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Sample records for apc hereditary colorectal

  1. Hereditary colorectal cancer diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov, Louise; Holck, Susanne; Bernstein, Inge

    2012-01-01

    BackgroundThe hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) subset of tumours can broadly be divided into tumours caused by an underlying mismatch-repair gene mutation, referred to as Lynch syndrome, and those that develop in families with similar patterns of heredity but without disease......-predisposing germline mismatch repair mutations, referred to as familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX). Recognition of HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers is central since surveillance programmes effectively reduce morbidity and mortality. The characteristic morphological features linked to Lynch syndrome can aid...... in the identification of this subset, whereas the possibility to use morphological features as an indicator of FCCTX is uncertain.Objective and methodsTo perform a detailed morphological evaluation of HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers and demonstrate significant differences between tumours associated with FCCTX...

  2. Role of APC and DNA mismatch repair genes in the development of colorectal cancers

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    Roy Deodutta

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Colorectal cancer is the third most common cause of cancer-related death in both men and women in the western hemisphere. According to the American Cancer Society, an estimated 105,500 new cases of colon cancer with 57,100 deaths will occur in the U.S. in 2003, accounting for about 10% of cancer deaths. Among the colon cancer patients, hereditary risk contributes approximately 20%. The main inherited colorectal cancers are the familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP and the hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancers (HNPCC. The FAP and HNPCC are caused due to mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC and DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes. The focus of this review is to summarize the functions of APC and MMR gene products in the development of colorectal cancers.

  3. Dietary factors and Truncating APC Mutations in Sporadic Colorectal Adenomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diergaarde, B.; Tiemersma, E.W.; Braam, H.; Muijen, van G.N.P.; Nagengast, F.M.; Kok, F.J.; Kampman, E.

    2005-01-01

    Inactivating mutations in APC are thought to be early, initiating events in colorectal carcinogenesis. To gain insight into the relationship between diet and inactivating APC mutations, we evaluated associations between dietary factors and the occurrence of these mutations in a Dutch case-control

  4. Dietary factors and truncating APC mutations in sporadic colorectal adenomas.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diergaarde, B.; Tiemersma, E.W.; Braam, H.; Muijen, G.N.P. van; Nagengast, F.M.; Kok, F.J.; Kampman, E.

    2005-01-01

    Inactivating mutations in APC are thought to be early, initiating events in colorectal carcinogenesis. To gain insight into the relationship between diet and inactivating APC mutations, we evaluated associations between dietary factors and the occurrence of these mutations in a Dutch case-control

  5. Hereditary & familial colorectal cancer : Identification, characteristics, surveillance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallenberg, F.G.J.

    2017-01-01

    Of all colorectal cancer (CRC) cases, 15-20% is related to familial or hereditary factors. Diagnosing familial and hereditary CRC syndromes is important for several reasons. One of these is that surveillance colonoscopies can reduce CRC incidence and mortality importantly. A complete family history

  6. Low-level APC mutational mosaicism is the underlying cause in a substantial fraction of unexplained colorectal adenomatous polyposis cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spier, Isabel; Drichel, Dmitriy; Kerick, Martin; Kirfel, Jutta; Horpaopan, Sukanya; Laner, Andreas; Holzapfel, Stefanie; Peters, Sophia; Adam, Ronja; Zhao, Bixiao; Becker, Tim; Lifton, Richard P; Perner, Sven; Hoffmann, Per; Kristiansen, Glen; Timmermann, Bernd; Nöthen, Markus M; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Schweiger, Michal R; Aretz, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    In 30-50% of patients with colorectal adenomatous polyposis, no germline mutation in the known genes APC, causing familial adenomatous polyposis, MUTYH, causing MUTYH-associated polyposis, or POLE or POLD1, causing polymerase-proofreading-associated polyposis can be identified, although a hereditary aetiology is likely. This study aimed to explore the impact of APC mutational mosaicism in unexplained polyposis. To comprehensively screen for somatic low-level APC mosaicism, high-coverage next-generation sequencing of the APC gene was performed using DNA from leucocytes and a total of 53 colorectal tumours from 20 unrelated patients with unexplained sporadic adenomatous polyposis. APC mosaicism was assumed if the same loss-of-function APC mutation was present in ≥ 2 anatomically separated colorectal adenomas/carcinomas per patient. All mutations were validated using diverse methods. In 25% (5/20) of patients, somatic mosaicism of a pathogenic APC mutation was identified as underlying cause of the disease. In 2/5 cases, the mosaic level in leucocyte DNA was slightly below the sensitivity threshold of Sanger sequencing; while in 3/5 cases, the allelic fraction was either very low (0.1-1%) or no mutations were detectable. The majority of mosaic mutations were located outside the somatic mutation cluster region of the gene. The present data indicate a high prevalence of pathogenic mosaic APC mutations below the detection thresholds of routine diagnostics in adenomatous polyposis, even if high-coverage sequencing of leucocyte DNA alone is taken into account. This has important implications for both routine work-up and strategies to identify new causative genes in this patient group. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  7. Hereditary Colorectal Cancer (CRC Program in Latvia

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    Irmejs Arvids

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The aim of the study is to evaluate the incidence and phenotype - genotype characteristics of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes in Latvia in order to develop the basis of clinical management for patients and their relatives affected by these syndromes. Materials and methods From 02/1999-09/2002 in several hospitals in Latvia cancer family histories were collected from 865 patients with CRC. In families suspected of having a history consistent with a hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome, DNA testing for MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 genes was performed. In addition immunohistochemical (IH examination of the normal and cancer tissue from large bowel tumors for MSH2 and MSH6 protein expression was performed prior to DNA analysis. Results From the 865 CRC cases only 3 (0.35% pedigrees fulfilled the Amsterdam II criteria of Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC and 15 cases (1.73% were suspected of HNPCC. In 69 cases (8% with a cancer family aggregation (CFA were identified. Thus far 27 IH analyses have been performed and in 3 cancers homogenous lack of MSH2 or MSH6 protein expression was found. In one of these cases a mutation in MSH6 was identified. In 18 patients suspected of HNPCC or of matching the Amsterdam II criteria, denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC followed by DNA sequencing of any heteroduplexes of the 35 exons comprising both MLH1 and MSH2 was performed revealing 3 mutations. For all of kindreds diagnosed definitively or with a high probability of being an HNPCC family appropriate recommendations concerning prophylactic measures, surveillance and treatment were provided in written form. Conclusions Existing pedigree/clinical data suggest that in Latvia the frequency of HNPCC is around 2% of consecutive colorectal cancer patients. It is crucial that genetic counseling is an integral part of cancer family syndrome management.

  8. Apc Restoration Promotes Cellular Differentiation and Reestablishes Crypt Homeostasis in Colorectal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dow, Lukas E; O'Rourke, Kevin P; Simon, Janelle; Tschaharganeh, Darjus F; van Es, Johan H; Clevers, Hans; Lowe, Scott W

    2015-01-01

    The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor suppressor is mutated in the vast majority of human colorectal cancers (CRC) and leads to deregulated Wnt signaling. To determine whether Apc disruption is required for tumor maintenance, we developed a mouse model of CRC whereby Apc can be conditionally

  9. Cancer risk in families with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer diagnosed by mutation analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasen, H. F.; Wijnen, J. T.; Menko, F. H.; Kleibeuker, J. H.; Taal, B. G.; Griffioen, G.; Nagengast, F. M.; Meijers-Heijboer, E. H.; Bertario, L.; Varesco, L.; Bisgaard, M. L.; Mohr, J.; Fodde, R.; Khan, P. M.

    1996-01-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer is characterized by early-onset colorectal cancer and the occurrence of various other cancers. The recent isolation of four mismatch repair genes responsible for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer allows for the identification of carriers within

  10. Cancer risk in families with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer diagnosed by mutation analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasen, HFA; Wijnen, JT; Menko, FH; Kleibeuker, JH; Taal, BG; Griffioen, G; Nagengast, FM; MeijersHeijboer, EH; Bertario, L; Varesco, L; Bisgaard, ML; Mohr, J; Fodde, R; Khan, PM

    Background & Aims: Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer is characterized by early-onset colorectal cancer and the occurrence of various other cancers, The recent isolation of four mismatch repair genes responsible for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer allows for the identification of

  11. APC hypermethylation for early diagnosis of colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Tie-Jun; Wang, Hong-Xu; Zheng, Yan-Yan; Cao, Ying-Qing; Wu, Xiaoyu; Zhou, Xin; Dong, Shu-Xiao

    2017-07-11

    Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) promoter hypermethylation has been frequently observed in colorectal cancer (CRC). The association between APC promoter methylation and clinicopathological significance in CRC is under investigation. We performed a meta-analysis to quantitatively evaluate the significance of APC methylation in CRC. The study included a total of 24 articles and 2025 CRC patients. The frequency of APC promoter hypermethylation was significantly higher in colorectal adenoma than in normal colorectal tissue, OR was 5.76, 95% CI, 2.45-13.56; pAPC promoter more frequently hypermethylated in CRC stage I compared to normal colorectal tissue, OR was 13.42, 95% CI, 3.66-49.20; pAPC promoter hypermethylation, pooled OR was 9.80, 95%CI, 6.07-15.81; pAPC methylation was not associated with grade, stage of CRC as well as tumor location, patients' gender, and smoking behavior. The results indicate that APC promoter hypermethylation is an early event in carcinogenesis of CRC, could be a valuable diagnostic marker for early-stage CRC. APC methylation is not significantly associated with overall survival in patients with CRC. APC is a potential drug target for development of personalized treatment.

  12. Peptidomimetic inhibitors of APC-Asef interaction block colorectal cancer migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Haiming; Deng, Rong; Yang, Xiuyan; Shang, Jialin; Lu, Shaoyong; Zhao, Yanlong; Song, Kun; Liu, Xinyi; Zhang, Qiufen; Chen, Yu; Chinn, Y Eugene; Wu, Geng; Li, Jian; Chen, Guoqiang; Yu, Jianxiu; Zhang, Jian

    2017-09-01

    The binding of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) to its receptor Asef relieves the negative intramolecular regulation of Asef and leads to aberrant cell migration in human colorectal cancer. Because of its crucial role in metastatic dissemination, the interaction between APC and Asef is an attractive target for anti-colorectal-cancer therapy. We rationally designed a series of peptidomimetics that act as potent inhibitors of the APC interface. Crystal structures and biochemical and cellular assays showed that the peptidomimetics in the APC pocket inhibited the migration of colorectal cells by disrupting APC-Asef interaction. By using the peptidomimetic inhibitor as a chemical probe, we found that CDC42 was the downstream GTPase involved in APC-stimulated Asef activation in colorectal cancer cells. Our work demonstrates the feasibility of exploiting APC-Asef interaction to regulate the migration of colorectal cancer cells, and provides what to our knowledge is the first class of protein-protein interaction inhibitors available for the development of cancer therapeutics targeting APC-Asef signaling.

  13. Differential RNA-seq analysis comparing APC-defective and APC-restored SW480 colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Lauren E; Love, Christopher G; Sieber, Oliver M; Faux, Maree C; Burgess, Antony W

    2016-03-01

    The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumour suppressor gene is mutated in about 80% of colorectal cancers (CRC) Brannon et al. (2014) [1]. APC is a large multifunctional protein that regulates many biological functions including Wnt signalling (through the regulation of beta-catenin stability) Reya and Clevers (2005) [2], cell migration Kroboth et al. (2007), Sansom et al. (2004) [3], [4], mitosis Kaplan et al. (2001) [5], cell adhesion Faux et al. (2004), Carothers et al. (2001) [6], [7] and differentiation Sansom et al. (2004) [4]. Although the role of APC in CRC is often described as the deregulation of Wnt signalling, its other biological functions suggest that there are other factors at play that contribute to the onset of adenomas and the progression of CRC upon the truncation of APC. To identify genes and pathways that are dysregulated as a consequence of loss of function of APC, we compared the gene expression profiles of the APC mutated human CRC cell line SW480 following reintroduction of wild-type APC (SW480 + APC) or empty control vector (SW480 + vector control) Faux et al. (2004) . Here we describe the RNA-seq data derived for three biological replicates of parental SW480, SW480 + vector control and SW480 + APC cells, and present the bioinformatics pipeline used to test for differential gene expression and pathway enrichment analysis. A total of 1735 genes showed significant differential expression when APC was restored and were enriched for genes associated with cell polarity, Wnt signalling and the epithelial to mesenchymal transition. There was additional enrichment for genes involved in cell-cell adhesion, cell-matrix junctions, angiogenesis, axon morphogenesis and cell movement. The raw and analysed RNA-seq data have been deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database under accession number GSE76307. This dataset is useful for further investigations of the impact of APC mutation on the properties of colorectal cancer cells.

  14. A multigene mutation classification of 468 colorectal cancers reveals a prognostic role for APC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, Michael J.; Yang, Mingli; Teer, Jamie K.; Lo, Fang Yin; Madan, Anup; Coppola, Domenico; Monteiro, Alvaro N. A.; Nebozhyn, Michael V.; Yue, Binglin; Loboda, Andrey; Bien-Willner, Gabriel A.; Greenawalt, Danielle M.; Yeatman, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a highly heterogeneous disease, for which prognosis has been relegated to clinicopathologic staging for decades. There is a need to stratify subpopulations of CRC on a molecular basis to better predict outcome and assign therapies. Here we report targeted exome-sequencing of 1,321 cancer-related genes on 468 tumour specimens, which identified a subset of 17 genes that best classify CRC, with APC playing a central role in predicting overall survival. APC may assume 0, 1 or 2 truncating mutations, each with a striking differential impact on survival. Tumours lacking any APC mutation carry a worse prognosis than single APC mutation tumours; however, two APC mutation tumours with mutant KRAS and TP53 confer the poorest survival among all the subgroups examined. Our study demonstrates a prognostic role for APC and suggests that sequencing of APC may have clinical utility in the routine staging and potential therapeutic assignment for CRC. PMID:27302369

  15. Genetic Testing for Hereditary Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... before 50). Dave has Lynch syndrome and had colorectal cancer at 28. Amy found out she has Lynch syndrome when she was diagnosed with colorectal cancer days after turning 47. Why is it Important ...

  16. A role for MLH3 in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Y; Berends, MJW; Sijmons, RH; Mensink, RGJ; Verlind, E; Kooi, KA; van der Sluis, T; Kempinga, C; van der Zee, AGJ; Hollema, H; Buys, CHCM; Kleibeuker, JH; Hofstra, RMW

    2001-01-01

    We investigated a possible role of the mismatch-repair gene MLH3 in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer by scanning for mutations in 39 HNPCC families and in 288 patients suspected of having HNPCC. We identified ten different germline MLH3 variants, one frameshift and nine missense mutations,

  17. Sulindac treatment in hereditary non-pollyposis colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijcken, Fleur E. M.; Hollema, Harry; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; van der Sluis, Tineke; Ek, Wytske Boersma-van; Kleibeuker, Jan H.

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, e.g. sulindac have been extensively studied for chemoprevention in familial adenomatous polyposis, but not in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). We evaluated these effects in HNPCC using surrogate end-points for cancer risk. In a randomised

  18. Neuroendocrine Differentiation in Sporadic CRC and Hereditary Nonpolyosis Colorectal Cancer

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    M. H. Sun

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Extent neuroendocrine differentiation can be encountered in many human neoplasm derived from different organs and systems using immunohistochemistry and ultrastructural techniques. The tumor cells' behaviors resemble those of neurons and neuroendocrine cells. The presence of neuroendocrine differentiation reputedly appears to be associated with a poorer prognosis than the adenocarcinoma counterparts in sporadic human neoplasm. In this review the neuroendocrine carcinoma and the adenocarcinoma with neuroendocrine differentiation of colon and rectum both in sporadic colorectal carcinoma and the hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, the relationship of neuroendocrine differentiation and some possible molecular pathways in tumorogenesis of colorectal cancer will be discussed. Possible treatment strategy will also be addressed.

  19. Modeling the Effect of APC Truncation on Destruction Complex Function in Colorectal Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barua, Dipak; Hlavacek, William S.

    2013-01-01

    In colorectal cancer cells, APC, a tumor suppressor protein, is commonly expressed in truncated form. Truncation of APC is believed to disrupt degradation of β—catenin, which is regulated by a multiprotein complex called the destruction complex. The destruction complex comprises APC, Axin, β—catenin, serine/threonine kinases, and other proteins. The kinases and , which are recruited by Axin, mediate phosphorylation of β—catenin, which initiates its ubiquitination and proteosomal degradation. The mechanism of regulation of β—catenin degradation by the destruction complex and the role of truncation of APC in colorectal cancer are not entirely understood. Through formulation and analysis of a rule-based computational model, we investigated the regulation of β—catenin phosphorylation and degradation by APC and the effect of APC truncation on function of the destruction complex. The model integrates available mechanistic knowledge about site-specific interactions and phosphorylation of destruction complex components and is consistent with an array of published data. We find that the phosphorylated truncated form of APC can outcompete Axin for binding to β—catenin, provided that Axin is limiting, and thereby sequester β—catenin away from Axin and the Axin-recruited kinases and . Full-length APC also competes with Axin for binding to β—catenin; however, full-length APC is able, through its SAMP repeats, which bind Axin and which are missing in truncated oncogenic forms of APC, to bring β—catenin into indirect association with Axin and Axin-recruited kinases. Because our model indicates that the positive effects of truncated APC on β—catenin levels depend on phosphorylation of APC, at the first 20-amino acid repeat, and because phosphorylation of this site is mediated by , we suggest that is a potential target for therapeutic intervention in colorectal cancer. Specific inhibition of is predicted to limit binding of β—catenin to truncated

  20. Environmental Factors and Colorectal Tumor Risk in Individuals With Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diergaarde, B.; Braam, H.; Vasen, H.F.; Nagengast, F.M.; Muijen, van G.N.P.; Kok, F.J.; Kampman, E.

    2007-01-01

    Background & Aims: Individuals with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) are at increased risk for colorectal cancer. Environmental factors might play a role in HNPCC-associated carcinogenesis. The aim of this study was to gain insight into the effects of environmental factors on

  1. Surveillance for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer: a long-term study on 114 families.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos tot Nederveen Cappel, W.H. de; Nagengast, F.M.; Griffioen, G.; Menko, F.H.; Taal, B.G.; Kleibeuker, J.H.; Vasen, H.F.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer is caused by germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes. Mutation carriers have a 60 to 85 percent risk of developing colorectal cancer. In the Netherlands hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer families are monitored in an intensive

  2. Surveillance for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer - A long-term study on 114 families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cappel, WHDTN; Nagengast, FM; Griffioen, G; Menko, FH; Taal, BG; Kleibeuker, JH; Vasen, HF

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer is caused by germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes. Mutation carriers have a 60 to 85 percent risk of developing colorectal cancer. In the Netherlands hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer families are monitored in an intensive

  3. Somatic APC mosaicism and oligogenic inheritance in genetically unsolved colorectal adenomatous polyposis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciavarella, Michele; Miccoli, Sara; Prossomariti, Anna; Pippucci, Tommaso; Bonora, Elena; Buscherini, Francesco; Palombo, Flavia; Zuntini, Roberta; Balbi, Tiziana; Ceccarelli, Claudio; Bazzoli, Franco; Ricciardiello, Luigi; Turchetti, Daniela; Piazzi, Giulia

    2018-03-01

    Germline variants in the APC gene cause familial adenomatous polyposis. Inherited variants in MutYH, POLE, POLD1, NTHL1, and MSH3 genes and somatic APC mosaicism have been reported as alternative causes of polyposis. However, ~30-50% of cases of polyposis remain genetically unsolved. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the genetic causes of unexplained adenomatous polyposis. Eight sporadic cases with >20 adenomatous polyps by 35 years of age or >50 adenomatous polyps by 55 years of age, and no causative germline variants in APC and/or MutYH, were enrolled from a cohort of 56 subjects with adenomatous colorectal polyposis. APC gene mosaicism was investigated on DNA from colonic adenomas by Sanger sequencing or Whole Exome Sequencing (WES). Mosaicism extension to other tissues (peripheral blood, saliva, hair follicles) was evaluated using Sanger sequencing and/or digital PCR. APC second hit was investigated in adenomas from mosaic patients. WES was performed on DNA from peripheral blood to identify additional polyposis candidate variants. We identified APC mosaicism in 50% of patients. In three cases mosaicism was restricted to the colon, while in one it also extended to the duodenum and saliva. One patient without APC mosaicism, carrying an APC in-frame deletion of uncertain significance, was found to harbor rare germline variants in OGG1, POLQ, and EXO1 genes. In conclusion, our restrictive selection criteria improved the detection of mosaic APC patients. In addition, we showed for the first time that an oligogenic inheritance of rare variants might have a cooperative role in sporadic colorectal polyposis onset.

  4. Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer : Identification of mutation carriers and assessing pathogenicity of mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, RC; Sijmons, RH; Berends, MJW; Ou, J; Hofstra, RNW; Kleibeuker, JH

    2004-01-01

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), also referred to as Lynch syndrome, is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that is characterized by susceptibility to colorectal cancer and extracolonic malignancies, in particular endometrial cancer. HNPCC is caused by pathogenic mutations

  5. ABERRANT METHYLATION OF THE PROMOTER OF APC, CDH13 AND MGMT GENES IN COLORECTAL CANCER PATIENTS

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    O. I. Kit

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant methylation of gene promoter regions is the main epigenetic change characterizing colorectal cancer. Methylation levels of 42 CpG-sites of promoter regions of the MGMT, APC and CDH13 genes in colorectal cancer were studied in comparison with methylation levels of the adjacent normal tissue in 25 patients. Pyrosequencing showed an increase in methylation levels of promoter regions of the MGMT, APC and CDH13 genes in tumor samples by 3 to 5 times. These tumor samples were screened for activating SNP-mutations in the KRAS (40 %, NRAS (0 % and BRAF (0 % oncogenes. SNP-mutations in the KRAS gene were accompanied by hypermethylation of one or more promoters of the studied genes. Association of this epigenetic index with tumor metastasis was proved. The data on an increase in methylation of the promoter regions of oncosupressor genes can be used as sensitive prognostic markers of progression and metastasis of colorectal cancer.

  6. Prevalence of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer in patients with colorectal cancer in Iran: a systematic review

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    Abbas Esmaeilzadeh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third leading cause of cancer deaths in the world, and hereditary factors and family history are responsible for the incidence and development of the disease in 20 to 30% of cases. Lynch syndrome, or hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC, is the most common hereditary form of CRC that is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. This study consisted of a systematic literature review of research articles that described the prevalence of HNPCC in Iranian patients with CRC. Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted in the PubMed, Scopus, IranMedex, and Google Scholar databases to identify relevant articles that describe HNPCC or Lynch syndrome in patients with CRC in Iran. For this purpose, a keyword search of the following terms was employed: (((Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer OR HNPCC OR Lynch syndrome AND (colorectal cancer OR familial colorectal cancer OR colon cancer OR rectal cancer OR bowel cancer AND IRAN. All eligible documents were collected, and the desired data were qualitatively analyzed.Result: Of the 67 articles that were found via the initial database search, only 12 were deemed to be of relevance to the current study. These articles included a total population of 3237 and this sample was selected and qualitatively analyzed. The findings of the review revealed that the frequency of mutation in MLH1, MSH2, PMS2, and MSH6 genes varied between 23.1% and 62.5% among the studied families. This indicated that HNPCC is linked with up to 5.5% of the total cases of colorectal cancers in Iran.Conclusion: The results of this study revealed that the hereditary form of HNPCC or Lynch syndrome is significantly high among patients with CRC in Iran

  7. Meta-analysis of the association between APC promoter methylation and colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhenyu; Jiang, Tong; Piao, Ying; Han, Tao; Han, Yaling; Xie, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies investigating the association between adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene promoter methylation and colorectal cancer (CRC) have yielded conflicting results. The aim of this study was to comprehensively evaluate the potential application of the detection of APC promoter methylation to the prevention and treatment of CRC. PubMed, Embase, and MEDLINE (results updated to October 2014) were searched for relevant studies. The effect size was defined as the weighted odds ratio (OR), which was calculated using either the fixed-effects or random-effects model. Prespecified subgroup and sensitivity analyses were conducted to evaluate potential heterogeneity among the included studies. Nineteen studies comprising 2,426 participants were selected for our meta-analysis. The pooled results of nine studies comprising a total of 740 subjects indicated that APC promoter methylation was significantly associated with CRC risk (pooled OR 5.53; 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.50-8.76; PAPC promoter methylation and the presence of CRC metastasis, and the pooled OR was 0.80 (95% CI 0.44-1.46; P=0.47). A meta-analysis conducted with four studies with a total of 467 patients found no significant correlation between APC promoter methylation and the presence of colorectal adenoma (pooled OR 1.85; 95% CI 0.67-5.10; P=0.23). No significant correlation between APC promoter methylation and patients' Dukes' stage, TNM stage, differentiation grade, age, or sex was identified. In conclusion, APC promoter methylation was found to be significantly associated with a higher risk of developing CRC. The findings indicate that APC promoter methylation may be a potential biomarker for the carcinogenesis of CRC.

  8. The tumour spectrum in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer: a study of 24 kindreds in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasen, H. F.; Offerhaus, G. J.; den Hartog Jager, F. C.; Menko, F. H.; Nagengast, F. M.; Griffioen, G.; van Hogezand, R. B.; Heintz, A. P.

    1990-01-01

    The hereditary colonic cancer syndrome without polyposis, hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), is usually divided into 2 main categories: hereditary site-specific colorectal cancer (Lynch syndrome I) and colorectal cancer in association with other forms of cancer (Lynch syndrome II).

  9. Association between cigarette smoking, APC mutations and the risk of developing sporadic colorectal adenomas and carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sæbø, Mona; Skjelbred, Camilla F; Breistein, Rebecca; Lothe, Inger Marie B; Hagen, Per Chr; Bock, Gunter; Hansteen, Inger-Lise; Kure, Elin H

    2006-01-01

    The association between colorectal cancer (CRC) and smoking has not been consistent. Incomplete smoking history and association to a specific subset of CRC tumors have been proposed as explanations. The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene has been reported to have a 'gatekeeper' function in the colonic mucosa. To evaluate the hypothesis that cigarette smoking is associated with adenoma and carcinoma development and further to investigate whether this association is due to mutations in the APC gene, we used a study population consisting of 133 cases (45 adenomas and 88 carcinomas) and 334 controls. All tumors were sequenced in the mutation cluster region (MCR) of the APC gene. Cases and controls were drawn from a homogeneous cohort of Norwegian origin. The mutational spectra of the APC gene revealed no difference in frequencies of mutations in cases based on ever and never smoking status. An overall case-control association was detected for adenomas and 'ever smoking' OR = 1.73 (95% CI 0.83–3.58). For CRC cases several smoking parameters for dose and duration were used. We detected an association for all smoking parameters and 'duration of smoking > 30 years', yielded a statistically significant OR = 2.86 (1.06–7.7). When cases were divided based on APC truncation mutation status, an association was detected in adenomas without APC mutation in relation to 'ever smoking', with an OR = 3.97 (1.26–12.51). For CRC cases without APC mutation 'duration of smoking > 30 years', yielded a statistically significant OR = 4.06 (1.20–13.7). The smoking parameter 'starting smoking ≥ 40 years ago' was only associated with CRC cases with APC mutations, OR = 2.0 (0.34–11.95). A case-case comparison revealed similar findings for this parameter, OR = 2.24 (0.73–6.86). Our data suggest an association between smoking and adenoma and CRC development. This association was strongest for cases without APC truncation

  10. Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) regulates miR17-92 cluster through β-catenin pathway in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yajuan; Lauriola, Mattia; Kim, Donghwa; Francesconi, Mirko; D'Uva, Gabriele; Shibata, Dave; Malafa, Mokenge P; Yeatman, Timothy J; Coppola, Domenico; Solmi, Rossella; Cheng, Jin Q

    2016-09-01

    Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutation is the most common genetic change in sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC). Although deregulations of miRNAs have been frequently reported in this malignancy, APC-regulated miRNAs have not been extensively documented. Here, by using an APC-inducible cell line and array analysis, we identified a total of 26 deregulated miRNAs. Among them, members of miR-17-92 cluster were dramatically inhibited by APC and induced by enforced expression of β-catenin. Furthermore, we demonstrate that activated β-catenin resulted from APC loss binds to and activates the miR-17-92 promoter. Notably, enforced expression of miR-19a overrides APC tumor suppressor activity, and knockdown of miR-19a in cancer cells with compromised APC function reduced their aggressive features in vitro. Finally, we observed that expression of miR-19a significantly correlates with β-catenin levels in colorectal cancer specimens, and it is associated to the aggressive stage of tumor progression. Thus, our study reveals that miR-17-92 cluster is directly regulated by APC/β-catenin pathway and could be a potential therapeutic target in colon cancers with aberrant APC/β-catenin signaling.

  11. [Consensus on clinical diagnosis, treatment and pedigree management of hereditary colorectal cancer in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-23

    Hereditary colorectal cancer can be divded into two categories based on the presence or absence of polyps. The first category is characterized by the development of polyposis, which includes familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP); The second category is nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, which is represented by Lynch syndrome. "Consensus on clinical diagnosis, treatment and pedigree management of hereditary colorectal cancer in China" developed by the Genetics Group of the Committee of Colorectal Cancer, Chinese Anti-cancer Association, is composed of three sections, including hereditary nonpolyposis syndrome, polyposis syndrome as well as genetic evaluation of hereditary colorectal cancer. The consensus aims to provide recommendations on management of the respective hereditary syndromes in terms of definition, clinical and pathological features, diagnostic standards, treatment, and follow-ups. In addition to describing diagnostic and treatment strategies, prophylactic treatment as well as genetic screening and pedigree monitoring is highly recommended. Through the establishment of this expert consensus, we hope to promote better understanding of hereditary colorectal cancer for clinicians and encourage standardized treatment through multidisciplinery approaches, eventually improving clinical treatment and pedigree management of hereditary colorectal cancer in China.

  12. Clinical and genetic characteristics of Chinese hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer families

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xu-Lin; Yuan, Ying; Zhang, Su-Zhan; Cai, Shan-Rong; Huang, Yan-Qin; Jiang, Qiang; Zheng, Shu

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the clinical characteristics of Chinese hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) families and to screen the germline mutations of human mismatch repair genes hMLH1 and hMSH2 in the probands.

  13. Microsatellite instability, immunohistochemistry, and additional PMS2 staining in suspected hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Andrea E.; van Puijenbroek, Marjo; Hendriks, Yvonne; Tops, Carli; Wijnen, Juul; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Wagner, Anja; van Os, Theo A. M.; Bröcker-Vriends, Annette H. J. T.; Vasen, Hans F. A.; Morreau, Hans

    2004-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) and microsatellite instability (MSI) analysis can be used to identify patients with a possible DNA mismatch repair defect [hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal carcinoma (HNPCC)]. The Bethesda criteria have been proposed to select families for determination of MSI. The aims

  14. Analysis of APC allelic imbalance/loss of heterozygosity and APC protein expression in cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gray, Sarah E

    2011-05-01

    The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene is a tumor suppressor gene which is mutated in the hereditary disease, familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Somatic mutations of the APC gene have also been identified in the majority of sporadic colorectal carcinomas, and mutation of the APC gene appears to be an early step in the initiation of colon cancer. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of APC has been described in a variety of other cancer types, including renal cell carcinoma, gastric cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, endometrial cancer and oral squamous cell carcinomas (SCC).

  15. Copy Number Variation in Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garry N. Hannan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC is the commonest form of inherited colorectal cancer (CRC predisposition and by definition describes families which conform to the Amsterdam Criteria or reiterations thereof. In ~50% of patients adhering to the Amsterdam criteria germline variants are identified in one of four DNA Mismatch repair (MMR genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. Loss of function of any one of these genes results in a failure to repair DNA errors occurring during replication which can be most easily observed as DNA microsatellite instability (MSI—a hallmark feature of this disease. The remaining 50% of patients without a genetic diagnosis of disease may harbour more cryptic changes within or adjacent to MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2 or elsewhere in the genome. We used a high density cytogenetic array to screen for deletions or duplications in a series of patients, all of whom adhered to the Amsterdam/Bethesda criteria, to determine if genomic re-arrangements could account for a proportion of patients that had been shown not to harbour causative mutations as assessed by standard diagnostic techniques. The study has revealed some associations between copy number variants (CNVs and HNPCC mutation negative cases and further highlights difficulties associated with CNV analysis.

  16. [Implantation of a hospital registry of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, J; Ginard, D; Barranco, L; Escarda, A; Vanrell, M; Mariño, Z; Garau, I; Llompart, A; Gayà, J; Obrador, A

    2006-10-01

    Identification of patients with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) can allow colorectal cancer (CRC) prevention through colonoscopy and polypectomies. The purpose of this study was to report the clinical characteristics of HNPCC families in our registry. HNPCC was identified using the Amsterdam criteria. Familial clustering of CRC and extracolonic cancers were investigated in families. Individuals at risk were offered annual colonoscopy, starting from the age of 25 years. Twelve HNPCC families were identified. There were 46 cases of CRC in 38 patients. The mean age at diagnosis of CRC was 45.4 +/- 12.7 years (range 25-73 years). In patients with documented disease, right-sided tumors predominated. Eleven patients with extracolonic cancer were identified (six tumors located in the endometrium). Of 43 at-risk individuals, 29 accepted surveillance. Our data confirm the importance of the family history in identifying HNPCC. This study confirms previously described characteristics in HNPCC, namely, early age at onset of CRC, right-sided predominance, multiple synchronous and metachronous neoplasms, and increased extracolonic cancers. This is the first study of clinical data in a Spanish HNPCC registry.

  17. Clinical definition of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer : A search for the impossible?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berends, MJW; Wu, Y; Sijmons, RH; Hofstra, RMW; van der Zee, AGJ; Buys, CHCM; Kleibeuker, JH

    2001-01-01

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder that predisposes its carriers to an almost 100% lifetime risk of cancer, in particular colorectal and endometrial cancer. Germline mutations, resulting in a deficient DNA mismatch repair system. are responsible

  18. Role of heterozygous APC mutation in niche succession and initiation of colorectal cancer--a computational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roschen Sasikumar

    Full Text Available Mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC gene are found in most colorectal cancers. They cause constitutive activation of proliferative pathways when both alleles of the gene are mutated. However studies on individuals with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP have shown that a single mutated APC allele can also create changes in the precancerous colon crypt, like increased number of stem cells, increased crypt fission, greater variability of DNA methylation patterns, and higher somatic mutation rates. In this paper, using a computational model of colon crypt dynamics, we evolve and investigate a hypothesis on the effect of heterozygous APC mutation that explains these different observations. Based on previous reports and the results from the computational model we propose the hypothesis that heterozygous APC mutation has the effect of increasing the chances for a stem cell to divide symmetrically, producing two stem cell daughters. We incorporate this hypothesis into the model and perform simulation experiments to investigate the consequences of the hypothesis. Simulations show that this hypothesis links together the changes in FAP crypts observed in previous studies. The simulations also show that an APC(+/- stem cell gets selective advantages for dominating the crypt and progressing to cancer. This explains why most colon cancers are initiated by APC mutation. The results could have implications for preventing or retarding the onset of colon cancer in people with inherited or acquired mutation of one APC allele. Experimental validation of the hypothesis as well as investigation into the molecular mechanisms of this effect may therefore be worth undertaking.

  19. Association of APC I1307K and E1317Q polymorphisms with colorectal cancer among Egyptian subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Malak, Camelia; Darwish, Hossam; Elsaid, Afaf; El-Tarapely, Fatma; Elshazli, Rami

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a multifactorial disease that involves both environmental and genetic factors. The gene encoding adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) has been reported to be associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) risk in several ethnic populations. The aim of this work is to assess the association of the APC I1307K and E1317Q polymorphisms with CRC risk among Egyptian subjects. This study included 120 unrelated CRC Egyptian patients who were compared to 100 healthy controls from the same locality. For all subjects, DNA was genotyped for APC I1307K and E1317Q polymorphisms using the PCR-ARMS technique. The frequency of APC I1307K carrier (TA+AA genotypes) was noted to be significantly higher among cases with CRC compared to controls (18.3 vs. 9.0 %, OR 2.58, 95 % CI 1.09-6.09, p = 0.03). Also the frequency of the APC I1307K A allele was significantly higher among cases compared to controls (10.4 vs. 4.5 %, OR 2.47; 95 % CI 1.12-5.42, p = 0.03). On the contrast, the frequencies of APC E1317Q GC genotype and C allele showed no significant difference among CRC patients compared to controls (3.3 vs. 2.0 %, OR 1.69; 95 % CI 0.30-9.42, p = 0.69 and 2.1 vs. 1.0 %, OR 2.11; 95 % CI 0.40-10.97, p = 0.46, respectively). Cases of the APC I1307K and E1317Q carriers (TA+AA and GC) showed no significant difference compared to those with I1307K and E1317Q non-carriers (TT and GG) regarding their clinical and laboratory markers. APC I1307K variant was associated with an increased risk of CRC among Egyptian subjects.

  20. Analysis of APC allelic imbalance/loss of heterozygosity and APC protein expression in cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gray, Sarah E

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene is a tumor suppressor gene which is mutated in the hereditary disease, familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Somatic mutations of the APC gene have also been identified in the majority of sporadic colorectal carcinomas, and mutation of the APC gene appears to be an early step in the initiation of colon cancer. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of APC has been described in a variety of other cancer types, including renal cell carcinoma, gastric cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, endometrial cancer and oral squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). AIM: To determine the role played by APC gene in the genesis of cutaneous SCC. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Allelic imbalance\\/loss of heterozygosity (AI\\/LOH) was examined in twenty-two histologically confirmed cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) using microsatellite markers, proximal to the APC gene. Immunohistochemical analysis of APC protein expression was also examined in the cutaneous SCC. RESULTS: AI\\/LOH was detected in 60% of the SCC samples using D5S346 marker (proximal to the APC gene). Ninty-five percent of the SCC samples showed positive reduced APC expression, however the localization of the APC protein was abnormal. CONCLUSION: The abnormal expression of APC suggests that APC gene may play a role in cutaneous SCC development.

  1. Chlorinated Water Modulates the Development of Colorectal Tumors with Chromosomal Instability and Gut Microbiota in Apc-Deficient Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasada, Tatsunari; Hinoi, Takao; Saito, Yasufumi; Adachi, Tomohiro; Takakura, Yuji; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Sotomaru, Yusuke; Sentani, Kazuhiro; Oue, Naohide; Yasui, Wataru; Ohdan, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is continuously exposed to a variety of chemicals and commensal bacteria. Recent studies have shown that changes in gut microbial populations caused by chlorine or other chemicals in the drinking water influence the development of human colorectal cancer, although the mechanism of tumorigenesis in the gut epithelium is obfuscated by the diversity of microflora and complexity of the tumor microenvironment. In this regard, mouse models that recapitulate human colorectal cancer are an invaluable tool. In this study, we used two conditional adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) knockout mouse models to investigate the effect of chlorinated water on tumorigenesis in the digestive tract. Mice with colon-specific carcinoma--caused by either chromosomal (CDX2P 9.5-NLS Cre;Apc(+/flox), abbreviated to CPC;Apc) or microsatellite (CDX2P9.5-G19Cre;Apc(flox/flox) and CDX2P9.5-G22Cre;Apc(flox/flox)) instability, respectively--were administered chlorinated (10.0 mg/L chlorine) or tap (0.7 mg/L chlorine) water and evaluated for colon polyp formation. In CPC;Apc mice given chlorinated drinking water, tumors tended to develop in the colon, whereas in those that drank tap water, tumors were mostly observed in the small intestine. There was no difference in the rate of tumor formation of CDX2P9.5-G19Cre;Apc(flox/flox) and CDX2P9.5-G22Cre;Apc(flox/flox) mice consuming chlorinated as compared to tap water, suggesting that microsatellite instability in the Apc gene does not significantly affect tumorigenesis. Chlorinated water altered the enteric environment by reducing the fecal populations of the obligatory anaerobes Clostridium perfringens and C. difficile, as well as species belonging to the Atopobium cluster, including Enterobacteriaceae and Staphylococcus sp., which was associated with colon tumorigenesis in CPC;Apc mice. These results suggest that differences in tumorigenesis among CPC;Apc mice consuming chlorinated versus tap water may be due to differences

  2. Hopefulness predicts resilience after hereditary colorectal cancer genetic testing: a prospective outcome trajectories study

    OpenAIRE

    Chu Annie TW; Bonanno George A; Ho Judy WC; Ho Samuel MY; Chan Emily MS

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background - Genetic testing for hereditary colorectal cancer (HCRC) had significant psychological consequences for test recipients. This prospective longitudinal study investigated the factors that predict psychological resilience in adults undergoing genetic testing for HCRC. Methods - A longitudinal study was carried out from April 2003 to August 2006 on Hong Kong Chinese HCRC family members who were recruited and offered genetic testing by the Hereditary Gastrointestinal Cancer R...

  3. Revised Bethesda Guidelines for Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer (Lynch Syndrome) and Microsatellite Instability

    OpenAIRE

    Umar, Asad; Boland, C. Richard; Terdiman, Jonathan P.; Syngal, Sapna; de la Chapelle, Albert; Rüschoff, Josef; Fishel, Richard; Lindor, Noralane M.; Burgart, Lawrence J.; Hamelin, Richard; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Hiatt, Robert A.; Jass, Jeremy; Lindblom, Annika; Lynch, Henry T.

    2004-01-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), also known as Lynch syndrome, is a common autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by early age at onset, neoplastic lesions, and microsatellite instability (MSI). Because cancers with MSI account for approximately 15% of all colorectal cancers and because of the need for a better understanding of the clinical and histologic manifestations of HNPCC, the National Cancer Institute hosted an international workshop on HNPCC in 1996, which led to...

  4. Knowledge about hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer; mutation carriers and physicians at equal levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanska, Katarina; Carlsson, Christina; Bendahl, Pär-Ola

    2009-01-01

    questions about cancer risks and surveillance strategies. RESULTS: Both groups answered questions on colorectal cancer risk, surveillance and genetic testing well, whereas answers about inheritance and risks for HNPCC associated cancer were less accurate. Only half of the family members and one third......BACKGROUND: Identification and adequate management of individuals at risk for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is crucial since surveillance programmes reduce morbidity and mortality. We investigated knowledge about key features of HNPCC in at risk individuals and physicians...

  5. USP7 Is a Tumor-Specific WNT Activator for APC-Mutated Colorectal Cancer by Mediating β-Catenin Deubiquitination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Novellasdemunt

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The tumor suppressor gene adenomatous polyposis coli (APC is mutated in most colorectal cancers (CRCs, resulting in constitutive Wnt activation. To understand the Wnt-activating mechanism of the APC mutation, we applied CRISPR/Cas9 technology to engineer various APC-truncated isogenic lines. We find that the β-catenin inhibitory domain (CID in APC represents the threshold for pathological levels of Wnt activation and tumor transformation. Mechanistically, CID-deleted APC truncation promotes β-catenin deubiquitination through reverse binding of β-TrCP and USP7 to the destruction complex. USP7 depletion in APC-mutated CRC inhibits Wnt activation by restoring β-catenin ubiquitination, drives differentiation, and suppresses xenograft tumor growth. Finally, the Wnt-activating role of USP7 is specific to APC mutations; thus, it can be used as a tumor-specific therapeutic target for most CRCs.

  6. USP7 Is a Tumor-Specific WNT Activator for APC-Mutated Colorectal Cancer by Mediating β-Catenin Deubiquitination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novellasdemunt, Laura; Foglizzo, Valentina; Cuadrado, Laura; Antas, Pedro; Kucharska, Anna; Encheva, Vesela; Snijders, Ambrosius P; Li, Vivian S W

    2017-10-17

    The tumor suppressor gene adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is mutated in most colorectal cancers (CRCs), resulting in constitutive Wnt activation. To understand the Wnt-activating mechanism of the APC mutation, we applied CRISPR/Cas9 technology to engineer various APC-truncated isogenic lines. We find that the β-catenin inhibitory domain (CID) in APC represents the threshold for pathological levels of Wnt activation and tumor transformation. Mechanistically, CID-deleted APC truncation promotes β-catenin deubiquitination through reverse binding of β-TrCP and USP7 to the destruction complex. USP7 depletion in APC-mutated CRC inhibits Wnt activation by restoring β-catenin ubiquitination, drives differentiation, and suppresses xenograft tumor growth. Finally, the Wnt-activating role of USP7 is specific to APC mutations; thus, it can be used as a tumor-specific therapeutic target for most CRCs. Copyright © 2017 The Francis Crick Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer and familial colorectal cancer in Central part of Iran, Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Nemati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is a lack of data on familial aggregation of colorectal cancer (CRC in Iran. We aimed to deter-mine the frequency of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC and familial colorectal cancer (FCC and to determine the frequency of extracolonic cancers in these families in Isfahan. Methods: We reviewed documents of all patients with a pathologically confirmed diagnosis of CRC admitted to Isfa-han referral hospitals between 1995 and 2006. We also studied our CRC registry at Poursina Hakim Research Institute from 2003 to 2008. We found HNPCC and FCC families based on the Amsterdam II criteria and interviewed them for family history of CRC and extracolonic tumors. The family history was taken at least up to the second-degree relatives. Results: During 1996 to 2008, a total of 2580 CRC cases have been diagnosed. We found 14 HNPCC and 53 FCC families. Mean age of CRC at diagnosis was 48.0 ΁ 14.6 and 49.0 ΁ 13.9 years in the HNPCC and FCC families, re-spectively (p > 0.05. The total numbers of observed extracolonic tumors were 70 (21.6%; mean age = 53.6 ΁ 11.0 years and 157 (13.8%; mean age = 54.8 ΁ 18.0 years in HNPCC and FCC families, respectively (p > 0.05. CRC was respectively found in 52 and 76 members of the HNPCC and FCC families, revealing the frequency of HNPCC and FCC as 2.0% (52/2580 and 2.9% (76/2580, respectively. Conclusions: We found a relative high frequency of HNPCC (2.0% and FCC (2.9% among CRC cases in our socie-ty and high incidence of extracolonic tumors in their families. Further studies focusing on molecular basis in this field and designing a specific screening and national cancer registry program for HNPCC and FCC families should be con-ducted.

  8. Expanding the genotype-phenotype spectrum in hereditary colorectal cancer by gene panel testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohlin, Anna; Rambech, Eva; Kvist, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary syndromes causing colorectal cancer include both polyposis and non-polyposis syndromes. Overlapping phenotypes between the syndromes have been recognized and this make targeted molecular testing for single genes less favorable, instead there is a gaining interest for multi-gene panel...

  9. Awareness of endometrial cancer risk and compliance with screening in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ketabi, Zohreh; Mosgaard, Berit J; Gerdes, Anne-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Women with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) have a 40-60% lifetime risk for endometrial cancer. Guidelines in Denmark recommend gynecologic screening for female members of families with HNPCC. We estimated the knowledge of endometrial cancer risk and identified possible predictors...

  10. Urinary tract cancer and hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer : Risks and screening options

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijmons, RH; Kiemeney, LALM; Witjes, JA; Vasen, HFA

    Purpose: We investigate the risk of the different types of urinary tract cancer in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer families and review screening options. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively calculated the relative and cumulative risks of developing urinary tract cancer by comparing

  11. Genetic etiology of hereditary colorectal cancer: new mechanisms and advanced mutation detection techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gazzoli, I.

    2006-01-01

    The human DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system functions to repair mispaired bases in DNA that result from DNA replication errors and thereby prevents the accumulation of mutations due to such replication errors. Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), the most common form of inherited colon

  12. Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer: clinical features and survival. Results from the Danish HNPCC register

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myrhøj, T; Bisgaard, M L; Bernstein, Inge Thomsen

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is a dominantly inherited syndrome characterized by the development of colorectal cancer (CRC) and other carcinomas. Our aim was to evaluate tumour parameters and survival in HNPCC. METHODS: One hundred and eight Danish HNPCC patients...... were compared with 870 patients with sporadic colorectal cancer. RESULTS: The median age at CRC diagnosis was 41 years in the HNPCC group. HNPCC patients had significantly more carcinomas located to the right colon (68% against 49% in controls), more synchromous tumours (7% versus 1%), more...

  13. Obesity, Aspirin, and Risk of Colorectal Cancer in Carriers of Hereditary Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Movahedi, Mohammad; Bishop, D Timothy; Macrae, Finlay

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: In the general population, increased adiposity is a significant risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC), but whether obesity has similar effects in those with hereditary CRC is uncertain. This prospective study investigated the association between body mass index and cancer risk...... was 25.0 months, and mean follow-up was 55.7 months. RESULTS: During follow-up, 55 of 937 participants developed CRC. For obese participants, CRC risk was 2.41× (95% CI, 1.22 to 4.85) greater than for underweight and normal-weight participants (reference group), and CRC risk increased by 7% for each 1-kg....../m(2) increase in body mass index. The risk of all LS-related cancers in obese people was 1.77× (95% CI, 1.06 to 2.96; P = .03) greater than for the reference group. In subgroup analysis, obesity was associated with 3.72× (95% CI, 1.41 to 9.81) greater CRC risk in patients with LS with MLH1 mutation...

  14. Rapidly progressive adenomatous polyposis in a patient with germline mutations in both the APC and MLH1 genes: the worst of two worlds.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheenstra, R; Rijcken, FE; Koornstra, JJ; Hollema, H; Fodde, R; Menko, F.H.; Sijmons, RH; Bijleveld, CM; Kleibeuker, J.H.

    2003-01-01

    The two most common inherited forms of colorectal cancer are familial adenomatous polyposis and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer. Simultaneous inheritance of both an APC gene mutation and a mismatch repair gene (for example, MLH1) mutation has never been described. In the present case

  15. Proteomic profiling of a mouse model of acute intestinal Apc deletion leads to identification of potential novel biomarkers of human colorectal cancer (CRC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammoudi, Abeer; Song, Fei; Reed, Karen R; Jenkins, Rosalind E; Meniel, Valerie S; Watson, Alastair J M; Pritchard, D Mark; Clarke, Alan R; Jenkins, John R

    2013-10-25

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Accurate non-invasive screening for CRC would greatly enhance a population's health. Adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) gene mutations commonly occur in human colorectal adenomas and carcinomas, leading to Wnt signalling pathway activation. Acute conditional transgenic deletion of Apc in murine intestinal epithelium (AhCre(+)Apc(fl)(/)(fl)) causes phenotypic changes similar to those found during colorectal tumourigenesis. This study comprised a proteomic analysis of murine small intestinal epithelial cells following acute Apc deletion to identify proteins that show altered expression during human colorectal carcinogenesis, thus identifying proteins that may prove clinically useful as blood/serum biomarkers of colorectal neoplasia. Eighty-one proteins showed significantly increased expression following iTRAQ analysis, and validation of nine of these by Ingenuity Pathaway Analysis showed they could be detected in blood or serum. Expression was assessed in AhCre(+)Apc(fl)(/)(fl) small intestinal epithelium by immunohistochemistry, western blot and quantitative real-time PCR; increased nucelolin concentrations were also detected in the serum of AhCre(+)Apc(fl)(/)(fl) and Apc(Min)(/)(+) mice by ELISA. Six proteins; heat shock 60kDa protein 1, Nucleolin, Prohibitin, Cytokeratin 18, Ribosomal protein L6 and DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp) box polypeptide 5,were selected for further investigation. Increased expression of 4 of these was confirmed in human CRC by qPCR. In conclusion, several novel candidate biomarkers have been identified from analysis of transgenic mice in which the Apc gene was deleted in the intestinal epithelium that also showed increased expression in human CRC. Some of these warrant further investigation as potential serum-based biomarkers of human CRC. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Discrepancies between estimated and perceived risk of cancer among individuals with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanska, K; Nilbert, Mef; Soller, M

    2007-01-01

    to individual characteristics. A perceived risk of colorectal cancer above 60% was reported by 22/45 individuals, and only one out of five mutation carriers reported a perceived risk > 80%. Female mutation carriers, individuals below age 50, and individuals who received their oncogenetic counseling within 1......Communicating cancer risk and recommending adequate control programs is central for genetic counseling. Individuals affected by hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) are at about 80% life-time risk of colorectal cancer and for female carriers 40-60% risk of endometrial cancer and 10...... year prior to the study reported higher, albeit not significantly, perceived risks of colorectal cancer. Higher perceived risks were also reported by individuals who had lost a parent to HNPCC-related cancer at early age, whereas individuals with a personal history of cancer did not report a higher...

  17. Discrepancies between estimated and perceived risk of cancer among individuals with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanska, K; Nilbert, Mef; Soller, M

    2007-01-01

    Communicating cancer risk and recommending adequate control programs is central for genetic counseling. Individuals affected by hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) are at about 80% life-time risk of colorectal cancer and for female carriers 40-60% risk of endometrial cancer and 10...... to individual characteristics. A perceived risk of colorectal cancer above 60% was reported by 22/45 individuals, and only one out of five mutation carriers reported a perceived risk > 80%. Female mutation carriers, individuals below age 50, and individuals who received their oncogenetic counseling within 1...... year prior to the study reported higher, albeit not significantly, perceived risks of colorectal cancer. Higher perceived risks were also reported by individuals who had lost a parent to HNPCC-related cancer at early age, whereas individuals with a personal history of cancer did not report a higher...

  18. The results of gynecologic surveillance in families with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ketabi, Zohreh; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Mosgaard, Berit

    2014-01-01

    Objective. We aimed to estimate the incidence rate of endometrial cancer (EC) and to evaluate the results of EC-surveillance in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) families. Methods. All at-risk women recommended for EC-surveillance by the HNPCC-register-2959 women (19,334 women yea...... of having Lynch syndrome. We conclude that EC surveillance should only be targeted at MMR-mutation carriers. (C) 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved....

  19. Smoking is associated with hypermethylation of the APC 1A promoter in colorectal cancer: the ColoCare Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Timothy M; Klett, Hagen; Toth, Reka; Böhm, Jürgen; Gigic, Biljana; Habermann, Nina; Scherer, Dominique; Schrotz-King, Petra; Skender, Stephanie; Abbenhardt-Martin, Clare; Zielske, Lin; Schneider, Martin; Ulrich, Alexis; Schirmacher, Peter; Herpel, Esther; Brenner, Hermann; Busch, Hauke; Boerries, Melanie; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Michels, Karin B

    2017-11-01

    Smoking tobacco is a known risk factor for the development of colorectal cancer and for mortality associated with the disease. Smoking has been reported to be associated with changes in DNA methylation in blood and in lung tumour tissues, although there has been scant investigation of how epigenetic factors may be implicated in the increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. To identify epigenetic changes associated with smoking behaviours, we performed epigenome-wide analysis of DNA methylation in colorectal tumours from 36 never-smokers, 47 former smokers, and 13 active smokers, and in adjacent mucosa from 49 never-smokers, 64 former smokers, and 18 active smokers. Our analyses identified 15 CpG sites within the APC 1A promoter that were significantly hypermethylated and 14 CpG loci within the NFATC1 gene body that were significantly hypomethylated (pLIS smoking (Spearman rank correlation, ρ = 0.26, p = 0.03) and was confined to tumours, with hypermethylation never being observed in adjacent mucosa. Further analysis of adjacent mucosa revealed significant hypomethylation of four loci associated with the TNXB gene in tissue from active smokers. Our findings provide exploratory evidence for hypermethylation of the key tumour suppressor gene APC being implicated in smoking-associated colorectal carcinogenesis. Further work is required to establish the validity of our observations in independent cohorts. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. HEREDITARY NON-POLYPOSIS COLORECTAL CANCER (LYNCH SYNDROME PADA WANITA UMUR 16 TAHUN

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    Asril Zahari

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakKanker kolorektal menduduki peringkat ketiga jenis kanker yang paling sering terjadi di dunia. Sekitar 3% kasus kanker kolorektal merupakan jenis hereditary non polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC/Lynch syndrome, yang sering muncul pada usia muda. Dilaporkan satu kasus di rumah sakit Dr. M. Djamil Padang, wanita berumur 16 tahun dengan keluhan nyeri perut kanan bawah. Didapatkan riwayat penyakit serupa pada kakek, bibi pasien dan enam anggota keluarga yang lain. Pada pemeriksaan fisik abdomen teraba massa dengan konsistensi keras dan terfiksir. Pada kolonoskopi dan biopsi ditemukan tumor jenis adenocarcinoma colon moderatly differentiated di fleksura hepatika dan polip di kolon sigmoid. Berdasarkan kriteria Amsterdam pasien didiagnosa Lynch syndrome. Pada Pasien dilakukan subtotal kolektomi, anastomose ileorectal dan kemoterapi ajuvan. Identifikasi genetik sedang dikerjakan untuk melihat adanya kelainan genetik pada pasien. Pasien melakukan skrining berkala untuk mencegah kanker HNPCC jenis yang lain.Kata kunci : Hereditary non polyposis colorectal cancer, Lynch syndrome, Microsatellite instability, skrining.AbstractCarcinoma colorectal is the third most common type of cancer that occurs in the world. About 2% -3% of cases of colorectal cancer is hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC/Lynch syndrome, which often appear at a young age. Amsterdam and Bethesda criteria have been used to identify patients with Lynch syndrome.one case was reported at the Dr. M. Djamil Padang hospital, a 16-year-old girl with right lower abdominal pain. Obtained a history of similar disease in grandparents, aunts and six other family members. On physical examination found palpable fixed abdominal mass with hard consistency in the lower right abdomen. At colonoscopy and biopsy found a moderatly differentiated adenocarcinoma colon type at the hepatic flexure and the sigmoid colon polyp. Based on the Amsterdam criteria, patients diagnosed with HNPCC

  1. Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer is predicted to contribute towards colorectal cancer in young South African blacks

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    M. Ramsay

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A disproportionately large number of young (<50 years black patients present with colorectal cancer (CRC in South Africa. Although a phenomenon previously described elsewhere in Africa, its specificmolecular basis,whether sporadic or hereditary, has not been established. Molecular analysis of these tumours could link them to the features known to be associated with specific types of hereditary colorectal cancer, specifically through examination of levels of microsatellite instability, promoter methylation and the presence or absence of KRAS and BRAF mutations. The molecular features of cancer tissue samples from 44 CRC cases of black and white patients in South Africa were accordingly retrospectively analysed without knowledge of family history. Compared with samples from older blacks (>50 years, those from young black patients presented more often with a low methylation phenotype (CIMP-L and high levels of microsatellite instability (MSI-H. Furthermore, as determined by real-time PCR using probe technology, the tissues from35%of young blacks showed mutations within exon 1 of the KRAS gene. The BRAF-V600E mutation was only evident in the case of a single young black patient. Based on these results it seems likely that a proportion of CRC cases in young black patients from South Africa develop through the accumulation of mutations resulting in a mismatch repair deficiency linked to MSI-H and, possibly, germline mutations in the mismatch repair genes. The features in these patients are consistent with a diagnosis of the Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC syndrome. This finding has important implications for patient management and suggests that family members may be at high risk for CRC.

  2. Reciprocal influence of B cells and tumor macro and microenvironments in the ApcMin/+ model of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mion, Francesca; Vetrano, Stefania; Tonon, Silvia; Valeri, Viviana; Piontini, Andrea; Burocchi, Alessia; Petti, Luciana; Frossi, Barbara; Gulino, Alessandro; Tripodo, Claudio; Colombo, Mario P; Pucillo, Carlo E

    2017-01-01

    One of the most fascinating aspects of the immune system is its dynamism, meant as the ability to change and readapt according to the organism needs. Following an insult, we assist to the spontaneous organization of different immune cells which cooperate, locally and at distance, to build up an appropriate response. Throughout tumor progression, adaptations within the systemic tumor environment, or macroenvironment, result in the promotion of tumor growth, tumor invasion and metastasis to distal organs, but also to dramatic changes in the activity and composition of the immune system. In this work, we show the changes of the B-cell arm of the immune system following tumor progression in the Apc Min/+ model of colorectal cancer. Tumor macroenvironment leads to an increased proportion of total and IL-10-competent B cells in draining LNs while activates a differentiation route that leads to the expansion of IgA + lymphocytes in the spleen and peritoneum. Importantly, serum IgA levels were significantly higher in Apc Min/+ than Wt mice. The peculiar involvement of IgA response in the adenomatous transformation had correlates in the gut-mucosal compartment where IgA-positive elements increased from normal mucosa to areas of low grade dysplasia while decreasing upon overt carcinomatous transformation. Altogether, our findings provide a snapshot of the tumor education of B lymphocytes in the Apc Min/+ model of colorectal cancer. Understanding how tumor macroenvironment affects the differentiation, function and distribution of B lymphocytes is pivotal to the generation of specific therapies, targeted to switching B cells to an anti-, rather than pro-, tumoral phenotype.

  3. Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer/Lynch syndrome in three dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravochuck, Sara E; Church, James M

    2017-12-01

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is defined by family history, and Lynch syndrome (LS) is defined genetically. However, universal tumour testing is now increasingly used to screen for patients with defective mismatch repair. This mixing of the results of family history, tumour testing and germline testing produces multiple permutations and combinations that can foster confusion. We wanted to clarify hereditary colorectal cancer using the three dimensions of classification: family history, tumour testing and germline testing. Family history (Amsterdam I or II criteria versus not Amsterdam criteria) was used to define patients and families with HNPCC. Tumour testing and germline testing were then performed to sub-classify patients and families. The permutations of these classifications are applied to our registry. There were 234 HNPCC families: 129 had LS of which 55 were three-dimensional Lynch (family history, tumour testing and germline testing), 66 were two-dimensional Lynch and eight were one-dimensional Lynch. A total of 10 families had tumour Lynch (tumours with microsatellite instability or loss of expression of a mismatch repair protein but an Amsterdam-negative family and negative germline testing), five were Lynch like (Amsterdam-positive family, tumours with microsatellite instability or loss of expression of a mismatch repair protein on immunohistochemistry but negative germline testing), 26 were familial colorectal cancer type X and 95 were HNPCC. Hereditary colorectal cancer can be confusing. Sorting families in three dimensions can clarify the confusion and may direct further testing and, ultimately, surveillance. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  4. Mutations in APC, CTNNBI en K-ras genes and expression of hMLHI in sporadic colorectal carcinomas from the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luchtenborg, M.; Weijenberg, M.P.; Wark, P.A.; Merdan Saritas, M.

    2005-01-01

    Background - The early to intermediate stages of the majority of colorectal tumours are thought to be driven by aberrations in the Wnt (APC, CTNNB1) and Ras (K-ras) pathways. A smaller proportion of cancers shows mismatch repair deficiency. The aim of this study was to analyse the co-occurrence of

  5. An effect from anticipation also in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer families without identified mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timshel, Susanne; Therkildsen, Christina; Bendahl, Pär-Ola

    2009-01-01

    Optimal prevention of hereditary cancer is central and requires initiation of surveillance programmes and/or prophylactic measures at a safe age. Anticipation, expressed as an earlier age at onset in successive generations, has been demonstrated in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC......). We specifically addressed anticipation in phenotypic HNPCC families without disease-predisposing mismatch repair (MMR) defects since risk estimates and age at onset are particularly difficult to determine in this cohort. The national Danish HNPCC register was used to identify families who fulfilled...... the Amsterdam criteria for HNPCC and showed normal MMR function and/or lack of disease-predisposing MMR gene mutation. In total, 319 cancers from 212 parent-child pairs in 99 families were identified. A paired t-test and a bivariate statistical model were used to assess anticipation. Both methods demonstrated...

  6. Recurrent APC gene mutations in Polish FAP families

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    Pławski Andrzej

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The molecular diagnostics of genetically conditioned disorders is based on the identification of the mutations in the predisposing genes. Hereditary cancer disorders of the gastrointestinal tracts are caused by mutations of the tumour suppressor genes or the DNA repair genes. Occurrence of recurrent mutation allows improvement of molecular diagnostics. The mutation spectrum in the genes causing hereditary forms of colorectal cancers in the Polish population was previously described. In the present work an estimation of the frequency of the recurrent mutations of the APC gene was performed. Eight types of mutations occurred in 19.4% of our FAP families and these constitute 43% of all Polish diagnosed families.

  7. Colorectal cancer risk variants at 8q23.3 and 11q23.1 are associated with disease phenotype in APC mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbanoghli, Z; Nieuwenhuis, M H; Houwing-Duistermaat, J J; Jagmohan-Changur, S; Hes, F J; Tops, C M; Wagner, A; Aalfs, C M; Verhoef, S; Gómez García, E B; Sijmons, R H; Menko, F H; Letteboer, T G; Hoogerbrugge, N; van Wezel, T; Vasen, H F A; Wijnen, J T

    2016-10-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is a dominantly inherited syndrome caused by germline mutations in the APC gene and characterized by the development of multiple colorectal adenomas and a high risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC). The severity of polyposis is correlated with the site of the APC mutation. However, there is also phenotypic variability within families with the same underlying APC mutation, suggesting that additional factors influence the severity of polyposis. Genome-wide association studies identified several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with CRC. We assessed whether these SNPs are associated with polyp multiplicity in proven APC mutation carriers. Sixteen CRC-associated SNPs were analysed in a cohort of 419 APC germline mutation carriers from 182 families. Clinical data were retrieved from the Dutch Polyposis Registry. Allele frequencies of the SNPs were compared for patients with APC genotype as a covariate. We found a trend of association of two of the tested SNPs with the ≥100 adenoma phenotype: the C alleles of rs16892766 at 8q23.3 (OR 1.71, 95 % CI 1.05-2.76, p = 0.03, dominant model) and rs3802842 at 11q23.1 (OR 1.51, 95 % CI 1.03-2.22, p = 0.04, dominant model). We identified two risk variants that are associated with a more severe phenotype in APC mutation carriers. These risk variants may partly explain the phenotypic variability in families with the same APC gene defect. Further studies with a larger sample size are recommended to evaluate and confirm the phenotypic effect of these SNPs in FAP.

  8. Revised Bethesda Guidelines for Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer (Lynch Syndrome) and Microsatellite Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umar, Asad; Boland, C. Richard; Terdiman, Jonathan P.; Syngal, Sapna; de la Chapelle, Albert; Rüschoff, Josef; Fishel, Richard; Lindor, Noralane M.; Burgart, Lawrence J.; Hamelin, Richard; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Hiatt, Robert A.; Jass, Jeremy; Lindblom, Annika; Lynch, Henry T.; Peltomaki, Païvi; Ramsey, Scott D.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Vasen, Hans F. A.; Hawk, Ernest T.; Barrett, J. Carl; Freedman, Andrew N.; Srivastava, Sudhir

    2010-01-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), also known as Lynch syndrome, is a common autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by early age at onset, neoplastic lesions, and microsatellite instability (MSI). Because cancers with MSI account for approximately 15% of all colorectal cancers and because of the need for a better understanding of the clinical and histologic manifestations of HNPCC, the National Cancer Institute hosted an international workshop on HNPCC in 1996, which led to the development of the Bethesda Guidelines for the identification of individuals with HNPCC who should be tested for MSI. To consider revision and improvement of the Bethesda Guidelines, another HNPCC workshop was held at the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, MD, in 2002. In this commentary, we summarize the Workshop presentations on HNPCC and MSI testing; present the issues relating to the performance, sensitivity, and specificity of the Bethesda Guidelines; outline the revised Bethesda Guidelines for identifying individuals at risk for HNPCC; and recommend criteria for MSI testing. PMID:14970275

  9. Frequent alterations of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekstrand, Anna Isinger; Jönsson, Mats; Lindblom, Annika

    2010-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases-AKT-mammalian target of rapamycin pathway (PI3K/AKT/mTOR) is central in colorectal tumors. Data on its role in hereditary cancers are, however, scarce and we therefore characterized mutations in PIK3CA and KRAS, and expression of PIK3CA, phosphorylated AKT......, and PTEN in colorectal cancers linked to hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Sequencing was used to identify mutations in PIK3CA, a real-time PCR-based method to identify KRAS mutations, and immunohistochemical staining was used to evaluate the expression of PIK3CA, phosphorylated AKT...... and PTEN in 58 HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers. Derangements of at least one of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR components analyzed were found in 51/58 (88%) tumors. Mutations in PIK3CA and KRAS were identified in 14 and 31% of the tumors respectively. Overexpression of PIK3CA and phosphorylated AKT occurred in 59...

  10. Recognition and management of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes Identificación y tratamiento de los síndromes de cáncer colorrectal hereditario

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    M. Herráiz

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Over 1.900 colorectal tumors will arise in association with a hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome in Spain in 2009. The genetic defects responsible for the most common syndromes have been discovered in recent years. Genetic testing helps diagnose affected individuals and allows identification of individuals at-risk. Colonoscopy and prophylactic colectomy decrease colorectal cancer incidence and overall mortality in patients with hereditary colon cancer. Extracolonic tumors are frequent in these syndromes, so specific surveillance strategies should be offered.

  11. Clinical Characteristics of Multiple Colorectal Adenoma Patients Without Germline APC or MYH Mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tieu, Alan H; Edelstein, Daniel; Axilbund, Jennifer; Romans, Katharine E; Brosens, Lodewijk; Wiley, Elizabeth; Hylind, Linda; Giardiello, Francis M

    BACKGROUND: Patients with multiple colorectal adenomas (MCRA) without genetic cause are increasingly being diagnosed. The characteristics and natural history of this condition are not well studied. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-seven patients with MCRA, with cumulatively 10 to 99 colorectal adenomas

  12. Effects of hereditary and acquired risk factors of venous thrombosis on a thrombin generation-based APC resistance test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curvers, J; Thomassen, MCLGD; Rimmer, J; Hamulyak, K; van der Meer, J; Tans, G; Preston, FE; Rosing, J

    Background. Several hereditary and acquired risk factors for venous thromboembolism (VTE) are associated with impaired down-regulation of thrombin formation via the protein C pathway. To identify individuals at risk, functional tests are needed that estimate the risk to develop venous thrombosis.

  13. MSI-Testing in Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Carcinoma (HNPCC

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    Annegret Müller

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Genomic instability at simple repeated sequences, termed microsatellite instability (MSI, plays an important role in the analysis of sporadic and hereditary colon cancers. In hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer syndrome (HNPCC more than 90% of cases show MSI, whereas only 10–15% of sporadic colorectal cancers do so. Thus, microsatellite analysis is commonly used as the first diagnostic screening test for HNPCC. In 1997, an international collaborative workshop sponsored by the National Cancer Institute (NCI proposed a set of guidelines for MSI-testing to improve reliability and reproducibility of the analysis as well to allow comparisons between different studies and different laboratories. In this review we assess the value of current protocols forMSI-testing and discuss some diagnostic pitfalls. Our findings support continued use of the MSI marker panel recommended in 1997. Additionally, MSI-testing should be improved by use of microdissection, which helps to identify additional patients with MSI due to enrichment of tumor cells and therefore increased sensitivity. In our view, immunohistochemical staining for mismatch repair protein expression is not a substitute for MSI-analysis but complements MSI screening and helps direct further testing. In summary, MSI-analysis is a highly sensitive and reliable screening method for HNPCC, that requires a well-equipped laboratory as well as an experienced pathologist. Integration of family history and histo-pathological features is also critical.

  14. Mutations in APC, CTNNB1 and K-ras genes and expression of hMLH1 in sporadic colorectal carcinomas from the Netherlands Cohort Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lüchtenborg, Margreet; Weijenberg, Matty P; Wark, Petra A; Saritas, A Merdan; Roemen, Guido MJM; Muijen, Goos NP van; Bruïne, Adriaan P de; Brandt, Piet A van den; Goeij, Anton FPM de

    2005-01-01

    The early to intermediate stages of the majority of colorectal tumours are thought to be driven by aberrations in the Wnt (APC, CTNNB1) and Ras (K-ras) pathways. A smaller proportion of cancers shows mismatch repair deficiency. The aim of this study was to analyse the co-occurrence of these genetic alterations in relation to tumour and patient characteristics. In a group of 656 unselected sporadic colorectal cancer patients, aberrations in the APC, K-ras, CTNNB1 genes, and expression of hMLH1 were investigated. Additionally, tumours were divided in groups based on molecular features and compared with respect to patient's age at diagnosis, sex, family history of colorectal cancer, tumour sub-localisation, Dukes' stage and differentiation. Mutations at the phosphorylation sites (codons 31, 33, 37, and 45) in the CTNNB1 gene were observed in tumours from only 5/464 patients. Tumours with truncating APC mutations and activating K-ras mutations in codons 12 and 13 occurred at similar frequencies (37% (245/656) and 36% (235/656), respectively). Seventeen percent of tumours harboured both an APC and a K-ras mutation (109/656). Nine percent of all tumours (58/656) lacked hMLH1 expression. Patients harbouring a tumour with absent hMLH1 expression were older, more often women, more often had proximal colon tumours that showed poorer differentiation when compared to patients harbouring tumours with an APC and/or K-ras mutation. CTNNB1 mutations seem to be of minor importance in sporadic colorectal cancer. The main differences in tumour and patient characteristics are found between groups of patients based on mismatch repair deficiency

  15. Mutations in APC, CTNNB1 and K-ras genes and expression of hMLH1 in sporadic colorectal carcinomas from the Netherlands Cohort Study

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    de Bruïne Adriaan P

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The early to intermediate stages of the majority of colorectal tumours are thought to be driven by aberrations in the Wnt (APC, CTNNB1 and Ras (K-ras pathways. A smaller proportion of cancers shows mismatch repair deficiency. The aim of this study was to analyse the co-occurrence of these genetic alterations in relation to tumour and patient characteristics. Methods In a group of 656 unselected sporadic colorectal cancer patients, aberrations in the APC, K-ras, CTNNB1 genes, and expression of hMLH1 were investigated. Additionally, tumours were divided in groups based on molecular features and compared with respect to patient's age at diagnosis, sex, family history of colorectal cancer, tumour sub-localisation, Dukes' stage and differentiation. Results Mutations at the phosphorylation sites (codons 31, 33, 37, and 45 in the CTNNB1 gene were observed in tumours from only 5/464 patients. Tumours with truncating APC mutations and activating K-ras mutations in codons 12 and 13 occurred at similar frequencies (37% (245/656 and 36% (235/656, respectively. Seventeen percent of tumours harboured both an APC and a K-ras mutation (109/656. Nine percent of all tumours (58/656 lacked hMLH1 expression. Patients harbouring a tumour with absent hMLH1 expression were older, more often women, more often had proximal colon tumours that showed poorer differentiation when compared to patients harbouring tumours with an APC and/or K-ras mutation. Conclusion CTNNB1 mutations seem to be of minor importance in sporadic colorectal cancer. The main differences in tumour and patient characteristics are found between groups of patients based on mismatch repair deficiency.

  16. Haemochromatosis HFE gene polymorphisms as potential modifiers of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer risk and onset age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zumin; Johnstone, Daniel; Talseth-Palmer, Bente A; Evans, Tiffany-Jane; Spigelman, Allan D; Groombridge, Claire; Milward, Elizabeth A; Olynyk, John K; Suchy, Janina; Kurzawski, Grzegorz; Lubinski, Jan; Scott, Rodney J

    2009-07-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is characterized by germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes; however, variation in disease expression suggests that there are potential modifying factors. Polymorphisms of the HFE gene, which cause the iron overload disorder hereditary haemochromatosis, have been proposed as potential risk factors for the development of colorectal cancer (CRC). To understand the relationship between HNPCC disease phenotype and polymorphisms of the HFE gene, a total of 362 individuals from Australia and Poland with confirmed causative MMR gene mutations were genotyped for the HFE C282Y and H63D polymorphisms. A significantly increased risk of developing CRC was observed for H63D homozygotes when compared with combined wild-type homozygotes and heterozygotes (hazard ratio = 2.93, p = 0.007). Evidence for earlier CRC onset was also observed in H63D homozygotes with a median age of onset 6 years earlier than wild type or heterozygous participants (44 vs. 50 years of age). This effect was significant by all tests used (log-rank test p = 0.026, Wilcoxon p = 0.044, Tarone-Ware p = 0.035). No association was identified for heterozygosity of either polymorphism and limitations on power-prevented investigation of C282Y homozygosity or compound C282Y/H63D heterozygosity. In the Australian sample only, women had a significantly reduced risk of developing CRC when compared with men (hazard ratio = 0.58, p = 0.012) independent of HFE genotype for either single nucleotide polymorphisms. In conclusion, homozygosity for the HFE H63D polymorphism seems to be a genetic modifier of disease expression in HNPCC. Understanding the mechanisms by which HFE interrelates with colorectal malignancies could lead to reduction of disease risk in HNPCC.

  17. Cancer risk in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer due to MSH6 mutations: impact on counseling and surveillance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, Yvonne M. C.; Wagner, Anja; Morreau, Hans; Menko, Fred; Stormorken, Astrid; Quehenberger, Franz; Sandkuijl, Lodewijk; Møller, Pal; Genuardi, Maurizio; van Houwelingen, Hans; Tops, Carli; van Puijenbroek, Marjo; Verkuijlen, Paul; Kenter, Gemma; van Mil, Anneke; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Tan, Gita B.; Breuning, Martijn H.; Fodde, Riccardo; Wijnen, Juul Th; Bröcker-Vriends, Annette H. J. T.; Vasen, Hans

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal carcinoma (HNPCC) is caused by a mutated mismatch repair (MMR) gene. The aim of our study was to determine the cumulative risk of developing cancer in a large series of MSH6 mutation carriers. METHODS: Mutation analysis was performed in 20

  18. Presymptomatic diagnosis using a deletion of a single codon in families with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripa, Rasmus S.; Katballe, Niels; Wikman, Friedrik P.

    2005-01-01

    The diagnosis of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is often confirmed by a mutation in one of several mismatch-repair genes, in particular MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6. Presymptomatic diagnosis requires the identification of a mutation causing the disease. Three different deletions...

  19. Evaluation of an online family history tool for identifying hereditary and familial colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallenberg, F G J; Aalfs, C M; The, F O; Wientjes, C A; Depla, A C; Mundt, M W; Bossuyt, P M M; Dekker, E

    2017-09-21

    Identifying a hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC) syndrome or familial CRC (FCC) in a CRC patient may enable the patient and relatives to enroll in surveillance protocols. As these individuals are insufficiently recognized, we evaluated an online family history tool, consisting of a patient-administered family history questionnaire and an automated genetic referral recommendation, to facilitate the identification of patients with hereditary CRC or FCC. Between 2015 and 2016, all newly diagnosed CRC patients in five Dutch outpatient clinics, were included in a trial with a stepped-wedge design, when first visiting the clinic. Each hospital continued standard procedures for identifying patients at risk (control strategy) and then, after a predetermined period, switched to offering the family history tool to included patients (intervention strategy). After considering the tool-based recommendation, the health care provider could decide on and arrange the referral. Primary outcome was the relative number of CRC patients who received screening or surveillance recommendations for themselves or relatives because of hereditary CRC or FCC, provided by genetic counseling. The intervention effect was evaluated using a logit-linear model. With the tool, 46/489 (9.4%) patients received a screening or surveillance recommendation, compared to 35/292 (12.0%) in the control group. In the intention-to-treat-analysis, accounting for time trends and hospital effects, this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.58). A family history tool does not necessarily assist in increasing the number of CRC patients and relatives enrolled in screening or surveillance recommendations for hereditary CRC or FCC. Other interventions should be considered.

  20. Molecular genetic approach for screening of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

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    Metka Ravnik-Glavač

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The main goal of knowledge concerning human diseases is to transfer as much as possible useful information into clinical applications. Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC is the most common autosomal dominant inherited predisposition for colorectal cancer, accounting for 1–2% of all bowel cancer. The only way to diagnose HNPCC is by a family history consistent with the disease defined by International Collaborative Group on HNPCC (Amsterdam criteria I and II. The main molecular cause of HNPCC is a constitutional mutation in one of the mismatch repair (MMR genes. Since HNPCC mutations have been detected also in families that did not fulfil the Amsterdam criteria, molecular genetic characteristics of HNPCC cancers have been proposed as valuable first step in HNPCC identification. Microsatellite instability is present in about 90% of cancers of HNPCC patients. However, of all MSI colorectal cancers 80– 90% are sporadic. Several molecular mechanisms have been uncovered that enable distinguishing to some extent between sporadic and HNPCC cancers with MSI including hypermethylation of hMLH1 promoter and frequent mutations in BAX and TGFBR2 in sporadic CRC with MSI-H.Conclusions: The determination of MSI status and careful separation of MSI positive colorectal cancer into sporadic MSIL, sporadic MSI-H, and HNPCC MSI-H followed by mutation detection in MMR genes is important for prevention, screening and management of colorectal cancer. In some studies we and others have already shown that large-scale molecular genetic analysis for HNPCC can be done and is sensitive enough to approve population screening. Population screening includes also colonoscopy which is restricted only to the obligate carriers of the mutation. This enables that the disease is detected in earlier stages which would greatly decrease medical treatment costs and most importantly decrease mortality. In Slovenia we have started population screening based

  1. Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer and Cancer Syndromes: Recent Basic and Clinical Discoveries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erbao Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximately one-third of individuals diagnosed with colorectal cancer have a family history of cancer, suggesting that CRCs may result from a heritable component. Despite the availability of current gene-identification techniques, only 5% of all CRCs emerge from well-identifiable inherited causes for predisposition, including polyposis and nonpolyposis syndromes. Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer represents a large proportion of cases, and robustly affected patients are at increased risk for early onset, synchronous, and metachronous colorectal malignancies and extracolonic malignancies. HNPCC encompasses several cancer syndromes, such as Lynch syndrome, Lynch-like syndrome, and familial colorectal cancer type X, which have remarkable clinical presentations and overlapping genetic profiles that make clinical diagnosis a challenging task. Therefore, distinguishing between the HNPCC disorders is crucial for physicians as an approach to tailor different recommendations for patients and their at-risk family members according to the risks for colonic and extracolonic cancer associated with each syndrome. Identification of these potential patients through epidemiological characteristics and new genetic testing can estimate the individual risk, which informs appropriate cancer screening, surveillance, and/or treatment strategies. In the past three years, many appealing and important advances have been made in our understanding of the relationship between HNPCC and CRC-associated syndromes. The knowledge from the genetic profile of cancer syndromes and unique genotype-phenotype profiles in the different syndromes has changed our cognition. Therefore, this review presents and discusses HNPCC and several common nonpolyposis syndromes with respect to molecular phenotype, histopathologic features, and clinical presentation.

  2. [Hereditary colorectal cancer : An update on genetics and entities in terms of differential diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, T T; Dawson, H; Hartmann, A; Rüschoff, J

    2017-05-01

    The pathologist can contribute to recognizing hereditary causes of colorectal cancer via morphology. By identifying so-called index patients, it is possible to take preventive measures in affected families. The precise definition of the clinical presentation and the histopathological phenotype help to narrow the spectrum of expected genetic alterations. Novelties within Lynch syndrome include the recognition of EPCAM as a fifth gene locus, as well as the newly defined Lynch-like syndrome with evidence of somatic mismatch repair (MMR) mutations. With regard to polyposis-associated syndromes, the spectrum of polyps, whether serrated, hamartomatous or classic adenoma, is of crucial importance. The resulting differential diagnosis includes (attenuated) familial adenomatous polyposis ([a]FAP), MUTYH-associated polyposis (MAP), polymerase proofreading-associated polyposis (PPAP), phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) hamartoma tumor syndrome (PHTS), Peutz-Jeghers syndrome and juvenile polyposis, each with a specific genetic background.

  3. Antibody-based screening for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal carcinoma compared with microsatellite analysis and sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mariann; Katballe, Niels; Wikman, Friedrik

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair genes, MSH2, MLH1, and others are associated with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Due to the high costs of sequencing, cheaper screening methods are needed to identify HNPCC cases. Ideally, these methods should have a high...... carcinoma of whom 11 met the Amsterdam criteria and 31 were suspected to belong to HNPCC families. Thirty-five patients were examined by microsatellite analysis, 40 by immunohistochemical staining, and in 31 patients both the MLH1 and MSH2 genes were sequenced. RESULTS: Ninety-two percent of patients...... the three methods was found in 74 % of the tumors. CONCLUSIONS: The authors suggest that immunohistochemistry should be used in combination with microsatellite analysis to prescreen suspected HNPCC patients for the selection of cases where sequencing of the MLH1 and MSH2 mismatch repair genes is indicated....

  4. Germ line mutations of mismatch repair genes in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer patients with small bowel cancer: International Society for Gastrointestinal Hereditary Tumours Collaborative Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Jae-Gahb; Kim, Duck-Woo; Hong, Chang Won

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of study was to determine the clinical characteristics and mutational profiles of the mismatch repair genes in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) patients with small bowel cancer (SBC). EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: A questionnaire was mailed to 55 members of the Internatio......PURPOSE: The aim of study was to determine the clinical characteristics and mutational profiles of the mismatch repair genes in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) patients with small bowel cancer (SBC). EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: A questionnaire was mailed to 55 members...... of the International Society for Gastrointestinal Hereditary Tumours, requesting information regarding patients with HNPCC-associated SBC and germ line mismatch repair gene mutations. RESULTS: The study population consisted of 85 HNPCC patients with identified mismatch repair gene mutations and SBCs. SBC was the first...... HNPCC-associated malignancy in 14 of 41 (34.1%) patients for whom a personal history of HNPCC-associated cancers was available. The study population harbored 69 different germ line mismatch repair gene mutations, including 31 mutations in MLH1, 34 in MSH2, 3 in MSH6, and 1 in PMS2. We compared...

  5. Screening for susceptibility genes in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Li; Yin, Bo; Qu, Kaiying; Li, Jingjing; Jin, Qiao; Liu, Ling; Liu, Chunlan; Zhu, Yuxing; Wang, Qi; Peng, Xiaowei; Zhou, Jianda; Cao, Peiguo; Cao, Ke

    2018-06-01

    In the present study, hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) susceptibility genes were screened for using whole exome sequencing in 3 HNPCC patients from 1 family and using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping assays in 96 other colorectal cancer and control samples. Peripheral blood was obtained from 3 HNPCC patients from 1 family; the proband and the proband's brother and cousin. High-throughput sequencing was performed using whole exome capture technology. Sequences were aligned against the HAPMAP, dbSNP130 and 1,000 Genome Project databases. Reported common variations and synonymous mutations were filtered out. Non-synonymous single nucleotide variants in the 3 HNPCC patients were integrated and the candidate genes were identified. Finally, SNP genotyping was performed for the genes in 96 peripheral blood samples. In total, 60.4 Gb of data was retrieved from the 3 HNPCC patients using whole exome capture technology. Subsequently, according to certain screening criteria, 15 candidate genes were identified. Among the 96 samples that had been SNP genotyped, 92 were successfully genotyped for 15 gene loci, while genotyping for HTRA1 failed in 4 sporadic colorectal cancer patient samples. In 12 control subjects and 81 sporadic colorectal cancer patients, genotypes at 13 loci were wild-type, namely DDX20, ZFYVE26, PIK3R3, SLC26A8, ZEB2, TP53INP1, SLC11A1, LRBA, CEBPZ, ETAA1, SEMA3G, IFRD2 and FAT1 . The CEP290 genotype was mutant in 1 sporadic colorectal cancer patient and was wild-type in all other subjects. A total of 5 of the 12 control subjects and 30 of the 81 sporadic colorectal cancer patients had a mutant HTRA1 genotype. In all 3 HNPCC patients, the same mutant genotypes were identified at all 15 gene loci. Overall, 13 potential susceptibility genes for HNPCC were identified, namely DDX20, ZFYVE26, PIK3R3, SLC26A8, ZEB2, TP53INP1, SLC11A1, LRBA, CEBPZ, ETAA1, SEMA3G, IFRD2 and FAT1 .

  6. Methylation status of the APC and RASSF1A promoter in cell-free circulating DNA and its prognostic role in patients with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthaios, Dimitrios; Balgkouranidou, Ioanna; Karayiannakis, Anastasios; Bolanaki, Helen; Xenidis, Nikolaos; Amarantidis, Kyriakos; Chelis, Leonidas; Romanidis, Konstantinos; Chatzaki, Aikaterini; Lianidou, Evi; Trypsianis, Grigorios; Kakolyris, Stylianos

    2016-07-01

    DNA methylation is the most frequent epigenetic alteration. Using methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP), the methylation status of the adenomatous polyposis coli ( APC ) and Ras association domain family 1 isoform A ( RASSF1A ) genes was examined in cell-free circulating DNA from 155 plasma samples obtained from patients with early and advanced colorectal cancer (CRC). APC and RASSF1A hypermethylation was frequently observed in both early and advanced disease, and was significantly associated with a poorer disease outcome. The methylation status of the APC and RASSF1A promoters was investigated in cell-free DNA of patients with CRC. Using MSP, the promoter methylation status of APC and RASSF1A was examined in 155 blood samples obtained from patients with CRC, 88 of whom had operable CRC (oCRC) and 67 had metastatic CRC (mCRC). The frequency of APC methylation in patients with oCRC was 33%. Methylated APC promoter was significantly associated with older age (P=0.012), higher stage (P=0.014) and methylated RASSF1A status (P=0.050). The frequency of APC methylation in patients with mCRC was 53.7%. In these patients, APC methylation was significantly associated with methylated RASSF1A status (P=0.016). The frequency of RASSF1A methylation in patients with oCRC was 25%. Methylated RASSF1A in oCRC was significantly associated with higher stage (P=0.021). The frequency of RASSF1A methylation in mCRC was 44.8%. Methylated RASSF1A in mCRC was associated with moderate differentiation (P=0.012), high levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (P=0.023) and methylated APC status (P=0.016). Patients with an unmethylated APC gene had better survival in both early (81±5 vs. 27±4 months, PAPC . Patients with an unmethylated RASSF1A gene had better survival in both early (71±6 vs. 46±8 months, PAPC and RASSF1A promoter methylation status and survival may be indicative of a prognostic role for these genes in CRC, which requires additional testing in larger studies.

  7. Sending family history questionnaires to patients before a colonoscopy improves genetic counseling for hereditary colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessels, Koen; Eisinger, Joey D; Letteboer, Tom G; Offerhaus, G Johan A; Siersema, Peter D; Moons, Leon M G

    2017-06-01

    To investigate whether sending a family history questionnaire to patients prior to undergoing colonoscopy results in an increased availability of family history and better genetic counseling. A questionnaire was mailed to patients before they underwent outpatient colonoscopy at a university hospital in 2013. These patients' additional characteristics and referral for genetic evaluation were retrieved from the electronic medical records. Patients undergoing inpatient coloboscopy, with confirmed hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC) or inflammatory bowel disease were excluded. All study patients from 2010 to 2013 were matched with the database of the genetics department to determine who consulted a geneticist. A total of 6163 patients underwent colonoscopy from 2010 to 2013. Of 1421 who underwent colonoscopy in 2013, 53 (3.7%) consulted a geneticist, while 75 (1.6%) of 4742 patients undergoing colonoscopy between 2010 and 2012 did so (P history was not recorded in the electronic medical records of 393 (40.3%). In 129 (32.8%), family history was obtained from the completed questionnaire. In 2013, 49 (60.5%) out of 81 patients referred for genetic counseling were referred based on their family history. Eight (9.9%) patients were referred based on the completed questionnaire. Screening for hereditary CRC in a population undergoing outpatient colonoscopy with a questionnaire sent by mail resulted in an increased availability of family histories and genetic counseling. © 2017 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  8. A novel tankyrase small-molecule inhibitor suppresses APC mutation-driven colorectal tumor growth

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lau, T.; Chan, E. Y.; Callow, M.; Waaler, J.; Boggs, J.; Blake, R.A.; Magnuson, S.; Sambrone, A.; Schutten, M.; Firestein, R.; Machoň, Ondřej; Kořínek, Vladimír; Choo, E.; Diaz, D.; Merchant, M.; Polakis, P.; Holsworth, D.D.; Krauss, S.; Costal, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 73, č. 10 (2013), s. 3132-3144 ISSN 0008-5472 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/12/2042; GA ČR GAP305/11/1780; GA MŠk(CZ) LK11214 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : beta-catenin signaling * colorectal cancer * Wnt pathway Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 9.284, year: 2013

  9. Psychological impact of genetic testing for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiser, B; Collins, V; Warren, R; Gaff, C; St John, D J B; Young, M-A; Harrop, K; Brown, J; Halliday, J

    2004-12-01

    The psychological impact of predictive genetic testing for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) was assessed in 114 individuals (32 carriers and 82 non-carriers) attending familial cancer clinics, using mailed self-administered questionnaires prior to, 2 weeks, 4 months and 12 months after carrier status disclosure. Compared to baseline, carriers showed a significant increase in mean scores for intrusive and avoidant thoughts about colorectal cancer 2 weeks (t = 2.49; p = 0.014) and a significant decrease in mean depression scores 2 weeks post-notification of result (t = -3.98; p depression scores 2 weeks, 4 months and 12 months post-notification. Significant decreases from baseline for mean state anxiety scores were also observed for non-carriers 2 weeks post-notification (t = -3.99; p < 0.001). These data indicate that predictive genetic testing for HNPCC leads to psychological benefits amongst non-carriers, and no adverse psychological outcomes were observed amongst carriers.

  10. Frequency of hereditary colorectal cancer in Uruguayans patients with non polipotic colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarroca, C.; Della Valle, A.; Fresco, R.; Peltomaki, P.; Lynch, H.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Colonic Cancer Family Polipótic not (CCFNP) is a syndrome transmission autosomal dominant characterized by the aggregation of colorectal cancer (CCR), frequently associated with other solid tumors. Few studies have investigated CCFNP frequency in colorectal cancer patients. these have shown marked geographic variation (0.3% to 13%). The objective of this study is to estimate the frequency of a population CCFNP CCR carriers Uruguayan cancer patients. All patients consecutively operated CRC were included in the Hospital Central Armed Forces (Montevideo, Uruguay) between 1987 and 2003. The cases were classified into 3 groups: 1) those who met the criteria Amsterdam (CCFNP), 2) those who did not meet these criteria but considered as a population of increased risk of cancer based on family history / staff (PRI), and 3) sporadic CRC. Genetic analysis was performed for Detection of mutations in hMLH1, hMSH2 and hMSH6 gene in patients subgroup 1. 461 patients were included, with a median age of 66 years. The subgroup 1 represented 2.5% 2 5.6% and 91.8% sporadic CRC. 75% of cases CCFNP were classified as under 55. Mutations in hMLH1 / hMSH2/hMSH6 were found in 16.6% of cases included in the subgroup 1 (2 in hMLH1, 1 in hMSH2, hMSH6 none). The proportion of patients who met the Amsterdam criteria matches with that observed by other authors. However, the percentage of cases classified CCFNP identified as carriers of mutations is lower than that reported (16.6% vs. ~ 70%). This may reflect a different genetic profile Uruguayan population

  11. Molecular Analysis: Microsatellite Instability and Loss of Heterozygosity of Tumor Suppressor Gene in Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Hadžiavdić

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available HNPCC (Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer development is caused by mutation of genes included in system of mismatch repair genes. The mutation exists at 60% of patients in hMSH2 gene, 30% in hMLH1 and 10% both in hPMS1and hPMS2 genes. RER+ exists in about 90% in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer and about 15-28% in sporadic cancers.The purpose of the study was to determine highly sensitive microsatellite markers which can be fast and efficient way of microsatellite screening for detection of HNPCC patients. Moreover, we have analysed the loss of heterozygosity of tumour suppressor genes which could have the diagnostic value in detection of HPNCC patients.

  12. A targeted constitutive mutation in the APC tumor suppressor gene underlies mammary but not intestinal tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Gaspar

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Germline mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC gene are responsible for familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP, an autosomal dominant hereditary predisposition to the development of multiple colorectal adenomas and of a broad spectrum of extra-intestinal tumors. Moreover, somatic APC mutations play a rate-limiting and initiating role in the majority of sporadic colorectal cancers. Notwithstanding its multifunctional nature, the main tumor suppressing activity of the APC gene resides in its ability to regulate Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. Notably, genotype-phenotype correlations have been established at the APC gene between the length and stability of the truncated proteins encoded by different mutant alleles, the corresponding levels of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling activity they encode for, and the incidence and distribution of intestinal and extra-intestinal tumors. Here, we report a novel mouse model, Apc1572T, obtained by targeting a truncated mutation at codon 1572 in the endogenous Apc gene. This hypomorphic mutant allele results in intermediate levels of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling activation when compared with other Apc mutations associated with multifocal intestinal tumors. Notwithstanding the constitutive nature of the mutation, Apc(+/1572T mice have no predisposition to intestinal cancer but develop multifocal mammary adenocarcinomas and subsequent pulmonary metastases in both genders. The histology of the Apc1572T primary mammary tumours is highly heterogeneous with luminal, myoepithelial, and squamous lineages and is reminiscent of metaplastic carcinoma of the breast in humans. The striking phenotype of Apc(+/1572T mice suggests that specific dosages of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling activity differentially affect tissue homeostasis and initiate tumorigenesis in an organ-specific fashion.

  13. MSH2 mutation carriers are at higher risk of cancer than MLH1 mutation carriers : A study of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasen, HFA; Stormorken, A; Menko, FH; Nagengast, FM; Kleibeuker, JH; Griffioen, G; Taal, BG; Moller, P; Wijnen, JT

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by the clustering of colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer, and various other cancers. The disease is caused by mutations in DNA-mismatch-repair (MMR) genes, most frequently in MLH1, MSH2, and

  14. MSH2 mutation carriers are at higher risk of cancer than MLH1 mutation carriers: a study of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer families.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasen, H.F.; Stormorken, A.; Menko, F.H.; Nagengast, F.M.; Kleibeuker, J.H.; Griffioen, G.; Taal, B.G.; Moller, P.; Wijnen, J.T.

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by the clustering of colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer, and various other cancers. The disease is caused by mutations in DNA-mismatch-repair (MMR) genes, most frequently in MLH1, MSH2, and

  15. ["Screening" in special situations. Assessing predictive genetic screening for hereditary breast and colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Susanna; Wild, Claudia; Schamberger, Chantal

    2003-02-01

    The aim of this health technology assessment was to analyse the current scientific and genetic counselling on predictive genetic testing for hereditary breast and colorectal cancer. Predictive genetic testing will be available for several common diseases in the future and questions related to financial issues and quality standards will be raised. This report is based on a systematic/nonsystematic literature search in several databases (e.g. EmBase, Medline, Cochrane Library) and on a specific health technology assessment report (CCOHTA) and review (American Gastroenterological Ass.), respectively. Laboratory test methods, early detection methods and the benefit from prophylactic interventions were analysed and social consequences interpreted. Breast and colorectal cancer are counted among the most frequently cancer diseases. Most of them are based on random accumulation of risk factors, 5-10% show a familial determination. A hereditary modified gene is responsible for the increased cancer risk. In these families, high tumour frequency, young age at diagnosis and multiple primary tumours are remarkable. GENETIC DIAGNOSIS: Sequence analysis is the gold standard. Denaturing high performance liquid chromatography is a quick alternative method. The identification of the responsible gene defect in an affected family member is important. If the test result is positive there is an uncertainty whether the disease will develop or not, when and in which degree, which is founded in the geno-/phenotype correlation. The individual risk estimation is based upon empirical evidence. The test results affect the whole family. Currently, primary prevention is possible for familial adenomatous polyposis (celecoxib, prophylactic colectomy) and for hereditary mamma carcinoma (prophylactic mastectomy). The so-called preventive medical check-ups are early detection examinations. The evidence about early detection methods for colorectal cancer is better than for breast cancer. Prophylactic

  16. The impact of predictive genetic testing for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer: three years after testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Veronica R; Meiser, Bettina; Ukoumunne, Obioha C; Gaff, Clara; St John, D James; Halliday, Jane L

    2007-05-01

    To fully assess predictive genetic testing programs, it is important to assess outcomes over periods of time longer than the 1-year follow-up reported in the literature. We conducted a 3-year study of individuals who received predictive genetic test results for previously identified familial mutations in Australian Familial Cancer Clinics. Questionnaires were sent before attendance at the familial cancer clinic and 2 weeks, 4 months, 1 year, and 3 years after receiving test results. Psychological measures were included each time, and preventive behaviors were assessed at baseline and 1 and 3 years. Psychological measures were adjusted for age, gender, and baseline score. The study included 19 carriers and 54 non-carriers. We previously reported an increase in mean cancer-specific distress in carriers at 2 weeks with a return to baseline levels by 12 months. This level was maintained until 3 years. Non-carriers showed sustained decreases after testing with a significantly lower level at 3 years compared with baseline (P depression and anxiety scores did not differ between carriers and non-carriers and, at 3 years, were similar to baseline. All carriers and 7% of non-carriers had had a colonoscopy by 3 years, and 69% of 13 female carriers had undergone gynecological screening in the previous 2 years. Prophylactic surgery was rare. This report of long-term data indicates appropriate screening and improved psychological measures for non-carriers with no evidence of undue psychological distress in carriers of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer mutations.

  17. Psychologic distress after disclosure of genetic test results regarding hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Yoshie; Okamura, Hitoshi; Sugano, Kokichi; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Kazuma, Keiko; Akechi, Tatsuo; Uchitomi, Yosuke

    2004-07-15

    To the authors' knowledge, there have been few studies of the psychologic distress after disclosure of genetic test results for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal carcinoma (HNPCC). The objectives of this study were to identify the prevalence rates and predictors of psychologic distress and to evaluate the feelings of guilt after disclosure of the test results in Japanese probands and unaffected relatives. Probands and unaffected relatives were interviewed immediately after the first genetic counseling session for HNPCC and again 1 month after disclosure of the genetic test results. The prevalence of major and minor depression, acute stress disorder (ASD), posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) were assessed using the Structured Clinical Interview based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 3rd edition revised (DSM-III-R) or the DSM-IV; feelings of guilt were investigated using a numeric scale and a semistructured interview. Among 47 participants who completed the baseline interview, 42 participants (89%) completed the 1-month follow-up interview. Although none of the participants met the criteria for major depression, ASD, or PTSD at the follow-up interview, 3 of 42 participants (7%) met the criteria for minor depression and 2 participants (5%) had PTSS. The only predictor of psychologic distress found was the presence of a history of major or minor depression (odds ratio, 19.41; 95% confidence interval, 1.42-264.95; P depression and PTSS. Copyright 2004 American Cancer Society.

  18. Hopefulness predicts resilience after hereditary colorectal cancer genetic testing: a prospective outcome trajectories study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu Annie TW

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background - Genetic testing for hereditary colorectal cancer (HCRC had significant psychological consequences for test recipients. This prospective longitudinal study investigated the factors that predict psychological resilience in adults undergoing genetic testing for HCRC. Methods - A longitudinal study was carried out from April 2003 to August 2006 on Hong Kong Chinese HCRC family members who were recruited and offered genetic testing by the Hereditary Gastrointestinal Cancer Registry to determine psychological outcomes after genetic testing. Self-completed questionnaires were administered immediately before (pre-disclosure baseline and 2 weeks, 4 months and 1 year after result disclosure. Using validated psychological inventories, the cognitive style of hope was measured at baseline, and the psychological distress of depression and anxiety was measured at all time points. Results - Of the 76 participating subjects, 71 individuals (43 men and 28 women; mean age 38.9 ± 9.2 years from nine FAP and 24 HNPCC families completed the study, including 39 mutated gene carriers. Four patterns of outcome trajectories were created using established norms for the specified outcome measures of depression and anxiety. These included chronic dysfunction (13% and 8.7%, recovery (0% and 4.3%, delayed dysfunction (13% and 15.9% and resilience (76.8% and 66.7%. Two logistic regression analyses were conducted using hope at baseline to predict resilience, with depression and anxiety employed as outcome indicators. Because of the small number of participants, the chronic dysfunction and delayed dysfunction groups were combined into a non-resilient group for comparison with the resilient group in all subsequent analysis. Because of low frequencies, participants exhibiting a recovery trajectory (n = 3 for anxiety and n = 0 for depression were excluded from further analysis. Both regression equations were significant. Baseline hope was a significant

  19. Hopefulness predicts resilience after hereditary colorectal cancer genetic testing: a prospective outcome trajectories study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Samuel M Y; Ho, Judy W C; Bonanno, George A; Chu, Annie T W; Chan, Emily M S

    2010-06-11

    Genetic testing for hereditary colorectal cancer (HCRC) had significant psychological consequences for test recipients. This prospective longitudinal study investigated the factors that predict psychological resilience in adults undergoing genetic testing for HCRC. A longitudinal study was carried out from April 2003 to August 2006 on Hong Kong Chinese HCRC family members who were recruited and offered genetic testing by the Hereditary Gastrointestinal Cancer Registry to determine psychological outcomes after genetic testing. Self-completed questionnaires were administered immediately before (pre-disclosure baseline) and 2 weeks, 4 months and 1 year after result disclosure. Using validated psychological inventories, the cognitive style of hope was measured at baseline, and the psychological distress of depression and anxiety was measured at all time points. Of the 76 participating subjects, 71 individuals (43 men and 28 women; mean age 38.9 +/- 9.2 years) from nine FAP and 24 HNPCC families completed the study, including 39 mutated gene carriers. Four patterns of outcome trajectories were created using established norms for the specified outcome measures of depression and anxiety. These included chronic dysfunction (13% and 8.7%), recovery (0% and 4.3%), delayed dysfunction (13% and 15.9%) and resilience (76.8% and 66.7%). Two logistic regression analyses were conducted using hope at baseline to predict resilience, with depression and anxiety employed as outcome indicators. Because of the small number of participants, the chronic dysfunction and delayed dysfunction groups were combined into a non-resilient group for comparison with the resilient group in all subsequent analysis. Because of low frequencies, participants exhibiting a recovery trajectory (n = 3 for anxiety and n = 0 for depression) were excluded from further analysis. Both regression equations were significant. Baseline hope was a significant predictor of a resilience outcome trajectory for depression

  20. Different Phenotypic Consequences of Simultaneous Versus Stepwise Apc Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Jared M; Miller, Ashleigh J; Shibata, Darryl; Liskay, R Michael

    2011-01-01

    APC is considered a gatekeeper for colorectal cancer (CRC). Cells with heterozygous APC mutations have altered expression profiles suggesting that the first APC hit may help set the stage for subsequent transformation. Therefore, we measured transformation efficiency following what we have designated as “simultaneous” versus “stepwise” Apc loss. We combined a conditional Apc allele (ApcCKO ) with a Cre reporter gene and an out-of-frame Cre allele (Pms2cre ) that stochastically becomes functio...

  1. DNA mismatch repair deficiency and hereditary syndromes in Latino patients with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricker, Charité N; Hanna, Diana L; Peng, Cheng; Nguyen, Nathalie T; Stern, Mariana C; Schmit, Stephanie L; Idos, Greg E; Patel, Ravi; Tsai, Steven; Ramirez, Veronica; Lin, Sonia; Shamasunadara, Vinay; Barzi, Afsaneh; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Figueiredo, Jane C

    2017-10-01

    The landscape of hereditary syndromes and clinicopathologic characteristics among US Latino/Hispanic individuals with colorectal cancer (CRC) remains poorly understood. A total of 265 patients with CRC who were enrolled in the Hispanic Colorectal Cancer Study were included in the current study. Information regarding CRC risk factors was elicited through interviews, and treatment and survival data were abstracted from clinical charts. Tumor studies and germline genetic testing results were collected from medical records or performed using standard molecular methods. The mean age of the patients at the time of diagnosis was 53.7 years (standard deviation, 10.3 years), and 48.3% were female. Overall, 21.2% of patients reported a first-degree or second-degree relative with CRC; 3.4% met Amsterdam I/II criteria. With respect to Bethesda guidelines, 38.5% of patients met at least 1 criterion. Of the 161 individuals who had immunohistochemistry and/or microsatellite instability testing performed, 21 (13.0%) had mismatch repair (MMR)-deficient (dMMR) tumors. dMMR tumors were associated with female sex (61.9%), earlier age at the time of diagnosis (50.4 ± 12.4 years), proximal location (61.9%), and first-degree (23.8%) or second-degree (9.5%) family history of CRC. Among individuals with dMMR tumors, 13 (61.9%) had a germline MMR mutation (MutL homolog 1 [MLH1] in 6 patients; MutS homolog 2 [MSH2] in 4 patients; MutS homolog 6 [MHS6] in 2 patients; and PMS1 homolog 2, mismatch repair system component [PMS2] in 1 patient). The authors identified 2 additional MLH1 mutation carriers by genetic testing who had not received immunohistochemistry/microsatellite instability testing. In total, 5.7% of the entire cohort were confirmed to have Lynch syndrome. In addition, 6 individuals (2.3%) had a polyposis phenotype. The percentage of dMMR tumors noted among Latino individuals (13%) is similar to estimates in non-Hispanic white individuals. In the current study, the majority of

  2. Knowledge about hereditary cancer of women with family histories of breast, colorectal, or both types of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campacci, N; de Lima, J O; Ramadan, L; Palmero, E I

    2015-03-01

    Usually, the mass media do not address hereditary cancer and their risk factors, nor are these topics discussed at the community level. We used an informative guide on cancer and hereditary cancer, followed by a questionnaire on these topics to investigate the relevant knowledge among women at high risk for hereditary breast and/or colorectal cancer from a population-based cohort. The cohort was composed of 81 Brazilian women with positive family histories of breast and/or colorectal cancer. Strauss and Corbin's Grounded Theory was used for qualitative analysis. The average age of the cohort was 49.9 years old. Three participants (3.9%) were illiterate, 45 (59.2%) had attended elementary school, 14 (18.4%) had secondary school, and 14 (18.4%) held higher education degrees. A total of 47 (54.3%) volunteers were unable to fully understand the information provided in the guide because they did not know the meaning of words such as metastasis, malignant, hereditary, sporadic, or oncogenetics. Notwithstanding, the acceptance of the educational tool utilized was satisfactory, and it enhanced the volunteers' interest in a better understanding of cancer and heredity. Thereby, we concluded that the low knowledge of this important subject and the unawareness about fundamental terms required for the comprehension of this specific type of neoplasm made us believe that the use of the informative guide can provide a great value when used previously to the genetic counseling consultations. Besides, educational tools of easy understanding should be part of everyday clinical practice, from primary to specialized patient care.

  3. MLH1-rheMac hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer syndrome in rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brammer, David W; Gillespie, Patrick J; Tian, Mei; Young, Daniel; Raveendran, Muthuswamy; Williams, Lawrence E; Gagea, Mihai; Benavides, Fernando J; Perez, Carlos J; Broaddus, Russell R; Bernacky, Bruce J; Barnhart, Kirstin F; Alauddin, Mian M; Bhutani, Manoop S; Gibbs, Richard A; Sidman, Richard L; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih; Rogers, Jeffrey; Abee, Christian R; Gelovani, Juri G

    2018-03-13

    Over the past two decades, 33 cases of colonic adenocarcinomas have been diagnosed in rhesus macaques ( Macaca mulatta ) at the nonhuman primate colony of the Keeling Center for Comparative Medicine and Research at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. The distinctive feature in these cases, based on PET/computed tomography (CT) imaging, was the presence of two or three tumor lesions in different locations, including proximal to the ileocecal juncture, proximal to the hepatic flexure, and/or in the sigmoid colon. These colon carcinoma lesions selectively accumulated [ 18 F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([ 18 F]FDG) and [ 18 F]fluoroacetate ([ 18 F]FACE) at high levels, reflecting elevated carbohydrate and fatty acid metabolism in these tumors. In contrast, the accumulation of [ 18 F]fluorothymidine ([ 18 F]FLT) was less significant, reflecting slow proliferative activity in these tumors. The diagnoses of colon carcinomas were confirmed by endoscopy. The expression of MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 proteins and the degree of microsatellite instability (MSI) was assessed in colon carcinomas. The loss of MLH1 protein expression was observed in all tumors and was associated with a deletion mutation in the MLH1 promoter region and/or multiple single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) mutations in the MLH1 gene. All tumors exhibited various degrees of MSI. The pedigree analysis of this rhesus macaque population revealed several clusters of affected animals related to each other over several generations, suggesting an autosomal dominant transmission of susceptibility for colon cancer. The newly discovered hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer syndrome in rhesus macaques, termed MLH1 -rheMac, may serve as a model for development of novel approaches to diagnosis and therapy of Lynch syndrome in humans. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  4. Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer: not just a barium enema{exclamation_point} Radiographic manifestations and screening tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, L.; Jeon, P. [Health Sciences Center, Diagnostic Imaging, St. John' s, Newfoundland (Canada)]. E-mail: u43dlb@mun.ca; Green, J. [Health Sciences Center, Discipline of Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, St. John' s, Newfoundland (Canada)

    2007-10-15

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is an autosomal dominant trait characterized by presentation of colorectal cancer (CRC) at an early age and by an increased risk of other primary malignancies, including those of the endometrium. ovaries, stomach, small bowel, upper biliary tract, skin, and brain, as well as by transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) that especially involves the renal pelvis and ureter. Because specific genetic mutations causing HNPCC have been recently discovered, genetic screening options have been developed for some families. Subsequently, radiology has an increasing role in surveillance for and management of these HNPCC-associated tumours. Although colonoscopy is the mainstay of a screening regimen for colon cancer, the barium enema has been a standard radiologic investigation. Further, computed tomography (CT) colonography (now practised in various centres) will, with further refinement, prove to be of increasing value. Ultrasonography is a standard investigation for endometrial and ovarian cancer, with CT and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging often playing a central role. As for TCC, intravenous urography (IVU) had been a standard investigation tool. However, with continued evolution of multidetector row CT with postprocessing manipulation (CT urography [CTU]), the role of IVU is diminishing in most centres. Newfoundland has a high prevalence of HNPCC exhibiting a broad range of manifestations. In this article, radiologic images of various tumours from individuals with HNPCC demonstrate a radiologic spectrum of this fascinating hereditary disease. Screening implications and specific screening methods are reviewed. (author)

  5. Psychological impact of genetic counseling for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer: the role of cancer history, gender, age, and psychological distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenbring, Monika I; Kreddig, Nina; Deges, Gabriele; Epplen, Joerg T; Kunstmann, Erdmute; Stemmler, Susanne; Schulmann, Karsten; Willert, Joerg; Schmiegel, Wolf

    2011-04-01

    We prospectively examined the impact of an initial interdisciplinary genetic counseling (human geneticist, oncologist, and psycho-oncologist) on feelings of anxiety with a special focus on subgroups related to personal cancer history, gender, age, and education. At baseline, cancer-affected men revealed a significantly higher level of anxiety than unaffected men (pDepression Scale-A cases can be predicted by general distress (Brief Symptom Inventory) as well as by hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer-related cognitions of intrusion and avoidance (impact of event scale) with a correct classification of 86%. Although initial hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer counseling leads to an overall reduction of anxiety, differential effects of cancer history, gender, and age focus on subgroups of cancer-affected men, who may display unexpectedly high anxiety scores at baseline. Especially younger men do not seem to reduce this high anxiety level. Baseline anxiety was mainly determined by maladaptive situation-specific cognitions. Therefore, consulters should be more aware of anxiety-related cognitions in cancer-affected younger men.

  6. Immunopurification of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumour suppressor gene encodes a 2843 residue (310 kDa) protein. APC is a multifunctional protein involved in the regulation of β-catenin/Wnt signalling, cytoskeletal dynamics and cell adhesion. APC mutations occur in most colorectal cancers and typically result in truncation of the C-terminal half of the protein. Results In order to investigate the biophysical properties of APC, we have generated a set of monoclonal antibodies which enable purification of recombinant forms of APC. Here we describe the characterisation of these anti-APC monoclonal antibodies (APC-NT) that specifically recognise endogenous APC both in solution and in fixed cells. Full-length APC(1–2843) and cancer-associated, truncated APC proteins, APC(1–1638) and APC(1–1311) were produced in Sf9 insect cells. Conclusions Recombinant APC proteins were purified using a two-step affinity approach using our APC-NT antibodies. The purification of APC proteins provides the basis for detailed structure/function analyses of full-length, cancer-truncated and endogenous forms of the protein. PMID:24156781

  7. Molecular spectrum of KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, TP53, and APC somatic gene mutations in Arab patients with colorectal cancer: determination of frequency and distribution pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shamsi, Humaid O.; Jones, Jeremy; Fahmawi, Yazan; Dahbour, Ibrahim; Tabash, Aziz; Abdel-Wahab, Reham; Abousamra, Ahmed O. S.; Shaw, Kenna R.; Xiao, Lianchun; Hassan, Manal M.; Kipp, Benjamin R.; Kopetz, Scott; Soliman, Amr S.; McWilliams, Robert R.; Wolff, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The frequency rates of mutations such as KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA in colorectal cancer (CRC) differ among populations. The aim of this study was to assess mutation frequencies in the Arab population and determine their correlations with certain clinicopathological features. Methods Arab patients from the Arab Gulf region and a population of age- and sex-matched Western patients with CRC whose tumors were evaluated with next-generation sequencing (NGS) were identified and retrospectively reviewed. The mutation rates of KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, TP53, and APC were recorded, along with clinicopathological features. Other somatic mutation and their rates were also identified. Fisher’s exact test was used to determine the association between mutation status and clinical features. Results A total of 198 cases were identified; 99 Arab patients and 99 Western patients. Fifty-two point seven percent of Arab patients had stage IV disease at initial presentation, 74.2% had left-sided tumors. Eighty-nine point two percent had tubular adenocarcinoma and 10.8% had mucinous adenocarcinoma. The prevalence rates of KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, TP53, APC, SMAD, FBXW7 mutations in Arab population were 44.4%, 4%, 4%, 13.1%, 52.5%, 27.3%, 2% and 3% respectively. Compared to 48.4%, 4%, 4%, 12.1%, 47.5%, 24.2%, 11.1% and 0% respectively in matched Western population. Associations between these mutations and patient clinicopathological features were not statistically significant. Conclusions This is the first study to report comprehensive hotspot mutations using NGS in Arab patients with CRC. The frequency of KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, TP53, APC and PIK3CA mutations were similar to reported frequencies in Western population except SMAD4 that had a lower frequency and higher frequency of FBXW7 mutation. PMID:28078112

  8. Frequent alterations of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekstrand, Anna Isinger; Jönsson, Mats; Lindblom, Annika

    2010-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases-AKT-mammalian target of rapamycin pathway (PI3K/AKT/mTOR) is central in colorectal tumors. Data on its role in hereditary cancers are, however, scarce and we therefore characterized mutations in PIK3CA and KRAS, and expression of PIK3CA, phosphorylated AKT...... and PTEN in 58 HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers. Derangements of at least one of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR components analyzed were found in 51/58 (88%) tumors. Mutations in PIK3CA and KRAS were identified in 14 and 31% of the tumors respectively. Overexpression of PIK3CA and phosphorylated AKT occurred in 59...... and 75% and were strongly associated (P = 0.005). Reduced/lost PTEN expression was found in 63% of the tumors. Though HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers show simple genetic profiles with few chromosomal alterations, we demonstrate frequent and repeated targeting of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, which...

  9. Outcome of 24 years national surveillance in different hereditary colorectal cancer subgroups leading to more individualised surveillance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Lars Joachim; Ladelund, Steen; Frederiksen, Birgitte Lidegaard

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Individuals with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) have a high risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). The benefits of colonic surveillance in Lynch syndrome and Amsterdam-positive (familial CRC type X familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX)) families are clear; only...... in the Lynch subgroup (2.0%) than in any other subgroup (0.0-0.4%, pLynch (3.6%) and non-Lynch (2.3-3.9%, p=0.28) subgroups. Non-Lynch Amsterdam-positive and Amsterdam-negative families were similar in their CRC (0.1-0.4%, p=0.......072), advanced adenoma (2.3-3.3%, p=0.32) and simple adenoma (8.4-9.9%, p=0.43) incidence. In moderate-risk families, no CRC and only one advanced adenoma was found. CONCLUSIONS: The risk of CRC in Lynch families is considerable, despite biannual surveillance. We suggest less frequent and more individualised...

  10. Novel mutations and phenotypic associations identified through APC, MUTYH, NTHL1, POLD1, POLE gene analysis in Indian Familial Adenomatous Polyposis cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nikhat; Lipsa, Anuja; Arunachal, Gautham; Ramadwar, Mukta; Sarin, Rajiv

    2017-05-22

    Colo-Rectal Cancer is a common cancer worldwide with 5-10% cases being hereditary. Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP) syndrome is due to germline mutations in the APC or rarely MUTYH gene. NTHL1, POLD1, POLE have been recently reported in previously unexplained FAP cases. Unlike the Caucasian population, FAP phenotype and its genotypic associations have not been widely studied in several geoethnic groups. We report the first FAP cohort from South Asia and the only non-Caucasian cohort with comprehensive analysis of APC, MUTYH, NTHL1, POLD1, POLE genes. In this cohort of 112 individuals from 53 FAP families, we detected germline APC mutations in 60 individuals (45 families) and biallelic MUTYH mutations in 4 individuals (2 families). No NTHL1, POLD1, POLE mutations were identified. Fifteen novel APC mutations and a new Indian APC mutational hotspot at codon 935 were identified. Eight very rare FAP phenotype or phenotypes rarely associated with mutations outside specific APC regions were observed. APC genotype-phenotype association studies in different geo-ethnic groups can enrich the existing knowledge about phenotypic consequences of distinct APC mutations and guide counseling and risk management in different populations. A stepwise cost-effective mutation screening approach is proposed for genetic testing of south Asian FAP patients.

  11. Presymptomatic diagnosis using a deletion of a single codon in families with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripa, R S; Katballe, N; Wikman, F P

    2005-01-01

    The diagnosis of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is often confirmed by a mutation in one of several mismatch-repair genes, in particular MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6. Presymptomatic diagnosis requires the identification of a mutation causing the disease. Three different deletions......, identified after mutation screening of MSH2 and MLH1. All patients in the families were haplotyped using markers flanking the MSH2 gene. The haplotypes revealed that the five families with high probability descended from only two founders. The N596del segregated with the HNPCC phenotype with lod scores of 3.......2 and 2.0 at the recombination fraction of 0.0 in the two founder families. Sequencing of MSH2 and MLH1 did not reveal other pathogenic mutations, and N596del was not identified in 50 healthy controls. The mutation has previously been found expressed in mRNA, and is located in a conserved domain...

  12. Hereditary Colorectal Tumors: A Literature Review on MUTYH-Associated Polyposis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micaella Kantor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available MAP (MUTYH-associated polyposis is a syndrome, described in 2002, which is associated with colorectal adenomas, with enhanced colorectal carcinogenesis. This review synthesizes the available literature on MAP and outlines its pathogenesis, association with colorectal tumorigenesis, screening, treatment, and the subtle differences between it and its close cousins—FAP and AFAP. The preponderance of data is collected using MAP guidelines. However, although AFAP and MAP appear similar, potentially important distinctions exist, warranting targeted diagnostic criteria and treatment approaches. We suggest that it may be prudent to screen for MAP earlier than in current clinical practice, as it has been shown that sequence variants are associated with more severe disease, presenting with an earlier onset of colorectal cancer. Finally, we issue a call-to-action for much-needed further data to establish clear clinical and diagnostic criteria.

  13. A rare case of choroid plexus carcinoma that led to the diagnosis of Lynch syndrome (hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Viola W; Hinduja, Sanjay; Knezevich, Stevan R; Silveira, William R; DeLozier, Celia D

    2017-07-01

    Lynch syndrome (hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by a significant risk of colorectal and endometrial cancers. A variety of other epithelial cancers may be associated with this syndrome. Brian tumors are infrequent, but have been reported in series. Here, we report a case of a 34-year-old Caucasian woman with WHO grade III choroid plexus carcinoma (CPC). Comprehensive genomic profiling of the patient's resected brain tumor revealed mutations in six genes: PTEN, VHL, MSH6, NOTCH1, RB1, and TP53. Family history is significant for endometrial cancer in her mother and sister as well as colon cancer in her maternal grandfather suggestive of Lynch syndrome. Site-specific mutational analysis showed the MSH6 mutation (p.R482*) in peripheral lymphocytes. Subsequently we performed immunohistochemical staining of the tumor tissue which demonstrated widespread loss of MSH6 with intact MSH2, MLH1, and PMS2. The diagnosis of Lynch syndrome due to a mutation in MSH6 was therefore established. Our patient elected to have adjuvant radiation to the surgical bed only followed by prophylactic total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and is doing very well. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of CPC in an adult patient with a germline MSH6 mutation. We believe our data have provided molecular evidence to suggest that CPC could potentially be part of the Lynch syndrome spectrum. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Cigarette smoking and colorectal cancer: APC mutations, hMLH1 Expression and GSTM1 and GSTT1 Polymorphisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luchtenborg, M.; Weijenberg, M.P.; Kampman, E.; Muijen, van G.N.P.; Roemen, G.M.J.M.; Zeegers, M.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Veer, van 't P.; Goeij, de A.F.P.M.; Brandt, van den P.A.

    2005-01-01

    The contribution of cigarette smoking to sporadic colorectal cancer may differ according to molecular aspects of the tumor or according to glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1) or glutathione S-transferase T1 (GSTT1) genotype. In the prospective Netherlands Cohort Study on Diet and Cancer, adjusted

  15. A new hereditary colorectal cancer network in the Middle East and eastern mediterranean countries to improve care for high-risk families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbanoghli, Zeinab; Jabari, Carol; Sweidan, Walid; Hammoudeh, Wail; Cortas, George; Sharara, Ala I; Abedrabbo, Amal; Hourani, Ijad; Mahjoubi, Bahareh; Majidzadeh, Keivan; Tözün, Nurdan; Ziada-Bouchaar, Hadia; Hamoudi, Waseem; Diab, Osama; Khorshid, Hamid Reza Khorram; Lynch, Henry; Vasen, Hans

    2018-04-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) has a very high incidence in the western world. Data from registries in the Middle East showed that the incidence of CRC is relatively low in these countries. However, these data also showed that CRC incidence has increased substantially over the past three decades and that a high proportion of cases are diagnosed at an early age (Middle East was discussed and the idea was conceived to establish a network on hereditary colorectal cancer (HCCN-ME) with the goal of improving care for high-risk groups in the Middle East and (Eastern) Mediterranean Countries.

  16. Long-term effect of resistant starch on cancer risk in carriers of hereditary colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathers, John C; Movahedi, Mohammad; Macrae, Finlay

    2012-01-01

    have been done. We assessed the effect of resistant starch on the incidence of colorectal cancer. METHODS: In the CAPP2 study, individuals with Lynch syndrome were randomly assigned in a two-by-two factorial design to receive 600 mg aspirin or aspirin placebo or 30 g resistant starch or starch placebo...

  17. Monitoring coping style moderates emotional reactions to genetic testing for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiloh, S; Koehly, L; Jenkins, J; Martin, J; Hadley, D

    2008-08-01

    The emotional effects of genetic testing for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) provided within a counseling program were assessed among 253 individuals. Assessments were scheduled at baseline before testing, and again after 6 and 12 months post-test. Negative emotional reactions were evaluated using the Revised Impact of Event Scale and the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale. Monitoring coping style was assessed at baseline using the Miller Behavioral Style Scale. Mean reductions were indicated in distress and depression levels within the first 6 months after counseling and testing. High monitors were generally more distressed than low monitors, specifically if they had indeterminate or positive results. Genetic counseling and testing for HNPCC do not result in long-term distress for most people. Of the variables investigated, only time and coping style have main effects on emotional reactions, and the impacts of mutation status are moderated by coping style. Psychological interventions, aimed to alleviate adverse emotional effects, were suggested for certain participants, i.e. recipients of positive or indeterminate results who are high monitors.

  18. Identity, community and care in online accounts of hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Emily; Broer, Tineke; Kerr, Anne; Cunningham-Burley, Sarah

    2018-01-01

    Sociological literature has explored how shifts in the point at which individuals may be designated as diseased impact upon experiences of ill health. Research has shown that experiences of being genetically "at risk" are shaped by and shape familial relations, coping strategies, and new forms of biosociality. Less is known about how living with genetic risk is negotiated in the everyday and over time, and the wider forms of identity, communities and care this involves. This article explores these arrangements drawing on online bloggers' accounts of Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP). We show how accounts of genetic risk co-exist with more palpable experiences of FAP in everyday life, notably the consequences of prophylactic surgeries. We consider how the act of blogging represents but also constitutes everyday experiences of hereditary cancer syndrome as simultaneously ordinary and exceptional, and reflect on the implications of our analysis for understanding experiences of genetic cancer risk.

  19. Recommendations to improve identification of hereditary and familial colorectal cancer in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vasen, H F A; Möslein, G; Alonso, A

    2010-01-01

    of individuals at high risk for CRC prevents the development of advanced CRC. About 1 million individuals in Western Europe are at risk for Lynch syndrome. We performed a survey to evaluate the strategies currently used to identify individuals at high risk for CRC in 14 Western European countries. Questionnaires...... recommended as tools to select high-risk patients for genetic testing and are performed in most countries in patients suspected of Lynch syndrome. In one country, IHC was recommended in all new cases of CRC. In most countries there are no specific programs on cancer genetics in the teaching curriculum...... for medical doctors. In conclusion, the outcome of this survey and the discussions within an European expert group may be used to improve the strategies to identify individuals at high risk of CRC. More attention should be given to increasing the awareness of the general population of hereditary CRC...

  20. Novel LOVD databases for hereditary breast cancer and colorectal cancer genes in the Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Min; Cong, Peikuan; Wang, Yue; Lin, Changsong; Yuan, Ying; Dong, Jian; Banerjee, Santasree; Zhang, Tao; Chen, Yanling; Zhang, Ting; Chen, Mingqing; Hu, Peter; Zheng, Shu; Zhang, Jin; Qi, Ming

    2011-12-01

    The Human Variome Project (HVP) is an international consortium of clinicians, geneticists, and researchers from over 30 countries, aiming to facilitate the establishment and maintenance of standards, systems, and infrastructure for the worldwide collection and sharing of all genetic variations effecting human disease. The HVP-China Node will build new and supplement existing databases of genetic diseases. As the first effort, we have created a novel variant database of BRCA1 and BRCA2, mismatch repair genes (MMR), and APC genes for breast cancer, Lynch syndrome, and familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), respectively, in the Chinese population using the Leiden Open Variation Database (LOVD) format. We searched PubMed and some Chinese search engines to collect all the variants of these genes in the Chinese population that have already been detected and reported. There are some differences in the gene variants between the Chinese population and that of other ethnicities. The database is available online at http://www.genomed.org/LOVD/. Our database will appear to users who survey other LOVD databases (e.g., by Google search, or by NCBI GeneTests search). Remote submissions are accepted, and the information is updated monthly. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. MSH6 Mutations are Frequent in Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer Families With Normal pMSH6 Expression as Detected by Immunohistochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okkels, Henrik; Larsen, K.L.; Thorlacius-Ussing, O.

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION:: Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is an autosomal dominant condition accounting for 2% to 4% of all colorectal cancer cases worldwide. Families with germ line mutations in 1 of 6 mismatch repair genes are known as Lynch syndrome families. The largest number...... this approach in Lynch families carrying mutations in MSH6. MATERIALS AND METHODS:: Results of the screening of the MSH6 gene in HNPCC families were compared with those obtained on immunohistochemical protein analysis. RESULTS:: In 56 (7%) of 815 families, at least 1 MSH6 mutation, 23 definitively pathogenic...... be detected, whereas in 34.5% pMSH6 was present and pMLH1/pPMS2 was absent. CONCLUSIONS:: If genetic screening of HNPCC families depended on immunohistochemical results, a substantial number of families harboring a pathogenic mutation in MSH6 and the vast majority of families harboring an MSH6 unclassified...

  2. Four novel germline mutations in the MLH1 and PMS2 mismatch repair genes in patients with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montazer Haghighi, Mahdi; Radpour, Ramin; Aghajani, Katayoun; Zali, Narges; Molaei, Mahsa; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2009-08-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is the most common cause of early onset hereditary colorectal cancer. In the majority of HNPCC families, microsatellite instability (MSI) and germline mutation in one of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes are found. The entire coding sequence of MMR genes (MLH1, MLH2, MLH6, and PMS2) was analyzed using direct sequencing. Also, tumor tests were done as MSI and immunohistochemistry testing. We were able to find three novel MLH1 and one novel PMS2 germline mutations in three Iranian HNPCC patients. The first was a transversion mutation c.346A>C (T116P) and happened in the highly conserved HATPase-c region of MLH1 protein. The second was a transversion mutation c.736A>T (I246L), which caused an amino acid change of isoleucine to leucine. The third mutation (c.2145,6 delTG) was frameshift and resulted in an immature stop codon in five codons downstream. All of these three mutations were detected in the MLH1 gene. The other mutation was a transition mutation, c.676G>A (G207E), which has been found in exon six of the PMS2 gene and caused an amino acid change of glycine to glutamic acid. MSI assay revealed high instability in microsatellite for two patients and microsatellite stable for one patient. In all patients, an abnormal expression of the MMR proteins in HNPCC was related to the above novel mutations.

  3. Loss of PACS-2 delays regeneration in DSS-induced colitis but does not affect the ApcMin model of colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dombernowsky, Sarah L.; Schwarz, Jeanette; Samsøe-Petersen, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    in these processes. Specifically, we analyzed the role of Pacs2- deficiency in a DSS-induced colitis model as well as in the genetic ApcMin colon cancer model. We now report that loss of PACS-2 delays tissue regeneration after colonic injury with little effect on key inflammatory parameters. We did however...... not observe any apparent effects on tumor formation driven by excessive proliferative signaling downstream from APC-deficiency. Our findings reveal that the role of PACS- 2 in regulating ADAM17-mediated shedding is not an obligate requirement for the epithelium to respond to the strong inflammatory...

  4. Molecular Features and Methylation Status in Early Onset (≤40 Years Colorectal Cancer: A Population Based, Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Magnani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is usually considered a disease of the elderly. However, a small fraction of patients develops colorectal cancer earlier. The aim of our study was to define the frequency of known hereditary colorectal syndromes and to characterise genetic and epigenetic features of early nonhereditary tumors. Thirty-three patients ≤40 years with diagnosis of colorectal cancer and 41 patients with disease at >60 years of age were investigated for MSI, Mismatch Repair proteins expression, KRAS and BRAF mutations, hypermethylation, and LINE-1 hypomethylation. Detection of germline mutations was performed in Mismatch Repair, APC and MUTYH genes. Early onset colorectal cancer showed a high incidence of hereditary forms (18%. KRAS mutations were detected in 36% of early nonhereditary tumors. Early onset colorectal cancer disclosed an average number of methylated genes significantly lower when compared to the controls (p=0.02. Finally both of the two groups were highly methylated in ESR1, GATA5, and WT1 genes and were similar for LINE-1 hypomethylation. The genetic make-up of carcinomas differs from young to elderly patients. Early onset tumors showed more frequently a constitutional defective of Mismatch Repair System and a minor number of methylated genes. Hypermethylation of ESR1, GATA5, and WT1 genes suggests possible markers in the earlier diagnosis of colorectal tumorigenesis.

  5. The mRNA level of MLH1 in peripheral blood is a biomarker for the diagnosis of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hong; Li, Hui; Cui, Yongan; Xiao, Wei; Dai, Guihong; Huang, Junxing; Wang, Chaofu

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is caused by functional defects in mismatch repair (MMR) genes, including mutL homolog 1 (MLH1) and mutS homolog 2 (MSH2). This study aimed to assess whether the mRNA expression of MLH1 in peripheral blood could be used as a biomarkers for the diagnosis of HNPCC. The mRNA level of MLH1 was determined in 19 HNPCC families (46 members) using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The mRNA levels of MLH1 in HNPCC were significantly lower than controls (P MLH1 for the diagnosis of HNPCC with the area under curve of 0.858. At an optimal cut-off value (0.511), the mRNA level of MLH1 had a sensitivity of 81.3% and a specificity of 86.7% for distinguishing HNPCC from controls. In conclusion, the mRNA expression of MLH1 in peripheral blood may serve as a biomarker for the diagnosis of HNPCC.

  6. Does a "one-stop" gynecology screening clinic for women in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer families have an impact on their psychological morbidity and perception of health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, N J; Munot, S; Sheridan, E; Duffy, S R

    2008-01-01

    Screening programs can reduce the burden of disease, however, they can be associated with raised levels of anxiety. The risk of endometrial and ovarian cancer is increased in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). There is no prospective evidence to support screening for gynecological disease in HNPCC, however, current recommendations include the use of ultrasound and endometrial biopsy. This study assesses the impact of screening for gynecological cancer on self-reported symptoms of anxiety, depression, and perceptions of health. Women from HNPCC families attending gynecological screening (n = 26) completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the ShortForm36v2 questionnaires prior to screening with transvaginal ultrasound, outpatient/office hysteroscopy, endometrial biopsy, and ovarian tumor marker assessment (CA125). The same questionnaires were completed at 3 and 6 months following screening (15/26). Women in HNPCC families attending for gynecological screening did not have excess symptoms of anxiety or depression at baseline in subjective comparison to other populations. The process of screening and false positive screening results had no significant impact on symptoms of anxiety and depression or perceptions of health. We conclude that within the limitations of analysis in this small study group, screening for gynecological disease in HNPCC does not appear to be associated with any psychological morbidity.

  7. Pulmonary sclerosing hemangioma in a 21-year-old male with metastatic hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer: Report of a case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angele Martin K

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pulmonary sclerosing hemangioma (SH is a rare tumor of the lung predominantly affecting Asian women in their fifth decade of life. SH is thought to evolve from primitive respiratory epithelium and mostly shows benign biological behavior; however, cases of lymph node metastases, local recurrence and multiple lesions have been described. Case Presentation We report the case of a 21-year-old Caucasian male with a history of locally advanced and metastatic rectal carcinoma (UICC IV; pT4, pN1, M1(hep that was eventually identified as having hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC, Lynch syndrome. After neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by low anterior resection, adjuvant chemotherapy and metachronous partial hepatectomy, he was admitted for treatment of newly diagnosed bilateral pulmonary metastases. Thoracic computed tomography showed a homogenous, sharply marked nodule in the left lower lobe. We decided in favor of atypical resection followed by systematic lymphadenectomy. Histopathological analysis revealed the diagnosis of SH. Conclusions Cases have been published with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP and simultaneous SH. FAP, Gardner syndrome and Li-Fraumeni syndrome, however, had been ruled out in the present case. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing SH associated with Lynch syndrome.

  8. Functions of the APC tumor suppressor protein dependent and independent of canonical WNT signaling: implications for therapeutic targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankey, William; Frankel, Wendy L; Groden, Joanna

    2018-03-01

    The acquisition of biallelic mutations in the APC gene is a rate-limiting step in the development of most colorectal cancers and occurs in the earliest lesions. APC encodes a 312-kDa protein that localizes to multiple subcellular compartments and performs diverse functions. APC participates in a cytoplasmic complex that promotes the destruction of the transcriptional licensing factor β-catenin; APC mutations that abolish this function trigger constitutive activation of the canonical WNT signaling pathway, a characteristic found in almost all colorectal cancers. By negatively regulating canonical WNT signaling, APC counteracts proliferation, promotes differentiation, facilitates apoptosis, and suppresses invasion and tumor progression. APC further antagonizes canonical WNT signaling by interacting with and counteracting β-catenin in the nucleus. APC also suppresses tumor initiation and progression in the colorectal epithelium through functions that are independent of canonical WNT signaling. APC regulates the mitotic spindle to facilitate proper chromosome segregation, localizes to the cell periphery and cell protrusions to establish cell polarity and appropriate directional migration, and inhibits DNA replication by interacting directly with DNA. Mutations in APC are often frameshifts, insertions, or deletions that introduce premature stop codons and lead to the production of truncated APC proteins that lack its normal functions and possess tumorigenic properties. Therapeutic approaches in development for the treatment of APC-deficient tumors are focused on the inhibition of canonical WNT signaling, especially through targets downstream of APC in the pathway, or on the restoration of wild-type APC expression.

  9. Patient accuracy of reporting on hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer-related malignancy in family members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katballe, Niels; Juul, Svend; Christensen, M.

    2001-01-01

    was rejected in three of 14 cases (false-positive rate 21 per cent). Furthermore, seven of 18 probands whose families met the Amsterdam criteria I or II after verification were identified by further exploration in families who, according to the probands, met weaker criteria (false-negative rate 39 per cent......). CONCLUSION: The present study suggests that family studies on HNPCC are not reliable unless the diagnoses of family members are verified from official sources. If endoscopic screening is offered entirely on the basis of unverified information from patients with colorectal cancer, there is a risk that a large...

  10. Cost-effectiveness of surveillance programs for families at high and moderate risk of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Kim R.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Gerdes, Anne-Marie M.

    2007-01-01

    for the group at high risk. The aim of the present study is to determine cost-effectiveness of surveillance programs where families at both high and moderate risk of HNPCC participate. METHODS: A decision analytic model (Markov model) is developed to assess surveillance programs where families at high......OBJECTIVES: Surveillance programs are recommended to both families at high risk (Amsterdam-positive families with known- and unknown mutation) and moderate risk (families not fulfilling all Amsterdam criteria) of colorectal cancer (CRC). Cost-effectiveness has so far only been estimated...

  11. Frequency of hereditary colorectal cancer in Uruguayans patients with non polipotic colorectal cancer; Frecuencia de cancer colorrectal hereditario no polipotico en pacientes uruguayos con cancer colorrectal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarroca, C.; Della Valle, A.; Fresco, R.; Peltomaki, P.; Lynch, H. [Hospital Central de las Fuerzas Armadas, Montevideo (Uruguay)

    2010-12-15

    Full text: Colonic Cancer Family Polipótic not (CCFNP) is a syndrome transmission autosomal dominant characterized by the aggregation of colorectal cancer (CCR), frequently associated with other solid tumors. Few studies have investigated CCFNP frequency in colorectal cancer patients. these have shown marked geographic variation (0.3% to 13%). The objective of this study is to estimate the frequency of a population CCFNP CCR carriers Uruguayan cancer patients. All patients consecutively operated CRC were included in the Hospital Central Armed Forces (Montevideo, Uruguay) between 1987 and 2003. The cases were classified into 3 groups: 1) those who met the criteria Amsterdam (CCFNP), 2) those who did not meet these criteria but considered as a population of increased risk of cancer based on family history / staff (PRI), and 3) sporadic CRC. Genetic analysis was performed for Detection of mutations in hMLH1, hMSH2 and hMSH6 gene in patients subgroup 1. 461 patients were included, with a median age of 66 years. The subgroup 1 represented 2.5% 2 5.6% and 91.8% sporadic CRC. 75% of cases CCFNP were classified as under 55. Mutations in hMLH1 / hMSH2/hMSH6 were found in 16.6% of cases included in the subgroup 1 (2 in hMLH1, 1 in hMSH2, hMSH6 none). The proportion of patients who met the Amsterdam criteria matches with that observed by other authors. However, the percentage of cases classified CCFNP identified as carriers of mutations is lower than that reported (16.6% vs. ~ 70%). This may reflect a different genetic profile Uruguayan population.

  12. RNF43 is mutated less frequently in Lynch Syndrome compared with sporadic microsatellite unstable colorectal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennell, Lochlan J; Clendenning, Mark; McKeone, Diane M; Jamieson, Saara H; Balachandran, Samanthy; Borowsky, Jennifer; Liu, John; Kawamata, Futoshi; Bond, Catherine E; Rosty, Christophe; Burge, Matthew E; Buchanan, Daniel D; Leggett, Barbara A; Whitehall, Vicki L J

    2018-01-01

    The WNT signaling pathway is commonly altered during colorectal cancer development. The E3 ubiquitin ligase, RNF43, negatively regulates the WNT signal through increased ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of the Frizzled receptor. RNF43 has recently been reported to harbor frequent truncating frameshift mutations in sporadic microsatellite unstable (MSI) colorectal cancers. This study assesses the relative frequency of RNF43 mutations in hereditary colorectal cancers arising in the setting of Lynch syndrome. The entire coding region of RNF43 was Sanger sequenced in 24 colorectal cancers from 23 patients who either (i) carried a germline mutation in one of the DNA mismatch repair genes (MLH1, MSH6, MSH2, PMS2), or (ii) showed immunohistochemical loss of expression of one or more of the DNA mismatch repair proteins, was BRAF wild type at V600E, were under 60 years of age at diagnosis, and demonstrated no promoter region methylation for MLH1 in tumor DNA. A validation cohort of 44 colorectal cancers from mismatch repair germline mutation carriers from the Australasian Colorectal Cancer Family Registry (ACCFR) were sequenced for the most common truncating mutation hotspots (X117 and X659). RNF43 mutations were found in 9 of 24 (37.5%) Lynch syndrome colorectal cancers. The majority of mutations were frameshift deletions in the G659 G7 repeat tract (29%); 2 cancers (2/24, 8%) from the one patient harbored frameshift mutations at codon R117 (C6 repeat tract) within exon 3. In the ACCFR validation cohort, RNF43 hotspot mutations were identified in 19/44 (43.2%) of samples, which was not significantly different to the initial series. The proportion of mutant RNF43 in Lynch syndrome related colorectal cancers is significantly lower than the previously reported mutation rate found in sporadic MSI colorectal cancers. These findings identify further genetic differences between sporadic and hereditary colorectal cancers. This may be because Lynch Syndrome cancers

  13. Detection of microsatellite instability but not truncating APC mutations in gastric adenocarcinomas in Brazilian patients

    OpenAIRE

    Bevilacqua Roberta A.U.; Corvello Cassandra M.; Duarte Ana Paula; Simpson Andrew J.G.

    2000-01-01

    A crucial role for the adenomatous polyposis colonic (APC) gene in colorectal carcinogenesis has been conclusively established, but, the role of APC in gastric tumors remains controversial. APC mutations have been detected at a relatively high frequency in gastric tumors of Japanese patients, yet such mutations have been reported to be extremely rare in British patients and patients from north-central-Italy. We here report the analysis of 40 primary sporadic gastric adenocarcinomas and 35 pri...

  14. The role of S100a4 (Mts1) in Apc- and Smad4-driven tumour onset and progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atlasi, Yaser; Noori, Rubina; Marolin, Ivana

    2016-01-01

    burden characteristic of the Apc1638N model. In agreement with these results, S100a4 appears to be co-expressed together with mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) markers in desmoid tumours from Apc1638N/+ mice, as well as from sporadic and hereditary human desmoids. Conclusion Our data provide the first report...

  15. A metabolic switch controls intestinal differentiation downstream of Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Imelda T; Delacruz, Richard Glenn C; Miller, Braden N; Hill, Shauna; Olson, Kristofor A; Gabriel, Ana E; Boyd, Kevin; Satterfield, Christeena; Remmen, Holly Van; Rutter, Jared; Jones, David A

    2017-04-11

    Elucidating signaling pathways that regulate cellular metabolism is essential for a better understanding of normal development and tumorigenesis. Recent studies have shown that mitochondrial pyruvate carrier 1 (MPC1) , a crucial player in pyruvate metabolism, is downregulated in colon adenocarcinomas. Utilizing zebrafish to examine the genetic relationship between MPC1 and Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), a key tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer, we found that apc controls the levels of mpc1 and that knock down of mpc1 recapitulates phenotypes of impaired apc function including failed intestinal differentiation. Exogenous human MPC1 RNA rescued failed intestinal differentiation in zebrafish models of apc deficiency. Our data demonstrate a novel role for apc in pyruvate metabolism and that pyruvate metabolism dictates intestinal cell fate and differentiation decisions downstream of apc .

  16. Occult progression by Apc-deficient intestinal crypts as a target for chemoprevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liskay, R.Michael

    2014-01-01

    Although Apc mutation is widely considered an initiating event in colorectal cancer, little is known about the earliest stages of tumorigenesis following sporadic Apc loss. Therefore, we have utilized a novel mouse model that facilitates the sporadic inactivation of Apc via frameshift reversion of Cre in single, isolated cells and subsequently tracks the fates of Apc-deficient intestinal cells. Our results suggest that consistent with Apc being a ‘gatekeeper’, loss of Apc early in life during intestinal growth leads to adenomas or increased crypt fission, manifested by fields of mutant but otherwise normal-appearing crypts. In contrast, Apc loss occurring later in life has minimal consequences, with mutant crypts being less prone to either increased crypt fission or adenoma formation. Using the stem cell-specific Lgr5-CreER mouse, we generated different sized fields of Apc-deficient crypts via independent recombination events and found that field size correlates with progression to adenoma. To evaluate this early stage prior to adenoma formation as a therapeutic target, we examined the chemopreventive effects of sulindac on Apc-deficient occult crypt fission. We found that sulindac treatment started early in life inhibits the morphologically occult spread of Apc-deficient crypts and thus reduces adenoma numbers. Taken together these results suggest that: (i) earlier Apc loss promotes increased crypt fission, (ii) a field of Apc-deficient crypts, which can form via occult crypt fission or independent neighboring events, is an important intermediate between loss of Apc and adenoma formation and (iii) normal-appearing Apc-deficient crypts are potential unappreciated targets for cancer screening and chemoprevention. PMID:23996931

  17. Long-term effect of aspirin on cancer risk in carriers of hereditary colorectal cancer: an analysis from the CAPP2 randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burn, John; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Macrae, Finlay

    2011-01-01

    Observational studies report reduced colorectal cancer in regular aspirin consumers. Randomised controlled trials have shown reduced risk of adenomas but none have employed prevention of colorectal cancer as a primary endpoint. The CAPP2 trial aimed to investigate the antineoplastic effects of as...

  18. Hereditary angioedema

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease; HAE- Hereditary angioedema; Kallikrein inhibitor-HAE: bradykinin receptor antagonist-HAE; C1-inhibitors-HAE; Hives-HAE ... aunt, uncle, or grandparent. Dental procedures, sickness (including colds and the flu), and surgery may trigger HAE ...

  19. β-Catenin destruction complex-independent regulation of Hippo–YAP signaling by APC in intestinal tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jing; Maitra, Anirban; Anders, Robert A.; Taketo, Makoto M.; Pan, Duojia

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) underlie familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), an inherited cancer syndrome characterized by the widespread development of colorectal polyps. APC is best known as a scaffold protein in the β-catenin destruction complex, whose activity is antagonized by canonical Wnt signaling. Whether other effector pathways mediate APC's tumor suppressor function is less clear. Here we report that activation of YAP, the downstream effector of the Hippo signaling pathway, is a general hallmark of tubular adenomas from FAP patients. We show that APC functions as a scaffold protein that facilitates the Hippo kinase cascade by interacting with Sav1 and Lats1. Consistent with the molecular link between APC and the Hippo signaling pathway, genetic analysis reveals that YAP is absolutely required for the development of APC-deficient adenomas. These findings establish Hippo–YAP signaling as a critical effector pathway downstream from APC, independent from its involvement in the β-catenin destruction complex. PMID:26193883

  20. Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Request Permissions Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 10/2017 What is hereditary diffuse gastric cancer? Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is a rare ...

  1. Germline APC mutations in hepatoblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Adeline; Sisson, Rebecca; Gupta, Anita; Tiao, Greg; Geller, James I

    2018-04-01

    Conflicting reports on the frequency of germline adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene mutations in patients with hepatoblastoma (HB) have called into question the clinical value of APC mutation testing on apparently sporadic HB. An Institutional Review Board approved retrospective review of clinical data collected from patients with HB who received APC testing at our institution was conducted. All HB patients seen at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center were eligible for testing. Potential genotype/phenotype correlations were assessed. As of July 2015, 29 patients with HB had received constitutional APC testing. Four (14%) were found to have APC pathogenic truncations of the APC protein and in addition two (7%) had APC missense variants of unknown clinical significance. Two patients (7%) had family histories indicative of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Response to chemotherapy tracked differently in APC pathogenic cases, with a slower imaging response despite an equivalent or slightly faster α-fetoprotein (AFP) response. The prevalence of pathogenic APC variants in apparently sporadic HB may be higher than previously detected. Differences in time to imaging response, despite similar AFP response, may impact surgical planning. All patients with HB warrant germline APC mutation testing for underlying FAP. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Predictors of advanced colorectal neoplasia for colorectal cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Martin C S; Lam, Thomas Y T; Tsoi, Kelvin K F; Chan, Victor C W; Hirai, Hoyee W; Ching, Jessica Y L; Sung, Joseph J Y

    2014-05-01

    The Asia-Pacific Colorectal Screening (APCS) score based on age, gender, family history, and smoking is useful to predict advanced colorectal neoplasia (ACN) in asymptomatic Asian subjects. To evaluate the factors in addition to those of APCS associated with ACN colonoscopic findings. Data from 5,220 asymptomatic subjects aged between 50 and 70 years who underwent screening colonoscopy in a community center between 2008 and 2012 were analyzed. One binary logistic regression analysis was conducted in 2013 with the presence of ACN or cancer as the outcome, controlling for APCS score, alcohol consumption, BMI, hypertension, and other chronic diseases as independent variables. The average participant age was 57.7 years (SD=4.9) and 47.5% were men. Advanced neoplasms or cancers were identified at colonoscopy in 5.6% of all screening participants. From multivariate regression analysis, APCS score≥4 (adjusted OR [AOR]=1.74, 95% CI=1.34, 2.25, pstatistic of APCS score alone was 0.560 (95% CI=0.524, 0.595, p=0.001) and that of APCS score plus BMI, hypertension, and alcohol consumption was 0.613 (95% CI=0.578, 0.648, p<0.001). Alcohol consumption, hypertension, and BMI are independent predictors of ACN, which could be incorporated into the APCS for prioritizing Asian asymptomatic subjects for colorectal cancer screening. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Apoptosis in neural crest cells by functional loss of APC tumor suppressor gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Sumitaka; Sato, Tomoyuki; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Okada, Hitoshi; Maeno, Akiteru; Ito, Masaki; Sugitani, Yoshinobu; Shibata, Hiroyuki; Miyazaki, Jun-ichi; Katsuki, Motoya; Yamauchi, Yasutaka; Yamamura, Ken-ichi; Katamine, Shigeru; Noda, Tetsuo

    2002-01-01

    Apc is a gene associated with familial adenomatous polyposis coli (FAP) and its inactivation is a critical step in colorectal tumor formation. The protein product, adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), acts to down-regulate intracellular levels of β-catenin, a key signal transducer in the Wnt signaling. Conditional targeting of Apc in the neural crest of mice caused massive apoptosis of cephalic and cardiac neural crest cells at about 11.5 days post coitum, resulting in craniofacial and cardiac anomalies at birth. Notably, the apoptotic cells localized in the regions where β-catenin had accumulated. In contrast to its role in colorectal epithelial cells, inactivation of APC leads to dysregulation of β-catenin/Wnt signaling with resultant apoptosis in certain tissues including neural crest cells. PMID:11756652

  4. Review: Clinical aspects of hereditary DNA Mismatch repair gene mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijmons, Rolf H.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.

    Inherited mutations of the DNA Mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 can result in two hereditary tumor syndromes: the adult-onset autosomal dominant Lynch syndrome, previously referred to as Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) and the childhood-onset autosomal recessive

  5. Distinct Gene Expression Signatures in Lynch Syndrome and Familial Colorectal Cancer Type X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin, Mev; Therkildsen, Christina; Veerla, Srinivas

    2013-01-01

    Heredity is estimated to cause at least 20% of colorectal cancer. The hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer subset is divided into Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX) based on presence of mismatch repair (MMR) gene defects.......Heredity is estimated to cause at least 20% of colorectal cancer. The hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer subset is divided into Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX) based on presence of mismatch repair (MMR) gene defects....

  6. Hereditary angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracho, Francisco A

    2005-11-01

    Hereditary angioedema is an autosomal-dominant deficiency of C1 inhibitor--a serpin inhibitor of kallikrein, C1r, C1s, factor XII, and plasmin. Quantitative or qualitative deficiency of C1 inhibitor leads to the generation of vasoactive mediators, most likely bradykinin. The clinical syndrome is repeated bouts of nonpruritic, nonpitting edema of the face, larynx, extermities, and intestinal viscera. Recently, investigators, physicians, and industry have demonstrated a renewed interest in the biology and treatment of hereditary angioedema. Investigators have generated a C1INH-/- mouse model that has demonstrated the importance of the contact activation system for hereditary angioedema-related vascular permeability. An interactive database of mutations is available electronically. Investigators have continued exploration into mRNA/protein levels. The proceedings of a recent workshop have been impressive in the scope and depth. Clinicians have produced consensus documents and expert reviews. The pharmaceutical industry has initiated clinical trails with novel agents. Hereditary angioedema is often misdiagnosed and poorly treated. Diagnosis requires careful medical and family history and the measurement of functional C1 inhibitor and C4 levels. Attenuated androgens, anti-fibrinolytics, and C1 inhibitor concentrates are used for long-term and preprocedure prophylaxis, but have significant drawbacks. C1 inhibitor concentrates and fresh frozen plasma are available for acute intervention. The mainstays of supportive care are airway monitoring, pain relief, hydration, and control of nausea. New agents such as recombinant C1 inhibitor, kallikrein inhibitors, and bradykinin inhibitors may offer safer and more tolerable treatments.

  7. Familial adenomatous polyposis patients without an identified APC germline mutation have a severe phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, M L; Ripa, R; Knudsen, Anne Louise

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Development of more than 100 colorectal adenomas is diagnostic of the dominantly inherited autosomal disease familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Germline mutations can be identified in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene in approximately 80% of patients. The APC protein...... comprises several regions and domains for interaction with other proteins, and specific clinical manifestations are associated with the mutation assignment to one of these regions or domains. AIMS: The phenotype in patients without an identified causative APC mutation was compared with the phenotype...... in patients with a known APC mutation and with the phenotypes characteristic of patients with mutations in specific APC regions and domains. PATIENTS: Data on 121 FAP probands and 149 call up patients from 70 different families were extracted from the Danish Polyposis register. METHODS: Differences in 16...

  8. Disruption of estrogen receptor signaling enhances intestinal neoplasia in ApcMin/+ mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, Alicia G.; Oikarinen, Seija I.; Bynoté, Kimberly K.; Marttinen, Maija; Rafter, Joseph J.; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Roy, Shyamal K.; Pitot, Henry C.; Korach, Kenneth S.; Lubahn, Dennis B.; Mutanen, Marja; Gould, Karen A.

    2009-01-01

    Estrogen receptors (ERs) [ERα (Esr1) and ERβ (Esr2)] are expressed in the human colon, but during the multistep process of colorectal carcinogenesis, expression of both ERα and ERβ is lost, suggesting that loss of ER function might promote colorectal carcinogenesis. Through crosses between an ERα knockout and ApcMin mouse strains, we demonstrate that ERα deficiency is associated with a significant increase in intestinal tumor multiplicity, size and burden in ApcMin/+ mice. Within the normal intestinal epithelium of ApcMin/+ mice, ERα deficiency is associated with an accumulation of nuclear β-catenin, an indicator of activation of the Wnt–β-catenin-signaling pathway, which is known to play a critical role in intestinal cancers. Consistent with the hypothesis that ERα deficiency is associated with activation of Wnt–β-catenin signaling, ERα deficiency in the intestinal epithelium of ApcMin/+ mice also correlated with increased expression of Wnt–β-catenin target genes. Through crosses between an ERβ knockout and ApcMin mouse strains, we observed some evidence that ERβ deficiency is associated with an increased incidence of colon tumors in ApcMin/+ mice. This effect of ERβ deficiency does not involve modulation of Wnt–β-catenin signaling. Our studies suggest that ERα and ERβ signaling modulate colorectal carcinogenesis, and ERα does so, at least in part, by regulating the activity of the Wnt–β-catenin pathway. PMID:19520794

  9. Epithelial-derived IL-33 promotes intestinal tumorigenesis in Apc Min/+ mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhengxiang; Chen, Lili; Souto, Fabricio O; Canasto-Chibuque, Claudia; Bongers, Gerold; Deshpande, Madhura; Harpaz, Noam; Ko, Huaibin M; Kelley, Kevin; Furtado, Glaucia C; Lira, Sergio A

    2017-07-14

    Increased expression of Interleukin (IL)-33 has been detected in intestinal samples of patients with ulcerative colitis, a condition associated with increased risk for colon cancer, but its role in the development of colorectal cancer has yet to be fully examined. Here, we investigated the role of epithelial expressed IL-33 during development of intestinal tumors. IL-33 expression was detected in epithelial cells in colorectal cancer specimens and in the Apc Min/+ mice. To better understand the role of epithelial-derived IL-33 in the intestinal tumorigenesis, we generated transgenic mice expressing IL-33 in intestinal epithelial cells (V33 mice). V33 Apc Min/+ mice, resulting from the cross of V33 with Apc Min/+ mice, had increased intestinal tumor burden compared with littermate Apc Min/+ mice. Consistently, Apc Min/+ mice deficient for IL-33 receptor (ST2), had reduced polyp burden. Mechanistically, overexpression of IL-33 promoted expansion of ST2 + regulatory T cells, increased Th2 cytokine milieu, and induced alternatively activated macrophages in the gut. IL-33 promoted marked changes in the expression of antimicrobial peptides, and antibiotic treatment of V33 Apc Min/+ mice abrogated the tumor promoting-effects of IL-33 in the colon. In conclusion, elevated IL-33 signaling increases tumor development in the Apc Min/+ mice.

  10. Chir99021 and Valproic acid reduce the proliferative advantage of Apc mutant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlands, Alistair J; Carroll, Thomas D; Chen, Yu; Näthke, Inke

    2018-02-15

    More than 90% of colorectal cancers carry mutations in Apc that drive tumourigenesis. A 'just-right' signalling model proposes that Apc mutations stimulate optimal, but not excessive Wnt signalling, resulting in a growth advantage of Apc mutant over wild-type cells. Reversal of this growth advantage constitutes a potential therapeutic approach. We utilised intestinal organoids to compare the growth of Apc mutant and wild-type cells. Organoids derived from Apc Min/+ mice recapitulate stages of intestinal polyposis in culture. They eventually form spherical cysts that reflect the competitive growth advantage of cells that have undergone loss of heterozygosity (LOH). We discovered that this emergence of cysts was inhibited by Chiron99021 and Valproic acid, which potentiates Wnt signalling. Chiron99021 and Valproic acid restrict the growth advantage of Apc mutant cells while stimulating that of wild-type cells, suggesting that excessive Wnt signalling reduces the relative fitness of Apc mutant cells. As a proof of concept, we demonstrated that Chiron99021-treated Apc mutant organoids were rendered susceptible to TSA-induced apoptosis, while wild-type cells were protected.

  11. Contribution of APC and MUTYH mutations to familial adenomatous polyposis susceptibility in Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, Janos; Kovacs, Marietta Eva; Matrai, Zoltan; Orosz, Enikő; Kásler, Miklós; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Olah, Edith

    2016-01-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is a colorectal cancer predisposition syndrome with considerable genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity, defined by the development of multiple adenomas throughout the colorectum. FAP is caused either by monoallelic mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli gene APC, or by biallelic germline mutations of MUTYH, this latter usually presenting with milder phenotype. The aim of the present study was to characterize the genotype and phenotype of Hungarian FAP patients. Mutation screening of 87 unrelated probands from FAP families (21 of them presented as the attenuated variant of the disease, showing APC were identified in 65 patients (75 %), including nine cases (37.5 %) with large genomic alterations. Twelve of the point mutations were novel. In addition, APC-negative samples were also tested for MUTYH mutations and we were able to identify biallelic pathogenic mutations in 23 % of these cases (5/22). Correlations between the localization of APC mutations and the clinical manifestations of the disease were observed, cases with a mutation in the codon 1200-1400 region showing earlier age of disease onset (p APC- and MUTYH-associated FAP in our cohort: the age at onset of polyposis was significantly delayed for biallelic MUTYH mutation carriers as compared to patients with an APC mutation. Our data represent the first comprehensive study delineating the mutation spectra of both APC and MUTYH in Hungarian FAP families, and underscore the overlap between the clinical characteristics of APC- and MUTYH-associated phenotypes, necessitating a more appropriate clinical characterization of FAP families.

  12. APC binds the Miro/Milton motor complex to stimulate transport of mitochondria to the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Kate M; Brocardo, Mariana G; Henderson, Beric R

    2016-02-01

    Mutations in adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) disrupt regulation of Wnt signaling, mitosis, and the cytoskeleton. We describe a new role for APC in the transport of mitochondria. Silencing of wild-type APC by small interfering RNA caused mitochondria to redistribute from the cell periphery to the perinuclear region. We identified novel APC interactions with the mitochondrial kinesin-motor complex Miro/Milton that were mediated by the APC C-terminus. Truncating mutations in APC abolished its ability to bind Miro/Milton and reduced formation of the Miro/Milton complex, correlating with disrupted mitochondrial distribution in colorectal cancer cells that could be recovered by reconstitution of wild-type APC. Using proximity ligation assays, we identified endogenous APC-Miro/Milton complexes at mitochondria, and live-cell imaging showed that loss of APC slowed the frequency of anterograde mitochondrial transport to the membrane. We propose that APC helps drive mitochondria to the membrane to supply energy for cellular processes such as directed cell migration, a process disrupted by cancer mutations. © 2016 Mills et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  13. Kaiso overexpression promotes intestinal inflammation and potentiates intestinal tumorigenesis in Apc(Min/+) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, Christina C; Longo, Joseph; Mavor, Meaghan; Milosavljevic, Snezana B; Chaudhary, Roopali; Gilbreath, Ebony; Yates, Clayton; Daniel, Juliet M

    2015-09-01

    Constitutive Wnt/β-catenin signaling is a key contributor to colorectal cancer (CRC). Although inactivation of the tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is recognized as an early event in CRC development, it is the accumulation of multiple subsequent oncogenic insults facilitates malignant transformation. One potential contributor to colorectal carcinogenesis is the POZ-ZF transcription factor Kaiso, whose depletion extends lifespan and delays polyp onset in the widely used Apc(Min/+) mouse model of intestinal cancer. These findings suggested that Kaiso potentiates intestinal tumorigenesis, but this was paradoxical as Kaiso was previously implicated as a negative regulator of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. To resolve Kaiso's role in intestinal tumorigenesis and canonical Wnt signaling, we generated a transgenic mouse model (Kaiso(Tg/+)) expressing an intestinal-specific myc-tagged Kaiso transgene. We then mated Kaiso(Tg/+) and Apc(Min/+) mice to generate Kaiso(Tg/+):Apc(Min/+) mice for further characterization. Kaiso(Tg/+):Apc(Min/+) mice exhibited reduced lifespan and increased polyp multiplicity compared to Apc(Min/+) mice. Consistent with this murine phenotype, we found increased Kaiso expression in human CRC tissue, supporting a role for Kaiso in human CRC. Interestingly, Wnt target gene expression was increased in Kaiso(Tg/+):Apc(Min/+) mice, suggesting that Kaiso's function as a negative regulator of canonical Wnt signaling, as seen in Xenopus, is not maintained in this context. Notably, Kaiso(Tg/+):Apc(Min/+) mice exhibited increased inflammation and activation of NFκB signaling compared to their Apc(Min/+) counterparts. This phenotype was consistent with our previous report that Kaiso(Tg/+) mice exhibit chronic intestinal inflammation. Together our findings highlight a role for Kaiso in promoting Wnt signaling, inflammation and tumorigenesis in the mammalian intestine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A Comparison Between Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis and Denaturing High Performance Liquid Chromatography in Detecting Mutations in Genes Associated with Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC and the Identification of 9 New Mutations Previously Unidentified by DGGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meldrum Cliff J

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Denaturing high performance liquid chromatography is a relatively new method by which heteroduplex structures formed during the PCR amplification of heterozygote samples can be rapidly identified. The use of this technology for mutation detection in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC has the potential to appreciably shorten the time it takes to analyze genes associated with this disorder. Prior to acceptance of this method for screening genes associated with HNPCC, assessment of the reliability of this method should be performed. In this report we have compared mutation and polymorphism detection by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE with denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC in a set of 130 families. All mutations/polymorphisms representing base substitutions, deletions, insertions and a 23 base pair inversion were detected by DHPLC whereas DGGE failed to identify four single base substitutions and a single base pair deletion. In addition, we show that DHPLC has been used for the identification of 5 different mutations in exon 7 of hMSH2 that could not be detected by DGGE. From this study we conclude that DHPLC is a more effective and rapid alternative to the detection of mutations in hMSH2 and hMLH1 with the same or better accuracy than DGGE. Furthermore, this technique offers opportunities for automation, which have not been realised for the majority of other methods of gene analysis.

  15. Drug therapy for hereditary cancers

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    Imyanitov Evgeny N

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tumors arising in patients with hereditary cancer syndromes may have distinct drug sensitivity as compared to their sporadic counterparts. Breast and ovarian neoplasms from BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers are characterized by deficient homologous recombination (HR of DNA, that makes them particularly sensitive to platinum compounds or inhibitors of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP. Outstandingly durable complete responses to high dose chemotherapy have been observed in several cases of BRCA-related metastatic breast cancer (BC. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that women with BRCA1-related BC may derive less benefit from taxane-based treatment than other categories of BC patients. There is virtually no reports directly assessing drug response in hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC patients; studies involving non-selected (i.e., both sporadic and hereditary CRC with high-level microsatellite instability (MSI-H suggest therapeutic advantage of irinotecan. Celecoxib has been approved for the treatment of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP. Hereditary medullary thyroid cancers (MTC have been shown to be highly responsive to a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor vandetanib, which exerts specific activity towards mutated RET receptor. Given the rapidly improving accessibility of DNA analysis, it is foreseen that the potential predictive value of cancer-associated germ-line mutations will be increasingly considered in the future studies.

  16. Different effection of p.1125Val>Ala and rs11954856 in APC on Wnt signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei-Feng; Zhao, Zhi-Xun; Yan, Peng; Wang, Song; Liu, Zheng; Zhang, Qiong; Zhang, Xiao-Ning; Sun, Chang-Hao; Wang, Xi-Shan; Wang, Gui-Yu; Liu, Shu-Lin

    2017-09-19

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is among the most common and fatal forms of solid tumors worldwide and more than two thirds of CRC and adenomas patients have APC gene mutations. APC is a key regulator in the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway but its roles in CRC remains to be elucidated. In this study, we compared APC genes between CRC patients and controls to determine possible associations of nucleotide changes in the APC gene with the pathways involved in CRC pathogenesis. All participants received physical and enteroscopic examinations. The APC gene was sequenced for 300 Chinese Han CRC patients and 411 normal controls, and the expression levels of genes in the signaling pathway were analyzed using Western Blotting. Statistical analyses were conducted using SPSS (version 19.0) software. We found that rs11954856 in the APC gene was associated with colorectal cancer and could increase the expression levels of APC , β-catenin , TCF7L1 , TCF7L2 and LEF1 genes in the pathway in the CRC patients, demonstrating the involvement of APC in the pathological processes leading to CRC.

  17. [The progress and prospect of application of genetic testing technology-based gene detection technology in the diagnosis and treatment of hereditary cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, J X; Jiang, Y F

    2017-08-06

    Hereditary cancer is caused by specific pathogenic gene mutations. Early detection and early intervention are the most effective ways to prevent and control hereditary cancer. High-throughput sequencing based genetic testing technology (NGS) breaks through the restrictions of pedigree analysis, provide a convenient and efficient method to detect and diagnose hereditary cancer. Here, we introduce the mechanism of hereditary cancer, summarize, discuss and prospect the application of NGS and other genetic tests in the diagnosis of hereditary retinoblastoma, hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome, hereditary colorectal cancer and other complex and rare hereditary tumors.

  18. A kinetic model to study the regulation of β-catenin, APC, and Axin in the human colonic crypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerick, Brooks; Schleiniger, Gilberto; Boman, Bruce M

    2017-11-01

    The Wnt/[Formula: see text]-catenin pathway plays a crucial role in stem cell renewal and differentiation in the normal human colonic crypt. The balance between [Formula: see text]-catenin and APC along the crypt axis determines its normal functionality. The mechanism that deregulates this balance may give insight into the initiation of colorectal cancer. This is significant because the spatial dysregulation of [Formula: see text]-catenin by the mutated tumor suppressor gene/protein APC in human colonic crypts is responsible for the initiation and growth of colorectal cancer. We consider a regulatory function that promotes APC synthesis within the cell and its effect on the accumulation of the Wnt target protein, [Formula: see text]-catenin. It is evident that an APC gradient exists along the crypt axis; however, the mechanism by which APC expression is regulated within the cell is not well known. We investigate the dynamics of an APC regulatory mechanism with an increased level of Axin at the subcellular level. Model output shows an increase of APC for a diminished Wnt signal, which explains the APC gradient along the crypt. We find that the dynamic interplay between [Formula: see text]-catenin, APC, and Axin produces oscillatory behavior, which is controlled by the Wnt stimulus. In the presence of reduced functional APC, the oscillations are amplified, which suggests that the cell remains in a more proliferative state for longer periods of time. Increased Axin levels (typical of mammalian cells) reduce oscillatory behavior and minimize the levels of [Formula: see text]-catenin within the cell while raising the levels of APC.

  19. The role of APC in WNT pathway activation in serrated neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowsky, Jennifer; Dumenil, Troy; Bettington, Mark; Pearson, Sally-Ann; Bond, Catherine; Fennell, Lochlan; Liu, Cheng; McKeone, Diane; Rosty, Christophe; Brown, Ian; Walker, Neal; Leggett, Barbara; Whitehall, Vicki

    2018-03-01

    Conventional adenomas are initiated by APC gene mutation that activates the WNT signal. Serrated neoplasia is commonly initiated by BRAF or KRAS mutation. WNT pathway activation may also occur, however, to what extent this is owing to APC mutation is unknown. We examined aberrant nuclear β-catenin immunolocalization as a surrogate for WNT pathway activation and analyzed the entire APC gene coding sequence in serrated and conventional pathway polyps and cancers. WNT pathway activation was a common event in conventional pathway lesions with aberrant nuclear immunolocalization of β-catenin and truncating APC mutations in 90% and 89% of conventional adenomas and 82% and 70% of BRAF wild-type cancers, respectively. WNT pathway activation was seen to a lesser extent in serrated pathway lesions. It occurred at the transition to dysplasia in serrated polyps with a significant increase in nuclear β-catenin labeling from sessile serrated adenomas (10%) to sessile serrated adenomas with dysplasia (55%) and traditional serrated adenomas (9%) to traditional serrated adenomas with dysplasia (39%) (P=0.0001). However, unlike the conventional pathway, truncating APC mutations were rare in the serrated pathway lesions especially sessile serrated adenomas even when dysplastic (15%) and in the BRAF mutant cancers with microsatellite instability that arise from them (8%). In contrast, APC missense mutations that were rare in conventional pathway adenomas and cancers (3% in BRAF wild-type cancers) were more frequent in BRAF mutant cancers with microsatellite instability (32%). We conclude that increased WNT signaling is important in the transition to malignancy in the serrated pathway but that APC mutation is less common and the spectrum of mutations is different than in conventional colorectal carcinogenesis. Moderate impact APC mutations and non-APC-related causes of increased WNT signaling may have a more important role in serrated neoplasia than the truncating APC mutations

  20. Hereditary hemochromatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen A. Geller

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH is the most commonly identified autosomal recessive genetic disorder in the white population, characterized by increased intestinal iron absorption and secondary abnormal accumulation in parenchymal organs, not infrequently accompanied by functional impairment. This entity is associated with mutations of the HFE gene (located on the short arm of chromosome 6 at location 6p22.2; closely linked to the HLA-A3 locus, which encodes the HFE protein, a membrane protein thought to regulate iron absorption by affecting the interaction between transferrin receptor and transferrin.

  1. Proteomic analysis reveals APC-dependent post-translational modifications and identifies a novel regulator of β-catenin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blundon, Malachi A; Schlesinger, Danielle R; Parthasarathy, Amritha; Smith, Samantha L; Kolev, Hannah M; Vinson, David A; Kunttas-Tatli, Ezgi; McCartney, Brooke M; Minden, Jonathan S

    2016-07-15

    Wnt signaling generates patterns in all embryos, from flies to humans, and controls cell fate, proliferation and metabolic homeostasis. Inappropriate Wnt pathway activation results in diseases, including colorectal cancer. The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor suppressor gene encodes a multifunctional protein that is an essential regulator of Wnt signaling and cytoskeletal organization. Although progress has been made in defining the role of APC in a normal cellular context, there are still significant gaps in our understanding of APC-dependent cellular function and dysfunction. We expanded the APC-associated protein network using a combination of genetics and a proteomic technique called two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE). We show that loss of Drosophila Apc2 causes protein isoform changes reflecting misregulation of post-translational modifications (PTMs), which are not dependent on β-catenin transcriptional activity. Mass spectrometry revealed that proteins involved in metabolic and biosynthetic pathways, protein synthesis and degradation, and cell signaling are affected by Apc2 loss. We demonstrate that changes in phosphorylation partially account for the altered PTMs in APC mutants, suggesting that APC mutants affect other types of PTM. Finally, through this approach Aminopeptidase P was identified as a new regulator of β-catenin abundance in Drosophila embryos. This study provides new perspectives on the cellular effects of APC that might lead to a deeper understanding of its role in development. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Period 2 Mutation Accelerates ApcMin/+ Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Patricia A.; Yang, Xiaoming; Taber, Andrew; Oh, Eun-Young; Ansell, Christine; Ayers, Stacy E.; Al-Assaad, Ziad; Carnevale, Kevin; Berger, Franklin G.; Peña, Maria Marjorette O.; Hrushesky, William J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer risk is increased in shift workers with presumed circadian disruption. Intestinal epithelial cell proliferation is gated throughout each day by the circadian clock. Period 2 (Per2) is a key circadian clock gene. Per2 mutant (Per2m/m) mice show an increase in lymphomas and deregulated expression of cyclin D and c-Myc genes that are key to proliferation control. We asked whether Per2 clock gene inactivation would accelerate intestinal and colonic tumorigenesis. The effects of PER2 on cell proliferation and β-catenin were studied in colon cancer cell lines by its down-regulation following RNA interference. The effects of Per2 inactivation in vivo on β-catenin and on intestinal and colonic polyp formation were studied in mice with Per2 mutation alone and in combination with an Apc mutation using polyp-prone ApcMin/+ mice. Down-regulation of PER2 in colon cell lines (HCT116 and SW480) increases β-catenin, cyclin D, and cell proliferation. Down-regulation of β-catenin along with Per2 blocks the increase in cyclin D and cell proliferation. Per2m/m mice develop colonic polyps and show an increase in small intestinal mucosa β-catenin and cyclin D protein levels compared with wild-type mice. ApcMin/+Per2m/m mice develop twice the number of small intestinal and colonic polyps, with more severe anemia and splenomegaly, compared with ApcMin/+ mice. These data suggest that Per2 gene product suppresses tumorigenesis in the small intestine and colon by down-regulation of β-catenin and β-catenin target genes, and this circadian core clock gene may represent a novel target for colorectal cancer prevention and control. PMID:19010825

  3. Surgical management of hereditary colorectal cancer: surgery based on molecular analysis and family history Manejo quirúrgico del cáncer colorrectal hereditario: cirugía basadas en el análisis molecular y los antecedentes familiares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Perea

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The importance of colorectal cancer (CRC is increasing. A proportion show a hereditary component, as in Lynch syndrome and Familial Adenomatous Polyposis, and a recently defined entity as well, namely, Familial Colorectal Cancer type X. The high probability to develop CRC in these groups may, at the time of recognition, change surgical management, including its timing or even the surgical technique. In some cases prophylactic surgery can play an important role. The possibility of using tools that allow recognition of the aforementioned syndromes, including microsatellite instability, immunohistochemistry for DNA mismatch repair system proteins, and especially their mutations, is on the basis of therapeutic strategies that differ from those employed in sporadic CRC cases.

  4. Organization and Running of the First Comprehensive Hereditary Cancer Clinic in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajkumar T

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary cancers are thought to account for around 5% of cancers, particularly breast/ovarian and colorectal cancers. In India there is a paucity of data on hereditary cancers and the mutations in some of the common genes linked to hereditary cancers, such as BRCA1, BRCA2, hMSH2 and hMLH1. The country's first comprehensive hereditary cancer clinic was established in February 2002. The article describes the organization and running of the Clinic. It also discusses some of the social issues relevant to the given population in running the Hereditary Cancer Clinic.

  5. Prevalence of Resistence to Activated Protein C (Apc-Resistance in Blood Donors in Kosovo

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    Ymer Mekaj

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available AbstractOne of the most frequent hereditary causes of thrombophilia is, without a doubt, resistance to Activated Protein C (APC-resistance, which is a consequence of point mutation in gene coding for coagulation Factor V (Factor V Leiden in 90-95% of cases.The aim of this paper was to determine prevalence of APC-resistance in a group of healthy blood donors. The size of the group is quite representative of Kosovo Albanians.A total of 944 blood donors were examined (537 males and 407 females, for whom APC-resistance was determined by functional methods of coagulation using the kit ACTICLOT® Protein C Resistance. Method is based on the test of APTT determined twice: first in the presence and second in the absence of activated Protein C (APC. The ratio of these two values constitutes is called Activated Protein C - Sensitivity Ratio (APC-SR.From 944 examined donors, pathologic values of APC-SR (1,3-1,9 were found in 32 persons (3,4% of the total number. The distribution among sexes was 3,35% (18/537 in male and 3,43% (14/407 in female subjects. The mean values of APC-SR (1,64 in male and 1,71 in female subjects were not significantly different (P = 0,22.Based on these results, we conclude that the prevalence of APC resistance in Albanian population of Kosovo is within the lower limit of prevalence in general population in different countries of European countries, which, according to some authors ranges is from 3 to 7%.

  6. Genetic profiles distinguish different types of hereditary ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanska, Katarina; Malander, Susanne; Staaf, Johan

    2010-01-01

    (HBOC) syndrome and the hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) syndrome. Genome-wide array comparative genomic hybridization was applied to 12 HBOC associated tumors with BRCA1 mutations and 8 HNPCC associated tumors with mismatch repair gene mutations with 24 sporadic ovarian cancers......Heredity represents the strongest risk factor for ovarian cancer with disease predisposing mutations identified in 15% of the tumors. With the aim to identify genetic classifiers for hereditary ovarian cancer, we profiled hereditary ovarian cancers linked to the hereditary breast and ovarian cancer...... that HBOC and HNPCC associated ovarian cancer develop along distinct genetic pathways and genetic profiles can thus be applied to distinguish between different types of hereditary ovarian cancer....

  7. Mutación fundadora en una familia argentina con cáncer colorrectal hereditario Detection of a founder mutation in an Argentine family with hereditary non polyposis colorectal cancer

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    Laura Gómez

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available El cáncer colorrectal hereditario no poliposo (CCHNP se relaciona con mutaciones en los genes reparadores de ADN (MLH1, MSH2 y MSH6. La mayoría de estas alteraciones son familia-específicas y su detección suele requerir la secuenciación completa de los genes relacionados. Se detectó una mutación puntual (2269-2270insT en el último codón del gen MLH1 en familias de un área del norte de Italia (Reggio Emilia y su origen se considera debido a un efecto fundador. En este trabajo presentamos una familia mendocina con CCHNP portadora de la misma mutación, cuyos ancestros eran oriundos de Reggio Emilia. Para la detección de la mutación se diseñó una estrategia basada en PCR y posterior corte enzimático. La mutación fue hallada en tres integrantes de la familia estudiada, dos de los cuales no presentaban sintomatología clínica. Estos pacientes fueron seguidos preventivamente mediante colonoscopias. La metodología utilizada en nuestro laboratorio fue específica y sensible para la detección de una mutación previamente registrada y permitió realizar el diagnóstico genético molecular en el país, evitando el envío de muestras al extranjero. Es de importancia destacar que el diagnóstico genético pre-sintomático de cáncer hereditario, enfocado desde un grupo multidisciplinario de profesionales, permite un mejor seguimiento y apoyo a las familias afectadas.Hereditary non polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC has been related to mutations in the DNA mismatch repair genes (MLH1, MSH2 y MSH6. Mutation detection analysis requires the complete sequencing of these genes, given the high frequency of family-specific alterations. A point mutation (2269- 2270insT in the last codon of the MLH1 gene has been detected in families from a northern region of Italy (Reggio Emilia.Given that this alteration was registered only in people from this region, it has been considered a founder mutation. In this work, we present an Argentine HNPCC family

  8. Anti-helminth compound niclosamide downregulates Wnt Signaling and elicits antitumor responses in tumors with activating APC mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, Takuya; Chen, Minyong; Yang, Xiao Yi; Spasojevic, Ivan; Vandeusen, Jeffrey B.; Hsu, David; Clary, Bryan M.; Clay, Timothy M.; Chen, Wei; Morse, Michael A.; Lyerly, H. Kim

    2011-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin pathway activation caused by APC mutations occurs in approximately 80% of sporadic colorectal cancers. The anti-helminth compound niclosamide downregulates components of the Wnt pathway, specifically Dishevelled-2 (Dvl2) expression, resulting in diminished downstream β-catenin signaling. In this study, we determined if niclosamide could inhibit the Wnt/ β-catenin pathway in human colorectal cancers and whether its inhibition might elicit antitumor effects in the presence of APC mutations. We found that niclosamide inhibited Wnt/ β-catenin pathway activation, downregulated Dvl2, decreased downstream β-catenin signaling and exerted anti-proliferative effects in human colon cancer cell lines and colorectal cancer cells isolated by surgical resection of metastatic disease, regardless of mutations in APC. In contrast, inhibition of NF-κB or mTOR did not exert similar anti-proliferative effects in these colorectal cancer model systems. In mice implanted with human colorectal cancer xenografts, orally administered niclosamide was well tolerated, achieved plasma and tumor levels associated with biologic activity and led to tumor control. Our findings support clinical explorations to reposition niclosamide for treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:21531761

  9. Familial colorectal cancer type X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dominguez-Valentin, Mev; Therkildsen, Christina; Da Silva, Sabrina

    2015-01-01

    Heredity is a major cause of colorectal cancer, but although several rare high-risk syndromes have been linked to disease-predisposing mutations, the genetic mechanisms are undetermined in the majority of families suspected of hereditary cancer. We review the clinical presentation, histopathologic...... features, and the genetic and epigenetic profiles of the familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX) syndrome with the aim to delineate tumor characteristics that may contribute to refined diagnostics and optimized tumor prevention....

  10. Prophylaxis against colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Steffen; Kronborg, O

    1996-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is diagnosed in more than 3000 people every year in Denmark, with a population of 5 million, and 2000 die from this disease every year. The aetiology of the disease is complex, but an increasing number of cancers have been related to genetics and Denmark is contributing...... with a well-established register of familial adenomatous polyposis and a recently founded register for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, both with major international relationships. The Danish tradition of epidemiology and clinical trials has also been demonstrated in population screening trials...... for colorectal cancer in average-risk persons as well as high-risk groups with precursors of the disease. The present review places Danish contributions within the prophylaxis of colorectal cancer during the last decade in an international context....

  11. Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer identification and surveillance of high-risk families Câncer colo-retal hereditário não polipose - Diagnóstico e surgimento de famílias de alto risco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Vasconcelos e Silva

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer is an autosomal dominant condition caused by highly penetrant gene mutations. It is characterized by increased susceptibility for a specific group of cancer, mainly colorectal cancer. The syndrome originates from the inheritance of mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes. The most commonly affected genes in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer are hMLH1 and hMSH2. Their deficient expression renders the cell susceptible to the accumulation of many molecular defects, a condition which can be evaluated by the instability in sections of base repeats in the genoma known as microsatellite instability. The molecular detection of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer is possible in most of the highly suspicious cases. Genetic tests for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer also allow characterization of the individual that bears the mutation within a family. The high cost and restricted availability of these tests hamper their use for every person presenting colorectal cancer. Due to this fact, some clinical criteria have been developed by a hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer international organization to select families with a high probability of carrying the mutation. Once families at risk are identified, they are encouraged to join a screening program that aims at early detection of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer-related cancers, increasing the possibility of its prevention and early detection.O câncer colo-retal hereditário não polipose é uma síndrome genética caracterizada por uma susceptilidade aumentada para certos tipos específicos de câncer, especialmente o câncer colo-retal. Ao nível molecular, a síndrome caracteriza-se pela herança autossômica dominante de mutações em genes envolvidos em um mecanismo de reparo do DNA dirigido para defeitos em trocas, ganhos ou perdas de um número de pequeno de bases, chamado de sistema de reparo de erros de pareamento. Os

  12. Multi-scale modeling of APC and [Formula: see text]-catenin regulation in the human colonic crypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerick, Brooks; Schleiniger, Gilberto; Boman, Bruce M

    2018-06-01

    Stem cell renewal and differentiation in the human colonic crypt are linked to the [Formula: see text]-catenin pathway. The spatial balance of Wnt factors in proliferative cells within the crypt maintain an appropriate level of cellular reproduction needed for normal crypt homeostasis. Mutational events at the gene level are responsible for deregulating the balance of Wnt factors along the crypt, causing an overpopulation of proliferative cells, a loss of structure of the crypt domain, and the initiation of colorectal carcinomas. We formulate a PDE model describing cell movement and reproduction in a static crypt domain. We consider a single cell population whose proliferative capabilities are determined by stemness, a quantity defined by intracellular levels of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) scaffold protein and [Formula: see text]-catenin. We fit APC regulation parameters to biological data that describe normal protein gradients in the crypt. We also fit cell movement and protein flux parameters to normal crypt characteristics such as renewal time, total cell count, and proportion of proliferating cells. The model is used to investigate abnormal crypt dynamics when subjected to a diminished APC gradient, a scenario synonymous to mutations in the APC gene. We find that a 25% decrease in APC synthesis leads to a fraction of 0.88 proliferative, which is reflective of normal-appearing FAP crypts. A 50% drop in APC activity yields a fully proliferative crypt showing a doubling of the level of stemness, which characterizes the initial stages of colorectal cancer development. A sensitivity analysis of APC regulation parameters shows the perturbation of factors that is required to restore crypt dynamics to normal in the case of APC mutations.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Hereditary pancreatitis Hereditary pancreatitis Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Hereditary pancreatitis is a genetic condition characterized by recurrent episodes ...

  14. APC promoter 1B deletion in seven American families with familial adenomatous polyposis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, A K; Tuohy, T M F; Sargent, N R; Smith, L J; Burt, R W; Neklason, D W

    2015-10-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is a colorectal cancer predisposition syndrome caused by mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene. Clinical genetic testing fails to identify disease causing mutations in up to 20% of clinically apparent FAP cases. Following the inclusion of multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) probes specific for APC promoter 1B, seven probands were identified with a deletion of promoter 1B. Using haplotype analysis spanning the APC locus, the seven families appear to be identical by descent from a common founder. The clinical phenotype of 19 mutation carriers is classical FAP with colectomy at an average age of 24. The majority of cases had a large number of duodenal and gastric polyps. Measurements of allele-specific expression of APC mRNA using TaqMan assay confirmed that relative expression in the allele containing the promoter 1B deletion was reduced 42-98%, depending on tissue type. This study confirms the importance of APC promoter deletions as a cause of FAP and identifies a founder mutation in FAP patients from the United States. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Genetics of Colorectal Cancer (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes include Lynch syndrome and several polyposis syndromes (familial adenomatous polyposis, MUTYH-associated polyposis, juvenile polyposis syndrome, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, and serrated polyposis syndrome). Learn about the genetics, clinical manifestations, management, and psychosocial aspects of these and other hereditary colon cancer syndromes in this expert-reviewed summary.

  16. Gastric tumours in hereditary cancer syndromes: clinical features, molecular biology and strategies for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sereno, María; Aguayo, Cristina; Guillén Ponce, Carmen; Gómez-Raposo, César; Zambrana, Francisco; Gómez-López, Miriam; Casado, Enrique

    2011-09-01

    Gastric cancer is the major cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. The majority of them are classified as sporadic, whereas the remaining 10% exhibit familial clustering. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) syndrome is the most important condition that leads to hereditary gastric cancer. However, other hereditary cancer syndromes, such as hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, familial adenomatous polyposis, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Li-Fraumeni syndrome and hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, entail a higher risk compared to the general population for developing this kind of neoplasia. In this review, we describe briefly the most important aspects related to clinical features, molecular biology and strategies for prevention in hereditary gastric associated to different cancer syndromes.

  17. Induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress by deletion of Grp78 depletes Apc mutant intestinal epithelial stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lidth de Jeude, J F; Meijer, B J; Wielenga, M C B; Spaan, C N; Baan, B; Rosekrans, S L; Meisner, S; Shen, Y H; Lee, A S; Paton, J C; Paton, A W; Muncan, V; van den Brink, G R; Heijmans, J

    2017-06-15

    Intestinal epithelial stem cells are highly sensitive to differentiation induced by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Colorectal cancer develops from mutated intestinal epithelial stem cells. The most frequent initiating mutation occurs in Apc, which results in hyperactivated Wnt signalling. This causes hyperproliferation and reduced sensitivity to chemotherapy, but whether these mutated stem cells are sensitive to ER stress induced differentiation remains unknown. Here we examined this by generating mice in which both Apc and ER stress repressor chaperone Grp78 can be conditionally deleted from the intestinal epithelium. For molecular studies, we used intestinal organoids derived from these mice. Homozygous loss of Apc alone resulted in crypt elongation, activation of the Wnt signature and accumulation of intestinal epithelial stem cells, as expected. This phenotype was however completely rescued on activation of ER stress by additional deletion of Grp78. In these Apc-Grp78 double mutant animals, stem cells were rapidly lost and repopulation occurred by non-mutant cells that had escaped recombination, suggesting that Apc-Grp78 double mutant stem cells had lost self-renewal capacity. Although in Apc-Grp78 double mutant mice the Wnt signature was lost, these intestines exhibited ubiquitous epithelial presence of nuclear β-catenin. This suggests that ER stress interferes with Wnt signalling downstream of nuclear β-catenin. In conclusion, our findings indicate that ER stress signalling results in loss of Apc mutated intestinal epithelial stem cells by interference with the Wnt signature. In contrast to many known inhibitors of Wnt signalling, ER stress acts downstream of β-catenin. Therefore, ER stress poses a promising target in colorectal cancers, which develop as a result of Wnt activating mutations.

  18. High-resolution melting (HRM) re-analysis of a polyposis patients cohort reveals previously undetected heterozygous and mosaic APC gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Out, Astrid A; van Minderhout, Ivonne J H M; van der Stoep, Nienke; van Bommel, Lysette S R; Kluijt, Irma; Aalfs, Cora; Voorendt, Marsha; Vossen, Rolf H A M; Nielsen, Maartje; Vasen, Hans F A; Morreau, Hans; Devilee, Peter; Tops, Carli M J; Hes, Frederik J

    2015-06-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis is most frequently caused by pathogenic variants in either the APC gene or the MUTYH gene. The detection rate of pathogenic variants depends on the severity of the phenotype and sensitivity of the screening method, including sensitivity for mosaic variants. For 171 patients with multiple colorectal polyps without previously detectable pathogenic variant, APC was reanalyzed in leukocyte DNA by one uniform technique: high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis. Serial dilution of heterozygous DNA resulted in a lowest detectable allelic fraction of 6% for the majority of variants. HRM analysis and subsequent sequencing detected pathogenic fully heterozygous APC variants in 10 (6%) of the patients and pathogenic mosaic variants in 2 (1%). All these variants were previously missed by various conventional scanning methods. In parallel, HRM APC scanning was applied to DNA isolated from polyp tissue of two additional patients with apparently sporadic polyposis and without detectable pathogenic APC variant in leukocyte DNA. In both patients a pathogenic mosaic APC variant was present in multiple polyps. The detection of pathogenic APC variants in 7% of the patients, including mosaics, illustrates the usefulness of a complete APC gene reanalysis of previously tested patients, by a supplementary scanning method. HRM is a sensitive and fast pre-screening method for reliable detection of heterozygous and mosaic variants, which can be applied to leukocyte and polyp derived DNA.

  19. Mouse model of proximal colon-specific tumorigenesis driven by microsatellite instability-induced Cre-mediated inactivation of Apc and activation of Kras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Hinoi, Takao; Saito, Yasufumi; Adachi, Tomohiro; Miguchi, Masashi; Niitsu, Hiroaki; Sasada, Tatsunari; Shimomura, Manabu; Egi, Hiroyuki; Oka, Shiro; Tanaka, Shinji; Chayama, Kazuaki; Sentani, Kazuhiro; Oue, Naohide; Yasui, Wataru; Ohdan, Hideki

    2016-05-01

    KRAS gene mutations are found in 40-50% of colorectal cancer cases, but their functional contribution is not fully understood. To address this issue, we generated genetically engineered mice with colon tumors expressing an oncogenic Kras(G12D) allele in the context of the Adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) deficiency to compare them to tumors harboring Apc deficiency alone. CDX2P9.5-G22Cre (referred to as G22Cre) mice showing inducible Cre recombinase transgene expression in the proximal colon controlled under the CDX2 gene promoter were intercrossed with Apc (flox/flox) mice and LSL-Kras (G12D) mice carrying loxP-flanked Apc and Lox-Stop-Lox oncogenic Kras(G12D) alleles, respectively, to generate G22Cre; Apc(flox/flox); Kras(G12D) and G22Cre; Apc(flox/flox); KrasWT mice. Gene expression profiles of the tumors were analyzed using high-density oligonucleotide arrays. Morphologically, minimal difference in proximal colon tumor was observed between the two mouse models. Consistent with previous findings in vitro, Glut1 transcript and protein expression was up-regulated in the tumors of G22Cre;Apc (flox/flox) ; Kras(G12D) mice. Immunohistochemical staining analysis revealed that GLUT1 protein expression correlated with KRAS mutations in human colorectal cancer. Microarray analysis identified 11 candidate genes upregulated more than fivefold and quantitative PCR analysis confirmed that Aqp8, Ttr, Qpct, and Slc26a3 genes were upregulated 3.7- to 30.2-fold in tumors with mutant Kras. These results demonstrated the validity of the G22Cre; Apc(flox/flox) ;Kras (G12D) mice as a new mouse model with oncogenic Kras activation. We believe that this model can facilitate efforts to define novel factors that contribute to the pathogenesis of human colorectal cancer with KRAS mutations.

  20. 4-Hydroxy-2(E)-nonenal metabolism differs in Apc(+/+) cells and in Apc(Min/+) cells: it may explain colon cancer promotion by heme iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baradat, Maryse; Jouanin, Isabelle; Dalleau, Sabine; Taché, Sylviane; Gieules, Mathilde; Debrauwer, Laurent; Canlet, Cécile; Huc, Laurence; Dupuy, Jacques; Pierre, Fabrice H F; Guéraud, Françoise

    2011-11-21

    Animal and epidemiological studies suggest that dietary heme iron would promote colorectal cancer. Oxidative properties of heme could lead to the formation of cytotoxic and genotoxic secondary lipid oxidation products, such as 4-hydroxy-2(E)-nonenal (HNE). This compound is more cytotoxic to mouse wild-type colon cells than to isogenic cells with a mutation on the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene. The latter thus have a selective advantage, possibly leading to cancer promotion. This mutation is an early and frequent event in human colorectal cancer. To explain this difference, the HNE biotransformation capacities of the two cell types have been studied using radiolabeled and stable isotope-labeled HNE. Apc-mutated cells showed better biotransformation capacities than nonmutated cells did. Thiol compound conjugation capacities were higher for mutated cells, with an important advantage for the extracellular conjugation to cysteine. Both cells types were able to reduce HNE to 4-hydroxynonanal, a biotransformation pathway that has not been reported for other intestinal cells. Mutated cells showed higher capacities to oxidize 4-hydroxynonanal into 4-hydroxynonanoic acid. The mRNA expression of different enzymes involved in HNE metabolism such as aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1, 2 and 3A1, glutathione transferase A4-4, or cystine transporter xCT was upregulated in mutated cells compared with wild-type cells. In conclusion, this study suggests that Apc-mutated cells are more efficient than wild-type cells in metabolizing HNE into thiol conjugates and 4-hydroxynonanoic acid due to the higher expression of key biotransformation enzymes. These differential biotransformation capacities would explain the differences of susceptibility between normal and Apc-mutated cells regarding secondary lipid oxidation products.

  1. APC/β-catenin-rich complexes at membrane protrusions regulate mammary tumor cell migration and mesenchymal morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odenwald, Matthew A; Prosperi, Jenifer R; Goss, Kathleen H

    2013-01-01

    The APC tumor suppressor is mutated or downregulated in many tumor types, and is prominently localized to punctate clusters at protrusion tips in migratory cells, such as in astrocytes where it has been implicated in directed cell motility. Although APC loss is considered an initiating event in colorectal cancer, for example, it is less clear what role APC plays in tumor cell motility and whether loss of APC might be an important promoter of tumor progression in addition to initiation. The localization of APC and β-catenin was analyzed in multiple cell lines, including non-transformed epithelial lines treated with a proteasome inhibitor or TGFβ to induce an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), as well as several breast cancer lines, by immunofluorescence. APC expression was knocked down in 4T07 mammary tumor cells using lentiviral-mediated delivery of APC-specific short-hairpin (sh) RNAs, and assessed using quantitative (q) reverse-transcriptase (RT)-PCR and western blotting. Tumor cell motility was analyzed by performing wound-filling assays, and morphology via immunofluorescence (IF) and phase-contrast microscopy. Additionally, proliferation was measured using BrdU incorporation, and TCF reporter assays were performed to determine β-catenin/TCF-mediated transcriptional activity. APC/β-catenin-rich complexes were observed at protrusion ends of migratory epithelial cells treated with a proteasome inhibitor or when EMT has been induced and in tumor cells with a mesenchymal, spindle-like morphology. 4T07 tumor cells with reduced APC levels were significantly less motile and had a more rounded morphology; yet, they did not differ significantly in proliferation or β-catenin/TCF transcriptional activity. Furthermore, we found that APC/β-catenin-rich complexes at protrusion ends were dependent upon an intact microtubule cytoskeleton. These findings indicate that membrane protrusions with APC/β-catenin-containing puncta control the migratory potential and

  2. APC/β-catenin-rich complexes at membrane protrusions regulate mammary tumor cell migration and mesenchymal morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The APC tumor suppressor is mutated or downregulated in many tumor types, and is prominently localized to punctate clusters at protrusion tips in migratory cells, such as in astrocytes where it has been implicated in directed cell motility. Although APC loss is considered an initiating event in colorectal cancer, for example, it is less clear what role APC plays in tumor cell motility and whether loss of APC might be an important promoter of tumor progression in addition to initiation. Methods The localization of APC and β-catenin was analyzed in multiple cell lines, including non-transformed epithelial lines treated with a proteasome inhibitor or TGFβ to induce an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), as well as several breast cancer lines, by immunofluorescence. APC expression was knocked down in 4T07 mammary tumor cells using lentiviral-mediated delivery of APC-specific short-hairpin (sh) RNAs, and assessed using quantitative (q) reverse-transcriptase (RT)-PCR and western blotting. Tumor cell motility was analyzed by performing wound-filling assays, and morphology via immunofluorescence (IF) and phase-contrast microscopy. Additionally, proliferation was measured using BrdU incorporation, and TCF reporter assays were performed to determine β-catenin/TCF-mediated transcriptional activity. Results APC/β-catenin-rich complexes were observed at protrusion ends of migratory epithelial cells treated with a proteasome inhibitor or when EMT has been induced and in tumor cells with a mesenchymal, spindle-like morphology. 4T07 tumor cells with reduced APC levels were significantly less motile and had a more rounded morphology; yet, they did not differ significantly in proliferation or β-catenin/TCF transcriptional activity. Furthermore, we found that APC/β-catenin-rich complexes at protrusion ends were dependent upon an intact microtubule cytoskeleton. Conclusions These findings indicate that membrane protrusions with APC/β-catenin-containing puncta

  3. Learning about Hereditary Hemochromatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Learning About Hereditary Hemochromatosis Enter Search Term(s): Español Research Funding An Overview Bioinformatics Current Grants Education and Training Funding Extramural Research ...

  4. Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Vase, P; Green, A

    1999-01-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a dominantly inherited disease characterized by telangiectatic lesions. The disease manifestations are variable and include epistaxis, gastrointestinal bleeding, pulmonary arteriovenous malformations and cerebral arteriovenous malformations. Early...

  5. APC implementation in Chandra Asri - ethylene plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidiq, Mochamad; Mustofa, Ali

    2017-05-01

    Nowadays, the modern process plants are continuously improved for maximizing production, Optimization of the energy and raw material and reducing the risk. Due to many disturbances appearance between the process units, hence, the failure of one unit might have a bad effect on the overall productivity. Ethylene Plant have significant opportunities for using Advanced Process Control (APC) technologies to improve operation stability, push closer to quality or equipment limit, and improve the capability of process units to handle disturbances. APC implementation had considered a best answer for solving multivariable control problem. PT. Chandra Asri Petrochemical, Tbk (CAP) operates a large naphtha cracker complex at Cilegon, Indonesia. To optimize the plant operation and to enhance the benefit, Chandra Asri has been decided to implement Advance Process Control (APC) for ethylene plant. The APC implementation technology scopes at CAP are as follows: 1. Hot Section : Furnaces, Quench Tower 2. Cold Section : Demethanizer, Deethanizer, Acetylene Converter, Ethylene Fractionator, Depropanizer, Propylene Fractionator, Debutanizer

  6. Data sharing system for lithography APC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Eiichi; Teranishi, Yoshiharu; Shimabara, Masanori

    2007-03-01

    We have developed a simple and cost-effective data sharing system between fabs for lithography advanced process control (APC). Lithography APC requires process flow, inter-layer information, history information, mask information and so on. So, inter-APC data sharing system has become necessary when lots are to be processed in multiple fabs (usually two fabs). The development cost and maintenance cost also have to be taken into account. The system handles minimum information necessary to make trend prediction for the lots. Three types of data have to be shared for precise trend prediction. First one is device information of the lots, e.g., process flow of the device and inter-layer information. Second one is mask information from mask suppliers, e.g., pattern characteristics and pattern widths. Last one is history data of the lots. Device information is electronic file and easy to handle. The electronic file is common between APCs and uploaded into the database. As for mask information sharing, mask information described in common format is obtained via Wide Area Network (WAN) from mask-vender will be stored in the mask-information data server. This information is periodically transferred to one specific lithography-APC server and compiled into the database. This lithography-APC server periodically delivers the mask-information to every other lithography-APC server. Process-history data sharing system mainly consists of function of delivering process-history data. In shipping production lots to another fab, the product-related process-history data is delivered by the lithography-APC server from the shipping site. We have confirmed the function and effectiveness of data sharing systems.

  7. Next-generation sequencing for genetic testing of familial colorectal cancer syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simbolo, Michele; Mafficini, Andrea; Agostini, Marco; Pedrazzani, Corrado; Bedin, Chiara; Urso, Emanuele D; Nitti, Donato; Turri, Giona; Scardoni, Maria; Fassan, Matteo; Scarpa, Aldo

    2015-01-01

    Genetic screening in families with high risk to develop colorectal cancer (CRC) prevents incurable disease and permits personalized therapeutic and follow-up strategies. The advancement of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies has revolutionized the throughput of DNA sequencing. A series of 16 probands for either familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP; 8 cases) or hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC; 8 cases) were investigated for intragenic mutations in five CRC familial syndromes-associated genes (APC, MUTYH, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6) applying both a custom multigene Ion AmpliSeq NGS panel and conventional Sanger sequencing. Fourteen pathogenic variants were detected in 13/16 FAP/HNPCC probands (81.3 %); one FAP proband presented two co-existing pathogenic variants, one in APC and one in MUTYH. Thirteen of these 14 pathogenic variants were detected by both NGS and Sanger, while one MSH2 mutation (L280FfsX3) was identified only by Sanger sequencing. This is due to a limitation of the NGS approach in resolving sequences close or within homopolymeric stretches of DNA. To evaluate the performance of our NGS custom panel we assessed its capability to resolve the DNA sequences corresponding to 2225 pathogenic variants reported in the COSMIC database for APC, MUTYH, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6. Our NGS custom panel resolves the sequences where 2108 (94.7 %) of these variants occur. The remaining 117 mutations reside inside or in close proximity to homopolymer stretches; of these 27 (1.2 %) are imprecisely identified by the software but can be resolved by visual inspection of the region, while the remaining 90 variants (4.0 %) are blind spots. In summary, our custom panel would miss 4 % (90/2225) of pathogenic variants that would need a small set of Sanger sequencing reactions to be solved. The multiplex NGS approach has the advantage of analyzing multiple genes in multiple samples simultaneously, requiring only a reduced number of Sanger sequences to resolve

  8. Mechanism of APC/CCDC20 activation by mitotic phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Renping; Weissmann, Florian; Yamaguchi, Masaya; Brown, Nicholas G; VanderLinden, Ryan; Imre, Richard; Jarvis, Marc A; Brunner, Michael R; Davidson, Iain F; Litos, Gabriele; Haselbach, David; Mechtler, Karl; Stark, Holger; Schulman, Brenda A; Peters, Jan-Michael

    2016-05-10

    Chromosome segregation and mitotic exit are initiated by the 1.2-MDa ubiquitin ligase APC/C (anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome) and its coactivator CDC20 (cell division cycle 20). To avoid chromosome missegregation, APC/C(CDC20) activation is tightly controlled. CDC20 only associates with APC/C in mitosis when APC/C has become phosphorylated and is further inhibited by a mitotic checkpoint complex until all chromosomes are bioriented on the spindle. APC/C contains 14 different types of subunits, most of which are phosphorylated in mitosis on multiple sites. However, it is unknown which of these phospho-sites enable APC/C(CDC20) activation and by which mechanism. Here we have identified 68 evolutionarily conserved mitotic phospho-sites on human APC/C bound to CDC20 and have used the biGBac technique to generate 47 APC/C mutants in which either all 68 sites or subsets of them were replaced by nonphosphorylatable or phospho-mimicking residues. The characterization of these complexes in substrate ubiquitination and degradation assays indicates that phosphorylation of an N-terminal loop region in APC1 is sufficient for binding and activation of APC/C by CDC20. Deletion of the N-terminal APC1 loop enables APC/C(CDC20) activation in the absence of mitotic phosphorylation or phospho-mimicking mutations. These results indicate that binding of CDC20 to APC/C is normally prevented by an autoinhibitory loop in APC1 and that its mitotic phosphorylation relieves this inhibition. The predicted location of the N-terminal APC1 loop implies that this loop controls interactions between the N-terminal domain of CDC20 and APC1 and APC8. These results reveal how APC/C phosphorylation enables CDC20 to bind and activate the APC/C in mitosis.

  9. Prophylaxis against colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Steffen; Kronborg, O

    1996-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is diagnosed in more than 3000 people every year in Denmark, with a population of 5 million, and 2000 die from this disease every year. The aetiology of the disease is complex, but an increasing number of cancers have been related to genetics and Denmark is contributing with a w......Colorectal cancer is diagnosed in more than 3000 people every year in Denmark, with a population of 5 million, and 2000 die from this disease every year. The aetiology of the disease is complex, but an increasing number of cancers have been related to genetics and Denmark is contributing...... with a well-established register of familial adenomatous polyposis and a recently founded register for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, both with major international relationships. The Danish tradition of epidemiology and clinical trials has also been demonstrated in population screening trials...... for colorectal cancer in average-risk persons as well as high-risk groups with precursors of the disease. The present review places Danish contributions within the prophylaxis of colorectal cancer during the last decade in an international context....

  10. [Colorectal cancer (CCR): genetic and molecular alterations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez-Vázquez, Clara Ibet; Rosales-Reynoso, Mónica Alejandra

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to present a genetic and molecular overview of colorectal carcinogenesis (sporadic and hereditary origin) as a multistage process, where there are a number of molecular mechanisms associated with the development of colorectal cancer and genomic instability that allows the accumulation of mutations in proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, chromosomal instability, and methylation and microsatellite instability, and the involvement of altered expression of microRNAs' prognosis factors.

  11. Sumoylation promotes optimal APC/C Activation and Timely Anaphase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Christine C; Li, Bing; Yu, Hongtao; Matunis, Michael J

    2018-03-08

    The Anaphase Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C) is a ubiquitin E3 ligase that functions as the gatekeeper to mitotic exit. APC/C activity is controlled by an interplay of multiple pathways during mitosis, including the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), that are not yet fully understood. Here, we show that sumoylation of the APC4 subunit of the APC/C peaks during mitosis and is critical for timely APC/C activation and anaphase onset. We have also identified a functionally important SUMO interacting motif in the cullin-homology domain of APC2 located near the APC4 sumoylation sites and APC/C catalytic core. Our findings provide evidence of an important regulatory role for SUMO modification and binding in affecting APC/C activation and mitotic exit. © 2018, Lee et al.

  12. Curcumin suppresses intestinal polyps in APC Min mice fed a high fat diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Pettan-Brewer

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is a leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. Various risk factors have been associated with CRC including increasing age and diet. Epidemiological and experimental studies have implicated a diet high in fat as an important risk factor for colon cancer. High fat diets can promote obesity resulting in insulin resistance and inflammation and the development of oxidative stress, increased cell proliferation, and suppression of apoptosis. Because of the high consumption of dietary fats, especially saturated fats, by Western countries, it is of interest to see if non-nutrient food factors might be effective in preventing or delaying CRC in the presence of high saturated fat intake. Curcumin (Curcuma longa, the main yellow pigment in turmeric, was selected to test because of its reported anti-tumor activity. APC Min mice, which develop intestinal polyps and have many molecular features of CRC, were fed a diet containing 35% pork fat, 33% sucrose, and a protein and vitamin mineral mixture (HFD with or without 0.5% curcumin. These cohorts were compared to APC Min mice receiving standard rodent chow (RC with 8% fat. APC Min mice fed the HFD for 3 months had a 23% increase in total number of polyps compared to APC Min mice on RC. Curcumin was able to significantly reverse the accelerated polyp development associated with the HFD suggesting it may be effective clinically in helping prevent colon cancer even when ingesting high amounts of fatty foods. The anti-tumor effect of curcumin was shown to be associated with enhanced apoptosis and increased efficiency of DNA repair. Since curcumin prevented the gain in body weight seen in APC Min mice ingesting the HFD, modulation of energy metabolism may also be a factor.

  13. Thymine DNA Glycosylase (TDG) is involved in the pathogenesis of intestinal tumors with reduced APC expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jinfei; Cortellino, Salvatore; Tricarico, Rossella; Chang, Wen-Chi; Scher, Gabrielle; Devarajan, Karthik; Slifker, Michael; Moore, Robert; Bassi, Maria Rosaria; Caretti, Elena; Clapper, Margie; Cooper, Harry; Bellacosa, Alfonso

    2017-10-27

    Thymine DNA Glycosylase (TDG) is a base excision repair enzyme that acts as a thymine and uracil DNA N-glycosylase on G:T and G:U mismatches, thus protecting CpG sites in the genome from mutagenesis by deamination. In addition, TDG has an epigenomic function by removing the novel cytosine derivatives 5-formylcytosine and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) generated by Ten-Eleven Translocation (TET) enzymes during active DNA demethylation. We and others previously reported that TDG is essential for mammalian development. However, its involvement in tumor formation is unknown. To study the role of TDG in tumorigenesis, we analyzed the effects of its inactivation in a well-characterized model of tumor predisposition, the Apc Min mouse strain. Mice bearing a conditional Tdg flox allele were crossed with Fabpl ::Cre transgenic mice, in the context of the Apc Min mutation, in order to inactivate Tdg in the small intestinal and colonic epithelium. We observed an approximately 2-fold increase in the number of small intestinal adenomas in the test Tdg -mutant Apc Min mice in comparison to control genotypes (p=0.0001). This increase occurred in female mice, and is similar to the known increase in intestinal adenoma formation due to oophorectomy. In the human colorectal cancer (CRC) TCGA database, the subset of patients with TDG and APC expression in the lowest quartile exhibits an excess of female cases. We conclude that TDG inactivation plays a role in intestinal tumorigenesis initiated by mutation/underexpression of APC . Our results also indicate that TDG may be involved in sex-specific protection from CRC.

  14. Disruption of the APC gene by t(5;7) translocation in a Turcot family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahnane, Nora; Bernasconi, Barbara; Carnevali, Ileana; Furlan, Daniela; Viel, Alessandra; Sessa, Fausto; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia

    2016-03-01

    Turcot syndrome (TS) refers to the combination of colorectal polyps and primary tumours of the central nervous system. TS is a heterogeneous genetic condition due to APC and/or mismatch repair germline mutations. When APC is involved the vast majority of mutations are truncating, but in approximately 20%-30% of patients with familial polyposis no germline mutation can be found. A 30-year-old Caucasian woman with a positive pedigree for TS was referred to our Genetic Counselling Service. She was negative for APC and MUTYH but showed a reciprocal balanced translocation t(5;7)(q22;p15) at chromosome analysis. FISH analysis using specific BAC probes demonstrated that 5q22 breakpoint disrupted the APC gene. Transcript analysis by MLPA and digital PCR revealed that the cytogenetic rearrangement involving the 3' end of the APC gene caused a defective expression of a truncated transcript. This result allowed cytogenetic analysis to be offered to all the other family members and segregation analysis clearly demonstrated that all the carriers were affected, whereas non-carriers did not have the polyposis. A cytogenetic approach permitted the identification of the mutation-causing disease in this family, and the segregation analysis together with the transcript study supported the pathogenetic role of this mutation. Karyotype analysis was used as a predictive test in all members of this family. This family suggests that clinically positive TS and FAP cases, which test negative with standard molecular analysis, could be easily and cost-effectively resolved by a classical and molecular cytogenetic approach. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A limited role for p53 in modulating the immediate phenotype of Apc loss in the intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, Karen R; Meniel, Valerie S; Marsh, Victoria; Cole, Alicia; Sansom, Owen J; Clarke, Alan R

    2008-01-01

    p53 is an important tumour suppressor with a known role in the later stages of colorectal cancer, but its relevance to the early stages of neoplastic initiation remains somewhat unclear. Although p53-dependent regulation of Wnt signalling activity is known to occur, the importance of these regulatory mechanisms during the early stages of intestinal neoplasia has not been demonstrated. We have conditionally deleted the Adenomatous Polyposis coli gene (Apc) from the adult murine intestine in wild type and p53 deficient environments and subsequently compared the phenotype and transcriptome profiles in both genotypes. Expression of p53 was shown to be elevated following the conditional deletion of Apc in the adult small intestine. Furthermore, p53 status was shown to impact on the transcription profile observed following Apc loss. A number of key Wnt pathway components and targets were altered in the p53 deficient environment. However, the aberrant phenotype observed following loss of Apc (rapid nuclear localisation of β-catenin, increased levels of DNA damage, nuclear atypia, perturbed cell death, proliferation, differentiation and migration) was not significantly altered by the absence of p53. p53 related feedback mechanisms regulating Wnt signalling activity are present in the intestine, and become activated following loss of Apc. However, the physiological Wnt pathway regulation by p53 appears to be overwhelmed by Apc loss and consequently the activity of these regulatory mechanisms is not sufficient to modulate the immediate phenotypes seen following Apc loss. Thus we are able to provide an explanation to the apparent contradiction that, despite having a Wnt regulatory capacity, p53 loss is not associated with early lesion development

  16. APC functions at the centrosome to stimulate microtubule growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Christina; Ashton, Cahora; Sharma, Manisha; Brocardo, Mariana G; Henderson, Beric R

    2016-01-01

    The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor suppressor is multi-functional. APC is known to localize at the centrosome, and in mitotic cells contributes to formation of the mitotic spindle. To test whether APC contributes to nascent microtubule (MT) growth at interphase centrosomes, we employed MT regrowth assays in U2OS cells to measure MT assembly before and after nocodazole treatment and release. We showed that siRNA knockdown of full-length APC delayed both initial MT aster formation and MT elongation/regrowth. In contrast, APC-mutant SW480 cancer cells displayed a defect in MT regrowth that was unaffected by APC knockdown, but which was rescued by reconstitution of full-length APC. Our findings identify APC as a positive regulator of centrosome MT initial assembly and suggest that this process is disrupted by cancer mutations. We confirmed that full-length APC associates with the MT-nucleation factor γ-tubulin, and found that the APC cancer-truncated form (1-1309) also bound to γ-tubulin through APC amino acids 1-453. While binding to γ-tubulin may help target APC to the site of MT nucleation complexes, additional C-terminal sequences of APC are required to stimulate and stabilize MT growth. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Apc-Mutant Kyoto Apc Delta (KAD) Rats Are Susceptible to 4-NQO-Induced Tongue Carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Takuji, E-mail: tmntt08@gmail.com [Department of Diagnostic Pathology (DDP) & Research Center of Diagnostic Pathology (RC-DiP), Gifu Municipal Hospital, 7-1 Kashima-Cho, Gifu 500-8513 (Japan); Department of Tumor Pathology, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); Shimizu, Masahito; Kochi, Takahiro; Shirakami, Yohei [Department of Internal Medicine/Gastroenterology, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); Mori, Takayuki [Department of Pharmacy, Ogaki Municipal Hospital, 4-86 Minaminokawa-cho, Ogaki 503-8502 (Japan); Watanabe, Naoki [Department of Diagnostic Pathology (DDP) & Research Center of Diagnostic Pathology (RC-DiP), Gifu Municipal Hospital, 7-1 Kashima-Cho, Gifu 500-8513 (Japan); Naiki, Takafumi [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Gifu Municipal Hospital, 7-1 Kashima-cho, Gifu 500-8513 (Japan); Moriwaki, Hisataka [Department of Internal Medicine/Gastroenterology, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); Yoshimi, Kazuto; Serikawa, Tadao; Kuramoto, Takashi [The Institute of Laboratory Animals, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Yoshidakonoe-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2014-07-21

    Despite widening interest in the possible association between infection/inflammation and cancer development, knowledge of this issue in relation to oral cancer remains inadequate. This study aimed to determine the susceptibility of Apc-mutant Kyoto Apc Delta (KAD) rats, which are vulnerable to developing inflammation-associated colorectal carcinogenesis, to 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4-NQO)-induced tongue carcinogenesis in order to clarify the role of inflammation in oral cancer. KAD (20 males and 22 females) and F344/NS1c (22 males and 23 females) rats received drinking water with or without 4-NQO (20 ppm) for eight weeks. Histopathological and immunohistochemical analyses of the tongue were performed at week 20. Additionally, the mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines in the tongue mucosa was determined at week 8. Tongue squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) developed in the KAD and F344/NS1c rats that received 4-NQO. Regardless of gender, the incidence and multiplicity of tongue SCC were greater in the KAD rats than in the F344/NS1c rats. In addition, the multiplicity of tongue SCC in the female KAD rats was significantly greater than that observed in the male KAD (p < 0.01) and female F344/NS1c rats (p < 0.05). The levels of inflammation and the mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines in the tongue in the 4-NQO-treated female KAD rats were the highest among the rats given 4-NQO. These results show that KAD rats, particularly females, are susceptible to 4-NQO-induced tongue carcinogenesis, suggesting the utility of models employing KAD rats for investigating the pathobiology of oral (tongue) carcinogenesis associated with inflammation.

  18. Apc-Mutant Kyoto Apc Delta (KAD) Rats Are Susceptible to 4-NQO-Induced Tongue Carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Takuji; Shimizu, Masahito; Kochi, Takahiro; Shirakami, Yohei; Mori, Takayuki; Watanabe, Naoki; Naiki, Takafumi; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Yoshimi, Kazuto; Serikawa, Tadao; Kuramoto, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Despite widening interest in the possible association between infection/inflammation and cancer development, knowledge of this issue in relation to oral cancer remains inadequate. This study aimed to determine the susceptibility of Apc-mutant Kyoto Apc Delta (KAD) rats, which are vulnerable to developing inflammation-associated colorectal carcinogenesis, to 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4-NQO)-induced tongue carcinogenesis in order to clarify the role of inflammation in oral cancer. KAD (20 males and 22 females) and F344/NS1c (22 males and 23 females) rats received drinking water with or without 4-NQO (20 ppm) for eight weeks. Histopathological and immunohistochemical analyses of the tongue were performed at week 20. Additionally, the mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines in the tongue mucosa was determined at week 8. Tongue squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) developed in the KAD and F344/NS1c rats that received 4-NQO. Regardless of gender, the incidence and multiplicity of tongue SCC were greater in the KAD rats than in the F344/NS1c rats. In addition, the multiplicity of tongue SCC in the female KAD rats was significantly greater than that observed in the male KAD (p < 0.01) and female F344/NS1c rats (p < 0.05). The levels of inflammation and the mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines in the tongue in the 4-NQO-treated female KAD rats were the highest among the rats given 4-NQO. These results show that KAD rats, particularly females, are susceptible to 4-NQO-induced tongue carcinogenesis, suggesting the utility of models employing KAD rats for investigating the pathobiology of oral (tongue) carcinogenesis associated with inflammation

  19. Hereditary Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, LenhAnh P.; Grundfast, Kenneth M.

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses inheritance patterns in hearing loss, epidemiology, clues to genetic causes, locating genes that cause hereditary disorders, genes related to hearing loss disorders in individuals with Usher syndrome, Waardenburg syndrome, Treacher-Collins syndrome, Branchio-oto-renal and Pendred syndromes, and the significance of finding…

  20. Hereditary periodic fever syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McDermott, MF; Frenkel, J

    Hereditary periodic fever syndromes are defined by recurrent attacks of generalised inflammation for which no infectious or auto-immune cause can be identified. For most of these disorders, the molecular basis has recently been elucidated. This has opened the prospect of novel therapeutic

  1. Colorectal polyps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intestinal polyps; Polyps - colorectal; Adenomatous polyps; Hyperplastic polyps; Villous adenomas; Serrated polyp; Serrated adenoma; Precancerous polyps; Colon cancer - polyps; Bleeding - colorectal polyps

  2. A importância da suspeição clínica no diagnóstico e tratamento do câncer colorretal hereditário The importance of clinical suspicion on the diagnosis and treatment of hereditary colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Valadão

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho relatamos o caso de um paciente portador de síndrome de Lynch (HNPCC que desenvolveu câncer retal metacrônico em curto intervalo de tempo após tratamento do tumor primário (câncer de cólon direito. O objetivo deste relato de caso é salientar a importância da suspeição clínica no diagnóstico de câncer colorretal hereditário e suas implicações terapêuticas.In this article we report the case of a patient with Lynch syndrome (HNPCC who developed metachronic rectal cancer in a short time interval after the primary tumor had been treated (right colon cancer. The objective of this case report is to point out the importance of clinical suspicion in the diagnosis of hereditary colorectal cancer and its therapeutics implications.

  3. COL11A1 in FAP polyps and in sporadic colorectal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, Heléne; Salahshor, Sima; Stenling, Roger; Björk, Jan; Lindmark, Gudrun; Iselius, Lennart; Rubio, Carlos; Lindblom, Annika

    2001-01-01

    We previously reported that the α-1 chain of type 11 collagen (COL11A1), not normally expressed in the colon, was up-regulated in stromal fibroblasts in most sporadic colorectal carcinomas. Patients with germline mutations in the APC gene show, besides colonic polyposis, symptoms of stromal fibroblast involvement, which could be related to COL11A1 expression. Most colorectal carcinomas are suggested to be a result of an activated Wnt- pathway, most often involving an inactivation of the APC gene or activation of β-catenin. We used normal and polyp tissue samples from one FAP patient and a set of 37 sporadic colorectal carcinomas to find out if the up-regulation of COL11A1 was associated with an active APC/β-catenin pathway. In this study we found a statistically significant difference in COL11A1 expression between normal tissue and adenomas from one FAP patient, and all adenomas gave evidence for an active APC/β-catenin pathway. An active Wnt pathway has been suggested to involve stromal expression of WISP-1. We found a strong correlation between WISP-1 and COL11A1 expression in sporadic carcinomas. Our results suggest that expression of COL11A1 in colorectal tumors could be associated with the APC/β-catenin pathway in FAP and sporadic colorectal cancer

  4. Informing family members about a hereditary predisposition to cancer: attitudes and practices among clinical geneticists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stol, Y.; Menko, F.H.; Westerman, M.J.; Janssens, M.J.P.A.

    2010-01-01

    If a hereditary predisposition to colorectal cancer or breast cancer is diagnosed, most guidelines state that clinical geneticists should request index patients to inform their at-risk relatives about the existence of this condition in their family, thus enabling them to consider presymptomatic

  5. Hereditary breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin J; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 are only detected in 25% of families with a strong history of breast cancer, though hereditary factors are expected to be involved in the remaining families with no recognized mutation. Molecular characterization is expected to provide new insight...... into the tumor biology to guide the search of new high-risk alleles and provide better classification of the growing number of BRCA1/2 variants of unknown significance (VUS). In this review, we provide an overview of hereditary breast cancer, its genetic background, and clinical implications, before focusing...... on the pathologically and molecular features associated with the disease. Recent transcriptome and genome profiling studies of tumor series from BRCA1/2 mutation carriers as well as familial non-BRCA1/2 will be discussed. Special attention is paid to its association with molecular breast cancer subtypes as well...

  6. Antihelminth compound niclosamide downregulates Wnt signaling and elicits antitumor responses in tumors with activating APC mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, Takuya; Chen, Minyong; Yang, Xiao Yi; Spasojevic, Ivan; Vandeusen, Jeffrey B; Hsu, David; Clary, Bryan M; Clay, Timothy M; Chen, Wei; Morse, Michael A; Lyerly, H Kim

    2011-06-15

    Wnt/β-catenin pathway activation caused by adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutations occurs in approximately 80% of sporadic colorectal cancers (CRC). The antihelminth compound niclosamide downregulates components of the Wnt pathway, specifically Dishevelled-2 (Dvl2) expression, resulting in diminished downstream β-catenin signaling. In this study, we determined whether niclosamide could inhibit the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in human CRCs and whether its inhibition might elicit antitumor effects in the presence of APC mutations. We found that niclosamide inhibited Wnt/β-catenin pathway activation, downregulated Dvl2, decreased downstream β-catenin signaling, and exerted antiproliferative effects in human colon cancer cell lines and CRC cells isolated by surgical resection of metastatic disease, regardless of mutations in APC. In contrast, inhibition of NF-κB or mTOR did not exert similar antiproliferative effects in these CRC model systems. In mice implanted with human CRC xenografts, orally administered niclosamide was well tolerated, achieved plasma and tumor levels associated with biologic activity, and led to tumor control. Our findings support clinical explorations to reposition niclosamide for the treatment of CRC.

  7. Novel APC mutations in Czech and Slovak FAP families: clinical and genetic aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesela Kamila

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Germline mutations in the adenomatous polyposis gene (APC result in familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP. FAP is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder predisposing to colorectal cancer. Typical FAP is characterized by hundreds to thousands of colorectal adenomatous polyps and by several extracolonic manifestations. An attenuated form of polyposis (AFAP is characterized by less than 100 adenomas and later onset of the disease. Methods Here, we analyzed the APC gene for germline mutations in 59 Czech and 15 Slovak FAP patients. In addition, 50 apparently APC mutation negative Czech probands and 3 probands of Slovak origin were screened for large deletions encompassing the APC gene. Mutation screening was performed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and/or protein truncation test. DNA fragments showing an aberrant electrophoretic banding pattern were sequenced. Screening for large deletions was performed by multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification. The extent of deletions was analyzed using following microsatellite markers: D5S299, D5S82, D5S134 and D5S346. Results In the set of Czech and Slovak patients, we identified 46 germline mutations among 74 unrelated probands. Total mutation capture is 62,2% including large deletions. Thirty seven mutations were detected in 49 patients presenting a classical FAP phenotype (75,5% and 9 mutations in 25 patients with attenuated FAP (36%. We report 20 novel germline APC mutations and 3 large deletions (6% encompassing the whole-gene deletions and/or exon 14 deletion. In the patients with novel mutations, correlations of the mutation localization are discussed in context of the classical and/or attenuated phenotype of the disease. Conclusion The results of the molecular genetic testing are used both in the establishment of the predictive diagnosis and in the clinical management of patients. In some cases this study has also shown the difficulty to classify clinically

  8. Hereditary pancreatitis for the endoscopist

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Milan R.; Eppolito, Amanda L.; Willingham, Field F.

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis shares a majority of clinical and morphologic features with chronic alcoholic pancreatitis, but may present at an earlier age. The term hereditary pancreatitis has primarily been associated with mutations in the serine protease 1 gene (PRSS1) which encodes for cationic trypsinogen. PRSS1 mutations account for approximately 68–81% of hereditary pancreatitis. Mutations in other genes, primarily serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK1) and the cystic fibrosis trans...

  9. EAMJ Oct Hereditary.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HEREDITARY GINGIVAL FIBROMATOSIS: REPORT OF FAMILY CASE SERIES. E. G. Wagaiyu ... Senior Lecturer, Department of Periodontology/Community and Preventive Dentistry, ... fibrous connective tissue held in chronically inflamed.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary fructose intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter Home Health Conditions Hereditary fructose intolerance Hereditary fructose intolerance Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Hereditary fructose intolerance is a condition that affects a person's ...

  11. Vliv screeningových programů karcinomu kolorekta na smrtnost a incidenci tohoto onemocnění v České republice modelovaný pomocí APC přístupu

    OpenAIRE

    Čady, Ondřej

    2012-01-01

    This work will first introduce the problems related to the colorectal cancer - its epidemiology and screening possibilities. Next the main topic is addressed - i.e. to ascertain the influence of national screening programmes for colorectal cancer on really observed data of lethality and incidence of this disease. Group of so-called APC models was selected as a useful tool for this purpose. Applying these methods on data of The National Oncological Registry of the Czech Republic for the period...

  12. Maslinic acid-enriched diet decreases intestinal tumorigenesis in Apc(Min/+ mice through transcriptomic and metabolomic reprogramming.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Sánchez-Tena

    Full Text Available Chemoprevention is a pragmatic approach to reduce the risk of colorectal cancer, one of the leading causes of cancer-related death in western countries. In this regard, maslinic acid (MA, a pentacyclic triterpene extracted from wax-like coatings of olives, is known to inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis in colon cancer cell lines without affecting normal intestinal cells. The present study evaluated the chemopreventive efficacy and associated mechanisms of maslinic acid treatment on spontaneous intestinal tumorigenesis in Apc(Min/+ mice. Twenty-two mice were randomized into 2 groups: control group and MA group, fed with a maslinic acid-supplemented diet for six weeks. MA treatment reduced total intestinal polyp formation by 45% (P<0.01. Putative molecular mechanisms associated with suppressing intestinal polyposis in Apc(Min/+ mice were investigated by comparing microarray expression profiles of MA-treated and control mice and by analyzing the serum metabolic profile using NMR techniques. The different expression phenotype induced by MA suggested that it exerts its chemopreventive action mainly by inhibiting cell-survival signaling and inflammation. These changes eventually induce G1-phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Moreover, the metabolic changes induced by MA treatment were associated with a protective profile against intestinal tumorigenesis. These results show the efficacy and underlying mechanisms of MA against intestinal tumor development in the Apc(Min/+ mice model, suggesting its chemopreventive potential against colorectal cancer.

  13. Cancer stemness in Apc- vs. Apc/KRAS-driven intestinal tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrnaz Ghazvini

    Full Text Available Constitutive activation of the Wnt pathway leads to adenoma formation, an obligatory step towards intestinal cancer. In view of the established role of Wnt in regulating stemness, we attempted the isolation of cancer stem cells (CSCs from Apc- and Apc/KRAS-mutant intestinal tumours. Whereas CSCs are present in Apc/KRAS tumours, they appear to be very rare (<10(-6 in the Apc-mutant adenomas. In contrast, the Lin(-CD24(hiCD29(+ subpopulation of adenocarcinoma cells appear to be enriched in CSCs with increased levels of active β-catenin. Expression profiling analysis of the CSC-enriched subpopulation confirmed their enhanced Wnt activity and revealed additional differential expression of other signalling pathways, growth factor binding proteins, and extracellular matrix components. As expected, genes characteristic of the Paneth cell lineage (e.g. defensins are co-expressed together with stem cell genes (e.g. Lgr5 within the CSC-enriched subpopulation. This is of interest as it may indicate a cancer stem cell niche role for tumor-derived Paneth-like cells, similar to their role in supporting Lgr5(+ stem cells in the normal intestinal crypt. Overall, our results indicate that oncogenic KRAS activation in Apc-driven tumours results in the expansion of the CSCs compartment by increasing ®-catenin intracellular stabilization.

  14. Molecular mechanism of APC/C activation by mitotic phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Suyang; Chang, Leifu; Alfieri, Claudio; Zhang, Ziguo; Yang, Jing; Maslen, Sarah; Skehel, Mark; Barford, David

    2016-05-12

    In eukaryotes, the anaphase-promoting complex (APC/C, also known as the cyclosome) regulates the ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis of specific cell-cycle proteins to coordinate chromosome segregation in mitosis and entry into the G1 phase. The catalytic activity of the APC/C and its ability to specify the destruction of particular proteins at different phases of the cell cycle are controlled by its interaction with two structurally related coactivator subunits, Cdc20 and Cdh1. Coactivators recognize substrate degrons, and enhance the affinity of the APC/C for its cognate E2 (refs 4-6). During mitosis, cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) and polo-like kinase (Plk) control Cdc20- and Cdh1-mediated activation of the APC/C. Hyperphosphorylation of APC/C subunits, notably Apc1 and Apc3, is required for Cdc20 to activate the APC/C, whereas phosphorylation of Cdh1 prevents its association with the APC/C. Since both coactivators associate with the APC/C through their common C-box and Ile-Arg tail motifs, the mechanism underlying this differential regulation is unclear, as is the role of specific APC/C phosphorylation sites. Here, using cryo-electron microscopy and biochemical analysis, we define the molecular basis of how phosphorylation of human APC/C allows for its control by Cdc20. An auto-inhibitory segment of Apc1 acts as a molecular switch that in apo unphosphorylated APC/C interacts with the C-box binding site and obstructs engagement of Cdc20. Phosphorylation of the auto-inhibitory segment displaces it from the C-box-binding site. Efficient phosphorylation of the auto-inhibitory segment, and thus relief of auto-inhibition, requires the recruitment of Cdk-cyclin in complex with a Cdk regulatory subunit (Cks) to a hyperphosphorylated loop of Apc3. We also find that the small-molecule inhibitor, tosyl-l-arginine methyl ester, preferentially suppresses APC/C(Cdc20) rather than APC/C(Cdh1), and interacts with the binding sites of both the C-box and Ile-Arg tail motifs. Our

  15. Article Processing Charges and OpenAPC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    The publication landscape is about to change. While being largely operated by subscription based journals in the past, recent political decisions force the publishing industry towards OpenAccess. Especially, the publication of the Finch report in 2012 put APC based Gold OpenAccess models almost everywhere on the agenda. These models also require quite some adoptions for library work flows to handle payments, bills and centralized funds for publication fees. Sometimes handled in specialized systems (e.g. first setups in Jülich) pretty early on discussions started to handle APCs in local repositories which would also hold the OpenAccess content resulting from these fees, e.g. the University of Regenburg uses ePrints for this purpose. Backed up by the OpenData movmement, libraries also saw opportunity to exchange data about fees payed. Thus, OpenAPC.de was born in 2014 on github to facilitate this exchange and aggregate large amounts of data for evaluation and comparison. Using the repository to hold payment d...

  16. Regulation of APC and AXIN2 expression by intestinal tumor suppressor CDX2 in colon cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Anders Krüger; Coskun, Mehmet; Bzorek, Michael

    2013-01-01

    was associated with endogenous downregulation of APC and AXIN2 expression in Caco-2 cells but did not affect GSK3β expression. Furthermore, elevated levels of nuclear β-catenin and reduced levels of cytoplasmic APC were correlated to a low CDX2 expression in migrating colon cancer cells in vivo. These results......Wnt signaling is often constitutively active in colorectal cancer cells. The expression of the intestinal specific transcription factor CDX2 is found to be transiently decreased in invasive cells at the tumor/stroma interface. A recent ChIP-Seq study has indicated that several Wnt signaling......-related genes are regulated by CDX2. The aim was to investigate the role of decreased CDX2 level on the expression of APC, AXIN2 and GSK3β in migrating colon cancer cells at the invasive front. CDX2-bound promoter and enhancer regions from APC, AXIN2 and GSK3β were analyzed for gene regulatory activity...

  17. Hereditary angioedema in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouillet Laurence

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Women with hereditary angioedema (HAE are more likely to be symptomatic that men. Hormonal factors (puberty, contraception, pregnancy,.... play a significant role in the precipitation or worsening of the condition in women. So, combined contraceptive pills are not indicated and progestogen pill must be preferred. During pregnancy, attack rate can increase (38-48% of women. C1Inhibitor concentrate and tranexamic acid can be used during pregnancy. Attenuated androgens for long term prophylaxis are effective but side effects appear more often in female patients. These side effects are dose dependant and can be attenuated by titrating the dose down the lowest effective level.

  18. Hereditary Angioedema in Childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Line; Bygum, Anette

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare inherited disease that is often difficult to diagnose. We report a case of a 9-year-old boy with a spontaneous mutation causing HAE, diagnosed after a life-threatening episode of angioedema of the head and upper respiratory tract after a 5-year history of r...... of recurrent skin swellings and abdominal pain leading to several hospital admissions. The aim of this report is to direct focus on this rare disease, which can be treated effectively, to diminish morbidity and mortality of children suffering from undiagnosed HAE....

  19. Inactivation of promoter 1B of APC causes partial gene silencing: evidence for a significant role of the promoter in regulation and causative of familial adenomatous polyposis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohlin, A; Engwall, Y; Fritzell, K

    2011-01-01

    inactivation of promoter 1B is disease causing in FAP; (ii) expression of transcripts from promoter 1B is generated at considerable higher levels compared with 1A, demonstrating a hitherto unknown importance of 1B; (iii) adenoma formation in FAP, caused by impaired function of promoter 1B, does not require......Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is caused by germline mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene. Two promoters, 1A and 1B, have been recognized in APC, and 1B is thought to have a minor role in the regulation of the gene. We have identified a novel deletion encompassing half...... of this promoter in the largest family (Family 1) of the Swedish Polyposis Registry. The mutation leads to an imbalance in allele-specific expression of APC, and transcription from promoter 1B was highly impaired in both normal colorectal mucosa and blood from mutation carriers. To establish the significance...

  20. Startle responses in hereditary hyperekplexia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijssen, M. A.; Voorkamp, L. M.; Padberg, G. W.; van Dijk, J. G.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with hereditary hyperekplexia have excessive startle responses that are accompanied by transient stiffness and also continuous stiffness in infancy. A point of mutation has been identified for the major form of hereditary hyperekplexia in the gene encoding the alpha 1 subunit of

  1. Startle responses in hereditary hyperekplexia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijssen, MAJ; Voorkamp, LM; Padberg, GW; vanDijk, JG

    Background: Patients with hereditary hyperekplexia have excessive startle responses that are accompanied by transient stiffness and also continuous stiffness in infancy. A point of mutation has been identified for the major form of hereditary hyperekplexia in the gene encoding the alpha 1 subunit of

  2. Evidence for genetic association between chromosome 1q loci and predisposition to colorectal neoplasia.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schubert, S.A.; Ruano, D.; Elsayed, F.A.; Boot, A.; Crobach, S.; Sarasqueta, A.F.; Wolffenbuttel, B.; van der Klauw, M.M.; Oosting, J.; Tops, C.M.; van Eijk, R.; Vasen, H.F.; Vossen, R.H.; Nielsen, M.; Castellví-Bel, S.; Ruiz-Ponte, C.; Tomlinson, I.; Dunlop, M.G.; Vodička, Pavel; Wijnen, J.T.; Hes, F.J.; Morreau, H.; de Miranda, N.F.; Sijmons, R.H.; van Wezel, T.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 117, č. 8 (2017), s. 1215-1223 ISSN 0007-0920 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD14050 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : hereditary colorectal cancer * colorectal polyps * homozygosity mapping Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 6.176, year: 2016

  3. Promoter methylation of Wnt-antagonists in polypoid and nonpolypoid colorectal adenomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voorham, Quirinus JM; Mulder, Chris JJ; Engeland, Manon van; Meijer, Gerrit A; Steenbergen, Renske DM; Carvalho, Beatriz; Janssen, Jerry; Tijssen, Marianne; Snellenberg, Suzanne; Mongera, Sandra; Grieken, Nicole CT van; Grabsch, Heike; Kliment, Martin; Rembacken, Bjorn J

    2013-01-01

    Nonpolypoid adenomas are a subgroup of colorectal adenomas that have been associated with a more aggressive clinical behaviour compared to their polypoid counterparts. A substantial proportion of nonpolypoid and polypoid adenomas lack APC mutations, APC methylation or chromosomal loss of the APC locus on chromosome 5q, suggesting the involvement of other Wnt-pathway genes. The present study investigated promoter methylation of several Wnt-pathway antagonists in both nonpolypoid and polypoid adenomas. Quantitative methylation-specific PCR (qMSP) was used to evaluate methylation of four Wnt-antagonists, SFRP2, WIF-1, DKK3 and SOX17 in 18 normal colorectal mucosa samples, 9 colorectal cancer cell lines, 18 carcinomas, 44 nonpolypoid and 44 polypoid adenomas. Results were integrated with previously obtained data on APC mutation, methylation and chromosome 5q status from the same samples. Increased methylation of all genes was found in the majority of cell lines, adenomas and carcinomas compared to normal controls. WIF-1 and DKK3 showed a significantly lower level of methylation in nonpolypoid compared to polypoid adenomas (p < 0.01). Combining both adenoma types, a positive trend between APC mutation and both WIF-1 and DKK3 methylation was observed (p < 0.05). Methylation of Wnt-pathway antagonists represents an additional mechanism of constitutive Wnt-pathway activation in colorectal adenomas. Current results further substantiate the existence of partially alternative Wnt-pathway disruption mechanisms in nonpolypoid compared to polypoid adenomas, in line with previous observations

  4. Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rectum are part of the large intestine. Colorectal cancer occurs when tumors form in the lining of ... men and women. The risk of developing colorectal cancer rises after age 50. You're also more ...

  5. Early diagnostic potential of APC hypermethylation in esophageal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang B

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Bujiang Wang,1 Haojun Song,1 Haizhong Jiang,1 Yangbo Fu,1 Xiaoyun Ding,1 Chongchang Zhou2 1Department of Gastroenterology, Laboratory of Digestive Diseases, Ningbo First Hospital, Ningbo, 2Department of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Lihuili Hospital of Ningbo University, Ningbo, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China Background: The hypermethylation of APC gene is observed in various cancers, including esophageal cancer (EC. However, the association between APC methylation and the initiation and progression of EC is poorly understood. Purpose and methods: The current study systematically reviewed studies on abnormal methylation of APC in EC and quantitatively synthesized 18 studies by meta-analysis involving 1008 ECs, 570 Barrett’s esophagus (BE, and 782 controls. Results: Our results showed higher methylation of APC in EC (OR = 23.33, P < 0.001 and BE (OR = 9.34, P < 0.001 than in normal controls. Whereas APC methylation in EC was similar to that in BE (P = 0.052, it was not associated with tumor stage (P = 0.204. Additionally, APC methylation was not significantly associated with overall survival (OS and relapse-free survival (RFS in patients with EC. The performance of APC methylation for the detection of EC and BE achieved areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves of 0.94 and 0.88, respectively. Conclusion: Our results imply that APC methylation detection is a potential diagnostic biomarker for EC and BE. Keywords: esophageal cancer, Barrett’s esophagus, methylation, APC

  6. Analysis of APC mutation in human ameloblastoma and clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Liu, Bing; Sui, Chengguang; Jiang, Youhong

    2016-01-01

    As a highly conserved signaling pathway, Wnt/β-catenin signal transduction pathway plays an important role in many processes. Either in the occurrence or development of tumor, activation of this pathway takes an important place. APC inhibits Wnt/β-catenin pathway to regulate cell proliferation and differentiation. This study aimed to investigate the function of cancer suppressor gene. PCR amplification and sequencing method was used to analyze APC mutations of human clinical specimens. The pathological specimens were collected for PCR and clear electrophoretic bands were obtained after electrophoresis. The gene sequence obtained after purification and sequencing analysis was compared with the known APC gene sequence (NM_000038.5). Base mutations at APC 1543 (T → C), APC-4564 (G → A), APC-5353 (T → G), APC-5550 (T → A) and APC-5969 (G → A) locus existed in 22 (27.5 %), 12 (15 %), 5 (6.25 %), 13 (16.25 %) and 12 patients (15 %), respectively. Gene mutations existed in ameloblastoma, and the mutation loci were 1543 locus (T → C), 4564 locus (G → A), 5353 locus (T → G), 5550 locus (T → A) and 5969 locus (G → A) 15 %, respectively. APC mutation plays a certain role in monitoring the tumor malignant degree as it may indicate the transition process of ameloblastoma malignant phenotype.

  7. Hereditary neuromuscular diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oezsarlak, O. E-mail: ozkan.ozsarlak@uza.be; Schepens, E.; Parizel, P.M.; Goethem, J.W. van; Vanhoenacker, F.; Schepper, A.M. de; Martin, J.J

    2001-12-01

    This article presents the actual classification of neuromuscular diseases based on present expansion of our knowledge and understanding due to genetic developments. It summarizes the genetic and clinical presentations of each disorder together with CT findings, which we studied in a large group of patients with neuromuscular diseases. The muscular dystrophies as the largest and most common group of hereditary muscle diseases will be highlighted by giving detailed information about the role of CT and MRI in the differential diagnosis. The radiological features of neuromuscular diseases are atrophy, hypertrophy, pseudohypertrophy and fatty infiltration of muscles on a selective basis. Although the patterns and distribution of involvement are characteristic in some of the diseases, the definition of the type of disease based on CT scan only is not always possible.

  8. Hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackstone, Craig

    2018-01-01

    The hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are a heterogeneous group of neurologic disorders with the common feature of prominent lower-extremity spasticity, resulting from a length-dependent axonopathy of corticospinal upper motor neurons. The HSPs exist not only in "pure" forms but also in "complex" forms that are associated with additional neurologic and extraneurologic features. The HSPs are among the most genetically diverse neurologic disorders, with well over 70 distinct genetic loci, for which about 60 mutated genes have already been identified. Numerous studies elucidating the molecular pathogenesis underlying HSPs have highlighted the importance of basic cellular functions - especially membrane trafficking, mitochondrial function, organelle shaping and biogenesis, axon transport, and lipid/cholesterol metabolism - in axon development and maintenance. An encouragingly small number of converging cellular pathogenic themes have been identified for the most common HSPs, and some of these pathways present compelling targets for future therapies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Structure of an APC3-APC16 complex: Insights into assembly of the Anaphase Promoting Complex/Cyclosome

    OpenAIRE

    Yamaguchi, Masaya; Yu, Shanshan; Qiao, Renping; Weissmann, Florian; Miller, Darcie J.; VanderLinden, Ryan; Brown, Nicholas G.; Frye, Jeremiah J.; Peters, Jan-Michael; Schulman, Brenda A.

    2014-01-01

    The Anaphase Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C) is a massive E3 ligase that controls mitosis by catalyzing ubiquitination of key cell cycle regulatory proteins. The APC/C assembly contains two subcomplexes: the “Platform” centers around a cullin-RING-like E3 ligase catalytic core; the “Arc Lamp” is a hub that mediates transient association with regulators and ubiquitination substrates. The Arc Lamp contains the small subunits APC16, CDC26, and APC13, and tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) protei...

  10. Hereditary chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mössner Joachim

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary chronic pancreatitis (HCP is a very rare form of early onset chronic pancreatitis. With the exception of the young age at diagnosis and a slower progression, the clinical course, morphological features and laboratory findings of HCP do not differ from those of patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis. As well, diagnostic criteria and treatment of HCP resemble that of chronic pancreatitis of other causes. The clinical presentation is highly variable and includes chronic abdominal pain, impairment of endocrine and exocrine pancreatic function, nausea and vomiting, maldigestion, diabetes, pseudocysts, bile duct and duodenal obstruction, and rarely pancreatic cancer. Fortunately, most patients have a mild disease. Mutations in the PRSS1 gene, encoding cationic trypsinogen, play a causative role in chronic pancreatitis. It has been shown that the PRSS1 mutations increase autocatalytic conversion of trypsinogen to active trypsin, and thus probably cause premature, intrapancreatic trypsinogen activation disturbing the intrapancreatic balance of proteases and their inhibitors. Other genes, such as the anionic trypsinogen (PRSS2, the serine protease inhibitor, Kazal type 1 (SPINK1 and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR have been found to be associated with chronic pancreatitis (idiopathic and hereditary as well. Genetic testing should only be performed in carefully selected patients by direct DNA sequencing and antenatal diagnosis should not be encouraged. Treatment focuses on enzyme and nutritional supplementation, pain management, pancreatic diabetes, and local organ complications, such as pseudocysts, bile duct or duodenal obstruction. The disease course and prognosis of patients with HCP is unpredictable. Pancreatic cancer risk is elevated. Therefore, HCP patients should strongly avoid environmental risk factors for pancreatic cancer.

  11. Apc inactivation, but not obesity, synergizes with Pten deficiency to drive intestinal stem cell-derived tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizian, Tahmineh; Wang, Donghai; Guan, Fangxia; Hu, Zunju; Beck, Amanda P; Delahaye, Fabien; Huffman, Derek M

    2017-06-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for colorectal cancer and can accelerate Lgr5+ intestinal stem cell (ISC)-derived tumorigenesis after the inactivation of Apc However, whether non-canonical pathways involving PI3K-Akt signaling in ISCs can lead to tumor formation, and if this can be further exacerbated by obesity is unknown. Despite the synergy between Pten and Apc inactivation in epithelial cells on intestinal tumor formation, their combined role in Lgr5+-ISCs, which are the most rapidly dividing ISC population in the intestine, is unknown. Lgr5+-GFP mice were provided low-fat diet (LFD) or high-fat diet (HFD) for 8 months, and the transcriptome was evaluated in Lgr5+-ISCs. For tumor studies, Lgr5+-GFP and Lgr5+-GFP- Pten flox/flox mice were tamoxifen treated to inactivate Pten in ISCs and provided LFD or HFD until 14-15 months of age. Finally, various combinations of Lgr5+-ISC-specific, Apc- and Pten -deleted mice were generated and evaluated for histopathology and survival. HFD did not overtly alter Akt signaling in ISCs, but did increase other metabolic pathways. Pten deficiency, but not HFD, increased BrdU-positive cells in the small intestine ( P  Apc deficiency synergistically increased proliferative markers, tumor pathology and mortality, in a dose-dependent fashion ( P  Apc deficiency in ISCs synergistically increases proliferation, tumor formation and mortality. Thus, aberrant Wnt/β-catenin, rather than PI3K-Akt signaling, is requisite for obesity to drive Lgr5+ ISC-derived tumorigenesis. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  12. Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer Screening Research Colorectal Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Colorectal Cancer Key Points Colorectal cancer is a disease in ...

  13. Colorectal Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer Screening Research Colorectal Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? Go ... to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Colorectal Cancer Key Points Colorectal cancer is a disease in ...

  14. WD40 domain of Apc1 is critical for the coactivator-induced allosteric transition that stimulates APC/C catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiuhong; Chang, Leifu; Aibara, Shintaro; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Ziguo; Barford, David

    2016-09-20

    The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) is a large multimeric cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligase that orchestrates cell-cycle progression by targeting cell-cycle regulatory proteins for destruction via the ubiquitin proteasome system. The APC/C assembly comprises two scaffolding subcomplexes: the platform and the TPR lobe that together coordinate the juxtaposition of the catalytic and substrate-recognition modules. The platform comprises APC/C subunits Apc1, Apc4, Apc5, and Apc15. Although the role of Apc1 as an APC/C scaffolding subunit has been characterized, its specific functions in contributing toward APC/C catalytic activity are not fully understood. Here, we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of human Apc1 (Apc1N) determined at 2.2-Å resolution and provide an atomic-resolution description of the architecture of its WD40 (WD40 repeat) domain (Apc1(WD40)). To understand how Apc1(WD40) contributes to APC/C activity, a mutant form of the APC/C with Apc1(WD40) deleted was generated and evaluated biochemically and structurally. We found that the deletion of Apc1(WD40) abolished the UbcH10-dependent ubiquitination of APC/C substrates without impairing the Ube2S-dependent ubiquitin chain elongation activity. A cryo-EM structure of an APC/C-Cdh1 complex with Apc1(WD40) deleted showed that the mutant APC/C is locked into an inactive conformation in which the UbcH10-binding site of the catalytic module is inaccessible. Additionally, an EM density for Apc15 is not visible. Our data show that Apc1(WD40) is required to mediate the coactivator-induced conformational change of the APC/C that is responsible for stimulating APC/C catalytic activity by promoting UbcH10 binding. In contrast, Ube2S activity toward APC/C substrates is not dependent on the initiation-competent conformation of the APC/C.

  15. Identification of Kininogen 1 as a Serum Protein Marker of Colorectal Adenoma in Patients with a Family History of Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jiekai; Huang, Yanqin; Lin, Chen; Li, Xiaofen; Fang, Xuefeng; Zhong, Chenhan; Yuan, Ying; Zheng, Shu

    2018-01-01

    The serum protein markers of colorectal adenoma in patients with a family history of colorectal cancer have been rarely reported. Serum samples from colorectal adenoma patients with or without a family history of colorectal cancer and healthy controls were profiled using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). The model to distinguish colorectal adenoma patients with a family history of colorectal cancer from atypical hereditary colorectal families (CRA-H) and sporadic colorectal adenoma patients without a family history of colorectal cancer (CRA-S) was established with 85.0% accuracy. The model distinguishing CRA-H from healthy individuals was established with 90.0% specificity and 86.7% sensitivity. Additionally, five peaks (2202, 5821, 3260, 2480, and 2218) showing differential expression in advanced colorectal adenoma patients with a family history of colorectal cancer were selected. The protein Kininogen 1 (KNG1) was identified in colorectal adenoma patients and validated using Western Blotting. KNG1 may be a biomarker for colorectal adenoma patients with a family history of colorectal cancer. PMID:29535795

  16. Hereditary familial vestibular degenerative diseases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, J.; Alphen, A.M. van; Wagenaar, M.; Huygen, P.L.M.; Hoogenraad, C.C.; Hasson, T.; Koekkoek, S.K.; Bohne, B.A.; Zeeuw, C.I. de

    2001-01-01

    Identification of genes involved in hereditary vestibular disease is growing at a remarkable pace. Mutant mouse technology can be an important tool for understanding the biological mechanism of human vestibular diseases.

  17. Hereditary forms of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bella, V.

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common oncologic disease in the female population. Besides the sporadic occurrence it occurs in the familial and hereditary form. Persons with the occurrence of positive family anamnesis of breast cancer should be actively investigated. In the indicated cases it is necessary to send the woman to genetic examination. In case that the hereditary form of breast cancer is affirmed it is necessary to examine her family relatives. Women with the hereditary form of breast cancer occur in about 5 – 10 % portion from all women diagnosed with breast cancer. Nowadays we already know that 80 % of hereditary breast cancers are due to germ mutations in BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 gene. Persons with detected gene mutations must be dispensarized in the centres intended for it. (author)

  18. Familial Colorectal Cancer: Understanding the Alphabet Soup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giglia, Matthew D; Chu, Daniel I

    2016-09-01

    While most colorectal cancers (CRCs) originate from nonhereditary spontaneous mutations, one-third of cases are familial or hereditary. Hereditary CRCs, which account for < 5% of all CRCs, have identifiable germline mutations and phenotypes, such as Lynch syndrome and familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Familial CRCs, which account for up to 30% of CRCs, have no identifiable germline mutation or specific pattern of inheritance, but higher-than-expected incidence within a family. Since the discovery that certain genotypes can lead to development of CRC, thousands of mutations have now been implicated in CRC. These new findings have enhanced our ability to identify at-risk patients, initiate better surveillance, and take preventative measures. Given the large number of genes now associated with hereditary and familial CRCs, clinicians should be familiar with the alphabet soup of genes to provide the highest quality of care for patients and families.

  19. APC gene mutations and extraintestinal phenotype of familial adenomatous polyposis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giardiello, F. M.; Petersen, G. M.; Piantadosi, S.; Gruber, S. B.; Traboulsi, E. I.; Offerhaus, G. J.; Muro, K.; Krush, A. J.; Booker, S. V.; Luce, M. C.; Laken, S. J.; Kinzler, K. W.; Vogelstein, B.; Hamilton, S. R.

    1997-01-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is caused by germline mutation of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene on chromosome 5q. This study assessed genotype-phenotype correlations for extraintestinal lesions in FAP. Mutations of the APC gene were compared with the occurrence of seven

  20. Myc deletion rescues Apc deficiency in the small intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sansom, O.J.; Meniel, V.S.; Muncan, V.; Phesse, T.J.; Wilkins, J.A.; Reed, K.R.; Vass, J.K.; Athineos, D.; Clevers, J.C.; Clarke, A.R.

    2007-01-01

    The APC gene encodes the adenomatous polyposis coli tumour suppressor protein, germline mutation of which characterizes familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), an autosomal intestinal cancer syndrome. Inactivation of APC is also recognized as the key early event in the development of sporadic

  1. Measuring APC/C-Dependent Ubiquitylation In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Marc A; Brown, Nicholas G; Watson, Edmond R; VanderLinden, Ryan; Schulman, Brenda A; Peters, Jan-Michael

    2016-01-01

    The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) is a 1.2 MDa ubiquitin ligase complex with important functions in both proliferating and post-mitotic differentiated cells. In proliferating cells, APC/C controls cell cycle progression by targeting inhibitors of chromosome segregation and mitotic exit for degradation by the 26S proteasome. To understand how APC/C recruits and ubiquitylates its substrate proteins and how these processes are controlled, it is essential to analyze APC/C activity in vitro. In the past, such experiments have been limited by the fact that large quantities of purified APC/C were difficult to obtain and that mutated versions of the APC/C could not be easily generated. In this chapter we review recent advances in generating and purifying recombinant forms of the human APC/C and its co-activators, using methods that are scalable and compatible with mutagenesis. We also describe a method that allows the quantitative analysis of APC/C activity using fluorescently labeled substrate proteins.

  2. Early diagnostic potential of APC hypermethylation in esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bujiang; Song, Haojun; Jiang, Haizhong; Fu, Yangbo; Ding, Xiaoyun; Zhou, Chongchang

    2018-01-01

    The hypermethylation of APC gene is observed in various cancers, including esophageal cancer (EC). However, the association between APC methylation and the initiation and progression of EC is poorly understood. The current study systematically reviewed studies on abnormal methylation of APC in EC and quantitatively synthesized 18 studies by meta-analysis involving 1008 ECs, 570 Barrett's esophagus (BE), and 782 controls. Our results showed higher methylation of APC in EC (OR = 23.33, P APC methylation in EC was similar to that in BE ( P = 0.052), it was not associated with tumor stage ( P = 0.204). Additionally, APC methylation was not significantly associated with overall survival (OS) and relapse-free survival (RFS) in patients with EC. The performance of APC methylation for the detection of EC and BE achieved areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves of 0.94 and 0.88, respectively. Our results imply that APC methylation detection is a potential diagnostic biomarker for EC and BE.

  3. More than two decades of Apc modeling in rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeineldin, Maged; Neufeld, Kristi L.

    2013-01-01

    Mutation of tumor suppressor gene Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is an initiating step in most colon cancers. This review summarizes Apc models in mice and rats, with particular concentration on those most recently developed, phenotypic variation among different models, and genotype/ phenotype correlations. PMID:23333833

  4. APC selectively mediates response to chemotherapeutic agents in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanKlompenberg, Monica K.; Bedalov, Claire O.; Soto, Katia Fernandez; Prosperi, Jenifer R.

    2015-01-01

    The Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) tumor suppressor is mutated or hypermethylated in up to 70 % of sporadic breast cancers depending on subtype; however, the effects of APC mutation on tumorigenic properties remain unexplored. Using the Apc Min/+ mouse crossed to the Polyoma middle T antigen (PyMT) transgenic model, we identified enhanced breast tumorigenesis and alterations in genes critical in therapeutic resistance independent of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Apc mutation changed the tumor histopathology from solid to squamous adenocarcinomas, resembling the highly aggressive human metaplastic breast cancer. Mechanistic studies in tumor-derived cell lines demonstrated that focal adhesion kinase (FAK)/Src/JNK signaling regulated the enhanced proliferation downstream of Apc mutation. Despite this mechanistic information, the role of APC in mediating breast cancer chemotherapeutic resistance is currently unknown. We have examined the effect of Apc loss in MMTV-PyMT mouse breast cancer cells on gene expression changes of ATP-binding cassette transporters and immunofluorescence to determine proliferative and apoptotic response of cells to cisplatin, doxorubicin and paclitaxel. Furthermore we determined the added effect of Src or JNK inhibition by PP2 and SP600125, respectively, on chemotherapeutic response. We also used the Aldefluor assay to measure the population of tumor initiating cells. Lastly, we measured the apoptotic and proliferative response to APC knockdown in MDA-MB-157 human breast cancer cells after chemotherapeutic treatment. Cells obtained from MMTV-PyMT;Apc Min/+ tumors express increased MDR1 (multidrug resistance protein 1), which is augmented by treatment with paclitaxel or doxorubicin. Furthermore MMTV-PyMT;Apc Min/+ cells are more resistant to cisplatin and doxorubicin-induced apoptosis, and show a larger population of ALDH positive cells. In the human metaplastic breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-157, APC knockdown led to paclitaxel and cisplatin

  5. APC-II: an electron beam propagation code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwan, D.C.; Freeman, J.R.

    1984-05-01

    The computer code APC-II simulates the propagation of a relativistic electron beam through air. APC-II is an updated version of the APC envelope model code. It incorporates an improved conductivity model which significantly extends the range of stable calculations. A number of test cases show that these new models are capable of reproducing the simulations of the original APC code. As the result of a major restructuring and reprogramming of the code, APC-II is now friendly to both the occasional user and the experienced user who wishes to make modifications. Most of the code is in standard ANS-II Fortran 77 so that it can be easily transported between machines

  6. Panta rhei: The APC/C at steady state

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome (APC/C) is a conserved, multisubunit E3 ubiquitin (Ub) ligase that is active both in dividing and in postmitotic cells. Its contributions to life are especially well studied in the domain of cell division, in which the APC/C lies at the epicenter of a regulatory network that controls the directionality and timing of cell cycle events. Biochemical and structural work is shedding light on the overall organization of APC/C subunits and on the mechanism of substrate recognition and Ub chain initiation and extension as well as on the molecular mechanisms of a checkpoint that seizes control of APC/C activity during mitosis. Here, we review how these recent advancements are modifying our understanding of the APC/C. PMID:23589490

  7. Genetics and tumor genomics in familial colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middeldorp, Janneke Willemijn

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers in the Western world and in about 30% hereditary factors play a role. Although several genetic factors that predispose families to CRC are known, in many families affected with CRC the underlying genetics remain elusive. The work described in

  8. Quantitative framework for ordered degradation of APC/C substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dan; Girard, Juliet R; Li, Weihan; Mizrak, Arda; Morgan, David O

    2015-11-16

    During cell-cycle progression, substrates of a single master regulatory enzyme can be modified in a specific order. Here, we used experimental and computational approaches to dissect the quantitative mechanisms underlying the ordered degradation of the substrates of the ubiquitin ligase APC/C(Cdc20), a key regulator of chromosome segregation in mitosis. We show experimentally that the rate of catalysis varies with different substrates of APC/C(Cdc20). Using a computational model based on multi-step ubiquitination, we then show how changes in the interaction between a single substrate and APC/C(Cdc20) can alter the timing of degradation onset relative to APC/C(Cdc20) activation, while ensuring a fast degradation rate. Degradation timing and dynamics depend on substrate affinity for the enzyme as well as the catalytic rate at which the substrate is modified. When two substrates share the same pool of APC/C(Cdc20), their relative enzyme affinities and rates of catalysis influence the partitioning of APC/C(Cdc20) among substrates, resulting in substrate competition. Depending on how APC/C(Cdc20) is partitioned among its substrates, competition can have minor or major effects on the degradation of certain substrates. We show experimentally that increased expression of the early APC/C(Cdc20) substrate Clb5 does not delay the degradation of the later substrate securin, arguing against a role for competition with Clb5 in establishing securin degradation timing. The degradation timing of APC/C(Cdc20) substrates depends on the multi-step nature of ubiquitination, differences in substrate-APC/C(Cdc20) interactions, and competition among substrates. Our studies provide a conceptual framework for understanding how ordered modification can be established among substrates of the same regulatory enzyme, and facilitate our understanding of how precise temporal control is achieved by a small number of master regulators to ensure a successful cell division cycle.

  9. Interaction between APC and Fen1 during breast carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Satya; Jaiswal, Aruna S; Law, Brian K; Kamal, Mohammad A; Sharma, Arun K; Hromas, Robert A

    2016-05-01

    Aberrant DNA base excision repair (BER) contributes to malignant transformation. However, inter-individual variations in DNA repair capacity plays a key role in modifying breast cancer risk. We review here emerging evidence that two proteins involved in BER - adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) and flap endonuclease 1 (Fen1) - promote the development of breast cancer through novel mechanisms. APC and Fen1 expression and interaction is increased in breast tumors versus normal cells, APC interacts with and blocks Fen1 activity in Pol-β-directed LP-BER, and abrogation of LP-BER is linked with cigarette smoke condensate-induced transformation of normal breast epithelial cells. Carcinogens increase expression of APC and Fen1 in spontaneously immortalized human breast epithelial cells, human colon cancer cells, and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Since APC and Fen1 are tumor suppressors, an increase in their levels could protect against carcinogenesis; however, this does not seem to be the case. Elevated Fen1 levels in breast and lung cancer cells may reflect the enhanced proliferation of cancer cells or increased DNA damage in cancer cells compared to normal cells. Inactivation of the tumor suppressor functions of APC and Fen1 is due to their interaction, which may act as a susceptibility factor for breast cancer. The increased interaction of APC and Fen1 may occur due to polypmorphic and/or mutational variation in these genes. Screening of APC and Fen1 polymorphic and/or mutational variations and APC/Fen1 interaction may permit assessment of individual DNA repair capability and the risk for breast cancer development. Such individuals might lower their breast cancer risk by reducing exposure to carcinogens. Stratifying individuals according to susceptibility would greatly assist epidemiologic studies of the impact of suspected environmental carcinogens. Additionally, a mechanistic understanding of the interaction of APC and Fen1 may provide the basis for developing new and

  10. Is it acceptable to approach colorectal cancer patients at diagnosis to discuss genetic testing? A pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Porteous, M; Dunckley, M; Appleton, S; Catt, S; Dunlop, M; Campbell, H; Cull, A

    2003-01-01

    In this pilot study, the acceptability of approaching 111 newly diagnosed colorectal cancer patients with the offer of genetic testing for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) was assessed. A total of 78% of participants found it highly acceptable to have the information about HNPCC brought to their attention at that time.

  11. Functional examination of MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 intronic mutations identified in Danish colorectal cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Sanne M; Dandanell, Mette; Rasmussen, Lene J

    2013-01-01

    Germ-line mutations in the DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 predispose to the development of colorectal cancer (Lynch syndrome or hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer). These mutations include disease-causing frame-shift, nonsense, and splicing mutations as well as large genomi...

  12. Psychological distress in newly diagnosed colorectal cancer patients following microsatellite instability testing for Lynch syndrome on the pathologist's initiative.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landsbergen, K.M.; Prins, J.B.; Brunner, H.G.; Duijvendijk, P. van; Nagengast, F.M.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Ligtenberg, M.J.; Hoogerbrugge-van der Linden, N.

    2012-01-01

    According to the Dutch Guideline on Hereditary Colorectal Cancer published in 2008, patients with recently diagnosed colorectal cancer (CRC) should undergo microsatellite instability (MSI) testing by a pathologist immediately after tumour resection if they are younger than 50 years, or if a second

  13. APC/C--the master controller of origin licensing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaprasad, Umasundari; Machida, Yuichi J; Dutta, Anindya

    2007-02-23

    DNA replication must be tightly controlled to prevent initiation of a second round of replication until mitosis is complete. So far, components of the pre-replicative complex (Cdt1, Cdc6 and geminin) were considered key players in this regulation. In a new study, Machida and Dutta have shown that depletion of Emi1 caused cells to replicate their DNA more than once per cell cycle 1. This effect was dependent on the ability of Emi1 to inhibit the APC/C. In addition to its role in regulating entry into mitosis, oscillation of APC/C activity regulates pre-RC formation: high APC/C activity in late M/G1 allows pre-RC formation and low APC/C activity in S/G2 prevents pre-RC formation for a second time thereby preventing rereplication. Each redundant pathway to prevent rereplication is dependent on regulating one of the pre-RC components, and all of the pathways are co-regulated by Emi1 through the APC/C. In this commentary we discuss how this new role of Emi1 adds to our understanding of the regulation of replication initiation. We also review the literature to analyze whether APC/C has a role in regulating endoreduplication (a normal state of polyploidy in some differentiated cells). Similarly a role of premature APC/C activation in genomic instability of tumors is discussed.

  14. APC/C – the master controller of origin licensing?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dutta Anindya

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract DNA replication must be tightly controlled to prevent initiation of a second round of replication until mitosis is complete. So far, components of the pre-replicative complex (Cdt1, Cdc6 and geminin were considered key players in this regulation. In a new study, Machida and Dutta have shown that depletion of Emi1 caused cells to replicate their DNA more than once per cell cycle 1. This effect was dependent on the ability of Emi1 to inhibit the APC/C. In addition to its role in regulating entry into mitosis, oscillation of APC/C activity regulates pre-RC formation: high APC/C activity in late M/G1 allows pre-RC formation and low APC/C activity in S/G2 prevents pre-RC formation for a second time thereby preventing rereplication. Each redundant pathway to prevent rereplication is dependent on regulating one of the pre-RC components, and all of the pathways are co-regulated by Emi1 through the APC/C. In this commentary we discuss how this new role of Emi1 adds to our understanding of the regulation of replication initiation. We also review the literature to analyze whether APC/C has a role in regulating endoreduplication (a normal state of polyploidy in some differentiated cells. Similarly a role of premature APC/C activation in genomic instability of tumors is discussed.

  15. State of the APC/C: Organization, function, and structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Janel R.; Chaix, Denis; Ohi, Melanie D.; Gould, Kathleen L.

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome protein degradation system is involved in many essential cellular processes including cell cycle regulation, cell differentiation, and the unfolded protein response.The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), an evolutionary conserved E3 ubiquitin ligase, was discovered 15 years ago because of its pivotal role in cyclin degradation and mitotic progression. Since then, we have learned that the APC/C is a very large, complex E3 ligase composed of 13 subunits, yielding a molecular machine of approximately 1 MDa. The intricate regulation of the APC/C is mediated by the Cdc20 family of activators, pseudosubstrate inhibitors, protein kinases and phosphatases and the spindle assembly checkpoint. The large size, complexity, and dynamic nature of the APC/C represent significant obstacles toward high-resolution structural techniques; however, over the last decade, there have been a number of lower resolution APC/C structures determined using single particle electron microscopy. These structures, when combined with data generated from numerous genetic and biochemical studies, have begun to shed light on how APC/C activity is regulated. Here, we discuss the most recent developments in the APC/C field concerning structure, substrate recognition, and catalysis. PMID:21261459

  16. Hereditary pancreatitis: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael KL

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Kara L Raphael, Field F Willingham Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract: Hereditary pancreatitis (HP is a rare cause of acute, recurrent acute, and chronic pancreatitis. It may present similarly to other causes of acute and chronic pancreatitis, and often there has been a protracted evaluation prior to the diagnosis of HP. Since it was first described in 1952, multiple genetic defects that affect the action of digestive enzymes in the pancreas have been implicated. The most common mutations involve the PRSS1, CFTR, SPINK1, and CTRC genes. New mutations in these genes and previously unrecognized mutations in other genes are being discovered due to the increasing use of next-generation genomic sequencing. While the inheritance pathways of these genetic mutations may be variable and complex, sometimes involving coinheritance of other mutations, the clinical presentation of patients tends to be similar. Interactions with environmental triggers often play a role. Patients tend to present at an early age (prior to the second decade of life and have a significantly increased risk for the development of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patients with HP may develop sequelae of chronic pancreatitis such as strictures and fluid collections as well as exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Management of patients with HP involves avoidance of environmental triggers, surveillance for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, medical therapy for endocrine and exocrine insufficiency, pain management, and endoscopic or surgical treatment for complications. Care for affected patients should be individualized, with an emphasis on early diagnosis and multidisciplinary involvement to develop a comprehensive treatment strategy. Keywords: pancreatic cancer, chronic pancreatitis, idiopathic pancreatitis, pancreatitis, familial pancreatitis, genetic mutations

  17. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... Diffuse Gastric Cancer MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Gastric Cancer National Cancer ... Option Overview General Information from MedlinePlus ( ...

  18. Oestrogen receptor beta isoform expression in sporadic colorectal cancer, familial adenomatous polyposis and progressive stages of colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevanato Filho, Paulo Roberto; Aguiar Júnior, Samuel; Begnami, Maria Dirlei

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Among the sex hormones, oestrogen may play a role in colorectal cancer, particularly in conjunction with oestrogen receptor-β (ERβ). The expression of ERβ isoform variants and their correlations with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) syndrome and sporadic colorectal carcinomas...... was identified in sporadic polyps and in sporadic colorectal cancer as well as in polyps from FAP syndrome patients compared with normal tissues (p expression in polyps (p ..., no differences were observed when sporadic colorectal carcinomas were compared to normal mucosa tissues. These findings suggest an association of the ERβ isoform variants in individuals affected by germline mutations of the APC gene. Progressively decreased expression of ERβ was found in polyps at early stages...

  19. 42 CFR 419.31 - Ambulatory payment classification (APC) system and payment weights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ambulatory payment classification (APC) system and... Outpatient Services § 419.31 Ambulatory payment classification (APC) system and payment weights. (a) APC... of resource use into APC groups. Except as specified in paragraph (a)(2) of this section, items and...

  20. A comprehensive custom panel design for routine hereditary cancer testing: preserving control, improving diagnostics and revealing a complex variation landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Elisabeth; Gel, Bernat; Rosas, Inma; Tornero, Eva; Santín, Sheila; Pluvinet, Raquel; Velasco, Juan; Sumoy, Lauro; Del Valle, Jesús; Perucho, Manuel; Blanco, Ignacio; Navarro, Matilde; Brunet, Joan; Pineda, Marta; Feliubadaló, Lidia; Capellá, Gabi; Lázaro, Conxi; Serra, Eduard

    2017-01-04

    We wanted to implement an NGS strategy to globally analyze hereditary cancer with diagnostic quality while retaining the same degree of understanding and control we had in pre-NGS strategies. To do this, we developed the I2HCP panel, a custom bait library covering 122 hereditary cancer genes. We improved bait design, tested different NGS platforms and created a clinically driven custom data analysis pipeline. The I2HCP panel was developed using a training set of hereditary colorectal cancer, hereditary breast and ovarian cancer and neurofibromatosis patients and reached an accuracy, analytical sensitivity and specificity greater than 99%, which was maintained in a validation set. I2HCP changed our diagnostic approach, involving clinicians and a genetic diagnostics team from panel design to reporting. The new strategy improved diagnostic sensitivity, solved uncertain clinical diagnoses and identified mutations in new genes. We assessed the genetic variation in the complete set of hereditary cancer genes, revealing a complex variation landscape that coexists with the disease-causing mutation. We developed, validated and implemented a custom NGS-based strategy for hereditary cancer diagnostics that improved our previous workflows. Additionally, the existence of a rich genetic variation in hereditary cancer genes favors the use of this panel to investigate their role in cancer risk.

  1. Cellular characteristics of hereditary diseases of man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Masao

    1978-01-01

    Hereditary diseases of which abnormal characters could be detected at cultured cell level were introduced, and tissue cultures of them were described. Characteristics such as reproduction, disorder, elimination, and repair of DNA in hereditary diseases with high cancer risk such as Bloom syndrome, etc. were investigated. Radiosensitivity of these hereditary diseases was also described, and factors of carcinogenesis were investigated. (Serizawa, K.)

  2. Western diet enhances intestinal tumorigenesis in Min/+ mice, associating with mucosal metabolic and inflammatory stress and loss of Apc heterozygosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niku, Mikael; Pajari, Anne-Maria; Sarantaus, Laura; Päivärinta, Essi; Storvik, Markus; Heiman-Lindh, Anu; Suokas, Santeri; Nyström, Minna; Mutanen, Marja

    2017-01-01

    Western-type diet (WD) is a risk factor for colorectal cancer, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We investigated the interaction of WD and heterozygous mutation in the Apc gene on adenoma formation and metabolic and immunological changes in the histologically normal intestinal mucosa of Apc Min/+ (Min/+) mice. The diet used was high in saturated fat and low in calcium, vitamin D, fiber and folate. The number of adenomas was twofold higher in the WD mice compared to controls, but adenoma size, proliferation or apoptosis did not differ. The ratio of the Min to wild-type allele was higher in the WD mice, indicating accelerated loss of Apc heterozygosity (LOH). Densities of intraepithelial CD3ε + T lymphocytes and of mucosal FoxP3 + regulatory T cells were higher in the WD mice, implying inflammatory changes. Western blot analyses from the mucosa of the WD mice showed suppressed activation of the ERK and AKT pathways and a tendency for reduced activation of the mTOR pathway as measured in phosphoS6/S6 levels. The expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 was up-regulated in both mRNA and protein levels. Gene expression analyses showed changes in oxidation/reduction, fatty acid and monosaccharide metabolic pathways, tissue organization, cell fate and regulation of apoptosis. Together, our results suggest that the high-risk Western diet primes the intestine to tumorigenesis through synergistic effects in energy metabolism, inflammation and oxidative stress, which culminate in the acceleration of LOH of the Apc gene. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. APC Inhibits Ligand-Independent Wnt Signaling by the Clathrin Endocytic Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito-Diaz, Kenyi; Benchabane, Hassina; Tiwari, Ajit; Tian, Ai; Li, Bin; Thompson, Joshua J; Hyde, Annastasia S; Sawyer, Leah M; Jodoin, Jeanne N; Santos, Eduardo; Lee, Laura A; Coffey, Robert J; Beauchamp, R Daniel; Williams, Christopher S; Kenworthy, Anne K; Robbins, David J; Ahmed, Yashi; Lee, Ethan

    2018-03-12

    Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutations cause Wnt pathway activation in human cancers. Current models for APC action emphasize its role in promoting β-catenin degradation downstream of Wnt receptors. Unexpectedly, we find that blocking Wnt receptor activity in APC-deficient cells inhibits Wnt signaling independently of Wnt ligand. We also show that inducible loss of APC is rapidly followed by Wnt receptor activation and increased β-catenin levels. In contrast, APC2 loss does not promote receptor activation. We show that APC exists in a complex with clathrin and that Wnt pathway activation in APC-deficient cells requires clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Finally, we demonstrate conservation of this mechanism in Drosophila intestinal stem cells. We propose a model in which APC and APC2 function to promote β-catenin degradation, and APC also acts as a molecular "gatekeeper" to block receptor activation via the clathrin pathway. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. OpenAPC. Open-Access-Publikationskosten als Open Data

    OpenAIRE

    Tullney, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Präsentationsfolien zum Vortrag „OpenAPC. Open-Access-Publikationskosten als Open Data“ in der Session „Ausgestaltung eines wissenschaftsadäquaten APC-Marktes: Grundsätze, Finanzierungsansätze und Management“ der Open-Access-Tage 2015 in Zürich (https://www.open-access.net/community/open-access-tage/open-access-tage-2015-zuerich/programm/#c1974)

  5. Appendiceal goblet cell carcinoids and adenocarcinomas ex-goblet cell carcinoid are genetically distinct from primary colorectal-type adenocarcinoma of the appendix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jesinghaus, Moritz; Konukiewitz, Björn; Foersch, Sebastian

    2018-01-01

    The appendix gives rise to goblet cell carcinoids, which represent special carcinomas with distinct biological and histological features. Their genetic background and molecular relationship to colorectal adenocarcinoma is largely unknown. We therefore performed a next-generation sequencing analysis...... a morphomolecular entity, histologically and genetically distinct from appendiceal colorectal-type adenocarcinomas and its colorectal counterparts. Altered Wnt-signaling associated genes, apart from APC, may act as potential drivers of these neoplasms. The absence of KRAS/NRAS mutations might render some....../adenocarcinoma ex-goblet cell carcinoid (n=2, respectively). Mutations in colorectal cancer-related genes (eg, TP53, KRAS, APC) were rare to absent in both, goblet cell carcinoids and adenocarcinomas ex-goblet cell carcinoid, but frequent in primary colorectal-type adenocarcinomas of the appendix. Additional large...

  6. Hyperplastic Polyps Are Innocuous Lesions in Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Speake

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To compare methylation profiles, protein expression, and microsatellite instability (MSI of sporadic, HNPCC, and familial hyperplastic polyps (HPs. Methods. Methylation-specific PCR (MSP and pyrosequencing assessed p16, MGMT, hMLH-1, MINT 1, and MINT 31 methylation. IHC (Immunohistochemistry assessed Ki67, CK20, hMLH-1, hMSH-2, and hMSH-6 protein expression. MSI analysis was performed on those polyps with adequate DNA remaining. Results. 124 HPs were identified 78 sporadic, 21 HNPCC, 25 familial, and the HNPCC group demonstrated no significant differences in overall methylation (P=.186 Chi2. The familial group demonstrated significantly less over all methylation levels (P=.004 Chi2. Conclusions. HPs that occur in HNPCC have no more worrying features at a molecular level than those patients with HPs in a sporadic setting.

  7. Deranged Wnt signaling is frequent in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isinger-Ekstrand, Anna; Therkildsen, Christina; Bernstein, Inge

    2011-01-01

    -cadherin in 80% with strong correlation between these markers (P = 0.001). Nuclear ß-catenin staining was detected in 19% of the tumors. Overexpression of TCF-4, which is activated by ß-catenin, was found in 89% and downregulation of PTEN, which suppresses nuclear accumulation of ß-catenin, was present in 54...

  8. Deranged Wnt signaling is frequent in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isinger-Ekstrand, Anna; Therkildsen, Christina; Bernstein, Inge

    2011-01-01

    -cadherin in 80% with strong correlation between these markers (P = 0.001). Nuclear β-catenin staining was detected in 19% of the tumors. Overexpression of TCF-4, which is activated by β-catenin, was found in 89% and downregulation of PTEN, which suppresses nuclear accumulation of β-catenin, was present in 54...

  9. Immunophenotyping of hereditary breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Groep, P.

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary breast cancer runs in families where several family members in different generations are affected. Most of these breast cancers are caused by mutations in the high penetrance genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 which account for about 5% of all breast cancers. However, mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 may

  10. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary hemochromatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Type 1 hemochromatosis results from mutations in the HFE gene, and type 2 hemochromatosis results from mutations in ... about the genes associated with hereditary hemochromatosis HAMP HFE HJV PNPLA3 SLC40A1 TFR2 Related Information What is a gene? What is a gene mutation and how do ...

  11. Is early-onset microsatellite and chromosomally stable colorectal cancer a hallmark of a genetic susceptibility syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kets, C M; van Krieken, J H J M; van Erp, P E J; Feuth, T; Jacobs, Y H A; Brunner, H G; Ligtenberg, M J L; Hoogerbrugge, N

    2008-02-15

    Most colorectal cancers show either microsatellite or chromosomal instability. A subset of colorectal cancers, especially those diagnosed at young age, is known to show neither of these forms of genetic instability and thus might have a distinct pathogenesis. Colorectal cancers diagnosed at young age are suggestive for hereditary predisposition. We investigate whether such early-onset microsatellite and chromosomally stable colorectal cancers are a hallmark of a genetic susceptibility syndrome. The ploidy status of microsatellite stable (familial) colorectal cancers of patients diagnosed before age 50 (n = 127) was analyzed in relation to the histopathological characteristics and family history. As a control the ploidy status of sporadic colorectal cancer, with normal staining of mismatch repair proteins, diagnosed at the age of 69 years or above (n = 70) was determined. A diploid DNA content was used as a marker for chromosomal stability. Within the group of patients with (familial) early onset microsatellite stable colorectal cancer the chromosomally stable tumors did not differ from chromosomally unstable tumors with respect to mean age at diagnosis, fulfillment of Amsterdam criteria or pathological characteristics. Segregation analysis did not reveal any family with microsatellite and chromosomally stable colorectal cancer in 2 relatives. The prevalence of microsatellite and chromosomally stable colorectal cancer was not significantly different for the early and late onset group (28 and 21%, respectively). We find no evidence that early-onset microsatellite and chromosomally stable colorectal cancer is a hallmark of a hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Colorectal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagi, B.; Kochhar, R.; Bhasin, D.K.; Singh, K.

    2003-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the incidence of colorectal tuberculosis in our series and to study its radiological spectrum. A total of 684 cases of proven gastrointestinal tuberculosis with positive barium contrast findings seen over a period of more than one decade were evaluated. The study did not include cases where colon was involved in direct contiguity with ileo-caecal tuberculosis. Seventy-four patients (10.8%) had colorectal tuberculosis. Commonest site involved was transverse colon, closely followed by rectum and ascending colon. Radiological findings observed were in the form of strictures (54%), colitis (39%) and polypoid lesions (7%). Complications noted were in the form of perforations and fistulae in 18.9% of cases. Colorectal tuberculosis is a very common site for gastrointestinal tuberculosis. Typical findings of colorectal tuberculosis are strictures, signs of colitis and polypoid lesions. Common complications are perforation and fistulae. (orig.)

  13. Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... possible. Research will help us better understand whether chemotherapy can benefit elderly colorectal cancer patients. Such patients often do not receive chemotherapy due to concerns about side effects. We will ...

  14. APC/C Dysfunction Limits Excessive Cancer Chromosomal Instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansregret, Laurent; Patterson, James O; Dewhurst, Sally; López-García, Carlos; Koch, André; McGranahan, Nicholas; Chao, William Chong Hang; Barry, David J; Rowan, Andrew; Instrell, Rachael; Horswell, Stuart; Way, Michael; Howell, Michael; Singleton, Martin R; Medema, René H; Nurse, Paul; Petronczki, Mark; Swanton, Charles

    2017-02-01

    Intercellular heterogeneity, exacerbated by chromosomal instability (CIN), fosters tumor heterogeneity and drug resistance. However, extreme CIN correlates with improved cancer outcome, suggesting that karyotypic diversity required to adapt to selection pressures might be balanced in tumors against the risk of excessive instability. Here, we used a functional genomics screen, genome editing, and pharmacologic approaches to identify CIN-survival factors in diploid cells. We find partial anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) dysfunction lengthens mitosis, suppresses pharmacologically induced chromosome segregation errors, and reduces naturally occurring lagging chromosomes in cancer cell lines or following tetraploidization. APC/C impairment caused adaptation to MPS1 inhibitors, revealing a likely resistance mechanism to therapies targeting the spindle assembly checkpoint. Finally, CRISPR-mediated introduction of cancer somatic mutations in the APC/C subunit cancer driver gene CDC27 reduces chromosome segregation errors, whereas reversal of an APC/C subunit nonsense mutation increases CIN. Subtle variations in mitotic duration, determined by APC/C activity, influence the extent of CIN, allowing cancer cells to dynamically optimize fitness during tumor evolution. We report a mechanism whereby cancers balance the evolutionary advantages associated with CIN against the fitness costs caused by excessive genome instability, providing insight into the consequence of CDC27 APC/C subunit driver mutations in cancer. Lengthening of mitosis through APC/C modulation may be a common mechanism of resistance to cancer therapeutics that increase chromosome segregation errors. Cancer Discov; 7(2); 218-33. ©2017 AACR.See related commentary by Burkard and Weaver, p. 134This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 115. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Oestrogen receptor beta isoform expression in sporadic colorectal cancer, familial adenomatous polyposis and progressive stages of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevanato Filho, Paulo Roberto; Aguiar Júnior, Samuel; Begnami, Maria Dirlei; Kuasne, Hellen; Spencer, Ranyell Matheus; Nakagawa, Wilson Toshihiko; Bezerra, Tiago Santoro; Kupper, Bruna Catin; Takahashi, Renata Maymi; Barros Filho, Mateus; Rogatto, Silvia Regina; Lopes, Ademar

    2017-11-13

    Among the sex hormones, oestrogen may play a role in colorectal cancer, particularly in conjunction with oestrogen receptor-β (ERβ). The expression of ERβ isoform variants and their correlations with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) syndrome and sporadic colorectal carcinomas are poorly described. This study aimed to investigate the expression levels of the ERβ1, ERβ2, ERβ4 and ERβ5 isoform variants using quantitative RT-PCR (921 analyses) in FAP, normal mucosa, adenomatous polyps and sporadic colorectal carcinomas. Decreased expression of ERβ isoforms was identified in sporadic polyps and in sporadic colorectal cancer as well as in polyps from FAP syndrome patients compared with normal tissues (p colorectal carcinomas were compared to normal mucosa tissues. These findings suggest an association of the ERβ isoform variants in individuals affected by germline mutations of the APC gene. Progressively decreased expression of ERβ was found in polyps at early stages of low-grade dysplasia, followed by T1-T2 and T3-T4 tumours (p colorectal cancer, the loss of expression was an independent predictor of recurrence, and ERβ1 and ERβ5 expression levels were associated with better disease-free survival (p = 0.002). These findings may provide a better understanding of oestrogens and their potential preventive and therapeutic effects on sporadic colorectal cancer and cancers associated with FAP syndrome.

  16. Linkage analysis in a large Swedish family supports the presence of a susceptibility locus for adenoma and colorectal cancer on chromosome 9q22.32-31.1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skoglund, J; Djureinovic, T; Zhou, X-L

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The best known hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes, familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), constitute about 2% of all colorectal cancers, and there are at least as many non-FAP, non-HNPCC cases where the family history suggests...... a dominantly inherited colorectal cancer risk. Recently, a locus on chromosome 9q22.2-31.2 was identified by linkage analysis in sib pairs with colorectal cancer or adenoma. METHODS: Linkage analysis for the suggested locus on chromosome 9 was carried out in an extended Swedish family. This family had...... previously been investigated but following the identification of adenomas in several previously unaffected family members, these subjects were now considered to be gene carriers. RESULTS: In the present study, we found linkage of adenoma and colorectal cancer to chromosome 9q22.32-31.1 with a multipoint LOD...

  17. New treatments of hereditary blindness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Mette; Rosenberg, Thomas; Larsen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Ongoing clinical trials are targeting several previously intractable hereditary causes of blindness of congenital, childhood or early adulthood onset, mainly in the optic nerve and retina. The intended stage of initiation of the new therapeutic approaches ranges from neonatal life and a structura......Ongoing clinical trials are targeting several previously intractable hereditary causes of blindness of congenital, childhood or early adulthood onset, mainly in the optic nerve and retina. The intended stage of initiation of the new therapeutic approaches ranges from neonatal life...... and a structurally intact retinal tissue to adult life with a complete loss of photoreceptors. It must be assumed that some of the trials will succeed in producing new therapies and action must be taken to refine and accelerate diagnostics and to preserve therapeutic potential in blind people....

  18. Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Hansen, Thomas van Overeem; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2016-01-01

    Genetic abnormalities in the DNA repair genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose to hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). However, only approximately 25% of cases of HBOC can be ascribed to BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Recently, exome sequencing has uncovered substantial locus heterogeneity among...... of putative causal variants and the clinical application of new HBOC genes in cancer risk management and treatment decision-making....

  19. Chemopreventive Effects of RXR-Selective Rexinoid Bexarotene on Intestinal Neoplasia of ApcMin/+ Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveena B. Janakiram

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Retinoid X receptor (RXR has been implicated in several neoplastic diseases. Previously, we have shown that RXR-α is downregulated in human and rodent colonic tumors, suggesting a potential target for colon cancer prevention (http://www.cancer.org/Cancer/ColonandRectumCancer/DetailedGuide/colorectal-cancer-key-statistics. Experiments were designed to assess the chemopreventive efficacy of the selective RXR agonist bexarotene for the suppression of intestinal tumorigenesis in ApcMin/+ mice. Before the efficacy studies, we determined that the maximal tolerated dose in C57BL/6J mice was less than 400 ppm. For the efficacy study, 6-week-old male and female C57BL/6J-ApcMin/+ mice (nine mice per group were fed diets containing 0, 30, and 60 ppm of bexarotene or 200 ppm of bexarotene for 80 days before intestinal tumors were evaluated. Dietary administration of 30 and 60 ppm of bexarotene suppressed the intestinal polyp formation by 38% (P < .015 and 60% (P < .0001 in males, respectively, and by 8.5% and 37% (P < .007 in females, respectively. Also, significant inhibition (50%–100% of colonic tumor formation was observed in both male and female mice with bexarotene treatment. Administration of 200 ppm of bexarotene showed significant suppression of tumor formation (66%, P < .0001; however, it had significant toxicity. Intestinal tumors of bexarotene-fed mice showed significantly reduced expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (60%, P < .0001, cyclin D1, and cyclooxygenase 2 and increased RXR-α messenger RNA and uptake of oleate (34%, P < .01. Also, bexarotene-fed mice showed dose-dependent suppression of serum triglycerides (25%–72%, P < .0001 and inflammatory cytokines.

  20. High performance APCS conceptual design and evaluation scoping study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soelberg, N.; Liekhus, K.; Chambers, A.; Anderson, G.

    1998-02-01

    This Air Pollution Control System (APCS) Conceptual Design and Evaluation study was conducted to evaluate a high-performance (APC) system for minimizing air emissions from mixed waste thermal treatment systems. Seven variations of high-performance APCS designs were conceptualized using several design objectives. One of the system designs was selected for detailed process simulation using ASPEN PLUS to determine material and energy balances and evaluate performance. Installed system capital costs were also estimated. Sensitivity studies were conducted to evaluate the incremental cost and benefit of added carbon adsorber beds for mercury control, specific catalytic reduction for NO x control, and offgas retention tanks for holding the offgas until sample analysis is conducted to verify that the offgas meets emission limits. Results show that the high-performance dry-wet APCS can easily meet all expected emission limits except for possibly mercury. The capability to achieve high levels of mercury control (potentially necessary for thermally treating some DOE mixed streams) could not be validated using current performance data for mercury control technologies. The engineering approach and ASPEN PLUS modeling tool developed and used in this study identified APC equipment and system performance, size, cost, and other issues that are not yet resolved. These issues need to be addressed in feasibility studies and conceptual designs for new facilities or for determining how to modify existing facilities to meet expected emission limits. The ASPEN PLUS process simulation with current and refined input assumptions and calculations can be used to provide system performance information for decision-making, identifying best options, estimating costs, reducing the potential for emission violations, providing information needed for waste flow analysis, incorporating new APCS technologies in existing designs, or performing facility design and permitting activities

  1. Undefined familial colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambirinis, Constantinos Pantelis; Theodoropoulos, George; Gazouli, Maria

    2009-10-15

    Colorectal cancer (CRC), one of the most common cancers of the world, is actually a spectrum of several subtypes, with different molecular profiles, clinico-pathological characteristics and possibly separate pathways of progression. It is estimated that in approximately 25%-35% of cases, a familial component exists, so they are classified as familial CRC (fCRC). However the known hereditary CRC syndromes justify only up to 5%. The rest are attributed to some inherited genetic predisposition passed to offspring through low-penetrance genes, which in the proper environmental setting can bring on tumorigenesis. Furthermore, part of the familial clustering may be attributed to chance. Because of the complexity regarding the etiology of CRC, the clinician is sometimes faced with obscure patient data, and cannot be sure if they are dealing with fCRC or sporadic CRC. The elucidation of what is going on with the as yet "undefined" portion of CRC will aid not only in the diagnosis, classification and treatment of CRC, but more importantly in the proper adjustment of the screening guidelines and in genetic counselling of patients.

  2. Regulated degradation of the APC coactivator Cdc20

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins Jonathan A

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cdc20 is a highly conserved activator of the anaphase-promoting complex (APC, promoting cell-cycle-regulated ubiquitination and proteolysis of a number of critical cell-cycle-regulatory targets including securin and mitotic cyclins. APC-Cdc20 activity is tightly regulated, and this regulation is likely important for accurate cell cycle control. One significant component of Cdc20 regulation is thought to be Cdc20 proteolysis. However, published literature suggests different mechanisms and requirements for Cdc20 proteolysis. The degree to which Cdc20 proteolysis is cell-cycle regulated, the dependence of Cdc20 proteolysis on Cdc20 destruction boxes (recognition sequences for APC-mediated ubiqutination, either by Cdc20 or by the related Cdh1 APC activator, and the need for APC itself for Cdc20 proteolysis all have been disputed to varying extents. In animals, Cdc20 proteolysis is thought to be mediated by Cdh1, contributing an intrinsic order of APC activation by Cdc20 and then by Cdh1. One report suggests a Cdh1 requirement for Cdc20 proteolysis in budding yeast; this idea has not been tested further. Results We characterized Cdc20 proteolysis using Cdc20 expressed from its endogenous locus; previous studies generally employed strongly overexpressed Cdc20, which can cause significant artifacts. We analyzed Cdc20 proteolysis with or without mutations in previously identified destruction box sequences, using varying methods of cell cycle synchronization, and in the presence or absence of Cdh1. Cdc20 instability is only partially dependent on destruction boxes. A much stronger dependence on Cdh1 for Cdc20 proteolysis was observed, but Cdh1-independent proteolysis was also clearly observed. Cdc20 proteolysis independent of both destruction boxes and Cdh1 was especially detectable around the G1/S transition; Cdh1-dependent proteolysis was most notable in late mitosis and G1. Conclusions Cdc20 proteolysis is under complex control

  3. Diagnosing lynch syndrome in absence of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Henry T; Knezetic, Joseph; Lanspa, Stephen

    2012-11-01

    There are many ways in which a diagnosis of Lynch syndrome can be made, most prominent of which is family history, presence of cancer, high microsatellite instability, immunohistochemistry, and a mismatch repair germline mutation. There are at least four molecular pathways for colorectal cancer carcinogenesis: 1) adenoma-carcinoma sequence; 2) hereditary microsatellite instability; 3) serrated pathway; 4) epidermal growth factor receptor. The answer to diagnosing Lynch syndrome in the absence of colorectal cancer may be partially based upon the phenotypic characteristics of the colonic polyps should they be identified at colonoscopy, specifically their phenotypic characteristics of location, size, histology, number, and age of polyp onset.

  4. Epigenetic regulation of APC in the molecular pathogenesis of gallbladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Singh Tekcham

    2016-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: The present findings indicate epigenetic silencing of APC in advanced GBC. The methylation pattern, followed by expression analysis of APC may be suggested for diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic purposes in GBC in future.

  5. Risks of Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer Screening Research Colorectal Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Colorectal Cancer Key Points Colorectal cancer is a disease in ...

  6. The regulation of skeletal muscle protein turnover during the progression of cancer cachexia in the Apc(Min/+ mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P White

    Full Text Available Muscle wasting that occurs with cancer cachexia is caused by an imbalance in the rates of muscle protein synthesis and degradation. The Apc(Min/+ mouse is a model of colorectal cancer that develops cachexia that is dependent on circulating IL-6. However, the IL-6 regulation of muscle protein turnover during the initiation and progression of cachexia in the Apc(Min/+ mouse is not known. Cachexia progression was studied in Apc(Min/+ mice that were either weight stable (WS or had initial (≤5%, intermediate (6-19%, or extreme (≥20% body weight loss. The initiation of cachexia reduced %MPS 19% and a further ∼50% with additional weight loss. Muscle IGF-1 mRNA expression and mTOR targets were suppressed with the progression of body weight loss, while muscle AMPK phosphorylation (Thr 172, AMPK activity, and raptor phosphorylation (Ser 792 were not increased with the initiation of weight loss, but were induced as cachexia progressed. ATP dependent protein degradation increased during the initiation and progression of cachexia. However, ATP independent protein degradation was not increased until cachexia had progressed beyond the initial phase. IL-6 receptor antibody administration prevented body weight loss and suppressed muscle protein degradation, without any effect on muscle %MPS or IGF-1 associated signaling. In summary, the %MPS reduction during the initiation of cachexia is associated with IGF-1/mTOR signaling repression, while muscle AMPK activation and activation of ATP independent protein degradation occur later in the progression of cachexia. IL-6 receptor antibody treatment blocked cachexia progression through the suppression of muscle protein degradation, while not rescuing the suppression of muscle protein synthesis. Attenuation of IL-6 signaling was effective in blocking the progression of cachexia, but not sufficient to reverse the process.

  7. The Regulation of Skeletal Muscle Protein Turnover during the Progression of Cancer Cachexia in the ApcMin/+ Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, James P.; Baynes, John W.; Welle, Stephen L.; Kostek, Matthew C.; Matesic, Lydia E.; Sato, Shuichi; Carson, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Muscle wasting that occurs with cancer cachexia is caused by an imbalance in the rates of muscle protein synthesis and degradation. The ApcMin/+ mouse is a model of colorectal cancer that develops cachexia that is dependent on circulating IL-6. However, the IL-6 regulation of muscle protein turnover during the initiation and progression of cachexia in the ApcMin/+ mouse is not known. Cachexia progression was studied in ApcMin/+ mice that were either weight stable (WS) or had initial (≤5%), intermediate (6–19%), or extreme (≥20%) body weight loss. The initiation of cachexia reduced %MPS 19% and a further ∼50% with additional weight loss. Muscle IGF-1 mRNA expression and mTOR targets were suppressed with the progression of body weight loss, while muscle AMPK phosphorylation (Thr 172), AMPK activity, and raptor phosphorylation (Ser 792) were not increased with the initiation of weight loss, but were induced as cachexia progressed. ATP dependent protein degradation increased during the initiation and progression of cachexia. However, ATP independent protein degradation was not increased until cachexia had progressed beyond the initial phase. IL-6 receptor antibody administration prevented body weight loss and suppressed muscle protein degradation, without any effect on muscle %MPS or IGF-1 associated signaling. In summary, the %MPS reduction during the initiation of cachexia is associated with IGF-1/mTOR signaling repression, while muscle AMPK activation and activation of ATP independent protein degradation occur later in the progression of cachexia. IL-6 receptor antibody treatment blocked cachexia progression through the suppression of muscle protein degradation, while not rescuing the suppression of muscle protein synthesis. Attenuation of IL-6 signaling was effective in blocking the progression of cachexia, but not sufficient to reverse the process. PMID:21949739

  8. Development and validation of a 36-gene sequencing assay for hereditary cancer risk assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina S. Vysotskaia

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The past two decades have brought many important advances in our understanding of the hereditary susceptibility to cancer. Numerous studies have provided convincing evidence that identification of germline mutations associated with hereditary cancer syndromes can lead to reductions in morbidity and mortality through targeted risk management options. Additionally, advances in gene sequencing technology now permit the development of multigene hereditary cancer testing panels. Here, we describe the 2016 revision of the Counsyl Inherited Cancer Screen for detecting single-nucleotide variants (SNVs, short insertions and deletions (indels, and copy number variants (CNVs in 36 genes associated with an elevated risk for breast, ovarian, colorectal, gastric, endometrial, pancreatic, thyroid, prostate, melanoma, and neuroendocrine cancers. To determine test accuracy and reproducibility, we performed a rigorous analytical validation across 341 samples, including 118 cell lines and 223 patient samples. The screen achieved 100% test sensitivity across different mutation types, with high specificity and 100% concordance with conventional Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA. We also demonstrated the screen’s high intra-run and inter-run reproducibility and robust performance on blood and saliva specimens. Furthermore, we showed that pathogenic Alu element insertions can be accurately detected by our test. Overall, the validation in our clinical laboratory demonstrated the analytical performance required for collecting and reporting genetic information related to risk of developing hereditary cancers.

  9. Hereditary iron and copper deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaseth, Jan; Flaten, Trond Peder; Andersen, Ole

    2007-01-01

    Hereditary deposition of iron (primary haemochromatosis) or copper (Wilson's disease) are autosomal recessive metabolic disease characterized by progressive liver pathology and subsequent involvement of various other organs. The prevalence of primary haemochromatosis is approximately 0.5%, about......, they may be inadequate in patients diagnosed so late that extensive body deposits of metal have been developed. The main research needs in this field are to further clarify molecular mechanisms of disease progression and to develop new chelators that are more effective and less toxic than those presently...

  10. Screening for urinary tract cancer with urine cytology in Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myrhøj, T; Andersen, M-B; Bernstein, I

    2008-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to evaluate if Urine Cytology (UC) is an appropriate screening procedure for detecting urinary tract neoplasia at an early stage in persons at risk in Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer families. METHOD: In the National Danish HNPCC-register persons at risk ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Central OMIM: JUVENILE POLYPOSIS/HEREDITARY HEMORRHAGIC TELANGIECTASIA SYNDROME McDonald J, Bayrak-Toydemir P, Pyeritz RE. Hereditary hemorrhagic ... 10.1097/GIM.0b013e3182136d32. Review. Citation on PubMed McDonald J, Wooderchak-Donahue W, VanSant Webb C, Whitehead ...

  12. ACR Appropriateness Criteria® Colorectal Cancer Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Courtney; Kim, David H; Bartel, Twyla B; Cash, Brooks D; Chang, Kevin J; Feig, Barry W; Fowler, Kathryn J; Garcia, Evelyn M; Kambadakone, Avinash R; Lambert, Drew L; Levy, Angela D; Marin, Daniele; Peterson, Christine M; Scheirey, Christopher D; Smith, Martin P; Weinstein, Stefanie; Carucci, Laura R

    2018-05-01

    This review summarizes the relevant literature regarding colorectal screening with imaging. For individuals at average or moderate risk for colorectal cancer, CT colonography is usually appropriate for colorectal cancer screening. After positive results on a fecal occult blood test or immunohistochemical test, CT colonography is usually appropriate for colorectal cancer detection. For individuals at high risk for colorectal cancer (eg, hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, ulcerative colitis, or Crohn colitis), optical colonoscopy is preferred because of its ability to obtain biopsies to detect dysplasia. After incomplete colonoscopy, CT colonography is usually appropriate for colorectal cancer screening for individuals at average, moderate, or high risk. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment. Copyright © 2018 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Independent Induction of Caspase-8 and cFLIP Expression during Colorectal Carcinogenesis in Sporadic and HNPCC Adenomas and Carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Heijink

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: TNF-Related Apoptosis Inducing Ligand (TRAIL is a promising agent for the induction of apoptosis in neoplastic tissues. Important determinants of TRAIL sensitivity are two intracellular proteins of the TRAIL pathway, caspase-8 and its anti-apoptotic competitor cellular Flice-Like Inhibitory Protein (cFLIP. Methods: The aim of this study was to investigate basic expression of caspase-8 and cFLIP in normal colorectal epithelium (n = 20, colorectal adenomas (n = 66 and colorectal carcinomas (n = 44 using immunohistochemistry performed on both sporadic and Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC or Lynch syndrome-associated adenomas and carcinomas. Results: Expression of both caspase-8 and cFLIP was similar in cases with sporadic and hereditary origin. Expression of caspase-8 in colorectal adenomas and carcinomas was increased when compared to normal colon tissue (P = 0.02. Nuclear, paranuclear as well as cytoplasmic localizations of caspase-8 were detected. Immunohistochemistry revealed an upregulation of cFLIP in colorectal carcinomas in comparison to normal epithelium and colorectal adenomas (P < 0.001. A large variation in the caspase-8/cFLIP ratio was observed between the individual adenomas and carcinomas. Conclusion: Caspase-8 and cFLIP are upregulated during colorectal carcinogenesis. Upregulation of caspase-8 and/or downregulation of cFLIP may be interesting approaches to maximize TRAIL sensitivity in colorectal neoplasms.

  14. Biopsies of colorectal clinical polyps--emergence of diagnostic information on deeper levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warnecke, Mads; Engel, Ulla Højholt; Bernstein, Inge

    2009-01-01

    an increased risk of CRC (hereditary, n=19, including 15 hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) cases). Sixty-five (13.5%) of the 480 samples were classified as NDB (normal morphology n=49, suspicious of adenoma n=5, suspicious of HP n=11), constituting roughly 10% of all biopsies from......Although the occasional appearance of a normal histology of biopsies from endoscopic colorectal (CR) polyps is generally held knowledge, its prevalence has rarely been focused on, and the yield of additional sections in such cases has been previously addressed in merely four communications...... specimens were obtained from 245 endoscopies and stratified in the following categories according to the clinical indications: relevant symptoms (symptomatic, n=127), previously documented sporadic large bowel neoplasia (follow-up, n=99), and documented or presumed hereditary condition that confer...

  15. The molecular classification of hereditary endocrine diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lei; Ning, Guang

    2015-12-01

    Hereditary endocrine diseases are an important group of diseases with great heterogeneity. The current classification for hereditary endocrine disease is mostly based upon anatomy, which is helpful for pathophysiological interpretation, but does not address the pathogenic variability associated with different underlying genetic causes. Identification of an endocrinopathy-associated genetic alteration provides evidence for differential diagnosis, discovery of non-classical disease, and the potential for earlier diagnosis and targeted therapy. Molecular diagnosis should be routinely applied when managing patients with suspicion of hereditary disease. To enhance the accurate diagnosis and treatment of patients with hereditary endocrine diseases, we propose categorization of endocrine diseases into three groups based upon the function of the mutant gene: cell differentiation, hormone synthesis and action, and tumorigenesis. Each category was further grouped according to the specific gene function. We believe that this format would facilitate practice of precision medicine in the field of hereditary endocrine diseases.

  16. The Anaphase-Promoting Complex (APC) ubiquitin ligase affects chemosensory behavior in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Julia; Jennings, Alexandra K; Kowalski, Jennifer R

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of fundamental aspects of neurobiological function has been linked to the ubiquitin signaling system (USS), which regulates the degradation and activity of proteins and is catalyzed by E1, E2, and E3 enzymes. The Anaphase-Promoting Complex (APC) is a multi-subunit E3 ubiquitin ligase that controls diverse developmental and signaling processes in post-mitotic neurons; however, potential roles for the APC in sensory function have yet to be explored. In this study, we examined the effect of the APC ubiquitin ligase on chemosensation in Caenorhabditis elegans by testing chemotaxis to the volatile odorants, diacetyl, pyrazine, and isoamyl alcohol, to which wild-type worms are attracted. Animals with loss of function mutations in either of two alleles (g48 and ye143) of the gene encoding the APC subunit EMB-27 APC6 showed increased chemotaxis towards diacetyl and pyrazine, odorants sensed by AWA neurons, but exhibited normal chemotaxis to isoamyl alcohol, which is sensed by AWC neurons. The statistically significant increase in chemotaxis in the emb-27 APC6 mutants suggests that the APC inhibits AWA-mediated chemosensation in C. elegans. Increased chemotaxis to pyrazine was also seen with mutants lacking another essential APC subunit, MAT-2 APC1; however, mat-2 APC1 mutants exhibited wild type responses to diacetyl. The difference in responsiveness of these two APC subunit mutants may be due to differential strength of these hypomorphic alleles or may indicate the presence of functional sub-complexes of the APC at work in this process. These findings are the first evidence for APC-mediated regulation of chemosensation and lay the groundwork for further studies aimed at identifying the expression levels, function, and targets of the APC in specific sensory neurons. Because of the similarity between human and C. elegans nervous systems, the role of the APC in sensory neurons may also advance our understanding of human sensory function and disease.

  17. Fission Yeast Apc15 Stabilizes MCC-Cdc20-APC/C Complexes, Ensuring Efficient Cdc20 Ubiquitination and Checkpoint Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Karen M; Paldi, Flora; Hardwick, Kevin G

    2017-04-24

    During mitosis, cells must segregate the replicated copies of their genome to their daughter cells with extremely high fidelity. Segregation errors lead to an abnormal chromosome number (aneuploidy), which typically results in disease or cell death [1]. Chromosome segregation and anaphase onset are initiated through the action of the multi-subunit E3 ubiquitin ligase known as the anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome (APC/C [2]). The APC/C is inhibited by the spindle checkpoint in the presence of kinetochore attachment defects [3, 4]. Here we demonstrate that two non-essential APC/C subunits (Apc14 and Apc15) regulate association of spindle checkpoint proteins, in the form of the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC), with the APC/C. apc14Δ mutants display increased MCC association with the APC/C and are unable to silence the checkpoint efficiently. Conversely, apc15Δ mutants display reduced association between the MCC and APC/C, are defective in poly-ubiquitination of Cdc20, and are checkpoint defective. In vitro reconstitution studies have shown that human MCC-APC/C can contain two molecules of Cdc20 [5-7]. Using a yeast strain expressing two Cdc20 genes with different epitope tags, we show by co-immunoprecipitation that this is true in vivo. MCC binding to the second molecule of Cdc20 is mediated via the C-terminal KEN box in Mad3. Somewhat surprisingly, complexes containing both molecules of Cdc20 accumulate in apc15Δ cells, and the implications of this observation are discussed. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of the APC materials on c-axis correlated pinning effects in a-axis oriented Y123/2D APC multilayer films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamura, M.; Mukaida, M.; Horii, S.; Ichinose, A.; Kita, R.; Namba, M.; Awaji, S.; Watanabe, K.; Matsumoto, K.; Yoshida, Y.; Teranishi, R.; Yamada, K.; Mori, N.

    2009-01-01

    For a-axis oriented and c-axis in-plane aligned YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ /artificial pinning center (Y123/APC) alternately-layered thin films, effects of the APC materials on the multilayer structures are discussed. Pr123, (Y 1-x Pr x )123 and Gd 2 CuO 4 (Gd214) were used as APCs. The multilayer structure was observed for Y123/Pr123 films and Y123/Gd214 films. However, some grains are also grown in the Y123/Gd214 film. For the Y123/Pr123 multilayer film, each Pr123 layer act as two-dimensional APCs (2D APCs) in the magnetic field angular dependences of the critical current density. The growth mechanism of the multilayer structure in the Y123/2D APC films is discussed by a transmission electron microscopy and an atomic force microscope. It is found that two conditions are needed to obtain the c-axis correlated pinning effects by 2D APC in the a-axis oriented and c-axis in-plane aligned Y123/APC multilayer films: the same structure as Y123; Y-free APC materials.

  19. Effect of maternal and post weaning folate supply on gene-specific DNA methylation in the small intestine of weaning and adult Apc+/Min and wild type mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Ann Mckay

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence supports the developmental origins of adult health and disease hypothesis which argues for a causal relationship between adverse early life nutrition and increased disease risk in adulthood. Modulation of epigenetic marks, e.g. DNA methylation and consequential altered gene expression, has been proposed as a mechanism mediating these effects. Via its role as a methyl donor, dietary folate supply may influence DNA methylation. As aberrant methylation is an early event in colorectal cancer (CRC pathogenesis, we hypothesised low maternal and/or post-weaning folate intake may influence methylation of genes involved in CRC development. We investigated the effects of maternal folate depletion during pregnancy and lactation on selected gene methylation in the small intestine (SI of wild type (WT and Apc+/Min mice at weaning and as adults. We also investigated the effects of folate depletion post-weaning on gene methylation in adult mice. Female C57Bl6/J mice were fed low or normal folate diets from mating with Apc+/Min males to the end of lactation. A sub set of offspring were killed at weaning. Remaining offspring were weaned on to low or normal folate diets, resulting in 4 treatment groups of Apc+/Min and WT mice. p53 was more methylated in weaning and adult WT compared with Apc+/Min mice (p>0.001. Igf2 and Apc were hypermethylated in adult Apc+/Mi n compared with WT mice (p=0.004 & p=0.012 respectively. Low maternal folate reduced p53 methylation in adults (p=0.04. Low post-weaning folate increased Apc methylation in Apc+/Min mice only (p=0.008 for interaction. These observations demonstrate that folate depletion in early life can alter epigenetic marks in a gene specific manner. Also, the differential effects of altered folate supply on DNA methylation in WT and Apc+/Min mice suggest that genotype may modulate epigenetic responses to environmental cues and may have implications for the development of personalised nutrition.

  20. Colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiba, Suminori

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes colorectal cancer risk in relation to A-bomb radiation. The RERF Life Span Study has revealed the incidence of colorectal cancer to be significantly high in the group of A-bomb survivors than the control group. With regard to relative risk or excess relative risk, there is no definitive difference among sites in the colon. Risk for colon cancer is found to be linearly increased with increasing radiation doses, and in younger A-bomb survivors at the time of exposure. Risk associated with one Gy is estimated to be increased by double. There is no definitive variation between sex and between Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Excess relative risk would be increased rapidly with aging in the whole group of A-bomb survivors and with the cancer-prone age in younger A-bomb survivors at the time of exposure. (N.K.)

  1. Correlation between the methylation of APC gene promoter and colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing-Qiang; Liu, Peng-Peng; Zhang, Cai-Hua

    2017-08-01

    The present study was planned to explore the correlation between the methylation of APC (adenomatous polyposis coli) and colon carcinogenesis. Colon cancer tissues and tumor-adjacent normal tissues of 60 colon cancer patients (who received surgical operation in our hospital from January 2012 to December 2014) were collected. SW1116 cells in human colon cancer tissues were selected for culturing. 5-aza-2c-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) was utilized as an inhibitor of the methylation for APC gene. Methylation specific PCR (MSP) was utilized for detection of APC methylation in SW1116 cells. The MTT and Transwell assays were performed to detect the effect of the methylation of APC gene on the proliferation and invasive abilities of SW1116 cells. The correlation between the methylation of APC gene and pathological parameters of colon cancer patients was analyzed. MSP results revealed that 41 cases (68.33%) showed methylation of APC gene in colon cancer tissues. No methylation of APC gene was found in tumor-adjacent normal tissues. 5-aza-dC was able to inhibit the methylation of APC gene in SW1116 cells. APC gene methylation was correlated with tumor size, differentiation degree, lymph node metastasis and Dukes staging. In conclusion, the levels of the methylation of APC in colon cancer tissues and SW1116 cells are relatively high. The methylation of APC promoted the proliferation and invasion abilities of SW1116 cells. Furthermore, methylation is correlated with a variety of clinicopathological features of colon cancer patients.

  2. The APC tumor suppressor is required for epithelial cell polarization and three-dimensional morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesko, Alyssa C.; Goss, Kathleen H.; Yang, Frank F.; Schwertner, Adam; Hulur, Imge; Onel, Kenan; Prosperi, Jenifer R.

    2015-01-01

    The Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) tumor suppressor has been previously implicated in the control of apical-basal polarity; yet, the consequence of APC loss-of-function in epithelial polarization and morphogenesis has not been characterized. To test the hypothesis that APC is required for the establishment of normal epithelial polarity and morphogenesis programs, we generated APC-knockdown epithelial cell lines. APC depletion resulted in loss of polarity and multi-layering on permeable supports, and enlarged, filled spheroids with disrupted polarity in 3D culture. Importantly, these effects of APC knockdown were independent of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, but were rescued with either full-length or a carboxy (c)-terminal segment of APC. Moreover, we identified a gene expression signature associated with APC knockdown that points to several candidates known to regulate cell-cell and cell-matrix communication. Analysis of epithelial tissues from mice and humans carrying heterozygous APC mutations further support the importance of APC as a regulator of epithelial behavior and tissue architecture. These data also suggest that the initiation of epithelial-derived tumors as a result of APC mutation or gene silencing may be driven by loss of polarity and dysmorphogenesis. PMID:25578398

  3. Timing of APC/C substrate degradation is determined by fzy/fzr specificity of destruction boxes

    OpenAIRE

    Zur, Amit; Brandeis, Michael

    2002-01-01

    The anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), activated by fzy and fzr, degrades cell cycle proteins that carry RXXL or KEN destruction boxes (d-boxes). APC/C substrates regulate sequential events and must be degraded in the correct order during mitosis and G1. We studied how d-boxes determine APC/Cfzy/APC/Cfzr specificity and degradation timing. Cyclin B1 has an RXXL box and is degraded by both APC/Cfzy and APC/Cfzr; fzy has a KEN box and is degraded by APC/Cfzr only. We characterized th...

  4. Prophylactic Therapy for Hereditary Angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, Hilary; Zinser, Emily

    2017-08-01

    Long-term prophylaxis is needed in many patients with hereditary angioedema and poses many challenges. Attenuated androgens are effective in many but are limited by side effect profiles. There is less evidence for efficacy of tranexamic acid and progestagens; however, the small side effect profile makes tranexamic acid an option for prophylaxis in children and progestagens an option for women. C1 inhibitor is beneficial, but at present requires intravenous delivery and may need dose titration for maximum efficacy. Short-term prophylaxis should be considered for all procedures. New therapies are promising in overcoming many problems encountered with current options for long-term prophylaxis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Imaging of Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carette, Marie-France; Nedelcu, Cosmina; Tassart, Marc; Grange, Jean-Didier; Wislez, Marie; Khalil, Antoine

    2009-01-01

    This pictorial review is based on our experience of the follow-up of 120 patients at our multidisciplinary center for hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Rendu-Osler-Weber disease or HHT is a multiorgan autosomal dominant disorder with high penetrance, characterized by epistaxis, mucocutaneous telangiectasis, and visceral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The research on gene mutations is fundamental and family screening by clinical examination, chest X-ray, research of pulmonary shunting, and abdominal color Doppler sonography is absolutely necessary. The angioarchitecture of pulmonary AVMs can be studied by unenhanced multidetector computed tomography; however, all other explorations of liver, digestive bowels, or brain require administration of contrast media. Magnetic resonance angiography is helpful for central nervous system screening, in particular for the spinal cord, but also for pulmonary, hepatic, and pelvic AVMs. Knowledge of the multiorgan involvement of HHT, mechanism of complications, and radiologic findings is fundamental for the correct management of these patients.

  6. Hereditary syndromes with enhanced radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohmann, D.

    2000-01-01

    Sensitivity to ionizing radiation is modified by heritable genetic factors. This is exemplified by heritable disorders that are characterized by predisposition to the development of neoplasms. Cells derived from patients with ataxia telangiectasia, Nijmegen breakage syndrome and ataxia telangiektasia-like disorder show a markedly changed reaction to exposure to ionizing radiation. Correspondingly, at least in patients with ataxia telangiectasia, an enhanced radiosensitivity that is of clinical importance has been observed. In addition to these recessive disorders, some autosomal dominant cancer predisposition syndromes are associated with increased radiosensitivity. As cells from these patients still have a normal allele (that is dominant over the mutant allele), the cellular phenotype is most often normal. Specifically, there is no overtly altered reaction in response to ionizing radiation. Nevertheless, two dominant cancer predisposition syndromes, namely hereditary retinoblastoma and naevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, are associated with a enhanced radiosensitivity as indicated by increased development of tumors following radiation therapy. (orig.) [de

  7. Copy number of the Adenomatous Polyposis Coli gene is not always neutral in sporadic colorectal cancers with loss of heterozygosity for the gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zauber, Peter; Marotta, Stephen; Sabbath-Solitare, Marlene

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the number of alleles of a chromosome may have an impact upon gene expression. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) indicates that one allele of a gene has been lost, and knowing the exact copy number of the gene would indicate whether duplication of the remaining allele has occurred. We were interested to determine the copy number of the Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) gene in sporadic colorectal cancers with LOH. We selected 38 carcinomas with LOH for the APC gene region of chromosome 5, as determined by amplification of the CA repeat region within the D5S346 loci. The copy number status of APC was ascertained using the SALSA® MLPA® P043-B1 APC Kit. LOH for the DCC gene, KRAS gene mutation, and microsatellite instability were also evaluated for each tumor, utilizing standard polymerase chain reaction methods. No tumor demonstrated microsatellite instability. LOH of the DCC gene was also present in 33 of 36 (91.7 %) informative tumors. A KRAS gene mutation was present in 16 of the 38 (42.1 %) tumors. Twenty-four (63.2 %) of the tumors were copy number neutral, 10 (26.3 %) tumors demonstrated major loss, while two (5.3 %) showed partial loss. Two tumors (5.3 %) had copy number gain. Results of APC and DCC LOH, KRAS and microsatellite instability indicate our colorectal cancer cases were typical of sporadic cancers following the ‘chromosomal instability’ pathway. The majority of our colorectal carcinomas with LOH for APC gene are copy number neutral. However, one-third of our cases showed copy number loss, suggesting that duplication of the remaining allele is not required for the development of a colorectal carcinoma

  8. Copy number of the Adenomatous Polyposis Coli gene is not always neutral in sporadic colorectal cancers with loss of heterozygosity for the gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zauber, Peter; Marotta, Stephen; Sabbath-Solitare, Marlene

    2016-03-12

    Changes in the number of alleles of a chromosome may have an impact upon gene expression. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) indicates that one allele of a gene has been lost, and knowing the exact copy number of the gene would indicate whether duplication of the remaining allele has occurred. We were interested to determine the copy number of the Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) gene in sporadic colorectal cancers with LOH. We selected 38 carcinomas with LOH for the APC gene region of chromosome 5, as determined by amplification of the CA repeat region within the D5S346 loci. The copy number status of APC was ascertained using the SALSA® MLPA® P043-B1 APC Kit. LOH for the DCC gene, KRAS gene mutation, and microsatellite instability were also evaluated for each tumor, utilizing standard polymerase chain reaction methods. No tumor demonstrated microsatellite instability. LOH of the DCC gene was also present in 33 of 36 (91.7%) informative tumors. A KRAS gene mutation was present in 16 of the 38 (42.1%) tumors. Twenty-four (63.2%) of the tumors were copy number neutral, 10 (26.3%) tumors demonstrated major loss, while two (5.3%) showed partial loss. Two tumors (5.3%) had copy number gain. Results of APC and DCC LOH, KRAS and microsatellite instability indicate our colorectal cancer cases were typical of sporadic cancers following the 'chromosomal instability' pathway. The majority of our colorectal carcinomas with LOH for APC gene are copy number neutral. However, one-third of our cases showed copy number loss, suggesting that duplication of the remaining allele is not required for the development of a colorectal carcinoma.

  9. APC: A new code for Atmospheric Polarization Computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korkin, Sergey V.; Lyapustin, Alexei I.; Rozanov, Vladimir V.

    2013-01-01

    A new polarized radiative transfer code Atmospheric Polarization Computations (APC) is described. The code is based on separation of the diffuse light field into anisotropic and smooth (regular) parts. The anisotropic part is computed analytically. The smooth regular part is computed numerically using the discrete ordinates method. Vertical stratification of the atmosphere, common types of bidirectional surface reflection and scattering by spherical particles or spheroids are included. A particular consideration is given to computation of the bidirectional polarization distribution function (BPDF) of the waved ocean surface. -- Highlights: •A new code, APC, has been developed. •The code was validated against well-known codes. •The BPDF for an arbitrary Mueller matrix is computed

  10. Gene expression signatures for colorectal cancer microsatellite status and HNPCC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruhøffer, M; Jensen, J L; Laiho, P

    2005-01-01

    The majority of microsatellite instable (MSI) colorectal cancers are sporadic, but a subset belongs to the syndrome hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Microsatellite instability is caused by dysfunction of the mismatch repair (MMR) system that leads to a mutator phenotype, and MSI...... of 101 stage II and III colorectal cancers (34 MSI, 67 microsatellite stable (MSS)) using high-density oligonucleotide microarrays. From these data, we constructed a nine-gene signature capable of separating the mismatch repair proficient and deficient tumours. Subsequently, we demonstrated...... is correlated to prognosis and response to chemotherapy. Gene expression signatures as predictive markers are being developed for many cancers, and the identification of a signature for MMR deficiency would be of interest both clinically and biologically. To address this issue, we profiled the gene expression...

  11. Initiation of universal tumor screening for Lynch syndrome in colorectal cancer patients as a model for the implementation of genetic information into clinical oncology practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Stacey A; Laurino, Mercy; Bowen, Deborah J; Upton, Melissa P; Pritchard, Colin; Hisama, Fuki; Jarvik, Gail; Fichera, Alessandro; Sjoding, Britta; Bennett, Robin L; Naylor, Lorraine; Jacobson, Angela; Burke, Wylie; Grady, William M

    2016-02-01

    Lynch syndrome confers a hereditary predisposition to colorectal and other cancers. Universal tumor screening (UTS) for Lynch syndrome is recommended by several professional societies, but the implementation can be complex. This article describes the evaluation, process development, and initiation of Lynch syndrome UTS at a tertiary referral cancer center. A multidisciplinary team developed the new process design. Issues in 5 themes were noted: timing, funding, second-opinion patients, result processing, and the role of genetics providers. A committee approach was used to examine each issue for process-improvement development. The issues related to testing were addressed individually for the successful implementation of UTS at the institutional level. In the conventional-care period, 9 of 30 cases (30%) received Lynch syndrome screening, and 4 cases were referred to medical genetics. During the 6 months following the implementation of UTS, 32 of 44 patients (73%) received Lynch syndrome screening. The 13 unscreened patients all had identified reasons for nonscreening (eg, financial limitations). Ten patients were referred to medical genetics, which identified no new cases of Lynch syndrome, but a low-risk adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) variant was detected in 1 individual. The implementation of effective Lynch syndrome UTS can feasibly alter practice at the institutional level. This experience with the assessment and management of issues relevant to the successful implementation of a new clinical care paradigm based on emerging technology has implications for the uptake of advances across molecular oncology into clinical practice, and this is highly relevant in the current era of rapidly evolving genomic technology. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  12. lemmingA encodes the Apc11 subunit of the APC/C in Drosophila melanogaster that forms a ternary complex with the E2-C type ubiquitin conjugating enzyme, Vihar and Morula/Apc2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagy Olga

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation is a critical step in key cell cycle events, such as metaphase-anaphase transition and mitotic exit. The anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C plays a pivotal role in these transitions by recognizing and marking regulatory proteins for proteasomal degradation. Its overall structure and function has been elucidated mostly in yeasts and mammalian cell lines. The APC/C is, however, a multisubunit assembly with at least 13 subunits and their function and interaction within the complex is still relatively uncharacterized, particularly in metazoan systems. Here, lemming (lmg mutants were used to study the APC/C subunit, Apc11, and its interaction partners in Drosophila melanogaster. Results The lmg gene was initially identified through a pharate adult lethal P element insertion mutation expressing developmental abnormalities and widespread apoptosis in larval imaginal discs and pupal abdominal histoblasts. Larval neuroblasts were observed to arrest mitosis in a metaphase-like state with highly condensed, scattered chromosomes and frequent polyploidy. These neuroblasts contain high levels of both cyclin A and cyclin B. The lmg gene was cloned by virtue of the lmg03424 P element insertion which is located in the 5' untranslated region. The lemming locus is transcribed to give a 2.0 kb mRNA that contains two ORFs, lmgA and lmgB. The lmgA ORF codes for a putative protein with more than 80% sequence homology to the APC11 subunit of the human APC/C. The 85 amino acid protein also contains a RING-finger motif characteristic of known APC11 subunits. The lmgA ORF alone was sufficient to rescue the lethal and mitotic phenotypes of the lmg138 null allele and to complement the temperature sensitive lethal phenotype of the APC11-myc9 budding yeast mutant. The LmgA protein interacts with Mr/Apc2, and they together form a binding site for Vihar, the E2-C type ubiquitin conjugating enzyme. Despite

  13. Reduced expression of APC-1B but not APC-1A by the deletion of promoter 1B is responsible for familial adenomatous polyposis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Kiyoshi; Nagayama, Satoshi; Shimizu, Eigo; Komura, Mitsuhiro; Yamaguchi, Rui; Shibuya, Tetsuo; Arai, Masami; Hatakeyama, Seira; Ikenoue, Tsuneo; Ueno, Masashi; Miyano, Satoru; Imoto, Seiya; Furukawa, Yoichi

    2016-05-24

    Germline mutations in the tumor suppressor gene APC are associated with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Here we applied whole-genome sequencing (WGS) to the DNA of a sporadic FAP patient in which we did not find any pathological APC mutations by direct sequencing. WGS identified a promoter deletion of approximately 10 kb encompassing promoter 1B and exon1B of APC. Additional allele-specific expression analysis by deep cDNA sequencing revealed that the deletion reduced the expression of the mutated APC allele to as low as 11.2% in the total APC transcripts, suggesting that the residual mutant transcripts were driven by other promoter(s). Furthermore, cap analysis of gene expression (CAGE) demonstrated that the deleted promoter 1B region is responsible for the great majority of APC transcription in many tissues except the brain. The deletion decreased the transcripts of APC-1B to 39-45% in the patient compared to the healthy controls, but it did not decrease those of APC-1A. Different deletions including promoter 1B have been reported in FAP patients. Taken together, our results strengthen the evidence that analysis of structural variations in promoter 1B should be considered for the FAP patients whose pathological mutations are not identified by conventional direct sequencing.

  14. Clinical application of Assessment of Parenting Competencies (APC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Stine Lindahl

    This paper is part of a symposium on music therapy with families with Kirsi Tuomi as Chair. It revolves around the clinical application of a new music therapy assessment model on parent-child interaction and parenting competencies. APC was developed for emotional neglected children and their pare......This paper is part of a symposium on music therapy with families with Kirsi Tuomi as Chair. It revolves around the clinical application of a new music therapy assessment model on parent-child interaction and parenting competencies. APC was developed for emotional neglected children......, child somatic hospitals, centers for refuges and other populations where it would be clinical relevant to assess the parent-child interaction. APC is an observational and improvisational based assessment model evaluating dyads of parent and child (child age range is 5-12). It produces information...... (numbers, graphs, and descriptions) of parent-child interaction and parenting competencies including nonverbal communication, level of attunement in the dyad, and level of emotional support from the parent. It is based on video analysis and a fixed assessment protocol. It was developed through a completed...

  15. Human immunodeficiencies related to APC/T cell interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinos eKallikourdis

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The primary event for initiating adaptive immune responses is the encounter between T lymphocytes and antigen presenting cells (APC in the T cell area of secondary lymphoid organs and the formation of highly organized inter-cellular junctions referred to as the immune synapses. In vivo live-cell imaging of APC-T cell interactions combined to functional studies unveiled that T cell fate is dictated, in large part, by the stability of the initial contact. Immune cell interaction is equally important during delivery of T cell help to B cells and for the killing of target cells by cytotoxic T cells and NK cells. The critical role of contact dynamics and synapse stability on the immune response is well illustrated by human immune deficiencies in which disease pathogenesis is linked to altered adhesion or defective cross-talk between the synaptic partners. Here we will discuss in details the mechanisms of defective APC-T cell communications in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS and in warts, hypogammaglobulinemia, infections, myelokathexis syndrome (WHIM. In addition, we will summarize the evidences pointing to a compromised conjugate formation in WIP deficiency, DOCK8 deficiency and X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome.

  16. Are Intestinal Tumours in Apc+/-mice a Suitable Model of Colorectal Carcinoma in Man?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lojda, Z.; Havránková, E.; Sovová, Vlasta; Šloncová, Eva; Frič, P.

    1999-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 1 (1999), s. 1-4 ISSN 0231-5882 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA312/97/1188; GA ČR GV312/96/K205 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.400, year: 1999

  17. Molecular basis of APC/C regulation by the spindle assembly checkpoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ziguo; Yang, Jing; Maslen, Sarah; Skehel, Mark; Barford, David

    2016-01-01

    In the dividing eukaryotic cell the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) ensures each daughter cell inherits an identical set of chromosomes. The SAC coordinates the correct attachment of sister chromatid kinetochores to the mitotic spindle with activation of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), the E3 ubiquitin ligase that initiates chromosome separation. In response to unattached kinetochores, the SAC generates the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC), a multimeric assembly that inhibits the APC/C, delaying chromosome segregation. Here, using cryo-electron microscopy we determined the near-atomic resolution structure of an APC/C-MCC complex (APC/CMCC). We reveal how degron-like sequences of the MCC subunit BubR1 block degron recognition sites on Cdc20, the APC/C coactivator subunit (Cdc20APC/C) responsible for substrate interactions. BubR1 also obstructs binding of UbcH10 (APC/C’s initiating E2) to repress APC/C ubiquitination activity. Conformational variability of the complex allows for UbcH10 association, and we show from a structure of APC/CMCC in complex with UbcH10 how the Cdc20 subunit intrinsic to the MCC (Cdc20MCC) is ubiquitinated, a process that results in APC/C reactivation when the SAC is silenced. PMID:27509861

  18. Epigenetic regulation of APC in the molecular pathogenesis of gallbladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekcham, Dinesh Singh; Poojary, Satish S; Bhunia, Shushruta; Barbhuiya, Mustafa Ahmed; Gupta, Sanjeev; Shrivastav, Braj Raj; Tiwari, Pramod Kumar

    2016-05-01

    Loss of function of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) has been reported in cancer. The two promoters of APC, 1A and 1B also have roles in cancer. But, the epigenetic role of APC promoters is not yet clear in gallbladder cancer (GBC) and gallstone diseases (GSD). We undertook this study to determine the epigenetic role of APC in GBC and GSD. Methylation-specific (MS)-PCR was used to analyze the methylation of APC gene. The expression of APC gene was studied by semi-quantitative PCR, real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry (IHC) in GBC, GSD and adjacent normal tissues. Of the two promoters, APC 1A promoter was found methylated in 96 per cent GBC ( P=0.0155) and 80 per cent GSD (P=0.015). Exon 1 was downregulated in grade II (P=0.002) and grade III (P=0.0001) of GBC, while exon 2 was normally expressed. Scoring analysis of IHC revealed 0 or negativity in 34.48 per cent (P=0.057) and 1+ in 24.14 per cent (P=0.005) GBC cases suggesting loss of APC expression. The present findings indicate epigenetic silencing of APC in advanced GBC. The methylation pattern, followed by expression analysis of APC may be suggested for diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic purposes in GBC in future.

  19. Genetics 101 --The Hereditary Material of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Genetics 101 Genetics 101 — The Hereditary Material of Life Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table of Contents Genetics is the study of heredity, the process in ...

  20. Hereditary History Preserving Bisimilarity Is Undecidable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurdzinski, Marcin; Nielsen, Mogens

    2000-01-01

    History preserving bisimilarity (hp-bisimilarity) and hereditary history preserving bisimilarity (hhp-bisimilarity) are behavioural equivalences taking into account causal relationships between events of concurrent systems. Their prominent feature is being preserved under action refinement...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary hypophosphatemic rickets

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A characteristic of X-linked inheritance is that fathers cannot pass X-linked traits to their sons. ... families, hereditary hypophosphatemic rickets has had an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern, which means one copy of an ...

  2. Clinical features of Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hosman, A.E.

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT), also known as Rendu-Osler-Weber disease (ROW), is an autosomal dominant disease with multi-systemic vascular dysplasia characterized by mucocutaneous telangiectasia, arteriovenous malformations and recurrent spontaneous epistaxis (nosebleeds). Most cases

  3. Splenic Involvement in Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susumu Takamatsu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 33-year-old man who presented with prolonged epigastric pain was referred to our hospital. He had experienced recurrent epistaxis and had a family history of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed splenomegaly and a 9 cm hypervascular mass in his spleen. Computed tomography also showed a pulmonary arteriovenous malformation and heterogeneous enhancement of the liver parenchyma, suggesting the presence of arteriosystemic shunts and telangiectases. Based on these findings, the patient was definitely diagnosed with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia according to Curaçao criteria. He underwent splenectomy, and his symptoms disappeared after surgery. Pathological examination of the resected specimen revealed that the hypervascular lesion of the spleen was not a tumor but was composed of abnormal vessels associated with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. Symptomatic splenic involvement may be a rare manifestation of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia but can be revealed by imaging modalities.

  4. Low and high dose rate heavy ion radiation-induced intestinal and colonic tumorigenesis in APC1638N/+ mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suman, Shubhankar; Kumar, Santosh; Moon, Bo-Hyun; Fornace, Albert J.; Datta, Kamal

    2017-05-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is a recognized risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC) and astronauts undertaking long duration space missions are expected to receive IR doses in excess of permissible limits with implications for colorectal carcinogenesis. Exposure to IR in outer space occurs at low doses and dose rates, and energetic heavy ions due to their high linear energy transfer (high-LET) characteristics remain a major concern for CRC risk in astronauts. Previously, we have demonstrated that intestinal tumorigenesis in a mouse model (APC1638N/+) of human colorectal cancer was significantly higher after exposure to high dose rate energetic heavy ions relative to low-LET γ radiation. The purpose of the current study was to compare intestinal tumorigenesis in APC1638N/+ mice after exposure to energetic heavy ions at high (50 cGy/min) and relatively low (0.33 cGy/min) dose rate. Male and female mice (6-8 weeks old) were exposed to either 10 or 50 cGy of 28Si (energy: 300 MeV/n; LET: 70 keV/μm) or 56Fe (energy: 1000 MeV/n; LET: 148 keV/μm) ions at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory in Brookhaven National Laboratory. Mice (n = 20 mice/group) were euthanized and intestinal and colon tumor frequency and size were counted 150 days after radiation exposure. Intestinal tumorigenesis in male mice exposed to 56Fe was similar for high and low dose rate exposures. Although male mice showed a decreasing trend at low dose rate relative to high dose rate exposures, the differences in tumor frequency between the two types of exposures were not statistically significant after 28Si radiation. In female mice, intestinal tumor frequency was similar for both radiation type and dose rates tested. In both male and female mice intestinal tumor size was not different after high and low dose rate radiation exposures. Colon tumor frequency in male and female mice after high and low dose rate energetic heavy ions was also not significantly different. In conclusion, intestinal and colonic tumor

  5. Application examples of APC-03-2 and APC-03-2A airborne particle counters under various contamination conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czitrovszky, A.; Jani, P.

    1997-01-01

    Several application examples of the airborne particle counters APC-03-2 and APC-03-2A for monitoring particle size distribution and concentration in air and other gases are described. The computer controlled fast data evaluation and storage provide efficient presentation of the measured data in a variety of table- and histogram-forms, presenting of alarm levels for each size range, observation of alarm history, etc. The device can be applied not only for clean room monitoring and laminar box testing, but also for measuring contamination in health care facilities in workshops using hazardous airborne compounds (e.g. in pharmacology), and in toxicology where the concentration of the contamination may be very high. (author)

  6. Get Tested for Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print This Topic En español Get Tested for Colorectal Cancer Browse Sections The Basics Overview What to Expect ... section Overview 2 of 6 sections The Basics: Colorectal Cancer What is colorectal cancer? Colorectal cancer is a ...

  7. A Review of Hereditary Fructose Intolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mogoş Tiberius

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Fructose intolerance is a metabolic disorder with hereditary determinism, clinically manifested on terms of fructose intake. Untreated, hereditary fructose intolerance may result in renal and hepatic failure. Unfortunately, there are no formal diagnostic and surveillance guidelines for this disease. If identified and treated before the occurrence of permanent organ damage, patients can improve their symptoms and self-rated health. Implementation and adherence to a strict fructose free diet is often difficult, but not impossible.

  8. Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auer-Grumbach Michaela

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I (HSN I is a slowly progressive neurological disorder characterised by prominent predominantly distal sensory loss, autonomic disturbances, autosomal dominant inheritance, and juvenile or adulthood disease onset. The exact prevalence is unknown, but is estimated as very low. Disease onset varies between the 2nd and 5th decade of life. The main clinical feature of HSN I is the reduction of sensation sense mainly distributed to the distal parts of the upper and lower limbs. Variable distal muscle weakness and wasting, and chronic skin ulcers are characteristic. Autonomic features (usually sweating disturbances are invariably observed. Serious and common complications are spontaneous fractures, osteomyelitis and necrosis, as well as neuropathic arthropathy which may even necessitate amputations. Some patients suffer from severe pain attacks. Hypacusis or deafness, or cough and gastrooesophageal reflux have been observed in rare cases. HSN I is a genetically heterogenous condition with three loci and mutations in two genes (SPTLC1 and RAB7 identified so far. Diagnosis is based on the clinical observation and is supported by a family history. Nerve conduction studies confirm a sensory and motor neuropathy predominantly affecting the lower limbs. Radiological studies, including magnetic resonance imaging, are useful when bone infections or necrosis are suspected. Definitive diagnosis is based on the detection of mutations by direct sequencing of the SPTLC1 and RAB7 genes. Correct clinical assessment and genetic confirmation of the diagnosis are important for appropriate genetic counselling and prognosis. Differential diagnosis includes the other hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN, especially HSAN II, as well as diabetic foot syndrome, alcoholic neuropathy, neuropathies caused by other neurotoxins/drugs, immune mediated neuropathy, amyloidosis, spinal cord diseases, tabes dorsalis, lepra

  9. Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer-Grumbach, Michaela

    2008-03-18

    Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I (HSN I) is a slowly progressive neurological disorder characterised by prominent predominantly distal sensory loss, autonomic disturbances, autosomal dominant inheritance, and juvenile or adulthood disease onset. The exact prevalence is unknown, but is estimated as very low. Disease onset varies between the 2nd and 5th decade of life. The main clinical feature of HSN I is the reduction of sensation sense mainly distributed to the distal parts of the upper and lower limbs. Variable distal muscle weakness and wasting, and chronic skin ulcers are characteristic. Autonomic features (usually sweating disturbances) are invariably observed. Serious and common complications are spontaneous fractures, osteomyelitis and necrosis, as well as neuropathic arthropathy which may even necessitate amputations. Some patients suffer from severe pain attacks. Hypacusis or deafness, or cough and gastrooesophageal reflux have been observed in rare cases. HSN I is a genetically heterogenous condition with three loci and mutations in two genes (SPTLC1 and RAB7) identified so far. Diagnosis is based on the clinical observation and is supported by a family history. Nerve conduction studies confirm a sensory and motor neuropathy predominantly affecting the lower limbs. Radiological studies, including magnetic resonance imaging, are useful when bone infections or necrosis are suspected. Definitive diagnosis is based on the detection of mutations by direct sequencing of the SPTLC1 and RAB7 genes. Correct clinical assessment and genetic confirmation of the diagnosis are important for appropriate genetic counselling and prognosis. Differential diagnosis includes the other hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN), especially HSAN II, as well as diabetic foot syndrome, alcoholic neuropathy, neuropathies caused by other neurotoxins/drugs, immune mediated neuropathy, amyloidosis, spinal cord diseases, tabes dorsalis, lepra neuropathy, or decaying skin

  10. Detection of up to 65% of Precancerous Lesions of the Human Colon and Rectum by Mutation Analysis of APC, K-Ras, B-Raf and CTNNB1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Mandy; Scholtka, Bettina; Gottschalk, Uwe; Faiss, Siegbert; Schatz, Daniela; Berghof-Jäger, Kornelia; Steinberg, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    In the present study a recently conceived 4-gene marker panel covering the Wnt and Ras-Raf-MEK-MAPK signaling pathways was used to analyze 20 colorectal serrated lesions and 41 colorectal adenoma samples and to determine the percentage of each of the above-mentioned potentially precancerous lesions carrying at least one of the four above-mentioned genes in a mutated form. CTNNB1 and B-Raf were screened by PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis, K-Ras by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and the APC gene mutation cluster region (codons 1243–1567) by direct DNA sequencing. APC mutations were only detected in 10% of the serrated lesions but in 34% of the adenomas. Twenty percent of the serrated lesions and 14% of the adenomas carried a mutated K-Ras. B-Raf was found to be mutated in 50% of the serrated lesions and in 22% of the adenomas. CTNNB1 was altered in 12% of the adenomas, but not in serrated lesions. By using the above gene marker panel it could be shown that 65% of the serrated lesions and 61% of the adenomas carried at least one of the four genes in a mutated form. Based on its excellent performance in detecting mutations in sporadic preneoplastic (in this study) and neoplastic lesions (in a previous study) of the human colon and rectum, this primer combination might also be suited to efficiently and non-invasively detect genetic alterations in stool DNA of patients with early colorectal cancer

  11. Detection of up to 65% of Precancerous Lesions of the Human Colon and Rectum by Mutation Analysis of APC, K-Ras, B-Raf and CTNNB1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Mandy; Scholtka, Bettina, E-mail: scholtka@uni-potsdam.de [Chair of Nutritional Toxicology, Institute of Nutritional Science, University of Potsdam, Arthur- Scheunert-Allee 114-116, 14558 Nuthetal (Germany); Gottschalk, Uwe [Maria Heimsuchung Caritas-Klinik Pankow, Breite Straße 46/47, 13187 Berlin (Germany); Faiss, Siegbert [III. Medizinische Abteilung - Gastroenterologie und Hepatologie, Asklepios Klinik Barmbek, Rubenkamp 220, 22291 Hamburg (Germany); Schatz, Daniela; Berghof-Jäger, Kornelia [BIOTECON Diagnostics GmbH, Hermannswerder Haus 17, 14473 Potsdam (Germany); Steinberg, Pablo, E-mail: scholtka@uni-potsdam.de [Chair of Nutritional Toxicology, Institute of Nutritional Science, University of Potsdam, Arthur- Scheunert-Allee 114-116, 14558 Nuthetal (Germany); Institute for Food Toxicology and Analytical Chemistry, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Bischofsholer Damm 15, 30173 Hannover (Germany)

    2010-12-29

    In the present study a recently conceived 4-gene marker panel covering the Wnt and Ras-Raf-MEK-MAPK signaling pathways was used to analyze 20 colorectal serrated lesions and 41 colorectal adenoma samples and to determine the percentage of each of the above-mentioned potentially precancerous lesions carrying at least one of the four above-mentioned genes in a mutated form. CTNNB1 and B-Raf were screened by PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis, K-Ras by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and the APC gene mutation cluster region (codons 1243–1567) by direct DNA sequencing. APC mutations were only detected in 10% of the serrated lesions but in 34% of the adenomas. Twenty percent of the serrated lesions and 14% of the adenomas carried a mutated K-Ras. B-Raf was found to be mutated in 50% of the serrated lesions and in 22% of the adenomas. CTNNB1 was altered in 12% of the adenomas, but not in serrated lesions. By using the above gene marker panel it could be shown that 65% of the serrated lesions and 61% of the adenomas carried at least one of the four genes in a mutated form. Based on its excellent performance in detecting mutations in sporadic preneoplastic (in this study) and neoplastic lesions (in a previous study) of the human colon and rectum, this primer combination might also be suited to efficiently and non-invasively detect genetic alterations in stool DNA of patients with early colorectal cancer.

  12. Electrodialytically treated MSWI APC residue as substitute for cement in mortar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkelund, Gunvor Marie; Geiker, Mette Rica; Jensen, Pernille Erland

    2014-01-01

    Air pollution control (APC) residues from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) are considered hazardous waste and need pretreatment prior to possible reuse. Here, two MSWI APC residues, from which the most mobile fraction of heavy metals and salts has been removed by carbonation and/or elect......Air pollution control (APC) residues from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) are considered hazardous waste and need pretreatment prior to possible reuse. Here, two MSWI APC residues, from which the most mobile fraction of heavy metals and salts has been removed by carbonation and....../or electrodialytic remediation, were used in Portland cement mortar. Mortar bars with 15 % weight replacement of cement by APC residues showed compressive strengths up to 40 MPa after 28/32 days. Heavy metal and salt leaching from both crushed and monolithic mortars with APC residues was generally similar...

  13. Regulation of MLH1 mRNA and protein expression by promoter methylation in primary colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Henrik; Rasmussen, Anders Aamann; Byriel, Lene

    2013-01-01

    In colorectal cancer MLH1 deficiency causes microsatellite instability, which is relevant for the patient's prognosis and treatment, and its putative heredity. Dysfunction of MLH1 is caused by sporadic gene promoter hypermethylation or by hereditary mutations as seen in Lynch Syndrome. The aim...... of this study was to determine in detail how DNA methylation regulates MLH1 expression and impacts clinical management....

  14. The technical hereditary of CWD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smulders, P.T.

    1990-01-01

    An overview is given of the activities of the Dutch foundation CWD since 1975. The financing of the foundation stopped July 1st 1990. From 1975 the CWD stimulated the use of small scale wind energy to pump up water in developing countries. The hereditary of the CWD consists of knowledge of the design and performance of components of wind mills, knowledge to design integral systems based on these components and preconditions, and knowledge how to manufacture, install and maintain the wind mills locally. The CWD designed three wind mill pumps of which 250 have been brought into operation in developing countries. A CWD-type pump was developed in Sri-Lanka of which 150 pumps were installed. Also attention is paid to the external situation which effected the CWD activities: the lack of interest from the Dutch industry to cooperate in developing CWD pumps; the actual market far away in developing countries; and too little competition in the research and development. The nature of the CWD-participants caused some internal friction which did not contribute to the effectivity of the CWD organisation. It is recommended to continue the development and testing of small wind energy systems and to preserve the knowledge gained by the CWD. 3 figs., 2 tabs., 3 refs

  15. Movement disorders in hereditary ataxias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Ruiz, Pedro J; Mayo, David; Hernandez, Jaime; Cantarero, Susana; Ayuso, Carmen

    2002-10-15

    Movement disorders are well known features of some dominant hereditary ataxias (HA), specially SCA3/Machado-Joseph disease and dentatorubropallidolusyan atrophy. However, little is known about the existence and classification of movement disorders in other dominant and recessive ataxias. We prospectively studied the presence of movement disorders in patients referred for HA over the last 3 years. Only those patients with a confirmed family history of ataxia were included. We studied 84 cases of HA, including 46 cases of recessive and 38 cases of dominant HA. Thirty out of 46 cases of recessive HA could be classified as: Friedreich ataxia (FA), 29 cases; vitamin E deficiency, 1 case. Twenty-three out of 38 cases of dominant HA could be classified as: SCA 2, 4 cases; SCA 3, 8 cases; SCA 6, 4 cases; SCA 7, 6 cases and SCA 8, 1 case. We observed movement disorders in 20/38 (52%) patients with dominant HA and 25/46 (54%) cases with recessive HA, including 16 patients (16/29) with FA. In general, postural tremor was the most frequent observed movement disorder (27 cases), followed by dystonia (22 cases). Five patients had akinetic rigid syndrome, and in 13 cases, several movement disorders coexisted. Movement disorders are frequent findings in HA, not only in dominant HA but also in recessive HA. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.

  16. Stable MCC binding to the APC/C is required for a functional spindle assembly checkpoint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hein, Jamin B; Nilsson, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    stably to the APC/C. Whether MCC formation per se is sufficient for a functional SAC or MCC association with the APC/C is required remains unclear. Here, we analyze the role of two conserved motifs in Cdc20, IR and C-Box, in binding of the MCC to the APC/C. Mutants in both motifs assemble the MCC....../C is critical for a functional SAC....

  17. Extensive metabolic disorders are present in APC(min) tumorigenesis mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenzhen; Xiao, Yi; Zhou, Zhengxiang; Mao, Xiaoxiao; Cai, Jinxing; Xiong, Lu; Liao, Chaonan; Huang, Fulian; Liu, Zehao; Ali Sheikh, Md Sayed; Plutzky, Jorge; Huang, He; Yang, Tianlun; Duan, Qiong

    2016-05-15

    Wnt signaling plays essential role in mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation. Activation of Wnt signaling suppresses adipogenesis, but promotes osteogenesis in MSC. Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is a negative regulator of β-catenin and Wnt signaling activity. The mutation of APC gene leads to the activation of Wnt signaling and is responsible for tumorigenesis in APC(min) mouse; however, very few studies focused on its metabolic abnormalities. The present study reports a widespread metabolic disorder phenotype in APC(min) mice. The old APC(min) mice have decreased body weight and impaired adipogenesis, but severe hyperlipidemia, which mimic the phenotypes of Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP), an inherited disease also caused by APC gene mutation in human. We found that the expression of lipid metabolism and free fat acids (FA) use genes in the white adipose tissue (WAT) of the APC(min) mice is much lower than those of control. The changed gene expression pattern may lead to the disability of circulatory lipid transportation and storage at WAT. Moreover, the APC(min) mice could not maintain the core body temperature in cold condition. PET-CT determination revealed that the BAT of APC(min) mice has significantly impaired ability to take up (18)FDG from the blood. Morphological studies identified that the brown adipocytes of APC(min) mice were filled with lipid droplets but fewer mitochondria. These results matched with the findings of impaired BAT function in APC(min) mice. Collectively, our study explores a new mechanism that explains abnormal metabolism in APC(min) mice and provides insights into studying the metabolic disorders of FAP patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. APC/C-Cdh1-dependent anaphase and telophase progression during mitotic slippage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toda Kazuhiro

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC inhibits anaphase progression in the presence of insufficient kinetochore-microtubule attachments, but cells can eventually override mitotic arrest by a process known as mitotic slippage or adaptation. This is a problem for cancer chemotherapy using microtubule poisons. Results Here we describe mitotic slippage in yeast bub2Δ mutant cells that are defective in the repression of precocious telophase onset (mitotic exit. Precocious activation of anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C-Cdh1 caused mitotic slippage in the presence of nocodazole, while the SAC was still active. APC/C-Cdh1, but not APC/C-Cdc20, triggered anaphase progression (securin degradation, separase-mediated cohesin cleavage, sister-chromatid separation and chromosome missegregation, in addition to telophase onset (mitotic exit, during mitotic slippage. This demonstrates that an inhibitory system not only of APC/C-Cdc20 but also of APC/C-Cdh1 is critical for accurate chromosome segregation in the presence of insufficient kinetochore-microtubule attachments. Conclusions The sequential activation of APC/C-Cdc20 to APC/C-Cdh1 during mitosis is central to accurate mitosis. Precocious activation of APC/C-Cdh1 in metaphase (pre-anaphase causes mitotic slippage in SAC-activated cells. For the prevention of mitotic slippage, concomitant inhibition of APC/C-Cdh1 may be effective for tumor therapy with mitotic spindle poisons in humans.

  19. Controlling the response to DNA damage by the APC/C-Cdh1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, H Rudolf; Guerrero Llobet, S; van Vugt, Marcel A T M

    2016-03-01

    Proper cell cycle progression is safeguarded by the oscillating activities of cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase complexes. An important player in the regulation of mitotic cyclins is the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), a multi-subunit E3 ubiquitin ligase. Prior to entry into mitosis, the APC/C remains inactive, which allows the accumulation of mitotic regulators. APC/C activation requires binding to either the Cdc20 or Cdh1 adaptor protein, which sequentially bind the APC/C and facilitate targeting of multiple mitotic regulators for proteasomal destruction, including Securin and Cyclin B, to ensure proper chromosome segregation and mitotic exit. Emerging data have indicated that the APC/C, particularly in association with Cdh1, also functions prior to mitotic entry. Specifically, the APC/C-Cdh1 is activated in response to DNA damage in G2 phase cells. These observations are in line with in vitro and in vivo genetic studies, in which cells lacking Cdh1 expression display various defects, including impaired DNA repair and aberrant cell cycle checkpoints. In this review, we summarize the current literature on APC/C regulation in response to DNA damage, the functions of APC/C-Cdh1 activation upon DNA damage, and speculate how APC/C-Cdh1 can control cell fate in the context of persistent DNA damage.

  20. Apc bridges Wnt/{beta}-catenin and BMP signaling during osteoblast differentiation of KS483 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miclea, Razvan L., E-mail: R.L.Miclea@lumc.nl [Department of Pediatrics, Leiden University Medical Centre (LUMC), Leiden (Netherlands); Horst, Geertje van der, E-mail: G.van_der_Horst@lumc.nl [Department of Urology, LUMC, Leiden (Netherlands); Robanus-Maandag, Els C., E-mail: E.C.Robanus@lumc.nl [Department of Human Genetics, LUMC, Leiden (Netherlands); Loewik, Clemens W.G.M., E-mail: C.W.G.M.Lowik@lumc.nl [Department of Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases, LUMC, Leiden (Netherlands); Oostdijk, Wilma, E-mail: W.Oostdijk@lumc.nl [Department of Pediatrics, Leiden University Medical Centre (LUMC), Leiden (Netherlands); Wit, Jan M., E-mail: J.M.Wit@lumc.nl [Department of Pediatrics, Leiden University Medical Centre (LUMC), Leiden (Netherlands); Karperien, Marcel, E-mail: H.B.J.Karperien@tnw.utwente.nl [MIRA Institute for Biomedical Technology and Technical Medicine, Department of Tissue Regeneration, University of Twente, Zuidhorst Room ZH 144, Drienerlolaan 5, 7522 NB Enschede (Netherlands)

    2011-06-10

    The canonical Wnt signaling pathway influences the differentiation of mesenchymal cell lineages in a quantitative and qualitative fashion depending on the dose of {beta}-catenin signaling. Adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) is the critical intracellular regulator of {beta}-catenin turnover. To better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the role of Apc in regulating the differentiation capacity of skeletal progenitor cells, we have knocked down Apc in the murine mesenchymal stem cell-like KS483 cells by stable expression of Apc-specific small interfering RNA. In routine culture, KSFrt-Apc{sub si} cells displayed a mesenchymal-like spindle shape morphology, exhibited markedly decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis. Apc knockdown resulted in upregulation of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin and the BMP/Smad signaling pathways, but osteogenic differentiation was completely inhibited. This effect could be rescued by adding high concentrations of BMP-7 to the differentiation medium. Furthermore, KSFrt-Apc{sub si} cells showed no potential to differentiate into chondrocytes or adipocytes. These results demonstrate that Apc is essential for the proliferation, survival and differentiation of KS483 cells. Apc knockdown blocks the osteogenic differentiation of skeletal progenitor cells, a process that can be overruled by high BMP signaling.

  1. Synergistic inhibition of the APC/C by the removal of APC15 in HCT116 cells lacking UBE2C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvanska, Dimitriya H; Larsen, Marie Sofie Yoo; Nilsson, Jakob

    2016-10-15

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) inhibits the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) in response to unattached kinetochores by generating a diffusible inhibitor termed the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC). At metaphase, rapid activation of the APC/C requires removal of the MCC, a process that has been shown to depend on the APC/C E2 enzymes, UBE2C and UBE2S. Here we investigate the in vivo role of the APC/C E2 enzymes in SAC silencing using CRISPR/Cas9 genetically engineered HCT116 UBE2C or UBE2S null cell lines. Using live cell assays, we show that UBE2C and UBE2S make a minor contribution to SAC silencing in HCT116 cells. Strikingly, in cells specifically lacking UBE2C, we observe a strong synergistic inhibition of mitotic progression when we stabilize the MCC on the APC/C by depleting APC15, potentially reflecting increased competition between the MCC and the remaining initiating E2 enzyme UBE2D. In conclusion, we provide in vivo insight into the APC/C E2 module and its interplay with SAC silencing components. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Colorectal Cancer Incidence and Mortality Disparities in New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, R. M.; Gonzales, M.; Wiggins, C. L.; Hoffman, R. M.

    2014-01-01

    Previous analyses indicated that New Mexican Hispanics and American Indians (AI) did not experience the declining colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality rates observed among non-Hispanic whites (NHW). We evaluated more recent data to determine whether racial/ethnic differences persisted. Methods. We used New Mexico Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results data from 1995 to 2009 to calculate age-specific incidence rates and age-adjusted incidence rates overall and by tumor stage. We calculated mortality rates using National Center for Health Statistics’ data. We used join point regression to determine annual percentage change (APC) in age-adjusted incidence rates. Analyses were stratified by race/ethnicity and gender. Results. Incidence rates continued declining in NHW (APC −1.45% men, −1.06% women), while non significantly increasing for AI (1.67% men, 1.26% women) and Hispanic women (0.24%). The APC initially increased in Hispanic men through 2001 (3.33%, P = 0.06), before declining (−3.10%, P = 0,003). Incidence rates declined in NHW and Hispanics aged 75 and older. Incidence rates for distant-stage cancer remained stable for all groups. Mortality rates declined significantly in NHW and Hispanics. Conclusions. Racial/ethnic disparities in CRC persist in New Mexico. Incidence differences could be related to risk factors or access to screening; mortality differences could be due to patterns of care for screening or treatment.

  3. APC: A New Code for Atmospheric Polarization Computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkin, Sergey V.; Lyapustin, Alexei I.; Rozanov, Vladimir V.

    2014-01-01

    A new polarized radiative transfer code Atmospheric Polarization Computations (APC) is described. The code is based on separation of the diffuse light field into anisotropic and smooth (regular) parts. The anisotropic part is computed analytically. The smooth regular part is computed numerically using the discrete ordinates method. Vertical stratification of the atmosphere, common types of bidirectional surface reflection and scattering by spherical particles or spheroids are included. A particular consideration is given to computation of the bidirectional polarization distribution function (BPDF) of the waved ocean surface.

  4. Detection of irradiated foods by the DEFT/APC method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuecel, P. K.; Koeseoglu, T.; Halkman, H. B. D.

    2009-01-01

    Irradiation technology is used to prevent the spoilage losses and to improve the hygienic quality of foods. Appropriate techniques for the detection of irradiated foods are needed to guarantee the proper consumer information and to facilitate the trade of irradiated foods. The characteristics of the microbial population of irradiated foods have been used for developing detection methods for irradiated foods. This microbiological method is based on the comparison of an aerobic plate count (APC) with a count obtained with the direct epifluorescent filter technique (DEFT) for the detection of irradiation of foodstuffs.

  5. Colorectal adenomatous polyposis syndromes: Genetic determinism, clinical presentation and recommendations for care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buecher, Bruno

    2016-02-01

    Colorectal adenomatous polyposis constitutes a diverse group of disorders with different modes of inheritance. Molecular diagnosis of this condition has become more complex. In fact, somatic mosaicism for APC mutations now appears to be more frequent than previously thought and rare germline alterations of this gene may be implicated in patients tested negative for "classical" APC mutations (point mutations and large genomic rearrangements). Moreover, the knowledge concerning several aspects of the MUTYH-associated polyposis has improved since its first description in 2002 and germline mutations in new genes have recently been implicated in some cases of unexplained adenomatous polyposis. Genetic testing in probands and their relatives should be conducted in the context of pre- and post-test genetic counseling. The recent advent of New Generation Sequencing (NGS) techniques affords the opportunity to rapidly screen patients for a comprehensive panel of colorectal cancer susceptibility genes in a cost-effective fashion. This type of approach will probably replace the classical sequential approach based on clinical presumptive diagnoses in the near future. The risk of colorectal cancer is very high in affected patients in the absence of appropriate care. Clinical management is complex and should be provided in centers with special expertise in these diseases. This review focuses on the various colorectal adenomatous polyposis syndromes with special attention to more innovative and important aspects. Copyright © 2015 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sensory neuropathy type IA Hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... expand/collapse boxes. Description Hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA is a condition characterized by nerve abnormalities in ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions HLRCC Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... expand/collapse boxes. Description Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer ( HLRCC ) is a disorder in which affected individuals ...

  8. [Paediatric retinal detachment and hereditary vitreoretinal disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, P

    2013-09-01

    The number of retinal detachments in children is very low in comparison to the number in adults. One predisposing factor for development of paediatric retinal detachment is suffering from hereditary vitreoretinal degeneration (e.g., Stickler syndrome, Wagner syndrome, Kniest dysplasia, familial exudative vitreoretinopathy, congenital X-linked retinoschisis, Knobloch syndrome, incontinentia pigmenti, Norrie disease). Hereditary vitreoretinopathies are characterised by an abnormal-appearing vitreous gel with associated retinal changes. In most of these eyes further ocular abnormalities can be diagnosed. A group of hereditary disorders is associated with characteristic systemic abnormalities. Allied conditions should be considered in the clinical diagnosis. Vitreoretinopathies are the most common cause of inherited retinal detachment. In most eyes primary vitrectomy is necessary, and disease-specific surgical treatment is discussed. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Pancreatic cancer risk in hereditary pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Ulrich Weiss

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is part of the body’s immune response in order to remove harmful stimuli – like pathogens, irritants or damaged cells - and start the healing process. Recurrent or chronic inflammation on the other side seems a predisposing factor for carcinogenesis and has been found associated with cancer development. In chronic pancreatitis mutations of the cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1 gene have been identified as risk factors of the disease. Hereditary pancreatitis is a rare cause of chronic pancreatic inflammation with an early onset, mostly during childhood. Hereditary pancreatitis often starts with recurrent episodes of acute pancreatitis and the clinical phenotype is not very much different from other etiologies of the disease. The long-lasting inflammation however generates a tumor promoting environment and represents a major risk factor for tumor development This review will reflect our knowledge concerning the specific risk of hereditary pancreatitis patients to develop pancreatic cancer.

  10. Synergistic inhibition of the APC/C by the removal of APC15 in HCT116 cells lacking UBE2C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garvanska, Dimitriya H; Larsen, Marie Sofie Yoo; Nilsson, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    that has been shown to depend on the APC/C E2 enzymes, UBE2C and UBE2S. Here we investigate the in vivo role of the APC/C E2 enzymes in SAC silencing using CRISPR/Cas9 genetically engineered HCT116 UBE2C or UBE2S null cell lines. Using live cell assays, we show that UBE2C and UBE2S make a minor...... contribution to SAC silencing in HCT116 cells. Strikingly in cells specifically lacking UBE2C, we observe a strong synergistic inhibition of mitotic progression when we stabilize the MCC on the APC/C by depleting APC15, potentially reflecting increased competition between the MCC and the remaining initiating E...

  11. Differential gene expression profile reveals deregulation of pregnancy specific β1 glycoprotein 9 early during colorectal carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallinger Steven

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background APC (Adenomatous polyposis coli plays an important role in the pathogenesis of both familial and sporadic colorectal cancer. Patients carrying germline APC mutations develop multiple colonic adenomas at younger age and higher frequency than non-carrier cases which indicates that silencing of one APC allele may be sufficient to initiate the transformation process. Methods To elucidate the biological dysregulation underlying adenoma formation we examined global gene expression profiles of adenomas and corresponding normal mucosa from an FAP patient. Differential expression of the most significant gene identified in this study was further validated by mRNA in situ hybridization, reverse transcriptase PCR and Northern blotting in different sets of adenomas, tumours and cancer cell lines. Results Eighty four genes were differentially expressed between all adenomas and corresponding normal mucosa, while only seven genes showed differential expression within the adenomas. The first group included pregnancy specific β-1 glycoprotein 9 (PSG9 (p PSG9 is a member of the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA/PSG family and is produced at high levels during pregnancy, mainly by syncytiotrophoblasts. Further analysis of sporadic and familial colorectal cancer confirmed that PSG9 is ectopically upregulated in vivo by cancer cells. In total, deregulation of PSG9 mRNA was detected in 78% (14/18 of FAP adenomas and 75% (45/60 of sporadic colorectal cancer cases tested. Conclusion Detection of PSG9 expression in adenomas, and at higher levels in FAP cases, indicates that germline APC mutations and defects in Wnt signalling modulate PSG9 expression. Since PSG9 is not found in the non-pregnant adult except in association with cancer, and it appears to be an early molecular event associated with colorectal cancer monitoring of its expression may be useful as a biomarker for the early detection of this disease.

  12. Therapeutic Strategies for Hereditary Kidney Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidana, Abhinav; Srinivasan, Ramaprasad

    2016-08-01

    The study of hereditary forms of kidney cancer has vastly increased our understanding of metabolic and genetic pathways involved in the development of both inherited and sporadic kidney cancers. The recognition that diverse molecular events drive different forms of kidney cancers has led to the preclinical and clinical development of specific pathway-directed strategies tailored to treat distinct subgroups of kidney cancer. Here, we describe the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of several different types of hereditary renal cancers, review their clinical characteristics, and summarize the treatment strategies for the management of these cancers.

  13. Diagnosis and management of hereditary hemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgia, Reena J; Brown, Kimberly

    2015-02-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis is a rare genetic disorder that can have significant clinical consequences. Hemochromatosis is associated with iron overload, and can initially be recognized through laboratory testing for serum ferritin and transferrin saturation. Genetic testing for the HFE mutation can be performed in patients with elevated iron indices and a suspicion for hemochromatosis or liver disease. The main pathway resulting in iron overload is through altered hepcidin levels. Treatment of patients with the clinical phenotype of hereditary hemochromatosis is commonly through phlebotomy for removal of excess iron stores. This article highlights the current information and data regarding the diagnosis and management of hemochromatosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Apc1 is required for maintenance of local brain organizers and dorsal midbrain survival.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paridaen, J.T.M.; Danesin, C.; Elas, A.T.; van de Water, S.G.P.; Houart, C.; Zivkovic, D.

    2009-01-01

    The tumor suppressor Apc1 is an intracellular antagonist of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway, which is vital for induction and patterning of the early vertebrate brain. However, its role in later brain development is less clear. Here, we examined the mechanisms underlying effects of an Apc1

  15. Effect of drying on leaching testing of treated municipal solid waste incineration APC-residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Y.; Hyks, Jiri; Astrup, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Air-pollution-control (APC) residues from waste incinerators are hazardous waste according to European legislation and must be treated prior to landfilling. Batch and column leaching data determine which type of landfill can receive the treated APC-residues. CEN standards are prescribed...

  16. REMOVAL OF ARSENIC IN DRINKING WATER: ARS CFU-50 APC ELECTROFLOCCULATION AND FILTRATION WATER TREATMENT SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    ETV testing of the ARS CFU-50 APC Electroflocculation and Filtration Water Treatment System (ARS CFU-50 APC) for arsenic removal was conducted at the Town of Bernalillo Well #3 site from April 18 through May 2, 2006. The source water was chlorinated groundwater from two supply w...

  17. APC sets the Wnt tone necessary for cerebral cortical progenitor development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Naoki; Li, Jingjun; Yabuno-Nakagawa, Keiko; Eom, Tae-Yeon; Cowles, Martis; Mapp, Tavien; Taylor, Robin; Anton, E S

    2017-08-15

    Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) regulates the activity of β-catenin, an integral component of Wnt signaling. However, the selective role of the APC-β-catenin pathway in cerebral cortical development is unknown. Here we genetically dissected the relative contributions of APC-regulated β-catenin signaling in cortical progenitor development, a necessary early step in cerebral cortical formation. Radial progenitor-specific inactivation of the APC-β-catenin pathway indicates that the maintenance of appropriate β-catenin-mediated Wnt tone is necessary for the orderly differentiation of cortical progenitors and the resultant formation of the cerebral cortex. APC deletion deregulates β-catenin, leads to high Wnt tone, and disrupts Notch1 signaling and primary cilium maintenance necessary for radial progenitor functions. β-Catenin deregulation directly disrupts cilium maintenance and signaling via Tulp3, essential for intraflagellar transport of ciliary signaling receptors. Surprisingly, deletion of β-catenin or inhibition of β-catenin activity in APC-null progenitors rescues the APC-null phenotype. These results reveal that APC-regulated β-catenin activity in cortical progenitors sets the appropriate Wnt tone necessary for normal cerebral cortical development. © 2017 Nakagawa et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  18. Tumour Suppressor Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) localisation is regulated by both Kinesin-1 and Kinesin-2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruane, Peter T; Gumy, Laura F; Bola, Becky; Anderson, Beverley; Wozniak, Marcin J; Hoogenraad, Casper C; Allan, Victoria J

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules and their associated proteins (MAPs) underpin the polarity of specialised cells. Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is one such MAP with a multifunctional agenda that requires precise intracellular localisations. Although APC has been found to associate with kinesin-2 subfamily members,

  19. The aPC treatment improves microcirculation in severe sepsis/septic shock syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donati, Abele; Damiani, Elisa; Botticelli, Laura; Adrario, Erica; Lombrano, Maria Rita; Domizi, Roberta; Marini, Benedetto; van Teeffelen, Jurgen W. G. E.; Carletti, Paola; Girardis, Massimo; Pelaia, Paolo; Ince, Can

    2013-01-01

    The role of recombinant activated protein C (aPC) during sepsis is still controversial. It showed anti-inflammatory effect and improved the microvascular perfusion in experimental models of septic shock. The present study was aimed at testing the hypothesis that recombinant aPC therapy improves the

  20. Development and validation of a simple questionnaire for the identification of hereditary breast cancer in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palmero Edenir I

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer is a significant public health problem worldwide and the development of tools to identify individuals at-risk for hereditary breast cancer syndromes, where specific interventions can be proposed to reduce risk, has become increasingly relevant. A previous study in Southern Brazil has shown that a family history suggestive of these syndromes may be prevalent at the primary care level. Development of a simple and sensitive instrument, easily applicable in primary care units, would be particularly helpful in underserved communities in which identification and referral of high-risk individuals is difficult. Methods A simple 7-question instrument about family history of breast, ovarian and colorectal cancer, FHS-7, was developed to screen for individuals with an increased risk for hereditary breast cancer syndromes. FHS-7 was applied to 9218 women during routine visits to primary care units in Southern Brazil. Two consecutive samples of 885 women and 910 women who answered positively to at least one question and negatively to all questions were included, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values were determined. Results Of the 885 women reporting a positive family history, 211 (23.8%; CI95%: 21.5–26.2 had a pedigree suggestive of a hereditary breast and/or breast and colorectal cancer syndrome. Using as cut point one positive answer, the sensitivity and specificity of the instrument were 87.6% and 56.4%, respectively. Concordance between answers in two different applications was given by a intra-class correlation (ICC of 0.84 for at least one positive answer. Temporal stability of the instrument was adequate (ICC = 0.65. Conclusion A simple instrument for the identification of the most common hereditary breast cancer syndrome phenotypes, showing good specificity and temporal stability was developed and could be used as a screening tool in primary care to refer at

  1. The CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazemalhosseini Mojarad, Ehsan; Kuppen, Peter Jk; Aghdaei, Hamid Asadzadeh; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2013-01-01

    It is clear that colorectal cancer (CRC) develops through multiple genetic and epigenetic pathways. These pathways may be determined on the basis of three molecular features: (i) mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes, leading to a DNA microsatellite instability (MSI) phenotype, (ii) mutations in APC and other genes that activate Wnt pathway, characterized by chromosomal instability (CIN) phenotype, and (iii) global genome hypermethylation, resulting in switch off of tumor suppressor genes, indicated as CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP). Each of these pathways is characterized by specific pathological features, mechanisms of carcinogenesis and process of tumor development. The molecular aspects of these pathways have been used clinically in the diagnosis, screening and management of patients with colorectal cancer. In this review we especially describe various aspects of CIMP, one of the important and rather recently discovered pathways that lead to colorectal cancer.

  2. Aberrant DNA methylation of WNT pathway genes in the development and progression of CIMP-negative colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galamb, Orsolya; Kalmár, Alexandra; Péterfia, Bálint; Csabai, István; Bodor, András; Ribli, Dezső; Krenács, Tibor; Patai, Árpád V; Wichmann, Barnabás; Barták, Barbara Kinga; Tóth, Kinga; Valcz, Gábor; Spisák, Sándor; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnár, Béla

    2016-08-02

    The WNT signaling pathway has an essential role in colorectal carcinogenesis and progression, which involves a cascade of genetic and epigenetic changes. We aimed to analyze DNA methylation affecting the WNT pathway genes in colorectal carcinogenesis in promoter and gene body regions using whole methylome analysis in 9 colorectal cancer, 15 adenoma, and 6 normal tumor adjacent tissue (NAT) samples by methyl capture sequencing. Functional methylation was confirmed on 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine-treated colorectal cancer cell line datasets. In parallel with the DNA methylation analysis, mutations of WNT pathway genes (APC, β-catenin/CTNNB1) were analyzed by 454 sequencing on GS Junior platform. Most differentially methylated CpG sites were localized in gene body regions (95% of WNT pathway genes). In the promoter regions, 33 of the 160 analyzed WNT pathway genes were differentially methylated in colorectal cancer vs. normal, including hypermethylated AXIN2, CHP1, PRICKLE1, SFRP1, SFRP2, SOX17, and hypomethylated CACYBP, CTNNB1, MYC; 44 genes in adenoma vs. NAT; and 41 genes in colorectal cancer vs. adenoma comparisons. Hypermethylation of AXIN2, DKK1, VANGL1, and WNT5A gene promoters was higher, while those of SOX17, PRICKLE1, DAAM2, and MYC was lower in colon carcinoma compared to adenoma. Inverse correlation between expression and methylation was confirmed in 23 genes, including APC, CHP1, PRICKLE1, PSEN1, and SFRP1. Differential methylation affected both canonical and noncanonical WNT pathway genes in colorectal normal-adenoma-carcinoma sequence. Aberrant DNA methylation appears already in adenomas as an early event of colorectal carcinogenesis.

  3. [Aspirin and colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grancher, Adrien; Michel, Pierre; Di Fiore, Frédéric; Sefrioui, David

    2018-02-01

    Colorectal cancer is a worldwide public health problem. Aspirin has been identified as a protective factor against the apparition of colorectal cancer. There are several mechanisms about the actions by aspirin on colorectal tumorogenesis. These are not perfectly known nowadays. On one hand, there are direct mechanisms on colorectal mucosa, on the other hand there are indirect mechanisms through platelet functions. Aspirin also plays a role by its anti-inflammatory action and the stimulation of antitumor immunity. Several studies show that long-term treatment with low-doses of aspirin decreases the incidence of adenomas and colorectal cancers. In the United States, aspirin is currently recommended for primary prevention of the risk of colorectal cancer in all patients aged 50 to 59, with a 10-year risk of cardiovascular event greater than 10 %. However, primary prevention with aspirin should not be a substitute for screening in colorectal cancer. Furthermore, aspirin seems to be beneficial when used in post-diagnosis of colorectal cancer. It could actually decrease the risk of metastasis in case of a localized colorectal cancer, and increase the survival in particular, concerning PIK3CA mutated tumors. The association of aspirin with neoadjuvant treatment of colorectal cancer by radiochimiotherapy seems to have beneficial effects. French prospective randomized study is currently being conducted to investigate postoperative aspirin in colorectal cancers with a PIK3CA mutation. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. APC senses cell-cell contacts and moves to the nucleus upon their disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocardo, M G; Bianchini, M; Radrizzani, M; Reyes, G B; Dugour, A V; Taminelli, G L; Gonzalez Solveyra, C; Santa-Coloma, T A

    2001-06-22

    The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor suppressor protein is involved in the Wnt/wingless pathway, modulating beta-catenin activity. We report the development of a highly specific, chemically synthesized oligobody (oligonucleotide-based synthetic antibody), directed against the N-terminal region of APC. Using this reagent, we found that within 16 h of disrupting HT-29 cell-cell contacts by harvesting cells with trypsin/EDTA treatment and replating, APC was translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Five days after plating the cells, when the cells had returned to their normal confluent phenotype and cell-cell contacts were reestablished, APC returned to the cytoplasm. These results suggest that APC functions as part of a "sensor" system, and responds to the loss of cell-cell contacts by moving to the nucleus, and returning to the cytoplasm when the contacts are fully restored. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  5. Critical Current Properties in Longitudinal Magnetic Field of YBCO Superconductor with APC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kido, R.; Kiuchi, M.; Otabe, E. S.; Matsushita, T.; Jha, A. K.; Matsumoto, K.

    The critical current density (Jc) properties of the Artificial Pinning Center (APC) introduced YBa2Cu3O7 (YBCO) films in the longitudinal magnetic field were measured. Y2O3 or Y2BaCuO5 (Y211) was introduced as APCs to YBCO, and YBCO films with APC were fabricated on SrTiO3 single crystal substrate. The sizes of Y2O3 and Y211 were 5-10 nm and 10-20 nm, respectively. As a result, Jc enhancement in the longitudinal magnetic field was observed in Y2O3 introduced YBCO films. However, it was not observed in Y211 introduced YBCO films. Therefore, it was considered that Jc properties in the longitudinal magnetic field were affected by introducing of small size APC, and it was necessary that APC does not disturb the current pathway in the superconductor.

  6. Precancerous Lesions in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fayez Sandouk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cause of cancer death in the world. The incidence rate (ASR and age distribution of this disease differ between most of African-Middle-Eastern (AMAGE and North America and Europe for many reasons. However, in all areas, “CRC” is considered as one of the most preventable cancers, because it might develop from variant processes like polyps and IBD in addition to the genetic pathogenesis which became very well known in this disease. We tried in this paper to review all the possible reasons of the differences in incidence and age between the west and AMAGE. Also we reviewed all the mutations that lead to the hereditary and familiar clustering of this disease with the correlations with the surrounding food and environment of different areas. Then, we focused on the precancerous pathology of this disease with special focusing on early detection depending on new endoscopy technology and most important genetic studies. We lastly reviewed the evidence of some of the surveillance and put suggestions about future surveillance programs and how important those programs are on the psychological aspect of the patients and their families.

  7. Lynch syndrome and Lynch syndrome mimics: The growing complex landscape of hereditary colon cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carethers, John M; Stoffel, Elena M

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) was previously synonymous with Lynch syndrome; however, identification of the role of germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes has made it possible to differentiate Lynch syndrome from other conditions associated with familial colorectal cancer (CRC). Broadly, HNPCC may be dichotomized into conditions that demonstrate defective DNA MMR and microsatellite instability (MSI) vs those conditions that demonstrate intact DNA MMR. Conditions characterized by MMR deficient CRCs include Lynch syndrome (germline MMR mutation), Lynch-like syndrome (biallelic somatic MMR mutations), constitutional MMR deficiency syndrome (biallelic germline MMR mutations), and sporadic MSI CRC (somatic biallelic methylation of MLH1). HNPCC conditions with intact DNA MMR associated with familial CRC include polymerase proofreading associated polyposis and familial colorectal cancer type X. Although next generation sequencing technologies have elucidated the genetic cause for some HNPCC conditions, others remain genetically undefined. Differentiating between Lynch syndrome and the other HNPCC disorders has profound implications for cancer risk assessment and surveillance of affected patients and their at-risk relatives. Clinical suspicion coupled with molecular tumor analysis and testing for germline mutations can help differentiate the clinical mimicry within HNPCC and facilitate diagnosis and management. PMID:26309352

  8. Lynch syndrome and Lynch syndrome mimics: The growing complex landscape of hereditary colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carethers, John M; Stoffel, Elena M

    2015-08-21

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) was previously synonymous with Lynch syndrome; however, identification of the role of germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes has made it possible to differentiate Lynch syndrome from other conditions associated with familial colorectal cancer (CRC). Broadly, HNPCC may be dichotomized into conditions that demonstrate defective DNA MMR and microsatellite instability (MSI) vs those conditions that demonstrate intact DNA MMR. Conditions characterized by MMR deficient CRCs include Lynch syndrome (germline MMR mutation), Lynch-like syndrome (biallelic somatic MMR mutations), constitutional MMR deficiency syndrome (biallelic germline MMR mutations), and sporadic MSI CRC (somatic biallelic methylation of MLH1). HNPCC conditions with intact DNA MMR associated with familial CRC include polymerase proofreading associated polyposis and familial colorectal cancer type X. Although next generation sequencing technologies have elucidated the genetic cause for some HNPCC conditions, others remain genetically undefined. Differentiating between Lynch syndrome and the other HNPCC disorders has profound implications for cancer risk assessment and surveillance of affected patients and their at-risk relatives. Clinical suspicion coupled with molecular tumor analysis and testing for germline mutations can help differentiate the clinical mimicry within HNPCC and facilitate diagnosis and management.

  9. Mismatch repair deficiency commonly precedes adenoma formation in Lynch Syndrome-Associated colorectal tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, Shigeki; Mori, Taisuke; Ogawa, Reiko; Tanaka, Masahiro; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Nakajima, Takeshi; Sugano, Kokichi; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Kato, Mamoru; Furukawa, Eisaku; Ochiai, Atsushi; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi

    2017-08-01

    Lynch syndrome is a cancer predisposition syndrome caused by germline mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes. MMR deficiency is a ubiquitous feature of Lynch syndrome-associated colorectal adenocarcinomas; however, it remains unclear when the MMR-deficient phenotype is acquired during tumorigenesis. To probe this issue, the present study examined genetic alterations and MMR statuses in Lynch syndrome-associated colorectal adenomas and adenocarcinomas, in comparison with sporadic adenomas. Among the Lynch syndrome-associated colorectal tumors, 68 of 86 adenomas (79%) and all adenocarcinomas were MMR-deficient, whereas all the sporadic adenomas were MMR-proficient, as determined by microsatellite instability testing and immunohistochemistry for MMR proteins. Sequencing analyses identified APC or CTNNB1 mutations in the majority of sporadic adenomas (58/84, 69%) and MMR-proficient Lynch syndrome-associated adenomas (13/18, 72%). However, MMR-deficient Lynch syndrome-associated adenomas had less APC or CTNNB1 mutations (25/68, 37%) and frequent frameshift RNF43 mutations involving mononucleotide repeats (45/68, 66%). Furthermore, frameshift mutations affecting repeat sequences constituted 14 of 26 APC mutations (54%) in MMR-deficient adenomas whereas these frameshift mutations were rare in MMR-proficient adenomas in patients with Lynch syndrome (1/12, 8%) and in sporadic adenomas (3/52, 6%). Lynch syndrome-associated adenocarcinomas exhibited mutation profiles similar to those of MMR-deficient adenomas. Considering that WNT pathway activation sufficiently drives colorectal adenoma formation, the distinct mutation profiles of WNT pathway genes in Lynch syndrome-associated adenomas suggest that MMR deficiency commonly precedes adenoma formation.

  10. Germline Missense Changes in the APC Gene and Their Relationship to Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Rodney J; Crooks, Renee; Rose, Lindy; Attia, John; Thakkinstian, Ammarin; Thomas, Lesley; Spigelman, Allan D; Meldrum, Cliff J

    2004-05-15

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is characterized by the presence of hundreds to thousands of adenomas that carpet the entire colon and rectum. Nonsense and frameshift mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene account for the majority of mutations identified to date and predispose primarily to the typical disease phenotype. Some APC mutations are associated with a milder form of the disease known as attenuated FAP. Virtually all mutations that have been described in the APC gene result in the formation of a premature stop codon and very little is known about missense mutations apart from a common Ashkenazi Jewish mutation (1307 K) and a British E1317Q missense change. The incidence of missense mutations in the APC gene has been underreported since the APC gene lends itself to analysis using an artificial transcription and translation assay known as the Protein Truncation Test (PTT) or the In Vitro Synthetic Protein assay (IVSP).In this report we have used denaturing high performance liquid chromatography to analyse the entire coding sequence of the APC gene to determine if a cohort of patients adhering to the diagnostic criteria of FAP to assess the frequency of missense mutations in the APC gene. Altogether 112 patients were studied and 22 missense mutations were identified. From the total of 22 missense changes, 13 were silent changes and the remaining 9 resulted in amino acid substitutions. One or more of these changes were identified multiple times in 62.5% of the population under study.The results reveal that missense mutations in the APC gene appear not to radically alter protein function but may be associated with more subtle processing of RNA transcripts which in turn could result in the expression of differentially spliced forms of the APC gene which may interfere with the functional activity of the APC protein.

  11. Germline Missense Changes in the APC Gene and Their Relationship to Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Rodney J

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP is characterized by the presence of hundreds to thousands of adenomas that carpet the entire colon and rectum. Nonsense and frameshift mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC gene account for the majority of mutations identified to date and predispose primarily to the typical disease phenotype. Some APC mutations are associated with a milder form of the disease known as attenuated FAP. Virtually all mutations that have been described in the APC gene result in the formation of a premature stop codon and very little is known about missense mutations apart from a common Ashkenazi Jewish mutation (1307 K and a British E1317Q missense change. The incidence of missense mutations in the APC gene has been underreported since the APC gene lends itself to analysis using an artificial transcription and translation assay known as the Protein Truncation Test (PTT or the In Vitro Synthetic Protein assay (IVSP. In this report we have used denaturing high performance liquid chromatography to analyse the entire coding sequence of the APC gene to determine if a cohort of patients adhering to the diagnostic criteria of FAP to assess the frequency of missense mutations in the APC gene. Altogether 112 patients were studied and 22 missense mutations were identified. From the total of 22 missense changes, 13 were silent changes and the remaining 9 resulted in amino acid substitutions. One or more of these changes were identified multiple times in 62.5% of the population under study. The results reveal that missense mutations in the APC gene appear not to radically alter protein function but may be associated with more subtle processing of RNA transcripts which in turn could result in the expression of differentially spliced forms of the APC gene which may interfere with the functional activity of the APC protein.

  12. CpG methylation of APC promoter 1A in sporadic and familial breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debouki-Joudi, Saoussen; Trifa, Fatma; Khabir, Abdelmajid; Sellami-Boudawara, Tahia; Frikha, Mounir; Daoud, Jamel; Mokdad-Gargouri, Raja

    2017-01-01

    Tumour suppressor gene (TSG) silencing through promoter hypermethylation plays an important role in cancer initiation. The aim of this study was to assess the extent of methylation of APC gene promoter in 91 sporadic and 44 familial cases of Tunisian patients with breast cancer (BC) in. The frequency of APC promoter methylation is somewhat similar for sporadic and familial breast cancer cases, (52.1%, and 54.5% respectively). For sporadic breast cancer patients, there was a significant correlation of APC promoter hypermethylation with TNM stage (p = 0.024) and 3-year survival (p = 0.025). Regarding the hormonal status (HR), we found significant association between negativity to PR and unmethylated APC (p= 0.005) while ER and Her2/neu are not correlated. Moreover, unmethylated APC promoter is more frequent in tumours expressing at least one out the 3 proteins compared to triple negative cases (p= 0.053). On the other hand, aberrant methylation of APC was associated with tumour size (p = 0.036), lymph node (p = 0.028), distant metastasis (p = 0.031), and 3-year survival (p = 0.046) in the group of patients with familial breast cancer. Moreover, patients with sporadic breast cancer displaying the unmethylated profile have a significant prolonged overall survival compared to those with the methylated pattern of APC promoter (p log rank = 0.008). Epigenetic change at the CpG islands in the APC promoter was associated with the silence of its transcript and the loss of protein expression suggesting that this event is the main mechanism regulating the APC expression in breast cancer. In conclusion, our data showed that the loss of APC through aberrant methylation is associated with the aggressive behavior of both sporadic and familial breast cancer in Tunisian patients.

  13. Protein kinase A antagonist inhibits β-catenin nuclear translocation, c-Myc and COX-2 expression and tumor promotion in ApcMin/+ mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brudvik Kristoffer W

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC protein is part of the destruction complex controlling proteosomal degradation of β-catenin and limiting its nuclear translocation, which is thought to play a gate-keeping role in colorectal cancer. The destruction complex is inhibited by Wnt-Frz and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 - PI-3 kinase pathways. Recent reports show that PGE2-induced phosphorylation of β-catenin by protein kinase A (PKA increases nuclear translocation indicating two mechanisms of action of PGE2 on β-catenin homeostasis. Findings Treatment of ApcMin/+ mice that spontaneously develop intestinal adenomas with a PKA antagonist (Rp-8-Br-cAMPS selectively targeting only the latter pathway reduced tumor load, but not the number of adenomas. Immunohistochemical characterization of intestines from treated and control animals revealed that expression of β-catenin, β-catenin nuclear translocation and expression of the β-catenin target genes c-Myc and COX-2 were significantly down-regulated upon Rp-8-Br-cAMPS treatment. Parallel experiments in a human colon cancer cell line (HCT116 revealed that Rp-8-Br-cAMPS blocked PGE2-induced β-catenin phosphorylation and c-Myc upregulation. Conclusion Based on our findings we suggest that PGE2 act through PKA to promote β-catenin nuclear translocation and tumor development in ApcMin/+ mice in vivo, indicating that the direct regulatory effect of PKA on β-catenin nuclear translocation is operative in intestinal cancer.

  14. Impact of Age on the Risk of Advanced Colorectal Neoplasia in a Young Population: An Analysis Using the Predicted Probability Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yoon Suk; Park, Chan Hyuk; Kim, Nam Hee; Lee, Mi Yeon; Park, Dong Il

    2017-09-01

    The incidence of colorectal cancer is decreasing in adults aged ≥50 years and increasing in those aged probability models for ACRN in a population aged 30-49 years. Of 96,235 participants, 57,635 and 38,600 were included in the derivation and validation cohorts, respectively. The predicted probability model considered age, sex, body mass index, family history of colorectal cancer, and smoking habits, as follows: Y ACRN  = -8.755 + 0.080·X age  - 0.055·X male  + 0.041·X BMI  + 0.200·X family_history_of_CRC  + 0.218·X former_smoker  + 0.644·X current_smoker . The optimal cutoff value for the predicted probability of ACRN by Youden index was 1.14%. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUROC) values of our model for ACRN were higher than those of the previously established Asia-Pacific Colorectal Screening (APCS), Korean Colorectal Screening (KCS), and Kaminski's scoring models [AUROC (95% confidence interval): model in the current study, 0.673 (0.648-0.697); vs. APCS, 0.588 (0.564-0.611), P probability model can assess the risk of ACRN more accurately than existing models, including the APCS, KCS, and Kaminski's scoring models.

  15. The function of BCL9 in Wnt/β-catenin signaling and colorectal cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, Marc de la; Worm, Jesper; Bienz, Mariann

    2008-01-01

    Most cases of colorectal cancer are initiated by hyperactivation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway due to mutations in the APC tumour suppressor, or in β-catenin itself. A recently discovered component of this pathway is Legless, which is essential for Wnt-induced transcription during Drosophila development. Limited functional information is available for its two mammalian relatives, BCL9 and B9L/BCL9-2: like Legless, these proteins bind to β-catenin, and RNAi-mediated depletion of B9L/BCL9-2 has revealed that this protein is required for efficient β-catenin-mediated transcription in mammalian cell lines. No loss-of-function data are available for BCL9. We have used overexpression of dominant-negative forms of BCL9, and RNAi-mediated depletion, to study its function in human cell lines with elevated Wnt pathway activity, including colorectal cancer cells. We found that BCL9 is required for efficient β-catenin-mediated transcription in Wnt-stimulated HEK 293 cells, and in the SW480 colorectal cancer cell line whose Wnt pathway is active due to APC mutation. Dominant-negative mutants of BCL9 indicated that its function depends not only on its β-catenin ligand, but also on an unknown ligand of its C-terminus. Finally, we show that BCL9 and B9L are both Wnt-inducible genes, hyperexpressed in colorectal cancer cell lines, indicating that they are part of a positive feedback loop. BCL9 is required for efficient β-catenin-mediated transcription in human cell lines whose Wnt pathway is active, including colorectal cancer cells, indicating its potential as a drug target in colorectal cancer

  16. Downregulation of the anaphase-promoting complex (APC)7 in invasive ductal carcinomas of the breast and its clinicopathologic relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Kwang-Hwa; Choi, Sung-E; Eom, Minseob; Kang, Yup

    2005-01-01

    The anaphase-promoting complex (APC) is a multiprotein complex with E3 ubiquitin ligase activity, which is required for the ubiquitination of securin and cyclin-B. Moreover, the mitotic spindle checkpoint is activated if APC activation is prevented. In addition, several APC-targeting molecules such as securin, polo-like kinase, aurora kinase, and SnoN have been reported to be oncogenes. Therefore, dysregulation of APC may be associated with tumorigenesis. However, the clinical significance and the involvement of APC in tumorigenesis have not been investigated. The expression of APC7 was immunohistochemically investigated in 108 invasive ductal carcinomas of the breast and its relationship with clinicopathologic parameters was examined. The expression of APC7 was defined as positive when the summed scores of staining intensities (0 to 3+) and stained proportions (0 to 3+) exceeded 3+. Positive APC7 expression was less frequent than its negative expression when histologic (P = 0.009) or nuclear grade (P = 0.009), or mitotic number (P = 0.0016) was elevated. The frequency of APC7 negative expression was higher in high Ki-67 or aneuploid groups than in low Ki-67 or diploid groups. These data show that loss of APC7 expression is more common in breast carcinoma cases with poor prognostic parameters or malignant characteristics. They therefore suggest that dysregulation of APC activity, possibly through downregulation of APC7, may be associated with tumorigenesis in breast cancer

  17. 75 FR 78246 - Medicare Program; Re-Chartering of the Advisory Panel on Ambulatory Payment Classification (APC...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-15

    ...] Medicare Program; Re-Chartering of the Advisory Panel on Ambulatory Payment Classification (APC) Groups... announces the re-chartering of the Advisory Panel on Ambulatory Payment Classification (APC) Groups (the... (APC) groups and their associated weights established under the Medicare hospital Outpatient...

  18. Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura Misdiagnosed as Hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Michelle Fog; Bygum, Anette

    2015-01-01

    however not always have to be caused by angioedema but can relate to other concomitant disorders. In this report we are focusing on misdiagnosis in a patient with known hereditary angioedema, whose bleeding episode caused by idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura was mistaken for an acute attack...

  19. Hereditary spherocytosis: Consequences of delayed diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah C Steward

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine whether patients with undiagnosed hereditary spherocytosis hospitalized for transfusions might have avoided hospitalization via earlier diagnosis. Study design: Charts of all (N = 30 patients with hereditary spherocytosis seen in pediatric hematology at West Virginia University-Charleston were reviewed. Family and transfusion history and presence of neonatal jaundice were recorded. Complete blood count and reticulocyte values during infancy were available for 20 of 30 patients, while baseline steady-state values were available for all 30. Results: Transfusions were given to 22 patients; 12 of 14 with an aplastic crisis were undiagnosed. In 10 of 12, the severity of anemia led to hospitalization (3 to intensive care. All 10 had prior mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration and/or red cell distribution width elevations and a history of neonatal jaundice; 7 of 10 had a positive family history. Conclusions: Undiagnosed hereditary spherocytosis may lead to inpatient transfusions for severe anemia. Earlier detection of hereditary spherocytosis is easily achievable and may reduce hospitalizations via closer monitoring.

  20. Major and minor form of hereditary hyperekplexia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijssen, MAJ; Vergouwe, MN; van Dijk, JG; Rees, M; Frants, RR; Brown, P

    Hyperekplexia is a hereditary neurological disorder characterized by excessive startle responses. Within the disorder two clinical forms can be distinguished. The major form is characterized by continuous generalized stiffness in the first year of life and an exaggerated startle reflex, accompanied

  1. MRI in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthews, Lucy; Enzinger, Christian; Fazekas, Franz

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and a multiple sclerosis (MS)-like illness appear to coexist 50 times more frequently than would be expected by chance. This association of LHON and MS (LMS) raises an important question about whether there could be a common pathophysiological...

  2. Autosomal dominant hereditary ataxia in Sri Lanka

    OpenAIRE

    Sumathipala, Dulika S; Abeysekera, Gayan S; Jayasekara, Rohan W; Tallaksen, Chantal ME; Dissanayake, Vajira HW

    2013-01-01

    Background Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA) are a group of hereditary neurodegenerative disorders. Prevalence of SCA subtypes differ worldwide. Autosomal dominant ataxias are the commonest types of inherited ataxias seen in Sri Lanka. The aim of the study is to determine the genetic etiology of patients with autosomal dominant ataxia in Sri Lanka and to describe the clinical features of each genetic subtype. Methods ...

  3. Hereditary hemochromatosis: An opportunity for gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FERNANDO EZQUER

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Levels of body iron should be tightly controlled to prevent the formation of oxygen radicals, lipoperoxidation, genotoxicity, and the production of cytotoxic cytokines, which result in damage to a number of organs. Enterocytes in the intestinal villae are involved in the apical uptake of iron from the intestinal lumen; iron is further exported from the cells into the circulation. The apical divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1 transports ferrous iron from the lumen into the cells, while the basolateral transporter ferroportin extrudes iron from the enterocytes into the circulation. Patients with hereditary hemochromatosis display an accelerated transepithelial uptake of iron, which leads to body iron accumulation that results in cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, pancreatitis, and cardiomyopathy. Hereditary hemochromatosis, a recessive genetic condition, is the most prevalent genetic disease in Caucasians, with a prevalence of one in 300 subjects. The majority of patients with hereditary hemochromatosis display mutations in the gene coding for HFE, a protein that normally acts as an inhibitor of transepithelial iron transport. We discuss the different control points in the homeostasis of iron and the different mutations that exist in patients with hereditary hemochromatosis. These control sites may be influenced by gene therapeutic approaches; one general therapy for hemochromatosis of different etiologies is the inhibition of DMT1 synthesis by antisense-generating genes, which has been shown to markedly inhibit apical iron uptake by intestinal epithelial cells. We further discuss the most promising strategies to develop gene vectors and deliver them into enterocytes

  4. Epidemiology of Non-hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Flemming; Attermann, Jorn; Linneberg, Allan

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of non-hereditary angioedema was investigated in a general population sample (n = 7,931) and in a sample of Danish patients (n = 7,433) tested for deficiency of functional complement C1 esterase inhibitor protein (functional C1 INH). The general population sample (44% response rate...

  5. Epidemiology of Non-hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Flemming; Attermann, Jørn; Linneberg, Allan

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of non-hereditary angioedema was investigated in a general population sample (n¿=¿7,931) and in a sample of Danish patients (n¿=¿7,433) tested for deficiency of functional complement C1 esterase inhibitor protein (functional C1 INH). The general population sample (44% response rate...

  6. Revisited diagnostics of hereditary epidermolysis bullosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Albanova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary epidermolysis bullosa is a big group of hereditary diseases with the main manifestations in the form of blisters on the skin and mucous coat after slight mechanical injuries. It is not always possible to diagnose this disease based on the clinical picture. The article discusses current laboratory diagnostics methods for hereditary epidermolysis bullosa including immunofluorescence antigen mapping (IFM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and genetic analysis (molecular or DNA diagnostics as well as their advantages and disadvantages. TEM determines the micro splitting level and nature of ultrafine changes in the area of the dermoepidermal junction; at the same time, such tests need special expensive equipment. Substantial experience is also needed to analyze the resulting submicroscopic images. IFM determines whether expression of the affected protein related to the disease development is reduced or absent; however, invalid (false positive or false negative results can be obtained in patients with the reduced expression of the affected protein. Genetic analysis plays a key role for prenatal diagnostics. Therefore, to make an exact diagnosis of hereditary epidermolysis bullosa, it is expedient to apply IFM, TEM and genetic analysis. The need to set an exact diagnosis of the disease is related to the fact that the promising treatment methods being currently developed are aimed at treating patients with certain forms of the disease.

  7. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia clinical and molecular genetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Letteboer, T.G.W.

    2010-01-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) or Rendu-Osler-Weber (ROW) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by vascular malformations in multiple organ systems. HHT has an age-related penetrance and variable clinical expression. The clinical symptoms are caused by direct

  8. Colorectal Cancer: A Personal Journey

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer: A Personal Journey Past Issues / Summer 2016 Table ... Carmen Marc Valvo is an outspoken voice for colorectal cancer screening. Photo Courtesy of: Phil Fisch Photography Designer ...

  9. Molecular Diagnostics in Colorectal Carcinoma: Advances and Applications for 2018.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Amarpreet; Zulfiqar, Muhammad; Bluth, Martin H

    2018-06-01

    The molecular pathogenesis and classification of colorectal carcinoma are based on the traditional adenomaecarcinoma sequence, serrated polyp pathway, and microsatellite instability (MSI). The genetic basis for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer is the detection of mutations in the MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2, and EPCAM genes. Genetic testing for Lynch syndrome includes MSI testing, methylator phenotype testing, BRAF mutation testing, and molecular testing for germline mutations in MMR genes. Molecular makers with predictive and prognostic implications include quantitative multigene reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay and KRAS and BRAF mutation analysis. Mismatch repair-deficient tumors have higher rates of programmed death-ligand 1 expression. Cell-free DNA analysis in fluids are proving beneficial for diagnosis and prognosis in these disease states towards effective patient management. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Apc1 is required for maintenance of local brain organizers and dorsal midbrain survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paridaen, Judith T M L; Danesin, Catherine; Elas, Abu Tufayal; van de Water, Sandra; Houart, Corinne; Zivkovic, Danica

    2009-07-15

    The tumor suppressor Apc1 is an intracellular antagonist of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway, which is vital for induction and patterning of the early vertebrate brain. However, its role in later brain development is less clear. Here, we examined the mechanisms underlying effects of an Apc1 zygotic-effect mutation on late brain development in zebrafish. Apc1 is required for maintenance of established brain subdivisions and control of local organizers such as the isthmic organizer (IsO). Caudal expansion of Fgf8 from IsO into the cerebellum is accompanied by hyperproliferation and abnormal cerebellar morphogenesis. Loss of apc1 results in reduced proliferation and apoptosis in the dorsal midbrain. Mosaic analysis shows that Apc is required cell-autonomously for maintenance of dorsal midbrain cell fate. The tectal phenotype occurs independently of Fgf8-mediated IsO function and is predominantly caused by stabilization of beta-catenin and subsequent hyperactivation of Wnt/beta-catenin signalling, which is mainly mediated through LEF1 activity. Chemical activation of the Wnt/beta-catenin in wild-type embryos during late brain maintenance stages phenocopies the IsO and tectal phenotypes of the apc mutants. These data demonstrate that Apc1-mediated restriction of Wnt/beta-catenin signalling is required for maintenance of local organizers and tectal integrity.

  11. PLK1 has tumor-suppressive potential in APC-truncated colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raab, Monika; Sanhaji, Mourad; Matthess, Yves; Hörlin, Albrecht; Lorenz, Ioana; Dötsch, Christina; Habbe, Nils; Waidmann, Oliver; Kurunci-Csacsko, Elisabeth; Firestein, Ron; Becker, Sven; Strebhardt, Klaus

    2018-03-16

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) acts as a molecular safeguard in ensuring faithful chromosome transmission during mitosis, which is regulated by a complex interplay between phosphatases and kinases including PLK1. Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) germline mutations cause aneuploidy and are responsible for familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Here we study the role of PLK1 in colon cancer cells with chromosomal instability promoted by APC truncation (APC-ΔC). The expression of APC-ΔC in colon cells reduces the accumulation of mitotic cells upon PLK1 inhibition, accelerates mitotic exit and increases the survival of cells with enhanced chromosomal abnormalities. The inhibition of PLK1 in mitotic, APC-∆C-expressing cells reduces the kinetochore levels of Aurora B and hampers the recruitment of SAC component suggesting a compromised mitotic checkpoint. Furthermore, Plk1 inhibition (RNAi, pharmacological compounds) promotes the development of adenomatous polyps in two independent Apc Min/+ mouse models. High PLK1 expression increases the survival of colon cancer patients expressing a truncated APC significantly.

  12. APC loss in breast cancer leads to doxorubicin resistance via STAT3 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanKlompenberg, Monica K; Leyden, Emily; Arnason, Anne H; Zhang, Jian-Ting; Stefanski, Casey D; Prosperi, Jenifer R

    2017-11-28

    Resistance to chemotherapy is one of the leading causes of death from breast cancer. We recently established that loss of Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) in the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus - Polyoma middle T (MMTV-PyMT) transgenic mouse model results in resistance to cisplatin or doxorubicin-induced apoptosis. Herein, we aim to establish the mechanism that is responsible for APC-mediated chemotherapeutic resistance. Our data demonstrate that MMTV-PyMT; Apc Min/+ cells have increased signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) activation. STAT3 can be constitutively activated in breast cancer, maintains the tumor initiating cell (TIC) population, and upregulates multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1). The activation of STAT3 in the MMTV-PyMT; Apc Min/+ model is independent of interleukin 6 (IL-6); however, enhanced EGFR expression in the MMTV-PyMT; Apc Min/+ cells may be responsible for the increased STAT3 activation. Inhibiting STAT3 with a small molecule inhibitor A69 in combination with doxorubicin, but not cisplatin, restores drug sensitivity. A69 also decreases doxorubicin enhanced MDR1 gene expression and the TIC population enhanced by loss of APC. In summary, these results have revealed the molecular mechanisms of APC loss in breast cancer that can guide future treatment plans to counteract chemotherapeutic resistance.

  13. The APC/C E3 Ligase Complex Activator FZR1 Restricts BRAF Oncogenic Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Lixin; Chen, Ming; Cao, Juxiang; Dai, Xiangpeng; Yin, Qing; Zhang, Jinfang; Song, Su-Jung; Lu, Ying; Liu, Jing; Inuzuka, Hiroyuki; Katon, Jesse M; Berry, Kelsey; Fung, Jacqueline; Ng, Christopher; Liu, Pengda; Song, Min Sup; Xue, Lian; Bronson, Roderick T; Kirschner, Marc W; Cui, Rutao; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Wei, Wenyi

    2017-04-01

    BRAF drives tumorigenesis by coordinating the activation of the RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK oncogenic signaling cascade. However, upstream pathways governing BRAF kinase activity and protein stability remain undefined. Here, we report that in primary cells with active APC FZR1 , APC FZR1 earmarks BRAF for ubiquitination-mediated proteolysis, whereas in cancer cells with APC-free FZR1, FZR1 suppresses BRAF through disrupting BRAF dimerization. Moreover, we identified FZR1 as a direct target of ERK and CYCLIN D1/CDK4 kinases. Phosphorylation of FZR1 inhibits APC FZR1 , leading to elevation of a cohort of oncogenic APC FZR1 substrates to facilitate melanomagenesis. Importantly, CDK4 and/or BRAF/MEK inhibitors restore APC FZR1 E3 ligase activity, which might be critical for their clinical effects. Furthermore, FZR1 depletion cooperates with AKT hyperactivation to transform primary melanocytes, whereas genetic ablation of Fzr1 synergizes with Pten loss, leading to aberrant coactivation of BRAF/ERK and AKT signaling in mice. Our findings therefore reveal a reciprocal suppression mechanism between FZR1 and BRAF in controlling tumorigenesis. Significance: FZR1 inhibits BRAF oncogenic functions via both APC-dependent proteolysis and APC-independent disruption of BRAF dimers, whereas hyperactivated ERK and CDK4 reciprocally suppress APC FZR1 E3 ligase activity. Aberrancies in this newly defined signaling network might account for BRAF hyperactivation in human cancers, suggesting that targeting CYCLIN D1/CDK4, alone or in combination with BRAF/MEK inhibition, can be an effective anti-melanoma therapy. Cancer Discov; 7(4); 424-41. ©2017 AACR. See related commentary by Zhang and Bollag, p. 356 This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 339 . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. Diet- and Genetically-Induced Obesity Differentially Affect the Fecal Microbiome and Metabolome in Apc1638N Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfalzer, Anna C; Nesbeth, Paula-Dene C; Parnell, Laurence D; Iyer, Lakshmanan K; Liu, Zhenhua; Kane, Anne V; Chen, C-Y Oliver; Tai, Albert K; Bowman, Thomas A; Obin, Martin S; Mason, Joel B; Greenberg, Andrew S; Choi, Sang-Woon; Selhub, Jacob; Paul, Ligi; Crott, Jimmy W

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC), and alterations in the colonic microbiome and metabolome may be mechanistically involved in this relationship. The relative contribution of diet and obesity per se are unclear. We compared the effect of diet- and genetically-induced obesity on the intestinal microbiome and metabolome in a mouse model of CRC. Apc1638N mice were made obese by either high fat (HF) feeding or the presence of the Leprdb/db (DbDb) mutation. Intestinal tumors were quantified and stool microbiome and metabolome were profiled. Genetic obesity, and to a lesser extent HF feeding, promoted intestinal tumorigenesis. Each induced distinct microbial patterns: taxa enriched in HF were mostly Firmicutes (6 of 8) while those enriched in DbDb were split between Firmicutes (7 of 12) and Proteobacteria (5 of 12). Parabecteroides distasonis was lower in tumor-bearing mice and its abundance was inversely associated with colonic Il1b production (pmetabolome. A depletion of adenosine and P.distasonis in tumor-bearing mice could play a mechanistic role in tumor formation. Adenosine and P. distasonis have previously been shown to be anti-inflammatory in the colon and we postulate their reduction could promote tumorigenesis by de-repressing inflammation.

  15. Comparison Study of MS-HRM and Pyrosequencing Techniques for Quantification of APC and CDKN2A Gene Methylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migheli, Francesca; Stoccoro, Andrea; Coppedè, Fabio; Wan Omar, Wan Adnan; Failli, Alessandra; Consolini, Rita; Seccia, Massimo; Spisni, Roberto; Miccoli, Paolo; Mathers, John C.; Migliore, Lucia

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the development of cost-effective techniques for the quantification of DNA methylation biomarkers. We analyzed 90 samples of surgically resected colorectal cancer tissues for APC and CDKN2A promoter methylation using methylation sensitive-high resolution melting (MS-HRM) and pyrosequencing. MS-HRM is a less expensive technique compared with pyrosequencing but is usually more limited because it gives a range of methylation estimates rather than a single value. Here, we developed a method for deriving single estimates, rather than a range, of methylation using MS-HRM and compared the values obtained in this way with those obtained using the gold standard quantitative method of pyrosequencing. We derived an interpolation curve using standards of known methylated/unmethylated ratio (0%, 12.5%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of methylation) to obtain the best estimate of the extent of methylation for each of our samples. We observed similar profiles of methylation and a high correlation coefficient between the two techniques. Overall, our new approach allows MS-HRM to be used as a quantitative assay which provides results which are comparable with those obtained by pyrosequencing. PMID:23326336

  16. Polyyne-Enriched Extract from Oplopanax elatus Significantly Ameliorates the Progression of Colon Carcinogenesis in ApcMin/+ Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Qiao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cancer in the world. Oplopanax elatus is widely used in traditional medicine. However, little is known about its pharmacological effects and bioactive compounds. We evaluated the effects of the polyyne-enriched extract from O. elatus (PEO on the progression of colon carcinogenesis in ApcMin/+ mice. In addition, these effects were also investigated in HCT116 and SW480 cells. After PEO oral administration (0.2% diet for 12 weeks, PEO significantly improved body weight changes and reduced the tumor burden and tumor multiplicity compared with the untreated mice. Meanwhile, western blot and immunohistochemistry results showed PEO significantly reduced the expression of β-catenin and cyclinD1 in both small intestine and the colon tissues compared with the untreated mice. In addition, PEO treatment significant decreased the cell viability in both HCT116 and SW480 cell lines. It also decreased the levels of β-catenin, cyclinD1, c-myc and p-GSK-3β in HCT116 and SW480 cells at 25 μM. These results indicate that PEO may have potential value in prevention of colon cancer by down-regulating Wnt-related protein.

  17. Metachronous colorectal carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Steffen; Svendsen, L B; Mellemgaard, A

    1990-01-01

    During the period 1943-67, 903 Danish patients aged less than 40 years had colorectal carcinoma. The patients were followed up for up to 41 years and during this period 44 of 501 (9 per cent) operated on for cure developed a metachronous colorectal carcinoma. The cumulative risk of a metachronous...... colorectal carcinoma was 30 per cent after up to 41 years of observation. The occurrence of a metachronous colorectal carcinoma was evenly distributed in the observation period. The cumulative survival rate after operation for a metachronous colorectal carcinoma was 41 per cent after 20 years of observation....... We propose a lifelong follow-up programme after resection of colorectal carcinoma for cure in this age group, including annual Hemoccult test and colonoscopy at 3-year intervals....

  18. Stabilization of APC residues from waste incineration with ferrous sulfate on a semi-industrial scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundtorp, Kasper; Jensen, Dorthe Lærke; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2002-01-01

    A stabilization method for air pollution control (APC) residues from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) involving mixing of the residue with water and FeSO4 has been demonstrated on a semi-industrial scale on three types of APC residues: a semidy (SD) APC residue, a fly ash (FA), and an FA...... mixed with sludge (FAS) from a wet flue gas cleaning system. The process was performed in batches of 165-175 kg residue. It generates a wastewater that is highly saline but has a low content of heavy metals such as Cd, Cr, and Pb. The stabilized and raw residues have been subject to a range of leaching...

  19. Epigenetics and Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Victoria Valinluck; Grady, William M.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths in the world. It results from an accumulation of genetic and epigenetic changes in colon epithelial cells that transforms them into adenocarcinomas. There have been major advances in our understanding of cancer epigenetics over the last decade, particularly regarding aberrant DNA methylation. Assessment of the colon cancer epigenome has revealed that virtually all colorectal cancers have aberrantly methylated genes and the average colorectal cancer methylome has hundreds to thousands of abnormally methylated genes. As with gene mutations in the cancer genome, a subset of these methylated genes, called driver genes, is presumed to play a functional role in colorectal cancer. The assessment of methylated genes in colorectal cancers has also revealed a unique molecular subgroup of colorectal cancers called CpG Island Methylator Phenotype (CIMP) cancers; these tumors have a particularly high frequency of methylated genes. The advances in our understanding of aberrant methylation in colorectal cancer has led to epigenetic alterations being developed as clinical biomarkers for diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic applications. Progress in the assessment of epigenetic alterations in colorectal cancer and their clinical applications has shown that these alterations will be commonly used in the near future as molecular markers to direct the prevention and treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:22009203

  20. Three molecular pathways model colorectal carcinogenesis in Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahadova, Aysel; Gallon, Richard; Gebert, Johannes; Ballhausen, Alexej; Endris, Volker; Kirchner, Martina; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Burn, John; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Bläker, Hendrik; Kloor, Matthias

    2018-07-01

    Lynch syndrome is caused by germline mutations of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. MMR deficiency has long been regarded as a secondary event in the pathogenesis of Lynch syndrome colorectal cancers. Recently, this concept has been challenged by the discovery of MMR-deficient crypt foci in the normal mucosa. We aimed to reconstruct colorectal carcinogenesis in Lynch syndrome by collecting molecular and histology evidence from Lynch syndrome adenomas and carcinomas. We determined the frequency of MMR deficiency in adenomas from Lynch syndrome mutation carriers by immunohistochemistry and by systematic literature analysis. To trace back the pathways of pathogenesis, histological growth patterns and mutational signatures were analyzed in Lynch syndrome colorectal cancers. Literature and immunohistochemistry analysis demonstrated MMR deficiency in 491 (76.7%) out of 640 adenomas (95% CI: 73.3% to 79.8%) from Lynch syndrome mutation carriers. Histologically normal MMR-deficient crypts were found directly adjacent to dysplastic adenoma tissue, proving their role as tumor precursors in Lynch syndrome. Accordingly, mutation signature analysis in Lynch colorectal cancers revealed that KRAS and APC mutations commonly occur after the onset of MMR deficiency. Tumors lacking evidence of polypous growth frequently presented with CTNNB1 and TP53 mutations. Our findings demonstrate that Lynch syndrome colorectal cancers can develop through three pathways, with MMR deficiency commonly representing an early and possibly initiating event. This underlines that targeting MMR-deficient cells by chemoprevention or vaccines against MMR deficiency-induced frameshift peptide neoantigens holds promise for tumor prevention in Lynch syndrome. © 2018 UICC.

  1. Hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome due to a BMPR1A mutation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Riordan, J M

    2010-06-01

    The conditions Juvenile Polyposis Syndrome (JPS) and Hereditary Mixed Polyposis Syndrome (HMPS) are associated with an increased risk of colorectal carcinoma. The genetic mechanisms which explain these conditions have until recently been poorly understood. Recent interest has focused on the transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta signalling pathway and, in particular, on mutations in the SMAD4 gene. However, not all cases of JPS and HMPS have mutations in SMAD4 and focus has now shifted to other components of the TGF-beta pathway to clarify the genetic mechanisms involved in these conditions. In this report, we describe the significance of a bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 1A gene mutation in an Irish family.

  2. Hereditary noetherian prime rings and idealizers

    CERN Document Server

    Levy, Lawrence S

    2011-01-01

    The direct sum behaviour of its projective modules is a fundamental property of any ring. Hereditary Noetherian prime rings are perhaps the only noncommutative Noetherian rings for which this direct sum behaviour (for both finitely and infinitely generated projective modules) is well-understood, yet highly nontrivial. This book surveys material previously available only in the research literature. It provides a re-worked and simplified account, with improved clarity, fresh insights and many original results about finite length modules, injective modules and projective modules. It culminates in the authors' surprisingly complete structure theorem for projective modules which involves two independent additive invariants: genus and Steinitz class. Several applications demonstrate its utility. The theory, extending the well-known module theory of commutative Dedekind domains and of hereditary orders, develops via a detailed study of simple modules. This relies upon the substantial account of idealizer subrings wh...

  3. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with cerebellar ataxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J E; Johnsen, B; Koefoed, P

    2004-01-01

    Complex forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are rare and usually transmitted in an autosomal recessive pattern. A family of four generations with autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) and a complex phenotype with variably expressed co-existing ataxia, dysarthria......, unipolar depression, epilepsy, migraine, and cognitive impairment was investigated. Genetic linkage analysis and sequencing of the SPG4 gene was performed and electrophysiologic investigations were carried out in six individuals and positron emission tomography (PET) in one patient. The disease was linked...... in those individuals who were clinically affected by a complex phenotype consisting of HSP and cerebellar ataxia. Other features noted in this kindred including epilepsy, cognitive impairment, depression, and migraine did not segregate with the HSP phenotype or mutation, and therefore the significance...

  4. Hereditary Transthyretin Amyloidosis in Eight Chinese Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-Chao Meng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mutations of transthyretin (TTR cause the most common type of autosomal-dominant hereditary systemic amyloidosis, which occurs worldwide. To date, more and more mutations in the TTR gene have been reported. Some variations in the clinical presentation are often observed in patients with the same mutation or the patients in the same family. The purpose of this study was to find out the clinicopathologic and genetic features of Chinese patients with hereditary TTR amyloidosis. Methods: Clinical and necessary examination materials were collected from nine patients of eight families with hereditary TTR amyloidosis at Peking University First Hospital from January 2007 to November 2014. Sural nerve biopsies were taken for eight patients and skin biopsies were taken in the calf/upper arm for two patients, for light and electron microscopy examination. The TTR genes from the nine patients were analyzed. Results: The onset age varied from 23 to 68 years. The main manifestations were paresthesia, proximal and/or distal weakness, autonomic dysfunction, cardiomyopathy, vitreous opacity, hearing loss, and glossohypertrophia. Nerve biopsy demonstrated severe loss of myelinated fibers in seven cases and amyloid deposits in three. One patient had skin amyloid deposits which were revealed from electron microscopic examination. Genetic analysis showed six kinds of mutations of TTR gene, including Val30Met, Phe33Leu, Ala36Pro, Val30Ala, Phe33Val, and Glu42Gly in exon 2. Conclusions: Since the pathological examinations of sural nerve were negative for amyloid deposition in most patients, the screening for TTR mutations should be performed in all the adult patients, who are clinically suspected with hereditary TTR amyloidosis.

  5. Multiple Hereditary Osteochondromatosis: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    K???kesmen, ?i?dem; ?zen, Bu?ra; Ak?am, Mustafa

    2007-01-01

    Objectives Common carious lesions owing to vomiting are not widespread in children. In this case, we aimed to report an 11-years-old male patient with common carious lesions due to repeated vomitings, chewing and eating difficulty and retarded growth with Multiple Hereditary Osteochondromatosis (MHO). Case Report An 11-years-old boy was referred to Department of Pediatric Dentistry in Faculty of Dentistry because of eating difficulty owing to common carious lesions. It was seen that the patie...

  6. Mania associated with complicated hereditary spastic paraparesis

    OpenAIRE

    Raghavendra B Nayak; Govind S Bhogale; Nanasaheb M Patil; Aditya A Pandurangi

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraparesis (HSP) is an inherited group of neurological disorders with progressive lower limb spasticity. HSP can be clinically grouped into pure and complicated forms. Pure HSP is one without any associated neurological/psychiatric comorbidity. Depression is the most common psychiatric comorbidity. Presence of mania or bipolar affective illness with HSP is a rare phenomenon. We report a case of a 17-year-old boy who presented with classical features of HSP with complaints ...

  7. Cellular Pathways of Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia*

    OpenAIRE

    Blackstone, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Human voluntary movement is controlled by the pyramidal motor system, a long CNS pathway comprising corticospinal and lower motor neurons. Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are a large, genetically diverse group of inherited neurologic disorders characterized by a length-dependent distal axonopathy of the corticospinal tracts, resulting in lower limb spasticity and weakness. A range of studies are converging on alterations in the shaping of organelles, particularly the endoplasmic reticul...

  8. Current problems in haematology. 2: Hereditary spherocytosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Smedley, J C; Bellingham, A J

    1991-01-01

    Hereditary spherocytosis is a relatively common haematological disorder and will be encountered by all haematologists. The abundance of new information, dealing principally with molecular and genetic aspects of pathophysiology, is beginning to have implications for its investigation and management. While these advances have not yet exerted a large influence at therapeutic level, the promise of such advents as prenatal diagnosis make this an exciting field to watch.

  9. Multimodality imaging features of hereditary multiple exostoses

    OpenAIRE

    Kok, H K; Fitzgerald, L; Campbell, N; Lyburn, I D; Munk, P L; Buckley, O; Torreggiani, W C

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary multiple exostoses (HME) or diaphyseal aclasis is an inherited disorder characterised by the formation of multiple osteochondromas, which are cartilage-capped osseous outgrowths, and the development of associated osseous deformities. Individuals with HME may be asymptomatic or develop clinical symptoms, which prompt imaging studies. Different modalities ranging from plain radiographs to cross-sectional and nuclear medicine imaging studies can be helpful in the diagnosis and detecti...

  10. Pancreatic cancer risk in hereditary pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Weiss, Frank U.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is part of the body’s immune response in order to remove harmful stimuli – like pathogens, irritants or damaged cells - and start the healing process. Recurrent or chronic inflammation on the other side seems a predisposing factor for carcinogenesis and has been found associated with cancer development. In chronic pancreatitis mutations of the cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) gene have been identified as risk factors of the disease. Hereditary pancreatitis is a rare cause of chronic...

  11. Disease expression in women with hereditary angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouillet, Laurence; Longhurst, Hilary; Boccon-Gibod, Isabelle

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Fluctuations in sex hormones can trigger angioedema attacks in women with hereditary angioedema. Combined oral contraceptive therapies, as well as pregnancy, can induce severe attacks. The course of angioedema may be very variable in different women. STUDY DESIGN: Within the PREHAEAT p......-sensitive phenotype for some patients. CONCLUSION: The course of angioedema in women with C1 inhibitor deficiency is affected by physiologic hormonal changes; consequently, physicians should take these into account when advising on management.......OBJECTIVE: Fluctuations in sex hormones can trigger angioedema attacks in women with hereditary angioedema. Combined oral contraceptive therapies, as well as pregnancy, can induce severe attacks. The course of angioedema may be very variable in different women. STUDY DESIGN: Within the PREHAEAT...... project launched by the European Union, data on 150 postpubertal women with hereditary angioedema were collected in 8 countries, using a patient-based questionnaire. RESULTS: Puberty worsened the disease for 62%. Combined oral contraceptives worsened the disease for 79%, whereas progestogen-only pills...

  12. Hereditary pituitary hyperplasia with infantile gigantism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gläsker, Sven; Vortmeyer, Alexander O; Lafferty, Antony R A; Hofman, Paul L; Li, Jie; Weil, Robert J; Zhuang, Zhengping; Oldfield, Edward H

    2011-12-01

    We report hereditary pituitary hyperplasia. The objective of the study was to describe the results of the clinical and laboratory analysis of this rare instance of hereditary pituitary hyperplasia. The study is a retrospective analysis of three cases from one family. The study was conducted at the National Institutes of Health, a tertiary referral center. A mother and both her sons had very early-onset gigantism associated with high levels of serum GH and prolactin. The condition was treated by total hypophysectomy. We performed clinical, pathological, and molecular evaluations, including evaluation basal and provocative endocrine testing, neuroradiological assessment, and assessment of the pituitary tissue by microscopic evaluation, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy. All three family members had very early onset of gigantism associated with abnormally high serum levels of GH and prolactin. Serum GHRH levels were not elevated in either of the boys. The clinical, radiographic, surgical, and histological findings indicated mammosomatotroph hyperplasia. The pituitary gland of both boys revealed diffuse mammosomatotroph hyperplasia of the entire pituitary gland without evidence of adenoma. Prolactin and GH were secreted by the same cells within the same secretory granules. Western blot and immunohistochemistry demonstrated expression of GHRH in clusters of cells distributed throughout the hyperplastic pituitary of both boys. This hereditary condition seems to be a result of embryonic pituitary maldevelopment with retention and expansion of the mammosomatotrophs. The findings suggest that it is caused by paracrine or autocrine pituitary GHRH secretion during pituitary development.

  13. Advances and challenges in hereditary cancer pharmacogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascorbi, Ingolf; Werk, Anneke Nina

    2017-01-01

    Cancer pharmacogenetics usually considers tumor-specific targets. However, hereditary genetic variants may interfere with the pharmacokinetics of antimetabolites and other anti-cancer drugs, which may lead to severe adverse events. Areas covered: Here, the impact of hereditary genes considered in drug labels such as thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT), UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UTG1A1) and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPYD) are discussed with respect to guidelines of the Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC). Moreover, the association between genetic variants of drug transporters with the clinical outcome is comprehensively discussed. Expert opinion: Precision therapy in the field of oncology is developing tremendously. There are a number of somatic tumor genetic markers that are indicative for treatment with anti-cancer drugs. By contrast, for some hereditary variants, recommendations have been developed. Although we have vast knowledge on the association between drug transporter variants and clinical outcome, the overall data is inconsistent and the predictability of the related phenotype is low. Further developments in research may lead to the discovery of rare, but functionally relevant single nucleotide polymorphisms and a better understanding of multiple genomic, epigenomic as well as phenotypic factors, contributing to drug response in malignancies.

  14. Visualizing the complex functions and mechanisms of the anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfieri, Claudio; Zhang, Suyang

    2017-01-01

    The anaphase promoting complex or cyclosome (APC/C) is a large multi-subunit E3 ubiquitin ligase that orchestrates cell cycle progression by mediating the degradation of important cell cycle regulators. During the two decades since its discovery, much has been learnt concerning its role in recognizing and ubiquitinating specific proteins in a cell-cycle-dependent manner, the mechanisms governing substrate specificity, the catalytic process of assembling polyubiquitin chains on its target proteins, and its regulation by phosphorylation and the spindle assembly checkpoint. The past few years have witnessed significant progress in understanding the quantitative mechanisms underlying these varied APC/C functions. This review integrates the overall functions and properties of the APC/C with mechanistic insights gained from recent cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) studies of reconstituted human APC/C complexes. PMID:29167309

  15. Novel APC gene mutations associated with protein alteration in diffuse type gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghatak, Souvik; Chakraborty, Payel; Sarkar, Sandeep Roy; Chowdhury, Biswajit; Bhaumik, Arup; Kumar, Nachimuthu Senthil

    2017-06-02

    The role of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene in mitosis might be critical for regulation of genomic stability and chromosome segregation. APC gene mutations have been associated to have a role in colon cancer and since gastric and colon tumors share some common genetic lesions, it is relevant to investigate the role of APC tumor suppressor gene in gastric cancer. We investigated for somatic mutations in the Exons 14 and 15 of APC gene from 40 diffuse type gastric cancersamples. Rabbit polyclonal anti-APC antibody was used, which detects the wild-type APC protein and was recommended for detection of the respective protein in human tissues. Cell cycle analysis was done from tumor and adjacent normal tissue. APC immunoreactivity showed positive expression of the protein in stages I, II, III and negative expression in Stages III and IV. Two novel deleterious variations (g.127576C > A, g.127583C > T) in exon 14 sequence were found to generate stop codon (Y622* and Q625*)in the tumor samples. Due to the generation of stop codon, the APC protein might be truncated and all the regulatory features could be lost which has led to the down-regulation of protein expression. Our results indicate that aneuploidy might occurdue to the codon 622 and 625 APC-driven gastric tumorigenesis, in agreement with our cell cycle analysis. The APC gene function in mitosis and chromosomal stability might be lost and G1 might be arrested with high quantity of DNA in the S phase. Six missense somatic mutations in tumor samples were detected in exon 15 A-B, twoof which showed pathological and disease causing effects based on SIFT, Polyphen2 and SNPs & GO score and were not previously reported in the literature or the public mutation databases. The two novel pathological somatic mutations (g.127576C > A, g.127583C > T) in exon 14 might be altering the protein expression leading to development of gastric cancer in the study population. Our study showed that mutations in the APC

  16. Colorectal Adenomatous Polyposis: Heterogeneity of Susceptibility Gene Mutations and Phenotypes in a Cohort of Italian Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marabelli, Monica; Molinaro, Valeria; Abou Khouzam, Raefa; Berrino, Enrico; Panero, Mara; Balsamo, Antonella; Venesio, Tiziana; Ranzani, Guglielmina Nadia

    2016-12-01

    Colorectal adenomatous polyposis entailing cancer predisposition is caused by constitutional mutations in different genes. APC is associated with the familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP/AFAP) and MUTYH with the MUTYH-associated polyposis (MAP), while POLE and POLD1 mutations cause the polymerase proofreading-associated polyposis (PPAP). We screened for mutations in patients with multiple adenomas/FAP: 121 patients were analyzed for APC and MUTYH mutations, and 36 patients were also evaluated for POLE and POLD1 gene mutations. We found 20 FAP/AFAP, 15 MAP, and no PPAP subjects: pathogenic mutations proved to be heterogeneous, and included 5 APC and 1 MUTYH novel mutations. The mutation detection rate was significantly different between patients with 5-100 polyps and those with >100 polyps (p = 8.154 × 10 -7 ), with APC mutations being associated with an aggressive phenotype (p = 1.279 × 10 -9 ). Mean age at diagnosis was lower in FAP/AFAP compared to MAP (p = 3.055 × 10 -4 ). Mutation-negative probands showed a mean age at diagnosis that was significantly higher than FAP/AFAP (p = 3.46986 × 10 -7 ) and included 45.3% of patients with <30 polyps and 70.9% of patients with no family history. This study enlarges the APC and MUTYH mutational spectra, and also evaluated variants of uncertain significance, including the MUTYH p.Gln338His mutation. Moreover this study underscores the phenotypic heterogeneity and genotype-phenotype correlations in a cohort of Italian patients.

  17. Molecular genetic analysis of 103 sporadic colorectal tumours in Czech patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Vasovcak

    Full Text Available The Czech Republic has one of the highest incidences of colorectal cancer (CRC in Europe. To evaluate whether sporadic CRCs in Czech patients have specific mutational profiles we analysed somatic genetic changes in known CRC genes (APC, KRAS, TP53, CTNNB1, MUTYH and BRAF, loss of heterozygosity (LOH at the APC locus, microsatellite instability (MSI, and methylation of the MLH1 promoter in 103 tumours from 102 individuals. The most frequently mutated gene was APC (68.9% of tumours, followed by KRAS (31.1%, TP53 (27.2%, BRAF (8.7% and CTNNB1 (1.9%. Heterozygous germline MUTYH mutations in 2 patients were unlikely to contribute to the development of their CRCs. LOH at the APC locus was found in 34.3% of tumours, MSI in 24.3% and MLH1 methylation in 12.7%. Seven tumours (6.9% were without any changes in the genes tested. The analysis yielded several findings possibly specific for the Czech cohort. Somatic APC mutations did not cluster in the mutation cluster region (MCR. Tumours with MSI but no MLH1 methylation showed earlier onset and more severe mutational profiles compared to MSI tumours with MLH1 methylation. TP53 mutations were predominantly located outside the hot spots, and transitions were underrepresented. Our analysis supports the observation that germline MUTYH mutations are rare in Czech individuals with sporadic CRCs. Our findings suggest the influence of specific ethnic genetic factors and/or lifestyle and dietary habits typical for the Czech population on the development of these cancers.

  18. Evaluation of Colorectal Cancer Incidence Trends in the United States (2000–2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin E. Ansa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC incidence rates have declined in recent years for people of all races/ethnicities; however, the extent to which the decrease varies annually by demographic and disease-related characteristics is largely unknown. This study examines trends and annual percent change (APC in the incidence among persons diagnosed with CRC in the United States of America from 2000–2014. The data obtained from the National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER Program were analyzed, and all persons (N = 577,708 with malignant CRC recorded in the SEER 18 database from 2000 to 2014 were characterized according to sex, race, age at diagnosis, disease site and stage. Incidence rates and APC were calculated for the entire study period. Overall, the incidence rate of CRC decreased from 54.5 in 2000 to 38.6 per 100,000 in 2014, with APC = −2.66 (p < 0.0001. Decline in rates was most profound between 2008 and 2011 from 46.0 to 40.7 per 100,000 (APC = −4.04; p < 0.0001. Rates were higher for males (vs. females; rate ratio (RR = 1.33 and for blacks (vs. whites; RR = 1.23. Proximal colon cancers at the localized stage were the predominant cancers. An increase in rate was observed among people younger than 50 years (6.6 per 100,000, APC= 1.5. The annual rate of CRC has decreased over time. However, the development and implementation of interventions that further reduce the disparities among demographic and disease-related subgroups are warranted.

  19. The interrelationship between APC/C and Plk1 activities in centriole disengagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Hatano

    2012-09-01

    Mother–daughter centriole disengagement, the necessary first step in centriole duplication, involves Plk1 activity in early mitosis and separase activity after APC/C activity mediates securin degradation. Plk1 activity is thought to be essential and sufficient for centriole disengagement with separase activity playing a supporting but non-essential role. In separase null cells, however, centriole disengagement is substantially delayed. The ability of APC/C activity alone to mediate centriole disengagement has not been directly tested. We investigate the interrelationship between Plk1 and APC/C activities in disengaging centrioles in S or G2 HeLa and RPE1 cells, cell types that do not reduplicate centrioles when arrested in S phase. Knockdown of the interphase APC/C inhibitor Emi1 leads to centriole disengagement and reduplication of the mother centrioles, though this is slow. Strong inhibition of Plk1 activity, if any, during S does not block centriole disengagement and mother centriole reduplication in Emi1 depleted cells. Centriole disengagement depends on APC/C–Cdh1 activity, not APC/C–Cdc20 activity. Also, Plk1 and APC/C–Cdh1 activities can independently promote centriole disengagement in G2 arrested cells. Thus, Plk1 and APC/C–Cdh1 activities are independent but slow pathways for centriole disengagement. By having two slow mechanisms for disengagement working together, the cell ensures that centrioles will not prematurely separate in late G2 or early mitosis, thereby risking multipolar spindle assembly, but rather disengage in a timely fashion only late in mitosis.

  20. APC fly ashes stabilized with Portland cement for further development of road sub-base aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formosa, J.; Giro-Paloma, J.; Maldonado-Alameda, A.; Huete-Hernández, S.; Chimenos, J. M.

    2017-10-01

    Although waste-to-energy plants allow reducing the mass and volume of municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerated, an average around 30 % of the total content remains as bottom ash (BA) and air pollution control (APC) ashes at the end of combustion process. While weathered bottom ash (WBA) is considered a non-hazardous residue that can be revalorized as a secondary aggregate, APC fly ashes generated during the flue gas treatment are classified as hazardous waste and are handled in landfill disposal after stabilization, usually with Portland cement (OPC). However, taking into account the amount of APC residues produced and the disposing cost in landfill, their revalorization is an important issue that could be effectively addressed. As MSW can be incinerated producing bottom ashes (BA) or air pollutant control (APC) residues, the development of a mortar formulated with APC fly ash as secondary building material is a significant risk to the environment for their content of heavy metals. In this way, Design of Experiment (DoE) was used for the improvement of granular material (GM) formulation composed by APC and OPC for further uses as road sub-base aggregate. DoE analysis was successful in the modelling and optimization the formulation as function of the mechanical properties and APC amount. Consequently, an optimal mortar formulation (OMF) of around 50 wt.% APC and 50 wt.% OPC was considered. The OMF leachates and abrasion resistance have been analyzed. These results have demonstrated the viability of OMF as non-hazardous material feasible to be used as secondary aggregate. Moreover, it would be possible to consider the environmental assessment of a GM composed by ≈20 wt.% of OMF and ≈80 wt.% of WBA in order to improve mechanical properties and heavy metals stabilization.

  1. Use of operator training and simulating complexes for development of NPP APCS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkin, S.D.; Rakitin, I.D.; Sivokon', V.P.

    2002-01-01

    The evolution of NPP educational facilities - from systems of training of personnel to power simulating systems for the development of Automatic Process Control System (APCS) and safety analysis is followed. High efficiency of simulating systems application for the development of NPP APCS including optimization of man-machine system interface was shown by experiments of USA, France, Japan, United Kingdom, conforming examples were given [ru

  2. Irradiated Foods Detection by Thermoluminescence (TL) and DEFT/APC Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, I.D.; Kang, E.K.; Yang, J.S.

    2004-01-01

    Irradiated food detection methods such as Thermoluminescence (TL) and Direct Epifluorescent Filter Technique and Aerobic Plate Count (DEFT/APC) methods were evaluated. Fresh green-onion, onion, and ginger were irradiated at 0, 0.3, 0.6, and 0.9 kGy. Difference in log DEFT/APC units between irradiated and un-irradiated samples was less than 2 long units, below the average threshold value (3-4 long units) of international researches

  3. Synchronous colorectal liver metastases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.E.M. van der Pool (Anne)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractColorectal cancer is one of the most common malignancies worldwide and ranks second in cancer-related deaths in many parts of the Western world. Once in the lymph or blood vessels, colorectal cancer can quickly spread and the liver is known to be a favourable site for metastases. The

  4. [Obesity and colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Soo-Young; Myung, Seung-Jae

    2012-01-01

    Obesity worldwide is constantly increasing. Obesity acts as an independent significant risk factor for malignant tumors of various organs including colorectal cancer. Visceral adipose tissue is physiologically more important than subcutaneous adipose tissue. The relative risk of colorectal cancer of obese patients is about 1.5 times higher than the normal-weight individuals, and obesity is also associated with premalignant colorectal adenoma. The colorectal cancer incidence of obese patients has gender-specific and site-specific characteristics that it is higher in men than women and in the colon than rectum. Obesity acts as a risk factor of colorectal carcinogenesis by several mechanisms. Isulin, insulin-like growth factor, leptin, adiponectin, microbiome, and cytokines of chronic inflammation etc. have been understood as its potential mechanisms. In addition, obesity in patients with colorectal cancer negatively affects the disease progression and response of chemotherapy. Although the evidence is not clear yet, there are some reports that weight loss as well as life-modification such as dietary change and physical activity can reduce the risk of colorectal cancer. It is very important knowledge in the point that obesity is a potentially modifiable risk factor that can alter the incidence and outcome of the colorectal cancer.

  5. MLH1-Silenced and Non-Silenced Subgroups of Hypermutated Colorectal Carcinomas Have Distinct Mutational Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donehower, Lawrence A.; Creighton, Chad J.; Schultz, Nikolaus; Shinbrot, Eve; Chang, Kyle; Gunaratne, Preethi H.; Muzny, Donna; Sander, Chris; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Wheeler, David

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 15% of colorectal carcinomas (CRC) exhibit a hypermutated genotype accompanied by high levels of microsatellite instability (MSI-H) and defects in DNA mismatch repair. These tumors, unlike the majority of colorectal carcinomas, are often diploid, exhibit frequent epigenetic silencing of the MLH1 DNA mismatch repair gene, and have a better clinical prognosis. As an adjunct study to The Cancer Genome Atlas consortium that recently analyzed 224 colorectal cancers by whole exome sequencing, we compared the 35 CRC (15.6%) with a hypermutated genotype to those with a non-hypermutated genotype. We found that 22 (63%) of hypermutated CRC exhibited transcriptional silencing of the MLH1 gene, a high frequency of BRAF V600E gene mutations and infrequent APC and KRAS mutations, a mutational pattern significantly different from their non-hypermutated counterparts. However, the remaining 13 (37%) hypermutated CRC lacked MLH1 silencing, contained tumors with the highest mutation rates (“ultramutated” CRC), and exhibited higher incidences of APC and KRAS mutations, but infrequent BRAF mutations. These patterns were confirmed in an independent validation set of 250 exome-sequenced CRC. Analysis of mRNA and microRNA expression signatures revealed that hypermutated CRC with MLH1 silencing had greatly reduced levels of WNT signaling and increased BRAF signaling relative non-hypermutated CRC. Our findings suggest that hypermutated CRC include one subgroup with fundamentally different pathways to malignancy than the majority of CRC. Examination of MLH1 expression status and frequencies of APC, KRAS, and BRAF mutation in CRC may provide a useful diagnostic tool that could supplement the standard microsatellite instability assays and influence therapeutic decisions. PMID:22899370

  6. A scoring model for predicting advanced colorectal neoplasia in a screened population of asymptomatic Japanese individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, Masau; Kakugawa, Yasuo; Matsumoto, Minori; Matsuda, Takahisa

    2018-01-22

    Risk stratification of screened populations could help improve colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. Use of the modified Asia-Pacific Colorectal Screening (APCS) score has been proposed in the Asia-Pacific region. This study was performed to build a new useful scoring model for CRC screening. Data were reviewed from 5218 asymptomatic Japanese individuals who underwent their first screening colonoscopy. Multivariate logistic regression was used to investigate risk factors for advanced colorectal neoplasia (ACN), and a new scoring model for the prediction of ACN was developed based on the results. The discriminatory capability of the new model and the modified APCS score were assessed and compared. Internal validation was also performed. ACN was detected in 225 participants. An 8-point scoring model for the prediction of ACN was developed using five independent risk factors for ACN (male sex, higher age, presence of two or more first-degree relatives with CRC, body mass index of > 22.5 kg/m 2 , and smoking history of > 18.5 pack-years). The prevalence of ACN was 1.6% (34/2172), 5.3% (127/2419), and 10.2% (64/627) in participants with scores of statistic of the scoring model was 0.70 (95% confidence interval, 0.67-0.73) in both the development and internal validation sets, and this value was higher than that of the modified APCS score [0.68 (95% confidence interval, 0.65-0.71), P = 0.03]. We built a new simple scoring model for prediction of ACN in a Japanese population that could stratify the screened population into low-, moderate-, and high-risk groups.

  7. Cerebral Vein Thrombosis:Screening of Acquired and Hereditary Thrombophilic Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarraf Payam

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral vein thrombosis (CVT is an infrequent condition with a large variety of causes that can lead to serious disabilities. However, in 20% to 35% of cases, no cause is found. In this study we evaluated the hereditary (P & C Proteins, antithrombin, mutation of prothrombin G20210A and factor V Leiden, other risk factors (hyperhomocycteinemia, factor VIII, ACL-ab, APL-ab, and OCP and clinical manifestations among a population of Iranian patients with CVT. 18 women and 10 men aged 16 to 50 years with CVT were screened for inherited and acquired coagulation risk factors. No one had an abnormal ACL-ab, APL-ab or antithrombin III deficiency. One had prothrombin G20210A mutation (heterozygot (3.6%. Hyperhomocycteinemia was observed in 5 patients (17.9%. APC-R was decreased in 3 (10.7%. 2 had positive factor V Leiden mutation (heterozygot (7.1%. 17 had an increased of factor VIII (60.7. PS and PC deficiencies were each detected in two cases (7.1%. Conclusion: Our study suggests that screening for inherited thrombophilia may be an integral part in the diagnostic workup and duration of treatment in patients with CVT.

  8. Ubiquitination of Cdc20 by the APC occurs through an intramolecular mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foe, Ian T.; Foster, Scott A.; Cheung, Stephanie K.; DeLuca, Steven Z.; Morgan, David O.; Toczyski, David P.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Background Cells control progression through late mitosis by regulating Cdc20 and Cdh1, the two mitotic activators of the Anaphase Promoting Complex (APC). The control of Cdc20 protein levels during the cell cycle is not well understood. Results Here, we demonstrate that Cdc20 is degraded in budding yeast by multiple APC-dependent mechanisms. We find that the majority of Cdc20 turnover does not involve a second activator molecule, but instead depends on in cis Cdc20 autoubiquitination while it is bound to its activator-binding site on the APC core. Unlike in trans ubiquitination of Cdc20 substrates, the APC ubiquitinates Cdc20 independent of APC activation by Cdc20’s C-box. Cdc20 turnover by this intramolecular mechanism is cell cycle-regulated, contributing to the decline in Cdc20 levels that occurs after anaphase. Interestingly, high substrate levels in vitro significantly reduce Cdc20 autoubiquitination. Conclusion We show here that Cdc20 fluctuates through the cell cycle via a distinct form of APC-mediated ubiquitination. This in cis autoubiquitination may preferentially occur in early anaphase, following depletion of Cdc20 substrates. This suggests that distinct mechanisms are able to target Cdc20 for ubiquitination at different points during the cell cycle. PMID:22079111

  9. The APC/C Ubiquitin Ligase: From Cell Biology to Tumorigenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penas, Clara; Ramachandran, Vimal [John P. Hussman Institute for Human Genomics, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States); Ayad, Nagi George, E-mail: nayad@med.miami.edu [John P. Hussman Institute for Human Genomics, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States); Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States)

    2012-01-09

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is required for normal cell proliferation, vertebrate development, and cancer cell transformation. The UPS consists of multiple proteins that work in concert to target a protein for degradation via the 26S proteasome. Chains of an 8.5-kDa protein called ubiquitin are attached to substrates, thus allowing recognition by the 26S proteasome. Enzymes called ubiquitin ligases or E3s mediate specific attachment to substrates. Although there are over 600 different ubiquitin ligases, the Skp1–Cullin–F-box (SCF) complexes and the anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) are the most studied. SCF involvement in cancer has been known for some time while APC/C’s cancer role has recently emerged. In this review we will discuss the importance of APC/C to normal cell proliferation and development, underscoring its possible contribution to transformation. We will also examine the hypothesis that modulating a specific interaction of the APC/C may be therapeutically attractive in specific cancer subtypes. Finally, given that the APC/C pathway is relatively new as a cancer target, therapeutic interventions affecting APC/C activity may be beneficial in cancers that are resistant to classical chemotherapy.

  10. Upregulation of miR-3607 promotes lung adenocarcinoma proliferation by suppressing APC expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yong; Gu, Qiangye; Sun, Zongwen; Sheng, Baowei; Qi, Congcong; Liu, Bing; Fu, Tian; Liu, Cun; Zhang, Yan

    2017-11-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of worldwide cancer-related deaths, although many drugs and new therapeutic approaches have been used, the 5-years survival rate is still low for lung cancer patients. microRNAs have been shown to regulate lung cancer initiation and development, here we studied the role of miR-3607 in lung cancer cell proliferation. We found miR-3607 was upregulated in lung cancer tissues and cells, miR-3607 overexpression promoted lung cancer cell A549 proliferation determined by MTT assay, colony formation assay, anchorage-independent growth ability assay and bromodeoxyuridine incorporation assay, while the opposite phenotypes were shown when miR-3607 was knocked down. Predicted analysis suggested a Wnt signaling pathway regulator adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) was the target of miR-3607, miR-3607 could directly bind to the 3'UTR of APC, and promoted Cyclin D1 and c-Myc expression which can be suppressed by APC. Double knockdown of miR-3607 and APC copied the phenotypes of miR-3607 overexpression, suggesting miR-3607 promoted lung cancer cell A549 proliferation by targeting APC. In conclusion, our study suggested miR-3607 contributes to lung cancer cell proliferation by inhibiting APC. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  11. The APC/C Ubiquitin Ligase: From Cell Biology to Tumorigenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penas, Clara; Ramachandran, Vimal; Ayad, Nagi George

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is required for normal cell proliferation, vertebrate development, and cancer cell transformation. The UPS consists of multiple proteins that work in concert to target a protein for degradation via the 26S proteasome. Chains of an 8.5-kDa protein called ubiquitin are attached to substrates, thus allowing recognition by the 26S proteasome. Enzymes called ubiquitin ligases or E3s mediate specific attachment to substrates. Although there are over 600 different ubiquitin ligases, the Skp1–Cullin–F-box (SCF) complexes and the anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) are the most studied. SCF involvement in cancer has been known for some time while APC/C’s cancer role has recently emerged. In this review we will discuss the importance of APC/C to normal cell proliferation and development, underscoring its possible contribution to transformation. We will also examine the hypothesis that modulating a specific interaction of the APC/C may be therapeutically attractive in specific cancer subtypes. Finally, given that the APC/C pathway is relatively new as a cancer target, therapeutic interventions affecting APC/C activity may be beneficial in cancers that are resistant to classical chemotherapy.

  12. Atomic structure of the APC/C and its mechanism of protein ubiquitination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; McLaughlin, Stephen H.; Barford, David

    2015-01-01

    The anaphase-promoting complex (APC/C) is a multimeric RING E3 ubiquitin ligase that controls chromosome segregation and mitotic exit. Its regulation by coactivator subunits, phosphorylation, the mitotic checkpoint complex, and interphase inhibitor Emi1 ensures the correct order and timing of distinct cell cycle transitions. Here, we used cryo-electron microscopy to determine atomic structures of APC/C-coactivator complexes with either Emi1 or a UbcH10-ubiquitin conjugate. These structures define the architecture of all APC/C subunits, the position of the catalytic module, and explain how Emi1 mediates inhibition of the two E2s UbcH10 and Ube2S. Definition of Cdh1 interactions with the APC/C indicates how they are antagonized by Cdh1 phosphorylation. The structure of the APC/C with UbcH10-ubiquitin reveals insights into the initiating ubiquitination reaction. Our results provide a quantitative framework for the design of experiments to further investigate APC/C functions in vivo. PMID:26083744

  13. The APC/C Ubiquitin Ligase: From Cell Biology to Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penas, Clara; Ramachandran, Vimal; Ayad, Nagi George

    2011-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is required for normal cell proliferation, vertebrate development, and cancer cell transformation. The UPS consists of multiple proteins that work in concert to target a protein for degradation via the 26S proteasome. Chains of an 8.5-kDa protein called ubiquitin are attached to substrates, thus allowing recognition by the 26S proteasome. Enzymes called ubiquitin ligases or E3s mediate specific attachment to substrates. Although there are over 600 different ubiquitin ligases, the Skp1–Cullin–F-box (SCF) complexes and the anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) are the most studied. SCF involvement in cancer has been known for some time while APC/C’s cancer role has recently emerged. In this review we will discuss the importance of APC/C to normal cell proliferation and development, underscoring its possible contribution to transformation. We will also examine the hypothesis that modulating a specific interaction of the APC/C may be therapeutically attractive in specific cancer subtypes. Finally, given that the APC/C pathway is relatively new as a cancer target, therapeutic interventions affecting APC/C activity may be beneficial in cancers that are resistant to classical chemotherapy. PMID:22655255

  14. The TLR3/TICAM-1 signal constitutively controls spontaneous polyposis through suppression of c-Myc in Apc Min/+ mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Junya; Shime, Hiroaki; Takaki, Hiromi; Takashima, Ken; Funami, Kenji; Yoshida, Sumito; Takeda, Yohei; Matsumoto, Misako; Kasahara, Masanori; Seya, Tsukasa

    2017-10-17

    Intestinal tumorigenesis is promoted by myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) activation in response to the components of microbiota in Apc Min/+ mice. Microbiota also contains double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), a ligand for TLR3, which activates the toll-like receptor adaptor molecule 1 (TICAM-1, also known as TRIF) pathway. We established Apc Min/+ Ticam1 -/- mice and their survival was compared to survival of Apc Min/+ Myd88 -/- and wild-type (WT) mice. The properties of polyps were investigated using immunofluorescence staining and RT-PCR analysis. We demonstrate that TICAM-1 is essential for suppression of polyp formation in Apc Min/+ mice. TICAM-1 knockout resulted in shorter survival of mice compared to WT mice or mice with knockout of MyD88 in the Apc Min/+ background. Polyps were more frequently formed in the distal intestine of Apc Min/+ Ticam1 -/- mice than in Apc Min/+ mice. Infiltration of immune cells such as CD11b + and CD8α + cells into the polyps was detected histologically. CD11b and CD8α mRNAs were increased in polyps of Apc Min/+ Ticam1 -/- mice compared to Apc Min/+ mice. Gene expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), interferon (IFN)-γ, CXCL9 and IL-12p40 was increased in polyps of Apc Min/+ Ticam1 -/- mice. mRNA and protein expression of c-Myc, a critical transcription factor for inflammation-associated polyposis, were increased in polyps of Apc Min/+ Ticam1 -/- mice. A Lactobacillus strain producing dsRNA was detected in feces of Apc Min/+ mice. These results imply that the TLR3/TICAM-1 pathway inhibits polyposis through suppression of c-Myc expression and supports long survival in Apc Min/+ mice.

  15. α2-Macroglobulin Is a Significant In Vivo Inhibitor of Activated Protein C and Low APC:α2M Levels Are Associated with Venous Thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martos, Laura; Ramón, Luis Andrés; Oto, Julia; Fernández-Pardo, Álvaro; Bonanad, Santiago; Cid, Ana Rosa; Gruber, Andras; Griffin, John H; España, Francisco; Navarro, Silvia; Medina, Pilar

    2018-04-01

     Activated protein C (APC) is a major regulator of thrombin formation. Two major plasma inhibitors form complexes with APC, protein C inhibitor (PCI) and α 1 -antitrypsin (α 1 AT), and these complexes have been quantified by specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). Also, complexes of APC with α 2 -macroglobulin (α 2 M) have been observed by immunoblotting. Here, we report an ELISA for APC:α 2 M complexes in plasma.  Plasma samples were pre-treated with dithiothreitol and then with iodoacetamide. The detection range of the newly developed APC:α 2 M assay was 0.031 to 8.0 ng/mL of complexed APC. Following infusions of APC in humans and baboons, complexes of APC with α 2 M, PCI and α 1 AT were quantified. These complexes as well as circulating APC were also measured in 121 patients with a history of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and 119 matched controls.  In all the in vivo experiments, α 2 M was a significant APC inhibitor. The VTE case-control study showed that VTE patients had significantly lower APC:α 2 M and APC levels than the controls ( p  APC:α 2 M or the lowest quartile of APC had approximately four times more VTE risk than those in the highest quartile of APC:α 2 M or of APC. The risk increased for individuals with low levels of both parameters.  The APC:α 2 M assay reported here may be useful to help monitor the in vivo fate of APC in plasma. In addition, our results show that a low APC:α 2 M level is associated with increased VTE risk. Schattauer GmbH Stuttgart.

  16. Colorectal cancer chemoprevention: the potential of a selective approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Amotz, Oded; Arber, Nadir; Kraus, Sarah

    2010-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer death, and therefore demands special attention. Novel recent approaches for the chemoprevention of CRC focus on selective targeting of key pathways. We review the study by Zhang and colleagues, evaluating a selective approach targeting APC-deficient premalignant cells using retinoid-based therapy and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). This study demonstrates that induction of TRAIL-mediated death signaling contributes to the chemopreventive value of all-trans-retinyl acetate (RAc) by sensitizing premalignant adenoma cells for apoptosis without affecting normal cells. We discuss these important findings, raise few points that deserve consideration, and may further contribute to the development of RAc-based combination therapies with improved efficacy. The authors clearly demonstrate a synergistic interaction between TRAIL, RAc and APC, which leads to the specific cell death of premalignant target cells. The study adds to the growing body of literature related to CRC chemoprevention, and provides solid data supporting a potentially selective approach for preventing CRC using RAc and TRAIL.

  17. Rca1 inhibits APC-Cdh1(Fzr) and is required to prevent cyclin degradation in G2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosskortenhaus, Ruth; Sprenger, Frank

    2002-01-01

    We demonstrate that Rca1 is an essential inhibitor of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC) in Drosophila. APC activity is restricted to mitotic stages and G1 by its activators Cdc20-Fizzy (Cdc20(Fzy)) and Cdh1-Fizzy-related (Cdh1(Fzr)), respectively. In rca1 mutants, cyclins are degraded prematurely in G2 by APC-Cdh1(Fzr)-dependent proteolysis, and cells fail to execute mitosis. Overexpression of Cdh1(Fzr) mimics the rca1 phenotype, and coexpression of Rca1 blocks this Cdh1(Fzr) function. We show that Rca1 and Cdh1(Fzr) are in a complex that also includes the APC component Cdc27. Previous studies have shown that phosphorylation of Cdh1 prevents its interaction with the APC. Our data reveal a different mode of APC regulation by Rca1 at the G2 stage, when low Cdk activity is unable to inhibit Cdh1(Fzr) interaction.

  18. Human APC sequesters beta-catenin even in the absence of GSK-3beta in a Drosophila model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, P R; Makhijani, K; Shashidhara, L S

    2008-04-10

    There have been conflicting reports on the requirement of GSK-3beta-mediated phosphorylation of the tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) vis-à-vis its ability to bind and degrade beta-catenin. Using a unique combination of loss of function for Shaggy/GSK-3beta and a gain of function for human APC in Drosophila, we show that misexpressed human APC (hAPC) can still sequester Armadillo/beta-catenin. In addition, human APC could suppress gain of Wnt/Wingless phenotypes associated with loss of Shaggy/GSK-3beta activity, suggesting that sequestered Armadillo/beta-catenin is non-functional. Based on these studies, we propose that binding per se of beta-catenin by APC does not require phosphorylation by GSK-3beta.

  19. Detection and Analysis of Cell Cycle-Associated APC/C-Mediated Cellular Ubiquitylation In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedeño, Cesyen; La Monaca, Esther; Esposito, Mara; Gutierrez, Gustavo J

    2016-01-01

    The anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome (APC/C) is one of the major orchestrators of the cell division cycle in mammalian cells. The APC/C acts as a ubiquitin ligase that triggers sequential ubiquitylation of a significant number of substrates which will be eventually degraded by proteasomes during major transitions of the cell cycle. In this chapter, we present accessible methodologies to assess both in in vitro conditions and in cellular systems ubiquitylation reactions mediated by the APC/C. In addition, we also describe techniques to evidence the changes in protein stability provoked by modulation of the activity of the APC/C. Finally, specific methods to analyze interactors or posttranslational modifications of particular APC/C subunits are also discussed. Given the crucial role played by the APC/C in the regulation of the cell cycle, this review only focuses on its action and effects in actively proliferating cells.

  20. Efficacy and safety of Hybrid-APC for the ablation of Barrett's esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manner, Hendrik; May, Andrea; Kouti, Ioanna; Pech, Oliver; Vieth, Michael; Ell, Christian

    2016-04-01

    After thermal ablation of Barrett's esophagus (BE), stricture formation is reported in 5 to over 10% of patients. The question arises whether submucosal fluid injection prior to ablation may lower the risk of stricture formation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the new technique of Hybrid-APC which combines submucosal injection with APC. Patients who had a residual BE segment of at least 1 cm after endoscopic resection of early Barrett's neoplasia underwent thermal ablation of BE by Hybrid-APC. Prior to thermal ablation, submucosal injection of sodium chloride 0.9% was carried out using a flexible water-jet probe (Erbejet 2; Erbe Elektromedizin, Tuebingen, Germany). Check-up upper GI endoscopy was carried out 3 months after macroscopically complete ablation including biopsies from the neo-Z-line and the former BE segment, and recording of stricture formation. From May 2011 to November 2012, a total of 60 patients (pt) were included in the study [55 pt male (92%); mean age 62 ± 9 years, range 42-79]. Ten patients were excluded from the study. In the remaining 50 pt, Hybrid-APC ablation and check-up endoscopy at 3 months were carried out. Forty-eight out of 50 pt (96%; ITT: 49/60, 82%) achieved macroscopically complete remission after a median of 3.5 APC sessions [SD 2.4; range 1-10]. Freedom from BE was histopathologically observed in 39/50 patients (78%). There was one treatment-related stricture (2%). Minor adverse events of Hybrid-APC were observed in 11 patients (22%). According to this pilot series, Hybrid-APC was effective and safe for BE ablation in a tertiary referral center. The rate of stricture formation was only 2%. Further studies are required to confirm the present results. DRKS00003369.

  1. APC promoter is frequently methylated in pancreatic juice of patients with pancreatic carcinomas or periampullary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginesta, Mireia M; Diaz-Riascos, Zamira Vanessa; Busquets, Juli; Pelaez, Núria; Serrano, Teresa; Peinado, Miquel Àngel; Jorba, Rosa; García-Borobia, Francisco Javier; Capella, Gabriel; Fabregat, Joan

    2016-09-01

    Early detection of pancreatic and periampullary neoplasms is critical to improve their clinical outcome. The present authors previously demonstrated that DNA hypermethylation of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), histamine receptor H2 (HRH2), cadherin 13 (CDH13), secreted protein acidic and cysteine rich (SPARC) and engrailed-1 (EN-1) promoters is frequently detected in pancreatic tumor cells. The aim of the present study was to assess their prevalence in pancreatic juice of carcinomas of the pancreas and periampullary area. A total of 135 pancreatic juices obtained from 85 pancreatic cancer (PC), 26 ampullary carcinoma (AC), 10 intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) and 14 chronic pancreatitis (CP) patients were analyzed. The methylation status of the APC, HRH2, CDH13, SPARC and EN-1 promoters was analyzed using methylation specific-melting curve analysis (MS-MCA). Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) mutations were also tested with allele-specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction amplification. Out of the 5 promoters analyzed, APC (71%) and HRH2 (65%) were the most frequently methylated in PC juice. APC methylation was also detected at a high frequency in AC (76%) and IPMN (80%), but only occasionally observed in CP (7%). APC methylation had a high sensitivity (71-80%) for all types of cancer analyzed. The panel (where a sample scored as positive when ≥2 markers were methylated) did not outperform APC as a single marker. Finally, KRAS detection in pancreatic juice offered a lower sensitivity (50%) and specificity (71%) for detection of any cancer. APC hypermethylation in pancreatic juice, as assessed by MS-MCA, is a frequent event of potential clinical usefulness in the diagnosis of pancreatic and periampullary neoplasms.

  2. Brain abscesses and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vives, Daniel A.; Bauni, Carlos E.; Mendoza, Monica E.

    2003-01-01

    Rendu-Osler-Weber disease or Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT) is a generalized familial angiodysplastic disorder. The neurological manifestations of this entity are due to Central Nervous System vascular lesions or to complications of other visceral lesions such as pulmonary arteriovenous fistulae. This report describes two patients (males, 40 and 61 years old), with brain abscesses associated with HHT. The CT, MRI and Angiographic findings as well as the therapeutic approach are analyzed. Patients with brain abscess of unknown origin must be evaluated for the presence of lung vascular malformation in association with HHT. (author)

  3. Bone scintigraphy in hereditary multiple exostoses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein, D.A.; Levin, E.J.

    1978-01-01

    Two adult patients with multiple hereditary exostoses, a skeletal disorder with recognized malignant potential, each demonstrated increased /sup 99m/Tc diphosphonate uptake in an exostosis in which renewed growth had begun. None of the other multiple exostoses in either patient showed abnormal uptake. Histologic study of the lesions demonstrated chondrosarcoma in one case and benign osteochondroma in the second. Although bone scintigraphy nonspecifically identifies bone growth rather than malignant degeneration, it is more useful than radiographic bone survey in the periodic surveillance of adult patients with this disorder

  4. Skin deposits in hereditary cystatin C amyloidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedikz, Eirikur; Blöndal, H; Gudmundsson, G

    1990-01-01

    Clinically normal skin from 47 individuals aged 9-70 years was investigated. Cystatin C amyloid deposits were found in various locations of the skin by light and/or electron microscopy, in all 12 patients with a clinical history of hereditary cystatin C amyloidosis (HCCA). Six asymptomatic...... individuals, who had the Alu 1 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) marker reported to cosegregate with the disease, also had cystatin C amyloid deposits in the skin. Three asymptomatic individuals (age 17-46) belonging to the HCCA families were without amyloid in the skin but had Alu 1 RFLP marker...

  5. Detection of colorectal neoplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhelmsen, Michael; Christensen, Ib J; Rasmussen, Louise

    2017-01-01

    Serological biomarkers may be an option for early detection of colorectal cancer (CRC). The present study assessed eight cancer-associated protein biomarkers in plasma from subjects undergoing first time ever colonoscopy due to symptoms attributable to colorectal neoplasia. Plasma AFP, CA19-9, CEA...... value was 18% and the negative predictive value was 97%. Combinations of serological protein biomarkers provided a significant identification of subjects with high risk of the presence of colorectal neoplasia. The present set of biomarkers could become important adjunct in early detection of CRC....

  6. Screening for colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans J.; Jakobsen, Karen V.; Christensen, Ib J.

    2011-01-01

    Emerging results indicate that screening improves survival of patients with colorectal cancer. Therefore, screening programs are already implemented or are being considered for implementation in Asia, Europe and North America. At present, a great variety of screening methods are available including...... into improvements of screening for colorectal cancer includes blood-based biological markers, such as proteins, DNA and RNA in combination with various demographically and clinically parameters into a "risk assessment evaluation" (RAE) test. It is assumed that such a test may lead to higher acceptance among...... procedures for colorectal cancer. Therefore, results of present research, validating RAE tests, are awaited with interest....

  7. Knowledge regarding basic concepts of hereditary cancers, and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. In families with hereditary cancer, at-risk individuals can benefit from genetic counselling and testing. General practitioners (GPs) are ideally placed to identify such families and refer them appropriately. Objective. To assess the practices, knowledge and attitudes of GPs regarding common hereditary cancers.

  8. Attitude towards pre-implantation genetic diagnosis for hereditary cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammens, Chantal; Bleiker, Eveline; Aaronson, Neil; Vriends, Annette; Ausems, Margreet; Jansweijer, Maaike; Wagner, Anja; Sijmons, Rolf; van den Ouweland, Ans; van der Luijt, Rob; Spruijt, Liesbeth; Gómez García, Encarna; Ruijs, Mariëlle; Verhoef, Senno

    2009-01-01

    The use of pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for hereditary cancer is subject to on-going debate, particularly among professionals. This study evaluates the attitude towards PGD and attitude-associated characteristics of those concerned: family members with a hereditary cancer predisposition.

  9. Hereditary lymphedema of the leg – A Case Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinig, Birgit; Lotti, T.; Tchernev, Georgi; Wollina, Uwe

    2017-01-01

    Primary of hereditary lymphedema is a rare but progressive disease. It is yet not curable. We present a 48-year-old male patient with hereditary lymphedema of his left leg, that was realised by minor trauma (able twist) when he was seven years old. He had never been treated for lymphedema but

  10. Predictive cytogenetic biomarkers for colorectal neoplasia in medium risk patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionescu, E M; Nicolaie, T; Ionescu, M A; Becheanu, G; Andrei, F; Diculescu, M; Ciocirlan, M

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage and chromosomal alterations in peripheral lymphocytes parallels DNA mutations in tumor tissues. The aim of our study was to predict the presence of neoplastic colorectal lesions by specific biomarkers in "medium risk" individuals (age 50 to 75, with no personal or family of any colorectal neoplasia). We designed a prospective cohort observational study including patients undergoing diagnostic or opportunistic screening colonoscopy. Specific biomarkers were analyzed for each patient in peripheral lymphocytes - presence of micronuclei (MN), nucleoplasmic bridges (NPB) and the Nuclear Division Index (NDI) by the cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay (CBMN). Of 98 patients included, 57 were "medium risk" individuals. MN frequency and NPB presence were not significantly different in patients with neoplastic lesions compared to controls. In "medium risk" individuals, mean NDI was significantly lower for patients with any neoplastic lesions (adenomas and adenocarcinomas, AUROC 0.668, p 00.5), for patients with advanced neoplasia (advanced adenoma and adenocarcinoma, AUROC 0.636 p 0.029) as well as for patients with adenocarcinoma (AUROC 0.650, p 0.048), for each comparison with the rest of the population. For a cut-off of 1.8, in "medium risk" individuals, an NDI inferior to that value may predict any neoplastic lesion with a sensitivity of 97.7%, an advanced neoplastic lesion with a sensitivity of 97% and adenocarcinoma with a sensitivity of 94.4%. NDI score may have a role as a colorectal cancer-screening test in "medium risk" individuals. DNA = deoxyribonucleic acid; CRC = colorectal cancer; EU = European Union; WHO = World Health Organization; FOBT = fecal occult blood test; CBMN = cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay; MN = micronuclei; NPB = nucleoplasmic bridges; NDI = Nuclear Division Index; FAP = familial adenomatous polyposis; HNPCC = hereditary non-polypoid colorectal cancer; IBD = inflammatory bowel diseases; ROC = receiver operating

  11. The Spindle Assembly Checkpoint Is Not Essential for Viability of Human Cells with Genetically Lowered APC/C Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Thomas; Larsen, Marie Sofie Yoo; Narita, Takeo; Schou, Julie; Nilsson, Jakob; Choudhary, Chunaram

    2016-03-01

    The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) and the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), which inhibits the APC/C, are essential determinants of mitotic timing and faithful division of genetic material. Activation of the APC/C is known to depend on two APC/C-interacting E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes-UBE2C and UBE2S. We show that APC/C activity in human cells is tuned by the combinatorial use of three E2s, namely UBE2C, UBE2S, and UBE2D. Genetic deletion of UBE2C and UBE2S, individually or in combination, leads to discriminative reduction in APC/C function and sensitizes cells to UBE2D depletion. Reduction of APC/C activity results in loss of switch-like metaphase-to-anaphase transition and, strikingly, renders cells insensitive to chemical inhibition of MPS1 and genetic ablation of MAD2, both of which are essential for the SAC. These results provide insights into the regulation of APC/C activity and demonstrate that the essentiality of the SAC is imposed by the strength of the APC/C. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Detection of irradiated food by using direct epifluorescent filter technique/aerobic plate count method (DEFT/APC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yongfu; Li Lili; Wang Changbao; Ji Ping; Wang Chao; Wang Zhidong

    2010-01-01

    The Direct Epifluorescent Filter Technique/Aerobic Plate Count technique(DEFT/APC) can be used to identify the irradiated food by comparing the DEFT and APC counts of the samples prior to the irradiation and after. This technology was tested by using spice and dried marine fish as testing materials in this study. The results shows that the index, log (DEFT/APC) > 4.0, can indicate that the samples have been irradiated at a dose level higher than 1.0 kGy. It also indicates that the detecting sensitivity was affected by the initial value of APC and D 10 value of the samples. (authors)

  13. Antitumor Activity of Total Flavonoids from Daphne genkwa in Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wen-Juan; Yang, Xiao-Lin; Song, Zi-Jing; Wang, Jiao-Ying; Zhang, Wen-Jun; He, Xin; Zhang, Run-Qi; Zhang, Chun-Feng; Li, Fei; Yu, Chun-Hao; Wang, Chong-Zhi; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2016-02-01

    Daphne genkwa Sieb.et Zucc. is a well-known medicinal plant. This study was designed to investigate the anticancer effects of total flavonoids in D. genkwa (TFDG) in vitro and in vivo. HT-29 and SW-480 human colorectal cancer cells were cultured to investigate the anticancer activity of TFDG. In addition, the Apc(Min/+) mouse model was applied in the in vivo experiment. Results of the cell experiment revealed that TFDG possessed significant inhibitory effects on HT-29 and SW-480 human colorectal cancer cells (both p colon (both p cancer therapeutics, and TFDG's action is likely linked to its ability to regulate immune function and inhibit the production of inflammatory cytokines. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. BRCA1/2 associated hereditary breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-song TENG; Yi ZHENG; Hao-hao WANG

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of death in women today. Some of the patients are hereditary, with a large proportion characterized by mutation in BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 genes. In this review, we provide an overview of these two genes,focusing on their relationship with hereditary breast cancers. BRCA1/2 associated hereditary breast cancers have unique features that differ from the general breast cancers, including alterations in cellular molecules, pathological bases, biological behavior, and a different prevention strategy. But the outcome of BRCA1/2 associated hereditary breast cancers still remains controversial;further studies are needed to elucidate the nature of BRCA1/2 associated hereditary breast cancers.

  15. Hypermethylated APC in serous carcinoma based on a meta-analysis of ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chunyan; Sheng, Qifang; Zhang, Xiaojie; Fu, Yuling; Zhu, Kemiao

    2016-09-26

    The reduced expression of the Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene, a tumor suppressor gene, through promoter hypermethylation has been reported to play a key role in the carcinogenesis. However, the correlation between APC promoter hypermethylation and ovarian cancer (OC) remains to be clarified. A comprehensive literature search was carried out in related research databases. The overall odds ratio (OR) and corresponding 95 % confidence interval (CI) were used to evaluate the effects of APC promoter hypermethylation on OC and clinicopathological characteristics. Ultimately, 12 eligible studies were used in our study, including 806 OC samples, 429 normal controls, 109 benign lesions and 75 LMP samples. The pooled OR showed that APC promoter hypermethylation was significantly higher in OC than in normal and benign controls (OR = 6.18 and OR = 3.26, respectively). No significant correlation was observed between OC and low malignant potential (LMP) tumors (P = 0.436). In the comparison of OC and normal controls, subgroup analysis based on race showed that the overall OR of APC promoter hypermethylation was significant and similar in Asians and Caucasians (OR = 8.34 and OR = 5.39, respectively). A subgroup analysis based on sample type found that the pooled OR was significantly higher in blood than in tissue (OR = 18.71 and OR = 5.74, respectively). A significant association was not observed between APC promoter hypermethylation and tumor grade or tumor stage. The pooled OR indicated that APC promoter hypermethylation was significantly lower in serous carcinoma than in non-serous carcinoma (OR = 0.56, P = 0.02). No obvious publication bias was detected by Egger's test (all P > 0.05). APC promoter hypermethylation may be linked to the increased risk of OC. It was associated with histological type, but not with tumor grade or tumor stage. Moreover, hypermethylated APC may be a noninvasive biomarker using blood samples. Future

  16. Gallstones and colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Torben; Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael

    1992-01-01

    The prevalence of gallstone disease in 145 consecutive patients with colorectal cancer was compared with gallstone prevalence in 4,159 subjects randomly selected from a population. The group of patients had a significantly higher prevalence of gallstone disease than the population (odds ratio = 1...... substantial evidence for an association between gallstones and colorectal cancer, an association which is not due to cholecystectomy being a predisposing factor to colorectal cancer. Sporadic findings of an association between cholecystectomy and colorectal cancer can be explained by the above relationship........59; 95 percent confidence limits 1.04-2.45), whereas cholecystectomies occurred with equal frequency in the two groups. There was a nonsignificant trend toward more right-sided cancers in patients with gallstones than in patients without. These results, together with available literature, give...

  17. Pavlodar city children's some hereditary diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shajmardanova, B. Kh.; Gorbach, S.V.

    1997-01-01

    Territory of the Pavlodar region directly adjoining to the Semipalatinsk test site is unique object for study of many year tests consequences on population health. Health worsening caused by small doses of radiation on artificial pollution background is defined. Purpose of the work is Pavlodar city children's some hereditary diseases (Downs syndrome, crack of upper lip and/or palate, hemophilia) under study of frequency dynamic of statistical data within period from 1980 by 1995. It is defined: a) tendency to growth Downs syndrome frequency has been distinctly observed beginning of the 1982; b) it is noted Downs syndrome frequency growth stabilization within period from 1988 by 1991; c) among children with Downs syndrome is distinguished low viability; d) there is rather higher correlation rate of Downs syndrome and congenial heart threshold against average statistical index; e) character of frequencies changes of crack of upper lip and/or palate has tendency to growth; f) it is defined that boys predominate among children with this disease; g) congenial crack of soft palate have being revealed as solitary thresholds of development; h) genealogy analysis of hemophilia sick reveals, that it has only hereditary character. 8 refs

  18. Genetics of Hereditary Ataxia in Scottish Terriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urkasemsin, G; Nielsen, D M; Singleton, A; Arepalli, S; Hernandez, D; Agler, C; Olby, N J

    2017-07-01

    Scottish Terriers have a high incidence of juvenile onset hereditary ataxia primarily affecting the Purkinje neuron of the cerebellar cortex and causing slowly progressive cerebellar dysfunction. To identify chromosomal regions associated with hereditary ataxia in Scottish Terriers. One hundred and fifty-three Scottish Terriers were recruited through the Scottish Terrier Club of America. Prospective study. Dogs were classified as affected if they had slowly progressive cerebellar signs. When possible, magnetic resonance imaging and histopathological evaluation of the brain were completed as diagnostic aids. To identify genomic regions connected with the disease, genome-wide mapping was performed using both linkage- and association-based approaches. Pedigree evaluation and homozygosity mapping were also performed to examine mode of inheritance and to investigate the region of interest, respectively. Linkage and genome-wide association studies in a cohort of Scottish Terriers both identified a region on CFA X strongly associated with the disease trait. Homozygosity mapping revealed a 4 Mb region of interest. Pedigree evaluation failed to identify the possible mode of inheritance due to the lack of complete litter information. This finding suggests that further genetic investigation of the potential region of interest on CFA X should be considered in order to identify the causal mutation as well as develop a genetic test to eliminate the disease from this breed. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  19. Surgical treatment of hereditary lens subluxations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdek, Sengul; Sari, Ayca; Bilgihan, Kamil; Akata, Fikret; Hasanreisoglu, Berati

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and results of pars plana vitreolensectomy approach with transscleral fixation of intraocular lens in hereditary lens subluxations. Fifteen eyes of 9 consecutive patients with a mean age of 12.8+/-6.2 years (6-26 years) with hereditary lens subluxation were operated on and the results were evaluated in a prospective study. Surgery was considered if best spectacle corrected visual acuity (BSCVA) was less than 20/70. All eyes underwent a 2-port pars plana vitreolensectomy and transscleral fixation of an intraocular lens (IOL). The mean follow-up period was 12.6+/-7.5 months (6-22 months). There was no major intraoperative complication. Preoperatively, 8 eyes (53.3%) had a BSCVA of counting fingers (CF) and 7 eyes (46.6%) had a BSCVA of 20/200 to 20/70. Postoperatively, 14 eyes (93.3%) had a BSCVA of 20/50 or better. None of the patients had IOL decentration or intraocular pressure (IOP) increase during the follow-up period. There was a macular hole formation in 1 eye postoperatively. The early results of pars plana vitreolensectomy with IOL implantation using scleral fixation technique had shown that it not only promises a rapid visual rehabilitation but it is also a relatively safe method. More serious complications, however, may occur in the long term.

  20. Recommendations regarding splenectomy in hereditary hemolytic anemias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iolascon, Achille; Andolfo, Immacolata; Barcellini, Wilma; Corcione, Francesco; Garçon, Loïc; De Franceschi, Lucia; Pignata, Claudio; Graziadei, Giovanna; Pospisilova, Dagmar; Rees, David C.; de Montalembert, Mariane; Rivella, Stefano; Gambale, Antonella; Russo, Roberta; Ribeiro, Leticia; Vives-Corrons, Jules; Martinez, Patricia Aguilar; Kattamis, Antonis; Gulbis, Beatrice; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Roberts, Irene; Tamary, Hannah

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary hemolytic anemias are a group of disorders with a variety of causes, including red cell membrane defects, red blood cell enzyme disorders, congenital dyserythropoietic anemias, thalassemia syndromes and hemoglobinopathies. As damaged red blood cells passing through the red pulp of the spleen are removed by splenic macrophages, splenectomy is one possible therapeutic approach to the management of severely affected patients. However, except for hereditary spherocytosis for which the effectiveness of splenectomy has been well documented, the efficacy of splenectomy in other anemias within this group has yet to be determined and there are concerns regarding short- and long-term infectious and thrombotic complications. In light of the priorities identified by the European Hematology Association Roadmap we generated specific recommendations for each disorder, except thalassemia syndromes for which there are other, recent guidelines. Our recommendations are intended to enable clinicians to achieve better informed decisions on disease management by splenectomy, on the type of splenectomy and the possible consequences. As no randomized clinical trials, case control or cohort studies regarding splenectomy in these disorders were found in the literature, recommendations for each disease were based on expert opinion and were subsequently critically revised and modified by the Splenectomy in Rare Anemias Study Group, which includes hematologists caring for both adults and children. PMID:28550188

  1. Molecular biology of hereditary diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, T Mary; Bichet, Daniel G

    2005-10-01

    The identification, characterization, and mutational analysis of three different genes-the arginine vasopressin gene (AVP), the arginine vasopressin receptor 2 gene (AVPR2), and the vasopressin-sensitive water channel gene (aquaporin 2 [AQP2])-provide the basis for understanding of three different hereditary forms of "pure" diabetes insipidus: Neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus, X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI), and non-X-linked NDI, respectively. It is clinically useful to distinguish two types of hereditary NDI: A "pure" type characterized by loss of water only and a complex type characterized by loss of water and ions. Patients who have congenital NDI and bear mutations in the AVPR2 or AQP2 genes have a "pure" NDI phenotype with loss of water but normal conservation of sodium, potassium, chloride, and calcium. Patients who bear inactivating mutations in genes (SLC12A1, KCNJ1, CLCNKB, CLCNKA and CLCNKB in combination, or BSND) that encode the membrane proteins of the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle have a complex polyuro-polydipsic syndrome with loss of water, sodium, chloride, calcium, magnesium, and potassium. These advances provide diagnostic and clinical tools for physicians who care for these patients.

  2. Function of the activated protein C (APC) autolysis loop in activated FVIII inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Thomas J; Gale, Andrew J

    2011-06-01

    Activated protein C (APC) binds to its substrates activated factor V (FVa) and activated factor VIII (FVIIIa) with a basic exosite that consists of loops 37, 60, 70 and the autolysis loop. These loops have a high density of basic residues, resulting in a positive charge on the surface of APC. Many of these residues are important in the interaction of APC with FVa and FVIIIa. The current study focused on the function of the autolysis loop in the interaction with FVIIIa. This loop was previously shown to interact with FVa, and it inhibits APC inactivation by plasma serpins. Charged residues of the autolysis loop were individually mutated to alanine and the activity of these mutants was assessed in functional FVIIIa inactivation assays. The autolysis loop was functionally important for FVIIIa inactivation. Mutation of R306, K311 and R314 each resulted in significantly reduced FVIIIa inactivation. The inactivating cleavages of FVIIIa at R336 and R562 were affected equally by the mutations. Protein S and FV stimulated cleavage at R562 more than cleavage at R336, independent of mutations in the autolysis loop. Together, these results confirmed that the autolysis loop plays a significant role as part of the basic exosite on APC in the interaction with FVIIIa. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. APC-PCI complex levels for screening of AAA in patients with peripheral atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrouk, Moncef; Keshavarz, Kave; Lindblad, Bengt; Gottsäter, Anders

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the use of activated protein C-protein C inhibitor (APC-PCI) complex levels for detection of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in patients with peripheral atherosclerotic disease (PAD). APC-PCI levels and aortic diameter evaluated in 511 PAD patients without previously known AAA followed-up concerning survival for 4.8(0.5) years. AAA was found in 13% of patients. Aortic diameter correlated (r = 0.138; p = 0.002) with APC-PCI levels which were higher (0.40[0.45] vs. 0.30[0.49] μg/l; p = 0.004) in patients with AAA. This difference persisted in multivariate analysis (p = 0.029). A threshold value of APC-PCI ≥0.15 μg/L showed a specificity of 11%, a sensitivity of 97% and a negative predictive value of 96% for an AAA diagnosis. APC-PCI levels were higher in patients with AAA, and showed high sensitivity but low specificity for the diagnosis and can therefore not be considered as a screening tool in PAD patients. An AAA prevalence of 13% in patients with PAD indicates a need for AAA screening within this population.

  4. Naringin, a natural dietary compound, prevents intestinal tumorigenesis in Apc (Min/+) mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Sheng; Li, Ye; Wang, Yan; Sun, Shi-Yue; Jiang, Tao; Li, Cong; Cui, Shu-Xiang; Qu, Xian-Jun

    2016-05-01

    Naringin is a natural dietary flavonoid compound. We aimed to evaluate the effects of naringin on intestinal tumorigenesis in the adenomatous polyposis coli multiple intestinal neoplasia (Apc (Min/+)) mouse model. Apc (Min/+) mice were given either naringin (150 mg/kg) or vehicle by p.o. gavage daily for 12 consecutive weeks. Mice were killed with ether, and blood samples were collected to assess the concentrations of IL-6 and PGE2. Total intestines were removed, and the number of polyps was examined. Tissue samples of intestinal polyps were subjected to the assays of histopathology, immunohistochemical analysis and Western blotting analysis. Apc (Min/+) mice fed with naringin developed less and smaller polyps in total intestines. Naringin prevented intestinal tumorigenesis without adverse effects. Histopathologic analysis revealed the reduction of dysplastic cells and dysplasia in the adenomatous polyps. The treatments' effects might arise from its anti-proliferation, induction of apoptosis and modulation of GSK-3β and APC/β-catenin signaling pathways. Naringin also exerted its effects on tumorigenesis through anti-chronic inflammation. Naringin prevented intestinal tumorigenesis likely through a collection of activities including anti-proliferation, induction of apoptosis, modulation of GSK-3β and APC/β-catenin pathways and anti-inflammation. Naringin is a potential chemopreventive agent for reducing the risk of colonic cancers.

  5. APC-PC Combined Scheme in Gilbert Two State Model: Proposal and Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulo, Yaka; Saring, Yang; Bhunia, Chandan Tilak

    2017-04-01

    In an automatic repeat request (ARQ) scheme, a packet is retransmitted if it gets corrupted due to transmission errors caused by the channel. However, an erroneous packet may contain both erroneous bits and correct bits and hence it may still contain useful information. The receiver may be able to combine this information from multiple erroneous copies to recover the correct packet. Packet combining (PC) is a simple and elegant scheme of error correction in transmitted packet, in which two received copies are XORed to obtain the bit location of erroneous bits. Thereafter, the packet is corrected by bit inversion of bit located as erroneous. Aggressive packet combining (APC) is a logic extension of PC primarily designed for wireless communication with objective of correcting error with low latency. PC offers higher throughput than APC, but PC does not correct double bit errors if occur in same bit location of erroneous copies of the packet. A hybrid technique is proposed to utilize the advantages of both APC and PC while attempting to remove the limitation of both. In the proposed technique, applications of APC-PC on Gilbert two state model has been studied. The simulation results show that the proposed technique offers better throughput than the conventional APC and lesser packet error rate than PC scheme.

  6. Colorectal cancer screening

    OpenAIRE

    Plumb, A. A.; Halligan, S.

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a major public health burden worldwide. There is clear-cut evidence that screening will reduce colorectal cancer mortality and the only contentious issue is which screening tool to use. Most evidence points towards screening with fecal occult blood testing. The immunochemical fecal occult blood tests have a higher sensitivity than the guaiac-based tests. In addition, their automation and haemoglobin quantification allows a threshold for colonoscopy to be selected that can...

  7. Screening for colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jin; Efron, Jonathan E

    2011-01-01

    March is national colorectal cancer awareness month. It is estimated that as many as 60% of colorectal cancer deaths could be prevented if all men and women aged 50 years or older were screened routinely. In 2000, Katie Couric's televised colonoscopy led to a 20% increase in screening colonoscopies across America, a stunning rise called the "Katie Couric Effect". This event demonstrated how celebrity endorsement affects health behavior. Currently, discussion is ongoing about the optimal strategy for CRC screening, particularly the costs of screening colonoscopy. The current CRC screening guidelines are summarized in Table 2. Debates over the optimum CRC screening test continue in the face of evidence that 22 million Americans aged 50 to 75 years are not screened for CRC by any modality and 25,000 of those lives may have been saved if they had been screened for CRC. It is clear that improving screening rates and reducing disparities in underscreened communities and population subgroups could further reduce colorectal cancer morbidity and mortality. National Institutes of Health consensus identified the following priority areas to enhance the use and quality of colorectal cancer screening: Eliminate financial barriers to colorectal cancer screening and appropriate follow-up of positive results of colorectal cancer screening. Develop systems to ensure the high quality of colorectal cancer screening programs. Conduct studies to determine the comparative effectiveness of the various colorectal cancer screening methods in usual practice settings. Encouraging population adherence to screening tests and allowing patients to select the tests they prefer may do more good (as long as they choose something) than whatever procedure is chosen by the medical profession as the preferred test.

  8. End-Binding Protein 1 (EB1) Up-regulation is an Early Event in Colorectal Carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stypula-Cyrus, Yolanda; Mutyal, Nikhil N.; Cruz, Mart Angelo Dela; Kunte, Dhananjay P.; Radosevich, Andrew J.; Wali, Ramesh; Roy, Hemant K.; Backman, Vadim

    2014-01-01

    End-binding protein (EB1) is a microtubule protein that binds to the tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli (APC). While EB1 is implicated as a potential oncogene, its role in cancer progression is unknown. Therefore, we analyzed EB1/APC expression at the earliest stages of colorectal carcinogenesis and in the uninvolved mucosa ("field effect") of human and animal tissue. We also performed siRNA-knockdown in colon cancer cell lines. EB1 is up-regulated in early and field carcinogenesis in the colon, and the cellular/nano-architectural effect of EB1 knockdown depended on the genetic context. Thus, dysregulation of EB1 is an important early event in colon carcinogenesis. PMID:24492008

  9. Targeting Wnt signaling in colorectal cancer. A Review in the Theme: Cell Signaling: Proteins, Pathways and Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novellasdemunt, Laura; Antas, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved Wnt signaling pathway plays essential roles during embryonic development and tissue homeostasis. Notably, comprehensive genetic studies in Drosophila and mice in the past decades have demonstrated the crucial role of Wnt signaling in intestinal stem cell maintenance by regulating proliferation, differentiation, and cell-fate decisions. Wnt signaling has also been implicated in a variety of cancers and other diseases. Loss of the Wnt pathway negative regulator adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is the hallmark of human colorectal cancers (CRC). Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing further reveal many novel recurrent Wnt pathway mutations in addition to the well-characterized APC and β-catenin mutations in CRC. Despite attractive strategies to develop drugs for Wnt signaling, major hurdles in therapeutic intervention of the pathway persist. Here we discuss the Wnt-activating mechanisms in CRC and review the current advances and challenges in drug discovery. PMID:26289750

  10. AGILE integration into APC for high mix logic fab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatefait, M.; Lam, A.; Le Gratiet, B.; Mikolajczak, M.; Morin, V.; Chojnowski, N.; Kocsis, Z.; Smith, I.; Decaunes, J.; Ostrovsky, A.; Monget, C.

    2015-09-01

    mix logic Fab) in term of product and technology portfolio AGILE corrects for up to 120nm of product topography error on process layer with less than 50nm depth of focus Based on tool functionalities delivered by ASML and on high volume manufacturing requirement, AGILE integration is a real challenge. Regarding ST requirements "Automatic AGILE" functionality developed by ASML was not a turnkey solution and a dedicated functionality was needed. A "ST homemade AGILE integration" has been fully developed and implemented within ASML and ST constraints. This paper describes this integration in our Advanced Process Control platform (APC).

  11. Genetic susceptibility markers for a breast-colorectal cancer phenotype: Exploratory results from genome-wide association studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joon, Aron; Brewster, Abenaa M.; Chen, Wei V.; Eng, Cathy; Shete, Sanjay; Casey, Graham; Schumacher, Fredrick; Lin, Yi; Harrison, Tabitha A.; White, Emily; Ahsan, Habibul; Andrulis, Irene L.; Whittemore, Alice S.; Ko Win, Aung; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Kapuscinski, Miroslaw K.; Ochs-Balcom, Heather M.; Gallinger, Steven; Jenkins, Mark A.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Peters, Ulrike; Amos, Christopher I.; Lynch, Patrick M.

    2018-01-01

    Background Clustering of breast and colorectal cancer has been observed within some families and cannot be explained by chance or known high-risk mutations in major susceptibility genes. Potential shared genetic susceptibility between breast and colorectal cancer, not explained by high-penetrance genes, has been postulated. We hypothesized that yet undiscovered genetic variants predispose to a breast-colorectal cancer phenotype. Methods To identify variants associated with a breast-colorectal cancer phenotype, we analyzed genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from cases and controls that met the following criteria: cases (n = 985) were women with breast cancer who had one or more first- or second-degree relatives with colorectal cancer, men/women with colorectal cancer who had one or more first- or second-degree relatives with breast cancer, and women diagnosed with both breast and colorectal cancer. Controls (n = 1769), were unrelated, breast and colorectal cancer-free, and age- and sex- frequency-matched to cases. After imputation, 6,220,060 variants were analyzed using the discovery set and variants associated with the breast-colorectal cancer phenotype at Pcolorectal cancer phenotype in the discovery and replication data (most significant; rs7430339, Pdiscovery = 1.2E-04; rs7429100, Preplication = 2.8E-03). In meta-analysis of the discovery and replication data, the most significant association remained at rs7429100 (P = 1.84E-06). Conclusion The results of this exploratory analysis did not find clear evidence for a susceptibility locus with a pleiotropic effect on hereditary breast and colorectal cancer risk, although the suggestive association of genetic variation in the region of ROBO1, a potential tumor suppressor gene, merits further investigation. PMID:29698419

  12. Molecular genetics of colorectal cancer Genética molecular del cáncer colorrectal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Cruz-Bustillo Clarens

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal tumours constitute an excellent system to study carcinogenesis and the molecular events implicated in the development of cancer. Attending to the way it is transmitted, colorectal cancer may appear in one of three forms: sporadic, familial, and hereditary. The sporadic form is most common and has no familial or hereditary associated factor thus far, while familial and hereditary forms show the same inheritance pattern. Hereditary colorectal cancers develop by means of defined stages that go from lesions in the crypt of the colon through adenomas to manifest cancer. They are characterised by the accumulation of multiple mutations in tumour suppressor genes and oncogenes that affect the balance between cell proliferation and apoptosis. The colorectal carcinogenesis pathway is not unique and there are probably several ways for the initiation, development and progression of colorectal tumours.Los tumores colorrectales constituyen un excelente sistema para estudiar la carcinogénesis y los eventos moleculares involucrados en el desarrollo de un tumor. El cáncer colorrectal puede presentarse en tres formas, según su forma de transmisión: esporádico, familiar y hereditario. La forma esporádica que es la mayoritaria, no tiene hasta el momento ningún factor familiar o hereditario asociado, mientras que las formas familiares y hereditarias siguen un patrón de herencia en la propensión familiar a padecerlo. Los cánceres colorrectales hereditarios se desarrollan mediante etapas definidas que van desde lesiones en la cripta del colon a través de adenomas hasta manifestar el cáncer y se caracterizan por la acumulación de múltiples mutaciones en genes supresores de tumor y oncogenes que afectan el balance entre la proliferación celular y la apoptosis. La vía de carcinogénesis colorrectal no es una sola y probablemente existan varios caminos para el inicio, desarrollo y progresión de un tumor colorrectal.

  13. 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... of colon cancer. Photo: AP Photo/Ron Edmonds Colorectal Cancer Cancer of the colon (large intestine) or rectum ( ...

  14. Colorectal Cancer Risk Assessment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 11/12/2014 Risk Calculator About the Tool Colorectal Cancer Risk Factors Download SAS and Gauss Code Page ... Rectal Cancer: Prevention, Genetics, Causes Tests to Detect Colorectal Cancer and Polyps Cancer Risk Prediction Resources Update November ...

  15. Brazilian guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of hereditary angioedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Giavina-Bianchi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary angioedema is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by edema attacks with multiple organ involvement. It is caused by a quantitative or functional deficiency of the C1 inhibitor, which is a member of the serine protease inhibitor family. Hereditary angioedema is unknown to many health professionals and is therefore an underdiagnosed disease. The causes of death from hereditary angioedema include laryngeal edema with asphyxia. The estimated mortality rate in patients in whom the disease goes undetected and who are therefore incorrectly treated is 25-40%. In addition to edema of the glottis, hereditary angioedema often results in edema of the gastrointestinal tract, which can be incapacitating. Patients with hereditary angioedema may undergo unnecessary surgical interventions because the digestive tract can be the primary or only organ system involved, thus mimicking acute surgical abdomen. It is estimated that patients with hereditary angioedema experience some degree of disability 20-100 days per year. The Experts in Clinical Immunology and Allergy of the "Associação Brasileira de Alergia e Imunopatologia -ASBAI" developed these guidelines for the diagnosis, therapy, and management of hereditary angioedema.

  16. Brazilian guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of hereditary angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giavina-Bianchi, Pedro; França, Alfeu T; Grumach, Anete S; Motta, Abílio A; Fernandes, Fátima R; Campos, Regis A; Valle, Solange O; Rosário, Nelson A; Sole, Dirceu

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by edema attacks with multiple organ involvement. It is caused by a quantitative or functional deficiency of the C1 inhibitor, which is a member of the serine protease inhibitor family. Hereditary angioedema is unknown to many health professionals and is therefore an underdiagnosed disease. The causes of death from hereditary angioedema include laryngeal edema with asphyxia. The estimated mortality rate in patients in whom the disease goes undetected and who are therefore incorrectly treated is 25-40%. In addition to edema of the glottis, hereditary angioedema often results in edema of the gastrointestinal tract, which can be incapacitating. Patients with hereditary angioedema may undergo unnecessary surgical interventions because the digestive tract can be the primary or only organ system involved, thus mimicking acute surgical abdomen. It is estimated that patients with hereditary angioedema experience some degree of disability 20-100 days per year. The Experts in Clinical Immunology and Allergy of the "Associação Brasileira de Alergia e Imunopatologia -ASBAI" developed these guidelines for the diagnosis, therapy, and management of hereditary angioedema.

  17. Thermally induced transformations of iron oxide stabilised APC residues from waste incineration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette Abildgaard; Koch, C.B.

    2001-01-01

    Air pollution control (APC) facilities at waste incinerator plants produce large quantities of solid residues rich in salts and heavy metals. Heavy metals are readily released to water from the residues and it has, therefore, been found suitable to apply a rapid co-precipitation/adsorption process...... as a means to immobilize the toxic elements. In the 'Ferrox process', this immobilization is based on co-precipitation with an Fe(III) oxide formed by oxidation of Fe(II) by air in an aqueous slurry with the APC residue at alkaline pH. In this work we have undertaken a Mossbauer spectroscopy study of the Fe...

  18. Jagged1 is the pathological link between Wnt and Notch pathways in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodilla, Verónica; Villanueva, Alberto; Obrador-Hevia, Antonia; Robert-Moreno, Alex; Fernández-Majada, Vanessa; Grilli, Andrea; López-Bigas, Nuria; Bellora, Nicolás; Albà, M Mar; Torres, Ferran; Duñach, Mireia; Sanjuan, Xavier; Gonzalez, Sara; Gridley, Thomas; Capella, Gabriel; Bigas, Anna; Espinosa, Lluís

    2009-04-14

    Notch has been linked to beta-catenin-dependent tumorigenesis; however, the mechanisms leading to Notch activation and the contribution of the Notch pathway to colorectal cancer is not yet understood. By microarray analysis, we have identified a group of genes downstream of Wnt/beta-catenin (down-regulated when blocking Wnt/beta-catenin) that are directly regulated by Notch (repressed by gamma-secretase inhibitors and up-regulated by active Notch1 in the absence of beta-catenin signaling). We demonstrate that Notch is downstream of Wnt in colorectal cancer cells through beta-catenin-mediated transcriptional activation of the Notch-ligand Jagged1. Consistently, expression of activated Notch1 partially reverts the effects of blocking Wnt/beta-catenin pathway in tumors implanted s.c. in nude mice. Crossing APC(Min/+) with Jagged1(+/Delta) mice is sufficient to significantly reduce the size of the polyps arising in the APC mutant background indicating that Notch is an essential modulator of tumorigenesis induced by nuclear beta-catenin. We show that this mechanism is operating in human tumors from Familial Adenomatous Polyposis patients. We conclude that Notch activation, accomplished by beta-catenin-mediated up-regulation of Jagged1, is required for tumorigenesis in the intestine. The Notch-specific genetic signature is sufficient to block differentiation and promote vasculogenesis in tumors whereas proliferation depends on both pathways.

  19. Test of electrodialytic upgrading of MSWI APC residue in pilot scale: focus on reduced metal and salt leaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkelund, Gunvor Marie; Jensen, Pernille Erland; Villumsen, Arne

    2010-01-01

    that is adapted from conventional electrodialysis, e.g. used in desalination of solutions. The APC residue was treated in a suspension (8 kg APC residue and 80 L tap water) and circulated through an electrodialytic (ED) stack consisting of 50 cell pairs separated by ion exchange membranes. A direct current...

  20. 77 FR 34455 - In the Matter of Aegis Assessments, Inc., APC Group, Inc., Aurelio Resource Corp., BioAuthorize...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-11

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [File No. 500-1] In the Matter of Aegis Assessments, Inc., APC Group, Inc., Aurelio Resource Corp., BioAuthorize Holdings, Inc., and Fonix Corporation; Order of... securities of APC Group, Inc. because it has not filed any periodic reports since the period ended August 31...

  1. The Spindle Assembly Checkpoint Is Not Essential for Viability of Human Cells with Genetically Lowered APC/C Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wild, Thomas; Larsen, Marie Sofie Yoo; Narita, Takeo

    2016-01-01

    The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) and the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), which inhibits the APC/C, are essential determinants of mitotic timing and faithful division of genetic material. Activation of the APC/C is known to depend on two APC/C-interacting E2 ubiquitin......-conjugating enzymes-UBE2C and UBE2S. We show that APC/C activity in human cells is tuned by the combinatorial use of three E2s, namely UBE2C, UBE2S, and UBE2D. Genetic deletion of UBE2C and UBE2S, individually or in combination, leads to discriminative reduction in APC/C function and sensitizes cells to UBE2D...... depletion. Reduction of APC/C activity results in loss of switch-like metaphase-to-anaphase transition and, strikingly, renders cells insensitive to chemical inhibition of MPS1 and genetic ablation of MAD2, both of which are essential for the SAC. These results provide insights into the regulation of APC...

  2. An APC/C-Cdh1 Biosensor Reveals the Dynamics of Cdh1 Inactivation at the G1/S Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondracka, Andrej; Robbins, Jonathan A; Cross, Frederick R

    2016-01-01

    B-type cyclin-dependent kinase activity must be turned off for mitotic exit and G1 stabilization. B-type cyclin degradation is mediated by the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C); during and after mitotic exit, APC/C is dependent on Cdh1. Cdh1 is in turn phosphorylated and inactivated by cyclin-CDK at the Start transition of the new cell cycle. We developed a biosensor to assess the cell cycle dynamics of APC/C-Cdh1. Nuclear exit of the G1 transcriptional repressor Whi5 is a known marker of Start; APC/C-Cdh1 is inactivated 12 min after Whi5 nuclear exit with little measurable cell-to-cell timing variability. Multiple phosphorylation sites on Cdh1 act in a redundant manner to repress its activity. Reducing the number of phosphorylation sites on Cdh1 can to some extent be tolerated for cell viability, but it increases variability in timing of APC/C-Cdh1 inactivation. Mutants with minimal subsets of phosphorylation sites required for viability exhibit striking stochasticity in multiple responses including budding, nuclear division, and APC/C-Cdh1 activity itself. Multiple cyclin-CDK complexes, as well as the stoichiometric inhibitor Acm1, contribute to APC/C-Cdh1 inactivation; this redundant control is likely to promote rapid and reliable APC/C-Cdh1 inactivation immediately following the Start transition.

  3. New Functions of APC/C Ubiquitin Ligase in the Nervous System and Its Role in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchsberger, Tanja; Lloret, Ana; Viña, Jose

    2017-05-14

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase Anaphase Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C) regulates important processes in cells, such as the cell cycle, by targeting a set of substrates for degradation. In the last decade, APC/C has been related to several major functions in the nervous system, including axon guidance, synaptic plasticity, neurogenesis, and neuronal survival. Interestingly, some of the identified APC/C substrates have been related to neurodegenerative diseases. There is an accumulation of some degradation targets of APC/C in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains, which suggests a dysregulation of the protein complex in the disorder. Moreover, recently evidence has been provided for an inactivation of APC/C in AD. It has been shown that oligomers of the AD-related peptide, Aβ, induce degradation of the APC/C activator subunit cdh1, in vitro in neurons in culture and in vivo in the mouse hippocampus. Furthermore, in the AD mouse model APP/PS1, lower cdh1 levels were observed in pyramidal neurons in CA1 when compared to age-matched wildtype mice. In this review, we provide a complete list of APC/C substrates that are involved in the nervous system and we discuss their functions. We also summarize recent studies that show neurobiological effects in cdh1 knockout mouse models. Finally, we discuss the role of APC/C in the pathophysiology of AD.

  4. Dementia in hereditary cystatin C amyloidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blöndal, H; Guomundsson, G; Benedikz, Eirikur

    1989-01-01

    in seventeen cases of whom two presented with dementia. At the last examination the majority had severe dementia and severely abnormal EEG. Anti-cystatin C positive amyloid vascular and perivascular infiltrates were found. The resulting damage to the microvasculature of the brain and secondary hemorrhages......Nineteen cases with verified Hereditary Cystatin C Amyloid Angiopathy are presented. All of the cases had one or more cerebrovascular insults starting at the age of 20-41 years and survived from 10 days to 23 years after the first insult. Progressive dementia was a prominent clinical feature...... and infarctions were considered to be an adequate explanation for the dementia in these cases. Skin biopsies can now probably be used to demonstrate cystatin C positive amyloid deposits conclusively in the tissues of these patients....

  5. Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Wu Chang

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON is a maternally inherited mitochondrial disease that primarily affects the optic nerve, causing bilateral vision loss in juveniles and young adults. A 12-year-old boy had complained of blurred vision in both eyes for more than 1 year. His best-corrected visual acuity was 0.08 in the right eye and 0.1 in the left. Ophthalmologic examination showed bilateral optic disc hyperemia and margin blurring, peripapillary telangiectasis, and a relative afferent pupil defect in his right eye. Fluorescein angiography showed no stain or leakage around the optic disc in the late phase. Visual field analysis showed central scotoma in the left eye and a near-total defect in the right. Upon examination of the patient's mitochondrial DNA, a point mutation at nucleotide position 11778 was found, and the diagnosis of LHON was confirmed. Coenzyme Q10 was used to treat the patient.

  6. Mania associated with complicated hereditary spastic paraparesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghavendra B Nayak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary spastic paraparesis (HSP is an inherited group of neurological disorders with progressive lower limb spasticity. HSP can be clinically grouped into pure and complicated forms. Pure HSP is one without any associated neurological/psychiatric comorbidity. Depression is the most common psychiatric comorbidity. Presence of mania or bipolar affective illness with HSP is a rare phenomenon. We report a case of a 17-year-old boy who presented with classical features of HSP with complaints of excessive happiness, irritability, increased self-esteem and decreased sleep since 1 month. The patient also had complex partial seizure ever since he had features of HSP. The patient′s father and younger sister suffer from pure HSP. The patient was diagnosed to have first episode mania with complicated HSP. The details of treatment and possible neurobiology are discussed in this case report.

  7. Mania associated with complicated hereditary spastic paraparesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Raghavendra B; Bhogale, Govind S; Patil, Nanasaheb M; Pandurangi, Aditya A

    2011-07-01

    Hereditary spastic paraparesis (HSP) is an inherited group of neurological disorders with progressive lower limb spasticity. HSP can be clinically grouped into pure and complicated forms. Pure HSP is one without any associated neurological/psychiatric comorbidity. Depression is the most common psychiatric comorbidity. Presence of mania or bipolar affective illness with HSP is a rare phenomenon. We report a case of a 17-year-old boy who presented with classical features of HSP with complaints of excessive happiness, irritability, increased self-esteem and decreased sleep since 1 month. The patient also had complex partial seizure ever since he had features of HSP. The patient's father and younger sister suffer from pure HSP. The patient was diagnosed to have first episode mania with complicated HSP. The details of treatment and possible neurobiology are discussed in this case report.

  8. Deprivation amblyopia and congenital hereditary cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri, Behzad; Stacy, Rebecca C; Kruger, Joshua; Cestari, Dean M

    2013-01-01

    Amblyopia is a neurodevelopmental disorder of vision associated with decreased visual acuity, poor or absent stereopsis, and suppression of information from one eye.(1,2) Amblyopia may be caused by strabismus (strabismic amblyopia), refractive error (anisometropic amblyopia), or deprivation from obstructed vision (deprivation amblyopia). 1 In the developed world, amblyopia is the most common cause of childhood visual impairment, 3 which reduces quality of life 4 and also almost doubles the lifetime risk of legal blindness.(5, 6) Successful treatment of amblyopia greatly depends on early detection and treatment of predisposing disorders such as congenital cataract, which is the most common cause of deprivational amblyopia. Understanding the genetic causes of congenital cataract leads to more effective screening tests, early detection and treatment of infants and children who are at high risk for hereditary congenital cataract.

  9. Developments in Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Colorectal Cancer Developments in Colorectal Cancer Screening Past Issues / Summer 2016 Table of ... at the National Cancer Institute, shared developments in colorectal cancer screening methods with NIH MedlinePlus magazine. What ...

  10. Improving Quality in Colorectal Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. Slieker (Juliette)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Colorectal surgery is an important aspect of our current health system, due to the high incidence of colorectal cancer combined with an ageing population, improved long-term outcomes after colorectal surgery, and the perfectioning of the operative and postoperative

  11. Genome-wide linkage scan for colorectal cancer susceptibility genes supports linkage to chromosome 3q

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velculescu Victor E

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer-related mortality. The disease is clinically and genetically heterogeneous though a strong hereditary component has been identified. However, only a small proportion of the inherited susceptibility can be ascribed to dominant syndromes, such as Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC or Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP. In an attempt to identify novel colorectal cancer predisposing genes, we have performed a genome-wide linkage analysis in 30 Swedish non-FAP/non-HNPCC families with a strong family history of colorectal cancer. Methods Statistical analysis was performed using multipoint parametric and nonparametric linkage. Results Parametric analysis under the assumption of locus homogeneity excluded any common susceptibility regions harbouring a predisposing gene for colorectal cancer. However, several loci on chromosomes 2q, 3q, 6q, and 7q with suggestive linkage were detected in the parametric analysis under the assumption of locus heterogeneity as well as in the nonparametric analysis. Among these loci, the locus on chromosome 3q21.1-q26.2 was the most consistent finding providing positive results in both parametric and nonparametric analyses Heterogeneity LOD score (HLOD = 1.90, alpha = 0.45, Non-Parametric LOD score (NPL = 2.1. Conclusion The strongest evidence of linkage was seen for the region on chromosome 3. Interestingly, the same region has recently been reported as the most significant finding in a genome-wide analysis performed with SNP arrays; thus our results independently support the finding on chromosome 3q.

  12. Identification of HNPCC by Molecular Analysis of Colorectal and Endometrial Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. F. A. Vasen

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC, Lynch syndrome is a dominantly inherited syndrome characterized by the development of colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer and other cancers and the presence of microsatellite instability (MSI in tumors. The Bethesda guidelines have been proposed for the identification of families suspected of HNPCC that require further molecular analysis. We have evaluated the yield of MSI-analysis in a large series of Dutch families suspected of HNPCC. We also analysed whether the loss of mismatch repair (MMR protein detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC of colorectal cancer (CRC and endometrial cancer correlated with the presence of MSI and/or a MMR gene mutation. The results showed that the Bethesda criteria with a few modifications are appropriate to identify families eligible for genetic testing. In addition, we found that MSI and IHC-analysis of CRC using antibodies against MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 proteins are equally effective for identifying carriers of the known MMR gene defects. However, as long as the role of other putative MMR genes in hereditary CRC has not been elucidated, IHC-analysis cannot completely replace MSI. For this reason, we prefer MSI-analysis as first step in families suspected of HNPCC. On the other hand, in families fulfilling the revised Amsterdam criteria in which the probability of detecting a mutation is relatively high, we would recommend IHC as first diagnostic step because the result might predict the specific underlying MMR gene mutation. MSI or IHC-analysis of endometrial cancer alone was found to be less sensitive compared with these tests performed in colorectal cancer. Therefore, probably the best approach in the analysis of this cancer is to perform both techniques. The identification of HNPCC is important as it makes it possible to target effective preventative measures. Our studies showed that MSI and IHC analysis of colorectal and endometrial cancer, are reliable

  13. Unsolicited information letters to increase awareness of Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer: reactions and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Helle Vendel; Frederiksen, Birgitte Lidegaard; Lautrup, Charlotte Kvist; Lindberg, Lars Joachim; Ladelund, Steen; Nilbert, Mef

    2018-04-12

    Dissemination of information on a genetically increased risk should according to guidelines primarily be family-mediated. Incomplete and incorrect information spread has, however, been documented and implies missed possibilities for prevention. In Denmark, the national HNPCC register has been granted an exception to send unsolicited letters with information on hereditary colorectal cancer and an invitation to genetic counseling to members of families with familial and hereditary colorectal cancer. To evaluate this approach, we investigated reactions and attitudes to unsolicited letters in 708 members of families with genetic predisposition and in 1600 individuals from the general population. Support for information letters was expressed by 78% of the family members and by 82% of the general population. Regarding route of information, 90% of family members preferred a letter to no information, 66% preferred information from the hospital rather than from family members and 40% preferred to obtain information from a close family member. Our results suggest that use of unsolicited information letters from the health care system may be a feasible and highly acceptable strategy to disseminate information to families at high risk of colorectal cancer.

  14. Recurrent IVF failure and hereditary thrombophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safdarian, Leila; Najmi, Zahra; Aleyasin, Ashraf; Aghahosseini, Marzieh; Rashidi, Mandana; Asadollah, Sara

    2014-07-01

    The largest percentage of failed invitro fertilization (IVF (cycles, are due to lack of implantation. As hereditary thrombophilia can cause in placentation failure, it may have a role in recurrent IVF failure. Aim of this case-control study was to determine whether hereditary thrombophilia is more prevalent in women with recurrent IVF failures. Case group comprised 96 infertile women, with a history of recurrent IVF failure. Control group was comprised of 95 healthy women with proven fertility who had conceived spontaneously. All participants were assessed for the presence of inherited thrombophilias including: factor V Leiden, methilen tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) mutation, prothrombin mutation, homocystein level, protein S and C deficiency, antithrombin III (AT-III) deficiency and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) mutation. Presence of thrombophilia was compared between groups. Having at least one thrombophilia known as a risk factor for recurrent IVF failure (95% CI=1.74-5.70, OR=3.15, p=0.00). Mutation of factor V Leiden (95% CI=1.26-10.27, OR=3.06, P=0.01) and homozygote form of MTHFR mutation (95% CI=1.55-97.86, OR=12.33, p=0.05) were also risk factors for recurrent IVF failure. However, we could not find significant difference in other inherited thrombophilia's. Inherited thrombophilia is more prevalent in women with recurrent IVF failure compared with healthy women. Having at least one thrombophilia, mutation of factor V Leiden and homozygote form of MTHFR mutation were risk factors for recurrent IVF failure.

  15. Chaperonopathies: spotlight on hereditary motor neuropathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Lupo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Distal hereditary motor neuropathies (dHMN comprise a group of rare hereditary neuromuscular disorders characterized by a peroneal muscular atrophy without sensory symptoms. To date twenty-three genes for dHMN have been reported and four of them encode for chaperones: DNAJB2, which encodes a member of the HSP40/DNAJ co-chaperone family, and HSPB1, HSPB3 and HSPB8, which encode three members of the family of small heat shock proteins. Except for HSPB1, with around thirty different mutations, the remaining three genes comprise a much low number of cases. Thus, only one case has been described caused by an HSPB3 mutation, whereas few DNAJB2 and HSPB8 cases are known, most of them caused by a founder c.352+1G>A mutation in DNAJB2 and by mutations affecting the hot spot K141 residue of the HSPB8 chaperone. This low number of cases makes it difficult to understand the pathomechanism underlying the neuropathy. Chaperones can assemble in multi-chaperone complexes forming an integrative chaperone network in the cell, which plays relevant cellular roles in a variety of processes such as the correct folding of newly synthesized proteins, their escort to their precise cellular locations to form functional proteins and complexes and the response to protein misfolding, including the degradation of proteins that fail to refold properly. Despite of this variety of functions, mutations in some of them lead to diseases with a similar clinical picture, suggesting common pathways. This review gives an overview of the genetics of dHMNs caused by mutations in four genes, DNAJB2, HSPB1, HSPB3 and HSPB8, which encode chaperones and show a common disease mechanism.

  16. Gender specific issues in hereditary ocular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iragavarapu, Saradha; Gorin, Michael B

    2015-02-01

    This review is intended to summarize the current knowledge from basic science and clinical medical literature cited within PubMed that pertain to gender-related factors and affect those individuals with hereditary ocular disorders. We consider gender-related biological factors that (a) affect disease onset and progression, (b) gender differences for major X-linked ocular disorders, (c) gender-specific conditions, (d) medications that may influence genetic eye disorders, and finally, (e) gender-related issues that influence the management and quality of life of these patients. Several studies have demonstrated the manner in which sex-related hormones in animal models are capable of influencing cell pathway and survival that are likely to affect hereditary eye disorders. There are very few clinical studies that provide compelling evidence for gender differences in human ocular conditions, other than for a number of X-linked disorders. Disease expression for X-linked disorders may be impacted by genetic mechanisms such as lyonization or uniparental disomy. Clinical evidence regarding the impact of gender-related medical conditions and therapies on eye conditions is extremely limited and primarily based on anecdotal evidence. Gender-specific factors may play a major role in the underlying biological pathways that influence the onset, rate of progression, and clinical findings associated with ocular genetic conditions. Clinicians need to be aware of the variable phenotypes observed in female carriers of X-linked disorders of gender specific issues, many of which are inadequately addressed in the current literature. Clinicians need to be sensitive to gender differences in social, cultural, and religious systems and they should also be aware of how their own gender biases may influence how they counsel patients. Finally, it is clear that the lack of effective clinical studies in this area creates an opportunity for future research that will have real benefits for these

  17. The Regulation of the Angiogenic Factor FGF Binding Protein (FGF-BP) by the APC/Beta-Catenin Signaling Pathway in the Progression of Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stylianou, Dora

    2004-01-01

    ...) to study the expression of FGF-BP in mammary tumorigenesis progression of the APC/+ mouse and 2) to determine the mechanism of regulation of FGF-BP b the APC/beta-catenin signaling pathway in breast cancer...

  18. The Regulation of the Angiogenic Factor FGF Binding Protein (FGF-BP) by the APC/Beta-Catenin Signaling Pathway in the Progression of Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stylianou, Dora

    2003-01-01

    ...) to study the expression of FGF-BP in mammary tumorigenesis% progression of the APC/+ mouse and 2) to determine the mechanism of regulation of FGF-BP by the APC/beta- catenin signaling pathway in breast cancer...

  19. Corruption of homeostatic mechanisms in the guanylyl cyclase C signaling pathway underlying colorectal tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Waldman, Scott A

    2010-08-01

    Colon cancer, the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide, originates from the malignant transformation of intestinal epithelial cells. The intestinal epithelium undergoes a highly organized process of rapid regeneration along the crypt-villus axis, characterized by proliferation, migration, differentiation and apoptosis, whose coordination is essential to maintaining the mucosal barrier. Disruption of these homeostatic processes predisposes cells to mutations in tumor suppressors or oncogenes, whose dysfunction provides transformed cells an evolutionary growth advantage. While sequences of genetic mutations at different stages along the neoplastic continuum have been established, little is known of the events initiating tumorigenesis prior to adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutations. Here, we examine a role for the corruption of homeostasis induced by silencing novel tumor suppressors, including the intestine-specific transcription factor CDX2 and its gene target guanylyl cyclase C (GCC), as early events predisposing cells to mutations in APC and other sequential genes that initiate colorectal cancer. CDX2 and GCC maintain homeostatic regeneration in the intestine by restricting cell proliferation, promoting cell maturation and adhesion, regulating cell migration and defending the intestinal barrier and genomic integrity. Elimination of CDX2 or GCC promotes intestinal tumor initiation and growth in aged mice, mice carrying APC mutations or mice exposed to carcinogens. The roles of CDX2 and GCC in suppressing intestinal tumorigenesis, universal disruption in their signaling through silencing of hormones driving GCC, and the uniform overexpression of GCC by tumors underscore the potential value of oral replacement with GCC ligands as targeted prevention and therapy for colorectal cancer.

  20. Molecular characterization of circulating colorectal tumor cells defines genetic signatures for individualized cancer care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Say Li; Liu, Xingliang; Suhaimi, Nur-Afidah Mohamed; Koh, Kenneth Jia Hao; Hu, Min; Lee, Daniel Yoke San; Cima, Igor; Phyo, Wai Min; Lee, Esther Xing Wei; Tai, Joyce A.; Foong, Yu Miin; Vo, Jess Honganh; Koh, Poh Koon; Zhang, Tong; Ying, Jackie Y.; Lim, Bing; Tan, Min-Han; Hillmer, Axel M.

    2017-01-01

    Studies on circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have largely focused on platform development and CTC enumeration rather than on the genomic characterization of CTCs. To address this, we performed targeted sequencing of CTCs of colorectal cancer patients and compared the mutations with the matched primary tumors. We collected preoperative blood and matched primary tumor samples from 48 colorectal cancer patients. CTCs were isolated using a label-free microfiltration device on a silicon microsieve. Upon whole genome amplification, we performed amplicon-based targeted sequencing on a panel of 39 druggable and frequently mutated genes on both CTCs and fresh-frozen tumor samples. We developed an analysis pipeline to minimize false-positive detection of somatic mutations in amplified DNA. In 60% of the CTC-enriched blood samples, we detected primary tumor matching mutations. We found a significant positive correlation between the allele frequencies of somatic mutations detected in CTCs and abnormal CEA serum level. Strikingly, we found driver mutations and amplifications in cancer and druggable genes such as APC, KRAS, TP53, ERBB3, FBXW7 and ERBB2. In addition, we found that CTCs carried mutation signatures that resembled the signatures of their primary tumors. Cumulatively, our study defined genetic signatures and somatic mutation frequency of colorectal CTCs. The identification of druggable mutations in CTCs of preoperative colorectal cancer patients could lead to more timely and focused therapeutic interventions. PMID:28978093