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Sample records for apca african palliative

  1. The African Palliative Care Association (APCA Atlas of Palliative Care Development in Africa: a comparative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Y Rhee

    2018-03-01

    Funding: Arnhold Institute of Global Health at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, the African Palliative Care Association, the International Association for Hospice and Palliative Care, and the Institute for Culture and Society at the University of Navarra.

  2. Validation of a core outcome measure for palliative care in Africa: the APCA African Palliative Outcome Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moll Tony

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the burden of progressive incurable disease in Africa, there is almost no evidence on patient care or outcomes. A primary reason has been the lack of appropriate locally-validated outcome tools. This study aimed to validate a multidimensional scale (the APCA African Palliative Outcome Scale in a multi-centred international study. Methods Validation was conducted across 5 African services and in 3 phases: Phase 1. Face validity: content analysis of qualitative interviews and cognitive interviewing of POS; Phase 2. Construct validity: correlation of POS with Missoula-Vitas Quality of Life Index (Spearman's rank tests; Phase 3. Internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha calculated twice using 2 datasets, test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficients calculated for 2 time points and time to complete (calculated twice using 2 datasets. Results The validation involved 682 patients and 437 family carers, interviewed in 8 different languages. Phase 1. Qualitative interviews (N = 90 patients; N = 38 carers showed POS items mapped well onto identified needs; cognitive interviews (N = 73 patients; N = 29 carers demonstrated good interpretation; Phase 2. POS-MVQoLI Spearman's rank correlations were low-moderate as expected (N = 285; Phase 3. (N = 307, 2nd assessment mean 21.2 hours after first, SD 7.2 Cronbach's Alpha was 0.6 on both datasets, indicating expected moderate internal consistency; test-retest found high intra-class correlation coefficients for all items (0.78-0.89; median time to complete 7 mins, reducing to 5 mins at second visit. Conclusions The APCA African POS has sound psychometric properties, is well comprehended and brief to use. Application of this tool offers the opportunity to at last address the omissions of palliative care research in Africa.

  3. 'Peace' and 'life worthwhile' as measures of spiritual well-being in African palliative care: a mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selman, Lucy; Speck, Peter; Gysels, Marjolein; Agupio, Godfrey; Dinat, Natalya; Downing, Julia; Gwyther, Liz; Mashao, Thandi; Mmoledi, Keletso; Moll, Tony; Sebuyira, Lydia Mpanga; Ikin, Barbara; Higginson, Irene J; Harding, Richard

    2013-06-10

    Patients with incurable, progressive disease receiving palliative care in sub-Saharan Africa experience high levels of spiritual distress with a detrimental impact on their quality of life. Locally validated measurement tools are needed to identify patients' spiritual needs and evaluate and improve spiritual care, but up to now such tools have been lacking in Africa. The African Palliative Care Association (APCA) African Palliative Outcome Scale (POS) contains two items relating to peace and life worthwhile. We aimed to determine the content and construct validity of these items as measures of spiritual wellbeing in African palliative care populations. The study was conducted at five palliative care services, four in South Africa and one in Uganda. The mixed-methods study design involved: (1) cognitive interviews with 72 patients, analysed thematically to explore the items' content validity, and (2) quantitative data collection (n = 285 patients) using the POS and the Spirit 8 to assess construct validity. (1) Peace was interpreted according to the themes 'perception of self and world', 'relationship to others', 'spiritual beliefs' and 'health and healthcare'. Life worthwhile was interpreted in relation to 'perception of self and world', 'relationship to others' and 'identity'. (2) Conceptual convergence and divergence were also evident in the quantitative data: there was moderate correlation between peace and Spirit 8 spiritual well-being (r = 0.46), but little correlation between life worthwhile and Spirit 8 spiritual well-being (r = 0.18) (both p Spirit 8 items were weak to moderate. Findings demonstrate the utility of POS items peace and life worthwhile as distinct but related measures of spiritual well-being in African palliative care. Peace and life worthwhile are brief and simple enough to be integrated into routine practice and can be used to measure this important but neglected outcome in this population.

  4. ‘Peace’ and ‘life worthwhile’ as measures of spiritual well-being in African palliative care: a mixed-methods study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with incurable, progressive disease receiving palliative care in sub-Saharan Africa experience high levels of spiritual distress with a detrimental impact on their quality of life. Locally validated measurement tools are needed to identify patients’ spiritual needs and evaluate and improve spiritual care, but up to now such tools have been lacking in Africa. The African Palliative Care Association (APCA) African Palliative Outcome Scale (POS) contains two items relating to peace and life worthwhile. We aimed to determine the content and construct validity of these items as measures of spiritual wellbeing in African palliative care populations. Methods The study was conducted at five palliative care services, four in South Africa and one in Uganda. The mixed-methods study design involved: (1) cognitive interviews with 72 patients, analysed thematically to explore the items’ content validity, and (2) quantitative data collection (n = 285 patients) using the POS and the Spirit 8 to assess construct validity. Results (1) Peace was interpreted according to the themes ‘perception of self and world’, ‘relationship to others’, ‘spiritual beliefs’ and ‘health and healthcare’. Life worthwhile was interpreted in relation to ‘perception of self and world’, ‘relationship to others’ and ‘identity’. (2) Conceptual convergence and divergence were also evident in the quantitative data: there was moderate correlation between peace and Spirit 8 spiritual well-being (r = 0.46), but little correlation between life worthwhile and Spirit 8 spiritual well-being (r = 0.18) (both p peace and life worthwhile as distinct but related measures of spiritual well-being in African palliative care. Peace and life worthwhile are brief and simple enough to be integrated into routine practice and can be used to measure this important but neglected outcome in this population. PMID:23758738

  5. Barriers to using palliative care: insight into African American culture.

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    Drisdom, Sheronda

    2013-08-01

    As the hospice care setting becomes more racially and ethnically diverse, attending to the different conditions and needs of various groups is essential to providing optimal care. African Americans make up only a small percentage of hospice users in the United States. This article highlights barriers associated with the underenrollment of African Americans into hospice and palliative care programs. A thorough analysis of the literature was conducted to define hospice and palliative care and assess circumstances that impact the use of hospice services by African Americans. Many African Americans are not choosing hospice care because of cultural issues or knowledge deficits, whether through lack of communication or low literacy. Healthcare providers can begin by familiarizing themselves with hospice organizations and developing and putting into practice strategies to communicate with and educate patients and families about hospice care in a culturally sensitive manner.

  6. Knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and experience of palliative care amongst South African physiotherapists

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    Brenda M. Morrow

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion: Many South African physiotherapists manage patients requiring palliative care, despite inadequate training and limited knowledge in this field. More under- and postgraduate learning opportunities should be made available for physiotherapists in the area of palliative care.

  7. Palliative chemotherapy: The perspectives and experiences of south african nurses

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    Johanna Elizabeth Maree

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to describe the perspectives and experiences of South African nurses caring for patients receiving palliative chemotherapy. Methods: A qualitative descriptive design was used and purposive sampling allowed us to select 11 nurses practising in a private ambulatory cancer care center in Port Elizabeth. In-depth interviews, guided by three broad themes were conducted and analyzed using qualitative content analyses. Data saturation determined the sample size. Results: Two themes emerged from the data – the patients cling to hope and the positive influence of palliative chemotherapy. The participants believed that patients consenting to palliative chemotherapy were clinging to false hope. They were also of the opinion that family members pressurize patients to consent to treatment. The participants experienced palliative chemotherapy positively, especially when an improvement in the patients' quality of life or pain relief was evident. Fatigue was highlighted as the major side effect, but it did not temper the participants' positive attitudes toward the treatment. Conclusions: Although the participants believed that patients cling to hope and consent to palliative chemotherapy because they hope to be cured, they experienced the treatment as positive. For them, the improvement in pain and quality of life outweighed the side effects the patients experienced. The positive attitude patients upheld while receiving this treatment encouraged them. Nurses should gain more knowledge about the meaning, people living with advanced cancer, attach to hope to prevent them from interpreting patients' hope as denial and false.

  8. Palliative cancer surgery | Ussiri | East and Central African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Palliative care or End-of-life care in terminally-ill patients requires multi-displinary approach and therefore, different modalities of treatment. The aim of palliative care is to improve the quality of life and make the subject as comfortable as possible. Palliative cancer surgery is a branch of surgical oncology which relieves the ...

  9. Palliation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coia, L.R.

    1991-01-01

    Depending on anatomic location, the unchecked growth of primary or metastatic malignancies can cause a number of distressing symptoms such as hemorrhage, bone pain, visceral pain, seizure, paralysis and asphyxia. The role of radiation therapy for the relief of these symptoms is well developed. Despite the fact that perhaps half of all radiation treatments are given with palliative intent, this aspect of the field receives little discussion in major textbooks of radiation therapy. This chapter deals with the more common problems presenting for palliative management, such as bone, brain and liver metastases. The role of radiation therapy in the management of metastatic non-squamous cancer of unknown origin is also discussed here

  10. A Prospective Study Assessing Tumour Response, Survival, and Palliative Care Outcomes in Patients with HIV-Related Kaposi's Sarcoma at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Blantyre, Malawi

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    H. Francis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Human-Immunodeficiency-Virus- (HIV- related Kaposi's sarcoma (KS has a high prevalence in Africa; however, there is minimal published data on treatment and outcomes in this population. Objective and Design. This was a prospective study of 50 patients, aiming to assess the impact of vincristine therapy on tumour response and survival and to assess palliative care outcomes in patients with HIV-related KS. Methods. 50 consecutive patients were recruited during 2008. Vincristine therapy and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART were given. Tumour response, survival, and chemotherapy-related toxicities were documented. Palliative care outcomes were assessed using the African Palliative Care Association (APCA Palliative Outcome Scale (POS. Results. The majority of patients were male, and the median age was 33 years. At baseline assessment, the median CD4 T-cell count was 263, and 50% patients had evidence of peripheral neuropathy. The overall response rate was 64% at 6 weeks, and median progression-free survival was 30 weeks. Treatment was generally well tolerated, with peripheral neuropathy the main dose-limiting toxicity. Conclusion. The combination of vincristine and HAART is feasible and effective in a low resource setting, although peripheral neuropathy is a dose-limiting factor. This patient group carries a high mortality and as such adequate access to palliative care is crucial.

  11. Where there is no morphine: The challenge and hope of palliative care delivery in Tanzania

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    Kristopher Hartwig

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Tanzania, a country of 42 million, access to oral morphine is rare.Aim: To demonstrate the effectiveness of palliative care teams in reducing patients’ pain and in increasing other positive life qualities in the absence of morphine; and to document the psychological burden experienced by their clinical providers, trained in morphine delivery, as they observed their patients suffering and in extreme pain.Setting: One hundred and forty-fie cancer patients were included from 13 rural hospitals spread across Tanzania.Method: A mixed method study beginning with a retrospective quantitative analysis of cancer patients who were administered the APCA African POS tool four times. Bivariate analyses of the scores at time one and four were compared across the domains. The qualitative arm included an analysis of interviews with six nurses, each with more than fie years’ palliative care experience and no access to strong opioids.Results: Patients and their family caregivers identifid statistically signifiant (p < 0.001 improvements in all of the domains. Thematic analysis of nurse interviews described the patient and family benefis from palliative care but also their great distress when ‘bad cases’ arose who would likely benefi only from oral morphine.Conclusion: People living with chronic cancer-related pain who receive palliative care experience profound physical, spiritual and emotional benefis even without oral morphine. These results demonstrate the need for continued advocacy to increase the availability of oral morphine in these settings in addition to palliative care services.

  12. A cost analysis of a hospital-based palliative care outreach program: implications for expanding public sector palliative care in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongoro, Charles; Dinat, Natalya

    2011-06-01

    Increasing access to palliative care services in low- and middle-income countries is often perceived as unaffordable despite the growing need for such services because of the increasing burden of chronic diseases including HIV and AIDS. The aim of the study was to establish the costs and cost drivers for a hospital outreach palliative care service in a low-resource setting, and to elucidate possible consequential quality-of-life improvements and potential cost savings. The study used a cost accounting procedure to cost the hospital outreach services--using a step-down costing method to measure unit (average) costs. The African Palliative Care Association Palliative Outcome Score (APCA POS) was applied at five intervals to a cohort of 72 consecutive and consenting patients, enrolled in a two-month period. The study found that of the 481 and 1902 patients registered for outreach and in-hospital visits, respectively, 4493 outreach hospital visits and 3412 in-hospital visits were done per year. The costs per hospital outreach visit and in-hospital visit were US$71 and US$80, respectively. The cost per outreach visit was 50% less than the average cost of a patient day equivalent for district hospitals of $142. Some of the POS of a subsample (n=72) showed statistically significant improvements. Hospital outreach services have the potential to avert hospital admissions in generally overcrowded services in low-resource settings and may improve the quality of life of patients in their home environments. Copyright © 2011 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Investigating the interaction of aminopolycarboxylic acid (APCA) ligands with silver nanoparticles: A Raman, surface-enhanced Raman and density functional theoretical study

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    Maiti, Nandita; Malkar, Vishwabharati V.; Mukherjee, Tulsi; Kapoor, Sudhir

    2018-03-01

    Aminopolycarboxylic acid (APCA) ligands are polydentate chelating agents that have multiple binding sites viz. nitrogen atoms and short chain carboxylic groups and hence can form very stable complexes with metal ions. The interactions of these APCAs with silver nanoparticles have been investigated using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) which is supported with density functional theoretical (DFT) calculations using B3LYP functional and LANL2DZ basis set. From the observed enhancement of the CO2 symmetric stretching vibration, in addition to the red shift of ∼14-35 cm-1 for the various APCAs in the SERS spectra as well as theoretical calculations, it has been inferred that the APCAs are chemisorbed to the silver surface directly through the oxygen atoms of the carboxylate groups as well as the N atom of the substituted amino groups. The apparent enhancement factors for the CO2 symmetric stretching vibration of the APCAs are of the order of 106.

  14. African American elders' psychological-social-spiritual cultural experiences across serious illness: an integrative literature review through a palliative care lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coats, Heather Lea

    2017-07-01

    Disparities in palliative care for seriously ill African American elders exist because of gaps in knowledge around culturally sensitive psychological, social, and spiritual care. The purpose of this integrative literature review is to summarize the research examining African American elders' psychological, social, and spiritual illness experiences. Of 108 articles, 60 quantitative, 42 qualitative, and 6 mixed methods studies were reviewed. Negative and positive psychological, social, and spiritual experiences were noted. These experiences impacted both the African American elders' quality of life and satisfaction with care. Due to the gaps noted around psychological, social, and spiritual healing and suffering for African American elders, palliative care science should continue exploration of seriously ill African American elders' psychological, social, and spiritual care needs.

  15. Palliative care and support for persons with HIV/AIDS in 7 African countries: implementation experience and future priorities.

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    Alexander, Carla S; Memiah, Peter; Henley, Yvonne B; Kaiza-Kangalawe, Angela; Shumbusho, Anna Joyce; Obiefune, Michael; Enejoh, Victor; Stanis-Ezeobi, Winifred; Eze, Charity; Odion, Ehekhaye; Akpenna, Donald; Effiong, Amana; Miriti, Kenneth; Aduda, Samson; Oko, John; Melaku, Gebremedhin D; Baribwira, Cyprien; Umutesi, Hassina; Shimabale, Mope; Mugisa, Emmanuel; Amoroso, Anthony

    2012-06-01

    To combat morbidity and mortality from the worldwide epidemic of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the United States Congress implemented a President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) in 30 resource-limited countries to integrate combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) for both prevention and cure. Over 35% of eligible persons have been successfully treated. Initial legislation cited palliative care as an essential aspect of this plan but overall health strengthening became critical to sustainability of programming and funding priorities shifted to assure staffing for care delivery sites; laboratory and pharmaceutical infrastructure; data collection and reporting; and financial management as individual countries are being encouraged to assume control of in-country funding. Given infrastructure requisites, individual care delivery beyond ART management alone has received minimal funding yet care remains necessary for durable viral suppression and overall quality of life for individuals. Technical assistance staff of one implementing partner representing seven African countries met to clarify domains of palliative care compared with the substituted term "care and support" to understand potential gaps in on-going HIV care. They prioritized care needs as: 1) mental health (depression and other mood disorders); 2) communication skills (age-appropriate disclosure of HIV status); 3) support of care-providers (stress management for sustainability of a skilled HIV workforce); 4) Tied Priorities: symptom management in opportunistic infections; end-of-life care; spiritual history-taking; and 5) Tied Priorities: attention to grief-related needs of patients, their families and staff; and management of HIV co-morbidities. This process can inform health policy as funding transitions to new priorities.

  16. The "Spirit 8" successfully captured spiritual well-being in African palliative care: factor and Rasch analysis.

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    Selman, Lucy; Siegert, Richard J; Higginson, Irene J; Agupio, Godfrey; Dinat, Natalya; Downing, Julia; Gwyther, Liz; Mashao, Thandi; Mmoledi, Keletso; Moll, Tony; Sebuyira, Lydia Mpanga; Ikin, Barbara; Harding, Richard

    2012-04-01

    To describe the dimensionality of a measure of spiritual well-being (SWB) (the "Spirit 8") in palliative care (PC) patients in South Africa and Uganda, and to determine SWB in this population. A cross-sectional survey was conducted using the Missoula Vitas Quality of Life Index (MVQOLI). Translated questionnaires were administered to consecutively recruited patients. Factor analysis and Rasch analysis were used to examine the dimensionality of eight items from the Well-being and Transcendent subscales. The resulting measure (the "Spirit 8") was used to determine levels of SWB. Two hundred eighty-five patients recruited; mean age 40.1; 197 (69.1%) female; primary diagnosis HIV (80.7%), cancer (17.9%). Internal consistency of the eight-item scale was α=0.73; Well-being factor α=0.69, Transcendence factor α=0.68. Rasch analysis suggested unidimensionality. Mean SWB score was 26.01 (standard deviation 5.68). Spiritual distress was present in 21.4-57.9%. Attending the Ugandan service, HIV and younger age were associated with poorer SWB scores. The Spirit 8 is a brief, psychometrically robust, unidimensional measure of SWB for use in South African and Ugandan PC research. Further research testing the Spirit 8 and examining the SWB of PC patients in South Africa and Uganda is needed to improve spiritual care. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Team networking in palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odette Spruyt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available "If you want to travel quickly, go alone. But if you want to travel far, you must go together". African proverb. The delivery of palliative care is often complex and always involves a group of people, the team, gathered around the patient and those who are close to them. Effective communication and functional responsive systems of care are essential if palliative care is to be delivered in a timely and competent way. Creating and fostering an effective team is one of the greatest challenges for providers of palliative care. Teams are organic and can be life giving or life sapping for their members.

  18. Palliative Care

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    Palliative care is treatment of the discomfort, symptoms, and stress of serious illness. It provides relief from distressing symptoms ... of the medical treatments you're receiving. Hospice care, care at the end of life, always includes ...

  19. Palliative Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... spiritual beliefs; they can also provide grief counseling massage therapists who promote relaxation, help patients and families ... too. Family members caring for seriously ill children face numerous challenges, and palliative care programs can help ...

  20. Palliative Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salinas, J.

    2003-01-01

    Palliative care does not attempt to prolong survival but to the achieve the highest quality of life both for the patient and their family covering their physical, psychological, social and spiritual needs. Radiotherapy (RT), one of the most important therapeutic modalities, has a great significance in palliative medicine for cancer since it attempts to reduce as much as possible the acute reaction associated with the treatment for the patient. (Author)

  1. Advances in pain control in palliative care: Pain in palliative care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Advances in pain control in palliative care: Pain in palliative care needs to be carefully assessed before treatment. R Krause, J Stanford. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE ...

  2. The multi-factorial origins of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) symptomology in post-career athletes: The athlete post-career adjustment (AP-CA) model.

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    Gaetz, Michael

    2017-05-01

    CTE has two prominent components: the pathophysiology that is detected in the brain postmortem and the symptomology that is present in the interval between retirement and end of life. CTE symptomology has been noted to include memory difficulties, aggression, depression, explosivity, and executive dysfunction at early stages progressing to problems with attention, mood swings, visuospatial difficulties, confusion, progressive dementia, and suicidality (e.g. McKee et al. (2012), Omalu et al. (2010a-c), McKee et al. (2009)). There are a number of assumptions embedded within the current CTE literature: The first is the assumption that CTE symptomology reported by athletes and their families is the product of the pathophysiology change detected post-mortem (e.g. McKee et al. (2009)). At present, there is little scientific evidence to suggest that all CTE symptomology is the product of CTE pathophysiology. It has been assumed that CTE pathophysiology causes CTE symptomology (Meehan et al. (2015), Iverson et al. (2016)) but this link has never been scientifically validated. The purpose of the present work is to provide a multi-factorial theoretical framework to account for the symptomology reported by some athletes who sustain neurotrauma during their careers that will lead to a more systematic approach to understanding post-career symptomology. There is significant overlap between the case reports of athletes with post-mortem diagnoses of CTE, and symptom profiles of those with a history of substance use, chronic pain, and athlete career transition stress. The athlete post-career adjustment (AP-CA) model is intended to explain some of the symptoms that athletes experience at the end of their careers or during retirement. The AP-CA model consists of four elements: neurotrauma, chronic pain, substance use, and career transition stress. Based on the existing literature, it is clear that any one of the four elements of the AP-CA model can account for a significant number of

  3. Palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Estuque Garcia de Queiroz

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available According to the World Health Organization (WHO, palliative care can be defined as active and totalcare measures that improve the life quality of patients with terminal diseases and their family/relatives, throughprevention and suffering relieve by means of early identification, adequate evaluation, and treatment of painand other physical, psychosocial and spiritual problems. This article deals with the attention of the occupationaltherapist in palliative care, as from the definition of this philosophy and its principles. The occupational therapist’spractice is described through the author’s theoretical and practical references. In palliative care, occupationaltherapy helps the patient and caregiver to deal with the difficulties mentioned and observed in order to achievegreater comfort, dignity and quality of life in the hospital or at home, in order to promote the maximum levelof independence and/or occupational performance with autonomy with the aim to improve the quality of life,despite the functional loss, cognitive, emotional and social.

  4. What is palliative care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comfort care; End of life - palliative care; Hospice - palliative care ... The goal of palliative care is to help people with serious illnesses feel better. It prevents or treats symptoms and side effects of disease and ...

  5. Palliative care in Africa: a global challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntizimira, Christian R; Nkurikiyimfura, Jean Luc; Mukeshimana, Olive; Ngizwenayo, Scholastique; Mukasahaha, Diane; Clancy, Clare

    2014-01-01

    We are often asked what challenges Rwanda has faced in the development of palliative care and its integration into the healthcare system. In the past, patients have been barred from accessing strong analgesics to treat moderate to severe pain, but thanks to health initiatives, this is slowly changing. Rwanda is an example of a country where only a few years ago, access to morphine was almost impossible. Albert Einsten said 'in the middle of difficulty lies opportunity' and this sentiment could not be more relevant to the development of palliative care programmes. Through advocacy, policy, and staunch commitment to compassion, Rwandan healthcare workers are proving how palliative care can be successfully integrated into a healthcare system. As a global healthcare community, we should be asking what opportunities exist to do this across the African continent. Champions of palliative care have a chance to forge lasting collaborations between international experts and African healthcare workers. This global network could not only advocate for palliative care programmes but it would also help to create a culture where palliative care is viewed as a necessary part of all healthcare systems.

  6. ‘Peace’ and ‘life worthwhile’ as measures of spiritual well-being in African palliative care: a mixed-methods study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Selman, L.; Speck, P.; Gysels, M.; Agupio, G.; Dinat, N.; Downing, J.; Gwyther, L.; Mashao, T.; Mmoledi, K.; Moll, T.; Mpanga Sebuyira, L.; Ikin, B.; Higginson, I.J.; Harding, R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with incurable, progressive disease receiving palliative care in sub-Saharan Africa experience high levels of spiritual distress with a detrimental impact on their quality of life. Locally validated measurement tools are needed to identify patients’ spiritual needs and evaluate

  7. Paediatric palliative medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Baum D, Curtis H, Elston S, et al. A Guide to the Development of Children's Palliative Care Services. Bristol: ACT/RCPCH, 1997. 3. World Health Organization. The WHO definition of paediatric palliative care. http://www.who.int/ cancer/palliative/definition/en/ (accessed 24 March 2014). 4. Stjernswärd J, Foley KM, Ferris FD.

  8. Palliative Care in Moldova.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gherman, Liliana; Pogonet, Vadim; Soltan, Viorel; Isac, Valerian

    2018-02-01

    The article describes the important steps of palliative care development in Moldova, the current status, main achievements and challenges to be addressed in the future. It covers background information, policy development, medicines access and availability, education, and training, as well as services' provision. Palliative care development in Moldova registered real progress in spite of frequent political changes at governmental levels and difficulties to ensure the continuity of the development process during the last 10 years. However, the unmet need for palliative care for patients with life-limiting illnesses from different disease and age groups remains high. Further effort is needed to increase the availability and access to opioid analgesics and other essential palliative care medications. Government commitment and support, together with adequate funding, trained and educated health care professionals, and easy access to and availability of medicines, are essential to ensure the successful implementation of palliative care services nationwide, and to deliver the most appropriate qualitative palliative care for patients. To speed up palliative care development, a national strategy on palliative care development should be considered. The authors took part and continue to be involved in different ways in palliative care development in the country. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Palliative Care in Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquilina, Francesca Falzon; Agius, Mark

    2015-09-01

    The Dementias are common neurodegenerative diseases which gradually deteriorate and eventually become fatal. However, hospice care is usually made available to patients suffering from Cancer, while patients who suffer from other chronic conditions such as dementia are not usually offered such care. However the lessons which have been learnt regarding hospice palliative care could be applied with some modification to the care of patients with Dementia. This article attempts to discuss the present literature about palliative care in Dementia, in order to clarify the evidence which underlies the European Association for Palliative Care 'White paper defining optimal palliative care in older people with dementia'.

  10. Palliative care and neurology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boersma, Isabel; Miyasaki, Janis; Kutner, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Palliative care is an approach to the care of patients and families facing progressive and chronic illnesses that focuses on the relief of suffering due to physical symptoms, psychosocial issues, and spiritual distress. As neurologists care for patients with chronic, progressive, life-limiting, and disabling conditions, it is important that they understand and learn to apply the principles of palliative medicine. In this article, we aim to provide a practical starting point in palliative medicine for neurologists by answering the following questions: (1) What is palliative care and what is hospice care? (2) What are the palliative care needs of neurology patients? (3) Do neurology patients have unique palliative care needs? and (4) How can palliative care be integrated into neurology practice? We cover several fundamental palliative care skills relevant to neurologists, including communication of bad news, symptom assessment and management, advance care planning, caregiver assessment, and appropriate referral to hospice and other palliative care services. We conclude by suggesting areas for future educational efforts and research. PMID:24991027

  11. Palliative Care - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care Tips - español (Spanish) PDF National Institute of Nursing Research Pediatric Palliative Care at a Glance - English PDF ... a Glance - español (Spanish) PDF National Institute of Nursing Research Palliative Care for Children: Support for the Whole ...

  12. Litteraturstudie: akupunktur og palliation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anne Bolt

    2013-01-01

    af systematiske søgninger fra 2002-2012 i Pubmed, Cochrane, Cinahl og PsykInfo med søgeordene acupuncture and palliation, acupuncture and cancer, acupuncture and placebo, acupuncture and neurophysiology, acupuncture and palliation and nursing. RCT-forskning viser ikke overbevisende effekt af...

  13. Palliative care and dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Carrie

    2014-09-01

    Dementia is a highly prevalent, progressive, life-limiting illness for which there is no cure. Palliative care is a specialized area of healthcare that focuses on improving the quality of life for individuals with life-limiting diseases. Symptoms such as disorientation, tension, and anxiety occur in patients with dementia at moderate to severe levels as they approach the end of their lives, as well as other common symptoms found with cancer patients, yet the dementia population continues to be unrecognized for their need for palliative care. This article examines current literature with respect to palliative care for patients with dementia.

  14. Palliative care - managing pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page, please enable JavaScript. Palliative care is a holistic approach to care that focuses on treating pain ... stressful for you and your family. But with treatment, pain can be managed. How Pain is Measured ...

  15. Future of palliative medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushma Bhatnagar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A ′need-supply′ and ′requirement-distribution mismatch′ along with a continuingneed explosion are the biggest hurdles faced by palliative medicine today. It is the need of the hour to provide an unbiased, equitable and evidence-based palliative care to those in need irrespective of the diagnosis, prognosis, social and economic status or geographical location. Palliative care as a fundamental human right, ensuring provision throughout the illness spectrum, global as well as region-specific capacity building, uniform availability of essential drugs at an affordable price, a multidisciplinary team approachand caregiver-support are some of the achievable goals for the future. This supplanted with a strong political commitment, professional dedication and ′public-private partnerships′ are necessaryto tackle the existing hurdles and the exponentially increasing future need. For effectively going ahead it is of utmost importance to integrate palliative medicine into medical education, healthcare system and societal framework.

  16. Danish Palliative Care Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønvold, Mogens; Adsersen, Mathilde; Hansen, Maiken Bang

    2016-01-01

    Aims: The aim of the Danish Palliative Care Database (DPD) is to monitor, evaluate, and improve the clinical quality of specialized palliative care (SPC) (ie, the activity of hospital-based palliative care teams/departments and hospices) in Denmark. Study population: The study population is all...... patients in Denmark referred to and/or in contact with SPC after January 1, 2010. Main variables: The main variables in DPD are data about referral for patients admitted and not admitted to SPC, type of the first SPC contact, clinical and sociodemographic factors, multidisciplinary conference...... patients were registered in DPD during the 5 years 2010–2014. Of those registered, 96% had cancer. Conclusion: DPD is a national clinical quality database for SPC having clinically relevant variables and high data and patient completeness....

  17. Palliative care in Enugu, Nigeria: Challenges to a new practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonia C Onyeka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Everyone, young and old, male and female, rich and poor, should have access to excellent care during the course of a serious illness and at the end of life. Therefore, a denial of such care becomes an infringement of the individual′s human rights. Because of the efforts of pioneers in this field of Medicine in Africa and beyond, both living and immortalized, we can now say that palliative care in the African context is affordable and achievable. In this article, some of the challenges faced in setting up and running a new palliative care practice in an emerging and developing economy are examined.

  18. Palliative care communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Goldsmith, Joy; Platt, Christine Small

    2014-11-01

    To summarize the challenges of teaching, practicing, and learning palliative care communication and offer resources for improving skills and educating others. A theoretically grounded, evidence-based communication curriculum called COMFORT (Communication, Orientation and opportunity, Mindful presence, Family, Openings, Relating, and Team). The COMFORT curriculum is available for free through a Web site, a smartphone/iPad application, and online for continuing education units. The COMFORT curriculum provides resources to support the expansion and inclusion of palliative care practice not only in oncology, but also in a wide variety of disease contexts.

  19. Inter-Professional Palliative Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kirsten Halskov; Henriksen, Jette; Meldgaard, Anette

    2013-01-01

    -professional level of palliative care’ – has been increasing for many years where palliative care has conventionally and primarily been associated with specialist training. As the authors show – based on a mapping out of existing educational initiatives in a region of Denmark, a reading of the curriculum......Chapter 11 by Kirsten Halskov Madsen, Anette Meldgaard and Jette Henriksen deals with the development of palliative care programmes aimed at the basic level of palliative care practice. The need to develop educational opportunities at particularly this level – described as ‘the basic inter...... and a description of the organization of palliative care – there is a need for such inter-professional palliative care that raises the level of competences at the basic level and the sharing of knowledge as well as securing the continuous qualifying of healthcare staff working with palliative care....

  20. Palliative care in Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanyushkin, A Y; Khetagurova, A K

    2005-01-01

    The article addresses the history of establishing hospices in Russia complying with international WHO documents. The article also presents the ethics of palliative medicine in the Russian Federation with an objective analysis of the diseases affecting patients with special highlights on social problems.

  1. Palliative care in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Robyna Irshad

    2017-01-01

    Pakistan is a developing country of South East Asia, with all the incumbent difficulties currently being faced by the region. Insufficient public healthcare facilities, poorly regulated private health sector, low budgetary allocation for health, improper priority setting while allocating limited resources, have resulted essentially in an absence of palliative care from the healthcare scene. Almost 90% of healthcare expenditure is out of the patient's pocket with more than 45% of population living below the poverty line. All these factors have a collective potential to translate into an end-of-life care disaster as a large percentage of population is suffering from chronic debilitating/terminal diseases. So far, such a disaster has not materialised, the reason being a family based culture emphasising the care of the sick and old at home, supported by religious teachings. This culture is not limited to Pakistan but subsists in the entire sub-continent, where looking after the sick/elderly at home is considered to be the duty of the younger generation. With effects of globalisation, more and more older people are living alone and an increasing need for palliative care is being realised. However, there does not seem to be any plan on the part of the public or private sectors to initiate palliative care services. This paper seeks to trace the social and cultural perspectives in Pakistan with regards to accessing palliative care in the context of healthcare facilities available.

  2. Palliative care and spirituality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayanasamy Aru

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Critical junctures in patients′ lives such as chronic illnesses and advanced diseases may leave the persons in a state of imbalance or disharmony of body, mind and spirit. With regard to spirituality and healing, there is a consensus in literature about the influence of spirituality on recovery and the ability to cope with and adjust to the varying and demanding states of health and illness. Empirical evidence suggests that spiritual support may act as an adjunct to the palliative care of those facing advanced diseases and end of life. In this article, the author draws from his empirical work on spirituality and culture to develop a discourse on palliative care and spirituality in both secular and non-secular settings. In doing so, this paper offers some understanding into the concept of spirituality, spiritual needs and spiritual care interventions in palliative care in terms of empirical evidence. Responding to spiritual needs could be challenging, but at the same time it could be rewarding to both healthcare practitioner (HCP and patient in that they may experience spiritual growth and development. Patients may derive great health benefits with improvements in their quality of life, resolutions and meaning and purpose in life. It is hoped that the strategies for spiritual support outlined in this paper serve as practical guidelines to HCPs for development of palliative care in South Asia.

  3. Pediatric Palliative Care at a Glance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ® ™ ® Pediatric Palliative Care at a Glance A child’s serious illness affects the entire family. Pediatric palliative (pal-lee-uh-tiv) care can support ... extra support, palliative care can help. What is pediatric palliative care? Pediatric palliative care is supportive care ...

  4. Palliative Care Development in Kyrgyzstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukambetov, Aibek; Sabyrbekova, Taalaigul; Asanalieva, Lola; Sadykov, Ilim; Connor, Stephen R

    2018-02-01

    Palliative care began in Kyrgyzstan in 2005 as a pilot home-based care program in Osh Cancer Center and was supported by a small group of nurses and one physician from Scotland. In 2010, the Soros Foundation-Kyrgyzstan and the Open Society Foundation's International Palliative Care Initiative began supporting work on palliative care policy, legislation, essential medicine availability, education, advocacy, and implementation. A Ministry of Health working group was established to lead this initiative, and technical assistance was provided by an international palliative care consultant. Work began with a national needs assessment, which identified the existing barriers to the provision of quality palliative care, and recommendations were made to the working group to address these challenges. Today, palliative care is included in many national health care policies and laws, a national palliative care association has been established, undergraduate medical and nursing education include elements of palliative care, oral morphine and fentanyl patches are now available in parts of the country, inpatient services exist in the National Cancer Center in Osh and Bishkek, two tuberculosis hospitals with multidrug resistant/extensively drug resistant, and home care services in Osh and Bishkek. Public information campaigns and advocacy activities continue to increase public awareness about palliative care and press government action. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Pancreatic carcinoma: Palliative surgical and endoscopic treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gouma, D. J.; Busch, O. R. C.; van Gulik, T. M.

    2006-01-01

    The majority of patients with pancreatic carcinoma (hepaticojejunostomy) unfortunately will have palliative treatment and palliation of symptoms is important to improve Quality of Life. The most common symptoms that require palliation are jaundice, gastric outlet obstruction and pain. Obstructive

  6. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience with illness. Category ... Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society 4,364 views 3:29 Perinatal Palliative Care - ...

  7. Generalist palliative care in hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergenholtz, Heidi; Jarlbæk, Lene; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2016-01-01

    hospital with 29 department managements and one hospital management. Results: Two overall themes emerged: (1) ‘generalist palliative care as a priority at the hospital’, suggesting contrasting issues regardingprioritisation of palliative care at different organisational levels, and (2) ‘knowledge and use......Background: It can be challenging to provide generalist palliative care in hospitals, owing to difficulties in integrating disease-orientedtreatment with palliative care and the influences of cultural and organisational conditions. However, knowledge on the interactionsthat occur is sparse. Aim......: To investigate the interactions between organisation and culture as conditions for integrated palliative care in hospital and, ifpossible, to suggest workable solutions for the provision of generalist palliative care. Design: A convergent parallel mixed-methods design was chosen using two independent studies...

  8. Training Physicians in Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, J. Cameron; Krammer, Lisa M.; von Gunten, Charles F.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the elements of a program in hospice and palliative medicine that may serve as a model of an effective system of physician education. Topics for the palliative-care curriculum include hospice medicine, breaking bad news, pain management, the process of dying, and managing personal stress. (JOW)

  9. Palliative Care for Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Jonathan T; Schultz, Susan K

    2018-03-01

    With the growing care needs for the older population at the end of their lives, there has been a substantial increase in attention to the management of the patient with dementia in hospice and palliative care services. This article reviews issues in access to care and the optimal management of the patient with dementia, particularly in the context of neuropsychiatric complexities. Special issues such as delirium, cachexia, behavioral symptoms, and pain management are addressed. Future challenges in research such as the development of better prognostic models are noted as well as the importance of attention to access to care. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. [Anxiety in palliative care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pautex, S; Toni, V; Bossert, P; Hilleret, H; Ducloux, D; Forestier, J; Cabotte, E; Philippin, Y; Guisado, H; Vogt-Ferrier, N

    2006-11-01

    In palliative care, the intensity and duration of anxiety as well as its consequences on the patient's daily activities can significantly decrease his quality of life. Anxiety that does not incapacitate the patient to the point of his being unable to communicate or perform his usual activities does not necessarily require drug treatment. The non pharmacological treatments of anxiety are presented in some detail. Prescription of anxiolytic drugs in renal or hepatic failure, as well as when oral intake or venous access are difficult, is briefly discussed.

  11. Resident-Led Palliative Care Education Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlen, Naomi; Cruz, Brian; Leigh, A E

    2016-04-01

    Despite the growth of palliative medicine, 39% of hospitals do not have palliative care teams for consultation or to provide resident education. We examined the impact of resident-led education in palliative care principles on attitudes toward and comfort with palliative medicine and end-of-life care among internal medicine residents. An educational module designed by the authors was presented to other internal medicine residents in the program. Pre- and post-intervention survey data measuring residents' agreement with various statements regarding palliative medicine and end-of-life care were analyzed. Residents' agreement with various statements regarding palliative medicine and end-of-life care on a 5-point Likert scale was analyzed. Following the intervention, participants reported improved comfort with general knowledge of palliative medicine (p palliative care and end-of-life care (p curriculum in palliative medicine can improve resident comfort within this still-under-represented area of medicine.

  12. Palliative care - fear and anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page, please enable JavaScript. Palliative care is a holistic approach to care that focuses on treating pain ... References Irwin SA, Montross LP, Chochinov HM. What treatments are effective for anxiety in patients with serious ...

  13. Palliative care - shortness of breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page, please enable JavaScript. Palliative care is a holistic approach to care that focuses on treating pain ... the cause will help the team decide the treatment. The nurse may check how much oxygen is ...

  14. [Multiprofessional cooperation in palliative care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falckenberg, Maja

    2007-04-01

    "Nothing is more powerful than an idea whose time has come." (Victor Hugo) Originally referring to the beginning of the enlightenment (reconnaissance) of the French revolution the transcription of this words regarding to German palliative Care structures would mean a tremendous effort. The meaning of the new idea is a holistic kind of care for patients with a chronic disease at the end of their lives, so that they can die as most self determined as possible at a location of their choice. The special aim of palliative care, the need of interdisciplinary cooperation leading to multidisciplinary solutions is pointed out. The meaning of palliative care team as a team with special communication skills in between the team and with further cooperating partners is described. Communication in palliative care means more than telling facts.

  15. Palliative care content on cancer center websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vater, Laura B; Rebesco, Gina; Schenker, Yael; Torke, Alexia M; Gramelspacher, Gregory

    2018-03-01

    Professional guidelines recommend that palliative care begin early in advanced cancer management, yet integration of palliative and cancer care remains suboptimal. Cancer centers may miss opportunities to provide palliative care information online. In this study, we described the palliative care content on cancer center websites. We conducted a systematic content analysis of 62 National Cancer Institute- (NCI) designated cancer center websites. We assessed the content of center homepages and analyzed search results using the terms palliative care, supportive care, and hospice. For palliative and supportive care webpages, we assessed services offered and language used to describe care. Two researchers analyzed all websites using a standardized coding manual. Kappa values ranged from 0.78 to 1. NCI-designated cancer center homepages presented information about cancer-directed therapy (61%) more frequently than palliative care (5%). Ten percent of cancer centers had no webpage with palliative care information for patients. Among centers with information for patients, the majority (96%) defined palliative or supportive care, but 30% did not discuss delivery of palliative care alongside curative treatment, and 14% did not mention provision of care early in the disease process. Cancer center homepages rarely mention palliative care services. While the majority of centers have webpages with palliative care content, they sometimes omit information about early use of care. Improving accessibility of palliative care information and increasing emphasis on early provision of services may improve integration of palliative and cancer care.

  16. Palliative radiotherapy in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, B.J.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: The International Agency for Research on Cancer predicts that cancer incidence in developing countries will increase dramatically in the first two decades of this millennium. Already some 80% of cancer patients in developing countries present with incurable disease. [n many cases pain is a severe problem and palliation is needed to improve quality of life as well as extending survival. This paper will consider the physical and clinical aspects of palliative radiotherapy (PRT), choice of radiation modality, alternative approaches to imaging and therapy and cost-benefit considerations. The potential benefits of a dedicated palliative centre include lower cost and therefore more centres, enabling more patients access to regional palliative care. Whilst there is an obvious need for palliative radiotherapy, simple curative treatments could also be managed. C060 radiotherapy has important advantages in developing countries, because of the higher initial cost of a linear accelerator, as well as the need for reliable power supply and the level of skill required by linac technicians and physicists. The beam characteristics of both C060 units and low energy linacs are compared and both are found to be acceptable for palliation. The concept of telemedicine is also discussed, using mobile phones and internet communication to allow rural clinics to receive support from specialists based in the cities, to send images for remote diagnosis and remote dose planning for radiotherapy. (author)

  17. When palliative treatment achieves more than palliation: Instances of long-term survival after palliative radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhup Rastogi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Palliative radiotherapy aims at symptom alleviation and improvement of quality of life. It may be effective in conferring a reasonable quantum of local control, as well as possibly prolonging survival on the short term. However, there can be rare instances where long-term survival, or even cure, results from palliative radiotherapy, which mostly uses sub-therapeutic doses. Aim: To categorize and characterize the patients with long-term survival and/or cure after palliative radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: This study is a retrospective analysis of hospital records of patients treated with palliative radiotherapy from 2001 to 2006 at the Regional Cancer Centre, Shimla. Results: Of the analyzed 963 patients who received palliative radiotherapy, 2.4% (n = 23 survived at least 5 years, with a large majority of these surviving patients (73.9%, n = 17 being free of disease. Conclusions: In addition to providing valuable symptom relief, palliative radiotherapy utilizing sub-therapeutic doses may, in a small proportion of patients, bestow long-term survival, and possibly cure. Rationally, such a favorable, but rare outcome cannot be expected with supportive care alone.

  18. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it free Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe from NINRnews? ... and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience ...

  19. Prevalence of hyponatremia in palliative care patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoba Nair

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Prevalence of hyponatremia is significant in palliative care patients. A prospective study looking at the causes and clinical outcomes associated with hyponatremia in palliative care patients is needed.

  20. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The Keeney Family discuss pediatric palliative care - Duration: 12:07. Hospice of the Western Reserve 11,132 views 12:07 Perinatal Palliative Care - The Zimmer Family Story - ...

  1. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Legacy through Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: 5:39. Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) 26,045 views 5:39 Little Stars – Paediatric Palliative Care – Charlie's Story - Duration: ...

  2. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancer Society 4,275 views 3:29 Little Stars – Paediatric Palliative Care – Charlie's Story - Duration: 10:35. Little Stars 12,275 views 10:35 Pediatric Palliative Care ...

  3. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 4:24 Perinatal Palliative Care - The Zimmer Family Story - Duration: 13:34. UnityPoint Health - Meriter 193,342 views 13:34 LIFE Before Death Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: 5:27. ...

  4. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... count__/__total__ Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe from NINRnews? ... and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience ...

  5. A National Palliative Care Strategy for Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Morrison, R. Sean

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To identify barrier to achieving universal access to high quality palliative care in Canada, review published national strategies and frameworks to promote palliative care, examine key aspects that have been linked to successful outcomes, and make recommendations for Canada.

  6. Life perceptions of patients receiving palliative care and experiencing psycho-social-spiritual healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lingsheng; Sloan, Danetta H; Mehta, Ambereen K; Willis, Gordon; Weaver, Meaghann S; Berger, Ann C

    2017-07-01

    It is important to identify, from the patients' perspectives, the different factors that contribute toward psycho-social-spiritual healing. This was a qualitative study that took place at a large research center, an underserved clinic, and a community hospital. We used a needs assessment questionnaire and open-ended questions to assess the constituents of psycho-social-spiritual healing: (I) how previous life experiences affected patients' present situations in dealing with their illnesses; (II) barriers to palliative care, and (III) benefits of palliative care. Of a total of 30 participants from 3 different study sites, 24 (80%) were receiving inpatient or outpatient palliative care at a research center. Thirteen (43%) participants were female, 10 (33%) were Black/African American, and 16 (53%) reported being on disability. While the initial shock of the diagnosis made participants feel unprepared for their illnesses, many looked to role models, previous work experiences, and spiritual as well as religious support as sources of strength and coping mechanisms. Barriers to palliative care were identified as either external (lack of proper resources) or internal (symptom barriers and perceived self-limitations). The feeling of "being seen/being heard" was perceived by many participants as the most beneficial aspect of palliative care. The needs assessment questionnaire and open-ended questions presented in this study may be used in clinical settings to better help patients achieve psycho-social-spiritual healing through palliative care and to help clinicians learn about the person behind the patient.

  7. Palliative social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taubert, Mark; Watts, Gareth; Boland, Jason; Radbruch, Lukas

    2014-03-01

    The uses of social media have become ubiquitous in contemporary society at an astonishingly fast-paced rate. The internet and in particular platforms such as Facebook, Twitter and YouTube are now part of most people's vocabulary and are starting to replace many face-to-face interactions. The online world, in particular, is alive with discussions, comments and anecdotes about the topics of illness, disease, hospitals, death and dying. The topic of death and dying had in the not too distant past been seen as taboo, but willingness and need to talk openly about it appears to be on the increase. In parallel to this, many public awareness campaigns are highlighting society's need to be more prepared for dying and death. This will have a significant impact on the way terminally ill patients and their families approach the last years, months and weeks of their lives and how they might expect palliative health and social care professionals working with them through these difficult periods to interact with them. We pay particular attention to the areas of digital posterity creation and memorialisation within the wider holistic context of end-of-life care.

  8. Endoscopic Palliation for Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihir Bakhru

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is devastating due to its poor prognosis. Patients require a multidisciplinary approach to guide available options, mostly palliative because of advanced disease at presentation. Palliation including relief of biliary obstruction, gastric outlet obstruction, and cancer-related pain has become the focus in patients whose cancer is determined to be unresectable. Endoscopic stenting for biliary obstruction is an option for drainage to avoid the complications including jaundice, pruritus, infection, liver dysfunction and eventually failure. Enteral stents can relieve gastric obstruction and allow patients to resume oral intake. Pain is difficult to treat in cancer patients and endoscopic procedures such as pancreatic stenting and celiac plexus neurolysis can provide relief. The objective of endoscopic palliation is to primarily address symptoms as well improve quality of life.

  9. Rawlsian Justice and Palliative Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knight, Carl; Albertsen, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Palliative care serves both as an integrated part of treatment and as a last effort to care for those we cannot cure. The extent to which palliative care should be provided and our reasons for doing so have been curiously overlooked in the debate about distributive justice in health and healthcare....... We argue that one prominent approach, the Rawlsian approach developed by Norman Daniels, is unable to provide such reasons and such care. This is because of a central feature in Daniels' account, namely that care should be provided to restore people's opportunities. Daniels' view is both unable...... to provide pain relief to those who need it as a supplement to treatment and, without justice-based reasons to provide palliative care to those whose opportunities cannot be restored. We conclude that this makes Daniels' framework much less attractive....

  10. Palliative care in gynecologic oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlin, Daniel; Phung, Peter; Pietras, Christopher

    2018-02-01

    Patients with gynecologic malignancies face many difficult issues in the course of their diseases, ranging from physical symptoms to advance care planning in light of a poor prognosis. This review examines the evidence supporting integration of palliative care early in the course of disease and symptom management, and provides a framework for difficult conversations. Palliative care has been demonstrated to improve quality of life and promote survival if integrated early in the course of disease. An evidence-based approach should guide symptom management, such as pain and nausea. Advance care planning and goals of care discussions are enhanced by a framework guiding discussion and the incorporation of empathetic responses. Palliative care is a diverse multidisciplinary field that can provide significant benefit for patients with gynecologic malignancies.

  11. Branding Palliative Care Units by Avoiding the Terms "Palliative" and "Hospice".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ying-Xiu; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Lin, Ming-Hwai

    2017-01-01

    The term "palliative care" has a negative connotation and may act as a barrier to early patient referrals. Rebranding has thus been proposed as a strategy to reduce the negative perceptions associated with palliative care. For example, using the term "supportive care" instead of "palliative care" in naming palliative care units has been proposed in several studies. In Taiwan, terms other than "palliative" and "hospice" are already widely used in the names of palliative care units. With this in mind, this study investigated the characteristics of palliative care unit names in order to better understand the role of naming in palliative care. Relevant data were collected from the Taiwan Academy of Hospice Palliative Medicine, the National Health Insurance Administration of the Ministry of Health and Welfare, and the open database maintained by the government of Taiwan. We found a clear phenomenon of avoiding use of the terms "palliative" and "hospice" in the naming of palliative care units, a phenomenon that reflects the stigma attached to the terms "palliative" and "hospice" in Taiwan. At the time of the study (September, 2016), there were 55 palliative care units in Taiwan. Only 20.0% (n = 11) of the palliative care unit names included the term "palliative," while 25.2% (n = 14) included the term "hospice." Religiously affiliated hospitals were less likely to use the terms "palliative" and "hospice" (χ 2 = 11.461, P = .001). There was also a lower prevalence of use of the terms "palliative" and "hospice" for naming palliative care units in private hospitals than in public hospitals (χ 2 = 4.61, P = .032). This finding highlights the strong stigma attached to the terms "palliative" and "hospice" in Taiwan. It is hypothesized that sociocultural and religious factors may partially account for this phenomenon.

  12. Endoscopic palliation in gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdivieso, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    The integral search for improved living conditions for those patients with gastric cancer who have not received curative surgical treatment continues to challenge the knowledge, dexterity and ethical foundations of medical teams. The justification for palliative treatment must be based on a thorough consideration of the available options and the particular situation in each case. This article reviews endoscopic therapy with auto expandable prosthetics for palliative treatment of gastric cancer, as well as the scientific evidence that supports its use and the factors that determine its indication.

  13. Palliative care in advanced dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merel, Susan E; Merel, Susan; DeMers, Shaune; Vig, Elizabeth

    2014-08-01

    Because neurodegenerative dementias are progressive and ultimately fatal, a palliative approach focusing on comfort, quality of life, and family support can have benefits for patients, families, and the health system. Elements of a palliative approach include discussion of prognosis and goals of care, completion of advance directives, and a thoughtful approach to common complications of advanced dementia. Physicians caring for patients with dementia should formulate a plan for end-of-life care in partnership with patients, families, and caregivers, and be prepared to manage common symptoms at the end of life in dementia, including pain and delirium. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Pediatric palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trapanotto Manuela

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The WHO defines pediatric palliative care as the active total care of the child's body, mind and spirit, which also involves giving support to the family. Its purpose is to improve the quality of life of young patients and their families, and in the vast majority of cases the home is the best place to provide such care, but for cultural, affective, educational and organizational reasons, pediatric patients rarely benefit from such an approach. In daily practice, it is clear that pediatric patients experience all the clinical, psychological, ethical and spiritual problems that severe, irreversible disease and death entail. The international literature indicates a prevalence of incurable disease annually affecting 10/10,000 young people from 0 to 19 years old, with an annual mortality rate of 1/10,000 young people from birth to 17 years old. The needs of this category of patients, recorded in investigations conducted in various parts of the world, reveal much the same picture despite geographical, cultural, organizational and social differences, particularly as concerns their wish to be treated at home and the demand for better communications between the professionals involved in their care and a greater availability of support services. Different patient care models have been tested in Italy and abroad, two of institutional type (with children staying in hospitals for treating acute disease or in pediatric hospices and two based at home (the so-called home-based hospitalization and integrated home-based care programs. Professional expertise, training, research and organization provide the essential foundations for coping with a situation that is all too often underestimated and neglected.

  15. Palliative Treatment of Esophageal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad; Goosenberg; Frucht; Coia

    1994-07-01

    Palliative interventions for advanced esophageal cancer include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, chemoradiation, endoscopic procedures, and combinations of the above. Palliative esophagectomy or bypass procedures are difficult to justify in these patients because their life expectancy is so short. Palliative external beam radiation to doses of 50 to 60 Gy is successful in 50% to 70% of patients. The addition of brachytherapy may improve these results. One third to one half of patients treated with radiation develop benign or maglinant stricture. Although response rates to combination chemotherapy are only 50% at best, the majority of patients do have improvement of dysphagia. These regimens are commonly used as part of a multidisciplinary approach with radiation andøor surgery, rather than as a sole modality of treatment. Chemoradiation regimens results in better survival than treatment with radiation alone, and provide palliation of dysphagia in up to 90% of patients. Although acute toxicity of chemoradiation is more severe than radiation alone, this is of limited duration. Chemoradiation may be the treatment of choice for the majority of patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer. Endoscopic techniques are available that provide palliation of dysphagia. The most commonly used technique is esophageal dilatation, either alone or before performing other palliative procedures such as laser therapy or stent placement. The most significant limitation of dilatation alone is that palliation is short-lived and most patients require repeat dilatations. Esophageal stents offer a high degree of palliation, but procedure-related morbidity and mortality rates are not insignificant. Expandable metal stents are associated with few complications but tumor ingrowth through the metallic mesh is frequent. Conventional plastic stents are not affected by tumor ingrowth but can migrate. Endoscopic laser therapy also provides symptoms relief and complication rates are

  16. Palliative Care: Delivering Comprehensive Oncology Nursing Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Constance

    2015-11-01

    To describe palliative care as part of comprehensive oncology nursing care. A review of the palliative care, oncology, and nursing literature over the past 10 years. Palliative care is mandated as part of comprehensive cancer care. A cancer diagnosis often results in distress in the physical, psychosocial, spiritual, and emotional domains of care. Oncology nurses are essential in providing palliative care from diagnosis to death to patients with cancer. They address the myriad aspects of cancer. With palliative care skills and knowledge, oncology nurses can provide quality cancer care. There are many opportunities in which oncology nurses can promote palliative care. Oncology nurses must obtain knowledge and skills in primary palliative care to provide comprehensive cancer care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Palliative care in advanced HIV

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Repro

    death, with close collaboration between acute and palliative physicians.This model of care should be encouraged ... productivity and death. BIOMEDICAL MARKERS DETER-. MINING THE TERMINAL PHASE .... nursing component of the multi- disciplinary team should facilitate strong liaison between the spe- cialised ...

  18. Palliative Care In Salima District

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    enrolled on its programme, due to pain. Palliative care across Sub-Saharan Africa is still in its infancy and invariably practised in resource limited settings. Accordingly effective medical treatment has to take account of factors not faced in the rich, more highly developed regions of the world. For example nsima readily blocks ...

  19. Palliative care in neuromuscular diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Visser, Marianne; Oliver, David J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review Palliative care is an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problem associated with life-threatening illness. Neuromuscular disorders (NMDs) are characterized by progressive muscle weakness, leading to pronounced and incapacitating

  20. Psychosocial issues in palliative care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Repro

    Mrs Tanchel co-super- vises final-year social work students at the. University of Cape. Town. She is active in education both for professionals (includ- ing medical students, doctors and nurses) and lay persons. She has worked in palliative care for more than 15 years and has had 25 years' experience in psychosocial care.

  1. Palliative care experiences of adult cancer patients from ethnocultural groups: a qualitative systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busolo, David; Woodgate, Roberta

    2015-01-01

    , chaplains, home health aides and volunteers.Palliative care needs for cancer patients are numerous and may include needs related to activities of daily living, communication, sexuality, physical needs, psychological needs, fear, spiritual wellbeing, socioeconomic aspects and insufficiency of information. Cancer patients often report of suffering, pain and being in constant need of support. In dealing with their suffering, some patients seek internal motivation by looking at the disease as a life challenge. Other patients turn to external sources of motivation like religion, or peer and family support groups.Patients from different ethnocultural groups report similar as well as dissimilar palliative care needs and experiences. With respect to similarities, a study from the United States found that African American and Caucasian patients alike valued practical assistance from social groups. Participants from both ethnocultural groups valued friends and families that listened to their cancer-related concerns. Similarly, Turkish and Moroccan patients in a study conducted in Netherlands valued friends and family members that were there for them. Additionally, participants particularly of African American descent treasured positive attitudes from people around them and valued support from religion and faith communities. These sentiments are echoed in a palliative care study conducted in the United Kingdom. In the UK study, Caribbean Blacks and British White patients appreciated the significance of social networks and partner or spousal support in their cancer trajectory.In regards to unsupportive palliative care experiences, authors of the United States study report that African Americans and Caucasians had more similarities than differences. Firstly, both ethnocultural groups shared experiences of losing association with family and close friends after they learnt of the patients' diagnosis. These sentiments were also reported by Danish-born and immigrant patients in a study by

  2. Specialist palliative care nursing and the philosophy of palliative care: a critical discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jackie; Gott, Merryn; Gardiner, Clare; Ingleton, Christine

    2017-07-02

    Nursing is the largest regulated health professional workforce providing palliative care across a range of clinical settings. Historically, palliative care nursing has been informed by a strong philosophy of care which is soundly articulated in palliative care policy, research and practice. Indeed, palliative care is now considered to be an integral component of nursing practice regardless of the specialty or clinical setting. However, there has been a change in the way palliative care is provided. Upstreaming and mainstreaming of palliative care and the dominance of a biomedical model with increasing medicalisation and specialisation are key factors in the evolution of contemporary palliative care and are likely to impact on nursing practice. Using a critical reflection of the authors own experiences and supported by literature and theory from seminal texts and contemporary academic, policy and clinical literature, this discussion paper will explore the influence of philosophy on nursing knowledge and theory in the context of an evolving model of palliative care.

  3. Undergraduate curricula in palliative medicine: a systematic analysis based on the palliative education assessment tool.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Schiessi, C

    2013-01-01

    By law in 2013, palliative medicine will be integrated into the undergraduate curriculum as part of a mandatory training program and examinations at German medical schools. For this reason a national curriculum in palliative medicine has to be developed.

  4. Knowledge of Palliative Care Among Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismaile, Samantha; Alshehri, Hanan H; Househ, Mowafa

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate nursing undergraduate students' knowledge with regard to palliative care in Saudi Arabia. A quantitative descriptive research study was conducted by the use of validated tool. A total of 204 students were included in the study. There is little evidence in Saudi Arabia to demonstrate if nursing undergraduates receives education on palliative care. The results indicate that 57.9% of the nursing undergraduates had received educational sessions and 42.1% of nursing undergraduates did not. In conclusion, palliative care nursing education is crucial to improve quality of patient care in nursing practices. It is recommended that a palliative care education should be integrated within the nursing programme courses. Hence, in order to improve students' knowledge of palliative care, course content should cover the principles of palliative care as a part of any nursing bachelor programme.

  5. Palliation of Dysphagia in Carcinoma Esophagus

    OpenAIRE

    Ramakrishnaiah, Vishnu Prasad Nelamangala; Malage, Somanath; Sreenath, G.S.; Kotlapati, Sudhakar; Cyriac, Sunu

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal carcinoma has a special place in gastrointestinal carcinomas because it contains two main types, namely, squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. Carcinoma esophagus patients require some form of palliation because of locally advanced stage or distant metastasis, where it cannot be subjected to curable treatment with surgery and chemoradiation. Many modalities of palliation of dysphagia are available, but the procedure with least morbidity, mortality, and long-term palliation of...

  6. PALLIATIVE CARE AND MEDICAL COMMUNICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Anca COLIBABA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article outlines learners’ difficulty in acquiring and practicing palliative medical skills necessary in medical procedures due to limited technologically state-of-the art language learning support to facilitate optimum access for medical students to the European medicine sector and offers as a potential solution the Palliative Care MOOC project (2014-1-RO01-KA203-002940. The project is co-financed by the European Union under the Erasmus+ program and coordinated by the Gr.T.Popa University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iasi, Romania. The article describes the project idea and main objectives, highlighting its focus and activities on developing innovative guidelines on standardized fundamental medical procedures, as well as clinical language and communication skills. The project thus helps not only medical lecturers and language teachers who teach medical students, but also the medical students themselves and the lay people involved in causalities.

  7. Smartphone Applications in Palliative Homecare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhiliwal, Sunil R; Salins, Naveen

    2015-01-01

    Smartphone applications in healthcare delivery are a novel concept and is rapidly gaining ground in all fields of medicine. The modes of e-communications such as e-mail, short message service (SMS), multimedia messaging service (MMS) and WhatsApp in palliative care provides a means for quick tele-consultation, information sharing, cuts the waiting time and facilitates initiation of the treatment at the earliest. It also forms a means of communication with local general practitioner and local health care provider such that continuity of the care is maintained. It also minimizes needless transport of the patient to hospital, prevents needless hospitalization and investigations and minimizes cost and logistics involved in the care process. The two case studies provided highlights the use of smartphone application like WhatsApp in palliative care practice and demonstrates its utility. PMID:25709195

  8. [Pastoral care in palliative medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borck, S

    2006-11-01

    The orientation of life before death towards a quality as high as possible leads to an understanding of palliative medicine not as a pure medical discipline but rather as an integral approach of different disciplines, professions and services, combining several sectors and not being restricted to professionals. Within this change of patterns the pastoral care contribution is developed from professional clinical pastoral care, at first the pastoral care attitude in palliative medicine, challenged by the irritating expectation which dying and death every time demands of all involved. Basics of general mourning research and tasks of bereavement counselling are explained for elaboration as well as theological basics of a Christian human dignity concept. Different competence areas of pastoral care are linked to the dimensions of myth, ethos and rite. Finally a couple of tasks and challenges concerning interreligious cooperation, the cooperating with relatives and volunteers as well as structural questions of pastoral care are mentioned.

  9. Palliative Care and Death Anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figen Inci

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Diminishing treatment alternatives, losing hope for a possible recovery, insufficient control of pain and inability to provide the necessary technical support lead palliative care to bring multiple problems with itself. Along with technical and professional challenges, palliative care can put a humanitarian strain on the nurse. Caring for a dying patient is a worrisome experience which causes spiritual pain. An increase in nurses’ death anxiety may cause unwillingness to be together with a dying patient. In terms of the end of life, it is expected that the nurse stands by patient’s family to help them in sustaining their psychosocial wellness. In order to meet this expectation, nurses should get a qualitative training for end of life care along with good interpersonal communication skills and coping strategies.

  10. Smartphone applications in palliative homecare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil R Dhiliwal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Smartphone applications in healthcare delivery are a novel concept and is rapidly gaining ground in all fields of medicine. The modes of e-communications such as e-mail, short message service (SMS, multimedia messaging service (MMS and WhatsApp in palliative care provides a means for quick tele-consultation, information sharing, cuts the waiting time and facilitates initiation of the treatment at the earliest. It also forms a means of communication with local general practitioner and local health care provider such that continuity of the care is maintained. It also minimizes needless transport of the patient to hospital, prevents needless hospitalization and investigations and minimizes cost and logistics involved in the care process. The two case studies provided highlights the use of smartphone application like WhatsApp in palliative care practice and demonstrates its utility.

  11. [Palliative care and Alzheimer disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Tourres, F; Lefebvre-Chapiro, S; Fétéanu, D; Trivalle, C

    2009-06-01

    Although end-of-life care is a relatively common option for patients with terminal cancer, it has become available only recently for patients with Alzheimer's disease. Alzheimer's disease is a chronic process of gradual deterioration of cognitive ability and the resulting deficits in activities of daily living. The chronic disease course of Alzheimer's disease gives to the clinician the opportunity to look ahead and plan for the final stages of care. This article presents a review of palliative care interventions for patients with Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. End-of-life care for individuals with end-stage Alzheimer's disease is increasingly important because of the increasing number of patients with this disease. However, there are barriers to providing high-quality end-of-life care. Currently, palliative care is not optimal for Alzheimer's patients. Health care systems and clinicians should make efforts to improve the suffering of patients with this disease and their caregivers.

  12. Smartphone applications in palliative homecare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhiliwal, Sunil R; Salins, Naveen

    2015-01-01

    Smartphone applications in healthcare delivery are a novel concept and is rapidly gaining ground in all fields of medicine. The modes of e-communications such as e-mail, short message service (SMS), multimedia messaging service (MMS) and WhatsApp in palliative care provides a means for quick tele-consultation, information sharing, cuts the waiting time and facilitates initiation of the treatment at the earliest. It also forms a means of communication with local general practitioner and local health care provider such that continuity of the care is maintained. It also minimizes needless transport of the patient to hospital, prevents needless hospitalization and investigations and minimizes cost and logistics involved in the care process. The two case studies provided highlights the use of smartphone application like WhatsApp in palliative care practice and demonstrates its utility.

  13. PALLIATIVE CARE IN SLOVENIA AND FUTURE CHALLENGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urška Lunder

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. Palliative care in Slovene health care system isn’t developed. Comparison with other countries is not possible in many aspects. There is no complete or appropriately educated palliative care team in hospitals or in primary care. Palliative care departments in hospitals and nursing homes do not exist. Holistic palliative home care is offered only by Slovene association of hospice. The pressure on nursing homes and nursing service departments is getting stronger. Standards and norms for staff, for living conditions and medical equipment do not allow any more admittances of patients with the needs of high category of care in these institutions.Conclusions. Indirect indicators of level of palliative care (e.g. morphine consumption, palliative care departments, home care network, undergraduate education, specialisation and research put Slovenia at the bade of the Europe. Statistics predict aging of population and more patients are also living with consequences of progressive chronic diseases and cancer.In the new healthcare reform there is an opportunity for palliative care to get an equal place in healthcare system. With coordinated implementation of palliative care departments, consultant teams and mobile specialistic teams, palliative care could reach a better level of quality. At the same time, quality permanent education is essential.

  14. Palliative sedation and ethical dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juri Salamah

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Palliative sedation is a unique concern for the patient as well as the family. It is a difficult serious ethical dilemma for the physicians to handle. The conflicting ethical principles of autonomy, beneficence and nonmaleficence in continuing versus discontinuing all supportive devices raise concerns among health professionals whether this is euthanasia (physician-assisted suicide or is just prolonging the patient's unnecessary suffering.

  15. On the palliative care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selwyn, Peter A

    2016-06-01

    As a physician working in palliative care, the author is often privileged to share special moments with patients and their families at the end of life. This haiku poem recalls one such moment in that precious space between life and death, as an elderly woman, surrounded by her adult daughters, takes her last breath. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Palliative Care: Opportunities for Nursing

    OpenAIRE

    Nambayan, Ayda Gan

    2018-01-01

    Ayda G. Nambayan, PhD, RN is the Training Consultant for The Ruth Foundation for Palliative and Hospice Care. Prior to this, she held various positions as a Consultant for Advanced Education and Training at Makati Medical Center, Philippines; a curriculum and distance learning developer for www.Cure4Kids.org, the educational website of the International Outreach Program of St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis, TN. In 2002, she retired from a faculty position from the University of...

  17. Music Therapy in Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warth, Marco; Keßler, Jens; Hillecke, Thomas K; Bardenheuer, Hubert J

    2015-11-13

    Music therapy has been used successfully for over 30 years as part of palliative care programs for severely ill patients. There is nonetheless a lack of high-quality studies that would enable an evidence-based evaluation of its psychological and physiological effects. In a randomized controlled trial, 84 hospitalized patients in palliative care were assigned to one of two treatment arms--music therapy and control. The music therapy intervention consisted of two sessions of live music-based relaxation exercises; the patients in the control group listened to a verbal relaxation exercise. The primary endpoints were self-ratings of relaxation, well-being, and acute pain, assessed using visual analog scales. Heart rate variability and health-related quality of life were considered as secondary outcomes. The primary data analysis was performed according to the intention-to-treat principle. Analyses of covariance revealed that music therapy was more effective than the control treatment at promoting relaxation (F = 13.7; p Music therapy did not differ from control treatment with respect to pain reduction (F = 0.4; p = 0.53), but it led to a significantly greater reduction in the fatigue score on the quality-of-life scale (F = 4.74; p = 0.03). Music therapy is an effective treatment with a low dropout rate for the promotion of relaxation and well-being in terminally ill persons undergoing palliative care.

  18. Palliative care for dementia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirot, France

    2016-12-01

    Dementia is a life-limiting disease without curative treatments but the data suggest that advanced dementia is not viewed as a terminal diagnosis by physicians. Although symptoms of dementia and cancer patients are similar, palliative care is less frequently proposed for dementia patients. However, professionals and family members of demented patients strongly favor comfort care for end-stage dementia. To improve the patients' relief near the end of life, advance care planning with patients and their proxies should be encouraged. It should start as soon as possible so that the patient can still be actively involved and his preferences, values, needs and beliefs elicited. Written advance directives or enrollment in hospice care are associated with quality of dying. Yet caregivers are sometimes concerned about applying palliative care too early or that advance plans would be invalidated if relatives or patients changed their mind. Therefore, general practitioners and palliative care specialists need to better collaborate to provide greater information and improve comfort and quality of life of dementia patients.

  19. Radiation therapy in palliative care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikushima, Hitoshi; Nishitani, Hiromu

    2005-01-01

    Radiation therapy is a valuable treatment for palliation of local symptoms with consistently high response rates in the relief and control of bone pain, neurological symptom, obstructive symptoms, and tumor hemorrhage. Over than 80% of patients who developed bone metastasis and superior vena cava syndrome obtained symptom relief by radiation therapy. Radiation therapy is also well established as an effective treatment for brain metastasis, improving symptoms and preventing progressive neurological deficits, and recently stereotactic irradiation had became a alternative treatment of surgery for small metastatic brain tumors. Both radiation therapy and surgery are effective in the initial treatment of malignant spinal cord compression syndrome, and no advantages of surgery over radiation therapy has been demonstrated in published series when patients have a previously conformed diagnosis of malignant disease and no evidence of vertebral collapse. The outcome of treatment depends primarily upon the speed of diagnosis and neurological status at initiation of treatment. It is very important to start radiation therapy before patient become non-ambulant. Low irradiation dose and short treatment period of palliative radiation therapy can minimize disruption and acute morbidity for the patients with advanced cancer with enabling control of symptoms and palliative radiation therapy is applicable to the patient even in poor general condition. (author)

  20. Bone pain palliation: Philippines setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagsisihan, J.R.; Barrenechea, E.; San Luis, T.O.L.

    2008-01-01

    Metastatic bone disease is a major sequela of several solid cancers; the breast, prostate, lung, kidney and thyroid etc. Bone pain is a common symptom in advancing malignancy and often determines the quality of life in the later stages of disease. Management of bone pain remains palliative at present. With the improved cancer survival resulting from advances in cancer management, the population of patients seeking relief of bone pain has increased. Radiopharmaceutical therapy offers potential pain relief with minimal adverse effects. The purpose of this study was to assess the current status of radiopharmaceutical therapy for bone pain palliation in the Philippines. To date, no study has been done on bone pain palliation therapy. The study population included all cancer patients with bone metastasis presenting with chronic bone pain who were subjected to radiopharmaceutical therapy for bone pain palliation in the different medical centers and hospitals in the Philippines. The clinical histories of the patients were reviewed. The specific radiopharmaceutical and corresponding doses used for the said therapies were also noted. The respondents were inquired of the effectiveness of the therapy in relieving bone pain and duration of the response to the therapy. The complete blood count, before and after the therapy, were retrieved. The approximate cost of the therapy was also inquired and was then compared with the cost of different treatment modalities. Over the years only six radiopharmaceutical therapies have been performed in the Philippines (three male patients with prostate cancer, two female patients with breast cancer and one female patient with renal cancer). All had multiple bone metastases on bone scintigraphy and presented with chronic bone pain, which were not adequately controlled by other treatment modalities such as analgesics, bisphosphonates, chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and radiation therapy. Four subjects were subjected to Strontium-89 chloride (Sr

  1. Palliative sedation versus euthanasia: an ethical assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Have, Henk; Welie, Jos V M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article was to review the ethical debate concerning palliative sedation. Although recent guidelines articulate the differences between palliative sedation and euthanasia, the ethical controversies remain. The dominant view is that euthanasia and palliative sedation are morally distinct practices. However, ambiguous moral experiences and considerable practice variation call this view into question. When heterogeneous sedative practices are all labeled as palliative sedation, there is the risk that palliative sedation is expanded to include practices that are actually intended to bring about the patients' death. This troublesome expansion is fostered by an expansive use of the concept of intention such that this decisive ethical concept is no longer restricted to signify the aim in guiding the action. In this article, it is argued that intention should be used in a restricted way. The significance of intention is related to other ethical parameters to demarcate the practice of palliative sedation: terminality, refractory symptoms, proportionality, and separation from other end-of-life decisions. These additional parameters, although not without ethical and practical problems, together formulate a framework to ethically distinguish a more narrowly defined practice of palliative sedation from practices that are tantamount to euthanasia. Finally, the article raises the question as to what impact palliative sedation might have on the practice of palliative care itself. The increasing interest in palliative sedation may reemphasize characteristics of health care that initially encouraged the emergence of palliative care in the first place: the focus on therapy rather than care, the physical dimension rather than the whole person, the individual rather than the community, and the primacy of intervention rather than receptiveness and presence. Copyright © 2014 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Palliative Care Processes Embedded in the ICU Workflow May Reserve Palliative Care Teams for Refractory Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, Eluned; Umbarger, Lillian; Ceria-Ulep, Clementina; Nakatsuka, Craig

    2018-01-01

    Palliative Care Teams have been shown to be instrumental in the early identification of multiple aspects of advanced care planning. Despite an increased number of services to meet the rising consultation demand, it is conceivable that the numbers of palliative care consultations generated from an ICU alone could become overwhelming for an existing palliative care team. Improve end-of-life care in the ICU by incorporating basic palliative care processes into the daily routine ICU workflow, thereby reserving the palliative care team for refractory situations. A structured, palliative care, quality-improvement program was implemented and evaluated in the ICU at Kaiser Permanente Medical Center in Hawaii. This included selecting trigger criteria, a care model, forming guidelines, and developing evaluation criteria. These included the early identification of the multiple features of advanced care planning, numbers of proactive ICU and palliative care family meetings, and changes in code status and treatment upon completion of either meeting. Early identification of Goals-of-Care, advance directives, and code status by the ICU staff led to a proactive ICU family meeting with resultant increases in changes in code status and treatment. The numbers of palliative care consultations also rose, but not significantly. Palliative care processes could be incorporated into a daily ICU workflow allowing for integration of aspects of advanced care planning to be identified in a systematic and proactive manner. This reserved the palliative care team for situations when palliative care efforts performed by the ICU staff were ineffective.

  3. Flemish palliative-care nurses' attitudes to palliative sedation: a quantitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gielen, Joris; Van den Branden, Stef; Van Iersel, Trudie; Broeckaert, Bert

    2012-09-01

    Palliative sedation is an option of last resort to control refractory suffering. In order to better understand palliative-care nurses' attitudes to palliative sedation, an anonymous questionnaire was sent to all nurses (589) employed in palliative care in Flanders (Belgium). In all, 70.5% of the nurses (n = 415) responded. A large majority did not agree that euthanasia is preferable to palliative sedation, were against non-voluntary euthanasia in the case of a deeply and continuously sedated patient and considered it generally better not to administer artificial floods or fluids to such a patient. Two clusters were found: 58.5% belonged to the cluster of advocates of deep and continuous sedation and 41.5% belonged to the cluster of nurses restricting the application of deep and continuous sedation. These differences notwithstanding, overall the attitudes of the nurses are in accordance with the practice and policy of palliative sedation in Flemish palliative-care units.

  4. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 187,809 views 4:24 Portraits of Life, Love and Legacy through Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: 5: ... 40,142 views 4:38 Portraits of Life, Love & Legacy Through Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: 54:51. ...

  5. Pediatric Palliative Care in Infants and Neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian S. Carter

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The application of palliative and hospice care to newborns in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU has been evident for over 30 years. This article addresses the history, current considerations, and anticipated future needs for palliative and hospice care in the NICU, and is based on recent literature review. Neonatologists have long managed the entirety of many newborns’ short lives, given the relatively high mortality rates associated with prematurity and birth defects, but their ability or willingness to comprehensively address of the continuum of interdisciplinary palliative, end of life, and bereavement care has varied widely. While neonatology service capacity has grown worldwide during this time, so has attention to pediatric palliative care generally, and neonatal-perinatal palliative care specifically. Improvements have occurred in family-centered care, communication, pain assessment and management, and bereavement. There remains a need to integrate palliative care with intensive care rather than await its application solely at the terminal phase of a young infant’s life—when s/he is imminently dying. Future considerations for applying neonatal palliative care include its integration into fetal diagnostic management, the developing era of genomic medicine, and expanding research into palliative care models and practices in the NICU.

  6. PALLIATIVE CARE IN ROMANIA : NEEDS AND RIGHTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvel, Wim J. A.; Olaroiu, Marinela

    2008-01-01

    Palliative care is directed to maintenance of quality of life and to prevent and to relief suffering of those with a life-threatening disease. Palliative care does not only concern the patient, but also the quality of life of family members and it deals with physical symptoms as well as with

  7. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 186,248 views 4:24 Portraits of Life, Love and Legacy through Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: 5: ... 40,056 views 4:38 Portraits of Life, Love & Legacy Through Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: 54:51. ...

  8. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Up next The Keeney Family discuss pediatric palliative care - Duration: 12:07. Hospice of the Western Reserve 11,132 views 12:07 Caroline Symmes' Story - Duration: 4:24. ... of Life, Love and Legacy through Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: 5:39. Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) ...

  9. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Little Stars 12,195 views 10:35 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society 4,258 views 3:29 Pediatric Palliative ... views 3:34 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 62,474 views 5: ...

  10. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Reserve 11,132 views 12:07 Portraits of Life, Love and Legacy through Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: ... Meriter 195,536 views 13:34 Portraits of Life, Love & Legacy Through Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: 54: ...

  11. Palliation of Dysphagia in Carcinoma Esophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishnu Prasad Nelamangala Ramakrishnaiah

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal carcinoma has a special place in gastrointestinal carcinomas because it contains two main types, namely, squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. Carcinoma esophagus patients require some form of palliation because of locally advanced stage or distant metastasis, where it cannot be subjected to curable treatment with surgery and chemoradiation. Many modalities of palliation of dysphagia are available, but the procedure with least morbidity, mortality, and long-term palliation of dysphagia needs to be chosen for the patient. This study aims to discuss the recent trends in palliation of dysphagia with promising results and the most suitable therapy for palliation of dysphagia in a given patient. A total of 64 articles that were published between years 2005 and 2015 on various modes of palliation of dysphagia in carcinoma esophagus were studied, which were mainly randomized and prospective studies. Through this study, we conclude that stents are the first choice of therapy for palliation, which is safe and cost-effective, and they can be combined with either radiotherapy or chemotherapy for long-term palliation of dysphagia with good quality of life. Radiotherapy can be used as a second-line treatment modality.

  12. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... Little Stars 12,195 views 10:35 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society 4,256 views 3:29 Pediatric Palliative ... views 3:34 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 62,410 views 5: ...

  13. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... report inappropriate content. Sign in Transcript Add translations 4,609 views Like this video? Sign in to ... Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society 4,363 views 3:29 Pediatric Palliative Care and ...

  14. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... Queue __count__/__total__ It’s YouTube. Uninterrupted. Loading... Want music and videos with zero ads? Get YouTube Red. ... 010 views 1:55 Seasons Hospice & Palliative Care Music Therapy & Alzheimer's - Duration: 6:24. Seasons Hospice & Palliative ...

  15. Pediatric Palliative Care Initiative in Cambodia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmut Yaşar Çeliker

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cancer care with curative intent remains difficult to manage in many resource-limited settings such as Cambodia. Cambodia has a small workforce with limited financial and health-care resources resulting in delayed diagnoses and availability of limited therapeutic tools. Thus, palliative care becomes the primary form of care in most cases. Although palliative care is becoming an integral part of medical care in developed countries, this concept remains poorly understood and utilized in developing countries. Angkor Hospital for Children serves a relatively large pediatric population in northern Cambodia. According to the modern definition of palliative care, approximately two-thirds of the patients admitted to the hospital were deemed candidates to receive palliative care. In an effort to develop a pediatric palliative care team utilizing existing resources and intensive training, our focus group recruited already existing teams with different health-care expertise and other motivated members of the hospital. During this process, we have also formed a palliative care training team of local experts to maintain ongoing palliative care education. Feedback from patients and health-care providers confirmed the effectiveness of these efforts. In conclusion, palliative and sustainable care was offered effectively in a resource-limited setting with adequately trained and motivated local providers. In this article, the steps and systems used to overcome challenges in Cambodia are summarized in the hope that our experience urges governmental and non-governmental agencies to support similar initiatives.

  16. Pediatric Palliative Care Initiative in Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çeliker, Mahmut Yaşar; Pagnarith, Yos; Akao, Kazumi; Sophearin, Dim; Sorn, Sokchea

    2017-01-01

    Cancer care with curative intent remains difficult to manage in many resource-limited settings such as Cambodia. Cambodia has a small workforce with limited financial and health-care resources resulting in delayed diagnoses and availability of limited therapeutic tools. Thus, palliative care becomes the primary form of care in most cases. Although palliative care is becoming an integral part of medical care in developed countries, this concept remains poorly understood and utilized in developing countries. Angkor Hospital for Children serves a relatively large pediatric population in northern Cambodia. According to the modern definition of palliative care, approximately two-thirds of the patients admitted to the hospital were deemed candidates to receive palliative care. In an effort to develop a pediatric palliative care team utilizing existing resources and intensive training, our focus group recruited already existing teams with different health-care expertise and other motivated members of the hospital. During this process, we have also formed a palliative care training team of local experts to maintain ongoing palliative care education. Feedback from patients and health-care providers confirmed the effectiveness of these efforts. In conclusion, palliative and sustainable care was offered effectively in a resource-limited setting with adequately trained and motivated local providers. In this article, the steps and systems used to overcome challenges in Cambodia are summarized in the hope that our experience urges governmental and non-governmental agencies to support similar initiatives. PMID:28804708

  17. [Multiprofessional team working in palliative medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaka, Iwao

    2013-04-01

    Now, more than ever, palliative medicine has been gaining recognition for its essential role in cancer treatment. Since its beginning, it has emphasized the importance of collaboration among multidisciplinary professionals, valuing a comprehensive and holistic philosophy, addressing a wide range of hopes and suffering that patients and families experience. There are three models (approaches) for the medical teams: multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary, and transdisciplinary. Palliative care teams often choose the interdisciplinary team model, and the teams in the palliative care units may often choose the transdisciplinary team model. Recently, accumulating research has shown the clinical benefits of the interdisciplinary/transdisciplinary approach in palliative care settings. Clarifying appropriate functions and ideal features of physicians in the health care team, and enforcing the suitable team approach will contribute to improve the quality of whole medical practice beyond the framework of "palliative medicine".

  18. Palliative radiotherapy of bone metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koswig, S.; Buchali, A.; Boehmer, D.; Schlenger, L.; Budach, V.

    1999-01-01

    Background: The effect of the palliative irradiation of bone metastases was explored in this retrospective analysis. The spectrum of primary tumor sites, the localization of the bone metastases and the fractionation schedules were analyzed with regard to palliation discriminating total, partial and complete pain response. Patients and Methods: One hundred seventy-six patients are included in this retrospective quantitative study from April 1992 to November 1993. Two hundred fifty-eight localizations of painful bone metastases were irradiated. The percentage of bone metastases of the total irradiated localizations in our department of radiotherapy in the Carite-Hospital, the primary tumor sites, the localizations and the different fractionation schedules were explored. The total, partial and complete pain response was analyzed in the most often used fractionation schedules and by primary tumor sites. Results: Eight per cent of all irradiated localizations in the observation period were bone metastases. There were irradiated bone metastases of 21 different tumor sites. Most of the primary tumor sites were breast cancer (49%), lung cancer (6%) and kidney cancer (6%). The most frequent site of metastases was the vertebral column (52%). The most often used fractionation schedules were: 4x5 Gy (32%), 10x3 Gy (18%), 6x5 Gy (9%), 7x3 Gy (7%), 10x2 Gy (5%) and 2x8 Gy. The total response rates in this fractionation schedules were 72%, 79%, 74%, 76%, 75% and 72%, the complete response rates were 35%, 32%, 30%, 35%, 33% and 33%. There were no significant differences between the most often irradiated primary tumor sites, the most frequent localizations and the palliation with regard to total, partial and complete pain response. (orig.) [de

  19. Radiopharmaceuticals for palliative therapy pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaudiano, Javier

    1994-01-01

    Dissemination to bone of various neoplasms is cause of pain with poor response by major analgesics.Indications. Radiopharmaceuticals,description of main characteristics of various β emitter radionuclides.Choose of patients for worm indication of pain palliative therapy with β emitter radiopharmaceuticals is adequate must be careful . Contraindications are recognized.Pre and post treatment controls as clinical examination and complete serology are described.It is essential to subscribe protocols,keep patient well informed,included the physician in charge of the patient as part of the team.Bibliography

  20. Symptomatic splenomegaly and palliative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaneva, M.; Vlaikova, M.

    2005-01-01

    We analysed the effect of irradiation of an enlarged spleen in some hematologic diseases: chronic myelaemia, osteomyelophybrosis and chronic lymphadenosis, where splenectomy had been contraindicated and where pain has been a leading symptom and also the discomfort because of an enlarged spleen. For 20 years in the Clinic of Radiotherapy have been treated 23 patients with the above mentioned diseases. We have irradiated all patients using X-ray and later- Co-60. To reach a palliative effect we have irradiated patients with single doses from 50 cGy to 100 cGy with an interval of 2-3 days between each fraction, but the total doses have been different- from 400 cGy to 1500 cGy. The enlarged spleen has reached the pelvis in 3 cm to 17 cm below the costal margin, and in some patients has crossed the median line of the body going in some centimetres on the other side. The reduction of splenic size and volume is as follows: full reduction in 6 patients (26.1%) and partial in 17 (73.9%). All patients resulted in decreases in pain and tension in abdomen and the total discomfort. No serious side haematologic effects were encountered. Our experience indicates that cautious splenic irradiation can be a safe and useful therapeutic alternative. The symptomatic palliation in patients, where splenectomy is not an option, is effective and is an additional alternative for an improvement of their general condition

  1. Knowledge of palliative care: an online survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Qadire, Mohammad

    2014-05-01

    The main purpose of palliative care is to manage symptoms among patients, reduce their burden of pain, and improve their quality of life. Nurses are an essential part of the palliative care team in providing high standards of care since they spend the longest time with patients. However, lack of adequate knowledge of palliative care is considered as one of the main barriers to palliative care development and practise. To evaluate Jordanian nursing students' knowledge about palliative care. Design A quantitative research method and descriptive online-survey design were used. Settings and Participants The sample consisted of 220 students enrolled in five nursing schools (four governmental and one private) in Jordan. The Palliative Care Quiz for Nursing was used to measure students' knowledge. The sample consisted of 220 nursing students; the mean age was 20.5, SD 2.5, and most of the students were female (67), 74 (34%) were fourth-year students and 58 (26%) were in their third year. The total mean score was low, at 8.0 (SD 3.1), ranging from 0 to 18 and the number of correctly answered statements ranged from 60 (27%, statement no. 3) to 145 (66%, statement no. 2). It was found that there were no significant impacts (H (3)=5.69, p=0.137) for place of study. However, students' knowledge was strongly affected by their academic level (H (3)=12.60, p=0.005). Integrating palliative care education is required as the mainstay to improve students' knowledge and therefore practise. This education needs to be comprehensive in covering the basic principles of palliative care and symptom management and it should be distributed throughout the different courses to discuss palliative care within different contexts, such as elderly, paediatric and adult settings. © 2013.

  2. [Introduction to palliative care for the oncologist-history and basic principles of palliative care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, Yasuo

    2010-10-01

    The basic principle of palliative care has evolved over time and is the historical origin of the modern hospice. WHO proposed the first definition of palliative care in 1989, and the definition was revised in 2002. These definitions have something in common. Both relieve the pain and suffering to improve QOL. Palliative care is also good for any kind of life-threatening disease, regardless of whether it requires short or long term recuperation. That also need to be able to accept equally all the people of the community. The provision of general palliative care is the responsibility of all medical, nursing, and health professionals for the welfare of all patients with life-threatening disease. Specialist palliative care is based on the basic principles of palliative care, intensive clinical training, and systematic acquisition of knowledge and skills training to support palliative care education, clinical research and training provided by the profession. It has been established by nursing and medical experts in palliative care that palliative care can provide expertise in interdisciplinary teams in different settings. It is necessary that the medical system.

  3. Palliative wound care management strategies for palliative patients and their circles of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Kevin Y; Krasner, Diane L; Kennedy, Bruce; Wardle, David; Moir, Olivia

    2015-03-01

    To provide information about palliative wound care management strategies for palliative patients and their circles of care. This continuing education activity is intended for physicians and nurses with an interest in skin and wound care. After participating in this educational activity, the participant should be better able to: 1. Recognize study findings, assessment tools, and non-pharmacologic strategies used for patients with palliative wounds. 2. Summarize pharmacologic and dressing treatment strategies used for wound care management of palliative patients. The principles of palliative wound care should be integrated along the continuum of wound care to address the whole person care needs of palliative patients and their circles of care, which includes members of the patient unit including family, significant others, caregivers, and other healthcare professionals that may be external to the current interprofessional team. Palliative patients often present with chronic debilitating diseases, advanced diseases associated with major organ failure (renal, hepatic, pulmonary, or cardiac), profound dementia, complex psychosocial issues, diminished self-care abilities, and challenging wound-related symptoms. This article introduces key concepts and strategies for palliative wound care that are essential for interprofessional team members to incorporate in clinical practice when caring for palliative patients with wounds and their circles of care.

  4. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... shares the story of Rachel—a pediatric neuroblastoma patient—and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience with illness. Category Science & Technology ...

  5. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe from NINRnews? Cancel Unsubscribe Working... ... on Jan 8, 2014 This vignette shares the story of Rachel—a pediatric neuroblastoma patient—and her ...

  6. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 54:51 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 62,370 views 5:21 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  7. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 4:24 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 63,227 views 5:21 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  8. Concept mapping in palliative medicine research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Carmen Wing Han; Choi, Kai Chow; So, Winnie Kwok Wei; Chan, Helen Yue Lai

    2012-07-01

    Palliative care adopts a share care model that emphasizes the collaboration among patients, families, and health care providers. Different views and different priority of care are often reported. Concept mapping is a research methodology that can best obtain a big picture as well as a clustering of sub-themes that are identified by different parties involved in palliative care. Concept mapping adopts qualitative method to identify themes, and then uses quantitative techniques such as multidimensional scaling to create a map that shows the patterns of relationships between themes. The method draws the shared expertise of a studied group by constructing graphic models of an issue in palliative medicine examined by the group. This paper will introduce the approach of concept mapping and its use in palliative medicine research. Issues such as sample size calculation and validity and reliability will be discussed.

  9. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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  10. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... views 5:39 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 62,647 views 5:21 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  11. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... has been rented. This feature is not available right now. Please try again later. Published on Jan ... Gavin 49,286 views 4:13 Portraits of Life, Love and Legacy through Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: ...

  12. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... neuroblastoma patient—and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and ... 3:50 4 Cardiac arrests in 14 hours, How our son survived - Duration: 4:38. usrooks 40, ...

  13. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... now Try it free Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe ... This vignette shares the story of Rachel—a pediatric neuroblastoma patient—and her family. The story demonstrates ...

  14. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... now Try it free Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Loading... Unsubscribe ... This vignette shares the story of Rachel—a pediatric neuroblastoma patient—and her family. The story demonstrates ...

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  16. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience with illness. Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License Show more Show less Comments are disabled ...

  17. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... 21. KidsCancerChannel 62,777 views 5:21 Little Stars – Paediatric Palliative Care – Charlie's Story - Duration: 10:35. Little Stars 12,275 views 10:35 Teen Cancer Stories | ...

  18. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Rachel—a pediatric neuroblastoma patient—and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience with illness. Category Science & Technology License Standard ...

  19. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views 12:07 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 63,703 views 5:21 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  20. Ethical issues in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinlaw, Kathy

    2005-02-01

    To review important issues that address respect for patient autonomy, beneficnce, non-maleficence, and justice, which are included in communication surrounding the determination of decision-making capacity, informed consent, breaking bad news, and creating shared goals of care. Review articles, and government and organizational reports. Palliative care and its proximity to end-of-life care issues frequently raises ethical issues for patients, their families, and the clinicians caring for them. Supporting the identification and honoring the patient's preferences for treatment are central components of ethical behavior. Advance care planning provides an important opportunity for respecting patient autonomy and may be helpful when discussing care options surrounding resuscitation, withholding or withdrawal of treatment, or the determination of medical futility.

  1. Advancing palliative care as a human right.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwyther, Liz; Brennan, Frank; Harding, Richard

    2009-11-01

    The international palliative care community has articulated a simple but challenging proposition that palliative care is an international human right. International human rights covenants and the discipline of palliative care have, as common themes, the inherent dignity of the individual and the principles of universality and nondiscrimination. However, when we consider the evidence for the effectiveness of palliative care, the lack of palliative care provision for those who may benefit from it is of grave concern. Three disciplines (palliative care, public health, and human rights) are now interacting with a growing resonance. The maturing of palliative care as a clinical specialty and academic discipline has coincided with the development of a public health approach to global and community-wide health problems. The care of the dying is a public health issue. Given that death is both inevitable and universal, the care of people with life-limiting illness stands equal to all other public health issues. The International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR) includes the right to health care and General Comment 14 (paragraph 34) CESCR stipulates that "States are under the obligation to respect the right to health by, inter alia, refraining from denying or limiting equal access for all persons, ... to preventive, curative and palliative health services." However, these rights are seen to be aspirational-rights to be achieved progressively over time by each signatory nation to the maximum capacity of their available resources. Although a government may use insufficient resources as a justification for inadequacies of its response to palliative care and pain management, General Comment 14 set out "core obligations" and "obligations of comparable priority" in the provision of health care and placed the burden on governments to justify "that every effort has nevertheless been made to use all available resources at its disposal in order to satisfy, as

  2. [Cancer and elderly people, what palliative care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benyahia, Stéphanie; N'Fissi, Karima; Sahut-D'Izarn, Marine; Cudennec, Tristan

    Epidemiological data relating to cancer and the ageing of the population highlight the need for oncology, geriatrics and palliative care to work more closely together. Geriatric and palliative care assessments in oncology are complex procedures and result in the modification of the oncological therapeutic choices. They have a significant impact on the methods of treatment of the patients concerned. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of palliative care nursing education seminars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrell, Betty; Virani, Rose; Paice, Judith A; Coyle, Nessa; Coyne, Patrick

    2010-02-01

    More than 50 million people die each year around the world. Nurses are crucial in providing care to these individuals and their families as they spend the most time at the bedside with patients and families. Yet many nurses have received little or no education about palliative care. The Open Society Institute (OSI) and the Open Medical Institute (OMI) partnered with End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC) to develop an international nursing palliative care curriculum. This international curriculum was implemented with two training courses held in Salzburg, Austria in October 2006 (n=38) and April 2008 (n=39) representing 22 Eastern European/Central Asian countries. Participants were asked to establish goals in disseminating the palliative care information when they returned to their country. The participants were mentored/followed for a 12-month period to evaluate their palliative care knowledge as well as challenges encountered. The participants provided excellent ratings for the training courses indicating that the courses were stimulating and met their expectations. The 12-month follow-up demonstrated many challenges (i.e., lack of funds, institutional support, fear of death), in advancing palliative care within each participant's setting/country as well as many examples of successful implementation. There is an urgent need for improved palliative care throughout the world. The ELNEC-International curriculum is designed to address the need for increased palliative care education in nursing. In order to improve the quality of life for those facing life-threatening illnesses around the world, ongoing support is needed for world-wide palliative care educational efforts. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [Palliative plastic surgery in multidisciplinary therapeutic concepts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kippenhan, T; Hirche, C; Lehnhardt, M; Daigeler, A

    2015-04-01

    Survival rates even in advanced tumour stage have been improved for some tumour entities due to progress in adjuvant and neoadjuvant therapeutic strategies. Nevertheless, painful, exulcerated or bleeding wounds can impair quality of life for palliative patients. Increasing evidence in palliative treatment has raised options for plastic-reconstructive surgery to be applied for treatment of local wounds which can improve quality of life for the remaining lifetime for the palliative patients in our institutions. In this review the role of plastic surgery in the palliative treatment concept is highlighted as well as conservative and operative treatment options are discussed. With regard to the limited evidence, an analysis of the currently available literature was performed and data reviewed. These data were added to a case series of patients of our hospital. The analysis of the literature revealed only few data which all indicate an improvement of quality of life due to reconstructive procedures in the palliative situation. There are some studies dealing with plastic surgical operations in advanced tumour diseases. Plastic surgery procedures become relevant after failure of conservative treatment wound care. The most frequent entities are soft tissue sarcomas, squamous cell carcinomas and breast cancer. Safe and simple flaps should be preferred, but free flaps and tendon transfer are optional procedures, and resection of the thoracic wall can be justified in palliative indications with sufficient soft tissue coverage. The indications for major limb amputation should be restricted to selective cases because quality of life is highly reduced. Radiation is possible even after tissue transfer in some cases, and radiation-induced dermatitis with ulcerations can be treated additionally. Opportunities and limitations in plastic and reconstructive surgery should be continuously presented in tumour boards, to clarify these important procedures for palliative patients to all

  5. Palliative care in Australian medical student education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Daryl R; Teh, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Greater emphasis needs to be placed on medical student palliative care education within the Australian arena. The development of a comprehensive, relevant and practical educational curriculum in this area during medical school is imperative in order to adequately equip the future junior medical workforce. Further development of a national palliative care curriculum as well as research comparing various teaching methods and curricula should be the priorities in the near future.

  6. Palliation for suspected unresectable hilar cholangiocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, S; Barron, E; Redhead, D N; Ireland, H; Madhavan, K K; Parks, R W; Garden, O J

    2007-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of different techniques of palliation for patients with hilar cholangiocarcinoma. All patients treated with palliative intent between 1988 and 2004 at the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh were reviewed. Patients were analysed on an intention to treat basis. Demographics, procedure and outcome (including re-admissions) were recorded. Two hundred and thirty-three patients underwent palliative treatment for suspected hilar cholangiocarcinoma. The diagnosis was confirmed histologically in 109 patients. The procedure related morbidity and mortality was 54/225 and 18/207 respectively. Seventy-one patients required re-admission. Twenty patients underwent surgical biliary bypass for jaundice. Those undergoing surgical palliation had a longer median (95% CI) time to re-admission (16 (0-36) vs.7 (2-12) weeks, p=0.001). Endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP) and stenting was only successful in 28 patients and was associated with a significantly higher re-admission rate compared to patients in whom ERCP was not performed (60/179 vs. 4/27, p=0.050). The overall median (95% CI) survival was 145 (124-185) days. Current options for palliation of hilar cholangiocarcinoma provide good short term success but are all associated with significant early and late morbidity. Due to its low success and association with an increased re-admission rate, ERCP for definitive palliation should not be used in the first line staging and management of these patients.

  7. Dental expression and role in palliative treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Saini

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available World Health Organization defines palliative care as the active total care of patients whose disease is not responding to curative treatment. Palliative care for the terminally ill is based on a multidimensional approach to provide whole-person comfort care while maintaining optimal function; dental care plays an important role in this multidisciplinary approach. The aim of the present study is to review significance of dentist′s role to determine whether mouth care was effectively assessed and implemented in the palliative care setting. The oral problems experienced by the hospice head and neck patient clearly affect the quality of his or her remaining life. Dentist plays an essential role in palliative care by the maintenance of oral hygiene; dental examination may identify and cure opportunistic infections and dental disease like caries, periodontal disease, oral mucosal problems or prosthetic requirement. Oral care may reduce not only the microbial load of the mouth but the risk for pain and oral infection as well. This multidisciplinary approach to palliative care, including a dentist, may reduce the oral debilities that influence the patient′s ability to speak, eat or swallow. This review highlighted that without effective assessment of the mouth, the appropriate implementation of care will not be delivered. Palliative dental care has been fundamental in management of patients with active, progressive, far-advanced disease in which the oral cavity has been compromised either by the disease directly or by its treatment; the focus of care is quality of life.

  8. Healing ministry and palliative care in Christianity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayard, S Stephen; Irudayadason, Nishant A; Davis, J Charles

    2017-01-01

    Death is inevitable, but that does not mean it can be planned or imposed. It is an ethical imperative that we attend to the unbearable pain and suffering of patients with incurable and terminal illnesses. This is where palliative care plays a vital role. Palliative care has been growing faster in the world of medicine since its emergence as a specialty in the last decade. Palliative care helps to reduce physical pain while affirming the aspect of human suffering and dying as a normal process. The goal of palliative care is to improve the quality of life both of the patient and the family. Palliative care resonates with the healing ministry of Christianity that affirms the sanctity and dignity of human life from the moment of conception to natural death. Christianity is convinced that patients at the very end of their lives, with all their ailments and agonies, are still people who have been created in the image and likeness of God. The human person is always precious, even when marked by age and sickness. This is one of the basic convictions that motivate Christians to take care of the sick and the dying. Palliative care is a great opportunity for Christians to manifest God's unfailing love for the terminally ill and the dying.

  9. [The perspectives on palliative nursing education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wen-Yu; Yeh, Mei Chang

    2015-04-01

    The numbers of people who suffer from age-related and chronic diseases have been increased worldwide. This has lead to an increased emphasis in the medical community on end of life care. This paper references the processes followed overseas in developing palliative care education programs as well as the domestic experiences promoting the hospitalization, home care, and "share care" models of palliative care. Particular emphasis is given to considerations of cultural diversity in palliative care. The aim of this paper is to elaborate on the prevalent clinical end-of-life care issues that are faced in Taiwan, to cultivate core capabilities in end-of-life care, to elicit the current status and development of formal nursing education, and to promote continuing education in palliative care. Kern formulated a six-step approach to curriculum development in education and the details has been discussed . Finally, this paper reflects on the current bottlenecks, challenges, and expectations related to palliative care curriculum development in order to help medical professionals further put humanistic and social care into practice, increase ethical reflection in end of life care and nursing competency, and encourage the creation of localized textbooks / multimedia e-teaching materials. The fostering of "patient-centered, family unit and the social-cultural contexture" for palliative care professionals and the ability to respond to the needs of terminal patients and patients with chronic diseases are critical to increasing the quality of Taiwan healthcare.

  10. Cryospray ablation (CSA in the palliative treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnston Mark H

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Esophageal carcinoma is the ninth most prevalent cancer worldwide with squamous cell carcinoma (SCCA and adenocarcinoma accounting for the vast majority of new cases (13,900 in 2003. Cure rates in the U.S. are less than 10%, similar to lung cancer. More than 50% of patients with esophageal carcinoma present with unresectable or metastatic disease, are not surgical candidates, or display disease progression despite the addition of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy to surgery. Need for improved palliation exits. Case presentation This case describes a 73-year-old African American male who presented with recurrent squamous cell carcinoma (SCCA of the esophagus who has a achieved complete remission for 24 months via endoscopic cryospray ablation. Conclusion Endoscopic cryo spray ablation warrants further investigation as a palliative treatment modality for esophageal cancer. This is the first reported case in the medical literature.

  11. The use of ketamine in cancer palliation | Smith | Southern African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cancer pain is caused by continuous tissue injury, which may be due to surgery, infiltration of the surrounding organs including nerves, as well as from mucositis after chemo- or radiotherapy. Nerve involvement, chronic opioid therapy and continuous nociceptive input cause hyperalgesia. Chronic stimulation of the dorsal ...

  12. Enhancing Palliative Care Education in Medical School Curricula: Implementation of the Palliative Education Assessment Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Emily B.; Meekin, Sharon Abele; Fins, Joseph J.; Fleischman, Alan R.

    2002-01-01

    Evaluated a project to catalyze New York State medical schools to develop and implement strategic plans for curricular change to enhance palliative care education. Found that the project's process of self-assessment and curriculum mapping with the Palliative Education Assessment Tool, along with strategic planning for change, appears to have…

  13. Teleconsultation for integrated palliative care at home: A qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gurp, J.; van Selm, M.; van Leeuwen, E.; Vissers, K.; Hasselaar, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Interprofessional consultation contributes to symptom control for home-based palliative care patients and improves advance care planning. Distance and travel time, however, complicate the integration of primary care and specialist palliative care. Expert online audiovisual

  14. Atlas of Palliative Care in the Eastern Mediterranean Region

    OpenAIRE

    Osman, H. (Hibah); Rihan, A. (Alaa); Garralda, E. (Eduardo); Rhee, J.Y. (John Y.); Pons-Izquierdo, J.J. (Juan José); Lima, L. (Liliana) de; Tfayli, A. (Arafat); Centeno-Cortes, C. (Carlos)

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Information on the state of palliative care development in Eastern Mediterranean countries is scant. This study is the first of its kind in conducting a systematic descriptive analysis of palliative care development in the region. AIMS To describe the current status of palliative care in the Eastern Mediterranean Region according to the World Health Organization (WHO) public health strategy for integrating palliative care: policies, opioid accessibility, ...

  15. Policy analysis: palliative care in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Larkin, P

    2014-03-01

    Palliative care for patients with advanced illness is a subject of growing importance in health services, policy and research. In 2001 Ireland became one of the first nations to publish a dedicated national palliative care policy. This paper uses the \\'policy analysis triangle\\' as a framework to examine what the policy entailed, where the key ideas originated, why the policy process was activated, who were the key actors, and what were the main consequences. Although palliative care provision expanded following publication, priorities that were unaddressed or not fully embraced on the national policy agenda are identified. The factors underlying areas of non-fulfilment of policy are then discussed. In particular, the analysis highlights that policy initiatives in a relatively new field of healthcare face a trade-off between ambition and feasibility. Key policy goals could not be realised given the large resource commitments required; the competition for resources from other, better-established healthcare sectors; and challenges in expanding workforce and capacity. Additionally, the inherently cross-sectoral nature of palliative care complicated the co-ordination of support for the policy. Policy initiatives in emerging fields such as palliative care should address carefully feasibility and support in their conception and implementation.

  16. Palliative Care Questions and Answers (Hospice Care Comparison)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Answers Palliative Care Questions and Answers Question Palliative Care Hospice Care Who can receive this care? Anyone with a ... a package deal? No, there is no ‘palliative care’ benefit package Yes, hospice is a comprehensive benefit covered by Medicare and ...

  17. Hope in palliative care: A longitudinal qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olsman, E.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis describes hope in palliative care patients, their family members and their healthcare professionals. An interpretative synthesis of the literature (chapter 2) and a metaphor analysis of semi-structured interviews with palliative care professionals (chapter 3) highlight palliative care

  18. European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC framework for palliative sedation: an ethical discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juth Niklas

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this paper is to critically discuss some of the ethically controversial issues regarding continuous deep palliative sedation at the end of life that are addressed in the EAPC recommended framework for the use of sedation in palliative care. Discussion We argue that the EAPC framework would have benefited from taking a clearer stand on the ethically controversial issues regarding intolerable suffering and refractory symptoms and regarding the relation between continuous deep palliative sedation at the end of life and euthanasia. It is unclear what constitutes refractory symptoms and what the relationship is between refractory symptoms and intolerable suffering, which in turn makes it difficult to determine what are necessary and sufficient criteria for palliative sedation at the end of life, and why. As regards the difference between palliative sedation at the end of life and so-called slow euthanasia, the rationale behind stressing the difference is insufficiently demonstrated, e.g. due to an overlooked ambiguity in the concept of intention. It is therefore unclear when palliative sedation at the end of life amounts to abuse and why. Conclusions The EAPC framework would have benefited from taking a clearer stand on some ethically controversial issues regarding intolerable suffering and refractory symptoms and regarding the relation between continuous deep palliative sedation at the end of life and euthanasia. In this text, we identify and discuss these issues in the hope that an ensuing discussion will clarify the EAPC's standpoint.

  19. Palliative Aged Care: Collaborative Partnerships Between Gerontology, Geriatrics and Palliative Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meg Hegarty

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Palliative aged care is rapidly developing as a specialty area, involving the collaboration and combined expertise of the fields of gerontology, geriatric care, and palliative care. The similarities and differences between these fields provide rich ground for complementing and informing each other's practice and perspectives and in working together to develop health and social policy, which acknowledge the unique factors distinguishing the experience of many elderly people with life-limiting illness. In recent years, two significant projects have been initiated in Australia: (1 the Australian Palliative Residential Aged Care Project (APRAC, which developed evidence-based guidelines for palliative aged care; and (2 the joint development of a postgraduate online program in Palliative Care in Aged Care, by the Department of Palliative and Supportive Services and the Centre for Ageing Studies, a WHO Collaborating Centre, both of Flinders University, Adelaide. Both projects have reconciled the paradigms, philosophies, and evidence-based knowledge of both palliative care and aged care to create for the first time a set of guidelines and an educational program, which will inform and influence the development of practice in this important and developing clinical area.

  20. Palliative care. Some organisational considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welshman, A

    2005-01-01

    Managing pain effectively is one of the biggest challenges in medicine, let alone when dealing with the dying patient and his family. For palliative care specialists this is a daily challenge. However, ''To cure when possible, to give comfort always'' is an empty credo if physicians don't use every weapon in the medical arsenal to relieve the suffering caused by chronic pain. It's of course the opioids: morphine, heroin, their synthetic derivatives and other narcotics, a class of medications that conjure up visions of drug addiction and narcotic squads. To say that opioids are stigmatised by such allusions is putting it mildly. An unhealthy proportion of doctors and patients alike are afraid to have anything to do with them, even in when facing their final stages of life. This is particularly so in the Mediterranean society. It is here in Italy that an effort must be made to educate both physicians and the general public, an arduous task to change a long standing belief which requires a quick cultural turn around. Those who refuse opioids because they are afraid of addiction, and the doctors who refuse to prescribe them out of fear or pure unwillingness to address an apprehensive attitude on behalf of his patient, need to be better informed. Most misconceptions about opioids have to do with terminology, because words like ''morphine, addiction, dependency'' and ''tolerance'' mean entirely different things in popular and medical parlance. Add to this the perceptions and attitudes the patient can have with this terminology which then can have a profound effect on the success or failure of a pain control programme. In fact, most people think that medication such as morphine are only for people who are dying and as a consequence is synonymous with death itself. Is this why Italian physicians are not prescribing morphine even though great efforts have been made recently by the Health Ministry to facilitate prescribing laws and costs? It is worthy of serious

  1. Palliative care and compound in household pets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskins, Jessica L

    2012-01-01

    Palliative care is not a term solely used for humans when discussing health care; the term is also used when discussing veterinary patients. Pets are considered part of the family by pet owners, and they have a special relationship that only another pet owner can fully understand. This article discusses some of the healthcare problems that affect pets (and their owners), statistics on the most commonly used medications for veterinary patients, quality of life, and discussions on the veterinary pharmacist-owner-palliative pet relationship and how compounding pharmacists can prepare patient-specific medications.

  2. Endoscopic and surgical palliation of esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrante, G; De Palma, G; Elia, S; Catanzano, C; Cecere, C; Griffo, S; Sivero, L; Costabile, R

    1999-12-01

    Esophageal carcinoma is frequently diagnosed at an advanced stage. Therefore for most patients either surgical or endoscopic palliation with or without radiochemotherapy may be taken into consideration. This retrospective study analyzes immediate and long term results of perendoscopic treatment in patients with unresectable esophageal cancer. Moreover a comparative analysis has been made with a group of patients who underwent palliation surgery. From 1982 to 1998 458 patients with esophageal cancer underwent palliation perendoscopic disobstructive treatment (427 patients), palliation surgery (29 patients) and dis-obstruction followed by perendoscopic gastrostomy (2 patients). Among patients treated by perendoscopic procedures, 18 underwent dilation, 53 dilation and radiotherapy, 236 stent implantation, respectively of the plastic (102) and self-expandable metallic (134) type. 120 patients underwent NdYAG laser treatment. The results for patients who underwent perendoscopic procedures are referred to as regards the first 30 days after treatment and on the long run in terms of grade of dysphagia according to Visick's scale. For the group of patients undergoing simple dilation we had an improvement (from Visick III-IV to I-II) in 33% of cases and in 54.7% when radiotherapy was added. Far better results were achieved in all groups undergoing stent implantation, with or without brachytherapy, and NdYAG laser treatment with or without previous chemical necrolysis (range 90.3-100%). Most frequent complications were obstruction and stent displacement. Mean survival was better for patients undergoing laser recanalisation (7.2 months) while among stents the metallic type has given better results than plastic ones both for survival (6.2 vs 5.9 months) and mortality (2.4 vs 4.9%). Comparison with the group undergoing palliation surgery has shown that mean survival is the same for patients undergoing jejunostomy or gastrostomy while it is significantly better for patients

  3. Embedding a Palliative Approach in Nursing Care Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porterfield, Pat; Roberts, Della; Lee, Joyce; Liang, Leah; Reimer-Kirkham, Sheryl; Pesut, Barb; Schalkwyk, Tilly; Stajduhar, Kelli; Tayler, Carolyn; Baumbusch, Jennifer; Thorne, Sally

    2017-01-01

    A palliative approach involves adapting and integrating principles and values from palliative care into the care of persons who have life-limiting conditions throughout their illness trajectories. The aim of this research was to determine what approaches to nursing care delivery support the integration of a palliative approach in hospital, residential, and home care settings. The findings substantiate the importance of embedding the values and tenets of a palliative approach into nursing care delivery, the roles that nurses have in working with interdisciplinary teams to integrate a palliative approach, and the need for practice supports to facilitate that embedding and integration. PMID:27930401

  4. Qualitative Research in Palliative Care: Applications to Clinical Trials Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Christopher T; Tadmor, Avia; Fujisawa, Daisuke; MacDonald, James J; Gallagher, Emily R; Eusebio, Justin; Jackson, Vicki A; Temel, Jennifer S; Greer, Joseph A; Hagan, Teresa; Park, Elyse R

    2017-08-01

    While vast opportunities for using qualitative methods exist within palliative care research, few studies provide practical advice for researchers and clinicians as a roadmap to identify and utilize such opportunities. To provide palliative care clinicians and researchers descriptions of qualitative methodology applied to innovative research questions relative to palliative care research and define basic concepts in qualitative research. Body: We describe three qualitative projects as exemplars to describe major concepts in qualitative analysis of early palliative care: (1) a descriptive analysis of clinician documentation in the electronic health record, (2) a thematic content analysis of palliative care clinician focus groups, and (3) a framework analysis of audio-recorded encounters between patients and clinicians as part of a clinical trial. This study provides a foundation for undertaking qualitative research within palliative care and serves as a framework for use by other palliative care researchers interested in qualitative methodologies.

  5. Strategies for Introducing Outpatient Specialty Palliative Care in Gynecologic Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Casey M; Lefkowits, Carolyn; Crowley-Matoka, Megan; Bakitas, Marie A; Clark, Leslie H; Duska, Linda R; Urban, Renata R; Creasy, Stephanie L; Schenker, Yael

    2017-09-01

    Concern that patients will react negatively to the idea of palliative care is cited as a barrier to timely referral. Strategies to successfully introduce specialty palliative care to patients have not been well described. We sought to understand how gynecologic oncologists introduce outpatient specialty palliative care. We conducted a national qualitative interview study at six geographically diverse academic cancer centers with well-established palliative care clinics between September 2015 and March 2016. Thirty-four gynecologic oncologists participated in semistructured telephone interviews focusing on attitudes, experiences, and practices related to outpatient palliative care. A multidisciplinary team analyzed interview transcripts using constant comparative methods to inductively develop and refine a coding framework. This analysis focuses on practices for introducing palliative care. Mean participant age was 47 years (standard deviation, 10 years). Mean interview length was 25 minutes (standard deviation, 7 minutes). Gynecologic oncologists described the following three main strategies for introducing outpatient specialty palliative care: focus initial palliative care referral on symptom management to dissociate palliative care from end-of-life care and facilitate early relationship building with palliative care clinicians; use a strong physician-patient relationship and patient trust to increase acceptance of referral; and explain and normalize palliative care referral to address negative associations and decrease patient fear of abandonment. These strategies aim to decrease negative patient associations and encourage acceptance of early referral to palliative care specialists. Gynecologic oncologists have developed strategies for introducing palliative care services to alleviate patient concerns. These strategies provide groundwork for developing system-wide best practice approaches to the presentation of palliative care referral.

  6. Palliative Care Leadership Centers Are Key To The Diffusion Of Palliative Care Innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassel, J Brian; Bowman, Brynn; Rogers, Maggie; Spragens, Lynn H; Meier, Diane E

    2018-02-01

    Between 2000 and 2015 the proportion of US hospitals with more than fifty beds that had palliative care programs tripled, from 25 percent to 75 percent. The rapid adoption of this high-value program, which is voluntary and runs counter to the dominant culture in US hospitals, was catalyzed by tens of millions of dollars in philanthropic support for innovation, dissemination, and professionalization in the palliative care field. We describe the dissemination strategies of the Center to Advance Palliative Care in the context of the principles of social entrepreneurship, and we provide an in-depth look at its hallmark training initiative, Palliative Care Leadership Centers. Over 1,240 hospital palliative care teams have trained at the Leadership Centers to date, with 80 percent of them instituting palliative care services within two years. We conclude with lessons learned about the role of purposeful technical assistance in promoting the rapid diffusion of high-value health care innovation.

  7. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... Little Stars 12,195 views 10:35 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society 4,257 views 3:29 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 62,434 views 5: ...

  8. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... 315 views 4:12 Children's Palliative Care - Duration: 2:26. Filmkaar 1,071 views 2:26 Sevanah Marecle's Story - Another child fighting cancer - ... Croup Stridor Barking Cough visual & audio sound - Duration: 2:50. Juliette Anderson 2,467,989 views 2: ...

  9. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... Support at Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children - Duration: 3:34. Nemours 1,004 views 3: ... 258,398 views 11:08 Palliative Care at Children's of Alabama - Duration: 4:12. ChildrensofAlabama 1,307 ...

  10. Palliative care teams: effective through moral reflection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermsen, M.A.; Have, H.A.M.J. ten

    2005-01-01

    Working as a multidisciplinary or interdisciplinary team is an essential condition to provide good palliative care. This widespread assumption is based on the idea that teamwork makes it possible to address the various needs of the patient and family more effectively. This article is about teamwork

  11. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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  12. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... views 4:24 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 63,326 views 5: ... University (NEOMED) 25,404 views 5:39 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  13. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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  14. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... Duration: 31:12. University of California Television (UCTV) 2,744 views 31:12 Palliative Care: Butterfly Children's ... Croup Stridor Barking Cough visual & audio sound - Duration: 2:50. Juliette Anderson 2,433,935 views 2: ...

  15. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... views 4:24 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 63,386 views 5: ... University (NEOMED) 25,404 views 5:39 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  16. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... Little Stars 12,462 views 10:35 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society 4,359 views 3:29 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 63,400 views 5: ...

  17. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... views 4:24 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 63,462 views 5: ... Little Stars 12,462 views 10:35 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  18. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... views 4:24 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 63,164 views 5: ... 34. Nemours 1,048 views 3:34 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  19. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... a patient's and family's experience with illness. Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License Show more Show ... 51 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society 4,309 views 3:29 Pediatric ...

  20. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... views 4:24 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 63,260 views 5: ... 50. PCC4UProject 42,853 views 12:50 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  1. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... views 5:39 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 63,535 views 5: ... Little Stars 12,587 views 10:35 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  2. A test instrument for palliative care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adriaansen, M.J.M.; Achterberg, T. van

    2004-01-01

    This article describes a methodological study concerning the development of a test instrument that can be used for measuring the effects of a course in palliative care on registered nurses and licensed practical nurses. This test instrument is comprised of two parts: an expertise and insight test

  3. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... views 4:24 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 63,040 views 5: ... 34. Nemours 1,015 views 3:34 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  4. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a patient's and family's experience with illness. Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License Show more Show ... 35 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society 4,309 views 3:29 Pediatric ...

  5. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... views 4:24 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 63,376 views 5: ... Little Stars 12,462 views 10:35 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  6. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... views 13:34 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 63,079 views 5: ... Little Stars 12,462 views 10:35 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  7. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... views 4:24 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 63,486 views 5: ... Little Stars 12,587 views 10:35 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  8. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... views 5:27 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 62,983 views 5: ... Little Stars 12,275 views 10:35 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  9. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... views 5:39 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 63,573 views 5: ... Little Stars 12,587 views 10:35 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  10. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... views 4:24 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 63,059 views 5: ... Little Stars 12,275 views 10:35 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  11. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... views 4:24 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 62,995 views 5: ... 34. Nemours 1,015 views 3:34 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  12. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... views 5:39 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 63,559 views 5: ... Little Stars 12,587 views 10:35 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  13. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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  14. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... views 5:39 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 62,707 views 5: ... Little Stars 12,275 views 10:35 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  15. Emotionality and teamwork in palliative nursing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nickelsen, Niels Christian

    This paper discusses the performance of palliative support teams based in an empirical study in a hospice in Denmark. The analytic strategy is based in science and technology studies (STS). The study was carried out as a number of meetings among the researcher and five non-consolidated teams in s...

  16. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... views 3:34 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 62,495 views 5: ... Melissa Saban 77,197 views 3:50 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  17. Palliation of Dysphagia from Esophageal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.Y.V. Homs (Marjolein)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe prognosis of esophageal cancer is poor with a 5-year survival of 10-15%. In addition, over 50% of patients with esophageal cancer already have an inoperable disease at presentation. The majority of these patients require palliative treatment to relieve progressive dysphagia. Metal

  18. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... views 13:34 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 63,605 views 5: ... Little Stars 12,587 views 10:35 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  19. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... views 5:39 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 62,732 views 5: ... Little Stars 12,275 views 10:35 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  20. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... views 4:24 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 62,858 views 5: ... Little Stars 12,275 views 10:35 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  1. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... views 4:24 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 63,636 views 5: ... 27. HammondCare 29,011 views 22:27 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  2. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... views 4:24 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 63,409 views 5: ... University (NEOMED) 25,404 views 5:39 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  3. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 62,647 views 5:21 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer ... The Zimmer Family Story - Duration: 13:34. UnityPoint Health - Meriter 196,167 views 13:34 Riley's journey ...

  4. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... views 5:39 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 62,732 views 5: ... 34. Nemours 1,015 views 3:34 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  5. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... University (NEOMED) 24,728 views 5:39 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society 4,267 views 3:29 Little Stars – ... views 3:34 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 62,538 views 5: ...

  6. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... views 4:24 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 63,026 views 5: ... 34. Nemours 1,015 views 3:34 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  7. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... views 5:39 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 62,610 views 5: ... Little Stars 12,275 views 10:35 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  8. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... University (NEOMED) 24,803 views 5:39 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society 4,268 views 3:29 Little Stars – ... views 3:34 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 62,558 views 5: ...

  9. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... views 4:24 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 63,135 views 5: ... Little Stars 12,462 views 10:35 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  10. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... views 4:24 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 63,355 views 5: ... University (NEOMED) 25,404 views 5:39 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  11. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... views 5:39 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 62,582 views 5: ... 34. Nemours 1,004 views 3:34 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  12. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... views 4:24 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 62,858 views 5: ... 34. Nemours 1,015 views 3:34 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  13. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... 24 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 62,888 views 5:21 Portraits of Life, Love and Legacy through Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: 5:39. Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) 25,017 ...

  14. Oesphageal Stenting for palliation of malignant mesothelioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahamim Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dyspahgia in patients with malignant mesothelioma is usually due to direct infiltration of the eosophagus by the tumour. It can be distressing for the patient and challenging for the physician to treat. We describe three cases in which this condition has been successfully palliated with self expanding esophageal stents.

  15. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... views 5:39 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 62,623 views 5: ... Little Stars 12,275 views 10:35 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  16. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... views 5:39 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 63,517 views 5: ... Little Stars 12,587 views 10:35 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  17. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... views 4:24 The Ugly Truth of Pediatric Cancer - Duration: 5:21. KidsCancerChannel 62,888 views 5: ... Little Stars 12,275 views 10:35 Childhood Cancer: Palliative Care - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer Society ...

  18. Palliative care specialists' beliefs about spiritual care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Megan; Butow, Phyllis; Olver, Ian

    2016-08-01

    A previous survey of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC) members found low frequency of spiritual care provision. We hypothesized that physicians with special training in palliative medicine would demonstrate an increased sense of responsibility for and higher self-reported adequacy to provide spiritual care to patients than health professionals with general training. We surveyed members of the Australian and New Zealand Palliative Medicine Society (ANZSPM) to ascertain their spiritual care practices. We sent 445 e-mails on four occasions, inviting members to complete the online survey. Tabulated results were analyzed to describe the results. One hundred and fifty-eight members (35.5 %) responded. Physicians working primarily in palliative care comprised the majority (95 %) of the sample. Significantly more of the ANZSPM than MASCC respondents had previously received training in spiritual care and had pursued training in the previous 2 years. There was a significant difference between the two groups with regard to interest in and self-reported ability to provide spiritual care. Those who believed it was their responsibility to provide spiritual care were more likely to have had training, feel they could adequately provide spiritual care, and were more likely to refer patients if they could not provide spiritual care themselves. Training in spiritual care was more common in healthcare workers who had received training in palliative care. ANZSPM members gave higher scores for both the importance of spiritual care and self-reported ability to provide it compared to MASCC members.

  19. Palliative nursing care for children and adolescents with cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilmer MJ

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Terrah L Foster,1,2 Cynthia J Bell,1 Carey F McDonald,2 Joy S Harris,3 Mary Jo Gilmer,1,21Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, Nashville, 2Monroe Carell Jr Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt, Nashville, 3Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: Pediatric palliative care aims to enhance life and decrease suffering of children and adolescents living with life-threatening conditions and their loved ones. Oncology nurses are instrumental in providing palliative care to pediatric oncology populations. This paper describes pediatric palliative care and provides an overview of literature related to the physical, psychological, social, and spiritual domains of palliative nursing care for children and adolescents with cancer. Nurses can provide optimal palliative care by accounting for children's understanding of death, encouraging early initiation of palliative care services, and improving utilization of pediatric palliative care in cancer settings. Specific roles of registered nurses and advanced practice nurses in pediatric palliative care will be addressed. Recommendations for future research are made to further advance the science of pediatric palliative care and decrease suffering for children and teens with cancer.Keywords: pediatric palliative care, pediatric cancer, oncology, child, suffering

  20. Situational analysis of palliative care education in thai medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvarnabhumi, Krishna; Sowanna, Non; Jiraniramai, Surin; Jaturapatporn, Darin; Kanitsap, Nonglak; Soorapanth, Chiroj; Thanaghumtorn, Kanate; Limratana, Napa; Akkayagorn, Lanchasak; Staworn, Dusit; Praditsuwan, Rungnirand; Uengarporn, Naporn; Sirithanawutichai, Teabaluck; Konchalard, Komwudh; Tangsangwornthamma, Chaturon; Vasinanukorn, Mayuree; Phungrassami, Temsak

    2013-01-01

    The Thai Medical School Palliative Care Network conducted this study to establish the current state of palliative care education in Thai medical schools. A questionnaire survey was given to 2 groups that included final year medical students and instructors in 16 Thai medical schools. The questionnaire covered 4 areas related to palliative care education. An insufficient proportion of students (defined as fewer than 60%) learned nonpain symptoms control (50.0%), goal setting and care planning (39.0%), teamwork (38.7%), and pain management (32.7%). Both medical students and instructors reflected that palliative care education was important as it helps to improve quality of care and professional competence. The percentage of students confident to provide palliative care services under supervision of their senior, those able to provide services on their own, and those not confident to provide palliative care services were 57.3%, 33.3%, and 9.4%, respectively. The lack of knowledge in palliative care in students may lower their level of confidence to practice palliative care. In order to prepare students to achieve a basic level of competency in palliative care, each medical school has to carefully put palliative care content into the undergraduate curriculum.

  1. Nurses' knowledge about palliative care in Southeast Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iranmanesh, Sedigheh; Razban, Farideh; Tirgari, Batool; Zahra, Ghazanfari

    2014-06-01

    Palliative care requires nurses to be knowledgeable about different aspects of the care that they provide for dying patients. This study, therefore, was conducted to examine oncology and intensive care nurses' knowledge about palliative care in Southeast Iran. Using the Palliative Care Quiz for Nursing (PCQN), 140 oncology and intensive care unit (ICU) nurses' knowledge about palliative care in three hospitals supervised by Kerman University of Medical Sciences was assessed. In PCQN, the mean score was 7.59 (SD: 2.28). The most correct answers were in the category of management of pain and other symptoms (46.07%). The lowest correct answers were in the category of psychosocial and spiritual care (19.3%). These findings suggest that nurses' knowledge about palliative care can be improved by establishing specific palliative care units to focus on end-of-life care. This establishment requires incorporation of an end-of-life nursing education curriculum into undergraduate nursing studies.

  2. Palliative care in India: Current progress and future needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Khosla

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite its limited coverage, palliative care has been present in India for about 20 years. Obstacles in the growth of palliative care in India are too many and not only include factors like population density, poverty, geographical diversity, restrictive policies regarding opioid prescription, workforce development at base level, but also limited national palliative care policy and lack of institutional interest in palliative care. Nonetheless we have reasons to be proud in that we have overcome several hurdles and last two decades have seen palpable changes in the mindset of health care providers and policy makers with respect to need of palliative care in India. Systematic and continuous education for medical staff is mandatory, and a major break-through for achieving this purpose would be to increase the number of courses and faculties in palliative medicine at most universities.

  3. Palliative care in India: current progress and future needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosla, Divya; Patel, Firuza D; Sharma, Suresh C

    2012-09-01

    Despite its limited coverage, palliative care has been present in India for about 20 years. Obstacles in the growth of palliative care in India are too many and not only include factors like population density, poverty, geographical diversity, restrictive policies regarding opioid prescription, workforce development at base level, but also limited national palliative care policy and lack of institutional interest in palliative care. Nonetheless we have reasons to be proud in that we have overcome several hurdles and last two decades have seen palpable changes in the mindset of health care providers and policy makers with respect to need of palliative care in India. Systematic and continuous education for medical staff is mandatory, and a major break-through for achieving this purpose would be to increase the number of courses and faculties in palliative medicine at most universities.

  4. [Current situation of palliative care in Hungary. Integrated palliative care model as a breakout possibility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benyó, Gábor; Lukács, Miklós; Busa, Csilla; Mangel, László; Csikós, Ágnes

    2017-09-20

    Modern palliative-hospice care has gained space in Europe for more than 50 years. Since the initial empirical work of Cicely Saunders, palliative medicine has gained its place in evidence-based medicine in more and more countries. However, development, as in many other medical fields, is not uniform, there are big differences between countries in the world. There are also significant differences in development of care and the level of services within the European Union amongst Western and Eastern European countries. These differences affect the professional approach, legislative mechanisms and social acceptance. Hungarian palliative-hospice care has developed significantly over the past 15 years. For further development thoughtful strategic steps and service development is needed. The integration of palliative care into standard oncology is an international requirement, which also appears in the form of professional guidelines. Hungary has also played a role in the development of the European model of integrated palliative care of which Hungarian implementation, the "Pécs model", is discussed in detail in our paper.

  5. Center to Advance Palliative Care palliative care clinical care and customer satisfaction metrics consensus recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, David E; Morrison, R Sean; Meier, Diane E

    2010-02-01

    Data collection and analysis are vital for strategic planning, quality improvement, and demonstration of palliative care program impact to hospital administrators, private funders and policymakers. Since 2000, the Center to Advance Palliative Care (CAPC) has provided technical assistance to hospitals, health systems and hospices working to start, sustain, and grow nonhospice palliative care programs. CAPC convened a consensus panel in 2008 to develop recommendations for specific clinical and customer metrics that programs should track. The panel agreed on four key domains of clinical metrics and two domains of customer metrics. Clinical metrics include: daily assessment of physical/psychological/spiritual symptoms by a symptom assessment tool; establishment of patient-centered goals of care; support to patient/family caregivers; and management of transitions across care sites. For customer metrics, consensus was reached on two domains that should be tracked to assess satisfaction: patient/family satisfaction, and referring clinician satisfaction. In an effort to ensure access to reliably high-quality palliative care data throughout the nation, hospital palliative care programs are encouraged to collect and report outcomes for each of the metric domains described here.

  6. Factors affecting rural volunteering in palliative care - an integrated review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittall, Dawn; Lee, Susan; O'Connor, Margaret

    2016-12-01

    To review factors shaping volunteering in palliative care in Australian rural communities using Australian and International literature. Identify gaps in the palliative care literature and make recommendations for future research. A comprehensive literature search was conducted using Proquest, Scopus, Sage Premier, Wiley online, Ovid, Cochran, Google Scholar, CINAHL and Informit Health Collection. The literature was synthesised and presented in an integrated thematic narrative. Australian Rural communities. While Australia, Canada, the United States (US) and the United Kingdom (UK) are leaders in palliative care volunteer research, limited research specifically focuses on volunteers in rural communities with the least occurring in Australia. Several interrelated factors influence rural palliative care provision, in particular an increasingly ageing population which includes an ageing volunteer and health professional workforce. Also current and models of palliative care practice fail to recognise the innumerable variables between and within rural communities such as distance, isolation, lack of privacy, limited health care services and infrastructure, and workforce shortages. These issues impact palliative care provision and are significant for health professionals, volunteers, patients and caregivers. The three key themes of this integrated review include: (i) Geography, ageing rural populations in palliative care practice, (ii) Psychosocial impact of end-end-of life care in rural communities and (iii) Palliative care models of practice and volunteering in rural communities. The invisibility of volunteers in rural palliative care research is a concern in understanding the issues affecting the sustainability of quality palliative care provision in rural communities. Recommendations for future Australian research includes examination of the suitability of current models of palliative care practice in addressing the needs of rural communities; the recruitment

  7. Forget me not: palliative care for people with dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Dylan

    2007-01-01

    Dementia is a progressive life limiting condition with increasing prevalence and complex needs. Palliative care needs of patients with dementia are often poorly addressed; symptoms such as pain are under treated while these patients are over subjected to burdensome interventions. Research into palliative care in dementia remains limited but recent developments together with national guidelines and policies set foundations for improving the delivery of palliative care to this group of the popu...

  8. Factors influencing palliative care. Qualitative study of family physicians' practices.

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, J. B.; Sangster, M.; Swift, J.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine factors that influence family physicians' decisions to practise palliative care. DESIGN: Qualitative method of in-depth interviews. SETTING: Southwestern Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: Family physicians who practise palliative care on a full-time basis, who practise on a part-time basis, or who have retired from active involvement in palliative care. METHOD: Eleven in-depth interviews were conducted to explore factors that influence family physicians' decisions to practise palli...

  9. Situational Analysis of Palliative Care Education in Thai Medical Schools

    OpenAIRE

    Suvarnabhumi, Krishna; Sowanna, Non; Jiraniramai, Surin; Jaturapatporn, Darin; Kanitsap, Nonglak; Soorapanth, Chiroj; Thanaghumtorn, Kanate; Limratana, Napa; Akkayagorn, Lanchasak; Staworn, Dusit; Praditsuwan, Rungnirand; Uengarporn, Naporn; Sirithanawutichai, Teabaluck; Konchalard, Komwudh; Tangsangwornthamma, Chaturon

    2013-01-01

    Objective The Thai Medical School Palliative Care Network conducted this study to establish the current state of palliative care education in Thai medical schools. Methods A questionnaire survey was given to 2 groups that included final year medical students and instructors in 16 Thai medical schools. The questionnaire covered 4 areas related to palliative care education. Results An insufficient proportion of students (defined as fewer than 60%) learned nonpain symptoms control (50.0%), goal ...

  10. PALLIATIVE CARE ELDERLY PATIENTS WITH SLEEPING DISORDERS ARE POORLY TREATED

    OpenAIRE

    Bellido-Estevez, Inmaculada

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sleep disorders are frequent in patients with advanced cancer receiving palliative-care, especially in elderly patients (1). Sleep disorders during palliative-care may be related with anxiety, opioids related central-sleep apnoea or corticoids therapy between others (2). Our aim was to quantify the effectiveness of hypnotic medication in the sleep quality in advanced cancer receiving palliative-care elderly patients. Material and methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was...

  11. Faith healing and the palliative care team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Denise

    2013-01-01

    As the spiritual care needs of patients and their loved ones have become an essential component of palliative care, clinicians are being challenged to develop new ways of addressing the spiritual issues that often arise in the palliative care setting. Recent research has given attention to the communication strategies that are effective with patients or their loved ones who report that they are seeking a miraculous physical healing. However, these strategies often assume a unilateral rather than collaborative view of divine intervention. Communication strategies that are effective with unilateral understandings of divine intervention may be contraindicated with those who hold to a collaborative view of divine intervention. Greater attention to language of human-divine interaction along with approaching faith healing as a third modality of treatment are explored as additional interventions.

  12. Palliative Radiofrequency Ablation for Recurrent Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jindal, Gaurav; Friedman, Marc; Locklin, Julia; Wood, Bradford J.

    2006-01-01

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive local therapy for cancer. Its efficacy is now becoming well documented in many different organs, including liver, kidney, and lung. The goal of RFA is typically complete eradication of a tumor in lieu of an invasive surgical procedure. However, RFA can also play an important role in the palliative care of cancer patients. Tumors which are surgically unresectable and incompatible for complete ablation present the opportunity for RFA to be used in a new paradigm. Cancer pain runs the gamut from minor discomfort relieved with mild pain medication to unrelenting suffering for the patient, poorly controlled by conventional means. RFA is a tool which can potentially palliate intractable cancer pain. We present here a case in which RFA provided pain relief in a patient with metastatic prostate cancer with pain uncontrolled by conventional methods

  13. Palliative care for people with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Elizabeth L

    2010-01-01

    The number of people with dementia will rise dramatically over the next 20 years. Currently, one in three people over the age of 65 will die with dementia. A PubMed search using MeSH headings for 'dementia' AND 'palliative care' and for specific areas, i.e. enteral feeding. National reports, UK guidelines and policies were also consulted. Advanced dementia is now being perceived as a 'terminal illness' with a similar symptom burden and prognosis to advanced cancer. People with dementia have poor access to good quality end-of-life care. Interventions such as antibiotics, fever management policies and enteral tube feeding remain in use despite little evidence that they improve quality of life or other outcomes. Research is required on the effectiveness of 'holistic' palliative care, outcome measures and the impact on carers and families.

  14. [Palliative care for persons with dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsiu-Li; Weng, Li-Chueh; Yeh, Mei Chang

    2011-02-01

    Dementia is irreversible. Although currently available drugs are typically able to ameliorate symptoms and slow down its progress, there is yet no known cure for this disease. The inevitable consequence of dementia is the gradual deterioration of the condition until final decline into the end of life stage. The priority care plan for patients with end stage dementia, therefore, must focus on palliative care that provides for a comfortable and high as possible quality of life. However, dementia is rarely looked upon as an end-stage disease. In 2009, the Taiwan National Health Insurance began reimbursing the costs of hospice care for patients with end stage dementia. This paper discusses end stage dementia cases in which patients received inappropriate interventions during their final days as well as the barriers faced in developing countries to providing palliative care. This paper also suggests strategies to promote quality of care and quality of life in people with end of life dementia.

  15. Specialized palliative care in advanced cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmenlund, Kristina; Sjogren, Per; Nordly, Mie

    2017-01-01

    was to review the existing literature about SPC and its effect on QoL, on physical and psychological symptoms, and on survival in adult patients with advanced cancer. Method: We utilized a search strategy based on the PICO (problem/population, intervention, comparison, and outcome) framework and employed......Objective: Due to the multiple physical, psychological, existential, and social symptoms involved, patients with advanced cancer often have a reduced quality of life (QoL), which requires specialized palliative care (SPC) interventions. The primary objective of the present systematic review...... terminology related to cancer, QoL, symptoms, mood, and palliative care. The search was performed in Embase, PubMed, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Selected studies were analyzed and categorized according to methods, results, quality of evidence, and strength of recommendation...

  16. Perception of older adults receiving palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Laporti Seredynskyj

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed at understanding the perception of older adults who are receiving palliative oncological care on self care in relation to different stages of the disease and how such perception affected their lives. This is a qualitative study using oral history conducted with 15 older adults receiving palliative chemotherapy treatment in a health institution. The following categories emerged: social network, perspectives for confronting life, changes and spirituality. It is necessary for nursing staff to understand this process so that the measures implemented take into account all of the implications of the disease and aim at improving quality of life.   doi: 10.5216/ree.v16i2.22795.

  17. Music therapy in palliative care: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Kelly, Julian

    2002-03-01

    As the music therapy profession has developed internationally over the last 25 years, so has its role in palliative care. Music is a highly versatile and dynamic therapeutic modality, lending itself to a variety of music therapy techniques used to benefit both those living with life-threatening illnesses and their family members and caregivers. This article will give a broad overview of the historical roots of music therapy and introduce the techniques that are employed in current practice. By combining a review of mainstream music therapy practice involving musical improvisation, song-writing and receptive/recreational techniques with case material from my own experience, this article aims to highlight the potential music therapy holds as an effective holistic practice for palliative care, whatever the care setting.

  18. Assessment of Palliative Care Awareness among Undergraduate Healthcare Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujatha, Rajaragupathy; Jayagowri, Karthikeyan

    2017-09-01

    Palliative care knowledge is being given meager importance in the curriculum of medical and other allied medical sciences. It is vital that all health care practitioners including medical, pharmacy, physiotherapy and nursing are aware and apply the best principles of palliative care. To assess the awareness of palliative care among undergraduate students of medical, nursing, pharmacy and physiotherapy. The study population included total of 200 students. Among 200 students, 50 were from each of the colleges of medicine, nursing, pharmacy and physiotherapy. After obtaining informed consent, questionnaire was given. The questionnaire contained the sociodemographic profile and 35 statements under nine groups, for which the respondents were expected to answer one out of the three options (Yes, No, Don't know). The groups of statements deal with palliative care definition, its philosophy, communication issues, non-pain symptoms, medications use and context of application of palliative care. It was found that less than 20% of nursing students were unaware of palliative care. Among the undergraduates of college of pharmacy, more than 50% had no knowledge of palliative care. More than 80% of physiotherapy, nursing and medical students agree that death should occur without any pain or symptoms. The need of palliative care was well understood by more than 70% of students of physiotherapy, pharmacy, nursing and medical colleges. Basic knowledge about palliative care was inadequate among the undergraduate students related to healthcare.

  19. Palliative care and neurology: time for a paradigm shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boersma, Isabel; Miyasaki, Janis; Kutner, Jean; Kluger, Benzi

    2014-08-05

    Palliative care is an approach to the care of patients and families facing progressive and chronic illnesses that focuses on the relief of suffering due to physical symptoms, psychosocial issues, and spiritual distress. As neurologists care for patients with chronic, progressive, life-limiting, and disabling conditions, it is important that they understand and learn to apply the principles of palliative medicine. In this article, we aim to provide a practical starting point in palliative medicine for neurologists by answering the following questions: (1) What is palliative care and what is hospice care? (2) What are the palliative care needs of neurology patients? (3) Do neurology patients have unique palliative care needs? and (4) How can palliative care be integrated into neurology practice? We cover several fundamental palliative care skills relevant to neurologists, including communication of bad news, symptom assessment and management, advance care planning, caregiver assessment, and appropriate referral to hospice and other palliative care services. We conclude by suggesting areas for future educational efforts and research. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  20. Gynecologic Oncologist Views Influencing Referral to Outpatient Specialty Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Casey M; Lefkowits, Carolyn; Crowley-Matoka, Megan; Bakitas, Marie A; Clark, Leslie H; Duska, Linda R; Urban, Renata R; Chen, Lee-May; Creasy, Stephanie L; Schenker, Yael

    2017-03-01

    Early specialty palliative care is underused for patients with advanced gynecologic malignancies. We sought to understand how gynecologic oncologists' views influence outpatient specialty palliative care referral to help inform strategies for improvement. We conducted a qualitative interview study at 6 National Cancer Institute-designated cancer centers with well-established outpatient palliative care services. Between September 2015 and March 2016, 34 gynecologic oncologists participated in semistructured telephone interviews focused on attitudes, experiences, and preferences related to outpatient specialty palliative care. A multidisciplinary team analyzed transcripts using constant comparative methods to inductively develop a coding framework. Through an iterative, analytic process, codes were classified, grouped, and refined into themes. Mean (SD) participant age was 47 (10) years. Mean (SD) interview length was 25 (7) minutes. Three main themes emerged regarding how gynecologic oncologists view outpatient specialty palliative care: (1) long-term relationships with patients is a unique and defining aspect of gynecologic oncology that influences referral, (2) gynecologic oncologists value palliative care clinicians' communication skills and third-party perspective to increase prognostic awareness and help negotiate differences between patient preferences and physician recommendation, and (3) gynecologic oncologists prefer specialty palliative care services embedded within gynecologic oncology clinics. Gynecologic oncologists value longitudinal relationships with patients and use specialty palliative care to negotiate conflict surrounding prognostic awareness or the treatment plan. Embedding specialty palliative care within gynecologic oncology clinics may promote communication between clinicians and facilitate gynecologic oncologist involvement throughout the illness course.

  1. African Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Recek, Denis

    2011-01-01

    The topic of this diploma is the formation and shaping of African literature. The first chapter is about the beginning of African literature. It describes oral literature and its transmission into written literature. Written African literature had great problems in becoming a part of world literature because of its diversity of languages and dialects. Christianity and Islam are mentioned as two religions which had a great impact on African literature. Colonialism is broadly described as an es...

  2. Palliative care in Africa: a global challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Ntizimira, Christian R; Nkurikiyimfura, Jean Luc; Mukeshimana, Olive; Ngizwenayo, Scholastique; Mukasahaha, Diane; Clancy, Clare

    2014-01-01

    We are often asked what challenges Rwanda has faced in the development of palliative care and its integration into the healthcare system. In the past, patients have been barred from accessing strong analgesics to treat moderate to severe pain, but thanks to health initiatives, this is slowly changing. Rwanda is an example of a country where only a few years ago, access to morphine was almost impossible. Albert Einsten said ?in the middle of difficulty lies opportunity? and this sentiment coul...

  3. [Euthanasia, self-determination, and palliative care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmiedebach, H-P; Woellert, K

    2006-11-01

    Many of the judicial and ethical questions raised by euthanasia are still the subject of controversial discussions. In this context the article broaches the issues of the doctor- patient relationship, patient's right to autonomy, and advance directive. It deals with the present judicial possibilities of euthanasia in Germany with reference to the situation in the Netherlands. Finally, there is an outlook on the role of palliative care and of hospices.

  4. Family physicians' perspectives regarding palliative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samant, Rajiv S.; Fitzgibbon, Edward; Meng, Joanne; Graham, Ian D.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To assess family physicians' views on common indications for palliative radiotherapy and to determine whether this influences patient referral. Methods and materials: A 30-item questionnaire evaluating radiotherapy knowledge and training developed at the Ottawa Regional Cancer Centre (ORCC) was mailed to a random sample of 400 family physicians in eastern Ontario, Canada. The completed surveys were collected and analyzed, and form the basis of this study. Results: A total of 172 completed surveys were received for a net response rate of 50% among practicing family physicians. Almost all of the physicians (97%) had recently seen cancer patients in their offices, with 85% regularly caring for patient with advanced cancer. Fifty-four percent had referred patients in the past for radiotherapy and 53% had contacted a radiation oncologist for advice. Physicians who were more knowledgeable about the common indications for palliative radiotherapy were significantly more likely to refer patients for radiotherapy (P<0.01). Inability to contact a radiation oncologist was correlated with not having referred patients for radiotherapy (P<0.01). Only 10% of the physicians had received radiotherapy education during their formal medical training. Conclusions: Many of the family physicians surveyed were unaware of the effectiveness of radiotherapy in a variety of common palliative situations, and radiotherapy referral was correlated with knowledge about the indications for palliative radiotherapy. This was not surprising given the limited education they received in this area and the limited contact they have had with radiation oncologists. Strategies need to be developed to improve continuing medical education opportunities for family physicians and to facilitate more interaction between these physicians and radiation oncologists

  5. Role of palliative radiotherapy in brain metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh S Bilimagga

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brain metastases are a common manifestation of systemic cancer and exceed primary brain tumors in number and are a significant cause of neurologic problems. They affect 20-40% of all cancer patients. Aggressive management of brain metastases is effective in both symptom palliation and prolonging the life. Radiotherapy has a major role to play in the management of brain metastases. AIM: The aim of the study was to know the outcome of palliative radiotherapy in symptomatic brain metastases in terms of improvement in their performance status. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study of 63 patients diagnosed to have brain metastases and treated with palliative whole brain radiotherapy to a dose of 30 Gy in 10 fractions over two weeks between June 1998 and June 2007. Diagnosis was done in most of the cases with computed tomography scan and in a few with magnetic resonance imaging. Improvement in presenting symptoms has been assessed in terms of improvement in their performance status by using the ECOG scale. Results: Fifty-four patients completed the planned treatment. Eight patients received concurrent Temozolamide; 88% of patients had symptom relief at one month follow-up; 39/54 patients had a follow-up of just one to three months. Hence survival could not be assessed in this study. Conclusion: External beam radiotherapy in the dose of 30 Gy over two weeks achieved good palliation in terms improvement in their performance status in 88% of patients. Addition of concurrent and adjuvant Timozolamide may improve the results.

  6. Music therapy perspectives in palliative care education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porchet-Munro, S

    1993-01-01

    Major strides have been made in expanding the content of professional education in palliative care to include a focus on attitudes which nurture compassionate care as well as on knowledge and skills. However, accessing the emotional spheres--for instance the fear and helplessness of caregivers--remains a challenge. The inclusion of music therapy techniques as a teaching modality, with an emphasis on emotional experience and nonverbal expression, is suggested to address the latter and to enhance affective growth and learning.

  7. Palliation in the management of laryngeal cancer. Surgical concepts in palliation of advanced disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiranandani, L H

    1975-01-01

    Every science has limits to its operation, including medical science concerning malignancy. Beyond a certain stage of a disease, palliation is the only recourse. The word "palliation" amounts to an acceptance of defeat by a clinician while trying to salvage his cancer patients. It means that the patient should breathe and eat without much pain till death takes pity on him. Palliative surgery in laryngeal cancer amounts to doing tracheostomies and gastrostomies and administering painkillers. Most of my cases belong to this category. I extended the accepted parameters of surgical excisions for primary lesion and metastatic nodes. These excisions include laryngectomy with cervical esophagectomy, total laryngectomy, total cervical esophagetomy, total glossectomy, and total mandibulectomy. The extended radical neck dissections include carotid artery, vagus nerve, and sympathetic trunk on one side. Removal of these so-called vital structures was not only compatible with life but proved curative in 20 per cent of these cases.

  8. African Anthropologist

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Anthropology is the journal of the Pan African Anthropological Association (PAAA). It provides a forum for African and Africanist anthropologists to publish research reports, articles, book reviews, news items and other useful information. It aims at stimulating the debate of ideas and the development of methods and ...

  9. The Palliative Care Chaplain as Story Catcher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Rhonda S

    2018-01-01

    The role of the professional chaplain on the palliative care team in the health care setting formalizes the concern for the emotional, spiritual, and social well-being of the care recipients and their caregivers. The chaplain also has a peculiar role on the team, in that her most fundamental task is her intentional listening-and-hearing of the other person's story. One palliative chaplain introduces herself as a Story Catcher to care recipients, in an effort both to overcome the resistance some may have to her presence on the team and communicate her essential role and intent in providing spiritual care. This self-appointed sobriquet resonates with the author's embrace of the theory and practice of the late theologian, educator, and civil rights activist Nelle Morton, who coined the phrase "hearing into speech" to describe the process by which another person, through being truly heard and entering into a relationship with the hearer, claims her/his own truth, hope, and identity in the face of adversity. The chaplain as Story Catcher functions as the agent of healing and hope for those who choose to tell their stories and are heard, as they resist their illness and death rather than submit to its indignity. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Metronomic palliative chemotherapy in maxillary sinus tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay M Patil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Metronomic chemotherapy consisting of methotrexate and celecoxib recently has shown promising results in multiple studies in head and neck cancers. However, these studies have not included patients with maxillary sinus primaries. Hence, the role of palliative metronomic chemotherapy in patients with maxillary sinus carcinoma that is not amenable to radical therapy is unknown. Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of carcinoma maxillary sinus patients who received palliative metronomic chemotherapy between August 2011 and August 2014. The demographic details, symptomatology, previous treatment details, indication for palliative chemotherapy, response to therapy, and overall survival (OS details were extracted. SPSS version 16 was used for analysis. Descriptive statistics have been performed. Survival analysis was done by Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Five patients had received metronomic chemotherapy. The median age was 60 years (range 37-64 years. The proportion of patients surviving at 6 months, 12 months, and 18 months were 40%, 40%, and 20%, respectively. The estimated median OS was 126 days (95% confidence interval 0-299.9 days. The estimated median survival in patients with an event-free period after the last therapy of <6 months was 45 days, whereas it was 409 days in patients with an event-free period postlast therapy above 6 months (P = 0.063. Conclusion: Metronomic chemotherapy in carcinoma maxillary sinus holds promise. It has activity similar to that seen in head and neck cancers and needs to be evaluated further in a larger cohort of patients.

  11. Palliative radiotherapy for symptomatic osseous metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Ito, Hisao; Toya, Kazuhito; Ko, Weijey; Kutsuki, Shouji; Tsukamoto, Nobuhiro; Kubo, Atsushi; Dokiya, Takushi; Yorozu, Atsunori.

    1995-01-01

    Bone matastases are one of the most common and serious conditions requiring radiotherapy, but there is still a considerable lack of agreement on optimal radiation schedule. We analyzed patients with symptomatic osseous matastases from lung (72 patients) and breast (63 patients) carcinoma treated by palliative radiotherapy between 1983 and 1992. In this series, the incidences of symptomatic bone metastases appearing within 2 years after the first diagnosis of the primary lesion were 96% and 36% for lung and breast carcinomas, respectively. Thirty percent of bone metastases from breast carcinoma were diagnosed more than 5 years after the first diagnosis. Thus careful follow-up must be carried out for a prolonged period. Pain relief was achieved at almost the same rate for bone metastases from lung and breast carcinomas (81% and 85%, respectively), an the rapid onset of pain relief (15 Gy or less) was obtained in about half the patients for both diseases. The rapid onset of pain relief and the lack of association between the onset of pain relief and primary tumor argued against the conventional theory that tumor shrinkage is a component of the initial response. In contrast to the fact that almost all lung carcinoma patients had very poor prognoses, one third of the breast carcinoma patients were alive more than 2 years after palliative radiotherapy. Thust, the late effects of radiation, such as radiation myelopathy, must be always considered especially in breast carcinoma patients even when it is 'just' palliative radiotherapy for bone metastases. (author)

  12. [Palliative care for patients with dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieschang, T; Oster, P; Pfisterer, M; Schneider, N

    2012-01-01

    Patients with dementia are an important target group for palliative care since particularly in advanced stages and at the end of life they often have complex health care and psychosocial needs. However, people with dementia have inappropriate access to palliative care. So far, palliative care focuses on cancer patients. Among other reasons, this is due to the different illness trajectories: while in cancer a relatively clear terminal phase is typical, in dementia functional decline is gradual without a clear terminal phase, making advanced care planning more difficult. Good communication among health care providers and with the patient and his/her family is essential to avoid unnecessary or even harmful interventions at the end of life (e.g., inserting a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy, PEG). To maintain the patient's autonomy and to deliver health care according to the individual preferences, it is important to appropriately inform the patient and the family at an early stage about the disease and problems that may occur. In this context, advanced directives can be helpful.

  13. Palliative care and pediatric surgical oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inserra, Alessandro; Narciso, Alessandra; Paolantonio, Guglielmo; Messina, Raffaella; Crocoli, Alessandro

    2016-10-01

    Survival rate for childhood cancer has increased in recent years, reaching as high as 70% in developed countries compared with 54% for all cancers diagnosed in the 1980s. In the remaining 30%, progression or metastatic disease leads to death and in this framework palliative care has an outstanding role though not well settled in all its facets. In this landscape, surgery has a supportive actor role integrated with other welfare aspects from which are not severable. The definition of surgical palliation has moved from the ancient definition of noncurative surgery to a group of practices performed not to cure but to alleviate an organ dysfunction offering the best quality of life possible in all the aspects of life (pain, dysfunctions, caregivers, psychosocial, etc.). To emphasize this aspect a more modern definition has been introduced: palliative therapy in whose context is comprised not only the care assistance but also the plans of care since the onset of illness, teaching the matter to surgeons in training and share paths. Literature is very poor regarding surgical aspects specifically dedicated and all researches (PubMed, Google Scholar, and Cochrane) with various meshing terms result in a more oncologic and psychosocial effort. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Spirituality and distress in palliative care consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Judith; Paice, Judith A; Cameron, Jacqueline R; Shott, Susan

    2005-08-01

    One's spirituality or religious beliefs and practices may have a profound impact on how the individual copes with the suffering that so often accompanies advanced disease. Several previous studies suggest that negative religious coping can significantly affect health outcomes. The primary aim of this study was to explore the relationship between spirituality, religious coping, and symptoms of distress among a group of inpatients referred to the palliative care consult service. Pilot study. The study was conducted in a large academic medical center with a comprehensive Palliative Care and Home Hospice Program. (1) National Comprehensive Cancer Network Distress Management Assessment Tool; (2) Pargament Brief Religious Coping Scale (Brief RCOPE); (3) Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual Well-Being (FACIT-Sp); (4) Puchalski's FICA; and (5) Profile of Mood States-Short Form (POMS-SF). The 31 subjects surveyed experienced moderate distress (5.8 +/- 2.7), major physical and psychosocial symptom burden, along with reduced function and significant caregiving needs. The majority (87.2%) perceived themselves to be at least somewhat spiritual, with 77.4% admitting to being at least somewhat religious. Negative religious coping (i.e., statements regarding punishment or abandonment by God) was positively associated with distress, confusion, depression, and negatively associated with physical and emotional well-being, as well as quality of life. Palliative care clinicians should be alert to symptoms of spiritual distress and intervene accordingly. Future research is needed to identify optimal techniques to address negative religious coping.

  15. Palliative care and palliative radiation therapy education in radiation oncology: A survey of US radiation oncology program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Randy L; Colbert, Lauren E; Jones, Joshua; Racsa, Margarita; Kane, Gabrielle; Lutz, Steve; Vapiwala, Neha; Dharmarajan, Kavita V

    The purpose of this study was to assess the state of palliative and supportive care (PSC) and palliative radiation therapy (RT) educational curricula in radiation oncology residency programs in the United States. We surveyed 87 program directors of radiation oncology residency programs in the United States between September 2015 and November 2015. An electronic survey on PSC and palliative RT education during residency was sent to all program directors. The survey consisted of questions on (1) perceived relevance of PSC and palliative RT to radiation oncology training, (2) formal didactic sessions on domains of PSC and palliative RT, (3) effective teaching formats for PSC and palliative RT education, and (4) perceived barriers for integrating PSC and palliative RT into the residency curriculum. A total of 57 responses (63%) was received. Most program directors agreed or strongly agreed that PSC (93%) and palliative radiation therapy (99%) are important competencies for radiation oncology residents and fellows; however, only 67% of residency programs had formal educational activities in principles and practice of PSC. Most programs had 1 or more hours of formal didactics on management of pain (67%), management of neuropathic pain (65%), and management of nausea and vomiting (63%); however, only 35%, 33%, and 30% had dedicated lectures on initial management of fatigue, assessing role of spirituality, and discussing advance care directives, respectively. Last, 85% of programs reported having a formal curriculum on palliative RT. Programs were most likely to have education on palliative radiation to brain, bone, and spine, but less likely on visceral, or skin, metastasis. Residency program directors believe that PSC and palliative RT are important competencies for their trainees and support increasing education in these 2 educational domains. Many residency programs have structured curricula on PSC and palliative radiation education, but room for improvement exists in

  16. Creation of minimum standard tool for palliative care in India and self-evaluation of palliative care programs using it

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M R Rajagopal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is important to ensure that minimum standards for palliative care based on available resources are clearly defined and achieved. Aims: (1 Creation of minimum National Standards for Palliative Care for India. (2 Development of a tool for self-evaluation of palliative care organizations. (3 Evaluation of the tool in India. In 2006, Pallium India assembled a working group at the national level to develop minimum standards. The standards were to be evaluated by palliative care services in the country. Materials and Methods: The working group prepared a "standards" document, which had two parts - the first composed of eight "essential" components and the second, 22 "desirable" components. The working group sent the document to 86 hospice and palliative care providers nationwide, requesting them to self-evaluate their palliative care services based on the standards document, on a modified Likert scale. Results: Forty-nine (57% palliative care organizations responded, and their self-evaluation of services based on the standards tool was analyzed. The majority of the palliative care providers met most of the standards identified as essential by the working group. A variable percentage of organizations had satisfied the desirable components of the standards. Conclusions: We demonstrated that the "standards tool" could be applied effectively in practice for self-evaluation of quality of palliative care services.

  17. [Use of music in palliative care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrbina, Dijana; Simunović, Dubravka; Santek, Vjerocka; Njegovan-Zvonarević, Tatjana

    2011-12-01

    Man is mortal, which means that as the earthly body perishes being, final. Disease and death will always be an inevitable and integral part of human experience. The way in which we try to identify and respond to the unique and individual needs of the dying is an indication of our maturity as a society. The number of people requiring palliative care is growing. Palliative care does not intend to either accelerate or postpone death she emphasizes the life and looks at dying as a normal process. It is an active form of care for patients with advanced, progressive illness, with the aim of suppressing pain and other symptoms in addition to providing psychological, social and spiritual support which ensures the best possible quality of life for patients and their families. Therefore requires a coordinated and interdisciplinary contribution team. The variety of professions in a team, and determine the needs of patients should be ready to provide physical, psychological, social and spiritual support using methods that result from an interdisciplinary, collaborative team approach. Development of a holistic approach and awareness in the medical and allied professions has led to a renewal of interest in the inclusion of music and other expressive media in contemporary concepts of palliative care, which are consistent with problem areas, clinical manifestations and the needs of patients. Music offers a direct and uncomplicated medium of intimacy, living in a man who listens to her, has a place where words lose their power. Music is like our existence, constantly polarizing and emotionally stimulating, as it touches the medium of the earliest layers of our becoming. The use of music in palliative care has proved very effective for a variety of effects that music creates in patients. These effects are achieved through the use of various musical techniques, such as musical improvisation, songwriting, receiving creative techniques, guided by imagination and music. These techniques

  18. African Journals Online: African Studies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 51 - 56 of 56 ... Research Review of the Institute of African Studies. Please note: As of 2013 the Research Review of the Institute of African Studies is now publishing under the title Contemporary Journal of African Studies. You can view the CJAS pages on AJOL here: http://www.ajol.info/index.php/contjas/index.

  19. Palliative Chemotherapy Affects Aggressiveness of End-of-Life Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chin-Chia; Hsu, Ta-Wen; Chang, Chun-Ming; Lee, Cheng-Hung; Huang, Chih-Yuan; Lee, Ching-Chih

    2016-06-01

    Although palliative chemotherapy during end-of-life care is used for relief of symptoms in patients with metastatic cancer, chemotherapy may lead to more aggressive end-of-life care and less use of hospice service. This is a population-based study of the association between palliative chemotherapy and aggressiveness of end-of-life care. Using the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan, we identified 49,920 patients with metastatic cancer who underwent palliative chemotherapy from January 1, 2009, to December 31, 2011. Patients who received chemotherapy 2-6 months before death were included. Aggressiveness of end-of-life care was examined by previously reported indicators. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation and endotracheal tube intubation were included as indicators of aggressive end-of-life care. The association between palliative chemotherapy and hospice care was studied. Palliative chemotherapy was associated with more aggressive treatment. After adjustment for patient age, sex, Charlson Comorbidity Index score, cancer group, primary physician's specialty, postdiagnosis survival, hospital characteristics, hospital caseload, urbanization, and geographic regions, more than one emergency room visit (p care unit admission (p life care were significantly more common in patients receiving palliative chemotherapy. Patients who did not receive palliative chemotherapy received more hospice care in the last 6 months of life (p life care, including more emergency room visits and intensive care unit admissions, and endotracheal intubation. The patients who received palliative chemotherapy received less hospice service toward the end of life. Palliative chemotherapy is used for patients with incurable cancer toward the end of life (EOL). Aggressiveness of EOL care and hospice care are related to the quality of life of these patients. This study of data from the Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database found that palliative chemotherapy led to more

  20. Malignant melanoma of the skin in black South Africans: A 15-year ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acral lentiginous melanomas develop on palmar, plantar and subungual skin and are, with few exceptions, the only form of melanoma occurring in black people. Most South African black patients present late for treatment, are in an advanced stage of the disease, and are therefore candidates for palliative rather than ...

  1. The palliative care knowledge questionnaire for PEACE: reliability and validity of an instrument to measure palliative care knowledge among physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Ryo; Kizawa, Yoshiyuki; Nakazawa, Yoko; Morita, Tatsuya

    2013-11-01

    In Japan, a nationwide palliative care education program for primary palliative care (the Palliative care Emphasis program on symptom management and Assessment for Continuous medical Education: PEACE) was established in 2008. Effective delivery of such programs relies on adequate evaluations of program efficacy; however, such an instrument does not exist. This study aimed to develop and validate a measurement tool to quantify knowledge level of physicians about broader areas of palliative care, by which the effect of an education program could be measured. We conducted a cross-sectional, anonymous, self-administered questionnaire survey with a group of 801 conveniently sampled physicians in October 2010. To examine the test-retest reliability of items and domains, the questionnaire was reissued two weeks after the first survey was completed. This study used psychometric methods, including item response theory, intraclass correlation coefficients, and known-group validity. The response rate was 54% (n=434). We included 33 items across the following 9 domains: (1) philosophy of palliative care, (2) cancer pain, (3) side effects of opioids, (4) dyspnea, (5) nausea and vomiting, (6) psychological distress, (7) delirium, (8) communication regarding palliative care, and (9) community-based palliative care. For these items, the intraclass correlation was 0.84 and the Kuder-Richardson Formula 20 (KR-20) test of internal consistency was 0.87. There was a significant difference in the scores between palliative care specialists and other physicians. We successfully validated a newly developed palliative care knowledge questionnaire to evaluate PEACE effectiveness (PEACE-Q). The PEACE-Q could be useful for evaluating both palliative care knowledge among physicians and education programs in primary palliative care.

  2. Palliative radiotherapy in patients with a poor performance status: the palliative effect is correlated with prolongation of the survival time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Shinsaku; Ohguri, Takayuki; Matsuki, Yuichi; Yahara, Katsuya; Narisada, Hiroyuki; Imada, Hajime; Korogi, Yukunori

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the efficacy and tolerability of palliative radiotherapy (RT) in patients with a poor performance status (PS) and to evaluate the relationship between the palliative effect and survival time. One hundred and thirty-three patients with a poor PS (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group 3 or 4) were treated with palliative RT using the three-dimensional conformal technique and retrospectively analyzed. Each patient's primary symptom treated with palliative RT as the major cause of the poor PS was evaluated using the second item of the Support Team Assessment Schedule (STAS) at the start and one week after the completion of palliative RT. One hundred and fourteen (86%) of the 133 patients completed the planned palliative radiation dose. Grade 3 acute toxicity was observed in two patients (2%) and Grade 2 acute toxicity was observed in 10 patients (9%). No Grade 2 or higher late toxicities were observed, except for Grade 3 radiation pneumonitis in one patient. Improvement in the STAS scores between pre- and post-palliative RT was recorded in 76 (61%) of the 125 patients with available scores of STAS. A significant improvement in the mean STAS score between pre- and post-palliative RT was recognized (p < 0.0001). Improvement in the STAS score was found to be the most statistically significant prognostic factor for overall survival after palliative RT in both the multivariate and univariate analyses. The median overall survival time in the patients with an improvement in the STAS score was 6.4 months, while that in the patients without improvement was 2.4 months (p < 0.0005). Palliative RT in patients with a poor PS provides symptomatic benefits in more than half of patients without inducing severe toxicities. The palliative effect is strongly correlated with prolongation of the survival time and may contribute to improving the remaining survival time in patients with metastatic/advanced cancer with a poor PS

  3. Understanding the concept and challenges of palliative care medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MJP

    2015-06-25

    Jun 25, 2015 ... Financial constraints, need for home visits and hospice were other challenges encountered. Conclusion: Palliative care ... Ojimadu and Okwuonu: Palliative care medicine in a tertiary hospital. Int J Med Biomed Res 2015;4(2):86- ... some challenges in the management of painful crisis associated with sickle ...

  4. Review of article palliative care in Nigeria: Challenges and prospects

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method: This is a review article on of various policies and publications concerning Palliative care in Nigeria using different search engines such as Pubmed and Google. Conclusion: Palliative care implementation in Nigeria is still a work in progress with limited availability in health facilities in the country. Key words: ...

  5. Improving prescription in palliative sedation: compliance with dutch guidelines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hasselaar, J.G.J.; Reuzel, R.P.B.; Verhagen, C.A.H.H.V.M.; Graeff, A. de; Vissers, K.C.P.; Crul, B.J.P.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Two guidelines addressing palliative sedation have been published in the Netherlands in 2002 and 2003. The objective of the present study is to determine adherence to the guidelines for palliative sedation with regard to prescription. The study is restricted to the practice of continuous

  6. Are Undergraduate Nurses Taught Palliative Care during Their Training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd-Williams, Mari; Field, David

    2002-01-01

    Responses from 46 of 108 nurse educators in the United Kingdom indicated that diploma students received a mean of 7.8 hours and degree students 12.2 hours of palliative care training. Although 82% believed it should be a core component, 67% had difficulty finding qualified teachers. Palliative care knowledge was not formally assessed in most…

  7. Palliative care for the homeless: complex lifes, complex care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, A. de; Stringer, B.; Meijel, B. van; Verkaik, R.; Francke, A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Homeless people often encounter multiple problems and have a shorter life- expectancy. Little is known about how palliative care for this group is organized and can be improved. Aim: To explore and describe aspects of the palliative care for homeless people in The Netherlands from the

  8. Incorporating the Arts and Humanities in Palliative Medicine Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Lucille R.

    2006-01-01

    The arts and humanities allow the teaching of palliative medicine to come alive by exploring what is often regarded as the most frightening outcome of the illness experience--death and dying. Palliative medicine focuses on the relief of suffering, but how can suffering be understood if the story of the patient is not told through prose, poetry,…

  9. Understanding the concept and challenges of palliative care medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Literature review was conducted using HINARI and Google search engines. Publications on palliative care were identified using relevant keywords. Challenges encountered rendering palliative care in a tertiary hospital were enumerated and discussed. Results: There is knowledge and attitude gap with urgent ...

  10. Patients' preferences in palliative care: A systematic mixed studies review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandsdalen, Tuva; Hov, Reidun; Høye, Sevald; Rystedt, Ingrid; Wilde-Larsson, Bodil

    2015-05-01

    It is necessary to develop palliative care to meet existing and future needs of patients and their families. It is important to include knowledge of patient preferences when developing high-quality palliative care services. Previous reviews have focused on patient preferences with regard to specific components of palliative care. There is a need to review research on patient's combined preferences for all elements that constitute palliative care. The aim of this study is to identify preferences for palliative care among patients in the palliative phase of their illness, by synthesizing existing research. Studies were retrieved by searching databases - the Cochrane Library, Medline, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Scopus and Sociological Abstracts - from 1946 to 2014, and by hand searching references in the studies included. A systematic mixed studies review was conducted. Two reviewers independently selected studies for inclusion and extracted data according to the eligibility criteria. Data were synthesized using integrative thematic analysis. The 13 qualitative and 10 quantitative studies identified included participants with different illnesses in various settings. Four themes emerged representing patient preferences for care. The theme 'Living a meaningful life' illustrated what patients strived for. The opportunity to focus on living required the presence of 'Responsive healthcare personnel', a 'Responsive care environment' and 'Responsiveness in the organization of palliative care'. The four themes may be useful for guiding clinical practice and measurements of quality, with the overall goal of meeting future needs and improving quality in palliative care services to suit patients' preferences. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Pastoral care, spirituality, and religion in palliative care journals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermsen, M.A.; Have, H.A.M.J. ten

    2004-01-01

    With the growth and development of palliative care, interest in pastoral care, spirituality, and religion also seems to be growing. The aim of this article is to review the topic of pastoral care, spirituality, and religion appearing in the journals of palliative care, between January 1984 and

  12. Palliative Care: Improving Nursing Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behaviors
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, Karen; Price, Deborah; Duffy, Elizabeth; Galunas, Laura; Rodgers, Cheryl

    2017-10-01

    Oncology nurses affect patient care at every point along the cancer journey. This creates the perfect opportunity to educate patients and caregivers about palliative care early and often throughout treatment. However, healthcare providers frequently do not have the knowledge and confidence to engage in meaningful conversations about palliative care.
. The specific aims were to improve oncology nurses' palliative care knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors by providing a palliative care nursing education program. An additional aim was to increase the number of conversations with patients and families about palliative care.
. This project had a pre-/post-test design to assess knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors at baseline and one month after implementation of an established education curriculum. The teaching strategy included one four-hour class for oncology RNs with topics about the definition of palliative care, pain and symptom management, and how to have palliative care conversations.
. Results showed a statistically significant difference after the educational intervention for knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. The number of conversations with patients and caregivers about palliative and end-of-life care increased significantly.

  13. Program Assessment Framework for a Rural Palliative Supportive Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesut, Barbara; Hooper, Brenda; Sawatzky, Richard; Robinson, Carole A; Bottorff, Joan L; Dalhuisen, Miranda

    2013-01-01

    Although there are a number of quality frameworks available for evaluating palliative services, it is necessary to adapt these frameworks to models of care designed for the rural context. The purpose of this paper was to describe the development of a program assessment framework for evaluating a rural palliative supportive service as part of a community-based research project designed to enhance the quality of care for patients and families living with life-limiting chronic illness. A review of key documents from electronic databases and grey literature resulted in the identification of general principles for high-quality palliative care in rural contexts. These principles were then adapted to provide an assessment framework for the evaluation of the rural palliative supportive service. This framework was evaluated and refined using a community-based advisory committee guiding the development of the service. The resulting program assessment framework includes 48 criteria organized under seven themes: embedded within community; palliative care is timely, comprehensive, and continuous; access to palliative care education and experts; effective teamwork and communication; family partnerships; policies and services that support rural capacity and values; and systematic approach for measuring and improving outcomes of care. It is important to identify essential elements for assessing the quality of services designed to improve rural palliative care, taking into account the strengths of rural communities and addressing common challenges. The program assessment framework has potential to increase the likelihood of desired outcomes in palliative care provisions in rural settings and requires further validation. PMID:25278757

  14. Funding models in palliative care: Lessons from international experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneveld, E.I.; Cassel, J.B.; Bausewein, C.; Csikos, A.; Krajnik, M.; Ryan, K.; Haugen, D.F.; Eychmueller, S.; Gudat Keller, H.; Allan, S.; Hasselaar, J.G.J.; García-Baquero Merino, T.; Swetenham, K.; Piper, K.; Furst, C.J.; Murtagh, F.E.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Funding models influence provision and development of palliative care services. As palliative care integrates into mainstream health care provision, opportunities to develop funding mechanisms arise. However, little has been reported on what funding models exist or how we can learn from

  15. Perception of Nurses about Palliative Care: Experience from South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Nurses play a major role all over the world in the palliative care team. Aim: The aim of this study was to ... The questionnaire sought information about the sociodemographic profile of respondents, their knowledge of definition and philosophy of palliative care among other things. Descriptive statistics was used ...

  16. Leadership Development Initiative: Growing Global Leaders… Advancing Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Frank D; Moore, Shannon Y; Callaway, Mary V; Foley, Kathleen M

    2018-02-01

    The International Palliative Care Leadership Development Initiative (LDI) was a model demonstration project that aimed to expand the global network of palliative care leaders in low- and moderate-resource countries who are well positioned to apply their new leadership skills. Thirty-nine palliative medicine physicians from 25 countries successfully completed the two-year curriculum that included three thematic residential courses, mentorship, and site visits by senior global palliative care leaders and personal projects to apply their new leadership skills. The focus on self-reflection, leadership behaviors and practices, strategic planning, high-level communication, and teaching skills led to significant personal and professional transformation among the participants, mentors, and the LDI team. The resulting residential course curriculum and the personal leadership stories and biosketches of the leaders are now available open access at IPCRC.net. Already, within their first-year postgraduation, the leaders are using their new leadership skills to grow palliative care capacity through significant changes in policy, improved opioid/other medication availability, new and enhanced educational curricula and continuing education activities, and development/expansion of palliative care programs in their organizations and regions. We are not aware of another palliative care initiative that achieves the global reach and ripple effect that LDI has produced. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The multidisciplinary team in palliative care: A case reflection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liza Bowen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This essay is a reflection on the multidisciplinary team in palliative care, from the perspective of a final year MBBS student from the UK spending one month with an Indian pain and palliative care team at Institute Rotary Cancer Hospital (IRCH, AIIMS, New Delhi.

  18. Palliative medicine and smartphones: an opportunity for innovation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwosu, Amara Callistus; Mason, Stephen

    2012-03-01

    The use of smartphones and their software applications (apps) provides health professionals with opportunities to integrate technology into clinical practice. Increasing numbers of work-related apps are available to health professionals, especially in certain specialties such as orthopaedics. However, so far the availability of apps specific to palliative medicine is limited. To review all smartphone apps targeted at health professionals within palliative medicine and available for the five most popular operating systems (iPhone, Blackberry, Android, Palm and Windows) . Each smartphone app store was systematically searched with a combination of the following keywords: palliative, pain, cancer, symptoms, medicine. Identified apps were purchased and tested to determine if their title and/or description was relevant to palliative care. Six apps specific to palliative medicine were identified across all five operating systems. These consisted of blog orientated apps (Pallimed and Geripal), an app containing guidelines from eight cancer networks (PalliApp), an educational app (Palliative Care) and opioid dose converter apps (eOpioid and PalliCalc). There is a lack of palliative medicine specific resources for smartphones and no studies have been published which examine the potential benefits of mobile technology for learning, clinical practice and professional development. This provides an opportunity for further research and development. Academic institutions could work with technological developers to improve access to, and dissemination of, key information for practice. Considered development of mobile technology has the potential to improve patient care, data sharing and education within the palliative medicine specialty.

  19. Evaluation of the palliative effect of radiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albertsson, M.; Ewers, S.B.; Widmark, H.; Hambraeus, G.; Lillo-Gil, R.; Ranstam, J.; Lund Univ. Hospital

    1989-01-01

    149 patients with carcinoma of the esophagus treated with radiotherapy were evaluated. Eighty-one patients had treatment with palliative intent and 68 with curative intent. The 4-year actuarial survival was 1 and 5% respectively. The tumor size, Karnofsky index (KI) and radiation dose were prognostic factors. The duration of palliation of the patients dysphagia was dose-dependant. (orig.)

  20. Implementation of improvement strategies in palliative care: an integrative review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riet Paap, J.C. van; Vernooij-Dassen, M.; Sommerbakk, R.; Moyle, W.; Hjermstad, M.J.; Leppert, W.; Vissers, K.; Engels, Y.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The European population is ageing, and as a consequence, an increasing number of patients are in need of palliative care, including those with dementia. Although a growing number of new insights and best practices in palliative care have been published, they are often not implemented in

  1. Palliative treatment alternatives and euthanasia consultations: a qualitative interview study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buiting, Hilde M.; Willems, Dick L.; Pasman, H. Roeline W.; Rurup, Mette L.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D.

    2011-01-01

    There is much debate about euthanasia within the context of palliative care. The six criteria of careful practice for lawful euthanasia in The Netherlands aim to safeguard the euthanasia practice against abuse and a disregard of palliative treatment alternatives. Those criteria need to be evaluated

  2. Palliation for transposition of great arteries | Adegboye | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method: Patients with the diagnosis of TGA were evaluated for morphological type. The choice of palliative procedure was made in some of the patients with morphological type in mind. ... All patients had delayed wound healing. Conclusion: Appropriate and timely palliative surgery has a place in patients with TGA as an ...

  3. Palliative care interventions in advanced dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Edel; Froggatt, Katherine; Connolly, Sheelah; O'Shea, Eamon; Sampson, Elizabeth L; Casey, Dympna; Devane, Declan

    2016-12-02

    Dementia is a chronic, progressive and ultimately fatal neurodegenerative disease. Advanced dementia is characterised by profound cognitive impairment, inability to communicate verbally and complete functional dependence. Usual care of people with advanced dementia is not underpinned universally by a palliative approach. Palliative care has focused traditionally on care of people with cancer but for more than a decade, there have been increased calls worldwide to extend palliative care services to include all people with life-limiting illnesses in need of specialist care, including people with dementia. To assess the effect of palliative care interventions in advanced dementia and to report on the range of outcome measures used. We searched ALOIS, the Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement Group's Specialized Register on 4 February 2016. ALOIS contains records of clinical trials identified from monthly searches of several major healthcare databases, trial registries and grey literature sources. We ran additional searches across MEDLINE (OvidSP), Embase (OvidSP), PsycINFO (OvidSP), CINAHL (EBSCOhost), LILACS (BIREME), Web of Science Core Collection (ISI Web of Science), ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization ICTRP trial portal to ensure that the searches were as comprehensive and as up-to-date as possible. We searched for randomised (RCT) and non-randomised controlled trials (nRCT), controlled before-and-after studies (CBA) and interrupted time series studies evaluating the impact of palliative care interventions for adults with dementia of any type, staged as advanced dementia by a recognised and validated tool. Participants could be people with advanced dementia, their family members, clinicians or paid care staff. We included clinical interventions and non-clinical interventions. Comparators were usual care or another palliative care intervention. We did not exclude studies on the basis of outcomes measured and recorded all outcomes measured in

  4. The Effect of Palliative Care Team Design on Referrals to Pediatric Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keele, Linda; Keenan, Heather T; Bratton, Susan L

    2016-03-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine (AAHPM) have recommended minimal standards for palliative care (PC) team composition and availability. It is unknown whether team composition affects utilization of PC. The study objective was to describe pediatric PC team composition, evaluate whether composition and availability are associated with utilization, and examine PC referral patterns. The study was a descriptive survey. Subjects were pediatric PC team directors or hospital administrators at Pediatric Health Information System (PHIS) hospitals (N = 44). The overall response rate was 86%. Teams varied in size from team roles, referral rates were 34% greater in teams with an advanced nurse practitioner (ANP) (p = 0.07). Likewise, teams with acute pain, chronic pain, or hospice palliative medicine specialists tended to have greater referral rates (39%, 36%, and 25%), though reported differences were not statistically significant. Teams adherent to the original AAP recommendations had a 31% greater referral rate (p = 0.22). Teams available 24 hours daily had similar referral rates to those with less availability (0.47 versus 0.46 [p = 0.94]). Team composition and availability are not crucial to PC utilization. Hospitals with some personnel but not all recommended team members should create formal teams and modify them over time. The addition of team members that tend to increase referrals, namely ANPs and acute pain, chronic pain, or hospice palliative medicine specialists, should be considered.

  5. Quality of palliative care through the relatives' eyes: findings of the CQ-index palliative care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Francke, A.F.; Claessen, S.J.J.; Deliens, L.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To measure the quality of palliative care, a CQ-index (Consumer Quality-index) was used. A CQ-index is a questionnaire assessing actual care experiences, rather than satisfaction. The questionnaire combines items on actual care experiences and items on how important certain quality aspects are

  6. Palliative care and nursing support for patients experiencing dyspnoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimura, Ayumi; Ando, Shoko; Tamakoshi, Koji

    2017-07-02

    To investigate the association between the type of support provided by nurses for dyspnoea and palliative care practice in Japan, a cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted in 2015. Of the 535 questionnaires sent to nurses working at 22 designated cancer hospitals, 344 were returned. The questionnaire assessed the demographic characteristics of the nurses, nursing support for dyspnoea, and palliative care practice measured by the 'Palliative care self-reported practices scale'. Multivariate analysis showed that the domains of palliative care practice influenced the provision of nursing support for patients with dyspnoea. In conclusion, palliative care practice is important for supporting patients with dyspnoea, and nurses should possess the requisite knowledge and skills to deliver this care appropriately.

  7. Satisfaction with palliative care after stroke: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacquiere, Dylan; Bhimji, Khadija; Meggison, Hilary; Sinclair, John; Sharma, Michael

    2013-09-01

    The determinants of satisfaction for families of acute stroke patients receiving palliative care have not been extensively studied. We surveyed families to determine how they perceived palliative care after stroke. Families of patients palliated after ischemic stroke, intracerebral, or subarachnoid hemorrhage were approached. Four weeks after the patient's death, families were administered the After-Death Bereaved Family Member Interview to determine satisfaction with the care provided. Fifteen families participated. Families were most satisfied with participation in decision making and least satisfied with attention to emotional needs. In stroke-specific domains, families had less satisfaction with artificial feeding, hydration, and communication. Overall satisfaction was high (9.04 out of 10). Families of patients receiving palliative care at our institution showed generally high satisfaction with palliation after stroke; specific domains were identified for improvement. Further study in larger populations is required.

  8. Provision of palliative care education in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Kathryn; Curie, Marie; Finch, Jemma

    To map the nature and extent of existing palliative care education activities. Data was gathered from questionnaires, face-to-face and telephone interviews, visiting palliative care teams across Mount Vernon Cancer Network and attendance at conferences, meetings and seminars. A comprehensive needs assessment for palliative care education within nursing homes was completed. The findings revealed inequality across the network with regard to education provision and uptake of palliative care services. Recruitment of overseas staff and a transient workforce were both cited as major difficulties in implementing education programmes. Funding of these programmes and responsibility for providing the education remain unclear. There was a real and urgent need for palliative care training in the network area and there was scope for a variety of approaches to be adopted to deliver the required training.

  9. Inadequacy of Palliative Training in the Medical School Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Nicholas; Cheon, Paul; Lutz, Stephen; Lao, Nicholas; Pulenzas, Natalie; Chiu, Leonard; McDonald, Rachel; Rowbottom, Leigha; Chow, Edward

    2015-12-01

    This report examines the literature on palliative training in the current medical school curriculum. A literature search was conducted to identify relevant articles. Physicians and medical students both report feeling that their training in end-of-life care and in palliative issues is lacking. The literature expresses concerns about the varied and non-uniform approach to palliative care training across medical schools. The authors recommend the development of more palliative training assessment tools in order to aid in the standardization of curriculum involving end-of-life care. In addition, increased exposure to dying patients will aid students in building comfort with palliative care issues. Such a goal may be accomplished through required clerkships or other similar programs.

  10. Palliative Care: A Partnership Across the Continuum of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding, Aaron; Harrison, Debra A; Harrison, Jeffrey P

    2016-01-01

    Palliative care services are becoming more prevalent in the United States as greater portions of the population are requiring end-of-life services. Furthermore, recent policy changes and service foci have promoted more continuity and encompassing care. This study evaluates characteristics that distinguish hospitals with a palliative care program from hospitals without such a program in order to better define the markets and environments that promote the creation and usage of these programs. This study demonstrates that palliative care programs are more likely in communities with favorable economic factors and higher Medicare populations. Large hospitals with high occupancy rates and a high case mix index use palliative care programs to better meet patient needs and improve hospital efficiency. Managerial, nursing, and policy implications are discussed relating to further usage and implementation of palliative care programs.

  11. Poverty Reduction in India through Palliative Care: A Pilot Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliff, Cathy; Thyle, Ann; Duomai, Savita; Manak, Manju

    2017-01-01

    EMMS International and Emmanuel Hospital Association (EHA) implemented a pilot project, poverty reduction in India through palliative care (PRIPCare). A total of 129 interviews with patients and family enrolled in palliative care at three EHA hospitals (in Fatehpur, Lalitpur and Utraula) and staff discussions established that 66% of palliative care patients had lost livelihoods due to illness, 26% of patients' families had members who had lost livelihoods due to the illness, 98% of enrolled households had debts, 59% had loans for which they had sold assets, 69% of households took out debt after their family member fell ill, many patients do not know about government benefits and lack necessary documents, many village headmen require bribes to give people access to benefits, and many bereaved women and children lose everything. Palliative care enabled 85% of patients and families to spend less on medicines, 31% of patients received free medicines, all patients reduced use of out-patient departments (OPDs), 20% reduced use of inpatient departments (IPDs), and therefore spent less on travel, 8% of patients had started earning again due to improved health, members of 10% of families started earning again, and one hospital educated 171 village headmen and increased by 5% the number of patients and their families receiving government benefits. If only 0.7% of needy adults are receiving palliative care, these benefits could be delivered to 143 times more families, targeted effectively at poverty reduction. Palliative care has great scope to reduce that most desperate poverty in India caused by chronic illness. This article concerns a study by the UK NGO EMMS International and Indian NGO EHA, to assess whether palliative care reduces household poverty. EHA staff had noticed that many patients spend a lot on ineffective treatment before joining palliative care, many families do not know their entitlement to government healthcare subsidies or government pensions, and many

  12. Early identification of palliative care patients in general practice: development of RADboud indicators for PAlliative Care Needs (RADPAC).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thoonsen, B.A.; Engels, Y.M.; Rijswijk, H.C.A.M. van; Verhagen, S.; Weel, C. van; Groot, M. de; Vissers, K.C.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: According to the World Health Organization (WHO) definition, palliative care should be initiated in an early phase and not be restricted to terminal care. In the literature, no validated tools predicting the optimal timing for initiating palliative care have been determined. AIM: The aim

  13. Developing organisational ethics in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandman, Lars; Molander, Ulla; Benkel, Inger

    2017-03-01

    Palliative carers constantly face ethical problems. There is lack of organised support for the carers to handle these ethical problems in a consistent way. Within organisational ethics, we find models for moral deliberation and for developing organisational culture; however, they are not combined in a structured way to support carers' everyday work. The aim of this study was to describe ethical problems faced by palliative carers and develop an adapted organisational set of values to support the handling of these problems. Ethical problems were mapped out using focus groups and content analysis. The organisational culture were developed using normative analysis and focus group methodology within a participatory action research approach. Main participants and research context: A total of 15 registered nurses and 10 assistant nurses at a palliative unit (with 19 patient beds) at a major University Hospital in Sweden. Ethical considerations: The study followed standard ethics guidelines concerning informed consent and confidentiality. We found six categories of ethical problems (with the main focus on problems relating to the patient's loved ones) and five categories of organisational obstacles. Based on these findings, we developed a set of values in three levels: a general level, an explanatory level and a level of action strategies. The ethical problems found corresponded to problems in other studies with a notable exception, the large focus on patient loved ones. The three-level set of values is a way to handle risks of formulating abstract values not providing guidance in concrete care voiced in other studies. Developing a three-level set of values adapted to the specific ethical problems in a concrete care setting is a first step towards a better handling of ethical problems.

  14. Public awareness of palliative care in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerlund, Caroline; Tishelman, Carol; Benkel, Inger; Fürst, Carl Johan; Molander, Ulla; Rasmussen, Birgit H; Sauter, Sylvia; Lindqvist, Olav

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the awareness of palliative care (PC) in a general Swedish population. We developed an e-survey based on a similar study conducted in Northern Ireland, consisting of 10 questions. Closed questions were primarily analyzed using descriptive statistics. Open questions were subject to inductive qualitative analysis. The study utilized a population sample of 7684 persons aged 18-66, of which 2020 responded, stratified by gender, age and region. Most participants reported 'no' ( n = 827, 41%) or 'some' ( n = 863, 43%) awareness of PC. Being female or older were associated with higher levels of awareness, as was a university-level education, working in a healthcare setting and having a friend or family member receiving PC. Most common sources of knowledge were the media, close friends and relatives receiving PC, as well as working in a healthcare setting. Aims of PC were most frequently identified as 'care before death', 'pain relief', 'dignity' and a 'peaceful death'. The preferred place of care and death was one's own home. The main barriers to raising awareness about PC were fear, shame and taboo, along with perceived lack of information and/or personal relevance. The term 'palliative care' was said to be unfamiliar by many. A number of strategies to enhance awareness and access to PC were suggested, largely reflecting the previously identified barriers. This survey found limited awareness of palliative care in an adult sample of the Swedish general public ≤ 66 years, and points to a more widespread disempowerment surrounding end-of-life issues.

  15. Emotionality and teamwork in palliative nursing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nickelsen, Niels Christian

    in spring 2007. Three interesting observations were done: 1) Teamwork in the hospice collides with the emotional character of the work 2) In spite of a very loose team organisation the team members find pivotal support in the teams 3) Materials such as the rota has far-reaching implications for the way......This paper discusses the performance of palliative support teams based in an empirical study in a hospice in Denmark. The analytic strategy is based in science and technology studies (STS). The study was carried out as a number of meetings among the researcher and five non-consolidated teams...

  16. Million Dollar Baby (2004 and Palliative Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Elías García Sánchez

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The worst misfortune that can befall an old, tormented and fearful boxing trainer is that the pupil he is training and of whom he is very fond should have a lesion as serious as a quadriplegia. This is the crux of the plot in Million Dollar Baby. A person who suffers a quadriplegia sees how most of her physical and sensorial abilities disappear and habitually suffers psychological disturbances requiring palliative medical care. Relatives are subjected to great stress and suffering. All these aspects are reflected, in general accurately, in the film.

  17. Ethical conduct of palliative care research: enhancing communication between investigators and institutional review boards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abernethy, Amy P; Capell, Warren H; Aziz, Noreen M; Ritchie, Christine; Prince-Paul, Maryjo; Bennett, Rachael E; Kutner, Jean S

    2014-12-01

    Palliative care has faced moral and ethical challenges when conducting research involving human subjects. There are currently no resources to guide institutional review boards (IRBs) in applying standard ethical principles and terms-in a specific way-to palliative care research. Using as a case study a recently completed multisite palliative care clinical trial, this article provides guidance and recommendations for both IRBs and palliative care investigators to facilitate communication and attain the goal of conducting ethical palliative care research and protecting study participants while advancing the science. Beyond identifying current challenges faced by palliative care researchers and IRBs reviewing palliative care research, this article suggests steps that the palliative care research community can take to establish a scientifically sound, stable, productive, and well-functioning relationship between palliative care investigators and the ethical bodies that oversee their work. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. All rights reserved.

  18. [(Early) Palliative Care in Emergency Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spickermann, Maximilian; Lenz, Philipp

    2018-04-01

    At the end of life patients with a life-limiting disease are often admitted to emergency departments (ED). Mostly, in the setting of an ED there may not be enough time to meet the needs for palliative care (PC) of these patients. Therefore, integration of PC into the ED offers a solution to improve their treatment. In the outpatient setting a cooperation between prehospital emergency services, the patient's general practitioner and specialized outpatient PC teams may allow the patient to die at home - this is what most patients prefer at the end of life. Furthermore, due to the earlier integration of PC after admission the hospital stay is shortened. Also the number of PC consultations may increase. Additionally, a screening of PC hneeds among all patients visiting the ED may be beneficial: to avoid not meeting existing PC needs and to standardize the need of PC consultation. An example for such a screening tool is the "Palliative Care and Rapid Emergency Screening" (P-CaRES). © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Palliative care and interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajwah, Sabrina; Yorke, Janelle

    2017-09-01

    The palliative care needs of people with interstitial lung disease (ILD) have recently been highlighted by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. All people with progressive ILD should receive best supportive care to improve symptom control and quality of life and where possible this should be evidence based. Deaths from ILD are increasing and deaths in hospital are more common compared to home. People with ILD experience a wide range of symptoms including breathlessness and cough. People living with ILD often suffer unmet physical and psychological needs throughout the disease journey. Few appropriately validated outcome measures exist for ILD which has hampered research on the longitudinal experience of symptoms and quality of life and the evaluation of interventions. Recent recommendations from the National Institute of Clinical Excellence promote the use of a new palliative care needs assessment tool. Use of a tool in busy respiratory clinics may help to highlight those requiring specialist input. Further research into the role of opioids, oxygen and neuromodulatory agents in symptom management are needed. In addition, exploration of breathlessness and case conference interventions in transitioning patients from the hospital to community settings is a priority. Further work is needed to identify a core set of validated ILD-specific patient-reported outcome measures for the robust evaluation of interventions.

  20. Burnout among physicians in palliative care: Impact of clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dréano-Hartz, Soazic; Rhondali, Wadih; Ledoux, Mathilde; Ruer, Murielle; Berthiller, Julien; Schott, Anne-Marie; Monsarrat, Léa; Filbet, Marilène

    2016-08-01

    Burnout syndrome is a work-related professional distress. Palliative care physicians often have to deal with complex end-of-life situations and are at risk of presenting with burnout syndrome, which has been little studied in this population. Our study aims to identify the impact of clinical settings (in a palliative care unit (PCU) or on a palliative care mobile team (PCMT)) on palliative care physicians. We undertook a cross-sectional study using a questionnaire that included the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), and we gathered sociodemographic and professional data. The questionnaire was sent to all 590 physicians working in palliative care in France between July of 2012 and February of 2013. The response rate was 61, 8% after three reminders. Some 27 (9%) participants showed high emotional exhaustion, 12 (4%) suffered from a high degree of depersonalization, and 71 (18%) had feelings of low personal accomplishment. Physicians working on a PCMT tended (p = 0.051) to be more likely to suffer from emotional exhaustion than their colleagues. Physicians working on a PCMT worked on smaller teams (fewer physicians, p burnout in palliative care physicians was low and in fact lower than that reported in other populations (e.g., oncologists). Working on a palliative care mobile team can be a more risky situation, associated with a lack of medical and paramedical staff.

  1. Establishment and preliminary outcomes of a palliative care research network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Peter; Street, Annette; Graham, Suzanne; Aranda, Sanchia; O'Connor, Margaret; Thomas, Kristina; Jackson, Kate; Spruyt, Odette; Ugalde, Anna; Philip, Jennifer

    2016-02-01

    The difficulties in conducting palliative care research have been widely acknowledged. In order to generate the evidence needed to underpin palliative care provision, collaborative research is considered essential. Prior to formalizing the development of a research network for the state of Victoria, Australia, a preliminary study was undertaken to ascertain interest and recommendations for the design of such a collaboration. Three data-collection strategies were used: a cross-sectional questionnaire, interviews, and workshops. The questionnaire was completed by multidisciplinary palliative care specialists from across the state (n = 61); interviews were conducted with senior clinicians and academics (n = 21) followed by two stakeholder workshops (n = 29). The questionnaire was constructed specifically for this study, measuring involvement of and perceptions of palliative care research. Both the interview and the questionnaire data demonstrated strong support for a palliative care research network and aided in establishing a research agenda. The stakeholder workshops assisted with strategies for the formation of the Palliative Care Research Network Victoria (PCRNV) and guided the development of the mission and strategic plan. The research and efforts to date to establish the PCRNV are encouraging and provide optimism for the evolution of palliative care research in Australia. The international implications are highlighted.

  2. Core attitudes of professionals in palliative care: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Steffen T; Ramsenthaler, Christina; Bausewein, Claudia; Krischke, Norbert; Geiss, Gerlinde

    2009-08-01

    Self-awareness of one's own reactions towards patients and their relatives is of paramount importance for all professionals in palliative care. 'Core attitude' describes the way in which a person perceives himself and the world, and forms the basis for his actions and thoughts. The aim of this study is to explore what core attitude means for palliative care professionals and whether there is a specific core attitude in palliative care. Qualitative study with 10 face-to-face in-depth interviews with experts in palliative care (nurses, physicians, social workers, psychologists, chaplain) in Germany. Core attitude in palliative care can be best described with the following three domains: 1) personal characteristics; 2) experience of care; and 3) competence in care. Authenticity is the most important characteristic of professionals, along with honesty and mindfulness. Core attitude primarily becomes apparent in the relationship with the patient. Perception and listening are key competences. The experts emphasized the universality of the core attitude in the care of ill people. They stressed the importance and relevance of teaching core attitudes in palliative care education. In the field of palliative care, core attitude consists predominately of authenticity, manifests itself in relationships, and requires a high degree of perceptiveness.

  3. PROGRAM OF PALLIATIVE CANCER CARE – OUR EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Slánská

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Annually more than 27,000 persons die of cancer in the Czech Republic and the overall incidence of malignancies is still increasing. These data shows the need for affordable and good follow-up care especially for patients without any cancer treatment due to irreversible progression of tumor. Currently the outpatient palliative cancer care gets more into the forefront. Prerequisite for a well working outpatient palliative care is cooperation with general practitioners and home health care agencies. The purpose of the so called program of palliative cancer care is to guide a patient in palliative cancer care and to improve the cooperation among health care providers. Methods: During the period from January 2008 to October 2010 we evaluated in patient without any oncology treatment due to irreversible progression of tumor. Results: In palliative outpatient clinic we treated 446 patients, 119 of them received home care services with average length of 27.8 days. 77 patients died at home, 51 in health facilities and 41 in inpatient hospice care. Conclusion: We present pilot study focusing on outpatient palliative cancer care which shows the real benefit from early indication of palliative cancer care. This type of care allows patients to stay as long as possible at home among their close relatives.

  4. A palliative care needs assessment of rural hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Regina M; Oman, Kathleen S; Youngwerth, Jeanie; Bryant, Lucinda L

    2013-06-01

    Palliative care services are lacking in rural hospitals. Implementing palliative care services in rural and remote areas requires knowledge of available resources, specific barriers, and a commitment from the hospital and community. The purpose of the study was to determine awareness, knowledge, barriers, and resources regarding palliative care services in rural hospitals. A descriptive survey design used an investigator-developed needs assessment to survey 374 (40% response rate) health care providers (chief executive officers, chiefs of medical staff, chief nursing officers, and social worker directors) at 236 rural hospitals (communication techniques, and end-of-life care issues. Webinar and online courses were suggested as strategies to promote long distance learning. It is imperative for quality of care that rural hospitals have practitioners who are up to date on current evidence and practice within a palliative care framework. Unique challenges exist to implementing palliative care services in rural hospitals. Opportunities for informing rural areas focus around utilizing existing hospice resources and relationships, and favoring Web-based classes and online courses. The development of a multifaceted intervention to facilitate education about palliative care and cultivate palliative care services in rural settings is indicated.

  5. PALLIATIVE CARE IN GERIATRICS: CURRENT ISSUES AND PROSPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. P. Рonomareva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to identify the main problems and prospects of development of palliative care in geriatrics at the present stage. Method of research was to analyze the printed and electronic databases that meet the stated issues. The results of the study highlight the problems of the development of palliative care in geriatric practice: the lack of a developed procedure of rendering palliative care and adequate elderly patient selection criteria, the lack of trained professional staff. The main prospects-association of palliative practices and concepts of modern geriatrics required specialized geriatric assessment and the provision of clinical, medical, social and socio-psychological geriatric syndromes. While promising option for the development of palliative care geriatrics is the integration into the existing health care system, acceptance of the fact that it is a part of the specialized geriatric care. This requires the involvement and training of not only specialists with medical education, but also persons without medical training from among social workers and volunteers working in palliative care. Therefore, the obtained data allowed to conclude that topical is the development of palliative care in geriatrics, taking into account not only clinical but medico-social, socio-psychological features.

  6. Palliative care education in U.S. medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Robert; Gramling, Robert; Quill, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Medical educators in the U.S.A. perceive the teaching of palliative care competencies as important, medical students experience it as valuable and effective, and demographic and societal forces fuel its necessity. Although it is encouraged by the Association of American Medical Colleges, the only palliative care-related mandate in U.S. medical schools is the Liaison Committee on Medical Education directive that end-of-life (EoL) care be included in medical school curricula, reinforcing the problematic conflation of EoL and palliative care. A review of US medical school surveys about the teaching of palliative and EoL care reveals varied and uneven approaches, ranging from 2 hours in the classroom on EoL to weeks of palliative care training or hospice-based clinical rotations. Palliative care competencies are too complex and universally important to be relegated to a minimum of classroom time, random clinical exposures, and the hidden curriculum. Given the reality of overstrained medical school curricula, developmentally appropriate, basic palliative care competencies should be defined and integrated into each year of the medical school curriculum, taking care to circumvent the twin threats of curricular overload and educational abandonment. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Feasibility of a rural palliative supportive service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesut, B; Hooper, B P; Robinson, C A; Bottorff, J L; Sawatzky, R; Dalhuisen, M

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare models for the delivery of palliative care to rural populations encounter common challenges: service gaps, the cost of the service in relation to the population, sustainability, and difficulty in demonstrating improvements in outcomes. Although it is widely agreed that a community capacity-building approach to rural palliative care is essential, how that approach can be achieved, evaluated and sustained remains in question. The purpose of this community-based research project is to test the feasibility and identify potential outcomes of implementing a rural palliative supportive service (RPaSS) for older adults living with life-limiting chronic illness and their family caregiver in the community. This paper reports on the feasibility aspects of the study. RPaSS is being conducted in two co-located rural communities with populations of approximately 10 000 and no specialized palliative services. Participants living with life-limiting chronic illness and their family caregivers are visited bi-weekly in the home by a nurse coordinator who facilitates symptom management, teaching, referrals, psychosocial and spiritual support, advance care planning, community support for practical tasks, and telephone-based support for individuals who must commute outside of the rural community for care. Mixed-method collection strategies are used to collect data on visit patterns; healthcare utilization; family caregiver needs; and participant needs, functional performance and quality of life. A community-based advisory committee worked with the investigative team over a 1-year period to plan RPaSS, negotiating the best fit between research methods and the needs of the community. Recruitment took longer than anticipated with service capacity being reached at 8 months. Estimated service capacity of one nurse coordinator, based on bi-weekly visits, is 25 participants and their family caregivers. A total of 393 in-person visits and 53 telephone visits were conducted between

  8. African Trypanosomiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    a disease of horses, mules, camels , and cattle. African trypanosomiasis has probably played an impor- tant role in recorded history from antiquity...Saunders; 1929:706. 6. Baker JR. The subspecific taxonomy of Trypanosoma brucei. Parasite. 1995;2:3-12. 7. Control and surveillance of African

  9. African Zoology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Zoology, a peer-reviewed research journal, publishes original scientific contributions and critical reviews that focus principally on African fauna in terrestrial, freshwater, and marine ecosystems. Research from other regions that advances practical and theoretical aspects of zoology will be considered. Rigorous ...

  10. Primary palliative care for heart failure: what is it? How do we implement it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfman, Laura P; Kavalieratos, Dio; Teuteberg, Winifred G; Lala, Anuradha; Goldstein, Nathan E

    2017-09-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a chronic and progressive illness, which affects a growing number of adults, and is associated with a high morbidity and mortality, as well as significant physical and psychological symptom burden on both patients with HF and their families. Palliative care is the multidisciplinary specialty focused on optimizing quality of life and reducing suffering for patients and families facing serious illness, regardless of prognosis. Palliative care can be delivered as (1) specialist palliative care in which a palliative care specialist with subspecialty palliative care training consults or co-manages patients to address palliative needs alongside clinicians who manage the underlying illness or (2) as primary palliative care in which the primary clinician (such as the internist, cardiologist, cardiology nurse, or HF specialist) caring for the patient with HF provides the essential palliative domains. In this paper, we describe the key domains of primary palliative care for patients with HF and offer some specific ways in which primary palliative care and specialist palliative care can be offered in this population. Although there is little research on HF primary palliative care, primary palliative care in HF offers a key opportunity to ensure that this population receives high-quality palliative care in spite of the growing numbers of patients with HF as well as the limited number of specialist palliative care providers.

  11. Palliative care in home care: perceptions of occupational therapists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Séfora Gomez Portela

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed at understanding and reflecting on the perceptions of occupational therapists regarding the implementation of palliative care in home care. This is an exploratory, qualitative study, through semi-structured interviews, conducted in the second semester of 2012 with eight occupational therapists with experience in palliative care in the city of São Paulo. Content analysis identified four themes: characterization and professional trajectory in the field, understanding the concepts of palliative care, home care and palliative care, and occupational therapy and palliative care in home care. The results suggest that the role of the occupational therapist in this field has taken place at different levels of health care, being addressed to people with varying needs. The use of the concept of palliative care by the interviewees exceeds the notion of end of life, following the changes in the epidemiological transition. They understand that professional services follow the trend of national palliative care services with focus on specialized levels, but manifest the importance of its implementation in primary and home care. Among the barriers to practice, they identified the complexity of “being at home “, peculiarities of palliative care with high cost demands, lack of infrastructure and implementation of the current policy. Professional training and scientific roduction in the area were viewed as inadequate, although they identified a call for change. The interviewees recognized palliative care in home care as a strong professional field, but one still requiring study and discussions regarding its limits and conditions of implementation, especially in the Unified Health System.

  12. Palliative and end-of-life care in South Dakota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minton, Mary E; Kerkvliet, Jennifer L; Mitchell, Amanda; Fahrenwald, Nancy L

    2014-05-01

    Geographical disparities play a significant role in palliative and end-of-life care access. This study assessed availability of palliative and end of life (hospice) care in South Dakota. Grounded in a conceptual model of advance care planning, this assessment explored whether South Dakota health care facilities had contact persons for palliative care, hospice services, and advance directives; health care providers with specialized training in palliative and hospice care; and a process for advance directives and advance care planning. Trained research assistants conducted a brief telephone survey. Of 668 health care eligible facilities, 455 completed the survey for a response rate of 68 percent (455 out of 668). Over one-half of facilities had no specific contact person for palliative care, hospice services and advance directives. Nursing homes reported the highest percentage of contacts for palliative care, hospice services and advance directives. Despite a lack of a specific contact person, nearly 75 percent of facilities reported having a process in place for addressing advance directives with patients; slightly over one-half (53 percent) reported having a process in place for advance care planning. Of participating facilities, 80 percent had no staff members with palliative care training, and 73 percent identified lack of staff members with end-of-life care training. Palliative care training was most commonly reported among hospice/home health facilities (45 percent). The results of this study demonstrate a clear need for a health care and allied health care workforce with specialized training in palliative and end-of-life care.

  13. Pediatric Palliative Care in the Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Kevin; Wolfe, Joanne; Collura, Christopher

    2015-09-01

    The chronicity of illness that afflicts children in Pediatric Palliative Care and the medical technology that has improved their lifespan and quality of life make prognostication extremely difficult. The uncertainty of prognostication and the available medical technologies make both the neonatal intensive care unit and the pediatric intensive care unit locations where many children will receive Pediatric Palliative Care. Health care providers in the neonatal intensive care unit and pediatric intensive care unit should integrate fundamental Pediatric Palliative Care principles into their everyday practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The ethics of palliative care and euthanasia: exploring common values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Samia A; Mauron, Alex

    2006-03-01

    The ethical underpinnings of palliative care and those of voluntary euthanasia and assisted suicide (VE/AS) are often viewed as opposites. In this article, we review the values held in common by the euthanasia legalization movement and palliative care providers. Outlining this common ground serves to define, with greater clarity, the issues on which differences do exist, and ways in which some open questions, which are as yet unresolved, could be approached. Open discussion between VE/AS legalization advocates and palliative care providers is important to address these open questions seriously, and to enrich the care of terminally ill patients by giving members of both groups access to each other's experience.

  15. Palliative Rehabilitation: Call for an everyday and activity perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Karen

    professionals can learn from each other. One of the challenges raised by hospices in the turn towards rehabilitation in palliative care is the understanding and awareness of how to address issues related to forthcoming death. This paper discusses how occupational therapist meet the challenges of integrating......Over the past decade there has been a growing awareness of the relationship between rehabilitation and palliative care. The Danish National Board of Health recommend further coordination and integration of Rehabilitation and Palliative care.. Some of the reasons for this recommendation...

  16. Exploring the interface between 'physician-assisted death' and palliative care: cross-sectional data from Australasian palliative care specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheahan, L

    2016-04-01

    Legalisation of physician-assisted dying (PAD) remains a highly contested issue. In the Australasian context, the opinion and perspective of palliative care specialists have not been captured empirically, and are required to inform better the debate around this issue, moving forward. To identify current attitudes and experiences of palliative care specialists in Australasia regarding requests for physician-assisted suicide and voluntary euthanasia, and to capture the opinion of palliative care specialists on the legalisation of these practices in the Australasian context. An anonymous, cross-sectional, online survey of Australasian specialists in palliative care, addressing the following six areas: (i) demographics; (ii) frequency of requests, and response given; (iii) understanding of the term 'voluntary euthanasia'; (iv) opinion regarding legalisation of physician-assisted suicide and voluntary euthanasia in Australasia, and willingness to participate if legal; (v) identification of the most important values guiding this opinion; and (vi) anticipated impact that legalisation of assisted death would have on palliative care practice. Important findings include: (i) palliative care specialists are largely opposed to the legalisation of PAD; (ii) the proportional titration of opioids is not understood by any palliative care specialist studied to be 'voluntary euthanasia'; and (iii) there is a wide variation in frequency of requests, and one-third of palliative care specialists express discomfort in dealing with requests for assisted suicide or euthanasia. Key areas for future research at the interface between PAD and best practice end-of-life care are identified, including exploration into why palliative care specialists are largely opposed to PAD, and consideration of the impact 'the opioid misconception' may have on the literature informing this debate. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  17. Developing palliative care practice guidelines and standards for nursing home-based palliative care teams: a Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temkin-Greener, Helena; Ladwig, Susan; Caprio, Tom; Norton, Sally; Quill, Timothy; Olsan, Tobie; Cai, Xueya; Mukamel, Dana B

    2015-01-01

    Lack of nursing home (NH)-specific palliative care practice guidelines has been identified as a barrier to improving palliative and end-of-life (EOL) quality of care. The objectives of this study were to (1) assess which of the guidelines developed by the National Consensus Project, and the corresponding preferred care practices endorsed by the National Quality Forum, are important and feasible to implement in NHs; and (2) identify the operational standards for palliative care teams in NHs. Two-round mail Delphi study. Based on the existing literature, a set of 7 domains with associated 22 palliative practice guidelines was drafted. We invited 48 NH leaders, including clinicians, to review the importance (10-point Likert scale) and the feasibility (5-point Likert scale) of these guidelines. Participants were also asked about palliative care team composition rounding frequency. The response rate to both rounds was 85%. With regard to importance, the mean rating for all guidelines was 8 or higher (ie, highly important), but there was variability in agreement with regard to 5 of the guidelines. The same 5 guidelines were also considered more difficult to implement (eg, costly, unrealistic). Overall, 17 palliative care guidelines were identified for use by NH palliative care teams. Five disciplines (social work, certified nurse assistant, nurse, physician, and nurse practitioner or physician assistant) were identified as comprising a core team and 3 were proposed as extended or ad hoc members. The palliative care guidelines and team standards identified in this study may be helpful in providing practical direction to NH administrators and staff looking to improve palliative care practice for their residents. Copyright © 2015 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. African Journals Online: African Studies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 56 ... African Journal of Library, Archives and Information Science is established mainly to provide a forum for librarians, archivists, documentalists, information scientists and other information related professionals in Africa to report their research findings but with emphasis on African setting. The Journal is ...

  19. Attitudes of palliative home care physicians towards palliative sedation at home in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercadante, Sebastiano; Masedu, Francesco; Mercadante, Alessandro; Marinangeli, Franco; Aielli, Federica

    2017-05-01

    Information about the attitudes towards palliative sedation (PS) at home is limited. The aim of this survey was to assess the attitudes of palliative care physicians in Italy regarding PS at home. A questionnaire was submitted to a sample of palliative care physicians, asking information about their activity and attitudes towards PS at home. This is a survey of home care physicians in Italy who were involved in end-of-life care decisions at home. One hundred and fifty participants responded. A large heterogeneity of home care organizations that generate some problems was found. Indications, intention and monitoring of PS seem to be appropriate, although some cultural and logistic conditions were limiting the use of PS. Specialized home care physicians are almost involved to start PS at home. Midazolam was seldom available at home and opioids were more frequently used. These data should prompt health care agencies to make a minimal set of drugs easily available for home care. Further research is necessary to compare attitudes in countries with different sociocultural profiles.

  20. [Measuring quality of life in palliative care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes Ferreira, Pedro; Pinto Barros, Ana; Barros Brito, Ana

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the process followed to create and validate the Portuguese versión of a quality of life measurement instrument for patients in palliative care. After a literature review about the measurement of the quality of life in this particular and very specific kind of patients, we opt by the Irene Higginson's measurement instrument called Palliative Care Outcome Scale (POS). It has been selected as the one most appropriate to Portuguese patients' reality. For the creation of the Portuguese version we followed the recommended methodologies for the forward-backward translations. These methodologies allow us to determine semantic and linguistic equivalences of health outcomes measurement instruments. The validation was performed on a sample of 104 cancer patients aged between 40 and 85 years old. 70% were female, 29% had lung cancer, 46% breast cáncer and 22% had melanoma. Content validity was assured by two cognitive debriefing tests, respectively performed in oncologists and in patients. Construct validation allow us to find five ortogonal factors, including 'emotional well being' (19.7% of variance explained), 'consequences of the disease in life' (18.2%), 'received information and support' (11.7%), 'anxiety' (10.1%), and 'burden of illness' (9.8%). Criterion validity was tested by comparing the results obtained by POS to the ones obtained by the EORTC QLQ-C30, a genetic instrument especially designed for cancer patients. The found correlation values were moderated to strong and ranged from 0.51 to 0.63. The reliability of the Portuguese version was assured through the reproducibility test and the search for the internal consistency. The scores obtained by a one-week testrestest ranged from 0.66 to 1.00. Cronbach's alpha was 0.68, acceptable and allowing us to consider POS as a unique index Time responsiveness and diagnosis responsiveness were also analysed. Comparing values measured with a one-month interval showed sensibility to the lack of the

  1. Development and challenges of palliative care in Indonesia: role of psychosomatic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putranto, Rudi; Mudjaddid, Endjad; Shatri, Hamzah; Adli, Mizanul; Martina, Diah

    2017-01-01

    To summarize the current status of palliative care and the role of psychosomatic medicine in Indonesia. Palliative care is not a new issue in Indonesia, which has been improving palliative care since 1992 and developed a palliative care policy in 2007 that was launched by the Indonesian Ministry of Health. However, the progress has been slow and varied across the country. Currently, palliative care services are only available in a few major cities, where most of the facilities for cancer treatment are located. Psychosomatic medical doctors have advantages that contribute to palliative care because of their special training in communication skills to deal with patients from the standpoints of both mind and body. Palliative care services in Indonesia are established in some hospitals. Future work is needed to build capacity, advocate to stakeholders, create care models that provide services in the community, and to increase the palliative care workforce. Psychosomatic medicine plays an important role in palliative care services.

  2. Starting a palliative care initiative using a transformational development approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleanor Foster

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A general descrition of the initiation of a palliative care program in Kenya using a transformational development, participatory and empowering approach, with lessons learned and description of subsequent impact.

  3. Palliative Care for Children in Hospital: Essential Roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Ross

    2018-02-19

    Palliative care for children in pediatric hospitals is a vital part of the network of services supporting children with severe illness. This has been recognized, with a trend over the past decade for an increased number of pediatric palliative care (PPC) services established in pediatric hospitals. The inpatient team is in the unique position of influencing the early identification of children and their families, across the age and diagnostic spectrum, which could benefit from palliative care. These services have an opportunity to influence the integration of the palliative approach throughout the hospital, and in so doing, have the capacity to improve many aspects of care, including altering an increasingly futile and burdensome treatment trajectory, and ensuring improved symptom (physical and psychological) management.

  4. Why Palliative Care for Children is Preferable to Euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Brian S

    2016-02-01

    Recent laws in Europe now allow for pediatric euthanasia. The author reviews some rationale for caution, and addresses why ensuring the availability of pediatric palliative care is an important step before allowing pediatric euthanasia. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Companionship and education: a nursing student experience in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwekkeboom, Kristine L; Vahl, Cheryl; Eland, Joann

    2005-04-01

    Currently, major deficiencies exist in undergraduate nursing education for end-of-life care. Nursing students report feeling anxious and unprepared to be with patients who are dying. A Palliative Care Companion program that allows undergraduate nursing students to volunteer to spend time with patients at the end of life provides a unique educational opportunity to enhance students' knowledge and attitudes toward palliative care. In addition, the program offers a service to patients and families by providing a nonmedical, caring human presence to patients who may be alone, lonely, or bored. In accordance with tenets of Experiential Learning Theory, a Palliative Care Companion program was developed and revised using feedback from initial participants and facilitators. Data collected during the first two semesters indicated increased knowledge of palliative care, improved attitudes about care at the end of life, and fewer concerns about providing nursing care to dying patients, when participating students were compared to their undergraduate peers.

  6. Cooperating with a palliative home-care team

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldschmidt, Dorthe; Groenvold, Mogens; Johnsen, Anna Thit

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Palliative home-care teams often cooperate with general practitioners (GPs) and district nurses. Our aim was to evaluate a palliative home-care team from the viewpoint of GPs and district nurses. METHODS: GPs and district nurses received questionnaires at the start of home-care and one...... month later. Questions focussed on benefits to patients, training issues for professionals and cooperation between the home-care team and the GP/ district nurse. A combination of closed- and open-ended questions was used. RESULTS: Response rate was 84% (467/553). Benefits to patients were experienced...... by 91 %, mainly due to improvement in symptom management, 'security', and accessibility of specialists in palliative care. After one month, 57% of the participants reported to have learnt aspects of palliative care, primarily symptom control, and 89% of them found cooperation satisfactory...

  7. Using communication skills for difficult conversations in palliative care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using communication skills for difficult conversations in palliative care: 'Suffering is not a question which demands an answer, It is not a problem which demands a solution, It is a mystery which demands a “Presence”.' (Anonymous)

  8. Associations between successful palliative cancer pathways and community nurse involvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Mette Asbjoern; Vedsted, Peter; Olesen, Frede

    2009-01-01

    between bereaved relatives' evaluation of palliative pathways at home and place of death and CN involvement were analysed. RESULTS: 'A successful palliative pathway at home' was positively associated with home-death and death at a nursing home compared with death at an institution. No significant......ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Most terminally ill cancer patients and their relatives wish that the patient dies at home. Community nurses (CNs) are often frontline workers in the patients' homes and CN involvement may be important in attaining successful palliative pathways at home.The aim of the present...... study was to examine associations between bereaved relatives' evaluation of palliative treatment at home and 1) place of death and 2) CN involvement. METHODS: The study is a population-based, cross-sectional combined register and questionnaire study performed in Aarhus County, Denmark. CN questionnaires...

  9. Palliative care - what the final days are like

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page, please enable JavaScript. Palliative care is a holistic approach to care that focuses on treating pain ... any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should ...

  10. Smarter palliative care for cancer: Use of smartphone applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha Rani Jamwal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Smartphones are technologically advanced mobile phone devices which use software similar to computer-based devices as a user-friendly interface. This review article is aimed to inform the palliative care professionals, cancer patients and their caregivers about the role of smartphone applications (apps in the delivery of palliative care services, through a brief review of existing literature on the development, feasibility, analysis, and effectiveness of such apps. There is a dearth need for sincere palliative care clinicians to work together with software professionals to develop the suitable smartphone apps in accordance with the family/caregivers' necessities and patients' biopsychosocial characteristics that influence the technology driven evidence informed palliative cancer care.

  11. Palliative care in developing countries: luxury or necessity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sembhi, Kathleen

    1995-01-02

    Palliative care is not a luxury in developing countries. This article challenges the assumption that money spent on the care of people who are terminally ill cannot be justified in the face of many competing claims. The absence of screening and diagnostic services, combined with a cultural reluctance to seek help, frequently results in patients presenting at a late stage in the natural history of their disease. Pain and symptom relief remain the only options. In developing countries, the health care systems and social networks are often inadequate to support terminally ill members of society and it is argued that palliative care home teams would provide the ideal model of care. Palliative care's eligibility for inclusion in the health care budget of Kenya is demonstrated in this article and the difficulties it is facing in other developing countries are described. A case history seeks to show the necessity of palliative care in these areas of the world.

  12. A palliative approach to care of residents with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Della; Gaspard, Gina

    2013-03-01

    Dementia is a progressive, life-limiting illness. People with the condition who move into a care home deserve palliative care. This article discusses an interprofessional pilot workshop for direct care providers held in a care home in British Columbia, Canada. The workshop aimed to incorporate a palliative approach into dementia care for residents. Workshop development, teaching strategies, evaluation and outcomes are shared. The four-hour workshop was structured to promote critical reflection and challenge participants to consider that people with dementia and their families need palliative care much earlier than during the last days of life. Commitment to change statements gathered as part of the workshop indicated that participation increased knowledge, skill and confidence to incorporate a palliative approach into care for people with advanced dementia and their families.

  13. Coping strategies and anxiety in caregivers of palliative cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Ordóñez, F; Frías-Osuna, A; Romero-Rodríguez, Y; Del-Pino-Casado, R

    2016-07-01

    The study purpose was to determine the relationship between coping strategies and anxiety in primary family caregivers of palliative cancer patients. A cross-sectional study was carried out in a Pain and Palliative Care Unit in Spain. Data were collected through interviews from fifty primary family caregivers of palliative cancer patients. Main research variables were: (1) dependent variable: anxiety (subscale of anxiety from Goldberg's scale); (2) independent variable: coping (Brief COPE); (3) control variables: functional capacity and perceived burden. Analyses comprised descriptive statistics, correlation coefficients and multiple linear regression. Anxiety was present in the majority of caregivers surveyed (76%). Anxiety was related to the perception of perceived burden (β = 0.42, P anxiety, while dysfunctional coping is positively associated with anxiety. Problem-focused coping is not related to anxiety. Assessment of coping should be done in a systematic way in caregivers of palliative cancer patients. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The role of dentist in palliative care team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rani P Mol

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The palliative doctor gives the ′touch of God′ as he/she takes care of the terminally ill patient. The oncologist encounters great difficulties in managing oral cavity problems of these patients. A trained dental doctor can help other doctors in dealing with these situations. But the general dental surgeon does not have enough idea about his part in these treatments. The community is also unaware of the role that a nearby dentist can play. Adequate training programs have to be conducted and awareness has to be created. A trained dentist will be a good team mate for the oncologist or radiotherapist or other doctors of the palliative care team. In this paper, a brief attempt is made to list a few areas in which a palliative care dentist can help other members of the palliative care team and also the patient in leading a better life.

  15. Using art and literature as educational resources in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, S; McKie, A

    2009-12-01

    This case study outlines a staff seminar programme that used art and literature as vehicles to explore personal and professional dimensions of palliative care. Participating staff found the learning experience interesting and insightful.

  16. Palliative chemotherapy or watchful waiting? A vignettes study among oncologists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koedoot, C. G.; de Haes, J. C. J. M.; Heisterkamp, S. H.; Bakker, P. J. M.; de Graeff, A.; de Haan, R. J.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the preferences of oncologists for palliative chemotherapy or watchful waiting and the factors considered important to that preference. Methods: Sixteen vignettes (paper case descriptions), varying on eight patient and treatment characteristics, were designed to assess the

  17. Improving Human Immunodeficiency Virus/AIDS Palliative Care in Critical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jami S; Halupa, Colleen

    2015-01-01

    Critical care nurses provide palliative care to many patients; often, this includes the patient diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS. Ongoing education about both palliative care and this complex diagnosis prepares the nurse to provide compassion and informed care. This study examines the effects of an educational intervention addressing palliative care in the intensive care unit and the needs of the HIV/AIDS patients and families. The study will evaluate the critical care nurses' knowledge and competence in caring for this population following the educational sessions. Thirty critical care nurses were recruited from the critical care unit at a hospital in the south. An HIV/AIDS palliative care course provided participants background knowledge, general principles, and opportunities for critical thinking regarding palliative care. A pretest and posttest on palliative care were provided to each subject to assess knowledge and confidence in palliative care in critical care nursing. The convenience sample of 30 nurses attained a mean pretest score of 82.9%. Their scores improved to 93.5% following the palliative care course. The nurses felt they improved in providing palliative care to patients and in taking responsibility for their practice. Ninety-three percent of the participants wanted to incorporate a palliative care course in nursing orientation. The course improved nurses' knowledge of palliative care for HIV/AIDS patients and their competency in palliative care. Thus, the palliative care course gave nurses deeper insight and improved their ability to provide competence palliative care.

  18. Family conference in palliative care: concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Rudval Souza da; Trindade, Géssica Sodré Sampaio; Paixão, Gilvânia Patrícia do Nascimento; Silva, Maria Júlia Paes da

    2018-01-01

    to analyze the attributes, antecedents and consequents of the family conference concept. Walker and Avante's method for concept analysis and the stages of the integrative review process, with a selection of publications in the PubMed, Cinahl and Lilacs databases focusing on the family conference theme in the context of palliative care. the most cited antecedents were the presence of doubts and the need to define a care plan. Family reunion and working instrument were evidenced as attributes. With respect to consequents, to promote the effective communication and to establish a plan of consensual action were the most remarkable elements. the scarcity of publications on the subject was observed, as well as and the limitation of the empirical studies to the space of intensive therapy. Thus, by analyzing the attributes, antecedents and consequents of the concept it was possible to follow their evolution and to show their efficacy and effectiveness as a therapeutic intervention.

  19. Awareness of palliative care among diploma nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkada, Suja; Nayak, Baby S; Malathi

    2011-01-01

    The goal of palliative care is not to cure, but to provide comfort and maintain the highest possible quality of life for as long as life remains. The knowledge of nurses influences the quality of care provided to these patients. The present study aimed at identifying the level of knowledge and attitude of nursing students who are the future caretakers of patients, which helps to make recommendations in incorporating palliative care concepts in the nursing curriculum. (1) To assess the level of knowledge of nursing students on palliative care; (2) To identify the attitude of nursing students towards palliative care; (3) To find the correlation between the knowledge and attitude of nursing students; (4) To find the association between nursing students' knowledge, attitude and selected demographic variables. A correlative survey was carried out among 83 third-year Diploma Nursing students by using cluster sampling method from selected nursing schools of Udupi district. The data analyzed showed that the majority (51%) of them was in the age group of 21years and 92% of them were females. Only 43.4% of them were aware of the term palliative care and it was during their training period. The data showed that 79.5% of students had poor knowledge (6.4± 1.64) on palliative care and 92.8% of them had favorable attitude (56.7± 8.5) towards palliative care. The chi-square showed a significant association between knowledge and age (χ(2)=18.52,Pnursing students. Palliative care aspects should be incorporated in the diploma nursing curriculum.

  20. Severe COPD and the transition to a palliative approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Landers

    2017-12-01

    A specific transition point is difficult to identify in severe COPD. Tools are available that may assist the physician in identifying those at risk of dying. It is essential that the patient voice is heard, patients can describe specific events that may be used as a “trigger” for a palliative approach. Specialist palliative care services may only be required for a subgroup of patients whose needs cannot be managed by the primary care team.

  1. Retroperitoneal endodermal sinus tumor patient with palliative care needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surbhi Kashyap

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is a case reflection of a personal encounter on the palliative care treatment required after the removal of a complicated case of a primary extra-gonadal retro-peritoneal endodermal sinus tumor (yolk sac tumor. This reflection is from the perspective of a recently graduated MD student who spent one month with an Indian pain management and palliative care team at the Institute Rotary Cancer Hospital (IRCH, All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS, New Delhi

  2. Treating nausea and vomiting in palliative care: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glare P

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Paul Glare, Jeanna Miller, Tanya Nikolova, Roma TickooPain and Palliative Care Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Nausea and vomiting are portrayed in the specialist palliative care literature as common and distressing symptoms affecting the majority of patients with advanced cancer and other life-limiting illnesses. However, recent surveys indicate that these symptoms may be less common and bothersome than has previously been reported. The standard palliative care approach to the assessment and treatment of nausea and vomiting is based on determining the cause and then relating this back to the “emetic pathway” before prescribing drugs such as dopamine antagonists, antihistamines, and anticholinergic agents which block neurotransmitters at different sites along the pathway. However, the evidence base for the effectiveness of this approach is meager, and may be in part because relevance of the neuropharmacology of the emetic pathway to palliative care patients is limited. Many palliative care patients are over the age of 65 years, making these agents difficult to use. Greater awareness of drug interactions and QTc prolongation are emerging concerns for all age groups. The selective serotonin receptor antagonists are the safest antiemetics, but are not used first-line in many countries because there is very little scientific rationale or clinical evidence to support their use outside the licensed indications. Cannabinoids may have an increasing role. Advances in interventional gastroenterology are increasing the options for nonpharmacological management. Despite these emerging issues, the approach to nausea and vomiting developed within palliative medicine over the past 40 years remains relevant. It advocates careful clinical evaluation of the symptom and the person suffering it, and an understanding of the clinical pharmacology of medicines that are available for palliating

  3. Awareness of palliative care among diploma nursing students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suja Karkada

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The goal of palliative care is not to cure, but to provide comfort and maintain the highest possible quality of life for as long as life remains. The knowledge of nurses influences the quality of care provided to these patients. The present study aimed at identifying the level of knowledge and attitude of nursing students who are the future caretakers of patients, which helps to make recommendations in incorporating palliative care concepts in the nursing curriculum. Objectives: (1 To assess the level of knowledge of nursing students on palliative care; (2 To identify the attitude of nursing students towards palliative care; (3 To find the correlation between the knowledge and attitude of nursing students; (4 To find the association between nursing students′ knowledge, attitude and selected demographic variables. Materials and Methods: A correlative survey was carried out among 83 third-year Diploma Nursing students by using cluster sampling method from selected nursing schools of Udupi district. Results: The data analyzed showed that the majority (51% of them was in the age group of 21years and 92% of them were females. Only 43.4% of them were aware of the term palliative care and it was during their training period. The data showed that 79.5% of students had poor knowledge (6.4± 1.64 on palliative care and 92.8% of them had favorable attitude (56.7± 8.5 towards palliative care. The chi-square showed a significant association between knowledge and age (χ2 =18.52,P<0.01 of the nursing students. Conclusion: Palliative care aspects should be incorporated in the diploma nursing curriculum.

  4. [Provision of palliative care for people with advanced dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl-Schmid, J; Riedl, L; Rüsing, U; Hartmann, J; Bertok, M; Levin, C; Hamann, J; Arcand, M; Lorenzl, S; Feddersen, B; Jox, R J

    2018-01-11

    As a result of a literature-based expert process, this review provides an overview about the principles of palliative care for people with advanced dementia that are relevant for clinical practice. In particular, the indications, impact and aims of palliative care for advanced dementia are described. Life-prolonging measures and management of symptoms at the end of life are discussed. Furthermore, the overview focuses on the legal basis of decision making.

  5. Integrating Function-Directed Treatments into Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheville, Andrea L; Morrow, Melissa; Smith, Sean Robinson; Basford, Jeffrey R

    2017-09-01

    The growing acceptance of palliative care has created opportunities to increase the use of rehabilitation services among populations with advanced disease, particularly those with cancer. Broader delivery has been impeded by the lack of a shared definition for palliative rehabilitation and a mismatch between patient needs and established rehabilitation service delivery models. We propose the definition that, in the advanced cancer population, palliative rehabilitation is function-directed care delivered in partnership with other clinical disciplines and aligned with the values of patients who have serious and often incurable illnesses in contexts marked by intense and dynamic symptoms, psychological stress, and medical morbidity to realize potentially time-limited goals. Although palliative rehabilitation is most often delivered by inpatient physical medicine and rehabilitation consultation/liaison services and by physical therapists in skilled nursing facilities, outcomes in these settings have received little scrutiny. In contrast, outpatient cancer rehabilitation programs have gained robust evidentiary support attesting to their benefits across diverse settings. Advancing palliative rehabilitation will require attention to historical barriers to the uptake of cancer rehabilitation services, which include the following: patient and referring physicians' expectation that effective cancer treatment will reverse disablement; breakdown of linear models of disablement due to presence of concurrent symptoms and psychological distress; tension between reflexive palliation and impairment-directed treatment; palliative clinicians' limited familiarity with manual interventions and rehabilitation services; and challenges in identifying receptive patients with the capacity to benefit from rehabilitation services. The effort to address these admittedly complex issues is warranted, as consideration of function in efforts to control symptoms and mood is vital to optimize

  6. Minding the gap: access to palliative care and the homeless

    OpenAIRE

    Huynh, Lise; Henry, Blair; Dosani, Naheed

    2015-01-01

    Background With an ever increasing number of individuals living with chronic and terminal illnesses, palliative care as an emerging field is poised for unprecedented expansion. Today?s rising recognition of its key role in patients? illnesses has led to increased interest in access to palliative care. It is known that homelessness as a social determinant of health has been associated with decreased access to health resources in spite of poorer health outcomes and some would argue, higher need...

  7. Palliative and low cost radiotherapy in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, Barry; Hussein, S.M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: The International Agency for Research on Cancer predicts that cancer incidence in developing countries will increase dramatically in the first two decades of this millennium. Already some 80% of cancer patients in developing countries present with incurable disease. In many cases pain is a severe problem and palliation is needed to improve quality of life as well as extending survival. This paper will consider the physical and clinical aspects of palliative radiotherapy (PRT), choice of radiation modality, alternative approaches to imaging and therapy and cost-benefit considerations. The potential benefits of a dedicated palliative care centre include lower cost and therefore more centres, enabling more patients access to regional palliative care. Simple curative treatments could also be managed. Co60 radiotherapy has important advantages in developing countries, because of the higher initial cost of a linear accelerator, as well as the need for reliable power supply and the level of skill required by linac technicians and physicists. The beam characteristics of both Co60 units and low energy linacs are compared and both are found to be acceptable for palliation. The role of palliative and low cost radiotherapy in Bangladesh is reviewed. The concept of telemedicine is also discussed, using mobile phones and internet communication to allow rural clinics to receive support from specialists based in the cities, to send images for remote diagnosis and remote dose planning for radiotherapy.

  8. Funding models in palliative care: Lessons from international experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groeneveld, E Iris; Cassel, J Brian; Bausewein, Claudia; Csikós, Ágnes; Krajnik, Malgorzata; Ryan, Karen; Haugen, Dagny Faksvåg; Eychmueller, Steffen; Gudat Keller, Heike; Allan, Simon; Hasselaar, Jeroen; García-Baquero Merino, Teresa; Swetenham, Kate; Piper, Kym; Fürst, Carl Johan; Murtagh, Fliss Em

    2017-04-01

    Funding models influence provision and development of palliative care services. As palliative care integrates into mainstream health care provision, opportunities to develop funding mechanisms arise. However, little has been reported on what funding models exist or how we can learn from them. To assess national models and methods for financing and reimbursing palliative care. Initial literature scoping yielded limited evidence on the subject as national policy documents are difficult to identify, access and interpret. We undertook expert consultations to appraise national models of palliative care financing in England, Germany, Hungary, Republic of Ireland, New Zealand, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the United States and Wales. These represent different levels of service development and a variety of funding mechanisms. Funding mechanisms reflect country-specific context and local variations in care provision. Patterns emerging include the following: Provider payment is rarely linked to population need and often perpetuates existing inequitable patterns in service provision. Funding is frequently characterised as a mixed system of charitable, public and private payers. The basis on which providers are paid for services rarely reflects individual care input or patient needs. Funding mechanisms need to be well understood and used with caution to ensure best practice and minimise perverse incentives. Before we can conduct cross-national comparisons of costs and impact of palliative care, we need to understand the funding and policy context for palliative care in each country of interest.

  9. Implementation of improvement strategies in palliative care: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Riet Paap, Jasper; Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra; Sommerbakk, Ragni; Moyle, Wendy; Hjermstad, Marianne J; Leppert, Wojciech; Vissers, Kris; Engels, Yvonne

    2015-07-26

    The European population is ageing, and as a consequence, an increasing number of patients are in need of palliative care, including those with dementia. Although a growing number of new insights and best practices in palliative care have been published, they are often not implemented in daily practice. The aim of this integrative review is to provide an overview of implementation strategies that have been used to improve the organisation of palliative care. Using an integrative literature review, we evaluated publications with strategies to improve the organisation of palliative care. Qualitative analysis of the included studies involved categorisation of the implementation strategies into subgroups, according to the type of implementation strategy. From the 2379 publications identified, 68 studies with an experimental or quasi-experimental design were included. These studies described improvements using educational strategies (n = 14), process mapping (n = 1), feedback (n = 1), multidisciplinary meetings (n = 1) and multi-faceted implementation strategies (n = 51). Fifty-three studies reported positive outcomes, 11 studies reported mixed effects and four studies showed a limited effect (two educational and two multi-faceted strategies). This review is one of the first to provide an overview of the available literature in relation to strategies used to improve the organisation of palliative care. Since most studies reported positive results, further research is needed to identify and improve the effects of strategies aiming to improve the organisation of palliative care.

  10. Cognitive hypnotherapy for psychological management of depression in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alladin, Assen

    2018-01-01

    The prevalence of psychiatric disorders in palliative care is well documented, yet they often remain undetected and untreated, adding further to the burden of suffering on patients who are already facing severe physical and psychosocial problems. This article will focus on depression as it represents one of the most common psychiatric disorders treated by psychiatrists and psychotherapists in palliative care. Although depression in palliative care can be treated successfully with antidepressant medication and psychotherapy, a significant number of depressives do not respond to either medication or existing psychotherapies. This is not surprising considering depression is a complex disorder. Moreover, the presentation of depression in palliative care is compounded by the severity of the underlying medical conditions. It is thus important for clinicians to continue to develop more effective treatments for depression in palliative care. This article describes cognitive hypnotherapy (CH), an evidence-based multimodal treatment for depression which can be applied to a wide range of depressed patients in palliative care. CH, however, does not represent a finished product; it is a work in progress to be empirically validated and refined by advances in cancer and clinical depression.

  11. Incorporating palliative care into undergraduate curricula: lessons for curriculum development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbins, Jane; McCoubrie, Rachel; Maher, Jane; Forbes, Karen

    2009-08-01

    It is well recognised that teaching about palliative care, death and dying should begin at undergraduate level. The General Medical Council in the UK has issued clear recommendations for core teaching on the relieving of pain and distress, and care for the terminally ill. However, whereas some medical schools have incorporated comprehensive teaching programmes, others provide very little. The reasons underpinning such variability are unknown. The aim of this study was to explore the factors that help or hinder the incorporation of palliative care teaching at undergraduate level in the UK. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with a purposive sample of coordinators of palliative care teaching in 14 medical schools in the UK. Transcribed interviews were analysed using principles of grounded theory and respondent validation. There are several factors promoting or inhibiting palliative care teaching at undergraduate level that are common to the development of teaching about any specialty. However, this study also revealed several factors that are distinctive to palliative care. Emergent themes were 'need for an individual lead or champion', 'the curriculum', 'patient characteristics and exposure', 'local colleagues and set-up of service', 'university support' and 'the influence of students'. The incorporation of palliative care into the medical undergraduate curriculum involves a complex process of individual, institutional, clinical, patient and curricular factors. These new findings could help medical schools to incorporate or improve such teaching.

  12. Palliative care education in China: insight into one medical university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xuan; Liao, Zhongli; Hao, Jia; Guo, Ying; Zhou, Yuanyuan; Ning, Linhong; Bai, Jianying; Zhang, Pengbin; Tang, Chunlin; Zhao, Xiaoyan; Guo, Hong

    2011-04-01

    There has been an increase in the amount of palliative care available in developing countries, including in China. However, palliative care is still very limited, and it is not mandatory to teach courses on palliative care in Chinese medical universities. To assess Chinese interns' awareness of palliative care concepts. Using a questionnaire selected from an earlier Austrian study, interns in a Chinese medical university were surveyed. All those surveyed had already been interns for at least six months. Four hundred interns from a Chinese medical university (response rate 99.5%) were surveyed. Twenty-one percent were female (84 of 400), and the average age was 23 years. Approximately one-third (34.5%) of interns were familiar with the pain scale, and 31% of interns were familiar with the concept of pain management. Only 7.5% of interns felt adequately trained in basic pain management, and 13% felt adequately trained to manage symptoms of dying patients. Seventy-seven percent of interns reported inadequate education regarding discussion of death with patients and family members. More than 80% of interns felt that more education about palliative care should be included in the basic medical curriculum and clinical intern training. Palliative care education is inadequate from the perspective of the Chinese medical interns. An improvement in the medical school curriculum is needed. Copyright © 2011 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. All rights reserved.

  13. A Strategy To Advance the Evidence Base in Palliative Medicine: Formation of a Palliative Care Research Cooperative Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Noreen M.; Basch, Ethan; Bull, Janet; Cleeland, Charles S.; Currow, David C.; Fairclough, Diane; Hanson, Laura; Hauser, Joshua; Ko, Danielle; Lloyd, Linda; Morrison, R. Sean; Otis-Green, Shirley; Pantilat, Steve; Portenoy, Russell K.; Ritchie, Christine; Rocker, Graeme; Wheeler, Jane L.; Zafar, S. Yousuf; Kutner, Jean S.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Palliative medicine has made rapid progress in establishing its scientific and clinical legitimacy, yet the evidence base to support clinical practice remains deficient in both the quantity and quality of published studies. Historically, the conduct of research in palliative care populations has been impeded by multiple barriers including health care system fragmentation, small number and size of potential sites for recruitment, vulnerability of the population, perceptions of inappropriateness, ethical concerns, and gate-keeping. Methods A group of experienced investigators with backgrounds in palliative care research convened to consider developing a research cooperative group as a mechanism for generating high-quality evidence on prioritized, clinically relevant topics in palliative care. Results : The resulting Palliative Care Research Cooperative (PCRC) agreed on a set of core principles: active, interdisciplinary membership; commitment to shared research purposes; heterogeneity of participating sites; development of research capacity in participating sites; standardization of methodologies, such as consenting and data collection/management; agile response to research requests from government, industry, and investigators; focus on translation; education and training of future palliative care researchers; actionable results that can inform clinical practice and policy. Consensus was achieved on a first collaborative study, a randomized clinical trial of statin discontinuation versus continuation in patients with a prognosis of less than 6 months who are taking statins for primary or secondary prevention. This article describes the formation of the PCRC, highlighting processes and decisions taken to optimize the cooperative group's success. PMID:21105763

  14. Care Planning for Inpatients Referred for Palliative Care Consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Kara; O'Riordan, David L; Marks, Angela K; Sudore, Rebecca; Pantilat, Steven Z

    2018-01-01

    Care planning is a critical function of palliative care teams, but the impact of advance care planning and goals of care discussions by palliative care teams has not been well characterized. To describe the population of patients referred to inpatient palliative care consultation teams for care planning, the needs identified by palliative care clinicians, the care planning activities that occur, and the results of these activities. This was a prospective cohort study conducted between January 1, 2013, and December 31, 2016. Seventy-eight inpatient palliative care teams from diverse US hospitals in the Palliative Care Quality Network, a national quality improvement collaborative. Standardized data were submitted for 73 145 patients. Inpatient palliative care consultation. Overall, 52 571 of 73 145 patients (71.9%) referred to inpatient palliative care were referred for care planning (range among teams, 27.5%-99.4% of patients). Patients referred for care planning were older (73.3 vs 67.9 years; F statistic, 1546.0; P planning needs in 52 825 of 73 145 patients (72.2%) overall, including 42 467 of 49 713 patients (85.4%) referred for care planning and in 10 054 of 17 475 patients (57.5%) referred for other reasons. Through care planning conversations, surrogates were identified for 10 571 of 11 149 patients (94.8%) and 9026 patients (37.4%) elected to change their code status. Substantially more patients indicated that a status of do not resuscitate/do not intubate was consistent with their goals (7006 [32.1%] preconsultation to 13 773 [63.1%] postconsultation). However, an advance directive was completed for just 2160 of 67 955 patients (3.2%) and a Physicians Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment form was completed for 8359 of 67 955 patients (12.3%) seen by palliative care teams. Care planning was the most common reason for inpatient palliative care consultation, and care planning needs were often found even when the consultation was

  15. A Community Needs Assessment for the Development of an Interprofessional Palliative Care Training Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coats, Heather; Paganelli, Tia; Starks, Helene; Lindhorst, Taryn; Starks Acosta, Anne; Mauksch, Larry; Doorenbos, Ardith

    2017-03-01

    There is a known shortage of trained palliative care professionals, and an even greater shortage of professionals who have been trained through interprofessional curricula. As part of an institutional Palliative Care Training Center grant, a core team of interprofessional palliative care academic faculty and staff completed a state-wide palliative care educational assessment to determine the needs for an interprofessional palliative care training program. The purpose of this article is to describe the process and results of our community needs assessment of interprofessional palliative care educational needs in Washington state. We approached the needs assessment through a cross-sectional descriptive design by using mixed-method inquiry. Each phase incorporated a variety of settings and subjects. The assessment incorporated multiple phases with diverse methodological approaches: a preparatory phase-identifying key informants; Phase I-key informant interviews; Phase II-survey; and Phase III-steering committee endorsement. The multiple phases of the needs assessment helped create a conceptual framework for the Palliative Care Training Center and developed an interprofessional palliative care curriculum. The input from key informants at multiple phases also allowed us to define priority needs and to refine an interprofessional palliative care curriculum. This curriculum will provide an interprofessional palliative care educational program that crosses disciplinary boundaries to integrate knowledge that is beneficial for all palliative care clinicians. The input from a range of palliative care clinicians and professionals at every phase of the needs assessment was critical for creating an interprofessional palliative care curriculum.

  16. Immunizations and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Data > Minority Population Profiles > Black/African American > Immunizations Immunizations and African Americans African American adults are less ... 19 to 35 months had comparable rates of immunization. African American women are as likely to have ...

  17. Radiotherapy in Palliative Cancer Care: Development and Implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    It is estimated that in 2008 there were over 12 million new cancer diagnoses and 7 million cancer deaths worldwide. The World Health Organisation (WHO) predicts that cancer rates will increase from 10 million to 24 million in the next 50 years. More than half of cancer cases will be diagnosed in low income nations, where 80% or more of patients will have incurable disease at diagnosis. In situations where most patients are diagnosed with incurable disease or where curative treatment is logistically unavailable, as is the case in many low income countries, the allocation of limited health care resources should reflect a greater emphasis on palliative care. Ironically, access to palliative care is greater in health care systems with well developed infrastructures and facilities for prevention, early detection, and curative treatment of cancer. To provide comprehensive cancer care, a multidisciplinary approach is needed. This maximizes the available treatments and interventions, whilst ensuring a cost effective and ethically sound approach to the treatment of patients at each stage of the disease. Barriers to palliative care may result from its low prioritization in health care policy and education. The WHO expert committee on cancer pain and palliative care report of 1990 called for the integration of efforts directed at maintaining patient quality of life through all stages of cancer treatment. As a result supportive interventions aimed at improving quality of life are needed for patients undergoing both curative and palliative cancer treatment. The International Atomic Energy Agency is currently collaborating with the Open Society Institute to develop palliative care programmes in Eastern Europe, Africa and India, as well as supporting programmes in other regions of the world, through the International Palliative Care Initiative. OSI partners with the IAEA's Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy, the World Health Organization, the International Agency for Research

  18. Patient participation in palliative care decisions: An ethnographic discourse analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Bélanger

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The participation of patients in making decisions about their care is especially important towards the end of life because palliative care decisions involve extensive uncertainty and are heavily influenced by personal values. Yet, there is a scarcity of studies directly observing clinical interactions between palliative patients and their health care providers. In this study, we aimed to understand how patient participation in palliative care decisions is constructed through discourse in a community hospital-based palliative care team. This qualitative study combined ethnographic observations of a palliative care team with discourse analysis. Eighteen palliative care patients with cancer diagnoses, six family physicians, and two nurses were involved in the study. Multiple interactions were observed between each patient and health care providers over the course of 1 year, for a total of 101 consultations, 24 of which were audio-recorded. The analysis consisted in looking for the interpretive repertoires (i.e., familiar lines of argument used to justify actions that were used to justify patient participation in decision-making during clinical interactions, as well as exploring their implications for decision roles and end-of-life care. Patients and their health care providers seldom addressed their decision-making roles explicitly. Rather, they constructed patient participation in palliative care decisions in a covert manner. Four interpretive repertoires were used to justify patient participation: (1 exposing uncertainty, (2 co-constructing patient preferences, (3 affirming patient autonomy, and finally (4 upholding the authority of health care providers. The results demonstrate how patients and health care providers used these arguments to negotiate their respective roles in decision-making. In conclusion, patients and health care providers used a variety of interpretive repertoires to covertly negotiate their roles in decision-making, and to

  19. [Achievement and Future Direction of the PEACE Project - A National Education Project for Palliative Care Education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizawa, Yoshiyuki; Yamamoto, Ryo

    2017-07-01

    Although palliative care is assuming an increasingly important role in patient care, most physicians did not learn to provide palliative care during their medical training. To address these serious deficiencies in physician training in palliative care, government decided to provide basic palliative education program for all practicing cancer doctors as a national policy namely Palliative care Emphasis program on symptom management and Assessment for Continuous medical Education(PEACE). The program was 2-days workshop based on adult learning theory and focusing on symptom management and communication. In this 9 years, 4,888 educational workshop has been held, and 93,250 physicians were trained. In prospective observational study, both knowledges and difficulties practicing palliative care were significantly improved. In 2017, the new palliative care education program will be launched including combined program of e-learning and workshop to provide tailor made education based on learner's readiness and educational needs in palliative care.

  20. How to Get It -- Step 2: Meet the Palliative Care Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Provider 3. Meet the Team Palliative Care Team The palliative care team will spend a lot of time with you ... your goals. But what should you ask the team during the meeting? Here are some suggestions: What ...

  1. Palliative or curative treatment intent affects communication in radiation therapy consultations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, L.; Maazen, R.W.M. van der; Leer, J.W.H.; Kraaimaat, F.W.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether communication in radiotherapy consultations is affected by palliative or curative treatment intent. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: The study involved 160 patients and 8 radiation oncologists. Eighty patients visited the radiation oncologist (RO) for palliative treatment and 80

  2. Identification of the palliative phase in people with dementia: a variety of opinions between healthcare professionals

    OpenAIRE

    van Riet Paap, Jasper; Mariani, Elena; Chattat, Rabih; Koopmans, Raymond; Kerherv?, H?l?ne; Leppert, Wojciech; Forycka, Maria; Radbruch, Lukas; Jaspers, Birgit; Vissers, Kris; Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra; Engels, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: People with dementia can benefit from a palliative care approach. Recommendations, such as those of the EAPC have been proposed to strengthen the provision of palliative care for this group of patients. Yet, it remains challenging for professionals to identify when a person with dementia is in need of palliative care. The objective of this study therefore was to explore when professionals in long-term care settings consider a person with dementia in need of palliative care. METHOD...

  3. Achieving consensus and controversy around applicability of palliative care to dementia.

    OpenAIRE

    Steen, J.T. van der; Radbruch, L.; Boer, M.E. de; Jünger, S.; Hughes, J.C.; Larkin, P.; Gove, D.; Francke, A.L.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.; Firth, P.; Volicer, L.; Hertogh, C.M.P.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: People with dementia may benefit from palliative care which specifically addresses the needs of patients and families affected by this life-limiting disease. On behalf of the European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC), we recently performed a Delphi study to define domains for palliative care in dementia and to provide recommendations for optimal care. An international panel of experts in palliative care, dementia care or both, achieved consensus on almost all domains and rec...

  4. Study of Nurses’ Knowledge about Palliative Care: A Quantitative Cross-sectional Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Prem, Venkatesan; Karvannan, Harikesavan; Kumar, Senthil P; Karthikbabu, Surulirajan; Syed, Nafeez; Sisodia, Vaishali; Jaykumar, Saroja

    2012-01-01

    Context: Studies have documented that nurses and other health care professionals are inadequately prepared to care for patients in palliative care. Several reasons have been identified including inadequacies in nursing education, absence of curriculum content related to pain management, and knowledge related to pain and palliative care. Aims: The objective of this paper was to assess the knowledge about palliative care amongst nursing professionals using the palliative care knowledge tes...

  5. Undergraduate palliative care teaching in Swiss medical faculties: a nationwide survey and improved learning objectives

    OpenAIRE

    Eychmüller, Steffen; Forster, M; Gudat, H; Lütolf, U M; Borasio, G D

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND In 2007, a first survey on undergraduate palliative care teaching in Switzerland has revealed major heterogeneity of palliative care content, allocation of hours and distribution throughout the 6 year curriculum in Swiss medical faculties. This second survey in 2012/13 has been initiated as part of the current Swiss national strategy in palliative care (2010 - 2015) to serve as a longitudinal monitoring instrument and as a basis for redefinition of palliative care learning obje...

  6. Undergraduate palliative care teaching in Swiss medical faculties: a nationwide survey and improved learning objectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eychmüller, S; Forster, M; Gudat, H; Lütolf, U M; Borasio, G D

    2015-11-27

    In 2007, a first survey on undergraduate palliative care teaching in Switzerland has revealed major heterogeneity of palliative care content, allocation of hours and distribution throughout the 6 year curriculum in Swiss medical faculties. This second survey in 2012/13 has been initiated as part of the current Swiss national strategy in palliative care (2010 - 2015) to serve as a longitudinal monitoring instrument and as a basis for redefinition of palliative care learning objectives and curriculum planning in our country. As in 2007, a questionnaire was sent to the deans of all five medical faculties in Switzerland in 2012. It consisted of eight sections: basic background information, current content and hours in dedicated palliative care blocks, current palliative care content in other courses, topics related to palliative care presented in other courses, recent attempts at improving palliative care content, palliative care content in examinations, challenges, and overall summary. Content analysis was performed and the results matched with recommendations from the EAPC for undergraduate training in palliative medicine as well as with recommendations from overseas countries. There is a considerable increase in palliative care content, academic teaching staff and hours in all medical faculties compared to 2007. No Swiss medical faculty reaches the range of 40 h dedicated specifically to palliative care as recommended by the EAPC. Topics, teaching methods, distribution throughout different years and compulsory attendance still differ widely. Based on these results, the official Swiss Catalogue of Learning Objectives (SCLO) was complemented with 12 new learning objectives for palliative and end of life care (2013), and a national basic script for palliative care was published (2015). Performing periodic surveys of palliative care teaching at national medical faculties has proven to be a useful tool to adapt the national teaching framework and to improve the

  7. Developing targets for public health initiatives to improve palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klindtworth Katharina

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Palliative Care is an approach that improves quality of life for patients and their families facing the problems associated with incurable life-threatening illness. In many countries, due to the rapidly ageing population, increasingly more people are suffering from serious chronic disease towards the end of life, making further development in palliative care a major public health challenge. The aim of this study was to develop the first targets for public health initiatives to improve palliative care in Germany. Methods Based on the findings from pilot studies (qualitative interviews and surveys with different stakeholders in the health care system, we conducted a modified Delphi study with two rounds of questionnaires with experts in public health and palliative care. In the first round, the experts commented on the findings from the pilot studies. The answers were evaluated descriptively and with qualitative content analysis, resulting in the formulation of 25 targets. These were presented to the experts in the second Delphi round to assess each of them separately with regard to its importance and current implementation (7-point answer scales and in relation to the other targets (defining the five most important of the 25 targets. Results Six most relevant targets for public health initiatives to improve palliative care in Germany were worked out: Supporting palliative care as a basic attitude for the care of people in the last phase of life; coordinating healthcare for people in the last phase of life; establishing cooperation among health professions and disciplines; establishing education in palliative care for all professional groups with contact to people in the last phase of life; reviewing the evidence of palliative care measures; offering support to family members who are caring for someone in the last phase of life. Conclusions To systematically develop palliative care, it makes sense to define fields of action

  8. Developing targets for public health initiatives to improve palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Nils; Lueckmann, Sara L; Kuehne, Franziska; Klindtworth, Katharina; Behmann, Mareike

    2010-04-29

    Palliative Care is an approach that improves quality of life for patients and their families facing the problems associated with incurable life-threatening illness. In many countries, due to the rapidly ageing population, increasingly more people are suffering from serious chronic disease towards the end of life, making further development in palliative care a major public health challenge. The aim of this study was to develop the first targets for public health initiatives to improve palliative care in Germany. Based on the findings from pilot studies (qualitative interviews and surveys with different stakeholders in the health care system), we conducted a modified Delphi study with two rounds of questionnaires with experts in public health and palliative care. In the first round, the experts commented on the findings from the pilot studies. The answers were evaluated descriptively and with qualitative content analysis, resulting in the formulation of 25 targets. These were presented to the experts in the second Delphi round to assess each of them separately with regard to its importance and current implementation (7-point answer scales) and in relation to the other targets (defining the five most important of the 25 targets). Six most relevant targets for public health initiatives to improve palliative care in Germany were worked out: Supporting palliative care as a basic attitude for the care of people in the last phase of life; coordinating healthcare for people in the last phase of life; establishing cooperation among health professions and disciplines; establishing education in palliative care for all professional groups with contact to people in the last phase of life; reviewing the evidence of palliative care measures; offering support to family members who are caring for someone in the last phase of life. To systematically develop palliative care, it makes sense to define fields of action with individual targets. For Germany, it can be recommended to give

  9. Gynaecological malignancies from palliative care perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamlesh Mishra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Of the approximately 80,000 new cases of all cancers detected every year in India, 10-15% are gynecological malignancies. As per population-based registries under the National Cancer Registry Program, the leading sites of cancer among women are the cervix uteri, breast, and oral cavity. About 50-60% of all cancers among women in India are mainly of the following four organs: cervix uteri, breast, corpus uteri, and ovaries. Over 70% of these women report for diagnostic and treatment services at an advanced stage of disease, resulting in poor survival and high mortality rates. Among all gynecological cancers, ovarian cancer is the deadliest one and, in 2/3 rd of the cases, is detected in an advanced stage. But, in India and in other developing countries, due to inadequate screening facilities for the preventable cancer cervix, this kills more women than any other cancer in females. Gynecology Oncologist as a sub-specialist has an immensely important role in curtailing the menace of gynecological malignancies by providing comprehensive preventive, curative, palliative and follow-up services, with the aim of assuring a good quality of life to women as a cornerstone of cancer management.

  10. Palliative care and the Indian neurologist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roop Gursahani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available End-of-life care is an integral part of neurology practice, and neuropalliative medicine is an emerging neurology subspeciality. This begins with serious illness communication as a protocol-based process that depends on an evaluation of patient autonomy and accurate prognostication. Communication needs vary between chronic, life-limiting neurologic illnesses and acute brain injury. In an ideal situation, the patient's wishes are spelled out in advance care plans and living wills, and surrogates have only limited choices for implementation. Palliative care prepares for decline and death as an expected outcome and focuses on improving the quality of life for both the patients and their caregivers. In the Intensive Care Unit, this may require clarity on withholding and withdrawal of treatment. In all locations of care, the emphasis is on symptom control. Neurologists are the quintessential physicians, and our “dharma” is best served by empathetically bringing our technical knowledge and communication skills into easing this final transition for our patients and their families to the best of our ability.

  11. Palliative Treatment of Malignant Pleural Effusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenyang Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant pleural effusion (MPE is a common clinical problem caused by cancers. Pleural effusion can be the first sign of cancer in more than 25% of patients. Lung cancer and breast cancer are the most common cancers that metastasize to the pleura in men and women, respectively. Other cancers, including, but not limited to, lymphomas, ovarian cancer, stomach cancer, and several unknown primary cancers can also lead to MPE. Dyspnea and chest pain are the most common symptoms of MPE along with other symptoms such as a cough, weight loss, anorexia, fatigue, and weakness. Aggravation of these symptoms is closely related to the rate of accumulation of pleural effusion. Treatment options to MPE are determined by the type and extent of the underlying malignancy. The major goals of the treatment are to relieve symptoms, restore functions, improve the quality of life, and minimize the duration of hospital stay and costs. Although some patients can be treated with systemic therapies, most of these treatments are temporary, and MPE would recur soon. Hence, further palliative treatments to effectively control pleural effusions and relieve symptoms are necessary. This review addresses the pathophysiology of MPE and the treatment options for patients with MPE.

  12. PALLIATIVE CARE – ITS ROLE IN HEALTHCARE SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urška Lunder

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. In the last decades a palliative care has been well established in the majority of West European countries. However, majority of these countries are not able to follow needs for palliative care because of demographic changes (older population, changes of morbidity pattern (increase of chronic progressive diseases and social changes (disability of families to care for their relatives at their homes. Research is showing evidence on palliative care effectiveness at end of life and in bereavement. There is still a great need for healthcare professionals’ change in their attitudes, knowledge and skills. In many National strategic plans (United Kingdom, Ireland, Sweden, Australia, New Zealand and Canada palliative care becomes a priority in the national public health. New organizational planning supports establishement of palliative care departments in hospitals and other healthcare settings and consultant teams at all levels of healthcare system. Hospices, caritative and independent organizations, will remain as a source of good clinical practice and philosophy of care at the end of life also in the future.

  13. Islamic theology and the principles of palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shahri, Mohammad Zafir

    2016-12-01

    It is well established that provision of palliative care is a human right for the patients and their families going through the suffering associated with a life-threatening illness. The holistic nature of palliative care, dictated by the multifaceted suffering experienced by patients, calls for giving due consideration to the cultural and spiritual background of the target population. Similarly, the paramount impact of Islamic wholeness on Muslims' perceptions, beliefs, and way of living makes it necessary for non-Muslim palliative care professionals who are caring for Muslim patients to increase their awareness about the parts of Islamic theology pertinent to the principles of palliative care. This would include a basic knowledge of the Islamic faith and how Muslims view and cope with the calamity of a life-threatening condition along with the suffering associated with it. Equally important are issues related to the management of symptoms using agents that are normally strictly prohibited by Islamic teachings, including opioids, brain stimulants, and cannabinoids. The current review briefly discusses the Islamic perspectives pertinent to a Muslim patient's journey throughout the palliative care experience, onward to a safe passing, and beyond.

  14. Team interactions in specialized palliative care teams: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klarare, Anna; Hagelin, Carina Lundh; Fürst, Carl Johan; Fossum, Bjöörn

    2013-09-01

    Teamwork is a standard of care in palliative care and that is emphasized by leading organizations. When interdisciplinary teams communicate their varied assessments, outcomes may be more than additive due to the synthesis of information. Interprofessionality does not guarantee multidimensionality in health care interventions, however, and that interprofessional teams promote collaboration may be questioned. The aim was to explore team interaction among team members in specialized palliative care teams. Semistructured interviews were conducted with health professionals working in specialized palliative home care teams. The interviews were analyzed by content analysis. Participants were recruited from specialized palliative care units in Sweden. The 15 interviewees included 4 men and 11 women. Physcians, nurses, paramedical staff, and social workers were included. Organizational issues like resources and leadership have a great impact on delivery of care. Competence was mirrored in education, collaboration, approach, and support within the team; while communication was described as key to being a team, resolving conflict, and executing palliative care. Communication and communication patterns within the team create the feeling of being a team. Team climate and team performance are significantly impacted by knowledge and trust of competence in colleagues, with other professions, and by the available leadership. Proportions of different health professionals in the team have an impact on the focus and delivery of care. Interprofessional education giving clarity on one's own professional role and knowledge of other professions would most likely benefit patients and family caregivers.

  15. Palliative Interventional and Surgical Therapy for Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assfalg, Volker; Hüser, Norbert; Michalski, Christoph; Gillen, Sonja; Kleeff, Jorg; Friess, Helmut, E-mail: friess@chir.med.tu-muenchen.de [Department of Surgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Ismaningerstr. 22, D-81675 Munich (Germany)

    2011-02-14

    Palliative treatment concepts are considered in patients with non-curatively resectable and/or metastasized pancreatic cancer. However, patients without metastases, but presented with marginally resectable or locally non-resectable tumors should not be treated by a palliative therapeutic approach. These patients should be enrolled in neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy trials because a potentially curative resection can be achieved in approximately one-third of them after finishing treatment and restaging. Within the scope of best possible palliative care, resection of the primary cancer together with excision of metastases represents a therapeutic option to be contemplated in selected cases. Comprehensive palliative therapy is based on treatment of bile duct or duodenal obstruction for certain locally unresectable or metastasized advanced pancreatic cancer. However, endoscopic or percutaneous stenting procedures and surgical bypass provide safe and highly effective therapeutic alternatives. In case of operative drainage of the biliary tract (biliodigestive anastomosis), the prophylactic creation of a gastro-intestinal bypass (double bypass) is recommended. The decision to perform a surgical versus an endoscopic procedure for palliation depends to a great extent on the tumor stage and the estimated prognosis, and should be determined by an interdisciplinary team for each patient individually.

  16. Palliative Interventional and Surgical Therapy for Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assfalg, Volker; Hüser, Norbert; Michalski, Christoph; Gillen, Sonja; Kleeff, Jorg; Friess, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    Palliative treatment concepts are considered in patients with non-curatively resectable and/or metastasized pancreatic cancer. However, patients without metastases, but presented with marginally resectable or locally non-resectable tumors should not be treated by a palliative therapeutic approach. These patients should be enrolled in neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy trials because a potentially curative resection can be achieved in approximately one-third of them after finishing treatment and restaging. Within the scope of best possible palliative care, resection of the primary cancer together with excision of metastases represents a therapeutic option to be contemplated in selected cases. Comprehensive palliative therapy is based on treatment of bile duct or duodenal obstruction for certain locally unresectable or metastasized advanced pancreatic cancer. However, endoscopic or percutaneous stenting procedures and surgical bypass provide safe and highly effective therapeutic alternatives. In case of operative drainage of the biliary tract (biliodigestive anastomosis), the prophylactic creation of a gastro-intestinal bypass (double bypass) is recommended. The decision to perform a surgical versus an endoscopic procedure for palliation depends to a great extent on the tumor stage and the estimated prognosis, and should be determined by an interdisciplinary team for each patient individually

  17. Current options for palliative treatment in patients with pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridwelski, K; Meyer, F

    2001-01-01

    Palliative treatment is often the only remaining option in the management of pancreatic carcinoma, but its efficacy is poor due to low tumor sensitivity and inadequate treatment protocols. There are several options of palliative treatment with antitumor or supportive intention. Classical end points of palliative treatment are survival, tumor response, and quality of life. A decade ago, palliative chemotherapy consisted mainly of 5-fluorouracil as the standard agent in combination with either other agents and/or radiotherapy. Only the new antineoplastic drug gemcitabine, which was introduced simultaneously with the definition of novel end points of chemotherapy such as clinical benefit, allowed to achieve some progress. However, while gemcitabine monotherapy appeared to be superior to 5-fluorouracil and improved important parameters of quality of life, it could not provide a significant improvement of survival. A novel concept, therefore, is to improve this beneficial cytostatic response in pancreatic carcinoma using a gemcitabine-based protocol by combining it with antineoplastic drugs such as taxanes or platin analogs. This strategy may have the potential to improve the outcome in palliative chemotherapy of pancreatic carcinoma patients with advanced tumor growth or metastases. Best supportive care in pancreatic cancer consists of the treatment of symptoms, such as pain, jaundice, duodenal obstruction, weight loss, exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, and tumor-associated depression. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

  18. Palliative care in residential aged care: An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Juliet

    2017-12-01

    To measure how care needs, health and length of stay in permanent residential aged care differs by assessed need for palliative care. On entry into permanent residential aged care, people's care needs and health conditions are assessed on the Aged Care Funding Instrument. Data for the period 2008-2009 and 2015-2016 were analysed for trends in care needs, health conditions, length of stay and separation reason across assessed need for palliative care. Assessed care needs have increased for all people in residential aged care over this period, and people appraised for palliative care were more likely to be rated 'high' in need for support in activities of daily living. People appraised for palliative care had a higher prevalence of cancer and shorter length of stays. Palliative care appraisal is associated with increased complexity in assessed care needs, different profiles of health and shorter length of stays in permanent residential aged care. © 2017 Australian Institute of Health and Welfare Australasian Journal on Ageing © 2017 AJA Inc.

  19. Barriers to palliative care for advanced dementia: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erel, Meira; Marcus, Esther-Lee; Dekeyser-Ganz, Freda

    2017-10-01

    People with dementia often fail to receive palliative care, despite increased recognition of their need and eligibility for such care. The aims of this study were to assess the barriers associated with a lack of implementation of palliative care for people with dementia and to explore whether there is a gap in knowledge necessitating further study. We reviewed the English literature published from 2000 to 2016, related to barriers to palliative care for people with dementia. Twenty-two articles met inclusion criteria for the review. Most originated in Europe or North America and were qualitative in nature. Four key themes were identified: administrative/policy issues, education, communication, and staff personal characteristics. Barriers to the delivery of palliative care for people with dementia have been studied for more than a decade, yet at present, there is a lack of consensus in practice. More research is needed related to barriers associated with personal characteristics. Such investigations have the potential to improve and better understand the complex nature of palliative care in this population.

  20. A Palliative Approach to Falls in Advanced Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaboni, Andrea; Van Ooteghem, Karen; Marcil, Meghan N; Cockburn, Amy; Flint, Alastair J; Grossman, Daphna; Keren, Ron

    2017-12-11

    Falls are viewed as a preventable cause of injury, functional loss, and death in older adults with dementia, and have been used as a marker of quality of care in long-term care facilities. Despite intensive intervention around fall prevention in these settings, falls and injury remain frequent, particularly among residents in the advanced stages of dementia. In this clinical review, we consider the common challenges and pitfalls in both the management of falls and the provision of palliative care in advanced dementia. We then describe a palliative approach to falls in advanced dementia that involves identifying individuals who would benefit from this care approach, framing falls and loss of mobility as a quality of life issue, and devising an individualized symptom assessment and management plan. A palliative approach can lead to recognition and acceptance that recurrent falls are often symptomatic of advanced dementia, and that not all falls are preventable. We conclude that falls in the advanced stage of dementia can be sentinel events indicating the need for a palliative approach to care. Rather than replace falls prevention activities, a palliative approach to falls prompts us to select dementia stage-appropriate interventions with a focus on symptom management, comfort, and dignity. Copyright © 2017 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Palliative care and dementia--A time and place?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kydd, Angela; Sharp, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    The current focus in dementia care places emphasis on the potential of people to live well with the condition. Given the historical tendency to neglect the full rights and citizenship of people with dementia, such an emphasis gives hope and optimism that there is life after diagnosis. This paper seeks to explore the potential compromise of effective preparation for the complexities of advanced illness that may be presented by this consistently up-beat message. Dementia is a life limiting condition, currently without cure. Therefore, the appropriateness of palliative care may seem obvious. Yet, until relatively recently, palliative care was seen as an adjunct to oncology in the minds of professionals and public alike. However, there is a growing recognition that specialist palliative care has much to offer people with a range of long term conditions, including people with dementia. So, whilst 'living well' is an important message-especially following diagnosis-planning for advanced dementia and dying well is equally important. The aim of this paper is to highlight policy on the living well and the palliative care approach for people with dementia. A word limited narrative literature review was conducted to explore how policies have or have not informed the literature on both messages. The findings emphasise the need for a continuum approach to dementia care, with discussion on when, where, and how can palliative care be delivered for people with dementia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Outcomes from a national multispecialty palliative care curriculum development project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, David E; Ambuel, Bruce; von Gunten, Charles F; Block, Susan; Warm, Eric; Hallenbeck, James; Milch, Robert; Brasel, Karen; Mullan, Patricia B

    2007-04-01

    In 1998 we completed a successful regional pilot project in palliative care curriculum development among 32 internal medicine residency programs recruited from the mid-western United States. Between 1999 and 2004 this project was expanded to include 358 U.S. programs, from four specialties, based on new training requirements in internal medicine, family medicine, neurology, and general surgery. To assess the 1-year outcomes from residency programs participating in a national multispecialty palliative care curriculum development project. Outcome data obtained from residency programs' responses to a structured progress report 12 months after enrolling in the project and from published residency project reports. Three hundred fifty-eight residency programs, representing 27% of all eligible training programs in the four specialties, participated in the project. Outcome data was available from 224 residencies (63%). Most programs started new teaching in pain, non-pain symptom management, and communication skills. More than 50% of programs integrated palliative care topics within established institutional grand rounds, morbidity/mortality conferences or morning report. More than 70% of internal medicine and family practice programs began new direct patient care training opportunities utilizing hospital-based palliative care or hospice programs. New faculty development initiatives and use of quality improvement projects to drive curriculum change were reported in less than 50% of programs. Focused short-term instruction in palliative care curriculum development, in a diverse group of residency programs, is feasible and associated with significant curriculum change.

  3. Palliative care in advanced gynecological cancers: Institute of palliative medicine experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushmita Pathy

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To study the epidemiological profile, clinical symptoms and referral patterns of patients with gynecological malignancy. To evaluate pain symptoms, response to treatment and factors affecting management in patients with advanced gynecological malignancies. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed of the gynecological malignancy cases registered at the Pain and Palliative Care Clinic, Calicut, over a 12-month period between January 2006 and December 2006.Patient characteristics, symptoms and response to treatment were evaluated in detail. Results: A total of 1813 patients registered, of which 64 had gynecological malignancies. Most of the cases were referred from the Oncology Department of the Calicut Medical College. Fifty-five percent of the patients were unaware of their diagnosis. Psychosocial issues and anxiety were observed in 48%. Insomnia was seen in 52% of the cases. Pain was the most common and most distressing symptom. Adequate pain relief was achieved in only 32% of the patients. Conclusions: The number of gynecological malignancy cases attending the Pain and Palliative Care Clinic is small. Pain is the most common and distressing symptom, with only 32% of the patients achieving adequate pain relief. Poor drug compliance, incomplete assessment of pain and the lack of awareness of morphine therapy were identified as the most common causes for poor pain control.

  4. Increase in palliative sedation and reasons in cancer patients in Dutch general practice 2005–2014.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donker, G.A.; Dijk, C.E. van

    2015-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the quantity and reasons for use of palliative sedation in cancer patients in general practice and the reason to apply palliative sedation when a request for euthanasia was pending. Aim: To gain more insight into the reasons for palliative sedation at the end of

  5. Effects of a Multimodule Curriculum of Palliative Care on Medical Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley S.L. Tsai

    2008-04-01

    Conclusion: A multimodule curriculum of palliative care for medical students can significantly improve their knowledge on principles of clinical management and beliefs about ethical decision-making in palliative care. As for changes in beliefs about ethical decision-making in palliative care, continued ethical and clinical training is required.

  6. Factors Associated with Attitude and Knowledge Toward Hospice Palliative Care Among Medical Caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Yi Lee

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: Life and work experience improve the accuracy of medical staff in providing hospice palliative care. A culture-based, case-oriented continuing education program and a timely revision of the Hospice Palliative Care Article are recommended to increase the consistency between the principle and the practice of hospice palliative care.

  7. Barriers to palliative care in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in home care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mousing, Camilla Askov; Timm, Helle; Lomborg, Kirsten

    2018-01-01

    vague understanding of palliative care and lack of knowledge about the disease. Organisational barriers, such as lack of time and continuity in patient care and lack of opportunity to discuss palliative care and lack of peer learning were experienced as challenging in the provision of palliative care...

  8. The Role and Timing of Palliative Care in Supporting Persons with Intellectual Disability and Advanced Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarron, Mary; McCallion, Philip; Fahey-McCarthy, Elizabeth; Connaire, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To better describe the role and timing of palliative care in supporting persons with intellectual disabilities and advanced dementia (AD). Background: Specialist palliative care providers have focused mostly on people with cancers. Working with persons with intellectual disabilities and AD offers opportunities to expand such palliative care…

  9. Development of a Palliative Education Assessment Tool for Medical Student Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meekin, Sharon Abele; Klein, Jason E.; Fleischman, Alan R.; Fins, Joseph J.

    2000-01-01

    Describes the Palliative Education Assessment Tool (PEAT), an innovative assessment to facilitate curricular mapping of palliative care education. The PEAT comprises seven palliative care domains, each of which details specific objectives of knowledge, skills, and attitudes. PEAT enables educators to describe a specific multidimensional aspect of…

  10. Internal Medicine Residents' Beliefs, Attitudes, and Experiences Relating to Palliative Care: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, S; Mirza, R; Nissim, R; Ridley, J

    2017-05-01

    Internal medicine residents are frequently called upon to provide palliative care to hospitalized patients, but report feeling unprepared to do so effectively. Curricular development to enhance residents' palliative care skills and competencies requires an understanding of current beliefs, attitudes and learning priorities. We conducted a qualitative study consisting of semi-structured interviews with ten internal medicine residents to explore their understanding of and experiences with palliative care. All of the residents interviewed had a sound theoretical understanding of palliative care, but faced many challenges in being able to provide care in practice. The challenges described by residents were system-related, patient-related and provider-related. They identified several priority areas for further learning, and discussed ways in which their current education in palliative care could be enhanced. Our findings provide important insights to guide curricular development for internal medicine trainees. The top five learning priorities in palliative care that residents identified in our study were: 1) knowing how and when to initiate a palliative approach, 2) improving communication skills, 3) improving symptom management skills, 4) identifying available resources, and 5) understanding the importance of palliative care. Residents felt that their education in palliative care could be improved by having a mandatory rotation in palliative care, more frequent didactic teaching sessions, more case-based teaching from palliative care providers, opportunities to be directly observed, and increased support from palliative care providers after-hours.

  11. An instrument to measure nurses' knowledge in palliative care: Validation of the Spanish version of Palliative Care Quiz for Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chover-Sierra, Elena; Martínez-Sabater, Antonio; Lapeña-Moñux, Yolanda Raquel

    2017-01-01

    Palliative care is nowadays essential in nursing care, due to the increasing number of patients who require attention in final stages of their life. Nurses need to acquire specific knowledge and abilities to provide quality palliative care. Palliative Care Quiz for Nurses is a questionnaire that evaluates their basic knowledge about palliative care. The Palliative Care Quiz for Nurses (PCQN) is useful to evaluate basic knowledge about palliative care, but its adaptation into the Spanish language and the analysis of its effectiveness and utility for Spanish culture is lacking. To report the adaptation into the Spanish language and the psychometric analysis of the Palliative Care Quiz for Nurses. The Palliative Care Quiz for Nurses-Spanish Version (PCQN-SV) was obtained from a process including translation, back-translation, comparison with versions in other languages, revision by experts, and pilot study. Content validity and reliability of questionnaire were analyzed. Difficulty and discrimination indexes of each item were also calculated according to Item Response Theory (IRT). Adequate internal consistency was found (S-CVI = 0.83); Cronbach's alpha coefficient of 0.67 and KR-20 test result of 0,72 reflected the reliability of PCQN-SV. The questionnaire had a global difficulty index of 0,55, with six items which could be considered as difficult or very difficult, and five items with could be considered easy or very easy. The discrimination indexes of the 20 items, show us that eight items are good or very good while six items are bad to discriminate between good and bad respondents. Although in shows internal consistency, reliability and difficulty indexes similar to those obtained by versions of PCQN in other languages, a reformulation of the items with lowest content validity or discrimination indexes and those showing difficulties with their comprehension is an aspect to take into account in order to improve the PCQN-SV. The PCQN-SV is a useful Spanish language

  12. An instrument to measure nurses' knowledge in palliative care: Validation of the Spanish version of Palliative Care Quiz for Nurses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Chover-Sierra

    Full Text Available Palliative care is nowadays essential in nursing care, due to the increasing number of patients who require attention in final stages of their life. Nurses need to acquire specific knowledge and abilities to provide quality palliative care. Palliative Care Quiz for Nurses is a questionnaire that evaluates their basic knowledge about palliative care. The Palliative Care Quiz for Nurses (PCQN is useful to evaluate basic knowledge about palliative care, but its adaptation into the Spanish language and the analysis of its effectiveness and utility for Spanish culture is lacking.To report the adaptation into the Spanish language and the psychometric analysis of the Palliative Care Quiz for Nurses.The Palliative Care Quiz for Nurses-Spanish Version (PCQN-SV was obtained from a process including translation, back-translation, comparison with versions in other languages, revision by experts, and pilot study. Content validity and reliability of questionnaire were analyzed. Difficulty and discrimination indexes of each item were also calculated according to Item Response Theory (IRT.Adequate internal consistency was found (S-CVI = 0.83; Cronbach's alpha coefficient of 0.67 and KR-20 test result of 0,72 reflected the reliability of PCQN-SV. The questionnaire had a global difficulty index of 0,55, with six items which could be considered as difficult or very difficult, and five items with could be considered easy or very easy. The discrimination indexes of the 20 items, show us that eight items are good or very good while six items are bad to discriminate between good and bad respondents.Although in shows internal consistency, reliability and difficulty indexes similar to those obtained by versions of PCQN in other languages, a reformulation of the items with lowest content validity or discrimination indexes and those showing difficulties with their comprehension is an aspect to take into account in order to improve the PCQN-SV.The PCQN-SV is a useful

  13. African Environment

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Environmental Studies and Regional Planning Bulletin African Environment is published in French and English, and for some issues, in Arabic. (only the issue below has been received by AJOL). Vol 10, No 3 (1999). DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Subscription or Fee Access. Table of ...

  14. Regional medical professionals' confidence in providing palliative care, associated difficulties and availability of specialized palliative care services in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirooka, Kayo; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Morita, Tatsuya; Ichikawa, Takeyuki; Yoshida, Saran; Akizuki, Nobuya; Akiyama, Miki; Shirahige, Yutaka; Eguchi, Kenji

    2014-03-01

    Although confidence in providing palliative care services is an essential component of providing such care, factors relating to this have not been investigated in Japan. This study aimed to explore confidence in the ability to provide palliative care and associated difficulties and to explore correlations between these variables. Design A cross-sectional mail survey of medical doctors and registered nurses in Japan was performed as part of a regional intervention trial: the Outreach Palliative Care Trial of Integrated Regional Model study. Subjects Questionnaires were sent to 7905 medical professionals, and 409 hospital doctors, 235 general practitioners, 2160 hospital nurses and 115 home visiting nurses completed them. Confidence in providing palliative care was low and difficulties frequent for all types of medical professionals assessed. In particular, only 8-24% of them, depending on category, agreed to 'having adequate knowledge and skills regarding cancer pain management'. In particular, 55-80% of medical professionals acknowledged difficulty with 'alleviation of cancer pain'. Multiple regression analysis revealed that confidence was positively correlated with the amount of relevant experience and, for medical doctors, with 'prescriptions of opioids (per year)'. Moreover, difficulties were negatively correlated with the amount of relevant clinical experience. Effective strategies for developing regional palliative care programs include basic education of medical professionals on management of cancer-related pain (especially regarding opioids) and other symptoms.

  15. African Journals Online: Central African Republic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journals Online: Central African Republic. Home > African Journals Online: Central African Republic. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Browse By Category · Browse Alphabetically · Browse By Country · List All Titles · Free to read Titles This ...

  16. Developing meaningful learning experiences in palliative care nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brajtman, Susan; Higuchi, Kathryn; Murray, Mary Ann

    2009-07-01

    To help nurses develop effective clinical decision-making skills, it is essential that palliative care education includes opportunities for undergraduate and practicing nurses to develop cognitive skills in addressing real-life clinical problems. This article describes the learning experiences within an elective nursing course designed to strengthen the clinical decision-making skills of students in the context of palliative care and interprofessional practice. A description of the course context, major learning assignment and evaluation rubic, and reflections on the learning process in terms of clinical decision-making and interprofessional practice provides an example of how meaningful learning opportunities can be used to prepare nurses for the challenges they will face as collaborative team members in their palliative clinical practice.

  17. Self-assessment in cancer patients referred to palliative care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strömgren, Annette S; Goldschmidt, Dorthe; Groenvold, Mogens

    2002-01-01

    -based study using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer quality-of-life instrument EORTC QLQ-C30, the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS), and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) in cancer patients who were receiving palliative care. This report describes...... symptoms. According to the HADS, 47% of patients suffered from depression. Outpatients had better scores than inpatients and patients in palliative home care for physical function, role function, cognitive function, depression, and inactivity. CONCLUSIONS: It is possible to carry out a questionnaire......-based study of symptomatology in consecutive cancer patients in palliative care, achieving rather complete data from the participants. The symptomatology in these patients was very pronounced. The questionnaires were able to detect clinically important differences between places of service....

  18. Cooperating with a palliative home-care team

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldschmidt, Dorthe; Groenvold, Mogens; Johnsen, Anna Thit

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Palliative home-care teams often cooperate with general practitioners (GPs) and district nurses. Our aim was to evaluate a palliative home-care team from the viewpoint of GPs and district nurses. METHODS: GPs and district nurses received questionnaires at the start of home-care and one...... month later. Questions focussed on benefits to patients, training issues for professionals and cooperation between the home-care team and the GP/ district nurse. A combination of closed- and open-ended questions was used. RESULTS: Response rate was 84% (467/553). Benefits to patients were experienced....... Dissatisfaction was caused mainly by lack of information from the home-care team to primary-care professionals. CONCLUSION: GPs and district nurses welcomed the palliative home-care team and most experienced benefits to patients. Strengthened communication, initiated by the home-care team would enhance...

  19. Reflections on Palliative Care from the Jewish and Islamic Tradition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Schultz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Spiritual care is a vital part of holistic patient care. Awareness of common patient beliefs will facilitate discussions about spirituality. Such conversations are inherently good for the patient, deepen the caring staff-patient-family relationship, and enhance understanding of how beliefs influence care decisions. All healthcare providers are likely to encounter Muslim patients, yet many lack basic knowledge of the Muslim faith and of the applications of Islamic teachings to palliative care. Similarly, some of the concepts underlying positive Jewish approaches to palliative care are not well known. We outline Jewish and Islamic attitudes toward suffering, treatment, and the end of life. We discuss our religions' approaches to treatments deemed unnecessary by medical staff, and consider some of the cultural reasons that patients and family members might object to palliative care, concluding with specific suggestions for the medical team.

  20. Enhancing collaborative leadership in palliative social work in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Barbara; Phillips, Farya; Head, Barbara Anderson; Hedlund, Susan; Kalisiak, Angela; Zebrack, Brad; Kilburn, Lisa; Otis-Green, Shirley

    2014-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) Report-Cancer Care for the Whole Patient: Meeting Psychosocial Health Needs-provided recommendations for meeting the palliative care needs of our growing population of older Americans. The IOM report highlights the demand for social work leadership across all aspects of the health care delivery system. Social workers are core interdisciplinary members of the health care team and it is important for them to be well prepared for collaborative leadership roles across health care settings. The ExCEL in Social Work: Excellence in Cancer Education & Leadership education project was created as a direct response to the 2008 IOM Report. This article highlights a sampling of palliative care projects initiated by outstanding oncology social work participants in the ExCEL program. These projects demonstrate the leadership of social workers in palliative care oncology.

  1. Negotiating futility, managing emotions: nursing the transition to palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broom, Alex; Kirby, Emma; Good, Phillip; Wootton, Julia; Yates, Patsy; Hardy, Janet

    2015-03-01

    Nurses play a pivotal role in caring for patients during the transition from life-prolonging care to palliative care. This is an area of nursing prone to emotional difficulty, interpersonal complexity, and interprofessional conflict. It is situated within complex social dynamics, including those related to establishing and accepting futility and reconciling the desire to maintain hope. Here, drawing on interviews with 20 Australian nurses, we unpack their accounts of nursing the transition to palliative care, focusing on the purpose of nursing at the point of transition; accounts of communication and strategies for representing palliative care; emotional engagement and burden; and key interprofessional challenges. We argue that in caring for patients approaching the end of life, nurses occupy precarious interpersonal and interprofessional spaces that involve a negotiated order around sentimental work, providing them with both capital (privileged access) and burden (emotional suffering) within their day-to-day work. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Applying motivational interviewing techniques to palliative care communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollak, Kathryn I; Childers, Julie W; Arnold, Robert M

    2011-05-01

    Palliative care relies heavily on communication. Although some guidelines do address difficult communication, less is known about how to handle conversations with patients who express ambivalence or resistance to such care. Clinicians also struggle with how to support patient autonomy when they disagree with patient choices. Motivational Interviewing (MI) techniques may help address these responses. Specifically, MI techniques such as reflective statements and summarizing can help reduce a patient's resistance, resolve patient ambivalence, and support patient autonomy. Not all the MI techniques are applicable, however, in part because palliative care clinicians do not guide patients to make particular choices but, instead, help patients make choices that are consistent with patient values. Some elements from MI can be used to improve the quality and efficacy of palliative care conversations.

  3. Use of palliative radiotherapy trials for clinical biomarker development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Jonathan; Milosevic, Michael; Brade, Anthony M

    2008-09-01

    Approximately one quarter of all cancer patients will require palliative radiation treatment at some point during the course of their disease, but only a minority of these patients are entered in clinical trials. We review the literature debating the ethics of inclusion of "palliative" patients on clinical trials. We suggest that these patients provide a potentially valuable resource that can be leveraged to facilitate the discovery and validation of biomarkers predictive of radiation response and toxicity. In addition, this patient population offers valuable opportunities to test combination of radiation and targeted therapies to screen for activity, toxicity and biomarkers in a relatively safe manner. Patients undergoing palliative radiation therapy may provide new opportunities for the development and testing of predictive radiotherapy biomarkers as well as affording opportunities to test combinations of radiation and targeted therapies.

  4. The extended palliative phase of dementia - An integrative literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Elizabeth; Hellström, Amanda; Sandvide, Åsa; Jackson, Graham A; MacRae, Rhoda; Waugh, Anna; Abreu, Wilson; Tolson, Debbie

    2016-07-26

    This article presents an integrative literature review of the experience of dementia care associated with the extended palliative phase of dementia. The aim was to highlight how dementia is defined in the literature and describe what is known about the symptomatology and management of advanced dementia regarding the needs and preferences of the person with dementia and their family carer/s. There was no consistent definition of advanced dementia. The extended palliative phase was generally synonymous with end-of-life care. Advanced care planning is purported to enable professionals to work together with people with dementia and their families. A lack of understanding of palliative care among frontline practitioners was related to a dearth of educational opportunities in advanced dementia care. There are few robust concepts and theories that embrace living the best life possible during the later stages of dementia. These findings informed our subsequent work around the concept, 'Dementia Palliare'. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. The Culture of General Palliative Nursing Care in Medical Departments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergenholtz, Heidi; Jarlbæk, Lene; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2015-01-01

    Background: In many countries, approximately half of the population dies in hospital, making general palliative nursing care (GPNC) a core nursing task. GPNC in the hospital setting is described as challenging, however little is known about its actual practice. Aim: To explore the GPNC culture...... and the nurses' reflections on GPNC: (1) GPNC provided in a treatment setting, (2) transition to loving care and the licence to perform palliative care (PC) and (3) potential for team improvement. Conclusions: GPNC as a culture in medical departments seemed to be embedded in a setting not suited for dying......; however, the content of this term was not defined or expressed among the health professionals. Practical and professional nursing skills are not sufficient to improve GPNC in the hospital department. Leaders on all levels need also to address the culture in which palliative care is embedded....

  6. The importance of measuring customer satisfaction in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turriziani, Adriana; Attanasio, Gennaro; Scarcella, Francesco; Sangalli, Luisa; Scopa, Anna; Genualdo, Alessandra; Quici, Stefano; Nazzicone, Giulia; Ricciotti, Maria Adelaide; La Commare, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    In the last decades, palliative care has been more and more focused on the evaluation of patients' and families' satisfaction with care. However, the evaluation of customer satisfaction in palliative care presents a number of issues such as the presence of both patients and their families, the frail condition of the patients and the complexity of their needs, and the lack of standard quality indicators and appropriate measurement tools. In this manuscript, we critically review existing evidence and literature on the evaluation of satisfaction in the palliative care context. Moreover, we provide - as a practical example - the preliminary results of our experience in this setting with the development of a dedicated tool for the measurement of satisfaction.

  7. Palliative radiotherapy in head and neck cancers: Evidence based review

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    Talapatra Kaustav

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck (SCCHN is one of the commonest cancers seen in India, constituting up to 25% of their overall cancer burden. Advanced SCCHN is a bad disease with a poor prognosis and patients usually die of uncontrolled loco-regional disease. Curative intent management of loco-regionally advanced SCCHN has become more evidence-based with active clinical research in the form of large prospective randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses. However, little has been written about palliative radiotherapy (PRT in head and neck cancers. It is widely recognized that PRT provides effective palliation and improved quality-of-life in advanced incurable malignancies. It is in this context that this study proposes to review the existing literature on palliative radiotherapy in advanced incurable SCCHN to help formulate consensus guidelines and recommendations.

  8. [Communication with patients in palliative care: favoring cheerfulness and optimism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo, Monica Martins Trovo; da Silva, Maria Júlia Paes

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this study was to know the expectations of patients who are in palliative care regarding communication with the nursing team. The data were collected during the first semester of 2005 through half-structured interviews among 39 oncological patients with no healing prognosis subjected to palliative chemotherapy in a hospital institution of the city of São Paulo. After transcription of the speeches, the data were analyzed according to the methodology of content analysis. From the interviewees' speeches four categories emerged. Interpersonal communication proved to be an important attribution to palliative care, with particular attention given to the professional's nonverbal signs for establishing a link of trust, the need for a compassionate presence, the desire not to focus the interaction and the relationship only on the disease and on death and to concentrate instead on cheerful verbal communication favoring optimism and good humor.

  9. Profile of patients opting for palliative care in India

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    Prince John

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Understanding the profile of end users is a key input for designing a service. Centers that provide full-scale palliative care are few and far between in our country, and there is a need to open more centers to extend the services to a larger percentage of patients. Methods: Patient data from the inception of the center till January 2016 have been stored in a database. The data were mined, exported to Excel, and analyzed. Results: The data of 11,258 patients revealed the profile of patients, including their age, gender distribution, marital status, symptomology, and outcome. The present paper describes the profile of patients opting for palliative care in our country. Conclusions: The profile of patients registered at this center validates certain assumptions while debunking others. It is hoped that this profile gives some guidance to those desirous of setting up palliative care services.

  10. Performance of Consultative Palliative Care Model in Achieving Quality Metrics in the ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysham, Nicholas G; Hochman, Michael J; Wolf, Steven P; Cox, Christopher E; Kamal, Arif H

    2016-12-01

    Quality metrics for intensive care unit (ICU)-based palliative care have been proposed, but it is unknown how consultative palliative care can contribute to performance on these measures. Assess adherence to proposed quality metrics of ICU-based palliative care by palliative care specialists. Surrogates for 9/14 patient-level quality metrics were assessed in all patients who received an initial palliative care specialist consult while in an ICU from 10/26/2012 to 1/16/2015 in the Global Palliative Care Quality Alliance, a nationwide palliative care quality registry. Two hundred fifty-four patients received an initial palliative care consultation in an ICU setting. Mean (SD) age was 67.5 (17.3) years, 52% were female. The most common reasons for consultation were symptom management (33%) and end-of-life transition (24%). Adherence to ICU quality metrics for palliative care was variable: clinicians documented presence or absence of advance directives in 36% of encounters, assessed pain in 52.0%, dyspnea in 50.8%, spiritual support in 62%, and reported an intervention for pain in 100% of patients with documented moderate to severe intensity pain. Palliative care consultations in an ICU setting are characterized by variable adherence to candidate ICU palliative care quality metrics. Although symptom management was the most common reason for palliative care consultation, consultants infrequently documented symptom assessments. Palliative care consultants performed better in offering spiritual support and managing documented symptoms. These results highlight specific competencies of consultative palliative care that should be complimented by ICU teams to ensure high-quality comprehensive care for the critically ill. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Development and Implementation of a Pediatric Palliative Care Program in a Developing Country

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    Megan Doherty

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundPalliative care is recognized as an important component of care for children with cancer and other life-limiting conditions. In resource limited settings, palliative care is a key component of care for children with cancer and other life-limiting conditions. Globally, 98% of children who need palliative care live in low- or middle-income countries, where there are very few palliative care services available. There is limited evidence describing the practical considerations for the development and implementation of sustainable and cost-effective palliative care services in developing countries.ObjectivesOur aim is to describe the key considerations and initiatives that were successful in planning and implementing a hospital-based pediatric palliative care service specifically designed for a resource-limited setting.SettingBangabandu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU is a tertiary referral hospital in Bangladesh. Local palliative care services are very limited and focused on adult patients. In partnership with World Child Cancer, a project establishing a pediatric palliative care service was developed for children with cancer at BSMMU.ResultsWe describe four key elements which were crucial for the success of this program: (1 raising awareness and sensitizing hospital administrators and clinical staff about pediatric palliative care; (2 providing education and training on pediatric palliative care for clinical staff; (3 forming a pediatric palliative care team; and (4 collecting data to characterize the need for pediatric palliative care.ConclusionThis model of a hospital-based pediatric palliative care service can be replicated in other resource-limited settings and can be expanded to include children with other life-limiting conditions. The development of pilot programs can generate interest among local physicians to become trained in pediatric palliative care and can be used to advocate for the palliative care needs of children.

  12. Gastric Outlet Obstruction Palliation: A Novel Stent-Based Solution

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    Natasha M. Rueth

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Gastric outlet obstruction (GOO after esophagectomy is a morbid outcome and significantly hinders quality of life for end-stage esophageal cancer patients. In the pre-stent era, palliation consisted of chemotherapy, radiation, tumor ablation, or stricture dilation. In the current era, palliative stenting has emerged as an additional tool; however, migration and tumor ingrowth are ongoing challenges. To mitigate these challenges, we developed a novel, hybrid, stent-based approach for the palliative management of GOO. We present a patient with esophageal cancer diagnosed with recurrent, metastatic disease 1 year after esophagectomy. She developed dehydration and intractable emesis, which significantly interfered with her quality of life. For palliation, we dilated the stenosis and proceeded with our stent-based solution. Using a combined endoscopic and fluoroscopic approach, we placed a 12-mm silicone salivary bypass tube across the pylorus, where it kinked slightly because of local tumor biology. To bridge this defect and ensure luminal patency, we placed a nitinol tracheobronchial stent through the silicone stent. Clinically, the patient had immediate relief from her pre-operative symptoms and was discharged home on a liquid diet. In conclusion, GOO and malignant dysphagia after esophagectomy are significant challenges for patients with end-stage disease. Palliative stenting is a viable option, but migration and tumor ingrowth are common complications. The hybrid approach presented here provides a unique solution to these potential pitfalls. The flared silicone tube minimized the chance of migration and impaired tumor ingrowth. The nitinol stent aided with patency and overcame the challenges of the soft tube. This novel strategy achieved palliation, describing another endoscopic option in the treatment of malignant GOO.

  13. A measure of palliative care in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Sarah; Bott, Marjorie; Boyle, Diane; Gajewski, Byron; Tilden, Virginia P

    2011-01-01

    Efforts to improve care for nursing home residents stand to be enhanced by measures to assess the degree to which staff provide palliative care. As the incidence of death in nursing homes increases with the aging population, the gap in measurement must be addressed. To that end, we report the development and psychometric testing of a nursing home palliative care survey. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Palliative Care Survey (PCS) for use in nursing homes. Psychometric evaluation of the instrument was completed in two phases. Phase 1 focused on individual item analyses and subsequent revision or deletion of items, and Phase 2 evaluated evidence for reliability and validity. Phase 1 included 26 nursing homes and staff (n=717), and Phase 2 included 85 nursing homes and staff (n=2779). Data were analyzed using item-total correlations, Cronbach's alpha, confirmatory factor analysis, and analysis of variance. Support was obtained for a 51-item PCS made up of two constructs, Palliative Care Practice and Palliative Care Knowledge. The PCS measures the extent to which the nursing home staff engage in palliative care practices and have knowledge consistent with good end-of-life care. Both practice and knowledge are an essential foundation to providing good end-of-life care to nursing home residents. Efforts to improve care for the dying in nursing homes have been slowed by an absence of measurement tools that capture care processes, a gap that the PCS reported here helps fill. Copyright © 2011 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Quality assessment of palliative home care in Italy.

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    Scaccabarozzi, Gianlorenzo; Lovaglio, Pietro Giorgio; Limonta, Fabrizio; Floriani, Maddalena; Pellegrini, Giacomo

    2017-08-01

    The complexity of end-of-life care, represented by a large number of units caring for dying patients, of different types of organizations motivates the importance of measure the quality of provided care. Despite the law 38/2010 promulgated to remove the barriers and provide affordable access to palliative care, measurement, and monitoring of processes of home care providers in Italy has not been attempted. Using data drawn by an institutional voluntary observatory established in Italy in 2013, collecting home palliative care units caring for people between January and December 2013, we assess the degree to which Italian home palliative care teams endorse a set of standards required by the 38/2010 law and best practices as emerged from the literature. The evaluation strategy is based on Rasch analysis, allowing to objectively measuring both performances of facilities and quality indicators' difficulty on the same metric, using 14 quality indicators identified by the observatory's steering committee. Globally, 195 home care teams were registered in the observatory reporting globally 40 955 cured patients in 2013 representing 66% of the population of home palliative care units active in Italy in 2013. Rasch analysis identifies 5 indicators ("interview" with caregivers, continuous training provided to medical and nursing staff, provision of specialized multidisciplinary interventions, psychological support to the patient and family, and drug supply at home) easy to endorse by health care providers and 3 problematic indicators (presence of a formally established Local Network of Palliative care in the area of reference, provision of the care for most problematic patient requiring high intensity of the care, and the percentage of cancer patient dying at Home). The lack of Local Network of Palliative care, required by law 38/2010, is, at the present, the main barrier to its application. However, the adopted methodology suggests that a clear roadmap for health facilities

  15. [Evaluation of 12 pilot projects to improve outpatient palliative care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Wolf, G; Elsner, F; Lindena, G; Hilgers, R-D; Heussen, N; Rolke, R; Ostgathe, C; Radbruch, L

    2013-12-01

    With a priority programme the German Cancer Aid supported the development of quality-assured outpatient palliative care to cover the whole country. The 12 regional pilot projects funded with the aim to improve outpatient palliative care in different models and different frameworks were concurrently monitored and evaluated. The supported projects, starting and ending individually, documented all patients who were cared for using HOPE (Hospice and palliative care evaluation) and MIDOS (Minimal documentation system for palliative patients). Total data were analyzed for 3239 patients decriptively. In addition to the quantitative data the experiences of the projects were recorded in a number of workshops (2008, 2009, 2010, and 2012). In particular, the experiences reported in the final meeting in July 2012 were considered for this article as well as the final reports for the German Cancer Aid. In the quantitative evaluation 85.6% of 3239 palliative care patients had a cancer diagnosis. In all model projects the goal of a network with close cooperation of primary providers, social support, and outpatient and inpatient specialist services has been achieved. For all projects, the initial financing of the German Cancer Aid was extremely important, because contracts with health insurance funds were negotiated slowly, and could then be built on the experiences with the projects. The participants of the project-completion meeting emphasized the need to carry out a market analysis before starting palliative care organizations considering the different regional structures and target groups of patients. Education, training and continuing education programs contribute significantly to the network. A reliably funded coordination center/case management across all institutions is extremely important. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Family meetings in palliative care: Multidisciplinary clinical practice guidelines

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    O'Hanlon Brendan

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Support for family carers is a core function of palliative care. Family meetings are commonly recommended as a useful way for health care professionals to convey information, discuss goals of care and plan care strategies with patients and family carers. Yet it seems there is insufficient research to demonstrate the utlility of family meetings or the best way to conduct them. This study sought to develop multidisciplinary clinical practice guidelines for conducting family meetings in the specialist palliative care setting based on available evidence and consensus based expert opinion. Methods The guidelines were developed via the following methods: (1 A literature review; (2 Conceptual framework; (3 Refinement of the guidelines based on feedback from an expert panel and focus groups with multidisciplinary specialists from three palliative care units and three major teaching hospitals in Melbourne, Australia. Results The literature review revealed that no comprehensive exploration of the conduct and utility of family meetings in the specialist palliative care setting has occurred. Preliminary clinical guidelines were developed by the research team, based on relevant literature and a conceptual framework informed by: single session therapy, principles of therapeutic communication and models of coping and family consultation. A multidisciplinary expert panel refined the content of the guidelines and the applicability of the guidelines was then assessed via two focus groups of multidisciplinary palliative care specialists. The complete version of the guidelines is presented. Conclusion Family meetings provide an opportunity to enhance the quality of care provided to palliative care patients and their family carers. The clinical guidelines developed from this study offer a framework for preparing, conducting and evaluating family meetings. Future research and clinical implications are outlined.

  17. Palliative radiotherapy for cervical carcinoma, a systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lonkhuijzen, Luc van; Thomas, Gillian

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Worldwide, particularly in developing countries, many women present with advanced stage cervical cancer for which palliative radiotherapy is the treatment of choice or may be the only available treatment. The purpose of this study was to determine from the literature the optimal palliative radiation scheme for the treatment of advanced cervical cancer. Design: A systematic literature review up to January 2010 was performed in Medline, Embase, the Cochrane database, CinHL and Google Scholar using a combination of synonyms for: cervical cancer, palliative treatment and radiation therapy. No limitations were applied for language or study types. For included papers data were extracted and described. Results: Only eight papers were identified and none compared the results of different fractionation schemes. Most used observational retrospective study design with considerable sources of bias. No studies used validated endpoints for symptom relief nor did they include measures of the quality of life. Several papers described the experience with single or multiple monthly 10 Gy doses or with a higher total dose delivered in 2-4 fractions within 48 h to 1 week. Studies report varying amounts of relief from bleeding. The effect on other symptoms such as pain and discharge is not evaluable. Acute and late toxicity is poorly documented. Conclusion: There is a dearth of information in the current literature to guide selection of an optimal palliative radiation schedule for treatment of patients with advanced cervical cancer. Based on this review and information from other solid tumors, there is no evidence to support the common belief that better and longer palliation is achieved with a high dose delivered in multiple smaller fractions. There is a clear need for comparative studies of different radiation fractionation schedules in order to identify an optimal palliative radiation scheme. These studies require the use of validated endpoints to measure specific symptom

  18. [Implementing the Cross-Disciplinary Subject Palliative Care - Lecture's Perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isermeyer, Leonie; Ilse, Benjamin; Marx, Gabriella; Seidemann, Stephanie; Jünger, Jana; Nauck, Friedemann; Alt-Epping, Bernd

    2017-11-01

    Introduction  In 2009, palliative care was introduced as a mandatory subject in the undergraduate medical curriculum in Germany. Despite all efforts to integrate this subject into the curriculum, research suggests substantial differences and deficits in the quality of education between the medical schools. The aim of this research was to find out promoting as well as impedimental aspects of implementing palliative care in the medical training program. By this, a suitable framework in terms of content and structure for palliative care teaching should be extracted. Methods  We performed guided interviews with 15 of the in total 36 lecturers responsible for the implementation of palliative care teaching at their respective medical schools. We focused on content, design and methods of implementation within the palliative care curriculum. Data was evaluated by content analysis according to Meuser and Nagel. Results  We found that a lack of recognition of this subject within the medical faculties, coupled with entrenched structures of an already packed syllabus, were considered to be most relevant for the given heterogeneity in the implementation process. Deficits in personnel, financial and time resources also contributed to the perceived deficits. Faced with these difficulties, inner- and cross-faculty teamwork and support, extracurricular activities as well as external funds have proven to be important resources. Discussion  To promote the implementation process, medical faculties need established palliative care structures that meet the interests and needs of the students more effectively. Analysis of structural needs (for instance, the amount of apprenticeships and teachings units) would be an important step to prove political claims. Moreover, the development of suitable and resource-saving teaching and assessment methods should be promoted. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Palliative reirradiation of recurrent rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lingareddy, Vasudha; Ahmad, Neelofur; Mohiuddin, Mohammed

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE: This report will summarize symptom palliation, complication rate, and survival outcome of an aggressive reirradiation policy for patients with recurrent rectal cancer. MATERIALS and METHODS: From 1987 - 1993, 83 patients with recurrent rectal adenocarcinoma following previous pelvic irradiation (RT) underwent reirradiation. Thirty-one patients were treated with radical intent, and underwent reirradiation followed by planned surgical resection. The remaining fifty-two patients underwent reirradiation alone and are the basis of this study. Median initial RT dose was 50.4 Gy (range 40.0 - 70.2 Gy), and median time to recurrence was 24 months. Reirradiation was delivered with two lateral fields (7x7 - 12x10 cm) encompassing recurrent tumor with a minimum of 2 cm margin and excluding all small bowel. Thirty patients received 1.8 - 2.0 Gy daily fractions, and 22 patients received 1.2 Gy BID fractions. Median reirradiation dose was 30.6 Gy (range 19.8 - 40.8 Gy). Median total cumulative dose was 84.6 Gy (range 66.6 - 104.9 Gy). Forty-seven of the 52 patients received concurrent 5-FU based chemotherapy. Median follow up for the entire group was 16 months (range 2 - 53 months). Eight patients who remain alive at the time of this study had a median follow up of 22 months (range 13 - 48 months). RESULTS: Patients' presenting symptoms included bleeding, pain and mass effect. Results of treatment are shown in Table 1. Treatment was well tolerated. Using the RTOG toxicity scale, 16 patients required a treatment break for grade 3 toxicity including severe diarrhea, moist desquamation, and mucositis. No patient developed grade 4 acute toxicity. Eighteen patients (35%) developed late grade 3 or 4 morbidity, including bowel obstruction in 9 patients, cystitis in 3 patients, fistula in 4 patients and skin ulceration in 1 patient. There was no difference in incidence of late complications by time to recurrence, reirradiation dose, or total cumulative dose. However, there was

  20. Communication skills in palliative surgery: skill and effort are key.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, Thomas J

    2011-04-01

    Excellence as a surgeon requires not only the technical and intellectual ability to effectively take care of surgical disease but also an ability to respond to the needs and questions of patients. This article provides an overview of the importance of communication skills in optimal surgical palliation and offers suggestions for a multidisciplinary team approach, using the palliative triangle as the ideal model of communication and interpersonal skills. This article also discusses guidelines for advanced surgical decision making and outlines methods to improve communication skills. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Palliative care for people with dementia: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillyman, Sue; Bruce, Mary

    2016-02-01

    With growing numbers of people dying with, and from, dementia there is a need for professionals and health-care organisations to review the access to and provision of palliative care. This literature review has identified several key themes in relation to the person dying with dementia including: diagnosis of the dying phase, appropriate timing of referral to specialist palliative care services; ethical decisions in relation to medication and nutrition; the environment; undertreatment especially, for pain relief; over and burdensome treatment interventions; carer involvement; collaborative working and advance decision making.

  2. Palliative and end of life care for people with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison Dening, Karen

    2016-02-03

    Dementia is a life-limiting condition that is largely a disease of ageing. However, older people in general, and older people with dementia in particular, have not always had equal access to effective palliative and end of life care. As a result, people with dementia at the end of life often receive aggressive and burdensome interventions, or inadequate assessment and management of their symptoms. Patterns in how people with dementia experience and present symptoms as they near the end of life can indicate when the goals of care should change and a palliative approach should be adopted.

  3. Palliative care and use of animal-assisted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelman, Suzanne R

    2013-01-01

    A growing body of research and clinical reports support the benefits of utilizing animal-assisted therapy (AAT) as a complementary, transdisciplinary treatment intervention in medical settings. However, fewer articles are found demonstrating AAT's use in palliative care settings. This article is a study of the effects of AAT in palliative care situations, presenting one anecdotal clinical vignette. In this way, the efficacy of this technique in decreasing patient pain, thereby increasing patient quality of life, and lowering staff stress levels may be illustrated.

  4. Pain, music creativity and music therapy in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, C C

    1996-01-01

    An analysis of the music therapy literature yields numerous reports to support the role of music in the alleviation of pain in palliative care. Four theoretical perspectives that support why many patients report reduced pain sensation after music therapy include: the psychological relationship between music and pain; the psychophysiological theory; spinal mechanisms involved in pain modulation; and the role of endorphins. Considerations significant to the use of music in pain relief include how music, used inappropriately, can aggravate pain sensation. Case studies, which include the use of creative music therapy techniques, point to the efficacy of music therapy in alleviating the pain experiences of both palliative care patients and their significant others.

  5. Providing quality palliative care in end-stage Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeaman, Paul A; Ford, James L; Kim, Kye Y

    2013-08-01

    Providing quality palliative care is a daunting task profoundly impacted by diminished patient capacity at the end of life. Alzheimer disease (AD) is a disorder that erases our memories and is projected to increase dramatically for decades to come. By the time the patients with AD reach the end stage of the disease, the ability of patients to provide pertinent subjective complaints of pain and discomfort would have vanished. Historical perspectives of palliative care, exploration of the AD process, ethical issues, and crucial clinical considerations are provided to improve the understanding of disease progression and quality of care for patients with end-stage AD.

  6. Planning a regional palliative care services network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalot, G N

    1989-03-01

    Table 1 summarizes the role of task force members and staff for each of the main tasks of the process of planning. The number of meetings required for each stage of the process is estimated in the last column. Planning for a regional palliative care services network is a process involving "hard" and "soft" elements. Hard elements involve the organizational structure, task force meetings, information/statistical data bases and the discrete tasks summarized in Table 1. These elements are well known, if nokt always well organized in practice. It is the "softer" elements that usually mean the difference between a dull bureaucratic exercise and a creative exchange of ideas and concepts with a vision for the future. Not to be underestimated is the critical role of group development in this process. The Task Force, supported by professional staff expertise and judgment, hopes to achieve a level of group development termed "synergy," that is, where the group outperforms (in terms of quality and quantity of work) its best individual member. Not a small feat, but critical to a successful planning exercise! Any regional planning implies a commitment to change. After all, new services will be added, some phased out, others revised, and others enhanced, resulting in changes in roles and responsibilities of providers. Change should not be greeted with disdain but viewed as a natural part of the environment in which we plan and provide services. A major advantage to the process of planning is that the level of support for change is already mobilized through the various stages of the process highlighted.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Embedding a Palliative Approach in Nursing Care Delivery: An Integrated Knowledge Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawatzky, Richard; Porterfield, Pat; Roberts, Della; Lee, Joyce; Liang, Leah; Reimer-Kirkham, Sheryl; Pesut, Barb; Schalkwyk, Tilly; Stajduhar, Kelli; Tayler, Carolyn; Baumbusch, Jennifer; Thorne, Sally

    A palliative approach involves adapting and integrating principles and values from palliative care into the care of persons who have life-limiting conditions throughout their illness trajectories. The aim of this research was to determine what approaches to nursing care delivery support the integration of a palliative approach in hospital, residential, and home care settings. The findings substantiate the importance of embedding the values and tenets of a palliative approach into nursing care delivery, the roles that nurses have in working with interdisciplinary teams to integrate a palliative approach, and the need for practice supports to facilitate that embedding and integration.

  8. Reflections on the challenges and opportunities for palliative care in Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Munday

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Palliative care in Nepal has been developing over the last 20 years, led by pioneering doctors and nurses who have gained experience in the specialty, often while working overseas, or who have had the opportunity to do clinical attachments abroad. Recently, in collaboration with international palliative care specialists, a national strategy has been developed and adopted to guide future development so that palliative care for all who need it can be provided. This article explores the faith-based context for palliative care and describes the particular issues Nepal faces, the work of Christian mission organizations in supporting palliative care development, and the need for religious and cultural sensitivity.

  9. Use of the Palliative Performance Scale (PPS) for end-of-life prognostication in a palliative medicine consultation service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Francis; Maida, Vincent; Downing, Michael; Lesperance, Mary; Karlson, Nicholas; Kuziemsky, Craig

    2009-06-01

    This study examines the use of the Palliative Performance Scale (PPS) in end-of-life prognostication within a regional palliative care program in a Canadian province. The analysis was done on a prospective cohort of 513 patients assessed by a palliative care consult team as part of an initial community/hospital-based consult. The variables used were initial PPS score, age, gender, diagnosis, cancer type, and survival time. The findings revealed initial PPS to be a significant predictor of survival, along with age, diagnosis, cancer type and site, but not gender. The survival curves were distinct for PPS 10%, 20%, and 30% individually, and for 40%-60% and > or =70% as bands. This is consistent with earlier findings of the ambiguity and difficulty when assessing patients at higher PPS levels because of the subjective nature of the tool. We advocate the use of median survival and survival rates based on a local cohort where feasible, when reporting individual survival estimates.

  10. The need for palliative care in Ireland: a population-based estimate of palliative care using routine mortality data, inclusive of nonmalignant conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Pauline M; Daveson, Barbara A; Ryan, Karen; McQuillan, Regina; Higginson, Irene J; Murtagh, Fliss E M

    2015-04-01

    Over the history of palliative care provision in Ireland, services have predominantly provided care to those with cancer. Previous estimates of palliative care need focused primarily on specialist palliative care and included only a limited number of nonmalignant diseases. The primary aim of this study was to estimate the potential population with generalist and/or specialist palliative care needs in Ireland using routine mortality data inclusive of nonmalignant conditions. The secondary aim was to consider the quality of Irish data available for this population-based estimate. Irish routine mortality data (2007-2011) were analyzed for malignant and nonmalignant conditions recognized as potentially requiring palliative care input, using specific International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems-10th Revision codes. The method developed by Murtagh et al. was used to give a population-based palliative care needs estimate, encompassing generalist and specialist palliative care need. During the period 2007-2011, there were 141,807 deaths. Eighty percent were from conditions recognized as having associated palliative care needs, with 41,253 (30%) deaths from cancer and 71,226 (50%) deaths from noncancer conditions. The majority of deaths, 81% (91,914), were among those ≥65 years. There was a 13.9% (901) increase in deaths of those ≥85 years. Deaths from dementia increased by 51.3%, with an increase in deaths from neurodegenerative disease (42.8%) and cancer (9.5%). Future palliative care policy decisions in Ireland must consider the rapidly aging Irish population with the accompanying increase in deaths from cancer, dementia, and neurodegenerative disease and associated palliative care need. New models of palliative care may be required to address this. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Palliative Care Gaps in Providing Psychological Treatment: A Review of the Current State of Research in Multidisciplinary Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, Elissa; Niknejad, Bahar; Reid, M C

    2018-03-01

    Patients with advanced illness often have high rates of psychological symptoms. Many multicomponent palliative care intervention studies have investigated the efficacy of overall symptom reduction; however, little research has focused explicitly on how interventions address psychological symptoms associated with serious illness. The current study reviewed 59 multicomponent palliative care intervention articles and analyzed the mental health components of palliative care interventions and their outcomes in order to better understand the current state of psychological care in palliative care. The majority of articles (69.5%) did not provide any details regarding the psychological component delivered as part of the palliative care intervention. Most (54.2%) studies did not specify which provider on the team was responsible for providing the psychological intervention. Studies varied regarding the type of outcome measure utilized; multi-symptom assessment scales were used in 54.2% of studies, mental health scales were employed in 25.4%, quality of life and distress scales were used in 16.9%, and no psychological scales were reported in 28.8%. Fewer than half the studies (42.4%) documented a change in a psychological outcome. The majority of analyzed studies failed to describe how psychological symptoms were identified and treated, which discipline on the team provided the treatment, and whether psychological symptoms improved as a result of the intervention. Future research evaluating the effects of palliative care interventions on psychological symptoms will benefit from using reliable and valid psychological outcome measures and providing specificity regarding the psychological components of the intervention and who provides it.

  12. Addressing Palliative Sedation during Expert Consultation: A Descriptive Analysis of the Practice of Dutch Palliative Care Consultation Teams.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Hoek

    Full Text Available Since palliative sedation is considered a complex intervention, consultation teams are increasingly established to support general practice. This study aims to offer insight into the frequency and characteristics of expert consultations regarding palliative sedation.We performed a retrospective analysis of a longitudinal database. This database contained all patient-related consultations by Dutch Palliative Care Consultation teams, that were requested between 2004 and 2011. We described the frequency and characteristics of these consultations, in particular of the subgroup of consultations in which palliative sedation was addressed (i.e. PSa consultations. We used multivariate regression analysis to explore consultation characteristics associated with a higher likelihood of PSa consultations.Of the 44,443 initial consultations, most were requested by general practitioners (73% and most concerned patients with cancer (86%. Palliative sedation was addressed in 18.1% of all consultations. Palliative sedation was relatively more often discussed during consultations for patients with a neurologic disease (OR 1.79; 95% CI: 1.51-2.12 or COPD (OR 1.39; 95% CI: 1.15-1.69 than for patients with cancer. We observed a higher likelihood of PSa consultations if the following topics were also addressed during consultation: dyspnoea (OR 1.30; 95% CI: 1.22-1.40, agitation/delirium (OR 1.57; 95% CI: 1.47-1.68, exhaustion (OR 2.89; 95% CI: 2.61-3.20, euthanasia-related questions (OR 2.65; 95% CI: 2.37-2.96 or existential issues (OR 1.55; 95% CI: 1.31-1.83.In conclusion, PSa consultations accounted for almost one-fifth of all expert consultations and were associated with several case-related characteristics. These characteristics may help clinicians in identifying patients at risk for a more complex disease trajectory at the end of life.

  13. Knowledge of and attitudes towards palliative care among multinational nurses in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abudari, Gassan; Zahreddine, Hassan; Hazeim, Hassan; Assi, Mohammad Al; Emara, Sania

    2014-09-01

    Background Palliative care is not yet integrated into the health-care system in Saudi Arabia. King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre-Riyadh (KFSH&RC-Riyadh) is a tertiary care facility and regional cancer centre in Saudia Arabia with a highly multinational nursing workforce. Little is known about these nurses' knowledge of and attitudes towards palliative care. Aim To determine the palliative care knowledge and attitudes of the nursing workforce of KFSH&RC-Riyadh and any influencing factors. Method A questionnaire including demographic data, the Palliative Care Quiz for Nurses (PCQN), and Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying scale (FATCOD) was completed by 395 staff nurses from 19 countries. Results The nurses scored a mean of 111.66 out of 150 on the FATCOD scale and of 9.06 out of 20 on the PCQN. These scores indicate moderate attitudes towards but a knowledge deficit regarding palliative care. The nurses' palliative care training and years of nursing experience significantly affected the scores. The level of palliative care integration in the nurses' home countries was the most significant factor in multiple regression tests. Conclusion Palliative care integration into the health-care system of the country in which nurses train significantly influences their knowledge of and attitudes towards palliative care. Incorporating palliative care into nursing education might promote positive attitudes towards palliative care in nurses while enhancing their knowledge and skills.

  14. Palliative Care in Vietnam: Long-Term Partnerships Yield Increasing Access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakauer, Eric L; Thinh, Dang Huy Quoc; Khanh, Quach Thanh; Huyen, Hoang Thi Mong; Tuan, Tran Diep; The, Than Ha Ngoc; Cuong, Do Duy; Thuan, Tran Van; Yen, Nguyen Phi; Van Anh, Pham; Cham, Nguyen Thi Phuong; Doyle, Kathleen P; Yen, Nguyen Thi Hai; Khue, Luong Ngoc

    2018-02-01

    Palliative care began in Vietnam in 2001, but steady growth in palliative care services and education commenced several years later when partnerships for ongoing training and technical assistance by committed experts were created with the Ministry of Health, major public hospitals, and medical universities. An empirical analysis of palliative care need by the Ministry of Health in 2006 was followed by national palliative care clinical guidelines, initiation of clinical training for physicians and nurses, and revision of opioid prescribing regulations. As advanced and specialist training programs in palliative care became available, graduates of these programs began helping to establish palliative care services in their hospitals. However, community-based palliative care is not covered by government health insurance and thus is almost completely unavailable. Work is underway to test the hypothesis that insurance coverage of palliative home care not only can improve patient outcomes but also provide financial risk protection for patients' families and reduce costs for the health care system by decreasing hospital admissions near the end of life. A national palliative care policy and strategic plan are needed to maintain progress toward universally accessible cost-effective palliative care services. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Achieving consensus and controversy around applicability of palliative care to dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Steen, Jenny T; Radbruch, Lukas; de Boer, Marike E; Jünger, Saskia; Hughes, Julian C; Larkin, Phil; Gove, Dianne; Francke, Anneke L; Koopmans, Raymond T C M; Firth, Pam; Volicer, Ladislav; Hertogh, Cees M P M

    2016-01-01

    People with dementia may benefit from palliative care which specifically addresses the needs of patients and families affected by this life-limiting disease. On behalf of the European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC), we recently performed a Delphi study to define domains for palliative care in dementia and to provide recommendations for optimal care. An international panel of experts in palliative care, dementia care or both, achieved consensus on almost all domains and recommendations, but the domain concerning the applicability of palliative care to dementia required revision. To examine in detail, the opinions of the international panel of 64 experts around the applicability of palliative care, we explored feedback they provided in the Delphi process. To examine which experts found it less important or less applicable, ordinal regression analyses related characteristics of the panelists to ratings of overall importance of the applicability domain, and to agreement with the domain's four recommendations. Some experts expressed concerns about bringing up end-of-life issues prematurely and about relabeling dementia care as palliative care. Multivariable analyses with the two outcomes of importance and agreement with applicability indicated that younger or less experienced experts and those whose expertise was predominantly in dementia care found palliative care in dementia less important and less applicable. Benefits of palliative care in dementia are acknowledged by experts worldwide, but there is some controversy around its early introduction. Further studies should weigh concerns expressed around care receiving a "palliative" label versus the benefits of applying palliative care early.

  16. African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ChemSearch Journal. Vol 48, No 3 (2018). South African Journal of Animal Science. Vol 8, No 1 (2018). African Journal of Chemical Education. Vol 48, No 2 (2018). South African Journal of Animal Science. Vol 48, No 1 (2018). South African Journal of Animal Science. Vol 7, No 1 (2018). South African Journal of Geomatics.

  17. Insights from health care professionals regarding palliative care options on South Dakota reservations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacson, Mary; Karel, Beth; Varilek, Brandon M; Steenstra, Whitney J; Tanis-Heyenga, Jordan P; Wagner, Amanda

    2015-11-01

    Palliative care options are limited for Native Americans (NA) in South Dakota (SD). This exploratory study offers the perspectives of Native and non-Native health care professionals regarding palliative care specific to NAs. Semi-structured interviews were conducted (N = 7) with participants representing NA (4) and non-Native (3) ethnicities. Non-Native participants were practicing health care professionals in palliative medicine, whereas the NA health care professionals had experience with palliative care. Concept analysis revealed two main themes and five subthemes: (a) barriers to palliative care, for example, insufficient funding, lack of infrastructure, and misconceptions; and (b) implementation strategies, for example, openness and listening and creating the right team. Genuine interest and concern exists for the provision of palliative care to NA communities using collaborative and innovative approaches. To address the health disparities of the NA population specific to palliative care, public health policy reform and education for health professionals are necessary. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Knowledge in palliative care of nursing professionals at a Spanish hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chover-Sierra, Elena; Martínez-Sabater, Antonio; Lapeña-Moñux, Yolanda

    2017-10-19

    to determine the level of knowledge in palliative care of nursing staff at a Spanish tertiary care hospital. descriptive, cross-sectional study. Data were collected about the results of the Spanish version of the Palliative Care Quiz for Nurses (PCQN), sociodemographic aspects, education level and experience in the field of palliative care. Univariate and bivariate descriptive analysis was applied. Statistical significance was set at p palliative care and 64.2% educational background (mainly basic education). The mean percentage of hits on the quiz was 54%, with statistically significant differences in function of the participants' education and experience in palliative care. although the participants show sufficient knowledge on palliative care, they would benefit from a specific training program, in function of the mistaken concepts identified through the quiz, which showed to be a useful tool to diagnose professionals' educational needs in palliative care.

  19. Team-based education in a palliative approach for rural nurses and unlicensed care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Gail; Pesut, Barbara; Hooper, Brenda Pherne; Erbacker, Lynnelle

    2015-06-01

    This article describes the preparation and delivery of an educational intervention designed to improve rural nurses and unlicensed care providers' confidence in a palliative approach to care. A palliative approach takes the principles of supportive palliative care and adapts them for application earlier in nonspecialized palliative contexts for individuals living with life-limiting chronic illness. Curriculum in a palliative approach was constructed for nurses and unlicensed care providers (care aides and home health workers) and was delivered through a workshop and monthly follow-up sessions offered through distance technology. Participants valued the joint interactive education and came away with greater appreciation for one another's contributions to care. Insights were gained into common challenges when attempting to apply a palliative approach in rural areas. Important lessons were learned about educating nurses and unlicensed care providers together, about the use of technology for this group, and about teaching the concept of a palliative approach. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Reporting characteristics of cancer pain: A systematic review and quantitative analysis of research publications in palliative care journals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthil P Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: A common disorder requiring symptom palliation in palliative and end-of-life care is cancer. Cancer pain is recognized as a global health burden. This paper sought to systematically examine the extent to which there is an adequate scientific research base on cancer pain and its reporting characteristics in the palliative care journal literature. Materials and Methods: Search conducted in MEDLINE and CINAHL sought to locate all studies published in 19 palliative/ hospice/ supportive/ end-of-life care journals from 2009 to 2010. The journals included were: American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Care, BMC Palliative Care, Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care, End of Life Care Journal, European Journal of Palliative Care, Hospice Management Advisor, Indian Journal of Palliative Care, International Journal of Palliative Nursing, Internet Journal of Pain Symptom Control and Palliative Care, Journal of Pain and Palliative Care Pharmacotherapy, Journal of Palliative Care, Journal of Palliative Medicine, Journal of Social Work in End-of-life and Palliative Care, Journal of Supportive Oncology, Palliative Medicine, Palliative and Supportive Care, and Supportive Care in Cancer. Journal contents were searched to identify studies that included cancer pain in abstract. Results: During the years 2009 and 2010, of the selected 1,569 articles published in the journals reviewed, only 5.86% (92 articles were on cancer pain. Conclusion: While researchers in the field of palliative care have studied cancer pain, the total percentage for studies is still a low 5.86%. To move the field of palliative care forward so that appropriate guidelines for cancer pain management can be developed, it is critical that more research be reported upon which to base cancer pain therapy in an evidence-based palliative care model.

  1. Reporting Characteristics of Cancer Pain: A Systematic Review and Quantitative Analysis of Research Publications in Palliative Care Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Senthil P

    2011-01-01

    Objective: A common disorder requiring symptom palliation in palliative and end-of-life care is cancer. Cancer pain is recognized as a global health burden. This paper sought to systematically examine the extent to which there is an adequate scientific research base on cancer pain and its reporting characteristics in the palliative care journal literature. Materials and Methods: Search conducted in MEDLINE and CINAHL sought to locate all studies published in 19 palliative/ hospice/ supportive/ end-of-life care journals from 2009 to 2010. The journals included were: American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Care, BMC Palliative Care, Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care, End of Life Care Journal, European Journal of Palliative Care, Hospice Management Advisor, Indian Journal of Palliative Care, International Journal of Palliative Nursing, Internet Journal of Pain Symptom Control and Palliative Care, Journal of Pain and Palliative Care Pharmacotherapy, Journal of Palliative Care, Journal of Palliative Medicine, Journal of Social Work in End-of-life and Palliative Care, Journal of Supportive Oncology, Palliative Medicine, Palliative and Supportive Care, and Supportive Care in Cancer. Journal contents were searched to identify studies that included cancer pain in abstract. Results: During the years 2009 and 2010, of the selected 1,569 articles published in the journals reviewed, only 5.86% (92 articles) were on cancer pain. Conclusion: While researchers in the field of palliative care have studied cancer pain, the total percentage for studies is still a low 5.86%. To move the field of palliative care forward so that appropriate guidelines for cancer pain management can be developed, it is critical that more research be reported upon which to base cancer pain therapy in an evidence-based palliative care model. PMID:21633623

  2. Palliative care for Parkinson's disease: Patient and carer's perspectives explored through qualitative interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Siobhan; Cashell, Alison; Kernohan, W George; Lynch, Marie; McGlade, Ciara; O'Brien, Tony; O'Sullivan, Sean S; Foley, Mary J; Timmons, Suzanne

    2017-07-01

    Palliative care is recommended for non-malignant illnesses, including Parkinson's disease. However, past research with healthcare workers highlights unmet palliative needs in this population and referral rates to Specialist Palliative Care are low. Some healthcare workers perceive a 'fear' in their patients about introducing palliative care. However, less is known about the views of people with Parkinson's disease and their carers about palliative care. (1) To explore the palliative care and related issues most affecting people with Parkinson's disease and their families and (2) to examine perceptions about/understanding of palliative care. This was a qualitative study; semi-structured interviews were conducted, transcribed and analysed using thematic analysis. A total of 31 people participated, both people with Parkinson's disease ( n = 19) and carers ( n = 12), across three Movement Disorder Clinics in the Republic of Ireland. People with Parkinson's disease and their carers were unfamiliar with the term palliative care. When informed of the role of palliative care, most felt that they would benefit from this input. People with Parkinson's disease and carers experienced a high illness burden and wanted extra support. Crises requiring Specialist Palliative Care involvement may occur at diagnosis and later, with advancing illness. Participants wanted more information about palliative care and especially further supports to address their psychosocial needs. A holistic palliative care approach could address the complex physical and psychosocial symptoms experienced by people with Parkinson's disease and their carers, and people with Parkinson's disease and their carers are open to palliative care. Further research needs to explore how palliative care can be introduced into the routine care for people with Parkinson's disease.

  3. Strengthening African Union for African Integration: An African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toshiba

    globalization, there is strong need for African leaders to re-strategize a new world view of African role in African affairs ... need to cope with the forces of globalization and her impact on national sovereignty and threat to local ..... 2011 endorsed a framework, roadmap and architecture of the continental free trade area (CFTA).

  4. A cultural analysis of New Zealand palliative care brochures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Mary Louisa; Berryman, Kay; Oetzel, John; Iti, Tiwai; Reddy, Rangimahora

    2016-12-01

    Low utilization of palliative care services by Māori remains despite increases in services designed to meet Māori needs. The purpose of this study is to explore palliative care information brochures in the context of Māori principles of well-being and communication protocols, and health literacy. We examined 99 brochures from palliative care services in New Zealand and held two focus groups with 12 Māori elders (kaumātua) and extended family (whanau) members. Taking a cultural-discursive approach incorporating Māori worldviews, we analysed textual and conceptual features of the brochures. The findings centred on cultural connection and disconnection within the brochures and serve as a critique of the prominent messages currently presented in these brochures. The findings raise questions about the capacity of agencies to convey culturally resonant messages to kaumātua and their whānau. We identify implications of palliative care brochures for health literacy of provider organizations as well as kaumātua and whanau. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Psychosocial interventions for fatigue during cancer treatment with palliative intent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poort, Hanneke; Peters, Marlies; Bleijenberg, Gijs; Gielissen, Marieke Fm; Goedendorp, Martine Margaretha; Jacobsen, Paul; Verhagen, Stans; Knoop, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Background: Fatigue is a prevalent and burdensome symptom for patients with incurable cancer receiving cancer treatment with palliative intent and is associated with reduced quality of life. Psychosocial interventions seem promising for management of fatigue among cancer patients.Objectives: To

  6. The value of case management in paediatric palliative care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verberne, L.M.

    2017-01-01

    In the Netherlands around 4000 – 6700 children with life-limiting diseases could benefit from paediatric palliative care (PPC). However, adequate PPC is often absent due to the lack of continuity and coordination of care and limited expertise among healthcare professionals (HCP). Consequently, many

  7. Palliative care team visits. Qualitative study through participant observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno Pernias, Maria José; Hueso Montoro, César; Guardia Mancilla, Plácido; Montoya Juárez, Rafael; García Caro, Maria Paz

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the clinical encounters that occur when a palliative care team provides patient care and the features that influence these encounters and indicate whether they are favorable or unfavorable depending on the expectations and feelings of the various participants. Methods: A qualitative case study conducted via participant observation. A total of 12 observations of the meetings of palliative care teams with patients and families in different settings (home, hospital and consultation room) were performed. The visits were follow-up or first visits, either scheduled or on demand. Content analysis of the observation was performed. Results: The analysis showed the normal follow-up activity of the palliative care unit that was focused on controlling symptoms, sharing information and providing advice on therapeutic regimens and care. The environment appeared to condition the patients' expressions and the type of patient relationship. Favorable clinical encounter conditions included kindness and gratitude. Unfavorable conditions were deterioration caused by approaching death, unrealistic family objectives and limited resources. Conclusion: Home visits from basic palliative care teams play an important role in patient and family well-being. The visits seem to focus on controlling symptoms and are conditioned by available resources. PMID:27226663

  8. Validation of a consciousness level scale for palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, F; Bento, M J; Alvarenga, M; Costa, I; Costa, L

    2008-09-01

    The main objective of this study is to validate a Consciousness Scale for palliative care. The scale was named Consciousness Scale for palliative care (CSPC). The validation had two phases: 1) face validity--the scale was assessed by seven healthcare professionals, both doctors and nurses, experienced in palliative care; 2) reliability and construct validity--performed by four investigators, two nurses and two doctors. The construct validation was performed by comparing the CSPC with a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) of 100 mm, anchored in the terms 'awake' and 'unarousable', and then with the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). In this study, all four observers completed 44 periods of observation relative to 38 patients resulting in a total of 176 observations. In the phase of face validation, there were no discrepancies in relation to the issue: the scale provides measures for measurement; the scale can be useful to clinical practice; the scale can improve communication among professionals and the scale is easy to use. As a measure of internal consistency, Cronbach's alpha was found to be very high (0.99). The inter-rater reliability was also very high with an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.99 (P consciousness in palliative care patients. It is very ease to use, not time consuming and can be used with minimal training. Communication between professionals can be improved in the clinical setting and in the research environment.

  9. Palliative Care for Patients and Families With Parkinson's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouca-Machado, R.; Titova, N.; Chaudhuri, K.R.; Bloem, B.R.; Ferreira, J.J.

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disease worldwide. There is widespread consensus that Parkinson patients, their carers, and clinicians involved in their care would benefit from a fully integrated, need-based provision of palliative care. However, the concept of

  10. Palliative Care for Extremely Premature Infants and Their Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boss, Renee D.

    2010-01-01

    Extremely premature infants face multiple acute and chronic life-threatening conditions. In addition, the treatments to ameliorate or cure these conditions often entail pain and discomfort. Integrating palliative care from the moment that extremely premature labor is diagnosed offers families and clinicians support through the process of defining…

  11. Palliative uses of methylphenidate in patients with cancer: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozans, Mark; Dreisbach, Albert; Lertora, Juan J L; Kahn, Marc J

    2002-01-01

    Cancer is, unfortunately, often a terminal disease. The goal of therapy for many patients with cancer is palliation of symptoms common at the end of life, including pain, depression, and cognitive dysfunction. Methylphenidate is a psychostimulant most commonly used in the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. In this report, we review the use of methylphenidate in the palliative care of patients with cancer. This review was written on the basis of a computerized literature search of Medline. We considered all English language publications from 1966 to present using the following key words: methylphenidate, palliative care, and cancer. Forty-nine articles were identified as being relevant for this review. On the basis of this review, we came to the conclusion that methylphenidate is used to ameliorate opioid-induced somnolence, to augment the analgesic effects of opioids, to treat depression, and to improve cognitive function in patients with cancer. The medical literature supports the palliative use of methylphenidate in the care of patients with cancer. Further placebo-controlled trials are needed to elucidate the precise role that methylphenidate will have in providing symptom relief to dying patients.

  12. The Nurses' Knowledge and Attitudes towards the Palliative Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayed, Ahmad; Sayej, Sumaya; Harazneh, Lubna; Fashafsheh, Imad; Eqtait, Faeda

    2015-01-01

    Background: Palliative care (PC) is an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problem associated with life-threatening illness through the prevention and relief of suffering by means of early identification, impeccable assessment and treatment of pain and other problems like physical, psychosocial and…

  13. Continuous Palliative Sedation: Not Only a Response to Physical Suffering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, S.J.; Heide, A.; van Zuylen, L.; Perez, R.S.G.M.; Zuurmond, W.W.A.; van der Maas, P.J.; van Delden, J.J.M.; Rietjens, J.A.C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Palliative sedation is a medical intervention aimed at relieving symptoms that can no longer be controlled by conventional treatment. Ample knowledge is available regarding the nature of such symptoms, but there is no in-depth information regarding how health care workers decide about

  14. Effects of a postqualification course in palliative care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adriaansen, M.J.M.; Achterberg, T. van; Borm, G.F.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: This paper reports a study to determine the effectiveness of a postqualification course in palliative care in terms of increased knowledge, insight and self-efficacy among Registered and Licensed Practical Nurses. BACKGROUND: The importance of measuring the effectiveness of postqualification

  15. Systematic Review of Palliative Care in the Rural Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakitas, Marie A; Elk, Ronit; Astin, Meka; Ceronsky, Lyn; Clifford, Kathleen N; Dionne-Odom, J Nicholas; Emanuel, Linda L; Fink, Regina M; Kvale, Elizabeth; Levkoff, Sue; Ritchie, Christine; Smith, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Many of the world's population live in rural areas. However, access and dissemination of the advances taking place in the field of palliative care to patients living in rural areas have been limited. We searched 2 large databases of the medical literature and found 248 relevant articles; we also identified another 59 articles through networking and a hand search of reference lists. Of those 307 articles, 39 met the inclusion criteria and were grouped into the following subcategories: intervention (n = 4), needs assessment (n = 2), program planning (n = 3), program evaluation (n = 4), education (n = 7), financial (n = 8), and comprehensive/systematic literature reviews (n = 11). We synthesized the current state of rural palliative care research and practice to identify important gaps for future research. Studies were conducted in the United States, Australia, Canada, Africa, Sweden, and India. Two randomized control trials were identified, both of which used telehealth approaches and had positive survival outcomes. One study demonstrated positive patient quality of life and depression outcomes. Research to guide rural palliative care practice is sparse. Approaches to telehealth, community- academic partnerships, and training rural health care professionals show promise, but more research is needed to determine best practices for providing palliative care to patients living in rural settings.

  16. Validating that palliative care giving is a stressful occupation: the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: It remains an incontrovertible fact that the phenomenon of HIV/AIDS has not only posed major health and development challenges, but is also a stressor experienced at local, regional and global levels. This article explores the stressrelated challenges facing volunteer palliative caregivers in the Kanye ...

  17. Perception of Nurses about Palliative Care: Experience from South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to affirm life while recognizing death as a normal process. In a study among nurses in Lebanon, 84.6% of them recognized this objective, a finding at variance from 62.5% found among our respondents.[10] The belief that palliative care is mainly for cancer patients was again reflected in our study. However, it is interesting to ...

  18. [Hypnosis to fight against pain and anxiety in palliative care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintini, Didier; Vitale, Claire; Gaide, Michelle; Surdej, Frédérique; Salas, Sébastien

    2017-12-01

    In our society, hypnosis sometimes has a negative, distorted image. For several years now it has become more widespread in the healthcare field and its use has increased in caring for symptoms such as pain and anxiety. It can be of great help in palliative situations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Geritalk: Communication Skills Training for Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine Fellows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Amy S.; Back, Anthony L.; Arnold, Robert M.; Goldberg, Gabrielle R.; Lim, Betty B.; Litrivis, Evgenia; Smith, Cardinale B.; O’Neill, Lynn B.

    2011-01-01

    Expert communication is essential to high quality care for older patients with serious illness. While the importance of communication skills is widely recognized, formal curricula for teaching communication skills to geriatrics and palliative medicine fellows is often inadequate or unavailable. We drew upon the educational principles and format of an evidence-based, interactive teaching method, to develop an intensive communication skills training course designed specifically to address the common communication challenges faced by geriatrics and palliative medicine fellows. The 2-day retreat, held away from the hospital environment, included large-group overview presentations, small-group communication skills practice, and development of future skills practice commitment. Faculty received in-depth training in small-group facilitation techniques prior to the course. Geriatrics and palliative medicine fellows were recruited to participate in the course and 100% (n=18) enrolled. Overall satisfaction with the course was very high (mean 4.8 on 5-point scale). Compared to before the course, fellows reported an increase in self-assessed preparedness for specific communication challenges (mean increase 1.4 on 5-point scale, pskills practice (mean 4.3 on 5-point scale). In sum, the intensive communication skills program, tailored to the specific needs of geriatrics and palliative medicine fellows, improved fellows’ self-assessed preparedness for challenging communication tasks and provided a model for ongoing deliberate practice of communication skills. PMID:22211768

  20. Geritalk: communication skills training for geriatric and palliative medicine fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Amy S; Back, Anthony L; Arnold, Robert M; Goldberg, Gabrielle R; Lim, Betty B; Litrivis, Evgenia; Smith, Cardinale B; O'Neill, Lynn B

    2012-02-01

    Expert communication is essential to high-quality care for older patients with serious illness. Although the importance of communication skills is widely recognized, formal curricula for teaching communication skills to geriatric and palliative medicine fellows is often inadequate or unavailable. The current study drew upon the educational principles and format of an evidence-based, interactive teaching method to develop an intensive communication skills training course designed specifically to address the common communication challenges that geriatric and palliative medicine fellows face. The 2-day retreat, held away from the hospital environment, included large-group overview presentations, small-group communication skills practice, and development of future skills practice commitment. Faculty received in-depth training in small-group facilitation techniques before the course. Geriatric and palliative medicine fellows were recruited to participate in the course and 100% (n = 18) enrolled. Overall satisfaction with the course was very high (mean 4.8 on a 5-point scale). After the course, fellows reported an increase in self-assessed preparedness for specific communication challenges (mean increase 1.4 on 5-point scale, P skills practice (mean 4.3 on 5-point scale). In sum, the intensive communication skills program, customized for the specific needs of geriatric and palliative medicine fellows, improved fellows' self-assessed preparedness for challenging communication tasks and provided a model for ongoing deliberate practice of communication skills. © 2012, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2011, The American Geriatrics Society.

  1. [The role of the mobile palliative care team nurse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrétien, Sophie

    2015-11-01

    The mobile palliative care and support team nurse works in different departments within the hospital. The clinical situation of a patient enables the team to identify in what ways she is declining and thereby participate in the care management in order to favour the patient's return home. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Paediatric Palliative Care and Intellectual Disability--A Unique Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duc, Jacqueline K.; Herbert, Anthony Robert; Heussler, Helen S.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Paediatric palliative care is a nuanced area of practice with additional complexities in the context of intellectual disability. There is currently minimal research to guide clinicians working in this challenging area of care. Method: This study describes the complex care of children with life-limiting conditions and intellectual…

  3. review of article palliative care in nigeria: challenges and prospects

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zamzar

    as an individual with physical ,psychological, and. 7 social needs .The World Health Organization. (WHO) has named palliative care as one of four strategies to .... Schug S.A, Zech D, Grond S, Jung H ,Meuser. T ,Stible B. A. Long Term use of morphine in cancer patients. J Pain Symptom Manage,. 1992;7: 259- 266. 11.

  4. Barriers to palliative radiotherapy referral: A Canadian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samant, Rajiv S.; Fitzgibbon, Edward; Meng, Joanne; Graham, Ian D.

    2007-01-01

    Radiotherapy is an effective but underutilized treatment modality for cancer patients. We decided to investigate the factors influencing radiotherapy referral among family physicians in our region. A 30-item survey was developed to determine palliative radiotherapy knowledge and factors influencing referral. It was sent to 400 physicians in eastern Ontario (Canada) and the completed surveys were evaluated. The overall response rate was 50% with almost all physicians seeing cancer patients recently (97%) and the majority (80%) providing palliative care. Approximately 56% had referred patients for radiotherapy previously and 59% were aware of the regional community oncology program. Factors influencing radiotherapy referral included the following: waiting times for radiotherapy consultation and treatment, uncertainty about the benefits of radiotherapy, patient age, and perceived patient inconvenience. Physicians who referred patients for radiotherapy were more than likely to provide palliative care, work outside of urban centres, have hospital privileges and had sought advice from a radiation oncologist in the past. A variety of factors influence the referral of cancer patients for radiotherapy by family physicians and addressing issues such as long waiting times, lack of palliative radiotherapy knowledge and awareness of Cancer Centre services could increase the rate of appropriate radiotherapy patient referral

  5. Dilemmas of telling bad news: Paediatric palliative care providers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. In general, the principles of palliative care suggest that, at some stage, patients should be given 'bad news' about poor illness prognosis. e information is oen important for care planning, especially when it involves disclosure to children. Although there are ongoing debates about whether to tell or not to tell ...

  6. PALLIATIVE TREATMENT FOR HIV-RELATED KAPOSrS SARCOMA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    patients (IO%J were homosexual men. Fifty-three patients. (53%) were treated for concomitant pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) [fable n. Optimal or standard therapy for AIDS-related KS has not been defined. The major goals of treatment are palliation of symptoms, shrinkage of tumour to alleviate oedema and psychological ...

  7. Characterising cancer burden and quality of care at two palliative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: This paper describes cancer burden and compares characteristics of cancer patients enrolled at 2 palliative care facilities of contrasting resources ... Methods: Data on all cancer patients registered between October 2010 and October 2015 at Tiyanjane Clinic (at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Blantyre) and ...

  8. Palliative care in children with advanced HIV/AIDS | Chunda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Palliative care in children with advanced HIV/AIDS. R Chunda, V Lavy. Abstract. No Abstract. Malawi Medical Journal Vol.17(2) 2005: 51-52. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/mmj.v17i2.10878.

  9. Palliative care policy analysis in Iran: A conceptual model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojgan Ansari

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Palliative care programs are rapidly evolving for patients with life-threatening illnesses. Increased and earlier access for facilities is a subject of growing importance in health services, policy, and research. Aim: This study was conducted to explain stakeholders' perceptions of the factors affecting the design of such a palliative care system and its policy analysis. Methodology: Semi-structured in-depth interviews conducted following purposive sampling of the participants. Twenty-two participants were included in the study. The interviews were analyzed using qualitative-directed content analysis based on "policy analysis triangle" framework. Results: The findings showed the impact of four categories, namely context (political, social, and structural feasibility, content (target setting, process (attracting stakeholder participation, the standardization of care, and education management, and actors (the Ministry of Health and Medical Education, health-care providers, and volunteers in the analysis of the palliative care policies of Iran. Conclusion: In the past 6 years, attention to palliative care has increased significantly as a result of the National Cancer Research Network with the support of the Ministry of Health. The success of health system plan requires great attention to its aspects of social, political, and executive feasibility. Careful management by policymakers of different stakeholders is vital to ensure support for any national plan, but this is challenging to achieve.

  10. Pediatric palliative care for children with complex chronic medical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwantes, Scott; O'Brien, Helen Wells

    2014-08-01

    Children with complex chronic medical conditions are at risk for significant distress during multiple points in their life. Pediatric palliative care can meaningfully assist in providing support to the child and family throughout their complex care, managing distressing symptoms, anticipating future decision points, and helping the child and family to thrive in their local community. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Attachment theory and spirituality: two threads converging in palliative care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loetz, Cécile; Müller, Jakob; Frick, Eckhard; Petersen, Yvonne; Hvidt, Niels Christian; Mauer, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss and explore the interrelation between two concepts, attachment theory and the concept of spirituality, which are important to palliative care and to founding a multivariate understanding of the patient's needs and challenges. Both concepts have been treated by research in diverse and multiform ways, but little effort has yet been made to integrate them into one theoretical framework in reference to the palliative context. In this paper, we begin an attempt to close this scientific gap theoretically. Following the lines of thought in this paper, we assume that spirituality can be conceptualized as an adequate response of a person's attachment pattern to the peculiarity of the palliative situation. Spirituality can be seen both as a recourse to securely based relationships and as an attempt to explore the ultimate unknown, the mystery of one's own death. Thus, spirituality in the palliative context corresponds to the task of attachment behavior: to transcend symbiosis while continuing bonds and thus to explore the unknown environment independently and without fear. Spiritual activity is interpreted as a human attachment behavior option that receives special quality and importance in the terminal stage of life. Implications for clinical practice and research are discussed in the final section of the paper.

  12. Attachment Theory and Spirituality: Two Threads Converging in Palliative Care?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Loetz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to discuss and explore the interrelation between two concepts, attachment theory and the concept of spirituality, which are important to palliative care and to founding a multivariate understanding of the patient’s needs and challenges. Both concepts have been treated by research in diverse and multiform ways, but little effort has yet been made to integrate them into one theoretical framework in reference to the palliative context. In this paper, we begin an attempt to close this scientific gap theoretically. Following the lines of thought in this paper, we assume that spirituality can be conceptualized as an adequate response of a person’s attachment pattern to the peculiarity of the palliative situation. Spirituality can be seen both as a recourse to securely based relationships and as an attempt to explore the ultimate unknown, the mystery of one’s own death. Thus, spirituality in the palliative context corresponds to the task of attachment behavior: to transcend symbiosis while continuing bonds and thus to explore the unknown environment independently and without fear. Spiritual activity is interpreted as a human attachment behavior option that receives special quality and importance in the terminal stage of life. Implications for clinical practice and research are discussed in the final section of the paper.

  13. Poverty reduction in India through palliative care: A pilot project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy Ratcliff

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Holistic palliative care can reduce the desperate poverty driven by life-limiting illness, and can do so systematically, on a large-scale, in-depth, especially if started early in the illness. Home-based care also frees up hospitals to serve more patients with treatable conditions.

  14. How do palliative medicine physicians assess and manage depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrie, Iain; Lloyd-Williams, Mari; Taylor, Fiona

    2004-04-01

    Depression is a significant symptom for approximately 25% of palliative care patients, but is frequently unrecognized and untreated. This study was carried out to determine how senior doctors working in palliative medicine in the UK assessed and managed depression in their patients. A questionnaire was sent to all palliative care units with a designated consultant or medical director. Questions were asked about assessment and management of depression (pharmacological and nonpharmacological); difficulties encountered, qualifications and current post. The response rate was 63%; two-thirds (90) of respondents were consultants and a further 21 medical directors. The majority (73%) routinely assessed for depression with 27% using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) Scale and 10% asking the patient 'are you depressed'? The most frequently prescribed medication was SSRI (80%). Less than 6% prescribed psychostimulants. Respondents reported difficulties with the assessment and management of depression which mainly focused on distinguishing symptoms of depression from sadness and whether it was appropriate to treat patients when life expectancy was short. Difficulties were identified in accessing psychiatric input by 47%. Depression is identified as being a difficult symptom to manage by many senior palliative care physicians in the UK and suggestions are made as to how some of theses issues can be addressed.

  15. Design of a Postgraduate Course in Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriaansen, Marian J. M.; Frederiks, Carla M. A.

    2002-01-01

    A postgraduate course on palliative nursing includes four class sessions and four peer review meetings in which students discuss case studies and assignments. The course is intended to prepare nurses for the bureaucratic, biomedical, social-therapeutic, and informal roles of terminal care. (SK)

  16. Professional competence and palliative care: an ethical perspective.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olthuis, G.J.; Dekkers, W.J.M.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this article is to explore an ethical view of professional competence by examining the professional competence of physicians in the context of palliative care. A discussion of the four dimensions of professional competence--knowledge, technical skills, relationships, and affective and

  17. Improving palliative treatment of patients with non-operable cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Improving palliative treatment of patients with non-operable cancer of the oesophagus: training doctors and nurses in the use of self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) in Malawi. ... Nationwide only three hospitals are able to perform oesophagectomies, and there is no radiotherapy- or chemotherapy available. Owing to late ...

  18. African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017). South African Family Practice. Vol 30, No 4 (2017). South African Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Vol 22, No 3 (2017). Journal of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes of South Africa. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL.

  19. Retraction | Simon | African Zoology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Panthera leo) ina. West African national park”. African Zoology is publishing an Editorial Expression of Concern regarding the following article: “New records of a threatened lion population (Panthera leo) in a West African national park” by ...

  20. African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Science and Technology; Educational leadership and management: theory, policy and practice. South African Journal of Education; Involute Spur Gear Template Development by Parametric Technique Using Computer Aided Design African Research Review; Drug interactions with tuberculosis therapy

  1. African Journals Online: Health

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    bioline.org.br/hs. African Health Sciences encourages authors to now submit ... The African Journal of Drug & Alcohol Studies is an international scientific journal published by the African Centre for Research and Information on ...

  2. Effectiveness of "palliative care information booklet" in enhancing nurses′ knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita David

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Patients diagnosed with a disease like cancer require not only physical control of disease but also they need psychological reassurance, social and spiritual support in coming to terms with their disease. Nurses working in the specialized cancer hospitals play a significant role in the care of terminally ill patients. They must be knowledgeable, skilled and sensitive to the needs of these patients and their families in order to provide active, holistic care. Aims: In this study, we attempted to assess the level of knowledge about palliative care among nurses working in the oncology department using a self administered structured questionnaire and also to assess the effectiveness of information booklet designed on various aspects of palliative care on their knowledge. Settings and Design: Indo American Cancer Hospital, Hyderabad, AP, India. The design adopted for this study was One Group pretest - posttest, pre - experimental design. Materials and Methods: Hundred nurses working in Indo American Cancer Hospital, Hyderabad, AP, India were selected by using the non probability purposive sampling technique. A structured self administered questionnaire was prepared and administered as a pretest. An information booklet was developed pertaining to the general concepts of palliative care, care components (physical, social, emotional and spiritual and role of the nurse in palliative care and it was given to the participants. As a post test, the same questionnaire was re-administered after four days to the same study subjects. Pretest and post test knowledge scores were compared and the findings were analyzed statistically. Statistical analysis used : Microsoft Excel and Statistical Package for Social Science package. Results: The post test scores were significantly higher than the pretest knowledge scores, which indicate that the developed information booklet regarding palliative care was highly effective in enhancing the knowledge levels of the

  3. Cultural and religious considerations in pediatric palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, Lori; McConnell, Denice Grady; Latella, Lauren; Ludi, Erica

    2013-02-01

    A growing multicultural society presents healthcare providers with a difficult task of providing appropriate care for individuals who have different life experiences, beliefs, value systems, religions, languages, and notions of healthcare. This is especially vital when end-of-life care is needed during childhood. There is a dearth of literature addressing cultural considerations in the pediatric palliative care field. As members of a specific culture often do not ascribe to the same religious traditions, the purpose of this article was to explore and review how culture and religion informs and shapes pediatric palliative care. Comprehensive literature searches were completed through an online search of nine databases for articles published between 1980 and 2011: PsychINFO, MEDLINE®, Journal of Citation Reports-Science Edition, Embase, Scopus, CINAHL®, Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI), EBSCO, and Ovid. Key terms included: culture, transcultural, spiritual, international, ethnic, customs or religion AND end-of-life, palliative care, death, dying, cancer, or hospice, and children, pediatrics, or pediatric oncology. Reference lists in the retrieved articles were examined for additional studies that fit the inclusion criteria, and relevant articles were included for review. In addition, web-based searches of specific journals were conducted. These included, but were not limited to: Qualitative Health Research, Psycho-Oncology, Journal of Psychosocial Oncology, Journal of Pediatric Psychology, Journal of Pediatric Health Care, Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, Omega, Social Work in Health Care, and Journal of Palliative Medicine. Thirty-seven articles met eligibility criteria. From these, seven distinct themes emerged that have implications for pediatric palliative care. These include the role of culture in decision-making, faith and the involvement of clergy, communication (spoken and unspoken language), communicating to children about death (truth telling

  4. The utilization of physical therapy in a palliative care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagnini, Marcos; Lodhi, Mohammed; Born, Wendi

    2003-02-01

    In the supportive oncology and palliative care settings, rehabilitation interventions are often overlooked and underutilized, despite high levels of functional disability in these patients. As a result, little is known about the utilization or effectiveness of rehabilitation interventions in palliative care populations. To assess the utilization of physical therapy (PT) in a hospital-based palliative care unit, to characterize functional disabilities in patients who received PT, and to identify factors related to functional improvement following a course of PT. Retrospective chart review of 100 patients (mean age 70 years, 97% male) discharged from the Milwaukee Veterans Hospital Palliative Care unit over 15 months. Activities of daily living (ADL) performance scores were recorded on admission, at 2 weeks, and at completion of the PT program and correlated with demographic and disease-related variables. Thirty-seven patients received a formal PT assessment, and 18 patients underwent PT. The most common functional disabilities in patients who received PT were deconditioning, pain, imbalance, and focal weakness. Ten patients demonstrated improvement in ADL function at 2 weeks. Six patients completed the course of PT. Albumin was significantly correlated with functional improvement. When controlling for albumin, patients with diagnosis of dementia were more likely to show improvement in functional status than patients without a dementia diagnosis. PT assessment and utilization were uncommon in this group. When utilized, PT benefited 56% of patients. Factors related to functional improvement following a PT course were a higher albumin level and a diagnosis of dementia. Prospective trials of PT in palliative care patients are needed to better define response rate and predictors of response.

  5. A reliability and validity study of the Palliative Performance Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Downing Michael G

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Palliative Performance Scale (PPS was first introduced in1996 as a new tool for measurement of performance status in palliative care. PPS has been used in many countries and has been translated into other languages. Methods This study evaluated the reliability and validity of PPS. A web-based, case scenarios study with a test-retest format was used to determine reliability. Fifty-three participants were recruited and randomly divided into two groups, each evaluating 11 cases at two time points. The validity study was based on the content validation of 15 palliative care experts conducted over telephone interviews, with discussion on five themes: PPS as clinical assessment tool, the usefulness of PPS, PPS scores affecting decision making, the problems in using PPS, and the adequacy of PPS instruction. Results The intraclass correlation coefficients for absolute agreement were 0.959 and 0.964 for Group 1, at Time-1 and Time-2; 0.951 and 0.931 for Group 2, at Time-1 and Time-2 respectively. Results showed that the participants were consistent in their scoring over the two times, with a mean Cohen's kappa of 0.67 for Group 1 and 0.71 for Group 2. In the validity study, all experts agreed that PPS is a valuable clinical assessment tool in palliative care. Many of them have already incorporated PPS as part of their practice standard. Conclusion The results of the reliability study demonstrated that PPS is a reliable tool. The validity study found that most experts did not feel a need to further modify PPS and, only two experts requested that some performance status measures be defined more clearly. Areas of PPS use include prognostication, disease monitoring, care planning, hospital resource allocation, clinical teaching and research. PPS is also a good communication tool between palliative care workers.

  6. Specialty Palliative Care Consultations for Nursing Home Residents With Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Susan C; Lima, Julie C; Intrator, Orna; Martin, Edward; Bull, Janet; Hanson, Laura C

    2017-07-01

    U.S. nursing home (NH) residents with dementia have limited access to specialty palliative care beyond Medicare hospice. The objective of this study was to examine the value of expanded palliative care access for NH residents with moderate-to-very severe dementia. We merged palliative care consultation data in 31 NHs in two states to Medicare data to identify residents with consultations, moderate-to-very severe dementia, and deaths in 2006-2010. Initial palliative consultations were identified as occurring later and earlier (1-30 days and 31-180 days before death, respectively). Three controls for each consultation recipient were selected using propensity score matching. Weighted multivariate analyses evaluated the effect of consultations on hospital or acute care use seven and 30 days before death and on (potentially) burdensome transitions (i.e., hospital or hospice admission three days before death or two plus acute care transitions 30 days before death). With earlier consultation (vs. no consultation), hospitalization rates in the seven days before death were on average 13.2 percentage points lower (95% confidence interval [CI] -21.8%, -4.7%) and with later consultation 5.9 percentage points lower (95% CI -13.7%, +4.9%). For earlier consultations (vs. no consultations), rates were 18.4 percentage points lower (95% CI -28.5%, -8.4%) for hospitalizations and 11.9 lower (95% CI -20.7%, -3.1%) for emergency room visits 30 days before death; they were 20.2 percentage points lower (95% CI -28.5%, -12.0%) for burdensome transitions. Consultations appear to reduce acute care use and (potentially) burdensome transitions for dying residents with dementia. Reductions were greater when consultations were earlier. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Usage Patterns of a Mobile Palliative Care Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haipeng; Liu, David; Marks, Sean; Rickerson, Elizabeth M; Wright, Adam; Gordon, William J; Landman, Adam

    2018-02-26

    Fast Facts Mobile (FFM) was created to be a convenient way for clinicians to access the Fast Facts and Concepts database of palliative care articles on a smartphone or tablet device. We analyzed usage patterns of FFM through an integrated analytics platform on the mobile versions of the FFM application. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the usage data from FFM as a way to better understand user behavior for FFM as a palliative care educational tool. This is an exploratory, retrospective analysis of de-identified analytics data collected through the iOS and Android versions of FFM captured from November 2015 to November 2016. FFM App download statistics from November 1, 2015, to November 1, 2016, were accessed from the Apple and Google development websites. Further FFM session data were obtained from the analytics platform built into FFM. FFM was downloaded 9409 times over the year with 201,383 articles accessed. The most searched-for terms in FFM include the following: nausea, methadone, and delirium. We compared frequent users of FFM to infrequent users of FFM and found that 13% of all users comprise 66% of all activity in the application. Demand for useful and scalable tools for both primary palliative care and specialty palliative care will likely continue to grow. Understanding the usage patterns for FFM has the potential to inform the development of future versions of Fast Facts. Further studies of mobile palliative care educational tools will be needed to further define the impact of these educational tools.

  8. Early palliative care for adults with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haun, Markus W; Estel, Stephanie; Rücker, Gerta; Friederich, Hans-Christoph; Villalobos, Matthias; Thomas, Michael; Hartmann, Mechthild

    2017-06-12

    Incurable cancer, which often constitutes an enormous challenge for patients, their families, and medical professionals, profoundly affects the patient's physical and psychosocial well-being. In standard cancer care, palliative measures generally are initiated when it is evident that disease-modifying treatments have been unsuccessful, no treatments can be offered, or death is anticipated. In contrast, early palliative care is initiated much earlier in the disease trajectory and closer to the diagnosis of incurable cancer. To compare effects of early palliative care interventions versus treatment as usual/standard cancer care on health-related quality of life, depression, symptom intensity, and survival among adults with a diagnosis of advanced cancer. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PsycINFO, OpenGrey (a database for grey literature), and three clinical trial registers to October 2016. We checked reference lists, searched citations, and contacted study authors to identify additional studies. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and cluster-randomised controlled trials (cRCTs) on professional palliative care services that provided or co-ordinated comprehensive care for adults at early advanced stages of cancer. We used standard methodological procedures as expected by Cochrane. We assessed risk of bias, extracted data, and collected information on adverse events. For quantitative synthesis, we combined respective results on our primary outcomes of health-related quality of life, survival (death hazard ratio), depression, and symptom intensity across studies in meta-analyses using an inverse variance random-effects model. We expressed pooled effects as standardised mean differences (SMDs, or Hedges' adjusted g). We assessed certainty of evidence at the outcome level using GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and

  9. Palliative Care Training in Cardiology Fellowship: A National Survey of the Fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabbouseh, Noura M; Kaushal, Shivtej; Peltier, Wendy; Johnston, Fabian M

    2018-02-01

    To address perspectives of cardiology fellows on the current state of palliative education and palliative and hospice resource utilization within their fellowship experiences. We conducted an online national survey of cardiology fellows during the 2015 to 2016 academic year. Survey questions aimed to assess perceived importance of palliative care education, level of palliative care education during fellowship, and the structure of palliative care support at respondent institutions. Responses were collected anonymously. A total of 519 programs, including subspecialty programs, were contacted. We received 365 responses, a number that represents roughly 14% of all cardiology fellows nationwide during the 2015 to 2016 academic year. Fellows reported discordance in the quality of education between general cardiology and palliative care principles as it relates to care of the patient approaching the end of life. Fellows infrequently received explicit training nor were observed or mentored in delivering end-of-life discussions. Respondents reported an underutilization of palliative care and hospice resources during fellowship training and also a perception that attending faculty were not routinely addressing goals of care. Our survey results highlight a need for enhanced palliative care and end-of-life training experiences for cardiology fellows and also suggest underutilization of hospice and palliative care resources for patients with advanced cardiac diseases. These findings create a platform for future work that might: (1) confirm this training deficit, (2) lead to exploration of educational models that could reconcile this deficit, and (3) potentially help improve palliative care support for patients and families facing advanced heart disease.

  10. Palliative Care Issues and Challenges in Saudi Arabia: Knowledge Assessment Among Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khraisat, Omar Mohammad; Hamdan, Mahmoud; Ghazzawwi, Mohannad

    Nurses are the heart of the palliative care team who provide high standards of care since they spend the longest time with patients. However, lack of adequate knowledge of palliative care is considered as one of the main obstacles to palliative care improvement. A survey was conducted to assess Saudi nursing students' knowledge about palliative care. Using a descriptive design, 154 students who enrolled in first year and who will graduate within 1 year were surveyed in a nursing college located in Riyadh, the capital of Saudi Arabia. The Palliative Care Quiz for Nursing (PCQN) was used to assess students' knowledge. The sample mean age was 22.1 (standard deviation (SD): 2.2), and most of the students were predominately female (93; 60.4%) and the majority were senior students who will be graduated within the current academic year (105; 68.2%). The total mean score of palliative care knowledge was low at 7.30 (SD: 0.56; range: 0-13), and the number of correctly answered statements ranged from 16 (10.4%, statement no. 7) to 91 (59.1%, statement no. 18). Eleven misconceptions about palliative care among participants are conceptually categorized into 3categories: principle and philosophy of palliative care, pain and symptom management, and psychological and spiritual care. Integrating palliative care education within the nursing programs is the backbone to improve nursing students' knowledge, namely, in principles of palliative care and symptom management.

  11. Participation of radiotherapy in interdisciplinary palliative care units. Challenge and chance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momm, F.; Frommhold, H.; Becker, G.; Ewald, H.; Baumgartner, J.; Adamietz, I.A.

    2004-01-01

    Background: in Germany, a sufficient system of palliative care does not exist. Possibilities for participation of radiooncologists in the further development of this promising part of medical action are reported. Material and methods: experiences from interdisciplinary work in the field of palliative care are described. This experience is communicated for use in the actual discussion about the future of palliative care in Germany, especially in the field of radiooncology. Results: a palliative care unit can only work in a team of different professions, which means different physicians, but also nurses, social workers, psychologists or pastors. A palliative care unit will benefit from working with radiooncologists as well as radiooncologists will do from working in the field of palliative care. Conclusion: in times of growing interest in and need for palliative care, radiooncologists should actively participate in the development of palliative care units in Germany. The aim of this participation should be to reasonably arrange the treatment of incurably ill patients with the chances of modern radiotherapy. Another aim should be to improve the treatment of ''classic'' radiation oncology patients by ideas of pallative care. The further development of palliative care in Germany should not take place without the participation of radiooncologists. This will meet the interests of palliative care and radiotherapy and - most importantly - the patients' interests. (orig.) [de

  12. Resources for Educating, Training, and Mentoring All Physicians Providing Palliative Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Abstract This article presents a rapid review of the published literature and available resources for educating Canadian physicians to provide palliative and end-of-life care. Several key messages emerge from the review. First, there are many palliative care educational resources already available for Canadian physicians. Second, the many palliative care education resources are often not used in physician training. Third, we know that some palliative care educational interventions are inexpensive and scalable, while others are costly and time-consuming; we know very little about which palliative care educational interventions impact physician behavior and patient care. Fourth, two palliative care competency areas in particular can be readily taught: symptom management and communication skill (e.g., breaking bad news and advance care planning). Fifth, palliative care educational interventions are undermined by the “hidden curriculum” in medical education; interventions must be accompanied by continuing education and faculty development to create lasting change in physician behavior. Sixth, undergraduate and postgraduate medical training is shifting from a time-based training paradigm to competency-based training and evaluation. Seventh, virtually every physician in Canada should be able to provide basic palliative care; physicians in specialized areas of practice should receive palliative care education that is tailored to their area, rather than generic educational interventions. For each key message, one or more implications are provided, which can serve as recommendations for a framework to improve palliative care as a whole in Canada. PMID:29283871

  13. Palliative care development in Latin America: an analysis using macro indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastrana, Tania; Torres-Vigil, Isabel; De Lima, Liliana

    2014-12-01

    Recently, the Latin American Association for Palliative Care developed 10 indicators to monitor the development of palliative care and enhance the development of regional and national strategies. To compare the status of palliative care development across Latin American nations using the Latin American Association for Palliative Care indicators and to classify the countries into three levels of palliative care development. A secondary analysis using the following indicators (number of indicators in each category): Policy (1), Education (3), Service Provision (3), and Opioids (3). A Latin American Association for Palliative Care Index was constructed adding the standard score (z-score) of each indicator. Nineteen Spanish and Portuguese-speaking countries of Latin America. Indicators significantly associated with the number of palliative care services per million inhabitants included: the proportion of medical schools with palliative care at the undergraduate level (p = 0.003), the number of accredited physicians working in palliative care (p = 0.001), and opioids consumed per capita (p = 0.032). According to the Latin American Association for Palliative Care Index, Costa Rica registered the highest score (8.1). Three ranking groups were built to measure palliative care development; Costa Rica, Chile, Mexico, and Argentina ranked in the high group, while Bolivia, Honduras, Dominican Republic, and Guatemala ranked in the lowest group. Most of the Latin American Association for Palliative Care indicators are useful for assessing national levels of palliative care development. These indicators may be applicable to other world regions. Additional studies are needed to evaluate the specificity of each indicator. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Branding Palliative Care Units by Avoiding the Terms “Palliative” and “Hospice”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ying-Xiu; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Lin, Ming-Hwai

    2017-01-01

    The term “palliative care” has a negative connotation and may act as a barrier to early patient referrals. Rebranding has thus been proposed as a strategy to reduce the negative perceptions associated with palliative care. For example, using the term “supportive care” instead of “palliative care” in naming palliative care units has been proposed in several studies. In Taiwan, terms other than “palliative” and “hospice” are already widely used in the names of palliative care units. With this in mind, this study investigated the characteristics of palliative care unit names in order to better understand the role of naming in palliative care. Relevant data were collected from the Taiwan Academy of Hospice Palliative Medicine, the National Health Insurance Administration of the Ministry of Health and Welfare, and the open database maintained by the government of Taiwan. We found a clear phenomenon of avoiding use of the terms “palliative” and “hospice” in the naming of palliative care units, a phenomenon that reflects the stigma attached to the terms “palliative” and “hospice” in Taiwan. At the time of the study (September, 2016), there were 55 palliative care units in Taiwan. Only 20.0% (n = 11) of the palliative care unit names included the term “palliative,” while 25.2% (n = 14) included the term “hospice.” Religiously affiliated hospitals were less likely to use the terms “palliative” and “hospice” (χ2 = 11.461, P = .001). There was also a lower prevalence of use of the terms “palliative” and “hospice” for naming palliative care units in private hospitals than in public hospitals (χ2 = 4.61, P = .032). This finding highlights the strong stigma attached to the terms “palliative” and “hospice” in Taiwan. It is hypothesized that sociocultural and religious factors may partially account for this phenomenon. PMID:28140730

  15. Palliative medicine specialists' causal explanations for depression in the palliative care setting: a qualitative in-depth interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Felicity; Crawford, Gregory B; Chur-Hansen, Anna

    2016-06-01

    Medical practitioners have different causal explanations for depression, and may have greater difficulty in explaining causality of depression in the palliative care setting. The objective of this study was to investigate and describe the causal explanations of depression in the palliative care setting, from the perspective of palliative medicine specialists. Palliative medicine specialists practising in Australia were recruited and purposively sampled. Individual semistructured, in-depth interviews were conducted to explore their explanatory models of depression, including a focus on causal explanations. Nine participants were interviewed to reach data saturation. Interview transcripts were analysed for themes. Six themes for causal explanations of depression were identified: (1) Depression is inexplicable; (2) Biological explanations-primarily neurotransmitter depletion; (3) Psychological explanations-including reaction to circumstances, inability to accept illness and dying, diminished self, and coping mechanisms; (4) Social explanations-including inadequate social support, and contribution from modern medicine and societal norms; (5) Interrelationships between causal factors-mainly multifactoriality; (6) Different explanation for de novo and pre-existing depressions. Participants also articulated a link between causal explanations and clinical interventions. Palliative medicine specialists hold causal explanations of depression that align with the biopsychosocial and vulnerability-stress models. They use multiple individual explanations with diverse theoretical underpinnings, and largely view depression as multifactorial in causality. Given that causal explanations are linked to clinical interventions, these findings have implications for clinical practice and medical education. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  16. Palliative care in heart failure : a position statement from the palliative care workshop of the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaarsma, Tiny; Beattie, James M.; Ryder, Mary; Rutten, Frans H.; McDonagh, Theresa; Mohacsi, Paul; Murray, Scott A.; Grodzicki, Thomas; Bergh, Ingrid; Metra, Marco; Ekman, Inger; Angermann, Christiane; Leventhal, Marcia; Pitsis, Antonis; Anker, Stefan D.; Gavazzi, Antonello; Ponikowski, Piotr; Dickstein, Kenneth; Delacretaz, Etienne; Blue, Lynda; Strasser, Florian; McMurray, John

    Heart failure is a serious condition and equivalent to malignant disease in terms of symptom burden and mortality. At this moment only a comparatively small number of heart failure patients receive specialist palliative care. Heart failure patients may have generic palliative care needs, such as

  17. The perceived impact of public involvement in palliative care in a provincial palliative care network in the Netherlands : a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henk van Rijswijk; Esther Stoffers; Anna Beurskens; M. Beckers; F.A. Haarsma; Albine Moser

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective Public involvement in palliative care is challenging and difficult, because people in need of palliative care are often not capable of speaking up for themselves. Patient representatives advocate for their common interests. The aim of our study was to examine in depth the

  18. White paper defining optimal palliative care in older people with dementia: a Delphi study and recommendations from the European Association for Palliative Care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steen, J.T. van der; Radbruch, L.; Hertogh, C.M.P.M.; Boer, M.E. de; Hughes, J.C.; Larkin, P.; Francke, A.L.; Jünger, S.; Gove, D.; Firth, P.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.; Volicer, L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dementia is a life-limiting disease without curative treatments. Patients and families may need palliative care specific to dementia. Aim:To define optimal palliative care in dementia. Methods: Five-round Delphi study. Based on literature, a core group of 12 experts from 6 countries

  19. White paper defining optimal palliative care in older people with dementia: A Delphi study and recommendations from the European Association for Palliative Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Steen, J.T.; Radbruch, L.; Hertogh, C.M.P.M.; de Boer, M.E.; Hughes, J.C.; Larkin, P.; Francke, A.L.; Junger, S.; Gove, D.; Firth, P.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.; Volicer, L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dementia is a life-limiting disease without curative treatments. Patients and families may need palliative care specific to dementia. Aim: To define optimal palliative care in dementia. Methods: Five-round Delphi study. Based on literature, a core group of 12 experts from 6 countries

  20. European Association for Palliative Care: Forging a Vision of Excellence in Palliative Care in Central and Eastern European and Former Soviet Union Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radbruch, Lukas; Ling, Julie; Hegedus, Katalin; Larkin, Philip

    2018-02-01

    The European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC) represents many thousands of health care workers and volunteers working in or with an interest in palliative care. In 2016, the EAPC has individual members from 48 nations across the world, and collective members from 57 national palliative care associations in 32 European countries. Throughout its history, the EAPC has produced guidance on a range of palliative care issues. The biennial congresses and research congresses and the comprehensive Web site (www.eapcnet.eu) are renowned and well utilized platforms for dissemination and exchange of palliative care information. The EAPC has also published a newsletter specifically for Eastern European and Central Asian countries that has been available in both English and Russian from 2005 to 2012. In addition, for a period of time, a Russian Web site (www.eapcspeaksrussian.eu) was also available. A survey of palliative care in Central and Eastern European nations sponsored by Open Society Foundation's International Palliative Care Initiative found that in most countries, the national language is preferred rather than using English or Russian for the provision of information. Accordingly, the EAPC Web site provides translations of white papers, position papers, and blog posts in a number of languages. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.