, Alan

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of treating the pelvic lymphatic regions during prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with respect to our routine acceptance criteria. Methods and Materials: A series of 10 previously treated prostate patients were randomly selected and the pelvic lymphatic regions delineated on the fused magnetic resonance/computed tomography data sets. A targeting progression was formed from the prostate and proximal seminal vesicles only to the inclusion of all pelvic lymphatic regions and presacral region resulting in 5 planning scenarios of increasing geometric difficulty. IMRT plans were generated for each stage for two accelerator manufacturers. Dose volume histogram data were analyzed with respect to dose to the planning target volumes, rectum, bladder, bowel, and normal tissue. Analysis was performed for the number of segments required, monitor units, 'hot spots,' and treatment time. Results: Both rectal endpoints were met for all targets. Bladder endpoints were not met and the bowel endpoint was met in 40% of cases with the inclusion of the extended and presacral lymphatics. A significant difference was found in the number of segments and monitor units with targeting progression and between accelerators, with the smaller beamlets yielding poorer results. Treatment times between the 2 linacs did not exhibit a clinically significant difference when compared. Conclusions: Many issues should be considered with pelvic lymphatic irradiation during IMRT delivery for prostate cancer including dose per fraction, normal structure dose/volume limits, planning target volumes generation, localization, treatment time, and increased radiation leakage. We would suggest that, at a minimum, the endpoints used in this work be evaluated before beginning IMRT pelvic nodal irradiation

  8. Predictors of Hypothyroidism in Hodgkin Lymphoma Survivors After Intensity Modulated Versus 3-Dimensional Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnix, Chelsea C; Cella, Laura; Andraos, Therese Y; Ayoub, Zeina; Milgrom, Sarah A; Gunther, Jillian; Thosani, Sonali; Wogan, Christine; Conson, Manuel; D'Avino, Vittoria; Oki, Yasuhiro; Fanale, Michelle; Lee, Hun J; Neelapu, Sattva; Fayad, Luis; Hagemeister, Frederick; Rodriguez, M Alma; Nastoupil, Loretta J; Nieto, Yago; Qiao, Wei; Pacelli, Roberto; Dabaja, Bouthaina

    2018-03-14

    To identify predictors of hypothyroidism after chemoradiation therapy for Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and to compare outcomes after intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with those after 3-dimensional (3D) conformal radiation therapy (CRT). Ninety patients who underwent involved-site IMRT in 2009 through 2014 were evaluated for treatment-induced hypothyroidism, defined as elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone or decreased free thyroxine levels (or both). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis identified individuals at low versus high risk based on dosimetric variables. Dosimetric cutoff points were verified with an external data set of 50 patients who underwent 3D-CRT. In the IMRT group, most patients (75 [83%]) had stage II HL, and the median prescribed dose was 30.6 Gy; in the 3D-CRT group, 32 patients (64%) had stage II HL, and the median prescribed dose was 32.0 Gy. No differences were found in the proportions of patients with bilateral (P = .982) or unilateral (P = .074) neck involvement between the 2 groups. Hypothyroidism rates were marginally higher in the IMRT group, with estimated 3-year rates of freedom from hypothyroidism of 56.1% in the 3D-CRT group and 40% in the IMRT group (P = .057). Univariate analysis showed that smaller thyroid volume and higher thyroid dose were associated with hypothyroidism in both groups (P hypothyroidism (P = .001 and P hypothyroidism (P hypothyroidism after either IMRT or 3D-CRT for HL. IMRT may confer a higher risk than 3D-CRT unless a treatment avoidance structure is used during planning. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Concurrent Chemotherapy and Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Locoregionally Advanced Laryngeal and Hypopharyngeal Cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Nancy Y.; O'Meara, William; Chan, Kelvin; Della-Bianca, Cesar; Mechalakos, James G.; Zhung, Joanne; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Narayana, Ashwatha; Kraus, Dennis; Shah, Jatin P.; Pfister, David G.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To perform a retrospective review of laryngeal/hypopharyngeal carcinomas treated with concurrent chemotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and June 2005, 20 laryngeal and 11 hypopharyngeal carcinoma patients underwent IMRT with concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy; most patients had Stage IV disease. The prescription of the planning target volume for gross, high-risk, and low-risk subclinical disease was 70, 59.4, and 54 Gy, respectively. Acute/late toxicities were retrospectively scored using the Common Toxicity Criteria scale. The 2-year local progression-free, regional progression-free, laryngectomy-free, distant metastasis-free, and overall survival rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median follow-up of the living patients was 26 months (range, 17-58 months). The 2-year local progression-free, regional progression-free, laryngectomy-free, distant metastasis-free, and overall survival rate was 86%, 94%, 89%, 92%, and 63%, respectively. Grade 2 mucositis or higher occurred in 48% of patients, and all experienced Grade 2 or higher pharyngitis during treatment. Xerostomia continued to decrease over time from the end of RT, with none complaining of Grade 2 toxicity at this analysis. The 2-year post-treatment percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy-dependency rate for those with hypopharyngeal and laryngeal tumors was 31% and 15%, respectively. The most severe late complications were laryngeal necrosis, necrotizing fascitis, and a carotid rupture resulting in death 3 weeks after salvage laryngectomy. Conclusion: These preliminary results have shown that IMRT achieved encouraging locoregional control of locoregionally advanced laryngeal and hypopharyngeal carcinomas. Xerostomia improved over time. Pharyngoesophageal stricture with percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy dependency remains a problem, particularly for patients with hypopharyngeal carcinoma and, to a lesser

  10. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy for T4 nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Treatment results and locoregional

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J.L.Y.; Tsai, C.L.; Chen, W.Y.; Wang, C.W. [National Taiwan Univ. Hospital, Taipei (China). Div. of Radiation Oncology; Huang, Y.S.; Chen, Y.F. [National Taiwan Univ. Hospital, Taipei (China). Dept. of Medical Imaging; Kuo, S.H. [National Taiwan Univ. Hospital, Taipei (China). Div. of Radiation Oncology; National Taiwan Univ. College of Medicine, Taipei (China). Graduate Inst. of Clinical Medicine; Hong, R.L. [National Taiwan Univ. Hospital, Taipei (China). Div. of Medical Oncology; Ko, J.Y.; Lou, P.J. [National Taiwan Univ. Hospital, Taipei (China). Dept. of Otolaryngology

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to examine outcomes in patients with T4 nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and materials: Between 2007 and 2010, 154 patients with nonmetastatic T4 NPC were treated with IMRT to a total dose of 70 Gy in 33-35 fractions. In addition, 97 % of patients received concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy. The median follow-up time was 52.8 months. Results: The rates of 5-year actuarial locoregional control, distant metastasis-free survival, progression free-survival, and overall survival (OS) were 81.2, 72.2, 61.9, and 78.1 %, respectively. A total of 27 patients had locoregional recurrence: 85.2 % in-field failures, 11.1 % marginal failures, and 3.7 % out-of-field failures. Fourteen patients with locoregional recurrence received aggressive treatments, including nasopharyngectomy, neck dissection, or re-irradiation, and the 5-year OS rate tended to be better (61.9 %) compared to those receiving conservative treatment (32.0 %, p = 0.051). In patients treated with 1 course of radiotherapy, grade {>=} 3 toxicities of ototoxicity, neck fibrosis, xerostomia, epistaxis, and radiographic temporal lobe necrosis occurred in 18.2, 9.8, 6.3, 2.1, and 5.6 % of patients, respectively. Increased ototoxicity, osteonecrosis, severe nasal bleeding, and temporal necrosis were observed in patients treated by re-irradiation. Conclusion: IMRT offers good locoregional control in patients with T4 NPC. For patients with locoregional recurrence after definitive radiotherapy, aggressive local treatment may be considered for a better outcome. (orig.)

  11. Intra-fractional uncertainties in image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polat, Buelent; Guenther, Iris; Wilbert, Juergen; Goebel, Joachim; Sweeney, Reinhart A.; Flentje, Michael; Guckenberger, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate intra-fractional uncertainties during intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of prostate cancer. During IMRT of 21 consecutive patients, kilovolt (kV) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were acquired prior to and immediately after treatment: a total of 252 treatment fractions with 504 CBCT studies were basis of this analysis. The prostate position in anterior-posterior (AP) direction was determined using contour matching; patient set-up based on the pelvic bony anatomy was evaluated using automatic image registration. Internal variability of the prostate position was the difference between absolute prostate and patient position errors. Intra-fractional changes of prostate position, patient position, rectal distension in AP direction and bladder volume were analyzed. With a median treatment time of 16 min, intra-fractional drifts of the prostate were > 5 mm in 12% of all fractions and a margin of 6 mm was calculated for compensation of this uncertainty. Mobility of the prostate was independent from the bony anatomy with poor correlation between absolute prostate motion and motion of the bony anatomy (R 2 = 0.24). A systematic increase of bladder filling by 41 ccm on average was observed; however, these changes did not influence the prostate position. Small variations of the prostate position occurred independently from intra-fractional changes of the rectal distension; a weak correlation between large internal prostate motion and changes of the rectal volume was observed (R 2 = 0.55). Clinically significant intra-fractional changes of the prostate position were observed and margins of 6 mm were calculated for this intra-fractional uncertainty. Repeated or continuous verification of the prostate position may allow further margin reduction. (orig.)

  12. Intra-fractional uncertainties in image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polat, Buelent; Guenther, Iris; Wilbert, Juergen; Goebel, Joachim; Sweeney, Reinhart A.; Flentje, Michael; Guckenberger, Matthias [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2008-12-15

    To evaluate intra-fractional uncertainties during intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of prostate cancer. During IMRT of 21 consecutive patients, kilovolt (kV) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were acquired prior to and immediately after treatment: a total of 252 treatment fractions with 504 CBCT studies were basis of this analysis. The prostate position in anterior-posterior (AP) direction was determined using contour matching; patient set-up based on the pelvic bony anatomy was evaluated using automatic image registration. Internal variability of the prostate position was the difference between absolute prostate and patient position errors. Intra-fractional changes of prostate position, patient position, rectal distension in AP direction and bladder volume were analyzed. With a median treatment time of 16 min, intra-fractional drifts of the prostate were > 5 mm in 12% of all fractions and a margin of 6 mm was calculated for compensation of this uncertainty. Mobility of the prostate was independent from the bony anatomy with poor correlation between absolute prostate motion and motion of the bony anatomy (R{sup 2} = 0.24). A systematic increase of bladder filling by 41 ccm on average was observed; however, these changes did not influence the prostate position. Small variations of the prostate position occurred independently from intra-fractional changes of the rectal distension; a weak correlation between large internal prostate motion and changes of the rectal volume was observed (R{sup 2} = 0.55). Clinically significant intra-fractional changes of the prostate position were observed and margins of 6 mm were calculated for this intra-fractional uncertainty. Repeated or continuous verification of the prostate position may allow further margin reduction. (orig.)

  13. Toxicity after intensity-modulated, image-guided radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flentje, Michael [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Univ. Hospital Wuerzburg (Germany); Guckenberger, Matthias; Ok, Sami; Polat, Buelent; Sweeney, Reinhart A.

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: To evaluate toxicity after dose-escalated radiotherapy for prostate cancer using intensity-modulated treatment planning (IMRT) and image-guided treatment (IGRT) delivery. Patients and Methods: 100 patients were treated with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) IMRT for prostate cancer: doses of 76.23 Gy and 60 Gy in 33 fractions were prescribed to the prostate and the seminal vesicles, respectively, for intermediate- and high-risk patients (n = 74). The total dose was 73.91 Gy in 32 fractions for low-risk patients and after transurethral resection of the prostate (n = 26). The pelvic lymphatics were treated with 46 Gy in 25 fractions in patients with high risk of lymph node metastases using an SIB to the prostate (n = 25). IGRT was practiced with cone-beam computed tomography. Acute and late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity was evaluated prospectively (CTCAE v3.0). Results: Treatment was completed as planned by all patients. Acute GI and GU toxicity grade {>=} 2 was observed in 12% and 42% of the patients, respectively, with 4% suffering from GU toxicity grade 3. 6 weeks after treatment, the incidence of acute toxicity grade {>=} 2 had decreased to 12%. With a median follow-up of 26 months, late GI and GU toxicity grade {>=} 2 was seen in 1.5% and 7.7% of the patients at 24 months. Four patients developed late toxicity grade 3 (GI n = 1; GU n = 3). Presence of acute GI and GU toxicity was significantly associated with late GI (p = 0.0007) and GU toxicity (p = 0.006). Conclusion: High-dose radiotherapy for prostate cancer using IMRT and IGRT resulted in low rates of acute toxicity and preliminary results of late toxicity are promising. (orig.)

  14. Kilovoltage Intrafraction Monitoring for Prostate Intensity Modulated Arc Therapy: First Clinical Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Jin Aun; Booth, Jeremy T.; Poulsen, Per R.; Fledelius, Walther; Worm, Esben Schjødt; Eade, Thomas; Hegi, Fiona; Kneebone, Andrew; Kuncic, Zdenka; Keall, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Most linear accelerators purchased today are equipped with a gantry-mounted kilovoltage X-ray imager which is typically used for patient imaging prior to therapy. A novel application of the X-ray system is kilovoltage intrafraction monitoring (KIM), in which the 3-dimensional (3D) tumor position is determined during treatment. In this paper, we report on the first use of KIM in a prospective clinical study of prostate cancer patients undergoing intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT). Methods and Materials: Ten prostate cancer patients with implanted fiducial markers undergoing conventionally fractionated IMAT (RapidArc) were enrolled in an ethics-approved study of KIM. KIM involves acquiring kV images as the gantry rotates around the patient during treatment. Post-treatment, markers in these images were segmented to obtain 2D positions. From the 2D positions, a maximum likelihood estimation of a probability density function was used to obtain 3D prostate trajectories. The trajectories were analyzed to determine the motion type and the percentage of time the prostate was displaced ≥3, 5, 7, and 10 mm. Independent verification of KIM positional accuracy was performed using kV/MV triangulation. Results: KIM was performed for 268 fractions. Various prostate trajectories were observed (ie, continuous target drift, transient excursion, stable target position, persistent excursion, high-frequency excursions, and erratic behavior). For all patients, 3D displacements of ≥3, 5, 7, and 10 mm were observed 5.6%, 2.2%, 0.7% and 0.4% of the time, respectively. The average systematic accuracy of KIM was measured at 0.46 mm. Conclusions: KIM for prostate IMAT was successfully implemented clinically for the first time. Key advantages of this method are (1) submillimeter accuracy, (2) widespread applicability, and (3) a low barrier to clinical implementation. A disadvantage is that KIM delivers additional imaging dose to the patient.

  15. Dosimetric predictors of hypothyroidism in oropharyngeal cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chyan, Arthur; Chen, Josephine; Shugard, Erin; Lambert, Louise; Quivey, Jeanne M; Yom, Sue S

    2014-01-01

    Radiation to the neck has long been associated with an elevated risk of hypothyroidism development. The goal of the present work is to define dosimetric predictors of hypothyroidism in oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy. Data for 123 patients, with a median follow up of 4.6 years, were retrospectively analyzed. Patients with elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone levels or with a clinical diagnosis were categorized as hypothyroid. Patient demographic parameters, thyroid volume, mean thyroid dose, the percent of thyroid volume receiving minimum specified dose levels (VxxGy), and the absolute thyroid volume spared from specified dose levels (VSxxGy) were analyzed. Normal-tissue complication probability (NTCP) was also calculated using several recently published models. Thyroid volume and many radiation dosimetric parameters were statistically different in the hypothyroid group. For the patients with initial thyroid volumes of 8 cc or greater, several dosimetric parameters were found to define subgroups at statistically significant lower risk of developing hypothyroidism. Patients with VS45 Gy of at least 3 cc, VS50 Gy at least 5 cc, VS50 Gy at least 6 cc, V50 Gy below 45%, V50 Gy below 55%, or mean thyroid dose below 49 Gy had a 28-38% estimated risk of hypothyroidism at 3 years compared to a 55% risk for the entire study group. Patients with a NTCP of less than 0.75 or 0.8, calculated using recently published models, were also observed to have a lower risk of developing hypothyroidism. Based on long-term follow up data for OPC patients treated with IMRT, we recommend plan optimization objectives to reduce the volume of thyroid receiving over 45 Gy to significantly decrease the risk of developing hypothyroidism. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13014-014-0269-4) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  16. Automation and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Individualized High-Quality Tangent Breast Treatment Plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purdie, Thomas G.; Dinniwell, Robert E.; Fyles, Anthony; Sharpe, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the large-scale clinical implementation and performance of an automated treatment planning methodology for tangential breast intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Automated planning was used to prospectively plan tangential breast IMRT treatment for 1661 patients between June 2009 and November 2012. The automated planning method emulates the manual steps performed by the user during treatment planning, including anatomical segmentation, beam placement, optimization, dose calculation, and plan documentation. The user specifies clinical requirements of the plan to be generated through a user interface embedded in the planning system. The automated method uses heuristic algorithms to define and simplify the technical aspects of the treatment planning process. Results: Automated planning was used in 1661 of 1708 patients receiving tangential breast IMRT during the time interval studied. Therefore, automated planning was applicable in greater than 97% of cases. The time for treatment planning using the automated process is routinely 5 to 6 minutes on standard commercially available planning hardware. We have shown a consistent reduction in plan rejections from plan reviews through the standard quality control process or weekly quality review multidisciplinary breast rounds as we have automated the planning process for tangential breast IMRT. Clinical plan acceptance increased from 97.3% using our previous semiautomated inverse method to 98.9% using the fully automated method. Conclusions: Automation has become the routine standard method for treatment planning of tangential breast IMRT at our institution and is clinically feasible on a large scale. The method has wide clinical applicability and can add tremendous efficiency, standardization, and quality to the current treatment planning process. The use of automated methods can allow centers to more rapidly adopt IMRT and enhance access to the documented

  17. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy as Preoperative Treatment for Localized Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakravarty, Twisha; Crane, Christopher H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Ajani, Jaffer A. [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mansfield, Paul F. [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Briere, Tina M.; Beddar, A. Sam [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mok, Henry; Reed, Valerie K.; Krishnan, Sunil; Delclos, Marc E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Das, Prajnan, E-mail: PrajDas@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to evaluate dosimetric parameters, acute toxicity, pathologic response, and local control in patients treated with preoperative intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy for localized gastric adenocarcinoma. Methods: Between November 2007 and April 2010, 25 patients with localized gastric adenocarcinoma were treated with induction chemotherapy, followed by preoperative IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy and, finally, surgical resection. The median radiation therapy dose was 45 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy was 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin in 18 patients, capecitabine in 3, and other regimens in 4. Subsequently, resection was performed with total gastrectomy in 13 patients, subtotal gastrectomy in 7, and other surgeries in 5. Results: Target coverage, expressed as the ratio of the minimum dose received by 99% of the planning target volume to the prescribed dose, was a median of 0.97 (range, 0.92-1.01). The median V{sub 30} (percentage of volume receiving at least 30 Gy) for the liver was 26%; the median V{sub 20} (percentage of volume receiving at least 20 Gy) for the right and left kidneys was 14% and 24%, respectively; and the median V{sub 40} (percentage of volume receiving at least 40 Gy) for the heart was 18%. Grade 3 acute toxicity developed in 14 patients (56%), including dehydration in 10, nausea in 8, and anorexia in 5. Grade 4 acute toxicity did not develop in any patient. There were no significant differences in the rates of acute toxicity, hospitalization, or feeding tube use in comparison to those in a group of 50 patients treated with preoperative three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy with concurrent chemotherapy. R0 resection was obtained in 20 patients (80%), and pathologic complete response occurred in 5 (20%). Conclusions: Preoperative IMRT for gastric adenocarcinoma was well tolerated, accomplished excellent target coverage and normal structure sparing, and led to appropriate

  18. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy as Preoperative Treatment for Localized Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakravarty, Twisha; Crane, Christopher H.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Mansfield, Paul F.; Briere, Tina M.; Beddar, A. Sam; Mok, Henry; Reed, Valerie K.; Krishnan, Sunil; Delclos, Marc E.; Das, Prajnan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to evaluate dosimetric parameters, acute toxicity, pathologic response, and local control in patients treated with preoperative intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy for localized gastric adenocarcinoma. Methods: Between November 2007 and April 2010, 25 patients with localized gastric adenocarcinoma were treated with induction chemotherapy, followed by preoperative IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy and, finally, surgical resection. The median radiation therapy dose was 45 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy was 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin in 18 patients, capecitabine in 3, and other regimens in 4. Subsequently, resection was performed with total gastrectomy in 13 patients, subtotal gastrectomy in 7, and other surgeries in 5. Results: Target coverage, expressed as the ratio of the minimum dose received by 99% of the planning target volume to the prescribed dose, was a median of 0.97 (range, 0.92–1.01). The median V 30 (percentage of volume receiving at least 30 Gy) for the liver was 26%; the median V 20 (percentage of volume receiving at least 20 Gy) for the right and left kidneys was 14% and 24%, respectively; and the median V 40 (percentage of volume receiving at least 40 Gy) for the heart was 18%. Grade 3 acute toxicity developed in 14 patients (56%), including dehydration in 10, nausea in 8, and anorexia in 5. Grade 4 acute toxicity did not develop in any patient. There were no significant differences in the rates of acute toxicity, hospitalization, or feeding tube use in comparison to those in a group of 50 patients treated with preoperative three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy with concurrent chemotherapy. R0 resection was obtained in 20 patients (80%), and pathologic complete response occurred in 5 (20%). Conclusions: Preoperative IMRT for gastric adenocarcinoma was well tolerated, accomplished excellent target coverage and normal structure sparing, and led to appropriate pathologic

  19. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Cervical Lymph Node Metastases From Unknown Primary Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madani, Indira; Vakaet, Luc; Bonte, Katrien; Boterberg, Tom; Neve, Wilfried de

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the effectiveness of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and conventional (two-dimensional) radiotherapy in the treatment of cervical lymph node metastases from unknown primary cancer (UPC). Methods and Materials: Between February 2003 and September 2006, 23 patients with UPC of squamous cell carcinoma were treated with IMRT. Extended putative mucosal and bilateral nodal sites were irradiated to a median dose of 66 Gy. In 19 patients, IMRT was performed after lymph node dissection, and in 4 patients primary radiotherapy was given. The conventional radiotherapy group (historical control group) comprised 18 patients treated to a median dose of 66 Gy between August 1994 and October 2003. Results: Twenty patients completed treatment. As compared with conventional radiotherapy, the incidence of Grade 3 acute dysphagia was significantly lower in the IMRT group (4.5% vs. 50%, p = 0.003). By 6 months, Grade 3 xerostomia was detected in 11.8% patients in the IMRT group vs. 53.4% in the historical control group (p = 0.03). No Grade 3 dysphagia or skin fibrosis was observed after IMRT but these were noted after conventional radiotherapy (26.7%, p = 0.01) and 26.7%, p = 0.03) respectively). With median follow-up of living patients of 17 months, there was no emergence of primary cancer. One patient had persistent nodal disease and another had nodal relapse at 5 months. Distant metastases were detected in 4 patients. The 2-year overall survival and distant disease-free probability after IMRT did not differ significantly from those for conventional radiotherapy (74.8% vs. 61.1% and 76.3% vs. 68.4%, respectively). Conclusions: Use of IMRT for UPC resulted in lower toxicity than conventional radiotherapy, and was similar in efficacy

  20. Pertinence analysis of intensity-modulated radiation therapy dosimetry error and parameters of beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi Zifeng; Liu Dan; Cao Yankun; Li Runxiao; Han Chun

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship between parameter settings in the intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning in order to explore the effect of parameters on absolute dose verification. Methods: Forty-three esophageal carcinoma cases were optimized with Pinnacle 7.6c by experienced physicist using appropriate optimization parameters and dose constraints with a number of iterations to meet the clinical acceptance criteria. The plans were copied to water-phantom, 0.13 cc ion Farmer chamber and DOSE1 dosimeter was used to measure the absolute dose. The statistical data of the parameters of beams for the 43 cases were collected, and the relationships among them were analyzed. The statistical data of the dosimetry error were collected, and comparative analysis was made for the relation between the parameters of beams and ion chamber absolute dose verification results. Results: The parameters of beams were correlated among each other. Obvious affiliation existed between the dose accuracy and parameter settings. When the beam segment number of IMRT plan was more than 80, the dose deviation would be greater than 3%; however, if the beam segment number was less than 80, the dose deviation was smaller than 3%. When the beam segment number was more than 100, part of the dose deviation of this plan was greater than 4%. On the contrary, if the beam segment number was less than 100, the dose deviation was smaller than 4% definitely. Conclusions: In order to decrease the absolute dose verification error, less beam angles and less beam segments are needed and the beam segment number should be controlled within the range of 80. (authors)

  1. Interfractional variability in intensity-modulated radiotherapy of prostate cancer with or without thermoplastic pelvic immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.A.; Kim, C.Y.; Park, Y.J.; Yoon, W.S.; Lee, N.K.; Yang, D.S.

    2014-01-01

    To determine the variability of patient positioning errors associated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer and to assess the impact of thermoplastic pelvic immobilization on these errors using kilovoltage (kV) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). From February 2012 to June 2012, the records of 314 IMRT sessions in 19 patients with prostate cancer, performed with or without immobilization at two different facilities in the Korea University Hospital were analyzed. The kV CBCT images were matched to simulation computed tomography (CT) images to determine the simulation-to-treatment variability. The shifts along the x (lateral)-, y (longitudinal)- and z (vertical)-axes were measured, as was the shift in the three dimensional (3D) vector. The measured systematic errors in the immobilized group during treatment were 0.46 ± 1.75 mm along the x-axis, - 0.35 ± 3.83 mm along the y-axis, 0.20 ± 2.75 mm along the z-axis and 4.05 ± 3.02 mm in the 3D vector. Those of nonimmobilized group were - 1.45 ± 7.50 mm along the x-axis, 1.89 ± 5.07 mm along the y-axis, 0.28 ± 3.81 mm along the z-axis and 8.90 ± 4.79 mm in the 3D vector. The group immobilized with pelvic thermoplastics showed reduced interfractional variability along the x- and y-axes and in the 3D vector compared to the nonimmobilized group (p < 0.05). IMRT with thermoplastic pelvic immobilization in patients with prostate cancer appears to be useful in stabilizing interfractional variability during the planned treatment course. (orig.)

  2. Clinical Outcomes and Patterns of Disease Recurrence After Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Oropharyngeal Squamous Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunn, G. Brandon [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Blanchard, Pierre [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Garden, Adam S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhu, X. Ronald [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Fuller, C. David [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Medical Physics Program, The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Texas (United States); Mohamed, Abdallah S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Clinical Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Alexandria (Egypt); Morrison, William H.; Phan, Jack; Beadle, Beth M.; Skinner, Heath D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Sturgis, Erich M. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kies, Merrill S. [Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hutcheson, Kate A. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Rosenthal, David I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mohan, Radhe; Gillin, Michael T. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); and others

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: A single-institution prospective study was conducted to assess disease control and toxicity of proton therapy for patients with head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Disease control, toxicity, functional outcomes, and patterns of failure for the initial cohort of patients with oropharyngeal squamous carcinoma (OPC) treated with intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) were prospectively collected in 2 registry studies at a single institution. Locoregional failures were analyzed by using deformable image registration. Results: Fifty patients with OPC treated from March 3, 2011, to July 2014 formed the cohort. Eighty-four percent were male, 50% had never smoked, 98% had stage III/IV disease, 64% received concurrent therapy, and 35% received induction chemotherapy. Forty-four of 45 tumors (98%) tested for p16 were positive. All patients received IMPT (multifield optimization to n=46; single-field optimization to n=4). No Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events grade 4 or 5 toxicities were observed. The most common grade 3 toxicities were acute mucositis in 58% of patients and late dysphagia in 12%. Eleven patients had a gastrostomy (feeding) tube placed during therapy, but none had a feeding tube at last follow-up. At a median follow-up time of 29 months, 5 patients had disease recurrence: local in 1, local and regional in 1, regional in 2, and distant in 1. The 2-year actuarial overall and progression-free survival rates were 94.5% and 88.6%. Conclusions: The oncologic, toxicity, and functional outcomes after IMPT for OPC are encouraging and provide the basis for ongoing and future clinical studies.

  3. Preoperative Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Combined with Temozolomide for Locally Advanced Soft-Tissue Sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakob, Jens; Wenz, Frederik; Dinter, Dietmar J.; Stroebel, Philipp; Hohenberger, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of preoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) combined with temozolomide to improve local tumor control in soft-tissue sarcoma (STS). Patients and Methods: A cohort of 15 consecutive patients with nonmetastasized, primary high-grade or locally recurrent Stage III (n = 14) or IIb (n = 1) STS not amenable to surgical resection without significant organ or extremity function loss was prospectively investigated. Median tumor size was 9.8 cm, and most tumors were non-extremity sarcomas. Patients preoperatively received 50 mg/m 2 of temozolomide during IMRT (50.4 Gy). Resection was intended 6 weeks thereafter. Toxicity was assessed by the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0, and response was assessed by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors. Results: Of 15 patients, 14 completed preoperative treatment. No Grade 4 toxicities occurred. Nausea and vomiting were the most frequent Grade 3 toxicities. The most frequent toxicities of any grade were dermatologic, gastrointestinal, and hematologic. Response was partial response in 5, stable disease in 7, and progressive disease in 2 patients. Ten patients underwent surgery: 7 were resected with clear margins (R0), and 2 patients had an R1 resection; in 1 patient the tumor was not resectable. Postoperative complications occurred in 4 patients. Five patients did not undergo surgery because of intercurrent metastatic disease, unresectable disease, or refusal. Conclusions: Preoperative chemoradiation with temozolomide and IMRT can be administered safely and with promising efficacy in patients with locally advanced STS.

  4. Postmastectomy intensity modulated radiation therapy following immediate expander-implant reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koutcher, Lawrence; Ballangrud, Ase; Cordeiro, Peter G.; McCormick, Beryl; Hunt, Margie; Zee, Kimberly J. Van; Hudis, Clifford; Beal, Kathryn

    2010-01-01

    Background/purpose: To evaluate radiation plans of patients undergoing mastectomy with immediate expander-implant reconstruction followed by postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT). Materials/methods: We identified 41 patients from June 2004 to May 2007 who underwent mastectomy, immediate expander-implant reconstruction, and PMRT with intensity-modulated radiation therapy. We assessed chest wall (CW) coverage and volume of heart and lung irradiated. Results: In 73% of patients, all CW borders were adequately covered, and in 22%, all but 1 border were adequately covered. The total lung V 20 was 20 was 13% (range, 3-23%), and the mean heart D mean was 2.81 Gy (range, 0.53-9.60 Gy). In patients with left-sided lesions without internal mammary nodes (IMNs) treatment (n = 22), the mean lung V 20 was 12.6% and the mean heart D mean was 3.90 Gy, and in the patient with IMN treatment, the lung V 20 was 18% and heart D mean was 8.04 Gy. For right-sided lesions without IMN treatment (n = 12), the mean lung V 20 was 12.4% and the mean heart D mean was 0.90 Gy, and in patients with IMN treatment (n = 6), these numbers were 17.8% and 1.76 Gy. At a median follow-up of 29 months, the 30-month actuarial local control was 97%. Conclusions: In women undergoing immediate expander-implant reconstruction, PMRT can achieve excellent local control with acceptable heart and lung doses. These results can be achieved even when the IMN are being treated, although doses to the heart and lungs will be higher.

  5. Adoption of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy For Early-Stage Breast Cancer From 2004 Through 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Elyn H. [Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Mougalian, Sarah S. [Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center at Yale, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Soulos, Pamela R. [Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center at Yale, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Internal Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Smith, Benjamin D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Haffty, Bruce G. [Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Gross, Cary P. [Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center at Yale, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Internal Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Yu, James B., E-mail: james.b.yu@yale.edu [Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center at Yale, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a newer method of radiation therapy (RT) that has been increasingly adopted as an adjuvant treatment after breast-conserving surgery (BCS). IMRT may result in improved cosmesis compared to standard RT, although at greater expense. To investigate the adoption of IMRT, we examined trends and factors associated with IMRT in women under the age of 65 with early stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective study of early stage breast cancer patients treated with BCS followed by whole-breast irradiation (WBI) who were ≤65 years old in the National Cancer Data Base from 2004 to 2011. We used logistic regression to identify factors associated with receipt of IMRT (vs standard RT). Results: We identified 11,089 women with early breast cancer (9.6%) who were treated with IMRT and 104,448 (90.4%) who were treated with standard RT, after BCS. The proportion of WBI patients receiving IMRT increased yearly from 2004 to 2009, with 5.3% of WBI patients receiving IMRT in 2004 and 11.6% receiving IMRT in 2009. Further use of IMRT declined afterward, with the proportion remaining steady at 11.0% and 10.7% in 2010 and 2011, respectively. Patients treated in nonacademic community centers were more likely to receive IMRT (odds ratio [OR], 1.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.30-1.43 for nonacademic vs academic center). Compared to privately insured patients, the uninsured patients (OR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.70-0.95) and those with Medicaid insurance (OR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.79-0.95) were less likely to receive IMRT. Conclusions: The use of IMRT rose from 2004 to 2009 and then stabilized. Important nonclinical factors associated with IMRT use included facility type and insurance status.

  6. Adoption of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy For Early-Stage Breast Cancer From 2004 Through 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Elyn H.; Mougalian, Sarah S.; Soulos, Pamela R.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Gross, Cary P.; Yu, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a newer method of radiation therapy (RT) that has been increasingly adopted as an adjuvant treatment after breast-conserving surgery (BCS). IMRT may result in improved cosmesis compared to standard RT, although at greater expense. To investigate the adoption of IMRT, we examined trends and factors associated with IMRT in women under the age of 65 with early stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective study of early stage breast cancer patients treated with BCS followed by whole-breast irradiation (WBI) who were ≤65 years old in the National Cancer Data Base from 2004 to 2011. We used logistic regression to identify factors associated with receipt of IMRT (vs standard RT). Results: We identified 11,089 women with early breast cancer (9.6%) who were treated with IMRT and 104,448 (90.4%) who were treated with standard RT, after BCS. The proportion of WBI patients receiving IMRT increased yearly from 2004 to 2009, with 5.3% of WBI patients receiving IMRT in 2004 and 11.6% receiving IMRT in 2009. Further use of IMRT declined afterward, with the proportion remaining steady at 11.0% and 10.7% in 2010 and 2011, respectively. Patients treated in nonacademic community centers were more likely to receive IMRT (odds ratio [OR], 1.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.30-1.43 for nonacademic vs academic center). Compared to privately insured patients, the uninsured patients (OR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.70-0.95) and those with Medicaid insurance (OR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.79-0.95) were less likely to receive IMRT. Conclusions: The use of IMRT rose from 2004 to 2009 and then stabilized. Important nonclinical factors associated with IMRT use included facility type and insurance status

  7. Toxicity after post-prostatectomy image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy using Australian guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Stephen; Aherne, Noel J; Last, Andrew; Assareh, Hassan; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2017-12-01

    We evaluated single institution toxicity outcomes after post-prostatectomy radiotherapy (PPRT) via image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) with implanted fiducial markers following national eviQ guidelines, for which late toxicity outcomes have not been published. Prospectively collected toxicity data were retrospectively reviewed for 293 men who underwent 64-66 Gy IG-IMRT to the prostate bed between 2007 and 2015. Median follow-up after PPRT was 39 months. Baseline grade ≥2 genitourinary (GU), gastrointestinal (GI) and sexual toxicities were 20.5%, 2.7% and 43.7%, respectively, reflecting ongoing toxicity after radical prostatectomy. Incidence of new (compared to baseline) acute grade ≥2 GU and GI toxicity was 5.8% and 10.6%, respectively. New late grade ≥2 GU, GI and sexual toxicity occurred in 19.1%, 4.7% and 20.2%, respectively. However, many patients also experienced improvements in toxicities. For this reason, prevalence of grade ≥2 GU, GI and sexual toxicities 4 years after PPRT was similar to or lower than baseline (21.7%, 2.6% and 17.4%, respectively). There were no grade ≥4 toxicities. Post-prostatectomy IG-IMRT using Australian contouring guidelines appears to have tolerable acute and late toxicity. The 4-year prevalence of grade ≥2 GU and GI toxicity was virtually unchanged compared to baseline, and sexual toxicity improved over baseline. This should reassure radiation oncologists following these guidelines. Late toxicity rates of surgery and PPRT are higher than following definitive IG-IMRT, and this should be taken into account if patients are considering surgery and likely to require PPRT. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  8. Carotid sparing intensity modulated radiotherapy on early glottic cancer: Preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hoon Sik; Jeong, Bae Kwon; Jeong, Ho Jin; Song, Jin Ho; Kim, Jin Pyeong; Park, Jung Je; Woo, Seung Hoon; Kang, Ki Mun [Gyeongsang National University Hospital, Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Jinju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    To compare the dose distribution between carotid sparing intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and opposed lateral field technique (LAFT), and to determine the effects of carotid sparing IMRT in early glottic cancer patients who have risk factors for atherosclerosis. Ten early glottic cancer patients were treated with carotid sparing IMRT. For each patient, the conventional LAFT plan was developed for comparison. IMRT and LAFT plans were compared in terms of planning target volume (PTV) coverage, conformity index, homogeneity index, and the doses to planning organ at risk volume (PRV) for carotid arteries, spinal cord and pharyngeal constrictor muscle. Recurrence was not observed in any patients during the follow-up period. V95% for PTV showed no significant difference between IMRT and LAFT plans, while V100% was significantly higher in the IMRT plan (95.5% vs. 94.6%, p = 0.005). The homogeneity index (11.6%) and conformity index (1.4) in the IMRT plan were significantly better than those in the LAFT plans (8.5% and 5.1, respectively) (p = 0.005). The median V5Gy (90.0%), V25Gy (13.5%), and V50Gy (0%) for carotid artery PRV in the IMRT plan were significantly lower than those in the LAFT plan (99.1%, 89.0%, and 77.3%, respectively) (p = 0.005). Our study suggests that carotid sparing IMRT can significantly decrease the dose to carotid arteries compared to LAFT, and it would be considered for early glottic cancer patient with high risk of atherosclerosis.

  9. The clinical implementation of respiratory-gated intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keall, Paul; Vedam, Sastry; George, Rohini; Bartee, Chris; Siebers, Jeffrey; Lerma, Fritz; Weiss, Elisabeth; Chung, Theodore

    2006-01-01

    The clinical use of respiratory-gated radiotherapy and the application of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) are 2 relatively new innovations to the treatment of lung cancer. Respiratory gating can reduce the deleterious effects of intrafraction motion, and IMRT can concurrently increase tumor dose homogeneity and reduce dose to critical structures including the lungs, spinal cord, esophagus, and heart. The aim of this work is to describe the clinical implementation of respiratory-gated IMRT for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. Documented clinical procedures were developed to include a tumor motion study, gated CT imaging, IMRT treatment planning, and gated IMRT delivery. Treatment planning procedures for respiratory-gated IMRT including beam arrangements and dose-volume constraints were developed. Quality assurance procedures were designed to quantify both the dosimetric and positional accuracy of respiratory-gated IMRT, including film dosimetry dose measurements and Monte Carlo dose calculations for verification and validation of individual patient treatments. Respiratory-gated IMRT is accepted by both treatment staff and patients. The dosimetric and positional quality assurance test results indicate that respiratory-gated IMRT can be delivered accurately. If carefully implemented, respiratory-gated IMRT is a practical alternative to conventional thoracic radiotherapy. For mobile tumors, respiratory-gated radiotherapy is used as the standard of care at our institution. Due to the increased workload, the choice of IMRT is taken on a case-by-case basis, with approximately half of the non-small cell lung cancer patients receiving respiratory-gated IMRT. We are currently evaluating whether superior tumor coverage and limited normal tissue dosing will lead to improvements in local control and survival in non-small cell lung cancer

  10. An Anatomically Validated Brachial Plexus Contouring Method for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van de Velde, Joris; Audenaert, Emmanuel; Speleers, Bruno; Vercauteren, Tom; Mulliez, Thomas; Vandemaele, Pieter; Achten, Eric; Kerckaert, Ingrid; D'Herde, Katharina; De Neve, Wilfried; Van Hoof, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To develop contouring guidelines for the brachial plexus (BP) using anatomically validated cadaver datasets. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) were used to obtain detailed visualizations of the BP region, with the goal of achieving maximal inclusion of the actual BP in a small contoured volume while also accommodating for anatomic variations. Methods and Materials: CT and MRI were obtained for 8 cadavers positioned for intensity modulated radiation therapy. 3-dimensional reconstructions of soft tissue (from MRI) and bone (from CT) were combined to create 8 separate enhanced CT project files. Dissection of the corresponding cadavers anatomically validated the reconstructions created. Seven enhanced CT project files were then automatically fitted, separately in different regions, to obtain a single dataset of superimposed BP regions that incorporated anatomic variations. From this dataset, improved BP contouring guidelines were developed. These guidelines were then applied to the 7 original CT project files and also to 1 additional file, left out from the superimposing procedure. The percentage of BP inclusion was compared with the published guidelines. Results: The anatomic validation procedure showed a high level of conformity for the BP regions examined between the 3-dimensional reconstructions generated and the dissected counterparts. Accurate and detailed BP contouring guidelines were developed, which provided corresponding guidance for each level in a clinical dataset. An average margin of 4.7 mm around the anatomically validated BP contour is sufficient to accommodate for anatomic variations. Using the new guidelines, 100% inclusion of the BP was achieved, compared with a mean inclusion of 37.75% when published guidelines were applied. Conclusion: Improved guidelines for BP delineation were developed using combined MRI and CT imaging with validation by anatomic dissection

  11. Application of influence diagrams to prostate intensity-modulated radiation therapy plan selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, Juergen; Phillips, Mark H; Cho, Paul S; Kalet, Ira; Doctor, Jason N

    2004-01-01

    The purpose is to incorporate clinically relevant factors such as patient-specific and dosimetric information as well as data from clinical trials in the decision-making process for the selection of prostate intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans. The approach is to incorporate the decision theoretic concept of an influence diagram into the solution of the multiobjective optimization inverse planning problem. A set of candidate IMRT plans was obtained by varying the importance factors for the planning target volume (PTV) and the organ-at-risk (OAR) in combination with simulated annealing to explore a large part of the solution space. The Pareto set for the PTV and OAR was analysed to demonstrate how the selection of the weighting factors influenced which part of the solution space was explored. An influence diagram based on a Bayesian network with 18 nodes was designed to model the decision process for plan selection. The model possessed nodes for clinical laboratory results, tumour grading, staging information, patient-specific information, dosimetric information, complications and survival statistics from clinical studies. A utility node was utilized for the decision-making process. The influence diagram successfully ranked the plans based on the available information. Sensitivity analyses were used to judge the reasonableness of the diagram and the results. In conclusion, influence diagrams lend themselves well to modelling the decision processes for IMRT plan selection. They provide an excellent means to incorporate the probabilistic nature of data and beliefs into one model. They also provide a means for introducing evidence-based medicine, in the form of results of clinical trials, into the decision-making process

  12. Dosimetric comparison using different multileaf collimeters in intensity-modulated radiotherapy for upper thoracic esophageal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Yuchuan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To study the impacts of multileaf collimators (MLC width [standard MLC width of 10 mm (sMLC and micro-MLC width of 4 mm (mMLC] in the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT planning for the upper thoracic esophageal cancer (UTEC. Methods and materials 10 patients with UTEC were retrospectively planned with the sMLC and the mMLC. The monitor unites (MUs and dose volume histogram-based parameters [conformity index (CI and homogeneous index (HI] were compared between the IMRT plans with sMLC and with mMLC. Results The IMRT plans with the mMLC were more efficient (average MUs: 703.1 ± 68.3 than plans with the sMLC (average MUs: 833.4 ± 73.8 (p p 5 (3260.3 ± 374.0 vs 3404.5 ± 374.4/gEUD (1815.1 ± 281.7 vs 1849.2 ± 297.6 of the spinal cord, the V10 (33.2 ± 6.5 vs 34.0 ± 6.7, V20 (16.0 ± 4.6 vs 16.6 ± 4.7, MLD (866.2 ± 174.1 vs 887.9 ± 172.1 and gEUD (938.6 ± 175.2 vs 956.8 ± 171.0 of the lungs were observed in the plans with the mMLC, respectively (p Conclusions Comparing to the sMLC, the mMLC not only demonstrated higher efficiencies and more optimal target coverage, but also considerably improved the dose sparing of OARs in the IMRT planning for UTEC.

  13. Fast voxel and polygon ray-tracing algorithms in intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, Christopher; Romeijn, H. Edwin; Dempsey, James F.

    2006-01-01

    We present work on combining three algorithms to improve ray-tracing efficiency in radiation therapy dose computation. The three algorithms include: An improved point-in-polygon algorithm, incremental voxel ray tracing algorithm, and stereographic projection of beamlets for voxel truncation. The point-in-polygon and incremental voxel ray-tracing algorithms have been used in computer graphics and nuclear medicine applications while the stereographic projection algorithm was developed by our group. These algorithms demonstrate significant improvements over the current standard algorithms in peer reviewed literature, i.e., the polygon and voxel ray-tracing algorithms of Siddon for voxel classification (point-in-polygon testing) and dose computation, respectively, and radius testing for voxel truncation. The presented polygon ray-tracing technique was tested on 10 intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning cases that required the classification of between 0.58 and 2.0 million voxels on a 2.5 mm isotropic dose grid into 1-4 targets and 5-14 structures represented as extruded polygons (a.k.a. Siddon prisms). Incremental voxel ray tracing and voxel truncation employing virtual stereographic projection was tested on the same IMRT treatment planning cases where voxel dose was required for 230-2400 beamlets using a finite-size pencil-beam algorithm. Between a 100 and 360 fold cpu time improvement over Siddon's method was observed for the polygon ray-tracing algorithm to perform classification of voxels for target and structure membership. Between a 2.6 and 3.1 fold reduction in cpu time over current algorithms was found for the implementation of incremental ray tracing. Additionally, voxel truncation via stereographic projection was observed to be 11-25 times faster than the radial-testing beamlet extent approach and was further improved 1.7-2.0 fold through point-classification using the method of translation over the cross product technique

  14. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Oropharyngeal Cancer: Clinical Outcomes and Patterns of Failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daly, Megan E.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Maxim, Peter G.; Loo, Billy W.; Kaplan, Michael J.; Fischbein, Nancy J.; Pinto, Harlan; Chang, Daniel T.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To report outcomes, failures, and toxicities in patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx. Methods And Materials: Between Aug 2001 and Oct 2007, 107 patients were treated with IMRT with curative intent at Stanford University. Twenty-two patients were treated postoperatively, and 85 were treated definitively. Concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy was administered to 86 patients (80%) and cetuximab to 8 patients (7%). The prescribed dose was 66 Gy at 2.2 Gy/fraction for definitively treated cases and 60 Gy at 2 Gy/fraction for postoperative cases. Median follow-up was 29 months among surviving patients (range, 4-105 months). Results: Eight patients had persistent disease or local-regional failure at a median of 6.5 months (range, 0-9.9 months). Six local failures occurred entirely within the high-risk clinical target volume (CTV) (one with simultaneous distant metastasis). One patient relapsed within the high- and intermediate-risk CTV. One patient had a recurrence at the junction between the IMRT and low-neck fields. Seven patients developed distant metastasis as the first site of failure. The 3-year local-regional control (LRC), freedom from distant metastasis, overall survival, and disease-free survival rates were 92%, 92%, 83%, and 81%, respectively. T stage (T4 vs. T1-T3) was predictive of poorer LRC (p = 0.001), overall survival (p = 0.001), and disease-free survival (p < 0.001) rates. Acute toxicity consisted of 58% grade 3 mucosal and 5% grade 3 skin reactions. Six patients (6%) developed grade ≥3 late complications. Conclusions: IMRT provides excellent LRC for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Distant metastases are a major failure pattern. No marginal failures were observed.

  15. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy with Simultaneously Integrated Boost at University Hospital Centre Zagreb (KBC Zagreb)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barisic, L.; Bibic, J.; Grego, T.; Hrsak, H.; Kovacevic, N.

    2013-01-01

    Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy technique (IMRT) is state of art in modern radiotherapy for bilateral Head and Neck (H and N) malignancies. IMRT of real patients is implemented at KBC Zagreb since June 2012. Our method is inspired partly by Hull IMRT technique. It differs from standard IMRT beam layout (7 beams, gantry angles in 51° steps) and it avoids direct irradiation of OARs. We also use simultaneous integrated boost (SIB IMRT) fractionation. The aim of this paper is to present in some details the whole process of our SIB IMRT including plan quality assurance. Results for several patients together with comparison with ConPas and standard IMRT are presented. In our department, in last several years, routine method for H and N cancer RT was ConPas. During this period we (together with ConPas plans) produced standard IMRT plans with seven equidistant fields for actual patients. Our comparative analysis showed clear superiority of IMRT over ConPas for H and N radiotherapy. Since spring 2012 we have produced also non-standard IMRT plans that are based on Hull (U.K.) experience, with beam gantry angles at 0, 50, 80, 150, 210, 280 and 310 degrees. Also, in this method, direct irradiation of OARs (particularly spinal cord) is avoided by shielding as initial constraint. This approach proved to be better than standard IMRT in all analyzed cases. Having all this in mind, we decided to implement 'our' IMRT technique on real patients. Second essential point of our method is SIB fractionation. It has dosimetric, logistic and radiobiological advantages over standard fractionation. IMRT plan QA is routinely performed using Seven29 and Gamma index method. We take 3 mm/3 % Gamma index and 85 % of passed points as passing rate.(author)

  16. Acute Esophagus Toxicity in Lung Cancer Patients After Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwint, Margriet; Uyterlinde, Wilma; Nijkamp, Jasper; Chen, Chun; Bois, Josien de; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Heuvel, Michel van den; Knegjens, Joost; Herk, Marcel van; Belderbos, José

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the dose-effect relation between acute esophageal toxicity (AET) and the dose-volume parameters of the esophagus after intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: One hundred thirty-nine patients with inoperable NSCLC treated with IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy were prospectively analyzed. The fractionation scheme was 66 Gy in 24 fractions. All patients received concurrently a daily dose of cisplatin (6 mg/m²). Maximum AET was scored according to Common Toxicity Criteria 3.0. Dose-volume parameters V5 to V70, D mean and D max of the esophagus were calculated. A logistic regression analysis was performed to analyze the dose-effect relation between these parameters and grade ≥2 and grade ≥3 AET. The outcome was compared with the clinically used esophagus V35 prediction model for grade ≥2 after radical 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) treatment. Results: In our patient group, 9% did not experience AET, and 31% experienced grade 1 AET, 38% grade 2 AET, and 22% grade 3 AET. The incidence of grade 2 and grade 3 AET was not different from that in patients treated with CCRT using 3DCRT. The V50 turned out to be the most significant dosimetric predictor for grade ≥3 AET (P=.012). The derived V50 model was shown to predict grade ≥2 AET significantly better than the clinical V35 model (P<.001). Conclusions: For NSCLC patients treated with IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy, the V50 was identified as most accurate predictor of grade ≥3 AET. There was no difference in the incidence of grade ≥2 AET between 3DCRT and IMRT in patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy.

  17. Acceleration of intensity-modulated radiotherapy dose calculation by importance sampling of the calculation matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thieke, Christian; Nill, Simeon; Oelfke, Uwe; Bortfeld, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    In inverse planning for intensity-modulated radiotherapy, the dose calculation is a crucial element limiting both the maximum achievable plan quality and the speed of the optimization process. One way to integrate accurate dose calculation algorithms into inverse planning is to precalculate the dose contribution of each beam element to each voxel for unit fluence. These precalculated values are stored in a big dose calculation matrix. Then the dose calculation during the iterative optimization process consists merely of matrix look-up and multiplication with the actual fluence values. However, because the dose calculation matrix can become very large, this ansatz requires a lot of computer memory and is still very time consuming, making it not practical for clinical routine without further modifications. In this work we present a new method to significantly reduce the number of entries in the dose calculation matrix. The method utilizes the fact that a photon pencil beam has a rapid radial dose falloff, and has very small dose values for the most part. In this low-dose part of the pencil beam, the dose contribution to a voxel is only integrated into the dose calculation matrix with a certain probability. Normalization with the reciprocal of this probability preserves the total energy, even though many matrix elements are omitted. Three probability distributions were tested to find the most accurate one for a given memory size. The sampling method is compared with the use of a fully filled matrix and with the well-known method of just cutting off the pencil beam at a certain lateral distance. A clinical example of a head and neck case is presented. It turns out that a sampled dose calculation matrix with only 1/3 of the entries of the fully filled matrix does not sacrifice the quality of the resulting plans, whereby the cutoff method results in a suboptimal treatment plan

  18. Limited benefit of inversely optimised intensity modulation in breast conserving radiotherapy with simultaneously integrated boost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laan, Hans Paul van der; Dolsma, Wil V.; Schilstra, Cornelis; Korevaar, Erik W.; Bock, Geertruida H. de; Maduro, John H.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: To examine whether in breast-conserving radiotherapy (RT) with simultaneously integrated boost (SIB), application of inversely planned intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT-SIB) instead of three-dimensional RT (3D-CRT-SIB) has benefits that justify the additional costs, and to evaluate whether a potential benefit of IMRT-SIB depends on specific patient characteristics. Material and methods: 3D-CRT-SIB and various IMRT-SIB treatment plans were constructed and optimised for 30 patients with early stage left-sided breast cancer. Coverage of planning target volumes (PTVs) and dose delivered to organs at risk (OARs) were determined for each plan. Overlap between heart and breast PTV (OHB), size of breast and boost PTVs and boost location were examined in their ability to identify patients that might benefit from IMRT-SIB. Results: All plans had adequate PTV coverage. IMRT-SIB generally reduced dose levels delivered to heart, lungs, and normal breast tissue relative to 3D-CRT-SIB. However, IMRT-SIB benefit differed per patient. For many patients, comparable results were obtained with 3D-CRT-SIB, while patients with OHB > 1.4 cm and a relatively large boost PTV volume (>125 cm 3 ) gained most from the use of IMRT-SIB. Conclusions: In breast-conserving RT, results obtained with 3D-CRT-SIB and IMRT-SIB are generally comparable. Patient characteristics could be used to identify patients that are most likely to benefit from IMRT-SIB.

  19. High-dose simultaneously integrated breast boost using intensity-modulated radiotherapy and inverse optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurkmans, Coen W.; Meijer, Gert J.; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van; Sangen, Maurice J. van der; Cassee, Jorien

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Recently a Phase III randomized trial has started comparing a boost of 16 Gy as part of whole-breast irradiation to a high boost of 26 Gy in young women. Our main aim was to develop an efficient simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) technique for the high-dose arm of the trial. Methods and Materials: Treatment planning was performed for 5 left-sided and 5 right-sided tumors. A tangential field intensity-modulated radiotherapy technique added to a sequentially planned 3-field boost (SEQ) was compared with a simultaneously planned technique (SIB) using inverse optimization. Normalized total dose (NTD)-corrected dose volume histogram parameters were calculated and compared. Results: The intended NTD was produced by 31 fractions of 1.66 Gy to the whole breast and 2.38 Gy to the boost volume. The average volume of the PTV-breast and PTV-boost receiving more than 95% of the prescribed dose was 97% or more for both techniques. Also, the mean lung dose and mean heart dose did not differ much between the techniques, with on average 3.5 Gy and 2.6 Gy for the SEQ and 3.8 Gy and 2.6 Gy for the SIB, respectively. However, the SIB resulted in a significantly more conformal irradiation of the PTV-boost. The volume of the PTV-breast, excluding the PTV-boost, receiving a dose higher than 95% of the boost dose could be reduced considerably using the SIB as compared with the SEQ from 129 cc (range, 48-262 cc) to 58 cc (range, 30-102 cc). Conclusions: A high-dose simultaneously integrated breast boost technique has been developed. The unwanted excessive dose to the breast was significantly reduced

  20. The impact of introducing intensity modulated radiotherapy into routine clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miles, Elizabeth A.; Clark, Catharine H.; Urbano, M. Teresa Guerrero; Bidmead, Margaret; Dearnaley, David P.; Harrington, Kevin J.; A'Hern, Roger; Nutting, Christopher M.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) at Royal Marsden Hospital London was introduced in July 2001. Treatment delivery was dynamic using a single-phase technique. Concerns were raised regarding increased clinical workload due to introduction of new technology. The potential increased use of resources was assessed. Patients and methods: IMRT patient selection was within guidelines of clinical trials and included patients undergoing prostate plus pelvic lymph node (PPN) irradiation and head and neck cancer (HNC) treatment. Patient planning, quality assurance and treatment times were collected for an initial IMRT patient group. A comparative group of patients with advanced HNC undergoing two- or three-phase conventional radiotherapy, requiring matched photon and electron fields, were also timed. Results: The median overall total planning time for IMRT was greater for HNC patients compared to the PPN cohort. For HNC the overall IMRT planning time was significantly longer than for conventional. The median treatment time for conventional two- or three-phase HNC treatments, encompassing similar volumes to those treated with IMRT, was greater than that for the IMRT HNC patient cohort. A reduction in radiographer man hours per patient of 4.8 h was recorded whereas physics time was increased by 4.9 h per patient. Conclusions: IMRT currently increases overall planning time. Additional clinician input is required for target volume localisation. Physics time is increased, a significant component of this being patient specific QA. Radiographer time is decreased. For HNC a single phase IMRT treatment has proven to be more efficient than a multiple phase conventional treatment. IMRT has been integrated smoothly and efficiently into the existing treatment working day. This preliminary study suggests that IMRT could be a routine treatment with efficient use of current radiotherapy resources

  1. The impact of introducing intensity modulated radiotherapy into routine clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Elizabeth A; Clark, Catharine H; Urbano, M Teresa Guerrero; Bidmead, Margaret; Dearnaley, David P; Harrington, Kevin J; A'Hern, Roger; Nutting, Christopher M

    2005-12-01

    Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) at the Royal Marsden Hospital London was introduced in July 2001. Treatment delivery was dynamic using a single-phase technique. Concerns were raised regarding increased clinical workload due to introduction of new technology. The potential increased use of resources was assessed. IMRT patient selection was within guidelines of clinical trials and included patients undergoing prostate plus pelvic lymph node (PPN) irradiation and head and neck cancer (HNC) treatment. Patient planning, quality assurance and treatment times were collected for an initial IMRT patient group. A comparative group of patients with advanced HNC undergoing two- or three-phase conventional radiotherapy, requiring matched photon and electron fields, were also timed. The median overall total planning time for IMRT was greater for HNC patients compared to the PPN cohort. For HNC the overall IMRT planning time was significantly longer than for conventional. The median treatment time for conventional two- or three-phase HNC treatments, encompassing similar volumes to those treated with IMRT, was greater than that for the IMRT HNC patient cohort. A reduction in radiographer man hours per patient of 4.8h was recorded whereas physics time was increased by 4.9h per patient. IMRT currently increases overall planning time. Additional clinician input is required for target volume localisation. Physics time is increased, a significant component of this being patient specific QA. Radiographer time is decreased. For HNC a single phase IMRT treatment has proven to be more efficient than a multiple phase conventional treatment. IMRT has been integrated smoothly and efficiently into the existing treatment working day. This preliminary study suggests that IMRT could be a routine treatment with efficient use of current radiotherapy resources.

  2. Improvement of dose distributions in abutment regions of intensity modulated radiation therapy and electron fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dogan, Nesrin; Leybovich, Leonid B.; Sethi, Anil; Emami, Bahman

    2002-01-01

    In recent years, intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is used to radiate tumors that are in close proximity to vital organs. Targets consisting of a deep-seated region followed by a superficial one may be treated with abutting photon and electron fields. However, no systematic study regarding matching of IMRT and electron beams was reported. In this work, a study of dose distributions in the abutment region between tomographic and step-and-shoot IMRT and electron fields was carried out. A method that significantly improves dose homogeneity between abutting tomographic IMRT and electron fields was developed and tested. In this method, a target region that is covered by IMRT was extended into the superficial target area by ∼2.0 cm. The length and shape of IMRT target extension was chosen such that high isodose lines bent away from the region treated by the electrons. This reduced the magnitude of hot spots caused by the 'bulging effect' of electron field penumbra. To account for the uncertainties in positioning of the IMRT and electron fields, electron field penumbra was modified using conventional (photon) multileaf collimator (MLC). The electron beam was delivered in two steps: half of the dose delivered with MLCs in retracted position and another half with MLCs extended to the edge of electron field that abuts tomographic IMRT field. The experimental testing of this method using film dosimetry has demonstrated that the magnitude of the hot spots was reduced from ∼45% to ∼5% of the prescription dose. When an error of ±1.5 mm in field positioning was introduced, the dose inhomogeneity in the abutment region did not exceed ±15% of the prescription dose. With step-and-shoot IMRT, the most homogeneous dose distribution was achieved when there was a 3 mm gap between the IMRT and electron fields

  3. Multi-GPU configuration of 4D intensity modulated radiation therapy inverse planning using global optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, Aaron; Sawant, Amit; Folkerts, Michael; Modiri, Arezoo

    2018-01-01

    We report on the design, implementation and characterization of a multi-graphic processing unit (GPU) computational platform for higher-order optimization in radiotherapy treatment planning. In collaboration with a commercial vendor (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA), a research prototype GPU-enabled Eclipse (V13.6) workstation was configured. The hardware consisted of dual 8-core Xeon processors, 256 GB RAM and four NVIDIA Tesla K80 general purpose GPUs. We demonstrate the utility of this platform for large radiotherapy optimization problems through the development and characterization of a parallelized particle swarm optimization (PSO) four dimensional (4D) intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique. The PSO engine was coupled to the Eclipse treatment planning system via a vendor-provided scripting interface. Specific challenges addressed in this implementation were (i) data management and (ii) non-uniform memory access (NUMA). For the former, we alternated between parameters over which the computation process was parallelized. For the latter, we reduced the amount of data required to be transferred over the NUMA bridge. The datasets examined in this study were approximately 300 GB in size, including 4D computed tomography images, anatomical structure contours and dose deposition matrices. For evaluation, we created a 4D-IMRT treatment plan for one lung cancer patient and analyzed computation speed while varying several parameters (number of respiratory phases, GPUs, PSO particles, and data matrix sizes). The optimized 4D-IMRT plan enhanced sparing of organs at risk by an average reduction of 26% in maximum dose, compared to the clinical optimized IMRT plan, where the internal target volume was used. We validated our computation time analyses in two additional cases. The computation speed in our implementation did not monotonically increase with the number of GPUs. The optimal number of GPUs (five, in our study) is directly related to the

  4. Reirradiation of Head and Neck Cancers With Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: Outcomes and Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takiar, Vinita [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio (United States); Garden, Adam S.; Ma, Dominic; Morrison, William H.; Edson, Mark [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zafereo, Mark E. [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gunn, Gary B.; Fuller, Clifton D.; Beadle, Beth; Frank, Steven J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); William, William N.; Kies, Merrill [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); El-Naggar, Adel K. [Department of Pathology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Weber, Randal [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Rosenthal, David I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Phan, Jack, E-mail: jphan@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: To review our 15-year institutional experience using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to reirradiate patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) and identify predictors of outcomes and toxicity. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 227 patients who received head and neck reirradiation using IMRT from 1999 to 2014. Patients treated with noncurative intent were excluded. Radiation-related acute and late toxicities were recorded. Prognostic variables included performance status, disease site, disease-free interval, chemotherapy, and RT dose and volume. Correlative analyses were performed separately for surgery and nonsurgery patients. Results: Two hundred six patients (91%) were retreated with curative intent, and 173 had HNSCC histology; 104 (50%) underwent salvage resection, and 135 (66%) received chemotherapy. Median follow-up after reirradiation was 24.7 months. Clinical outcomes were worse for HNSCC patients, with 5-year locoregional control, progression-free survival, and overall survival rates of 53%, 22%, and 32%, respectively, compared with 74%, 59%, and 79%, respectively, for non-HNSCC patients. On multivariate analysis, concurrent chemotherapy and retreatment site were associated with tumor control, whereas performance status was associated with survival. Favorable prognostic factors specific to surgery patients were neck retreatment and lack of extracapsular extension, whereas for nonsurgery patients, these were a nasopharynx subsite and complete response to induction chemotherapy. Actuarial rates of grade ≥3 toxicity were 32% at 2 years and 48% at 5 years, with dysphagia or odynophagia being most common. Increased grade ≥3 toxicity was associated with retreatment volume >50 cm{sup 3} and concurrent chemotherapy. Conclusions: Reirradiation with IMRT either definitively or after salvage surgery can produce promising local control and survival in selected patients with head and neck

  5. Outcomes After Intensity-Modulated Versus Conformal Radiotherapy in Older Men With Nonmetastatic Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekelman, Justin E.; Mitra, Nandita; Efstathiou, Jason; Liao Kaijun; Sunderland, Robert; Yeboa, Deborah N.; Armstrong, Katrina

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: There is little evidence comparing complications after intensity-modulated (IMRT) vs. three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (CRT) for prostate cancer. The study objective was to test the hypothesis that IMRT, compared with CRT, is associated with a reduction in bowel, urinary, and erectile complications in elderly men with nonmetastatic prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We undertook an observational cohort study using registry and administrative claims data from the SEER-Medicare database. We identified men aged 65 years or older diagnosed with nonmetastatic prostate cancer in the United States between 2002 and 2004 who received IMRT (n = 5,845) or CRT (n = 6,753). The primary outcome was a composite measure of bowel complications. Secondary outcomes were composite measures of urinary and erectile complications. We also examined specific subsets of bowel (proctitis/hemorrhage) and urinary (cystitis/hematuria) events within the composite complication measures. Results: IMRT was associated with reductions in composite bowel complications (24-month cumulative incidence 18.8% vs. 22.5%; hazard ratio [HR] 0.86; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79–0.93) and proctitis/hemorrhage (HR 0.78; 95% CI, 0.64–0.95). IMRT was not associated with rates of composite urinary complications (HR 0.93; 95% CI, 0.83–1.04) or cystitis/hematuria (HR 0.94; 95% CI, 0.83–1.07). The incidence of erectile complications involving invasive procedures was low and did not differ significantly between groups, although IMRT was associated with an increase in new diagnoses of impotence (HR 1.27, 95% CI, 1.14–1.42). Conclusion: IMRT is associated with a small reduction in composite bowel complications and proctitis/hemorrhage compared with CRT in elderly men with nonmetastatic prostate cancer.

  6. A critical evaluation of worst case optimization methods for robust intensity-modulated proton therapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fredriksson, Albin; Bokrantz, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To critically evaluate and compare three worst case optimization methods that have been previously employed to generate intensity-modulated proton therapy treatment plans that are robust against systematic errors. The goal of the evaluation is to identify circumstances when the methods behave differently and to describe the mechanism behind the differences when they occur. Methods: The worst case methods optimize plans to perform as well as possible under the worst case scenario that can physically occur (composite worst case), the combination of the worst case scenarios for each objective constituent considered independently (objectivewise worst case), and the combination of the worst case scenarios for each voxel considered independently (voxelwise worst case). These three methods were assessed with respect to treatment planning for prostate under systematic setup uncertainty. An equivalence with probabilistic optimization was used to identify the scenarios that determine the outcome of the optimization. Results: If the conflict between target coverage and normal tissue sparing is small and no dose-volume histogram (DVH) constraints are present, then all three methods yield robust plans. Otherwise, they all have their shortcomings: Composite worst case led to unnecessarily low plan quality in boundary scenarios that were less difficult than the worst case ones. Objectivewise worst case generally led to nonrobust plans. Voxelwise worst case led to overly conservative plans with respect to DVH constraints, which resulted in excessive dose to normal tissue, and less sharp dose fall-off than the other two methods. Conclusions: The three worst case methods have clearly different behaviors. These behaviors can be understood from which scenarios that are active in the optimization. No particular method is superior to the others under all circumstances: composite worst case is suitable if the conflicts are not very severe or there are DVH constraints whereas

  7. Beam orientation optimization for intensity modulated radiation therapy using adaptive l2,1-minimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Xun; Men Chunhua; Jiang, Steve B; Lou Yifei

    2011-01-01

    Beam orientation optimization (BOO) is a key component in the process of intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment planning. It determines to what degree one can achieve a good treatment plan in the subsequent plan optimization process. In this paper, we have developed a BOO algorithm via adaptive l 2,1 -minimization. Specifically, we introduce a sparsity objective function term into our model which contains weighting factors for each beam angle adaptively adjusted during the optimization process. Such an objective function favors a small number of beam angles. By optimizing a total objective function consisting of a dosimetric term and the sparsity term, we are able to identify unimportant beam angles and gradually remove them without largely sacrificing the dosimetric objective. In one typical prostate case, the convergence property of our algorithm, as well as how beam angles are selected during the optimization process, is demonstrated. Fluence map optimization (FMO) is then performed based on the optimized beam angles. The resulting plan quality is presented and is found to be better than that of equiangular beam orientations. We have further systematically validated our algorithm in the contexts of 5-9 coplanar beams for five prostate cases and one head and neck case. For each case, the final FMO objective function value is used to compare the optimized beam orientations with the equiangular ones. It is found that, in the majority of cases tested, our BOO algorithm leads to beam configurations which attain lower FMO objective function values than those of corresponding equiangular cases, indicating the effectiveness of our BOO algorithm. Superior plan qualities are also demonstrated by comparing DVH curves between BOO plans and equiangular plans.

  8. Automatically-generated rectal dose constraints in intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Taejin; Kim, Yong Nam; Kim, Soo Kon; Kang, Sei-Kwon; Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Park, Soah; Yoon, Jai-Woong; Han, Taejin; Kim, Haeyoung; Lee, Meyeon; Kim, Kyoung-Joo; Bae, Hoonsik; Suh, Tae-Suk

    2015-06-01

    The dose constraint during prostate intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) optimization should be patient-specific for better rectum sparing. The aims of this study are to suggest a novel method for automatically generating a patient-specific dose constraint by using an experience-based dose volume histogram (DVH) of the rectum and to evaluate the potential of such a dose constraint qualitatively. The normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) of the rectum with respect to V %ratio in our study were divided into three groups, where V %ratio was defined as the percent ratio of the rectal volume overlapping the planning target volume (PTV) to the rectal volume: (1) the rectal NTCPs in the previous study (clinical data), (2) those statistically generated by using the standard normal distribution (calculated data), and (3) those generated by combining the calculated data and the clinical data (mixed data). In the calculated data, a random number whose mean value was on the fitted curve described in the clinical data and whose standard deviation was 1% was generated by using the `randn' function in the MATLAB program and was used. For each group, we validated whether the probability density function (PDF) of the rectal NTCP could be automatically generated with the density estimation method by using a Gaussian kernel. The results revealed that the rectal NTCP probability increased in proportion to V %ratio , that the predictive rectal NTCP was patient-specific, and that the starting point of IMRT optimization for the given patient might be different. The PDF of the rectal NTCP was obtained automatically for each group except that the smoothness of the probability distribution increased with increasing number of data and with increasing window width. We showed that during the prostate IMRT optimization, the patient-specific dose constraints could be automatically generated and that our method could reduce the IMRT optimization time as well as maintain the

  9. A Multiplan Treatment-Planning Framework: A Paradigm Shift for Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, Robert R.; Zhang, Hao H.; Goadrich, Laura; Nazareth, Daryl P.; Shi Leyuan; D'Souza, Warren D.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To describe a multiplan intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) planning framework, and to describe a decision support system (DSS) for ranking multiple plans and modeling the planning surface. Methods and Materials: One hundred twenty-five plans were generated sequentially for a head-and-neck case and a pelvic case by varying the dose-volume constraints on each of the organs at risk (OARs). A DSS was used to rank plans according to dose-volume histogram (DVH) values, as well as equivalent uniform dose (EUD) values. Two methods for ranking treatment plans were evaluated: composite criteria and pre-emptive selection. The planning surface determined by the results was modeled using quadratic functions. Results: The DSS provided an easy-to-use interface for the comparison of multiple plan features. Plan ranking resulted in the identification of one to three 'optimal' plans. The planning surface models had good predictive capability with respect to both DVH values and EUD values and generally, errors of <6%. Models generated by minimizing the maximum relative error had significantly lower relative errors than models obtained by minimizing the sum of squared errors. Using the quadratic model, plan properties for one OAR were determined as a function of the other OAR constraint settings. The modeled plan surface can then be used to understand the interdependence of competing planning objectives. Conclusion: The DSS can be used to aid the planner in the selection of the most desirable plan. The collection of quadratic models constructed from the plan data to predict DVH and EUD values generally showed excellent agreement with the actual plan values

  10. Survival benefit of adding chemotherapy to intensity modulated radiation in patients with locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuemei Ji

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To evaluate the contribution of chemotherapy for patients with locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC treated by intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT and to identify the optimal combination treatment strategy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Between 2006 and 2010, 276 patients with stage II-IVb NPC were treated by IMRT alone or IMRT plus chemotherapy. Cisplatin-based chemotherapy included neoadjuvant or concurrent, or neoadjuvant plus concurrent protocols. The IMRT alone and chemoradiotherapy groups were well-matched for prognostic factors, except N stage, with more advanced NPC in the chemoradiotherapy arm. RESULTS: With a mean follow-up of 33.8 months, the 3-year actuarial rates of overall survival (OS, metastasis-free survival (MFS, relapse-free survival (RFS, and disease-free survival (DFS were 90.3%, 84.2%, 80.3%, and 69.2% for all of the patients, respectively. Compared with the IMRT alone arm, patients treated by concurrent chemoradiotherapy had a significantly better DFS (HR = 2.64; 95% CI, 1.12-6.22; P = 0.03, patients with neoadjuvant-concurrent chemoradiotherapy had a significant improvement in RFS and DFS (HR = 4.03; 95% CI, 1.35-12.05; P = 0.01 and HR = 2.43; 95% CI, 1.09-5.44; P = 0.03, neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy provided no significant benefit in OS, MFS, RFS, and DFS. Stage group and alcohol consumption were prognostic factors for OS and N stage was a significant predictor for DFS. CONCLUSIONS: Addition of concurrent or neoadjuvant-concurrent chemotherapy to IMRT is available to prolong RFS or DFS for locoregionally advanced NPC. Such work could be helpful to guide effective individualized therapy.

  11. Planning Hybrid Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Whole-breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farace, Paolo [Medical Physics Department, Regional Oncological Hospital, Cagliari (Italy); Zucca, Sergio; Solla, Ignazio; Fadda, Giuseppina; Durzu, Silvia; Porru, Sergio; Meleddu, Gianfranco [Medical Physics Department, Regional Oncological Hospital, Cagliari (Italy); Deidda, Maria Assunta; Possanzini, Marco; Orru, Sivia; Lay, Giancarlo [Radiotherapy Department, Regional Oncological Hospital, Cagliari (Italy)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To test tangential and not-tangential hybrid intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for whole-breast irradiation. Methods and Materials: Seventy-eight (36 right-, 42 left-) breast patients were randomly selected. Hybrid IMRT was performed by direct aperture optimization. A semiautomated method for planning hybrid IMRT was implemented using Pinnacle scripts. A plan optimization volume (POV), defined as the portion of the planning target volume covered by the open beams, was used as the target objective during inverse planning. Treatment goals were to prescribe a minimum dose of 47.5 Gy to greater than 90% of the POV and to minimize the POV and/or normal tissue receiving a dose greater than 107%. When treatment goals were not achieved by using a 4-field technique (2 conventional open plus 2 IMRT tangents), a 6-field technique was applied, adding 2 non tangential (anterior-oblique) IMRT beams. Results: Using scripts, manual procedures were minimized (choice of optimal beam angle, setting monitor units for open tangentials, and POV definition). Treatment goals were achieved by using the 4-field technique in 61 of 78 (78%) patients. The 6-field technique was applied in the remaining 17 of 78 (22%) patients, allowing for significantly better achievement of goals, at the expense of an increase of low-dose ({approx}5 Gy) distribution in the contralateral tissue, heart, and lungs but with no significant increase of higher doses ({approx}20 Gy) in heart and lungs. The mean monitor unit contribution to IMRT beams was significantly greater (18.7% vs 9.9%) in the group of patients who required 6-field procedure. Conclusions: Because hybrid IMRT can be performed semiautomatically, it can be planned for a large number of patients with little impact on human or departmental resources, promoting it as the standard practice for whole-breast irradiation.

  12. Planning hybrid intensity modulated radiation therapy for whole-breast irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farace, Paolo; Zucca, Sergio; Solla, Ignazio; Fadda, Giuseppina; Durzu, Silvia; Porru, Sergio; Meleddu, Gianfranco; Deidda, Maria Assunta; Possanzini, Marco; Orrù, Sivia; Lay, Giancarlo

    2012-09-01

    To test tangential and not-tangential hybrid intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for whole-breast irradiation. Seventy-eight (36 right-, 42 left-) breast patients were randomly selected. Hybrid IMRT was performed by direct aperture optimization. A semiautomated method for planning hybrid IMRT was implemented using Pinnacle scripts. A plan optimization volume (POV), defined as the portion of the planning target volume covered by the open beams, was used as the target objective during inverse planning. Treatment goals were to prescribe a minimum dose of 47.5 Gy to greater than 90% of the POV and to minimize the POV and/or normal tissue receiving a dose greater than 107%. When treatment goals were not achieved by using a 4-field technique (2 conventional open plus 2 IMRT tangents), a 6-field technique was applied, adding 2 non tangential (anterior-oblique) IMRT beams. Using scripts, manual procedures were minimized (choice of optimal beam angle, setting monitor units for open tangentials, and POV definition). Treatment goals were achieved by using the 4-field technique in 61 of 78 (78%) patients. The 6-field technique was applied in the remaining 17 of 78 (22%) patients, allowing for significantly better achievement of goals, at the expense of an increase of low-dose (∼5 Gy) distribution in the contralateral tissue, heart, and lungs but with no significant increase of higher doses (∼20 Gy) in heart and lungs. The mean monitor unit contribution to IMRT beams was significantly greater (18.7% vs 9.9%) in the group of patients who required 6-field procedure. Because hybrid IMRT can be performed semiautomatically, it can be planned for a large number of patients with little impact on human or departmental resources, promoting it as the standard practice for whole-breast irradiation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Planning Hybrid Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Whole-breast Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farace, Paolo; Zucca, Sergio; Solla, Ignazio; Fadda, Giuseppina; Durzu, Silvia; Porru, Sergio; Meleddu, Gianfranco; Deidda, Maria Assunta; Possanzini, Marco; Orrù, Sivia; Lay, Giancarlo

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To test tangential and not-tangential hybrid intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for whole-breast irradiation. Methods and Materials: Seventy-eight (36 right-, 42 left-) breast patients were randomly selected. Hybrid IMRT was performed by direct aperture optimization. A semiautomated method for planning hybrid IMRT was implemented using Pinnacle scripts. A plan optimization volume (POV), defined as the portion of the planning target volume covered by the open beams, was used as the target objective during inverse planning. Treatment goals were to prescribe a minimum dose of 47.5 Gy to greater than 90% of the POV and to minimize the POV and/or normal tissue receiving a dose greater than 107%. When treatment goals were not achieved by using a 4-field technique (2 conventional open plus 2 IMRT tangents), a 6-field technique was applied, adding 2 non tangential (anterior-oblique) IMRT beams. Results: Using scripts, manual procedures were minimized (choice of optimal beam angle, setting monitor units for open tangentials, and POV definition). Treatment goals were achieved by using the 4-field technique in 61 of 78 (78%) patients. The 6-field technique was applied in the remaining 17 of 78 (22%) patients, allowing for significantly better achievement of goals, at the expense of an increase of low-dose (∼5 Gy) distribution in the contralateral tissue, heart, and lungs but with no significant increase of higher doses (∼20 Gy) in heart and lungs. The mean monitor unit contribution to IMRT beams was significantly greater (18.7% vs 9.9%) in the group of patients who required 6-field procedure. Conclusions: Because hybrid IMRT can be performed semiautomatically, it can be planned for a large number of patients with little impact on human or departmental resources, promoting it as the standard practice for whole-breast irradiation.

  14. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy for pediatric medulloblastoma: early report on the reduction of ototoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Eugene; Teh, Bin S.; Strother, Douglas R.; Davis, Quillin G.; Chiu, J. Kam; Lu, Hsin H.; Carpenter, L. Steven; Mai Weiyuan; Chintagumpala, Murali M.; South, Michael; Grant, Walter H. III; Butler, E. Brian; Woo, Shiao Y.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: The combination of cisplatin chemotherapy and radiation therapy for the treatment of medulloblastoma has been shown to cause significant ototoxicity, impairing a child's cognitive function and quality of life. Our purpose is to determine whether the new conformal technique of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can achieve lower rates of hearing loss by decreasing the radiation dose delivered to the cochlea and eighth cranial nerve (auditory apparatus). Patients and Methods: Twenty-six pediatric patients treated for medulloblastoma were retrospectively divided into two groups that received either conventional radiotherapy (Conventional-RT Group) or IMRT (IMRT Group). One hundred thirteen pure-tone audiograms were evaluated retrospectively, and hearing function was graded on a scale of 0 to 4 according to the Pediatric Oncology Group's toxicity criteria. Statistical analysis comparing the rates of ototoxicity was performed using Fisher's exact test with two-tailed analysis. Results: When compared to conventional radiotherapy, IMRT delivered 68% of the radiation dose to the auditory apparatus (mean dose: 36.7 vs. 54.2 Gy). Audiometric evaluation showed that mean decibel hearing thresholds of the IMRT Group were lower at every frequency compared to those of the Conventional-RT Group, despite having higher cumulative doses of cisplatin. The overall incidence of ototoxicity was lower in the IMRT Group. Thirteen percent of the IMRT Group had Grade 3 or 4 hearing loss, compared to 64% of the Conventional-RT Group (p<0.014). Conclusion: The conformal technique of IMRT delivered much lower doses of radiation to the auditory apparatus, while still delivering full doses to the desired target volume. Our findings suggest that, despite higher doses of cisplatin, and despite radiotherapy before cisplatin therapy, treatment with IMRT can achieve a lower rate of hearing loss

  15. SU-E-T-124: Dosimetric Comparison of HDR Brachytherapy and Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, J [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Wu, H [IUPUI, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Das, I [Indiana University- School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Brachytherapy is known to be able to deliver more radiation dose to tumor while minimizing radiation dose to surrounding normal tissues. Proton therapy also provides superior dose distribution due to Bragg peak. Since both HDR and Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT) are beneficial for their quick dose drop off, our goal in this study is to compare the pace of dose gradient drop-off between HDR and IMPT plans based on the same CT image data-set. In addition, normal tissues sparing were also compared among HDR, IMPT and SBRT. Methods: Five cervical cancer cases treated with EBRT + HDR boost combination with Tandem and Ovoid applicator were used for comparison purpose. Original HDR plans with prescribed dose of 5.5 Gy x 5 fractions were generated and optimized. The 100% isodose line of HDR plans was converted to a dose volume, and treated as CTV for IMPT and SBRT planning. The same HDR CT scans were also used for IMPT plan and SBRT plan for direct comparison. The philosophy of the IMPT and SBRT planning was to create the same CTV coverage as HDR plans. All three modalities treatment plans were compared to each other with a set of predetermined criteria. Results: With similar target volume coverage in cervix cancer boost treatment, HDR provides a slightly sharper dose drop-off from 100% to 50% isodose line, averagely in all directions compared to IMPT. However, IMPT demonstrated more dose gradient drop-off at the junction of the target and normal tissues by providing more normal tissue sparing and superior capability to reduce integral dose. Conclusion: IMPT is capable of providing comparable dose drop-off as HDR. IMPT can be explored as replacement for HDR brachytherapy in various applications.

  16. Ototoxicity After Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and Cisplatin-Based Chemotherapy in Children With Medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulino, Arnold C.; Lobo, Mark; Teh, Bin S.; Okcu, M. Fatih; South, Michael; Butler, E. Brian; Su, Jack; Chintagumpala, Murali

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To report the incidence of Pediatric Oncology Group (POG) Grade 3 or 4 ototoxicity in a cohort of patients treated with craniospinal irradiation (CSI) followed by posterior fossa (PF) and/or tumor bed (TB) boost using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2006, 44 patients with medulloblastoma were treated with CSI followed by IMRT to the PF and/or TB and cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Patients with standard-risk disease were treated with 18 to 23.4 Gy CSI followed by either a (1) PF boost to 36 Gy and TB boost to 54 to 55.8 Gy or (2) TB boost to 55.8 Gy. Patients with high-risk disease received 36 to 39.6 Gy CSI followed by a (1) PF boost to 54 to 55.8 Gy, (2) PF boost to 45 Gy and TB boost to 55.8 Gy, or (3) TB boost to 55.8 Gy. Median audiogram follow-up was 41 months (range, 11-92.4 months). Results: POG Grade Ototoxicity 0, 1, 2, 3. and 4 was found in 29, 32, 11, 13. and 3 ears. respectively, with POG Grade 3 or 4 accounting for 18.2% of cases. There was a statistically significant difference in mean radiation dose (D mean ) cochlea according to degree of ototoxicity, with D mean cochlea increasing with severity of hearing loss (p = 0.027). Conclusions: Severe ototoxicity was seen in 18.2% of ears in children treated with IMRT boost and cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Increasing dose to the cochlea was associated with increasing severity of hearing loss.

  17. Candidate Dosimetric Predictors of Long-Term Swallowing Dysfunction After Oropharyngeal Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, David L.; Hutcheson, Katherine; Barringer, Denise; Tucker, Susan L.; Kies, Merrill; Holsinger, F. Christopher; Ang, K. Kian; Morrison, William H.; Rosenthal, David I.; Garden, Adam S.; Dong Lei; Lewin, Jan S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate long-term swallowing function in oropharyngeal cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and to identify novel dose-limiting criteria predictive for dysphagia. Methods and Materials: Thirty-one patients with Stage IV oropharyngeal squamous carcinoma enrolled on a Phase II trial were prospectively evaluated by modified barium swallow studies at baseline, and 6, 12, and 24 months post-IMRT treatment. Candidate dysphagia-associated organs at risk were retrospectively contoured into original treatment plans. Twenty-one (68%) cases were base of tongue and 10 (32%) were tonsil. Stage distribution was T1 (12 patients), T2 (10), T3 (4), T4 (2), and TX (3), and N2 (24), N3 (5), and NX (2). Median age was 52.8 years (range, 42-78 years). Thirteen patients (42%) received concurrent chemotherapy during IMRT. Thirteen (42%) were former smokers. Mean dose to glottic larynx for the cohort was limited to 18 Gy (range, 6-39 Gy) by matching IMRT to conventional low-neck fields. Results: Dose-volume constraints (V30 < 65% and V35 < 35% for anterior oral cavity and V55 < 80% and V65 < 30% for high superior pharyngeal constrictors) predictive for objective swallowing dysfunction were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses. Aspiration and feeding tube dependence were observed in only 1 patient at 24 months. Conclusions: In the context of glottic laryngeal shielding, we describe candidate oral cavity and superior pharyngeal constrictor organs at risk and dose-volume constraints associated with preserved long-term swallowing function; these constraints are currently undergoing prospective validation. Strict protection of the glottic larynx via beam-split IMRT techniques promises to make chronic aspiration an uncommon outcome.

  18. Patterns of relapse following surgery and postoperative intensity modulated radiotherapy for oral and oropharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collan, Juhani; Vaalavirta, Leila; Kajanti, Mikael; Tenhunen, Mikko; Saarilahti, Kauko; Lundberg, Marie; Baeck, Leif; Maekitie, Antti

    2011-01-01

    Background. To investigate the patterns of relapse following intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) given after radical surgery for oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer. Patients and methods. One hundred and two patients with oral or oropharyngeal cancer were treated with radical surgery followed by IMRT up to a mean total dose of 60 Gy between years 2001 and 2007. Thirty-nine of the patients (%) also received concomitant weekly cisplatin. Forty of the patients had oral and 62 had oropharyngeal cancer. Data on the tumour, patient and treatment factors were collected. Following therapy the patients were followed by clinical examination, endoscopy and MRI/CT at 2- to 3-months interval up to 2 years and thereafter at 6-month intervals. Results. The mean follow-up time of the patients was 55 months (range, 26-106 months). The rate for local tumour control for the whole cohort was 92.2%: 87.5% for oral cancer patients and 96.7% for oropharyngeal cancer patients. The 5-year disease specific survival was 90.2% and 5-year overall survival 84.3%. During the follow-up eight locoregional recurrences were observed, three at the primary tumour site and one at regional nodal site and four at both sites. The mean time to primary tumour recurrence was seven months (range, 2-10 months) and to nodal recurrence seven months (range, 2-12 months). Distant metastasis occurred in six (6%) patients. The factors associated with poor prognosis were the primary tumour size and tumour site with oral cancers having worse outcome. The treatment was well tolerated with no unexpected toxicities. The most frequent late toxicity was dysphagia necessitating permanent PEG in five patients. This was correlated with the advanced primary tumour size and resulting in wide tumour excision and reconstruction. Conclusions. Surgery combined with postoperative radiotherapy given as IMRT results in low level of tumour recurrence

  19. Patterns of Disease Recurrence Following Treatment of Oropharyngeal Cancer With Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garden, Adam S., E-mail: agarden@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Dong, Lei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Morrison, William H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Stugis, Erich M. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Epidemiology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Glisson, Bonnie S. [Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medicine, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Frank, Steven J.; Beadle, Beth M.; Gunn, Gary B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Schwartz, David L. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Long Island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park, NY (United States); Kies, Merill S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medicine, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Weber, Randal S. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Ang, K. Kian; Rosenthal, David I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To report mature results of a large cohort of patients diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx who were treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: The database of patients irradiated at The University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center was searched for patients diagnosed with oropharyngeal cancer and treated with IMRT between 2000 and 2007. A retrospective review of outcome data was performed. Results: The cohort consisted of 776 patients. One hundred fifty-nine patients (21%) were current smokers, 279 (36%) former smokers, and 337 (43%) never smokers. T and N categories and American Joint Committee on Cancer group stages were distributed as follows: T1/x, 288 (37%); T2, 288 (37%); T3, 113 (15%); T4, 87 (11%); N0, 88(12%); N1/x, 140 (18%); N2a, 101 (13%); N2b, 269 (35%); N2c, 122 (16%); and N3, 56 (7%); stage I, 18(2%); stage II, 40(5%); stage III, 150(19%); and stage IV, 568(74%). Seventy-one patients (10%) presented with nodes in level IV. Median follow-up was 54 months. The 5-year overall survival, locoregional control, and overall recurrence-free survival rates were 84%, 90%, and 82%, respectively. Primary site recurrence developed in 7% of patients, and neck recurrence with primary site control in 3%. We could only identify 12 patients (2%) who had locoregional recurrence outside the high-dose target volumes. Poorer survival rates were observed in current smokers, patients with larger primary (T) tumors and lower neck disease. Conclusions: Patients with oropharyngeal cancer treated with IMRT have excellent disease control. Locoregional recurrence was uncommon, and most often occurred in the high dose volumes. Parotid sparing was accomplished in nearly all patients without compromising tumor coverage.

  20. Factors influencing bowel sparing in intensity modulated whole pelvic radiotherapy for gynaecological malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georg, Petra; Georg, Dietmar; Hillbrand, Martin; Kirisits, Christian; Poetter, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the influence of uterus and bladder size on large and small bowel sparing with intensity modulated whole pelvic radiotherapy (IM-WPRT) in gynecologic patients. Patients and methods: Twenty patients were selected; 10 women with cervical cancer treated with definitive radiotherapy (group 'DEF') and 10 endometrial cancer patients treated postoperatively (group 'POST'). Bladder, rectal wall, small (SB) and large bowel (LB) were delineated as organs at risk. A conformal four field technique and a seven field IMRT plan (prescription dose 50.4 Gy) were compared in terms of DVH and various target parameters. Results: At doses between 40 and 50.4 Gy statistically significant improvements (P<0.05) were observed for IM-WPRT for irradiated volume of rectal wall and bladder. In both patient groups, with IMRT the average irradiated volume of SB was reduced by a factor of 6 at 50.4 Gy. This ratio was 2 for LB. In the DEF group the effect of SB-sparing with IMRT correlated with bladder size (correlation coefficient 0.70) while it did not correlate in the postoperative group. The effect of LB-sparing decreased with increasing bladder size in both groups but the impact of IMRT was larger for postoperative patients. Conclusions: IMRT significantly reduced the absolute volume of rectal wall, bladder and bowel irradiated at the prescribed dose level in gynaecologic patients. Main differences between POST and DEF patients receiving IM-WPRT were absolute volumes of LB irradiated to doses between 35 and 50 Gy, suggesting an impact of intact uterus on LB volume in the pelvis. POST patients seem to benefit most from elective nodal IMRT. Bladder filling is an important co-factor influencing the benefit of IMRT with respect to OAR sparing

  1. Reoptimization of Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Plans Based on Linear Energy Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unkelbach, Jan, E-mail: junkelbach@mgh.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Botas, Pablo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Faculty of Physics, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Gorissen, Bram L.; Paganetti, Harald [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: We describe a treatment plan optimization method for intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) that avoids high values of linear energy transfer (LET) in critical structures located within or near the target volume while limiting degradation of the best possible physical dose distribution. Methods and Materials: To allow fast optimization based on dose and LET, a GPU-based Monte Carlo code was extended to provide dose-averaged LET in addition to dose for all pencil beams. After optimizing an initial IMPT plan based on physical dose, a prioritized optimization scheme is used to modify the LET distribution while constraining the physical dose objectives to values close to the initial plan. The LET optimization step is performed based on objective functions evaluated for the product of LET and physical dose (LET×D). To first approximation, LET×D represents a measure of the additional biological dose that is caused by high LET. Results: The method is effective for treatments where serial critical structures with maximum dose constraints are located within or near the target. We report on 5 patients with intracranial tumors (high-grade meningiomas, base-of-skull chordomas, ependymomas) in whom the target volume overlaps with the brainstem and optic structures. In all cases, high LET×D in critical structures could be avoided while minimally compromising physical dose planning objectives. Conclusion: LET-based reoptimization of IMPT plans represents a pragmatic approach to bridge the gap between purely physical dose-based and relative biological effectiveness (RBE)-based planning. The method makes IMPT treatments safer by mitigating a potentially increased risk of side effects resulting from elevated RBE of proton beams near the end of range.

  2. Individualized Selection of Beam Angles and Treatment Isocenter in Tangential Breast Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penninkhof, Joan, E-mail: j.penninkhof@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus M.C. Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Spadola, Sara [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus M.C. Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Alma Mater Studiorum, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Baaijens, Margreet [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus M.C. Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Lanconelli, Nico [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Alma Mater Studiorum, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Heijmen, Ben [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus M.C. Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2017-06-01

    Purpose and Objective: Propose a novel method for individualized selection of beam angles and treatment isocenter in tangential breast intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: For each patient, beam and isocenter selection starts with the fully automatic generation of a large database of IMRT plans (up to 847 in this study); each of these plans belongs to a unique combination of isocenter position, lateral beam angle, and medial beam angle. The imposed hard planning constraint on patient maximum dose may result in plans with unacceptable target dose delivery. Such plans are excluded from further analyses. Owing to differences in beam setup, database plans differ in mean doses to organs at risk (OARs). These mean doses are used to construct 2-dimensional graphs, showing relationships between: (1) contralateral breast dose and ipsilateral lung dose; and (2) contralateral breast dose and heart dose (analyzed only for left-sided). The graphs can be used for selection of the isocenter and beam angles with the optimal, patient-specific tradeoffs between the mean OAR doses. For 30 previously treated patients (15 left-sided and 15 right-sided tumors), graphs were generated considering only the clinically applied isocenter with 121 tangential beam angle pairs. For 20 of the 30 patients, 6 alternative isocenters were also investigated. Results: Computation time for automatic generation of 121 IMRT plans took on average 30 minutes. The generated graphs demonstrated large variations in tradeoffs between conflicting OAR objectives, depending on beam angles and patient anatomy. For patients with isocenter optimization, 847 IMRT plans were considered. Adding isocenter position optimization next to beam angle optimization had a small impact on the final plan quality. Conclusion: A method is proposed for individualized selection of beam angles in tangential breast IMRT. This may be especially important for patients with cardiac risk factors or an

  3. Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Carcinoma of the Prostate: Analysis of Toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coote, Joanna H.; Wylie, James P.; Cowan, Richard A.; Logue, John P.; Swindell, Ric; Livsey, Jacqueline E.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Dose escalation for prostate cancer improves biological control but with a significant increase in late toxicity. Recent estimates of low α/β ratio for prostate cancer suggest that hypofractionation may result in biological advantage. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) should enable dose escalation to the prostate while reducing toxicity to local organs. We report late toxicity data of a hypofractionated IMRT regime. Methods and Materials: Eligible men had T2-3N0M0 adenocarcinoma prostate, and either Gleason score ≥ 7 or prostate-specific antigen 20-50 ng/L. Patients received 57-60 Gy to prostate in 19-20 fractions using five-field IMRT. All received hormonal therapy for 3 months before radiotherapy to a maximum of 6 months. Toxicity was assessed 2 years postradiotherapy using the RTOG criteria, LENT/SOMA, and UCLA prostate index assessment tools. Results: Acute toxicity was favorable with no RTOG Grade 3 or 4 toxicity. At 2 years, there was 4% Grade 2 bowel and 4.25% Grade 2 bladder toxicity. There was no Grade 3 or 4 bowel toxicity; one patient developed Grade 3 bladder toxicity. UCLA data showed a slight improvement in urinary function at 2 years compared with pretreatment. LENT/SOMA assessments demonstrated general worsening of bowel function at 2 years. Patients receiving 60 Gy were more likely to develop problems with bowel function than those receiving 57 Gy. Conclusions: These data demonstrate that hypofractionated radiotherapy using IMRT for prostate cancer is well tolerated with minimal late toxicity at 2 years posttreatment. Ongoing studies are looking at the efficacy of hypofractionated regimes with respect to biological control.

  4. Three-Year Outcomes of Breast Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy With Simultaneous Integrated Boost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, Mark W.; Godette, Karen D.; Whitaker, Daisy J.; Davis, Lawrence W.; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To report our clinical experience using breast intensity-modulated radiation therapy with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB-IMRT). Methods and Materials: Retrospective review identified 354 Stage 0 to III breast cancer patients treated with SIB-IMRT after conservative surgery between 2003 and 2006. The most common fractionation (89%) simultaneously delivered 1.8 Gy to the ipsilateral breast tissue and 2.14 Gy to the resection cavity, yielding a breast dose of 45 Gy (25 fractions) and cavity dose 59.92 Gy (28 fractions), biologically equivalent for tumor control to 45 Gy to the breast with sequential 16-Gy boost (33 fractions). Results: A total of 356 breasts in 354 patients were treated: 282 with invasive breast cancer, and 74 with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). For left breast radiation, median cardiac V 15 was 2.9% and left ventricular V 15 1.7%. Median follow-up was 33 months (range, 4-73 months). Acute toxicity was Grade 1 in 57% of cases, Grade 2 in 43%, and Grade 3 in <1%. For invasive breast cancer, the 3-year overall survival was 97.6% and risk of any locoregional recurrence was 2.8%. For ductal carcinoma in situ, 3-year overall survival was 98% and risk of locoregional recurrence 1.4%. In 142 cases at a minimum of 3 years follow-up, global breast cosmesis was judged by physicians as good or excellent in 96.5% and fair in 3.5%. Conclusions: Breast SIB-IMRT reduced treatment duration by five fractions with a favorable acute toxicity profile and low cardiac dose for left breast treatment. At 3 years, locoregional control was excellent, and initial assessment suggested good or excellent cosmesis in a high percentage of evaluable patients.

  5. Multivariate analysis of factors predicting prostate dose in intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomita, Tsuneyuki [Division of Radiology, Osaka Red Cross Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Nakamura, Mitsuhiro, E-mail: m_nkmr@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Hirose, Yoshinori; Kitsuda, Kenji; Notogawa, Takuya; Miki, Katsuhito [Division of Radiology, Osaka Red Cross Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Nakamura, Kiyonao; Ishigaki, Takashi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Red Cross Hospital, Osaka (Japan)

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a multivariate analysis to determine relationships between prostate radiation dose and the state of surrounding organs, including organ volumes and the internal angle of the levator ani muscle (LAM), based on cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images after bone matching. We analyzed 270 CBCT data sets from 30 consecutive patients receiving intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer. With patients in the supine position on a couch with the HipFix system, data for center of mass (COM) displacement of the prostate and the state of individual organs were acquired and compared between planning CT and CBCT scans. Dose distributions were then recalculated based on CBCT images. The relative effects of factors on the variance in COM, dose covering 95% of the prostate volume (D{sub 95%}), and percentage of prostate volume covered by the 100% isodose line (V{sub 100%}) were evaluated by a backward stepwise multiple regression analysis. COM displacement in the anterior-posterior direction (COM{sub AP}) correlated significantly with the rectum volume (δVr) and the internal LAM angle (δθ; R = 0.63). Weak correlations were seen for COM in the left-right (R = 0.18) and superior-inferior directions (R = 0.31). Strong correlations between COM{sub AP} and prostate D{sub 95%} and V{sub 100%} were observed (R ≥ 0.69). Additionally, the change ratios in δVr and δθ remained as predictors of prostate D{sub 95%} and V{sub 100%}. This study shows statistically that maintaining the same rectum volume and LAM state for both the planning CT simulation and treatment is important to ensure the correct prostate dose in the supine position with bone matching.

  6. Local Control After Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Rhabdomyosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, Amarinthia E.; Okcu, M. Fatih; Chintagumpala, Murali; Teh, Bin S.; Paulino, Arnold C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the patterns of failure in patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2005, 19 patients with a diagnosis of head-and-neck RMS received IMRT at The Methodist Hospital. There were 11 male and 8 female patients, with a median age of 6 years at time of irradiation. Tumor location was parameningeal in 7, orbital in 6, and other head-and-neck RMS in 6. Chemotherapy was given to all patients, with vincristine, actinomycin D, and cyclophosphamide being the most common regimen (n = 18). The median prescribed dose was 5040 cGy. The clinical target volume included the gross tumor volume with a 1.5-cm margin. The median duration of follow-up for surviving patients was 56 months. Results: The 4-year overall survival and local control rates were 76% and 92.9%, respectively. One patient developed a local failure in the high-dose region of the radiation field; there were no marginal failures. Distant metastasis was seen in 4 patients. Overall survival was 42.9% for parameningeal sites and 100% for other sites (p < 0.01). Late toxicities were seen in 7 patients. Two secondary malignancies occurred in 1 child with embryonal RMS of the face and a p53 mutation. Conclusions: Local control was excellent in patients receiving IMRT for head-and-neck RMS. Patterns of local failure reveal no marginal failures in this group of patients

  7. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy for T4 nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Treatment results and locoregional

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.L.Y.; Tsai, C.L.; Chen, W.Y.; Wang, C.W.; Huang, Y.S.; Chen, Y.F.; Kuo, S.H.; National Taiwan Univ. College of Medicine, Taipei; Hong, R.L.; Ko, J.Y.; Lou, P.J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to examine outcomes in patients with T4 nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and materials: Between 2007 and 2010, 154 patients with nonmetastatic T4 NPC were treated with IMRT to a total dose of 70 Gy in 33-35 fractions. In addition, 97 % of patients received concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy. The median follow-up time was 52.8 months. Results: The rates of 5-year actuarial locoregional control, distant metastasis-free survival, progression free-survival, and overall survival (OS) were 81.2, 72.2, 61.9, and 78.1 %, respectively. A total of 27 patients had locoregional recurrence: 85.2 % in-field failures, 11.1 % marginal failures, and 3.7 % out-of-field failures. Fourteen patients with locoregional recurrence received aggressive treatments, including nasopharyngectomy, neck dissection, or re-irradiation, and the 5-year OS rate tended to be better (61.9 %) compared to those receiving conservative treatment (32.0 %, p = 0.051). In patients treated with 1 course of radiotherapy, grade ≥ 3 toxicities of ototoxicity, neck fibrosis, xerostomia, epistaxis, and radiographic temporal lobe necrosis occurred in 18.2, 9.8, 6.3, 2.1, and 5.6 % of patients, respectively. Increased ototoxicity, osteonecrosis, severe nasal bleeding, and temporal necrosis were observed in patients treated by re-irradiation. Conclusion: IMRT offers good locoregional control in patients with T4 NPC. For patients with locoregional recurrence after definitive radiotherapy, aggressive local treatment may be considered for a better outcome. (orig.)

  8. Treatment of folliculitis decalvans using intensity-modulated radiation via tomotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsayad, Khaled; Kriz, Jan; Haverkamp, Uwe; Eich, Hans Theodor; Plachouri, Kerasia-Maria; Jeskowiak, Antonia; Sunderkoetter, Cord

    2015-01-01

    Folliculitis decalvans (FD) is a form of primary neutrophilic scarring alopecia that is characterized clinically by chronic suppurative folliculitis and often associated with pruritus or even pain. Treatment of FD is often difficult. Herein, we report a case of recalcitrant and painful folliculitis decalvans refractory to antibiotic and anti-inflammatory therapies, which was successfully treated by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in order to irreversibly eliminate hair follicles that prove to be one etiological trigger. A 45-year-old male patient with a refractory FD presented with a crusting suppurative folliculitis and atrophic scarring patches on the scalp associated with pain and pruritus. We attempted relief of symptoms by reducing scalp inflammation and eliminating hair follicles through radiation. We delivered 11.0 Gy in two radiation series using tomotherapy, 5.0 Gy in 5 equivalent fractions as a first radiation course. The symptoms markedly decreased but did not totally disappear. Therefore, we delivered a second radiation series 4 months later with an additional 6 Gy. This led to almost complete epilation on the scalp and abolished pain and pruritus on the capillitium. The patient was regularly followed up until 26 months after radiotherapy. Draining lesions or exudation did not recur. He only experienced discrete hair regrowth in the occipital region with folliculitis 12 months after radiotherapy. These residual lesions are currently treated with laser epilation therapy. A radical approach to eliminating hair follicles by repeated radiation therapy may induce lasting relief of symptoms in chronic suppurative FD associated with persistent trichodynia. (orig.) [de

  9. Automated Planning of Tangential Breast Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Using Heuristic Optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purdie, Thomas G.; Dinniwell, Robert E.; Letourneau, Daniel; Hill, Christine; Sharpe, Michael B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To present an automated technique for two-field tangential breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment planning. Method and Materials: A total of 158 planned patients with Stage 0, I, and II breast cancer treated using whole-breast IMRT were retrospectively replanned using automated treatment planning tools. The tools developed are integrated into the existing clinical treatment planning system (Pinnacle 3 ) and are designed to perform the manual volume delineation, beam placement, and IMRT treatment planning steps carried out by the treatment planning radiation therapist. The automated algorithm, using only the radio-opaque markers placed at CT simulation as inputs, optimizes the tangential beam parameters to geometrically minimize the amount of lung and heart treated while covering the whole-breast volume. The IMRT parameters are optimized according to the automatically delineated whole-breast volume. Results: The mean time to generate a complete treatment plan was 6 min, 50 s ± 1 min 12 s. For the automated plans, 157 of 158 plans (99%) were deemed clinically acceptable, and 138 of 158 plans (87%) were deemed clinically improved or equal to the corresponding clinical plan when reviewed in a randomized, double-blinded study by one experienced breast radiation oncologist. In addition, overall the automated plans were dosimetrically equivalent to the clinical plans when scored for target coverage and lung and heart doses. Conclusion: We have developed robust and efficient automated tools for fully inversed planned tangential breast IMRT planning that can be readily integrated into clinical practice. The tools produce clinically acceptable plans using only the common anatomic landmarks from the CT simulation process as an input. We anticipate the tools will improve patient access to high-quality IMRT treatment by simplifying the planning process and will reduce the effort and cost of incorporating more advanced planning into clinical practice.

  10. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy in the Salvage of Locally Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Sufang; Lin Shaojun; Tham, Ivan W.K.; Pan Jianji; Lu Jun; Lu, Jiade J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Local recurrences of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) may be salvaged by reirradiation with conventional techniques, but with significant morbidity. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) may improve the therapeutic ratio by reducing doses to normal tissue. The aim of this study was to address the efficacy and toxicity profile of IMRT for a cohort of patients with locally recurrent NPC. Methods and Materials: Between August 2003 and June 2009, 70 patients with radiologic or pathologically proven locally recurrent NPC were treated with IMRT. The median time to recurrence was 30 months after the completion of conventional radiation to definitive dose. Fifty-seven percent of the tumors were classified asrT3–4. The minimum planned doses were 59.4 to 60 Gy in 1.8- to 2-Gy fractions per day to the gross disease with margins, with or without chemotherapy. Results: The median dose to the recurrent tumor was 70 Gy (range, 50–77.4 Gy). Sixty-five patients received the planned radiation therapy; 5 patients received between 50 and 60 Gy because of acute side effects. With a median follow-up time of 25 months, the rates of 2-year locoregional recurrence-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival were 65.8%, 65.8%, and 67.4%, respectively. Moderate to severe late toxicities were noted in 25 patients (35.7%). Eleven patients (15.7%) had posterior nasal space ulceration, 17 (24.3%) experienced cranial nerve palsies, 12 (17.1%) had trismus, and 12 (17.1%) experienced deafness. Extended disease-free interval (relative risk 2.049) and advanced T classification (relative risk 3.895) at presentation were adverse prognostic factors. Conclusion: Reirradiation with IMRT provides reasonable long-term control in patients with locally recurrent NPC.

  11. Expert Consensus Contouring Guidelines for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Esophageal and Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Abraham J.; Bosch, Walter R.; Chang, Daniel T.; Hong, Theodore S.; Jabbour, Salma K.; Kleinberg, Lawrence R.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Thomas, Charles R.; Goodman, Karyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): Current guidelines for esophageal cancer contouring are derived from traditional 2-dimensional fields based on bony landmarks, and they do not provide sufficient anatomic detail to ensure consistent contouring for more conformal radiation therapy techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Therefore, we convened an expert panel with the specific aim to derive contouring guidelines and generate an atlas for the clinical target volume (CTV) in esophageal or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. Methods and Materials: Eight expert academically based gastrointestinal radiation oncologists participated. Three sample cases were chosen: a GEJ cancer, a distal esophageal cancer, and a mid-upper esophageal cancer. Uniform computed tomographic (CT) simulation datasets and accompanying diagnostic positron emission tomographic/CT images were distributed to each expert, and the expert was instructed to generate gross tumor volume (GTV) and CTV contours for each case. All contours were aggregated and subjected to quantitative analysis to assess the degree of concordance between experts and to generate draft consensus contours. The panel then refined these contours to generate the contouring atlas. Results: The κ statistics indicated substantial agreement between panelists for each of the 3 test cases. A consensus CTV atlas was generated for the 3 test cases, each representing common anatomic presentations of esophageal cancer. The panel agreed on guidelines and principles to facilitate the generalizability of the atlas to individual cases. Conclusions: This expert panel successfully reached agreement on contouring guidelines for esophageal and GEJ IMRT and generated a reference CTV atlas. This atlas will serve as a reference for IMRT contours for clinical practice and prospective trial design. Subsequent patterns of failure analyses of clinical datasets using these guidelines may require modification in the future

  12. Promising results with image guided intensity modulated radiotherapy for muscle invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whalley, D.; Caine, H.; McCloud, P.; Guo, L.; Kneebone, A.; Eade, T.

    2015-01-01

    To describe the feasibility of image guided intensity modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) using daily soft tissue matching in the treatment of bladder cancer. Twenty-eight patients with muscle-invasive carcinoma of the bladder were recruited to a protocol of definitive radiation using IMRT with accelerated hypofractionation with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB). Isotropic margins of .5 and 1 cm were used to generate the high risk and intermediate risk planning target volumes respectively. Cone beam CT (CBCT) was acquired daily and a soft tissue match was performed. Cystoscopy was scheduled 6 weeks post treatment. The median age was 83 years (range 58-92). Twenty patients had stage II or III disease, and eight were stage IV. Gross disease received 66 Gy in 30 fractions in 11 patients (ten with concurrent chemotherapy) or 55 Gy in 20 fractions for those of poorer performance status or with palliative intent. All patients completed radiation treatment as planned. Three patients ceased chemotherapy early due to toxicity. Six patients (21 %) had acute Grade ≥ 2 genitourinary (GU) toxicity and six (21 %) had acute Grade ≥ 2 gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. Five patients (18 %) developed Grade ≥2 late GU toxicity and no ≥2 late GI toxicity was observed. Nineteen patients underwent cystoscopy following radiation, with complete response (CR) in 16 cases (86 %), including all patients treated with chemoradiotherapy. Eight patients relapsed, four of which were local relapses. Of the patients with local recurrence, one underwent salvage cystectomy. For patients treated with definitive intent, freedom from locoregional recurrence (FFLR) and overall survival (OS) was 90 %/100 % for chemoradiotherapy versus 86 %/69 % for radiotherapy alone. IG- IMRT using daily soft tissue matching is a feasible in the treatment of bladder cancer, enabling the delivery of accelerated synchronous integrated boost with good early local control outcomes and low toxicity

  13. Is Planned Neck Dissection Necessary for Head and Neck Cancer After Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Min; Hoffman, Henry T.; Chang, Kristi; Funk, Gerry F.; Smith, Russell B.; Tan Huaming; Clamon, Gerald H.; Dornfeld, Ken; Buatti, John M.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to determine regional control of local regional advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), along with the role and selection criteria for neck dissection after IMRT. Methods and Materials: A total of 90 patients with stage N2A or greater HNSCC were treated with definitive IMRT from December 1999 to July 2005. Three clinical target volumes were defined and were treated to 70 to 74 Gy, 60 Gy, and 54 Gy, respectively. Neck dissection was performed for selected patients after IMRT. Selection criteria evolved during this period with emphasis on post-IMRT [ 18 F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in recent years. Results: Median follow-up for all patients was 29 months (range, 0.2-74 months). All living patients were followed at least 9 months after completing treatment. Thirteen patients underwent neck dissection after IMRT because of residual lymphadenopathy. Of these, 6 contained residual viable tumor. Three patients with persistent adenopathy did not undergo neck dissection: 2 refused and 1 had lung metastasis. Among the remaining 74 patients who were observed without neck dissection, there was only 1 case of regional failure. Among all 90 patients in this study, the 3-year local and regional control was 96.3% and 95.4%, respectively. Conclusions: Appropriately delivered IMRT has excellent dose coverage for cervical lymph nodes. A high radiation dose can be safely delivered to the abnormal lymph nodes. There is a high complete response rate. Routine planned neck dissection for patients with N2A and higher stage after IMRT is not necessary. Post-IMRT [ 18 F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography is a useful tool in selecting patients appropriate for neck dissection

  14. Radiation efficacy and biological risk from whole-breast irradiation via intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desantis, David M.

    Radiotherapy is an established modality for women with breast cancer. During the delivery of external beam radiation to the breast, leakage, scattered x-rays from the patient and the linear accelerator also expose healthy tissues and organs outside of the breast, thereby increasing the patient's whole-body dose, which then increases the chance of developing a secondary, radiation-induced cancer. Generally, there are three IntensityModulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) delivery techniques from a conventional linear accelerator; forward planned (FMLC), inverse planned 'sliding window' (DMLC), and inverse planned 'step-and-shoot' (SMLC). The goal of this study was to determine which of these three techniques delivers an optimal dose to the breast with the least chance of causing a fatal, secondary, radiation-induced cancer. A conventional, non-IMRT, 'Wedge' plan also was compared. Computerized Tomography (CT) data sets for both a large and small sized patient were used in this study. With Varian's Eclipse AAA algorithm, the organ doses specified in the revised ICRP 60 publication were used to calculate the whole-body dose. Also, an anthropomorphic phantom was irradiated with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) at each organ site for measured doses. The risk coefficient from the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) VII report of 4.69 x 10-2 deaths per Gy was used to convert whole-body dose to risk of a fatal, secondary, radiation-induced cancer. The FMLC IMRT delivered superior tumor coverage over the 3D conventional plan and the inverse DMLC or SMLC treatment plans delivered clinically equivalent tumor coverage. However, the FMLC plan had the least likelihood of inadvertently causing a fatal, secondary, radiation-induced cancer compared to the inverse DMLC, SMLC, and Wedge plans.

  15. Dosimetric validation of new semiconductor diode dosimetry system for intensity modulated radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Kinhikar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The new diode Isorad was validated for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT and the observations during the validation are reported. Materials and Methods: The validation includes intrinsic precision, post-irradiation stability, dose linearity, dose-rate effect, angular response, source to surface (SSD dependence, field size dependence, and dose calibration. Results: The intrinsic precision of the diode was more than 1% (1 σ. The linearity found in the whole range of dose analyzed was 1.93% (R 2 = 1. The minimum and maximum variation in the measured and calculated dose were found to be 0.78% (with 25 MU at ioscentre and 4.8% (with 1000 MU at isocentre, respectively. The maximal variation in angular response with respect to arbitrary angle 0° found was 1.31%. The diode exhibited a 51.7% and 35% decrease in the response in the 35 cm and 20 cm SSD range, respectively. The minimum and the maximum variation in the measured dose from the diode and calculated dose were 0.82% (5 cm × 5 cm and 3.75% (30 cm × 30 cm, respectively. At couch 270°, the response of the diode was found to vary maximum by 1.4% with ΁ 60 gantry angle. Mean variation between measured dose with diode and planned dose by TPS was found to be 1.3% (SD 0.75 for IMRT patient-specific quality assurance. Conclusion: For the evaluation of IMRT, use of cylindrical diode is strongly recommended.

  16. Minimizing the number of segments in a delivery sequence for intensity-modulated radiation therapy with a multileaf collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Jianrong; Zhu Yunping

    2001-01-01

    This paper proposes a sequencing algorithm for intensity-modulated radiation therapy with a multileaf collimator in the static mode. The algorithm aims to minimize the number of segments in a delivery sequence. For a machine with a long verification and recording overhead time (e.g., 15 s per segment), minimizing the number of segments is equivalent to minimizing the delivery time. The proposed new algorithm is based on checking numerous candidates for a segment and selecting the candidate that results in a residual intensity matrix with the least complexity. When there is more than one candidate resulting in the same complexity, the candidate with the largest size is selected. The complexity of an intensity matrix is measured in the new algorithm in terms of the number of segments in the delivery sequence obtained by using a published algorithm. The beam delivery efficiency of the proposed algorithm and the influence of different published algorithms used to calculate the complexity of an intensity matrix were tested with clinical intensity-modulated beams. The results show that no matter which published algorithm is used to calculate the complexity of an intensity matrix, the sequence generated by the algorithm proposed here is always more efficient than that generated by the published algorithm itself. The results also show that the algorithm used to calculate the complexity of an intensity matrix affects the efficiency of beam delivery. The delivery sequences are frequently most efficient when the algorithm of Bortfeld et al. is used to calculate the complexity of an intensity matrix. Because no single variation is most efficient for all beams tested, we suggest implementing multiple variations of our algorithm

  17. Rationale and development of image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy post-prostatectomy: the present standard of care?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray JR

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Julia R Murray,1,2 Helen A McNair,2 David P Dearnaley1,2 1Academic Urology Unit, Institute of Cancer Research, London, 2Department of Radiotherapy, The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, UK Abstract: The indications for post-prostatectomy radiotherapy have evolved over the last decade, although the optimal timing, dose, and target volume remain to be well defined. The target volume is susceptible to anatomical variations with its borders interfacing with the rectum and bladder. Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy has become the gold standard for radical prostate radiotherapy. Here we review the current evidence for image-guided techniques with intensity-modulated radiotherapy to the prostate bed and describe current strategies to reduce or account for interfraction and intrafraction motion. Keywords: radiotherapy, prostate cancer, post-prostatectomy, image-guided radiation therapy

  18. Dosimetric effect of beam arrangement for intensity-modulated radiation therapy in the treatment of upper thoracic esophageal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Yuchuan [Division of Radiation Physics, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Deng, Min; Zhou, Xiaojuan [Department of Thoracic Oncology, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Lin, Qiang; Du, Bin [Division of Radiation Physics, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Tian, Xue; Xu, Yong; Wang, Jin; Lu, You [Department of Thoracic Oncology, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Gong, Youling, E-mail: gongyouling@hotmail.com [Department of Thoracic Oncology, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China)

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the lung sparing in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for patients with upper thoracic esophageal tumors extending inferiorly to the thorax by different beam arrangement. Overall, 15 patient cases with cancer of upper thoracic esophagus were selected for a retrospective treatment-planning study. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans using 4, 5, and 7 beams (4B, 5B, and 7B) were developed for each patient by direct machine parameter optimization (DMPO). All plans were evaluated with respect to dose volumes to irradiated targets and normal structures, with statistical comparisons made between 4B with 5B and 7B intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans. Differences among plans were evaluated using a two-tailed Friedman test at a statistical significance of p < 0.05. The maximum dose, average dose, and the conformity index (CI) of planning target volume 1 (PTV1) were similar for 3 plans for each case. No significant difference of coverage for planning target volume 1 and maximum dose for spinal cords were observed among 3 plans in present study (p > 0.05). The average V{sub 5}, V{sub 13}, V{sub 20}, mean lung dose, and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) for the total lung were significantly lower in 4B-plans than those data in 5B-plans and 7B-plans (p < 0.01). Although the average V{sub 30} for the total lung were significantly higher in 4B-plans than those in 5B-plans and 7B-plans (p < 0.05). In addition, when comparing with the 4B-plans, the conformity/heterogeneity index of the 5B- and 7B-plans were significantly superior (p < 0.05). The 4B-intensity-modulated radiation therapy plan has advantage to address the specialized problem of lung sparing to low- and intermediate-dose exposure in the thorax when dealing with relative long tumors extended inferiorly to the thoracic esophagus for upper esophageal carcinoma with the cost for less conformity. Studies are needed to compare the superiority of volumetric modulated arc therapy

  19. Dosimetric effect of beam arrangement for intensity-modulated radiation therapy in the treatment of upper thoracic esophageal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Yuchuan; Deng, Min; Zhou, Xiaojuan; Lin, Qiang; Du, Bin; Tian, Xue; Xu, Yong; Wang, Jin; Lu, You; Gong, Youling

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the lung sparing in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for patients with upper thoracic esophageal tumors extending inferiorly to the thorax by different beam arrangement. Overall, 15 patient cases with cancer of upper thoracic esophagus were selected for a retrospective treatment-planning study. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans using 4, 5, and 7 beams (4B, 5B, and 7B) were developed for each patient by direct machine parameter optimization (DMPO). All plans were evaluated with respect to dose volumes to irradiated targets and normal structures, with statistical comparisons made between 4B with 5B and 7B intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans. Differences among plans were evaluated using a two-tailed Friedman test at a statistical significance of p < 0.05. The maximum dose, average dose, and the conformity index (CI) of planning target volume 1 (PTV1) were similar for 3 plans for each case. No significant difference of coverage for planning target volume 1 and maximum dose for spinal cords were observed among 3 plans in present study (p > 0.05). The average V 5 , V 13 , V 20 , mean lung dose, and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) for the total lung were significantly lower in 4B-plans than those data in 5B-plans and 7B-plans (p < 0.01). Although the average V 30 for the total lung were significantly higher in 4B-plans than those in 5B-plans and 7B-plans (p < 0.05). In addition, when comparing with the 4B-plans, the conformity/heterogeneity index of the 5B- and 7B-plans were significantly superior (p < 0.05). The 4B-intensity-modulated radiation therapy plan has advantage to address the specialized problem of lung sparing to low- and intermediate-dose exposure in the thorax when dealing with relative long tumors extended inferiorly to the thoracic esophagus for upper esophageal carcinoma with the cost for less conformity. Studies are needed to compare the superiority of volumetric modulated arc therapy with intensity-modulated

  20. A Dosimetric Evaluation of Conventional Helmet Field Irradiation Versus Two-Field Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, James B.; Shiao, Stephen L.; Knisely, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To compare dosimetric differences between conventional two-beam helmet field irradiation (external beam radiotherapy, EBRT) of the brain and a two-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique. Methods and Materials: Ten patients who received helmet field irradiation at our institution were selected for study. External beam radiotherapy portals were planned per usual practice. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy fields were created using the identical field angles as the EBRT portals. Each brain was fully contoured along with the spinal cord to the bottom of the C2 vertebral body. This volume was then expanded symmetrically by 0.5 cm to construct the planning target volume. An IMRT plan was constructed using uniform optimization constraints. For both techniques, the nominal prescribed dose was 3,000 cGy in 10 fractions of 300 cGy using 6-MV photons. Comparative dose-volume histograms were generated for each patient and analyzed. Results: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy improved dose uniformity over EBRT for whole brain radiotherapy. The mean percentage of brain receiving >105% of dose was reduced from 29.3% with EBRT to 0.03% with IMRT. The mean maximum dose was reduced from 3,378 cGy (113%) for EBRT to 3,162 cGy (105%) with IMRT. The mean percent volume receiving at least 98% of the prescribed dose was 99.5% for the conventional technique and 100% for IMRT. Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy reduces dose inhomogeneity, particularly for the midline frontal lobe structures where hot spots occur with conventional two-field EBRT. More study needs to be done addressing the clinical implications of optimizing dose uniformity and its effect on long-term cognitive function in selected long-lived patients

  1. Carcinoma of the anal canal: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) versus three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT)

    OpenAIRE

    Sale, Charlotte; Moloney, Phillip; Mathlum, Maitham

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Patients with anal canal carcinoma treated with standard conformal radiotherapy frequently experience severe acute and late toxicity reactions to the treatment area. Roohipour et al. (Dis Colon Rectum 2008; 51: 147–53) stated a patient's tolerance of chemoradiation to be an important prediction of treatment success. A new intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique for anal carcinoma cases has been developed at the Andrew Love Cancer Centre aimed at reducing radiation ...

  2. Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) in the postoperative treatment of an adenocarcinoma of the endometrium complicated by a pelvic kidney

    OpenAIRE

    Castilho, Marcus S; Jacinto, Alexandre A; Viani, Gustavo A; Campana, Andre; Carvalho, Juliana; Ferrigno, Robson; Novaes, Paulo ERS; Fogaroli, Ricardo C; Salvajoli, Joao V

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Pelvic Radiotherapy (RT) as a postoperative treatment for endometrial cancer improves local regional control. Brachytherapy also improves vaginal control. Both treatments imply significant side effects that a fine RT technique can help avoiding. Intensity Modulated RT (IMRT) enables the treatment of the target volume while protecting normal tissue. It therefore reduces the incidence and severity of side effects. Case We report on a 50 year-old patient with a serous-papilif...

  3. A dosimetric comparison of two-phase adaptive intensity-modulated radiotherapy for locally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Chitapanarux, Imjai; Chomprasert, Kittisak; Nobnaop, Wannapa; Wanwilairat, Somsak; Tharavichitkul, Ekasit; Jakrabhandu, Somvilai; Onchan, Wimrak; Traisathit, Patrinee; Van Gestel, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the potential dosimetric benefits of a two-phase adaptive intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) protocol for patients with locally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC). A total of 17 patients with locally advanced NPC treated with IMRT had a second computed tomography (CT) scan after 17 fractions in order to apply and continue the treatment with an adapted plan after 20 fractions. To simulate the situation without adaptation, a hybrid plan w...

  4. Locoregional control after intensity-modulated radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma with an anatomy-based target definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Ariji, Takaki; Kameoka, Satoru

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate locoregional control after intensity-modulated radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal cancer using a target definition along with anatomical boundaries. Forty patients with biopsy-proven squamous cell or non-keratinizing carcinoma of the nasopharynx who underwent intensity-modulated radiotherapy between April 2006 and November 2009 were reviewed. There were 10 females and 30 males with a median age of 48 years (range, 17-74 years). More than half of the patients had T3/4 (n=21) and/or N2/3 (n=24) disease. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy was administered as 70 Gy/33 fractions with or without concomitant chemotherapy. The clinical target volume was contoured along with muscular fascia or periosteum, and the prescribed radiotherapy dose was determined for each anatomical compartment and lymph node level in the head and neck. One local recurrence was observed at Meckel's cave on the periphery of the high-risk clinical target volume receiving a total dose of <63 Gy. Otherwise, six locoregional failures were observed within irradiated volume receiving 70 Gy. Local and nodal control rates at 3 years were 91 and 89%, respectively. Adverse events were acceptable, and 25 (81%) of 31 patients who were alive without recurrence at 2 years had xerostomia of ≤ Grade 1. The overall survival rate at 3 years was 87%. Target definition along with anatomically defined boundaries was feasible without compromise of the therapeutic ratio. It is worth testing this method further to minimize the unnecessary irradiated volume and to standardize the target definition in intensity-modulated radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal cancer. (author)

  5. Reduced Acute Bowel Toxicity in Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuelian, Jason M.; Callister, Matthew D.; Ashman, Jonathan B.; Young-Fadok, Tonia M.; Borad, Mitesh J.; Gunderson, Leonard L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We have previously shown that intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can reduce dose to small bowel, bladder, and bone marrow compared with three-field conventional radiotherapy (CRT) technique in the treatment of rectal cancer. The purpose of this study was to review our experience using IMRT to treat rectal cancer and report patient clinical outcomes. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was conducted of patients with rectal cancer who were treated at Mayo Clinic Arizona with pelvic radiotherapy (RT). Data regarding patient and tumor characteristics, treatment, acute toxicity according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v 3.0, tumor response, and perioperative morbidity were collected. Results: From 2004 to August 2009, 92 consecutive patients were treated. Sixty-one (66%) patients were treated with CRT, and 31 (34%) patients were treated with IMRT. All but 2 patients received concurrent chemotherapy. There was no significant difference in median dose (50.4 Gy, CRT; 50 Gy, IMRT), preoperative vs. postoperative treatment, type of concurrent chemotherapy, or history of previous pelvic RT between the CRT and IMRT patient groups. Patients who received IMRT had significantly less gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. Sixty-two percent of patients undergoing CRT experienced ≥Grade 2 acute GI side effects, compared with 32% among IMRT patients (p = 0.006). The reduction in overall GI toxicity was attributable to fewer symptoms from the lower GI tract. Among CRT patients, ≥Grade 2 diarrhea and enteritis was experienced among 48% and 30% of patients, respectively, compared with 23% (p = 0.02) and 10% (p = 0.015) among IMRT patients. There was no significant difference in hematologic or genitourinary acute toxicity between groups. In addition, pathologic complete response rates and postoperative morbidity between treatment groups did not differ significantly. Conclusions: In the management of rectal cancer, IMRT is associated with a

  6. Examination of geometric and dosimetric accuracies of gated step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiersma, R. D.; Xing, L.

    2007-01-01

    Due to the complicated technical nature of gated radiation therapy, electronic and mechanical limitations may affect the precision of delivery. The purpose of this study is to investigate the geometric and dosimetric accuracies of gated step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiation treatments (SS-IMRT). Unique segmental MLC plans are designed, which allow quantitative testing of the gating process. Both ungated and gated deliveries are investigated for different dose sizes, dose rates, and gating window times using a commercial treatment system (Varian Trilogy) together with a respiratory gating system [Varian Real-Time Position Management system]. Radiographic film measurements are used to study the geometric accuracy, where it is found that with both ungated and gated SS-IMRT deliveries the MLC leaf divergence away from planned is less than or equal to the MLC specified leaf tolerance value for all leafs (leaf tolerance being settable from 0.5-5 mm). Nevertheless, due to the MLC controller design, failure to define a specific leaf tolerance value suitable to the SS-IMRT plan can lead to undesired geometric effects, such as leaf motion of up to the maximum 5 mm leaf tolerance value occurring after the beam is turned on. In this case, gating may be advantageous over the ungated case, as it allows more time for the MLC to reach the intended leaf configuration. The dosimetric precision of gated SS-IMRT is investigated using ionization chamber methods. Compared with the ungated case, it is found that gating generally leads to increased dosimetric errors due to the interruption of the ''overshoot phenomena.'' With gating the average timing deviation for intermediate segments is found to be 27 ms, compared to 18 ms for the ungated case. For a plan delivered at 600 MU/min this would correspond to an average segment dose error of ∼0.27 MU and ∼0.18 MU for gated and ungated deliveries, respectively. The maximum dosimetric errors for individual intermediate segments are

  7. Analytical incorporation of fractionation effects in probabilistic treatment planning for intensity-modulated proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Niklas; Hennig, Philipp; Wieser, Hans-Peter; Bangert, Mark

    2018-04-01

    We show that it is possible to explicitly incorporate fractionation effects into closed-form probabilistic treatment plan analysis and optimization for intensity-modulated proton therapy with analytical probabilistic modeling (APM). We study the impact of different fractionation schemes on the dosimetric uncertainty induced by random and systematic sources of range and setup uncertainty for treatment plans that were optimized with and without consideration of the number of treatment fractions. The APM framework is capable of handling arbitrarily correlated uncertainty models including systematic and random errors in the context of fractionation. On this basis, we construct an analytical dose variance computation pipeline that explicitly considers the number of treatment fractions for uncertainty quantitation and minimization during treatment planning. We evaluate the variance computation model in comparison to random sampling of 100 treatments for conventional and probabilistic treatment plans under different fractionation schemes (1, 5, 30 fractions) for an intracranial, a paraspinal and a prostate case. The impact of neglecting the fractionation scheme during treatment planning is investigated by applying treatment plans that were generated with probabilistic optimization for 1 fraction in a higher number of fractions and comparing them to the probabilistic plans optimized under explicit consideration of the number of fractions. APM enables the construction of an analytical variance computation model for dose uncertainty considering fractionation at negligible computational overhead. It is computationally feasible (a) to simultaneously perform a robustness analysis for all possible fraction numbers and (b) to perform a probabilistic treatment plan optimization for a specific fraction number. The incorporation of fractionation assumptions for robustness analysis exposes a dose to uncertainty trade-off, i.e., the dose in the organs at risk is increased for a

  8. Simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (SIB-IMRT) in nasopharyngeal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studer, Gabriela [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Hospital, Zurich (Switzerland); Peponi, Evangelia; Glanzmann, Christoph; Kunz, Guntram; Renner, Christoph; Tomuschat, Katja

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy and safety of using simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (SIB-IMRT) to treat nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) in a Caucasian cohort. Outcome was analyzed with respect to dose-volume histogram (DVH) values. Patients and Methods: Between 03/2002 and 01/2008, 39 NPC patients underwent SIB-IMRT (37 Caucasians; 31 males; mean age 53 years [16-78 years]). 41% presented with WHO (World Health Organization) type 1 unfavorable histology, 85% with stage III/IV disease. 19 patients had total gross tumor volume (GTV) 16-70 cm{sup 3} (mean 36 cm{sup 3}), while 16 had GTV > 70 cm{sup 3} (73-217 cm{sup 3}; mean 115 cm{sup 3}). All patients with stage II-IV disease received concomitant cisplatin. The prescribed SIB dose delivered to the planning target volume (PTV) was 70 Gy (2.00 Gy/fraction) in 17, 69.6 Gy (2.11 Gy/fraction) in 19, and 66 Gy (2.20 Gy/fraction) in three patients. Results: 3-year local relapse-free, nodal relapse-free, distant metastases-free, disease-free rates and overall survival were 86%, 89%, 85%, 72%, and 85% (median follow-up 30 months [8-71 months]). Histology was a significant prognostic factor concerning overall survival, with worst prognosis in WHO type 1 compared to type 2/3 (75% vs. 93%; p = 0.03). There was a trend in favor of WHO type 2/3 regarding local control (74% vs. 94%; p = 0.052). The PTV DVHs showed a slight left shift compared to reported series. Three patients developed grade 3 late effects (xerostomia [n=2], dysphagia [n=1], hearing loss [n=1]). Conclusion: In comparison with predominantly Asian NPC IMRT series in the literature, chemo-IMRT in the own Caucasian cohort, characterized by less radioresponsive WHO type 1, was equally effective. Treatment tolerance was excellent. (orig.)

  9. Treatment of Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma With Adjuvant or Definitive Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sher, David J., E-mail: dsher@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Thotakura, Vijaya [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Balboni, Tracy A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Norris, Charles M.; Haddad, Robert I.; Posner, Marshall R.; Lorch, Jochen [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Goguen, Laura A.; Annino, Donald J. [Department of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Tishler, Roy B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The optimal management of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OCSCC) typically involves surgical resection followed by adjuvant radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in the setting of adverse pathologic features. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is frequently used to treat oral cavity cancers, but published IMRT outcomes specific to this disease site are sparse. We report the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute experience with IMRT-based treatment for OCSCC. Methods and Materials: Retrospective study of all patients treated at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute for OCSCC with adjuvant or definitive IMRT between August 2004 and December 2009. The American Joint Committee on Cancer disease stage criteria distribution of this cohort included 5 patients (12%) with stage I; 10 patients (24%) with stage II (n = 10, 24%),; 14 patients (33%) with stage III (n = 14, 33%),; and 13 patients (31%) with stage IV. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS); secondary endpoints were locoregional control (LRC) and acute and chronic toxicity. Results: Forty-two patients with OCSCC were included, 30 of whom were initially treated with surgical resection. Twenty-three (77%) of 30 surgical patients treated with adjuvant IMRT also received concurrent chemotherapy, and 9 of 12 (75%) patients treated definitively without surgery were treated with CRT or induction chemotherapy and CRT. With a median follow-up of 2.1 years (interquartile range, 1.1-3.1 years) for all patients, the 2-year actuarial rates of OS and LRC following adjuvant IMRT were 85% and 91%, respectively, and the comparable results for definitive IMRT were 63% and 64% for OS and LRC, respectively. Only 1 patient developed symptomatic osteoradionecrosis, and among patients without evidence of disease, 35% experienced grade 2 to 3 late dysphagia, with only 1 patient who was continuously gastrostomy-dependent. Conclusions: In this single-institution series, postoperative IMRT was associated with promising LRC

  10. Cardiac avoidance in breast radiotherapy: a comparison of simple shielding techniques with intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landau, David; Adams, Elizabeth J.; Webb, Steve; Ross, Gillian

    2001-01-01

    Background and purpose: Adjuvant breast radiotherapy (RT) is now part of the routine care of patients with early breast cancer. However, analysis of the Early Breast Cancer Trialists' Collaborative suggests that patients with the lowest risk of dying of breast cancer are at significant risk of cardiac mortality due to longer relapse-free survival. Patients with a significant amount of heart in the high-dose volume have been shown to be at risk of fatal cardiac events. This study was designed to assess whether conformal planning or intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques allow reduced cardiac irradiation whilst maintaining full target coverage. Material and methods: Ten patients with early breast cancer were available for computed tomography (CT) planning. Each had at least 1 cm maximum heart depth within the posterior border of conventional tangents. For each patient, plans were generated and compared using dose volume histograms for planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk. The plans included conventional tangents with and without shielding. The shielding was designed to either completely spare the heart or to shield as much heart as possible without compromising PTV coverage. IMRT plans were also prepared using two- and four-field tangential and six-field arc-like beam arrangements. Results: PTV homogeneity was better for the tangential IMRT techniques. For all patients, cardiac irradiation was reduced by the addition of partial cardiac shielding to conventional tangents, without compromise of PTV coverage. The two- and four-field IMRT techniques also reduced heart doses. The average percentage volume of heart receiving >60% of the prescription dose was 4.4% (range 1.0-7.1%) for conventional tangents, 1.5% (0.2-3.9%) for partial shielding, 2.3% (0.5-4.6%) for the two-field IMRT technique and 2.2% (0.4-5.6%) for the four-field IMRT technique. For patients with larger maximum heart depths the four-field IMRT plan achieved greater heart sparing

  11. Temporary organ displacement coupled with image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy for paraspinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsoulakis, Evangelia; Thornton, Raymond H; Yamada, Yoshiya; Solomon, Stephen B; Maybody, Majid; Housman, Douglas; Niyazov, Greg; Riaz, Nadeem; Lovelock, Michael; Spratt, Daniel E; Erinjeri, Joseph P

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility and dosimetric improvements of a novel technique to temporarily displace critical structures in the pelvis and abdomen from tumor during high-dose radiotherapy. Between 2010 and 2012, 11 patients received high-dose image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy with temporary organ displacement (TOD) at our institution. In all cases, imaging revealed tumor abutting critical structures. An all-purpose drainage catheter was introduced between the gross tumor volume (GTV) and critical organs at risk (OAR) and infused with normal saline (NS) containing 5-10% iohexol. Radiation planning was performed with the displaced OARs and positional reproducibility was confirmed with cone-beam CT (CBCT). Patients were treated within 36 hours of catheter placement. Radiation plans were re-optimized using pre-TOD OARs to the same prescription and dosimetrically compared with post-TOD plans. A two-tailed permutation test was performed on each dosimetric measure. The bowel/rectum was displaced in six patients and kidney in four patients. One patient was excluded due to poor visualization of the OAR; thus 10 patients were analyzed. A mean of 229 ml (range, 80–1000) of NS 5-10% iohexol infusion resulted in OAR mean displacement of 17.5 mm (range, 7–32). The median dose prescribed was 2400 cGy in one fraction (range, 2100–3000 in 3 fractions). The mean GTV D min and PTV D min pre- and post-bowel TOD IG-IMRT dosimetry significantly increased from 1473 cGy to 2086 cGy (p=0.015) and 714 cGy to 1214 cGy (p=0.021), respectively. TOD increased mean PTV D95 by 27.14% of prescription (p=0.014) while the PTV D05 decreased by 9.2% (p=0.011). TOD of the bowel resulted in a 39% decrease in mean bowel D max (p=0.008) confirmed by CBCT. TOD of the kidney significantly decreased mean kidney dose and D max by 25% (0.022). TOD was well tolerated, reproducible, and facilitated dose escalation to previously radioresistant tumors abutting critical structures while

  12. Evaluation of xerostomia following intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seok Ho; Kim, Tae Hyun; Chie, Eui Kyu

    2004-01-01

    This study was done to evaluate xerostomia following intensity modulated radiotherapy for patients with head and neck cancer, and to analyze the correlation between the dosimetric parameters and xerostomia parameters. From February till October 2003, 13 patients with 3 months of follow-up were evaluated for xerostomia after being treated for head and neck cancer with IMRT. Their median age was 57 years (range:43 ∼ 77). Xerostomia were assessed with a 4-question xerostomia questionnaire score (XQS) and a test for salivary flow rates (unstimulated and stimulated). The patients were also given a validated LENT SOMA scale (LSC) questionnaire. The evaluations were completed before radiation therapy (pre-RT) and at 1 and. 3 months after radiation therapy (RT). We evaluated xerostomia at pre-RT, 1 and, 3 months after RT. The association between the xerostomia parameters (XQS and LSC) and salivary flow rates (unstimulated and stimulated: USFR and SSFR) was assessed at 1 and 3 months after RT. All 13 patients showed no significant changes in XQS, LSC and Salivary Flow rates. As a result, we couldn't find out about xerostomia development. Based on the total mean parotid dose, 3,500 cGy, we divided these patients into two groups. The 8 patients (< 3,500 cGy) showed no significant changes in XQS, LSC and Salivary Flow rates. However, in 5 patients (≥ 3,500 cGy), there was a significant increase in USFR and, SSFR at 3 months after RT, and for the XQS and, LSC at 1 and 3 months after RT. The correlation between XQS and, LSC, and USFR and, SSFR in all patients (13) was significant at 3 months after RT. The correlation had a tendency to the decrease for USFR and, SSFR in proportion to the increase of XQS and, LSC. Base on the results of this study, IMRT seem to be an effective treatment to significantly decrease the xerostomia. XQS and, LSC seem to be a effective tool for predicting the xerostomia. A total parotid gland mean dose of < 3,500 cGy should be a planning goal if

  13. Predictors of Dysgeusia in Patients With Oropharyngeal Cancer Treated With Chemotherapy and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapir, Eli [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Tao, Yebin [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Feng, Felix; Samuels, Stuart; El Naqa, Issam [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Murdoch-Kinch, Carol A. [School of Dentistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Feng, Mary [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Schipper, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Eisbruch, Avraham, E-mail: eisbruch@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Objective(s): Dysgeusia is a significant factor reducing quality of life and worsening dysphagia in patients receiving chemoradiation therapy for head and neck cancer. The factors affecting dysgeusia severity are uncertain. We investigated the effects on patient-reported dysgeusia of doses to the oral cavity, salivary output (required to dissolve food particles), and patient-reported xerostomia. Methods and Materials: Seventy-three patients with stage III to IV oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) (N=73) receiving definitive intensity modulated radiation therapy concurrently with chemotherapy participated in a prospective, longitudinal study of quality of life (QOL), including assessment of patient-reported gustatory function by taste-related questions from the Head and Neck QOL instrument (HNQOL) and the University of Washington Head and Neck-related QOL instrument (UWQOL), before therapy and periodically after treatment. At these intervals, patients also completed a validated xerostomia-specific questionnaire (XQ) and underwent unstimulated and stimulated major salivary gland flow rate measurements. Results: At 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after treatment, dysgeusia improved over time: severe dysgeusia was reported by 50%, 40%, 22%, and 23% of patients, respectively. Significant associations were found between patient-reported severe dysgeusia and radiation dose to the oral cavity (P=.005) and tongue (P=.019); normal tissue complication probability for severe dysgeusia at 3 months showed mean oral cavity D{sub 50} doses 53 Gy and 57 Gy in the HNQOL and WUQOL questionnaires, respectively, with curve slope (m) of 0.41. Measured salivary output was not statistically significantly correlated with severe taste dysfunction, whereas patient-reported XQ summary scores and xerostomia while eating scores were correlated with severe dysgeusia in the UWQOL tool (P=.04). Conclusions: Taste impairment is significantly correlated with mean radiation dose to the oral cavity. Patient

  14. Salivary Gland Tumors Treated With Adjuvant Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With or Without Concurrent Chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenfeld, Jonathan D., E-mail: jdschoenfeld@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, MA (United States); Sher, David J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Norris, Charles M. [Department of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Haddad, Robert I.; Posner, Marshall R. [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Balboni, Tracy A.; Tishler, Roy B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the recent single-institution experience of patients with salivary gland tumors who had undergone adjuvant intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), with or without concurrent chemotherapy. Patients and Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 35 salivary gland carcinoma patients treated primarily at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute between 2005 and 2010 with surgery and adjuvant IMRT. The primary endpoints were local control, progression-free survival, and overall survival. The secondary endpoints were acute and chronic toxicity. The median follow-up was 2.3 years (interquartile range, 1.2-2.8) among the surviving patients. Results: The histologic types included adenoid cystic carcinoma in 15 (43%), mucoepidermoid carcinoma in 6 (17%), adenocarcinoma in 3 (9%), acinic cell carcinoma in 3 (9%), and other in 8 (23%). The primary sites were the parotid gland in 17 (49%), submandibular glands in 6 (17%), tongue in 4 (11%), palate in 4 (11%), and other in 4 (11%). The median radiation dose was 66 Gy, and 22 patients (63%) received CRT. The most common chemotherapy regimen was carboplatin and paclitaxel (n = 14, 64%). A trend was seen for patients undergoing CRT to have more adverse prognostic factors, including Stage T3-T4 disease (CRT, n = 12, 55% vs. n = 4, 31%, p = .29), nodal positivity (CRT, n = 8, 36% vs. n = 1, 8%, p = .10), and positive margins (n = 13, 59% vs. n = 5, 38%, p = .30). One patient who had undergone CRT developed an in-field recurrence, resulting in an overall actuarial 3-year local control rate of 92%. Five patients (14%) developed distant metastases (1 who had undergone IMRT only and 4 who had undergone CRT). Acute Grade 3 mucositis, esophagitis, and dermatitis occurred in 8%, 8%, and 8% (1 each) of IMRT patients and in 18%, 5%, and 14% (4, 1, and 3 patients) of the CRT group, respectively. No acute Grade 4 toxicity occurred. The most common late toxicity was Grade 1 xerostomia (n = 8, 23%). Conclusions: Treatment of

  15. Targeting accuracy of single-isocenter intensity-modulated radiosurgery for multiple lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo-Ortega, J.F., E-mail: jfcdrr@yahoo.es; Pozo, M.; Moragues, S.; Casals, J.

    2017-07-01

    To investigate the targeting accuracy of intensity-modulated SRS (IMRS) plans designed to simultaneously treat multiple brain metastases with a single isocenter. A home-made acrylic phantom able to support a film (EBT3) in its coronal plane was used. The phantom was CT scanned and three coplanar small targets (a central and two peripheral) were outlined in the Eclipse system. Peripheral targets were 6 cm apart from the central one. A reference IMRS plan was designed to simultaneously treat the three targets, but only a single isocenter located at the center of the central target was used. After positioning the phantom on the linac using the room lasers, a CBCT scan was acquired and the reference plan were mapped on it, by placing the planned isocenter at the intersection of the landmarks used in the film showing the linac isocenter. The mapped plan was then recalculated and delivered. The film dose distribution was derived using a cloud computing application ( (www.radiochromic.com)) that uses a triple-channel dosimetry algorithm. Comparison of dose distributions using the gamma index (5%/1 mm) were performed over a 5 × 5 cm{sup 2} region centered over each target. 2D shifts required to get the best gamma passing rates on the peripheral target regions were compared with the reported ones for the central target. The experiment was repeated ten times in different sessions. Average 2D shifts required to achieve optimal gamma passing rates (99%, 97%, 99%) were 0.7 mm (SD: 0.3 mm), 0.8 mm (SD: 0.4 mm) and 0.8 mm (SD: 0.3 mm), for the central and the two peripheral targets, respectively. No statistical differences (p > 0.05) were found for targeting accuracy between the central and the two peripheral targets. The study revealed a targeting accuracy within 1 mm for off-isocenter targets within 6 cm of the linac isocenter, when a single-isocenter IMRS plan is designed.

  16. Particle swarm optimizer for weighting factor selection in intensity-modulated radiation therapy optimization algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Zhang, Pengcheng; Zhang, Liyuan; Shu, Huazhong; Li, Baosheng; Gui, Zhiguo

    2017-01-01

    In inverse treatment planning of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the objective function is typically the sum of the weighted sub-scores, where the weights indicate the importance of the sub-scores. To obtain a high-quality treatment plan, the planner manually adjusts the objective weights using a trial-and-error procedure until an acceptable plan is reached. In this work, a new particle swarm optimization (PSO) method which can adjust the weighting factors automatically was investigated to overcome the requirement of manual adjustment, thereby reducing the workload of the human planner and contributing to the development of a fully automated planning process. The proposed optimization method consists of three steps. (i) First, a swarm of weighting factors (i.e., particles) is initialized randomly in the search space, where each particle corresponds to a global objective function. (ii) Then, a plan optimization solver is employed to obtain the optimal solution for each particle, and the values of the evaluation functions used to determine the particle's location and the population global location for the PSO are calculated based on these results. (iii) Next, the weighting factors are updated based on the particle's location and the population global location. Step (ii) is performed alternately with step (iii) until the termination condition is reached. In this method, the evaluation function is a combination of several key points on the dose volume histograms. Furthermore, a perturbation strategy - the crossover and mutation operator hybrid approach - is employed to enhance the population diversity, and two arguments are applied to the evaluation function to improve the flexibility of the algorithm. In this study, the proposed method was used to develop IMRT treatment plans involving five unequally spaced 6MV photon beams for 10 prostate cancer cases. The proposed optimization algorithm yielded high-quality plans for all of the cases, without human

  17. Rules of parotid gland dose variations and shift during intensity modulated radiation therapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Wei; Yang, Haihua; Mi, Yucheng; Hu, Wei; Ding, Weijun; Xie, Youyou; Cai, Yujie; Chen, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    To determine the position and dose delivery changes rules of parotid gland (PG) during the course of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients (NPC). One hundred and forty one competed tomography (CT) images from 47 NPC patients (three images for each patient were acquired before treatment, at the 15th and 25th fraction during the treatment) who underwent radical IMRT were selected for this study. A total of 70-76Gy at 2.12–2.3 Gy/fraction/d was given to the GTVnx in 33 fractions. The distances between the lateral/medial aspects of PG and midline (DLM and DMM) at the level of odontoid process were measured. The dose differences between plan and actual delivery were calculated. The volume reductions of PGs between fractions 15 and 25 were larger than those in the first 15 fractions (4.68 ± 3.23 cc vs. 2.46 ± 4.55 cc for the right PG and 5.96 ± 2.99 cc vs. 2.06 ± 2.99 cc for the left PG). However, the percentage of gland volume receiving ≥30 Gy (V30) of bilateral PGs decreased more significantly in the first 15 fractions than that between fractions 15 and 25 (5.61 ± 16.04% vs. 1.14 ± 21.54% for the right PG and 6.87 ± 15.58% vs. 0.81 ± 15.94% for the left PG). The gross tumor volume of the nasopharynx (GTVnx) decreased more significantly in the first 15 fractions than that between the 15th and 25th fraction (8.23 ± 13.61 cc vs. 3.30 ± 8.09 cc). The DMM of ipsilateral PGs reduced in the first 15 fractions (0.80 ± 2.96 mm) but increased between fraction 15 and 25 (−2.19 ± 3.96 mm). While ipsilateral PG shifted into target volume but shifted out target volume between fraction 15 and 25. Parotid glands V30 was correlated with GTVnx, GTVnx reduction and DMM reduction (p < 0.01). Our results indicate that the reduction of GTVnx leads to the positional change of the parotid gland, which results in more significant dose change of the parotid gland in the first 15 fractions than that between fraction 15 and 25

  18. Including robustness in multi-criteria optimization for intensity-modulated proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Unkelbach, Jan; Trofimov, Alexei; Madden, Thomas; Kooy, Hanne; Bortfeld, Thomas; Craft, David

    2012-02-01

    We present a method to include robustness in a multi-criteria optimization (MCO) framework for intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT). The approach allows one to simultaneously explore the trade-off between different objectives as well as the trade-off between robustness and nominal plan quality. In MCO, a database of plans each emphasizing different treatment planning objectives, is pre-computed to approximate the Pareto surface. An IMPT treatment plan that strikes the best balance between the different objectives can be selected by navigating on the Pareto surface. In our approach, robustness is integrated into MCO by adding robustified objectives and constraints to the MCO problem. Uncertainties (or errors) of the robust problem are modeled by pre-calculated dose-influence matrices for a nominal scenario and a number of pre-defined error scenarios (shifted patient positions, proton beam undershoot and overshoot). Objectives and constraints can be defined for the nominal scenario, thus characterizing nominal plan quality. A robustified objective represents the worst objective function value that can be realized for any of the error scenarios and thus provides a measure of plan robustness. The optimization method is based on a linear projection solver and is capable of handling large problem sizes resulting from a fine dose grid resolution, many scenarios, and a large number of proton pencil beams. A base-of-skull case is used to demonstrate the robust optimization method. It is demonstrated that the robust optimization method reduces the sensitivity of the treatment plan to setup and range errors to a degree that is not achieved by a safety margin approach. A chordoma case is analyzed in more detail to demonstrate the involved trade-offs between target underdose and brainstem sparing as well as robustness and nominal plan quality. The latter illustrates the advantage of MCO in the context of robust planning. For all cases examined, the robust optimization for

  19. Postoperative Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in High Risk Prostate Cancer: A Dosimetric Comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Digesu, Cinzia; Cilla, Savino; De Gaetano, Andrea; Massaccesi, Mariangela; Macchia, Gabriella; Ippolito, Edy; Deodato, Francesco; Panunzi, Simona; Iapalucci, Chiara; Mattiucci, Gian Carlo; D'Angelo, Elisa; Padula, Gilbert D.A.; Valentini, Vincenzo; Cellini, Numa

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with 3D conformal technique (3D-CRT), with respect to target coverage and irradiation of organs at risk for high dose postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) of the prostate fossa. 3D-CRT and IMRT treatment plans were compared with respect to dose to the rectum and bladder. The dosimetric comparison was carried out in 15 patients considering 2 different scenarios: (1) exclusive prostate fossa irradiation, and (2) pelvic node irradiation followed by a boost on the prostate fossa. In scenario (1), a 3D-CRT plan (box technique) and an IMRT plan were calculated and compared for each patient. In scenario (2), 3 treatment plans were calculated and compared for each patient: (a) 3D-CRT box technique for both pelvic (prophylactic nodal irradiation) and prostate fossa irradiation (3D-CRT only); (b) 3D-CRT box technique for pelvic irradiation followed by an IMRT boost to the prostatic fossa (hybrid 3D-CRT and IMRT); and (c) IMRT for both pelvic and prostate fossa irradiation (IMRT only). For exclusive prostate fossa irradiation, IMRT significantly reduced the dose to the rectum (lower Dmean, V50%, V75%, V90%, V100%, EUD, and NTCP) and the bladder (lower Dmean, V50%, V90%, EUD and NTCP). When prophylactic irradiation of the pelvis was also considered, plan C (IMRT only) performed better than plan B (hybrid 3D-CRT and IMRT) as respect to both rectum and bladder irradiation (reduction of Dmean, V50%, V75%, V90%, equivalent uniform dose [EUD], and normal tissue complication probability [NTCP]). Plan (b) (hybrid 3D-CRT and IMRT) performed better than plan (a) (3D-CRT only) with respect to dose to the rectum (lower Dmean, V75%, V90%, V100%, EUD, and NTCP) and the bladder (Dmean, EUD, and NTCP). Postoperative IMRT in prostate cancer significantly reduces rectum and bladder irradiation compared with 3D-CRT.

  20. Disease Control After Reduced Volume Conformal and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Childhood Craniopharyngioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchant, Thomas E., E-mail: thomas.merchant@stjude.org [St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Radiological Sciences, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Kun, Larry E.; Hua, Chia-Ho [St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Radiological Sciences, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Wu, Shengjie; Xiong, Xiaoping [St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Biostatistics, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Sanford, Robert A.; Boop, Frederick A. [Semmes Murphey Neurologic and Spine Institute, Neurosurgery, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To estimate the rate of disease control after conformal radiation therapy using reduced clinical target volume (CTV) margins and to determine factors that predict for tumor progression. Methods and Materials: Eighty-eight children (median age, 8.5 years; range, 3.2-17.6 years) received conformal or intensity modulated radiation therapy between 1998 and 2009. The study group included those prospectively treated from 1998 to 2003, using a 10-mm CTV, defined as the margin surrounding the solid and cystic tumor targeted to receive the prescription dose of 54 Gy. The CTV margin was subsequently reduced after 2003, yielding 2 groups of patients: those treated with a CTV margin greater than 5 mm (n=26) and those treated with a CTV margin less than or equal to 5 mm (n=62). Disease progression was estimated on the basis of additional variables including sex, race, extent of resection, tumor interventions, target volume margins, and frequency of weekly surveillance magnetic resonance (MR) imaging during radiation therapy. Median follow-up was 5 years. Results: There was no difference between progression-free survival rates based on CTV margins (>5 mm vs ≤5 mm) at 5 years (88.1% ± 6.3% vs 96.2% ± 4.4% [P=.6386]). There were no differences based on planning target volume (PTV) margins (or combined CTV plus PTV margins). The PTV was systematically reduced from 5 to 3 mm during the time period of the study. Factors predictive of superior progression-free survival included Caucasian race (P=.0175), no requirement for cerebrospinal fluid shunting (P=.0066), and number of surveillance imaging studies during treatment (P=.0216). Patients whose treatment protocol included a higher number of weekly surveillance MR imaging evaluations had a lower rate of tumor progression. Conclusions: These results suggest that targeted volume reductions for radiation therapy using smaller margins are feasible and safe but require careful monitoring. We are currently investigating

  1. Treatment planning, optimization, and beam delivery technqiues for intensity modulated proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengbusch, Evan R.

    , beamlet weight, the number of delivered beamlets, and the number of delivery angles. These methods are evaluated via treatment planning studies including left-sided whole breast irradiation, lung stereotactic body radiotherapy, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and whole brain radiotherapy with hippocampal avoidance. Improvements in efficiency and efficacy relative to traditional proton therapy and intensity modulated photon radiation therapy are discussed.

  2. A comparison of conformal and intensity-modulated techniques for oesophageal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nutting, Christopher M.; Bedford, James L.; Cosgrove, Vivian P.; Tait, Diana M.; Dearnaley, David P.; Webb, Steve

    2001-01-01

    Background and purpose: To investigate the potential of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to reduce lung irradiation in the treatment of oesophageal carcinoma with radical radiotherapy. Materials and methods: A treatment planning study was performed to compare two-phase conformal radiotherapy (CFRT) with IMRT in five patients. The CFRT plans consisted of anterior, posterior and bilateral posterior oblique fields, while the IMRT plans consisted of either nine equispaced fields (9F), or four fields (4F) with orientations equal to the CFRT plans. IMRT plans with seven, five or three equispaced fields were also investigated in one patient. Treatment plans were compared using dose-volume histograms and normal tissue complication probabilities. Results: The 9F IMRT plan was unable to improve on the homogeneity of dose to the planning target volume (PTV), compared with the CFRT plan (dose range, 16.9±4.5 (1 SD) vs. 12.4±3.9%; P=0.06). Similarly, the 9F IMRT plan was unable to reduce the mean lung dose (11.7±3.2 vs. 11.0±2.9 Gy; P=0.2). Similar results were obtained for seven, five and three equispaced fields in the single patient studied. The 4F IMRT plan provided comparable PTV dose homogeneity with the CFRT plan (11.8±3.3 vs. 12.4±3.9%; P=0.6), with reduced mean lung dose (9.5±2.3 vs 11.0±2.9 Gy; P=0.001). Conclusions: IMRT using nine equispaced fields provided no improvement over CFRT. This was because the larger number of fields in the IMRT plan distributed a low dose over the entire lung. In contrast, IMRT using four fields equal to the CFRT fields offered an improvement in lung sparing. Thus, IMRT with a few carefully chosen field directions may lead to a modest reduction in pneumonitis, or allow tumour dose escalation within the currently accepted lung toxicity

  3. Robustness Recipes for Minimax Robust Optimization in Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Oropharyngeal Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voort, Sebastian van der [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Section of Nuclear Energy and Radiation Applications, Department of Radiation, Science and Technology, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Water, Steven van de [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Perkó, Zoltán [Section of Nuclear Energy and Radiation Applications, Department of Radiation, Science and Technology, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Heijmen, Ben [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Lathouwers, Danny [Section of Nuclear Energy and Radiation Applications, Department of Radiation, Science and Technology, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Hoogeman, Mischa, E-mail: m.hoogeman@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: We aimed to derive a “robustness recipe” giving the range robustness (RR) and setup robustness (SR) settings (ie, the error values) that ensur