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Sample records for apca african palliative

  1. Validation of a core outcome measure for palliative care in Africa: the APCA African Palliative Outcome Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moll Tony

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the burden of progressive incurable disease in Africa, there is almost no evidence on patient care or outcomes. A primary reason has been the lack of appropriate locally-validated outcome tools. This study aimed to validate a multidimensional scale (the APCA African Palliative Outcome Scale in a multi-centred international study. Methods Validation was conducted across 5 African services and in 3 phases: Phase 1. Face validity: content analysis of qualitative interviews and cognitive interviewing of POS; Phase 2. Construct validity: correlation of POS with Missoula-Vitas Quality of Life Index (Spearman's rank tests; Phase 3. Internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha calculated twice using 2 datasets, test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficients calculated for 2 time points and time to complete (calculated twice using 2 datasets. Results The validation involved 682 patients and 437 family carers, interviewed in 8 different languages. Phase 1. Qualitative interviews (N = 90 patients; N = 38 carers showed POS items mapped well onto identified needs; cognitive interviews (N = 73 patients; N = 29 carers demonstrated good interpretation; Phase 2. POS-MVQoLI Spearman's rank correlations were low-moderate as expected (N = 285; Phase 3. (N = 307, 2nd assessment mean 21.2 hours after first, SD 7.2 Cronbach's Alpha was 0.6 on both datasets, indicating expected moderate internal consistency; test-retest found high intra-class correlation coefficients for all items (0.78-0.89; median time to complete 7 mins, reducing to 5 mins at second visit. Conclusions The APCA African POS has sound psychometric properties, is well comprehended and brief to use. Application of this tool offers the opportunity to at last address the omissions of palliative care research in Africa.

  2. Evaluation of environmental impact from APCA/CW partnership

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examines the APCA/Climate Wise Partnership and its potential energy and environmental impacts. The authors discuss the issues surrounding greenhouse gas emissions from the production of cement, new and future technologies, and the primary drivers and barriers associated with reducing emissions. The APCA/CW Partner actions and the aggregated impacts of these actions that are undertaken through this partnership are examined. These impacts include cost and energy savings and emission reductions for the current year, and estimated for the year 2000. Comparing these impacts to industrial CO2 benchmarks indicate the level of effort and what additionally needs to be accomplished. The current results from this partnership indicate that in the remainder of the industry adopts their level of effort, greenhouse gas emissions can be reduced well below the business-as-usual benchmarks. The US cement industry accounts for about 1.5% of US industrial energy use and about 5% of US industrial carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. In 1997 Climate Wise and the American Portland Cement Alliance (APCA) embarked upon a unique partnership to turn energy efficiency and pollution prevention into a corporate asset. This partnership consists of the 16 APCA member companies, representing nearly 60% of US cement manufacturing capacity. Climate Wise, working with APCA and industry representatives, developed the cement industry Action Plan Software, reporting workbook, and sample Action Plan. Through these tools, continued technical support, and the hard work of the APCA companies, this partnership is showing positive results. Over half of the APCA Climate Wise partners have submitted Action Plans - detailing a comprehensive array of current and future actions to improve energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. These Action Plans have supplied valuable information about how this industry is reducing energy use and greenhouse gas emissions

  3. Outcomes 'out of africa': the selection and implementation of outcome measures for palliative care in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Downing Julia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background End-of-life care research across Africa is under-resourced and under-developed. A central issue in research in end-of-life care is the measurement of effects and outcomes of care on patients and families. Little is known about the experiences of health professionals' selection and implementation of outcome measures (OM in clinical care, research, audit, or teaching in Africa. Methods An online survey was undertaken of those using outcome measures across the region, as part of the PRISMA project. A questionnaire addressing the use of OMs was developed for a similar survey in Europe and adapted for Africa. Participants were sampled through the contacts database of APCA. Invitation emails were sent out in January 2010 and reminders in February 2010. Results 168/301 invited contacts (56% from 24 countries responded, with 78 respondents having previously used OM (65% in clinical practice, 12% in research and 23% for both. Main reasons for not using OM were a lack of guidance/training on using and analysing OM, with 49% saying that they would use the tools if this was provided. 40% of those using OM in clinical practice used POS, and 80% used them to assess, evaluate and monitor change. The POS was also the main tool used in research, with the principle criteria for use being validation in Africa, access to the tool and time needed to complete it. Challenges to the use of tools were shortage of time and resources, lack of guidance and training for the professionals, poor health status of patients and complexity of OM. Researchers also have problems analysing OM data. The APCA African POS was the most common version of the POS used, and was reported as a valuable tool for measuring outcomes. Respondents indicated the ideal outcome tool should be short, multi-dimensional and easy to use. Conclusion This was the first survey on professionals' views on OM in Africa. It showed that the APCA African POS was the most frequently OM used

  4. Where there is no morphine: The challenge and hope of palliative care delivery in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristopher Hartwig

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Tanzania, a country of 42 million, access to oral morphine is rare.Aim: To demonstrate the effectiveness of palliative care teams in reducing patients’ pain and in increasing other positive life qualities in the absence of morphine; and to document the psychological burden experienced by their clinical providers, trained in morphine delivery, as they observed their patients suffering and in extreme pain.Setting: One hundred and forty-fie cancer patients were included from 13 rural hospitals spread across Tanzania.Method: A mixed method study beginning with a retrospective quantitative analysis of cancer patients who were administered the APCA African POS tool four times. Bivariate analyses of the scores at time one and four were compared across the domains. The qualitative arm included an analysis of interviews with six nurses, each with more than fie years’ palliative care experience and no access to strong opioids.Results: Patients and their family caregivers identifid statistically signifiant (p < 0.001 improvements in all of the domains. Thematic analysis of nurse interviews described the patient and family benefis from palliative care but also their great distress when ‘bad cases’ arose who would likely benefi only from oral morphine.Conclusion: People living with chronic cancer-related pain who receive palliative care experience profound physical, spiritual and emotional benefis even without oral morphine. These results demonstrate the need for continued advocacy to increase the availability of oral morphine in these settings in addition to palliative care services.

  5. Development of an alternative plutonium canister assay system (APCA) using He-3 alternative neutron detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to deal with the global shortage of He-3 gas, He-3 alternative neutron detectors using ZnS/10B2O3 ceramic scintillators for nuclear security and the safeguards, and a demonstrator of Alternative Plutonium Canister Assay System (APCA) for the safeguards NDA in which the alternative detectors are employed, have been developed with the support of Japanese government (the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology). The results of the optical guide property of scintillation lights in the alternative detector tubes derived from the simulations using a ray-tracing code are presented in comparison with the test results of the developed alternative detectors. Furthermore, the fundamental performance of APCA estimated from the neutron Monte-Carlo code MVP and the comparison with the performance of the current PCAS are also described, respectively, together with the future plan of the APCA demonstration test. (author)

  6. Best practices in developing a national palliative care policy in resource limited settings: lessons from five African countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luyirika, Emmanuel Bk; Namisango, Eve; Garanganga, Eunice; Monjane, Lidia; Ginindza, Ntombi; Madonsela, Gugulethu; Kiyange, Fatia

    2016-01-01

    Given the high unmet need for palliative care in Africa and other resource limited settings, it is important that countries embrace the public health approach to increasing access through its integration within existing healthcare systems. To give this approach a strong foundation that would ensure sustainability, the World Health Organisation urges member states to ensure that policy environments are suitable for this intervention. The development, strengthening, and implementation of national palliative care policies is a priority. Given the lack of a critical mass of palliative care professionals in the region and deficiency in documenting and sharing best practices as part of information critical for regional development, policy development becomes a complex process. This article shares experiences with regard to best practices when advocating the national palliative care policies. It also tells about policy development process, the important considerations, and cites examples of policy content outlines in Africa. PMID:27563347

  7. Team networking in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruyt, Odette

    2011-01-01

    "If you want to travel quickly, go alone. But if you want to travel far, you must go together". African proverb. The delivery of palliative care is often complex and always involves a group of people, the team, gathered around the patient and those who are close to them. Effective communication and functional responsive systems of care are essential if palliative care is to be delivered in a timely and competent way. Creating and fostering an effective team is one of the greatest challenges for providers of palliative care. Teams are organic and can be life giving or life sapping for their members. PMID:21811361

  8. Team networking in palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odette Spruyt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available "If you want to travel quickly, go alone. But if you want to travel far, you must go together". African proverb. The delivery of palliative care is often complex and always involves a group of people, the team, gathered around the patient and those who are close to them. Effective communication and functional responsive systems of care are essential if palliative care is to be delivered in a timely and competent way. Creating and fostering an effective team is one of the greatest challenges for providers of palliative care. Teams are organic and can be life giving or life sapping for their members.

  9. Palliative Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzo, Marianne

    2016-06-01

    This article is the first in a series on palliative care developed in collaboration with the Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association (HPNA; http://hpna.advancingexpertcare.org). The HPNA aims to guide nurses in preventing and relieving suffering and in giving the best possible care to patients and families, regardless of the stage of disease or the need for other therapies. The HPNA offers education, certification, advocacy, leadership, and research. PMID:27227867

  10. Palliative Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palliative care does not attempt to prolong survival but to the achieve the highest quality of life both for the patient and their family covering their physical, psychological, social and spiritual needs. Radiotherapy (RT), one of the most important therapeutic modalities, has a great significance in palliative medicine for cancer since it attempts to reduce as much as possible the acute reaction associated with the treatment for the patient. (Author)

  11. Team Networking in Palliative Care

    OpenAIRE

    Odette Spruyt

    2011-01-01

    "If you want to travel quickly, go alone. But if you want to travel far, you must go together". African proverb. The delivery of palliative care is often complex and always involves a group of people, the team, gathered around the patient and those who are close to them. Effective communication and functional responsive systems of care are essential if palliative care is to be delivered in a timely and competent way. Creating and fostering an effective team is one of the greatest challenges f...

  12. Oncology and palliative care

    OpenAIRE

    Bausewein, Claudia; Hartenstein, R.

    2000-01-01

    Oncology developed as a discipline over the last decades. Treatment is concentrated on cure or palliation of the illness with the help of chemotherapy, radiotherapy or surgery. Palliative care has its origin in the hospice movement that started around 1960 in the UK. Centre of care is the patient and his family. Focus of care has moved from quantity to quality of life. Symptom control, communication, rehabilitation and care for the dying are main areas of palliative care. Palliative care and ...

  13. Pediatric Palliative Care

    OpenAIRE

    Johnston, Donna L.; Hentz, Tracy A.; Friedman, Debra L.

    2005-01-01

    Pediatric palliative care provides benefit to children living with life-threatening or terminal conditions. Palliative care should be available to all seriously ill children. Palliative care includes the treatment of symptoms such as pain, nausea, dyspnea, constipation, anorexia, and sialorrhea. This care can occur in a variety of settings, from home to hospice to hospital, and must include bereavement care and follow up after the death of a child. There are many challenges in pediatric palli...

  14. Education in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, David E; Blust, Linda

    2005-02-01

    Palliative care education includes the domains of pain and nonpain symptom management, communications skills, ethics and law, psychosocial care, and health systems. Defining key attitudes, knowledge, and skill objectives, and matching these to appropriate learning formats, is essential in educational planning. Abundant educational resource material is available to support classroom and experiential palliative care training. PMID:15639043

  15. [Palliative care in neurology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provinciali, Leandro; Tarquini, Daniela; De Falco, Fabrizio A; Carlini, Giulia; Zappia, Mario; Toni, Danilo

    2015-07-01

    Palliative care in neurology is characterized by the need of taking into account some distinguishing features which supplement and often differ from the general palliative approach to cancer or to severe organ failures. Such position is emphasized by a new concept of palliative assistance which is not limited to the "end of life" stage, as it was the traditional one, but is applied along the entire course of progressive, life-limiting, and disabling conditions. There are various reasons accounting for a differentiation of palliative care in neurology and for the development of specific expertise; the long duration of the advanced stages of many neurological diseases and the distinguishing features of some clinical problems (cognitive disorders, psychic disorders, etc.), in addition to the deterioration of some general aspects (nutrition, etc.), make the general criteria adopted for cancer, severe respiratory, hepatic or renal failures and heart failure inadequate. The neurological diseases which could benefit from the development of a specific palliative approach are dementia, cerebrovascular diseases, movement disorders, neuromuscular diseases, severe traumatic brain injury, brain cancers and multiple sclerosis, as well as less frequent conditions. The growing literature on palliative care in neurology provides evidence of the neurological community's increasing interest in taking care of the advanced and terminal stages of nervous system diseases, thus encouraging research, training and updating in such direction. This document aims to underline the specific neurological requirements concerning the palliative assistance. PMID:26228722

  16. Pediatric palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Karen; Siegel, Linda; Scharbach, Kathryn; Cunningham, Leslie; Cantor, Rabbi Mollie

    2011-06-01

    Progress in pediatric palliative care has gained momentum, but there remain significant barriers to the appropriate provision of palliative care to ill and dying children, including the lack of properly trained health care professionals, resources to finance such care, and scientific research, as well as a continued cultural denial of death in children. This article reviews the epidemiology of pediatric palliative care, special communication concerns, decision making, ethical and legal considerations, symptom assessment and management, psychosocial issues, provision of care across settings, end-of-life care, and bereavement. Educational and supportive resources for health care practitioners and families, respectively, are included. PMID:21628042

  17. Palliative care - managing pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    End of life - pain management; Hospice - pain management ... or if you have side effects from your pain treatments. ... Bookbinder M, McHugh ME. Symptom management in palliative care and ... Medicine . 1st ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2008:chap ...

  18. Future of palliative medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushma Bhatnagar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A ′need-supply′ and ′requirement-distribution mismatch′ along with a continuingneed explosion are the biggest hurdles faced by palliative medicine today. It is the need of the hour to provide an unbiased, equitable and evidence-based palliative care to those in need irrespective of the diagnosis, prognosis, social and economic status or geographical location. Palliative care as a fundamental human right, ensuring provision throughout the illness spectrum, global as well as region-specific capacity building, uniform availability of essential drugs at an affordable price, a multidisciplinary team approachand caregiver-support are some of the achievable goals for the future. This supplanted with a strong political commitment, professional dedication and ′public-private partnerships′ are necessaryto tackle the existing hurdles and the exponentially increasing future need. For effectively going ahead it is of utmost importance to integrate palliative medicine into medical education, healthcare system and societal framework.

  19. Center to Advance Palliative Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Discussion Forum The IPAL Project Palliative Care Leadership Centers (PCLC) Member Resources National Seminar Quick Links Certification ... a Job Manage Job Posts About About The Center to Advance Palliative Care (CAPC) is a national ...

  20. Palliative care in Enugu, Nigeria: Challenges to a new practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonia C Onyeka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Everyone, young and old, male and female, rich and poor, should have access to excellent care during the course of a serious illness and at the end of life. Therefore, a denial of such care becomes an infringement of the individual′s human rights. Because of the efforts of pioneers in this field of Medicine in Africa and beyond, both living and immortalized, we can now say that palliative care in the African context is affordable and achievable. In this article, some of the challenges faced in setting up and running a new palliative care practice in an emerging and developing economy are examined.

  1. Inter-Professional Palliative Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kirsten Halskov; Henriksen, Jette; Meldgaard, Anette

    2013-01-01

    Chapter 11 by Kirsten Halskov Madsen, Anette Meldgaard and Jette Henriksen deals with the development of palliative care programmes aimed at the basic level of palliative care practice. The need to develop educational opportunities at particularly this level – described as ‘the basic inter......-professional level of palliative care’ – has been increasing for many years where palliative care has conventionally and primarily been associated with specialist training. As the authors show – based on a mapping out of existing educational initiatives in a region of Denmark, a reading of the curriculum...... and a description of the organization of palliative care – there is a need for such inter-professional palliative care that raises the level of competences at the basic level and the sharing of knowledge as well as securing the continuous qualifying of healthcare staff working with palliative care....

  2. Palliative care and spirituality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayanasamy Aru

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Critical junctures in patients′ lives such as chronic illnesses and advanced diseases may leave the persons in a state of imbalance or disharmony of body, mind and spirit. With regard to spirituality and healing, there is a consensus in literature about the influence of spirituality on recovery and the ability to cope with and adjust to the varying and demanding states of health and illness. Empirical evidence suggests that spiritual support may act as an adjunct to the palliative care of those facing advanced diseases and end of life. In this article, the author draws from his empirical work on spirituality and culture to develop a discourse on palliative care and spirituality in both secular and non-secular settings. In doing so, this paper offers some understanding into the concept of spirituality, spiritual needs and spiritual care interventions in palliative care in terms of empirical evidence. Responding to spiritual needs could be challenging, but at the same time it could be rewarding to both healthcare practitioner (HCP and patient in that they may experience spiritual growth and development. Patients may derive great health benefits with improvements in their quality of life, resolutions and meaning and purpose in life. It is hoped that the strategies for spiritual support outlined in this paper serve as practical guidelines to HCPs for development of palliative care in South Asia.

  3. Palliation:Hilar cholangiocarcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mahesh; Kr; Goenka; Usha; Goenka

    2014-01-01

    Hilar cholangiocarcinomas are common tumors of the bile duct that are often unresectable at presentation. Palliation, therefore, remains the goal in the majority of these patients. Palliative treatment is particularly indicated in the presence of cholangitis and pruritus but is often also offered for high-grade jaundice and abdominal pain. Endoscopic drainage by placing stents at endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography(ERCP) is usually the preferred modality of palliation. However, for advanced disease, percutaneous stenting has been shown to be superior to endoscopic stenting. Endosonography-guided biliary drainage is emerging as an alternative technique, particularly when ERCP is not possible or fails. Metal stents are usually preferred over plastic stents, both for ERCP and for percutaneous bili-ary drainage. There is no consensus as to whether it is necessary to place multiple stents within advanced hi-lar blocks or whether unilateral stenting would suffice. However, recent data have suggested that, contrary to previous belief, it is useful to drain more than 50% of the liver volume for favorable long-term results. In the presence of cholangitis, it is beneficial to drain all of the obstructed biliary segments. Surgical bypass plays a limited role in palliation and is offered primarily as asegment Ⅲ bypass if, during a laparotomy for resec-tion, the tumor is found to be unresectable. Photody-namic therapy and, more recently, radiofrequency abla-tion have been used as adjuvant therapies to improve the results of biliary stenting. The exact technique to be used for palliation is guided by the extent of the bili-ary involvement(Bismuth class) and the availability of local expertise.

  4. Pediatric Palliative Care at a Glance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ® ™ ® Pediatric Palliative Care at a Glance A child’s serious illness affects the entire family. Pediatric palliative (pal-lee-uh-tiv) care can support ... extra support, palliative care can help. What is pediatric palliative care? Pediatric palliative care is supportive care ...

  5. Cancer and the African American Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    The first plenary of the EPEC-O (Education in Palliative and End-of-Life Care for Oncology) Self-Study: Cultural Considerations When Caring for African Americans explores the many factors that lead to inequalities in cancer care outcomes for African Americans.

  6. Generalist palliative care in hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergenholtz, Heidi; Jarlbæk, Lene; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2016-01-01

    Background: It can be challenging to provide generalist palliative care in hospitals, owing to difficulties in integrating disease-orientedtreatment with palliative care and the influences of cultural and organisational conditions. However, knowledge on the interactionsthat occur is sparse. Aim: To...... investigate the interactions between organisation and culture as conditions for integrated palliative care in hospital and, ifpossible, to suggest workable solutions for the provision of generalist palliative care. Design: A convergent parallel mixed-methods design was chosen using two independent studies: a...... hospital with 29 department managements and one hospital management. Results: Two overall themes emerged: (1) ‘generalist palliative care as a priority at the hospital’, suggesting contrasting issues regardingprioritisation of palliative care at different organisational levels, and (2) ‘knowledge and use...

  7. Improving Palliative Cancer Care

    OpenAIRE

    Del Ferraro, Catherine; Ferrell, Betty; Van Zyl, Carin; Freeman, Bonnie; Klein, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Over a decade ago, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) presented Ensuring Quality Cancer Care in the United States, with recommendations for change (IOM, 1999). However, barriers to integrating palliative care (PC) to achieve high-quality care in cancer still remain. As novel therapeutic agents evolve, patients are living longer, and advanced cancer is now considered a chronic illness. In addition to complex symptom concerns, patients and family caregivers are burdened with psychological, social,...

  8. Pediatric palliative care

    OpenAIRE

    Trapanotto Manuela; Spizzichino Marco; Benini Franca; Ferrante Anna

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The WHO defines pediatric palliative care as the active total care of the child's body, mind and spirit, which also involves giving support to the family. Its purpose is to improve the quality of life of young patients and their families, and in the vast majority of cases the home is the best place to provide such care, but for cultural, affective, educational and organizational reasons, pediatric patients rarely benefit from such an approach. In daily practice, it is clear that pedi...

  9. How to plan research in palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh K Chaturvedi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Research in palliative care has its challenges. However, research in different aspects of palliative care is important. This paper gives simple methods of planning and conducting a research in the area of palliative care in India.

  10. Improving Palliative Cancer Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Ferraro, Catherine; Ferrell, Betty; Van Zyl, Carin; Freeman, Bonnie; Klein, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Over a decade ago, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) presented Ensuring Quality Cancer Care in the United States, with recommendations for change (IOM, 1999). However, barriers to integrating palliative care (PC) to achieve high-quality care in cancer still remain. As novel therapeutic agents evolve, patients are living longer, and advanced cancer is now considered a chronic illness. In addition to complex symptom concerns, patients and family caregivers are burdened with psychological, social, and spiritual distress. Furthermore, data show that PC continues to be underutilized and inaccessible, and current innovative models of integrating PC into standard cancer care lack uniformity. The aim of this article is to address the existing barriers in implementing PC into our cancer care delivery system and discuss how the oncology advanced practice nurse plays an essential role in providing high-quality cancer care. We also review the IOM recommendations; highlight the work done by the National Consensus Project in promoting quality PC; and discuss a National Cancer Institute-funded program project currently conducted at a National Comprehensive Cancer Center, "Palliative Care for Quality of Life and Symptoms Concerns in Lung Cancer," which serves as a model to promote high-quality care for patients and their families. PMID:26114013

  11. What is Pediatric Palliative Care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... communication and coordination of care. With the close communication that palliative care provides, families are better able to choose options that are in line with their values, traditions and culture. This improves the well-being of the entire ...

  12. Palliative Care and Death Anxiety

    OpenAIRE

    İnci, Figen; Öz, Fatma

    2012-01-01

    Diminishing treatment alternatives, losing hope for a possible recovery, insufficient control of pain and inability to provide the necessary technical support lead palliative care to bring multiple problems with itself. Along with technical and professional challenges, palliative care can put a humanitarian strain on the nurse. Caring for a dying patient is a worrisome experience which causes spiritual pain. An increase in nurses' death anxiety may cause unwillingness to be together ...

  13. Palliative Care and Death Anxiety

    OpenAIRE

    Figen Inci; Fatma Oz

    2012-01-01

    Diminishing treatment alternatives, losing hope for a possible recovery, insufficient control of pain and inability to provide the necessary technical support lead palliative care to bring multiple problems with itself. Along with technical and professional challenges, palliative care can put a humanitarian strain on the nurse. Caring for a dying patient is a worrisome experience which causes spiritual pain. An increase in nurses’ death anxiety may cause unwillingness to be together with a dy...

  14. Palliative Procedures in Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Masuda, Emi; Sista, Akhilesh K.; Pua, Bradley B.; Madoff, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Palliative care aims to optimize comfort and function when cure is not possible. Image-guided interventions for palliative treatment of lung cancer is aimed at local control of advanced disease in the affected lung, adjacent mediastinal structures, or distant metastatic sites. These procedures include endovascular therapy for superior vena cava syndrome, bronchial artery embolization for hemoptysis associated with lung cancer, and ablation of osseous metastasis. Pathophysiology, clinical pres...

  15. Palliative care guidelines in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palliative care has its roots in hospice movement arising in the 1970s in Europe and later also in America. From its beginning it has had connection with patients in terminal phase of cancer disease who suffered from many serious symptoms. Nowadays palliative care is also being provided to patients in terminal phase of certain neurological disorders, AIDS, exceptionally for patients with heart, lung or kidney failure. It has become part of modern medicine and of good clinical practice. (author)

  16. Palliative radiotherapy in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The International Agency for Research on Cancer predicts that cancer incidence in developing countries will increase dramatically in the first two decades of this millennium. Already some 80% of cancer patients in developing countries present with incurable disease. [n many cases pain is a severe problem and palliation is needed to improve quality of life as well as extending survival. This paper will consider the physical and clinical aspects of palliative radiotherapy (PRT), choice of radiation modality, alternative approaches to imaging and therapy and cost-benefit considerations. The potential benefits of a dedicated palliative centre include lower cost and therefore more centres, enabling more patients access to regional palliative care. Whilst there is an obvious need for palliative radiotherapy, simple curative treatments could also be managed. C060 radiotherapy has important advantages in developing countries, because of the higher initial cost of a linear accelerator, as well as the need for reliable power supply and the level of skill required by linac technicians and physicists. The beam characteristics of both C060 units and low energy linacs are compared and both are found to be acceptable for palliation. The concept of telemedicine is also discussed, using mobile phones and internet communication to allow rural clinics to receive support from specialists based in the cities, to send images for remote diagnosis and remote dose planning for radiotherapy. (author)

  17. When palliative treatment achieves more than palliation: Instances of long-term survival after palliative radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhup Rastogi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Palliative radiotherapy aims at symptom alleviation and improvement of quality of life. It may be effective in conferring a reasonable quantum of local control, as well as possibly prolonging survival on the short term. However, there can be rare instances where long-term survival, or even cure, results from palliative radiotherapy, which mostly uses sub-therapeutic doses. Aim: To categorize and characterize the patients with long-term survival and/or cure after palliative radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: This study is a retrospective analysis of hospital records of patients treated with palliative radiotherapy from 2001 to 2006 at the Regional Cancer Centre, Shimla. Results: Of the analyzed 963 patients who received palliative radiotherapy, 2.4% (n = 23 survived at least 5 years, with a large majority of these surviving patients (73.9%, n = 17 being free of disease. Conclusions: In addition to providing valuable symptom relief, palliative radiotherapy utilizing sub-therapeutic doses may, in a small proportion of patients, bestow long-term survival, and possibly cure. Rationally, such a favorable, but rare outcome cannot be expected with supportive care alone.

  18. Endoskopie als palliative Therapieoption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sauer P

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinale, hepatobiliäre und Pankreastumoren sind in der Palliativsituation durch die Symptome Dysphagie und Passagestörung, Schmerzen, Ikterus sowie eine erhebliche Einschränkung der Lebensqualität gekennzeichnet. Beim Ösophaguskarzinom kommen neben der Radiochemotherapie lokale Verfahren wie die Bougierung oder die Argon-Plasmakoagulation zum Einsatz. Patienten mit stenosierendem Ösophaguskarzinom, die lokal nicht resektabel sind oder eine fortgeschrittene metastasierende Erkrankung haben, ein nicht kalkulierbares Risiko für ein chirurgisches Vorgehen besitzen oder eine Bestrahlung bzw. kombinierte Radiochemotherapie nicht tolerieren, können palliativ erfolgreich mit Stents behandelt werden. Die Indikationen für enterale Stents bei gastroduodenaler Obstruktion sind noch nicht präzise definiert, aber es gelingt, eine akzeptable Palliation mit erheblicher Verbesserung der Lebensqualität zu erreichen. Bei Patienten mit einem nicht resektablen Pankreaskarzinom ist das vordringliche Therapieziel die Beherrschung des Ikterus. Obwohl auch chirurgische Optionen zur Verfügung stehen, werden die endoskopischen Methoden aufgrund der geringeren Morbidität bevorzugt. Selbstexpandierende Metallstents haben gegenüber Kunststoffendoprothesen den klaren Vorteil der längeren Offenheitsrate.

  19. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... count__/__total__ Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 240 ... and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience ...

  20. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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  2. Palliative Care: What You Should Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Palliative care is provided by a team of doctors, nurses, and other specialists who work together with a ... help you. 3 ? Ask for it! Tell your doctors, nurses, family and caregivers that you want palliative care. ...

  3. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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  1. Pediatric palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trapanotto Manuela

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The WHO defines pediatric palliative care as the active total care of the child's body, mind and spirit, which also involves giving support to the family. Its purpose is to improve the quality of life of young patients and their families, and in the vast majority of cases the home is the best place to provide such care, but for cultural, affective, educational and organizational reasons, pediatric patients rarely benefit from such an approach. In daily practice, it is clear that pediatric patients experience all the clinical, psychological, ethical and spiritual problems that severe, irreversible disease and death entail. The international literature indicates a prevalence of incurable disease annually affecting 10/10,000 young people from 0 to 19 years old, with an annual mortality rate of 1/10,000 young people from birth to 17 years old. The needs of this category of patients, recorded in investigations conducted in various parts of the world, reveal much the same picture despite geographical, cultural, organizational and social differences, particularly as concerns their wish to be treated at home and the demand for better communications between the professionals involved in their care and a greater availability of support services. Different patient care models have been tested in Italy and abroad, two of institutional type (with children staying in hospitals for treating acute disease or in pediatric hospices and two based at home (the so-called home-based hospitalization and integrated home-based care programs. Professional expertise, training, research and organization provide the essential foundations for coping with a situation that is all too often underestimated and neglected.

  2. [Xerostomia in palliative care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feio, Madalena; Sapeta, Paula

    2005-01-01

    Xerostomia is the subjective feeling of mouth dryness, caused or not by function lowering of salivary glands, with decrease of saliva quality or quantity. It's a frequent symptom in palliative care patients and its prevalence is referred to be 60% to 88% in advanced and progressive oncological disease patients. Xerostomia has physical, social and psychological consequences. Saliva plays an important role in maintaining the best physiological conditions of mouth. Besides humidifying the oral cavity tissues, its lubricating properties help swallowing, talking and prevents other damages caused by mechanical and noxious microbiological agents. Xerostomia is caused by three basic mechanisms: factors that compromise the salivary centre, factors related to the autonomic stimulation or factors related to salivary glands themselves. The diagnosis is mainly clinical. Mouth condition must be thoroughly evaluated. If justified, a quantitative evaluation of saliva secretion, in rest and under stimulation, might be done. The treatment must be oriented by aetiology and directed towards the disease effects in patient comfort and quality of life. During treatment, the use of xerogenic drugs should be controlled, hydration should be promoted and other symptom control measures improved. The symptomatic treatment has three pathways: the increasing of saliva production by mechanical, gustatory or pharmacological stimulation; the using of saliva substitutes and the improving of active mouth care. Mechanical stimulation is obtained by chewing gum and gustatory stimulation may be reached by sucking Vitamin C tablets. Pilocarpine is the available drug to improve salivation. A soft diet must be advised, hard and dry food, tobacco and alcoholic beverages should be avoided. It's important that health workers teach patients with xerostomia the best way to get relief and the measures to prevent its complications that could, even more, compromise their quality of life. PMID:16684486

  3. Is exercise ignored in palliative cancer patients?

    OpenAIRE

    Eyigor, Sibel; Akdeniz, Sedef

    2014-01-01

    Exercise and rehabilitation approaches in palliative care programs for cancer patients affect patients’ symptoms, physical functioning, muscle strength, emotional wellbeing, psychological symptoms, functional capacities, quality of life, mortality and morbidity positively. Based on scientific data, palliative cancer patients should be recommended to participate in exercise programs. There is no standard approach to recipe an exercise regimen for a palliative cancer survivor. Studies for demon...

  4. Rawlsian Justice and Palliative Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knight, Carl; Albertsen, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Palliative care serves both as an integrated part of treatment and as a last effort to care for those we cannot cure. The extent to which palliative care should be provided and our reasons for doing so have been curiously overlooked in the debate about distributive justice in health and healthcare....... We argue that one prominent approach, the Rawlsian approach developed by Norman Daniels, is unable to provide such reasons and such care. This is because of a central feature in Daniels' account, namely that care should be provided to restore people's opportunities. Daniels' view is both unable to...... provide pain relief to those who need it as a supplement to treatment and, without justice-based reasons to provide palliative care to those whose opportunities cannot be restored. We conclude that this makes Daniels' framework much less attractive....

  5. Palliative radiotherapy for multiple myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study reviews the experience of palliative radiotherapy to patients with multiple myeloma to define the optimal dose for pain relief. The records of 31 patients (66 sites) with multiple myeloma irradiated for palliation at Kumamoto University hospital between 1985 and 1994 were reviewed. Total dose ranged from 8 to 50 Gy, with a mean of 32.2 Gy. Symptoms included pain (78.1%), neurological abnormalities (28.1%), and palpable masses (34.3%). Symptomatic remission was obtained in 45 of 46 evaluable sites (97.8%). Complete remission of symptoms were obtained in 28.3%, and partial remission in 69.6%. According to fraction size, there was no significant difference between 3-5 Gy and 1.8-2 Gy. The incidence of complete remission increased when a total dose of more than 20 Gy was given. When the quality of life is considered, hypofractionation was recommended for the palliative radiation therapy of multiple myeloma. (author)

  6. Palliative care in advanced dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merel, Susan E; Merel, Susan; DeMers, Shaune; Vig, Elizabeth

    2014-08-01

    Because neurodegenerative dementias are progressive and ultimately fatal, a palliative approach focusing on comfort, quality of life, and family support can have benefits for patients, families, and the health system. Elements of a palliative approach include discussion of prognosis and goals of care, completion of advance directives, and a thoughtful approach to common complications of advanced dementia. Physicians caring for patients with dementia should formulate a plan for end-of-life care in partnership with patients, families, and caregivers, and be prepared to manage common symptoms at the end of life in dementia, including pain and delirium. PMID:25037291

  7. Cultural Considerations When Caring for African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPEC-O (Education in Palliative and End-of-Life Care for Oncology) Self-Study: Cultural Considerations When Caring for African Americans is a free comprehensive multimedia curricula for health professionals caring for persons with cancer and their families.

  8. Palliative Care: A Holistic Discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Steven; Joseph, Marie

    2016-03-01

    Although mind and body are inextricably interwoven, psychological factors have received insufficient attention within medicine. The biomedical model though necessary is not sufficient. In medicine and particularly in palliative care, a holistic biopsychosocial approach is required. A number of examples from clinical practice in a hospice setting are presented. PMID:26631259

  9. [Nutritional problems in palliative medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollenschläger, G

    2000-09-01

    Malnutrition is a frequent problem in the palliative care of the seriously ill and dying. Want of appetite and los of weight are direct symptoms of patients with consumptive infectional diseases (AIDS, TBC) as well as cancer or geriatric patients. Severe malnutrition significantly contributes to a loss of quality of life and increases morbidity of palliative patients. The subjective well-being of seriously ill patients is heavily influenced by want of appetite and loss of weight. Patients often find want of appetite and the incapability to eat as pressing as the physical impairment caused by the disease. Therefore the sole aim of palliative dietotherapy has to be to strengthen the general physical and mental condition of the patient. A specific training of home care staff and relatives of seriously ill patients in dealing sensitively with this problem of care is desirable. Above all, in-patient treatment of affected patients for the sole purpose of feeding has to be avoided. Aggressive dietotherapeutic interventions, especially artificial feeding, should be refrained from as far as possible in the terminal phase. Only if the prognosis of a patient in palliative treatment is improving contrary to expectations are strategies of curative dietotherapy valid. PMID:11048342

  10. Undergraduate curricula in palliative medicine: a systematic analysis based on the palliative education assessment tool.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Schiessi, C

    2013-01-01

    By law in 2013, palliative medicine will be integrated into the undergraduate curriculum as part of a mandatory training program and examinations at German medical schools. For this reason a national curriculum in palliative medicine has to be developed.

  11. Palliative Care and Death Anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figen Inci

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Diminishing treatment alternatives, losing hope for a possible recovery, insufficient control of pain and inability to provide the necessary technical support lead palliative care to bring multiple problems with itself. Along with technical and professional challenges, palliative care can put a humanitarian strain on the nurse. Caring for a dying patient is a worrisome experience which causes spiritual pain. An increase in nurses’ death anxiety may cause unwillingness to be together with a dying patient. In terms of the end of life, it is expected that the nurse stands by patient’s family to help them in sustaining their psychosocial wellness. In order to meet this expectation, nurses should get a qualitative training for end of life care along with good interpersonal communication skills and coping strategies.

  12. [Legal basics in palliative care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putz, Wolfgang

    2016-03-01

    The German legal framework concerning end of life decisions is based on two pillars: the medical standards and the patient's autonomy. Every medical treatment, including life-saving and palliative measures, requires medical indication and, crucially, the patient's consent. Without the patient's consent even medically indicated treatment is prohibited.In other cases, complying with the patient's wishes, doctors have to treat symptoms the best they can. This includes palliative sedation accepting that the indicated medication may shorten life.It is prohibited to actively kill a patient to shorten his suffering. Assisting a suicide is only permitted if the suicide decision is made freely and on the patient's own responsibility. Businesslike suicide assistance is prohibited. PMID:26983108

  13. Smartphone applications in palliative homecare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhiliwal, Sunil R; Salins, Naveen

    2015-01-01

    Smartphone applications in healthcare delivery are a novel concept and is rapidly gaining ground in all fields of medicine. The modes of e-communications such as e-mail, short message service (SMS), multimedia messaging service (MMS) and WhatsApp in palliative care provides a means for quick tele-consultation, information sharing, cuts the waiting time and facilitates initiation of the treatment at the earliest. It also forms a means of communication with local general practitioner and local health care provider such that continuity of the care is maintained. It also minimizes needless transport of the patient to hospital, prevents needless hospitalization and investigations and minimizes cost and logistics involved in the care process. The two case studies provided highlights the use of smartphone application like WhatsApp in palliative care practice and demonstrates its utility. PMID:25709195

  14. Smartphone applications in palliative homecare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil R Dhiliwal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Smartphone applications in healthcare delivery are a novel concept and is rapidly gaining ground in all fields of medicine. The modes of e-communications such as e-mail, short message service (SMS, multimedia messaging service (MMS and WhatsApp in palliative care provides a means for quick tele-consultation, information sharing, cuts the waiting time and facilitates initiation of the treatment at the earliest. It also forms a means of communication with local general practitioner and local health care provider such that continuity of the care is maintained. It also minimizes needless transport of the patient to hospital, prevents needless hospitalization and investigations and minimizes cost and logistics involved in the care process. The two case studies provided highlights the use of smartphone application like WhatsApp in palliative care practice and demonstrates its utility.

  15. Smartphone Applications in Palliative Homecare

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Smartphone applications in healthcare delivery are a novel concept and is rapidly gaining ground in all fields of medicine. The modes of e-communications such as e-mail, short message service (SMS), multimedia messaging service (MMS) and WhatsApp in palliative care provides a means for quick tele-consultation, information sharing, cuts the waiting time and facilitates initiation of the treatment at the earliest. It also forms a means of communication with local general practitioner and local ...

  16. [Malignant wounds in palliative care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromantin, Isabelle; Rollot, Florence; Nicodeme, Marguerite; Kriegel, Iréne

    2015-01-01

    In the alsence of effective cancer treatment, malignant wounds evolve. The decisions taken by the multi-disciplinary team with regard to their care vary depending on whether the patient is in the initial, advanced or terminal phase of palliative care. Modern dressings can be used to control bleeding, odours and drainage. The aim is to control the symptoms and improve the quality of life, until its end. PMID:26027186

  17. Palliative Care Doula: an innovative model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentz, Judy C

    2014-01-01

    Walking the journey of serious illness is very difficult and stressful for patients and families. A universal principle of palliative care is caring for the patient/ family unit. This article introduces a model for the Palliative Care Doula for experienced and advanced practice palliative care nurses to support patients and families during the traumatic and vulnerable period of end-of-life care. PMID:25296488

  18. Palliative Care in Musculoskeletal Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulia, Ashish; Byregowda, Suman; Panda, Pankaj Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Patients in advanced stages of illness trajectories with local and widespread musculoskeletal incurable malignancies, either treatment naive or having recurrence are referred to the palliative care clinic to relieve various disease-related symptoms and to improve the quality of life. Palliative care is a specialized medicine that offers treatment to the disease-specific symptoms, places emphasis on the psychosocial and spiritual aspects of life and help the patients and their family to cope with advance stage cancer in a stronger and reasonable way. The overall outcome of musculoskeletal malignancies has improved with the advent of multidisciplinary management. Even then these tumors do relapse and leads to organ failures and disease-specific deaths in children and young adults in productive age group thus requiring an integrated approach to improve the supportive/palliative care needs in end-stage disease. In this article, we would like to discuss the spectrum of presentation of advanced musculoskeletal malignancies, skeletal metastasis, and their management. PMID:27559251

  19. Palliative Care in Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, Arvind M; Dashti, Azadeh

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cancer worldwide and is the leading cause of cancer death for both men and women in the USA. Symptom burden in patients with advanced lung cancer is very high and has a negative impact on their quality of life (QOL). Palliative care with its focus on the management of symptoms and addressing physical, psychosocial, spiritual, and existential suffering, as well as medically appropriate goal setting and open communication with patients and families, significantly adds to the quality of care received by advanced lung cancer patients. The Provisional Clinical Opinion (PCO) of American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) as well as the National Cancer Care Network's (NCCN) clinical practice guidelines recommends early integration of palliative care into routine cancer care. In this chapter, we will provide an overview of palliative care in lung cancer and will examine the evidence and recommendations with regard to a comprehensive and interdisciplinary approach to symptom management, as well as discussions of goals of care, advance care planning, and care preferences. PMID:27535397

  20. Radiation therapy in palliative care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy is a valuable treatment for palliation of local symptoms with consistently high response rates in the relief and control of bone pain, neurological symptom, obstructive symptoms, and tumor hemorrhage. Over than 80% of patients who developed bone metastasis and superior vena cava syndrome obtained symptom relief by radiation therapy. Radiation therapy is also well established as an effective treatment for brain metastasis, improving symptoms and preventing progressive neurological deficits, and recently stereotactic irradiation had became a alternative treatment of surgery for small metastatic brain tumors. Both radiation therapy and surgery are effective in the initial treatment of malignant spinal cord compression syndrome, and no advantages of surgery over radiation therapy has been demonstrated in published series when patients have a previously conformed diagnosis of malignant disease and no evidence of vertebral collapse. The outcome of treatment depends primarily upon the speed of diagnosis and neurological status at initiation of treatment. It is very important to start radiation therapy before patient become non-ambulant. Low irradiation dose and short treatment period of palliative radiation therapy can minimize disruption and acute morbidity for the patients with advanced cancer with enabling control of symptoms and palliative radiation therapy is applicable to the patient even in poor general condition. (author)

  1. Palliative Care Consultation Service and Palliative Care Unit: Why Do We Need Both?

    OpenAIRE

    Gaertner, Jan; Frechen, Sebastian, 1982-; Sladek, Markus; Ostgathe, Christoph; Voltz, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Patients treated in a palliative care unit were compared with those treated by a palliative care consultation service at the same center. The coexistence of the two institutions at one hospital contributed to the goal of ensuring optimal palliative care for patients in complex and challenging clinical situations.

  2. Turkish healthcare professionals' views on palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgay, Gulay; Kav, Sultan

    2012-01-01

    The concept of modern palliative care has been disseminating slowly in Turkey and has recently been included in the National Cancer Control Program. The aim of this study was to explore healthcare professionals' knowledge and views of palliative care. It was conducted at three hospitals with a sample of 369 healthcare professionals working in adult clinics. Data were collected via open-ended questions and 16 statements from healthcare professionals on their views of palliative care. Most respondents stated that there was a lack of in-service/continuing education in palliative care, and more than half said they had not received any education in palliative care. A majority stated that the meaning and goal of palliative care is "improving the quality of life of a patient who is in the terminal stage." Lack of awareness of palliative care and a lack of educational resources in that field are the most frequently reported barriers to the development of palliative care in Turkey. Palliative care should be included in curricula for healthcare professionals and in-service education programs should be established. PMID:23413762

  3. Palliative dental care- a boon for debilitating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulk, Bhavana Sujana; Chintamaneni, Raja Lakshmi; Mpv, Prabhat; Gummadapu, Sarat; Salvadhi, Shyam Sundar

    2014-06-01

    World Health Organization defines "palliative care" as the active total care of patients whose disease is not responding to curative treatment. Palliative care actually deals with patients at the terminal end stage of the disease. We always face a question why a dentist should be in a palliative team? What is the exact role of dentist? Dental treatment may not always be strenuous and curative, but also can focus on improving quality of life of the patient. Hence forth the present paper enlightens the importance of dentist role in palliative team. PMID:25121074

  4. Understanding Models of Palliative Care Delivery in Sub-Saharan Africa: Learning From Programs in Kenya and Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Julia; Grant, Liz; Leng, Mhoira; Namukwaya, Elizabeth

    2015-09-01

    The need for palliative care has never been greater. From being significantly present in only five African countries in 2004, palliative care is now delivered in nearly 50% of African countries; however, less than 5% of people in need receive it. To scale-up palliative care, we need greater knowledge about how different models of palliative care work within different health systems. A case study evaluation was undertaken in Kenya and Malawi to define the models used, contextualize them, and identify challenges, best practices, and transferable lessons for scale-up. Visits were made to seven sites and, using an audit tool, data were collected from program staff, hospital staff, and local stakeholders, and care observed as appropriate. Three models of palliative care service delivery were identified, which supports the existing literature, that is, specialist, district hospital level, and community level. However, in looking further, findings show that the major determinants for each model were a set of philosophical questions and assumptions underpinning each and influencing staff and patient decision-making, planning, and allocation of resources. The health system structure and the beliefs about palliative care determined, and were determined most by, referrals, the patient journey, the centeredness of the model, and role definition and training. The models are also closely associated with the physical setting of services. Understanding how the services have developed because of, and indeed despite the geographical setting and the system level, provides us with a different set of indicators of program structure incorporated into the three models. The analysis of models provides pointers to future planning for palliative care. PMID:25936938

  5. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Reserve 6,185 views 12:07 Portraits of Life, Love and Legacy through Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: ... havoctrend 4,258,570 views 1:09:38 LIFE Before Death Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: 5:27. ...

  6. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Reserve 6,028 views 12:07 Portraits of Life, Love and Legacy through Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: ... Karen Fauman 1,238 views 1:05:13 LIFE Before Death Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: 5:27. ...

  7. Parenting and palliative care in paediatric oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kars, M.C.

    2012-01-01

    Although many children with cancer can be cured, approximately 25 % will die of their disease. These deaths are usually anticipated and preceded by a period of palliative care focused on the end-of-life, usually referred to as the palliative phase. The PRESENCE-study was aimed at a better understand

  8. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Palliative Care - Duration: 5:39. Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) 15,536 views 5:39 Emily's story - ... 4:17. batsonhospital 1,946 views 4:17 Right to Relief: Palliative Care in India - Duration: 3: ...

  9. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Queue __count__/__total__ Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 236 ... patient—and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience ...

  10. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Palliative Care - Duration: 5:39. Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) 14,458 views 5:39 The Cost ... 56:31 Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: 31:12. University of California Television (UCTV) 984 views 31:12 ...

  11. Integrating palliative care into comprehensive cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahm, Janet L

    2012-10-01

    While there are operational, financial, and workforce barriers to integrating oncology with palliative care, part of the problem lies in ourselves, not in our systems. First, there is oncologists' "learned helplessness" from years of practice without effective medications to manage symptoms or training in how to handle the tough communication challenges every oncologist faces. Unless they and the fellows they train have had the opportunity to work with a palliative care team, they are unlikely to be fully aware of what palliative care has to offer to their patients at the time of diagnosis, during active therapy, or after developing advanced disease, or may believe that, "I already do that." The second barrier to better integration is the compassion fatigue many oncologists develop from caring for so many years for patients who, despite the oncologists' best efforts, suffer and die. The cumulative grief oncologists experience may go unnamed and unacknowledged, contributing to this compassion fatigue and burnout, both of which inhibit the integration of oncology and palliative care. Solutions include training fellows and practicing oncologists in palliative care skills (eg, in symptom management, psychological disorders, communication), preventing and treating compassion fatigue, and enhancing collaboration with palliative care specialists in caring for patients with refractory distress at any stage of disease. As more oncologists develop these skills, process their grief, and recognize the breadth of additional expertise offered by their palliative care colleagues, palliative care will become integrated into comprehensive cancer care. PMID:23054873

  12. Radiopharmaceuticals for palliative therapy pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissemination to bone of various neoplasms is cause of pain with poor response by major analgesics.Indications. Radiopharmaceuticals,description of main characteristics of various β emitter radionuclides.Choose of patients for worm indication of pain palliative therapy with β emitter radiopharmaceuticals is adequate must be careful . Contraindications are recognized.Pre and post treatment controls as clinical examination and complete serology are described.It is essential to subscribe protocols,keep patient well informed,included the physician in charge of the patient as part of the team.Bibliography

  13. Current trends in palliative heart care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Rongyun

    2016-02-01

    Palliative care is an alternate therapeutic approach that involves specialised medical care of a patient diagnosed with serious life threatening illness like heart failure (HF). The prime aim of the palliative care is to provide patient with relief from the symptoms, pain, physical stress, and mental stress of the diagnosed disease. The palliative care helps in improving the quality of life for both the patient and the family. Advanced HF is a disease process that carries a high burden of symptoms, suffering, and death. Palliative care can complement traditional care to improve symptom amelioration, patient-caregiver communication, emotional support, and medical decision making. The present review summarized all the available on alternative palliative approaches provided to heart patient by a team of physicians, nurses and other healthcare professionals. PMID:25926080

  14. Diagnostic radiology in paediatric palliative care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palliative care is an expanding specialty within paediatrics, which has attracted little attention in the paediatric radiological literature. Paediatric patients under a palliative care team will have numerous radiological tests which we traditionally categorise under organ systems rather than under the umbrella of palliative medicine. The prevalence of children with life-limiting illness is significant. It has been estimated to be one per thousand, and this may be an underestimate. In this review, we will focus on our experience at one institution, where radiology has proven to be an invaluable partner to palliative care. We will discuss examples of conditions commonly referred to our palliative care team and delineate the crucial role of diagnostic radiology in determining treatment options. (orig.)

  15. Diagnostic radiology in paediatric palliative care

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Preena; Koh, Michelle; Carr, Lucinda; McHugh, Kieran [Great Ormond Street Hospital, Radiology Department, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-15

    Palliative care is an expanding specialty within paediatrics, which has attracted little attention in the paediatric radiological literature. Paediatric patients under a palliative care team will have numerous radiological tests which we traditionally categorise under organ systems rather than under the umbrella of palliative medicine. The prevalence of children with life-limiting illness is significant. It has been estimated to be one per thousand, and this may be an underestimate. In this review, we will focus on our experience at one institution, where radiology has proven to be an invaluable partner to palliative care. We will discuss examples of conditions commonly referred to our palliative care team and delineate the crucial role of diagnostic radiology in determining treatment options. (orig.)

  16. Hospital based palliative care in sub-Saharan Africa; a six month review from Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Bates M

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The World Health Organisation recognises the importance of palliative care in an African setting. Despite this services are often patchy and inconsistent, and many operate at health centre and/or community level. Few reports from hospital based palliative care services in sub-Saharan Africa exist in the current literature. As part of its activities Tiyanjane Clinic has been providing hospital based palliative care to patients at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, a large government tertiary referral institution, in the Southern region of Malawi since 2003, caring for patients with HIV, cancer and other non-malignant palliative diagnoses. Methods A retrospective review of case notes for all in-patients seen by Tiyanjane Clinic over a six month period (April-Sept 2009 was undertaken. Results A total of 177 patients were seen, for whom 137 case notes were available (77%. 58% of patients were male, 42% female. The average age of patients was 39.1 years (range 15-92 years. 54% of patients were HIV positive, with 34% on ARV drugs at the time of care. 42% of patients had HIV related diagnoses, including AIDS defining malignancies, 48% had (non AIDS related cancers and 9% had other palliative diagnoses. The mean age of patients with HIV related diagnoses was 34 years, for cancer patients it was 48 years. Pain was the most commonly reported symptom (74%, with 56% of patients requiring oral morphine. The mean daily dose of morphine was 30 mg/day (range 9-100 mg. 65% of patients were discharged home, 26% of patients died during admission. Conclusions The palliative care population in this setting is relatively young, especially among patients with HIV related diagnoses. HIV and cancer are the main diagnostic groups. Pain is the most commonly reported symptom, with oral morphine frequently required. Health workers require access to and knowledge of oral morphine in order to provide appropriate assistance to patients under their care.

  17. THE CZECH PUBLIC VIEW OF PALLIATIVE CARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macková Marie

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The topic of palliative care is not yet in the Czech Republic sufficiently discussed. The research try to attempt to identify current levels of awareness of palliative care within the Czech population. The research was carried out through a postal survey. 2 000 individuals in Czech were identified at random from the phone book. To ensure geographical representation stratified random sampling was used. In total, 785 responses were received. The research aimed to identify what are the current levels of knowledge of palliative care and what factors contribute to this knowledge. It also asked a number of additional questions relating to who respondents think should receive paliative care, what they think palliative care should consist of, when they would want information on palliative care and whether respondents feel that in the Czech society there is sufficient discussion of issues surrounding death and dying. Overall the majority of respondents reported some knowledge of palliative care, with under a third reporting no knowledge. Only a very small number of respondents reported a high level of knowledge of palliative care. The vast majority of respondents feel that palliative care should be offered to all those who have terminal illnesses. The majority of respondents cited pain relief as important in end of life care with many stating this as their first, most important service. The second most common service requested for end of life care was family support, including respite services, support services and someone for family to talk to. Respect or dignity were also commonly cited. More than half of respondents stating that we do not discuss death and dying enough. Although not a representative study, the survey findings confirm many of existing views and policies within palliative care and point to possible directions and challenges for future development.

  18. Palliative Care in Rural Minnesota: Findings from Stratis Health's Minnesota Rural Palliative Care Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinley, Deb; Shearer, Janelle; Weng, Karla

    2016-01-01

    Palliative care, which involves managing symptoms, controlling pain and addressing stress caused by a chronic or terminal illness, has been shown to keep patients out of the hospital and allow them to stay home and live more comfortably with their illness. Typically, it is provided by an interdisciplinary team led by a physician trained in palliative medicine. Rural areas have not always had access to such specialists. Yet, today, rural health care organizations are finding ways to create palliative care programs that meet the needs of their chronically ill and aging populations. This article describes a six-year initiative led by Stratis Health to advance palliative care in rural Minnesota. It highlights the work of FirstLight Health System in Mora and describes Stratis Health's Rural Palliative Care Measurement Pilot Project, an effort to develop and test measures for evaluating rural palliative care programs. PMID:26897897

  19. Palliative Dental Care- A Boon for Debilitating

    OpenAIRE

    Mulk, Bhavana Sujana; Chintamaneni, Raja Lakshmi; Mpv, Prabhat; Gummadapu, Sarat; Salvadhi, Shyam Sundar

    2014-01-01

    World Health Organization defines “palliative care” as the active total care of patients whose disease is not responding to curative treatment. Palliative care actually deals with patients at the terminal end stage of the disease. We always face a question why a dentist should be in a palliative team? What is the exact role of dentist? Dental treatment may not always be strenuous and curative, but also can focus on improving quality of life of the patient. Hence forth the present paper enligh...

  20. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... Young Adult Cancer Program - Duration: 11:08. UCLA Health 178,145 views 11:08 Portraits of Life, Love and Legacy through Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: 5:39. Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) ...

  1. The Island Hospice model of palliative care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khumalo, Thembelihle; Maasdorp, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    There has been a substantial increase in cancer detections in Africa over years, and it has also been noted that higher number of individuals are affected by the later stages of cancer that lead to death. When it comes to cancer care, Zimbabwe is no exception with its ongoing palliative care related research, though still in its infancy. The need for advanced and more accessible palliative care to assist the vulnerable has been intensified by this increase in cancer prevalence. Island Hospice, which is a centre of excellence in palliative care has varying elements of the models that it employs to engage those most in need of palliative assistance, especially children and financially-challenged individuals.

  2. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... Young Adult Cancer Program - Duration: 11:08. UCLA Health 177,444 views 11:08 Little Stars – Paediatric Palliative Care – Charlie's Story - Duration: 10:35. Little Stars 3, ...

  3. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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  4. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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  5. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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  6. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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  7. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... Young Adult Cancer Program - Duration: 11:08. UCLA Health 178,763 views 11:08 Little Stars – Paediatric Palliative Care – Charlie's Story - Duration: 10:35. Little Stars 3, ...

  8. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... of Rachel—a pediatric neuroblastoma patient—and her family. The story demonstrates how palliative care can positively influence a patient's and family's experience with illness. Category Science & Technology License Standard ...

  9. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    ... Queue Queue __count__/__total__ Find out why Close Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story NINRnews Subscribe Subscribed ... This vignette shares the story of Rachel—a pediatric neuroblastoma patient—and her family. The story demonstrates ...

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  13. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... NEOMED) 15,536 views 5:39 Perinatal Palliative Care - The Zimmer Family Story - Duration: 13:34. UnityPoint Health - Meriter 52,107 views 13:34 A Certain Kind Of Death - Documentary - Duration: 1:09:38. havoctrend 4,265,977 views 1:09:38 ... LIFE Before Death Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: 5:27. LIFE Before Death 9,986 ...

  14. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... 1,185 views 1:05:13 Perinatal Palliative Care - The Zimmer Family Story - Duration: 13:34. UnityPoint Health - Meriter 43,618 views 13:34 Phoebe's Cancer Story - Duration: 7:46. Family A-Fair 572,031 views 7:46 Faces Of Palliative Care - Duration: 45:21. PHCMediaServices 47,505 views 45: ...

  15. Parental concerns in children requiring palliative care

    OpenAIRE

    Manjiri Dighe; Sunita Jadhav; Mary Ann Muckaden; Anuradha Sovani

    2008-01-01

    Children with advanced, life-limiting illness have unique needs which are different from those of adults. Pediatric palliative care is an under developed specialty. Aims : To identify concerns of parents of children with advanced, incurable cancers, and to elicit their attitudes toward revealing the diagnosis and prognosis to the sick child. Method : This study was carried out in a large tertiary cancer center in India. Parents of 20 pediatric palliative care patients attending the ou...

  16. Metronomic palliative chemotherapy in maxillary sinus tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Vijay M Patil; Vanita Noronh; Amit Joshi; Ashay Karpe; Vikas Talreja; Arun Chandrasekharan; Sachin Dhumal; Kumar Prabhash

    2016-01-01

    Background: Metronomic chemotherapy consisting of methotrexate and celecoxib recently has shown promising results in multiple studies in head and neck cancers. However, these studies have not included patients with maxillary sinus primaries. Hence, the role of palliative metronomic chemotherapy in patients with maxillary sinus carcinoma that is not amenable to radical therapy is unknown. Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of carcinoma maxillary sinus patients who received palliative m...

  17. Dental expression and role in palliative treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Rajiv Saini; P P Marawar; Sujata Shete; Santosh Saini; Ameet Mani

    2009-01-01

    World Health Organization defines palliative care as the active total care of patients whose disease is not responding to curative treatment. Palliative care for the terminally ill is based on a multidimensional approach to provide whole-person comfort care while maintaining optimal function; dental care plays an important role in this multidisciplinary approach. The aim of the present study is to review significance of dentist's role to determine whether mouth care was effectively assessed a...

  18. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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  19. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... Reserve 5,654 views 12:07 Perinatal Palliative Care - The Zimmer Family Story - Duration: 13:34. UnityPoint Health - Meriter 45,108 views 13:34 End of Life | Aging Matters | NPT Reports - Duration: 59:01. NPT Reports 44,760 views 59:01 ... 7:46 Principles of Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: 1:05:13. Karen Fauman 1,199 ...

  20. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... Reserve 5,654 views 12:07 Perinatal Palliative Care - The Zimmer Family Story - Duration: 13:34. UnityPoint Health - Meriter 45,108 views 13:34 End of Life | Aging Matters | NPT Reports - Duration: 59:01. NPT Reports 44,760 views 59:01 ... 7:46 Principles of Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: 1:05:13. Karen Fauman 1,200 ...

  1. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... NEOMED) 15,234 views 5:39 Perinatal Palliative Care - The Zimmer Family Story - Duration: 13:34. UnityPoint Health - Meriter 50,432 views 13:34 A Certain Kind Of Death - Documentary - Duration: 1:09:38. havoctrend 4,213,979 views ... Principles of Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: 1:05:13. Karen Fauman 1,257 ...

  2. Kampo medicine for palliative care in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Okumi, Hirokuni; Koyama, Atsuko

    2014-01-01

    Kampo medicines are currently manufactured under strict quality controls. The Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare of Japan has approved 148 Kampo formulas. There is increasing evidence for the efficacy of Kampo medicines, and some are used clinically for palliative care in Japan. The specific aim of this review is to evaluate the clinical use of Kampo medicines in palliative care in the treatment of cancer. The conclusions are as follows: Juzentaihoto inhibits the progression of liver tumo...

  3. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... Reserve 5,654 views 12:07 Perinatal Palliative Care - The Zimmer Family Story - Duration: 13:34. UnityPoint Health - Meriter 45,108 views 13:34 End of Life | Aging Matters | NPT Reports - Duration: 59:01. NPT Reports 45,182 views 59:01 ... LIFE Before Death Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: 5:27. LIFE Before Death 9,509 ...

  4. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... Fair 585,155 views 7:46 Perinatal Palliative Care - The Zimmer Family Story - Duration: 13:34. UnityPoint Health - Meriter 46,153 views 13:34 The Last ... Young Adult Cancer Program - Duration: 11:08. UCLA Health 180,287 views ... 58:22 The Human Connection of Palliative Care: Ten Steps for What To Say and Do - ...

  5. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... Fair 616,862 views 7:46 Perinatal Palliative Care - The Zimmer Family Story - Duration: 13:34. UnityPoint Health - Meriter 50,610 views 13:34 A Certain Kind Of Death - Documentary - Duration: 1:09:38. havoctrend 4,218,518 views ... 59:01 The Human Connection of Palliative Care: Ten Steps for What To Say and Do - ...

  6. Palliative care reimagined: a needed shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Julian; Kellehear, Allan

    2016-03-01

    Palliative care, since its inception over 60 years ago, has set the standard of how to care for people who are dying. Key features among these standards have been the professional development of clinical specialisms such as palliative medicine and palliative nursing; the essential addition of the multidisciplinary team to these two new specialisms that included social, spiritual and allied health workers-an outgrowth of the recognition that routine work with the dying, their carers, and the bereaved required more than solely clinical skills; and the unique partnership with communities that yielded the volunteer movement within palliative care. Professional, evidence-based symptom management and the importance of supportive care in its widest possible sense were and remain the cornerstones of the modern palliative care approach. However, the majority of people with terminal illnesses do not have access to palliative care teams, whose main focus of care remains patients with cancer. In the context outlined above this paper therefore poses two key questions: how can we provide an equitable level of care for all people irrespective of diagnosis and how can we increase the range and quality of non-medical/nursing supportive care in a context of diminishing resources? We argue that an important opportunity and solution can be found by adopting the principles of a public health approach to end-of-life care. PMID:26832803

  7. Dental expression and role in palliative treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Saini

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available World Health Organization defines palliative care as the active total care of patients whose disease is not responding to curative treatment. Palliative care for the terminally ill is based on a multidimensional approach to provide whole-person comfort care while maintaining optimal function; dental care plays an important role in this multidisciplinary approach. The aim of the present study is to review significance of dentist′s role to determine whether mouth care was effectively assessed and implemented in the palliative care setting. The oral problems experienced by the hospice head and neck patient clearly affect the quality of his or her remaining life. Dentist plays an essential role in palliative care by the maintenance of oral hygiene; dental examination may identify and cure opportunistic infections and dental disease like caries, periodontal disease, oral mucosal problems or prosthetic requirement. Oral care may reduce not only the microbial load of the mouth but the risk for pain and oral infection as well. This multidisciplinary approach to palliative care, including a dentist, may reduce the oral debilities that influence the patient′s ability to speak, eat or swallow. This review highlighted that without effective assessment of the mouth, the appropriate implementation of care will not be delivered. Palliative dental care has been fundamental in management of patients with active, progressive, far-advanced disease in which the oral cavity has been compromised either by the disease directly or by its treatment; the focus of care is quality of life.

  8. Pulmonary medicine and palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucakovic, M; Bascom, R; Bascom, P B

    2001-04-01

    Gynaecological malignancies affect the respiratory system both directly and indirectly. Malignant pleural effusion is a poor prognostic factor: management options include repeated thoracentesis, chemical pleurodesis, symptomatic relief of dyspnoea with oxygen and morphine, and external drainage. Parenchymal metastases are typically multifocal and respond to chemotherapy, with a limited role for pulmonary metastatectomy. Pulmonary tumour embolism is frequently associated with lymphangitic carcinomatosis, and is most common in choriocarcinoma. Thromboembolic disease, associated with the hypercoagulable state of cancer, is treated with anticoagulation. Inferior vena cava filter placement is indicated when anticoagulation cannot be given, or when emboli recur despite adequate anticoagulation. Palliative care has a major role for respiratory symptoms of gynaecological malignancies. Treatable causes of dyspnoea include bronchospasm, fluid overload and retained secretions. Opiates are effective at relieving dyspnoea associated with effusions, metatases, and lymphangitic tumour spread. Non-pharmacological therapies include energy conservation, home redesign, and dyspnoea relief strategies, including pursed lip breathing, relaxation, oxygen, circulation of air with a fan, and attention to spiritual suffering. Identification and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux, sinusitis, and asthma can improve many patients' coughs. Chest wall pain responds to local radiotherapy, nerve blocks or systemic analgesia. Case examples illustrate ways to address quality of life issues. PMID:11358403

  9. Palliative care in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlvennan, Colleen K; Allen, Larry A

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in cardiac therapy, heart failure (HF) remains a progressive, highly symptomatic, and deadly disease that places great demands on patients, caregivers, and healthcare systems. Palliative care is a multidisciplinary approach to care that focuses on communication, shared decision making, and advance care planning; provides relief from pain and other distressing symptoms; integrates psychological and spiritual aspects of care; and offers a support system to help families cope during illness and bereavement. Palliative care has applications across the stages of heart failure, including early in the course of illness, often in conjunction with other therapies that are intended to prolong life. However, the incorporation of palliative care into the management of heart failure has been suboptimal for several reasons: uncertainty in the disease trajectory, failure to reward communication between healthcare providers and patients, siloed care, lack of knowledge, overlay of comorbidity and frailty, life saving devices with complex trade-offs, and a limited evidence base. This review will summarize the current literature on the emerging role of palliative care in patients with heart failure and the challenges and opportunities for its integration into routine care. It will discuss current initiatives and future directions of the collaborative relationship between the palliative care and heart failure disciplines. PMID:27079896

  10. Palliative radiotherapy: current status and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sonam; Hertan, Lauren; Jones, Joshua

    2014-12-01

    For nearly 100 years, palliative radiotherapy has been a time-efficient, effective treatment for patients with metastatic or advanced cancer in any area where local tumors are causing symptoms. Short courses including a single fraction of radiotherapy may be effective for symptom relief with minimal side effects and maximization of convenience for patient and family. With recent advances in imaging, surgery, and other local therapies as well as systemic cancer therapies, palliative radiotherapy has been used frequently in patients who may not yet have symptoms of advanced or metastatic cancer. In this setting, more prolonged radiotherapy courses and advanced radiotherapy techniques including intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) may be useful in obtaining local control and durable palliative responses. This review will explore the use of radiotherapy across the spectrum of patients with advanced and metastatic cancer and delineate an updated, rational approach for the use of palliative radiotherapy that incorporates symptoms, prognosis, and other factors into the delivery of palliative radiotherapy. PMID:25499634

  11. Policy analysis: palliative care in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Larkin, P

    2014-03-01

    Palliative care for patients with advanced illness is a subject of growing importance in health services, policy and research. In 2001 Ireland became one of the first nations to publish a dedicated national palliative care policy. This paper uses the \\'policy analysis triangle\\' as a framework to examine what the policy entailed, where the key ideas originated, why the policy process was activated, who were the key actors, and what were the main consequences. Although palliative care provision expanded following publication, priorities that were unaddressed or not fully embraced on the national policy agenda are identified. The factors underlying areas of non-fulfilment of policy are then discussed. In particular, the analysis highlights that policy initiatives in a relatively new field of healthcare face a trade-off between ambition and feasibility. Key policy goals could not be realised given the large resource commitments required; the competition for resources from other, better-established healthcare sectors; and challenges in expanding workforce and capacity. Additionally, the inherently cross-sectoral nature of palliative care complicated the co-ordination of support for the policy. Policy initiatives in emerging fields such as palliative care should address carefully feasibility and support in their conception and implementation.

  12. Benefiting Africans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG ZHIPING

    2011-01-01

    Along with thriving Sino-African economic and trade ties,Chinese companies have attached greater importance to their social responsibility to Africans.More than 2,000 sweaters woven by Chinese mothers were sent to orphans and disabled children in Kenya and four other African countries in September.This activity was launched by Hengyuanxiang,a leading Chinese wool manufacturer.

  13. Benefiting Africans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Along with thriving Sino-African economic and trade ties,Chinese companies have attached greater importance to their social responsibility to Africans.More than 2,000 sweaters woven by Chinese mothers were sent to orphans and disabled children in Kenya and four other African countries in September. This activity was launched by Hengyuanxiang,aleading Chinese wool manufacturer.

  14. Opportunities to maximize value with integrated palliative care

    OpenAIRE

    Bergman, Jonathan; Laviana, Aaron A

    2016-01-01

    Palliative care involves aggressively addressing and treating psychosocial, spiritual, religious, and family concerns, as well as considering the overall psychosocial structures supporting a patient. The concept of integrated palliative care removes the either/or decision a patient needs to make: they need not decide if they want either aggressive chemotherapy from their oncologist or symptom-guided palliative care but rather they can be comanaged by several clinicians, including a palliative...

  15. European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC framework for palliative sedation: an ethical discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juth Niklas

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this paper is to critically discuss some of the ethically controversial issues regarding continuous deep palliative sedation at the end of life that are addressed in the EAPC recommended framework for the use of sedation in palliative care. Discussion We argue that the EAPC framework would have benefited from taking a clearer stand on the ethically controversial issues regarding intolerable suffering and refractory symptoms and regarding the relation between continuous deep palliative sedation at the end of life and euthanasia. It is unclear what constitutes refractory symptoms and what the relationship is between refractory symptoms and intolerable suffering, which in turn makes it difficult to determine what are necessary and sufficient criteria for palliative sedation at the end of life, and why. As regards the difference between palliative sedation at the end of life and so-called slow euthanasia, the rationale behind stressing the difference is insufficiently demonstrated, e.g. due to an overlooked ambiguity in the concept of intention. It is therefore unclear when palliative sedation at the end of life amounts to abuse and why. Conclusions The EAPC framework would have benefited from taking a clearer stand on some ethically controversial issues regarding intolerable suffering and refractory symptoms and regarding the relation between continuous deep palliative sedation at the end of life and euthanasia. In this text, we identify and discuss these issues in the hope that an ensuing discussion will clarify the EAPC's standpoint.

  16. Palliative care: Progress, needs, and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassileth Barrie R

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Palliative care is increasingly available and the importance of its role increasingly recognized. International work toward making palliative care a basic human right underscores the growing need to ensure comfort and pain relief for the terminally ill. The organizational structures in place for providing such care vary greatly within and across countries; even definition of the term is not uniform. The World Health Organization (WHO definition includes the statement that palliative care "... intends neither to hasten nor postpone death...", thus illustrating varying socio-cultural perceptions. In addition to cultural differences, other challenges include clinical, economic, and varying institutionalized systems and practices in patient care. This is a commentary on http://www.ijhpr.org/content/1/1/9/

  17. Compassion fatigue in pediatric palliative care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rourke, Mary T

    2007-10-01

    The experience of compassion fatigue is an expected and common response to the professional task of routinely caring for children at the end of life. Symptoms of compassion fatigue often mimic trauma reactions. Implementing strategies that span personal, professional, and organizational domains can help protect health care providers from the damaging effects of compassion fatigue. Providing pediatric palliative care within a constructive and supportive team can help caregivers deal with the relational challenges of compassion fatigue. Finally, any consideration of the toll of providing pediatric palliative care must be balanced with a consideration of the parallel experience of compassion satisfaction. PMID:17933615

  18. The palliative care clinical nurse consultant: an essential link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Margaret; Chapman, Ysanne

    2008-01-01

    This study describes the role of acute hospital palliative care nurse consultants and makes recommendations about future directions for the role development of this role. While the palliative care nurse consultant role is accepted in the acute setting there is little evidence or literature about what contributes to the success of this role. A three-phase study was undertaken to describe the role of palliative care nurse consultants in acute hospitals in Melbourne, Australia. The first phase of the three-phase study, involving in-depth qualitative interviews with the palliative care nurse consultants, is reported in this article. Using open-ended semi-structured questions, 10 palliative care nurse consultants were interviewed using open-ended questions about aspects of their role and the interviews were thematically analysed. Four main themes were identified that clarified the role; being the internal link; being the lynch pin; being responsive and being challenged. The palliative care nurse consultants were the first point of introduction to palliative care and thus they saw a significant role in introducing the concept of palliative care to those requiring palliative care, their families and others. They are an important link between the settings of care required by people accessing palliative care-acute, in-patient palliative care and community care. The palliative care nurse consultants saw themselves in leadership positions that in some ways defy boundaries, because of the inherent complexity and diversity of the role. The palliative care nurse consultants' role appears to be pivotal in providing expert advice to staff and people requiring palliative care, and connecting palliative care services both within the hospital and to external services. PMID:19112925

  19. Kenya Hospices and Palliative Care Association: integrating palliative care in public hospitals in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Zipporah

    2016-01-01

    Background In Kenya, cancers as a disease group rank third as a cause of death after infectious and cardiovascular diseases. It is estimated that the annual incidence of cancer is about 37,000 new cases with an annual mortality of 28,000 cases (Kenya National Cancer Control Strategy 2010). The incidence of non-communicable diseases accounts for more than 50% of total hospital admissions and over 55% of hospital deaths (Kenya National Strategy for the Prevention and Control of Non Communicable Diseases 2015–2020). The prevalence of HIV is 6.8 (KIAS 2014). Most of these patients will benefit from palliative care services, hence the need to integrate palliative care services in the public healthcare system. Method The process of integrating palliative care in public hospitals involved advocacy both at the national level and at the institutional level, training of healthcare professionals, and setting up services within the hospitals that we worked with. Technical support was provided to each individual institution as needed. Results Eleven provincial hospitals across the country have now integrated palliative care services (Palliative Care Units) and are now centres of excellence. Over 220 healthcare providers have been trained, and approximately, over 30,000 patients have benefited from these services. Oral morphine is now available in the hospital palliative care units. Conclusion As a success of the pilot project, Kenya Hospices and Palliative Care Association (KEHPCA) is now working with the Ministry of Health Kenya to integrate palliative care services in 30 other county hospitals across the country, thus ensuring more availability and access to more patients. Other developing countries can learn from Kenya’s successful experience.

  20. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... NPT Reports 43,088 views 59:01 Phoebe's Cancer Story - Duration: 7:46. Family A-Fair 571, ... 54:51 Pediatric Palliative Care: helping children with cancer survive and thrive - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer ...

  1. Parental concerns in children requiring palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjiri Dighe

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Children with advanced, life-limiting illness have unique needs which are different from those of adults. Pediatric palliative care is an under developed specialty. Aims : To identify concerns of parents of children with advanced, incurable cancers, and to elicit their attitudes toward revealing the diagnosis and prognosis to the sick child. Method : This study was carried out in a large tertiary cancer center in India. Parents of 20 pediatric palliative care patients attending the outpatient department were interviewed and emerging themes identified. Results : Parents showed varying degrees of anticipatory grief. Most families were financially strained. Most parents were reluctant to discuss disease and dying with the child. Siblings were rarely told or directly involved in care. There was resistance to allowing the palliative care team to communicate with the patient. Patients did not receive any formal support. Parents identified family and neighbors as the main sources of support. Conclusions : Parental attitudes hinder open communication with dying children in India. There is a need for research to explore the concerns of families of children with fatal illness. Specialist training is required for professionals working in pediatric palliative care to address this issue.

  2. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... Health - Meriter 49,205 views 13:34 Phoebe's Cancer Story - Duration: 7:46. Family A-Fair 606, ... 05:13 Pediatric Palliative Care: helping children with cancer survive and thrive - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer ...

  3. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... 21. PHCMediaServices 46,965 views 45:21 Phoebe's Cancer Story - Duration: 7:46. Family A-Fair 570, ... 09:38 Pediatric Palliative Care: helping children with cancer survive and thrive - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer ...

  4. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... patient's and family's experience with illness. Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License Show more Show less ... views 1:09:38 Pediatric Palliative Care: helping children with cancer survive and thrive - Duration: 3:29. ...

  5. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... 327,928 views 56:49 Dr. Patti Brennan: Nursing, Big Data, & the NIH BD2K Initiative - Duration: 58:22. NINRnews 752 views 58:22 Portraits of Life, Love & Legacy Through Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: 54:51. WesternReservePBS 2,974 views 54: ...

  6. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... Fauman 1,271 views 1:05:13 Phoebe's Cancer Story - Duration: 7:46. Family A-Fair 622, ... 3:02 Pediatric Palliative Care: helping children with cancer survive and thrive - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer ...

  7. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... Young Adult Cancer Program - Duration: 11:08. UCLA Health 191,156 views 11:08 A Day in the Life - Lauren (Nurse Practitioner- Palliative Care) - Duration: 2:56. JNJDiscoverNursing 8,458 views 2: ...

  8. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... Medway CCG 99,206 views 27:40 Phoebe's Cancer Story - Duration: 7:46. Family A-Fair 576, ... 5:39 Pediatric Palliative Care: helping children with cancer survive and thrive - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer ...

  9. In palliative cancer care symptoms mean everything

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunissen, S.C.C.M.

    2007-01-01

    The thesis aims to provide deeper insight into symptoms of cancer patients in palliative care, in order to improve the adequacy of decision-making for optimizing symptom control. Several aspects of symptoms and symptom management were investigated as were some aspects of communication and consultati

  10. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... The Zimmer Family Story - Duration: 13:34. UnityPoint Health - Meriter 43,618 views 13:34 Portraits of Life, Love & Legacy Through Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: 54:51. WesternReservePBS 2,763 views 54: ...

  11. Emotionality and teamwork in palliative nursing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nickelsen, Niels Christian

    This paper discusses the performance of palliative support teams based in an empirical study in a hospice in Denmark. The analytic strategy is based in science and technology studies (STS). The study was carried out as a number of meetings among the researcher and five non-consolidated teams in s...

  12. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... in to report inappropriate content. Sign in Transcript 3,398 views Like this video? Sign in to ... Through Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: 54:51. WesternReservePBS 3,095 views 54:51 Teen Cancer Stories | UCLA ...

  13. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... 4,045,475 views 1:09:38 Phoebe's Cancer Story - Duration: 7:46. Family A-Fair 578, ... CAPC Palliative 54,349 views 5:53 Teen Cancer Stories | UCLA Daltrey/Townshend Teen & Young Adult Cancer ...

  14. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... NPT Reports 44,760 views 59:01 Phoebe's Cancer Story - Duration: 7:46. Family A-Fair 580, ... 58:22 Pediatric Palliative Care: helping children with cancer survive and thrive - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer ...

  15. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... a patient's and family's experience with illness. Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License Show more Show ... 993 views 10:35 Pediatric Palliative Care: helping children with cancer survive and thrive - Duration: 3:29. ...

  16. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... Before Death 9,901 views 5:27 Phoebe's Cancer Story - Duration: 7:46. Family A-Fair 617, ... 09:38 Pediatric Palliative Care: helping children with cancer survive and thrive - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer ...

  17. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... Health - Meriter 45,108 views 13:34 Phoebe's Cancer Story - Duration: 7:46. Family A-Fair 583, ... CAPC Palliative 54,477 views 5:53 Teen Cancer Stories | UCLA Daltrey/Townshend Teen & Young Adult Cancer ...

  18. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... Medway CCG 99,206 views 27:40 Phoebe's Cancer Story - Duration: 7:46. Family A-Fair 575, ... 13:30 Pediatric Palliative Care: helping children with cancer survive and thrive - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer ...

  19. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... Quality Palliative & End of Life Care in Canada (English subtitles/captions) - Duration: 16:53. palliummja 39,413 ... 16:53 Loading more suggestions... Show more Language: English Country: Worldwide Restricted Mode: Off History Help Loading... ...

  20. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... 4,244,244 views 1:09:38 Phoebe's Cancer Story - Duration: 7:46. Family A-Fair 621, ... 3:02 Pediatric Palliative Care: helping children with cancer survive and thrive - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer ...

  1. Oesphageal Stenting for palliation of malignant mesothelioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahamim Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dyspahgia in patients with malignant mesothelioma is usually due to direct infiltration of the eosophagus by the tumour. It can be distressing for the patient and challenging for the physician to treat. We describe three cases in which this condition has been successfully palliated with self expanding esophageal stents.

  2. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... NPT Reports 44,760 views 59:01 Phoebe's Cancer Story - Duration: 7:46. Family A-Fair 579, ... 5:53 Pediatric Palliative Care: helping children with cancer survive and thrive - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer ...

  3. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... Western Reserve 6,162 views 12:07 Phoebe's Cancer Story - Duration: 7:46. Family A-Fair 621, ... CAPC Palliative 57,541 views 5:53 Teen Cancer Stories | UCLA Daltrey/Townshend Teen & Young Adult Cancer ...

  4. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... Fauman 1,200 views 1:05:13 Phoebe's Cancer Story - Duration: 7:46. Family A-Fair 581, ... CAPC Palliative 54,477 views 5:53 Teen Cancer Stories | UCLA Daltrey/Townshend Teen & Young Adult Cancer ...

  5. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... Before Death 9,793 views 5:27 Phoebe's Cancer Story - Duration: 7:46. Family A-Fair 608, ... 31:23 Pediatric Palliative Care: helping children with cancer survive and thrive - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer ...

  6. A test instrument for palliative care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adriaansen, M.J.M.; Achterberg, T. van

    2004-01-01

    This article describes a methodological study concerning the development of a test instrument that can be used for measuring the effects of a course in palliative care on registered nurses and licensed practical nurses. This test instrument is comprised of two parts: an expertise and insight test an

  7. Palliative care teams: effective through moral reflection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermsen, M.A.; Have, H.A.M.J. ten

    2005-01-01

    Working as a multidisciplinary or interdisciplinary team is an essential condition to provide good palliative care. This widespread assumption is based on the idea that teamwork makes it possible to address the various needs of the patient and family more effectively. This article is about teamwork

  8. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... Medway CCG 110,583 views 27:40 Phoebe's Cancer Story - Duration: 7:46. Family A-Fair 618, ... 31:23 Pediatric Palliative Care: helping children with cancer survive and thrive - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer ...

  9. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... Fauman 1,210 views 1:05:13 Phoebe's Cancer Story - Duration: 7:46. Family A-Fair 584, ... 2:29 Pediatric Palliative Care: helping children with cancer survive and thrive - Duration: 3:29. American Cancer ...

  10. Aggressive surgical palliation for advanced girdle tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Burd

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The surgical management of advanced, incurable, malignant disease presents particular ethical and technical challenges. The clear goal is palliation and the surgical futility must be avoided. This case series presents some particular challenges in end-of-life surgery. Materials and Methods: Fifteen patients referred with advanced malignant disease involving a limb girdle were reviewed. Results: In one case, a patient pleaded for surgery after initially requesting a delay to seek treatment from a Chinese Traditional Herbalist. The increase in tumour bulk led to problems with surgery and the patient died in a hospital a few weeks later. This case illustrates ′futility′ not recognized and encountered. The remaining 14 patients exhibited positive palliation with improved quality of dying and appreciation expressed by patients, relatives and staff. Conclusion: In selected cases, with a skilled and experienced surgical team, patients with advanced malignant disease can still benefit from aggressive surgical palliation. The margin of error is small between palliation being attempted and futility being achieved. This considerably adds to the challenge of end-of-life surgery.

  11. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

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    Full Text Available ... 505 views 45:21 A Certain Kind Of Death - Documentary - Duration: 1:09:38. havoctrend 4,026, ... Grubb 15,851 views 31:23 LIFE Before Death Pediatric Palliative Care - Duration: 5:27. LIFE Before ...

  12. Patterns of Practice of Palliative Radiotherapy in Africa, Part 1: Bone and Brain Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To provide data on the pattern of practice of palliative radiotherapy (RT) on the African continent. Methods and Materials: A questionnaire was distributed to participants in a regional training course of the International Atomic Energy Agency in palliative cancer care and sent by e-mail to other institutions in Africa. Requested information included both infrastructure and human resources available and the pattern of RT practice for metastatic and locally advanced cancers. Results: Of 35 centers contacted, 24 (68%) completed the questionnaire. Although RT is used by most centers for most metastatic cancers, liver and lung metastases are treated with chemotherapy. Of 23 centers, 14 (61%) had a single RT regimen as an institutional policy for treating painful bone metastases, but only 5 centers (23%) of 23 used 8 Gy in 1 fraction. Brain metastases were being treated by RT to the whole brain to 30 Gy in 10 fractions, either exclusively (n = 13, 56%) or in addition to the use of 20 Gy in 5 fractions (n = 3, 14%). Conclusion: Radiotherapy is a major component of treatment of cancer patients in African countries. There is consensus among few centers for treatment schedules for almost all sites regarding time and dose-fractionation characteristics of RT regimens used and/or indications for the use of RT in this setting

  13. HIFU for Palliative Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhlova, Tatiana D; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest malignancies, with only a 6 % 5-year survival rate and over 50 % of patients being diagnosed at the advanced stage. Current therapies are ineffective, and the treatment of patients with advanced disease is palliative. In the past decade, HIFU ablation has emerged as a modality for palliative treatment of pancreatic tumors. Multiple preclinical and non-randomized clinical trials have been performed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of this procedure. Substantial tumor-related pain reduction was achieved in most cases after HIFU treatment and few significant side effects were observed. In addition, some studies indicate that combination of HIFU ablation with chemotherapy may provide a survival benefit. This chapter summarizes the pre-clinical and clinical experience obtained to date in HIFU treatment of pancreatic tumors and discusses the challenges, limitations and new approaches in this modality. PMID:26486333

  14. [NURSING ETHICS ISSUES IN PALLIATIVE CARE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Serna, José María; de Llanos Peña, Francisco

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the essential anthropological categories of terminal illness and the main attitudes of nurses for their care and the ethical criteria for indication and application of palliative therapies. We conclude that ethical attitudes of care in palliative care nursing are based in anthropological categories of dying process; the access granted to nurse by the patient and family within their privacy generates a relational context where communication can be made more effective and thus facilitate the coping existential, spiritual and psychosocial in illness and the process of diagnostic and prognostic information. The qualitative and quantitative clinical information provided by the nursing professional to multidisciplinary team on the evaluation of the effectiveness of care outcomes and therapies in the context of terminal illness assistance allows establishing a plan of treatment appropriate ethically. PMID:26117997

  15. Palliative Radiofrequency Ablation for Recurrent Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive local therapy for cancer. Its efficacy is now becoming well documented in many different organs, including liver, kidney, and lung. The goal of RFA is typically complete eradication of a tumor in lieu of an invasive surgical procedure. However, RFA can also play an important role in the palliative care of cancer patients. Tumors which are surgically unresectable and incompatible for complete ablation present the opportunity for RFA to be used in a new paradigm. Cancer pain runs the gamut from minor discomfort relieved with mild pain medication to unrelenting suffering for the patient, poorly controlled by conventional means. RFA is a tool which can potentially palliate intractable cancer pain. We present here a case in which RFA provided pain relief in a patient with metastatic prostate cancer with pain uncontrolled by conventional methods

  16. Perception of older adults receiving palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Laporti Seredynskyj

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed at understanding the perception of older adults who are receiving palliative oncological care on self care in relation to different stages of the disease and how such perception affected their lives. This is a qualitative study using oral history conducted with 15 older adults receiving palliative chemotherapy treatment in a health institution. The following categories emerged: social network, perspectives for confronting life, changes and spirituality. It is necessary for nursing staff to understand this process so that the measures implemented take into account all of the implications of the disease and aim at improving quality of life.   doi: 10.5216/ree.v16i2.22795.

  17. The Role of Psychology in Pediatric Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlynn, Emily; Kaur, Harpreet

    2016-07-01

    Pediatric medicine increasingly has recognized the value of integrating behavioral health in medical care, but this trend has not yet extended to pediatric palliative care. Results from a recent survey of pediatric palliative care programs across the United States indicate that team composition almost never included a psychologist. This article presents a model of collaborative care to optimize the integration of psychosocial and medical aspects of treatment in pediatric palliative care, delineating how a psychologist adds to this model. This article argues that psychology brings specialized skills in assessment, intervention, and research that fit with the premise of palliative care as a holistic approach that relieves symptoms. Systematic inclusion of psychologists on pediatric palliative care teams may help to improve effectiveness of services as well as extend the knowledge base of mental health in pediatric palliative care. PMID:27008276

  18. Palliative care in India: Current progress and future needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Khosla

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite its limited coverage, palliative care has been present in India for about 20 years. Obstacles in the growth of palliative care in India are too many and not only include factors like population density, poverty, geographical diversity, restrictive policies regarding opioid prescription, workforce development at base level, but also limited national palliative care policy and lack of institutional interest in palliative care. Nonetheless we have reasons to be proud in that we have overcome several hurdles and last two decades have seen palpable changes in the mindset of health care providers and policy makers with respect to need of palliative care in India. Systematic and continuous education for medical staff is mandatory, and a major break-through for achieving this purpose would be to increase the number of courses and faculties in palliative medicine at most universities.

  19. [Palliative care needs in advanced chronic illness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripodoro, Vilma A; Rynkiewicz, María C; Llanos, Victoria; Padova, Susana; De Lellis, Silvina; De Simone, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    About 75% of population will die from one or more chronic progressive diseases. From this projection WHO urged countries to devise strategies for strengthening palliative treatment as part of comprehensive care. In Catalonia, Spain, direct measurement of the prevalence of these patients with NECPAL CCOMS-ICO© tool was 1.5% of the population. This tool is an indicative, not dichotomous, quali-quantitative multifactorial evaluation to be completed by the treating physician. In Argentina there is no information on these patients. Our goal was to explore and characterize the proportion of chronically ill patients in palliative care needs, by NECPAL CCOMS-ICO© tool, in an accessible population of the City of Buenos Aires. General hospitals of the Health Region 2 (Piñero, álvarez and Santojanni) and its program areas were surveyed. In Health Region 1, we surveyed the Udaondo gastroenterology hospital. A total of 53 physicians (704 patients) were interviewed. It was identified that 29.5% of these patients were affected by advanced chronic diseases; 72.1% of them were NECPAL positive, younger (median 64) than in others studies, and more than 98% presented high levels of comorbidity. Palliative care demand (31.4%) and needs (52.7%) were recorded. Specific indicators of fragility, progression, severity and kind of chronic disease were described. The main finding was to identify, with an instrument not based on mortality that, in Buenos Aires City, 1 in 3 patients with chronic diseases could die in the next year and had palliative care needs. PMID:27295702

  20. Role of palliative radiotherapy in brain metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh S Bilimagga

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brain metastases are a common manifestation of systemic cancer and exceed primary brain tumors in number and are a significant cause of neurologic problems. They affect 20-40% of all cancer patients. Aggressive management of brain metastases is effective in both symptom palliation and prolonging the life. Radiotherapy has a major role to play in the management of brain metastases. AIM: The aim of the study was to know the outcome of palliative radiotherapy in symptomatic brain metastases in terms of improvement in their performance status. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study of 63 patients diagnosed to have brain metastases and treated with palliative whole brain radiotherapy to a dose of 30 Gy in 10 fractions over two weeks between June 1998 and June 2007. Diagnosis was done in most of the cases with computed tomography scan and in a few with magnetic resonance imaging. Improvement in presenting symptoms has been assessed in terms of improvement in their performance status by using the ECOG scale. Results: Fifty-four patients completed the planned treatment. Eight patients received concurrent Temozolamide; 88% of patients had symptom relief at one month follow-up; 39/54 patients had a follow-up of just one to three months. Hence survival could not be assessed in this study. Conclusion: External beam radiotherapy in the dose of 30 Gy over two weeks achieved good palliation in terms improvement in their performance status in 88% of patients. Addition of concurrent and adjuvant Timozolamide may improve the results.

  1. Custom Ocular Prosthesis: A Palliative Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Prachi Thakkar; JR Patel; Rajesh Sethuraman; Narendra Nirmal

    2012-01-01

    The goal of palliative care is the achievement of the best quality of life for patients and their families. Eyes are generally the first features of the face to be noticed. Loss of an eye is a traumatic event which has a crippling effect on the psychology of the patient. Several ocular and orbital disorders require surgical intervention that may result in ocular defects. An ocular prosthesis is fabricated to restore the structure, function, and cosmetics of the defects created by such conditi...

  2. Family physicians' perspectives regarding palliative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess family physicians' views on common indications for palliative radiotherapy and to determine whether this influences patient referral. Methods and materials: A 30-item questionnaire evaluating radiotherapy knowledge and training developed at the Ottawa Regional Cancer Centre (ORCC) was mailed to a random sample of 400 family physicians in eastern Ontario, Canada. The completed surveys were collected and analyzed, and form the basis of this study. Results: A total of 172 completed surveys were received for a net response rate of 50% among practicing family physicians. Almost all of the physicians (97%) had recently seen cancer patients in their offices, with 85% regularly caring for patient with advanced cancer. Fifty-four percent had referred patients in the past for radiotherapy and 53% had contacted a radiation oncologist for advice. Physicians who were more knowledgeable about the common indications for palliative radiotherapy were significantly more likely to refer patients for radiotherapy (P<0.01). Inability to contact a radiation oncologist was correlated with not having referred patients for radiotherapy (P<0.01). Only 10% of the physicians had received radiotherapy education during their formal medical training. Conclusions: Many of the family physicians surveyed were unaware of the effectiveness of radiotherapy in a variety of common palliative situations, and radiotherapy referral was correlated with knowledge about the indications for palliative radiotherapy. This was not surprising given the limited education they received in this area and the limited contact they have had with radiation oncologists. Strategies need to be developed to improve continuing medical education opportunities for family physicians and to facilitate more interaction between these physicians and radiation oncologists

  3. Supportive and Palliative Care of Pancreatic Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Salman Fazal; Muhammad Wasif Saif

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies. An estimated 32,300 patients will die of pancreatic cancer in year 2006. It is the tenth most common malignancy in the United State. Despite recent advances in pathology, molecular basis and treatment, the overall survival rate remains 4% for all stages and races. Palliative care represents an important aspect of care in patient with pancreatic malignancy. Identifying and treating disease related symptomology are priorities. As a physi...

  4. Using Skype to support palliative care surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jacqueline

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this article is to demonstrate how a novel yet important tool can facilitate family involvement in person-centred care, despite geographical distance. The author presents a case study as an in-depth example of the use of Skype in the context of palliative care at home. Skype enhanced family surveillance and symptom management, augmented shared decision making, provided a space for virtual bedside vigil, and ultimately provided the rapport necessary for optimal end of life care. PMID:24471549

  5. Palliative irradiation of the bile ducts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutzner, J.; Klose, K.; Keller, E.

    1985-11-01

    Carcinoma of the common hepatic bile duct or common bile duct were treated by interstitial irradiation with gold seeds using the percutaneous transhepatic drainage partly boosted by external irradiation. The interstitial dose of 50 Gy was given in two applications and 40 Gy by linac. Twice histological examination showed wide tumor destruction of local irradiation, but also much more tumor extension than seen before by diagnostic investigation. Mostly the therapy is only palliative because of the infiltration of liver and lymphnodes. (orig.).

  6. Pediatric Palliative Care: A Personal Story

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 1,257 views 1:05:13 Perinatal Palliative Care - The Zimmer Family Story - Duration: 13:34. UnityPoint Health - Meriter 50,610 views 13:34 Phoebe's Cancer Story - Duration: 7:46. Family A-Fair 616,342 views 7:46 Dr. Patti Brennan: ... The Cost of Dying: End-of-Life Care - Duration: 14:20. CBS 60,768 views 14: ...

  7. Palliative care in India: Situation assessment and future scope

    OpenAIRE

    S S Kar; Subitha, L.; S Iswarya

    2015-01-01

    Palliative care is an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problems associated with life-threatening illness, through prevention and relief of suffering by means of early identification, assessment and treatment of pain, and other problems – physical, psychosocial, and spiritual. It is estimated that in India the total number of people who need palliative care is likely to be 5.4 million people a year. Though palliative care services have been i...

  8. Incorporating the Arts and Humanities in Palliative Medicine Education

    OpenAIRE

    Marchand, Lucille R

    2006-01-01

    The arts and humanities allow the teaching of palliative medicine to come alive by exploring what is often regarded as the most frightening outcome of the illness experience – death and dying. Palliative medicine focuses on the relief of suffering, but how can suffering be understood if the story of the patient is not told through prose, poetry, music, and images? This article describes how teaching can incorporate the power of story through the arts to enrich the palliative medicine curric...

  9. Attitudes of Nonpalliative Care Nurses towards Palliative Care

    OpenAIRE

    Victoria Tait; Megan Higgs; Linda Magann; Joanne Dixon; Jan Maree Davis; Ritin Fernandez

    2015-01-01

    The quality of palliative care given to terminally ill patients and their family members can be directly impacted by the attitudes that nurses hold towards palliative care. This study aimed to investigate the attitudes of nonpalliative care nurses towards death and dying in the context of palliative care. Nurses working within the medical aged care, cardiology and respiratory wards at two metropolitan teaching hospitals in Sydney completed the Frommelt Attitudes Towards Care of the Dying (FAT...

  10. Palliative Percutaneous Jejunal Stent for Patients with Short Bowel Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Takayama, Satoru; Ochi, Yasuo; Yasuda, Akira; Sakamoto, Masaki; Takahashi, Hideki; Akamo, Yoshimi; Takeyama, Hiromitsu

    2009-01-01

    Gastrointestinal obstruction is a common preterminal event in patients with gastric and pancreatic cancer who often undergo palliative bypass surgery. Although endoscopic palliation with self-expandable metallic stents has emerged as a safe and effective alternative to surgery, experience with this technique remains limited. In particular, a proximal jejunal obstruction requires more technical expertise than a duodenal obstruction. Palliative treatment modalities include both surgical and non...

  11. Metronomic palliative chemotherapy in maxillary sinus tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay M Patil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Metronomic chemotherapy consisting of methotrexate and celecoxib recently has shown promising results in multiple studies in head and neck cancers. However, these studies have not included patients with maxillary sinus primaries. Hence, the role of palliative metronomic chemotherapy in patients with maxillary sinus carcinoma that is not amenable to radical therapy is unknown. Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of carcinoma maxillary sinus patients who received palliative metronomic chemotherapy between August 2011 and August 2014. The demographic details, symptomatology, previous treatment details, indication for palliative chemotherapy, response to therapy, and overall survival (OS details were extracted. SPSS version 16 was used for analysis. Descriptive statistics have been performed. Survival analysis was done by Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Five patients had received metronomic chemotherapy. The median age was 60 years (range 37-64 years. The proportion of patients surviving at 6 months, 12 months, and 18 months were 40%, 40%, and 20%, respectively. The estimated median OS was 126 days (95% confidence interval 0-299.9 days. The estimated median survival in patients with an event-free period after the last therapy of <6 months was 45 days, whereas it was 409 days in patients with an event-free period postlast therapy above 6 months (P = 0.063. Conclusion: Metronomic chemotherapy in carcinoma maxillary sinus holds promise. It has activity similar to that seen in head and neck cancers and needs to be evaluated further in a larger cohort of patients.

  12. Palliative radiotherapy for symptomatic osseous metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone matastases are one of the most common and serious conditions requiring radiotherapy, but there is still a considerable lack of agreement on optimal radiation schedule. We analyzed patients with symptomatic osseous matastases from lung (72 patients) and breast (63 patients) carcinoma treated by palliative radiotherapy between 1983 and 1992. In this series, the incidences of symptomatic bone metastases appearing within 2 years after the first diagnosis of the primary lesion were 96% and 36% for lung and breast carcinomas, respectively. Thirty percent of bone metastases from breast carcinoma were diagnosed more than 5 years after the first diagnosis. Thus careful follow-up must be carried out for a prolonged period. Pain relief was achieved at almost the same rate for bone metastases from lung and breast carcinomas (81% and 85%, respectively), an the rapid onset of pain relief (15 Gy or less) was obtained in about half the patients for both diseases. The rapid onset of pain relief and the lack of association between the onset of pain relief and primary tumor argued against the conventional theory that tumor shrinkage is a component of the initial response. In contrast to the fact that almost all lung carcinoma patients had very poor prognoses, one third of the breast carcinoma patients were alive more than 2 years after palliative radiotherapy. Thust, the late effects of radiation, such as radiation myelopathy, must be always considered especially in breast carcinoma patients even when it is 'just' palliative radiotherapy for bone metastases. (author)

  13. Radiotherapeutic management of the patient for palliation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of palliative irradiation for incurable cancer is to improve the quality of life that remains; it may prolong life but it should not be used to prolong death. Proper assessment of the potential favorable influence on the patient's course of disease and comfort is difficult and complex. The decision not to administer irradiation to an informed patient should not be censured. Radical radiation therapy may carry side effects that are worse than the symptoms that need alleviation. For example, radical irradiation to the pelvis for incurable carcinoma of the rectum may cause hemorrhagic enteritis or induce bowel obstruction of fixed loops. Many factors influence the decision to give palliative irradiation: survival time, severity and length of side effects, potential hospitalization for treatment of complications, comfort during transportation, and treatment costs and benefit. For example, does palliative treatment of brain metastasis benefit a patient with carcinoma of the lung that is not oat cell carcinoma when there is also metastasis to the liver and bone? In these cases a judgment must be made that balances quality of life against quantity of life. Other factors also prevent straightforward decisions. Psycho-oncologic radiation therapy may be demanded by the referring physician or by the patient and his or her family. Second opinions are frequently sought by the incurable patient. For every expert radiation therapist, there are other experts who may render a contrary opinion

  14. Contradictions and dialectics in the palliative dialogue: enhancing the palliative dialogue by dialectical principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Tali; Shvartzman, Pesach

    2014-11-01

    The application of required communication skills in the palliative dialogue necessitates a significant transition from the paternalistic medical approach to the holistic psychosocial approach that focuses on the patient and views the individual as a whole entity. Understanding the evolution of a therapeutic relationship in terms of entrance into the relationship, development, maintenance, and leave taking as well as the adoption of dialectical ideas gives palliative caregivers flexibility in the dialogue with patients and families. Accepting the principles of dialectics, in which the existence of contradictions is seen as an inherent part of a reality that is undergoing constant change, gives the caregiver the flexibility to interpret dichotomic thoughts and emotions as a dialectic failure and, in accordance, to move toward a synthesis of the ideas of living and dying. This approach provides caregivers the means to promote the palliative dialogue, implement varied communication skills to clarify the patient's goals, and implement a therapeutic plan to realize them. PMID:24780179

  15. Palliative care in India: Situation assessment and future scope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S S Kar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Palliative care is an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problems associated with life-threatening illness, through prevention and relief of suffering by means of early identification, assessment and treatment of pain, and other problems – physical, psychosocial, and spiritual. It is estimated that in India the total number of people who need palliative care is likely to be 5.4 million people a year. Though palliative care services have been in existence for many years, India ranks at the bottom of the Quality of Death index in overall score. However there has been steady progress in the past few years through community-owned palliative care services. One of the key objectives of the National Programme for prevention and control of cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and stroke is to establish and develop capacity for palliative and rehabilitative care. Community models for the provision of home-based palliative care is possible by involving community caregivers and volunteers supervised by nurses trained in palliative care. Training of medical officers and health care professionals, and sensitization of the public through awareness campaigns are vital to improve the scope and coverage of palliative care. Process of translating palliative care plan into action requires strong leadership, competent management, political support and integration across all levels of care.

  16. [Providing regular relief; considerations for palliative care in the Netherlands].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crul, B J; van Weel, C

    2001-10-20

    Over the last few decades the attention devoted to the palliative aspects of medicine, particularly those in hospital care, has declined due to the emphasis on medical technology. In Anglo-Saxon countries a review of this development resulted in structured palliative care that benefited terminally ill patients with a progressive fatal disease, especially cancer patients. Due to increasing national and international criticism of both the practice of euthanasia (assumed to be too liberal) and the lack of attention devoted to structured palliative care in the Netherlands, the Dutch government decided to improve the structure of palliative care. The government's viewpoint is based on the assumption that good palliative care that includes adequate pain control benefits patient care and might eventually lead to fewer requests for euthanasia. The improvements to palliative care should be realised by means of improvements in the structure, training and knowledge. Six academic medical clusters have been designated as Centres for the Development of Palliative Care (Dutch acronym: COPZ) for a 5-year period. Each COPZ must develop the various aspects needed to improve palliative care within the region it serves and ensure that its activities are carefully coordinated with those in the other centres. Research will focus on measuring the efficacy of palliative care as well as ethical and epidemiological aspects. A government committee will assess the appropriateness of the activities undertaken by each of the centres. PMID:11695096

  17. [Use of music in palliative care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrbina, Dijana; Simunović, Dubravka; Santek, Vjerocka; Njegovan-Zvonarević, Tatjana

    2011-12-01

    Man is mortal, which means that as the earthly body perishes being, final. Disease and death will always be an inevitable and integral part of human experience. The way in which we try to identify and respond to the unique and individual needs of the dying is an indication of our maturity as a society. The number of people requiring palliative care is growing. Palliative care does not intend to either accelerate or postpone death she emphasizes the life and looks at dying as a normal process. It is an active form of care for patients with advanced, progressive illness, with the aim of suppressing pain and other symptoms in addition to providing psychological, social and spiritual support which ensures the best possible quality of life for patients and their families. Therefore requires a coordinated and interdisciplinary contribution team. The variety of professions in a team, and determine the needs of patients should be ready to provide physical, psychological, social and spiritual support using methods that result from an interdisciplinary, collaborative team approach. Development of a holistic approach and awareness in the medical and allied professions has led to a renewal of interest in the inclusion of music and other expressive media in contemporary concepts of palliative care, which are consistent with problem areas, clinical manifestations and the needs of patients. Music offers a direct and uncomplicated medium of intimacy, living in a man who listens to her, has a place where words lose their power. Music is like our existence, constantly polarizing and emotionally stimulating, as it touches the medium of the earliest layers of our becoming. The use of music in palliative care has proved very effective for a variety of effects that music creates in patients. These effects are achieved through the use of various musical techniques, such as musical improvisation, songwriting, receiving creative techniques, guided by imagination and music. These techniques

  18. Creation of minimum standard tool for palliative care in India and self-evaluation of palliative care programs using it

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M R Rajagopal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is important to ensure that minimum standards for palliative care based on available resources are clearly defined and achieved. Aims: (1 Creation of minimum National Standards for Palliative Care for India. (2 Development of a tool for self-evaluation of palliative care organizations. (3 Evaluation of the tool in India. In 2006, Pallium India assembled a working group at the national level to develop minimum standards. The standards were to be evaluated by palliative care services in the country. Materials and Methods: The working group prepared a "standards" document, which had two parts - the first composed of eight "essential" components and the second, 22 "desirable" components. The working group sent the document to 86 hospice and palliative care providers nationwide, requesting them to self-evaluate their palliative care services based on the standards document, on a modified Likert scale. Results: Forty-nine (57% palliative care organizations responded, and their self-evaluation of services based on the standards tool was analyzed. The majority of the palliative care providers met most of the standards identified as essential by the working group. A variable percentage of organizations had satisfied the desirable components of the standards. Conclusions: We demonstrated that the "standards tool" could be applied effectively in practice for self-evaluation of quality of palliative care services.

  19. Cancer and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Population Profiles > Black/African American > Cancer Cancer and African Americans African Americans have the highest mortality rate ... 65MB] At a glance – Top Cancer Sites for African Americans (2008-2012) Cancer Incidence Rates per 100, ...

  20. [Use of methylphenidate in palliative patients with asthenia: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saralegui, A; Palacio, P; Royo, P

    2013-01-01

    Asthenia (or fatigue) is one of the most common symptoms in palliative patients. Methylphenidate is currently being assessed for treating this condition. A review of related literature published to date was performed, revealing methylphenidate to be a safe drug which could decrease fatigue in palliative patients with a tolerable side-effects profile. PMID:24008532

  1. Access to palliative medicine training for Canadian family medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oneschuk, D; Bruera, E

    1998-01-01

    The authors conducted a nine-item mail questionnaire of the 16 Canadian family medicine teaching programme directors to determine the accessibility and operation of palliative care education for their respective family medicine residents. All 16 faculties of medicine responded (100%). The survey revealed that while all universities offer elective time in palliative care only five out of 16 (31%) have a mandatory rotation. The median durations of the mandatory and elective rotations are limited to two and three-and-a-half weeks, respectively. The majority of the universities offer formal lectures in palliative care (12/16, 75%) and educational reading material (13/16, 81%), with the main format in 14/16 (87%) of the sites being case-based learning. The two most common sites for teaching to occur for the residents are the community/outpatient environment and an acute palliative care unit. Fifty-six per cent (9/16) of the universities have designated faculty positions for palliative medicine with a median number of two positions per site. Only one centre offers a specific palliative medicine examination during the rotation. Feedback from the residents regarding their respective palliative medicine programmes were positive overall. Findings from our survey indicate an ongoing need for improved education in palliative medicine at the postgraduate level. PMID:9616456

  2. Sammenhængende palliative forløb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedsted, Peter; Åbom, Birgit; Jespersen, Bodil Abild; Brogaard, Trine; Neergaard, Mette Asbjørn

    2009-01-01

    Almen praksis har altid spillet en central rolle i palliative forløb. I de senere år er der sket en udbygning af den specialiserede palliative indsats, og det stiller krav om en integreret og sammenhængende indsats med shared care, klar ansvarsfordeling og let tilgængelige kommunikationslinjer...

  3. Metastron in palliative therapy of bone metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metastron (strontium-89 chloride) was used as a palliative therapy for metastatic bone pain in 34 patients: in 17 persons cancer of prostate was diagnosed, in 13 patients - breast cancer and in four persons - cancer of other localizations. In case of cancer of prostate complete response was received in four persons, partial one - in two patients, in case of breast cancer - in eight and five patients. The effects had been observed for 13 week. The radionuclide may be recommended as an alternative method to the external radiation in case of multiple metastases

  4. Intention, procedure, outcome and personhood in palliative sedation and euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Materstvedt, Lars Johan

    2012-03-01

    Palliative sedation at the end of life has become an important last-resort treatment strategy for managing refractory symptoms as well as a topic of controversy within palliative care. Furthermore, palliative sedation is prominent in the public debate about the possible legalisation of voluntary assisted dying (physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia). This article attempts to demonstrate that palliative sedation is fundamentally different from euthanasia when it comes to intention, procedure, outcome and the status of the person. Nonetheless, palliative sedation in its most radical form of terminal deep sedation parallels euthanasia in one respect: both end the experience of suffering. However, only the latter intentionally ends life and also has this as its goal. There is the danger that deep sedation could bring death forward in time due to particular side effects of the treatment. Still that would, if it happens, not be intended, and accordingly is defensible in view of the doctrine of double effect. PMID:24653491

  5. Japanese Bereaved Family Members' Perspectives of Palliative Care Units and Palliative Care: J-HOPE Study Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Satomi; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Morita, Tatsuya; Sato, Kazuki; Shoji, Ayaka; Chiba, Yurika; Miyazaki, Tamana; Tsuneto, Satoru; Shima, Yasuo

    2016-06-01

    The study purpose was to understand the perspectives of bereaved family members regarding palliative care unit (PCU) and palliative care and to compare perceptions of PCU before admission and after bereavement. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted, and the perceptions of 454 and 424 bereaved family members were obtained regarding PCU and palliative care, respectively. Family members were significantly more likely to have positive perceptions after bereavement (ranging from 73% to 80%) compared to before admission (ranging from 62% to 71%). Bereaved family members who were satisfied with medical care in the PCU had a positive perception of the PCU and palliative care after bereavement. Respondents younger than 65 years of age were significantly more likely to have negative perceptions of PCU and palliative care. PMID:25852202

  6. Using cannabinoids in pain and palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peat, Sue

    2010-10-01

    Interest in the use of cannabinoids in a clinical setting is gradually increasing, particularly in patients where more conventional treatments have failed. They have been reported as offering perceived benefits in a wide range of conditions, but the major interest at present is centred on their place in pain management and in the palliation of symptoms secondary to terminal cancer and neurological disease. The potential benefits include symptomatic relief for patients suffering from intractable neuropathic pain, anorexia, anxiety and muscle spasm. There is clear consensus that cannibinoids should not be used as a first-line monotherapy, but should be considered as valuable adjuvants to more commonly indicated therapeutic options in the management of palliative care patients. Scientific evidence documenting the benefits of the canibinoids nabilone and sativex is accumulating, but needs to be evaluated carefully in the light of the paucity of available data. Both drugs are usually used under the guidance of specialist units. Nabilone and Sativex are now controlled drugs, and are frequently used outside of their licensed indication (control of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting) and hence particular care needs to be taken in evaluating the rational for their use. Sativex has been recently licenced for use in the management of patients with multiple sclerosis. PMID:20972379

  7. Palliative care and elderly health in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Maria Amaral Soares Abou Ali

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years elderly population is increasing substantially, about 650,000 per year, as well as the concept of unifamílies, ie, families consisting of a single person. In this paper, is proposed a reflection about health of elderly in Brazil, and the conditions of a chronic disease and its acute state - terminal. In the actual society, capitalist and capitalized, the individual is valued by his production, losing his value when acquires a disabling illnesses. There is a growing need for work, and each time there is less time and resources to manage the permanence of an elderly patient at home, or pay for a caregiver. This situation leads families to resort to hospitalization, which in turn makes the hospitals overcrowded with patients in this state, affecting both emergency care as the treatment of chronic patients. This fact occurs due to lack of hospital infrastructure, as well by the lack of units of the healthy system capable of providing palliative care. The questioning about the elderly who need palliative care, and reflection about the type of care dispended for this kind of patient, should be the focal point of professional's reflections, capable to lead him to a new way of thinking and, consequently, to inspire him to act in a new way.

  8. Palliative radiation therapy for multiple myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy is a useful palliative modality for refractory lesions of multiple myeloma. It has been reported that total doses of 10 to 20 Gy are usually adequate to obtain some degree of pain relief. However, there are many patients who need additional doses to obtain sufficient pain relief. In this study. we retrospectively analyzed the records of patients with multiple myeloma irradiated at our department, in an attempt to develop an effective treatment policy for this disease. Twenty-nine patients with 53 lesions were treated between 1968 and 1993. Total irradiation doses were 4 to 60 Gy (median 40 Gy) with daily fractions of 2 Gy or less, and 16 to 51 Gy (median 30 Gy) with daily fractions greater than 2 Gy. Evaluated were 59 symptoms, including pain (68%), neurological abnormalities (15%), and masses (28%). Symptomatic remission was obtained in 33 of 36 (92%) lesions with pain, 6 of 8 (75%) with neurological abnormalities, and 13 of 15 (87%) mass lesions. Pain was partially relieved at a median TDF of 34, and completely at a median TDF of 66 (equivalent to 40-42 Gy with daily fractions of 2 Gy). Radiation therapy is an effective and palliative treatment method for symptomatic multiple myeloma. However, the treatment seems to require higher radiation doses than those reported to obtain adequate relief of symptoms. (author)

  9. Generalist primary and palliative care is associated with few hospitalisations in the last month of life.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.; Korte-Verhoef, M.C. de; Schweitzer, B.; Francke, A.L.; Deliens, L.; Pasman, H.R.W.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hospitalisations in the last phase of life may be related to poor quality of palliative care at home. In the Netherlands, that has a generalist palliative care model, palliative care at home can be given by generalist and palliative care consultants. Aim: To study the association between

  10. African dance

    OpenAIRE

    Mumberson, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The RE Open will be shown at the Mall Gallery London and the international section was judged by major practitioners and educators, print dealers and collectors, President of RE and Keeper of the Ashmolean Museum Dr Bren Unwin, John Purcell, Deborah Roslund, Colin Harrison, Dave Ferry, and Mark Hampson. Piece selected "African Dance" print.

  11. Nurses’ Knowledge of Palliative Care in the Pneumological Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inarvis Medina González

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: application of palliative care to patients with chronic respiratory conditions is a current problem related to the quality of nursing care provided to them.Objective: to identify the nurses’ level of knowledge of palliative care for patients with chronic respiratory conditions in the Pneumological Hospital.Methods: a descriptive study was conducted in the Pneumological Hospital from January through May 2014. It included 33 nurses who provide care to hospitalized patients. The variables analyzed were years of experience, educational level, knowledge of defining aspects of palliative care, pain management, intervention for control of dyspnea, criteria for drug administration and choice of route of administration as well as nurses’ perception of their knowledge of palliative care. Results: thirty percent have more than 30 years of professional work experience, 51% are graduates. Fifty four point five percent consider that palliative care should not be provided at home; 63.6% believe that they should not be provided to patients with chronic non-cancerous diseases in advanced stages; 69.9% suggest that mixed therapies should not be used for pain management; 51.5% do not consider that breathing techniques should be used to control dyspnea. Forty eight point four percent recognize their lack of knowledge about palliative care. Conclusions: nurses from the Pneumological Hospital do not have sufficient knowledge about the different dimensions of palliative care for patients with chronic respiratory conditions.

  12. Integrating palliative care into the trajectory of cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, David; Bruera, Eduardo

    2016-03-01

    Over the past five decades, palliative care has evolved from serving patients at the end of life into a highly specialized discipline focused on delivering supportive care to patients with life-limiting illnesses throughout the disease trajectory. A growing body of evidence is now available to inform the key domains in the practice of palliative care, including symptom management, psychosocial care, communication, decision-making, and end-of-life care. Findings from multiple studies indicate that integrating palliative care early in the disease trajectory can result in improvements in quality of life, symptom control, patient and caregiver satisfaction, illness understanding, quality of end-of-life care, survival, and costs of care. In this narrative Review, we discuss various strategies to integrate oncology and palliative care by optimizing clinical infrastructures, processes, education, and research. The goal of integration is to maximize patient access to palliative care and, ultimately, to improve patient outcomes. We provide a conceptual model for the integration of supportive and/or palliative care with primary and oncological care. We also discuss how health-care systems and institutions need to tailor integration based on their resources, size, and the level of primary palliative care available. PMID:26598947

  13. Palliative care in home care: perceptions of occupational therapists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Séfora Gomez Portela

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed at understanding and reflecting on the perceptions of occupational therapists regarding the implementation of palliative care in home care. This is an exploratory, qualitative study, through semi-structured interviews, conducted in the second semester of 2012 with eight occupational therapists with experience in palliative care in the city of São Paulo. Content analysis identified four themes: characterization and professional trajectory in the field, understanding the concepts of palliative care, home care and palliative care, and occupational therapy and palliative care in home care. The results suggest that the role of the occupational therapist in this field has taken place at different levels of health care, being addressed to people with varying needs. The use of the concept of palliative care by the interviewees exceeds the notion of end of life, following the changes in the epidemiological transition. They understand that professional services follow the trend of national palliative care services with focus on specialized levels, but manifest the importance of its implementation in primary and home care. Among the barriers to practice, they identified the complexity of “being at home “, peculiarities of palliative care with high cost demands, lack of infrastructure and implementation of the current policy. Professional training and scientific roduction in the area were viewed as inadequate, although they identified a call for change. The interviewees recognized palliative care in home care as a strong professional field, but one still requiring study and discussions regarding its limits and conditions of implementation, especially in the Unified Health System.

  14. Associations between successful palliative cancer pathways and community nurse involvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Mette Asbjoern; Vedsted, Peter; Olesen, Frede;

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Most terminally ill cancer patients and their relatives wish that the patient dies at home. Community nurses (CNs) are often frontline workers in the patients' homes and CN involvement may be important in attaining successful palliative pathways at home.The aim of the present...... were used to obtain data on CNs' efforts, GP-questionnaires were used to obtain data on pathway characteristics and relatives answered questionnaires to evaluate the palliative pathway at home. Questionnaires addressed the palliative pathway of a total of 599 deceased cancer patients. Associations...

  15. Pediatric Palliative Care in the Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Kevin; Wolfe, Joanne; Collura, Christopher

    2015-09-01

    The chronicity of illness that afflicts children in Pediatric Palliative Care and the medical technology that has improved their lifespan and quality of life make prognostication extremely difficult. The uncertainty of prognostication and the available medical technologies make both the neonatal intensive care unit and the pediatric intensive care unit locations where many children will receive Pediatric Palliative Care. Health care providers in the neonatal intensive care unit and pediatric intensive care unit should integrate fundamental Pediatric Palliative Care principles into their everyday practice. PMID:26333755

  16. Edmonton, Canada: a regional model of palliative care development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fainsinger, Robin L; Brenneis, Carleen; Fassbender, Konrad

    2007-05-01

    Palliative care developed unevenly in Edmonton in the 1980s and early 1990s. Health care budget cuts created an opportunity for innovative redesign of palliative care service delivery. This report describes the components that were developed to build an integrated comprehensive palliative care program, the use of common clinical assessments and outcome evaluation that has been key to establishing credibility and ongoing support. Our program has continued to develop and grow with an ongoing focus on the core areas of clinical care, education, and research. PMID:17482060

  17. Palliative radiotherapy for cancers other than brain or bone metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy plays a major role in the palliation of patients with uncontrolled cancer and is important in any comprehensive care program. There are fewer phase III trials on palliative radiotherapy of other symptomatic tumors than there are for the treatment of bone metastases. However, the number of such trials has been increasing, especially for the treatment of lung cancer. In particular, symptoms from bronchial obstruction, superior vena cava obstruction and other solid tumors as well as cancer-related bone pain and brain metastases can all be palliated effectively with radiotherapy. (author)

  18. A randomised, multicentre clinical trial of specialised palliative care plus standard treatment versus standard treatment alone for cancer patients with palliative care needs: the Danish palliative care trial (DanPaCT) protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Anna Thit; Damkier, Anette; Vejlgaard, Tove Bahn; Lindschou, Jane; Sjøgren, Per; Gluud, Christian Nyfeldt; Neergaard, Mette Asbjørn; Petersen, Morten Aa; Lundorff, Lena Elisabeth; Pedersen, Lise; Fayers, Peter; Strömgren, Annette S; Higginson, Irene J; Groenvold, Mogens

    2013-01-01

    Advanced cancer patients experience considerable symptoms, problems, and needs. Early referral of these patients to specialised palliative care (SPC) could improve their symptoms and problems.The Danish Palliative Care Trial (DanPaCT) investigates whether patients with metastatic cancer, who report...... palliative needs in a screening, will benefit from being referred to 'early SPC'....

  19. Assessing and responding to palliative care needs in rural sub-Saharan Africa: results from a model intervention and situation analysis in Malawi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Herce

    Full Text Available Palliative care is rarely accessible in rural sub-Saharan Africa. Partners In Health and the Malawi government established the Neno Palliative Care Program (NPCP to provide palliative care in rural Neno district. We conducted a situation analysis to evaluate early NPCP outcomes and better understand palliative care needs, knowledge, and preferences.Employing rapid evaluation methodology, we collected data from 3 sources: 1 chart review of all adult patients from the NPCP's first 9 months; 2 structured interviews with patients and caregivers; 3 semi-structured interviews with key stakeholders.The NPCP enrolled 63 patients in its first 9 months. Frequent diagnoses were cancer (n = 50, 79% and HIV/AIDS (n = 37 of 61, 61%. Nearly all (n = 31, 84% patients with HIV/AIDS were on antiretroviral therapy. Providers registered 112 patient encounters, including 22 (20% home visits. Most (n = 43, 68% patients had documented pain at baseline, of whom 23 (53% were treated with morphine. A majority (n = 35, 56% had ≥1 follow-up encounter. Mean African Palliative Outcome Scale pain score decreased non-significantly between baseline and follow-up (3.0 vs. 2.7, p = 0.5 for patients with baseline pain and complete pain assessment documentation. Providers referred 48 (76% patients for psychosocial services, including community health worker support, socioeconomic assistance, or both. We interviewed 36 patients referred to the NPCP after the chart review period. Most had cancer (n = 19, 53% or HIV/AIDS (n = 10, 28%. Patients frequently reported needing income (n = 24, 67% or food (n = 22, 61%. Stakeholders cited a need to make integrated palliative care widely available.We identified a high prevalence of pain and psychosocial needs among patients with serious chronic illnesses in rural Malawi. Early NPCP results suggest that comprehensive palliative care can be provided in rural Africa by integrating disease

  20. The role of dentist in palliative care team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rani P Mol

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The palliative doctor gives the ′touch of God′ as he/she takes care of the terminally ill patient. The oncologist encounters great difficulties in managing oral cavity problems of these patients. A trained dental doctor can help other doctors in dealing with these situations. But the general dental surgeon does not have enough idea about his part in these treatments. The community is also unaware of the role that a nearby dentist can play. Adequate training programs have to be conducted and awareness has to be created. A trained dentist will be a good team mate for the oncologist or radiotherapist or other doctors of the palliative care team. In this paper, a brief attempt is made to list a few areas in which a palliative care dentist can help other members of the palliative care team and also the patient in leading a better life.

  1. Smarter palliative care for cancer: Use of smartphone applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha Rani Jamwal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Smartphones are technologically advanced mobile phone devices which use software similar to computer-based devices as a user-friendly interface. This review article is aimed to inform the palliative care professionals, cancer patients and their caregivers about the role of smartphone applications (apps in the delivery of palliative care services, through a brief review of existing literature on the development, feasibility, analysis, and effectiveness of such apps. There is a dearth need for sincere palliative care clinicians to work together with software professionals to develop the suitable smartphone apps in accordance with the family/caregivers' necessities and patients' biopsychosocial characteristics that influence the technology driven evidence informed palliative cancer care.

  2. Overcoming Recruitment Challenges in Palliative Care Clinical Trials

    OpenAIRE

    LeBlanc, Thomas W.; Lodato, Jordan E.; Currow, David C; Abernethy, Amy P.

    2013-01-01

    Challenges to clinical trial recruitment in palliative care are significant but not insurmountable. Through their experience with designing and deploying a social-marketing based protocol, the authors show that a carefully crafted recruitment and retention protocol can be effective.

  3. Pharmacological treatments for fatigue associated with palliative care

    OpenAIRE

    Mücke, M.; Mochamat; Cuhls, H; Peuckmann-Post, V.; Minton, O.; Stone, P.; Radbruch, L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This review updates the original review, 'Pharmacological treatments for fatigue associated with palliative care' and also incorporates the review 'Drug therapy for the management of cancer-related fatigue'.In healthy individuals, fatigue is a protective response to physical or mental stress, often relieved by rest. By contrast, in palliative care patients' fatigue can be severely debilitating and is often not counteracted with rest, thereby impacting daily activity and quality of...

  4. Opportunities to maximize value with integrated palliative care

    OpenAIRE

    Bergman J; Laviana AA

    2016-01-01

    Jonathan Bergman,1–3 Aaron A Laviana,1 1Department of Urology, 2Department of Family Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 3Veterans Health Affairs-Greater Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Palliative care involves aggressively addressing and treating psychosocial, spiritual, religious, and family concerns, as well as considering the overall psychosocial structures supporting a patient. The concept of integrated palliative care removes the either/or decision a pa...

  5. Opportunities to maximize value with integrated palliative care

    OpenAIRE

    Bergman, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Jonathan Bergman,1–3 Aaron A Laviana,1 1Department of Urology, 2Department of Family Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 3Veterans Health Affairs-Greater Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Palliative care involves aggressively addressing and treating psychosocial, spiritual, religious, and family concerns, as well as considering the overall psychosocial structures supporting a patient. The concept of integrated palliative care removes the either/or decision ...

  6. Endoscopic Stent Placement in the Palliation of Malignant Biliary Obstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jin Hong

    2011-01-01

    Biliary drainage with biliary stent placement is the treatment of choice for palliation in patients with malignant biliary obstruction caused by unresectable neoplasms. In such patients, the endoscopic approach can be initially used with percutaneous radiological intervention. In patients with unresectable malignant distal bile duct obstructions, endoscopic biliary drainage with biliary stent placement has now become the main and least invasive palliative modality, which has been proven to be...

  7. Retroperitoneal Endodermal Sinus Tumor Patient with Palliative Care Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, Surbhi

    2016-01-01

    This article is a case reflection of a personal encounter on the palliative care treatment required after the removal of a complicated case of a primary extra-gonadal retro-peritoneal endodermal sinus tumor (yolk sac tumor). This reflection is from the perspective of a recently graduated MD student who spent one month with an Indian pain management and palliative care team at the Institute Rotary Cancer Hospital (IRCH), All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New Delhi. PMID:26962288

  8. Orientations can avert psychosocial risks to palliative staff

    OpenAIRE

    Kamau, Caroline; Medisauskaite, A.; Lopes, B.

    2014-01-01

    Key points 1. Personnel in palliative care wards and hospices are at risk of chronic stress, burnout, anxiety, depression and substance/alcohol abuse because working in end-of-life care involves frequent grief, death anxiety and feelings of professional helplessness. 2. This commentary discusses the reported labour shortage in palliative care, and why some occupations are particularly at risk of quitting (e.g., care workers). 3. Most healthcare organizations are not providing pal...

  9. The management of family conflict in palliative care

    OpenAIRE

    LICHTENTHAL, WENDY G.; Kissane, David W.

    2008-01-01

    We review the literature on family conflict in palliative care. The prevalence and common sources of conflict are discussed, including historical issues of tension, differing coping styles, the division of labour, and the presence of acute or chronic mental illness within the family. Assessment and intervention strategies used in Family Focused Grief Therapy (FFGT), a family-centred preventive intervention that begins during palliative care and continues during bereavement, are presented, wit...

  10. Palliative care in medical outliers with heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Jammula Prabhakar Patro; Pavani Priyadarsini

    2016-01-01

    Medical outliers are the patients who present to medical practices without health insurance or with serious co-morbidities needing prolonged hospital stay. Palliative care is part of standard guidelines for management of heart failure. But in medical outliers suffering from heart failure, palliative care should begin more early than it is recommended in standard guidelines because of financial reasons. It is suggested that guidelines be framed also for medical outliers with heart failure. It ...

  11. Program Assessment Framework for a Rural Palliative Supportive Service

    OpenAIRE

    Barbara Pesut; Brenda Hooper; Richard Sawatzky; Robinson, Carole A; Bottorff, Joan L.; Miranda Dalhuisen

    2013-01-01

    Although there are a number of quality frameworks available for evaluating palliative services, it is necessary to adapt these frameworks to models of care designed for the rural context. The purpose of this paper was to describe the development of a program assessment framework for evaluating a rural palliative supportive service as part of a community-based research project designed to enhance the quality of care for patients and families living with life-limiting chronic illness. A review ...

  12. Palliative care -- an essential component of cancer control

    OpenAIRE

    Macdonald, N.

    1998-01-01

    Unlike in other nations, in Canada palliative care has its origins in university hospitals. It has subsequently developed in a few Canadian schools as an academic discipline closely linked with oncology programs. Although this model is successful, other faculties of medicine and cancer centres have been slow to emulate it. Today, the situation is rapidly changing, and both palliative care and oncology professionals are re-examining the manifest need for collaborative efforts in patient care, ...

  13. Retroperitoneal endodermal sinus tumor patient with palliative care needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surbhi Kashyap

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is a case reflection of a personal encounter on the palliative care treatment required after the removal of a complicated case of a primary extra-gonadal retro-peritoneal endodermal sinus tumor (yolk sac tumor. This reflection is from the perspective of a recently graduated MD student who spent one month with an Indian pain management and palliative care team at the Institute Rotary Cancer Hospital (IRCH, All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS, New Delhi

  14. Identifying potential need for cancer palliation in Nova Scotia

    OpenAIRE

    Johnston, G M; Gibbons, L.; Burge, F I; Dewar, R A; Cummings, I; Levy, I G

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the degree to which Nova Scotia cancer patients who may need palliative care are being referred to the comprehensive Halifax-based Palliative Care Program (PCP). METHODS: The authors conducted a retrospective, population-based study using administrative health data for all adults in Nova Scotia who died of cancer from 1988 to 1994. Proportions and odds ratios (ORs) were used to determine where there were differences in age, sex, place of residence, cancer cause of death, ...

  15. Treating nausea and vomiting in palliative care: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glare P

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Paul Glare, Jeanna Miller, Tanya Nikolova, Roma TickooPain and Palliative Care Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Nausea and vomiting are portrayed in the specialist palliative care literature as common and distressing symptoms affecting the majority of patients with advanced cancer and other life-limiting illnesses. However, recent surveys indicate that these symptoms may be less common and bothersome than has previously been reported. The standard palliative care approach to the assessment and treatment of nausea and vomiting is based on determining the cause and then relating this back to the “emetic pathway” before prescribing drugs such as dopamine antagonists, antihistamines, and anticholinergic agents which block neurotransmitters at different sites along the pathway. However, the evidence base for the effectiveness of this approach is meager, and may be in part because relevance of the neuropharmacology of the emetic pathway to palliative care patients is limited. Many palliative care patients are over the age of 65 years, making these agents difficult to use. Greater awareness of drug interactions and QTc prolongation are emerging concerns for all age groups. The selective serotonin receptor antagonists are the safest antiemetics, but are not used first-line in many countries because there is very little scientific rationale or clinical evidence to support their use outside the licensed indications. Cannabinoids may have an increasing role. Advances in interventional gastroenterology are increasing the options for nonpharmacological management. Despite these emerging issues, the approach to nausea and vomiting developed within palliative medicine over the past 40 years remains relevant. It advocates careful clinical evaluation of the symptom and the person suffering it, and an understanding of the clinical pharmacology of medicines that are available for palliating

  16. Palliative care for adolescents and young adults with cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenberg AR

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Abby R Rosenberg,1–3 Joanne Wolfe4–61Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Seattle Children’s Hospital, Seattle, WA; 2Clinical Research Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA; 3Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; 4Department of Psychosocial Oncology and Palliative Care/Division of Pediatric Palliative Care, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA; 5Department of Medicine/Division of Hematology/Oncology, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA; 6Department of Pediatrics, Harvard University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Adolescents and young adults (AYAs with cancer represent a unique and challenging group of patients with distinct developmental and psychosocial needs that may be unrecognized or unmet during their cancer experience. Palliative care refers to the total care of a patient, regardless of his or her disease status, and aims to improve quality of life by controlling symptoms and alleviating physical, social, psychological, and spiritual suffering. Integrating palliative care into standard oncology practice for AYAs is therefore valuable, if not imperative, in improving their overall cancer experience. In this review, we aimed to describe the scope, benefits, and challenges of palliative care for AYA oncology patients. We provide a broad impression of the existing literature describing or investigating palliative care in this population. Put together, the evidence suggests that palliative care is not only needed, but can also be critically beneficial to patients, families, and health care professionals alike. As we increase public and professional awareness of the needs and applications of palliative care for AYA patients with cancer, we will ultimately enable better psychosocial outcomes of the AYA patients and their larger communities.Keywords: supportive care, end of life, psychosocial outcomes, psychosocial oncology, psychosocial needs, quality of life

  17. Obesity and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Data > Minority Population Profiles > Black/African American > Obesity Obesity and African Americans African American women have the ... ss6304.pdf [PDF | 3.38MB] HEALTH IMPACT OF OBESITY More than 80 percent of people with type ...

  18. Palliative and low cost radiotherapy in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The International Agency for Research on Cancer predicts that cancer incidence in developing countries will increase dramatically in the first two decades of this millennium. Already some 80% of cancer patients in developing countries present with incurable disease. In many cases pain is a severe problem and palliation is needed to improve quality of life as well as extending survival. This paper will consider the physical and clinical aspects of palliative radiotherapy (PRT), choice of radiation modality, alternative approaches to imaging and therapy and cost-benefit considerations. The potential benefits of a dedicated palliative care centre include lower cost and therefore more centres, enabling more patients access to regional palliative care. Simple curative treatments could also be managed. Co60 radiotherapy has important advantages in developing countries, because of the higher initial cost of a linear accelerator, as well as the need for reliable power supply and the level of skill required by linac technicians and physicists. The beam characteristics of both Co60 units and low energy linacs are compared and both are found to be acceptable for palliation. The role of palliative and low cost radiotherapy in Bangladesh is reviewed. The concept of telemedicine is also discussed, using mobile phones and internet communication to allow rural clinics to receive support from specialists based in the cities, to send images for remote diagnosis and remote dose planning for radiotherapy.

  19. Integrating palliative care in public health: the Colombian experience following an international pain policy fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, Marta; Florez, Sandra; De Lima, Liliana; Ryan, Karen

    2011-06-01

    Access to palliative care is insufficient in many countries around the world. In an effort to improve access to palliative care services and treatments, a public health approach as suggested by the World Health Organization was implemented in Colombia to improve opioid availability, increase awareness and competences about palliative care for healthcare workers, and to include palliative care as a component of care in legislation. As a result, opioid availability has improved, a mandatory palliative care course for medical undergraduate students has been implemented and a palliative care law is being discussed in the Senate. This article describes the strategy, main achievements and suggestions for implementing similar initiatives in developing countries. PMID:21228093

  20. Radiotherapy in Palliative Cancer Care: Development and Implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is estimated that in 2008 there were over 12 million new cancer diagnoses and 7 million cancer deaths worldwide. The World Health Organisation (WHO) predicts that cancer rates will increase from 10 million to 24 million in the next 50 years. More than half of cancer cases will be diagnosed in low income nations, where 80% or more of patients will have incurable disease at diagnosis. In situations where most patients are diagnosed with incurable disease or where curative treatment is logistically unavailable, as is the case in many low income countries, the allocation of limited health care resources should reflect a greater emphasis on palliative care. Ironically, access to palliative care is greater in health care systems with well developed infrastructures and facilities for prevention, early detection, and curative treatment of cancer. To provide comprehensive cancer care, a multidisciplinary approach is needed. This maximizes the available treatments and interventions, whilst ensuring a cost effective and ethically sound approach to the treatment of patients at each stage of the disease. Barriers to palliative care may result from its low prioritization in health care policy and education. The WHO expert committee on cancer pain and palliative care report of 1990 called for the integration of efforts directed at maintaining patient quality of life through all stages of cancer treatment. As a result supportive interventions aimed at improving quality of life are needed for patients undergoing both curative and palliative cancer treatment. The International Atomic Energy Agency is currently collaborating with the Open Society Institute to develop palliative care programmes in Eastern Europe, Africa and India, as well as supporting programmes in other regions of the world, through the International Palliative Care Initiative. OSI partners with the IAEA's Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy, the World Health Organization, the International Agency for Research

  1. Impact of pain and palliative care services on patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Santha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Palliative care has become an emerging need of the day as the existing health-care facilities play only a limited role in the care of the chronically ill in the society. Patients with terminal illness in most cases spend their lives in the community among their family and neighbors, so there is the need for a multi disciplinary team for their constant care. Volunteers are primary care givers who originate normally from the same locality with local knowledge and good public contact through which they can make significant contributions in a team work by bridging the gap between the patient community and outside world. Aim: The present study has been undertaken to analyze the impact of palliative care services on patients by considering 51 variables. Materials and Methods: The respondents of the study include 50 pain and palliative care patients selected at random from 15 palliative care units functioning in Ernakulam district. The analysis was made by using statistical techniques viz. weighted average method, Chi-square test, Friedman repeated measures analysis of variance on ranks and percentages. Results: The study revealed that the major benefit of palliative care to the patients is the reduction of pain to a considerable extent, which was unbearable for them earlier. Second, the hope of patients could be maintained or strengthened through palliative care treatment. Conclusion: It is understood that the services of the doctors and nurses are to be improved further by making available their services to all the palliative care patients in a uniform manner.

  2. Gynaecological malignancies from palliative care perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamlesh Mishra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Of the approximately 80,000 new cases of all cancers detected every year in India, 10-15% are gynecological malignancies. As per population-based registries under the National Cancer Registry Program, the leading sites of cancer among women are the cervix uteri, breast, and oral cavity. About 50-60% of all cancers among women in India are mainly of the following four organs: cervix uteri, breast, corpus uteri, and ovaries. Over 70% of these women report for diagnostic and treatment services at an advanced stage of disease, resulting in poor survival and high mortality rates. Among all gynecological cancers, ovarian cancer is the deadliest one and, in 2/3 rd of the cases, is detected in an advanced stage. But, in India and in other developing countries, due to inadequate screening facilities for the preventable cancer cervix, this kills more women than any other cancer in females. Gynecology Oncologist as a sub-specialist has an immensely important role in curtailing the menace of gynecological malignancies by providing comprehensive preventive, curative, palliative and follow-up services, with the aim of assuring a good quality of life to women as a cornerstone of cancer management.

  3. Malignant biliary obstruction: From palliation to treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulay, Brian R; Birg, Aleksandr

    2016-01-01

    Malignant obstruction of the bile duct from cholangiocarcinoma, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, or other tumors is a common problem which may cause debilitating symptoms and increase the risk of subsequent surgery. The optimal treatment - including the decision whether to treat prior to resection - depends on the type of malignancy, as well as the stage of disease. Preoperative biliary drainage is generally discouraged due to the risk of infectious complications, though some situations may benefit. Patients who require neoadjuvant therapy will require decompression for the prolonged period until attempted surgical cure. For pancreatic cancer patients, self-expanding metallic stents are superior to plastic stents for achieving lasting decompression without stent occlusion. For cholangiocarcinoma patients, treatment with percutaneous methods or nasobiliary drainage may be superior to endoscopic stent placement, with less risk of infectious complications or failure. For patients of either malignancy who have advanced disease with palliative goals only, the choice of stent for endoscopic decompression depends on estimated survival, with plastic stents favored for survival of stent patency and patient survival for these patients by achieving local control of the obstructing tumor. Both photodynamic therapy and radiofrequency ablation may play a role in extending survival of patients with malignant biliary obstruction. PMID:27326319

  4. [Palliative Care for Non-cancer Patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegaki, Junichi

    2016-03-01

    Although palliative care has been developed and implemented as care for cancer pain, it is holistic care for suffering that includes physical, psychosocial and spiritual pain of life-threatening illness. It turned out that non-cancer patients in the end-stage are also suffering from various pain that should be treated as cancer patients. Trajectories of illness in non-cancer patients are with more gradual decline than those of cancer patients with steady progression and it is often difficult to make decision about end-of-life. The purpose of advance care planning was originally to help describe legal documents. This process is proved to contribute to improving QOL of patients and their families to discuss preference, hope, economic problems, spiritual question as well as medical treatment In Japan guideline of decision making process in end-of-life stage has been established. A program of communication training in end-of-life discussion has been made. Under current situation some comments on the role of anesthesiologists are also mentioned. PMID:27097506

  5. [Euthanasia and palliative care in the Netherlands].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisseau, Nicolas

    2004-03-27

    THE BIRTH OF THE DUTCH LAW: Euthanasia has been recently legalized in the Netherlands (since April 1, 2002). In this Article, we present the various cultural and historical factors that contributed to the law, the guidelines for the procedure and the resulting controversy. THE INTERVENING FACTORS: Internationally, the attitude concerning end of life care are heterogenic and also directly depend on religious and cultural factors. In the Netherlands, the health system promotes the maintenance at home of the terminally ill. However, the financial aspects (private health insurance) interact with the management of these patients. The rules for euthanasia are very strict and a declaration must be registered. Dedicated commissions are organised to control that the rules are applied. The current debate concerns the pertinence of the regulations, the attitude towards handicapped people and children, and the need to develop palliative care. The latter have only recently been developed in the country. The priority is focusing on old peoples' homes. The Netherlands is slow in this regard, but a new draft law is soon to be presented to the Authorities, and will most probably enable the gaps to be bridged. PMID:15105777

  6. Palliative Treatment of Malignant Pleural Effusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenyang Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant pleural effusion (MPE is a common clinical problem caused by cancers. Pleural effusion can be the first sign of cancer in more than 25% of patients. Lung cancer and breast cancer are the most common cancers that metastasize to the pleura in men and women, respectively. Other cancers, including, but not limited to, lymphomas, ovarian cancer, stomach cancer, and several unknown primary cancers can also lead to MPE. Dyspnea and chest pain are the most common symptoms of MPE along with other symptoms such as a cough, weight loss, anorexia, fatigue, and weakness. Aggravation of these symptoms is closely related to the rate of accumulation of pleural effusion. Treatment options to MPE are determined by the type and extent of the underlying malignancy. The major goals of the treatment are to relieve symptoms, restore functions, improve the quality of life, and minimize the duration of hospital stay and costs. Although some patients can be treated with systemic therapies, most of these treatments are temporary, and MPE would recur soon. Hence, further palliative treatments to effectively control pleural effusions and relieve symptoms are necessary. This review addresses the pathophysiology of MPE and the treatment options for patients with MPE.

  7. Malignant biliary obstruction: From palliation to treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulay, Brian R; Birg, Aleksandr

    2016-06-15

    Malignant obstruction of the bile duct from cholangiocarcinoma, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, or other tumors is a common problem which may cause debilitating symptoms and increase the risk of subsequent surgery. The optimal treatment - including the decision whether to treat prior to resection - depends on the type of malignancy, as well as the stage of disease. Preoperative biliary drainage is generally discouraged due to the risk of infectious complications, though some situations may benefit. Patients who require neoadjuvant therapy will require decompression for the prolonged period until attempted surgical cure. For pancreatic cancer patients, self-expanding metallic stents are superior to plastic stents for achieving lasting decompression without stent occlusion. For cholangiocarcinoma patients, treatment with percutaneous methods or nasobiliary drainage may be superior to endoscopic stent placement, with less risk of infectious complications or failure. For patients of either malignancy who have advanced disease with palliative goals only, the choice of stent for endoscopic decompression depends on estimated survival, with plastic stents favored for survival of < 4 mo. New endoscopic techniques may actually extend stent patency and patient survival for these patients by achieving local control of the obstructing tumor. Both photodynamic therapy and radiofrequency ablation may play a role in extending survival of patients with malignant biliary obstruction. PMID:27326319

  8. Pediatric palliative care in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Erica C; Rubenstein, Jared; Levine, Deena; Baker, Justin N; Dabbs, Devon; Friebert, Sarah E

    2015-01-01

    Early integration of pediatric palliative care (PPC) for children with life-threatening conditions and their families enhances the provision of holistic care, addressing psychological, social, spiritual, and physical concerns, without precluding treatment with the goal of cure. PPC involvement ideally extends throughout the illness trajectory to improve continuity of care for patients and families. Although current PPC models focus primarily on the hospital setting, community-based PPC (CBPPC) programs are increasingly integral to the coordination, continuity, and provision of quality care. In this review, the authors examine the purpose, design, and infrastructure of CBPPC in the United States, highlighting eligibility criteria, optimal referral models to enhance early involvement, and fundamental tenets of CBPPC. This article also appraises the role of CBPPC in promoting family-centered care. This model strives to enhance shared decision making, facilitate seamless handoffs of care, maintain desired locations of care, and ease the end of life for children who die at home. The effect of legislation on the advent and evolution of CBPPC also is discussed, as is an assessment of the current status of state-specific CBPPC programs and barriers to implementation of CBPPC. Finally, strategies and resources for designing, implementing, and maintaining quality standards in CBPPC programs are reviewed. PMID:25955682

  9. Palliative care in advanced gynecological cancers: Institute of palliative medicine experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushmita Pathy

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To study the epidemiological profile, clinical symptoms and referral patterns of patients with gynecological malignancy. To evaluate pain symptoms, response to treatment and factors affecting management in patients with advanced gynecological malignancies. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed of the gynecological malignancy cases registered at the Pain and Palliative Care Clinic, Calicut, over a 12-month period between January 2006 and December 2006.Patient characteristics, symptoms and response to treatment were evaluated in detail. Results: A total of 1813 patients registered, of which 64 had gynecological malignancies. Most of the cases were referred from the Oncology Department of the Calicut Medical College. Fifty-five percent of the patients were unaware of their diagnosis. Psychosocial issues and anxiety were observed in 48%. Insomnia was seen in 52% of the cases. Pain was the most common and most distressing symptom. Adequate pain relief was achieved in only 32% of the patients. Conclusions: The number of gynecological malignancy cases attending the Pain and Palliative Care Clinic is small. Pain is the most common and distressing symptom, with only 32% of the patients achieving adequate pain relief. Poor drug compliance, incomplete assessment of pain and the lack of awareness of morphine therapy were identified as the most common causes for poor pain control.

  10. "PRIMARY PALLIATIVE CARE? - Treating terminally ill cancer patients in the primary care sector"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Mette Asbjørn; Jensen, AB; Olesen, Frede;

    2006-01-01

    4th Research Forum of the European Association for Palliative Care "Collaborate to Catalyse Research", Venice Lido,......4th Research Forum of the European Association for Palliative Care "Collaborate to Catalyse Research", Venice Lido,...

  11. Self-Expanding Metal Stenting for Palliation of Patients with Malignant Colonic Obstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meisner, Søren; González-Huix, Ferran; Vandervoort, Jo G;

    2012-01-01

    Background. Self-expanding metal stents can alleviate malignant colonic obstruction in incurable patients and avoid palliative stoma surgery. Objective. Evaluate stent effectiveness and safety on palliation of patients with malignant colorectal strictures. Design. Two prospective, one Spanish and...

  12. An Ecological Understanding of Caregiver Experiences in Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Devyani; Corbin, J Hope; Shillam, Casey

    2016-01-01

    Palliative care is specialized health care to improve quality of life for patients with serious illness and their families through prevention and relief of suffering. A Palliative Care Institute was held in western Washington to capture community voices about diverse needs, strengths, and opportunities for improvement of palliative care. Researchers employed qualitative methods to obtain thematic data, provide real-time analysis, and engage in a multivoting technique to reflect stakeholder interest in individual themes and prioritize larger group interests. Bronfenbrenner's ecological systems framework was used to explore caregiver experiences. Within the microsystem, caregivers reported difficulties in interactions with medical providers as a key challenge. Within the mesosysytem, interactions between patients and medical providers and the impact on caregivers were explored. Within the exosystem, caregivers reported lack of control over the schedules of personal care staff. Macrosystem influences included impact of local culture on the development of palliative care services. Chronosystem influences include de-medicalization of childbirth and its impact on perceptions of palliative care. Implications include the need for social workers to be proactive in fostering trust and effective communication between care providers and caregivers, and the demand for health care provider training in communication with patients and families. PMID:27143579

  13. Palliative Interventional and Surgical Therapy for Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assfalg, Volker; Hüser, Norbert; Michalski, Christoph; Gillen, Sonja; Kleeff, Jorg; Friess, Helmut, E-mail: friess@chir.med.tu-muenchen.de [Department of Surgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Ismaningerstr. 22, D-81675 Munich (Germany)

    2011-02-14

    Palliative treatment concepts are considered in patients with non-curatively resectable and/or metastasized pancreatic cancer. However, patients without metastases, but presented with marginally resectable or locally non-resectable tumors should not be treated by a palliative therapeutic approach. These patients should be enrolled in neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy trials because a potentially curative resection can be achieved in approximately one-third of them after finishing treatment and restaging. Within the scope of best possible palliative care, resection of the primary cancer together with excision of metastases represents a therapeutic option to be contemplated in selected cases. Comprehensive palliative therapy is based on treatment of bile duct or duodenal obstruction for certain locally unresectable or metastasized advanced pancreatic cancer. However, endoscopic or percutaneous stenting procedures and surgical bypass provide safe and highly effective therapeutic alternatives. In case of operative drainage of the biliary tract (biliodigestive anastomosis), the prophylactic creation of a gastro-intestinal bypass (double bypass) is recommended. The decision to perform a surgical versus an endoscopic procedure for palliation depends to a great extent on the tumor stage and the estimated prognosis, and should be determined by an interdisciplinary team for each patient individually.

  14. Palliative Interventional and Surgical Therapy for Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palliative treatment concepts are considered in patients with non-curatively resectable and/or metastasized pancreatic cancer. However, patients without metastases, but presented with marginally resectable or locally non-resectable tumors should not be treated by a palliative therapeutic approach. These patients should be enrolled in neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy trials because a potentially curative resection can be achieved in approximately one-third of them after finishing treatment and restaging. Within the scope of best possible palliative care, resection of the primary cancer together with excision of metastases represents a therapeutic option to be contemplated in selected cases. Comprehensive palliative therapy is based on treatment of bile duct or duodenal obstruction for certain locally unresectable or metastasized advanced pancreatic cancer. However, endoscopic or percutaneous stenting procedures and surgical bypass provide safe and highly effective therapeutic alternatives. In case of operative drainage of the biliary tract (biliodigestive anastomosis), the prophylactic creation of a gastro-intestinal bypass (double bypass) is recommended. The decision to perform a surgical versus an endoscopic procedure for palliation depends to a great extent on the tumor stage and the estimated prognosis, and should be determined by an interdisciplinary team for each patient individually

  15. Evidence of improved quality of life with pediatric palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Quinn, Lucy P; Giambra, Barbara K

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric nurses provide holistic family-centered care for children with life-limiting illnesses while being sensitive to children's growth and developmental needs. To learn how pediatric palliative care programs benefit children and their families, the following clinical question was asked: Among children with a life-limiting illness, does the use of a palliative care program compared with not using a palliative care program improve quality of life for patients and their families? Evidence from two studies found that palliative care services improve quality of life for children with life-limiting illness and their families in the areas of the child's emotional well-being and parental perception of preparation for the child's end of life, resulting in a low grade for the body of evidence. Future research should include high quality studies with larger sample sizes and control groups, and include children's perspectives--from both patients and siblings--to give a more complete picture of how best to improve their quality of life. A reliable tool is needed that includes a spiritual component and sensitive indicators specific to children with a life-limiting illness. Future research using this tool will more fully answer how palliative care services improve children's quality of life. PMID:25929123

  16. Study of nurses′ knowledge about palliative care: A quantitative cross-sectional survey

    OpenAIRE

    Venkatesan Prem; Harikesavan Karvannan; Kumar, Senthil P; Surulirajan Karthikbabu; Nafeez Syed; Vaishali Sisodia; Saroja Jaykumar

    2012-01-01

    Context: Studies have documented that nurses and other health care professionals are inadequately prepared to care for patients in palliative care. Several reasons have been identified including inadequacies in nursing education, absence of curriculum content related to pain management, and knowledge related to pain and palliative care. Aims: The objective of this paper was to assess the knowledge about palliative care amongst nursing professionals using the palliative care knowledge tes...

  17. Cooperating with a palliative home-care team

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldschmidt, Dorthe; Groenvold, Mogens; Johnsen, Anna Thit;

    2005-01-01

    . Dissatisfaction was caused mainly by lack of information from the home-care team to primary-care professionals. CONCLUSION: GPs and district nurses welcomed the palliative home-care team and most experienced benefits to patients. Strengthened communication, initiated by the home-care team would enhance......BACKGROUND: Palliative home-care teams often cooperate with general practitioners (GPs) and district nurses. Our aim was to evaluate a palliative home-care team from the viewpoint of GPs and district nurses. METHODS: GPs and district nurses received questionnaires at the start of home-care and one...... month later. Questions focussed on benefits to patients, training issues for professionals and cooperation between the home-care team and the GP/ district nurse. A combination of closed- and open-ended questions was used. RESULTS: Response rate was 84% (467/553). Benefits to patients were experienced by...

  18. The management of family conflict in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenthal, Wendy G; Kissane, David W

    2008-02-01

    We review the literature on family conflict in palliative care. The prevalence and common sources of conflict are discussed, including historical issues of tension, differing coping styles, the division of labour, and the presence of acute or chronic mental illness within the family. Assessment and intervention strategies used in Family Focused Grief Therapy (FFGT), a family-centred preventive intervention that begins during palliative care and continues during bereavement, are presented, with special consideration given to research on treatment decision-making, cultural issues, special-needs populations, and the management of crises within the family. We conclude with a discussion of challenges that frequently impede conflict resolution and with suggestions for addressing these difficulties in the palliative care setting. PMID:24027358

  19. Self-assessment in cancer patients referred to palliative care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strömgren, Annette S; Goldschmidt, Dorthe; Groenvold, Mogens;

    2002-01-01

    -based study using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer quality-of-life instrument EORTC QLQ-C30, the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS), and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) in cancer patients who were receiving palliative care. This report describes the......-based study of symptomatology in consecutive cancer patients in palliative care, achieving rather complete data from the participants. The symptomatology in these patients was very pronounced. The questionnaires were able to detect clinically important differences between places of service.......BACKGROUND: Research in palliative care is considered difficult due to the poor health of patients. However, patient-provided data are essential for a thorough description of patient symptomatology and for the evaluation of care. METHODS: The authors examined the feasibility of a questionnaire...

  20. Palliative radiotherapy in head and neck cancers: Evidence based review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talapatra Kaustav

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck (SCCHN is one of the commonest cancers seen in India, constituting up to 25% of their overall cancer burden. Advanced SCCHN is a bad disease with a poor prognosis and patients usually die of uncontrolled loco-regional disease. Curative intent management of loco-regionally advanced SCCHN has become more evidence-based with active clinical research in the form of large prospective randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses. However, little has been written about palliative radiotherapy (PRT in head and neck cancers. It is widely recognized that PRT provides effective palliation and improved quality-of-life in advanced incurable malignancies. It is in this context that this study proposes to review the existing literature on palliative radiotherapy in advanced incurable SCCHN to help formulate consensus guidelines and recommendations.

  1. The importance of measuring customer satisfaction in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turriziani, Adriana; Attanasio, Gennaro; Scarcella, Francesco; Sangalli, Luisa; Scopa, Anna; Genualdo, Alessandra; Quici, Stefano; Nazzicone, Giulia; Ricciotti, Maria Adelaide; La Commare, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    In the last decades, palliative care has been more and more focused on the evaluation of patients' and families' satisfaction with care. However, the evaluation of customer satisfaction in palliative care presents a number of issues such as the presence of both patients and their families, the frail condition of the patients and the complexity of their needs, and the lack of standard quality indicators and appropriate measurement tools. In this manuscript, we critically review existing evidence and literature on the evaluation of satisfaction in the palliative care context. Moreover, we provide - as a practical example - the preliminary results of our experience in this setting with the development of a dedicated tool for the measurement of satisfaction. PMID:26837318

  2. Development and efficacy of music therapy techniques within palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements-Cortés, Amy

    2016-05-01

    Music therapy is increasingly becoming an intervention used in palliative care settings around the globe. While the specialty of palliative care music therapy is relatively young having emerged in the late 1980s, there is a strong and growing body of evidence demonstrating its efficacy in assisting a variety of issues common at end-of-life. There are multiple music therapy techniques that are implemented with clients in palliative care and they can be categorized in four broad areas: receptive, creative, recreative and combined. These techniques will be presented with respect to their development by clinicians as supported by the descriptive and research literature. Information is also provided on the use of music therapy in facilitating the grieving and bereavement process. PMID:25986297

  3. Further Radiobiologic Modeling of Palliative Radiotherapy: Use of Virtual Trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To study duration of response in palliative radiotherapy in a population of tumors. Methods and Materials: Models of dynamic changes in cell number with time were used to develop a function for the remission time (Trem) after palliative radiotherapy: Trem=(BED)/K -t1(1+(α.K)/z ), where BED is the biologically effective dose, t1 the duration of symptoms (i.e., the time between the onset of symptoms and the initiation of radiotherapy), K the daily BED repopulation equivalent, α the linear radiosensitivity parameter in the linear-quadratic model, and z the tumor regression rate. Results: Simulations of clinical trials show marked variations in remission statistics depending on the tumor characteristics and are highly compatible with the results of clinical trials. Dose escalation produces both a higher proportion and extended duration of remissions, especially in tumors with high α/β ratios and K values, but the predicted dose responses of acute and late side effects show that caution is necessary. The prospect of using particle beam therapy to reduce normal tissue radiation exposures or using hypoxic sensitizers to improve the tumor cell kill might significantly improve the results of palliative radiotherapy in carefully selected patients and could also be used for safer palliative re-treatments in patients with the potential for prolonged survival. The effect of tumor heterogeneity in determining palliative responses probably exceeds that in radical radiotherapy; as few as 100 patients in each treatment arm produce statistically unreliable results. Conclusions: Virtual trials of palliative radiotherapy can be useful to test the effects of competing schedules and better determine future strategies, including improved design of clinical trials as well as combinations of radiotherapy with other anticancer modalities

  4. Palliative radiotherapy for cervical carcinoma, a systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Worldwide, particularly in developing countries, many women present with advanced stage cervical cancer for which palliative radiotherapy is the treatment of choice or may be the only available treatment. The purpose of this study was to determine from the literature the optimal palliative radiation scheme for the treatment of advanced cervical cancer. Design: A systematic literature review up to January 2010 was performed in Medline, Embase, the Cochrane database, CinHL and Google Scholar using a combination of synonyms for: cervical cancer, palliative treatment and radiation therapy. No limitations were applied for language or study types. For included papers data were extracted and described. Results: Only eight papers were identified and none compared the results of different fractionation schemes. Most used observational retrospective study design with considerable sources of bias. No studies used validated endpoints for symptom relief nor did they include measures of the quality of life. Several papers described the experience with single or multiple monthly 10 Gy doses or with a higher total dose delivered in 2-4 fractions within 48 h to 1 week. Studies report varying amounts of relief from bleeding. The effect on other symptoms such as pain and discharge is not evaluable. Acute and late toxicity is poorly documented. Conclusion: There is a dearth of information in the current literature to guide selection of an optimal palliative radiation schedule for treatment of patients with advanced cervical cancer. Based on this review and information from other solid tumors, there is no evidence to support the common belief that better and longer palliation is achieved with a high dose delivered in multiple smaller fractions. There is a clear need for comparative studies of different radiation fractionation schedules in order to identify an optimal palliative radiation scheme. These studies require the use of validated endpoints to measure specific symptom

  5. Addressing Palliative Sedation during Expert Consultation: A Descriptive Analysis of the Practice of Dutch Palliative Care Consultation Teams.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Hoek

    Full Text Available Since palliative sedation is considered a complex intervention, consultation teams are increasingly established to support general practice. This study aims to offer insight into the frequency and characteristics of expert consultations regarding palliative sedation.We performed a retrospective analysis of a longitudinal database. This database contained all patient-related consultations by Dutch Palliative Care Consultation teams, that were requested between 2004 and 2011. We described the frequency and characteristics of these consultations, in particular of the subgroup of consultations in which palliative sedation was addressed (i.e. PSa consultations. We used multivariate regression analysis to explore consultation characteristics associated with a higher likelihood of PSa consultations.Of the 44,443 initial consultations, most were requested by general practitioners (73% and most concerned patients with cancer (86%. Palliative sedation was addressed in 18.1% of all consultations. Palliative sedation was relatively more often discussed during consultations for patients with a neurologic disease (OR 1.79; 95% CI: 1.51-2.12 or COPD (OR 1.39; 95% CI: 1.15-1.69 than for patients with cancer. We observed a higher likelihood of PSa consultations if the following topics were also addressed during consultation: dyspnoea (OR 1.30; 95% CI: 1.22-1.40, agitation/delirium (OR 1.57; 95% CI: 1.47-1.68, exhaustion (OR 2.89; 95% CI: 2.61-3.20, euthanasia-related questions (OR 2.65; 95% CI: 2.37-2.96 or existential issues (OR 1.55; 95% CI: 1.31-1.83.In conclusion, PSa consultations accounted for almost one-fifth of all expert consultations and were associated with several case-related characteristics. These characteristics may help clinicians in identifying patients at risk for a more complex disease trajectory at the end of life.

  6. Heart Disease and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Minority Population Profiles > Black/African American > Heart Disease Heart Disease and African Americans Although African American adults are ... were 30 percent more likely to die from heart disease than non-Hispanic whites. African American women are ...

  7. Infant Mortality and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... African American > Infant Heath & Mortality Infant Mortality and African Americans African Americans have 2.2 times the infant mortality rate ... birthweight as compared to non-Hispanic white infants. African Americans had almost twice the sudden infant death syndrome ...

  8. French physicians' attitudes toward legalisation of euthanasia and the ambiguous relationship between euthanasia and palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretti-Watel, Patrick; Bendiane, Marc K; Galinier, Anne; Favre, Roger; Lapiana, Jean-Marc; Pégliasco, Hervé; Moatti, Jean-Paul

    2003-01-01

    In 1999, the French Parliament established a "right to palliative care", which reactivated public debate about euthanasia. In order to investigate jointly physicians' attitude toward palliative care and euthanasia, we conducted a cross-sectional survey of a national sample of French GPs, oncologists, and neurologists. Overall, 917 physicians participated in the survey. Significant proportions of respondents, especially among GPs and neurologists, considered that palliative sedation and withdrawing life-sustaining treatments (WLST) were euthanasia. Multivariate analysis showed that the physicians who had special medical training in palliative care, and those who distinguish palliative sedation and WLST from euthanasia were more likely to oppose legalisation of euthanasia. Thus, French physicians' attitude to the legalisation of euthanasia is strongly influenced by whether or not they distinguish palliative care from euthanasia. Improved palliative care requires better training of the entire medical profession, and clearer guidelines about which end-of-life care practices are legally and ethically acceptable. PMID:14959598

  9. Palliative surgery for intestinal obstruction due to recurrent ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intestinal Obstruction is a frequent complication after operation for Ovarian Cancer. This study was done to see the outcome of palliative surgery for Intestinal Obstruction due to recurrent ovarian Cancer. We retrospectively evaluated the records of all the patients who presented with intestinal obstruction after operations for Ovarian Cancer in all the three Surgical Units of Ayub Teaching Hospital Abbottabad from March 1998 to April, 2009. Demographic data, type of management, morbidity, mortality, hospital stay, surgical procedure, symptomatic relief, return of bowel function and outcome were analyzed. There were 56 patients with symptoms of partial or complete intestinal obstruction. Conservative treatment was successful in 22 (39%) patients. Laparotomy was done in 30 (53.5%) patients. The cause of intestinal obstruction was adhesions 8 (26.6%), local recurrence 10 (33.3%) and diffuse carcinomatosis in 12 (40%) patients. Palliative surgery was done in 20 (66.6%) patients while 8 (26.6%) had adhesionolysis only. 9 (30%) patients had resection and anastomosis, 7 (23.3%) had bypass surgery, 3 (10%) had colostomy and one (3%) had Hartmann procedure. Postoperative complications occurred in 26 (86.6%) patients. 12 (40 %) patients died after surgery. Mean hospital stay was 18 (9-42) days. Palliative surgery was successful in 8 (26.65%). Majority of patients with Intestinal obstruction after operation for Ovarian Cancer can be managed conservatively. Palliative surgery is associated with high mortality and morbidity but it should be done in patients not responding to conservative measures. (Author)

  10. Reality of evidence-based practice in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Claire; Hadley, Gina; Wee, Bee

    2015-09-01

    There has been a paradigm shift in medicine away from tradition, anecdote and theoretical reasoning from the basic sciences towards evidence-based medicine (EBM). In palliative care however, statistically significant benefits may be marginal and may not be related to clinical meaningfulness. The typical treatment vs. placebo comparison necessitated by 'gold standard' randomised controlled trials (RCTs) is not necessarily applicable. The complex multimorbidity of end of life care involves considerations of the patient's physical, psychological, social and spiritual needs. In addition, the field of palliative care covers a heterogeneous group of chronic and incurable diseases no longer limited to cancer. Adequate sample sizes can be difficult to achieve, reducing the power of studies and high attrition rates can result in inadequate follow up periods. This review uses examples of the management of cancer-related fatigue and death rattle (noisy breathing) to demonstrate the current state of EBM in palliative care. The future of EBM in palliative care needs to be as diverse as the patients who ultimately derive benefit. Non-RCT methodologies of equivalent quality, validity and size conducted by collaborative research networks using a 'mixed methods approach' are likely to pose the correct clinical questions and derive evidence-based yet clinically relevant outcomes. PMID:26487964

  11. Intercultural palliative care: do we need cultural competence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunaratnam, Yasmin

    2007-10-01

    Recognition of the importance of 'cultural competence' is now central to health care policy and to nurse education and training across the international spectrum. Detailed engagement with models of cultural competence is comparatively recent in palliative care nursing. This article presents the findings from a development project on elders and carers from 'minority ethnic' groups, funded by the Department of Health, to increase awareness of palliative care and to improve understanding of the needs of these groups of service users. The article describes the experiences of nurses involved in the delivery of palliative care who were interviewed in focus groups as a part of the project. It draws attention to the complicated relationships between cultural knowledge and practice and to the non-rational and visceral dimensions of intercultural care. These aspects of nursing are marginalised in current approaches to cultural competence, which emphasise the rational acquisition and application of cultural knowledge and skills by practitioners. It is suggested that recognition of these marginalised experiences can contribute to the development of new approaches to intercultural nursing that are also more attuned to the ethos and values of palliative care. PMID:18073705

  12. Palliative nephrectomy until targeted therapy of disseminated kidney cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Klimov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to assess the role of palliative nephrectomy in disseminated kidney cancer patients planned to undergo targeted antiangiogenic treatment.Subjects and methods. The investigation included data on 83 patients with T1-4N0 / +M1 disseminated renal cell carcinoma (RCC who had received at least 2 targeted therapy cycles in 2009 to 2011. In 48 (57.8 % patients, the treatment was preceded by palliative nephrectomy that was not carried out in 35 (42.2 %. Before starting targeted therapy, all the cases were confirmed to be diagnosed with clear cell RCC, with a sarcomatoid component being in 7 (8.4 % patients. The median follow-up of all the patients was 21 (12–36 months.Results. The unremoved affected kidney in disseminated kidney cancer patients receiving targeted antiangiogenic therapy is an independent factor for the poor prognosis of progression-free (odds ratio (OR, 2.4; 95 % confidence interval (CI, 1.2–4.7 and overall (OR, 2.8; 95 % CI, 1.3–6.3 survival. Palliative nephrectomy does not improve the prognosis in patients with a low somatic status, the N+ category, and metastases into the bones and nonregional lymph nodes.Conclusion. Palliative nephrectomy in the selected patients with disseminated kidney cancer on targeted antiangiogenic therapy increases progression-free and overall survival.

  13. Spirituality in palliative home care: a framework for the clinician

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermandere, M.; Lepeleire, J. De; Mechelen, W. van; Warmenhoven, F.C.; Thoonsen, B.A.; Aertgeerts, B.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Spiritual care at the end of life remains poorly understood despite its promotion by the World Health Organisation. The purpose of this paper was to develop a consensus-based framework of the main elements of spiritual care in palliative home care. METHODS: Expert meeting using the nominal

  14. Acceptance of dying: a discourse analysis of palliative care literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Camilla

    2012-07-01

    The subject of death denial in the West has been examined extensively in the sociological literature. However, there has not been a similar examination of its "opposite", the acceptance of death. In this study, I use the qualitative method of discourse analysis to examine the use of the term "acceptance" of dying in the palliative care literature from 1970 to 2001. A Medline search was performed by combining the text words "accept or acceptance" with the subject headings "terminal care or palliative care or hospice care", and restricting the search to English language articles in clinical journals discussing acceptance of death in adults. The 40 articles were coded and analysed using a critical discourse analysis method. This paper focuses on the theme of acceptance as integral to palliative care, which had subthemes of acceptance as a goal of care, personal acceptance of healthcare workers, and acceptance as a facilitator of care. For patients and families, death acceptance is a goal that they can be helped to attain; for palliative care staff, acceptance of dying is a personal quality that is a precondition for effective practice. Acceptance not only facilitates the dying process for the patient and family, but also renders care easier. The analysis investigates the intertextuality of these themes with each other and with previous texts. From a Foucauldian perspective, I suggest that the discourse on acceptance of dying represents a productive power, which disciplines patients through apparent psychological and spiritual gratification, and encourages participation in a certain way to die. PMID:22513246

  15. Barriers to palliative radiotherapy referral: A Canadian perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samant, Rajiv S.; Fitzgibbon, Edward; Meng, Joanne; Graham, Ian D. [Univ. of Ottawa. Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2007-07-15

    Radiotherapy is an effective but underutilized treatment modality for cancer patients. We decided to investigate the factors influencing radiotherapy referral among family physicians in our region. A 30-item survey was developed to determine palliative radiotherapy knowledge and factors influencing referral. It was sent to 400 physicians in eastern Ontario (Canada) and the completed surveys were evaluated. The overall response rate was 50% with almost all physicians seeing cancer patients recently (97%) and the majority (80%) providing palliative care. Approximately 56% had referred patients for radiotherapy previously and 59% were aware of the regional community oncology program. Factors influencing radiotherapy referral included the following: waiting times for radiotherapy consultation and treatment, uncertainty about the benefits of radiotherapy, patient age, and perceived patient inconvenience. Physicians who referred patients for radiotherapy were more than likely to provide palliative care, work outside of urban centres, have hospital privileges and had sought advice from a radiation oncologist in the past. A variety of factors influence the referral of cancer patients for radiotherapy by family physicians and addressing issues such as long waiting times, lack of palliative radiotherapy knowledge and awareness of Cancer Centre services could increase the rate of appropriate radiotherapy patient referral.

  16. Determination of oxidative and occupational stress in palliative care workers

    OpenAIRE

    Casado Moragón, Ángela; Castellanos Asenjo, Alberto; López-Fernández, M.E.; Ruíz, R.; Imedio, E.L.; Castillo, C.; Fernández-Nieto, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: In previous work, we demonstrated that some occupational workers in stressful conditions can have increases in several markers of oxidative stress when compared to other workers. We investigated two antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities, and malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations, according to demographics, lifestyle and occupational parameters in palliative care unit workers, and analyzed the relationship with occupational burnout. Methods: F...

  17. Patients who die during palliative radiotherapy. Status survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palliative radiotherapy (RT) is routinely used in end of life care of patients with advanced malignancies; however, unnecessarily burdensome treatment shortly before death should be avoided. There is little knowledge on incidence and causes of intercurrent deaths during palliative RT. In this study death events among inpatients receiving palliative RT between January 2009 and December 2011 at this department were retrospectively analyzed. Among epidemiological factors, treatment schedule and chronology, latency and duration of treatment in relation to the actual survival were identified. In this study 52 patients died during or shortly after palliative RT. Symptomatic bone metastases and brain metastases represented the most common RT indications. The general health status was poor with a median Karnofsky performance score of 50 %, RT was realized with a median single dose of 2.5 Gy to a median total dose of 30.5 Gy and was stopped prematurely in 73 % of patients. On average 53 % of the remaining lifetime was occupied by latency to starting RT. Once RT was begun the treatment duration required a median 64 % of the still remaining lifetime. The majority of patients who died had explicitly adverse pre-existing factors and rarely completed RT as scheduled. Latency to RT and RT duration occupied more than half of the remaining lifetime. (orig.)

  18. Barriers to palliative radiotherapy referral: A Canadian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy is an effective but underutilized treatment modality for cancer patients. We decided to investigate the factors influencing radiotherapy referral among family physicians in our region. A 30-item survey was developed to determine palliative radiotherapy knowledge and factors influencing referral. It was sent to 400 physicians in eastern Ontario (Canada) and the completed surveys were evaluated. The overall response rate was 50% with almost all physicians seeing cancer patients recently (97%) and the majority (80%) providing palliative care. Approximately 56% had referred patients for radiotherapy previously and 59% were aware of the regional community oncology program. Factors influencing radiotherapy referral included the following: waiting times for radiotherapy consultation and treatment, uncertainty about the benefits of radiotherapy, patient age, and perceived patient inconvenience. Physicians who referred patients for radiotherapy were more than likely to provide palliative care, work outside of urban centres, have hospital privileges and had sought advice from a radiation oncologist in the past. A variety of factors influence the referral of cancer patients for radiotherapy by family physicians and addressing issues such as long waiting times, lack of palliative radiotherapy knowledge and awareness of Cancer Centre services could increase the rate of appropriate radiotherapy patient referral

  19. Initiating palliative care conversations: lessons from Jewish bioethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Michael; Bar-Sela, Gil

    2013-03-01

    What are the ethical responsibilities of the medical staff (doctors, nurses, social workers, and chaplains) regarding the preservation of meaningful life for their patients who are approaching the end of life (EOL)? In particular, what is the staff's ethical responsibility to initiate a conversation with their patient regarding palliative care? By subjecting traditional Jewish teachings to an ethical analysis and then exploring the underlying universal principles, we will suggest a general ethical duty to inform patients of the different care options, especially in a manner that preserves hope. The principle that we can derive from Jewish bioethics teaches that the medical staff has a responsibility to help our patients live in a way that is consistent with how they understand their task or responsibility in life. For some patients, the best way to preserve a meaningful life in which they can fulfill their sense of purpose in the time that remains is to focus on palliation. For this reason, although palliative and supportive care are provided from the time of diagnosis, it is critical we make sure our patients realize that they have the opportunity to make a decision between either pursuing additional active treatments or choosing to focus primarily on palliative therapies to maximize quality of life. The Jewish tradition and our experience in spiritual care suggest the importance of helping patients preserve hope while, simultaneously, honestly acknowledging their situation. Staff members can play a vital role in helping patients make the most of this new period of their lives. PMID:23089233

  20. Reality of evidence-based practice in palliative care

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Claire Visser; Gina Hadley; Bee Wee

    2015-01-01

    hTere has been a paradigm shitf in medicine away from tradition, anecdote and theoretical reasoning from the basic sciences towards evidence-based medicine (EBM). In palliative care however, statistically signiifcant beneifts may be marginal and may not be related to clinical meaningfulness. hTe typical treatmentvs. placebo comparison necessitated by ‘gold standard’ randomised controlled trials (RCTs) is not necessarily applicable. hTe complex multimorbidity of end of life care involves considerations of the patient’s physical, psychological, social and spiritual needs. In addition, the field of palliative care covers a heterogeneous group of chronic and incurable diseases no longer limited to cancer. Adequate sample sizes can be diffcult to achieve, reducing the power of studies and high attrition rates can result in inadequate follow up periods. hTis review uses examples of the management of cancer-related fatigue and death rattle (noisy breathing) to demonstrate the current state of EBM in palliative care. hTe future of EBM in palliative care needs to be as diverse as the patients who ultimately derive benefit. Non-RCT methodologies of equivalent quality, validity and size conducted by collaborative research networks using a ‘mixed methods approach’ are likely to pose the correct clinical questions and derive evidence-based yet clinically relevant outcomes.

  1. [Palliative care: an approach based on the professional health categories].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermes, Hélida Ribeiro; Lamarca, Isabel Cristina Arruda

    2013-09-01

    Palliative care has emerged as a humanitarian philosophy of caring for terminally ill patients, alleviating their pain and suffering. This care involves the action of an interdisciplinary team, in which all the professional recognize the limits of their performance will help the terminally ill patient to die with dignity. This article deals with the issue of death and dying, both from the traditional and the contemporary standpoint, and how palliative care have been treated in the job categories of medicine, social work, psychology and nursing. The methodology of this study consists of a literature review of articles in the SciELO database, electronic journals and technical books related to the topic. Analysis of the articles revealed a shortage of subjects that deal with the theme of death in professional curricula, as well as few palliative care services in Brazilian society and barriers faced by this new approach to the terminal patient. This research aims to broaden the discussion of palliative care in public health, and provide information for future studies that will address the theme. PMID:23989564

  2. Specialized Pediatric Palliative Home Care: A Prospective Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Groh, Gesa; Borasio, Gian Domenico; Nickolay, Carla; Bender, Hans-Ulrich; von Lüttichau, Irene; Führer, Monika

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: In Germany since 2007 children with advanced life-limiting diseases are eligible for Pediatric Palliative Home Care (PPHC), which is provided by newly established specialized PPHC teams. The objective of this study was to evaluate the acceptance and effectiveness of PPHC as perceived by the parents.

  3. [Ethical questions with patients in the palliative phase].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, Violaine

    2016-04-01

    Ethics question our values and the principles which govern our decisions. In the specific context of the home, where the family is alone most of the time with the sick family member, and where the team of health professionals is more fragmented, day-to-day care, notably in the palliative phase, requires almost constant ethical questioning. PMID:27063882

  4. [Palliative care in non-cancer, chronic, progressive diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radványi, Ildikó; Nagy, Lajos; Balogh, Sándor; Csikós, Ágnes

    2015-10-18

    Malignant and other chronic diseases cause the death of 2.5 million people in Europe annually. It is anticipated that this number will grow due to the aging of the European population. The death of a significant proportion of patients having progressive chronic disease is preceded by an extended end of life stadium. In this stage the patients have severe symptoms and pain that necessitate their symptomatic treatment and palliative care. The assessment of the life expectancy of patients, estimation of the prognosis of their illness and, therefore, selection of patients with a need of intensified palliative care often pose difficulties. This paper provides a summary on the basic elements of "good palliative care". It introduces the most frequent models for the procession of chronic diseases and those indicators that help practicing doctors to recognise easier patients with a need of intensified palliative care, and as a result provides more adequate medical attendance that is better suited to the specific needs of the patients. PMID:26551310

  5. Palliative Care for Extremely Premature Infants and Their Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boss, Renee D.

    2010-01-01

    Extremely premature infants face multiple acute and chronic life-threatening conditions. In addition, the treatments to ameliorate or cure these conditions often entail pain and discomfort. Integrating palliative care from the moment that extremely premature labor is diagnosed offers families and clinicians support through the process of defining…

  6. Effectiveness of "palliative care information booklet" in enhancing nurses′ knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita David

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Patients diagnosed with a disease like cancer require not only physical control of disease but also they need psychological reassurance, social and spiritual support in coming to terms with their disease. Nurses working in the specialized cancer hospitals play a significant role in the care of terminally ill patients. They must be knowledgeable, skilled and sensitive to the needs of these patients and their families in order to provide active, holistic care. Aims: In this study, we attempted to assess the level of knowledge about palliative care among nurses working in the oncology department using a self administered structured questionnaire and also to assess the effectiveness of information booklet designed on various aspects of palliative care on their knowledge. Settings and Design: Indo American Cancer Hospital, Hyderabad, AP, India. The design adopted for this study was One Group pretest - posttest, pre - experimental design. Materials and Methods: Hundred nurses working in Indo American Cancer Hospital, Hyderabad, AP, India were selected by using the non probability purposive sampling technique. A structured self administered questionnaire was prepared and administered as a pretest. An information booklet was developed pertaining to the general concepts of palliative care, care components (physical, social, emotional and spiritual and role of the nurse in palliative care and it was given to the participants. As a post test, the same questionnaire was re-administered after four days to the same study subjects. Pretest and post test knowledge scores were compared and the findings were analyzed statistically. Statistical analysis used : Microsoft Excel and Statistical Package for Social Science package. Results: The post test scores were significantly higher than the pretest knowledge scores, which indicate that the developed information booklet regarding palliative care was highly effective in enhancing the knowledge levels of the

  7. African Americans and Glaucoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Involved News About Us Donate In This Section African Americans and Glaucoma email Send this article to ... glaucoma is the leading cause of blindness in African Americans. Half of those with glaucoma don't ...

  8. Health care professionals' perceptions towards lifelong learning in palliative care for general practitioners: a focus group study

    OpenAIRE

    Pype, Peter; Symons, Linda; Wens, Johan; Van den Eynden, Bart; Stes, Ann; Deveugele, Myriam

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is a growing need for palliative care. The majority of palliative patients prefer their general practitioner (GP) to organize their palliative home care. General practitioners need a range of competences to perform this task. However, there has been no general description so far of how GPs keep these competences up-to-date. The present study explores current experiences, views and preferences towards training and education in palliative care among GPs, palliative home-care p...

  9. Reporting characteristics of cancer pain: A systematic review and quantitative analysis of research publications in palliative care journals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthil P Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: A common disorder requiring symptom palliation in palliative and end-of-life care is cancer. Cancer pain is recognized as a global health burden. This paper sought to systematically examine the extent to which there is an adequate scientific research base on cancer pain and its reporting characteristics in the palliative care journal literature. Materials and Methods: Search conducted in MEDLINE and CINAHL sought to locate all studies published in 19 palliative/ hospice/ supportive/ end-of-life care journals from 2009 to 2010. The journals included were: American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Care, BMC Palliative Care, Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care, End of Life Care Journal, European Journal of Palliative Care, Hospice Management Advisor, Indian Journal of Palliative Care, International Journal of Palliative Nursing, Internet Journal of Pain Symptom Control and Palliative Care, Journal of Pain and Palliative Care Pharmacotherapy, Journal of Palliative Care, Journal of Palliative Medicine, Journal of Social Work in End-of-life and Palliative Care, Journal of Supportive Oncology, Palliative Medicine, Palliative and Supportive Care, and Supportive Care in Cancer. Journal contents were searched to identify studies that included cancer pain in abstract. Results: During the years 2009 and 2010, of the selected 1,569 articles published in the journals reviewed, only 5.86% (92 articles were on cancer pain. Conclusion: While researchers in the field of palliative care have studied cancer pain, the total percentage for studies is still a low 5.86%. To move the field of palliative care forward so that appropriate guidelines for cancer pain management can be developed, it is critical that more research be reported upon which to base cancer pain therapy in an evidence-based palliative care model.

  10. Diabetes in African Americans

    OpenAIRE

    Marshall, M.

    2005-01-01

    African Americans have a high risk for type 2 diabetes. Genetic traits, the prevalence of obesity, and insulin resistance all contribute to the risk of diabetes in the African American community. African Americans have a high rate of diabetic complications, because of poor glycaemic control and racial disparities in health care in the USA. African Americans with diabetes may have an atypical presentation that simulates type 1 diabetes, but then their subsequent clinical course is typical of t...

  11. African American Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    African American Suicide Fact Sheet Based on 2012 Data (2014) Overview • In 2012, 2,357 African Americans completed suicide in the U.S. Of these, ... 46 per 100,000. • The suicide rate for African Americans ages 10-19 was 2.98 per ...

  12. ROLE OF PALLIATION IN STAGE IV CARCINOMA CERVIX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smriti

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Palliation reduces the severity of disease symptoms, rather than reversing its progression or providing a cure. Metast atic cancer cervix (Ca Cx is incurable by surgery, radiation or chemotherapy, but these modali ties are useful for palliation. Globally about five to six lakh new cases of carcinoma cervi x are diagnosed every year. Of these, one lakh cases are diagnosed in India of which 25.0% are fro m West Bengal only. OBJECTIVES: Our objective was to study the role of palliation in Sta ge IV Carcinoma Cervix. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: During the study period of five years from January 2 007 to December 2011, consecutive seventy five new cases of stage IV carc inoma cervix diagnosed at Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose Cancer Research Institute, Kolkata, we re included in our study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Clinical examination with relevant investigations l ike kidney function tests (KFT, biopsy, cystoscopy, CT scan etc were done for diagno sis & staging. Treatment was decided based on woman's age, general health and the locati on & type of the tumour. Treatment options were surgery, radiotherapy (RT, chemotherapy (CT an d simple palliation. In our study, combined CT+RT was done in 18.67% patients most of w ho presented with Stage IV disease. Radiation was given as brachytherapy following telet herapy. Chemotherapy was used as adjunct to RT or for palliation or as neo-adjuvant c hemotherapy (NACT, most commonly using paclitaxel (135mg/square metre, cisplatin (50mg/ squ are metre and 5- fluorouracil (600mg/ square metre. At times, chemotherapy could provide pa in relief only. Vault smear and metastatic workup was done during follow-up visits ev ery 8-12 weeks after treatment completion. RESULTS: Majority of patients belonged to the age group 42-69 years with a median age of 53 years. Bladder involvement was see n in 15(20.0% cases, bowel involvement in 14(19.0% and distant metastasis in 46(61.0% ca ses. Most cases were of Squamous

  13. The distinct role of palliative care in the surgical intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Valerie; Novick, Richard J

    2013-12-01

    Palliative care is expanding its role into the surgical intensive care units (SICU). Embedding palliative philosophies of care into SICUs has considerable potential to improve the quality of care, especially in complex patient care scenarios. This article will explore palliative care, identifying patients/families who benefit from palliative care services, how palliative care complements SICU care, and opportunities to integrate palliative care into the SICU. Palliative care enhances the SICU team's ability to recognize pain and distress; establish the patient's wishes, beliefs, and values and their impact on decision making; develop flexible communication strategies; conduct family meetings and establish goals of care; provide family support during the dying process; help resolve team conflicts; and establish reasonable goals for life support and resuscitation. Educational opportunities to improve end-of-life management skills are outlined. It is necessary to appreciate how traditional palliative and surgical cultures may influence the integration of palliative care into the SICU. Palliative care can provide a significant, "value added" contribution to the care of seriously ill SICU patients. PMID:24071600

  14. Participation of radiotherapy in interdisciplinary palliative care units. Challenge and chance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: in Germany, a sufficient system of palliative care does not exist. Possibilities for participation of radiooncologists in the further development of this promising part of medical action are reported. Material and methods: experiences from interdisciplinary work in the field of palliative care are described. This experience is communicated for use in the actual discussion about the future of palliative care in Germany, especially in the field of radiooncology. Results: a palliative care unit can only work in a team of different professions, which means different physicians, but also nurses, social workers, psychologists or pastors. A palliative care unit will benefit from working with radiooncologists as well as radiooncologists will do from working in the field of palliative care. Conclusion: in times of growing interest in and need for palliative care, radiooncologists should actively participate in the development of palliative care units in Germany. The aim of this participation should be to reasonably arrange the treatment of incurably ill patients with the chances of modern radiotherapy. Another aim should be to improve the treatment of ''classic'' radiation oncology patients by ideas of pallative care. The further development of palliative care in Germany should not take place without the participation of radiooncologists. This will meet the interests of palliative care and radiotherapy and - most importantly - the patients' interests. (orig.)

  15. Desires in Palliative Medicine. Five models of the Physician-Patient Interaction on Palliative Treatments Related to Hellenistic Therapies of Desire.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijer, Marli; Widdershoven, Guy

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the desires that play a role at the palliative stage and relate them to various approaches to patient autonomy. What attitude can physicians and other caregivers take to the desires of patients at the palliative stage? We examine this question by introducing five physicians

  16. Palliative care in heart failure : a position statement from the palliative care workshop of the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaarsma, Tiny; Beattie, James M.; Ryder, Mary; Rutten, Frans H.; McDonagh, Theresa; Mohacsi, Paul; Murray, Scott A.; Grodzicki, Thomas; Bergh, Ingrid; Metra, Marco; Ekman, Inger; Angermann, Christiane; Leventhal, Marcia; Pitsis, Antonis; Anker, Stefan D.; Gavazzi, Antonello; Ponikowski, Piotr; Dickstein, Kenneth; Delacretaz, Etienne; Blue, Lynda; Strasser, Florian; McMurray, John

    2009-01-01

    Heart failure is a serious condition and equivalent to malignant disease in terms of symptom burden and mortality. At this moment only a comparatively small number of heart failure patients receive specialist palliative care. Heart failure patients may have generic palliative care needs, such as ref

  17. Palliative care provision for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohannes Abebaw

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a major cause of disability, morbidity and mortality in old age. Patients with advanced stage COPD are most likely to be admitted three to four times per year with acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD which are costly to manage. The adverse events of AECOPD are associated with poor quality of life, severe physical disability, loneliness, and depression and anxiety symptoms. Currently there is a lack of palliative care provision for patients with advanced stage COPD compared with cancer patients despite having poor prognosis, intolerable dyspnoea, lower levels of self efficacy, greater disability, poor quality of life and higher levels of anxiety and depression. These symptoms affect patients' quality of life and can be a source of concern for family and carers as most patients are likely to be housebound and may be in need of continuous support and care. Evidence of palliative care provision for cancer patients indicate that it improves quality of life and reduces health care costs. The reasons why COPD patients do not receive palliative care are complex. This partly may relate to prognostic accuracy of patients' survival which poses a challenge for healthcare professionals, including general practitioners for patients with advanced stage COPD, as they are less likely to engage in end-of-life care planning in contrast with terminal disease like cancer. Furthermore there is a lack of resources which constraints for the wider availability of the palliative care programmes in the health care system. Potential barriers may include unwillingness of patients to discuss advance care planning and end-of-life care with their general practitioners, lack of time, increased workload, and fear of uncertainty of the information to provide about the prognosis of the disease and also lack of appropriate tools to guide general practitioners when to refer patients for palliative care. COPD is a chronic

  18. The palliative care needs of ethnic minority patients: staff perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diver, Fiona; Molassiotis, Alexander; Weeks, Les

    2003-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess palliative care staff's perceptions of multicultural care provision and explore the barriers and facilitators to culturally sensitive care. Qualitative semi-structured interviews with five palliative care staff were conducted. Staff showed awareness of inter-cultural diversity and the importance of individualized care. It also became apparent that staff did not possess ethnocentric attitudes. Facilitators of multicultural care that emerged from the data included training, learning from experience, the use of culturally specific literature and resources, and effective communication channels in the team. However, barriers were present, including limited interpreting services, and some staff and other patients' negative behaviours towards ethnic minority patients. The findings lead to recommendations for better resourcing and expansion of interpreting services, and for more training, based on staff's desire for limited culturally specific knowledge in sensitive combination with an individualized care philosophy. PMID:12968120

  19. Teaching palliative care across cultures: The singapore experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina Breaden

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Palliative care is a growing area of practice throughout the world and its promotion relies on adequately trained health care professionals. However, there are only a limited number of postgraduate academic courses or clinical training opportunities available, especially in resource challenged areas of the Asia Pacific region. This article outlines a creative endeavour between Flinders University, Adelaide Australia, the Singapore National Cancer Centre and the Asia Pacific Hospice and Palliative Care Network to provide an educational opportunity for students from the region. The strengths of the programme include its strong theoretical and evidenced-based framework, its multidisciplinary inclusiveness and its innovative and interactive teaching style. The main teaching challenge for the teaching team is to deliver culturally appropriate curricula to students from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds. This postgraduate programme is an important initiative for the region and for the development of future leaders and pioneers in the discipline.

  20. Pediatric palliative care online: the views of health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ens, Carla D L; Chochinov, Harvey M; Bérard, Josette L M; Harlos, Mike S; Stenekes, Simone J; Wowchuk, Suzanne M

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the role of an online resource for dying children, their family members, and health care providers from the perspective of pediatric palliative care experts. Semistructured interviews with 12 leaders in pediatric palliative care in North America were conducted, exploring their perceptions and attitudes towards various aspects of Web-based resources for dying children and their care providers. Informants felt that an online resource may allow for a different form of expression, a connection between people undergoing a rare event, and an increase in education and support. Major challenges, such as accessibility, monitoring, and remaining current, would be ongoing. Other key themes included access, information, and anonymity. The data suggest that developing Web-based resources for dying young patients and their families may have merit. Should this take place, a feasibility study will be necessary to further determine the value of such a Web site for these vulnerable populations. PMID:18459596

  1. Radiologically placed tunneled peritoneal catheter in palliation of malignant ascites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the safety and effectiveness of radiologically placed tunneled peritoneal catheter in palliation of malignant ascites. Between July 2005 and June 2009, 41 tunneled peritoneal catheters were placed under ultrasonographic and fluoroscopic guidance in 40 patients (mean age, 55 years; 22 women) who had symptomatic malignant ascites. No procedure related mortality was observed. Major complication occurred in one patient (2.5%) in the form of serious bacterial peritonitis that necessitated catheter removal. Minor complications such as minor bacterial peritonitis, catheter dislodgement, tunnel infection, and catheter blockage occurred in 11 patients (27.5%). The mean duration of survival after catheter placement was 11.8 weeks. All patients expired of their primary malignancies in the follow-up. Radiologically placed tunneled peritoneal catheter is safe and effective in palliation of symptomatic malignant ascites.

  2. [Palliative Care for Neurological Intractable Diseases and Home Medical Support].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Ogino, Mieko; Ishigaki, Yasunori; Hattori, Nobutaka

    2015-08-01

    Many medical doctors regard the end stage and palliative care of neurological intractable diseases as the point at which aggressive treatment should be interrupted and death is imminent. However, the definition of health by the World Health Organization as the physical, psychological, and social goal to achieve a fully favorable health condition should be revisited. In the real clinical setting, the health condition, as the ability to adapt and self-manage in the face of social, physical, and emotional challenges with the aim to overcome stress (resilience), is dynamic and involves a healthy condition and satisfaction with one's own living. The most important step in palliative therapy that is shared by neurologists is the maintenance of the health status with the help of multi-disciplinary team with the view to improving the quality of life. PMID:26241362

  3. Palliative home care: A designer′s perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tigmanshu Bhatnagar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose for this observational research was to understand how Can Support provides palliative care at home and analyze its strengths and weaknesses in various socioeconomic scenarios for future development. In the period of 2 weeks, patients and their caregivers were silently observed in their natural surroundings during home care visits in order to listen their problems, identify the pattern of questions for the home care team, their natural way of storytelling, organizational techniques for medicines and medical reports, care givers lives, patient journey, etc. Such observations have enabled the understanding of the phenomena of home palliative care and have led to the identification of certain influential variables of the practice.

  4. Operationalizing reflexivity to improve the rigor of palliative care research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Bridget; Pringle, Jan; Buchanan, Deans

    2016-08-01

    Reflective practice involves deliberate consideration of actions, attitudes and behaviors. Reflexivity in research is considered important for ensuring that research is ethically and rigorously conducted. This paper details the challenges of conducting research involving patients with palliative care needs within the acute hospital environment. It discusses the contribution of reflexivity to a pilot study using the Patient Dignity Question (PDQ) "What do I need to know about you as a person to take the best care of you that I can?" as a brief intervention to foster a more person-centered climate. Challenges that emerged are discussed from the perspectives of the researchers, the participants, and the setting; they relate to: timing and recruitment, the nature of palliative care illness, attitudes to research, and the research environment. Awareness of such issues can prompt researchers to devise appropriate strategies and approaches that may inform and assist the rigor and conduct of future research. PMID:26620579

  5. Twin pregnancy in a Fontan-palliated patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Anupama; Radhakrishnan, Sitaraman; Iyer, Krishna S

    2016-08-01

    The Fontan connection, originally described in 1971, is used to provide palliation for patients with many forms of CHDs that cannot support a biventricular circulation. An increasing number of females who have undergone these connections in childhood are now surviving into adulthood and some are becoming pregnant. We report a case of a 29-year-old woman who presented with a twin pregnancy at 33 weeks of gestation. She had significant deterioration of her cardiovascular status before the twin babies were delivered by emergency caesarean section owing to associated obstetric complications. This report also highlights the various maternal and fetal complications occurring in pregnancy of Fontan-palliated patients and suggests the need for meticulous pre-conception counselling and strict perinatal care. PMID:27125813

  6. Trappings of technology: casting palliative care nursing as legal relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Ann-Claire

    2012-12-01

    Community palliative care nurses in Perth have joined the throng of healthcare workers relying on personal digital assistants (PDAs) to store, access and send client information in 'real time'. This paper is guided by Heidegger's approach to technologies and Habermas' insights into the role of law in administering social welfare programs to reveal how new ethical and legal understandings regarding patient information add to nursing's professional responsibilities. This qualitative research interprets data from interviews with twenty community palliative care nurses about clients' legal rights to informational privacy and confidentiality. It explores nurses' views of their nursing responsibilities regarding clients' legal rights, liability issues, bureaucratic monitoring and enforcement procedures. It concludes that nurses and clients are construed as legal subjects entrenched in legal relations that have magnified since these nurses began using PDAs in 2005/2006. PMID:23134278

  7. The Culture of General Palliative Nursing Care in Medical Departments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergenholtz, Heidi; Jarlbæk, Lene; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2015-01-01

    Background: In many countries, approximately half of the population dies in hospital, making general palliative nursing care (GPNC) a core nursing task. GPNC in the hospital setting is described as challenging, however little is known about its actual practice. Aim: To explore the GPNC culture in...... medical departments. Methods: An ethnographic study, using Spradley's 12-step method, with observational field studies and interviews with nurses from three medical departments in a Danish regional hospital. Findings: Three cultural themes emerged from the analysis, focusing on the setting, the practice...... and the nurses' reflections on GPNC: (1) GPNC provided in a treatment setting, (2) transition to loving care and the licence to perform palliative care (PC) and (3) potential for team improvement. Conclusions: GPNC as a culture in medical departments seemed to be embedded in a setting not suited for...

  8. Palliative care nursing in rural and urban community settings: a comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaasalainen, Sharon; Brazil, Kevin; Wilson, Donna M; Willison, Kathleen; Marshall, Denise; Taniguchi, Alan; Williams, Allison

    2011-07-01

    Nurses have key roles in the coordination and delivery of community-based palliative care. The purpose of this study was to examine the differences between rural and urban community nurses' delivery of palliative care services. A survey was distributed to 277 nurses employed by a community agency in Ontario, Canada, and a 60% response rate was obtained. Nurses reported spending 27% of their time providing palliative care. Rural and urban nurses had similar roles in palliative care but rural nurses spent more time travelling and were more confident in their ability to provide palliative care. Both groups of nurses reported moderate job satisfaction and moderate satisfaction with the level of interdisciplinary collaboration in their practice. Several barriers to and facilitators of optimal palliative care provision were identified. The study results provide information about the needs of nurses that practise in these settings and may provide a basis for the development of strategies to address these needs. PMID:21841703

  9. Healthcare professionals' perceptions toward interprofessional collaboration in palliative home care: a view from Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pype, Peter; Symons, Linda; Wens, Johan; Van den Eynden, Bart; Stess, Ann; Cherry, Gemma; Deveugele, Myriam

    2013-07-01

    There is a growing need for palliative care, with the majority of palliative patients preferring palliative home care from their general practitioner (GP). GPs join specialized palliative home care teams (PHCTs) to perform this task. GPs' views on this collaboration are not known. This study explores the perceptions and preferences of GPs toward interprofessional collaboration. By employing a grounded theory approach, five focus groups were conducted in Flanders, Belgium with a total of 29 participants (professionals from PHCTs; professionals from organizations who provide training and education in palliative care and GPs who are not connected to either of the aforementioned groups). Analysis revealed that GPs considered palliative home care as part of their job. Good relationships with patients and families were considered fundamental in the delivery of high quality care. Factors influencing effective interprofessional collaboration were team competences, team arrangements (responsibilities and task description) and communication. GPs' willingness to share responsibilities with equally competent team members requires further research. PMID:23181267

  10. Team Interactions in Specialized Palliative Care Teams: A Qualitative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Klarare, Anna; Hagelin, Carina Lundh; Fürst, Carl Johan; Fossum, Bjoorn

    2013-01-01

    Background: Teamwork is a standard of care in palliative care and that is emphasized by leading organizations. When interdisciplinary teams communicate their varied assessments, outcomes may be more than additive due to the synthesis of information. Interprofessionality does not guarantee multidimensionality in health care interventions, however, and that interprofessional teams promote collaboration may be questioned. Aim: The aim was to explore team interaction among team members in special...

  11. Teaching Palliative Care Across Cultures: The Singapore Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Katrina Breaden

    2011-01-01

    Palliative care is a growing area of practice throughout the world and its promotion relies on adequately trained health care professionals. However, there are only a limited number of postgraduate academic courses or clinical training opportunities available, especially in resource challenged areas of the Asia Pacific region. This article outlines a creative endeavour between Flinders University, Adelaide Australia, the Singapore National Cancer Centre and the Asia Pacific Hospice and Pallia...

  12. Gynecologic oncology patients' satisfaction and symptom severity during palliative chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Gibbons Heidi E; Reidy Anne; Hutchins Jessica R; von Gruenigen Vivian E; Daly Barbara J; Eldermire Elisa M; Fusco Nancy L

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Research on quality and satisfaction with care during palliative chemotherapy in oncology patients has been limited. The objective was to assess the association between patient's satisfaction with care and symptom severity and to evaluate test-retest of a satisfaction survey in this study population. Methods A prospective cohort of patients with recurrent gynecologic malignancies receiving chemotherapy were enrolled after a diagnosis of recurrent cancer. Patients completed...

  13. Update in palliative management of hormone refractory cancer of prostate

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Pratipal; Srivastava, Aneesh

    2007-01-01

    Hormone refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) is an incurable disease and as in the pressure sensitive adhesive era the median survival of patients is increasing, these men increasingly develop symptomatic problems as a result of advanced local and or metastatic disease during their progression to death. Recently, it has been shown that it is possible to improve survival in this group of patients with use of chemotherapy which reinforces the need of better options in palliative care. We discus th...

  14. Intrathecal analgesia and palliative care: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen S Salins

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Intrathecal analgesia is an interventional form of pain relief with definite advantages and multiple complications. Administration of intrathecal analgesia needs a good resource setting and expertise. Early complications of intrathecal analgesia can be very distressing and managing these complications will need a high degree of knowledge, technical expertise and level of experience. Pain control alone cannot be the marker of quality in palliative care. A holistic approach may need to be employed that is more person and family oriented.

  15. Treatment of bone metastases with palliative radiotherapy: Patients' treatment preferences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the proportion of patients undergoing palliative radiotherapy (RT) for bone pain who would like to participate in the decision-making process, and to determine their choice of palliative RT regimen (2000 cGy in five fractions vs. 800 cGy in one fraction) for painful bone metastases. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients were approached and all patients agreeing to participate provided written informed consent. Patients' decisional preferences were studied using a five-statement preference instrument. A decision board was used to help patients decide their preferred palliative RT regimen. Factors influencing patients' choices were studied using a visual analog scale. Results: A total of 101 patients were enrolled in the study (55 women and 46 men). The preferences for decision-making were as follows: 30 active, 47 collaborative, and 24 passive. Most (55 [76%] of 72) patients favored one fraction of palliative RT (95% confidence interval, 65-86%). Patients were more likely to select the 800 cGy in one fraction because of the convenience of the treatment plan (odds ratio, 1.024; 95% confidence interval, 1.004-1044) but were less likely to choose it because of the chance of bone fracture (odds ratio, 0.973; 95% confidence interval, 0.947-1.000) compared with 2000 cGy in five fractions. Conclusion: Most participating patients preferred to decide either by themselves or with the radiation oncologists which treatment option they preferred. An 800-cGy-in-one-fraction regimen was favored, independent of the treated site. The convenience of the treatment plan and the likelihood of bone fracture were the most important factors influencing patients' choice

  16. Geritalk: Communication Skills Training for Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine Fellows

    OpenAIRE

    Kelley, Amy S.; Back, Anthony L.; Arnold, Robert M.; Goldberg, Gabrielle R.; Lim, Betty B.; Litrivis, Evgenia; Smith, Cardinale B; O’Neill, Lynn B.

    2011-01-01

    Expert communication is essential to high quality care for older patients with serious illness. While the importance of communication skills is widely recognized, formal curricula for teaching communication skills to geriatrics and palliative medicine fellows is often inadequate or unavailable. We drew upon the educational principles and format of an evidence-based, interactive teaching method, to develop an intensive communication skills training course designed specifically to address the c...

  17. Psychiatric Issues in Palliative Care: Assessing Mental Capacity

    OpenAIRE

    Itoro Udo; Zeid Mohammed; Amanda Gash

    2013-01-01

    Issues surrounding capacity to consent to or refuse treatment are increasingly receiving clinical and legal attention. Through the use of 3 case vignettes that involve different aspects of mental health care in palliative care settings, mental capacity issues are discussed. The vignettes tackle capacity in a patient with newly developed mental illness consequent to physical illness, capacity in a patient with mental illness but without delirium and capacity in a patient with known impairment ...

  18. Modelling the landscape of palliative care for people with dementia: a European mixed methods study

    OpenAIRE

    Iliffe, Steve; Davies, Nathan; Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra; van Riet Paap, Jasper; Sommerbakk, Ragni; Mariani, Elena; Jaspers, Birgit; Radbruch, Lukas; Manthorpe, Jill; Maio, Laura; Haugen, Dagny; Engels, Yvonne

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Palliative care for people with dementia is often sub-optimal. This is partly because of the challenging nature of dementia itself, and partly because of system failings that are particularly salient in primary care and community services. There is a need to systematize palliative care for people with dementia, to clarify where changes in practice could be made.To develop a model of palliative care for people with dementia that captures commonalities and differences across Europe,...

  19. End-of-life care: identifying an appropriate legal framework for specialist palliative care in Ireland

    OpenAIRE

    Lombard, John

    2014-01-01

    This thesis argues that the legal framework in Ireland for specialist palliative care is inadequate and consequently a more appropriate legal framework must be identified. This research is guided by three central research questions. The first central research question examines the legitimacy of the distinction between specialist palliative care and euthanasia. The second central research question asks what legal framework currently exists in Ireland for specialist palliative care. The third c...

  20. How integrated are neurology and palliative care services?:Results of a multicentre mapping exercise

    OpenAIRE

    van Vliet, Liesbeth M.; Gao, Wei; DiFrancesco, Daniel; Crosby, Vincent; Wilcock, Andrew; Byrne, Anthony; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Chaudhuri, K. Ray; Evans, Catherine; Silber, Eli; Young, Carolyn; Malik, Farida; Quibell, Rachel; Irene J Higginson; OPTCARE Neuro

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients affected by progressive long-term neurological conditions might benefit from specialist palliative care involvement. However, little is known on how neurology and specialist palliative care services interact. This study aimed to map the current level of connections and integration between these services.METHODS: The mapping exercise was conducted in eight centres with neurology and palliative care services in the United Kingdom. The data were provided by the respective ne...

  1. Assessment of distress with physical and psychological symptoms of patients in german palliative care services.

    OpenAIRE

    Neuwöhner, Karl; Lindena, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Within the framework of the nationwide Hospice and Palliative Care Evaluation (HOPE), the German Basic Documentation for Psycho-oncology (PO-Bado) was used from 2004 to 2006 as an optional module in most participating palliative care services to investigate how patient distress due to symptom burdens in different palliative care settings should be assessed and how professional interventions could be derived. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The distress scores of 3,317 PO-Bado records o...

  2. Improving palliative care in selected settings in England using quality indicators: a realist evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Iliffe, S.; Davies, N; Manthorpe, J; Crome, P; Ahmedzai, S.; Vernooij-Dassen, M; Engels, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is a gap between readily available evidence of best practice and its use in everyday palliative care. The IMPACT study evaluated the potential of facilitated use of Quality Indicators as tools to improve palliative care in different settings in England. / Methods: 1) Modelling palliative care services and selecting a set of Quality Indicators to form the core of an intervention, 2) Case studies of intervention using the Quality Indicator set supported by an expert in service...

  3. First-Line Nursing Home Managers in Sweden and their Views on Leadership and Palliative Care

    OpenAIRE

    Håkanson, Cecilia; Seiger-Cronfalk, Berit; Henriksen, Eva; Norberg, Astrid; Ternestedt, Britt-Marie; Sandberg, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate first-line nursing home managers' views on their leadership and related to that, palliative care. Previous research reveals insufficient palliation, and a number of barriers towards implementation of palliative care in nursing homes. Among those barriers are issues related to leadership quality. First-line managers play a pivotal role, as they influence working conditions and quality of care. Nine first-line managers, from different nursing homes in Sw...

  4. How integrated are neurology and palliative care services? Results of a multicentre mapping exercise

    OpenAIRE

    van Vliet, Liesbeth M.; Gao, Wei; DiFrancesco, Daniel; Crosby, Vincent; Wilcock, Andrew; Byrne, Anthony; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Chaudhuri, K Ray; Evans, Catherine; Silber, Eli; Young, Carolyn; Malik, Farida; Quibell, Rachel; Higginson, Irene J; ,

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients affected by progressive long-term neurological conditions might benefit from specialist palliative care involvement. However, little is known on how neurology and specialist palliative care services interact. This study aimed to map the current level of connections and integration between these services. Methods The mapping exercise was conducted in eight centres with neurology and palliative care services in the United Kingdom. The data were provided by the respective neu...

  5. Improving palliative care in selected settings in England using quality indicators: a realist evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Iliffe, Steve; Davies, Nathan; Manthorpe, Jill; Crome, Peter; Ahmedzai, Sam H; Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra; Engels, Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is a gap between readily available evidence of best practice and its use in everyday palliative care. The IMPACT study evaluated the potential of facilitated use of Quality Indicators as tools to improve palliative care in different settings in England.Methods: 1) Modelling palliative care services and selecting a set of Quality Indicators to form the core of an intervention, 2) Case studies of intervention using the Quality Indicator set supported by an expert in service ch...

  6. Palliative home-based technology from a practitioner's perspective: benefits and disadvantages

    OpenAIRE

    Johnston BM

    2014-01-01

    Bridget M Johnston Sue Ryder Care Centre for the Study of Supportive, Palliative, and End of Life Care, School of Health Sciences, University of Nottingham, Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham, UK Abstract: This critical review paper explores the concept of palliative home-based technology from a practitioner's perspective. The aim of the critical review was to scope information available from published and unpublished research on the current state of palliative home-based technology,...

  7. Palliative home-based technology from a practitioner's perspective: benefits and disadvantages

    OpenAIRE

    Johnston, Bridget

    2014-01-01

    Bridget M Johnston Sue Ryder Care Centre for the Study of Supportive, Palliative, and End of Life Care, School of Health Sciences, University of Nottingham, Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham, UK Abstract: This critical review paper explores the concept of palliative home-based technology from a practitioner's perspective. The aim of the critical review was to scope information available from published and unpublished research on the current state of palliative home-based tec...

  8. Validation of a New Instrument for Self-Assessment of Nurses’ Core Competencies in Palliative Care

    OpenAIRE

    Kari Slåtten; Ove Hatlevik; Lisbeth Fagerström

    2014-01-01

    Competence can be seen as a prerequisite for high quality nursing in clinical settings. Few research studies have focused on nurses’ core competencies in clinical palliative care and few measurement tools have been developed to explore these core competencies. The purpose of this study was to test and validate the nurses’ core competence in palliative care (NCPC) instrument. A total of 122 clinical nurse specialists who had completed a postbachelor program in palliative care at two university...

  9. Accuracy of survival prediction by palliative radiation oncologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To examine the accuracy of survival prediction by palliative radiation oncologists. Methods and materials: After consultation of cancer patients with metastatic disease for referral of palliative radiotherapy, radiation oncologists estimated the survival of the patients. These were compared with the actual dates of death obtained from the Cancer Death Registry. The time to death from all causes was the outcome. The survival times were measured from the date of the first consultation at the palliative radiotherapy clinics. Results: Six radiation oncologists provided estimates for 739 patients. Of the 739 patients, 396 were men and 343 were women (median age, 69 years). The median survival of all patients was 15.9 weeks. The mean difference between the actual survival (AS) and the clinician predicted survival (i.e., actual survival minus clinician predicted survival) was -12.3 weeks (95% confidence interval, -15.0 to -9.5) for the entire population. The mean difference was -21.9 weeks when the actual survival was ≤12 weeks, -19.2 weeks when the AS was 13-26 weeks, -9.7 weeks when the AS was 27-52 weeks, and +23.0 weeks when the AS was >52 weeks. Conclusion: In this study, the prediction of survival by radiation oncologists was inaccurate and tended to be overly optimistic

  10. Evaluating Palliative Care - A Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubert R. Jocham RN

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article was to investigate the outcome measures developed and used in palliative care. The paper involved a literature review of published research. Many of the reviewed papers concluded similarly that there was lack of good quality evidence on which to base conclusions. More high quality evidence is needed to compare the relative merits of the differences in models of palliative care services, so that we can learn from other appropriate systems of care at end of life. It follows that quality of life is the main outcome of palliative care, in which the patient instead of the disease represents the target of the clinical approach. Patients struggling with serious illness have other concerns, including managing pain and other symptoms, coordinating care among multiple providers and settings, ensuring that treatments reflect preferences and balance benefits and harms as well as clinical appropriateness, achieving empathic communication and care, fostering well-being, maintaining function and practically supporting family and caregivers through illness and bereavement.

  11. Palliative stent implantation for coarctation in neonates and young infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In selected neonates and infants, primary palliative stent implantation may be indicated for coarctation of the aorta. We describe our experience with this approach in five consecutive patients. Five neonates and infants (age range 6 to 68 days, gestation 33 to 38 weeks, weight range at procedure of between 1650 to 4000 g) underwent palliative stent implantation as primary therapy for coarctation of the aorta. Indications for primary stent implantation were varied. All procedures were performed by elective surgical cut down of the axillary artery. Standard coronary stents (diameter 4.5 to 5 mm, length 12 to 16 mm) were delivered via a 4F sheath. The axillary artery was repaired after removal of the sheath. All procedures were acutely successful, and without procedural complications. All patients survived to hospital discharge. Four patients have subsequently undergone elective stent removal and surgical repair of the arch, at between 38 and 83 days following stent implantation. Complete stent removal was achieved in three patients. Over a follow-up ranging between 8 weeks and 36 months, none of the patients has had any further complications. This palliative approach is warranted in carefully selected patients. Long-term follow-up is required

  12. Cancer patients, emergencies service and provision of palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Miranda

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Objective: To describe the clinical and sociodemographic profile of cancer patients admitted to the Emergency Center for High Complexity Oncologic Assistance, observing the coverage of palliative and home care. Method: Cross sectional study including adult cancer patients admitted to the emergency service (September-December/2011 with a minimum length of hospital stay of two hours. Student’s t-test and Pearson chi-square test were used to compare the means. Results: 191 patients were enrolled, 47.6% elderly, 64.4% women, 75.4% from the city of Recife and greater area. The symptom prevalent at admission was pain (46.6%. 4.2% of patients were linked to palliative care and 2.1% to home care. The most prevalent cancers: cervix (18.3%, breast (13.6% and prostate (10.5%; 70.7% were in advanced stages (IV, 47.1%; 39.4% without any cancer therapy. Conclusion: Patients sought the emergency service on account of pain, probably due to the incipient coverage of palliative and home care. These actions should be included to oncologic therapy as soon as possible to minimize the suffering of the patient/family and integrate the skills of oncologists and emergency professionals.

  13. Short-course palliative radiotherapy for uterine cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Hyun; Lee, Ju Hye; Ki, Yong Kan; Kim, Won Taek; Park, Dahl; Kim, Dong Won [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Biomedical Research Institute, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Ji Ho; Jeon, Sang Ho [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of short-course hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) for the palliation of uterine cervical cancer. Seventeen patients with cancer of the uterine cervix, who underwent palliative hypofractionated 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy between January 2002 and June 2012, were retrospectively analyzed. RT was delivered to symptomatic lesions (both the primary mass and/or metastatic regional lymph nodes). The total dose was 20 to 25 Gy (median, 25 Gy) in 5 Gy daily fractions. The median follow-up duration was 12.2 months (range, 4 to 24 months). The median survival time was 7.8 months (range, 4 to 24 months). Vaginal bleeding was the most common presenting symptom followed by pelvic pain (9 patients). The overall response rates were 93.8% and 66.7% for vaginal bleeding control and pelvic pain, respectively. Nine patients did not have any acute side effects and 7 patients showed minor gastrointestinal toxicity. Only 1 patient had grade 3 diarrhea 1 week after completion of treatment, which was successfully treated conservatively. Late complications occurred in 4 patients; however, none of these were of grade 3 or higher severity. Short-course hypofractionated RT was effective and well tolerated as palliative treatment for uterine cervical cancer.

  14. Stomach-interposed cholecystogastrojejunostomy: A palliative approach for periampullary carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Yi Hao; Xiang-Qian Su; Jia-Fu Ji; Xin-Fu Huang; Bao-Cai Xing

    2005-01-01

    AIM: For patients of periampullary carcinoma found to be unresectable at the time of laparotomy, surgical palliation is the primary choice of treatment. Satisfactory palliation to maximize the quality of life with low morbidity and mortality is the gold standard for a good procedure.Our aim is to explore such a procedure as an alternative to the traditional ones.METHODS: A modified double-bypass procedure is performed by, in addition to the usual gastrojejunostomy,implanting a mushroom catheter from the gall bladder into the jejunum through the interposed stomach as an internal drainage. A retrospective review was performed including 22 patients with incurable periampullary carcinomas who underwent this surgery.RESULTS: Both jaundice and impaired liver function improved significantly after surgery. No postoperative deaths, cholangitis, gastrojejunal, biliary anastomotic leaks, recurrent jaundice or late gastric outlet obstruction occurred. Delayed gastric emptying occurred in two patients. The total surgical time was 150±26 min. The estimated blood loss was 160±25 mL. The mean length of hospital stay after surgery was 22±6 d. The mean survival was 8 mo (range 1.5-18 mo).CONCLUSION: In patients of unresectable periampullary malignancies, stomach-interposed cholecystogastrojejunostomy is a safe, simple and efficient technique for palliation.

  15. Early palliative care and metastatic non-small cell lung cancer: potential mechanisms of prolonged survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Kelly E; Greer, Joseph A; Khatib, Jude; Temel, Jennifer S; Pirl, William F

    2013-02-01

    Patients with advanced cancer experience a significant burden of physical symptoms and psychological distress at the end of life, and many elect to receive aggressive cancer-directed therapy. The goal of palliative care is to relieve suffering and promote quality of life (QOL) for patients and families. Traditionally, both the public and medical community have conceptualized the need for patients to make a choice between pursuing curative therapy or receiving palliative care. However, practice guidelines from the World Health Organization and leadership from the oncology and palliative care communities advocate a different model of palliative care that is introduced from the point of diagnosis of life-threatening illness. Early palliative care has been shown to provide benefits in QOL, mood, and health care utilization. Additionally, preliminary research has suggested that in contrast to fears about palliative care hastening death, referral to palliative care earlier in the course of illness may have the potential to lengthen survival, particularly in patients with advanced nonsmall-cell lung cancer. This review summarizes the literature on potential survival benefits of palliative care and presents a model of how early integrated palliative care could potentially influence survival in patients with advanced cancer. PMID:23355404

  16. Negotiating the equivocality of palliative care: a grounded theory of team communicative processes in inpatient medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledford, Christy J W; Canzona, Mollie Rose; Cafferty, Lauren A; Kalish, Virginia B

    2016-01-01

    In the majority of U.S. hospitals, inpatient medicine teams make palliative care decisions in the absence of a formalized palliative system. Using a grounded theory approach, interviews with inpatient team members were systematically analyzed to uncover how participants conceptualize palliative care and how they regard the communicative structures that underlie its delivery. During analysis, Weick's model of organizing emerged as a framework that fit the data. The 39 participant inpatient team members discussed palliative care as primarily a communicative process. Themes describing the meaning of palliative care emerged around the concepts of receiver of care, timeline of care, and location of care. The emerging model included four stages in the communicative processes of inpatient palliative care: (a) interpret the need, (b) initiate the conversation, (c) integrate the processes, and (d) identify what works. In contrast to stable, focused palliative care teams or hospice care teams, which have prescribed patient populations and processes, the inpatient medicine team faces the equivocality of providing palliative care within a broader practice. This research offers a four-phase model to show how these inpatient teams communicate within this context. Implications for the provision of palliative care are discussed. PMID:26431077

  17. Victoria BGY palliative care model--a new model for the 1990s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, G M; Braithwaite, D L; Wilde, J M

    1993-01-01

    If, as palliative care practitioners, we ensure that distressing symptoms such as pain, vomiting, dyspnea, confusion, and pre-death restlessness are fully controlled (note "fully"), then most people are deeply appreciative and continue to live until they die, confident that whatever happens, their worth, desires, and comfort are secure. Credibility (Latin, fides dignus) is remaining true and reliable to what was agreed. Patients registering with palliative care generally desire comfort, which can only occur when palliative care physicians and programs are capable and willing to apply all three types of palliation discussed here--the BGY model. PMID:7510798

  18. An interprofessional education programme for medical learners during a one-month palliative care rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stilos, Kalli; Daines, Patricia; Moore, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    Interprofessional education in health care and in palliative care has been the focus of increasing attention in recent years. For health professionals to provide and deliver high-quality palliative care, collaboration and teamwork is required. Palliative care is the ideal service to introduce interprofessional teamwork to medical learners early on in their training. During a 1-month palliative care rotation in Ontario, Canada, medical learners completed a questionnaire seeking their feedback on the interprofessional team model. This article will highlight the results of the questionnaire, how the team promotes a culture of interprofessional collaborative practice, and the supportive structures that foster collaboration among professionals. PMID:27119406

  19. Organization position statements and the stance of "studied neutrality" on euthanasia in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Megan-Jane

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, palliative care and related organizations have increasingly adopted a stance of "studied neutrality" on the question of whether euthanasia should be legalized as a bona fide medical regimen in palliative care contexts. This stance, however, has attracted criticism from both opponents and proponents of euthanasia. Pro-euthanasia activists see the stance as an official position of indecision that is fundamentally disrespectful of a patient's right to "choose death" when life has become unbearable. Some palliative care constituents, in turn, are opposed to the stance, contending that it reflects an attitude of "going soft" on euthanasia and as weakening the political resistance that has hitherto been successful in preventing euthanasia from becoming more widely legalized. In this article, attention is given to examining critically the notion and possible unintended consequences of adopting a stance of studied neutrality on euthanasia in palliative care. It is argued that although palliative care and related organizations have an obvious stake in the outcome of the euthanasia debate, it is neither unreasonable nor inconsistent for such organizations to be unwilling to take a definitive stance on the issue. It is further contended that, given the long-standing tenets of palliative care, palliative care organizations have both a right and a responsibility to defend the integrity of the principles and practice of palliative care and to resist demands for euthanasia to be positioned either as an integral part or logical extension of palliative care. PMID:22771130

  20. Exploring the leadership role of the clinical nurse specialist on an inpatient palliative care consulting team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stilos, Kalli; Daines, Pat

    2013-03-01

    Demand for palliative care services in Canada will increase owing to an aging population and the evolving role of palliative care in non-malignant illness. Increasing healthcare demands continue to shape the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) role, especially in the area of palliative care. Clinical nurse specialists bring specialized knowledge, skills and leadership to the clinical setting to enhance patient and family care. This paper highlights the clinical leadership role of the CNS as triage leader for a hospital-based palliative care consulting team. Changes to the team's referral and triage processes are emphasized as key improvements to team efficiency and timely access to care for patients and families. PMID:24863582

  1. Quality of death: a dimensional analysis of palliative care in the nursing home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotta, Rebecca L

    2007-10-01

    Palliative care in nursing homes is increasingly discussed, investigated, and implemented, yet the term lacks conceptual clarity and definition. Furthermore, the components, process, and outcomes of palliative care as it is delivered in the nursing home have not been clearly articulated. This paper provides a dimensional analysis of palliative care in the nursing home to elucidate the concept and its context and consequences, as portrayed through available literature. As a method, dimensional analysis is rooted in symbolic interaction and grounded theory. As such, it provides a useful tool with which to analyze existing literature on palliative care in the nursing home. In this dimensional analysis, communication is the dominant perspective of palliative care in the nursing home. This analysis demonstrates that the consequences of palliative care in the nursing home are personhood and identity, and quality of death rather than quality of life. These consequences suggest that the focus of palliative care should be on the nursing home resident and the dying experience, rather than quality of life and issues around living that exclude the dying experience and do not acknowledge the personhood and identity of the resident. These elements represent a shift in focus away from one that does not include death, toward the dying experience, and that such a change in focus is necessary to achieve palliative care in the nursing home. Finally, the analysis elucidates potential outcome measures for the study of palliative care in nursing homes and outlines possibilities for further research. PMID:17985968

  2. General practitioners and referral for palliative radiotherapy: A population-based survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: The suspicion exists that the referral rate for palliative radiotherapy (RT) is too low. RT, especially in a short series, is an essential and established modality within palliative cancer care for localised symptoms. Material and methods: Questionnaires to evaluate the knowledge of palliative RT were sent to the 1100 general practitioners (GP's) in the area of the Comprehensive Cancer Centre South in the Netherlands, covering about 2.6 million inhabitants. Four hundred and ninety-eight questionnaires were evaluated. Results: Forty-six percent of the respondents had cared for patients referred for palliative RT in the last two years. Knowledge about the effects of palliative RT on bone metastases and spinal cord compression was good but about other palliative indications it was moderate to poor. Determinants of the actual referral for palliative RT were mainly patient related. GPs considered their own knowledge to be poor with only 10% reporting previous RT education. Conclusions: It is absolutely necessary to inform GPs about the possibility of short series of palliative irradiation in order to improve their information for symptomatic cancer patients about all possibilities for palliative treatment.

  3. Palliative care in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a review of current international guidelines and initiatives.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bede, Peter

    2011-04-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a relentlessly progressive neurodegenerative condition. Optimal management requires a palliative approach from diagnosis with emphasis on patient autonomy, dignity and quality of life.

  4. African Otter Workshop

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Reed-Smith; Hughes Akpona; Grace Yoxon

    2016-01-01

    All concerned thought this was an excellent workshop with important progress made towards creating a viable beginning of an African Otter Network. There is a long road ahead but the 2015 African Otter Workshop is a start on developing range country partners, activists and researchers as well as collaborating on issue identification and resolution which will assist in preserving at least some refugia for Africa’s otters. A list of actions was agreed on, including the creation of an African Ott...

  5. African and non-African admixture components in African Americans and an African Caribbean population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Tanda; Beaty, Terri H; Mathias, Rasika A; Rafaels, Nicholas; Grant, Audrey Virginia; Faruque, Mezbah U; Watson, Harold R; Ruczinski, Ingo; Dunston, Georgia M; Barnes, Kathleen C

    2010-09-01

    Admixture is a potential source of confounding in genetic association studies, so it becomes important to detect and estimate admixture in a sample of unrelated individuals. Populations of African descent in the US and the Caribbean share similar historical backgrounds but the distributions of African admixture may differ. We selected 416 ancestry informative markers (AIMs) to estimate and compare admixture proportions using STRUCTURE in 906 unrelated African Americans (AAs) and 294 Barbadians (ACs) from a study of asthma. This analysis showed AAs on average were 72.5% African, 19.6% European and 8% Asian, while ACs were 77.4% African, 15.9% European, and 6.7% Asian which were significantly different. A principal components analysis based on these AIMs yielded one primary eigenvector that explained 54.04% of the variation and captured a gradient from West African to European admixture. This principal component was highly correlated with African vs. European ancestry as estimated by STRUCTURE (r(2)=0.992, r(2)=0.912, respectively). To investigate other African contributions to African American and Barbadian admixture, we performed PCA on approximately 14,000 (14k) genome-wide SNPs in AAs, ACs, Yorubans, Luhya and Maasai African groups, and estimated genetic distances (F(ST)). We found AAs and ACs were closest genetically (F(ST)=0.008), and both were closer to the Yorubans than the other East African populations. In our sample of individuals of African descent, approximately 400 well-defined AIMs were just as good for detecting substructure as approximately 14,000 random SNPs drawn from a genome-wide panel of markers. PMID:20717976

  6. Patients who die during palliative radiotherapy. Status survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, B.; Ankele, H.; Bamberg, M.; Zips, D. [University of Tuebingen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    Palliative radiotherapy (RT) is routinely used in end of life care of patients with advanced malignancies; however, unnecessarily burdensome treatment shortly before death should be avoided. There is little knowledge on incidence and causes of intercurrent deaths during palliative RT. In this study death events among inpatients receiving palliative RT between January 2009 and December 2011 at this department were retrospectively analyzed. Among epidemiological factors, treatment schedule and chronology, latency and duration of treatment in relation to the actual survival were identified. In this study 52 patients died during or shortly after palliative RT. Symptomatic bone metastases and brain metastases represented the most common RT indications. The general health status was poor with a median Karnofsky performance score of 50 %, RT was realized with a median single dose of 2.5 Gy to a median total dose of 30.5 Gy and was stopped prematurely in 73 % of patients. On average 53 % of the remaining lifetime was occupied by latency to starting RT. Once RT was begun the treatment duration required a median 64 % of the still remaining lifetime. The majority of patients who died had explicitly adverse pre-existing factors and rarely completed RT as scheduled. Latency to RT and RT duration occupied more than half of the remaining lifetime. (orig.) [German] Die palliative Radiotherapie (RT) hat einen hohen Stellenwert in der Symptomenkontrolle terminal erkrankter Tumorpatienten. Unnoetig belastende Therapien kurz vor Lebensende sollten jedoch vermieden werden. Bislang gibt es kaum strukturierte Daten ueber Sterbefaelle unter palliativer RT. Im Rahmen der vorgestellten Studie wurden die Sterbefaelle unter stationaer palliativ bestrahlten Patienten der eigenen Abteilung zwischen Januar 2009 und Dezember 2011 analysiert. Ausgewertet wurden epidemiologische Faktoren, Behandlungskonzept und -verlauf. Zeit bis zum RT-Beginn und RT-Dauer wurden ins Verhaeltnis zur tatsaechlichen

  7. Improving search filter development: a study of palliative care literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tieman Jennifer

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is difficult to systematically search for literature relevant to palliative care in general medical journals. A previously developed search filter for use on OVID Medline validated using a gold standard set of references identified through hand searching, achieved an unacceptably low sensitivity (45.4%. Retrieving relevant literature is integral to support evidence based practice, and understanding the nature of the incorrectly excluded citations (false negatives using the filter may lead to improvement in the filter's performance. Methods The objectives were to describe the nature of subjects reflected in the false negative citations and to empirically improve the sensitivity of the search filter. A thematic analysis of MeSH terms by three independent reviewers was used to describe the subject coverage of the missed records. Using a frequency analysis of MeSH terms, those headings which could individually contribute at least 2.5% to sensitivity (occurring 19 or more times were added to the search filter. All previously run searches were rerun at the same time as the revised filter, and results compared. Results Thematic analysis of MeSH terms identified thirteen themes reflected in the missing records, none of them intrinsically palliative. The addition of six MeSH terms to the existing search filter (physician-patient relations, prognosis, quality of life, survival rate, treatment outcome and attitude to health led to an increase in sensitivity from 46.3% to 64.7%, offset by a decrease in precision from 72.6% to 21.9%. Conclusion The filter's sensitivity was successfully increased using frequency analysis of MeSH terms, offset by a decrease in precision. A thematic analysis of MeSH terms for the false negative citations confirmed the absence of any intrinsically palliative theme or term, suggesting that future improvements to search filters for palliative care literature will first depend on better identifying how

  8. Coverage and development of specialist palliative care services across the World Health Organization European region (2005-2012): results from a European association for palliative care task force survey of 53 countries

    OpenAIRE

    Centeno, Carlos; Lynch, Thomas; Garralda, Eduardo; Carrasco, José Miguel; Guillen-Grima, Francisco; Clark, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: The evolution of the provision of palliative care specialised services is important for planning and evaluation. Aim: To examine the development between 2005 and 2012 of three specialised palliative care services across the World Health Organization European Region – home care teams, hospital support teams and inpatient palliative care services. Design and setting: Data were extracted and analysed from two editions of the European Association for Palliative Care Atlas of Pal...

  9. Keeping African Masks Real

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddington, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Art is a good place to learn about our multicultural planet, and African masks are prized throughout the world as powerfully expressive artistic images. Unfortunately, multicultural education, especially for young children, can perpetuate stereotypes. Masks taken out of context lose their meaning and the term "African masks" suggests that there is…

  10. Empowering African States

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    China helps bring lasting peace and stability to Africa African think tanks expressed a high opinion of China’s role in helping build African peace and security at the first meeting of the China-Africa Think Tanks Forum. The

  11. African Literature as Celebration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achebe, Chinua

    1989-01-01

    Describes the Igbo tradition of "Mbari," a communal creative enterprise that celebrates the world and the life lived in it through art. Contrasts the cooperative, social dimension of pre-colonial African culture with the exclusion and denial of European colonialism, and sees new African literature again celebrating human presence and dignity. (AF)

  12. Reporting characteristics of cancer pain: A systematic review and quantitative analysis of research publications in palliative care journals

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Senthil P

    2011-01-01

    Objective: A common disorder requiring symptom palliation in palliative and end-of-life care is cancer. Cancer pain is recognized as a global health burden. This paper sought to systematically examine the extent to which there is an adequate scientific research base on cancer pain and its reporting characteristics in the palliative care journal literature. Materials and Methods: Search conducted in MEDLINE and CINAHL sought to locate all studies published in 19 palliative/ hospice/ suppo...

  13. A modified systematic review of research evidence about education for pre-registration nurses in palliative care

    OpenAIRE

    Bassah, N.; Seymour, J; K. Cox

    2014-01-01

    Background: We undertook a modified systematic review of research regarding educational approaches to and effectiveness of pre-registration palliative care nursing, to inform the development of a short course in palliative care for pre-registration nursing students in Cameroon. The aim of this review was to examine educational approaches applied to pre-registration palliative care nursing education and their effectiveness, and to discuss implications for the development of palliat...

  14. Inadequate Palliative Care in Chronic Lung Disease. An Issue of Health Care Inequality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Crystal E; Jecker, Nancy S; Curtis, J Randall

    2016-03-01

    Patients with chronic lung diseases suffer higher symptom burden, lower quality of life, and greater social isolation compared with patients with other diagnoses, such as cancer. These conditions may be alleviated by palliative care, yet palliative care is used less by patients with chronic lung disease compared with patients with cancer. Underuse is due, in part, to poor implementation of primary palliative care and inadequate referral to specialty palliative care. Lack of primary and specialty palliative care in patients with chronic lung disease falls short of the minimum standard of competent health care, and represents a disparity in health care and a social injustice. We invoke the ethical principles of justice and sufficiency to highlight the importance of this issue. We identify five barriers to implementing palliative care in patients with chronic lung disease: uncertainty in prognosis; lack of provider skill to engage in discussions about palliative care; fear of using opioids among patients with chronic lung disease; fear of diminishing hope; and perceived and implicit bias against patients with smoking-related lung diseases. We propose mechanisms for improving implementation of palliative care for patients with chronic lung disease with the goal of enhancing justice in health care. PMID:26730490

  15. General practitioners (GPs) and palliative care: perceived tasks and barriers in daily practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, C.M.; Vernooy-Dassen, M.J.F.J.; Crul, B.J.P.; Grol, R.P.T.M.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: General practitioners (GPs) play a crucial part in palliative care. The quality of care can be improved by investigating and addressing barriers perceived by GPs in daily practice. The aim of this study was to investigate GPs' task perception and barriers involved in palliative care. MET

  16. Shared Care in Basic Level Palliative Home Care: Organizational and Interpersonal Challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Mette Asbjørn; Olesen, Frede; Jensen, Anders Bonde;

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about the existing barriers to cooperation among health professionals in basic level palliative care for terminally ill patients with cancer in primary health care.......Little is known about the existing barriers to cooperation among health professionals in basic level palliative care for terminally ill patients with cancer in primary health care....

  17. Interventions geared towards strengthening the health system of Namibia through the integration of palliative care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Rachel; Luyirika, Emmanuel BK; Namisango, Eve; Kiyange, Fatia

    2016-01-01

    The high burden of non-communicable diseases and communicable diseases in Africa characterised by late presentation and diagnosis makes the need for palliative care a priority from the point of diagnosis to death and through bereavement. Palliative care is an intervention that requires a multidisciplinary team to address the multifaceted needs of the patient and family. Thus, its development takes a broad approach that involves engaging all key stakeholders ranging from policy makers, care providers, educators, the public, patients, and families. The main focus of stakeholder engagement should address some core interventions geared towards improving knowledge and awareness, strengthening skills and attitudes about palliative care. These interventions include educating health and allied healthcare professionals on the palliative care-related problems of patients and best practices for care, explaining palliative care as a clinical and holistic discipline and demonstrating its effectiveness, the need to include palliative care into national policies, strategic plans, training curriculums of healthcare professionals and the engagement of patients, families, and communities. Interventions from a five-year programme that was aimed at strengthening the health system of Namibia through the integration of palliative care for people living with HIV and AIDS and cancer in Namibia are shared. This article illustrates how a country can implement the World Health Organisation’s public health strategy for developing palliative care services, which recommends four pillars: government policy, education, drug availability, and implementation.

  18. [Resistance from caregivers and doctors to a transfer to palliative care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azémard, Alain

    2014-04-01

    Doctors' and caregivers' knowledge, acquired experience and representation of death might favour or delay a patient's transfer to a palliative care unit. The mobile palliative care team, witnessing resistance to a transfer, is in a position to respond thanks to the multidisciplinary nature of the team and the trust established between the different players in the patient's care. PMID:24881246

  19. Integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer care: Survey of oncologists, oncology nurses, and patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Salins

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Oncologists, oncology nurses, and patients felt that integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer improves symptom control, end-of-life care, health-related communication, and continuity of care. The perceptions of benefit of the palliative care intervention in the components surveyed, differed among the three groups.

  20. Palliative treatment of Erdheim-Chester disease with radiotherapy: A Rare Cancer Network study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A retrospective study of the use of palliative external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in nine patients with Erdheim-Chester disease was conducted through the Rare Cancer Network. Patients received EBRT for bone pain, brain infiltration, or retro-orbital involvement. EBRT typically provided short-term palliation, with later recurrence of symptoms in most cases

  1. Integrating Speech-Language Pathology Services in Palliative End-of-Life Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollens, Robin D.

    2012-01-01

    Clinical speech-language pathologists (SLPs) may receive referrals to consult with teams serving patients who have a severe and/or terminal disease. Palliative care focuses on the prevention or relief of suffering to maximize quality of life for these patients and their families. This article describes how the role of the SLP in palliative care…

  2. Transmural palliative care by means of teleconsultation: a window of opportunities and new restrictions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. van Gurp; M. van Selm; E. van Leeuwen; J. Hasselaar

    2013-01-01

    Background: Audio-visual teleconsultation is expected to help home-based palliative patients, hospital-based palliative care professionals, and family physicians to jointly design better, pro-active care. Consensual knowledge of the possibilities and limitations of teleconsultation in transmural pal

  3. Transmural palliative care by means of teleconsultation: a window of opportunities and new restrictions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gurp, J.L. van; Selm, M. van; Leeuwen, E. van; Hasselaar, J.G.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Audio-visual teleconsultation is expected to help home-based palliative patients, hospital-based palliative care professionals, and family physicians to jointly design better, pro-active care. Consensual knowledge of the possibilities and limitations of teleconsultation in transmural pal

  4. Access to palliative care: insights into ground realities post-2014 amendment to NDPS Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, M R

    2016-01-01

    Medical practice today is disease-focused, ignoring the universally accepted definition of health as not just the absence of disease, but the promotion of complete physical, social and mental well-being. Generations of doctors in India have not studied modern pain management, and palliative care is practically unknown in most parts of the country, causing patients to be rejected by hospitals and doctors when they need help the most. The draconian Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances (NDPS) Act of 1985, outdated medical and nursing education, lack of public awareness and lack of clear governmental policy are responsible for this sorry state of affairs. The development of a community-oriented palliative care network eventually led to the formulation of a state palliative care policy in Kerala. The acceptance of palliative care as a medical specialty by the Medical Council of India and introduction of a postgraduate degree course in palliative medicine in 2010, the development of a National Programme for Palliative Care in 2012 by the Ministry of Health of the Government of India, and the amendment of the NDPS Act in 2014 have been major positive developments which have the potential to change the current state of affairs. However, these recent achievements represent but one step in the right direction. An improvement in palliative care education, a realistic palliative care policy and implementation of the NDPS Amendment Act are necessary for doing away with the gross, needless violation of the human right to life with dignity. PMID:26826658

  5. Quality palliative care for cancer and dementia in five European countries: some common challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davies, N.; Maio, L.; Riet Paap, J.C. van; Mariani, E.; Jaspers, B.; Sommerbakk, R.; Grammatico, D.; Manthorpe, J.; Ahmedzai, S.; Vernooij-Dassen, M.J.F.J.; Iliffe, S.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: There is a growing consensus worldwide that palliative care needs to be both more inclusive of conditions other than cancer and to improve. This paper explores some common challenges currently faced by professionals providing palliative care for patients with either cancer or dementia ac

  6. Palliative or curative treatment intent affects communication in radiation therapy consultations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, L.; Maazen, R.W.M. van der; Leer, J.W.H.; Kraaimaat, F.W.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether communication in radiotherapy consultations is affected by palliative or curative treatment intent. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: The study involved 160 patients and 8 radiation oncologists. Eighty patients visited the radiation oncologist (RO) for palliative treatment and 80 fo

  7. Changes in Emotion Work at Interdisciplinary Conferences Following Clinical Supervision in a Palliative Outpatient Ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Helle Merete

    2008-01-01

    In this article, I describe changes in emotion work at weekly interdisciplinary conferences in a palliative1 outpatient ward following clinical supervision (CS). I conceive emotions as constantly negotiated in interaction, and I researched the similarity between how this is done during CS and at ...... conclude that CS enhances professional development and may prevent burnout in palliative care....

  8. Inappropriateness of using opioids for end-stage palliative sedation: a Dutch study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reuzel, R.P.B.; Hasselaar, J.G.J.; Vissers, K.C.P.; Wilt, G.J. van der; Groenewoud, J.M.M.; Crul, B.J.P.

    2008-01-01

    To be able to distinguish end-stage palliative sedation from euthanasia without having to refer to intentions that are difficult to verify, physicians must be able to manage palliative sedation appropriately (i.e., see that death is not hastened as a result of disproportionate medication). In the pr

  9. Radiation therapy for the palliation of multiple myeloma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leigh, B.R.; Kurtts, T.A.; Mack, C.F.; Matzner, M.B.; Shimm, D.S. (Univ. of Arizona, Tucson (United States))

    1993-04-02

    This study reviews the experience at the University of Arizona in an effort to define the minimum effective radiation dose for durable pain relief in the majority of patients with symptomatic multiple myeloma. The records of 101 patients with multiple myeloma irradiated for palliation at the University of Arizona between 1975 and 1990 were reviewed. Three hundred sixteen sites were treated. Ten sites were asymptomatic, including six hemibody fields with advanced disease unresponsive to chemotherapy and four local fields with impending pathological fractures. Three hundred six evaluable symptomatic sites remained. The most common symptom was bone pain. Other symptoms included neurological impairment with a palpable mass. Total tumor dose ranged from 3.0 to 60 Gy, with a mean of 25 Gy. Symptom relief was obtained in 297 of 306 evaluable symptomatic sites (97%). Complete relief of symptoms was obtained in 26% and partial relief in 71%. Symptom relief was obtained in 92% of sites receiving a total dose less than 10 Gy (n = 13) and 98% of sites receiving 10 Gy or more (n = 293). No dose-response could be demonstrated. The likelihood of symptom relief was not influenced by the location of the lesion or the use of concurrent chemotherapy. Of the 297 responding sites, 6% (n = 19) relapsed after a median symptom-free interval of 16 months. Neither the probability of relapse nor the time to relapse was related to the radiation dose. Retreatment of relapsing sites provided effective palliation in all cases. Radiation therapy is effective in palliating local symptoms in multiple myeloma. A total dose of 10 Gy should provide durable symptom relief in the majority of patients. 16 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Spinal Cord Doses in Palliative Lung Radiotherapy Schedules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: We aim to check the safety of the standard palliative radiotherapy techniques by using the Linear quadratic model for a careful estimation of the doses received by the spinal cord, in all standard palliative lung radiotherapy fields and fractionation. Material and Methods: All patients surveyed at this prospective audit were treated with palliative chest radio-therapy for lung cancer over a period from January to June 2005 by different clinical oncology specialists within the department. Radiotherapy field criteria were recorded and compared with the recommended limits of the MRC trial protocols for the dose and fractionation prescribed. Doses delivered to structures off the field central axis were estimated using a standard CT scan of the chest. Dose estimates were made using an SLPLAN planning system. As unexpected spinal cord toxicity has been reported after hypo fractionated chest radiotherapy, a sagittal view was used to calculate the isodoses along the length of the spinal cord that could lie within the RT field. Equivalent dose estimates are made using the Linear Quadratic Equivalent Dose formula (LQED). The relative radiation sensitivity of spinal cord for myelopathy (the a/b dose) cord has been estimated as a/b = 1 Gy. Results: 17 Gy in 2 fraction and 39 Gy in 13 fraction protocols have spinal cord equivalent doses (using the linear-quadratic model) that lie within the conventional safe limits of 50 Gy in 25 fractions for the 100% isodose. However when the dosimetry is modelled for a 6 MV 100 cm isocentric linac in 3 dimensions, and altered separations and air space inhomogeneity are considered, the D-Max doses consistently fall above this limit on our 3 model patients. Conclusion: The 17 Gy in 2 fraction and 39 Gy in 13 fraction protocol would risk spinal cord damage if the radio therapist was unaware of the potential spinal cord doses. Alterative doses are suggested below 15.5 Gy/ 2 fractions (7 days apart) would be most acceptable

  11. Radiation therapy for the palliation of multiple myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study reviews the experience at the University of Arizona in an effort to define the minimum effective radiation dose for durable pain relief in the majority of patients with symptomatic multiple myeloma. The records of 101 patients with multiple myeloma irradiated for palliation at the University of Arizona between 1975 and 1990 were reviewed. Three hundred sixteen sites were treated. Ten sites were asymptomatic, including six hemibody fields with advanced disease unresponsive to chemotherapy and four local fields with impending pathological fractures. Three hundred six evaluable symptomatic sites remained. The most common symptom was bone pain. Other symptoms included neurological impairment with a palpable mass. Total tumor dose ranged from 3.0 to 60 Gy, with a mean of 25 Gy. Symptom relief was obtained in 297 of 306 evaluable symptomatic sites (97%). Complete relief of symptoms was obtained in 26% and partial relief in 71%. Symptom relief was obtained in 92% of sites receiving a total dose less than 10 Gy (n = 13) and 98% of sites receiving 10 Gy or more (n = 293). No dose-response could be demonstrated. The likelihood of symptom relief was not influenced by the location of the lesion or the use of concurrent chemotherapy. Of the 297 responding sites, 6% (n = 19) relapsed after a median symptom-free interval of 16 months. Neither the probability of relapse nor the time to relapse was related to the radiation dose. Retreatment of relapsing sites provided effective palliation in all cases. Radiation therapy is effective in palliating local symptoms in multiple myeloma. A total dose of 10 Gy should provide durable symptom relief in the majority of patients. 16 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  12. Quantifying Interobserver Variation in Target Definition in Palliative Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To describe the degree of interobserver and intraobserver variability in target and field definition when using three-dimensional (3D) volume- vs. two-dimensional (2D) field-based planning. Methods and Materials: Standardized case scenario and diagnostic imaging for 9 palliative cases (3 bone metastases, 3 palliative lung cancer, and 3 abdominal pelvis soft-tissue disease) were presented to 5 study radiation oncologists. After a decision on what the intended anatomic target should be, observers created two sets of treatment fields, first using a 2D field-based and then a 3D volume-based planning approach. Percent overlap, under-coverage, and over-coverage were used to describe interobserver and intraobserver variations in target definition. Results: The degree of interobserver variation for 2D and 3D planning was similar with a degree of overlap of 76% (range, 56%-85%) and 74% (range, 55%-88%), respectively. When comparing the treatment fields defined by the same observer using the two different planning methods, the mean degree of overlap was 78%; over-coverage, 22%; and under-coverage, 41%. There was statistically significantly more under-coverage when field-based planning was used for bone metastases (33%) vs. other anatomic sites (16%) (p = 0.02). In other words, 2D planning is more likely to result in geographic misses in bone metastases compared with other areas. Conclusions: In palliative radiotherapy clinically significant interobserver and intraobserver variation existed when using both field- and volume-based planning approaches. Strategies that would reduce this variability deserve further investigation.

  13. Lutetium-177-EDTMP for pain palliation in bone metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiences with the new palliative agent Lu-177 EDTMP are summarized. The production of primary 177Lu by the 176Lu(n,γ) 177Lu reaction and the synthesis of the radioactive complex are described as well as the procedures used for the control of the radionuclidic and the radiochemical purity. The stability of the compound has been also studied. The in vivo essays with rats and the use of the radiopharmaceutical, after a careful dose evaluation, in a patient with bone metastases from a breast cancer, show that the behaviour of Lu-177 EDTMP is similar to that of the analogue Sm-153 EDTMP. (author)

  14. Emotion management in children′s palliative care nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eryl Zac Maunder

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the emotional labor involved for nurses providing palliative care for children/young people living with life-limiting illnesses/conditions, and their families. It highlights the challenges nurses face in managing their emotion when caring for children/young people and their families, and explores strategies to enable nurses to cope with this aspect of their role without compromising their personal wellbeing. It suggests that emotional labor within nursing goes largely unrecorded, and remains undervalued by managers and health care services.

  15. Primary peritoneal serous carcinoma: A rare case and palliative approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viral M Bhanvadia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary peritoneal serous carcinoma (PPSC is a rare primary malignancy that diffusely involves the peritoneum, indistinguishable clinically and histopathologically from primary serous ovarian carcinoma. The origin of PPSC has not been well characterized. Here we present a case of PPSC diagnosed in ultrasonography-guided fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC in a 76- old female presenting with ascites, abdominal pain, distension and constipation. PPSC is an unusual tumour but cytomorphology is distinctive enough to diagnose preoperatively. In the case report hereby described PPSC is an inoperable malignancy, hence chemotherapy and palliative care are the only offered treatment.

  16. Palliative Mitral Valve Repair During Infancy for Neonatal Marfan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitahara, Hiroto; Aeba, Ryo; Takaki, Hidenobu; Shimizu, Hideyuki

    2016-05-01

    An infant with neonatal Marfan syndrome (nMFS), a condition that is nearly always lethal during infancy, was referred to our hospital with symptoms of congestive heart failure resulting from severe mitral valve insufficiency. During mitral valve repair, the use of an annuloplasty ring was waived until annular dilatation was achieved after 2 palliative mitral valvuloplasty procedures. After the definitive operation, the patient's mitral valve function remained within normal limits until the last follow-up when the patient was 11 years old. To the best of our knowledge, this patient has the longest recorded survival after mitral valve repair. PMID:27106438

  17. Retreatment of the spinal cord with palliative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We conducted this retrospective review of patients whose spinal cord was irradiated twice to evaluate the outcome in terms of palliation and long-term side effects. Methods and Materials: Eight patients (4 females, 4 males; median age: 67 years) were identified whose spinal cord had been irradiated twice between July 1990 and July 1997, usually for the management of bone metastases. All patients were followed up until their death from progressive disease. The Karnofsky performance score at the time of retreatment ranged from 20% to 90%. Total dose for the first treatment ranged from 29 to 50 Gy (median: 38 Gy) with single doses 1.25-3 Gy; the total dose for the retreatment ranged from 29 to 38 Gy (median: 30 Gy) with a single dose 1.8-4 Gy. The cumulative dose ranged from 59 to 88 Gy (median: 67.5 Gy). The overlap in the site of retreatment consisted of 1-3 segments, whereas in one patient, 2 single segments were treated twice. The outcome in terms of progressive disease, the palliative effects, and the development of myelopathy was assessed retrospectively. Results: The median interval to reirradiation was 30 months (range: 6-63 months), and the median follow-up after the last treatment was 16 months (range: 5-44 months). After reirradiation, 4/7 patients experienced complete pain relief, 2/7 patients experienced minor pain relief, and only 1 patient showed no change. Two patients with paraparesis experienced complete recovery. All patients tolerated retreatment very well. No serious acute side effects requiring any therapy were seen. During follow-up, no patient showed treatment-induced neurologic abnormalities affecting motor and sensory function, and all patients were able to walk and were continent for stool and urine. Conclusion: On the basis of the findings in this limited number of patients, it is not possible to give clear and general recommendations concerning the optimal total dose and fraction size that will have maximal palliative effects and

  18. Narrative palliative care: a method for building empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Patricia; Hurst, Marsha

    2011-01-01

    We make meaning of illness, suffering, and death through narrative, by telling a story. In this article, the authors explore narrative and palliative care: how, at the end of life, narratives of patients, caregivers, and clinicians serve to connect to those still living, and how through each telling and listening, we honor and validate the experience of suffering. A discussion of narrative competence and the skills of attention, representation, and affiliation is followed by an outline of the format for a narrative medicine workshop and a detailed analysis of an experiential exercise in close reading and reflective writing. PMID:21391077

  19. [Hypnosis as an alternative treatment for pain in palliative medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peintinger, Christa; Hartmann, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Pain--which can have a variety of causes--constitutes a severe problem for patients in need of palliative care, because this pain usually dramatically impairs their quality of life. Thus, the more advanced a terminal illness has become, the more hospital staff should focus on holistic treatment, encompassing body, mind and soul of the patient. Apart from conventional medication-based pain therapy, there is also a variety of non-medicinal treatments for pain. One of these methods is hypnosis, an imaginative treatment that activates available resources; it is not only an effective way of alleviating pain, but it also can ease psychological problems at the same time. PMID:19165446

  20. Tracheo-esophageal fistula: Successful palliation after failed esophageal stent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh K Chawla

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of tracheo-esophageal (TO fistula is on the rise, especially after palliative management for esophageal malignancies. We report a case of cancer of esophagus who after chemotherapy and radiotherapy developed TO fistula. Placement of an esophageal stent helped him in taking food orally, but his cough and dyspnoea continued to worsen. Fibreoptic bronchoscopy demonstrated a severely compressed trachea secondary to protrusion of esophageal stent which responded very well to an Ultraflex-covered tracheal stent and the patient achieved relief from cough and dyspnoea.

  1. Psychosocial issues in palliative care: A review of five cases

    OpenAIRE

    Onyeka, Tonia C

    2010-01-01

    Palliative care is not just vital in controlling symptoms of the patient’s disease condition, but also aims to extend the patient’s life, giving it a better quality. However, several times in the course of management, the psychosocial impact of cancer, HIV/AIDS, and other life-limiting disease conditions may not be noticed and dealt with during the admission period, thereby giving rise to a more complex situation than the disease condition itself. This article aims to review some psychosocial...

  2.  Cancer palliation in primary care - what is good and bad?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Mette Asbjørn

     CANCER PALLIATION IN PRIMARY CARE -WHAT IS GOOD AND BAD?MA Neergaard, MD, specialist in general medicine, PhD student*F Olesen, general practitioner, Dr.Med.Sci., professor* J Soendergaard, general practitioner, senior researcher, PhD*AB Jensen, MD, consultant in oncology, PhD** *The Research Unit...... for General Practice, University of Aarhus, Vennelyst Boulevard 6, 8000 Århus C, DK.**Department of Oncology / The Palliative Team, Aarhus Hospital, DK.Background. Palliative care for cancer patients is an important part of a general practitioner's work. Although every general practitioner is...... frequently involved in care for terminally ill cancer patients, only little is known about how the palliation efforts are perceived, a knowledge that is vital to make improvements. We aimed to analyse the quality of palliative home care based on evaluations by the relatives and the primary and secondary...

  3. Organization and evaluation of generalist palliative care in a Danish hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergenholtz, H; Hølge-Hazelton, B; Jarlbæk, Lene

    2015-01-01

    Background Hospitals have a responsibility to ensure that palliative care is provided to all patients with life-threatening illnesses. Generalist palliative care should therefore be acknowledged and organized as a part of the clinical tasks. However, little is known about the organization and...... evaluation of generalist palliative care in hospitals. Therefore the aim of the study was to investigate the organization and evaluation of generalist palliative care in a large regional hospital by comparing results from existing evaluations. Methods Results from three different data sets, all aiming to...... evaluate generalist palliative care, were compared retrospectively. The data-sets derived from; 1. a national accreditation of the hospital, 2. a national survey and 3. an internal self-evaluation performed in the hospital. The data were triangulated to investigate the organization and evaluation of...

  4. [Importance of Anesthesiologists in the Work of a Palliative Care Team].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hozumi, Jun; Sumitani, Masahiko

    2016-03-01

    World Health Organization has proposed that palliative medicine should be applied early in the course of the malignant diseases. Regrettably, however, palliative care has been usually provided to patients with the advanced stage of cancer, as terminal care. Recently, palliative medicine begins at the time when patients are diagnosed with cancer. In response to changes in clinical settings of palliative medicine, anesthesiologists, with substantial experience in interdisciplinary pain management, can utilize their advantages in providing palliative medicine to cancer patients: 1) use of opioid analgesics; 2) considering the biopsychosocial model of pain; 3) helping patients live as actively as possible until death; and 4) helping the family cope with the patient's illness and their own bereavement. PMID:27097502

  5. Validity, reliability and responsiveness to change of the Italian palliative care outcome scale:A multicenter study of advanced cancer patients Cancer palliative care

    OpenAIRE

    COSTANTINI, MASSIMO; Rabitti, Elisa; Beccaro, Monica; Fusco, Flavio; Peruselli, Carlo; La Ciura, Pietro; Valle, Alessandro; Suriani, Cinzia; Berardi, Maria Alejandra; Valenti, Danila; Mosso, Felicita; Morino, Piero; Zaninetta, Giovanni; Tubere, Giorgio; Piazza, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Background There is an increasing requirement to assess outcomes, but few measures have been tested for advanced medical illness. We aimed to test the validity, reliability and responsiveness of the Palliative care Outcome Scale (POS), and to analyse predictors of change after the transition to palliative care. Methods Phase 1: multicentre, mixed method study comprising cognitive and qualitative interviews with patients and staff, cultural refinement and adaption. Phase 2: consecutive cancer ...

  6. Age Disparity in Palliative Radiation Therapy Among Patients With Advanced Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Jonathan [University of Hawaii, John A. Burns School of Medicine, Honolulu, Hawaii (United States); Xu, Beibei [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Moores Cancer Center, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Yeung, Heidi N.; Roeland, Eric J. [Moores Cancer Center, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Division of Palliative Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Martinez, Maria Elena [Moores Cancer Center, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Mell, Loren K. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Moores Cancer Center, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Murphy, James D., E-mail: j2murphy@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Moores Cancer Center, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose/Objective: Palliative radiation therapy represents an important treatment option among patients with advanced cancer, although research shows decreased use among older patients. This study evaluated age-related patterns of palliative radiation use among an elderly Medicare population. Methods and Materials: We identified 63,221 patients with metastatic lung, breast, prostate, or colorectal cancer diagnosed between 2000 and 2007 from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database. Receipt of palliative radiation therapy was extracted from Medicare claims. Multivariate Poisson regression analysis determined residual age-related disparity in the receipt of palliative radiation therapy after controlling for confounding covariates including age-related differences in patient and demographic covariates, length of life, and patient preferences for aggressive cancer therapy. Results: The use of radiation decreased steadily with increasing patient age. Forty-two percent of patients aged 66 to 69 received palliative radiation therapy. Rates of palliative radiation decreased to 38%, 32%, 24%, and 14% among patients aged 70 to 74, 75 to 79, 80 to 84, and over 85, respectively. Multivariate analysis found that confounding covariates attenuated these findings, although the decreased relative rate of palliative radiation therapy among the elderly remained clinically and statistically significant. On multivariate analysis, compared to patients 66 to 69 years old, those aged 70 to 74, 75 to 79, 80 to 84, and over 85 had a 7%, 15%, 25%, and 44% decreased rate of receiving palliative radiation, respectively (all P<.0001). Conclusions: Age disparity with palliative radiation therapy exists among older cancer patients. Further research should strive to identify barriers to palliative radiation among the elderly, and extra effort should be made to give older patients the opportunity to receive this quality of life-enhancing treatment at the end

  7. First-Line Nursing Home Managers in Sweden and their Views on Leadership and Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Håkanson, Cecilia; Cronfalk, Berit Seiger; Henriksen, Eva; Norberg, Astrid; Ternestedt, Britt-Marie; Sandberg, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate first-line nursing home managers' views on their leadership and related to that, palliative care. Previous research reveals insufficient palliation, and a number of barriers towards implementation of palliative care in nursing homes. Among those barriers are issues related to leadership quality. First-line managers play a pivotal role, as they influence working conditions and quality of care. Nine first-line managers, from different nursing homes in Sweden participated in the study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and analysed using qualitative descriptive content analysis. In the results, two categories were identified: embracing the role of leader and being a victim of circumstances, illuminating how the first-line managers handle expectations and challenges linked to the leadership role and responsibility for palliative care. The results reveal views corresponding to committed leaders, acting upon demands and expectations, but also to leaders appearing to have resigned from the leadership role, and who express powerlessness with little possibility to influence care. The first line managers reported their own limited knowledge about palliative care to limit their possibilities of taking full leadership responsibility for implementing palliative care principles in their nursing homes. The study stresses that for the provision of high quality palliative care in nursing homes, first-line managers need to be knowledgeable about palliative care, and they need supportive organizations with clear expectations and goals about palliative care. Future action and learning oriented research projects for the implementation of palliative care principles, in which first line managers actively participate, are suggested. PMID:25628769

  8. Age Disparity in Palliative Radiation Therapy Among Patients With Advanced Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: Palliative radiation therapy represents an important treatment option among patients with advanced cancer, although research shows decreased use among older patients. This study evaluated age-related patterns of palliative radiation use among an elderly Medicare population. Methods and Materials: We identified 63,221 patients with metastatic lung, breast, prostate, or colorectal cancer diagnosed between 2000 and 2007 from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database. Receipt of palliative radiation therapy was extracted from Medicare claims. Multivariate Poisson regression analysis determined residual age-related disparity in the receipt of palliative radiation therapy after controlling for confounding covariates including age-related differences in patient and demographic covariates, length of life, and patient preferences for aggressive cancer therapy. Results: The use of radiation decreased steadily with increasing patient age. Forty-two percent of patients aged 66 to 69 received palliative radiation therapy. Rates of palliative radiation decreased to 38%, 32%, 24%, and 14% among patients aged 70 to 74, 75 to 79, 80 to 84, and over 85, respectively. Multivariate analysis found that confounding covariates attenuated these findings, although the decreased relative rate of palliative radiation therapy among the elderly remained clinically and statistically significant. On multivariate analysis, compared to patients 66 to 69 years old, those aged 70 to 74, 75 to 79, 80 to 84, and over 85 had a 7%, 15%, 25%, and 44% decreased rate of receiving palliative radiation, respectively (all P<.0001). Conclusions: Age disparity with palliative radiation therapy exists among older cancer patients. Further research should strive to identify barriers to palliative radiation among the elderly, and extra effort should be made to give older patients the opportunity to receive this quality of life-enhancing treatment at the end

  9. African Peacekeepers in Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emmanuel, Nikolas G.

    2015-01-01

    peacekeeping operations in the region. It is important to add that the international community has frequently tried to facilitate the deployment of African armed forces with aid and training. From this reality, the following study goes beyond the current literature by focusing on the international factors...... behind African participation in United Nations (UN) peacekeeping operations in Africa. In doing so, this research focuses on US military aid and foreign troop training from 2002 to 2012, and its impact on African deployments into UN peacekeeping missions in Africa. As can be expected, such third...

  10. Reading the African context

    OpenAIRE

    Musonda Bwalya

    2012-01-01

    There is so much alienation, pain and suffering in our today�s world. In this vein, African Christianity, a voice amongst many voices, should seek to be a transformational religion for the whole of life, affecting all facets of human life towards a fuller life of all in Africa. This article sought to highlight and point to some of the major societal challenges in the African context which African Christianity, as a life-affirming religion, should continue to embrace, re-embrace and engag...

  11. Palliative Airway Stenting Performed Under Radiological Guidance and Local Anesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose. To assess the effectiveness of airway stenting performed exclusively under radiological guidance for the palliation of malignant tracheobronchial strictures. Methods. We report our experience in 16 patients with malignant tracheobronchial stricture treated by insertion of 20 Ultraflex self-expandable metal stents performed under fluoroscopic guidance only. Three patients presented dysphagia grade IV due to esophageal malignant infiltration; they therefore underwent combined airway and esophageal stenting. All the procedures were performed under conscious sedation in the radiological room; average procedure time was around 10 min, but the airway impediment never lasted more than 40 sec. Results. We obtained an overall technical success in 16 cases (100%) and clinical success in 14 patients (88%). All prostheses were successfully placed without procedural complications. Rapid clinical improvement with symptom relief and normalization of respiratory function was obtained in 14 cases. Two patients died within 48 hr from causes unrelated to stent placement. Two cases (13%) of migration were observed; they were successfully treated with another stent. Tumor overgrowth developed in other 2 patients (13%); however, no further treatment was possible because of extensive laryngeal infiltration. Conclusions. Tracheobronchial recanalization with self-expandable metal stents is a safe and effective palliative treatment for malignant strictures. Airway stenting performed exclusively under fluoroscopic view was rapid and well tolerated

  12. The power of integration: radiotherapy and global palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodin, Danielle; Grover, Surbhi; Elmore, Shekinah N; Knaul, Felicia M; Atun, Rifat; Caulley, Lisa; Herrera, Cristian A; Jones, Joshua A; Price, Aryeh J; Munshi, Anusheel; Gandhi, Ajeet K; Shah, Chiman; Gospodarowicz, Mary

    2016-07-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) is a powerful tool for the palliation of the symptoms of advanced cancer, although access to it is limited or absent in many low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). There are multiple factors contributing to this, including assumptions about the economic feasibility of RT in LMICs, the logical challenges of building capacity to deliver it in those regions, and the lack of political support to drive change of this kind. It is encouraging that the problem of RT access has begun to be included in the global discourse on cancer control and that palliative care and RT have been incorporated into national cancer control plans in some LMICs. Further, RT twinning programs involving high- and low-resource settings have been established to improve knowledge transfer and exchange. However, without large-scale action, the consequences of limited access to RT in LMICs will become dire. The number of new cancer cases around the world is expected to double by 2030, with twice as many deaths occurring in LMICs as in high-income countries (HICs). A sustained and coordinated effort involving research, education, and advocacy is required to engage global institutions, universities, health care providers, policymakers, and private industry in the urgent need to build RT capacity and delivery in LMICs. PMID:27481320

  13. Implementing a Palliative Care Nurse Leadership Fellowship Program in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Julia; Leng, Mhoira; Grant, Liz

    2016-05-01

    Global oncology and palliative care needs are increasing faster than the available capacity to meet these needs. This is particularly marked in sub-Saharan Africa, where healthcare capacity and systems are limited and resources are stretched. Uganda, a country of 35.6 million people in eastern Africa, faces the challenges of a high burden of communicable disease and a rising number of cases of non-communicable disease, including cancer. The vast majority of patients in Uganda are diagnosed with cancer too late for curative treatment to be an option because of factors like poor access to healthcare facilities, a lack of health education, poverty, and delays resulting from seeking local herbal or other traditional remedies. This article describes an innovative model of nurse leadership training in Uganda to improve the delivery of palliative care. The authors believe this model can be applicable to other low- and middle-income countries, where health resources are constrained and care needs are great.
. PMID:27105201

  14. Changing the focus of care: from curative to palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Soffritti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The improvements in the obstetrical and neonatal diagnosis and therapies have resulted into an increase in the survival rate of infants previously considered as non-viable. Debate is focusing on professionals’ behaviour about withdrawal or withholding of life sustaining treatment (LST and administration of palliative care for newborns whose conditions are incompatible with a prolonged life. Decisions about treatment should be made jointly by the professionals’ team and the family, placing the interest of the baby at the very heart of the decision process. It is very important that the environment in which the family has to make the decision is characterized by openness, dialogue and frankness. A proper and effective communication with parents is always necessary and can resolve any conflict caused by disagreement. Furthermore, parents need time in the decision making process. Other supports, which could help the family in the final decision are the possibility to ask for a specialist’s second opinion and the involvement of religious leaders and of an indipendent clinical ethics committee. Withholding or withdrawal of LST does not mean cessation of care for the baby, it means to change the focus of care from curative to palliative care. Proceedings of the 10th International Workshop on Neonatology · Cagliari (Italy · October 22nd-25th, 2014 · The last ten years, the next ten years in Neonatology Guest Editors: Vassilios Fanos, Michele Mussap, Gavino Faa, Apostolos Papageorgiou 

  15. Parents' Voices Supporting Music Therapy within Pediatric Palliative Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Lindenfelser

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available It has been my experience that parents are willing and open to express their voices to promote and advocate for music therapy services for their terminally ill children. By listening to parents' voices when providing care for terminally ill children, much can be done to ease the suffering of children and families at the end of life (Widger & Wilkins, 2004. My music therapy masters research at the University of Melbourne with Dr. Katrina McFerran will investigate bereaved parents' experiences of music therapy with their terminally ill child. This inquiry unfolded through my music therapy work with several children and families within hospice and palliative care. Parents have reflected that music therapy was a vital component in their child's care at the end of life. As one mom commented, "I don't care what anyone says, it has made a world of a difference." In order to further explore parents' experiences of music therapy, in-depth interviews will be conducted and transcripts will be analyzed using phenomenological strategies. It has been reported that parents find the interview process helpful in working through grief. They have also reported feeling an overall eagerness to share their child's story in order to provide input that might assist other families in the future (Widger & Wilkins, 2004. This article will describe pediatric palliative and hospice care, discuss parents as advocates for their terminally ill children, portray the use of music therapy within pediatrics, and share an example of music therapy with Jack.

  16. Palliative embolization of hemorrhages in extensive head and neck tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A lot has changed in terms of intervention technique, indications and embolic agents since Duggan introduced embolization to management of postraumatic epistaxis in 1970. Embolization is used in treatment of spontaneous and traumatic epistaxis, palliative tumors and vascular defects, as well as vascularized tumors and juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas. The possibility of simultaneous visualization of pathology and implementation of therapy is one of its greatest advantages. Authors analyzed the efficacy of selective embolization treatment of haemorrhage in advanced head and neck tumors. Seventy-six patients with such tumors treated at the Department of Otolaryngology in Bialystok between1999 and 2011 were examined. Embolization of bleeding vessel within the tumor was effective (hemorrhage was stopped) in 65 patients (86%). Although the method is highly efficient, it is still associated with complications. Fourteen patients suffered from headaches that lasted for several days and six from face edema. Rebleeding was rare. Unfortunately, there was one case of hemiparesis. We conclude that superselective endovascular treatment deserves to be considered alongside standard options for the palliative or preoperative management of acute hemorrhage from advanced head and neck cancers

  17. Quality of life of cancer patients motivation for palliative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Most patients with advanced diseases suffer from symptoms that are distressing in nature and can interfere with their activities of daily living and different aspects of functioning. In these circumstances, improving quality of life is very important. Patients with bone metastases feel pain with different intensity and the palliative irradiation helps to relieve this pain. The primary goal of palliative irradiation with different radiation schedules in advanced cancer is to control the incurable disease and to maintain or improve the patients' quality of life. Two features characterize most forms of QOL evaluation: 1. QOL is a multidimensional construct and is best measured using instruments that assess multiple domains of functioning and well-being. They measure physical, social and emotional aspects of functioning as well as common symptoms of cancer and its treatment (pain, nausea and fatigue). 2. QOL is subjective phenomenon and the patient is the best judge of his own QOL. Assessment of QOL in radiooncology is performed using patient self-report questionnaires. Two of the most widely used multidimensional QOL instruments are the General Version of the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (FACT-G) and the EORTC-QOL-C30. In patients with advanced disease with metastases another endpoint besides survival may be of interest and it is QOL

  18. Current Surgical Aspects of Palliative Treatment for Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite all improvements in both surgical and other conservative therapies, pancreatic cancer is steadily associated with a poor overall prognosis and remains a major cause of cancer mortality. Radical surgical resection has been established as the best chance these patients have for long-term survival. However, in most cases the disease has reached an incurable state at the time of diagnosis, mainly due to the silent clinical course at its early stages. The role of palliative surgery in locally advanced pancreatic cancer mainly involves patients who are found unresectable during open surgical exploration and consists of combined biliary and duodenal bypass procedures. Chemical splanchnicectomy is another modality that should also be applied intraoperatively with good results. There are no randomized controlled trials evaluating the outcomes of palliative pancreatic resection. Nevertheless, data from retrospective reports suggest that this practice, compared with bypass procedures, may lead to improved survival without increasing perioperative morbidity and mortality. All efforts at developing a more effective treatment for unresectable pancreatic cancer have been directed towards neoadjuvant and targeted therapies. The scenario of downstaging tumors in anticipation of a future oncological surgical resection has been advocated by trials combining gemcitabine with radiation therapy or with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib, with promising early results

  19. Radionuclide therapy for metastatic bone palliation; Nuklearmedizinische Therapie von Skelettmetastasen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtaran, A.; Preitfellner, J. [Vienna Univ. (Austria). Universitaetsklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Havlik, E. [Allgemeines Krankenhaus, Vienna (Austria). Inst. fuer Biomedizinische Technik und Physik

    2000-07-01

    In patients with advanced osteoblastic bone metastases from malignant tumours, {beta}-emitting radiopharmaceuticals are used. These radiopharmaceuticals are in elemental form such as {sup 32}P, {sup 89}Sr or bound on a bone-seeking carrier like HEDP, HMDTP. The radionuclide therapy of bone metastases causes no serious side effects and is well tolerated by the patients. According to recommended criteria this therapy is palliative and serves mainly for pain relief. The effect of the therapy lasts for several months and may be repeated if required. (orig.) [German] Bei Patienten mit fortgeschrittenen osteoblastischen ossaeren Metastasen werden {beta}-Strahlung-emittierende osteotrope Radiopharmaka verwendet. Diese sind entweder Radionuklide in elementarer Form ({sup 32}P, {sup 89}Sr...) oder an einer knochenaffinen Traegersubstanz gebundene Radionuklide ({sup 153}Sm, {sup 186}Re...). Die Radionuklidterapie ist im Allgemeinen nebenwirkungsarm und belastet die Patienten wenig. Nach derzeit ueblichen Kriterien stellt diese Therapie eine palliative Massnahme dar und dient hauptsaechlich zur Schmerzlinderung. Die Wirkung haelt ueber mehrere Monate an und bei Bedarf kann die Therapie wiederholt werden. (orig.)

  20. Capitalism and African business cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Scott D.

    2014-01-01

    Scholars and practitioners once commonly linked 'African culture' to a distinctive 'African capitalism', at odds with genuine capitalism and the demands of modern business. Yet contemporary African business cultures reveal that a capitalist ethos has taken hold within both state and society. The success and visibility of an emergent, and celebrated, class of African big business reveals that business and profit are culturally acceptable. Existing theories of African capitalism are ill-equippe...

  1. "It Was Definitely Very Different": An evaluation of palliative care teaching to medical students using a mixed methods approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Alison H; Harrison, Amanda; Kumar, Koshila

    2015-01-01

    Given our ageing population and the increase in chronic disease, palliative care will become an increasingly important part of doctors' workloads, with implications for palliative care education. This study used a mixed methods strategy to evaluate second-year medical students' learning outcomes and experiences within a palliative care education program. Analysis of pre- and post-test scores showed a significant improvement in students' attitudinal scores, but no change in knowledge as measured by multiple-choice questions. Analysis of qualitative data revealed that students' learning experience was marked by a lack of clear learning objectives and experiential learning opportunities. Students also reported divergent reactions to death and dying and noted that palliative care was different from other areas of clinical medicine. This study revealed that palliative care teaching results in improved attitudes toward palliative care, reflecting the holistic and patient-focused nature of the palliative care curriculum. PMID:26399087

  2. Palliative Care, Hospice, and Advance Care Planning: Views of People Living with HIV and Other Chronic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slomka, Jacquelyn; Prince-Paul, Maryjo; Webel, Allison; Daly, Barbara J

    2016-01-01

    People living with HIV (PLWH) who survive to older adulthood risk developing multiple chronic medical conditions. Health policymakers recognize the role of early palliative care and advance care planning in improving health quality for at-risk populations, but misperceptions about palliative care, hospice, and advance care planning are common. Before testing a program of early palliative care for PLWH and other chronic conditions, we conducted focus groups to elicit perceptions of palliative care, hospice, and advance care planning in our target population. Overall, participants were unfamiliar with the term palliative care, confused concepts of palliative care and hospice, and/or associated hospice care with dying. Participants misunderstood advance care planning, but valued communication about health care preferences. Accepting palliative care was contingent on distinguishing it from hospice and historical memories of HIV and dying. Provision of high-quality, comprehensive care will require changing public perceptions and individuals' views in this high-risk population. PMID:27053406

  3. Role of radiation therapy in palliative care of the patient with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Stephen T; Jones, Joshua; Chow, Edward

    2014-09-10

    Radiotherapy is a successful, time-efficient, well-tolerated, and cost-effective intervention that is crucial for the appropriate delivery of palliative oncology care. The distinction between curative and palliative goals is blurred in many patients with cancer, requiring that treatments be chosen on the basis of factors related to the patient (ie, poor performance status, advanced age, significant weight loss, severe comorbid disease), the cancer (ie, metastatic disease, aggressive histology), or the treatment (ie, poor response to systemic therapy, previous radiotherapy). Goals may include symptom relief at the site of primary tumor or from metastatic lesions. Attention to a patient's discomfort and transportation limitations requires hypofractionated courses, when feasible. Innovative approaches include rapid response palliative care clinics as well as the formation of palliative radiotherapy specialty services in academic centers. Guidelines are providing better definitions of appropriate palliative radiotherapy interventions, and bone metastases fractionation has become the first radiotherapy quality measure accepted by the National Quality Forum. Further advances in the palliative radiation oncology subspecialty will require integration of education and training between the radiotherapy and palliative care specialties. PMID:25113773

  4. Knowledge of the residents at King Abdul-Aziz University Hospital (KAAUH about palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan H Alamri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Palliative care is a rapidly growing subspecialty that aims at improving the quality of life and relieving suffering associated with life threatening disease. Despite its rapid growth and huge demand, the knowledge of health care professionals on palliative care remains inadequate. Objective: This study aims to determine the knowledge of residents at King Abdul-Aziz University Hospital (KAAUH on palliative care. Materials and Methods: Through a cross-sectional design, all residents in the hospital were invited to complete a two-part self-administered questionnaire in June 2010. The first part of the questionnaire included variables describing the socio-demographic characteristics and educational background, and the second part developed by palliative care education initiative at Dalhousie University in Canada in 2000 had 25 items on the knowledge of palliative care. Results : Of the 80 residents 65 (81% responded, the overwhelming majority of whom were Saudis (92.3% with an equal representation of males and females. The mean age of the participants was 29.1 ± 2.4 years. Less than one-third (29.2% indicated that they had previous didactic education on palliative care. The percentage of right answers on items reflecting knowledge on palliative care accounted for 29.9% ± 9.9%. No statistically significant difference was found in the level of knowledge among the residents according to their demographics or graduation and training characteristics. Conclusion: Resident physicians enrolled in postgraduate programs have suboptimal knowledge of basic palliative care. Substantial efforts should be made to incorporate a palliative care module into the theoretical and practical training of medical students and resident physicians.

  5. The global state of palliative care-progress and challenges in cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reville, Barbara; Foxwell, Anessa M

    2014-07-01

    All persons have a right to palliative care during cancer treatment and at the end-of-life. The World Health Organization (WHO) defines palliative care as a medical specialty that addresses physical, psychological, social, legal, and spiritual domains of care by an interdisciplinary team of professional and lay health care providers. Widespread adoption of this universal definition will aid policy development and educational initiatives on a national level. The need for palliative care is expanding due to the aging of the world's population and the increase in the rate of cancer in both developed and developing countries. However, in one third of the world there is no access to palliative care for persons with serious or terminal illness. Palliative care improves symptoms, most frequently pain, and improves quality of life for patients and their families, especially in the terminal disease phase. Accessibility to palliative care services, adequately trained health care professionals, availability of essential medicines, and gaps in education vary greatly throughout the world. Pain management is an integral concept in the practice of palliative care; however, opioiphobia, insufficient supply of opioids, and regulatory restrictions contribute to undue suffering for millions. Ongoing advocacy efforts call for increased awareness, palliative care integration with cancer care, and public and professional education. Enacting necessary change will require the engagement of health ministries and the recognition of the unique needs and resources of each country. The aim of this review is to examine progress in palliative care development and explore some of the barriers influencing cancer care across the globe. PMID:25841689

  6. Palliative care for the elderly - developing a curriculum for nursing and medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bongartz Maren

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Delivering palliative care to elderly, dying patients is a present and future challenge. In Germany, this has been underlined by a 2009 legislation implementing palliative care as compulsory in the medical curriculum. While the number of elderly patients is increasing in many western countries multimorbidity, dementia and frailty complicate care. Teaching palliative care of the elderly to an interprofessional group of medical and nursing students can help to provide better care as acknowledged by the ministry of health and its expert panels. In this study we researched and created an interdisciplinary curriculum focussing on the palliative care needs of the elderly which will be presented in this paper. Methods In order to identify relevant learning goals and objectives for the curriculum, we proceeded in four subsequent stages. We searched international literature for existing undergraduate palliative care curricula focussing on the palliative care situation of elderly patients; we searched international literature for palliative care needs of the elderly. The searches were sensitive and limited in nature. Mesh terms were used where applicable. We then presented the results to a group of geriatrics and palliative care experts for critical appraisal. Finally, the findings were transformed into a curriculum, focussing on learning goals, using the literature found. Results The literature searches and expert feedback produced a primary body of results. The following deduction domains emerged: Geriatrics, Palliative Care, Communication & Patient Autonomy and Organisation & Social Networks. Based on these domains we developed our curriculum. Conclusions The curriculum was successfully implemented following the Kern approach for medical curricula. The process is documented in this paper. The information given may support curriculum developers in their search for learning goals and objectives.

  7. Endoscopic palliation of malignant dysphagia: a challenging task in inoperable oesophageal cancer

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    Mylvaganam S

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The main goal when managing patients with inoperable oesophageal cancer is to restore and maintain their oral nutrition. The aim of the present study was to assess the value of endoscopic palliation of dysphagia in patients with oesophageal cancer, who either due to advanced stage of the disease or co-morbidity are not suitable for surgery. Patients and methods All the endoscopic palliative procedures performed over a 5-year period in our unit were retrospectively reviewed. Dilatation and insertion of self-expandable metal stents (SEMS were mainly used for tight circumferential strictures whilst ablation with Nd-YAG laser was used for exophytic lesions. All procedures were performed under sedation. Results Overall 249 palliative procedures were performed in 59 men and 40 women, with a median age of 73 years (range 35 – 93. The median number of sessions per patient was 2 (range 1 – 13 sessions. Palliation involved laser ablation alone in 24%, stent insertion alone in 22% and dilatation alone in 13% of the patients. In 41% of the patients, a combination of the above palliative techniques was applied. A total of 45 SEMS were inserted. One third of the patients did not receive any other palliative treatment, whilst the rest received chemotherapy, radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Swallowing was maintained in all patients up to death. Four oesophageal perforations were encountered; two were fatal whilst the other two were successfully treated with covered stent insertion and conservative treatment. The median survival from diagnosis was 10.5 months (range 0.5–83 months and the median survival from 1st palliation was 5 months (range 0.5–68.5 months. Conclusion Endoscopic interventions are effective and relatively safe palliative modalities for patients with oesophageal cancer. It is possible to adequately palliate almost all cases of malignant dysphagia. This is achieved by expertise in combination treatment.

  8. The challenge of providing palliative care to terminally ill prison inmates in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Felicity Juliette

    2007-03-01

    Terminally ill prison inmates have a right to all aspects of health care including palliative care provision. However, there are numerous difficulties in providing palliative care to high-security prisoners in the UK. Local community hospices may be reluctant to admit terminally ill prisoners and therefore initiatives must be established to provide appropriate palliative care within the prison itself. Dying prisoners need companionship and to be shown respect and compassion to avoid feelings of loneliness and hopelessness. Inmate volunteers can provide an invaluable source of support and friendship for the terminally ill prisoner, helping to improve quality of life. PMID:17505406

  9. Is there a role of palliative care in the neonatal intensive care unit in India?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjiri P Dighe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in medical care have improved the survival of newborn babies born with various problems. Despite this death in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU is an inevitable reality. For babies who are not going to "get better," the health care team still has a duty to alleviate the physical suffering of the baby and to support the family. Palliative care is a multidisciplinary approach to relieve the physical, psycho social, and spiritual suffering of patients and their families. Palliative care provision in the Indian NICU settings is almost nonexistent at present. In this paper we attempt to "build a case" for palliative care in the Indian NICU setting.

  10. Symptom severity of patients with advanced cancer in palliative care unit: longitudinal assessments of symptoms improvement

    OpenAIRE

    Tai, Shu-Yu; Lee, Chung-Yin; Wu, Chien-Yi; Hsieh, Hui-ya; Huang, Joh-Jong; Huang, Chia-Tsuan; Chien, Chen-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Background This study assessed the symptom severity of patients with advanced cancer in a palliative care unit and explored the factors associated with symptom improvement. Methods This study was conducted in a palliative care unit in Taiwan between October 2004 and December 2009. Symptom intensity was measured by the “Symptom Reporting Form”, and graded on a scale of 0 to 4 (0 = none, and 4 = extreme). These measures were assessed on the 1st, 3rd, 5th, and 7th Day in the palliative care unit...

  11. Nobel Prize winners for literature as palliative for scientific English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sri Kantha, Sachi

    2003-02-01

    Plagiarism causes a serious concern in scientific literature. I distinguish two types of plagiarism. What is routinely highlighted and discussed is the reprehensible type of stealing another author's ideas and words. This type I categorize as "heterotrophic" plagiarism. A more prevalent and less-discussed type of plagiarism is the verbatim use of same sentences repetitively by authors in their publications. This I categorize as "autotrophic" plagiarism. Though harmless per se, autotrophic plagiarism is equally taxing on the readers. The occurrence of autotrophic plagiarism is mainly caused by the lack of proficiency in the current lingua franca of science, ie, English. The writings of 22 Nobel literature laureates who wrote in English, especially their travelogues, essays, and letters to the press can be used for benefit of improving one's own vocabulary and writing skills and style. I suggest the writings of three literati--Bernard Shaw, Bertrand Russell, and Ernest Hemingway--as palliatives for autotrophic plagiarism in scientific publishing. PMID:12590423

  12. Improving Palliative Care Team Meetings: Structure, Inclusion, and "Team Care".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Caitlin W; Kelly, Brittany; Skarf, Lara Michal; Tellem, Rotem; Dunn, Kathleen M; Poswolsky, Sheila

    2016-07-01

    Increasing demands on palliative care teams point to the need for continuous improvement to ensure teams are working collaboratively and efficiently. This quality improvement initiative focused on improving interprofessional team meeting efficiency and subsequently patient care. Meeting start and end times improved from a mean of approximately 9 and 6 minutes late in the baseline period, respectively, to a mean of 4.4 minutes late (start time) and ending early in our sustainability phase. Mean team satisfaction improved from 2.4 to 4.5 on a 5-point Likert-type scale. The improvement initiative clarified communication about patients' plans of care, thus positively impacting team members' ability to articulate goals to other professionals, patients, and families. We propose several recommendations in the form of a team meeting "toolkit." PMID:25794871

  13. Chronic pain management as a barrier to pediatric palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Lindsay A; Meinert, Elizabeth; Baker, Kimberly; Knapp, Caprice

    2013-12-01

    Pain is common as a presenting complaint to outpatient and emergency departments for children, yet pain management represents one of the children's largest unmet needs. A child may present with acute pain for an intermittent issue or may have acute or chronic pain in the setting of chronic illness. The mainstay of treatment for pain uses a stepwise approach for pain management, such as set up by the World Health Organization. For children with life-limiting illnesses, the Institute of Medicine guidelines recommends referral upon diagnosis for palliative care, meaning that the child receives comprehensive services that include pain control in coordination with curative therapies; yet barriers remain. From the provider perspective, pain can be better addressed through a careful assessment of one's own knowledge, skills, and attitudes. The key components of pain management in children are multimodal, regardless of the cause of the pain. PMID:23329083

  14. Palliative management of malignant bowel obstruction in terminally Ill patient

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    Darshit A Thaker

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mr. P was a 57-year-old man who presented with symptoms of bowel obstruction in the setting of a known metastatic pancreatic cancer. Diagnosis of malignant bowel obstruction was made clinically and radiologically and he was treated conservatively (non-operativelywith octreotide, metoclopromide and dexamethasone, which provided good control over symptoms and allowed him to have quality time with family until he died few weeks later with liver failure. Bowel obstruction in patients with abdominal malignancy requires careful assessment. The patient and family should always be involved in decision making. The ultimate goals of palliative care (symptom management, quality of life and dignity of death should never be forgotten during decision making for any patient.

  15. Adverse effects and treatment on palliative radiotherapy for bone metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adverse effects on palliative radiotherapy for bone metastases are generally mild. Acute and late adverse effects are similar between 8 Gy single fraction and multi-fraction radiotherapy (e.g. 30 Gy in 10 fractions). Both external beam radiotherapy and radiopharmaceutical therapy with strontium-89 may cause pain flare. A randomized controlled trial is currently performed to confirm the effectiveness of dexamethasone for the prevention of pain flare. Reirradiation for the same site is widely used. However, its safeness has not been confirmed enough. Radiation myelitis is an unrecoverable severe adverse effect. However, the tolerated accumulated dose for the spinal cord is not fully understood. Stereotactic body radiotherapy may be considered to deliver reirradiation for spinal metastases without exposing too much dose for the spinal cord. Another solution to prevent radiation myelitis after reirradiation may use dose fractionations of 8 Gy single or 20 Gy in 5 fractions instead of 30 Gy in 10 fractions. (author)

  16. Psychosocial issues in palliative care: A review of five cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonia C Onyeka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Palliative care is not just vital in controlling symptoms of the patient′s disease condition, but also aims to extend the patient′s life, giving it a better quality. However, several times in the course of management, the psychosocial impact of cancer, HIV/AIDS, and other life-limiting disease conditions may not be noticed and dealt with during the admission period, thereby giving rise to a more complex situation than the disease condition itself. This article aims to review some psychosocial issues and measures that can be taken to address them. It highlights the various roles and the importance of the clinician, nurse, social worker, and other members of the multidisciplinary team in tackling these issues and will help healthcare professionals in this field achieve better practice in the future.

  17. Oropharyngeal Candidiasis in Palliative Care Patients in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astvad, Karen; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Høiby, Niels;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) is a significant cause of morbidity, especially among patients with advanced cancer. The incidence and significance of yeast carriage and OPC in the palliative care setting in Denmark is unknown. The best diagnostic strategy and treatment regimen has...... to be defined. OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the clinical and microbiological incidence of yeast carriage/OPC and assessed available diagnostic procedures-culture and microscopy. The distribution of Candida species and fluconazole susceptibility was determined. METHODS: Terminal care patients admitted...... recently treated with azoles. CONCLUSIONS: In total, 52% of culture-positive patients harbored at least one isolate with innately or acquired decreased fluconazole susceptibility. Therefore, susceptibility testing appears recommendable for patients with clinical signs of OPC....

  18. Experiences in preoperative and palliative percutaneous transhepatic cholangiodrainage (PTCD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arlart, I.P.; Dewitz, H. von; Fritz, W.

    1986-03-01

    In obstructive jaundice PTCD plays an important role as a preoperative or a palliative therapeutic method inspite of the availability of biliary endoprostheses. This study was carried out to assess complications following PTCD, the effect on liver function (serum parameters) and the relationship between duration of preoperative drainage and postoperative complication rate. The results demonstrate the 11-hole pigtailcatheters are useful for intrahepatic location and 32-hole ringcatheters for extrahepatic location due to reduced dislocation rates. The effect of biliary drainage after 7 rsp. 25 days on liver function was significant (p<0.05). As a main complication fever episodes could be observed associated with pathologic bile-/bloodcultures in most cases; other complications were similar to those presented in the literature. A prophylactic antibiotic therapy following PTCD seems to be useful, a preoperative biliary drainage is recommended until serum bilirubin levels become constant or at least for 2 weeks.

  19. Experiences in preoperative and palliative percutaneous transhepatic cholangiodrainage (PTCD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In obstructive jaundice PTCD plays an important role as a preoperative or a palliative therapeutic method inspite of the availability of biliary endoprostheses. This study was carried out to assess complications following PTCD, the effect on liver function (serum parameters) and the relationship between duration of preoperative drainage and postoperative complication rate. The results demonstrate the 11-hole pigtailcatheters are useful for intrahepatic location and 32-hole ringcatheters for extrahepatic location due to reduced dislocation rates. The effect of biliary drainage after 7 rsp. 25 days on liver function was significant (p<0.05). As a main complication fever episodes could be observed associated with pathologic bile-/bloodcultures in most cases; other complications were similar to those presented in the literature. A prophylactic antibiotic therapy following PTCD seems to be useful, a preoperative biliary drainage is recommended until serum bilirubin levels become constant or at least for 2 weeks. (orig.)

  20. Radiotherapy of the neuroaxis for palliative treatment of leptomeningeal carcinomatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis occurs in about 5% of solid tumors and may seriously compromise quality of life. Aim of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility of craniospinal irradiation with and without intrathecal chemotherapy and its efficacy with regard to symptom palliation and survival. Patients and Methods: 16 patients (mean age 46 years; nine breast cancers, five lung cancers, one renal cell cancer, one tumor of unknown primary site) with leptomeningeal carcinomatosis occurring after a median interval from primary tumor diagnosis of 5 months (0-300 months) received craniospinal irradiation between October 1995 and May 2000. The median total dose was 36 Gy (a 1.6-2.0 Gy). Ten patients were additionally treated with intrathecal methotrexate (15 mg per cycle, 2-8 cycles). Results: Median survival was 12 weeks, 8 weeks after radiotherapy alone, 16 weeks after combined modality treatment. 14 patients died from disease. Eleven patients (68%) experienced regression of their neurological symptoms during or soon after completion of radiotherapy. Seven patients regained their ability to walk, six had pain reduction, three regression of bladder and bowel incontinence. In three patients symptom progression and in two patients no change occurred. Side effects were: Myelosuppression (CTC) Grade I: n=2, Grade II: n=4, Grade III: n=4 patients and Grade IV: n=1. Nine patients had dysphagia, seven mucositis, three suffered from nausea. No late toxicity was observed. Conclusion: Craniospinal radiotherapy is feasible and effective for palliative treatment of leptomeningeal carcinomatosis. As far as the small patient number permits any definite conclusions, combined modality treatment seems superior to irradiation alone. (orig.)

  1. The Illness Experience: Palliative Care Given the impossibility of Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Margarida Maria Florêncio; Amazonas, Maria Cristina Lopes de Almeida

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a reflection about being terminally ill and the various ways that the subject has at its disposal to deal with this event. The objective is to understand the experience of palliation for patients undergoing no therapeutic possibilities of cure. The methodology of this study has the instruments to semi-structured interview, the participant observation and the field diary, and the Descriptive Analysis of Foucault's inspiration how the narratives of the subjects were perceived. The Results of paper there was the possibility of looking at the experience of illness through the eyes of a subject position assumed by the very sick. As conclusion we have than when choosing palliative care, the terminally ill opts for a way to feel more comfortable and resists the impositions of the medical model of prolonging life. O presente trabalho traz uma reflexão a respeito do ser um doente terminal e das várias maneiras que o sujeito tem a seu dispor para lidar com esse acontecimento. Nosso objetivo foi compreender a experiência da paliação por sujeitos doentes sem possibilidades terapêuticas de cura. A metodologia deste estudo teve como instrumentos a Entrevista Narrativa, a Observação Participante e o Diário de Campo, sendo a Análise Descritiva de inspiração foucaultiana o modo como as narrativas dos sujeitos foram percebidas. O resultado do estudo mostrou a possibilidade de olhar a experiência do adoecer através da ótica de uma posição de sujeito assumida pelo próprio enfermo. E concluímos que ao escolher os cuidados paliativos, o doente terminal opta por um modo de se sentir mais confortável e resiste às imposições do modelo médico de prolongamento da vida. PMID:27384275

  2. Malignant duodenal obstructions: palliative treatment with covered expandable nitinol stent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Chul; Jung, Gyoo Sik; Lee, Sang Hee; Kim, Sung Min; Oh, Kyung Seung; Huh, Jin Do; Cho, Young Duk [College of Medicine, Kosin Univ, Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Song, Ho Young [College of Medicine, Ulsan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-04-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and clinical effectiveness of using a polyurethane-covered expandable nitinol stent in the palliative treatment of malignant duodenal obstruction. Under fluoroscopic guidance, a polyurethane-covered expandable nitinol stent was placed in 12 consecutive patients with malignant duodenal obstructions. All presented with severe nausea and recurrent vomiting. The underlying causes of obstruction were duodenal carcinoma (n=4), pancreatic carcinoma (n=4), gall bladder carcinoma (n=2), distal CBD carcinoma (n=1), and uterine cervical carcinoma (n=1). The sites of obstruction were part I (n=1), part II (n=8), and III (n=3). Due to pre-existing jaundice, eight patients with part II obstructions underwent biliary decompression prior to stent placement. An introducer sheath with a 6-mm outer diameter and stents 16 mm in diameter were employed, and to place the stent, and after-loading technique was used. Stent placement was technically successful in ten patients, and no procedural complications occuured. In one of two patients in whom there was technical failure, and in whom the obstructions were located in part III, the stent was placed transgastrically. Stent migration occurred in one patient four days after the procedure, and treatment involved the palcement of a second, uncovered, nitinol stent. After stent placement, symptoms improved in all patients. During follow-up, obstructive symptoms due to stent stenosis (n=1), colonic obstruction (n=1), and multiple small bowel obstruction (n=1) recurred in three patients. Two of these were treated by placing additional stents in the duodenum and colon, respectively. One of the eight patients in whom a stent was placed in the second portion of the duodenum developed jaundice. The patients died a mean 14 (median, 9) weeks after stent placement. The placement of a polyurethane-covered expandable nitinol stent seems to be technically feasible, safe and effective for the palliative treatment of malignant

  3. Palliative care among heart failure patients in primary care: a comparison to cancer patients using English family practice data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Gadoud

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Patients with heart failure have a significant symptom burden and other palliative care needs often over a longer period than patients with cancer. It is acknowledged that this need may be unmet but by how much has not been quantified in primary care data at the population level. METHODS: This was the first use of Clinical Practice Research Datalink, the world's largest primary care database to explore recognition of the need for palliative care. Heart failure and cancer patients who had died in 2009 aged 18 or over and had at least one year of primary care records were identified. A palliative approach to care among patients with heart failure was compared to that among patients with cancer using entry onto a palliative care register as a marker for a palliative approach to care. RESULTS: Among patients with heart failure, 7% (234/3 122 were entered on the palliative care register compared to 48% (3 669/7 608 of cancer patients. Of heart failure patients on the palliative care register, 29% (69/234 were entered onto the register within a week of their death. CONCLUSIONS: This confirms that the stark inequity in recognition of palliative care needs for people with heart failure in a large primary care dataset. We recommend a move away from prognosis based criteria for palliative care towards a patient centred approach, with assessment of and attention to palliative needs including advance care planning throughout the disease trajectory.

  4. Early identification of and proactive palliative care for patients in general practice, incentive and methods of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thoonsen Bregje

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background According to the Word Health Organization, patients who can benefit from palliative care should be identified earlier to enable proactive palliative care. Up to now, this is not common practice and has hardly been addressed in scientific literature. Still, palliative care is limited to the terminal phase and restricted to patients with cancer. Therefore, we trained general practitioners (GPs in identifying palliative patients in an earlier phase of their disease trajectory and in delivering structured proactive palliative care. The aim of our study is to determine if this training, in combination with consulting an expert in palliative care regarding each palliative patient's tailored care plan, can improve different aspects of the quality of the remaining life of patients with severe chronic diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, congestive heart failure and cancer. Methods/Design A two-armed randomized controlled trial was performed. As outcome variables we studied: place of death, number of hospital admissions and number of GP out of hours contacts. Discussion We expect that this study will increase the number of identified palliative care patients and improve different aspects of quality of palliative care. This is of importance to improve palliative care for patients with COPD, CHF and cancer and their informal caregivers, and to empower the GP. The study protocol is described and possible strengths and weaknesses and possible consequences have been outlined. Trial Registration The Netherlands National Trial Register: NTR2815

  5. Dyspnea management in Palliative home care: A case series in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rojanasak Thongkhamcharoen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Managing dyspnea at home is a challenging task. Although a competent palliative home care team can assist a patient to live at home with better pain control, dyspnea is usually not as well managed. In the Asian context, there are few research studies in dyspnea management in palliative home care. This paper aims to illustrate the cultural context that has an impact on dyspnea management at home and the assessment and management of dyspnea in a community palliative care setting in Malaysia. This paper reports on a study of 5 dyspneic patients suffering from both cancer-related and non-cancer-related dyspnea. Its focus is on a unique Asian cultural belief system that affects communication about prognosis and the role of family in palliative home care. In addition, this paper also describes dyspnea assessment, the barriers to morphine use, benzodiazepine prescription, oxygen therapy, and nonpharmacologic intervention in this center.

  6. Palliative Care Eases Symptoms, Enhances Lives | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer, heart disease, lung disease, kidney failure, AIDS, cystic fibrosis and other diseases, experience physical symptoms and emotional distress. Sometimes these are related to the patient's medical treatment. You may want to consider palliative care if ...

  7. Palliative care communication curriculum: what can students learn from an unfolding case?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Joy; Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Shaunfield, Sara; Sanchez-Reilly, Sandra

    2011-06-01

    Limited attention to palliative care communication training is offered to medical students. In this work, we pursued unfolding case responses and what they indicated about student tendencies to use palliative care communication as well as what medical students can learn from their own reflective practice about palliative care. Findings showed an overwhelming trend for students to avoid palliative care communication or inclusion of topics including advance directives, place of care, family support, and dying. Instead, students relied heavily on the SPIKES protocol, communication that was strategically vague and ambiguous, and discussions that centered on specialty care and referral. In reflecting on their own case study responses, students noted an absence of direct communication about prognosis, no coordination of care, late hospice entry, and patient pain resulting from communication inefficacies. Future research should focus on the development of formal and adaptive curriculum structures to address these communication needs. PMID:21071434

  8. What Proportion of Terminally Ill and Dying People Require Specialist Palliative Care Services?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna M. Wilson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, around 55 million people die each year worldwide. That number is expected to increase rapidly with accelerating population aging. Despite growth in the number of palliative care specialists and specialist services in most countries, the prospect of an increasing number of terminally ill and dying persons is daunting. This paper attempts to answer the question: what proportion of terminally ill and dying persons require specialist palliative care services? To address this question and highlight which persons require specialist palliative care, the current state of access to specialist palliative care services and specialists in Canada and other countries is highlighted, along with available evidence-based information on specialist services utilization and the care needs of terminally ill and dying persons. Current evidence and information gaps reveal that this question cannot be answered now, but it should be answered in advance of a crisis of unmet end-of-life care needs with the rising death toll.

  9. PRIMARY PALLIATIVE CARE? - Treating terminally ill cancer patients in the primary care sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Mette Asbjørn; Jensen, Anders Bonde; Olesen, Frede;

    BACKGROUND. Palliative care for cancer patients is an important part of a GP's work. Although every GP is frequently involved in care for terminally ill cancer patients, only little is known about how these palliative efforts are perceived by the patients and their families, a knowledge that is...... vital to further improve palliative care in the primary sector.AIM. The aim of the study was to analyse the quality of palliative home care with focus on the GP's role based on evaluations by relatives of recently deceased cancer patients and professionals from both the primary and secondary health care...... sectors.METHOD. A number of focus group interviews were conducted with three types of subgroups: 1) Bereaved relatives, 2) GPs and 3) Various health-care-professionals, namely community nurses, hospital physicians and GPs. The interviews were transcribed and analysed according to a phenomenological...

  10. Impact of teaching session on concepts of palliative care in medical undergraduates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirisha Annavarapu

    2016-02-01

    Conclusions: Concept of palliative care was poor among medical undergraduates. Health care providers can overcome by knowledge construction, interrelation between practice and evidence based medicine. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(1.000: 188-191

  11. Sustainable practice improvements: impact of the Comprehensive Advanced Palliative Care Education (CAPCE) program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Diane; Hillier, Loretta M; Keat, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes an education program designed to improve palliative care practice through the development of workplace hospice palliative care resources (PCRs), and its impact on knowledge transfer and longer-term changes to clinical practice. Evaluation methods included pre- and post-program questionnaires, and a survey of learners' (n=301) perceptions of program learning strategies. Interviews (n=21) were conducted with a purposeful sample of PCRs and representatives from their work sites. Ratings of the sessions indicated that they were relevant to learners' clinical practice. At follow up, the majority of learners (83%) continued to serve as PCRs. Many positive effects were identified, including enhanced pain and symptom management, staff education, and development of care policies and guidelines. Management support, particularly the prioritization of palliative care and staff development, were factors facilitating sustained implementation. These findings highlight the importance of multimodal learning strategies and supportive work environments in the development of PCRs to enhance palliative care practice. PMID:18251444

  12. Palliative Care: The Relief You Need When You're Experiencing Symptoms of Serious Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Need When You’re Experiencing the Symptoms of Serious Illness Palliative Care: Improving quality of life when ... Dealing with the symptoms of any painful or serious illness is difficult. However, special care is available ...

  13. Characterizing the admixed African ancestry of African Americans

    OpenAIRE

    Zakharia, Fouad; Basu, Analabha; Absher, Devin; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Go, Alan S.; Hlatky, Mark A.; Iribarren, Carlos; Knowles, Joshua W.; Li, Jun; Narasimhan, Balasubramanian; Sidney, Steven; Southwick, Audrey; Myers, Richard M.; Quertermous, Thomas; Risch, Neil

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Accurate, high-throughput genotyping allows the fine characterization of genetic ancestry. Here we applied recently developed statistical and computational techniques to the question of African ancestry in African Americans by using data on more than 450,000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyped in 94 Africans of diverse geographic origins included in the...

  14. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma: can it be palliated with radiotherapy? Do higher biologically effective doses help?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BACKGROUND: Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has traditionally been regarded as a 'radioresistant cancer'. Yet controversy exists as to whether dose escalation can overcome the inherent resistance of such tumors when they metastasize. Using a Tumor Dose Factor (TDF) model, Onuffrey et al. (IJROB 11:2007, 1985) showed that TDF >70 was predictive of higher palliative response rates. In contrast, Halperin et al (Cancer 51:614, 1983) could not establish a correlation between TDF equivalent dose and frequency of palliative response. Since that time, the linear quadratic model has emerged as an alternative paradigm for biologically effective dose (BED). The current project was undertaken to determine the ability of radiotherapy to palliate focally metastatic RCC and to assess whether the delivery of higher biologically effective dose was more likely to bring about complete palliative response (CR). METHODS: Between 1966 and 1995, 107 patients with renal cell metastases at 150 sites were irradiated with palliative intent. Sites irradiated included bone (n=89), soft tissue (n=16), brain (n=20), spinal cord (n=9), and pulmonary (n=16). To determine dose effectiveness, the biological effective dose (BED) was calculated according to the following formula Gy10 = Total Dose (1 + fractional dose/α-β) using an α-β of 10. The above table presents univariate comparisons. For the entire series, 94% of patients derived a palliative response after treatment with irradiation. The median duration of palliation was 4 months (range, 2-80 months). With respect to overall response, only patients with metastases to the spinal cord were significantly less likely to derive palliation in multivariate analysis (p70) and the rate of CR (p=0.03). When entered as a dichotomous variable (e.g., relative to 39 Gy 10) increasing biologically effective dose was not associated with an increased rate of complete palliation; however, when entered as a continuous variable, increasing BED was strongly

  15. African-Americans and Alzheimer's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share Plus on Google Plus African-Americans and Alzheimer's alz.org | IHaveAlz Introduction 10 Warning Signs Brain ... African-Americans are at a higher risk for Alzheimer's disease. Many Americans dismiss the warning signs of ...

  16. The Use of Emergency Medication Kits in Community Palliative Care: An Exploratory Survey of Views of Current Practice in Australian Home-Based Palliative Care Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullen, Tracey; Rosenberg, John P; Smith, Bradley; Maher, Kate

    2015-09-01

    Improving symptom management for palliative care patients has obvious benefits for patients and advantages for the clinicians, as workload demands and work-related stress can be reduced when the emergent symptoms of patients are managed in a timely manner. The use of emergency medication kits (EMKs) can provide such timely symptom relief. The purpose of this study was to conduct a survey of a local service to examine views on medication management before and after the implementation of an EMK and to conduct a nationwide prevalence survey examining the use of EMKs in Australia. Most respondents from community palliative care services indicated that EMKs were not being supplied to palliative care patients but believed such an intervention could improve patient care. PMID:24871345

  17. Integrated palliative care in the Spanish context: a systematic review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Garralda, Eduardo; Hasselaar, Jeroen; Carrasco, José Miguel; Van Beek, Karen; Siouta, Naouma; Csikos, Agnes; Menten, Johan; Centeno, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Background Integrated palliative care (IPC) involves bringing together administrative, organisational, clinical and service aspects in order to achieve continuity of care between all actors involved in the care network of patients receiving palliative care (PC) services. The purpose of this study is to identify literature on IPC in the Spanish context, either in cancer or other advanced chronic diseases. Methods Systematic review of the literature about IPC published in Spain between 1995 and...

  18. The role and significance of nurses in managing transitions to palliative care: a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Kirby, Emma; Broom, Alex; Good, Phillip

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Nurses are generally present, and often influential, in supporting patient and family acceptance of medical futility and in assisting doctors in negotiating referral to palliative care. Yet the specificities of the nursing role and how nurses may contribute to timely and effective referrals is not well understood. This study aimed to systematically explore hospital-based nurses’ accounts of the transition to palliative care, and the potential role of nurses in facilitating more eff...

  19. Living in the face of death: Studies on palliative care in upper GI cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Uitdehaag, Madeleen

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis explores palliative care provided to patients with advanced upper gastrointestinal (GI) cancer. The 5-year survival rates for these cancer sites range between 4 and 17%, which implies that many of these patients require palliative care. Considering the fact that there is no uniform management policy aiming at improvement of quality of life (QoL) of these patients and their families, we decided to study different interventions with effect on this primary aim. The introd...

  20. Team meetings in specialist palliative care: Asking questions as a strategy within interprofessional interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Arber, A

    2008-01-01

    In this article, I explore what happens when specialist palliative care staff meet together to discuss patients under their care. Many studies (e.g., Atkinson) have discussed how health care practitioners in various settings use rhetorical strategies when presenting cases in situations such as ward rounds and team meetings. Strategies for arguing and persuading are central to medical practice in the interprofessional context. The context of specialist palliative care is an interesting place...

  1. Flushable Exo-Endodrainage: A Modified Palliative Approach to Non-Resectable Malignant Biliary Obstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Stierer, M; Wasl, H.; Rosen, H. R.; Marczell, A. P.; Spoula, H.

    1993-01-01

    The introduction of new imaging techniques has markedly improved the diagnosis of hepatobiliary disorders. Due to their anatomic situation, a substantial percentage of malignancies located near the hilus is not suitable for surgical management. We discuss an effective palliative intervention to relieve jaundice. In many instances drainage is a superior choice when biliodigestive anastomoses are not technically feasible and palliative resection carries a high complication rate. We present an i...

  2. Meaning and Practice of Palliative Care for Hospitalized Older Adults with Life Limiting Illnesses

    OpenAIRE

    Bethel Ann Powers; Norton, Sally A.; Schmitt, Madeline H.; Quill, Timothy E.; Maureen Metzger

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To illustrate distinctions and intersections of palliative care (PC) and end-of-life (EOL) services through examples from case-centered data of older adults cared for during a four-year ethnographic study of an acute care hospital palliative care consultation service. Methods. Qualitative narrative and thematic analysis. Results. Description of four practice paradigms (EOL transitions, prognostic uncertainty, discharge planning, and patient/family values and preferences) and identi...

  3. A Comparative Study on the Palliative Care in Romania and France

    OpenAIRE

    Mariana ENACHE; Rodica GRAMMA; Silvia DUMITRAS; Stefana MOISA; Catalin IOV; Beatrice IOAN

    2013-01-01

    The palliative care has old tradition, as the single support and relief of suffering in terminally ill patients form, until the release of antibiotics and the development of modern medical technologies, investigation, diagnosis and treatment. In the 1960s the palliative care was officially recognized as a medical field, focused on the psycho-emotional and spiritual aspects without neglecting, however, the physical aspects of care. Further evolution differed on a country basis.The health insur...

  4. Edmonton Regional Palliative Care Program: impact on patterns of terminal cancer care

    OpenAIRE

    Bruera, E; Neumann, C M; Gagnon, B.; Brenneis, C; Kneisler, P; Selmser, P; J Hanson

    1999-01-01

    The Edmonton Regional Palliative Care Program was established in July 1995 to measure the access of patients with terminal cancer to palliative care services, decrease the number of cancer-related deaths in acute care facilities and increase the participation of family physicians in the care of terminally ill patients. In this retrospective study the authors compared the pattern of care and site of deaths before establishment of the program (1992/93) and during its second year of operation (1...

  5. Identification and characteristics of patients with palliative care needs in Brazilian primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Marcucci, Fernando C. I.; Cabrera, Marcos A. S.; Perilla, Anamaria Baquero; Brun, Marilia Maroneze; de Barros, Eder Marcos L.; Martins, Vanessa M.; Rosenberg, John P.; Yates, Patsy

    2016-01-01

    Background The Brazilian healthcare system offers universal coverage but lacks information about how patients with PC needs are serviced by its primary care program, Estratégia Saúde da Família (ESF). Methods Cross-sectional study in community settings. Patients in ESF program were screened using a Palliative Care Screening Tool (PCST). Included patients were assessed with Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS), Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS) and Palliative Care Outcome Scale (POS). Res...

  6. Symptom burden, palliative care need and predictors of physical and psychological discomfort in two UK hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, T; Ingleton, C.; Gardiner, C.; Parker, C; Gott, M.; Noble, B

    2013-01-01

    Background: The requirement to meet the palliative needs of acute hospital populations has grown in recent years. With increasing numbers of frail older people needing hospital care as a result of both malignant and nonmalignant conditions, emphasis is being placed upon understanding the physical, psychological and social burdens experienced by patients. This study explores the extent of burden in two large UK hospitals, focusing upon those patients who meet palliative care criter...

  7. Palliative care in neonatal neurology: robust support for infants, families and clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmon, M E; Bidegain, M; Boss, R D

    2016-05-01

    Infants with neurological injury and their families face unique challenges in the neonatal intensive care unit. As specialty palliative care support becomes increasingly available, we must consider how to intentionally incorporate palliative care principles into the care of infants with neurological injury. Here, we review data regarding neonatal symptom management, prognostic uncertainty, decision making, communication and parental support for neonatal neurology patients and their families. PMID:26658120

  8. Palliative care in advanced cancer patients in a tertiary care hospital in Uttarakhand

    OpenAIRE

    Manisha Bisht; Bist, S. S.; Dhasmana, D. C.; Sunil Saini

    2008-01-01

    Aim: Advanced cancer, irrespective of the site of the cancer, is characterized by a number of associated symptoms that impair the quality of life of patients. The management of these symptoms guides palliative care. The present study aims to describe the symptoms and appropriate palliation provided in patients with advanced cancer in a tertiary care hospital in Uttarakhand. Methods: This was an observational study. A total of 100 patients with advanced cancer were included in the study. T...

  9. Acupuncture and Related Therapies for Symptom Management in Palliative Cancer Care

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, Charlotte H. Y.; Wu, Xinyin; Vincent C. H. Chung; Liu, Xin; Hui, Edwin P.; Cramer, Holger; Lauche, Romy; Wong, Samuel Y. S.; Lau, Alexander Y.L.; Sit, Regina S. T.; Eric T. C. Ziea; Ng, Bacon F. L.; Wu, Justin C. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Available systematic reviews showed uncertainty on the effectiveness of using acupuncture and related therapies for palliative cancer care. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to summarize current best evidence on acupuncture and related therapies for palliative cancer care. Five international and 3 Chinese databases were searched. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing acupuncture and related therapies with conventional or sham treatments were considered. ...

  10. The case for home based telehealth in pediatric palliative care: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Bradford Natalie; Armfield Nigel R; Young Jeanine; Smith Anthony C

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Over the last decade technology has rapidly changed the ability to provide home telehealth services. At the same time, pediatric palliative care has developed as a small, but distinct speciality. Understanding the experiences of providing home telehealth services in pediatric palliative care is therefore important. Methods A literature review was undertaken to identify and critically appraise published work relevant to the area. Studies were identified by searching the ele...

  11. Infomarkers for Transition to Goals Consistent with Palliative Care in Dying Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yingwei; Stifter, Janet; Ezenwa, Miriam O.; Lodhi, Muhammad; Khokhar, Ashfaq; Ansari, Rashid; Keenan, Gail M.; Wilkie, Diana J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Electronic health records (EHRs) may contain infomarkers that identify patients near the end of life for whom it would be appropriate to shift care goals to palliative care. Discovery and use of such infomarkers could be used to conduct effectiveness research that ultimately could help to reduce the monumental costs for dying care. Our aim was to identify changes in the plans of care that represented infomarkers, which signaled the transition of care goals from non-palliative care goals to those consistent with palliative care. Methods Using an existing electronic health record database generated during a two-year, longitudinal study of 9 diverse medical-surgical units from 4 Midwest hospitals and a known group approach, we evaluated the patient care episodes for 901 patients who died (mean age=74.5±14.6 years). We used ANOVA and Tukey’s post-hoc tests to compare patient groups. Results We identified 11 diagnoses, including Death Anxiety and Anticipatory Grieving, whose addition to the care plan, some of which also occurred with removal of non-palliative care diagnoses, represent infomarkers of transition to palliative care goals. There were four categories of patients, those who had: no infomarkers on plans (n=507); infomarkers added on the admission plan (n=194); infomarkers added on a post admission plan (minor transitions, n=109), and infomarkers added and non-palliative care diagnoses removed on a post admission plan (major transition, n=91). Age, length of stay, and pain outcomes differed significantly for these four categories of patients. Significance of Results EHRs contain pertinent infomarkers that if confirmed in future studies could be used for timely referral to palliative care for improved focus on comfort outcomes and to identify palliative care subjects from data repositories for to conduct big data research, comparative effectiveness studies, and health services research. PMID:25711431

  12. Relieving suffering at the end of life: practitioners' perspectives on palliative sedation from three European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Jane E; Janssens, Rien; Broeckaert, Bert

    2007-04-01

    This paper reports findings from visits to palliative care settings and research units in the UK, Belgium and the Netherlands. The aim was to learn about clinicians' (both nurses and doctors) and academic researchers' understandings and experiences of palliative sedation for managing suffering at the end of life, and their views regarding its clinical, ethical and social implications. The project was linked to two larger studies of technologies used in palliative care. Eleven doctors, 14 nurses and 10 researchers took part in informal interviews. Relevant reports and papers from the academic, clinical and popular press were also collected from the three countries. The study took place in a context in which attention has been drawn towards palliative sedation by the legalisation of euthanasia in the Netherlands and Belgium, and by the re-examination of the legal position on assisted dying in the UK. In this context, palliative sedation has been posited by some as an alternative path of action. We report respondents' views under four headings: understanding and responding to suffering; the relationship between palliative sedation and euthanasia; palliative sedation and artificial hydration; and risks and uncertainties in the clinician-patient/family relationship. We conclude that the three countries can learn from one another about the difficult issues involved in giving compassionate care to those who are suffering immediately before death. Future research should be directed at enabling dialogue between countries: this has already been shown to open the door to the development of improved palliative care and to enhance respect for the different values and histories in each. PMID:17250941

  13. Use of dependency and prioritization tools by clinical nurse specialists in palliative care: an exploratory study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bracken, Mairéad

    2011-12-01

    The principal aim was to assess the utility of three needs assessment\\/dependency tools for use in community-based palliative care services. Specific objectives were to assess a sample of patients receiving specialist palliative care community nursing using these tools, to assess the predictive ability of each tool, and to explore the utility of prioritizing and measuring patient dependency from a clinical nurse specialist (CNS) perspective.

  14. Validation of the Prognosis in Palliative Care Study Predictor Models in Terminal Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Eun-Shin; Lee, Jung-Kwon; Kim, Mi-Hyun; Noh, Hye-Mi; Jin, Yeong-Hyeon

    2014-01-01

    Background Prognosis in Palliative Care Study (PiPS) predictor models were developed in 2011 to estimate the survival of terminal cancer patients in the United Kingdom. The aim of this study was to validate the PiPS model for terminal cancer patients in Korea, and evaluate its value in clinical practice. Methods This study included 202 advanced cancer patients who were admitted to the cancer hospital's palliative care ward from November 2011 to February 2013. On admission, physicians recorded...

  15. A comparison of two methods of palliation of large bowel obstruction due to irremovable colon cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Richard; Marsh, Ralph; Corson, John; Seymour, Keith

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Untreated malignant large bowel obstruction is rapidly fatal. Short-term palliation of symptoms can be achieved by formation of a stoma in those patients for whom resection surgery is inappropriate. In the final months of life, a stoma represents a significant burden for both patients and carers. Palliative endoluminal stenting may therefore be an attractive alternative option for this poor prognostic group. PATIENTS: Thirty-six patients were studied of whom 18 had obstructing l...

  16. Measuring the diffusion of palliative care in long-term care facilities – a death census

    OpenAIRE

    Santos-Eggimann Brigitte; Paroz Sophie

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The dissemination of palliative care for patients presenting complex chronic diseases at various stages has become an important matter of public health. A death census in Swiss long-term care facilities (LTC) was set up with the aim of monitoring the frequency of selected indicators of palliative care. Methods The survey covered 150 LTC facilities (105 nursing homes and 45 home health services), each of which was asked to complete a questionnaire for every non-accidental d...

  17. Palliative care professionals’ willingness to perform euthanasia or physician assisted suicide

    OpenAIRE

    Zenz, Julia; Tryba, Michael; Zenz, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Euthanasia and physician assisted suicide (PAS) are highly debated upon particularly in the light of medical advancement and an aging society. Little is known about the professionals’ willingness to perform these practices particularly among those engaged in the field of palliative care and pain management. Thus a study was performed among those professionals. Methods An anonymous questionnaire was handed out to all participants of a palliative care congress and a pain symposium in...

  18. Palliative and end of life care communication as emerging priorities in postgraduate medical education

    OpenAIRE

    des Ordons, Amanda Roze; Ajjawi, Rola; MacDonald, John; Sarti, Aimee; Lockyer, Jocelyn; Hartwick, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Reliance on surveys and qualitative studies of trainees to guide postgraduate education about palliative and end of life (EOL) communication may lead to gaps in the curriculum. We aimed to develop a deeper understanding of internal medicine trainees’ educational needs for a palliative and EOL communication curriculum and how these needs could be met. Methods Mixed methods, including a survey and focus groups with trainees, and interviews with clinical faculty and medical educators,...

  19. African Cultural Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Holbrook, Jarita C; Medupe, R. Thebe; Current Archaeoastronomy and Ethnoastronomy research in Africa

    2008-01-01

    Astronomy is the science of studying the sky using telescopes and light collectors such as photographic plates or CCD detectors. However, people have always studied the sky and continue to study the sky without the aid of instruments this is the realm of cultural astronomy. This is the first scholarly collection of articles focused on the cultural astronomy of Africans. It weaves together astronomy, anthropology, and Africa. The volume includes African myths and legends about the sky, alignments to celestial bodies found at archaeological sites and at places of worship, rock art with celestial imagery, and scientific thinking revealed in local astronomy traditions including ethnomathematics and the creation of calendars. Authors include astronomers Kim Malville, Johnson Urama, and Thebe Medupe; archaeologist Felix Chami, and geographer Michael Bonine, and many new authors. As an emerging subfield of cultural astronomy, African cultural astronomy researchers are focused on training students specifically for do...

  20. The comparative palliative care needs of those with heart failure and cancer patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Leary, Norma

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Patients with heart failure seem particularly suited to palliative care having needs that fall within the prototypical palliative care domains. Despite this there is still much debate as to who should respond to these needs and when. RECENT FINDINGS: Since the early 1990s many studies have been published outlining the unmet needs of patients with heart failure. However, there have been limitations to these studies and they have not guided professionals as to how to respond. More recently comparative studies using cancer as the reference have explored similarities and highlighted differences in need between heart failure and cancer patients. These studies are useful for informing future service development. SUMMARY: Patients with heart failure have variable needs and variable disease trajectories. A targeted response to these needs is required. Palliative triggers or transitions should be recognized by professionals caring for patients with heart failure. It is unlikely that either specialist palliative care or medical specialists working in isolation will be sufficiently experienced to respond to these needs. Research is required to determine the effectiveness of different collaborative approaches; heart failure specialist care aligned with palliative care consultancy or heart failure-oriented palliative care services.

  1. The role of palliative care in population management and accountable care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Grant; Bernacki, Rachelle; Block, Susan D

    2015-06-01

    By 2021, health care spending is projected to grow to 19.6% of the GDP, likely crowding out spending in other areas. The 2010 Affordable Care Act (ACA) attempts to curb health care spending by incentivizing high-value care through the creation of Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs), which assume financial risk for patient outcomes. With this financial risk, health systems creating ACOs will be motivated to pursue innovative care models that maximize the value of care. Palliative care, as an emerging field with a growing evidence base, is positioned to improve value in ACOs by increasing high-quality care and decreasing costs for the sickest patients. ACO leaders may find palliative care input valuable in optimizing high-quality patient-centered care in the accountable care environment; however, palliative care clinicians will need to adopt new models that extrapolate their direct patient care skills to population management strategies. We propose that palliative care specialists take on responsibilities for working with ACO leaders to broaden their mission for systemwide palliative care for appropriate patients by prospectively identifying patients with a high risk of death, high symptom burden, and/or significant psychosocial dysfunction, and developing targeted, "triggered" interventions to enhance patient-centered, goal-consistent, coordinated care. Developing these new population management competencies is a critical role for palliative care teams in the ACO environment. PMID:25723619

  2. The basis, ethics and provision of palliative care for dementia: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahin-Babaei, Fariba; Hilal, Jamal; Hughes, Julian C

    2016-01-01

    Interest in palliative care for people with dementia has been around for over two decades. There are clinical and ethical challenges and practical problems around the implementation of good quality palliative care in dementia. This narrative review of the literature focuses on the rationale or basis for services, some of the ethical issues that arise (particularly to do with artificial nutrition and hydration) and on the provision and implementation of services. We focus on the most recent literature. The rationale for palliative care for people with dementia is based on research and on an identified need for better clinical care. But the research largely demonstrates a paucity of good quality evidence, albeit particular interventions (and non-interventions) can be justified in certain circumstances. Numerous specific clinical challenges in end-of-life care for people with dementia are ethical in nature. We focus on literature around artificial nutrition and hydration and conclude that good communication, attention to the evidence and keeping the well-being of the person with dementia firmly in mind will guide ethical decision-making. Numerous challenges surround the provision of palliative care for people with dementia. Palliative care in dementia has been given definition, but can still be contested. Different professionals provide services in different locations. More research and education are required. No single service can provide palliative care for people with dementia. PMID:26421475

  3. [Personal and dignified death. The role of pastoral care in palliative medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breit-Keßler, Susanne

    2016-03-01

    Palliative pastoral care is not about "adding days to life, but about "adding life to days". It does not matter whether the dying process is short or long. What matters is to ensure the best possible quality of life until the very end through mindful companionship. Palliative pastoral care is a path towards a personal dying, dying where the person is taken seriously as an individual until the last moment. Palliative care includes medical assistance, careful care, psychosocial support, and counselling that addresses the spiritual needs of the dying. This palliative care includes inpatient and outpatient hospice work and accompanies not only the patients but also their relatives. It must become the standard procedure in end of life care. The palliative pastoral care also take the needs of medical staff into account: Time-consuming care for the dying exceeds the staff's time budget. A sudden death can be perceived as traumatic. In this case palliative pastoral care must perform the tasks of crisis management, crisis intervention and de-escalation. The debriefing of involved staff can prevent the development of burn-out syndrome. In the view of holistic healthcare, health insurance funds should co-finance pastoral care. Society and humanity benefit from addressing the needs of the dying. In an economically dominated environment it is a social responsibility to make dying humane. PMID:26983110

  4. [The present and future of community/home-based palliative care in Taiwan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueng, Ruey-Shiuan; Hsu, Su-Hsuan; Shih, Chih-Yuan; Huang, Sheng-Jean

    2015-04-01

    In Taiwan, the Department of Health (DOH) has implemented regulations and policies related to hospice and palliative care since 1995. Taiwan is the first country in Asia to have a Natural Death Act, promulgated in 2000. Although recognition of the need for palliative care in non-cancer terminally ill patients is increasing, at present, the needs of these patients are often not met. Moreover, while a majority of the population prefers to die at home, the percentage of patients who die in the home setting remains small. The palliative care system should be adjusted to improve the accessibility and continuity of care based on the needs of patients. Therefore, the Jin-Shan Branch of the National Taiwan University Hospital has run a pilot community palliative care service model since 2012. National Health Insurance reimbursement was introduced in 2014 for community-based palliative care services. Establishing a formal system of community-based palliative care should be encouraged in order to improve the quality of care at the end of life and to allow more patients to receive end-of-life care and die in their own communities. This system will require that skilled nurses provide discharge planning, symptoms control, end-of-life communications, social-resources integration, and social-support networks in order to achieve a high quality of end-of-life care. PMID:25854944

  5. Extending emotion and decision-making beyond the laboratory: The promise of palliative care contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Rebecca A; Padgett, Lynne; Ellis, Erin M

    2016-08-01

    Although laboratory-based research on emotion and decision-making holds the distinct advantage of rigorous experimental control conditions that allow causal inferences, the question of how findings in a laboratory generalize to real-world settings remains. Identifying ecologically valid, real-world opportunities to extend laboratory findings is a valuable means of advancing this field. Palliative care-or care intended to provide relief from serious illness and aging-related complications during treatment or at the end of life-provides a particularly rich opportunity for such work. Here, we present an overview of palliative care, summarize existing research on emotion and palliative care decision-making, highlight challenges associated with conducting such research, outline examples of collaborative projects leveraging palliative care as a context for generating fundamental knowledge about emotion and decision-making, and describe the resources and collaborations necessary to conduct this type of research. In sum, palliative care holds unique promise as an emotionally laden context in which to answer fundamental questions about emotion and decision-making that extends our theoretical understanding of the role of emotion in high-stakes decision-making while simultaneously generating knowledge that can improve palliative care implementation. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27018611

  6. African names for American plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andel, van T.R.

    2015-01-01

    African slaves brought plant knowledge to the New World, sometimes applying it to related plants they found there and sometimes bringing Old World plants with them. By tracing the linguistic parallels between names for plants in African languages and in communities descended from African slaves, pie

  7. The Struggles over African Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maseko, Pam; Vale, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In this interview, African Language expert Pam Maseko speaks of her own background and her first encounter with culture outside of her mother tongue, isiXhosa. A statistical breakdown of South African languages is provided as background. She discusses Western (originally missionary) codification of African languages and suggests that this approach…

  8. African agricultural trade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hans Grinsted; Sandrey, Ron

    2015-01-01

    This article starts with a profile of African agricultural trade. Using the pre-release version 9.2 of the GTAP database, we then show that the results for tariff elimination on intra-African trade are promising, but these tariff barriers are not as significant as the various trade-related barriers...... elimination, non-tariff barrier reductions and time in transit cost reductions are likely to be cumulative and would generate very large gains to Africa. The policy implications are clear: while cooperation will enhance the gains, much of the benefits will result from unilateral actions and regional...

  9. A qualitative evaluation of the impact of a palliative care course on preregistration nursing students’ practice in Cameroon

    OpenAIRE

    Bassah, Nahyeni; Cox, Karen; Seymour, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Background Current evidence suggests that palliative care education can improve preregistration nursing students’ competencies in palliative care. However, it is not known whether these competencies are translated into students’ practice in the care of patients who are approaching the end of life. This paper seeks to contribute to the palliative care evidence base by examining how nursing students in receipt of education report transfer of learning to practice, and what the barriers and facil...

  10. Threading the cloak: palliative care education for care providers of adolescents and young adults with cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiener L

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lori Wiener,1,*,# Meaghann Shaw Weaver,2,3,*,# Cynthia J Bell,4,# Ursula M Sansom-Daly,5–7 1Pediatric Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA; 2Department of Oncology, Children’s National Health System, Washington, DC, USA; 3Department of Oncology, St Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, USA; 4College of Nursing, Wayne State University and Hospice of Michigan Institute, Detroit, MI, USA; 5Behavioural Sciences Unit, Kids Cancer Centre, Sydney Children’s Hospital, Randwick, NSW, Australia; 6Discipline of Paediatrics, School of Women’s and Children’s Health, UNSW Medicine, The University of New South Wales, Kensington, NSW, Australia; 7Sydney Youth Cancer Service, Sydney Children’s/Prince of Wales Hospitals, Randwick, NSW, Australia *These authors have contributed equally to this work #On behalf of the Pediatric Palliative Care Special Interest Group at Children’s National Health System Abstract: Medical providers are trained to investigate, diagnose, and treat cancer. Their primary goal is to maximize the chances of curing the patient, with less training provided on palliative care concepts and the unique developmental needs inherent in this population. Early, systematic integration of palliative care into standard oncology practice represents a valuable, imperative approach to improving the overall cancer experience for adolescents and young adults (AYAs. The importance of competent, confident, and compassionate providers for AYAs warrants the development of effective educational strategies for teaching AYA palliative care. Just as palliative care should be integrated early in the disease trajectory of AYA patients, palliative care training should be integrated early in professional development of trainees. As the AYA age spectrum represents sequential transitions through developmental stages, trainees experience changes in their learning needs during their progression through sequential

  11. Paediatric palliative home care by general paediatricians: a multimethod study on perceived barriers and incentives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischbach Thomas

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-specialist palliative care, as it is delivered by general practitioners, is a basic component of a comprehensive palliative care infrastructure for adult patients with progressive and far advanced disease. Currently palliative care for children and adolescents is recognized as a distinct entity of care, requiring networks of service providers across different settings, including paediatricians working in general practice. In Germany, the medical home care for children and adolescents is to a large extent delivered by general paediatricians working in their own practice. However, these are rarely confronted with children suffering from life-limiting diseases. The aim of this study was therefore to examine potential barriers, incentives, and the professional self-image of general paediatricians with regard to paediatric palliative care. Methods Based on qualitative expert interviews, a questionnaire was designed and a survey among general paediatricians in their own practice (n = 293 was undertaken. The survey has been developed and performed in close cooperation with the regional professional association of paediatricians. Results The results showed a high disposition on part of the paediatricians to engage in palliative care, and the majority of respondents regarded palliative care as part of their profile. Main barriers for the implementation were time restrictions (40.7% and financial burden (31.6%, sole responsibility without team support (31.1%, as well as formal requirements such as forms and prescriptions (26.6%. Major facilitations were support by local specialist services such as home care nursing service (83.0%, access to a specialist paediatric palliative care consultation team (82.4%, as well as an option of exchange with colleagues (60.1%. Conclusions Altogether, the high commitment to this survey reflects the relevance of the issue for paediatricians working in general practice. Education in basic palliative

  12. Deepening African Ties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Chinese President Hu Jintao has just embarked on his state visits to eight African countries that will take him to both the northern and southern tips of the continent. This is his first trip abroad this year, and also his third visit to Africa

  13. East African institutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordby, Johannes Riber; Jacobsen, Katja

    For the past decade security in East Africa has gained focus internationally. However there is a growing ambition among African states to handle such issues by themselves, sometimes through regional institutions. This has been supported by many Western states but potential risks are often forgotten....

  14. African Women Writing Resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jennifer Browdy de Hernandez; Pauline Dongala; Omotayo; Jolaosho; Anne Serafin

    2011-01-01

    AFRICAN Women Writing Resistance is the first transnational anthology to focus on women's strategies of resistance to the challenges they face in Africa today.The anthology brings together personal narratives,testimony,interviews,short stories,poetry,performance scripts,folktales and lyrics.

  15. African Women Writing Resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jennifer; Browdy; de; Hernandez; Pauline; Dongala; Omotayo; Jolaosho; Anne; Serafin

    2011-01-01

    An Anthology of Contemporary Voices AFRICAN Women Writing Resistance is the first transnational anthology to focus on women’s strategies of resistance to the challenges they face in Africa today.The anthology brings together personal narratives,testimony,interviews, short stories,po-

  16. West African Antislavery Movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hahonou, Eric Komlavi; Pelckmans, Lotte

    2011-01-01

    In the context of liberalization of West African political regimes, the upsurge of audacious political entrepreneurs who want to end chattel slavery in their nation-state, resulted in the legal criminalisation of slavery in both Mauritania (2007) and Niger (2003) and in a proposal to revise the...... cultures (or ‘mentalities’) go hand in hand....

  17. Immunizations and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Program Grants Other Grants Planning and Evaluation Grantee Best Practices Black/African American Asthma Cancer Chronic Liver Disease ... 13 to 17 years who ever received the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination, 2014 - Males # doses ... 240-453-2882 Office of Minority Health Resource Center Toll Free: 1-800-444-6472 / Fax: ...

  18. The African Union

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, Thomas; Mandrup, Bjørn

    2009-01-01

    . Moreover, the ‘African Security Architecture’, of which it is the central component, also includes sub-regional organisations to which responsibility is to be devolved for dealing with armed confl ict and other matters. These so-called Regional Economic Communities (RECs) are, likewise, constantly changing...

  19. African tick bite fever

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jakob Aaquist; Thybo, Søren

    2011-01-01

    The incident of spotted fever imported to Denmark is unknown. We present a classic case of African Tick Bite Fever (ATBF) to highlight a disease, which frequently infects wildlife enthusiasts and hunters on vacation in South Africa. ATBF has a good prognosis and is easily treated with doxycyclin...

  20. Impact of comorbidity on survival after palliative radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieder, Carsten [Nordland Hospital, Department of Oncology and Palliative Medicine, Bodoe (Norway); University of Tromsoe, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Tromsoe (Norway); Engljaehringer, Kirsten [Nordland Hospital, Department of Oncology and Palliative Medicine, Bodoe (Norway); Angelo, Kent [University of Tromsoe, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Tromsoe (Norway)

    2014-12-15

    To evaluate prognostic factors for survival after palliative radiotherapy (PRT) with consideration of different comorbidities and the Charlson comorbidity index (CCI). Between 2007 and 2012, 525 consecutive patients were treated with PRT and included in this retrospective study. Most patients received PRT for bone metastases, for brain metastases, or in order to improve thoracic symptoms from lung cancer. Median age was 69 years. Uni- and multivariate analyses were performed. We recommend assessment of comorbidity when prescribing PRT and selecting the optimal fractionation regimen, because most patients with severe comorbidities had limited survival. One of the possible explanations could be that only a minority of these patients are fit for systemic therapy, which plays an important role in the overall treatment concept. (orig.) [German] Auswertung der prognostischen Faktoren nach palliativer Strahlentherapie (PST) unter besonderer Beruecksichtigung von Begleiterkrankungen und des Charlson Komorbiditaetsindex (CCI). Zwischen 2007 und 2012 wurden 525 konsekutive Patienten mit PST behandelt und in diese retrospektive Studie eingeschlossen. Die haeufigsten PST Indikationen waren Skelett- und Hirnmetastasen bzw. symptomatische Lungentumoren. Das mediane Alter betrug 69 Jahre. Die Ueberlebensdaten wurden in uni- und multivariaten Modellen analysiert. Nur 7 % der Patienten hatten keinerlei Begleiterkrankungen. Bei 49 % lag ein CCI von 1-2 vor, bei 36 % von 3-4 und bei 9 % von mehr als 4. Juengere Patienten, Frauen und Nichtraucher hatten signifikant weniger Begleiterkrankungen. Patienten ohne Begleiterkrankungen waren in signifikant besserem Allgemeinzustand (AZ) und erhielten oefter eine zusaetzliche palliative systemische Therapie. Sowohl Patienten mit niedrigem CCI als auch solche mit nur einer Krebserkrankung in der Anamnese ueberlebten signifikant laenger. In der multivariaten Analyse waren auch noch der AZ und die Anzahl der mit Metastasen befallenen Organe mit

  1. Timely identification of palliative patients and anticipatory care planning by GPs: practical application of tools and a training programme

    OpenAIRE

    Thoonsen, Bregje; Groot, Marieke; Verhagen, Stans; van Weel, Chris; Vissers, Kris; Engels, Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Background Palliative care is mainly restricted to terminal care. General practitioners (GPs) are not trained to early identify palliative patients with cancer, COPD or heart failure. With the help of the RADboud indicators for PAlliative Care needs (RADPAC), we trained GPs to identify patients’ needs and to make a proactive care plan. They were also able to join two role-plays where they discussed the patient’s future, and consulted a palliative care consultant to fine-tune the care plan. We...

  2. Barriers and facilitators to palliative care of patients with chronic heart failure in Germany: a study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Köberich

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Despite its high prevalence, similar symptoms and symptom burden, people suffering from chronic heart failure receive less palliative care than patients with malignant diseases. Internationally, numerous barriers to palliative care of patients with chronic heart failure are known, however, there are no credible data regarding barriers and facilitators to palliative care of people suffering from chronic heart failure available for Germany. Design and Methods. Tripartite study. First part of this study evaluates health care providers’ (physicians and nurses perceived barriers and facilitators to palliative care of patients with chronic heart failure using a qualitative approach. At least 18 persons will be interviewed. In the second part, based on the results of part one, a questionnaire about barriers and facilitators to palliative care of patients with chronic heart failure will be designed and applied to at least 150 physicians and nurses. In the last part a classic Delphi method will be used to develop specific measures to improve the palliative care for chronic heart failure patients. Expected Impact for Public Health. The results of this study will help to understand why patients with heart failure are seldom referred to palliative care and will provide solutions to overcome these barriers. Developed solutions will be the first step to improve palliative care in patients with heart failure in Germany. In addition, the results will help health care providers in other countries to take action to improve palliative care situations for heart failure patients.

  3. Using Technology to Create a More Humanistic Approach to Integrating Palliative Care into the Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Christopher E; Curtis, J Randall

    2016-02-01

    A decade ago, the major obstacles to integration of palliative care into the intensive care unit (ICU) were the limited number of providers trained in palliative care, an immature evidence base, and a lack of appreciation for the importance of palliative care in the ICU. In 2016, the palliative care workforce has expanded markedly and there is growing appreciation of the benefits of palliative care, whether provided by a generalist (intensivist, nurse, social worker) or palliative care specialist. However, there is evidence that the quality of ICU-based palliative care is often suboptimal. A major barrier to more broadly addressing this quality problem is the lack of scalable ICU-based palliative care models that use technology to deliver efficient, collaborative palliative care in the ICU setting to the right patient at the right time. To address these challenges, we first review strengths and limitations of current care models as the basis for our novel conceptual framework that uses the electronic health record as a platform on which external innovations can be built, including: (1) screening for patients at risk for poor outcomes, (2) integrating patient- and family-reported needs, (3) personalizing care, and (4) directing generalist versus specialist triage algorithms. In the approaches considered, we describe current challenges and propose specific solutions that use technology to improve the quality of the human interaction in a stressful, complex environment. PMID:26599829

  4. Female genital mutilation in African and African American women's literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darja Marinšek

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The article builds on the existing dispute between African and African American women writers on the competence of writing about female genital mutilation (FGM, and tries to determine the existence and nature of the differences between the writings of these two groups. The author uses comparative analysis of two popular African and African American novels, comparing their ways of describing FGM, its causes and consequences, the level ob objectivity and the style of the narrations.This is followed by a discussion on the reasons for such differences, incorporating a larger circle of both African and African American women authors, at the same time analysing the deviance within the two groups. While the differences between African American writers are not that great, as they mostly fail to present the issue from different points of view, which is often the result of their lack of direct knowledge of the topic, African authors' writing is in itself discovered to be ambivalent and not at all invariable. The reasons for such ambivalence are then discussed in greater context, focusing on the effect of the authors' personal contact with circumcision as well as their knowledge and acceptance of Western values. The author concludes by establishing the African ambivalent attitude towards FGM, which includes different aspects of the issue, as the most significant difference between their and African American writers' description of this practice.

  5. Quality of life in patients with esophageal stenting for the palliation of malignant dysphagia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giorgio Diamantis; Marco Scarpa; Paolo Bocus; Stefano Realdon; Carlo Castoro; Ermanno Ancona; Giorgio Battaglia

    2011-01-01

    Incidence of esophageal cancer (EC) is rising more rapidly in the Western world than that of any other cancer.Despite advances in therapy, more than 50% of patients have incurable disease at the time of presentation. This precludes curative treatment and makes palliative treatment a more realistic option for most of these patients.Dysphagia is the predominant symptom in more than 70% of patients with EC and although several management options have been developed in recent years to palliate this symptom, the optimum management is not established. Self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) are a well-established palliation modality for dysphagia in such patients. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is becoming a major issue in the evaluation of any therapeutic or palliative intervention. To date, only a few published studies can be found on Medline examining HRQoL in patients with advanced EC treated with SEMS implantation.The aim of this study was to review the impact on HRQoL of SEMS implantation as palliative treatment in patients with EC. All Medline articles regarding HRQoL in patients with advanced EC, particularly those related to SEMS, were reviewed. In most studies, relief of dysphagia was the only aspect of HRQoL being measured and SEMS implantation was compared with other palliative treatments such as brachytherapy and laser therapy.SEMS insertion provides a swift palliation of dysphagia compared to brachytherapy and no evidence was found to suggest that stent implantation is different to laser treatment in terms of improving dysphagia, recurrent dysphagia and better HRQoL, although SEMS insertion has a better technical success rate and also reduces the number of repeat interventions.

  6. Palliative radiotherapy in patients with a symptomatic pelvic mass of metastatic colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Ho Kyung

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the palliative role of radiotherapy (RT and define the effectiveness of chemotherapy combined with palliative RT (CCRT in patients with a symptomatic pelvic mass of metastatic colorectal cancer. Methods From August 1995 to December 2007, 80 patients with a symptomatic pelvic mass of metastatic colorectal cancer were treated with palliative RT at Samsung Medical Center. Initial presenting symptoms were pain (68 cases, bleeding (18 cases, and obstruction (nine cases. The pelvic mass originated from rectal cancer in 58 patients (73% and from colon cancer in 22 patients (27%. Initially 72 patients (90% were treated with surgery, including 64 complete local excisions; 77% in colon cancer and 81% in rectal cancer. The total RT dose ranged 8-60 Gy (median: 36 Gy with 1.8-8 Gy per fraction. When the α/β for the tumor was assumed to be 10 Gy for the biologically equivalent dose (BED, the median RT dose was 46.8 Gy10 (14.4-78. Twenty one patients (26% were treated with CCRT. Symptom palliation was assessed one month after the completion of RT. Results Symptom palliation was achieved in 80% of the cases. During the median follow-up period of five months (1-44 months, 45% of the cases experienced reappearance of symptoms; the median symptom control duration was five months. Median survival after RT was six months. On univariate analysis, the only significant prognostic factor for symptom control duration was BED ≥40 Gy10 (p Conclusions RT was an effective palliation method in patients with a symptomatic pelvic mass of metastatic colorectal cancer. For improvement of symptom control rate and duration, a BED ≥ 40 Gy10 is recommended when possible. Considering the low morbidity and improved symptom palliation, CCRT might be considered in patients with good performance status.

  7. Palliative radiotherapy in patients with a symptomatic pelvic mass of metastatic colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the palliative role of radiotherapy (RT) and define the effectiveness of chemotherapy combined with palliative RT (CCRT) in patients with a symptomatic pelvic mass of metastatic colorectal cancer. From August 1995 to December 2007, 80 patients with a symptomatic pelvic mass of metastatic colorectal cancer were treated with palliative RT at Samsung Medical Center. Initial presenting symptoms were pain (68 cases), bleeding (18 cases), and obstruction (nine cases). The pelvic mass originated from rectal cancer in 58 patients (73%) and from colon cancer in 22 patients (27%). Initially 72 patients (90%) were treated with surgery, including 64 complete local excisions; 77% in colon cancer and 81% in rectal cancer. The total RT dose ranged 8-60 Gy (median: 36 Gy) with 1.8-8 Gy per fraction. When the α/β for the tumor was assumed to be 10 Gy for the biologically equivalent dose (BED), the median RT dose was 46.8 Gy10 (14.4-78). Twenty one patients (26%) were treated with CCRT. Symptom palliation was assessed one month after the completion of RT. Symptom palliation was achieved in 80% of the cases. During the median follow-up period of five months (1-44 months), 45% of the cases experienced reappearance of symptoms; the median symptom control duration was five months. Median survival after RT was six months. On univariate analysis, the only significant prognostic factor for symptom control duration was BED ≥40 Gy10 (p < 0.05), and CCRT was a marginally significant factor (p = 0.0644). On multivariate analysis, BED and CCRT were significant prognostic factors for symptom control duration (p < 0.05). RT was an effective palliation method in patients with a symptomatic pelvic mass of metastatic colorectal cancer. For improvement of symptom control rate and duration, a BED ≥ 40 Gy10 is recommended when possible. Considering the low morbidity and improved symptom palliation, CCRT might be considered in patients with good performance status

  8. Measuring the diffusion of palliative care in long-term care facilities – a death census

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos-Eggimann Brigitte

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dissemination of palliative care for patients presenting complex chronic diseases at various stages has become an important matter of public health. A death census in Swiss long-term care facilities (LTC was set up with the aim of monitoring the frequency of selected indicators of palliative care. Methods The survey covered 150 LTC facilities (105 nursing homes and 45 home health services, each of which was asked to complete a questionnaire for every non-accidental death over a period of six months. The frequency of 4 selected indicators of palliative care (resort to a specialized palliative care service, the administration of opiates, use of any pain measurement scale or other symptom measurement scale was monitored in respect of the stages of care and analysed based on gender, age, medical condition and place of residence. Results Overall, 1200 deaths were reported, 29.1% of which were related to cancer. The frequencies of each indicator varied according to the type of LTC, mostly regarding the administration of opiate. It appeared that the access to palliative care remained associated with cancer, terminal care and partly with age, whereas gender and the presence of mental disorders had no effect on the indicators. In addition, the use of drugs was much more frequent than the other indicators. Conclusion The profile of patients with access to palliative care must become more diversified. Among other recommendations, equal access to opiates in nursing homes and in home health services, palliative care at an earlier stage and the systematic use of symptom management scales when resorting to opiates have to become of prime concern.

  9. End-of-life palliative chemotherapy: Where do we stand?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: This study evaluates the use of palliative chemotherapy (PCT) and possible associated factors at the end of life. Method: The study includes all advanced non hematological cancer patients who died in the King Abdullah Medical City during the period from January 2011 to April 2014. Demographic and disease features were registered. Results: 420 patients were included in the study, median age 62 years (range 17-108); 52% female and 48% male. 87.4% of patients were Saudis and 12.6% non Saudis. 124 (29.5%) patients received PCT at the last month before death (LM-PCT): 21.8%, 22.6% and 55.6% within one, two and four weeks of death, respectively. Place of death (critical care vs. regular ward) and mode of admission (ER vs. OPD vs. Transferred) had a strong association with LM-PCT (p< 0.0001, / = 0.35) and (p< 0.0001, V = 0.43), respectively. There was a gradual increase in the number of patients receiving LM-PCT from January 2011 to April 2014; 15.3%, 28.2%, 37.1% and 19.4%, respectively. Conclusion: In our center; at the end of life, there is a gradual increase in the number of patients receiving chemotherapy which significantly increased cancer patients’ odds without clear predictive factors associated with its use, which calls into question the benefits of PCT in terminally ill cancer patients.

  10. Applying sociodramatic methods in teaching transition to palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baile, Walter F; Walters, Rebecca

    2013-03-01

    We introduce the technique of sociodrama, describe its key components, and illustrate how this simulation method was applied in a workshop format to address the challenge of discussing transition to palliative care. We describe how warm-up exercises prepared 15 learners who provide direct clinical care to patients with cancer for a dramatic portrayal of this dilemma. We then show how small-group brainstorming led to the creation of a challenging scenario wherein highly optimistic family members of a 20-year-old young man with terminal acute lymphocytic leukemia responded to information about the lack of further anticancer treatment with anger and blame toward the staff. We illustrate how the facilitators, using sociodramatic techniques of doubling and role reversal, helped learners to understand and articulate the hidden feelings of fear and loss behind the family's emotional reactions. By modeling effective communication skills, the facilitators demonstrated how key communication skills, such as empathic responses to anger and blame and using "wish" statements, could transform the conversation from one of conflict to one of problem solving with the family. We also describe how we set up practice dyads to give the learners an opportunity to try out new skills with each other. An evaluation of the workshop and similar workshops we conducted is presented. PMID:22889858

  11. Developing leadership in rural interprofessional palliative care teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Pippa; Weaver, Lynda; Handfield-Jones, Richard; Bouvette, Maryse

    2008-01-01

    This project brought together community-based practitioners and academics to develop and deliver interventions designed to enhance the leadership abilities of the designated leaders of seven rural/small town-based palliative care teams. Members of these community-based teams have already gained recognition for their teams' leadership and service delivery in their communities. All of the teams had worked closely with most members of the academic team prior to this project. The team members participated in a needs assessment exercise developed by the Sisters of Charity of Ottawa Health Service and University of Ottawa academic team. Results of the needs assessment identified leadership qualities that had contributed to their success, as well as their needs to further enhance their individual leadership qualities. The team effort, however, was the most important factor contributing to the success of their work. The interventions developed to address the identified needs had to be adapted creatively through the collaborative efforts of both the community and academic teams. The educational interventions facilitated the integration of learning at the individual and community level into the busy work schedules of primary health care providers. PMID:19005956

  12. The use of palliative radiotherapy for bone metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The value of palliative radiotherapy (PRT) for bone metastases is well established, but little is known about its use in the general population. Purpose: To describe the use of PRT for bone metastases in Ontario. Materials and methods: This was a retrospective cohort study. Treatment records from all Ontario RT departments were linked to a population-based cancer registry to describe the use of PRT. Results: 12.2% of the 434,241 patients, who died of cancer in Ontario between 1984 and 2004, received at least one course of PRT for bone metastases in the last 2 years of life. The rate of use of PRT varied across the province (inter-county range, 8.2-18.6%). Older patients and residents of poorer areas were less likely to receive PRT (p < 0.0001). Patients diagnosed with cancer in a hospital with a radiotherapy facility and those who lived closer to a radiotherapy centre were more likely to receive PRT (p < 0.0001). Over the study period, the use of PRT decreased in breast cancer and myeloma, but increased in prostate cancer (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: Access to PRT appears to be inequitable. More effort is required to make this useful treatment available to all those who would benefit from it.

  13. Structuring a palliative care service in Brazil: experience report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Batista Santos Garcia

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: in Brazil, palliative care (PC is not properly structured and that reality transforms this theme in a public health problem; therefore, initiatives become relevant in this context. This paper aims to share the experience that occurred in an oncology referral hospital in the State of Maranhão and present initiatives that helped in the development of PC Service. EXPERIENCE REPORT: the hospital had an outpatient Pain and PC Service, but without specialized beds. The terminally ill patients stayed in common wards, which caused much unrest. A sensitization process was initiated in the hospital through initiatives, such as a photo contest called Flashes of Life and a ward called Room of Dreams, designed in partnership with the architecture course at the Universidade Estadual do Maranhão. The process culminated in the granting of wards to the PC and in the commitment of the Foundation, sponsor of the hospital, to run the project. CONCLUSION: this experience was a reproducible local initiative for the establishment of PC in a cancer hospital. Local initiatives are valuable in Brazil because they favor a significant number of patients and show its effectiveness in practice to governments and society. To structure a PC service, it is essential to establish priorities that include the assignment of drugs for management of symptoms, humanization, multidisciplinarity, sensitization and education of professionals.

  14. An evaluation of aromatherapy massage in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, S; Aldridge, J; Salmon, I; Cain, E; Wilson, B

    1999-09-01

    The use of complementary therapies, such as massage and aromatherapy massage, is rising in popularity among patients and healthcare professionals. They are increasingly being used to improve the quality of life of patients, but there is little evidence of their efficacy. This study assessed the effects of massage and aromatherapy massage on cancer patients in a palliative care setting. We studied 103 patients, who were randomly allocated to receive massage using a carrier oil (massage) or massage using a carrier oil plus the Roman chamomile essential oil (aromatherapy massage). Outcome measurements included the Rotterdam Symptom Checklist (RSCL), the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and a semi-structured questionnaire, administered 2 weeks postmassage, to explore patients' perceptions of massage. There was a statistically significant reduction in anxiety after each massage on the STAI (P essential oils appears to reduce levels of anxiety. The addition of an essential oil seems to enhance the effect of massage and to improve physical and psychological symptoms, as well as overall quality of life. PMID:10659113

  15. The Role of Play in Children’s Palliative Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue Boucher

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Play is the universal language of childhood and the time and opportunity to play is every child’s right. The role of play as a vehicle for communication, a tool for distraction and its value in the holistic development of a normal child is without dispute. The role and value of play increase proportionately when a child is made more vulnerable through illness or disability. Despite this, providing time and opportunities to play can be overlooked or considered to be of little importance or relevance when the focus of the adult carers is the amelioration of clinical symptoms of the illness and on lessening the psychological impact the illness may have on the child. This paper outlines the role and the value of play as an integral component in the provision of palliative care for children with chronic, life-threatening and life-limiting conditions. It will show how providing appropriate equipment, sufficient time and relevant play opportunities not only improves the very sick child’s psychological wellbeing, but also allows the child to cast aside the confines and restrictions imposed upon them by their illness and for a few golden moments to be nothing more than a child at play.

  16. The Role of Play in Children’s Palliative Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Sue; Downing, Julia; Shemilt, Rise

    2014-01-01

    Play is the universal language of childhood and the time and opportunity to play is every child’s right. The role of play as a vehicle for communication, a tool for distraction and its value in the holistic development of a normal child is without dispute. The role and value of play increases proportionately when a child is made more vulnerable through illness or disability. Despite this, providing time and opportunities to play can be overlooked or considered to be of little importance or relevance when the focus of the adult carers is the amelioration of clinical symptoms of the illness and on lessening the psychological impact the illness may have on the child. This paper outlines the role and the value of play as an integral component in the provision of palliative care for children with chronic, life-threatening and life-limiting conditions. It will show how providing appropriate equipment, sufficient time and relevant play opportunities not only improves the very sick child’s psychological wellbeing, but also allows the child to cast aside the confines and restrictions imposed upon them by their illness and for a few golden moments to be nothing more than a child at play.

  17. Leadership in the African context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Masango

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available The Western world has always viewed the African continent as plagued by corruption; dictatorship; military coups; rebellious leaders; greediness; misuse of power; and incompetent, politically unstable leaders - in effect, suspicious leaders who undermine their own democracies. This paper analyzes African leadership and its impact by concentrating on three historical eras, namely; the African Religious era; the Christian era, and the era of Globalization. These affected African leadership. In addition, many brilliant minds left the continent in search of greener pastures. A review of these three eras will help us understand how leadership shifted from African values into Western concepts. The role of missionaries lead African people to live with both an African and a Western concept of life. In spite of the above problems, our past leaders did their best in addressing the difficulties they faced during the three eras. African concepts of leadership were often regarded as barbaric and uncultured. Structures were evaluated by Western standards. Due to globalisation, African leaders, through programmes like NEPAD, are going back to basics, drawing on African concepts of unity among its leadership. Effectiveness or life-giving leadership is emerging and empowering villagers/communities in the continent. This type of leadership is innovative and has brought new hope for the continent.

  18. The genetic structure and history of Africans and African Americans

    OpenAIRE

    Tishkoff, Sarah A; Reed, Floyd A; Friedlaender, Françoise R; Ehret, Christopher; Ranciaro, Alessia; Froment, Alain; Hirbo, Jibril B.; Awomoyi, Agnes A; Bodo, Jean-Marie; Doumbo, Ogobara; Ibrahim, Muntaser; Juma, Abdalla T; Kotze, Maritha J.; Lema, Godfrey; Moore, Jason H.

    2009-01-01

    Africa is the source of all modern humans, but characterization of genetic variation and of relationships among populations across the continent has been enigmatic. We studied 121 African populations, four African American populations, and 60 non-African populations for patterns of variation at 1327 nuclear microsatellite and insertion/deletion markers. We identified 14 ancestral population clusters in Africa that correlate with self-described ethnicity and shared cultural and/or linguistic p...

  19. Improving medical graduates' training in palliative care: advancing education and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Head BA

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Barbara A Head,1 Tara J Schapmire,1 Lori Earnshaw,1 John Chenault,2 Mark Pfeifer,1 Susan Sawning,3 Monica A Shaw,3 1Division of General Internal Medicine, Palliative Care and Medical Education, University of Louisville School of Medicine, 2Kornhouser Health Sciences Library, University of Louisville, 3Undergraduate Medical Education Office, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY, USA Abstract: The needs of an aging population and advancements in the treatment of both chronic and life-threatening diseases have resulted in increased demand for quality palliative care. The doctors of the future will need to be well prepared to provide expert symptom management and address the holistic needs (physical, psychosocial, and spiritual of patients dealing with serious illness and the end of life. Such preparation begins with general medical education. It has been recommended that teaching and clinical experiences in palliative care be integrated throughout the medical school curriculum, yet such education has not become the norm in medical schools across the world. This article explores the current status of undergraduate medical education in palliative care as published in the English literature and makes recommendations for educational improvements which will prepare doctors to address the needs of seriously ill and dying patients. Keywords: medical education, palliative care, end-of-life care

  20. Pharmacological treatments for fatigue associated with palliative care: executive summary of a Cochrane Collaboration systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochamat; Cuhls, Henning; Peuckmann‐Post, Vera; Minton, Ollie; Stone, Patrick; Radbruch, Lukas

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background In palliative care patients, fatigue can be severely debilitating and is often not counteracted with rest, thereby impacting daily activity and quality of life. Further complicating issues are the multidimensionality, subjective nature and lack of a consensus definition of fatigue. The review aimed to evaluate the efficacy of pharmacological treatments for fatigue in palliative care, with a focus on patients at an advanced stage of disease, including patients with cancer and other chronic diseases. Methods We considered randomized controlled trials concerning adult palliative care with a focus on pharmacological treatment of fatigue compared with placebo, application of two drugs, usual care or a non‐pharmacological intervention. The primary outcome had to be non‐specific fatigue (or related terms such as asthenia). We searched the CENTRAL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO and EMBASE, and a selection of cancer journals up to 28 April 2014. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted the data. Results We screened 1645 publications of which 45 met the inclusion criteria. In total, we analysed data from 18 drugs and 4696 participants. There was a very high degree of statistical and clinical heterogeneity in the trials. Meta‐analysis of data was possible for modafinil, pemoline, and methylphenidate. Conclusions Due to the limited evidence, we cannot recommend a specific drug for the treatment of fatigue in palliative care patients. Some drugs, which may be beneficial for the treatment of fatigue associated with palliative care such as amantadine, methylphenidate, and modafinil, should be further researched. PMID:27066315