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Sample records for aperture grb observatory

  1. The Large Aperture GRB Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Allard, D; Asorey, H; Barros, H; Bertou, X; Castillo, M; Chirinos, J M; De Castro, A; Flores, S; González, J; Berisso, M Gomez; Grajales, J; Guada, C; Day, W R Guevara; Ishitsuka, J; López, J A; Martínez, O; Melfo, A; Meza, E; Loza, P Miranda; Barbosa, E Moreno; Murrugarra, C; Núñez, L A; Ormachea, L J Otiniano; Pérez, G; Perez, Y; Ponce, E; Quispe, J; Quintero, C; Rivera, H; Rosales, M; Rovero, A C; Saavedra, O; Salazar, H; Tello, J C; Peralda, R Ticona; Varela, E; Velarde, A; Villaseñor, L; Wahl, D; Zamalloa, M A

    2009-01-01

    The Large Aperture GRB Observatory (LAGO) is aiming at the detection of the high energy (around 100 GeV) component of Gamma Ray Bursts, using the single particle technique in arrays of Water Cherenkov Detectors (WCD) in high mountain sites (Chacaltaya, Bolivia, 5300 m a.s.l., Pico Espejo, Venezuela, 4750 m a.s.l., Sierra Negra, Mexico, 4650 m a.s.l). WCD at high altitude offer a unique possibility of detecting low gamma fluxes in the 10 GeV - 1 TeV range. The status of the Observatory and data collected from 2007 to date will be presented.

  2. LAGOVirtual: A Collaborative Environment for the Large Aperture GRB Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Camacho, R; Diaz, G; Guada, C; Hamar, V; Hoeger, H; Melfo, A; Nunez, L A; Perez, Y; Quintero, C; Rosales, M; Torrens, R

    2009-01-01

    We present the LAGOVirtual Project: an ongoing project to develop platform to collaborate in the Large Aperture GRB Observatory (LAGO). This continental-wide observatory is devised to detect high energy (around 100 GeV) component of Gamma Ray Bursts, by using the single particle technique in arrays of Water Cherenkov Detectors (WCD) at high mountain sites (Chacaltaya, Bolivia, 5300 m a.s.l., Pico Espejo, Venezuela, 4750 m a.s.l., Sierra Negra, Mexico, 4650 m a.s.l). This platform will allow LAGO collaboration to share data, and computer resources through its different sites. This environment has the possibility to generate synthetic data by simulating the showers through AIRES application and to store/preserve distributed data files collected by the WCD at the LAGO sites. The present article concerns the implementation of a prototype of LAGO-DR adapting DSpace, with a hierarchical structure (i.e. country, institution, followed by collections that contain the metadata and data files), for the captured/simulate...

  3. Operating Water Cherenkov Detectors in high altitude sites for the Large Aperture GRB Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Allard, D; Asorey, H; Barros, H; Bertou, X; Castillo, M; Chirinos, J M; De Castro, A; Flores, S; González, J; Berisso, M Gomez; Grajales, J; Guada, C; Day, W R Guevara; Ishitsuka, J; López, J A; Martínez, O; Melfo, A; Meza, E; Loza, P Miranda; Barbosa, E Moreno; Murrugarra, C; Núñez, L A; Ormachea, L J Otiniano; Pérez, G; Perez, Y; Ponce, E; Quispe, J; Quintero, C; Rivera, H; Rosales, M; Rovero, A C; Saavedra, O; Salazar, H; Tello, J C; Peralda, R Ticona; Varela, E; Velarde, A; Villaseñor, L; Wahl, D; Zamalloa, M A

    2009-01-01

    Water Cherenkov Detectors (WCD) are efficient detectors for detecting GRBs in the 10 GeV - 1 TeV energy range using the single particle technique, given their sensitivity to low energy secondary photons produced by high energy photons when cascading in the atmosphere. The Large Aperture GRB Observatory (LAGO) operates arrays of WCD in high altitude sites (above 4500 m a.s.l.) in Bolivia, Mexico and Venezuela, with planned extension to Peru. Details on the operation and stability of these WCD in remote sites with high background rates of particles will be detailed, and compared to simulations. Specific issues due to operation at high altitude, atmospheric effects and solar activity, as well as possible hardware enhancements will also be presented.

  4. Use of water-Cherenkov detectors to detect Gamma Ray Bursts at the Large Aperture GRB Observatory (LAGO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Large Aperture GRB Observatory (LAGO) project aims at the detection of high energy photons from Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB) using the single particle technique in ground-based water-Cherenkov detectors (WCD). To reach a reasonable sensitivity, high altitude mountain sites have been selected in Mexico (Sierra Negra, 4550 m a.s.l.), Bolivia (Chacaltaya, 5300 m a.s.l.) and Venezuela (Merida, 4765 m a.s.l.). We report on detector calibration and operation at high altitude, search for bursts in 4 months of preliminary data, as well as search for signal at ground level when satellites report a burst

  5. Calibration and Simulation of the GRB trigger detector of the Ultra Fast Flash Observatory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, M.-H.A.; Ahmad, S.; Barrillon, P.;

    2013-01-01

    The UFFO (Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory) is a GRB detector on board the Lomonosov satellite, to be launched in 2013. The GRB trigger is provided by an X-ray detector, called UBAT (UFFO Burst Alarm & Trigger Telescope), which detects X-rays from the GRB and then triggers to determine the direction ...

  6. A GRB Follow-up System at the Xinglong Observatory and Detection of the High-Redshift GRB 060927

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, W; Zhai, M; Xin, L; Qiu, Y; Wang, J; Lü, X; Wei, J; Hu, J; 10.1088/1009-9271/8/6/08

    2009-01-01

    A gamma-ray burst (GRB) optical photometric follow-up system at the Xinglong Observatory of National Astronomical Observatories of China (NAOC) has been constructed. It uses the 0.8-m Tsinghua-NAOC Telescope (TNT) and the 1-m EST telescope, and can automatically respond to GRB Coordinates Network (GCN)alerts. Both telescopes slew relatively fast, being able to point to a new target field within about 1 min upon a request. Whenever available, the 2.16-m NAOC telescope is also used. In 2006, the system responded to 15 GRBs and detected seven early afterglows. In 2007, six GRBs have been detected among 18 follow-up observations. TNT observations of the second most distant GRB 060927 (z=5.5) are shown, which started as early as 91s after the GRB trigger. The afterglow was detected in the combined image of first 19x20s unfiltered exposures. This GRB follow-up system has joined the East-Asia GRB Follow-up Observation Network (EAFON).

  7. A method for searching the Whipple Observatory gamma ray data base for evidence of GRB's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In light of recent Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) data from GRO, it is desirable to have a method for searching data from the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory 10 meter Cherenkov telescope for evidence of GRB's at TeV energies. In particular, this instrument's narrow field of view and high angular resolution make it well suited for observations of M31 as a test of the galactic halo model of GRB origin. We present here such a method, and give the results of its application to data taken on M31. Also reported here is an upper limit for the detection of a DC signal from M31

  8. Aperture calculation of the Pierre Auger Observatory surface detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Armengaud, E.; Aublin, J.; Bertou, Xavier; Chou, A.; Ghia, P.L.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Hamilton, J.C.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Medina, C.; Navarra, G.; Parizot, E.; Tripathi, A.

    2005-08-01

    We determine the instantaneous aperture and integrated exposure of the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory, taking into account the trigger efficiency as a function of the energy, arrival direction (with zenith angle lower than 60 degrees) and nature of the primary cosmic-ray. We make use of the so-called Lateral Trigger Probability function (or LTP) associated with an extensive air shower, which summarizes all the relevant information about the physics of the shower, the water tank Cherenkov detector, and the triggers.

  9. Search for gamma-rays from the unusually bright GRB 130427A with the HAWC Gamma-ray Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Solares, H A Ayala; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; BenZvi, S Y; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carramiñana, A; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De León, C; DeYoung, T; Hernandez, R Diaz; Dingus, B L; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Gussert, M; Hampel-Arias, Z; Harding, J P; Hui, C M; Hüntemeyer, P; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Lara, A; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H León; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-García, R; Malone, K; Marinelli, A; Marinelli, S S; Martinez, H; Martinez, O; Martínez-Castro, J; Matthews, J A J; Torres, E Mendoza; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostafá, M; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T O; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Ponce, E; Pretz, J; Pérez-Pérez, E G; Rivière, C; Rosa-González, D; Salazar, H; Greus, F Salesa; Sandoval, A; Schneider, M; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Woodle, K Sparks; Springer, R W; Taboada, I; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Villaseñor, L; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H; Álvarez, J D

    2014-01-01

    The long gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130427A was the most powerful burst ever detected with a redshift $z\\lesssim0.5$, featuring the highest energy photon so far detected from a GRB and the longest lasting emission above 100 MeV. The HAWC Gamma-ray Observatory is a new extensive air shower detector currently under construction in central Mexico. It features two data acquisition (DAQ) systems - one designed to readout full air-shower events (main DAQ) and the other one counting the signals in each photomultiplier tube (scaler DAQ). The burst occurred at a zenith angle of $57^\\circ$, when HAWC was running 10% of the final detector and collecting data with the scaler DAQ only. Based on the observed light curve at MeV-GeV energies, 8 different time periods have been searched for prompt and delayed emission from this GRB. In all cases, no statistically significant excess of counts has been found and upper limits have been placed. It is shown that a similar GRB close to zenith would be easily detected by the full HAWC de...

  10. SEARCH FOR GAMMA-RAYS FROM THE UNUSUALLY BRIGHT GRB 130427A WITH THE HAWC GAMMA-RAY OBSERVATORY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first limits on the prompt emission from the long gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130427A in the >100 GeV energy band are reported. GRB 130427A was the most powerful burst ever detected with a redshift z ≲ 0.5 and featured the longest lasting emission above 100 MeV. The energy spectrum extends at least up to 95 GeV, clearly in the range observable by the High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Gamma-Ray Observatory, a new extensive air shower detector currently under construction in central Mexico. The burst occurred under unfavorable observation conditions, low in the sky and when HAWC was running 10% of the final detector. Based on the observed light curve at MeV-GeV energies, eight different time periods have been searched for prompt and delayed emission from this GRB. In all cases, no statistically significant excess of counts has been found and upper limits have been placed. It is shown that a similar GRB close to zenith would be easily detected by the full HAWC detector, which will be completed soon. The detection rate of the full HAWC detector may be as high as one to two GRBs per year. A detection could provide important information regarding the high energy processes at work and the observation of a possible cut-off beyond the Fermi Large Area Telescope energy range could be the signature of gamma-ray absorption, either in the GRB or along the line of sight due to the extragalactic background light

  11. SEARCH FOR GAMMA-RAYS FROM THE UNUSUALLY BRIGHT GRB 130427A WITH THE HAWC GAMMA-RAY OBSERVATORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abeysekara, A. U. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Alfaro, R. [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México D. F. (Mexico); Alvarez, C.; Arceo, R. [CEFyMAP, Universidad Autónoma de Chiapas, Tuxtla Gutiérrez, Chiapas (Mexico); Álvarez, J. D.; Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Cotti, U.; De León, C. [Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Solares, H. A. Ayala [Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI (United States); Barber, A. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Baughman, B. M.; Braun, J. [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Bautista-Elivar, N. [Universidad Politécnica de Pachuca, Municipio de Zempoala, Hidalgo (Mexico); BenZvi, S. Y. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Rosales, M. Bonilla; Carramiñana, A. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica, Tonantzintla, Puebla (Mexico); Caballero-Mora, K. S. [Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México D. F. (Mexico); Castillo, M.; Cotzomi, J. [Facultad de Ciencias Físico Matemáticas, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Ciudad Universitaria, Puebla (Mexico); De la Fuente, E., E-mail: dirk.lennarz@gatech.edu [Departamento de Física, Centro Universitario de Ciencias Exactas e Ingenierías, Universidad de Guadalajara, Guadalajara (Mexico); Collaboration: HAWC collaboration; and others

    2015-02-20

    The first limits on the prompt emission from the long gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130427A in the >100 GeV energy band are reported. GRB 130427A was the most powerful burst ever detected with a redshift z ≲ 0.5 and featured the longest lasting emission above 100 MeV. The energy spectrum extends at least up to 95 GeV, clearly in the range observable by the High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Gamma-Ray Observatory, a new extensive air shower detector currently under construction in central Mexico. The burst occurred under unfavorable observation conditions, low in the sky and when HAWC was running 10% of the final detector. Based on the observed light curve at MeV-GeV energies, eight different time periods have been searched for prompt and delayed emission from this GRB. In all cases, no statistically significant excess of counts has been found and upper limits have been placed. It is shown that a similar GRB close to zenith would be easily detected by the full HAWC detector, which will be completed soon. The detection rate of the full HAWC detector may be as high as one to two GRBs per year. A detection could provide important information regarding the high energy processes at work and the observation of a possible cut-off beyond the Fermi Large Area Telescope energy range could be the signature of gamma-ray absorption, either in the GRB or along the line of sight due to the extragalactic background light.

  12. An Engineering Design Reference Mission for a Future Large-Aperture UVOIR Space Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thronson, Harley A.; Bolcar, Matthew R.; Clampin, Mark; Crooke, Julie A.; Redding, David; Rioux, Norman; Stahl, H. Philip

    2016-01-01

    From the 2010 NRC Decadal Survey and the NASA Thirty-Year Roadmap, Enduring Quests, Daring Visions, to the recent AURA report, From Cosmic Birth to Living Earths, multiple community assessments have recommended development of a large-aperture UVOIR space observatory capable of achieving a broad range of compelling scientific goals. Of these priority science goals, the most technically challenging is the search for spectroscopic biomarkers in the atmospheres of exoplanets in the solar neighborhood. Here we present an engineering design reference mission (EDRM) for the Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST), which was conceived from the start as capable of breakthrough science paired with an emphasis on cost control and cost effectiveness. An EDRM allows the engineering design trade space to be explored in depth to determine what are the most demanding requirements and where there are opportunities for margin against requirements. Our joint NASA GSFC/JPL/MSFC/STScI study team has used community-provided science goals to derive mission needs, requirements, and candidate mission architectures for a future large-aperture, non-cryogenic UVOIR space observatory. The ATLAST observatory is designed to operate at a Sun-Earth L2 orbit, which provides a stable thermal environment and excellent field of regard. Our reference designs have emphasized a serviceable 36-segment 9.2 m aperture telescope that stows within a five-meter diameter launch vehicle fairing. As part of our cost-management effort, this particular reference mission builds upon the engineering design for JWST. Moreover, it is scalable to a variety of launch vehicle fairings. Performance needs developed under the study are traceable to a variety of additional reference designs, including options for a monolithic primary mirror.

  13. A Future Large-Aperture UVOIR Space Observatory: Key Technologies and Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolcar, Matthew Ryan; Stahle, Carl M.; Balasubramaniam, Kunjithapatham; Clampin, Mark; Feinberg, Lee D.; Mosier, Gary E.; Quijada, Manuel A.; Rauscher, Bernard J.; Redding, David C.; Rioux, Norman M.; Shaklan, Stuart B.; Stahl, H. Philip; Thronson, Harley A.

    2015-01-01

    We present the key technologies and capabilities that will enable a future, large-aperture ultravioletopticalinfrared (UVOIR) space observatory. These include starlight suppression systems, vibration isolation and control systems, lightweight mirror segments, detector systems, and mirror coatings. These capabilities will provide major advances over current and near-future observatories for sensitivity, angular resolution, and starlight suppression. The goals adopted in our study for the starlight suppression system are 10-10 contrast with an inner working angle of 20 milliarcsec and broad bandpass. We estimate that a vibration and isolation control system that achieves a total system vibration isolation of 140 dB for a vibration-isolated mass of 5000 kg is required to achieve the high wavefront error stability needed for exoplanet coronagraphy. Technology challenges for lightweight mirror segments include diffraction-limited optical quality and high wavefront error stability as well as low cost, low mass, and rapid fabrication. Key challenges for the detector systems include visible-blind, high quantum efficiency UV arrays, photon counting visible and NIR arrays for coronagraphic spectroscopy and starlight wavefront sensing and control, and detectors with deep full wells with low persistence and radiation tolerance to enable transit imaging and spectroscopy at all wavelengths. Finally, mirror coatings with high reflectivity ( 90), high uniformity ( 1) and low polarization ( 1) that are scalable to large diameter mirror substrates will be essential for ensuring that both high throughput UV observations and high contrast observations can be performed by the same observatory.

  14. Apertures

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, R C

    2014-01-01

    Microwave Scanning Antennas, Volume I: Apertures is a comprehensive account of phased arrays, multiple beam arrays, time domain and synthetic apertures, and adaptive antennas. Advances in continuous apertures and near field theory are discussed. Low noise and monopulse apertures, optical scanners, and large radomes are also covered, along with radio astronomy instruments and associated theory.Comprised of five chapters, this volume begins with an overview of aperture theory as well as aperture distributions and near field theory. The second and third chapters deal with mechanically steered and

  15. CALISTO - A Novel Architecture for the Single Aperture Far Infrared Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Daniel F.; Goldsmith, P.; Benford, D.

    2007-12-01

    Following the success of Spitzer, and in expectation of success with JWST and Herschel, the astronomical community is looking ahead to a large aperture far infrared mission that can build on the scientific results of these missions. This expectation was formalized by the 2000 Decadal recommendation for design studies on a SAFIR - a single aperture far infrared observatory. A JWST-inspired architecture for SAFIR was considered in a Vision Mission study several years ago. We present here a exciting new architecture for this important mission that offers several advantages. This CALISTO (Cryogenic Far-Infrared/Submillimeter Observatory) architecture, originally developed by JPL, builds on the thermally optimized passive cooling design of the Vision Mission version of SAFIR, and focal plane instrument strategies as well, but is based on a 4x6m ellipsoidal primary that greatly simplifies deployment out of an ELV launch shroud. Used off-axis, this design is much less affected by scattered (e.g. galactic plane and ZODI) emission than previous architectures, providing astronomical background-limited facility over much of the sky. Technologies for such a large mirror, diffraction-limited at 20µm, are now becoming credible. Using the large focal plane to host envisioned large format sensor arrays operating with high spatial resolution, CALISTO will resolve the far infrared extragalactic background, and trace the chemical evolution of galaxies. Simple models suggest that detection of the first structure in the universe, marked by cooling primordial clouds of molecular hydrogen at high z, may be achievable with such a telescope. Further building on the work of Spitzer, CALISTO will trace the development of planetary systems, probing the inner structure of star forming disks, and reveal the structure of nearby solar systems using the structure of debris disks that surround them. We review in this paper the science goals and engineering challenges for this mission.

  16. The Swift GRB Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil; Chincarini, Guido

    2004-01-01

    Swift is a MIDEX mission that is in development for launch in October 2004. It is a multiwavelength transient observatory for GRB astronomy. The goals of the mission are to determine the origin of GRBs and their afterglows and use bursts to probe the early Universe. A wide-field gamma-ray camera will detect mare than 100 GRBs per year to -3 times fainter than BATSE. Sensitive narrow-field X-ray and UV/optical telescopes will be pointed at the burst location in 20 to 75 sec by an autonomously controlled spacecraft. Far each burst, aresec positions will be determined and optical/UV/X-ray/gamma-say spectrophotometry performed. Measurements of redshift will be made for many burstes. The instrumentation is a combination of superb existing flight-spare hardware and design from XMM and Spectrum-X/JET-X contributed by collaborators in the UK and Italy and development of a coded-aperture camera with a large-area (approx. 0.5 square meter) CdZnTe detector array. Key components of the mission are vigorous follow-up and outreach programs to engage the astronomical community and public in Swift. The talk vi11 describe the mission statue and give a summary of plans for GRB operations. It is likely that Swift will have just been launched at the time of the conference.

  17. Trigger and aperture of the surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Boháčová, Martina; Chudoba, Jiří; Kárová, Tatiana; Mandát, Dušan; Nečesal, Petr; Nožka, Libor; Nyklíček, Michal; Palatka, Miroslav; Pech, Miroslav; Prouza, Michael; Řídký, Jan; Schovancová, Jaroslava; Schovánek, Petr; Šmída, Radomír; Trávníček, Petr

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 613, č. 1 (2010), s. 29-39. ISSN 0168-9002 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC527; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06002; GA AV ČR KJB100100904; GA AV ČR KJB300100801; GA MŠk(CZ) LA08016 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502; CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : cosmic rays * trigger * Pierre Auger Observatory Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 1.142, year: 2010

  18. Trigger and Aperture of the Surface Detector Array of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Abraham, J; Aglietta, M; Aguirre, C; Ahn, E J; Allard, D; Allekotte, I; Allen, J; Alvarez-Muñiz, J; Ambrosio, M; Anchordoqui, L; Andringa, S; Anzalone, A; Aramo, C; Arganda, E; Argirò, S; Arisaka, K; Arneodo, F; Arqueros, F; Asch, T; Asorey, H; Assis, P; Aublin, J; Ave, M; Avila, G; Bäcker, T; Badagnani, D; Barber, K B; Barbosa, A F; Barroso, S L C; Baughman, B; Bauleo, P; Beatty, J J; Beau, T; Becker, B R; Becker, K H; Bellétoile, A; Bellido, J A; BenZvi, S; Berat, C; Bernardini, P; Bertou, X; Biermann, P L; Billoir, P; Blanch-Bigas, O; Blanco, F; Bleve, C; Blümer, H; Boháčová, M; Boncioli, D; Bonifazi, C; Bonino, R; Borodai, N; Brack, J; Brogueira, P; Brown, W C; Bruijn, R; Buchholz, P; Bueno, A; Burton, R E; Busca, N G; Caballero-Mora, K S; Caramete, L; Caruso, R; Carvalho, W; Castellina, A; Catalano, O; Cazon, L; Cester, R; Chauvin, J; Chiavassa, A; Chinellato, J A; Chou, A; Chudoba, J; Chye, J; Clay, R W; Colombo, E; Conceição, R; Connolly, B; Contreras, F; Coppens, J; Cordier, A; Cotti, U; Coutu, S; Covault, C E; Creusot, A; Criss, A; Cronin, J; Curutiu, A; Dagoret-Campagne, S; Dallier, R; Daumiller, K; Dawson, B R; de Almeida, R M; De Domenico, M; De Donato, C; de Jong, S J; De La Vega, G; Junior, W J M de Mello; Neto, J R T de Mello; De Mitri, I; de Souza, V; de Vries, K D; Decerprit, G; del Peral, L; Deligny, O; Della Selva, A; Fratte, C Delle; Dembinski, H; Di Giulio, C; Diaz, J C; Diep, P N; Dobrigkeit, C; D'Olivo, J C; Dong, P N; Dorofeev, A; Anjos, J C dos; Dova, M T; D'Urso, D; Dutan, I; DuVernois, M A; Engel, R; Erdmann, M; Escobar, C O; Etchegoyen, A; Luis, P Facal San; Falcke, H; Farrar, G; Fauth, A C; Fazzini, N; Ferrer, F; Ferrero, A; Fick, B; Filevich, A; Filipčič, A; Fleck, I; Fliescher, S; Fracchiolla, C E; Fraenkel, E D; Fulgione, W; Gamarra, R F; Gambetta, S; García, B; Gámez, D García; Garcia-Pinto, D; Garrido, X; Gelmini, G; Gemmeke, H; Ghia, P L; Giaccari, U; Giller, M; Glass, H; Goggin, L M; Gold, M S; Golup, G; Albarracin, F Gomez; Berisso, M Gómez; Gonçalves, P; Amaral, M Gonçalves do; Gonzalez, D; Gonzalez, J G; Góra, D; Gorgi, A; Gouffon, P; Gozzini, S R; Grashorn, E; Grebe, S; Grigat, M; Grillo, A F; Guardincerri, Y; Guarino, F; Guedes, G P; Gutiérrez, J; Hague, J D; Halenka, V; Hansen, P; Harari, D; Harmsma, S; Harton, J L; Haungs, A; Healy, M D; Hebbeker, T; Hebrero, G; Heck, D; Hojvat, C; Holmes, V C; Homola, P; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Hrabovský, M; Huege, T; Hussain, M; Iarlori, M; Insolia, A; Ionita, F; Italiano, A; Jiraskova, S; Kaducak, M; Kampert, K H; Karova, T; Kasper, P; Kégl, B; Keilhauer, B; Kemp, E; Kieckhafer, R M; Klages, H O; Kleifges, M; Kleinfeller, J; Knapik, R; Knapp, J; Koang, D -H; Krieger, A; Krömer, O; Kruppke-Hansen, D; Kuehn, F; Kuempel, D; Kulbartz, K; Kunka, N; Kusenko, A; La Rosa, G; Lachaud, C; Lago, B L; Lautridou, P; Leão, M S A B; Lebrun, D; Lebrun, P; Lee, J; de Oliveira, M A Leigui; Lemiere, A; Letessier-Selvon, A; Leuthold, M; Lhenry-Yvon, I; López, R; Agüera, A Lopez; Louedec, K; Bahilo, J Lozano; Lucero, A; Lyberis, H; Maccarone, M C; Macolino, C; Maldera, S; Mandat, D; Mantsch, P; Mariazzi, A G; Maris, I C; Falcon, H R Marquez; Martello, D; Bravo, O Martínez; Mathes, H J; Matthews, J; Matthews, J A J; Matthiae, G; Maurizio, D; Mazur, P O; McEwen, M; McNeil, R R; Medina-Tanco, G; Melissas, M; Melo, D; Menichetti, E; Menshikov, A; Meyhandan, R; Micheletti, M I; Miele, G; Miller, W; Miramonti, L; Mollerach, S; Monasor, M; Ragaigne, D Monnier; Montanet, F; Morales, B; Morello, C; Moreno, J C; Morris, C; Mostafá, M; Moura, C A; Mueller, S; Muller, M A; Mussa, R; Navarra, G; Navarro, J L; Navas, S; Necesal, P; Nellen, L; Newman-Holmes, C; Newton, D; Nhung, P T; Nierstenhoefer, N; Nitz, D; Nosek, D; Nožka, L; Nyklicek, M; Oehlschläger, J; Olinto, A; Oliva, P; Olmos-Gilbaja, V M; Ortiz, M; Pacheco, N; Selmi-Dei, D Pakk; Palatka, M; Pallotta, J; Parente, G; Parizot, E; Parlati, S; Pastor, S; Patel, M; Paul, T; Pavlidou, V; Payet, K; Pech, M; Pȩkala, J; Pepe, I M; Perrone, L; Pesce, R; Petermann, E; Petrera, S; Petrinca, P; Petrolini, A; Petrov, Y; Petrovic, J; Pfendner, C; Piegaia, R; Pierog, T; Pimenta, M; Pinto, T; Pirronello, V; Pisanti, O; Platino, M; Pochon, J; Ponce, V H; Pontz, M; Privitera, P; Prouza, M; Quel, E J; Rautenberg, J; Ravel, O; Ravignani, D; Redondo, A; Revenu, B; Rezende, F A S; Ridky, J; Riggi, S; Risse, M; Rivière, C; Rizi, V; Robledo, C; Rodriguez, G; Martino, J Rodriguez; Rojo, J Rodriguez; Rodriguez-Cabo, I; Rodríguez-Frías, M D; Ros, G; Rosado, J; Rossler, T; Roth, M; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B; Roulet, E; Rovero, A C; Salamida, F; Salazar, H; Salina, G; Sánchez, F; Santander, M; Santo, C E; Santos, E M; Sarazin, F; Sarkar, S; Sato, R; Scharf, N; Scherini, V; Schieler, H; Schiffer, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, F; Schmidt, T; Scholten, O; Schoorlemmer, H; Schovancova, J; Schovánek, P; Schroeder, F; Schulte, S; Schüssler, F; Schuster, D; Sciutto, S J; Scuderi, M; Segreto, A; Semikoz, D; Settimo, M; Shellard, R C; Sidelnik, I; Siffert, B B; Sigl, G; Śmiałkowski, A; Šmída, R; Smith, B E; Snow, G R; Sommers, P; Sorokin, J; Spinka, H; Squartini, R; Strazzeri, E; Stutz, A; Suarez, F; Suomijärvi, T; Supanitsky, A D; Sutherland, M S; Swain, J; Szadkowski, Z; Tamashiro, A; Tamburro, A; Tarutina, T; Taşcău, O; Tcaciuc, R; Tcherniakhovski, D; Tegolo, D; Thao, N T; Thomas, D; Ticona, R; Tiffenberg, J; Timmermans, C; Tkaczyk, W; Peixoto, C J Todero; Tomé, B; Tonachini, A; Torres, I; Travnicek, P; Tridapalli, D B; Tristram, G; Trovato, E; Tueros, M; Ulrich, R; Unger, M; Urban, M; Galicia, J F Valdés; Valiño, I; Valore, L; Berg, A M van den; Vázquez, J R; Vázquez, R A; Veberič, D; Velarde, A; Venters, T; Verzi, V; Videla, M; Villaseñor, L; Vorobiov, S; Voyvodic, L; Wahlberg, H; Wahrlich, P; Wainberg, O; Warner, D; Watson, A A; Westerhoff, S; Whelan, B J; Wieczorek, G; Wiencke, L; Wilczyńska, B; Wilczyński, H; Wileman, C; Winnick, M G; Wu, H; Wundheiler, B; Yamamoto, T; Younk, P; Yuan, G; Yushkov, A; Zas, E; Zavrtanik, D; Zavrtanik, M; Zaw, I; Zepeda, A; Ziolkowski, M

    2011-01-01

    The surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory consists of 1600 water-Cherenkov detectors, for the study of extensive air showers (EAS) generated by ultra-high-energy cosmic rays. We describe the trigger hierarchy, from the identification of candidate showers at the level of a single detector, amongst a large background (mainly random single cosmic ray muons), up to the selection of real events and the rejection of random coincidences. Such trigger makes the surface detector array fully efficient for the detection of EAS with energy above $3\\times 10^{18}$ eV, for all zenith angles between 0$^\\circ$ and 60$^\\circ$, independently of the position of the impact point and of the mass of the primary particle. In these range of energies and angles, the exposure of the surface array can be determined purely on the basis of the geometrical acceptance.

  19. The optical identification of events with poorly defined locations: the case of the Fermi GBM GRB 140801A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipunov, V. M.; Gorosabel, J.; Pruzhinskaya, M. V.; Postigo, A. de Ugarte; Pelassa, V.; Tsvetkova, A. E.; Sokolov, I. V.; Kann, D. A.; Xu, Dong; Gorbovskoy, E. S.; Krushinski, V. V.; Kornilov, V. G.; Balanutsa, P. V.; Boronina, S. V.; Budnev, N. M.; Cano, Z.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Chazov, V. V.; Connaughton, V.; Delvaux, C.; Frederiks, D. D.; Fynbo, J. F. U.; Gabovich, A. V.; Goldstein, A.; Greiner, J.; Gress, O. A.; Ivanov, K. I.; Jakobsson, P.; Klose, S.; Knust, F.; Komarova, V. N.; Konstantinov, E.; Krylov, A. V.; Kuvshinov, D. A.; Kuznetsov, A. S.; Lipunova, G. V.; Moskvitin, A. S.; Pal'shin, V. D.; Pandey, S. B.; Poleshchuk, V. A.; Schmidl, S.; Sergienko, Yu. P.; Sinyakov, E. V.; Schulze, S.; Sokolov, V. V.; Sokolova, T. N.; Sparre, M.; Thöne, C. C.; Tlatov, A. G.; Tyurina, N. V.; Ulanov, M. V.; Yazev, S. A.; Yurkov, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    We report the early discovery of the optical afterglow of gamma-ray burst (GRB) 140801A in the 137 deg2 3-σ error-box of the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). MASTER is the only observatory that automatically reacts to all Fermi alerts. GRB 140801A is one of the few GRBs whose optical counterpart was discovered solely from its GBM localization. The optical afterglow of GRB 140801A was found by MASTER Global Robotic Net 53 s after receiving the alert, making it the fastest optical detection of a GRB from a GBM error-box. Spectroscopy obtained with the 10.4-m Gran Telescopio Canarias and the 6-m Big Telescope Alt-azimuth of the Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences reveals a redshift of z = 1.32. We performed optical and near-infrared photometry of GRB 140801A using different telescopes with apertures ranging from 0.4 to 10.4 m. GRB 140801A is a typical burst in many ways. The rest-frame bolometric isotropic energy release and peak energy of the burst are E_iso = 5.54_{-0.24}^{+0.26} {×} 10^{52} erg and Ep, rest ≃ 280 keV, respectively, which is consistent with the Amati relation. The absence of a jet break in the optical light curve provides a lower limit on the half-opening angle of the jet θ = 6.1°. The observed Epeak is consistent with the limit derived from the Ghirlanda relation. The joint Fermi GBM and Konus-Wind analysis show that GRB 140801A could belong to the class of intermediate duration. The rapid detection of the optical counterpart of GRB 140801A is especially important regarding the upcoming experiments with large coordinate error-box areas.

  20. A next generation Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory (UFFO-100) for IR/optical observations of the rise phase of gamma-ray bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grossan, B.; Park, I.H.; Ahmad, S.;

    2012-01-01

    for a next generation space observatory as a secondinstrument on a low-earth orbit spacecraft, with a 120 kg instrument mass budget. Restricted to relatively modest mass,power, and launch resources, we find that a coded mask X-ray camera with 1024 cm2 of detector area could rapidlylocate about 64...... generation of rapid-response space observatory instruments. We list science topics motivating ourinstruments, those that require rapid optical-IR GRB response, including: A survey of GRB rise shapes/times,measurements of optical bulk Lorentz factors, investigation of magnetic dominated (vs. non-magnetic) jet...... GRB triggers/year. Responding to the locations from the X-ray camera, a 30 cm aperture telescope witha beam-steering system for rapid (~ 1 s) response and a near-IR camera should detect ~ 29 GRB, given Swift GRBproperties. The additional optical camera would permit the measurement...

  1. The LAGO Collaboration: Searching for high energy GRB emissions in Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, H.; Lago Collaboration

    2012-02-01

    During more than a decade Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB a cosmological phenomena of tremendous power) have been extensively studied in the keV - MeV energy range. However, the higher energy emission still remains a mystery. The Large Aperture GRB Observatory (L.A.G.O.) is an international collaboration started in 2005 aiming at a better understanding of the GRB by studying their emission at high energies (> 1 GeV), where the fluxes are low and measurements by satellites are difficult. This is done using the Single Particle Technique, by means of ground-based Water Cherenkov Detectors (WCD) at sites of high altitude. At those altitudes it is possible to detect air showers produced by high energy photons from the GRB, i. e. a higher rate of events on a short time scale, of the order of the second. The Pierre Auger Observatory could detect such GRB given its large number of detectors, but at 1400 m.a.s.l. the expected signal is quite small. At higher altitudes, similar performance is expected with only a very small number of WCD. As of 2011, high altitude WCD are in operation at Sierra Negra (Mexico, 4650 m.a.s.l.), Chacaltaya (Bolivia, 5200 m.a.s.l.), Maracapomacocha (Peru, 4200 m.a.s.l.), and new WCDs are being installed in Venezuela (Pico Espejo, 4750 m.a.s.l.), Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia and Guatemala. Most of the new WCDs will not be at high enough altitude to detect GRB, never the less it will allow obtaining valuable measurements of secondaries at ground level, which are relevant for solar physics. The LAGO sensitivity to GRB is determined from simulations (under a sudden increase of 1 GeV - 1 TeV photons from a GRB) of the gamma initiated particle shower in the atmosphere and the WCD response to secondaries. We report on WDC calibration and operation at high altitude, GRB detectability, background rates, search for bursts in several months of preliminary data, as well as search for signals at ground level when satellite burst is reported, all these show the

  2. The optical identifcation of events with poorly defined locations: The case of the Fermi GBM GRB140801A

    CERN Document Server

    Lipunov, V M; Pruzhinskaya, M V; Postigo, A de Ugarte; Pelassa, V; Tsvetkova, A E; Sokolov, I V; Kann, D A; Xu, Dong; Gorbovskoy, E S; Krushinski, V V; Kornilov, V G; Balanutsa, P V; Boronina, S V; Budnev, N M; Cano, Z; Castro-Tirado, A J; Chazov, V V; Connaughton, V; Delvaux, C; Frederiks, D D; Fynbo, J F U; Gabovich, A V; Goldstein, A; Greiner, J; Gress, O A; Ivanov, K I; Jakobsson, P; Klose, S; Knust, F; Komarova, V N; Konstantinov, E; Krylov, A V; Kuvshinov, D A; Kuznetsov, A S; Lipunova, G V; Moskvitin, A S; Pal'shin, V D; Pandey, S B; Poleshchuk, V A; Schmidl, S; Sergienko, Yu P; Sinyakov, E V; Schulze, S; Sokolov, V V; Sokolova, T N; Sparre, M; Thone, C C; Tlatov, A G; Tyurina, N V; Ulanov, M V; Yazev, S A; Yurkov, V V

    2015-01-01

    We report the early discovery of the optical afterglow of gamma-ray burst (GRB) 140801A in the 137 deg$^2$ 3-$\\sigma$ error-box of the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). MASTER is the only observatory that automatically react to all Fermi alerts. GRB 140801A is one of the few GRBs whose optical counterpart was discovered solely from its GBM localization. The optical afterglow of GRB 140801A was found by MASTER Global Robotic Net 53 sec after receiving the alert, making it the fastest optical detection of a GRB from a GBM error-box. Spectroscopy obtained with the 10.4-m Gran Telescopio Canarias and the 6-m BTA of SAO RAS reveals a redshift of $z=1.32$. We performed optical and near-infrared photometry of GRB 140801A using different telescopes with apertures ranging from 0.4-m to 10.4-m. GRB 140801A is a typical burst in many ways. The rest-frame bolometric isotropic energy release and peak energy of the burst is $E_\\mathrm{iso} = 5.54_{-0.24}^{+0.26} \\times 10^{52}$ erg and $E_\\mathrm{p, rest}\\simeq280$ keV,...

  3. A next generation Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory (UFFO-100) for IR/optical observations of the rise phase of gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossan, B.; Park, I. H.; Ahmad, S.; Ahn, K. B.; Barrillon, P.; Brandt, S.; Budtz-Jørgensen, C.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Chen, P.; Choi, H. S.; Choi, Y. J.; Connell, P.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; De La Taille, C.; Eyles, C.; Hermann, I.; Huang, M.-H. A.; Jung, A.; Jeong, S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.-W.; Kim, Y. W.; Lee, J.; Lim, H.; Linder, E. V.; Liu, T.-C.; Lund, N.; Min, K. W.; Na, G. W.; Nam, J. W.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Ripa, J.; Reglero, V.; Rodrigo, J. M.; Smoot, G. F.; Suh, J. E.; Svertilov, S.; Vedenkin, N.; Wang, M.-Z.; Yashin, I.; Zhao, M. H.

    2012-09-01

    The Swift Gamma-ray Burst (GRB) observatory responds to GRB triggers with optical observations in ~ 100 s, butcannot respond faster than ~ 60 s. While some rapid-response ground-based telescopes have responded quickly, thenumber of sub-60 s detections remains small. In 2013 June, the Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory-Pathfinder is expected tobe launched on the Lomonosov spacecraft to investigate early optical GRB emission. Though possessing uniquecapability for optical rapid-response, this pathfinder mission is necessarily limited in sensitivity and event rate; here wediscuss the next generation of rapid-response space observatory instruments. We list science topics motivating ourinstruments, those that require rapid optical-IR GRB response, including: A survey of GRB rise shapes/times,measurements of optical bulk Lorentz factors, investigation of magnetic dominated (vs. non-magnetic) jet models,internal vs. external shock origin of prompt optical emission, the use of GRBs for cosmology, and dust evaporation inthe GRB environment. We also address the impacts of the characteristics of GRB observing on our instrument andobservatory design. We describe our instrument designs and choices for a next generation space observatory as a secondinstrument on a low-earth orbit spacecraft, with a 120 kg instrument mass budget. Restricted to relatively modest mass,power, and launch resources, we find that a coded mask X-ray camera with 1024 cm2 of detector area could rapidlylocate about 64 GRB triggers/year. Responding to the locations from the X-ray camera, a 30 cm aperture telescope witha beam-steering system for rapid (~ 1 s) response and a near-IR camera should detect ~ 29 GRB, given Swift GRBproperties. The additional optical camera would permit the measurement of a broadband optical-IR slope, allowingbetter characterization of the emission, and dynamic measurement of dust extinction at the source, for the first time.

  4. GRB 050319

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fynbo, J.P.U; Hjorth, J.; Jakobsson, P.; Møller, P; Naranen, J

    2005-01-01

    "Using ALFOSC on the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) we have obtained spectra of the afterglow of GRB 050319 (GCN 3116, 3117) on 2005, March 20 UT. We find several absorption features, including strong Lyman-alpha, OI+SiII, SiIV and CIV, corresponding to a redshift of z=3.24."......"Using ALFOSC on the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) we have obtained spectra of the afterglow of GRB 050319 (GCN 3116, 3117) on 2005, March 20 UT. We find several absorption features, including strong Lyman-alpha, OI+SiII, SiIV and CIV, corresponding to a redshift of z=3.24."...

  5. GRB 051008

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volnova, A. A.; Pozanenko, A. S.; Gorosabel, J.; Perley, D. A.; Frederiks, D. D.; Kann, D. A.; Rumyantsev, V. V.; Biryukov, V. V.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Ferrero, P.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Klose, S.; Loznikov, V. M.; Minaev, P. Yu.; Stecklum, B.; Svinkin, D. S.; Tsvetkova, A. E.; Ugarte Postigo, Antonio de; Ulanov, M. V.

    2014-01-01

    We present observations of the dark gamma-ray burst GRB 051008 provided by Swift/BAT, Swift/XRT, Konus-WIND, INTEGRAL/SPI-ACS in the high-energy domain and the Shajn, Swift/UVOT, Tautenburg, NOT, Gemini and Keck I telescopes in the optical and near-infrared bands. The burst was detected only in g...

  6. GRB 090313

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Ugarte Postigo...[}, A.; Goldoni, P.; Thöne, Christina; Malesani, Daniele; Fynbo, Johan Peter Uldall; Hjorth, Jens; Rasmussen, Per Kjærgaard; Andersen, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Context. X-shooter is the first second-generation instrument to become operative at the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT). It is a broad-band medium-resolution spectrograph designed with gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow spectroscopy as one of its main science drivers. Aims. During the first commissio...... just a few minutes, X-shooter constitutes an significant leap forward on medium resolution spectroscopic studies of GRBs, their host galaxies and intervening systems, probing the early history of the Universe.......Context. X-shooter is the first second-generation instrument to become operative at the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT). It is a broad-band medium-resolution spectrograph designed with gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow spectroscopy as one of its main science drivers. Aims. During the first...... identify as the redshift of the GRB. These features are composed of 3 components with different ionisation levels and velocities. Some of the features have never been observed before in a GRB at such a high redshift. Furthermore, we detect two intervening systems at redshifts of 1.8005 and 1...

  7. GRB 060117: Reverse + forward shock solution

    CERN Document Server

    Jel'inek, M; Kubánek, P; Hudec, R; Nekola, M F; Rídky, J; Grygar, J; Jel\\'inek, Martin; Prouza, Michael; Kub\\'anek, Petr; Hudec, Ren\\'e; Nekola, Martin F.; Ridky, Jan; Grygar, Jiri

    2007-01-01

    We present a discovery and observation of an extraordinarily bright prompt optical emission of the GRB 060117 obtained by a wide-field camera atop the robotic telescope FRAM of the Pierre Auger Observatory from 2 to 10 minutes after the GRB. We found rapid average temporal flux decay of alpha = -1.7 +/- 0.1 and a peak brightness R = 10.1 mag. We interpret the shape of the lightcurve as a transition between reverse and forward shock emission.

  8. GRB 060605: RTT150 optical observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamitov, I.; Saygac, A. T.; Aslan, Z.; Kiziloglu, U.; Gogus, E.; Alis, S.; Onal, O.; Burenin, R.; Pavlinsky, M.; Sunyaev, R.; Bikmaev, I.; Sakhibullin, N.

    2006-06-01

    We observed the field around the position of the optical counterpart (Rykoff et al. GCN5220, Page et al., GCN5221) of GRB060605 (Swift trigger 213630) with the Russian-Turkish 1.5-m telescope (RTT150, Bakirlitepe, TUBITAK National Observatory, Turkey), at the beginning of June 07, about 31.1 hours after the burst. A series of frames was taken in R band with TFOSC. The afterglow is detected on combined image. http://www.tug.tubitak.gov.tr/~irekk/grb/grb060605/GRB060605_0607_RTT150.JPG Using USNO-B1 star (RA=21:28:40.26, DEC=-06:03:44.5, R2MAG=15.37) we estimate the following R magnitude for the OT: t-t0 m_R err 31.1 23.0 0.2 Using all data (Khamitov et al., GCN5224) we estimate the power-law decay index in R as -1.7+-0.02, which did not changed since ~5.6 hours after the burst. Our R lightcurve can be found at: http://www.tug.tubitak.gov.tr/~irekk/grb/grb060605/GRB060605_lc0607.jpg This message may be cited.

  9. Update on The Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory (UFFO) Pathfinder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grossan, B.; Brandt, Søren; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl;

    2011-01-01

    design of the pathfinder, with a 191 square centimeter LSO+MAPMT X/gamma detector and a 10 cm aperture SMT. We estimate that we will observe ∼44 GRB per year, and detect ∼10 GRB with both instruments. The UFFO will provide the most rapid optical/UV observations of GRB available thus far, and yield a...

  10. GRB Prompt Optical Observations by Master and Lomonosov

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbovskoy, Evgeny

    We present the results of the prompt, early and afterglow optical observations of five γ-ray bursts (GRBs): GRB 100901A, GRB 100902A, GRB 100905A, GRB 100906A and GRB 101020A. These observations were made with the Mobile Astronomical System of TElescope-Robots in Russia (MASTER-II Net), the 1.5-m telescope of the Sierra Nevada Observatory and the 2.56-m Nordic Optical Telescope. For two sources, GRB 100901A and GRB 100906A, we detected optical counterparts and obtained light curves starting before the cessation of γ-ray emission, at 113 and 48 s after the trigger, respectively. Observations of GRB 100906A were conducted in two polarizing filters. Observations of the other three bursts gave the upper limits on the optical flux; their properties are briefly discussed. A more detailed analysis of GRB 100901A and GRB 100906A, supplemented by Swift data, provides the following results and indicates different origins for the prompt optical radiation in the two bursts. The light-curve patterns and spectral distributions suggest that there is a common production site for the prompt optical and high-energy emission in GRB 100901A. The results of the spectral fits for GRB 100901A in the range from optical to X-ray favour power-law energy distributions and a consistent value of the optical extinction in the host galaxy. GRB 100906A produced a smoothly peaking optical light curve, suggesting that the prompt optical radiation in this GRB originated in a front shock. This is supported by a spectral analysis. We have found that the Amati and Ghirlanda relations are satisfied for GRB 100906A. We obtain an upper limit on the value of the optical extinction on the host of GRB 100906A. Also we consider prompt observation of dark gamma ray bursts for which on very widefield cameras MASTER-VWF and MASTER-II telescopes upper limits were received. We represent SHOCK experiment onboard the spacecraft Lomonosov.

  11. XCAT: the JANUS x-ray coded aperture telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, A. D.; Burrows, D. N.; Barthelmy, S.; Chang, W.; Fox, D.; Fredley, J.; Gehrels, N.; Kelly, M.; Klar, R.; Palmer, D.; Persyn, S.; Reichard, K.; Roming, P.; Seifert, E.; Smith, R. W. M.; Wood, P.; Zugger, M.

    2010-07-01

    The JANUS mission concept is designed to study the high redshift universe using a small, agile Explorer class observatory. The primary science goals of JANUS are to use high redshift (6field of view (4 steradians), thus facilitating the detection of z>6 XRFs/GRBs, which can be further studied by other instruments. XCAT would use a coded mask aperture design with hybrid CMOS Si detectors. It would be sensitive to XRFs and GRBs with flux in excess of approximately 240 mCrab. In order to obtain redshift measurements and accurate positions from the NIRT, the spacecraft is designed to rapidly slew to source positions following a GRB trigger from XCAT. XCAT instrument design parameters and science goals are presented in this paper.

  12. The Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory’s space GRB mission and science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lim, H.; Ahmad, S.; Barrillon, P.;

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. The Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory (UFFO) is a space mission to detect the early moments of an explosion from Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), thus enhancing our understanding of the GRB mechanism. It consists of the UFFO Burst & Trigger telescope (UBAT) for the recognition of GRB positions using...

  13. The GRB-SN connection: GRB030329 and XRF030723

    OpenAIRE

    Fynbo, J. P. U.; Hjorth, J.; Sollerman, J.; Moller, P.; Gorosabel, J.; S. Guziy; Woosley, S.; Kouveliotou, C.; Grundahl, F.; Jensen, B. L.; Andersen, M. I.; Vreeswijk, P.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; collaboration, the GRACE

    2004-01-01

    The attempt to secure conclusive, spectroscopic evidence for the GRB/SN connection has been a central theme in most GRB observing time proposals since the discovery of the very unusual GRB980425 associated with the peculiar type Ib/c SN1998bw. GRB030329 provided this evidence to everybody's satisfaction. In this contribution we show the results of a spectroscopic campaign of the supernova associated with GRB030329 carried out at ESOs Very Large Telescope. We also present preliminary results f...

  14. A multi band study of the optically dark GRB 051028

    CERN Document Server

    Urata, Yuji; Kuo, Ping-Hung; Ip, Wing-Huen; Qiu, Yulei; Masuno, Keisuke; Tashiro, Makoto; Abe, Keichi; Onda, Kaori; Kodaka, Natsuki; Kuwahara, Makoto; Tamagawa, Toru; Usui, Fumihiko; Ioka, Kunihito; Lee, Yi-Hsi; Wei, Jianyan; Deng, Jinsong; Zheng, Weikang; Makishima, Kazuo

    2007-01-01

    Observations were made of the optical afterglow of GRB 051028 with the Lulin observatory's 1.0 m telescope and the WIDGET robotic telescope system. R band photometric data points were obtained on 2005 October 28 (UT), or 0.095-0.180 days after the burst. There is a possible plateau in the optical light curve around 0.1 days after the burst; the light curve resembles optically bright afterglows (e.g. GRB 041006, GRB 050319, GRB060605) in shape of the light curve but not in brightness. The brightness of the GRB 051028 afterglow is 3 magnitudes fainter than that of one of the dark events, GRB 020124. Optically dark GRBs have been attributed to dust extinction within the host galaxy or high redshift. However, the spectrum analysis of the X-rays implies that there is no significant absorption by the host galaxy. Furthermore, according to the model theoretical calculation of the Ly$\\alpha$ absorption to find the limit of GRB 051028's redshift, the expected $R$ band absorption is not high enough to explain the darkn...

  15. The bright optical flash from GRB 060117

    CERN Document Server

    Jel'inek, M; Kubánek, P; Hudec, R; Nekola, M; Grygar, J; Castro-Tirado, A J; Gorosabel, J; Hrabovsk'y, M; Mandat, D; Nosek, D; Palatka, M; Pandey, S B; Pech, M; Schovanek, P; De Postigo, A U; Vítek, S; Jel\\'inek, Martin; Prouza, Michael; Kub\\'anek, Petr; Hudec, Ren\\'e; Nekola, Martin; R}\\'idk\\'y, Jan {; Grygar, Ji{r}\\'i; Castro-Tirado, Alberto J.; Gorosabel, Javier; Hrabovsk\\'y, Miroslav; Mand\\'at, Du{s}an; Nosek, Dalibor; Palatka, Miroslav; Pandey, Shashi B.; Pech, Miroslav; Schov\\'anek, Petr; S}m\\'ida, Radom\\'ir {; Postigo, Antonio de Ugarte; V\\'itek, Stanislav

    2006-01-01

    We present a discovery and observation of an extraordinarily bright prompt optical emission of the GRB 060117 obtained by a wide-field camera atop the robotic telescope FRAM of the Pierre Auger Observatory from 2 to 10 minutes after the GRB. We found rapid average temporal flux decay of alpha = -1.7 +- 0.1 and a peak brightness R = 10.1 mag. Later observations by other instruments set a strong limit on the optical and radio transient fluxes, unveiling an unexpectedly rapid further decay. We present an interpretation featuring a relatively steep electron-distribution parameter p ~ 3.0 and providing a straightforward solution for the overall fast decay of this optical transient as a transition between reverse and forward shock.

  16. Apodized pupil Lyot coronagraphs for arbitrary apertures. V. Hybrid Shaped Pupil designs for imaging Earth-like planets with future space observatories

    CERN Document Server

    N'Diaye, Mamadou; Pueyo, Laurent; Carlotti, Alexis; Stark, Christopher C; Perrin, Marshall D

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a new class of solutions for Apodized Pupil Lyot Coronagraphs (APLC) with segmented aperture telescopes to remove broadband diffracted light from a star with a contrast level of $10^{10}$. These new coronagraphs provide a key advance to enabling direct imaging and spectroscopy of Earth twins with future large space missions. Building on shaped pupil (SP) apodization optimizations, our approach enables two-dimensional optimizations of the system to address any aperture features such as central obstruction, support structures or segment gaps. We illustrate the technique with a design that could reach $10^{10}$ contrast level at 34\\,mas for a 12\\,m segmented telescope over a 10\\% bandpass centered at a wavelength $\\lambda_0=$500\\,nm. These designs can be optimized specifically for the presence of a resolved star, and in our example, for stellar angular size up to 1.1\\,mas. This would allow probing the vicinity of Sun-like stars located beyond 4.4\\,pc, therefore fully retiring this concern. If the fr...

  17. Is GRB 100418A a Cosmic Twin of GRB 060614?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lan-Wei Jia; Hou-Jun Lü; Shu-Jin Hou; En-Wei Liang

    2011-03-01

    GRB 100418A is a long burst at = 0.624 without detection of associated supernova (SN).We present a detailed analysis on this event and discuss possible origins of its multi-wavelength emission. The temporal features of this event is similar to GRB 060614, a well-known nearby long GRB without SN association (possibly a Type I GRB), indicating that the two events may be cosmic twins. However, both the circumburst medium density and the GRB classification based on the gamma-ray energy and spectrum suggest that GRB 100418A would be a Type II GRB. These results make a great puzzle on the progenitors of this kind of events, if they belong to the same population.

  18. Optical and NIR observations of the afterglow of GRB 020813

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covino, S.; Malesani, D.; Tavecchio, F.; Antonelli, L. A.; Arkharov, A.; Di Paola, A.; Fugazza, D.; Ghisellini, G.; Larionov, V.; Lazzati, D.; Mannucci, F.; Masetti, N.; Barrena, R.; Benetti, S.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Di Serego Alighieri, S.; Fiore, F.; Frontera, F.; Fruchter, A.; Ghinassi, F.; Gladders, M.; Hall, P. B.; Israel, G. L.; Klose, S.; Magazzù, A.; Palazzi, E.; Pedani, M.; Pian, E.; Romano, P.; Stefanon, M.; Stella, L.

    2003-06-01

    We present optical and near-infrared (NIR) photometry of the bright afterglow of GRB 020813. Our data span from 3 hours to 4 days after the GRB event. A rather sharp achromatic break is present in the light curve, 14 hours after the trigger. In the framework of jetted fireballs, this break corresponds to a jet half-opening angle of 1.9degr +/-0.2degr , the smallest value ever inferred for a GRB. We discuss our results in the framework of currently available models, and find that they have problems in explaining the joint temporal and spectral properties, and in particular the slow decay before the break. Based on observations partly made with ESO telescopes at the Paranal Observatories under programme Id 69.D-0461 and with the Italian TNG telescope under programme TAC 8_01(47).

  19. Optical Photometry of the GRB 010222 Afterglow

    CERN Document Server

    Cowsik, R; Anupama, G C; Bhatt, B C; Sahu, D K; Ambika, S; Bhargavi, S G

    2001-01-01

    The optical afterglow of GRB 010222 was observed using the recently installed 2-m telescope at the Indian Astronomical Observatory Hanle and the telescopes at the Vainu Bappu Observatory, Kavalur, beginning ~0.6 day after the detection of the event. The results based on these photometric observations combined with others reported in the literature are presented in this paper. The R band light curve shows an initial decline of intensities proportional to t^{-0.608} which steepens, after 10.6 hours, to t^{-1.24}. Following the model of collimated outflow, the early break in the light curve implies a very narrow beam angle ~3 deg. The two decay rates are consistent with the standard jet model in a uniform density ambient medium, but require a hard spectrum of electron power density with ~1.5. The early spectral energy distribution derived using published fluxes in different bands and our R band light curve suggests that the ambient density is very low: n ~1 cm^-3. GRB 010222 is thus an example of a highly collim...

  20. Open Questions in GRB Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Bing

    2011-01-01

    Open questions in GRB physics are summarized as of 2011, including classification, progenitor, central engine, ejecta composition, energy dissipation and particle acceleration mechanism, radiation mechanism, long term engine activity, external shock afterglow physics, origin of high energy emission, and cosmological setting. Prospects of addressing some of these problems with the upcoming Chinese-French GRB mission, SVOM, are outlined.

  1. Configurable Aperture Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennico, Kimberly; Bendek, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    In December 2014, we were awarded Center Innovation Fund to evaluate an optical and mechanical concept for a novel implementation of a segmented telescope based on modular, interconnected small sats (satlets). The concept is called CAST, a Configurable Aperture Space Telescope. With a current TRL is 2 we will aim to reach TLR 3 in Sept 2015 by demonstrating a 2x2 mirror system to validate our optical model and error budget, provide straw man mechanical architecture and structural damping analyses, and derive future satlet-based observatory performance requirements. CAST provides an alternative access to visible and/or UV wavelength space telescope with 1-meter or larger aperture for NASA SMD Astrophysics and Planetary Science community after the retirement of HST

  2. SRG/eROSITA prospects for detection of GRB afterglows

    CERN Document Server

    Khabibullin, I I; Sunyaev, R A

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the potential of the eROSITA telescope on board the \\emph{Spectrum-X-Gamma} observatory to detect gamma-ray burst (GRB) X-ray afterglows during its 4-year all-sky survey. The expected rate of afterglows associated with long-duration GRBs without any information on the bursts proper that can be identified by a characteristic power-law light curve in the eROSITA data is 4--8 events per year. An additional small number, $\\lesssim 2$ per year, of afterglows may be associated with short GRBs, ultra hard (GeV) GRBs and X-ray flashes. eROSITA can thus provide the first unbiased (unaffected by GRB triggering) sample of $\\lesssim 40$ X-ray afterglows, which can be used for statistical studies of GRB afterglows and for constraining the shape of the GRB $\\log N$--$\\log S$ distribution at its low-fluence end. The total number of afterglows detected by eROSITA may be yet higher due to orphan afterglows and failed GRBs. The actual detection rate could thus provide interesting constraints on the properties of rel...

  3. Polarimetric observations of GRB 011211

    OpenAIRE

    S. Covino(INAF - Oss. Astronomico di Brera); Lazzati, D.; Malesani, D.; Ghisellini, G.; Israel, G. L.; Stella, L.; Cimatti, A.; Di Serego, S.; Fiore, F.; Kawai, N.; S. Ortolani; Pasquini, L.; Ricker, G.; P. Saracco(INFN, Sezione di Genova); Tagliaferri, G.

    2002-01-01

    We present and discuss polarimetric observations performed with the VLT-UT3 (Melipal) on the afterglow of GRB 011211, ~35 hours after the burst onset. The observations yielded a 3-sigma upper limit of P

  4. A case of mistaken identity? GRB060912A and the nature of the long-short GRB divide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levan, A. J.; Jakobsson, P.; Hurkett, C.; Tanvir, N. R.; Gorosabel, J.; Vreeswijk, P.; Rol, E.; Chapman, R.; Gehrels, N.; O'Brien, P. T.; Osborne, J. P.; Priddey, R. S.; Kouveliotou, C.; Starling, R.; vanden Berk, D.; Wiersema, K.

    2007-07-01

    We investigate the origin of the GRB060912A, which has observational properties that make its classification as either a long or short burst ambiguous. Short-duration gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) are thought to have typically lower energies than long-duration bursts, can be found in galaxies with populations of all ages and are likely to originate from different progenitors to the long-duration bursts. However, it has become clear that duration alone is insufficient to make a distinction between the two populations in many cases, leading to a desire to find additional discriminators of burst type. GRB060912A had a duration of 6s and occurred only ~10arcsec from a bright, low-redshift (z = 0.0936) elliptical galaxy, suggesting that this may have been the host, which would favour it being a short burst. However, our deep optical imaging and spectroscopy of the location of GRB060912A using the Very Large Telescope (VLT) shows that GRB060912A more likely originates in a distant star-forming galaxy at z = 0.937, and is most likely a long burst. This demonstrates the risk in identifying bright, nearby galaxies as the hosts of given gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) without further supporting evidence. Further, it implies that, in the absence of secure identifications, `host' type, or more broadly discriminators that rely on galaxy redshifts, may not be good indicators of the true nature of any given GRB. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at the Paranal Observatory under programme ID 077.D-0691. E-mail: a.j.levan@warwick.ac.uk

  5. The Early Optical Afterglow of GRB 030418 and Progenitor Mass Loss

    CERN Document Server

    Rykoff, E S; Price, P A; Akerlof, C W; Ashley, M C B; Bizyaev, D V; Garradd, G J; McKay, T A; McNaught, R H; Phillips, A; Quimby, R; Schaefer, B; Schmidt, B; Vestrand, W T; Wheeler, J C; Wren, J

    2004-01-01

    The ROTSE-IIIa telescope and the SSO-40 inch telescope, both located at Siding Spring Observatory, imaged the early time afterglow of GRB 030418. In this report we present observations of the early afterglow, first detected by the ROTSE-IIIa telescope 211 s after the start of the burst, and only 76 s after the end of the gamma-ray activity. We detect optical emission that rises for ~600 s, slowly varies around R=17.3 mag for ~1400 s, and then fades as a power law of index alpha=-1.36. Additionally, the ROTSE-IIIb telescope, located at McDonald Observatory, imaged the early time afterglow of GRB 030723. The behavior of this light curve was qualitatively similar to that of GRB 030418, but two magnitudes dimmer. These two afterglows are dissimilar to other afterglows such as GRB 990123 and GRB 021211. We investigate whether the early afterglow can be attributed to a synchrotron break in a cooling synchrotron spectrum as it passes through the optical band, but find this model is unable to accurately describe the ...

  6. GRB physics with Fermi

    CERN Document Server

    Medvedev, Mikhail V

    2009-01-01

    Radiation from GRBs in the prompt phase, flares and an afterglow is thought to be produced by accelerated electrons in magnetic fields. Such emission may be produced at collisionless shocks of baryonic outflows or at reconnection sites (at least for the prompt and flares) of the magnetically dominated (Poynting flux driven) outflows, where no shocks presumably form at all. An astonishing recent discovery is that during reconnection strong small-scale magnetic fields are produced via the Weibel instability, very much like they are produced at relativistic shocks. The relevant physics has been successfully and extensively studied with the PIC simulations in 2D and, to some extent, in 3D for the past few years. We discuss how these simulations predict the existence of MeV-range synchrotron/jitter emission in some GRBs, which can be observed with Fermi. Recent results on modeling of the spectral variability and spectral correlations of the GRB prompt emission in the Weibel-jitter paradigm applicable to both baryo...

  7. The GRB early optical flash from internal shock: application to GRB990123, GRB041219a and GRB060111b

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, D M

    2006-01-01

    With the successful launch of the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer, people expected the prompt optical flash like GRB990123 would be easily detected. However the fact that early optical flash have not been detected for a number of GRBs indicates the reverse shock must be suppressed. Here we explore the possibility that the optical flash may arise from the internal shock. We find that, under certain circumstance, the optical flash of GRB990123 and GRB060111b can really be explained by the internal shock. For GRB041219a, the prompt optical emission was correlated with the gamma-ray emission, we explain this feature also in the internal shock scenario, the optical emission is the low energy extension of the gamma-ray emission, and we can restrict its redshift $z\\sim 0.2$. As for GRB050904, we have shown in previous paper that the optical flash was produced by synchrotron radiation and the X-ray flare was produced by the synchrotron-self-Compton mechanism. Therefore we conclude that the early optical flash of GRBs ...

  8. The Liverpool Telescope Automatic Pipeline for Real-time GRB Afterglow Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Gomboc, A; Guidorzi, C; Mundell, C G; Mottram, C J; Fraser, S N; Smith, R J; Steele, I A; Carter, D; Bode, M F; Newsam, A M

    2005-01-01

    The 2-m robotic Liverpool Telescope (LT) is ideally suited to the rapid follow-up of unpredictable and transient events such as GRBs. Our GRB follow-up strategy is designed to identify optical/IR counterparts in real time; it involves the automatic triggering of initial observations, on receipt of an alert from Gamma Ray Observatories HETE-2, INTEGRAL and Swift, followed by automated data reduction, analysis, OT identification and subsequent observing mode choice. The lack of human intervention in this process requires robustness at all stages of the procedure. Here we describe the telescope, its instrumentation and GRB pipeline.

  9. The detailed optical light curve of GRB 030329

    CERN Document Server

    Lipkin, Yu M; Gal-Yam, A; Leibowitz, E M; Poznanski, D; Kaspi, S; Polishook, D; Kulkarni, S R; Fox, D W; Berger, E; Mirabal, N; Halpern, J; Bureau, M; Fathi, K; Price, P A; Peterson, B A; Frebel, A; Schmidt, B; Orosz, J A; Fitzgerald, J B; Bloom, J S; Van Dokkum, P G; Bailyn, C D; Buxton, M M; Barsony, M

    2004-01-01

    (Abridged) We present densely sampled BVRI light curves of the optical transient associated with the gamma-ray burst GRB 030329, the result of a coordinated observing campaign conducted at five observatories. Augmented with published observations of this GRB, the compiled optical dataset contains 2687 photometric measurements, obtained between 78 minutes and 79 days after the burst. We show that the underlying supernova 2003dh evolved faster than, and was probably somewhat fainter than the type Ic SN 1998bw, associated with GRB 980425. We find that our data can be described by a broken power-law decay perturbed by a complex variable component. The early- and late-time decay slopes are determined to be ~1.1 and ~2, respectively. Assuming this single power-law model, we constrain the break to lie between ~3 and ~8 days after the burst. This simple, singly-broken power-law model, derived only from the analysis of our optical observations, may also account for available multi-band data, provided that the break ha...

  10. Hubble Space Telescope STIS Observations of GRB 000301C: CCD Imaging and Near-Ultraviolet MAMA Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Smette; A.S. Fruchter; Th.R. Gull; K.C. Sahu; L. Petro; H. Ferguson; J. Rhoads; D.J. Lindler; R.A.M.J. Wijers

    2001-01-01

    We present Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph observations of the optical transient (OT) counterpart of the gamma-ray burster GRB 000301C obtained 5 days after the burst, on 2000 March 6. CCD clear-aperture imaging reveals a R~=21.50+/-0.15 source with no apparent host galaxy. An 8000 s, 1150 Å

  11. Hubble Space Telescope STIS observations of GRB 000301C: CCD imaging and near-ultraviolet MAMA spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smette, A.; Fruchter, A.S.; Gull, T.R.;

    2001-01-01

    We present Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph observations of the optical transient (OT) counterpart of the c-ray burster GRB 000301C obtained 5 days after the burst, on 2000 March 6. CCD clear-aperture imaging reveals a R similar or equal to 21.50 +/- 0.15 source with no apparent host galaxy. ...

  12. Identifying the host galaxy of the short GRB 100628A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicuesa Guelbenzu, A.; Klose, S.; Palazzi, E.; Greiner, J.; Michałowski, M. J.; Kann, D. A.; Hunt, L. K.; Malesani, D.; Rossi, A.; Savaglio, S.; Schulze, S.; Xu, D.; Afonso, P. M. J.; Elliott, J.; Ferrero, P.; Filgas, R.; Hartmann, D. H.; Krühler, T.; Knust, F.; Masetti, N.; Olivares E., F.; Rau, A.; Schady, P.; Schmidl, S.; Tanga, M.; Updike, A. C.; Varela, K.

    2015-11-01

    We report on the results of a comprehensive observing campaign to reveal the host galaxy of the short GRB 100628A. This burst was followed by a faint X-ray afterglow but no optical counterpart was discovered. However, inside the X-ray error circle a potential host galaxy at a redshift of z = 0.102 was soon reported in the literature. If this system is the host, then GRB 100628A was the cosmologically most nearby unambiguous short burst with a measured redshift so far. We used the multi-colour imager GROND at the ESO/La Silla MPG 2.2 m telescope, ESO/VLT spectroscopy, and deep Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) radio-continuum observations together with publicly available Gemini imaging data to study the putative host and the galaxies in the field of GRB 100628A. We confirm that inside the X-ray error circle the most probable host-galaxy candidate is the morphologically disturbed, interacting galaxy system at z = 0.102. The interacting galaxies are connected by a several kpc long tidal stream, which our VLT/FORS2 spectroscopy reveals strong emission lines of [O ii], [O iii], Hα and Hβ, characteristic for the class of extreme emission-line galaxies and indicative of ongoing star formation. The latter leaves open the possibility that the GRB progenitor was a member of a young stellar population. However, we indentify a second host-galaxy candidate slightly outside the X-ray error circle. It is a radio-bright, luminous elliptical galaxy at a redshift z = 0.311. With a K-band luminosity of 2 × 1011L⊙ this galaxy resembles the probable giant elliptical host of the first well-localized short burst, GRB 050509B. If this is the host, then the progenitor of GRB 100628A was a member of an old stellar population. Based on observations collected at the Very Large Telescope of the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (ESO programme 087.D-0503 and 290.D-5194; PI: A. Nicuesa Guelbenzu; 090.A-0825; PI: D. Malesani), GROND (PI: J. Greiner), and ATCA (Program C

  13. MAGIC upper limits on the GRB 090102 afterglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksić, J.; Ansoldi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Babic, A.; de Almeida, U. Barres; Barrio, J. A.; González, J. Becerra; Bednarek, W.; Berger, K.; Bernardini, E.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bock, R. K.; Boller, A.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bonnoli, G.; Borracci, F.; Bretz, T.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Fidalgo, D. Carreto; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Cossio, L.; Covino, S.; Da Vela, P.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Caneva, G.; De Lotto, B.; Mendez, C. Delgado; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Prester, D. Dominis; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Eisenacher, D.; Elsaesser, D.; Farina, E.; Ferenc, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Frantzen, K.; Fruck, C.; López, R. J. García; Garczarczyk, M.; Terrats, D. Garrido; Gaug, M.; Giavitto, G.; Godinović, N.; Munoz, A. González; Gozzini, S. R.; Hadamek, A.; Hadasch, D.; Herrero, A.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Idec, W.; Kadenius, V.; Knoetig, M. L.; Krähenbühl, T.; Krause, J.; Kushida, J.; Barbera, A. La; Lelas, D.; Lewandowska, N.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; López-Coto, R.; López, M.; López-Oramas, A.; Lorenz, E.; Lozano, I.; Makariev, M.; Mallot, K.; Maneva, G.; Mankuzhiyil, N.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Marcote, B.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Masbou, J.; Mazin, D.; Menzel, U.; Meucci, M.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moldón, J.; Moralejo, A.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Nakajima, D.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Nilsson, K.; Nowak, N.; Orito, R.; Overkemping, A.; Paiano, S.; Palatiello, M.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Partini, S.; Persic, M.; Prada, F.; Moroni, P. G. Prada; Prandini, E.; Preziuso, S.; Puljak, I.; Reichardt, I.; Reinthal, R.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Garcia, J. Rodriguez; Rügamer, S.; Saggion, A.; Saito, K.; Saito, T.; Salvati, M.; Satalecka, K.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Shore, S. N.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Snidaric, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Spanier, F.; Stamatescu, V.; Stamerra, A.; Storz, J.; Sun, S.; Surić, T.; Takalo, L.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Thaele, J.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Toyama, T.; Treves, A.; Uellenbeck, M.; Vogler, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Weitzel, Q.; Zandanel, F.; Zanin, R.; Bouvier, A.; Hayashida, M.; Tajima, H.; Longo, F.

    2014-02-01

    Indications of a GeV component in the emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are known since the Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope observations during the 1990s and they have been confirmed by the data of the Fermi satellite. These results have, however, shown that our understanding of GRB physics is still unsatisfactory. The new generation of Cherenkov observatories and in particular the MAGIC telescope, allow for the first time the possibility to extend the measurement of GRBs from several tens up to hundreds of GeV energy range. Both leptonic and hadronic processes have been suggested to explain the possible GeV/TeV counterpart of GRBs. Observations with ground-based telescopes of very high energy (VHE) photons (E > 30 GeV) from these sources are going to play a key role in discriminating among the different proposed emission mechanisms, which are barely distinguishable at lower energies. MAGIC telescope observations of the GRB 090102 (z = 1.547) field and Fermi Large Area Telescope data in the same time interval are analysed to derive upper limits of the GeV/TeV emission. We compare these results to the expected emissions evaluated for different processes in the framework of a relativistic blastwave model for the afterglow. Simultaneous upper limits with Fermi and a Cherenkov telescope have been derived for this GRB observation. The results we obtained are compatible with the expected emission although the difficulties in predicting the HE and VHE emission for the afterglow of this event makes it difficult to draw firmer conclusions. Nonetheless, MAGIC sensitivity in the energy range of overlap with space-based instruments (above about 40 GeV) is about one order of magnitude better with respect to Fermi. This makes evident the constraining power of ground-based observations and shows that the MAGIC telescope has reached the required performance to make possible GRB multiwavelength studies in the VHE range.

  14. The Pierre Auger Observatory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the scientific motivation, conceptual design and status of the P. Auger Observatory, a hybrid detector designed to measure both the longitudinal and the lateral profile of giant air-showers produced by cosmic-rays of energy above 1019 eV. Two ground arrays of water Cerenkov tanks overlooked by fluorescence detectors will cover an area of 3000 km2 each. They will be build in the Southern and Northern hemisphere to provide full sky coverage. The total aperture of 14000 km2sr will allow to study all observable aspects of cosmic rays from below 10 EeV up to arbitrarily high energies with an unprecedented accuracy

  15. The red optical afterglow of GRB 030725

    CERN Document Server

    Pugliese, G; Gorosabel, J; Jensen, B L; Fynbo, J P U; Hjorth, J; Jorgensen, S F; Monard, B; Vinter, C

    2005-01-01

    We present a photometric study of the optical counterpart of the long-duration Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) 030725, which triggered the HETE FREGATE and WXM instruments on July 25th, 2003, and lasted more than 160s. An optical counterpart was identified at the Bronberg Observatory in South Africa about 7 hours after the burst occurred. The optical afterglow (OA) was observed between 4 and 15 days after the burst with the 1.54m Danish telescope at La Silla in the V, Rc, and Ic bands. We fit a broken power law to the data and determine a break time in the light curve between 16 hours and 4.7 days after the first detection of the burst. The decay slope is alpha1 = -0.59 +0.59/-0.44 before and alpha2 = -1.43 +/- 0.06 after the break. A bump may be present in the light curve, only significant at the 2-sigma level, 13.9 days after the main burst. The spectral slope of the OA, measured 12 days after the burst, is -2.9 +/- 0.6 , i.e. it falls in the extreme red end of the distribution of previous OA spectral slopes. Observa...

  16. The UFFO (Ultra Fast Flash Observatory) Pathfinder: Science and Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, P; Ahn, K; Barrillon, P; Blin-Bondil, S; Brandt, S; Budtz-Jorgensen, C; Castro-Tirado, A J; Choi, H S; Choi, Y J; Connell, P; Dagoret-Campagne, S; De La Taille, C; Eyles, C; Grossan, B; Hermann, I; Huang, M -H A; Jeong, S; Jung, A; Kim, J E; Kim, S H; Kim, Y W; Lee, J; Lim, H; Linder, E V; Liu, T -C; Lund, Niels; Min, K W; Na, G W; Nam, J W; Nam, K; Panayuk, M I; Park, I H; Re-Glero, V; Rodrigo, J M; Smoot, G F; Suh, Y D; Svelitov, S; Vedenken, N; Wang, M -Z; Yashin, I; Zhao, M H

    2011-01-01

    Hundreds of gamma-ray burst (GRB) optical light curves have been measured since the discovery of optical afterglows. However, even after nearly 7 years of operation of the Swift Observatory, only a handful of measurements have been made soon (within a minute) after the gamma ray signal. This lack of early observations fails to address burst physics at short time scales associated with prompt emissions and progenitors. Because of this lack of sub-minute data, the characteristics of the rise phase of optical light curve of short-hard type GRB and rapid-rising GRB, which may account for ~30% of all GRB, remain practically unknown. We have developed methods for reaching sub-minute and sub-second timescales in a small spacecraft observatory. Rather than slewing the entire spacecraft to aim the optical instrument at the GRB position, we use rapidly moving mirror to redirect our optical beam. As a first step, we employ motorized slewing mirror telescope (SMT), which can point to the event within 1s, in the UFFO Path...

  17. A Trio of GRB-SNe: GRB 120729A, GRB 130215A / SN 2013ez and GRB 130831A / SN 2013fu

    CERN Document Server

    Cano, Z; Pozanenko, A; Butler, N; Thone, C C; Guidorzi, C; Kruhler, T; Gorosabel, J; Jakobsson, P; Leloudas, G; Malesani, D; Hjorth, J; Melandri, A; Mundell, C; Wiersema, K; D'Avanzo, P; Schulze, S; Gomboc, A; Johansson, A; Zheng, W; Kann, D A; Knust, F; Varela, K; Akerlof, C W; Bloom, J; Burkhonov, O; Cooke, E; de Diego, J A; Dhungana, G; Farina, C; Ferrante, F V; Flewelling, H A; Fox, O D; Fynbo, J; Gehrels, N; Georgiev, L; Gonzalez, J J; Greiner, J; Guver, T; Hartoog, O; Hatch, N; Jelinek, M; Kehoe, R; Klose, S; Klunko, E; Kopac, D; Kutyrev, A; Krugl, Y; Lee, W H; Levan, A; Linkov, V; Matkin, A; Minikulov, N; Molotov, I; Prochaska, J Xavier; Richer, M G; Roman-Zuniga, C G; Rumyantsev, V; Sanchez-Ramirez, R; Steele, I; Tanvir, N R; Volnova, A; Watson, A M; Xu, D; Yuan, F

    2014-01-01

    We present optical and near-infrared (NIR) photometry for three gamma-ray burst supernovae (GRB-SNe): GRB 120729A, GRB 130215A / SN 2013ez and GRB 130831A / SN 2013fu. In the case of GRB 130215A / SN 2013ez, we also present optical spectroscopy at t-t0=16.1 d, which covers rest-frame 3000-6250 Angstroms. Based on Fe II (5169) and Si (II) (6355), our spectrum indicates an unusually low expansion velocity of 4000-6350 km/s, the lowest ever measured for a GRB-SN. Additionally, we determined the brightness and shape of each accompanying SN relative to a template supernova (SN 1998bw), which were used to estimate the amount of nickel produced via nucleosynthesis during each explosion. We find that our derived nickel masses are typical of other GRB-SNe, and greater than those of SNe Ibc that are not associated with GRBs. For GRB 130831A / SN 2013fu, we use our well-sampled R-band light curve (LC) to estimate the amount of ejecta mass and the kinetic energy of the SN, finding that these too are similar to other GRB-...

  18. The ultraluminous GRB 110918A

    CERN Document Server

    Frederiks, D D; Svinkin, D S; Pal'shin, V D; Mangano, V; Oates, S; Aptekar, R L; Golenetskii, S V; Mazets, E P; Oleynik, Ph P; Tsvetkova, A E; Ulanov, M V; Kokomov, A V; Cline, T L; Burrows, D N; Krimm, H A; Pagani, C; Sbarufatti, B; Siegel, M H; Mitrofanov, I G; Golovin, D; Litvak, M L; Sanin, A B; Boynton, W; Fellows, C; Harshman, K; Enos, H; Starr, R; von Kienlin, A; Rau, A; Zhang, X; Goldstein, J

    2013-01-01

    GRB 110918A is the brightest long GRB detected by Konus-WIND during its 19 years of continuous observations and the most luminous GRB ever observed since the beginning of the cosmological era in 1997. We report on the final IPN localization of this event and its detailed multiwavelength study with a number of space-based instruments. The prompt emission is characterized by a typical duration, a moderare $E_{peak}$ of the time-integrated spectrum, and strong hard-to-soft evolution. The high observed energy fluence yields, at z=0.984, a huge isotropic-equivalent energy release $E_{iso}=(2.1\\pm0.1)\\times10^{54}$ erg. The record-breaking energy flux observed at the peak of the short, bright, hard initial pulse results in an unprecedented isotropic-equivalent luminosity $L_{iso}=(4.7\\pm0.2)\\times10^{54}$erg s$^{-1}$. A tail of the soft gamma-ray emission was detected with temporal and spectral behavior typical of that predicted by the synchrotron forward-shock model. Swift/XRT and Swift/UVOT observed the bright af...

  19. A Small, Rapid Optical-IR Response Gamma-Ray Burst Space Observatory (The NGRG)

    OpenAIRE

    Grossan, Bruce; Kumar, Pawan; Perley, Daniel; Smoot, George F.

    2014-01-01

    Here we propose a new gamma-ray burst (GRB) mission, the Next Generation Rapid-Response GRB Observatory (NGRG). As with Swift, GRBs are initially located with a coded-mask X-ray camera. However, the NGRG has two new features: First, a beam-steering system to begin optical observations within ~ 1 s after location; second, a near-IR (NIR) camera viewing the same sky, for sensitivity to extinguished bursts. These features allow measurement of the rise phase of GRB optical-NIR emission. Thus far,...

  20. Study of WATCH GRB error boxes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorosabel, J.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Lund, Niels;

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the first WATCH GRB Catalogue ofγ-ray Bursts in order to find correlations between WATCH GRB error boxes and a great variety of celestial objects present in 33 different catalogues. No particular class of objects has been found to be significantly correlated with the WATCH GRBs....

  1. GRB Probes of the High-z Universe with EXIST

    CERN Document Server

    Grindlay, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    The Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST) mission concept is optimized for study of high-z GRBs as probes of the early Universe. With a High Energy Telescope (HET) incorporating a 4.5m^2 5-600keV (CZT; 0.6mm pixels) detector plane for coded aperture imaging a 90deg x 70deg (>10% coding fraction) field of view with 2' resolution and 5 sigma sources, EXIST will perform rapid (7, EXIST will open a new era in studies of the early Universe as well as carry o ut a rich program of AGN and transient-source science. An overview of the GRB science objectives and a brief discussion of the overall mission design and operations is given, and example high-z GRB IRT spectra are shown. EXIST is being proposed to the Astro2010 Decadal Survey as a 5 year Medium Class mission that could be launched as early as 2017.

  2. Challenging GRB models through the broadband dataset of GRB060908

    CERN Document Server

    Covino, S; Conciatore, M L; D'Elia, V; Palazzi, E; Thöne, C C; Vergani, S D; Wiersema, K; Brusasca, M; Cucchiara, A; Cobb, B E; Fernandez-Soto, A; Kann, D A; Malesani, D; Tanvir, N R; Antonelli, L A; Bremer, M; Castro-Tirado, A J; Postigo, A de Ugarte; Molinari, E; Nicastro, L; Stefanon, M; Testa, V; Tosti, G; Vitali, F; Amati, L; Chapman, R; Conconi, P; Cutispoto, G; Fynbo, J P U; Goldoni, P; Henriksen, C; Horne, K D; Malaspina, G; Meurs, E J A; Pian, E; Stella, L; Tagliaferri, G; Ward, P; Zerbi, F M

    2010-01-01

    Context: Multiwavelength observations of gamma-ray burst prompt and afterglow emission are a key tool to disentangle the various possible emission processes and scenarios proposed to interpret the complex gamma-ray burst phenomenology. Aims: We collected a large dataset on GRB060908 in order to carry out a comprehensive analysis of the prompt emission as well as the early and late afterglow. Methods: Data from Swift-BAT, -XRT and -UVOT together with data from a number of different ground-based optical/NIR and millimeter telescopes allowed us to follow the afterglow evolution from about a minute from the high-energy event down to the host galaxy limit. We discuss the physical parameters required to model these emissions. Results: The prompt emission of GRB060908 was characterized by two main periods of activity, spaced by a few seconds of low intensity, with a tight correlation between activity and spectral hardness. Observations of the afterglow began less than one minute after the high-energy event, when it ...

  3. Keele Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodorus van Loon, Jacco; Albinson, James; Bagnall, Alan; Bryant, Lian; Caisley, Dave; Doody, Stephen; Johnson, Ian; Klimczak, Paul; Maddison, Ron; Robinson, StJohn; Stretch, Matthew; Webb, John

    2015-08-01

    Keele Observatory was founded by Dr. Ron Maddison in 1962, on the hill-top campus of Keele University in central England, hosting the 1876 Grubb 31cm refractor from Oxford Observatory. It since acquired a 61cm research reflector, a 15cm Halpha solar telescope and a range of other telescopes. Run by a group of volunteering engineers and students under directorship of a Keele astrophysicist, it is used for public outreach as well as research. About 4,000 people visit the observatory every year, including a large number of children. We present the facility, its history - including involvement in the 1919 Eddington solar eclipse expedition which proved Albert Einstein's theory of general relativity - and its ambitions to erect a radio telescope on its site.

  4. Discovery of GRB 020405 and its Underlying Supernova

    CERN Document Server

    Price, P A; Berger, E; Fox, D W; Bloom, J S; Djorgovski, S G; Frail, D A; Galama, T J; Harrison, F A; McCarthy, P; Reichart, D E; Sari, R; Yost, S A; Jerjen, H; Flint, K; Phillips, A; Warren, B E; Axelrod, T S; Chevalier, R A; Halpern, J P; Holtzmann, J A; Kimble, R A; Schmidt, B P; Wheeler, J C; Frontera, F; Costa, E; Piro, L; Hurley, K; Cline, T; Guidorzi, C; Montanari, E; Mazets, E; Golenetskii, S V; Mitrofanov, I G; Anfimov, D; Kozyrev, A B; Litvak, M; Sanin, A; Boynton, W; Fellows, C; Harshman, K; Shinohara, C; Gal-Yam, A; Ofek, E O; Lipkin, Yu M

    2002-01-01

    We present the discovery of GRB 020405 made with the Inter-Planetary Network (IPN). With a duration of 60 s, the burst appears to be a typical long duration event. We observed the 75-square acrminute IPN error region with the Mount Stromlo Observatory's 50-inch robotic telescope and discovered a transient source which subsequently decayed and was also associated with a variable radio source. We identify this source as the afterglow of GRB 020405. Subsequent observations by other groups found varying polarized flux and established a redshift of 0.690 to the host galaxy. Motivated by the low redshift we triggered observations with WFPC2 on-board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Modeling the early ground-based data with a jet model, we find a clear red excess over the decaying optical lightcurves that is present between day 10 and day 50 (the last HST epoch). This "bump" has the spectral and temporal features expected of an underlying supernova (SN). In particular, the red color of the putative SN is similar to...

  5. MAGIC upper limits on the GRB 090102 afterglow

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksić, J; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Babic, A; Bangale, P; de Almeida, U Barres; Barrio, J A; González, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Berger, K; Bernardini, E; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bock, R K; Bonnefoy, S; Bonnoli, G; Borracci, F; Bretz, T; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Fidalgo, D Carreto; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Covino, S; Da Vela, P; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Caneva, G; De Lotto, B; Mendez, C Delgado; Doert, M; Domínguez, A; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Einecke, S; Eisenacher, D; Elsaesser, D; Farina, E; Ferenc, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Frantzen, K; Fruck, C; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Terrats, D Garrido; Gaug, M; Giavitto, G; Godinović, N; Muñoz, A González; Gozzini, S R; Hadasch, D; Hayashida, M; Herrero, A; Hildebrand, D; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Idec, W; Kadenius, V; Kellermann, H; Knoetig, M L; Kodani, K; Konno, Y; Krause, J; Kubo, H; Kushida, J; La Barbera, A; Lelas, D; Lewandowska, N; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; López, M; López-Coto, R; López-Oramas, A; Lorenz, E; Lozano, I; Makariev, M; Mallot, K; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Marcote, B; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Menzel, U; Meucci, M; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Moralejo, A; Munar-Adrover, P; Nakajima, D; Niedzwiecki, A; Nilsson, K; Nishijima, K; Nowak, N; Orito, R; Overkemping, A; Paiano, S; Palatiello, M; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Paredes-Fortuny, X; Partini, S; Persic, M; Prada, F; Moroni, P G Prada; Prandini, E; Preziuso, S; Puljak, I; Reinthal, R; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Garcia, J Rodriguez; Rügamer, S; Saggion, A; Saito, T; Saito, K; Salvati, M; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Shore, S N; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Snidaric, I; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Stamatescu, V; Stamerra, A; Steinbring, T; Storz, J; Sun, S; Surić, T; Takalo, L; Takami, H; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzić, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Thaele, J; Tibolla, O; Torres, D F; Toyama, T; Treves, A; Vogler, P; Wagner, R M; Zandanel, F; Zanin, R; Bouvier, A; Tajima, H; Longo, F

    2013-01-01

    Indications of a GeV component in the emission from GRBs are known since the EGRET observations during the 1990's and they have been confirmed by the data of the Fermi satellite. These results have, however, shown that our understanding of GRB physics is still unsatisfactory. The new generation of Cherenkov observatories and in particular the MAGIC telescope, allow for the first time the possibility to extend the measurement of GRBs from several tens up to hundreds of GeV energy range. Both leptonic and hadronic processes have been suggested to explain the possible GeV/TeV counterpart of GRBs. Observations with ground-based telescopes of very high energy photons (E>30 GeV) from these sources are going to play a key role in discriminating among the different proposed emission mechanisms, which are barely distinguishable at lower energies. MAGIC telescope observations of the GRB 090102 (z=1.547) field and Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data in the same time interval are analysed to derive upper limits of the ...

  6. A double component in GRB 090618: a proto-black hole and a genuinely long gamma-ray burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, L.; Ruffini, R.; Penacchioni, A. V.; Bianco, C. L.; Caito, L.; Chakrabarti, S. K.; Rueda, J. A.; Nandi, A.; Patricelli, B.

    2012-07-01

    Context. The joint X-ray and gamma-ray observations of GRB 090618 by very many satellites offer an unprecedented possibility of testing crucial aspects of theoretical models. In particular, they allow us to test (a) in the process of gravitational collapse, the formation of an optically thick e+e--baryon plasma self-accelerating to Lorentz factors in the range 200 AGILE, RT-2, and Suzaku, as well as from on-ground optical observatories. Methods: We analyzed the emission from GRB 090618 using several spectral models, with special attention to the thermal and power-law components. We determined the fundamental parameters of a canonical GRB within the context of the fireshell model, including the identification of the total energy of the e+e- plasma, Etote+e-, the proper GRB (P-GRB), the baryon load, the density and structure of the CBM. Results: We find evidence of the existence of two different episodes in GRB 090618. The first episode lasts 50 s and is characterized by a spectrum consisting of a thermal component, which evolves between kT = 54 keV and kT = 12 keV, and a power law with an average index γ = 1.75 ± 0.04. The second episode, which lasts for ~100 s, behaves as a canonical long GRB with a Lorentz gamma factor at transparency of Γ = 495, a temperature at transparency of 29.22 keV and with a characteristic size of the surrounding clouds of Rcl ~ 1015-16 cm and masses of ~1022-24 g. Conclusions: We support the recently proposed two-component nature of GRB 090618, namely, episode 1 and episode 2, with a specific theoretical analysis. We furthermore illustrate that episode 1 cannot be considered to be either a GRB or a part of a GRB event, but it appears to be related to the progenitor of the collapsing bare core, leading to the formation of the black hole, which we call a "proto-black hole". Thus, for the first time, we are witnessing the process of formation of a black hole from the phases just preceding the gravitational collapse all the way up to the

  7. Radio Observations of GRB Afterglows

    CERN Document Server

    Weiler, K W; Montes, M J; Weiler, Kurt W.; Panagia, Nino; Montes, Marcos J.

    2002-01-01

    Since 1997 the afterglow of gamma-ray bursting sources (GRBs) has occasionally been detected in the radio, as well in other wavelengths bands. In particular, the interesting and unusual gamma-ray burst GRB980425, thought to be related to the radio supernova SN1998bw, is a possible link between the two classes of objects. Analyzing the extensive radio emission data avaliable for SN1998bw, one can describe its time evolution within the well established framework available for the analysis of radio emission from supernovae. This then allows relatively detailed description of a number of physical properties of the object. The radio emission can best be explained as the interaction of a mildly relativistic shock with a dense preexplosion stellar wind-established circumstellar medium (CSM) that is highly structured both azimuthally, in clumps or filaments, and radially, with observed density enhancements. Because of its unusual characteristics for a Type Ib/c supernova, the relation of SN1998bw to GRB980425 is stre...

  8. GRB Astrophysics in the Swift Era and Beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Stamatikos, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs) are relativistic cosmological beacons of transient high energy radiation whose afterglows span the electromagnetic spectrum. Theoretical expectations of correlated neutrino emission position GRBs at an astrophysical nexus for a metamorphosis in our understanding of the Cosmos. This new dawn in the era of experimental (particle) astrophysics and cosmology is afforded by current facilities enabling the novel astronomy of high energy neutrinos, in concert with unprecedented electromagnetic coverage. In that regard, GRBs represent a compelling scientific theme that may facilitate fundamental breakthroughs in the context of Swift, Fermi and IceCube. Scientific synergy will be achieved by leveraging the combined sensitivity of contemporaneous ground-based and satellite observatories, thus optimizing their collective discovery potential. Hence, the advent of GRB multi-messenger astronomy may cement an explicit connection to fundamental physics, via nascent cosmic windows, throughout the next ...

  9. FERMI OBSERVATIONS OF HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM GRB 090217A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fermi observatory is advancing our knowledge of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) through pioneering observations at high energies, covering more than seven decades in energy with the two on-board detectors, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). Here, we report on the observation of the long GRB 090217A which triggered the GBM and has been detected by the LAT with a significance greater than 9σ. We present the GBM and LAT observations and on-ground analyses, including the time-resolved spectra and the study of the temporal profile from 8 keV up to ∼1 GeV. All spectra are well reproduced by a Band model. We compare these observations to the first two LAT-detected, long bursts GRB 080825C and GRB 080916C. These bursts were found to have time-dependent spectra and exhibited a delayed onset of the high-energy emission, which are not observed in the case of GRB 090217A. We discuss some theoretical implications for the high-energy emission of GRBs.

  10. LCOGT Network Observatory Operations

    CERN Document Server

    Pickles, Andrew; Boroson, Todd; Burleson, Ben; Conway, Patrick; de Vera, Jon; Elphick, Mark; Haworth, Brian; Rosing, Wayne; Saunders, Eric; Thomas, Doug; White, Gary; Willis, Mark; Walker, Zach

    2014-01-01

    We describe the operational capabilities of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network. We summarize our hardware and software for maintaining and monitoring network health. We focus on methodologies to utilize the automated system to monitor availability of sites, instruments and telescopes, to monitor performance, permit automatic recovery, and provide automatic error reporting. The same jTCS control system is used on telescopes of apertures 0.4m, 0.8m, 1m and 2m, and for multiple instruments on each. We describe our network operational model, including workloads, and illustrate our current tools, and operational performance indicators, including telemetry and metrics reporting from on-site reductions. The system was conceived and designed to establish effective, reliable autonomous operations, with automatic monitoring and recovery - minimizing human intervention while maintaining quality. We illustrate how far we have been able to achieve that.

  11. GRB 070518: A Gamma-ray Burst with Optically Dim Luminosity

    CERN Document Server

    Xin, L P; Wang, J; Deng, J S; Urata, Y; Qiu, Y L; Huang, K Y; Hu, J Y; Wei, J Y

    2009-01-01

    We present our optical observations of {\\em Swift} GRB 070518 afterglow obtained at the 0.8-m Tsinghua University-National Astronomical Observatory of China telescope (TNT) at Xinglong Observatory. Our follow-up observations were performed from 512 sec after the burst trigger. With the upper limit of redshift $\\sim$0.7, GRB 070518 is found to be an optically dim burst. The spectra indices $\\beta_{ox}$ of optical to X-ray are slightly larger than 0.5, which implies the burst might be a dark burst. The extinction $A_{V}$ of the host galaxy is 3.2 mag inferred from the X-ray hydrogen column density with Galactic extinction law, and 0.3 mag with SMC extinction law. Also, it is similar to three other low-redshift optically dim bursts, which belong to XRR or XRF, and mid-term duration($T_{90}<10$, except for GRB 070419A, $T_{90}$=116s). Moreover, its $R$ band afterglow flux is well fitted by a single power-law with an index of 0.87. The optical afterglow and the X-ray afterglow in the normal segment might have t...

  12. GRB 130427A: A Nearby Ordinary Monster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maselli, A.; Melandri, A.; Nava, L.; Mundell, C. G.; Kawai, N.; Campana, S.; Covino, S.; Cummings, J. R.; Cusumano, G.; Evans, P. A.; Ghirlander, G.; Ghisellini, G.; Guidorzi, C.; Kobayashi, S.; Kuin, P.; La Parola, V.; Mangano, V.; Oates, S.; Barthelmy, S.; Gehrels, N.; Marshall, F.; Wiegand, B.

    2014-01-01

    Long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are an extremely rare outcome of the collapse of massive stars and are typically found in the distant universe. Because of its intrinsic luminosity (L approx. 3 x 10(exp 53) ergs/s and its relative proximity (z = 0.34), GRB 130427A reached the highest fluence observed in the gamma-ray band. Here, we present a comprehensive multiwavelength view of GRB 130427A with Swift, the 2-meter Liverpool and Faulkes telescopes, and by other ground-based facilities, highlighting the evolution of the burst emission from the prompt to the afterglow phase. The properties of GRB 130427A are similar to those of the most luminous, high-redshift GRBs, suggesting that a common central engine is responsible for producing GRBs in both the contemporary and the early universe and over the full range of GRB isotropic energies.

  13. The GRB/XRF-SN Association

    CERN Document Server

    Dar, Arnon

    2004-01-01

    There is mounting evidence that long duration gamma ray bursts (GRBs) and X-ray flashes (XRFs) are produced by highly relativistic and narrowly collimated jets ejected in core collapse supernova (SN) explosions akin to SN 1998bw. We review the history of the GRB-SN association idea and its observational verification. We summarize the present evidence for a GRB/XRF-SN association. We comment on the possibility that most, perhaps all, SN explosions produce GRBs, including SNe of Type Ia which may produce short GRBs/XRFs. We list the major open questions that follow from a GRB/XRF-SN association. Possible uses of the GRB-SN association in cosmology are pointed out.

  14. GRB 130427A: a Nearby Ordinary Monster

    CERN Document Server

    Maselli, A; Nava, L; Mundell, C G; Kawai, N; Campana, S; Covino, S; Cummings, J R; Cusumano, G; Evans, P A; Ghirlanda, G; Ghisellini, G; Guidorzi, C; Kobayashi, S; Kuin, P; La Parola, V; Mangano, V; Oates, S; Sakamoto, T; Serino, M; Virgili, F; Zhang, B -B; Barthelmy, S; Beardmore, A; Bernardini, M G; Bersier, D; Burrows, D; Calderone, G; Capalbi, M; Chiang, J; D'Avanzo, P; D'Elia, V; De Pasquale, M; Fugazza, D; Gehrels, N; Gomboc, A; Harrison, R; Hanayama, H; Japelj, J; Kennea, J; Kopac, D; Kouveliotou, C; Kuroda, D; Levan, A; Malesani, D; Marshall, F; Nousek, J; O'Brien, P; Osborne, J P; Pagani, C; Page, K L; Page, M; Perri, M; Pritchard, T; Romano, P; Saito, Y; Sbarufatti, B; Salvaterra, R; Steele, I; Tanvir, N; Vianello, G; Weigand, B; Wiersema, K; Yatsu, Y; Yoshii, T; Tagliaferri, G

    2014-01-01

    Long-duration Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are an extremely rare outcome of the collapse of massive stars, and are typically found in the distant Universe. Because of its intrinsic luminosity ($L\\sim 3 \\times 10^{53}$ erg s$^{-1}$) and its relative proximity ($z=0.34$), GRB 130427A was a unique event that reached the highest fluence observed in the gamma-ray band. Here we present a comprehensive multiwavelength view of GRB 130427A with Swift, the 2-m Liverpool and Faulkes telescopes and by other ground-based facilities, highlighting the evolution of the burst emission from the prompt to the afterglow phase. The properties of GRB 130427A are similar to those of the most luminous, high-redshift GRBs, suggesting that a common central engine is responsible for producing GRBs in both the contemporary and the early Universe and over the full range of GRB isotropic energies.

  15. Astronomical Observatory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansi Khanna

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This photograph was taken at Jantar Mantar, one of India’s most famous astronomical observatories, located in Central Delhi. It was built in 1724 by Maharaja Jai Singh II of Jaipur, who then went on to build other observatories in Jaipur, Varanasi, and Mathura. It was used to make astronomical tables and predict movements of the planets and the sun. Its name is derived from yantra meaning instruments and mantar meaning formula.Due to the construction of several high rise buildings around the monument, it is no longer used for astronomical purposes. It however continues to be one of the biggest tourist attractions of the capital city. 

  16. Radio Observations of GRB Host Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Stanway, E R; Davies, Luke J M

    2014-01-01

    We present 5.5 and 9.0 GHz observations of a sample of seventeen GRB host galaxies at 0.5GRB 100418A) likely due to lingering afterglow emission. We suggest that the previously-reported radio afterglow of GRB 100621A may instead be due to host galaxy flux. We see no strong evidence for redshift evolution in the typical star formation rate of GRB hosts, but note that the fraction of `dark' bursts with detections is higher than would be expected given constraints on the more typical long GRB population. We also determine the average radio-derived star formation rates of core collapse supernovae at comparable redshift, and show that these are still well below the limits obtained for GRB hosts, and show evidence for a rise in typical star formation rate with redshift in supernova hosts.

  17. Prompt GRB optical follow-up experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, H-S; Williams, G; Ables, E; Band, D; Barthelmy, S; Bionta, R; Cline, T; Gehrels, N; Hartmann, D; Hurley, K; Kippen, M; Nemiroff, R; Pereira, W; Porrata, R

    2000-11-13

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are brief, randomly located, releases of gamma-ray energy from unknown celestial sources that occur almost daily. The study of GRBs has undergone a revolution in the past three years due to an international effort of follow-up observations of coordinates provided by Beppo/SAX and IPN GRB. These follow-up observations have shown that GRBs are at cosmological distances and interact with surrounding material as described by the fireball model. However, prompt optical counterparts have only been seen in one case and are therefore very rare or much dimmer than the sensitivity of the current instruments. Unlike later time afterglows, prompt optical measurements would provide information on the GRB progenitor. LOTIS is the very first automated and dedicated telescope system that actively utilizes the GRB Coordinates Network (GCN) and it attempts to measure simultaneous optical light curve associated with GRBs. After 3 years of running, LOTIS has responded to 75 GRB triggers. The lack of any optical signal in any of the LOTIS images places numerical limits on the surrounding matter density, and other physical parameters in the environment of the GRB progenitor. This paper presents LOTIS results and describes other prompt GRB follow-up experiments including the Super-LOTIS at Kitt Peak in Arizona.

  18. Fermi Observations of High-Energy Gamma-Ray Emission from GRB 080916C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are highly energetic explosions signaling the death of massive stars in distant galaxies. The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor and Large Area Telescope onboard the Fermi Observatory together record GRBs over a broad energy range spanning about 7 decades of gamma-ray energy. In September 2008, Fermi observed the exceptionally luminous GRB 080916C, with the largest apparent energy release yet measured. The high-energy gamma rays are observed to start later and persist longer than the lower energy photons. A simple spectral form fits the entire GRB spectrum, providing strong constraints on emission models. The known distance of the burst enables placing lower limits on the bulk Lorentz factor of the outflow and on the quantum gravity mass. (authors)

  19. Fermi Observations of high-energy gamma-ray emissions from GRB 080916C

    CERN Document Server

    Abdo, A A; Arimoto, M; Asano, K; Atwood, W B; Axelsson, M; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Band, D L; Barbiellini, Guido; Baring, Matthew G; Bastieri, Denis; Battelino, M; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellardi, F; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Bhat, P N; Bissaldi, E; Blandford, R D; Bloom, Elliott D; Bogaert, G; Bogart, J R; Bonamente, E; Bonnell, J; Borgland, A W; Bouvier, A; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Briggs, M S; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, Thompson H; Burrows, David N; Busetto, Giovanni; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Ceccanti, M; Cecchi, C; Celotti, Annalisa; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C.C.Teddy; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, Johann; Cominsky, Lynn R; Connaughton, V; Conrad, J; Costamante, L; Cutini, S; DeKlotz, M; Dermer, C D; De Angelis, Alessandro; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; Dingus, B L; do Couto e Silva, Eduardo; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Edmonds, Y; Evans, P A; Fabiani, D; Farnier, C; Favuzzi, C; Finke, Justin D; Fishman, G; Focke, W B; Frailis, M; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giommi, P; Giordano, F; Glanzman, Thomas Lynn; Godfrey, Gary L; Goldstein, A; Granot, J; Greiner, J; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M H; Grove, J.Eric; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Haller, G; Hanabata, Y; Harding, Alice K; Hayashida, M; Hays, Elizabeth A; Hernando Morata, J A; Hoover, A; Hughes, R E; Johannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, R P; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Kamae, Tsuneyoshi; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Kavelaars, A; Kawai, N; Kelly, H; Kennea, J; Kerr, M; Kippen, R M; Knodlseder, J; Kocevski, D; Kocian, M L; Komin, N; Kouveliotou, C; Kuehn, Frederick Gabriel Ivar; Kuss, Michael; Lande, J; Landriu, D; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Lavalley, C; Lee, B; Lee, S H; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lichti, G G; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, Pasquale; Madejski, G M; Makeev, A; Marangelli, B; Mazziotta, M N; McBreen, Sheila; McEnery, J E; McGlynn, S; Meegan, C; Miszaros, P; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Minuti, M; Mirizzi, N; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Moretti, E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, Igor Vladimirovich; Murgia, Simona; Nakamori, T; Nelson, D; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, Takashi; Okumura, Akira; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Ozaki, M; Paciesas, W S; Paneque, D; Panetta, J H; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Perri, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Petrosian, Vahe; Pinchera, M; Piron, F; Porter, Troy A; Preece, R; Rainr, S; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Rando, R; Rapposelli, E; Razzano, M; Razzaque, Soebur; Rea, N; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, Thierry; Reyes, Luis C; Ritz, S; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, A Y; Roth, M; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F W; Sanchez, D; Sander, A; Parkinson, P.M.Saz; Scargle, J D; Schalk, T L; Segal, K N; Sgro, C; Shimokawabe, T; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Stamatikos, M; Starck, Jean-Luc; Stecker, Floyd William; Steinle, H; Stephens, T E; Strickman, M S; Suson, Daniel J; Tagliaferri, G.; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Tenze, A; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Torres, Diego F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Turri, M; Tuvi, S; Usher, T L; van der Horst, A J; Vigiani, L; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; von Kienlin, A; Waite, A P; Williams, D A; Wilson-Hodge, C; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Wu, X F; Yamazaki, R; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M

    2009-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are highly energetic explosions signaling the death of massive stars in distant galaxies. The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor and Large Area Telescope onboard the Fermi Observatory together record GRBs over a broad energy range spanning about 7 decades of gammaray energy. In September 2008, Fermi observed the exceptionally luminous GRB 080916C, with the largest apparent energy release yet measured. The high-energy gamma rays are observed to start later and persist longer than the lower energy photons. A simple spectral form fits the entire GRB spectrum, providing strong constraints on emission models. The known distance of the burst enables placing lower limits on the bulk Lorentz factor of the outflow and on the quantum gravity mass.

  20. Very Large Telescope/Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph and FORS2 spectroscopy of the GRB 081008 afterglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Elia, V.; Campana, S.; Covino, S.; D'Avanzo, P.; Piranomonte, S.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2011-11-01

    0.19 mag. The curve-of-growth analysis applied to the FORS2 spectra brings column densities consistent at the 3σ level to that evaluated from the UVES data using the line-fitting procedure. This reflects the low saturation of the detected GRB 081008 absorption features. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, ESO, the VLT/Kueyen telescope, Paranal, Chile, in the framework of the programme 082-0755.

  1. A next generation Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory (UFFO-100) for IR/optical observations of the rise phase of gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Grossan, B; Ahmad, S; Ahn, K B; Barrillon, P; Brandt, S; Budtz-Jørgensen, C; Castro-Tirado, A J; Chen, P; Choi, H S; Choi, Y J; Connell, P; Dagoret-Campagne, S; De La Taille, C; Eyles, C; Hermann, I; Huang, M –H A; Jung, A; Jeong, S; Kim, J E; Kim, M; Kim, S -W; Kim, Y W; Lee, J; Lim, H; Linder, E V; Liu, T –C; Lund, N; Min, K W; Na, G W; Nam, J W; Panasyuk, M I; Ripa, J; Reglero, V; Rodrigo, J M; Smoot, G F; Suh, J E; Svertilov, S; Vedenkin, N; Wang, M –Z; Yashin, I; Zhao, M H

    2012-01-01

    The Swift Gamma-ray Burst (GRB) observatory responds to GRB triggers with optical observations in ~ 100 s, but cannot respond faster than ~ 60 s. While some ground-based telescopes respond quickly, the number of sub-60 s detections remains small. In 2013 June, the Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory-Pathfinder is to be launched on the Lomonosov spacecraft to investigate early optical GRB emission. This pathfinder mission is necessarily limited in sensitivity and event rate; here we discuss a next generation rapid-response space observatory. We list science topics motivating our instruments, those that require rapid optical-IR GRB response, including: A survey of GRB rise shapes/times, measurements of optical bulk Lorentz factors, investigation of magnetic dominated (vs. non-magnetic) jet models, internal vs. external shock origin of prompt optical emission, the use of GRBs for cosmology, and dust evaporation in the GRB environment. We also address the impacts of the characteristics of GRB observing on our instrument...

  2. Solving the missing GRB neutrinos and the GRB-SN puzzles

    CERN Document Server

    Fargion, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    We argue that any GRB model where the progenitor is made by high relativistic hadronic interactions shock waves, and later on by electron-pairs feeding gamma jets, is necessarily leading to an average high neutrino over photon fluency ratio well above unity, mostly above several thousands. The present observed average highest energy ICECUBE neutrino energy fluency is at most comparable to the gamma-X in GRB one. Therefore no hadronic GRB, Fireball or even any earliest hadronic thin precessing Jet, may fit the observation. We therefore imagine a novel electronic thin spinning and precessing jet, fed in late binary system, able to avoid the overcrowded neutrino tails foreseen in hadronic GRB models. In some occasion such an electronic model may lead to an explosion that shines during a GRB with an (apparent) late SN-like event.

  3. Testing GRB models with the strange afterglow of GRB 090102

    CERN Document Server

    Gendre, B; Palazzi, E; Kruhler, T; Covino, S; Afonso, P; Antonelli, L A; Atteia, J L; D'Avanzo, P; Boër, M; Greiner, J; Klose, S

    2009-01-01

    We present the observations of the afterglow of gamma-ray burst GRB 090102. We use optical data taken by the TAROT, REM, GROND, Palomar and NOT telescopes, and X-ray data taken by the XRT instrument on board the Swift spacecraft. This event features an unusual light curve. In X-rays, it presents a very monotonic decrease with no hint of temporal break from 0.005 to 6 days after the burst. In optical, the light curve presents a flattening after 1 ks. Before this break, the optical light curve is steeper than the X-ray one. In optical, no further break is observed up to 10 days after the burst. We tried to explain these observations in light of the standard fireball model, but we failed to do so. We then investigated several other models, like the cannonball model. We find that the explanation of the broad band data by any model requires a strong fine tuning when taking into account both optical and X-ray bands.

  4. Ice Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    blugerman, n.

    2015-10-01

    My project is to make ice observatories to perceive astral movements as well as light phenomena in the shape of cosmic rays and heat, for example.I find the idea of creating an observation point in space, that in time will change shape and eventually disappear, in consonance with the way we humans have been approaching the exploration of the universe since we started doing it. The transformation in the elements we use to understand big and small transformations, within the universe elements.

  5. First hours of the GRB 030329 optical afterglow

    CERN Document Server

    Burenin, R A; Pavlinsky, M N; Denissenko, D V; Terekhov, O V; Tkachenko, A V; Aslan, Z; Khamitov, I; Uluc, K; Alpar, M A; Kiziloglu, U; Baykal, A; Bikmaev, I; Sakhibullin, N A; Suleymanov, V

    2003-01-01

    We present the first results of the observations of the extremely bright optical afterglow of gamma-ray burst (GRB) 030329 with the 1.5m Russian-Turkish telescope RTT150 (TUBITAK National Observatory, Bakyrlytepe, Turkey). RTT150 was one of the first 1.5m-class telescopes pointed to the afterglow. Observations were started approximately 6 hours after the burst. During the first 5 hours of our observations the afterglow faded exactly as a power law with index -1.19+-0.01 in each of the BVRI Bessel filters. After that, in all BVRI filters simultaneously we observe a steepening of the power law light curve. The power law decay index smoothly approaches the value ~= -1.9, observed by other observatories later. This power law break occurs at t-t_0 =0.57 days and lasts for +-0.1 days. We observe no variability above the gradual fading with the upper limits 10--1% on time scales 0.1--1000s. Spectral flux distribution in four BVRI filters corresponds to the power law spectrum with spectral index \\alpha=0.66+-0.01. Th...

  6. Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory for observation of early photons from gamma ray bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, I. H.; Ahmad, S.; Barrillon, P.;

    2012-01-01

    We describe the space project of Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory (UFFO) which will observe early optical photons from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with a sub-second optical response, for the first time. The UFFO will probe the early optical rise of GRBs, opening a completely new frontier in GRB and trans...

  7. GRB/GW Association: Long–Short GRB Candidates, Time Lag, Measuring Gravitational Wave Velocity, and Testing Einstein’s Equivalence Principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Hu, Yi-Ming; Fan, Yi-Zhong; Wei, Da-Ming

    2016-08-01

    Short-duration gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) are widely believed to be powered by the mergers of compact binaries, such as binary neutron stars or possibly neutron star–black hole binaries. Though the prospect of detecting SGRBs with gravitational wave (GW) signals by the advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO)/VIRGO network is promising, no known SGRB has been found within the expected advanced LIGO/VIRGO sensitivity range for binary neutron star systems. We find, however, that the two long–short GRBs (GRB 060505 and GRB 060614) may be within the horizon of advanced GW detectors. In the upcoming era of GW astronomy, the merger origin of some long–short GRBs, as favored by the macronova signature displayed in GRB 060614, can be unambiguously tested. The model-dependent time lags between the merger and the onset of the prompt emission of the GRB are estimated. The comparison of such time lags between model predictions and the real data expected in the era of the GW astronomy would be helpful in revealing the physical processes taking place at the central engine (including the launch of the relativistic outflow, the emergence of the outflow from the dense material ejected during the merger, and the radiation of gamma rays). We also show that the speed of GWs, with or without a simultaneous test of Einstein’s equivalence principle, can be directly measured to an accuracy of ∼ 3× {10}-8 {cm} {{{s}}}-1 or even better in the advanced LIGO/VIRGO era.

  8. GRB 080913 at redshift 6.7

    CERN Document Server

    Greiner, J; Fynbo, J P U; Rossi, A; Schwarz, R; Klose, S; Savaglio, S; Tanvir, N R; McBreen, S; Totani, T; Zhang, B B; Wu, X F; Watson, D; Barthelmy, S D; Beardmore, A P; Ferrero, P; Gehrels, N; Kann, D A; Kawai, N; Yoldas, A Kuepcue; Mészáros, P; Milvang-Jensen, B; Oates, S R; Pierini, D; Schady, P; Toma, K; Vreeswijk, P M; Yoldas, A; Zhang, B; Afonso, P; Aoki, K; Burrows, D N; Clemens, C; Filgas, R; Haiman, Z; Hartmann, D H; Hasinger, G; Hjorth, J; Jehin, E; Levan, A J; Liang, E W; Malesani, D; Pyo, T -S; Schulze, S; Szokoly, G; Terada, H; Wiersema, K

    2008-01-01

    We report on the detection by Swift of GRB 080913, and subsequent optical/near-infrared follow-up observations by GROND which led to the discovery of its optical/NIR afterglow and the recognition of its high-z nature via the detection of a spectral break between the i' and z' bands. Spectroscopy obtained at the ESO-VLT revealed a continuum extending down to lambda = 9400 A, and zero flux for 7500 A < lambda<9400 A, which we interpret as the onset of a Gunn-Peterson trough at z=6.695+-0.025 (95.5% conf. level), making GRB 080913 the highest redshift GRB to date, and more distant than the highest-redshift QSO. We note that many redshift indicators which are based on promptly available burst or afterglow properties have failed for GRB 080913. We report on our follow-up campaign and compare the properties of GRB 080913 with bursts at lower redshift. In particular, since the afterglow of this burst is fainter than typical for GRBs, we show that 2m-class telescopes can identify most high-redshift GRBs.

  9. Swift Observatory Space Simulation Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espiritu, Mellina; Choi, Michael K.; Scocik, Christopher S.

    2004-01-01

    The Swift Observatory is a Middle-Class Explorer (MIDEX) mission that is a rapidly re-pointing spacecraft with immediate data distribution capability to the astronomical community. Its primary objectives are to characterize and determine the origin of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) and to use the collected data on GRB phenomena in order to probe the universe and gain insight into the physics of black hole formation and early universe. The main components of the spacecraft are the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT), Ultraviolet and Optical Telescope (UVOT), X-Ray Telescope (XRT), and Optical Bench (OB) instruments coupled with the Swift spacecraft (S/C) bus. The Swift Observatory will be tested at the Space Environment Simulation (SES) chamber at the Goddard Space Flight Center from May to June 2004 in order to characterize its thermal behavior in a vacuum environment. In order to simulate the independent thermal zones required by the BAT, XRT, UVOT, and OB instruments, the spacecraft is mounted on a chariot structure capable of maintaining adiabatic interfaces and enclosed in a modified, four section MSX fixture in order to accommodate the strategic placement of seven cryopanels (on four circuits), four heater panels, and a radiation source burst simulator mechanism. There are additionally 55 heater circuits on the spacecraft. To mitigate possible migration of silicone contaminants from BAT to the XRT and UVOT instruments, a contamination enclosure is to be fabricated around the BAT at the uppermost section of the MSX fixture. This paper discuses the test requirements and implemented thermal vacuum test configuration for the Swift Observatory.

  10. GRB 081007 AND GRB 090424: THE SURROUNDING MEDIUM, OUTFLOWS, AND SUPERNOVAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin Zhiping; Covino, Stefano; Fugazza, Dino; Melandri, Andrea; Campana, Sergio; D' Avanzo, Paolo [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, via Emilio Bianchi 46, I-23807 Merate (Italy); Della Valle, Massimo [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, Salita Moiariello, 16, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); Ferrero, Patrizia [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias (IAC), E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Malesani, Daniele; Fynbo, Johan P. U.; Hjorth, Jens [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark); Pian, Elena [Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, I-56126 Pisa (Italy); Salvaterra, Ruben [INAF-IASF Milano, via E. Bassini 15, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Bersier, David [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Egerton Wharf, Birkenhead CH41 1LD (United Kingdom); Cano, Zach [Centre for Astrophysics and Cosmology, Science Institute, University of Iceland, Reykjavik (Iceland); Castro-Tirado, Alberto J.; Gorosabel, Javier [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (IAA-CSIC), Glorieta de la Astronomia s/n, E-18008 Granada (Spain); Gomboc, Andreja [Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana, Jadranska ulica 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Guidorzi, Cristiano [Department of Physics, University of Ferrara, via Saragat 1, I-44122 Ferrara (Italy); Haislip, Joshua B., E-mail: jin@pmo.ac.cn [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); and others

    2013-09-10

    We discuss the results of the analysis of multi-wavelength data for the afterglows of GRB 081007 and GRB 090424, two bursts detected by Swift. One of them, GRB 081007, also shows a spectroscopically confirmed supernova, SN 2008hw, which resembles SN 1998bw in its absorption features, while the maximum magnitude may be fainter, up to 0.7 mag, than observed in SN 1998bw. Bright optical flashes have been detected in both events, which allows us to derive solid constraints on the circumburst-matter density profile. This is particularly interesting in the case of GRB 081007, whose afterglow is found to be propagating into a constant-density medium, yielding yet another example of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) clearly associated with a massive-star progenitor which did not sculpt the surroundings with its stellar wind. There is no supernova component detected in the afterglow of GRB 090424, likely due to the brightness of the host galaxy, comparable to the Milky Way. We show that the afterglow data are consistent with the presence of both forward- and reverse-shock emission powered by relativistic outflows expanding into the interstellar medium. The absence of optical peaks due to the forward shock strongly suggests that the reverse-shock regions should be mildly magnetized. The initial Lorentz factor of outflow of GRB 081007 is estimated to be {Gamma} {approx} 200, while for GRB 090424 a lower limit of {Gamma} > 170 is derived. We also discuss the prompt emission of GRB 081007, which consists of just a single pulse. We argue that neither the external forward-shock model nor the shock-breakout model can account for the prompt emission data and suggest that the single-pulse-like prompt emission may be due to magnetic energy dissipation of a Poynting-flux-dominated outflow or to a dissipative photosphere.

  11. HST\\/STIS observations of GRB000301C CCD imaging and NUV MAMA spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Smette, A; Gull, T R; Sahu, K C; Petro, L; Ferguson, H; Rhoads, J E; Lindler, D; Gibbons, R A; Hogg, D W; Kouveliotou, C; Livio, M; Macchetto, D; Metzger, M R; Pedersen, H; Pian, E; Thorsett, S E; Wijers, R A M J; Fynbo, J P U; Gorosabel, J; Hjorth, J; Jensen, B L; Levine, A; Smith, D A; Cline, T; Hurley, K; Trombka, J I

    2000-01-01

    We present HST/STIS observations of the optical counterpart (OT) of the gamma-ray burster GRB 000301C obtained on 2000 March 6, five days after the burst. CCD clear aperture imaging reveals a R ~ 21.50+/-0.15 source with no apparent host galaxy. An 8000 s, 1150 18 on the line-of-sight to the OT. This value is conservatively a lower limit to the GRB redshift. However, the facts that large N(HI) system are usually considered as progenitors of present day galaxies and that other OTs are found associated with star forming galaxies strongly suggest that it is the GRB redshift. In any case, this represents the largest direct redshift determination of a gamma-ray burster to date. Our data are compatible with an OT spectrum represented by a power-law with an intrinsic index \\alpha = 1.2((f_nu \\propto nu^-alpha) and no extinction in the host galaxy or with alpha = 0.5 and extinction by a SMC-like dust in the OT rest-frame with A_V = 0.15. The large N(HI) and the lack of detected host is similar to the situation for d...

  12. The ``Christmas burst'' GRB 101225A revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thöne, C. C.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Fryer, C. L.; Kann, D. A.

    2015-03-01

    Long GRBs are related to the death of massive stars and reveal themselves through synchrotron emission from highly relativistic jets. The `Christmas Burst' GRB 101225A was an exceptionally long GRB with a thermal afterglow, very different from the standard GRB. Initially, no spectroscopic redshift could be obtained and SED modeling yielded z=0.33. A plausible model was a He-NS star merger where the He-star had ejected part of its envelope in the common envelope phase during inspiral. The interaction between the jet and the previously ejected shell can explains the thermal emission. We obtained deep spectroscopy of the host galaxy which leads to a correction of the redshift to z=0.847. Despite the higher redshift, our model is still valid and theoretically better justified than the alternative suggestion of a blue supergiant progenitor proposed by Levan et al. (2014) for several ``ultra-long'' GRBs.

  13. Variable-aperture screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, George M.

    1991-01-01

    Apparatus for separating material into first and second portions according to size including a plurality of shafts, a plurality of spaced disks radiating outwardly from each of the shafts to define apertures and linkage interconnecting the shafts for moving the shafts toward or away from one another to vary the size of the apertures while the apparatus is performing the separating function.

  14. Mastering Apple Aperture

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzgerald, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Written in a conversational style, the author will share his knowledge on advanced Aperture topics with detailed discussions of advanced topics, the theory behind some of those topics and lots of hints and tips for ways to improve your workflow.Photographer's who have a basic understanding of Aperture

  15. Synthetic Aperture Sequential Beamforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kortbek, Jacob; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Gammelmark, Kim Løkke

    2008-01-01

    A synthetic aperture focusing (SAF) technique denoted Synthetic Aperture Sequential Beamforming (SASB) suitable for 2D and 3D imaging is presented. The technique differ from prior art of SAF in the sense that SAF is performed on pre-beamformed data contrary to channel data. The objective is to...

  16. The GRB/XRF-SN Association

    OpenAIRE

    Dar, Arnon

    2004-01-01

    There is mounting evidence that long duration gamma ray bursts (GRBs) and X-ray flashes (XRFs) are produced by highly relativistic and narrowly collimated jets ejected in core collapse supernova (SN) explosions akin to SN 1998bw. We review the history of the GRB-SN association idea and its observational verification. We summarize the present evidence for a GRB/XRF-SN association. We comment on the possibility that most, perhaps all, SN explosions produce GRBs, including SNe of Type Ia which m...

  17. POLAR: a space borne GRB polarimeter

    OpenAIRE

    Lamanna, G; Fouque, N.; Hermel, R.; Vialle, J. P.; Hofer, H; Lechanoine-Leluc, C.; Orsi, S.; Pohl, M.; Rapin, D.; Gierlik, S.M.; Marcinkowski, R.; Courvoisier, T.; Haas, D.; Produit, N.; Hajdas, W.

    2008-01-01

    The direction and the level of polarization of high energy photons emitted by astrophysics sources are valuable observables for the understanding of the corresponding emission mechanisms, source geometry and strength of magnetic fields at work. POLAR is a novel compact space-borne detector conceived for a precise measurement of hard X-ray polarization and optimized for the detection of Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) photons in the energy range 50-500 keV. In POLAR, the GRB photons undergo Compton scat...

  18. Rotating Aperture System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusnak, Brian; Hall, James M.; Shen, Stewart; Wood, Richard L.

    2005-01-18

    A rotating aperture system includes a low-pressure vacuum pumping stage with apertures for passage of a deuterium beam. A stator assembly includes holes for passage of the beam. The rotor assembly includes a shaft connected to a deuterium gas cell or a crossflow venturi that has a single aperture on each side that together align with holes every rotation. The rotating apertures are synchronized with the firing of the deuterium beam such that the beam fires through a clear aperture and passes into the Xe gas beam stop. Portions of the rotor are lapped into the stator to improve the sealing surfaces, to prevent rapid escape of the deuterium gas from the gas cell.

  19. GRB 091024A and the nature of ultra-long gamma-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a broadband study of gamma-ray burst (GRB) 091024A within the context of other ultra-long-duration GRBs. An unusually long burst detected by Konus-Wind (KW), Swift, and Fermi, GRB 091024A has prompt emission episodes covering ∼1300 s, accompanied by bright and highly structured optical emission captured by various rapid-response facilities, including the 2 m autonomous robotic Faulkes North and Liverpool Telescopes, KAIT, S-LOTIS, and the Sonoita Research Observatory. We also observed the burst with 8 and 10 m class telescopes and determine the redshift to be z = 1.0924 ± 0.0004. We find no correlation between the optical and γ-ray peaks and interpret the optical light curve as being of external origin, caused by the reverse and forward shock of a highly magnetized jet (RB ≈ 100-200). Low-level emission is detected throughout the near-background quiescent period between the first two emission episodes of the KW data, suggesting continued central-engine activity; we discuss the implications of this ongoing emission and its impact on the afterglow evolution and predictions. We summarize the varied sample of historical GRBs with exceptionally long durations in gamma-rays (≳1000 s) and discuss the likelihood of these events being from a separate population; we suggest ultra-long GRBs represent the tail of the duration distribution of the long GRB population.

  20. GRB 091024A and the nature of ultra-long gamma-ray bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virgili, F. J.; Mundell, C. G.; Harrison, R.; Kobayashi, S.; Steele, I. A.; Mottram, C. J.; Clay, N. R. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, L3 5RF (United Kingdom); Pal' shin, V. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Guidorzi, C. [Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, University of Ferrara, Via Saragat, 1, I-44122 Ferrara (Italy); Margutti, R.; Chornock, R. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Melandri, A. [INAF/Brera Astronomical Observatory, via Bianchi 46, I-23807 Merate (Italy); Henden, A. [AAVSO, 49 Bay State Road, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Updike, A. C. [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI 02809 (United States); Cenko, S. B. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Tanvir, N. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Cucchiara, A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Gomboc, A. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana, Jadranska 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Levan, A. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Cano, Z., E-mail: F.J.Virgili@ljmu.ac.uk [Centre for Astrophysics and Cosmology, Science Institute, University of Iceland, 107 Reykjavik (Iceland); and others

    2013-11-20

    We present a broadband study of gamma-ray burst (GRB) 091024A within the context of other ultra-long-duration GRBs. An unusually long burst detected by Konus-Wind (KW), Swift, and Fermi, GRB 091024A has prompt emission episodes covering ∼1300 s, accompanied by bright and highly structured optical emission captured by various rapid-response facilities, including the 2 m autonomous robotic Faulkes North and Liverpool Telescopes, KAIT, S-LOTIS, and the Sonoita Research Observatory. We also observed the burst with 8 and 10 m class telescopes and determine the redshift to be z = 1.0924 ± 0.0004. We find no correlation between the optical and γ-ray peaks and interpret the optical light curve as being of external origin, caused by the reverse and forward shock of a highly magnetized jet (R{sub B} ≈ 100-200). Low-level emission is detected throughout the near-background quiescent period between the first two emission episodes of the KW data, suggesting continued central-engine activity; we discuss the implications of this ongoing emission and its impact on the afterglow evolution and predictions. We summarize the varied sample of historical GRBs with exceptionally long durations in gamma-rays (≳1000 s) and discuss the likelihood of these events being from a separate population; we suggest ultra-long GRBs represent the tail of the duration distribution of the long GRB population.

  1. Multiwavelength Observations of GRB 110731A: GeV Emission from Onset to Afterglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Asano, K.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Blandford, R. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Granot, J.; Greiner, J.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hughes, R. E.; Jackson, M. S.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Mehault, J.; Mészáros, P.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Nymark, T.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Racusin, J. L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Romoli, C.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sanchez, D. A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Sonbas, E.; Spinelli, P.; Stamatikos, M.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Tibaldo, L.; Tinivella, M.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Yang, Z.; Gruber, D.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Briggs, M. S.; Burgess, J. M.; Connaughton, V.; Foley, S.; Kippen, R. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; McBreen, S.; McGlynn, S.; Paciesas, W. S.; Pelassa, V.; Preece, R.; Rau, A.; van der Horst, A. J.; von Kienlin, A.; Kann, D. A.; Filgas, R.; Klose, S.; Krühler, T.; Fukui, A.; Sako, T.; Tristram, P. J.; Oates, S. R.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Littlejohns, O.

    2013-02-01

    We report on the multiwavelength observations of the bright, long gamma-ray burst GRB 110731A, by the Fermi and Swift observatories, and by the MOA and GROND optical telescopes. The analysis of the prompt phase reveals that GRB 110731A shares many features with bright Large Area Telescope bursts observed by Fermi during the first three years on-orbit: a light curve with short time variability across the whole energy range during the prompt phase, delayed onset of the emission above 100 MeV, extra power-law component and temporally extended high-energy emission. In addition, this is the first GRB for which simultaneous GeV, X-ray, and optical data are available over multiple epochs beginning just after the trigger time and extending for more than 800 s, allowing temporal and spectral analysis in different epochs that favor emission from the forward shock in a wind-type medium. The observed temporally extended GeV emission is most likely part of the high-energy end of the afterglow emission. Both the single-zone pair transparency constraint for the prompt signal and the spectral and temporal analysis of the forward-shock afterglow emission independently lead to an estimate of the bulk Lorentz factor of the jet Γ ~ 500-550.

  2. Detailed Afterglow Modeling and Host Galaxy Properties of the Dark GRB 111215A

    CERN Document Server

    van der Horst, A J; Pooley, G G; Wiersema, K; Kruhler, T; Perley, D A; Starling, R L C; Curran, P A; Tanvir, N R; Wijers, R A M J; Strom, R G; Kouveliotou, C; Hartoog, O E; Xu, D; Fynbo, J P U; Jakobsson, P

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) 111215A was bright at X-ray and radio frequencies, but not detected in the optical or near-infrared (nIR) down to deep limits. We have observed the GRB afterglow with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope and Arcminute Microkelvin Imager at radio frequencies, with the William Herschel Telescope and Nordic Optical Telescope in the nIR/optical, and with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We have combined our data with the Swift X-Ray Telescope monitoring, and radio and millimeter observations from the literature to perform broadband modeling, and determined the macro- and microphysical parameters of the GRB blast wave. By combining the broadband modeling results with our nIR upper limits we have put constraints on the extinction in the host galaxy. This is consistent with the optical extinction we have derived from the excess X-ray absorption, and higher than in other dark bursts for which similar modeling work has been performed. We also present deep imaging of the host galaxy with the Kec...

  3. Haystack Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    Radio astronomy programs comprise three very-long-baseline interferometer projects, ten spectral line investigations, one continuum mapping in the 0.8 cm region, and one monitoring of variable sources. A low-noise mixer was used in mapping observations of 3C273 at 31 GHz and in detecting of a new methyl alcohol line at 36,169 MHz in Sgr B2. The new Mark 2 VLBI recording terminal was used in galactic H2O source observations using Haystack and the Crimean Observatory, USSR. One feature in W29 appears to have a diameter of 0.3 millisec of arc and a brightness temperature of 1.4 x 10 to the 15th power K. Geodetic baseline measurements via VLBI between Green Bank and Haystack are mutually consistent within a few meters. Radar investigations of Mercury, Venus, Mars, and the Moon have continued. The favorable opposition of Mars and improvements in the radar permit measurements on a number of topographic features with unprecedented accuracy, including scarps and crater walls. The floor of Mare Serenitatis slopes upward towards the northeast and is also the location of a strong gravitational anomaly.

  4. Mutantes de Grb7 y Grb7V con actividad antiangiogénica y su uso en procedimientos biomédicos

    OpenAIRE

    Villalobo, Antonio; Sánchez Torres, Juan; Moreno García, María Jesús; Stanimirovic, Danica

    2006-01-01

    Mutantes de Grb7 y Grb7V con actividad antiangiogénica y su uso en procedimientos biomédicos. La invención proporciona mutantes de la proteína adaptadora Grb7 humana y de su variante natural Grb7V, ambas carentes de un dominio funcional implicado en la unión de la calmodulina, Grb7 y Grb7V , y medios condicionados derivados de células transfectadas por Grb7 y Grb7V con actividad biológica, incluyendo entre otras la modulación positiva o negativa de la angiogénesis, l...

  5. GRB 090323 and GRB 090328: two long high-energy GRBs detected with Fermi

    OpenAIRE

    Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Collaboration, for the Fermi GBM

    2010-01-01

    We present the analysis of two long Gamma-Ray Bursts, GRB 090323 and GRB 090328, which triggered the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and generated an Autonomous Repoint Request to the Fermi Large Area Telescope. The GBM light curves show multi-peaked structures for both events. Here, we present time-integrated and time-resolved burst spectra fitted with different models by the GBM detectors.

  6. Hyper-accreting black hole as GRB central engine. I: Baryon loading in GRB jets

    OpenAIRE

    Lei, Wei-Hua; Zhang, Bing; Liang, En-Wei

    2012-01-01

    A hyper-accreting stellar-mass black hole has been long speculated as the best candidate of central engine of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Recent rich observations of GRBs by space missions such as Swift and Fermi pose new constraints on GRB central engine models. In this paper, we study the baryon loading processes of a GRB jet launched from a black hole central engine. We consider a relativistic jet powered by $\

  7. ALMA SUBMILLIMETER CONTINUUM IMAGING OF THE HOST GALAXIES OF GRB 021004 AND GRB 080607

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report 345 GHz continuum observations of the host galaxies of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) 021004 and 080607 at z > 2 using the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) in Cycle 0. Of the two bursts, GRB 021004 is one of the few GRBs that originate in a Lyman limit host, while GRB 080607 is classified as a 'dark burst' and its host galaxy is a candidate of dusty star-forming galaxy at z ∼ 3. With an order of magnitude improvement in the sensitivities of the new imaging searches, we detect the host galaxy of GRB 080607 with a flux of S345 = 0.31 ± 0.09 mJy and a corresponding infrared luminosity of LIR = (2.4-4.5) × 1011 L☉. However, the host galaxy of GRB 021004 remains undetected and the ALMA observations allow us to place a 3σ upper limit of LIR 11 L☉ for the host galaxy. The continuum imaging observations show that the two galaxies are not ultraluminous infrared galaxies, but are at the faintest end of the dusty galaxy population that gives rise to the submillimeter extragalactic background light. The derived star formation rates of the two GRB host galaxies are less than 100 M☉ yr–1, which are broadly consistent with optical measurements. The result suggests that the large extinction (AV ∼ 3) in the afterglow of GRB 080607 is confined along its particularly dusty sight line, and not representative of the global properties of the host galaxy.

  8. Could the GRB-Supernovae GRB 031203 and XRF 060218 be Cosmic Twins?

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Lu

    2009-01-01

    The gamma-ray burst (GRB) / X-ray flash (XRF) events GRB 031203, discovered by INTEGRAL, and XRF 060218, discovered by Swift, represent two of only five GRB-SNe with optical spectroscopic confirmation of their SN components. Yet their observed high-energy properties offer a sharp contrast: While GRB 031203 was detected as a short 40-s burst with a spectrum peaking at E_peak > 190 keV, XRF 060218 was a T_90 ~ 2100-s long, smoothly-evolving burst with peak energy E_peak = 4.9 keV. At the same time, the properties of the two expanding dust-scattered X-ray halos observed in a fast-response XMM-Newton observation of GRB 031203 reveal that this event was accompanied by an "X-ray blast" with fluence comparable to or greater than that of the prompt gamma-ray event. Taking this observation as our starting point, we investigate the likely properties of the X-ray blast from GRB 031203 via detailed modeling of the XMM data, discovering a third halo due to scattering off a more distant dust sheet at d_3 = 9.94 +/- 0.39 kp...

  9. GRB 081007 and GRB 090424: the surrounding medium, outflows and supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Zhi-Ping; Della Valle, Massimo; Ferrero, Patrizia; Fugazza, Dino; Malesani, Daniele; Melandri, Andrea; Pian, Elena; Salvaterra, Ruben; Bersier, David; Campana, Sergio; Cano, Zach; D'Avanzo, Paolo; Fynbo, Johan P U; Guidorzi, Cristiano; Haislip, Joshua B; Hjorth, Jens; LaCluyze, Aaron P; Marconi, Gianni; Mazzali, Paolo A; Piranomonte, Silvia; Reichart, Daniel E; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero; Tanvir, Nial R; Valenti, Stefano; Vergani, Susanna D; Vestrand, Thomas; Walker, Emma S; Wozniak, Przemyslaw

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the results of the analysis of multi-wavelength data for the afterglows of GRB 081007 and GRB 090424, two bursts detected by Swift. One of them, GRB 081007, also shows a spectroscopically confirmed supernova, SN 2008hw, which resembles SN 1998bw in its absorption features, while the maximum luminosity is only about half as large as that of SN 1998bw. Bright optical flashes have been detected in both events, which allows us to derive solid constraints on the circumburst-matter density profile. This is particularly interesting in the case of GRB 081007, whose afterglow is found to be propagating into a constant-density medium, yielding yet another example of a GRB clearly associated with a massive star progenitor which did not sculpt the surroundings with its stellar wind. There is no supernova component detected in the afterglow of GRB 090424, likely due to the brightness of the host galaxy, comparable to the Milky Way. We show that the afterglow data are consistent with the presence of both forward...

  10. GRB070610 : A Curious Galactic Transient

    CERN Document Server

    Kasliwal, M M; Kulkarni, S R; Cameron, P B; Nakar, E; Ofek, E O; Rau, A; Soderberg, A M; Campana, S; Bloom, J S; Perley, D A; Pollack, L; Barthelmy, S; Cummings, J; Gehrels, N; Krimm, H A; Markwardt, C B; Sato, G; Chandra, P; Frail, D; Fox, D B; Price, P; Berger, E; Grebenev, S A; Krivonos, R A; Sunyaev, R A

    2007-01-01

    GRB070610 is a typical high-energy event with a duration of 5s. Yet within the burst localization we detect a highly unusual X-ray and optical transient, Swift J195509.6+261406. We see high amplitude X-ray and optical variability on very short time scales even at late times. Using near-infrared imaging assisted by a laser guide star and adaptive optics, we have identified a quiescent counterpart to Swift J195509.6+261406. Our spectroscopic observations show that the spectral type of the counterpart is likely a K dwarf/sub-giant. It is possible that GRB070610 and Swift J195509.6+261406 are unrelated sources. However, the absence of a typical X-ray afterglow from GRB070610 in conjunction with the spatial and temporal coincidence of GRB070610 and Swift J195509.6+261406 motivate us to suggest that the sources are related. The closest analog to Swift J195509.6+261406 is V4641 Sgr, an unusual black hole binary. We suggest that Swift J195509.6+261406 along with V4641 Sgr define a sub-class of stellar black holes -- ...

  11. GRB 080913 at redshift 6.7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greiner, J.; Krühler, T.; Fynbo, J. P. U.;

    2009-01-01

    We report on the detection by Swift of GRB 080913, and subsequent optical/near-infrared follow-up observations by GROND, which led to the discovery of its optical/NIR afterglow and the recognition of its high-z nature via the detection of a spectral break between the i' and z' bands. Spectroscopy...

  12. The Swift GRB Host Galaxy Legacy Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perley, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    I will describe the Swift Host Galaxy Legacy Survey (SHOALS), a comprehensive multiwavelength program to characterize the demographics of the GRB host population and its redshift evolution from z=0 to z=7. Using unbiased selection criteria we have designated a subset of 119 Swift gamma-ray bursts which are now being targeted with intensive observational follow-up. Deep Spitzer imaging of every field has already been obtained and analyzed, with major programs ongoing at Keck, GTC, Gemini, VLT, and Magellan to obtain complementary optical/NIR photometry and spectroscopy to enable full SED modeling and derivation of fundamental physical parameters such as mass, extinction, and star-formation rate. Using these data I will present an unbiased measurement of the GRB host-galaxy luminosity and mass distributions and their evolution with redshift, compare GRB hosts to other star-forming galaxy populations, and discuss implications for the nature of the GRB progenitor and the ability of GRBs to serve as tools for measuring and studying cosmic star-formation in the distant universe.

  13. The short GRB 051210 observed by Swift

    OpenAIRE

    La Parola, V.; Mangano, V.; B. Zhang; Cusumano, G.; Mineo, T.; Troja, E.; Burrows, D.N.; Campana, S.; Capalbi, M.; Chincarini, G.; Giommi, P.; A. Moretti(Fermilab, Batavia, IL, USA); Perri, M; Romano, P; Tagliaferri, G.

    2007-01-01

    We report on the short GRB051210 detected by the Swift-BAT. The light curve, on which we focus mainly, shows a hint of extended emission in the BAT energy range, a steep decay of the X-ray emission, without any flattening or break, and two small flares in the first 300 sec. The emission fades out after ~1000 s.

  14. GRB 011121 A Massive Star Progenitor

    CERN Document Server

    Price, P A; Reichart, D E; Kulkarni, S R; Subramanian, R; Wark, R M; Wieringa, M H; Frail, D A; Bailey, J; Boyle, B; Corbett, E A; Gunn, K; Ryder, S D; Seymour, N; Koviak, K; McCarthy, P; Phillips, M; Axelrod, T S; Bloom, J S; Djorgovski, S G; Fox, D W; Galama, T J; Harrison, F A; Hurley, K; Sari, R; Schmidt, B P; Yost, S A; Brown, M J I; Cline, T; Frontera, F; Guidorzi, C; Montanari, E

    2002-01-01

    Of the cosmological gamma-ray bursts, GRB 011121 has the lowest redshift, z=0.36. More importantly, the multi-color excess in the afterglow detected in the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) light curves is compelling observational evidence for an underlying supernova. Here we present near-infrared and radio observations of the afterglow. We undertake a comprehensive modeling of these observations and those reported in the literature and find good evidence favoring a wind-fed circumburst medium. In detail, we infer the progenitor had a mass loss rate of Mdot ~ 10^-7 / v_w3 Mo/yr where v_w3 is the speed of the wind from the progenitor in units of 10^3 km/s. This mass loss rate is similar to that inferred for the progenitor of SN 1998bw which has been associated with GRB 980425. Our data, taken in conjunction with the HST results of Bloom et al. (2002), provide a consistent picture: the long duration GRB 011121 had a massive star progenitor which exploded as a supernova at about the same time as the GRB event.

  15. Early Stages of the GRB Explosion

    OpenAIRE

    Beloborodov, Andrei M.

    2004-01-01

    Physics of GRB blast waves is discussed with a focus on two effects: (1) pair creation in the external medium by the gamma-ray front and (2) decay of neutrons ahead of the decelerating blast wave. Both effects impact the afterglow mechanism at radii up to 10^{17}cm.

  16. Sub-Aperture Interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Feng

    2010-01-01

    Sub-aperture interferometers -- also called wavefront-split interferometers -- have been developed for simultaneously measuring displacements of multiple targets. The terms "sub-aperture" and "wavefront-split" signify that the original measurement light beam in an interferometer is split into multiple sub-beams derived from non-overlapping portions of the original measurement-beam aperture. Each measurement sub-beam is aimed at a retroreflector mounted on one of the targets. The splitting of the measurement beam is accomplished by use of truncated mirrors and masks, as shown in the example below

  17. Photodisintegrated gamma rays and neutrinos from heavy nuclei in the gamma-ray burst jet of GRB 130427A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Jagdish C.; Razzaque, Soebur; Moharana, Reetanjali

    2016-05-01

    Detection of ˜0.1-70 GeV prompt γ-ray emission from the exceptionally bright gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130427A by the Fermi-Large Area Telescope provides an opportunity to explore the physical processes of GeV γ-ray emission from the GRB jets. In this work, we discuss interactions of Iron and Oxygen nuclei with observed keV-MeV photons in the jet of GRB 130427A in order to explain an additional, hard spectral component observed during 11.5-33 s after trigger. The photodisintegration time-scale for Iron nuclei is comparable to or shorter than this duration. We find that γ rays resulting from the Iron nuclei disintegration can account for the hard power-law component of the spectra in the ˜1-70 GeV range, before the γγ → e± pair production with low-energy photons severely attenuates emission of higher energy photons. Electron antineutrinos from the secondary neutron decay, on the other hand, can be emitted with energies up to ˜2 TeV. The flux of these neutrinos is low and consistent with non-detection of GRB 130427A by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory. The required total energy in the Iron nuclei for this hadronic model for GeV emission is ≲10 times the observed total energy released in the prompt keV-MeV emission.

  18. Detailed afterglow modelling and host galaxy properties of the dark GRB 111215A

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Horst, A. J.; Levan, A. J.; Pooley, G. G.; Wiersema, K.; Krühler, T.; Perley, D. A.; Starling, R. L. C.; Curran, P. A.; Tanvir, N. R.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Strom, R. G.; Kouveliotou, C.; Hartoog, O. E.; Xu, D.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Jakobsson, P.

    2015-02-01

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) 111215A was bright at X-ray and radio frequencies, but not detected in the optical or near-infrared (nIR) down to deep limits. We have observed the GRB afterglow with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope and Arcminute Microkelvin Imager at radio frequencies, with the William Herschel Telescope and Nordic Optical Telescope in the nIR/optical, and with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We have combined our data with the Swift X-Ray Telescope monitoring, and radio and millimetre observations from the literature to perform broad-band modelling, and determined the macro- and microphysical parameters of the GRB blast wave. By combining the broad-band modelling results with our nIR upper limits we have put constraints on the extinction in the host galaxy. This is consistent with the optical extinction we have derived from the excess X-ray absorption, and higher than in other dark bursts for which similar modelling work has been performed. We also present deep imaging of the host galaxy with the Keck I telescope, Spitzer Space Telescope, and Hubble Space Telescope (HST), which resulted in a well-constrained photometric redshift, giving credence to the tentative spectroscopic redshift we obtained with the Keck II telescope, and estimates for the stellar mass and star formation rate of the host. Finally, our high-resolution HST images of the host galaxy show that the GRB afterglow position is offset from the brightest regions of the host galaxy, in contrast to studies of optically bright GRBs.

  19. VAMOS: a Pathfinder for the HAWC Gamma-Ray Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; Álvarez, J D; Ángeles, F; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Avila-Aroche, A; Solares, H A Ayala; Badillo, C; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Gonzalez, J Becerra; Belmont, E; Benítez, E; BenZvi, S Y; Berley, D; Bernal, A; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Lopez, R A; Caballero-Mora, K S; Cabrera, I; Carramiñana, A; Castañeda-Martínez, L; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De León, C; DeYoung, T; Diaz-Azuara, A; Diaz-Cruz, L; Hernandez, R Diaz; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dingus, B L; Dultzin, D; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fernandez, A; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; García-Torales, G; Garfias, F; González, A; González, L X; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Grabski, V; Gussert, M; Guzmán-Cerón, C; Hampel-Arias, Z; Harding, J P; Hernández-Cervantes, L; Hui, C M; Hüntemeyer, P; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Langarica, R; Lara, A; Lara, G; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H León; Linares, E C; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-Garcia, R; Marinelli, A; Martínez, L A; Martínez, H; Martínez, O; Martínez-Castro, J; Martos, M; Matthews, J A J; McEnery, J; Torres, E Mendoza; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostafá, M; Nava, J; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T; Page, D P; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Pérez-Pérez, E G; Pretz, J; Ramírez, I; Renter, A; Rivière, C; Rosa-González, D; Ruiz-Sala, F; Ruiz-Velasco, E L; Ryan, J; Sacahui, J R; Salazar, H; Salesa, F; Sandoval, A; Santos, E; Schneider, M; Silich, S; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Woodle, K Sparks; Springer, R W; Suarez, F; Taboada, I; Tepe, A; Toale, P A; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Tinoco, S; Ukwatta, T N; Galicia, J F Valdés; Vanegas, P; Vázquez, A; Villaseñor, L; Wall, W; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H

    2014-01-01

    VAMOS was a prototype detector built in 2011 at an altitude of 4100m a.s.l. in the state of Puebla, Mexico. The aim of VAMOS was to finalize the design, construction techniques and data acquisition system of the HAWC observatory. HAWC is an air-shower array currently under construction at the same site of VAMOS with the purpose to study the TeV sky. The VAMOS setup included six water Cherenkov detectors and two different data acquisition systems. It was in operation between October 2011 and May 2012 with an average live time of 30%. Besides the scientific verification purposes, the eight months of data were used to obtain the results presented in this paper: the detector response to the Forbush decrease of March 2012, and the analysis of possible emission, at energies above 30 GeV, for long gamma-ray bursts GRB111016B and GRB120328B.

  20. Multi-color Shallow Decay and Chromatic Breaks in the GRB 050319 Optical Afterglow

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, K Y; Kuo, P H; Ip, W H; Ioka, K; Aoki, T; Chen, C W; Chen, W P; Isogai, M; Lin, H C; Makishima, K; Mito, H; Miyata, T; Nakada, Y; Nishiura, S; Onda, K; Qiu, Y; Soyano, T; Tamagawa, T; Tarusawa, K; Tashiro, M; Yoshioka, T

    2006-01-01

    Multi-wavelength B, V, R, I observations of the optical afterglow of GRB 050319 were performed by the 1.05-m telescope at Kiso Observatory and the 1.0-m telescope at Lulin Observatory from 1.31 hours to 9.92 hours after the burst. Our R band lightcurves, combined with other published data, can be described by the smooth broken power-law function, with $\\alpha_1$ = -0.84 $\\pm$0.02 to $\\alpha_2$ = -0.48$\\pm$0.03, 0.04 days after the GRB. The optical lightcurves are characterized by shallow decays-- as was also observed in the X-rays-- which may have a similar origin, related to energy injection. However, our observations indicate that there is still a puzzle concerning the chromatic breaks in the R band lightcurve (at 0.04 days) and the X-ray lightcurve (at 0.004 days) that remains to be solved.

  1. Short GRB and binary black hole standard sirens as a probe of dark energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Observations of the gravitational radiation from well-localized, inspiraling compact-object binaries can measure absolute source distances with high accuracy. When coupled with an independent determination of redshift through an electromagnetic counterpart, these standard sirens can provide an excellent probe of the expansion history of the Universe and the dark energy. Short γ-ray bursts, if produced by merging neutron star binaries, would be standard sirens with known redshifts detectable by ground-based gravitational wave (GW) networks such as Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO), Virgo, and Australian International Gravitational Observatory (AIGO). Depending upon the collimation of these GRBs, the measurement of about 10 GW-GRB events (corresponding to about 1 yr of observation with an advanced GW detector network and an all-sky GRB monitor) can measure the Hubble constant h to ∼2-3%. When combined with measurement of the absolute distance to the last scattering surface of the cosmic microwave background, this determines the dark energy equation of state parameter w to ∼9%. Similarly, supermassive binary black hole inspirals will be standard sirens detectable by Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA). Depending upon the precise redshift distribution, ∼100 sources could measure w at the ∼4% level

  2. Modeling the early multiwavelength emission in GRB130427A

    CERN Document Server

    Fraija, Nissim; Veres, Péter

    2016-01-01

    One of the most powerful gamma-ray bursts, GRB 130427A was swiftly detected from GeV $\\gamma$-rays to optical wavelengths. In the GeV band, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope observed the highest-energy photon ever recorded of 95 GeV, and a bright peak in the early phase followed by emission temporally extended for more than 20 hours. In the optical band, a bright flash with a magnitude of $7.03\\pm 0.03$ in the time interval from 9.31 s to 19.31 s after the trigger was reported by RAPTOR in r-band. We study the origin of the GeV $\\gamma$-ray emission, using the multiwavelength observation detected in X-ray and optical bands. The origin of the temporally extended LAT, X-ray and optical flux is naturally interpreted as synchrotron radiation and the 95-GeV photon and the integral flux upper limits placed by the HAWC observatory are consistent with synchrotron self-Compton from an adiabatic forward shock propagating into the stellar wind of its progenitor. The extreme LAT ...

  3. ISO detection of a 60 micron source near GRB970508

    CERN Document Server

    Hanlon, L O; Metcalfe, L; McBreen, B; Altieri, B; Castro-Tirado, A J; Claret, A; Costa, E; Delaney, M; Feroci, M; Frontera, F; Galama, T J; Gorosabel, J; Groot, P J; Heise, J; Kessler, M F; Kouveliotou, C; Palazzi, E; Van Paradijs, J; Piro, L; Smith, N

    2000-01-01

    The Infrared Space Observatory observed the field of the $\\gamma$--ray burst GRB 970508 with the CAM and PHT instruments on May 21 and 24, 1997 and with PHT in three filters in November 1997. A source at 60 $\\mu$m (flux in May of $66\\pm 10$ mJy) was detected near the position of the host galaxy of this $\\gamma$--ray burst. The source was detected again in November 1997, at a marginally lower flux ($43\\pm 13$ mJy). A Galactic cirrus origin and a stellar origin for the emission can be ruled out on the basis of the infrared colours. The marginal evidence for variability in the 60 $\\mu$m flux between May and November is not sufficient to warrant interpretation of the source as transient fireball emission. However, the infrared colours are physically reasonable if attributed to conventional dust emission from a single blackbody source. The probability of detecting a 60 $\\mu$m by chance in a PHT beam down to a detection limit of 50 mJy is $\\sim 5\\times 10^{-3}$. If the source is at the redshift of the host galaxy o...

  4. The 'Supercritical Pile' GRB Model: Afterglows and GRB, XRR, XRF Unification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazanas, D.

    2007-01-01

    We present the general notions and observational consequences of the "Supercritical Pile" GRB model; the fundamental feature of this model is a detailed process for the conversion of the energy stored in relativistic protons in the GRB Relativistic Blast Waves (RBW) into relativistic electrons and then into radiation. The conversion is effected through the $p \\, \\gamma \\rightarrow p \\, e circumflex + e circumflex -$ reaction, whose kinematic threshold is imprinted on the GRB spectra to provide a peak of their emitted luminosity at energy \\Ep $\\sim 1$ MeV in the lab frame. We extend this model to include, in addition to the (quasi--)thermal relativistic post-shock protons an accelerated component of power law form. This component guarantees the production of $e circumflex +e circumflex- - $pairs even after the RBW has slowed down to the point that its (quasi-) thermal protons cannot fulfill the threshold of the above reaction. We suggest that this last condition marks the transition from the prompt to the afterglow GRB phase. We also discuss conditions under which this transition is accompanied by a significant drop in the flux and could thus account for several puzzling, recent observations. Finally, we indicate that the same mechanism applied to the late stages of the GRB evolution leads to a decrease in \\Ep $\\propto \\Gamma circumflex 2(t)\\propto t circumflex {-3/4}$, a feature amenable to future observational tests.

  5. A Search for Gravitational Waves Associated with the Gamma Ray Burst GRB030329 Using the LIGO Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, R; Ageev, A; Allen, B; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Ashley, M; Asiri, F; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Balasubramanian, R; Ballmer, S; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barnes, M; Barr, B; Barton, M A; Bayer, K; Beausoleil, R; Belczynski, K; Bennett, R; Berukoff, S J; Betzwieser, J; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Bland, B; Bochner, B; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brown, D A; Bullington, A; Bunkowski, A; Buonanno, A; Burgess, R; Busby, D; Butler, W E; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cantley, C A; Cardenas, L; Carter, K; Casey, M M; Castiglione, J; Chandler, A; Chapsky, J; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chickarmane, V; Chin, D; Christensen, N; Churches, D; Cokelaer, T; Colacino, C; Coldwell, R; Coles, M; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Crooks, D R M; Csatorday, P; Cusack, B J; Cutler, C; D'Ambrosio, E; Danzmann, K; Daw, E; De Bra, D; Delker, T; Dergachev, V; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S V; Di Credico, A; Díaz, M; Ding, H; Drever, R W P; Dupuis, R J; Edlund, J A; Ehrens, P; Elliffe, E J; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Fallnich, C; Farnham, D; Fejer, M M; Findley, T; Fine, M; Finn, L S; Franzen, K Y; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Ganezer, K S; Garofoli, J; Giaime, J A; Gillespie, A; Goda, K; González, G; Goler, S; Grandclément, P; Grant, A; Gray, C; Gretarsson, A M; Grimmett, D; Grote, H; Grünewald, S; Günther, M; Gustafson, E; Gustafson, R; Hamilton, W O; Hammond, M; Hanson, J; Hardham, C; Harms, J; Harry, G; Hartunian, A; Heefner, J; Hefetz, Y; Heinzel, G; Heng, I S; Hennessy, M; Hepler, N; Heptonstall, A; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hindman, N; Hoang, P; Hough, J; Hrynevych, M; Hua, W; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Jennrich, O; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Johnston, W R; Jones, D I; Jones, L; Jungwirth, D; Kalogera, V; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kells, W; Kern, J; Khan, A; Killbourn, S; Killow, C J; Kim, C; King, C; King, P; Klimenko, S; Koranda, S; Kotter, K; Kovalik, Yu; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Landry, M; Langdale, J; Lantz, B; Lawrence, R; Lazzarini, A; Lei, M; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Libson, A; Lindquist, P; Liu, S; Logan, J; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Luck, H; Lyons, T T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Majid, W; Malec, M; Mann, F; Marin, A; Marka, S; Maros, E; Mason, J; Mason, K; Matherny, O; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McHugh, M; McNabb, J W C; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messaritaki, E; Messenger, C; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Miyoki, S; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Müller, G; Mukherjee, S; Murray, P; Myers, J; Nagano, S; Nash, T; Nayak, R; Newton, G; Nocera, F; Noel, J S; Nutzman, P; Olson, T; O'Reilly, B; Ottaway, D J; Ottewill, A; Ouimette, D A; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pan, Y; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Parameswariah, C; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pitkin, M; Plissi, M; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rakhmanov, M; Rao, S R; Rawlins, K; Ray-Majumder, S; Re, V; Redding, D; Regehr, M W; Regimbau, T; Reid, S; Reilly, K T; Reithmaier, K; Reitze, D H; Richman, S; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Rizzi, A; Robertson, D I; Robertson, N A; Robison, L; Roddy, S; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Rong, H; Rose, D; Rotthoff, E; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Salzman, I; Sandberg, V; Sanders, G H; Sannibale, V; Sathyaprakash, B; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Sazonov, A; Schilling, R; Schlaufman, K; Schmidt, V; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Seader, S E; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seel, S; Seifert, F; Sengupta, A S; Shapiro, C A; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Shu, Q Z; Sibley, A; Siemens, X; Sievers, L; Sigg, D; Sintes, A M; Smith, J R; Smith, M; Smith, M R; Sneddon, P H; Spero, R; Stapfer, G; Steussy, D; Strain, K A; Strom, D; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T; Sumner, M C; Sutton, P J; Sylvestre, J; Takamori, A; Tanner, D B; Tariq, H; Taylor, I; Taylor, R; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Tibbits, M; Tilav, S; Tinto, M; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traylor, G; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D W; Ungarelli, C; Vallisneri, M; Van Putten, M H P M; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P; Wallace, L; Walther, H; Ward, H; Ware, B; Watts, K; Webber, D; Weidner, A; Weiland, U; Weinstein, A; Weiss, R; Welling, H; Wen, L; Wen, S; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; Whiting, B F; Wiley, S; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Williams, P R; Williams, R; Willke, B; Wilson, A; Winjum, B J; Winkler, W; Wise, S; Wiseman, A G; Woan, G; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Wu, W; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yoshida, S; Zaleski, K D; Zanolin, M; Zawischa, I; Zhang, L; Zhu, R; Zotov, N P; Zucker, M; Zweizig, J

    2005-01-01

    We have performed a search for bursts of gravitational waves associated with the very bright Gamma Ray Burst GRB030329, using the two detectors at the LIGO Hanford Observatory. Our search covered the most sensitive frequency range of the LIGO detectors (approximately 80-2048 Hz), and we specifically targeted signals shorter than 150 ms. Our search algorithm looks for excess correlated power between the two interferometers and thus makes minimal assumptions about the gravitational waveform. We observed no candidates with gravitational wave signal strength larger than a pre-determined threshold. We report frequency dependent upper limits on the strength of the gravitational waves associated with GRB030329. Near the most sensitive frequency region, around 250 Hz, our root-sum-square (RSS) gravitational wave strain sensitivity for optimally polarized bursts was better than h_RSS = 6E-21 Hz^{-1/2}. Our result is comparable to the best published results searching for association between gravitational waves and GRBs...

  6. Aperture distribution of rock fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis concerns the properties of the fracture void geometry of single rock fractures. It is suggested that the parameter aperture be used to describe the fracture void geometry and a definition of the aperture is proposed. The relation between void geometry and other fracture properties such as roughness, stiffness, conductivity and channelling are discussed. Different experimental techniques for aperture measurement have been developed in this work. The methods are applicable to fractures of different nature and size. A compilation of measurement results indicates that the spatial correlation (range) of fracture apertures increases with increasing mean aperture and that the range is correlated with the coefficient of variation. The existing data from aperture measurements and fracture flow experiments are still very scarce, in particular for fractures with large apertures. For future research, additional aperture measurements from fractures of different types is recommended. A further development of aperture measurement techniques suitable for field investigation is also suggested. 31 refs, 18 figs

  7. Structural and Functional Studies of the Ras-Associating and Pleckstrin Homology Domains of Grb10 and Grb14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depetris, R.; Wu, J; Hubbard, S

    2009-01-01

    Growth factor receptor-binding proteins Grb7, Grb10 and Grb14 are adaptor proteins containing a Ras-associating (RA) domain, a pleckstrin-homology (PH) domain, a family-specific BPS (between PH and SH2) region and a C-terminal Src-homology-2 domain. Previous structural studies showed that the Grb14 BPS region binds as a pseudosubstrate inhibitor in the tyrosine kinase domain of the insulin receptor to suppress insulin signaling. Here we report the crystal structure of the RA and PH domains of Grb10 at 2.6-A resolution. The structure reveals that these two domains, along with the intervening linker, form an integrated, dimeric structural unit. Biochemical studies demonstrated that Grb14 binds to activated Ras, which may serve as a timing mechanism for downregulation of insulin signaling. Our results illuminate the membrane-recruitment mechanisms not only of Grb7, Grb10 and Grb14 but also of MIG-10, Rap1-interacting adaptor molecule, lamellipodin and Pico, proteins involved in actin-cytoskeleton rearrangement that share a structurally related RA-PH tandem unit.

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: List of isolated emission episodes in GRB (Charisi+, 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charisi, M.; Marka, S.; Bartos, I.

    2015-09-01

    We analysed GRB light curves from the three main GRB catalogues: (i) the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Meegan et al., 2009ApJ...702..791M), (ii) the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on the Swift satellite (Gehrels et al., 2004ApJ...611.1005G), and (iii) the BATSE on board Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (Fishman et al., 1989, Its Max'91 Workshop 2: Developments in Observations and Theory for Solar Cycle 22. Wingle R. M., Dennis B. R., editors. 1989. p. 96.). We analysed GRBs detected prior to 2014 January 01. The search was confined to long GRBs with nominal duration T90 (T90>2s), where T90 is defined as the time interval during which 90% of the GRB fluence was detected with 5% fluence detected both before and after the interval. Note that T90 was the only property considered in identifying long GRBs. The main reason for this selection is the reduced accuracy of the search for variability shorter than the bin size of the available light curves. Fermi-GBM consists of 12 NaI detectors, sensitive to energies from 8keV to ~1MeV, which cover the entire unocculted sky, along with two BGO detectors sensitive to higher energy photons (~200keV to ~40MeV). The GBM burst catalogue (http://heasarc.gsfc.nasa.gov/W3Browse/fermi/fermigbrst.html) consists of 1276 GRBs (2008 July-2013 December) and the data are publicly available (http://heasarc.gsfc.nasa.gov/FTP/fermi/data/gbm/) Swift-BAT is a sensitive gamma-ray detector with a wide field of view (1.4sr) designed to provide GRB triggers with accurate localization. During the considered observation period up to the end of 2013 (2004 Decembe-2013 December), Swift had detected 833 GRBs (Sakamoto et al., 2011ApJS..195....2S, Cat. J/ApJS/195/2). The data are retrieved from the public archive (http://swift.gsfc.nasa.gov/archive/) BATSE consisted of eight large NaI area detectors (LADs) covering the energy range of ~25keV to ~2MeV, and was able to observe the entire unobstructed sky. Over its nine

  9. Solar Dynamics Observatory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A searchable database of all Solar Dynamics Observatory data including EUV, magnetograms, visible light and X-ray. SDO: The Solar Dynamics Observatory is the first...

  10. European Southern Observatory

    CERN Multimedia

    1970-01-01

    Professor A. Blaauw, Director general of the European Southern Observatory, with George Hampton on his right, signs the Agreement covering collaboration with CERN in the construction of the large telescope to be installed at the ESO Observatory in Chile.

  11. Apodizer aperture for lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorna, Siebe; Siebert, Larry D.; Brueckner, Keith A.

    1976-11-09

    An aperture attenuator for use with high power lasers which includes glass windows shaped and assembled to form an annulus chamber which is filled with a dye solution. The annulus chamber is shaped such that the section in alignment with the axis of the incident beam follows a curve which is represented by the equation y = (r - r.sub.o).sup.n.

  12. The LHC dynamic aperture

    CERN Document Server

    Koutchouk, Jean-Pierre

    1999-01-01

    In 1996, the expected field errors in the dipoles and quadrupoles yielded a long-term dynamic aperture of some 8sigma at injection. The target was set to 12sigma to account for the limitations of our model (imperfections and dynamics). From scaling laws and tracking, a specification for the field imperfections yielding the target dynamic aperture was deduced. The gap between specification and expected errors is being bridged by i) an improvement of the dipole field quality, ii) a balance between geometric and persistent current errors, iii) additional correction circuits (a3 ,b4 ). With the goal in view, the emphasis has now turned to the sensitivity of the dynamic aperture to the optical parameters.The distortion of the dynamics at the lower amplitudes effectively reached by the particles is minimized by optimizing the distribution of the betatron phase advance. At collision energy, the dynamic aperture is limited by the field imperfections of the low-beta triplets, enhanced by the crossing angle. With corre...

  13. Apertured paraxial Bessel beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umul, Yusuf Z

    2010-03-01

    The paraxial Bessel beam is obtained by applying an approximation in the wavenumbers. The scattering of the beams by a circular aperture in an absorbing screen is investigated. The scattered fields are expressed in terms of the Fresnel integrals by evaluating the Kirchhoff diffraction integral in the paraxial approximation. The results are examined numerically. PMID:20208927

  14. Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, P. A.; Hensley, S.; Joughin, I. R.; Li, F.; Madsen, S. N.; Rodriguez, E.; Goldstein, R. M.

    1998-01-01

    Synthetic aperture radar interferometry is an imaging technique for measuring the topography of a surface, its changes over time, and other changes in the detailed characteristics of the surface. This paper reviews the techniques of interferometry, systems and limitations, and applications in a rapidly growing area of science and engineering.

  15. The "Supercritical Pile" GRB Model: Afterglows and GRB, XRR, XRF Unification

    CERN Document Server

    Kazanas, D; Georganopoulos, M; Kazanas, Demosthenes; Mastichiadis, Apostolos; Georganopoulos, Markos

    2006-01-01

    We present the general notions and observational consequences of the "Supercritical Pile" GRB model; the fundamental feature of this model is a detailed process for the conversion of the energy stored in relativistic protons in the GRB Relativistic Blast Waves (RBW) into relativistic electrons and then into radiation. The conversion is effected through the $p \\gamma \\to p e^+e^-$ reaction, whose kinematic threshold is imprinted on the GRB spectra to provide a peak of their emitted luminosity at energy \\Ep $\\sim 1$ MeV in the lab frame. We extend this model to include, in addition to the (quasi--)thermal relativistic post-shock protons an accelerated component of power law form. This component guarantees the production of $e^+e^- -$pairs even after the RBW has slowed down to the point that its (quasi--)thermal protons cannot fulfill the threshold of the above reaction. We suggest that this last condition marks the transition from the prompt to the afterglow GRB phase. We also discuss conditions under which thi...

  16. Effect of GRB spectra on the empirical luminosity correlations and the GRB Hubble diagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hai-Nan; Li, Xin; Chang, Zhe

    2016-04-01

    The spectra of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in a wide energy range can usually be well described by the Band function, which is a two smoothly jointed power laws cutting at a breaking energy. Below the breaking energy, the Band function reduces to a cut-off power law, while above the breaking energy it is a simple power law. However, for some detectors (such as the Swift-BAT) whose working energy is well below or just near the breaking energy, the observed spectra can be fitted to cut-off power law with enough precision. Besides, since the energy band of Swift-BAT is very narrow, the spectra of most GRBs can be fitted well even using a simple power law. In this paper, with the most up-to-date sample of Swift-BAT GRBs, we study the effect of different spectral models on the empirical luminosity correlations, and further investigate the effect on the reconstruction of GRB Hubble diagram. We mainly focus on two luminosity correlations, i.e., the Amati relation and Yonetoku relation. We calculate these two luminosity correlations on both the case that the GRB spectra are modeled by Band function and cut-off power law. It is found that both luminosity correlations only moderately depend on the choice of GRB spectra. Monte Carlo simulations show that Amati relation is insensitive to the high-energy power-law index of the Band function. As a result, the GRB Hubble diagram calibrated using luminosity correlations is almost independent on the GRB spectra.

  17. Survey of coded aperture imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic principle and limitations of coded aperture imaging for x-ray and gamma cameras are discussed. Current trends include (1) use of time varying apertures, (2) use of ''dilute'' apertures with transmission much less than 50%, and (3) attempts to derive transverse tomographic sections, unblurred by other planes, from coded images

  18. Polarization Evolution of the GRB 020405 Afterglow

    OpenAIRE

    S. Covino(INAF - Oss. Astronomico di Brera); Malesani, D.; Ghisellini, G.; Lazzati, D.; Alighieri, S. di Serego; Stefanon, M.; Cimatti, A.; Della Valle, M.; Fiore, F.; Goldoni, P.; Kawai, N.; Israel, G. L.; Floc'h, E. Le; Mirabel, I. F.; Ricker, G.

    2002-01-01

    Polarization measurements for the optical counterpart to GRB 020405 are presented and discussed. Our observations were performed with the VLT-UT3 (Melipal) during the second and third night after the gamma-ray burst discovery. The polarization degree (and the position angle) appears to be constant between our two observations at a level around (1.5 - 2)%. The polarization can be intrinsic but it is not possible to unambiguously exclude that a substantial fraction of it is induced by dust in t...

  19. Congenital pyriform aperture stenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osovsky, Micky [Schneider Pediatric Hospital, Department of Neonatology, Petach Tikvah (Israel); Rabin Medical Center, Department of Neonatology, Schneider Children' s Medical Center of Israel, Beilinson Campus, Petah Tikvah (Israel); Aizer-Danon, Anat; Horev, Gadi [Schneider Pediatric Hospital, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Petach Tikvah (Israel); Sirota, Lea [Schneider Pediatric Hospital, Department of Neonatology, Petach Tikvah (Israel)

    2007-01-15

    Nasal airway obstruction is a potentially life-threatening condition in the newborn. Neonates are obligatory nasal breathers. The pyriform aperture is the narrowest, most anterior bony portion of the nasal airway, and a decrease in its cross-sectional area will significantly increase nasal airway resistance. Congenital nasal pyriform aperture stenosis (CNPAS) is a rare, unusual form of nasal obstruction. It should be considered in the differential diagnosis of any neonate or infant with signs and symptoms of upper airway compromise. It is important to differentiate this level of obstruction from the more common posterior choanal stenosis or atresia. CNPAS presents with symptoms of nasal airway obstruction, which are often characterized by episodic apnea and cyclical cyanosis. (orig.)

  20. Complex Aperture Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Owladeghaffari, Hamed

    2009-01-01

    A complex network approach on a rough fracture is developed. In this manner, some hidden metric spaces (similarity measurements) between apertures profiles are set up and a general evolutionary network in two directions (in parallel and perpendicular to the shear direction) is constructed. Evaluation of the emerged network shows the connectivity degree (distribution) of network, after a transition step; fall in to the stable states which are coincided with the Gaussian distribution. Based on this event and real observations of the complex network changes, an algorithm (COmplex Networks on Apertures: CONA) is proposed in which evolving of a network is accomplished using preferential detachments and attachments of edges (based on a competition and game manner) while the number of nodes is fixed. Also, evolving of clustering coefficients and number of edges display similar patterns as well as are appeared in shear stress, hydraulic conductivity and dilation changes, which can be engaged to estimate shear strengt...

  1. Synthetic Aperture Radiometer Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeVine, David M.

    1999-01-01

    Aperture synthesis is a new technology for passive microwave remote sensing from space which has the potential to overcome the limitations set in the past by antenna size. This is an interferometric technique in which pairs of small antennas and signal processing are used to obtain the resolution of a single large antenna. The technique has been demonstrated successfully at L-band with the aircraft prototype instrument, ESTAR. Proposals have been submitted to demonstrate this technology in space (HYDROSTAR and MIRAS).

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The BATSE 5B GRB spectral catalog (Goldstein+, 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, A.; Preece, R. D.; Mallozzi, R. S.; Briggs, M. S.; Fishman, G. J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Paciesas, W. S.; Burgess, J. M.

    2013-10-01

    The Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) was placed into low Earth orbit (~400 km) by the space shuttle Atlantis on 1991 April 5. BATSE was one of four experiments on board the 17 ton satellite. It was an eight-module all-sky detector system designed to study gamma-rays in the energy band of ~10keV-20MeV. During its entire 3323 days of operation (an effective exposure of ~2390 days in the GRB triggering energy band), BATSE triggered on 2704 GRBs, 2145 of which are presented in this catalog. We chose five spectral models to fit the spectra of GRBs in our selection sample. These models include a single power law (PL), Band's GRB function (Band et al. 1993ApJ...413..281B) (BAND), an exponential cut-off power-law (COMP), a smoothly connected broken power law (SBPL), and a Log10 Gaussian (GLOGE). All models are formulated in units of photon flux with energy (E) in keV and multiplied by a normalization constant A (ph/s/cm2/keV). See section 4 for the details of each model. (10 data files).

  3. Properties of GRB Lightcurves from Magnetic Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beniamini, Paz; Granot, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    The energy dissipation mechanism within Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) outflows, driving their extremely luminous prompt γ-ray emission is still uncertain. The leading candidates are internal shocks and magnetic reconnection. While the emission from internal shocks has been extensively studied, that from reconnection still has few quantitative predictions. We study the expected prompt-GRB emission from magnetic reconnection and compare its temporal and spectral properties to observations. The main difference from internal shocks is that for reconnection one expects relativistic bulk motions with Lorentz factors Γ' ≳ a few in the jet's bulk frame. We consider such motions of the emitting material in two anti-parallel directions (e.g. of the reconnecting magnetic-field lines) within an ultra-relativistic (with Γ ≫ 1) thin spherical reconnection layer. The emission's relativistic beaming in the jet's frame greatly affects the light-curves. For emission at radii R0 tracking (for Γ' > 2). However, only the relativistic turbulence mode can naturally account also for the following correlations: luminosity-variability, peak luminosity - peak frequency and pulse width energy dependence / spectral lags.

  4. The host galaxy of GRB 990712

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, L.; Hjorth, J.; Gorosabel, J.;

    2004-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the z = 0.43 host galaxy of GRB 990712, involving ground-based photometry, spectroscopy, and HST imaging. The broad-band UBVRIJHKs photometry is used to determine the global spectral energy distribution (SED) of the host galaxy. Comparison with that of known...... galaxy types shows that the host is similar to a moderately kreddened starburst galaxy with a young stellar population. The estimated internal extinction in the host is A(V) = 0.15 +/- 0.1 and the star-formation rate (SFR) from the UV continuum is 1.3 +/- 0.3 M-circle dot yr(-1) (not corrected for the...... effects of extinction). Other galaxy template spectra than starbursts failed to reproduce the observed SED. We also present VLT spectra leading to the detection of Halpha from the GRB host galaxy. A SFR of 2.8 +/- 0.7 M-circle dot yr(-1) is inferred from the Halpha line flux, and the presence of a young...

  5. UHECR acceleration at GRB internal shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Globus, Noemie; Mochkovitch, Robert; Parizot, Etienne

    2014-01-01

    We study the acceleration of CR protons and nuclei at GRB internal shocks. Physical quantities and their time evolution are estimated using the internal shock modeling implemented by Daigne & Mochkovitch 1998. We consider different hypotheses about the way the energy dissipated at internal shocks is shared between accelerated CR, e- and B field. We model CR acceleration at mildly relativistic shocks, including all the significant energy loss processes. We calculate CR and neutrino release from single GRBs, assuming that nuclei heavier than protons are present in the relativistic wind. Protons can only reach maximum energies of ~ 10^19.5 eV, while intermediate and heavy nuclei are able to reach values of ~ 10^20 eV and above. The spectra of nuclei escaping from the acceleration site are found to be very hard while the combined spectrum of protons and neutrons is much softer. We calculate the diffuse UHECR flux expected on Earth using the GRB luminosity function from Wanderman & Piran 2010. Only the mod...

  6. Very early multi-color observations of the plateau phase of GRB 041006 afterglow

    CERN Document Server

    Urata, Y; Qiu, Y L; Hu, J; Kuo, P H; Tamagawa, T; Ip, W H; Kinoshita, D; Fukushi, H; Isogai, M; Miyata, T; Nakada, Y; Aoki, T; Soyano, T; Tarusawa, K; Mito, H; Onda, K; Ibrahimov, M; Pozanenko, A; Makishima, K

    2006-01-01

    Observations of the optical afterglow of GRB 041006 with the Kiso Observatory 1.05 m Schmidt telescope, the Lulin Observatory 1.0 m telescope and the Xinglong Observatory 0.6 m telescope. Three-bands (B, V and R) of photometric data points were obtained on 2004 October 6, 0.025-0.329 days after the burst. These very early multi band light curves imply the existence of a color dependent plateau phase. The B-band light curve shows a clear plateau at around 0.03 days after the burst. The R band light curve shows the hint of a plateau, or a possible slope change, at around 0.1 days after the burst. The overall behavior of these multi-band light curves may be interpreted in terms of the sum of two separate components, one showing a monotonic decay the other exhibiting a rising and a falling phase, as described by the standard afterglow model.

  7. The early afterglow and magnetized ejecta present in GRB 110731A

    CERN Document Server

    Fraija, Nissim

    2015-01-01

    One of the most energetic gamma-ray bursts GRB 110731A, was observed from optical to GeV energy range by Fermi and Swift Observatories, and by the MOA and GROND optical telescopes. The multiwavelength observations over different epochs (from trigger time to more than 800 s) showed that the spectral energy distribution was better fitted by a wind afterglow model. We present a leptonic model based on an early afterglow that evolves in a stellar wind to describe the multiwavelength light curves observations. In particular, the origin of the LAT emission is explained through the superposition of synchrotron radiation from the forward shock and synchrotron self-Compton emission from the reverse shock. The bulk Lorentz factor required in this model is $\\Gamma\\simeq520$ and the result suggests that the ejecta must be magnetized.

  8. On the nature of the short-duration GRB 050906

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levan, A. J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Jakobsson, P.; Chapman, R.; Hjorth, J.; Priddey, R. S.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Hurley, K.; Jensen, B. L.; Johnson, R.; Gorosabel, J.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Jarvis, M.; Watson, D.; Wiersema, K.

    2008-02-01

    We present deep optical and infrared (IR) observations of the short-duration GRB 050906. Although no X-ray or optical/IR afterglow was discovered to deep limits, the error circle of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) (as derived from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope, or BAT) is unusual in containing the relatively local starburst galaxy IC328. This makes GRB 050906 a candidate burst from a soft gamma-ray repeater (SGR), similar to the giant flare from SGR 1806-20. The probability of chance alignment of a given BAT position with such a galaxy is small (levan@warwick.ac.uk

  9. Synthetic Aperture Compound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jens Munk

    Medical ultrasound imaging is used for many purposes, e.g. for localizing and classifying cysts, lesions, and other processes. Almost any mass is first observed using B-mode imaging and later classified using e.g. color flow, strain, or attenuation imaging. It is therefore important that the B...... and the limiting factor is the amount of memory IO resources available. An equally high demand for memory throughput is found in the computer gaming industry, where a large part of the processing takes place on the graphics processing unit (GPU). Using the GPU, a framework for synthetic aperture imaging...

  10. GRB 110721A: photosphere "death line" and the physical origin of the GRB "Band" function

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Bing; Liang, En-Wei; Wu, Xue-Feng

    2012-01-01

    The prompt emission spectra of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) usually have a dominant component that is well described by a phenomenological "Band" function. The physical origin of this spectral component is debated. Although the traditional interpretation is synchrotron radiation of non-thermal electrons accelerated in internal shocks or magnetic dissipation regions, a growing trend in the community is to interpret this component as emission from the dissipative photosphere of a GRB fireball. We analyze the time dependent spectrum of GRB 110721A detected by Fermi GBM and LAT, and pay special attention to the rapid evolution of the peak energy $E_p$. We define a "death line" of baryonic photospheric emission in the $E_p - L$ plane, and show that $E_p$ of GRB 110721A at the earliest epoch has a very high $E_p \\sim 15$ MeV that is beyond the "death line". This rules out the baryonic photosphere model for the "Band" component for this burst. Together with the finding that an additional "shoulder" component exists in th...

  11. Reengineering observatory operations for the time domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, Robert L.; Vestrand, W. T.; Hessman, Frederic V.

    2014-07-01

    Observatories are complex scientific and technical institutions serving diverse users and purposes. Their telescopes, instruments, software, and human resources engage in interwoven workflows over a broad range of timescales. These workflows have been tuned to be responsive to concepts of observatory operations that were applicable when various assets were commissioned, years or decades in the past. The astronomical community is entering an era of rapid change increasingly characterized by large time domain surveys, robotic telescopes and automated infrastructures, and - most significantly - of operating modes and scientific consortia that span our individual facilities, joining them into complex network entities. Observatories must adapt and numerous initiatives are in progress that focus on redesigning individual components out of the astronomical toolkit. New instrumentation is both more capable and more complex than ever, and even simple instruments may have powerful observation scripting capabilities. Remote and queue observing modes are now widespread. Data archives are becoming ubiquitous. Virtual observatory standards and protocols and astroinformatics data-mining techniques layered on these are areas of active development. Indeed, new large-aperture ground-based telescopes may be as expensive as space missions and have similarly formal project management processes and large data management requirements. This piecewise approach is not enough. Whatever challenges of funding or politics facing the national and international astronomical communities it will be more efficient - scientifically as well as in the usual figures of merit of cost, schedule, performance, and risks - to explicitly address the systems engineering of the astronomical community as a whole.

  12. Tissue Harmonic Synthetic Aperture Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Joachim

    The main purpose of this PhD project is to develop an ultrasonic method for tissue harmonic synthetic aperture imaging. The motivation is to advance the field of synthetic aperture imaging in ultrasound, which has shown great potentials in the clinic. Suggestions for synthetic aperture tissue...... harmonic techniques have been made, but none of these methods have so far been applicable for in-vivo imaging. The basis of this project is a synthetic aperture technique known as synthetic aperture sequential beamforming (SASB). The technique utilizes a two step beamforming approach to drastically reduce...... system complexity compared to conventional synthetic aperture techniques. In this project, SASB is sought combined with a pulse inversion technique for 2nd harmonic tissue harmonic imaging. The advantages in tissue harmonic imaging (THI) are expected to further improve the image quality of SASB. The...

  13. Probing the Nature of High-z Short GRB 090426 with Its Early Optical and X-ray Afterglows

    CERN Document Server

    Xin, Liping; Wei, Jianyan; Zhang, Bing; Lv, Houjun; Zheng, Weikang; Urata, Yuji; Im, Myungshin; Wang, Jing; Qiu, Yulei; Deng, Jinsong; Huang, Kuiyun; Hu, Jingyao; Jeon, Yiseul; Li, Huali; Han, Xuhui

    2010-01-01

    Swift GRB 090426 is a short duration burst T_{90}~0.33 seconds in the burst frame at z=2.609) with analogous properties on its host galaxy and spectrum-energy correlation to typical long duration GRBs from collapses of massive stars (Type II GRBs). We present its early optical observations with 0.8-m TNT telescope at Xinglong observatory and 1-m telescope at Mt. Lemmon Optical Astronomy Observatory LOAO in Arizona. Our well-sampled optical afterglow lightcurve covered from ~90 seconds to ~10^4 seconds post the GRB trigger shows two energy injection phases ended at ~230 seconds and ~7100 seconds, respectively. The decay slopes post the injection phases are consistent with each other (\\alpha ~1.22). The X-ray afterglow lightcurve seems to trace the optical one, although the second energy injection phase was missed due to the orbit constrain of Swift satellite. The spectral index of the X-rays is ~1.0 without temporal evolution. The X-ray emission is consistent with the forward shock models. Both the X-ray and o...

  14. Zelenchukskaya Radio Astronomical Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolentsev, Sergey; Dyakov, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes information about Zelenchukskaya Radio Astronomical Observatory activities in 2012. Last year a number of changes took place in the observatory to improve some technical characteristics and to upgrade some units to the required status. The report provides an overview of current geodetic VLBI activities and gives an outlook for the future.

  15. Svetloe Radio Astronomical Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolentsev, Sergey; Rahimov, Ismail

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes information about the Svetloe Radio Astronomical Observatory activities in 2012. Last year, a number of changes took place in the observatory to improve some technical characteristics and to upgrade some units to their required status. The report provides an overview of current geodetic VLBI activities and gives an outlook for the future.

  16. The Norwegian Naval Observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersen, Bjørn Ragnvald

    2007-07-01

    Archival material has revealed milestones and new details in the history of the Norwegian Naval Observatories. We have identified several of the instrument types used at different epochs. Observational results have been extracted from handwritten sources and an extensive literature search. These allow determination of an approximate location of the first naval observatory building (1842) at Fredriksvern. No physical remains exist today. A second observatory was established in 1854 at the new main naval base at Horten. Its location is evident on military maps and photographs. We describe its development until the Naval Observatory buildings, including archives and instruments, were completely demolished during an allied air bomb raid on 23 February 1945. The first director, C.T.H. Geelmuyden, maintained scientific standards at the the Observatory between 1842 and 1870, and collaborated with university astronomers to investigate, develop, and employ time-transfer by telegraphy. Their purpose was accurate longitude determination between observatories in Norway and abroad. The Naval Observatory issued telegraphic time signals twice weekly to a national network of sites, and as such served as the first national time-service in Norway. Later the Naval Observatory focused on the particular needs of the Navy and developed into an internal navigational service.

  17. Confronting GRB prompt emission with a model for subphotospheric dissipation

    CERN Document Server

    Ahlgren, Björn; Nymark, Tanja; Ryde, Felix; Pe'er, Asaf

    2015-01-01

    The origin of the prompt emission in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is still an unsolved problem and several different mechanisms have been suggested. Here we fit Fermi GRB data with a photospheric emission model which includes dissipation of the jet kinetic energy below the photosphere. The resulting spectra are dominated by Comptonization and contain no significant contribution from synchrotron radiation. In order to fit to the data we span a physically motivated part of the model's parameter space and create DREAM ($\\textit{Dissipation with Radiative Emission as A table Model}$), a table model for ${\\scriptsize XSPEC}$. We show that this model can describe different kinds of GRB spectra, including GRB 090618, representing a typical Band function spectrum, and GRB 100724B, illustrating a double peaked spectrum, previously fitted with a Band+blackbody model, suggesting they originate from a similar scenario. We suggest that the main difference between these two types of bursts is the optical depth at the dissipatio...

  18. Detectability of GRB optical afterglows with Gaia satellite

    CERN Document Server

    Japelj, J

    2011-01-01

    With the launch of Gaia satellite, detection of many different types of transient sources will be possible, one of them being optical afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Using the knowledge of the satellites dynamics and properties of GRB optical afterglows we performed a simulation in order to estimate an average GRB detection rate with Gaia. Here we present the simulation results for two types of GRB optical afterglows, differing in the observer's line-of-sight compared to a GRB jet axis: regular (on-axis) and orphan afterglows. Results show that for on-axis GRBs, less than 10 detections in five years of foreseen Gaia operational time are expected. The orphan afterglows simulation results are more promising, giving a more optimistic number of several tens of detections in five years.

  19. Properties of GRB Lightcurves from Magnetic Reconnection

    CERN Document Server

    Beniamini, Paz

    2015-01-01

    The energy dissipation mechanism within Gamma ray bursts' (GRBs) ultra-relativistic outflows that drive the prompt $\\gamma$-ray emission remains uncertain. Two leading candidates are internal shocks and magnetic reconnection. While the emission from internal shocks has been extensively studied, that from reconnection still has few quantitative predictions. We study the prompt GRB emission from magnetic reconnection and compare its expected temporal and spectral properties to observations. The main difference from internal shocks is that for magnetic reconnection one expects relativistic bulk motions with a Lorentz factor of $\\Gamma'\\gtrsim$a few in the mean rest frame of the outflow - the comoving frame. We consider a thin spherical shell (or reconnection layer) expanding at a bulk Lorentz factor $\\Gamma\\gg 1$ in which the emitting material moves with $\\Gamma'$ in the comoving frame along this layer in two anti-parallel directions (e.g. of the reconnecting field lines). The resulting relativistic beaming of t...

  20. Interaction of GRB Fireballs with Ambient Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Beloborodov, A M

    2003-01-01

    The customary picture of the fireball deceleration by an external medium neglects two physical agents in the problem that are important at radii R<10^{17} cm: a radiative precursor (the prompt GRB) and a relativistic front of free neutrons. The radiative precursor preaccelerates the medium and loads it with e+- pairs. This provides a new explanation for the early optical flashes in GRBs. The front of free neutrons must form in a standard baryonic fireball and change the mechanism of the fireball deceleration. The neutron effect, however, disappears if the fireball is strongly dominated by the Poynting flux. The neutrons thus provide a unique link between the progenitor physics and the observed external blast wave. The explosion mechanism at R<10^{17} cm is testable with upcoming observations of early afterglows.

  1. Survival analysis of the optical brightness of GRB host galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Racz, I I; Bagoly, Z; Toth, L V

    2015-01-01

    We studied the unbiased optical brightness distribution which was calculated from the survival analysis of host galaxies and its relationship with the Swift GRB data of the host galaxies observed by the Keck telescopes. Based on the sample obtained from merging the Swift GRB table and the Keck optical data we also studied the dependence of this distribution on the data of the GRBs. Finally, we compared the HGs distribution with standard galaxies distribution which is in the DEEP2 galaxies catalog.

  2. GRB afterglow light curves from realistic density profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Mimica, Petar; Giannios, Dimitrios

    2011-01-01

    The afterglow emission that follows gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) contains valuable information about the circumburst medium and, therefore, about the GRB progenitor. Theoretical studies of GRB blast waves, however, are often limited to simple density profiles for the external medium (mostly constant density and power-law R^{-k} ones). We argue that a large fraction of long-duration GRBs should take place in massive stellar clusters where the circumburst medium is much more complicated. As a case s...

  3. CONSTRAINTS ON VERY HIGH ENERGY EMISSION FROM GRB 130427A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aliu, E.; Errando, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Barnard College, Columbia University, NY 10027 (United States); Aune, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Barnacka, A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V. [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Benbow, W.; Cerruti, M. [Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Amado, AZ 85645 (United States); Berger, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and the Bartol Research Institute, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Biteau, J. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Byrum, K. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Cardenzana, J. V; Dickinson, H. J.; Eisch, J. D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Chen, X. [Institute of Physics and Astronomy, University of Potsdam, 14476 Potsdam-Golm (Germany); Ciupik, L. [Astronomy Department, Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States); Connaughton, V. [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research (CSPAR), University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Cui, W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Falcone, A., E-mail: aune@astro.ucla.edu, E-mail: sjzhu@umd.edu, E-mail: veres@email.gwu.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); and others

    2014-11-01

    Prompt emission from the very fluent and nearby (z = 0.34) gamma-ray burst GRB 130427A was detected by several orbiting telescopes and by ground-based, wide-field-of-view optical transient monitors. Apart from the intensity and proximity of this GRB, it is exceptional due to the extremely long-lived high-energy (100 MeV to 100 GeV) gamma-ray emission, which was detected by the Large Area Telescope on the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope for ∼70 ks after the initial burst. The persistent, hard-spectrum, high-energy emission suggests that the highest-energy gamma rays may have been produced via synchrotron self-Compton processes though there is also evidence that the high-energy emission may instead be an extension of the synchrotron spectrum. VERITAS, a ground-based imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope array, began follow-up observations of GRB 130427A ∼71 ks (∼20 hr) after the onset of the burst. The GRB was not detected with VERITAS; however, the high elevation of the observations, coupled with the low redshift of the GRB, make VERITAS a very sensitive probe of the emission from GRB 130427A for E > 100 GeV. The non-detection and consequent upper limit derived place constraints on the synchrotron self-Compton model of high-energy gamma-ray emission from this burst.

  4. GRB environment properties through X and optical afterglow observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the spectral analysis of 14 gamma-ray bursts (GRB) X-ray afterglows in order to investigate the properties of interstellar matter (ISM) along the line of sight of GRB. We carried out a simultaneous analysis of the NIR-optical and X-band for those afterglows with an optical counterpart too, in order to evaluate and strongly constrain the absorption effect on the spectral energy distribution due to dust extinction from GRB environment. We evaluated the equivalent hydrogen column density NH from X-ray spectroscopy and rest frame visual extinction Aν by assuming different type of ISM composition and dust grain size distribution. From our analysis we obtained a distribution of the GRB rest frame consistent with the one expected if GRB were embedded in a galactic-like molecular cloud. Moreover, values of the visual extinction estimated from the simultaneous analysis or NIR-to-X band favour an environment where small dust grains are destroyed by the interaction with the X-ray and UV photons from GRB

  5. GRB environment properties through X and optical afterglow observations

    CERN Document Server

    Conciatore, M L; Stratta, G; Fiore, F; Perna, R

    2005-01-01

    We present the spectral analysis of 14 gamma-ray bursts (GRB) X-ray afterglows in order to investigate the properties of interstellar matter (ISM) along the line of sight of GRB. We carried out a simultaneous analysis of the NIR-optical and X-band for those afterglows with an optical counterpart too, in order to evaluate and strongly constrain the absorption effect on the spectral energy distribution due to dust extinction from GRB environment. We evaluated the equivalent hydrogen column density Nh from X-ray spectroscopy and rest frame visual extinction Av by assuming different type of ISM composition and dust grain size distribution. From our analysis we obtained a distribution of the GRB rest frame consistent with the one expected if GRB were embedded in a Galactic-like molecular cloud. Moreover, values of the visual extinction estimated from the simultaneous analysis of NIR-to-X band favour an environment where small dust grain are destroyed by the interaction with the X-ray and UV photons from GRB.

  6. Compounding in synthetic aperture imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Jens Munk; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2012-09-01

    A method for obtaining compound images using synthetic aperture data is investigated using a convex array transducer. The new approach allows spatial compounding to be performed for any number of angles without reducing the frame rate or temporal resolution. This important feature is an intrinsic property of how the compound images are constructed using synthetic aperture data and an improvement compared with how spatial compounding is obtained using conventional methods. The synthetic aperture compound images are created by exploiting the linearity of delay-and-sum beamformation for data collected from multiple spherical emissions to synthesize multiple transmit and receive apertures, corresponding to imaging the tissue from multiple directions. The many images are added incoherently, to produce a single compound image. Using a 192-element, 3.5-MHz, λ-pitch transducer, it is demonstrated from tissue-phantom measurements that the speckle is reduced and the contrast resolution improved when applying synthetic aperture compound imaging. At a depth of 4 cm, the size of the synthesized apertures is optimized for lesion detection based on the speckle information density. This is a performance measure for tissue contrast resolution which quantifies the tradeoff between resolution loss and speckle reduction. The speckle information density is improved by 25% when comparing synthetic aperture compounding to a similar setup for compounding using dynamic receive focusing. The cystic resolution and clutter levels are measured using a wire phantom setup and compared with conventional application of the array, as well as to synthetic aperture imaging without compounding. If the full aperture is used for synthetic aperture compounding, the cystic resolution is improved by 41% compared with conventional imaging, and is at least as good as what can be obtained using synthetic aperture imaging without compounding. PMID:23007781

  7. Synthetic Aperture Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nikolov, Svetoslav; Gammelmark, Kim Løkke;

    2006-01-01

    The paper describes the use of synthetic aperture (SA) imaging in medical ultrasound. SA imaging is a radical break with today's commercial systems, where the image is acquired sequentially one image line at a time. This puts a strict limit on the frame rate and the possibility of acquiring a...... SA imaging. Due to the complete data set, it is possible to have both dynamic transmit and receive focusing to improve contrast and resolution. It is also possible to improve penetration depth by employing codes during ultrasound transmission. Data sets for vector flow imaging can be acquired using...... short imaging sequences, whereby both the correct velocity magnitude and angle can be estimated. A number of examples of both phantom and in-vivo SA images will be presented measured by the experimental ultrasound scanner RASMUS to demonstrate the many benefits of SA imaging....

  8. Multiple Differential Aperture Microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Differential-aperture X-ray microscopy (DAXM) is a powerful approach to 3D tomography with particular relevance to X-ray microdiffraction. With DAXM, scattering from submicron volumes can be resolved. However, the method is intrinsically a scanning technique where every resolved volume element (voxel) requires at least one area-detector readout. Previous applications of DAXM have used a single wire for knife-edge step profiling. Here, we demonstrate a way to accelerate DAXM measurements using multiple wires. A proof-of-principle experiment with a three-wire prototype showed that the speed of measurements can be tripled, but careful calibrations of wires will be required to maintain the spatial accuracy. In addition, related possibilities for accelerating measurements are briefly discussed

  9. UVES/VLT high resolution spectroscopy of GRB 050730 afterglow: probing the features of the GRB environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Elia, V.; Fiore, F.; Piranomonte, S.; Sbordone, L.; Stella, L.; Antonelli, L.A.; Fontana, A.; Giannini, T.; Guetta, D.; Israel, G.; Testa, V. [INAF, Osservatorio Astron Roma, I-00044 Frascati, (Italy); Meurs, E.J.A.; Vergani, S.D.; Ward, P. [Dunsink Observ, Dublin 15, (Ireland); Chincarini, G.; Tagliaferri, G.; Campana, S.; Fugazza, D.; Molinari, E.; Moretti, A. [INAF, Osservatorio Astron Brera, I-23807 Merate, LC, (Italy); Chincarini, G. [Univ Milano Bicocca, I-20126 Milan, (Italy); Melandri, A. [Liverpool John Moores Univ, Astron Res Inst, Birkenhead, Merseyside, (United Kingdom); Norci, L.; Vergani, S.D. [Dublin City Univ, Sch Phys Sci, Dublin 9, (Ireland); Pellizza, L.; Filliatre, P. [Dublin City Univ, NCPST, Dublin 9, (Ireland); Perna, R.; Lazzati, D. [CEA Saclay, DSM, DAPNIA, Serv Astrophys, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France)] (and others)

    2007-07-01

    Aims. The aim of this paper is to study the Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) environment through the analysis of the optical absorption features due to the gas surrounding the GRB. Methods. To this purpose we analyze high resolution spectroscopic observations (R = 20000-45000, corresponding to 14 kms{sup -1} at 4200 Angstroms and 6.6 kms{sup -1} at 9000 Angstroms of the optical afterglow of GRB050730, obtained with UVES-VLT {approx} 4 h after the GRB trigger. Results. The spectrum shows that the ISM of the GRB host galaxy at z = 3.967 is complex, with at least five components contributing to the main absorption system. We detect strong CII*, SiII*, OI* and FeII* fine structure absorption lines associated to the second and third component. Conclusions. For the first three components we derive information on the relative distance from the site of the GRB explosion. Component 1, which has the longest wavelength, highest positive velocity shift, does not present any fine structure nor low ionization lines; it only shows very high ionization features, such as C IV and O VI, suggesting that this component is very close to the GRB site. From the analysis of low and high ionization lines and fine structure lines, we find evidences that the distance of component 2 from the site of the GRB explosion is 10-100 times smaller than that of component 3. We evaluated the mean metallicity of the z = 3.967 system obtaining values approximate to 10{sup -2} of the solar metallicity or less. However, this should not be taken as representative of the circum-burst medium, since the main contribution to the hydrogen column density comes from the outer regions of the galaxy while that of the other elements presumably comes from the ISM closer to the GRB site. Furthermore, difficulties in evaluating dust depletion correction can modify significantly these values. The mean [C/Fe] ratio agrees well with that expected by single star-formation event models. Interestingly the [C/Fe] of component 2 is

  10. Sequential Beamforming Synthetic Aperture Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kortbek, Jacob; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Gammelmark, Kim Løkke

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic aperture sequential beamforming (SASB) is a novel technique which allows to implement synthetic aperture beamforming on a system with a restricted complexity, and without storing RF-data. The objective is to improve lateral resolution and obtain a more depth independent resolution...

  11. Spacecraft Conceptual Design for the 8-Meter Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Randall C.; Capizzo, Peter; Fincher, Sharon; Hornsby, Linda S.; Jones, David

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Concepts Office at Marshall Space Flight Center completed a brief spacecraft design study for the 8-meter monolithic Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST-8m). This spacecraft concept provides all power, communication, telemetry, avionics, guidance and control, and thermal control for the observatory, and inserts the observatory into a halo orbit about the second Sun-Earth Lagrange point. The multidisciplinary design team created a simple spacecraft design that enables component and science instrument servicing, employs articulating solar panels for help with momentum management, and provides precise pointing control while at the same time fast slewing for the observatory.

  12. The distribution of equivalent widths in long GRB afterglow spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Thöne, C. C.; Christensen, L.; Gorosabel, J.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Schulze, S.; Jakobsson, P.; Wiersema, K.; Sánchez-Ramírez, R.; Leloudas, G.; Zafar, T.; Malesani, D.; Hjorth, J.

    2012-12-01

    Context. The extreme brightness of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows and their simple spectral shape make them ideal beacons to study the interstellar medium of their host galaxies through absorption line spectroscopy at almost any redshift. Aims: We describe the distribution of rest-frame equivalent widths (EWs) of the most prominent absorption features in GRB afterglow spectra, providing the means to compare individual spectra to the sample and identify its peculiarities. Methods: Using 69 low-resolution GRB afterglow spectra, we conduct a study of the rest-frame EWs distribution of features with an average rest-frame EW larger than 0.5 Å. To compare an individual GRB with the sample, we develop EW diagrams as a graphical tool, and we give a catalogue with diagrams for the 69 spectra. We introduce a line strength parameter (LSP) that allows us to quantify the strength of the absorption features in a GRB spectrum as compared to the sample by a single number. Using the distributions of EWs of single-species features, we derive the distribution of their column densities by a curve of growth (CoG) fit. Results: We find correlations between the LSP and the extinction of the GRB, the UV brightness of the host galaxies and the neutral hydrogen column density. However, we see no significant evolution of the LSP with the redshift. There is a weak correlation between the ionisation of the absorbers and the energy of the GRB, indicating that, either the GRB event is responsible for part of the ionisation, or that galaxies with high-ionisation media produce more energetic GRBs. Spectral features in GRB spectra are, on average, 2.5 times stronger than those seen in QSO intervening damped Lyman-α (DLA) systems and slightly more ionised. In particular we find a larger excess in the EW of C ivλλ1549 relative to QSO DLAs, which could be related to an excess of Wolf-Rayet stars in the environments of GRBs. From the CoG fitting we obtain an average number of components in the

  13. Sparse synthetic aperture radar imaging with optimized azimuthal aperture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Cao; WANG MinHang; LIAO GuiSheng; ZHU ShengQi

    2012-01-01

    To counter the problem of acquiring and processing huge amounts of data for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) using traditional sampling techniques,a method for sparse SAR imaging with an optimized azimuthal aperture is presented.The equivalence of an azimuthal match filter and synthetic array beamforming is shown so that optimization of the azimuthal sparse aperture can be converted to optimization of synthetic array beamforming.The azimuthal sparse aperture,which is composed of a middle aperture and symmetrical bilateral apertures,can be obtained by optimization algorithms (density weighting and simulated annealing algorithms,respectively).Furthermore,sparse imaging of spectrum analysis SAR based on the optimized sparse aperture is achieved by padding zeros at null samplings and using a non-uniform Taylor window. Compared with traditional sampling,this method has the advantages of reducing the amount of sampling and alleviating the computational burden with acceptable image quality.Unlike periodic sparse sampling,the proposed method exhibits no image ghosts.The results obtained from airborne measurements demonstrate the effectiveness and superiority of the proposed method.

  14. Observatory Improvements for SOFIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Robert A.; Jensen, Stephen C.

    2012-01-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is a joint project between NASA and Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR), the German Space Agency. SOFIA is based in a Boeing 747 SP and flown in the stratosphere to observe infrared wavelengths unobservable from the ground. In 2007 Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) inherited and began work on improving the plane and its telescope. The improvements continue today with upgrading the plane and improving the telescope. The Observatory Verification and Validation (V&V) process is to ensure that the observatory is where the program says it is. The Telescope Status Display (TSD) will provide any information from the on board network to monitors that will display the requested information. In order to assess risks to the program, one must work through the various threats associate with that risk. Once all the risks are closed the program can work towards improving the observatory.

  15. Boulder Magnetic Observatory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are vector and scalar component values of the Earth's magnetic field for 2004 recorded at the Boulder Magnetic Observatory in Colorado. Vector values are...

  16. e-EVN detections of GRB130427A and GRB130702A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paragi, Z.; van der Horst, A. J.; Yang, J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Granot, J.

    2013-08-01

    We observed GRB130427A (GCN #14448, #14455, #14471, #14480, #14494) at 5 GHz with the European VLBI Network on 2013 May 3 from 15:50 UT till 02:20 UT the next day. All e-EVN stations in Europe, and the telescopes in Shanghai, Hartebeesthoek and Arecibo participated in the observations. The aggregate bitrate was 1024 Mbps for most telescopes. Shanghai and Arecibo observed the same bandwidth but at a lower bitrate of 512 Mbps and using 1-bit sampling.

  17. The Burst Cluster: Dark Matter in a Cluster Merger Associated with the Short Gamma-Ray Burst, GRB 050509B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahle, H.; Sarazin, C. L.; Lopez, L. A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Patel, S. K.; Rol, E.; van der Horst, A. J.; Fynbo, J.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Burrows, D. N.; Gehrels, N.; Grupe, D.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Michałowski, M. J.

    2013-07-01

    We have identified a merging galaxy cluster with evidence of two distinct subclusters. The X-ray and optical data suggest that the subclusters are presently moving away from each other after closest approach. This cluster merger was discovered from observations of the first well-localized short-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB), GRB 050509B. The Swift/Burst Alert Telescope error position of the source is coincident with a cluster of galaxies ZwCl 1234.0+02916, while the subsequent Swift/X-Ray Telescope localization of the X-ray afterglow found the GRB coincident with 2MASX J12361286+2858580, a giant red elliptical galaxy in the cluster. Deep multi-epoch optical images were obtained in this field to constrain the evolution of the GRB afterglow, including a total of 27,480 s exposure in the F814W band with Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys, among the deepest imaging ever obtained toward a known galaxy cluster in a single passband. We perform a weak gravitational lensing analysis based on these data, including mapping of the total mass distribution of the merger system with high spatial resolution. When combined with Chandra X-ray Observatory Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer and Swift/XRT observations, we are able to investigate the dynamical state of the merger to better understand the nature of the dark matter component. Our weak gravitational lensing measurements reveal a separation of the X-ray centroid of the western subcluster from the center of the mass and galaxy light distributions, which is somewhat similar to that of the famous "Bullet cluster," and we conclude that this "Burst cluster" adds another candidate to the previously known merger systems for determining the nature of dark matter, as well as for studying the environment of a short GRB. Finally, we discuss potential connections between the cluster dynamical state and/or matter composition, and compact object mergers, which is currently the leading model for the origin of short GRBs

  18. THE BURST CLUSTER: DARK MATTER IN A CLUSTER MERGER ASSOCIATED WITH THE SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURST, GRB 050509B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahle, H. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029, Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); Sarazin, C. L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Lopez, L. A. [MIT-Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, 37-664H, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Kouveliotou, C. [Space Science Office, ZP12, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Patel, S. K. [Optical Sciences Corporation, 6767 Old Madison Pike, Suite 650, Huntsville, AL 35806 (United States); Rol, E.; Van der Horst, A. J.; Wijers, R. A. M. J. [Astronomical Institute ' Anton Pannekoek' , University of Amsterdam, Kruislaan 403, 1098 SJ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Fynbo, J.; Michalowski, M. J. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Burrows, D. N.; Grupe, D. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Gehrels, N. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Ramirez-Ruiz, E., E-mail: hdahle@astro.uio.no [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95060 (United States)

    2013-07-20

    We have identified a merging galaxy cluster with evidence of two distinct subclusters. The X-ray and optical data suggest that the subclusters are presently moving away from each other after closest approach. This cluster merger was discovered from observations of the first well-localized short-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB), GRB 050509B. The Swift/Burst Alert Telescope error position of the source is coincident with a cluster of galaxies ZwCl 1234.0+02916, while the subsequent Swift/X-Ray Telescope localization of the X-ray afterglow found the GRB coincident with 2MASX J12361286+2858580, a giant red elliptical galaxy in the cluster. Deep multi-epoch optical images were obtained in this field to constrain the evolution of the GRB afterglow, including a total of 27,480 s exposure in the F814W band with Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys, among the deepest imaging ever obtained toward a known galaxy cluster in a single passband. We perform a weak gravitational lensing analysis based on these data, including mapping of the total mass distribution of the merger system with high spatial resolution. When combined with Chandra X-ray Observatory Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer and Swift/XRT observations, we are able to investigate the dynamical state of the merger to better understand the nature of the dark matter component. Our weak gravitational lensing measurements reveal a separation of the X-ray centroid of the western subcluster from the center of the mass and galaxy light distributions, which is somewhat similar to that of the famous 'Bullet cluster', and we conclude that this 'Burst cluster' adds another candidate to the previously known merger systems for determining the nature of dark matter, as well as for studying the environment of a short GRB. Finally, we discuss potential connections between the cluster dynamical state and/or matter composition, and compact object mergers, which is currently the leading model for the

  19. Interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralston, Tyler S.; Marks, Daniel L.; Scott Carney, P.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2007-02-01

    State-of-the-art methods in high-resolution three-dimensional optical microscopy require that the focus be scanned through the entire region of interest. However, an analysis of the physics of the light-sample interaction reveals that the Fourier-space coverage is independent of depth. Here we show that, by solving the inverse scattering problem for interference microscopy, computed reconstruction yields volumes with a resolution in all planes that is equivalent to the resolution achieved only at the focal plane for conventional high-resolution microscopy. In short, the entire illuminated volume has spatially invariant resolution, thus eliminating the compromise between resolution and depth of field. We describe and demonstrate a novel computational image-formation technique called interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM). ISAM has the potential to broadly impact real-time three-dimensional microscopy and analysis in the fields of cell and tumour biology, as well as in clinical diagnosis where in vivo imaging is preferable to biopsy.

  20. Lucky imaging and aperture synthesis with low-redundancy apertures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jennifer E; Rhodes, William T; Sheridan, John T

    2009-01-01

    Lucky imaging, used with some success in astronomical and even horizontal-path imaging, relies on fleeting conditions of the atmosphere that allow momentary improvements in image quality, at least in portions of an image. Aperture synthesis allows a larger aperture and, thus, a higher-resolution imaging system to be synthesized through the superposition of image spatial-frequency components gathered by cooperative combinations of smaller subapertures. A combination of lucky imaging and aperture synthesis strengthens both methods for obtaining improved images through the turbulent atmosphere. We realize the lucky imaging condition appropriate for aperture synthesis imaging for a pair of rectangular subapertures and demonstrate that this condition occurs when the signal energy associated with bandpass spatial-frequency components achieves its maximum value. PMID:19107157

  1. The Broadband Afterglow of GRB980703

    CERN Document Server

    Frail, D A; Berger, E; Harrison, F A; Sari, R; Kulkarni, S R; Taylor, G B; Bloom, J S; Fox, D W; Moriarty-Schieven, G H; Price, P A

    2003-01-01

    We present radio observations of the afterglow of the bright gamma-ray burst GRB980703 made between one day and one year after the burst. These data are combined with published late-time radio measurements and existing optical, near-infrared (NIR) and X-ray observations to create a comprehensive broadband dataset for modeling the physical parameters of the outflow. While a wind-stratified medium cannot be ruled out statistically, it requires a high fraction of the shock energy in the electrons, and so is not favored on theoretical grounds. Instead, the data are consistent with a fireball model in which the ejecta are collimated and expanding into a constant density medium. The radio data cannot be fit with an isotropic shock but instead require a jet break at ~ 3.5 days, not seen at optical wavelengths due to the presence of a a bright host galaxy. The addition of the full radio dataset constrains the self-absorption frequency, giving an estimate of the circumburst density of n ~ 30 cm^-3, a value which diffe...

  2. A Fe K Line in GRB 970508

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protassov, R.; van Dyk, D.; Connors, A.; Kashyap, V.; Siemiginowska, A.

    2000-12-01

    We examine the x-ray spectrum of the afterglow of GRB 970508, analyzed for Fe line emission by Piro et al (1999, ApJL, 514, L73). This is a difficult and extremely important measurement: the detection of x-ray afterglows from γ -ray bursts is at best a tricky business, relying on near-real satellite time response to unpredictable events; and a great deal of luck in catching a burst bright enough for a useful spectral analysis. Detecting a clear atomic (or cyclotron) line in the generally smooth and featureless afterglow (or burst) emission not only gives one of the few very specific keys to the physics local to the emission region, but also provides clues or confirmation of its distance (via redshift). Unfortunately, neither the likelihood ratio test or the related F-statistic commonly used to detect spectral lines adhere to their nominal Chi square and F-distributions. Thus we begin by calibrating the F-statistic used in Piro et al (1999, ApJL, 514, L73) via a simulation study. The simulation study relies on a completely specified source model, i.e. we do Monte Carlo simulations with all model parameters fixed (so--called ``parametric bootstrapping''). Second, we employ the method of posterior predictive p-values to calibrate a LRT statistic while accounting for the uncertainty in the parameters of the source model. Our analysis reveals evidence for the Fe K line.

  3. Slope evolution of GRB correlations and cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Dainotti, Maria Giovanna; Piedipalumbo, Ester; Capozziello, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    Gamma -ray bursts (GRBs) observed up to redshifts $z>9.4$ can be used as possible probes to test cosmological models. Here we show how changes of the slope of the {\\it luminosity $L^*_X$ -break time $T^*_a$} correlation in GRB afterglows, hereafter the LT correlation, affect the determination of the cosmological parameters. With a simulated data set of 101 GRBs with a central value of the correlation slope that differs on the intrinsic one by a $5\\sigma$ factor, we find an overstimated value of the matter density parameter, $\\Omega_M$, compared to the value obtained with SNe Ia, while the Hubble constant, $H_0$, best fit value is still compatible in 1$\\sigma$ compared to other probes. We show that this compatibility of $H_0$ is due to the large intrinsic scatter associated with the simulated sample. Instead, if we consider a subsample of high luminous GRBs ($HighL$), we find that both the evaluation of $H_0$ and $\\Omega_M$ are not more compatible in 1$\\sigma$ and $\\Omega_M$ is underestimated by the $13\\%$. Ho...

  4. A Reverse Shock in GRB 160509A

    CERN Document Server

    Laskar, Tanmoy; Berger, Edo; Fong, Wen-fai; Margutti, Raffaella; Shivvers, Isaac; Williams, Peter K G; Kopac, Drejc; Kobayashi, Shiho; Mundell, Carole; Gomboc, Andreja; Zheng, WeiKang; Menten, Karl M; Graham, Melissa L; Filippenko, Alexei V

    2016-01-01

    We present the second multi-frequency radio detection of a reverse shock in a $\\gamma$-ray burst. By combining our extensive radio observations of the Fermi-LAT GRB 160509A at $z = 1.17$ up to $20$ days after the burst with Swift X-ray observations and ground-based optical and near-infrared data, we show that the afterglow emission comprises distinct reverse shock and forward shock contributions: the reverse shock emission dominates in the radio band at $\\lesssim10~$days, while the forward shock emission dominates in the X-ray, optical, and near-infrared bands. Through multi-wavelength modeling, we determine a circumburst density of $n_0\\approx10^{-3}~$cm$^{-3}$, supporting our previous suggestion that a low-density circumburst environment is conducive to the production of long-lasting reverse shock radiation in the radio band. We infer the presence of a large excess X-ray absorption column, $N_{\\rm H} \\approx 1.5\\times10^{22}~$cm$^{-2}$, and a high rest-frame optical extinction, $A_{\\rm V}\\approx3.4~$mag. We...

  5. The Host Galaxy of GRB 990123

    CERN Document Server

    Bloom, J S; Djorgovski, S G; Harrison, F A; Koresko, C D; Neugebauer, G; Armus, L; Frail, D A; Gal, R R; Sari, R; Squires, G L; Illingworth, G D; Kelson, D D; Chaffee, F H; Goodrich, R; Feroci, M; Costa, E; Piro, L; Frontera, F; Mao, S; Akerlof, Carl W; McKay, T A; Kulkarni, S R

    1999-01-01

    We present deep images of the field of gamma-ray burst (GRB) 990123 obtained in a broad-band UV/visible bandpass with the Hubble Space Telescope, and deep near-infrared images obtained with the Keck-I 10-m telescope. Both the HST and Keck images show that the optical transient (OT) is clearly offset by 0.6 arcsec from an extended object, presumably the host galaxy. This galaxy is the most likely source of the metallic-line absorption at z = 1.6004 seen in the spectrum of the OT. With magnitudes V_{C} ~ 24.6 +/- 0.2 and K = 21.65 +/- 0.30 mag this corresponds to an L ~ 0.7 L_* galaxy, assuming that it is located at z = 1.6. The estimated unobscured star formation rate is SFR ~ 6 M_sun/yr, which is not unusually high for normal galaxies at comparable redshifts. The strength of the observed metallic absorption lines is suggestive of a relatively high metallicity of the gas, and thus of a chemically evolved system which may be associated with a massive galaxy. It is also indicative of a high column density of the...

  6. Lucky imaging and aperture synthesis with low-redundancy apertures

    OpenAIRE

    Ward, Jennifer E.; Rhodes, William T.; Sheridan, John T.

    2009-01-01

    Lucky imaging, used with some success in astronomical and even horizontal-path imaging, relies on fleeting conditions of the atmosphere that allow momentary improvements in image quality, at least in portions of an image. Aperture synthesis allows a larger aperture and, thus, a higher-resolution imaging system to be synthesized through the superposition of image spatial-frequency components gathered by cooperative combinations of smaller subapertures. Acombination of lucky imaging and aper...

  7. Radio rebrightening of the GRB afterglow by the accompanying supernova

    CERN Document Server

    Duran, Rodolfo Barniol

    2015-01-01

    The gamma-ray burst (GRB) jet powers the afterglow emission by shocking the surrounding medium, and radio afterglow can now be routinely observed to almost a year after the explosion. Long-duration GRBs are accompanied by supernovae (SNe) that typically contain much more energy than the GRB jet. Here we consider the fact that the SN blast wave will also produce its own afterglow, which will peak at much later time (since it is non-relativistic), when the SN blast wave transitions from a coasting phase to a decelerating Sedov-Taylor phase. We predict that this component will peak generally a few tens of years after the explosion and it will outshine the GRB powered afterglow well-before its peak emission. In the case of GRB 030329, where the external density is constrained by the $\\sim 10$-year coverage of the radio GRB afterglow, the radio emission is predicted to start rising over the next decade and to continue to increase for the following decades up to a level of $\\sim 0.5$ mJy. Detection of the SN-powere...

  8. Radio rebrightening of the GRB afterglow by the accompanying supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barniol Duran, R.; Giannios, D.

    2015-12-01

    The gamma-ray burst (GRB) jet powers the afterglow emission by shocking the surrounding medium, and radio afterglow can now be routinely observed to almost a year after the explosion. Long-duration GRBs are accompanied by supernovae (SNe) that typically contain much more energy than the GRB jet. Here we consider the fact that the SN blast wave will also produce its own afterglow (supernova remnant emission), which will peak at much later time (since it is non-relativistic), when the SN blast wave transitions from a coasting phase to a decelerating Sedov-Taylor phase. We predict that this component will peak generally a few tens of years after the explosion and it will outshine the GRB powered afterglow well-before its peak emission. In the case of GRB 030329, where the external density is constrained by the ˜10-year coverage of the radio GRB afterglow, the radio emission is predicted to start rising over the next decade and to continue to increase for the following decades up to a level of ˜ mJy. Detection of the SN-powered radio emission will greatly advance our knowledge of particle acceleration in ˜0.1c shocks.

  9. GRB 080517: A local, low luminosity GRB in a dusty galaxy at z=0.09

    CERN Document Server

    Stanway, E R; Tanvir, N R; Wiersema, K; van der Horst, A; Mundell, C G; Guidorzi, C

    2014-01-01

    We present an analysis of the photometry and spectroscopy of the host galaxy of Swift-detected GRB 080517. From our optical spectroscopy, we identify a redshift of z = 0.089 +/- 0.003, based on strong emission lines, making this a rare example of a very local, low luminosity, long gamma ray burst. The galaxy is detected in the radio with a flux density of S(4.8GHz) =0.22 +/- 0.04mJy - one of relatively few known GRB hosts with a securely measured radio flux. Both optical emission lines and a strong detection at 22 um suggest that the host galaxy is forming stars rapidly, with an inferred star formation rate ~16 Msun/yr and a high dust obscuration (E(B-V )>1, based on sight-lines to the nebular emission regions). The presence of a companion galaxy within a projected distance of 25 kpc, and almost identical in redshift, suggests that star formation may have been triggered by galaxy-galaxy interaction. However, fitting of the remarkably flat spectral energy distribution from the ultraviolet through to the infrar...

  10. The flux-E_p relation within GRB060218 in comparison with typical GRB pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The prompt gamma-ray/X-ray emission of gamma-ray burst(GRB) 060218 was simultaneously observed by the Burst Alert Telescope(BAT) and X-ray Telescope(XRT) onboard Swift.Its peak energy of the joint νfν spectrum(Ep) clearly evolves with time from tens of keV to-1 keV,crossing both the BAT and XRT bands.The best fit yields log Ep=(4.61± 0.23)+(-1.29±0.08) log t,with a correlation coefficient of 0.98 and a chance probability of p<10-4.We derive its bolometric flux(F)in the 0.01-10 4 keV band,and find that its F-Ep relation,with a power-law index of 0.37,is much shallower than that observed in typical GRB pulses.Discussion of this shallowness is presented.

  11. Observations of GRB X-ray afterglows with SODART/SRG

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren Kristian; Lund, Niels; Pedersen, Henrik;

    1998-01-01

    for detecting GRBs, and the powerful pointed SODART telescopes will be a unique tool for studying the long-term behavior of GRB afterglows. It is shown that SODART will be able to follow the temporal and spectral development of a GRB similar to the now famous GRB 970228 event for well over 20 days in order...

  12. GRB Cosmology and the First Stars

    OpenAIRE

    Bromm, Volker; Loeb, Abraham

    2006-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are unique probes of the cosmic star formation history and the state of the intergalactic medium up to the redshifts of the first stars. In particular, the ongoing {\\it Swift} mission might be the first observatory to detect individual Population~III stars, provided that the massive, metal-free stars were able to trigger GRBs. {\\it Swift} will empirically constrain the redshift at which Population~III star formation was terminated, thus providing crucial input to model...

  13. UAVSAR Phased Array Aperture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Neil; Zawadzki, Mark; Sadowy, Greg; Oakes, Eric; Brown, Kyle; Hodges, Richard

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a patch antenna array for an L-band repeat-pass interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) instrument that is to be flown on an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). The antenna operates at a center frequency of 1.2575 GHz and with a bandwidth of 80 MHz, consistent with a number of radar instruments that JPL has previously flown. The antenna is designed to radiate orthogonal linear polarizations in order to facilitate fully-polarimetric measurements. Beam-pointing requirements for repeat-pass SAR interferometry necessitate electronic scanning in azimuth over a range of -20degrees in order to compensate for aircraft yaw. Beam-steering is accomplished by transmit/receive (T/R) modules and a beamforming network implemented in a stripline circuit board. This paper, while providing an overview of phased array architecture, focuses on the electromagnetic design of the antenna tiles and associated interconnects. An important aspect of the design of this antenna is that it has an amplitude taper of 10dB in the elevation direction. This is to reduce multipath reflections from the wing that would otherwise be detrimental to interferometric radar measurements. This taper is provided by coupling networks in the interconnect circuits as opposed to attenuating the output of the T/R modules. Details are given of material choices and fabrication techniques that meet the demanding environmental conditions that the antenna must operate in. Predicted array performance is reported in terms of co-polarized and crosspolarized far-field antenna patterns, and also in terms of active reflection coefficient.

  14. Compounding in synthetic aperture imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J. M.; Jensen, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    A method for obtaining compound images using synthetic aperture data is investigated using a convex array transducer. The new approach allows spatial compounding to be performed for any number of angles without reducing the frame rate or temporal resolution. This important feature is an intrinsic...... from multiple spherical emissions to synthesize multiple transmit and receive apertures, corresponding to imaging the tissue from multiple directions. The many images are added incoherently, to produce a single compound image. Using a 192-element, 3.5-MHz, λ-pitch transducer, it is demonstrated from...... tissue-phantom measurements that the speckle is reduced and the contrast resolution improved when applying synthetic aperture compound imaging. At a depth of 4 cm, the size of the synthesized apertures is optimized for lesion detection based on the speckle information density. This is a performance...

  15. Optimizing Synthetic Aperture Compound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jens Munk; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2012-01-01

    Spatial compound images are constructed from synthetic aperture data acquired using a linear phased-array transducer. Compound images of wires, tissue, and cysts are created using a method, which allows both transmit and receive compounding without any loss in temporal resolution. Similarly to...... optimal for lesion detection. Synthetic aperture data are acquired from unfocused emissions and 154 compound images are constructed by synthesizing different aperture configurations with more or less compounding, all maintaining a constant resolution across depth corresponding to an f-number of 2.0 for...... transmit and receive. The same configurations are used for scanning a phantom with cysts, and it is demonstrated how an improved cysts contrast follows from an aperture configuration, which gives a higher value for the performance measure extracted from the phantom without cysts. A correlation value R = 0...

  16. Synthetic Aperture Radar - Hardware Development

    OpenAIRE

    Rosner, V.; Seller, R.; L. Dudas; Kazi, K.; Miko, G.

    2009-01-01

    Experimental real and synthetic aperture radar are developed from the base-band digital unit to the analogue RF parts, based on solid state units, using pulse compression for radar imaging. Proper QPSK code is found for matched filter.

  17. Fast-response optical and near-infrared GRB science with RATIR and RIMAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capone, John; RIMAS Collaboration, RATIR project Team

    2016-01-01

    As the Universe's most luminous transient events, long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are observed at cosmological distances. The afterglow emission generated by the burst's interaction with the surrounding medium presents the opportunity to study the local environment, as well as intervening systems. The transient nature of these events requires observations starting within minutes of the GRB to maximize the scientific opportunities.This dissertation work comprises efforts to advance the field with a new instrument, the Rapid Infrared Imager and Spectrograph (RIMAS). The optical design is complicated by the broad band coverage (0.97 to 2.39 microns) and the necessity of transmissive optics due to space and weight limitations on the telescope. Additionally, the entire optical system must be cooled to cryogenic temperatures to decrease the background from thermal emission. The completed instrument will be permanently installed on Lowell Observatory's new 4.3 meter Discovery Channel Telescope (DCT) located in Happy Jack, Arizona. The fast slew time of the telescope, combined with the instrument's ability to image in two bands simultaneously and switch to spectroscopic configurations in under a minute will allow observers to obtain photometric data within minutes and spectra within ~ ten minutes.In addition to instrumentation work on RIMAS's optics, early time photometric light curves have been studied primarily using data from the Reionization and Transients Infrared/Optical Project (RATIR). Early time photometric data in six optical and near-infrared (NIR) bands has allowed a study of color evolution in the early to late time SEDs. This study probes possible impacts of the GRB on the local medium as well as intrinsic changes in the afterglow emission.This work is made possible by the RATIR and RIMAS collaborations as well as financial support by the NSF.

  18. Everyday astronomy @ Sydney Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parello, S. L.

    2008-06-01

    Catering to a broad range of audiences, including many non-English speaking visitors, Sydney Observatory offers everything from school programmes to public sessions, day care activities to night observing, personal interactions to web-based outreach. With a history of nearly 150 years of watching the heavens, Sydney Observatory is now engaged in sharing the wonder with everybody in traditional and innovative ways. Along with time-honoured tours of the sky through two main telescopes, as well as a small planetarium, Sydney Observatory also boasts a 3D theatre, and offers programmes 363 days a year - rain or shine, day and night. Additionally, our website neversleeps, with a blog, YouTube videos, and night sky watching podcasts. And for good measure, a sprinkling of special events such as the incomparable Festival of the Stars, for which most of northern Sydney turns out their lights. Sydney Observatory is the oldest working observatory in Australia, and we're thrilled to be looking forward to our 150th Anniversary next year in anticipation of the International Year of Astronomy immediately thereafter.

  19. Search for ultra high energy primary photons at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colalillo, Roberta

    2016-07-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory, located in Argentina, provides an unprecedented integrated aperture in the search for primary photons with energy above 1017 eV over a large portion of the southern sky. Such photons can be detected in principle via the air showers they initiate at such energies, using the complement of Auger Observatory detectors. We discuss the results obtained in diffuse and directional searches for primary photons in the EeV energy range.

  20. Synthetic aperture controlled source electromagnetics

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Y.; Snieder, R.; Slob, E.; Hunziker, J.W.; Singer, J.; Sheiman, J.; Rosenquist, M.

    2010-01-01

    Controlled‐source electromagnetics (CSEM) has been used as a de‐risking tool in the hydrocarbon exploration industry. Although there have been successful applications of CSEM, this technique is still not widely used in the industry because the limited types of hydrocarbon reservoirs CSEM can detect. In this paper, we apply the concept of synthetic aperture to CSEM data. Synthetic aperture allows us to design sources with specific radiation patterns for different purposes. The ability to detec...

  1. Circular polarization in the optical afterglow of GRB 121024A

    CERN Document Server

    Wiersema, K; Toma, K; van der Horst, A J; Varela, K; Min, M; Greiner, J; Starling, R L C; Tanvir, N R; Wijers, R A M J; Campana, S; Curran, P A; Fan, Y; Fynbo, J P U; Gorosabel, J; Gomboc, A; Gotz, D; Hjorth, J; Jin, Z P; Kobayashi, S; Kouveliotou, C; Mundell, C; O'Brien, P T; Pian, E; Rowlinson, A; Russell, D M; Salvaterra, R; Alighieri, S di Serego; Tagliaferri, G; Vergani, S D; Elliott, J; Farina, C; Hartoog, O E; Karjalainen, R; Klose, S; Knust, F; Levan, A J; Schady, P; Sudilovski, V; Willingale, R

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are most probably powered by collimated relativistic outflows (jets) from accreting black holes at cosmological distances. Bright afterglows are produced when the outflow collides with the ambient medium. Afterglow polarization directly probes the magnetic properties of the jet, when measured minutes after the burst, and the geometric properties of the jet and the ambient medium when measured hours to days after the burst. High values of optical polarization detected minutes after burst in GRB 120308A indicate the presence of large-scale ordered magnetic fields originating from the central engine (the power source of the GRB). Theoretical models predict low degrees of linear polarization and negligable circular polarization at late times, when the energy in the original ejecta is quickly transferred to the ambient medium and propagates farther into the medium as a blastwave. Here we report the detection of circularly polarized optical light in the afterglow of GRB 121024A, measured 0.1...

  2. Crystal structure of the mammalian Grb2 adaptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maignan, S; Guilloteau, J P; Fromage, N; Arnoux, B; Becquart, J; Ducruix, A

    1995-04-14

    The mammalian growth factor receptor-binding protein Grb2 is an adaptor that mediates activation of guanine nucleotide exchange on Ras. Grb2 binds to the receptor through its SH2 domain and to the carboxyl-terminal domain of Son of sevenless through its two SH3 domains. It is thus a key element in the signal transduction pathway. The crystal structure of Grb2 was determined to 3.1 angstrom resolution. The asymmetric unit is composed of an embedded dimer. The interlaced junctions between the SH2 and SH3 domains bring the two adjacent faces of the SH3 domains in van der Waals contact but leave room for the binding of proline-rich peptides. PMID:7716522

  3. Purification, stabilization, and crystallization of a modular protein: Grb2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilloteau, J P; Fromage, N; Ries-Kautt, M; Reboul, S; Bocquet, D; Dubois, H; Faucher, D; Colonna, C; Ducruix, A; Becquart, J

    1996-05-01

    We report here the purification and the crystallization of the modular protein Grb2. The protein was expressed as a fusion with glutathione-S-transferase and purified by affinity chromatography on glutathione agarose. It was apparent from reverse phase chromatography that the purified protein was conformationally unstable. Instability was overcome by the addition of 100 mM arginine to the buffers. Because Grb2 appeared to be extremely sensitive to oxidation, crystallization experiments were performed with a dialysis button technique involving daily addition of fresh DTT to the reservoirs. The presence of 8 to 14% glycerol was necessary to obtain monocrystals. These results are discussed in relation with the modular nature of Grb2. PMID:8727323

  4. Evolution of a black hole at the center of GRB

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, H K; Lee, Hyun Kyu; Kim, Hui-Kyung

    2002-01-01

    Using a simplified model of a black hole-accretion disk system which is dominated by Poynting flux, the evolution of the central black hole which is supposed to be powering GRB is discussed. It is demonstrated explicitly that there is a lower limit on the angular momentum parameter for a given GRB energy. It is found that the most energetic GRBs can only accommodate relatively rapid-rotating black holes at the center. For a set of GRBs for which the isotropic energies and T_90s are known, the effect of the disk mass and the magnetic field on the horizon are discussed quantitatively. It is found that the magnetic field has little influence on the energy but affects the GRB duration as expected. The role of the disk mass is found to be significant in determining both the energy and the duration.

  5. GRB 010921 Strong Limits on an Underlying Supernova from HST

    CERN Document Server

    Price, P A; Schmidt, B P; Galama, T J; Bloom, J S; Berger, E; Frail, D A; Djorgovski, S G; Fox, D W; Henden, A A; Klose, S; Harrison, F A; Reichart, D E; Sari, R; Yost, S A; Axelrod, T S; McCarthy, P; Holtzmann, J A; Halpern, J P; Kimble, R A; Wheeler, J C; Chevalier, R A; Hurley, K; Ricker, G R; Costa, E; Frontera, F; Piro, L

    2003-01-01

    GRB 010921 was the first HETE-2 GRB to be localized via its afterglow emission. The low-redshift of the host galaxy, z=0.451, prompted us to undertake intensive multi-color observations with the Hubble Space Telescope with the goal of searching for an underlying supernova component. We do not detect any coincident supernova to a limit 1.34 mag fainter than SN 1998bw at 99.7% confidence, making this one of the most sensitive searches for an underlying SN. Analysis of the afterglow data allow us to infer that the GRB was situated behind a net extinction (Milky Way and the host galaxy) of A_V ~ 1.8 mag in the observer frame. Thus, had it not been for such heavy extinction our data would have allowed us to probe for an underlying SN with brightness approaching those of more typical Type Ib/c supernovae.

  6. GRB Cosmology and Self-organized Criticality in GRBs

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, F Y

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which have isotropic energy up to $10^{54}$ erg, would be the ideal tool to study the properties of early universe: including dark energy, star formation rate, and the metal enrichment history of the Universe. We will briefly review the progress on the field of GRB cosmology. Meanwhile, X-ray flares, which may have important clues to the central engine, are common phenomena in the GRB afterglows. We present statistical results of X-ray flares, i.e., energy, duration time and waiting time distributions, and compare the results with solar flares. The similarity between the two kinds of flares are found, which may indicates that the physical mechanism of GRB X-ray flares is magnetic reconnection.

  7. The CFHTLS Real Time Analysis System "Optically Selected GRB Afterglows"

    CERN Document Server

    Malacrino, F; Boër, M; Klotz, A; Veillet, C; Cuillandre, J C; Malacrino, Frederic; Atteia, Jean-Luc; Boer, Michel; Klotz, Alain; Veillet, Christian; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles

    2006-01-01

    We describe a wide and deep search for optical GRB afterglows on images taken with MegaCAM at the Canada France Hawaii Telescope, within the framework of the CFHT Legacy Survey. This search is performed in near real-time thanks to a Real Time Analysis System called "Optically Selected GRB Afterglows", which has been completely realized and installed on a dedicated computer in Hawaii. This pipeline automatically and quickly analyzes Megacam images and extracts from them a list of astrometrically and photometrically variable objects which are displayed on a web page for validation by a member of the collaboration. In this paper, we comprehensively describe the RTAS process. We also present statistical results based on nearly one full year of operation, showing the quality of the images and the performance of the RTAS. Finally, we compare the efficiency of this study with similar searches, propose an ideal observational strategy using simulations, and discuss general considerations on the searches for GRB afterg...

  8. The Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Radio Telescope Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Di; Pan, Zhichen

    2016-07-01

    The Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Radio Telescope (FAST) is a Chinese megascience project funded by the National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC) of the People's Republic of China. The National Astronomical Observatories of China (NAOC) is in charge of its construction and subsequent operation. Upon its expected completion in September 2016, FAST will surpass the 305 m Arecibo Telescope and the 100 m Green Bank Telescope in terms of absolute sensitivity in the 70 MHz to 3 GHz bands. In this paper, we report on the project, its current status, the key science goals, and plans for early science.

  9. Optical light curve of GRB 121011A: a textbook for the onset of GRB afterglow in a mixture of ISM and wind-type medium

    CERN Document Server

    Xin, Li-Ping; Qiu, Yu-Lei; Deng, Jin-Song; Wang, Jing; Han, Xu-Hui

    2016-01-01

    We reported the optical observations of GRB 121011A by 0.8-m TNT telescope at Xinglong observatory, China. The light curve of optical afterglow shows a smooth and featureless bump during the epoch of $\\sim$130 sec and $\\sim$5000 sec with a rising index of $1.57\\pm0.28$ before the break time of $539\\pm44$ sec, and a decaying index of about $1.29\\pm0.07$ up to the end of our observations. Meanwhile, the X-ray light curve decays in a single power-law with a slop of about $1.51\\pm0.03$ observed by $XRT$ onboard ${\\rm} Swift$ from 100 sec to about 10000 sec after the burst trigger. The featureless optical light curve could be understood as an onset process under the external-shock model. The typical frequency has been below or near the optical one before the deceleration time, and the cooling frequency is located between the optical and X-ray wavelengths. The external medium density has a transition from a mixed stage of ISM and wind-type medium before the peak time to the ISM at the later phase. The joint-analysi...

  10. GRB 090902B: AFTERGLOW OBSERVATIONS AND IMPLICATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optical-infrared afterglow of the Large Area Telescope (LAT)-detected long-duration burst, GRB 090902B, has been observed by several instruments. The earliest detection by ROTSE-IIIa occurred 80 minutes after detection by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor instrument on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope, revealing a bright afterglow and a decay slope suggestive of a reverse shock origin. Subsequent optical-IR observations followed the light curve for 6.5 days. The temporal and spectral behavior at optical-infrared frequencies is consistent with synchrotron fireball model predictions; the cooling break lies between optical and XRT frequencies ∼1.9 days after the burst. The inferred electron energy index is p = 1.8 ± 0.2, which would however imply an X-ray decay slope flatter than observed. The XRT and LAT data have similar spectral indices and the observed steeper value of the LAT temporal index is marginally consistent with the predicted temporal decay in the radiative regime of the forward shock model. Absence of a jet break during the first 6 days implies a collimation-corrected γ-ray energy Eγ > 2.2 x 1052 erg, one of the highest ever seen in a long-duration gamma-ray bursts. More events combining GeV photon emission with multiwavelength observations will be required to constrain the nature of the central engine powering these energetic explosions and to explore the correlations between energetic quanta and afterglow emission.

  11. GRB Polarization Measurements with CGRO/COMPTEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Mark L.; Collmar, Werner

    2016-04-01

    We have embarked on a program to analyze CGRO/COMPTEL data in search for evidence of polarization in both transient sources and in brighter steady sources. We are pursuing this work because of the heightened interest in high energy polarimetry, the recognition that some high energy sources may be highly polarized (thus improving our chances of a making useful measurements), and the ready availability of modern computing resources that provide the ability to carry out more comprehensive simulations in support of the analysis. The only significant work done to date with regards to COMPTEL polarimetry was published almost 20 years ago and used a simplified mass model of COMPTEL for simulating the instrument response. Estimates of the minimum detectable polarization (MDP) near 1 MeV included 30% for a two-week observation of the Crab, as low as 10% for bright GRBs, and as low as 10% for bright solar flares. The data analysis performed at the time led to inconclusive results and suggested some unknown systematic error. We contend that a self-consistent analysis will be feasible with high fidelity simulations, simulations that were not easily generated 20 years ago. Our analysis utilizes the latest GEANT4 simulation tools in conjunction with a high-fidelity mass model of the COMPTEL instrument, and incorporate updated analysis tools originally developed by the COMPTEL collaboration. Given the nine years of COMPTEL data, we expect that this work will likely add to our understanding of the polarization properties of transient sources, such as GRBs and solar flares, as well as brighter steady sources, such as the Crab and Cyg X-1. Here we present results from simulations of the COMPTEL polarization response and examine prospects for studying GRB polarization.

  12. GRB Cosmology and Self-organized Criticality in GRBs

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, F.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which have isotropic energy up to $10^{54}$ erg, would be the ideal tool to study the properties of early universe: including dark energy, star formation rate, and the metal enrichment history of the Universe. We will briefly review the progress on the field of GRB cosmology. Meanwhile, X-ray flares, which may have important clues to the central engine, are common phenomena in the GRB afterglows. We present statistical results of X-ray flares, i.e., energy, duration t...

  13. The Early Optical Brightening in the GRB 071010B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J H; Schwamb, M E; Huang, K Y; Wen, C Y; Zhang, Z W; Wang, S Y; Chen, W P; Bianco, F B; Dave, R; Lehner, M J; Marshall, S L; Porrata, R; Alcock, C; Byun, Y I; Cook, K H; King, S K; Lee, T; Urata, Y

    2008-04-08

    We report the detection of early (60-230 s) optical emission of the gamma-ray burst afterglow of GRB071010B. No significant correlation with the prompt {gamma}-ray emission was found. Our high time-resolution data combining with other measurements within 2 days after the burst indicate that GRB071010B is composed of a weak early brightening ({alpha} {approx} 0.6), probably caused by the peak frequency passing through the optical wavelengths, followed by a decay ({alpha} {approx} -0.51), attributed to continuous energy injection by patchy jets.

  14. Dynamics and stability of relativistic GRB blast waves

    OpenAIRE

    Meliani, Z.; Keppens, R.

    2010-01-01

    In gamma-ray-bursts (GRB), ultra-relativistic blast waves are ejected into the circumburst medium. We analyse in unprecedented detail the deceleration of a self-similar Blandford-McKee blast wave from a Lorentz factor 25 to the nonrelativistic Sedov phase. Our goal is to determine the stability properties of its frontal shock. We carried out a grid-adaptive relativistic 2D hydro-simulation at extreme resolving power, following the GRB jet during the entire afterglow phase. We investigate the ...

  15. Physical conditions in high-redshift GRB-DLA absorbers observed with VLT/UVES: implications for molecular hydrogen searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledoux, C.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Smette, A.; Fox, A. J.; Petitjean, P.; Ellison, S. L.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Savaglio, S.

    2009-11-01

    Aims: We aim to understand the nature of the absorbing neutral gas in the galaxies hosting high-redshift long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and to determine their physical conditions. Methods: A detailed analysis of high-quality VLT/UVES spectra of the optical afterglow of GRB 050730 and other Swift-era bursts is presented. Results: We report the detection of a significant number of previously unidentified allowed transition lines of Fe^+, involving the fine structure of the ground term ( ^6D{7/2}, ^6D{5/2}, ^6D{3/2}, ^6D{1/2}) and that of other excited levels (^4F{9/2}, ^4F{7/2}, ^4F{5/2}, ^4F{3/2}, ^4D{7/2}, ^4D{5/2}), from the zabs = 3.969, log N(H^0) = 22.10, damped Lyman-α (DLA) system located in the host galaxy of GRB 050730. No molecular hydrogen (H2) is detected down to a molecular fraction of log f 1.8 GRB host galaxies observed with VLT/UVES. We show that the lack of H2 can be explained by the low metallicities, [X/H] Fiore, and 075.A-0385, 077.D-0661, 080.D-0526, and 081.A-0856, P.I. Vreeswijk, with the Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) installed at the Nasmyth-B focus of the Very Large Telescope (VLT), Unit 2 - Kueyen, operated by the European Southern Observatory (ESO) on Cerro Paranal in Chile.

  16. The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory is a second-generation water Cherenkov detector designed to determine whether the currently observed solar neutrino deficit is a result of neutrino oscillations. The detector is unique in its use of D2O as a detection medium, permitting it to make a solar model-independent test of the neutrino oscillation hypothesis by comparison of the charged- and neutral-current interaction rates. In this paper the physical properties, construction, and preliminary operation of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory are described. Data and predicted operating parameters are provided whenever possible

  17. The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Boger, J; Rowley, J K; Carter, A L; Hollebone, B; Kessler, D; Blevis, I; Dalnoki-Veress, F; De Kok, A; Farine, J; Grant, D R; Hargrove, C K; Laberge, G; Levine, I; McFarlane, K W; Mes, H; Noble, A T; Novikov, V M; O'Neill, M; Shatkay, M; Shewchuk, C; Sinclair, D; Clifford, E T H; Deal, R; Earle, E D; Gaudette, E; Milton, G; Sur, B; Bigu, J; Cowan, J H M; Cluff, D L; Hallman, E D; Haq, R U; Hewett, J L; Hykawy, J G; Jonkmans, G; Michaud, R; Roberge, A; Roberts, J; Saettler, E; Schwendener, M H; Seifert, H; Sweezey, D; Tafirout, R; Virtue, C J; Beck, D N; Chan, Y D; Chen, X; Dragowsky, M R; Dycus, F W; González, J; Isaac, M C P; Kajiyama, Y; Köhler, G W; Lesko, K T; Moebus, M C; Norman, E B; Okada, C E; Poon, A W P; Purgalis, P; Schülke, A; Smith, A R; Stokstad, R G; Turner, S; Zlimen, I; Anaya, J M; Bowles, T J; Brice, S J; Esch, E I; Fowler, M M; Goldschmidt, A; Hime, A; McGirt, A F; Miller, G G; Teasdale, W A; Wilhelmy, J B; Wouters, J M; Anglin, J D; Bercovitch, M; Davidson, W F; Storey, R S; Biller, S; Black, R A; Boardman, R J; Bowler, M G; Cameron, J; Cleveland, B; Ferraris, A P; Doucas, G; Heron, H; Howard, C; Jelley, N A; Knox, A B; Lay, M; Locke, W; Lyon, J; Majerus, S; Moorhead, M E; Omori, Mamoru; Tanner, N W; Taplin, R K; Thorman, M; Wark, D L; West, N; Barton, J C; Trent, P T; Kouzes, R; Lowry, M M; Bell, A L; Bonvin, E; Boulay, M; Dayon, M; Duncan, F; Erhardt, L S; Evans, H C; Ewan, G T; Ford, R; Hallin, A; Hamer, A; Hart, P M; Harvey, P J; Haslip, D; Hearns, C A W; Heaton, R; Hepburn, J D; Jillings, C J; Korpach, E P; Lee, H W; Leslie, J R; Liu, M Q; Mak, H B; McDonald, A B; MacArthur, J D; McLatchie, W; Moffat, B A; Noel, S; Radcliffe, T J; Robertson, B C; Skensved, P; Stevenson, R L; Zhu, X; Gil, S; Heise, J; Helmer, R L; Komar, R J; Nally, C W; Ng, H S; Waltham, C E; Allen, R C; Buhler, G; Chen, H H; Aardsma, G; Andersen, T; Cameron, K; Chon, M C; Hanson, R H; Jagam, P; Karn, J; Law, J; Ollerhead, R W; Simpson, J J; Tagg, N; Wang, J X; Alexander, C; Beier, E W; Cook, J C; Cowen, D F; Frank, E D; Frati, W; Keener, P T; Klein, J R; Mayers, G; McDonald, D S; Neubauer, M S; Newcomer, F M; Pearce, R J; Van de Water, R G; Van Berg, R; Wittich, P; Ahmad, Q R; Beck, J M; Browne, M C; Burritt, T H; Doe, P J; Duba, C A; Elliott, S R; Franklin, J E; Germani, J V; Green, P; Hamian, A A; Heeger, K M; Howe, M; Meijer-Drees, R; Myers, A; Robertson, R G H; Smith, M W E; Steiger, T D; Van Wechel, T; Wilkerson, J F

    2000-01-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory is a second generation water Cherenkov detector designed to determine whether the currently observed solar neutrino deficit is a result of neutrino oscillations. The detector is unique in its use of D2O as a detection medium, permitting it to make a solar model-independent test of the neutrino oscillation hypothesis by comparison of the charged- and neutral-current interaction rates. In this paper the physical properties, construction, and preliminary operation of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory are described. Data and predicted operating parameters are provided whenever possible.

  18. WFIRST Observatory Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruk, Jeffrey W.

    2012-01-01

    The WFIRST observatory will be a powerful and flexible wide-field near-infrared facility. The planned surveys will provide data applicable to an enormous variety of astrophysical science. This presentation will provide a description of the observatory and its performance characteristics. This will include a discussion of the point spread function, signal-to-noise budgets for representative observing scenarios and the corresponding limiting sensitivity. Emphasis will be given to providing prospective Guest Observers with information needed to begin thinking about new observing programs.

  19. Early polarization observations of the optical emission of gamma-ray bursts: GRB150301B and GRB150413A

    CERN Document Server

    Gorbovskoy, E S; Buckley, D; Kornilov, V G; Balanutsa, P V; Tyurina, N V; Kuznetsov, A S; Kuvshinov, D A; Gorbunov, I A; Vlasenko, D; Popova, E; Chazov, V V; Potter, S; Kotze, M; Kniazev, A; Gress, O A; Budnev, N M; Ivanov, K I; Yazev, S A; Tlatov, A G; Senik, V A; Dormidontov, D V; Parhomenko, A V; Krushinski, V V; Zalozhnich, I S; Castro-Tirado, R Alberto; Sanchez-Ramrez, R; Sergienko, Yu P; Gabovich, A; Yurkov, V V; Levato, H; Saffe, C; Mallamaci, C; Lopez, C; Podest, F

    2015-01-01

    We report early optical linear polarization observations of two gamma-ray bursts made with the MASTER robotic telescope network. We found the minimum polar- ization for GRB150301B to be 8% at the beginning of the initial stage, whereas we detected no polarization for GRB150413A either at the rising branch or after the burst reached the power-law afterglow stage. This is the earliest measurement of the polarization (in cosmological rest frame) of gamma-ray bursts. The primary intent of the paper is to discover optical emission and publish extremely rare (unique) high- quality light curves of the prompt optical emission of gamma-ray bursts during the non-monotonic stage of their evolution. We report that our team has discovered the optical counterpart of one of the bursts, GRB150413A.

  20. The obscured hyper-energetic GRB 120624B hosted by a luminous compact galaxy at z = 2.20

    CERN Document Server

    Postigo, A de Ugarte; Thoene, C C; D'Avanzo, P; Sanchez-Ramirez, R; Melandri, A; Gorosabel, J; Ghirlanda, G; Veres, P; Martin, S; Petitpas, G; Covino, S; Fynbo, J P U; Levan, A J

    2013-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are the most luminous explosions that we can witness in the Universe. Studying the most extreme cases of these phenomena allows us to constrain the limits for the progenitor models. In this Letter, we study the prompt emission, afterglow, and host galaxy of GRB 120624B, one of the brightest GRBs detected by Fermi, to derive the energetics of the event and characterise the host galaxy in which it was produced. Following the high-energy detection we conducted a multi-wavelength follow-up campaign, including near-infrared imaging from HAWKI/VLT, optical from OSIRIS/GTC, X-ray observations from the Chandra X-ray Observatory and at sub-millimetre/millimetre wavelengths from SMA. Optical/nIR spectroscopy was performed with X-shooter/VLT. We detect the X-ray and nIR afterglow of the burst and determine a redshift of z = 2.1974 +/- 0.0002 through the identification of emission lines of [OII], [OIII] and H-alpha from the host galaxy of the GRB. This implies an energy release of Eiso = (3.0+/-0.2)x10^5...

  1. A Search for gravitational waves associated with the gamma ray burst GRB030329 using the LIGO detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Ageev, A.; Allen, B.; Amin, R.; Anderson, S.B.; Anderson, W.G.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Ashley, M.; Asiri, F.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Balasubramanian, R.; Ballmer, S.; Barish, B.C.; Barker, C.; Barker, D.; Barnes, M.; /Potsdam, Max Planck Inst. /Hannover, Max Planck Inst. Grav. /Australian

    2005-01-01

    We have performed a search for bursts of gravitational waves associated with the very bright Gamma Ray Burst GRB030329, using the two detectors at the LIGO Hanford Observatory. Our search covered the most sensitive frequency range of the LIGO detectors (approximately 80-2048 Hz), and we specifically targeted signals shorter than {approx_equal}150 ms. Our search algorithm looks for excess correlated power between the two interferometers and thus makes minimal assumptions about the gravitational waveform. We observed no candidates with gravitational wave signal strength larger than a pre-determined threshold. We report frequency dependent upper limits on the strength of the gravitational waves associated with GRB030329. Near the most sensitive frequency region, around {approx_equal}250 Hz, our root-sum-square (RSS) gravitational wave strain sensitivity for optimally polarized bursts was better than h{sub RSS} {approx_equal} 6 x 10{sup -21} Hz{sup -1/2}. Our result is comparable to the best published results searching for association between gravitational waves and GRBs.

  2. NPS high resolution synthetic aperture sonar

    OpenAIRE

    Welter, Joseph Donald

    1995-01-01

    This thesis investigated the use of synthetic aperture techniques to achieve a long effective aperture, high resolution, imaging sonar. The approach included a full simulation of the system using the MATLAB programming environment that provided a model for developing six data processing algorithms and a working 25KHz, 1 m baseline, air medium synthetic aperture sonar. The six azimuthal processing techniques included: (1) a normal, real aperture, (2) an unfocussed synthetic aperture, (3) a hyb...

  3. Poznan acute Astronomical Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    This Poznan acute Astronomical Observatory is a unit of the Adam Mickiewicz University, located in Poznan acute, Poland. From its foundation in 1919, it has specialized in astrometry and celestial mechanics (reference frames, dynamics of satellites and small solar system bodies). Recently, research activities have also included planetary and stellar astrophysics (asteroid photometry, catalysmic b...

  4. The San Fernando Observatory video Stokes polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, P. H.; Zeldin, L. K.; Loftin, T. A.

    1985-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the suitability of the San Fernando Observatory's 61 cm (24 inch) aperture vacuum solar telescope and 3 m (118 inch) focal length vacuum spectroheliograph for Stokes Polarimetry measurements. The polarization characteristics of these two instruments was measured by determining their Mueller matrices as a function of telescope orientation, field angle, wavelength, grating type, and position of the measuring beam in the telescope entrance window. In general, the polarizing and depolarizing properties are small so that inversion of the system Mueller matrix will permit the accurate measurement of Stokes profiles for vector magnetic field determination. A proposed polarimeter design based on the use of a TV camera system to simultaneously scan six different polarization components of a given line profile is described. This design, which uses no rotating optics or electronic modulators and makes efficient use of the available irradiance, promises to yield high quality vector magnetograms.

  5. The distribution of equivalent widths in long GRB afterglow spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Postigo, A de Ugarte; Thoene, C C; Christensen, L; Gorosabel, J; Milvang-Jensen, B; Schulze, S; Jakobsson, P; Wiersema, K; Sanchez-Ramirez, R; Leloudas, G; Zafar, T; Malesani, D; Hjorth, J

    2012-01-01

    The extreme brightness of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows and their simple spectral shape make them ideal beacons to study the interstellar medium of their host galaxies through absorption line spectroscopy. Using 69 low-resolution GRB afterglow spectra, we conduct a study of the rest-frame equivalent width (EW) distribution of features with an average rest-frame EW larger than 0.5 A. To compare an individual GRB with the sample, we develop EW diagrams as a graphical tool, and we give a catalogue with diagrams for the 69 spectra. We introduce a line strength parameter (LSP) that allows us to quantify the strength of the absorption features as compared to the sample by a single number. Using the distributions of EWs of single-species features, we derive the distribution of column densities by a curve of growth (CoG) fit. We find correlations between the LSP and the extinction of the GRB, the UV brightness of the host galaxies and the neutral hydrogen column density. However, we see no significant evolution of...

  6. The Distance of GRB is Independent from the Redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Fu-gao

    2008-01-01

    Although it is acknowledged that the host galaxy of GRB is the source of GRB at present, but it is in fact not obtained a reliable confirmation. However, the fact is still unclear because the host is possibly a background galaxy that has no physical affiliation to the GRB. Here, I show a series of evidences, including three methods, to identify the status of hosts. The correlation analysis shows that there is no correlation between the distance of GRBs and the redshift of hosts although there is a significant correlation between the apparent magnitude of hosts and the redshift; the deductive reasoning shows that many wrong conclusions that violate to the basic principle of physics would inevitably be obtained if the redshift indicates the distance; and the variables separation test proves directly that, however, the distance is independent from the redshift and the values of the fluence and the photon flux can be accurately forecasted for the GRB with higher redshift. On the other hand, the three statistical ...

  7. Early danish GRB experiments - And some for the future?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Niels

    2013-01-01

    japanese report of a balloon instrument for GRB studies based on a Rotation Modulation Collimator we at the Danish Space Research Institute started the development of an RMC detector for GRBs, the WATCH wide field monitor. Four WATCH units were flown on the Soviet Granat satellites, and one on ESA's EURECA...

  8. A SUPRAMASSIVE MAGNETAR CENTRAL ENGINE FOR GRB 130603B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that the peculiar early optical emission and, in particular, the X-ray afterglow emission of the short-duration burst GRB 130603B can be explained by continuous energy injection into the blastwave from a supramassive magnetar central engine. The observed energetics and temporal/spectral properties of the late infrared bump (i.e., the kilonova) are also found to be consistent with emission from the ejecta launched during a neutron star (NS)-NS merger and powered by a magnetar central engine. The isotropic-equivalent kinetic energies of both the gamma-ray burst (GRB) blastwave and the kilonova are approximately Ek ∼ 1051 erg, consistent with being powered by a near-isotropic magnetar wind. However, this relatively small value requires that most of the initial rotational energy of the magnetar (∼a few × 1052 erg) is carried away by gravitational wave radiation. Our results suggest that (1) the progenitor of GRB 130603B was a NS-NS binary system, the merger product of which would have been a supramassive NS that lasted for about ∼1000 s; (2) the equation of state of the nuclear matter should be stiff enough to allow the survival of a long-lived supramassive NS; thus this suggested that the detection of the bright electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational wave triggers without short GRB associations is promising in the upcoming Advanced LIGO/VIRGO era

  9. WIDGET: System Performance and GRB Prompt Optical Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Urata, Yuji; Tamagawa, Toru; Usui, Fumihiko; Kuwahara, Makoto; Lin, Hungmiao; Kageyama, Shoichi; Iwakiri, Wataru; Sugasahara, Takako; Takahara, Kazuki; Kodaka, Natsuki; Abe, Keiichi; Masuno, Keisuke; Onda, Kaori

    2010-01-01

    The WIDeField telescope for Gamma-ray burst Early Timing (WIDGET) is used for a fully automated, ultra-wide-field survey aimed at detecting the prompt optical emission associated with Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs). WIDGET surveys the HETE-2 and Swift/BAT pointing directions covering a total field of view of 62 degree x 62 degree every 10 secounds using an unfiltered system. This monitoring survey allows exploration of the optical emission before the gamma-ray trigger. The unfiltered magnitude is well converted to the SDSS r' system at a 0.1 mag level. Since 2004, WIDGET has made a total of ten simultaneous and one pre-trigger GRB observations. The efficiency of synchronized observation with HETE-2 is four times better than that of Swift. There has been no bright optical emission similar to that from GRB 080319B. The statistical analysis implies that GRB080319B is a rare event. This paper summarizes the design and operation of the WIDGET system and the simultaneous GRB observations obtained with this instrument.

  10. BeppoSAX attitude operations for GRB follow up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This poster describes the attitude dynamics software, Attitude and Orbit Control Ground Support System (AOCGSS), which was developed by TELESPAZIO and integrated in the Operations Control Centre (OCC), in order to support the on ground operations of the Attitude and Orbit Control Subsystem (AOCS). In particular its involvement during the operations performed to carry out the Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) Follow Up is described

  11. Spectroscopy of the short-hard GRB 130603B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postigo, A. de Ugarte; Thoene, C. C.; Rowlinson, A.;

    2014-01-01

    Short duration gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) are thought to be related to the violent merger of compact objects, such as neutron stars or black holes, which makes them promising sources of gravitational waves. The detection of a 'kilonova'-like signature associated to the Swift-detected GRB 130603B ha...

  12. When GRB afterglows get softer, hard components come into play

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the ability of simple spectral models to describe the early afterglow emission of GRBs. We found that four spectra, belonging to the GRB060502A, GRB060729, GRB060904B, GRB061H0A prompt-afterglow transition phase, can be modeled neither by a single power-law nor by the Band model. Instead we find that the data present high-energy (>3 keV, in the observer frame) statistically significant excesses with respect to these models In all four cases, the deviations can be modeled well by adding either a second power law or a blackbody component to the usual synchrotron power law spectrum. Although the data do not allow an unequivocal physical interpretation, the importance of this analysis consists in showing that a simple power-law model or a Band model is insufficient to describe the X-ray spectra of a small homogeneous sample of GRBs at the end of their prompt phase [1

  13. An External Shock Origin of GRB $\\textit{141028A}$

    CERN Document Server

    Burgess, J Michael; Ryde, Felix; Omodei, Nicola; Pe'er, Asaf; Racusin, J L; Cucchiara, A

    2015-01-01

    The prompt emission of the long, smooth, and single-pulsed gamma-ray burst, GRB $\\textit{141028A}$, is analyzed under the guise of an external shock model. First, we fit the $\\gamma$-ray spectrum with a two-component photon model, namely synchrotron+blackbody, and then fit the recovered evolution of the synchrotron $\

  14. Constraints on Very High Energy Emission from GRB 130427A

    CERN Document Server

    Aliu, E; Barnacka, A; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Berger, K; Biteau, J; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Byrum, K; Cardenzana, J V; Cerruti, M; Chen, X; Ciupik, L; Connaughton, V; Cui, W; Dickinson, H J; Eisch, J D; Errando, M; Falcone, A; Federici, S; Feng, Q; Finley, J P; Fleischhack, H; Fortin, P; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Galante, N; Gillanders, G H; Griffin, S; Griffiths, S T; Grube, J; Gyuk, G; Håkansson, N; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Hughes, G; Humensky, T B; Johnson, C A; Kaaret, P; Kar, P; Kertzman, M; Khassen, Y; Kieda, D; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Lang, M J; Madhavan, A S; Maier, G; McArthur, S; McCann, A; Meagher, K; Millis, J; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; Nieto, D; de Bhróithe, A O'Faoláin; Ong, R A; Otte, A N; Park, N; Pohl, M; Popkow, A; Prokoph, H; Pueschel, E; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Rajotte, J; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Richards, G T; Roache, E; Sembroski, G H; Shahinyan, K; Smith, A W; Staszak, D; Telezhinsky, I; Tucci, J V; Tyler, J; Varlotta, A; Vassiliev, V V; Vincent, S; Wakely, S P; Weiner, O M; Weinstein, A; Welsing, R; Wilhelm, A; Williams, D A; Zitzer, B; McEnery, J E; Perkins, J S; Veres, P; Zhu, S

    2014-01-01

    Prompt emission from the very fluent and nearby (z=0.34) gamma-ray burst GRB 130427A was detected by several orbiting telescopes and by ground-based, wide-field-of-view optical transient monitors. Apart from the intensity and proximity of this GRB, it is exceptional due to the extremely long-lived high-energy (100 MeV to 100 GeV) gamma-ray emission, which was detected by the Large Area Telescope on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope for ~70 ks after the initial burst. The persistent, hard-spectrum, high-energy emission suggests that the highest-energy gamma rays may have been produced via synchrotron self-Compton processes though there is also evidence that the high-energy emission may instead be an extension of the synchrotron spectrum. VERITAS, a ground-based imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope array, began follow-up observations of GRB 130427A ~71 ks (~20 hr) after the onset of the burst. The GRB was not detected with VERITAS; however, the high elevation of the observations, coupled with the low redsh...

  15. Effects of Beyond Standard Model Physics on GRB Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Moharana, Reetanjali

    2013-01-01

    The nondetection of neutrinos coming from Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) by the IceCube experiment has raised serious questions on our understanding of GRB's and the mechanism of neutrino flux production in them. Motivated by this and the need for a precise calculation for GRB neutrino flux, here we study the effects of beyond standard model physics on the GRB neutrino flux. In the internal shock model of GRB, high energy neutrinos are expected from muon, pion and kaon decays. Using the latest best fit neutrino oscillation parameters, we compute the expected flux on earth for standard as well as non-standard oscillation scenarios. Among the non-standard scenarios, we consider neutrino decay, pseudo-dirac nature of neutrinos and presence of one eV scale light sterile neutrino. Incorporating other experimental bounds on these new physics scenarios, we show that neutrino decay scenario can significantly alter the neutrino flux on earth from the expected ones whereas the corresponding changes for pseudo-dirac and steril...

  16. IMPLICATIONS FOR THE ORIGIN OF GRB 051103 FROM LIGO OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Ajith, P.; Anderson, S. B.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C. [LIGO-California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Abbott, T. D. [California State University Fullerton, Fullerton, CA 92831 (United States); Abernathy, M. [University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Adams, C. [LIGO-Livingston Observatory, Livingston, LA 70754 (United States); Affeldt, C.; Allen, B. [Albert-Einstein-Institut, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Allen, G. S. [Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Ceron, E. Amador; Anderson, W. G. [University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States); Amariutei, D.; Arain, M. A. [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Amin, R. S. [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Aston, S. M. [University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Collaboration: LIGO Collaboration; and others

    2012-08-10

    We present the results of a LIGO search for gravitational waves (GWs) associated with GRB 051103, a short-duration hard-spectrum gamma-ray burst (GRB) whose electromagnetically determined sky position is coincident with the spiral galaxy M81, which is 3.6 Mpc from Earth. Possible progenitors for short-hard GRBs include compact object mergers and soft gamma repeater (SGR) giant flares. A merger progenitor would produce a characteristic GW signal that should be detectable at a distance of M81, while GW emission from an SGR is not expected to be detectable at that distance. We found no evidence of a GW signal associated with GRB 051103. Assuming weakly beamed {gamma}-ray emission with a jet semi-angle of 30 Degree-Sign , we exclude a binary neutron star merger in M81 as the progenitor with a confidence of 98%. Neutron star-black hole mergers are excluded with >99% confidence. If the event occurred in M81, then our findings support the hypothesis that GRB 051103 was due to an SGR giant flare, making it one of the most distant extragalactic magnetars observed to date.

  17. Implications For The Origin Of GRB 051103 From LIGO Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Abadie, J; Abbott, T D; Abbott, R; Abernathy, M; Adams, C; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allen, G S; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Amin, R S; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Arain, M A; Araya, M C; Aston, S M; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballmer, S; Barker, D; Barnum, S; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barsotti, L; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Bauchrowitz, J; Behnke, B; Bell, A S; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biswas, R; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bondarescu, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Bose, S; Boyle, M; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Bridges, D O; Brinkmann, M; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brummitt, A; Buonanno, A; Burguet-Castell, J; Burmeister, O; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Cao, J; Capano, C; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavaglia, M; Cepeda, C; Chalermsongsak, T; Chalkley, E; Charlton, P; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Chung, C T Y; Clara, F; Clark, D; Clark, J; Clayton, J H; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R C; Cornish, N; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coward, D M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Culter, R M; Dahl, K; Danilishin, S L; Dannenberg, R; Danzmann, K; Das, K; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davies, G; Daw, E J; Dayanga, T; DeBra, D; Degallaix, J; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Palma, I; Diaz, M; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Dorsher, S; Douglas, E S D; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Farr, B F; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Finn, L S; Flanigan, M; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Fotopoulos, N; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Garcia, J; Garofoli, J A; Gholami, I; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Gill, C; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; Gonzalez, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossler, S; Graef, C; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guido, C; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hage, B; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Heefner, J; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kanner, J B; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Kelner, M; Keppel, D G; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, N; Kim, H; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kozak, D; Kringel, V; Krishnamurthy, S; Krishnan, B; Kuehn, G; Kumar, R; Kwee, P; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lastzka, N; Lazzarini, A; Leaci, P; Leong, J; Leonor, I; Li, J; Lindquist, P E; Lockerbie, N A; Lodhia, D; Lormand, M; Lu, P; Luan, J; Lubinski, M; Luck, H; Lundgren, A P; Macdonald, E; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Marandi, A; Marka, S; Marka, Z; Maros, E; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Matzner, R A; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; McKechan, D J A; Meadors, G; Mehmet, M; Meier, T; Melatos, A; Melissinos, A C; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Meyer, M S; Miao, H; Miller, J; Mino, Y; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Moe, B; Moesta, P; Mohanty, S D; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, G; Mukherjee, S; Mullavey, A; Muller-Ebhardt, H; Munch, J; Murphy, D; Murray, P G; Nash, T; Nawrodt, R; Nelson, J; Newton, G; Nishizawa, A; Nolting, D; Nuttall, L; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Ogin, G H; Oldenburg, R G; Osthelder, C; Ott, C D; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Page, A; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Papa, M A; Patel, P; Pedraza, M; Pekowsky, L; Penn, S; Peralta, C; Perreca, A; Phelps, M; Pickenpack, M; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Pletsch, H J; Plissi, M V; Podkaminer, J; Pold, J; Postiglione, F; Predoi, V; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Privitera, S; Prix, R; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Quetschke, V; Raab, F J; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Rakhmanov, M; Ramet, C R; Rankins, B; Mohapatra, S R P; Raymond, V; Redwine, K; Reed, C M; Reed, T; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Roberts, P; Robertson, N A; Robinson, C; Robinson, E L; Roddy, S; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J H; Rover, C; Rowan, S; Rudiger, A; Ryan, K; Sakata, S; Sakosky, M; Salemi, F; Salit, M; Sammut, L; de la Jordana, L Sancho; Sandberg, V; Sannibale, V; SantamarÌa, L; Santiago-Prieto, I; Santostasi, G; Saraf, S; Sathyaprakash, B S; Sato, S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Schilling, R; Schlamminger, S; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schulz, B; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Searle, A C; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sergeev, A; Shaddock, D A; Shaltev, M; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Weerathunga, T Shihan; Shoemaker, D H; Sibley, A; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Singer, A; Singer, L; Sintes, A M; Skelton, G; Slagmolen, B J J; Slutsky, J; Smith, R; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Smith, N D; Somiya, K; Sorazu, B; Soto, J; Speirits, F C; Stein, A J; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Steplewski, S; Stefszky, M; Stochino, A; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Strigin, S; Stroeer, A S; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Sung, M; Susmithan, S; Sutton, P J; Szokoly, G P; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tarabrin, S P; Taylor, J R; Taylor, R; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Thuring, A; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C I; Traylor, G; Trias, M; Tseng, K; Ugolini, D; Urbanek, K; Vahlbruch, H; Vaishnav, B; Vallisneri, M; Broeck, C Van Den; van der Sluys, M V; van Veggel, A A; Vass, S; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Veltkamp, C; Villar, A E; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P; Waldman, S J; Wallace, L; Wanner, A; Ward, R L; Wei, P; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Wen, L; Wen, S; Wessels, P; West, M; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; White, D; Whiting, B F; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Williams, H R; Williams, L; Willke, B; Winkelmann, L; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wiseman, A G; Woan, G; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Yablon, J; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, K; Yamamoto, H; Yang, H; Yeaton-Massey, D; Yoshida, S; Yu, P; Zanolin, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, Z; Zhao, C; Zotov, N; Zucker, M E; Zweizig, J; Bizouard, M A; Dietz, A; Guidi, G M; Was, M

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a LIGO search for gravitational waves (GWs) associated with GRB 051103, a short-duration hard-spectrum gamma-ray burst (GRB) whose electromagnetically determined sky position is coincident with the spiral galaxy M81, which is 3.6 Mpc from Earth. Possible progenitors for short-hard GRBs include compact object mergers and soft gamma repeater (SGR) giant flares. A merger progenitor would produce a characteristic GW signal that should be detectable at the distance of M81, while GW emission from an SGR is not expected to be detectable at that distance. We found no evidence of a GW signal associated with GRB 051103. Assuming weakly beamed gamma-ray emission with a jet semi-angle of 30 deg we exclude a binary neutron star merger in M81 as the progenitor with a confidence of 98%. Neutron star-black hole mergers are excluded with > 99% confidence. If the event occurred in M81 our findings support the the hypothesis that GRB 051103 was due to an SGR giant flare, making it the most distant extr...

  18. The polarized gamma-ray burst GRB 061122

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götz, D.; Covino, S.; Fernández-Soto, A.; Laurent, P.; Bošnjak, Ž.

    2013-06-01

    We report on the polarization measure, obtained with IBIS on board INTEGRAL, of the prompt emission of GRB 061122. Over an 8 s interval containing the brightest part of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) we put a lower limit on its polarization fraction of 60 per cent at 68 per cent confidence level (c.l.) and of 33 per cent at 90 per cent c.l. on the 250-800 keV energy range. We performed late time optical and near-infrared imaging observations of the GRB field using the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo and the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. Our multiband (ugrizYJHK) photometry allowed us to identify the host galaxy of GRB 061122 and to build its spectral energy distribution. Using a photometric redshift code we fitted these data, and derived the basic properties of the galaxy, including its type and redshift, that we could constrain to the interval [0.57, 2.10] at a 90 per cent c.l., with a best-fitting value of z = 1.33. The polarization measurement in different energy bands, together with the distance determination, allowed us to put the most stringent limit (ξ ≲ 3.4 × 10-16) to date to a possible Lorentz invariance violation based on the vacuum birefringence effect, predicted by some quantum-gravity theories.

  19. Features of >130 Gamma-Ray Bursts at high energy: towards the 2nd Fermi LAT GRB catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianello, Giacomo; Omodei, Nicola; Fermi LAT Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The high-energy emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts is a formidable probe for extreme physics, calling for highly relativistic sources with very large Lorentz factors. Despite the advancements prompted by observations from the Fermi Large Area Telescope and the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor, as well as other observatories, many questions remain open, especially on radiative processes and mechanisms. We present here the most extensive search for GRBs at high energies performed so far, featuring a detection efficiency more than 50% better than previous works, and returning more than 130 detections. With this sample size, much larger than the 35 detections presented in the first Fermi/LAT GRB catalog, we are able to assess the characteristics of the population of GRBs at high energy with unprecedented sensitivity. We will review the preliminary results of this work, as well as their interpretation.

  20. US Naval Observatory Hourly Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hourly observations journal from the National Observatory in Washington DC. The observatory is the first station in the United States to produce hourly observations...

  1. A flat laser array aperture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Stergios J.; Ricciardi, Gerald F.; Gross, Michael C.; Krill, Jerry A.

    2010-04-01

    We describe a design concept for a flat (or conformal) thin-plate laser phased-array aperture. The aperture consists of a substrate supporting a grid of single-mode optical waveguides fabricated from a linear electro-optic material. The waveguides are coupled to a single laser source or detector. An arrangement of electrodes provides for two-dimensional beam steering by controlling the phase of the light entering the grid. The electrodes can also be modulated to simultaneously provide atmospheric turbulence modulation for long-range free-space optical communication. An approach for fabrication is also outlined.

  2. The need for a multicomponent UHECR Observatory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letessier-Selvon Antoine

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In the past fifteen years, UHECR hybrid detection systems – combinations of fluorescence techniques with very large ground arrays (over 103km2 – have provided data sets of unprecedented statistics and quality However, the paucity of events above the GZK cut-off combined with the limited duty cycle of the fluorescence detectors calls for further progress in the detection techniques and larger aperture. Above 50 EeV the current world data sets are of the order of 200 events out of which only a handful have been observed in hybrid mode. Hence, while the spectrum feature as well as anisotropy studies can be performed, although with limitation, a proper identification of the primary particle is out of reach. I argue here that the next generation observatory should reach an aperture of several 104km2 using detectors able to measure both the muonic and electromagnetic component of each individual extensive air shower in order to provide the necessary information to pin down the primary cosmic ray nature and possibly point back at their sources.

  3. High resolution non-iterative aperture synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraczek, Jeffrey R; McManamon, Paul F; Watson, Edward A

    2016-03-21

    The maximum resolution of a multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) imaging system is determined by the size of the synthetic aperture. The synthetic aperture is determined by a coordinate shift using the relative positions of the illuminators and receive apertures. Previous methods have shown non-iterative phasing for multiple illuminators with a single receive aperture for intra-aperture synthesis. This work shows non-iterative phasing with both multiple illuminators and multiple receive apertures for inter-aperture synthesis. Simulated results show that piston, tip, and tilt can be calculated using inter-aperture phasing after intra-aperture phasing has been performed. Use of a fourth illuminator for increased resolution is shown. The modulation transfer function (MTF) is used to quantitatively judge increased resolution. PMID:27136816

  4. ESO's Two Observatories Merge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-02-01

    On February 1, 2005, the European Southern Observatory (ESO) has merged its two observatories, La Silla and Paranal, into one. This move will help Europe's prime organisation for astronomy to better manage its many and diverse projects by deploying available resources more efficiently where and when they are needed. The merged observatory will be known as the La Silla Paranal Observatory. Catherine Cesarsky, ESO's Director General, comments the new development: "The merging, which was planned during the past year with the deep involvement of all the staff, has created unified maintenance and engineering (including software, mechanics, electronics and optics) departments across the two sites, further increasing the already very high efficiency of our telescopes. It is my great pleasure to commend the excellent work of Jorge Melnick, former director of the La Silla Observatory, and of Roberto Gilmozzi, the director of Paranal." ESO's headquarters are located in Garching, in the vicinity of Munich (Bavaria, Germany), and this intergovernmental organisation has established itself as a world-leader in astronomy. Created in 1962, ESO is now supported by eleven member states (Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, The Netherlands, Portugal, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom). It operates major telescopes on two remote sites, all located in Chile: La Silla, about 600 km north of Santiago and at an altitude of 2400m; Paranal, a 2600m high mountain in the Atacama Desert 120 km south of the coastal city of Antofagasta. Most recently, ESO has started the construction of an observatory at Chajnantor, a 5000m high site, also in the Atacama Desert. La Silla, north of the town of La Serena, has been the bastion of the organization's facilities since 1964. It is the site of two of the most productive 4-m class telescopes in the world, the New Technology Telescope (NTT) - the first major telescope equipped with active optics - and the 3.6-m, which hosts HARPS

  5. GRB 090510: a genuine short-GRB from a binary neutron star coalescing into a Kerr-Newman black hole

    CERN Document Server

    Enderli, M; Muccino, M; Aimuratov, Y; Bianco, C L; Cherubini, C; Kovacevic, M; Moradi, R; Penacchioni, A V; Pisani, G B; Rueda, J A; Wang, Y

    2016-01-01

    In a new classification of merging binary neutron stars (NSs) we separate short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in two sub-classes. The ones with $E_{\\rm iso}\\lesssim10^{52}$ erg coalesce to form a massive NS and are indicated as short gamma-ray flashes (S-GRFs). The hardest, with $E_{\\rm iso}\\gtrsim10^{52}$ erg, coalesce to form a black hole (BH) and are indicated as genuine short-GRBs (S-GRBs). Within the fireshell model, S-GRBs exhibit three different components: the P-GRB emission, observed at the transparency of a self-accelerating baryon-$e^+e^-$ plasma; the prompt emission, originating from the interaction of the accelerated baryons with the circumburst medium; the high-energy (GeV) emission, observed after the P-GRB and indicating the formation of a BH. GRB 090510 gives the first evidence for the formation of a Kerr-Newman BH. Its P-GRB spectrum can be fitted by a convolution of thermal spectra whose origin can be traced back to an axially symmetric dyadotorus. A large value of the angular momentum of the new...

  6. A case of mistaken identity? GRB 060912A and the nature of the long -- short GRB divide

    CERN Document Server

    Levan, A J; Chapman, R; Gehrels, N; Gorosabel, J; Hurkett, C; Jakobsson, P; Kouveliotou, C; O'Brien, P T; Osborne, J P; Priddey, R S; Rol, E; Starling, R; Tanvir, N R; Vreeswijk, P M; Wiersema, K

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the origin of the GRB 060912A, which has observational properties that make its classification as either a long or short burst ambiguous. Short duration GRBs (SGRBs) are thought to have typically lower energies than long duration bursts, can be found in galaxies with populations of all ages and are likely to originate from different progenitors to the long duration bursts. However, it has become clear that duration alone is insufficient to make a distinction between the two populations in many cases, leading to a desire to find additional discriminators of burst type. GRB 060912A had a duration of 6 s and occurred only ~10 arcsec from a bright, low redshift ($z=0.0936$) elliptical galaxy, suggesting that this may have been the host, which would favour it being a short-burst. However, our deep optical imaging and spectroscopy of the location of GRB 060912A using the VLT shows that GRB 060912A more likely originates in a distant star forming galaxy at z=0.937, and is most likely a long burst. Thi...

  7. GRBs Optical follow-up observation at Lulin observatory, Taiwan

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, K Y; Ip, W H; Tamagawa, T; Onda, K; Makishima, K

    2005-01-01

    The Lulin GRB program, using the Lulin One-meter Telescope (LOT) in Taiwan started in July 2003. Its scientific aims are to discover optical counterparts of XRFs and short and long GRBs, then to quickly observe them in multiple bands. Thirteen follow-up observations were provided by LOT between July 2003 and Feb. 2005. One host galaxy was found at GRB 031203. Two optical afterglows were detected for GRB 040924 and GRB 041006. In addition, the optical observations of GRB 031203 and a discussion of the non-detection of the optical afterglow of GRB 031203 are also reported in this article.

  8. A Small, Rapid Optical-IR Response Gamma-Ray Burst Space Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Grossan, Bruce; Perley, Daniel; Smoot, George F

    2014-01-01

    Here we propose a new gamma-ray burst (GRB) mission, the Next Generation Rapid-Response GRB Observatory (NGRG). As with Swift, GRBs are initially located with a coded-mask X-ray camera. However, the NGRG has two new features: First, a beam-steering system to begin optical observations within ~ 1 s after location; second, a near-IR (NIR) camera viewing the same sky, for sensitivity to extinguished bursts. These features allow measurement of the rise phase of GRB optical-NIR emission. Thus far, the rise time and transition between prompt and afterglow in the optical and NIR are rarely measured. Rapid-response measurements explore many science topics including optical emission mechanisms (synchrotron vs. SSC, photospheric emission) and jet characteristics (reverse vs. forward shock emission, baryon-dominated vs. magnetic dominated). Rapid optical-NIR response can measure dynamic evolution of extinction due to vaporization of dust, and separate star system and galaxy dust extinction. We discuss these measurements...

  9. Expanding the HAWC Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Johanna [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-17

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma-Ray Observatory is expanding its current array of 300 water tanks to include 350 outrigger tanks to increase sensitivity to gamma rays above 10 TeV. This involves creating and testing hardware with which to build the new tanks, including photomultiplier tubes, high voltage supply units, and flash analog to digital converters. My responsibilities this summer included preparing, testing and calibrating that equipment.

  10. The properties of the 2175AA extinction feature discovered in GRB afterglows

    CERN Document Server

    Zafar, Tayyaba; Eliasdottir, Ardis; Fynbo, Johan P U; Kruhler, Thomas; Schady, Patricia; Leloudas, Giorgos; Jakobsson, Pall; Thone, Christina C; Perley, Daniel A; Morgan, Adam N; Bloom, Joshua; Greiner, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    The unequivocal, spectroscopic detection of the 2175 bump in extinction curves outside the Local Group is rare. To date, the properties of the bump have been examined in only two GRB afterglows (GRB 070802 and GRB 080607). In this work we analyse in detail the detections of the 2175 extinction bump in the optical spectra of the two further GRB afterglows: GRB 080605 and 080805. We gather all available optical/NIR photometric, spectroscopic and X-ray data to construct multi-epoch SEDs for both GRB afterglows. We fit the SEDs with the Fitzpatrick & Massa (1990) model with a single or broken PL. We also fit a sample of 38 GRB afterglows, known to prefer a SMC-type extinction curve, with the same model. We find that the SEDs of GRB 080605 and GRB 080805 at two epochs are fit well with a single PL with a derived extinction of A_V = 0.52(+0.13 -0.16) and 0.50 (+0.13 -0.10), and 2.1(+0.7-0.6) and 1.5+/-0.2 respectively. While the slope of the extinction curve of GRB 080805 is not well-constrained, the extinction...

  11. An Observatory to Enhance the Preparation of Future California Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, L.; Lederer, S.

    2004-12-01

    With a major grant from the W. M. Keck Foundation, California State University, San Bernardino is establishing a state-of-the-art teaching astronomical observatory. The Observatory will be fundamental to an innovative undergraduate physics and astronomy curriculum for Physics and Liberal Studies majors and will be integrated into our General Education program. The critical need for a research and educational observatory is linked to changes in California's Science Competencies for teacher certification. Development of the Observatory will also complement a new infusion of NASA funding and equipment support for our growing astronomy education programs and the University's established Strategic Plan for excellence in education and teacher preparation. The Observatory will consist of two domed towers. One tower will house a 20" Ritchey-Chretien telescope equipped with a CCD camera in conjunction with either UBVRI broadband filters or a spectrometer for evening laboratories and student research projects. The second tower will house the university's existing 12" Schmidt-Cassegrain optical telescope coupled with a CCD camera and an array of filters. A small aperture solar telescope will be attached to the 12" for observing solar prominences while a milar filter can be attached to the 12" for sunspot viewing. We have been very fortunate to receive a challenge grant of \\600,000 from the W. M. Keck Foundation to equip the two domed towers; we continue to seek a further \\800,000 to meet our construction needs. Funding also provided by the California State University, San Bernardino.

  12. The Russian Virtual Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dluzhnevskaya, O. B.; Malkov, O. Yu.; Kilpio, A. A.; Kilpio, E. Yu.; Kovaleva, D. A.; Sat, L. A.

    The Russian Virtual Observatory (RVO) will be an integral component of the International Virtual Observatory (IVO). The RVO has the main goal of integrating resources of astronomical data accumulated in Russian observatories and institutions (databases, archives, digitized glass libraries, bibliographic data, a remote access system to information and technical resources of telescopes etc.), and providing transparent access for scientific and educational purposes to the distributed information and data services that comprise its content. Another goal of the RVO is to provide Russian astronomers with on-line access to the rich volumes of data and metadata that have been, and will continue to be, produced by astronomical survey projects. Centre for Astronomical Data (CAD), among other Russian institutions, has had the greatest experience in collecting and distributing astronomical data for more than 20 years. Some hundreds of catalogs and journal tables are currently available from the CAD repository. More recently, mirrors of main astronomical data resources (VizieR, ADS, etc) are now maintained in CAD. Besides, CAD accumulates and makes available for the astronomical community information on principal Russian astronomical resources.

  13. Ultrasound fields from triangular apertures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    1996-01-01

    The pulsed field from a triangular aperture mounted in an infinite, rigidbaffle is calculated. The approach of spatial impulse responses,as developed by Tupholme and Stepanishen, is used. By this both the emitted and received pulsed ultrasound field can be found for any transducerexcitation and...

  14. Synthetic Aperture Radar - Hardware Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Rosner

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Experimental real and synthetic aperture radar are developed from the base-band digital unit to the analogue RF parts, based on solid state units, using pulse compression for radar imaging. Proper QPSK code is found for matched filter.

  15. The Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT): An International Observatory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gary H. Sanders

    2013-06-01

    The Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) will be the first truly global ground-based optical/infrared observatory. It will initiate the era of extremely large (30-meter class) telescopes with diffraction limited performance from its vantage point in the northern hemisphere on Mauna Kea, Hawaii, USA. The astronomy communities of India, Canada, China, Japan and the USA are shaping its science goals, suite of instrumentation and the system design of the TMT observatory. With large and open Nasmyth-focus platforms for generations of science instruments, TMT will have the versatility and flexibility for its envisioned 50 years of forefront astronomy. The TMT design employs the filled-aperture finely-segmented primary mirror technology pioneered with the W.M. Keck 10-meter telescopes. With TMT’s 492 segments optically phased, and by employing laser guide star assisted multi-conjugate adaptive optics, TMT will achieve the full diffraction limited performance of its 30-meter aperture, enabling unprecedented wide field imaging and multi-object spectroscopy. The TMT project is a global effort of its partners with all partners contributing to the design, technology development, construction and scientific use of the observatory. TMT will extend astronomy with extremely large telescopes to all of its global communities.

  16. Erratum: The Late Afterglow and Host Galaxy of GRB 990712

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjorth, J.; Holland, S.; Courbin, F.; Dar, A.; Olsen, L. F.; Scodeggio, M.

    2000-08-01

    In the Letter ``The Late Afterglow and Host Galaxy of GRB 990712'' by J. Hjorth, S. Holland, F. Courbin, A. Dar, L. F. Olsen, & M. Scodeggio (ApJ, 534, L147 [2000]), there was an error in the flux calibration of the spectrum. The y-axis scale of Figure 2 and the fluxes in the last column of Table 1 should be multiplied by a factor of 3.47 to read 2.25, 0.86, 1.61, and 3.79×10-16 ergs s-1 cm-2. The error affects the luminosities and star formation rates (SFRs) presented in the third and fourth paragraphs of § 5 as follows. In the third paragraph, the total SFR based on the continuum flux should be 0.91-1.41 Msolar yr-1 instead of 0.29-0.45 the [O II] luminosity should be L3727=1.5×1041 ergs s-1 instead of 6.3×1040 and the implied [O II] SFR should be 2.12+/-0.60 Msolar yr-1 instead of 0.88+/-0.25. Consequently, the last two sentences of this paragraph are revised to read ``The derived SFR (from the [O II] flux) is about half of the SFR found by Bloom et al. (1999b) for the host of GRB 990123 and 2-3 times that of the host of GRB 970508 (Bloom et al. 1998). The specific SFR per unit luminosity of the GRB 990712 host galaxy is comparable to that of the host galaxies of GRB 990123 and GRB 970508.'' In the fourth paragraph, the total V-band flux in the feature should be 0.405+/-0.004 μJy instead of 0.323+/-0.003 the power-law spectral index should be β=-2.57 instead of -2.93 and the SFR in the feature should be 0.11-0.17 Msolar instead of 0.03-0.05. The main results and conclusions of the original Letter are unaffected by the error. The authors thank P. M. Vreeswijk for bringing this error to their attention.

  17. Effect of GRB spectra on the empirical luminosity correlations and the GRB Hubble diagram

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Hai-Nan; Chang, Zhe

    2016-01-01

    The spectra of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in a wide energy range can usually be well described by the Band function, which is a two smoothly jointed power laws cutting at a breaking energy. Below the breaking energy, the Band function reduces to a cut-off power law, while above the breaking energy it is a simple power law. However, for some detectors (such as the Swift-BAT) whose working energy is well below or just near the breaking energy, the observed spectra can be fitted to cut-off power law with enough precision. Besides, since the energy band of Swift-BAT is very narrow, the spectra of most GRBs can be fitted well even using a simple power law. In this paper, with the most up-to-date sample of Swift-BAT GRBs, we study the effect of different spectral models on the empirical luminosity correlations, and further investigate the effect on the reconstruction of GRB Hubble diagram. We mainly focus on two luminosity correlations, i.e., the Amati relation and Yonetoku relation. We calculate these two luminosity ...

  18. GRB beaming and gravitational-wave observations

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Hsin-Yu

    2012-01-01

    Using the observed rate of short-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) it is possible to make predictions for the detectable rate of compact binary coalescences in gravitational-wave detectors. These estimates rely crucially on the growing consensus that short gamma-ray bursts are associated with the merger of two neutron stars or a neutron star and a black hole, but otherwise make no assumptions beyond the observed rate of short GRBs. In particular, our results do not assume coincident gravitational wave and electromagnetic observations. We show that the non-detection of mergers in the existing LIGO/Virgo data constrains the progenitor masses and beaming angles of gamma-ray bursts. For future detectors, we find that the first detection of a NS-NS binary coalescence associated with the progenitors of short GRBs is likely to happen within the first 16 months of observation, even in the case of a modest network of observatories (e.g., only LIGO-Hanford and LIGO-Livingston) operating at modest sensitivities (e.g., ad...

  19. Sudbury neutrino observatory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a supplement to a report (SNO-85-3 (Sudbury Neutrino Observatory)) which contained the results of a feasibility study on the construction of a deep underground neutrino observatory based on a 1000 ton heavy water Cerenkov detector. Neutrinos carry detailed information in their spectra on the reactions taking place deep in the interstellar interior and also provide information on supernova explosions. In addition to their role as astrophysical probes, a knowledge of the properties of neutrinos is crucial to theories of grand unification. The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory is unique in its high sensitivity to electron neutrinos and its ability to detect all other types of neutrinos of energy greater than 2.2 MeV. The results of the July 1985 study indicated that the project is technically feasible in that the proposed detector can measure the direction and energy of electron neutrinos above 7 MeV and the scientific programs will make significant contributions to physics and astrophysics. This present report contains new information obtained since the 1985 feasibility study. The enhanced conversion of neutrinos in the sun and the new physics that could be learned using the heavy water detector are discussed in the physics section. The other sections will discuss progress in the areas of practical importance in achieving the physics objectives such as new techniques to measure, monitor and remove low levels of radioactivity in detector components, ideas on calibration of the detector and so forth. The section entitled Administration contains a membership list of the working groups within the SNO collaboration

  20. The Observatory Health Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Murianni

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: The number of indicators aiming to provide a clear picture of healthcare needs and the quality and efficiency of healthcare systems and services has proliferated in recent years. The activity of the National Observatory on Health Status in the Italian Regions is multidisciplinary, involving around 280 public health care experts, clinicians, demographers, epidemiologists, mathematicians, statisticians and economists who with their different competencies, and scientific interests aim to improve the collective health of individuals and their conditions through the use of “core indicators”. The main outcome of the National Observatory on Health Status in the Italian Regions is the “Osservasalute Report – a report on health status and the quality of healthcare assistance in the Italian Regions”.

    Methods: The Report adopts a comparative analysis, methodology and internationally validated indicators.

    Results: The results of Observatory Report show it is necessary:

    • to improve the monitoring of primary health care services (where the chronic disease could be cared through implementation of clinical path;

     • to improve in certain areas of hospital care such as caesarean deliveries, as well as the average length of stay in the pre-intervention phase, etc.;

    • to try to be more focused on the patients/citizens in our health care services; • to practice more geographical interventions to reduce the North-South divide as well as reduce gender inequity.

    Conclusions: The health status of Italian people is good with positive results and outcomes, but in the meantime some further efforts should be done especially in the South that still has to improve the quality and the organization of health care services. There are huge differences in accuracy and therefore usefulness of the reported data, both between diseases and between

  1. The Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST): Science Drivers and Technology Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postman, Marc; Brown, Tom; Giavalisco, Mauro; Traub, Wesley; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Rich, R. Michael; Tumlinson, Jason; Soummer, Remi; Sembach, Kenneth; Calzetti, Daniela; Oegerle, William; Stahl, H. Phillip; Mountain, Matt; Hyde, Tupper

    2011-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) is a concept for an 8-meter to 16-meter UVOIR space observatory for launch in the 2025-2030 era. ATLAST will allow astronomers to answer fundamental questions at the forefront of modern astrophysics, including "Is there life elsewhere in the Galaxy?" We present a range of science drivers and the resulting performance requirements for ATLAST (8 to 16 milliarcsecond angular resolution, diffraction limited imaging at 0.5 m wavelength, minimum collecting area of 45 square meters, high sensitivity to light wavelengths from 0.1 m to 2.4 m, high stability in wavefront sensing and control). We also discuss the priorities for technology development needed to enable the construction of ATLAST for a cost that is comparable to current generation observatory-class space missions. Keywords: Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST); ultraviolet/optical space telescopes; astrophysics; astrobiology; technology development.

  2. Initial Technology Assessment for the Large-Aperture UV-Optical-Infrared (LUVOIR) Mission Concept Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolcar, Matthew R.; Feinberg, Lee; France, Kevin; Rauscher, Bernard J.; Redding, David; Schiminovich, David

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Astrophysics Division's 30-Year Roadmap prioritized a future large-aperture space telescope operating in the ultra-violet/optical/infrared wavelength regime. The Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy envisioned a similar observatory, the High Definition Space Telescope. And a multi-institution group also studied the Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope. In all three cases, a broad science case is outlined, combining general astrophysics with the search for biosignatures via direct-imaging and spectroscopic characterization of habitable exoplanets. We present an initial technology assessment that enables such an observatory that is currently being studied for the 2020 Decadal Survey by the Large UV/Optical/Infrared (LUVOIR) surveyor Science and Technology Definition Team. We present here the technology prioritization for the 2016 technology cycle and define the required technology capabilities and current state-of-the-art performance. Current, planned, and recommended technology development efforts are also reported.

  3. Peripheral Disruption of the Grb10 Gene Enhances Insulin Signaling and Sensitivity In Vivo▿

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lixin; Balas, Bogdan; Christ-Roberts, Christine Y.; Kim, Ryang Yeo; Ramos, Fresnida J.; Kikani, Chintan K.; Li, Cuiling; Deng, Chuxia; Reyna, Sara; Musi, Nicolas; Dong, Lily Q.; Defronzo, Ralph A.; Feng LIU

    2007-01-01

    Grb10 is a pleckstrin homology and Src homology 2 domain-containing protein that interacts with a number of phosphorylated receptor tyrosine kinases, including the insulin receptor. In mice, Grb10 gene expression is imprinted with maternal expression in all tissues except the brain. While the interaction between Grb10 and the insulin receptor has been extensively investigated in cultured cells, whether this adaptor protein plays a positive or negative role in insulin signaling and action rema...

  4. Next Generation Virtual Observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, P.; McGuinness, D. L.

    2008-12-01

    Virtual Observatories (VO) are now being established in a variety of geoscience disciplines beyond their origins in Astronomy and Solar Physics. Implementations range from hydrology and environmental sciences to solid earth sciences. Among the goals of VOs are to provide search/ query, access and use of distributed, heterogeneous data resources. With many of these goals being met and usage increasing, new demands and requirements are arising. In particular there are two of immediate and pressing interest. The first is use of VOs by non-specialists, especially for information products that go beyond the usual data, or data products that are sought for scientific research. The second area is citation and attribution of artifacts that are being generated by VOs. In some sense VOs are re-publishing (re-packaging, or generating new synthetic) data and information products. At present only a few VOs address this need and it is clear that a comprehensive solution that includes publishers is required. Our work in VOs and related semantic data framework and integration areas has lead to a view of the next generation of virtual observatories which the two above-mentioned needs as well as others that are emerging. Both of the needs highlight a semantic gap, i.e. that the meaning and use for a user or users beyond the original design intention is very often difficult or impossible to bridge. For example, VOs created for experts with complex, arcane or jargon vocabularies are not accessible to the non-specialist and further, information products the non-specialist may use are not created or considered for creation. In the second case, use of a (possibly virtual) data or information product (e.g. an image or map) as an intellectual artifact that can be accessed as part of the scientific publication and review procedure also introduces terminology gaps, as well as services that VOs may need to provide. Our supposition is that formalized methods in semantics and semantic web

  5. NASA's Heliophysics System Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Steven

    2016-04-01

    NASA formulates and implements a national research program for understanding the Sun and its interactions with the Earth and the solar system and how these phenomena impact life and society. This research provides theory, data, and modeling development services to national and international space weather efforts utilizing a coordinated and complementary fleet of spacecraft, called the Heliophysics System Observatory (HSO), to understand the Sun and its interactions with Earth and the solar system, including space weather. This presentation will focus on NASA's role in space weather research and the contributions the agency continues to provide to the science of space weather, leveraging inter-agency and international collaborations for the benefit of society.

  6. Strasbourg Observatory Archives Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, A.

    2002-12-01

    Official talks in France and Germany after World War I were generally of hatred and revenge. Strasbourg Observatory had just changed nationality (from Prussian to French) for the first time (this would happen again at the outbreak of WWII and after the conflict). Documents show that astronomers did not share the general attitude. For example the inventory book started in German was continued in French after 1918. It is moving to see those different handwritings in two different languages on the same pages -- making of that book a unique document in various respects, but also reminding us that the native language of the region was in fact Alsacian.

  7. The Afterglows of Swift-era Gamma-Ray Bursts. II. Type I GRB versus Type II GRB Optical Afterglows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kann, D. A.; Klose, S.; Zhang, B.; Covino, S.; Butler, N. R.; Malesani, D.; Nakar, E.; Wilson, A. C.; Antonelli, L. A.; Chincarini, G.; Cobb, B. E.; D'Avanzo, P.; D'Elia, V.; Della Valle, M.; Ferrero, P.; Fugazza, D.; Gorosabel, J.; Israel, G. L.; Mannucci, F.; Piranomonte, S.; Schulze, S.; Stella, L.; Tagliaferri, G.; Wiersema, K.

    2011-06-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been separated into two classes, originally along the lines of duration and spectral properties, called "short/hard" and "long/soft." The latter have been conclusively linked to the explosive deaths of massive stars, while the former are thought to result from the merger or collapse of compact objects. In recent years, indications have been accumulating that the short/hard versus long/soft division does not map directly onto what would be expected from the two classes of progenitors, leading to a new classification scheme called Type I and Type II which is based on multiple observational criteria. We use a large sample of GRB afterglow and prompt-emission data (adding further GRB afterglow observations in this work) to compare the optical afterglows (or the lack thereof) of Type I GRBs with those of Type II GRBs. In comparison to the afterglows of Type II GRBs, we find that those of Type I GRBs have a lower average luminosity and show an intrinsic spread of luminosities at least as wide. From late and deep upper limits on the optical transients, we establish limits on the maximum optical luminosity of any associated supernova (SN), confirming older works and adding new results. We use deep upper limits on Type I GRB optical afterglows to constrain the parameter space of possible mini-SN emission associated with a compact-object merger. Using the prompt-emission data, we search for correlations between the parameters of the prompt emission and the late optical afterglow luminosities. We find tentative correlations between the bolometric isotropic energy release and the optical afterglow luminosity at a fixed time after the trigger (positive), and between the host offset and the luminosity (negative), but no significant correlation between the isotropic energy release and the duration of the GRBs. We also discuss three anomalous GRBs, GRB 060505, GRB 060614, and GRB 060121, in light of their optical afterglow luminosities. Based in part

  8. Fermi Large Area Telescope observations of GRB 110625A

    CERN Document Server

    Tam, P H Thomas; Fan, Yi-Zhong

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that emit photons at GeV energies form a small but significant population of GRBs. However, the number of GRBs whose GeV-emitting period is simultaneously observed in X-rays remains small. We report gamma-ray observations of GRB 110625A using Fermi's Large Area Telescope (LAT) in the energy range 100 MeV to 20 GeV. Gamma-ray emission at these energies was clearly detected using data taken between 180s and 580s after the burst, an epoch after the prompt emission phase. The GeV light curve differs from a simple power-law decay, and probably consists of two emission periods. Simultaneous Swift/XRT observations did not show flaring behaviors as in the case of GRB 100728A. We discuss the possibility that the GeV emission is the synchrotron self-Compton radiation of underlying ultraviolet flares.

  9. IceCube and GRB neutrinos propagating in quantum spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Amelino-Camelia, Giovanni; D'Amico, Giacomo; Loret, Niccoló; Rosati, Giacomo

    2016-01-01

    Two recent publications have reported intriguing analyses, tentatively suggesting that some aspects of IceCube data might be manifestations of quantum-gravity-modified laws of propagation for neutrinos. We here propose a strategy of data analysis which has the advantage of being applicable to several alternative possibilities for the laws of propagation of neutrinos in a quantum spacetime. In all scenarios here of interest one should find a correlation between the energy of an observed neutrino and the difference between the time of observation of that neutrino and the trigger time of a GRB. We select accordingly some GRB-neutrino candidates among IceCube events, and our data analysis finds a rather strong such correlation. This sort of studies naturally lends itself to the introduction of a "false alarm probability", which for our analysis we estimate conservatively to be of 1%. We therefore argue that our findings should motivate a vigorous program of investigation following the strategy here advocated.

  10. GRB 010921 Discovery of the First HETE Afterglow

    CERN Document Server

    Price, P A; Berger, E; Djorgovski, S G; Frail, D A; Mahabal, A A; Fox, D W; Harrison, F A; Bloom, J S; Yost, S A; Reichart, D E; Henden, A A; Ricker, G R; Van der Spek, R; Hurley, K; Atteia, J L; Kawai, N; Fenimore, E E; Graziani, C

    2003-01-01

    We report the discovery of the optical and radio afterglow of GRB 010921, the first gamma-ray burst afterglow to be found from a localization by the High Energy Transient Explorer (HETE) satellite. We present optical spectroscopy of the host galaxy which we find to be a dusty and apparently normal star-forming galaxy at z = 0.451. The unusually steep optical spectral slope of the afterglow can be explained by heavy extinction, A_V > 0.5 mag, along the line of sight to the GRB. Dust with similar A_V for the the host galaxy as a whole appears to be required by the measurement of a Balmer decrement in the spectrum of the host galaxy. Thanks to the low redshift, continued observations of the afterglow will enable the strongest constraints, to date, on the existence of a possible underlying supernova.

  11. Acquirement of the observatory code of Langkawi National Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loon, Chin Wei; Zainuddin, Mohd. Zambri; Ahmad, Nazhatulshima; Shukor, Muhammad Shamim; Tahar, Muhammad Redzuan

    2015-04-01

    Observatory code was assigned by The International Astronomical Union (IAU) Minor Planet Center (MPC) for a permanent observatory that intended to do astrometric CCD-observing program of minor planet or comets in solar system. The purpose of acquiring an observatory code is to document specific details about a particular observation site and the types of instruments used within the observatory. In addition, many astronomical centers and stations worldwide will know there is an active observatory at the particular location and international cooperation program in astronomy observation is possible. The Langkawi National Observatory has initiated an observation program to monitor minor planet, specifically those Near Earth Objects (NEOs) that may bring potentially hazardous to the Earth. In order to fulfil the requirement that stated by MPC for undertaking astrometric CCD-observing program, an observatory code was required. The instruments and methods that applied to obtain the observatory code will be discussed. The Langkawi National Observatory is now coded as O43 and listed in the MPC system, the single worldwide location for receipt and distribution of positional measurements of minor planets, comets and outer irregular natural satellites of major planets.

  12. Fermi-LAT Observations of the Gamma-ray Burst GRB 130427A

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Sylvia; Dermer, Charles; Omodei, Nicola; Vianello, Giacomo; Xiong, Shaolin; Fermi-LAT, the

    2013-01-01

    The observations of the exceptionally bright gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130427A by the Large Area Telescope aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope provide constraints on the nature of such unique astrophysical sources. GRB 130427A had the largest fluence, highest-energy photon (95 GeV), longest $\\gamma$-ray duration (20 hours), and one of the largest isotropic energy releases ever observed from a GRB. Temporal and spectral analyses of GRB 130427A challenge the widely accepted model that the non-thermal high-energy emission in the afterglow phase of GRBs is synchrotron emission radiated by electrons accelerated at an external shock.

  13. Fermi-LAT Observations of the Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 130427A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Asano, K.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Gehrels, Cornelis

    2013-01-01

    The observations of the exceptionally bright gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130427A by the Large Area Telescope aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope provide constraints on the nature of these unique astrophysical sources. GRB 130427A had the largest fluence, highest-energy photon (95 GeV), longest gamma-ray duration (20 hours), and one of the largest isotropic energy releases ever observed from a GRB. Temporal and spectral analyses of GRB 130427A challenge the widely accepted model that the nonthermal high-energy emission in the afterglow phase of GRBs is synchrotron emission radiated by electrons accelerated at an external shock.

  14. Fermi-LAT Observations of the Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 130427A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Asano, K.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonamente, E.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burgess, J. Michael; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cecchi, C.; Chaplin, V.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cleveland, W.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Collazzi, A.; Cominsky, L. R.; Connaughton, V.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; DeKlotz, M.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Desiante, R.; Diekmann, A.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Finke, J.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Gibby, M.; Giglietto, N.; Giles, M.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Godfrey, G.; Granot, J.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Gruber, D.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Inoue, Y.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, W. N.; Kawano, T.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Paneque, D.; Pelassa, V.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Racusin, J. L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Ritz, S.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sartori, A.; Parkinson, P. M. Saz; Scargle, J. D.; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Sonbas, E.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Yamazaki, R.; Younes, G.; Yu, H.-F.; Zhu, S. J.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M. S.; Byrne, D.; Foley, S.; Goldstein, A.; Jenke, P.; Kippen, R. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; McBreen, S.; Meegan, C.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R.; Rau, A.; Tierney, D.; van der Horst, A. J.; von Kienlin, A.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Xiong, S.; Cusumano, G.; La Parola, V.; Cummings, J. R.

    2014-01-01

    The observations of the exceptionally bright gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130427A by the Large Area Telescope aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope provide constraints on the nature of these unique astrophysical sources. GRB 130427A had the largest fluence, highest-energy photon (95 GeV), longest γ-ray duration (20 hours), and one of the largest isotropic energy releases ever observed from a GRB. Temporal and spectral analyses of GRB 130427A challenge the widely accepted model that the nonthermal high-energy emission in the afterglow phase of GRBs is synchrotron emission radiated by electrons accelerated at an external shock.

  15. Scintiscanning with a coded aperture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In scintigraphy the quality of the recorded image is a function of the quantum statistics of the photons, because only a small number of photons are available for an image. If the apertured or parallel-hole collimator is replaced by a coded aperture, e.g., a Fresnel-type zone plate of the proper size, a much larger fraction of the gamma quanta emitted by the object under investigation are captured, and there is no loss in resolution. A technique is described which allows the sequential reconstruction of various planes of the object while, at the same time, eliminating the spurious constant light fraction. For recording of the incoherent gamma hologram an on-axis zone plate can be used. In the coherent-optical reconstruction the gamma hologram is correlated with the zone plate used for the recording process. The experimental results shown are optical reconstructions of phantoms filled with 57Co. (orig./ORU)

  16. Airborne synthetic aperture acoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soumekh, M

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a system model and inversion for airborne synthetic aperture acoustic (SAA) imaging. The system model accurately represents the intercation of the acoustic source and the target region at near range values. Moreover, the model incorporates the fact that the relative speed of the vehicle's (transmitter/receiver) with respect to the target region is comparable to the acoustic wave propagation speed. The inversion utilizes the principle of spectral decomposition of spherical phase functions to develop a wavefront reconstruction method from SAA data. Processing issues and selection of appropriate acoustic FM-CW sources are discussed. Results are provided that exhibit the superior accuracy of the proposed SAA system model and inversion over their synthetic aperture radar (SAR) counterpart in which the vehicle's speed is assumed to be much smaller than the wave propagation speed. PMID:18282912

  17. A SUPRAMASSIVE MAGNETAR CENTRAL ENGINE FOR GRB 130603B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Yi-Zhong; Jin, Zhi-Ping; Wei, Da-Ming [Key Laboratory of dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Science, Nanjing 210008 (China); Yu, Yun-Wei [Institute of Astrophysics, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Xu, Dong [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Wu, Xue-Feng [Chinese Center for Antarctic Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Zhang, Bing, E-mail: yzfan@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States)

    2013-12-20

    We show that the peculiar early optical emission and, in particular, the X-ray afterglow emission of the short-duration burst GRB 130603B can be explained by continuous energy injection into the blastwave from a supramassive magnetar central engine. The observed energetics and temporal/spectral properties of the late infrared bump (i.e., the {sup k}ilonova{sup )} are also found to be consistent with emission from the ejecta launched during a neutron star (NS)-NS merger and powered by a magnetar central engine. The isotropic-equivalent kinetic energies of both the gamma-ray burst (GRB) blastwave and the kilonova are approximately E{sub k} ∼ 10{sup 51} erg, consistent with being powered by a near-isotropic magnetar wind. However, this relatively small value requires that most of the initial rotational energy of the magnetar (∼a few × 10{sup 52} erg) is carried away by gravitational wave radiation. Our results suggest that (1) the progenitor of GRB 130603B was a NS-NS binary system, the merger product of which would have been a supramassive NS that lasted for about ∼1000 s; (2) the equation of state of the nuclear matter should be stiff enough to allow the survival of a long-lived supramassive NS; thus this suggested that the detection of the bright electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational wave triggers without short GRB associations is promising in the upcoming Advanced LIGO/VIRGO era.

  18. GRB 150101B: Confirmation of a fading optical counterpart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Wen-fai; Berger, Edo; Fox, Derek; Shappee, Ben

    2015-01-01

    We re-observed the field of the short/soft GRB 150101B (Cummings, GCN #17267) with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph (GMOS) mounted on the Gemini-South 8-m telescope starting on 2015 Jan 12.326 UT, 10.7 days after the BAT trigger and 9.0 days after our initial Magellan observations (Fong et al., GCN #17271).

  19. The study on aperture configuration of optical synthetic aperture imaging system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A model based on Fourier domain consideration on aperture configuration of optical synthetic aperture imaging system is introduced in this paper. The derivation of the model is directly linked to the restoration error of the original object from the recorded image. The aperture configuration is a function of the maximum frequency of interest, and takes into account the diameter of the aperture. The simulative results of genetic algorithms illustrate the usefulness of this model for designing a synthetic aperture optical imaging system, and the aperture configuration of a good synthetic aperture optical imaging system should be non-redundant.

  20. Multifocal interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Yang; Chng, Xiong Kai Benjamin; Adie, Steven G.; Boppart, Stephen A.; Scott Carney, P.

    2014-01-01

    There is an inherent trade-off between transverse resolution and depth of field (DOF) in optical coherence tomography (OCT) which becomes a limiting factor for certain applications. Multifocal OCT and interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM) each provide a distinct solution to the trade-off through modification to the experiment or via post-processing, respectively. In this paper, we have solved the inverse problem of multifocal OCT and present a general algorithm for combining mu...

  1. Circular polarization in the optical afterglow of GRB 121024A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiersema, K; Covino, S; Toma, K; van der Horst, A J; Varela, K; Min, M; Greiner, J; Starling, R L C; Tanvir, N R; Wijers, R A M J; Campana, S; Curran, P A; Fan, Y; Fynbo, J P U; Gorosabel, J; Gomboc, A; Götz, D; Hjorth, J; Jin, Z P; Kobayashi, S; Kouveliotou, C; Mundell, C; O'Brien, P T; Pian, E; Rowlinson, A; Russell, D M; Salvaterra, R; di Serego Alighieri, S; Tagliaferri, G; Vergani, S D; Elliott, J; Fariña, C; Hartoog, O E; Karjalainen, R; Klose, S; Knust, F; Levan, A J; Schady, P; Sudilovsky, V; Willingale, R

    2014-05-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are most probably powered by collimated relativistic outflows (jets) from accreting black holes at cosmological distances. Bright afterglows are produced when the outflow collides with the ambient medium. Afterglow polarization directly probes the magnetic properties of the jet when measured minutes after the burst, and it probes the geometric properties of the jet and the ambient medium when measured hours to days after the burst. High values of optical polarization detected minutes after the burst of GRB 120308A indicate the presence of large-scale ordered magnetic fields originating from the central engine (the power source of the GRB). Theoretical models predict low degrees of linear polarization and no circular polarization at late times, when the energy in the original ejecta is quickly transferred to the ambient medium and propagates farther into the medium as a blast wave. Here we report the detection of circularly polarized light in the afterglow of GRB 121024A, measured 0.15 days after the burst. We show that the circular polarization is intrinsic to the afterglow and unlikely to be produced by dust scattering or plasma propagation effects. A possible explanation is to invoke anisotropic (rather than the commonly assumed isotropic) electron pitch-angle distributions, and we suggest that new models are required to produce the complex microphysics of realistic shocks in relativistic jets. PMID:24776800

  2. Pulse-wise GRB correlation: implication as a cosmological tool

    CERN Document Server

    Basak, Rupal

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are cosmological explosions which carry valuable information from the distant past of the expanding universe. One of the greatest discoveries in modern cosmology is the finding of the accelerated expansion of the universe using Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) as standard candles. However, due to the interstellar extinction SN Ia can be seen only up to a redshift $z\\sim 1.5$. GRBs are considered as the potential alternative to push this limit to as high as $z\\sim 10$, a redshift regime corresponding to an epoch when the universe just started to form the first structures. There exist several correlations between the energy and an observable of a GRB which can be used to derive luminosity distance. In recent works, we have studied spectral evolution within the individual pulses and obtained such correlations within the pulses. Here we summarize our results of the pulse-wise GRB correlation study. It is worth mentioning that all GRB correlations are still empirical, and we cannot use them in co...

  3. The Interpretation and Implication of the Afterglow of GRB 060218

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Y; Xu, D; Fan, Yizhong; Piran, Tsvi; Xu, Dong

    2006-01-01

    The nearby GRB 060216/SN 2006aj was an extremely long, weak and very soft GRB. While it was peculiar in many aspects its late ($>10^4$ sec) X-ray afterglow showed a canonical power law decay. Assuming that this component arises due to a relativistic blast wave decelerated by a circumburst matter we infer that the blast wave's kinetic energy was rather high, $5 \\times 10^{50}$ erg, close to what is seen in other GRBs. The lack of a "jet break" implies that the outflow was wide $\\theta_j \\sim 1$. The rather weak early optical emission rules out a dense circumburst wind profile. It also constrains the initial Lorentz factor to be significantly lower than usual, $\\Gamma_{\\rm ini}\\sim 15$. The observed afterglow suggests that the medium surrounding a massive star progenitor (up to distances of $\\sim 10^{17}-10^{18}$ cm) is not the expected dense stellar wind (a similar result was seen in many other bursts and in particular in GRB 030329). This implies that the progenitor's wind was weak during the last 100-1000 ye...

  4. Circular polarization in the optical afterglow of GRB 121024A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiersema, K.; Covino, S.; Toma, K.; van der Horst, A. J.; Varela, K.; Min, M.; Greiner, J.; Starling, R. L. C.; Tanvir, N. R.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Campana, S.; Curran, P. A.; Fan, Y.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Gorosabel, J.; Gomboc, A.; Götz, D.; Hjorth, J.; Jin, Z. P.; Kobayashi, S.; Kouveliotou, C.; Mundell, C.; O'Brien, P. T.; Pian, E.; Rowlinson, A.; Russell, D. M.; Salvaterra, R.; di Serego Alighieri, S.; Tagliaferri, G.; Vergani, S. D.; Elliott, J.; Fariña, C.; Hartoog, O. E.; Karjalainen, R.; Klose, S.; Knust, F.; Levan, A. J.; Schady, P.; Sudilovsky, V.; Willingale, R.

    2014-05-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are most probably powered by collimated relativistic outflows (jets) from accreting black holes at cosmological distances. Bright afterglows are produced when the outflow collides with the ambient medium. Afterglow polarization directly probes the magnetic properties of the jet when measured minutes after the burst, and it probes the geometric properties of the jet and the ambient medium when measured hours to days after the burst. High values of optical polarization detected minutes after the burst of GRB 120308A indicate the presence of large-scale ordered magnetic fields originating from the central engine (the power source of the GRB). Theoretical models predict low degrees of linear polarization and no circular polarization at late times, when the energy in the original ejecta is quickly transferred to the ambient medium and propagates farther into the medium as a blast wave. Here we report the detection of circularly polarized light in the afterglow of GRB 121024A, measured 0.15 days after the burst. We show that the circular polarization is intrinsic to the afterglow and unlikely to be produced by dust scattering or plasma propagation effects. A possible explanation is to invoke anisotropic (rather than the commonly assumed isotropic) electron pitch-angle distributions, and we suggest that new models are required to produce the complex microphysics of realistic shocks in relativistic jets.

  5. GRB 131231A: IMPLICATIONS OF THE GeV EMISSION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GRB 131231A was detected by the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Space Gamma-ray Telescope. The high-energy gamma-ray (>100 MeV) afterglow emission spectrum is F ν∝ν–0.54 ± 0.15 in the first ∼1300 s after the trigger and the most energetic photon has an energy of ∼62 GeV, arriving at t ∼ 520 s. With reasonable parameters of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) outflow as well as the density of the circum-burst medium, the synchrotron radiation of electrons or protons accelerated at an external forward shock have difficulty accounting for the data. Rather, the synchrotron self-Compton radiation of the forward shock-accelerated electrons can account for both the spectrum and temporal behavior of the GeV afterglow emission. We also show that the prospect for detecting GRB 131231A-like GRBs with the Cherenkov Telescope Array is promising

  6. Multi-Color Observations of the GRB000926 Afterglow

    CERN Document Server

    Price, P A; Galama, T J; Reichart, D E; Axelrod, T S; Busche, J; Cline, T; Diercks, A H; Djorgovski, S G; Frail, D A; Gal-Yam, A; Halpern, J; Hunt, J A H M; Hurley, K; Jacoby, B; Kimble, R A; Kulkarni, S R; Mirabal, N; Morrison, G; Pevunova, E O O; Sari, R; Schmidt, B P; Turnshek, D A; Yost, S; Bloom, S J

    2000-01-01

    We present multi-color light-curves of the optical afterglow of GRB 000926. Beginning 1.18 days after the burst, the light curves of this GRB steepen measurably. The existence of such achromatic breaks are usually taken to be an important observational signature that the ejecta are not expanding isotropically, but rather have a collimated jet-like geometry. If we interpret the data in this context, we derive an opening angle of 7 deg, which reduces the energy release compared to an isotropic model by a factor of 120, to 2.2 x 10^{51} erg. To fit the data with a simple jet model requires extinction along the line of sight. The derived A_V is in the range 0.91 -- 0.12 mag, depending on the adopted extinction law and whether the electrons giving rise to the optical emission are undergoing synchrotron cooling or not. Since this is in excess of the expected extinction from our Galaxy, we attribute this to the GRB host. We note that this extinction is typical of a galactic disk, and therefore the event likely took ...

  7. Spectroscopic Discovery of the Supernova Associated with GRB 030329

    CERN Document Server

    Stanek, K Z; Garnavich, P M; Martini, P; Caldwell, P B N; Challis, P M; Brown, W; Schild, R; Krisciunas, K; Calkins, M L; Lee, J C; Hathi, N; Jansen, R; Windhorst, R A; Echevarria, L; Eisenstein, D J; Pindor, B; Olszewski, E W; Harding, P; Bersier, D F

    2003-01-01

    We present early observations of the afterglow of the Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) 030329 and the spectroscopic discovery of its associated supernova. We obtained spectra of the afterglow of GRB 030329 each night from March 30.12 (0.6 days after the burst) to April 8.13 (UT) (9.6 days after the burst). The spectra cover a wavelength range of 350 nm to 850 nm. The early spectra consist of a power-law continuum (F_{nu} ~ nu^{-0.9}) with narrow emission lines originating from HII regions in the host galaxy, indicating a low redshift of z=0.1687. However, our spectra taken after 2003 Apr. 5 show broad peaks in flux characteristic of a supernova. Correcting for the afterglow emission, we find the spectrum of the supernova is remarkably similar to the type Ic `hypernova' SN 1998bw. While the presence of supernovae have been inferred from the light curves and colors of GRB afterglows in the past, this is the first direct, spectral confirmation that a subset of classical gamma-ray bursts originate from supernovae.

  8. THE EXTREMELY RED HOST GALAXY OF GRB 080207

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present optical, near-infrared, and Spitzer IRAC and MIPS observations of the host galaxy of the dark Swift gamma-ray burst GRB 080207. The host is faint, with extremely red optical-infrared colors (R - K = 6.3, 24 μm/R-band flux ∼1000) making it an extremely red object (ERO) and a dust-obscured galaxy (DOG). The spectral energy distribution (SED) shows the clear signature of the 1.6 μm photometric 'bump', typical of evolved stellar populations. We use this bump to establish the photometric redshift zphot as 2.2+0.2-0.3, using a vast library of SED templates, including M 82. The star formation rate (SFR) inferred from the SED fitting is ∼119 Msun yr-1, the stellar mass 3 x 1011 Msun, and AV extinction from 1 to 2 mag. The ERO and DOG nature of the host galaxy of the dark GRB 080207 may be emblematic of a distinct class of dark GRB hosts, with high SFRs, evolved and metal-rich stellar populations, and significant dust extinction within the host galaxy.

  9. The Unusually Long Duration Gamma-ray Burst GRB 000911

    CERN Document Server

    Price, P A; Kulkarni, S R; Djorgovski, S G; Fox, D W; Mahabal, A A; Hurley, K; Bloom, J S; Frail, D A; Galama, T J; Harrison, F A; Morrison, G; Reichart, D E; Yost, S A; Sari, R; Axelrod, T S; Cline, T; Golenetskii, S V; Mazets, E; Schmidt, B P; Trombka, J I

    2002-01-01

    Of all the well localized gamma-ray bursts, GRB 000911 has the longest duration (T_90 ~ 500 s), and ranks in the top 1% of BATSE bursts for fluence. Here, we report the discovery of the afterglow of this unique burst. In order to simultaneously fit our radio and optical observations, we are required to invoke a model involving an hard electron distribution, p ~ 1.5 and a jet-break time less than 1.5 day. A spectrum of the host galaxy taken 111 days after the burst reveals a single emission line, interpreted as [OII] at a redshift z = 1.0585, and a continuum break which we interpret as the Balmer limit at this redshift. Despite the long T_90, the afterglow of GRB 000911 is not unusual in any other way when compared to the set of afterglows studied to date. We conclude that the duration of the GRB plays little part in determining the physics of the afterglow.

  10. AMRVAC and Relativistic Hydrodynamic simulations for GRB afterglow phases

    CERN Document Server

    Meliani, Z; Casse, F; Giannios, D

    2007-01-01

    We apply a novel adaptive mesh refinement code, AMRVAC, to numerically investigate the various evolutionary phases in the interaction of a relativistic shell with its surrounding cold Interstellar Medium (ISM). We do this for both 1D isotropic as well as full 2D jetlike fireball models. This is relevant for Gamma Ray Bursts, and we demonstrate that, thanks to the AMR strategy, we resolve the internal structure of the shocked shell-ISM matter, which will leave its imprint on the GRB afterglow. We determine the deceleration from an initial Lorentz factor $\\gamma=100$ up to the almost Newtonian $\\gamma\\sim{\\cal O}(2)$ phase of the flow. We present axisymmetric 2D shell evolutions, with the 2D extent characterized by their initial opening angle. In such jetlike GRB models, we discuss the differences with the 1D isotropic GRB equivalents. These are mainly due to thermally induced sideways expansions of both the shocked shell and shocked ISM regions. We found that the propagating 2D ultrarelativistic shell does not...

  11. The 050709 macronova and the GRB/macronova connection

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Zhi-Ping; Li, Xiang; Tanaka, Masaomi; D'Avanzo, Paolo; Fan, Yi-Zhong; Covino, Stefano; Wei, Da-Ming; Piran, Tsvi

    2016-01-01

    We reanalyzed the publicly-available optical/near-infrared afterglow observations of GRB 050709, the first short GRB from which an optical afterglow was detected. The $I$-band/F814W-band light curve is significantly shallower than the $R$-band light curve. This additional low-luminosity soft component can be a signature of a Li-Paczy\\'{n}ski macronova (also known as kilonova) arising from $\\sim 0.05~M_\\odot$ r-process material launched by a compact binary merger. As macronovae are relatively weak and soft they can be identified only within the afterglows of relatively nearby ($z<0.4$) bursts that have sufficient near-infrared/optical data. There are five such events: GRBs 050709, 060505, 060614, 061201 and 130603B. However, the redshift of 061201 is unclear and there is doubt concerning the origin of GRB 060505. Remarkably, evidence for a macronova signature is found in the afterglow of each one of the remaining three events. This demonstrates that macronovae are ubiquitous. The significant mass ejection s...

  12. The polarized Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 061122

    CERN Document Server

    Gotz, D; Fernandez-Soto, A; Laurent, P; Bosnjak, Z

    2013-01-01

    We report on the polarization measure, obtained with IBIS on board INTEGRAL, of the prompt emission of GRB 061122. Over an 8 s interval containing the brightest part of the Gamma-Ray Burst we put a lower limit on its polarization fraction of 60% at 68% c.l. and of 33% at 90% c.l. on the 250-800 keV energy range. We performed late time optical and near infra-red imaging observations of the GRB field using the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG), and the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT). Our multi-band (ugrizYJHK) photometry allowed us to identify the host galaxy of GRB 061122 and to build its SED. Using a photometric redshift code we fitted these data, and derived the basic properties of the galaxy, including its type and redshift, that we could constrain to the interval [0.57, 2.10] at a 90% c.l., with a best fit value of z=1.33. The polarization measurement in different energy bands, together with the distance determination, allowed us to put the most stringent limit (xi < 3.4x10-16) to date to a poss...

  13. The Theoretical Virtual Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Simon

    A functioning virtual observatory will require easy and transparent access not only to diverse observational databases but also to the tools needed to analyse visualise and interpret them. For the large statistical datasets produced by modern multiwavelength surveys this almost always requires the use of equally large artificially generated ""mock"" surveys. These are used to calibrate observational biases introduced for example by flux or resolution limits and to study how differing physical effects are manifest in the observational plane (for example how the observable clustering of galaxies is affected by merging by collision-induced starbursts by harassment etc). Such mock catalogues are almost always produced from large-scale supercomputer simulations so the ""virtual observer"" of the future will need access to such theoretical datasets or to the computer codes and resources needed to create them. At the MPA and within the Virgo Supercomputing Consortium we have for several years publically released both supercomputer code and large simulated datasets. I will review how this eperience can help in the design of the theoretical component of a virtual observatory.

  14. Sudbury neutrino observatory proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a proposal by the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) collaboration to develop a world class laboratory for neutrino astrophysics. This observatory would contain a large volume heavy water detector which would have the potential to measure both the electron-neutrino flux from the sun and the total solar neutrino flux independent of neutrino type. It will therefore be possible to test models of solar energy generation and, independently, to search for neutrino oscillations with a sensitivity many orders of magnitude greater than that of terrestrial experiments. It will also be possible to search for spectral distortion produced by neutrino oscillations in the dense matter of the sun. Finally the proposed detector would be sensitive to neutrinos from a stellar collapse and would detect neutrinos of all types thus providing detailed information on the masses of muon- and tau-neutrinos. The neutrino detector would contain 1000 tons of D20 and would be located more than 2000 m below ground in the Creighton mine near Sudbury. The operation and performance of the proposed detector are described and the laboratory design is presented. Construction schedules and responsibilities and the planned program of technical studies by the SNO collaboration are outlined. Finally, the total capital cost is estimated to be $35M Canadian and the annual operating cost, after construction, would be $1.8 M Canadian, including the insurance costs of the heavy water

  15. Short term dynamic aperture with AC dipoles

    CERN Document Server

    Mönig, Saskia; Persson, Tobias Hakan Bjorn; Coello De Portugal, Jaime; Langner, Andy; Tomas, Rogelio; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic aperture of an accelerator is determined by its non-linear components and errors. Control of the dynamic aperture is important for a good understanding and operation of the accelerator. The AC dipole, installed in the LHC for the diagnostic of linear and non-linear optics, could serve as a tool for the determination of the dynamic aperture. However, since the AC dipole itself modifies the non-linear dynamics, the dynamic aperture with and without AC dipole are expected to differ. The effect of the AC dipole on the dynamic aperture is studied within this note.

  16. Observations of Extrasolar Planet Transit at the Bosscha Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Satyaningsih, R; Hidayat, T; Siregar, S; Radiman, I; Yamani, A

    2010-01-01

    Since its first discovery, most extrasolar planets were detected using radial velocity (RV) method. However, the RV method does not provide all parameters required to characterize a planetary system. Recently, Charbonneau et al.(2000) and Brown et al(2001)have shown that the RV planet orbiting HD 209458 can be observed using transit method yielding some additional information. As pointed out by Castellano (2004), this method can be undertaken using small aperture telescopes and inexpensive CCDs. We report here new observations of planetary transit in HD 102195 and HD 209458 performed at the Bosscha Observatory since March 2006. Some preliminary results will be presented

  17. Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Hamidouche, M; Marcum, P; Krabbe, A

    2010-01-01

    We present one of the new generations of observatories, the Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). This is an airborne observatory consisting of a 2.7-m telescope mounted on a modified Boeing B747-SP airplane. Flying at an up to 45,000 ft (14 km) altitude, SOFIA will observe above more than 99 percent of the Earth's atmospheric water vapor allowing observations in the normally obscured far-infrared. We outline the observatory capabilities and goals. The first-generation science instruments flying on board SOFIA and their main astronomical goals are also presented.

  18. WUVS spectrographs of World Space Observatory - Ultraviolet project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savanov, Igor; Sachkov, Mikhail; Shustov, Boris M.; Shugarov, Andrey

    2016-07-01

    WSO-UV (World Space Observatory - Ultraviolet) project is an international space observatory designed for observations in the UV (115 - 320 nm). It includes a 170 cm aperture telescope capable of high-resolution spectroscopy, long slit low-resolution spectroscopy and deep UV and optical imaging. WUVS - the set of three ultraviolet spectrographs are regarded as the main instrument of «Spektr -UF» space mission. The spectrographs unit includes three channels and is intended for acquisition of spectrums of high (R=50000) and low (R=1000) resolution of the observed objects in the electromagnetic radiation's ultraviolet range (115-310 nm). We present the design philosophy of WUVS and summarize its key characteristics. We shall present the main properties of WUVS new structure and current status of its mockups and prototypes manufacturing.

  19. CGRO/BATSE Data Support the New Paradigm for GRB Prompt Emission and the New LinTh-Epeak,inTh,rest Relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiriec, S.; Gonzalez, M. M.; Sacahui, J. R.; Kouveliotou, C.; Gehrels, N.; McEnery, J.

    2016-03-01

    The paradigm for gamma-ray burst (GRB) prompt emission is changing. Since early in the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) era, the empirical Band function has been considered a good description of the keV-MeV γ-ray prompt emission spectra despite the fact that its shape was very often inconsistent with the theoretical predictions, especially those expected in pure synchrotron emission scenarios. We have recently established a new observational model analyzing data of the NASA Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. In this model, GRB prompt emission would be a combination of three main emission components: (i) a thermal-like component that we have interpreted so far as emission from the jet photosphere, (ii) a non-thermal component that we have interpreted so far as either synchrotron radiation from the propagating and accelerated charged particles within the jet or reprocessed jet photospheric emission, and (iii) an additional non-thermal (cutoff) power law (PL) extending from low to high energies in γ-rays and most likely of inverse Compton origin. In this article we reanalyze some of the bright GRBs, namely GRBs 941017, 970111, and 990123, observed with the Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on board CGRO with the new model. We conclude that BATSE data for these three GRBs are fully consistent with the recent results obtained with Fermi: some bright BATSE GRBs exhibit three separate components during the prompt phase with similar spectral parameters as those reported from Fermi data. In addition, the analysis of the BATSE GRBs with the new prompt emission model results in a relation between the time-resolved energy flux of the non-thermal component, {F}{{i}}{nTh}, and its corresponding νF{}ν spectral peak energy, {E}{peak,{{i}}}{nTh} (i.e., {F}{{i}}{nTh}-{E}{peak,{{i}}}{nTh}), which has a similar index—when fitted to a PL—as the one initially derived from Fermi data. For GRBs with known redshifts (z) this results in a possible universal relation

  20. Photometry and spectroscopy of GRB 060526: a detailed study of the afterglow and host galaxy of a z = 3.2 gamma-ray burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thöne, C. C.; Kann, D. A.; Jóhannesson, G.; Selj, J. H.; Jaunsen, A. O.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Akerlof, C. W.; Baliyan, K. S.; Bartolini, C.; Bikmaev, I. F.; Bloom, J. S.; Burenin, R. A.; Cobb, B. E.; Covino, S.; Curran, P. A.; Dahle, H.; Ferrero, A.; Foley, S.; French, J.; Fruchter, A. S.; Ganesh, S.; Graham, J. F.; Greco, G.; Guarnieri, A.; Hanlon, L.; Hjorth, J.; Ibrahimov, M.; Israel, G. L.; Jakobsson, P.; Jelínek, M.; Jensen, B. L.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Khamitov, I. M.; Koch, T. S.; Levan, A. J.; Malesani, D.; Masetti, N.; Meehan, S.; Melady, G.; Nanni, D.; Näränen, J.; Pakstiene, E.; Pavlinsky, M. N.; Perley, D. A.; Piccioni, A.; Pizzichini, G.; Pozanenko, A.; Roming, P. W. A.; Rujopakarn, W.; Rumyantsev, V.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sharapov, D.; Starr, D.; Sunyaev, R. A.; Swan, H.; Tanvir, N. R.; Terra, F.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Wilson, A. C.; Yost, S. A.; Yuan, F.

    2010-11-01

    Aims: With this paper we want to investigate the highly variable afterglow light curve and environment of gamma-ray burst (GRB) 060526 at z = 3.221. Methods: We present one of the largest photometric datasets ever obtained for a GRB afterglow, consisting of multi-color photometric data from the ultraviolet to the near infrared. The data set contains 412 data points in total to which we add additional data from the literature. Furthermore, we present low-resolution high signal-to-noise spectra of the afterglow. The afterglow light curve is modeled with both an analytical model using broken power law fits and with a broad-band numerical model which includes energy injections. The absorption lines detected in the spectra are used to derive column densities using a multi-ion single-component curve-of-growth analysis from which we derive the metallicity of the host of GRB 060526. Results: The temporal behaviour of the afterglow follows a double broken power law with breaks at t = 0.090 ± 0.005 and t = 2.401 ± 0.061 days. It shows deviations from the smooth set of power laws that can be modeled by additional energy injections from the central engine, although some significant microvariability remains. The broadband spectral-energy distribution of the afterglow shows no significant extinction along the line of sight. The metallicity derived from S ii and Fe ii of [S/H] = -0.57 ± 0.25 and [Fe/H] = -1.09 ± 0.24 is relatively high for a galaxy at that redshift but comparable to the metallicity of other GRB hosts at similar redshifts. At the position of the afterglow, no host is detected to F775W(AB) = 28.5 mag with the HST, implying an absolute magnitude of the host M(1500 Å) > -18.3 mag which is fainter than most long-duration hosts, although the GRB may be associated with a faint galaxy at a distance of 11 kpc. Based in part on observations obtained with the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope under proposals 077.D-0661 (PI: Vreeswijk) and 177.A-0591

  1. GRB 140619B: a short GRB from a binary neutron stars merger leading to the black hole formation

    CERN Document Server

    Muccino, M; Kovacevic, M; Izzo, L; Oliveira, F G; Rueda, J A; Bianco, C L; Enderli, M; Penacchioni, A V; Pisani, G B; Wang, Y; Zaninoni, E

    2014-01-01

    Following the recent identification of the prototypical short GRB 090227B originating from a binary neutron star (NS) merger and forming a black hole (BH), we present here a new example of such sources, GRB 140619B. The time-resolved spectral analysis of the early ~0.2s of the Fermi-GBM data, allows for the identification of the characteristic features of the e^+e^- plasma at transparency (P-GRB): i.e., a thermal spectrum with an observed temperature kT=(324+/-33)keV which represents ~40% of the total source fluence. The subsequent emission, with no thermal spectrum, is identified with the prompt emission. We consequently deduce a theoretical redshift of z=2.67+/-0.37, a total burst energy E+/-=(6.03+/-0.79)x10^{52}erg, a baryon load B=(5.52+/-0.73)x10^{-5}, and a Lorentz factor at transparency Gamma=(1.08+/-0.08)x10^4. From the simulation of the prompt emission we determine the average density of the circumburst medium (CBM), n_CBM=(4.7+/-1.2)x10^{-5}cm^{-3}, typical of the galactic halo environment. These l...

  2. The Statistics of the Prompt-to-Afterglow GRB Flux Ratios and the Supercritical Pile GRB Model

    CERN Document Server

    Kazanas, D; Sultana, J; Mastichiadis, A

    2015-01-01

    We present the statistics of the ratio, ${\\mathrm R}$, between the prompt and afterglow "plateau" fluxes of GRB. This we define as the ratio between the mean prompt energy flux in the {\\em Swift} BAT and the {\\em Swift} XRT, immediately following the steep transition between these two states and the beginning of the afterglow stage referred to as the "plateau". Like the distribution of other GRB observables, the histogram of ${\\mathrm R}$ is close to log-normal, with maximum at ${\\mathrm R = R}_{\\rm m} \\simeq 2,000$, FWHM of about 2 decades and with the entire distribution spanning about 6 decades in the value of ${\\mathrm R}$. We note that the peak of the distribution is close to the proton-to-electron mass ratio $({\\mathrm R}_{\\rm m} \\simeq m_p/m_e = 1836)$, as proposed by us earlier, on the basis of a specific model for the conversion of the GRB blast wave kinetic energy into radiation, before any similar analysis were made. It therefore appears that, in addition to the values of the energy of peak luminos...

  3. Short-hairpin RNA-mediated stable silencing of Grb2 impairs cell growth and DNA synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grb2 is an SH2-SH3 protein adaptor responsible for linking growth factor receptors with intracellular signaling cascades. To study the role of Grb2 in cell growth, we have generated a new COS7 cell line (COS7shGrb2), based on RNAi technology, as null mutations in mammalian Grb2 genes are lethal in early development. This novel cell line continuously expresses a short hairpin RNA that targets endogenous Grb2. Stable COS7shGrb2 cells had the shGrb2 integrated into the genomic DNA and carried on SiL construct (made refractory to the shRNA-mediated interference), but not with an SH2-deficient mutant (R86K). Thus, a viable knock-down and rescue protocol has demonstrated that Grb2 is crucial for cell proliferation

  4. High-Altitude Balloon Observatories for Planetary Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, S. P.; Tibor, K.; Cheng, A. F.; Hibbitts, C.; Young, E. F.; Andrews, J.; Landis, R.

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that progress can be made on over 20% of the key questions called out in the current Planetary Science Decadal Survey by a high-altitude balloon borne observatory. Therefore NASA has been assessing concepts for a gondola based observatory that would achieve the most possible science in a low risk and cost effective manner. As a first application of the concept, a stratospheric balloon mission to observe the newly discovered comet ISON is being developed and planned to fly in late 2013. This flight will demonstrate some of the characteristic features of balloon borne observatories and how those impact planetary science observations. That flight will result in mission proven instrument payloads which can be applied to future flights and science investigations. This paper documents the current status of stratospheric balloon applications to planetary science and some of the contributions that BRRISON will provide for a potential future planetary observatory system. The paper will also discuss the science benefits to be expected if larger aperture telescopes are flown, better pointing systems are realized, or different instruments are utilized with the telescopes. The paper concludes with a high level summary of ways to interface and utilize the potential platform for the readers own scientific interests.

  5. Heat balance and thermal management of the TMT Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Hugh; Vogiatzis, Konstantinos

    2014-08-01

    An extensive campaign of aero-thermal modeling of the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) has been carried out and presented in other papers. This paper presents a summary view of overall heat balance of the TMT observatory. A key component of this heat balance that can be managed is the internal sources of heat dissipation to the ambient air inside the enclosure. An engineering budget for both daytime and nighttime sources is presented. This budget is used to ensure that the overall effects on daytime cooling and nighttime seeing are tracked and fall within the modeled results that demonstrate that the observatory meets its performance requirements. In the daytime heat fluxes from air-conditioning, solar loading, infiltration, and deliberate venting through the enclosure top vent are included along with equipment heat sources. In the nighttime convective heat fluxes through the open aperture and vent doors, as well as radiation to the sky are tracked along with the nighttime residual heat dissipations after cooling from equipment in the observatory. The diurnal variation of thermal inertia of large masses, such as the telescope structure, is also included. Model results as well as the overall heat balance and thermal management strategy of the observatory are presented.

  6. Running a distributed virtual observatory: US Virtual Astronomical Observatory operations

    CERN Document Server

    McGlynn, Thomas A; Berriman, G Bruce; Thakar, Aniruddha R

    2012-01-01

    Operation of the US Virtual Astronomical Observatory shares some issues with modern physical observatories, e.g., intimidating data volumes and rapid technological change, and must also address unique concerns like the lack of direct control of the underlying and scattered data resources, and the distributed nature of the observatory itself. In this paper we discuss how the VAO has addressed these challenges to provide the astronomical community with a coherent set of science-enabling tools and services. The distributed nature of our virtual observatory-with data and personnel spanning geographic, institutional and regime boundaries-is simultaneously a major operational headache and the primary science motivation for the VAO. Most astronomy today uses data from many resources. Facilitation of matching heterogeneous datasets is a fundamental reason for the virtual observatory. Key aspects of our approach include continuous monitoring and validation of VAO and VO services and the datasets provided by the commun...

  7. The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Bellerive, A; McDonald, A B; Noble, A J; Poon, A W P

    2016-01-01

    This review paper provides a summary of the published results of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) experiment that was carried out by an international scientific collaboration with data collected during the period from 1999 to 2006. By using heavy water as a detection medium, the SNO experiment demonstrated clearly that solar electron neutrinos from $^8$B decay in the solar core change into other active neutrino flavors in transit to Earth. The reaction on deuterium that has equal sensitivity to all active neutrino flavors also provides a very accurate measure of the initial solar flux for comparison with solar models. This review summarizes the results from three phases of solar neutrino detection as well as other physics results obtained from analyses of the SNO data.

  8. Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    He, Miao

    2014-01-01

    The Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) is a multipurpose neutrino-oscillation experiment designed to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to precisely measure oscillation parameters by detecting reactor antineutrinos, observe supernova neutrinos, study the atmospheric, solar neutrinos and geo-neutrinos, and perform exotic searches, with a 20 kiloton liquid scintillator detector of unprecedented $3\\%$ energy resolution (at 1 MeV) at 700-meter deep underground and to have other rich scientific possibilities. Currently MC study shows a sensitivity of the mass hierarchy to be $\\overline{\\Delta\\chi^2}\\sim 11$ and $\\overline{\\Delta\\chi^2}\\sim 16$ in a relative and an absolute measurement, respectively. JUNO has been approved by Chinese Academy of Sciences in 2013, and an international collaboration was established in 2014. The civil construction is in preparation and the R$\\&$D of the detectors are ongoing. A new offline software framework was developed for the detector simulation, the event ...

  9. The Solar Dynamics Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Pesnell, William; Thompson, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    This volume is dedicated to the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), which was launched 11 February 2010.  The articles focus on the spacecraft and its instruments: the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), the Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE), and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). Articles within also describe calibration results and data processing pipelines that are critical to understanding the data and products, concluding with a description of the successful Education and Public Outreach activities.  This book is geared towards anyone interested in using the unprecedented data from SDO, whether for fundamental heliophysics research, space weather modeling and forecasting, or educational purposes. Previously published in Solar Physics journal, Vol. 275/1-2, 2012.

  10. The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellerive, A.; Klein, J. R.; McDonald, A. B.; Noble, A. J.; Poon, A. W. P.

    2016-07-01

    This review paper provides a summary of the published results of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) experiment that was carried out by an international scientific collaboration with data collected during the period from 1999 to 2006. By using heavy water as a detection medium, the SNO experiment demonstrated clearly that solar electron neutrinos from 8B decay in the solar core change into other active neutrino flavors in transit to Earth. The reaction on deuterium that has equal sensitivity to all active neutrino flavors also provides a very accurate measure of the initial solar flux for comparison with solar models. This review summarizes the results from three phases of solar neutrino detection as well as other physics results obtained from analyses of the SNO data.

  11. The Virtual Observatory Registry

    CERN Document Server

    Demleitner, Markus; Sidaner, Pierre Le; Plante, Raymond L

    2014-01-01

    In the Virtual Observatory (VO), the Registry provides the mechanism with which users and applications discover and select resources -- typically, data and services -- that are relevant for a particular scientific problem. Even though the VO adopted technologies in particular from the bibliographic community where available, building the Registry system involved a major standardisation effort, involving about a dozen interdependent standard texts. This paper discusses the server-side aspects of the standards and their application, as regards the functional components (registries), the resource records in both format and content, the exchange of resource records between registries (harvesting), as well as the creation and management of the identifiers used in the system based on the notion of authorities. Registry record authors, registry operators or even advanced users thus receive a big picture serving as a guideline through the body of relevant standard texts. To complete this picture, we also mention comm...

  12. Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, E. W.

    1992-03-01

    This document is a technical progress report on work performed at the University of Pennsylvania during the current year on the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory project. The motivation for the experiment is the measurement of neutrinos emitted by the sun. The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a second generation dedicated solar neutrino experiment which will extend the results of our work with the Kamiokande II detector by measuring three reactions of neutrinos rather than the single reaction measured by the Kamiokande experiment. The collaborative project includes physicists from Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Full funding for the construction of this facility was obtained in Jan. 1990, and its construction is estimated to take five years. The motivation for the SNO experiment is to study the fundamental properties of neutrinos, in particular the mass and mixing parameters, which remain undetermined after decades of experiments in neutrino physics utilizing accelerators and reactors as sources of neutrinos. To continue the study of neutrino properties it is necessary to use the sun as a neutrino source. The long distance to the sun makes the search for neutrino mass sensitive to much smaller mass than can be studied with terrestrial sources. Furthermore, the matter density in the sun is sufficiently large to enhance the effects of small mixing between electron neutrinos and mu or tau neutrinos. This experiment, when combined with the results of the radiochemical Cl-37 and Ga-71 experiments and the Kamiokande II experiment, should extend our knowledge of these fundamental particles, and as a byproduct, improve our understanding of energy generation in the sun.

  13. VLT identification of the optical afterglow of the gamma-ray burst GRB 000131 at z=4.50

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, M. I.; Hjorth, J.; Pedersen, H.;

    2000-01-01

    We report the discovery of the gamma-ray burst GRB 000131 and its optical afterglow. The optical identification was made with the VLT 84 hours after the burst following a BATSE detection and an Inter Planetary Network localization. GRB 000131 was a bright, long-duration GRB, with an apparent prec...

  14. Directional synthetic aperture flow imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nikolov, Svetoslav

    2004-01-01

    A method for flow estimation using synthetic aperture imaging and focusing along the flow direction is presented. The method can find the correct velocity magnitude for any flow angle and full color flow images can be measured using only 32 to 128 pulse emissions. The approach uses spherical wave...... emissions using a number of defocused elements and a linear frequency modulated pulse (chirp) to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. The received signals are dynamically focused along the flow direction and these signals are used in a cross-correlation estimator for finding the velocity magnitude. The flow...

  15. Ultrasonic large aperture imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new ultrasonic large aperture imaging technique is described. This device combines a focussed transducer as a transmitter, producing a small ultrasonic beam, with N transducers as receivers. We show that is possible to considerably reduce the number of receivers if, on the one hand, we limit the reconstitution process to the emitter beam area and, on the other hand, we ensure that the artefacts, caused by the spatial sampling of the reception, are outside this area. Under these conditions, the result is a high resolution image which does not require large reconstitution processing times. Theoretical and experimental results are given

  16. A serendipitous observation of the gamma-ray burst GRB 921013b field with EUVE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castro-Tirado, A.J.; Gorosabel, J.; Bowyer, S.;

    1999-01-01

    We report a serendipitous extreme ultraviolet observation by EUVE of the field containing GRB 921013b, similar to 11 hours after its occurrence. This burst was detected on 1992 October 13 by the WATCH and PHEBUS on Granat, and by the GRB experiment on Ulysses. The lack of any transient (or quiesc...

  17. Detailed afterglow modelling and host galaxy properties of the dark GRB 111215A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horst, A. J. van der; Levan, A. J.; Pooley, G. G.;

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) 111215A was bright at X-ray and radio frequencies, but not detected in the optical or near-infrared (nIR) down to deep limits. We have observed the GRB afterglow with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope and Arcminute Microkelvin Imager at radio frequencies, with the Wil...

  18. X-ray Emission Lines in GRB Afterglows: Evidence for a Two-component Jet Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Hong Gao; Da-Ming Wei

    2005-01-01

    X-ray emission lines have been observed in X-ray afterglows of several γ-ray bursts (GRBs). It is a major breakthrough for understanding the nature of the progenitors. It has been proposed that the X-ray emission lines can be well explained by the Geometry-Dominated models, but in these models the illuminating angle is much larger than that of the collimated jet of the GRB. For GRB 011211, we have obtained an illuminating angle of about θ~ 45°, while the angle of the GRB jet is only 3.6°. So we propose that the outflow of GRBs with emission lines should have two distinct components: a wide component that illuminates the reprocessing material and produces the emission lines and a narrow one that produces the GRB. Observations show the energy for producing the emission lines is higher than that of the GRB. In this case, when the wide component dominates the afterglows, a bump should appear in the GRB afterglow. For GRB 011211,the bump should occur within 0.05 days of the GRB, which is obviously too early for the observation to catch it. Alongside the X-ray emission lines there should also be a bright emission component between the UV and the soft X-rays. These features can be tested by the Swift satellite in the near future.

  19. A multi-colour study of the dark GRB 000210 host galaxy and its environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorosabel, J.; Christensen, Lise; Hjorth, J.;

    2003-01-01

    We present UBVRIZJsHKs broad band photometry of the host galaxy of the dark gamma-ray burst (GRB) of February 10, 2000. These observations represent the most exhaustive photometry given to date of any GRB host galaxy. A grid of spectral templates have been fitted to the Spectral Energy Distribution...

  20. Spectral lag features of GRB 060814 from swift bat and Suzaku observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work reports a study on the spectral lag of the prompt emission spectrum of a multi-pulse gamma-ray burst (GRB) GRB 060814 (z = 0.84) using the observations of the Swift Burst Alert Telescope and the Suzaku Wide Area Monitor. We found that the spectral lag for GRB 060814 is positive for the first two and the fourth pulses, while the third pulse exhibits negative lag. However, the time variation of the E peak of all the stated pulses shows a similar trend. The leading models for spectral lags in GRBs are thus found inadequate to explain the observed spectral lag features of GRB 060814. Probable causes of the spectral lag characteristics of GRB 060814 are discussed.

  1. A Simple Energy-Dependent Model for GRB Pulses with Interesting Physical Implications

    CERN Document Server

    Nemiroff, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    A simple mathematical model for GRB pulses is postulated in both time and energy. The model breaks GRB pulses up into component functions, one general light curve function exclusively in the time dimension and four component functions exclusively in the energy dimension. Each component function of energy is effectively orthogonal to the other energy-component functions. The model is a good statistical fit to several of the most fluent separable GRB pulses known. Even without theoretical interpretation, the model may be immediately useful for fitting prompt emission from GRB pulses across energy channels with a minimal number of free parameters, sometimes far fewer than freshly fitting a GRB pulse in every energy band separately. Some theoretical implications of the model might be particularly interesting, however, as the temporal component (e.g. the shape of the light curve) is well characterized mathematically by the well known Planck distribution.

  2. Broadband Study of GRB 091127: A Sub-Energetic Burst at Higher Redshift?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troja, E.; Sakamoto, T.; Guidorzi, C.; Norris, J. P.; Panaitescu, A.; Kobayashi, S.; Omodei, N.; Brown, J. C.; Burrows, D. N.; Evans, P. A.; Gehrels, N.; Marshall, F. E.; Mawson, N.; Melandri,; Mundell, C. G.; Oates, S. R.; Pal'shin, V.; Preece, R. D.; Racusin, J. L.; Steele, I. A.; Tanvir, N. R.; Vasileiou, V.; Wilson-Hodge, C.

    2012-01-01

    GRB 091127 is a bright gamma-ray burst (GRB) detected by Swift at a redshift z=0.49 and associated with SN 2009nz. We present the broadband analysis of the GRB prompt and afterglow emission and study its high-energy properties in the context of the GRB/SN association. While the high luminosity of the prompt emission and standard afterglow behavior are typical of cosmological long GRBs, its low energy release (E(sub gamma),bursts. We discuss the suppression of high-energy emission in this burst, and investigate whether this behavior could be connected with the sub-energetic nature of the explosion. Subject headings: gamma-ray bursts: individual (GRB 091127)

  3. Search for strong gravitational lensing effect in the current GRB data of BATSE

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Chun-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Because gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) trace the high-z Universe, there is an appreciable probability for a GRB to be gravitational lensed by galaxies in the universe. Herein we consider the gravitational lensing effect of GRBs contributed by the dark matter halos in galaxies. Assuming that all halos have the singular isothermal sphere (SIS) mass profile in the mass range $10^{10} h^{-1} M_\\odot < M < 2\\times 10^{13} h^{-1}M_\\odot $ and all GRB samples follow the intrinsic redshift distribution and luminosity function derived from the Swift LGRBs sample, we calculated the gravitational lensing probability in BATSE, Swift/BAT and Fermi/GBM GRBs, respectively. With an derived probability result in BATSE GRBs, we searched for lensed GRB pairs in the BATSE 5B GRB Spectral catalog. The search did not find any convincing gravitationally lensed events. We discuss our result and future observations for GRB lensing observation.

  4. Neutrino emission from a GRB afterglow shock during an inner supernova shock breakout

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Yun-Wei; Zheng, Xiao-Ping

    2008-01-01

    The observations of a nearby low-luminosity gamma-ray burst (GRB) 060218 associated with supernova SN 2006aj may imply an interesting astronomical picture where a supernova shock breakout locates behind a relativistic GRB jet. Based on this picture, we study neutrino emission for early afterglows of GRB 060218-like GRBs, where neutrinos are expected to be produced from photopion interactions in a GRB blast wave that propagates into a dense wind. Relativistic protons for the interactions are accelerated by an external shock, while target photons are basically provided by the incoming thermal emission from the shock breakout and its inverse-Compton scattered component. Because of a high estimated event rate of low-luminosity GRBs, we would have more opportunities to detect afterglow neutrinos from a single nearby GRB event of this type by IceCube. Such a possible detection could provide evidence for the picture described above.

  5. Resonant Effects in Nanoscale Bowtie Apertures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Li; Qin, Jin; Guo, Songpo; Liu, Tao; Kinzel, Edward; Wang, Liang

    2016-06-01

    Nanoscale bowtie aperture antennas can be used to focus light well below the diffraction limit with extremely high transmission efficiencies. This paper studies the spectral dependence of the transmission through nanoscale bowtie apertures defined in a silver film. A realistic bowtie aperture is numerically modeled using the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method. Results show that the transmission spectrum is dominated by Fabry-Pérot (F-P) waveguide modes and plasmonic modes. The F-P resonance is sensitive to the thickness of the film and the plasmonic resonant mode is closely related to the gap distance of the bowtie aperture. Both characteristics significantly affect the transmission spectrum. To verify these numerical results, bowtie apertures are FIB milled in a silver film. Experimental transmission measurements agree with simulation data. Based on this result, nanoscale bowtie apertures can be optimized to realize deep sub-wavelength confinement with high transmission efficiency with applications to nanolithography, data storage, and bio-chemical sensing.

  6. Practical Applications of Synthetic Aperture Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav Ivanov; Kortbek, Jacob; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2010-01-01

    Synthetic aperture imaging has been a focus of research for almost 3 decades. The research carried out at the Center for Fast Ultrasound Imaging has demonstrated that synthetic aperture focusing not only can be used in-vivo, but that it also yields superior B-mode and blood flow images. In the last...... years synthetic aperture focusing has moved from the lab to commercial products. The implementations vary in their scope and purpose. Some scanners use synthetic aperture imaging to improve the detail and contrast resolution of the system. Others to increase the image uniformity. Yet others use...... synthetic aperture acquisition to achieve high frame rates and superior flow estimations. On the other end of the scale are the systems that utilize synthetic aperture techniques to reduce the data rate and take advantage of modern computer hardware. Retrospecitve transmit beamformation, zone sonography...

  7. Doppler synthetic aperture hitchhiker imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we consider passive airborne receivers that use backscattered signals from sources of opportunity transmitting single-frequency or ultra-narrowband waveforms. Because of its combined passive synthetic aperture and the single-frequency nature of the transmitted waveforms, we refer to the system under consideration as Doppler synthetic aperture hitchhiker (DSAH). We present a novel image formation method for DSAH. Our method first correlates the windowed signal obtained from one receiver with the windowed, filtered, scaled and translated version of the received signal from another receiver. This processing removes the transmitter-related variables from the phase of the Fourier integral operator that maps the radiance of the scene to the correlated signal. Next, we use microlocal analysis to reconstruct the scene radiance by the weighted backprojection of the correlated signal. The image reconstruction method is applicable to both cooperative and non-cooperative sources of opportunity using one or more airborne receivers. It has the desirable property of preserving the visible edges of the scene radiance. Additionally, it is an analytic reconstruction technique that can be made computationally efficient. We present numerical simulations to demonstrate the performance of the image reconstruction method and to verify the theoretical results

  8. Game: GRB and All-Sky Monitor Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amati, Lorenzo; Campana, Riccardo; Evangelista, Yuri; Feroci, Marco; Fuschino, Fabio; Labanti, Claudio; Salvaterra, Ruben; Stratta, Giulia; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero; Frontera, Filippo; Guidorzi, Cristiano; Rosati, Piero; Titarchuk, Lev; Braga, João Penacchioni, Ana; Ruffini, Remo; Izzo, Luca; Zampa, Nicola; Vacchi, Andrea; Santangelo, Andrea; Hudec, Rene; Gomboc, Andreja; Rodic, Tomaz

    2015-01-01

    We describe the GRB and All-sky Monitor Experiment (GAME) mission submitted by a large international collaboration (Italy, Germany, Czech Repubblic, Slovenia, Brazil) in response to the 2012 ESA call for a small mission opportunity for a launch in 2017 and presently under further investigation for subsequent opportunities. The general scientific objective is to perform measurements of key importance for GRB science and to provide the wide astrophysical community of an advanced X-ray all-sky monitoring system. The proposed payload was based on silicon drift detectors (~1-50 keV), CdZnTe (CZT) detectors (~15-200 keV) and crystal scintillators in phoswich (NaI/CsI) configuration (~20 keV-20 MeV), three well established technologies, for a total weight of ~250 kg and a required power of ~240 W. Such instrumentation allows a unique, unprecedented and very powerful combination of large field of view (3-4 sr), a broad energy energy band extending from ˜1 keV up to ˜20 MeV, an energy resolution as good as ~250 eV in the 1-30 keV energy range, a source location accuracy of ~1 arcmin. The mission profile included a launch (e.g., by Vega) into a low Earth orbit, a baseline sky scanning mode plus pointed observations of regions of particular interest, data transmission to ground via X-band (4.8 Gb/orbit, Alcantara and Malindi ground stations), and prompt transmission of GRB / transient triggers.

  9. Jet or Shock Breakout? The Low-Luminosity GRB 060218

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Christopher; Chevalier, Roger

    2016-01-01

    We consider a model for the long-duration, low-luminosity gamma-ray burst GRB 060218 that plausibly accounts for multiwavelength observations to day 20. The components of our model are: (1) a long-lived (tj ~ 3000 s) central engine and accompanying low-luminosity (Lj ~ 1045 erg s-1), mildly relativistic jet; (2) a low-mass (~ 10-2 Msun) envelope surrounding the progenitor star; and (3) a modest amount of dust (AV ~ 0.1) in the circumstellar or interstellar environment. Blackbody emission from the transparency radius in a low-power jet outflow can fit the prompt thermal X-ray emission, and the prompt nonthermal X-rays and γ-rays may be produced via Compton scattering of thermal photons from hot leptons in the jet interior or the external shocks. The later mildly relativistic phase of this outflow can produce the radio emission via synchrotron radiation from the forward shock. Meanwhile, interaction of the associated SN 2006aj with a circumstellar envelope extending to ~ 1013 cm can explain the early optical peak. The X-ray afterglow can be interpreted as a light echo of the prompt emission from dust at ~ 30 pc. Our model is a plausible alternative to that of Nakar, who recently proposed shock breakout of a jet smothered by an extended envelope as the source of prompt emission. Both our results and Nakar's suggest that ultra-long bursts such as GRB 060218 and GRB 100316D may originate from unusual progenitors with extended circumstellar envelopes, and that a jet is necessary to decouple the prompt high-energy emission from the supernova.

  10. Klimovskaya: A new geomagnetic observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloviev, A. A.; Sidorov, R. V.; Krasnoperov, R. I.; Grudnev, A. A.; Khokhlov, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    In 2011 Geophysical Center RAS (GC RAS) began to deploy the Klimovskaya geomagnetic observatory in the south of Arkhangelsk region on the territory of the Institute of Physiology of Natural Adaptations, Ural Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences (IPNA UB RAS). The construction works followed the complex of preparatory measures taken in order to confirm that the observatory can be constructed on this territory and to select the optimal configuration of observatory structures. The observatory equipping stages are described in detail, the technological and design solutions are described, and the first results of the registered data quality control are presented. It has been concluded that Klimovskaya observatory can be included in INTERMAGNET network. The observatory can be used to monitor and estimate geomagnetic activity, because it is located at high latitudes and provides data in a timely manner to the scientific community via the web-site of the Russian-Ukrainian Geomagnetic Data Center. The role of ground observatories such as Klimovskaya remains critical for long-term observations of secular variation and for complex monitoring of the geomagnetic field in combination with low-orbiting satellite data.

  11. Strategies for Prompt Searches for GRB Afterglows: The Discovery of GRB 001011 Optical/Near-Infrared Counterpart Using Colour-Colour Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorosabel, J.; Fynbo, J. U.; Hjorth, J.; Wolf, C.; Andersen, M. I.; Pedersen, H.; Christensen, L.; Jensen, B. L.; Moller, P.; Afonso, J.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We report the discovery of the optical and near-infrared counterpart to GRB 001011. The GRB 001011 error box determined by Beppo-SAX was simultaneously imaged in the near-infrared by the 3.58-m. New Technology Telescope and in the optical by the 1.54-m Danish Telescope - 8 hr after the gamma-ray event. We implement the colour-colour discrimination technique proposed by Rhoads (2001) and extend it using near-IR data as well. We present the results provided by an automatic colour-colour discrimination pipe-line developed to discern the different populations of objects present in the GRB 001011 error box. Our software revealed three candidates based on single-epoch images. Second-epoch observations carried out approx. 3.2 days after the burst revealed that the most likely candidate had faded thus identifying it with the counterpart to the GRB. In deep R-band images obtained 7 months after the burst a faint (R=25.38 plus or minus 0.25) elongated object, presumably the host galaxy of GRB 001011, was detected at the position of the afterglow. The GRB 001011 afterglow is the first discovered with the assistance of colour-colour diagram techniques. We discuss the advantages of using this method and its application to boxes determined by future missions.

  12. Advanced Optics Experiments Using Nonuniform Aperture Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Wood, Lowell T

    2012-01-01

    A method to create instructive, nonuniform aperture functions using spatial frequency filtering is described. The diffraction from a single slit in the Fresnel limit and the interference from a double slit in the Fraunhofer limit are spatially filtered to create electric field distributions across an aperture to produce apodization, inverse apodization or super-resolution, and apertures with phase shifts across their widths. The diffraction effects from these aperture functions are measured and calculated. The excellent agreement between the experimental results and the calculated results makes the experiment ideal for use in an advanced undergraduate or graduate optics laboratory to illustrate experimentally several effects in Fourier optics.

  13. Ion mobility spectrometer with virtual aperture grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Kent B.; Rumpf, Arthur N.

    2010-11-23

    An ion mobility spectrometer does not require a physical aperture grid to prevent premature ion detector response. The last electrodes adjacent to the ion collector (typically the last four or five) have an electrode pitch that is less than the width of the ion swarm and each of the adjacent electrodes is connected to a source of free charge, thereby providing a virtual aperture grid at the end of the drift region that shields the ion collector from the mirror current of the approaching ion swarm. The virtual aperture grid is less complex in assembly and function and is less sensitive to vibrations than the physical aperture grid.

  14. Practical Applications of Synthetic Aperture Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolov, Svetoslav Ivanov; Kortbek, Jacob; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2010-01-01

    Synthetic aperture imaging has been a focus of research for almost 3 decades. The research carried out at the Center for Fast Ultrasound Imaging has demonstrated that synthetic aperture focusing not only can be used in-vivo, but that it also yields superior B-mode and blood flow images. In the last years synthetic aperture focusing has moved from the lab to commercial products. The implementations vary in their scope and purpose. Some scanners use synthetic aperture imaging to improve the det...

  15. Health Observatories in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Shad­pour

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Islamic Republic of Iran, in her 20 year vision by the year 2025, is a developed country with the first economic, scientific and technological status in the region, with revolutionary and Islamic identity, inspiring Islamic world, as well as effective and constructive interaction in international relations. Enjoying health, welfare, food security, social security, equal opportunities, fair income distribution, strong family structure; to be away from poverty, corruption, and discrimination; and benefiting desirable living environment are also considered out of characteristics of Iranian society in that year. Strategic leadership towards perceived vision in each setting requires restrictive, complete and timely information. According to constitution of National Institute for Health Researches, law of the Fifth Development Plan of the country and characteristics of health policy making, necessity of designing a Health Observatory System (HOS was felt. Some Principles for designing such system were formulated by taking following steps: reviewing experience in other countries, having local history of the HOS in mind, superior documents, analysis of current production and management of health information, taking the possibilities to run a HOS into account. Based on these principles, the protocol of HOS was outlined in 3 different stages of opinion poll of informed experts responsible for production on management of information, by using questionnaires and Focus Group Discussions. The protocol includes executive regulations, the list of health indicators, vocabulary and a calendar for periodic studies of the community health situation.

  16. Light speed variation from gamma ray burst GRB 160509A

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Haowei

    2016-01-01

    It is postulated in Einstein's relativity that the speed of light in vacuum is a constant for all observers. However, the effect of quantum gravity could bring an energy dependence of light speed. Even a tiny speed variation, when amplified by the cosmological distance, may be revealed by the observed time lags between photons with different energies from astrophysical sources. From the newly detected long gamma ray burst GRB~160509A, we find evidence to support the prediction for a linear form modification of light speed in cosmological space.

  17. GRB 050822: Detailed analysis of an XRF observed by Swift

    OpenAIRE

    Godet, O; Page, K. L.; Osborne, J.; B. Zhang; Burrows, D.N.; O'Brien, P. T.; Hill, J. E.; Racusin, J.; Beardmore, A. P.; Goad, M. R.; Falcone, A; Morris, D. C.; Ziaeepour, H.

    2007-01-01

    We report on the temporal and spectral characteristics of the early X-ray emission from the GRB 050822 as observed by Swift. This burst is likely to be an XRF showing major X-ray flares in its XRT light-curve. The quality of the data allows a detailed spectral analysis of the early afterglow in the X-ray band. During the X-ray flares, a positive correlation between the count rate and the spectral hardness (i.e. the higher the count rate, the harder the spectrum) is clearly seen for the X-ray ...

  18. Light speed variation from gamma ray burst GRB 160509A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haowei; Ma, Bo-Qiang

    2016-09-01

    It is postulated in Einstein's relativity that the speed of light in vacuum is a constant for all observers. However, the effect of quantum gravity could bring an energy dependence of light speed. Even a tiny speed variation, when amplified by the cosmological distance, may be revealed by the observed time lags between photons with different energies from astrophysical sources. From the newly detected long gamma ray burst GRB 160509A, we find evidence to support the prediction for a linear form modification of light speed in cosmological space.

  19. Teaching and Research in Astronomy using Small Aperture Optical Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, S. K.

    2006-08-01

    Small aperture (Colleges/. On the basis of over a decade's experience in observing with small optical telescopes it has been amply demonstrated that such a facility, which any University department can hope to procure and maintain, can be effectively used for teaching as well quality research. The Physics Department of Pt Ravishankar Shukla University at Raipur, India offers Astronomy & Astrophysics (A&A) as one of the specialization as a part of M Sc program in Physics. A set of observational exercises has been incorporated with a view to provide training in observations, analysis and interpretation of the astronomical data to the students. Observing facilities available in the department include 8"-14" aperture telescopes (CGE series from Celestron) equipped with the new-state-of-the-art backend instrumentation like Photometer, CCD Camera and also a CCD spectrograph. Observing facility of this kind is ideally suited for continuous monitoring of a variety of variable stars, and thus can provide valuable data for understanding the physics of stellar variability. This is especially true for a class of variable stars known as chromospherically active stars. The stars belonging to this class have variable light curves, and the most puzzling feature is that their light curves change year after year in a rather queerer way. A large fraction of these active stars are bright ones and, hence, the importance of small aperture telescope for collecting the much needed photometric data. For over a decade the research activity using 14" optical telescope is focused on photometric monitoring of well known as well suspected active stars. This together with spectroscopic data using observing facility at Indian Observatories has led to identification of new chromosperically active stars. The talk is aimed at sharing our experiences quoting examples with professional colleagues on the usage of small optical telescopes for teaching and research in Colleges/Universities.

  20. Overview and Status of the James Webb Space Telescope Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clampin, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a large aperture (6.5 meter), cryogenic space telescope with a suite of near and mid-infrared instruments spanning the wavelength range of 0.6 microns to 28 microns. JWST's primary science goals are to detect and characterize the first galaxies, study the assembly of galaxies, star formation, and the formation of evolution of planetary systems. JWST has a unique design based on the concept of passive cooling by means of a multi-layer sunshield to achieve the telescope's cryogenic operating temperature. Each of the five layers of the sunshield is approximately the size of a tennis court, and made of aluminized kapton. By maintaining an observatory attitude whereby the sunshield keeps the telescope in the shade from the sun's rays, the telescope and science instruments can operate at cryogenic temperature (-40 K). On the sun facing side of the observatory the spacecraft bus houses most of the electronic sub-systems, and provides a platform for the solar array and communications hardware. JWST is sufficiently large that it cannot fit inside .the fairing of its Ariane 5 launcher without being stowed in a more compact configuration, so the ability to deploy its major SUb-systems such as the telescope optics and sunshield after launch are another major feature of the observatory. Development of observatory is making rapid progress as major hardware SUb-systems nearcompletion. Polishing of the JWST telescope mirrors is complete with 18 primary mirror segments, the secondary mirror, tertiary and fine steering mirror all gold coated and through acceptance testing. Engineering test articles of each sunshield membrane layer are underway. The first layer 3 membrane is complete and is undergoing testing to evaluate its tensioned shape for compliance with alignment tolerances. As each major SUb-system is tested, the expected scientific performance of the observatory can be evaluated using test results and integrated system models of the

  1. Architecture of Chinese Virtual Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Chen-Zhou; Zhao, Yong-Heng

    2004-06-01

    Virtual Observatory (VO) is brought forward under the background of progresses of astronomical technologies and information technologies. VO architecture design embodies the combination of above two technologies. As an introduction of VO, principle and workflow of Virtual Observatory are given firstly. Then the latest progress on VO architecture is introduced. Based on the Grid technology, layered architecture model and service-oriented architecture model are given for Chinese Virtual Observatory. In the last part of the paper, some problems on architecture design are discussed in detail.

  2. Snowstorm at the geomagnetic observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čop, R.

    2015-08-01

    The Sinji Vrh Geomagnetic Observatory (hereinafter the Observatory) is situated on Gora above Ajdovščina, a highland karst plateau, in the southwestern part of Slovenia. The Observatory operates in exceptional geological and meteorological conditions due to its location. The very first measurements at the time of initial tests showed that weather fronts induce changes in the local magnetic field. The first measurements intended to determine the value of this influence were carried out at the end of summer 2011. In 2013 the first such measurements were carried out in January. This article presents the results of these measurements, showing how the snowstorm induced changes in Earth's magnetic field.

  3. An introduction to the Indian Astronomical Observatory, Hanle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowsik, R.; Srinivasan, R.; Prabhu, T. P.

    2002-03-01

    Situated in the high-altitude cold desert of Changthang Ladakh bordering Himachal Pradesh and Tibet, Indian Astronomical Observatory, Hanle (32o46m46sN, 78o57'51''E; 4500 m above msl), provides excellent opportunities for developing astronomical facilities at a variety of frequencies. In addition, it provides environment and logistics for a range of scientific experiments which be nefit from its unique location. Indian Institute of Astrophysics has built this observatory around a modest 2-m aperture optical/infrared telescope. A 0.5 m telescope will soon be added. A large facility (6.5-8.5 m class infrared/optical telescope) is under consid eration. A 2-m telescope of new advanced technology design has been installed at the observatory in what probably is a record in the speed of execution. The site development, fabrication and installation of the telescope has been accomplished in just about 3 years. The telescope saw its first light on the night of September 26/27 2000 and has been operating with a CCD imager. A larger CCD imager, a faint object spectrograph camera, and a JHK imager are under fabrication. A 1-5 micron imager spectrograph is planned as the next generation instrument. The telescope will be remotely operable from the Centre for Research and Education in Science & Technology of IIA at Hosakote near Bangalore over the next few months. All the necessary infrastructure including 20 kw/h power through generators, 1 Mbps dedicated satellite communication link (to be upgarded to 2 Mbps and a 128 kbps redundant link to be established), liquid nitrogen plant, etc. have been already developed. The Government of Jammu & Kashmir has transferred over 600 acres of land to the observatory. The infrastructure developed for the observatory is already being used for other scientific experiments by national and international institutions. The experiments include determination of atmospheric opcaity at mm wavelengths, geodynamic and seismological experiments, aerosol

  4. Multifocal interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yang; Chng, Xiong Kai Benjamin; Adie, Steven G; Boppart, Stephen A; Carney, P Scott

    2014-06-30

    There is an inherent trade-off between transverse resolution and depth of field (DOF) in optical coherence tomography (OCT) which becomes a limiting factor for certain applications. Multifocal OCT and interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM) each provide a distinct solution to the trade-off through modification to the experiment or via post-processing, respectively. In this paper, we have solved the inverse problem of multifocal OCT and present a general algorithm for combining multiple ISAM datasets. Multifocal ISAM (MISAM) uses a regularized combination of the resampled datasets to bring advantages of both multifocal OCT and ISAM to achieve optimal transverse resolution, extended effective DOF and improved signal-to-noise ratio. We present theory, simulation and experimental results. PMID:24977909

  5. Synthetic aperture interferometry: error analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synthetic aperture interferometry (SAI) is a novel way of testing aspherics and has a potential for in-process measurement of aspherics [Appl. Opt.42, 701 (2003)].APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.42.000701 A method to measure steep aspherics using the SAI technique has been previously reported [Appl. Opt.47, 1705 (2008)].APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.47.001705 Here we investigate the computation of surface form using the SAI technique in different configurations and discuss the computational errors. A two-pass measurement strategy is proposed to reduce the computational errors, and a detailed investigation is carried out to determine the effect of alignment errors on the measurement process.

  6. Grb2 is regulated by foxd3 and has roles in preventing accumulation and aggregation of mutant huntingtin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shounak Baksi

    Full Text Available Growth factor receptor protein binding protein 2 (Grb2 is known to be associated with intracellular growth and proliferation related signaling cascades. Huntingtin (Htt, a ubiquitously expressed protein, when mutated, forms toxic intracellular aggregates - the hallmark of Huntington's disease (HD. We observed an elevated expression of Grb2 in neuronal cells in animal and cell models of HD. Grb2 overexpression was predominantly regulated by the transcription factor Forkhead Box D3 (Foxd3. Exogenous expression of Grb2 also reduced aggregation of mutant Htt in Neuro2A cells. Grb2 is also known to interact with Htt, depending on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR activation. Grb2- mutant Htt interaction in the contrary, took place in vesicular structures, independent of EGFR activation that eventually merged with autophagosomes and activated the autophagy machinery helping in autophagosome and lysosome fusion. Grb2, with its emerging dual role, holds promise for a survival mechanism for HD.

  7. The Sudbury neutrino observatory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report initially discusses the Homestake Mine Experiment, South Dakota, U.S.A. which has been detecting neutrinos in 38 x 10 litre vats of cleaning fluid containing chlorine since the 1960's. The interation between neutrinos and chlorine produces argon so the number of neutrinos over time can be calculated. However, the number of neutrinos which have been detected represent only one third to one quarter of the expected number i.e. 11 per month rather than 48. It is postulated that the electron-neutrinos originating in the solar core could change into muon- or tau-neutrinos during passage through the high electron densities of the sun. The 'low' results at Homestake could thus be explained by the fact that the experiment is only sensitive to electron-neutrinos. The construction of a heavy water detector is therefore proposed as it would be able to determine the energy of the neutrinos, their time of arrival at the detector and their direction. It is proposed to build the detector at Creighton mine near Sudbury at a depth of 6800 feet below ground level thus shielding the detector from cosmic rays which would completely obscure the neutrino signals from the detector. The report then discusses the facility itself, the budget estimate and the social and economic impact on the surrounding area. At the time of publication the proposal for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory was due to be submitted for peer review by Oct. 1, 1987 and then to various granting bodies charged with the funding of scientific research in Canada, the U.S.A. and Britain

  8. The 80 Ms follow-up of the X-ray afterglow of GRB 130427A challenges the standard forward shock model

    CERN Document Server

    De Pasquale, M; Kann, D A; Oates, S R; Schulze, S; Zhang, B; Cano, Z; Gendre, B; Malesani, D; Rossi, A; Troja, E; Piro, L; Boër, M; Stratta, G; Gehrels, N

    2016-01-01

    GRB 130427A was the brightest gamma-ray burst detected in the last 30 years. With an equivalent isotropic energy output of $8.5\\times10^{53}$ erg and redshift $z=0.34$, it uniquely combined very high energetics with a relative proximity to Earth. As a consequence, its X-ray afterglow has been detected by sensitive X-ray observatories such as XMM-Newton and Chandra for a record-breaking baseline longer than 80 million seconds. We present the X-ray light-curve of this event over such an interval. The light-curve shows a simple power-law decay with a slope $\\alpha = 1.309 \\pm 0.007$ over more than three decades in time (47 ks - 83 Ms). We discuss the consequences of this result for a few models proposed so far to interpret GRB 130427A, and more in general the significance of this outcome in the context of the standard forward shock model. We find that this model has difficulty in explaining our data, in both cases of constant density and stellar-wind circumburst media, and requires far-fetched values for the phy...

  9. The Infrared Space Observatory (ISO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helou, George; Kessler, Martin F.

    1995-01-01

    ISO, scheduled to launch in 1995, will carry into orbit the most sophisticated infrared observatory of the decade. Overviews of the mission, instrument payload and scientific program are given, along with a comparison of the strengths of ISO and SOFIA.

  10. Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Deep Space Climate ObserVatoRy (DSCOVR) satellite is a NOAA operated asset located at the first Lagrange point (L1). This places it approximately 1% of the...

  11. Islamic Astronomical Instruments and Observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidarzadeh, Tofigh

    This chapter is a brief survey of astronomical instruments being used and developed in Islamic territories from the eighth to the fifteenth centuries as well as a concise account of major observatories and observational programs in this period.

  12. On the constraining observations of the dark GRB 001109 and the properties of a z=0.398 radio selected starburst galaxy contained in its error box

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ceron, J.M.C.; Gorosabel, J.; Castro-Tirado, A.J.;

    2004-01-01

    similar to21, 10.2 h after the GRB; Igreater than or similar to23, 11.4 h after the GRB; Hgreater than or similar to20.7, 9.9 h after the GRB; and K(S)greater than or similar to20, 9.6 h after the GRB. We discuss whether the radio source found in the GRB's error box (Taylor et al. 2000) might be related...

  13. MAGIC low energy observation of GRB090102 afterglow

    CERN Document Server

    Carosi, A; de Almeida, U Barres; Bastieri, D; González, J Becerra; Colombo, E; Garczarczyk, M; Covino, S; La Barbera, A; Spiro, S; Domínguez, A; Gaug, M; Longo, F; Scapin, V

    2011-01-01

    Hints for a GeV component in the emission from GRBs are known since the EGRET observations during the '90s and they have been recently confirmed by the data of the Fermi satellite. These results have, however, shown that a fully satisfactory interpretative framework of the GRB phenomena is still lacking. The MAGIC telescope opens the possibility to extend the measurement of GRBs in the several tens up to hundreds of GeV energy range. From the theoretical point of view, both leptonic and hadronic processes have been suggested to explain the possible GeV/TeV counterpart of GRBs. Observations with ground-based telescopes of very high energy photons (E>30 GeV) from these sources are going to play a key role in discriminating among the different proposed emission mechanisms which are barely distinguishable at lower energies. MAGIC telescope observations of the GRB090102 (z=1.547) field from 03:14:52 UT to 06:54:01 UT are analyzed to derive upper limits to the GeV/TeV emission. We compare these results to the expec...

  14. GAME: Grb and All-sky Monitor Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Amati, L; Frontera, F; Labanti, C; Feroci, M; Hudec, R; Gomboc, A; Ruffini, R; Santangelo, A; Vacchi, A; Campana, R; Evangelista, Y; Fuschino, F; Salvaterra, R; Stratta, G; Tagliaferri, G; Guidorzi, C; Rosati, P; Titarchuk, L; Penacchioni, A; Izzo, L; Zampa, N; Rodic, T

    2014-01-01

    We describe the GRB and All-sky Monitor Experiment (GAME) mission submitted by a large international collaboration (Italy, Germany, Czech Repubblic, Slovenia, Brazil) in response to the 2012 ESA call for a small mission opportunity for a launch in 2017 and presently under further investigation for subsequent opportunities. The general scientific objective is to perform measurements of key importance for GRB science and to provide the wide astrophysical community of an advanced X-ray all-sky monitoring system. The proposed payload was based on silicon drift detectors (~1-50 keV), CdZnTe (CZT) detectors (~15-200 keV) and crystal scintillators in phoswich (NaI/CsI) configuration (~20 keV-20 MeV), three well established technologies, for a total weight of ~250 kg and a required power of ~240 W. Such instrumentation allows a unique, unprecedented and very powerful combination of large field of view (3-4 sr), a broad energy energy band extending from ~1 keV up to ~20 MeV, an energy resolution as good as ~300 eV in ...

  15. The Energy Dependence of GRB Minimum Variability Timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golkhou, V. Zach; Butler, Nathaniel R.; Littlejohns, Owen M.

    2015-10-01

    We constrain the minimum variability timescales for 938 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed by the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor instrument prior to 2012 July 11. The tightest constraints on progenitor radii derived from these timescales are obtained from light curves in the hardest energy channel. In the softer bands—or from measurements of the same GRBs in the hard X-rays from Swift—we show that variability timescales tend to be a factor of two to three longer. Applying a survival analysis to account for detections and upper limits, we find median minimum timescale in the rest frame for long-duration and short-duration GRBs of 45 and 10 ms, respectively. Less than 10% of GRBs show evidence for variability on timescales below 2 ms. These shortest timescales require Lorentz factors ≳ 400 and imply typical emission radii R≈ 1× {10}14 cm for long-duration GRBs and R≈ 3× {10}13 cm for short-duration GRBs. We discuss implications for the GRB fireball model and investigate whether or not GRB minimum timescales evolve with cosmic time.

  16. The Energy-Dependence of GRB Minimum Variability Timescales

    CERN Document Server

    Golkhou, V Zach; Littlejohns, Owen M

    2015-01-01

    We constrain the minimum variability timescales for 938 GRBs observed by the Fermi/GBM instrument prior to July 11, 2012. The tightest constraints on progenitor radii derived from these timescales are obtained from light curves in the hardest energy channel. In the softer bands -- or from measurements of the same GRBs in the hard X-rays from Swift -- we show that variability timescales tend to be a factor 2--3 longer. Applying a survival analysis to account for detections and upper limits, we find median minimum timescale in the rest frame for long-duration and short-duration GRBs of 45 ms and 10 ms, respectively. Fewer than 10% of GRBs show evidence for variability on timescales below 2 ms. These shortest timescales require Lorentz factors $\\gtrsim 400$ and imply typical emission radii $R \\approx 1 {\\times} 10^{14}$ cm for long-duration GRBs and $R \\approx 3 {\\times} 10^{13}$ cm for short-duration GRBs. We discuss implications for the GRB fireball model and investigate whether GRB minimum timescales evolve w...

  17. The jet and circumburst stellar wind of GRB 980519

    CERN Document Server

    Jaunsen, A O; Björnsson, G; Andersen, M I; Pedersen, H; Kjernsmo, K; Korhonen, H; Sørensen, P M; Palazzi, E

    2001-01-01

    We present extensive multi-colour (UBVR_CI_C) photometry of the optical afterglow of GRB 980519. Upon discovery, 8.3 hours after the burst, the source was decaying as a power law, (t-t_GRB)^alpha, with a rapid decay rate alpha_1 = - 1.73+-0.04. About 13 hours after the burst a steepening of the light-curve to alpha_2 = -2.22+-0.04 was observed. Within the framework of current afterglow models, we argue that the rapid initial decline, the `break' in the light curve, and the spectral properties of the afterglow are best interpreted as being due to a collimated ultra-relativistic jet of fixed opening angle expanding into an inhomogeneous medium. In this scenario, we find that the circumburst medium has a density structure that goes as r^(-2.05+-0.22). This is characteristic of a preexisting wind expelled from a massive star. A possible physical scenario is that the progenitor star collapsed to form a black hole (i.e., a `collapsar'), producing the observed burst and afterglow. However, the supernova signature ex...

  18. A magnetar powering the ordinary monster GRB 130427A?

    CERN Document Server

    Bernardini, M G; Ghisellini, G; D'Avanzo, P; Calderone, G; Covino, S; Cusumano, G; Ghirlanda, G; La Parola, V; Maselli, A; Salvaterra, A Melandri R; Burlon, D; D'Elia, V; Fugazza, D; Sbarufatti, B; Vergani, S D; Tagliaferri, G

    2014-01-01

    We present the analysis of the extraordinarily bright Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) 130427A under the hypothesis that the GRB central engine is an accretion-powered magnetar. In this framework, initially proposed to explain GRBs with precursor activity, the prompt emission is produced by accretion of matter onto a newly-born magnetar, and the observed power is related to the accretion rate. The emission is eventually halted if the centrifugal forces are able to pause accretion. We show that the X-ray and optical afterglow is well explained as the forward shock emission with a jet break plus a contribution from the spin-down of the magnetar. Our modelling does not require any contribution from the reverse shock, that may still influence the afterglow light curve at radio and mm frequencies, or in the optical at early times. We derive the magnetic field ($B\\sim 10^{16}$ G) and the spin period ($P\\sim 20$ ms) of the magnetar and obtain an independent estimate of the minimum luminosity for accretion. This minimum luminos...

  19. Properties of GRB light curves from magnetic reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beniamini, Paz; Granot, Jonathan

    2016-07-01

    The energy dissipation mechanism within gamma-ray burst (GRB) outflows, driving their extremely luminous prompt γ-ray emission is still uncertain. The leading candidates are internal shocks and magnetic reconnection. While the emission from internal shocks has been extensively studied, that from reconnection still has few quantitative predictions. We study the expected prompt-GRB emission from magnetic reconnection and compare its temporal and spectral properties to observations. The main difference from internal shocks is that for reconnection one expects relativistic bulk motions with Lorentz factors Γ'≳ a few in the jet's bulk frame. We consider such motions of the emitting material in two antiparallel directions (e.g. of the reconnecting magnetic-field lines) within an ultrarelativistic (with Γ ≫ 1) thin spherical reconnection layer. The emission's relativistic beaming in the jet's frame greatly affects the light curves. For emission at radii R0 tracking (for Γ' > 2). However, the relativistic turbulence mode is more likely to be relevant for the prompt sub-MeV emission and can naturally account also for the peak luminosity - peak frequency correlation.

  20. Initial Evolution of GRB Jets with Different Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Ken-ichi; Hardee, Phil; Hartmann, Dieter; Niemiec, Jacek; Pohl, Martin; Sol, Helene; Gomez, Jose L.; Nordlund, Aake; Dutan, Ioana; Mizuno, Yosuke; Meli, Athina; Peer, Asaf; Frederiksen, Jacob

    2016-07-01

    In the study of GRB jets one of the key open questions is their interaction with the environment. Here, we study the initial evolution of both electron-proton and electron-positron relativistic jets injected, focusing on their lateral interaction with ambient plasma. We follow the evolution of toroidal magnetic fields generated by both the kinetic Kelvin-Helmholtz (kKH) and Mushroom instabilities (MI). For an electron-proton jet, the induced magnetic field collimates the jet and electrons are perpendicularly accelerated. As the instabilities saturate and subsequently weaken, the magnetic polarity switches from clockwise to counter-clockwise in the middle of jet. For an electron-positron jet, we find strong mixing of electrons and positrons with the ambient plasma, resulting in the creation of a bow shock. The merging of current filaments generates density inhomogeneities which initiate a forward shock. Strong jet ambient plasma mixing prevents a full development of the jet (on the scale studied), revealing evidence for both jet collimation and particle acceleration in the forming bow shock. Differences in the magnetic field structure generated by different jets may contribute to the polarization properties of the observed emission in gamma ray bursts. The different electron acceleration mechanisms in different jets may affect the light-curves in GRB observations.

  1. Variable polarization in the optical afterglow of GRB 021004

    CERN Document Server

    Rol, E; Fynbo, J P U; Hjorth, J; Gorosabel, J; Egholm, M P; Castro-Cerón, J M; Castro-Tirado, A J; Kaper, L; Masetti, N; Palazzi, E; Pian, E; Tanvir, N R; Vreeswijk, P M; Kouveliotou, C; Møller, P; Pedersen, H; Fruchter, A S; Rhoads, J; Burud, I; Salamanca, I; Van den Heuvel, E P J

    2003-01-01

    We present polarimetric observations of the afterglow of gamma-ray burst (GRB) 021004, obtained with the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) and the Very Large Telescope (VLT) between 8 and 17 hours after the burst. Comparison among the observations shows a 45 degree change in the position angle from 9 hours after the burst to 16 hours after the burst, and comparison with published data from later epochs even shows a 90 degree change between 9 and 89 hours after the burst. The degree of linear polarization shows a marginal change, but is also consistent with being constant in time. In the context of currently available models for changes in the polarization of GRBs, a homogeneous jet with an early break time of t_b ~ 1 day provides a good explanation of our data. The break time is a factor 2 to 6 earlier than has been found from the analysis of the optical light curve. The change in the position angle of the polarization rules out a structured jet model for the GRB.

  2. Theory in a Virtual Observatory

    OpenAIRE

    Teuben, Peter; DeYoung, Dave; Hut, Piet; Levy, Stuart; Makino, Jun; McMillan, Steve; Zwart, Simon Portegies; Slavin, Shawn

    2001-01-01

    During the last couple of years, observers have started to make plans for a Virtual Observatory, as a federation of existing data bases, connected through levels of software that enable rapid searches, correlations, and various forms of data mining. We propose to extend the notion of a Virtual Observatory by adding archives of simulations, together with interactive query and visualization capabilities, as well as ways to simulate observations of simulations in order to compare them with obser...

  3. Synthetic aperture radar: principles and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper an introduction to synthetic aperture radar is presented. Synthetic aperture radar is a relatively new remote sensing platform and the technology has matured a lot in the last two decades. This paper introduces the concepts behind SAR principles as well as the major areas where this new technology has shown additional information. (author)

  4. Sofia Observatory Performance and Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temi, Pasquale; Miller, Walter; Dunham, Edward; McLean, Ian; Wolf, Jurgen; Becklin, Eric; Bida, Tom; Brewster, Rick; Casey, Sean; Collins, Peter; Jakob, Holger; Killebrew, Jana; Lampater, Ulrich; Mandushev, Georgi; Marcum, Pamela; Meyer, Allan; Pfueller, Enrico; Reinacher, Andreas; Roeser, Hans-Peter; Savage, Maureen; Teufel, Stefan; Wiedemann, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) has recently concluded a set of engineering flights for Observatory performance evaluation. These in-flight opportunities have been viewed as a first comprehensive assessment of the Observatory's performance and will be used to address the development activity that is planned for 2012, as well as to identify additional Observatory upgrades. A series of 8 SOFIA Characterization And Integration (SCAI) flights have been conducted from June to December 2011. The HIPO science instrument in conjunction with the DSI Super Fast Diagnostic Camera (SFDC) have been used to evaluate pointing stability, including the image motion due to rigid-body and flexible-body telescope modes as well as possible aero-optical image motion. We report on recent improvements in pointing stability by using an Active Mass Damper system installed on Telescope Assembly. Measurements and characterization of the shear layer and cavity seeing, as well as image quality evaluation as a function of wavelength have been performed using the HIPO+FLITECAM Science Instrument configuration (FLIPO). A number of additional tests and measurements have targeted basic Observatory capabilities and requirements including, but not limited to, pointing accuracy, chopper evaluation and imager sensitivity. SCAI activities included in-flight partial Science Instrument commissioning prior to the use of the instruments as measuring engines. This paper reports on the data collected during the SCAI flights and presents current SOFIA Observatory performance and characterization.

  5. LATE-TIME OBSERVATIONS OF GRB 080319B: JET BREAK, HOST GALAXY, AND ACCOMPANYING SUPERNOVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Swift-discovered GRB 080319B was by far the most distant source ever observed at naked-eye brightness, reaching a peak apparent magnitude of 5.3 at a redshift of z = 0.937. We present our late-time optical (Hubble Space Telescope, Gemini, and Very Large Telescope) and X-ray (Chandra) observations, which confirm that an achromatic break occurred in the power-law afterglow light curve at ∼11 days post-burst. This most likely indicates that the gamma-ray burst (GRB) outflow was collimated, which for a uniform jet would imply a total energy in the jet Ejet ∼> 1052 erg. Our observations also show a late-time excess of red light, which is well explained if the GRB was accompanied by a supernova (SN), similar to those seen in some other long-duration GRBs. The latest observations are dominated by light from the host and show that the GRB took place in a faint dwarf galaxy (r(AB) ∼ 27.0, rest frame MB ∼ -17.2). This galaxy is small even by the standards of other GRB hosts, which is suggestive of a low-metallicity environment. Intriguingly, the properties of this extreme event-a small host and bright SN-are entirely typical of the very low luminosity bursts such as GRB 980425 and GRB 060218.

  6. THE DISCOVERY OF VIBRATIONALLY EXCITED H2 IN THE MOLECULAR CLOUD NEAR GRB 080607

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GRB 080607 has provided the first observational signatures of molecular absorption bands toward any galaxy hosting a gamma-ray burst (GRB). Despite the identification of dozens of features as belonging to various atomic and molecular (H2 and CO) carriers, many more absorption features remained unidentified. Here, we report on a search among these features for absorption from vibrationally excited H2, a species that was predicted to be produced by the UV flash of a GRB impinging on a molecular cloud. Following a detailed comparison between our spectroscopy and static, as well as dynamic, models of H2* absorption, we conclude that a column density of 1017.5±0.2 cm-2 of H2* was produced along the line of sight toward GRB 080607. Depending on the assumed amount of dust extinction between the molecular cloud and the GRB, the model distance between the two is found to be in the range 230-940 pc. Such a range is consistent with a conservative lower limit of 100 pc estimated from the presence of Mg I in the same data. These distances show that substantial molecular material is found within hundreds of pc from GRB 080607, part of the distribution of clouds within the GRB host galaxy.

  7. The Pierre Auger project: An observatory for measuring extremely high-energy cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the scientific motivation and conceptual design of the P. Auger Observatory. Two giant ground arrays of water Cerenkov tanks overlooked by fluorescence detectors will cover an area of 3000 km2 each. They will be build in the Southern and Northern hemisphere to provide full sky coverage. The total aperture of 14000 km2sr will allow to study all observable aspects of cosmic rays from below 10 EeV up to arbitrarily high energies with an unprecedented accuracy

  8. Selection of candidate sites for Iranian national observatory by wind-rose studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nasiri

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available   The site selection procedure for optical observatories housing a telescope with a sizeable aperture is described. The theory of seeing is briefly introduced and a special type of seeing monitor that is widely used for seeing measurements is discussed. The results of the meteorological studies mainly based on the wind-rose diagrams are presented. These are done for 31 preliminary selected candidate sites using the data obtained from meteorological synoptic stations during the last 20 years.

  9. Thermal emission by a subwavelength aperture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joulain, Karl; Ezzahri, Younès; Carminati, Rémi

    2016-04-01

    We calculate, by means of fluctuational electrodynamics, the thermal emission of an aperture separating from the outside, vacuum or a material at temperature T. We show that thermal emission is very different whether the aperture size is large or small compared to the thermal wavelength. Subwavelength apertures separating vacuum from the outside have their thermal emission strongly decreased compared to classical blackbodies which have an aperture much larger than the wavelength. A simple expression of their emissivity can be calculated and their total emissive power scales as T8 instead of T4 for large apertures. Thermal emission of disk of materials with a size comparable to the wavelength is also discussed. It is shown in particular that emissivity of such a disk is increased when the material can support surface waves such as phonon polaritons.

  10. Two short bursts originating from different astrophysical systems: the genuine short GRB 090227B and the disguised short GRB 090510 by excess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GRB 090227B and GRB 090510 are two gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) traditionally classified as short bursts. The major outcome of our analysis is that they indeed originate from different systems. In the case of GRB 090227B, from the inferred values of the total energy of the e+e- plasma, Etote+e- = (2.83 ± 0.15) x 1053 erg, the engulfed baryonic mass MB, expressed as B = MBc2 / Etote+e- = (4.1 ± 0.05) x 10-5, and the circumburst medium (CBM) average density, = (1.90 ± 0.20) x 10-5 cm-3, we have assumed the progenitor of this burst to be a symmetric neutron star (NS) merger with masses m = 1.34 M, radii R = 12.24 km, and crustal thicknesses of ∼ 0.47 km. In the case of GRB 090510, we have derived the total plasma energy, Etote+e- = (1.10 ± 0.06) x 1053 erg, the Baryon load, B = (1.45 ± 0.28) x 10-3, and the Lorentz factor at transparency, Γ = (6.7 ± 1.7) x 102, which are characteristic of the long GRB class, as well as a very high CBM density, (1.85 ± 0.14) x 103 cm-3. The joint effect of the high values of Γ and compresses in time and 'inflates' in intensity the extended afterglow, making GRB 090510 appear to be a short burst, which we here define as a 'disguised short GRB by excess', occurring in an overdense region with 103 cm-3.

  11. Evidence for jet launching close to the black hole in GRB 101219B - a Fermi GRB dominated by thermal emission

    CERN Document Server

    Larsson, J; Burgess, J M

    2015-01-01

    We present observations by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) of the nearby (z=0.55) GRB 101219B. This burst is a long GRB, with an associated supernova and with a blackbody component detected in the early afterglow observed by the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT). Here we show that the prompt gamma-ray emission has a blackbody spectrum, making this the second such burst observed by Fermi GBM. The properties of the blackbody, together with the redshift and our estimate of the radiative efficiency, makes it possible to calculate the absolute values of the properties of the outflow. We obtain an initial Lorentz factor Gamma=138\\pm 8, a photospheric radius r_phot=4.4\\pm 1.9 \\times 10^{11} cm and a launch radius r_0=2.7\\pm 1.6 \\times 10^{7} cm. The latter value is close to the event horizon for a stellar-mass black hole and suggests that the jet has a relatively unobstructed path through the star. There is no smooth connection between the blackbody components seen by GBM and XRT, ruling ...

  12. Analysis of GRB 080319B and GRB 050904 within the fireshell model: evidence for a broader spectral energy distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Patricelli, Barbara; Bianco, Carlo Luciano; Caito, Letizia; de Barros, Gustavo; Izzo, Luca; Ruffini, Remo; Vereshchagin, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    (Shortened) GRB080319B, with an isotropic energy E_{iso}=1.32x10^{54}erg, and GRB050904, with E_{iso}=1.04x10^{54}erg, offer the possibility of studying the spectral properties of the prompt radiation of two of the most energetic Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). This allows us to probe the validity of the fireshell model for GRBs beyond 10^{54}erg, well outside the energy range where it has been successfully tested up to now (10^{49}-10^{53}erg). We find that in the low energy region, the prompt emission spectra observed by Swift BAT reveals more power than theoretically predicted. The opportunities offered by these observations to improve the fireshell model are outlined. One of the distinguishing features of the fireshell model is that it relates the observed spectra to the spectrum in the comoving frame of the fireshell. Originally, a fully radiative condition and a comoving thermal spectrum were adopted. An additional power-law in the comoving thermal spectrum is required [...] in the fireshell model for GRBs 080...

  13. The Large Observatory For x-ray Timing

    CERN Document Server

    Feroci, M; Bozzo, E; Barret, D; Brandt, S; Hernanz, M; van der Klis, M; Pohl, M; Santangelo, A; Stella, L; Watts, A; Wilms, J; Zane, S; Ahangarianabhari, M; Albertus, C; Alford, M; Alpar, A; Altamirano, D; Alvarez, L; Amati, L; Amoros, C; Andersson, N; Antonelli, A; Argan, A; Artigue, R; Artigues, B; Atteia, J -L; Azzarello, P; Bakala, P; Baldazzi, G; Balman, S; Barbera, M; van Baren, C; Bhattacharyya, S; Baykal, A; Belloni, T; Bernardini, F; Bertuccio, G; Bianchi, S; Bianchini, A; Binko, P; Blay, P; Bocchino, F; Bodin, P; Bombaci, I; Bidaud, J -M Bonnet; Boutloukos, S; Bradley, L; Braga, J; Brown, E; Bucciantini, N; Burderi, L; Burgay, M; Bursa, M; Budtz-Jørgensen, C; Cackett, E; Cadoux, F R; Cais, P; Caliandro, G A; Campana, R; Campana, S; Capitanio, F; Casares, J; Casella, P; Castro-Tirado, A J; Cavazzuti, E; Cerda-Duran, P; Chakrabarty, D; Château, F; Chenevez, J; Coker, J; Cole, R; Collura, A; Cornelisse, R; Courvoisier, T; Cros, A; Cumming, A; Cusumano, G; D'Aì, A; D'Elia, V; Del Monte, E; De Luca, A; De Martino, D; Dercksen, J P C; De Pasquale, M; De Rosa, A; Del Santo, M; Di Cosimo, S; Diebold, S; Di Salvo, T; 1), I Donnarumma; (32), A Drago; (33), M Durant; (107), D Emmanoulopoulos; (135), M H Erkut; (85), P Esposito; (1, Y Evangelista; 1b),; (24), A Fabian; (34), M Falanga; (25), Y Favre; (35), C Feldman; (128), V Ferrari; (3), C Ferrigno; (133), M Finger; (36), M H Finger; (35, G W Fraser; +),; (2), M Frericks; (7), F Fuschino; (125), M Gabler; (37), D K Galloway; (6), J L Galvez Sanchez; (6), E Garcia-Berro; (10), B Gendre; (62), S Gezari; (39), A B Giles; (40), M Gilfanov; (10), P Giommi; (102), G Giovannini; (102), M Giroletti; (4), E Gogus; (105), A Goldwurm; (86), K Goluchová; (16), D Götz; (16), C Gouiffes; (56), M Grassi; (42), P Groot; (17), M Gschwender; (128), L Gualtieri; (32), C Guidorzi; (3), L Guy; (2), D Haas; (50), P Haensel; (29), M Hailey; (19), F Hansen; (42), D H Hartmann; (43), C A Haswell; (88), K Hebeler; (37), A Heger; (2), W Hermsen; (28), J Homan; (19), A Hornstrup; (23, R Hudec; 72),; (45), J Huovelin; (5), A Ingram; (2), J J M in't Zand; (27), G Israel; (20), K Iwasawa; (47), L Izzo; (2), H M Jacobs; (17), F Jetter; (118, T Johannsen; 127),; (2), P Jonker; (126), J Josè; (49), P Kaaret; (123), G Kanbach; (23), V Karas; (6), D Karelin; (29), D Kataria; (49), L Keek; (29), T Kennedy; (17), D Klochkov; (50), W Kluzniak; (17), K Kokkotas; (45), S Korpela; (51), C Kouveliotou; (87), I Kreykenbohm; (2), L M Kuiper; (19), I Kuvvetli; (7), C Labanti; (52), D Lai; (53), F K Lamb; (2), P P Laubert; (105), F Lebrun; (8), D Lin; (29), D Linder; (54), G Lodato; (55), F Longo; (19), N Lund; (131), T J Maccarone; (14), D Macera; (8), S Maestre; (62), S Mahmoodifar; (17), D Maier; (56), P Malcovati; (120), I Mandel; (144), V Mangano; (50), A Manousakis; (7), M Marisaldi; (109), A Markowitz; (35), A Martindale; (59), G Matt; (107), I M McHardy; (60), A Melatos; (61), M Mendez; (85), S Mereghetti; (68), M Michalska; (20), S Migliari; (85, R Mignani; 108),; (62), M C Miller; (49), J M Miller; (57), T Mineo; (112), G Miniutti; (64), S Morsink; (65), C Motch; (13), S Motta; (66), M Mouchet; (8), G Mouret; (19), J Mulačová; (1, F Muleri; (140), T Muñoz-Darias; (95), I Negueruela; (28), J Neilsen; (43), A J Norton; (28), M Nowak; (35), P O'Brien; (19), P E H Olsen; (102), M Orienti; (99, M Orio; 110),; (7), M Orlandini; (68), P Orleanski; (35), J P Osborne; (69), R Osten; (70), F Ozel; (1, L Pacciani; (119), M Paolillo; (6), A Papitto; (20), J M Paredes; (83, A Patruno; 141),; (71), B Paul; (17), E Perinati; (115), A Pellizzoni; (47), A V Penacchioni; (136), M A Perez; (72), V Petracek; (10), C Pittori; (95), J Pons; (6), J Portell; (115), A Possenti; (73), J Poutanen; (122), M Prakash; (16), P Le Provost; (70), D Psaltis; (8), D Rambaud; (8), P Ramon; (76), G Ramsay; (1, M Rapisarda; (77), A Rachevski; (77), I Rashevskaya; (78), P S Ray; (6), N Rea; (80), S Reddy; (113, P Reig; 81),; (63), M Reina Aranda; (28), R Remillard; (62), C Reynolds; (124), L Rezzolla; (20), M Ribo; (2), R de la Rie; (115), A Riggio; (138), A Rios; (82, P Rodríguez- Gil; 104),; (16), J Rodriguez; (3), R Rohlfs; (57), P Romano; (83), E M R Rossi; (50), A Rozanska; (29), A Rousseau; (84), F Ryde; (63), L Sabau-Graziati; (6), G Sala; (85), R Salvaterra; (61), A Sanna; (134), J Sandberg; (130), S Scaringi; (16), S Schanne; (86), J Schee; (87), C Schmid; (117), S Shore; (27), R Schneider; (88), A Schwenk; (89), A D Schwope; (114), J -Y Seyler; (90), A Shearer; (29), A Smith; (58), D M Smith; (29), P J Smith; (23), V Sochora; (1), P Soffitta; (61), P Soleri; (29), A Spencer; (91), B Stappers; (80), A W Steiner; (92), N Stergioulas; (10), G Stratta; (93), T E Strohmayer; (86), Z Stuchlik; (17), S Suchy; (17), V Sulemainov; (94), T Takahashi; (15), F Tamburini; (129), T Tauris; (17), C Tenzer; (6), L Tolos; (62), F Tombesi; (121), J Tomsick; (86), G Torok; (95), J M Torrejon; (96), D F Torres; (3), A Tramacere; (1), A Trois; (15), R Turolla; (101), S Turriziani; (17), P Uter; (5), P Uttley; (77), A Vacchi; (105), P Varniere; (35), S Vaughan; (57), S Vercellone; (97), V Vrba; (29), D Walton; (94), S Watanabe; (68), R Wawrzaszek; (8), N Webb; (28), N Weinberg; (17), H Wende; (98), P Wheatley; (5), R Wijers; (5), R Wijnands; (87), M Wille; (44), C A Wilson-Hodge; (29), B Winter; (78), K Wood; (77), G Zampa; (77), N Zampa; (99), L Zampieri; (50), L Zdunik; (50), A Zdziarski; (100), B Zhang; (2), F Zwart; (142), M Ayre; (142), T Boenke; (142), C Corral van Damme; (143), E Kuulkers; (, D Lumb (142); IAPS-INAF,; Rome,; Italy,; INFN,; Vergata, Sez Roma Tor; SRON,; Netherlands, The; ISDC,; University, Geneve; Switzerland,; University, Sabanci; Istanbul,; Turkey,; Pannekoek, Astronomical Institute Anton; Amsterdam, University of; IEEC-CSIC-UPC-UB,; Barcelona,; Spain,; INAF-IASF-Bologna,; IRAP,; Toulouse,; France,; Physical, Faculty of; Sciences, Applied; Southampton, University of; Kingdom, United; ASDC,; University, Middle East Technical; 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Garching,; Germany,; Physics, Max Planck Institute for Gravitational; Valencia, University of; Catalonia, Technical University of; Barcelona,; Physics, Department of; Waterloo, University of; University, Sapienza; Rome,; Astronomie, Argelander-Institut für; Bonn,; Leuven, Institute for Astronomy K U; Leuven,; Belgium,; University, Texas Tech; Research, Tata Institute of Fundamental; Mumbai,; India,; Prague, Charles University in; Republic, Czech; Consulting, Jorgen Sandberg; Denmark,; University, Istanbul Kültür; Turkey,; Salamanca, Facultad de Ciencias-Trilingüe University of; de Granada, Universidad; Surrey, University of; University, Washington; University, Oxford; ASTRON,; Netherlands, The; Agency, European Space; ESTEC,; Centre, European Space Astronomy; Madrid,; University, The Pennsylvania State; States), United

    2014-01-01

    The Large Observatory For x-ray Timing (LOFT) was studied within ESA M3 Cosmic Vision framework and participated in the final down-selection for a launch slot in 2022-2024. Thanks to the unprecedented combination of effective area and spectral resolution of its main instrument, LOFT will study the behaviour of matter under extreme conditions, such as the strong gravitational field in the innermost regions of accretion flows close to black holes and neutron stars, and the supra-nuclear densities in the interior of neutron stars. The science payload is based on a Large Area Detector (LAD, 10 m 2 effective area, 2-30 keV, 240 eV spectral resolution, 1 deg collimated field of view) and a WideField Monitor (WFM, 2-50 keV, 4 steradian field of view, 1 arcmin source location accuracy, 300 eV spectral resolution). The WFM is equipped with an on-board system for bright events (e.g. GRB) localization. The trigger time and position of these events are broadcast to the ground within 30 s from discovery. In this paper we ...

  14. GRB Follow-up Observations with the Whipple Telescope and VERITAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GRB observations above 100 GeV promise to constrain source models decisively and may also permit to study questions in other fields such as quantum gravity. The VERITAS collaboration has been working on GRB follow-up observations for several years using the Whipple 10 m telescope on Mt. Hopkins, AZ. We present a preliminary summary of the bursts for which interesting data is available. Even though the telescope mount was not optimized for this task, GRB follow-ups within less than 5 minutes have been possible. The new telescopes of the VERITAS array (under construction) will bring a further reduction in reaction time and an improvement in sensitivity

  15. Unusual Central Engine Activity in the Double Burst GRB 110709B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin-Bin; Burrows, David N.; Zhang, Bing; Meszaros, Peter; Stratta, Giulia; D'Elia, Valerio; Frederiks, Dmitry; Golenetskii, S.; Cummings, Jay R.; Wang, Xiang-Yu; Falcone, Abraham D.; Barthelmy, Scott D.; Gehrels, Neil

    2011-01-01

    The double burst, GRB 110709B, triggered Swift/BAT twice at 21:32:39 UT and 21:43:45 UT, respectively, on 9 July 2011. This is the first time we observed a GRB with two BAT triggers. In this paper, we present simultaneous Swift and Konus-WIND observations of this unusual GRB and its afterglow. If the two events are from the same physical origin, their different time-dependent spectral evolution suggest they must belong to different episodes of the central engine, which may be a magnetar-to-BH accretion system.

  16. The Carl Sagan solar and stellar observatories as remote observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saucedo-Morales, J.; Loera-Gonzalez, P.

    In this work we summarize recent efforts made by the University of Sonora, with the goal of expanding the capability for remote operation of the Carl Sagan Solar and Stellar Observatories, as well as the first steps that have been taken in order to achieve autonomous robotic operation in the near future. The solar observatory was established in 2007 on the university campus by our late colleague A. Sánchez-Ibarra. It consists of four solar telescopes mounted on a single equatorial mount. On the other hand, the stellar observatory, which saw the first light on 16 February 2010, is located 21 km away from Hermosillo, Sonora at the site of the School of Agriculture of the University of Sonora. Both observatories can now be remotely controlled, and to some extent are able to operate autonomously. In this paper we discuss how this has been accomplished in terms of the use of software as well as the instruments under control. We also briefly discuss the main scientific and educational objectives, the future plans to improve the control software and to construct an autonomous observatory on a mountain site, as well as the opportunities for collaborations.

  17. GRB hosts through cosmic time - VLT/X-shooter emission-line spectroscopy of 96 GRB-selected galaxies at 0.1 < z < 3.6

    CERN Document Server

    Krühler, T; Fynbo, J P U; Hartoog, O E; Hjorth, J; Jakobsson, P; Perley, D A; Rossi, A; Schady, P; Schulze, S; Tanvir, N R; Vergani, S D; Wiersema, K; Afonso, P M J; Bolmer, J; Cano, Z; Covino, S; D'Elia, V; Postigo, A de Ugarte; Filgas, R; Friis, M; Graham, J F; Greiner, J; Goldoni, P; Gomboc, A; Hammer, F; Japelj, J; Kann, D A; Kaper, L; Klose, S; Levan, A J; Leloudas, G; Milvang-Jensen, B; Guelbenzu, A Nicuesa; Palazzi, E; Pian, E; Piranomonte, S; Sanchez-Ramirez, R; Savaglio, S; Selsing, J; Tagliaferri, G; Vreeswijk, P M; Watson, D J; Xu, D

    2015-01-01

    We present data and initial results from VLT/X-shooter emission-line spectroscopy of 96 GRB-selected galaxies at 0.1GRB host spectroscopy available to date. The majority of our GRBs was detected by Swift and 76% are at 0.5GRB hosts with redshift. The median SFR, for example, increases from ~0.6 M_sun/yr at z~0.6 up to ~15 M_sun/yr at z~2. A higher ratio of [OIII]/[OII] at higher redshifts leads to an increasing distance of GRB-selected galaxies to the locus of local galaxies in the BPT diagram. Oxygen abundances of the galaxies are distributed between 12+log(O/H)=7.9 and 12+log(O/H)=9.0 with a median of 12+log(O/H)~8.5. The fraction of GRB-selected galaxies with super-solar metallic...

  18. REM observations of GRB060418 and GRB060607A: the onset of the afterglow and the initial fireball Lorentz factor determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Context. Gamma-ray burst (GRB) emission is believed to originate in highly relativistic fireballs. Aims. Currently, only lower limits were securely set to the initial fireball Lorentz factor Γ0. We aim to provide a direct measure of Γ0. Methods. The early-time afterglow light curve carries information about Γ0, which determines the time of the afterglow peak. We have obtained early observations of the near-infrared afterglows of GRB060418 and GRB060607A with the REM robotic telescope. Results. For both events, the afterglow peak could be clearly singled out, allowing a firm determination of the fireball Lorentz of Γ0 similar to 400, fully confirming the highly relativistic nature of GRB fireballs. The deceleration radius was inferred to be R-dec approximate to 1017 cm. This is much larger than the internal shocks radius (believed to power the prompt emission), thus providing further evidence for a different origin of the prompt and afterglow stages of the GRB. (authors)

  19. REM observations of GRB060418 and GRB060607A: the onset of the afterglow and the initial fireball Lorentz factor determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molinari, E.; Covino, S.; D' Avanzo, P.; Chincarini, G.; Zerbi, F.M.; Conconi, P.; Malaspina, G.; Campana, S.; Rizzuto, D.; Tagliaferri, G. [Osserv Astron Brera, INAF, I-23807 Merate, LC, (Italy); Vergani, S.D.; Meurs, E.J.A.; Ward, P.A. [DIAS, Dunsink Observ, Dublin 15, (Ireland); Vergani, S.D.; Norci, L. [Dublin City Univ, Sch Phys Sci, NCPST, Dublin 9, (Ireland); Malesani, D. [SISSA, ISAS, I-34014 Trieste, (Italy); Malesani, D. [Univ Copenhagen, Niels Bohr Inst, Dark Cosmol Ctr, DK-2100 Copenhagen, (Denmark); D' Avanzo, P. [Univ Insubria, Dipartimento Matemat and Fis, I-22100 Como, (Italy); Chincarini, G.; Rizzuto, D. [Univ Milan, I-20126 Milan, (Italy); Antonelli, L.A.; Testa, V.; Vitali, F.; D' Alessio, F.; Guetta, D.; Piranomonte, S.; Stella, L. [Osserv Astron Roma, INAF, I-00040 Monte Porzio Catone, (Italy); Tosti, G. [Univ Perugia, Dipartimento Fis, Osservatorio Astron, I-06123 Perugia, (Italy); Nicastro, L.; Palazzi, E.; Masetti, N. [IASF Bologna, INAF, I-40129 Bologna, (Italy); Goldoni, P. [APC, Lab Astroparticule and Cosmol, UMR 7164, F-75231 Paris 05, (France); Goldoni, P. [CEA Saclay, DSM, DAPNIA, Serv Astrophys, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France)] (and others)

    2007-07-01

    Context. Gamma-ray burst (GRB) emission is believed to originate in highly relativistic fireballs. Aims. Currently, only lower limits were securely set to the initial fireball Lorentz factor {gamma}{sub 0}. We aim to provide a direct measure of {gamma}{sub 0}. Methods. The early-time afterglow light curve carries information about {gamma}{sub 0}, which determines the time of the afterglow peak. We have obtained early observations of the near-infrared afterglows of GRB060418 and GRB060607A with the REM robotic telescope. Results. For both events, the afterglow peak could be clearly singled out, allowing a firm determination of the fireball Lorentz of {gamma}{sub 0} similar to 400, fully confirming the highly relativistic nature of GRB fireballs. The deceleration radius was inferred to be R-dec approximate to 10{sup 17} cm. This is much larger than the internal shocks radius (believed to power the prompt emission), thus providing further evidence for a different origin of the prompt and afterglow stages of the GRB. (authors)

  20. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Microscopy (ISAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adie, Steven G.; Shemonski, Nathan D.; Ralston, Tyler S.; Carney, P. Scott; Boppart, Stephen A.

    The trade-off between transverse resolution and depth-of-field, and the mitigation of optical aberrations, are long-standing problems in optical imaging. The deleterious impact of these problems on three-dimensional tomography increases with numerical aperture (NA), and so they represent a significant impediment for real-time cellular resolution tomography over the typical imaging depths achieved with OCT. With optical coherence microscopy (OCM), which utilizes higher-NA optics than OCT, the depth-of-field is severely reduced, and it has been postulated that aberrations play a major role in reducing the useful imaging depth in OCM. Even at lower transverse resolution, both these phenomena produce artifacts that degrade the imaging of fine tissue structures. Early approaches to the limited depth-of-field problem in time-domain OCT utilized dynamic focusing. In spectral-domain OCT, this focus-shifting approach to data acquisition leads to long acquisition times and large datasets. Adaptive optics (AO) has been utilized to correct optical aberrations, in particular for retinal OCT, but in addition to requiring elaborate and expensive setups, the real-time optimization requirements at the time of imaging, and the correction of spatially varying effects of aberrations throughout an imaged volume, remain as significant challenges. This chapter presents computed imaging solutions for the reconstruction of sample structure when imaging with ideal and aberrated Gaussian beams.

  1. On the sensitivity of the HAWC observatory to gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Abeysekara, A U; Aguilar, S; Alfaro, R; Almaraz, E; Álvarez, C; Álvarez-Romero, J de D; Álvarez, M; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Badillo, C; Barber, A; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Belmont, E; Benítez, E; BenZvi, S Y; Berley, D; Bernal, A; Bonamente, E; Braun, J; Caballero-Lopez, R; Cabrera, I; Carramiñana, A; Carrasco, L; Castillo, M; Chambers, L; Conde, R; Condreay, P; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; D'Olivo, J C; de la Fuente, E; De León, C; Delay, S; Delepine, D; DeYoung, T; Diaz, L; Diaz-Cruz, L; Dingus, B L; Duvernois, M A; Edmunds, D; Ellsworth, R W; Fick, B; Fiorino, D W; Flandes, A; Fraija, N I; Galindo, A; García-Luna, J L; García-Torales, G; Garfias, F; González, L X; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Grabski, V; Gussert, M; Guzmán-Ceron, C; Hampel-Arias, Z; Harris, T; Hays, E; Hernandez-Cervantes, L; Hüntemeyer, P H; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Jimenez, J J; Karn, P; Kelley-Hoskins, N; Kieda, D; Langarica, R; Lara, A; Lauer, R; Lee, W H; Linares, E C; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-García, R; Martínez, H; Martínez, J; Martínez, L A; Martínez, O; Martínez-Castro, J; Martos, M; Matthews, J; McEnery, J E; Medina-Tanco, G; Mendoza-Torres, J E; Miranda-Romagnoli, P A; Montaruli, T; Moreno, E; Mostafa, M; Napsuciale, M; Nava, J; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T; Tapia, A Olmos; Orozco, V; Pérez, V; Pérez-Pérez, E G; Perkins, J S; Pretz, J; Ramirez, C; Ramírez, I; Rebello, D; Rentería, A; Reyes, J; Rosa-González, D; Rosado, A; Ryan, J M; Sacahui, J R; Salazar, H; Salesa, F; Sandoval, A; Santos, E; Schneider, M; Shoup, A; Silich, S; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sparks, K; Springer, W; Suárez, F; Suarez, N; Taboada, I; Tellez, A F; Tenorio-Tagle, G; Tepe, A; Toale, P A; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Valdes-Galicia, J; Vanegas, P; Vasileiou, V; Vázquez, O; Vázquez, X; Villaseñor, L; Wall, W; Walters, J S; Warner, D; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A

    2011-01-01

    We present the sensitivity of HAWC to Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). HAWC is a very high-energy gamma-ray observatory currently under construction in Mexico at an altitude of 4100 m. It will observe atmospheric air showers via the water Cherenkov method. HAWC will consist of 300 large water tanks instrumented with 4 photomultipliers each. HAWC has two data acquisition (DAQ) systems. The main DAQ system reads out coincident signals in the tanks and reconstructs the direction and energy of individual atmospheric showers. The scaler DAQ counts the hits in each photomultiplier tube (PMT) in the detector and searches for a statistical excess over the noise of all PMTs. We show that HAWC has a realistic opportunity to observe the high-energy power law components of GRBs that extend at least up to 30 GeV, as it has been observed by Fermi LAT. The two DAQ systems have an energy threshold that is low enough to observe events similar to GRB 090510 and GRB 090902b with the characteristics observed by Fermi LAT. HAWC will prov...

  2. Fast Parametric Beamformer for Synthetic Aperture Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Tomov, Borislav Gueorguiev

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a real-time delay-and-sum synthetic aperture beamformer. The beamforming delays and apodization coefficients are described parametrically. The image is viewed as a set of independent lines that are defined in 3-D by their origin, direction, and...... implementation of the beamformer is optimized with respect to the architecture of a novel synthetic aperture real-time ultrasound scanner (SARUS), in which 4 channels are processed by the same set of field-programmable gate arrays (FPGA). In synthetic transmit aperture imaging, low-resolution images are formed...

  3. Search for strong gravitational lensing effect in the current GRB data of BATSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, ChunYu; Li, LiXin

    2014-08-01

    Because gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) trace the high- z universe, there is an appreciable probability for a GRB to be gravitational lensed by galaxies in the universe. Herein we consider the gravitational lensing effect of GRBs contributed by the dark matter halos in galaxies. Assuming that all halos have the singular isothermal sphere (SIS) mass profile in the mass range 1010 h -1 M ⊙ distribution and luminosity function derived from the Swift LGRBs sample, we calculated the gravitational lensing probability in BATSE, Swift/BAT and Fermi/GBM GRBs, respectively. With an derived probability result in BATSE GRBs, we searched for lensed GRB pairs in the BATSE5B GRB Spectral catalog. The search did not find any convincing gravitationally lensed events. We discuss our result and future observations for GRB lensing observation.

  4. Afterglow from GRB 070610/Swift J195509.6+261406:An explanation using the fireball model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    GRB 070610,which is also named Swift J195509.6+261406,is a peculiar Galactic transient with significant variability on short timescales in both X-ray and optical light curves.One possible explanation is that GRB 070610/Swift J195509.6 + 261406 is a soft gamma-ray repeater(SGR) in our Galaxy.Here,we use the fireball model,which is usually recognized as the standard model of gamma-ray burst(GRB) afterglows,and the energy injection hypothesis to interpret the X-ray and optical afterglow light curves of GRB 070610/Swift J195509.6 + 261406.It is found that the model is generally consistent with observations.

  5. FERMI OBSERVATIONS OF HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM GRB 080825C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has opened a new high-energy window in the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Here we present a thorough analysis of GRB 080825C, which triggered the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), and was the first firm detection of a GRB by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). We discuss the LAT event selections, background estimation, significance calculations, and localization for Fermi GRBs in general and GRB 080825C in particular. We show the results of temporal and time-resolved spectral analysis of the GBM and LAT data. We also present some theoretical interpretation of GRB 080825C observations as well as some common features observed in other LAT GRBs.

  6. Detectability of gravitational wave bursts from a class of neutron star starquake GRB models

    CERN Document Server

    Horváth, J E

    1995-01-01

    A large class of gamma-ray burst (GRB) models (overwhelming until recently) involve the release of energy in a neutron star quake. Even though the extreme isotropy of the GRB sky established by the BATSE experiment has now shifted the interest to cosmological models, the former starquake scenarios are still attractive and may naturally produce a gravitational wave burst that carries most of the released energy. We discuss the prospects for detection of these high-frequency bursts by the forthcoming interferometers and spheroidal antennas, emphasizing the most recent results on the distribution and nature of GRB sources. We find that, even if the overall picture is correct, the positive detection of GRB-associated gravitational wave bursts is unlikely and therefore these events will not be a prime target for the detectors.

  7. Implications of Lag-Luminosity Relationship for Unified GRB Paradigms

    CERN Document Server

    Norris, J P

    2002-01-01

    Spectral lags are deduced for 1437 long GRBs with peak fluxes extending to near the BATSE trigger threshold. The lags are modeled to approximate the observed distribution in the peak flux-lag plane, realizing a noise-free representation. Assuming a two-branch lag-luminosity relationship, the lags are self- consistently corrected for cosmological effects to yield distributions in luminosity, distance, and redshift. The results have several consequences for GRB populations -- including a possible nearby subpopulation of low-luminosity, long-lag GRBs -- and for unified gamma-ray/afterglow scenarios which would account for afterglow break times and gamma-ray spectral evolution in terms of jet opening angle, viewing angle, or a profiled jet with variable Lorentz factor.

  8. GRB 060206: Evidence of Precession of Central Engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high-redshift (z = 4.048) gamma-ray burst GRB 060206 showed unusual behavior, with a significant re-brightening about 3000 s after the burst. We assume that the central engine became active again 2000 s after the main burst and drove another more collimated off-axis jet. The two jets both interacted with the ambient medium and contributed to the whole emission. We numerically fit this optical afterglow from the two jets using the forward-shock model and the forward-reverse shock model. Combining with the zero time effect, we suggest that the fast rise at ∼3000 s in the afterglow was due to the off-axis emission from the second jet. The precession of the torus or accretion disk of the gamma ray burst engine is the natural explanation for the symmetry axes of these two jets not to lie on the same line

  9. GRB production and SN signatures in slowly rotating collapsars

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez-Camara, Diego; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2008-01-01

    We consider accretion onto newborn black holes following the collapse of rotating massive stellar cores, at the threshold where a centrifugally supported disk gives way to nearly radial inflow for low angular momentum. For realistic initial conditions taken from pre-supernova evolution calculations, the densities and temperatures involved require the use of a detailed equation of state and neutrino cooling processes, as well as a qualitative consideration of the effects of General Relativity. Through two-dimensional dynamical calculations we show how the energy release is affected by the rotation rate and the strength of angular momentum transport, giving rise to qualitatively different solutions in limits of high and low angular momentum, each being capable of powering a GRB. We explore the likelihood of producing Fe-group elements in the two regimes and suggest that while large and massive centrifugally supported disks are capable of driving strong outflows with a possible SN-like signature, quasi-radial fl...

  10. Evidence for TeV Emission from GRB 970417a

    CERN Document Server

    Atkins, R; Berley, D; Chen, M L; Coyne, D G; Dingus, B L; Dorfan, D E; Ellsworth, R W; Evans, D; Falcone, A D; Fleysher, L; Fleysher, R; Gisler, G; Goodman, J A; Haines, T J; Hoffman, C M; Hugenberger, S; Kelley, L A; Leonor, I; McConnell, M; McCullough, J F; McEnery, J E; Miller, R S; Mincer, A I; Morales, M F; Némethy, P; Ryan, J M; Shen, B; Shoup, A L; Sinnis, C; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Tümer, T O; Wang, K; Wascko, M O; Westerhoff, S; Williams, D A; Yang, T; Yodh, G B

    2000-01-01

    Milagrito, a detector sensitive to very high energy gamma rays, monitored the northern sky from February 1997 through May 1998. With a large field of view and a high duty cycle, this instrument was well suited to perform a search for TeV gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We report on a search made for TeV counterparts to GRBs observed by BATSE. BATSE detected 54 GRBs within the field of view of Milagrito during this period. An excess of events coincident in time and space with one of these bursts, GRB 970417a, was observed by Milagrito. The excess has a chance probability of $2.8 \\times 10^{-5}$ of being a fluctuation of the background. The probability for observing an excess at least this large from any of the 54 bursts is $1.5 \\times 10^{-3}$. No significant correlations were detected from the other bursts.

  11. Theory in a Virtual Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Teuben, P; Hut, P; Levy, S; Makino, J; McMillan, S; Zwart, S P; Slavin, S D; Teuben, Peter; Young, Dave De; Hut, Piet; Levy, Stuart; Makino, Jun; Millan, Steve Mc; Zwart, Simon Portegies; Slavin, Shawn

    2001-01-01

    During the last couple of years, observers have started to make plans for a Virtual Observatory, as a federation of existing data bases, connected through levels of software that enable rapid searches, correlations, and various forms of data mining. We propose to extend the notion of a Virtual Observatory by adding archives of simulations, together with interactive query and visualization capabilities, as well as ways to simulate observations of simulations in order to compare them with observations. For this purpose, we have already organized two small workshops, earlier in 2001, in Tucson and Aspen. We have also provided concrete examples of theory data, designed to be federated with a Virtual Observatory. These data stem from a project to construct an archive for our large-scale simulations using the GRAPE-6 (a 32-Teraflops special purpose computer for stellar dynamics). We are constructing interfaces by which remote observers can observe these simulations. In addition, these data will enable detailed comp...

  12. A high-content imaging workflow to study Grb2 signaling complexes by expression cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Jamie; Kriston-Vizi, Janos; Seed, Brian; Ketteler, Robin

    2012-01-01

    Signal transduction by growth factor receptors is essential for cells to maintain proliferation and differentiation and requires tight control. Signal transduction is initiated by binding of an external ligand to a transmembrane receptor and activation of downstream signaling cascades. A key regulator of mitogenic signaling is Grb2, a modular protein composed of an internal SH2 (Src Homology 2) domain flanked by two SH3 domains that lacks enzymatic activity. Grb2 is constitutively associated with the GTPase Son-Of-Sevenless (SOS) via its N-terminal SH3 domain. The SH2 domain of Grb2 binds to growth factor receptors at phosphorylated tyrosine residues thus coupling receptor activation to the SOS-Ras-MAP kinase signaling cascade. In addition, other roles for Grb2 as a positive or negative regulator of signaling and receptor endocytosis have been described. The modular composition of Grb2 suggests that it can dock to a variety of receptors and transduce signals along a multitude of different pathways(1-3). Described here is a simple microscopy assay that monitors recruitment of Grb2 to the plasma membrane. It is adapted from an assay that measures changes in sub-cellular localization of green-fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged Grb2 in response to a stimulus(4-6). Plasma membrane receptors that bind Grb2 such as activated Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) recruit GFP-Grb2 to the plasma membrane upon cDNA expression and subsequently relocate to endosomal compartments in the cell. In order to identify in vivo protein complexes of Grb2, this technique can be used to perform a genome-wide high-content screen based on changes in Grb2 sub-cellular localization. The preparation of cDNA expression clones, transfection and image acquisition are described in detail below. Compared to other genomic methods used to identify protein interaction partners, such as yeast-two-hybrid, this technique allows the visualization of protein complexes in mammalian cells at the sub

  13. Jet or Shock Breakout? The Low-Luminosity GRB 060218

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Christopher M.; Chevalier, Roger A.

    2016-05-01

    We consider a model for the low-luminosity gamma-ray burst GRB 060218 that plausibly accounts for multiwavelength observations to day 20. The model components are: (1) a long-lived (tj ˜ 3000 s) central engine and accompanying low-luminosity (Lj ˜ 1047 erg s-1), mildly relativistic (γ ˜ 10) jet; (2) a low-mass (˜4 × 10-3M⊙) envelope surrounding the progenitor star; and (3) a modest amount of dust (AV ˜ 0.1 mag) in the circumstellar or interstellar environment. Blackbody emission from the transparency radius in a low-power jet outflow can fit the prompt thermal X-ray emission, and the nonthermal X-rays and γ-rays may be produced via Compton scattering of thermal photons from hot leptons in the jet interior or the external shocks. The later mildly relativistic phase of this outflow can produce the radio emission via synchrotron radiation from the forward shock. Meanwhile, interaction of the associated SN 2006aj with a circumstellar envelope extending to ˜1013 cm can explain the early optical emission. The X-ray afterglow can be interpreted as a light echo of the prompt emission from dust at ˜30 pc. Our model is a plausible alternative to that of Nakar, who recently proposed shock breakout of a jet smothered by an extended envelope as the source of prompt emission. Both our results and Nakar's suggest that bursts such as GRB 060218 may originate from unusual progenitors with extended circumstellar envelopes, and that a jet is necessary to decouple the prompt emission from the supernova.

  14. Jet or shock breakout? The low-luminosity GRB 060218

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Christopher M.; Chevalier, Roger A.

    2016-08-01

    We consider a model for the low-luminosity gamma-ray burst GRB 060218 that plausibly accounts for multiwavelength observations to day 20. The model components are: (1) a long-lived (tj ˜ 3000 s) central engine and accompanying low-luminosity (Lj ˜ 1047 erg s-1), mildly relativistic (γ ˜ 10) jet; (2) a low-mass (˜4 × 10-3 M⊙) envelope surrounding the progenitor star; and (3) a modest amount of dust (AV ˜ 0.1 mag) in the circumstellar or interstellar environment. Blackbody emission from the transparency radius in a low-power jet outflow can fit the prompt thermal X-ray emission, and the non-thermal X-rays and gamma-rays may be produced via Compton scattering of thermal photons from hot leptons in the jet interior or the external shocks. The later mildly relativistic phase of this outflow can produce the radio emission via synchrotron radiation from the forward shock. Meanwhile, interaction of the associated SN 2006aj with a circumstellar envelope extending to ˜1013 cm can explain the early optical emission. The X-ray afterglow can be interpreted as a light echo of the prompt emission from dust at ˜30 pc. Our model is a plausible alternative to that of Nakar, who recently proposed shock breakout of a jet smothered by an extended envelope as the source of prompt emission. Both our results and Nakar's suggest that bursts such as GRB 060218 may originate from unusual progenitors with extended circumstellar envelopes, and that a jet is necessary to decouple the prompt emission from the supernova.

  15. The digitisation of observatory magnetograms

    OpenAIRE

    Clarke, Ellen; Flower, Simon; Humphries, Thomas; Hussey, John; McIntosh, Robert; MacTaggart, Fergus; McIntyre, Brian; Owenson, Nicola; Henderson, Keith; Mann, Elizabeth; MacKenzie, Kenneth; Piper, Simon; Wilson, Louise; Gillanders, Richard; Kilpatrick, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Long running magnetic observatories are extremely important for studies of the Earth’s magnetic field. They are used to model and study the core field and it’s secular variation and are important for studies of the solar driven regular and irregular short-term variations in the geomagnetic field. For investigations into changes to the character of these variations over decades to centuries, data sets of most value are those that can be derived from the longest running series of observatories....

  16. ATLAST-9.2m: a Large-Aperture Deployable Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oergerle, William; Feinberg, Lee D.; Purves, Lloyd R.; Hyde, T. Tupper; Thronson, Harley A.; Townsend, Jacqueline A.; Postman, Marc; Bolear, Matthew R.; Budinoff, Jason G.; Dean, Bruce H.; Clampin, Mark C.; Ebbets, Dennis C.; Gong, Qian; Gull, Theodore R.; Howard, Joseph M.; Jones, Andrew L.; Lyon, Richard G.; Pasquale, Bert A.; Perrygo, Charles; Smith, Jeffrey S.; Thompson, Patrick L.; Woodgate, Bruce E.

    2010-01-01

    We present results of a study of a deployable version of the Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST), designed to operate in a Sun-Earth L2 orbit. The primary mirror of the segmented 9.2-meter aperture has 36 hexagonal 1.315 m (flat to flat) glass mirrors. The architecture and folding of the telescope is similar to JWST, allowing it to fit into the 6.5 m fairing of a modest upgrade to the Delta-IV Heavy version of the Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV). We discuss the overall observatory design, optical design, instruments, stray light, wavefront sensing and control, pointing and thermal control, and in-space servicing options.

  17. Sparse aperture differential piston measurements using the pyramid wave-front sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Yan, Zhaojun; Zheng, Lixin; Agapito, Guido; Wang, Chaoyan; Zhu, Nenghong; Zhu, Liyun; Cai, Jianqing; Tang, Zhenghong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we report on the laboratory experiment we settled in the Shanghai Astronomical Observatory (SHAO) to investigate the pyramid wavefront sensor (WFS) ability to measure the differential piston on a sparse aperture. The ultimate goal is to verify the ability of the pyramid WFS work in closed loop to perform the phasing of the primary mirrors of a sparse Fizeau imaging telescope. In the experiment we installed on the optical bench we performed various test checking the ability to flat the wave-front using a deformable mirror and to measure the signal of the differential piston on a two pupils setup. These steps represent the background from which we start to perform full closed loop operation on multiple apertures. These steps were also useful to characterize the achromatic double pyramids (double prisms) manufactured in the SHAO optical workshop.

  18. Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST): A Technology Roadmap for the Next Decade

    CERN Document Server

    Postman, Marc

    2009-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) is a set of mission concepts for the next generation of UVOIR space observatory with a primary aperture diameter in the 8-m to 16-m range that will allow us to perform some of the most challenging observations to answer some of our most compelling questions, including "Is there life elsewhere in the Galaxy?" We have identified two different telescope architectures, but with similar optical designs, that span the range in viable technologies. The architectures are a telescope with a monolithic primary mirror and two variations of a telescope with a large segmented primary mirror. This approach provides us with several pathways to realizing the mission, which will be narrowed to one as our technology development progresses. The concepts invoke heritage from HST and JWST design, but also take significant departures from these designs to minimize complexity, mass, or both. Our report provides details on the mission concepts, shows the extraordinary s...

  19. Thermal Emission by a Subwavelength Aperture

    CERN Document Server

    Joulain, Karl; Carminati, Rémi

    2015-01-01

    We calculate, by means of fluctuational electrodynamics, the thermal emission of an aperture filled by vacuum or a material at temperature T. We show that thermal emission is very different whether the aperture size is large or small compared to the thermal wavelength. Subwavelength apertures filled with vacuum (subwavelength blackbody) have their thermal emission strongly decreased compared to classical blackbodies. A simple expression of their emissivity can be calculated and their total emittance scales as T 8 instead of T 4 for large apertures. Thermal emission of disk of materials with a size comparable to the wavelength is also discussed. It is shown in particular that emissivity of such a disk is increased when the material can support surface waves such as phonon polaritons.

  20. Beam Combination for Sparse Aperture Telescopes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal is for funding to continue development of an alternative beam combiner for Stellar Imager (SI), a 30-aperture, interferometric telescope chosen as one...

  1. Beam Combination for Sparse Aperture Telescopes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Stellar Imager, an ultraviolet, sparse-aperture telescope, was one of the fifteen Vision Missions chosen for a study completed last year. Stellar Imager will...

  2. Synthetic Aperture Radar Missions Study Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bard, S.

    2000-01-01

    This report reviews the history of the LightSAR project and summarizes actions the agency can undertake to support industry-led efforts to develop an operational synthetic aperture radar (SAR) capability in the United States.

  3. Probing the Nature of Short Swift Bursts via Deep INTEGRAL Monitoring of GRB 050925

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, T.; Barbier, L.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Cummings, J. R.; Fenimore, E. E.; Gehrels, N.; Krimm, H. A.; Markwardt, C. B.; Palmer, D. M.; Parsons, A. M.; Sato, G.; Stamatikos, M.; Tueller, J.

    2010-01-01

    We present results from Swift, XMM-Newton, and deep INTEGRAL monitoring in the region of GRB 050925. This short Swift burst is a candidate for a newly discovered soft gamma-ray repeater (SGR) with the following observational burst properties: 1) galactic plane (b=-0.1 deg) localization, 2) 150 msec duration, and 3) a blackbody rather than a simple power-law spectral shape (with a significance level of 97%). We found two possible X-ray counterparts of GRB 050925 by comparing the X-ray images from Swift XRT and XMM-Newton. Both X-ray sources show the transient behavior with a power-law decay index shallower than -1. We found no hard X-ray emission nor any additional burst from the location of GRB 050925 in approximately 5 Ms of INTEGRAL data. We discuss about the three BATSE short bursts which might be associated with GRB 050925, based on their location and the duration. Assuming GRB 050925 is associated with the H(sub II), regions (W 58) at the galactic longitude of 1=70 deg, we also discuss the source frame properties of GRB 050925.

  4. Extremely hard GRB spectra prune down the forest of emission models

    CERN Document Server

    Ghirlanda, G; Ghisellini, G; Ghirlanda, Giancarlo; Celotti, Annalisa; Ghisellini, Gabriele

    2003-01-01

    We consider the evidence for very hard low energy spectra during the prompt phase of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB). In particular we examine the spectral evolution of GRB 980306 together with the detailed analysis of some other bursts already presented in the literature (GRB 911118, GRB 910807, GRB 910927 and GRB 970111), and check for the significance of their hardness by applying different tests. These are among the bursts with the hardest low energy spectrum, sufficiently bright to allow time resolved spectral studies on time intervals of the order of tenths of a second. We discuss the hard spectra of these bursts and their evolution in the context of several non--thermal emission models, which all appear inadequate to account for these cases. The extremely hard spectra at the beginning of their prompt emission are also compared with a black body spectral model: the resulting fits are remarkably good, except for an excess at high energies (in several cases) which could be simply accounted for by the presence of a...

  5. VLT/X-shooter spectroscopy of the GRB 120327A afterglow

    CERN Document Server

    D'Elia, V; Goldoni, P; Covino, S; Postigo, A de Ugarte; Ledoux, C; Calura, F; Gorosabel, J; Malesani, D; Sanchez-Ramirez, F Matteucci R; Savaglio, S; Castro-Tirado, A J; Hartoog, O E; Kaper, L; Munoz-Darias, T; Pian, E; Piranomonte, S; Tagliaferri, G; Tanvir, N; Vergani, S D; Watson, D J; Xu, D

    2014-01-01

    We present a study of the environment of the Swift long gamma-ray burst GRB 120327A at z ~2.8 through optical spectroscopy of its afterglow. We analyzed medium-resolution, multi-epoch spectroscopic observations (~7000 - 12000, corresponding to ~ 15 - 23 km/s, S/N = 15- 30 and wavelength range 3000-25000AA) of the optical afterglow of GRB 120327A, taken with X-shooter at the VLT 2.13 and 27.65 hr after the GRB trigger. The first epoch spectrum shows that the ISM in the GRB host galaxy at z = 2.8145 is extremely rich in absorption features, with three components contributing to the line profiles. The hydrogen column density associated with GRB 120327A has log NH / cm^(-2) = 22.01 +/- 0.09, and the metallicity of the host galaxy is in the range [X/H] = -1.3 to -1.1. In addition to the ground state lines, we detect absorption features associated with excited states of CII, OI, SiII, FeII, and NiII, which we used to derive information on the distance between the host absorbing gas and the site of the GRB explosion...

  6. Evidences for a double component in the emission of GRB 101023

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we present the results of the analysis of GRB 101023 in the fireshell scenario. Its redshift is not known, so we attempted to infer it from the Amati Relation, obtaining z = 0.9. Its light curve presents a double emission, which makes it very similar to the already studied GRB 090618. We called each part Episode 1 and Episode 2. We performed a time-resolved spectral analysis with RMFIT using different spectral models, and fitted the light curve with a numerical code integrating the fireshell equations of motion. We used Fermi GBM data to build the light curve, in particular the second NaI detector, in the range (8.5–1000 keV). We considered different hypotheses regarding which part of the light curve could be the GRB and performed the analysis of all of them. We noticed a great variation of the temperature with time in the first episode, as well as almost no variation of the progenitor radius. We found that the first emission does not match the requirements for a GRB, while the second part perfectly agrees with being a canonical GRB, with a P-GRB lasting 4 s.

  7. Grb10 characterization in bovine cumulus oocyte complexes from different follicle sizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto Antunes da Rosa

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the mRNA expression and protein localization of Grb10 gene in bovine cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs from different follicle sizes. Firstly, it was investigated the mRNA expression to correlate with maturation rates. COCs from follicles at 1-3, 4-6, 6-8 and >8mm were used to evaluate Grb10 gene expression by qRT-PCR assay and nuclear maturation rates. It was observed that more competent oocytes (from follicles at 6-8 and >8mm; P>0.05, had lower Grb10 mRNA expression levels when compared to the oocytes from follicles at 1-3 and 4-6mm (P>0.05. After it was performed an immunofluorescence analysis in COCs from different follicle sizes (1-3, 4-6, 6-8 and >8mm to investigate Grb10 protein localization. Samples were incubated with primary antibody: Polyclonal rabbit anti-Grb10 (1:100. Primary antibody was detected using goat anti-rabbit IgG antibody conjugated with Alexa Fluor 488 (1:500. Positive fluorescence signal was detected in all analyzed samples but less evident in COCs from largest follicles. These results characterized Grb10 gene in bovine COC and provide evidences for its involvement during oocyte molecular maturation.

  8. Chromosome locations of genes encoding human signal transduction adapter proteins, Nck (NCK), Shc (SHC1), and Grb2 (GRB2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huebner, K; Kastury, K; Druck, T;

    1994-01-01

    Abnormalities due to chromosomal aberration or point mutation in gene products of growth factor receptors or in ras gene products, which lie on the same signaling pathway, can cause disease in animals and humans. Thus, it can be important to determine chromosomal map positions of genes encoding...... "adapter" proteins, which are involved in transducing signals from receptor tyrosine kinases to downstream signal recipients such as ras, because adaptor protein genes could also, logically, serve as targets of mutation, rearrangement, or other aberration in disease. Therefore, DNAs from panels of rodent-human...... hybrids carrying defined complements of human chromosomes were assayed for the presence of the cognate genes for NCK, SHC, and GRB2, three SH2 or SH2/SH3 (Src homology 2 and 3) domain-containing adapter proteins. Additionally, NCK and SHC genes were more narrowly localized by chromosomal in situ...

  9. Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory for the observation of early photons from gamma-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the least documented and understood aspects of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is the rise phase of the optical light curve. The Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory (UFFO) is an effort to address this question through extraordinary opportunities presented by a series of space missions including a small spacecraft observatory. The UFFO is equipped with a fast-response Slewing Mirror Telescope (SMT) that uses a rapidly moving mirror or mirror array to redirect the optical beam rather than slewing the entire spacecraft to aim the optical instrument at the GRB position. The UFFO will probe the early optical rise of GRBs with sub-second response, for the first time, opening a completely new frontier in GRBs and transient studies. Its fast response measurements of the optical emission of dozens of GRBs each year will provide unique probes of the burst mechanism and test the prospect of GRBs as a new standard candle, potentially opening up the z > 10 universe. For the first time we employ a motorized slewing stage in SMT that can point to the event within 1 s after the x-ray trigger provided by the UFFO Burst Alert and Trigger Telescope. These two scientific instruments comprise the UFFO-pathfinder payload, which will be placed onboard the Lomonosov satellite and launched in 2013. The UFFO-pathfinder is the first step of our long-term program of space instruments for rapid-response GRB observations. We describe early photon science, our soon-to-be-launched UFFO-pathfinder hardware and mission, and our next planned mission, the UFFO-100. (paper)

  10. Fresnel aperture pre-stack depth migration

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis, I present the results of a new approach to pre-stack Kirchoff depth migration using the Kirchoff algorithm and the Fresnel aperture features in order to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the seismic data in depth imaging. Another advantage of this method is that it requires no additionnal measurments compared to the traditionnal PSDM. Indeed, the Fresnel apertures are picked interactively, in a way that is similar to velocity picking, and thereafter used during the migratio...

  11. New multiple aperture arrangements for speckle photography

    OpenAIRE

    Angel-Toro, Luciano; Tebaldi, Myrian; Trivi, Marcelo; Bolognini, Néstor

    2000-01-01

    Abstract. We propose a multiple exposure specklegram by using an optical system whose multiple aperture pupil changes between exposures. In particular, we analyze experimentally two arrangements and we show that it is possible to store the required information by employing a minimum number of registers if an adequate selection of the pupil is done. We study the effect of the decorrelation (among the stored speckle pattern) introduced by changing the multiple aperture pupil arrangements betwee...

  12. Synthetic Aperture Techniques for Sonar Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, S&#;rgio Rui; Cunha, S&#;rgio; Matos, An&#;bal; Cruz, Nuno

    2009-01-01

    As demonstrated, synthetic aperture sonar is a technique that enables attainment of high quality, high resolution underwater images. Autonomous surface vehicles provides several advantages for synthetic aperture imagery. Not only it is possible to control the boat motion in this way, it is also possible to obtain navigation measurements with precisions in the order of the wavelength used in high resolution sonar systems. Furthermore unsupervised surveillance applications that combine the high...

  13. An autonomous boat based Synthetic Aperture Sonar

    OpenAIRE

    Sergio Rui Silva; Sergio Cunha; Anibal Matos; Nuno Cruz

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a Synthetic Aperture Sonar (SAS) system being developed at the University of Porto to be used in a small autonomous boat for the survey of shallow water environments, such as rivers, deltas, estuaries and dams. Its purpose is to obtain high resolution echo reflectivity maps through synthetic aperture techniques, taking advantage of the high precision navigation system of the boat. In the future the production of bottom tomography maps is also considered through the use of...

  14. EVIDENCE FOR A PHOTOSPHERIC COMPONENT IN THE PROMPT EMISSION OF THE SHORT GRB 120323A AND ITS EFFECTS ON THE GRB HARDNESS-LUMINOSITY RELATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The short GRB 120323A had the highest flux ever detected with the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. Here we study its remarkable spectral properties and their evolution using two spectral models: (1) a single emission component scenario, where the spectrum is modeled by the empirical Band function (a broken power law), and (2) a two-component scenario, where thermal (a Planck-like function) emission is observed simultaneously with a non-thermal component (a Band function). We find that the latter model fits the integrated burst spectrum significantly better than the former, and that their respective spectral parameters are dramatically different: when fit with a Band function only, the Epeak of the event is unusually soft for a short gamma-ray burst (GRB; 70 keV compared to an average of 300 keV), while adding a thermal component leads to more typical short GRB values (Epeak ∼ 300 keV). Our time-resolved spectral analysis produces similar results. We argue here that the two-component model is the preferred interpretation for GRB 120323A based on (1) the values and evolution of the Band function parameters of the two component scenario, which are more typical for a short GRB, and (2) the appearance in the data of a significant hardness-intensity correlation, commonly found in GRBs, when we employee two-component model fits; the correlation is non-existent in the Band-only fits. GRB 110721A, a long burst with an intense photospheric emission, exhibits the exact same behavior. We conclude that GRB 120323A has a strong photospheric emission contribution, observed for the first time in a short GRB. Magnetic dissipation models are difficult to reconcile with these results, which instead favor photospheric thermal emission and fast cooling synchrotron radiation from internal shocks. Finally, we derive a possibly universal hardness-luminosity relation in the source frame using a larger set of GRBs (LiBand = (1.59 ± 0.84) x 1050 (Epeak

  15. The circumburst environment of a FRED GRB: study of the prompt emission and X-ray/optical afterglow of GRB 051111

    OpenAIRE

    Guidorzi, C.; Gomboc, A.; Kobayashi, S; Mundell, C. G.; Rol, E.; Bode, M.F.; Carter, D.; La Parola, V.; Melandri, A.; Monfardini, A.; Mottram, C. J.; O'Brien, P.T.; Page, K. L.; Sakamoto, T; Smith, R.J.

    2006-01-01

    We report a multi-wavelength analysis of the prompt emission and early afterglow of GRB051111 and discuss its properties in the context of current fireball models. The detection of GRB051111 by the Burst Alert Telescope on-board Swift triggered early BVRi' observations with the 2-m robotic Faulkes Telescope North in Hawaii, as well as X-ray observations with the Swift X-Ray Telescope. The prompt gamma-ray emission shows a classical FRED profile. The optical afterglow light curves are fitted w...

  16. EVIDENCE FOR A PHOTOSPHERIC COMPONENT IN THE PROMPT EMISSION OF THE SHORT GRB 120323A AND ITS EFFECTS ON THE GRB HARDNESS-LUMINOSITY RELATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guiriec, S.; McEnery, J.; Gehrels, N. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Daigne, F.; Hascoeet, R.; Mochkovitch, R. [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris UMR 7095 Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 06 (France); CNRS 98 bis bd Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Vianello, G. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Ryde, F. [Department of Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Kouveliotou, C. [Office of Science and Technology, ZP12, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Xiong, S.; Bhat, P. N.; Burgess, J. M. [University of Alabama in Huntsville, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Foley, S.; McGlynn, S. [UCD School of Physics, University College Dublin, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Gruber, D., E-mail: sylvain.guiriec@nasa.gov [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2013-06-10

    The short GRB 120323A had the highest flux ever detected with the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. Here we study its remarkable spectral properties and their evolution using two spectral models: (1) a single emission component scenario, where the spectrum is modeled by the empirical Band function (a broken power law), and (2) a two-component scenario, where thermal (a Planck-like function) emission is observed simultaneously with a non-thermal component (a Band function). We find that the latter model fits the integrated burst spectrum significantly better than the former, and that their respective spectral parameters are dramatically different: when fit with a Band function only, the E{sub peak} of the event is unusually soft for a short gamma-ray burst (GRB; 70 keV compared to an average of 300 keV), while adding a thermal component leads to more typical short GRB values (E{sub peak} {approx} 300 keV). Our time-resolved spectral analysis produces similar results. We argue here that the two-component model is the preferred interpretation for GRB 120323A based on (1) the values and evolution of the Band function parameters of the two component scenario, which are more typical for a short GRB, and (2) the appearance in the data of a significant hardness-intensity correlation, commonly found in GRBs, when we employee two-component model fits; the correlation is non-existent in the Band-only fits. GRB 110721A, a long burst with an intense photospheric emission, exhibits the exact same behavior. We conclude that GRB 120323A has a strong photospheric emission contribution, observed for the first time in a short GRB. Magnetic dissipation models are difficult to reconcile with these results, which instead favor photospheric thermal emission and fast cooling synchrotron radiation from internal shocks. Finally, we derive a possibly universal hardness-luminosity relation in the source frame using a larger set of GRBs (L{sub i}{sup Band

  17. Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope: Science Drivers and Technology Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postman, Marc; Brown, Tom; Traub, Wesley; Calzetti, Daniela; Soummer, Remi; Hyde, Tupper; Sembach, Kenneth; Glavallsco, Mauro; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Oegerle, William; Rich, R. Michael; Stahl, H. Philip; Tumlinson, Jason; Mountain, Matt

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) is a concept for an 8- to 16-m ultraviolet optical near Infrared space observatory for launch in the 2025 to 2030 era. ATLAST will allow astronomers to answer fundamental questions at the forefront of modern astrophysics, including: Is there life elsewhere in the Galaxy? We present a range of science drivers and the resulting performance requirements for ATLAST (8- to 16-marcsec angular resolution, diffraction limited imaging at 0.5 micron wavelength, minimum collecting area of 45 sq m, high sensitivity to light wavelengths from 0.1 to 2.4 micron, high stability in wavefront sensing and control). We also discuss the priorities for technology development needed to enable the construction of ATLAST for a cost that is comparable to that of current generation observatory-class space missions.

  18. ISS images for Observatory protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez de Miguel, Alejandro; Zamorano, Jaime

    2015-08-01

    Light pollution is the main factor of degradation of the astronomical quality of the sky along the history. Astronomical observatories have been monitoring how the brightness of the sky varies using photometric measures of the night sky brightness mainly at zenith. Since the sky brightness depends in other factors such as sky glow, aerosols, solar activity and the presence of celestial objects, the continuous increase of light pollution in these enclaves is difficult to trace except when it is too late.Using models of light dispersion on the atmosphere one can determine which light pollution sources are increasing the sky brightness at the observatories. The input satellite data has been provided by DMSP/OLS and SNPP/VIIRS. Unfortunately their panchromatic bands (color blinded) are not useful to detect in which extension the increase is due to the dramatic change produced by the irruption of LED technology in outdoor lighting. The only instrument in the space that is able to distinguish between the various lighting technologies are the DSLR cameras used by the astronauts onboard the ISS.Current status for some astronomical observatories that have been imaged from the ISS is presented. We are planning to send an official request to NASA with a plan to get images for the most important astronomical observatories. We ask support for this proposal by the astronomical community and especially by the US-based researchers.

  19. The Coronal Solar Magnetism Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomczyk, S.; Landi, E.; Zhang, J.; Lin, H.; DeLuca, E. E.

    2015-12-01

    Measurements of coronal and chromospheric magnetic fields are arguably the most important observables required for advances in our understanding of the processes responsible for coronal heating, coronal dynamics and the generation of space weather that affects communications, GPS systems, space flight, and power transmission. The Coronal Solar Magnetism Observatory (COSMO) is a proposed ground-based suite of instruments designed for routine study of coronal and chromospheric magnetic fields and their environment, and to understand the formation of coronal mass ejections (CME) and their relation to other forms of solar activity. This new facility will be operated by the High Altitude Observatory of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (HAO/NCAR) with partners at the University of Michigan, the University of Hawaii and George Mason University in support of the solar and heliospheric community. It will replace the current NCAR Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (http://mlso.hao.ucar.edu). COSMO will enhance the value of existing and new observatories on the ground and in space by providing unique and crucial observations of the global coronal and chromospheric magnetic field and its evolution. The design and current status of the COSMO will be reviewed.

  20. Seafloor Observatory Science: a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Beranzoli

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The ocean exerts a pervasive influence on Earth’s environment. It is therefore important that we learn how this system operates (NRC, 1998b; 1999. For example, the ocean is an important regulator of climate change (e.g., IPCC, 1995. Understanding the link between natural and anthropogenic climate change and ocean circulation is essential for predicting the magnitude and impact of future changes in Earth’s climate. Understanding the ocean, and the complex physical, biological, chemical, and geological systems operating within it, should be an important goal for the opening decades of the 21st century. Another fundamental reason for increasing our understanding of ocean systems is that the global economy is highly dependent on the ocean (e.g., for tourism, fisheries, hydrocarbons, and mineral resources (Summerhayes, 1996. The establishment of a global network of seafloor observatories will help to provide the means to accomplish this goal. These observatories will have power and communication capabilities and will provide support for spatially distributed sensing systems and mobile platforms. Sensors and instruments will potentially collect data from above the air-sea interface to below the seafloor. Seafloor observatories will also be a powerful complement to satellite measurement systems by providing the ability to collect vertically distributed measurements within the water column for use with the spatial measurements acquired by satellites while also providing the capability to calibrate remotely sensed satellite measurements (NRC, 2000. Ocean observatory science has already had major successes. For example the TAO array has enabled the detection, understanding and prediction of El Niño events (e.g., Fujimoto et al., 2003. This paper is a world-wide review of the new emerging “Seafloor Observatory Science”, and describes both the scientific motivations for seafloor observatories and the technical solutions applied to their architecture. A

  1. Tools for Coordinating Planning Between Observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J.; Maks, L.; Fishman, M.; Grella, V.; Kerbel, U.; Misra, D.; Pell, V.

    With the realization of NASA's era of great observatories, there are now more than three space-based telescopes operating in different wave bands. This situation provides astronomers with a unique opportunity to simultaneously observe with multiple observatories. Yet scheduling multiple observatories simultaneously is highly inefficient when compared to observations using only a single observatory. Thus, programs using multiple observatories are limited not by scientific restrictions, but by operational inefficiencies. At present, multi-observatory programs are initiated by submitting observing proposals separately to each concerned observatory. To assure that the proposed observations can be scheduled, each observatory's staff has to check that the observations are valid and meet all constraints for their own observatory; in addition, they have to verify that the observations satisfy the constraints of the other observatories. Thus, coordinated observations require painstaking manual collaboration among staffs at each observatory. Due to the lack of automated tools for coordinated observations, this process is time consuming and error-prone, and the outcome of requests is not certain until the very end. To increase multi-observatory operations efficiency, such resource intensive processes need to be re-engineered. To overcome this critical deficiency, Goddard Space Flight Center's Advanced Architectures and Automation Branch is developing a prototype called the Visual Observation Layout Tool (VOLT). The main objective of VOLT is to provide visual tools to help automate the planning of coordinated observations by multiple astronomical observatories, as well as to increase the probability of scheduling all observations.

  2. Overview of the James Webb Space Telescope Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clampin, Mark; Smith, Eric P.

    2011-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a large aperture, space telescope designed to provide imaging and spectroscopy from 1.0 micron to 28 microns. JWST will be launched to an orbit at L2 aboard an Ariane 5 launcher in 2013. The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is the lead center for the JWST program and manages the project for NASA. The prime contractor for JWST is Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems (NGST). JWST is an international partnership with the European Space Agency (ESA), and the Canadian Space Agency (CSA). ESA will contribute the Ariane 5 launch, and a multi-object infrared spectrograph. CSA will contribute the Fine Guidance Sensor (FGS), which includes the Tunable Filter Imager (TFI). The European consortium, in collaboration with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), builds the mid-infrared imager (MIRI). In this paper we present an overview of the JWST science program, and discuss recent progress in the development of the observatory.

  3. Norwegian Ocean Observatory Network (NOON)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferré, Bénédicte; Mienert, Jürgen; Winther, Svein; Hageberg, Anne; Rune Godoe, Olav; Partners, Noon

    2010-05-01

    The Norwegian Ocean Observatory Network (NOON) is led by the University of Tromsø and collaborates with the Universities of Oslo and Bergen, UniResearch, Institute of Marine Research, Christian Michelsen Research and SINTEF. It is supported by the Research Council of Norway and oil and gas (O&G) industries like Statoil to develop science, technology and new educational programs. Main topics relate to ocean climate and environment as well as marine resources offshore Norway from the northern North Atlantic to the Arctic Ocean. NOON's vision is to bring Norway to the international forefront in using cable based ocean observatory technology for marine science and management, by establishing an infrastructure that enables real-time and long term monitoring of processes and interactions between hydrosphere, geosphere and biosphere. This activity is in concert with the EU funded European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures (ESFRI) roadmap and European Multidisciplinary Seafloor Observation (EMSO) project to attract international leading research developments. NOON envisions developing towards a European Research Infrastructure Consortium (ERIC). Beside, the research community in Norway already possesses a considerable marine infrastructure that can expand towards an international focus for real-time multidisciplinary observations in times of rapid climate change. PIC The presently established cable-based fjord observatory, followed by the establishment of a cable-based ocean observatory network towards the Arctic from an O&G installation, will provide invaluable knowledge and experience necessary to make a successful larger cable-based observatory network at the Norwegian and Arctic margin (figure 1). Access to large quantities of real-time observation from the deep sea, including high definition video, could be used to provide the public and future recruits to science a fascinating insight into an almost unexplored part of the Earth beyond the Arctic Circle

  4. Space astrophysical observatory 'Orion-2'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultraviolet spectrograms of a large number of faint stars up to 13sup(m) were obtained in the wavelengths 2000-5000 A by means of the space observatory 'Orion-2' installed in the spaceship 'Soyuz-13' with two spacemen on board. The paper deals with a description of the operation modes of this observatory, the designs and basic schemes of the scientific and auxiliary device and the method of combining the work of the flight engineer and the automation system of the observatory itself. It also treats of the combination of the particular parts of 'Orion-2' observatory on board the spaceship and the measures taken to provide for its normal functioning in terms of the space flight. A detailed description is given of the optical, electrical and mechanical schemes of the devices - meniscus telescope with an objective prism, stellar diffraction spectrographs, single-coordinate and two-coordinate stellar and solar transducers, control panel, control systems, etc. The paper also provides the functional scheme of astronavigation, six-wheel stabilization, the design of mounting (assembling) the stabilized platform carrying the telescopes and the drives used in it. Problems relating to the observation program in orbit, the ballistic provision of initial data, and control of the operation of the observatory are also dealt with. In addition, the paper carries information of the photomaterials used, the methods of their energy calibration, standardization and the like. Matters of pre-start tests of apparatus, the preparation of the spacemen for conducting astronomical observations with the given devices, etc. are likewise dwelt on. The paper ends with a brief survey of the results obtained and the elaboration of the observed material. (Auth.)

  5. The digitisation of observatory magnetograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Long running magnetic observatories are extremely important for studies of the Earth's magnetic field. They are used to model and study the core field and it's secular variation and are important for studies of the solar driven regular and irregular short-term variations in the geomagnetic field. For investigations into changes to the character of these variations over decades to centuries, data sets of most value are those that can be derived from the longest running series of observatories. Magnetograms exist from UK observatories dating back to 1848, which are archived by the British Geological Survey (BGS). BGS has started a programme to digitise the full set of magnetograms (∼256,000) from the date of the earliest records up to 1982, the last year for which definitive observatory results are based on analogue records. The first objective of the project is to provide a complete backup of the collection as digital images and to make these images available to the scientific community on-line. The second objective is to develop a semi-automated method that can be used to extract digital data from the magnetograms. These data will be of a higher time resolution than that of the previously published values. This paper describes the data management methodology used to capture the magnetogram images including the use of photography. Results for Kew Observatory will be shown. We also discuss on-going development work to extract digital data as accurately as possible and to as high a time resolution as possible. It is envisaged that techniques developed will be applicable to other archives of geophysical data.

  6. A Rapid-Response Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow Observing Program at Etelman Observatory in the US Virgin Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giblin, Timothy W.; Neff, James E.; Hakkila, Jon; Hartmann, Dieter; Andresian-Thomas, Noretta; Drost, Donald M.

    2004-09-01

    The College of Charleston (CofC) is one of three institutions that belong to a consortium led by the Division of Science and Mathematics at the University of the Virgin Islands (UVI) to maintain and operate a research grade telescope at Etelman Observatory on the island of St. Thomas (18deg, 21' N, 65deg W at an elevation ~ 1325 ft with facility for observing Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). The observatory will serve a variety of needs to the consortium members that include research, teaching, and public outreach. The primary research function of this facility will be to perform rapid, automated followup observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) observed with NASA's Swift spacecraft, to be launched in June 2004, via the GCN. The newly renovated observatory houses a new robotic 0.5 m Cassegrain telescope with a back-illuminated Marconi 2024 × 2024 CCD42-40 imaging array and 12-position UBVRI filter wheel. Assuming 1.5'' seeing and a S/N=5, we can obtain a limiting (unfiltered) magnitude of ~ 19 with a 10 s integration time. The slew rate is >= 10deg per second. With the exceptional sky coverage at Etelman Observatory, we anticipate a detection rate of about 10-15% of the Swift detection rate, and we anticipate making a significant contribution to the global network of small telescopes dedicated to GRB observations.

  7. SOFIA - Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Nans; Bowers, Al

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). The contents include: 1) Heritage & History; 2) Level 1 Requirements; 3) Top Level Overview of the Observatory; 4) Development Challenges; and 5) Highlight Photos.

  8. SOFIA: Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Eric; Kunz, Nans; Bowers, Al

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). The contents include: 1) Heritage & History; 2) Level 1 Requirements; 3) Top Level Overview of the Observatory; 4) Development Challenges; and 5) Highlight Photos.

  9. Global Health Observatory (GHO): Life Expectancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Feed Youtube Twitter Facebook Google + iTunes Play Store Global Health Observatory (GHO) data Menu Global Health Observatory ... years on average in 2015 MORE MORTALITY AND GLOBAL HEALTH ESTIMATES DATA PRODUCTS Maps Country profiles About ...

  10. Evidence for a proto-black hole and a double astrophysical component in GRB 101023

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penacchioni, A. V.; Ruffini, R.; Izzo, L.; Muccino, M.; Bianco, C. L.; Caito, L.; Patricelli, B.; Amati, L.

    2012-02-01

    Context. It has been recently shown that GRB 090618, observed by AGILE, Coronas Photon, Fermi, Konus, Suzaku, and Swift, is composed of two very different components: episode 1, lasting 50 s, shows a thermal plus power-law spectrum with a characteristic temperature evolving in time as a power law; episode 2 (the remaining 100 s) is a canonical long GRB. We have associated episode 1 to the progenitor of a collapsing bare core leading to the formation of a black hole: what was defined as a "proto black hole" Aims: In precise analogy with GRB 090618 we aim to analyze the 89 s of the emission of GRB 101023, observed by Fermi, Gemini, Konus and Swift, to see if there are two different episodes: the first one presenting a characteristic black-body temperature evolving in time as a broken power law, and the second one consistent with a canonical GRB. Methods: To obtain information on the spectra, we analyzed the data provided by the GBM detector onboard the Fermi satellite, and we used the heasoft package XSPEC and RMFIT to obtain their spectral distribution. We also used the numerical code GRBsim to simulate the emission in the context of the fireshell scenario for episode 2. Results: We confirm that the first episode can be well fit by a black body plus power-law spectral model. The temperature changes with time following a broken power law, and the photon index of the power-law component presents a soft-to-hard evolution. We estimate that the radius of this source increases with time with a velocity of 1.5 × 104 km s-1. The second episode appears to be a canonical GRB. By using the Amati and the Atteia relations, we determined the cosmological redshift, z ~ 0.9 ± 0.084(stat.) ± 0.2(sys.). The results of GRB 090618 are compared and contrasted with the results of GRB 101023. Particularly striking is the scaling law of the soft X-ray component of the afterglow. Conclusions: We identify GRB 090618 and GRB 101023 with a new family of GRBs related to a single core

  11. The UFFO (Ultra Fast Flash Observatory) Pathfinder: Science and Mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, P.; Ahmad, S.; Ahn, K.;

    a more rigorous test of current internal shock models, probe the extremes of bulk Lorentz factors, provide the first early and detailed measurements of fast-rise GRB optical light curves, and help verify the prospect of GRB as a new standard candle. We will describe the science and the mission of...

  12. Double exposure specklegrams obtained by using scaled aperture pupils

    OpenAIRE

    Angel-Toro, Luciano; Tebaldi, Myrian; Trivi, Marcelo; Bolognini, N??stor

    2001-01-01

    In speckle photography the pupil aperture is usually not modified between exposures. In our work, the change of the pupil aperture scale between exposures is analyzed on the basis of double-exposed image speckle, before and after a diffuse in-plane displacement is done. The apertures have the same shape but its scale is modified between exposures. Note that the relative position of the aperture is maintained. In particular, we analyze a simple case that uses a circular aperture whose diameter...

  13. The MicroObservatory Net

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brecher, K.; Sadler, P.

    1994-12-01

    A group of scientists, engineers and educators based at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) has developed a prototype of a small, inexpensive and fully integrated automated astronomical telescope and image processing system. The project team is now building five second generation instruments. The MicroObservatory has been designed to be used for classroom instruction by teachers as well as for original scientific research projects by students. Probably in no other area of frontier science is it possible for a broad spectrum of students (not just the gifted) to have access to state-of-the-art technologies that would allow for original research. The MicroObservatory combines the imaging power of a cooled CCD, with a self contained and weatherized reflecting optical telescope and mount. A microcomputer points the telescope and processes the captured images. The MicroObservatory has also been designed to be used as a valuable new capture and display device for real time astronomical imaging in planetariums and science museums. When the new instruments are completed in the next few months, they will be tried with high school students and teachers, as well as with museum groups. We are now planning to make the MicroObservatories available to students, teachers and other individual users over the Internet. We plan to allow the telescope to be controlled in real time or in batch mode, from a Macintosh or PC compatible computer. In the real-time mode, we hope to give individual access to all of the telescope control functions without the need for an "on-site" operator. Users would sign up for a specific period of time. In the batch mode, users would submit jobs for the telescope. After the MicroObservatory completed a specific job, the images would be e-mailed back to the user. At present, we are interested in gaining answers to the following questions: (1) What are the best approaches to scheduling real-time observations? (2) What criteria should be used

  14. Evidence for a Photospheric Component in the Prompt Emission of the Short GRB120323A and its Effects on the GRB Hardness-Luminosity Relation

    CERN Document Server

    Guiriec, S; Hascoët, R; Vianello, G; Mochkovitch, R; Ryde, F; Kouveliotou, C; Xiong, S; Bhat, P N; Foley, S; Grüber, D; Burgess, J M; McGlynn, S; McEnery, J; Gehrels, N

    2012-01-01

    The short GRB 120323A had the highest flux ever detected with the Fermi/GBM. Here we study its remarkable spectral properties and their evolution using two spectral models: (i) a single emission component scenario, where the spectrum is modeled by the empirical Band function, and (ii) a two component scenario, where thermal (Planck-like) emission is observed simultaneously with a non-thermal component (a Band function). We find that the latter model fits the integrated burst spectrum significantly better than the former, and that their respective spectral parameters are dramatically different: when fit with a Band function only, the Epeak of the event is unusually soft for a short GRB, while adding a thermal component leads to more typical short GRB values. Our time-resolved spectral analysis produces similar results. We argue here that the two-component model is the preferred interpretation for GRB 120323A, based on: (i) the values and evolution of the Band function parameters of the two component scenario, ...

  15. Aperture effects in squid jet propulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staaf, Danna J; Gilly, William F; Denny, Mark W

    2014-05-01

    Squid are the largest jet propellers in nature as adults, but as paralarvae they are some of the smallest, faced with the inherent inefficiency of jet propulsion at a low Reynolds number. In this study we describe the behavior and kinematics of locomotion in 1 mm paralarvae of Dosidicus gigas, the smallest squid yet studied. They swim with hop-and-sink behavior and can engage in fast jets by reducing the size of the mantle aperture during the contraction phase of a jetting cycle. We go on to explore the general effects of a variable mantle and funnel aperture in a theoretical model of jet propulsion scaled from the smallest (1 mm mantle length) to the largest (3 m) squid. Aperture reduction during mantle contraction increases propulsive efficiency at all squid sizes, although 1 mm squid still suffer from low efficiency (20%) because of a limited speed of contraction. Efficiency increases to a peak of 40% for 1 cm squid, then slowly declines. Squid larger than 6 cm must either reduce contraction speed or increase aperture size to maintain stress within maximal muscle tolerance. Ecological pressure to maintain maximum velocity may lead them to increase aperture size, which reduces efficiency. This effect might be ameliorated by nonaxial flow during the refill phase of the cycle. Our model's predictions highlight areas for future empirical work, and emphasize the existence of complex behavioral options for maximizing efficiency at both very small and large sizes. PMID:24501132

  16. Large-aperture subwavelength grating couplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Fan; Ma, Qingyan; Wang, Yufei; Zheng, Wanhua

    2016-04-10

    Subwavelength nanostructure grating couplers fabricated on silicon-on-insulator substrates are used to simplify the fabrication process while maintaining high coupling efficiency. The main obstacle for their application in photonic integrated circuits is the small aperture size of the nanostructure when TE polarization is involved, since they are difficult to achieve with 193 nm deep-ultraviolet lithography and cause problems in inductively coupled plasma etching. A larger lateral period has been used to increase the aperture size. Here, we propose that decreasing the effective index of the nanostructure can also enlarge the aperture size. We analyze the two methods in detail with a rectangle-hole nanostructure and 220 nm thick waveguide layer, aiming at TE polarization centered at 1560 nm. We find performance degenerations for large lateral periods, and this can be simply compensated by adjusting the width of the rectangle hole. The minimum linewidth of the nanostructure can reach 240 nm, while the coupling efficiency is just slightly decreased. The backreflections of a large-aperture grating increase but stay in the same order with ordinary ones, and we also show that this can be overcome by apodizing the grating structure. Finally, we experimentally demonstrate the designed large-aperture grating couplers and the coupling efficiencies are higher than 35%, and reach a rectangle-hole width. PMID:27139860

  17. SSC [Superconducting Super Collider] aperture workshop summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SSC Aperture Workshop was held November 5-9, 1984 at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The workshop focused on issues related to the selection of an optimum aperture for the SSC. Aperture is a critical issue at this early stage of design, because it strongly affects both the construction cost and the satisfactory commissioning and operation of the collider. The workshop had a double purpose: To design a course of action for determining the needed physical and dynamic aperture and commensurate magnetic field specifications of a high luminosity proton collider with a beam energy of 20 TeV, and to prepare a proposal for carrying out the recommended R ampersand D program in two steps -- a four-month intensive phase to provide knowledge essential for conceptual design and magnet selection, and a longer term effort to supply details and ultimately to support the construction, commissioning, and operation of the new collider. To accomplish these objectives, the participants met in the following working groups, each led by a coordinator, which are discussed in this paper: test lattices; aperture requirements; magnet errors; formats, data bases, networks and lattice codes; tracking codes; analytical screening; and experiments on existing machines

  18. Grb2 Is Important for T Cell Development, Th Cell Differentiation, and Induction of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Daniel; Lacher, Sonja M; Szumilas, Nadine; Sandrock, Lena; Ackermann, Jochen; Nitschke, Lars; Zinser, Elisabeth

    2016-04-01

    The small adaptor protein growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (Grb2) modulates and integrates signals from receptors on cellular surfaces in inner signaling pathways. In murine T cells, Grb2 is crucial for amplification of TCR signaling. T cell-specific Grb2(fl/fl) Lckcre(tg) Grb2-deficient mice show reduced T cell numbers due to impaired negative and positive selection. In this study, we found that T cell numbers in Grb2(fl/fl) CD4cre(tg) mice were normal in the thymus and were only slightly affected in the periphery. Ex vivo analysis of CD4(+) Th cell populations revealed an increased amount of Th1 cells within the CD4(+) population of Grb2(fl/fl) CD4cre(tg) mice. Additionally, Grb2-deficient T cells showed a greater potential to differentiate into Th17 cells in vitro. To test whether these changes in Th cell differentiation potential rendered Grb2(fl/fl) CD4cre(tg) mice more prone to inflammatory diseases, we used the murine Th1 cell- and Th17 cell-driven model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). In contrast to our expectations, Grb2(fl/fl) CD4cre(tg) mice developed a milder form of EAE. The impaired EAE disease can be explained by the reduced proliferation rate of Grb2-deficient CD4(+) T cells upon stimulation with IL-2 or upon activation by allogeneic dendritic cells, because the activation of T cells by dendritic cells and the subsequent T cell proliferation are known to be crucial factors for the induction of EAE. In summary, Grb2-deficient T cells show defects in T cell development, increased Th1 and Th17 cell differentiation capacities, and impaired proliferation after activation by dendritic cells, which likely reduce the clinical symptoms of EAE. PMID:26921310

  19. Boscovich and the Brera Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Antonello, E

    2013-01-01

    In the mid 18th century both theoretical and practical astronomy were cultivated in Milan by Barnabites and Jesuits. In 1763 R.G. Boscovich was appointed to the chair of mathematics of the University of Pavia in the Duchy of Milan, and the following year he designed an observatory for the Jesuit Collegium of Brera. The Specola was built in 1765 and it became quickly one of the main European observatories. We discuss the relation between Boscovich and Brera in the framework of a short biography. An account is given of the initial research activity in the Specola, of the departure of Boscovich from Milan in 1773 and his coming back just before his death.

  20. ALOHA Cabled Observatory: Early Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, B. M.; Lukas, R.; Duennebier, F. K.

    2011-12-01

    The ALOHA Cabled Observatory (ACO) was installed 6 June 2011, extending power, network communications and timing to a seafloor node and instruments at 4726 m water depth 100 km north of Oahu. The system was installed using ROV Jason operated from the R/V Kilo Moana. Station ALOHA is the field site of the Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) program that has investigated temporal dynamics in biology, physics, and chemistry since 1988. HOT conducts near monthly ship-based sampling and makes continuous observations from moored instruments to document and study climate and ecosystem variability over semi-diurnal to decadal time scales. The cabled observatory system will provide the infrastructure for continuous, interactive ocean sampling enabling new measurements as well as a new mode of ocean observing that integrates ship and cabled observations. The ACO is a prototypical example of a deep observatory system that uses a retired first-generation fiber-optic telecommunications cable. Sensors provide live video, sound from local and distant sources, and measure currents, pressure, temperature, and salinity. Preliminary results will be presented and discussed.

  1. Solar initiative at Oukaimeden Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkaldoun, Zouhair; Makela, Jonathan J.; Meriwether, John W.

    2013-07-01

    The solar research program at Oukaimeden Observatory started in 1988 with the helioseimological IRIS network. The Moroccan researchers involved in this research have analyzed solar observations in order to detect and characterize the solar sphere modes of oscillations. In the coming year, the researchers at the Oukaimeden Observatory will add new research capabilities by joining the International Space Weather Initiative (ISWI), installing a suite of optical instruments, comprising a Remote Equatorial Nighttime Observatory of Ionospheric Regions (RENOIR). The scope and objectives to be achieved in this proposed project are to: • deploy a Fabry-Perot interferometer and wide-angle imaging system to the Observatoire Astronomique Universitaire de LOukaimeden; • train students and researchers from Cadi Ayyad University on the operation of the equipment and related analysis techniques; • collect and analyze data from the equipment to study properties of upper-atmospheric winds and temperatures and how they relate to the occurrence of space weather; and • develop an international collaboration network with other researchers using similar instrumentation in Brazil and Peru. We will present here the plan we intend to develop for the Moroccan solar program in connection with ISWI.

  2. TAUVEX observatory activiies: Science planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safonova, Margarita

    The TAUVEX Observatory is a collaborative project between the Indian Institute of Astrophysics (IIA) and Tel Aviv University (TAU) to observe the ultraviolet (UV) sky. TAUVEX Observatory consists of a set of three co-aligned telescopes capable of imaging in the 100 to 350 nm range through a set of 5 different filters. The major science objectives of TAUVEX are (a) searches for QSOs and AGNs based on their UV properties, (b) surface photometry of galaxies in the UV, (c) studies of stars and nebulae within the Galaxy, (d) the nature of the UV background, and (d) studies of variable sources in the UV domain. Science planning for TAUVEX is being conducted by the personnel of the TAUVEX Core Group (TCG). All science operations activities will be based at TAUVEX Data Centre, IIA, Bangalore, India. The Principal Investigators and TAUVEX Science Team have created a coherent observing program to address several key science objectives that will constitute the Core Science Program projects. The responsibilities of TCG are described. We present a description of the TAUVEX mission, including details of the instrument design and its estimated performance, assess the status of the Observatory development and describe in brief the main research categories.

  3. Swift captures the spectrally evolving prompt emission of GRB 070616

    CERN Document Server

    Starling, R L C; Willingale, R; Page, K L; Osborne, J P; De Pasquale, M; Nakagawa, Y E; Kuin, N P M; Onda, K; Norris, J P; Ukwatta, T N; Kodaka, N; Burrows, D N; Kennea, J A; Page, M J; Perri, M; Markwardt, C B

    2007-01-01

    The origins of Gamma-ray Burst prompt emission are currently not well understood and in this context long, well-observed events are particularly important to study. We present the case of GRB 070616, analysing the exceptionally long-duration multipeaked prompt emission, and later afterglow, captured by all the instruments on-board Swift and by Suzaku WAM. The high energy light curve remained generally flat for several hundred seconds before going into a steep decline. Spectral evolution from hard to soft is clearly taking place throughout the prompt emission, beginning at 285 s after the trigger and extending to 1200 s. We track the movement of the spectral peak energy, whilst observing a softening of the low energy spectral slope. The steep decline in flux may be caused by a combination of this strong spectral evolution and the curvature effect. We investigate origins for the spectral evolution, ruling out a superposition of two power laws and considering instead an additional component dominant during the l...

  4. GRB 060313: A New Paradigm for Short-Hard Bursts?

    CERN Document Server

    Roming, P W A; Palshin, V D; Pagani, C; Norris, J; Kumar, P; Krimm, H; Holland, S T; Gronwall, C; Blustin, A J; Zhang, B; Schady, P; Sakamoto, T; Osborne, J P; Nousek, J A; Marshall, F E; Mészáros, P; Golenetskii, S V; Gehrels, N; Frederiks, D D; Campana, S; Burrows, D N; Boyd, P T; Barthelmy, S; Aptekar, R L; Roming, Peter W. A.; Berk, Daniel Vanden; Palshin, Valentin; Pagani, Claudio; Norris, Jay; Kumar, Pawan; Krimm, Hans; Holland, Stephen T.; Gronwall, Caryl; Zhang, Bing; Schady, Patricia; Sakamoto, Takanori; Osborne, Julian P.; Nousek, John A.; Marshall, Frank E.; Meszaros, Peter; Golenetskii, Sergey V.; Gehrels, Neil; Frederiks, Dmitry D.; Campana, Sergio; Burrows, David N.; Boyd, Patricia T.; Barthelmy, Scott

    2006-01-01

    We report the simultaneous observations of the prompt emission in the gamma-ray and hard X-ray bands by the Swift-BAT and the KONUS-Wind instruments of the short-hard burst, GRB 060313. The observations reveal multiple peaks in both the gamma-ray and hard X-ray suggesting a highly variable outflow from the central explosion. We also describe the early-time observations of the X-ray and UV/Optical afterglows by the Swift XRT and UVOT instruments. The combination of the X-ray and UV/Optical observations provide the most comprehensive lightcurves to date of a short-hard burst at such an early epoch. The afterglows exhibit complex structure with different decay indices and flaring. This behavior can be explained by the combination of a structured jet, radiative loss of energy, and decreasing microphysics parameters occurring in a circum-burst medium with densities varying by a factor of approximately two on a length scale of 10^17 cm. These density variations are normally associated with the environment of a mass...

  5. GRB physics and cosmology with peak energy-intensity correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawant, Disha, E-mail: sawant@fe.infn.it [University of Ferrara, Via Saragat-1, Block C, Ferrara 44122 (Italy); University of Nice, 28 Avenue Valrose, Nice 06103 (France); IRAP Erasmus PhD Program, European Union and INAF - IASF Bologna, Via P. Gobetti 101, Bologna 41125 (Italy); Amati, Lorenzo, E-mail: amati@iasfbo.inaf.it [INAF - IASF Bologna, Via P. Gobetti 101, Bologna 41125 (Italy); ICRANet, Piazzale Aldo Moro-5, Rome 00185 (Italy)

    2015-12-17

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are immensely energetic explosions radiating up to 10{sup 54} erg of energy isotropically (E{sub iso}) and they are observed within a wide range of redshift (from ∼ 0.01 up to ∼ 9). Such enormous power and high redshift point at these phenomena being highly favorable to investigate the history and evolution of our universe. The major obstacle in their application as cosmological study-tools is to find a way to standardize the GRBs, for instance similar to SNe Ia. With respect to this goal, the correlation between spectral peak energy (E{sub p,i}) and the “intensity” is a positively useful and investigated criterion. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that, through the E{sub p,i} – E{sub iso} correlation, the current data set of GRBs can already contribute to the independent evidence of the matter density Ω{sub M} being ∼ 0.3 for a flat universe scenario. We try to inspect and compare the correlations of E{sub p,i} with different intensity indicators (e.g., radiated energy, average and peak luminosity, bolometric vs. monochromatic quantities, etc.) both in terms of intrinsic dispersion and precise estimation of Ω{sub M}. The outcome of such studies are further analyzed in verifying the reliability of the correlations for both GRB physics and their standardization for cosmology.

  6. Are GRB Blackbodies an Artifact of Spectral Evolution?

    CERN Document Server

    Burgess, J Michael

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of gamma-ray burst (GRB) spectra with multi-component emission models has become an important part of the field. In particular, multi-component analysis where one component is a blackbody representing emission from a photosphere has enabled both a more detailed understanding of the energy content of the jet as well as the ability to examine the dynamic structure of the outflow. While the existence of a blackbody-like component has been shown to be significant and not a byproduct of background fluctuations, it is very possible that it can be an artifact of spectral evolution of a single component that is being poorly resolved in time. Herein, this possibility is tested by simulating a single component evolving in time and then folding the spectra through the $Fermi$ detector response to generate time-tagged event Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) data. We then fit both the time integrated and resolved generated spectral data with a multi-component model using standard tools. It is found that in {\\it t...

  7. The SEDs and Host Galaxies of the dustiest GRB afterglows

    CERN Document Server

    Krühler, T; Schady, P; Savaglio, S; Afonso, P M J; Clemens, C; Elliott, J; Filgas, R; Gruber, D; Kann, D A; Klose, S; Küpcü-Yoldas, A; McBreen, S; E., F Olivares; Pierini, D; Rau, A; Rossi, A; Nardini, M; Guelbenzu, A Nicuesa; Sudilovsky, V; Updike, A C

    2011-01-01

    (Abridged) Until recently the information inferred from gamma-ray burst follow-up observations was mostly limited to optically bright afterglows, biasing all demographic studies against sight-lines that contain large amounts of dust. Here, we present GRB afterglow and host observations for a sample of bursts that are exemplary of previously missed ones because of high visual extinction along the sight-line. This facilitates an investigation of the properties, geometry and location of the absorbing dust of these poorly-explored host galaxies, and a comparison to hosts from optically-selected samples. The hosts of the dustiest afterglows are diverse in their properties, but on average redder, more luminous and massive than the hosts of optically-bright events. We hence probe a different galaxy population, suggesting that previous host samples miss most of the massive, chemically-evolved and metal-rich members. This also indicates that the dust along the sight-line is often related to host properties, and thus p...

  8. GRB 050822: Detailed analysis of an XRF observed by Swift

    CERN Document Server

    Godet, O; Osborne, J; Zhang, B; Burrows, D N; O'Brien, P T; Hill, J E; Racusin, J; Beardmore, A P; Goad, M R; Falcone, A; Morris, D C; Ziaeepour, H

    2007-01-01

    We report on the temporal and spectral characteristics of the early X-ray emission from the GRB 050822 as observed by Swift. This burst is likely to be an XRF showing major X-ray flares in its XRT light-curve. The quality of the data allows a detailed spectral analysis of the early afterglow in the X-ray band. During the X-ray flares, a positive correlation between the count rate and the spectral hardness (i.e. higher the count rate is and harder the spectrum is) is clearly seen for the X-ray flares. This behaviour similar to that seen for Gamma-ray pulses indicates that the energy peak of the spectrum is in the XRT energy band and it moves at lower energy with time. We show evidence for the possible detection of the emergence of the forward-shock emission produced at a radius larger than 4 x 10^{16} cm (a forming region clearly different to that producing the prompt emission). Finally, we show that the null detection of a jet break up to T_0+4 x 10^6s in the X-ray light curve of this XRF can be understood: i...

  9. A bivariate luminosity model for GRB pulses and flares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have fitted the complete Swift BAT and XRT light curves of 88 GRBs for which we have a redshift with a total of 331 pulses. For each GRB we also include an afterglow component to fit the plateau phase and the late decay seen in the XRT data. The combination of pulses and afterglow model all the emission detected, prompt plus afterglow, including late X-ray flares detected only in the XRT. Each pulse is described by a simple physical model which includes the spectrum at peak and the temporal characteristics of the pulse. We find that the pulse peak luminosity is correlated with both the mean photon energy in the bolometric band of the pulse spectrum at the peak, referred to as Ezbol, and the temporal parameter Tzf which is a measure of the pulse width. An empirical bivariate luminosity model set up with these parameters provides a good fit to the pulse luminosity. The analysis indicates that prompt pulses and X-ray flares are one and the same and arise from the same physical process and this physical process is responsible for the bivariate nature of the luminosity.

  10. SN1998bw/GRB980425 and Radio Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Weiler, K W; Montes, M J; Weiler, Kurt W.; Panagia, Nino; Montes, Marcos J.

    2001-01-01

    The unusual supernova SN1998bw, which is thought to be related to the gamma-ray burster GRB980425, is a possible link between the two classes of objects. Analyzing the extensive radio emission data avaliable for SN1998bw, we are able to describe its time evolution within the well established framework available for the analysis of radio emission from supernovae. This then allows description of a number of physical properties of the object. The radio emission can best be explained as interaction of a mildly relativistic (Gamma about 1.6) shock with a dense pre-explosion stellar wind established circumstellar medium (CSM) which is highly structured both azimuthally, in clumps or filaments, and radially, with two observed density enhancements separated by about 3e17 cm. With assumptions as to pre-explosion stellar wind conditions, it is possible to estimate that the progenitor to SN 1998bw had a mass loss rate of about 3.5e-5 solar masses per yr with at least two approximately 30% increases in mass-loss rate; th...

  11. A 23 GHz survey of GRB error boxes

    CERN Document Server

    Hewitt, J N; Barthelmy, S D; Baumgartner, W H; Cline, T L; Corey, B E; Fishman, G J; Gehrels, N; Hurley, K C; Kouveliotou, C; Meegan, C A; Moore, C B; Rutledge, R E; Trotter, C S

    1996-01-01

    The Haystack 37-meter telescope was used in a pilot project in May 1995 to observe GRB error boxes at 23~GHz. Seven BATSE error boxes and two IPN arcs were scanned by driving the beam of the telescope rapidly across their area. For the BATSE error boxes, the radio observations took place two to eighteen days after the BATSE detection and several boxes were observed more than once. Total power data were recorded continuously as the telescope was driven at a rate of 0.2~degrees/second, yielding Nyquist sampling of the beam with an integration time of 50~milliseconds, corresponding to a theoretical rms sensitivity of 0.5~Jy. Under conditions of good weather, this sensitivity was achieved. In a preliminary analysis of the data we detect only two sources, 3C273 and 0552+398, both catalogued sources that are known to be variable at 23~GHz. Neither had a flux density that was unusally high or low at the time of our observations.

  12. GRB physics and cosmology with peak energy-intensity correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are immensely energetic explosions radiating up to 1054 erg of energy isotropically (Eiso) and they are observed within a wide range of redshift (from ∼ 0.01 up to ∼ 9). Such enormous power and high redshift point at these phenomena being highly favorable to investigate the history and evolution of our universe. The major obstacle in their application as cosmological study-tools is to find a way to standardize the GRBs, for instance similar to SNe Ia. With respect to this goal, the correlation between spectral peak energy (Ep,i) and the “intensity” is a positively useful and investigated criterion. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that, through the Ep,i – Eiso correlation, the current data set of GRBs can already contribute to the independent evidence of the matter density ΩM being ∼ 0.3 for a flat universe scenario. We try to inspect and compare the correlations of Ep,i with different intensity indicators (e.g., radiated energy, average and peak luminosity, bolometric vs. monochromatic quantities, etc.) both in terms of intrinsic dispersion and precise estimation of ΩM. The outcome of such studies are further analyzed in verifying the reliability of the correlations for both GRB physics and their standardization for cosmology

  13. An External Shock Origin of GRB 141028A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Michael; Bégué, Damien

    2016-07-01

    The prompt emission of the long, smooth, and single-pulsed gamma-ray burst, GRB 141028A, is analyzed under the guise of an external shock model. First, we fit the γ-ray spectrum with a two-component photon model, namely synchrotron+blackbody, and then fit the recovered evolution of the synchrotron ν F_{ν} peak to an analytic model derived considering the emission of a relativistic blast-wave expanding into an external medium. The prediction of the model for the ν F_{ν} peak evolution matches well with the observations. We observe the blast-wave transitioning into the deceleration phase. Further we assume the expansion of the magnetic field deduced from the observations. This allows us to recover within an order of magnitude the flux density at the ν F_{ν} peak, which is remarkable considering the simplicity of the analytic model. Under this scenario we argue that the distinction between prompt and afterglow emission is superfluous as both early and late time emission emanate from the same source. While the external shock model is clearly not a universal solution, this analysis opens the possibility that at least some fraction of GRBs can be explained with an external shock origin of their prompt phase.

  14. New constraints on GRB jet geometry and relativistic shock physics

    CERN Document Server

    Guidorzi, C; Harrison, R; Margutti, R; Sudilovsky, V; Zauderer, B A; Kobayashi, S; Cucchiara, A; Melandri, A; Pandey, S B; Berger, E; Bersier, D; D'Elia, V; Gomboc, A; Greiner, J; Japelj, J; Kopac, D; Kumar, B; Malesani, D; Mottram, C J; O'Brien, P T; Rau, A; Smith, R J; Steele, I A; Tanvir, N R; Virgili, F

    2014-01-01

    We use high--quality, multi-band observations of Swift GRB120404A, from gamma-ray to radio frequencies, together with the new hydrodynamics code of van Eerten et al. (2012) to test the standard synchrotron shock model. The evolution of the radio and optical afterglow, with its prominent optical rebrightening at t_rest 260-2600 s, is remarkably well modelled by a decelerating jet viewed close to the jet edge, combined with some early re-energization of the shock. We thus constrain the geometry of the jet with half-opening and viewing angles of 23 and 21 deg respectively and suggest that wide jets viewed off-axis are more common in GRBs than previously thought. We also derive the fireball microphysics parameters epsilon_B=2.4e-4 and epsilon_e=9.3e-2 and a circumburst density of n=240 cm^-3. The ability to self-consistently model the microphysics parameters and jet geometry in this way offers an alternative to trying to identify elusive canonical jet breaks at late times. The mismatch between the observed and mo...

  15. The origin of the late rebrightening in GRB 080503

    CERN Document Server

    Hascoët, R; Mochkovitch, R

    2012-01-01

    GRB 080503, detected by Swift, belongs to the class of bursts whose prompt phase consists of an initial short spike followed by a longer soft tail. It did not show any transition to a regular afterglow at the end of the prompt emission but exhibited a surprising rebrightening after one day. We aim to explain this rebrightening with two different scenarios - refreshed shocks or a density clump in the circumburst medium - and two models for the origin of the afterglow, the standard one where it comes from the forward shock, and an alternative one where it results from a long-lived reverse shock. We computed afterglow light curves either using a single-zone approximation for the shocked region or a detailed multizone method that more accurately accounts for the compression of the material. We find that in several of the considered cases the detailed model must be used to obtain a reliable description of the shock dynamics. The density clump scenario is not favored. We confirm previous results that the presence o...

  16. An External Shock Origin of GRB 141028A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, J. Michael; Bégué, Damien; Ryde, Felix; Omodei, Nicola; Pe’er, Asaf; Racusin, J. L.; Cucchiara, A.

    2016-05-01

    The prompt emission of the long, smooth, and single-pulsed gamma-ray burst, GRB 141028A, is analyzed under the guise of an external shock model. First, we fit the γ-ray spectrum with a two-component photon model, namely, synchrotron+blackbody, and then fit the recovered evolution of the synchrotron νF ν peak to an analytic model derived considering the emission of a relativistic blast wave expanding into an external medium. The prediction of the model for the νF ν peak evolution matches well with the observations. We observe the blast wave transitioning into the deceleration phase. Furthermore, we assume the expansion of the blast wave to be nearly adiabatic, motivated by the low magnetic field deduced from the observations. This allows us to recover within an order of magnitude the flux density at the νF ν peak, which is remarkable considering the simplicity of the analytic model. Under this scenario we argue that the distinction between prompt and afterglow emission is superfluous as both early-time emission and late-time emission emanate from the same source. While the external shock model is clearly not a universal solution, this analysis opens the possibility that at least some fraction of GRBs can be explained with an external shock origin of their prompt phase.

  17. GRB physics and cosmology with peak energy-intensity correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Disha; Amati, Lorenzo

    2015-12-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are immensely energetic explosions radiating up to 1054 erg of energy isotropically (Eiso) and they are observed within a wide range of redshift (from ˜ 0.01 up to ˜ 9). Such enormous power and high redshift point at these phenomena being highly favorable to investigate the history and evolution of our universe. The major obstacle in their application as cosmological study-tools is to find a way to standardize the GRBs, for instance similar to SNe Ia. With respect to this goal, the correlation between spectral peak energy (Ep,i) and the "intensity" is a positively useful and investigated criterion. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that, through the Ep,i - Eiso correlation, the current data set of GRBs can already contribute to the independent evidence of the matter density ΩM being ˜ 0.3 for a flat universe scenario. We try to inspect and compare the correlations of Ep,i with different intensity indicators (e.g., radiated energy, average and peak luminosity, bolometric vs. monochromatic quantities, etc.) both in terms of intrinsic dispersion and precise estimation of ΩM. The outcome of such studies are further analyzed in verifying the reliability of the correlations for both GRB physics and their standardization for cosmology.

  18. Solar energy apparatus with apertured shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collings, Roger J. (Inventor); Bannon, David G. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A protective apertured shield for use about an inlet to a solar apparatus which includesd a cavity receiver for absorbing concentrated solar energy. A rigid support truss assembly is fixed to the periphery of the inlet and projects radially inwardly therefrom to define a generally central aperture area through which solar radiation can pass into the cavity receiver. A non-structural, laminated blanket is spread over the rigid support truss in such a manner as to define an outer surface area and an inner surface area diverging radially outwardly from the central aperture area toward the periphery of the inlet. The outer surface area faces away from the inlet and the inner surface area faces toward the cavity receiver. The laminated blanket includes at least one layer of material, such as ceramic fiber fabric, having high infra-red emittance and low solar absorption properties, and another layer, such as metallic foil, of low infra-red emittance properties.

  19. Optimization of Synthetic Aperture Image Quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moshavegh, Ramin; Jensen, Jonas; Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando;

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture (SA) imaging produces high-quality images and velocity estimates of both slow and fast flow at high frame rates. However, grating lobe artifacts can appear both in transmission and reception. These affect the image quality and the frame rate. Therefore optimization of parameters...... F-number, number of emissions and the aperture size. They are considered to be the most contributing acquisition factors in the quality of the high resolution images in SA. Therefore, the performance of image quality is quantified in terms of full-width at half maximum (FWHM) and the cystic...... resolution (CTR). The results of the study showed that SA imaging with only 32 emissions and maximum sweep angle of 22 degrees yields a very good image quality compared with using 256 emissions and the full aperture size. Therefore the number of emissions and the maximum sweep angle in the SA can be...

  20. Discerning the physical origins of cosmological Gamma-ray bursts based on multiple observational criteria: the cases of z=6.7 GRB 080913, z=8.3 GRB 090423, and some short/hard GRBs

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Bing; Zhang, Bin-Bin; Virgili, Francisco J.; Liang, En-Wei; Kann, D. Alexander; Wu, Xue-Feng; Proga, Daniel; LV, Hou-Jun; Toma, Kenji; Meszaros, Peter; Burrows, David N.; Roming, Peter W. A.; Gehrels, Neil

    2009-01-01

    (Abridged) The two high-redshift gamma-ray bursts, GRB 080913 at z=6.7 and GRB 090423 at z=8.3, recently detected by Swift appear as intrinsically short, hard GRBs. They could have been recognized by BATSE as short/hard GRBs should they have occurred at z

  1. GRB 070125 and the environments of spectral-line poor afterglow absorbers

    CERN Document Server

    De Cia, A; Wiersema, K; van der Horst, A J; Vreeswijk, P M; Björnsson, G; Postigo, A de Ugarte; Jakobsson, P; Levan, A J; Rol, E; Schulze, S; Tanvir, N R

    2011-01-01

    GRB 070125 is among the most energetic bursts detected and the most extensively observed so far. Nevertheless, unresolved issues are still open in the literature on the physics of the afterglow and on the GRB environment. In particular, GRB 070125 was claimed to have exploded in a galactic halo environment, based on the uniqueness of the optical spectrum and the non-detection of an underlying host galaxy. In this work we collect all publicly available data and address these issues by modelling the NIR-to-X-ray spectral energy distribution (SED) and studying the high signal-to-noise VLT/FORS afterglow spectrum in comparison with a larger sample of GRB absorbers. The SED reveals a synchrotron cooling break in the UV, low equivalent hydrogen column density and little reddening caused by a LMC- or SMC-type extinction curve. From the weak MgII absorption at z=1.5477 in the spectrum, we derived logN(MgII)=12.96+0.13-0.18 and upper limits on the ionic column density of several metals. These suggest that the GRB abso...

  2. Faint high-energy gamma-ray photon emission of GRB 081006A from Fermi observations

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, WeiKang; Pandey, Shashi B; McKay, Timothy A; Zhang, BinBin; Zhang, Bing; 10.1088/0004-637X/745/1/72

    2012-01-01

    Since the launch of the Fermi gamma - ray Space Telescope on June 11, 2008, the LAT instrument has solidly detected more than 20 GRBs with high energy photon emission above 100 MeV. Using the matched filter technique, 3 more GRBs have also shown evidence of correlation with high energy photon emission as demonstrated by Akerlof et al. In this paper, we present another GRB unambiguously detected by the matched filter technique, GRB 081006A. This event is associated with more than 13 high energy photons above 100 MeV. The likelihood analysis code provided by the $Fermi$ Science Support Center (FSSC) generated an independent verification of this detection by comparison of the Test Statistics (TS) value with similar calculations for random LAT data fields. We have performed detailed temporal and spectral analysis of photons from 8 keV up to 0.8 GeV from the GBM and the LAT. The properties of GRB 081006A can be compared to the other two long duration GRBs detected at similar significance, GRB 080825C and GRB 09021...

  3. Deep Ly-alpha imaging of two z=2.04 GRB host galaxy fields

    CERN Document Server

    Fynbo, J P U; Thomsen, B; Hjorth, J; Gorosabel, J; Andersen, M I; Egholm, M P; Holland, S; Jensen, B L; Pedersen, H; Weidinger, M

    2002-01-01

    We report on the results of deep narrow-band Ly-alpha, U and I imaging of the fields of two GRBs at z=2.04 (GRB 000301C and GRB 000926). We find that the host galaxy of GRB 000926 is an extended, strong Ly-alpha emitter with a rest-frame equivalent width of 71+20-15 AA. The galaxy consists of two main components and several fainter knots. GRB 000926 occurred in the western component, whereas most of the Ly-alpha luminosity (about 65%) originates in the eastern component. Using archival HST images of the host galaxy we measure the spectral slopes (f_lambda prop. to lambda^beta) of the two components to beta = -2.4+-0.3 (east) and -1.4+-0.2 (west). This implies that both components contain at most small amounts of dust, consistent with the observed strong Ly-alpha emission. The western component has a slightly redder V-I colour than the eastern component, suggesting the presence of at least some dust. We do not detect the host galaxy of GRB 000301C in neither Ly-alpha emission nor in U and I-band images. We inf...

  4. GRB 140206A: the most distant polarized Gamma-Ray Burst

    CERN Document Server

    Gotz, D; Antier, S; Covino, S; D'Avanzo, P; D'Elia, V; Melandri, A

    2014-01-01

    The nature of the prompt gamma-ray emission of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) is still far from being completely elucidated. The measure of linear polarization is a powerful tool that can be used to put further constraints on the content and magnetization of the GRB relativistic outflows, as well as on the radiation processes at work. To date only a handful of polarization measurements are available for the prompt emission of GRBs. Here we present the analysis of the prompt emission of GRB 140206A, obtained with INTEGRAL/IBIS, Swift/BAT, and Fermi/GBM. Using INTEGRAL/IBIS as a Compton polarimeter we were able to constrain the linear polarization level of the second peak of this GRB as being larger than 28% at 90% c.l. We also present the GRB afterglow optical spectroscopy obtained at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG), which allowed us the measure the distance of this GRB, z=2.739. This distance value together with the polarization measure obtained with IBIS, allowed us to derive the deepest and most reliable li...

  5. GRB 130606A within a sub-DLA at redshift 5.91

    CERN Document Server

    Castro-Tirado, A J; Ellison, S L; Jelínek, M; Martín-Carrillo, A; Bromm, V; Gorosabel, J; Bremer, M; Winters, J M; Hanlon, L; Meegan, S; Topinka, M; Pandey, S B; Guziy, S; Jeong, S; Sonbas, E; Pozanenko, A S; Cunniffe, R; Fernández-Muñoz, R; Ferrero, P; Gehrels, N; Hudec, R; Kubánek, P; Lara-Gil, O; Muñoz-Martínez, V F; Pérez-Ramírez, D; Štrobl, J; Álvarez-Iglesias, C; Inasaridze, R; Rumyantsev, V; Volnova, A; Hellmich, S; Mottola, S; Cerón, J M Castro; Cepa, J; Göğüş, E; Güver, T; Taş, Ö Önal; Park, I H; Sabau-Graziati, L; Tejero, A

    2013-01-01

    Events such as GRB130606A at z=5.91, offer an exciting new window into pre-galactic metal enrichment in these very high redshift host galaxies. We study the environment and host galaxy of GRB 130606A, a high-z event, in the context of a high redshift population of GRBs. We have obtained multiwavelength observations from radio to gamma-ray, concentrating particularly on the X-ray evolution as well as the optical photometric and spectroscopic data analysis. With an initial Lorentz bulk factor in the range \\Gamma_0 ~ 65-220, the X-ray afterglow evolution can be explained by a time-dependent photoionization of the local circumburst medium, within a compact and dense environment. The host galaxy is a sub-DLA (log N (HI) = 19.85+/-0.15), with a metallicity content in the range from ~1/7 to ~1/60 of solar. Highly ionized species (N V and Si IV) are also detected. This is the second highest redshift burst with a measured GRB-DLA metallicity and only the third GRB absorber with sub-DLA HI column density. GRB ' lightho...

  6. On the Host Galaxy of GRB 150101B and the Associated Active Galactic Nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Chen; Wang, Junfeng; Liu, Tong; Jiang, Xiaochuan

    2016-01-01

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of the host galaxy of short-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) 150101B. Follow-up optical and X-ray observations suggested that the host galaxy, 2MASX J12320498-1056010, likely harbors a low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGN). Our modeling of the spectral energy distribution (SED) has confirmed the nature of the AGN, making it the first reported GRB host that contains an AGN. We have also found the host galaxy is a massive elliptical galaxy with stellar population of $\\sim 5.7\\ Gyr$, one of the oldest among the short-duration GRB hosts. Our analysis suggests that the host galaxy can be classified as an X-ray bright, optically normal galaxy (XBONG), and the central AGN is likely dominated by a radiatively inefficient accretion flow (RIAF). Our work explores interesting connection that may exist between GRB and AGN activities of the host galaxy, which can help understand the host environment of the GRB events and the roles of AGN feedback.

  7. Shocked by the Very Bright Radio Flare and Afterglow of GRB 130427A

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Horst, Alexander J.

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130427A was extremely bright across the electromagnetic spectrum, with emission spanning 16 orders of magnitude in observing frequency, from almost 100 GeV gamma-rays down to the GHz radio regime. While the intrinsic luminosity of this GRB was not extreme compared to other GRBs, it displayed the largest measured fluence of the last three decades due to its proximity with a redshift of 0.34. One of the most notable characteristics of this GRB was its bright radio emission, in particular the radio flare which has been observed only a few times in other GRBs and is usually attributed to the reverse shock moving back into the GRB jet. Here we present radio observations with unprecedented temporal coverage at three observing frequencies obtained with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) and the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager (AMI). AMI had the earliest radio detection at 8 hours after the initial flash of gamma-rays, catching the radio flare on the rise. The 12-hour WSRT observations in the first few days enabled a detailed study of the short time-scale behavior at radio wavelengths. Besides our observations of the radio flare and afterglow up to three months after the gamma-ray trigger, we present our results for modeling the radio light curves together with the broadband data set in various other wavelength regimes, enabling us to determine physical parameters of both the reverse and forward shock of this enigmatic GRB.

  8. The ECLAIRs GRB-trigger telescope on-board the future mission SVOM

    CERN Document Server

    Schanne, Stéphane; Atteia, Jean-Luc; Godet, Olivier; Lachaud, Cyril; Mercier, Karine

    2015-01-01

    The Space-based multi-band astronomical Variable Objects Monitor (SVOM) is an approved satellite mission for Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) studies, developed in cooperation between the Chinese National Space Agency (CNSA), the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), the French Space Agency (CNES) and French laboratories. SVOM entered Phase B in 2014 and is scheduled for launch in 2021. SVOM will provide fast and accurate GRB localizations, and determine the temporal and spectral properties of the GRB emission, thanks to a set of 4 on-board instruments. The trigger system of the coded-mask telescope ECLAIRs images the sky in the 4-120 keV energy range, in order to detect and localize GRBs in its 2 sr-wide field of view. The low-energy threshold of ECLAIRs is well suited for the detection of highly redshifted GRB. The high-energy coverage is extended up to 5 MeV thanks to the non-imaging gamma-ray spectrometer GRM. GRB alerts are sent in real-time to the ground observers community, and a spacecraft slew is performed in orde...

  9. Constraining the GRB-magnetar model by means of the Galactic pulsar population

    CERN Document Server

    Rea, Nanda; Pons, Jose' A; Perna, Rosalba; Dainotti, Maria G; Miralles, Juan A; Torres, Diego F

    2015-01-01

    A large fraction of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) displays an X-ray plateau phase within <10^{5} s from the prompt emission, proposed to be powered by the spin-down energy of a rapidly spinning newly born magnetar. In this work we use the properties of the Galactic neutron star population to constrain the GRB-magnetar scenario. We re-analyze the X-ray plateaus of all Swift GRBs with known redshift, between January 2005 and August 2014. From the derived initial magnetic field distribution for the possible magnetars left behind by the GRBs, we study the evolution and properties of a simulated GRB-magnetar population using numerical simulations of magnetic field evolution, coupled with Monte Carlo simulations of Pulsar Population Synthesis in our Galaxy. We find that if the GRB X-ray plateaus are powered by the rotational energy of a newly formed magnetar, the current observational properties of the Galactic magnetar population are not compatible with being formed within the GRB scenario (regardless of the GRB type...

  10. Detection of GRB 090618 with RT-2 Experiment Onboard the Coronas-Photon Satellite

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, A R; Hingar, M K; Agrawal, V K; Chakrabarti, S K; Nandi, A; Debnath, D; Kotoch, T B; Sarkar, R; Chidambaram, T R; Vinod, P; Sreekumar, S; Kotov, Y D; Buslov, A S; Yurov, V N; Tyshkevich, V G; Arkhangelskij, A I; Zyatkov, R A; Naik, Sachindra

    2010-01-01

    We present the results of an analysis of the prompt gamma-ray emission from GRB 090618 using the RT-2 Experiment onboard the Coronas-Photon satellite. GRB 090618 shows multiple peaks and a detailed study of the temporal structure as a function of energy is carried out. As the GRB was incident at an angle of 77 degree to the detector axis, we have generated appropriate response functions of the detectors to derive the spectrum of this GRB. We have augmented these results using the publicly available data from the Swift BAT detector and show that a combined spectral analysis can measure the spectral parameters quite accurately. We also attempt a spectral and timing analysis of individual peaks and find evidence for a systematic change in the pulse emission characteristics for the successive pulses. In particular, we find that the peak energy of the spectrum, E_p, is found to monotonically decrease with time, for the successive pulses of this GRB.

  11. A tale of two GRB-SNe at a common redshift of z = 0.54

    CERN Document Server

    Cano, Z; Guidorzi, C; Margutti, R; Svensson, K M; Kobayashi, S; Melandri, A; Wiersema, K; Pozanenko, A; van der Horst, A J; Pooley, G G; Fernandez-Soto, A; Castro-Tirado, A J; Postigo, A de Ugarte; Im, M; Kamble, A P; Sahu, D; Alonso-Lorite, J; Anupama, G; Bibby, J L; Burgdorf, M J; Clay, N; Curran, P A; Fatkhullin, T A; Fruchter, A S; Garnavich, P; Gomboc, A; Gorosabel, J; Graham, J F; Gurugubelli, U; Haislip, J; Huang, K; Huxor, A; Ibrahimov, M; Jeon, Y; Jeon, Y-B; Ivarsen, K; Kasen, D; Klunko, E; Kouveliotou, C; LaCluyze, A; Levan, A J; Loznikov, V; Mazzali, P A; Moskvitin, A S; Mottram, C; Mundell, C G; Nugent, P E; Nysewander, M; O'Brien, P T; Park, W -K; Peris, V; Pian, E; Reichart, D; Rhoads, J E; Rol, E; Rumyantsev, V; Scowcroft, V; Shakhovskoy, D; Small, E; Smith, R J; Sokolov, V V; Starling, R L C; Steele, I; Strom, R G; Tanvir, N R; Tsapras, Y; Urata, Y; Vaduvescu, O; Volnova, A; Volvach, A; Wijers, R A M J; Woosley, S E; Young, D R

    2010-01-01

    We present ground-based and HST optical observations of the optical transients (OTs) of long-duration Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) 060729 and 090618, both at a redshift of z = 0.54. For GRB 060729, bumps are seen in the optical light curves (LCs), and the late-time broadband spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the OT resemble those of local type Ic supernovae (SNe). For GRB 090618, the dense sampling of our optical observations has allowed us to detect well-defined bumps in the optical LCs, as well as a change in colour, that are indicative of light coming from a core-collapse SN. The accompanying SNe for both events are individually compared with SN1998bw, a known GRB-supernova, and SN1994I, a typical type Ic supernova without a known GRB counterpart, and in both cases the brightness and temporal evolution more closely resemble SN1998bw. We also exploit our extensive optical and radio data for GRB 090618, as well as the publicly-available SWIFT -XRT data, and discuss the properties of the afterglow at early t...

  12. Happy Birthday Swift: Ultra-long GRB141121A and its broad-band Afterglow

    CERN Document Server

    Cucchiara, A; Corsi, A; Cenko, S B; Perley, D A; Marshall, A Lien F E; Pagani, C; Toy, V L; Capone, J I; Frail, D A; Horesh, A; Modjaz, M; Butler, N R; Littlejohns, O M; Watson, A M; Kutyrev, A S; Lee, W H; Richer, M G; Klein, C R; Fox, O D; Prochaska, J X; Bloom, J S; Troja, E; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; de Diego, J A; Georgiev, L; Gonzalez, J; Roman-Zuniga, C G; Gehrels, N; Moseley, H

    2015-01-01

    We present our extensive observational campaign on the Swift-discovered GRB141121A, al- most ten years after its launch. Our observations covers radio through X-rays, and extends for more than 30 days after discovery. The prompt phase of GRB 141121A lasted 1410 s and, at the derived redshift of z = 1.469, the isotropic energy is E{\\gamma},iso = 8.0x10^52 erg. Due to the long prompt duration, GRB141121A falls into the recently discovered class of UL-GRBs. Peculiar features of this burst are a flat early-time optical light curve and a radio-to-X-ray rebrightening around 3 days after the burst. The latter is followed by a steep optical-to-X-ray decay and a much shallower radio fading. We analyze GRB 141121A in the context of the standard forward-reverse shock (FS,RS) scenario and we disentangle the FS and RS contributions. Finally, we comment on the puzzling early-time (t ~3 d) behavior of GRB 141121A, and suggest that its interpretation may require a two-component jet model. Overall, our analysis confirms that ...

  13. Synchrotron radiation and diffusive shock acceleration - A short review and GRB perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlica, Mile, E-mail: mile.karlica@icranet.org [La Sapienza University of Rome - ICRANet, Piazzale Aldo Moro 5, 00189 Rome (Italy)

    2015-12-17

    In this talk we present the sponge” model and its possible implications on the GRB afterglow light curves. “Sponge” model describes source of GRB afterglow radiation as fragmented GRB ejecta where bubbles move through the rarefied medium. In the first part of the talk a short introduction to synchrotron radiation and Fermi acceleration was presented. In the assumption that X-ray luminosity of GRB afterglow phase comes from the kinetic energy losses of clouds in ejecta medium radiated as synchrotron radiation we solved currently very simple equation of motion to find which combination of cloud and medium regime describes the afterglow light curve the best. We proposed for the first step to watch simple combinations of expansion regimes for both bubbles and surrounding medium. The closest case to the numerical fit of GRB 150403A with time power law index k = 1.38 is the combination of constant bubbles and Sedov like expanding medium with time power law index k = 1.25. Of course the question of possible mixture of variuos regime combinations is still open within this model.

  14. AstroSat CZT Imager observations of GRB 151006A: timing, spectroscopy, and polarisation study

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, A R; Hingar, M K; Iyyani, S; Khanna, Rakesh; Kutty, A P K; Malkar, J P; Paul, D; Bhalerao, V B; Bhattacharya, D; Dewangan, G C; Pawar, Pramod; Vibhute, A M; Chattopadhyay, T; Mithun, N P S; Vadawale, S V; Vagshette, N; Basak, R; Pradeep, P; Samuel, Essy; Sreekumar, S; Vinod, P; Navalgund, K H; Pandiyan, R; Sarma, K S; Seetha, S; Subbarao, K

    2016-01-01

    AstroSat is a multi-wavelength satellite launched on 2015 September 28. The CZT Imager of AstroSat on its very first day of operation detected a long duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) namely GRB 151006A. Using the off-axis imaging and spectral response of the instrument, we demonstrate that CZT Imager can localise this GRB correct to about a few degrees and it can provide, in conjunction with Swift, spectral parameters similar to that obtained from Fermi/GBM. Hence CZT Imager would be a useful addition to the currently operating GRB instruments (Swift and Fermi). Specifically, we argue that the CZT Imager will be most useful for the short hard GRBs by providing localisation for those detected by Fermi and spectral information for those detected only by Swift. We also provide preliminary results on a new exciting capability of this instrument: CZT Imager is able to identify Compton scattered events thereby providing polarisation information for bright GRBs. GRB 151006A, in spite of being relatively faint, shows h...

  15. Synchrotron radiation and diffusive shock acceleration - A short review and GRB perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this talk we present the sponge” model and its possible implications on the GRB afterglow light curves. “Sponge” model describes source of GRB afterglow radiation as fragmented GRB ejecta where bubbles move through the rarefied medium. In the first part of the talk a short introduction to synchrotron radiation and Fermi acceleration was presented. In the assumption that X-ray luminosity of GRB afterglow phase comes from the kinetic energy losses of clouds in ejecta medium radiated as synchrotron radiation we solved currently very simple equation of motion to find which combination of cloud and medium regime describes the afterglow light curve the best. We proposed for the first step to watch simple combinations of expansion regimes for both bubbles and surrounding medium. The closest case to the numerical fit of GRB 150403A with time power law index k = 1.38 is the combination of constant bubbles and Sedov like expanding medium with time power law index k = 1.25. Of course the question of possible mixture of variuos regime combinations is still open within this model

  16. Large aperture calorimeter for fusion laser measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, J.G.; Smith, P.A.

    The authors designed and constructed a large aperture calorimeter intended for laser fusion measurements on beams up to 20 cm diameter. The laser beam is absorbed in a glass disc backed by a disc carry a resistance wire. Although it performs essentially as expected with a noise equivalent energy of 20 mJ and a maximum energy of about 100 J, difficulties in construction give a 17% variation of sensitivity across the aperture. To overcome this problem it would probably be necessary to adopt an integral construction with the resistance bridge formed from an etched film on the back of the absorbing glass.

  17. Synthetic aperture radar capabilities in development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    The Imaging and Detection Program (IDP) within the Laser Program is currently developing an X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) to support the Joint US/UK Radar Ocean Imaging Program. The radar system will be mounted in the program`s Airborne Experimental Test-Bed (AETB), where the initial mission is to image ocean surfaces and better understand the physics of low grazing angle backscatter. The Synthetic Aperture Radar presentation will discuss its overall functionality and a brief discussion on the AETB`s capabilities. Vital subsystems including radar, computer, navigation, antenna stabilization, and SAR focusing algorithms will be examined in more detail.

  18. Multi-antenna synthetic aperture radar

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Wen-Qin

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is a well-known remote sensing technique, but conventional single-antenna SAR is inherently limited by the minimum antenna area constraint. Although there are still technical issues to overcome, multi-antenna SAR offers many benefits, from improved system gain to increased degrees-of-freedom and system flexibility. Multi-Antenna Synthetic Aperture Radar explores the potential and challenges of using multi-antenna SAR in microwave remote sensing applications. These applications include high-resolution imaging, wide-swath remote sensing, ground moving target indica

  19. A Method for Synthetic Aperture Compounding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jens Munk; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2010-01-01

    An approach to perform ultrasound spatial compounding using synthetic aperture data is proposed. The approach allows compounding to be performed for any number of directions without reducing the frame rate or temporal resolution. It is demonstrated how the contrast is improved by compounding and...... obtained when using 5 images. Using the same RF data, a synthetic aperture image without compounding reveals a CNR of -0.36, -0.93, -1.23, and -1.61 dB for the four cysts, respectively....

  20. Improvements in geomagnetic observatory data quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reda, Jan; Fouassier, Danielle; Isac, Anca;

    2011-01-01

    Geomagnetic observatory practice and instrumentation has evolved significantly over the past 150 years. Evolution continues to be driven by advances in technology and by the need of the data user community for higher-resolution, lower noise data in near-real time. Additionally, collaboration...... between observatories and the establishment of observatory networks has harmonized standards and practices across the world; improving the quality of the data product available to the user. Nonetheless, operating a highquality geomagnetic observatory is non-trivial. This article gives a record...... of the current state of observatory instrumentation and methods, citing some of the general problems in the complex operation of geomagnetic observatories. It further gives an overview of recent improvements of observatory data quality based on presentation during 11th IAGA Assembly at Sopron and INTERMAGNET...

  1. NuSTARobservations of grb 130427a establish a single component synchrotron afterglow origin for the late optical to multi-gev emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kouveliotou, C.; Granot, J.; Racusin, J. L.;

    2013-01-01

    GRB 130427A occurred in a relatively nearby galaxy; its prompt emission had the largest GRB fluence ever recorded. The afterglow of GRB 130427A was bright enough for the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope ARray (NuSTAR) to observe it in the 3-79 keV energy range long after its prompt emission (simil...

  2. Dust Extinction in High-z Galaxies with GRB Afterglow Spectroscopy - The 2175{\\AA} Feature at z=2.45

    CERN Document Server

    Elíasdóttir, Á; Hjorth, J; Ledoux, C; Watson, D; Andersen, A C; Malesani, D; Vreeswijk, P M; Prochaska, J X; Sollerman, J; Jaunsen, A O

    2008-01-01

    We report the clear detection of the 2175A dust absorption feature in the optical afterglow spectrum of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) GRB070802 at a redshift of z=2.45. This is the highest redshift for a detected 2175A dust bump to date, and it is the first clear detection of the 2175A bump in a GRB host galaxy, while several tens of optical afterglow spectra without the bump have been recorded in the past decade. The derived extinction curve gives A_V=0.8-1.5 depending on the assumed intrinsic slope. Of the three local extinction laws, an LMC type extinction gives the best fit to the extinction curve of the host of GRB070802. Besides the 2175A bump we find that the spectrum of GRB070802 is characterized by unusually strong low-ionization metal lines and possibly a high metallicity for a GRB sightline ([Si/H]=-0.46+/-0.38, [Zn/H]=-0.50+/-0.68). In particular, the spectrum of GRB070802 is unique for a GRB spectrum in that it shows clear CI absorption features, leading us to propose a correlation between the presen...

  3. IMPROVED SYNTHETIC APERTURE SONAR MOTION COMPENSATION COMBINED DPCA WITH SUB-APERTURE IMAGE CORRELATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Wei; Zhang Chunhua; Liu Jiyuan

    2009-01-01

    Estimation precision of Displaced Phase Center Algorithm (DPCA) is affected by the number of displaced phase center pairs, the bandwidth of transmitting signal and many other factors. Detailed analysis is made on DPCA's estimation precision. Analysis results show that the directional vector estimation precision of DPCA is low, which will produce accumulating errors when phase centers' track is estimated. Because of this reason, DPCA suffers from accumulating errors seriously. To overcome this problem, a method combining DPCA with Sub Aperture Image Correlation (SAIC) is presented. Large synthetic aperture is divided into sub-apertures. Micro errors in sub-aperture are estimated by DPCA and compensated to raw echo data. Bulk errors between sub-apertures are estimated by SAIC and compensated directly to sub-aperture images. After that, sub-aperture images are directly used to generate ultimate SAS image. The method is applied to the lake-trial dataset of a 20 kHz SAS prototype system. Results show the method can successfully remove the accumulating error and produce a better SAS image.

  4. Physical conditions and element abundances in SN and GRB host galaxies at different redshifts

    CERN Document Server

    Contini, M

    2016-01-01

    We compare the physical parameters and the relative abundances calculated throughout supernova (SN) and gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxies by the detailed modelling of the spectra. The results show that : 1) shock velocities are lower in long period GRB (LGRB) than in SN host galaxies. 2) O/H relative abundance in SN hosts are scattered within a range 8.0 10^5 K. Ts in LGRB hosts are 3-8 10^4 K. 4) Ha increases with the ionization parameter U. We suggest that SN-host symbiosis is stronger in terms of host galaxy activity than GRB-host in the range of energies related to the near UV - optical - near IR spectra.

  5. GRB 050904: the oldest cosmic explosion ever observed in the Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swift discovered the high redshift (z=6.29) GRB 050904 with the Burst Alert Telescope and began observing with its narrow field instruments only 161 s after the burst onset. GRB 050904 was a long, multi-peaked, bright GRB with a presence of flaring activity lasting up to 1-2 hours after the burst onset. The spectral energy distribution shows a clear softening trend along the burst evolution with a photon index decreasing from -1.2 up to -1.9. The observed variability is more dramatic than the typical Swift afterglow, the amplitude and rise/fall times of the flares are consistent with the behavior of nearby (z ≤ 1) long GRBs and suggest the interpretation of the BAT and XRT data as a single continuous observation of long lasting prompt emission

  6. A Detection of Molecular Gas Emission in the Host Galaxy of GRB 080517

    CERN Document Server

    Stanway, E R; Tanvir, N R; Wiersema, K; van der Laan, T P R

    2014-01-01

    We have observed the host galaxy of the low redshift, low luminosity GRB 080517 at 105.8 GHz using the IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer. We detect an emission line with integrated flux S.delta{nu} = 0.39 +/- 0.05 Jy km/s - consistent both spatially and in velocity with identification as the J=1-0 rotational transition of carbon monoxide (CO) at the host galaxy redshift. This represents only the third long GRB host galaxy with molecular gas detected in emission. The inferred molecular gas mass, M_H2 ~ 6.3 x 10^8 M_sun, implies a gas consumption timescale of ~40 Myr if star formation continues at its current rate. Similar short timescales appear characteristic of the long GRB population with CO observations to date, suggesting that the gamma-ray burst in these sources occurs towards the end of their star formation episode.

  7. Simulations of GRB detections with the ECLAIRs telescope onboard the future SVOM mission

    CERN Document Server

    Antier, S; Cordier, B; Gros, A; Götz, D; Lachaud, C

    2015-01-01

    The soft gamma-ray telescope ECLAIRs with its Scientific Trigger Unit is in charge of detecting Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) on-board the future SVOM satellite. Using the "scientific software model" (SSM), we study the efficiency of both implemented trigger algorithms, the Count-Rate Trigger for time-scales below 20s and the Image Trigger for larger ones. The SMM provides a simulation of ECLAIRs with photon projection through the coded-mask onto the detection plane. We developed an input GRB database for the SSM based on GRBs light curves detected by the Fermi GBM instrument. We extrapolated the GRB spectra into the ECLAIRs band (4-120 keV) and projected them onto the detection plane, superimposed with cosmic extragalactic background photons (CXB). Several simulations were performed by varying the GRB properties (fluxes and positions in the field of view). We present first results of this study in this paper.

  8. Development of a Gamma-Ray Burst Automated Response and Remote 0.5 m Telescope at Eteleman Observatory at the University of the Virgin Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giblin, T. W.; Neff, J. E.; Hakkila, J.; Drost, D. M.; Andreasian-Thomas, N.

    2003-03-01

    The College of Charleston is one of three institutions belonging to a consortium led by the Division of Science and Mathematics at the University of the Virgin Islands (UVI) to maintain and operate a research grade telescope at Etelman Observatory on the island of St. Thomas (18° 21‧ N, 65° W at an elevation 1325 ft with 1.5″ seeing). Renovations to the pre-existing UVI observatory through an NSF grant to UVI have been ongoing for the past 18 months and include: (i) complete renovation of the control room and housing facility, (ii) installation of a new Ash dome, and (iii) delivery and installation of a TORUS Technologies 0.5 m telescope in early Spring, 2003. We anticipate the observatory to be fully operational in the summer of 2003. The observatory will serve a variety of needs to the consortium members. One of the primary research functions of this facility will be to perform rapid automated follow-up observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts observed with Swift. With the exceptional sky coverage at Etelman Observatory, we anticipate to collect a large database of GRB afterglow (and counterpart) photometry and light curves throughout the duration of the Swift mission. This is work is funded through NSF, AAS/NASA, and The College of Charleston.

  9. Parametric Beamformer for Synthetic Aperture Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Tomov, Borislav Gueorguiev; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2006-01-01

    In this paper a parametric beamformer, which can handle all imaging modalities including synthetic aperture imaging, is presented. The image lines and apodization coefficients are specified parametrically, and the lines can have arbitrary orientation and starting point in 3D coordinates. The beam...

  10. Vowel Aperture and Syllable Segmentation in French

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goslin, Jeremy; Frauenfelder, Ulrich H.

    2008-01-01

    The theories of Pulgram (1970) suggest that if the vowel of a French syllable is open then it will induce syllable segmentation responses that result in the syllable being closed, and vice versa. After the empirical verification that our target French-speaking population was capable of distinguishing between mid-vowel aperture, we examined the…

  11. Perceiving Affordances for Fitting through Apertures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishak, Shaziela; Adolph, Karen E.; Lin, Grace C.

    2008-01-01

    Affordances--possibilities for action--are constrained by the match between actors and their environments. For motor decisions to be adaptive, affordances must be detected accurately. Three experiments examined the correspondence between motor decisions and affordances as participants reached through apertures of varying size. A psychophysical…

  12. Synthetic Aperture Beamformation using the GPU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jens Munk; Schaa, Dana; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2011-01-01

    A synthetic aperture ultrasound beamformer is implemented for a GPU using the OpenCL framework. The implementation supports beamformation of either RF signals or complex baseband signals. Transmit and receive apodization can be either parametric or dynamic using a fixed F-number, a reference, and a...

  13. Diffraction contrast imaging using virtual apertures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two methods on how to obtain the full diffraction information from a sample region and the associated reconstruction of images or diffraction patterns using virtual apertures are demonstrated. In a STEM-based approach, diffraction patterns are recorded for each beam position using a small probe convergence angle. Similarly, a tilt series of TEM dark-field images is acquired. The resulting datasets allow the reconstruction of either electron diffraction patterns, or bright-, dark- or annular dark-field images using virtual apertures. The experimental procedures of both methods are presented in the paper and are applied to a precipitation strengthened and creep deformed ferritic alloy with a complex microstructure. The reconstructed virtual images are compared with conventional TEM images. The major advantage is that arbitrarily shaped virtual apertures generated with image processing software can be designed without facing any physical limitations. In addition, any virtual detector that is specifically designed according to the underlying crystal structure can be created to optimize image contrast. - Highlights: • A dataset containing all structural information of a given position is recorded. • The dataset allows reconstruction of virtual diffraction patterns or images. • Specific virtual apertures are designed to image precipitates in a complex alloy. • Virtual diffraction patterns from arbitrarily small regions can be established. • Using STEM diffraction to record the dataset is more efficient than TEM dark-field

  14. Dynamic metamaterial aperture for microwave imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleasman, Timothy; F. Imani, Mohammadreza; Gollub, Jonah N.; Smith, David R.

    2015-11-01

    We present a dynamic metamaterial aperture for use in computational imaging schemes at microwave frequencies. The aperture consists of an array of complementary, resonant metamaterial elements patterned into the upper conductor of a microstrip line. Each metamaterial element contains two diodes connected to an external control circuit such that the resonance of the metamaterial element can be damped by application of a bias voltage. Through applying different voltages to the control circuit, select subsets of the elements can be switched on to create unique radiation patterns that illuminate the scene. Spatial information of an imaging domain can thus be encoded onto this set of radiation patterns, or measurements, which can be processed to reconstruct the targets in the scene using compressive sensing algorithms. We discuss the design and operation of a metamaterial imaging system and demonstrate reconstructed images with a 10:1 compression ratio. Dynamic metamaterial apertures can potentially be of benefit in microwave or millimeter wave systems such as those used in security screening and through-wall imaging. In addition, feature-specific or adaptive imaging can be facilitated through the use of the dynamic aperture.

  15. Parametric Transverse Patterns in Broad Aperture Lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grigorieva, E.V.; Kashchenko, S.A.; Mosekilde, Erik

    1998-01-01

    Parametrically generated optical patterns are investigated for finite and large-scale transverse aperture lasers. Standing and rotating patterns as well as periodic and chaotic pattern alternations are described in the framework of the amplitude equation formalism. Sensitive dependence on the...... geometrical size of the system is demonstrated even in the case of large-scale systems....

  16. Dynamic metamaterial aperture for microwave imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sleasman, Timothy; Imani, Mohammadreza F.; Gollub, Jonah N.; Smith, David R. [Center for Metamaterials and Integrated Plasmonics, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, 27708 (United States)

    2015-11-16

    We present a dynamic metamaterial aperture for use in computational imaging schemes at microwave frequencies. The aperture consists of an array of complementary, resonant metamaterial elements patterned into the upper conductor of a microstrip line. Each metamaterial element contains two diodes connected to an external control circuit such that the resonance of the metamaterial element can be damped by application of a bias voltage. Through applying different voltages to the control circuit, select subsets of the elements can be switched on to create unique radiation patterns that illuminate the scene. Spatial information of an imaging domain can thus be encoded onto this set of radiation patterns, or measurements, which can be processed to reconstruct the targets in the scene using compressive sensing algorithms. We discuss the design and operation of a metamaterial imaging system and demonstrate reconstructed images with a 10:1 compression ratio. Dynamic metamaterial apertures can potentially be of benefit in microwave or millimeter wave systems such as those used in security screening and through-wall imaging. In addition, feature-specific or adaptive imaging can be facilitated through the use of the dynamic aperture.

  17. Analytic inversion in synthetic aperture radar.

    OpenAIRE

    Rothaus, O. S.

    1994-01-01

    A method of processing synthetic aperture radar signals that avoids some of the approximations currently in use that appear to be responsible for severe phase distortions is described. As a practical matter, this method requires N3 numerical operations, as opposed to the N2 ln N currently the case, but N3 is now easily managed, for N in the range of interest.

  18. Experiences on synthetic aperture focussing technique (SAFT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaging based on the synthetic aperture focussing technique (SAFT) improves the reliability of sizing and characterisation of structural discontinuities found in non-destructive testing of nuclear components. One of the main advantages of this technique is an improvement of signal-to-noise-ratio. The advantages are discussed in terms of practical applications and theory. (orig.)

  19. Compound imaging using Synthetic Aperture Sequential Beamformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Casper Bo; Jensen, Jonas; Hemmsen, Martin Christian;

    2011-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Sequential Beamforming (SASB) is a technique with low complexity and the ability to yield a more uniform lateral resolution with range. However, the presence of speckle artifacts in ultrasound images degrades the contrast. In conventional imaging speckle is reduced by using...

  20. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Microwave Radiometers : an Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colliander, Andreas; McKague, Darren

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes 1) the progress of the work of the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society (GRSS) Instrumentation and Future Technologies Technical Committee (IFT-TC) Microwave Radiometer Working Group and 2) an overview of the development of interferometric synthetic aperture microwave radiometers as an introduction to a dedicated session.