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Sample records for apert syndrome phenotype

  1. Apert's Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Gudipaneni Ravi; Jyothsna, Mandapati; Ahmed, Syed Basheer; Sree Lakshmi, Ketham Reddy

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Apert's syndrome (acrocephalosyndactyly) is a rare congenital disorder characterized by craniosynostosis, midfacial malforma­tion and symmetrical syndactyly of hands and feet. Craniofacial deformities include cone-shaped calvarium, fat forehead, prop-tosis, hypertelorism and short nose with a bulbous tip. Intraoral findings include high arched palate with pseudocleft, maxillary transverse and sagittal hypoplasia with concomitant dental crowding, skeletal and dental anterior open bite...

  2. Apert Syndrome. Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ninecta Pérez Breña

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The case of a white female aged 7 is evaluated in the Primary Care Service of the Barrio Adentro medical mission in Nueva Esparta state, Republic of Venezuela. After a clinical and radiological evaluation she is diagnosed with a genetic syndrome known as Apert Syndrome.

  3. Apert, Crouzon and Other Craniosynostosis Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Ontario).

    This booklet discusses the impact and treatment of the two craniosynostosis syndromes (Apert and Crouzon), which involve the premature fusion of skull sutures, are usually identified at birth, and require years of treatment. It is noted that children with Apert syndrome may have some degree of mental retardation while children with Crouzon…

  4. Mandibular asymmetry in patients with the Crouzon or Apert Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Elmi; J.H. Reitsma; P.H. Buschang; E.B. Wolvius; E.M. Ongkosuwito

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe directional and fluctuating mandibular asymmetry over time in children with Crouzon or Apert syndrome. Mandibular asymmetry of children between 7.5 and 14 years of age with Crouzon syndrome (n = 35) and Apert syndrome (n = 24) were compared with controls (n = 32

  5. Mandibular asymmetry in patients with the crouzon or apert syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmi, P; Reitsma, J H; Buschang, P H; Wolvius, E B; Ongkosuwito, E M

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to describe directional and fluctuating mandibular asymmetry over time in children with Crouzon or Apert syndrome. Mandibular asymmetry of children between 7.5 and 14 years of age with Crouzon syndrome (n = 35) and Apert syndrome (n = 24) were compared with controls (n = 327). From panoramic radiographs, mandibular directional and fluctuating asymmetry was determined for the three groups. Multilevel statistical techniques were used to describe mandibular asymmetry changes over time. Patients with Crouzon and Apert syndromes showed statistically significant more fluctuating asymmetry for mandibular measures than did controls. Between the Crouzon and Apert syndromes groups, no statistical differences were found in directional and fluctuating asymmetry. The control group showed statistically significantly more directional asymmetry than did patients with Crouzon or Apert syndrome. The controls showed no change over time for the directional asymmetry of condylar-ramal height; however, the directional asymmetry of the gonial angle increased. Patients with Crouzon syndrome showed side dominance for only condylar-ramal height; whereas, patients with Apert syndrome did not show dominance for any of the measurements. Apert and Crouzon syndromes showed developmental instability, in contrast to the controls. No statistically significant longitudinal differences were found for either the directional or the fluctuating asymmetry between Crouzon and Apert syndromes. Findings for fluctuating and directional asymmetry for both syndromes may indicate an inability to cope with genetic and environmental stress during development and treatment, compared with untreated nonsyndromic individuals. PMID:24878346

  6. Apert Syndrome. Case Report Síndrome de Apert. Reporte de un caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamil González Martínez

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The case of a white female aged 7 is evaluated in the Primary Care Service of the Barrio Adentro medical mission in Nueva Esparta state, Republic of Venezuela. After a clinical and radiological evaluation she is diagnosed with a genetic syndrome known as Apert Syndrome.Se presenta el caso de una paciente de sexo femenino, de color de piel blanca, de 7 años de edad, evaluada en el Servicio de Atención Primaria de la misión médica Barrio Adentro del estado Nueva Esparta, en la República de Venezuela. Después de la evaluación clínica y radiológica se diagnostica un síndrome genético conocido como Síndrome de Apert.

  7. A longitudinal study of dental arch morphology in children with the syndrome of Crouzon or Apert

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Reitsma; P. Elmi; E.M. Ongkosuwito; P.H. Buschang; B. Prahl-Andersen

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare changes in dental arch morphology between patients with Crouzon syndrome or Apert syndrome and controls. Children between 4 and 14 yr of age with Crouzon syndrome (n = 40) or Apert syndrome (n = 28) were compared with non-syndromic controls (n = 457) in terms of

  8. Apert syndrome: quality of life and challenges of a management protocol in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raposo-Amaral, Cassio Eduardo; Raposo-Amaral, Cesar Augusto; Garcia Neto, José Junqueira; Farias, Daniely Bento; Somensi, Renato Salazar

    2012-07-01

    Apert syndrome is a complex craniofacial deformity with a broad clinical spectrum that mainly affects the craniofacial skeleton, lower and upper limbs. The quality of life for patients born with Apert syndrome may be strongly affected by the limitations that this syndrome imposes. The aims of this study were to describe the quality of life of patients born with Apert syndrome and the challenges of managing an Apert protocol in Brazil. The quality of life of 8 Apert patients who adhered to our management protocol was assessed using the Portuguese version of WHOQOL-100 (World Health Organization Quality of Life instrument). The answers were submitted to SPSS (Statistic Package for Social Science), and results were expressed in 25 facets and 6 domains (physical, psychological, social relations, level of independence, environment, and spirituality). Patients and families signed an informed consent, and the study was previously approved by our institutional review board. The cohort of patients scored 60 in 22 of 25 facets, with no grade less than 50. The facet of positive feelings note was 76.79; self-esteem and body image scored, respectively, 75.00 and 85.71. When the facets were grouped into domains, they had a high overall score. The cohort of Apert patients presented a satisfactory quality of life. This cohort of Apert patients acquired the necessary repertoire to manage the aversive daily situations of their lives. PMID:22777480

  9. Oral findings in patients with Apert Syndrome Achados bucais em pacientes com Síndrome de Apert

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele da Silva Dalben

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The Apert syndrome is a rare disorder of autosomal dominant inheritance caused by mutations in the FGFR2 gene at locus 10q26; patients with this syndrome present severe syndactyly, exophthalmia, ocular hypertelorism and hypoplastic midface with Class III malocclusion, besides systemic alterations. Most investigations available on the Apert syndrome address the genetic aspect or surgical management, with little emphasis on the oral aspects. OBJECTIVE: to investigate the oral findings, including dental anomalies, ectopic eruption of the maxillary permanent first molars and soft tissue alterations, in subjects with Apert syndrome. MATERIALS AND METHODS: clinical and radiographic examination of nine patients with Apert syndrome, aged 6 to 15 years, not previously submitted to orthodontic or orthognathic treatment. RESULTS: dental anomalies were present in all patients, with one to eight anomalies per individual. The most frequent anomalies were tooth agenesis, mainly affecting maxillary canines, and enamel opacities (44.4% for both. Ectopic eruption of maxillary first molars was found in 33.3% of patients; lateral palatal swellings were observed in 88.8% of patients. CONCLUSIONS: The occurrence of typical lateral palatal swellings agrees with the literature. The high prevalence of dental anomalies and ectopic eruption may suggest a possible etiologic relationship with the syndrome.INTRODUÇÃO: A síndrome de Apert é um distúrbio raro de herança autossômica dominante causado por mutações no lócus 10q26 do gene FGFR2; pacientes com esta síndrome apresentam sindactilia severa, exoftalmia, hiperteleorbitismo e hipoplasia da face média com má oclusão de Classe III, além de alterações sistêmicas. A maior parte dos estudos disponíveis sobre a síndrome de Apert aborda o aspecto genético ou manejo cirúrgico, com pouca ênfase nos aspectos bucais. OBJETIVO: investigar os achados bucais, incluindo anomalias dentárias, irrup

  10. Ocular manifestations of Apert and Crouzon syndromes: qualitative and quantitative findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreiborg, Sven; Cohen, M Michael

    2010-01-01

    There are significant differences in the ocular manifestations of Apert and Crouzon syndromes. Here, we present qualitative and quantitative data about the oculo-orbital region to demonstrate these differences. Although ocular protosis and hypertelorism characterize both disorders, the nature...

  11. Apert Syndrome: Outcomes From the Australian Craniofacial Unit's Birth to Maturity Management Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, David J; Anderson, Peter; Flapper, Walter; Syme-Grant, Jonathan; Santoreneos, Steven; Moore, Mark

    2016-07-01

    The complex, progressive, multisystem nature of Apert syndrome presents many challenges to managing surgeons. Based on the pioneering work of Paul Tessier, the senior author developed a multidisciplinary birth to maturity management protocol for Apert syndrome. Between 1975 and 2014 the Australian Craniofacial Unit has treated 174 Apert syndrome patients and 28 have completed full protocol management. This paper reviews the scientific contribution made to the management of Apert syndrome by the Australian Craniofacial Unit, the development and evolution of the protocol and presents comprehensive data on the surgical and nonsurgical craniofacial interventions, and outcomes for the 28 patients who have completed the programme; 26 had normal visual acuity, 22 had normal hearing, 20 achieved normal or nearly normal speech, 24 a functional class I occlusion, 18 completed mainstream schooling of whom at least 8 went on to tertiary education, at least 13 gained employment and 15 developed good social groups. These outcomes equal or exceed those presented by other authors and provide compelling evidence of the value of protocol management in clinical outcomes, in addition to their value in international collaboration, and scientific development of future therapeutic strategies for the management of Apert syndrome. PMID:27380568

  12. Patterns of tooth agenesis in patients with Crouzon or Apert syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Reitsma; E.M. Ongkosuwito; A.J. van Wijk; B. Prahl-Andersen

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Dental agenesis is the most common anomaly of dental development and can be a component of a congenital syndrome. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of agenesis and to describe patterns of tooth agenesis in patients with Crouzon or Apert syndrome compared with nonsyndr

  13. Original article patterns of tooth agenesis in patients with Crouzon or Apert syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Reitsma (Jacobus Harmen); E.M. Ongkosuwito (Edwin); A.J. van Wijk (Arjen); B. Prahl-Andersen (B.)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Dental agenesis is the most common anomaly of dental development and can be a component of a congenital syndrome. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of agenesis and to describe patterns of tooth agenesis in patients with Crouzon or Apert syndrome compared w

  14. Orthodontic and orthognathic management of a patient with Apert syndrome: a case report.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdonck, A.; Bertrand, J.; Carels, C.E.L.; Swinnen, S.; Schoenaers, J.

    2010-01-01

    This case report describes the combined orthodontic and orthognathic management of a 14-year-old girl affected with Apert syndrome. She presented with a severe Class III skeletal relationship, midfacial hypoplasia and an large anterior open bite. Intraorally, she had severe crowding, a narrow maxill

  15. Facial growth in patients with apert and crouzon syndromes compared to normal children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Reitsma; E.M. Ongkosuwito; P.H. Buschang; B. Prahl-Andersen

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate vertical and sagittal facial growth in children with Apert and Crouzon syndromes and compare it to the growth patterns of a nonsyndromic control group. Design: Case-control study. Setting: Department of Orthodontics, Children's Hospital Erasmus Medical Centre, Sophia, Rotterda

  16. Craniofacial stability in patients with Crouzon or Apert syndrome after Le Fort III distraction osteogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Reitsma; E.M. Ongkosuwito; P.H. Buschang; L.N.A. van Adrichem; B. Prahl-Andersen

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Le Fort III osteotomy with distraction osteogenesis (DO) is used to improve the retruded midface in patients with Crouzon or Apert syndrome. This study aimed to evaluate sagittal and vertical preoperative and postoperative cephalometric changes of DO of the midface in patients with Crouzo

  17. Craniofacial stability in patients with crouzon or apert syndrome after le fort III distraction osteogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Reitsma (Jacobus Harmen); E.M. Ongkosuwito (Edwin); P.H. Buschang (Peter); L.N.A. V Adrichem (Léon); B. Prahl-Andersen (Birte)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractObjective: Le Fort III osteotomy with distraction osteogenesis (DO) is used to improve the retruded midface in patients with Crouzon or Apert syndrome. This study aimed to evaluate sagittal and vertical preoperative and postoperative cephalometric changes of DO of the midface in patients

  18. Apert and Crouzon syndromes-Cognitive development, brain abnormalities, and molecular aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Marilyse B L; Maximino, Luciana P; Perosa, Gimol B; Abramides, Dagma V M; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita; Yacubian-Fernandes, Adriano

    2016-06-01

    Apert and Crouzon are the most common craniosynostosis syndromes associated with mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) gene. We conducted a study to examine the molecular biology, brain abnormalities, and cognitive development of individuals with these syndromes. A retrospective longitudinal review of 14 patients with Apert and Crouzon syndromes seen at the outpatient Craniofacial Surgery Hospital for Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies in Brazil from January 1999 through August 2010 was performed. Patients between 11 and 36 years of age (mean 18.29 ± 5.80), received cognitive evaluations, cerebral magnetic resonance imaging, and molecular DNA analyses. Eight patients with Apert syndrome (AS) had full scale intelligence quotients (FSIQs) that ranged from 47 to 108 (mean 76.9 ± 20.2), and structural brain abnormalities were identified in five of eight patients. Six patients presented with a gain-of-function mutation (p.Ser252Trp) in FGFR2 and FSIQs in those patients ranged from 47 to78 (mean 67.2 ± 10.7). One patient with a gain-of-function mutation (p.Pro253Arg) had a FSIQ of 108 and another patient with an atypical splice mutation (940-2A →G) had a FSIQ of 104. Six patients with Crouzon syndrome had with mutations in exons IIIa and IIIc of FGFR2 and their FSIQs ranged from 82 to 102 (mean 93.5 ± 6.7). These reveal that molecular aspects are another factor that can be considered in studies of global and cognitive development of patients with Apert and Crouzon syndrome (CS). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27028366

  19. General and oral aspects in Apert syndrome: report of a case

    OpenAIRE

    Villarreal Becerra, Einer Niels; Sánchez Soler, Luis Alberto; Espías Gómez, Ángel F. (Ángel Fortunato); Leonard, R. H.; Herrero-Payo, Julio; Chimenos Küstner, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Background: The present paper describes the general and oral manifestations in a 32-year-old man previously diagnosed with Apert syndrome. Clinical examination revealed features of acrocephalosyndactyly. The patient was found to have a flattened occiput with frontal prominence, abnormal contour of head (brachycephaly), shallow and downward slanting orbits with bilateral proptosis, hypertelorism, retruded midface, and prognathic mandible.Dental anormalies were present in a patient. Intraoral e...

  20. Novel molecular pathways elicited by mutant FGFR2 may account for brain abnormalities in Apert syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Yeh

    Full Text Available Apert syndrome (AS, the most severe form craniosynostosis, is characterized by premature fusion of coronal sutures. Approximately 70% of AS patients carry S252W gain-of-function mutation in FGFR2. Besides the cranial phenotype, brain dysmorphologies are present and are not seen in other FGFR2-asociated craniosynostosis, such as Crouzon syndrome (CS. Here, we hypothesized that S252W mutation leads not only to overstimulation of FGFR2 downstream pathway, but likewise induces novel pathological signaling. First, we profiled global gene expression of wild-type and S252W periosteal fibroblasts stimulated with FGF2 to activate FGFR2. The great majority (92% of the differentially expressed genes (DEGs were divergent between each group of cell populations and they were regulated by different transcription factors. We than compared gene expression profiles between AS and CS cell populations and did not observe correlations. Therefore, we show for the first time that S252W mutation in FGFR2 causes a unique cell response to FGF2 stimulation. Since our gene expression results suggested that novel signaling elicited by mutant FGFR2 might be associated with central nervous system (CNS development and maintenance, we next investigated if DEGs found in AS cells were also altered in the CNS of an AS mouse model. Strikingly, we validated Strc (stereocilin in newborn Fgfr2(S252W/+ mouse brain. Moreover, immunostaining experiments suggest a role for endothelial cells and cerebral vasculature in the establishment of characteristic CNS dysmorphologies in AS that has not been proposed by previous literature. Our approach thus led to the identification of new target genes directly or indirectly associated with FGFR2 which are contributing to the pathophysiology of AS.

  1. Surgical treatment results of hand deformities in patients with Apert syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ufuk Nalbantoglu

    2015-12-01

    Results: The mean age at the first operation was 2.7 years and the mean number of operations was 3 per patient. No patient developed graft-flap necrosis and no patients required amputations. All patients were able to perform grasping and pinching functions and families were satisfied with the cosmetic results. Conclusion: Using a two-stage surgical protocol, achieving satisfactory results with a minimal number of operations is possible in patients with Apert Syndrome. [Hand Microsurg 2015; 4(3.000: 53-57

  2. Effects of multisensory yoga on behavior in a male child with Apert and Asperger syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scroggins, Michaela L; Litchke, Lyn G; Liu, Ting

    2016-01-01

    This case focused on a 7-year-old boy with Apert and Asperger's syndrome who attended 8, 45 min multisensory yoga sessions, twice a week, during 4-week camp. Results from the pre- and post-tests on Treatment and Research Institute for Autism Social Skills Assessment showed improvements in the total score changes from 19 to 7 for disruptive behaviors. Sparks Target Behavior Checklist scores changed from eight to one showing progression in ability to stay on task. Yoga Pose Rating Scale displayed the transformation in total scores from 80 = emerging to 115 = consistency in pose performance. The field notes revealed the positive development in expressive emotions, social engagement, and decline in looking around. Outside class parent and school behavioral specialist reported the improved ability to self-regulate stress using lion's breath and super brain. These findings indicate an improvement in behaviors that influenced the physical performance, emotional expression, and social interaction after yoga training for this child. PMID:26865777

  3. Effects of multisensory yoga on behavior in a male child with Apert and Asperger syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scroggins, Michaela L; Litchke, Lyn G; Liu, Ting

    2016-01-01

    This case focused on a 7-year-old boy with Apert and Asperger's syndrome who attended 8, 45 min multisensory yoga sessions, twice a week, during 4-week camp. Results from the pre- and post-tests on Treatment and Research Institute for Autism Social Skills Assessment showed improvements in the total score changes from 19 to 7 for disruptive behaviors. Sparks Target Behavior Checklist scores changed from eight to one showing progression in ability to stay on task. Yoga Pose Rating Scale displayed the transformation in total scores from 80 = emerging to 115 = consistency in pose performance. The field notes revealed the positive development in expressive emotions, social engagement, and decline in looking around. Outside class parent and school behavioral specialist reported the improved ability to self-regulate stress using lion's breath and super brain. These findings indicate an improvement in behaviors that influenced the physical performance, emotional expression, and social interaction after yoga training for this child.

  4. Effects of multisensory yoga on behavior in a male child with Apert and Asperger syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scroggins, Michaela L; Litchke, Lyn G; Liu, Ting

    2016-01-01

    This case focused on a 7-year-old boy with Apert and Asperger's syndrome who attended 8, 45 min multisensory yoga sessions, twice a week, during 4-week camp. Results from the pre- and post-tests on Treatment and Research Institute for Autism Social Skills Assessment showed improvements in the total score changes from 19 to 7 for disruptive behaviors. Sparks Target Behavior Checklist scores changed from eight to one showing progression in ability to stay on task. Yoga Pose Rating Scale displayed the transformation in total scores from 80 = emerging to 115 = consistency in pose performance. The field notes revealed the positive development in expressive emotions, social engagement, and decline in looking around. Outside class parent and school behavioral specialist reported the improved ability to self-regulate stress using lion's breath and super brain. These findings indicate an improvement in behaviors that influenced the physical performance, emotional expression, and social interaction after yoga training for this child. PMID:26865777

  5. FGF/FGFR signaling coordinates skull development by modulating magnitude of morphological integration: evidence from Apert syndrome mouse models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neus Martínez-Abadías

    Full Text Available The fibroblast growth factor and receptor system (FGF/FGFR mediates cell communication and pattern formation in many tissue types (e.g., osseous, nervous, vascular. In those craniosynostosis syndromes caused by FGFR1-3 mutations, alteration of signaling in the FGF/FGFR system leads to dysmorphology of the skull, brain and limbs, among other organs. Since this molecular pathway is widely expressed throughout head development, we explore whether and how two specific mutations on Fgfr2 causing Apert syndrome in humans affect the pattern and level of integration between the facial skeleton and the neurocranium using inbred Apert syndrome mouse models Fgfr2(+/S252W and Fgfr2(+/P253R and their non-mutant littermates at P0. Skull morphological integration (MI, which can reflect developmental interactions among traits by measuring the intensity of statistical associations among them, was assessed using data from microCT images of the skull of Apert syndrome mouse models and 3D geometric morphometric methods. Our results show that mutant Apert syndrome mice share the general pattern of MI with their non-mutant littermates, but the magnitude of integration between and within the facial skeleton and the neurocranium is increased, especially in Fgfr2(+/S252W mice. This indicates that although Fgfr2 mutations do not disrupt skull MI, FGF/FGFR signaling is a covariance-generating process in skull development that acts as a global factor modulating the intensity of MI. As this pathway evolved early in vertebrate evolution, it may have played a significant role in establishing the patterns of skull MI and coordinating proper skull development.

  6. Effects of multisensory yoga on behavior in a male child with Apert and Asperger syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela L Scroggins

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This case focused on a 7-year-old boy with Apert and Asperger's syndrome who attended 8, 45 min multisensory yoga sessions, twice a week, during 4-week camp. Results from the pre- and post-tests on Treatment and Research Institute for Autism Social Skills Assessment showed improvements in the total score changes from 19 to 7 for disruptive behaviors. Sparks Target Behavior Checklist scores changed from eight to one showing progression in ability to stay on task. Yoga Pose Rating Scale displayed the transformation in total scores from 80 = emerging to 115 = consistency in pose performance. The field notes revealed the positive development in expressive emotions, social engagement, and decline in looking around. Outside class parent and school behavioral specialist reported the improved ability to self-regulate stress using lion's breath and super brain. These findings indicate an improvement in behaviors that influenced the physical performance, emotional expression, and social interaction after yoga training for this child.

  7. The Ups and Downs of Mutation Frequencies during Aging Can Account for the Apert Syndrome Paternal Age Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Song-Ro Yoon; Jian Qin; Rivka L Glaser; Ethylin Wang Jabs; Wexler, Nancy S; Rebecca Sokol; Norman Arnheim; Peter Calabrese

    2009-01-01

    Author Summary Epidemiological studies show that the incidence of some genetic diseases increases with the age of the father. This “paternal age effect” is traditionally explained by the fact that, as men age, the male germ-line cells continue to divide, and each division presents an additional chance for mutation. Apert syndrome is an example of such a disease; virtually all cases are caused by spontaneous base substitution mutations of paternal origin at either one of just two sites. In thi...

  8. Rare mutations of FGFR2 causing Apert syndrome : identification of the first partial gene deletion, and an Alu element insertion from a new subfamily

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bochukova, E.G.; Roscioli, T.; Hedges, D.J.; Taylor, I.B.; Johnson, D.; David, D.J.; Deininger, P.L.; Wilkie, A.O.

    2009-01-01

    Apert syndrome (AS) is a severe disorder, characterized by craniosynostosis and complex syndactyly of the hands and feet. Two heterozygous gain-of-function substitutions (Ser252Trp and Pro253Arg) in exon IIIa of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) are responsible for >98% of cases. Here we d

  9. Common primary fibroblastic growth factor receptor-related craniosynostosis syndromes: A pictorial review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit K Singh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in different types of fibroblastic growth factor receptors (FGFRs have been associated with a variety of phenotype abnormalities, the common ones being Apert, Crouzon and Pfeiffer syndromes. In this study, we present two representative cases having the Apert and Pfeiffer syndromes, respectively, and discuss their clinical presentation, sequel and surgical implications.

  10. 胎儿Apert综合征产前超声诊断研究%Prenatal diagnosis of Apert syndrome by sonography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎文雅; 李胜利; 余艳红; 文华轩; 王晨虹

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨Apert综合征胎儿产前超声声像图特征。方法对2010年1月至2014年2月在深圳市妇幼保健院产前超声诊断为Apert综合征的4例胎儿超声影像检查资料进行总结,并与引产胎儿尸体解剖和产后诊断结果进行对照分析。结果4例Apert综合征胎儿产前超声声像图特征及临床结局:(1)头颅异常:4例胎儿均表现为尖头、冠状缝早闭、前额隆凸,其中3例(例1~3)头颅形态呈“三叶草征”。(2)面部异常:4例胎儿中1例(例4)颜面部无明显异常,3例(例1~3)两眼眼距增宽和颜面部正中矢状切面轮廓线异常,1例(例2)鼻梁塌陷。(3)肢体异常:4例胎儿双手均呈对称性并指畸形(表现为“手套征”),产前超声检出1例(例2)双足并趾畸形。(4)伴发其他系统畸形:1例(例1)伴永久性右脐静脉,1例(例2)伴脊椎胸段椎管狭窄,1例(例3)伴双肾实质回声增强,1例(例4)伴左侧膈疝。(5)胎儿临床结局:4例胎儿超声检查后引产3例,胎儿标本外观检查发现产前超声漏诊2例(例1、2)双足并趾畸形;足月出生1例(例3),产后检查发现产前超声漏诊Ⅰ度腭裂伴双足并趾畸形,新生儿2d后死亡。除漏诊Ⅰ度腭裂及双足并趾畸形外4例胎儿产前超声与产后检查结果均符合。结论 Apert综合征临床罕见,冠状缝早闭、尖头、颜面部正中矢状切面轮廓线异常和并指(趾)畸形为胎儿典型超声表现。产前超声发现胎儿头颅畸形、面容特殊应注意观察有无肢体畸形并连续追踪观察至产后。产前超声诊断Apert综合征对孕妇遗传咨询和胎儿出生后手术治疗有重要指导作用。%Objective To discuss the prenatal ultrasound manifestations of Apert syndrome. Methods The prenatal ultrasound features of 4 fetuses identified as Apert syndrome after detailed antenatal ultrasound

  11. Apert syndrome: report of 5 cases and review of the literature%Apert综合征5例报告及文献复习

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    艾方兴; 陈振兵; 洪光祥

    2014-01-01

    Objective To discuss the clinical manifestation,diagnosis and treatment of Apert syndrome.Methods Separation of the fingers should start at 9 months of age and completed before 5 years old.Border digits were separated first,while the middle digits separated later.A bilateral approach was adopted in patients under 1 year old.The first web was reconstructed first,followed by the second and fourth webs that were done simultaneously.Z shape incision was made to separate the digits while a dorsal rectangular flap was adopted for reconstruction of the web.Skin defects were covered by fill thickness skin graft.Results Between 2003 and 2012,five Apert syndrome children were treated.Two of them underwent syndactyly separation as soon as being diagnosed.No skin graft necrosis or infection occurred after the operation.None of the 5 cases achieved separation of all 5 digits.The parents were satisfied with both esthetic and functional outcome of the surgery.Radial clinodactyly of the thumb and stiffness of the interphalangeal joint were not further corrected.Short-term follow-up revealed aesthetic and functional improvement of the hand.The long-term outcomes need to be reviewed after longer follow-up.Conclusion Apert hand is severe syndactyly that requires complex surgical management.Aesthetics and function of the hand can be improved after multiple operations.%目的 探讨Apert综合征的临床表现、诊断及治疗.方法 第1次并指分离应在患儿9个月时开始,随后的治疗最好能在5岁前完成.分离手指从边缘的手指开始,再行中间手指.1岁以下患儿采用双侧同时手术.首先重建第1指蹼,随后再同时分离第2和第4指蹼.采用“Z”形切口分指,指间背侧矩形皮瓣重建指蹼,游离全厚皮片覆盖皮肤缺损.结果 2003年至2012年间5例患者诊断为Apert综合征,其中2例诊断后即行并指分离手术,术后未发生植皮坏死及感染,无病例最终分离5个手指,拇指桡偏畸形和指间关节

  12. Cognitive Phenotype of Velocardiofacial Syndrome: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furniss, Frederick; Biswas, Asit B.; Gumber, Rohit; Singh, Niraj

    2011-01-01

    The behavioural phenotype of velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), one of the most common human multiple anomaly syndromes, includes developmental disabilities, frequently including intellectual disability (ID) and high risk of diagnosis of psychotic disorders including schizophrenia. VCFS may offer a model of the relationship between ID and risk of…

  13. The Behavioural Phenotype of Angelman Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsler, K.; Oliver, C.

    2006-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this review is to examine the notion of a behavioural phenotype for Angelman syndrome and identify methodological and conceptual influences on the accepted presentation. Methods: Studies examining the behavioural characteristics associated with Angelman syndrome are reviewed and methodology is described. Results:…

  14. Genotype versus phenotype in families with androgen insensitivity syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boehmer, ALM; Bruggenwirth, H; Van Assendelft, C; Otten, BJ; Verleun-Mooijman, MCT; Niermeijer, MF; Brunner, HG; Rouwe, CW; Waelkens, JJ; Oostdijk, W; Kleijer, WJ; Van der Kwast, TH; De Vroede, MA; Drop, SLS

    2001-01-01

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome encompasses a wide range of phenotypes, which are caused by numerous different mutations in the AR gene. Detailed information on the genotype/ phenotype relationship in androgen insensitivity syndrome is important for sex assignment, treatment of androgen insensitivit

  15. Sheep models of polycystic ovary syndrome phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Padmanabhan, Vasantha; Veiga-Lopez, Almudena

    2012-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a fertility disorder affecting 5–7% of reproductive-aged women. Women with PCOS manifest both reproductive and metabolic defects. Several animal models have evolved, which implicate excess steroid exposure during fetal life in the development of the PCOS phenotype. This review addresses the fetal and adult reproductive and metabolic consequences of prenatal steroid excess in sheep and the translational relevance of these findings to PCOS. By comparing findi...

  16. RIN2 syndrome: Expanding the clinical phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosato, Simonetta; Syx, Delfien; Ivanovski, Ivan; Pollazzon, Marzia; Santodirocco, Daniela; De Marco, Loredana; Beltrami, Marina; Callewaert, Bert; Garavelli, Livia; Malfait, Fransiska

    2016-09-01

    Biallelic defects in the RIN2 gene, encoding the Ras and Rab interactor 2 protein, are associated with a rare autosomal recessive connective tissue disorder, with only nine patients from four independent families reported to date. The condition was initially termed MACS syndrome (macrocephaly, alopecia, cutis laxa, and scoliosis), based on the clinical features of the first identified family; however, with the expansion of the clinical phenotype in additional families, it was subsequently coined RIN2 syndrome. Hallmark features of this condition include dysmorphic facial features with striking, progressive facial coarsening, sparse hair, normal to enlarged occipitofrontal circumference, soft redundant and/or hyperextensible skin, and scoliosis. Patients with RIN2 syndrome present phenotypic overlap with other conditions, including EDS (especially the dermatosparaxis and kyphoscoliosis subtypes). Here, we describe a 10th patient, the first patient of Caucasian origin and the oldest reported patient so far, who harbors the previously identified homozygous RIN2 mutation c.1878dupC (p. (Ile627Hisfs*7)). Besides the hallmark features, this patient also presents problems not previously associated with RIN2 syndrome, including cervical vertebral fusion, mild hearing loss, and colonic fibrosis. We provide an overview of the clinical findings in all reported patients with RIN2 mutations and summarize some of the possible pathogenic mechanisms that may underlie this condition. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27277385

  17. Syndromic (phenotypic diarrhea in early infancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodemer Christine

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Syndromic diarrhea (SD, also known as phenotypic diarrhea (PD or tricho-hepato-enteric syndrome (THE, is a congenital enteropathy presenting with early-onset of severe diarrhea requiring parenteral nutrition (PN. To date, no epidemiological data are available. The estimated prevalence is approximately 1/300,000–400,000 live births in Western Europe. Ethnic origin does not appear to be associated with SD. Infants are born small for gestational age and present with facial dysmorphism including prominent forehead and cheeks, broad nasal root and hypertelorism. Hairs are woolly, easily removed and poorly pigmented. Severe and persistent diarrhea starts within the first 6 months of life (≤ 1 month in most cases and is accompanied by severe malabsorption leading to early and relentless protein energy malnutrition with failure to thrive. Liver disease affects about half of patients with extensive fibrosis or cirrhosis. There is currently no specific biochemical profile, though a functional T-cell immune deficiency with defective antibody production was reported. Microscopic analysis of the hair show twisted hair (pili torti, aniso- and poilkilotrichosis, and trichorrhexis nodosa. Histopathological analysis of small intestine biopsy shows non-specific villous atrophy with low or no mononuclear cell infiltration of the lamina propria, and no specific histological abnormalities involving the epithelium. The etiology remains unknown. The frequent association of the disorder with parental consanguinity and/or affected siblings suggests a genetic origin with an autosomal recessive mode of transmission. Early management consists of total PN. Some infants have a rather milder phenotype with partial PN dependency or require only enteral feeding. Prognosis of this syndrome is poor, but most patients now survive, and about half of the patients may be weaned from PN at adolescence, but experience failure to thrive and final short stature. Disease name

  18. A vestibular phenotype for Waardenburg syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, F. O.; Pesznecker, S. C.; Allen, K.; Gianna, C.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate vestibular abnormalities in subjects with Waardenburg syndrome. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective record review. SETTING: Tertiary referral neurotology clinic. SUBJECTS: Twenty-two adult white subjects with clinical diagnosis of Waardenburg syndrome (10 type I and 12 type II). INTERVENTIONS: Evaluation for Waardenburg phenotype, history of vestibular and auditory symptoms, tests of vestibular and auditory function. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Results of phenotyping, results of vestibular and auditory symptom review (history), results of vestibular and auditory function testing. RESULTS: Seventeen subjects were women, and 5 were men. Their ages ranged from 21 to 58 years (mean, 38 years). Sixteen of the 22 subjects sought treatment for vertigo, dizziness, or imbalance. For subjects with vestibular symptoms, the results of vestibuloocular tests (calorics, vestibular autorotation, and/or pseudorandom rotation) were abnormal in 77%, and the results of vestibulospinal function tests (computerized dynamic posturography, EquiTest) were abnormal in 57%, but there were no specific patterns of abnormality. Six had objective sensorineural hearing loss. Thirteen had an elevated summating/action potential (>0.40) on electrocochleography. All subjects except those with severe hearing loss (n = 3) had normal auditory brainstem response results. CONCLUSION: Patients with Waardenburg syndrome may experience primarily vestibular symptoms without hearing loss. Electrocochleography and vestibular function tests appear to be the most sensitive measures of otologic abnormalities in such patients.

  19. The role of bone centers in the pathogenesis of craniosynostosis: An embryologic approach using CT measurements in isolated craniosynostosis and Apert and Crouzon syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.M.J. Mathijssen (Irene); J.M. Vaandrager (Michiel); J.C.H.M. van der Meulen (Jacques); H. Pieterman; F.W. Zonneveld; S. Kreiborg; C. Vermeij-Keers (Christl)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThis paper describes the role of the displacement of bone centers, i.e., the tubers, in the pathogenesis of craniosynostosis. This displacement was studied in 54 patients with isolated or syndromic craniosynostosis in the form of CT scans as well as in two dry neonate s

  20. The Down Syndrome Behavioural Phenotype: Taking a Developmental Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, Deborah; Most, David; Philofsky, Amy

    2009-01-01

    Individuals with Down syndrome are predisposed to show a specific behavioural phenotype, or a pattern of strengths and challenges in functioning across different domains of development. It is argued that a developmental approach to researching the Down syndrome behavioural phenotype, including an examination of the dynamic process of the unfolding…

  1. Sheep models of polycystic ovary syndrome phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanabhan, Vasantha; Veiga-Lopez, Almudena

    2013-07-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a fertility disorder affecting 5-7% of reproductive-aged women. Women with PCOS manifest both reproductive and metabolic defects. Several animal models have evolved, which implicate excess steroid exposure during fetal life in the development of the PCOS phenotype. This review addresses the fetal and adult reproductive and metabolic consequences of prenatal steroid excess in sheep and the translational relevance of these findings to PCOS. By comparing findings in various breeds of sheep, the review targets the role of genetic susceptibility to fetal insults. Disruptions induced by prenatal testosterone excess are evident at both the reproductive and metabolic level with each influencing the other thus creating a self-perpetuating vicious cycle. The review highlights the need for identifying a common mediator of the dysfunctions at the reproductive and metabolic levels and developing prevention and treatment interventions targeting all sites of disruption in unison for achieving optimal success.

  2. Craniosynostoses: Phenotypic/molecular correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, M.M. Jr. [Dalhousie Univ., Nova Scotia (Canada)

    1995-04-10

    From the discovery of the first known human homeobox mutation in MSX2 for craniosynostosis of the Boston type by Jams to the recent report of 2 mutations in FGFR2 in Apert syndrome by Wilkie, it is clear that the molecular aspects of syndromes with craniosynostosis are becoming known at a dizzying pace. Four of the syndromes involve mutations in FGFR2. The first to emerge was Crouzon syndrome followed by Jackson-Weiss syndrome, Pfeiffer syndrome, and finally Apert syndrome. Earlier, Muenke showed that Pfeiffer syndrome was heterogeneous, some families having a mutation in FGFR1. 50 refs., 4 tabs.

  3. Obesity Differentially Affects Phenotypes of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Moran; Monica Arriaga; Gustavo Rodriguez; Segundo Moran

    2012-01-01

    Obesity or overweight affect most of patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Phenotypes are the clinical characteristics produced by the interaction of heredity and environment in a disease or syndrome. Phenotypes of PCOS have been described on the presence of clinical hyperandrogenism, oligoovulation and polycystic ovaries. The insulin resistance is present in the majority of patients with obesity and/or PCOS and it is more frequent and of greater magnitude in obese than in non obese...

  4. Describing the phenotype in Rett syndrome using a population database

    OpenAIRE

    Colvin, L; Fyfe, S.; Leonard, S.; Schiavello, T; ELLAWAY, C; N de Klerk; Christodoulou, J.; Msall, M; Leonard, H

    2003-01-01

    Background: Mutations in the MECP2 gene have been recently identified as the cause of Rett syndrome, prompting research into genotype-phenotype relations. However, despite these genetic advances there has been little descriptive epidemiology of the full range of phenotypes.

  5. [Challenging behavior: behavioral phenotypes of some genetic syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Challenging behavior in individuals with mental retardation (MR) is relatively frequent, and represents a significant obstacle to adaptive skills. The frequency of specific forms and manifestations of challenging behavior can depend on a variety of personal and environmental factors. There are several prominent theoretical models regarding the etiology of challenging behavior and psychopathology in persons with MR: behavioral, developmental, socio-cultural and biological.The biological model emphasizes the physiological, biochemical and genetic factors as the potential source of challenging behavior. The progress in the field of genetics and neuroscience has opened the opportunity to study and discover the neurobiological basis of phenotypic characteristics. Genetic syndromes associated with MR can be followed by a specific set of problems and disorders which constitutes their behavioral phenotype. The aim of this paper was to present challenging behaviors that manifest in the most frequently studied syndromes: Down syndrome, Fragile X syndrome, Williams syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome and Angelman syndrome. The concept of behavioral phenotype implies a higher probability of manifesting specific developmental characteristics and specific behaviors in individuals with a certain genetic syndrome. Although the specific set of (possible) problems and disorders is distinctive for the described genetic syndromes, the connection between genetics and behavior should be viewed through probabilistic dimension. The probabilistic concept takes into consideration the possibility of intra-syndrome variability in the occurrence, intensity and time onset of behavioral characteristics, at which the higher variability the lower is the specificity of the genetic syndrome. Identifying the specific pattern of behavior can be most important for the process of early diagnosis and prognosis. In addition, having knowledge about behavioral phenotype can be a landmark in the creation of

  6. Challenging behavior: Behavioral phenotypes of some genetic syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buha Nataša

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Challenging behavior in individuals with mental retardation (MR is relatively frequent, and represents a significant obstacle to adaptive skills. The frequency of specific forms and manifestations of challenging behavior can depend on a variety of personal and environmental factors. There are several prominent theoretical models regarding the etiology of challenging behavior and psychopathology in persons with MR: behavioral, developmental, socio-cultural and biological. The biological model emphasizes the physiological, biochemical and genetic factors as the potential source of challenging behavior. The progress in the field of genetics and neuroscience has opened the opportunity to study and discover the neurobiological basis of phenotypic characteristics. Genetic syndromes associated with MR can be followed by a specific set of problems and disorders which constitutes their behavioral phenotype. The aim of this paper was to present challenging behaviors that manifest in the most frequently studied syndromes: Down syndrome, Fragile X syndrome, Williams syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome and Angelman syndrome. The concept of behavioral phenotype implies a higher probability of manifesting specific developmental characteristics and specific behaviors in individuals with a certain genetic syndrome. Although the specific set of (possible problems and disorders is distinctive for the described genetic syndromes, the connection between genetics and behavior should be viewed through probabilistic dimension. The probabilistic concept takes into consideration the possibility of intra-syndrome variability in the occurrence, intensity and time onset of behavioral characteristics, at which the higher variability the lower is the specificity of the genetic syndrome. Identifying the specific pattern of behavior can be most important for the process of early diagnosis and prognosis. In addition, having knowledge about behavioral phenotype can be a landmark in

  7. Towards a Behavioral Phenotype for Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mount, Rebecca H.; Hastings, Richard P.; Reilly, Sheena; Cass, Hilary; Charman, Tony

    2003-01-01

    A study compared 143 girls (ages 6-14) with Rett syndrome with 85 girls with severe mental retardation on the Developmental Behavior Checklist. Girls with Rett syndrome presented more "autistic relating" and fewer antisocial behaviors. When compared to children with autism, they did not present with classic autistic behavioral features. (Contains…

  8. Phenotype in 18 Danish subjects with genetically verified CHARGE syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husu, E; Hove, Hd; Farholt, Stense;

    2013-01-01

    ) syndrome is a rare genetic, multiple-malformation syndrome. About 80% of patients with a clinical diagnose, have a mutation or a deletion in the gene encoding chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 7 (CHD7). Genotype-phenotype correlation is only partly known. In this nationwide study, phenotypic...... characteristics of 18 Danish CHD7 mutation positive CHARGE individuals (N = 18) are presented. We studied patient records, clinical photographs, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Information was not available for all traits in all subjects. Therefore, the results are presented as...

  9. Infectious and Immunologic Phenotype of MECP2 Duplication Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Bauer, Michael; Kölsch, Uwe; Krüger, Renate; Unterwalder, Nadine; Hameister, Karin; Kaiser, Fabian Marc; Vignoli, Aglaia; Rossi, Rainer; Botella, Maria Pilar; Budisteanu, Magdalena; Rosello, Monica; Orellana, Carmen; Tejada, Maria Isabel; Papuc, Sorina Mihaela; Patat, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    MECP2 (methyl CpG binding protein 2) duplication causes syndromic intellectual disability. Patients often suffer from life-threatening infections, suggesting an additional immunodeficiency. We describe for the first time the detailed infectious and immunological phenotype of MECP2 duplication syndrome. 17/27 analyzed patients suffered from pneumonia, 5/27 from at least one episode of sepsis. Encapsulated bacteria (S.pneumoniae, H.influenzae) were frequently isolated. T-cell immunity showed no...

  10. Low bone turnover phenotype in Rett syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roende, Gitte; Petersen, Janne; Ravn, Kirstine;

    2014-01-01

    Background:Patients with Rett syndrome (RTT) are at risk of having low bone mass and low-energy fractures.Methods:We characterised bone metabolism by both bone formation and resorption markers in blood in a RTT population of 61 girls and women and 122 well-matched healthy controls. Levels of N-te...

  11. Gitelman's syndrome: towards genotype-phenotype correlations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riveira-Munoz, E.; Chang, Q.; Bindels, R.J.M.; Devuyst, O.

    2007-01-01

    Gitelman's syndrome (GS) is a salt-losing tubulopathy characterized by hypokalemic alkalosis with hypomagnesemia and hypocalciuria. The disease is associated with inactivating mutations in the SLC12A3 gene that codes for the thiazide-sensitive Na+-Cl- cotransporter (NCCT) that is expressed in the ap

  12. Behavioral Phenotype in the 9q Subtelomeric Deletion Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, W.M.A.; Kleefstra, T.; Egger, J.I.M.

    2010-01-01

    The 9q Subtelomeric Deletion Syndrome (9qSTDS) is clinically characterized by mental retardation, childhood hypotonia, and facial dysmorphisms. Haploinsufficiency of the EHMT1 gene has been demonstrated to be responsible for its core phenotype. In a significant number of patients behavioral abnormal

  13. Nicolaides-Baraitser Syndrome : Delineation of the Phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sousa, Sergio B.; Abdul-Rahman, Omar A.; Bottani, Armand; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Fryer, Alan; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Horn, Denise; Josifova, Dragana; Kuechler, Alma; Lees, Melissa; MacDermot, Kay; Magee, Alex; Morice-Picard, Fanny; Rosser, Elizabeth; Sarkar, Ajoy; Shannon, Nora; Stolte-Dijkstra, Irene; Verloes, Alain; Wakeling, Emma; Wilson, Louise; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.

    2009-01-01

    Nicolaides-Baraitser syndrome (NBS) is an infrequently described condition, thus far reported in five cases. In order to delineate the phenotype and its natural history in more detail, we gathered data on 18 hitherto unreported patients through a multi-center collaborative study, and follow-up data

  14. Criteria, prevalence, and phenotypes of polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizneva, Daria; Suturina, Larisa; Walker, Walidah; Brakta, Soumia; Gavrilova-Jordan, Larisa; Azziz, Ricardo

    2016-07-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a highly prevalent disorder effecting reproductive-aged women worldwide. This article addresses the evolution of the criteria used to diagnosis PCOS; reviews recent advances in the phenotypic approach, specifically in the context of the extended Rotterdam criteria; discusses limitations of the current criteria used to diagnosis, particularly when studying adolescents and women in the peri- and postmenopause; and describes significant strides made in understanding the epidemiology of PCOS. This review recognizes that although there is a high prevalence of PCOS, there is increased variability when using Rotterdam 2003 criteria, owing to limitations in population sampling and approaches used to define PCOS phenotypes. Last, we discuss the distribution of PCOS phenotypes, their morbidity, and the role that referral bias plays in the epidemiology of this syndrome. PMID:27233760

  15. Kabuki syndrome: expanding the phenotype to include microphthalmia and anophthalmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVeigh, Terri P; Banka, Siddharth; Reardon, William

    2015-10-01

    Kabuki syndrome is a rare genetic malformation syndrome that is characterized by distinct facies, structural defects and intellectual disability. Kabuki syndrome may be caused by mutations in one of two histone methyltransferase genes: KMT2D and KDM6A. We describe a male child of nonconsanguineous Irish parents presenting with multiple malformations, including bilateral extreme microphthalmia; cleft palate; congenital diaphragmatic hernia; duplex kidney; as well as facial features of Kabuki syndrome, including interrupted eyebrows and lower lid ectropion. A de-novo germline mutation in KMT2D was identified. Whole-exome sequencing failed to reveal mutations in any of the known microphthalmia/anopthalmia genes. We also identified four other patients with Kabuki syndrome and microphthalmia. We postulate that Kabuki syndrome may produce this type of ocular phenotype as a result of extensive interaction between KMT2D, WAR complex proteins and PAXIP1. Children presenting with microphthalmia/anophthalmia should be examined closely for other signs of Kabuki syndrome, especially at an age where the facial gestalt might be less readily appreciable.

  16. Phenotype of asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Rhee, Chin Kook

    2015-01-01

    Many patients with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have overlapping characteristics of both diseases. By spirometric definition, patients with both fixed airflow obstruction (AO) and bronchodilator reversibility or fixed AO and bronchial hyperresponsiveness can be considered to have asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS). However, patients regarded to have ACOS by spirometric criteria alone are heterogeneous and can be classified by phenotype. Eosinophilic inflammation, a ...

  17. SATB2-associated syndrome presenting with Rett-like phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J S; Yoo, Y; Lim, B C; Kim, K J; Choi, M; Chae, J-H

    2016-06-01

    The SATB2-associated syndrome (SAS) was proposed recently, after the SATB2 gene was initially discovered to be associated with isolated cleft palate. This syndrome is characterized by intellectual disability with delayed speech development, facial dysmorphism, cleft or high-arched palate, and dentition problems. Here, we describe two novel SATB2 sequence variants in two unrelated patients presenting with Rett-like phenotypes. We performed trio-based whole-exome sequencing in a 17-month-old girl presenting with severe retardation and Rett-like phenotypes, which revealed a de novo missense variant in SATB2 (p.Glu396Gln). Moreover, targeted sequencing of the SATB2 gene was performed in a 2-year-old girl with severe psychomotor retardation, facial hypotonia, and cleft palate who also exhibited some features of Rett syndrome. A nonsense variant in SATB2 was identified in this patient (p.Arg459*). This study expanded the clinical and genetic spectrum of SAS. SATB2 variants should be considered in cases with psychomotor retardation alone or in any cases with Rett-like phenotypes, regardless of the typical features of SAS such as cleft palate.

  18. Phenotype of asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Chin Kook

    2015-07-01

    Many patients with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have overlapping characteristics of both diseases. By spirometric definition, patients with both fixed airflow obstruction (AO) and bronchodilator reversibility or fixed AO and bronchial hyperresponsiveness can be considered to have asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS). However, patients regarded to have ACOS by spirometric criteria alone are heterogeneous and can be classified by phenotype. Eosinophilic inflammation, a history of allergic disease, and smoke exposure are important components in the classification of ACOS. Each phenotype has a different underlying pathophysiology, set of characteristics, and prognosis. Medical treatment for ACOS should be tailored according to phenotype. A narrower definition of ACOS that includes both spirometric and clinical criteria is needed. PMID:26161009

  19. Obesity Differentially Affects Phenotypes of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Moran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity or overweight affect most of patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS. Phenotypes are the clinical characteristics produced by the interaction of heredity and environment in a disease or syndrome. Phenotypes of PCOS have been described on the presence of clinical hyperandrogenism, oligoovulation and polycystic ovaries. The insulin resistance is present in the majority of patients with obesity and/or PCOS and it is more frequent and of greater magnitude in obese than in non obese PCOS patients. Levels of sexual hormone binding globulin are decreased, and levels of free androgens are increased in obese PCOS patients. Weight loss treatment is important for overweight or obese PCOS patients, but not necessary for normal weight PCOS patients, who only need to avoid increasing their body weight. Obesity decreases or delays several infertility treatments. The differences in the hormonal and metabolic profile, as well as the different focus and response to treatment between obese and non obese PCOS patients suggest that obesity has to be considered as a characteristic for classification of PCOS phenotypes.

  20. The phenotypic spectrum of dystonia in Mohr-Tranebjaerg syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ha, Ainhi D; Parratt, Kaitlyn L; Rendtorff, Nanna D;

    2012-01-01

    , including 2 with novel mutations, together with a systematic review of the literature, in order to define the phenotypic expression of dystonia. Profound hearing impairment in affected males develops by infancy and precedes the development of dystonia, which varies in time of onset from the first......Mohr-Tranebjaerg syndrome (MTS) is an X-linked recessive disorder characterized by deafness and dystonia. However the phenotypic expression of dystonia has not been systematically defined. We report clinical, neurophysiological, and ophthalmological data on 6 subjects from 3 Australian kindreds......, pyramidal signs, and in 1 patient, gait freezing and postural instability. Optic atrophy and cortical visual impairment were both observed. We report for the first time a female patient who developed multiple disabling neurological complications of MTS. Our findings more clearly define and expand...

  1. Down syndrome phenotypes: The consequences of chromosomal imbalance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korenberg, J.R.; Chen, X.N.; Schipper, R.; Sun, Z.; Gonsky, R.; Gerwehr, S.; Graham, J.M. Jr. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)); Carpenter, N.; Say, B. (H.A. Chapman Institute of Medical Genetics, Tulsa, OK (United States)); Daumer, C. (Univ. of Munich (Germany)) (and others)

    1994-05-24

    Down syndrome (DS) is a major cause of mental retardation and congenital heart disease. Besides a characteristic set of facial and physical features, DS is associated with congenital anomalies of the gastrointestinal tract, an increased risk of leukemia, immune system defects, and an Alzheimer-like dementia. Moreover, DS is a model for the study of human aneuploidy. Although usually caused by the presence of an extra chromosome 21, subsets of the phenotypic features of DS may be caused by the duplication of small regions of the chromosome. The physical map of chromosome 21 allows the molecular definition of the regions duplicated in these rare cases of partial trisomy. As a first step in identifying the genes responsible for individual DS features and their pathophysiology, a panel of cell lines derived from 16 such individuals has been established and the molecular break points have been determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization and Southern blot dosage analysis of 32 markers unique to human chromosome 21. Combining this information with detailed clinical evaluations of these patients, the authors have now constructed a [open quotes]phenotypic map[close quotes] that includes 25 features and assigns regions of 2-20 megabases as likely to contain the genes responsible. This study provides evidence for a significant contribution of genes outside the D21S55 region to the DS phenotypes, including the facies, microcephaly, short stature, hypotonia, abnormal dermatoglyphics, and mental retardation. This strongly suggests DS is a contiguous gene syndrome and augurs against a single DS chromosomal region responsible for most of the DS phenotypic features.

  2. Prenatal diagnosis of Pena-Shokeir syndrome phenotype by ultrasonography and MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena-Shokeir syndrome phenotype is characterized by neurogenic arthrogryposis, facial anomalies, polyhydramnios and lung hypoplasia. Prenatal US is crucial in showing Pena-Shokeir syndrome phenotype in addition to demonstrating reduced fetal movements or akinesia as an underlying aetiological factor as early as the 14th week of gestation. Several reports of prenatal diagnosis of Pena-Shokeir syndrome phenotype by US have been published. In this report, MRI findings providing prenatal diagnosis are presented. (orig.)

  3. Prenatal diagnosis of Pena-Shokeir syndrome phenotype by ultrasonography and MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senocak, Efsun Urger; Oguz, Kader Karli; Akata, Deniz [Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Haliloglu, Goknur [Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pediatric Neurology, Ankara (Turkey); Karcaaltincaba, Deniz; Kandemir, Omer [Etlik Zubeyde Hanim Woman' s Hospital, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Ankara (Turkey)

    2009-04-15

    Pena-Shokeir syndrome phenotype is characterized by neurogenic arthrogryposis, facial anomalies, polyhydramnios and lung hypoplasia. Prenatal US is crucial in showing Pena-Shokeir syndrome phenotype in addition to demonstrating reduced fetal movements or akinesia as an underlying aetiological factor as early as the 14th week of gestation. Several reports of prenatal diagnosis of Pena-Shokeir syndrome phenotype by US have been published. In this report, MRI findings providing prenatal diagnosis are presented. (orig.)

  4. Phenotypic and behavioral variability within Angelman Syndrome group with UPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cintia Fridman

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The Angelman syndrome (AS (developmental delay, mental retardation, speech impairment, ataxia, outbursts of laughter, seizures can result either from a 15q11-q13 deletion, or from paternal uniparental disomy (UPD, imprinting, or UBE3A mutations. We describe here the phenotypic and behavioral variability detected in eight UPD patients out of a group of 58 AS patients studied. All of them presented developmental delay, mental retardation, ataxia, speech impairment, and frequent drooling. Only one had microcephaly, whereas in two of them the OFC (head circumference was above the 98th percentile. The weight of all patients was above the 50th percentile, and in three of them the height was above the 90th percentile. Three were able to say a few words and to communicate by gestures. Two patients presented hyperphagia, and three presented skin picking, common features in the Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS. Four patients (4/7 had wide-spaced teeth. Five presented seizures, and two others did not manifest frequent laughter. One patient was very different from the others, as he showed a better understanding and abilities to communicate, to play video games and to draw. We suggest here that there seems to be an extreme phenotypic and behavioral variability within the UPD group, and that both typical patients and those with mental retardation, language impairment, happy disposition, and hyperactivity should be tested for AS.

  5. Phenotype-genotype discordance in congenital malformations with communication disorders resembling trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome)

    OpenAIRE

    Pruszewicz, Antoni; Wiskirska-Woźnica, Bożena; Wojnowski, Waldemar; Czerniejewska, Hanna; Jackowska, Joanna; Jarmuż, Małgorzata; Szyfter, Krzysztof; Leszczyńska, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Female, 6 Final Diagnosis: Phenotype-genotype discordance in congenital malformations with communication disorders resembling trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome) Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Otolaryngology Objective: Congenital defects Background: Communication process disorders are very frequent in rare cases of chromosomal aberrations (deletions, insertions, and trisomies) such as Down syndrome (trisomy 21), Turner syndrome, Edwards syndrome (trisomy 18), or...

  6. The phenotypic spectrum of dystonia in Mohr-Tranebjaerg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Ainhi D; Parratt, Kaitlyn L; Rendtorff, Nanna D; Lodahl, Marianne; Ng, Karl; Rowe, Dominic B; Sue, Carolyn M; Hayes, Michael W; Tranebjaerg, Lisbeth; Fung, Victor S C

    2012-07-01

    Mohr-Tranebjaerg syndrome (MTS) is an X-linked recessive disorder characterized by deafness and dystonia. However the phenotypic expression of dystonia has not been systematically defined. We report clinical, neurophysiological, and ophthalmological data on 6 subjects from 3 Australian kindreds, including 2 with novel mutations, together with a systematic review of the literature, in order to define the phenotypic expression of dystonia. Profound hearing impairment in affected males develops by infancy and precedes the development of dystonia, which varies in time of onset from the first to the sixth decades, with a peak in the second and third decades. Dystonia in MTS tends to be focal, segmental, or multifocal in distribution at onset, with a predilection for the upper body, variably involving the head, neck, and upper limbs. The majority of patients have progression or generalization of their dystonia regardless of age of onset. Within our 3 kindreds, we observed relative intrafamilial homogeneity but interfamilial variation. The median time to the development of moderate-severely disabling dystonia in these subjects was 11 years. Associated features included progressive cognitive decline, pyramidal signs, and in 1 patient, gait freezing and postural instability. Optic atrophy and cortical visual impairment were both observed. We report for the first time a female patient who developed multiple disabling neurological complications of MTS. Our findings more clearly define and expand the phenotype of both the dystonia and other neurological features of MTS and have implications for the diagnosis and management of this condition. PMID:22736418

  7. Phenotypic extremes in liveborn monozygotic twins with mosaic Edwards syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussmann, Neidin; Cunningham, Katie; Green, Andrew; Ryan, C Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Mosaic trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome) in monozygotic diamniotic liveborn twins is rare. We describe such a case involving preterm male infants. Although both infants had a low percentage of trisomy 18 cells in peripheral blood leucocytes, their varied phenotypic presentation of mosaic trisomy 18 resulted in one twin surviving, with the other twin's demise at 1 month of age. Despite the presence of trisomy 18 in peripheral leucocytes, further analysis of a buccal smear and skin biopsy of the surviving twin did not show evidence of trisomy 18. Establishing such diagnoses in a timely manner is imperative for the child, parents and clinicians. The clinical course of these twins reflects the unpredictable prognosis associated with the diagnosis of mosaic trisomy 18, and emphasises the challenges that can be encountered when counselling parents. PMID:26561224

  8. Mutation in collagen II alpha 1 isoforms delineates Stickler and Wagner syndrome phenotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Tran-Viet, Khanh-Nhat; Soler, Vincent; Quiette, Valencia; POWELL, CALDWELL; Yanovitch, Tammy; Metlapally, Ravikanth; Luo, Xiaoyan; Katsanis, Nicholas; Nading, Erica; Young, Terri L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Stickler syndrome is an arthro-ophthalmopathy with phenotypic overlap with Wagner syndrome. The common Stickler syndrome type I is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, with causal mutations in collagen type II alpha 1 (COL2A1). Wagner syndrome is associated with mutations in versican (VCAN), which encodes for a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan. A three-generation Caucasian family variably diagnosed with either syndrome was screened for sequence variants in the COL2A1 and VCAN gen...

  9. Aarskog-Scott syndrome: phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Briceno

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aarskog-Scott syndrome (AAS is a rare developmental disorder which primarily affects males and has a relative prevalence of 1 in 25,000 in the general population. AAS patients usually present with developmental complications including short stature and facial, skeletal and urogenital anomalies. The spectrum of genotype-phenotype correlations in AAS is unclear and mutations of the FGD1 gene on the proximal short arm of chromosome X account for only 20% of the incidence of the disorder. Failure to identify pathogenic variants in patients referred for FGD1 screening suggests heterogeneity underlying pathophysiology of the condition. Furthermore, overlapping features of AAS with several other developmental disorders increase the complexity of diagnosis. Cytoskeletal signaling may be involved in the pathophysiology of AAS. The FGD1 protein family has a role in activation of CDC42 (Cell Division Control protein 42 homolog which has a core function in remodeling of extracellular matrix and the transcriptional activation of many modulators of development. Therefore, mutations in components in the EGFR1 (Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 1 signaling pathway, to which CDC42 belongs, may contribute to pathophysiology. Parallel sequencing strategies (so-called next generation sequencing or high throughput sequencing enables simultaneous production of millions of sequencing reads that enormously facilitate cost-effective identification of cryptic mutations in heterogeneous monogenic disorders. Here we review the source of phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity in the context of AAS and discuss the applicability of next generation sequencing for identification of novel mutations underlying AAS.

  10. Surgical Treatment of Patients with Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Yong Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS is a devastating and refractory generalized epilepsy affecting children and adolescents. In this study we report the results of resective surgery in 18 patients with LGS phenotype who underwent single-lobe/lesionectomy or multilobe resection plus multiple subpial transection and/or callosotomy. After surgery, seven patients became completely seizure-free (Engel Class I and five almost seizure-free (Engel Class II. Additional four had significant seizure control (Engel Class III, and two had no change in seizure frequency (Engel Class IV. Of the 4 patients without any lesion on brain MRI, 2 ended with Engel Class II, 1 with III and the other with IV in Engels’ classification. Mean intelligence quotient (IQ increased from 56.1 ± 8.1 (mean ± SD before operation to 67.4 ± 8.2 (mean ± SD after operation, a significant improvement (P=0.001. Results also indicated that the younger the patient at surgery, or the shorter the interval between onset of seizure and resective operation, the better the intellectual outcome. Our data suggest that resective epilepsy surgery can be successful in patients with LGS phenotype as long as the EEG shows dominance of discharges in one hemisphere and corresponding ipsilateral imaging findings, even with contralateral ictal discharges.

  11. The neurobehavioral and molecular phenotype of Angelman Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wink, Logan K; Fitzpatrick, Sarah; Shaffer, Rebecca; Melnyk, Sophia; Begtrup, Amber H; Fox, Emma; Schaefer, Tori L; Mathieu-Frasier, Lauren; Ray, Balmiki; Lahiri, Debomoy; Horn, Paul A; Erickson, Craig A

    2015-11-01

    Angelman Syndrome (AS) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder associated with developmental delay, speech impairment, gait ataxia, and a unique behavioral profile. AS is caused by loss of maternal expression of the paternally imprinted UBE3A gene. In this study we aim to contribute to understanding of the neurobehavioral phenotype of AS with particular focus on the neuropsychiatric presentation of the disorder. We also undertake initial exploration of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plasma levels in AS. Twelve individuals ages 3 years or older with a confirmed genetic diagnosis of AS underwent detailed medical history, phenotypic characterization, and BDNF plasma sampling. The results of this study demonstrate that individuals with AS suffer from significant developmental delay, impaired adaptive behavior, and sleep disruption. Additionally, hyperactivity/impulsivity appears to be the primary behavioral domain noted in these individuals. The majority of individuals in this project met criteria for autism spectrum disorder on the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS); however, a negative correlation was noted between ADOS score and developmental age. BDNF plasma levels in AS individuals were significantly elevated compared to neurotypical controls. This is the first report of abnormal BDNF levels in AS, and one that necessitates larger future studies. The results provide a clue to understanding abnormal neuronal development in AS and may help guide future AS research. PMID:26219744

  12. A Marfan syndrome gene expression phenotype in cultured skin fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emond Mary

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Marfan syndrome (MFS is a heritable connective tissue disorder caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene. This syndrome constitutes a significant identifiable subtype of aortic aneurysmal disease, accounting for over 5% of ascending and thoracic aortic aneurysms. Results We used spotted membrane DNA macroarrays to identify genes whose altered expression levels may contribute to the phenotype of the disease. Our analysis of 4132 genes identified a subset with significant expression differences between skin fibroblast cultures from unaffected controls versus cultures from affected individuals with known fibrillin-1 mutations. Subsequently, 10 genes were chosen for validation by quantitative RT-PCR. Conclusion Differential expression of many of the validated genes was associated with MFS samples when an additional group of unaffected and MFS affected subjects were analyzed (p-value -6 under the null hypothesis that expression levels in cultured fibroblasts are unaffected by MFS status. An unexpected observation was the range of individual gene expression. In unaffected control subjects, expression ranges exceeding 10 fold were seen in many of the genes selected for qRT-PCR validation. The variation in expression in the MFS affected subjects was even greater.

  13. The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea in symptomatic patients with syndromic craniosynostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inverso, G; Brustowicz, K A; Katz, E; Padwa, B L

    2016-02-01

    The reported prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in patients with syndromic craniosynostosis (SCS) varies due to inconsistent definitions of OSA, lack of uniform diagnostic testing, and different mixes of syndromic diagnoses. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of OSA in symptomatic patients with SCS, and to determine whether this differs by phenotypic diagnosis. A retrospective cohort study of children with SCS was conducted. The primary outcome was presence of OSA diagnosed by polysomnography. The prevalence of OSA was calculated and stratified by diagnosis to compare differences in prevalence and severity (mild, moderate, or severe). The prevalence of OSA in symptomatic patients was 74.2%. Patients with Apert syndrome had the highest prevalence (80.6%), followed by Pfeiffer, Crouzon with acanthosis nigricans, and Crouzon syndromes (72.7%, 66.7%, and 64.7%, respectively). Severe OSA was most common in patients with Pfeiffer syndrome (45.5%), while patients with Apert and Crouzon syndromes were more likely to have moderate OSA (29.0% and 23.5%, respectively). Given that 56.4% of patients with SCS are symptomatic and that 74.2% of these symptomatic patients have OSA, it is recommended that a screening level I polysomnography be part of the clinical care for all patients with SCS. PMID:26602951

  14. Dissecting the phenotypes of Dravet syndrome by gene deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Moran; Han, Sung; Tai, Chao; Westenbroek, Ruth E; Hunker, Avery; Scheuer, Todd; Catterall, William A

    2015-08-01

    Neurological and psychiatric syndromes often have multiple disease traits, yet it is unknown how such multi-faceted deficits arise from single mutations. Haploinsufficiency of the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.1 causes Dravet syndrome, an intractable childhood-onset epilepsy with hyperactivity, cognitive deficit, autistic-like behaviours, and premature death. Deletion of Nav1.1 channels selectively impairs excitability of GABAergic interneurons. We studied mice having selective deletion of Nav1.1 in parvalbumin- or somatostatin-expressing interneurons. In brain slices, these deletions cause increased threshold for action potential generation, impaired action potential firing in trains, and reduced amplification of postsynaptic potentials in those interneurons. Selective deletion of Nav1.1 in parvalbumin- or somatostatin-expressing interneurons increases susceptibility to thermally-induced seizures, which are strikingly prolonged when Nav1.1 is deleted in both interneuron types. Mice with global haploinsufficiency of Nav1.1 display autistic-like behaviours, hyperactivity and cognitive impairment. Haploinsufficiency of Nav1.1 in parvalbumin-expressing interneurons causes autistic-like behaviours, but not hyperactivity, whereas haploinsufficiency in somatostatin-expressing interneurons causes hyperactivity without autistic-like behaviours. Heterozygous deletion in both interneuron types is required to impair long-term spatial memory in context-dependent fear conditioning, without affecting short-term spatial learning or memory. Thus, the multi-faceted phenotypes of Dravet syndrome can be genetically dissected, revealing synergy in causing epilepsy, premature death and deficits in long-term spatial memory, but interneuron-specific effects on hyperactivity and autistic-like behaviours. These results show that multiple disease traits can arise from similar functional deficits in specific interneuron types. PMID:26017580

  15. Behavioral Phenotype of Fragile X Syndrome in Adolescence and Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Leann E.; Barker, Erin T.; Seltzer, Marsha Mailick; Abbeduto, Leonard; Greenberg, Jan S.

    2012-01-01

    The present study explored the behavioral profile of individuals with fragile X syndrome during adolescence and adulthood. Individuals with both fragile X syndrome and autism (n = 30) were compared with (a) individuals diagnosed with fragile X syndrome (but not autism; n = 106) and (b) individuals diagnosed with autism (but not fragile X syndrome;…

  16. Study on phenotypic and cytogenetic characteristics of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in myelodysplastic syndromes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋陆茜

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate phenotype,cell differentiation and cytogenetic properties of bone marrow(BM) mesenchymal stem cells(MSC)separated from the myelodysplastic syndrome(MDS) patients,and to analyze cytogenetic

  17. Social Phenotypes of Autism Spectrum Disorders and Williams Syndrome: Similarities and Differences

    OpenAIRE

    Kosuke eAsada; Shoji eItakura

    2012-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and Williams syndrome (WS) both are neurodevelopmental disorders, each with a unique social phenotypic pattern. This review article aims to define the similarities and differences between the social phenotypes of ASD and WS. We review studies that have examined individuals with WS using diagnostic assessments such as the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS), cross-syndrome direct comparison studies, and studies that have individually examined either di...

  18. Phenotypic, genetic, and genome-wide structure in the metabolic syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Comuzzie Anthony G; Blangero John; Dyer Tom; North Kari E; Martin Lisa J; Williams Jeff

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Background Insulin resistance, obesity, dyslipidemia, and high blood pressure characterize the metabolic syndrome. In an effort to explore the utility of different multivariate methods of data reduction to better understand the genetic influences on the aggregation of metabolic syndrome phenotypes, we calculated phenotypic, genetic, and genome-wide LOD score correlation matrices using five traits (total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, systolic blood ...

  19. Clinical and molecular phenotype of Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Gillian; Patrick, Teresa; Parmar, Rekha; Taylor, Claire F; Aeby, Alec; Aicardi, Jean; Artuch, Rafael; Montalto, Simon Attard; Bacino, Carlos A; Barroso, Bruno; Baxter, Peter; Benko, Willam S; Bergmann, Carsten; Bertini, Enrico; Biancheri, Roberta; Blair, Edward M; Blau, Nenad; Bonthron, David T; Briggs, Tracy; Brueton, Louise A; Brunner, Han G; Burke, Christopher J; Carr, Ian M; Carvalho, Daniel R; Chandler, Kate E; Christen, Hans-Jurgen; Corry, Peter C; Cowan, Frances M; Cox, Helen; D'Arrigo, Stefano; Dean, John; De Laet, Corinne; De Praeter, Claudine; Dery, Catherine; Ferrie, Colin D; Flintoff, Kim; Frints, Suzanna G M; Garcia-Cazorla, Angels; Gener, Blanca; Goizet, Cyril; Goutieres, Francoise; Green, Andrew J; Guet, Agnes; Hamel, Ben C J; Hayward, Bruce E; Heiberg, Arvid; Hennekam, Raoul C; Husson, Marie; Jackson, Andrew P; Jayatunga, Rasieka; Jiang, Yong-Hui; Kant, Sarina G; Kao, Amy; King, Mary D; Kingston, Helen M; Klepper, Joerg; van der Knaap, Marjo S; Kornberg, Andrew J; Kotzot, Dieter; Kratzer, Wilfried; Lacombe, Didier; Lagae, Lieven; Landrieu, Pierre Georges; Lanzi, Giovanni; Leitch, Andrea; Lim, Ming J; Livingston, John H; Lourenco, Charles M; Lyall, E G Hermione; Lynch, Sally A; Lyons, Michael J; Marom, Daphna; McClure, John P; McWilliam, Robert; Melancon, Serge B; Mewasingh, Leena D; Moutard, Marie-Laure; Nischal, Ken K; Ostergaard, John R; Prendiville, Julie; Rasmussen, Magnhild; Rogers, R Curtis; Roland, Dominique; Rosser, Elisabeth M; Rostasy, Kevin; Roubertie, Agathe; Sanchis, Amparo; Schiffmann, Raphael; Scholl-Burgi, Sabine; Seal, Sunita; Shalev, Stavit A; Corcoles, C Sierra; Sinha, Gyan P; Soler, Doriette; Spiegel, Ronen; Stephenson, John B P; Tacke, Uta; Tan, Tiong Yang; Till, Marianne; Tolmie, John L; Tomlin, Pam; Vagnarelli, Federica; Valente, Enza Maria; Van Coster, Rudy N A; Van der Aa, Nathalie; Vanderver, Adeline; Vles, Johannes S H; Voit, Thomas; Wassmer, Evangeline; Weschke, Bernhard; Whiteford, Margo L; Willemsen, Michel A A; Zankl, Andreas; Zuberi, Sameer M; Orcesi, Simona; Fazzi, Elisa; Lebon, Pierre; Crow, Yanick J

    2007-10-01

    Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome (AGS) is a genetic encephalopathy whose clinical features mimic those of acquired in utero viral infection. AGS exhibits locus heterogeneity, with mutations identified in genes encoding the 3'-->5' exonuclease TREX1 and the three subunits of the RNASEH2 endonuclease complex. To define the molecular spectrum of AGS, we performed mutation screening in patients, from 127 pedigrees, with a clinical diagnosis of the disease. Biallelic mutations in TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, and RNASEH2C were observed in 31, 3, 47, and 18 families, respectively. In five families, we identified an RNASEH2A or RNASEH2B mutation on one allele only. In one child, the disease occurred because of a de novo heterozygous TREX1 mutation. In 22 families, no mutations were found. Null mutations were common in TREX1, although a specific missense mutation was observed frequently in patients from northern Europe. Almost all mutations in RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, and RNASEH2C were missense. We identified an RNASEH2C founder mutation in 13 Pakistani families. We also collected clinical data from 123 mutation-positive patients. Two clinical presentations could be delineated: an early-onset neonatal form, highly reminiscent of congenital infection seen particularly with TREX1 mutations, and a later-onset presentation, sometimes occurring after several months of normal development and occasionally associated with remarkably preserved neurological function, most frequently due to RNASEH2B mutations. Mortality was correlated with genotype; 34.3% of patients with TREX1, RNASEH2A, and RNASEH2C mutations versus 8.0% RNASEH2B mutation-positive patients were known to have died (P=.001). Our analysis defines the phenotypic spectrum of AGS and suggests a coherent mutation-screening strategy in this heterogeneous disorder. Additionally, our data indicate that at least one further AGS-causing gene remains to be identified.

  20. Behavioral Phenotype of Fragile X Syndrome in Adolescence and Adulthood

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Leann E.; Barker, Erin T.; Seltzer, Marsha Mailick; Abbeduto, Leonard; Greenberg, Jan S.

    2012-01-01

    The present study explored the behavioral profile of individuals with fragile X syndrome during adolescence and adulthood. Individuals with both fragile X syndrome and autism (n = 30) were compared with (a) individuals diagnosed with fragile X syndrome (but not autism; n = 106) and (b) individuals diagnosed with autism (but not fragile X syndrome; n = 135) on measures of autism symptoms, adaptive functioning, behavior problems, and psychological symptoms. Results indicated that individuals du...

  1. Using Mouse Models to Explore Genotype-Phenotype Relationship in Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Ahmad; Faizi, Mehrdad; Belichenko, Pavel V.; Mobley, William C.

    2007-01-01

    Down Syndrome (DS) caused by trisomy 21 is characterized by a variety of phenotypes and involves multiple organs. Sequencing of human chromosome 21 (HSA21) and subsequently of its orthologues on mouse chromosome 16 have created an unprecedented opportunity to explore the complex relationship between various DS phenotypes and the extra copy of…

  2. The Behavioural Phenotype of Smith-Magenis Syndrome: Evidence for a Gene-Environment Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, L.; Oliver, C.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Behaviour problems and a preference for adult contact are reported to be prominent in the phenotype of Smith-Magenis syndrome. In this study we examined the relationship between social interactions and self-injurious and aggressive/disruptive behaviour in Smith-Magenis syndrome to explore potential operant reinforcement of problem…

  3. Further patient with Angelman syndrome due to paternal disomy of chromosome 15 and a milder phenotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillessen-Kaesbach, G.; Passarge, E.; Horsthemke, B. [Institut fuer Humangenetik, Essen (Germany)

    1995-04-10

    This {open_quotes}Letter to the Editor{close_quotes} decribes a patient with Angelman syndrome due to paternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15 and a milder phenotype compared to Angelman syndrome patients with a 15q deletion. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Craniofacial and Dental Aspects of Crouzon and Apert Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Reitsma (Jacobus Harmen)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The cranium of an infant or young child consists of different bony plates intersected by sutures. A calvarial suture is a type of fibrous joint in the cranium. The growth of the cranium is effectuated mainly in the sutures. Two important functions of the calvarial sutur

  5. Unusual phenotype of glucose transport protein type 1 deficiency syndrome: A case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annio Posar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The glucose transport protein type 1 (GLUT1 deficit causes a chronic brain energy failure. The classic phenotype of GLUT1 deficiency syndrome is characterized by: Mild to severe motor delay and mental retardation; infantile-onset epilepsy; head growth deceleration; movement disorders (ataxia, dystonia, spasticity; and non-epileptic paroxysmal events (intermittent ataxia, periodic confusion, recurrent headaches. During last years the classic phenotype of this syndrome, as originally reported, has expanded. We report the atypical phenotype of a boy with GLUT1 deficiency syndrome, characterized by mild mental retardation and drug-resistant absence seizures with onset at the age of 6 years, without movement disorders nor decrease of head circumference. A prompt diagnosis of this disorder is mandatory since the ketogenic diet might represent an effective treatment.

  6. Parkinsonian syndroms: Clinical phenotype, differential diagnosis and disease progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkinsonian syndromes include idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD), other neurodegenerative diseases with parkinsonism, the so-called atypical parkinsonian syndromes, and symptomatic parkinsonian syndromes, such as Wilson's disease. IPD is the most frequent disease with parkinsonism as the main clinical feature and is responsible for approx. 80% of all parkinsonian syndromes. Atypical parkinsonian syndromes are the most important differential diagnoses of IPD. The two most frequent types are multiple system atrophy (MSA) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). For clinical diagnosis it is essential to take a careful medical history and to examine the patients physically in regular intervals. However, various clinico-pathological studies have shown that approx. 25% of patients with clinical diagnosis of IPD may have other causes of parkinsonism. Selected technical investigations, in particular functional imaging of the central dopaminergic system using PET or SPECT, may help to make clinical diagnosis more secure. This paper reviews the clinical features and diagnostic findings in diseases with parkinsonism and summarises the difficulties in establishing early and differential diagnoses. (orig.)

  7. WDR35 mutation in siblings with Sensenbrenner syndrome: a ciliopathy with variable phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacino, Carlos A; Dhar, Shweta U; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Lee, Brendan; Bonnen, Penelope E

    2012-11-01

    Sensenbrenner syndrome and unclassified short rib-polydactyly conditions are ciliopathies with overlapping phenotypes and genetic heterogeneity. Mutations in WDR35 were identified recently in a sub-group of patients with Sensenbrenner syndrome and in a single family that presented with an unclassified form of short-rib polydactyly (SRP) syndrome. We report on siblings with an unusual combination of phenotypes: narrow thorax, short stature, minor anomalies, developmental delay, and severe hepatic fibrosis leading to liver failure and early death in two of the children. Both parents were unaffected suggesting autosomal recessive inheritance. The family and their affected children were followed over a decade. Exome sequencing was performed in one affected individual. It showed a homozygous missense mutation in a highly conserved position of the WDR35 gene. This family represents a WDR35-ciliopathy with a complex clinical presentation that includes significant overlap of the phenotypes described in Sensenbrenner syndrome and the unclassified SRPs. The accurate molecular diagnosis of this family exemplifies the power of exome sequencing in the diagnosis of Mendelian disorders and enabled us to broaden and refine our understanding of Sensenbrenner syndrome and SRP. Detailed genotype-phenotype information is provided as well as discussion of previously reported cases.

  8. WDR35 Mutation in Siblings with Sensenbrenner Syndrome: A Ciliopathy With Variable Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacino, Carlos A.; Dhar, Shweta U.; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Lee, Brendan; Bonnen, Penelope E.

    2014-01-01

    Sensenbrenner syndrome and unclassified short rib-polydactyly conditions are ciliopathies with overlapping phenotypes and genetic heterogeneity. Mutations in WDR35 were identified recently in a sub-group of patients with Sensenbrenner syndrome and in a single family that presented with an unclassified form of short-rib polydactyly (SRP) syndrome. We report on siblings with an unusual combination of phenotypes: narrow thorax, short stature, minor anomalies, developmental delay, and severe hepatic fibrosis leading to liver failure and early death in two of the children. Both parents were unaffected suggesting autosomal recessive inheritance. The family and their affected children were followed over a decade. Exome sequencing was performed in one affected individual. It showed a homozygous missense mutation in a highly conserved position of the WDR35 gene. This family represents aWDR35-ciliopathy with a complex clinical presentation that includes significant overlap of the phenotypes described in Sensenbrenner syndrome and the unclassified SRPs. The accurate molecular diagnosis of this family exemplifies the power of exome sequencing in the diagnosis of Mendelian disorders and enabled us to broaden and refine our understanding of Sensenbrenner syndrome and SRP. Detailed genotype–phenotype information is provided as well as discussion of previously reported cases. PMID:22987818

  9. Clinical and molecular phenotype of Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rice, Gillian; Patrick, Teresa; Parmar, Rekha; Taylor, Claire F.; Aeby, Alec; Aicardi, Jean; Artuch, Rafael; Montalto, Simon Attard; Bacino, Carlos A.; Barroso, Bruno; Baxter, Peter; Benko, Willam S.; Bergmann, Carsten; Bertini, Enrico; Biancheri, Roberta; Blair, Edward M.; Blau, Nenad; Bonthron, David T.; Briggs, Tracy; Brueton, Louise A.; Brunner, Han G.; Burke, Christopher J.; Carr, Ian M.; Carvalho, Daniel R.; Chandler, Kate E.; Christen, Hans-Juergen; Corry, Peter C.; Cowan, Frances M.; Cox, Helen; D'Arrigo, Stefano; Dean, John; De laet, Corinne; De Praeter, Claudine; Dery, Catherine; Ferrie, Colin D.; Flintoff, Kim; Frints, Suzanna G. M.; Garcia-Cazorla, Angels; Gener, Blanca; Goizet, Cyril; Goutieres, Francoise; Green, Andrew J.; Gueet, Agnes; Hamel, Ben C. J.; Hayward, Bruce E.; Heiberg, Arvid; Hennekam, Raoul C.; Husson, Marie; Jackson, Andrew P.; Jayatunga, Rasieka; Jiang, Yong-Hui; Kant, Sarina G.; Kao, Amy; King, Mary D.; Kingston, Helen M.; Klepper, Joerg; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Kornberg, Andrew J.; Kotzot, Dieter; Kratzer, Wilfried; Lacombe, Didier; Lagae, Lieven; Landrieu, Pierre Georges; Lanzi, Giovanni; Leitch, Andrea; Lim, Ming J.; Livingston, John H.; Lourenco, Charles M.; Lyall, E. G. Hermione; Lynch, Sally A.; Lyons, Michael J.; Marom, Daphna; McClure, John P.; McWilliam, Robert; Melancon, Serge B.; Mewasingh, Leena D.; Moutard, Marie-Laure; Nischal, Ken K.; Ostergaard, John R.; Prendiville, Julie; Rasmussen, Magnhild; Rogers, R. Curtis; Roland, Dominique; Rosser, Elisabeth M.; Rostasy, Kevin; Roubertie, Agathe; Sanchis, Amparo; Schiffmann, Raphael; Scholl-Buergi, Sabine; Seal, Sunita; Shalev, Stavit A.; Corcoles, C. Sierra; Sinha, Gyan P.; Soler, Doriette; Spiegel, Ronen; Stephenson, John B. P.; Tacke, Uta; Tan, Tiong Yang; Till, Marianne; Tolmie, John L.; Tomlin, Pam; Vagnarelli, Federica; Valente, Enza Maria; Van Coster, Rudy N. A.; Van der Aa, Nathalie; Vanderver, Adeline; Vles, Johannes S. H.; Voit, Thomas; Wassmer, Evangeline; Weschke, Bernhard; Whiteford, Margo L.; Willemsen, Michel A. A.; Zankl, Andreas; Zuberi, Sameer M.; Orcesi, Simona; Fazzi, Elisa; Lebon, Pierre; Crow, Yanick J.

    2007-01-01

    Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome (AGS) is a genetic encephalopathy whose clinical features mimic those of acquired in utero viral infection. AGS exhibits locus heterogeneity, with mutations identified in genes encoding the 3'-> 5' exonuclease TREX1 and the three subunits of the RNASEH2 endonuclease comple

  10. Clinical and molecular phenotype of Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rice, Gillian; Patrick, Teresa; Parmar, Rekha;

    2007-01-01

    Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome (AGS) is a genetic encephalopathy whose clinical features mimic those of acquired in utero viral infection. AGS exhibits locus heterogeneity, with mutations identified in genes encoding the 3'-->5' exonuclease TREX1 and the three subunits of the RNASEH2 endonuclease com...

  11. Neurodevelopmental outcome in Angelman syndrome: Genotype-phenotype correlations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mertz, Line Granild Bie; Thaulov, Per; Trillingsgaard, Anegen;

    2014-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurogenetic disorder characterized by intellectual disability, developmental delay, lack of speech, and epileptic seizures. Previous studies have indicated that children with AS due to 15q11.2-q13 deletions have a more severe developmental delay and present more often...

  12. Behavioural phenotype in Borjeson-Forssman-Lehmann syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.F. de Winter; F. van Dijk; J.J. Stolker; R.C.M. Hennekam

    2009-01-01

    Borjeson-Forssman-Lehmann syndrome (BFLs) is an X-linked inherited disorder characterised by unusual facial features, abnormal fat distribution and intellectual disability. As many genetically determined disorders are characterised not only by physical features but also by specific behaviour, we stu

  13. Mucosal neuroma syndrome--a phenotype for malignancy.

    OpenAIRE

    White, M P; Goel, K M; Connor, J M; Coutts, N A

    1985-01-01

    The mucosal neuroma syndrome is characterised by a typical physical appearance, neuromata on tongue and buccal mucosa, and a high risk of developing medullary thyroid carcinoma and phaeochromocytoma. A case is described and the importance of early recognition for prevention of malignancy is stressed.

  14. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome : Genetic determinants of the phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O. Valkenburg (Olivier)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) was first described in 1935 by Stein and Leventhal as an association of amenorrhoea, obesity and a typical, polycystically enlarged, appearance of the ovaries at laparatomy1. Taking into account the absence of advanced imaging techni

  15. The phenotype of polycystic ovary syndrome ameliorates with aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown, Zoe A.; Louwers, Yvonne V.; Fong, Sharon Lie; Valkenburg, Olivier; Birnie, Erwin; de Jong, Frank H.; Fauser, Bart C. J. M.; Laven, Joop S. E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effects of aging on the features of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Design: Retrospective longitudinal follow-up study. Setting: Tertiary care center. Patient(s): Patients with PCOS, diagnosed according to the 2003 Rotterdam criteria, who visited the outpatient clinic on c

  16. Environmental Influences on the Behavioral Phenotype of Angelman Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsler, Kate; Oliver, Chris

    2006-01-01

    Using observational methods, we examined the social influences on laughing and smiling behavior in children with Angelman syndrome by systematically manipulating aspects of social interaction. Seven boys and 4 girls who were between 4 and 11 years of age and who had a confirmed maternal deletion of chromosome 15q11-q13 completed the study. Each…

  17. A Turner syndrome neurocognitive phenotype maps to Xp22.3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elder Frederick F

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Turner syndrome (TS is associated with a neurocognitive phenotype that includes selective nonverbal deficits, e.g., impaired visual-spatial abilities. We previously reported evidence that this phenotype results from haploinsufficiency of one or more genes on distal Xp. This inference was based on genotype/phenotype comparisons of individual girls and women with partial Xp deletions, with the neurocognitive phenotype considered a dichotomous trait. We sought to confirm our findings in a large cohort (n = 47 of adult women with partial deletions of Xp or Xq, enriched for subjects with distal Xp deletions. Methods Subjects were recruited from North American genetics and endocrinology clinics. Phenotype assessment included measures of stature, ovarian function, and detailed neurocognitive testing. The neurocognitive phenotype was measured as a quantitative trait, the Turner Syndrome Cognitive Summary (TSCS score, derived from discriminant function analysis. Genetic analysis included karyotyping, X inactivation studies, fluorescent in situ hybridization, microsatellite marker genotyping, and array comparative genomic hybridization. Results We report statistical evidence that deletion of Xp22.3, an interval containing 31 annotated genes, is sufficient to cause the neurocognitive phenotype described by the TSCS score. Two other cardinal TS features, ovarian failure and short stature, as well as X chromosome inactivation pattern and subject's age, were unrelated to the TSCS score. Conclusion Detailed mapping suggests that haploinsufficiency of one or more genes in Xp22.3, the distal 8.3 megabases (Mb of the X chromosome, is responsible for a TS neurocognitive phenotype. This interval includes the 2.6 Mb Xp-Yp pseudoautosomal region (PAR1. Haploinsufficiency of the short stature gene SHOX in PAR1 probably does not cause this TS neurocognitive phenotype. Two genes proximal to PAR1 within the 8.3 Mb critical region, STS and NLGN4X, are

  18. Behavioral phenotype in the 9q subtelomeric deletion syndrome: a report about two adult patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, W.M.A.; Kleefstra, T.; Egger, J.I.

    2010-01-01

    The 9q Subtelomeric Deletion Syndrome (9qSTDS) is clinically characterized by mental retardation, childhood hypotonia, and facial dysmorphisms. Haploinsufficiency of the EHMT1 gene has been demonstrated to be responsible for its core phenotype. In a significant number of patients behavioral abnormal

  19. The Splicing Efficiency of Activating HRAS Mutations Can Determine Costello Syndrome Phenotype and Frequency in Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartung, Anne-Mette; Swensen, Jeff; Uriz, Inaki E;

    2016-01-01

    Costello syndrome (CS) may be caused by activating mutations in codon 12/13 of the HRAS proto-oncogene. HRAS p.Gly12Val mutations have the highest transforming activity, are very frequent in cancers, but very rare in CS, where they are reported to cause a severe, early lethal, phenotype. We...

  20. Honing in on the Social Phenotype in Williams Syndrome Using Multiple Measures and Multiple Raters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein-Tasman, Bonita P.; Li-Barber, Kirsten T.; Magargee, Erin T.

    2011-01-01

    The behavioral phenotype of Williams syndrome (WS) is characterized by difficulties with establishment and maintenance of friendships despite high levels of interest in social interaction. Here, parents and teachers rated 84 children with WS ages 4-16 years using two commonly-used measures assessing aspects of social functioning: the Social Skills…

  1. Phelan-McDermid syndrome in two adult brothers: Atypical bipolar disorder as its psychopathological phenotype?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.M.A. Verhoeven (Wim); J.I.M. Egger (Jos); M.H. Willemsen; G.J.M. de Leijer (Gert); T. Kleefstra (Tjitske)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe 22q13.3 deletion, or Phelan-McDermid syndrome, is characterized by global intellectual disability, generalized hypotonia, severely delayed or absent speech associated with features of autism spectrum disorder, and minor dysmorphisms. Its behavioral phenotype comprises sleep disturban

  2. Genotype-phenotype correlations in L1 syndrome : a guide for genetic counselling and mutation analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Yvonne J.; de Walle, Hermien E. K.; Bos, Krista K.; Stegeman, Jenneke A.; ten Berge, Annelies M.; Bruining, Martijn; van Maarle, Merel C.; Elting, Mariet W.; den Hollander, Nicolette S.; Hamel, Ben; Fortuna, Ana Maria; Sunde, Lone E. M.; Stolte-Dijkstra, Irene; Schrander-Stumpel, Connie T. R. M.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To develop a comprehensive mutation analysis system with a high rate of detection, to develop a tool to predict the chance of detecting a mutation in the L1CAM gene, and to look for genotype-phenotype correlations in the X-linked recessive disorder, L1 syndrome. Methods DNA from 367 refer

  3. Phelan-McDermid syndrome in two adult brothers: atypical bipolar disorder as its psychopathological phenotype?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, W.M.; Egger, J.I.; Willemsen, M.H.; Leijer, G.J. de; Kleefstra, T.

    2012-01-01

    The 22q13.3 deletion, or Phelan-McDermid syndrome, is characterized by global intellectual disability, generalized hypotonia, severely delayed or absent speech associated with features of autism spectrum disorder, and minor dysmorphisms. Its behavioral phenotype comprises sleep disturbances, communi

  4. Clinical and molecular phenotype of Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Rice, Gillian; Patrick, Teresa; Parmar, Rekha; Taylor, Claire F.; Aeby, Alec; Aicardi, Jean; Artuch, Rafael; Montalto, Simon Attard; Bacino, Carlos A.; Barroso, Bruno; Baxter, Peter; Benko, Willam S; Bergmann, Carsten; Bertini, Enrico; Biancheri, Roberta

    2007-01-01

    Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome (AGS) is a genetic encephalopathy whose clinical features mimic those of acquired in utero viral infection. AGS exhibits locus heterogeneity, with mutations identified in genes encoding the 3'-->5' exonuclease TREX1 and the three subunits of the RNASEH2 endonuclease complex. To define the molecular spectrum of AGS, we performed mutation screening in patients, from 127 pedigrees, with a clinical diagnosis of the disease. Biallelic mutations in TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNA...

  5. A further case of a Prader-Willi syndrome phenotype in a patient with Angelman syndrome molecular defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Molfetta Greice Andreotti

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Angelman syndrome (AS and Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS are distinct human neurogenetic disorders; however, a clinical overlap between AS and PWS has been identified. We report on a further case of a patient showing the PWS phenotype with the AS molecular defect. Despite the PWS phenotype, the DNA methylation analysis of SNRPN revealed an AS pattern. Cytogenetic and FISH analysis showed normal chromosomes 15 and microsatellite analysis showed heterozygous loci inside and outside the 15q11-13 region. The presence of these atypical cases could be more frequent than previously expected and we reinforce that the DNA methylation analysis is important for the correct diagnosis of severe mental deficiency, congenital hypotonia and obesity.

  6. Identification of the fragile X syndrome: phenotype and educational approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Begoña Medina Gómez

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Researchers confirm that fragile X syndrome is the leading cause of hereditary intellectual disability, but it is still largely unknown by educational professionals, health professionals and social service workers. An early detection could avoid transmission of the genetic disorder and would enable the establishment of the most appropriate interventions for each person. Great progress has been made over the last years in the understanding of the neurodevelopmental disorder. In this article, an extensive review about the most relevant studies and contributions that have been made so far concerning its molecular, brain, cognitive and conceptual interactions, the tools to sift in order to detect possible affected people, and also some tips on interventions. Nevertheless there should be continued progress in order to improve the assessment and the assistance in each particular case.

  7. The insulin-resistant phenotype of polycystic ovary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Pernille Fog; Madsbad, Sten; Nilas, Lisbeth

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the individual parameters included in the diagnosis of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), and their impact on insulin sensitivity. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Hvidovre, Denmark. PATIENT......(S): Sixty-one women; 36 women with PCOS and 25 age- and weight-matched control women were investigated. INTERVENTION(S): Peripheral insulin sensitivity was evaluated by the hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp, glucose tolerance by an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), and ovarian morphology by transvaginal...... assessment IR index. We found no significant association between ovarian morphology and insulin sensitivity or between menstrual frequency and insulin sensitivity. CONCLUSION(S): The PCOS is associated with IR. Body mass index, hyperandrogenemia, and hyperandrogenism are independent predictors of low insulin...

  8. Oculo-facio-cardio-dental syndrome in three succeeding generations: genotypic data and phenotypic features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lozić, B. [Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital Split, Split (Croatia); Ljubković, J. [Department of Pathology, Forensic Medicine and Cytology, University Hospital Split, Split (Croatia); Gabrić Pandurić, D. [Department of Oral Surgery, School of Dental Medicine, University of Zagreb, Zagreb (Croatia); Saltvig, I. [Jessenius Faculty of Medicine of Commenius, University in Bratislava, Martin (Slovakia); Kutsche, K. [Institute of Human Genetics, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Krželj, V. [Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital Split, Split (Croatia); Zemunik, T. [Department of Medical Biology, School of Medicine, University of Split, Split (Croatia)

    2012-09-21

    Oculo-facio-cardio-dental (OFCD) syndrome is a rare X-linked disorder mainly manifesting in females. Patients show ocular, facial, cardiac, and dental abnormalities. OFCD syndrome is caused by heterozygous mutations in the BCOR gene, located in Xp11.4, encoding the BCL6 co-repressor. We report a Croatian family with four female members (grandmother, mother and monozygotic female twins) diagnosed with OFCD syndrome who carry the novel BCOR mutation c.4438C>T (p.R1480*). They present high intrafamilial phenotypic variability with special regard to cardiac defect and cataract that showed more severe disease expression in successive generations. Clinical and radiographic examination of the mother of the twins revealed a talon cusp involving the permanent maxillary right central incisor. This is the first known report of a talon cusp in OFCD syndrome with a novel mutation in the BCOR gene.

  9. Oculo-facio-cardio-dental syndrome in three succeeding generations: genotypic data and phenotypic features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Lozić

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Oculo-facio-cardio-dental (OFCD syndrome is a rare X-linked disorder mainly manifesting in females. Patients show ocular, facial, cardiac, and dental abnormalities. OFCD syndrome is caused by heterozygous mutations in the BCOR gene, located in Xp11.4, encoding the BCL6 co-repressor. We report a Croatian family with four female members (grandmother, mother and monozygotic female twins diagnosed with OFCD syndrome who carry the novel BCOR mutation c.4438C>T (p.R1480*. They present high intrafamilial phenotypic variability with special regard to cardiac defect and cataract that showed more severe disease expression in successive generations. Clinical and radiographic examination of the mother of the twins revealed a talon cusp involving the permanent maxillary right central incisor. This is the first known report of a talon cusp in OFCD syndrome with a novel mutation in the BCOR gene.

  10. Oculo-facio-cardio-dental syndrome in three succeeding generations: genotypic data and phenotypic features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oculo-facio-cardio-dental (OFCD) syndrome is a rare X-linked disorder mainly manifesting in females. Patients show ocular, facial, cardiac, and dental abnormalities. OFCD syndrome is caused by heterozygous mutations in the BCOR gene, located in Xp11.4, encoding the BCL6 co-repressor. We report a Croatian family with four female members (grandmother, mother and monozygotic female twins) diagnosed with OFCD syndrome who carry the novel BCOR mutation c.4438C>T (p.R1480*). They present high intrafamilial phenotypic variability with special regard to cardiac defect and cataract that showed more severe disease expression in successive generations. Clinical and radiographic examination of the mother of the twins revealed a talon cusp involving the permanent maxillary right central incisor. This is the first known report of a talon cusp in OFCD syndrome with a novel mutation in the BCOR gene

  11. Expansion of phenotype and genotypic data in CRB2-related syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamont, Ryan E; Tan, Wen-Hann; Innes, A Micheil; Parboosingh, Jillian S; Schneidman-Duhovny, Dina; Rajkovic, Aleksandar; Pappas, John; Altschwager, Pablo; DeWard, Stephanie; Fulton, Anne; Gray, Kathryn J; Krall, Max; Mehta, Lakshmi; Rodan, Lance H; Saller, Devereux N; Steele, Deanna; Stein, Deborah; Yatsenko, Svetlana A; Bernier, François P; Slavotinek, Anne M

    2016-10-01

    Sequence variants in CRB2 cause a syndrome with greatly elevated maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein and amniotic fluid alpha-fetoprotein levels, cerebral ventriculomegaly and renal findings similar to Finnish congenital nephrosis. All reported patients have been homozygotes or compound heterozygotes for sequence variants in the Crumbs, Drosophila, Homolog of, 2 (CRB2) genes. Variants affecting CRB2 function have also been identified in four families with steroid resistant nephrotic syndrome, but without any other known systemic findings. We ascertained five, previously unreported individuals with biallelic variants in CRB2 that were predicted to affect function. We compiled the clinical features of reported cases and reviewed available literature for cases with features suggestive of CRB2-related syndrome in order to better understand the phenotypic and genotypic manifestations. Phenotypic analyses showed that ventriculomegaly was a common clinical manifestation (9/11 confirmed cases), in contrast to the original reports, in which patients were ascertained due to renal disease. Two children had minor eye findings and one was diagnosed with a B-cell lymphoma. Further genetic analysis identified one family with two affected siblings who were both heterozygous for a variant in NPHS2 predicted to affect function and separate families with sequence variants in NPHS4 and BBS7 in addition to the CRB2 variants. Our report expands the clinical phenotype of CRB2-related syndrome and establishes ventriculomegaly and hydrocephalus as frequent manifestations. We found additional sequence variants in genes involved in kidney development and ciliopathies in patients with CRB2-related syndrome, suggesting that these variants may modify the phenotype. PMID:27004616

  12. Characterization of Rett Syndrome-like phenotypes in Mecp2-knockout rats

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Yang; Zhong, Weiwei; Cui, Ningren; Johnson, Christopher M.; Xing, Hao; Zhang, Shuang; Jiang, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Background Rett Syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disease caused by the disruption of the MECP2 gene. Several mouse models of RTT have been developed with Mecp2 disruptions. Although the mouse models are widely used in RTT research, results obtained need to be validated in other species. Therefore, we performed these studies to characterize phenotypes of a novel Mecp2 −/Y rat model and compared them with the Mecp2 tm1.1Bird mouse model of RTT. Methods RTT-like phenotypes were systematica...

  13. Omphalocele in Miller-Dieker syndrome: Expanding the phenotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chitayat, D. [Toronto Hospital-General Division, Ontario (Canada)]|[Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Moola, S.; Yarkoni, D. [Toronto Hospital-General Division, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1997-03-31

    We report on a patient prenatally diagnosed with omphalocele, mild cerebral ventriculomegaly, nuchal fold thickening, and cystic changes in the umbilical cord who was found postnatally to have lissencephaly type I. Prenatal chromosome analysis showed a normal male karyotype; however, postnatal high resolution banding and FISH analysis, using a probe for locus D17S379 in chromosome region 17p13.3, demonstrated a deletion at 17p13.3 consistent with Miller-Dieker syndrome (MDS). A review documented four more cases with MDS/isolated lissencephaly/17p-, with omphalocele. Because MDS is a contiguous gene disorder, we speculate that a gene or genes in this region have a major role in the closure of the lateral folds or the return of the midgut from the body stalk to the abdomen at 5-11 weeks of gestation. Prenatal diagnosis of omphalocele with mild ventriculomegaly should prompt FISH analysis for a deletion in 17p13.3. 44 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Novel MASP1 mutations are associated with an expanded phenotype in 3MC1 syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Kayserili Karabey, Hülya; Tahir Atik; Asuman Koparir; Guney Bademci; Joseph Foster II; Umut Altunoglu; Gül Yesiltepe Mutlu; Sarah Bowdin; Nursel Elcioglu; Gulsen A. Tayfun; Sevinc Sahin Atik; Mustafa Ozen; Ferda Ozkinay; Yasemin Alanay; Steffen Thiel and Mustafa Tekin

    2015-01-01

    RESEARCH Open Access Novel MASP1 mutations are associated with an expanded phenotype in 3MC1 syndrome Tahir Atik1,2†, Asuman Koparir3†, Guney Bademci1, Joseph Foster II1, Umut Altunoglu4, Gül Yesiltepe Mutlu5, Sarah Bowdin6, Nursel Elcioglu7, Gulsen A. Tayfun7, Sevinc Sahin Atik8, Mustafa Ozen3,9, Ferda Ozkinay2, Yasemin Alanay10, Hulya Kayserili4,11, Steffen Thiel12 and Mustafa Tekin1* Abstract Background: 3MC1 syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterize...

  15. Phenotypic variation and detection of carrier status in the partial androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Batch, J A; Davies, H. R.; Evans, B.A.; Hughes, I. A.; Patterson, M N

    1993-01-01

    The partial androgen insensitivity syndrome occurs in 46,XY subjects with phenotypes ranging from perineoscrotal hypospadias with cryptorchidism and micropenis (mild undervirilisation) to clitoromegaly and partial labial fusion (marked undervirilisation). Within an affected family, wide variation in the degree of genital ambiguity between individuals can be seen. Two cousins of a previously reported subject who had severe genital ambiguity and partial androgen insensitivity were investigated....

  16. Characterizing associations and dissociations between anxiety, social, and cognitive phenotypes of Williams syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, Rowena; Järvinen, Anna; Bellugi, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurogenetic disorder known for its “hypersocial” phenotype and a complex profile of anxieties. The anxieties are poorly understood specifically in relation to the social-emotional and cognitive profiles. To address this gap, we employed a Wechsler intelligence test, the Brief Symptom Inventory, Beck Anxiety Inventory, and Salk Institute Sociability Questionnaire, to (1) examine how anxiety symptoms distinguish individuals with WS from typically developing (TD) ind...

  17. Honing in on the Social Phenotype in Williams Syndrome Using Multiple Measures and Multiple Raters

    OpenAIRE

    Klein-Tasman, Bonita P.; Li-Barber, Kirsten T.; Magargee, Erin T.

    2011-01-01

    The behavioral phenotype of Williams syndrome (WS) is characterized by difficulties with establishment and maintenance of friendships despite high levels of interest in social interaction. Here, parents and teachers rated 84 children with WS ages 4–16 years using two commonly-used measures assessing aspects of social functioning: the Social Skills Rating System and the Social Responsiveness Scale. Mean prosocial functioning fell in the low average to average range, whereas social reciprocity ...

  18. The Spectrum of the Behavioral Phenotype in Boys and Adolescents 47,XXY (Klinefelter Syndrome)

    OpenAIRE

    Tartaglia, Nicole; Cordeiro, Lisa; Howell, Susan; Wilson, Rebecca; Janusz, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    The behavioral phenotype of 47,XXY (Klinefelter syndrome) includes increased risks for developmental delays, language-based learning disabilities, executive dysfunction/ADHD, and social-emotional difficulties. However there is significant variability between individuals with 47,XXY, and many children and adolescents have minimal or no behavioral features while others have quite significant involvement. This paper describes behavioral features in a cohort of 57 children and adolescents with 47...

  19. Genotype and phenotype in Klinefelter syndrome - impact of androgen receptor polymorphism and skewed X inactivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojesen, A; Hertz, J M; Gravholt, C H

    2011-01-01

    The phenotypic variation of Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is wide and may by caused by various genetic and epigenetic effects. Skewed inactivation of the supra-numerical X chromosome and polymorphism in the androgen receptor (AR) have been suggested as plausible causes. We wanted to describe X-chromo......-chromosome inactivation did not. The impact of CAGn on final height may be caused by later reactivation of the pituitary-gonadal axis....

  20. Candidate Genes and the Behavioral Phenotype in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Sarah E.; Howley, Sarah; Murphy, Kieran C.

    2008-01-01

    There is an overwhelming evidence that children and adults with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) have a characteristic behavioral phenotype. In particular, there is a growing body of evidence that indicates an unequivocal association between 22q11.2DS and schizophrenia, especially in adulthood. Deletion of 22q11.2 is the third highest risk…

  1. Molecular mapping of the Edwards syndrome phenotype to two noncontiguous regions on chromosome 18

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boghosian-Sell, L.; Mewar, R.; Harrison, W.; Shapiro, R.M.; Zackai, E.H.; Carey, J.; Davis-Keppen, L.; Hudgins, L.; Overhauser, J.

    1994-09-01

    In an effort to identify regions on chromosome 18 that may be critical in the appearance of the Edwards syndrome phenotype, the authors have analyzed six patients with partial duplication of chromosome 18. Four of the patients have duplications involving the distal half of 18q (18q21.1-qter) and are very mildly affected. The remaining two patients have most of 18q (18q12.1-qter) duplicated, are severely affected, and have been diagnosed with Edwards syndrome. The authors have employed FISH, using DNA probes from a chromosome 18-specific library, for the precise determination of the duplicated material in each of these patients. The clinical features and the extent of the chromosomal duplication in these patients were compared with four previously reported partial trisomy 18 patients, to identify regions of chromosome 18 that may be responsible for certain clinical features of trisomy 18. The comparative analysis confirmed that there is no single region on 18q that is sufficient to produce the trisomy 18 phenotype and identified two regions on 18q that may work in conjunction to produce the Edwards syndrome phenotype. In addition, correlative analysis indicates that duplication of 18q12.3-q22.1 may be associated with more severe mental retardation in trisomy 18 individuals. 25 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Social phenotypes of autism spectrum disorders and Williams syndrome: similarities and differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke eAsada

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders (ASD and Williams syndrome (WS both are neurodevelopmental disorders, each with a unique social phenotypic pattern. This review article aims to define the similarities and differences between the social phenotypes of ASD and WS. We review studies that have examined individuals with WS using diagnostic assessments such as the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS, cross-syndrome direct comparison studies, and studies that have individually examined either disorder. We conclude that (1 Individuals with these disorders show quite contrasting phenotypes for face processing (i.e., preference to faces and eyes and sociability (i.e., interest in and motivation to interact with others, and (2 Although the ADOS and a direct comparison study on pragmatic language ability suggest more deficits in ASD, individuals with WS are similarly impaired on social cognition and communicative skills. In light of these results, we discuss how cross-syndrome comparisons between ASD and WS can contribute to developmental theory, cognitive neuroscience, and the development and choice of clinical treatments.

  3. Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome: Altered phenotype of a contiguous gene syndrome by the presence of a chromosomal deletion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hersh, J.H.; Williams, P.G.; Yen, F.F. [Univ. of Louisville, KY (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome (GCPS) is characterized by craniofacial anomalies, broad thumbs and halluces, polydactyly of the hands and feet, and variable syndactyly. Intellectual abilities are usually normal. Inheritance is in an autosomal dominant fashion. The disorder has been mapped to chromosome 7p13, suggesting that the condition represents a contiguous gene syndrome (CGS). A male infant presented with multiple congenital anomalies, including omphalocele, dysgenesis of the corpus callosum, hydrocephalus, esotropia, broad thumbs and halluces, syndactyly, polydactyly of one foot, hypotonia and developmental delay. A de novo interstitial deletion of chromosome 7p was detected, 46,XY,del(7)(p13p15). Although clinical findings in this case were reminiscent of GCPS, and the chromosomal abnormality included the region assigned to the candidate gene for this syndrome, additional physical abnormalities were present, as well as cognitive deficits. Some of these features have been previously described in patients with chromosomal deletions of 7p. The chromosomal abnormality in our case provides supportive evidence of the gene locus in GCPS, and that GCPS represents a new CGS. However, a larger deletion, extending beyond the limits of the gene, significantly altered the phenotype. Isolation of the gene responsible for GCPS, and identification of additional patients with chromosomal abnormalities in this region of chromosome 7, should help to provide more accurate genotype-phenotype correlations.

  4. The prevalence of metabolic disorders in various phenotypes of polycystic ovary syndrome: a community based study in Southwest of Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Ramezani Tehrani, Fahimeh; Rashidi, Homeira; Bahri Khomami, Mahnaz; Tohidi, Maryam; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2014-01-01

    Background Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrinopathy, associated with metabolic abnormalities. Metabolic features of various phenotypes of this syndrome are still debatable. The aim of present study hence was to evaluate the metabolic and hormonal features of PCOS phenotypes in comparison to a group of healthy control. Methods A total of 646 reproductive-aged women were randomly selected using the stratified, multistage probability cluster sampling method. The subjects were ...

  5. The Acrocallosal Syndrome in A Neonate With Further Widening of Phenotypic Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravish SINGHAL*

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Singhal R, Pandit S, Saini A, Singh P, Dhawan N. The Acrocallosal Syndrome in A Neonate With Further Widening of Phenotypic Expression. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Spring;8(2:60-64. The presentation of the typical characteristics of the acrocallosal syndrome (ACLS are hypoplasia/agenesis of corpus callosum, moderate to severe mental retardation, characteristic craniofacial abnormalities, distinctive digitalmalformation, and growth retardation in a neonate.An Indian neonate presented on day 1 of life (youngest in the literature to be reported with combination of abnormalities consistent with the acrocallosal syndrome and some additional findings. The baby, born to non-consanguineous, healthy parents, presented with macrocephaly, prominent forehead, hypertelorism, polydactyly of the hands and feet, duplication of hallux, hypotonia, recurrent cyanotic episodes, rib anomalies, dextro-positioning of heart, and delayed fallof umbilical cord.As the mode of inheritance of ACLS is autosomal recessive, the risk of recurrence is 25%. Genetic counselling is of prime importance, Polydactyly, and central nervous system malformations can be detected by ultrasonography in the second trimester, but due to variability of presentation, prenatal diagnosis may not always be possible.References1. Schinzel A. Postaxial polydactyly, hallux duplication, absence of corpus callosum, macencephaly and severemental retardation: a new syndrome? Helv Paediatr Acta 1979:34:141-146.2. Schinzel A. The acrocallosal syndrome: expansion of the phenotypic spectrum. Clin Dysmorphol 1994;3:31-34.3. Schinzel A, Schmid W. Hallux duplication, postaxial Polydactyly, absence of corpus callosum, severe mental retardation and additional anomalies in two unrelated patients: a new syndrome. Am J Med Genet 1980;6:241-249.4. Moeschler JB, Pober BR, Holmes LB, Graham JM Jr. Acrocallosal syndrome: new findings. Am J Med Genet 1989;32:195-199.5. Schinzel A

  6. Genotype-phenotype correlation in 21 patients with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome using high resolution array comparative genome hybridisation (CGH)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, N. M. C.; Van Buggenhout, G.; Hannes, F.; Thienpont, B.; Sanlaville, D.; Kok, K.; Midro, A.; Andrieux, J.; Anderlid, B-M; Schoumans, J.; Hordijk, R.; Devriendt, K.; Fryns, J-P; Vermeesch, J. R.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is usually caused by terminal deletions of the short arm of chromosome 4 and is phenotypically defined by growth and mental retardation, seizures, and specific craniofacial manifestations. Large variation is observed in phenotypic expression of these fe

  7. Stickler syndrome and the vitreous phenotype: Mutations in COL2A1 and COL11A1

    OpenAIRE

    Richards, Allan; McNinch, Annie; Martin, Howard; Oakhill, Kim; Rai, Harjeet; WALLER, SARAH; Treacy, Becky; Whittaker, Joanne; Meredith, Sarah; Poulson, Arabella; Snead, Martin P

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Stickler syndrome is a dominantly inherited disorder affecting the fibrillar type II/XI collagen molecules expressed in vitreous and cartilage. Mutations have been found in COL2A1, COL11A1 and COL11A2. It has a highly variable phenotype that can include midline clefting, hearing loss, premature osteoarthritis, congenital high myopia and blindness through retinal detachment. Although the systemic phenotype is highly variable, the vitreous phenotype has been used successfull...

  8. Stickler syndrome caused by COL2A1 mutations: genotype-phenotype correlation in a series of 100 patients

    OpenAIRE

    Mortier, Geert; Hoornaert, Kristien P; Vereecke, Inge; Dewinter, Chantal; Rosenberg, Thomas; Beemer, Frits A; Leroy, Jules G; Bendix, Laila; Björck, Erik; Bonduelle, Dr.; Boute, Odile; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; De Die-Smulders, Christine E.M.; Dieux-Coeslier, Anne; Dollfus, Hélène

    2010-01-01

    Stickler syndrome is an autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder caused by mutations in different collagen genes. The aim of our study was to define more precisely the phenotype and genotype of Stickler syndrome type 1 by investigating a large series of patients with a heterozygous mutation in COL2A1. In 188 probands with the clinical diagnosis of Stickler syndrome, the COL2A1 gene was analyzed by either a mutation scanning technique or bidirectional fluorescent DNA sequencing. The effec...

  9. Phelan-McDermid syndrome in two adult brothers: atypical bipolar disorder as its psychopathological phenotype?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verhoeven WMA

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Willem MA Verhoeven1,2, Jos IM Egger1,3,4, Marjolein H Willemsen5, Gert JM de Leijer6, Tjitske Kleefstra51Vincent van Gogh Institute for Psychiatry, Centre of Excellence for Neuropsychiatry, Venray, 2Erasmus University Medical Centre, Department of Psychiatry, Rotterdam, 3Donders Centre for Cognition, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, 4Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, 5Department of Human Genetics, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, 6Dichterbij, Institutes for Intellectual Disabilities, Gennep, The NetherlandsAbstract: The 22q13.3 deletion, or Phelan-McDermid syndrome, is characterized by global intellectual disability, generalized hypotonia, severely delayed or absent speech associated with features of autism spectrum disorder, and minor dysmorphisms. Its behavioral phenotype comprises sleep disturbances, communication deficits, and motor perseverations. Data on psychological dysfunctions are so far not available. Previous studies have suggested that the loss of one copy of the gene SH3 and multiple ankyrin repeat domains 3 (SHANK3 is related to the neurobehavioral phenotype. Additional genes proximal to SHANK3 are also likely to play a role in the phenotype of patients with larger deletions. The present paper describes two adult brothers with an identical 2.15 Mb 22qter (22q13.32q13.33 deletion, of whom the youngest was referred for evaluation of recurrent mood changes. In both patients, magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed hypoplasia of the vermis cerebelli. Extensive clinical examinations led to a final diagnosis of atypical bipolar disorder, of which symptoms fully remitted during treatment with a mood stabilizer. In the older brother, a similar psychopathological picture appeared to be present, although less severe and with a later onset. It is concluded that the behavioral phenotype of the 22q13.3 deletion syndrome comprises absent or delayed speech and perseverations

  10. Angelman syndrome due to paternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15: A milder phenotype?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bottani, A.; Robinson, W.P.; DeLoizer-Blanchet, C.D.; Engel, E.; Morris, M.A.; Schmitt, Thun-Hohenstein, L.; Schinzel, A. [Univ. of Zuerich (Switzerland)

    1994-05-15

    The Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurological disorder characterized by severe mental retardation, absent speech, seizures, gait disturbances, and a typical age-dependent facial phenotype. Most cases are due to an interstitial deletion on the maternally inherited chromosome 15, in the critical region q11-q13. Rare cases also result from paternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15. In a group of 14 patients with sporadic AS diagnosed in Switzerland, we found 2 unrelated females with paternal isodisomy for the entire chromosome 15. Their phenotypes were milder than usually seen in this syndrome: one girl did not show the typical AS facial changes; both patients had late-onset mild seizures; as they grow older, they had largely undisturbed gross motor functions, in particular no severe ataxia. Both girls were born to older fathers (45 and 43 years old, respectively). The apparent association of a relatively milder phenotype in AS with paternal uniparental disomy will have to be confirmed by detailed clinical descriptions of further patients. 25 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. The lymphatic phenotype in Turner syndrome: an evaluation of nineteen patients and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atton, Giles; Gordon, Kristiana; Brice, Glen; Keeley, Vaughan; Riches, Katie; Ostergaard, Pia; Mortimer, Peter; Mansour, Sahar

    2015-12-01

    Turner syndrome is a complex disorder caused by an absent or abnormal sex chromosome. It affects 1/2000-1/3000 live-born females. Congenital lymphoedema of the hands, feet and neck region (present in over 60% of patients) is a common and key diagnostic indicator, although is poorly described in the literature. The aim of this study was to analyse the medical records of a cohort of 19 Turner syndrome patients attending three specialist primary lymphoedema clinics, to elucidate the key features of the lymphatic phenotype and provide vital insights into its diagnosis, natural history and management. The majority of patients presented at birth with four-limb lymphoedema, which often resolved in early childhood, but frequently recurred in later life. The swelling was confined to the legs and hands with no facial or genital swelling. There was only one case of suspected systemic involvement (intestinal lymphangiectasia). The lymphoscintigraphy results suggest that the lymphatic phenotype of Turner syndrome may be due to a failure of initial lymphatic (capillary) function.

  12. The lymphatic phenotype in Turner syndrome: an evaluation of nineteen patients and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atton, Giles; Gordon, Kristiana; Brice, Glen; Keeley, Vaughan; Riches, Katie; Ostergaard, Pia; Mortimer, Peter; Mansour, Sahar

    2015-12-01

    Turner syndrome is a complex disorder caused by an absent or abnormal sex chromosome. It affects 1/2000-1/3000 live-born females. Congenital lymphoedema of the hands, feet and neck region (present in over 60% of patients) is a common and key diagnostic indicator, although is poorly described in the literature. The aim of this study was to analyse the medical records of a cohort of 19 Turner syndrome patients attending three specialist primary lymphoedema clinics, to elucidate the key features of the lymphatic phenotype and provide vital insights into its diagnosis, natural history and management. The majority of patients presented at birth with four-limb lymphoedema, which often resolved in early childhood, but frequently recurred in later life. The swelling was confined to the legs and hands with no facial or genital swelling. There was only one case of suspected systemic involvement (intestinal lymphangiectasia). The lymphoscintigraphy results suggest that the lymphatic phenotype of Turner syndrome may be due to a failure of initial lymphatic (capillary) function. PMID:25804399

  13. Hyperandrogenism and phenotypes of polycystic ovary syndrome are not associated with differences in obstetric outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mumm, Hanne; Jensen, Dorte Møller; Sørensen, Jens Aage;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate obstetric outcomes in Danish women with different phenotypes of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and isolated hyperandrogenism (HA) and describe the risk of adverse obstetric outcomes in women with PCOS and HA compared to controls. DESIGN: Cohort study. SETTING: Odense...... characteristics and obstetric outcomes were collected in patients with PCOS and HA and controls. In PCOS and HA, total and free testosterone, sex hormone binding globulin, and hemoglobin A1c were measured outside pregnancy. During pregnancy, oral glucose tolerance tests were performed in 39 patients and 123....... RESULTS: The incidence of adverse obstetric outcomes and anthropometric measures among the newborns were comparable between different phenotypes of PCOS and patients with HA. During oral glucose tolerance test, patients had higher risk of gestational diabetes mellitus compared to controls; odds ratio (95...

  14. Interstitial duplication of proximal 22q: Phenotypic overlap with cat eye syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoll, J.H.M.; Asamoah, A.; Wagstaff, J. [Children`s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)] [and others

    1995-01-16

    We describe a child with downslanting palpebral fissures, preauricular malfunctions, congenital heart defect (total anomalous pulmonary venous return), unilateral absence of a kidney, and developmental delay with an apparent interstitial duplication of proximal 22q. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis showed duplication of the IGLC locus, and C-banding of the duplicated region was negative. The duplication appears to involve 22q11.2-q12. Although the child has neither colobomas nor microphthalmia, he shows phenotypic overlap with with the cat eye syndrome, which is caused by a supernumerary bisatellited chromosome arising from inverted duplication of the short arm and proximal long arm of chromosome 22. Further molecular studies of this patient should help to define the regions responsible for the manifestations of cat eye syndrome. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Molecular definition of a region of chromosome 21 that causes features of the Down syndrome phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Korenberg, Julie R; Kawashima, Hiroko; Pulst, Stefan-M.; Ikeuchi, T; Ogasawara, N; Yamamoto, K.; Schonberg, Steven A.; West, Ruth; Allen, Leland; Magenis, Ellen; Ikawa, K; Taniguchi, N; Epstein, Charles J.

    1990-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is a major cause of mental retardation and heart disease. Although it is usually caused by the presence of an extra chromosome 21, a subset of the diagnostic features may be caused by the presence of only band 21q22. We now present evidence that significantly narrows the chromosomal region responsible for several of the phenotypic features of DS. We report a molecular and cytogenetic analysis of a three-generation family containing four individuals with clinical DS as manif...

  16. Genotype/phenotype correlation in women with nonmosaic X chromosome deletions and Turner syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinn, A.R. [Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas, TX (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Turner syndrome is a complex human developmental disorder associated with the absence of the second sex chromosome (monosomy X). Cardinal features of the Turner phenotype include high intrauterine lethality, growth retardation, gonadal failure, and the variable presence of specific somatic abnormalities such as webbed neck, lymphedema, and skeletal abnormalities. Recent observations support the hypothesis that the phenotype associated with monosomy X results from haploid dosage of genes common the X and Y chromosomes that escape X-inactivation ({open_quotes}Turner genes{close_quotes}). Apart from a locus causing short stature that maps to the pseudoautosomal region on the distal short arm, the location of X-linked Turner genes is not known. Karyotype/phenotype correlations in women with partial X deletions have been inconsistent. However, previous studies have focused on sporadic sex chromosome aberrations and may have been confounded by occult mosaicism. In addition, mapping of deletions was limited by the resolution of cytogenetic techniques. I am reexamining genotype/phenotype correlations in partial X monosomy, focusing on a subset of cases in which mosaicism is highly unlikely (e.g., unbalanced X-autosome translocations, familial X deletions), and using molecular techniques to map deletions. I have collected eight cases of nonmosaic X deletions in women with varied manifestations of Turner syndrome. Cytogenetic data suggests that genes responsible for Turner anatomic abnormalities may lie within a critical region of the very proximal portion of the short arm (Xp11). Molecular characterization of the deletions is in progress. Methods include (1) fluorescence in situ hybridization of metaphase spreads from patient-derived cell lines, using cosmid probes that map to known locations on Xp, and (2) sequence tagged site (STS) content mapping of somatic cell hybrids retaining the deleted X chromosomes derived from these cell lines.

  17. A three generation X-linked family with Kabuki syndrome phenotype and a frameshift mutation in KDM6A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederer, Damien; Shears, Debbie; Benoit, Valérie; Verellen-Dumoulin, Christine; Maystadt, Isabelle

    2014-05-01

    Kabuki syndrome is a rare malformation syndrome characterized by a typical facial appearance, skeletal anomalies, cardiac malformation, and mild to moderate intellectual disability. In 55-80% of patients with Kabuki syndrome, a mutation in MLL2 is identified. Recently, eight patients with Kabuki syndrome and a mutation in KDM6A were described. In this report, we describe two brothers with a mutation in KDM6A inherited from their mother and maternal grandmother. The two boys have Kabuki-like phenotypes whereas the mother and grandmother present with attenuated phenotypes. This family represents the first instance of hereditary X-linked Kabuki syndrome. We present a short literature review of the patients described with a mutation in KDM6A.

  18. Dubowitz syndrome is a complex comprised of multiple, genetically distinct and phenotypically overlapping disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas R Stewart

    Full Text Available Dubowitz syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by multiple congenital anomalies, cognitive delay, growth failure, an immune defect, and an increased risk of blood dyscrasia and malignancy. There is considerable phenotypic variability, suggesting genetic heterogeneity. We clinically characterized and performed exome sequencing and high-density array SNP genotyping on three individuals with Dubowitz syndrome, including a pair of previously-described siblings (Patients 1 and 2, brother and sister and an unpublished patient (Patient 3. Given the siblings' history of bone marrow abnormalities, we also evaluated telomere length and performed radiosensitivity assays. In the siblings, exome sequencing identified compound heterozygosity for a known rare nonsense substitution in the nuclear ligase gene LIG4 (rs104894419, NM_002312.3:c.2440C>T that predicts p.Arg814X (MAF:0.0002 and an NM_002312.3:c.613delT variant that predicts a p.Ser205Leufs*29 frameshift. The frameshift mutation has not been reported in 1000 Genomes, ESP, or ClinSeq. These LIG4 mutations were previously reported in the sibling sister; her brother had not been previously tested. Western blotting showed an absence of a ligase IV band in both siblings. In the third patient, array SNP genotyping revealed a de novo ∼ 3.89 Mb interstitial deletion at chromosome 17q24.2 (chr 17:62,068,463-65,963,102, hg18, which spanned the known Carney complex gene PRKAR1A. In all three patients, a median lymphocyte telomere length of ≤ 1st centile was observed and radiosensitivity assays showed increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Our work suggests that, in addition to dyskeratosis congenita, LIG4 and 17q24.2 syndromes also feature shortened telomeres; to confirm this, telomere length testing should be considered in both disorders. Taken together, our work and other reports on Dubowitz syndrome, as currently recognized, suggest that it is not a unitary entity but instead a collection of

  19. The Role of Anti-Müllerian Hormone in the Characterization of the Different Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romualdi, Daniela; Di Florio, C; Tagliaferri, V; De Cicco, S; Gagliano, D; Immediata, V; Lanzone, A; Guido, M

    2016-05-01

    Rotterdam criteria identified 4 polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) phenotypes based on the combination of anovulation (ANOV), hyperandrogenism (HA), and polycystic ovaries (PCOs): phenotype 1 (ANOV + HA + PCO), phenotype 2 (ANOV + HA), phenotype 3 (HA + PCO), and phenotype 4 (ANOV + PCO). Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) was suggested to play a pathophysiologic and diagnostic role in this syndrome. The aim of this study was to compare AMH levels among the different phenotypes in relation to clinical, endocrine, and metabolic features. We enrolled 117 women with PCOS (body mass index: 25.89 ± 6.20 kg/m(2), age range: 18-37 years) and 24 controls. Anthropometric characteristics, hirsutism score, ultrasound ovarian features, and hormonal parameters, including AMH, were evaluated. Each participant also underwent an oral glucose tolerance test and an euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp. The prevalence of phenotypes 1 to 4 was 62.4%, 8.6%, 11.1%, and 17.9%, respectively. Body mass index and insulin resistance indexes were similar among the groups. Phenotype 1 showed the highest luteinizing hormone, androgens levels, ovarian volume, and AMH concentrations (9.27 ± 8.17 ng/mL,P< .05) versus phenotype 2 and controls. Phenotype 2 women were hirsute, showed an intermediate free androgen index value, low ovarian volume, and low AMH levels (4.05 ± 4.12 ng/mL). Phenotype 3 showed an intermediate state of HA and slightly augmented AMH levels (5.87 ± 4.35 ng/mL). The clinical and endocrine characteristics of phenotype 4 resembled those of controls, except for higher ovarian volume and AMH levels (7.62 ± 3.85 ng/mL;P< .05). Our results highlight the heterogeneity of the association between increased AMH levels, menstrual dysfunction, and HA in the different PCOS phenotypes, thus offering a key to an understanding of the current controversy on the value of AMH measurement in PCOS. PMID:26718304

  20. Genotype, phenotype, and karyotype correlation in the XO mouse model of Turner Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, Frank J; Cooper, Mitchell Lance; Cheung, Sau Wai; Justice, Monica J

    2008-01-01

    The murine model for Turner Syndrome is the XO mouse. Unlike their human counterparts, XO mice are typically fertile, and their lack of a second sex chromosome can be transmitted from one generation to the next as an X-linked dominant trait with male lethality. The introduction of an X-linked coat-color marker (tabby) has greatly facilitated the maintenance of this useful mouse strain. XO mice can be produced in large numbers, generation after generation, and rapidly identified on the basis of their sex and coat color. Although this breeding scheme appears to be effective at the phenotype level, its utility has never been conclusively proved at the molecular or cytogenetic levels. Here, we clone and sequence the tabby deletion break point and present a multiplex polymerase chain reaction-based assay for the tabby mutation. By combining the results of this assay with whole-chromosome painting data, we demonstrate that genotype, phenotype, and karyotype all show perfect correlation in the publicly available XO breeding stock. This work lays the foundation for the use of this strain to study Turner Syndrome in particular and the X chromosome in general. PMID:18499648

  1. Recognition of the Cornelia de Lange syndrome phenotype with facial dysmorphology novel analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basel-Vanagaite, L; Wolf, L; Orin, M; Larizza, L; Gervasini, C; Krantz, I D; Deardoff, M A

    2016-05-01

    Facial analysis systems are becoming available to healthcare providers to aid in the recognition of dysmorphic phenotypes associated with a multitude of genetic syndromes. These technologies automatically detect facial points and extract various measurements from images to recognize dysmorphic features and evaluate similarities to known facial patterns (gestalts). To evaluate such systems' usefulness for supporting the clinical practice of healthcare professionals, the recognition accuracy of the Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) phenotype was examined with FDNA's automated facial dysmorphology novel analysis (FDNA) technology. In the first experiment, 2D facial images of CdLS patients with either an NIPBL or SMC1A gene mutation as well as non-CdLS patients which were assessed by dysmorphologists in a previous study were evaluated by the FDNA technology; the average detection rate of experts was 77% while the system's detection rate was 87%. In the second study, when a new set of NIPBL, SMC1A and non-CdLS patient photos was evaluated, the detection rate increased to 94%. The results from both studies indicated that the system's detection rate was comparable to that of dysmorphology experts. Therefore, utilizing such technologies may be a useful tool in a clinical setting. PMID:26663098

  2. Perfluorocarbons and Gilbert syndrome (phenotype) in the C8 Health Study Population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Hongmin [Cancer Center, School of Public Health, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 265050-9190 (United States); Department of Epidemiology and Statistics, School of Public Health, Hebei United University, Hebei 063000 (China); Ducatman, Alan [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, School of Public Health, West Virginia University (United States); Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, West Virginia University (United States); Clinical Translational Science Institute, West Virginia University (United States); Zhang, Jianjun [Department of Biostatistics, School Public Health, West Virginia University (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Background: Gilbert syndrome (GS) is an inherited defect of bilirubin conjugation, most commonly caused by a gene mutation for the enzyme UGT1A. GS is known to affect the metabolism and excretion of drugs and xenobiotics. Perfluorocarbon compounds (PFCs) are bio-persistent environmental contaminants that affect metabolic regulation. In this study, we examined the associations of GS phenotype and serum PFCs in the C8 Health Study Population. Materials and methods: Using 2005–2006 data from a large PFC-exposure population survey, we compared serum PFCs concentrations between GS and non GS clinical phenotypes, in a cross sectional design, adjusting for standard risk factors, including age, BMI, smoking status, socioeconomic status and gender. Results: Among 10 PFC compounds considered, only perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA) was seen at a significantly higher concentration in GS men and women. Conclusion: PFHxA exposure may be associated with GS. Our findings do not support increased exposure in GS for other PFCs. - Highlights: • Most serum PFCs are not associated with clinically evident Gilbert syndrome. • However, serum perfluorohexanoic acid is positively associated. • The investigation addresses the clinical presentation, not the genetic mutation.

  3. Perfluorocarbons and Gilbert syndrome (phenotype) in the C8 Health Study Population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Gilbert syndrome (GS) is an inherited defect of bilirubin conjugation, most commonly caused by a gene mutation for the enzyme UGT1A. GS is known to affect the metabolism and excretion of drugs and xenobiotics. Perfluorocarbon compounds (PFCs) are bio-persistent environmental contaminants that affect metabolic regulation. In this study, we examined the associations of GS phenotype and serum PFCs in the C8 Health Study Population. Materials and methods: Using 2005–2006 data from a large PFC-exposure population survey, we compared serum PFCs concentrations between GS and non GS clinical phenotypes, in a cross sectional design, adjusting for standard risk factors, including age, BMI, smoking status, socioeconomic status and gender. Results: Among 10 PFC compounds considered, only perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA) was seen at a significantly higher concentration in GS men and women. Conclusion: PFHxA exposure may be associated with GS. Our findings do not support increased exposure in GS for other PFCs. - Highlights: • Most serum PFCs are not associated with clinically evident Gilbert syndrome. • However, serum perfluorohexanoic acid is positively associated. • The investigation addresses the clinical presentation, not the genetic mutation

  4. Genomic imprinting: genetic mechanisms and phenotypic consequences in Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fridman Cintia

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal 15q11-q13 region is of great interest in Human Genetics because many structural rearrangements have been described for it (deletions, duplications and translocations leading to phenotypes resulting in conditions such as the Prader-Willi (PWS and Angelman (AS syndromes which were the first human diseases found to be related to the differential expression of parental alleles (genomic imprinting. Contrary to Mendelian laws where the parental inheritance of genetic information does not influence gene expression, genomic imprinting is characterized by DNA modifications that produce different phenotypes depending on the parental origin of the mutation. Clinical manifestation of PWS appears when the loss of paternally expressed genes occurs and AS results from the loss of a maternally expressed gene. Different genetic mechanisms can lead to PWS or AS, such as deletions, uniparental disomy or imprinting mutation. In AS patients an additional class occurs with mutations on the UBE3A gene. Studies of PWS and AS patients can help us to understand the imprinting process, so that other genomic regions with similar characteristics can be located, and different syndromes can have their genetic mechanisms elucidated.

  5. A de-novo STXBP1 gene mutation in a patient showing the Rett syndrome phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaniello, Romina; Saettini, Francesco; Panzeri, Elena; Arrigoni, Filippo; Bassi, Maria T; Borgatti, Renato

    2015-03-25

    This study reports on a 9-year-old girl who developed West syndrome and showed clinical features fulfilling the main revised diagnostic criteria for typical Rett syndrome (hand washing, severe cognitive impairment with absence of language, ataxic gait, progressive scoliosis and autistic features). Mutation analyses for methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2), cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5/STK9), ARX and Forkhead box G1 (FOXG1) genes were carried out, with negative results. A known de-novo c.1217G>A missense mutation in exon 14 leading to the substitution of a conserved residue, p.R406H in domain3b of the syntaxin-binding protein 1 (STXBP1) gene, was detected. The STXBP1 gene encodes the syntaxin-binding protein 1, a neuron-specific protein involved in synaptic vesicle release at both glutaminergic and GABAergic synapses. This function is also affected by MECP2 gene mutations, which are known to lead to a decrease in glutamate and GABA receptors' density. It is possible to speculate that the impairment in synaptic plasticity represents the pathogenic link between MECP2 and STXBP1 gene mutations. On reviewing the clinical features of the reported patients with the same mutation in the STXBP1 gene, it has been observed that poor eye contact, tremour, dyskinesia, head/hand stereotypies and both cognitive and motor progressive deterioration are common symptoms, although never considered as indicative of a Rett syndrome phenotype. In conclusion, the case described here suggests a relationship between the Rett syndrome and the STXBP1 gene not described so far, making the search for STXBP1 gene mutations advisable in patients with Rett syndrome and early onset of epilepsy.

  6. Variable phenotype of Marfan syndrome in two large Australian pedigrees, one of Australian aboriginal origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, K.K.; Summers, K.M.; West, M.J. [Univ. of Queensland (Australia)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Marfan syndrome may affect the cardiovascular, ocular and skeletal systems. The gene for this autosomal dominant disease maps to chromosome 15 and codes for the extracellular matrix protein fibrillin. Phenotypic expression is very variable both within and between families, possibly due to the influence of other, unlinked, genetic factors interacting with the fibrillin gene. We report two Australian families which demonstrate the extent of inter- and intra-family phenotypic variability. Eye, cardiac and skeletal assessments were made independently. In the first family, 8 of 12 siblings and 11 of 19 of their children had ectopia lentis with or without other ocular findings. There were few cardiac signs. One child had mitral valve prolapse. He and three other children had mild dilatation of the aorta. Skeletal abnormalities were also found (3 adults and 7 children). Chest wall asymmetry was the most common skeletal finding. This family has less cardiac and skeletal involvement than is usual in Marfan syndrome, although the disease maps to chromosome 15 in the region of the fibrillin gene (LOD=4.8 at {theta}=0 with respect to CYP19). The second family is partly of Australian aboriginal origin. The disease has been traced through 5 generations. To date we have examined 37 of 84 living members. Twenty-three in 3 generations are affected. Five adults and 4 children have moderate to severe aortic dilatation and there has been at least one death due to aortic dissection. However, two adolescents with subluxed lenses and marked skeletal abnormalities have normal aortic diameters, two children have aortic dilatation without other signs and two children have only subluxed lenses. This family shows the range of phenotypic variation which can arise from mutation in the fibrillin gene, which may be influenced by the admixture of Australian aboriginal genes. These two families provide an invaluable resource for studying genetic interactions in this disease.

  7. Clinical phenotype and candidate genes for the 5q31.3 microdeletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoki, Kana; Ohta, Tohru; Natsume, Jun; Imai, Sumiko; Okumura, Akihisa; Matsui, Takeshi; Harada, Naoki; Bacino, Carlos A; Scaglia, Fernando; Jones, Jeremy Y; Niikawa, Norio; Saitoh, Shinji

    2012-08-01

    Array-based technologies have led to the identification of many novel microdeletion and microduplication syndromes demonstrating multiple congenital anomalies and intellectual disability (MCA/ID). We have used chromosomal microarray analysis for the evaluation of patients with MCA/ID and/or neonatal hypotonia. Three overlapping de novo microdeletions at 5q31.3 with the shortest region of overlap (SRO) of 370 kb were detected in three unrelated patients. These patients showed similar clinical features including severe neonatal hypotonia, neonatal feeding difficulties, respiratory distress, characteristic facial features, and severe developmental delay. These features are consistent with the 5q31.3 microdeletion syndrome originally proposed by Shimojima et al., providing further evidence that this syndrome is clinically discernible. The 370 kb SRO encompasses only four RefSeq genes including neuregulin 2 (NRG2) and purine-rich element binding protein A (PURA). NRG2 is one of the members of the neuregulin family related to neuronal and glial cell growth and differentiation, thus making NRG2 a good candidate for the observed phenotype. Moreover, PURA is also a good candidate because Pura-deficient mice demonstrate postnatal neurological manifestations.

  8. Cleft palate and ADULT phenotype in a patient with a novel TP63 mutation suggests lumping of EEC/LM/ADULT syndromes into a unique entity: ELA syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prontera, Paolo; Garelli, Emanuela; Isidori, Ilenia; Mencarelli, Amedea; Carando, Adriana; Silengo, Margherita Cirillo; Donti, Emilio

    2011-11-01

    Acro-dermato-ungual-lacrimal-tooth (ADULT) syndrome is a rare condition belonging to the group of ectodermal dysplasias caused by TP63 mutations. Its clinical phenotype is similar to ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-cleft lip/palate (EEC) and limb-mammary syndrome (LMS), and differs from these disorders mainly by the absence of cleft lip and/or palate. We report on a 39-year-old patient who was found to be heterozygous for a c.401G > T (p.Gly134Val) de novo mutation of TP63. This patient had the ADULT phenotype associated with cleft palate. Our findings, rather than extend the clinical spectrum of ADULT syndrome, suggest that cleft palate can no longer be considered an element for differential diagnosis for ADULT, EEC, and LMS. Our data, added to other reports on overlapping phenotypes, support the combining of these three phenotypes into a unique entity that we propose to call "ELA syndrome," which is an acronym of ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-cleft lip and palate, limb-mammary, and ADULT syndromes.

  9. Phenotypic and molecular assessment of seven patients with 6p25 deletion syndrome: Relevance to ocular dysgenesis and hearing impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritch Robert

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thirty-nine patients have been described with deletions involving chromosome 6p25. However, relatively few of these deletions have had molecular characterization. Common phenotypes of 6p25 deletion syndrome patients include hydrocephalus, hearing loss, and ocular, craniofacial, skeletal, cardiac, and renal malformations. Molecular characterization of deletions can identify genes that are responsible for these phenotypes. Methods We report the clinical phenotype of seven patients with terminal deletions of chromosome 6p25 and compare them to previously reported patients. Molecular characterization of the deletions was performed using polymorphic marker analysis to determine the extents of the deletions in these seven 6p25 deletion syndrome patients. Results Our results, and previous data, show that ocular dysgenesis and hearing impairment are the two most highly penetrant phenotypes of the 6p25 deletion syndrome. While deletion of the forkhead box C1 gene (FOXC1 probably underlies the ocular dysgenesis, no gene in this region is known to be involved in hearing impairment. Conclusions Ocular dysgenesis and hearing impairment are the two most common phenotypes of 6p25 deletion syndrome. We conclude that a locus for dominant hearing loss is present at 6p25 and that this locus is restricted to a region distal to D6S1617. Molecular characterization of more 6p25 deletion patients will aid in refinement of this locus and the identification of a gene involved in dominant hearing loss.

  10. Elevated Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate Levels as the Reproductive Phenotype in the Brothers of Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Legro, Richard S.; Kunselman, Allen R.; DEMERS, LAWRENCE; Wang, Steve C.; Bentley-Lewis, Rhonda; Dunaif, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    There is an inherited susceptibility to polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Some investigators have suggested that premature male-pattern balding is a male phenotype in PCOS families, but this remains controversial. We recently reported evidence for an autosomal monogenic abnormality in ovarian and adrenal steroidogenesis in the sisters of women with PCOS. We performed this study to determine whether we could identify a clinical or biochemical phenotype in the brothers of women with PCOS. One h...

  11. Neurological phenotype in Waardenburg syndrome type 4 correlates with novel SOX10 truncating mutations and expression in developing brain.

    OpenAIRE

    Touraine, R L; Attié-Bitach, T; Manceau, E; Korsch, E.; Sarda, P; PINGAULT, V.; Encha-Razavi, F; Pelet, A.; Augé, J; Nivelon-Chevallier, A.; Holschneider, A M; Munnes, M; Doerfler, W; Goossens, M.; Munnich, A

    2000-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome type 4 (WS4), also called Shah-Waardenburg syndrome, is a rare neurocristopathy that results from the absence of melanocytes and intrinsic ganglion cells of the terminal hindgut. WS4 is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait attributable to EDN3 or EDNRB mutations. It is inherited as an autosomal dominant condition when SOX10 mutations are involved. We report on three unrelated WS4 patients with growth retardation and an as-yet-unreported neurological phenotype with im...

  12. Associations between salivary gland histopathologic diagnoses and phenotypic features of Sjögren's syndrome among 1,726 registry participants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daniels, Troy E; Cox, Darren; Shiboski, Caroline H;

    2011-01-01

    To examine associations between labial salivary gland (LSG) histopathology and other phenotypic features of Sjögren's syndrome (SS).......To examine associations between labial salivary gland (LSG) histopathology and other phenotypic features of Sjögren's syndrome (SS)....

  13. X-linked Aarskog syndrome: report on a novel FGD1 gene mutation. Executive dysfunction as part of the behavioural phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, W.M.A.; Egger, J.I.M.; Hoogeboom, A.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    X-linked Aarskog syndrome: report on a novel FGDI gene mutation. Executive dysfunction as part of the behavioural phenotype: Aarskog-Scott syndrome [OMIM 1000501 is a predominantly X-linked disorder that is phenotypically characterized by short stature, craniofacial dysmorphisms, brachydactyly and u

  14. The spectrum of the behavioral phenotype in boys and adolescents 47,XXY (Klinefelter syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartaglia, Nicole; Cordeiro, Lisa; Howell, Susan; Wilson, Rebecca; Janusz, Jennifer

    2010-12-01

    The behavioral phenotype of 47,XXY (Klinefelter syndrome) includes increased risks for developmental delays, language-based learning disabilities, executive dysfunction/ADHD, and socialemotional difficulties. However there is significant variability between individuals with 47,XXY, and many children and adolescents have minimal or no behavioral features while others have quite significant involvement. This paper describes behavioral features in a cohort of 57 children and adolescents with 47,XXY, including results on standardized measures of behavior (BASC-2), attention (Conner's Rating Scales), and social skills (Social Responsiveness Scale). A subset was directly assessed for autism spectrum disorders using the ADOS and ADIR. We discuss our results within the context of previous literature, including implications for genetic counseling, recommendations for care, and areas for future research.

  15. Primary Sjӧgren's syndrome: Clinical phenotypes, outcome and the development of biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goules, Andreas V; Tzioufas, Athanasios G

    2016-07-01

    Primary Sjӧgren's syndrome (pSS) is a complex autoimmune disease with distinct clinical phenotypes and variable outcomes. The systemic form of the disease is characterized by immune complex mediated manifestations and is complicated by lymphoma as a result of a polyclonal B cell hyperactivity that is evolving into B cell malignancy. In the past decades, well-established clinical and serological markers have been described in the literature to identify high-risk patients and to predict lymphoma development. However, specific biologic treatments have proven ineffective to control the disease. Significant research effort has been made to reveal the major underlying biological events in this subgroup and identify biomarkers for early diagnosis, prognosis and response to treatment. In this review, we summarize the current data for the proposed histological, molecular and genetic biomarkers.

  16. The spectrum of the behavioral phenotype in boys and adolescents 47,XXY (Klinefelter syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartaglia, Nicole; Cordeiro, Lisa; Howell, Susan; Wilson, Rebecca; Janusz, Jennifer

    2010-12-01

    The behavioral phenotype of 47,XXY (Klinefelter syndrome) includes increased risks for developmental delays, language-based learning disabilities, executive dysfunction/ADHD, and socialemotional difficulties. However there is significant variability between individuals with 47,XXY, and many children and adolescents have minimal or no behavioral features while others have quite significant involvement. This paper describes behavioral features in a cohort of 57 children and adolescents with 47,XXY, including results on standardized measures of behavior (BASC-2), attention (Conner's Rating Scales), and social skills (Social Responsiveness Scale). A subset was directly assessed for autism spectrum disorders using the ADOS and ADIR. We discuss our results within the context of previous literature, including implications for genetic counseling, recommendations for care, and areas for future research. PMID:21217607

  17. An Extra X or Y Chromosome: Contrasting the Cognitive and Motor Phenotypes in Childhood in Boys with 47,XYY Syndrome or 47,XXY Klinefelter Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Judith L.; Zeger, Martha P. D.; Kushner, Harvey; Zinn, Andrew R.; Roeltgen, David P.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The goal of this study was to contrast the cognitive phenotypes in boys with 47,XYY (XYY) karyotype and boys with 47,XXY karyotype [Klinefelter syndrome, (KS)], who share an extra copy of the X-Y pseudoautosomal region but differ in their dosage of strictly sex-linked genes. Methods: Neuropsychological evaluation of general cognitive…

  18. MECP2 deletions and genotype-phenotype correlation in Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scala, Elisa; Longo, Ilaria; Ottimo, Federica; Speciale, Caterina; Sampieri, Katia; Katzaki, Eleni; Artuso, Rosangela; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; D'Ambrogio, Tatiana; Vonella, Giuseppina; Zappella, Michele; Hayek, Giuseppe; Battaglia, Agatino; Mari, Francesca; Renieri, Alessandra; Ariani, Francesca

    2007-12-01

    Rett syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder that represents one of the most common genetic causes of mental retardation in girls. MECP2 point mutations in exons 2-4 account for about 80% of classic Rett cases and for a lower percentage of variant patients. We investigated the genetic cause in 77 mutation-negative Rett patients (33 classic, 31 variant, and 13 Rett-like cases) by searching missed MECP2 defects. DHPLC analysis of exon 1 and MLPA analysis allowed us to identify the defect in 17 Rett patients: one exon 1 point mutation (c.47_57del) in a classic case and 16 MECP2 large deletions (15/33 classic and 1/31 variant cases). One identical intragenic MECP2 deletion, probably due to gonadal mosaicism, was found in two sisters with discordant phenotype: one classic and one "highly functioning" preserved speech variant. This result indicates that other epigenetic or genetic factors, beside MECP2, may contribute to phenotype modulation. Three out of 16 MECP2 deletions extend to the adjacent centromeric IRAK1 gene. A putative involvement of the hemizygosity of this gene in the ossification process is discussed. Finally, results reported here clearly indicate that MECP2 large deletions are a common cause of classic Rett, and MLPA analysis is mandatory in MECP2-negative patients, especially in those more severely affected (P = 0.044).

  19. Novel mutation in Sjogren-Larsson syndrome is associated with divergent neurologic phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kathleen; Holden, Kenton R; S'Aulis, Dana; Amador, Claudia; Matheus, M Gisele; Rizzo, William B

    2013-10-01

    Sjögren-Larsson syndrome is an inherited disorder of lipid metabolism caused by mutations in the ALDH3A2 gene that codes for fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase, which results in accumulation of fatty aldehydes and alcohols and is characterized by ichthyosis, intellectual disability, and spastic diplegia/quadriplegia. The authors describe 2 unrelated Honduran patients who carried the same novel homozygous nonsense mutation (c.1309A>T, p.K437X) and ALDH3A2 DNA haplotype, but widely differed in disease severity. One patient exhibited spastic quadriplegia with unusual neuroregression, whereas the other patient had the usual static form of spastic diplegia with neurodevelopmental disabilities. Biochemical analyses showed a similar profound deficiency of fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and impaired fatty alcohol metabolism in both patients' cultured fibroblasts. These results indicate that variation in the neurologic phenotype of Sjögren-Larsson syndrome is not strictly determined by the ALDH3A2 mutation or the biochemical defect as expressed in cultured fibroblasts, but by unidentified epigenetic/environmental factors, gene modifiers, or other mechanisms.

  20. Atypical Down syndrome phenotype in a girl with 21;21 translocation trisomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuysuz, B; Yavuz, A; Ozdil, M; Caferler, J; Ozon, H

    2010-01-01

    We describe a girl with microcephaly, short stature, coarse face, severe growth and developmental delay, seizures, hypertonia, bilateral flexion contractures of the knees, and a de novo 21;21 translocation trisomy 21 in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis confirmed the trisomy 21 translocation using whole chromosome painting probe 21 (WCP21). Chromosome analysis which was also performed on skin fibroblasts and revealed mosaicism for a translocation trisomy 21 cell line (22.3%) as well as a second cell line consisting of one normal chromosome 21 and a small ring chromosome 21 derived from the translocation 21q21q (61%) and a third line consisting of monosomy 21 (16.7%). FISH analyses by LS121 probe for the critical (21q22.2-22.3) region of Down syndrome (DS) on interphase blood cells resulted with 30% two signals and 70% three signals, skin fibroblasts showed 84% single signal, 9% two signals and 7% three signals. The size of ring chromosome 21 in skin fibroblasts was very small and probably there was a large, more proximally located deletion including chromosome 21q22 band. We consider that the atypical DS phenotype of the patient originated from the small ring chromosome 21 and the monosomy 21 in the skin fibroblasts and other tissues not available for analysis. Therefore, the clinical findings of the patient were most similar to monosomy 21 mosaicism syndrome. PMID:20420031

  1. Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (Maroteaux-Lamy Syndrome): Six unique arylsulfatase B gene alleles causing variable disease phenotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isbrandt, D.; Arlt, G.; Figura, K. von; Peters, C.; Brooks, D.A.; Hopwood, J.J.

    1994-03-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type VI, or Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome, is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency of the enzyme arylsulfatase B (ASB), also known as N-acetylgalactosamine-4-sulfatase. Multiple clinical phenotypes of this autosomal recessively inherited disease have been described. Recent isolation and characterization of the human ASB gene facilitated the analysis of molecular defects underlying the different phenotypes. Conditions for PCR amplification of the entire open reading frame from genomic DNA and for subsequent direct automated DNA sequencing of the resulting DNA fragments were established. Besides two polymorphisms described elsewhere that cause methionine-for-valine substitutions in the arylsulfatase B gene, six new mutations in six patients were detected: four point mutations resulting in amino acid substitutions, a 1-bp deletion, and a 1-bp insertion. The point mutations were two G-to-A and two T-to-C transitions. The G-to-A transitions cause an arginine-for-glycine substitution at residue 144 in a homoallelic patient with a severe disease phenotype and a tyrosine-for-cysteine substitution at residue 521 in a potentially heteroallelic patient with the severe form of the disease. The T-to-C transitions cause an arginine-for-cysteine substitution at amino acid residue 192 in a homoallelic patient with mild symptoms and a proline-for-leucine substitution at amino acid 321 in a homoallelic patient with the intermediate form. The insertion between nucleotides T1284 and G1285 resulted in a loss of the 100 C-terminal amino acids of the wild-type protein and in the deletion of nucleotide C1577 in a 39-amino-acid C-terminal extension of the ASB polypeptide. Both mutations were detected in homoallelic patients with the severe form of the disease. Expression of mutant cDNAs encoding the four amino acid substitutions and the deletion resulted in reduction of both ASB protein levels and arylsulfatase enzyme activity. 25 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Observation of phenotypic variation among Indian women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) from Delhi and Srinagar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganie, Mohd Ashraf; Marwaha, Raman Kumar; Dhingra, Atul; Nisar, Sobia; Mani, Kaliavani; Masoodi, Shariq; Chakraborty, Semanti; Rashid, Aafia

    2016-07-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogeneous disorder that demonstrates ethnic and regional differences. To assess the phenotypic variability among Indian PCOS women, we evaluated clinical, biochemical and hormonal parameters of these women being followed in two tertiary care institutions located in Delhi and Srinagar. A total of 299 (210 PCOS diagnosed by Rotterdam 2003 criteria and 89 healthy) women underwent estimation of T4, TSH, LH, FSH, total testosterone, prolactin, cortisol, 17OHP, and lipid profile, in addition to post OGTT, C-peptide, insulin, and glucose measurements. Among women with PCOS, mean age, age of menarche, height, systolic, diastolic blood pressure, and serum LH were comparable. PCOS women from Delhi had significantly higher BMI (26.99 ± 5.38 versus 24.77 ± 4.32 kg/m(2); P = 0.01), glucose intolerance (36 versus 10%), insulin resistance as measured by HOMA-IR (4.20 ± 3.39 versus 3.01 ± 2.6; P = 0.006) and QUICKI (0.140 ± 0.013 versus 0.147 ± 0.015; P = 0.03) while PCOS from Srinagar had higher FG score (12.12 ± 3.91 versus 10.32 ± 2.22; P = 0.01) and serum total testosterone levels (0.65 ± 0.69 versus 0.86 ± 0.41 ng/ml; P = 0.01. Two clear phenotypes, i.e. obese hyperinsulinaemic dysglycemic women from Delhi and lean hyperandrogenic women from Srinagar are emerging. This is the first report on North Indian women with PCOS showing phenotypic differences in clinical, biochemical and hormonal parameters despite being in the same region.

  3. S267P mutation in FGFR2: first report in a patient with Crouzon syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Ronghu; Yang, Xianxian; Ge, Min; Cai, Tianyi; Lei, Jiaqi; Mu, Xiongzheng

    2015-03-01

    It has been known for several years that mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR2) result in syndromic craniosynostosis including Apert, Crouzon, or Pfeiffer syndromes. Here, we report on a child with a clinically diagnosed Crouzon syndrome that shows the missense point mutation S267P in FGFR2 gene. The mutation is firstly identified in Crouzon syndrome. Our observations expand the molecular spectrum of FGFR2 mutations in the syndrome. PMID:25759927

  4. Sequence homology at the breakpoint and clinical phenotype of mitochondrial DNA deletion syndromes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bekim Sadikovic

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA deletions are a common cause of mitochondrial disorders. Large mtDNA deletions can lead to a broad spectrum of clinical features with different age of onset, ranging from mild mitochondrial myopathies (MM, progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO, and Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS, to severe Pearson syndrome. The aim of this study is to investigate the molecular signatures surrounding the deletion breakpoints and their association with the clinical phenotype and age at onset. MtDNA deletions in 67 patients were characterized using array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH followed by PCR-sequencing of the deletion junctions. Sequence homology including both perfect and imperfect short repeats flanking the deletion regions were analyzed and correlated with clinical features and patients' age group. In all age groups, there was a significant increase in sequence homology flanking the deletion compared to mtDNA background. The youngest patient group (<6 years old showed a diffused pattern of deletion distribution in size and locations, with a significantly lower sequence homology flanking the deletion, and the highest percentage of deletion mutant heteroplasmy. The older age groups showed rather discrete pattern of deletions with 44% of all patients over 6 years old carrying the most common 5 kb mtDNA deletion, which was found mostly in muscle specimens (22/41. Only 15% (3/20 of the young patients (<6 years old carry the 5 kb common deletion, which is usually present in blood rather than muscle. This group of patients predominantly (16 out of 17 exhibit multisystem disorder and/or Pearson syndrome, while older patients had predominantly neuromuscular manifestations including KSS, PEO, and MM. In conclusion, sequence homology at the deletion flanking regions is a consistent feature of mtDNA deletions. Decreased levels of sequence homology and increased levels of deletion mutant heteroplasmy appear to correlate with earlier

  5. An inferential study of the phenotype for the chromosome 15q24 microdeletion syndrome: a bootstrap analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Prado, Dolores; Cortés, Ernesto; Aguilar-Segura, María Soledad; Gil-Guillén, Vicente Francisco

    2016-01-01

    In January 2012, a review of the cases of chromosome 15q24 microdeletion syndrome was published. However, this study did not include inferential statistics. The aims of the present study were to update the literature search and calculate confidence intervals for the prevalence of each phenotype using bootstrap methodology. Published case reports of patients with the syndrome that included detailed information about breakpoints and phenotype were sought and 36 were included. Deletions in megabase (Mb) pairs were determined to calculate the size of the interstitial deletion of the phenotypes studied in 2012. To determine confidence intervals for the prevalence of the phenotype and the interstitial loss, we used bootstrap methodology. Using the bootstrap percentiles method, we found wide variability in the prevalence of the different phenotypes (3–100%). The mean interstitial deletion size was 2.72 Mb (95% CI [2.35–3.10 Mb]). In comparison with our work, which expanded the literature search by 45 months, there were differences in the prevalence of 17% of the phenotypes, indicating that more studies are needed to analyze this rare disease. PMID:26925314

  6. Assisted reproductive outcomes in women with different polycystic ovary syndrome phenotypes: the predictive value of anti-Müllerian hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramezanali, Fariba; Ashrafi, Mahnaz; Hemat, Mandana; Arabipoor, Arezoo; Jalali, Samaneh; Moini, Ashraf

    2016-05-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) outcomes in different polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) phenotypes (A, B, C and D) compared with a control group and the predictive values of serum anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) in PCOS phenotypes for main outcomes. This study evaluated 386 PCOS women and 350 patients with male factor infertility. Women with phenotypes A and C had significantly higher concentrations of AMH than those with phenotype B (P hyperandrogenism and chronic anovulation is associated with a negative impact on the CPR in these patients. These results demonstrated that AMH concentration is related to PCO morphology but not predictive for CPR and live birth rate. PMID:26968928

  7. PFEIFFER TYPE I SYNDROME: A GENETICALLY PROVEN CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh. Salehpour

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivePfeiffer Syndrome is as rare as Apert syndrome in the Western population. This condition is very rare in the Asian population. At the best of our knowledge this is the first genetically proven case report from Iran. The authors report with a review of literature, the case of a infant with Pfeiffer syndrome, manifested by Lacunar skull, ventriculomegaly, bicoronal craniosynostosis,frontal bossing, shallow orbits, parrot-like nose, umbilical hernia, broad and medially deviated great toes.

  8. Turner Syndrome Genotype and phenotype and their effect on presenting features and timing of Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Alwan, I; M, Khadora; Amir; G, Nasrat; A, Omair; L, Brown; M, Al Dubayee; M, Badri

    2014-01-01

    Background Turner syndrome (TS) is a common genetic disorder caused by abnormalities of the X chromosome. We aimed to describe the phenotypic characteristics of TS patients and evaluate their association with presenting clinical characteristics and time at diagnosis. Methods We studied females diagnosed with TS at King Abdul Aziz Medical City (KAMC), Riyadh between 1983 and 2010. Patients were classified based upon karyotype into females with classical monosomy 45,X (group A) and females with other X chromosome abnormalities (mosaic 45,X/46,XX, Xqisochromosomes, Xp or Xq deletion) (group B). Clinical features of the two groups were analyzed. Results Of the 52 patients included in the study, 16(30.8%) were diagnosed with classical monosomy 45,X and the rest with other X chromosome abnormalities. Only 19(36.5%) patients were diagnosed in infancy and the remaining during childhood or later (odds ratio (OR) = 4.5,95%CI 1.27–15.90, p=0.02). Short stature was universal in group A versus 77.8% in group B. All patients in group A had primary amenorrhea compared with 63.2% of those in group B (P = 0.04); the rest of group B had secondary amenorrhea. Cardiovascular abnormalities were higher in group A (OR=3.50, 95%CI 0.99–12.29, p-value =0.05). Renal defects and recurrent otitis media were similar in both groups. Conclusion This study suggests that karyotype variations might affect the phenotype of TS; however, it may not reliably predict the clinical presentation. Chromosomal analysis for all suspected cases of TS should be promptly done at childhood in order to design an appropriate management plan early in life. PMID:25246887

  9. The Splicing Efficiency of Activating HRAS Mutations Can Determine Costello Syndrome Phenotype and Frequency in Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Mette Hartung

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Costello syndrome (CS may be caused by activating mutations in codon 12/13 of the HRAS proto-oncogene. HRAS p.Gly12Val mutations have the highest transforming activity, are very frequent in cancers, but very rare in CS, where they are reported to cause a severe, early lethal, phenotype. We identified an unusual, new germline p.Gly12Val mutation, c.35_36GC>TG, in a 12-year-old boy with attenuated CS. Analysis of his HRAS cDNA showed high levels of exon 2 skipping. Using wild type and mutant HRAS minigenes, we confirmed that c.35_36GC>TG results in exon 2 skipping by simultaneously disrupting the function of a critical Exonic Splicing Enhancer (ESE and creation of an Exonic Splicing Silencer (ESS. We show that this vulnerability of HRAS exon 2 is caused by a weak 3' splice site, which makes exon 2 inclusion dependent on binding of splicing stimulatory proteins, like SRSF2, to the critical ESE. Because the majority of cancer- and CS- causing mutations are located here, they affect splicing differently. Therefore, our results also demonstrate that the phenotype in CS and somatic cancers is not only determined by the different transforming potentials of mutant HRAS proteins, but also by the efficiency of exon 2 inclusion resulting from the different HRAS mutations. Finally, we show that a splice switching oligonucleotide (SSO that blocks access to the critical ESE causes exon 2 skipping and halts proliferation of cancer cells. This unravels a potential for development of new anti-cancer therapies based on SSO-mediated HRAS exon 2 skipping.

  10. A splicing mutation of the HMGA2 gene is associated with Silver-Russell syndrome phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Crescenzo, Agostina; Citro, Valentina; Freschi, Andrea; Sparago, Angela; Palumbo, Orazio; Cubellis, Maria Vittoria; Carella, Massimo; Castelluccio, Pia; Cavaliere, Maria Luigia; Cerrato, Flavia; Riccio, Andrea

    2015-06-01

    Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS) is a heterogeneous disorder characterized by intrauterine and post-natal growth retardation, dysmorphic facial features and body asymmetry. About 50% of the patients carry (epi)genetic alterations involving chromosomes 7 or 11.The high proportion of patients with unidentified molecular etiology suggests the involvement of other genes. Interestingly, SRS patients share clinical features with the 12q14 microdeletion syndrome, characterized by several deletions with a 2.6 Mb region of overlap. Among the genes present in this interval, high mobility AT-hook 2 (HMGA2) appears to be the most likely cause of the growth deficiency, due to its described growth control function. To define the role of HMGA2 in SRS, we looked for 12q14 chromosome imbalances and HMGA2 mutations in a cohort of 45 patients with growth retardation and SRS-like phenotype but no 11p15 (epi)mutations or maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 7 (matUPD7). We identified a novel 7 bp intronic deletion in HMGA2 present in heterozygosity in the proband and her mother both displaying the typical features of SRS. We demonstrated that the deletion affected normal splicing, indicating that it is a likely cause of HMGA2 deficiency. This study provides the first evidence that a loss-of-function mutation of HMGA2 can be associated with a familial form of SRS. We suggest that HMGA2 mutations leading to haploinsufficiency should be investigated in the SRS patients negative for the typical 11p15 (epi)mutations and matUPD7. PMID:25809938

  11. Atypical phenotypes associated with pathogenic CHD7 variants and a proposal for broadening CHARGE syndrome clinical diagnostic criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Caitlin L; Niederriter, Adrienne N; Green, Glenn E; Martin, Donna M

    2016-02-01

    CHARGE syndrome (Coloboma of the eye, Heart defects, Atresia of the choanae, Retardation of growth and/or development, Genital and/or urinary anomalies, and Ear malformations, including deafness and vestibular disorders) is a genetic condition characterized by a specific and recognizable pattern of features. Heterozygous pathogenic variants in the chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 7 (CHD7) are the major cause of CHARGE syndrome, and have been identified in 70-90% of individuals fulfilling clinical diagnostic criteria. Since 2004, when CHD7 was discovered as the causative gene for CHARGE syndrome, the phenotypic spectrum associated with pathogenic CHD7 variants has expanded. Predicted pathogenic CHD7 variants have been identified in individuals with isolated features of CHARGE including autism and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Here, we present genotype and phenotype data from a cohort of 28 patients who were considered for a diagnosis of CHARGE syndrome, including one patient with atypical presentations and a pathogenic CHD7 variant. We also summarize published literature on pathogenic CHD7 variant positive individuals who have atypical clinical presentations. Lastly, we propose a revision to current clinical diagnostic criteria, including broadening of the major features associated with CHARGE syndrome and addition of pathogenic CHD7 variant status as a major criterion. PMID:26590800

  12. Observation of phenotypic variation among Indian women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) from Delhi and Srinagar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganie, Mohd Ashraf; Marwaha, Raman Kumar; Dhingra, Atul; Nisar, Sobia; Mani, Kaliavani; Masoodi, Shariq; Chakraborty, Semanti; Rashid, Aafia

    2016-07-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogeneous disorder that demonstrates ethnic and regional differences. To assess the phenotypic variability among Indian PCOS women, we evaluated clinical, biochemical and hormonal parameters of these women being followed in two tertiary care institutions located in Delhi and Srinagar. A total of 299 (210 PCOS diagnosed by Rotterdam 2003 criteria and 89 healthy) women underwent estimation of T4, TSH, LH, FSH, total testosterone, prolactin, cortisol, 17OHP, and lipid profile, in addition to post OGTT, C-peptide, insulin, and glucose measurements. Among women with PCOS, mean age, age of menarche, height, systolic, diastolic blood pressure, and serum LH were comparable. PCOS women from Delhi had significantly higher BMI (26.99 ± 5.38 versus 24.77 ± 4.32 kg/m(2); P = 0.01), glucose intolerance (36 versus 10%), insulin resistance as measured by HOMA-IR (4.20 ± 3.39 versus 3.01 ± 2.6; P = 0.006) and QUICKI (0.140 ± 0.013 versus 0.147 ± 0.015; P = 0.03) while PCOS from Srinagar had higher FG score (12.12 ± 3.91 versus 10.32 ± 2.22; P = 0.01) and serum total testosterone levels (0.65 ± 0.69 versus 0.86 ± 0.41 ng/ml; P = 0.01. Two clear phenotypes, i.e. obese hyperinsulinaemic dysglycemic women from Delhi and lean hyperandrogenic women from Srinagar are emerging. This is the first report on North Indian women with PCOS showing phenotypic differences in clinical, biochemical and hormonal parameters despite being in the same region. PMID:26878496

  13. Phenotypic and Cytogenetic Characterization of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in De Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goonasekera, H. W. W.

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow (BM) mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) are vital in hematopoiesis. Whether BM-MSCs alter their characteristics in Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS) is still controversial. We characterized MSCs of de novo MDS patients in Sri Lanka who have not been reported previously in the literature. We also analyzed MSCs derived from different MDS subtypes. MSCs were culture-expanded, characterized by flow cytometry, and induced towards osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation. Growth properties were determined using growth curves and population doubling times. Karyotyping and FISH were performed on MSCs. Cell morphology, differentiation potential, and CD marker expression of MDS-MSCs of all subtypes were comparable to those of control-MSCs. No significant growth differences were observed between control MSCs and MDS-MSCs of all subtypes (p > 0.05). 31% of MDS-MSCs had chromosomal aberrations (der(3),del(6q),del(7p), loss of chromosomes) whose BM karyotypes were normal. Highest percentage of karyotypic abnormalities was observed in RCMD-MSCs. Patients with abnormal BM karyotypes had no aberrant MSC clones. Results show that in spite of presence of genetically abnormal clones in MDS-MSC populations, in vitro phenotypic and growth characteristics of MSCs in MDS remain unchanged. Further, the occurrence of genetic abnormalities in BM-MSCs in MDS could be considered as an autonomous event from that of their hematopoietic counterparts. PMID:27660743

  14. [Phenotypes of Charcot-Marie-Tooth Syndrome and Differential Diagnosis Focused in Inflammatory Neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), the most frequent form of inherited neuropathy, is a genetically heterogeneous syndrome of the peripheral nervous system with a rather homologous clinical phenotype (slowly progressive distal weakness and muscle atrophy, skeletal deformities, and areflexia in each limb). CMT1 is the autosomal-dominant demyelinating form, and CMT1A (mostly PMP22 duplication) is the most frequent subtype, followed by CMTX1, HNPP (hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies), CMT1B, or CMT2. As CMT is characterized by slowly progressive motor and sensory disturbances in each limb, it could be misdiagnosed as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) occasionally. Some points can distinguish demyelinating CMT from CIDP. CMT1 patients do not show the conduction block that is frequent in CIDP. In addition, ultrasonographic findings are useful because CMT1 suggests diffuse enlargement of peripheral nerves, whereas CIDP is characterized by asymmetrical or focal enlargement of peripheral nerves. Some CMT1 cases show favorable responses to immunomodulating therapeutics such as corticosteroids, IVIg, and plasma exchange. Such CIDP-like CMT1 (especially CMT1B or CMT2A) shows moderate to high levels of cerebrospinal fluid protein and infiltrated inflammatory macrophages. PMID:26764297

  15. Clinical, morphological, and biochemical phenotype of a new case of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VIIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, A; Wilcox, W R; Cohn, D H

    1997-01-10

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type VIIC is a newly recognized human disorder which results from failure to remove the amino-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen. Four cases of EDS type VIIC have been reported, and here we describe a fifth case. The propositus was a 1,445 g male infant born at 30 weeks of gestation following premature rupture of membranes. He had wide fontanelles, prominent eyes with swollen eyelids and blue sclerae, anteverted nostrils, micrognathia, umbilical hernia, short stubby fingers, and cutis laxa with hirsutism. At age 3 months, during the repair of the umbilical hernia, he was noted to have unusual skin fragility. Examination of skin by scanning electron microscopy showed frayed collagen fibrils, and transmission electron microscopy showed the hieroglyphic collagen fibril morphology characteristic of the disorder. As reported in other cases, cultured fibroblasts synthesized type I procollagen that was very poorly processed at the amino-terminal propeptide cleavage site. the 5 known cases of human EDS type VIIC characterize a distinct clinical phenotype, making this condition recognizable at birth before manifestation of severe skin fragility. The diagnosis can be confirmed by biochemical studies of type I procollagen synthesis and by electron microscopic examination of skin. PMID:8986271

  16. Johanson-Blizzard syndrome with mild phenotypic features confirmed by UBR1 gene testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naim Alkhouri; Barbara Kaplan; Marsha Kay; Amy Shealy; Carol Crowe; Susanne Bauhuber; Nartin Zenker

    2008-01-01

    Johanson-Blizzard syndrome (JBS) is a rare autosomal recessive condition associated with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, and is characterized by hypoplastic nasal alae, mental retardation, sensorineural hearing loss, short stature, scalp defects, dental abnormalities and abnormal hair patterns. Growth hormone deficiency, hypopituitarism, and impaired glucagon secretion response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia have been reported. Congenital heart defects have also been described in this condition. Mental retardation is typically moderate to severe in patients with JBS; however, normal intelligence can occur. In the pancreas, there is a selective defect of acinar tissue, whereas the islets of Langerhans and ducts are preserved. Diabetes has been reported in older children, suggesting the progressive nature of pancreatic disease. The molecular basis of JBS has recently been mapped to chromosome 15q15-q21 with identified mutations in the UBR1 gene. We report the case of a 7-year-old female with pancreatic insufficiency and mild phenotypic features, in whom the diagnosis of JBS was established using recently described molecular testing for the UBR1 gene.

  17. A case of variant biochemical phenotype of Niemann-Pick disease type C accompanying savant syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamatani, Mio; Jingami, Naoto; Uemura, Kengo; Nakasone, Naoe; Kinoshita, Hisanori; Yamakado, Hodaka; Ninomiya, Haruaki; Takahashi, Ryosuke

    2016-06-22

    A 40-year-old man was referred to our hospital because of vertical supranuclear gaze palsy, frequent sudden loss of muscle tonus and ataxia for several years. He had a history of prolonged neonatal jaundice. He was given a diagnosis of autism in his childhood, followed by a diagnosis of schizophrenia in his teenage. He also developed a savant skill of calendar calculating. (123)I-IMP-SPECT showed decreased cerebral blood flow in the left frontotemporal lobe as often seen in savant syndrome. Although genetic analysis of NPC1 and NPC2 revealed no pathogenic mutation, filipin staining of cultured fibroblasts from his biopsied skin revealed a certain amount of intracellular cholesterol storage pattern, indicating a variant biochemical phenotype of Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC). The diagnosis of adulthood onset NPC is difficult and challenging, especially for neurologists, because the symptoms and signs are not as clear as those in the classical childhood onset NPC and this subtype is not yet widely known. However, the diagnosis can be made by a combination of filipin staining of fibroblast and/or gene analysis. As a disease-specific therapy for NPC has been approved in Japan, the diagnosis of NPC is of significance. PMID:27181747

  18. A case of variant biochemical phenotype of Niemann-Pick disease type C accompanying savant syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamatani, Mio; Jingami, Naoto; Uemura, Kengo; Nakasone, Naoe; Kinoshita, Hisanori; Yamakado, Hodaka; Ninomiya, Haruaki; Takahashi, Ryosuke

    2016-06-22

    A 40-year-old man was referred to our hospital because of vertical supranuclear gaze palsy, frequent sudden loss of muscle tonus and ataxia for several years. He had a history of prolonged neonatal jaundice. He was given a diagnosis of autism in his childhood, followed by a diagnosis of schizophrenia in his teenage. He also developed a savant skill of calendar calculating. (123)I-IMP-SPECT showed decreased cerebral blood flow in the left frontotemporal lobe as often seen in savant syndrome. Although genetic analysis of NPC1 and NPC2 revealed no pathogenic mutation, filipin staining of cultured fibroblasts from his biopsied skin revealed a certain amount of intracellular cholesterol storage pattern, indicating a variant biochemical phenotype of Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC). The diagnosis of adulthood onset NPC is difficult and challenging, especially for neurologists, because the symptoms and signs are not as clear as those in the classical childhood onset NPC and this subtype is not yet widely known. However, the diagnosis can be made by a combination of filipin staining of fibroblast and/or gene analysis. As a disease-specific therapy for NPC has been approved in Japan, the diagnosis of NPC is of significance.

  19. Genotype-phenotype relationship in Japanese patients with congenital central hypoventilation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimokaze, Tomoyuki; Sasaki, Ayako; Meguro, Toru; Hasegawa, Hisaya; Hiraku, Yuka; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Kishikawa, Yumiko; Hayasaka, Kiyoshi

    2015-09-01

    Examine the genotype-phenotype relationship in Japanese congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) patients and estimate the incidence of CCHS in Japan. Subjects were 92 Japanese patients with PHOX2B mutations; 19 cases carried 25 polyalanine repeat expansion mutations (PARMs); 67 cases carried 26 or more PARMs; and 6 had non-PARMs (NPARMs). We collected clinical data in all patients and estimated the development or intelligent quotients only in the patients carrying 25 PARM. The estimated incidence of CCHS was greater than one case per 148 000 births. Polyhydramnios was observed in three cases. Twelve infants exhibited depressed respiration at birth. In 19 cases carrying 25 PARM, the male-to-female ratio was ~3, no cases had Hirschsprung disease; 7 cases (37%) developed hypoventilation after the neonatal period, and 8 cases (42%) had mental retardation. In other 73 cases carrying 26 or more PARMs or NPARMs, male-to-female ratio was equal; patients frequently complicated with Hirschsprung disease and constipation, and all patients presented with hypoventilation in the neonatal period. Clinical symptoms were severe in most patients carrying long PARMs and NPARMs. In 25 PARM, additional genetic and/or epigenetic factors were required for CCHS development and male sex is likely a predisposing factor. The patients carrying 25 PARM frequently had mental retardation likely because they were not able to receive appropriate ventilation support following a definitive diagnosis owing to subtle and or irregular hypoventilation. Molecular diagnosis provides a definitive diagnosis and enables to receive appropriate ventilator support. PMID:26063465

  20. Molecular genetic analysis in 14 Czech Kabuki syndrome patients is confirming the utility of phenotypic scoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paděrová, J; Holubová, A; Simandlová, M; Puchmajerová, A; Vlčková, M; Malíková, M; Pourová, R; Vejvalková, S; Havlovicová, M; Šenkeříková, M; Ptáková, N; Drábová, J; Geryk, J; Maver, A; Křepelová, A; Macek, M

    2016-09-01

    Kabuki syndrome (KS) is a dominantly inherited disorder mainly due to de novo pathogenic variation in KMT2D or KDM6A genes. Initially, a representative cohort of 14 Czech cases with clinical features suggestive of KS was analyzed by experienced clinical geneticists in collaboration with other specialties, and observed disease features were evaluated according to the 'MLL2-Kabuki score' defined by Makrythanasis et al. Subsequently, the aforementioned genes were Sanger sequenced and copy number variation analysis was performed by MLPA, followed by genome-wide array CGH testing. Pathogenic variants in KMT2D resulting in protein truncation in 43% (6/14; of which 3 are novel) of all cases were detected, while analysis of KDM6A was negative. MLPA analysis was negative in all instances. One female patient bears a 6.6 Mb duplication of the Xp21.2-Xp21.3 region that is probably disease causing. Subjective KS phenotyping identified predictive clinical features associated with the presence of a pathogenic variant in KMT2D. We provide additional evidence that this scoring approach fosters prioritization of patients prior to KMT2D sequencing. We conclude that KMT2D sequencing followed by array CGH is a diagnostic strategy with the highest diagnostic yield. PMID:26841933

  1. Mild Angelman syndrome phenotype due to a mosaic methylation imprinting defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbrother, Laura C; Cytrynbaum, Cheryl; Boutis, Paula; Buiting, Karin; Weksberg, Rosanna; Williams, Charles

    2015-07-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurogenetic disorder causing severe to profound intellectual disability, absent or very limited speech and a high risk for seizures. AS is caused by a loss of function of the maternally-derived UBE3A allele due to one of several mechanisms including imprinting defects (ImpDs). We present a girl with AS due to a mosaic ImpD who has relatively high developmental function (VABS-II composite score of 76) and communication skills (as demonstrated in supplemental video links). Given the patient's relatively mild developmental impairment, without clinical evidence of seizures, gait disturbance or inappropriate laughter, the diagnosis of AS was not initially suspected. Initial laboratory testing for AS was inconclusive but additional studies suggested mosaic ImpD and characteristic EEG findings provided further support for the clinical diagnosis. Our patient, along with other case reports of children with AS and relatively mild phenotypes, raises the question as to whether there exists an undiagnosed group of individuals with mild intellectual disability and expressive speech delays due to mosaic methylation defects of the chromosome 15q11.2-13 region. Population studies may be needed to determine if such an undiagnosed group exists. PMID:25899869

  2. Craniofacial and anthropometric phenotype in ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate syndrome (Hay-Wells syndrome) in a cohort of 17 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, V Reid; Plunkett, Katie; Dang, Diane X; Lewis, Richard A; Bree, Alanna F; Bacino, Carlos A

    2009-09-01

    Ankyloblepharon-ectodermal dysplasia-cleft lip/palate (AEC) syndrome and Rapp-Hodgkin syndrome are well-characterized clinical entities caused by mutations in the TP63 gene. While AEC and Rapp-Hodgkin had been thought to be clinically distinct entities, the elucidation of their molecular etiology confirmed that they are a clinical continuum as opposed to distinct disorders. We have evaluated 17 patients with AEC syndrome using a systematic clinical approach. In our study, we have identified new features and others that were thought to occur only rarely. These include short stature and poor weight gain with preservation of head circumference in nearly all subjects, trismus in 35% and hypospadias in 78% of males. In addition, we describe the frequency of phenotypic features and demonstrate the extreme clinical variability in the largest cohort of AEC individuals reported in the literature thus far.

  3. Increased protein stability of CDKN1C causes a gain-of-function phenotype in patients with IMAGe syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Hamajima

    Full Text Available Mutations in the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA-binding domain of the CDKN1C gene were recently identified in patients with IMAGe syndrome. However, loss of PCNA binding and suppression of CDKN1C monoubiquitination by IMAGe-associated mutations hardly explain the reduced-growth phenotype characteristic of IMAGe syndrome. We demonstrate here that IMAGe-associated mutations in the CDKN1C gene dramatically increased the protein stability. We identified a novel heterozygous mutation, c.815T>G (p.Ile272Ser, in the CDKN1C gene in three siblings manifesting clinical symptoms associated with IMAGe syndrome and their mother (unaffected carrier. PCNA binding to CDKN1C was disrupted in the case of p.Ile272Ser, and for two other IMAGe-associated mutations, p.Asp274Asn and p.Phe276Val. Intriguingly, the IMAGe-associated mutant CDKN1C proteins were fairly stable even in the presence of cycloheximide, whereas the wild-type protein was almost completely degraded via the proteasome pathway, as shown by the lack of degradation with addition of a proteasome inhibitor, MG132. These results thus suggested that the reduced-growth phenotype of IMAGe syndrome derives from CDKN1C gain-of-function due to IMAGe-associated mutations driving increased protein stability.

  4. Clinical and Molecular Phenotype of Aicardi-Goutières Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Gillian ; Patrick, Teresa ; Parmar, Rekha ; Taylor, Claire F. ; Aeby, Alec ; Aicardi, Jean ; Artuch, Rafael ; Montalto, Simon Attard ; Bacino, Carlos A. ; Barroso, Bruno ; Baxter, Peter ; Benko, Willam S. ; Bergmann, Carsten ; Bertini, Enrico ; Biancheri, Roberta ; Blair, Edward M. ; Blau, Nenad ; Bonthron, David T. ; Briggs, Tracy ; Brueton, Louise A. ; Brunner, Han G. ; Burke, Christopher J. ; Carr, Ian M. ; Carvalho, Daniel R. ; Chandler, Kate E. ; Christen, Hans-Jürgen ; Corry, Peter C. ; Cowan, Frances M. ; Cox, Helen ; D’Arrigo, Stefano ; Dean, John ; De Laet, Corinne ; De Praeter, Claudine ; Déry, Catherine ; Ferrie, Colin D. ; Flintoff, Kim ; Frints, Suzanna G. M. ; Garcia-Cazorla, Angels ; Gener, Blanca ; Goizet, Cyril ; Goutières, Françoise ; Green, Andrew J. ; Guët, Agnès ; Hamel, Ben C. J. ; Hayward, Bruce E. ; Heiberg, Arvid ; Hennekam, Raoul C. ; Husson, Marie ; Jackson, Andrew P. ; Jayatunga, Rasieka ; Jiang, Yong-Hui ; Kant, Sarina G. ; Kao, Amy ; King, Mary D. ; Kingston, Helen M. ; Klepper, Joerg ; van der Knaap, Marjo S. ; Kornberg, Andrew J. ; Kotzot, Dieter ; Kratzer, Wilfried ; Lacombe, Didier ; Lagae, Lieven ; Landrieu, Pierre Georges ; Lanzi, Giovanni ; Leitch, Andrea ; Lim, Ming J. ; Livingston, John H. ; Lourenco, Charles M. ; Lyall, E. G. Hermione ; Lynch, Sally A. ; Lyons, Michael J. ; Marom, Daphna ; McClure, John P. ; McWilliam, Robert ; Melancon, Serge B. ; Mewasingh, Leena D. ; Moutard, Marie-Laure ; Nischal, Ken K. ; Østergaard, John R. ; Prendiville, Julie ; Rasmussen, Magnhild ; Rogers, R. Curtis ; Roland, Dominique ; Rosser, Elisabeth M. ; Rostasy, Kevin ; Roubertie, Agathe ; Sanchis, Amparo ; Schiffmann, Raphael ; Scholl-Bürgi, Sabine ; Seal, Sunita ; Shalev, Stavit A. ; Corcoles, C. Sierra ; Sinha, Gyan P. ; Soler, Doriette ; Spiegel, Ronen ; Stephenson, John B. P. ; Tacke, Uta ; Tan, Tiong Yang ; Till, Marianne ; Tolmie, John L. ; Tomlin, Pam ; Vagnarelli, Federica ; Valente, Enza Maria ; Van Coster, Rudy N. A. ; Van der Aa, Nathalie ; Vanderver, Adeline ; Vles, Johannes S. H. ; Voit, Thomas ; Wassmer, Evangeline ; Weschke, Bernhard ; Whiteford, Margo L. ; Willemsen, Michel A. A. ; Zankl, Andreas ; Zuberi, Sameer M. ; Orcesi, Simona ; Fazzi, Elisa ; Lebon, Pierre ; Crow, Yanick J. 

    2007-01-01

    Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) is a genetic encephalopathy whose clinical features mimic those of acquired in utero viral infection. AGS exhibits locus heterogeneity, with mutations identified in genes encoding the 3′→5′ exonuclease TREX1 and the three subunits of the RNASEH2 endonuclease complex. To define the molecular spectrum of AGS, we performed mutation screening in patients, from 127 pedigrees, with a clinical diagnosis of the disease. Biallelic mutations in TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, and RNASEH2C were observed in 31, 3, 47, and 18 families, respectively. In five families, we identified an RNASEH2A or RNASEH2B mutation on one allele only. In one child, the disease occurred because of a de novo heterozygous TREX1 mutation. In 22 families, no mutations were found. Null mutations were common in TREX1, although a specific missense mutation was observed frequently in patients from northern Europe. Almost all mutations in RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, and RNASEH2C were missense. We identified an RNASEH2C founder mutation in 13 Pakistani families. We also collected clinical data from 123 mutation-positive patients. Two clinical presentations could be delineated: an early-onset neonatal form, highly reminiscent of congenital infection seen particularly with TREX1 mutations, and a later-onset presentation, sometimes occurring after several months of normal development and occasionally associated with remarkably preserved neurological function, most frequently due to RNASEH2B mutations. Mortality was correlated with genotype; 34.3% of patients with TREX1, RNASEH2A, and RNASEH2C mutations versus 8.0% RNASEH2B mutation–positive patients were known to have died (P=.001). Our analysis defines the phenotypic spectrum of AGS and suggests a coherent mutation-screening strategy in this heterogeneous disorder. Additionally, our data indicate that at least one further AGS-causing gene remains to be identified. PMID:17846997

  5. Stewart-Treves syndrome angiosarcoma expresses phenotypes of both blood and lymphatic capillaries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marek Stanczyk; Magdalena Gewartowska; Marcin Swierkowski; Bartlomiej Grala; Marek Maruszynski

    2013-01-01

    Background The development of angiosarcoma in oedematous tissue is referred to as Stewart-Treves syndrome (STS).This rare and fatal complication is associated with chronic post mastectomy lymphoedema and radiotherapy for breast cancer.Angiosarcoma spread is facilitated by the formation of blood vessels (angiogenesis) and lymph vessels (lymphangiogenesis).In the future antiangiogenic therapy may improve the poor outcome of current treatments.There was evidence that blocking the angiogenenesis would inhibit progression of angiosarcoma.It seems reasonable to hypothesize that blocking the lymphangiogenesis may yield similar results.Although angiosarcomas commonly derive from blood vessels,in case of STS angiosarcomas chronic lymphoedema may suggest its lymphatic origin.The goal of this study was to visualize interstitial space and lymphatics in the central and peripheral regions of STS angiosarcoma.Methods On tissue samples obtained from STS angiosarcoma we have performed:first colour stereoscopic lymphography to visualise the morphology of lymphatic vessels and extracellular spaces,second immunohistochemical staining specific for lymphatic vessels endothelium (LYVE-1) and blood endothelial cells (CD31,factor Ⅷ) and prolymphangiogenic vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-C) for precise identification of lymphatic endothelia.STS angiosarcoma morphology was assessed by comparison of pictures obtained on lymphography,microscopy and confocal microscopy.Results STS angiosarcomas present heterogenous morphology with areas dominated by hemangiosarcoma and lymphangiosarcoma structures.STS angiosarcoma expressed phenotypes of both blood and lymphatic endothelia.LYVE-1 and VEGF-C is expressed by STS angiosarcoma and may be used to discriminate tumour differentiation.Morphology of lymphatic vessels and spaces in the tumour suggest absence of their normal lymphatic function.Conclusions Our results confirmed both hemangio-and lymphangiogenic origin of STS angiosarcoma

  6. Asthma COPD Overlap Syndrome on CT Densitometry: A Distinct Phenotype from COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yanli; Zhai, Xiaoli; Li, Kun; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Ying; Lu, Yong; Pan, Zhenyu; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Kewu; Zhai, Renyou

    2016-08-01

    Patients with asthma COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS) are an important but poorly characterized group. This study sought to explore the distinct characteristics of ACOS on CT densitometry. The study population was randomly selected from communities via questionnaires. All participants underwent low-dose volumetric chest CT both before and after bronchodilator administration. Each CT scan was performed at full-inspiration and full-expiration for CT densitometry. Emphysema index (EI), air trapping (AT), mean lung density (MLD) and total lung volume (TLV) were measured and compared between the ACOS and COPD groups. The distributions of both EI and AT were compared between patients with ACOS and COPD. The variations between the pre- and post-BD measurements observed in patients with ACOS were compared with those in patients with COPD. A total of 71 patients completed the study, including 32 patients with COPD and 39 patients with ACOS. The patients with ACOS exhibited lower EI and more upper-zone-predominant EI distributions, compared with the patients with COPD. No significant differences were exhibited in AT and its distribution. Following bronchodilator administration, the variations in AT and expiratory MLD were greater in patients with ACOS than in patients with COPD. No differences were observed in the variations of EI and inspiratory MLD. Our results indicate that patients with ACOS have lower extent of emphysema and different emphysema distribution, as well as greater post-BD variations in air trapping, compared with patients with COPD. These findings suggest that CT densitometry characterizes ACOS as a distinct phenotype from COPD. PMID:26742511

  7. Knockdown of fbxl10/kdm2bb rescues chd7 morphant phenotype in a zebrafish model of CHARGE syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balow, Stephanie A; Pierce, Lain X; Zentner, Gabriel E; Conrad, Patricia A; Davis, Stephani; Sabaawy, Hatem E; McDermott, Brian M; Scacheri, Peter C

    2013-10-01

    CHARGE syndrome is a sporadic autosomal-dominant genetic disorder characterized by a complex array of birth defects so named for its cardinal features of ocular coloboma, heart defects, choanal atresia, growth retardation, genital abnormalities, and ear abnormalities. Approximately two-thirds of individuals clinically diagnosed with CHARGE syndrome have heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 7 (CHD7), an ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler. To examine the role of Chd7 in development, a zebrafish model was generated through morpholino (MO)-mediated targeting of the zebrafish chd7 transcript. High doses of chd7 MO induce lethality early in embryonic development. However, low dose-injected embryos are viable, and by 4 days post-fertilization, morphant fish display multiple defects in organ systems analogous to those affected in humans with CHARGE syndrome. The chd7 morphants show elevated expression of several potent cell-cycle inhibitors including ink4ab (p16/p15), p21 and p27, accompanied by reduced cell proliferation. We also show that Chd7 is required for proper organization of neural crest-derived craniofacial cartilage structures. Strikingly, MO-mediated knockdown of the jumonji domain-containing histone demethylase fbxl10/kdm2bb, a repressor of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, rescues cell proliferation and cartilage defects in chd7 morphant embryos and can lead to complete rescue of the CHARGE syndrome phenotype. These results indicate that CHARGE-like phenotypes in zebrafish can be mitigated through modulation of fbxl10 levels and implicate FBXL10 as a possible therapeutic target in CHARGE syndrome.

  8. Recent insights into genotype-phenotype relationships in patients with Rett syndrome using a fine grain scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabio, Rosa Angela; Colombo, Barbara; Russo, Silvia; Cogliati, Francesca; Masciadri, Maura; Foglia, Silvia; Antonietti, Alessandro; Tavian, Daniela

    2014-11-01

    Mutations in MECP2 gene cause Rett syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder affecting around 1 in 10,000 female births. The clinical picture of RTT appears quite heterogeneous for each single feature. Mutations in MECP2 gene have been associated with the onset of RTT. The most known gene function consists of transcriptional repression of specific target genes, mainly by the binding of its methyl binding domain (MBD) to methylated CpG nucleotides and recruiting co-repressors and histone deacetylase binding to DNA by its transcription repressor domain (TRD). This study aimed at evaluating a cohort of 114 Rett syndrome (RTT) patients with a detailed scale measuring the different kinds of impairments produced by the syndrome. The sample included relatively large subsets of the most frequent mutations, so that genotype-phenotype correlations could be tested. Results revealed that frequent missense mutations showed a specific profile in different areas of impairment. The R306C mutation, considered as producing mild impairment, was associated to a moderate phenotype in which behavioural characteristics were mainly affected. A notable difference emerged by comparing mutations truncating the protein before and after the nuclear localization signal; such a difference concerned prevalently the motor-functional and autonomy skills of the patients, affecting the management of everyday activities.

  9. Recent insights into genotype-phenotype relationships in patients with Rett syndrome using a fine grain scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabio, Rosa Angela; Colombo, Barbara; Russo, Silvia; Cogliati, Francesca; Masciadri, Maura; Foglia, Silvia; Antonietti, Alessandro; Tavian, Daniela

    2014-11-01

    Mutations in MECP2 gene cause Rett syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder affecting around 1 in 10,000 female births. The clinical picture of RTT appears quite heterogeneous for each single feature. Mutations in MECP2 gene have been associated with the onset of RTT. The most known gene function consists of transcriptional repression of specific target genes, mainly by the binding of its methyl binding domain (MBD) to methylated CpG nucleotides and recruiting co-repressors and histone deacetylase binding to DNA by its transcription repressor domain (TRD). This study aimed at evaluating a cohort of 114 Rett syndrome (RTT) patients with a detailed scale measuring the different kinds of impairments produced by the syndrome. The sample included relatively large subsets of the most frequent mutations, so that genotype-phenotype correlations could be tested. Results revealed that frequent missense mutations showed a specific profile in different areas of impairment. The R306C mutation, considered as producing mild impairment, was associated to a moderate phenotype in which behavioural characteristics were mainly affected. A notable difference emerged by comparing mutations truncating the protein before and after the nuclear localization signal; such a difference concerned prevalently the motor-functional and autonomy skills of the patients, affecting the management of everyday activities. PMID:25124696

  10. QTLs of factors of the metabolic syndrome and echocardiographic phenotypes: the hypertension genetic epidemiology network study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Simone Giovanni

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a previous study of the Hypertension Genetic Epidemiology Network (HyperGEN we have shown that metabolic syndrome (MetS risk factors were moderately and significantly associated with echocardiographic (ECHO left ventricular (LV phenotypes. Methods The study included 1,393 African Americans and 1,133 whites, stratified by type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM status. Heritabilities of seven factor scores based on the analysis of 15 traits were sufficiently high to pursue QTL discovery in this follow-up study. Results Three of the QTLs discovered relate to combined MetS-ECHO factors of "blood pressure (BP-LV wall thickness" on chromosome 3 at 225 cM with a 2.8 LOD score, on chromosome 20 at 2.1 cM with a 2.6 LOD score; and for "LV wall thickness" factor on chromosome 16 at 113.5 with a 2.6 LOD score in whites. The remaining QTLs include one for a "body mass index-insulin (BMI-INS" factor with a LOD score of 3.9 on chromosome 2 located at 64.8 cM; one for the same factor on chromosome 12 at 91.4 cM with a 3.3 LOD score; one for a "BP" factor on chromosome 19 located at 67.8 cM with a 3.0 LOD score. A suggestive linkage was also found for "Lipids-INS" with a 2.7 LOD score located on chromosome 11 at 113.1 cM in African Americans. Of the above QTLs, the one on chromosome 12 for "BMI-INS" is replicated in both ethnicities, (with highest LOD scores in African Americans. In addition, the QTL for "LV wall thickness" on chromosome 16q24.2-q24.3 reached its local maximum LOD score at marker D16S402, which is positioned within the 5th intron of the cadherin 13 gene, implicated in heart and vascular remodeling. Conclusion Our previous study and this follow-up suggest gene loci for some crucial MetS and cardiac geometry risk factors that contribute to the risk of developing heart disease.

  11. Metabolomic and Gene Expression Profiles Exhibit Modular Genetic and Dietary Structure Linking Metabolic Syndrome Phenotypes in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Stephanie; Dew-Budd, Kelly; Davis, Kristen; Anderson, Julie; Bishop, Ruth; Freeman, Kenda; Davis, Dana; Bray, Katherine; Perkins, Lauren; Hubickey, Joana; Reed, Laura K

    2015-12-01

    Genetic and environmental factors influence complex disease in humans, such as metabolic syndrome, and Drosophila melanogaster serves as an excellent model in which to test these factors experimentally. Here we explore the modularity of endophenotypes with an in-depth reanalysis of a previous study by Reed et al. (2014), where we raised 20 wild-type genetic lines of Drosophila larvae on four diets and measured gross phenotypes of body weight, total sugar, and total triglycerides, as well as the endophenotypes of metabolomic and whole-genome expression profiles. We then perform new gene expression experiments to test for conservation of phenotype-expression correlations across different diets and populations. We find that transcript levels correlated with gross phenotypes were enriched for puparial adhesion, metamorphosis, and central energy metabolism functions. The specific metabolites L-DOPA and N-arachidonoyl dopamine make physiological links between the gross phenotypes across diets, whereas leucine and isoleucine thus exhibit genotype-by-diet interactions. Between diets, we find low conservation of the endophenotypes that correlate with the gross phenotypes. Through the follow-up expression study, we found that transcript-trait correlations are well conserved across populations raised on a familiar diet, but on a novel diet, the transcript-trait correlations are no longer conserved. Thus, physiological canalization of metabolic phenotypes breaks down in a novel environment exposing cryptic variation. We cannot predict the physiological basis of disease in a perturbing environment from profiles observed in the ancestral environment. This study demonstrates that variation for disease traits within a population is acquired through a multitude of physiological mechanisms, some of which transcend genetic and environmental influences, and others that are specific to an individual's genetic and environmental context. PMID:26530416

  12. Beare-Stevenson syndrome: two new patients, including a novel finding of tracheal cartilaginous sleeve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Tara L; Bhoj, Elizabeth J; Wetmore, Ralph F; Mennuti, Michael T; Bartlett, Scott P; Mollen, Thomas J; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M; Zackai, Elaine H

    2015-04-01

    Beare-Stevenson syndrome (BSS) is a rare FGFR2-associated craniosynostosis syndrome with a higher rate of sudden unexplained death than related conditions such as Apert, Pfeiffer, and Crouzon syndromes. BSS presents with craniosynostosis, cutis gyrata, and significant developmental delay in most patients who survive infancy. There have only been 21 reported patients with BSS, which limits prognostication for clinicians and likely does not capture the full extent of the phenotype. Here we report on two additional patients with molecularly confirmed BSS, one each with p.Ser372Tyr and p.Tyr375Cys mutations in FGFR2. Cloverleaf skull was identified prenatally in one patient, with initial concern for Crouzon syndrome. Prenatal 3D ultrasound was performed, but cutis gyrata was only visible on retrospective examination following the clinical diagnosis of BSS after birth. Due to phenotypic overlap with Crouzon syndrome, but worse prognosis, we recommend consideration of prenatal 3D ultrasound and mutation testing for patients with suspected Crouzon to allow for prenatal diagnosis of BSS and to enable appropriate genetic counseling and postnatal care. One of our patients was noted to have a tracheal cartilaginous sleeve, which if present could explain sudden death. Of note, tracheal cartilaginous sleeves have been reported in other FGFR2-related craniosynostosis syndromes, and are associated with 90% risk of death by two years of age without tracheostomy. Tracheal cartilaginous sleeves are often only found incidentally at autopsy as they are difficult to diagnose without direct visualization of the trachea. This association and our experience suggests that BSS patients be evaluated for tracheal cartilaginous sleeve to prevent airway compromise. PMID:25706251

  13. The neurocognitive phenotype of the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: selective deficit in visual-spatial memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearden, C E; Woodin, M F; Wang, P P; Moss, E; McDonald-McGinn, D; Zackai, E; Emannuel, B; Cannon, T D

    2001-08-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (velocardiofacial/DiGeorge syndrome) is associated with a high frequency of learning disabilities. Although previous work has demonstrated that verbal skills are typically better preserved than non-verbal skills on both IQ and academic achievement testing in children with this syndrome, such measures are not sufficiently specific to determine a selective cognitive deficit. As part of an ongoing prospective study of patients with this syndrome, 29 children aged 5-17 with confirmed 22q11.2 deletions were assessed with a comprehensive neuropsychological test battery, including matched tasks of verbal and visuospatial memory. Results indicate that 22q patients displayed a selective deficit in visual-spatial memory, which was mirrored by deficits in arithmetic and general visual-spatial cognition. Further, a dissociation between visual-spatial and object memory was observed, indicating further selectivity of this pattern of deficit, and providing evidence for the dissociability of these components of visual cognition. These results indicate that children with 22q11.2 deletions display a specific neurocognitive phenotype, and suggest that this region of Chromosome 22q11 may harbor a gene or genes relevant to the etiology of nonverbal learning deficits. PMID:11780945

  14. Amniotic fluid RNA gene expression profiling provides insights into the phenotype of Turner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massingham, Lauren J; Johnson, Kirby L; Scholl, Thomas M; Slonim, Donna K; Wick, Heather C; Bianchi, Diana W

    2014-09-01

    Turner syndrome is a sex chromosome aneuploidy with characteristic malformations. Amniotic fluid, a complex biological material, could contribute to the understanding of Turner syndrome pathogenesis. In this pilot study, global gene expression analysis of cell-free RNA in amniotic fluid supernatant was utilized to identify specific genes/organ systems that may play a role in Turner syndrome pathophysiology. Cell-free RNA from amniotic fluid of five mid-trimester Turner syndrome fetuses and five euploid female fetuses matched for gestational age was extracted, amplified, and hybridized onto Affymetrix(®) U133 Plus 2.0 arrays. Significantly differentially regulated genes were identified using paired t tests. Biological interpretation was performed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and BioGPS gene expression atlas. There were 470 statistically significantly differentially expressed genes identified. They were widely distributed across the genome. XIST was significantly down-regulated (p Turner syndrome transcriptome from other aneuploidies we previously studied. Manual curation of the differentially expressed gene list identified genes of possible pathologic significance, including NFATC3, IGFBP5, and LDLR. Transcriptomic differences in the amniotic fluid of Turner syndrome fetuses are due to genome-wide dysregulation. The hematologic/immune system differences may play a role in early-onset autoimmune dysfunction. Other genes identified with possible pathologic significance are associated with cardiac and skeletal systems, which are known to be affected in females with Turner syndrome. The discovery-driven approach described here may be useful in elucidating novel mechanisms of disease in Turner syndrome.

  15. Delineation of Behavioral Phenotypes in Genetic Syndromes: Characteristics of Autism Spectrum Disorder, Affect and Hyperactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Chris; Berg, Katy; Moss, Jo; Arron, Kate; Burbidge, Cheryl

    2011-01-01

    We investigated autism spectrum disorder (ASD) symptomatology, hyperactivity and affect in seven genetic syndromes; Angelman (AS; n = 104), Cri du Chat (CdCS; 58), Cornelia de Lange (CdLS; 101), Fragile X (FXS; 191), Prader-Willi (PWS; 189), Smith-Magenis (SMS; 42) and Lowe (LS; 56) syndromes (age range 4-51). ASD symptomatology was heightened in…

  16. Genes, Brain Development and Psychiatric Phenotypes in Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gothelf, Doron; Schaer, Marie; Eliez, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    Velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS) has been in the focus of intensive research over the last 15 years. The syndrome represents a homogeneous model for studying the effect of a decreased dosage of genes on the development of brain structure and function and, consequently, on the emergence of schizophrenia-like psychotic disorder. In this review, we…

  17. Reciprocal Effects on Neurocognitive and Metabolic Phenotypes in Mouse Models of 16p11.2 Deletion and Duplication Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbogast, Thomas; Ouagazzal, Abdel-Mouttalib; Chevalier, Claire; Kopanitsa, Maksym; Afinowi, Nurudeen; Migliavacca, Eugenia; Cowling, Belinda S.; Birling, Marie-Christine; Champy, Marie-France; Reymond, Alexandre; Herault, Yann

    2016-01-01

    The 16p11.2 600 kb BP4-BP5 deletion and duplication syndromes have been associated with developmental delay; autism spectrum disorders; and reciprocal effects on the body mass index, head circumference and brain volumes. Here, we explored these relationships using novel engineered mouse models carrying a deletion (Del/+) or a duplication (Dup/+) of the Sult1a1-Spn region homologous to the human 16p11.2 BP4-BP5 locus. On a C57BL/6N inbred genetic background, Del/+ mice exhibited reduced weight and impaired adipogenesis, hyperactivity, repetitive behaviors, and recognition memory deficits. In contrast, Dup/+ mice showed largely opposite phenotypes. On a F1 C57BL/6N × C3B hybrid genetic background, we also observed alterations in social interaction in the Del/+ and the Dup/+ animals, with other robust phenotypes affecting recognition memory and weight. To explore the dosage effect of the 16p11.2 genes on metabolism, Del/+ and Dup/+ models were challenged with high fat and high sugar diet, which revealed opposite energy imbalance. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that the majority of the genes located in the Sult1a1-Spn region were sensitive to dosage with a major effect on several pathways associated with neurocognitive and metabolic phenotypes. Whereas the behavioral consequence of the 16p11 region genetic dosage was similar in mice and humans with activity and memory alterations, the metabolic defects were opposite: adult Del/+ mice are lean in comparison to the human obese phenotype and the Dup/+ mice are overweight in comparison to the human underweight phenotype. Together, these data indicate that the dosage imbalance at the 16p11.2 locus perturbs the expression of modifiers outside the CNV that can modulate the penetrance, expressivity and direction of effects in both humans and mice. PMID:26872257

  18. Reciprocal Effects on Neurocognitive and Metabolic Phenotypes in Mouse Models of 16p11.2 Deletion and Duplication Syndromes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Arbogast

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The 16p11.2 600 kb BP4-BP5 deletion and duplication syndromes have been associated with developmental delay; autism spectrum disorders; and reciprocal effects on the body mass index, head circumference and brain volumes. Here, we explored these relationships using novel engineered mouse models carrying a deletion (Del/+ or a duplication (Dup/+ of the Sult1a1-Spn region homologous to the human 16p11.2 BP4-BP5 locus. On a C57BL/6N inbred genetic background, Del/+ mice exhibited reduced weight and impaired adipogenesis, hyperactivity, repetitive behaviors, and recognition memory deficits. In contrast, Dup/+ mice showed largely opposite phenotypes. On a F1 C57BL/6N × C3B hybrid genetic background, we also observed alterations in social interaction in the Del/+ and the Dup/+ animals, with other robust phenotypes affecting recognition memory and weight. To explore the dosage effect of the 16p11.2 genes on metabolism, Del/+ and Dup/+ models were challenged with high fat and high sugar diet, which revealed opposite energy imbalance. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that the majority of the genes located in the Sult1a1-Spn region were sensitive to dosage with a major effect on several pathways associated with neurocognitive and metabolic phenotypes. Whereas the behavioral consequence of the 16p11 region genetic dosage was similar in mice and humans with activity and memory alterations, the metabolic defects were opposite: adult Del/+ mice are lean in comparison to the human obese phenotype and the Dup/+ mice are overweight in comparison to the human underweight phenotype. Together, these data indicate that the dosage imbalance at the 16p11.2 locus perturbs the expression of modifiers outside the CNV that can modulate the penetrance, expressivity and direction of effects in both humans and mice.

  19. Robinow syndrome: phenotypic variability in a family with a novel intragenic ROR2 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Del Gaudio, Daniela; Peters, Hartmut; Justino, Henri; Ott, Claus-Eric; Mundlos, Stefan; Bacino, Carlos A

    2008-11-01

    Robinow syndrome comprises dysmorphic facial features, short stature, brachymesomelia, segmental spine defects, and genital hypoplasia. The range of severity in this disorder is broad. We report on the clinical and molecular findings of two sib pairs from the same extended family with Robinow syndrome due to a novel intragenic ROR2 deletion involving exons 6 and 7 that could not be detected by sequencing. The affected individuals exhibited variability with respect to the cleft lip, cleft palate, and cardiac findings and for the presence in one of the patients of syringomyelia, which has not been previously reported in Robinow syndrome.

  20. Syndromes with supernumerary teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubinsky, Mark; Kantaputra, Piranit Nik

    2016-10-01

    While most supernumerary teeth are idiopathic, they can be associated with a number of Mendelian syndromes. However, this can also be a coincidental finding, since supernumerary teeth occur in 6% or more of the normal population. To better define this relationship, we analyzed the evidence for specific associations. We excluded conditions with a single affected patient reported, supernumerary teeth adjacent to clefts or other forms of alveolar disruption (as secondary rather than primary findings), and natal teeth, which can involve premature eruption of a normal tooth. Since, the cause of supernumerary teeth shows considerable heterogeneity, certain findings are less likely to be coincidental, such as five or more supernumerary teeth in a single patient, or locations outside of the premaxilla. We found only eight genetic syndromes with strong evidence for an association: cleidocranial dysplasia; familial adenomatous polyposis; trichorhinophalangeal syndrome, type I; Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome; Nance-Horan syndrome; Opitz BBB/G syndrome; oculofaciocardiodental syndrome; and autosomal dominant Robinow syndrome. There is also suggestive evidence of an association with two uncommon disorders, Kreiborg-Pakistani syndrome (craniosynostosis and dental anomalies), and insulin-resistant diabetes mellitus with acanthosisnigricans. An association of a Mendelian disorder with a low frequency manifestation of supernumerary teeth is difficult to exclude without large numbers, but several commonly cited syndromes lacked evidence for clear association, including Hallermann-Streiff syndrome, Fabry disease, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Apert and Crouzon syndromes, Zimmermann-Laband syndrome, and Ellis-van Creveld syndrome. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27250821

  1. Associations among genotype, clinical phenotype, and intracellular localization of trafficking proteins in ARC syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, Holly; Galmes, Romain; Gogolina, Ekaterina; Straatman-Iwanowska, Anna; Reay, Kim; Banushi, Blerida; Bruce, Christopher K.; Cullinane, Andrew R.; Romero, Rene; Chang, Richard; Ackermann, Oanez; Baumann, Clarisse; Cangul, Hakan; Celik, Fatma Cakmak; Aygun, Canan; Coward, Richard; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo; Sibbles, Barbara; Inward, Carol; Kim, Chong Ae; Klumperman, Judith; Knisely, A. S.; Watson, Steven P.; Gissen, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Arthrogryposisrenal dysfunctioncholestasis (ARC) syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive multisystem disorder caused by mutations in vacuolar protein sorting 33 homologue B (VPS33B) and VPS33B interacting protein, apicalbasolateral polarity regulator (VIPAR). Cardinal features of ARC include congenit

  2. Novel MASP1 mutations are associated with an expanded phenotype in 3MC1 syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Kayserili Karabey, Hülya; Tahir Atik; Asuman Koparir; Guney Bademci; Joseph Foster II; Umut Altunoglu; Gül Yesiltepe Mutlu; Sarah Bowdin; Nursel Elcioglu; Gulsen A. Tayfun; Sevinc Sahin Atik; Mustafa Ozen; Ferda Ozkinay; Yasemin Alanay; Steffen Thiel and Mustafa Tekin

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: 3MC1 syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by intellectual disability, short stature and distinct craniofacial, umbilical, and sacral anomalies. Five mutations in MASP1, encoding lectin complement pathway enzymes MASP-1 and MASP-3, have thus far been reported to cause 3MC1 syndrome. Only one previously reported mutation affects both MASP-1 and MASP-3, while the other mutations affect only MASP-3. METHODS: We evaluated six unrelated individuals with...

  3. De Lange syndrome: subjective and objective comparison of the classical and mild phenotypes.

    OpenAIRE

    Allanson, J E; Hennekam, R C; Ireland, M

    1997-01-01

    Classical de Lange syndrome presents with a striking face, pronounced growth and mental retardation, and variable limb deficiencies. Over the past five years, a mild variant has been defined, with less significant psychomotor retardation, less marked pre- and postnatal growth deficiency, and an uncommon association with major malformations, although mild limb anomalies may be present. We have evaluated 43 subjects with de Lange syndrome, 30 with classical features, aged from birth to 21 years...

  4. Novel compound heterozygous mutations in DYNC2H1 in a patient with severe short-rib polydactyly syndrome type III phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Toshio; Nagaya, Ken; Kawata, Yumi; Asai, Hiroko; Tsuchida, Etsushi; Nohara, Fumikatsu; Okajima, Kazuki; Azuma, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    Short-rib polydactyly syndrome type III is an autosomal recessive lethal skeletal ciliopathy, which is phenotypically similar to nonlethal asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy. Mutations in DYNC2H1 have been identified in both of these disorders, indicating that they are variants of a single disorder. However, short-rib polydactyly syndrome type III is the more severe variant. Here, we report novel compound heterozygous mutations in DYNC2H1 (p.E1894fsX10 and p.R3004C) in a patient with typical short-rib polydactyly syndrome type III phenotype. R3004 is located within the microtubule-binding domain of DYNC2H1, and its substitution is predicted to disrupt the interaction with microtubules. Considering the severe phenotype of our patient, our findings suggest that R3004 may be a key residue for the microtubule-binding affinity of dynein.

  5. A new family with an SLC9A6 mutation expanding the phenotypic spectrum of Christianson syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masurel-Paulet, Alice; Piton, Amélie; Chancenotte, Sophie; Redin, Claire; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Henrenger, Yvan; Minot, Delphine; Creppy, Audrey; Ruffier-Bourdet, Marie; Thevenon, Julien; Kuentz, Paul; Lehalle, Daphné; Curie, Aurore; Blanchard, Gaelle; Ghosn, Ezzat; Bonnet, Marlene; Archimbaud-Devilliers, Mélanie; Huet, Frédéric; Perret, Odile; Philip, Nicole; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Faivre, Laurence

    2016-08-01

    Using targeted next generation sequencing, we have identified a splicing mutation (c.526-9_526-5del) in the SLC9A6 gene in a 9-year-old boy with mild intellectual disability (ID), microcephaly, and social interaction disabilities. This intronic microdeletion leads to the skipping of exon 3 and to an in-frame deletion of 26 amino acids in the TM4 domain. It segregates with cognitive impairment or learning difficulties in other members of the family. Mutations in SLC9A6 have been reported in X-linked Christianson syndrome associating severe to profound intellectual deficiency and an Angelman-like phenotype with microcephaly, absent speech, ataxia with progressive cerebellar atrophy, ophthalmoplegia, epilepsy, and neurological regression. The proband and his maternal uncle both have an attenuated phenotype with mild ID, attention deficit disorder, speech difficulties, and mild asymptomatic cerebellar atrophy. The proband also have microcephaly. The mutation cosegregated with learning disabilities and speech difficulties in the female carriers (mother and three sisters of the proband). Detailed neuropsychological, speech, and occupational therapy investigations in the female carriers revealed impaired oral and written language acquisition, with dissociation between verbal and performance IQ. An abnormal phenotype, ranging from learning disability with predominant speech difficulties to mild intellectual deficiency, has been described previously in a large proportion of female carriers. Besides broadening the clinical spectrum of SLC9A6 gene mutations, we present an example of a monogenic origin of mild learning disability. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27256868

  6. The SSB-positive/SSA-negative antibody profile is not associated with key phenotypic features of Sjögren's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baer, Alan N; McAdams DeMarco, Mara; Shiboski, Stephen C;

    2015-01-01

    established SS, we compared anti-SSA/anti-SSB reactivity profiles against concurrent phenotypic features. We fitted logistic regression models to explore the association between anti-SSA/anti-SSB reactivity profile and each key SS phenotypic feature, controlling for potential confounders. RESULTS: Among 3297...... participants, 2061 (63%) had negative anti-SSA/anti-SSB, 1162 (35%) had anti-SSA with or without anti-SSB, and 74 (2%) anti-SSB alone. Key SS phenotypic features were more prevalent and had measures indicative of greater disease activity in those participants with anti-SSA, either alone or with anti-SSB, than......OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the Sjögren's syndrome B (SSB)-positive/Sjögren's syndrome A (SSA)-negative antibody profile is associated with key phenotypic features of SS. METHODS: Among registrants in the Sjögren's International Collaborative Clinical Alliance (SICCA) with possible or...

  7. Investigating Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease Based on Polycystic Ovary Syndrome phenotypes in the 18-14 year Old High School Girls in Shiraz 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MH Dabbaghmaneh

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In patients with polycystic ovary syndrome hyperinsulinaemia, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia may represent an increased risk for coronary cardiovascular disease .This study aimed to investigate risk factors for cardiovascular disease based on polycystic ovary syndrome phenotypes in Shiraz. Methods: This Cross-sectional study was performed on 3200 students aged 18-14. Demographic survey, clinical signs of androgen excess (acne, hirsutism, alopecia, Ultrasound were applied in order to find the cyst. Tests included prolactin, dehydroepiandrodion sulfate, and oral glucose tolerance test, fasting blood glucose, blood sugar two hours later, triglycerides, cholesterol, high density lipoprotein. Data were submitted to SPSS software, version 11.5 and then analyzed by chi-square tests. Results: The serum cholesterol mean in four phenotypes had a statistically significant relationship with non-PCOS patients(p<0.05. Mean of serum cholesterol in oligomenorrhea, Hyperandrogenism and polycystic ovary phenotype (195.09±30.28 was higher than the other phenotypes. Mean of serum cholesterol and low density lipoprotein(LDL-C were significantly higher in patients with Hyperandrogenism and polycystic ovarian phenotype(130.046±26.27 and oligomenorrhea, Hyperandrogenism and polycystic ovary syndrome phenotype(138.58±28.34 compared with non-infected individuals. Serum glucose mean in all phenotype was higher than non-infected after two hours and it showed a significant relation in oligomenorrhea and also polycystic ovarian phenotype(98.03 ± 20.98 versus 87.5±12.97 with non-infected individuals. Conclusion: Biochemical factors that lead to increased risk of cardiovascular diseases is increased in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome. Therefore, it should be attended in prevention programs

  8. Attention deficits predict phenotypic outcomes in syndrome-specific and domain-specific ways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim eCornish

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Attentional difficulties, both at home and in the classroom, are reported across a number of neurodevelopmental disorders. However, exactly how attention influences early socio-cognitive learning remains unclear. We addressed this question both concurrently and longitudinally in a cross-syndrome design, with respect to the communicative domain of vocabulary and to the cognitive domain of early literacy, and then extended the analysis to social behavior. Participants were young children (aged 4 to 9 years at Time 1 with either Williams syndrome (WS, N=26 or Down syndrome (DS, N=26 and typically developing controls (N=103. Children with WS displayed significantly greater attentional deficits (as indexed by teacher report of behavior typical of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, ADHD than children with DS, but both groups had greater attentional problems than the controls. Despite their attention differences, children with DS and those with WS were equivalent in their cognitive abilities of reading single words, both at Time 1 and 12 months later, at Time 2, although they differed in their early communicative abilities in terms of vocabulary. Greater ADHD-like behaviors predicted poorer subsequent literacy for children with DS, but not for children with WS, pointing to syndrome-specific attentional constraints on specific aspects of early development. Overall, our findings highlight the need to investigate more precisely whether and, if so, how, syndrome-specific profiles of behavioral difficulties constrain learning and socio-cognitive outcomes across different domains.

  9. Aquaporin gene therapy corrects Sjögren's syndrome phenotype in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zhennan; Yin, Hongen; Cabrera-Pérez, Javier; Guimaro, Maria C; Afione, Sandra; Michael, Drew G; Glenton, Patricia; Patel, Ankur; Swaim, William D; Zheng, Changyu; Nguyen, Cuong Q; Nyberg, Fred; Chiorini, John A

    2016-05-17

    Primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) is a chronic autoimmune disease that is estimated to affect 35 million people worldwide. Currently, no effective treatments exist for Sjögren's syndrome, and there is a limited understanding of the physiological mechanisms associated with xerostomia and hyposalivation. The present work revealed that aquaporin 5 expression, a water channel critical for salivary gland fluid secretion, is regulated by bone morphogenetic protein 6. Increased expression of this cytokine is strongly associated with the most common symptom of primary Sjögren's syndrome, the loss of salivary gland function. This finding led us to develop a therapy in the treatment of Sjögren's syndrome by increasing the water permeability of the gland to restore saliva flow. Our study demonstrates that the targeted increase of gland permeability not only resulted in the restoration of secretory gland function but also resolved the hallmark salivary gland inflammation and systemic inflammation associated with disease. Secretory function also increased in the lacrimal gland, suggesting this local therapy could treat the systemic symptoms associated with primary Sjögren's syndrome. PMID:27140635

  10. Targeting Translation Control with p70 S6 Kinase 1 Inhibitors to Reverse Phenotypes in Fragile X Syndrome Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Aditi; Mamcarz, Maggie; Mullins, Caitlin; Choudhury, Ayesha; Boyle, Robert G; Smith, Daniel G; Walker, David W; Klann, Eric

    2016-07-01

    Aberrant neuronal translation is implicated in the etiology of numerous brain disorders. Although mTORC1-p70 ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) signaling is critical for translational control, pharmacological manipulation in vivo has targeted exclusively mTORC1 due to the paucity of specific inhibitors to S6K1. However, small molecule inhibitors of S6K1 could potentially ameliorate pathological phenotypes of diseases, which are based on aberrant translation and protein expression. One such condition is fragile X syndrome (FXS), which is considered to be caused by exaggerated neuronal translation and is the most frequent heritable cause of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). To date, potential therapeutic interventions in FXS have focused largely on targets upstream of translational control to normalize FXS-related phenotypes. Here we test the ability of two S6K1 inhibitors, PF-4708671 and FS-115, to normalize translational homeostasis and other phenotypes exhibited by FXS model mice. We found that although the pharmacokinetic profiles of the two S6K1 inhibitors differed, they overlapped in reversing multiple disease-associated phenotypes in FXS model mice including exaggerated protein synthesis, inappropriate social behavior, behavioral inflexibility, altered dendritic spine morphology, and macroorchidism. In contrast, the two inhibitors differed in their ability to rescue stereotypic marble-burying behavior and weight gain. These findings provide an initial pharmacological characterization of the impact of S6K1 inhibitors in vivo for FXS, and have therapeutic implications for other neuropsychiatric conditions involving aberrant mTORC1-S6K1 signaling. PMID:26708105

  11. Investigating Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease Based on Polycystic Ovary Syndrome phenotypes in the 18-14 year Old High School Girls in Shiraz 2009

    OpenAIRE

    MH Dabbaghmaneh; T. Naderi; M Akbarzadeh; HR Tabatabaee; Z Zareh

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: In patients with polycystic ovary syndrome hyperinsulinaemia, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia may represent an increased risk for coronary cardiovascular disease .This study aimed to investigate risk factors for cardiovascular disease based on polycystic ovary syndrome phenotypes in Shiraz. Methods: This Cross-sectional study was performed on 3200 students aged 18-14. Demographic survey, clinical signs of androgen excess (acne, hirsutism, alopecia), Ultrasound...

  12. Isochromosome X mosaicism in a child with Kabuki syndrome phenotype: A rare cytogenetic association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Jeevan M.; Gowrishankar, Kalpana; Vasanthi, T.; Kumar, R. Ashok; Jayasudha, T.

    2011-01-01

    Isochromosome is a structurally unbalanced chromosome consisting of two short arms or two long arms, which are derived by abnormal centromere division or sister-chromatid exchange. Most autosomal isochromosomes are unusual, while those involving sex chromosomes are common. Kabuki syndrome (KS, OMIM 147920) is a multiple malformation/mental retardation syndrome of unknown etiology. A conventional cytogenetic study on lymphocytes from a 4-year-old girl with physical features suggestive of KS was found to have mosaicism for isochromosome for the long arm of the X. Although most manifestations present in this patient have been described before, this report is a rare association of clinical and cytogenetic findings in this syndrome. A genome-wide analysis and a larger number of patient groups studied could improve our understanding of the genetic basis of KS. PMID:22346002

  13. Hyperferritinaemia-cataract syndrome: Worldwide mutations and phenotype of an increasingly diagnosed genetic disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Millonig Gunda; Muckenthaler Martina U; Mueller Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The hereditary hyperferritinaemia-cataract syndrome (HHCS) is characterised by an autosomal dominant cataract and high levels of serum ferritin without iron overload. The cataract develops due to L-ferritin deposits in the lens and its pulverulent aspect is pathognomonic. The syndrome is caused by mutations within the iron-responsive element of L-ferritin. These mutations prevent efficient binding of iron regulatory proteins 1 and 2 to the IRE in L-ferritin mRNA, resulting in an unle...

  14. The 2q23.1 microdeletion syndrome: clinical and behavioural phenotype.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bon, B.W.M. van; Koolen, D.A.; Brueton, L.; McMullan, D.; Lichtenbelt, K.D.; Ades, L.C.; Peters, G.; Gibson, K.; Moloney, S.; Novara, F.; Pramparo, T.; Bernardina, B. Dalla; Zoccante, L.; Balottin, U.; Piazza, F.; Pecile, V.; Gasparini, P.; Guerci, V.; Kets, M.; Pfundt, R.; Brouwer, A.P.M. de; Veltman, J.A.; Leeuw, N. de; Wilson, M.; Antony, J.; Reitano, S.; Luciano, D.; Fichera, M.; Romano, C.; Brunner, H.G.; Zuffardi, O.; Vries, L.B.A. de

    2010-01-01

    Six submicroscopic deletions comprising chromosome band 2q23.1 in patients with severe mental retardation (MR), short stature, microcephaly and epilepsy have been reported, suggesting that haploinsufficiency of one or more genes in the 2q23.1 region might be responsible for the common phenotypic fea

  15. Cancer risk and genotype-phenotype correlations in PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuis, Marry H.; Kets, C. Marleen; Murphy-Ryan, Maureen; Yntema, Helger G.; Evans, D. Gareth; Colas, Chrystelle; Moller, Pal; Hes, Frederik J.; Hodgson, Shirley V.; Olderode - Berends, Maran J. W.; Aretz, Stefan; Heinimann, Karl; Garcia, Encarna B. Gomez; Douglas, Fiona; Spigelman, Allan; Timshel, Susanne; Lindor, Noralane M.; Vasen, Hans F. A.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with germline PTEN mutations are at high risk of developing benign and malignant tumours. We aimed to evaluate the cumulative risk of several types of cancer and of dysplastic cerebellar gangliocytoma (Lhermitte-Duclos disease, LDD). In addition, genotype-phenotype correlations in PTEN hama

  16. Exome sequencing extends the phenotypic spectrum for ABHD12 mutations: from syndromic to nonsyndromic retinal degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nishiguchi, K.M.; Avila-Fernandez, A.; Huet, R.A.C. van; Corton, M.; Perez-Carro, R.; Martin-Garrido, E.; Lopez-Molina, M.I.; Blanco-Kelly, F.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Zelst-Stams, W.A.G. van; Garcia-Ruiz, P.J.; Val, J. Del; Gioia, S.A. Di; Klevering, B.J.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Vazquez, C.; Cremers, F.P.M.; Garcia-Sandoval, B.; Hoyng, C.B.; Collin, R.W.J.; Rivolta, C.; Ayuso, C.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify the genetic causes underlying autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) and to describe the associated phenotype. DESIGN: Case series. PARTICIPANTS: Three hundred forty-seven unrelated families affected by arRP and 33 unrelated families affected by retinitis pigmentosa (

  17. The phenotypic spectrum of Schaaf-Yang syndrome : 18 new affected individuals from 14 families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fountain, Michael D; Aten, Emmelien; Cho, Megan T; Juusola, Jane; Walkiewicz, Magdalena A; Ray, Joseph W; Xia, Fan; Yang, Yaping; Graham, Brett H; Bacino, Carlos A; Potocki, Lorraine; van Haeringen, Arie; Ruivenkamp, Claudia A L; Mancias, Pedro; Northrup, Hope; Kukolich, Mary K; Weiss, Marjan M; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M A; Mathijssen, Inge B; Levesque, Sebastien; Meeks, Naomi; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Lemke, Danielle; Hamosh, Ada; Lewis, Suzanne K; Race, Simone; Stewart, Laura L; Hay, Beverly; Lewis, Andrea M; Guerreiro, Rita L; Bras, Jose T; Martins, Marcia P; Derksen-Lubsen, Gerarda; Peeters, Els; Stumpel, Connie; Stegmann, Sander; Bok, Levinus A; Santen, Gijs W E; Schaaf, Christian P

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Truncating mutations in the maternally imprinted, paternally expressed gene MAGEL2, which is located in the Prader-Willi critical region 15q11-13, have recently been reported to cause Schaaf-Yang syndrome, a Prader-Willi-like disease that manifests as developmental delay/intellectual disabi

  18. Social cognition and the behavioural phenotype of 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egger, J.I.M.; Wingbermühle, P.A.M.; Verhoeven, W.M.A.; Dijkman, M.W.; Kessels, R.P.C.; Koolen, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Recently, the 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome was described with characteristic features including developmental delay, moderate intellectual disability, facial dysmorphisms, and anomalies of the brain and multiple organ systems. With respect to behaviour, scarce data from clinical obse

  19. Development and behaviour in Marshall-Smith syndrome : an exploratory study of cognition, phenotype and autism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Balkom, I. D. C.; Shaw, A.; Vuijk, P. J.; Franssens, M.; Hoek, H. W.; Hennekam, R. C. M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Marshall-Smith syndrome (MSS) is an infrequently described entity characterised by failure to thrive, developmental delay, abnormal bone maturation and a characteristic face. In studying the physical features of a group of patients, we noticed unusual behavioural traits. This urged us to

  20. Mapping of pain phenotypes in female patients with bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis and controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tripp, Dean A; Nickel, J Curtis; Wong, Jennifer;

    2012-01-01

    Many bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) patients report multiple pain locations outside the pelvis. No research has examined pain using a whole-body diagram, pain-associated adjustment factors, or the impact of pain in multiple body areas on patients' quality of life (QoL)....

  1. Bilateral lambdoid and sagittal synostosis (BLSS): a unique craniosynostosis syndrome or predictable craniofacial phenotype?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hing, Anne V; Click, Eleanor S; Holder, Ursula; Seto, Marianne L; Vessey, Kyle; Gruss, Joseph; Hopper, Richard; Cunningham, Michael L

    2009-05-01

    Multisutural craniosynostosis that includes bilateral lambdoid and sagittal synostosis (BLSS) results in a very characteristic head shape with frontal bossing, turribrachycephaly, biparietal narrowing, occipital concavity, and inferior displacement of the ears. This entity has been reported both in the genetics literature as craniofacial dyssynostosis and in the surgical literature as "Mercedes Benz" syndrome. Craniofacial dyssynostosis was first described in 1976 by Dr. Neuhauser when he presented a series of seven patients with synostosis of the sagittal and lambdoid sutures, short stature, and developmental delay. Over the past 30 years nine additional patients with craniofacial dyssynostosis have been reported in the literature adding to the growing evidence for a distinct craniosynostosis syndrome. The term "Mercedes Benz" syndrome was coined by Moore et al. in 1998 due to the characteristic appearance of the fused sutures on three-dimensional CT imaging. In contrast to the aforementioned reported cases of craniofacial dyssynostosis, all three patients had normal development. Recently, there have been several case reports of patients with BLSS and distinct chromosomal anomalies. These findings suggest that BLSS is a heterogeneous disorder perhaps with syndromic, chromosomal, and isolated forms. In this manuscript we will present the largest series of patients with BLSS and review clinical, CT, and molecular findings. PMID:19396832

  2. Gilles de la Tourette syndrome: the complexities of phenotype and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Mary M

    2011-02-01

    Tourette syndrome is a chronic motor and vocal tic disorder, which is common (1%). The aetiology is complex (mostly genetic) and 90% of people have co-morbid psychiatric disorders and reduced quality of life. Management includes reassurance, education, behavioural treatments and medications for tics and psychopathology. PMID:21378617

  3. Expanding the phenotypic spectrum of Lenz-Majewski syndrome: facial palsy, cleft palate and hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattanasirichaigoon, Duangrurdee; Visudtibhan, Anannit; Jaovisidha, Suphaneewan; Laothamatas, Jiraporn; Chunharas, Amornsri

    2004-07-01

    We report a sporadic case of Lenz-Majewski syndrome (LMS) with newly recognized manifestations including facial palsy, cleft palate and hydrocephalus developing later in infancy. The clinical course of the patient and neuroimaging studies are described. Increased intracranial pressure was recognized and treated early with the aim of preventing neurological morbidity.

  4. Phenotype-Environment Interactions in Genetic Syndromes Associated with Severe or Profound Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunnicliffe, Penny; Oliver, Chris

    2011-01-01

    The research literature notes both biological and operant theories of behavior disorder in individuals with intellectual disabilities. These two theories of genetic predisposition and operant reinforcement remain quite distinct; neither theory on its own is sufficient to explain challenging behavior in genetic syndromes and an integrated approach…

  5. The "double a" phenotype: Portending allgrove′s syndrome and averting adrenal crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumik Goswami

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Allgrove′s syndrome is a rare autosomal-recessive disorder with only about 70 cases reported thus far and is characterized by alacrima, achalasia, and ACTH insensitivity among other clinical features. However, it has a widely variable clinical presentation, which may result in such cases remaining undiagnosed. Objective: To report a patient with impending Allgrove′s syndrome and to highlight the importance of clinical suspicion in diagnosing the same. Materials and Methods: A 2.5-year-old girl was diagnosed with impending Allgrove′s syndrome on the basis of clinical presentation, barium swallow study, Schirmer′s test, and hormonal evaluation. Results: A 2.5-year-old girl, born of non-consanguineous marriage, presented with failure to thrive and developmental delay with occasional vomiting on taking solid or semi-solid food for past 6 months. Examination revealed stunted weight (SDS of -4.4 and height (SDS of -4.76, and barium swallow showed presence of achalasia. On direct questioning, her mother mentioned presence of decreased tears on crying since birth, and Schirmer′s test confirmed the presence of dry eyes. Baseline ACTH was slightly elevated with normal basal and post-ACTH stimulation serum cortisol. Based on these findings, impending Allgrove′s syndrome was diagnosed with a plan for follow-up study of adrenal function. Conclusions: Allgrove′s syndrome may be an under diagnosed disorder as aclarima is often overlooked. However, a high index of clinical suspicion may help in avoiding adrenal crisis by diagnosing the condition early.

  6. Cytokine profiles and phenotype regulation of antigen presenting cells by genotype-I porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gimeno Mariona

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The present study examined the immunological response of antigen presenting cells (APC to genotype-I isolates of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV infection by analysing the cytokine profile induced and evaluating the changes taking place upon infection on immunologically relevant cell markers (MHCI, MHCII, CD80/86, CD14, CD16, CD163, CD172a, SWC9. Several types of APC were infected with 39 PRRSV isolates. The results show that different isolates were able to induce different patterns of IL-10 and TNF-α. The four possible phenotypes based on the ability to induce IL-10 and/or TNF-α were observed, although different cell types seemed to have different capabilities. In addition, isolates inducing different cytokine-release profiles on APC could induce different expression of cell markers.

  7. PFEIFFER TYPE I SYNDROME: A GENETICALLY PROVEN CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh. Salehpour

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivePfeiffer Syndrome is as rare as Apert syndrome in the Western population. This condition is very rare in the Asian population. At the best of our knowledge this is the first genetically proven case report from Iran. The authors report with a review of literature, the case of a infant with Pfeiffer syndrome, manifested by Lacunar skull, ventriculomegaly, bicoronal craniosynostosis,frontal bossing, shallow orbits, parrot-like nose, umbilical hernia, broad and medially deviated great toes.Keywords: Acrocephalosyndactylia, Craniosynostoses, Broad and great toes, Pfeiffer, Syndrome

  8. Phenotypic variability of the kyphoscoliotic type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS VIA: clinical, molecular and biochemical delineation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kariminejad Ariana

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The kyphoscoliotic type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS VIA (OMIM 225400 is a rare inheritable connective tissue disorder characterized by a deficiency of collagen lysyl hydroxylase 1 (LH1; EC 1.14.11.4 due to mutations in PLOD1. Biochemically this results in underhydroxylation of collagen lysyl residues and, hence, an abnormal pattern of lysyl pyridinoline (LP and hydroxylysyl pyridinoline (HP crosslinks excreted in the urine. Clinically the disorder is characterized by hypotonia and kyphoscoliosis at birth, joint hypermobility, and skin hyperelasticity and fragility. Severe hypotonia usually leads to delay in gross motor development, whereas cognitive development is reported to be normal. Methods We describe the clinical, biochemical and molecular characterisation, as well as electron microscopy findings of skin, in 15 patients newly diagnosed with this rare type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Results Age at diagnosis ranged from 5 months to 27 years, with only 1/3 of the patients been diagnosed correctly in the first year of life. A similar disease frequency was found in females and males, however a broad disease severity spectrum (intra- and interfamilial, independent of molecular background or biochemical phenotype, was observed. Kyphoscoliosis, one of the main clinical features was not present at birth in 4 patients. Importantly we also noted the occurrence of vascular rupture antenatally and postnatally, as well as developmental delay in 5 patients. Conclusion In view of these findings we propose that EDS VIA is a highly variable clinical entity, presenting with a broad clinical spectrum, which may also be associated with cognitive delay and an increased risk for vascular events. Genotype/phenotype association studies and additional molecular investigations in more extended EDS VIA populations will be necessary to further elucidate the cause of the variability of the disease severity.

  9. Expanding the phenotypic spectrum of PORCN variants in two males with syndromic microphthalmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Paul D; Van Esch, Hilde; Fieremans, Nathalie; Froyen, Guy; Slavotinek, Anne; Deprest, Jan; Devriendt, Koenraad; Vermeesch, Joris R

    2015-04-01

    Variants in PORCN are a cause of Goltz-Gorlin syndrome or Focal Dermal Hypoplasia, an X-linked dominant disorder affecting heterozygous females and until now considered to be embryonic lethal in males. Exome sequencing was performed in a family in which two male siblings were characterized by microphthalmia and additional congenital anomalies including diaphragmatic hernia, spina bifida and cardiac defects. Surprisingly, we identified a maternally inherited variant in PORCN present in both males as well as in two female siblings. This represents the first finding of a PORCN variant in non-mosaic males affected with Goltz-Gorlin syndrome. The apparently asymptomatic mother showed extreme skewing of X-inactivation (90%), an asymptomatic female sibling showed skewing of 88%, and the second female sibling affected with cutis aplasia of the scalp showed X-inactivation considered within the normal range.

  10. The Koolen-de Vries syndrome: a phenotypic comparison of patients with a 17q21.31 microdeletion versus a KANSL1 sequence variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koolen, David A; Pfundt, Rolph; Linda, Katrin; Beunders, Gea; Veenstra-Knol, Hermine E; Conta, Jessie H; Fortuna, Ana Maria; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Dugan, Sarah; Halbach, Sara; Abdul-Rahman, Omar A; Winesett, Heather M; Chung, Wendy K; Dalton, Marguerite; Dimova, Petia S; Mattina, Teresa; Prescott, Katrina; Zhang, Hui Z; Saal, Howard M; Hehir-Kwa, Jayne Y; Willemsen, Marjolein H; Ockeloen, Charlotte W; Jongmans, Marjolijn C; Van der Aa, Nathalie; Failla, Pinella; Barone, Concetta; Avola, Emanuela; Brooks, Alice S; Kant, Sarina G; Gerkes, Erica H; Firth, Helen V; Õunap, Katrin; Bird, Lynne M; Masser-Frye, Diane; Friedman, Jennifer R; Sokunbi, Modupe A; Dixit, Abhijit; Splitt, Miranda; Kukolich, Mary K; McGaughran, Julie; Coe, Bradley P; Flórez, Jesús; Nadif Kasri, Nael; Brunner, Han G; Thompson, Elizabeth M; Gecz, Jozef; Romano, Corrado; Eichler, Evan E; de Vries, Bert Ba

    2016-05-01

    The Koolen-de Vries syndrome (KdVS; OMIM #610443), also known as the 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome, is a clinically heterogeneous disorder characterised by (neonatal) hypotonia, developmental delay, moderate intellectual disability, and characteristic facial dysmorphism. Expressive language development is particularly impaired compared with receptive language or motor skills. Other frequently reported features include social and friendly behaviour, epilepsy, musculoskeletal anomalies, congenital heart defects, urogenital malformations, and ectodermal anomalies. The syndrome is caused by a truncating variant in the KAT8 regulatory NSL complex unit 1 (KANSL1) gene or by a 17q21.31 microdeletion encompassing KANSL1. Herein we describe a novel cohort of 45 individuals with KdVS of whom 33 have a 17q21.31 microdeletion and 12 a single-nucleotide variant (SNV) in KANSL1 (19 males, 26 females; age range 7 months to 50 years). We provide guidance about the potential pitfalls in the laboratory testing and emphasise the challenges of KANSL1 variant calling and DNA copy number analysis in the complex 17q21.31 region. Moreover, we present detailed phenotypic information, including neuropsychological features, that contribute to the broad phenotypic spectrum of the syndrome. Comparison of the phenotype of both the microdeletion and SNV patients does not show differences of clinical importance, stressing that haploinsufficiency of KANSL1 is sufficient to cause the full KdVS phenotype. PMID:26306646

  11. The Social Behavioral Phenotype in Boys and Girls with an Extra X Chromosome (Klinefelter Syndrome and Trisomy X) : A Comparison with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, Sophie; Stockmann, Lex; Borghgraef, Martine; Bruining, Hilgo; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny; Govaerts, Lutgarde; Hansson, Kerstin; Swaab, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to gain more insight in the social behavioral phenotype, and related autistic symptomatology, of children with an extra X chromosome in comparison to children with ASD. Participants included 60 children with an extra X chromosome (34 boys with Klinefelter syndrome and 26 girl

  12. Genotype-phenotype studies in nail-patella syndrome show that LMX1B mutation location is involved in the risk of developing nephropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongers, Ernie M H F; Huysmans, Frans T; Levtchenko, Elena; de Rooy, Jacky W; Blickman, Johan G; Admiraal, Ronald J C; Huygen, Patrick L M; Cruysberg, Johannes R M; Toolens, Pauline A M P; Prins, Judith B; Krabbe, Paul F M; Borm, George F; Schoots, Jeroen; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Remortele, Angela M F; Hoefsloot, Lies H; van Kampen, Albert; Knoers, Nine V A M

    2005-01-01

    Nail-patella syndrome (NPS) is characterized by developmental defects of dorsal limb structures, nephropathy, and glaucoma and is caused by heterozygous mutations in the LIM homeodomain transcription factor LMX1B. In order to identify possible genotype-phenotype correlations, we performed LMX1B muta

  13. Phenotypic discordance in a family with monozygotic twins and non-syndromic cleft lip and palate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyszynski, D.F. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)]|[National Center for Human Genome Research, Bethesda, MD (United States); Lewanda, A.F. [Johnson Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States)]|[Children`s National Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States); Beaty, T.H. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Balitomre, MD (United States)

    1996-12-30

    Despite considerable research, the cause of non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCLP) is still an enigma. Case-control and cohort studies have searched for environmental factors that might influence the development of this common malformation, such as maternal cigarette smoking, periconceptional supplementation of folic acid and multivitamins, agricultural chemical use, and place of residence, among others. However, these studies are subject to numerous biases, and their results have often been contradictory and inconclusive. 41 refs., 1 fig.

  14. Genetic and Phenotypic Heterogeneity in Chinese Patients with Waardenburg Syndrome Type II

    OpenAIRE

    Shuzhi Yang; Pu Dai; Xin Liu; Dongyang Kang; Xin Zhang; Weiyan Yang; Chengyong Zhou; Shiming Yang; Huijun Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Waardenburg Syndrome (WS) is an autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and pigmentary abnormalities of the eyes, hair, and skin. Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) gene mutations account for about 15% of WS type II (WS2) cases. To date, fewer than 40 different MITF gene mutations have been identified in human WS2 patients, and few of these were of Chinese descent. In this study, we report clinical findings and mutation identification in the ...

  15. Waardenburg syndrome type I: Dental phenotypes and genetic analysis of an extended family

    OpenAIRE

    Sólia-Nasser, Luciano; de Aquino, Sibele-Nascimento; Paranaíba, Lívia-Maris-R.; Gomes, Andreia; dos-Santos-Neto, Pedro; Coletta, Ricardo-D.; Cardoso, Aline-Francoise; Frota, Ana-Cláudia; Martelli-Júnior, Hercílio

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to describe the pattern of inheritance and the clinical features in a large family with Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS1), detailing the dental abnormalities and screening for PAX3 mutations. Material and Methods To characterize the pattern of inheritance and clinical features, 29 family members were evaluated by dermatologic, ophthalmologic, otorhinolaryngologic and orofacial examination. Molecular analysis of the PAX3 gene was performed. Results The pedi...

  16. Adams Oliver syndrome: Description of a new phenotype with cerebellar abnormalities in a family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To describe cerebellar abnormalities in a family composed by a father and two affected sibs with Adams Oliver syndrome (AOS) (OMIM 100300). Brain MRI and MR angiography were performed at 1.5T. The siblings presented cerebellar cortex dysplasia characterized by the presence of cysts. Abnormalities of CNS are an unusual manifestation of AOS. To our knowledge, this is the first report of cerebellar cortical dysplasia in a family with AOS

  17. Germline Missense Mutations Affecting KRAS Isoform B Are Associated with a Severe Noonan Syndrome Phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Carta, Claudio; Pantaleoni, Francesca; Bocchinfuso, Gianfranco; Stella, Lorenzo; Vasta, Isabella; Sarkozy, Anna; Digilio, Cristina; Palleschi, Antonio; Pizzuti, Antonio; Grammatico, Paola; Zampino, Giuseppe; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Gelb, Bruce D.; Tartaglia, Marco

    2006-01-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is a developmental disorder characterized by short stature, facial dysmorphia, congenital heart disease, and multiple skeletal and hematologic defects. NS is an autosomal dominant trait and is genetically heterogeneous. Gain of function of SHP-2, a protein tyrosine phosphatase that positively modulates RAS signaling, is observed in nearly 50% of affected individuals. Here, we report the identification of heterozygous KRAS gene mutations in two subjects exhibiting a severe...

  18. Defining the phenotype associated with microduplication reciprocal to Sotos syndrome microdeletion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novara, Francesca; Stanzial, Franco; Rossi, Elena;

    2014-01-01

    microduplication encompassing NSD1 gene has been reported so far in 27 cases presenting with delayed bone age, microcephaly, failure to thrive and seizures in some cases, further supporting a gene dosage effect of NSD1 on growth regulation and neurological functions. Here we depict the clinical presentation...... of three new cases with 5q35 microduplication outlining a novel syndrome characterized by microcephaly, short stature, developmental delay and in some cases delayed bone maturation, without any typical facial or osseous anomalies....

  19. Lithium ameliorates phenotypic deficits in a mouse model of fragile X syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Zhong-hua; Chuang, De-Maw; Smith, Carolyn Beebe

    2010-01-01

    As our understanding of the underlying defects in fragile X syndrome (FXS) increases so does the potential for development of treatments aimed at modulating the defects and ameliorating the constellation of symptoms seen in patients. Symptoms of FXS include cognitive disability, hyperactivity, autistic behavior, seizures and learning deficits. Lithium is a drug used clinically to treat bipolar disorder, and it has been used to treat mood dysregulation in individuals with FXS. We examined whet...

  20. Deleterious coding variants in multi-case families with non-syndromic cleft lip and/or palate phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pengelly, Reuben J; Arias, Liliana; Martínez, Julio; Upstill-Goddard, Rosanna; Seaby, Eleanor G; Gibson, Jane; Ennis, Sarah; Collins, Andrew; Briceño, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Nonsyndromic Cleft Lip and/or Palate (NSCLP) is regarded as a multifactorial condition in which clefting is an isolated phenotype, distinguished from the largely monogenic, syndromic forms which include clefts among a spectrum of phenotypes. Nonsyndromic clefting has been shown to arise through complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors. However, there is increasing evidence that the broad NSCLP classification may include a proportion of cases showing familial patterns of inheritance and contain highly penetrant deleterious variation in specific genes. Through exome sequencing of multi-case families ascertained in Bogota, Colombia, we identify 28 non-synonymous single nucleotide variants that are considered damaging by at least one predictive score. We discuss the functional impact of candidate variants identified. In one family we find a coding variant in the MSX1 gene which is predicted damaging by multiple scores. This variant is in exon 2, a highly conserved region of the gene. Previous sequencing has suggested that mutations in MSX1 may account for ~2% of NSCLP. Our analysis further supports evidence that a proportion of NSCLP cases arise through monogenic coding mutations, though further work is required to unravel the complex interplay of genetics and environment involved in facial clefting. PMID:27456059

  1. Reprogramming suppresses premature senescence phenotypes of Werner syndrome cells and maintains chromosomal stability over long-term culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Shimamoto

    Full Text Available Werner syndrome (WS is a premature aging disorder characterized by chromosomal instability and cancer predisposition. Mutations in WRN are responsible for the disease and cause telomere dysfunction, resulting in accelerated aging. Recent studies have revealed that cells from WS patients can be successfully reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs. In the present study, we describe the effects of long-term culture on WS iPSCs, which acquired and maintained infinite proliferative potential for self-renewal over 2 years. After long-term cultures, WS iPSCs exhibited stable undifferentiated states and differentiation capacity, and premature upregulation of senescence-associated genes in WS cells was completely suppressed in WS iPSCs despite WRN deficiency. WS iPSCs also showed recapitulation of the phenotypes during differentiation. Furthermore, karyotype analysis indicated that WS iPSCs were stable, and half of the descendant clones had chromosomal profiles that were similar to those of parental cells. These unexpected properties might be achieved by induced expression of endogenous telomerase gene during reprogramming, which trigger telomerase reactivation leading to suppression of both replicative senescence and telomere dysfunction in WS cells. These findings demonstrated that reprogramming suppressed premature senescence phenotypes in WS cells and WS iPSCs could lead to chromosomal stability over the long term. WS iPSCs will provide opportunities to identify affected lineages in WS and to develop a new strategy for the treatment of WS.

  2. Genetic Reduction of the α1 Subunit of Na/K-ATPase Corrects Multiple Hippocampal Phenotypes in Angelman Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanoch Kaphzan

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Angelman syndrome (AS is associated with symptoms that include autism, intellectual disability, motor abnormalities, and epilepsy. We recently showed that AS model mice have increased expression of the alpha1 subunit of Na/K-ATPase (α1-NaKA in the hippocampus, which was correlated with increased expression of axon initial segment (AIS proteins. Our developmental analysis revealed that the increase in α1-NaKA expression preceded that of the AIS proteins. Therefore, we hypothesized that α1-NaKA overexpression drives AIS abnormalities and that by reducing its expression these and other phenotypes could be corrected in AS model mice. Herein, we report that the genetic normalization of α1-NaKA levels in AS model mice corrects multiple hippocampal phenotypes, including alterations in the AIS, aberrant intrinsic membrane properties, impaired synaptic plasticity, and memory deficits. These findings strongly suggest that increased expression of α1-NaKA plays an important role in a broad range of abnormalities in the hippocampus of AS model mice.

  3. Hyperferritinaemia-cataract syndrome: Worldwide mutations and phenotype of an increasingly diagnosed genetic disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millonig Gunda

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The hereditary hyperferritinaemia-cataract syndrome (HHCS is characterised by an autosomal dominant cataract and high levels of serum ferritin without iron overload. The cataract develops due to L-ferritin deposits in the lens and its pulverulent aspect is pathognomonic. The syndrome is caused by mutations within the iron-responsive element of L-ferritin. These mutations prevent efficient binding of iron regulatory proteins 1 and 2 to the IRE in L-ferritin mRNA, resulting in an unleashed ferritin translation. This paper reviews all 31 mutations (27 single nucleotide transitions and four deletions that have been described since 1995. Laboratory test showing hyperferritinaemia, normal serum iron and normal transferrin saturation are indicative for HHCS after exclusion of other causes of increased ferritin levels (inflammation, malignancy, alcoholic liver disease and should prompt an ophthalmological consultation for diagnostic confirmation. Invasive diagnostics such as liver biopsy are not indicated. HHCS is an important differential diagnosis of hyperferritinaemia. Haematologists, gastroenterologists and ophthalmologists should be aware of this syndrome to spare patients from further invasive diagnosis (liver biopsy, and also from a false diagnosis of hereditary haemochromatosis followed by venesections. Patients diagnosed with HHCS should be counselled regarding the relative harmlessness of this genetic disease, with early cataract surgery as the only clinical consequence.

  4. Discussão genetico-clinica sobre a Síndrome de Apert: a propósito de um caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aguinaldo Gonçalves

    1976-09-01

    Full Text Available Após breve introdução sobre a síndrome de Apert, é relatado um caso clínico, sendo destacada a conduta genético-clínica. A discussão revela como os aspectos genéticos envolvidos orientam o raciocínio clínico.

  5. Molecular analysis of chromosome 21 in a patient with a phenotype of down syndrome and apparently normal karyotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlbom, B.E.; Wadelius, C.; Zech, L.; Anneren, G. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1996-06-28

    Down syndrome (DS) is caused in most cases by the presence of an extra chromosome 21. It has been shown that the DS phenotype is produced by duplication of only a small part of the long arm of chromosome 21, the 21q22 region, including and distal to locus D21S55. We present molecular investigations on a woman with clinically typical DS but apparently normal chromosomes. Her parents were consanguineous and she had a sister with a DS phenotype, who died at the age of 15 days. Repeated cytogenetic investigations (G-banding and high resolution banding) on the patient and her parents showed apparently normal chromosomes. Autoradiographs of quantitative Southern blots of DNAs from the patient, her parents, trisomy 21 patients, and normal controls were analyzed after hybridization with unique DNA sequences regionally mapped on chromosome 21. Sequences D21S59, D21S1, D21S11, D21S8, D21S17, D21S55, ERG, D21S15, D21S112, and COL6A1 were all found in two copies. Fluorescent in situ hybridization with a chromosome 21-specific genomic library showed no abnormalities and only two copies of chromosome 21 were detected. Nineteen markers from the critical region studied with polymerase chain reaction amplification of di- and tetranucleotide repeats did not indicate any partial trisomy 21. From his study we conclude that the patient does not have any partial submicroscopic trisomy for any segment of chromosome 21. It seems reasonable to assume that she suffers from an autosomal recessive disorder which is phenotypically indistinguishable from DS. 23 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. CT and MRI of congenital nasal lesions in syndromic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginat, Daniel T. [University of Chicago, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Robson, Caroline D. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Congenital malformations of the nose can be associated with a variety of syndromes, including solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome, CHARGE syndrome, Bosma syndrome, median cleft face syndrome, PHACES association, Bartsocas-Papas syndrome, Binder syndrome, duplication of the pituitary gland-plus syndrome and syndromic craniosynsotosis (e.g., Apert and Crouzon syndromes) among other craniofacial syndromes. Imaging with CT and MRI plays an important role in characterizing the nasal anomalies as well as the associated brain and cerebrovascular lesions, which can be explained by the intimate developmental relationship between the face and intracranial structures, as well as certain gene mutations. These conditions have characteristic imaging findings, which are reviewed in this article. (orig.)

  7. CT and MRI of congenital nasal lesions in syndromic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginat, Daniel T; Robson, Caroline D

    2015-07-01

    Congenital malformations of the nose can be associated with a variety of syndromes, including solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome, CHARGE syndrome, Bosma syndrome, median cleft face syndrome, PHACES association, Bartsocas-Papas syndrome, Binder syndrome, duplication of the pituitary gland-plus syndrome and syndromic craniosynsotosis (e.g., Apert and Crouzon syndromes) among other craniofacial syndromes. Imaging with CT and MRI plays an important role in characterizing the nasal anomalies as well as the associated brain and cerebrovascular lesions, which can be explained by the intimate developmental relationship between the face and intracranial structures, as well as certain gene mutations. These conditions have characteristic imaging findings, which are reviewed in this article. PMID:25573243

  8. Dental phenotype in Jalili syndrome due to a c.1312 dupC homozygous mutation in the CNNM4 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans U Luder

    Full Text Available Jalili syndrome denotes a recessively inherited combination of an eye disease (cone-rod dystrophy and a dental disorder (amelogenesis imperfecta, which is caused by mutations in the CNNM4 gene. Whereas the ophthalmic consequences of these mutations have been studied comprehensively, the dental phenotype has obtained less attention. A defective transport of magnesium ions by the photoreceptors of the retina is assumed to account for the progressive visual impairment. Since magnesium is also incorporated in the mineral of dental hard tissues, we hypothesized that magnesium concentrations in defective enamel resulting from mutations in CNNM4 would be abnormal, if a similar deficiency of magnesium transport also accounted for the amelogenesis imperfecta. Thus, a detailed analysis of the dental hard tissues was performed in two boys of Kosovan origin affected by Jalili syndrome. Retinal dystrophy of the patients was diagnosed by a comprehensive eye examination and full-field electroretinography. A mutational analysis revealed a c.1312 dupC homozygous mutation in CNNM4, a genetic defect which had already been identified in other Kosovan families and putatively results in loss-of-function of the protein. The evaluation of six primary teeth using light and scanning electron microscopy as well as energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy showed that dental enamel was thin and deficient in mineral, suggesting a hypoplastic/hypomineralized type of amelogenesis imperfecta. The reduced mineral density of enamel was accompanied by decreased amounts of calcium, but significantly elevated levels of magnesium. In dentin, however, a similar mineral deficiency was associated with reduced magnesium and normal calcium levels. It is concluded that the c.1312 dupC mutation of CNNM4 results in mineralization defects of both enamel and dentin, which are associated with significantly abnormal magnesium concentrations. Thus, we could not disprove the hypothesis that a

  9. Phenotype and genotype in 103 patients with tricho-rhino-phalangeal syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maas, Saskia M; Shaw, Adam C; Bikker, Hennie;

    2015-01-01

    it remained uncertain whether TRPS1 was partially or completely deleted. Main features defining the facial phenotype include fine and sparse hair, thick and broad eyebrows, especially the medial portion, a broad nasal ridge and tip, underdeveloped nasal alae, and a broad columella. The facial manifestations...... are the cone-shaped epiphyses and in TRPS II multiple exostoses. Osteopenia is common in both, as is reduced linear growth, both prenatally and postnatally. Variability for all findings, also within a single family, can be marked. Morbidity mostly concerns joint problems, manifesting in increased or decreased...

  10. Principal genetic syndromes and autism: from phenotypes, proteins to genes%孤独性障碍及其相关的主要遗传综合征:从表型、蛋白到基因

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯萌; 王曼捷; Nanbert ZHONG

    2006-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impairments in social skills, language, and behavior. It is now clear that autism is not a disease, but a syndrome characterized by phenotypic and genetic complexity. The etiology of autism is still poorly understood. Available evidence from a variety of sources strongly suggests that many genetic disorders are frequently associated with autism for their similar phenotypes. Based on this fact, this review begins by highlighting several principal genetic syndromes consistently associated with autism (fragile X, tuberous sclerosis, Angelman syndrome, Pader-Willi syndrome, Rett syndrome, Down syndrome and Turner syndrome). These genetic disorders include both chromosome disorders and single gene disorders. By comparing the similar phenotype, protein marker and candidate genes, we might make some breakthrough in the mechanism of autism and other genetic disorders.

  11. Genotype, Phenotype, and Karyotype Correlation in the XO Mouse Model of Turner Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Probst, Frank J.; Cooper, Mitchell Lance; Cheung, Sau Wai; Justice, Monica J.

    2008-01-01

    The murine model for Turner Syndrome is the XO mouse. Unlike their human counterparts, XO mice are typically fertile, and their lack of a second sex chromosome can be transmitted from one generation to the next as an X-linked dominant trait with male lethality. The introduction of an X-linked coat-color marker (tabby) has greatly facilitated the maintenance of this useful mouse strain. XO mice can be produced in large numbers, generation after generation, and rapidly identified on the basis o...

  12. Clinical and Molecular Phenotype of Aicardi-Goutières Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Rice, Gillian ; Patrick, Teresa ; Parmar, Rekha ; Taylor, Claire F. ; Aeby, Alec ; Aicardi, Jean ; Artuch, Rafael ; Montalto, Simon Attard ; Bacino, Carlos A. ; Barroso, Bruno ; Baxter, Peter ; Benko, Willam S. ; Bergmann, Carsten ; Bertini, Enrico ; Biancheri, Roberta 

    2007-01-01

    Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) is a genetic encephalopathy whose clinical features mimic those of acquired in utero viral infection. AGS exhibits locus heterogeneity, with mutations identified in genes encoding the 3′→5′ exonuclease TREX1 and the three subunits of the RNASEH2 endonuclease complex. To define the molecular spectrum of AGS, we performed mutation screening in patients, from 127 pedigrees, with a clinical diagnosis of the disease. Biallelic mutations in TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B...

  13. Genotype-Phenotype Characterization of Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome Confirmed by FISH: Case Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Sheth

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS is a multiple malformation and contiguous gene syndrome resulting from the deletion encompassing a 4p16.3 region. A microscopically visible terminal deletion on chromosome 4p (4p16→pter was detected in Case 1 with full blown features of WHS. The second case which had an interstitial microdeletion encompassing WHSC 1 and WHSC 2 genes at 4p16.3 presented with less striking clinical features of WHS and had an apparently “normal” karyotype. The severity of the clinical presentation was as a result of haploinsufficiency and interaction with surrounding genes as well as mutations in modifier genes located outside the WHSCR regions. The study emphasized that an individual with a strong clinical suspicion of chromosomal abnormality and a normal conventional cytogenetic study should be further investigated using molecular cytogenetic techniques such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH or array-comparative genomic hybridization (a-CGH.

  14. Searching for Tourette’s syndrome gene. Part 1. Heterogeneity of clinical phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kowalska

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The French neuropsychiatrist Georges Gilles de la Tourette described in 1885 the “Maladie des Tics” which later was named after him, as Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS. Gilles de la Tourette syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by simple and complex motor and vocal tics with multiple neuropsychiatric comorbidities. GTS is often concurrent with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. There are several clinical GTS subtypes: GTS only, GTS OCD, and GTS OCD ADHD. Additional clinical aspects of the disorder include occurrence of anger episodes, anxiety and mood disorders, and learning and sleeping disturbances. The genetics of GTS is complex and remains unclear. So far, no causative candidate genes have been identified. However, segregation studies in families and twins with GTS provide strong evidence for the existence of a genetic background associated with a multifactorial mode of inheritance. Progress in studies on genome variability among patients with GTS is necessary to improve pharmacotherapeutic strategies of the disorder.

  15. Kenny Caffey syndrome with severe respiratory and gastrointestinal involvement: expanding the clinical phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christodoulou, Loucas; Krishnaiah, Anil; Spyridou, Christina; Salpietro, Vincenzo; Hannan, Siobhan; Saggar, Anand; Mankad, Kshitij; Deep, Akash; Kinali, Maria

    2015-06-01

    Kenny Caffey syndrome (KCS) is a rare syndrome reported almost exclusively in Middle Eastern populations. It is characterized by severe growth retardation-short stature, dysmorphic features, episodic hypocalcaemia, hypoparathyroidism, seizures, and medullary stenosis of long bones with thickened cortices. We report a 10-year-old boy with KCS with an unusually severe respiratory and gastrointestinal system involvement-features not previously described in the literature. He had severe psychomotor retardation and regressed developmentally from walking unaided to sitting with support. MRI brain showed bilateral hippocampal sclerosis, marked supra-tentorial volume loss and numerous calcifications. A 12 bp deletion of exon 2 of tubulin-specific chaperone E (TBCE) gene was identified and the diagnosis of KCS was confirmed. Hypercarbia following a sleep study warranted nocturnal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) when aged 6. When boy aged 8, persistent hypercarbia with increasing oxygen requirement and increased frequency and severity of lower respiratory tract infections led to progressive respiratory failure. He became fully dependent on non-invasive ventilation and by 9 years he had a tracheotomy and was established on long-term ventilation. He developed retching, vomiting and diarrhea. Chest CT showed changes consistent with chronic aspiration, but no interstitial pulmonary fibrosis. He died aged 10 from respiratory complications. PMID:26029652

  16. Phenotypic differences among patients with Bardet-Biedl syndrome linked to three different chromosome loci

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmi, R.; Elbedour, K. [Ben-Gurion Univ., Beer-Sheva (Israel); Stone, E.M.; Sheffield, V.C. [Univ. of Iowa, IA (United States)

    1995-11-06

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is an autosomal-recessive disorder of mental retardation, obesity, retinal dystrophy, polydactyly, and hypogenitalism. Renal and cardiac abnormalities are also frequent in this disorder. Previous clinical suggestions of heterogeneity of BBS were confirmed recently by the identification of four different chromosome loci linked to the disease. In this study we compared clinical manifestations of the syndrome in patients form 3 unrelated, extended Arab-Bedouin kindreds which were used for the linkage mapping of the BBS loci to chromosomes 3, 15, and 16. The observed differences included the limb distribution of the postaxial polydactyly and the extent and age-association of obesity. It appears that the chromosome 3 locus is associated with polydactyly of all four limbs, while polydactyly of the chromosome 15 type is mostly confined to the hands. On the other hand, the chromosome 15 type is associated with early-onset morbid obesity, while the chromosome 16 type appears to present the {open_quotes}leanest{close_quotes} form of BBS. Future cloning of the various BB genes will contribute to the understanding of the molecular basis of limb development and the identification of human obesity-related genes. 22 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  17. Definition of 5q11.2 Microdeletion Syndrome Reveals Overlap with CHARGE Syndrome and 22q11 Deletion Syndrome Phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, Charlotte Snijders; Corsten-Janssen, Nicole; FitzPatrick, David R.; Romano, Corrado; Fichera, Marco; Vitello, Girolamo Aurelio; Willemsen, Marjolein H.; Schoots, Jeroen; Pfundt, Rolph; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M. A.; Hoefsloot, Lies; Kleefstra, Tjitske

    2014-01-01

    Microdeletions of the 5q11.2 region are rare; in literature only two patients with a deletion in this region have been reported so far. In this study, we describe four additional patients and further define this new 5q11.2 microdeletion syndrome. A comparison of the features observed in all six pati

  18. Elevated chemerin levels in Pakistani men: an interrelation with metabolic syndrome phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syeda Sadia Fatima

    Full Text Available Chemerin is a novel protein linked to adipocyte differentiation and the development of metabolic imbalances. We sought to examine the relationship of chemerin with metabolic syndrome disturbances including body fat percentage, serum lipid, glucose, insulin levels and body fat percentage in lean and obese volunteers. A cross-sectional study of 90 randomly selected healthy males from Pakistan were divided into three groups as per Body Mass Index (BMI criteria for South Asian Population. Anthropometric measurements were taken for BMI, waist circumference, hip circumference and body fat percentage, while serum analyses were performed for fasting blood glucose, fasting insulin, fasting lipid profile and serum chemerin. Associations between serum chemerin levels and body fat and other metabolic syndrome parameters were performed using ANOVA and multiple regression analyses. Data was presented as Mean±SD. In all statistical analyses p-values <0.05 were considered significant. Circulating chemerin levels were significantly higher in obese subjects with BMI greater than 25 kg/m(2 compared with those with a BMI below 25 kg/m(2 (P = 0.001. Serum chemerin levels were found to be independently and significantly associated with serum levels of cholesterol (P = 0.0160; r = 0.255, fasting glucose (P = 0.002; r = 0.323, HOMA-IR (P = 0.004; r = 0.300 and hip circumference (P = 0.021; r = 0.246. This demonstrates that chemerin levels are associated with obesity and dyslipidemia and may play a role in the development of insulin resistance. This data suggests that chemerin may serve as an independent marker in diagnosing these conditions even before they become clinically symptomatic.

  19. FGFR2 mutation in a patient without typical features of Pfeiffer syndrome--The emerging role of combined NGS and phenotype based strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flöttmann, Ricarda; Knaus, Alexej; Zemojtel, Tomasz; Robinson, Peter N; Mundlos, Stefan; Horn, Denise; Spielmann, Malte

    2015-08-01

    Pfeiffer syndrome (MIM: #101600) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder classically characterized by limb and craniofacial anomalies. It is caused by heterozygous mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptors types 1 and 2 (FGFR1 and FGFR2). We applied a next generation sequencing (NGS) panel approach comprising all 2877 genes currently known to be causative for one or more Mendelian diseases combined with the phenotype based computational tool PhenIX (Phenotypic Interpretation of eXomes). We report on a patient presenting with multiple anomalies of hands and feet including brachydactyly and symphalangism. No clinical diagnosis could be established based on the clinical findings and testing of several genes associated with brachydactyly and symphalangism failed to identify mutations. Via next generation sequencing (NGS) panel approach we then identified a novel de novo missense FGFR2 mutation affecting an amino acid reported to be mutated in Pfeiffer syndrome. Since our patient shows typical radiological findings of Pfeiffer syndrome in hands and feet but at the same time lacks several characteristic features such as clinical signs of craniosynostosis and prominent eyes we suggest introducing the term "FGFR2 associated phenotypes" for similar cases. Our results highlight the emerging role of combined NGS and phenotype based bioinformatics strategies to establish clinical diagnoses.

  20. Two novel heterozygous mutations of EVC2 cause a mild phenotype of Ellis-van Creveld syndrome in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wenjing; Han, Dong; Zhang, Jin; Zhao, Hongshan; Feng, Hailan

    2011-09-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC, chondroectodermal dysplasia; OMIM 225500) is an autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasia with associated multisystem involvement. The syndrome is characterized by short limbs, short ribs, postaxial polydactyly, dysplastic nails, and abnormal teeth. Congenital heart defects occur in 50-60% of cases. In this study, we report EvC in a 6-year-old Chinese girl with hypodontia and polydactyly, mild short stature, and abnormalities of the knee joints. No signs of short ribs, narrow thorax, or congenital heart defects were found in this patient. The EvC phenotype shares some similarity with Weyers acrofacial dysostosis (Weyer; OMIM 193530), an autosomal dominant disorder clinically characterized by mild short stature, postaxial polydactyly, nail dystrophy, and dysplastic teeth. Mutations in EVC or EVC2 are associated with both EvC syndrome and Weyers acrodental dysostosis, but the two conditions differ in the severity of the phenotype and their pattern of inheritance. In this study, two novel heterozygous EVC2 mutations, IVS5-2A > G and c.2653C > T (Arg885X), were identified in the patient. The IVS5-2A > G mutation was inherited from the patient's mother and the c.2653C > T from her father. Her parents have no phenotypic symptoms similar to those of the patient. These findings extend the mutation spectrum of this malformation syndrome and provide the possibility of prenatal diagnosis for future offspring in this family.

  1. Metabolic and Phenotypic Differences between Mice Producing a Werner Syndrome Helicase Mutant Protein and Wrn Null Mice.

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    Lucie Aumailley

    Full Text Available Werner syndrome (WS is a premature aging disorder caused by mutations in a RecQ-family DNA helicase, WRN. Mice lacking part of the helicase domain of the WRN orthologue exhibit many phenotypic features of WS, including metabolic abnormalities and a shorter mean life span. In contrast, mice lacking the entire Wrn protein (i.e. Wrn null mice do not exhibit a premature aging phenotype. In this study, we used a targeted mass spectrometry-based metabolomic approach to identify serum metabolites that are differentially altered in young Wrn helicase mutant and Wrn null mice. An antibody-based quantification of 43 serum cytokines and markers of cardiovascular disease risk complemented this study. We found that Wrn helicase mutants exhibited elevated and decreased levels, respectively, of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-18. Wrn helicase mutants also exhibited an increase in serum hydroxyproline and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, markers of extracellular matrix remodeling of the vascular system and inflammation in aging. We also observed an abnormal increase in the ratio of very long chain to short chain lysophosphatidylcholines in the Wrn helicase mutants underlying a peroxisome perturbation in these mice. Remarkably, the Wrn mutant helicase protein was mislocalized to the endoplasmic reticulum and the peroxisomal fractions in liver tissues. Additional analyses with mouse embryonic fibroblasts indicated a severe defect of the autophagy flux in cells derived from Wrn helicase mutants compared to wild type and Wrn null animals. These results indicate that the deleterious effects of the helicase-deficient Wrn protein are mediated by the dysfunction of several cellular organelles.

  2. Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome type 2: report of nine new cases that extend the phenotypic and genotypic spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Mark J; Newbury-Ecob, Ruth; Holder-Espinasse, Muriel; Yau, Shu; Lillis, Suzanne; Hurst, Jane A; Clement, Emma; Reardon, William; Joss, Shelagh; Hobson, Emma; Blyth, Moira; Al-Shehhi, Maryam; Lynch, Sally A; Suri, Mohnish

    2016-10-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS) is an autosomal dominant neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by growth deficiency, broad thumbs and great toes, intellectual disability and characteristic craniofacial appearance. Mutations in CREBBP account for around 55% of cases, with a further 8% attributed to the paralogous gene EP300. Comparatively few reports exist describing the phenotype of Rubinstein-Taybi because of EP300 mutations. Clinical and genetic data were obtained from nine patients from the UK and Ireland with pathogenic EP300 mutations, identified either by targeted testing or by exome sequencing. All patients had mild or moderate intellectual impairment. Behavioural or social difficulties were noted in eight patients, including three with autistic spectrum disorders. Typical dysmorphic features of Rubinstein-Taybi were only variably present. Additional observations include maternal pre-eclampsia (2/9), syndactyly (3/9), feeding or swallowing issues (3/9), delayed bone age (2/9) and scoliosis (2/9). Six patients had truncating mutations in EP300, with pathogenic missense mutations identified in the remaining three. The findings support previous observations that microcephaly, maternal pre-eclampsia, mild growth restriction and a mild to moderate intellectual disability are key pointers to the diagnosis of EP300-related RTS. Variability in the presence of typical facial features of Rubinstein-Taybi further highlights clinical heterogeneity, particularly among patients identified by exome sequencing. Features that overlap with Floating-Harbor syndrome, including craniofacial dysmorphism and delayed osseous maturation, were observed in three patients. Previous reports have only described mutations predicted to cause haploinsufficiency of EP300, whereas this cohort includes the first described pathogenic missense mutations in EP300. PMID:27465822

  3. Analysis of large phenotypic variability of EEC and SHFM4 syndromes caused by K193E mutation of the TP63 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Wei

    Full Text Available EEC (ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, clefting; OMIM 604292 is an autosomal dominant developmental disorder resulting mainly from pathogenic mutations of the DNA-binding domain (DBD of the TP63 gene. In this study, we showed that K193E mutation in nine affected individuals of a four-generation kindred with a large degree of phenotypic variability causes four different syndromes or TP63-related disorders: EEC, Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia (EE, isolated ectodermal dysplasia, and isolated Split Hand/Foot Malformation type 4 (SHFM4. Genotype-phenotype and DBD structural modeling analysis showed that the K193-located loop L2-A is associated with R280 through hydrogen bonding interactions, while R280 mutations also often cause large phenotypic variability of EEC and SHFM4. Thus, we speculate that K193 and several other DBD mutation-associated syndromes may share similar pathogenic mechanisms, particularly in the case of the same mutation with different phenotypes. Our study and others also suggest that the phenotypic variability of EEC is attributed, at least partially, to genetic and/or epigenetic modifiers.

  4. Adrenocortical steroid response to ACTH in different phenotypes of non-obese polycystic ovary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinar Nese

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adrenal androgen excess is frequently observed in PCOS. The aim of the study was to determine whether adrenal gland function varies among PCOS phenotypes, women with hyperandrogenism (H only and healthy women. Methods The study included 119 non-obese patients with PCOS (age: 22.2 ± 4.1y, BMI:22.5 ± 3.1 kg/m2, 24 women with H only and 39 age and BMI- matched controls. Among women with PCOS, 50 had H, oligo-anovulation (O, and polycystic ovaries (P (PHO, 32 had O and H (OH, 23 had P and H (PH, and 14 had P and O (PO. Total testosterone (T, SHBG and DHEAS levels at basal and serum 17-hydroxprogesterone (17-OHP, androstenedione (A4, DHEA and cortisol levels after ACTH stimulation were measured. Results T, FAI and DHEAS, and basal and AUC values for 17-OHP and A4 were significantly and similarly higher in PCOS and H groups than controls (p  Conclusion PCOS patients and women with H only have similar and higher basal and stimulated adrenal androgen levels than controls. All three hyperandrogenic subphenotypes of PCOS exhibit similar and higher basal and stimulated adrenal androgen secretion patterns compared to non-hyperandrogenic subphenotype.

  5. SETD5 loss-of-function mutation as a likely cause of a familial syndromic intellectual disability with variable phenotypic expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczałuba, Krzysztof; Brzezinska, Monika; Kot, Justyna; Rydzanicz, Małgorzata; Walczak, Anna; Stawiński, Piotr; Werner, Bożena; Płoski, Rafał

    2016-09-01

    Loss-of-function de novo mutations in the SETD5 gene, encoding a putative methyltransferase, are an important cause of moderate/severe intellectual disability as evidenced by the results of sequencing large patient cohorts. We present the first familial case of a SETD5 mutation contributing to a phenotype of congenital heart defects and dysmorphic features, with variable expression, in two siblings and their father. Interestingly, the father demonstrated only mild intellectual impairment. Family based exome sequencing combined to careful parental phenotyping may reveal a more complex clinical picture in newly recognized syndromes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27375234

  6. Choline Ameliorates Disease Phenotypes in Human iPSC Models of Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Eunice W M; Marcy, Guillaume; Yoon, Su-In; Ma, Dongliang; Rosales, Francisco J; Augustine, George J; Goh, Eyleen L K

    2016-09-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a postnatal neurodevelopmental disorder that primarily affects girls. Mutations in the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene account for approximately 95 % of all RTT cases. To model RTT in vitro, we generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from fibroblasts of two RTT patients with different mutations (MECP2 (R306C) and MECP2 (1155Δ32)) in their MECP2 gene. We found that these iPSCs were capable of differentiating into functional neurons. Compared to control neurons, the RTT iPSC-derived cells had reduced soma size and a decreased amount of synaptic input, evident both as fewer Synapsin 1-positive puncta and a lower frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents. Supplementation of the culture media with choline rescued all of these defects. Choline supplementation may act through changes in the expression of choline acetyltransferase, an important enzyme in cholinergic signaling, and also through alterations in the lipid metabolite profiles of the RTT neurons. Our study elucidates the possible mechanistic pathways for the effect of choline on human RTT cell models, thereby illustrating the potential for using choline as a nutraceutical to treat RTT. PMID:27379379

  7. Genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity in Chinese patients with Waardenburg syndrome type II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuzhi Yang

    Full Text Available Waardenburg Syndrome (WS is an autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and pigmentary abnormalities of the eyes, hair, and skin. Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF gene mutations account for about 15% of WS type II (WS2 cases. To date, fewer than 40 different MITF gene mutations have been identified in human WS2 patients, and few of these were of Chinese descent. In this study, we report clinical findings and mutation identification in the MITF gene of 20 Chinese WS2 patients from 14 families. A high level of clinical variability was identified. Sensorineural hearing loss (17/20, 85.0% and heterochromia iridum (20/20, 100.0% were the most commonly observed clinical features in Chinese WS2 patients. Five affected individuals (5/20, 25.0% had numerous brown freckles on the face, trunk, and limb extremities. Mutation screening of the MITF gene identified five mutations: c.20A>G, c.332C>T, c.647_649delGAA, c.649A>G, and c.763C>T. The total mutational frequency of the MITF gene was 21.4% (3/14, which is significantly higher than the 15.0% observed in the fair-skinned WS2 population. Our results indicate that MITF mutations are relatively common among Chinese WS2 patients.

  8. Genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity in Chinese patients with Waardenburg syndrome type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuzhi; Dai, Pu; Liu, Xin; Kang, Dongyang; Zhang, Xin; Yang, Weiyan; Zhou, Chengyong; Yang, Shiming; Yuan, Huijun

    2013-01-01

    Waardenburg Syndrome (WS) is an autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and pigmentary abnormalities of the eyes, hair, and skin. Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) gene mutations account for about 15% of WS type II (WS2) cases. To date, fewer than 40 different MITF gene mutations have been identified in human WS2 patients, and few of these were of Chinese descent. In this study, we report clinical findings and mutation identification in the MITF gene of 20 Chinese WS2 patients from 14 families. A high level of clinical variability was identified. Sensorineural hearing loss (17/20, 85.0%) and heterochromia iridum (20/20, 100.0%) were the most commonly observed clinical features in Chinese WS2 patients. Five affected individuals (5/20, 25.0%) had numerous brown freckles on the face, trunk, and limb extremities. Mutation screening of the MITF gene identified five mutations: c.20A>G, c.332C>T, c.647_649delGAA, c.649A>G, and c.763C>T. The total mutational frequency of the MITF gene was 21.4% (3/14), which is significantly higher than the 15.0% observed in the fair-skinned WS2 population. Our results indicate that MITF mutations are relatively common among Chinese WS2 patients. PMID:24194866

  9. Choline Ameliorates Disease Phenotypes in Human iPSC Models of Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Eunice W M; Marcy, Guillaume; Yoon, Su-In; Ma, Dongliang; Rosales, Francisco J; Augustine, George J; Goh, Eyleen L K

    2016-09-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a postnatal neurodevelopmental disorder that primarily affects girls. Mutations in the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene account for approximately 95 % of all RTT cases. To model RTT in vitro, we generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from fibroblasts of two RTT patients with different mutations (MECP2 (R306C) and MECP2 (1155Δ32)) in their MECP2 gene. We found that these iPSCs were capable of differentiating into functional neurons. Compared to control neurons, the RTT iPSC-derived cells had reduced soma size and a decreased amount of synaptic input, evident both as fewer Synapsin 1-positive puncta and a lower frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents. Supplementation of the culture media with choline rescued all of these defects. Choline supplementation may act through changes in the expression of choline acetyltransferase, an important enzyme in cholinergic signaling, and also through alterations in the lipid metabolite profiles of the RTT neurons. Our study elucidates the possible mechanistic pathways for the effect of choline on human RTT cell models, thereby illustrating the potential for using choline as a nutraceutical to treat RTT.

  10. Germline PRKACA amplification leads to Cushing syndrome caused by 3 adrenocortical pathologic phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, J Aidan; Lyssikatos, Charalampos; Lodish, Maya B; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2015-01-01

    We describe the pathology of 5 patients with germline PRKACA copy number gain and Cushing syndrome: 4 males and 1 female, aged 2 to 43 years, including a mother and son. Imaging showed normal or slightly enlarged adrenal glands in 4 patients and a unilateral mass in the fifth. Biochemically, the patients had corticotropin-independent hypercortisolism. Four underwent bilateral adrenalectomy; unilateral adrenalectomy was performed in the patient with the adrenal mass. Pathologically, 3 patients, including the 1 with the tumor (adenoma), had primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease with extranodular cortical atrophy and mild intracapsular and extracapsular extension of cortical cells. The other 2 patients had cortical hyperplasia and prominent capsular and extracapsular micronodular cortical hyperplasia. Immunoperoxidase staining revealed differences for synaptophysin, inhibin-A, and Ki-67 (nuclei) in the atrophic cortices (patients 1, 2, and 3) and hyperplastic cortices (patients 4 and 5) and for Ki-67 (nuclei) and vimentin in the extracortical nodules in the 2 groups of patients. β-Catenin stained the cell membrane, cytoplasm, and nuclei of the adenoma. The patients were well at follow-up (1-23 years); 24-hour urinary cortisol excretion was elevated in the patient who had unilateral adrenalectomy.

  11. Oxidative Stress -a Phenotypic Hallmark of Fanconi Anemia and Down Syndrome: The Effect of Antioxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bassyouni, HT; Afifi, HH; Eid, MM; Kamal, RM; El-Gebali, HH; El-Saeed, GSM; Thomas, MM; Abdel-Maksoud, SA

    2015-01-01

    Background: Oxidative stress plays a major role in the pathogenesis of leukemia-prone diseases such as Fanconi anemia (FA) and Down syndrome (DS) Aim: To explore the oxidative stress state in children with DS and FA by estimating the levels of antioxidants (e.g., malondialdehyde [MDA], total antioxidant capacity, and superoxide dismutase [SOD] activity) and DNA damage, and to evaluate of the effect of antioxidant treatment on these patients. Subjects and methods The study included 32 children clinically diagnosed with (15 patients) and FA (17 patients) in addition to 17 controls matched for age and sex. MDA, total antioxidant capacity, SOD activity, and DNA damage were measured. Antioxidants including Vitamin A, E, and C were given to the patients according to the recommended daily allowance for 6 months. Clinical follow-up and re-evaluation were conducted for all patients. Laboratory tests including complete blood count, karyotyping, DNA damage, and oxidative stress were re-evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed using statistical computer program Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 14.0. Results: Children with FA and DS had elevated levels of oxidative stress and more DNA damage than controls. Oxidative stress parameters and DNA damage improved in FA and DS patients after antioxidant administration. Conclusion: Early administration of antioxidants to FA and DS patients is recommended for slowing of the disease course with symptoms amelioration and improvement of general health. PMID:26097763

  12. Impact of socioeconomic status on disease phenotype, genomic landscape and outcomes in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastaglio, Francesca; Bedair, Khaled; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Groves, Michael J; Hyslop, Ann; Keenan, Norene; Hothersall, Eleanor J; Campbell, Peter J; Bowen, David T; Tauro, Sudhir

    2016-07-01

    Genetic and epigenetic alterations contribute to the biological and clinical characteristics of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), but a role for socioeconomic environment remains unclear. Here, socioeconomic status (SES) for 283 MDS patients was estimated using the Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation tool. Indices were assigned to quintile categorical indicators ranked from SES1 (lowest) to SES5 (highest). Clinicopathological features and outcomes between SES quintiles containing 15%, 20%, 19%, 30% and 16% of patients were compared. Prognostic scores identified lower-risk MDS in 82% of patients, with higher-risk disease in 18%. SES quintiles did not associate with age, gender, cytogenetics, International Prognostic scores or, in sub-analysis (n = 95), driver mutations. The odds ratio of a diagnosis of refractory anaemia was greater than other MDS sub-types in SES5 (OR 1·9, P = 0·024). Most patients (91%) exclusively received supportive care. SES did not associate with leukaemic transformation or cause of death. Cox regression models confirmed male gender (P disease-risk (P disease biology or survival in MDS patients receiving supportive treatment; additional studies are required to determine whether outcomes following disease-modifying therapies are influenced by SES. PMID:27098194

  13. Impact of TP53 mutation variant allele frequency on phenotype and outcomes in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallman, D A; Komrokji, R; Vaupel, C; Cluzeau, T; Geyer, S M; McGraw, K L; Al Ali, N H; Lancet, J; McGinniss, M J; Nahas, S; Smith, A E; Kulasekararaj, A; Mufti, G; List, A; Hall, J; Padron, E

    2016-03-01

    Although next-generation sequencing has allowed for the detection of somatic mutations in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), the clinical relevance of variant allele frequency (VAF) for the majority of mutations is unknown. We profiled TP53 and 20 additional genes in our training set of 219 patients with MDS or secondary acute myeloid leukemia with findings confirmed in a validation cohort. When parsed by VAF, TP53 VAF predicted for complex cytogenetics in both the training (P=0.001) and validation set (P 40% had a median overall survival (OS) of 124 days versus an OS that was not reached in patients with VAF 40% was an independent covariate (HR, 1.61; P<0.0001). In addition, SRSF2 VAF predicted for monocytosis (P=0.003), RUNX1 VAF with thrombocytopenia (P=0.01) and SF3B1 with ringed sideroblasts (P=0.001). Together, our study indicates that VAF should be incorporated in patient management and risk stratification in MDS. PMID:26514544

  14. Novel CDKL5 Mutations in Czech Patients with Phenotypes of Atypical Rett Syndrome and Early-Onset Epileptic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Záhoráková, D; Langová, M; Brožová, K; Laštůvková, J; Kalina, Z; Rennerová, L; Martásek, P

    2016-01-01

    The X-linked CDKL5 gene, which encodes cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 protein, has been implicated in early-onset encephalopathy and atypical Rett syndrome with early-onset seizures. The CDKL5 protein is a kinase required for neuronal development and morphogenesis, but its precise functions are still largely unexplored. Individuals with CDKL5 mutations present with severe global developmental delay, intractable epilepsy, and Rett-like features. A clear genotype-phenotype correlation has not been established due to an insufficient number of reported cases. The aim of this study was to analyse the CDKL5 gene in Czech patients with early-onset seizures and Rett-like features. We performed mutation screening in a cohort of 83 individuals using high-resolution melting analysis, DNA sequencing and multiplex ligation- dependent probe amplification. Molecular analyses revealed heterozygous pathogenic mutations in three girls with severe intellectual disability and intractable epilepsy starting at the age of two months. All three identified mutations, c.637G>A, c.902_977+29del105, and c.1757_1758delCT, are novel, thus significantly extending the growing spectrum of known pathogenic CDKL5 sequence variants. Our results support the importance of genetic testing of the CDKL5 gene in patients with early-onset epileptic encephalopathy and Rett-like features with early-onset seizures. This is the first study referring to molecular defects of CDKL5 in Czech cases. PMID:27187038

  15. Epigenetic mechanism underlying the development of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS-like phenotypes in prenatally androgenized rhesus monkeys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Xu

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is poorly understood. PCOS-like phenotypes are produced by prenatal androgenization (PA of female rhesus monkeys. We hypothesize that perturbation of the epigenome, through altered DNA methylation, is one of the mechanisms whereby PA reprograms monkeys to develop PCOS. Infant and adult visceral adipose tissues (VAT harvested from 15 PA and 10 control monkeys were studied. Bisulfite treated samples were subjected to genome-wide CpG methylation analysis, designed to simultaneously measure methylation levels at 27,578 CpG sites. Analysis was carried out using Bayesian Classification with Singular Value Decomposition (BCSVD, testing all probes simultaneously in a single test. Stringent criteria were then applied to filter out invalid probes due to sequence dissimilarities between human probes and monkey DNA, and then mapped to the rhesus genome. This yielded differentially methylated loci between PA and control monkeys, 163 in infant VAT, and 325 in adult VAT (BCSVD P<0.05. Among these two sets of genes, we identified several significant pathways, including the antiproliferative role of TOB in T cell signaling and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β signaling. Our results suggest PA may modify DNA methylation patterns in both infant and adult VAT. This pilot study suggests that excess fetal androgen exposure in female nonhuman primates may predispose to PCOS via alteration of the epigenome, providing a novel avenue to understand PCOS in humans.

  16. Variations in dysfunction of sister chromatid cohesion in esco2 mutant zebrafish reflect the phenotypic diversity of Roberts syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie M. Percival

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in ESCO2, one of two establishment of cohesion factors necessary for proper sister chromatid cohesion (SCC, cause a spectrum of developmental defects in the autosomal-recessive disorder Roberts syndrome (RBS, warranting in vivo analysis of the consequence of cohesion dysfunction. Through a genetic screen in zebrafish targeting embryonic-lethal mutants that have increased genomic instability, we have identified an esco2 mutant zebrafish. Utilizing the natural transparency of zebrafish embryos, we have developed a novel technique to observe chromosome dynamics within a single cell during mitosis in a live vertebrate embryo. Within esco2 mutant embryos, we observed premature chromatid separation, a unique chromosome scattering, prolonged mitotic delay, and genomic instability in the form of anaphase bridges and micronuclei formation. Cytogenetic studies indicated complete chromatid separation and high levels of aneuploidy within mutant embryos. Amongst aneuploid spreads, we predominantly observed decreases in chromosome number, suggesting that either cells with micronuclei or micronuclei themselves are eliminated. We also demonstrated that the genomic instability leads to p53-dependent neural tube apoptosis. Surprisingly, although many cells required Esco2 to establish cohesion, 10-20% of cells had only weakened cohesion in the absence of Esco2, suggesting that compensatory cohesion mechanisms exist in these cells that undergo a normal mitotic division. These studies provide a unique in vivo vertebrate view of the mitotic defects and consequences of cohesion establishment loss, and they provide a compensation-based model to explain the RBS phenotypes.

  17. Reduction of NADPH-oxidase activity ameliorates the cardiovascular phenotype in a mouse model of Williams-Beuren Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Campuzano

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A hallmark feature of Williams-Beuren Syndrome (WBS is a generalized arteriopathy due to elastin deficiency, presenting as stenoses of medium and large arteries and leading to hypertension and other cardiovascular complications. Deletion of a functional NCF1 gene copy has been shown to protect a proportion of WBS patients against hypertension, likely through reduced NADPH-oxidase (NOX-mediated oxidative stress. DD mice, carrying a 0.67 Mb heterozygous deletion including the Eln gene, presented with a generalized arteriopathy, hypertension, and cardiac hypertrophy, associated with elevated angiotensin II (angII, oxidative stress parameters, and Ncf1 expression. Genetic (by crossing with Ncf1 mutant and/or pharmacological (with ang II type 1 receptor blocker, losartan, or NOX inhibitor apocynin reduction of NOX activity controlled hormonal and biochemical parameters in DD mice, resulting in normalized blood pressure and improved cardiovascular histology. We provide strong evidence for implication of the redox system in the pathophysiology of the cardiovascular disease in a mouse model of WBS. The phenotype of these mice can be ameliorated by either genetic or pharmacological intervention reducing NOX activity, likely through reduced angII-mediated oxidative stress. Therefore, anti-NOX therapy merits evaluation to prevent the potentially serious cardiovascular complications of WBS, as well as in other cardiovascular disorders mediated by similar pathogenic mechanism.

  18. Variations in dysfunction of sister chromatid cohesion in esco2 mutant zebrafish reflect the phenotypic diversity of Roberts syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percival, Stefanie M; Thomas, Holly R; Amsterdam, Adam; Carroll, Andrew J; Lees, Jacqueline A; Yost, H Joseph; Parant, John M

    2015-08-01

    Mutations in ESCO2, one of two establishment of cohesion factors necessary for proper sister chromatid cohesion (SCC), cause a spectrum of developmental defects in the autosomal-recessive disorder Roberts syndrome (RBS), warranting in vivo analysis of the consequence of cohesion dysfunction. Through a genetic screen in zebrafish targeting embryonic-lethal mutants that have increased genomic instability, we have identified an esco2 mutant zebrafish. Utilizing the natural transparency of zebrafish embryos, we have developed a novel technique to observe chromosome dynamics within a single cell during mitosis in a live vertebrate embryo. Within esco2 mutant embryos, we observed premature chromatid separation, a unique chromosome scattering, prolonged mitotic delay, and genomic instability in the form of anaphase bridges and micronuclei formation. Cytogenetic studies indicated complete chromatid separation and high levels of aneuploidy within mutant embryos. Amongst aneuploid spreads, we predominantly observed decreases in chromosome number, suggesting that either cells with micronuclei or micronuclei themselves are eliminated. We also demonstrated that the genomic instability leads to p53-dependent neural tube apoptosis. Surprisingly, although many cells required Esco2 to establish cohesion, 10-20% of cells had only weakened cohesion in the absence of Esco2, suggesting that compensatory cohesion mechanisms exist in these cells that undergo a normal mitotic division. These studies provide a unique in vivo vertebrate view of the mitotic defects and consequences of cohesion establishment loss, and they provide a compensation-based model to explain the RBS phenotypes.

  19. Array-based FMR1 sequencing and deletion analysis in patients with a fragile X syndrome-like phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen C Collins

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fragile X syndrome (FXS is caused by loss of function mutations in the FMR1 gene. Trinucleotide CGG-repeat expansions, resulting in FMR1 gene silencing, are the most common mutations observed at this locus. Even though the repeat expansion mutation is a functional null mutation, few conventional mutations have been identified at this locus, largely due to the clinical laboratory focus on the repeat tract. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To more thoroughly evaluate the frequency of conventional mutations in FXS-like patients, we used an array-based method to sequence FMR1 in 51 unrelated males exhibiting several features characteristic of FXS but with normal CGG-repeat tracts of FMR1. One patient was identified with a deletion in FMR1, but none of the patients were found to have other conventional mutations. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data suggest that missense mutations in FMR1 are not a common cause of the FXS phenotype in patients who have normal-length CGG-repeat tracts. However, screening for small deletions of FMR1 may be of clinically utility.

  20. Characterization of a 8q21.11 Microdeletion Syndrome Associated with Intellectual Disability and a Recognizable Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomares, María; Delicado, Alicia; Mansilla, Elena; de Torres, María Luisa; Vallespín, Elena; Fernandez, Luis; Martinez-Glez, Victor; García-Miñaur, Sixto; Nevado, Julián; Simarro, Fernando Santos; Ruiz-Perez, Victor L.; Lynch, Sally Ann; Sharkey, Freddie H.; Thuresson, Ann-Charlotte; Annerén, Göran; Belligni, Elga F.; Martínez-Fernández, María Luisa; Bermejo, Eva; Nowakowska, Beata; Kutkowska-Kazmierczak, Anna; Bocian, Ewa; Obersztyn, Ewa; Martínez-Frías, María Luisa; Hennekam, Raoul C.M.; Lapunzina, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    We report eight unrelated individuals with intellectual disability and overlapping submicroscopic deletions of 8q21.11 (0.66–13.55 Mb in size). The deletion was familial in one and simplex in seven individuals. The phenotype was remarkably similar and consisted of a round face with full cheeks, a high forehead, ptosis, cornea opacities, an underdeveloped alae, a short philtrum, a cupid's bow of the upper lip, down-turned corners of the mouth, micrognathia, low-set and prominent ears, and mild finger and toe anomalies (camptodactyly, syndactyly, and broadening of the first rays). Intellectual disability, hypotonia, decreased balance, sensorineural hearing loss, and unusual behavior were frequently observed. A high-resolution oligonucleotide array showed different proximal and distal breakpoints in all of the individuals. Sequencing studies in three of the individuals revealed that proximal and distal breakpoints were located in unique sequences with no apparent homology. The smallest region of overlap was a 539.7 kb interval encompassing three genes: a Zinc Finger Homeobox 4 (ZFHX4), one microRNA of unknown function, and one nonfunctional pseudogen. ZFHX4 encodes a transcription factor expressed in the adult human brain, skeletal muscle, and liver. It has been suggested as a candidate gene for congenital bilateral isolated ptosis. Our results suggest that the 8q21.11 submicroscopic deletion represents a clinically recognizable entity and that a haploinsufficient gene or genes within the minimal deletion region could underlie this syndrome. PMID:21802062

  1. A chemical with proven clinical safety rescues Down-syndrome-related phenotypes in through DYRK1A inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyeongki; Lee, Kyu-Sun; Kim, Ae-Kyeong; Choi, Miri; Choi, Kwangman; Kang, Mingu; Chi, Seung-Wook; Lee, Min-Sung; Lee, Jeong-Soo; Lee, So-Young; Song, Woo-Joo; Yu, Kweon; Cho, Sungchan

    2016-08-01

    DYRK1A is important in neuronal development and function, and its excessive activity is considered a significant pathogenic factor in Down syndrome and Alzheimer's disease. Thus, inhibition of DYRK1A has been suggested to be a new strategy to modify the disease. Very few compounds, however, have been reported to act as inhibitors, and their potential clinical uses require further evaluation. Here, we newly identify CX-4945, the safety of which has been already proven in the clinical setting, as a potent inhibitor of DYRK1A that acts in an ATP-competitive manner. The inhibitory potency of CX-4945 on DYRK1A (IC50=6.8 nM) in vitro was higher than that of harmine, INDY or proINDY, which are well-known potent inhibitors of DYRK1A. CX-4945 effectively reverses the aberrant phosphorylation of Tau, amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilin 1 (PS1) in mammalian cells. To our surprise, feeding with CX-4945 significantly restored the neurological and phenotypic defects induced by the overexpression of minibrain, an ortholog of human DYRK1A, in the Drosophila model. Moreover, oral administration of CX-4945 acutely suppressed Tau hyperphosphorylation in the hippocampus of DYRK1A-overexpressing mice. Our research results demonstrate that CX-4945 is a potent DYRK1A inhibitor and also suggest that it has therapeutic potential for DYRK1A-associated diseases. PMID:27483355

  2. A chemical with proven clinical safety rescues Down-syndrome-related phenotypes in through DYRK1A inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeongki Kim

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available DYRK1A is important in neuronal development and function, and its excessive activity is considered a significant pathogenic factor in Down syndrome and Alzheimer's disease. Thus, inhibition of DYRK1A has been suggested to be a new strategy to modify the disease. Very few compounds, however, have been reported to act as inhibitors, and their potential clinical uses require further evaluation. Here, we newly identify CX-4945, the safety of which has been already proven in the clinical setting, as a potent inhibitor of DYRK1A that acts in an ATP-competitive manner. The inhibitory potency of CX-4945 on DYRK1A (IC50=6.8 nM in vitro was higher than that of harmine, INDY or proINDY, which are well-known potent inhibitors of DYRK1A. CX-4945 effectively reverses the aberrant phosphorylation of Tau, amyloid precursor protein (APP and presenilin 1 (PS1 in mammalian cells. To our surprise, feeding with CX-4945 significantly restored the neurological and phenotypic defects induced by the overexpression of minibrain, an ortholog of human DYRK1A, in the Drosophila model. Moreover, oral administration of CX-4945 acutely suppressed Tau hyperphosphorylation in the hippocampus of DYRK1A-overexpressing mice. Our research results demonstrate that CX-4945 is a potent DYRK1A inhibitor and also suggest that it has therapeutic potential for DYRK1A-associated diseases.

  3. Oral phenotype and scoring of vascular Ehlers–Danlos syndrome: a case–control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Michael; Gogly, Bruno; Golmard, Lisa; Naveau, Adrien; Chérifi, Hafida; Emmerich, Joseph; Gaultier, Frédérick; Berdal, Ariane; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Fournier, Benjamin P J

    2012-01-01

    Objective Vascular Ehlers–Danlos syndrome (vEDS) is a rare genetic condition related to mutations in the COL3A1 gene, responsible of vascular, digestive and uterine accidents. Difficulty of clinical diagnosis has led to the design of diagnostic criteria, summarised in the Villefranche classification. The goal was to assess oral features of vEDS. Gingival recession is the only oral sign recognised as a minor diagnostic criterion. The authors aimed to check this assumption since bibliographical search related to gingival recession in vEDS proved scarce. Design Prospective case–control study. Setting Dental surgery department in a French tertiary hospital. Participants 17 consecutive patients with genetically proven vEDS, aged 19–55 years, were compared with 46 age- and sex-matched controls. Observations Complete oral examination (clinical and radiological) with standardised assessment of periodontal structure, temporomandibular joint function and dental characteristics were performed. COL3A1 mutations were identified by direct sequencing of genomic or complementary DNA. Results Prevalence of gingival recession was low among patients with vEDS, as for periodontitis. Conversely, patients showed marked gingival fragility, temporomandibular disorders, dentin formation defects, molar root fusion and increased root length. After logistic regression, three variables remained significantly associated to vEDS. These variables were integrated in a diagnostic oral score with 87.5% and 97% sensitivity and specificity, respectively. Conclusions Gingival recession is an inappropriate diagnostic criterion for vEDS. Several new specific oral signs of the disease were identified, whose combination may be of greater value in diagnosing vEDS. PMID:22492385

  4. X-Linked and Autosomal Recessive Alport Syndrome: Pathogenic Variant Features and Further Genotype-Phenotype Correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savige, Judith; Storey, Helen; Il Cheong, Hae; Gyung Kang, Hee; Park, Eujin; Hilbert, Pascale; Persikov, Anton; Torres-Fernandez, Carmen; Ars, Elisabet; Torra, Roser; Hertz, Jens Michael; Thomassen, Mads; Shagam, Lev; Wang, Dongmao; Wang, Yanyan; Flinter, Frances; Nagel, Mato

    2016-01-01

    Alport syndrome results from mutations in the COL4A5 (X-linked) or COL4A3/COL4A4 (recessive) genes. This study examined 754 previously- unpublished variants in these genes from individuals referred for genetic testing in 12 accredited diagnostic laboratories worldwide, in addition to all published COL4A5, COL4A3 and COL4A4 variants in the LOVD databases. It also determined genotype-phenotype correlations for variants where clinical data were available. Individuals were referred for genetic testing where Alport syndrome was suspected clinically or on biopsy (renal failure, hearing loss, retinopathy, lamellated glomerular basement membrane), variant pathogenicity was assessed using currently-accepted criteria, and variants were examined for gene location, and age at renal failure onset. Results were compared using Fisher's exact test (DNA Stata). Altogether 754 new DNA variants were identified, an increase of 25%, predominantly in people of European background. Of the 1168 COL4A5 variants, 504 (43%) were missense mutations, 273 (23%) splicing variants, 73 (6%) nonsense mutations, 169 (14%) short deletions and 76 (7%) complex or large deletions. Only 135 of the 432 Gly residues in the collagenous sequence were substituted (31%), which means that fewer than 10% of all possible variants have been identified. Both missense and nonsense mutations in COL4A5 were not randomly distributed but more common at the 70 CpG sequences (pAla substitutions were underrepresented in all three genes (p< 0.0001) probably because of an association with a milder phenotype. The average age at end-stage renal failure was the same for all mutations in COL4A5 (24.4 ±7.8 years), COL4A3 (23.3 ± 9.3) and COL4A4 (25.4 ± 10.3) (COL4A5 and COL4A3, p = 0.45; COL4A5 and COL4A4, p = 0.55; COL4A3 and COL4A4, p = 0.41). For COL4A5, renal failure occurred sooner with non-missense than missense variants (p<0.01). For the COL4A3 and COL4A4 genes, age at renal failure occurred sooner with two non

  5. Phenotypic and genetic characterization of a family carrying two Xq21.1-21.3 interstitial deletions associated with syndromic hearing loss

    OpenAIRE

    Iossa, Sandra; Costa, Valerio; Corvino, Virginia; Auletta, Gennaro; Barruffo, Luigi; Cappellani, Stefania; Ceglia, Carlo; Cennamo, Giovanni; d’Adamo, Adamo Pio; D’Amico, Alessandra; Di Paolo, Nilde; Forte, Raimondo; Gasparini, Paolo; Laria, Carla; Lombardo, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Background Sensorineural hearing impairment is a common pathological manifestation in patients affected by X-linked intellectual disability. A few cases of interstitial deletions at Xq21 with several different phenotypic characteristics have been described, but to date, a complete molecular characterization of the deletions harboring disease-causing genes is still missing. Thus, the aim of this study is to realize a detailed clinical and molecular analysis of a family affected by syndromic X-...

  6. Exclusive expression of MeCP2 in the nervous system distinguishes between brain and peripheral Rett syndrome-like phenotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Ross, Paul D; Guy, Jacky; Selfridge, Jim; Kamal, Bushra; Bahey, Noha; Tanner, Elizabeth; Gillingwater, Thomas H.; Jones, Ross A.; Christopher M Loughrey; McCarroll, Charlotte S.; Mark E S Bailey; Bird, Adrian; Cobb, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Rett Syndrome (RTT) is a severe genetic disorder resulting from mutations in the X-linked MECP2 gene. MeCP2 protein is highly expressed in the nervous system and deficiency in the mouse central nervous system alone recapitulates many features of the disorder. This suggests that RTT is primarily a neurological disorder, although the protein is reportedly widely expressed throughout the body. To determine whether aspects of the RTT phenotype that originate in non-neuronal tissues might have bee...

  7. Analysis of Large Phenotypic Variability of EEC and SHFM4 Syndromes Caused by K193E Mutation of the TP63 Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Jianhua Wei; Yang Xue; Lian Wu; Jie Ma; Xiuli Yi; Junrui Zhang; Bin Lu; Chunying Li; Dashuang Shi; Songtao Shi; Xinghua Feng; Tao Cai

    2012-01-01

    EEC (ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, clefting; OMIM 604292) is an autosomal dominant developmental disorder resulting mainly from pathogenic mutations of the DNA-binding domain (DBD) of the TP63 gene. In this study, we showed that K193E mutation in nine affected individuals of a four-generation kindred with a large degree of phenotypic variability causes four different syndromes or TP63-related disorders: EEC, Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia (EE), isolated ectodermal dysplasia, and isol...

  8. Deletion of protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 4 (PTPN4) in twins with a Rett syndrome-like phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Sarah L; Ellaway, Carolyn J; Peters, Greg B; Pelka, Gregory J; Tam, Patrick P L; Christodoulou, John

    2015-09-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder that predominantly affects females, is primarily caused by variants in MECP2. Variants in other genes such as CDKL5 and FOXG1 are usually associated with individuals who manifest distinct phenotypes that may overlap with RTT. Individuals with phenotypes suggestive of RTT are typically screened for variants in MECP2 and then subsequently the other genes dependent on the specific phenotype. Even with this screening strategy, there are individuals in whom no causative variant can be identified, suggesting that there are other novel genes that contribute to the RTT phenotype. Here we report a de novo deletion of protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 4 (PTPN4) in identical twins with a RTT-like phenotype. We also demonstrate the reduced expression of Ptpn4 in a Mecp2 null mouse model of RTT, as well as the activation of the PTPN4 promoter by MeCP2. Our findings suggest that PTPN4 should be considered for addition to the growing list of genes that warrant screening in individuals with a RTT-like phenotype.

  9. High-resolution mapping of genotype-phenotype relationships in cridu chat syndrome using array comparative genomic hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Snijders, Antoine; Segraves, Richard; Zhang,Xiuqing; Niebuhr, Anita; Albertson, Donna; Yang, Huanming; Gray, Joe; Niebuhr, Erik; Bolund, Lars; Pinkel, Dan

    2007-07-03

    We have used array comparative genomic hybridization to map DNA copy-number changes in 94 patients with cri du chat syndrome who had been carefully evaluated for the presence of the characteristic cry, speech delay, facial dysmorphology, and level of mental retardation (MR). Most subjects had simple deletions involving 5p (67 terminal and 12 interstitial). Genotype-phenotype correlations localized the region associated with the cry to 1.5 Mb in distal 5p15.31, between bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) containing markers D5S2054 and D5S676; speech delay to 3.2 Mb in 5p15.32-15.33, between BACs containing D5S417 and D5S635; and the region associated with facial dysmorphology to 2.4 Mb in 5p15.2-15.31, between BACs containing D5S208 and D5S2887. These results overlap and refine those reported in previous publications. MR depended approximately on the 5p deletion size and location, but there were many cases in which the retardation was disproportionately severe, given the 5p deletion. All 15 of these cases, approximately two-thirds of the severely retarded patients, were found to have copy-number aberrations in addition to the 5p deletion. Restriction of consideration to patients with only 5p deletions clarified the effect of such deletions and suggested the presence of three regions, MRI-III, with differing effect on retardation. Deletions including MRI, a 1.2-Mb region overlapping the previously defined cri du chat critical region but not including MRII and MRIII, produced a moderate level of retardation. Deletions restricted to MRII, located just proximal to MRI, produced a milder level of retardation, whereas deletions restricted to the still-more proximal MRIII produced no discernible phenotype. However, MR increased as deletions that included MRI extended progressively into MRII and MRIII, and MR became profound when all three regions were deleted.

  10. Generational Association Studies of Dopaminergic Genes in Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS Subjects: Selecting Appropriate Phenotypes for Reward Dependence Behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Fornari

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal behaviors involving dopaminergic gene polymorphisms often reflect an insufficiency of usual feelings of satisfaction, or Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS. RDS results from a dysfunction in the “brain reward cascade,” a complex interaction among neurotransmitters (primarily dopaminergic and opioidergic. Individuals with a family history of alcoholism or other addictions may be born with a deficiency in the ability to produce or use these neurotransmitters. Exposure to prolonged periods of stress and alcohol or other substances also can lead to a corruption of the brain reward cascade function. We evaluated the potential association of four variants of dopaminergic candidate genes in RDS (dopamine D1 receptor gene [DRD1]; dopamine D2 receptor gene [DRD2]; dopamine transporter gene [DAT1]; dopamine beta-hydroxylase gene [DBH]. Methodology: We genotyped an experimental group of 55 subjects derived from up to five generations of two independent multiple-affected families compared to rigorously screened control subjects (e.g., N = 30 super controls for DRD2 gene polymorphisms. Data related to RDS behaviors were collected on these subjects plus 13 deceased family members. Results: Among the genotyped family members, the DRD2 Taq1 and the DAT1 10/10 alleles were significantly (at least p < 0.015 more often found in the RDS families vs. controls. The TaqA1 allele occurred in 100% of Family A individuals (N = 32 and 47.8% of Family B subjects (11 of 23. No significant differences were found between the experimental and control positive rates for the other variants. Conclusions: Although our sample size was limited, and linkage analysis is necessary, the results support the putative role of dopaminergic polymorphisms in RDS behaviors. This study shows the importance of a nonspecific RDS phenotype and informs an understanding of how evaluating single subset behaviors of RDS may lead to spurious results. Utilization of a nonspecific

  11. Genetic Syndromes Associated with Craniosynostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jung Min

    2016-05-01

    Craniosynostosis is defined as the premature fusion of one or more of the cranial sutures. It leads not only to secondary distortion of skull shape but to various complications including neurologic, ophthalmic and respiratory dysfunction. Craniosynostosis is very heterogeneous in terms of its causes, presentation, and management. Both environmental factors and genetic factors are associated with development of craniosynostosis. Nonsyndromic craniosynostosis accounts for more than 70% of all cases. Syndromic craniosynostosis with a certain genetic cause is more likely to involve multiple sutures or bilateral coronal sutures. FGFR2, FGFR3, FGFR1, TWIST1 and EFNB1 genes are major causative genes of genetic syndromes associated with craniosynostosis. Although most of syndromic craniosynostosis show autosomal dominant inheritance, approximately half of patients are de novo cases. Apert syndrome, Pfeiffer syndrome, Crouzon syndrome, and Antley-Bixler syndrome are related to mutations in FGFR family (especially in FGFR2), and mutations in FGFRs can be overlapped between different syndromes. Saethre-Chotzen syndrome, Muenke syndrome, and craniofrontonasal syndrome are representative disorders showing isolated coronal suture involvement. Compared to the other types of craniosynostosis, single gene mutations can be more frequently detected, in one-third of coronal synostosis patients. Molecular diagnosis can be helpful to provide adequate genetic counseling and guidance for patients with syndromic craniosynostosis. PMID:27226847

  12. Genetic Syndromes Associated with Craniosynostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jung Min

    2016-05-01

    Craniosynostosis is defined as the premature fusion of one or more of the cranial sutures. It leads not only to secondary distortion of skull shape but to various complications including neurologic, ophthalmic and respiratory dysfunction. Craniosynostosis is very heterogeneous in terms of its causes, presentation, and management. Both environmental factors and genetic factors are associated with development of craniosynostosis. Nonsyndromic craniosynostosis accounts for more than 70% of all cases. Syndromic craniosynostosis with a certain genetic cause is more likely to involve multiple sutures or bilateral coronal sutures. FGFR2, FGFR3, FGFR1, TWIST1 and EFNB1 genes are major causative genes of genetic syndromes associated with craniosynostosis. Although most of syndromic craniosynostosis show autosomal dominant inheritance, approximately half of patients are de novo cases. Apert syndrome, Pfeiffer syndrome, Crouzon syndrome, and Antley-Bixler syndrome are related to mutations in FGFR family (especially in FGFR2), and mutations in FGFRs can be overlapped between different syndromes. Saethre-Chotzen syndrome, Muenke syndrome, and craniofrontonasal syndrome are representative disorders showing isolated coronal suture involvement. Compared to the other types of craniosynostosis, single gene mutations can be more frequently detected, in one-third of coronal synostosis patients. Molecular diagnosis can be helpful to provide adequate genetic counseling and guidance for patients with syndromic craniosynostosis.

  13. Trafficking defect and proteasomal degradation contribute to the phenotype of a novel KCNH2 long QT syndrome mutation.

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    Anton Mihic

    Full Text Available The Kv11.1 (hERG K+ channel plays a fundamental role in cardiac repolarization. Missense mutations in KCNH2, the gene encoding Kv11.1, cause long QT syndrome (LQTS and frequently cause channel trafficking-deficiencies. This study characterized the properties of a novel KCNH2 mutation discovered in a LQT2 patient resuscitated from a ventricular fibrillation arrest. Proband genotyping was performed by SSCP and DNA sequencing. The electrophysiological and biochemical properties of the mutant channel were investigated after expression in HEK293 cells. The proband manifested a QTc of 554 ms prior to electrolyte normalization. Mutation analysis revealed an autosomal dominant frameshift mutation at proline 1086 (P1086fs+32X; 3256InsG. Co-immunoprecipitation demonstrated that wild-type Kv11.1 and mutant channels coassemble. Western blot showed that the mutation did not produce mature complex-glycosylated Kv11.1 channels and coexpression resulted in reduced channel maturation. Electrophysiological recordings revealed mutant channel peak currents to be similar to untransfected cells. Co-expression of channels in a 1∶1 ratio demonstrated dominant negative suppression of peak Kv11.1 currents. Immunocytochemistry confirmed that mutant channels were not present at the plasma membrane. Mutant channel trafficking rescue was attempted by incubation at reduced temperature or with the pharmacological agents E-4031. These treatments did not significantly increase peak mutant currents or induce the formation of mature complex-glycosylated channels. The proteasomal inhibitor lactacystin increased the protein levels of the mutant channels demonstrating proteasomal degradation, but failed to induce mutant Kv11.1 protein trafficking. Our study demonstrates a novel dominant-negative Kv11.1 mutation, which results in degraded non-functional channels leading to a LQT2 phenotype.

  14. Expanding the phenotypic profile of Kleefstra syndrome: A female with low-average intelligence and childhood apraxia of speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samango-Sprouse, Carole; Lawson, Patrick; Sprouse, Courtney; Stapleton, Emily; Sadeghin, Teresa; Gropman, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Kleefstra syndrome (KS) is a rare neurogenetic disorder most commonly caused by deletion in the 9q34.3 chromosomal region and is associated with intellectual disabilities, severe speech delay, and motor planning deficits. To our knowledge, this is the first patient (PQ, a 6-year-old female) with a 9q34.3 deletion who has near normal intelligence, and developmental dyspraxia with childhood apraxia of speech (CAS). At 6, the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Intelligence testing (WPPSI-III) revealed a Verbal IQ of 81 and Performance IQ of 79. The Beery Buktenica Test of Visual Motor Integration, 5th Edition (VMI) indicated severe visual motor deficits: VMI = 51; Visual Perception = 48; Motor Coordination < 45. On the Receptive One Word Picture Vocabulary Test-R (ROWPVT-R), she had standard scores of 96 and 99 in contrast to an Expressive One Word Picture Vocabulary-R (EOWPVT-R) standard scores of 73 and 82, revealing a discrepancy in vocabulary domains on both evaluations. Preschool Language Scale-4 (PLS-4) on PQ's first evaluation reveals a significant difference between auditory comprehension and expressive communication with standard scores of 78 and 57, respectively, further supporting the presence of CAS. This patient's near normal intelligence expands the phenotypic profile as well as the prognosis associated with KS. The identification of CAS in this patient provides a novel explanation for the previously reported speech delay and expressive language disorder. Further research is warranted on the impact of CAS on intelligence and behavioral outcome in KS. Therapeutic and prognostic implications are discussed. PMID:26833960

  15. Of mothers and myelin: Aberrant myelination phenotypes in mouse model of Angelman syndrome are dependent on maternal and dietary influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grier, Mark D; Carson, Robert P; Lagrange, Andre H

    2015-09-15

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by a number of neurological problems, including developmental delay, movement disorders, and epilepsy. AS results from the loss of UBE3A (an imprinted gene) expressed from the maternal chromosome in neurons. Given the ubiquitous expression of Ube3a and the devastating nature of AS, the role of environmental and maternal effects has been largely ignored. Severe ataxia, anxiety-like behaviors and learning deficits are well-documented in patients and AS mice. More recently, clinical imaging studies of AS patients suggest myelination may be delayed or reduced. Utilizing a mouse model of AS, we found disrupted expression of cortical myelin proteins, the magnitude of which is influenced by maternal status, in that the aberrant myelination in the AS pups of AS affected mothers were more pronounced than those seen in AS pups raised by unaffected (Ube3a (m+/p-)) Carrier mothers. Furthermore, feeding the breeding mothers a higher fat (11% vs 5%) diet normalizes these myelin defects. These effects are not limited to myelin proteins. Since AS mice have abnormal stress responses, including altered glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression, we measured GR expression in pups from Carrier and affected AS mothers. AS pups had higher GR expression than their WT littermates. However, we also found an effect of maternal status, with reduced GR levels in pups from affected mothers compared to genotypically identical pups raised by unaffected Carrier mothers. Taken together, our findings suggest that the phenotypes observed in AS mice may be modulated by factors independent of Ube3a genotype. PMID:26028516

  16. Association of a de novo 16q copy number variant with a phenotype that overlaps with Lenz microphthalmia and Townes-Brocks syndromes

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    Johnston Jennifer J

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anophthalmia and microphthalmia are etiologically and clinically heterogeneous. Lenz microphthalmia is a syndromic form that is typically inherited in an X-linked pattern, though the causative gene mutation is unknown. Townes-Brocks syndrome manifests thumb anomalies, imperforate anus, and ear anomalies. We present a 13-year-old boy with a syndromic microphthalmia phenotype and a clinical diagnosis of Lenz microphthalmia syndrome. Case Presentation The patient was subjected to clinical and molecular evaluation, including array CGH analysis. The clinical features included left clinical anophthalmia, right microphthalmia, anteriorly placed anus with fistula, chordee, ventriculoseptal defect, patent ductus arteriosus, posteriorly rotated ears, hypotonia, growth retardation with delayed bone age, and mental retardation. The patient was found to have an approximately 5.6 Mb deletion of 16q11.2q12.1 by microarray based-comparative genomic hybridization, which includes the SALL1 gene, which causes Townes-Brocks syndrome. Conclusions Deletions of 16q11.2q12.2 have been reported in several individuals, although those prior reports did not note microphthalmia or anophthalmia. This region includes SALL1, which causes Townes-Brocks syndrome. In retrospect, this child has a number of features that can be explained by the SALL1 deletion, although it is not clear if the microphthalmia is a rare feature of Townes-Brocks syndrome or caused by other mechanisms. These data suggest that rare copy number changes may be a cause of syndromic microphthalmia allowing a personalized genomic medicine approach to the care of patients with these aberrations.

  17. OCRL-mutated fibroblasts from patients with Dent-2 disease exhibit INPP5B-independent phenotypic variability relatively to Lowe syndrome cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montjean, Rodrick; Aoidi, Rifdat; Desbois, Pierrette; Rucci, Julien; Trichet, Michaël; Salomon, Rémi; Rendu, John; Fauré, Julien; Lunardi, Joël; Gacon, Gérard; Billuart, Pierre; Dorseuil, Olivier

    2015-02-15

    OCRL mutations are associated with both Lowe syndrome and Dent-2 disease, two rare X-linked conditions. Lowe syndrome is an oculo-cerebro-renal disorder, whereas Dent-2 patients mainly present renal proximal tubulopathy. Loss of OCRL-1, a phosphoinositide-5-phosphatase, leads in Lowe patients' fibroblasts to phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) accumulation, with defects in F-actin network, α-actinin distribution and ciliogenesis, whereas fibroblasts of Dent-2 patients are still uncharacterized. To search for mechanisms linked to clinical variability observed between these two OCRL mutation-associated pathologies, we compared dermal fibroblasts from independent patients, four affected by Dent-2 disease and six with Lowe syndrome. For the first time, we describe that Dent-2 fibroblasts with OCRL loss-of-function (LOF) mutations exhibit decrease in actin stress fibers, appearance of punctate α-actinin signals and alteration in primary cilia formation. Interestingly, we quantified these phenotypes as clearly intermediate between Lowe and control fibroblasts, thus suggesting that levels of these defects correlate with clinical variations observed between patients with OCRL mutations. In addition, we show that Lowe and Dent-2 fibroblasts display similar PI(4,5)P2 accumulation levels. Finally, we analyzed INPP5B, a paralogous gene already reported to exhibit functional redundancy with OCRL, and report neither differences in its expression at RNA or protein levels, nor specific allelic variations between fibroblasts of patients. Altogether, we describe here differential phenotypes between fibroblasts from Lowe and Dent-2 patients, both associated with OCRL LOF mutations, we exclude direct roles of PI(4,5)P2 and INPP5B in this phenotypic variability and we underline potential key alterations leading to ocular and neurological clinical features in Lowe syndrome. PMID:25305077

  18. 14q12 microdeletions excluding FOXG1 give rise to a congenital variant Rett syndrome-like phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Ellaway, Carolyn J.; Ho, Gladys; Bettella, Elisa; Knapman, Alisa; Collins, Felicity; Hackett, Anna; McKenzie, Fiona; Darmanian, Artur; Peters, Gregory B.; Fagan, Kerry; Christodoulou, John

    2012-01-01

    Rett syndrome is a clinically defined neurodevelopmental disorder almost exclusively affecting females. Usually sporadic, Rett syndrome is caused by mutations in the X-linked MECP2 gene in ∼90–95% of classic cases and 40–60% of individuals with atypical Rett syndrome. Mutations in the CDKL5 gene have been associated with the early-onset seizure variant of Rett syndrome and mutations in FOXG1 have been associated with the congenital Rett syndrome variant. We report the clinical features and ar...

  19. Identification of a novel nonsense mutation in the FOXP3 gene in a fetus with hydrops--Expanding the phenotype of IPEX syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Sara L; McKay, Eileen M; Moldenhauer, Julie S

    2016-01-01

    IPEX Syndrome is a well-characterized, however rare, autoimmune condition primarily affecting males presenting with neonatal onset of severe diarrhea, diabetes, dermatitis, and other autoimmune symptoms. The gene responsible for this condition, FOXP3, is important in the function of T-regulatory cells which maintain tolerance to self-antigens and are implicated in many autoimmune conditions. While females who carry FOXP3 mutations are typically asymptomatic, pregnancy loss of male fetuses in families with a history of IPEX syndrome has been noted. This loss is likely unrelated to the maternal carrier status, and rather related to pathogenic fetal autoimmunity. Fetal presentation of IPEX Syndrome has been recently reported in two families. Of the two reported probands, one had onset of severe intrauterine growth restriction and the second involved monochorionic diamniotic twins affected with fetal hydrops. Loss of male fetuses was noted in both families. We present a third family who suffered the loss of two male fetuses as a result of fetal hydrops of an unknown etiology. Whole Exome Sequencing on fetal remains following the second loss identified a novel nonsense mutation in the FOXP3 gene, which was inherited from the mother and subsequently confirmed in saved cells from the first pregnancy. These two cases further expand the fetal phenotype of IPEX Syndrome. While rare, IPEX syndrome should be another potential differential when considering the onset of unexplained hydrops in a male fetus. PMID:26395338

  20. 唐氏综合征表型与基因的相关性%Correlation between genes and phenotypes in Down' s syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江美燕; 偶健; 李红

    2013-01-01

    Down' s syndrome results form abnormal meiosis of 21 chromosome and has many kinds of abnormal phenotypes,for example,cognitive impairment,learning disability,mental retardation,congenital heart defect,early onset of Alzeimer' s disease and leukaemia.There are different each phenotypes among Down' s syndrome individuals.That is,not each individual will have all kinds of these abnormal phenotypes,moreover,the severe degree of each phenotype is also various,which may be related to the environment and genetic factors.Therefore,It is important to identify the correlation between genes and phenotyes,which has very important significance for susceptibility gene locating and gene therapy.This article will review the progress in the correlation between genes and phenotypes in patients and animal models with Down' s syndrome.%唐氏综合征(Down’s syndrome,DS)是由于21号染色体的配子减数分裂异常造成的,并且会出现异常的表型,例如,认知损害、学习和记忆能力降低、智力低下、先天性心脏病、早发的阿尔茨海默病以及白血病等.DS个体之间会出现表型的差异,即并不是每个DS患者都会出现所有表型,以及每种表型的严重程度在DS患者之间也是有差异的,这种差异可能与环境、遗传因素有关.因此明确表型和基因的相关性对于致病基因的定位及以后的基因治疗都有着非常重要的意义.现对DS患者以及动物模型的表型和基因相关性研究的进展进行综述.

  1. Third case of 8q23.3-q24.13 deletion in a patient with Langer-Giedion syndrome phenotype without TRPS1 gene deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereza, Nina; Severinski, Srećko; Ostojić, Saša; Volk, Marija; Maver, Aleš; Dekanić, Kristina Baraba; Kapović, Miljenko; Peterlin, Borut

    2012-03-01

    Langer-Giedion syndrome (LGS) is a contiguous gene syndrome caused by a hemizygous deletion on chromosome 8q23.3-q24.11 involving TRPS1 and EXT1 genes. We report on a girl with LGS phenotype and a 7.5 Mb interstitial deletion at chromosome 8q23.3-q24.13. Array-comparative genomic hybridization (a-CGH) revealed a deletion encompassing only the EXT1 and not the TRPS1 gene. Even though the deletion of TRPS1 and EXT1 genes is responsible for craniofacial and skeletal features of LGS, there have been previous reports of patients with LGS phenotype and 8q24 deletions leaving the TRPS1 gene intact. To our knowledge, this is the third such case. Our patient differs from previously reported LGS patients without TRPS1 gene deletion in that she has the typical LGS facial dysmorphism and skeletal abnormalities. However, the girl is of normal height and has only a mild developmental delay. Additionally, she has dyslalia and premature adrenarche classified as Tanner stage 3 premature pubarche which have not yet been described as features of LGS. We examine the molecular breakpoints and phenotypes of our patient and previously reported cases.

  2. Third case of 8q23.3-q24.13 deletion in a patient with Langer-Giedion syndrome phenotype without TRPS1 gene deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereza, Nina; Severinski, Srećko; Ostojić, Saša; Volk, Marija; Maver, Aleš; Dekanić, Kristina Baraba; Kapović, Miljenko; Peterlin, Borut

    2012-03-01

    Langer-Giedion syndrome (LGS) is a contiguous gene syndrome caused by a hemizygous deletion on chromosome 8q23.3-q24.11 involving TRPS1 and EXT1 genes. We report on a girl with LGS phenotype and a 7.5 Mb interstitial deletion at chromosome 8q23.3-q24.13. Array-comparative genomic hybridization (a-CGH) revealed a deletion encompassing only the EXT1 and not the TRPS1 gene. Even though the deletion of TRPS1 and EXT1 genes is responsible for craniofacial and skeletal features of LGS, there have been previous reports of patients with LGS phenotype and 8q24 deletions leaving the TRPS1 gene intact. To our knowledge, this is the third such case. Our patient differs from previously reported LGS patients without TRPS1 gene deletion in that she has the typical LGS facial dysmorphism and skeletal abnormalities. However, the girl is of normal height and has only a mild developmental delay. Additionally, she has dyslalia and premature adrenarche classified as Tanner stage 3 premature pubarche which have not yet been described as features of LGS. We examine the molecular breakpoints and phenotypes of our patient and previously reported cases. PMID:22315192

  3. p63 Gene Mutations in EEC Syndrome, Limb-Mammary Syndrome, and Isolated Split Hand–Split Foot Malformation Suggest a Genotype-Phenotype Correlation

    OpenAIRE

    van Bokhoven, Hans; Hamel, Ben C. J.; Bamshad, Mike; Sangiorgi, Eugenio; Gurrieri, Fiorella; Duijf, Pascal H. G.; Vanmolkot, Kaate R. J.; van Beusekom, Ellen; van Beersum, Sylvia E. C.; Celli, Jacopo; Merkx, Gerard F. M.; Tenconi, Romano; Fryns, Jean Pierre; Verloes, Alain; Newbury-Ecob, Ruth A.

    2001-01-01

    p63 mutations have been associated with EEC syndrome (ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, and cleft lip/palate), as well as with nonsyndromic split hand–split foot malformation (SHFM). We performed p63 mutation analysis in a sample of 43 individuals and families affected with EEC syndrome, in 35 individuals affected with SHFM, and in three families with the EEC-like condition limb-mammary syndrome (LMS), which is characterized by ectrodactyly, cleft palate, and mammary-gland abnormalities. Th...

  4. Digit ratios by computer-assisted analysis confirm lack of anatomical evidence of prenatal androgen exposure in clinical phenotypes of polycystic ovary syndrome

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    Lehotay Denis C

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We recently showed that women with four clinical phenotypes of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS do not demonstrate anatomical evidence of elevated prenatal androgen exposure as judged by a lower ratio of the index (2D to ring (4D finger. However, those findings conflicted with a previous study where women with PCOS had lower right hand 2D:4D compared to healthy female controls. Both these studies used Vernier calipers to measure finger lengths - a method recently shown to be less reliable at obtaining finger length measurements than computer-assisted analysis. Methods Ninety-six women diagnosed with PCOS according to the 2003 Rotterdam criteria had their finger lengths measured with computer-assisted analysis. Participants were categorized into four recognized phenotypes of PCOS and their 2D:4D compared to healthy female controls (n = 48 and men (n = 50. Results Digit ratios assessed by computer-assisted analysis in women with PCOS did not differ from female controls, but were significantly lower in men. When subjects were stratified by PCOS phenotype, 2D:4D did not differ among phenotypes or when compared to female controls. Conclusion Computer-assisted measurements validated that digit ratios of women with PCOS do not show anatomical evidence of increased prenatal androgen exposure.

  5. 1031-1034delTAAC (Leu125Stop: a novel familial UBE3A mutation causing Angelman syndrome in two siblings showing distinct phenotypes

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    De Molfetta Greice Andreotti

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background More than 50 mutations in the UBE3A gene (E6-AP ubiquitin protein ligase gene have been found in Angelman syndrome patients with no deletion, no uniparental disomy, and no imprinting defect. Case Presentation We here describe a novel UBE3A frameshift mutation in two siblings who have inherited it from their asymptomatic mother. Despite carrying the same UBE3A mutation, the proband shows a more severe phenotype whereas his sister shows a milder phenotype presenting the typical AS features. Conclusions We hypothesized that the mutation Leu125Stop causes both severe and milder phenotypes. Potential mechanisms include: i maybe the proband has an additional problem (genetic or environmental besides the UBE3A mutation; ii since the two siblings have different fathers, the UBE3A mutation is interacting with a different genetic variant in the proband that, by itself, does not cause problems but in combination with the UBE3A mutation causes the severe phenotype; iii this UBE3A mutation alone can cause either typical AS or the severe clinical picture seen in the proband.

  6. MICrocephaly, disproportionate pontine and cerebellar hypoplasia syndrome: A clinico-radiologic phenotype linked to calcium/calmodulin-dependent serine protein kinase gene mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashid Saleem

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available MICrocephaly, disproportionate pontine and cerebellar hypoplasia (MICPCH syndrome, a rare X-linked disorder, generally seen in girls, is characterized by neurodevelopmental delay, microcephaly, and disproportionate pontine and cerebellar hypoplasia. It is caused by inactivating calcium/calmodulin-dependent serine protein kinase (CASK gene mutations. We report a 2-year-old girl with severe neurodevelopmental delay, microcephaly, minimal pontine hypoplasia, cerebellar hypoplasia, and normal looking corpus callosum, with whom the conventional cytogenetic studies turned out to be normal, and an array-comparative genomic hybridization (a-CGH analysis showed CASK gene duplication at Xp11.4. Our case highlights the importance of using clinico-radiologic phenotype to guide genetic investigation and it also confirms the role of a-CGH analysis in establishing the genetic diagnosis of MICPCH syndrome, when conventional cytogenetic studies are inconclusive.

  7. Potter syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter phenotype ... In Potter syndrome, the primary problem is kidney failure. The kidneys fail to develop properly as the baby is ... kidneys normally produce the amniotic fluid (as urine). Potter phenotype refers to a typical facial appearance that ...

  8. The emerging microduplication 3q13.31: Expanding the genotype-phenotype correlations of the reciprocal microdeletion 3q13.31 syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervé, B; Fauvert, D; Dard, R; Roume, J; Cognard, S; Goidin, D; Lozach, F; Molina-Gomes, D; Vialard, F

    2016-09-01

    Microdeletion and microduplication syndromes are well-known causes of developmental delay and/or malformations of differing severity. It was recently reported that a microdeletion at the 3q13.31 locus is associated with a new syndrome combining developmental delay, postnatal overgrowth and dysmorphic features. However, the reciprocal microduplication has only been described in a few case reports displaying some clinical features of the microdeletion syndrome. Here, we report on a female infant with a 3.34 Mb microduplication of the 3q13.2q13.31 region inherited from her mother. The infant presented with severe intellectual disability, learning difficulties, intrauterine and postnatal growth retardation and skeletal particularities but no dysmorphic traits. This microduplication encompassed the previously described shortest region of overlap, which contains five genes (DRD3, ZNF80, TIGIT, MIR568 and ZBTB20). We reviewed the phenotypes described in the literature on microduplications and in the well-characterized 3q13.31 microdeletion syndrome. In agreement with the literature data, DRD3 and ZBTB20 appear to be strong candidate genes for neurodevelopmental defects and growth retardation. Lastly, we consider the putative mechanism of this rearrangement, which may involve a particular kind of nonallelic homologous recombination of human endogenous retrovirus elements. PMID:27568866

  9. GAPO syndrome : a new case of this rare syndrome and a review of the relative importance of different phenotypic features in diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bacon, W; Hall, RK; Roset, JP; Boukari, A; Tenenbaum, H; Walter, B

    1999-01-01

    The case of GAPO syndrome reported here is the 24th recorded case, 23 cases having been published previously. The 29-year-old male under discussion presents all the typical features of the syndrome, having short stature, dysmorphic craniofacial features. total alopecia and pseudoanodontia. Orally, t

  10. GENERAL OVERGROWTH IN THE FRAGILE-X SYNDROME - VARIABILITY IN THE PHENOTYPIC-EXPRESSION OF THE FMR1 GENE MUTATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEVRIES, BBA; ROBINSON, H; STOLTEDIJKSTRA, [No Value; GI, CVTP; DIJKSTRA, PF; VANDOOM, J; HALLEY, DJJ; OOSTRA, BA; TURNER, G; NIERMEIJER, MF

    1995-01-01

    The fragile X syndrome, which often presents in childhood with overgrowth, may in some cases show some diagnostic overlap with classical Sotos syndrome. We describe four fragile X patients with general overgrowth, all of whom are from families with other affected relatives who show the classic Marti

  11. Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome: further delineation of the phenotype and management of PTEN mutation-positive cases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, Y.M.; Verhallen, J.T.; Smagt, J.J. van der; Kant, S.; Hilhorst, Y.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Hansson, K.B.; Straaten, P.J. van der; Boutkan, H.; Breuning, M.H.; Vasen, H.F.; Brocker-Vriends, A.H.

    2003-01-01

    Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome (BRRS) is characterised by macrocephaly, intestinal hamartomatous polyps, lipomas, pigmented maculae of the glans penis, developmental delay and mental retardation. The syndrome follows an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. In 1997 reports on two BRRS patien

  12. A new mouse model for marfan syndrome presents phenotypic variability associated with the genetic background and overall levels of Fbn1 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno L Lima

    Full Text Available Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant disease of connective tissue caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 encoding gene FBN1. Patients present cardiovascular, ocular and skeletal manifestations, and although being fully penetrant, MFS is characterized by a wide clinical variability both within and between families. Here we describe a new mouse model of MFS that recapitulates the clinical heterogeneity of the syndrome in humans. Heterozygotes for the mutant Fbn1 allele mgΔloxPneo, carrying the same internal deletion of exons 19-24 as the mgΔ mouse model, present defective microfibrillar deposition, emphysema, deterioration of aortic wall and kyphosis. However, the onset of a clinical phenotypes is earlier in the 129/Sv than in C57BL/6 background, indicating the existence of genetic modifiers of MFS between these two mouse strains. In addition, we characterized a wide clinical variability within the 129/Sv congenic heterozygotes, suggesting involvement of epigenetic factors in disease severity. Finally, we show a strong negative correlation between overall levels of Fbn1 expression and the severity of the phenotypes, corroborating the suggested protective role of normal fibrillin-1 in MFS pathogenesis, and supporting the development of therapies based on increasing Fbn1 expression.

  13. Loss of MeCP2 in Parvalbumin-and Somatostatin-Expressing Neurons in Mice Leads to Distinct Rett Syndrome-like Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito-Ishida, Aya; Ure, Kerstin; Chen, Hongmei; Swann, John W; Zoghbi, Huda Y

    2015-11-18

    Inhibitory neurons are critical for proper brain function, and their dysfunction is implicated in several disorders, including autism, schizophrenia, and Rett syndrome. These neurons are heterogeneous, and it is unclear which subtypes contribute to specific neurological phenotypes. We deleted Mecp2, the mouse homolog of the gene that causes Rett syndrome, from the two most populous subtypes, parvalbumin-positive (PV+) and somatostatin-positive (SOM+) neurons. Loss of MeCP2 partially impairs the affected neuron, allowing us to assess the function of each subtype without profound disruption of neuronal circuitry. We found that mice lacking MeCP2 in either PV+ or SOM+ neurons have distinct, non-overlapping neurological features: mice lacking MeCP2 in PV+ neurons developed motor, sensory, memory, and social deficits, whereas those lacking MeCP2 in SOM+ neurons exhibited seizures and stereotypies. Our findings indicate that PV+ and SOM+ neurons contribute complementary aspects of the Rett phenotype and may have modular roles in regulating specific behaviors.

  14. A novel unstable duplication upstream of HAS2 predisposes to a breed-defining skin phenotype and a periodic fever syndrome in Chinese Shar-Pei dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia Olsson

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary periodic fever syndromes are characterized by recurrent episodes of fever and inflammation with no known pathogenic or autoimmune cause. In humans, several genes have been implicated in this group of diseases, but the majority of cases remain unexplained. A similar periodic fever syndrome is relatively frequent in the Chinese Shar-Pei breed of dogs. In the western world, Shar-Pei have been strongly selected for a distinctive thick and heavily folded skin. In this study, a mutation affecting both these traits was identified. Using genome-wide SNP analysis of Shar-Pei and other breeds, the strongest signal of a breed-specific selective sweep was located on chromosome 13. The same region also harbored the strongest genome-wide association (GWA signal for susceptibility to the periodic fever syndrome (p(raw = 2.3 × 10⁻⁶, p(genome = 0.01. Dense targeted resequencing revealed two partially overlapping duplications, 14.3 Kb and 16.1 Kb in size, unique to Shar-Pei and upstream of the Hyaluronic Acid Synthase 2 (HAS2 gene. HAS2 encodes the rate-limiting enzyme synthesizing hyaluronan (HA, a major component of the skin. HA is up-regulated and accumulates in the thickened skin of Shar-Pei. A high copy number of the 16.1 Kb duplication was associated with an increased expression of HAS2 as well as the periodic fever syndrome (p < 0.0001. When fragmented, HA can act as a trigger of the innate immune system and stimulate sterile fever and inflammation. The strong selection for the skin phenotype therefore appears to enrich for a pleiotropic mutation predisposing these dogs to a periodic fever syndrome. The identification of HA as a major risk factor for this canine disease raises the potential of this glycosaminoglycan as a risk factor for human periodic fevers and as an important driver of chronic inflammation.

  15. CDH3-Related Syndromes: Report on a New Mutation and Overview of the Genotype-Phenotype Correlations

    OpenAIRE

    Basel-Vanagaite, L; Pasmanik-Chor, M.; Lurie, R.; Yeheskel, A.; Kjaer, K W

    2011-01-01

    Hypotrichosis with juvenile macular dystrophy (HJMD) and ectodermal dysplasia, ectrodactyly and macular dystrophy (EEM) are both caused by mutations in the CDH3 gene. In this report, we describe a family with EEM syndrome caused by a novel CDH3 gene mutation and review the mutation spectrum and limb abnormalities in both EEM and HJMD. A protein structure model showing the localization of different mutations causing both syndromes is presented. The CDH3 gene was sequenced and investigation of ...

  16. Using the avian mutant talpid2 as a disease model for understanding the oral-facial phenotypes of oral-facial-digital syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth N. Schock

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Oral-facial-digital syndrome (OFD is a ciliopathy that is characterized by oral-facial abnormalities, including cleft lip and/or palate, broad nasal root, dental anomalies, micrognathia and glossal defects. In addition, these individuals have several other characteristic abnormalities that are typical of a ciliopathy, including polysyndactyly, polycystic kidneys and hypoplasia of the cerebellum. Recently, a subset of OFD cases in humans has been linked to mutations in the centriolar protein C2 Ca2+-dependent domain-containing 3 (C2CD3. Our previous work identified mutations in C2CD3 as the causal genetic lesion for the avian talpid2 mutant. Based on this common genetic etiology, we re-examined the talpid2 mutant biochemically and phenotypically for characteristics of OFD. We found that, as in OFD-affected individuals, protein-protein interactions between C2CD3 and oral-facial-digital syndrome 1 protein (OFD1 are reduced in talpid2 cells. Furthermore, we found that all common phenotypes were conserved between OFD-affected individuals and avian talpid2 mutants. In light of these findings, we utilized the talpid2 model to examine the cellular basis for the oral-facial phenotypes present in OFD. Specifically, we examined the development and differentiation of cranial neural crest cells (CNCCs when C2CD3-dependent ciliogenesis was impaired. Our studies suggest that although disruptions of C2CD3-dependent ciliogenesis do not affect CNCC specification or proliferation, CNCC migration and differentiation are disrupted. Loss of C2CD3-dependent ciliogenesis affects the dispersion and directional persistence of migratory CNCCs. Furthermore, loss of C2CD3-dependent ciliogenesis results in dysmorphic and enlarged CNCC-derived facial cartilages. Thus, these findings suggest that aberrant CNCC migration and differentiation could contribute to the pathology of oral-facial defects in OFD.

  17. The rem mutations in the ATP-binding groove of the Rad3/XPD helicase lead to Xeroderma pigmentosum-Cockayne syndrome-like phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Herrera-Moyano

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The eukaryotic TFIIH complex is involved in Nucleotide Excision Repair and transcription initiation. We analyzed three yeast mutations of the Rad3/XPD helicase of TFIIH known as rem (recombination and mutation phenotypes. We found that, in these mutants, incomplete NER reactions lead to replication fork breaking and the subsequent engagement of the homologous recombination machinery to restore them. Nevertheless, the penetrance varies among mutants, giving rise to a phenotype gradient. Interestingly, the mutations analyzed reside at the ATP-binding groove of Rad3 and in vivo experiments reveal a gain of DNA affinity upon damage of the mutant Rad3 proteins. Since mutations at the ATP-binding groove of XPD in humans are present in the Xeroderma pigmentosum-Cockayne Syndrome (XP-CS, we recreated rem mutations in human cells, and found that these are XP-CS-like. We propose that the balance between the loss of helicase activity and the gain of DNA affinity controls the capacity of TFIIH to open DNA during NER, and its persistence at both DNA lesions and promoters. This conditions NER efficiency and transcription resumption after damage, which in human cells would explain the XP-CS phenotype, opening new perspectives to understand the molecular basis of the role of XPD in human disease.

  18. Identification of a premature stop codon mutation in the PHGDH gene in severe Neu-Laxova syndrome-evidence for phenotypic variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattos, Eduardo P; Silva, André Anjos da; Magalhães, José Antônio A; Leite, Júlio César L; Leistner-Segal, Sandra; Gus-Kessler, Rejane; Perez, Juliano Adams; Vedolin, Leonardo M; Torreblanca-Zanca, Albertina; Lapunzina, Pablo; Ruiz-Perez, Victor L; Sanseverino, Maria Teresa V

    2015-06-01

    In some cases Neu-Laxova syndrome (NLS) is linked to serine deficiency due to mutations in the phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH) gene. We describe the prenatal and postnatal findings in a fetus with one of the most severe NLS phenotypes described so far, caused by a homozygous nonsense mutation of PHGDH. Serial ultrasound (US) and pre- and postnatal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluations were performed. Prenatally, serial US evaluations suggested symmetric growth restriction, microcephaly, hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis, micrognathia, hydrops, shortened limbs, arthrogryposis, and talipes equinovarus. The prenatal MRI confirmed these findings prompting a diagnosis of NLS. After birth, radiological imaging did not detect any gross bone abnormalities. DNA was extracted from fetal and parental peripheral blood, all coding exons of PHGDH were PCR-amplified and subjected to Sanger sequencing. Sequencing of PHGDH identified a homozygous premature stop codon mutation (c.1297C>T; p.Gln433*) in fetal DNA, both parents (first-cousins) being heterozygotes. Based on previous associations of mutations in this gene with a milder NLS phenotype, as well as cases of serine deficiency, these observations lend further support to a genotype-phenotype correlation between the degree of PHGDH inactivation and disease severity. PMID:25913727

  19. A molecular deletion of distal chromosome 4p in two families with a satellited chromosome 4 lacking the Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estabrooks, L L; Lamb, A N; Kirkman, H N; Callanan, N P; Rao, K W

    1992-11-01

    We report two families with a satellited chromosome 4 short arm (4ps). Satellites and stalks normally occur on the short arms of acrocentric chromosomes; however, the literature cites several reports of satellited nonacrocentric chromosomes, which presumably result from a translocation with an acrocentric chromosome. This is the first report of 4ps chromosomes. Our families are remarkable in that both unaffected and affected individuals carry the 4ps chromosome. The phenotypes observed in affected individuals, although dissimilar, were sufficient to encourage a search for a deletion of chromosome 4p. By Southern blot analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization, a deletion of material mapping approximately 150 kb from chromosome 4pter was discovered. This deletion is notable because it does not result in the Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome and can result in an apparently normal phenotype. We speculate that homology between subterminal repeat sequences on 4p and sequences on the acrocentric short arms may explain the origin of the rearrangement and that position effect may play a role in the expression of the abnormal phenotype.

  20. Rescue of the abnormal skeletal phenotype in Ts65Dn Down syndrome mice using genetic and therapeutic modulation of trisomic Dyrk1a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazek, Joshua D; Abeysekera, Irushi; Li, Jiliang; Roper, Randall J

    2015-10-15

    Trisomy 21 causes skeletal alterations in individuals with Down syndrome (DS), but the causative trisomic gene and a therapeutic approach to rescue these abnormalities are unknown. Individuals with DS display skeletal alterations including reduced bone mineral density, modified bone structure and distinctive facial features. Due to peripheral skeletal anomalies and extended longevity, individuals with DS are increasingly more susceptible to bone fractures. Understanding the genetic and developmental origin of DS skeletal abnormalities would facilitate the development of therapies to rescue these and other deficiencies associated with DS. DYRK1A is found in three copies in individuals with DS and Ts65Dn DS mice and has been hypothesized to be involved in many Trisomy 21 phenotypes including skeletal abnormalities. Return of Dyrk1a copy number to normal levels in Ts65Dn mice rescued the appendicular bone abnormalities, suggesting that appropriate levels of DYRK1A expression are critical for the development and maintenance of the DS appendicular skeleton. Therapy using the DYRK1A inhibitor epigallocatechin-3-gallate improved Ts65Dn skeletal phenotypes. These outcomes suggest that the osteopenic phenotype associated with DS may be rescued postnatally by targeting trisomic Dyrk1a. PMID:26206885

  1. Apert Syndrome: Molecularly Confirmed C.758C>G (P.Pro253Arg) in FGFR2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha Gon, Lee, E-mail: leechagon@eulji.ac.kr [Department of Pediatrics, Eulji General Hospital, College of Medicine, Eulji University, 68 Hangeulbiseok-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul 139-711 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-21

    A 5-day-old girl was referred to our clinic for evaluation of congenital malformations. She was identified with a pathogenic mutation c.758C>G (p.Pro253Arg) in FGFR2 gene using targeted exome sequencing. The de novo mutation was confirmed with Sanger sequencing in the patient and her parents. She showed occipital plagiocephaly with frontal bossing (Figure A and B). Skull frontal and lateral radiography revealed fusion of most of the sutures except coronal suture, with convolutional markings (Figure D and E). She had complete cleft palate (Figure C). Her fused bilateral hands showed type II syndactyly with complete syndactyly between the ring and the little fingers (Figure F1-F3). Both toes were simple syndactyly with side-to-side fusion of skin (Figure G1-)

  2. Apert Syndrome: Molecularly Confirmed C.758C>G (P.Pro253Arg) in FGFR2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 5-day-old girl was referred to our clinic for evaluation of congenital malformations. She was identified with a pathogenic mutation c.758C>G (p.Pro253Arg) in FGFR2 gene using targeted exome sequencing. The de novo mutation was confirmed with Sanger sequencing in the patient and her parents. She showed occipital plagiocephaly with frontal bossing (Figure A and B). Skull frontal and lateral radiography revealed fusion of most of the sutures except coronal suture, with convolutional markings (Figure D and E). She had complete cleft palate (Figure C). Her fused bilateral hands showed type II syndactyly with complete syndactyly between the ring and the little fingers (Figure F1-F3). Both toes were simple syndactyly with side-to-side fusion of skin (Figure G1-)

  3. Contribution of G71R mutation to Gilbert’s syndrome phenotype in a Greek patient:A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vassiliki; Kalotychou; Maria; Karakosta; Revekka; Tzanetea; Aleka; Stamoulakatou; Kostas; Konstantopoulos; Yannis; Rombos

    2011-01-01

    Gilbert’s syndrome is characterized by a benign indirect hyperbilirubinemia.It has often been underestimated and undiagnosed because of its mild symptoms;al-though it is not as rare as was once believed when its frequency was estimated using data originating from biochemical tests.Based on molecular techniques,the occurrence of Gilbert’s syndrome has changed,increas-ing to 10% in the Caucasian population.This molecular defect was described,by Bosma et al,in 1995,and af-fects the promoter region of the UGT 1A1 gene.In this case report,our aim is to present a new combination of two molecular defects in a Greek patient with Gilbert’ s syndrome.A 13-year-old Greek girl was examined for Gilbert’s syndrome using molecular techniques,and an uncommon genotype was revealed comprising the rare mutation G71R in trans with A(TA)7TAA motif.TheG71R mutation according to the literature,as well as our epidemiological data,is rare in Caucasians,while it is common in Asian populations.This is the first case study in the Greek population to report a new genotype for Gilbert’s syndrome manifestation in the Caucasian population.

  4. Contribution of G71R mutation to Gilbert's syndrome phenotype in a Greek patient: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalotychou, Vassiliki; Karakosta, Maria; Tzanetea, Revekka; Stamoulakatou, Aleka; Konstantopoulos, Kostas; Rombos, Yannis

    2011-10-01

    Gilbert's syndrome is characterized by a benign indirect hyperbilirubinemia. It has often been underestimated and undiagnosed because of its mild symptoms; although it is not as rare as was once believed when its frequency was estimated using data originating from biochemical tests. Based on molecular techniques, the occurrence of Gilbert's syndrome has changed, increasing to 10% in the Caucasian population. This molecular defect was described, by Bosma et al, in 1995, and affects the promoter region of the UGT 1A1 gene. In this case report, our aim is to present a new combination of two molecular defects in a Greek patient with Gilbert's syndrome. A 13-year-old Greek girl was examined for Gilbert's syndrome using molecular techniques, and an uncommon genotype was revealed comprising the rare mutation G71R in trans with A(TA)7TAA motif. The G71R mutation according to the literature, as well as our epidemiological data, is rare in Caucasians, while it is common in Asian populations. This is the first case study in the Greek population to report a new genotype for Gilbert's syndrome manifestation in the Caucasian population. PMID:22046580

  5. Cenani-Lenz syndrome in father and daughter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Smet, L; De Beer, P; Fryns, J P

    1996-01-01

    We present a father and daughter with typical clinical and radiological features of Cenani-Lenz syndrome. Cenani-Lenz syndrome has been delineated as a type of complete syndactyly resembling the spoon hand seen in Apert syndrome, with as important additional feature, the fusion of metacarpals and disorganization of the phalanges. Based on the observation of the syndrome in at least two affected siblings born to normal parents and the consanguinity in one family autosomal recessive inheritance was proposed. The findings in the present family could indicate that Cenani-Lenz syndrome may be genetically heterogeneous. Another possible explanation could be that the occurrence in affected siblings born to normal parents could be explained by gonadal mosaicism for an autosomal dominant gene.

  6. A case of severe proximal focal femoral deficiency with overlapping phenotypes of Al-Awadi-Raas-Rothschild syndrome and Fuhrmann syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Masaki; Kitoh, Hiroshi; Mishima, Kenichi; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2014-12-01

    Proximal focal femoral deficiency (PFFD) is a heterogeneous disorder characterized by various degrees of femoral deficiencies and associated anomalies of the pelvis and lower limbs. The etiology of the disease has not been determined. We report on a 3-year-old boy with severe PFFD, who showed almost completely absent femora and fibulae, malformed pelvis and ectrodactyly of the left foot. These features were partially overlapped with those of Al-Awadi-Raas-Rothschild syndrome or Fuhrmann syndrome, both of which are caused by WNT7A mutations. Molecular analysis of our case, however, demonstrated no disease-causing mutations in the WNT7A gene. PMID:24839142

  7. Characterization of a 8q21.11 microdeletion syndrome associated with intellectual disability and a recognizable phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Palomares; A. Delicado; E. Mansilla; M.L. de Torres; E. Vallespín; L. Fernandez; V. Martinez-Glez; S. García-Miñaur; J. Nevado; F.S. Simarro; V.L. Ruiz-Perez; S.A. Lynch; F.H. Sharkey; A.C. Thuresson; G. Annerén; E.F. Belligni; M.L. Martínez-Fernández; E. Bermejo; B. Nowakowska; A. Kutkowska-Kazmierczak; E. Bocian; E. Obersztyn; M.L. Martínez-Frías; R.C.M. Hennekam; P. Lapunzina

    2011-01-01

    We report eight unrelated individuals with intellectual disability and overlapping submicroscopic deletions of 8q21.11 (0.66-13.55 Mb in size). The deletion was familial in one and simplex in seven individuals. The phenotype was remarkably similar and consisted of a round face with full cheeks, a hi

  8. De novo heterozygous mutations in SMC3 cause a range of Cornelia de Lange syndrome-overlapping phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gil-Rodríguez, María Concepción; Deardorff, Matthew A; Ansari, Morad;

    2015-01-01

    craniofacial appearance, a milder prenatal growth retardation that worsens in childhood, few congenital heart defects, and an absence of limb deficiencies. While most mutations are unique, two unrelated affected individuals shared the same mutation but presented with different phenotypes. This work confirms...

  9. The phenotype of Floating-Harbor syndrome: Clinical characterization of 52 individuals with mutations in exon 34 of SRCAP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M. Nikkel (Sarah); A. Dauber (Andrew); S. de Munnik (Sonja); M. Connolly (Meghan); R.L. Hood (Rebecca L); O. Caluseriu (Oana); J.A. Hurst (Jane); U. Kini (Usha); M.J.M. Nowaczyk; A. Afenjar (Alexandra); B. Albrecht; J.E. Allanson (Judith E); P. Balestri (Paolo); T. Ben-Omran (Tawfeg); F. Brancati (Fred); I. Cordeiro (Isabel); B.S. Da Cunha (Bruna Santos); P.F. Delaney (Peter); A. Destrée (Anne); D.R. Fitzpatrick (David); F. Forzano (Francesca); N. Ghali (Neeti); G. Gillies (Greta); J. Harwood; Y. Hendriks; D. Héron (Delphine); A. Hoischen (Alex); E.M. Honey (Engela Magdalena); E.H. Hoefsloot (Lies); J. Ibrahim (Jennifer); C. Jacob (Claire); S.G. Kant (Sarina); C.A. Kim (Chong); E.P. Kirk (Edwin P); N.V.A.M. Knoers (Nine); D. Lacombe (Denis); C. van der Lee (Christiaan); I.F.M. Lo (Ivan F M); L.S. Lucas (Luiza S); F. Mari (Francesca); V. Mericq (Veronica); J.S. Moilanen (Jukka S); S.T. Møller (Sanne Traasdahl); S. Moortgat (Stephanie); D.T. Pilz (Daniela); K. Pope (Kate); S. Price (Susan); A. Renieri (Alessandra); J. Sá (Joaquim); J. Schoots (Jeroen); E.L. Silveira (Elizabeth L); M.E.H. Simon (Marleen); A. Slavotinek (Anne); I.K. Temple; I. van der Burgt (Ineke); B.B.A. de Vries (Bert); J.D. Weisfeld-Adams (James D); M.L. Whiteford (Margo L); D. Wierczorek (Dagmar); J.M. Wit (Jan); C.F.O. Yee (Connie Fung On); P. Beaulieu (Patrick); S.M. White (Sue M); B. Bulman; E. Bongers (Ernie); H. Brunner (Han); M. Feingold (Murray); K.M. Boycott (Kym)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Floating-Harbor syndrome (FHS) is a rare condition characterized by short stature, delays in expressive language, and a distinctive facial appearance. Recently, heterozygous truncating mutations in SRCAP were determined to be disease-causing. With the availability of a DNA ba

  10. Coexpression network analysis in abdominal and gluteal adipose tissue reveals regulatory genetic loci for metabolic syndrome and related phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Min, Josine L; Nicholson, George; Halgrimsdottir, Ingileif;

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) is highly prevalent and has considerable public health impact, but its underlying genetic factors remain elusive. To identify gene networks involved in MetS, we conducted whole-genome expression and genotype profiling on abdominal (ABD) and gluteal (GLU) adipose tissue, ...

  11. Shwachman-Diamond syndrome presenting with early ichthyosis, associated dermal and epidermal intracellular lipid droplets, hypoglycemia, and later distinctive clinical SDS phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalais, Emmanuel; Connerotte, Anne-Catherine; Despontin, Karine; Biver, Armand; Ceuterick-de Groote, Chantal; Alders, Marielle; Kolivras, Athanassios; Hachem, Jean-Pierre; De Meirleir, Linda

    2016-07-01

    Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS) is a recessive ribosomopathy, characterized by bone marrow failure and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (ePI) often associated with neurodevelopmental and skeletal abnormalities. The aim of this report is to describe a SDS patient with early ichthyosis associated with dermal and epidermal intracellular lipid droplets (iLDs), hypoglycemia and later a distinctive clinical SDS phenotype. At 3 months of age, she had ichthyosis, growth retardation, and failure to thrive. She had not cytopenia. Ultrasonography (US) showed pancreatic diffuse high echogenicity. Subsequently fasting hypoketotic hypoglycemia occurred without permanent hepatomegaly or hyperlipidemia. Continuous gavage feeding was followed by clinical improvement including ichthyosis and hypoglycemia. After 14 months of age, she developed persistent neutropenia and ePI consistent with SDS. The ichthyotic skin biopsy, performed at 5 months of age, disclosed iLDs in all epidermal layers, in melanocytes, eccrine sweat glands, Schwann cells and dermal fibroblasts. These iLDs were reminiscent of those described in Dorfman-Chanarin syndrome (DCS) or Wolman's disease. Both LIPA and CGI-58 analysis did not revealed pathogenic mutation. By sequencing SBDS, a compound heterozygous for a previously reported gene mutation (c.258 + 2T>C) and a novel mutation (c.284T>G) were found. Defective SBDS may hypothetically interfere as in DCS, with neutral lipid metabolism and play a role in the SDS phenotype such as ichthyosis with dermal and epidermal iLDs and hypoglycemia. This interference with neutral lipid metabolism must most likely occur in the cytoplasm compartment as in DCS and not in the lysosomal compartment as in Wolman's disease. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27127007

  12. Inheritance of balanced translocation t(17; 22) from a Down syndrome mother to a phenotypically normal daughter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X Y; Jiang, Y T; Wang, R X; Luo, L L; Liu, Y H; Liu, R Z

    2015-01-01

    We report that a 30-year-old woman with mental retardation was referred for prenatal diagnoses during pregnancy. An ultrasound scan showed that the heart structure and function of the fetus were normal. Cytogenetic analysis showed that the female karyotype was 47,XX, t(17; 22) (q21; q11), +21. The woman's husband had a normal male karyotype and was phenotypically normal. During this first pregnancy, an amniocentesis, which was done at 19 weeks, revealed that the fetal karyotype was 46,XX, t(17; 22) (q21; q11). Fluorescence in situ hybridization testing of amniotic fluid gave a normal result for chromosome 21. The child was a phenotypically normal female baby. PMID:26345964

  13. High proportion of large genomic deletions and a genotype phenotype update in 80 unrelated families with juvenile polyposis syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aretz, S; Stienen, D; Uhlhaas, S;

    2007-01-01

    suspected to have JPS. RESULTS: By direct sequencing of the two genes, point mutations were identified in 30 patients (46% of typical JPS). Using MLPA, large genomic deletions were found in 14% of all patients with typical JPS (six deletions in SMAD4 and three deletions in BMPR1A). Mutation analysis...... polyposis, gastric cancer, and HHT was identified, which should have implications for counselling and surveillance. Histopathological results in hamartomatous polyposis syndromes must be critically interpreted. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Nov...

  14. An analysis of phenotypic variation in the familial cancer syndrome von Hippel-Lindau disease: evidence for modifier effects.

    OpenAIRE

    Webster, A. R.; Richards, F. M.; MacRonald, F E; Moore, A T; Maher, E. R.

    1998-01-01

    von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL) is a dominantly inherited familial cancer syndrome predisposing to ocular and CNS hemangioblastomas, renal-cell carcinoma (RCC), and pheochromocytoma. Both interfamilial and intrafamilial variability in expression is well recognized. Interfamilial differences in pheochromocytoma susceptibility have been attributed to allelic heterogeneity such that specific missense germ-line mutations confer a high risk for this complication. However, in most cases, tumor susc...

  15. A Cross-Sectional Study of the Phenotypes of Obesity and Insulin Resistance in Adults with Down Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Diego Real de Asua; Pedro Parra; Ramón Costa; Fernando Moldenhauer; Carmen Suarez

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the confluence of multiple cardiovascular risk factors, subclinical atherosclerotic damage and cardiovascular events remain extremely rare in adults with Down syndrome (DS). We aim to determine the prevalence of obesity and metabolic disorders in an adult cohort with DS and to compare our findings with adults without DS. Methods Cross-sectional study of 51 consecutively selected adults with DS living in the community and 51 healthy controls in an outpatient clinic of a tert...

  16. Combined Pulmonary Fibrosis and Emphysema Syndrome: A New Phenotype within the Spectrum of Smoking-Related Interstitial Lung Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Karina Portillo; Josep Morera

    2012-01-01

    Combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE) is a recently defined syndrome, in which centrilobular and/or paraseptal emphysemas in upper lung zones coexist with pulmonary fibrosis in lower lobes in individuals. These patients have a characteristic lung function profile, with unexpected subnormal dynamic and static lung volumes, contrasting with a significant reduction of carbon monoxide transfer (DLco) and exercise hypoxemia. Pulmonary hypertension is highly prevalent in CPFE and is the ...

  17. Whole blood microarray analysis of pigs showing extreme phenotypes after a porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Schroyen, Martine; Steibel, Juan P.; Koltes, James E.; Choi, Igseo; Raney, Nancy E.; Eisley, Christopher; Fritz-Waters, Eric; Reecy, James M.; Dekkers, Jack C M; Rowland, Robert R. R.; Lunney, Joan K.; Catherine W Ernst; Christopher K Tuggle

    2015-01-01

    Background The presence of variability in the response of pigs to Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome virus (PRRSv) infection, and recent demonstration of significant genetic control of such responses, leads us to believe that selection towards more disease resistant pigs could be a valid strategy to reduce its economic impact on the swine industry. To find underlying molecular differences in PRRS susceptible versus more resistant pigs, 100 animals with extremely different growth ra...

  18. Investigation of the behavioural phenotype of a mouse model of Williams-Beuren Syndrome (Gtf2ird1)

    OpenAIRE

    Skitt, Zara

    2013-01-01

    Williams-beuren syndrome (WBS) is caused by a deletion of ~25 genes and is characterised by cardiovascular dysfunction, an uneven cognitive profile and a hypersocial personality. Studies with partial deletion patients suggest that hemizygosity of less than half of the genes within the critical region are sufficient to cause WBS. One of these genes, GTF2IRD1, is thought to be an important contributor to the cognitive and behavioural deficits, as well as the craniofacial morphology associated w...

  19. Prenatal Diagnosis of Arthrogryposis as a Phenotype of Pena-Shokeir Syndrome using Two- and Three-dimensional Ultrasonography

    OpenAIRE

    Eduardo Felix Martins Santana; Priscila Nogueira Oliveira Serni; Liliam Cristine Rolo; Edward Araujo Júnior

    2014-01-01

    Pena-Shokeir syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disease, characterized by facial anomalies, arthrogryposis, polyhydramnios, fetal growth restriction, and pulmonary hypoplasia. This report describes the findings of this anomaly with two and three-dimensional ultrasound in a female in her 28 th week of pregnancy, who was referred to us because the fetus presented arthrogryposis of unknown cause. These imaging methods allowed adequate evaluation of the fetal malformations and also enabled ap...

  20. Prenatal Diagnosis of Arthrogryposis as a Phenotype of Pena-Shokeir Syndrome using Two- and Three-dimensional Ultrasonography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Felix Martins Santana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pena-Shokeir syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disease, characterized by facial anomalies, arthrogryposis, polyhydramnios, fetal growth restriction, and pulmonary hypoplasia. This report describes the findings of this anomaly with two and three-dimensional ultrasound in a female in her 28 th week of pregnancy, who was referred to us because the fetus presented arthrogryposis of unknown cause. These imaging methods allowed adequate evaluation of the fetal malformations and also enabled appropriate counseling of the couple.

  1. miR-199a Links MeCP2 with mTOR Signaling and Its Dysregulation Leads to Rett Syndrome Phenotypes

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    Keita Tsujimura

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Rett syndrome (RTT is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by MECP2 mutations. Although emerging evidence suggests that MeCP2 deficiency is associated with dysregulation of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR, which functions as a hub for various signaling pathways, the mechanism underlying this association and the molecular pathophysiology of RTT remain elusive. We show here that MeCP2 promotes the posttranscriptional processing of particular microRNAs (miRNAs as a component of the microprocessor Drosha complex. Among the MeCP2-regulated miRNAs, we found that miR-199a positively controls mTOR signaling by targeting inhibitors for mTOR signaling. miR-199a and its targets have opposite effects on mTOR activity, ameliorating and inducing RTT neuronal phenotypes, respectively. Furthermore, genetic deletion of miR-199a-2 led to a reduction of mTOR activity in the brain and recapitulated numerous RTT phenotypes in mice. Together, these findings establish miR-199a as a critical downstream target of MeCP2 in RTT pathogenesis by linking MeCP2 with mTOR signaling.

  2. Phenotypic variability in Waardenburg syndrome resulting from a 22q12.3-q13.1 microdeletion involving SOX10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelena, Brezo; Christina, Lam; Eric, Vilain; Fabiola, Quintero-Rivera

    2014-06-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a neurocristopathy characterized by pigmentation abnormalities of the skin, hair, and iris, as well as sensorineural hearing loss. Contiguous gene deletions encompassing SOX10 are rare, which limits conclusions about genotype-phenotype correlation regarding patient prognosis and management. This study adds to the existing body of knowledge by characterizing a 2.4 Mb deletion [arr[hg19] 22q12.3-q13.1 (36467502-38878207)x1] encompassing SOX10 and 53 additional RefSeq genes in a 15-year-old female with atypical WS. The patient presented with developmental delay, profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, heterochromia iridis, hypotonia, and bilateral finger contractures. Published genomic and phenotypic profiles of patients with SOX10-encompassing deletions point toward several plausible candidate gene that could account for the considerable clinical heterogeneity. These studies suggest the existence of modifiers among the co-deleted, dosage-sensitive genes (e.g., MYH9) and among genes whose effect may depend on the unmasking of recessive mutations (e.g., PLA2G6). Finally, we highlight evidence illustrating extensive interconnectivity of SOX10-hypothesizing that haploinsufficiency of SOX10 may "unmask" subtler effects on expression or epistasis associated with variants in SOX10 targets (e.g., DHH), in its partners (e.g., PAX3, EGR2), and in genes with functional overlap (e.g., SOX8, SOX9). PMID:24715709

  3. Homozygosity for the V377I mutation in mevalonate kinase causes distinct clinical phenotypes in two sibs with hyperimmunoglobulinaemia D and periodic fever syndrome (HIDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messer, Laurent; Alsaleh, Ghada; Georgel, Philippe; Carapito, Raphael; Waterham, Hans R; Dali-Youcef, Nassim; Bahram, Siamak; Sibilia, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Objective Mevalonate kinase (MVK) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive auto-inflammatory disorder characterised by recurring episodes of fever associated with multiple non-specific inflammatory symptoms and caused by mutations in the MVK gene. The phenotypic spectrum is wide and depends mostly on the nature of the mutations. Hyperimmunoglobulinaemia D and periodic fever syndrome (HIDS) is a relatively mild presentation and predominantly associated with a c.1129G>A (p.V377I) mutation in the MVK gene. We report cases of two sisters homozygous for this mutation but exhibiting distinct (symptomatic vs asymptomatic) phenotypes. Methods Patient history was obtained; physical and clinical examination and laboratory tests were performed; lipopolysaccharide (LPS) response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells was quantified. Results Low MVK enzymatic activity is not necessarily associated with inflammatory symptoms. Increased inflammatory cytokine secretion in response to LPS is associated with symptomatic MVK deficiency. Conclusions Individuals who are homozygous for the common p.V377I mutation in the MVK gene may not display the characteristic inflammatory episodes diagnostic of MKD and thus may be lost for correct and timely diagnosis. PMID:26977311

  4. The Fras1/Frem family of extracellular matrix proteins: structure, function, and association with Fraser syndrome and the mouse bleb phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrou, Petros; Makrygiannis, Apostolos K; Chalepakis, Georges

    2008-01-01

    Fras1 and the structurally related proteins Frem1, Frem2, and Frem3, comprise a novel family of extracellular matrix proteins, which localize in a similar fashion underneath the lamina densa of epithelial basement membranes. They are involved in the structural adhesion of the skin epithelium to its underlying mesenchyme. Deficiency in the individual murine Fras1/Frem genes gives rise to the bleb phenotype, which is equivalent to the human hereditary disorder Fraser syndrome, characterized by cryptophthalmos (hidden eyes), embryonic skin blistering, renal agenesis, and syndactyly. Recent studies revealed a functional cooperation between the Fras1/Frem gene products, in which Fras1, Frem1 and Frem2 are simultaneously stabilized at the lowermost region of the basement membrane by forming a macromolecular ternary complex. Loss of any of these proteins results in the collapse of the protein assembly, thus providing a molecular explanation for the highly similar phenotypic defects displayed by the respective mutant mice. Here, we summarize the current knowledge regarding the structure, function, and interplay between the proteins of the Fras1/Frem family and further propose a possible scenario for the evolution of the corresponding genes.

  5. Ten new cases further delineate the syndromic intellectual disability phenotype caused by mutations in DYRK1A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronicki, Lucas M; Redin, Claire; Drunat, Severine; Piton, Amélie; Lyons, Michael; Passemard, Sandrine; Baumann, Clarisse; Faivre, Laurence; Thevenon, Julien; Rivière, Jean-Baptiste; Isidor, Bertrand; Gan, Grace; Francannet, Christine; Willems, Marjolaine; Gunel, Murat; Jones, Julie R; Gleeson, Joseph G; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Stevenson, Roger E; Friez, Michael J; Aylsworth, Arthur S

    2015-11-01

    The dual-specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A) gene, located on chromosome 21q22.13 within the Down syndrome critical region, has been implicated in syndromic intellectual disability associated with Down syndrome and autism. DYRK1A has a critical role in brain growth and development primarily by regulating cell proliferation, neurogenesis, neuronal plasticity and survival. Several patients have been reported with chromosome 21 aberrations such as partial monosomy, involving multiple genes including DYRK1A. In addition, seven other individuals have been described with chromosomal rearrangements, intragenic deletions or truncating mutations that disrupt specifically DYRK1A. Most of these patients have microcephaly and all have significant intellectual disability. In the present study, we report 10 unrelated individuals with DYRK1A-associated intellectual disability (ID) who display a recurrent pattern of clinical manifestations including primary or acquired microcephaly, ID ranging from mild to severe, speech delay or absence, seizures, autism, motor delay, deep-set eyes, poor feeding and poor weight gain. We identified unique truncating and non-synonymous mutations (three nonsense, four frameshift and two missense) in DYRK1A in nine patients and a large chromosomal deletion that encompassed DYRK1A in one patient. On the basis of increasing identification of mutations in DYRK1A, we suggest that this gene be considered potentially causative in patients presenting with ID, primary or acquired microcephaly, feeding problems and absent or delayed speech with or without seizures. PMID:25920557

  6. Upregulation of Haploinsufficient Gene Expression in the Brain by Targeting a Long Non-coding RNA Improves Seizure Phenotype in a Model of Dravet Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hsiao

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Dravet syndrome is a devastating genetic brain disorder caused by heterozygous loss-of-function mutation in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene SCN1A. There are currently no treatments, but the upregulation of SCN1A healthy allele represents an appealing therapeutic strategy. In this study we identified a novel, evolutionary conserved mechanism controlling the expression of SCN1A that is mediated by an antisense non-coding RNA (SCN1ANAT. Using oligonucleotide-based compounds (AntagoNATs targeting SCN1ANAT we were able to induce specific upregulation of SCN1A both in vitro and in vivo, in the brain of Dravet knock-in mouse model and a non-human primate. AntagoNAT-mediated upregulation of Scn1a in postnatal Dravet mice led to significant improvements in seizure phenotype and excitability of hippocampal interneurons. These results further elucidate the pathophysiology of Dravet syndrome and outline a possible new approach for the treatment of this and other genetic disorders with similar etiology.

  7. The new total Western diet for rodents does not induce an overweight phenotype or alter parameters of metabolic syndrome in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsanto, Stephany P; Hintze, Korry J; Ward, Robert E; Larson, Deanna P; Lefevre, Michael; Benninghoff, Abby D

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we determined the impact of the total Western diet (TWD) for rodents and its macro- and micronutrient components on weight gain and biomarkers of metabolic function in mice compared to a 45% fat diet-induced obesity (DIO) diet and the standard AIN93G diet. We hypothesized that mice fed the TWD would have increased body fat with indicators of metabolic syndrome similar to mice consuming the DIO diet. As expected, DIO-fed mice acquired a metabolic syndrome phenotype typified by increased energy intake, increased body weight gain, increased fat mass, higher fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, and higher plasma leptin relative to the AIN93G diet. Mice fed a macronutrient-modified (MM) diet (with standard vitamin and mineral composition) had a similar response, albeit to a lesser degree than mice fed the DIO diet. Mice fed a vitamin- and mineral-modified diet (with standard macronutrient composition) were not different from mice fed the AIN93G diet. Surprisingly, the TWD (with modified macronutrients, vitamins and minerals) did not significantly affect any of these parameters, despite the fact that the TWD macronutrient profile was identical to the MM diet. These data suggest that, in the context of the TWD, vitamin and mineral intakes in mice that reflect a Western dietary pattern inhibit the hyperphagia and resulting increased weight gain associated with the higher fat content of the TWD. In conclusion, these observations underscore the need to consider the influence of micronutrient intakes in pre-clinical models of obesity and metabolic syndrome. PMID:27632924

  8. The new total Western diet for rodents does not induce an overweight phenotype or alter parameters of metabolic syndrome in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsanto, Stephany P; Hintze, Korry J; Ward, Robert E; Larson, Deanna P; Lefevre, Michael; Benninghoff, Abby D

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we determined the impact of the total Western diet (TWD) for rodents and its macro- and micronutrient components on weight gain and biomarkers of metabolic function in mice compared to a 45% fat diet-induced obesity (DIO) diet and the standard AIN93G diet. We hypothesized that mice fed the TWD would have increased body fat with indicators of metabolic syndrome similar to mice consuming the DIO diet. As expected, DIO-fed mice acquired a metabolic syndrome phenotype typified by increased energy intake, increased body weight gain, increased fat mass, higher fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, and higher plasma leptin relative to the AIN93G diet. Mice fed a macronutrient-modified (MM) diet (with standard vitamin and mineral composition) had a similar response, albeit to a lesser degree than mice fed the DIO diet. Mice fed a vitamin- and mineral-modified diet (with standard macronutrient composition) were not different from mice fed the AIN93G diet. Surprisingly, the TWD (with modified macronutrients, vitamins and minerals) did not significantly affect any of these parameters, despite the fact that the TWD macronutrient profile was identical to the MM diet. These data suggest that, in the context of the TWD, vitamin and mineral intakes in mice that reflect a Western dietary pattern inhibit the hyperphagia and resulting increased weight gain associated with the higher fat content of the TWD. In conclusion, these observations underscore the need to consider the influence of micronutrient intakes in pre-clinical models of obesity and metabolic syndrome.

  9. Membrane frizzled-related protein gene–related ophthalmological syndrome: 30-month follow-up of a sporadic case and review of genotype-phenotype correlation in the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaci, Rosachiara; Zenteno, Juan C.; Casubolo, Cristina; Delfini, Elisabetta; Macaluso, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To report a new sporadic case of membrane frizzled-related protein gene (MFRP)-related syndrome with a 30-month follow-up, and to review the literature for genotype-phenotype correlation in MFRP mutations. Methods A complete ophthalmological evaluation was performed at presentation and 30 months later, including best-corrected visual acuity test, slit lamp examination, fundoscopy, kinetic perimetry, electroretinography, fundus imaging (color, red-free, and autofluorescence), and morphologic-biometric analysis of the eye structures with an optical biometer, anterior-segment optical coherence tomography, retinal optical coherence tomography, and a confocal scanning laser for optic nerve head study. Polymerase chain reaction amplification of DNA obtained from peripheral blood lymphocytes and nucleotide sequencing of the complete MFRP gene were performed. The literature on cases of posterior microphthalmos and retinitis pigmentosa associated with MFRP mutations was reviewed. Results A 33-year-old female patient presented with posterior microphthalmos, retinitis pigmentosa with patches of retinal pigmented epithelium atrophy and scarce pigment mobilization, foveoschisis, and optic nerve drusen. After 30 months, progression of rod-cone retinal degeneration was detected. One obligate carrier showed a normal eye phenotype. A homozygote mutation in the MFRP gene (c.492delC), predicting a truncated protein (P166fsX190), was identified with genetic analysis. To our knowledge, 17 cases of MFRP-related syndrome have been reported in the literature, including the patient described herein. The phenotype of the syndrome, expressivity, and age of onset varied among and within the affected families. However, all patients sharing homozygous mutation c.492delC (alternatively named c.498delC) showed a complete phenotype (including foveoschisis and optic nerve head drusen), and similar fundus characteristics. Conclusions A new sporadic case of MFRP-related syndrome is reported

  10. Spontaneous ruptured dissection of the right common iliac artery in a patient with classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, Rick; Tinkle, Brad T; Halandras, Pegge M; Al-Nouri, Omar; Crisostomo, Paul; Cho, Jae S

    2015-04-01

    Unlike vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), classic EDS is rarely associated with vascular manifestation. We report the case of a 39-year-old man who presented with acute abdominal pain. At the time of presentation, the patient was in hypovolemic shock, and computed tomography angiogram demonstrated common iliac artery dissection with rupture. He underwent an attempted endovascular repair that was converted to an open repair of a ruptured right common iliac artery dissection. Subsequent genetic testing revealed a substitution of arginine for cysteine in type I collagen, COL1A1 exon 14 c.934C>T mutation, consistent with a rare variant of classic EDS. PMID:25597651

  11. A Cross-Sectional Study of the Phenotypes of Obesity and Insulin Resistance in Adults with Down Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Real de Asua

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundDespite the confluence of multiple cardiovascular risk factors, subclinical atherosclerotic damage and cardiovascular events remain extremely rare in adults with Down syndrome (DS. We aim to determine the prevalence of obesity and metabolic disorders in an adult cohort with DS and to compare our findings with adults without DS.MethodsCross-sectional study of 51 consecutively selected adults with DS living in the community and 51 healthy controls in an outpatient clinic of a tertiary care hospital in Madrid, Spain. Epidemiological data (age and gender, anthropometric data (body mass index and waist-to-height ratio, coexisting clinical conditions, and laboratory data (fasting glucose, insulin, glycated hemoglobin, creatinine, thyroid hormones, vitamins, and lipid profile were measured and compared between the groups.ResultsAdults with DS were significantly younger and more often men with a higher prevalence of overweight and obesity than controls. Their waist-to-height ratio was higher, and they more frequently had abdominal obesity. The results of an analysis adjusted for age and gender revealed no differences in fasting insulin levels, homeostatic model assessment indexes, or lipid profile between adults with DS and controls.ConclusionAdults with DS presented a high prevalence of overweight and obesity. However, we found no differences in lipid profile, prevalence of insulin resistance, or metabolic syndrome between adults with DS and controls.

  12. Comparison of periodontal parameters in individuals with syndromic craniosynostosis

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    Paula Simões Múfalo

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Craniosynostosis syndromes are characterized by premature closure of one or more cranial sutures, associated with other malformations, the most frequent of which are the Crouzon and Apert syndromes. Few studies in the literature have addressed the oral health of these individuals. The purpose of this study was to compare the periodontal status of individuals with Apert, Crouzon, Pfeiffer and Saethre-Chotzen syndromes before toothbrushing and compare the efficiency of plaque removal before and after mechanical toothbrushing. The probing depth, plaque index (according to Löe and O'Leary, clinical attachment level, gingival index (according to Silness and Löe and amount of keratinized mucosa were evaluated before toothbrushing, and the O'Leary plaque index was assessed before and immediately after toothbrushing, on the same day, in 27 individuals aged 11 to 36 years. There was statistically significant difference in the mean probing depth and clinical attachment level among regions (p=0.00; p=0.01, respectively. The gingival index did not reveal statistically significant differences. With regard to the plaque index, the left region exhibited higher plaque index values than the right and anterior regions. No significant results were found in the analysis of keratinized mucosa. Comparison of the O'Leary plaque index before and after toothbrushing revealed statistically significant difference for all syndromes except for the Pfeiffer syndrome (p<0.05. In conclusion, there was no difference in the periodontal status among individuals with syndromic craniosynostosis. The posterior region was more affected than the anterior region as to the presence of plaque, loss of insertion and probing depth. Individuals with Pfeiffer syndrome exhibited greater toothbrushing efficiency than individuals with the other craniosynostosis syndromes.

  13. Characterization of isolates of Flavobacterium psychrophilum associated with coldwater disease or rainbow trout fry syndrome I : phenotypic and genomic studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Ellen; Dalsgaard, Inger; Bernardet, Jean-Francois

    1997-01-01

    characteristics, and compared with previously characterized French and American strains. DNA hybridization studies showed that the Danish isolates were highly related to the type strain, F. psychrophilum NCIMB 1947(T). Plasmid profiling of Danish isolates and those from other European countries revealed...... differences, which might be related to differences in pathogenicity. European isolates originating from clinical outbreaks of either RTFS or CND usually harboured one plasmid of 3.2 kb, whereas isolates originating from fish with different or no disease signs had other profiles. Phenotypically, the Danish...... isolates appeared very homogeneous and shared most characteristics with the type strain, and with French and American strains studied by other authors. Further studies on the importance of the plasmids and the proteolytic activities of the bacterium might help in elucidating possible virulence factors....

  14. Combined Pulmonary Fibrosis and Emphysema Syndrome: A New Phenotype within the Spectrum of Smoking-Related Interstitial Lung Disease

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    Karina Portillo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE is a recently defined syndrome, in which centrilobular and/or paraseptal emphysemas in upper lung zones coexist with pulmonary fibrosis in lower lobes in individuals. These patients have a characteristic lung function profile, with unexpected subnormal dynamic and static lung volumes, contrasting with a significant reduction of carbon monoxide transfer (DLco and exercise hypoxemia. Pulmonary hypertension is highly prevalent in CPFE and is the leading determinant of death. Tobacco smoking has been proposed as the main factor in its etiology, though the pathophysiology and its natural history remain to be determined. High-resolution computed axial tomography is the mandatory tool to confirm the diagnosis. Currently, there is no consensus about its treatment since those published to date on this issue are limited to well-characterised series of cases; hence, a better understanding of this entity may help in the development of future therapeutic approaches.

  15. Stickler syndrome caused by COL2A1 mutations: genotype-phenotype correlation in a series of 100 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoornaert, Kristien P; Vereecke, Inge; Dewinter, Chantal;

    2010-01-01

    COL2A1. In 188 probands with the clinical diagnosis of Stickler syndrome, the COL2A1 gene was analyzed by either a mutation scanning technique or bidirectional fluorescent DNA sequencing. The effect of splice site alterations was investigated by analyzing mRNA. Multiplex ligation......-dependent amplification analysis was used for the detection of intragenic deletions. We identified 77 different COL2A1 mutations in 100 affected individuals. Analysis of the splice site mutations showed unusual RNA isoforms, most of which contained a premature stop codon. Vitreous anomalies and retinal detachments were...... found more frequently in patients with a COL2A1 mutation compared with the mutation-negative group (P90% of the mutations were predicted to result in nonsense-mediated decay. On the basis of binary regression analysis, we developed a scoring system that may be useful when evaluating patients with...

  16. Stickler syndrome caused by COL2A1 mutations: genotype-phenotype correlation in a series of 100 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoornaert, Kristien P; Vereecke, Inge; Dewinter, Chantal;

    2010-01-01

    in COL2A1. In 188 probands with the clinical diagnosis of Stickler syndrome, the COL2A1 gene was analyzed by either a mutation scanning technique or bidirectional fluorescent DNA sequencing. The effect of splice site alterations was investigated by analyzing mRNA. Multiplex ligation......-dependent amplification analysis was used for the detection of intragenic deletions. We identified 77 different COL2A1 mutations in 100 affected individuals. Analysis of the splice site mutations showed unusual RNA isoforms, most of which contained a premature stop codon. Vitreous anomalies and retinal detachments were...... found more frequently in patients with a COL2A1 mutation compared with the mutation-negative group (P90% of the mutations were predicted to result in nonsense-mediated decay. On the basis of binary regression analysis, we developed a scoring system that may be useful when evaluating patients...

  17. Clinical phenotype study of Prader-Willi syndrome in 13 neonates%新生儿Prader-Willi综合征13例临床表型分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    詹实娜; 何玺玉; 王春枝; 杨尧; 王艳; 吴虹林; 李昊

    2012-01-01

    目的 分析Prader-Willi综合征(PWS)新生儿期的临床表现,为临床早期筛选及进一步行分子诊断提供帮助.方法 回顾性分析2009年8月至2011年8月在北京军区总医院附属八一儿童医院依据MS-PCR和MS-MLPA方法确诊为PWS患儿的诊断、分型和临床表型资料,分析中国PWS新生儿期典型特征.结果 13例PWS进入分析,男9例,女4例,确诊年龄4~28 d.足月儿10例,早产儿2例,过期产儿1例.孕母高龄9例(69.2%),羊水污染8例(61.5%),羊水过多3例(23.1%),胎膜早破5例(38.5%),异常胎位4例(30.8%),宫内窘迫9例(69.2%).9例为父源性15q11.2-q13区域缺失致病,4例为母源性同源二倍体.4例母源性同源二倍体患儿均可见中枢性肌张力低下和皮肤色素减退,吸吮缓慢2例(50.0%)、哭声微弱3例(75.0%)、男性隐睾1例(25.0%)、女性小阴唇3例(75.0%);均未见特殊面容和唾液黏稠,均不需特殊喂养.9例父源性15q11.2-q13区域缺失患儿均可见中枢性肌张力低下、皮肤色素减退和哭声微弱,吸吮缓慢2例(22.2%)、需特殊喂养7例(77.8%)、特殊面容5例(55.6%)、男性隐睾7例(77.8%)、阴茎短小4例(44.4%)、女性小阴唇1例(11.1%)、唾液黏稠5例(55.6%).结论 母源性同源二倍体患儿的特殊面容和男性生殖器发育不全的发生率低于父源性15q11.2-q13区域缺失患儿.新生儿期皮肤色素减退及中枢性肌张力低下是中国PWS新生儿普遍存在的特征,可作为进一步行PWS分子诊断的初步筛选指标.%Objective To summarize the clinical phenotype charateristics of Prader-Willi syndrome in neonates for screening earlier and making further molecular genetic diagnosis for appropriate patients. Methods The data from thirteen Prader-Willi syndrome neonates that had been definitely diagnosed with molecular biological methods from August 2009 to August 2011 were collected retrospectively. For each patient, the presence or absence of the major and minor features

  18. Absence of family history and phenotype-genotype correlation in pediatric Brugada syndrome: more burden to bear in clinical and genetic diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daimi, Houria; Khelil, Amel Haj; Ben Hamda, Khaldoun; Aranega, Amelia; Chibani, Jemni B E; Franco, Diego

    2015-06-01

    Brugada syndrome (BrS) is an autosomal-dominant genetic cardiac disorder caused in 18-30 % of the cases by SCN5A gene mutations and manifested by an atypical right bundle block pattern with ST segment elevation and T wave inversion in the right precordial leads. The syndrome is usually detected after puberty. The identification of BrS in pediatric patients is thus a rare occurrence, and most of the reported cases are unmasked after febrile episodes. Usually, having a family history of sudden death represents the first reason to perform an ECG in febrile children. However, this practice makes the sporadic cases of cardiac disease and specially the asymptomatic ones excluded from this diagnosis. Here, we report a sporadic case of a 2-month-old male patient presented with vaccination-related fever and ventricular tachycardia associated with short breathing, palpitation and cold sweating. ECG changes were consistent with type 1 BrS. SCN5A gene analysis of the proband and his family revealed a set of mutations and polymorphisms differentially distributed among family members, however, without any clear genotype-phenotype correlation. Based on our findings, we think that genetic testing should be pursued as a routine practice in symptomatic and asymptomatic pediatric cases of BrS, with or without family history of sudden cardiac death. Similarly, our study suggests that pediatrician should be encouraged to perform an ECG profiling in suspicious febrile children and quickly manage fever since it is the most important factor unmasking BrS in children. PMID:25758664

  19. Applicability of genetic polymorphism analysis for the diagnosis of Angelman syndrome and the correlation between language difficulties and disease phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K; Li, Y T; Hou, M

    2016-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurogenetic disorder caused by a defect in the expression of the maternally inherited ubiquitin protein ligase E3A (UBE3A) gene in chromosome 15. The most common genetic defects include maternal deletions in chromosome 15q11-13; however, paternal uniparental disomy and imprinting defects allow for the identification of mutations in UBE3A in 10% of patients with AS. The aim of this study was to validate the clinical features and genetic polymorphisms of AS, and to discuss the relationship between functional language lateralization and the arcuate fasciculus in the Broca's and Wernicke's areas. Six children with AS (mean age = 32.57 months) presenting characteristic behavioral patterns of AS (frequent laughter and happy demeanor, hand flapping, and hypermotor behavior) were recruited to this study. The patients underwent a clinical evaluation (clinical history, dysmorphological and neurological examinations, and psychological evaluations) and paraclinical investigations [genetic tests (fluorescence in situ hybridization and methylation polymerase chain reaction), electroencephalogram, and magnetic resonance imaging]. We conclude that AS diagnosis cannot rely solely on genetic testing for polymorphisms in UBE3A and must consider its clinical characteristics. Moreover, functional language lateralization and the arcuate fasciculus in the Broca's and Wernicke's areas were found to be closely correlated. Therefore, UBE3A gene mutation analysis combined with comprehensive clinical evaluations may be suitable for the diagnosis of AS. PMID:27323188

  20. The role of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection in immune phenotype and Th1/Th2 balance of dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinling; Wei, Shu; Liu, Lixia; Shan, Fengping; Zhao, Yujun; Shen, Guoshun

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the immune response of dendritic cells derived from monocytes (Mo-DCs) in the porcine peripheral blood following infection with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). Viral load assays indicated that PRRSV efficiently infected Mo-DCs but failed to replicate, whereas PRRSV infection of Mo-DCs decreased the expression of SLA-I, SLA-II, CD80 and CD40 compared with those of mock Mo-DCs. Furthermore, we analyzed the cytokine profiles using quantitative RT-PCR and ELISA. Results indicated apparent changes in IL-10 and IL-12 p40 expression but not in IFN-γ and TNF-α among Mo-DCs infected with PRRSV and uninfected Mo-DCs. Additionally, flow cytometry analysis of the altered Mo-DCs together with IL-4 and GM-CSF induction for 7days revealed the typical morphology and phenotype with 91.73% purity before infection with PRRSV. Overall, our data demonstrate that PRRSV impaired the normal antigen presentation of Mo-DCs and led to inadequate adaptive immune response by down-regulating the expression of SLA-I,SLA-II, CD80 and CD40. Enhanced Th2 -type cytokine IL-10 secretion and reduced Th1-type cytokines IL-12p40,IFN-γ and TNF-α secretion results in Th1/Th2 imbalance.

  1. ACTIVATION OF p53 IN DOWN SYNDROME AND IN THE Ts65Dn MOUSE BRAIN IS ASSOCIATED WITH A PRO-APOPTOTIC PHENOTYPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Domenico, Fabio; Barone, Eugenio; Arena, Andrea; Lanzillotta, Chiara; Brokeaart, Diede; Blarzino, Carla; Head, Elizabeth; Butterfield, D Allan; Perluigi, Marzia

    2016-01-01

    Down Syndrome (DS) is the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability resulting from trisomy of chromosome 21. The main feature of DS neuropathology includes early onset of Alzheimer's disease, with deposition of senile plaques and tangles. We hypothesized that apoptosis may be activated in the presence of AD neuropathology in DS, thus we measured proteins associated with upstream and downstream pathways of p53 in the frontal cortex from DS cases with and without AD pathology and from Ts65Dn mice, at different ages. We observed increased acetylation and phosphorylation of p53, coupled to reduced MDM2-mediated ubiquitination and lower levels of SIRT1. Activation of p53 was associated with a number of down-stream targets (bax, PARP1, caspase-3, heat shock proteins and PGC1α) that were modulated in both DS and DS/AD compared with age-matched controls. In particular, the most relevant changes (increased p-p53, acetyl-p53 and reduced formation of MDM2/p53 complex) were found to be modified only in the presence of AD pathology in DS. In addition, a similar pattern of alterations in the p53 pathway were found in Ts65Dn mice. These results suggest that p53 may integrate different signals, which can result in a pro-apoptotic-phenotype contributing to AD neuropathology in people with DS. PMID:26967221

  2. Increased expression of aphidicolin-induced common fragile sites in Tourette syndrome: The key to understand the genetics of comorbid phenotypes?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gericke, G.S.; Simonic, I.; Cloete, E.; Becker, P.J. [Univ. of Pretoria (South Africa)

    1996-02-16

    In a comparison of 80 common aphidicolin-induced fragile sites (FS) between 26 DSM-IV Tourette syndrome (TS) and 24 control individuals, the mean of the summed break frequencies following mild aphidicolin pretreatment was significantly higher in TS individuals than in controls (P < 0.001). Other breakpoints encountered during this study, i.e., random breaks, breaks corresponding to rare FS, and breakpoints recorded by others but not listed as common FS according to the Chromosome Coordinating Meeting were listed as category II breakpoints. By using the most significantly different mean FS breakage figures between TS and control individuals, further stepwise discriminant analysis allowed identification of TS individuals from only a few sites in both the common FS and category II breakpoint groups. Future research needs to focus on confirmation of altered common fragile site expression in association with behavioral variation, whether expression of certain discriminatory sites concurs with specific comorbid disorder expression; the nature of the molecular alterations at these FS and the implications of a genomic instability phenotype for the mapping of a primary TS gene or genes. 45 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  3. Proteomics, ultrastructure, and physiology of hippocampal synapses in a fragile X syndrome mouse model reveal presynaptic phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemmer, Patricia; Meredith, Rhiannon M; Holmgren, Carl D; Klychnikov, Oleg I; Stahl-Zeng, Jianru; Loos, Maarten; van der Schors, Roel C; Wortel, Joke; de Wit, Heidi; Spijker, Sabine; Rotaru, Diana C; Mansvelder, Huibert D; Smit, August B; Li, Ka Wan

    2011-07-22

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common form of hereditary mental retardation, is caused by a loss-of-function mutation of the Fmr1 gene, which encodes fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). FMRP affects dendritic protein synthesis, thereby causing synaptic abnormalities. Here, we used a quantitative proteomics approach in an FXS mouse model to reveal changes in levels of hippocampal synapse proteins. Sixteen independent pools of Fmr1 knock-out mice and wild type mice were analyzed using two sets of 8-plex iTRAQ experiments. Of 205 proteins quantified with at least three distinct peptides in both iTRAQ series, the abundance of 23 proteins differed between Fmr1 knock-out and wild type synapses with a false discovery rate (q-value) <5%. Significant differences were confirmed by quantitative immunoblotting. A group of proteins that are known to be involved in cell differentiation and neurite outgrowth was regulated; they included Basp1 and Gap43, known PKC substrates, and Cend1. Basp1 and Gap43 are predominantly expressed in growth cones and presynaptic terminals. In line with this, ultrastructural analysis in developing hippocampal FXS synapses revealed smaller active zones with corresponding postsynaptic densities and smaller pools of clustered vesicles, indicative of immature presynaptic maturation. A second group of proteins involved in synaptic vesicle release was up-regulated in the FXS mouse model. In accordance, paired-pulse and short-term facilitation were significantly affected in these hippocampal synapses. Together, the altered regulation of presynaptically expressed proteins, immature synaptic ultrastructure, and compromised short-term plasticity points to presynaptic changes underlying glutamatergic transmission in FXS at this stage of development.

  4. Expanding the clinical phenotype of the 3q29 microdeletion syndrome and characterization of the reciprocal microduplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedrich Christopher A

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interstitial deletions of 3q29 have been recently described as a microdeletion syndrome mediated by nonallelic homologous recombination between low-copy repeats resulting in an ~1.6 Mb common-sized deletion. Given the molecular mechanism causing the deletion, the reciprocal duplication is anticipated to occur with equal frequency, although only one family with this duplication has been reported. Results In this study we describe 14 individuals with microdeletions of 3q29, including one family with a mildly affected mother and two affected children, identified among 14,698 individuals with idiopathic mental retardation who were analyzed by array CGH. Eleven individuals had typical 1.6-Mb deletions. Three individuals had deletions that flank, span, or partially overlap the commonly deleted region. Although the clinical presentations of individuals with typical-sized deletions varied, several features were present in multiple individuals, including mental retardation and microcephaly. We also identified 19 individuals with duplications of 3q29, five of which appear to be the reciprocal duplication product of the 3q29 microdeletion and 14 of which flank, span, or partially overlap the common deletion region. The clinical features of individuals with microduplications of 3q29 also varied with few common features. De novo and inherited abnormalities were found in both the microdeletion and microduplication cohorts illustrating the need for parental samples to fully characterize these abnormalities. Conclusion Our report demonstrates that array CGH is especially suited to identify chromosome abnormalities with unclear or variable presentations.

  5. From Cortical and Subcortical Grey Matter Abnormalities to Neurobehavioral Phenotype of Angelman Syndrome: A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghakhanyan, Gayane; Bonanni, Paolo; Randazzo, Giovanna; Nappi, Sara; Tessarotto, Federica; De Martin, Lara; Frijia, Francesca; De Marchi, Daniele; De Masi, Francesco; Kuppers, Beate; Lombardo, Francesco; Caramella, Davide; Montanaro, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a rare neurogenetic disorder due to loss of expression of maternal ubiquitin-protein ligase E3A (UBE3A) gene. It is characterized by severe developmental delay, speech impairment, movement or balance disorder and typical behavioral uniqueness. Affected individuals show normal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, although mild dysmyelination may be observed. In this study, we adopted a quantitative MRI analysis with voxel-based morphometry (FSL-VBM) method to investigate disease-related changes in the cortical/subcortical grey matter (GM) structures. Since 2006 to 2013 twenty-six AS patients were assessed by our multidisciplinary team. From those, sixteen AS children with confirmed maternal 15q11-q13 deletions (mean age 7.7 ± 3.6 years) and twenty-one age-matched controls were recruited. The developmental delay and motor dysfunction were assessed using Bayley III and Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM). Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the clinical and neuropsychological datasets. High-resolution T1-weighted images were acquired and FSL-VBM approach was applied to investigate differences in the local GM volume and to correlate clinical and neuropsychological changes in the regional distribution of GM. We found bilateral GM volume loss in AS compared to control children in the striatum, limbic structures, insular and orbitofrontal cortices. Voxel-wise correlation analysis with the principal components of the PCA output revealed a strong relationship with GM volume in the superior parietal lobule and precuneus on the left hemisphere. The anatomical distribution of cortical/subcortical GM changes plausibly related to several clinical features of the disease and may provide an important morphological underpinning for clinical and neurobehavioral symptoms in children with AS. PMID:27626634

  6. Hepatitis Delta Virus Detected in Salivary Glands of Sjögren’s Syndrome Patients and Recapitulates a Sjögren’s Syndrome-Like Phenotype in Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Melodie L.; Gardener, Matthew R.; Bogus, Zoe C.; Smith, Michael A.; Astorri, Elisa; Michael, Drew G.; Michael, Donald A.; Zheng, Changyu; Burbelo, Peter D.; Lai, Zhennan; Wilson, Paul A.; Swaim, William; Handelman, Beverly; Afione, Sandra A.; Bombardieri, Michele; Chiorini, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Low-level, chronic viral infections have been suspect in the development of select autoimmune diseases, including primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS). Multiple studies have shown stimulation of antiviral response pathways in pSS tissues suggestive of a viral infection. Yet, with this data in hand, a causal link between a viral infection and development of pSS had not been identified. Therefore, a study was designed to further define the viral landscape within pSS-affected salivary gland tissue to identify potential viral-mediated triggers in the pathogenesis of this autoimmune disease. Methods A viral microarray was utilized to measure viral transcripts present in salivary gland tissue from patients diagnosed with pSS compared to healthy controls. Murine models of salivary gland localized HDV antigen expression were developed to evaluate the capacity of a chronic HDV signature to trigger the development of a pSS-like phenotype. Results Through this analysis, two distinct viral profiles were identified, including the increased presence of hepatitis delta virus (HDV) in 50% of pSS patients evaluated. Presence of HDV antigen and sequence were confirmed in minor salivary gland tissue. Patients with elevated HDV levels in salivary gland tissue were negative for detectible hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antigen and antibodies to HBV or HDV. Expression of HDV antigens in vivo resulted in reduced stimulated saliva flow, increase in focal lymphocytic infiltrates, and development of autoantibodies. Conclusion Identification of HDV in pSS patients and induction of a complete pSS-like phenotype in vivo provides further support of a viral-mediated etiopathology in the development of pSS. PMID:27294212

  7. Do you know this syndrome? *

    OpenAIRE

    Rosmaninho, A.; Pinto-Almeida, T.; Fernandes, I; Machado, S; Selores, M.

    2013-01-01

    Noonan Syndrome is one of the most common genetic syndromes and also an important differential diagnosis in children presenting with syndromic facies similar to Turner's syndrome phenotype. This syndrome is characterized by facial dysmorphism, congenital heart defects, short stature and also a wide phenotypic variation. This article discusses the case of a 10 year-old patient with Noonan syndrome that presented typical facies, cardiac defects (pulmonary dilatation and mitral regurgitation), d...

  8. Discordant gene expression signatures and related phenotypic differences in lamin A- and A/C-related Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Plasilova

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS is a genetic disorder displaying features reminiscent of premature senescence caused by germline mutations in the LMNA gene encoding lamin A and C, essential components of the nuclear lamina. By studying a family with homozygous LMNA mutation (K542N, we showed that HGPS can also be caused by mutations affecting both isoforms, lamin A and C. Here, we aimed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis in both, lamin A- (sporadic and lamin A and C-related (hereditary HGPS. For this, we performed detailed molecular studies on primary fibroblasts of hetero- and homozygous LMNA K542N mutation carriers, accompanied with clinical examinations related to the molecular findings. By assessing global gene expression we found substantial overlap in altered transcription profiles (13.7%; 90/657 in sporadic and hereditary HGPS, with 83.3% (75/90 concordant and 16.7% (15/90 discordant transcriptional changes. Among the concordant ones we observed down-regulation of TWIST2, whose inactivation in mice and humans leads to loss of subcutaneous fat and dermal appendages, and loss of expression in dermal fibroblasts and periadnexial cells from a LMNA(K542N/K542N patient further confirming its pivotal role in skin development. Among the discordant transcriptional profiles we identified two key mediators of vascular calcification and bone metabolism, ENPP1 and OPG, which offer a molecular explanation for the major phenotypic differences in vascular and bone disease in sporadic and hereditary HGPS. Finally, this study correlates reduced TWIST2 and OPG expression with increased osteocalcin levels, thereby linking altered bone remodeling to energy homeostasis in hereditary HGPS.

  9. Eplerenone ameliorates the phenotypes of metabolic syndrome with NASH in liver-specific SREBP-1c Tg mice fed high-fat and high-fructose diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Tsutomu; Miyashita, Yusuke; Sasaki, Motohiro; Aruga, Yusuke; Nakamura, Yuto; Ishii, Yoko; Sasahara, Masakiyo; Kanasaki, Keizo; Kitada, Munehiro; Koya, Daisuke; Shimano, Hitoshi; Tsuneki, Hiroshi; Sasaoka, Toshiyasu

    2013-12-01

    Because the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system has been implicated in the development of insulin resistance and promotion of fibrosis in some tissues, such as the vasculature, we examined the effect of eplerenone, a selective mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist, on nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and metabolic phenotypes in a mouse model reflecting metabolic syndrome in humans. We adopted liver-specific transgenic (Tg) mice overexpressing the active form of sterol response element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) fed a high-fat and fructose diet (HFFD) as the animal model in the present study. When wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 and liver-specific SREBP-1c Tg mice grew while being fed HFFD for 12 wk, body weight and epididymal fat weight increased in both groups with an elevation in blood pressure and dyslipidemia. Glucose intolerance and insulin resistance were also observed. Adipose tissue hypertrophy and macrophage infiltration with crown-like structure formation were also noted in mice fed HFFD. Interestingly, the changes noted in both genotypes fed HFFD were significantly ameliorated with eplerenone. HFFD-fed Tg mice exhibited the histological features of NASH in the liver, including macrovesicular steatosis and fibrosis, whereas HFFD-fed WT mice had hepatic steatosis without apparent fibrotic changes. Eplerenone effectively ameliorated these histological abnormalities. Moreover, the direct suppressive effects of eplerenone on lipopolysaccharide-induced TNFα production in the presence and absence of aldosterone were observed in primary-cultured Kupffer cells and bone marrow-derived macrophages. These results indicated that eplerenone prevented the development of NASH and metabolic abnormalities in mice by inhibiting inflammatory responses in both Kupffer cells and macrophages.

  10. Male patients with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellmann, Philip; Christiansen, Peter; Johannsen, Trine Holm;

    2012-01-01

    To describe the natural history of phenotype, growth and gonadal function in patients with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome.......To describe the natural history of phenotype, growth and gonadal function in patients with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome....

  11. Systemic vascular phenotypes of Loeys-Dietz syndrome in a child carrying a de novo R381P mutation in TGFBR2: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Uike, Kiyoshi; Matsushita, Yuki; Sakai, Yasunari; Togao, Osamu; Nagao, Michinobu; Ishizaki, Yoshito; Nagata, Hazumu; Yamamura, Kenichiro; Torisu, Hiroyuki; Hara, Toshiro

    2013-01-01

    Background Loeys–Dietz syndrome, also known as Marfan syndrome type II, is a rare connective tissue disorder caused by dominant mutations in transforming growth factor-beta receptors (TGFBR1 and 2). Case presentation We report a 7-year-old Japanese boy with Loeys–Dietz syndrome who carried a novel, de novo missense mutation in TGFBR2 (c.1142g > c, R381P). He showed dysmorphic faces and skeletal malformations that were typical in previous cases with Loeys-Dietz syndrome. The cardiac studies di...

  12. Marfan syndrome masked by Down syndrome?

    OpenAIRE

    Mulder, B. J.; van Engelen, K.; Vis, J.C.; Timmermans, J.; Hamel, B C J

    2009-01-01

    Down syndrome is the most common chromosomal abnormality. A simultaneous occurrence with Marfan syndrome is extremely rare. We present a case of a 28-year-old female with Down syndrome and a mutation in the fibrillin-1 gene. The patient showed strikingly few manifestations of Marfan syndrome. Although variable expression is known to be present in Marfan syndrome, phenotypic expression of Marfan syndrome in our patient might be masked by the co-occurrence of Down syndrome. (Neth Heart J 2009;1...

  13. Thoracic aortic aneurysm in infancy in aneurysms-osteoarthritis syndrome due to a novel SMAD3 mutation: further delineation of the phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wischmeijer, A.; Laer, L. van; Tortora, G.; Bolar, N.A.; Camp, G. van; Fransen, E.; Peeters, N.; Bartolomeo, R. di; Pacini, D.; Gargiulo, G.; Turci, S.; Bonvicini, M.; Mariucci, E.; Lovato, L.; Brusori, S.; Ritelli, M.; Colombi, M.; Garavelli, L.; Seri, M.; Loeys, B.L.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, mutations in the SMAD3 gene were found to cause a new autosomal dominant aneurysm condition similar to Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS), mostly with osteoarthritis, called aneurysms-osteoarthritis syndrome (AOS). Our 3-year-old propositus underwent correction of an inguinal hernia at 3 months an

  14. Chromosomal phenotypes and submicroscopic abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devriendt Koen

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The finding, during the last decade, that several common, clinically delineated syndromes are caused by submicroscopic deletions or, more rarely, by duplications, has provided a powerful tool in the annotation of the human genome. Since most microdeletion/microduplication syndromes are defined by a common deleted/duplicated region, abnormal dosage of genes located within these regions can explain the phenotypic similarities among individuals with a specific syndrome. As such, they provide a unique resource towards the genetic dissection of complex phenotypes such as congenital heart defects, mental and growth retardation and abnormal behaviour. In addition, the study of phenotypic differences in individuals with the same microdeletion syndrome may also become a treasury for the identification of modifying factors for complex phenotypes. The molecular analysis of these chromosomal anomalies has led to a growing understanding of their mechanisms of origin. Novel tools to uncover additional submicroscopic chromosomal anomalies at a higher resolution and higher speed, as well as the novel tools at hand for deciphering the modifying factors and epistatic interactors, are 'on the doorstep' and will, besides their obvious diagnostic role, play a pivotal role in the genetic dissection of complex phenotypes.

  15. Phenotypic patterns of MELAS/LS overlap syndrome associated with m.13513G>A mutation, and neuropathological findings in one autopsy case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaoxia; Qi, Xiao Kun; Yao, Sheng; Chen, Bin; Luan, Xinghua; Zhang, Wei; Han, Manfu; Yuan, Yun

    2010-12-01

    The 13513G>A mutation in the ND5 gene of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is usually associated with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactate acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), or Leigh syndrome (LS). In this study, we describe three young Chinese patients with MELAS/LS overlap syndrome who carried the m.13513G>A mutation. Clinical and MRI features were characteristic of both MELAS and LS. Interestingly, the clinical presentation of this overlap syndrome could be variable depending on the degree of relative contribution of MELAS and LS, that is, MELAS as the initial presenting syndrome, LS as the predominant syndrome, or both MELAS and LS appearing at the same time. The final brain MRI showed findings characteristic of both MELAS and LS, with asymmetrical lesions in the cortex and subcortical white matter of the occipital, temporal, and frontal lobes (MELAS), and bilateral and symmetrical lesions in the basal ganglia and brainstem (LS). Brain autopsy in one case revealed infarct-like lesions in the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia and brainstem, providing further insight into the distribution of the pathological lesions in MELAS/LS overlap syndrome. This is the first report of the brain pathological changes in a patient with m.13513G>A mutation. The spatial distribution of infarct-like lesions in the brain could explain the symptoms in MELAS/LS overlap syndrome.

  16. High incidence of Noonan syndrome features including short stature and pulmonic stenosis in patients carrying NF1 missense mutations affecting p.Arg1809: genotype-phenotype correlation

    OpenAIRE

    Rojnueangnit, Kitiwan; Xie, Jing; Gomes, Alicia; Sharp, Angela; Callens, Tom; Chen, Yunjia; Liu, Ying; Cochran, Meagan; Abbott, Mary-Alice; Atkin, Joan; Babovic-Vuksanovic, Dusica; Barnett, Christopher P; Crenshaw, Melissa; Bartholomew, Dennis W; Basel, Lina

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is one of the most frequent genetic disorders, affecting 1:3,000 worldwide. Identification of genotype-phenotype correlations is challenging because of the wide range clinical variability, the progressive nature of the disorder, and extreme diversity of the mutational spectrum. We report 136 individuals with a distinct phenotype carrying one of five different NF1 missense mutations affecting p.Arg1809. Patients presented with multiple cafe-au-lait macules (CALM)...

  17. Novel and recurrent non-truncating mutations of the MITF basic domain: genotypic and phenotypic variations in Waardenburg and Tietz syndromes

    OpenAIRE

    Léger, Sandy; Balguerie, Xavier; Goldenberg, Alice; Drouin-Garraud, Valérie; Cabot, Annick; Amstutz-Montadert, Isabelle; Young, Paul; Joly, Pascal; Bodereau, Virginie; Holder-Espinasse, Muriel; Jamieson, Robyn V.; Krause, Amanda; Chen, Hongsheng; Baumann, Clarisse; Nunes, Luis

    2012-01-01

    The microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) is a basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper transcription factor, which regulates melanocyte development and the biosynthetic melanin pathway. A notable relationship has been described between non-truncating mutations of its basic domain and Tietz syndrome, which is characterized by albinoid-like hypopigmentation of the skin and hair, rather than the patchy depigmentation seen in Waardenburg syndrome, and severe hearing loss. Twelve pat...

  18. High Incidence of Noonan Syndrome Features Including Short Stature and Pulmonic Stenosis in Patients carrying NF1 Missense Mutations Affecting p.Arg1809: Genotype-Phenotype Correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojnueangnit, Kitiwan; Xie, Jing; Gomes, Alicia; Sharp, Angela; Callens, Tom; Chen, Yunjia; Liu, Ying; Cochran, Meagan; Abbott, Mary-Alice; Atkin, Joan; Babovic-Vuksanovic, Dusica; Barnett, Christopher P; Crenshaw, Melissa; Bartholomew, Dennis W; Basel, Lina; Bellus, Gary; Ben-Shachar, Shay; Bialer, Martin G; Bick, David; Blumberg, Bruce; Cortes, Fanny; David, Karen L; Destree, Anne; Duat-Rodriguez, Anna; Earl, Dawn; Escobar, Luis; Eswara, Marthanda; Ezquieta, Begona; Frayling, Ian M; Frydman, Moshe; Gardner, Kathy; Gripp, Karen W; Hernández-Chico, Concepcion; Heyrman, Kurt; Ibrahim, Jennifer; Janssens, Sandra; Keena, Beth A; Llano-Rivas, Isabel; Leppig, Kathy; McDonald, Marie; Misra, Vinod K; Mulbury, Jennifer; Narayanan, Vinodh; Orenstein, Naama; Galvin-Parton, Patricia; Pedro, Helio; Pivnick, Eniko K; Powell, Cynthia M; Randolph, Linda; Raskin, Salmo; Rosell, Jordi; Rubin, Karol; Seashore, Margretta; Schaaf, Christian P; Scheuerle, Angela; Schultz, Meredith; Schorry, Elizabeth; Schnur, Rhonda; Siqveland, Elizabeth; Tkachuk, Amanda; Tonsgard, James; Upadhyaya, Meena; Verma, Ishwar C; Wallace, Stephanie; Williams, Charles; Zackai, Elaine; Zonana, Jonathan; Lazaro, Conxi; Claes, Kathleen; Korf, Bruce; Martin, Yolanda; Legius, Eric; Messiaen, Ludwine

    2015-11-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is one of the most frequent genetic disorders, affecting 1:3,000 worldwide. Identification of genotype-phenotype correlations is challenging because of the wide range clinical variability, the progressive nature of the disorder, and extreme diversity of the mutational spectrum. We report 136 individuals with a distinct phenotype carrying one of five different NF1 missense mutations affecting p.Arg1809. Patients presented with multiple café-au-lait macules (CALM) with or without freckling and Lisch nodules, but no externally visible plexiform neurofibromas or clear cutaneous neurofibromas were found. About 25% of the individuals had Noonan-like features. Pulmonic stenosis and short stature were significantly more prevalent compared with classic cohorts (P < 0.0001). Developmental delays and/or learning disabilities were reported in over 50% of patients. Melanocytes cultured from a CALM in a segmental NF1-patient showed two different somatic NF1 mutations, p.Arg1809Cys and a multi-exon deletion, providing genetic evidence that p.Arg1809Cys is a loss-of-function mutation in the melanocytes and causes a pigmentary phenotype. Constitutional missense mutations at p.Arg1809 affect 1.23% of unrelated NF1 probands in the UAB cohort, therefore this specific NF1 genotype-phenotype correlation will affect counseling and management of a significant number of patients. PMID:26178382

  19. Effect of soluble ICAM-1 on a Sjögren's syndrome-like phenotype in NOD mice is disease stage dependent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Roescher; J.L. Vosters; H. Yin; G.G. Illei; P.P. Tak; J.A. Chiorini

    2011-01-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is involved in migration and co-stimulation of T and B cells. Membrane bound ICAM-1 is over expressed in the salivary glands (SG) of Sjögren's syndrome (SS) patients and has therefore been proposed as a potential therapeutic target. To test the utility of I

  20. Is there an influence of X-chromosomal imprinting on the phenotype in Klinefelter syndrome? A clinical and molecular genetic study of 61 cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stemkens, D; Roza, T; Verrij, L; Swaab, H; van Werkhoven, MK; Alizadeh, BZ; Sinke, RJ; Giltay, JC

    2006-01-01

    Studies on Turner syndrome suggested the presence of X-chromosomal-imprinted genes involved in social and verbal cognition. Imprinted genes on autosomes were shown to affect growth. Could imprinting of such genes on the X chromosome also influence psychomotor development and growth in men with Kline

  1. Deleted in Breast Cancer 1 Limits Adipose Tissue Fat Accumulation and Plays a Key Role in the Development of Metabolic Syndrome Phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Escande, Carlos; Nin, Veronica; Pirtskhalava, Tamar; Chini, Claudia C. S.; Tchkonia, Tamar; Kirkland, James L.; Chini, Eduardo N.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is often regarded as the primary cause of metabolic syndrome. However, many lines of evidence suggest that obesity may develop as a protective mechanism against tissue damage during caloric surplus and that it is only when the maximum fat accumulation capacity is reached and fatty acid spill

  2. 12例Angelman综合征及Prader-Willi综合征患者的临床表型和遗传学分析%Phenotype-genotype correlation analysis of 12 cases with Angelman/Prader-Willi syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晨; 彭莹; 夏艳; 李浩贤; 朱慧敏; 潘乾; 尹飞; 邬玲仟

    2014-01-01

    目的 探讨Angelman综合征(Angelman syndrome,AS)及Prader-Willi综合征(Prader-Willi syndrome,PWS)患者的临床表型与基因型关系及单核苷酸多态性微阵列技术(single nucleotide polymorphism microarrays,SNP array)在其诊断中所起的作用.方法 应用SNP array、荧光原位杂交及染色体核型分析对12例AS及PWS患者进行精确的遗传学诊断及分型,并结合临床特点进行相关分析.结果 12例患者中,11例存在染色体15q11.2-13区域4.8~7.0 Mb缺失,1例为该区域单亲二体(uniparental disomy,UPD);根据近端断裂点位置,7例患者为缺失Ⅰ型,4例为缺失Ⅱ型,两组临床表现无明显差异;UPD患者语言运动发育相对较好;荧光原位杂交证实6例缺失患者为新发突变,其同胞再患病概率<1%.9例患者行染色体核型分析,1例为46,XY,?del(15) (q11q11),余8例无异常.结论 缺失Ⅰ型及缺失Ⅱ型AS及PWS患者的临床表型差异有待进一步研究;SNP array可对缺失型及UPD型AS/PWS患者进行确诊和分型,有助于表型-基因型关联研究及AS及PWS发病机制研究.%Objective To investigate the genotype-phenotype correlation in patients with Angelman syndrome /Prader-Willi syndrome (AS/PWS) and assess the application value of high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism microarrays (SNP array) for such diseases.Methods Twelve AS/PWS patients were diagnosed through SNP array,fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and karyotype analysis.Clinical characteristics were analyzed.Results Deletions ranging from 4.8 Mb to 7.0 Mb on chromosome 15q11.2-13 were detected in 11 patients.Uniparental disomy (UPD) was detected in only 1 patient.Patients with deletions could be divided into 2 groups,including 7 cases with class Ⅰ and 4 with class Ⅱ.The two groups however had no significant phenotypic difference.The UPD patient had relatively better development and language ability.Deletions of 6 patients were confirmed by FISH to be of de novo

  3. Loss-of-function HDAC8 mutations cause a phenotypic spectrum of Cornelia de Lange syndrome-like features, ocular hypertelorism, large fontanelle and X-linked inheritance

    OpenAIRE

    Frank J. Kaiser; Ansari, Morad; Braunholz, Diana; Gil-Rodríguez, María Concepción; Decroos, Christophe; Wilde, Jonathan J.; Fincher, Christopher T.; Kaur, Maninder; Bando, Masashige; Amor, David J.; P.S. Atwal; Bahlo, Melanie; Bowman, Christine M.; Bradley, Jacquelyn J.; Brunner, Han G.

    2014-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is amultisystemgenetic disorder with distinct facies, growth failure, intellectual disability, distal limb anomalies, gastrointestinal and neurological disease. Mutations in NIPBL, encoding a cohesin regulatory protein, account for >80% of cases with typical facies. Mutations in the core cohesin complex proteins, encoded by the SMC1A, SMC3 and RAD21 genes, together account for ̃5% of subjects, often with atypical CdLS features. Recently, we identified mutatio...

  4. Complex chromosome rearrangements related 15q14 microdeletion plays a relevant role in phenotype expression and delineates a novel recurrent syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaiuolo Anna

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Complex chromosome rearrangements are constitutional structural rearrangements involving three or more chromosomes or having more than two breakpoints. These are rarely seen in the general population but their frequency should be much higher due to balanced states with no phenotypic presentation. These abnormalities preferentially occur de novo during spermatogenesis and are transmitted in families through oogenesis. Here, we report a de novo complex chromosome rearrangement that interests eight chromosomes in eighteen-year-old boy with an abnormal phenotype consisting in moderate developmental delay, cleft palate, and facial dysmorphisms. Standard G-banding revealed four apparently balanced traslocations involving the chromosomes 1;13, 3;19, 9;15 and 14;18 that appeared to be reciprocal. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization analysis showed no imbalances at all the breakpoints observed except for an interstitial microdeletion on chromosome 15. This deletion is 1.6 Mb in size and is located at chromosome band 15q14, distal to the Prader-Willi/Angelman region. Comparing the features of our patient with published reports of patients with 15q14 deletion this finding corresponds to the smallest genomic region of overlap. The deleted segment at 15q14 was investigated for gene content.

  5. Diagnosis, assessment, and phenotyping of COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Peter; Halpin, David M; O'Donnell, Denis E;

    2016-01-01

    biomarkers to confirm and further assess the diagnosis of COPD. However, it is possible to identify patients who display different phenotypic characteristics of COPD that relate to clinically relevant outcomes. Currently, validated phenotypes of COPD include alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, and "frequent...... exacerbators". Recently, a definition and assessment of a new phenotype comprising patients with overlapping features of asthma and COPD has been suggested and is known as "asthma COPD overlap syndrome". Several other phenotypes have been proposed, but require validation against clinical outcomes. Defining...

  6. Genotype-phenotype correlation in Brazillian Rett syndrome patients Correlação genótipo-fenótipo em pacientes brasileiras com síndrome de Rett

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda T. de Lima

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rett syndrome (RS is a severe neurodevelopmental X-linked dominant disorder caused by mutations in the MECP2 gene. PURPOSE: To search for point mutations on the MECP2 gene and to establish a correlation between the main point mutations found and the phenotype. METHOD: Clinical evaluation of 105 patients, following a standard protocol. Detection of point mutations on the MECP2 gene was performed on peripheral blood DNA by sequencing the coding region of the gene. RESULTS: Classical RS was seen in 68% of the patients. Pathogenic point mutations were found in 64.1% of all patients and in 70.42% of those with the classical phenotype. Four new sequence variations were found, and their nature suggests patogenicity. Genotype-phenotype correlations were performed. CONCLUSION: Detailed clinical descriptions and identification of the underlying genetic alterations of this Brazilian RS population add to our knowledge of genotype/phenotype correlations, guiding the implementation of mutation searching programs.INTRODUÇÃO: A síndrome de Rett é uma grave doença do neurodesenvolvimento ligada ao X dominante, causada por mutações no gene MECP2. OBJETIVOS: Identificar mutações de ponto no gene MECP2 e estabelecer uma correlação entre as principais mutações encontradas e o fenótipo. MÉTODO: Avaliação clínica de 105 pacientes, seguindo um protocolo estabelecido. A identificação de mutações de ponto foi realizada em DNA de sangue periférico por sequenciamento da região codificante do gene amplificada por PCR. RESULTADOS: Em 68% dos pacientes observou-se o quadro clássico da síndrome. Mutações de ponto patogênicas foram encontradas em 64,1% dos pacientes e em 70,42% das pacientes com o quadro clássico. Quatro novas variações de seqüência foram identificadas e sua natureza sugere patogenicidade. Correlações genótipo-fenótipo foram estabelecidas. CONCLUSÃO: Descrições clínicas detalhadas desta popula

  7. β2-Adrenergic receptor agonist ameliorates phenotypes and corrects microRNA-mediated IGF1 deficits in a mouse model of Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellios, Nikolaos; Woodson, Jonathan; Garcia, Rodrigo I; Crawford, Benjamin; Sharma, Jitendra; Sheridan, Steven D; Haggarty, Stephen J; Sur, Mriganka

    2014-07-01

    Rett syndrome is a severe childhood onset neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutations in methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2), with known disturbances in catecholamine synthesis. Here, we show that treatment with the β2-adrenergic receptor agonist clenbuterol increases survival, rescues abnormalities in respiratory function and social recognition, and improves motor coordination in young male Mecp2-null (Mecp2(-/y)) mice. Importantly, we demonstrate that short-term treatment with clenbuterol in older symptomatic female heterozygous (Mecp2(-/+)) mice rescues respiratory, cognitive, and motor coordination deficits, and induces an anxiolytic effect. In addition, we reveal abnormalities in a microRNA-mediated pathway, downstream of brain-derived neurotrophic factor that affects insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) expression in Mecp2(-/y) mice, and show that treatment with clenbuterol restores the observed molecular alterations. Finally, cotreatment with clenbuterol and recombinant human IGF1 results in additional increases in survival in male null mice. Collectively, our data support a role for IGF1 and other growth factor deficits as an underlying mechanism of Rett syndrome and introduce β2-adrenergic receptor agonists as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of the disorder. PMID:24958851

  8. Molecular cytogenetic determination of a deletion/duplication of 1q that results in a trisomy 18 syndrome-like phenotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mewar, R.; Harrison, W.; Weaver, D.D.; Palmer, C.; Davee, M.A.; Overhauser, J.

    1994-08-15

    We report on an infant who presented at birth with some characteristics of trisomy 18 syndrome, including low birth weight, facial abnormalities, overlapping fingers, and congenital heart defects. On chromosome analysis, no additional chromosome 18 was observed and both chromosome 18 homologues appeared normal. However, a small piece of chromosomal material of unknown origin was detected at the tip of the long arm of chromosome 1. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using whole chromosome 18 painting probes disclosed no additional hybridization at the telomere of 1q, suggesting that the material was derived from another chromosome. Further chromosome painting experiments suggested that the telomeric addition was of chromosome 1 origin. To identify subchromosomal regions involved in the rearrangement, additional FISH analyses were performed using single copy and repetitive DNA probes mapping different portions of chromosome 1. The analyses showed that probes mapping to 1q34-43 were duplicated in the derivative chromosome 1. In addition, a DNA probe mapping to 1q44 was found to be deleted from the derivative chromosome 1. Our composite analysis suggests that a deletion and a duplication of chromosome 1q can result in some of the clinical findings usually associated with trisomy 16 syndrome. These results demonstrate the usefulness of FISH analysis when karyotype analysis is not consistent with the clinical description. 23 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Transgene silencing of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome mutation results in a reversible bone phenotype, whereas resveratrol treatment does not show overall beneficial effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandgren, Charlotte; Nasser, Hasina Abdul; McKenna, Tomás;

    2015-01-01

    model to study the possibility of recovering from HGPS bone disease upon silencing of the HGPS mutation, and the potential benefits from treatment with resveratrol. We show that complete silencing of the transgenic expression of progerin normalized bone morphology and mineralization already after 7...... weeks. The improvements included lower frequencies of rib fractures and callus formation, an increased number of osteocytes in remodeled bone, and normalized dentinogenesis. The beneficial effects from resveratrol treatment were less significant and to a large extent similar to mice treated with sucrose...... alone. However, the reversal of the dental phenotype of overgrown and laterally displaced lower incisors in HGPS mice could be attributed to resveratrol. Our results indicate that the HGPS bone defects were reversible upon suppressed transgenic expression and suggest that treatments targeting aberrant...

  10. Increased chromosomal breakage in Tourette syndrome predicts the possibility of variable multiple gene involvement in spectrum phenotypes: Preliminary findings and hypothesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gericke, G.S.; Simonic, I.; Cloete, E.; Buckle, C. [Univ. of Pretoria (South Africa)] [and others

    1995-10-09

    Increased chromosomal breakage was found in 12 patients with DSM-IV Tourette syndrome (TS) as compared with 10 non-TS control individuals with respect to untreated, modified RPM1-, and BrdU treated lymphocyte cultures (P < 0.001 in each category). A hypothesis is proposed that a major TS gene is probably connected to genetic instability, and associated chromosomal marker sites may be indicative of the localization of secondary genes whose altered expression could be responsible for associated comorbid conditions. This concept implies that genes influencing higher brain functions may be situated at or near highly recombigenic areas allowing enhanced amplification, duplication and recombination following chromosomal strand breakage. Further studies on a larger sample size are required to confirm the findings relating to chromosomal breakage and to analyze the possible implications for a paradigmatic shift in linkage strategy for complex disorders by focusing on areas at or near unstable chromosomal marker sites. 32 refs., 1 tab.

  11. Developmental Dynamics of Rett Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Danielle Feldman; Abhishek Banerjee; Mriganka Sur

    2016-01-01

    Rett Syndrome was long considered to be simply a disorder of postnatal development, with phenotypes that manifest only late in development and into adulthood. A variety of recent evidence demonstrates that the phenotypes of Rett Syndrome are present at the earliest stages of brain development, including developmental stages that define neurogenesis, migration, and patterning in addition to stages of synaptic and circuit development and plasticity. These phenotypes arise from the pleotropic ef...

  12. Gorlin Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siroos Risbaf

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin syndrome is a dominant autosomal familial disorder. The manifestations begin at an early age and a combination of phenotypic abnormalities such special facial appearance, jaw cysts and skeletal anomalies are seen in this disease. A 22-year-old woman referred to Zahedan Dental School complaining of pain on the left cheek. During the examination, several cutaneous lesions in the neck, pits in palm and sole and multiple jaw cysts were observed. According to the clinical symptoms, lesion biopsy and reports of Gorlin syndrome radiography were presented.

  13. GM3 synthase deficiency due to ST3GAL5 variants in two Korean female siblings: Masquerading as Rett syndrome-like phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Sook; Yoo, Yongjin; Lim, Byung Chan; Kim, Ki Joong; Song, Junghan; Choi, Murim; Chae, Jong-Hee

    2016-08-01

    There have been a few reports of GM3 synthase deficiency since the disease of the ganglioside biosynthetic pathway was first reported in 2004. It is characterized by infantile-onset epilepsy with severe intellectual disability, blindness, cutaneous dyspigmentation, and choreoathetosis. Here we report the cases of two Korean female siblings with ST3GAL5 variants, who presented with a Rett-like phenotype. They had delayed speech, hand stereotypies with a loss of purposeful hand movements, and choreoathetosis, but no clinical seizures. One of them had microcephaly, while the other had small head circumference less than 10th centile. There were no abnormal laboratory findings with the exception of a high lactate level. MECP2/CDKL5/FOXG1 genetic tests with an array comparative genomic hybridization revealed no molecular defects. Through whole-exome sequencing of the proband, we found compound heterozygous ST3GAL5 variants (p.Gly201Arg and p.Cys195Ser), both of which were novel. The siblings were the same compound heterozygotes and their unaffected parents were heterozygous carriers of each variant. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis confirmed a low level of GM3 and its downstream metabolites, indicating GM3 synthase deficiency. These cases expanded the clinical and genetic spectrum of the ultra-rare disease, GM3 synthase deficiency with ST3GAL5 variants. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27232954

  14. Phenotypic variation in Aicardi-Goutières syndrome explained by cell-specific IFN-stimulated gene response and cytokine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuadrado, Eloy; Michailidou, Iliana; van Bodegraven, Emma J; Jansen, Machiel H; Sluijs, Jacqueline A; Geerts, Dirk; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; De Filippis, Lidia; Vescovi, Angelo L; Kuijpers, Taco W; Hol, Elly M

    2015-04-15

    Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) is a monogenic inflammatory encephalopathy caused by mutations in TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, RNASEH2C, SAMHD1, ADAR1, or MDA5. Mutations in those genes affect normal RNA/DNA intracellular metabolism and detection, triggering an autoimmune response with an increase in cerebral IFN-α production by astrocytes. Microangiopathy and vascular disease also contribute to the neuropathology in AGS. In this study, we report that AGS gene silencing of TREX1, SAMHD1, RNASEH2A, and ADAR1 by short hairpin RNAs in human neural stem cell-derived astrocytes, human primary astrocytes, and brain-derived endothelial cells leads to an antiviral status of these cells compared with nontarget short hairpin RNA-treated cells. We observed a distinct activation of the IFN-stimulated gene signature with a substantial increase in the release of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6) and chemokines (CXCL10 and CCL5). A differential impact of AGS gene silencing was noted; silencing TREX1 gave rise to the most dramatic in both cell types. Our findings fit well with the observation that patients carrying mutations in TREX1 experience an earlier onset and fatal outcome. We provide in the present study, to our knowledge for the first time, insight into how astrocytic and endothelial activation of antiviral status may differentially lead to cerebral pathology, suggesting a rational link between proinflammatory mediators and disease severity in AGS.

  15. Turner Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Akcan AB.

    2007-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a neurogenetic disorder characterized by partial or complete monosomy-X. TS is associated with certain physical and medical features including estrogen deficiency, short stature and increased risk for several diseases with cardiac conditions being among the most serious. Girls with TS are typically treated with growth hormone and estrogen replacement therapies to address short stature and estrogen deficiency. The cognitive-behavioral phenotype associated with TS includ...

  16. An overlapping phenotype of Osteogenesis imperfecta and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome due to a heterozygous mutation in COL1A1 and biallelic missense variants in TNXB identified by whole exome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenroth, Luisa; Fischer-Zirnsak, Björn; Egerer, Johannes; Hecht, Jochen; Kallinich, Tilmann; Stenzel, Werner; Spors, Birgit; von Moers, Arpad; Mundlos, Stefan; Kornak, Uwe; Gerhold, Kerstin; Horn, Denise

    2016-04-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) are variable genetic disorders that overlap in different ways [Cole 1993; Grahame 1999]. Here, we describe a boy presenting with severe muscular hypotonia, multiple fractures, and joint hyperflexibility, features that are compatible with mild OI and hypermobility type EDS, respectively. By whole exome sequencing, we identified both a COL1A1 mutation (c.4006-1G > A) inherited from the patient's mildly affected mother and biallelic missense variants in TNXB (p.Val1213Ile, p.Gly2592Ser). Analysis of cDNA showed that the COL1A1 splice site mutation led to intron retention causing a frameshift (p.Phe1336Valfs*72). Type 1 collagen secretion by the patient's skin fibroblasts was reduced. Immunostaining of a muscle biopsy obtained from the patient revealed a clear reduction of tenascin-X in the extracellular matrix compared to a healthy control. These findings imply that the combination of the COL1A1 mutation with the TNXB variants might cause the patient's unique phenotype. PMID:26799614

  17. Airway statuses and nasopharyngeal airway use for airway obstruction in syndromic craniosynostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouga, Takeshi; Tanoue, Koji; Matsui, Kiyoshi

    2014-05-01

    Syndromic craniosynostosis is associated with a high rate of respiratory difficulty, due mainly to midfacial hypoplasia. Nasopharyngeal airway establishment has been reported as the first-line approach to airway obstruction and may obviate the need for a highly invasive tracheotomy. No previous studies have compared airway obstruction status in syndromic craniosynostosis between cases requiring and not requiring airway managements. We focus on nasopharyngeal airway use and airway status outcomes to assess respiratory difficulty in patients with syndromic craniosynostosis. A retrospective data analysis of 51 cases with syndromic craniosynostosis was carried out. We divided 30 of the 51 cases with lateral pharyngeal x-rays taken before operations affecting airway diameters into 2 groups, one with neither nasopharyngeal airway insertion nor tracheotomy and the other with one or both of these interventions, and the mean diameters for 8 indices related to the pharyngeal space were compared. Cases with respiratory difficulty due to nasopharyngeal stenosis and requiring airway managements comprised a significantly higher proportion of those with Pfeiffer syndrome than patients with Crouzon or Apert syndrome. Comparative examination of lateral x-ray cephalometry between cases with neither nasopharyngeal airway insertion nor tracheotomy and cases with one or both revealed oropharyngeal diameters tended to be smaller in those with interventions. Cases requiring nasopharyngeal airway insertion were able to continue nasopharyngeal airway use for more than 1 year and a considerable number avoided tracheotomy. It may be worth considering an oropharyngeal-bypass nasopharyngeal airway before performing a tracheotomy. PMID:24820706

  18. A multicenter study on Leigh syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sofou, Kalliopi; De Coo, Irenaeus F M; Isohanni, Pirjo;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Leigh syndrome is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, associated with primary or secondary dysfunction of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Despite the fact that Leigh syndrome is the most common phenotype of mitochondrial disorders in children, longitudinal natural h...

  19. Neuroacanthocytosis Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Ruth H

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neuroacanthocytosis (NA syndromes are a group of genetically defined diseases characterized by the association of red blood cell acanthocytosis and progressive degeneration of the basal ganglia. NA syndromes are exceptionally rare with an estimated prevalence of less than 1 to 5 per 1'000'000 inhabitants for each disorder. The core NA syndromes include autosomal recessive chorea-acanthocytosis and X-linked McLeod syndrome which have a Huntington´s disease-like phenotype consisting of a choreatic movement disorder, psychiatric manifestations and cognitive decline, and additional multi-system features including myopathy and axonal neuropathy. In addition, cardiomyopathy may occur in McLeod syndrome. Acanthocytes are also found in a proportion of patients with autosomal dominant Huntington's disease-like 2, autosomal recessive pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration and several inherited disorders of lipoprotein metabolism, namely abetalipoproteinemia (Bassen-Kornzweig syndrome and hypobetalipoproteinemia leading to vitamin E malabsorption. The latter disorders are characterized by a peripheral neuropathy and sensory ataxia due to dorsal column degeneration, but movement disorders and cognitive impairment are not present. NA syndromes are caused by disease-specific genetic mutations. The mechanism by which these mutations cause neurodegeneration is not known. The association of the acanthocytic membrane abnormality with selective degeneration of the basal ganglia, however, suggests a common pathogenetic pathway. Laboratory tests include blood smears to detect acanthocytosis and determination of serum creatine kinase. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging may demonstrate striatal atrophy. Kell and Kx blood group antigens are reduced or absent in McLeod syndrome. Western blot for chorein demonstrates absence of this protein in red blood cells of chorea-acanthocytosis patients. Specific genetic testing is possible in all NA syndromes

  20. Alexithymia, emotion perception, and social assertiveness in adult women with Noonan and Turner syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, R.L.; Wingbermühle, P.A.M.; Freriks, K.; Verhaak, C.M.; Kessels, R.P.C.; Egger, J.I.M.

    2015-01-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) and Turner syndrome (TS) are associated with cognitive problems and difficulties in affective information processing. While both phenotypes include short stature, facial dysmorphisms, and a webbed neck, genetic etiology and neuropsychological phenotype differ significantly. The

  1. Craniosynostosis genetics: The mystery unfolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inusha Panigrahi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Craniosynsostosis syndromes exhibit considerable phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity. Sagittal synostosis is common form of isolated craniosynostosis. The sutures involved, the shape of the skull and associated malformations give a clue to the specific diagnosis. Crouzon syndrome is one of the most common of the craniosynostosis syndromes. Apert syndrome accounts for 4.5% of all craniosynostoses and is one of the most serious of these syndromes. Most syndromic craniosynostosis require multidisciplinary management. The following review provides a brief appraisal of the various genes involved in craniosynostosis syndromes, and an approach to diagnosis and genetic counseling.

  2. Pfeiffer syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fryns Jean-Pierre

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pfeiffer syndrome is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that associates craniosynostosis, broad and deviated thumbs and big toes, and partial syndactyly on hands and feet. Hydrocephaly may be found occasionally, along with severe ocular proptosis, ankylosed elbows, abnormal viscera, and slow development. Based on the severity of the phenotype, Pfeiffer syndrome is divided into three clinical subtypes. Type 1 "classic" Pfeiffer syndrome involves individuals with mild manifestations including brachycephaly, midface hypoplasia and finger and toe abnormalities; it is associated with normal intelligence and generally good outcome. Type 2 consists of cloverleaf skull, extreme proptosis, finger and toe abnormalities, elbow ankylosis or synostosis, developmental delay and neurological complications. Type 3 is similar to type 2 but without a cloverleaf skull. Clinical overlap between the three types may occur. Pfeiffer syndrome affects about 1 in 100,000 individuals. The disorder can be caused by mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor genes FGFR-1 or FGFR-2. Pfeiffer syndrome can be diagnosed prenatally by sonography showing craniosynostosis, hypertelorism with proptosis, and broad thumb, or molecularly if it concerns a recurrence and the causative mutation was found. Molecular genetic testing is important to confirm the diagnosis. Management includes multiple-staged surgery of craniosynostosis. Midfacial surgery is performed to reduce the exophthalmos and the midfacial hypoplasia.

  3. Study on immuno-phenotype in early diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndrome%免疫表型对骨髓增生异常综合征早期诊断应用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈艳君; 王永才; 张蕾; 孙洪军; 安月; 许方

    2012-01-01

    Objective To research the immuno-phenotype's significance in the classification and differentiation of myelodysplastic syndrome( MDS). Methods The immuno-phenotype of bone marrow cells was detected in 98 patients with MDS and 100 patients with benign hematological disease. Results More than 89. 2% MDS patients had anor-mality in 2 or 3 lineages of immuno-phenotype,among which CD7,19,13,14,33, 34.HLA-DR changed most greatly,higher than normal(P<0. 01). Myeloid series antigens were significantly increased. They showed the relular change with the progress of illness. RA-RAS increased,CD1S ,24 and lympho-linaege antigen decreased step by step. High level CD34, HLA-DR indicated poor prognosis and such MDS tend to transfer into leukemia. Conclusion Anormal immnophetotype of MDS is valuable for diagnosis.%目的 探讨免疫异常表型对骨髓增生异常综合征(MDS)早期诊断价值.方法 选用多种单克隆抗体,用流式细胞测定分析仪,对98例MDS、100例良性血液患者(贫血、粒细胞减少症、血小板减少性紫癜、感染等)的骨髓细胞免疫表型进行测定分析研究.结果 MDS89.3%以上有二系或三系免疫表型异常,其中CD7、CD19、CD13、CD14、CD33、CD34、HLA-DR免疫标志改变明显,明显高于正常对照组(P<0.01);髓系抗原表达明显增高,而且随MDS进展恶化,FAB亚型抗原表达出现规律性变化,RA→RAS→RAEB→向RAEB-T转化,较早期髓系抗原表达(如CD13、CD33)逐渐增加,而较晚期髓系抗原表达(如CD15、CD24)逐渐减少;同时伴淋系抗原表达逐渐减少;骨髓干细胞/祖细胞表面抗原(如CD34、HLA-DR).随着MDS恶化发展,有逐渐明显增加异常表现,而且CD34、HLA-DR早期抗原表达增高者,常常预后较差,易于转化成白血病.结论 MDS患者骨髓细胞免疫异常表型,有利于MDS早期诊断及鉴别诊断,并对治疗、预后判断有重要指导价值.

  4. X-linked Alport syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jais, Jean Philippe; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Giatras, Iannis;

    2003-01-01

    Alport syndrome (AS) is a type IV collagen hereditary disease characterized by progressive hematuric nephritis, hearing loss, and ocular changes. Mutations in the COL4A5 collagen gene are responsible for the more common X-linked dominant form of the disease characterized by much less severe disease...... in girls and women. A "European Community Alport Syndrome Concerted Action" (ECASCA) group was established to delineate the Alport syndrome phenotype in each gender and to determine genotype-phenotype correlations in a large number of families. Data concerning 329 families, 250 of them with an X...... to increase after the age of 60 yr in women. Because of the absence of genotype-phenotype correlation and the large intrafamilial phenotypic heterogeneity, early prognosis of the disease in X-linked Alport syndrome carriers remains moot. Risk factors for developing renal failure have been identified...

  5. Polycystic ovary syndrome: from phenotype to genetype

    OpenAIRE

    Louwers, Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ oligomenorrhea or amenorrhea, hirsutism or hyperandrogenism and polycystic ovarian morphology. Later in life, adverse metabolic implications, such as obesity, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, become more prominent. In this thesis, we aimed to identify genetic factors for PCOS susceptibility using a candidate-gene approach and a hypothesis-free genome-wide approach. Moreover, we have identified several high-risk groups for long-term h...

  6. Polycystic ovary syndrome: from phenotype to genetype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.V. Louwers (Yvonne)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ oligomenorrhea or amenorrhea, hirsutism or hyperandrogenism and polycystic ovarian morphology. Later in life, adverse metabolic implications, such as obesity, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, become more prominent. In this thesis, we aimed

  7. Noonan syndrome and Turner syndrome patients respond similarly to 4 years' growth-hormone therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Peter A; Ross, Judith L; Pedersen, Birgitte Tønnes;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Turner syndrome (TS) and Noonan syndrome (NS) are distinct syndromes associated with short stature and other similar phenotypic features. We compared the responses to growth hormone (GH) therapy of TS and NS patients enrolled in the NordiNet® International Outcome Study (IOS) or the A......BACKGROUND: Turner syndrome (TS) and Noonan syndrome (NS) are distinct syndromes associated with short stature and other similar phenotypic features. We compared the responses to growth hormone (GH) therapy of TS and NS patients enrolled in the NordiNet® International Outcome Study (IOS...

  8. Social-Cognition and the Broad Autism Phenotype: Identifying Genetically Meaningful Phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losh, Molly; Piven, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Background: Strong evidence from twin and family studies suggests that the genetic liability to autism may be expressed through personality and language characteristics qualitatively similar, but more subtly expressed than those defining the full syndrome. This study examined behavioral features of this "broad autism phenotype" (BAP) in relation…

  9. Microglia phenotype diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olah, M.; Biber, K.; Vinet, J.; Boddeke, H. W. G. M.

    2011-01-01

    Microglia, the tissue macrophages of the brain, have under healthy conditions a resting phenotype that is characterized by a ramified morphology. With their fine processes microglia are continuously scanning their environment. Upon any homeostatic disturbance microglia rapidly change their phenotype

  10. Multilocus Inherited Neoplasia Alleles Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whitworth, James; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Sunde, Lone;

    2016-01-01

    as multilocus inherited neoplasia alleles syndrome [MINAS]) in patients with unusual inherited cancer syndrome phenotypes. To facilitate the clinical management of novel cases of MINAS, we have established a database to collect information on what is likely to be an increasingly recognized cohort...

  11. Turner's syndrome presenting as metabolic bone disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sadishkumar Kamalanathan; Karthik Balachandran; Ramesh Ananthakrishnan; Abdoul Hamide

    2012-01-01

    Turner′s syndrome is a genetic disorder with a complete or partial absence of one X chromosome with characteristic phenotypic features. The prevalence of renal anomalies in turner syndrome is 30-40%. However, the renal function is usually normal. We report a case of Turner′s syndrome presenting with chronic kidney disease and renal osteodystrophy.

  12. Turner's syndrome presenting as metabolic bone disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalanathan, Sadishkumar; Balachandran, Karthik; Ananthakrishnan, Ramesh; Hamide, Abdoul

    2012-07-01

    Turner's syndrome is a genetic disorder with a complete or partial absence of one X chromosome with characteristic phenotypic features. The prevalence of renal anomalies in turner syndrome is 30-40%. However, the renal function is usually normal. We report a case of Turner's syndrome presenting with chronic kidney disease and renal osteodystrophy. PMID:22837932

  13. Features of gene mutation and clinical phenotype in Alport syndrome%Alport 综合征家系的基因突变及临床表型分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何威; 高春林; 夏正坤

    2016-01-01

    目的: Alport综合征( Alport syndrome,AS)是常见的遗传性肾小球疾病,且目前认为有3种遗传方式,文中分析AS家系的基因突变特征,总结临床表型特点。方法应用二代测序外显子序列捕获技术对30例确诊或疑似AS患儿的COL4A3、COL4A4、COL4A5基因进行测序,对其家系成员针对突变位点进行Sanger测序验证;并经Provean对基因突变进行蛋白功能预测。收集临床资料,并结合基因突变结果进行分析。结果30例患儿经基因测序后均可明确诊断为AS。其中常染色体隐性遗传4例,均为男性患儿;X连锁显性遗传26例,男性患儿16例,女性患儿10例。二代测序结果共检测出不同的COL4A3、COL4A4、COL4A5基因突变35个,其中包括错义突变19个、同义突变2个、剪切位点突变4个、无义突变3个、插入突变2个、缺失突变4个、复杂突变1个。通过Sanger测序对家系成员进行验证,结果发现20个突变来源于母亲、8个突变来源于父亲、8个为新生突变、1个先证者纯合基因突变分别来自父母双方、1个突变来源不详。30例患儿均以血尿和(或)蛋白尿起病,17例患儿合并阳性家族史,1例合并高频神经性耳聋,无患儿出现眼部病变及肾功能不全。23例患儿行肾穿刺活检,光镜可见肾小球微小病变为13例,系膜增生性病变10例。电镜下,仅9例表现为肾小球基膜致密层分层撕裂等AS典型改变。结论 AS以X连锁显性遗传多见,致病性突变以错义突变为主。 AS患儿病理多表现为肾小球轻微病变,电镜表现常不典型,肾外表现少见。%Objective The article was to analyze the features of gene mutation and clinical phenotype in Alport syndrome. Methods Next-generation sequencing was applied to capture the exons of COL4A3, COL4A4, COL4A5 genes in 30 cases of children with suspected or confirmed diagnosis of Alport syndrome and Sanger method

  14. Statistical models for trisomic phenotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamb, N.E.; Sherman, S.L.; Feingold, E. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Certain genetic disorders are rare in the general population but more common in individuals with specific trisomies, which suggests that the genes involved in the etiology of these disorders may be located on the trisomic chromosome. As with all aneuploid syndromes, however, a considerable degree of variation exists within each phenotype so that any given trait is present only among a subset of the trisomic population. We have previously presented a simple gene-dosage model to explain this phenotypic variation and developed a strategy to map genes for such traits. The mapping strategy does not depend on the simple model but works in theory under any model that predicts that affected individuals have an increased likelihood of disomic homozygosity at the trait locus. This paper explores the robustness of our mapping method by investigating what kinds of models give an expected increase in disomic homozygosity. We describe a number of basic statistical models for trisomic phenotypes. Some of these are logical extensions of standard models for disomic phenotypes, and some are more specific to trisomy. Where possible, we discuss genetic mechanisms applicable to each model. We investigate which models and which parameter values give an expected increase in disomic homozygosity in individuals with the trait. Finally, we determine the sample sizes required to identify the increased disomic homozygosity under each model. Most of the models we explore yield detectable increases in disomic homozygosity for some reasonable range of parameter values, usually corresponding to smaller trait frequencies. It therefore appears that our mapping method should be effective for a wide variety of moderately infrequent traits, even though the exact mode of inheritance is unlikely to be known. 21 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  15. JP-HHT phenotype in Danish patients with SMAD4 mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsig, A M; Tørring, P M; Kjeldsen, A D;

    2016-01-01

    Patients with germline mutations in SMAD4 can present symptoms of both juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT): the JP-HHT syndrome. The complete phenotypic picture of this syndrome is only just emerging. We describe the clinical characteristics of 14 pat...

  16. Fragile ′X′ syndrome. A case study.

    OpenAIRE

    Mittal S; Rawal Y

    1996-01-01

    Fragile ′X′ syndrome also known as the Martin-Bell syndrome or the marker ′X′ syndrome is an ′X′-linked disorder with connective tissue dysplasia and varying degree of mental retardation. A case of this syndrome with characteristic Martin-Bell phenotype is presented. Oral features as yet unmentioned are added.

  17. Phenotypic variation in Blastocystis sp. ST3

    OpenAIRE

    Ragavan, Nanthiney Devi; Govind, Suresh Kumar; Chye, Tan Tian; Mahadeva, Sanjiv

    2014-01-01

    Background Blastocystis, is one of the most common human intestinal protozoan, which has many conflicting reports on its pathogenic role. Gut conditions which obviously varies in asymptomatic individuals, symptomatic and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients in terms of gut flora, pH, osmotic pressure and water potentials could play an important role in its pathogenicity. The present study is the first study to investigate phenotypic characteristics of Blastocystis sp. ST3 isolated from asy...

  18. Innate lymphocyte cells in asthma phenotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Ozyigit, Leyla Pur; MORITA, Hideaki; Akdis, Mubeccel

    2015-01-01

    T helper type 2 (TH2) cells were previously thought to be the main initiating effector cell type in asthma; however, exaggerated TH2 cell activities alone were insufficient to explain all aspects of asthma. Asthma is a heterogeneous syndrome comprising different phenotypes that are characterized by their different clinical features, treatment responses, and inflammation patterns. The most-studied subgroups of asthma include TH2-associated early-onset allergic asthma, late-onset persistent eos...

  19. Ultrasound and MR imaging findings in prenatal diagnosis of craniosynostosis syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubio, Eva I.; Blask, Anna; Bulas, Dorothy I. [Children' s National Health System, Department of Radiology, Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Craniosynostosis syndromes are uncommonly encountered in the prenatal period. Identification is challenging but important for family counseling and perinatal management. This series examines prenatal findings in craniosynostosis syndromes, comparing the complementary roles of US and MRI and emphasizing clues easily missed in the second trimester. Six prenatal cases evaluated from 2002 through 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. Referral history, gestational age, and sonographic and MRI findings were reviewed by three pediatric radiologists. Abnormalities of the calvarium, hands, feet, face, airway and central nervous system were compared between modalities. The diagnosis was Apert syndrome in three, Pfeiffer syndrome in two and Carpenter syndrome in one. The gestational age at evaluation ranged from 21 to 33 weeks. All six were evaluated by MRI and US, with two undergoing repeat evaluation in the third trimester, yielding a total of eight MRIs and US exams. The referral history suggested cloverleaf skull in two cases but did not suggest craniosynostosis syndrome in any case. In four, the referral suggested central nervous system (CNS) findings that were not confirmed by MRI; additional CNS findings were discovered in the remaining two. In four cases, developing turricephaly resulted in a characteristic ''lampshade'' contour of the fetal head. Hypertelorism and proptosis were present in five, with proptosis better appreciated by MRI. Digit abnormalities were present in all, seen equally well by MRI and US. Lung abnormalities in the second trimester in one fetus resolved by the third trimester. Prenatal diagnosis of craniosynostosis syndromes is difficult prior to the third trimester. MRI and US have complementary roles in evaluation of these patients. (orig.)

  20. Beals Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Boards & Staff Annual Report & Financials Contact Us Donate Marfan & Related Disorders What is Marfan Syndrome? What are ... the syndrome. How does Beals syndrome compare with Marfan syndrome? People with Beals syndrome have many of ...

  1. Novel and recurrent non-truncating mutations of the MITF basic domain: genotypic and phenotypic variations in Waardenburg and Tietz syndromes. : Non-truncating mutations of the MITF basic domain

    OpenAIRE

    Léger, Sandy; Balguerie, Xavier; Goldenberg, Alice; Drouin-Garraud, Valérie; Cabot, Annick; Amstutz-Montadert, Isabelle; Young, Paul; Joly, Pascal; Bodereau, Virginie; Holder-Espinasse, Muriel; Jamieson, Robyn,; Krause, Amanda; Chen, Hongsheng; Baumann, Clarisse; Nunes, Luis

    2012-01-01

    International audience The microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) is a basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper transcription factor, which regulates melanocyte development and the biosynthetic melanin pathway. A notable relationship has been described between non-truncating mutations of its basic domain and Tietz syndrome, which is characterized by albinoid-like hypopigmentation of the skin and hair, rather than the patchy depigmentation seen in Waardenburg syndrome, and sever...

  2. Variabilidade fenotípica na síndrome do cromossomo supernumerário der(22t(11;22 (síndrome de Emanuel Phenotypical variability in supernumerary chromosome der(22t(11;22 syndrome (Emanuel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Fabiano M. Rosa

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Relatar dois pacientes com a síndrome de Emanuel (SE ou cromossomo supernumerário der(22t(11;22, secundária a translocações balanceadas familiares, apresentando fenótipos distintos. DESCRIÇÃO DE CASO: O primeiro paciente é uma menina branca de cinco anos de idade, apresentando hipotonia, atraso no desenvolvimento neuropsicomotor, movimentos estereotipados, microcefalia, ptose palpebral, orelhas proeminentes, fossetas e apêndices pré-auriculares, e imperfuração anal. As avaliações adicionais identificaram hipoplasia cerebral e estenose da válvula pulmonar. Possuía história também de laringotraqueomalácia e fenda palatina. O segundo paciente é um menino branco de seis meses de idade com hipotonia, movimentos coreoatetóticos, déficit de crescimento, microcefalia, microssomia hemifacial, fenda palatina, microtia, apêndices pré-auriculares e polegares proximalmente implantados. A ecocardiografia demonstrou estenose da válvula pulmonar, comunicação interatrial e interventricular, persistência do canal arterial e da veia cava superior esquerda. A radiografia de tórax identificou uma costela cervical. O cariótipo por bandas GTG mostrou a presença, em ambos os pacientes, de um cromossomo adicional der(22t(11;22, secundário a uma translocação balanceada materna no primeiro caso e paterna no segundo caso. COMENTÁRIOS: Apesar de a primeira paciente apresentar achados frequentes da SE, o caso adicional representa a segunda descrição da literatura com um fenótipo de espectro óculo-aurículo-vertebral (EOAV. Assim, ambos salientam a variabilidade clínica observada na SE e a importância da avaliação cariotípica em indivíduos com fenótipo de EOAV.OBEJECTIVE: To report two patients with Emanuel syndrome (ES or supernumerary chromosome der(22t(11;22, secondary to familial balanced translocations, presenting distinct phenotypes. CASES DESCRIPTION: The first patient was a five-year-old white girl presenting

  3. Viewing Social Scenes: A Visual Scan-Path Study Comparing Fragile X Syndrome and Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Tracey A.; Porter, Melanie A.; Langdon, Robyn

    2013-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) and Williams syndrome (WS) are both genetic disorders which present with similar cognitive-behavioral problems, but distinct social phenotypes. Despite these social differences both syndromes display poor social relations which may result from abnormal social processing. This study aimed to manipulate the location of…

  4. Phenotype definition in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winawer, Melodie R

    2006-05-01

    Phenotype definition consists of the use of epidemiologic, biological, molecular, or computational methods to systematically select features of a disorder that might result from distinct genetic influences. By carefully defining the target phenotype, or dividing the sample by phenotypic characteristics, we can hope to narrow the range of genes that influence risk for the trait in the study population, thereby increasing the likelihood of finding them. In this article, fundamental issues that arise in phenotyping in epilepsy and other disorders are reviewed, and factors complicating genotype-phenotype correlation are discussed. Methods of data collection, analysis, and interpretation are addressed, focusing on epidemiologic studies. With this foundation in place, the epilepsy subtypes and clinical features that appear to have a genetic basis are described, and the epidemiologic studies that have provided evidence for the heritability of these phenotypic characteristics, supporting their use in future genetic investigations, are reviewed. Finally, several molecular approaches to phenotype definition are discussed, in which the molecular defect, rather than the clinical phenotype, is used as a starting point.

  5. 不同表型多囊卵巢综合征患者代谢综合征患病特点及风险研究%Morbidity and risk factors of metabolic syndrome in different phenotypes of polycystic ovary syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶弢; 刘伟; 赵爱民; 李圣贤; 郑俊; 王丽华; 周佳雯; 黄融; 张萍

    2013-01-01

    目的 多囊卵巢综合征(PCOS)患者表型的高度异质性决定了其合并代谢异常及预后的不同,故本研究调查不同表型的PCOS患者的代谢综合征(MS)患病率,并探讨代谢紊乱发生的危险因素.方法 比较305例PCOS患者及123例非PCOS女性的MS及其组分的患病率.PCOS的诊断根据2003年鹿特丹标准,将其分为高雄激素PCOS和无高雄激素PCOS两个亚组.MS诊断根据2005年国际糖尿病联盟(IDF)标准.结果 (1)无高雄激素PCOS组及高雄激素PCOS组的MS患病率分别为12.3%和22.9%,高雄激素PCOS组的MS患病率显著高于非PCOS对照组的6.5%(P<0.05),除空腹血糖和血压外,其他的MS组分在高雄激素PCOS组和无高雄激素PCOS组均高于非PCOS对照组(P<0.05).在血脂异常谱中,无高雄激素PCOS组高甘油三酯组分出现率显著高于高雄激素PCOS组及非PCOS对照组(均P<O.01),而在高雄激素PCOS组低高密度脂蛋白胆固醇组分出现率最高.(2)无高雄激素PCOS组及高雄激素PCOS组的葡萄糖处置指数(DI)及全身胰岛素敏感性(Matsuda Index)均明显低于正常对照组(均P<O.01),校正体重指数后差异仍有统计学意义.但无高雄激素PCOS组与高雄激素PCOS组的DI及全身胰岛素敏感性之间差异无统计学意义.(3)多元逐步回归分析显示全身胰岛素敏感性和体重指数是MS的独立预测因素(均P<O.01).结论 肥胖和全身胰岛素敏感性是MS的独立危险因素,高雄激素PCOS患者MS风险显著增加,而不同表型PCOS之间MS的组分有所差异.%Objective To test the hypothesis that different phenotypes Chinese women with polycystic ovary syndrome(PCOS) have various risk of metabolic syndrome(MS) and different metabolic phenotypes.Methods This was a prospective case-control study.A total of 305 women were diagnosed as PCOS based on the 2003 Rotterdam criteria.123 women with regular menstrual cycles and without hyperandrogenism were recruited and served as

  6. The analysis of the polymorphic variations of the dopamine gen transporter (DAT1 and the serotonin transporter (5-HTTLPR in patients with Alcohol Dependence Syndrome with inclusion of the phenotypic feature of sweet liking preference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasiewicz, Andrzej

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between sweet-liking phenotype and the variation of the gene sequence of the dopaminergic and serotonergic system. Methods. The study recruited 100 probands. The participants were interviewed for addiction (SSAGA-Semi Structured Assessment for the Genetics of Alcoholism and assessed with the questionnaires: MMSE, Beck Depression Inventory and Hamilton Anxiety, Snaith-Hamilton Pleasure Scale. The taste was analyzed with tests to assess sensitivity to sweet taste and also smell tests were performed. Patients preferring the highest glucose volumes were called sweet likers. Statistical analyses were performed (SPSS- Statistical Package for the Social Sciences. Results. Links between sweet liking phenotype and polymorphic variant of DAT1 gene were determined. The presence of DAT1 9/10 genotype increased three fold time sweet liking phenotype (p=0.015, odds ratio-3.00, the presence of DAT1 10/10 decreased two fold time the chance being sweet liker (p=0.051, odds ratio-0.43. Genotype 10/10 was significantly more common among sweet dislikers 10/10 (68.18% vs 47.92% i 9/9 (6.82% vs 2.08%. Conclusions. A genetically significant association between the presence of 9/10 DAT1 VNTR genotype and a sweet-liking phenotype in probands was determined.

  7. Genotype and phenotype of female Dravet syndrome with PCDH19 mutations%PCDH19基因突变导致的女性Dravet综合征的基因型和表型特点

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘爱杰; 张月华; 许小菁; 杨小玲; 杨志仙; 吴晔; 刘晓燕; 姜玉武; 吴希如

    2016-01-01

    目的 探讨PCDH19基因突变阳性的女性Dravet综合征(DS)患儿的基因型和表型特点.方法 前瞻性收集2005年2月至2015年5月在北京大学第一医院儿科就诊的DS患儿及其家系成员的临床资料和外周血DNA.以SCN1A基因突变筛查阴性的女性DS患儿为研究对象,采用Sanger测序的方法筛查PCDH19基因突变,分析PCDH19基因突变阳性女性患儿的基因型和临床特点.结果 共收集75例SCN1A基因突变阴性的女性DS患儿,其中6例发现PCDH19基因杂合突变,突变率8% (6/75);5例为新生突变,1例为遗传性突变.共检测到5种突变类型,均位于第1外显子,其中错义突变3种,碱基插入突变2种.6例携带PCDH19基因突变的患儿起病年龄为5~9月龄,平均6.8个月;首次发作由发热诱发者4例,接种疫苗后发作1例,无热发作1例.6例病程中表现为多种发作类型,均有全面强直-阵挛发作和局灶性发作,3例有肌阵挛发作,不典型失神发作和失张力发作各1例.6例患儿病程中癫痫发作均有热敏感和丛集性的特点,均有智力发育落后;2例有孤独症样表现,3例有共济失调.结论 PCDH19是继SCN1A之后DS的另一个重要致病基因,且以新生突变为主,该基因突变导致的女性DS患儿以全面强直-阵挛发作和局灶性发作为主,发作具有热敏感和丛集性的特点,且多数发作持续时间短,常有智力发育落后,部分可有孤独症样表现.%Objective To explore the genotype and phenotype of female Dravet syndrome (DS) patients with PCDH19 mutations.Method Clinical data of all DS patients seen at Pediatric Department of Peking University First Hospital from February 2005 to May 2015 were prospectively collected.Genomic DNAs were extracted from the patients and their family members.Female DS patients without SCN1A mutation were enrolled.PCR and Sanger sequencing were performed to identify PCDH19 mutations.Clinical data of DS patients with PCDH19 mutations were

  8. Auriculotemporal Syndrome (Frey Syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motz, Kevin M; Kim, Young J

    2016-04-01

    Frey syndrome is a common sequela of parotidectomy, and although it is not frequently manifested clinically, it can cause significant morbidity for those affected. Frey syndrome results from synkinetic autonomic reinnervation by transected postganglionic parasympathetic nerve fiber within the parotid gland to the overlying sweat glands of the skin. Many surgical techniques have been proposed to prevent the development of Frey syndrome. For those who develop clinical symptoms of Frey syndrome, objective testing can be performed with a Minor starch-iodine test. Some of the current methods to prevent and treat symptomatic Frey syndrome are reviewed. PMID:26902982

  9. Identifying Mutations of the Tetratricopeptide Repeat Domain 37 (TTC37) Gene in Infants With Intractable Diarrhea and a Comparison of Asian and Non-Asian Phenotype and Genotype: A Global Case-report Study of a Well-Defined Syndrome With Immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wen-I; Huang, Jing-Long; Chen, Chien-Chang; Lin, Ju-Li; Wu, Ren-Chin; Jaing, Tang-Her; Ou, Liang-Shiou

    2016-03-01

    Syndromic diarrhea/tricho-hepato-enteric syndrome (SD/THE) is a rare, autosomal recessive and severe bowel disorder mainly caused by mutations in the tetratricopeptide repeat domain 37 (TTC37) gene which act as heterotetrameric cofactors to enhance aberrant mRNAs decay. The phenotype and immune profiles of SD/THE overlap those of primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs). Neonates with intractable diarrhea underwent immunologic assessments including immunoglobulin levels, lymphocyte subsets, lymphocyte proliferation, superoxide production, and IL-10 signaling function. Candidate genes for PIDs predisposing to inflammatory bowel disease were sequencing in this study. Two neonates, born to nonconsanguineous parents, suffered from intractable diarrhea, recurrent infections, and massive hematemesis from esopharyngeal varices due to liver cirrhosis or accompanying Trichorrhexis nodosa that developed with age and thus guided the diagnosis of SD/THE compatible to TTC37 mutations (homozygous DelK1155H, Fs*2; heterozygous Y1169Ter and InsA1143, Fs*3). Their immunologic evaluation showed normal mitogen-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation, superoxide production, and IL-10 signaling, but low IgG levels, undetectable antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen and decreased antigen-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation. A PubMed search for bi-allelic TTC37 mutations and phenotypes were recorded in 14 Asian and 12 non-Asian cases. They had similar presentations of infantile onset refractory diarrhea, facial dysmorphism, hair anomalies, low IgG, low birth weight, and consanguinity. A higher incidence of heart anomalies (8/14 vs 2/12; P = 0.0344, Chi-square), nonsense mutations (19 in 28 alleles), and hot-spot mutations (W936Ter, 2779-2G>A, and Y1169Ter) were found in the Asian compared with the non-Asian patients. Despite immunoglobulin therapy in 20 of the patients, 4 died from liver cirrhosis and 1 died from sepsis. Patients of all ethnicities with SD/THE with the characteristic

  10. TESTICULAR FEMINISING SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kumar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Testicular feminization syndrome is a form of pseudohermaphroditism where phenotypic female has male gonads and is genotypically male. Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS, also known as testicular feminization, encompasses a wide range of phenotypes that are caused by numerous different mutations in the androgen receptor gene. AIS is an X-linked recessive disorder that is classified as complete, partial based on the phenotypic presentation. The clinical findings include a female type of external genitalia, 46-XY karyotype, absence of Mullerian structures, presence of Wolffian structures to various degrees, and normal to high testosterone and gonadotropin levels. The syndrome is illustrated by a 24-year-old phenotypic female who presented with a primary amenorrhea, female-type external genitalia, an absent uterus and ovaries, and bilateral testes at the level of the internal inguinal ring. Management includes counseling, gonadectomy to prevent primary malignancy in undescended gonad, and hormone replacement. The karyotyping of family members is advocated because of known familial tendencies.

  11. Phenotypic variability in 49 cases of ESCO2 mutations, including novel missense and codon deletion in the acetyltransferase domain, correlates with ESCO2 expression and establishes the clinical criteria for Roberts syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vega, H; Trainer, A H; Gordillo, M;

    2010-01-01

    Roberts syndrome (RBS) and SC phocomelia are caused by mutations in ESCO2, which codes for an acetyltransferase involved in the regulation of sister chromatid cohesion. Of 26 mutations described to date, only one missense mutation has been reported and all others are predicted to be truncating mu...

  12. Two families with isolated cat cry without the cri-du-chat syndrome phenotype have an inherited 5p15.3 deletion: Delineation of the larynx malformation region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gersh, M.; Overhauser, J. [Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Pasztor, L.M. [Children`s Mercy Hospital, Kansas City, MO (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The cri-du-chat syndrome is a contiguous gene syndrome that results from a deletion of the short arm of chromosome 5 (5p). Patients present with a cat-like cry at birth that is usually considered diagnostic of this syndrome. Additional features of the syndrome include failure to thrive, microcephaly, hypertelorism, epicanthal folds, hypotonia, and severe mental retardation. We report on two families in which the patients with 5p deletions have only the characteristic cat-like cry with normal to mildly delayed development. One family has three children with varying levels of developmental delay and a deletion of 5p15.3 that was inherited from the father. The second family has a mother and daughter both presenting with a cat-like cry and normal intelligence. A de novo deletion in a patient with isolated cat cry and mild developmental delay was also identified. The precise locations of the deletions in each family were determined by fluorescent in situ hybridization using lambda phage, cosmids, and YAC clones. Cryptic translocations and mosaicism were not detected in the parents transmitting the deletion. All of the deletion breakpoints map distal to the previously defined cri-du-chat critical region. A YAC contig has been constructed for the chromosomal region implicated in the larynx malformation. DNA clones mapping in this region will be useful diagnostic tools for delineating 5p deletions that result in the typical features of cri-du-chat syndrome with deletions that result in the isolated cat-like cry feature which is associated with a better prognosis.

  13. Analysis of Pena Shokeir phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, J G

    1986-09-01

    At this point in time, we recognize that "Pena Shokeir" is not a diagnosis or a specific syndrome but rather a description of a phenotype produced by fetal akinesia or decreased in utero movement. In its "full blown" form, it is characterized by polyhydramnios, intrauterine growth retardation, pulmonary hypoplasia, craniofacial and limb anomalies, congenital contractures, short umbilical cord, and lethality. From the cases thus far reported, we would anticipate that the phenotype is present in a very heterogeneous group of disorders--heterogeneous both with regard to the specific anomalies present and with regard to the causes (which must include many environmental agents and multiple genetic forms). One challenge for the future is to better describe and delineate specific entities. In the meantime, we would do well to use the terms "Pena Shokeir phenotype" or "fetal akinesia/hypokinesia sequence," which do not imply a single entity. There are many practical aspects of recognizing this phenotype. The presence of any one of the cardinal signs of the fetal akinesia/hypokinesia sequence should alert the physician to look for the other associated anomalies, since specific treatment may be indicated, and catch-up or compensatory growth may occur, if given a chance. The ability to provide prenatal diagnosis and perhaps prenatal treatment in the future may allow us to alter dramatically the natural history of some cases. In others, we need to establish when treatment is possible and when it gives no benefit. Perhaps the most important insight gained from the study of the fetal akinesia sequence is the reaffirmation of the concept that function is an integral part of normal development. Specific structures do not develop in isolation but are part of a carefully timed and integrated system. The "use" of a structure in utero is necessary for its continuing and normal development. The old adage "use it or lose it" seems to apply just as appropriately to prenatal normal

  14. Developmental Dynamics of Rett Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Feldman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rett Syndrome was long considered to be simply a disorder of postnatal development, with phenotypes that manifest only late in development and into adulthood. A variety of recent evidence demonstrates that the phenotypes of Rett Syndrome are present at the earliest stages of brain development, including developmental stages that define neurogenesis, migration, and patterning in addition to stages of synaptic and circuit development and plasticity. These phenotypes arise from the pleotropic effects of MeCP2, which is expressed very early in neuronal progenitors and continues to be expressed into adulthood. The effects of MeCP2 are mediated by diverse signaling, transcriptional, and epigenetic mechanisms. Attempts to reverse the effects of Rett Syndrome need to take into account the developmental dynamics and temporal impact of MeCP2 loss.

  15. Myasthenic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, M E

    2011-03-01

    The neuromuscular junction is vulnerable to autoimmune attack both at the pre-synaptic nerve terminal and at the post-synaptic muscle membrane. Antibodies directed to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor at the muscle surface are the cause of myasthenia gravis in the majority of cases. Myasthenia gravis is an acquired condition, characterised by weakness and fatigability of the skeletal muscles. The ocular muscles are commonly affected first, but the disease often generalises. Treatment includes symptom control and immunosuppression. The thymus gland plays an important role in the pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis and thymectomy is indicated in certain subgroups. Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome is associated with antibodies directed to the voltage-gated calcium channel antibodies at the pre-synaptic nerve terminal. It is an acquired condition and, in some cases, may be paraneoplastic, often secondary to underlying small cell lung carcinoma. Clinical presentation is distinct from myasthenia gravis, with patients often first presenting with lower limb muscle fatigability and autonomic symptoms. Congenital myasthenic syndromes are inherited neuromuscular disorders due to mutations in proteins at the neuromuscular junction. Various phenotypes exist depending on the protein mutation. Treatment is directed towards symptom control and immunosuppression is not indicated. PMID:21365067

  16. The Human Phenotype Ontology project: linking molecular biology and disease through phenotype data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Sebastian; Doelken, Sandra C.; Mungall, Christopher J.; Bauer, Sebastian; Firth, Helen V.; Bailleul-Forestier, Isabelle; Black, Graeme C. M.; Brown, Danielle L.; Brudno, Michael; Campbell, Jennifer; FitzPatrick, David R.; Eppig, Janan T.; Jackson, Andrew P.; Freson, Kathleen; Girdea, Marta; Helbig, Ingo; Hurst, Jane A.; Jähn, Johanna; Jackson, Laird G.; Kelly, Anne M.; Ledbetter, David H.; Mansour, Sahar; Martin, Christa L.; Moss, Celia; Mumford, Andrew; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Park, Soo-Mi; Riggs, Erin Rooney; Scott, Richard H.; Sisodiya, Sanjay; Vooren, Steven Van; Wapner, Ronald J.; Wilkie, Andrew O. M.; Wright, Caroline F.; Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T.; de Leeuw, Nicole; de Vries, Bert B. A.; Washingthon, Nicole L.; Smith, Cynthia L.; Westerfield, Monte; Schofield, Paul; Ruef, Barbara J.; Gkoutos, Georgios V.; Haendel, Melissa; Smedley, Damian; Lewis, Suzanna E.; Robinson, Peter N.

    2014-01-01

    The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) project, available at http://www.human-phenotype-ontology.org, provides a structured, comprehensive and well-defined set of 10,088 classes (terms) describing human phenotypic abnormalities and 13,326 subclass relations between the HPO classes. In addition we have developed logical definitions for 46% of all HPO classes using terms from ontologies for anatomy, cell types, function, embryology, pathology and other domains. This allows interoperability with several resources, especially those containing phenotype information on model organisms such as mouse and zebrafish. Here we describe the updated HPO database, which provides annotations of 7,278 human hereditary syndromes listed in OMIM, Orphanet and DECIPHER to classes of the HPO. Various meta-attributes such as frequency, references and negations are associated with each annotation. Several large-scale projects worldwide utilize the HPO for describing phenotype information in their datasets. We have therefore generated equivalence mappings to other phenotype vocabularies such as LDDB, Orphanet, MedDRA, UMLS and phenoDB, allowing integration of existing datasets and interoperability with multiple biomedical resources. We have created various ways to access the HPO database content using flat files, a MySQL database, and Web-based tools. All data and documentation on the HPO project can be found online. PMID:24217912

  17. PRRT2 phenotypes and penetrance of paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia and infantile convulsions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vliet, Rianne; Breedveld, Guido; de Rijk-van Andel, Johanneke; Brilstra, Eva; Verbeek, Nienke; Verschuuren-Bemelmans, Corien; Boon, Maartje; Samijn, Johnny; Diderich, Karin; van de Laar, Ingrid; Oostra, Ben; Bonifati, Vincenzo; Maat-Kievit, Anneke

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To describe the phenotypes and penetrance of paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD), a movement disorder characterized by attacks of involuntary movements occurring after sudden movements, infantile convulsion and choreoathetosis (ICCA) syndrome, and benign familial infantile convulsions

  18. Variation in the Vitreous Phenotype of Stickler Syndrome Can Be Caused by Different Amino Acid Substitutions in the X Position of the Type II Collagen Gly-X-Y Triple Helix

    OpenAIRE

    Richards, Allan J; Baguley, David M.; Yates, John R W; Lane, Carol; Nicol, Mary; Harper, Peter S; Scott, John D.; Snead, Martin P

    2000-01-01

    Stickler syndrome is a dominantly inherited disorder characterized by arthropathy, midline clefting, hearing loss, midfacial hypoplasia, myopia, and retinal detachment. These features are highly variable both between and within families. Mutations causing the disorder have been found in the COL2A1 and COL11A1 genes. Premature termination codons in COL2A1 that result in haploinsufficiency of type II collagen are a common finding. These produce a characteristic congenital “membranous” anomaly o...

  19. 47,XXY Klinefelter syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aksglaede, Lise; Link, Katarina; Giwercman, Aleksander;

    2013-01-01

    clinical finding in KS is small testes, that are most often not identified until after puberty. Decreased awareness of this syndrome among health professionals and a general perception that all patients with 47,XXY exhibit the classic textbook phenotype results in a highly under-diagnosed condition with up...... at the appropriate ages and stages of development for the purpose of preventing osteopenia/osteoporosis, metabolic syndrome, and other medical conditions related to hypogonadism and to the XXY as well as minimizing potential learning and psychosocial problems. The aim of this review is to present the clinical...

  20. Heritable Gastrointestinal Cancer Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffel, Elena M

    2016-09-01

    Although almost all gastrointestinal cancers develop from sporadic genomic events, approximately 5% arise from germline mutations in genes associated with cancer predisposition. The number of these genes continues to increase. Tumor phenotypes and family history provide the framework for identifying at-risk individuals. The diagnosis of a hereditary cancer syndrome has implications for management of patients and their families. Systematic approaches that integrate family history and molecular characterization of tumors and polyps facilitate identification of individuals with this genetic predisposition. This article summarizes diagnosis and management of hereditary cancer syndromes associated with gastrointestinal cancers. PMID:27546846

  1. COGNITIVE PROFILE OF TURNER SYNDROME

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, David; Kent, Jamie Scaletta; Kesler, Shelli

    2009-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a relatively common neurogenetic disorder characterized by complete or partial monosomy-X in a phenotypic female. TS is associated with a cognitive profile that typically includes intact intellectual function and verbal abilities with relative weaknesses in visual–spatial, executive, and social cognitive domains. In this report, we review previous and current research related to the cognitive profile of TS. We also discuss how cognitive impairments in this syndrome may...

  2. Rett syndrome: a study of the face

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.E. Allanson; R.C.M. Hennekam; U. Moog; E.E. Smeets

    2011-01-01

    Rett syndrome is a unique disorder of neurodevelopment that is characterized by an evolving behavioral and developmental phenotype, which emerges after an apparently normal early infantile period. It almost exclusively affects females. The face of Rett syndrome is said to resemble that of Angelman s

  3. Treacher Collins syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Ravi Prakash Sasankoti; Verma, Sankalp; Agarwal, Neha; Singh, Udita

    2013-05-24

    Treacher Collins syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development. The fully expressed phenotype exhibits characteristic dysmorphic features involving the face, eyes, mandible and ears. We report a case of a 17-year-old woman presenting with the typical orofacial implications of this syndrome.

  4. Turner′s syndrome presenting as metabolic bone disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadishkumar Kamalanathan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Turner′s syndrome is a genetic disorder with a complete or partial absence of one X chromosome with characteristic phenotypic features. The prevalence of renal anomalies in turner syndrome is 30-40%. However, the renal function is usually normal. We report a case of Turner′s syndrome presenting with chronic kidney disease and renal osteodystrophy.

  5. Education and Children with Down Syndrome: Neuroscience, Development, and Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, Deborah J.; Nadel, Lynn

    2007-01-01

    Of the recent advances in education-related research in Down syndrome, the characterization of the Down syndrome behavioral phenotype has become a potentially critical tool for shaping education and intervention in this population. This article briefly reviews the literature on brain-behavior connections in Down syndrome and identifies aspects of…

  6. A case of duplication of 13q32-->qter and deletion of 18p11.32-->pter with mild phenotype: Patau syndrome and duplications of 13q revisited.

    OpenAIRE

    Helali, N; Iafolla, A K; Kahler, S G; Qumsiyeh, M B

    1996-01-01

    A mild clinical phenotype is described in a patient with duplication of 13q32-->qter and a small deletion of 18p11.32-->pter. The 8 year old white male presented with psychomotor retardation, tethered cord, soft, fleshy ears, and normal facial features except for thin lips. The karyotype was found to be 46, XY, der(18)t(13;18) (q32;p11.32) pat confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH). A review of earlier studies showed that features of trisomy 13 are found in cases of duplicatio...

  7. Partial 1q Duplications and Associated Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Marcos L.M.; Baroneza, José E.; Teixeira, Patricia; Medina, Cristina T.N.; Cordoba, Mara S.; Versiani, Beatriz R.; Roese, Liege L.; Freitas, Erika L.; Fonseca, Ana C.S.; dos Santos, Maria C.G.; Pic-Taylor, Aline; Rosenberg, Carla; Oliveira, Silviene F.; Ferrari, Iris; Mazzeu, Juliana F.

    2016-01-01

    Duplications of the long arm of chromosome 1 are rare. Distal duplications are the most common and have been reported as either pure trisomy or unbalanced translocations. The paucity of cases with pure distal 1q duplications has made it difficult to delineate a partial distal trisomy 1q syndrome. Here, we report 2 patients with overlapping 1q duplications detected by G-banding. Array CGH and FISH were performed to characterize the duplicated segments, exclude the involvement of other chromosomes and determine the orientation of the duplication. Patient 1 presents with a mild phenotype and carries a 22.5-Mb 1q41q43 duplication. Patient 2 presents with a pure 1q42.13qter inverted duplication of 21.5 Mb, one of the smallest distal 1q duplications ever described and one of the few cases characterized by array CGH, thus contributing to a better characterization of distal 1q duplication syndrome. PMID:27022331

  8. Syndromes that Link the Endocrine System and Genitourinary Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özlük, Yasemin; Kılıçaslan, Işın

    2015-01-01

    The endocrine system and genitourinary tract unite in various syndromes. Genitourinary malignancies may cause paraneoplastic endocrine syndromes by secreting hormonal substances. These entities include Cushing`s syndrome, hypercalcemia, hyperglycemia, polycythemia, hypertension, and inappropriate ADH or HCG production. The most important syndromic scenarios that links these two systems are hereditary renal cancer syndromes with specific genotype/phenotype correlation. There are also some very rare entities in which endocrine and genitourinary systems are involved such as Carney complex, congenital adrenal hyperplasia and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. We will review all the syndromes regarding manifestations present in endocrine and genitourinary organs.

  9. Child Neurology: Zellweger syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Paul R.; Raymond, Gerald V.

    2013-01-01

    Zellweger syndrome (ZS) is a severe manifestation of disease within the spectrum of peroxisome biogenesis disorders that includes neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy, infantile Refsum disease, and rhizomelic chondroplasia punctata. Patients with ZS present in the neonatal period with a characteristic phenotype of distinctive facial stigmata, pronounced hypotonia, poor feeding, hepatic dysfunction, and often seizures and boney abnormalities. In patients with ZS, a mutation in one of the PEX genes co...

  10. Bi Syndrome (Arthralgia Syndrome)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG En-qin

    2010-01-01

    @@ The word 'Bi' (痹) in Chinese means an obstruction.Bi Syndrome refers the syndrome characterized by the obstruction of qi and blood in the meridians due to the invasion of external pathogenic wind, cold and dampness, manifested as soreness, pain, numbness,heavy sensation, swelling of joints and limbs, limitation of movements and so on.

  11. Neurofibromatosis with fully expressed Noonan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuelo, D N; Meryash, D L

    1988-04-01

    We present an 18-year-old man with neurofibromatosis (NF) and classic manifestations of the Noonan syndrome (NS), including the cardiac findings. His father also has neurofibromatosis but only some of the characteristics of Noonan syndrome. This case lends further support to the notion that the neurofibromatosis-Noonan syndrome (NF-NS) is a discrete entity and demonstrates that the NF-NS can be inherited, with variable expression of the Noonan phenotype within a family.

  12. Anterior segment dysgenesis in mosaic Turner syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Lloyd, I; Haigh, P; Clayton-Smith, J.; Clayton, P.; Price, D.; Ridgway, A; Donnai, D

    1997-01-01

    AIMS/BACKGROUND—Females with Turner syndrome commonly exhibit ophthalmological abnormalities, although there is little information in the literature documenting findings specific to Turner syndrome mosaics. Ophthalmic findings are described in four patients with mosaic Turner syndrome. All had anterior chamber abnormalities and all four had karyotypic abnormalities with a 45, X cell line. The possible relation between the karyotypic and the phenotypic findings in these patients is discussed.
...

  13. [Lynch syndrome, Muir Torre variant: 2 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Mujica, María Del Carmen; Barletta-Carrillo, Claudia; Acosta-Aliaga, Marisa; Montenegro-Garreaud, Ximena

    2016-01-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is an autosomal-dominant inherited cancer predisposition syndrome caused by germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2). Muir-Torre syndrome (MTS) is a phenotypic variant of LS that includes a predisposition to sebaceous glands tumors and keratoacanthomas. We report two patients with MTS, with more than one LS-related cancer, skin lesions, family history of cancer andmicrosatellite instability and immunohistochemistry analysis. PMID:27131946

  14. The importance of chromosome studies in Roberts syndrome/SC phocomelia and other cohesinopathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerkes, Erica H.; van der Kevie-Kersemaekers, Anne-Marie F.; Yakin, Mariam; Smeets, Dominique F. C. M.; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M. A.

    2010-01-01

    Roberts syndrome/SC phocomelia is a rare, autosomal recessive syndrome characterised by pre- and postnatal growth retardation, microcephaly, craniofacial anomalies, mental retardation, and tetraphocomelia in varying degrees of severity. The clinical diagnosis can be challenging in phenotypically mil

  15. Epidermal nevus syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asch, Sarah; Sugarman, Jeffrey L

    2015-01-01

    The term epidermal nevus syndrome (ENS) has been used to describe the association of epidermal hamartomas and extracutaneous abnormalities. Although many continue to use the term "ENS," it is now understood that this is not one disease, but rather a heterogeneous group with distinct genetic profiles defined by a common cutaneous phenotype: the presence of epidermal and adnexal hamartomas that are associated with other organ system involvement. One commonality is that epidermal nevi often follow the lines of Blaschko and it appears the more widespread the cutaneous manifestations, the greater the risk for extracutaneous manifestations. The majority of the extracutaneous manifestations involve the brain, eye, and skeletal systems. The CNS involvement is wide ranging and involves both clinical manifestations such as intellectual disability and seizures, as well as structural anomalies. Several subsets of ENS with characteristic features have been delineated including the nevus sebaceus syndrome, Proteus syndrome, CHILD syndrome, Becker's nevus syndrome, nevus comedonicus syndrome, and phakomatosis pigmentokeratotica. Advances in molecular biology have revealed that the manifestations of ENS are due to genomic mosaicism. It is likely that the varied clinical manifestations of ENS are due in great part to the functional effects of specific genetic defects. Optimal management of the patient with ENS involves an interdisciplinary approach given the potential for multisystem involvement. Of note, epidermal nevi have been associated with both benign and malignant neoplasms, and thus ongoing clinical follow-up is required.

  16. The Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biesecker Leslie G

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome (GCPS is a pleiotropic, multiple congenital anomaly syndrome. It is rare, but precise estimates of incidence are difficult to determine, as ascertainment is erratic (estimated range 1–9/1,000,000. The primary findings include hypertelorism, macrocephaly with frontal bossing, and polysyndactyly. The polydactyly is most commonly preaxial of the feet and postaxial in the hands, with variable cutaneous syndactyly, but the limb findings vary significantly. Other low frequency findings include central nervous system (CNS anomalies, hernias, and cognitive impairment. GCPS is caused by loss of function mutations in the GLI3 transcription factor gene and is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern. The disorder is allelic to the Pallister-Hall syndrome and one form of the acrocallosal syndrome. Clinical diagnosis is challenging because the findings of GCPS are relatively non-specific, and no specific and sensitive clinical have been delineated. For this reason, we have proposed a combined clinical-molecular definition for the syndrome. A presumptive diagnosis of GCPS can be made if the patient has the classic triad of preaxial polydactyly with cutaneous syndactyly of at least one limb, hypertelorism, and macrocephaly. Patients with a phenotype consistent with GCPS (but which may not manifest all three attributes listed above and a GLI3 mutation may be diagnosed definitively with GCPS. In addition, persons with a GCPS-consistent phenotype who are related to a definitively diagnosed family member in a pattern consistent with autosomal dominant inheritance may be diagnosed definitively as well. Antenatal molecular diagnosis is technically straightforward to perform. Differential diagnoses include preaxial polydactyly type 4, the GCPS contiguous gene syndrome, acrocallosal syndrome, Gorlin syndrome, Carpenter syndrome, and Teebi syndrome. Treatment of the disorder is symptomatic, with plastic or

  17. COPD: Definition and Phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestbo, J.

    2014-01-01

    particles or gases. Exacerbations and comorbidities contribute to the overall severity in individual patients. The evolution of this definition and the diagnostic criteria currently in use are discussed. COPD is increasingly divided in subgroups or phenotypes based on specific features and association...

  18. Mixed phenotype acute leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ye Zixing; Wang Shujie

    2014-01-01

    Objective To highlight the current understanding of mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL).Data sources We collected the relevant articles in PubMed (from 1985 to present),using the terms "mixed phenotype acute leukemia","hybrid acute leukemia","biphenotypic acute leukemia",and "mixed lineage leukemia".We also collected the relevant studies in WanFang Data base (from 2000 to present),using the terms "mixed phenotype acute leukemia" and "hybrid acute leukemia".Study selection We included all relevant studies concerning mixed phenotype acute leukemia in English and Chinese version,with no limitation of research design.The duplicated articles are excluded.Results MPAL is a rare subgroup of acute leukemia which expresses the myeloid and lymphoid markers simultaneously.The clinical manifestations of MPAL are similar to other acute leukemias.The World Health Organization classification and the European Group for Immunological classification of Leukaemias 1998 cdteria are most widely used.MPAL does not have a standard therapy regimen.Its treatment depends mostly on the patient's unique immunophenotypic and cytogenetic features,and also the experience of individual physician.The lack of effective treatment contributes to an undesirable prognosis.Conclusion Our understanding about MPAL is still limited.The diagnostic criteria have not been unified.The treatment of MPAL remains to be investigated.The prognostic factor is largely unclear yet.A better diagnostic cdteria and targeted therapeutics will improve the therapy effect and a subsequently better prognosis.

  19. Joint hypermobility syndrome pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grahame, Rodney

    2009-12-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) was initially defined as the occurrence of musculoskeletal symptoms in the presence of joint laxity and hypermobility in otherwise healthy individuals. It is now perceived as a commonly overlooked, underdiagnosed, multifaceted, and multisystemic heritable disorder of connective tissue (HDCT), which shares many of the phenotypic features of other HDCTs such as Marfan syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Whereas the additional flexibility can confer benefits in terms of mobility and agility, adverse effects of tissue laxity and fragility can give rise to clinical consequences that resonate far beyond the confines of the musculoskeletal system. There is hardly a clinical specialty to be found that is not touched in one way or another by JHS. Over the past decade, it has become evident that of all the complications that may arise in JHS, chronic pain is arguably the most menacing and difficult to treat. PMID:19889283

  20. Brachman de lange syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leena Verma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Brachman de Lange syndrome or Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS is a genetic disorder which can lead to severe developmental anomalies. It affects both the physical and intellectual development of a child. It is characterized by skeletal, craniofacial deformities, gastrointestinal and cardiac malformations. This syndrome is of rare occurrence and affects between 1/10,000 and 1/60,000 neonates. Diagnosis is based on the characteristic phenotype, in particular, a striking facial appearance, prenatal and postnatal growth retardation, various skeletal abnormalities, hypertrichosis, and developmental delay. Here, we present the case of a 13-year-old patient, with micrognathia, delayed eruption, multiple carious teeth, missing teeth and periodontal problems together, which had never been reported before. The father was also found to have the same missing teeth as the girl child.

  1. Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfan syndrome is a disorder that affects connective tissue. Connective tissues are proteins that support skin, bones, ... fibrillin. A problem with the fibrillin gene causes Marfan syndrome. Marfan syndrome can be mild to severe, ...

  2. Kliniske aspekter af Marfans syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belsing, Tina Zimmermann; Lund, Allan Meldgaard; Søndergaard, Lars;

    2011-01-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) and MFS-related diseases are inherited connective tissue disorders involving several organ systems. The diagnosis of MFS is difficult as the many symptoms overlap with those of other systemic connective tissue diseases. The phenotype is progressive. Effective surgical therapy...

  3. RETT'S SYNDROME : A CASE REPORT

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Vinay

    2001-01-01

    Rett's syndrome is a rare condition affecting only the girl child. It presents as a pervasive developmental disorder with a remarkable behavioural phenotype. The cause for this remains unknown but genetic factors and brain dysfunction have been implicated. This case report emphasises the importance of being aware of rare yet significant disorders of interest to neuro-developmental psychiatrists.

  4. Cognitive Profile of Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, David; Kent, Jamie Scaletta; Kesler, Shelli

    2009-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a relatively common neurogenetic disorder characterized by complete or partial monosomy-X in a phenotypic female. TS is associated with a cognitive profile that typically includes intact intellectual function and verbal abilities with relative weaknesses in visual-spatial, executive, and social cognitive domains. In this…

  5. Genetics Home Reference: Christianson syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... L, Christianson A, Tarpey P, Whibley A, Stratton MR, Futreal PA, Teague J, Edkins S, Gecz J, Turner G, Raymond FL, Schwartz C, Stevenson RE, Undlien DE, Strømme P. SLC9A6 mutations cause X-linked mental retardation, microcephaly, epilepsy, and ataxia, a phenotype mimicking Angelman syndrome. Am ...

  6. Phenotypes and enviromental factors: their influence in PCOS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia; Christakou, Charikleia; Marinakis, Evangelos

    2012-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a complex syndrome of unclear etiopathogenesis characterized by heterogeneity in phenotypic manifestations. The clinical phenotype of PCOS includes reproductive and hormonal aberrations, namely anovulation and hyperandrogenism, which coexist with metabolic disturbances. Reflecting the crosstalk between the reproductive system and metabolic tissues, obesity not only deteriorates the metabolic profile but also aggravates ovulatory dysfunction and hyperandrogenism. Although the pathogenesis of PCOS remains unclear, the syndrome appears to involve environmental and genetic components. Starting from early life and extending throughout lifecycle, environmental insults may affect susceptible women who finally demonstrate the clinical phenotype of PCOS. Diet emerges as the major environmental determinant of PCOS. Overnutrition leading to obesity is widely recognized to have an aggravating impact, while another detrimental dietary factor may be the high content of food in advanced glycated end products (AGEs). Environmental exposure to industrial products, particularly Bisphenol A (BPA), may also exacerbate the clinical course of PCOS. AGEs and BPA may act as endocrine disruptors in the pathogenesis of the syndrome. PCOS appears to mirror the harmful influence of the modern environment on the reproductive and metabolic balance of inherently predisposed individuals. PMID:22229564

  7. Musculo-Skeletal Abnormalities in Patients with Marfan Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Al Kaissi; Elisabeth Zwettler; Rudolf Ganger; Simone Schreiner; Klaus Klaushofer; Franz Grill

    2013-01-01

    Background A leptosomic body type is tall and thin with long hands. Marfanoid features may be familial in nature or pathological, as occurs in congenital contractual arachnodactyly (Beal’s syndrome) and Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome mimicking some of the changes of Marfan syndrome, although not accompanied by luxation of lens and dissecting aneurysm of aorta. Methods In this article we collected eight patients who were consistent with the diagnosis of Marfan syndrome via phenotypic and genotyp...

  8. Radial, renal and craniofacial anomalies: Baller-Gerold syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murthy Jyotsna

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The Baller-Gerold syndrome is a rare syndrome with very few cases published in literature. Craniosynostosis and radial aplasia are striking features, easy to diagnose. However, there are many differential diagnoses. Often, the question raised is whether the Baller-Gerald syndrome is a distinct entity. We report a patient with findings of craniosynostosis and radial aplasia consistent with the diagnosis of the Baller-Gerold syndrome. Genotypic heterogeneity could possibly underlie the phenotypic variability exhibited by these cases.

  9. Cohen Syndrome. A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elayne Esther Santana Hernández

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cohen syndrome is a rare genetic disease that is transmitted in an autosomal recessive pattern. It is characterized by obesity, hypotonia, mental retardation, microcephaly, typical craniofacial dysmorphism, large and prominent central incisors as well as thin, spindle-shaped fingers. The locus for Cohen syndrome has been located on chromosome 8q 22 (COH 1. Few cases have been reported since its description, it is clinically diagnosed through a proper delineation of the phenotype. The case of 14-year-old patient with this syndrome in whom a clinical diagnosis had not been established thus far is presented. An accurate delineation of the phenotype was achieved at this age and consequently, the correct diagnosis was reached, which is critical in order to provide better genetic counseling to the family.

  10. The behavioral characteristics of Sotos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Krupa; Moss, Joanna; Hyland, Sarah; Stinton, Chris; Cole, Trevor; Oliver, Chris

    2015-12-01

    In this study we describe the levels of clinically significant behavior in participants with Sotos syndrome relative to three matched contrast groups in which the behavioral phenotype is well documented (Autism Spectrum Disorder, ASD; Prader-Willi, and Down syndromes). Parents and carers of 38 individuals with Sotos syndrome (mean age = 17.3; SD = 9.36), completed questionnaires regarding self-injury, aggression, repetitive behavior, autism spectrum phenomenology, overactivity, impulsivity and mood, interest and pleasure. Individuals with Sotos syndrome showed an increased risk of self-injurious behavior, physical aggression, and destruction of property relative to the Down syndrome group but not a greater risk of stereotyped behavior. Impulsivity and levels of activity were also significantly higher relative to those with Down syndrome and comparable to those with ASD. A large proportion of participants met the cut off score for ASD (70.3%) and Autism (32.4%) on the Social Communication Questionnaire. Social impairments were particularly prominent with repetitive behavior and communication impairments less characteristic of the syndrome. Interestingly, preference for routine and repetitive language were heightened in individuals with Sotos syndrome and the repetitive behavior profile was strikingly similar to that observed in individuals with Prader-Willi syndrome. These findings build upon previous research and provide further evidence of the behavioral phenotype associated with Sotos syndrome.

  11. An unusual presentation of Kabuki syndrome: clinical overlap with CHARGE syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhagen, Judith M A; Oostdijk, Wilma; Terwisscha van Scheltinga, Cecilia E J; Schalij-Delfos, Nicoline E; van Bever, Yolande

    2014-09-01

    Kabuki syndrome is a rare genetic disorder characterized by intellectual disability and multiple congenital anomalies, including short stature, peculiar facial appearance, skeletal anomalies, a variety of visceral malformations and abnormal dermatoglyphic patterns. We describe a case of Kabuki syndrome presenting with atypical features, consisting of bilateral microphthalmia, coloboma, anal atresia and panhypopituitarism, showing considerable phenotypic overlap with CHARGE syndrome. This report demonstrates that clinical follow-up and molecular genetic testing can be useful for establishing the correct diagnosis. PMID:24862881

  12. Phenotypic heterogeneity of monogenic frontotemporal dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto eBenussi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Frontotemporal dementia (FTD is a genetically and pathologically heterogeneous disorder characterized by personality changes, language impairment and deficits of executive functions associated with frontal and temporal lobe degeneration. Different phenotypes have been defined on the basis of presenting clinical symptoms, i.e. the behavioral variant of FTD (bvFTD, the agrammatic variant of Primary Progressive Aphasia (avPPA and the semantic variant of PPA (svPPA. Some patients have an associated movement disorder, either parkinsonism, as in Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP and Corticobasal Syndrome (CBS, or motor neuron disease (FTD-MND. A family history of dementia is found in 40% of cases of FTD and about 10% have a clear autosomal dominant inheritance. Genetic studies have identified several genes associated to monogenic FTD: microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT, progranulin (GRN, TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TARBDP, valosin-containing protein (VCP, charged multivesicular body protein 2B (CHMP2B, fused in sarcoma (FUS and the hexanucleotide repeat expansion in intron 1 of the chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9orf72. Patients often present with an extensive phenotypic variability, even among different members of the same kindred carrying an identical disease mutation. The objective of the present work is to review and evaluate available literature data in order to highlight recent advances in clinical, biological and neuroimaging features of monogenic frontotemporal lobar degeneration and try to identify different mechanisms underlying the extreme phenotypic heterogeneity that characterizes this disease.

  13. Phenotypic and molecular characterization of 19q12q13.1 deletions: a report of five patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Shimul; Bandholz, Anne M; Parkash, Sandhya; Dyack, Sarah; Rideout, Andrea L; Leppig, Kathleen A; Thiese, Heidi; Wheeler, Patricia G; Tsang, Marilyn; Ballif, Blake C; Shaffer, Lisa G; Torchia, Beth S; Ellison, Jay W; Rosenfeld, Jill A

    2014-01-01

    A syndrome associated with 19q13.11 microdeletions has been proposed based on seven previous cases that displayed developmental delay, intellectual disability, speech disturbances, pre- and post-natal growth retardation, microcephaly, ectodermal dysplasia, and genital malformations in males. A 324-kb critical region was previously identified as the smallest region of overlap (SRO) for this syndrome. To further characterize this microdeletion syndrome, we present five patients with deletions within 19q12q13.12 identified using a whole-genome oligonucleotide microarray. Patients 1 and 2 possess deletions overlapping the SRO, and Patients 3-5 have deletions proximal to the SRO. Patients 1 and 2 share significant phenotypic overlap with previously reported cases, providing further definition of the 19q13.11 microdeletion syndrome phenotype, including the first presentation of ectrodactyly in the syndrome. Patients 3-5, whose features include developmental delay, growth retardation, and feeding problems, support the presence of dosage-sensitive genes outside the SRO that may contribute to the abnormal phenotypes observed in this syndrome. Multiple genotype-phenotype correlations outside the SRO are explored, including further validation of the deletion of WTIP as a candidate for male hypospadias observed in this syndrome. We postulate that unique patient-specific deletions within 19q12q13.1 may explain the phenotypic variability observed in this emerging contiguous gene deletion syndrome. PMID:24243649

  14. 不同亚型的多囊卵巢综合征患者临床及实验室指标特征的研究%Clinical and endocrine characteristics among phenotypic expressions of polycystic ovary syndrome according to the 2003 Rotterdam consensus criteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵越; Alfred O. Meuck; 阮祥燕; 崔亚美; 李扬璐; 武红琴; 杜娟; 张颖; 田玄玄; Diethelm Wallwiener

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the relative prevalence and the clinical and endocrine characteristics of each phenotype expressions of polycystic ovary syndrome( PCOS) according to the National Institutes of Health( NIH) and Rotterdan Consensus criteria definitions for PCOS. Methods Clinical, endocrine and metabolic data from 647 women with PCOS diagnosed according to Rotterdam criteria and NIH recommendations between Dec. 2014 and May 2015 were collected and divided into four different phenotypes. Results The severe PCOS phenotype defined as having oligo-ovulation( OO) , hyperandrogenism( HA) , and polycystic ovary( PCO) , i. e. , Group A, was the most common phenotype seen in 63. 2% of the patients. Group B, defined as having OO and HA, was seen in 9% of the phenotype. Group C, defined as having HA and PCO, was seen in 15. 6% and Group D, defined as having OO and PCO, was seen in 12. 9%. The rate of clinical high androgen manifestation and hyperandrogenism was 87. 8%, but hyperandrogenism, insulin resistance( IR) and triglyceride ( TG) were significantly higher in Group A, followed by group B. Group C presented relatively milder clinical and endocrine alterations than group A and B, but had a higher luteinizing hormone/follicle-stimulating hormone(LH/FSH) than controls(P0. 05). Conclusion 1) The classification according to the revised 2003 consensus on diagnosis reflects the basic characteristics of PCOS. 2) Androgen levels are the major distinguishing endocrine feature differentiating phenotypic expressions of PCOS. Ovulatory PCOS and normoandrogenic phenotype represent the mild forms of classic PCOS, but the latter may have a different pathogenic pathway. So the choice of treatment should be individualized.%目的:基于鹿特丹标准,依据美国国立卫生院( National Institutes of Health,NIH)最新指南推荐,探讨不同亚型多囊卵巢综合征( polycystic ovary syndrome,PCOS)患者临床、内分泌代谢等相关指标特征,以指

  15. Mowat-Wilson syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garavelli, Livia; Mainardi, Paola Cerruti

    2007-01-01

    Mowat-Wilson syndrome (MWS) is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by a distinct facial phenotype (high forehead, frontal bossing, large eyebrows, medially flaring and sparse in the middle part, hypertelorism, deep set but large eyes, large and uplifted ear lobes, with a central depression, saddle nose with prominent rounded nasal tip, prominent columella, open mouth, with M-shaped upper lip, frequent smiling, and a prominent but narrow and triangular pointed chin), moderate-to-severe intellectual deficiency, epilepsy and variable congenital malformations including Hirschsprung disease (HSCR), genitourinary anomalies (in particular hypospadias in males), congenital heart defects, agenesis of the corpus callosum and eye anomalies. The prevalence of MWS is currently unknown, but 171 patients have been reported so far. It seems probable that MWS is under-diagnosed, particularly in patients without HSCR. MWS is caused by heterozygous mutations or deletions in the Zinc finger E-box-binding homeobox 2 gene, ZEB2, previously called ZFHX1B (SIP1). To date, over 100 deletions/mutations have been reported in patients with a typical phenotype; they are frequently whole gene deletions or truncating mutations, suggesting that haploinsufficiency is the main pathological mechanism. Studies of genotype-phenotype analysis show that facial gestalt and delayed psychomotor development are constant clinical features, while the frequent and severe congenital malformations are variable. In a small number of patients, unusual mutations can lead to an atypical phenotype. The facial phenotype is particularly important for the initial clinical diagnosis and provides the hallmark warranting ZEB2 mutational analysis, even in the absence of HSCR. The majority of MWS cases reported so far were sporadic, therefore the recurrence risk is low. Nevertheless, rare cases of sibling recurrence have been observed. Congenital malformations and seizures require precocious clinical

  16. Mowat-Wilson syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mainardi Paola

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mowat-Wilson syndrome (MWS is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by a distinct facial phenotype (high forehead, frontal bossing, large eyebrows, medially flaring and sparse in the middle part, hypertelorism, deep set but large eyes, large and uplifted ear lobes, with a central depression, saddle nose with prominent rounded nasal tip, prominent columella, open mouth, with M-shaped upper lip, frequent smiling, and a prominent but narrow and triangular pointed chin, moderate-to-severe intellectual deficiency, epilepsy and variable congenital malformations including Hirschsprung disease (HSCR, genitourinary anomalies (in particular hypospadias in males, congenital heart defects, agenesis of the corpus callosum and eye anomalies. The prevalence of MWS is currently unknown, but 171 patients have been reported so far. It seems probable that MWS is under-diagnosed, particularly in patients without HSCR. MWS is caused by heterozygous mutations or deletions in the Zinc finger E-box-binding homeobox 2 gene, ZEB2, previously called ZFHX1B (SIP1. To date, over 100 deletions/mutations have been reported in patients with a typical phenotype; they are frequently whole gene deletions or truncating mutations, suggesting that haploinsufficiency is the main pathological mechanism. Studies of genotype-phenotype analysis show that facial gestalt and delayed psychomotor development are constant clinical features, while the frequent and severe congenital malformations are variable. In a small number of patients, unusual mutations can lead to an atypical phenotype. The facial phenotype is particularly important for the initial clinical diagnosis and provides the hallmark warranting ZEB2 mutational analysis, even in the absence of HSCR. The majority of MWS cases reported so far were sporadic, therefore the recurrence risk is low. Nevertheless, rare cases of sibling recurrence have been observed. Congenital malformations and seizures require

  17. Correlation between MECP2 genotype and phenotype in Chinese patients with Rett syndrome%Rett综合征患儿MECP2基因型和表型关系研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李美蓉; 潘虹; 包新华; 朱兴旺; 曹广娜; 张玉稚; 吴希如

    2009-01-01

    目的 寻找中国Rett综合征(RTT)患儿甲基化CpG结合蛋白2基因(MECP2)突变的基因型和表型之间的相互关系,为临床诊断和治疗提供帮助.方法 对126例经分子遗传学方法诊断的RTT患儿的临床表型参照Kerr等和Scala等评分标准进行打分,采用SPSS 12.0软件包进行统计分析.结果 分析MECP2突变类型、基因功能区和表型的关系显示,位于基因不同功能区的突变:甲基化CpG结合区(MBD)、转录抑制区(TRD)和C末端(CTS)对RTT表型的影响差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);不同突变类型:错义、无义、移码和大片段缺失突变对RTT表型的影响差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).分析MECP2突变类型和基因功能区共同对表型的影响显示:同位于MBD的无义和错义突变相比较,前者临床严重性评分高于后者,差异有统计学意义(P=0.016),而位于TRD的无义和错义突变临床严重性评分之间差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);位于MBD和TRD的错义突变的临床严重性评分之间差异无统计学意义(P>0.05),位于MBD和TRD的无义突变的临床严重性评分之间差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).分析MECP2最常见突变类型和表型的关系显示:p.T158M、p.R168X、c.806delG和p.R255X对RTT表型总的影响差异无统计学意义(P>0.05),但在语言功能的受累程度上,以上4种突变之间差异有统计学意义(P=0.028),且语言能力受损的发生率差异也有统计学意义(P=0.019).结论 MECP2基因型和表型之间存在一些相互关系:位于MBD的无义突变病情较严重;在0.05). The RTT patients with nonsense mutations located in the region of MBD have more severe phenotype than those with missense mutations in the same region (P=0.016). Among p. T158M, p. R168X, c. 806delG and p. R255X, there were no significant differences in the average overall scores (P>0.05), but there were significant differences in language skill (P=0.028) and in language impairment rate at different level (P=0

  18. Pediatric Neurocutaneous Syndromes with Cerebellar Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Huisman, Thierry A G M; Poretti, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Neurocutaneous syndromes encompasses a broad group of genetic disorders with different clinical, genetic, and pathologic features that share developmental lesions of the skin as well as central and peripheral nervous system. Cerebellar involvement has been shown in numerous types of neurocutaneous syndrome. It may help or be needed for the diagnosis and to explain the cognitive and behavioral phenotype of affected children. This article describes various types of neurocutaneous syndrome with cerebellar involvement. For each neurocutaneous disease or syndrome, clinical features, genetic, neuroimaging findings, and the potential role of the cerebellar involvement is discussed. PMID:27423801

  19. The duplication 17p13.3 phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Curry, Cynthia J; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Grant, Erica;

    2013-01-01

    duplications that include both the YWHAE and LIS1 genes. These patients had a relatively distinct facial phenotype and frequent structural brain abnormalities involving the corpus callosum, cerebellar vermis, and cranial base. Autism spectrum disorders were seen in a third of duplication probands, most......Chromosome 17p13.3 is a gene rich region that when deleted is associated with the well-known Miller-Dieker syndrome. A recently described duplication syndrome involving this region has been associated with intellectual impairment, autism and occasional brain MRI abnormalities. We report 34...

  20. Phenotypic plasticity and the perception-action-cognition-environment paradigm in neurodevelopmental genetic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Bernard; Pelc, Karine; de Meirleir, Linda; Cheron, Guy

    2015-04-01

    Careful study of the phenotype can have implications at several levels, namely clinical diagnosis, pathophysiological reasoning, management planning, and outcome measurement. Behavioural phenotypes involve cognition, communication, social skills, and motor control. They can be documented in a host of neurodevelopmental conditions and approached with the recently refined perception-action-cognition-environment (PACE) paradigm, which focuses on the neurodevelopmental processes that underlie learning and adaption to the environment through perception, action, and cognitive processing. Although this paradigm was originally developed in the context of cerebral palsy, it can be applied along developmental trajectories in several neurogenetic conditions, including Down syndrome, fragile X syndrome, Rett syndrome, Angelman syndrome, and Williams syndrome, to name but a few. It must be recognized, however, that relevant, valid tools for assessment and management strategies still need to be developed.

  1. Spread of X-chromosome inactivation into chromosome 15 is associated with Prader-Willi syndrome phenotype in a boy with a t(X;15)(p21.1;q11.2) translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakazume, Satoru; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Sasaki, Yuki; Harada, Naoki; Nakanishi, Katsumi; Sato, Hidenori; Emi, Mitsuru; Endoh, Kazushi; Sohma, Ryoichi; Kido, Yasuhiro; Nagai, Toshiro; Kubota, Takeo

    2012-01-01

    X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) is an essential mechanism in females that compensates for the genome imbalance between females and males. It is known that XCI can spread into an autosome of patients with X;autosome translocations. The subject was a 5-year-old boy with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS)-like features including hypotonia, hypo-genitalism, hypo-pigmentation, and developmental delay. G-banding, fluorescent in situ hybridization, BrdU-incorporated replication, human androgen receptor gene locus assay, SNP microarrays, ChIP-on-chip assay, bisulfite sequencing, and real-time RT-PCR were performed. Cytogenetic analyses revealed that the karyotype was 46,XY,der(X)t(X;15)(p21.1;q11.2),-15. In the derivative chromosome, the X and half of the chromosome 15 segments showed late replication. The X segment was maternal, and the chromosome 15 region was paternal, indicating its post-zygotic origin. The two chromosome 15s had a biparental origin. The DNA methylation level was relatively high in the region proximal from the breakpoint, and the level decreased toward the middle of the chromosome 15 region; however, scattered areas of hypermethylation were found in the distal region. The promoter regions of the imprinted SNRPN and the non-imprinted OCA2 genes were completely and half methylated, respectively. However, no methylation was found in the adjacent imprinted gene UBE3A, which contained a lower density of LINE1 repeats. Our findings suggest that XCI spread into the paternal chromosome 15 led to the aberrant hypermethylation of SNRPN and OCA2 and their decreased expression, which contributes to the PWS-like features and hypo-pigmentation of the patient. To our knowledge, this is the first chromosome-wide methylation study in which the DNA methylation level is demonstrated in an autosome subject to XCI.

  2. Alport综合征患儿临床表型及基因型单中心分析%Features of clinical phenotype and genotype in Alport syndrome: a monocentric study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙蕾; 匡新宇; 郝胜; 王平; 钮小玲; 朱光华; 周君梅; 黄文彦

    2015-01-01

    目的 了解儿童Alport综合征(AS)临床表型及基因突变的特点.方法 回顾性分析2011年5月至2014年5月于上海交通大学附属儿童医院肾脏风湿科明确诊断并具有完整资料(临床、肾组织病理、基因检测结果)的AS患儿25例.采用外显子捕获-二代测序技术进行基因检测,包括COL4A3、COL4A4、COL4A5基因,并同时进行家系验证.结果 (1)25例患儿中X连锁AS(XL-AS)19例(76%),常染色体隐性遗传AS (AR-AS)6例(24%).25例患儿均以血尿和(或)蛋白尿起病,8例以上呼吸道感染为诱因.其中2例(8%)存在听力损伤,1例(4%)患儿存在眼部病变.(2)25例均行肾组织活检,光镜表现为:16例轻微病变,8例系膜增生,1例局灶节段硬化.电镜下仅2例(8%)见肾小球基底膜致密层撕裂分层等典型AS改变,另4例表现为薄基底膜病,8例系膜增生性改变,6例轻微病变,5例未见肾小球.肾组织Ⅳ型胶原α链间接免疫荧光检测中21例(84%)存在表达缺失.(3)对25例(来自23个家系)行COL4A3、COL4A4及COL4A5基因突变检查,发现突变类型24种(16种突变未见报道).其中COL4A3基因突变1种(4%),COL4A4基因突变5种(21%),COL4A5基因突变18种(75%).同时对25例患儿的直系家庭成员全部可疑致病突变进行了验证,结果发现13例突变遗传自母亲,3例遗传自父亲,2例(同胞姐妹)患儿的1种突变遗传自父亲、另一种遗传自母亲,7例为新生突变.结论 (1)AS以X连锁显性遗传为主,病理检查多表现为轻微病变或系膜增生性改变,电镜下少数患儿可表现为薄基底膜病.(2)25例患儿共检出24种COL4A3、COL4A4、COL4A5基因突变,其中16种未见报道.%Objective To analyze the clinical features and gene mutation of Chinese children with Alport syndrome (AS).Method From May 2011 to May 2014,clinical and pathological information gathered from 25 patients was retrospectively analyzed.COL4A5,COL4A4 and COL4A3 genes were analyzed using

  3. Connectomic intermediate phenotypes for psychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex eFornito

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatric disorders are phenotypically heterogeneous entities with a complex genetic basis. To mitigate this complexity, many investigators study so-called intermediate phenotypes that putatively provide a more direct index of the physiological effects of candidate genetic risk variants than overt psychiatric syndromes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a particularly popular technique for measuring such phenotypes because it allows interrogation of diverse aspects of brain structure and function in vivo. Much of this work however, has focused on relatively simple measures that quantify variations in the physiology or tissue integrity of specific brain regions in isolation, contradicting an emerging consensus that most major psychiatric disorders do not arise from isolated dysfunction in one or a few brain regions, but rather from disturbed interactions within and between distributed neural circuits; i.e., they are disorders of brain connectivity. The recent proliferation of new MRI techniques for comprehensively mapping the entire connectivity architecture of the brain, termed the human connectome, has provided a rich repertoire of tools for understanding how genetic variants implicated in mental disorder impact distinct neural circuits. In this article, we review research using these connectomic techniques to understand how genetic variation influences the connectivity and topology of human brain networks. We highlight recent evidence from twin and imaging genetics studies suggesting that the penetrance of candidate risk variants for mental illness, such as those in SLC6A4, MAOA, ZNF804A and APOE, may be higher for intermediate phenotypes characterised at the level of distributed neural systems than at the level of spatially localised brain regions. The findings indicate that imaging connectomics provides a powerful framework for understanding how genetic risk for psychiatric disease is expressed through altered structure and function of

  4. The Role of Genetic Variation in the Lamin A/C Gene in the Etiology of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Urbanek, Margrit; Nampiaparampil, Geetha; D'Souza, Janine; Sefton, Elizabeth; Ackerman, Christine; Legro, Richard S.; Dunaif, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Objective: We performed this study to test the hypothesis that variation in the lamin a/c gene (LMNA) contributes to milder phenotypes of insulin resistance, hyperandrogenism, and/or metabolic syndrome associated with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

  5. Tic symptom dimensions and their heritabilities in Tourette's syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, Marcel J; Delucchi, Kevin L; Mathews, Carol M; Cath, Danielle C

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome (TS) is both genotypically and phenotypically heterogeneous. Gene-finding strategies have had limited success, possibly because of symptom heterogeneity. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed at specifically investigating heritabilities of tic symptom factors in

  6. The neurobehavioral phenotype in mucopolysaccharidosis Type IIIB: An exploratory study

    OpenAIRE

    Shapiro, E; King, K; Ahmed, A.; Rudser, K.; R. Rumsey; Yund, B.; Delaney, K; I. Nestrasil; Whitley, C.; M. Potegal

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Our goal was to describe the neurobehavioral phenotype in mucopolysaccharidosis Type IIIB (MPS IIIB). Parents report that behavioral abnormalities are a major problem in MPS III posing serious challenges to parenting and quality-of-life for both patient and parent. Our previous research on MPS IIIA identified autistic symptoms, and a Klüver-Bucy-type syndrome as indicated by reduced startle and loss of fear associated with amygdala atrophy. We hypothesized that MPS IIIB would mani...

  7. Clinical asthma phenotypes in the real world: opportunities and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Clementine Bostantzoglou; Vicky Delimpoura; Konstantinos Samitas; Eleftherios Zervas; Frank Kanniess; Mina Gaga

    2015-01-01

    Key Points Asthma is a heterogeneous syndrome ranging from mild disease with barely noticeable symptoms to very severe disease with constant symptoms that may greatly hinder patients’ quality of life.; The aim of asthma treatment is control of asthma and the prevention of risk of exacerbations and fixed airflow limitation.; Asthma management must be individualised; tailored not only to the severity of the disease but importantly, to the phenotypic characteristics of the patient and m...

  8. Possible role of imprinting in the Turner phenotype.

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, C E; Donaldson, M D; Kelnar, C J; Smail, P. J.; Greene, S A; Paterson, W.F.; Connor, J M

    1994-01-01

    We have attempted to investigate the role of imprinting in the phenotype of Turner's syndrome. Sixty-three patients were investigated for parental origin of the retained normal X chromosome; 43 were found to retain the maternal X (XM) and 20 the paternal (XP). The relationship between a child's pretreatment height centile and parental height centiles was examined in 36 patients. No significant correlation was found between child and parental height centiles for XP or child and paternal height...

  9. Complications in 54 frontofacial distraction procedures in patients with syndromic craniosynostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Jesse A; Paliga, James Thomas; Taylor, Jesse A; Bartlett, Scott P

    2015-01-01

    Patients with syndromic craniosynostosis manifest midfacial hypoplasia often treated by midfacial advancement. Benefits of midfacial advancement by distraction osteogenesis have been well studied; little is known about the perioperative morbidity of these procedures, specifically relating to device selection. This study compares the perioperative complications between semiburied- and halo-type distraction osteogenesis of the midface. A retrospective review was performed on all patients with syndromic craniosynostosis who underwent midface distraction with semiburied- or halo-type external distractors. Demographic information and operative/postoperative course were reviewed. Complications were categorized as hardware-related, infectious, and either as major (requiring additional intervention) or minor (requiring medication only). Chi-squared and Fisher exact test were used to compare variables.From 1999 to 2012, a total of 54 patients underwent midface distraction osteogenesis, including 23 patients with Apert syndrome, 19 patients with Crouzon syndrome, 10 patients with Pfeiffer syndrome, and 2 patients with other craniofacial syndromes. Thirty-three patients underwent a total of 34 subcranial Le Fort III distraction procedures and 21 underwent 21 monobloc distraction procedures. The mean age during surgery was 8.0 (range, 4.0-17.7) years, whereas the mean time between distractor placement and removal was 102.9 days. Thirty procedures were performed with external halo-type distractors (18 Le Fort III and 12 monobloc distractions), whereas 25 were performed with buried midface distractors (16 Le Fort III and 9 monobloc distractions). There were no significant differences in diagnoses or interventions between the distraction devices. Of the 19 distractor-related complications, there were a total of 10 (18.2%) in the halo group including 5 (9.1%) requiring separate operative intervention as well as 9 (16.4%) in the buried distractor group including 6 (10.1%) requiring

  10. Correlation between chromosome deletion and phenotypes in two cases of ring chromosome 6 syndrome%二例环6号染色体综合征病例染色体缺失片段及其与临床表型的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付杰; 王松涛; 潘虹; 马京梅; 于丽; 杨慧霞

    2014-01-01

    Objective To understand the correlation between chromosome deletion and the phenotypes in cases of ring chromosome 6 syndrome.Methods Two cases of ring chromosome 6 syndrome persented to the Peking University First Hospital in 2013 were studied.Case 1 was a fetus diagnosed as having ring chromosome 6 with karyotype 46,XY,r (6) [14]/46,XY,r (6; 6) [1]/45,XY,-6[15] from a pregnant woman who received prenatal examination because of high risk found in serum screening for Down's syndrome at 21 +1 weeks of gestation.Case 2 was an eight-month-old female infant with growth retardation and congenital facial anomaly,whose karyotype was 46,XX,r (6) /47,XX,r (6) × 2/46,XX,r (6; 6) /45,XX,-6.Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and array-based comparative genomic hybridization were used to detect the location of chromosome telomeric loss and its size,and the correlation between chromosome deletion and the phenotypes was analyzed by reviewing related literatures.Results Case 1 was confirmed to have short-arm terminal deletions on 6p25.3-25.2 (2.42 Mb) which mainly included DUSP22,IRF4,EXOC2,FOXC1,FOXF2 and FOXQ genes,and long-arm terminal deletions on 6q26-27 (7.84 Mb) mainly included PARK2,PACRG,LOC28596 and RPS6KA2 genes.Case 2 had short-arm terminal deletions on 6p25.3-25.1 (5.44 Mb) which included DUSP22,IRF4,EXOC2,FOXC1,FOXF2,FOXQ and SERPINB6 genes,and long-arm terminal deletions on 6q27 (0.16 Mb) which included PSMB1,TBP and PDCD2 genes.Except for the growth retardation,the common feature of "ring syndrome",in both cases,cerebellum hypoplasia was observed in case 1,and microcephaly and esotropia were observed in case 2.Conclusions The difference of phenotypes in patients with a ring chromosome 6 is closely associated with the location and size of the deletion in chromosome 6.%目的 探讨环6号染色体综合征病例染色体缺失片段和定位于其中的基因与临床表型的关系. 方法 2013年就诊于北京大学第一医院的2例环6号染色

  11. Genetic syndromes in the family : child characteristics and parenting stress in Angelman, CHARGE, Cornelia de Lange, Prader-Willi, and Rett syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wulffaert, Josette

    2010-01-01

    Aim of the dissertation: To expand the knowledge on the behavioural phenotypes, level of parenting stress and the relationship between child characteristics and parenting stress in five genetic syndromes. The included syndromes are Angelman, CHARGE, Cornelia de Lange, Prader-Willi, and Rett syndrome

  12. Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome and Associated Medical Conditions With an Emphasis on Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nickel, J.C.; Tripp, D.A.; Pontari, M.;

    2010-01-01

    and Methods: Female patients with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome and controls with no interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome completed a biopsychosocial phenotyping questionnaire battery which included demographics/history form, self-reported history of associated conditions, and 10...

  13. Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects a girl's development. The cause is a missing or incomplete ... t work properly. Other physical features typical of Turner syndrome are Short, "webbed" neck with folds of skin ...

  14. Cushing's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing's syndrome is a hormonal disorder. The cause is long-term exposure to too much cortisol, a hormone ... cause your body to make too much cortisol. Cushing's syndrome is rare. Some symptoms are Upper body obesity ...

  15. Cushing's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cushing's syndrome, also called hypercortisolism , is a rare endocrine disorder caused by chronic exposure of the body's tissues ... removing the tumor while minimizing the chance of endocrine deficiency or long-term ... for Cushing's Syndrome Clinical Trials ...

  16. Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects a girl's development. The cause is a missing or ... t work properly. Other physical features typical of Turner syndrome are Short, "webbed" neck with folds of ...

  17. National Down Syndrome Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... info@ndss.org Down Syndrome What Is Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & Truths Preferred Language Guide Q& ... More » Follow us Down Syndrome What Is Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & Truths Preferred Language Guide Q& ...

  18. Learning about Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... genetic terms used on this page Learning About Marfan Syndrome What is Marfan syndrome? What are the ... Syndrome Additional Resources for Marfan Syndrome What is Marfan syndrome? Marfan syndrome is one of the most ...

  19. Otopalatodigital spectrum disorders: refinement of the phenotypic and mutational spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutton, Sébastien; Fergelot, Patricia; Naudion, Sophie; Cordier, Marie-Pierre; Solé, Guilhem; Guerineau, Elodie; Hubert, Christophe; Rooryck, Caroline; Vuillaume, Marie-Laure; Houcinat, Nada; Deforges, Julie; Bouron, Julie; Devès, Sylvie; Le Merrer, Martine; David, Albert; Geneviève, David; Giuliano, Fabienne; Journel, Hubert; Megarbane, André; Faivre, Laurence; Chassaing, Nicolas; Francannet, Christine; Sarrazin, Elisabeth; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Vigneron, Jacqueline; Leclair, Danielle; Abadie, Caroline; Sarda, Pierre; Baumann, Clarisse; Delrue, Marie-Ange; Arveiler, Benoit; Lacombe, Didier; Goizet, Cyril; Coupry, Isabelle

    2016-08-01

    Otopalatodigital spectrum disorders (OPDSD) constitute a group of dominant X-linked osteochondrodysplasias including four syndromes: otopalatodigital syndromes type 1 and type 2 (OPD1 and OPD2), frontometaphyseal dysplasia, and Melnick-Needles syndrome. These syndromes variably associate specific facial and extremities features, hearing loss, cleft palate, skeletal dysplasia and several malformations, and show important clinical overlap over the different entities. FLNA gain-of-function mutations were identified in these conditions. FLNA encodes filamin A, a scaffolding actin-binding protein. Here, we report phenotypic descriptions and molecular results of FLNA analysis in a large series of 27 probands hypothesized to be affected by OPDSD. We identified 11 different missense mutations in 15 unrelated probands (n=15/27, 56%), of which seven were novel, including one of unknown significance. Segregation analyses within families made possible investigating 20 additional relatives carrying a mutation. This series allows refining the phenotypic and mutational spectrum of FLNA mutations causing OPDSD, and providing suggestions to avoid the overdiagnosis of OPD1.

  20. Crouzon's syndrome: literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunha, Sarah Crestian

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Crouzon syndrome or craniofacial dysostosis type I is a rare disease that affects the craniofacial skeleton development. Although it is uncommon, it has a transmission risk of 50% when one of the parents is a carrier. Objective: Performing a literature review about the Crouzon Syndrome, with emphasis on the current aspects. Method: As a methodology, a search on databases on-line, such as Cochrane, LILACS, MEDLINE, OMIM and SciELO has been made, by applying for the search the key-word Crouzon's Syndrome for articles published until 2007, in addition to the literature already dedicated to the subject. Literature Review: This syndrome is characterized by craniofacial anomalies caused by the early loss of the cranium flexibility, and present since the birth with tendency to aggravation in time. The main clinic signs are craniosynostosis, hypertelorism, exophthalmia, external strabismus, "parrot-beaked nose", short upper lip, hypoplastic maxilla and a relative mandibular prognathism determining a mid-facial hypoplasia aspect. It is a hereditary affection with an autosomal dominant transmission with 100% of penetrance and large phenotypic scale. Final Considerations: The genetic advising and an individual study of each case are essential to promote the improvement of the diagnosis. An early multidisciplinary approach is necessary, with specific therapeutic program aiming at the prevention of late diagnosis effects.