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Sample records for apc gene mutations

  1. ApcMin, a mutation in the murine Apc gene, predisposes to mammary carcinomas and focal alveolar hyperplasias.

    OpenAIRE

    Moser, A R; Mattes, E M; Dove, W. F.; Lindstrom, M.J.; Haag, J D; Gould, M N

    1993-01-01

    ApcMin (Min, multiple intestinal neoplasia) is a point mutation in the murine homolog of the APC gene. Min/+ mice develop multiple intestinal adenomas, as do humans carrying germ-line mutations in APC. Female mice carrying Min are also prone to develop mammary tumors. Min/+ mammary glands are more sensitive to chemical carcinogenesis than are +/+ mammary glands. Transplantation of mammary cells from Min/+ or +/+ donors into +/+ hosts demonstrates that the propensity to develop mammary tumors ...

  2. ApcMin, A Mutation in the Murine Apc Gene, Predisposes to Mammary Carcinomas and Focal Alveolar Hyperplasias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Amy Rapaich; Mattes, Ellen M.; Dove, William F.; Lindstrom, Mary J.; Haag, Jill D.; Gould, Michael N.

    1993-10-01

    ApcMin (Min, multiple intestinal neoplasia) is a point mutation in the murine homolog of the APC gene. Min/+ mice develop multiple intestinal adenomas, as do humans carrying germ-line mutations in APC. Female mice carrying Min are also prone to develop mammary tumors. Min/+ mammary glands are more sensitive to chemical carcinogenesis than are +/+ mammary glands. Transplantation of mammary cells from Min/+ or +/+ donors into +/+ hosts demonstrates that the propensity to develop mammary tumors is intrinsic to the Min/+ mammary cells. Long-term grafts of Min/+ mammary glands also gave rise to focal alveolar hyperplasias, indicating that the presence of the Min mutation also has a role in the development of these lesions.

  3. Molecular analysis of the APC gene in 71 Israeli families: 17 novel mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavert, Nancy; Yaron, Yuval; Naiman, Tova; Bercovich, Dani; Rozen, Paul; Shomrat, Ruth; Legum, Cyril; Orr-Urtreger, Avi

    2002-06-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is caused by germline mutations in the APC gene. This study included 71 Israeli families referred for molecular analysis of the APC gene. Analysis was performed by the protein truncation test (PTT) of exon 15, and if negative, by direct sequencing of exon 1 to 14. Mutations were found in 36 (50.7%) probands. Mutation detection rates depended on the pattern of referral, such that among the 40 probands referred from the Service for Hereditary Cancer the mutation detection rate was 70%, whereas among the 31 probands referred by other gastroenterologists detection rate was significantly lower (25.8%). Of the 36 mutations detected, 21 were within exon 15, 13 within exons 1 to 14 and 2 were newly-described splicing mutations in introns 9 and 14. A relatively high proportion of the mutations was detected in exon 9 (6/36), five of them newly described. Altogether, we describe here 17 new mutations. Within the two major ethnic groups in Israel, patients of Ashkenazi and non-Ashkenazi origin, there was no significant differences in the mutation detection rate or the distribution of mutations within the APC gene. No founder mutation was detected in any of these populations. Our data confirm that higher detection rates may be expected in patients referred by clinical services specializing in hereditary colon cancer. These results further underscore the importance of complete analysis of all exons and exon/intron boundaries, in order to achieve maximal detection rate in patients suspected of FAP. PMID:12007223

  4. Mutations in APC, CTNNB1 and K-ras genes and expression of hMLH1 in sporadic colorectal carcinomas from the Netherlands Cohort Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The early to intermediate stages of the majority of colorectal tumours are thought to be driven by aberrations in the Wnt (APC, CTNNB1) and Ras (K-ras) pathways. A smaller proportion of cancers shows mismatch repair deficiency. The aim of this study was to analyse the co-occurrence of these genetic alterations in relation to tumour and patient characteristics. In a group of 656 unselected sporadic colorectal cancer patients, aberrations in the APC, K-ras, CTNNB1 genes, and expression of hMLH1 were investigated. Additionally, tumours were divided in groups based on molecular features and compared with respect to patient's age at diagnosis, sex, family history of colorectal cancer, tumour sub-localisation, Dukes' stage and differentiation. Mutations at the phosphorylation sites (codons 31, 33, 37, and 45) in the CTNNB1 gene were observed in tumours from only 5/464 patients. Tumours with truncating APC mutations and activating K-ras mutations in codons 12 and 13 occurred at similar frequencies (37% (245/656) and 36% (235/656), respectively). Seventeen percent of tumours harboured both an APC and a K-ras mutation (109/656). Nine percent of all tumours (58/656) lacked hMLH1 expression. Patients harbouring a tumour with absent hMLH1 expression were older, more often women, more often had proximal colon tumours that showed poorer differentiation when compared to patients harbouring tumours with an APC and/or K-ras mutation. CTNNB1 mutations seem to be of minor importance in sporadic colorectal cancer. The main differences in tumour and patient characteristics are found between groups of patients based on mismatch repair deficiency

  5. APC mutations in sporadic coloretal carcinomas from The Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lüchtenborg, M.; Weijenberg, M.P.; Roemen, G.M.J.M.; Bruïne, A.P. de; Brandt, P.A. van den; Lentjes, M.H.F.M.; Brink, M.; Engeland, M. van; Goldbohm, R.A.; Goeij, A.F.P.M. de

    2004-01-01

    The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene is considered to be a gatekeeper in colorectal tumourigenesis. Inactivating mutations in APC have been reported in 34-70% of sporadic colorectal cancer patients, the majority of which occur in the mutation cluster region (MCR). In this study, tumour tissue f

  6. Meat and fish consumption, APC gene mutations and hMLH1 expression in colon and rectal cancer: A prospective cohort study (The Netherlands)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lüchtenborg, M.; Weijenberg, M.P.; Goeij, A.F.P.M. de; Wark, P.A.; Brink, M.; Roemen, G.M.J.M.; Lentjes, M.H.F.M.; Bruïne, A.P. de; Goldbohm, R.A.; Veer, P. van 't; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between meat and fish consumption and APC mutation status and hMLH1 expression in colon and rectal cancer. Methods: The associations were investigated in the Netherlands Cohort Study, and included 434 colon and 154 rectal cancer pa

  7. Loss-of-Function Mutation in APC2 Causes Sotos Syndrome Features

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    Mariam Almuriekhi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Sotos syndrome, characterized by intellectual disability and characteristic facial features, is caused by haploinsufficiency in the NSD1 gene. We conducted an etiological study on two siblings with Sotos features without mutations in NSD1 and detected a homozygous frameshift mutation in the APC2 gene by whole-exome sequencing, which resulted in the loss of function of cytoskeletal regulation in neurons. Apc2-deficient (Apc2−/− mice exhibited impaired learning and memory abilities along with an abnormal head shape. Endogenous Apc2 expression was downregulated by the knockdown of Nsd1, indicating that APC2 is a downstream effector of NSD1 in neurons. Nsd1 knockdown in embryonic mouse brains impaired the migration and laminar positioning of cortical neurons, as observed in Apc2−/− mice, and this defect was rescued by the forced expression of Apc2. Thus, APC2 is a crucial target of NSD1, which provides an explanation for the intellectual disability associated with Sotos syndrome.

  8. Association between cigarette smoking, APC mutations and the risk of developing sporadic colorectal adenomas and carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The association between colorectal cancer (CRC) and smoking has not been consistent. Incomplete smoking history and association to a specific subset of CRC tumors have been proposed as explanations. The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene has been reported to have a 'gatekeeper' function in the colonic mucosa. To evaluate the hypothesis that cigarette smoking is associated with adenoma and carcinoma development and further to investigate whether this association is due to mutations in the APC gene, we used a study population consisting of 133 cases (45 adenomas and 88 carcinomas) and 334 controls. All tumors were sequenced in the mutation cluster region (MCR) of the APC gene. Cases and controls were drawn from a homogeneous cohort of Norwegian origin. The mutational spectra of the APC gene revealed no difference in frequencies of mutations in cases based on ever and never smoking status. An overall case-control association was detected for adenomas and 'ever smoking' OR = 1.73 (95% CI 0.83–3.58). For CRC cases several smoking parameters for dose and duration were used. We detected an association for all smoking parameters and 'duration of smoking > 30 years', yielded a statistically significant OR = 2.86 (1.06–7.7). When cases were divided based on APC truncation mutation status, an association was detected in adenomas without APC mutation in relation to 'ever smoking', with an OR = 3.97 (1.26–12.51). For CRC cases without APC mutation 'duration of smoking > 30 years', yielded a statistically significant OR = 4.06 (1.20–13.7). The smoking parameter 'starting smoking ≥ 40 years ago' was only associated with CRC cases with APC mutations, OR = 2.0 (0.34–11.95). A case-case comparison revealed similar findings for this parameter, OR = 2.24 (0.73–6.86). Our data suggest an association between smoking and adenoma and CRC development. This association was strongest for cases without APC truncation

  9. Association between cigarette smoking, APC mutations and the risk of developing sporadic colorectal adenomas and carcinomas

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    Hagen Per

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The association between colorectal cancer (CRC and smoking has not been consistent. Incomplete smoking history and association to a specific subset of CRC tumors have been proposed as explanations. The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC gene has been reported to have a "gatekeeper" function in the colonic mucosa. Methods To evaluate the hypothesis that cigarette smoking is associated with adenoma and carcinoma development and further to investigate whether this association is due to mutations in the APC gene, we used a study population consisting of 133 cases (45 adenomas and 88 carcinomas and 334 controls. All tumors were sequenced in the mutation cluster region (MCR of the APC gene. Cases and controls were drawn from a homogeneous cohort of Norwegian origin. Results The mutational spectra of the APC gene revealed no difference in frequencies of mutations in cases based on ever and never smoking status. An overall case-control association was detected for adenomas and "ever smoking" OR = 1.73 (95% CI 0.83–3.58. For CRC cases several smoking parameters for dose and duration were used. We detected an association for all smoking parameters and "duration of smoking > 30 years", yielded a statistically significant OR = 2.86 (1.06–7.7. When cases were divided based on APC truncation mutation status, an association was detected in adenomas without APC mutation in relation to "ever smoking", with an OR = 3.97 (1.26–12.51. For CRC cases without APC mutation "duration of smoking > 30 years", yielded a statistically significant OR = 4.06 (1.20–13.7. The smoking parameter "starting smoking ≥ 40 years ago" was only associated with CRC cases with APC mutations, OR = 2.0 (0.34–11.95. A case-case comparison revealed similar findings for this parameter, OR = 2.24 (0.73–6.86. Conclusion Our data suggest an association between smoking and adenoma and CRC development. This association was strongest for cases without APC truncation

  10. Synergy between Apc min and an activated ras mutation is sufficient to induce colon carcinomas.

    OpenAIRE

    D Abaco, G. M.; Whitehead, R. H.; Burgess, A W

    1996-01-01

    Colon carcinomas appear to arise from the cumulative effect of mutations to several genes (APC, DCC, p53, ras, hMLH1, and hMSH2). By using novel colonic epithelial cell lines derived from the Immorto mouse, named the YAMC (young adult mouse colon) cell line, and an Immorto-Min mouse hybrid, named the IMCE (Immorto-Min colonic epithelial) cell line, carrying the Apc min mutation, we investigated the effect of an activated v-Ha-ras gene on tumor progression. The YAMC and IMCE cell lines are nor...

  11. Nuclear APC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, Kristi L

    2009-01-01

    Mutational inactivation of the tumor suppressor gene APC (Adenomatous polyposis coli) is thought to be an initiating step in the progression of the vast majority ofcolorectal cancers. Attempts to understand APC function have revealed more than a dozen binding partners as well as several subcellular localizations including at cell-cell junctions, associated with microtubules at the leading edge of migrating cells, at the apical membrane, in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. The present chapter focuses on APC localization and functions in the nucleus. APC contains two classical nuclear localization signals, with a third domain that can enhance nuclear import. Along with two sets of nuclear export signals, the nuclear localization signals enable the large APC protein to shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm. Nuclear APC can oppose beta-catenin-mediated transcription. This down-regulation of nuclear beta-catenin activity by APC most likely involves nuclear sequestration of beta-catenin from the transcription complex as well as interaction of APC with transcription corepressor CtBP. Additional nuclear binding partners for APC include transcription factor activator protein AP-2alpha, nuclear export factor Crm1, protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP-BL and perhaps DNA itself. Interaction of APC with polymerase beta and PCNA, suggests a role for APC in DNA repair. The observation that increases in the cytoplasmic distribution of APC correlate with colon cancer progression suggests that disruption of these nuclear functions of APC plays an important role in cancer progression. APC prevalence in the cytoplasm of quiescent cells points to a potential function for nuclear APC in control of cell proliferation. Clear definition of APC's nuclear function(s) will expand the possibilities for early colorectal cancer diagnostics and therapeutics targeted to APC. PMID:19928349

  12. Nuclear APC

    OpenAIRE

    Neufeld, Kristi L.

    2009-01-01

    Mutational inactivation of the tumor suppressor gene APC (Adenomatous polyposis coli) is thought to be an initiating step in the progression of the vast majority of colorectal cancers. Attempts to understand APC function have revealed more than a dozen binding partners as well as several subcellular localizations including at cell-cell junctions, associated with microtubules at the leading edge of migrating cells, at the apical membrane, in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. The present chapte...

  13. Identification of the Modifier of Min 2 (Mom2) Locus, a New Mutation That Influences Apc-Induced Intestinal Neoplasia

    OpenAIRE

    Silverman, Karen A.; Koratkar, Revati; Linda D. Siracusa; Buchberg, Arthur M.

    2002-01-01

    Min (Multiple intestinal neoplasia) mice carry a dominant mutation in the adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) gene and develop multiple adenomas throughout their intestinal tract (Moser et al. 1990; Su et al. 1992). Polyp multiplicity in Min mice is greatly influenced by genetic background. A modifier locus, Mom1 (Modifier of Min 1), was identified and localized to distal mouse chromosome 4 (Moser et al. 1992; Dietrich et al. 1993), and accounts for some of the genetic variance in polyp multipli...

  14. Role of APC and DNA mismatch repair genes in the development of colorectal cancers

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    Roy Deodutta

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Colorectal cancer is the third most common cause of cancer-related death in both men and women in the western hemisphere. According to the American Cancer Society, an estimated 105,500 new cases of colon cancer with 57,100 deaths will occur in the U.S. in 2003, accounting for about 10% of cancer deaths. Among the colon cancer patients, hereditary risk contributes approximately 20%. The main inherited colorectal cancers are the familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP and the hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancers (HNPCC. The FAP and HNPCC are caused due to mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC and DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes. The focus of this review is to summarize the functions of APC and MMR gene products in the development of colorectal cancers.

  15. Modelling Wnt/β-catenin target gene expression in APC and Wnt gradients under wild type and mutant conditions

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    JanaWolf

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The Wnt/β-catenin pathway is involved in the regulation of a multitude of physiological processes by controlling the differential expression of target genes. In certain tissues such as the adult liver, the Wnt/β-catenin pathway can attain different levels of activity due to gradients of Wnt ligands and/or intracellular pathway components like APC. How graded pathway activity is converted into regionally distinct patterns of Wnt/β-catenin target gene expression is largely unknown. Here, we apply a mathematical modelling approach to investigate the impact of different regulatory mechanisms on target gene expression within Wnt or APC concentration gradients. We develop a minimal model of Wnt/β-catenin signal transduction and combine it with various mechanisms of target gene regulation. In particular, the effects of activation, inhibition, and an incoherent feedforward loop are compared. To specify activation kinetics, we analyse experimental data that quantifies the response of β-catenin/TCF reporter constructs to different Wnt concentrations, and demonstrate that the induction of these constructs occurs in a cooperative manner with Hill coefficients between 2 and 5. In summary, our study shows that the combination of specific gene regulatory mechanisms with a time-independent gradient of Wnt or APC is sufficient to generate distinct target gene expression patterns as have been experimentally observed in liver. We find that cooperative gene activation in combination with a TCF feedback can establish sharp borders of target gene expression in Wnt or APC gradients. In contrast, the incoherent feedforward loop renders gene expression independent of gradients of the upstream signalling components. Our subsequent analysis of carcinogenic pathway mutations reveals that their impact on gene expression is determined by the gene regulatory mechanism and the APC concentration of the cell in which the mutation occurs.

  16. A novel tankyrase small-molecule inhibitor suppresses APC mutation-driven colorectal tumor growth

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, T.; Chan, E Y; Callow, M.; Waaler, J.; Boggs, J.; Blake, R.A.; Magnuson, S.; Sambrone, A.; Schutten, M; Firestein, R.; Machoň, O. (Ondřej); Kořínek, V. (Vladimír); Choo, E.; Diaz, D.; Merchant, M

    2013-01-01

    Most colorectal cancers (CRC) are initiated by mutations of APC, leading to increased β-catenin-mediated signaling. However, continued requirement of Wnt/β-catenin signaling for tumor progression in the context of acquired KRAS and other mutations is less well-established. To attenuate Wnt/β-catenin signaling in tumors, we have developed potent and specific small-molecule tankyrase inhibitors, G007-LK and G244-LM, that reduce Wnt/β-catenin signaling by preventing poly(ADP-...

  17. Aberrant methylation of the Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) gene promoter is associated with the inflammatory breast cancer phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Van der Auwera, I; Laere, S.J.; Van den Bosch, S M; Van den Eynden, G. G.; Trinh, B X; van Dam, P A; Colpaert, C G; van Engeland, M; Van Marck, E A; Vermeulen, P B; Dirix, L Y

    2008-01-01

    Aberrant methylation of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene promoter occurs in about 40% of breast tumours and has been correlated with reduced APC protein levels. To what extent epigenetic alterations of the APC gene may differ according to specific breast cancer phenotypes, remains to be elucidated. Our aim was to explore the role of APC methylation in the inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) phenotype. The status of APC gene promoter hypermethylation was investigated in DNA from normal b...

  18. A novel tankyrase small-molecule inhibitor suppresses APC mutation-driven colorectal tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Ted; Chan, Emily; Callow, Marinella; Waaler, Jo; Boggs, Jason; Blake, Robert A; Magnuson, Steven; Sambrone, Amy; Schutten, Melissa; Firestein, Ron; Machon, Ondrej; Korinek, Vladimir; Choo, Edna; Diaz, Dolores; Merchant, Mark; Polakis, Paul; Holsworth, Daniel D; Krauss, Stefan; Costa, Mike

    2013-05-15

    Most colorectal cancers (CRC) are initiated by mutations of APC, leading to increased β-catenin-mediated signaling. However, continued requirement of Wnt/β-catenin signaling for tumor progression in the context of acquired KRAS and other mutations is less well-established. To attenuate Wnt/β-catenin signaling in tumors, we have developed potent and specific small-molecule tankyrase inhibitors, G007-LK and G244-LM, that reduce Wnt/β-catenin signaling by preventing poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation-dependent AXIN degradation, thereby promoting β-catenin destabilization. We show that novel tankyrase inhibitors completely block ligand-driven Wnt/β-catenin signaling in cell culture and display approximately 50% inhibition of APC mutation-driven signaling in most CRC cell lines. It was previously unknown whether the level of AXIN protein stabilization by tankyrase inhibition is sufficient to impact tumor growth in the absence of normal APC activity. Compound G007-LK displays favorable pharmacokinetic properties and inhibits in vivo tumor growth in a subset of APC-mutant CRC xenograft models. In the xenograft model most sensitive to tankyrase inhibitor, COLO-320DM, G007-LK inhibits cell-cycle progression, reduces colony formation, and induces differentiation, suggesting that β-catenin-dependent maintenance of an undifferentiated state may be blocked by tankyrase inhibition. The full potential of the antitumor activity of G007-LK may be limited by intestinal toxicity associated with inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling and cell proliferation in intestinal crypts. These results establish proof-of-concept antitumor efficacy for tankyrase inhibitors in APC-mutant CRC models and uncover potential diagnostic and safety concerns to be overcome as tankyrase inhibitors are advanced into the clinic. PMID:23539443

  19. Analysis of APC allelic imbalance/loss of heterozygosity and APC protein expression in cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gray, Sarah E

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene is a tumor suppressor gene which is mutated in the hereditary disease, familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Somatic mutations of the APC gene have also been identified in the majority of sporadic colorectal carcinomas, and mutation of the APC gene appears to be an early step in the initiation of colon cancer. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of APC has been described in a variety of other cancer types, including renal cell carcinoma, gastric cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, endometrial cancer and oral squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). AIM: To determine the role played by APC gene in the genesis of cutaneous SCC. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Allelic imbalance\\/loss of heterozygosity (AI\\/LOH) was examined in twenty-two histologically confirmed cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) using microsatellite markers, proximal to the APC gene. Immunohistochemical analysis of APC protein expression was also examined in the cutaneous SCC. RESULTS: AI\\/LOH was detected in 60% of the SCC samples using D5S346 marker (proximal to the APC gene). Ninty-five percent of the SCC samples showed positive reduced APC expression, however the localization of the APC protein was abnormal. CONCLUSION: The abnormal expression of APC suggests that APC gene may play a role in cutaneous SCC development.

  20. Point Mutations in Exon 1B of APC Reveal Gastric Adenocarcinoma and Proximal Polyposis of the Stomach as a Familial Adenomatous Polyposis Variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Woods, Susan L; Healey, Sue; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Lee, Jason S; Sivakumaran, Haran; Wayte, Nicci; Nones, Katia; Waterfall, Joshua J; Pearson, John; Patch, Anne-Marie; Senz, Janine; Ferreira, Manuel A; Kaurah, Pardeep; Mackenzie, Robertson; Heravi-Moussavi, Alireza; Hansford, Samantha; Lannagan, Tamsin R M; Spurdle, Amanda B; Simpson, Peter T; da Silva, Leonard; Lakhani, Sunil R; Clouston, Andrew D; Bettington, Mark; Grimpen, Florian; Busuttil, Rita A; Di Costanzo, Natasha; Boussioutas, Alex; Jeanjean, Marie; Chong, George; Fabre, Aurélie; Olschwang, Sylviane; Faulkner, Geoffrey J; Bellos, Evangelos; Coin, Lachlan; Rioux, Kevin; Bathe, Oliver F; Wen, Xiaogang; Martin, Hilary C; Neklason, Deborah W; Davis, Sean R; Walker, Robert L; Calzone, Kathleen A; Avital, Itzhak; Heller, Theo; Koh, Christopher; Pineda, Marbin; Rudloff, Udo; Quezado, Martha; Pichurin, Pavel N; Hulick, Peter J; Weissman, Scott M; Newlin, Anna; Rubinstein, Wendy S; Sampson, Jone E; Hamman, Kelly; Goldgar, David; Poplawski, Nicola; Phillips, Kerry; Schofield, Lyn; Armstrong, Jacqueline; Kiraly-Borri, Cathy; Suthers, Graeme K; Huntsman, David G; Foulkes, William D; Carneiro, Fatima; Lindor, Noralane M; Edwards, Stacey L; French, Juliet D; Waddell, Nicola; Meltzer, Paul S; Worthley, Daniel L; Schrader, Kasmintan A; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2016-05-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma and proximal polyposis of the stomach (GAPPS) is an autosomal-dominant cancer-predisposition syndrome with a significant risk of gastric, but not colorectal, adenocarcinoma. We mapped the gene to 5q22 and found loss of the wild-type allele on 5q in fundic gland polyps from affected individuals. Whole-exome and -genome sequencing failed to find causal mutations but, through Sanger sequencing, we identified point mutations in APC promoter 1B that co-segregated with disease in all six families. The mutations reduced binding of the YY1 transcription factor and impaired activity of the APC promoter 1B in luciferase assays. Analysis of blood and saliva from carriers showed allelic imbalance of APC, suggesting that these mutations lead to decreased allele-specific expression in vivo. Similar mutations in APC promoter 1B occur in rare families with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Promoter 1A is methylated in GAPPS and sporadic FGPs and in normal stomach, which suggests that 1B transcripts are more important than 1A in gastric mucosa. This might explain why all known GAPPS-affected families carry promoter 1B point mutations but only rare FAP-affected families carry similar mutations, the colonic cells usually being protected by the expression of the 1A isoform. Gastric polyposis and cancer have been previously described in some FAP-affected individuals with large deletions around promoter 1B. Our finding that GAPPS is caused by point mutations in the same promoter suggests that families with mutations affecting the promoter 1B are at risk of gastric adenocarcinoma, regardless of whether or not colorectal polyps are present. PMID:27087319

  1. Analysis of APC allelic imbalance/loss of heterozygosity and APC protein expression in cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gray, Sarah E

    2011-05-01

    The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene is a tumor suppressor gene which is mutated in the hereditary disease, familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Somatic mutations of the APC gene have also been identified in the majority of sporadic colorectal carcinomas, and mutation of the APC gene appears to be an early step in the initiation of colon cancer. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of APC has been described in a variety of other cancer types, including renal cell carcinoma, gastric cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, endometrial cancer and oral squamous cell carcinomas (SCC).

  2. The modifier of Min 2 (Mom2) locus: Embryonic lethality of a mutation in the Atp5a1 gene suggests a novel mechanism of polyp suppression

    OpenAIRE

    Baran, Amy A.; Silverman, Karen A.; Zeskand, Joseph; Koratkar, Revati; Palmer, Ashley; McCullen, Kristen; Curran, Walter J.; Edmonston, Tina Bocker; Linda D. Siracusa; Buchberg, Arthur M.

    2007-01-01

    Inactivation of the APC gene is considered the initiating event in human colorectal cancer. Modifier genes that influence the penetrance of mutations in tumor-suppressor genes hold great potential for preventing the development of cancer. The mechanism by which modifier genes alter adenoma incidence can be readily studied in mice that inherit mutations in the Apc gene. We identified a new modifier locus of ApcMin-induced intestinal tumorigenesis called Modifier of Min 2 (Mom2). The polyp-resi...

  3. Detection of up to 65% of Precancerous Lesions of the Human Colon and Rectum by Mutation Analysis of APC, K-Ras, B-Raf and CTNNB1

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    Schneider, Mandy; Scholtka, Bettina, E-mail: scholtka@uni-potsdam.de [Chair of Nutritional Toxicology, Institute of Nutritional Science, University of Potsdam, Arthur- Scheunert-Allee 114-116, 14558 Nuthetal (Germany); Gottschalk, Uwe [Maria Heimsuchung Caritas-Klinik Pankow, Breite Straße 46/47, 13187 Berlin (Germany); Faiss, Siegbert [III. Medizinische Abteilung - Gastroenterologie und Hepatologie, Asklepios Klinik Barmbek, Rubenkamp 220, 22291 Hamburg (Germany); Schatz, Daniela; Berghof-Jäger, Kornelia [BIOTECON Diagnostics GmbH, Hermannswerder Haus 17, 14473 Potsdam (Germany); Steinberg, Pablo, E-mail: scholtka@uni-potsdam.de [Chair of Nutritional Toxicology, Institute of Nutritional Science, University of Potsdam, Arthur- Scheunert-Allee 114-116, 14558 Nuthetal (Germany); Institute for Food Toxicology and Analytical Chemistry, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Bischofsholer Damm 15, 30173 Hannover (Germany)

    2010-12-29

    In the present study a recently conceived 4-gene marker panel covering the Wnt and Ras-Raf-MEK-MAPK signaling pathways was used to analyze 20 colorectal serrated lesions and 41 colorectal adenoma samples and to determine the percentage of each of the above-mentioned potentially precancerous lesions carrying at least one of the four above-mentioned genes in a mutated form. CTNNB1 and B-Raf were screened by PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis, K-Ras by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and the APC gene mutation cluster region (codons 1243–1567) by direct DNA sequencing. APC mutations were only detected in 10% of the serrated lesions but in 34% of the adenomas. Twenty percent of the serrated lesions and 14% of the adenomas carried a mutated K-Ras. B-Raf was found to be mutated in 50% of the serrated lesions and in 22% of the adenomas. CTNNB1 was altered in 12% of the adenomas, but not in serrated lesions. By using the above gene marker panel it could be shown that 65% of the serrated lesions and 61% of the adenomas carried at least one of the four genes in a mutated form. Based on its excellent performance in detecting mutations in sporadic preneoplastic (in this study) and neoplastic lesions (in a previous study) of the human colon and rectum, this primer combination might also be suited to efficiently and non-invasively detect genetic alterations in stool DNA of patients with early colorectal cancer.

  4. Detection of up to 65% of Precancerous Lesions of the Human Colon and Rectum by Mutation Analysis of APC, K-Ras, B-Raf and CTNNB1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study a recently conceived 4-gene marker panel covering the Wnt and Ras-Raf-MEK-MAPK signaling pathways was used to analyze 20 colorectal serrated lesions and 41 colorectal adenoma samples and to determine the percentage of each of the above-mentioned potentially precancerous lesions carrying at least one of the four above-mentioned genes in a mutated form. CTNNB1 and B-Raf were screened by PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis, K-Ras by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and the APC gene mutation cluster region (codons 1243–1567) by direct DNA sequencing. APC mutations were only detected in 10% of the serrated lesions but in 34% of the adenomas. Twenty percent of the serrated lesions and 14% of the adenomas carried a mutated K-Ras. B-Raf was found to be mutated in 50% of the serrated lesions and in 22% of the adenomas. CTNNB1 was altered in 12% of the adenomas, but not in serrated lesions. By using the above gene marker panel it could be shown that 65% of the serrated lesions and 61% of the adenomas carried at least one of the four genes in a mutated form. Based on its excellent performance in detecting mutations in sporadic preneoplastic (in this study) and neoplastic lesions (in a previous study) of the human colon and rectum, this primer combination might also be suited to efficiently and non-invasively detect genetic alterations in stool DNA of patients with early colorectal cancer

  5. The I1307K APC mutation in a high-risk clinic setting: a follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev, M; Barzilai, S-Eisenberg; Figer, A; Zidan, J; Fidder, H H; Friedman, E

    2005-04-01

    While the I1307K APC mutation clearly confers an increased lifetime risk for colorectal cancer, there is a paucity of data on the natural history of colonic neoplasia in symptomatic and asymptomatic mutation carriers. In this study, 51 Jewish I1307K APC mutation carriers were identified in a high-risk familial cancer clinic over a 4-year period, of whom 29 (56.8%) (four males and 25 females) were successfully telephone interviewed for 0.5-5 years (mean 2.4 +/- 1.4) after initial genetic testing. Of these 29 cases, one individual was diagnosed with colon cancer at the age of 45 years, five had adenomatous polyps (mean number of polyps = 1.8), 11 had breast cancer (mean age at diagnosis 49.5 +/- 10.5 years), and 12 were asymptomatic, at the time of the testing. During the follow-up period, new colonic polyps were diagnosed in three mutation carriers, two with previously diagnosed colon cancer and polyps and only one of the asymptomatic mutation carriers, and two additional previously affected patients had new cancer diagnoses: gastric cancer and melanoma. From this descriptive study, it seems that the short-term risk for colonic polyps in I1307K APC mutation is low, primarily affecting patients with previously diagnosed colon tumors. PMID:15733272

  6. An APC:WNT counter-current-like mechanism regulates cell division along the colonic crypt axis: a mechanism that explains how APC mutations induce proliferative abnormalities that drive colon cancer development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce M Boman

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available APC normally down-regulates WNT signaling in human colon, and APC mutations cause proliferative abnormalities in premalignant crypts leading to colon cancer, but the mechanisms are unclear at the level of spatial and functional organization of the crypt. Accordingly, we postulated a counter-current-like mechanism based on gradients of factors (APC;WNT that regulate colonocyte proliferation along the crypt axis. During crypt renewal, stem cells (SCs at the crypt bottom generate non-SC daughter cells that proliferate and differentiate while migrating upwards. The APC concentration is low at the crypt bottom and high at the top (where differentiated cells reside. WNT signaling, in contrast, is high at the bottom (where SCs reside and low at the top. Given that WNT and APC gradients are counter to one another, we hypothesized that a counter-current-like mechanism exists. Since both APC and WNT signaling components (e.g. survivin are required for mitosis, this mechanism establishes a zone in the lower crypt where conditions are optimal for maximal cell division and mitosis orientation (symmetric versus asymmetric. APC haploinsufficiency diminishes the APC gradient, shifts the proliferative zone upwards, and increases symmetric division, which causes SC overpopulation. In homozygote mutant crypts, these changes are exacerbated. Thus, APC-mutation-induced changes in the counter-current-like mechanism cause expansion of proliferative populations (SCs, rapidly-proliferating cells during tumorigenesis. We propose this mechanism also drives crypt fission, functions in the crypt cycle, and underlies adenoma development. Novel chemoprevention approaches designed to normalize the two gradients and readjust the proliferative zone downwards, might thwart progression of these premalignant changes.

  7. Mutations in the WTX - gene are found in some high-grade microsatellite instable (MSI-H) colorectal cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Scheel Silvio K; Porzner Marc; Pfeiffer Sabine; Ormanns Steffen; Kirchner Thomas; Jung Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Genetically, colorectal cancers (CRCs) can be subdivided into tumors with chromosomal instability (CIN) or microsatellite instability (MSI). In both types of CRCs genes that are involved in the degradation of β-CATENIN are frequently mutated. Whereas in CIN CRCs APC (Adenomatous Polyposis Coli) is affected in most cases, high grade MSI (MSI-H) CRCs frequently display mutations in various genes, like the APC-, AXIN2- or CTNNBI (β-CATENIN) gene itself. Recently in Wilms tumo...

  8. Genetic mechanisms in Apc-mediated mammary tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Kuraguchi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Many components of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway also play critical roles in mammary tumor development, yet the role of the tumor suppressor gene APC (adenomatous polyposis coli in breast oncongenesis is unclear. To better understand the role of Apc in mammary tumorigenesis, we introduced conditional Apc mutations specifically into two different mammary epithelial populations using K14-cre and WAP-cre transgenic mice that express Cre-recombinase in mammary progenitor cells and lactating luminal cells, respectively. Only the K14-cre-mediated Apc heterozygosity developed mammary adenocarcinomas demonstrating histological heterogeneity, suggesting the multilineage progenitor cell origin of these tumors. These tumors harbored truncation mutation in a defined region in the remaining wild-type allele of Apc that would retain some down-regulating activity of beta-catenin signaling. Activating mutations at codons 12 and 61 of either H-Ras or K-Ras were also found in a subset of these tumors. Expression profiles of acinar-type mammary tumors from K14-cre; Apc(CKO/+ mice showed luminal epithelial gene expression pattern, and clustering analysis demonstrated more correlation to MMTV-neu model than to MMTV-Wnt1. In contrast, neither WAP-cre-induced Apc heterozygous nor homozygous mutations resulted in predisposition to mammary tumorigenesis, although WAP-cre-mediated Apc deficiency resulted in severe squamous metaplasia of mammary glands. Collectively, our results suggest that not only the epithelial origin but also a certain Apc mutations are selected to achieve a specific level of beta-catenin signaling optimal for mammary tumor development and explain partially the colon- but not mammary-specific tumor development in patients that carry germline mutations in APC.

  9. MUTATIONS IN CALMODULIN GENES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to an isolated polynucleotide encoding at least a part of calmodulin and an isolated polypeptide comprising at least a part of a calmodulin protein, wherein the polynucleotide and the polypeptide comprise at least one mutation associated with a cardiac disorder. The ...... binding of calmodulin to ryanodine receptor 2 and use of such compound in a treatment of an individual having a cardiac disorder. The invention further provides a kit that can be used to detect specific mutations in calmodulin encoding genes....

  10. A knock-in mouse model reveals roles for nuclear Apc in cell proliferation, Wnt signal inhibition and tumor suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeineldin, M; Cunningham, J; McGuinness, W; Alltizer, P; Cowley, B; Blanchat, B; Xu, W; Pinson, D; Neufeld, K L

    2012-05-10

    Mutation of the tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is considered an initiating step in the genesis of the vast majority of colorectal cancers. APC inhibits the Wnt-signaling pathway by targeting the proto-oncogene β-catenin for destruction by cytoplasmic proteasomes. In the presence of a Wnt signal, or in the absence of functional APC, β-catenin can serve as a transcription cofactor for genes required for cell proliferation such as cyclin-D1 and c-Myc. In cultured cells, APC shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm, with nuclear APC implicated in the inhibition of Wnt target gene expression. Adopting a genetic approach to evaluate the functions of nuclear APC in the context of a whole organism, we generated a mouse model with mutations that inactivate the nuclear localization signals (NLSs) of Apc (Apc(mNLS)). Apc(mNLS/mNLS) mice are viable and fractionation of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) isolated from these mice revealed a significant reduction in nuclear Apc as compared with Apc(+/+) MEFs. The levels of Apc and β-catenin protein were not significantly altered in small intestinal epithelia from Apc(mNLS/mNLS) mice. Compared with Apc(+/+) mice, Apc(mNLS/mNLS) mice showed increased proliferation in epithelial cells from the jejunum, ileum and colon. These same tissues from Apc(mNLS/mNLS) mice showed more mRNA from three genes upregulated in response to canonical Wnt signal, c-Myc, axin-2 and cyclin-D1, and less mRNA from Hath-1, which is downregulated in response to Wnt. These observations suggest a role for nuclear Apc in the inhibition of canonical Wnt signaling and the control of epithelial proliferation in intestinal tissue. Furthermore, we found Apc(Min/+) mice, which harbor a mutation that truncates Apc, to have an increased polyp size and multiplicity if they also carry the Apc(mNLS) allele. Taken together, this analysis of the novel Apc(mNLS) mouse model supports a role for nuclear Apc in the control of Wnt target genes

  11. Role of Bone Marrow-Derived Stem Cells in Polyps Development in Mice with ApcMin/+ Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Barone

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We explored the hypothesis that an altered microenvironment (intestinal adenomatous polyp could modify the differentiation program of bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs, involving them in colon carcinogenesis. Sublethally irradiated 8-week-old female ApcMin/+ mice were transplanted with bone marrow (BM cells obtained from either male age-matched ApcMin/+ (Apc-Tx-Apc or wild type (WT (WT-Tx-Apc mice. At 4 and 7 weeks after transplantation, BM-derived colonocytes were recognized by colocalization of Y-chromosome and Cdx2 protein (specific colonocyte marker. Polyp number, volume, and grade of dysplasia were not influenced by irradiation/transplantation procedures since they were similar in both untreated female ApcMin/+ and Apc-Tx-Apc mice. At 4 and 7 weeks after transplantation, a progressive significant reduction of polyp number and volume was observed in WT-Tx-Apc mice. Moreover, the number of WT-Tx-Apc mice with a high-grade dysplastic polyps significantly decreased as compared to Apc-Tx-Apc mice. Finally, at 4 and 7 weeks after transplantation, WT-Tx-Apc mice showed a progressive significant increase of Y+/Cdx2+ cells in “normal” mucosa, whereas, in the adenomatous tissue, Y+/Cdx2+ cells remained substantially unvaried. Our findings demonstrate that WT BMSCs do not participate in polyp development but rather inhibit their growth. The substitution of genotypically altered colonocytes with Y+/Cdx2+ cells probably contributes to this process.

  12. Interaction between APC and Fen1 during breast carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Satya; Jaiswal, Aruna S; Law, Brian K; Kamal, Mohammad A; Sharma, Arun K; Hromas, Robert A

    2016-05-01

    Aberrant DNA base excision repair (BER) contributes to malignant transformation. However, inter-individual variations in DNA repair capacity plays a key role in modifying breast cancer risk. We review here emerging evidence that two proteins involved in BER - adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) and flap endonuclease 1 (Fen1) - promote the development of breast cancer through novel mechanisms. APC and Fen1 expression and interaction is increased in breast tumors versus normal cells, APC interacts with and blocks Fen1 activity in Pol-β-directed LP-BER, and abrogation of LP-BER is linked with cigarette smoke condensate-induced transformation of normal breast epithelial cells. Carcinogens increase expression of APC and Fen1 in spontaneously immortalized human breast epithelial cells, human colon cancer cells, and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Since APC and Fen1 are tumor suppressors, an increase in their levels could protect against carcinogenesis; however, this does not seem to be the case. Elevated Fen1 levels in breast and lung cancer cells may reflect the enhanced proliferation of cancer cells or increased DNA damage in cancer cells compared to normal cells. Inactivation of the tumor suppressor functions of APC and Fen1 is due to their interaction, which may act as a susceptibility factor for breast cancer. The increased interaction of APC and Fen1 may occur due to polypmorphic and/or mutational variation in these genes. Screening of APC and Fen1 polymorphic and/or mutational variations and APC/Fen1 interaction may permit assessment of individual DNA repair capability and the risk for breast cancer development. Such individuals might lower their breast cancer risk by reducing exposure to carcinogens. Stratifying individuals according to susceptibility would greatly assist epidemiologic studies of the impact of suspected environmental carcinogens. Additionally, a mechanistic understanding of the interaction of APC and Fen1 may provide the basis for developing new and

  13. Extensive metabolic disorders are present in APC(min) tumorigenesis mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenzhen; Xiao, Yi; Zhou, Zhengxiang; Mao, Xiaoxiao; Cai, Jinxing; Xiong, Lu; Liao, Chaonan; Huang, Fulian; Liu, Zehao; Ali Sheikh, Md Sayed; Plutzky, Jorge; Huang, He; Yang, Tianlun; Duan, Qiong

    2016-05-15

    Wnt signaling plays essential role in mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation. Activation of Wnt signaling suppresses adipogenesis, but promotes osteogenesis in MSC. Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is a negative regulator of β-catenin and Wnt signaling activity. The mutation of APC gene leads to the activation of Wnt signaling and is responsible for tumorigenesis in APC(min) mouse; however, very few studies focused on its metabolic abnormalities. The present study reports a widespread metabolic disorder phenotype in APC(min) mice. The old APC(min) mice have decreased body weight and impaired adipogenesis, but severe hyperlipidemia, which mimic the phenotypes of Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP), an inherited disease also caused by APC gene mutation in human. We found that the expression of lipid metabolism and free fat acids (FA) use genes in the white adipose tissue (WAT) of the APC(min) mice is much lower than those of control. The changed gene expression pattern may lead to the disability of circulatory lipid transportation and storage at WAT. Moreover, the APC(min) mice could not maintain the core body temperature in cold condition. PET-CT determination revealed that the BAT of APC(min) mice has significantly impaired ability to take up (18)FDG from the blood. Morphological studies identified that the brown adipocytes of APC(min) mice were filled with lipid droplets but fewer mitochondria. These results matched with the findings of impaired BAT function in APC(min) mice. Collectively, our study explores a new mechanism that explains abnormal metabolism in APC(min) mice and provides insights into studying the metabolic disorders of FAP patients. PMID:26948948

  14. Targeting the DNA replication checkpoint by pharmacologic inhibition of Chk1 kinase: a strategy to sensitize APC mutant colon cancer cells to 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Martino-Echarri, Estefania; Henderson, Beric R.; Brocardo, Mariana G.

    2014-01-01

    5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is the first line component used in colorectal cancer (CRC) therapy however even in combination with other chemotherapeutic drugs recurrence is common. Mutations of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene are considered as the initiating step of transformation in familial and sporadic CRCs. We have previously shown that APC regulates the cellular response to DNA replication stress and recently hypothesized that APC mutations might therefore influence 5-FU resistance. T...

  15. Short-term carcinogenicity testing of a potent murine intestinal mutagen, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo(4,5-b)pyridine (PhIP), in Apc1638N transgenic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ilona Kryspin; Kristiansen, E.; Mortensen, Alicja; van Kranen, H.; van Kreijl, C.; Fodde, R.; Thorgeirsson, S. S.

    1997-01-01

    Transgenic Apc1638N mice, heterozygous for a targeted frameshift mutation at codon 1638 of the endogenous adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene, are predisposed to develop multiple adenomas and adenocarcinomas along the intestinal tract and to a number of extra-intestinal lesions including, among...... increased number of small intestinal tumors as well as an increased number of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) were observed in male Apc(+)/Apc1638N mice compared with untreated transgenic mice, No differences in intestinal and mammary tumor multiplicity were observed between treated and control Apc(+)/Apc1638N...

  16. Genetic transformation of marine Actinomycete sp. Isolate M048 and expression of a recombinant plasmid carrying the apc gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Yanhua; LI Fuchao; QIN Song; WANG Quanfu

    2006-01-01

    Optimal conditions for protoplasts formation of marine Actinomycete sp. isolate M048 were described, dense and disperse mycelia were cultured in SGGP medium, 0.5% glycine, lysozyme exposure (2 mg/cm3, 37 ℃, 40 min), and the concentration of sucrose in protoplast buffer was 0.4 mol/dm3 for keeping the balance of osmotic pressure. Using PEG-mediated protoplasts transformation, the transformation frequency was 89 transformants per microgramme of pIJ702. Meanwhile, an effective transformation procedure was established based on intergeneric conjugation from E. coli ET12567 (pUZ8002) using shuttle vectors pPM801, pPM803 and a(ψ)C31-derived integration vector pIJ8600 containing oriT and attP fragments. Transformation frequencies were 5.30×10-4±0.26×10-4, 8.92×10-4±0.19×10-4 and 6.38×10-5±0.41×10-5, respectively. Further, the heterologous expression of the allophycocyanin gene (apc) in the strain M048 was used to demonstrate this transformation system. SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis confirmed the expression of recombinant APC (rAPC).

  17. Mutated genes as research tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green plants are the ultimate source of all resources required for man's life, his food, his clothes, and almost all his energy requirements. Primitive prehistoric man could live from the abundance of nature surrounding him. Man today, dominating nature in terms of numbers and exploiting its limited resources, cannot exist without employing his intelligence to direct natural evolution. Plant sciences, therefore, are not a matter of curiosity but an essential requirement. From such considerations, the IAEA and FAO jointly organized a symposium to assess the value of mutation research for various kinds of plant science, which directly or indirectly might contribute to sustaining and improving crop production. The benefit through developing better cultivars that plant breeders can derive from using the additional genetic resources resulting from mutation induction has been assessed before at other FAO/IAEA meetings (Rome 1964, Pullman 1969, Ban 1974, Ibadan 1978) and is also monitored in the Mutation Breeding Newsletter, published by IAEA twice a year. Several hundred plant cultivars which carry economically important characters because their genes have been altered by ionizing radiation or other mutagens, are grown by farmers and horticulturists in many parts of the world. But the benefit derived from such mutant varieties is without any doubt surpassed by the contribution which mutation research has made towards the advancement of genetics. For this reason, a major part of the papers and discussions at the symposium dealt with the role induced-mutation research played in providing insight into gene action and gene interaction, the organization of genes in plant chromosomes in view of homology and homoeology, the evolutionary role of gene duplication and polyploidy, the relevance of gene blocks, the possibilities for chromosome engineering, the functioning of cytroplasmic inheritance and the genetic dynamics of populations. In discussing the evolutionary role of

  18. Gene mutations in hepatocellular adenomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raft, Marie B; Jørgensen, Ernö N; Vainer, Ben

    2015-01-01

    associated with bi-allelic mutations in the TCF1 gene and morphologically has marked steatosis. β-catenin activating HCA has increased activity of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and is associated with possible malignant transformation. Inflammatory HCA is characterized by an oncogene-induced inflammation due to...

  19. A knock-in mouse model reveals roles for nuclear Apc in cell proliferation, Wnt signal inhibition and tumor suppression

    OpenAIRE

    Zeineldin, Maged; Cunningham, Jamie; McGuinness, William; Alltizer, Preston; Cowley, Brett; Blanchat, Bryan; Xu, Wenhao; Pinson, David; Neufeld, Kristi L.

    2011-01-01

    Mutation of the tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is considered an initiating step in the genesis of the vast majority of colorectal cancers. APC inhibits the Wnt signaling pathway by targeting proto-oncogene β-catenin for destruction by cytoplasmic proteasomes. In the presence of a Wnt signal, or in the absence of functional APC, β-catenin can serve as a transcription co-factor for genes required for cell proliferation such as cyclin D1 and c-Myc. In cultured cells, APC shutt...

  20. Insulin gene mutations and diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Nishi, Masahiro; Nanjo, Kishio

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Some mutations of the insulin gene cause hyperinsulinemia or hyperproinsulinemia. Replacement of biologically important amino acid leads to defective receptor binding, longer half‐life and hyperinsulinemia. Three mutant insulins have been identified: (i) insulin Chicago (F49L or PheB25Leu); (ii) insulin Los Angeles (F48S or PheB24Ser); (iii) and insulin Wakayama (V92L or ValA3Leu). Replacement of amino acid is necessary for proinsulin processing results in hyperproinsulinemia. Four t...

  1. Elevated incidence of polyp formation in APC(Min/⁺Msh2⁻/⁻ mice is independent of nitric oxide-induced DNA mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoaneta Belcheva

    Full Text Available Gut microbiota has been linked to a number of human diseases including colon cancer. However, the mechanism through which gut bacteria influence colon cancer development and progression remains unclear. Perturbation of the homeostasis between the host immune system and microbiota leads to inflammation and activation of macrophages which produce large amounts of nitric oxide that acts as a genotoxic effector molecule to suppress bacterial growth. However, nitric oxide also has genotoxic effects to host cells by producing mutations that can predispose to colon cancer development. The major DNA lesions caused by nitric oxide are 8oxoG and deamination of deoxycytosine bases. Cellular glycosylases that belong to the base excision repair pathway have been demonstrated to repair these mutations. Recent evidence suggests that the mismatch repair pathway (MMR might also repair nitric oxide-induced DNA damage. Since deficiency in MMR predisposes to colon cancer, we hypothesized that MMR-deficient colon epithelial cells are incapable of repairing nitric-oxide induced genetic lesions that can promote colon cancer. Indeed, we found that the MMR pathway repairs nitric oxide-induced DNA mutations in cell lines. To test whether nitric oxide promotes colon cancer, we genetically ablated the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS or inhibited iNOS activity in the APC(Min/+Msh2(-/- mouse model of colon cancer. However, despite the fact that nitric oxide production was strongly reduced in the colon using both approaches, colon cancer incidence was not affected. These data show that nitric oxide and iNOS do not promote colon cancer in APC(Min/+Msh2(-/- mice.

  2. Rapid detection of most frequent Slovenian germ-line mutations in BRCA1 gene using real-time PCR and melting curve analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. Detection of inherited mutations in cancer susceptibility genes is of great importance in some types of cancers including the colorectal cancer (mutations of APC gene in familial adenomatous polyposis - FAP, mutations in mismatch repair genes in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer - HNPCC), malignant melanoma (mutations in CDKN2A and CDK4 genes) and breast cancer (mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes). Methods. This article presents the technical data for the detection of five mutations in BRCA1 gene in breast cancer patients and their relatives. The mutations - 1806C>T, 300T>G, 300T>A, 310G>A, 5382insC - were determined by the real-time PCR and the melting curve analysis. Results and conclusion. In comparison to direct sequencing, this method proved to be sensitive and rapid enough for the routine daily determination of mutations in DNA isolated from the peripheral blood. (author)

  3. lemmingA encodes the Apc11 subunit of the APC/C in Drosophila melanogaster that forms a ternary complex with the E2-C type ubiquitin conjugating enzyme, Vihar and Morula/Apc2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagy Olga

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation is a critical step in key cell cycle events, such as metaphase-anaphase transition and mitotic exit. The anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C plays a pivotal role in these transitions by recognizing and marking regulatory proteins for proteasomal degradation. Its overall structure and function has been elucidated mostly in yeasts and mammalian cell lines. The APC/C is, however, a multisubunit assembly with at least 13 subunits and their function and interaction within the complex is still relatively uncharacterized, particularly in metazoan systems. Here, lemming (lmg mutants were used to study the APC/C subunit, Apc11, and its interaction partners in Drosophila melanogaster. Results The lmg gene was initially identified through a pharate adult lethal P element insertion mutation expressing developmental abnormalities and widespread apoptosis in larval imaginal discs and pupal abdominal histoblasts. Larval neuroblasts were observed to arrest mitosis in a metaphase-like state with highly condensed, scattered chromosomes and frequent polyploidy. These neuroblasts contain high levels of both cyclin A and cyclin B. The lmg gene was cloned by virtue of the lmg03424 P element insertion which is located in the 5' untranslated region. The lemming locus is transcribed to give a 2.0 kb mRNA that contains two ORFs, lmgA and lmgB. The lmgA ORF codes for a putative protein with more than 80% sequence homology to the APC11 subunit of the human APC/C. The 85 amino acid protein also contains a RING-finger motif characteristic of known APC11 subunits. The lmgA ORF alone was sufficient to rescue the lethal and mitotic phenotypes of the lmg138 null allele and to complement the temperature sensitive lethal phenotype of the APC11-myc9 budding yeast mutant. The LmgA protein interacts with Mr/Apc2, and they together form a binding site for Vihar, the E2-C type ubiquitin conjugating enzyme. Despite

  4. Pronounced reduction in adenoma recurrence associated with aspirin use and a polymorphism in the ornithine decarboxylase gene

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez, María Elena; O'Brien, Thomas G.; Fultz, Kimberly E.; Babbar, Naveen; Yerushalmi, Hagit; Qu, Ning; Guo, Yongjun; Boorman, David; Einspahr, Janine; Alberts, David S.; Gerner, Eugene W.

    2003-01-01

    Most sporadic colon adenomas acquire mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli gene (APC) and show defects in APC-dependent signaling. APC influences the expression of several genes, including the c-myc oncogene and its antagonist Mad1. Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the first enzyme in polyamine synthesis, is a transcriptional target of c-myc and a modifier of APC-dependent tumorigenesis. A single-nucleotide polymorphism exists in intron 1 of the human ODC gene, which lies between t...

  5. Mutational Robustness of Gene Regulatory Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Dijk, van, G.; Mourik, van, J.A.; Ham, van, R.C.H.J.

    2012-01-01

    Mutational robustness of gene regulatory networks refers to their ability to generate constant biological output upon mutations that change network structure. Such networks contain regulatory interactions (transcription factor – target gene interactions) but often also protein-protein interactions between transcription factors. Using computational modeling, we study factors that influence robustness and we infer several network properties governing it. These include the type of mutation, i.e....

  6. Evaluation of CFTR gene mutations in Adana

    OpenAIRE

    Ozlem Goruroglu Ozturk; Filiz Kibar; Esin Damla Ziyanoglu Karacor; Salih Cetiner; Gulhan Sahin; Akgun Yaman

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Cystic fibrosis is the most common autosomal recessive inherited disorder seen in the white populations. It develops in result of mutations of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene. Rate of these mutations vary in different geographical regions. In this study, we aimed to determine the frequency of CFTR gene mutations in Adana. Methods: DNA samples of 63 subjects (21 women, 42 men) who were diagnosed as cystic fibrosis at Balcali Hospital of Cukurova Universi...

  7. Evaluation of CFTR gene mutations in Adana

    OpenAIRE

    Öztürk, Özlem Görüroğlu; Filiz KIBAR; Karaçor, Esin Damla Ziyanoğlu; Çetiner, Salih; Şahin, Gülhan; Yaman, Akgün

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Cystic fibrosis is the most common autosomal recessive inherited disorder seen in the white populations. It develops in result of mutations of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene. Rate of these mutations vary in different geographical regions. In this study, we aimed to determine the frequency of CFTR gene mutations in Adana. Methods: DNA samples of 63 subjects (21 women, 42 men) who were diagnosed as cystic fibrosis at Balcalı Hospital of Çukurova Unive...

  8. Phylogenetic analysis of Amphioxus genes of the proprotein convertase family, including aPC6C, a marker of epithelial fusions during embryology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Bertrand, Alain Camasses, Mathilde Paris, Nicholas D. Holland, Hector Escriva

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The proprotein convertases (PCs comprise a family of subtilisin-like endoproteases that activate precursor proteins (including, prohormones, growth factors, and adhesion molecules during their transit through secretory pathways or at the cell surface. To explore the evolution of the PC gene family in chordates, we made a phylogenetic analysis of PC genes found in databases, with special attention to three PC genes of the cephalochordate amphioxus, the closest living invertebrate relative to the vertebrates. Since some vertebrate PC genes are essential for early development, we investigated the expression pattern of the C isoform of the amphioxus PC6 gene (aPC6C. In amphioxus embryos and larvae, aPC6C is expressed at places where epithelia fuse. Several kinds of fusions occur: ectoderm-to-ectoderm during neurulation; mesoderm-to-ectoderm during formation of the preoral ciliated pit; and endoderm-to-ectoderm during formation of the mouth, pharyngeal slits, anus, and external opening of the club-shaped gland. Presumably, at all these sites, aPC6C is activating proteins favoring association between previously disjunct cell populations.

  9. Rb1 GENE MUTATIONS IN OSTEOSARCOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Ji-bin; SONG Yue; WANG Yi; SHI Yu-yuan

    1999-01-01

    @@ Genetic alternations, such as mutations caused inactivities of tumor suppressor gene, have been identified in a wide variety of tumors, including osteosarcoma. Osteosarcoma is the most frequent primary malignant bone tumor that occurs in the extremities of young adolescents in most cases. Because of the high frequent occurrence of this type of tumor in hereditary retinoblastoma patients, involvement of the Rb1 gene mutations was suspected in the development of osteosarcoma, and a few reports have shown alternations of the Rb1 gene in osteosarcoma. We studied Rb1 gene mutations in 9 osteosarcoma samples and one cell line (OS 732) to explore the types and mechanism of Rb1 gene mutations in osteosarcoma.

  10. Mechanism of APC/CCDC20 activation by mitotic phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Renping; Weissmann, Florian; Yamaguchi, Masaya; Brown, Nicholas G; VanderLinden, Ryan; Imre, Richard; Jarvis, Marc A; Brunner, Michael R; Davidson, Iain F; Litos, Gabriele; Haselbach, David; Mechtler, Karl; Stark, Holger; Schulman, Brenda A; Peters, Jan-Michael

    2016-05-10

    Chromosome segregation and mitotic exit are initiated by the 1.2-MDa ubiquitin ligase APC/C (anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome) and its coactivator CDC20 (cell division cycle 20). To avoid chromosome missegregation, APC/C(CDC20) activation is tightly controlled. CDC20 only associates with APC/C in mitosis when APC/C has become phosphorylated and is further inhibited by a mitotic checkpoint complex until all chromosomes are bioriented on the spindle. APC/C contains 14 different types of subunits, most of which are phosphorylated in mitosis on multiple sites. However, it is unknown which of these phospho-sites enable APC/C(CDC20) activation and by which mechanism. Here we have identified 68 evolutionarily conserved mitotic phospho-sites on human APC/C bound to CDC20 and have used the biGBac technique to generate 47 APC/C mutants in which either all 68 sites or subsets of them were replaced by nonphosphorylatable or phospho-mimicking residues. The characterization of these complexes in substrate ubiquitination and degradation assays indicates that phosphorylation of an N-terminal loop region in APC1 is sufficient for binding and activation of APC/C by CDC20. Deletion of the N-terminal APC1 loop enables APC/C(CDC20) activation in the absence of mitotic phosphorylation or phospho-mimicking mutations. These results indicate that binding of CDC20 to APC/C is normally prevented by an autoinhibitory loop in APC1 and that its mitotic phosphorylation relieves this inhibition. The predicted location of the N-terminal APC1 loop implies that this loop controls interactions between the N-terminal domain of CDC20 and APC1 and APC8. These results reveal how APC/C phosphorylation enables CDC20 to bind and activate the APC/C in mitosis. PMID:27114510

  11. APC mutant zebrafish uncover a changing temporal requirement for wnt signaling in liver development.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goessling, W.; North, T.E.; Lord, A.M.; Ceol, C.; Lee, S.; Weidinger, G.; Bourque, C.; Strijbosch, R.; Haramis, A.P.; Puder, M.; Clevers, H.; Moon, R.T.; Zon, L.I.

    2008-01-01

    Developmental signaling pathways hold the keys to unlocking the promise of adult tissue regeneration, and to inhibiting carcinogenesis. Patients with mutations in the Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) gene are at increased risk of developing hepatoblastoma, an embryonal form of liver cancer, suggesti

  12. Evaluation of CFTR gene mutations in Adana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Goruroglu Ozturk

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: Cystic fibrosis is the most common autosomal recessive inherited disorder seen in the white populations. It develops in result of mutations of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR gene. Rate of these mutations vary in different geographical regions. In this study, we aimed to determine the frequency of CFTR gene mutations in Adana. Methods: DNA samples of 63 subjects (21 women, 42 men who were diagnosed as cystic fibrosis at Balcali Hospital of Cukurova University, were studied for 19 different CFTR mutations by the strip assay method which is based on reverse hybridization. Results: In cystic fibrosis diagnosed patients, 19 mutations were observed of which 9 were homozygous and 10 were heterozygous. ∆F508 frequency was found as 11.9%, and rate of homozygous was found as 66.7%. Mutation frequencies of W1282X and N1303K were found as 2.40% and 4.80% respectively and rate of homozygous mutations were 50% for both. I148T mutation frequency was found as 3.20% and all were heterozygous. For the whole 19 mutations, frequency of mutation in 63 subjects was 22.3%. Conclusion: Detection of CFTR gene mutations by the strip assay method by reverse hybridization is an easy, fast and informative method. However, due to improvability of the common mutations in probable cystic fibrosis patients because of heterogenity in this region, it is still a major problem and does not exclude cystic fibrosis diagnosis. But this problematic issue can be overcome by evaluating the whole exons of CFTR mutations by advanced molecular tecniques. Key words: CFTR, cystic fibrosis, molecular diagnosis, reverse hibridisation [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(2.000: 202-208

  13. Mutation update for the PORCN gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lombardi, Maria Paola; Bulk, Saskia; Celli, Jacopo;

    2011-01-01

    , the pentalogy of Cantrell and Limb-Body Wall Complex. Here we present a review of the published mutations in the PORCN gene to date and report on seven new mutations together with the corresponding clinical data. Based on the review we have created a Web-based locus-specific database that lists all...

  14. Mutations in the WTX - gene are found in some high-grade microsatellite instable (MSI-H) colorectal cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genetically, colorectal cancers (CRCs) can be subdivided into tumors with chromosomal instability (CIN) or microsatellite instability (MSI). In both types of CRCs genes that are involved in the degradation of β-CATENIN are frequently mutated. Whereas in CIN CRCs APC (Adenomatous Polyposis Coli) is affected in most cases, high grade MSI (MSI-H) CRCs frequently display mutations in various genes, like the APC-, AXIN2- or CTNNBI (β-CATENIN) gene itself. Recently in Wilms tumors, WTX (Wilms tumor gene on the X-chromosome) was discovered as another gene involved in the destruction of β-CATENIN. As the WTX-gene harbors a short T6-microsatellite in its N-terminal coding region, we hypothesized that frameshift-mutations might occur in MSI-H CRCs in the WTX gene, thus additionally contributing to the stabilization of β-CATENIN in human CRCs. DNA was extracted from 632 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded metastatic CRCs (UICCIV) and analyzed for MSI-H by investigating the stability of the highly sensitive microsatellite markers BAT25 and BAT26 applying fluorescence capillary electrophoresis (FCE). Then, in the MSI-H cases, well described mutational hot spot regions from the APC-, AXIN2- and CTNNBI genes were analyzed for genomic alterations by didesoxy-sequencing while the WTX T6-microsatellite was analyzed by fragment analysis. Additionally, the PCR products of T5-repeats were subcloned and mutations were validated using didesoxy-sequencing. Furthermore, the KRAS and the BRAF proto-oncogenes were analyzed for the most common activating mutations applying pyro-sequencing. mRNA expression of WTX from MSI-H and MSS cases and a panel of colorectal cancer cell lines was investigated using reverse transcription (RT-) PCR and FCE. In our cohort of 632 metastatic CRCs (UICCIV) we identified 41 MSI-H cases (6.5%). Two of the 41 MSI-H cases (4.8%) displayed a frameshift mutation in the T6-repeat resulting in a T5 sequence. Only one case, a male patient, expressed the mutated WTX

  15. Mutations in the WTX - gene are found in some high-grade microsatellite instable (MSI-H colorectal cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheel Silvio K

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetically, colorectal cancers (CRCs can be subdivided into tumors with chromosomal instability (CIN or microsatellite instability (MSI. In both types of CRCs genes that are involved in the degradation of β-CATENIN are frequently mutated. Whereas in CIN CRCs APC (Adenomatous Polyposis Coli is affected in most cases, high grade MSI (MSI-H CRCs frequently display mutations in various genes, like the APC-, AXIN2- or CTNNBI (β-CATENIN gene itself. Recently in Wilms tumors, WTX (Wilms tumor gene on the X-chromosome was discovered as another gene involved in the destruction of β-CATENIN. As the WTX-gene harbors a short T6-microsatellite in its N-terminal coding region, we hypothesized that frameshift-mutations might occur in MSI-H CRCs in the WTX gene, thus additionally contributing to the stabilization of β-CATENIN in human CRCs. Methods DNA was extracted from 632 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded metastatic CRCs (UICCIV and analyzed for MSI-H by investigating the stability of the highly sensitive microsatellite markers BAT25 and BAT26 applying fluorescence capillary electrophoresis (FCE. Then, in the MSI-H cases, well described mutational hot spot regions from the APC-, AXIN2- and CTNNBI genes were analyzed for genomic alterations by didesoxy-sequencing while the WTX T6-microsatellite was analyzed by fragment analysis. Additionally, the PCR products of T5-repeats were subcloned and mutations were validated using didesoxy-sequencing. Furthermore, the KRAS and the BRAF proto-oncogenes were analyzed for the most common activating mutations applying pyro-sequencing. mRNA expression of WTX from MSI-H and MSS cases and a panel of colorectal cancer cell lines was investigated using reverse transcription (RT- PCR and FCE. Results In our cohort of 632 metastatic CRCs (UICCIV we identified 41 MSI-H cases (6.5%. Two of the 41 MSI-H cases (4.8% displayed a frameshift mutation in the T6-repeat resulting in a T5 sequence. Only one case, a

  16. APC functions at the centrosome to stimulate microtubule growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Christina; Ashton, Cahora; Sharma, Manisha; Brocardo, Mariana G; Henderson, Beric R

    2016-01-01

    The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor suppressor is multi-functional. APC is known to localize at the centrosome, and in mitotic cells contributes to formation of the mitotic spindle. To test whether APC contributes to nascent microtubule (MT) growth at interphase centrosomes, we employed MT regrowth assays in U2OS cells to measure MT assembly before and after nocodazole treatment and release. We showed that siRNA knockdown of full-length APC delayed both initial MT aster formation and MT elongation/regrowth. In contrast, APC-mutant SW480 cancer cells displayed a defect in MT regrowth that was unaffected by APC knockdown, but which was rescued by reconstitution of full-length APC. Our findings identify APC as a positive regulator of centrosome MT initial assembly and suggest that this process is disrupted by cancer mutations. We confirmed that full-length APC associates with the MT-nucleation factor γ-tubulin, and found that the APC cancer-truncated form (1-1309) also bound to γ-tubulin through APC amino acids 1-453. While binding to γ-tubulin may help target APC to the site of MT nucleation complexes, additional C-terminal sequences of APC are required to stimulate and stabilize MT growth. PMID:26556314

  17. Rare mutations predisposing to familial adenomatous polyposis in Greek FAP patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP) is caused by germline mutations in the APC (Adenomatous Polyposis Coli) gene. The vast majority of APC mutations are point mutations or small insertions / deletions which lead to truncated protein products. Splicing mutations or gross genomic rearrangements are less common inactivating events of the APC gene. In the current study genomic DNA or RNA from ten unrelated FAP suspected patients was examined for germline mutations in the APC gene. Family history and phenotype were used in order to select the patients. Methods used for testing were dHPLC (denaturing High Performance Liquid Chromatography), sequencing, MLPA (Multiplex Ligation – dependent Probe Amplification), Karyotyping, FISH (Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization) and RT-PCR (Reverse Transcription – Polymerase Chain Reaction). A 250 Kbp deletion in the APC gene starting from intron 5 and extending beyond exon 15 was identified in one patient. A substitution of the +5 conserved nucleotide at the splice donor site of intron 9 in the APC gene was shown to produce frameshift and inefficient exon skipping in a second patient. Four frameshift mutations (1577insT, 1973delAG, 3180delAAAA, 3212delA) and a nonsense mutation (C1690T) were identified in the rest of the patients. Screening for APC mutations in FAP patients should include testing for splicing defects and gross genomic alterations

  18. Expression and promoter methylation status of hMLH1, MGMT, APC, and CDH1 genes in patients with colon adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailidi, Christina; Theocharis, Stamatios; Tsourouflis, Gerasimos; Pletsa, Vasiliki; Kouraklis, Gregorios; Patsouris, Efstratios; Papavassiliou, Athanasios G; Troungos, Constantinos

    2015-12-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in men and the second in women worldwide. CRC development is the result of genetic and epigenetic alterations accumulation in the epithelial cells of colon mucosa. In the present study, DNA methylation, an epigenetic event, was evaluated in tumoral and matching normal epithelium in a cohort of 61 CRC patients. The results confirmed and expanded knowledge for the tumor suppressor genes hMLH1, MGMT, APC, and CDH1. Promoter methylation was observed for all the examined genes in different percentage. A total of 71% and 10% of the examined cases were found to be methylated in two or more and in all genes, respectively. mRNA and protein levels were also evaluated. Promoter methylation of hMLH1, MGMT, APC, and CDH1 genes was present at the early stages of tumor's formation and it could also be detected in the normal mucosa. Correlations of the methylated genes with patient's age and tumor's clinicopathological characteristics were also observed. Our findings suggest that DNA methylation is a useful marker for tumor progression monitoring and that promoter methylation in certain genes is associated with more advanced tumor stage, poor differentiation, and metastasis. PMID:25908636

  19. Mutational robustness of gene regulatory networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aalt D J van Dijk

    Full Text Available Mutational robustness of gene regulatory networks refers to their ability to generate constant biological output upon mutations that change network structure. Such networks contain regulatory interactions (transcription factor-target gene interactions but often also protein-protein interactions between transcription factors. Using computational modeling, we study factors that influence robustness and we infer several network properties governing it. These include the type of mutation, i.e. whether a regulatory interaction or a protein-protein interaction is mutated, and in the case of mutation of a regulatory interaction, the sign of the interaction (activating vs. repressive. In addition, we analyze the effect of combinations of mutations and we compare networks containing monomeric with those containing dimeric transcription factors. Our results are consistent with available data on biological networks, for example based on evolutionary conservation of network features. As a novel and remarkable property, we predict that networks are more robust against mutations in monomer than in dimer transcription factors, a prediction for which analysis of conservation of DNA binding residues in monomeric vs. dimeric transcription factors provides indirect evidence.

  20. A novel function of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) in regulating DNA repair

    OpenAIRE

    Jaiswal, Aruna S.; Narayan, Satya

    2008-01-01

    Prevailing literature suggests diversified cellular functions for the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene. Among them a recently discovered unique role of APC is in DNA repair. The APC gene can modulate the base excision repair (BER) pathway through an interaction with DNA polymerase β (Pol-β) and flap endonuclease 1 (Fen-1). Taken together with the transcriptional activation of APC gene by alkylating agents and modulation of BER activity, APC may play an important role in carcinogenesis an...

  1. Hypomorphic bimA(APC3) alleles cause errors in chromosome metabolism that activate the DNA damage checkpoint blocking cytokinesis in Aspergillus nidulans.

    OpenAIRE

    Wolkow, T D; Mirabito, P.M.; Venkatram, S; Hamer, J. E.

    2000-01-01

    The Aspergillus nidulans sepI(+) gene has been implicated in the coordination of septation with nuclear division and cell growth. We find that the temperature-sensitive (ts) sepI1 mutation represents a novel allele of bimA(APC3), which encodes a conserved component of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). We have characterized the septation, nuclear division, cell-cycle checkpoint defects, and DNA sequence alterations of sepI1 (renamed bimA10) and two other ts lethal bimA(APC3) al...

  2. Wnt signaling and colon carcinogenesis: Beyond APC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rani Najdi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the Wnt signaling pathway via mutation of the adenomatous polyposis coli gene (APC is a critical event in the development of colon cancer. For colon carcinogenesis, however, constitutive signaling through the canonical Wnt pathway is not a singular event. Here we review how canonical Wnt signaling is modulated by intracellular LEF/TCF composition and location, the action of different Wnt ligands, and the secretion of Wnt inhibitory molecules. We also review the contributions of non-canonical Wnt signaling and other distinct pathways in the tumor micro environment that cross-talk to the canonical Wnt pathway and thereby influence colon cancer progression. These ′non-APC′ aspects of Wnt signaling are considered in relation to the development of potential agents for the treatment of patients with colon cancer. Regulatory pathways that influence Wnt signaling highlight how it might be possible to design therapies that target a network of signals beyond that of APC and β-catenin.

  3. Targeted gene mutation in Phytophthora spp.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamour, K.H.; Finley, L.; Hurtado-Gonzales, O.; Gobena, D.; Tierney, M.; Meijer, H.J.G.

    2006-01-01

    The genus Phytophthora belongs to the oomycetes and is composed of plant pathogens. Currently, there are no strategies to mutate specific genes for members of this genus. Whole genome sequences are available or being prepared for Phytophthora sojae, P. ramorum, P. infestans, and P. capsici and the d

  4. Mutated Genes in Schizophrenia Map to Brain Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2013 Mutated Genes in Schizophrenia Map to Brain Networks Schizophrenia networks in the prefrontal cortex area of the brain. ... of spontaneous mutations in genes that form a network in the front region of the brain. The ...

  5. PETALS: Proteomic Evaluation and Topological Analysis of a mutated Locus' Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Vishal

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colon cancer is driven by mutations in a number of genes, the most notorious of which is Apc. Though much of Apc's signaling has been mechanistically identified over the years, it is not always clear which functions or interactions are operative in a particular tumor. This is confounded by the presence of mutations in a number of other putative cancer driver (CAN genes, which often synergize with mutations in Apc. Computational methods are, thus, required to predict which pathways are likely to be operative when a particular mutation in Apc is observed. Results We developed a pipeline, PETALS, to predict and test likely signaling pathways connecting Apc to other CAN-genes, where the interaction network originating at Apc is defined as a "blossom," with each Apc-CAN-gene subnetwork referred to as a "petal." Known and predicted protein interactions are used to identify an Apc blossom with 24 petals. Then, using a novel measure of bimodality, the coexpression of each petal is evaluated against proteomic (2 D differential In Gel Electrophoresis, 2D-DIGE measurements from the Apc1638N+/-mouse to test the network-based hypotheses. Conclusions The predicted pathways linking Apc and Hapln1 exhibited the highest amount of bimodal coexpression with the proteomic targets, prioritizing the Apc-Hapln1 petal over other CAN-gene pairs and suggesting that this petal may be involved in regulating the observed proteome-level effects. These results not only demonstrate how functional 'omics data can be employed to test in silico predictions of CAN-gene pathways, but also reveal an approach to integrate models of upstream genetic interference with measured, downstream effects.

  6. Mutation scanning of peach floral genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilde H Dayton

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutation scanning technology has been used to develop crop species with improved traits. Modifications that improve screening throughput and sensitivity would facilitate the targeted mutation breeding of crops. Technical innovations for high-resolution melting (HRM analysis are enabling the clinic-based screening for human disease gene polymorphism. We examined the application of two HRM modifications, COLD-PCR and QMC-PCR, to the mutation scanning of genes in peach, Prunus persica. The targeted genes were the putative floral regulators PpAGAMOUS and PpTERMINAL FLOWER I. Results HRM analysis of PpAG and PpTFL1 coding regions in 36 peach cultivars found one polymorphic site in each gene. PpTFL1 and PpAG SNPs were used to examine approaches to increase HRM throughput. Cultivars with SNPs could be reliably detected in pools of twelve genotypes. COLD-PCR was found to increase the sensitivity of HRM analysis of pooled samples, but worked best with small amplicons. Examination of QMC-PCR demonstrated that primary PCR products for further analysis could be produced from variable levels of genomic DNA. Conclusions Natural SNPs in exons of target peach genes were discovered by HRM analysis of cultivars from a southeastern US breeding program. For detecting natural or induced SNPs in larger populations, HRM efficiency can be improved by increasing sample pooling and template production through approaches such as COLD-PCR and QMC-PCR. Technical advances developed to improve clinical diagnostics can play a role in the targeted mutation breeding of crops.

  7. APC binds the Miro/Milton motor complex to stimulate transport of mitochondria to the plasma membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Mills, Kate M.; Brocardo, Mariana G.; Henderson, Beric R.

    2016-01-01

    The role of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor suppressor at mitochondria is unclear. We show that APC associates with the Miro/Milton/kinesin complex to stimulate anterograde transport of mitochondria. This identifies the first regulatory role of APC in organelle transport. APC cancer mutations block this activity.

  8. Deafness gene mutations in newborns in Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shujing; Yang, Xiaojian; Zhou, Yi; Hao, Jinsheng; Shen, Adong; Xu, Fang; Chu, Ping; Jin, Yaqiong; Lu, Jie; Guo, Yongli; Shi, Jin; Liu, Haihong; Ni, Xin

    2016-05-01

    Objective To determine the incidence of congenital hearing loss (HL) in newborns by the rate of deafness-related genetic mutations. Design Clinical study of consecutive newborns in Beijing using allele-specific polymerase chain reaction-based universal array. Study sample This study tested 37 573 newborns within 3 days after birth, including nine sites in four genes: GJB2 (35 del G, 176 del 16, 235 del C, 299 del AT), SLC26A4 (IVS7-2 A > G, 2168 A > G), MTRNR1 (1555 A > G, 1494 C > T), and GJB3 (538 C > T). The birth condition of infants was also recorded. Results Of 37 573 newborns, 1810 carried pathogenic mutations, or 4.817%. The carrier rates of GJB2 (35 del G, 176 del 16, 235 del C, 299 del AT), GJB3 (538 C > T), SLC26A4 (IVS7-2 A > G, 2168 A > G), and MTRNR1 (1555 A > G, 1494 C > T) mutations were 0.005%, 0.104%, 1.924%, 0.551%, 0.295%, 0.253%, 1.387%, 0.024%, and 0.274%, respectively. Logistic regression analysis indicated no statistically significant relationship between mutations and infant sex, premature delivery, twin status, or birth weight. Conclusions The 235delC GJB2 mutation was the most frequent deafness-related mutation in the Chinese population. Genetic screening for the deafness gene will help detect more cases of newborn congenital HL than current screening practices. PMID:26766211

  9. Major gene mutations and domestication of plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From the approximately 200,000 species of flowering plants known, only about 200 have been domesticated. The process has taken place in many regions over long periods. At present there is great interest in domesticating new species and developing new uses for existing ones in order to supply needed food, industrial raw materials, etc. It is proposed that major gene mutations were important in domestication; many key characters distinguishing cultivated from related wild species are controlled by one or very few major genes. The deliberate effort to domesticate new species requires at least the following: identification of needs and potential sources, establishment of suitable niches, choice of taxa to be domesticated, specification of the desired traits and key characters to be modified, as well as the potential role of induced mutations. (author). 14 refs

  10. A novel SYBR-based duplex qPCR for the detection of gene dosage: detection of an APC large deletion in a familial adenomatous polyposis patient with an unusual phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torrezan Giovana

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP is a hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome caused by a loss of function of the APC gene. Large deletions in APC are a common cause of FAP; despite the existence of a variety of gene dosage detection methodologies, most are labor intensive and time and resource consuming. Methods We describe a new duplex qPCR method for gene dosage analysis based on the coamplification of a target and a reference gene in a SYBR Green reaction, followed by a comparison of the ratio between the target and the reference peaks of the melting curve for the test (patient and control samples. The reliability of the described duplex qPCR was validated for several genes (APC, HPRT1, ATM, PTEN and BRCA1. Results Using this novel gene dosage method, we have identified an APC gene deletion in a FAP patient undergoing genetic testing. Comparative genomic hybridization based on microarrays (aCGH was used to confirm and map the extent of the deletion, revealing a 5.2 MB rearrangement (5q21.3-q22.3 encompassing the entire APC and 19 additional genes. Conclusion The novel assay accurately detected losses and gains of one copy of the target sequences, representing a reliable and flexible alternative to other gene dosage techniques. In addition, we described a FAP patient harboring a gross deletion at 5q21.3-q22.3 with an unusual phenotype of the absence of mental impairment and dysmorphic features.

  11. Mutations in the Human naked cuticle Homolog NKD1 Found in Colorectal Cancer Alter Wnt/Dvl/β-Catenin Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Jianhui; Cagatay, Tolga; Zhou, Guangjin; Chan, Chih-Chiang; Blythe, Shelby; Suyama, Kaye; Zheng, Li; Pan, Kaifeng; Qian, Chiping; Hamelin, Richard; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Klein, Peter S.; Wharton, Keith A.; Liu, Wanguo

    2009-01-01

    Background Mutation of Wnt signal antagonists Apc or Axin activates β-catenin signaling in many cancers including the majority of human colorectal adenocarcinomas. The phenotype of apc or axin mutation in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is strikingly similar to that caused by mutation in the segment-polarity gene, naked cuticle (nkd). Nkd inhibits Wnt signaling by binding to the Dishevelled (Dsh/Dvl) family of scaffold proteins that link Wnt receptor activation to β-catenin accumulation...

  12. Apc Restoration Promotes Cellular Differentiation and Reestablishes Crypt Homeostasis in Colorectal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dow, Lukas E; O'Rourke, Kevin P; Simon, Janelle; Tschaharganeh, Darjus F; van Es, Johan H; Clevers, Hans; Lowe, Scott W

    2015-01-01

    The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor suppressor is mutated in the vast majority of human colorectal cancers (CRC) and leads to deregulated Wnt signaling. To determine whether Apc disruption is required for tumor maintenance, we developed a mouse model of CRC whereby Apc can be conditionally su

  13. THE ANALYSIS OF NF2 GENE MUTATION IN SPORADIC SCHWANNOMAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卞留贯; 孙青芳; 沈建康; 赵卫国; 罗其中

    2002-01-01

    Objective To analyze the mutation of NF2 gene (exon 2,4,6 and 13) in schwannomas. Methods The NF2 gene mutation in 36 schwannomas were observed by PCR-SSCP and DNA sequence. The proliferative index of schwannoma was detected by immunohistochemistry. Results We found 13 mutations in 36 schwannomas, including 6 deletion or insertion resulting in a frameshift, 2 nonsense mutations, 2 missense mutations, and 3 alterations affecting acceptor or donor of splicing sites in E4,E6,E13. The proliferative index of schwannomas with mutation were significantly higher than those without mutation (P< 0.05). Conclusion NF2 gene mutation is the frequent event in the tumorigenesis of schwannomas, and there is some correlation between the mutation and clinical behavior(tumor proliferation).

  14. The postsynaptic adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) multiprotein complex is required for localizing neuroligin and neurexin to neuronal nicotinic synapses in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Madelaine M; Yang, Fang; Mohn, Jesse L; Storer, Elizabeth K; Jacob, Michele H

    2010-08-18

    Synaptic efficacy requires that presynaptic and postsynaptic specializations align precisely and mature coordinately. The underlying mechanisms are poorly understood, however. We propose that adenomatous polyposis coli protein (APC) is a key coordinator of presynaptic and postsynaptic maturation. APC organizes a multiprotein complex that directs nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) localization at postsynaptic sites in avian ciliary ganglion neurons in vivo. We hypothesize that the APC complex also provides retrograde signals that direct presynaptic active zones to develop in register with postsynaptic nAChR clusters. In our model, the APC complex provides retrograde signals via postsynaptic neuroligin that interacts extracellularly with presynaptic neurexin. S-SCAM (synaptic cell adhesion molecule) and PSD-93 (postsynaptic density-93) are scaffold proteins that bind to neuroligin. We identify S-SCAM as a novel component of neuronal nicotinic synapses. We show that S-SCAM, PSD-93, neuroligin and neurexin are enriched at alpha3*-nAChR synapses. PSD-93 and S-SCAM bind to APC and its binding partner beta-catenin, respectively. Blockade of selected APC and beta-catenin interactions, in vivo, leads to decreased postsynaptic accumulation of S-SCAM, but not PSD-93. Importantly, neuroligin synaptic clusters are also decreased. On the presynaptic side, there are decreases in neurexin and active zone proteins. Further, presynaptic terminals are less mature structurally and functionally. We define a novel neural role for APC by showing that the postsynaptic APC multiprotein complex is required for anchoring neuroligin and neurexin at neuronal synapses in vivo. APC human gene mutations correlate with autism spectrum disorders, providing strong support for the importance of the association, demonstrated here, between APC, neuroligin and neurexin. PMID:20720115

  15. Detection of Rare Beta Globin Gene Mutations in Northwestern Iran

    OpenAIRE

    M Haghi; N Pouladi; AA Hosseinpour Feizi; MA Hosseinpour Feizi; P Azarfam

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Recent molecular studies on Iranian β-thalassemia genes revealed the presence of eight common mutations associated with thalassemia. Although these mutations are frequent, there are other rare and unknown mutations that can create large problems in designing preventive programs. We detected and explained the common mutations in north-western Iran previously and detection of the rare and unknown mutations could be useful in diagnosis and design of future preventive programs. Meth...

  16. Mutational analysis of the human MAOA gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tivol, E.A.; Shalish, C.; Schuback, D.E.; Breakefield, X.O. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Hsu, Yun-Pung [VA Medical Center, West Roxbury, MA (United States)

    1996-02-16

    The monoamine oxidases (MAO-A and MAO-B) are the enzymes primarily responsible for the degradation of amine neurotransmitters, such as dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin. Wide variations in activity of these isozymes have been reported in control humans. The MAOA and MAOB genes are located next to each other in the p11.3-11.4 region of the human X chromosome. Our recent documentation of an MAO-A-deficiency state, apparently associated with impulsive aggressive behavior in males, has focused attention on genetic variations in the MAOA gene. In the present study, variations in the coding sequence of the MAOA gene were evaluated by RT-PCR, SSCP, and sequencing of mRNA or genomic DNA in 40 control males with >100-fold variations in MAOA activity, as measured in cultured skin fibroblasts. Remarkable conservation of the coding sequence was found, with only 5 polymorphisms observed. All but one of these were in the third codon position and thus did not alter the deduced amino acid sequence. The one amino acid alteration observed, lys{r_arrow}arg, was neutral and should not affect the structure of the protein. This study demonstrates high conservation of coding sequence in the human MAOA gene in control males, and provides primer sets which can be used to search genomic DNA for mutations in this gene in males with neuropsychiatric conditions. 47 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  17. Comparison Study of MS-HRM and Pyrosequencing Techniques for Quantification of APC and CDKN2A Gene Methylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migheli, Francesca; Stoccoro, Andrea; Coppedè, Fabio; Wan Omar, Wan Adnan; Failli, Alessandra; Consolini, Rita; Seccia, Massimo; Spisni, Roberto; Miccoli, Paolo; Mathers, John C.; Migliore, Lucia

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the development of cost-effective techniques for the quantification of DNA methylation biomarkers. We analyzed 90 samples of surgically resected colorectal cancer tissues for APC and CDKN2A promoter methylation using methylation sensitive-high resolution melting (MS-HRM) and pyrosequencing. MS-HRM is a less expensive technique compared with pyrosequencing but is usually more limited because it gives a range of methylation estimates rather than a single value. Here, we developed a method for deriving single estimates, rather than a range, of methylation using MS-HRM and compared the values obtained in this way with those obtained using the gold standard quantitative method of pyrosequencing. We derived an interpolation curve using standards of known methylated/unmethylated ratio (0%, 12.5%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of methylation) to obtain the best estimate of the extent of methylation for each of our samples. We observed similar profiles of methylation and a high correlation coefficient between the two techniques. Overall, our new approach allows MS-HRM to be used as a quantitative assay which provides results which are comparable with those obtained by pyrosequencing. PMID:23326336

  18. Tumor promotion and inhibition by phenobarbital in livers of conditional Apc-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braeuning, Albert; Gavrilov, Alina; Geissler, Miriam; Wenz, Christine; Colnot, Sabine; Templin, Markus F; Metzger, Ute; Römer, Michael; Zell, Andreas; Schwarz, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling is important for human and rodent hepatocarcinogenesis. In mice, the tumor promoter phenobarbital (PB) selects for hepatocellular tumors with activating β-catenin mutations via constitutive androstane receptor activation. PB-dependent tumor promotion was studied in mice with genetic inactivation of Apc, a negative regulator of β-catenin, to circumvent the problem of randomly induced mutations by chemical initiators and to allow monitoring of PB- and Wnt/β-catenin-dependent tumorigenesis in the absence of unknown genomic alterations. Moreover, the study was designed to investigate PB-induced proliferation of liver cells with activated β-catenin. PB treatment provided Apc-deficient hepatocytes with only a minor proliferative advantage, and additional connexin 32 deficiency did not affect the proliferative response. PB significantly promoted the outgrowth of Apc-deficient hepatocellular adenoma (HCA), but simultaneously inhibited the formation of Apc-deficient hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The probability of tumor promotion by PB was calculated to be much lower for hepatocytes with loss of Apc, as compared to mutational β-catenin activation. Comprehensive transcriptomic and phosphoproteomic characterization of HCA and HCC revealed molecular details of the two tumor types. HCC were characterized by a loss of differentiated hepatocellular gene expression, enhanced proliferative signaling, and massive over-activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. In conclusion, PB exerts a dual role in liver tumor formation by promoting the growth of HCA but inhibiting the growth of HCC. Data demonstrate that one and the same compound can produce opposite effects on hepatocarcinogenesis, depending on context, highlighting the necessity to develop a more differentiated view on the tumorigenicity of this model compound. PMID:26838046

  19. PET neuroimaging and mutations in the DJ-1 gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, MCJ; Eshuis, SA; Maguire, RP; Veenma-van der Duijn, L; Pruim, J; Oostra, BA; van Duijn, CM; Leenders, KL

    2004-01-01

    Mutations in the DJ-1 gene lead to autosomal recessive early-onset parkinsonism. We performed F-DOPA and FDG PET neuroimaging in two parkinsonism patients homozygous for DJ-1 mutations, three relatives heterozygous for a DJ-1 mutation and one non-carrier, all from the originally described kindred fr

  20. Preliminary Report of Molecular Detection of Retinoblastoma Gene Mutations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    To develop gene diagnosis for retinoblastoma predisposition, it is necessary to disclose the retinoblastoma gene mutations or deletions in detail. Genomic DNA from tumor and peripheral white blood cells in 33 patients with retinoblastoma was detected with 3.8kb probe derived from 3' end of retinoblastoma gene cDNA. The gene abnormalities, including deletion, partial deletion and rearrangement, were found in 18 patients. Further research will be aimed at microdeletions or mutations for those patients wti...

  1. Frequent loss of the AXIN1 locus but absence of AXIN1 gene mutations in adenocarcinomas of the gastro-oesophageal junction with nuclear β-catenin expression

    OpenAIRE

    Koppert, L.B.; Velden, A.W. van der; Van de Wetering, M; Abbou, M.; van den Ouweland, A M W; Tilanus, H W; Wijnhoven, B P L; Dinjens, W.N.M.

    2004-01-01

    Up to 60% of gastro-oesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinomas show nuclear β-catenin expression, pointing to activated T-cell factor (TCF)/β-catenin-driven gene transcription. We demonstrate in five human GEJ adenocarcinoma cell lines that nuclear β-catenin expression indeed correlates with enhanced TCF-mediated transcription of a reporter gene. In several tumour types, TCF/β-catenin activation is caused by mutations in either adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), β-catenin exon 3, AXIN1, AXIN2 ...

  2. Aneuploidy vs. gene mutation hypothesis of cancer: Recent study claims mutation but is found to support aneuploidy

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Ruhong; Sonik, Arvind; Stindl, Reinhard; Rasnick, David; Duesberg, Peter

    2000-01-01

    For nearly a century, cancer has been blamed on somatic mutation. But it is still unclear whether this mutation is aneuploidy, an abnormal balance of chromosomes, or gene mutation. Despite enormous efforts, the currently popular gene mutation hypothesis has failed to identify cancer-specific mutations with transforming function and cannot explain why cancer occurs only many months to decades after mutation by carcinogens and why solid cancers are aneuploid, although conventional mutation does...

  3. Splice Site Mutations in the ATP7A Gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjørringe, Tina; Tümer, Zeynep; Møller, Lisbeth Birk

    2011-01-01

    Menkes disease (MD) is caused by mutations in the ATP7A gene. We describe 33 novel splice site mutations detected in patients with MD or the milder phenotypic form, Occipital Horn Syndrome. We review these 33 mutations together with 28 previously published splice site mutations. We investigate 12...... mutations for their effect on the mRNA transcript in vivo. Transcriptional data from another 16 mutations were collected from the literature. The theoretical consequences of splice site mutations, predicted with the bioinformatics tool Human Splice Finder, were investigated and evaluated in relation to in...... vivo results. Ninety-six percent of the mutations identified in 45 patients with classical MD were predicted to have a significant effect on splicing, which concurs with the absence of any detectable wild-type transcript in all 19 patients investigated in vivo. Sixty-seven percent of the mutations...

  4. Suppression of TGA Mutations in the Bacillus subtilis spoIIR Gene by prfB Mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Karow, Margaret L.; Rogers, Elizabeth J.; Lovett, Paul S.; Piggot, Patrick J.

    1998-01-01

    An unexpectedly high proportion of TGA nonsense mutations was obtained in a collection of chemically induced mutations in the spoIIR locus of Bacillus subtilis. Of 11 different mutations obtained, TGA mutations were found in four codons, whereas only three codons yielded missense mutations. Six suppressors of the TGA mutations were isolated, and five of the suppressing mutations were mapped to the prfB gene encoding protein release factor 2. These are the first mutations shown to map to the B...

  5. Differential gene expression profile reveals deregulation of pregnancy specific β1 glycoprotein 9 early during colorectal carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Gallinger Steven; Chetty Runjan; Goncalves Jason; Salahshor Sima; Woodgett James R

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background APC (Adenomatous polyposis coli) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of both familial and sporadic colorectal cancer. Patients carrying germline APC mutations develop multiple colonic adenomas at younger age and higher frequency than non-carrier cases which indicates that silencing of one APC allele may be sufficient to initiate the transformation process. Methods To elucidate the biological dysregulation underlying adenoma formation we examined global gene express...

  6. PARK1 gene mutation of autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ligang Jiang; Guohua Hu; Qiuhui Chen; Ying Zhang; Xinyu Hu; Jia Fan; Lifeng Liu; Rui Guo; Yajuan Sun; Yixhi Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Studies have shown that PARK1 gene is associated with the autosomal dominant inheritance of Parkinson's disease.PARK1 gene contains two mutation sites, namely Ala30Pro and AIa53Thr, which are located on exons 3 and 4, respectively.However, the genetic loci of the pathogenic genes remain unclear.In this study, blood samples were collected from 11 members of a family with high prevalence of Parkinson's disease, including four affected cases, five suspected cases,and two non-affected cases.Point mutation screening of common mutation sites on PARK1 gene exon 4 was conducted using PCR, to determine the genetic loci of the causative gene for Parkinson's disease.Gene identification and sequencing results showed that a T base deletion mutation was observed in the PARK1 gene exon 4 of all 11 collected samples.It was confirmed that the PARKf gene exon 4 gene mutation is an important pathogenic mutation for Parkinson's disease.

  7. DRUMS: a human disease related unique gene mutation search engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zuofeng; Liu, Xingnan; Wen, Jingran; Xu, Ye; Zhao, Xin; Li, Xuan; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2011-10-01

    With the completion of the human genome project and the development of new methods for gene variant detection, the integration of mutation data and its phenotypic consequences has become more important than ever. Among all available resources, locus-specific databases (LSDBs) curate one or more specific genes' mutation data along with high-quality phenotypes. Although some genotype-phenotype data from LSDB have been integrated into central databases little effort has been made to integrate all these data by a search engine approach. In this work, we have developed disease related unique gene mutation search engine (DRUMS), a search engine for human disease related unique gene mutation as a convenient tool for biologists or physicians to retrieve gene variant and related phenotype information. Gene variant and phenotype information were stored in a gene-centred relational database. Moreover, the relationships between mutations and diseases were indexed by the uniform resource identifier from LSDB, or another central database. By querying DRUMS, users can access the most popular mutation databases under one interface. DRUMS could be treated as a domain specific search engine. By using web crawling, indexing, and searching technologies, it provides a competitively efficient interface for searching and retrieving mutation data and their relationships to diseases. The present system is freely accessible at http://www.scbit.org/glif/new/drums/index.html. PMID:21913285

  8. APC is required for muscle stem cell proliferation and skeletal muscle tissue repair

    OpenAIRE

    Parisi, Alice; Lacour, Floriane; Giordani, Lorenzo; Colnot, Sabine; Maire, Pascal; Le Grand, Fabien

    2015-01-01

    The tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is a crucial regulator of many stem cell types. In constantly cycling stem cells of fast turnover tissues, APC loss results in the constitutive activation of a Wnt target gene program that massively increases proliferation and leads to malignant transformation. However, APC function in skeletal muscle, a tissue with a low turnover rate, has never been investigated. Here we show that conditional genetic disruption of APC in adult muscle ste...

  9. Mutation analysis and prenatal diagnosis of EXT1 gene mutations in Chinese patients with multiple osteochondromas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Hai-yan; HU Ya-li; YANG Ying; WU Xing; ZHU Rui-fang; ZHU Xiang-yu; DUAN Hong-lei; ZHANG Ying; ZHOU Jin-yong

    2011-01-01

    Background Multiple osteochondromas (MO), an inherited autosomal dominant disorder, is characterized by the presence of multiple exostoses on the long bones. MO is caused by mutations in the EXT1 or EXT2 genes which encode glycosyltransferases implicated in heparin sulfate biosynthesis.Methods In this study, efforts were made to identify the underlying disease-causing mutations in patients from two MO families in China.Results Two novel EXT1 gene mutations were identified and no mutation was found in EXT2 gene. The mutation c.497T>A in exon 1 of the EXT1 gene was cosegregated with the disease phenotype in family 1 and formed a stop codon at amino acid site 166. The fetus of the proband was diagnosed negative. In family 2, the mutation c. 1430-1431delCC in exon 6 of the EXT1 gene would cause frameshift and introduce a premature stop codon after the reading frame being open for 42 amino acids. The fetus of this family inherited this mutation from the father.Conclusions Mutation analysis of two MO families in this study demonstrates its further application in MO genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis.

  10. CFTR gene mutations in isolated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pignatti, P.F.; Bombien, C.; Marigo, C. [and others

    1994-09-01

    In order to identify a possible hereditary predisposition to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), we have looked for the presence of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene DNA sequence modifications in 28 unrelated patients with no signs of cystic fibrosis. The known mutations in Italian CF patients, as well as the most frequent worldwide CF mutations, were investigated. In addition, a denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of about half of the coding sequence of the gene in 56 chromosomes from the patients and in 102 chromosomes from control individuals affected by other pulmonary diseases and from normal controls was performed. Nine different CFTR gene mutations and polymorphisms were found in seven patients, a highly significant increase over controls. Two of the patients were compound heterozygotes. Two frequent CF mutations were detected: deletion F508 and R117H; two rare CF mutations: R1066C and 3667ins4; and five CF sequence variants: R75Q (which was also described as a disease-causing mutation in male sterility cases due to the absence of the vasa deferentia), G576A, 2736 A{r_arrow}G, L997F, and 3271+18C{r_arrow}T. Seven (78%) of the mutations are localized in transmembrane domains. Six (86%) of the patients with defined mutations and polymorphisms had bronchiectasis. These results indicate that CFTR gene mutations and sequence alterations may be involved in the etiopathogenesis of some cases of COPD.

  11. Mitochondrial gene mutations and type 2 diabetes in Chinese families

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ming-zhen; YU De-min; YU Pei; LIU De-min; WANG Kun; TANG Xin-zhi

    2008-01-01

    Background Numerous mitochondrial DNA mutations are significantly correlated with development of diabetes. This study investigated mitochondrial gene, point mutations in patients with type 2 diabetes and their families. Methods Unrelated patients with type 2 diabetes(n=826)were randomly recruited; unrelated and nondiabetic subjects (n=637)served as controls. The clinical and biochemical data of the participants were collected. Total genome was extracted from peripheral leucocytes. Polymerase chain reaction, restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP)and clonig techniques were used to screen mitochondrial genes including np3316,np3394 and np3426 in the ND1 region and np3243 in the tRNALeu (UUR). Results In 39 diabetics with one or more mitochondrial gene point mutations, the prevalence(4.7%,39/826)of mtDNA mutations was higher than that(0.7%,5/637)in the controls. The identical mutation was found in 23 of 43 tested members from three pedigrees. Affected family members presented with variable clinical features ranging from normal glucose tolerance to impaired glucose tolerance (IGT)(n=2),impaired fasting glucose(IFG)(n=1)to type 2 diabetes (n=13)with 3 family members suffering from hearing loss. Conclusions Type 2 diabetes in China is associated with several mitochondrial gene mutations. Aged patients with diabetic family history had a higher prevalence of mutation and various clinical pictures. Mitochondrial gene mutation might be one of the genetic factors contributing to diabetic familial clustering.

  12. Ferredoxin Gene Mutation in Iranian Trichomonas Vaginalis Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soudabeh Heidari

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Trichomonas vaginalis causes trichomoniasis and metronidazole is its chosen drug for treatment. Ferredoxin has role in electron transport and carbohydrate metabolism and the conversion of an inactive form of metronidazole (CO to its active form (CPR. Ferredoxin gene mutations reduce gene expression and increase its resistance to metronidazole. In this study, the frequency of ferredoxin gene mutations in clinical isolates of T.vaginalis in Tehran has been studied.Methods: Forty six clinical T. vaginalis isolates of vaginal secretions and urine sediment were collected from Tehran Province since 2011 till 2012. DNA was extracted and ferredoxin gene was amplified by PCR technique. The ferredoxin gene PCR products were sequenced to determine gene mutations.Results: In four isolates (8.69% point mutation at nucleotide position -239 (the translation start codon of the ferredoxin gene were detected in which adenosine were converted to thymine.Conclusion: Mutation at nucleotide -239 ferredoxin gene reduces translational regulatory protein’s binding affinity which concludes reduction of ferredoxin expression. For this reduction, decrease in activity and decrease in metronidazole drug delivery into the cells occur. Mutations in these four isolates may lead to resistance of them to metronidazole.

  13. Amelogenesis Imperfecta and Screening of Mutation in Amelogenin Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Veronese Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to report the clinical findings and the screening of mutations of amelogenin gene of a 7-year-old boy with amelogenesis imperfecta (AI. The genomic DNA was extracted from saliva of patient and his family, followed by PCR and direct DNA sequencing. The c.261C>T mutation was found in samples of mother, father, and brother, but the mutation was not found in the sequence of the patient. This mutation is a silent mutation and a single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs2106416. Thus, it is suggested that the mutation found was not related to the clinical presence of AI. Further research is necessary to examine larger number of patients and genes related to AI.

  14. Mutation hot spots in the canine herpesvirus thymidine kinase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shinya; Matsumoto, Yasunobu; Takashima, Yasuhiro; Otsuka, Haruki

    2005-08-01

    The guanine and cytosine content (GC-content) of alpha-herpesvirus genes are highly variable despite similar genome structures. It is known that drug resistant HSV, which has the genome with a high GC-content (approximately 70%), commonly includes frameshift mutations in homopolymer stretches of guanine (G) and cytosine (C) within the thymidine kinase (TK) gene. However, whether such mutation hotspots exist in the TK gene of canine herpesvirus (CHV) which has a low GC-content was unknown. In this study, we investigated mutations in the TK gene of CHV. CHV was passaged in the presence of iodo-deoxyuridine (IDU), and IDU-resistant clones were isolated. In all IDU-resistant virus clones, mutations in the TK gene were observed. The majority of these mutations were frameshift mutations of an adenine (A) insertion or deletion within either of 2 stretches of eight A's in the TK gene. It was demonstrated that CHV TK mutations frequently occur at a limited number of hot spots within long homopolymer nucleotide stretches. PMID:15965615

  15. Redefining the subcellular location and transport of APC: new insights using a panel of antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocardo, Mariana; Näthke, Inke S; Henderson, Beric R

    2005-01-01

    Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is a tumour suppressor involved in colon cancer progression. We and others previously described nuclear–cytoplasmic shuttling of APC. However, there are conflicting reports concerning the localization of endogenous wild-type and tumour-associated, truncated APC. To resolve this issue, we compared APC localization using immunofluorescence (IF) microscopy and cell fractionation with nine different APC antibodies. We found that three commonly used APC antibodies showed nonspecific nuclear staining by IF and validated this conclusion in cells where APC was inactivated using small interfering RNA or Cre/Flox. Fractionation showed that wild-type and truncated APC from colon cancer cells were primarily cytoplasmic, but increased in the nucleus after leptomycin B treatment, consistent with CRM1-dependent nuclear export. In contrast to recent reports, our biochemical data indicate that APC nuclear localization is not regulated by changes in cell density, and that APC nuclear export is not prevented by truncating mutations in cancer. These results verify that the bulk of APC resides in the cytoplasm and indicate the need for caution when evaluating the nuclear accumulation of APC. PMID:15678162

  16. Simulation of gene evolution under directional mutational pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudkiewicz, Małgorzata; Mackiewicz, Paweł; Kowalczuk, Maria; Mackiewicz, Dorota; Nowicka, Aleksandra; Polak, Natalia; Smolarczyk, Kamila; Banaszak, Joanna; R. Dudek, Mirosław; Cebrat, Stanisław

    2004-05-01

    The two main mechanisms generating the genetic diversity, mutation and recombination, have random character but they are biased which has an effect on the generation of asymmetry in the bacterial chromosome structure and in the protein coding sequences. Thus, like in a case of two chiral molecules-the two possible orientations of a gene in relation to the topology of a chromosome are not equivalent. Assuming that the sequence of a gene may oscillate only between certain limits of its structural composition means that the gene could be forced out of these limits by the directional mutation pressure, in the course of evolution. The probability of the event depends on the time the gene stays under the same mutation pressure. Inversion of the gene changes the directional mutational pressure to the reciprocal one and hence it changes the distance of the gene to its lower and upper bound of the structural tolerance. Using Monte Carlo methods we were able to simulate the evolution of genes under experimentally found mutational pressure, assuming simple mechanisms of selection. We found that the mutation and recombination should work in accordance to lower their negative effects on the function of the products of coding sequences.

  17. Recognizable cerebellar dysplasia associated with mutations in multiple tubulin genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Oegema (Renske); T.D. Cushion (Thomas); I.G. Phelps (Ian G.); S.-K. Chung (Seo-Kyung); J.C. Dempsey (Jennifer C.); S. Collins (Sarah); J.G.L. Mullins (Jonathan G.L.); T. Dudding (Tracy); H. Gill (Harinder); A.J. Green (Andrew J.); W.B. Dobyns (William); G.E. Ishak (Gisele E.); M.I. Rees (Mark); D. Doherty (Dan)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractMutations in alpha- and beta-tubulins are increasingly recognized as a major cause of malformations of cortical development (MCD), typically lissencephaly, pachygyria and polymicrogyria; however, sequencing tubulin genes in large cohorts of MCD patients has detected tubulin mutations in

  18. Androgen receptor gene mutations in 46, XY females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir Davood Omrani

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The androgen insensitivity syndrome is a heterogeneous disorder with a wide spectrum of phenotypic abnormalities, ranging from complete female to ambiguous forms that more closely resemble males. The primary abnormality is a defective androgen receptor protein due to a mutation of the androgen receptor gene. This prevents normal androgen action and thus leads to impaired virilization. A point mutation of the androgen receptor gene affecting two siblings with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome is described. On examination they both had normal external female genitalia. Genomic DNA was extracted from EDTA-preserved blood samples and isolated according to standard procedures. The androgen receptor gene was screened for mutations using an automated sequence analyzer (ABI Prism 310. Both girls possess one substitutions (G>A at position 2086 in exon 4, leading to D695N mutation. Mother was found to be a heterozygous carrier for this mutation. GTG banded karyotype of the girls showed they both have male karyotype (46, XY. In addition, the SRY gene screening showed they both have intact SRY gene. The labioscrotal folds contained palpable gonads measuring 1.5 cm in largest diameter. Ultrasound examination of the pelvis revealed absence of the uterus. Serum follicle stimulating hormone (FSH, luteinizing hormone (LH, and testosterone values were higher than normal range. To our knowledge this is the first confirmed instance of AIS due to an AR mutation occurring in familial cases in this country. Furthermore, the phenotype has complete association with this mutation. KEY WORDS: Androgen insensitivity syndrome, androgen receptor

  19. Novel mutations and the emergence of a common mutation in the SDHD gene causing familial paraganglioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milunsky, J M; Maher, T A; Michels, V V; Milunsky, A

    2001-05-15

    Familial paragangliomas (PGL) are slow-growing, highly vascular, generally benign neoplasms, usually of the head and neck, that arise from neural crest cells. This rare autosomal dominant disorder is highly penetrant and influenced by genomic imprinting through paternal transmission. Timely detection of these tumors may afford the affected individual the opportunity to avoid the potential serious morbidity associated with surgical removal and the mortality that may accompany local and distant metastases. Linkage to two distinct chromosomal loci, 11q13.1 and 11q23, has been previously reported. Recently, germline mutations in SDHD, a mitochondrial complex II gene on chromosome 11q23, have been demonstrated. We evaluated members of seven families with PGL, five previously studied and shown to have linkage to chromosome 11q23. The entire coding region of the SDHD gene was sequenced and yielded four novel mutations and one mutation shared in three of our unrelated families. Novel mutations found included a truncating mutation in exon 2, as well as a missense mutation, a deletion, and an insertion in exon 4. Three of our families had a common mutation in exon 3 (P81L) that has been reported and thought to be a founder mutation. A restriction enzyme assay was developed for initial screening of this mutation. Molecular analysis is now available and recommended for presymptomatic diagnosis in those at-risk individuals and for confirmatory diagnosis in those having PGL. PMID:11343322

  20. Parkin gene mutations in younger onset Parkinson's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Piu Chan; Hua Bai; Rong Chen; J Willian Langston

    2000-01-01

    Objective': To screen for exonic and point mutations in the Parkin gene in both Chinese and American Caucasian younger onset Parkinson's disease (YOPD) patients.Background: Recently, the Autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism (ARJP) gene was first mapped to chromosome 6q25.2-27 and was late cloned and designated as Parkin. A wide variety of mutations, including homozygous exonic deletions and point mutations,have been found in at least more than 50 ARJP families of Japanese, European and Jewish origins. However, the distribution of Parkin gene mutations is not known in the Chinese and American Caucasians, It is also not clear how frequent the Parkin gene mutations occur in YOPD patients. Method and Material: Twenty-one Chinese subjects were selected from 121 Chinese PD inpatients who were admitted to the Xuanwu Hospital in Beijing between August of 1998 and April of 1999 and had an onset before age 51. Thirty-eight American subjects were PD patients with an onset before age 41 from the Tissue Bank of the Parkinson′s Institute at California. Homozygous exonic deletion and point mutations in all 12 exons of the Parkin gene were screened using PCR, SSCP and direct sequencing methods. Mutations identified by sequencing were further confirmed by restriction enzyme digestion. Results: Five different types of homozygous deletion mutations (exons 1, 4, 6, 7 and 12) were found in 7 out of 21 Chinese cases but none of the 37 American Caucasian patients in all 12 exons of Parkin gene. One novel and four polymorphic mutationswere found in the American Caucasian YOPD cases.Conclusion: our results suggest that homozygous exonic deletions in the Parkin gene may account for a significant amount of YOPD in the Chinese but not in the American Caucasian YOPD.

  1. APPLICATION OF GENETIC DEAFNESS GENE CHIP FOR DETECTION OF GENE MUTATION OF DEAFNESS IN PREGNANT WOMEN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Liang; ZHONG Su; ZHAO Nan; LIU Ping; ZHAO Yangyu; QIAO Jie

    2014-01-01

    Objective The study is to identify the carrier rate of common deafness mutation in Chinese pregnant women via detecting deafness gene mutations with gene chip. Methods The pregnant women in obstetric clinic without hearing impairment and hearing disorders family history were selected. The informed consent was signed. Peripheral blood was taken to extract genom-ic DNA. Application of genetic deafness gene chip for detecting 9 mutational hot spot of the most common 4 Chinese deafness genes, namely GJB2 (35delG,176del16bp, 235delC, 299delAT), GJB3 (C538T) ,SLC26A4 ( IVS72A>G, A2168G) and mito-chondrial DNA 12S rRNA (A1555G, C1494T) . Further genetic testing were provided to the spouses and newborns of the screened carriers. Results Peripheral blood of 430 pregnant women were detected,detection of deafness gene mutation carri-ers in 24 cases(4.2%), including 13 cases of the GJB2 heterozygous mutation, 3 cases of SLC26A4 heterozygous mutation, 1 cases of GJB3 heterozygous mutation, and 1 case of mitochondrial 12S rRNA mutation. 18 spouses and 17 newborns took fur-ther genetic tests, and 6 newborns inherited the mutation from their mother. Conclusion The common deafness genes muta-tion has a high carrier rate in pregnant women group,235delC and IVS7-2A>G heterozygous mutations are common.

  2. Identifying cancer genes from cancer mutation profiles by cancer functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI YanHui; GUO Zheng; PENG ChunFang; LIU Qing; MA WenCai; WANG Jing; YAO Chen; ZHANG Min; ZHU Jing

    2008-01-01

    It is of great importance to identify new cancer genes from the data of large scale genome screenings of gene mutations in cancers. Considering the alternations of some essential functions are indispensable for oncogenesis, we define them as cancer functions and select, as their approximations, a group of detailed functions in GO (Gene Ontology) highly enriched with known cancer genes. To evaluate the efficiency of using cancer functions as features to identify cancer genes, we define, in the screened genes, the known protein kinase cancer genes as gold standard positives and the other kinase genes as gold standard negatives. The results show that cancer associated functions are more efficient in identifying cancer genes than the selection pressure feature. Furthermore, combining cancer functions with the number of non-silent mutations can generate more reliable positive predictions. Finally, with precision 0.42, we suggest a list of 46 kinase genes as candidate cancer genes which are annotated to cancer functions and carry at least 3 non-silent mutations.

  3. Hemochromatosis (HFE gene mutations in Brazilian chronic hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.V. Perícole

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic renal insufficiency (CRI have reduced hemoglobin levels, mostly as a result of decreased kidney production of erythropoietin, but the relation between renal insufficiency and the magnitude of hemoglobin reduction has not been well defined. Hereditary hemochromatosis is an inherited disorder of iron metabolism. The importance of the association of hemochromatosis with treatment for anemia among patients with CRI has not been well described. We analyzed the frequency of the C282Y and H63D mutations in the HFE gene in 201 Brazilian individuals with CRI undergoing hemodialysis. The analysis of the effects of HFE mutations on iron metabolism and anemia with biochemical parameters was possible in 118 patients of this study (hemoglobin, hematocrit, ferritin levels, transferrin saturation, and serum iron. A C282Y heterozygous mutation was found in 7/201 (3.4% and H63D homozygous and heterozygous mutation were found in 2/201 (1.0% and 46/201 (22.9%, respectively. The allelic frequencies of the HFE mutations (0.017 for C282Y mutation and 0.124 for H63D mutation did not differ between patients with CRI and healthy controls. Regarding the biochemical parameters, no differences were observed between HFE heterozygous and mutation-negative patients, although ferritin levels were not higher among patients with the H63D mutation (P = 0.08. From what we observed in our study, C282Y/H63D HFE gene mutations are not related to degrees of anemia or iron stores in CRI patients receiving intravenous iron supplementation (P > 0.10. Nevertheless, the present data suggest that the H63D mutation may have an important function as a modulating factor of iron overload in these patients.

  4. A novel mutation of the fibrillin gene causing Ectopia lentis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loennqvist, L.; Kainulainen, K.; Puhakka, L.; Peltonen, L. (National Public Health Institute, Helsinki (Finland)); Child, A. (St. George' s Hospital Medical School, London (United Kingdom)); Peltonen, L. (Duncan Guthrie Institute, Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom))

    1994-02-01

    Ectopia lentis (EL), a dominantly inherited connective tissue disorder, has been genetically linked to the fibrillin gene on chromosome 15 (FBN1) in earlier studies. Here, the authors report the first EL mutation in the FBN1 gene confirming that EL is caused by mutations of this gene. So far, several mutations in the FBN1 gene have been reported in patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS). EL and MFS are clinically related but distinct conditions with typical manifestations in the ocular and skeletal systems, the fundamental difference between them being the absence of cardiovascular involvement in EL. They report a point mutation, cosegregating with the disease in the described family, that displays EL over four generations. The mutation changes a conserved glutamic acid residue in an EGF-like motif, which is the major structural component of the fibrillin and is repeated throughout the polypeptide. In vitro mutagenetic studies have demonstrated the necessity of an analogous glutamic acid residue for calcium binding in an EGF-like repeat of human factor IX. This provides a possible explanation for the role of this mutation in the disease pathogenesis. 32 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Thyroglobulin Gene Mutation with Cold Nodule on Thyroid Scintigraphy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshio Kahara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroglobulin gene mutation is a rare cause of congenital hypothyroidism, but thyroglobulin gene mutations are thought to be associated with thyroid cancer development. A 21-year-old Japanese man treated with levothyroxine for congenital hypothyroidism had an enlarged thyroid gland with undetectable serum thyroglobulin despite elevated serum TSH level. The patient was diagnosed with thyroglobulin gene mutation, with compound heterozygosity for Gly304Cys missense mutation and Arg432X nonsense mutation. Ultrasonography showed a hypovascular large tumor in the left lobe that appeared as a cold nodule on thyroid scintigraphy. He underwent total thyroidectomy, but pathological study did not reveal findings of thyroid carcinoma, but rather a hyperplastic nodule with hemorrhage. Strong cytoplasmic thyroglobulin immunostaining was observed, but sodium iodide symporter immunostaining was hardly detected in the hyperplastic nodule. The clinical characteristics of patients with thyroglobulin gene mutations are diverse, and some patients are diagnosed by chance on examination of goiter in adults. The presence of thyroid tumors that appear as cold nodules on thyroid scintigraphy should consider the potential for thyroid carcinoma, if the patient has relatively low serum thyroglobulin concentration in relation to the degree of TSH without thyroglobulin autoantibody.

  6. Convergence in pigmentation at multiple levels: mutations, genes and function

    OpenAIRE

    Manceau, Marie; Domingues, Vera S.; Linnen, Catherine R.; Rosenblum, Erica Bree; Hoekstra, Hopi E.

    2010-01-01

    Convergence—the independent evolution of the same trait by two or more taxa—has long been of interest to evolutionary biologists, but only recently has the molecular basis of phenotypic convergence been identified. Here, we highlight studies of rapid evolution of cryptic coloration in vertebrates to demonstrate that phenotypic convergence can occur at multiple levels: mutations, genes and gene function. We first show that different genes can be responsible for convergent phenotypes even among...

  7. Molecular evaluation of a novel missense mutation & an insertional truncating mutation in SUMF1 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udhaya H Kotecha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Multiple suphphatase deficiency (MSD is an autosomal recessive disorder affecting the post translational activation of all enzymes of the sulphatase family. To date, approximately 30 different mutations have been identified in the causative gene, sulfatase modifying factor 1 (SUMF1. We describe here the mutation analysis of a case of MSD. Methods: The proband was a four year old boy with developmental delay followed by neuroregression. He had coarse facies, appendicular hypertonia, truncal ataxia and ichthyosis limited to both lower limbs. Radiographs showed dysostosis multiplex. Clinical suspicion of MSD was confirmed by enzyme analysis of four enzymes of the sulphatase group. Results: The patient was compound heterozygote for a c.451A>G (p.K151E substitution in exon 3 and a single base insertion mutation (c.690_691 InsT in exon 5 in the SUMF1 gene. The bioinformatic analysis of the missense mutation revealed no apparent effect on the overall structure. However, the mutated 151-amino acid residue was found to be adjacent to the substrate binding and the active site residues, thereby affecting the substrate binding and/or catalytic activity, resulting in almost complete loss of enzyme function. Conclusions: The two mutations identified in the present case were novel. This is perhaps the first report of an insertion mutation in SUMF1 causing premature truncation of the protein.

  8. SERPINA1 Full-Gene Sequencing Identifies Rare Mutations Not Detected in Targeted Mutation Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Rondell P; Dina, Michelle A; Howe, Sarah C; Butz, Malinda L; Willkomm, Kurt S; Murray, David L; Snyder, Melissa R; Rumilla, Kandelaria M; Halling, Kevin C; Highsmith, W Edward

    2015-11-01

    Genetic α-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is characterized by low serum AAT levels and the identification of causal mutations or an abnormal protein. It needs to be distinguished from deficiency because of nongenetic causes, and diagnostic delay may contribute to worse patient outcome. Current routine clinical testing assesses for only the most common mutations. We wanted to determine the proportion of unexplained cases of AAT deficiency that harbor causal mutations not identified through current standard allele-specific genotyping and isoelectric focusing (IEF). All prospective cases from December 1, 2013, to October 1, 2014, with a low serum AAT level not explained by allele-specific genotyping and IEF were assessed through full-gene sequencing with a direct sequencing method for pathogenic mutations. We reviewed the results using American Council of Medical Genetics criteria. Of 3523 cases, 42 (1.2%) met study inclusion criteria. Pathogenic or likely pathogenic mutations not identified through clinical testing were detected through full-gene sequencing in 16 (38%) of the 42 cases. Rare mutations not detected with current allele-specific testing and IEF underlie a substantial proportion of genetic AAT deficiency. Full-gene sequencing, therefore, has the ability to improve accuracy in the diagnosis of AAT deficiency. PMID:26321041

  9. TINF2 Gene Mutation in a Patient with Pulmonary Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. W. Hoffman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary fibrosis is a frequent manifestation of telomere syndromes. Telomere gene mutations are found in up to 25% and 3% of patients with familial disease and sporadic disease, respectively. The telomere gene TINF2 encodes an eponymous protein that is part of the shelterin complex, a complex involved in telomere protection and maintenance. A TINF2 gene mutation was recently reported in a family with pulmonary fibrosis. We identified a heterozygous Ser245Tyr mutation in the TINF2 gene of previously healthy female patient that presented with progressive cough due to pulmonary fibrosis as well as panhypogammaglobulinemia at age 52. Retrospective multidisciplinary evaluation classified her as a case of possible idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Telomere length-measurement indicated normal telomere length in the peripheral blood compartment. This is the first report of a TINF2 mutation in a patient with sporadic pulmonary fibrosis, which represents another association between TINF2 mutations and this disease. Furthermore, this case underlines the importance of telomere dysfunction and not telomere length alone in telomere syndromes and draws attention to hypogammaglobulinemia as a manifestation of telomere syndromes.

  10. Detection of Rare Beta Globin Gene Mutations in Northwestern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Haghi

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Recent molecular studies on Iranian β-thalassemia genes revealed the presence of eight common mutations associated with thalassemia. Although these mutations are frequent, there are other rare and unknown mutations that can create large problems in designing preventive programs. We detected and explained the common mutations in north-western Iran previously and detection of the rare and unknown mutations could be useful in diagnosis and design of future preventive programs. Methods: In this study, 5ml peripheral blood from 20 Azari- β-thalassemia patients whose mutation was not revealed in the previous study was collected and DNA extraction was done by isopropanol and proteinase k method. Initially, samples were examined for the rare mutations: Codon6, Codon16, Codon41/42, Codon36/37, -88 and Codon22 by ARMS – PCR techniques and then the unknown cases were directly sequenced. Results: According to our results, Codon15(TGG-TGA, Codon16(-C, Codon36/37(-T, IVSII-848(C-A, IVSII-745(C-G, -28(A-C( and Codon25/26(+T were recognized and added to the spectrom of beta globin gene mutations in Azerbaijan and Iran. Also, we detected four SNP sites: 5’UTR+20(C-T, Codon2 (CAC-CAT , IVSII-16(C-G and IVSII-666(T-C in β-thalassemia genes. Conclusion: Our results could be useful for developing molecular screening plans and help prenatal diagnosis of beta thalassemia in Azerbaijan , Iran and other neighboring countries.

  11. Mutation distributions and clinical correlations of PIK3CA gene mutations in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirican, Ebubekir; Akkiprik, Mustafa; Özer, Ayşe

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer (BCa) is the most common cancer and the second cause of death among women. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway has a crucial role in the cellular processes such as cell survival, growth, division, and motility. Moreover, oncogenic mutations in the PI3K pathway generally involve the activation phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase-catalytic subunit alpha (PIK3CA) mutation which has been identified in numerous BCa subtypes. In this review, correlations between PIK3CA mutations and their clinicopathological parameters on BCa will be described. It is reported that PIK3CA mutations which have been localized mostly on exon 9 and 20 hot spots are detected 25-40 % in BCa. This relatively high frequency can offer an advantage for choosing the best treatment options for BCa. PIK3CA mutations may be used as biomarkers and have been major focus of drug development in cancer with the first clinical trials of PI3K pathway inhibitors currently in progress. Screening of PIK3CA gene mutations might be useful genetic tests for targeted therapeutics or diagnosis. Increasing data about PIK3CA mutations and its clinical correlations with BCa will help to introduce new clinical applications in the near future. PMID:26921096

  12. Mutator gene and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Chapelle, Albert; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W.

    2008-02-05

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error.sup.+ (RER.sup.+) tumor cells.

  13. Major gene mutations in fruit tree domestication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Though fruit gathering from the wild began long before domestication, fruit tree domestication started only after the establishment of grain agriculture. Banana, fig, date, grape and olive were among the first fruit trees domesticated. Most fruit trees are outbreeders, highly heterozygous and vegetatively propagated. Knowledge of genetics and economic traits controlled by major genes is limited. Ease of vegetative propagation has played a prominent part in domestication; advances in propagation technology will play a role in domestication of new crops. Changes toward domestication affected by major genes include self-fertility in peach, apricot and sour cherry, while the emergence of self-fertile almond populations is more recent and due probably to introgression from Amygdalus webbii. Self-compatibility in the sweet cherry has been attained only by pollen irradiation. A single gene controls sex in Vitis. Wild grapes are dioecious, with most domesticated cultivars hermaphrodite, and only a few females. In the papaya changes from dioecism to hermaphroditism have also occurred. Self-compatible systems have also been selected during domestication in Rubus. Changes towards parthenocarpy and seedlessness during domestication occurred in the banana, citrus, grape, fig and pineapple. In the banana, parthenocarpy is due to three complementary dominant genes; stenospermocarpy in the grape depends on two complementary recessive genes; parthenocarpy and sterility in citrus seems more complicated; however, it can be induced in genetic material of suitable background with ease by irradiation. Presence of persistent syconia in the fig is controlled by a mutant allele P dominant to wild +. Thornlessness in blackberry is recessive, while in the pineapple spineless forms are dominant. Changes affecting fruit composition owing to major genes include the disappearance of amygdalin present in bitter almonds (bitter kernel recessive to sweet), shell hardness in almond, and a recessive

  14. Common filaggrin gene mutations and risk of cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Peter; Wohlfahrt, Jan; Sørensen, Erik;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As carriers of filaggrin gene (FLG) mutations may have a compromised cervical mucosal barrier against human papillomavirus infection, our primary objective was to study their risk of cervical cancer. METHODS: We genotyped 586 cervical cancer patients for the two most common FLG...... mutations, R501X and 2282del4, using blood from the Copenhagen Hospital Biobank, Denmark. Controls (n = 8050) were genotyped in previous population-based studies. Information on cervical cancer, mortality and emigration were obtained from national registers. Odds ratios (OR) were estimated by logistic...... and stratification by cancer stage. RESULTS: The primary results showed that FLG mutations were not associated with the risk of cervical cancer (6.3% of cases and 7.7% of controls were carriers; OR adjusted 0.81, 95% CI 0.57-1.14; OR adjusted+ weighted 0.96, 95% CI 0.58-1.57). Among cases, FLG mutations increased...

  15. DETECTION OF GENE MUTATION IN SPUTUM OF LUNG CANCER PATIENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG He-long; WANG Wen-liang; CUI Da-xiang

    1999-01-01

    @@ Lung cancer is a common malignant tumor, which has ahigh incidence and mortality rate. Therefore, it is necessary to seek a new method for the diagnosis, especially the early diagnosis of lung cancer. The development of molecular biology makes the gene diagnosis of lung cancer possible.PCR-SSCP was applied to detect p53 gene mutation of lung cancer patients' sputum cells and we have achieved good results.

  16. EDA Gene Mutations Underlie Non-syndromic Oligodontia

    OpenAIRE

    Song, S.; Han, D; Qu, H.; Gong, Y; Wu, H.; Zhang, X; Zhong, N.; H. Feng

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have detected mutations in the EDA gene, previously identified as causing X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XLHED), in two families with X-linked non-syndromic hypodontia. Notably, all affected males in both families exhibited isolated oligodontia, while almost all female carriers showed a milder or normal phenotype. We hypothesized that the EDA gene could be responsible for sporadic non-syndromic oligodontia in affected males. In this study, we examined 15 unrelated ...

  17. Thyroglobulin gene mutations in Chinese patients with congenital hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xuyun; Chen, Rongyu; Fu, Chunyun; Fan, Xin; Wang, Jin; Qian, Jiale; Yi, Shang; Li, Chuan; Luo, Jingsi; Su, Jiasun; Zhang, Shujie; Xie, Bobo; Zheng, Haiyang; Lai, Yunli; Chen, Yun; Li, Hongdou; Gu, Xuefan; Chen, Shaoke; Shen, Yiping

    2016-03-01

    Mutations in Thyroglobulin (TG) are common genetic causes of congenital hypothyroidism (CH). But the TG mutation spectrum and its frequency in Chinese CH patients have not been investigated. Here we conducted a genetic screening of TG gene in a cohort of 382 Chinese CH patients. We identified 22 rare non-polymorphic variants including six truncating variants and 16 missense variants of unknown significance (VUS). Seven patients carried homozygous pathogenic variants, and three patients carried homozygous or compound heterozygous VUS. 48 out of 382 patients carried one of 18 heterozygous VUS which is significantly more often than their occurrences in control cohort (P G variant is the most common pathogenic variant with an allele frequency of 0.021. The prevalence of CH due to TG gene defect in Chinese population was estimated to be approximately 1/101,000. Our study uncovered ethnicity specific TG mutation spectrum and frequency. PMID:26777470

  18. Mutations in the AXIN1 gene in advanced prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yardy, George W; Bicknell, David C; Wilding, Jennifer L;

    2009-01-01

    The Wnt signalling pathway directs aspects of embryogenesis and is thought to contribute to maintenance of certain stem cell populations. Disruption of the pathway has been observed in many different tumour types. In bowel, stomach, and endometrial cancer, this is usually due to mutation of genes...

  19. [Correlation of adult AML Npm1 mutations with prognosis and its relationship with gene mutation of FLT3 and CEBPA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Li-Yan; Wang, Ji-Shi

    2010-02-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the correlation of 12th exon mutations in the npm1 gene with prognosis of adult AML patients and to explore the relationship of 12th exon mutation with other gene mutations. The specimen of bone marrow and peripheral blood from AML patients, the informations of medical history, symptoms, related image examinations, blood routine examination, NAP, oxygen saturation level in artery blood and EPO level in serum were collected; the bcr/abl fusion gene was detected by routine examination of bone marrow + biopsy + chromosome mapping + FISH. The patients were typed according to WHO classification. The DNA in cells was extracted, the npm1 gene mutation was detected by allele specific PCR combined were the sequencing. The results indicated that the npm1 heterozygote gene mutation was found in 72 out of 150 AML patients with normal cytogenetics (48%, 72/150). 48% patients showed a frameshift mutation in the C-terminal region of the NPM1 protein. The AML patients with npm1 gene mutation had specific clinical, phenotypic and genetic characteristics. The statistical analysis demonstrated the relationship between npm1 and flt3 ITDs. The patients with npm1 mutation showed a better response to induction therapy, furthermore, the overall survival (OS) rate of patients without flt3 ITD mutation was enhanced. The multivariate analysis demonstrated that the npm1 gene mutation and cebpa mutation positively correlated to the OS rate, and the correlation of flt3 mutation to OS rate showed negative. It is concluded that npm1 mutation is a favorable independent prognostic factor for adult AML patients with normal cytogenetics under conditions without FIT3 gene mutation. PMID:20137111

  20. Specific gene mutations induced by heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes our heavy-ion research rationale, progress, and plans for the near future. The major project involves selecting a group of maize Adh1 mutants induced by heavy ions and correlating their altered behavior with altered DNA nucleotide sequences and sequence arrangements. This research requires merging the techniques of classical genetics and recombinant DNA technology. Our secondary projects involve (1) the use of the Adh gene in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, as a second system with which to quantify the sort of specific gene mutants induced by heavy ions as compared to x rays, and (2) the development of a maize Adh1 pollen in situ monitor for environmental mutagens

  1. FLAGS, frequently mutated genes in public exomes

    OpenAIRE

    Shyr, Casper; Tarailo-Graovac, Maja; Gottlieb, Michael; Lee, Jessica JY; Van Karnebeek, Clara; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2014-01-01

    Background Dramatic improvements in DNA-sequencing technologies and computational analyses have led to wide use of whole exome sequencing (WES) to identify the genetic basis of Mendelian disorders. More than 180 novel rare-disease-causing genes with Mendelian inheritance patterns have been discovered through sequencing the exomes of just a few unrelated individuals or family members. As rare/novel genetic variants continue to be uncovered, there is a major challenge in distinguishing true pat...

  2. APC binds the Miro/Milton motor complex to stimulate transport of mitochondria to the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Kate M; Brocardo, Mariana G; Henderson, Beric R

    2016-02-01

    Mutations in adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) disrupt regulation of Wnt signaling, mitosis, and the cytoskeleton. We describe a new role for APC in the transport of mitochondria. Silencing of wild-type APC by small interfering RNA caused mitochondria to redistribute from the cell periphery to the perinuclear region. We identified novel APC interactions with the mitochondrial kinesin-motor complex Miro/Milton that were mediated by the APC C-terminus. Truncating mutations in APC abolished its ability to bind Miro/Milton and reduced formation of the Miro/Milton complex, correlating with disrupted mitochondrial distribution in colorectal cancer cells that could be recovered by reconstitution of wild-type APC. Using proximity ligation assays, we identified endogenous APC-Miro/Milton complexes at mitochondria, and live-cell imaging showed that loss of APC slowed the frequency of anterograde mitochondrial transport to the membrane. We propose that APC helps drive mitochondria to the membrane to supply energy for cellular processes such as directed cell migration, a process disrupted by cancer mutations. PMID:26658612

  3. Mutations of the tyrosinase gene produce autosomal recessive ocular albinism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, R.A.; Summers, C.G.; Oetting, W.S. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Albinism has historically been divided into ocular (OA) and oculocutaneous (OCA) types based on the presence or absence of clinically apparent skin and hair involvement in an individual with the ocular features of albinism. The major genes for OCA include the tyrosinase gene in OCA1 and the P gene in OCA2. X-linked and autosomal recessive OA have been described and the responsible genes have not been identified. We now present six Caucasian individuals who have the phenotype of autosomal recessive OA but who have OCA1 as shown by the presence of mutations of the tyrosinase. They had white or very light hair and white skin at birth, and cutaneous pigment developed in the first decade of life. At ages ranging from 1.5-23 years, hair color was dark blond to light brown. The skin had generalized pigment and well developed tan was present on the exposed arm and face skin of four. Iris pigment was present and iris translucency varied. Molecular analysis of the tyrosinase gene, using PCR amplification and direct di-deoxy sequencing showed the following mutations: E398Z/E398Q, P406S/g346a, R402E/T373K, ?/D383N, and H211N/T373K. The homozygous individual was not from a known consanguineous mating. T373K is the most common tyrosinase gene mutation in our laboratory. Three of these mutations are associated with a total loss of tyrosinase activity (g346a splice-site, T373K, and D383N), while four are associated with residual enzyme activity (H211N, R402E, E398Q, and P406S). These studies show that mutations of the tyrosinase gene can produce the phenotype of autosomal recessive OA in an individual who has normal amounts of cutaneous pigment and the ability to tan after birth. This extends the phenotypic range of OCA1 to normal cutaneous pigment after early childhood, and suggest that mutations of the tyrosinase gene account for a significant number of individuals with autosomal recessive OA.

  4. Mutation detection in tumor suppressor genes using archival tissue specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astrinidis, Aristotelis; Henske, Elizabeth Petri

    2006-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a neurocutaneous syndrome characterized by seizures, mental retardation, and benign tumors of many organs, including the brain, kidneys, skin, retina, and heart. TSC is caused by mutations in the TSC1 and TSC2 tumor suppressor genes. The genes follow the two-hit model for tumorigenesis, with germline mutations inactivating one allele and somatic mutations inactivating the remaining wild-type allele. Allelic loss (also called loss of heterozygosity [LOH]) in the 9q34 and 16p13 regions has been found in many tumor types from TSC patients. Cardiac rhabdomyomas are frequently found in infants with TSC. Because rhabdomyomas often spontaneously regress, access to fresh tissue is limited. In this chapter, we present methodology for detection of genetic inactivation of TSC1 and TSC2 in paraffin-embedded archival tissues. The template DNA is obtained either by direct scraping of tissue or after laser capture microdissection. LOH analysis is performed after polymerase chain reaction amplification of microsatellite markers in the 9q34 and 16p13 regions and denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Mutation detection is performed using single-strand conformation polymorphisms on mutation detection enhancement gels. Finally, variant bands are amplified and analyzed by direct sequencing. PMID:16930013

  5. Helicobacter hepaticus Infection Promotes Colon Tumorigenesis in the BALB/c-Rag2−/− ApcMin/+ Mouse ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Nagamine, Claude M; Sohn, Jane J.; Rickman, Barry H.; Rogers, Arlin B.; Fox, James G.; Schauer, David B.

    2008-01-01

    Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutations are linked to human and mouse colorectal cancers. The Apc multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min) mouse mutation causes adenomas to develop throughout the small and large intestines. The BALB-Min (C.B6-ApcMin/+) congenic strain was generated by backcrossing into BALB/c the ApcMin allele from C57BL/6J-ApcMin/+ mice. BALB-Min mice have a low tumor multiplicity (27.4 small intestine tumors/mouse) and a relatively long life span (>1 year) that makes them ame...

  6. Induced marker gene mutations in soybean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Non-fluorescent root mutants in soybean are useful as markers in genetic studies. 13 such mutants were detected among more than 150 000 seedlings derived from soybean lines treated with 6 mutagens. One of them, derived from variety 'Williams' treated with 20 kR gamma rays, did not correspond to the already known spontaneous non-fluorescent mutants. It was assigned the identification no. T285 and the gene symbol fr5. The other mutants corresponded with known loci fr1, fr2 or fr4. (author)

  7. [Driver gene mutation and targeted therapy of lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2013-03-01

    Although cancers may have many genetic alterations, there are only a few mutations actually associated with essential traits of cancer cells such as cell proliferation or evasion from apoptosis. Because cancer cells are "addicted" to these "drive genes" , pharmacologic inhibition of these gene function is highly effective. Epidermal growth factor receptor(EGFR)-tyrosine kinase inhibitor(TKI)(such as gefitinib or erlotinib)treatment of lung cancer harboring EGFR gene mutation is one of the prototypes of such therapies. Several clinical trials clearly demonstrated that progression-free survival of patients treated with EGFR-TKI is significantly longer than that of those treated by conventional platinum doublet chemotherapy. EGFR-TKI therapy dramatically changed the paradigm of lung cancer treatment. Furthermore, in 2012, crizotinib was approved for lung cancer treatment with anaplastic lymphoma kinase(ALK)gene translocation. Targeted therapies for lung cancers "addicted" to other driver gene mutations including ROS1, RET or HER2 are also under development. Through these personalized approaches, lung cancer is changing from an acute fatal disease to a more chronic disease, and eventually we might be able to cure it. PMID:23507588

  8. EDA Gene Mutations Underlie Non-syndromic Oligodontia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, S.; Han, D.; Qu, H.; Gong, Y.; Wu, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhong, N.; Feng, H.

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have detected mutations in the EDA gene, previously identified as causing X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XLHED), in two families with X-linked non-syndromic hypodontia. Notably, all affected males in both families exhibited isolated oligodontia, while almost all female carriers showed a milder or normal phenotype. We hypothesized that the EDA gene could be responsible for sporadic non-syndromic oligodontia in affected males. In this study, we examined 15 unrelated males with non-syndromic oligodontia. Three novel EDA mutations (p.Ala259Glu, p.Arg289Cys, and p.Arg334His) were identified in four individuals (27%). A genetic defect in the EDA gene could result in non-syndromic oligodontia in affected males. PMID:19278982

  9. AID-initiated purposeful mutations in immunoglobulin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Myron F; Scharff, Matthew D; Romesberg, Floyd E

    2007-01-01

    Exposure brings risk to all living organisms. Using a remarkably effective strategy, higher vertebrates mitigate risk by mounting a complex and sophisticated immune response to counter the potentially toxic invasion by a virtually limitless army of chemical and biological antagonists. Mutations are almost always deleterious, but in the case of antibody diversification there are mutations occurring at hugely elevated rates within the variable (V) and switch regions (SR) of the immunoglobulin (Ig) genes that are responsible for binding to and neutralizing foreign antigens throughout the body. These mutations are truly purposeful. This chapter is centered on activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). AID is required for initiating somatic hypermutation (SHM) in the V regions and class switch recombination (CSR) in the SR portions of Ig genes. By converting C --> U, while transcription takes place, AID instigates a cascade of mutational events involving error-prone DNA polymerases, base excision and mismatch repair enzymes, and recombination pathways. Together, these processes culminate in highly mutated antibody genes and the B cells expressing antibodies that have achieved optimal antigenic binding undergo positive selection in germinal centers. We will discuss the biological role of AID in this complex process, primarily in terms of its biochemical properties in relation to SHM in vivo. The chapter also discusses recent advances in experimental methods to characterize antibody dynamics as a function of SHM to help elucidate the role that the AID-induced mutations play in tailoring molecular recognition. The emerging experimental techniques help to address long-standing conundrums concerning evolution-imposed constraints on antibody structure and function. PMID:17560274

  10. Mutations of the adenomatous polyposis coli and p53 genes in a child with Turcot's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barel, D; Cohen, I J; Mor, C; Stern, S; Shapiro, R; Shomrat, R; Galanti, Y; Legum, C; Zaizov, R; Avigad, S

    1998-10-23

    Turcot's syndrome is a rare heritable complex that is characterized by an association between a primary neuroepithelial tumor of the central nervous system and multiple colonic polyps. The aim of this study was to analyze genetic alterations in a case of Turcot's syndrome in a 10.5-year-old boy in whom a colorectal tumor developed 3.5 years following astrocytoma. An APC germline non-sense mutation at codon 1284 leading to a truncated protein was identified, as was a somatic p53 mutation in the colorectal carcinoma in exon 7, codon 244. The latter was not identified in the primary astrocytoma. However, immunohistochemistry revealed high p53 protein expression in both tumors, suggesting an additional p53 mutation in the primary astrocytic tumor. The diverse p53 mutations observed in this unique syndrome in two different sites and stages of the disease may shed light on the multistep progression of the malignant events. PMID:10397462

  11. Dihydropteroate Synthase and Novel Dihydrofolate Reductase Gene Mutations in Strains of Pneumocystis jirovecii from South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Robberts, F. J. L.; Chalkley, L J; Weyer, K.; Goussard, P.; Liebowitz, L. D.

    2005-01-01

    Dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) gene mutations have raised concerns about emerging sulfonamide resistance in Pneumocystis jirovecii. DHPS and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) gene products were amplified in clinical specimens from South African patients. One of 53 DHPS genes sequenced contained the double mutation Thr55Ala Pro57Ser. DHFR gene mutations detected were Ala67Val and the new mutations Arg59Gly and C278T.

  12. Low load for disruptive mutations in autism genes and their biased transmission

    OpenAIRE

    Iossifov, Ivan; Levy, Dan; ALLEN, JEREMY; Ye, Kenny; Ronemus, Michael; Lee, Yoon-ha; Yamrom, Boris; Wigler, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Gene targets of de novo mutation in autistic children have a lighter load of rare disruptive variation than typical human genes. This finding suggests such mutations are under negative selection and autism genes are highly vulnerable to mutation. Disruptive variants in these genes have biased transmission: They are more frequently transmitted to affected children, and more often from mothers than from fathers. Targets of mutation in lower intelligence quotient (IQ) affected children have a lo...

  13. Canine mdr1 gene mutation in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Akiko; Momoi, Yasuyuki; Inoue-Murayama, Miho; Iwasaki, Toshiroh

    2005-11-01

    Frequency of the 4-bp deletion mutant in canine mdr1 gene was examined in 193 dogs of eight breeds in Japan. The mutant allele was found in Collies, Australian Shepherds, and Shetland Sheepdogs, where its respective frequencies were 58.3%, 33.3%, and 1.2%. The MDR1 protein was detected on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from a MDR1/MDR1 dog, but not on PBMC from a mdr1-1Delta/mdr1-1Delta Collie. Rhodamine 123 was extruded from MDR1/MDR1 lymphocytes. That excretion was inhibited by a MDR1 inhibitor, verapamil. On the other hand, Rh123 excretion was not observed from lymphocytes derived from a mdr1-1Delta/mdr1-1Delta Collie. These results indicated that the mutant mdr1 allele also existed in Collie-breed dogs in Japan at high rates and that mdr1-1Delta /mdr1-1Delta dogs have no functional MDR1. PMID:16327220

  14. 21 CFR 866.5900 - Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system. 866.5900 Section 866.5900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5900 Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system. (a) Identification. The CFTR gene mutation detection system is a...

  15. A mitotic recombination map proximal to the APC locus on chromosome 5q and assessment of influences on colorectal cancer risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clark Susan

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitotic recombination is important for inactivating tumour suppressor genes by copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (LOH. Although meiotic recombination maps are plentiful, little is known about mitotic recombination. The APC gene (chr5q21 is mutated in most colorectal tumours and its usual mode of LOH is mitotic recombination. Methods We mapped mitotic recombination boundaries ("breakpoints" between the centromere (~50 Mb and APC (~112 Mb in early colorectal tumours. Results Breakpoints were non-random, with the highest frequency between 65 Mb and 75 Mb, close to a low copy number repeat region (68–71 Mb. There were, surprisingly, few breakpoints close to APC, contrary to expectations were there constraints on tumorigenesis caused by uncovering recessive lethal alleles or if mitotic recombination were mechanistically favoured by a longer residual chromosome arm. The locations of mitotic and meiotic recombination breakpoints were correlated, suggesting that the two types of recombination are influenced by similar processes, whether mutational or selective in origin. Breakpoints were also associated with higher local G+C content. The recombination and gain/deletion breakpoint maps on 5q were not, however, associated, perhaps owing to selective constraints on APC dosage in early colorectal tumours. Since polymorphisms within the region of frequent mitotic recombination on 5q might influence the frequency of LOH, we tested the 68–71 Mb low copy number repeat and nearby tagSNPs, but no associations with colorectal cancer risk were found. Conclusion LOH on 5q is non-random, but local factors do not greatly influence the rate of LOH at APC or explain inter differential susceptibility to colorectal tumours.

  16. Prevalence of α-1-Antitrypsin gene mutations in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badr Aljarallah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: α-1 antitrypsin (AAT deficiency results from mutations of the protease inhibitor (PI. The AAT gene is mapped on chromosome 14 and has been associated with chronic liver disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Objective: To determine the frequency of AAT mutations on S and Z carrier alleles in healthy Saudi individuals from Qassim Province in Saudi Arabia. Patients and Methods : A total of 158 healthy, unrelated participants from Qassim Province were recruited. They were genotyped for the two AAT-deficiency alleles, PIFNx01S and PIFNx01Z, using polymerase chain reaction, with primers designed throughout to mediate site-directed mutagenesis. Results: Of the 158 subjects, 11.39% were carriers for the S mutation (i.e., had the MS genotype, whereas 2.53% were carriers for the Z mutation (i.e., had the MZ genotype. The SZ genotype was present in 3.8% of subjects, while the homozygous genotype SS was present in 1.9% of subjects. No subjects showed the ZZ mutant genotype. Accordingly, frequency of the mutant S and Z alleles of AAT gene was 9.49% and 3.19%, respectively. Conclusion: The results obtained showed a high prevalence of the AAT deficiency allele in the Saudi population. This probably warrants adoption of a screening program for at-risk individuals, so that they might initiate adequate prophylactic measures.

  17. Heterogeneous AVPR2 gene mutations in congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wildin, R.S.; Antush, M.J.; Bennett, R.L.; Schoof, J.M.; Scott, C.R. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States))

    1994-08-01

    Mutations in the AVPR2 gene encoding the receptor for arginine vasopressin in the kidney (V2 ADHR) have been reported in patients with congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, a predominantly X-linked disorder of water homeostasis. The authors have used restriction-enzyme analysis and direct DNA sequencing of genomic PCR product to evaluate the AVPR2 gene in 11 unrelated affected males. Each patient has a different DNA sequence variation, and only one matches a previously reported mutation. Cosegregation of the variations with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus was demonstrated for two families, and a de novo mutation was accomplished in one family. All the variations predict frameshifts, truncations, or nonconservative amino acid substitutions in evolutionarily conserved positions in the V2 ADHR and related receptors. Of interest, a 28-bp deletion is found in one patient, while another, unrelated patient has a tandem duplication of the same 28-bp segment, suggesting that both resulted from the same unusual unequal crossing-over mechanism facilitated by 9-mer direct sequence repeats. Since the V2 ADHR is a member of the seven-transmembrane-domain, G-protein-coupled receptor superfamily, the loss-of-function mutations from this study and others provide important clues to the structure-function relationship of this and related receptors. 55 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Mutations in COL1A1 Gene Change Dentin Nanostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xiaohong; Liu, Zhenxia; Gan, Yunna; Xia, Dan; Li, Qiang; Li, Yanling; Yang, Jiaji; Gao, Shan; Dong, Mingdong

    2016-04-01

    Although many studies have attempted to associate specific gene mutations with dentin phenotypic severity, it remains unknown how the mutations in COL1A1 gene influence the mechanical behavior of dentin collagen and matrix. Here, we reported one osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) pedigree caused by two new inserting mutations in exon 5 of COL1A1 (NM_000088.3:c.440_441insT;c.441_442insA), which resulted in the unstable expression of COL1A1 mRNA and half quantity of procollagen production. We investigated the morphological and mechanical features of proband's dentin using atomic force microscope (AFM), scanning electron microscope, and transmission electron microscope. Increased D-periodic spacing, variably enlarged collagen fibrils coating with fewer minerals were found in the mutated collagen. AFM analysis demonstrated rougher dentin surface and sparsely decreased Young's modulus in proband's dentin. We believe that our findings provide new insights into the genetic-/nano- mechanisms of dentin diseases, and may well explain OI dentin features with reduced mechanical strength and a lower crosslinked density. Anat Rec, 299:511-519, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26694865

  19. Molecular screening of pituitary adenomas for gene mutations and rearrangements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman, V.; Drazin, N.Z.; Gonskey, R.; Melmed, S. (Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States))

    1993-07-01

    Although pituitary tumors arise as benign monoclonal neoplasms, genetic alterations have not readily been identified in these adenomas. The authors studied restriction fragment abnormalities involving the GH gene locus, and mutations in the p53 and H-, K-, and N-ras genes in 22 human GH cell adenomas. Twenty two nonsecretory adenomas were also examined for p53 and ras gene mutations. Seven prolactinoma DNA samples were tested for deletions in the multiple endocrine neoplasia-1 (MEN-1) locus, as well as for rearrangements in the hst gene, a member of the fibroblast growth factor family. In DNA from GH-cell adenomas, identical GH restriction patterns were detected in both pituitary and lymphocyte DNA in all patients and in one patient with a mixed GH-TSH cell adenoma. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-single stranded conformation polymorphism analysis, no mutations were detected in exons 5, 6, 7 and 8 of the p53 gene in GH cell adenomas nor in 22 nonsecretory adenomas. Codons 12/13 and 61 of H-ras, K-ras, and N-ras genes were also intact on GH cell adenomas and in nonsecretory adenomas. Site-specific probes for chromosome 11q13 including, PYGM, D11S146, and INT2 were used in 7 sporadic PRL-secreting adenomas to detect deletions of the MEN-1 locus on chromosome 11. One patient was identified with a loss of 11p, and the remaining 6 patients did not demonstrate loss of heterozygosity in the pituitary 11q13 locus, compared to lymphocyte DNA. None of these patients demonstrated hst gene rearrangements which also maps to this locus. These results show that p53 and ras gene mutations are not common events in the pathogenesis of acromegaly and nonsecretory tumors. Although hst gene rearrangements and deletions of 11q13 are not associated with sporadic PRl-cell adenoma formation, a single patient was detected with a partial loss of chromosome 11, including the putative MEN-1 site. 31 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Next generation sequencing in synovial sarcoma reveals novel gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlenterie, Myrella; Hillebrandt-Roeffen, Melissa H S; Flucke, Uta E; Groenen, Patricia J T A; Tops, Bastiaan B J; Kamping, Eveline J; Pfundt, Rolph; de Bruijn, Diederik R H; Geurts van Kessel, Ad H M; van Krieken, Han J H J M; van der Graaf, Winette T A; Versleijen-Jonkers, Yvonne M H

    2015-10-27

    Over 95% of all synovial sarcomas (SS) share a unique translocation, t(X;18), however, they show heterogeneous clinical behavior. We analyzed multiple SS to reveal additional genetic alterations besides the translocation. Twenty-six SS from 22 patients were sequenced for 409 cancer-related genes using the Comprehensive Cancer Panel (Life Technologies, USA) on an Ion Torrent platform. The detected variants were verified by Sanger sequencing and compared to matched normal DNAs. Copy number variation was assessed in six tumors using the Oncoscan array (Affymetrix, USA). In total, eight somatic mutations were detected in eight samples. These mutations have not been reported previously in SS. Two of these, in KRAS and CCND1, represent known oncogenic mutations in other malignancies. Additional mutations were detected in RNF213, SEPT9, KDR, CSMD3, MLH1 and ERBB4. DNA alterations occurred more often in adult tumors. A distinctive loss of 6q was found in a metastatic lesion progressing under pazopanib, but not in the responding lesion. Our results emphasize t(X;18) as a single initiating event in SS and as the main oncogenic driver. Our results also show the occurrence of additional genetic events, mutations or chromosomal aberrations, occurring more frequently in SS with an onset in adults. PMID:26415226

  1. Deconstructing the ßcatenin destruction complex: mechanistic roles for the tumor suppressor APC in regulating Wnt signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, David M.; Pronobis, Mira I.; Poulton, John S; Waldmann, Jon D.; Stephenson, Elise M.; Hanna, Shahnaz; Peifer, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Negatively regulating signaling by targeting key effectors for ubiquitina­tion/destruction is essential for development and oncogenesis. The tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), an essential negative regulator of Wnt signaling, provides a paradigm. APC mutations occur in most colon cancers. Acting in the “destruction complex” with Axin, glycogen synthase kinase 3, and casein kinase, APC targets ßcatenin (ßcat) for phosphorylation and recognition by an E3 ubiquitin-ligase. Despit...

  2. Involvement of MET/TWIST/APC Combination or the Potential Role of Ossification Factors in Pediatric High-Grade Osteosarcoma Oncogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natacha Entz-Werle

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Dysregulated cell growth or differentiation due to misexpression of developmental critical factors seems to be a decisive event in oncogenesis. As osteosarcomas are histologically defined by malignant osteoblasts producing an osteoid component, we prospected in pediatric osteosarcomas treated with OS94 protocol the genomic status of several genes implied in ossification processes. In 91 osteosarcoma cases, we focused on the analysis of the fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs TWIST, APC, MET by allelotyping, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, gene sequencing, protein polymorphism study. Our study supports the frequent role of TWIST, APC, MET as osteosarcoma markers (50%, 62%, 50%, respectively. TWIST, MET were mainly found to be deleted, no additional APC mutation was identified. Surprisingly, FGFRs are abnormal in only < 30%. Most of these factors, their abnormalities seem to be linked more or less to one clinical subgroup, but the most significant correlation is the link of MET, TWIST, APC abnormalities to a worse outcome, their combination within abnormal tumors. A wider cohort is mandatory to define more robust molecular conclusions, but these results are to be considered as the beginning of a more accurate basis for diagnosis, in search of targeted therapies, to further characterize prognostic markers.

  3. Separation of mutational and transcriptional enhancers in immunoglobulin genes

    OpenAIRE

    Kothapalli, Naga Rama; Collura, Kaitlin M.; Norton, Darrell D.; Fugmann, Sebastian D.

    2011-01-01

    Secondary immunoglobulin (Ig) gene diversification relies on activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) to create U:G mismatches that are subsequently fixed by mutagenic repair pathways. AID activity is focused to Ig loci by cis-regulatory DNA sequences named targeting elements. Here we show that in contrast to prevailing thought in the field, the targeting elements in the chicken IGL locus are distinct from classical transcriptional enhancers. These mutational enhancer elements (MEEs) are r...

  4. Hereditary pancreatitis and mutation of the trypsinogen gene

    OpenAIRE

    Weber, P; Keim, V; Zimmer, K.

    1999-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis is a rare form of chronic recurrent pancreatitis. A family, in which 11 members had chronic pancreatitis, five had diabetes, and two had pancreatic cancer, was studied, and hereditary pancreatitis was diagnosed in all patients by demonstrating the mutation in exon 3 of the cationic trypsinogen gene (R117H). The clinical implications of genotypic analysis in hereditary pancreatitis are discussed.



  5. Gene Expression Study on Peripheral Blood Identifies Progranulin Mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Coppola, Giovanni; Karydas, Anna; Rademakers, Rosa; Wang, Qing; Baker, Matt; Hutton, Mike; Miller, Bruce L.; Geschwind, Daniel H.

    2008-01-01

    Peripheral blood is a readily available tissue source allowing relatively noninvasive screening for a host of medical conditions. We screened total-blood progranulin (PGRN) levels in 107 patients with neurodegenerative dementias and related conditions, and 36 control subjects, and report the following findings: (1) confirmation of high progranulin expression levels in peripheral blood; (2) two subjects with reduced progranulin levels and mutations in the PGRN gene confirmed by direct sequenci...

  6. Driver Gene Mutations in Stools of Colorectal Carcinoma Patients Detected by Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armengol, Gemma; Sarhadi, Virinder K; Ghanbari, Reza; Doghaei-Moghaddam, Masoud; Ansari, Reza; Sotoudeh, Masoud; Puolakkainen, Pauli; Kokkola, Arto; Malekzadeh, Reza; Knuutila, Sakari

    2016-07-01

    Detection of driver gene mutations in stool DNA represents a promising noninvasive approach for screening colorectal cancer (CRC). Amplicon-based next-generation sequencing (NGS) is a good option to study mutations in many cancer genes simultaneously and from a low amount of DNA. Our aim was to assess the feasibility of identifying mutations in 22 cancer driver genes with Ion Torrent technology in stool DNA from a series of 65 CRC patients. The assay was successful in 80% of stool DNA samples. NGS results showed 83 mutations in cancer driver genes, 29 hotspot and 54 novel mutations. One to five genes were mutated in 75% of cases. TP53, KRAS, FBXW7, and SMAD4 were the top mutated genes, consistent with previous studies. Of samples with mutations, 54% presented concomitant mutations in different genes. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway genes were mutated in 70% of samples, with 58% having alterations in KRAS, NRAS, or BRAF. Because mutations in these genes can compromise the efficacy of epidermal growth factor receptor blockade in CRC patients, identifying mutations that confer resistance to some targeted treatments may be useful to guide therapeutic decisions. In conclusion, the data presented herein show that NGS procedures on stool DNA represent a promising tool to detect genetic mutations that could be used in the future for diagnosis, monitoring, or treating CRC. PMID:27155048

  7. The significance of haemochromatosis gene mutations in the general population: implications for screening

    OpenAIRE

    Burt, M; George, P.; Upton, J; Collett, J.; Frampton, C.; Chapman, T; Walmsley, T.; Chapman, B.

    1998-01-01

    Background—Haemochromatosis is associated with mutations in the HFE gene but the significance of these mutations in the general population is unknown. 
Aims—To determine the frequency of HFE gene mutations in the general population, their effect on serum iron indexes, and their role in screening for haemochromatosis. 
Methods—Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) from 1064 randomly selected subjects was analysed for the C282Y and H63D mutations in the HFE gene. Serum iron, transferrin ...

  8. HFE gene mutations and iron status of Brazilian blood donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.C.J.L. Santos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations of the HFE and TFR2 genes have been associated with iron overload. HFE and TFR2 mutations were assessed in blood donors, and the relationship with iron status was evaluated. Subjects (N = 542 were recruited at the Hemocentro da Santa Casa de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. Iron status was not influenced by HFE mutations in women and was independent of blood donation frequency. In contrast, men carrying the HFE 282CY genotype had lower total iron-binding capacity (TIBC than HFE 282CC genotype carriers. Men who donated blood for the first time and were carriers of the HFE 282CY genotype had higher transferrin saturation values and lower TIBC concentrations than those with the homozygous wild genotype for the HFE C282Y mutation. Moreover, in this group of blood donors, carriers of HFE 63DD plus 63HD genotypes had higher serum ferritin values than those with the homozygous wild genotype for HFE H63D mutation. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that HFE 282CY leads to a 17.21% increase (P = 0.018 and a 83.65% decrease (P = 0.007 in transferrin saturation and TIBC, respectively. In addition, serum ferritin is influenced by age (3.91%, P = 0.001 and the HFE 63HD plus DD genotype (55.84%, P = 0.021. In conclusion, the HFE 282Y and 65C alleles were rare, while the HFE 63D allele was frequent in Brazilian blood donors. The HFE C282Y and H63D mutations were associated with alterations in iron status in blood donors in a gender-dependent manner.

  9. Screening of sarcomere gene mutations in young athletes with abnormal findings in electrocardiography: identification of a MYH7 mutation and MYBPC3 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadota, Chika; Arimura, Takuro; Hayashi, Takeharu; Naruse, Taeko K; Kawai, Sachio; Kimura, Akinori

    2015-10-01

    There is an overlap between the physiological cardiac remodeling associated with training in athletes, the so-called athlete's heart, and mild forms of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), the most common hereditary cardiac disease. HCM is often accompanied by unfavorable outcomes including a sudden cardiac death in the adolescents. Because one of the initial signs of HCM is abnormality in electrocardiogram (ECG), athletes may need to monitor for ECG findings to prevent any unfavorable outcomes. HCM is caused by mutations in genes for sarcomere proteins, but there is no report on the systematic screening of gene mutations in athletes. One hundred and two genetically unrelated young Japanese athletes with abnormal ECG findings were the subjects for the analysis of four sarcomere genes, MYH7, MYBPC3, TNNT2 and TNNI3. We found that 5 out of 102 (4.9%) athletes carried mutations: a heterozygous MYH7 Glu935Lys mutation, a heterozygous MYBPC3 Arg160Trp mutation and another heterozygous MYBPC3 Thr1046Met mutation, all of which had been reported as HCM-associated mutations, in 1, 2 and 2 subjects, respectively. This is the first study of systematic screening of sarcomere gene mutations in a cohort of athletes with abnormal ECG, demonstrating the presence of sarcomere gene mutations in the athlete's heart. PMID:26178432

  10. The clinical implications of gene mutations in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Davide; Gaidano, Gianluca

    2016-04-12

    Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) is a molecularly heterogeneous disease as revealed by recent genomic studies. Among genetic lesions that are recurrent in CLL, few clinically validated prognostic markers, such as TP53 mutations and 17p deletion, are available for the use in clinical practice to guide treatment decisions. Recently, several novel molecular markers have been identified in CLL. Though these mutations have not yet gained the qualification of predictive factors for treatment tailoring, they have shown to be promising to refine the prognostic stratification of patients. The introduction of targeted drugs is changing the genetics of CLL, and has disclosed the acquisition of previously unexpected drug resistant mutations in signalling pathway genes. Ultra-deep next generation sequencing has allowed to reach deep levels of resolution of the genetic portrait of CLL providing a precise definition of its subclonal genetic architecture. This approach has shown that small subclones harbouring drug resistant mutations anticipate the development of a chemorefractory phenotype. Here we review the recent advances in the definition of the genomic landscape of CLL and the ongoing research to characterise the clinical implications of old and new molecular lesions in the setting of both conventional chemo-immunotherapy and targeted drugs. PMID:27031852

  11. Molecular basis of human CD36 gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rać, Monika Ewa; Safranow, Krzysztof; Poncyljusz, Wojciech

    2007-01-01

    CD36 is a transmembrane glycoprotein of the class B scavenger receptor family. The CD36 gene is located on chromosome 7 q11.2 and is encoded by 15 exons. Defective CD36 is a likely candidate gene for impaired fatty acid metabolism, glucose intolerance, atherosclerosis, arterial hypertension, diabetes, cardiomyopathy, Alzheimer disease, and modification of the clinical course of malaria. Contradictory data concerning the effects of antiatherosclerotic drugs on CD36 expression indicate that further investigation of the role of CD36 in the development of atherosclerosis may be important for the prevention and treatment of this disease. This review summarizes current knowledge of CD36 gene structure, splicing, and mutations and the molecular, metabolic, and clinical consequences of these phenomena. PMID:17673938

  12. Identification of Gene Mutations and Fusion Genes in Patients with Sézary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Aparna; Rabionet, Raquel; Espinet, Blanca; Zapata, Luis; Puiggros, Anna; Melero, Carme; Puig, Anna; Sarria-Trujillo, Yaris; Ossowski, Stephan; Garcia-Muret, Maria P; Estrach, Teresa; Servitje, Octavio; Lopez-Lerma, Ingrid; Gallardo, Fernando; Pujol, Ramon M; Estivill, Xavier

    2016-07-01

    Sézary syndrome is a leukemic form of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma with an aggressive clinical course. The genetic etiology of the disease is poorly understood, with chromosomal abnormalities and mutations in some genes being involved in the disease. The goal of our study was to understand the genetic basis of the disease by looking for driver gene mutations and fusion genes in 15 erythrodermic patients with circulating Sézary cells, 14 of them fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of Sézary syndrome. We have discovered genes that could be involved in the pathogenesis of Sézary syndrome. Some of the genes that are affected by somatic point mutations include ITPR1, ITPR2, DSC1, RIPK2, IL6, and RAG2, with some of them mutated in more than one patient. We observed several somatic copy number variations shared between patients, including deletions and duplications of large segments of chromosome 17. Genes with potential function in the T-cell receptor signaling pathway and tumorigenesis were disrupted in Sézary syndrome patients, for example, CBLB, RASA2, BCL7C, RAMP3, TBRG4, and DAD1. Furthermore, we discovered several fusion events of interest involving RASA2, NFKB2, BCR, FASN, ZEB1, TYK2, and SGMS1. Our work has implications for the development of potential therapeutic approaches for this aggressive disease. PMID:27039262

  13. Data mining approach to predict BRCA1 gene mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olegas Niakšu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most frequent women cancer form and one of the leading mortality causes among women around the world. Patients with pathological mutation of a BRCA gene have 65% lifelong breast cancer probability. It is known that such patients have different cause of illness. In this study, we have proposed a new approach for the prediction of BRCA mutation carriers by methodically applying knowledge discovery steps and utilizing data mining methods. An alternative BRCA risk assessment model has been created utilizing decision tree classifier model. The biggest challenge was a very small size and imbalanced nature of the initial dataset, which have been collected by clinicians during 4 years of clinical trial. Iterative optimization of initial dataset, optimal algorithms selection and their parameterization have resulted in higher classifier model performance, with acceptable prediction accuracy for the clinical usage. In this study, three data mining problems have been analyzed using eleven data mining algorithms.

  14. Tumorigenic fragments of APC cause dominant defects in directional cell migration in multiple model systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott A. Nelson

    2012-11-01

    Nonsense mutations that result in the expression of truncated, N-terminal, fragments of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC tumour suppressor protein are found in most sporadic and some hereditary colorectal cancers. These mutations can cause tumorigenesis by eliminating β-catenin-binding sites from APC, which leads to upregulation of β-catenin and thereby results in the induction of oncogenes such as MYC. Here we show that, in three distinct experimental model systems, expression of an N-terminal fragment of APC (N-APC results in loss of directionality, but not speed, of cell motility independently of changes in β-catenin regulation. We developed a system to culture and fluorescently label live pieces of gut tissue to record high-resolution three-dimensional time-lapse movies of cells in situ. This revealed an unexpected complexity of normal gut cell migration, a key process in gut epithelial maintenance, with cells moving with spatial and temporal discontinuity. Quantitative comparison of gut tissue from wild-type mice and APC heterozygotes (APCMin/+; multiple intestinal neoplasia model demonstrated that cells in precancerous epithelia lack directional preference when moving along the crypt-villus axis. This effect was reproduced in diverse experimental systems: in developing chicken embryos, mesoderm cells expressing N-APC failed to migrate normally; in amoeboid Dictyostelium, which lack endogenous APC, expressing an N-APC fragment maintained cell motility, but the cells failed to perform directional chemotaxis; and multicellular Dictyostelium slug aggregates similarly failed to perform phototaxis. We propose that N-terminal fragments of APC represent a gain-of-function mutation that causes cells within tissue to fail to migrate directionally in response to relevant guidance cues. Consistent with this idea, crypts in histologically normal tissues of APCMin/+ intestines are overpopulated with cells, suggesting that a lack of migration might cause cell

  15. Mutations of p53 gene exons 4-8 in human esophageal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Ya Li; Jin-Tian Tang; Li-Qun Jia; Pei-Wen Li

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the tumor suppressor gene p53 mutations in exon 4, esophageal cancer and adjacent noncancerous tissues.METHODS: We performed p53 (exons 4-8) gene mutation analysis on 24 surgically resected human esophageal cancer specimens by PCR, single-strand conformation polymorphism, and DNA sequencing. RESULTS: p53 gene mutations were detected in 9 of 22 (40.9%) esophageal cancer specimens and 10 of 17 (58.8%) adjacent non-cancerous tissues. Eight of sixteen (50.0%) point mutations detected were G-A transitions and 9 of 18 (50.0%) p53 gene mutations occurred in exon 4 in esophageal cancer specimens. Only 1 of 11 mutations detected was G-A transition and 4 of 11 (36.4%) p53 gene mutations occurred in exon 4 in adjacent non-cancerous tissues.CONCLUSION: Mutation of p53 gene in exon 4 may play an important role in development of esophageal cancer. The observation of p53 gene mutation in adjacent noncancerous tissues suggests that p53 gene mutation may be an early event in esophageal carcinogenesis. Some clinical factors, including age, sex, pre-operation therapy and location of tumors, do not influence p53 gene mutation rates.

  16. the characterization of exon-1 mutation(s) of beta globin gene in beta thalassemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    β-thalassemia constitutes one of the most serious health problems worldwide, it is the most common chronic hemolytic anemia in egypt. the aim of this work is to study the mutations of exon-1 of β-globin gene in β-thalassaemic children in sharkia governorate. the present study was included 25 healthy children and 50 patients diagnosed as β-thalassemia. this work showed that the thalassaemic patients had significantly decrease in Hb conc . than the control group (p 2 showed a significant increase as compared with the control group

  17. Novel chloride channel gene mutations in two unrelated Chinese families with myotonia congenita

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Feng

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Myotonia congenita (MC is a genetic disease characterized by mutations in the muscle chloride channel gene (CLCN1. To date, approximately 130 different mutations on the CLCN1 gene have been identified. However, most of the studies have focused on Caucasians, and reports on CLCN1 mutations in Chinese population are rare. This study investigated the mutation of CLCN1 in two Chinese families with MC. Direct sequencing of the CLCN1 gene revealed a heterozygous mutation (892G>A, resulting in A298T in one family and a compound heterozygous mutations (782A>G, resulting in Y261C; 1679T>C, resulting in M560T in the other family, None of the 100 normal controls had these mutations. Our findings add more to the available information on the CLCN1 mutation spectrum, and provide a valuable reference for studying the mutation types and inheritance pattern of CLCN1 in the Chinese population.

  18. Mutation analysis of the WFS1 gene in seven Danish Wolfram syndrome families; four new mutations identified

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars; Eiberg, Hans Rudolf Lytchoff; Barrett, Timothy;

    2005-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WS) is a neuro-degenerative autosomal recessive (AR) disorder (OMIM #222300) caused by mutations in the WFS1 gene on 4p16.1. More than 120 mutations have been identified in WFS1 associated with AR WS, as well as autosomal dominant nonsyndromic low-frequency sensorineural hearing...

  19. NIH Researchers Identify New Gene Mutation Associated with ALS and Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NIH researchers identify new gene mutation associated with ALS and dementia April 7, 2014 A rare mutation ... cell, has been linked with development of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). This finding, from a research team led ...

  20. Novel PRKAR1A gene mutations in Carney Complex

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Lorraine; PENG Lan; Jean-Gilles, J; Zhang, Ximin; Wieczorek, Rosemary; Jain, Shilpa; Levine, Vicki; Osman, Iman; Prieto, Victor G.; Lee, Peng

    2010-01-01

    Carney complex is a syndrome that may include cardiac and mucocutaneous myxomas, spotting skin pigmentation, and endocrine lesions. Many patients with Carney complex have been shown to have a stop codon mutation in the PRKAR1A gene in the 17q22-24 region. Here we present the case of a 57 year-old man with multiple skin lesions and cardiac myxomas. Histology of the skin lesions showed lentigenous melanocytic hyperplasia and cutaneous myxomas, confirming the diagnosis of Carney complex. Lesiona...

  1. APC2 and Axin promote mitotic fidelity by facilitating centrosome separation and cytoskeletal regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Poulton, John S; Mu, Frank W.; Roberts, David M.; Peifer, Mark

    2013-01-01

    To ensure the accurate transmission of genetic material, chromosome segregation must occur with extremely high fidelity. Segregation errors lead to chromosomal instability (CIN), with deleterious consequences. Mutations in the tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) initiate most colon cancers and have also been suggested to promote disease progression through increased CIN, but the mechanistic role of APC in preventing CIN remains controversial. Using fly embryos as a model, we inv...

  2. Mutation spectrum of the TYR and SLC45A2 genes in patients with oculocutaneous albinism

    OpenAIRE

    Ko, Jung Min; YANG, JUNG-AH; Jeong, Seon-Yong; Kim, Hyon-Ju

    2012-01-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is a group of inherited disorders characterized by defective melanin biosynthesis. OCA1, the most common and severe form, is caused by mutations in the tyrosinase (TYR) gene. OCA4, caused by mutations in the SLC45A2 gene, has frequently been reported in the Japanese population. To determine the mutational spectrum in Korean OCA patients, 12 patients were recruited. The samples were first screened for TYR mutations, and negative samples were screened for SLC45A2 m...

  3. Phenylalanine hydroxylase gene mutations in the United States: report from the Maternal PKU Collaborative Study.

    OpenAIRE

    Guldberg, P; Levy, H L; Hanley, W. B.; R. Koch; Matalon, R; Rouse, B. M.; Trefz, F.; de la Cruz, F.; Henriksen, K. F.; Güttler, F

    1996-01-01

    The major cause of hyperphenylalaninemia is mutations in the gene encoding phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH). The known mutations have been identified primarily in European patients. The purpose of this study was to determine the spectrum of mutations responsible for PAH deficiency in the United States. One hundred forty-nine patients enrolled in the Maternal PKU Collaborative Study were subjects for clinical and molecular investigations. PAH gene mutations associated with phenylketonuria (PKU)...

  4. Genetic syndromes caused by mutations in epigenetic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdasco, María; Esteller, Manel

    2013-04-01

    The orchestrated organization of epigenetic factors that control chromatin dynamism, including DNA methylation, histone marks, non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) and chromatin-remodeling proteins, is essential for the proper function of tissue homeostasis, cell identity and development. Indeed, deregulation of epigenetic profiles has been described in several human pathologies, including complex diseases (such as cancer, cardiovascular and neurological diseases), metabolic pathologies (type 2 diabetes and obesity) and imprinting disorders. Over the last decade it has become increasingly clear that mutations of genes involved in epigenetic mechanism, such as DNA methyltransferases, methyl-binding domain proteins, histone deacetylases, histone methylases and members of the SWI/SNF family of chromatin remodelers are linked to human disorders, including Immunodeficiency Centromeric instability Facial syndrome 1, Rett syndrome, Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome, Sotos syndrome or alpha-thalassemia/mental retardation X-linked syndrome, among others. As new members of the epigenetic machinery are described, the number of human syndromes associated with epigenetic alterations increases. As recent examples, mutations of histone demethylases and members of the non-coding RNA machinery have recently been associated with Kabuki syndrome, Claes-Jensen X-linked mental retardation syndrome and Goiter syndrome. In this review, we describe the variety of germline mutations of epigenetic modifiers that are known to be associated with human disorders, and discuss the therapeutic potential of epigenetic drugs as palliative care strategies in the treatment of such disorders. PMID:23370504

  5. Mutations of the prion protein gene phenotypic spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Gábor G; Trabattoni, Gianriccardo; Hainfellner, Johannes A; Ironside, James W; Knight, Richard S G; Budka, Herbert

    2002-11-01

    Prion diseases are inherited in 5-15 % of cases. They are classified according to changes in the prion protein gene ( PRNP) or conventionally according to phenotype as Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker disease (GSS), fatal familial insomnia (FFI), or familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (fCJD). Point mutations and insertions within PRNP form the genetic background. We report the results of a systematic analysis of over 500 case reports of patients with PRNP abnormalities. We compare clinical, neuropathological and molecular data in five groups, namely GSS, FFI, fCJD, base pair insertion (BPI), and all cases collectively. Clinical presentation overlaps between mutations, but some have characteristic features (e. g. P105L, D178N-129M, T183A). Some mutations, especially in the lack of sufficient family history, in earlier phases tend to resemble other neurodegenerative disorders like multiple system atrophy, corticobasal degeneration or familial diseases such as late-onset spinocerebellar ataxia, spastic paraparesis, frontotemporal dementia, or Alzheimer's disease. The codon 129 polymorphism has a phenotypic influence in inherited prion diseases, as in non-genetic forms, but additional factors might be considered as background for phenotypic variability. PMID:12420099

  6. Review: Clinical aspects of hereditary DNA Mismatch repair gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sijmons, Rolf H; Hofstra, Robert M W

    2016-02-01

    Inherited mutations of the DNA Mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 can result in two hereditary tumor syndromes: the adult-onset autosomal dominant Lynch syndrome, previously referred to as Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) and the childhood-onset autosomal recessive Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency syndrome. Both conditions are important to recognize clinically as their identification has direct consequences for clinical management and allows targeted preventive actions in mutation carriers. Lynch syndrome is one of the more common adult-onset hereditary tumor syndromes, with thousands of patients reported to date. Its tumor spectrum is well established and includes colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer and a range of other cancer types. However, surveillance for cancers other than colorectal cancer is still of uncertain value. Prophylactic surgery, especially for the uterus and its adnexa is an option in female mutation carriers. Chemoprevention of colorectal cancer with aspirin is actively being investigated in this syndrome and shows promising results. In contrast, the Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency syndrome is rare, features a wide spectrum of childhood onset cancers, many of which are brain tumors with high mortality rates. Future studies are very much needed to improve the care for patients with this severe disorder. PMID:26746812

  7. Mutations in the gene region of hepatitis B virus genotype in Turkish patients

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mehmet Özaslan; Ersan Özaslan; Arzu Barsgan; Mehmet Koruk

    2007-12-01

    The gene region of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) is responsible for the expression of surface antigens and includes the ‘a’-determinant region. Thus, mutation(s) in this region would afford HBV variants a distinct survival advantage, permitting the mutant virus to escape from the immune system. The aim of this study was to search for mutations of the gene region in different patient groups infected with genotype variants of HBV, and to analyse the biological significance of these mutations. Moreover, we investigated gene mutation inductance among family members. Forty HBV-DNA-positive patients were determined among 132 hepatitis B surface antigen (HbsAg) carriers by the first stage of seminested PCR. Genotypes and subtypes were established by sequencing of the amplified S gene regions. Variants were compared with original sequences of these serotypes, and mutations were identified. All variants were designated as genotype and subtype ayw3. Ten kinds of point mutations were identified within the region. The highest rates of mutation were found in chronic hepatitis patients and their family members. The amino acid mutations 125 (M → T) and 127 (T → P) were found on the first loop of ‘a’-determinant. The other consequence was mutation inductance in a family member. We found some mutations in the S gene region known to be stable and observed that some of these mutations affected gene expression.

  8. Whole-exome sequencing defines the mutational landscape of pheochromocytoma and identifies KMT2D as a recurrently mutated gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhlin, C Christofer; Stenman, Adam; Haglund, Felix; Clark, Victoria E; Brown, Taylor C; Baranoski, Jacob; Bilguvar, Kaya; Goh, Gerald; Welander, Jenny; Svahn, Fredrika; Rubinstein, Jill C; Caramuta, Stefano; Yasuno, Katsuhito; Günel, Murat; Bäckdahl, Martin; Gimm, Oliver; Söderkvist, Peter; Prasad, Manju L; Korah, Reju; Lifton, Richard P; Carling, Tobias

    2015-09-01

    As subsets of pheochromocytomas (PCCs) lack a defined molecular etiology, we sought to characterize the mutational landscape of PCCs to identify novel gene candidates involved in disease development. A discovery cohort of 15 PCCs wild type for mutations in PCC susceptibility genes underwent whole-exome sequencing, and an additional 83 PCCs served as a verification cohort for targeted sequencing of candidate mutations. A low rate of nonsilent single nucleotide variants (SNVs) was detected (6.1/sample). Somatic HRAS and EPAS1 mutations were observed in one case each, whereas the remaining 13 cases did not exhibit variants in established PCC genes. SNVs aggregated in apoptosis-related pathways, and mutations in COSMIC genes not previously reported in PCCs included ZAN, MITF, WDTC1, and CAMTA1. Two somatic mutations and one constitutional variant in the well-established cancer gene lysine (K)-specific methyltransferase 2D (KMT2D, MLL2) were discovered in one sample each, prompting KMT2D screening using focused exome-sequencing in the verification cohort. An additional 11 PCCs displayed KMT2D variants, of which two were recurrent. In total, missense KMT2D variants were found in 14 (11 somatic, two constitutional, one undetermined) of 99 PCCs (14%). Five cases displayed somatic mutations in the functional FYR/SET domains of KMT2D, constituting 36% of all KMT2D-mutated PCCs. KMT2D expression was upregulated in PCCs compared to normal adrenals, and KMT2D overexpression positively affected cell migration in a PCC cell line. We conclude that KMT2D represents a recurrently mutated gene with potential implication for PCC development. PMID:26032282

  9. Combining gene mutation with gene expression data improves outcome prediction in myelodysplastic syndromes

    OpenAIRE

    GERSTUNG, MORITZ; Pellagatti, Andrea; Malcovati, Luca; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Porta, Matteo G Della; Jädersten, Martin; Dolatshad, Hamid; Verma, Amit; Cross, Nicholas C. P.; Vyas, Paresh; Killick, Sally; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva; Cazzola, Mario; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Campbell, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a genetic disease, but two patients rarely have identical genotypes. Similarly, patients differ in their clinicopathological parameters, but how genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity are interconnected is not well understood. Here we build statistical models to disentangle the effect of 12 recurrently mutated genes and 4 cytogenetic alterations on gene expression, diagnostic clinical variables and outcome in 124 patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. Overall, one or more genetic ...

  10. Three faces of recombination activating gene 1 (RAG1) mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patiroglu, Turkan; Akar, Himmet Haluk; Van Der Burg, Mirjam

    2015-12-01

    Severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) is a group of genetic disorder associated with development of T- and/or B-lymphocytes. Recombination-activating genes (RAG1/2) play a critical role on VDJ recombination process that leads to the production of a broad T-cell receptor (TCR) and B-cell receptor (BCR) repertoire in the development of T and B cells. RAG1/2 genes mutations result in various forms of primary immunodeficiency, ranging from classic SCID to Omenn syndrome (OS) to atypical SCID with such as granuloma formation and autoimmunity. Herein, we reported 4 patients with RAG1 deficiency: classic SCID was seen in two patients who presented with recurrent pneumonia and chronic diarrhoea, and failure to thrive. OS was observed in one patient who presented with chronic diarrhoea, skin rash, recurrent lower respiratory infections, and atypical SCID was seen in one patient who presented with Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) and had novel RAG1 mutation. PMID:26689875

  11. Yeast prt1 mutations alter heat-shock gene expression through transcript fragmentation.

    OpenAIRE

    Barnes, C.A.; Singer, R A; Johnston, G C

    1993-01-01

    The inhibition of translation initiation by modification or mutation of initiation factors can lead to disproportionate effects on gene expression. Here we report disproportionate decreases in gene expression in cells with mutated Prt1 activity. The PRT1 gene product of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is necessary for translation initiation and is thought to be a component of initiation factor 3. At a restrictive temperature the prt1-1 mutation, in addition to decreasing global pro...

  12. Missense mutations of the fibrillin-1 gene in two Chinese patients with severe Marfan syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective To describe two Chinese patients with severe forms of Marfan syndrome and to report findings of mutational analysis of the fibrillin-1 (FBN1) gene.Methods Two Chinese patients were studied, one suffering from Marfan syndrome of infantile onset and the other of neonatal onset. Their clinical features were described. Mutational analysis of the FBN1 gene was performed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique and direct sequencing of exons 23 - 32,where the mutational hotspots for severe forms of Marfan syndrome are located.Results Two missense mutations were successfully identified, a G3037A transition and an A3083T transversion, the latter being an unreported mutation.Conclusion Taking advantage of the clustering phenomenon of mutations in severe forms of Marfan syndrome, one can identify FBN1 mutations in these patients by first screening the mutational hotspots,thus reducing the effort that would otherwise be much greater because of the size of the gene.

  13. Relationship between mutations of mitochondrial DNA ND1 gene and type 2 diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于珮; 于德民; 刘德敏; 王琨; 汤新之

    2004-01-01

    Background Recent studies have indicated that many mutations in mitochondrial (mt)DNA NDI gene region are related to diabetes mellitus. In this study we explored the relationship between various mtDNA ND1 gene mutations and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) among Chinese. Methods Using PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis and gene sequencing, 4 spots of mtDNA (nt3243, nt3316, nt3394, nt3426) were screened in 478 diabetics and 430 non-diabetic subjects.Results In diabetic group, there were 13 carriers (2.72%)of 3316 G→A mutation,12 (2.51%) of 3394 T→C mutation and 2 (0.42%) of 3426A→G mutation. In controls, only 3394 T→C mutation was observed in 2 subjects (0.47%). There was significant difference in the frequency of 3316 and 3394 mutation between two groups (P<0.05, respectively). More subjects with mitochondrial DNA ND1 gene mutations had DM family history and greater tendency of maternal inheritance when compared to those patients without mutation in diabetic group(P<0.01). A 3426 mutation diabetic pedigree was studied, and we found 12 maternal members in the family had the same mutation. Conclusion mtDNA ND1 gene mutations at nt3316 (G→A), nt3394 (T→C) and 3426 (A→G) might contribute to the pathogenesis of DM with other genetic factors and environment factors.

  14. A range of clinical phenotypes associated with mutations in CRX, a photoreceptor transcription-factor gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Sohocki, M M; Sullivan, L S; Mintz-Hittner, H A; Birch, D.; Heckenlively, J R; Freund, C L; McInnes, R R; Daiger, S P

    1998-01-01

    Mutations in the retinal-expressed gene CRX (cone-rod homeobox gene) have been associated with dominant cone-rod dystrophy and with de novo Leber congenital amaurosis. However, CRX is a transcription factor for several retinal genes, including the opsins and the gene for interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein. Because loss of CRX function could alter the expression of a number of other retinal proteins, we screened for mutations in the CRX gene in probands with a range of degenerative re...

  15. Mutation Analysis in the BRCA1 Gene in Chinese Breast Cancer Families

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WUZhengyan; ZHENLinlin; FANPing

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the mutation of BRCA1 gene in Chinese breast cancer families. Methods:Fifteen families were selected, involving 41 members, consisting of 23 breast cancer patients. Using poly-merase chain reaction and single stranded conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP), and subsequent DNA sequencing, the mutation of BRCA1 genes were analyzed. Results: Four mutations were found in all fam-ilies, and the proportion of mutation was 26.7% (4/15) in breast cancer families. One of the 4 mutations was 2228 insC, resulting in chain termination at codon 711. The remaining 3 mutations were 1884A→T and 3232A→G, resulting in single amino acid change respectively. Conclusion: BRCA1 is a breast cancer susceptibility gene. The relatively low proportion and frequency of BRCA1 mutations in our study hints additional BRCA genes existed.

  16. Novel association of APC with intermediate filaments identified using a new versatile APC antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coffey Robert J

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a key player in suppression of colon tumorigenesis, Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC has been widely studied to determine its cellular functions. However, inconsistencies of commercially available APC antibodies have limited the exploration of APC function. APC is implicated in spindle formation by direct interactions with tubulin and microtubule-binding protein EB1. APC also interacts with the actin cytoskeleton to regulate cell polarity. Until now, interaction of APC with the third cytoskeletal element, intermediate filaments, has remained unexamined. Results We generated an APC antibody (APC-M2 pAb raised against the 15 amino acid repeat region, and verified its reliability in applications including immunoprecipitation, immunoblotting, and immunofluorescence in cultured cells and tissue. Utilizing this APC-M2 pAb, we immunoprecipitated endogenous APC and its binding proteins from colon epithelial cells expressing wild-type APC. Using Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS, we identified 42 proteins in complex with APC, including β-catenin and intermediate filament (IF proteins lamin B1 and keratin 81. Association of lamin B1 with APC in cultured cells and human colonic tissue was verified by co-immunoprecipitation and colocalization. APC also colocalized with keratins and remained associated with IF proteins throughout a sequential extraction procedure. Conclusion We introduce a versatile APC antibody that is useful for cell/tissue immunostaining, immunoblotting and immunoprecipitation. We also present evidence for interactions between APC and IFs, independent of actin filaments and microtubules. Our results suggest that APC associates with all three major components of the cytoskeleton, thus expanding potential roles for APC in the regulation of cytoskeletal integrity.

  17. A study on sodium iodide symporter gene mutation in congenital hypothyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the mutation of sodium iodide symporter (NIS) gene in the patients with congenital hypothyroidism (CH) in Tianjin area. Methods: Total genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood of 18 patients with CH and 35 normal subjects randomly selected. All 15 exons of NIS gene were individually amplified. Mutation was detected by single-strand conformational polymorphism(SSCP) technique and confirmed with direct sequencing. Results: Exons of NIS gene of all the subjects were successfully amplified by polymerase chain reaction. SSCP analysis displayed no abnormality. No mutation was found in these patients Conclusion: The CH in Tianjin urban area had no mutation of NIS gene. (authors)

  18. APC2 and Axin promote mitotic fidelity by facilitating centrosome separation and cytoskeletal regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulton, John S; Mu, Frank W; Roberts, David M; Peifer, Mark

    2013-10-01

    To ensure the accurate transmission of genetic material, chromosome segregation must occur with extremely high fidelity. Segregation errors lead to chromosomal instability (CIN), with deleterious consequences. Mutations in the tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) initiate most colon cancers and have also been suggested to promote disease progression through increased CIN, but the mechanistic role of APC in preventing CIN remains controversial. Using fly embryos as a model, we investigated the role of APC proteins in CIN. Our findings suggest that APC2 loss leads to increased rates of chromosome segregation error. This occurs through a cascade of events beginning with incomplete centrosome separation leading to failure to inhibit formation of ectopic cleavage furrows, which result in mitotic defects and DNA damage. We test several hypotheses related to the mechanism of action of APC2, revealing that APC2 functions at the embryonic cortex with several protein partners, including Axin, to promote mitotic fidelity. Our in vivo data demonstrate that APC2 protects genome stability by modulating mitotic fidelity through regulation of the cytoskeleton. PMID:24026117

  19. Murine muscular dystrophy caused by a mutation in the laminin alpha 2 (Lama2) gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, H; Wu, X R; Wewer, U M;

    1994-01-01

    The classic murine muscular dystrophy strain, dy, was first described almost 40 years ago. We have identified the molecular basis of an allele of dy, called dy2J, by detecting a mutation in the laminin alpha 2 chain gene--the first identified mutation in laminin-2. The G to A mutation in a splice...

  20. Comprehensive and accurate mutation scanning of the CFTR gene by two-dimensional DNA electrophoresis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Y; Hofstra, RMW; Scheffer, H; Uitterlinden, AG; Mullaart, E; Buys, CHCM; Vijg, J

    1996-01-01

    The large number of possible disease causing mutations in the 27 exons of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene has severely limited direct diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and carriers by mutation detection. Here we show that in principle testing for mutation

  1. Emerging Trend of Mutation Profile of rpoB Gene in MDR Tuberculosis, North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makadia, Jemil S; Jain, Anju; Patra, Surajeet Kumar; Sherwal, B L; Khanna, Ashwani

    2012-10-01

    The present study was conducted on North Indian population to observe rpoB gene mutation profile in multidrug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This was an observational study. 30 cases of MDR-TB proven by culture and drug sensitivity were selected. DNA sequencing of 81 bp (codon 507-533) long RRDR of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was done to detect the sites of mutation. Out of 30 cases, 24 showed a single mutation in the RRDR region of rpoB gene in which 16 (53.33 %) showed mutation in codon 531(TCG→TTG), 5 cases (16.66 %) showed mutation in codon 526(CAC→TAC), mutation in codon 516(GAC→GTC, AAC) was present in 3 cases (10 %). It was also observed that mutation in more than one codon was present in 4 cases (13.33 %), which included deletion at codon 509(AGC→-GC), mutation at 513(CAA→CTA), 516, 526, 529(CGA→CTA) and 531. No mutation was detected in RRDR in 2 cases (6.66 %). Our finding of 13.33 % cases with multiple sites of mutation in RRDR region is in contrast to earlier studies done in North India which showed single mutation detected in RRDR of rpoB gene that highlights the emerging change in the trend of mutation profile of rpoB gene in rifampicin resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PMID:24082462

  2. Homozygous tyrosinase gene mutation in an American black with tyrosinase-negative (type IA) oculocutaneous albinism.

    OpenAIRE

    Spritz, R.A.; Strunk, K M; Hsieh, C L; G.S. Sekhon; Francke, U.

    1991-01-01

    We have identified a tyrosinase gene mutation in an American black with classic, tyrosinase-negative oculocutaneous albinism. This mutation results in an amino acid substitution (Cys----Arg) at codon 89 of the tyrosinase polypeptide. The proband is homozygous for the substitution, suggesting that this mutation may be frequently associated with tyrosinase-negative oculocutaneous albinism in blacks.

  3. Laminin 5 genes and Herlitz junctional epidermolysis bullosa: novel mutations and polymorphisms in the LAMB3 and LAMC2 genes. Mutations in brief no. 190. Online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kon, A; Pulkkinen, L; Hara, M; Tamai, K; Tagami, H; Hashimoto, I; Uitto, J

    1998-01-01

    Herlitz junctional epidermolysis bullosa (H-JEB; OMIM #226700) is a lethal, autosomal recessive blistering disorder characterized by fragility of the skin and other specialized epithelia. Previously, mutations in the laminin 5 genes (LAMA3, LAMB3, and LAMC2) have been disclosed, most of them in LAMB3. In this study, we have examined the genetic basis of H-JEB in three families utilizing heteroduplex analysis and automated nucleotide sequencing. In one family, the proband was compound heterozygote for previously unpublished LAMB3 mutations, 1482delC and W95X. In two other families, the probands were found to be homozygous for novel nonsense mutations C553X and K822X in the LAMC2 gene. These mutations result in premature termination codons and predict truncation of the corresponding polypeptides. Also, during the search of laminin 5 mutations, 18 LAMB3 and LAMC2 polymorphisms were discovered, 9 of them being previously undescribed. Delineation of novel homozygous nonsense mutations in the LAMB3 and LAMC2 genes, with previous demonstrations of LAMA3 mutations, re-emphasizes the concept that stop codon mutations in both alleles of any of the three laminin 5 genes result in the severe H-JEB phenotype. PMID:10660342

  4. Deconstructing the ßcatenin destruction complex: mechanistic roles for the tumor suppressor APC in regulating Wnt signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, David M; Pronobis, Mira I; Poulton, John S; Waldmann, Jon D; Stephenson, Elise M; Hanna, Shahnaz; Peifer, Mark

    2011-06-01

    Negatively regulating signaling by targeting key effectors for ubiquitination/destruction is essential for development and oncogenesis. The tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), an essential negative regulator of Wnt signaling, provides a paradigm. APC mutations occur in most colon cancers. Acting in the "destruction complex" with Axin, glycogen synthase kinase 3, and casein kinase, APC targets ßcatenin (ßcat) for phosphorylation and recognition by an E3 ubiquitin-ligase. Despite 20 years of work, the internal workings of the destruction complex and APC's role remain largely mysterious. We use both Drosophila and colon cancer cells to test hypotheses for APC's mechanism of action. Our data are inconsistent with current models suggesting that high-affinity ßcat-binding sites on APC play key roles. Instead, they suggest that multiple ßcat-binding sites act additively to fine-tune signaling via cytoplasmic retention. We identify essential roles for two putative binding sites for new partners--20-amino-acid repeat 2 and conserved sequence B--in destruction complex action. Finally, we demonstrate that APC interacts with Axin by two different modes and provide evidence that conserved sequence B helps ensure release of APC from Axin, with disassembly critical in regulating ßcat levels. Using these data, we suggest a new model for destruction complex action in development, which also provides new insights into functions of truncated APC proteins in cancer. PMID:21471006

  5. Mutation analysis of codons 345 and 347 of rhodopsin gene in Indian retinitis pigmentosa patients

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhurima Dikshit; Rakhi Agarwal

    2001-08-01

    More than 100 mutations have been reported till date in the rhodopsin gene in patients with retinitis pigmentosa. The present study was undertaken to detect the reported rhodopsin gene point mutations in Indian retinitis pigmentosa patients. We looked for presence or absence of codon 345 and 347 mutations in exon 5 of the gene using the technique of allele-specific polymerase chain reaction by designing primers for each mutation. We have examined 100 patients from 76 families irrespective of genetic categories. Surprisingly, in our sample the very widely reported highly frequent mutations of codon 347 (P → S/A/R/Q/L/T) were absent while the codon 345 mutation V → M was seen in three cases in one family (autosomal dominant form) and in one sporadic case (total two families). This is the first report on codon 345 and 347 mutation in Indian retinitis pigmentosa subjects.

  6. Exome mutation burden predicts clinical outcome in ovarian cancer carrying mutated BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Kochupurakkal, Bose; Gonzalez-Izarzugaza, Jose Maria;

    2013-01-01

    Reliable biomarkers predicting resistance or sensitivity to anti-cancer therapy are critical for oncologists to select proper therapeutic drugs in individual cancer patients. Ovarian and breast cancer patients carrying germline mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes are often sensitive to DNA damaging......-type BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. These results suggest that in cancers with DNA repair deficiency caused by functional BRCA loss, higher versus lower Nmut may reflect the status of deficiency or rescue by alternative mechanism(s) for DNA repair, with lower Nmut predicting for resistance to DNA-damaging drugs in...... drugs and relative to non-mutation carriers present a favorable clinical outcome following therapy. Genome sequencing studies have shown a high number of mutations in the tumor genome in patients carrying BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations (mBRCA). The present study used exome-sequencing and SNP 6 array data of...

  7. Mutations in the dihydropteroate synthase gene of Pneumocystis jiroveci isolates from Portuguese patients with Pneumocystis pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costa, M C; Helweg-Larsen, J; Lundgren, Bettina; Antunes, F; Matos, O

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of mutations of the P. jiroveci dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) gene in an immunocompromised Portuguese population and to investigate the possible association between DHPS mutations and sulpha exposure. In the studied population, DHPS gene...... mutations were not significantly more frequent in patients exposed to sulpha drugs compared with patients not exposed (P=0.390). The results of this study suggest that DHPS gene mutations are frequent in the Portuguese immunocompromised population but do not seem associated with previous sulpha exposure...

  8. Osteogenesis imperfecta without features of type V caused by a mutation in the IFITM5 gene

    OpenAIRE

    Grover, Monica; Campeau, Philippe M.; Lietman, Caressa Dee; Lu, James T.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Schlesinger, Alan E.; Lee, Brendan H.

    2013-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is typically caused by mutations in type 1 collagen genes, but in recent years new recessive and dominant forms caused by mutations in a plethora of different genes have been characterized. OI type V is a dominant form caused by the recurrent (c.-14C>T) mutation in the 5′UTR of the IFITM5 gene. The mutation adds 5 residues to the N-terminus of the IFITM5 but the pathophysiology of the disease still remains to be elucidated. Typical clinical features present in the...

  9. Limited clinical relevance of mitochondrial DNA mutation and gene expression analyses in ovarian cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Rachinger Andrea; Bartnik Ewa; Kupryjanczyk Jolanta; Bragoszewski Piotr; Ostrowski Jerzy

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background In recent years, numerous studies have investigated somatic mutations in mitochondrial DNA in various tumours. The observed high mutation rates might reflect mitochondrial deregulation; consequently, mutation analyses could be clinically relevant. The purpose of this study was to determine if mutations in the mitochondrial D-loop region and/or the level of mitochondrial gene expression could influence the clinical course of human ovarian carcinomas. Methods We sequenced a ...

  10. Point Mutations Effects on Charge Transport Properties of the Tumor-Suppressor Gene p53

    OpenAIRE

    Shih, Chi-Tin; Roche, Stephan; Römer, Rudolf A.

    2007-01-01

    We report on a theoretical study of point mutations effects on charge transfer properties in the DNA sequence of the tumor-suppressor p53 gene. On the basis of effective single-strand or double-strand tight-binding models which simulate hole propagation along the DNA, a statistical analysis of charge transmission modulations associated with all possible point mutations is performed. We find that in contrast to non-cancerous mutations, mutation hotspots tend to result in significantly weaker {...

  11. Novel heterozygous nonsense mutation of the OPTN gene segregating in a Danish family with ALS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tümer, Zeynep; Bertelsen, Birgitte; Gredal, Ole; Magyari, Melinda; Nielsen, Karen Cecilie; Lucamp; Grønskov, Karen; Brøndum-Nielsen, Karen

    2012-01-01

    , mutations of the optineurin gene (OPTN), which is involved in open-angle glaucoma, were identified in 3 Japanese patients/families with ALS, and subsequently in a few FALS patients of European descent. We found a heterozygous nonsense mutation (c.493C>T, p.Gln165X, exon 6) in the OPTN gene in a Danish...

  12. [Parkinson's disease associated with a mutation in the PARK2 gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaasinen, Valtteri; Hietala, Marja; Kuoppamäki, Mikko

    2015-01-01

    The most common cause of monogenic hereditary Parkinson's disease is a mutation in the PARK2 gene. Early onset, slow progression, dystonia, and good response to levodopa are typical of the disease phenotype. Finnish PARK2 patients have not been described previously. We describe two patients, in whom pathogenic mutations in the PARK2 gene were the cause of parkinsonism. PMID:26245049

  13. Prevalence of pathogenic mutations in cancer predisposition genes among pancreatic cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Chunling; Steven N Hart; William R Bamlet; Moore, Raymond M.; Nandakumar, Kannabiran; Bruce W Eckloff; Lee, Yean K.; Petersen, Gloria M.; Robert R McWilliams; Couch, Fergus J.

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of germline pathogenic mutations in a comprehensive panel of cancer predisposition genes is not well defined for patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). To estimate the frequency of mutations in a panel of 22 cancer predisposition genes, 96 patients unselected for a family history of cancer who were recruited to the Mayo Clinic Pancreatic Cancer patient registry over a 12 month period were screened by next-generation sequencing. Fourteen pathogenic mutations in 1...

  14. Alleged Detrimental Mutations in the SMPD1 Gene in Patients with Niemann-Pick Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Cosima Rhein; Christiane Mühle; Johannes Kornhuber; Martin Reichel

    2015-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 1 (SMPD1) gene are associated with decreased catalytic activity of acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) and are the cause of the autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder Niemann-Pick disease (NPD) types A and B. Currently, >100 missense mutations in SMPD1 are listed in the Human Gene Mutation Database. However, not every sequence variation in SMPD1 is detrimental and gives rise to NPD. We have analysed several alleged SMPD1 mis...

  15. Gonadal Function in 15 Patients Associated with WT1 Gene Mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Maesaka, Akiko; Higuchi, Asako; Kotoh, Shinobu; Hasegawa, Yukihiro; Ikeda, Masahiro; Shishido, Seiichirou; Honda, Masataka

    2006-01-01

    Denys-Drash syndrome (DDS) and Frasier syndrome (FS) are caused by mutations of the WT1 gene. These disorders are characterized by renal disease, abnormality of male sex differentiation, and Wilms’ tumor and gonadoblastoma. There have been few reports on gonadal function in a large series of patients with mutations of the WT1 gene. Here, we evaluated the relation between gonadal function and the phenotype of external genitalia in 15 Japanese patients with WT1 mutations. We confirmed three set...

  16. Identification of Novel Mutations in HEXA Gene in Children Affected with Tay Sachs Disease from India

    OpenAIRE

    Mehul Mistri; Tamhankar, Parag M; Frenny Sheth; Daksha Sanghavi; Pratima Kondurkar; Swapnil Patil; Susan Idicula-Thomas; Sarita Gupta; Jayesh Sheth

    2012-01-01

    Tay Sachs disease (TSD) is a neurodegenerative disorder due to β-hexosaminidase A deficiency caused by mutations in the HEXA gene. The mutations leading to Tay Sachs disease in India are yet unknown. We aimed to determine mutations leading to TSD in India by complete sequencing of the HEXA gene. The clinical inclusion criteria included neuroregression, seizures, exaggerated startle reflex, macrocephaly, cherry red spot on fundus examination and spasticity. Neuroimaging criteria included thala...

  17. Mutational screening of the USH2A gene in Spanish USH patients reveals 23 novel pathogenic mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diaz-Llopis Manuel

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Usher Syndrome type II (USH2 is an autosomal recessive disorder, characterized by moderate to severe hearing impairment and retinitis pigmentosa (RP. Among the three genes implicated, mutations in the USH2A gene account for 74-90% of the USH2 cases. Methods To identify the genetic cause of the disease and determine the frequency of USH2A mutations in a cohort of 88 unrelated USH Spanish patients, we carried out a mutation screening of the 72 coding exons of this gene by direct sequencing. Moreover, we performed functional minigene studies for those changes that were predicted to affect splicing. Results As a result, a total of 144 DNA sequence variants were identified. Based upon previous studies, allele frequencies, segregation analysis, bioinformatics' predictions and in vitro experiments, 37 variants (23 of them novel were classified as pathogenic mutations. Conclusions This report provide a wide spectrum of USH2A mutations and clinical features, including atypical Usher syndrome phenotypes resembling Usher syndrome type I. Considering only the patients clearly diagnosed with Usher syndrome type II, and results obtained in this and previous studies, we can state that mutations in USH2A are responsible for 76.1% of USH2 disease in patients of Spanish origin.

  18. mutation3D: Cancer Gene Prediction Through Atomic Clustering of Coding Variants in the Structural Proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Michael J; Lapcevic, Ryan; Romero, Alfonso E; Yoon, Mark; Das, Jishnu; Beltrán, Juan Felipe; Mort, Matthew; Stenson, Peter D; Cooper, David N; Paccanaro, Alberto; Yu, Haiyuan

    2016-05-01

    A new algorithm and Web server, mutation3D (http://mutation3d.org), proposes driver genes in cancer by identifying clusters of amino acid substitutions within tertiary protein structures. We demonstrate the feasibility of using a 3D clustering approach to implicate proteins in cancer based on explorations of single proteins using the mutation3D Web interface. On a large scale, we show that clustering with mutation3D is able to separate functional from nonfunctional mutations by analyzing a combination of 8,869 known inherited disease mutations and 2,004 SNPs overlaid together upon the same sets of crystal structures and homology models. Further, we present a systematic analysis of whole-genome and whole-exome cancer datasets to demonstrate that mutation3D identifies many known cancer genes as well as previously underexplored target genes. The mutation3D Web interface allows users to analyze their own mutation data in a variety of popular formats and provides seamless access to explore mutation clusters derived from over 975,000 somatic mutations reported by 6,811 cancer sequencing studies. The mutation3D Web interface is freely available with all major browsers supported. PMID:26841357

  19. Reversible modification of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) with K63-linked polyubiquitin regulates the assembly and activity of the β-catenin destruction complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Hoanh; Polakis, Paul

    2012-08-17

    The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor suppressor forms a complex with Axin and GSK3β to promote the phosphorylation and degradation of β-catenin, a key co-activator of Wnt-induced transcription. Here, we establish that APC is modified predominantly with K63-linked ubiquitin chains when it is bound to Axin in unstimulated HEK293 cells. Wnt3a stimulation induced a time-dependent loss of K63-polyubiquitin adducts from APC, an effect synchronous with the dissociation of Axin from APC and the stabilization of cytosolic β-catenin. RNAi-mediated depletion of Axin or β-catenin, which negated the association between APC and Axin, resulted in the absence of K63-adducts on APC. Overexpression of wild-type and phosphodegron-mutant β-catenin, combined with analysis of thirteen human cancer cell lines that harbor oncogenic mutations in APC, Axin, or β-catenin, support the hypothesis that a fully assembled APC-Axin-GSK3β-phospho-β-catenin complex is necessary for the K63-polyubiquitylation of APC. Intriguingly, the degree of this modification on APC appears to correlate inversely with the levels of β-catenin in cells. Together, our results indicate that K63-linked polyubiquitin adducts on APC regulate the assembly and/or efficiency of the β-catenin destruction complex. PMID:22761442

  20. Profile of TP53 gene mutations in sinonasal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmila, Reetta; Bornholdt, Jette; Suitiala, Tuula;

    2010-01-01

    Genetic alterations underlying the development of the cancer of the nose and paranasal sinuses (sinonasal cancer, SNC), a rare cancer that can be included in the group of head and neck cancers, are still largely unknown. We recently reported that TP53 mutations are a common feature of SNC, with an...... not been reported before as frequently mutated in head and neck cancer or human cancer in general. About half of all tumours with TP53 mutations carried more than one mutation. Interestingly, 86% (19/22) of the silent mutations detected had occurred in tumours with multiple mutations....

  1. Clinical study of DMD gene point mutation causing Becker muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-qing CAO

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background  DMD gene point mutation, mainly nonsense mutation, always cause the most severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. However, we also observed some cases of Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD carrying DMD point mutation. This paper aims to explore the mechanism of DMD point mutation causing BMD, in order to enhance the understanding of mutation types of BMD.  Methods  Sequence analysis was performed in 11 cases of BMD confirmed by typical clinical manifestations and muscle biopsy. The exon of DMD gene was detected non-deletion or duplication by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA.  Results  Eleven patients carried 10 mutation types without mutational hotspot. Six patients carried nonsense mutations [c.5002G>T, p.(Glu1668X; c.1615C > T, p.(Arg539X; c.7105G > T, p.(Glu2369X; c.5287C > T, p.(Arg1763X; c.9284T > G, p.(Leu3095X]. One patient carried missense mutation [c.5234G > A, p.(Arg1745His]. Two patients carried frameshift mutations (c.10231dupT, c.10491delC. Two patients carried splicing site mutations (c.4518 + 3A > T, c.649 + 2T > C.  Conclusions  DMD gene point mutation may result in BMD with mild clinical symptoms. When clinical manifestations suggest the possibility of BMD and MLPA reveals non?deletion or duplication mutation of DMD gene, BMD should be considered. Study on the mechanism of DMD point mutation causing BMD is very important for gene therapy of DMD. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.06.005

  2. Association of PAX2 and Other Gene Mutations with the Clinical Manifestations of Renal Coloboma Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiya Okumura

    Full Text Available Renal coloboma syndrome (RCS is characterized by renal anomalies and optic nerve colobomas. PAX2 mutations contribute to RCS. However, approximately half of the patients with RCS have no mutation in PAX2 gene.To investigate the incidence and effects of mutations of PAX2 and 25 candidate genes, patient genes were screened using next-generation sequence analysis, and candidate mutations were confirmed using Sanger sequencing. The correlation between mutations and clinical manifestation was evaluated.Thirty patients, including 26 patients (two families of five and two, 19 sporadic cases with RCS, and 4 optic nerve coloboma only control cases were evaluated in the present study. Six PAX2 mutations in 21 probands [28%; two in family cohorts (n = 5 and n = 2 and in 4 out of 19 patients with sporadic disease] including four novel mutations were confirmed using Sanger sequencing. Moreover, four other sequence variants (CHD7, SALL4, KIF26B, and SIX4 were also confirmed, including a potentially pathogenic novel KIF26B mutation. Kidney function and proteinuria were more severe in patients with PAX2 mutations than in those without the mutation. Moreover, the coloboma score was significantly higher in patients with PAX2 gene mutations. Three out of five patients with PAX2 mutations had focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS diagnosed from kidney biopsies.The results of this study identify several new mutations of PAX2, and sequence variants in four additional genes, including a novel potentially pathogenic mutation in KIF26B, which may play a role in the pathogenesis of RCS.

  3. Identification of a novel mutation in the presenilin 1 gene in a Chinese Alzheimer's disease family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Bo; Lian, Yan; Wang, Xin; Zeng, Fan; Jiao, Bin; Wang, Ye-Ran; Liang, Chun-Rong; Liu, Yu-Hui; Bu, Xian-Le; Yao, Xiu-Qing; Zhu, Chi; Shen, Lu; Zhou, Hua-Dong; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Yan-Jiang

    2014-10-01

    This study has identified a gene mutation in a Chinese family with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Family members were screened by a set of medical examinations and neuropsychological tests. Their DNA was extracted from blood cells and sequenced for gene mutation in the amyloid precursor protein (APP), the presenilin 1 (PS1) and the presenilin 2 (PS2) genes. Genetic analysis showed that the AD patients in the family harbored a T to G missense mutation at the position 314 in exon 4 of the PS1 gene, resulting in a change of F105C in amino acid sequence. Clinical manifestation of these patients included memory loss, counting difficulty, personality change, disorientation, dyscalculia, agnosia, aphasia, and apraxia, which was similar to that of the familial AD (FAD) patients harboring other PS1 mutations. We intend to add a novel mutation F105C of the PS1 gene to the pool of FAD mutations. With the current available genetic data, mutations of the PS1 gene account for the majority of gene mutations in Chinese FAD. PMID:24737487

  4. 熔解曲线法用于肺癌APC基因甲基化模式的研究%Investigation of Methylation Patterns of APC Gene in Lung Cancer with a Novel Fluorescence Melting Curve Analysis Assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高丽; 潘世扬; 陈丹; 张丽霞; 谢而付; 徐建; 黄佩珺

    2012-01-01

    目的 以熔解曲线法测定4株肺癌细胞株和肺癌病人APC基因启动子区的甲基化模式.方法 以脐血淋巴细胞DNA及其转甲基后的DNA经化学修饰、克隆测序的质粒,作为完全非甲基化和完全甲基化标准品.设计通用引物,采用加入荧光染料SYBR Green I的荧光定量PCR法扩增包含21个CpG位点的APC基因启动子区的目的序列,以熔解曲线法通过与完全非甲基化和完全甲基化标准品的Tm值比较,确定四株肺癌细胞株(NCI-H446,NCI-H460,SPCA1,NCI-H520)在该区段的甲基化模式,并通过克隆测序验证.同时测定两例肺癌患者癌组织中APC基因启动子区甲基化模式.结果 四株肺癌细胞株中,NCI-H446,SPCA1和NCI-H520的Tm值与完全非甲基化标准品的Tm值相同,而NCI-H460的Tm值有两个,分别与完全非甲基化和完全甲基化标准品的Tm值吻合,并经克隆测序验证.两例肺癌患者癌组织的Tm值位于完全非甲基化和完全甲基化标准品的Tm值之间.结论 小细胞肺癌细胞株NCI-H446,肺腺癌细胞株SPCA1和肺鳞癌细胞株NCI-H520的APC基因启动子区为完全未甲基化型,而大细胞肺癌细胞株NCI-H460APC基因启动子区甲基化模式为等位基因杂合型.两例肺癌患者癌组织中的APC基因启动子均为部分甲基化型.熔解曲线法是简单、经济和实用的甲基化模式检测方法.%Objective To identify methylation patterns in the promoter region of APC gene in lung cancer cell lines and cancer patients by fluorescence melting curve analysis assay. Methods After bisulfate treatment, DNA samples of lymphocytes from cord blood without and with trans-methyl treatment were amplified. The amplicons were then cloned into plasmid vector and employed as unmethylation and methylation controls. Universal primes were designed to amplify the target sequence in the APC gene promoter region comprising 21 CpG sites. DNA melting curves were acquired by measuring the fluorescence of a

  5. Applications of homemade kit in mutation detection of genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO; Chunxia

    2004-01-01

    [1]Orita, M., Iwahana, H., Kanazawa, H. et al., Detection of poly morphisms of human DNA by gel electrophoresis as single-strand conformation polymorphisms, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., 1989, 86:2766-2770.[2]Hongyo, T., Buzard, G. S., Calvert, R. J. et al., Cold SSCP: a simple, rapid and non-radioactive method for optimized single-strand conformation polymorphism analyses, Nucleic Acids Res., 1993, 21: 3637-3642.[3]Kutach, L. S., Bolshakov, S., Ananthaswamy, H. N., Detection of mutations and polymorphisms in the p53 tumor suppressor gene by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis, Electrophoresis, 1999, 20: 1204-1210.[4]Kozlowski, P., Krzyzosiak, W. J., Combined SSCP/duplex analysis by capillary electrophoresis for more efficient mutation detection, Nucleic Acids Res., 2001, 29( 14): E71.[5]Turner, D., Choudhury, F., Reynard, M. et al., Typing of multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms in cytokine and receptor genes using SNaPshot, Human Immunology, 2002, 63: 508-513.[6]Sudor, J., Barbier, V., Thirot, S. et al., New block-copolymer thermoassociating matrices for DNA sequencing: Effect of molecular sreucture on rheology and resolution, Electrophoresis, 2001, 22: 720-728.[7]Barbier, V., Viovy, J. L., Advanced polymers for DNA separation, Curr. Opin. Biotechnol., 2003, 14: 51-57.[8]Ugaz, V. M., Lin, R., Srivastava, N. et al., A versatile microfabri cated platform for electrophoresis of double- and single-stranded DNA, Electrophoresis, 2003, 24:151-157.[9]Lassiter, S. J., Stryjewski, W., Owens, C. V. et al., Optimization of sequencing conditions using near-infrared lifetime identification methods in capillary gel electrophoresis, Electrophoresis, 2002, 23: 1480-1489.[10]Chang, H. T., Yeung, E. S., Poly(ethyleneoxide) for high-resolution and high-speed separation of DNA by capillary electrophoresis, J. Chromatogr. B, 1995, 669: 113-123.[11]Gao, Q., Yeung, E. S., A matrix for DNA separation: genotyping and sequencing using

  6. IL7R and RAG1/2 Genes Mutations/Polymorphisms in Patients SCID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepideh Safaei

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available SCID disorder is major failure of the immune system, usually genetic. The aim of this study was on mutations detection of RAG1, RAG2, and IL7RG genes in SCID cases. Mutation detection was performed by PCR sequencing.Our results  indicated  that 13  mutations  were found  through  cases which  include 4 mutations in IL7R gene (T661I, I138V, T56A, C57W, 7 mutations in RAG1 (W896X, W204R, M324V, T731I, M1006V, K820R, and R249H, and 2 mutations in RAG2 gene (R229W, ΔT251.

  7. Detection of p53 gene mutations in bronchial biopsy samples of patients with lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung cancer is the malignant transformation and expansion of lung tissue. It is the most lethal of all cancers worldwide, responsible for 1.2 million deaths annually. The goal of this study was to detect the p53 gene mutations in lung cancer, in local population of Lahore, Pakistan. These mutations were screened in the bronchial biopsy lung cancer tissue samples. For this purpose microtomed tissue sections were collected. Following DNA extraction from tissue sections, the p53 mutations were detected by amplifying Exon 7 (145 bp) and Exon 8 (152 bp) of the p53 gene. PCR then followed by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis for screening the p53 gene mutations. This results of SSCP were visualized of silver staining. The results showed different banding pattern indicating the presence of mutation. Majority of the mutations were found in Exon 7. Exon 7 of p53 gene may be the mutation hotspot in lung cancer. In lung cancer, the most prevalent mutations of p53 gene are G -> T transversions; other types of insertions and deletions are also expected, however, the exact nature of mutations in presented work could be confirmed by direct sequencing. (author)

  8. DETECTION OF p53 GENE MUTATION OF BRONCHOSCOPIC SAMPLIES IN THE PATIENTS SUSPECTED TO LUNG CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To determine the feasibility of detecting p53 gene mutations for early diagnosis of lung cancer using the samples from bronchoscopic examination. Methods: Point mutations of the exon 5-8 of p53 gene were detected in 85 bronchoscopic samples of 35 patients suspected to be lung cancer using silver staining PCR-SSCP. Results: p53 gene mutations were founded in 10 of 35 patients(28.6%). The incidence of p53 gene mutations (14.9%) was obviously higher than the cytological positive incidence(2.9%) in samples of sputum, bronchoalveolar lavage and brush, especially for the sputum(27.7%). In the bronchoscopic biopsy specimens, the incidence of p53 gene mutations (12.5%) was lower than that of pathologic positive result (50.0%). However, in view of all the bronchoscopic samples, there was no statistically difference between cytopathologic positive results (11.8%) and the incidence of p53 gene mutations (14.1%). Although the p53 mutations were most common in the samples from the patients bronchoscopically manifested as neoplasm compared with other manifestations, there was no statistical difference. It is valuable to notice that 3 patients with p53 gene mutation merely presented as bronchial inflammation in bronchoscope. Conclusion: Results indicated that the value of detecting p53 gene mutation for the diagnosis of lung cancer using the bronchoscopic samples was more superior to cytological examination and detection of p53 gene mutations in post-bronchoscopic sputum was easy and effective, may be used as a valuable method for early diagnosis of lung cancer.

  9. Transmission of the P250R mutation of the FGFR3 gene in four generations with highly variable phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove, Hanne Buciek; Dunø, Morten; Daugaard-Jensen, Jette;

    Transmission of the P250R mutation of the FGFR3 gene in four generations with highly variable phenotype.......Transmission of the P250R mutation of the FGFR3 gene in four generations with highly variable phenotype....

  10. Splicing mutation of a gene within the Duchenne muscular dystrophy family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y B; Gan, J H; Luo, J W; Zheng, X Y; Wei, S C; Hu, D

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the mutation site and phenotype of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene in a DMD family. The DMD gene is by far the largest known gene in humans. Up to 34% of the point mutations reported to date affect splice sites of the DMD gene. However, no hotspot mutation has been reported. Capture sequencing of second-generation exons was used to investigate the DMD gene in a proband. Sanger sequencing was performed for mutation scanning in eight family members. Scale-invariant feature transform and PolyPhen were applied to predict the functional impact of protein mutations. A hemizygous splicing mutation IVS44ds +1G-A (c.6438 +1G>A) that induces abnormal splicing variants during late transcription and produces abnormal proteins was located in intron 44. Four missense mutations (p.Arg2937Gln, p.Asp882Gly, p.Lys2366Gln, and p.Arg1745His) that are known multiple-polymorphic sites were found in the coding region of the DMD gene. A heterozygous c.6438+1G>A mutation was detected on the X chromosome of the proband's mother and maternal grandmother. PMID:27421007

  11. Meta-Prediction of MTHFR Gene Polymorphism Mutations and Associated Risk for Colorectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Shiao, S. P. K.; Yu, C H

    2016-01-01

    The methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene is one of the most investigated of the genes associated with chronic human diseases because of its associations with hyperhomocysteinemia and toxicity. It has been proposed as a prototype gene for the prevention of colorectal cancer (CRC). The major objectives of this meta-analysis were to examine the polymorphism-mutation patterns of MTHFR and their associations with risk for CRC as well as potential contributing factors for mutations and ...

  12. "Deafness –Associated Connexin 26 Gene (GJB2) Mutations in Iranian Population"

    OpenAIRE

    Hashemzadeh Chaleshtori, M.; DD Farhud; Taylor, R.; V Hadavi; MA Patton; AR Afzal

    2002-01-01

    Mutations in the GJB2 gene at the DFNB1 locus on chromosome 13q12 are associated with autosomal recessive non syndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL) in many populations. A single mutation, at position 35 (35delG) accounts for approximately 30-63% of mutations in white populations with a carrier frequency of 1.5-2.5% in most European, North American and Mediterranean populations. In this study we have investigated the prevalence of the GJB2 gene mutations using direct sequencing in 43 presumed ARNSHL...

  13. Analysis of catechol-O-methyltransferase gene mutation and identification of new pathogenic gene for paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Chengzhi; Li, Jia; Zhu, Lianhai; Lu, Zhenhui; Huang, Huaiyu

    2016-03-01

    We aimed to analyze the mutation site and frequency of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene, to explore the relationship between COMT genotype and phenotype, and to find new pathogenic genes for paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD). PKD patients who were treated from December 2011 to January 2014 were selected and subjected to genetic testing in the exon region of COMT. Two patients and one intrafamilial healthy control were subjected to exome sequencing using whole exome capture in combination with high-throughput sequencing to find candidate pathogenic gene sites. The results were verified by Sanger sequencing. A total of 11 familial PKD patients from 4 families and 9 sporadic patients without family history were included. Pathogenic c.634dupC(p.P220fsX7) mutation of COMT gene was found in 7 familial PKD patients and3 sporadic patients. Mutated COMT gene carriers suffered from PKD earlier (average age of onset: 11.61 ± 2.33 vs 16.21 ± 2.58, P = 0.001) with symmetric symptoms in most cases, while the mutation-negative group only showed unilateral symptoms (P = 0.001). The mutation-positive group also had more daily attacks (P = 0.038). Carbamazepine worked for all mutation-positive patients (10/10, 100 %), but only for a part of mutation-negative patients (3/10, 30.0 %). About 90000 single nucleotide polymorphisms and 2000 insertion-deletion polymorphisms were detected in each of the three samples. c.737C → T(p.T246 M) mutation of POC1B gene was a new pathogenic site for a selected family. COMT gene mutation, which was the pathogenesis of most familial PKD patients and a part of sporadic patients, predicted the response to carbamazepine. POC1B may be a novel pathogenic gene for PKD. PMID:26650803

  14. Nonsense mutations in the human beta-globin gene affect mRNA metabolism.

    OpenAIRE

    Baserga, S J; Benz, E J

    1988-01-01

    A number of premature translation termination mutations (nonsense mutations) have been described in the human alpha- and beta-globin genes. Studies on mRNA isolated from patients with beta zero-thalassemia have shown that for both the beta-17 and the beta-39 mutations less than normal levels of beta-globin mRNA accumulate in peripheral blood cells. (The codon at which the mutation occurs designates the name of the mutation; there are 146 codons in human beta-globin mRNA.) In vitro studies usi...

  15. Separation of mutational and transcriptional enhancers in Ig genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothapalli, Naga Rama; Collura, Kaitlin M; Norton, Darrell D; Fugmann, Sebastian D

    2011-09-15

    Secondary Ig gene diversification relies on activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) to create U:G mismatches that are subsequently fixed by mutagenic repair pathways. AID activity is focused to Ig loci by cis-regulatory DNA sequences named targeting elements. In this study, we show that in contrast to prevailing thought in the field, the targeting elements in the chicken IGL locus are distinct from classical transcriptional enhancers. These mutational enhancer elements (MEEs) are required over and above transcription to recruit AID-mediated mutagenesis to Ig loci. We identified a small 222-bp fragment in the chicken IGL locus that enhances mutagenesis without boosting transcription, and this sequence represents a key component of an MEE. Lastly, MEEs are evolutionarily conserved among birds, both in sequence and function, and contain several highly conserved sequence modules that are likely involved in recruiting trans-acting targeting factors. We propose that MEEs represent a novel class of cis-regulatory elements for which the function is to control genomic integrity. PMID:21844395

  16. Separation of mutational and transcriptional enhancers in immunoglobulin genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothapalli, Naga Rama; Collura, Kaitlin M.; Norton, Darrell D.; Fugmann, Sebastian D.

    2011-01-01

    Secondary immunoglobulin (Ig) gene diversification relies on activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) to create U:G mismatches that are subsequently fixed by mutagenic repair pathways. AID activity is focused to Ig loci by cis-regulatory DNA sequences named targeting elements. Here we show that in contrast to prevailing thought in the field, the targeting elements in the chicken IGL locus are distinct from classical transcriptional enhancers. These mutational enhancer elements (MEEs) are required over and above transcription to recruit AID-mediated mutagenesis to Ig loci. We identified a small 222 bp fragment in the chicken IGL locus that enhances mutagenesis without boosting transcription, and this sequence represents a key component of a MEE. Lastly, MEEs are evolutionarily conserved amongst birds, both in sequence and function, and contain several highly conserved sequence modules that are likely involved in recruiting trans-acting targeting factors. We propose that MEEs represent a novel class of cis-regulatory elements whose function is to control genomic integrity. PMID:21844395

  17. TET2 gene mutation is unfavorable prognostic factor in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia patients with NPM1+ and FLT3-ITD - mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiaopeng; Xu, Yang; Yin, Jia; Tian, Hong; Chen, Suning; Wu, Depei; Sun, Aining

    2014-07-01

    Cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (cn-AML) is a group of heterogeneous diseases. Gene mutations are increasingly used to assess the prognosis of cn-AML patients and guide risk-adapted treatment. In the present study, we analyzed the molecular genetics characteristics of 373 adult cn-AML patients and explored the relationship between TET2 gene mutations or different genetic mutation patterns and prognosis. We found that 16.1 % of patients had TET2 mutations, 31.6 % had FLT3 internal tandem duplications (ITDs), 6.2 % had FLT3 tyrosine kinase domain mutations, 2.4 % had c-KIT mutations, 37.8 % had NPM1 mutations, 11.3 % had WT1 mutations, 5.9 % had RUNX1 mutations, 11.5 % had ASXL1 mutations, 3.8 % had MLL-PTDs, 7.8 % had IDH1 mutations, 7.8 % had NRAS mutations, 12.3 % had IDH2 mutations, 1.6 % had EZH2 mutations, and 14.7 % had DNMT3A mutations, while none had CBL mutations. Gene mutations were detected in 76.94 % (287/373) of all patients. In the NPM1m(+) patients, those with TET2 mutations were associated with a shorter median overall survival (OS) as compared to TET2 wild-type (wt) patients (9.9 vs. 27.0 months, respectively; P = 0.023); Interestingly, the TET2 mutation was identified as an unfavorable prognostic factor and was closely associated with a shorter median OS as compared to TET2-wt (9.5 vs. 32.2 months, respectively; P = 0.013) in the NPM1m(+)/FLT3-ITDm(-) patient group. Thus, identification of TET2 combined with classic NPM1 and FLT3-ITD mutations allowed us to stratify cn-AML into distinct subtypes. PMID:24859829

  18. Periventricular nodular heterotopia in patients with filamin-1 gene mutations: neuroimaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. The filamin-1 (FLN-1) gene is responsible for periventricular nodular heterotopia (PNH), which is an X-linked dominant neuronal migration disorder. Objective. To review the clinical and imaging findings in a series of patients with documented filamin-1 mutations. Materials and methods. A retrospective review of the medical records and MR studies of a series of patients with PNH and confirmed FLN-1 mutations was done. There were 16 female patients (age range:.67-71 years; mean = 28.6) with filamin-1 gene mutations. Results. In six of the patients the same mutation was inherited in four generations in one pedigree. In a second pedigree, a distinct mutation was found in two patients in two generations. In a third pedigree, a third mutation was found in four patients in two generations. The remaining four patients had sporadic de novo mutations that were not present in the parents. Ten patients had seizures, and all patients had normal intelligence. In all 16 patients MR demonstrated bilateral near-continuous PNH. There were no consistent radiographic or clinical differences between patients carrying different mutations. Conclusion. Patients with confirmed FLN-1 gene mutations are usually female and have a distinctive MR pattern of PNH. Other female patients with this same MR pattern probably harbor FLN-1 mutations and risk transmission to their progeny. This information is important for genetic counseling. (orig.)

  19. Frequent mutation of the p53 gene in human esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sequence alterations in the p53 gene have been detected in human tumors of the brain, breast, lung, and colon, and it has been proposed that p53 mutations spanning a major portion of the coding region inactivate the tumor suppressor function of this gene. To our knowledge, neither transforming mutations in oncogenes nor mutations in tumor suppressor genes have been reported in human esophageal tumors. The authors examined four human esophageal carcinoma cell lines and 14 human esophageal squamous cell carcinomas by polymerase chain reaction amplification and direct sequencing for the presence of p53 mutations in exons 5,6,7,8, and 9. Two cell lines and five of the tumor speicmens contained a mutated allele (one frameshift and six missense mutations). All missense mutations detected occurred at G·C base pairs in codons at or adjacent to mutations previously reported in other cancers. The identification of aberrant p53 genes alleles in one-third of the tumors they tested suggests that mutations at this locus are common genetic events in the pathogenesis of squamous cell carcinomas of the esophagus

  20. Mutational scanning of large genes by extensive PCR multiplexing and two-dimensional electrophoresis : Application to the RB1 gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanOrsouw, NJ; Li, DZ; vanderVlies, P; Scheffer, H; Eng, C; Buys, CHCM; Li, FP; Vijg, J

    1996-01-01

    With the rapid increase in the number of identified human disease genes, the development of accurate and cost-efficient mutation tests has become opportune. Here we present a combination of extensive PCR multiplexing and two dimensional (2-D) DNA electrophoresis to screen for mutations in 26 exons o

  1. Mutations in genes involved in nonsense mediated decay ameliorate the phenotype of sel-12 mutants with amber stop mutations in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aubert Sylvie

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Presenilin proteins are part of a complex of proteins that can cleave many type I transmembrane proteins, including Notch Receptors and the Amyloid Precursor Protein, in the middle of the transmembrane domain. Dominant mutations in the human presenilin genes PS1 and PS2 lead to Familial Alzheimer's disease. Mutations in the Caenorhabditis elegans sel-12 presenilin gene cause a highly penetrant egg-laying defect due to reduction of signalling through the lin-12/Notch receptor. Mutations in six spr genes (for suppressor of presenilin are known to strongly suppress sel-12. Mutations in most strong spr genes suppress sel-12 by de-repressing the transcription of the largely functionally equivalent hop-1 presenilin gene. However, how mutations in the spr-2 gene suppress sel-12 is unknown. Results We show that spr-2 mutations increase the levels of sel-12 transcripts with Premature translation Termination Codons (PTCs in embryos and L1 larvae. mRNA transcripts from sel-12 alleles with PTCs undergo degradation by a process known as Nonsense Mediated Decay (NMD. However, spr-2 mutations do not appear to affect NMD. Mutations in the smg genes, which are required for NMD, can restore sel-12(PTC transcript levels and ameliorate the phenotype of sel-12 mutants with amber PTCs. However, the phenotypic suppression of sel-12 by smg genes is nowhere near as strong as the effect of previously characterized spr mutations including spr-2. Consistent with this, we have identified only two mutations in smg genes among the more than 100 spr mutations recovered in genetic screens. Conclusion spr-2 mutations do not suppress sel-12 by affecting NMD of sel-12(PTC transcripts and appear to have a novel mechanism of suppression. The fact that mutations in smg genes can ameliorate the phenotype of sel-12 alleles with amber PTCs suggests that some read-through of sel-12(amber alleles occurs in smg backgrounds.

  2. Functional features of gene expression profiles differentiating gastrointestinal stromal tumours according to KIT mutations and expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) represent a heterogeneous group of tumours of mesenchymal origin characterized by gain-of-function mutations in KIT or PDGFRA of the type III receptor tyrosine kinase family. Although mutations in either receptor are thought to drive an early oncogenic event through similar pathways, two previous studies reported the mutation-specific gene expression profiles. However, their further conclusions were rather discordant. To clarify the molecular characteristics of differentially expressed genes according to GIST receptor mutations, we combined microarray-based analysis with detailed functional annotations. Total RNA was isolated from 29 frozen gastric GISTs and processed for hybridization on GENECHIP® HG-U133 Plus 2.0 microarrays (Affymetrix). KIT and PDGFRA were analyzed by sequencing, while related mRNA levels were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR. Fifteen and eleven tumours possessed mutations in KIT and PDGFRA, respectively; no mutation was found in three tumours. Gene expression analysis identified no discriminative profiles associated with clinical or pathological parameters, even though expression of hundreds of genes differentiated tumour receptor mutation and expression status. Functional features of genes differentially expressed between the two groups of GISTs suggested alterations in angiogenesis and G-protein-related and calcium signalling. Our study has identified novel molecular elements likely to be involved in receptor-dependent GIST development and allowed confirmation of previously published results. These elements may be potential therapeutic targets and novel markers of KIT mutation status

  3. DETECTION OF p53 GENE MUTATION IN PLASMA OF PATIENTS WITH GASTRIC CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏鹏程; 李子禹; 张连海; 万文徽; 任晖; 张桂国; 王怡; 邓国仁; 季加孚

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigated p53 gene mutation in plasma of gastric cancer patients. Methods: DNA extracted from plasma and matched tumor and tumor-adjacent non-cancerous tissues of 96 gastric cancer patients, and DNA from 20 healthy volunteers were studied. Exon 5, 6, 7, and 8 of p53 were amplified by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). The mutation status was analyzed by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC), followed by direct sequencing of cases with aberrant chromatographic patterns. Results: Heterozygous mutations of p53 gene were detected in 19.9% (19/96) of primary tumor tissues and 5.2% (5/96) of corresponding plasma. All p53 gene mutations detected in plasma DNA consisted with mutations in the matched primary tumor samples. Neither the tumor-adjacent gastric mucosa tissues nor control plasma from healthy volunteers showed p53 gene mutation. No correlation was found between p53 mutation status and clinicopathological features of gastric cancer patients. Conclusion: p53 gene mutation in plasma can be detected in tissues and plasma of gastric cancer patients, which could be applied in screening and surveillance of this disease.

  4. A new mutation of the fukutin gene causing late-onset limb girdle muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisager, Maria; Duno, M; Hansen, Flemming Juul;

    2013-01-01

    Defects in glycosylations of α-dystroglycan are associated with mutations in several genes, including the fukutin gene (FKTN). Hypoglycosylation of α-dystroglycan results in several forms of muscular dystrophy with variable phenotype. Outside Japan, the prevalence of muscular dystrophies related to...... episodes of tachycardia caused by Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. On examination, she had rigid spine syndrome, a typical limb girdle dystrophy pattern of muscle weakness, cardiomyopathy, and serum CK levels >2000 IU/L (normal G; p.Y306C mutation in the FKTN gene was found. The case confirms FKTN mutations...

  5. Phenylalanine hydroxylase gene mutations in the United States: Report from the maternal PKU collaborative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guldberg, P.; Henriksen, K.F.; Guettler, F. [John F. Kennedy Inst., Glostrup (Denmark)] [and others

    1996-07-01

    The major cause of hyperphenylalaninemia is mutations in the gene encoding phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH). The known mutations have been identified primarily in European patients. The purpose of this study was to determine the spectrum of mutations responsible for PAH deficiency in the United States. One hundred forty-nine patients enrolled in the Maternal PKU Collaborative Study were subjects for clinical and molecular investigations. PAH gene mutations associated with phenylketonuria (PKU) or mild hyperphenylalaninemia (MHP) were identified on 279 of 294 independent mutant chromosomes, a diagnostic efficiency of 95%. The spectrum is composed of 71 different mutations, including 47 missense mutations, 11 splice mutations, 5 nonsense mutations, and 8 microdeletions. Sixteen previously unreported mutations were identified. Among the novel mutations, five were found in patients with MHP, and the remainder were found in patients with PKU. The most common mutations were R408W, IVS12nt1g{r_arrow}a, and Y414C, accounting for 18.7%, 7.8% and 5.4% of the mutant chromosomes, respectively. Thirteen mutations had relative frequencies of 1%-5%, and 55 mutations each had frequencies {le}1%. The mutational spectrum corresponded to that observed for the European ancestry of the U.S. population. To evaluate the extent of allelic variation at the PAH locus within the United States in comparison with other populations, we used allele frequencies to calculate the homozygosity for 11 populations where >90% ascertainment has been obtained. The United States was shown to contain one of the most heterogeneous populations, with homozygosity values similar to Sicily and ethnically mixed sample populations in Europe. The extent of allelic heterogeneity must be a major determining factor in the choice of mutation-detection methodology for molecular diagnosis in PAH deficiency. 47 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  6. Detection of V617F mutation of gene jak2 at patients with chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maliuta S. S.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work was to create a protocol for detecting the V617F mutation of the gene jak2 in samples of patients with chronic myeloproliferative neoplasm which is necessary to unify the procedures of the analysis of blood samples according to WHO criteria for this group of diseases. Methods. Mutation was revealed using reverse transcriptase PCR and direct sequencing of PCR products. Results. Six samples of blood of patients with polycythemia vera were analyzed and the mutation V617F was detected in all six cases. This mutation was not detected in any of RNA samples of healthy donors. A case of simultaneous detection of mutations V617F and fused bcr/abl gene in CML patient was described. Conclusions. The proposed method for detecting the V617F mutation allows molecular genetic differential diagnosis of myeloproliferative neoplasm as well

  7. Prevalence of pathogenic mutations in cancer predisposition genes among pancreatic cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chunling; Hart, Steven N.; Bamlet, William R.; Moore, Raymond M.; Nandakumar, Kannabiran; Eckloff, Bruce W.; Lee, Yean K.; Petersen, Gloria M.; McWilliams, Robert R.; Couch, Fergus J.

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of germline pathogenic mutations in a comprehensive panel of cancer predisposition genes is not well defined for patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). To estimate the frequency of mutations in a panel of 22 cancer predisposition genes, 96 patients unselected for a family history of cancer who were recruited to the Mayo Clinic Pancreatic Cancer patient registry over a 12 month period were screened by next-generation sequencing. Fourteen pathogenic mutations in 13 patients (13.5%) were identified in eight genes: four in ATM, two in BRCA2, CHEK2, and MSH6, and one in BARD1, BRCA1, FANCM, and NBN. These included nine mutations (9.4%) in established pancreatic cancer genes. Three mutations were found in patients with a first degree relative with PDAC, and 10 mutations were found in patients with first or second-degree relatives with breast, pancreas, colorectal, ovarian, or endometrial cancer. These results suggest that a substantial proportion of patients with PDAC carry germline mutations in predisposition genes associated with other cancers, and that a better understanding of pancreatic cancer risk will depend on evaluation of families with broad constellations of tumors. These findings highlight the need for recommendations governing germline gene-panel testing of pancreatic cancer patients. PMID:26483394

  8. Prevalence of Pathogenic Mutations in Cancer Predisposition Genes among Pancreatic Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chunling; Hart, Steven N; Bamlet, William R; Moore, Raymond M; Nandakumar, Kannabiran; Eckloff, Bruce W; Lee, Yean K; Petersen, Gloria M; McWilliams, Robert R; Couch, Fergus J

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of germline pathogenic mutations in a comprehensive panel of cancer predisposition genes is not well-defined for patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). To estimate the frequency of mutations in a panel of 22 cancer predisposition genes, 96 patients unselected for a family history of cancer who were recruited to the Mayo Clinic Pancreatic Cancer patient registry over a 12-month period were screened by next-generation sequencing. Fourteen pathogenic mutations in 13 patients (13.5%) were identified in eight genes: four in ATM, two in BRCA2, CHEK2, and MSH6, and one in BARD1, BRCA1, FANCM, and NBN. These included nine mutations (9.4%) in established pancreatic cancer genes. Three mutations were found in patients with a first-degree relative with PDAC, and 10 mutations were found in patients with first- or second-degree relatives with breast, pancreas, colorectal, ovarian, or endometrial cancers. These results suggest that a substantial proportion of patients with PDAC carry germline mutations in predisposition genes associated with other cancers and that a better understanding of pancreatic cancer risk will depend on evaluation of families with broad constellations of tumors. These findings highlight the need for recommendations governing germline gene-panel testing of patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:26483394

  9. Novel mutations of PRSS1 gene in patients with pancreatic cancer among Han population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Kai; LIU Qi-cai; LIN Jian-hua; LIN Xin-hua; ZHUANG Ze-hao; GAO Feng; OU Qi-shui

    2011-01-01

    Background A high mortality rate of pancreatic cancer becomes a bottleneck for further treatment with long-term efficacy. It is urgent to find a new mean to predict the early onset of pancreatic cancer accurately. The authors hypothesized that genetic variants of cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) gene could affect trypsin expression/function and result in abnormal activation of protease activated receptor-2 (PAR-2), then lead to pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to elaborate some novel mutations of PRSS1 gene in the patients with pancreatic cancer.Methods Totally 156 patients with pancreatic cancer and 220 unrelated individuals as controls were enrolled in this study. The mutations of PRSS1 gene were analyzed by direct sequencing. K-ras Mutation Detection Kit was used to find the general k-ras gene disorder in the pancreatic cancer tissue. Then the clinical data were collected and analyzed simultaneously.Results There were two patients who carried novel mutations which was IVS 3 +157 G>C of PRSS1 gene in peripheral blood specimens and pancreatic cancer tissue. What's more, it was surprising to find a novel complicated mutation of exon 3 in PRSS1 gene (c.409 A>G and c.416 C>T) in another young patient. The complicated mutation made No. 135 and No.137 amino acid transfer from Thr to Ala and Thr to Met respectively. No any mutation was found in the normal controls while no mutations of k-ras gene were detected in the three patients.Conclusion Mutations of PRSS1 gene may be an important factor of pancreatic cancer.

  10. A Common Founder Mutation in the EDA-A1 Gene in X-Linked Hypodontia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurban, Mazen; Michailidis, Eleni; Wajid, Muhammad; Shimomura, Yutaka; Christiano, Angela M.

    2010-01-01

    Background X-linked recessive hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XLHED; OMIM 305100) is a rare genodermatosis characterized clinically by developmental abnormalities affecting the teeth, hair and sweat glands. Mutations in the EDA-A1 gene have been associated with XLHED. Recently, mutations in the EDA-A1 gene have also been implicated in isolated X-linked recessive hypodontia (XLRH; OMIM 313500). Methods We analyzed the DNA from members of 3 unrelated Pakistani families with XLRH for mutations in the EDA-A1 gene through direct sequencing and performed haplotype analysis. Results We identified a common missense mutation in both families designated c.1091T→C (p.M364T). Haplotype analysis revealed that this is a founder mutation in the 3 families. Conclusion XLHED is a syndrome with variable clinical presentations that contain a spectrum of findings, including hypodontia. We suggest that XLRH should be grouped under XLHED as both share several phenotypic and genotypic similarities. PMID:20628232

  11. Hereditary and acquired p53 gene mutations in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Felix, C A; Nau, M M; Takahashi, T.; Mitsudomi, T.; Chiba, I.; Poplack, D G; Reaman, G H; Cole, D E; Letterio, J J; Whang-Peng, J

    1992-01-01

    The p53 gene was examined in primary lymphoblasts of 25 pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia by the RNase protection assay and by single strand conformation polymorphism analysis in 23 of 25 cases. p53 mutations were found to occur, but at a low frequency (4 of 25). While all four mutations were identified by single strand conformation polymorphism, the comparative sensitivity of RNase protection was 50% (2 of 4). Heterozygosity was retained at mutated codons in 3 of 4 cases. ...

  12. Interaction of the Murine Dilute Suppressor Gene (Dsu) with Fourteen Coat Color Mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, K. J.; Swing, D. A.; Copeland, N. G.; Jenkins, N. A.

    1990-01-01

    The murine dilute suppressor gene, dsu, was previously shown to suppress the dilute coat color phenotypes of mice homozygous for the dilute (d), leaden (ln), and ashen (ash) mutations. Each of these mutations produce adendritic melanocytes, which results in an abnormal transportation of pigment granules into the hair shaft and a diluted coat color. The suppression of each mutation is associated with the restoration of near normal melanocyte morphology, indicating that dsu can compensate for t...

  13. Novel Compound Heterozygous Mutations in the Cathepsin K Gene in Japanese Female Siblings with Pyknodysostosis

    OpenAIRE

    Matsushita, M.(CNS, The University of Tokyo, RIKEN Campus, Saitama, Wako, 351-0198, Japan); Kitoh, H.; Kaneko, H.; Mishima, K.; Itoh, Y.; Hattori, T; Ishiguro, N

    2012-01-01

    We report on female siblings with pyknodysostosis who showed common clinical and radiographic features including disproportionate short stature, dental abnormalities, increased bone density, open fontanelle, and acroosteolysis. Sequence analysis of the cathepsin K (CTSK) gene demonstrated compound heterozygous mutations (935 C>T, A277V and 489 G>C, R122P) in the affected siblings and a heterozygous mutation in their parents. The former missense mutation has previously been reported in 6 unrel...

  14. A frequent tyrosinase gene mutation in classic, tyrosinase-negative (type IA) oculocutaneous albinism.

    OpenAIRE

    Giebel, L.B.; Strunk, K M; King, R A; Hanifin, J. M.; Spritz, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    We have identified a tyrosinase gene mutation in several patients with classic, tyrosinase-negative (type IA) oculocutaneous albinism. This mutation, which results in a proline----leucine substitution at codon 81 of the tyrosinase polypeptide (EC 1.14.18.1), was observed in 20% (6 of 30) of oculocutaneous albinism alleles from independent probands, but it was not observed in any normal individuals. This mutation thus appears to be a frequent cause of tyrosinase-negative oculocutaneous albinism.

  15. Extending the mutation spectrum for Galloway-Mowat syndrome to include homozygous missense mutations in the WDR73 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosti, Rasim O; Dikoglu, Esra; Zaki, Maha S; Abdel-Salam, Ghada; Makhseed, Nawal; Sese, Jordan C; Musaev, Damir; Rosti, Basak; Harbert, Mary J; Jones, Marilyn C; Vaux, Keith K; Gleeson, Joseph G

    2016-04-01

    Galloway-Mowat syndrome is a rare autosomal-recessive disorder classically described as the combination of microcephaly and nephrotic syndrome. Recently, homozygous truncating mutations in WDR73 (WD repeat domain 73) were described in two of 31 unrelated families with Galloway-Mowat syndrome which was followed by a report of two sibs in an Egyptian consanguineous family. In this report, seven affecteds from four families showing biallelic missense mutations in WDR73 were identified by exome sequencing and confirmed to follow a recessive model of inheritance. Three-dimensional modeling predicted conformational alterations as a result of the mutation, supporting pathogenicity. An additional 13 families with microcephaly and renal phenotype were negative for WDR73 mutations. Missense mutations in the WDR73 gene are reported for the first time in Galloway-Mowat syndrome. A detailed phenotypic comparison of all reported WDR73-linked Galloway-Mowat syndrome patients with WDR73 negative patients showed that WDR73 mutations are limited to those with classical Galloway-Mowat syndrome features, in addition to cerebellar atrophy, thin corpus callosum, brain stem hypoplasia, occasional coarse face, late-onset and mostly slow progressive nephrotic syndrome, and frequent epilepsy. PMID:27001912

  16. Consequences of Marfan mutations to expression of fibrillin gene and to the structure of microfibrils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peltonen, L.; Karttunen, L.; Rantamaeki, T. [NPHI, Helsinki (Finland)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a dominantly inherited connective tissue disorder which is caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene (FBN1). Over 40 family-specific FBN1 mutations have been identified. We have characterized 18 different heterozygous mutations including amino acid substitutions, premature stop, and splicing defects leading to deletions or one insertion, and one compound heterozygote with two differently mutated FBN1 alleles inherited from his affected parents. To unravel the consequences of FBN1 mutations to the transcription of FBN1 gene, we have measured the steady state levels of mRNA transcribed from the normal and mutated alleles. The missense mutations do not affect the transcription of the allele while the nonsense mutation leads to lower steady state amount of mutated allele. For the dissection of molecular pathogenesis of FBN1 mutations we have performed rotary shadowing of the microfibrils produced by the cell cultures from MFS patients. The cells from the neonatal patients with established mutations produced only disorganized fibrillin aggregates but no clearly defined microfibrils could be detected, suggesting a major role of this gene region coding for exons 24-26 in stabilization and organization of the bead structure of microfibrils. From the cells of a rare compound heterozygote case carrying two different mutations, no detectable microfibrils could be detected whereas the cells of his parents with heterozygous mutations were able to form identifiable but disorganized microfibrils. In the cells of an MFS case caused by a premature stop removing the C-terminus of fibrillin, the microfibril assembly takes place but the appropriate packing of the microfibrils is disturbed suggesting that C-terminae are actually located within the interbead domain of the microfibrils.

  17. The homeobox gene MEIS1 is methylated in BRAFp.V600E mutated colon tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A. Dihal (Ashwin); A. Boot (Arnoud); E.H.J. van Roon (Eddy); M. Schrumpf (Melanie); A. Fariña-Sarasqueta (Arantza); M. Fiocco (Marta); E.C.M. Zeestraten (Eliane); P.J.K. Kuppen (Peter); H. Morreau (Hans); T. van Wezel (Tom); J.M. Boer (Judith)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractDevelopment of colorectal cancer (CRC) can occur both via gene mutations in tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes, as well as via epigenetic changes, including DNA methylation. Site-specific methylation in CRC regulates expression of tumor-associated genes. Right-sided colon tumors more f

  18. An Undergraduate Laboratory Class Using CRISPR/Cas9 Technology to Mutate Drosophila Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adame, Vanesa; Chapapas, Holly; Cisneros, Marilyn; Deaton, Carol; Deichmann, Sophia; Gadek, Chauncey; Lovato, TyAnna L.; Chechenova, Maria B.; Guerin, Paul; Cripps, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technology is used in the manipulation of genome sequences and gene expression. Because of the ease and rapidity with which genes can be mutated using CRISPR/Cas9, we sought to determine if a single-semester undergraduate class could be successfully taught, wherein students isolate mutants for specific genes using…

  19. FGFR3 mutations and the skin: report of a patient with a FGFR3 gene mutation, acanthosis nigricans, hypochondroplasia and hyperinsulinemia and review of the literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg, M; Jeppesen, E M; Skovby, F;

    2010-01-01

    developed acanthosis nigricans. The report of a K650Q mutation in the FGFR3 gene in a similar case prompted us to conduct a point mutation analysis. The K650Q mutation was confirmed, but in contrast to the previous case, we additionally report findings of hyperinsulinemia. In the recent literature...

  20. Mutation Analysis of CFTR Gene in 70 Iranian Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Alibakhshi Mahdi Zamani

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is the most common inherited disorder in Caucasian populations, with over 1400 cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR mutations. The type of mutations and their distributions varies widely between different countries and/or ethnic groups. Seventy Iranian cystic fibrosis patients were screened for the CFTR gene mutation using ARMS/PCR (amplification refractory mutation system for the following mutations: ∆F508, N1303K, G542X, 1717-1G>A, R553X, W1282X, G551D, 621+1G>T, ∆I507 and R560T. Single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP analysis of exons 3, 7, 10, 11 and 17b, including both the exon/intron junctions, of the CFTR gene was performed in patients in whom no mutation could be identified on one or both CFTR genes. As a result of this screening, only three mutations were found: ∆F508 mutation was found in 25 (17.8% alleles, N1303K in six (4.3% alleles and G542X in five (3.6% alleles. Thus, a total of 3 mutations cover 25.7% of CF alleles. These finding will be used for planning future screening and appropriate genetic counseling programs in Iranian CF patients.

  1. "Deafness –Associated Connexin 26 Gene (GJB2 Mutations in Iranian Population"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Hashemzadeh Chaleshtori

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the GJB2 gene at the DFNB1 locus on chromosome 13q12 are associated with autosomal recessive non syndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL in many populations. A single mutation, at position 35 (35delG accounts for approximately 30-63% of mutations in white populations with a carrier frequency of 1.5-2.5% in most European, North American and Mediterranean populations. In this study we have investigated the prevalence of the GJB2 gene mutations using direct sequencing in 43 presumed ARNSHL subjects from 34 families in an Iranian population. Eleven different genetic variants were identified. GJB2-related deafness mutations (35delG, 235delC, W24X, R184P and IVS1+1G>A were found in 9 of 34 families (26.5%. The 35delG was the most common mutation found in 5 of 34 families (14.7%. We found one novel variant (–3517G>A in the upstream region to the gene. The mutation frequency found in this study is lower than other ethnic groups with European ancestry, but it is indicating that mutation in GJB2 in Iranian population has contribution to ARNSHL. We have also developed a simple and accurate nested PCR assay to screen the 35delG mutation in 250 unrelated unaffected Iranian individual (controls. No 35delG heterozygous was found in the control population.

  2. Relationship between periodontal destruction and gene mutations in patients with familial Mediterranean fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezer, Ufuk; Şenyurt, Süleyman Ziya; Özdemir, Eda Çetin; Zengin, Orhan; Üstün, Kemal; Erciyas, Kamile; Kısacık, Bünyamin; Onat, Ahmet Mesut

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that genetic factors involved in the host responses might determine the disease severity for both familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) and periodontitis. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship of FMF with periodontitis and to search for the potential association between periodontitis and MEFV gene missense variations in patients with FMF. The study consisted of 97 FMF patients and 34 healthy volunteers. FMF patients were classified according to the kind of MEFV gene mutation: (1) patients with homozygous M694V gene mutation, (2) patients with heterozygous M694V gene mutation, and (3) patients with MEFV gene different mutations. Gingival Index (GI), Plaque Index (PI), probing pocket depth (PD), and clinical attachment level (CAL) were measured in all participants. The results of multivariate logistic regression showed a highly significant association between homozygous M694V gene mutation and periodontitis in FMF patients (p periodontitis than the other FMF patients. These results indicate that the presence of homozygous M694V gene mutation seems to increase the risk for periodontitis in FMF patients. PMID:26400644

  3. Mutation detection of Binding Site Region of Human COLIA1 Gene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šormová, L.; Mařík, I.; Zachová, M.; Pexa, T.; Hudáková, O.; Kuklík, M.; Nutsu-Mazura, F.; Mazura, Ivan; Zvárová, Jana

    Carlton : Genomic Disorders Research Centre, 2011. s. 79. [International Symposium on Mutation s in the Genome /11./. 06.06.2011-10.06.2011, Santorini] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : mutation detection * COLIA1 gene * genomic disorders * heredity Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  4. A Novel Elastin Gene Mutation in a Vietnamese Patient with Cutis Laxa

    OpenAIRE

    Siefring, Mark L.; Lawrence, Elizabeth C.; Nguyen, Tom C.; Lu, Doanh; Pham, Giang; Lorenchick, Christa; Levine, Kara L.; Urban, Zsolt

    2014-01-01

    We report a 3-year-old girl from Vietnam with severe congenital cutis laxa, no cardiovascular, pulmonary, neurological or visceral involvement and no family history of cutis laxa. Mutational analysis of the elastin (ELN) gene identified heterozygosity for a previously unreported, de novo c.2184delT mutation in exon 30, not present in either parent.

  5. Genetic basis of cystinosis in Tunisian patients: Identification of novel mutation in CTNS gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latifa Chkioua

    2015-09-01

    This study expands the mutational and population spectrum of NC, representing the first molecular diagnosis of NC in Tunisian population. The mutation screening of the CTNS gene was used for prenatal diagnosis to prevent and/or limit this inheritable disease in our country where the families are particularly large and have a high rate of consanguinity.

  6. [Mutational analysis of the MECP2 gene by direct sequencing in Hungarian patients with Rett syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karteszi, J.; Hollody, K.; Bene, J.; Morava, E.; Hadzsiev, K.; Czako, M.; Melegh, B.; Kosztolanyi, G.Y.

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Rett syndrome is an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by loss of acquired skills and stereotypical hand movements. Mutations in the gene encoding methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 have been identified as cause of Rett syndrome in 1999. AIM: The authors initialized mutation

  7. Mutations in the Kv1.5 channel gene KCNA5 in cardiac arrest patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Nathalie H; Winkel, Bo G; Kanters, Jørgen K; Schmitt, Nicole; Hofman-Bang, Jacob; Jensen, Henrik S; Bentzen, Bo H; Sigurd, Bjarne; Larsen, Lars Allan; Andersen, Paal S; Kjeldsen, Keld; Grunnet, Morten; Christiansen, Michael; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Haunsø, Stig

    2007-01-01

    Mutations in one of the ion channels shaping the cardiac action potential can lead to action potential prolongation. However, only in a minority of cardiac arrest cases mutations in the known arrhythmia-related genes can be identified. In two patients with arrhythmia and cardiac arrest, we identi...

  8. Screening for mutations in the uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase gene using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, L; Ged, C; Hombrados, I; Brons-Poulsen, J; Fontanellas, A; de Verneuil, H; Hørder, M; Petersen, N E

    1999-01-01

    The two porphyrias, familial porphyria cutanea tarda (fPCT) and hepatoerythropoietic porphyria (HEP), are associated with mutations in the gene encoding the enzyme uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (UROD). Several mutations, most of which are private, have been identified in HEP and fPCT patients...

  9. Somatic gene mutation in the human in relation to radiation risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the measurement of somatic gene-mutation frequencies in the human. We ask the following questions. How well can they be measured? Do they respond to radiation? Can they also function as a dosimeter? What do they tell us about the somatic mutation theory of carcinogenesis?

  10. Spectrum of factor X gene mutations in Iranian patients with congenital factor X deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorgalaleh, Akbar; Zaker, Farhad; Tabibian, Shadi; Alizadeh, Shaban; Dorgalele, Saeed; Hosseini, Soudabeh; Shamsizadeh, Morteza

    2016-04-01

    Congenital factor X deficiency is one of the most severe forms of rare bleeding disorders transmitted in autosomal recessive manner. According to the World Federation of Hemophilia survey, 153 patients with factor X deficiency (FXD) live in Iran, but a few studies have been performed to determine the precise distribution of FXD in different parts of the country and to assess molecular basis of this disorder in Iranian patients. This study was conducted to assess the spectrum of factor X gene mutation in Iranian patients with congenital FXD. All relevant English and Persian-language publications were searched (until 2015). Clinical presentations or molecular basis of nearly 90 Iranian patients were reported in different studies. Most of these studies focused on clinical presentations of patients, whereas molecular analyses were rarely performed. Most molecular studies found a diversity in factor X disease causing mutations in Iranian patients. Like other parts of the world, the majority of mutations in Iranian patients were missense mutations, but splice-site mutations were relatively common. Three extremely rare cases of combined factor X and factor VII deficiencies were observed in two cases of which this disorder resulted from different missense mutations in respective factor genes. A wide spectrum of factor X gene mutations was observed in Iranian patients with congenital FXD that revealed diversity in FXD gene mutations. PMID:26891460

  11. GPR143 Gene Mutations in Five Chinese Families with X-linked Congenital Nystagmus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ruifang; Wang, Xiaojuan; Wang, Dongjie; Wang, Liming; Yuan, Zhongfang; Ying, Ming; Li, Ningdong

    2015-01-01

    The ocular albinism type I (OA1) is clinically characterized by impaired visual acuity, nystagmus, iris hypopigmentation with translucency, albinotic fundus, and macular hypoplasia together with normally pigmented skin and hair. However, it is easily misdiagnosed as congenital idiopathic nystagmus in some Chinese patients with OA1 caused by the G-protein coupled receptor 143 (GPR143) gene mutations. Mutations in the FERM domain-containing 7 (FRMD7) gene are responsible for the X-linked congenital idiopathic nystagmus. In this study, five Chinese families initially diagnosed as X-linked congenital nystagmus were recruited and patients underwent ophthalmological examinations. After direct sequencing of the FRMD7 and GPR143 genes, five mutations in GPR143 gene were detected in each of the five families, including a novel nonsense mutation of c.333G>A (p.W111X), two novel splicing mutations of c.360+1G>C and c.659-1G>A, a novel small deletion mutation of c.43_50dupGACGCAGC (p.L20PfsX25), and a previously reported missense mutation of c.703G>A (p.E235K). Optical coherence tomography (OCT) examination showed foveal hypoplasia in all the affected patients with nystagmus. Our study further expands the GPR143 mutation spectrum and contributes to the study of GPR143 molecular pathogenesis. Molecular diagnosis and optical coherence tomography (OCT) are two useful tools for differential diagnosis. PMID:26160353

  12. Red blood cell PK deficiency: An update of PK-LR gene mutation database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canu, Giulia; De Bonis, Maria; Minucci, Angelo; Capoluongo, Ettore

    2016-03-01

    Pyruvate kinase (PK) deficiency is known as being the most common cause of chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia (CNSHA). Clinical PK deficiency is transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait, that can segregate neither in homozygous or in a compound heterozygous modality, respectively. Two PK genes are present in mammals: the pyruvate kinase liver and red blood cells (PK-LR) and the pyruvate kinase muscle (PK-M), of which only the first encodes for the isoenzymes normally expressed in the red blood cells (R-type) and in the liver (L-type). Several reports have been published describing a large variety of genetic defects in PK-LR gene associated to CNSHA. Herein, we present a review of about 250 published mutations and six polymorphisms in PK-LR gene with the corresponding clinical and molecular data. We consulted the PubMed website for searching mutations and papers, along with two main databases: the Leiden Open Variation Database (LOVD, https://grenada.lumc.nl/LOVD2/mendelian_genes/home.php?select_db=PKLR) and Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD, http://www.hgmd.cf.ac.uk/ac/gene.php?gene=PKLR) for selecting, reviewing and listing the annotated PK-LR gene mutations present in literature. This paper is aimed to provide useful information to clinicians and laboratory professionals regarding overall reported PK-LR gene mutations, also giving the opportunity to harmonize data regarding PK-deficient individuals. PMID:26832193

  13. Nonsense mutations in the human β-globin gene affect mRNA metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of premature translation termination mutations (nonsense mutations) have been described in the human α- and β-globin genes. Studies on mRNA isolated from patients with β0-thalassemia have shown that for both the β-17 and the β-39 mutations less than normal levels of β-globin mRNA accumulate in peripheral blood cells. (The codon at which the mutation occurs designates the name of the mutation; there are 146 codons in human β-globin mRNA). In vitro studies using the cloned β-39 gene have reproduced this effect in a heterologous transfection system and have suggested that the defect resides in intranuclear metabolism. The authors have asked if this phenomenon of decreased mRNA accumulation is a general property of nonsense mutations and if the effect depends on the location or the type of mutation. Toward this end, they have studied the effect of five nonsense mutations and two missense mutations on the expression of human β-globin mRNA in a heterologous transfection system. In all cases studied, the presence of a translation termination codon correlates with a decrease in the steady-state level of mRNA. The data suggest that the metabolism of a mammalian mRNA is affected by the presence of a mutation that affects translation

  14. The role of sarcomere gene mutations in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Daniel Vega; Andersen, Paal Skytt; Hedley, Paula;

    2009-01-01

    We investigated a Danish cohort of 31 unrelated patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDC), to assess the role that mutations in sarcomere protein genes play in IDC. Patients were genetically screened by capillary electrophoresis single strand conformation polymorphism and subsequently...

  15. Two mutations in LDLR gene were found in two Chinese families with familial hypercholesterolemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiaohuan; Ding, Junfa; Zheng, Fang; Zhou, Xin; Xiong, Chenling

    2009-11-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) (OMIM 143890) is an autosomal dominantly inherited disease mainly caused by mutations of the gene encoding the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and Apolipoprotein (Apo) B. First the common mutation R3500Q in ApoB gene was determined using PCR/RFLP method. Then the LDLR gene was screened for mutations using Touch-down PCR, SSCP and sequencing techniques. Furthermore, the secondary structure of the LDLR protein was predicted with ANTHEPROT5.0. The R3500Q mutation was absent in these two families. A heterozygous p.W483X mutation of LDLR gene was identified in family A which caused a premature stop codon, while a homozygous mutation p.A627T was found in family B. The predicted secondary structures of the mutant LDLR were altered. We identified two known mutations (p.W483X, p.A627T) of the LDLR gene in two Chinese FH families respectively. PMID:19020990

  16. Utilization of Gene Mapping and Candidate Gene Mutation Screening for Diagnosing Clinically Equivocal Conditions:A Norrie Disease Case Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vasiliki Chini; Danai Stambouli; Florina Mihaela Nedelea; George Alexandru Filipescu; Diana Mina; Marios Kambouris; Hatem El-Shanti

    2014-01-01

    Prenatal diagnosis was requested for an undiagnosed eye disease showing X-linked inheritance in a family. No medical records existed for the affected family members..Mapping of the X chromosome and candidate gene mutation screening i-dentified a c.C267A[p.F89L] mutation in NPD previously de-scribed as possibly causing Norrie disease..The detection of the c.C267A[p.F89L] variant in another unrelated family con-firms the pathogenic nature of the mutation for the Norrie dis-ease phenotype. Gene mapping, haplotype analysis, and can-didate gene screening have been previously utilized in research applications but were applied here in a diagnostic setting due to the scarcity of available clinical information..The clinical diagnosis and mutation identification were critical for provid-ing proper genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis for this family.

  17. Human Genetic Disorders Caused by Mutations in Genes Encoding Biosynthetic Enzymes for Sulfated Glycosaminoglycans*

    OpenAIRE

    Mizumoto, Shuji; Ikegawa, Shiro; Sugahara, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    A number of genetic disorders are caused by mutations in the genes encoding glycosyltransferases and sulfotransferases, enzymes responsible for the synthesis of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) side chains of proteoglycans, including chondroitin sulfate, dermatan sulfate, and heparan sulfate. The phenotypes of these genetic disorders reflect disturbances in crucial biological functions of GAGs in human. Recent studies have revealed that mutations in genes encoding chondroitin sulfate and derm...

  18. Mutation analysis of the NSD1 gene in patients with autism spectrum disorders and macrocephaly.

    OpenAIRE

    Delorme Richard; Chaste Pauline; Nygren Gudrun; Cai Guiqing; Buxbaum Joseph D; Goldsmith Juliet; Råstam Maria; Silverman Jeremy M; Hollander Eric; Gillberg Christopher; Leboyer Marion; Betancur Catalina

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Sotos syndrome is an overgrowth syndrome characterized by macrocephaly, advanced bone age, characteristic facial features, and learning disabilities, caused by mutations or deletions of the NSD1 gene, located at 5q35. Sotos syndrome has been described in a number of patients with autism spectrum disorders, suggesting that NSD1 could be involved in other cases of autism and macrocephaly. Methods We screened the NSD1 gene for mutations and deletions in 88 patients with autis...

  19. Phenotypic heterogeneity in British patients with a founder mutation in the FHL1 gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkozy, Anna; Windpassinger, Christian; Hudson, Judith; Dougan, Charlotte F; Lecky, Bryan; Hilton-Jones, David; Eagle, Michelle; Charlton, Richard; Barresi, Rita; Lochmüller, Hanns; Bushby, Kate; Straub, Volker

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the four-and-a-half LIM domain 1 (FHL1) gene, which encodes a 280-amino-acid protein containing four LIM domains and a single zinc-finger domain in the N-terminal region, have been associated with a broad clinical spectrum of X-linked muscle diseases encompassing a variety of different phenotypes. Patients might present with a scapuloperoneal myopathy, a myopathy with postural muscle atrophy and generalized hypertrophy, an Emery–Dreifuss muscular dystrophy, or an early onset myopathy with reducing bodies. It has been proposed that the phenotypic variability is related to the position of the mutation within the FHL1 gene. Here, we report on three British families with a heterogeneous clinical presentation segregating a single FHL1 gene mutation and haplotype, suggesting that this represents a founder mutation. The underlying FHL1 gene mutation was detected by direct sequencing and the founder effect was verified by haplotype analysis of the FHL1 gene locus. A 3-bp insertion mutation (p.Phe127_Thr128insIle) within the second LIM domain of the FHL1 gene was identified in all available affected family members of the three families. Haplotype analysis of the FHL1 region on Xq26 revealed that the families shared a common haplotype. The p.Phe127_Thr128insIle mutation in the FHL1 gene therefore appears to be a British founder mutation and FHL1 gene screening, in particular of exon 6, should therefore be indicated in British patients with a broad phenotypic spectrum of X-linked muscle diseases. PMID:21629301

  20. Mutation of MeCP2 alters transcriptional regulation of select immediate-early genes

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Dan; Cha, Young May; West, Anne E.

    2012-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the methyl-DNA binding protein MeCP2 are associated with neurological dysfunction and impaired neural plasticity. However, the transcriptional changes that underlie these deficits remain poorly understood. Here, we show that mice bearing a C-terminal truncating mutation in Mecp2 (Mecp2308) are hypersensitive to the locomotor stimulating effects of cocaine. Furthermore, these mice have gene-specific alterations in striatal immediate-early gene (IEG) induction foll...

  1. Mutations of the AAAS gene in an Indian family with Allgrove's syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Mukhopadhya, Ashis; Danda, Sumita; Huebner, Angela; Chacko, Ashok

    2006-01-01

    The triple A or Allgrove's syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the triad of achalasia cardia, alacrima and ACTH resistant adrenocortical insufficiency. Mutations of the Achalasia-Addisonianism-Alacrima-Syndrome (AAAS) gene on chromosome 12q13 are associated with this syndrome. We report an Indian family where two siblings were homozygous for a known mutation of the AAAS gene and presented with the classical triad of symptoms. The mother and the brother were heterozygo...

  2. HFE Gene Mutation Among Turkish Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Erdem Akbal; Fahri Güneş; Mehmet Aşık; Mustafa Özbek; Kemal Üreten; Mustafa Altınbaş

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Hereditary haemochromatosis (HH) is a genetic disease with autosomal recessive trait. Recent studies demonstrated the importance of C282Y gene mutation in the aetiology of HH. Free iron accumulating in pancreas deteriorates insulin secretion and synthesis which can lead to insulin resistance and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in patients with HH. There has been no study determining the prevalence of haemochromatosis gene (HFE) mutations and HH in diabetic patients...

  3. Dystrophin gene mutation location and the risk of cognitive impairment in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J Taylor

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A significant component of the variation in cognitive disability that is observed in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is known to be under genetic regulation. In this study we report correlations between standardised measures of intelligence and mutational class, mutation size, mutation location and the involvement of dystrophin isoforms. METHODS AND RESULTS: Sixty two male subjects were recruited as part of a study of the cognitive spectrum in boys with DMD conducted at the Sydney Children's Hospital (SCH. All 62 children received neuropsychological testing from a single clinical psychologist and had a defined dystrophin gene (DMD mutation; including DMD gene deletions, duplications and DNA point mutations. Full Scale Intelligence Quotients (FSIQ in unrelated subjects with the same mutation were found to be highly correlated (r = 0.83, p = 0.0008, in contrast to results in previous publications. In 58 cases (94% it was possible to definitively assign a mutation as affecting one or more dystrophin isoforms. A strong association between the risk of cognitive disability and the involvement of groups of DMD isoforms was found. In particular, improvements in the correlation of FSIQ with mutation location were identified when a new classification system for mutations affecting the Dp140 isoform was implemented. SIGNIFICANCE: These data represent one of the largest studies of FSIQ and mutational data in DMD patients and is among the first to report on a DMD cohort which has had both comprehensive mutational analysis and FSIQ testing through a single referral centre. The correlation between FSIQ results with the location of the dystrophin gene mutation suggests that the risk of cognitive deficit is a result of the cumulative loss of central nervous system (CNS expressed dystrophin isoforms, and that correct classification of isoform involvement results in improved estimates of risk.

  4. First report of a de novo germline mutation in the MLH1 gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rein P Stulp; Yvonne J Vos; Bart Mol; Arend Karrenbeld; Monique de Raad; Huub JC van der Mijle; Rolf H Sijmons

    2006-01-01

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal carcinoma (HNPCC)is an autosomal dominant disorder associated with colorectal and endometrial cancer and a range of other tumor types. Germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes, particularly MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6, underlie this disorder. The vast majority of these HNPCC-associated mutations have been proven,or assumed, given the family history of cancer, to be transmitted through several generations. To the best of our knowledge, only a single case of a de novo germline MMR gene mutation (in MSH2) has been reported till now. Here, we report a patient with a de novo mutation in MLH1. We identified a MLH1 Q701X truncating mutation in the blood lymphocytes of a male who had been diagnosed with rectal cancer at the age of 35. His family history of cancer was negative for the first- and second-degree relatives. The mutation could not be detected in the patient's parents and sibling and paternity was confirmed with a set of highly polymorphic markers. Non-penetrance and small family size is the common explanation of verified negative family histories of cancer in patients with a germline MMR gene mutation. However, in addition to some cases explained by non-paternity, de novo germline mutations should be considered as a possible explanation as well. As guidelines that stress not to restrict MMR gene mutation testing to patients with a positive family history are more widely introduced, more cases of de novo MMR gene germline mutations may be revealed.

  5. Adverse events in families with hypertrophic or dilated cardiomyopathy and mutations in the MYBPC3 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehrke Stephanie

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in MYBPC3 encoding myosin binding protein C belong to the most frequent causes of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM and may also lead to dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM. MYBPC3 mutations initially were considered to cause a benign form of HCM. The aim of this study was to examine the clinical outcome of patients and their relatives with 18 different MYBPC3 mutations. Methods 87 patients with HCM and 71 patients with DCM were screened for MYBPC3 mutations by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequencing. Close relatives of mutation carriers were genotyped for the respective mutation. Relatives with mutation were then evaluated by echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging. A detailed family history regarding adverse clinical events was recorded. Results In 16 HCM (18.4% and two DCM (2.8% index patients a mutation was detected. Seven mutations were novel. Mutation carriers exhibited no additional mutations in genes MYH7, TNNT2, TNNI3, ACTC and TPM1. Including relatives of twelve families, a total number of 42 mutation carriers was identified of which eleven (26.2% had at least one adverse event. Considering the twelve families and six single patients with mutations, 45 individuals with cardiomyopathy and nine with borderline phenotype were identified. Among the 45 patients, 23 (51.1% suffered from an adverse event. In eleven patients of seven families an unexplained sudden death was reported at the age between 13 and 67 years. Stroke or a transient ischemic attack occurred in six patients of five families. At least one adverse event occurred in eleven of twelve families. Conclusion MYBPC3 mutations can be associated with cardiac events such as progressive heart failure, stroke and sudden death even at younger age. Therefore, patients with MYBPC3 mutations require thorough clinical risk assessment.

  6. Mutational Analysis of the TYR and OCA2 Genes in Four Chinese Families with Oculocutaneous Albinism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Wang

    Full Text Available Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA is an autosomal recessive disorder. The most common type OCA1 and OCA2 are caused by homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the tyrosinase gene (TYR and OCA2 gene, respectively.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the molecular basis of oculocutaneous albinism in four Chinese families.Four non-consanguineous OCA families were included in the study. The TYR and OCA2 genes of all individuals were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR, sequenced and compared with a reference database.Four patients with a diagnosis of oculocutaneous albinism, presented with milky skin, white or light brown hair and nystagmus. Genetic analyses demonstrated that patient A was compound heterozygous for c.1037-7T.A, c.1037-10_11delTT and c.1114delG mutations in the TYR gene; patient B was heterozygous for c.593C>T and c.1426A>G mutations in the OCA2 gene, patients C and D were compound heterozygous mutations in the TYR gene (c.549_550delGT and c.896G>A, c.832C>T and c.985T>C, respectively. The heterozygous c.549_550delGT and c.1114delG alleles in the TYR gene were two novel mutations. Interestingly, heterozygous members in these pedigrees who carried c.1114delG mutations in the TYR gene or c.1426A>G mutations in the OCA2 gene presented with blond or brown hair and pale skin, but no ocular disorders when they were born; the skin of these patients accumulated pigment over time and with sun exposure.This study expands the mutation spectrum of oculocutaneous albinism. It is the first time, to the best of our knowledge, to report that c.549_550delGT and c.1114delG mutations in the TYR gene were associated with OCA. The two mutations (c.1114delG in the TYR gene and c.1426A>G in the OCA2 gene may be responsible for partial clinical manifestations of OCA.

  7. Screening for germline mutations in the neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) gene in NF2 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andermann, A.A.; Ruttledge, M.H.; Rangaratnam, A. [McGill Univ. and Montreal General Hospital Research Institute, Quebec (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is an autosomal dominant disease with over 95% penetrance which predisposes gene carriers to develop multiple tumors of the central nervous system. The NF2 gene is a putative tumor suppressor gene which was previously mapped to the long arm of chromosome 22, and has recently been identified, using positional cloning techniques. The gene encodes a protein, schwannomin (SCH), which is highly homologous to the band 4.1 protein family. In an attempt to identify and characterize mutations which lead to the manifestation of the disease, we have used single strand conformation analysis (SSCA) to screen for germline mutations in all 17 exons of the NF2 gene in 59 unrelated NF2 patients, representing both familial and new mutations. A total of 27 migration abnormalities was found in 26 patients. Using direct sequencing analysis, the majority of these variants were found to result in nonsense, splice-site or frameshift mutations. Mutations identified in familial NF2 patients segregate in the family, and may prove to be useful tools for a simple and direct SSCA-based technique of presymptomatic or prenatal diagnosis in relatives of patients with NF2. This may be of particular importance in children of patients who have new mutations in the NF2 gene, where linkage analysis may not be feasible.

  8. Frequent mutation of histone-modifying genes in non-Hodgkin lymphoma | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a recent Nature article, Morin et al. uncovered a novel role for chromatin modification in driving the progression of two non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs), follicular lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Through DNA and RNA sequencing of 117 tumor samples and 10 assorted cell lines, the authors identified and validated 109 genes with multiple mutations in these B-cell NHLs. Of the 109 genes, several genes not previously linked to lymphoma demonstrated positive selection for mutation including two genes involved in histone modification, MLL2 and MEF2B.

  9. Three novel PHEX gene mutations in four Chinese families with X-linked dominant hypophosphatemic rickets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► In our study, all of the patients were of Han Chinese ethnicity, which were rarely reported. ► We identified three novel PHEX gene mutations in four unrelated families with XLH. ► We found that the relationship between the phenotype and genotype of the PHEX gene was not invariant. ► We found that two PHEX gene sites, p.534 and p.731, were conserved. -- Abstract: Background: X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH), the most common form of inherited rickets, is a dominant disorder that is characterized by renal phosphate wasting with hypophosphatemia, abnormal bone mineralization, short stature, and rachitic manifestations. The related gene with inactivating mutations associated with XLH has been identified as PHEX, which is a phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X chromosome. In this study, a variety of PHEX mutations were identified in four Chinese families with XLH. Methods: We investigated four unrelated Chinese families who exhibited typical features of XLH by using PCR to analyze mutations that were then sequenced. The laboratory and radiological investigations were conducted simultaneously. Results: Three novel mutations were found in these four families: one frameshift mutation, c.2033dupT in exon 20, resulting in p.T679H; one nonsense mutation, c.1294A > T in exon 11, resulting in p.K432X; and one missense mutation, c.2192T > C in exon 22, resulting in p.F731S. Conclusions: We found that the PHEX gene mutations were responsible for XLH in these Chinese families. Our findings are useful for understanding the genetic basis of Chinese patients with XLH.

  10. Three novel PHEX gene mutations in four Chinese families with X-linked dominant hypophosphatemic rickets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Qing-lin [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai 200233 (China); Xu, Jia [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai 200233 (China); Metabolic Bone Disease and Genetic Research Unit, Department of Osteoporosis and Bone Diseases, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai 200233 (China); Medical College of Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu province 215000 (China); Zhang, Zeng [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai 200233 (China); Metabolic Bone Disease and Genetic Research Unit, Department of Osteoporosis and Bone Diseases, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai 200233 (China); He, Jin-wei [Metabolic Bone Disease and Genetic Research Unit, Department of Osteoporosis and Bone Diseases, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai 200233 (China); Lu, Lian-song [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai 200233 (China); Medical College of Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu province 215000 (China); Fu, Wen-zhen [Metabolic Bone Disease and Genetic Research Unit, Department of Osteoporosis and Bone Diseases, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai 200233 (China); Zhang, Zhen-lin, E-mail: zzl2002@medmail.com.cn [Metabolic Bone Disease and Genetic Research Unit, Department of Osteoporosis and Bone Diseases, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai 200233 (China)

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In our study, all of the patients were of Han Chinese ethnicity, which were rarely reported. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We identified three novel PHEX gene mutations in four unrelated families with XLH. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found that the relationship between the phenotype and genotype of the PHEX gene was not invariant. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found that two PHEX gene sites, p.534 and p.731, were conserved. -- Abstract: Background: X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH), the most common form of inherited rickets, is a dominant disorder that is characterized by renal phosphate wasting with hypophosphatemia, abnormal bone mineralization, short stature, and rachitic manifestations. The related gene with inactivating mutations associated with XLH has been identified as PHEX, which is a phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X chromosome. In this study, a variety of PHEX mutations were identified in four Chinese families with XLH. Methods: We investigated four unrelated Chinese families who exhibited typical features of XLH by using PCR to analyze mutations that were then sequenced. The laboratory and radiological investigations were conducted simultaneously. Results: Three novel mutations were found in these four families: one frameshift mutation, c.2033dupT in exon 20, resulting in p.T679H; one nonsense mutation, c.1294A > T in exon 11, resulting in p.K432X; and one missense mutation, c.2192T > C in exon 22, resulting in p.F731S. Conclusions: We found that the PHEX gene mutations were responsible for XLH in these Chinese families. Our findings are useful for understanding the genetic basis of Chinese patients with XLH.

  11. Association of mutations in the hemochromatosis gene with shorter life expectancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bathum, L; Christiansen, L; Nybo, H;

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To investigate whether the frequency of carriers of mutations in the HFE gene associated with hereditary hemochromatosis diminishes with age as an indication that HFE mutations are associated with increased mortality. It is of value in the debate concerning screening for hereditary...... in the distribution of mutations in exon 2 in the different age groups. CONCLUSIONS: In a high-carrier frequency population like Denmark, mutations in HFE show an age-related reduction in the frequency of heterozygotes for C282Y, which suggests that carrier status is associated with shorter life...

  12. Determining lower limits of detection of digital PCR assays for cancer-related gene mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Milbury, Coren A.; Qun Zhong; Jesse Lin; Miguel Williams; Jeff Olson; Link, Darren R.; Brian Hutchison

    2014-01-01

    Digital PCR offers very high sensitivity compared to many other technologies for processing molecular detection assays. Herein, a process is outlined for determining the lower limit of detection (LoD) of two droplet-based digital PCR assays for point mutations of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene. Hydrolysis probe mutation-detection assays for EGFR p.L858R and p.T790M mutations were characterized in detail. Furthermore, sixteen additional cancer-related mutation assays were exp...

  13. Expression and clinical significance of genes frequently mutated in small cell lung cancers defined by whole exome/RNA sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Iwakawa, Reika; Kohno, Takashi; Totoki, Yasushi; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Tsuchihara, Katsuya; Mimaki, Sachiyo; Tsuta, Koji; NARITA, Yoshitaka; Nishikawa, Ryo; Noguchi, Masayuki; Harris, Curtis C.; Robles, Ana I.; Yamaguchi, Rui; Imoto, Seiya; Miyano, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    We identified the TMEM132D, SPTA1 and VPS13B genes as frequently mutated and expressed in any progression stage of SCLC, in addition to known tumor suppressor genes, TP53, RB1 and PTEN. These genes could be involved in SCLC development, and their mutated gene products will be promising therapeutic targets in SCLC patients.

  14. Meta-analysis of clinical characteristics of 299 carriers of LMNA gene mutations : do lamin A/C mutations portend a high risk of sudden death?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Voogt, WG; van der Kooi, AJ; van Tintelen, JP; Bonne, G; Ben Yaou, R; Duboc, D; Rossenbacker, T; Heidbuchel, H; de Visser, M; Crijns, HJGM; Pinto, YM; van Berlo, Jop H.

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated common clinical characteristics of patients with lamin A/C gene mutations that cause either isolated dilated cardiornyopathy or dilated cardiomyopathy in association with skeletal muscular dystrophy. We pooled clinical data of all published carriers of lamin A/C gene mutations a

  15. Mutational Analysis of Pneumocystis jirovecii Dihydropteroate Synthase and Dihydrofolate Reductase Genes in HIV-Infected Patients in China

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Xilong; Zhuo, Li; Lan, Yun; Dai, Zhaoxia; Chen, Wan-shan; Cai, Weiping; Kovacs, Joseph A.; Ma, Liang; Tang, Xiaoping

    2014-01-01

    We investigated Pneumocystis jirovecii dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) genes for mutations in 25 Chinese HIV-infected patients with P. jirovecii pneumonia. We identified DHPS mutations in 3 (12%) patients and DHFR mutations in 1 (4%) patient. The prevalence of DHPS and DHFR mutations in China remains low, as it does in other developing countries.

  16. Identification of 28 novel mutations in the Bardet-Biedl syndrome genes: the burden of private mutations in an extensively heterogeneous disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Jean; Stoetzel, C; Vincent, M C; Leitch, C C; Laurier, V; Danse, J M; Hellé, S; Marion, V; Bennouna-Greene, V; Vicaire, S; Megarbane, A; Kaplan, J; Drouin-Garraud, V; Hamdani, M; Sigaudy, S; Francannet, C; Roume, J; Bitoun, P; Goldenberg, A; Philip, N; Odent, S; Green, J; Cossée, M; Davis, E E; Katsanis, N; Bonneau, D; Verloes, A; Poch, O; Mandel, J L; Dollfus, H

    2010-03-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS), an emblematic disease in the rapidly evolving field of ciliopathies, is characterized by pleiotropic clinical features and extensive genetic heterogeneity. To date, 14 BBS genes have been identified, 3 of which have been found mutated only in a single BBS family each (BBS11/TRIM32, BBS13/MKS1 and BBS14/MKS4/NPHP6). Previous reports of systematic mutation detection in large cohorts of BBS families (n > 90) have dealt only with a single gene, or at most small subsets of the known BBS genes. Here we report extensive analysis of a cohort of 174 BBS families for 12/14 genes, leading to the identification of 28 novel mutations. Two pathogenic mutations in a single gene have been found in 117 families, and a single heterozygous mutation in 17 families (of which 8 involve the BBS1 recurrent mutation, M390R). We confirm that BBS1 and BBS10 are the most frequently mutated genes, followed by BBS12. No mutations have been found in BBS11/TRIM32, the identification of which as a BBS gene only relies on a single missense mutation in a single consanguineous family. While a third variant allele has been observed in a few families, they are in most cases missenses of uncertain pathogenicity, contrasting with the type of mutations observed as two alleles in a single gene. We discuss the various strategies for diagnostic mutation detection, including homozygosity mapping and targeted arrays for the detection of previously reported mutations. PMID:20177705

  17. Identification of 28 novel mutations in the Bardet–Biedl syndrome genes: the burden of private mutations in an extensively heterogeneous disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoetzel, C.; Vincent, M. C.; Leitch, C. C.; Laurier, V.; Danse, J. M.; Hellé, S.; Marion, V.; Bennouna-Greene, V.; Vicaire, S.; Megarbane, A.; Kaplan, J.; Drouin-Garraud, V.; Hamdani, M.; Sigaudy, S.; Francannet, C.; Roume, J.; Bitoun, P.; Goldenberg, A.; Philip, N.; Odent, S.; Green, J.; Cossée, M.; Davis, E. E.; Katsanis, N.; Bonneau, D.; Verloes, A.; Poch, O.; Mandel, J. L.; Dollfus, H.

    2013-01-01

    Bardet–Biedl syndrome (BBS), an emblematic disease in the rapidly evolving field of ciliopathies, is characterized by pleiotropic clinical features and extensive genetic heterogeneity. To date, 14 BBS genes have been identified, 3 of which have been found mutated only in a single BBS family each (BBS11/TRIM32, BBS13/MKS1 and BBS14/MKS4/NPHP6). Previous reports of systematic mutation detection in large cohorts of BBS families (n > 90) have dealt only with a single gene, or at most small subsets of the known BBS genes. Here we report extensive analysis of a cohort of 174 BBS families for 12/14 genes, leading to the identification of 28 novel mutations. Two pathogenic mutations in a single gene have been found in 117 families, and a single heterozygous mutation in 17 families (of which 8 involve the BBS1 recurrent mutation, M390R). We confirm that BBS1 and BBS10 are the most frequently mutated genes, followed by BBS12. No mutations have been found in BBS11/TRIM32, the identification of which as a BBS gene only relies on a single missense mutation in a single consanguineous family. While a third variant allele has been observed in a few families, they are in most cases missenses of uncertain pathogenicity, contrasting with the type of mutations observed as two alleles in a single gene. We discuss the various strategies for diagnostic mutation detection, including homozygosity mapping and targeted arrays for the detection of previously reported mutations. PMID:20177705

  18. A cancer-predisposing "hot spot" mutation of the fumarase gene creates a dominant negative protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzato, Annalisa; Olivero, Martina; Perro, Mario; Brière, Jean Jacques; Rustin, Pierre; Di Renzo, Maria Flavia

    2008-02-15

    The Fumarase (Fumarate Hydratase, FH) is a tumor suppressor gene whose germline heterozygous mutations predispose to hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC). The FH gene encodes an enzyme of the Krebs cycle, functioning as a homotetramer and catalyzing the hydration of fumarate to malate. Among the numerous FH mutations reported so far, the R190H missense mutation is the most frequent in HLRCC patients. Here we show the functional analyses of the R190H, in comparison to the better characterized E319Q mutation. We first expressed wild-type and mutated proteins in FH deficient human skin fibroblasts, using lentiviral vectors. The wild-type transgene was able to restore the FH enzymatic activity in cells, while the R190H- and E319Q-FH were not. More interestingly, when the same transgenes were expressed in normal, FH-proficient cells, only the R190H-FH reduced the endogenous FH enzymatic activity. By enforcing the expression of equal amount of wild-type and R190H-FH in the same cell, we showed that the mutated FH protein directly inhibited enzymatic activity by nearly abrogating the FH homotetramer formation. These data demonstrate the dominant negative effect of the R190H missense mutation in the FH gene and suggest that the FH tumor-suppressing activity might be impaired in cells carrying a heterozygous mutation. PMID:17960613

  19. Novel point mutations in the ERG11 gene in clinical isolates of azole resistant Candida species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielly Beraldo dos Santos Silva

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The azoles are the class of medications most commonly used to fight infections caused by Candida sp. Typically, resistance can be attributed to mutations in ERG11 gene (CYP51 which encodes the cytochrome P450 14α-demethylase, the primary target for the activity of azoles. The objective of this study was to identify mutations in the coding region of theERG11 gene in clinical isolates of Candidaspecies known to be resistant to azoles. We identified three new synonymous mutations in the ERG11 gene in the isolates of Candida glabrata (C108G, C423T and A1581G and two new nonsynonymous mutations in the isolates of Candida krusei - A497C (Y166S and G1570A (G524R. The functional consequence of these nonsynonymous mutations was predicted using evolutionary conservation scores. The G524R mutation did not have effect on 14α-demethylase functionality, while the Y166S mutation was found to affect the enzyme. This observation suggests a possible link between the mutation and dose-dependent sensitivity to voriconazole in the clinical isolate of C. krusei. Although the presence of the Y166S in phenotype of reduced azole sensitivity observed in isolate C. kruseidemands investigation, it might contribute to the search of new therapeutic agents against resistant Candida isolates.

  20. Novel point mutations in the ERG11 gene in clinical isolates of azole resistant Candida species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Danielly Beraldo dos Santos; Rodrigues, Luana Mireli Carbonera; Almeida, Adriana Araújo de; Oliveira, Kelly Mari Pires de; Grisolia, Alexéia Barufatti

    2016-03-01

    The azoles are the class of medications most commonly used to fight infections caused by Candida sp. Typically, resistance can be attributed to mutations in ERG11 gene (CYP51) which encodes the cytochrome P450 14α-demethylase, the primary target for the activity of azoles. The objective of this study was to identify mutations in the coding region of theERG11 gene in clinical isolates of Candida species known to be resistant to azoles. We identified three new synonymous mutations in the ERG11 gene in the isolates of Candida glabrata (C108G, C423T and A1581G) and two new nonsynonymous mutations in the isolates of Candida krusei--A497C (Y166S) and G1570A (G524R). The functional consequence of these nonsynonymous mutations was predicted using evolutionary conservation scores. The G524R mutation did not have effect on 14α-demethylase functionality, while the Y166S mutation was found to affect the enzyme. This observation suggests a possible link between the mutation and dose-dependent sensitivity to voriconazole in the clinical isolate of C. krusei. Although the presence of the Y166S in phenotype of reduced azole sensitivity observed in isolate C. krusei demands investigation, it might contribute to the search of new therapeutic agents against resistant Candida isolates. PMID:26982177

  1. Analysis of mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR gene in patients with obstructive azoospermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea L.F. Bernardino

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens (CBAVD accounts for 1%-2% of sterility in men. A high incidence of mutations, as well as the involvement of the 5T variant of the T tract length in intron 8 of the cystic fibrosis conductance regulator (CFTR gene, have been previously described in males with CBAVD. Herein we report the screening for mutations and for the 5T variant of the CFTR gene in 17 patients with CBAVD and three others with non-CABVD obstructive azoospermia. In the CBAVD group, three patients (15% were compound heterozygotes for mutations, and five patients (25% had a mutation in one allele and the 5T variant in the other; the 5T variant was also present in two other patients, one of them being homozygous. The most frequent mutation was DF508, present on five chromosomes (12.5%. A novel missense mutation (A399D was detected in a Japanese CBVAD patient. Our results yield further evidence for a strong association between male obstructive azoospermia caused by CBAVD and mutation/5T variant in the CFTR gene. The search for CFTR mutations in such patients is thus recommended for genetic counseling of couples who undergo assisted fertilization due to CBAVD.

  2. Clinical potential of gene mutations in lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Carper, Miranda B.; Claudio, Pier Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cancer type worldwide and the leading cause of cancer related deaths in the United States. The majority of newly diagnosed patients present with late stage metastatic lung cancer that is inoperable and resistant to therapies. High-throughput genomic technologies have made the identification of genetic mutations that promote lung cancer progression possible. Identification of the mutations that drive lung cancer provided new targets for non-small cell lung cancer...

  3. Mutation analysis of cathepsin C gene in a Chinese patient with pre-pubertal periodontitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Yuan; BAI Xiao-wen; SONG Shu-juan; GE Li-hong; CAO Cai-fang

    2005-01-01

    @@ Pre-pubertal periodontitis (PPP) is a rare and rapidly progressive form of early onset periodontitis resulting in premature tooth loss of primary and permanent dentitions. Mutations in cathepsin C (CTSC) gene have been found in patients with pre-pubertal periodontitis and Papillon-Lefevre syndrome which also characterized with severe periodontitis and palmoplantar hyperkera-tosis.1-3 To date, more than 40 mutations of CTSC gene have been identified in ethnically diverse people worldwide.4 However, there is no such genetic analysis in China. In the present study, we report the mutation analysis of a Chinese patient with PPP.

  4. Fatal familial insomnia: a second kindred with mutation of prion protein gene at codon 178.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medori, R; Montagna, P; Tritschler, H J; LeBlanc, A; Cortelli, P; Tinuper, P; Lugaresi, E; Gambetti, P

    1992-03-01

    Fatal familial insomnia (FFI), a condition characterized by inability to sleep, dysautonomia, motor disturbances, and selective thalamic atrophy is a prion disease linked to a GAC----AAC mutation at codon 178 of the prion gene. These data were obtained from one kindred. We now report a second kindred affected by FFI and carrying the same mutation. The finding of the same disease phenotype and genotype in a second family further validates FFI as a distinct disease entity and a phenotype of the GAC----AAC mutation at codon 178 of the prion gene. PMID:1347910

  5. Antithrombin gene Arg197Stop mutation-associated venous sinus thrombosis in a Chinese family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ang Li; Dexin Wang; Qiming Xue; Baoen Wang; Tianhui Liu; Zhandong Liu; Jimei Li; Chunling Zhang; Jun Chen; Jinmei Sun; YanfeiHan; Lili Wang

    2011-01-01

    This study sought to elucidate the genetic correlation of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis caused by a hereditary antithrombin deficiency in a Chinese family, at the genetic and protein levels. A nonsense mutation from C to T on locus 6431 in exon 3B of the antithrombin gene was observed,leading to an arginine (CGA) to stop codon (TGA) change in the protein. This is the first report of this mutation in China. Ineffective heparin therapy in the propositus patient is associated with a lack of heparin binding sites after antithrombin gene mutation. Characteristic low intracranial pressure in the acute phase might be specific to this patient with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis.

  6. Clinical impact of recurrently mutated genes on lymphoma diagnostics: state-of-the-art and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenquist, Richard; Rosenwald, Andreas; Du, Ming-Qing; Gaidano, Gianluca; Groenen, Patricia; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Ghia, Paolo; Gaulard, Philippe; Campo, Elias; Stamatopoulos, Kostas

    2016-09-01

    Similar to the inherent clinical heterogeneity of most, if not all, lymphoma entities, the genetic landscape of these tumors is markedly complex in the majority of cases, with a rapidly growing list of recurrently mutated genes discovered in recent years by next-generation sequencing technology. Whilst a few genes have been implied to have diagnostic, prognostic and even predictive impact, most gene mutations still require rigorous validation in larger, preferably prospective patient series, to scrutinize their potential role in lymphoma diagnostics and patient management. In selected entities, a predominantly mutated gene is identified in almost all cases (e.g. Waldenström's macroglobulinemia/lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma and hairy-cell leukemia), while for the vast majority of lymphomas a quite diverse mutation pattern is observed, with a limited number of frequently mutated genes followed by a seemingly endless tail of genes with mutations at a low frequency. Herein, the European Expert Group on NGS-based Diagnostics in Lymphomas (EGNL) summarizes the current status of this ever-evolving field, and, based on the present evidence level, segregates mutations into the following categories: i) immediate impact on treatment decisions, ii) diagnostic impact, iii) prognostic impact, iv) potential clinical impact in the near future, or v) should only be considered for research purposes. In the coming years, coordinated efforts aiming to apply targeted next-generation sequencing in large patient series will be needed in order to elucidate if a particular gene mutation will have an immediate impact on the lymphoma classification, and ultimately aid clinical decision making. PMID:27582569

  7. Characterization of six mutations in Exon 37 of neurofibromatosis type 1 gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyaya, M.; Osborn, M.; Maynard, J.; Harper, P. [Institute of Medical Genetics, Cardiff, Wales (United Kingdom)

    1996-07-26

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is one of the most common inherited disorders, with an incidence of 1 in 3,000. We screened a total of 320 unrelated NF1 patients for mutations in exon 37 of the NF1 gene. Six independent mutations were identified, of which three are novel, and these include a recurrent nonsense mutation identified in 2 unrelated patients at codon 2281 (G2281X), a 1-bp insertion (6791 ins A) resulting in a change of TAG (tyrosine) to a TAA (stop codon), and a 3-bp deletion (6839 del TAC) which generated a frameshift. Another recurrent nonsense mutation, Y2264X, which was detected in 2 unrelated patients in this study, was also previously reported in 2 NF1 individuals. All the mutations were identified within a contiguous 49-bp sequence. Further studies are warranted to support the notion that this region of the gene contains highly mutable sequences. 17 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. [Some behavioral features in Drosophila melanogaster lines carrying a flamenco gene mutation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subocheva, E A; Romanova, L G; Romanova, N I; Kim, A I

    2001-11-01

    Olfactory sensitivity and locomotor activity was assayed in Drosophila melanogaster strains carrying a mutation of the flamenco gene, which controls transposition of the mobile genetic element 4 (MGE4) retrotransposon the gypsy mobile element. A change in olfactory sensitivity was detected. The reaction to the odor of acetic acid was inverted in flies of the mutator strain (MS), which carried the flam mutation and active MGE4 copies and were characterized by genetic instability. Flies of the genetically unstable strains displayed a lower locomotor activity. The behavioral changes in MS flies can be explained by the pleiotropic effect of the flam mutation or by insertion mutations which arise in behavior genes as a result of genome destabilization by MGE4. PMID:11771305

  9. Tyrosinase gene mutations in the Chinese Han population with OCA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Kong, Xiang Dong; Shi, Hui Rong; Wu, Qing Hua; Jiang, Miao

    2014-01-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is a heterogeneous autosomal recessive genetic disorder that affects melanin synthesis. OCA results in reduced or absent pigmentation in the hair, skin and eyes. Type 1 OCA (OCA1) is the result of tyrosinase (TYR) gene mutations and is a severe disease type. This study investigated TYR mutations in a Chinese cohort with OCA1. This study included two parts: patient genetic study and prenatal genetic diagnosis. A total of 30 OCA1 patients were subjected to TYR gene mutation analysis. Ten pedigrees were included for prenatal genetic diagnosis. A total of 100 unrelated healthy Chinese individuals were genotyped for controls. The coding sequence and the intron/exon junctions of TYR were analysed by bidirectional DNA sequencing. In this study, 20 mutations were identified, four of which were novel. Of these 30 OCA1 patients, 25 patients were TYR compound heterozygous; two patients carried homozygous TYR mutations; and three were heterozygous. Among the ten prenatally genotyped fetuses, three fetuses carried compound heterozygous mutations and seven carried no mutation or only one mutant allele of TYR and appeared normal at birth. In conclusion, we identified four novel TYR mutations and showed that molecular-based prenatal screening to detect TYR mutations in a fetus at risk for OCA1 provided essential information for genetic counselling of couples at risk. PMID:25577957

  10. A high frequency of distinct ATM gene mutations in ataxia-telangiectasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, J.; Teraoka, S.; Concannon, P. [Univ. of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    The clinical features of the autosomal recessive disorder ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) include a progressive cerebellar ataxia, hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation, and an increased susceptibility to malignancies. Epidemiological studies have suggested that AT heterozygotes may also be at increased risk for malignancy, possibly as a consequence of radiation exposure. A gene mutated in AT patients (ATM) has recently been isolated, making mutation screening in both patients and the general population possible. Because of the relatively large size of the ATM gene, the design of screening programs will depend on the types and distribution of mutations in the general population. In this report, we describe 30 mutations identified in a panel of unrelated AT patients and controls. Twenty-five of the 30 were distinct, and most patients were compound heterozygotes. The most frequently detected mutation was found in three different families and had previously been reported in five others. This corresponds to a frequency of 8% of all reported ATM mutations. Twenty-two of the alterations observed would be predicted to lead to protein truncation at sites scattered throughout the molecule. Two fibroblast cell lines, which displayed normal responses to ionizing radiation, also proved to be heterozygous for truncation mutations of ATM. These observations suggest that the carrier frequency of ATM mutations may be sufficiently high to make population screening practical. However, such screening may need to be done prospectively, that is, by searching for new mutations rather than by screening for just those already identified in AT families. 33 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  11. A mutation in the mitochondrial fission gene Dnm1l leads to cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houman Ashrafian

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in a number of genes have been linked to inherited dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM. However, such mutations account for only a small proportion of the clinical cases emphasising the need for alternative discovery approaches to uncovering novel pathogenic mutations in hitherto unidentified pathways. Accordingly, as part of a large-scale N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis screen, we identified a mouse mutant, Python, which develops DCM. We demonstrate that the Python phenotype is attributable to a dominant fully penetrant mutation in the dynamin-1-like (Dnm1l gene, which has been shown to be critical for mitochondrial fission. The C452F mutation is in a highly conserved region of the M domain of Dnm1l that alters protein interactions in a yeast two-hybrid system, suggesting that the mutation might alter intramolecular interactions within the Dnm1l monomer. Heterozygous Python fibroblasts exhibit abnormal mitochondria and peroxisomes. Homozygosity for the mutation results in the death of embryos midway though gestation. Heterozygous Python hearts show reduced levels of mitochondria enzyme complexes and suffer from cardiac ATP depletion. The resulting energy deficiency may contribute to cardiomyopathy. This is the first demonstration that a defect in a gene involved in mitochondrial remodelling can result in cardiomyopathy, showing that the function of this gene is needed for the maintenance of normal cellular function in a relatively tissue-specific manner. This disease model attests to the importance of mitochondrial remodelling in the heart; similar defects might underlie human heart muscle disease.

  12. Identification of candidate genes for lung cancer somatic mutation test kits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past three decades, mortality from lung cancer has sharply and continuously increased in China, ascending to the first cause of death among all types of cancer. The ability to identify the actual sequence of gene mutations may help doctors determine which mutations lead to precancerous lesions and which produce invasive carcinomas, especially using next-generation sequencing (NGS technology. In this study, we analyzed the latest lung cancer data in the COSMIC database, in order to find genomic "hotspots" that are frequently mutated in human lung cancer genomes. The results revealed that the most frequently mutated lung cancer genes are EGFR, KRAS and TP53.In recent years, EGFR and KRAS lung cancer test kits have been utilized for detecting lung cancer patients, but they presented many disadvantages, as they proved to be of low sensitivity, labor-intensive and time-consuming. In this study, we constructed a more complete catalogue of lung cancer mutation events including 145 mutated genes. With the genes of this list it may be feasible to develop a NGS kit for lung cancer mutation detection.

  13. A novel heterozygous missense mutation in the UMOD gene responsible for Familial Juvenile Hyperuricemic Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemente Carla

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Familial Juvenile Hyperuricemic Nephropathy is an autosomal dominant nephropathy, characterized by decreased urate excretion and progressive interstitial nephritis. Mutations in the uromodulin coding UMOD gene have been found responsible for the disease in some families. Case presentation We here describe a novel heterozygous p.K307T mutation in an affected female with hyperuricemia, renal cysts and renal failure. The proband's only son is also affected and the mutation was found to segregate with the disease. Conclusions This mutation is the fourth reported in exon 5. Initial studies identified a mutation clustering in exon 4 and it has been recommended that sequencing this exon alone should be the first diagnostic test in patients with chronic interstitial nephritis with gout or hyperuricemia. However, regarding the increasing number of mutations being reported in exon 5, we now suggest that sequencing exon 5 should also be performed.

  14. Investigation of mutations in Erg11 gene of fluconazole resistant Candida albicans isolates from Turkish hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manastır, Lerzan; Ergon, M Cem; Yücesoy, Mine

    2011-03-01

    Widespread use of fluconazole has resulted in resistance in strains of Candida. The aim of our study was to investigate Y132H and other mutations in the ERG11 gene in conferring fluconazole resistance to C. albicans isolates. Seven fluconazole-resistant (R)/susceptible dose-dependent (SDD)/trailing and 10 fluconazole-susceptible (S) isolates were included. Restriction enzyme analysis was performed on all isolates for Y132H mutation and sequence analysis was performed for other mutations in the ERG11 gene. None of our strains had Y132H mutation. One single mutation (D153E, E266D, D116E, V437I) was detected in isolates 348, 533, 644, 1453, 2157, while the others had more than one nucleotide change. D116E and E266D, which were two mutations found in fluconazole R/SDD/trailing isolates with the highest frequency, were also detected in azole S strains. K143R, G464S, G465S and V488I mutations were determined in three of the R/SDD isolates. S412T and R469K mutations were detected only in this group of strains by sequence analysis. Mutations such as K143R, G464S, G465S, V488I, S412T and R469K in the ERG11 gene were determined to be effective mechanisms in our fluconazole R/SDD C. albicans isolates. Other mechanisms of resistance, such as overexpression of ERG11 and efflux pumps and mutations in the ERG3 gene should also be investigated. PMID:19732347

  15. Mutational profile of KIT and PDGFRA genes in gastrointestinal stromal tumors in Peruvian samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Buleje

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs are mesenchymal neoplasms usually caused by somatic mutations in the genes KIT (c-KIT or PDGFRA. Mutation characterization has become an important exam for GIST patients because it is useful in predicting the response to the inhibitors of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of KIT and PDGFRA mutations in 25 GIST samples collected over two years at two national reference hospitals in Peru. There were 21 samples collected from the Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Neoplásicas (INEN, national cancer center and 4 samples collected from Hospital A. Loayza. Methods and materials: In this retrospective study, we performed polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA sequencing of KIT (exons 9, 11, 13, and 17 and PDGFRA (exons 12 and 18 genes in 20 FFPE (formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded and 5 frozen GIST samples. Results: We report 21 mutations, including deletions, duplications, and missense, no mutations in 2 samples, and 2 samples with no useful DNA for further analysis. Eighty-six percent of these mutations were located in exon 11 of KIT, and 14 % were located in exon 18 of PDGFRA. Conclusions: Our study identified mutations in 21 out of 25 GIST samples from 2 referential national hospitals in Peru, and the mutation proportion follows a global tendency observed from previous studies (i.e., the majority of samples presented KIT mutations followed by a minor percentage of PDGFRA mutations. This study presents the first mutation data of the KIT and PDGFRA genes from Peruvian individuals with GIST.

  16. Sensitivity of the Pig-a assay for detecting gene mutation in rats exposed acutely to strong clastogens

    OpenAIRE

    Bhalli, Javed A.; Shaddock, Joseph G.; Pearce, Mason G.; Dobrovolsky, Vasily N.

    2013-01-01

    Clastogens are potential human carcinogens whose detection by genotoxicity assays is important for safety assessment. Although some endogenous genes are sensitive to the mutagenicity of clastogens, many genes that are used as reporters for in vivo mutation (e.g. transgenes) are not. In this study, we have compared responses in the erythrocyte Pig-a gene mutation assay with responses in a gene mutation assay that is relatively sensitive to clastogens, the lymphocyte Hprt assay, and in the reti...

  17. Molecular pathology of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy caused by mutations in the cardiac myosin binding protein C gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, B.; French, J. A.; Carrier, L.; Jeremy, R W; McTaggart, D R; Nicholson, M R; Hambly, B; Semsarian, C; Richmond, D R; Schwartz, K.; Trent, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    DNA studies in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) have shown that it is caused by mutations in genes coding for proteins which make up the muscle sarcomere. The majority of mutations in the FHC genes result from missense changes, although one of the most recent genes to be identified (cardiac myosin binding protein C gene, MYBPC3) has predominantly DNA mutations which produce truncated proteins. Both dominant negative and haploinsufficiency models have been proposed to explain the mol...

  18. Array CGH improves detection of mutations in the GALC gene associated with Krabbe disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanner Alice K

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Krabbe disease is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the GALC gene. The most common mutation in the Caucasian population is a 30-kb deletion of exons 11 through 17. There are few other reports of intragenic GALC deletions or duplications, due in part to difficulties detecting them. Methods and results We used gene-targeted array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH to analyze the GALC gene in individuals with Krabbe disease in whom sequence analysis with 30-kb deletion analysis identified only one mutation. In our sample of 33 cases, traditional approaches failed to identify two pathogenic mutations in five (15.2% individuals with confirmed Krabbe disease. The addition of array CGH deletion/duplication analysis to the genetic testing strategy led to the identification of a second pathogenic mutation in three (9.1% of these five individuals. In all three cases, the deletion or duplication identified through array CGH was a novel GALC mutation, including the only reported duplication in the GALC gene, which would have been missed by traditional testing methodologies. We report these three cases in detail. The second mutation remains unknown in the remaining two individuals (6.1%, despite our full battery of testing. Conclusions Analysis of the GALC gene using array CGH deletion/duplication testing increased the two-mutation detection rate from 84.8% to 93.9% in affected individuals. Better mutation detection rates are important for improving molecular diagnosis of Krabbe disease, as well as for providing prenatal and carrier testing in family members.

  19. A common FGFR3 gene mutation is present in achondroplasia but not in hypochondroplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoilov, I.; Kilpatrick, M.W.; Tsipouras, P. [Univ. of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT (United States)

    1995-01-02

    Achondroplasia is the most common type of genetic dwarfism. It is characterized by disproportionate short stature and other skeletal anomalies resulting from a defect in the maturation of the chondrocytes in the growth plate of the cartilage. Recent studies mapped the achondroplasia gene on chromosome region 4p16.3 and identified a common mutation in the gene encoding the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3). In an analysis of 19 achondroplasia families from a variety of ethnic backgrounds we confirmed the presence of the G380R mutation in 21 of 23 achondroplasia chromosomes studied. In contrast, the G380R mutation was not found in any of the 8 hypochondroplasia chromosomes studied. Futhermore, linkage studies in a 3-generation family with hypochondroplasia show discordant segregation with markers in the 4p16.3 region suggesting that at least some cases of hypochondroplasia are caused by mutations in a gene other than FGFR3. 27 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Analysis of human transforming growth factor β-induced gene mutation in corneal dystrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李杨; 孙旭光; 任慧媛; 董冰; 王智群; 孙秀英

    2004-01-01

    Background Corneal dystrophy is a group of inherited blinding diseases of the cornea. This study was to identify the mutations of the keratoepithelin (KE) gene for proper diagnosis of corneal dystrophy. Methods Three families with corneal dystrophy were analysed. Thirteen individuals at risk for corneal dystrophy in family A, the proband and her son in family B, and the proband in family C were examined after their blood samples were obtained. Mutation screening of human transforming growth factor β-induced gene (BIGH3 gene) was performed. Results Five individuals in family A were found by clinical evaluation to be affected with granular corneal dystrophy and carried the BIGH3 mutation W555R. However, both probands in families B and C, also diagnosed with granular corneal dystrophy, harboured the BIGH3 mutation R124H. Conclusion Molecular genetic analysis can improve accurate diagnosis of corneal dystrophy.

  1. Accumulation of Deleterious Mutations Near Sexually Antagonistic Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connallon, Tim; Jordan, Crispin Y

    2016-01-01

    Mutation generates a steady supply of genetic variation that, while occasionally useful for adaptation, is more often deleterious for fitness. Recent research has emphasized that the fitness effects of mutations often differ between the sexes, leading to important evolutionary consequences for the maintenance of genetic variation and long-term population viability. Some forms of sex-specific selection-i.e., stronger purifying selection in males than females-can help purge a population's load of female-harming mutations and promote population growth. Other scenarios-e.g., sexually antagonistic selection, in which mutations that harm females are beneficial for males-inflate genetic loads and potentially dampen population viability. Evolutionary processes of sexual antagonism and purifying selection are likely to impact the evolutionary dynamics of different loci within a genome, yet theory has mostly ignored the potential for interactions between such loci to jointly shape the evolutionary genetic basis of female and male fitness variation. Here, we show that sexually antagonistic selection at a locus tends to elevate the frequencies of deleterious alleles at tightly linked loci that evolve under purifying selection. Moreover, haplotypes that segregate for different sexually antagonistic alleles accumulate different types of deleterious mutations. Haplotypes that carry female-benefit sexually antagonistic alleles preferentially accumulate mutations that are primarily male harming, whereas male-benefit haplotypes accumulate mutations that are primarily female harming. The theory predicts that sexually antagonistic selection should shape the genomic organization of genetic variation that differentially impacts female and male fitness, and contribute to sexual dimorphism in the genetic basis of fitness variation. PMID:27226163

  2. GJB2 and GJB6 gene mutations found in Indian probands with congenital hearing impairment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G. Padma; P. V. Ramchander; U. V. Nandur; T. Padma

    2009-12-01

    Genetically caused deafness is a common trait affecting one in 1000 children and is predominantly inherited in an autosomal-recessive fashion. Several mutations in the GJB2 gene and a deletion of 342 kb in GJB6 gene (delGJB6-D13S1830) have been identified worldwide in patients with hearing impairment. In the present study, 303 nonsyndromic hearing-impaired patients (140 familial; 163 sporadic) were examined clinically and screened for mutations in GJB2 and GJB6 genes. Mutations in GJB2 gene were found in 33 (10.9%) patients of whom six (18.2%) were carriers for the mutant allele. The most frequent mutation was p.W24X accounting for 87% of the mutant alleles. In addition, six other sequence variations were identified in the GJB2 gene viz., c.IVS1+1G>A, c.167delT, c.235delC, p.W77X, p.R127H (polymorphism), p.M163V. None of the samples showed del(GJB6-D13S1830) or any point mutations in GJB6 gene.

  3. A novel ATP1A2 gene mutation in an Irish familial hemiplegic migraine kindred.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fernandez, Desiree M

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVE: We studied a large Irish Caucasian pedigree with familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) with the aim of finding the causative gene mutation. BACKGROUND: FHM is a rare autosomal-dominant subtype of migraine with aura, which is linked to 4 loci on chromosomes 19p13, 1q23, 2q24, and 1q31. The mutations responsible for hemiplegic migraine have been described in the CACNA1A gene (chromosome 19p13), ATP1A2 gene (chromosome 1q23), and SCN1A gene (chromosome 2q24). METHODS: We performed linkage analyses in this family for chromosome 1q23 and performed mutation analysis of the ATP1A2 gene. RESULTS: Linkage to the FHM2 locus on chromosome 1 was demonstrated. Mutation screening of the ATP1A2 gene revealed a G to C substitution in exon 22 resulting in a novel protein variant, D999H, which co-segregates with FHM within this pedigree and is absent in 50 unaffected individuals. This residue is also highly conserved across species. CONCLUSIONS: We propose that D999H is a novel FHM ATP1A2 mutation.

  4. Mutations of the tyrosinase gene in Indo-Pakistani patients with type I (tyrosinase-deficient) oculocutaneous albinsm (OCA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripathi, R.K.; Droetto, S.; Strunk, K.M.; Holmes, S.A.; Spritz, R.A. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)); Bundey, S.; Musarella, M.A.

    1993-12-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is a group of autosomal recessive disorders characterized by deficient synthesis of melanin pigment. Type I (tyrosinase-deficient) OCA results from mutations of the tyrosinase gene (TYR gene) encoding tyrosinase, the enzyme that catalyzes the first two steps of melanin biosynthesis. Mutations of the TYR gene have been identified in a large number of patients, most of Caucasian ethnic origin, with various forms of type I OCA. The authors present an analysis of the TYR gene in eight Indo-Pakistani patients with type I OCA. The authors describe four novel TYR gene mutations and a fifth mutation previously observed in a Caucasian patient. 16 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Study of nucleophosmin (NPM) gene mutation in patients with acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张悦

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate nucleophosmin (NPM) gene mutations in patients with de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with normal cytogenetics and primary myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Methods Genomic DNA corresponding to exon 12 of NPM gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 40 AML patients (28 case untreated and 12 in first remission) and

  6. A novel deletion mutation of ATP7A gene in a Chinese family with Menkes disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Li-ping; L(U) Jun-lan; WANG Xiao-hui; ZOU Li-ping

    2008-01-01

    @@ Menkes disease is a rare X-linked recessive hereditary disorder first described bv Menkes et al in 1962.1The gene mutation results in clinical features including pili torti, unusual facies, mental/growth retardation and metabolic dysfunction.The Dathogenic gene ATP7A was identified in 1993.

  7. Macrosomia and Hyperinsulinaemic Hypoglycaemia in Patients with Heterozygous Mutations in the HNF4A Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Glaser, Benjamin

    2007-01-01

    The author discusses a new study reporting the birth weight of patients carrying a mutation in either of two closely related genes associated with maturity-onset diabetes of the young, testing the hypothesis that the primary defect caused by these genes results in decreased insulin secretion.

  8. R102W mutation in the RS1 gene responsible for retinoschisis and recurrent glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu-Feng Huang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To identify the mutations in RS1 gene associated with typical phenotype of X-linked juvenile retinoschisis (XLRS and a rare condition of concomitant glaucoma.METHODS: Complete ophthalmic examinations were performed in the proband. The coding regions of the RS1 gene that encode retinoschisin were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and directly sequenced.RESULTS: The proband showed a typical phenotype of XLRS with large peripheral retinal schisis in both eyes, involving the macula and combined with foveal cystic change, reducing visual acuity. A typical phenotype of recurrent glaucoma with high intraocular pressure (IOP and reduced visual field was also demonstrated with the patient. Mutation analysis of RS1 gene revealed R102W (c.304C>T mutations in the affected male, and his mother was proved to be a carrier with the causative mutation and another synonymous polymorphism (c.576C>CT.CONCLUSION: We identified the genetic variations of a Chinese family with typical phenotype of XLRS and glaucoma. The severe XLRS phenotypes associated with R102W mutations reveal that the mutation determines a notable alteration in the function of the retinoschisin protein. Identification of the disease-causing mutation is beneficial for future clinical references.

  9. The humanδ2 glutamate receptor gene is not mutated in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinxiang Huang; Aiyu Lin; Haiyan Dong; Chaodong Wang

    2014-01-01

    The human glutamate receptor delta 2 gene (GRID2) shares 90%homology with the orthologous mouse gene. The mouse Grid2 gene is involved with functions of the cerebellum and sponta-neous mutation of Grid2 leads to a spinocerebellar ataxia-like phenotype. To investigate whether such mutations occur in humans, we screened for mutations in the coding sequence of GRID2 in 24 patients with familial or sporadic spinocerebellar ataxia and in 52 normal controls. We de-tected no point mutations or insertion/deletion mutations in the 16 exons of GRID2. However, a polymorphic 4 nucleotide deletion (IVS5-121_-118 GAGT) and two single nucleotide polymor-phisms (c.1251G>T and IVS14-63C>G) were identiifed. The frequency of these polymorphisms was similar between spinocerebellar ataxia patients and normal controls. These data indicate that spontaneous mutations do not occur in GRID2 and that the incidence of spinocerebellar ataxia in humans is not associated with GRID2 mutation or polymorphisms.

  10. Kallmann syndrome: mutations in the genes encoding prokineticin-2 and prokineticin receptor-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Dodé

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Kallmann syndrome combines anosmia, related to defective olfactory bulb morphogenesis, and hypogonadism due to gonadotropin-releasing hormone deficiency. Loss-of-function mutations in KAL1 and FGFR1 underlie the X chromosome-linked form and an autosomal dominant form of the disease, respectively. Mutations in these genes, however, only account for approximately 20% of all Kallmann syndrome cases. In a cohort of 192 patients we took a candidate gene strategy and identified ten and four different point mutations in the genes encoding the G protein-coupled prokineticin receptor-2 (PROKR2 and one of its ligands, prokineticin-2 (PROK2, respectively. The mutations in PROK2 were detected in the heterozygous state, whereas PROKR2 mutations were found in the heterozygous, homozygous, or compound heterozygous state. In addition, one of the patients heterozygous for a PROKR2 mutation was also carrying a missense mutation in KAL1, thus indicating a possible digenic inheritance of the disease in this individual. These findings reveal that insufficient prokineticin-signaling through PROKR2 leads to abnormal development of the olfactory system and reproductive axis in man. They also shed new light on the complex genetic transmission of Kallmann syndrome.

  11. Novel plasminogen gene mutations in Turkish patients with type I plasminogen deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dönmez-Demir, Buket; Celkan, Tiraje; Sarper, Nazan; Deda, Gülhis; İnce, Elif; Çalişkan, Ümran; Öztürk, Gülyüz; Karagün, Barbaros; Küpesiz, Alphan; Tokgöz, Hüseyin; Akar, Nejat; Özdağ, Hilal

    2016-09-01

    The plasminogen (Plg) protein is the inactive proenzyme form of plasmin that dissolves fibrin thrombi by a process called fibrinolysis. It has been shown that homozygous or compound-heterozygous deficiency of this protein is a major cause of a rare inflammatory disease affecting mainly mucous membranes found in different body sites. In this study, five individual Turkish patients and nine Turkish families with type 1 Plg deficiency were investigated for PLG gene mutations. All of the coding regions of the PLG gene mutations were screened for mutations using denaturing high-pressure liquid chromatography (DHPLC). Samples showing a different DHPLC profile were subjected to DNA sequencing analysis. Here, we described five novel mutations namely, Cys49Ter, +1 IVS6 G>A, Gly218Val, Tyr283Cys, and Gly703Asp. Previously identified five nonsynonymous (Lys38Glu, Glu180Lys, Gly420Asp, Asp453Asn, Pro763Ser), five synonymous (330 C>T, 582 C>T, 771 T>C, 1083 A>G, 2286 T>G), and a 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) mutation (c.*45 A>G) were also reported in this present study. In this study, we have identified a total of eight mutations, five of which are novel. The mutations/polymorphisms identified in eight of the patients do not explain the disease phenotype. These cases probably carry other pathological mutations (homozygous or compound heterozygous) that cannot be detected by DHPLC. PMID:26340456

  12. BRCA1 and BRCA2 Gene Mutations Screening In Sporadic Breast Cancer Patients In Kazakhstan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ainur R. Akilzhanova

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: A large number of distinct mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have been reported worldwide, but little is known regarding the role of these inherited susceptibility genes in breast cancer risk among Kazakhstan women. Aim: To evaluate the role of BRCA1/2 mutations in Kazakhstan women presenting with sporadic breast cancer. Methods: We investigated the distribution and nature of polymorphisms in BRCA1 and BRCA2 entire coding regions in 156 Kazakhstan sporadic breast cancer cases and 112 age-matched controls using automatic direct sequencing. Results: We identified 22 distinct variants, including 16 missense mutations and 6 polymorphisms in BRCA1/2 genes. In BRCA1, 9 missense mutations and 3 synonymous polymorphisms were observed. In BRCA2, 7 missense mutations and 3 polymorphisms were detected. There was a higher prevalence of observed mutations in Caucasian breast cancer cases compared to Asian cases (p<0.05; higher frequencies of sequence variants were observed in Asian controls. No recurrent or founder mutations were observed in BRCA1/2 genes. There were no statistically significant differences in age at diagnosis, tumor histology, size of tumor, and lymph node involvement between women with breast cancer with or without the BRCA sequence alterations. Conclusions: Considering the majority of breast cancer cases are sporadic, the present study will be helpful in the evaluation of the need for the genetic screening of BRCA1/2 mutations and reliable genetic counseling for Kazakhstan sporadic breast cancer patients. Evaluation of common polymorphisms and mutations and breast cancer risk in families with genetic predisposition to breast cancer is ongoing in another current investigation. 

  13. Identification of new mutations in the NF2 tumor suppressor gene in schwannomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guida, M.; Welling, B.; Prior, T.W. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is a severe genetic disorder with an incidence of approximately 1 in 40,000 individuals and is characterized by the formation of multiple benign nervous system tumors. The clinical hallmark of NF2 is the bilateral occurrence of schwannomas on the eighth cranial nerve (vestibular schwannomas). Recently, it has been shown that loss or inactivation of a tumor suppressor gene located in chromosome band 22q12 is the molecular cause of NF2 tumorigenesis. Also, mutations in the NF2 gene have now been identified in patients with sporadic vestibular schwannomas (unilateral schwannomas). We have completed the screening of 80% of the NF2 coding sequence of DNA from 13 sporadic schwannomas and 2 schwannomas from NF2 patients. Using heteroduplex analysis and direct sequencing, we found 13 novel mutations located in 7 different exons with a small cluster (46% of the mutations) located in the central portion of the gene. All of the mutations were unique to single patients. In three tumors, both NF2 alleles were mutated. The types of mutations found include: small deletions ranging from 1 to 30 base pairs, nonsense mutations, a single missense mutation and a splice donor site alteration. It appears that small deletions are the most common type of NF2 gene mutation. We also have developed a dosage test based on quantitative PCR and hybridization with specific probes to detect the loss of heterozygosity. We found that 7 out of 15 schwannomas (47%) show loss of heterozygosity. We are currently extending the analysis to all of the NF2 exons and DNA from 60 additional schwannomas.

  14. Association between loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene and self-reported food allergy and alcohol sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, Allan; Fenger, Runa V; Husemoen, Lise Lotte Nystrup;

    2013-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations of the filaggrin (FLG) gene cause an impaired skin barrier and increase the risk of atopic dermatitis. Interestingly, FLG mutations have also been found to be associated with a high risk of peanut allergy.......Loss-of-function mutations of the filaggrin (FLG) gene cause an impaired skin barrier and increase the risk of atopic dermatitis. Interestingly, FLG mutations have also been found to be associated with a high risk of peanut allergy....

  15. P53 Gene Mutation as Biomarker of Radiation Induced Cell Injury and Genomic Instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gene expression profiling and its mutation has become one of the most widely used approaches to identify genes and their functions in the context of identify and categorize genes to be used as radiation effect markers including cell and tissue sensitivities. Ionizing radiation produces genetic damage and changes in gene expression that may lead to cancer due to specific protein that controlling cell proliferation altered the function, its expression or both. P53 protein encoded by p53 gene plays an important role in protecting cell by inducing growth arrest and or cell suicide (apoptosis) after deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage induced by mutagen such as ionizing radiation. The mutant and thereby dysfunctional of this gene was found in more than 50% of various human cancers, but it is as yet unclear how p53 mutations lead to neoplastic development. Wild-type p53 has been postulated to play a role in DNA repair, suggesting that expression of mutant forms of p53 might alter cellular resistance to the DNA damage caused by radiation. Moreover, p53 is thought to function as a cell cycle checkpoint after irradiation, also suggesting that mutant p53 might change the cellular proliferative response to radiation. P53 mutations affect the cellular response to DNA damage, either by increasing DNA repair processes or, possibly, by increasing cellular tolerance to DNA damage. The association of p53 mutations with increased radioresistance suggests that alterations in the p53 gene might lead to oncogenic transformation. Current attractive model of carcinogenesis also showed that p53 gene is the major target of radiation. The majority of p53 mutations found so far is single base pair changes ( point mutations), which result in amino acid substitutions or truncated forms of the p53 protein, and are widely distributed throughout the evolutionary conserved regions of the gene. Examination of p53 mutations in human cancer also shows an association between particular carcinogens and

  16. A mutation in the MATP gene causes the cream coat colour in the horse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guérin Gérard

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In horses, basic colours such as bay or chestnut may be partially diluted to buckskin and palomino, or extremely diluted to cream, a nearly white colour with pink skin and blue eyes. This dilution is expected to be controlled by one gene and we used both candidate gene and positional cloning strategies to identify the "cream mutation". A horse panel including reference colours was established and typed for different markers within or in the neighbourhood of two candidate genes. Our data suggest that the causal mutation, a G to A transition, is localised in exon 2 of the MATP gene leading to an aspartic acid to asparagine substitution in the encoded protein. This conserved mutation was also described in mice and humans, but not in medaka.

  17. Nonsense Mutations in the Shelterin Complex Genes ACD and TERF2IP in Familial Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoude, Lauren G.; Pritchard, Antonia L.; Robles-Espinoza, Carla Daniela; Wadt, Karin; Harland, Mark; Choi, Jiyeon; Gartside, Michael; Quesada, Víctor; Johansson, Peter; Palmer, Jane M.; Ramsay, Andrew J.; Zhang, Xijun; Jones, Kristine; Symmons, Judith; Holland, Elizabeth A.; Schmid, Helen; Bonazzi, Vanessa; Woods, Susan; Dutton-Regester, Ken; Stark, Mitchell S.; Snowden, Helen; van Doorn, Remco; Montgomery, Grant W.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Keane, Thomas M.; López-Otín, Carlos; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Olsson, Håkan; Ingvar, Christian; Borg, Åke; Gruis, Nelleke A.; Trent, Jeffrey M.; Jönsson, Göran; Bishop, D. Timothy; Mann, Graham J.; Newton-Bishop, Julia A.; Brown, Kevin M.; Adams, David J.; Hayward, Nicholas K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The shelterin complex protects chromosomal ends by regulating how the telomerase complex interacts with telomeres. Following the recent finding in familial melanoma of inactivating germline mutations in POT1, encoding a member of the shelterin complex, we searched for mutations in the other five components of the shelterin complex in melanoma families. Methods: Next-generation sequencing techniques were used to screen 510 melanoma families (with unknown genetic etiology) and control cohorts for mutations in shelterin complex encoding genes: ACD, TERF2IP, TERF1, TERF2, and TINF 2. Maximum likelihood and LOD [logarithm (base 10) of odds] analyses were used. Mutation clustering was assessed with χ2 and Fisher’s exact tests. P values under .05 were considered statistically significant (one-tailed with Yates’ correction). Results: Six families had mutations in ACD and four families carried TERF2IP variants, which included nonsense mutations in both genes (p.Q320X and p.R364X, respectively) and point mutations that cosegregated with melanoma. Of five distinct mutations in ACD, four clustered in the POT1 binding domain, including p.Q320X. This clustering of novel mutations in the POT1 binding domain of ACD was statistically higher (P = .005) in melanoma probands compared with population control individuals (n = 6785), as were all novel and rare variants in both ACD (P = .040) and TERF2IP (P = .022). Families carrying ACD and TERF2IP mutations were also enriched with other cancer types, suggesting that these variants also predispose to a broader spectrum of cancers than just melanoma. Novel mutations were also observed in TERF1, TERF2, and TINF2, but these were not convincingly associated with melanoma. Conclusions: Our findings add to the growing support for telomere dysregulation as a key process associated with melanoma susceptibility. PMID:25505254

  18. Soluble normal and mutated DNA sequences from single-copy genes in human blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorenson, G D; Pribish, D M; Valone, F H; Memoli, V A; Bzik, D J; Yao, S L

    1994-01-01

    Healthy individuals have soluble (extracellular) DNA in their blood, and increased amounts are present in cancer patients. Here we report the detection of specific sequences of the cystic fibrosis and K-ras genes in plasma DNA from normal donors by amplification with the polymerase chain reaction. In addition, mutated K-ras sequences are identified by polymerase chain reaction utilizing allele-specific primers in the plasma or serum from three patients with pancreatic carcinoma that contain mutated K-ras genes. The mutations are confirmed by direct sequencing. These results indicate that sequences of single-copy genes can be identified in normal plasma and that the sequences of mutated oncogenes can be detected and identified with allele-specific amplification by polymerase chain reaction in plasma or serum from patients with malignant tumors containing identical mutated genes. Mutated oncogenes in plasma and serum may represent tumor markers that could be useful for diagnosis, determining response to treatment, and predicting prognosis. PMID:8118388

  19. Genetic Basis for Diagnosis of Novel Mutation of LDL Receptor Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia Perwaiz Khan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The low density lipoprotein (LDL receptor is a cell-surface protein that regulates plasma cholesterol by specific uptake of LDL particles from the plasma. Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH is autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemias that predispose to premature coronary artery diseases. Familial hypercholesterolemia is caused by sequence variations in LDL receptor gene.Aim & Objective: The molecular analysis of low density lipoprotein for diagnosis of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH, an autosomal dominant disease caused by a multitude of LDL receptor (LDLR gene mutations and confirmation of these mutations by DNA sequencing.Methods: Polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification of type specific primers allowed the rapid detection of point mutations in exon 3, 4, 9, and 14 of the low density lipoprotein receptor gene in hypercholesterolemia patients. In our study we screened 120 patients with hypercholesterolemia by lipid profiles after twelve hours fasting and with family history of premature coronary heart diseases.Results: Genomic DNA was extracted from blood samples of an apparently healthy control group and hypercholesterolemia patients with LDL > 160mg/dL and clinical features of FH to detect mutations in exons 3, 4, 9, and 14 of the LDLR gene, with modification in the technique by using type-specific primers. Discussion/ Conclusions: The frequency of heterozygous FH was noted that 35% were classical and 65% probable cases were observed with mutation at exon 3 and 4. The mutations reported were further confirmed by DNA sequencing.

  20. Identification of FVIII gene mutations in patients with hemophilia A using new combinatorial sequencing by hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chetta M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Standard methods of mutation detection are time consuming in Hemophilia A (HA rendering their application unavailable in some analysis such as prenatal diagnosis. Objectives: To evaluate the feasibility of combinatorial sequencing-by-hybridization (cSBH as an alternative and reliable tool for mutation detection in FVIII gene. Patients/Methods: We have applied a new method of cSBH that uses two different colors for detection of multiple point mutations in the FVIII gene. The 26 exons encompassing the HA gene were analyzed in 7 newly diagnosed Italian patients and in 19 previously characterized individuals with FVIII deficiency. Results: Data show that, when solution-phase TAMRA and QUASAR labeled 5-mer oligonucleotide sets mixed with unlabeled target PCR templates are co-hybridized in the presence of DNA ligase to universal 6-mer oligonucleotide probe-based arrays, a number of mutations can be successfully detected. The technique was reliable also in identifying a mutant FVIII allele in an obligate heterozygote. A novel missense mutation (Leu1843Thr in exon 16 and three novel neutral polymorphisms are presented with an updated protocol for 2-color cSBH. Conclusions: cSBH is a reliable tool for mutation detection in FVIII gene and may represent a complementary method for the genetic screening of HA patients.

  1. MEFV Gene Profile in Northwest of Iran, Twelve Common MEFV Gene Mutations Analysis in 216 Patients with Familial Mediterranean Fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Salehzadeh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF is a hereditary autoinflammatory disease with autosomal recessive inheritance pattern often seen around the Mediterranean Sea. It is characterized by recurrent episodes of fever and polyserositis and rash. Recently, MEFV gene analysis determines the definitive diagnosis of FMF. In this study, we analyzed 12 MEFV gene mutations in more than 200 FMF patients, previously diagnosed by Tel-Hashomer clinical criteria, in northwest of Iran, located in the proximity of the Mediterranean Sea. In the northwest of Iran (Ardabil, 216 patients with FMF diagnosis, based on Tel-Hashomer criteria, referred to the genetic laboratory to be tested for the following mutations; P369S, F479L, M680I(G/C, M680I(G/A, I692del, M694V, M694I, K695R, V726A, A744S, R761H, E148Q. All patients were screened for MEFV gene mutations by a reverse hybridization assay (FMF Strip Assay, Vienna lab, Vienna, Austria according to manufacturer’s instructions. Among these FMF patients, no mutation was detected in 51 (23/62% patients, but 165 (76/38% patients had one or two mutations, 33 patients (15/28% homozygous, 86 patients (39/81% compound heterozygous and 46 patients (21/29% were heterozygous. The most common mutations were M694V (23/61%, V726A (11/11% and E148Q (9/95% respectively. MEFV gene mutations showed similarities and dissimilarities in different ethnic groups, while it is common among Arabs and Armenians genotype. Since common 12 MEFV gene analysis could not detect up to 50% of our patients, who had FMF on the basis of clinical Tel-Hashomer criteria, clinical criteria is still the best way in the diagnosis of FMF in this area.

  2. Spectrum of mutations in sarcoglycan genes in the Mumbai region of western India: High prevalence of 525del T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadilkar Satish

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : While the clinical and immunocytochemical features of sarcoglycanopathies have been reported from India, genetic aspects have not been studied. There is large variation in the sarcoglycan mutations among the studied populations. Aim : To study the spectrum of mutations in sarcoglycan genes (SG. Materials and Methods : Patients fulfilling Bushby′s criteria for limb girdle muscular dystrophy were prospectively analyzed. Patients gave their medical history and underwent a clinical examination, serum creatine kinase estimation, electrophysiology, muscle biopsy with immunostaining for alpha, beta, gamma, and delta subunits and mutational analysis using denaturing high pressure liquid chromatography and direct sequencing. Results : Mutations in SG accounted for 26.4% of the cohort of limb girdle muscular dystrophy. The mean age of these 18 patients was 22.5 years. Generally, proximal weakness affected the flexor and adductor compartments of the lower and upper limbs. The clinical profile of various mutations was indistinguishable from each other. Gamma SG mutations were most common, seen in 8 patients, followed by delta SG mutation in 5 patients and alpha mutation in 4 patients, while only 1 patient had mutation in the beta sarcoglycan gene. The most prevalent mutation in the gamma SG gene was 525del T. This is of interest as the mutation has been known to exist only in specific populations. Conclusion : This study, the first mutational analysis of Indian patients with sarcoglycanopathies suggests gamma SG mutations were the most common and the most prevalent mutation in the gamma SG gene was 525del T.

  3. Natural selection against a circadian clock gene mutation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoelstra, Kamiel; Wikelski, Martin; Daan, Serge; Loudon, Andrew S I; Hau, Michaela

    2016-01-19

    Circadian rhythms with an endogenous period close to or equal to the natural light-dark cycle are considered evolutionarily adaptive ("circadian resonance hypothesis"). Despite remarkable insight into the molecular mechanisms driving circadian cycles, this hypothesis has not been tested under natural conditions for any eukaryotic organism. We tested this hypothesis in mice bearing a short-period mutation in the enzyme casein kinase 1ε (tau mutation), which accelerates free-running circadian cycles. We compared daily activity (feeding) rhythms, survivorship, and reproduction in six replicate populations in outdoor experimental enclosures, established with wild-type, heterozygous, and homozygous mice in a Mendelian ratio. In the release cohort, survival was reduced in the homozygote mutant mice, revealing strong selection against short-period genotypes. Over the course of 14 mo, the relative frequency of the tau allele dropped from initial parity to 20%. Adult survival and recruitment of juveniles into the population contributed approximately equally to the selection for wild-type alleles. The expression of activity during daytime varied throughout the experiment and was significantly increased by the tau mutation. The strong selection against the short-period tau allele observed here contrasts with earlier studies showing absence of selection against a Period 2 (Per2) mutation, which disrupts internal clock function, but does not change period length. These findings are consistent with, and predicted by the theory that resonance of the circadian system plays an important role in individual fitness. PMID:26715747

  4. 2004 Annual Meeting - Genes, Mutations and Disease: The Environmental Connection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leona D. Samson, Ph.D.

    2004-08-23

    The Meeting consisted of 9 Symposia, 4 Keynote Lectures, 3 Platform Sessions and 4 Poster Sessions. In addition there were Breakfast Meetings for Special Interest Groups designed to inform attendees about the latest advances in environmental mutagenesis research. Several of the topics to be covered at this broad meeting will be of interest to the Department of Energy, Office of Science. The relevance of this meeting to the DOE derives from the fact that low dose radiation may represent one of the most significant sources of human mutations that are attributable to the environment. The EMS membership, and those who attended the EMS Annual Meeting were interested in both chemical and radiation induced biological effects, such as cell death, mutation, teratogenesis, carcinogenesis and aging. These topics thate were presented at the 2004 EMS Annual meeting that were of clear interest to DOE include: human variation in cancer susceptibility, unusual mechanisms of mutation, germ and stem cell mutagenesis, recombination and the maintenance of genomic stability, multiple roles for DNA mismatch repair, DNA helicases, mutation, cancer and aging, Genome-wide transcriptional responses to environmental change, Telomeres and genomic stability: when ends don?t meet, systems biology approach to cell phenotypic decision processes, and the surprising biology of short RNAs. Poster and platform sessions addressed topics related to environmental mutagen exposure, DNA repair, mechanisms of mutagenesis, epidemiology, genomic and proteomics and bioinformatics. These sessions were designed to give student, postdocs and more junior scientists a chance to present their workl.

  5. Frequency of mutations and polymorphisms in borderline ovarian tumors of known cancer genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemke-Hale, Katherine; Shipman, Kristy; Kitsou-Mylona, Isidora; de Castro, David G; Hird, Vicky; Brown, Robert; Flanagan, James; Gabra, Hani; Mills, Gordon B; Agarwal, Roshan; El-Bahrawy, Mona

    2013-04-01

    Borderline ovarian tumors represent an understudied subset of ovarian tumors. Most studies investigating aberrations in borderline tumors have focused on KRAS/BRAF mutations. In this study, we conducted an extensive analysis of mutations and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in borderline ovarian tumors. Using the Sequenom MassArray platform, we investigated 160 mutations/polymorphisms in 33 genes involved in cell signaling, apoptosis, angiogenesis, cell cycle regulation and cellular senescence. Of 52 tumors analyzed, 33 were serous, 18 mucinous and 1 endometrioid. KRAS c.35G>A p.Gly12Asp mutations were detected in eight tumors (six serous and two mucinous), BRAF V600E mutations in two serous tumors, and PIK3CA H1047Y and PIK3CA E542K mutations in a serous and an endometrioid BOT, respectively. CTNNB1 mutation was detected in a serous tumor. Potentially functional polymorphisms were found in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), ABCB1, FGFR2 and PHLPP2. VEGF polymorphisms were the most common and detected at four loci. PHLPP2 polymorphisms were more frequent in mucinous as compared with serous tumors (P=0.04), with allelic imbalance in one case. This study represents the largest and most comprehensive analysis of mutations and functional SNPs in borderline ovarian tumors to date. At least 25% of borderline ovarian tumors harbor somatic mutations associated with potential response to targeted therapeutics. PMID:23174937

  6. Analysis of HFE and non-HFE gene mutations in Brazilian patients with hemochromatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Lisboa Bittencourt

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Approximately one-half of Brazilian patients with hereditary hemochromatosis (HH are neither homozygous for the C282Y mutation nor compound heterozygous for the H63D and C282Y mutations that are associated with HH in Caucasians. Other mutations have been described in the HFE gene as well as in genes involved in iron metabolism, such as transferrin receptor 2 (TfR2 and ferroportin 1 (SCL40A1. AIMS: To evaluate the role of HFE, TfR2 and SCL40A1 mutations in Brazilian subjects with HH. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Nineteen male subjects (median age 42 [range: 20-72] years with HH were evaluated using the Haemochromatosis StripAssay A®. This assay is capable of detecting twelve HFE mutations, which are V53M, V59M, H63D, H63H, S65C, Q127H, P160delC, E168Q, E168X, W169X, C282Y and Q283, four TfR2 mutations, which are E60X, M172K, Y250X, AVAQ594-597del, and two SCL40A1 mutations, which are N144H and V162del. RESULTS: In our cohort, nine (47% patients were homozygous for the C282Y mutation, two (11% were heterozygous for the H63D mutation, and one each (5% was either heterozygous for C282Y or compound heterozygous for C282Y and H63D. No other mutations in the HFE, TfR2 or SCL40A1 genes were observed in the studied patients. CONCLUSIONS: One-third of Brazilian subjects with the classical phenotype of HH do not carry HFE or other mutations that are currently associated with the disease in Caucasians. This observation suggests a role for other yet unknown mutations in the aforementioned genes or in other genes involved in iron homeostasis in the pathogenesis of HH in Brazil.

  7. Missense mutation of the {beta}-cardiac myosin heavy-chain gene in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, Shoichi; Matsuoka, Rumiko; Hirayama, Kenji; Sakurai, Hisanao [Heart Inst. of Japan, Tokyo (Japan)] [and others

    1995-09-11

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy occurs as an autosomal dominant familial disorder or as a sporadic disease without familial involvement. We describe a missense mutation of the {beta}-cardiac myosin heavy chain (MHC) gene, a G to T transversion (741 Gly{r_arrow}Trp) identified by direct sequencing of exon 20 in four individuals affected with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Three individuals with sporadic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, whose parents are clinically and genetically unaffected, had sequence variations of exon 34 of the {alpha}-cardiac MHC gene (a C to T transversion, 1658 Asp{r_arrow}Asp, resulting in FokI site polymorphism), of intron 33 of the {alpha}-cardiac MHC gene (a G to A and an A to T transversion), and also of intron 14 of the {beta}-cardiac MHC gene (a C to T transversion in a patient with Noonan syndrome). Including our case, 30 missense mutations of the {beta}-cardiac MHC gene in 49 families have been reported thus far worldwide. Almost all are located in the region of the gene coding for the globular head of the molecule, and only one mutation was found in both Caucasian and Japanese families. Missense mutations of the {Beta}-cardiac MHC gene in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy may therefore differ according to race. 29 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Correlation of p53 gene mutation and expression of P53 protein in cholangiocarcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Fang Liu; Hao Zhang; Shi-Guang Zhu; Xian-Ting Zhou; Hai-Long Su; Zheng Xu; Shao-Jun Li

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the tumor suppressor gene p53 mutations and study the correlation of p53 gene mutation and the expression of P53 protein in cholangiocarcinoma.METHODS: A total of 36 unselected, frozen samples of cholangiocarcinoma were collected. p53 gene status(exon 5-8) and P53 protein were examined by automated sequencing and immunohistochemical staining, combined with the clinical parameters of patients.RESULTS: p53 gene mutations were found in 22 of 36 (61.1%) patients. Nineteen of 36 (52.8%) patients were positive for P53 protein expression. There were significant differences in extent of differentiation and invasion between the positive and negative expression of P53 protein. However, there were no significant differences in pathologic parameters between the mutations and non-mutations.CONCLUSION: The alterations of the p53 gene evaluated by DNA sequence analysis is relatively accurate. Expression of P53 protein could not act as an independent index to estimate the prognosis of cholangiocarcinoma.

  9. Mutations of dual oxidase 2 (DUOX2) gene among patients with permanent and transient congenital hypothyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The prevalence of congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is high in Isfahan, Iran. In addition, it has different etiologies compared with other countries. The rate of parental consanguinity is also high in the city. Moreover, DUOX2 gene is effective in transient CH and permanent CH due to dyshormonogenesis. Therefore, the aim of this research was to investigate the mutations of DUOX2 gene in patients with transient CH and permanent CH due to dyshormonogenesis. Methodology: In this descriptive, prospective study, patients diagnosed with transient and permanent CH due to dyshormonogenesis during CH screening program were selected. Venous blood samples were obtained to determine the 3 mutations (Q36H, R376W, and D506N) of DUOX2 gene using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method by specific primers and complementary methods such as restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP). Results: In this study, 25 patients with transient CH and 33 subjects with permanent CH due to dyshormonogenesis were studied. In addition, 30 children were studied as the control group. We did not find any mutations of the 3 mentioned mutations of DUOX2 gene. Conclusion: Considering the findings of the current study, further studies with other methods are required to evaluate other gene mutations such as pendrin, sodium-iodide symporter (NIS) and thyroglobulin. (author)

  10. Common Mediterranean Fever (MEFV Gene Mutations Associated with Ankylosing Spondylitis in Turkish Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serbulent Yigit

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ankylosing spondylitis (AS is a common inflammatory rheumatic disease. Mediterranean fever (MEFV gene, which has already been identified as being responsible for familial Mediterranean fever (FMF, is also a suspicious gene for AS because of the clinical association of these two diseases. The aim of this study was to explore the frequency and clinical significance of MEFV gene mutations (M694V, M680I, V726A, E148Q and P369S in a cohort of Turkish patients with AS. Genomic DNAs of 103 AS patients and 120 controls were isolated and genotyped using polymerase chain reaction (PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP methods. There was a statistically significant difference of the MEFV gene mutation carrier rates between AS patients and healthy controls (p = 0.004, OR: 2.5, 95% CI: 1.32–4.76. This association was also observed in allele frequencies (p = 0.005, OR: 2.3, 95% CI: 1.27–4.2. A relatively higher frequency was observed for M694V mutation in AS patients than controls (10.7% versus 4.2% , p = 0.060. There were no significant differences between MEFV mutation carriers and non-carriers with respect to the clinical and demographic characteristics. The results of this study suggest that MEFV gene mutations are positively associated with a predisposition to develop AS.

  11. New novel mutation of the ATP7B gene in a family with Wilson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun-Young; Kim, Young-Hyun; Kim, Tae-Woo; Oh, Sun-Young; Kim, Dal-Sik; Shin, Byoung-Soo

    2012-02-15

    Wilson disease (WD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of copper metabolism. The WD gene codes for a copper transporting P-type ATPase (ATP7B) are located on chromosome 13q14.3. Mutation of this gene disrupts copper homeostasis, resulting in the accumulation of copper in the liver, brain, kidneys and corneas and copper toxication at these sites. Since the detection of the WD gene in 1993, approximately 300 disease-specific muations have been identified. We recently evaluated a Korean family with WD. The proband, a 17-year-old boy, visited our hospital due to abnormal behaviors including generalized slow movement, dysphagia, drooling and ataxia. Laboratory results revealed decreases in serum copper and ceruloplasmin and an increase in urinary excretion of copper. He had liver cirrhosis, brain lesions and Kayser-Fleischer corenal rings. Molecular genetic analysis of the ATP7B gene demonstrated that he was heterozygous for deletion mutation c.2697_2723del27 in exon 11. Further study of family members revealed that his father and younger brother had the same mutation. The c.2697_2723del27 deletion mutation in exon 11 has not yet been reported as a causative muation of WD and is an in-frame deletion not expected to lead to a frame shift. Therefore, we report a novel mutation of the ATP7B gene in a family with WD. PMID:22075048

  12. Novel insertion mutation of ABCB1 gene in an ivermectin-sensitive Border Collie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jae-Ik; Son, Hyoung-Won; Park, Seung-Cheol; Na, Ki-Jeong

    2010-12-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is encoded by the ABCB1 gene and acts as an efflux pump for xenobiotics. In the Border Collie, a nonsense mutation caused by a 4-base pair deletion in the ABCB1 gene is associated with a premature stop to P-gp synthesis. In this study, we examined the full-length coding sequence of the ABCB1 gene in an ivermectin-sensitive Border Collie that lacked the aforementioned deletion mutation. The sequence was compared to the corresponding sequences of a wild-type Beagle and seven ivermectin-tolerant family members of the Border Collie. When compared to the wild-type Beagle sequence, that of the ivermectin-sensitive Border Collie was found to have one insertion mutation and eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the coding sequence of the ABCB1 gene. While the eight SNPs were also found in the family members' sequences, the insertion mutation was found only in the ivermectin-sensitive dog. These results suggest the possibility that the SNPs are species-specific features of the ABCB1 gene in Border Collies, and that the insertion mutation may be related to ivermectin intolerance. PMID:21113104

  13. Alleged Detrimental Mutations in the SMPD1 Gene in Patients with Niemann-Pick Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosima Rhein

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Loss-of-function mutations in the sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 1 (SMPD1 gene are associated with decreased catalytic activity of acid sphingomyelinase (ASM and are the cause of the autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder Niemann-Pick disease (NPD types A and B. Currently, >100 missense mutations in SMPD1 are listed in the Human Gene Mutation Database. However, not every sequence variation in SMPD1 is detrimental and gives rise to NPD. We have analysed several alleged SMPD1 missense mutations mentioned in a recent publication and found them to be common variants of SMPD1 that give rise to normal in vivo and in vitro ASM activity. (Comment on Manshadi et al. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2015, 16, 6668–6676.

  14. Multiple mutations in a specific gene in a small geographic area: A common phenomenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zlotogora, J.; Bach, G.; Gieselmann, V.

    1996-01-01

    We read with interest the article from Allamand et al., which demonstrates in a genetic isolate the presence of at least six different haplotypes in the limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A chromosome. Several hypotheses were proposed by the authors to explain this finding, but, after the identification of calpain, the gene involved in the disorder, multiple mutations were proved to be at the origin of this observation. The authors proposed that both the presence of multiple distinct calpain mutations within the Reunion Island pedigrees and the relatively low frequency of the disease in the isolate may be explained by a digenic inheritance of the disorder. Their hypothesis postulates that, although calpain mutations may be frequent in all populations, the disease manifestations are controlled by another frequently mutated nuclear or mitochondrial gene in the Reunion isolate. 8 refs.

  15. Mutation analysis of the BRCA1 gene in Breast cancer Families

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutations in two genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, are responsible for approximately two thirds of all hereditary breast and ovarian cancers. In this study, we have examined patients from breast and/or ovarian cancer families in BRCA1, using the protein truncation test. The protein truncation test was used to screen for mutations leading to premature translational termination. The PCR-products were added to the TnT/T7 coupled reticulocyte lysate system (Promega) and the 35S-Met-labelled proteins were analyzed by gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. In a group of 26 tested patients we have detected one mutation affecting exon 11 in one of the BRCA1 alleles because, in addition to the normal product, a truncated protein was found after in vitro transcription and translation. The low frequency of BRCA1 mutations in the present study could be explained by the role of additional genes (e.g. BRCA2) in predisposed families. (authors)

  16. Two Mutations in Surfactant Protein C Gene Associated with Neonatal Respiratory Distress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Tarocco

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple mutations of surfactant genes causing surfactant dysfunction have been described. Surfactant protein C (SP-C deficiency is associated with variable clinical manifestations ranging from neonatal respiratory distress syndrome to lethal lung disease. We present an extremely low birth weight male infant with an unusual course of respiratory distress syndrome associated with two mutations in the SFTPC gene: C43-7G>A and 12T>A. He required mechanical ventilation for 26 days and was treated with 5 subsequent doses of surfactant with temporary and short-term efficacy. He was discharged at 37 weeks of postconceptional age without any respiratory support. During the first 16 months of life he developed five respiratory infections that did not require hospitalization. Conclusion. This mild course in our patient with two mutations is peculiar because the outcome in patients with a single SFTPC mutation is usually poor.

  17. Mutational Analysis of the TYR and OCA2 Genes in Four Chinese Families with Oculocutaneous Albinism

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yun; Wang, Zhi; Chen, Mengping; Fan, Ning; Yang, Jie; Liu, Lu; Wang, Ying; Liu, Xuyang

    2015-01-01

    Background Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is an autosomal recessive disorder. The most common type OCA1 and OCA2 are caused by homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the tyrosinase gene (TYR) and OCA2 gene, respectively. Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the molecular basis of oculocutaneous albinism in four Chinese families. Patients and Methods Four non-consanguineous OCA families were included in the study. The TYR and OCA2 genes of all individuals were amplified...

  18. Differences in the evolutionary history of disease genes affected by dominant or recessive mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Albà M Mar; Furney Simon J; López-Bigas Núria

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Global analyses of human disease genes by computational methods have yielded important advances in the understanding of human diseases. Generally these studies have treated the group of disease genes uniformly, thus ignoring the type of disease-causing mutations (dominant or recessive). In this report we present a comprehensive study of the evolutionary history of autosomal disease genes separated by mode of inheritance. Results We examine differences in protein and coding...

  19. Identification of a constitutional mutation in the WT1 gene in Taiwanese patients with Wilms tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Meng-Yao Lu; Wen-Chung Wang; Chiao-Wen Lin; Alice Chang; Yen-Chein Lai

    2014-01-01

    The overall frequency of WT1 gene alterations in Wilms tumor is still unclear in Taiwan. Here we conducted molecular genetic analysis of the WT1 gene in Taiwanese patients with Wilms tumor. Polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing were performed on DNA samples from blood and paraffin-embedded tumor specimens. A constitutional mutation in the WT1 gene was found in one DNA sample from peripheral blood lymphocytes. The remaining DNA samples from peripheral blood lym...

  20. Retinal dystrophies caused by mutations in the ABCA4 gene : an evaluation of the clinical spectrum

    OpenAIRE

    Klevering, Bert Jeroen

    2004-01-01

    In the past seven years, the ABCA4 gene has emerged as the most prominent gene in inherited retinal disease. Pathogenic ABCA4 mutations are the cause of all cases of Stargardt disease, and a portion of the cases of autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa and cone-rod dystrophy. Moreover, specific heterozygous alterations in this gene have been associated with age-related macular degeneration, although this role has been disputed by others. The papers in this thesis, joined in the six appendi...

  1. The application of asymmetric PCR-SSCP in gene mutation detecting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaohui ZHANG; Shangzhong XU; Xue GAO; Lupei ZHANG; Hongyan REN; Jinbao CHEN

    2008-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of asymmetric PCR-SSCP and the traditional PCR-SSCP were compared in this study.The mutations in 3'UTR of Smad4 gene of Luxi cattle and the Holstein cow were analyzed by asymmetric PCR-SSCP and one insert "T" mutation and one G/A mutation in this region were found.The G/A mutation created a HhaI restriction enzyme digestion position and the frequencies studied by asymmetric PCR-SSCP and HhaI-RFLP in 116 Luxi cattle and 75 Holstein cows were all the same.The asymmetric PCR-SSCP had fewer,clearer and more stabile bands than traditional PCR-SSCP.This indicates that the asymmetric PCR-SSCP is suited for mutation detection.

  2. Effects of a Mutation in the gyrA Gene on the Virulence of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez-Céspedes, Javier; Sáez-López, Emma; Frimodt-Møller, N.; Vila, Jordi; Soto, Sara M.

    2015-01-01

    Fluoroquinolones are among the drugs most extensively used for the treatment of bacterial infections in human and veterinary medicine. Resistance to quinolones can be chromosome or plasmid mediated. The chromosomal mechanism of resistance is associated with mutations in the DNA gyrase- and topoisomerase IV-encoding genes and mutations in regulatory genes affecting different efflux systems, among others. We studied the role of the acquisition of a mutation in the gyrA gene in the virulence and...

  3. Prothrombin Gene G20210A Mutation in Acute Deep Venous Thrombosis Patients with Poor Response to Warfarin Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Attia, F.M; Mikhailidis, D. P.; Reffat, S.A

    2009-01-01

    Aim: The pathogenesis of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) involves an interaction between hereditary and acquired factors. Prothrombin gene mutation is one of the hereditary risk factors. We evaluated the frequency of the prothrombin gene mutation in patients with DVT and its relation to oral warfarin anticoagulant therapy response. Methods: Prothrombin gene mutation was looked for in 40 DVT patients with poor response to warfarin. The results were compared with 40 DVT patients with a normal resp...

  4. Analysis of Y chromosome microdeletions and CFTR gene mutations as genetic markers of infertility in Serbian men

    OpenAIRE

    Dinić Jelena; Kušić Jelena; Nikolić Аleksandra; Divac Aleksandra; Ristanović Momčilo; Radojković Dragica

    2007-01-01

    Background/Aim. Impaired fertility of a male partner is the main cause of infertility in up to one half of all infertile couples. At the genetic level, male infertility can be caused by chromosome aberrations or gene mutations. The presence and types of Y chromosome microdeletions and cystic fybrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutations as genetic cause of male infertility was tested in Serbian men. The aim of this study was to analyze CFTR gene mutations and Y chromosome...

  5. A Novel c.554+5C>T Mutation in the DUOXA2 Gene Combined with p.R885Q Mutation in the DUOX2 Gene Causing Congenital Hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiao; Ma, Shao Gang; Qiu, Ya Li; Guo, Man Li; Shao, Xiao Juan

    2016-06-01

    The coexistence of mutations in the dual oxidase maturation factor 2 (DUOXA2) and dual oxidase 2 (DUOX2) genes is rarely identified in congenital hypothyroidism (CH). This study reports a boy with CH due to a novel splice-site mutation in the DUOXA2 gene and a missense mutation in the DUOX2 gene. A four-year-old boy was diagnosed with CH at neonatal screening and was enrolled in this study. The DUOXA2, DUOX2, thyroid peroxidase (TPO), and thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) genes were considered for genetic defects screening. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes, and Sanger sequencing was used to screen the mutations in the exon fragments. Family members of the patient and the controls were also enrolled and evaluated. The boy harbored compound heterozygous mutations including a novel splice-site mutation c.554+5C>T in the maternal DUOXA2 allele and c.2654G>A (p.R885Q) in the paternal DUOX2 allele. The germline mutations from his parents were consistent with an autosomal recessive inheritance pattern. No mutations in the TPO and TSHR genes were detected. A novel splice-site mutation c.554+5C>T in the DUOXA2 gene and a mutation p.R885Q in the DUOX2 gene were identified in a 4-year-old patient with goitrous CH. PMID:26758695

  6. Eight previously unidentified mutations found in the OA1 ocular albinism gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dufier Jean-Louis

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ocular albinism type 1 (OA1 is an X-linked ocular disorder characterized by a severe reduction in visual acuity, nystagmus, hypopigmentation of the retinal pigmented epithelium, foveal hypoplasia, macromelanosomes in pigmented skin and eye cells, and misrouting of the optical tracts. This disease is primarily caused by mutations in the OA1 gene. Methods The ophthalmologic phenotype of the patients and their family members was characterized. We screened for mutations in the OA1 gene by direct sequencing of the nine PCR-amplified exons, and for genomic deletions by PCR-amplification of large DNA fragments. Results We sequenced the nine exons of the OA1 gene in 72 individuals and found ten different mutations in seven unrelated families and three sporadic cases. The ten mutations include an amino acid substitution and a premature stop codon previously reported by our team, and eight previously unidentified mutations: three amino acid substitutions, a duplication, a deletion, an insertion and two splice-site mutations. The use of a novel Taq polymerase enabled us to amplify large genomic fragments covering the OA1 gene. and to detect very likely six distinct large deletions. Furthermore, we were able to confirm that there was no deletion in twenty one patients where no mutation had been found. Conclusion The identified mutations affect highly conserved amino acids, cause frameshifts or alternative splicing, thus affecting folding of the OA1 G protein coupled receptor, interactions of OA1 with its G protein and/or binding with its ligand.

  7. Novel polymerase gamma (POLG1) gene mutation in the linker domain associated with parkinsonism

    OpenAIRE

    Dolhun, Rachel; Presant, Erin M; Hedera, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background Mutations in the POLG1 gene have variable phenotypic presentations and a high degree of clinical suspicion is necessary for their recognition. Parkinsonism and ataxia are the most common movement disorders associated with POLG1 mutations but no phenotype-genotype correlation has been established. Case presentation We identified a male patient with progressive external ophthalmoplegia who also developed a progressive bradykinesia, rigidity and camptocormia in the third decade. Parki...

  8. p53 gene mutations, p53 protein accumulation and compartmentalization in colorectal adenocarcinoma.

    OpenAIRE

    Bosari, S.; Viale, G.; Roncalli, M; Graziani, D.; Borsani, G; Lee, A. K.; Coggi, G.

    1995-01-01

    p53 accumulation may occur in the nucleus and/or cytoplasm of neoplastic cells. Cytoplasmic accumulation has been reported to be an unfavorable, but not established, prognostic indicator in colorectal cancer. Different types of p53 intracellular compartmentalization could depend either on p53 gene mutations or on the interaction with p53 protein ligands. The purposes of our study were (1) to assess whether the different patterns of p53 accumulation are selectively associated with p53 mutation...

  9. A Novel WASP Gene Mutation in a Chinese Boy with Wiskott–Aldrich Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Hui; Hu, Cheng; Dang, Dan; Guo, Ying-Jie

    2014-01-01

    Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is a rare inherited X-linked recessive immunodeficiency disease characterized by eczema, thrombocytopenia, immune deficiency, and bloody diarrhea and is caused by WASP gene mutations. This study reports a case of WAS with a novel mutation. A newborn Chinese infant was admitted to the hospital because of intermittent bloody stools, recurrent infections, and persistent thrombocytopenia. Genetic analysis of the coding sequences and flanking splice sites of the WASP...

  10. Mutations in the human SIX3 gene in holoprosencephaly are loss of function

    OpenAIRE

    Domené, Sabina; Roessler, Erich; El-Jaick, Kenia B.; Snir, Mirit; Brown, Jamie L.; Vélez, Jorge I.; Bale, Sherri; Lacbawan, Felicitas; Muenke, Maximilian; Feldman, Benjamin

    2008-01-01

    Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is the most common developmental anomaly of the human forebrain; however, the genetics of this heterogeneous and etiologically complex malformation is incompletely understood. Heterozygous mutations in SIX3, a transcription factor gene expressed in the anterior forebrain and eyes during early vertebrate development, have been frequently detected in human HPE cases. However, only a few mutations have been investigated with limited functional studies that would confirm a...

  11. Rescue of non-sense mutated p53 tumor suppressor gene by aminoglycosides

    OpenAIRE

    Floquet, Célia; Deforges, Jules; Rousset, Jean-Pierre; Bidou, Laure

    2010-01-01

    Mutation-based treatments are a new development in genetic medicine, in which the nature of the mutation dictates the therapeutic strategy. Interest has recently focused on diseases caused by premature termination codons (PTCs). Drugs inducing the readthrough of these PTCs restore the production of a full-length protein. In this study, we explored the possibility of using aminoglycoside antibiotics to induce the production of a full-length functional p53 protein from a gene carrying a PTC. We...

  12. Screening for mutations of the cationic trypsinogen gene: are they of relevance in chronic alcoholic pancreatitis?

    OpenAIRE

    TEICH, N; MOSSNER;, J; Keim, V

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—In hereditary pancreatitis mutations of exons 2 (N21I) and 3 (R117H) of the cationic trypsinogen gene have been described. 
AIMS—To investigate whether the same mutations can also be found in patients with chronic alcoholic pancreatitis. 
METHODS—Leucocyte DNA was prepared from 23 patients with chronic alcoholic pancreatitis, 21 with alcoholic liver cirrhosis, 34 individuals from seven independent families with hereditary pancreatitis, and 15 healthy controls. DNA...

  13. Novel Hypoxanthine Guanine Phosphoribosyltransferase Gene Mutations in Saudi Arabian Hyperuricemia Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed Alanazi; Abdulrahman Saud Al-Arfaj; Zainularifeen Abduljaleel; Hussein Fahad Al-Arfaj; Narasimha Reddy Parine; Jilani Purusottapatnam Shaik; Zahid Khan; Akbar Ali Khan Pathan

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, a steady increase in the incidence of HPRT-related hyperuricemia (HRH) has been observed in Saudi Arabia. We examined all the nine exons of HPRT gene for mutations in ten biochemically confirmed hyperuricemia patients, including one female and three normal controls. In all, we identified 13 novel mutations in Saudi Arabian HPRT-related hyperuricemia patients manifesting different levels of uric acid. The Lys103Met alteration was highly recurrent and was observed in 50% o...

  14. Molecular and clinical studies in five index cases with novel mutations in the GLA gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zizzo, Carmela; Monte, Ines; Pisani, Antonio; Fatuzzo, Pasquale; Riccio, Eleonora; Rodolico, Margherita Stefania; Colomba, Paolo; Uva, Maurizio; Cammarata, Giuseppe; Alessandro, Riccardo; Iemolo, Francesco; Duro, Giovanni

    2016-03-01

    Fabry disease is a metabolic and lysosomal storage disorder caused by the functional defect of the α-galactosidase A enzyme; this defect is due to mutations in the GLA gene, that is composed of seven exons and is located on the long arm of the X-chromosome (Xq21-22). The enzymatic deficit is responsible for the accumulation of glycosphingolipids in lysosomes of different cellular types, mainly in those ones of vascular endothelium. It consequently causes a cellular and microvascular dysfunction. In this paper, we described five novel mutations in the GLA gene, related to absent enzymatic activity and typical manifestations of Fabry disease. We identified three mutations (c.846_847delTC, p.E341X and p.C382X) that lead to the introduction of a stop codon in positions 297, 341 and 382. Moreover we found a missense mutation (p.R227P) in the exon 5 of the GLA gene and a single point mutation (c.639+5 G>T) occurring five base pairs beyond the end of the exon 4. These mutations have never been found in our group of healthy control subjects >2300. The studied patients presented some clinical manifestations, such as cornea verticillata, hypo-anhidrosis, left ventricular hypertrophy, cerebrovascular disorders and renal failure, that, considering the null enzymatic activity, suggest that the new mutations reported here are related to the classic form of Fabry disease. The identification of novel mutations in patients with symptomatology referable to FD increases the molecular knowledge of the GLA gene and it gives clinicians an important support for the proper diagnosis of the disease. PMID:26691501

  15. EGFR gene-mutation status correlated with therapeutic decision making in lung adenocarcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Ren YY; Yao YB; Ma Q; Zhong DS

    2015-01-01

    Yaoyao Ren, Yibing Yao, Qing Ma, Diansheng Zhong Oncology Department, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between EGFR-mutation status and treatment efficacy for advanced lung adenocarcinoma patients. A total of 47 patients receiving erlotinib as first-line therapy were divided into two groups: the EGFR gene mutation group included 19 patients with known EGFR-sensiti...

  16. Frequent NF2 gene transcript mutations in sporadic meningiomas and vestibular schwannomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deprez, R.H.L.; Groen, N.A.; Zwarthoff, E.C.; Hagemeijer, A.; Van Drunen, E.; Bootsma, D.; Koper, J.W.; Avezaat, C.J.J. (Erasmus Univ., Rotterdam (Netherlands)); Bianchi, A.B.; Seizinger, B.R. (Bristol Myers-Squibb Pharmaceutical Research Institute, Princeton, NY (United States))

    1994-06-01

    The gene for the hereditary disorder neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2), which predisposes for benign CNS tumors such as vestibular schwannomas and meningiomas, has been assigned to chromosome 22 and recently has been isolated. Mutations in the NF2 gene were found in both sporadic meningiomas and vestibular schwannomas. However, so far only 6 of the 16 exons of the gene have been analyzed. In order to extend the analysis of an involvement of the NF2 gene in the sporadic counterparts of these NF2-related tumors, the authors have used reverse transcriptase-PCR amplification followed by SSCP and DNA sequence analysis to screen for mutations in the coding region of the NF2 gene. Analysis of the NF2 gene transcript in 53 unrelated patients with meningiomas and vestibular schwannomas revealed mutations in 32% of the sporadic meningiomas (n = 44), in 50% of the sporadic vestibular schwannomas (n = 4), in 100% of the tumors found in NF2 patients (n = 2), and in one of three tumors from multiple-meningioma patients. Of the 18 tumors in which a mutation in the NF2 gene transcript was observed and the copy number of chromosome 22 could be established, 14 also showed loss of (parts of) chromosome 22. This suggests that in sporadic meningiomas and NF2-associated tumors the NF2 gene functions as a recessive tumor-suppressor gene. The mutations detected resulted mostly in frameshifts, predicting truncations starting within the N-terminal half of the putative protein. 23 refs., 2 figs. 3 tabs.

  17. A Recessive Mutation in the Insulin Gene in Neonatal Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulmoein Eid Al-Agha

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal diabetes mellitus (DM is a persistent hyperglycemia occurring in the first 4-6 weeks of life that lasts more than two weeks and requires insulin for management. We report a case of a 23-day-old boy with neonatal diabetes due to recessive inheritance INS promoter C-331 C>A mutation accompanied by diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA. The hyperglycemia and ketoacidosis resolved by the 48th hour of treatment consisting of IV insulin and rehydration. Subsequently, insulin treatment was continued with neutral protamine Hagedorn (NPH insulin. Neonatal DM due to genetic mutation may mimic sepsis and should be kept in mind for all newborns who present with shortness of breath, vomiting, and dehydration.

  18. Mutations of Presenilin Genes in Dilated Cardiomyopathy and Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Duanxiang ; Parks, Sharie B. ; Kushner, Jessica D. ; Nauman, Deirdre ; Burgess, Donna ; Ludwigsen, Susan ; Partain, Julie ; Nixon, Randal R. ; Allen, Charles N. ; Irwin, Robert P. ; Jakobs, Petra M. ; Litt, Michael ; Hershberger, Ray E. 

    2006-01-01

    Two common disorders of the elderly are heart failure and Alzheimer disease (AD). Heart failure usually results from dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). DCM of unknown cause in families has recently been shown to result from genetic disease, highlighting newly discovered disease mechanisms. AD is the most frequent neurodegenerative disease of older Americans. Familial AD is caused most commonly by presenilin 1 (PSEN1) or presenilin 2 (PSEN2) mutations, a discovery that has greatly advanced the fiel...

  19. De novo mutations in histone modifying genes in congenital heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Zaidi, Samir; Choi, Murim; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Ma, Lijiang; Jiang, Jianming; Overton, John D; Romano-Adesman, Angela; Bjornson, Robert D.; Breitbart, Roger E.; Brown, Kerry K.; Carriero, Nicholas J.; Cheung, Yee Him; Deanfield, John; Depalma, Steve; Fakhro, Khalid A.

    2013-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most frequent birth defect, affecting 0.8% of live births1. Many cases occur sporadically and impair reproductive fitness, suggesting a role for de novo mutations. By analysis of exome sequencing of parent-offspring trios, we compared the incidence of de novo mutations in 362 severe CHD cases and 264 controls. CHD cases showed a significant excess of protein-altering de novo mutations in genes expressed in the developing heart, with an odds ratio of 7.5 f...

  20. De novo mutations in histone modifying genes in congenital heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Zaidi, Samir; Choi, Murim; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Ma, Lijiang; Jiang, Jianming; Overton, John D; Romano-Adesman, Angela; Bjornson, Robert D.; Breitbart, Roger E.; Brown, Kerry K.; Carriero, Nicholas J.; Cheung, Yee Him; Deanfield, John; Depalma, Steve; Fakhro, Khalid A.

    2013-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most frequent birth defect, affecting 0.8% of live births 1 . Many cases occur sporadically and impair reproductive fitness, suggesting a role for de novo mutations. By analysis of exome sequencing of parent-offspring trios, we compared the incidence of de novo mutations in 362 severe CHD cases and 264 controls. CHD cases showed a significant excess of protein-altering de novo mutations in genes expressed in the developing heart, with an odds ratio of 7.5...

  1. Development of ARMS PCR tests for detection of common CFTR gene mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Livshits L. A.; Pampukha V. M.; Soloviov O. O.

    2010-01-01

    Aim. To develop diagnostic assays, based on the amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) principle, for detection of common mutations in the CFTR gene using two approaches: standard PCR with further gel-electrophoresis and Real-Time PCR with SYBR Green. Materials. For this study we have chosen the following mutations: dF508, W1282X, R117H, 621 + 1G > T, 2143delT with the frequencies in Ukraine: dF508 – 43.3 %; 2143delT – 1.38 %; W1282X – 1.1 %; R117H, 621 + 1G > T – < 0.6 %. For the de...

  2. Parental source effect of inherited mutations in the dystrophin gene of mice and men

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kress, W.; Grimm, T.; Mueller, C.R. [Institute of Human Genetics, Wuerburg (Germany); Bittner, R. [Institute of Anatomy, Wein (Australia)

    1994-09-01

    Skewed X-inactivation has been suspected the genetic cause for some manifesting female carriers of BMD and DMD. To test whether a parental source effect on the protein expression of the dystrophin gene exists, we have set up backcrosses of mdx mice to wild type strains, enabling us to study the effect of the well-defined origin of the mutation on the dystrophin expression. In skeletal muscle sections the immunohistological staining patterns of dystrophin antibodies were showing a significant difference in the proportion of dystrophin positive versus negative fibers, suggesting a lower expression of paternally inherited mdx mutations. These data are in concordance with the pyruvate kinase (PK) levels in the serum: PK levels were much higher when the mutation was of maternal origin as compared to PK levels in paternally derived mutations. In order to test this {open_quotes}paternal source effect{close_quotes} in humans, we checked obligatory carriers of Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) for the origin of their mutations. Creatin kinase (CK) levels in 21 carriers with maternally derived mutations were compared to CK values from 8 heterozygotes with mutations of paternal origin: CK (mat) = 140.3 IU/1 versus CK (pat) = 48.6 IU/I. The difference is statistically significant at the 5% level. These observations suggest either a differential X-inactivation or an imprinting of the dystrophin gene in mice and men.

  3. A functional alternative splicing mutation in AIRE gene causes autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junyu Zhang

    Full Text Available Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS-1 is a rare autosomal recessive disease defined by the presence of two of the three conditions: mucocutaneous candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism, and Addison's disease. Loss-of-function mutations of the autoimmune regulator (AIRE gene have been linked to APS-1. Here we report mutational analysis and functional characterization of an AIRE mutation in a consanguineous Chinese family with APS-1. All exons of the AIRE gene and adjacent exon-intron sequences were amplified by PCR and subsequently sequenced. We identified a homozygous missense AIRE mutation c.463G>A (p.Gly155Ser in two siblings with different clinical features of APS-1. In silico splice-site prediction and minigene analysis were carried out to study the potential pathological consequence. Minigene splicing analysis and subsequent cDNA sequencing revealed that the AIRE mutation potentially compromised the recognition of the splice donor of intron 3, causing alternative pre-mRNA splicing by intron 3 retention. Furthermore, the aberrant AIRE transcript was identified in a heterozygous carrier of the c.463G>A mutation. The aberrant intron 3-retaining transcript generated a truncated protein (p.G155fsX203 containing the first 154 AIRE amino acids and followed by 48 aberrant amino acids. Therefore, our study represents the first functional characterization of the alternatively spliced AIRE mutation that may explain the pathogenetic role in APS-1.

  4. Structure of an APC3–APC16 Complex: Insights into Assembly of the Anaphase-Promoting Complex/Cyclosome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Masaya; Yu, Shanshan; Qiao, Renping; Weissmann, Florian; Miller, Darcie J.; VanderLinden, Ryan; Brown, Nicholas G.; Frye, Jeremiah J.; Peters, Jan-Michael; Schulman, Brenda A. (SJCH); (IMP)

    2015-08-21

    The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) is a massive E3 ligase that controls mitosis by catalyzing ubiquitination of key cell cycle regulatory proteins. The APC/C assembly contains two subcomplexes: the “Platform” centers around a cullin-RING-like E3 ligase catalytic core; the “Arc Lamp” is a hub that mediates transient association with regulators and ubiquitination substrates. The Arc Lamp contains the small subunits APC16, CDC26, and APC13, and tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) proteins (APC7, APC3, APC6, and APC8) that homodimerize and stack with quasi-2-fold symmetry. Within the APC/C complex, APC3 serves as center for regulation. APC3's TPR motifs recruit substrate-binding coactivators, CDC20 and CDH1, via their C-terminal conserved Ile-Arg (IR) tail sequences. Human APC3 also binds APC16 and APC7 and contains a > 200-residue loop that is heavily phosphorylated during mitosis, although the basis for APC3 interactions and whether loop phosphorylation is required for ubiquitination are unclear. Here, we map the basis for human APC3 assembly with APC16 and APC7, report crystal structures of APC3Δloop alone and in complex with the C-terminal domain of APC16, and test roles of APC3's loop and IR tail binding surfaces in APC/C-catalyzed ubiquitination. The structures show how one APC16 binds asymmetrically to the symmetric APC3 dimer and, together with biochemistry and prior data, explain how APC16 recruits APC7 to APC3, show how APC3's C-terminal domain is rearranged in the full APC/C assembly, and visualize residues in the IR tail binding cleft important for coactivator-dependent ubiquitination. Overall, the results provide insights into assembly, regulation, and interactions of TPR proteins and the APC/C.

  5. Analysis of mutations in the entire coding sequence of the factor VIII gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidichadani, S.I.; Lanyon, W.G.; Connor, J.M. [Glascow Univ. (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Hemophilia A is a common X-linked recessive disorder of bleeding caused by deleterious mutations in the gene for clotting factor VIII. The large size of the factor VIII gene, the high frequency of de novo mutations and its tissue-specific expression complicate the detection of mutations. We have used a combination of RT-PCR of ectopic factor VIII transcripts and genomic DNA-PCRs to amplify the entire essential sequence of the factor VIII gene. This is followed by chemical mismatch cleavage analysis and direct sequencing in order to facilitate a comprehensive search for mutations. We describe the characterization of nine potentially pathogenic mutations, six of which are novel. In each case, a correlation of the genotype with the observed phenotype is presented. In order to evaluate the pathogenicity of the five missense mutations detected, we have analyzed them for evolutionary sequence conservation and for their involvement of sequence motifs catalogued in the PROSITE database of protein sites and patterns.

  6. Limited clinical relevance of mitochondrial DNA mutation and gene expression analyses in ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, numerous studies have investigated somatic mutations in mitochondrial DNA in various tumours. The observed high mutation rates might reflect mitochondrial deregulation; consequently, mutation analyses could be clinically relevant. The purpose of this study was to determine if mutations in the mitochondrial D-loop region and/or the level of mitochondrial gene expression could influence the clinical course of human ovarian carcinomas. We sequenced a 1320-base-pair DNA fragment of the mitochondrial genome (position 16,000-750) in 54 cancer samples and in 44 corresponding germline control samples. In addition, six transcripts (MT-ATP6, MT-CO1, MT-CYB, MT-ND1, MT-ND6, and MT-RNR1) were quantified in 62 cancer tissues by real-time RT-PCR. Somatic mutations in the D-loop sequence were found in 57% of ovarian cancers. Univariate analysis showed no association between mitochondrial DNA mutation status or mitochondrial gene expression and any of the examined clinicopathologic parameters. A multivariate logistic regression model revealed that the expression of the mitochondrial gene RNR1 might be used as a predictor of tumour sensitivity to chemotherapy. In contrast to many previously published papers, our study indicates rather limited clinical relevance of mitochondrial molecular analyses in ovarian carcinomas. These discrepancies in the clinical utility of mitochondrial molecular tests in ovarian cancer require additional large, well-designed validation studies

  7. Limited clinical relevance of mitochondrial DNA mutation and gene expression analyses in ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachinger Andrea

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, numerous studies have investigated somatic mutations in mitochondrial DNA in various tumours. The observed high mutation rates might reflect mitochondrial deregulation; consequently, mutation analyses could be clinically relevant. The purpose of this study was to determine if mutations in the mitochondrial D-loop region and/or the level of mitochondrial gene expression could influence the clinical course of human ovarian carcinomas. Methods We sequenced a 1320-base-pair DNA fragment of the mitochondrial genome (position 16,000-750 in 54 cancer samples and in 44 corresponding germline control samples. In addition, six transcripts (MT-ATP6, MT-CO1, MT-CYB, MT-ND1, MT-ND6, and MT-RNR1 were quantified in 62 cancer tissues by real-time RT-PCR. Results Somatic mutations in the D-loop sequence were found in 57% of ovarian cancers. Univariate analysis showed no association between mitochondrial DNA mutation status or mitochondrial gene expression and any of the examined clinicopathologic parameters. A multivariate logistic regression model revealed that the expression of the mitochondrial gene RNR1 might be used as a predictor of tumour sensitivity to chemotherapy. Conclusion In contrast to many previously published papers, our study indicates rather limited clinical relevance of mitochondrial molecular analyses in ovarian carcinomas. These discrepancies in the clinical utility of mitochondrial molecular tests in ovarian cancer require additional large, well-designed validation studies.

  8. Mutation analysis of GJB2 gene and prenatal diagnosis in a non-syndromic deafness family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-hua CHEN

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To identify the pathogenic gene in a non-syndromic deafness family, provide an accurate genetic consultation and early intervention for deaf family to reduce the incidence of congenital deafness. Methods Mutation analysis was carried out by polymerase chain reaction followed by DNA sequencing of coding region of GJB2 gene. The fetal DNA was extracted from the amniotic fluid cells by amniocentesis at 20 weeks during pregnancy. The genotype of the fetus was characterized for predicting the status of hearing. Results Complex heterozygous mutations 235delC and 176-191del16bp were detected in the proband of the family, heterozygous mutation 176-191del16bp was detected in the father, and 235delC was detected in the mother. Fetus carried 235delC heterozygous mutation inherited from his mother. Conclusions The proband's hearing loss is resulted from the complex heterozygous mutations 235delC and 176-191del16bp in GJB2 gene. Fetus is a heterozygous mutation 235delC carrier. Prenatal diagnosis for deafness assisted by genetic test can provide efficient guidance about offspring's hearing condition, and prevent another deaf-mute member from birth. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.07.09

  9. Distribution of gene mutations in sporadic congenital cataract in a Han Chinese population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Wang, Siying; Ye, Hongfei; Tang, Yating; Qiu, Xiaodi; Fan, Qi; Rong, Xianfang; Liu, Xin; Chen, Yuhong; Yang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to investigate the genetic effects underlying non-familial sporadic congenital cataract (SCC). Methods We collected DNA samples from 74 patients with SCC and 20 patients with traumatic cataract (TC) in an age-matched group and performed genomic sequencing of 61 lens-related genes with target region capture and next-generation sequencing (NGS). The suspected SCC variants were validated with MassARRAY and Sanger sequencing. DNA samples from 103 healthy subjects were used as additional controls in the confirmation examination. Results By filtering against common variants in public databases and those associated with TC cases, we identified 23 SCC-specific variants in 17 genes from 19 patients, which were predicted to be functional. These mutations were further confirmed by examination of the 103 healthy controls. Among the mutated genes, CRYBB3 had the highest mutation frequency with mutations detected four times in four patients, followed by EPHA2, NHS, and WDR36, the mutation of which were detected two times in two patients. We observed that the four patients with CRYBB3 mutations had three different cataract phenotypes. Conclusions From this study, we concluded the clinical and genetic heterogeneity of SCC. This is the first study to report broad spectrum genotyping for patients with SCC. PMID:27307692

  10. Novel Hypoxanthine Guanine Phosphoribosyltransferase Gene Mutations in Saudi Arabian Hyperuricemia Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Alanazi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, a steady increase in the incidence of HPRT-related hyperuricemia (HRH has been observed in Saudi Arabia. We examined all the nine exons of HPRT gene for mutations in ten biochemically confirmed hyperuricemia patients, including one female and three normal controls. In all, we identified 13 novel mutations in Saudi Arabian HPRT-related hyperuricemia patients manifesting different levels of uric acid. The Lys103Met alteration was highly recurrent and was observed in 50% of the cases, while Ala160Thr and Lys158Asn substitutions were found in two patients. Moreover, in 70% of the patients ≥2 mutations were detected concurrently in the HPRT gene. Interestingly, one of the patients that harbored Lys103Met substitution along with two frameshift mutations at codons 85 and 160 resulting in shortened protein demonstrated unusually high serum uric acid level of 738 μmol/L. Two of the seven point mutations that resulted in amino acid change (Lys103Met and Val160Gly were predicted to be damaging by SIFT and Polyphen and were further analyzed for their protein stability and function by molecular dynamics simulation. The identified novel mutations in the HPRT gene may prove useful in the prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling.

  11. Mutation analysis of the PALB2 gene in unselected pancreatic cancer patients in the Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borecka, M; Zemankova, P; Vocka, M; Soucek, P; Soukupova, J; Kleiblova, P; Sevcik, J; Kleibl, Z; Janatova, M

    2016-05-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has the worst prognosis among common solid cancer diagnoses. It has been shown that up to 10% of PDAC cases have a familial component. Characterization of PDAC-susceptibility genes could reveal high-risk individuals and patients that may benefit from tailored therapy. Hereditary mutations in PALB2 (Partner and Localizer of BRCA2) gene has been shown to predispose, namely to PDAC and breast cancers; however, frequencies of mutations vary among distinct geographical populations. Using the combination of sequencing, high-resolution melting and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification analyses, we screened the entire PALB2 gene in 152 unselected Czech PDAC patients. Truncating mutations were identified in three (2.0%) patients. Genotyping of found PALB2 variants in 1226 control samples revealed one carrier of PALB2 truncating variant (0.08%; P = 0.005). The mean age at PDAC diagnosis was significantly lower among PALB2 mutation carriers (51 years) than in non-carriers (63 years; P = 0.016). Only one patient carrying germline PALB2 mutation had a positive family breast cancer history. Our results indicate that hereditary PALB2 mutation represents clinically considerable genetic factor increasing PDAC susceptibility in our population and that analysis of PALB2 should be considered not only in PDAC patients with familial history of breast or pancreatic cancers but also in younger PDAC patients without family cancer history. PMID:27106063

  12. FLT3 and NPM1 gene mutations in childhood acute myeloblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukda, Ekchol; Pintaraks, Katsarin; Sawangpanich, Rachchadol; Wiangnon, Surapon; Pakakasama, Samart

    2011-01-01

    Mutations of receptor tyrosine kinases are implicated in the constitutive activation and development of human hematologic malignancies. Mutations in fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) gene including internal tandem duplication (ITD) and point mutation in the tyrosine kinase domain (TKD) as well as in nucleoplasmin (NPM1) gene are associated with pathogenesis of acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML). Several reports have demonstrated high incidences of the FLT3 and NPM1 mutations in adult AML patients. Since the pathogenesis of pediatric AML is different from that of adult and the FLT3 and NPM1 mutations have not been well characterized in childhood AML. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the frequencies of FLT3 and NPM1 mutations in 64 newly diagnosed childhood AML patients. All blood and bone marrow samples were previously diagnosed with AML by using flow cytometry and/or cytochemistry. FLT3-ITD and FLT3-TKD were detected by PCR and PCR-RFLP methods, respectively. The NPM1 mutation was analyzed by PCR and direct DNA sequencing. The FLT3 mutations were detected in 7 of 64 (11.1%), including FLT3-ITD in 4 of 64 (6.3%) and FLT-TKD in 3 of 62 (4.8%). The NPM1 mutation was not detected in this cohort. By multivariate analysis, white blood cell counts, peripheral blood and bone marrow blast cell counts at diagnosis were significantly higher in children with FLT3-ITD (P<0.05). In addition, the median percentage of CD117 was significantly higher in leukemic blast cells with FLT3-ITD than those with wild type (P=0.01). We did not find any FLT3 mutations in children aged less than 5 years. The AML M3 cell type was most frequently associated with FLT3 gene mutations (50%). In conclusion, the FLT3 mutations was found in 11.1% but none of NPM1 mutation was detected in Thai children with AML. These data support the hypothesis of different biology and pathogenesis between adult and childhood AML. PMID:22126574

  13. Identification of novel mutations in HEXA gene in children affected with Tay Sachs disease from India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehul Mistri

    Full Text Available Tay Sachs disease (TSD is a neurodegenerative disorder due to β-hexosaminidase A deficiency caused by mutations in the HEXA gene. The mutations leading to Tay Sachs disease in India are yet unknown. We aimed to determine mutations leading to TSD in India by complete sequencing of the HEXA gene. The clinical inclusion criteria included neuroregression, seizures, exaggerated startle reflex, macrocephaly, cherry red spot on fundus examination and spasticity. Neuroimaging criteria included thalamic hyperdensities on CT scan/T1W images of MRI of the brain. Biochemical criteria included deficiency of hexosaminidase A (less than 2% of total hexosaminidase activity for infantile patients. Total leukocyte hexosaminidase activity was assayed by 4-methylumbelliferyl-N-acetyl-β-D-glucosamine lysis and hexosaminidase A activity was assayed by heat inactivation method and 4-methylumbelliferyl-N-acetyl-β-D-glucosamine-6-sulphate lysis method. The exons and exon-intron boundaries of the HEXA gene were bidirectionally sequenced using an automated sequencer. Mutations were confirmed in parents and looked up in public databases. In silico analysis for mutations was carried out using SIFT, Polyphen2, MutationT@ster and Accelrys Discovery Studio softwares. Fifteen families were included in the study. We identified six novel missense mutations, c.340 G>A (p.E114K, c.964 G>A (p.D322N, c.964 G>T (p.D322Y, c.1178C>G (p.R393P and c.1385A>T (p.E462V, c.1432 G>A (p.G478R and two previously reported mutations. c.1277_1278insTATC and c.508C>T (p.R170W. The mutation p.E462V was found in six unrelated families from Gujarat indicating a founder effect. A previously known splice site mutation c.805+1 G>C and another intronic mutation c.672+30 T>G of unknown significance were also identified. Mutations could not be identified in one family. We conclude that TSD patients from Gujarat should be screened for the common mutation p.E462V.

  14. A Novel WASP Gene Mutation in a Chinese Boy with Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hui; Hu, Cheng; Dang, Dan; Guo, Ying-Jie

    2014-09-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is a rare inherited X-linked recessive immunodeficiency disease characterized by eczema, thrombocytopenia, immune deficiency, and bloody diarrhea and is caused by WASP gene mutations. This study reports a case of WAS with a novel mutation. A newborn Chinese infant was admitted to the hospital because of intermittent bloody stools, recurrent infections, and persistent thrombocytopenia. Genetic analysis of the coding sequences and flanking splice sites of the WASP gene showed a novel WASP gene deletion mutation (1144delA) at exon 10. Family history showed that both his mother and aunt had a heterozygous genotype of the WASP gene. The infant died at the age of 4 months due to persistent thrombocytopenia and severe pneumonia. A novel WASP gene deletion (1144delA) at exon 10 was identified in a Chinese infant with WAS. This base deletion results in a frame-shift mutation of the gene for an early stop codon at amino acid 444. PMID:25332617

  15. Targeted disruption of Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated gene in miniature pigs by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young June; Ahn, Kwang Sung; Kim, Minjeong; Kim, Min Ju; Park, Sang-Min; Ryu, Junghyun; Ahn, Jin Seop; Heo, Soon Young; Kang, Jee Hyun; Choi, You Jung [Department of Nanobiomedical Science and BK21 PLUS NBM Global Research Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Seong-Jun [Institute of Tissue Regeneration Engineering, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Hosup, E-mail: shim@dku.edu [Department of Nanobiomedical Science and BK21 PLUS NBM Global Research Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Tissue Regeneration Engineering, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physiology, Dankook University School of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • ATM gene-targeted pigs were produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer. • A novel large animal model for ataxia telangiectasia was developed. • The new model may provide an alternative to the mouse model. - Abstract: Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a recessive autosomal disorder associated with pleiotropic phenotypes, including progressive cerebellar degeneration, gonad atrophy, and growth retardation. Even though A-T is known to be caused by the mutations in the Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene, the correlation between abnormal cellular physiology caused by ATM mutations and the multiple symptoms of A-T disease has not been clearly determined. None of the existing ATM mouse models properly reflects the extent to which neurological degeneration occurs in human. In an attempt to provide a large animal model for A-T, we produced gene-targeted pigs with mutations in the ATM gene by somatic cell nuclear transfer. The disrupted allele in the ATM gene of cloned piglets was confirmed via PCR and Southern blot analysis. The ATM gene-targeted pigs generated in the present study may provide an alternative to the current mouse model for the study of mechanisms underlying A-T disorder and for the development of new therapies.

  16. Targeted disruption of Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated gene in miniature pigs by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • ATM gene-targeted pigs were produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer. • A novel large animal model for ataxia telangiectasia was developed. • The new model may provide an alternative to the mouse model. - Abstract: Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a recessive autosomal disorder associated with pleiotropic phenotypes, including progressive cerebellar degeneration, gonad atrophy, and growth retardation. Even though A-T is known to be caused by the mutations in the Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene, the correlation between abnormal cellular physiology caused by ATM mutations and the multiple symptoms of A-T disease has not been clearly determined. None of the existing ATM mouse models properly reflects the extent to which neurological degeneration occurs in human. In an attempt to provide a large animal model for A-T, we produced gene-targeted pigs with mutations in the ATM gene by somatic cell nuclear transfer. The disrupted allele in the ATM gene of cloned piglets was confirmed via PCR and Southern blot analysis. The ATM gene-targeted pigs generated in the present study may provide an alternative to the current mouse model for the study of mechanisms underlying A-T disorder and for the development of new therapies

  17. Achondroplastic dog breeds have no mutations in the transmembrane domain of the FGFR-3 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, S; Valdés, J; Alonso, R A

    2000-10-01

    One of the most common skeletal affections in humans is achondroplasia, a short-limbed dwarfism that is, in most cases, caused by mutations in the transmembrane domain of the fibroblast growth factor receptor-3 (FGFR-3) gene. Due to the lack of sufficient radiological, genetic, and molecular studies, most types of skeletal anomalies in dogs are classified as achondroplasia. To initiate the molecular characterization of some osteochondrodysplastic dog breeds, we obtained the DNA sequence of the transmembrane domain of the FGFR-3 gene from the dachshund, basset hound, bulldog, and German shepherd dogs. All 4 breeds showed no mutation in the evaluated region. This indicates that the mutation responsible for the osteochondrodysplastic phenotype in the tested dog breeds lies either elsewhere in the FGFR-3 gene or in other ones involved in the formation and development of endochondral bone. PMID:11041504

  18. A case of familial X-linked thrombocytopenia with a novel WAS gene mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eu Kyoung Lee

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS is an inherited X-linked disorder. The WAS gene is located on the X chromosome and undergoes mutations, which affect various domains of the WAS protein, resulting in recurrent infection, eczema, and thrombocytopenia. However, the clinical features and severity of the disease vary according to the type of mutations in the WAS gene. Here, we describe the case of a 4-year-old boy with a history of marked thrombocytopenia since birth, who presented with recurrent herpes simplex infection and late onset of eczema. Examination of his family history revealed that older brother, who died from intracranial hemorrhage, had chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenia. Therefore, we proceeded with genetic analysis and found a new deletion mutation in the WAS gene: c.858delC (p.ser287Leufs*21 as a hemizygous form.

  19. Mutational characteristics of ANK1 and SPTB genes in hereditary spherocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J; Jeong, D-C; Yoo, J; Jang, W; Chae, H; Kim, J; Kwon, A; Choi, H; Lee, J W; Chung, N-G; Kim, M; Kim, Y

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the mutational characteristics in Korean hereditary spherocytosis (HS) patients. Relevant literatures including genetically confirmed cases with well-documented clinical summaries and relevant information were also reviewed to investigate the mutational gene- or domain-specific laboratory and clinical association. Twenty-five HS patients carried one heterozygous mutation of ANK1 (n = 13) or SPTB (n = 12) but not in SPTA1, SLC4A1, or EPB42. Deleterious mutations including frameshift, nonsense, and splice site mutations were identified in 91% (21/23), and non-hotspot mutations were dispersed across multiple exons. Genotype-phenotype correlation was clarified after combined analysis of the cases and the literature review; anemia was most severe in HS patients with mutations on the ANK1 spectrin-binding domain (p parvovirus B19 was detected in 88%. The study clarifies ANK1 or SPTB mutational characteristics in HS Korean patients. The genetic association of laboratory and clinical aspects suggests comprehensive considerations for genetic-based management of HS. PMID:26830532

  20. Epidemiology and clinical relevanceof Pneumocystis jirovecii Frenkel, 1976 dihydropteroate synthase gene mutations*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matos O.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A review was conducted to examine the published works that studied the prevalence of Pneumocystis jirovecii dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS mutations in patients with P. jirovecii pneumonia (PcP, in develop and developing countries, and that focused the problem of the possible association of these mutations with exposure to sulpha or sulphone drugs and their influence in the PcP outcome. Studies conducted in United States of America presented higher P. jirovecii mutations rates, in comparison with European countries, and in developing countries, lower rates of DHPS mutations were reported, due to limited use of sulpha drugs. A significant association was reported between the use of sulpha or sulphone agents for PcP prophylaxis in HIV-infected patients and the presence of DHPS mutations. However these mutations were also detected in PcP patients who were not currently receiving sulpha or sulphone agents. The outcome and mortality of HIV-infected patients with PcP harbouring DHPS gene mutations were related primarily to the underlying severity of illness and the initial severity of PcP, more than to the presence of mutations.

  1. DNA polymerase ι functions in the generation of tandem mutations during somatic hypermutation of antibody genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maul, Robert W; MacCarthy, Thomas; Frank, Ekaterina G; Donigan, Katherine A; McLenigan, Mary P; Yang, William; Saribasak, Huseyin; Huston, Donald E; Lange, Sabine S; Woodgate, Roger; Gearhart, Patricia J

    2016-08-22

    DNA polymerase ι (Pol ι) is an attractive candidate for somatic hypermutation in antibody genes because of its low fidelity. To identify a role for Pol ι, we analyzed mutations in two strains of mice with deficiencies in the enzyme: 129 mice with negligible expression of truncated Pol ι, and knock-in mice that express full-length Pol ι that is catalytically inactive. Both strains had normal frequencies and spectra of mutations in the variable region, indicating that loss of Pol ι did not change overall mutagenesis. We next examined if Pol ι affected tandem mutations generated by another error-prone polymerase, Pol ζ. The frequency of contiguous mutations was analyzed using a novel computational model to determine if they occur during a single DNA transaction or during two independent events. Analyses of 2,000 mutations from both strains indicated that Pol ι-compromised mice lost the tandem signature, whereas C57BL/6 mice accumulated significant amounts of double mutations. The results support a model where Pol ι occasionally accesses the replication fork to generate a first mutation, and Pol ζ extends the mismatch with a second mutation. PMID:27455952

  2. Mutation analysis of breast cancer gene BRCA among breast cancer Jordanian females

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To screen mutations of the tumor suppressor breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) within 3 exons among Jordanian breast cancer females. A total of 135 Jordanian breast cancer females were genetically analyzed by denaturing gradient electrophoresis (DGGE) for mutation detection in 3 BRCA1 exons (2, 11 and 20) between 2000-2002 in Al-Basheer Hospital, Amman, Jordan. Of the studied patients 50 had a family history of breast cancer, 28 had a family history of cancer other than breast cancer, and 57 had no family history of any cancer. Five germline mutations were detected among breast cancer females with a family history of breast cancers (one in exon 2 and 4 mutations in exon 11). Another germline mutation (within exon 11) was detected among breast cancer females with family history of cancer other than breast cancer, and no mutation was detected among breast cancer females with no family history of any cancer or among normal control females. Screening mutations within exon 2, exon 11 and exon 20 showed that most screened mutations were within BRCA1 exon 11 among breast cancer Jordanian families with a family history of breast cancer. (author)

  3. Mutations in the collagen XII gene define a new form of extracellular matrix-related myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Debbie; Farsani, Golara Torabi; Laval, Steven; Collins, James; Sarkozy, Anna; Martoni, Elena; Shah, Ashoke; Zou, Yaqun; Koch, Manuel; Bönnemann, Carsten G; Roberts, Mark; Lochmüller, Hanns; Bushby, Kate; Straub, Volker

    2014-05-01

    Bethlem myopathy (BM) [MIM 158810] is a slowly progressive muscle disease characterized by contractures and proximal weakness, which can be caused by mutations in one of the collagen VI genes (COL6A1, COL6A2 and COL6A3). However, there may be additional causal genes to identify as in ∼50% of BM cases no mutations in the COL6 genes are identified. In a cohort of -24 patients with a BM-like phenotype, we first sequenced 12 candidate genes based on their function, including genes for known binding partners of collagen VI, and those enzymes involved in its correct post-translational modification, assembly and secretion. Proceeding to whole-exome sequencing (WES), we identified mutations in the COL12A1 gene, a member of the FACIT collagens (fibril-associated collagens with interrupted triple helices) in five individuals from two families. Both families showed dominant inheritance with a clinical phenotype resembling classical BM. Family 1 had a single-base substitution that led to the replacement of one glycine residue in the triple-helical domain, breaking the Gly-X-Y repeating pattern, and Family 2 had a missense mutation, which created a mutant protein with an unpaired cysteine residue. Abnormality at the protein level was confirmed in both families by the intracellular retention of collagen XII in patient dermal fibroblasts. The mutation in Family 2 leads to the up-regulation of genes associated with the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway and swollen, dysmorphic rough-ER. We conclude that the spectrum of causative genes in extracellular matrix (ECM)-related myopathies be extended to include COL12A1. PMID:24334769

  4. Novel mutations in the SCNN1A gene causing Pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Wang

    Full Text Available Pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1 (PHA1 is a rare inherited disease characterized by resistance to the actions of aldosterone. Mutations in the subunit genes (SCNN1A, SCNN1B, SCNN1G of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC and the NR3C2 gene encoding the mineralocorticoid receptor, result in systemic PHA1 and renal PHA1 respectively. Common clinical manifestations of PHA1 include salt wasting, hyperkalaemia, metabolic acidosis and elevated plasma aldosterone levels in the neonatal period. In this study, we describe the clinical and biochemical manifestations in two Chinese patients with systemic PHA1. Sequence analysis of the SCNN1A gene revealed a compound heterozygous mutation (c.1311delG and c.1439+1G>C in one patient and a homozygous mutation (c.814_815insG in another patient, all three variants are novel. Further analysis of the splicing pattern in a minigene construct showed that the c.1439+1G>C mutation can lead to the retainment of intron 9 as the 5'-donor splice site disappears during post-transcriptional processing of mRNA. In conclusion, our study identified three novel SCNN1A gene mutations in two Chinese patients with systemic PHA1.

  5. Predictive models for mutations in mismatch repair genes: implication for genetic counseling in developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monteiro Santos Erika

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lynch syndrome (LS is the most common form of inherited predisposition to colorectal cancer (CRC, accounting for 2-5% of all CRC. LS is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by mutations in the mismatch repair genes mutL homolog 1 (MLH1, mutS homolog 2 (MSH2, postmeiotic segregation increased 1 (PMS1, post-meiotic segregation increased 2 (PMS2 and mutS homolog 6 (MSH6. Mutation risk prediction models can be incorporated into clinical practice, facilitating the decision-making process and identifying individuals for molecular investigation. This is extremely important in countries with limited economic resources. This study aims to evaluate sensitivity and specificity of five predictive models for germline mutations in repair genes in a sample of individuals with suspected Lynch syndrome. Methods Blood samples from 88 patients were analyzed through sequencing MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 genes. The probability of detecting a mutation was calculated using the PREMM, Barnetson, MMRpro, Wijnen and Myriad models. To evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of the models, receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed. Results Of the 88 patients included in this analysis, 31 mutations were identified: 16 were found in the MSH2 gene, 15 in the MLH1 gene and no pathogenic mutations were identified in the MSH6 gene. It was observed that the AUC for the PREMM (0.846, Barnetson (0.850, MMRpro (0.821 and Wijnen (0.807 models did not present significant statistical difference. The Myriad model presented lower AUC (0.704 than the four other models evaluated. Considering thresholds of ≥ 5%, the models sensitivity varied between 1 (Myriad and 0.87 (Wijnen and specificity ranged from 0 (Myriad to 0.38 (Barnetson. Conclusions The Barnetson, PREMM, MMRpro and Wijnen models present similar AUC. The AUC of the Myriad model is statistically inferior to the four other models.

  6. Predictive models for mutations in mismatch repair genes: implication for genetic counseling in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is the most common form of inherited predisposition to colorectal cancer (CRC), accounting for 2-5% of all CRC. LS is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by mutations in the mismatch repair genes mutL homolog 1 (MLH1), mutS homolog 2 (MSH2), postmeiotic segregation increased 1 (PMS1), post-meiotic segregation increased 2 (PMS2) and mutS homolog 6 (MSH6). Mutation risk prediction models can be incorporated into clinical practice, facilitating the decision-making process and identifying individuals for molecular investigation. This is extremely important in countries with limited economic resources. This study aims to evaluate sensitivity and specificity of five predictive models for germline mutations in repair genes in a sample of individuals with suspected Lynch syndrome. Blood samples from 88 patients were analyzed through sequencing MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 genes. The probability of detecting a mutation was calculated using the PREMM, Barnetson, MMRpro, Wijnen and Myriad models. To evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of the models, receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed. Of the 88 patients included in this analysis, 31 mutations were identified: 16 were found in the MSH2 gene, 15 in the MLH1 gene and no pathogenic mutations were identified in the MSH6 gene. It was observed that the AUC for the PREMM (0.846), Barnetson (0.850), MMRpro (0.821) and Wijnen (0.807) models did not present significant statistical difference. The Myriad model presented lower AUC (0.704) than the four other models evaluated. Considering thresholds of ≥ 5%, the models sensitivity varied between 1 (Myriad) and 0.87 (Wijnen) and specificity ranged from 0 (Myriad) to 0.38 (Barnetson). The Barnetson, PREMM, MMRpro and Wijnen models present similar AUC. The AUC of the Myriad model is statistically inferior to the four other models

  7. Frequency of p53 Gene Mutation and Protein Expression in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the frequency of p53 gene mutation and protein expression in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC) and to establish correlation between the two. Study Design: Analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Histopathology Department and Molecular Biology Laboratory, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP), Rawalpindi, from May 2010 to May 2011. Methodology: Thirty diagnosed cases of OSCC were selected by consecutive sampling. Seventeen were retrieved from the record files of the AFIP, and 13 fresh/frozen sections were selected from patients reporting to the Oral Surgery Department, Armed Forces Institute of Dentistry (AFID). Gene p53 mutation was analyzed in all the cases using PCRSSCP analysis. DNA was extracted from the formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue sections and fresh/frozen sections. DNA thus extracted was amplified by polymerase chain reaction. The amplified products were denatured and finally analyzed by gel electrophoresis. Gene mutation was detected as electrophoretic mobility shift. The immunohistochemical marker p53 was applied to the same 30 cases and overexpression of protein p53 was recorded. Results: Immunohistochemical expression of marker p53 was positive in 67% (95% Confidence Interval (CI) 48.7 - 80.9) of the cases. Mutations of the p53 gene were detected in 23% (95% CI 11.5 - 41.2) of the OSCC. No statistically significant correlation was found between p53 gene mutation and protein p53 expression (rs = - 0.057, p = 0.765). Conclusion: A substantial number of patients have p53 gene mutation (23%) and protein p53 expression (67%) in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). (author)

  8. Leu452His mutation in lipoprotein lipase gene transfer associated with hypertriglyceridemia in mice in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaiyue Sun

    Full Text Available Mutated mouse lipoprotein lipase (LPL containing a leucine (L to histidine (H substitution at position 452 was transferred into mouse liver by hydrodynamics-based gene delivery (HD. Mutated-LPL (MLPL gene transfer significantly increased the concentrations of plasma MLPL and triglyceride (TG but significantly decreased the activity of plasma LPL. Moreover, the gene transfer caused adiposis hepatica and significantly increased TG content in mouse liver. To understand the effects of MLPL gene transfer on energy metabolism, we investigated the expression of key functional genes related to energy metabolism in the liver, epididymal fat, and leg muscles. The mRNA contents of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL, adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL, fatty acid-binding protein (FABP, and uncoupling protein (UCP were found to be significantly reduced. Furthermore, we investigated the mechanism by which MLPL gene transfer affected fat deposition in the liver, fat tissue, and muscle. The gene expression and protein levels of forkhead Box O3 (FOXO3, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α were found to be remarkably decreased in the liver, fat and muscle. These results suggest that the Leu452His mutation caused LPL dysfunction and gene transfer of MLPL in vivo produced resistance to the AMPK/PGC-1α signaling pathway in mice.

  9. Mutation screening of the RYR1 gene in malignant hyperthermia: Detection of a novel Tyr to ser mutation in a pedigree with associated centrl cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quane, K.A.; Keating, K.E.; Healy, J.M.S. [University College, Cork (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The ryanodine receptor gene (RYR1) has been shown to be mutated in a small number of malignant hyperthermia (MH) predigrees. Missense mutations in this gene have also been identified in two families with central core disease (CCD), a rare myopathy closely associated with MH. In an effort to identify other RYR1 mutations responsible for MH and CCD, we used a SSCP approach to screen the RYR1 gene for mutations in a family exhibiting susceptibility to MH (MHS) where some of the MHS individuals display core regions in their muscle. Sequence analysis of a unique aberrant SSCP has allowed us to identify a point mutation cosegregating with MHS in the described family. The mutation changes a conserved tyrosine residue at position 522 to a serine residue. This mutation is positioned relatively close to five of the six MHS/CCD mutations known to date and provides further evidence that MHS/CCD mutations may cluster in the amino terminal region of the RYR1 protein.

  10. A CIS-Dominant Mutation in ASPERGILLUS NIDULANS Affecting the Expression of the amdS Gene in the Presence of Mutations in the Unlinked Gene, amdA

    OpenAIRE

    Hynes, Michael J.

    1982-01-01

    A mutant producing very high levels of the acetamidase enzyme encoded by the amdS gene has been isolated in a strain containing the amdA7 mutation, which itself causes high levels of this enzyme. Genetic analysis has shown that this mutation, designated amdI66, is adjacent to the amdS gene and is cis-dominant in its effect. The amdI66 mutation has little effect on amdS expression when present in strains not containing the amdA7 mutation. Two other amdA mutations investigated also interact wit...

  11. Gene Mutation Profiles in Primary Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma of Central Nervous System: Next Generation Sequencing Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorovic Balint, Milena; Jelicic, Jelena; Mihaljevic, Biljana; Kostic, Jelena; Stanic, Bojana; Balint, Bela; Pejanovic, Nadja; Lucic, Bojana; Tosic, Natasa; Marjanovic, Irena; Stojiljkovic, Maja; Karan-Djurasevic, Teodora; Perisic, Ognjen; Rakocevic, Goran; Popovic, Milos; Raicevic, Sava; Bila, Jelena; Antic, Darko; Andjelic, Bosko; Pavlovic, Sonja

    2016-01-01

    The existence of a potential primary central nervous system lymphoma-specific genomic signature that differs from the systemic form of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) has been suggested, but is still controversial. We investigated 19 patients with primary DLBCL of central nervous system (DLBCL CNS) using the TruSeq Amplicon Cancer Panel (TSACP) for 48 cancer-related genes. Next generation sequencing (NGS) analyses have revealed that over 80% of potentially protein-changing mutations were located in eight genes (CTNNB1, PIK3CA, PTEN, ATM, KRAS, PTPN11, TP53 and JAK3), pointing to the potential role of these genes in lymphomagenesis. TP53 was the only gene harboring mutations in all 19 patients. In addition, the presence of mutated TP53 and ATM genes correlated with a higher total number of mutations in other analyzed genes. Furthermore, the presence of mutated ATM correlated with poorer event-free survival (EFS) (p = 0.036). The presence of the mutated SMO gene correlated with earlier disease relapse (p = 0.023), inferior event-free survival (p = 0.011) and overall survival (OS) (p = 0.017), while mutations in the PTEN gene were associated with inferior OS (p = 0.048). Our findings suggest that the TP53 and ATM genes could be involved in the molecular pathophysiology of primary DLBCL CNS, whereas mutations in the PTEN and SMO genes could affect survival regardless of the initial treatment approach. PMID:27164089

  12. Gene Mutation Profiles in Primary Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma of Central Nervous System: Next Generation Sequencing Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorovic Balint, Milena; Jelicic, Jelena; Mihaljevic, Biljana; Kostic, Jelena; Stanic, Bojana; Balint, Bela; Pejanovic, Nadja; Lucic, Bojana; Tosic, Natasa; Marjanovic, Irena; Stojiljkovic, Maja; Karan-Djurasevic, Teodora; Perisic, Ognjen; Rakocevic, Goran; Popovic, Milos; Raicevic, Sava; Bila, Jelena; Antic, Darko; Andjelic, Bosko; Pavlovic, Sonja

    2016-01-01

    The existence of a potential primary central nervous system lymphoma-specific genomic signature that differs from the systemic form of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) has been suggested, but is still controversial. We investigated 19 patients with primary DLBCL of central nervous system (DLBCL CNS) using the TruSeq Amplicon Cancer Panel (TSACP) for 48 cancer-related genes. Next generation sequencing (NGS) analyses have revealed that over 80% of potentially protein-changing mutations were located in eight genes (CTNNB1, PIK3CA, PTEN, ATM, KRAS, PTPN11, TP53 and JAK3), pointing to the potential role of these genes in lymphomagenesis. TP53 was the only gene harboring mutations in all 19 patients. In addition, the presence of mutated TP53 and ATM genes correlated with a higher total number of mutations in other analyzed genes. Furthermore, the presence of mutated ATM correlated with poorer event-free survival (EFS) (p = 0.036). The presence of the mutated SMO gene correlated with earlier disease relapse (p = 0.023), inferior event-free survival (p = 0.011) and overall survival (OS) (p = 0.017), while mutations in the PTEN gene were associated with inferior OS (p = 0.048). Our findings suggest that the TP53 and ATM genes could be involved in the molecular pathophysiology of primary DLBCL CNS, whereas mutations in the PTEN and SMO genes could affect survival regardless of the initial treatment approach. PMID:27164089

  13. Leigh Syndrome with COX deficiency and SURF1 gene mutations: MR imaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Andrea; Biancheri, Roberta; Bruno, Claudio; Di Rocco, Maja; Calvi, Angela; Pessagno, Alice; Tortori-Donati, Paolo

    2003-01-01

    Mutations in the nuclear SURF1 gene are specifically associated with cytochrome c oxidase (COX)-deficient Leigh syndrome. MR imaging abnormalities in three children with this condition involved the subthalamic nuclei, medulla, inferior cerebellar peduncles, and substantia nigra in all cases. The dentate nuclei and central tegmental tracts were involved in two cases each (all instances), and the putamina, interpeduncular nucleus, and pallido-cortical-nigro-cortical tracts in one. MR imaging pattern recognition can suggest an underlying COX deficiency and should prompt investigators to search for SURF1 gene mutations. PMID:12812953

  14. Detection of Connexion 26 GENE (GJB2) Mutations in Cases of Congenital Non Syndromic Deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banjara, Hansa; Mungutwar, Varsha; Swarnkar, Neha; Patra, Pradeep

    2016-06-01

    Hearing loss is most common form of genetic hearing disorder. Non-syndromic sensory neural autosomal recessive deafness (NSRD) is the most common form of genetic hearing loss. Mutations in GJB2 gene, which encodes the connexin 26 protein, are major cause of NSRD. The aim of this study is directed towards the mutations caused along the connexin 26 gene using blood samples from nonsyndromic deaf children. The study was conducted on 36 congenitally hearing impaired children who visited to our department with complains of hearing loss and reduced speech and whose age was strategies for diagnosis and treatment of these common genetic disorders. PMID:27340645

  15. Molecular analysis of contiguous exons of the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene: identification of a new PKU mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dianzani, I; Camaschella, C; Saglio, G; Ferrero, G B; Ramus, S; Ponzone, A; Cotton, R G

    1993-01-01

    A modified application of the chemical cleavage of mismatch (CCM) method has been used to screen three contiguous exons (exons 9, 10, and 11) of the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene in 17 Italian PKU patients. A new nonsense heterozygous C-->G transversion within exon 11 (S359X) was identified in a single patient. Only one of the four mutations previously reported in this DNA region in Caucasians was found. This lesion, IVS X-546, was detected in five of the 34 PKU alleles examined. Our results underline the versatility of the CCM method for scanning a gene for multiple mutations. Images PMID:8097261

  16. Mutations of SCN4A gene cause different diseases: 2 case reports and literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xiao-Li; Huang, Xiao-Jun; LUAN Xing-hua; Zhou, Hai-Yan; Wang, Tian; Wang, Jing-yi; Chen, Sheng-Di; Tang, Hui-Dong; Cao, Li

    2015-01-01

    SCN4A encodes the Nav1.4 channel and mutations in SCN4A lead to different ionic channelopathies. In this study, one sporadic individual of periodic paralysis, one paramyotonia family and 200 normal healthy controls are enrolled. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes, followed by polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing of candidate genes, including SCN4A and CACNA1S. As a result, heterozygous mutations c.2024G>A (R675Q) and c.1333G>A (V445M) of gene SCN4A were identif...

  17. Mutations in the two ribosomal RNA genes in mitochondrial DNA among Finnish children with hearing impairment

    OpenAIRE

    Häkli, Sanna; Luotonen, Mirja; Sorri, Martti; Majamaa, Kari

    2015-01-01

    Background Mutations in the two MT-RNR genes in mitochondrial DNA can cause hearing impairment that presents with variable severity and age of onset. In order to study the prevalence of mutations in MT-RNR1 and MT-RNR2 genes among Finnish children, we studied a ten-year cohort of hearing impaired children born in Northern Finland. Methods We studied children, who had been born in Northern Finland in 1993–2002 and who had been ascertained to have hearing impairment by 31 December 2007. Samples...

  18. Bitterness of glucose/galactose: novel mutations in the SLC5A1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pode-Shakked, Ben; Reish, Orit; Aktuglu-Zeybek, Cigdem; Kesselman, Dafna; Dekel, Benjamin; Bujanover, Yoram; Anikster, Yair

    2014-01-01

    Glucose galactose malabsorption (GGM) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by life-threatening osmotic diarrhea at infancy. When the intake of the offending sugars (namely, glucose, galactose and lactose) is ceased, the diarrhea promptly stops. Mutations in the SLC5A1 gene, encoding the sodium-glucose co-transporter located in the brush border of enterocytes, have been shown to cause the disease. More than 300 subjects of diverse origin have been reported worldwide, most of whom are a result of a consanguineous union. We examined 6 patients from 4 families presenting with complaints consistent with GGM and responsive to the appropriate fructose-based diet. Genomic DNA of the patients was polymerase chain reaction amplified for each of the 15 exons of the SLC5A1 gene and analyzed by nucleotide sequencing. The analysis lead to the identification of 2 novel mutations: a 1915 del C mutation, a frameshift mutation leading to a premature stop at codon 645; and a substitution missense mutation of T to C on nucleotide 947 (exon 9) causing a L316P substitution. In addition, G426R and C255W mutations previously described were identified; in both cases, the patients were shown to be homozygous and their parents heterozygous for the mutation. Of note, additional patients who underwent a similar evaluation at our center for suspected GGM did not show mutations in the SLC5A1 gene. Because the latter did not previously undergo a diagnostic algorithm in full, for instance, one that may consist of a glucose breath hydrogen test and an empiric attempt of a dietary switch to galactomin, we suggest that molecular genotyping of such patients should only follow such appropriate clinical evaluation. PMID:24048166

  19. Associations Between Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Gene Mutation and Serum Tumor Markers in Advanced Lung Adenocarcinomas:A Retrospective Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-qiu Pan; Wei-wu Shi; Dan-ping Xu; Hui-hui Xu; Mei-ying Zhou; Wei-hua Yan

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the associations between epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene mutations and serum tumor markers in advanced lung adenocarcinomas. Methods We investigated the association between EGFR gene mutations and clinical features, including serum tumor marker levels, in 97 advanced lung adenocarcinomas patients who did not undergo the treatment of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. EGFR gene mutation was detected by real-time PCR at exons 18, 19, 20, and 21. Serum tumor marker concentrations were analyzed by chemiluminescence assay kit at the same time. Results EGFR gene mutations were detected in 42 (43%) advanced lung adenocarcinoma patients. Gender (P=0.003), smoking status (P=0.001), and abnormal serum status of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, P=0.028) were significantly associated with EGFR gene mutation incidence. Multivariate analysis showed the abnormal CEA level in serum was independently associated with the incidence of EGFR gene mutation (P=0.046) with an odds ratio of 2.613 (95%CI:1.018-6.710). However, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis revealed CEA was not an ideal predictive marker for EGFR gene mutation status in advanced lung adenocarcinoma (the area under the ROC curve was 0.608, P=0.069). Conclusions EGFR gene mutation status is significantly associated with serum CEA status in advanced lung adenocarcinmoas. However, serum CEA is not an ideal predictor for EGFR mutation.

  20. Comparison of Nuclear Accumulation of p53 Protein with Mutations in the p53 Gene of Human Breast Cancer Tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王萱仪; 查小明; 武正炎; 范萍

    2001-01-01

    Objective The objective was to compare nuclear accumulation of p53 protein with mutations in the p53 gene on the tissues of human breast cancer. Methods Fifty-four invasive ductal carcinomas of breast were analyzed by the method of polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformational polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) silver stain and strep-avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex (SABC) immunohistochemistry. Results A statistically significant association between the presence of p53 gene mutation and nuclear accumulation of p53 protein was found (P<0.01). 22 tumors that demonstrated p53 gene mutations showed nuclear accumulation of p53 protein, while only 9 (28%) showed nuclear accumulation of p53 protein in 32 tumors without p53 gene mutations. Both p53 mutation protein and p53 gene mutations were prevalent in steroid and progesterone receptors negative tumors (P<0.05). A statistically significant association was found between the nuclear accumulation of p53 protein and lymph node invasion (P<0.05), and between p53 gene mutations and lymph node invasion (P<0.05). p53 abnormalities might be associated with an aggressive phenotype in breast cancer. Conclusion The immunohistochemical detection of nuclear p53 protein accumulation is highly associated with p53 gene mutations in breast cancer tissues, and that this method is useful for rapid screening of p53 abnormalities. However, in order to avoid false positive reaction, the p53 gene mutations should be determined in cases slightly positive for p53 nuclear protein.

  1. Laminin gene LAMB4 is somatically mutated and expressionally altered in gastric and colorectal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Mi Ryoung; An, Chang Hyeok; Yoo, Nam Jin; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2015-01-01

    Laminins are important in tumor invasion and metastasis as well as in maintenance of normal epithelial cell structures. However, mutation status of laminin chain-encoding genes remains unknown in cancers. Aim of this study was to explore whether laminin chain genes are mutated and expressionally altered in gastric (GC) and colorectal cancers (CRC). In a public database, we found that laminin chain genes LAMA1, LAMA3, LAMB1 and LAMB4 had mononucleotide repeats in the coding sequences that might be mutation targets in the cancers with microsatellite instability (MSI). We analyzed the genes in 88 GC and 139 CRC [high MSI (MSI-H) or stable MSI/low MSI (MSS/MSI-L)] by single strand conformation polymorphism analysis and DNA sequencing. In the present study, we found LAMB4 (11.8% of GC and 7.6% of CRC with MSI-H), LAMA3 (2.9% of GC and 2.5 of CRC with MSI-H), LAMA1 (5.9% of GC with MSI-H) and LAMB1 frameshift mutations (1.3% of CRC with MSI-H). These mutations were not found in MSS/MSI-L (0/114). We also analyzed LAMB4 expression in GC and CRC by immunohistochemistry. Loss of LAMB4 expression was identified in 17-32% of the GC and CRC. Of note, the loss expression was more common in the cancers with LAMB4 mutation or those with MSI-H. Our data show that frameshift mutations of LAMA1, LAMA3, LAMB1 and LAMB4, and loss of LAMB4 may be features of GC and CRC with MSI-H. PMID:25257191

  2. Identification of CFTR Gene Mutations in Chinese Patients with Congenital Obstructive Azoospermia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾国华; 吴开俊; 梅骅; 庄广伦

    2001-01-01

    Objective To analyze the frequency and hot spot of CFTR gene mutations in Chinese patients with congenital obstructive azoospermia Materials & Methods Mutations in CFTR exon 2,3,4,5,6a,8,10,11,12,13,15A 17b, 19A,20,21and 23 were detected. PCR-single strand conformation poly-morphism (SSCP) and direct sequencing were performed on 32 patients with congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens (CBAVD), 17 patients with congenital unilateral absence of the vas deferens (CUAVD) and 50 normal Chinese.Results No CFTR gene mutations were detected in 50 normal Chinese. One CBAVD patient exhibited an abnormal band on SSCP for exon 10 of the CFTR gene and subsequent DNA sequencing showed a 3 bp deletion at position 1 653~ 1 655, which caused the deletion of a single amino acid, phenyalanine, in codon 508, i. e. , △F 508. A shift mutation was detected in another CBAVD patient in exon 2, a 1 bp deletion at position 225, 225 delC. One CUAVD patient exhibited an abnormal band on SSCP for exon 17 b of CFTR gene. Subsequent DNA sequencing showed a C-to-A transversion at position 3 295, which led to a predicted change of Leusine (codon 1 055,CUU) to Isoleucine (codon AUU), L1055I.Conclusion CFTR mutation could be detected in Chinese patients with congenital obstructive azoospermia. But no hot spots of mutations are discovered. 225 delC and L1055I are identified as two novel mutations, which are found only in Chinese.

  3. Mutation analysis of BRCA1 and BRCA2 cancer predisposition genes in radiation hypersensitive cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The dose intensity of radiotherapy (RT) used in cancer treatment is limited in rare individuals who display severe normal tissue reactions after standard RT treatments. Novel predictive assays are required to identify these individuals prior to treatment. The mechanisms responsible for such reactions are unknown, but may involve dysfunction of genes involved in the sensing and response of cells to DNA damage. The breast cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 are implicated in DNA damage repair and the control of genome stability. The purpose of this study was to determine if clinical radiation hypersensitivity is related to mutations of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Such information is of potential use in the clinical management of BRCA mutation carriers and their families. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two cancer patients who developed severe normal tissue reactions after RT were screened for mutations of BRCA1 and BRCA2, using various methods including protein truncation testing, direct DNA sequencing, and a PCR-based BRCA1 exon 13 duplication test. Results: No mutations were detected in the 22 patients tested, despite screening for the majority of commonly described types of mutations of BRCA1 and BRCA2. Conclusion: These early results suggest that genes other than BRCA1 and BRCA2 probably account for most cases of clinical radiation hypersensitivity, and that screening for mutations of BRCA1 and BRCA2 is unlikely to be useful in predicting response to radiotherapy. However, it has not been excluded that some BRCA1 or BRCA2 heterozygotes might experience unexpected RT toxicity; further BRCA mutation screening on radiation sensitive individuals is warranted

  4. APC/β-catenin-rich complexes at membrane protrusions regulate mammary tumor cell migration and mesenchymal morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The APC tumor suppressor is mutated or downregulated in many tumor types, and is prominently localized to punctate clusters at protrusion tips in migratory cells, such as in astrocytes where it has been implicated in directed cell motility. Although APC loss is considered an initiating event in colorectal cancer, for example, it is less clear what role APC plays in tumor cell motility and whether loss of APC might be an important promoter of tumor progression in addition to initiation. The localization of APC and β-catenin was analyzed in multiple cell lines, including non-transformed epithelial lines treated with a proteasome inhibitor or TGFβ to induce an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), as well as several breast cancer lines, by immunofluorescence. APC expression was knocked down in 4T07 mammary tumor cells using lentiviral-mediated delivery of APC-specific short-hairpin (sh) RNAs, and assessed using quantitative (q) reverse-transcriptase (RT)-PCR and western blotting. Tumor cell motility was analyzed by performing wound-filling assays, and morphology via immunofluorescence (IF) and phase-contrast microscopy. Additionally, proliferation was measured using BrdU incorporation, and TCF reporter assays were performed to determine β-catenin/TCF-mediated transcriptional activity. APC/β-catenin-rich complexes were observed at protrusion ends of migratory epithelial cells treated with a proteasome inhibitor or when EMT has been induced and in tumor cells with a mesenchymal, spindle-like morphology. 4T07 tumor cells with reduced APC levels were significantly less motile and had a more rounded morphology; yet, they did not differ significantly in proliferation or β-catenin/TCF transcriptional activity. Furthermore, we found that APC/β-catenin-rich complexes at protrusion ends were dependent upon an intact microtubule cytoskeleton. These findings indicate that membrane protrusions with APC/β-catenin-containing puncta control the migratory potential and

  5. Mutation analysis of the MCHR1 gene in human obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wermter, Anne-Kathrin; Reichwald, Kathrin; Büch, Thomas;

    2005-01-01

    The importance of the melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) system for regulation of energy homeostasis and body weight has been demonstrated in rodents. We analysed the human MCH receptor 1 gene (MCHR1) with respect to human obesity.......The importance of the melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) system for regulation of energy homeostasis and body weight has been demonstrated in rodents. We analysed the human MCH receptor 1 gene (MCHR1) with respect to human obesity....

  6. Molecular Basis of Human CD36 Gene Mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Rać, Monika Ewa; Safranow, Krzysztof; Poncyljusz, Wojciech

    2007-01-01

    CD36 is a transmembrane glycoprotein of the class B scavenger receptor family. The CD36 gene is located on chromosome 7 q11.2 and is encoded by 15 exons. Defective CD36 is a likely candidate gene for impaired fatty acid metabolism, glucose intolerance, atherosclerosis, arterial hypertension, diabetes, cardiomyopathy, Alzheimer disease, and modification of the clinical course of malaria. Contradictory data concerning the effects of antiatherosclerotic drugs on CD36 expression indicate that fur...

  7. Congenital Hypothyroidism Caused by a PAX8 Gene Mutation Manifested as Sodium/Iodide Symporter Gene Defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wakako Jo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Loss-of-function mutations of the PAX8 gene are considered to mainly cause congenital hypothyroidism (CH due to thyroid hypoplasia. However, some patients with PAX8 mutation have demonstrated a normal-sized thyroid gland. Here we report a CH patient caused by a PAX8 mutation, which manifested as iodide transport defect (ITD. Hypothyroidism was detected by neonatal screening and L-thyroxine replacement was started immediately. Although 123I scintigraphy at 5 years of age showed that the thyroid gland was in the normal position and of small size, his iodide trapping was low. The ratio of the saliva/plasma radioactive iodide was low. He did not have goiter; however laboratory findings suggested that he had partial ITD. Gene analyses showed that the sodium/iodide symporter (NIS gene was normal; instead, a mutation in the PAX8 gene causing R31H substitution was identified. The present report demonstrates that individuals with defective PAX8 can have partial ITD, and thus genetic analysis is useful for differential diagnosis.

  8. A nonsense mutation in the tyrosinase gene of Afghan patients with tyrosinase negative (type IA) oculocutaneous albinism.

    OpenAIRE

    Giebel, L.B.; Musarella, M A; Spritz, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    We detected a nonsense mutation in the tyrosinase gene of two Afghan sibs with classical tyrosinase negative (type IA) oculocutaneous albinism. The mutation, a single base substitution at codon 178, creates an amber termination codon that truncates the 529 amino acid tyrosinase polypeptide at this position. The patients' parents are first cousins, and the patients are therefore homoallelic for this mutation.

  9. Physical Mapping Technologies for the Identification and Characterization of Mutated Genes to Crop Quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The improvement of quality traits in food and industrial crops is an important breeding objective for both developed and developing countries in order to add value to the crop and thereby increasing farmers' income. It has been well established that the application of mutagens can be a very important approach for manipulating many crop characteristics including quality. While mutation induction using nuclear techniques such as gamma irradiation is a power tool in generating new genotypes with favourable alleles for improving crop quality in plant breeding, a more thorough understanding of gene expression, gene interactions, and physical location will improve ability to manipulate and control genes, and directly lead to crop improvement. Physical mapping technologies, molecular markers and molecular cytogenetic techniques are tools available with the potential to enhance the ability to tag genes and gene complexes to facilitate the selection of desirable genotypes in breeding programmes, including those based on mutation breeding. This Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Physical Mapping Technologies for the Identification and Characterization of Mutated Genes Contributing to Crop Quality' was conducted under the overall IAEA project objective of 'Identification, Characterization and Transfer of Mutated Genes'. The specific objectives of the CRP were to assist Member States in accelerating crop breeding programmes through the application of physical mapping and complementary genomic approaches, and the characterization and utilization of induced mutants for improvement of crop quality. The IAEA-TECDOC describes the success obtained in the application of molecular cytology, molecular markers, physical mapping and mutation technologies since the inception of the CRP in 2003. The CRP also resulted in two book chapters, 35 peer reviewed papers, 25 conference proceedings, one PhD thesis, and 22 published abstracts. In addition, thirteen sequences were submitted to the

  10. Feature genes predicting the FLT3/ITD mutation in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chenglong; Zhu, Biao; Chen, Jiao; Huang, Xiaobing

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, gene expression profiles of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) samples were analyzed to identify feature genes with the capacity to predict the mutation status of FLT3/ITD. Two machine learning models, namely the support vector machine (SVM) and random forest (RF) methods, were used for classification. Four datasets were downloaded from the European Bioinformatics Institute, two of which (containing 371 samples, including 281 FLT3/ITD mutation-negative and 90 mutation‑positive samples) were randomly defined as the training group, while the other two datasets (containing 488 samples, including 350 FLT3/ITD mutation-negative and 138 mutation-positive samples) were defined as the test group. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified by significance analysis of the microarray data by using the training samples. The classification efficiency of the SCM and RF methods was evaluated using the following parameters: Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. Functional enrichment analysis was performed for the feature genes with DAVID. A total of 585 DEGs were identified in the training group, of which 580 were upregulated and five were downregulated. The classification accuracy rates of the two methods for the training group, the test group and the combined group using the 585 feature genes were >90%. For the SVM and RF methods, the rates of correct determination, specificity and PPV were >90%, while the sensitivity and NPV were >80%. The SVM method produced a slightly better classification effect than the RF method. A total of 13 biological pathways were overrepresented by the feature genes, mainly involving energy metabolism, chromatin organization and translation. The feature genes identified in the present study may be used to predict the mutation status of FLT3/ITD in patients with AML. PMID:27177049

  11. Mutational analysis of the BRCA1 gene in 30 Czech ovarian cancer patients

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Zikan; P. Pohlreich; J. Stribrna

    2005-04-01

    Ovarian cancer is one of the most severe of oncological diseases. Inherited mutations in cancer susceptibility genes play a causal role in 5–10% of newly diagnosed tumours. BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene alterations are found in the majority of these cases. The aim of this study was to analyse the BRCA1 gene in the ovarian cancer risk group to characterize the spectrum of its mutations in the Czech Republic. Five overlapping fragments amplified on both genomic DNA and cDNA were used to screen for the whole protein-coding sequence of the BRCA1 gene. These fragments were analysed by the protein truncation test (PTT) and direct sequencing. Three inactivating mutations were identified in the group of 30 Czech ovarian cancer patients: the 5382insC mutation in two unrelated patients and a deletion of exons 21 and 22 in another patient. In addition, we have found an alternatively spliced product lacking exon 5 in two other unrelated patients. The 5382insC is the most frequent alteration of the BRCA1 gene in Central and Eastern Europe. The deletion of exons 21 and 22 affects the BRCT functional domain of the BRCA1 protein. Although large genomic rearragements are known to be relatively frequent in Western European populations, no analyses have been performed in our region yet.

  12. Introduction of a PCR-RFLP method for the detection of two mutations in VHL gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Alejandro Esperón

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Von Hippel-Lindau disease is an inherited neoplastic disorder caused by germline mutations in the VHL gene. In Cuba, molecular diagnosis is performed by the method of single-strand conformation polymorphism of DNA of the three exons of the gene followed by sequencing. This method is expensive, complicated and time-consuming. Objective: to describe the introduction of the molecular diagnosis of mutations c.362A>G and c.481C> in the VHL gene by PCR-RFLP. Methods: computer software CLC Sequence viewer 6.5.1 was used to identify restriction enzymes with cleavage sites modified by mutation c.362A>G in the exon 2 and c.481C>T in exon 3 in the VHL gene. DNA samples of patients already diagnosed through SSCP-sequencing were used. Such samples were amplified by PCR method followed by the enzymatic digestion with SfaNI and BtgZI restriction enzymes. Amplified fragments were analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis. Results obtained using both methods were compared. Results: effectiveness of the PRC-RFLP method for the diagnosis of c.362A>G and c.481C>T mutations in the VHL gene was standardized and proved. Conclusions: PCR-RFLP method has advantages over SSCP-sequencing strategy for establishing a fast, reproducible and reliable diagnosis of VHL disease in family cases molecularly characterized.

  13. Inhibition of intestinal adenoma formation in APC(Min/+ mice by Riccardin D, a natural product derived from liverwort plant Dumortiera hirsuta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Ping Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mutation of tumor suppressor gene, adenomatous polyposis coli (APC, is the primary molecular event in the development of most intestinal carcinomas. Animal model with APC gene mutation is an effective tool for study of preventive approaches against intestinal carcinomas. We aimed to evaluate the effect of Riccardin D, a macrocyclic bisbibenzyl compound, as a chemopreventive agent against intestinal adenoma formation in APC(Min/+ mice. METHODS: APC(Min/+ mice were given Riccardin D by p.o. gavage for 7 weeks. Mice were sacrificed, and the number, size and histopathology of intestinal polyps were examined under a microscope. We performed immunohistochemical staining, western blotting, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA in intestinal polyps to investigate the mechanism of chemopreventive effect of Riccardin D. RESULTS: Riccardin D treatment resulted in a significant inhibition of intestinal adenoma formation, showing a reduction of polyp number by 41.7%, 31.1% and 44.4%, respectively, in proximal, middle and distal portions of small intestine. The activity of Riccardin D against polyp formation was more profound in colon, wherein Riccardin D decreased polyp number by 79.3%. Size distribution analysis revealed a significant reduction in large-size polyps (2-3 mm by 40.0%, 42.5% and 33.3%, respectively, in proximal, middle and distal portions of small intestine, and 77.8% in colon. Histopathological analysis of the intestinal polyps revealed mostly hyperplastic morphology without obvious dysplasia in Riccardin D-treated mice. Molecular analyses of the polyps suggested that the inhibitory effect of Riccardin D on intestinal adenoma formation was associated with its abilities of reduction in cell proliferation, induction of apoptosis, antiangiogenesis, inhibition of the Wnt signaling pathway and suppression of inflammatory mediators in polyps. CONCLUSIONS: Our results

  14. Spliceosomal gene mutations are frequent events in the diverse mutational spectrum of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia but largely absent in juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Sarah Abu; Jankowska, Anna; Makishima, Hideki; Visconte, Valeria; Jerez, Andres; Sugimoto, Yuka; Muramatsu, Hideki; Traina, Fabiola; Afable, Manuel; Guinta, Kathryn; Tiu, Ramon V.; Przychodzen, Bartlomiej; Sakaguchi, Hirotoshi; Kojima, Seiji; Sekeres, Mikkael A.; List, Alan F.; McDevitt, Michael A.; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia is a heterogeneous disease with multifactorial molecular pathogenesis. Various recurrent somatic mutations have been detected alone or in combination in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia. Recently, recurrent mutations in spliceosomal genes have been discovered. We investigated the contribution of U2AF1, SRSF2 and SF3B1 mutations in the pathogenesis of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia and closely related diseases. We genotyped a cohort of patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, secondary acute myeloid leukemia derived from chronic myelomonocytic leukemia and juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia for somatic mutations in U2AF1, SRSF2, SF3B1 and in the other 12 most frequently affected genes in these conditions. Chromosomal abnormalities were assessed by nucleotide polymorphism array-based karyotyping. The presence of molecular lesions was correlated with clinical endpoints. Mutations in SRSF2, U2AF1 and SF3B1 were found in 32%, 13% and 6% of cases of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, secondary acute myeloid leukemia derived from chronic myelomonocytic leukemia and juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia, respectively. Spliceosomal genes were affected in various combinations with other mutations, including TET2, ASXL1, CBL, EZH2, RAS, IDH1/2, DNMT3A, TP53, UTX and RUNX1. Worse overall survival was associated with mutations in U2AF1 (P=0.047) and DNMT3A (P=0.015). RAS mutations had an impact on overall survival in secondary acute myeloid leukemia (P=0.0456). By comparison, our screening of juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia cases showed mutations in ASXL1 (4%), CBL (10%), and RAS (6%) but not in IDH1/2, TET2, EZH2, DNMT3A or the three spliceosomal genes. SRSF2 and U2AF1 along with TET2 (48%) and ASXL1 (38%) are frequently affected by somatic mutations in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, quite distinctly from the profile seen in juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia. Our data also suggest that spliceosomal mutations are of ancestral origin. PMID:22773603

  15. CHD7, the gene mutated in CHARGE syndrome, regulates genes involved in neural crest cell guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Yvonne; Wehner, Peter; Opitz, Lennart; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Bongers, Ernie M H F; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M A; Wincent, Josephine; Schoumans, Jacqueline; Kohlhase, Jürgen; Borchers, Annette; Pauli, Silke

    2014-08-01

    Heterozygous loss of function mutations in CHD7 (chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 7) lead to CHARGE syndrome, a complex developmental disorder affecting craniofacial structures, cranial nerves and several organ systems. Recently, it was demonstrated that CHD7 is essential for the formation of multipotent migratory neural crest cells, which migrate from the neural tube to many regions of the embryo, where they differentiate into various tissues including craniofacial and heart structures. So far, only few CHD7 target genes involved in neural crest cell development have been identified and the role of CHD7 in neural crest cell guidance and the regulation of mesenchymal-epithelial transition are unknown. Therefore, we undertook a genome-wide microarray expression analysis on wild-type and CHD7 deficient (Chd7 (Whi/+) and Chd7 (Whi/Whi)) mouse embryos at day 9.5, a time point of neural crest cell migration. We identified 98 differentially expressed genes between wild-type and Chd7 (Whi/Whi) embryos. Interestingly, many misregulated genes are involved in neural crest cell and axon guidance such as semaphorins and ephrin receptors. By performing knockdown experiments for Chd7 in Xenopus laevis embryos, we found abnormalities in the expression pattern of Sema3a, a protein involved in the pathogenesis of Kallmann syndrome, in vivo. In addition, we detected non-synonymous SEMA3A variations in 3 out of 45 CHD7-negative CHARGE patients. In summary, we discovered for the first time that Chd7 regulates genes involved in neural crest cell guidance, demonstrating a new aspect in the pathogenesis of CHARGE syndrome. Furthermore, we showed for Sema3a a conserved regulatory mechanism across different species, highlighting its significance during development. Although we postulated that the non-synonymous SEMA3A variants which we found in CHD7-negative CHARGE patients alone are not sufficient to produce the phenotype, we suggest an important modifier role for SEMA3A in the

  16. RET gene mutations and polymorphisms in medullary thyroid carcinomas in Indian patients

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B P Sharma; D Saranath

    2011-09-01

    Germline mutations of RET gene are pathognomonic of multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN; MEN 2A/MEN 2B) and familial medullary thyroid carcinoma (FMTC), constituting 25% of medullary thyroid carcinomas (MTCs). We investigated RET gene mutations and polymorphisms at exons 10, 11, 13, 14, 15 and 16 in 140 samples, comprising 51 clinically diagnosed MTC patients, 39 family members of patients and 50 normal individuals. The method of choice was PCR and direct nucleotide sequencing of the PCR products. RET gene mutations were detected in 15 (29.4%) patients, with MEN 2A/FMTC in 13 patients and MEN 2B in 2 patients. Further, 39 family members of seven index cases were analysed, wherein four of the seven index cases showed identical mutations, in 13 of 25 family members. We also examined single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in RET gene exons in 101 unrelated samples. Significant differences in the allelic frequencies of SNPs at codons 691, 769, 836 and 904 between patient and control groups were not observed. However, SNP frequencies were significantly different in the Indian group as compared with other European groups. We identified two novel, rare and unique SNPs separately in single patients. Our study demonstrated presence of MEN 2A/MEN 2B/FMTC-associated mutations in accordance with the reported literature. Thus, RET gene mutations in exons 10, 11, 13, 14, 15 and 16 constitute a rapid test to confirm diagnosis and assess risk of the disease in familial MEN 2A/MEN 2B/FMTC.

  17. The Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase Enzyme Tankyrase Antagonizes Activity of the β-Catenin Destruction Complex through ADP-ribosylation of Axin and APC2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croy, Heather E; Fuller, Caitlyn N; Giannotti, Jemma; Robinson, Paige; Foley, Andrew V A; Yamulla, Robert J; Cosgriff, Sean; Greaves, Bradford D; von Kleeck, Ryan A; An, Hyun Hyung; Powers, Catherine M; Tran, Julie K; Tocker, Aaron M; Jacob, Kimberly D; Davis, Beckley K; Roberts, David M

    2016-06-10

    Most colon cancer cases are initiated by truncating mutations in the tumor suppressor, adenomatous polyposis coli (APC). APC is a critical negative regulator of the Wnt signaling pathway that participates in a multi-protein "destruction complex" to target the key effector protein β-catenin for ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis. Prior work has established that the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) enzyme Tankyrase (TNKS) antagonizes destruction complex activity by promoting degradation of the scaffold protein Axin, and recent work suggests that TNKS inhibition is a promising cancer therapy. We performed a yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screen and uncovered TNKS as a putative binding partner of Drosophila APC2, suggesting that TNKS may play multiple roles in destruction complex regulation. We find that TNKS binds a C-terminal RPQPSG motif in Drosophila APC2, and that this motif is conserved in human APC2, but not human APC1. In addition, we find that APC2 can recruit TNKS into the β-catenin destruction complex, placing the APC2/TNKS interaction at the correct intracellular location to regulate β-catenin proteolysis. We further show that TNKS directly PARylates both Drosophila Axin and APC2, but that PARylation does not globally regulate APC2 protein levels as it does for Axin. Moreover, TNKS inhibition in colon cancer cells decreases β-catenin signaling, which we find cannot be explained solely through Axin stabilization. Instead, our findings suggest that TNKS regulates destruction complex activity at the level of both Axin and APC2, providing further mechanistic insight into TNKS inhibition as a potential Wnt pathway cancer therapy. PMID:27068743

  18. Using BrdU labelling to detect the HPRT gene mutation frequencies induced by γ rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using BrdU labelling to detect the HPRT gene mutation frequencies (MFs) of a normal adult induced by γ rays of different doses and to analysis the relationship between the HPRT gene MFs and the radiation doses. Blood was drawn via the vein of a normal adult and was equally divided into five groups. The blood was exposed to γ rays with a dose range from 0.0 Gy to 4.0 Gy respectively. After having cultivated the whole blood, the authors got the HPRT gene MFs of the lymphocytes. With the increase of the doses, the MFs of the HPRT gene rose accordingly. The results also showed that there is a linear-square relationship between the doses of the γ ray and the MFs of the HPRT gene. According to the results, the authors may conclude that BrdU labelling method is a quick, simple and relatively sensitive method for detecting the HPRT gene mutations of somatic cells induced by external radiation exposure and HPRT gene mutation may be used as a radiobiological dosimeter

  19. Mutation Update of the CLCN5 Gene Responsible for Dent Disease 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour-Hendili, Lamisse; Blanchard, Anne; Le Pottier, Nelly; Roncelin, Isabelle; Lourdel, Stéphane; Treard, Cyrielle; González, Wendy; Vergara-Jaque, Ariela; Morin, Gilles; Colin, Estelle; Holder-Espinasse, Muriel; Bacchetta, Justine; Baudouin, Véronique; Benoit, Stéphane; Bérard, Etienne; Bourdat-Michel, Guylhène; Bouchireb, Karim; Burtey, Stéphane; Cailliez, Mathilde; Cardon, Gérard; Cartery, Claire; Champion, Gerard; Chauveau, Dominique; Cochat, Pierre; Dahan, Karin; De la Faille, Renaud; Debray, François-Guillaume; Dehoux, Laurenne; Deschenes, Georges; Desport, Estelle; Devuyst, Olivier; Dieguez, Stella; Emma, Francesco; Fischbach, Michel; Fouque, Denis; Fourcade, Jacques; François, Hélène; Gilbert-Dussardier, Brigitte; Hannedouche, Thierry; Houillier, Pascal; Izzedine, Hassan; Janner, Marco; Karras, Alexandre; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Lavocat, Marie-Pierre; Lemoine, Sandrine; Leroy, Valérie; Loirat, Chantal; Macher, Marie-Alice; Martin-Coignard, Dominique; Morin, Denis; Niaudet, Patrick; Nivet, Hubert; Nobili, François; Novo, Robert; Faivre, Laurence; Rigothier, Claire; Roussey-Kesler, Gwenaëlle; Salomon, Remi; Schleich, Andreas; Sellier-Leclerc, Anne-Laure; Soulami, Kenza; Tiple, Aurélien; Ulinski, Tim; Vanhille, Philippe; Van Regemorter, Nicole; Jeunemaître, Xavier; Vargas-Poussou, Rosa

    2015-08-01

    Dent disease is a rare X-linked tubulopathy characterized by low molecular weight proteinuria, hypercalciuria, nephrocalcinosis and/or nephrolithiasis, progressive renal failure, and variable manifestations of other proximal tubule dysfunctions. It often progresses over a few decades to chronic renal insufficiency, and therefore molecular characterization is important to allow appropriate genetic counseling. Two genetic subtypes have been described to date: Dent disease 1 is caused by mutations of the CLCN5 gene, coding for the chloride/proton exchanger ClC-5; and Dent disease 2 by mutations of the OCRL gene, coding for the inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase OCRL-1. Herein, we review previously reported mutations (n = 192) and their associated phenotype in 377 male patients with Dent disease 1 and describe phenotype and novel (n = 42) and recurrent mutations (n = 24) in a large cohort of 117 Dent disease 1 patients belonging to 90 families. The novel missense and in-frame mutations described were mapped onto a three-dimensional homology model of the ClC-5 protein. This analysis suggests that these mutations affect the dimerization process, helix stability, or transport. The phenotype of our cohort patients supports and extends the phenotype that has been reported in smaller studies. PMID:25907713

  20. c.376G>A mutation in WFS1 gene causes Wolfram syndrome without deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarpour Lima, Behnam; Ghaedi, Hamid; Daftarian, Narsis; Ahmadieh, Hamid; Jamshidi, Javad; Khorrami, Mehdi; Noroozi, Rezvan; Sohrabifar, Nasim; Assarzadegan, Farhad; Hesami, Omid; Taghavi, Shaghayegh; Ahmadifard, Azadeh; Atakhorrami, Minoo; Rahimi-Aliabadi, Simin; Shahmohammadibeni, Neda; Alehabib, Elham; Andarva, Monavvar; Darvish, Hossein; Emamalizadeh, Babak

    2016-02-01

    Wolfram syndrome is one of the rare autosomal recessive, progressive, neurodegenerative disorders, characterized by diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy. Several other features are observed in patients including deafness, ataxia, and peripheral neuropathy. A gene called WFS1 is identified on chromosome 4p, responsible for Wolfram syndrome. We investigated a family consisted of parents and 8 children, which 5 of them have been diagnosed for Wolfram syndrome. WFS1 gene in all family members was sequenced for causative mutations. A mutation (c.376G>A, p.A126T) was found in all affected members in homozygous state and in both parents in heterozygous state. The bioinformatics analysis showed the deleterious effects of this nucleotide change on the structure and function of the protein product. As all of the patients in the family showed the homozygote mutation, and parents were both heterozygote, this mutation is probably the cause of the disease. We identified this mutation in homozygous state for the first time as Wolfram syndrome causation. We also showed that this mutation probably doesn't cause deafness in affected individuals. PMID:26773575

  1. Mutations of SCN4A gene cause different diseases: 2 case reports and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-li; Huang, Xiao-jun; Luan, Xing-hua; Zhou, Hai-yan; Wang, Tian; Wang, Jing-yi; Chen, Sheng-di; Tang, Hui-dong; Cao, Li

    2015-01-01

    SCN4A encodes the Nav1.4 channel and mutations in SCN4A lead to different ionic channelopathies. In this study, one sporadic individual of periodic paralysis, one paramyotonia family and 200 normal healthy controls are enrolled. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes, followed by polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing of candidate genes, including SCN4A and CACNA1S. As a result, heterozygous mutations c.2024G>A (R675Q) and c.1333G>A (V445M) of gene SCN4A were identified in the hypokalemic periodic paralysis patient and the paramyotonia congenita family respectively. Both mutations were not detected in healthy controls. Compared with reported cases, patients with mutation R675Q usually do not present hypokalemic periodic paralysis but hyperkalemic or normokalemic periodic paralysis. The mutation V445M was first reported in Chinese patients with nondystrophic myotonias. In addition, we carried out literature review by summarizing clinical features of the 2 mutations and establish the genotype-phenotype correlations to provide guidance for diagnosis. PMID:25839108

  2. Detection of BRAF Gene Mutation in Preoperative Diagnostic of Thyroid Gland Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Yu Semyonov

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To assess the utility of BRAFV600E mutation detection in preoperative thyroid cancer diagnostic. Material and methods: We studied 46 aspirates taken by FNA from patients with thyroid gland nodes. Thyroid tissue aspirates DNA was extracted by sorbent method. BRAF gene mutation was analyzed with primers specific for wild and mutant gen type by RT-PCR. Results: All patients were divided into three groups by cytological conclusions: colloid nodules (9, PTC (19, and suspicious for malignancy (18. In the group of patients with PTC all diagnoses were confirmed by histology, and BRAF gene mutation was detected in 15 (79% FNAB specimens. In the group with suspicious cytological diagnosis only one patient had follicular cancer by histology and positive BRAF mutation. There were detected no BRAF mutation in 16 patients with histologically proven follicular adenoma, in 9 patients with colloid nodular goiter and in one patient with follicular cancer. Thereby, we received the following criteria valuers of method’s reliability: sensitivity – 76%, specificity – 100%, diagnostic accuracy – 89%. Conclusions: Detection of the BRAFV600E mutation may be a useful adjunct marker for preoperative diagnostic of thyroid gland cancer.

  3. Novel Missense Mitochondrial ND4L Gene Mutations in Friedreich's Ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mehdi Heidari

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective(sThe mitochondrial defects in Friedreich's ataxia have been reported in many researches. Mitochondrial DNA is one of the candidates for defects in mitochondrion, and complex I is the first and one of the largest catalytic complexes of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS system. Materials and MethodsWe searched the mitochondrial ND4L gene for mutations by TTGE and sequencing on 30 FRDA patients and 35 healthy controls.ResultsWe found 3 missense mutations [m.10506A>G (T13A, m.10530G>A (V21M, and m.10653G>A (A62T] in four patients whose m.10530G>A and m.10653G>A were not reported previously. In two patients, heteroplasmic m.10530G>A mutation was detected. They showed a very early ataxia syndrome. Our results showed that the number of mutations in FRDA patients was higher than that in the control cases (P= 0.0287.ConclusionAlthough this disease is due to nuclear gene mutation, the presence of these mutations might be responsible for further mitochondrial defects and the increase of the gravity of the disease. Thus, it should be considered in patients with this disorder.

  4. Prognostic signature and clonality pattern of recurrently mutated genes in inactive chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An increasing numbers of patients are being diagnosed with asymptomatic early-stage chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), with no treatment indication at baseline. We applied a high-throughput deep-targeted analysis, especially designed for covering widely TP53 and ATM genes, in 180 patients with inactive disease at diagnosis, to test the independent prognostic value of CLL somatic recurrent mutations. We found that 40/180 patients harbored at least one acquired variant with ATM (n=17, 9.4%), NOTCH1 (n=14, 7.7%), TP53 (n=14, 7.7%) and SF3B1 (n=10, 5.5%) as most prevalent mutated genes. Harboring one ‘sub-Sanger' TP53 mutation granted an independent 3.5-fold increase of probability of needing treatment. Those patients with a double-hit ATM lesion (mutation+11q deletion) had the shorter median time to first treatment (17 months). We found that a genomic variable: TP53 mutations, most of them under the sensitivity of conventional techniques; a cell phenotypic factor: CD38-positive expression; and a classical marker as β2-microglobulin, remained as the unique independent predictors of outcome. The high-throughput determination of TP53 status, particularly in this set of patients frequently lacking high-risk chromosomal aberrations, emerges as a key step, not only for prediction modeling, but also for exploring mutation-specific therapeutic approaches and minimal residual disease monitoring

  5. Germ-line mutations in the neurofibromatosis 2 gene: Correlations with disease severity and retinal abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parry, D.M. [National Cancer Inst., Bethesda, WA (United States); Kaiser-Kupfer, M. [National Eye Inst., Bethesda, MD (United States); Eldridge, R. [Public Health Service, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [and others

    1996-09-01

    Neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2) features bilateral vestibular schwannomas, other benign neural tumors, and cataracts. Patients in some families develop many tumors at an early age and have rapid clinical progression, whereas in other families, patients may not have symptoms until much later and vestibular schwannomas may be the only tumors. The NF2 gene has been cloned from chromosome 22q; most identified germ-line mutations result in a truncated protein and severe NF2. To look for additional mutations and clinical correlations, we used SSCP analysis to screen DNA from 32 unrelated patients. We identified 20 different mutations in 21 patients (66%): 10 nonsense mutations, 2 frameshifts, 7 splice-site mutations, and 1 large in-frame deletion. Clinical information on 47 patients from the 21 families included ages at onset and at diagnosis, numbers of meningiomas, spinal and skin tumors, and presence of cataracts and retinal abnormalities. We compared clinical findings in patients with nonsense or frameshift mutations to those with splice-site mutations. When each patient was considered as an independent random event, the two groups differed (P {le} .05) for nearly every variable. Patients with nonsense or frameshift mutations were younger at onset and at diagnosis and had a higher frequency and mean number of tumors, supporting the correlation between nonsense and frameshift mutations and severe NF2. When each family was considered as an independent random event, statistically significant differences between the two groups were observed only for mean ages at onset and at diagnosis. A larger data set is needed to resolve these discrepancies. We observed retinal hamartomas and/or epiretinal membranes in nine patients from five families with four different nonsense mutations. This finding, which may represent a new genotype-phenotype correlation, merits further study. 58 refs., 2 tabs.

  6. Recurring dominant-negative mutations in the AVP-NPII gene cause neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repaske, D.R. [Children`s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Phillips, J.A.; Krishnamani, M.R.S. [Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (ADNDI) is a familial form of arginine vasopressin (or antidiuretic hormone) deficiency that is usually manifest in early childhood with polyuria, polydipsia and an antidiuretic response to exogenous vasopressin or its analogs. The phenotype is postulated to arise from gliosis and depletion of the magnocellular neurons that produce vasopressin in the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus. ADNDI is caused by heterozygosity for a variety of mutations in the AVP-NPII gene which encodes vasopressin, its carrier protein (NPII) and a glycoprotein (copeptin) of unknown function. These mutations include: (1) Ala 19{r_arrow}Thr (G279A) in AVP`s signal peptide, (2) Gly 17{r_arrow}Val (G1740T), (3) Pro 24{r_arrow}Leu (C1761T), (4) Gly 57{r_arrow}Ser (G1859A) and (5) del Glu 47({delta}AGG 1824-26), all of which occur in NPII. In characterizing the AVP-NPII mutations in five non-related ADNDI kindreds, we have detected two kindreds having mutation 1 (G279A), two having mutation 3 (C1761T) and one having mutation 4 (G1859A) without any other allelic changes being detected. Two of these recurring mutations (G279A and G1859A) are transitions that occur at CpG dinucleotides while the third (C1761T) does not. Interestingly, families with the same mutations differed in their ethnicity or in their affected AVP-NPII allele`s associated haplotype of closely linked DNA polymorphisms. Our data indicated that at least three of five known AVP-NPII mutations causing ADNDI tend to recur but the mechanisms by which these dominant-negative mutations cause variable or progressive expression of the ADNDI phenotype remain unclear.

  7. Pneumocystis jiroveci dihydropteroate synthase gene mutations among colonized individuals and Pneumocystis pneumonia patients from Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friaza, Vicente; Morilla, Rubén; Respaldiza, Nieves; de la Horra, Carmen; Calderón, Enrique J

    2010-11-01

    Cotrimoxazole, an association of trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole, and dapsone, are mainstays for the prophylaxis and treatment of Pneumocystis pneumonia (PcP). The inability to culture Pneumocystis prevents routine susceptibility testing and detection of drug resistance. Instead, molecular techniques have been used to detect Pneumocystis jiroveci dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) mutations that cause sulfa resistance in other microorganisms. The most frequent DHPS mutations occur at nucleotide positions 165 and 171, which lead to an amino acid change at positions 55 and 57. Several studies suggest that these mutations are associated with the failure of chemoprophylaxis for PcP. The aim was to establish the frequency and characteristics of P jiroveci DHPS mutations among colonized individuals and PcP patients from Spain. A total of 50 colonized individuals and 25 PcP patients were studied. DHPS polymorphisms were identified by restriction fragment length polymorphism assay. The analysis provided a rate of 28% of DHPS gene mutations in our population, with the presence of all possible polymorphisms described. The presence of mutations was higher in PcP patients than in colonized subjects (40% vs 22%), probably because of the chemoprophylaxis used in PcP patients. The comparison between patients with and without DHPS mutations did not show statistical differences due to age, sex, steroid use, sulfa drug exposure, or smoking. A high rate of DHPS mutations in our area of Spain, not only confined to patients previously exposed to sulfa drugs, is shown in this study. As well as PcP patients, colonized individuals who harbor P jiroveci strains with DHPS mutations could play a major role in the transmission cycle of these mutations, representing a reservoir and source of infection for susceptible individuals. Further research is thus warranted to assess the true scope of the problem and to design rational preventive strategies. PMID:21084778

  8. Mutational analysis of Btk, the defective gene in X-linked agammaglobulinemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conley, M.E.; Fitch-Hilgenberg, M.E.; Rohrer, J. [St. Jude Children`s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA), a disorder of B cell development, is due to mutations in an scr-like cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase, Btk. Thus far, mutations in this gene have been identified by sequencing of cDNA. To permit the detection of mutations in genomic DNA, we determined the structure of Btk and identified 19 exons in 37 kb of DNA. PCR primers were designed to amplify each exon with its splice sites. Two overlapping PCR products were employed for exons longer than 230 base pairs. Single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis was used to screen genomic DNA from 30 unrelated families presumed to carry a mutation in Btk. It was possible to amplify DNA in every reaction from every patient. None of the DNA samples demonstrated more than one aberrant SSCP pattern. Twenty three mutations were detected in 25 families. Seven point mutations resulting in amino acid substitutions were seen. An additional 7 base pair substitutions gave rise to premature stop codons. Two splice defects were noted. Small insertions or deletions, all resulting in frameshifts and premature stop codons were seen in eight patients. One patient had an A to G transition in the ATG start codon. Two mutations, both at CpG dinucleotides, were seen in more than one family. Haplotype analysis, using CA repeats closely linked to Btk, demonstrated that the mutations in these families arose independently. We conclude from these studies that the mutations in Btk in patients with XLA are highly variable. Large deletions are uncommon, although small 1 to 4 bp insertions or deletions constitute as many as one third of the mutations. Further analysis of patients with amino acid substitutions will permit structure/function correlations.

  9. Hereditary thrombophilia: identification of nonsense and missense mutations in the protein C gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure of the gene for protein C, an anticoagulant serine protease, was analyzed in 29 unrelated patients with hereditary thrombophilia and protein C deficiency. Gene deletion(s) or gross rearrangement(s) was not demonstrable by Southern blot hybridization to cDNA probes. However, two unrelated patients showed a variant restriction pattern after Pvu II or BamHi digestion, due to mutations in the last exon: analysis of their pedigrees, including three or seven heterozygotes, respectively, with ∼50% reduction of both enzymatic and antigen level, showed the abnormal restriction pattern in all heterozygous individuals, but not in normal relatives. Cloning of protein C gene and sequencing of the last exon allowed the authors to identify a nonsense and a missense mutation, respectively. In the first case, codon 306 (CGA, arginine) is mutated to an inframe stop codon, thus generating a new Pvu II recognition site. In the second case, a missense mutation in the BamHI palindrome (GGATCC → GCATCC) leads to substitution of a key amino acid (a tryptophan to cysteine substitution at position 402), invariantly conserved in eukaryotic serine proteases. These point mutations may explain the protein C-deficiency phenotype of heterozygotes in the two pedigrees

  10. Point Mutation in the Parkin Gene on Patients with Parkinson's Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王涛; 梁直厚; 孙圣刚; 曹学兵; 彭海; 曹非; 刘红进; 童萼塘

    2003-01-01

    Summary: To investigate the distribution of possible novel mutations from parkin gene in variant sub-set of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) in China and explore whether parkin gene plays an im-portant role in the pathogenesis of PD, 70 patients were divided into early-onset group and late-onsetgroup; 70 healthy subjects were included as controls. Genomic DNA from 70 normal controls andfrom those of PD patients were extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes by using standard proce-dures. Mutations of parkin gene (exon 1-12) in all the subjects were screened by PCR-single strandconformation polymorphism (SSCP), and further sequencing was performed in the samples with ab-normal SSCP results, in order to confirm the mutation and its location. A new missense mutationGly284Arg in a patient and 3 abnormal bands in SSCP electrophoresis from samples of another 3 pa-tients were found. All the DNA variants were sourced from the samples of the patients with early-on-set PD. It was concluded that Parkin point mutation also partially contributes to the development ofearly-onset Parkinson's disease in Chinese.

  11. Germline mutation in the RAD51B gene confers predisposition to breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most currently known breast cancer predisposition genes play a role in DNA repair by homologous recombination. Recent studies conducted on RAD51 paralogs, involved in the same DNA repair pathway, have identified rare germline mutations conferring breast and/or ovarian cancer predisposition in the RAD51C, RAD51D and XRCC2 genes. The present study analysed the five RAD51 paralogs (RAD51B, RAD51C, RAD51D, XRCC2, XRCC3) to estimate their contribution to breast and ovarian cancer predisposition. The study was conducted on 142 unrelated patients with breast and/or ovarian cancer either with early onset or with a breast/ovarian cancer family history. Patients were referred to a French family cancer clinic and had been previously tested negative for a BRCA1/2 mutation. Coding sequences of the five genes were analysed by EMMA (Enhanced Mismatch Mutation Analysis). Detected variants were characterized by Sanger sequencing analysis. Three splicing mutations and two likely deleterious missense variants were identified: RAD51B c.452 + 3A > G, RAD51C c.706-2A > G, RAD51C c.1026 + 5-1026 + 7del, RAD51B c.475C > T/p.Arg159Cys and XRCC3 c.448C > T/p.Arg150Cys. No RAD51D and XRCC2 gene mutations were detected. These mutations and variants were detected in families with both breast and ovarian cancers, except for the RAD51B c.475C > T/p.Arg159Cys variant that occurred in a family with 3 breast cancer cases. This study identified the first RAD51B mutation in a breast and ovarian cancer family and is the first report of XRCC3 mutation analysis in breast and ovarian cancer. It confirms that RAD51 paralog mutations confer breast and ovarian cancer predisposition and are rare events. In view of the low frequency of RAD51 paralog mutations, international collaboration of family cancer clinics will be required to more accurately estimate their penetrance and establish clinical guidelines in carrier individuals

  12. Analysis of low-density lipoprotein receptor gene mutations in a Chinese patient with clinically homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹守春; 王绿娅; 秦彦文; 蔺洁; 吴邦俊; 刘舒; 潘晓冬; 杜兰平; 陈保生

    2003-01-01

    Objective To screen the point mutation of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) gene in Chinese familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) patients, characterize the relationship between the genotype and the phenotype and discuss the molecular pathological mechanism of FH. Methods A patient with clinical phenotype of homozygous FH and her parents were investigated for mutations in the promoter and all eighteen exons of the LDL-R gene. Screening was carried out using Touch-down PCR and direct DNA sequencing; multiple alignment analysis by DNASIS 2.5 was used to find base alteration, and the LDL-R gene mutation database was searched to identify the alteration. In addition, the apolipoprotein B gene (apo B) was screened for known mutations (R3500Q) that cause familial defective apo B100 (FDB) by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP).Results Two new heterozygous mutations in exons 4 and 9 of the LDL-R gene were identified in the proband (C122Y and T383I) as well as her parents. Both of the mutations have not been published in the LDL-R gene mutation database. No mutation of apo B100 (R3500Q) was observed. Conclusion Two new mutations (C112Y and T383I) were found in the LDL-R gene, which may result in FH and may be particularly pathogenetic genotypes in Chinese people.

  13. Analysis of mutation induced by radiation in HPRT gene exon 7/8 of rat smooth muscles cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between radiation dose and HPRT gene locus mutation in rat smooth muscle cells, and provide a molecular basis for prevention of blood vessel restenosis after PTCA. Methods: The smooth muscle cells cultured in vitro were irradiated by radionuclide 188Re with different doses. HPRT gene mutation colonies were selected and isolated by 6-thioguanine. Analysis of mutation in exon 7/8 of HPRT gene were accomplished by polymerase chain reaction and single-strand conformation polymorphism. Results: The HPRT gene mutation frequency of rat smooth muscle cells that were irradiated by radionuclide 188Re ranged from 5.5 x 10-6 to 13 x 10-6. Of 91 HPRT gene mutation colonies, 13 contained exon 7/8 deletion and 15 had point mutation. The exon 7/8 mutation frequency was 30.8%. There was significant relationship between radiation dose and mutation frequency of HPRT gene and exon 7/8. Conclusions: The DNA damage and gene mutation induced by radiation was the basis of proliferation inhibition and apoptosis of smooth muscle cells

  14. Novel mutations of the arylsulphatase B (ARSB) gene in Indian patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uttarilli, Anusha; Ranganath, Prajnya; Jain, S. Jamal Md Nurul; Krishna, Prasad C.; Sinha, Anupam; Verma, Ishwar C.; Phadke, Shubha R.; Puri, Ratna D.; Danda, Sumita; Muranjan, Mamta N.; Jevalikar, Ganesh; Nagarajaram, H. A.; Dalal, Ashwin B.

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Mucopolysaccharidosis type VI (MPS VI) is a rare, autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficient enzymatic activity of N-acetyl galactosamine-4-sulphatase resulting from mutations in the arylsulphatase B (ARSB) gene. The ARSB gene is located on chromosome 5q11-q13 and is composed of eight exons. More than hundred ARSB mutations have been reported so far, but the mutation spectrum of MPS VI in India is still unknown. Hence, the aim of the present study was to identify the mutational spectrum in patients with MPS VI in India and to study the genotype-phenotype association and functional outcomes of these mutations. Methods: Molecular characterization of the ARSB gene by Sanger sequencing was done for 15 patients (aged 15 months to 11 yr) who were enzymatically confirmed to have MPS VI. Age of onset, clinical progression and enzyme activity levels in each patient were studied to look for genotype-phenotype association. Haplotype analysis performed for unrelated patients with the recurring mutation W450C, was suggestive of a founder effect. Sequence and structural analyses of the ARSB protein using standard software were carried out to determine the impact of detected mutations on the function of the ARSB protein. Results: A total of 12 mutations were identified, of which nine were novel mutations namely, p.D53N, p.L98R, p.Y103SfsX9, p.W353X, p.H393R, p.F166fsX18, p.I220fsX5, p.W450L, and p.W450C, and three were known mutations (p.D54N, p.A237D and p.S320R). The nine novel sequence variants were confirmed not to be polymorphic variants by performing sequencing in 50 unaffected individuals from the same ethnic population. Interpretation & conclusions: Nine novel mutations were identified in MPS VI cases from India in the present study. The study also provides some insights into the genotype-phenotype association in MPS VI. PMID:26609033

  15. Two novel mutations of CLCN7 gene in Chinese families with autosomal dominant osteopetrosis (type II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hui; Shao, Chong; Zheng, Yan; He, Jin-Wei; Fu, Wen-Zhen; Wang, Chun; Zhang, Zhen-Lin

    2016-07-01

    Autosomal dominant osteopetrosis type II (ADO-II) is a heritable bone disorder characterized by osteosclerosis, predominantly involving the spine (vertebral end-plate thickening, or rugger-jersey spine), the pelvis ("bone-within-bone" structures) and the skull base. Chloride channel 7 (CLCN7) has been reported to be the causative gene. In this study, we aimed to identify the pathogenic mutation in four Chinese families with ADO-II. All 25 exons of the CLCN7 gene, including the exon-intron boundaries, were amplified and sequenced directly in four probands from the Chinese families with ADO-II. The mutation site was then identified in other family members and 250 healthy controls. In family 1, a known missense mutation c.296A>G in exon 4 of CLCN7 was identified in the proband, resulting in a tyrosine (UAU) to cysteine (UGU) substitution at p.99 (Y99C); the mutation was also identified in his affected father. In family 2, a novel missense mutation c.865G>C in exon 10 was identified in the proband, resulting in a valine (GUC) to leucine (CUC) substitution at p.289 (V289L); the mutation was also identified in her healthy mother and sister. In family 3, a novel missense mutation c.1625C>T in exon 17 of CLCN7 was identified in the proband, resulting in an alanine (GCG) to valine (GUG) substitution at p.542 (A542V); the mutation was also identified in her father. In family 4, a hot spot, R767W (c.2299C>T, CGG>TGG), in exon 24 was found in the proband which once again proved the susceptibility of the site or the similar genetic background in different races. Moreover, two novel mutations, V289L and A542V, occurred at a highly conserved position, found by a comparison of the protein sequences from eight vertebrates, and were predicted to have a pathogenic effect by PolyPhen-2 software, which showed "probably damaging" with a score of approximately 1. These mutation sites were not identified in 250 healthy controls. Our present findings suggest that the novel missense

  16. Frequent mutations of chromatin remodeling genes in transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gui, Yaoting; Guo, Guangwu; Huang, Yi;

    2011-01-01

    Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is the most common type of bladder cancer. Here we sequenced the exomes of nine individuals with TCC and screened all the somatically mutated genes in a prevalence set of 88 additional individuals with TCC with different tumor stages and grades. In our study, we...... discovered a variety of genes previously unknown to be mutated in TCC. Notably, we identified genetic aberrations of the chromatin remodeling genes (UTX, MLL-MLL3, CREBBP-EP300, NCOR1, ARID1A and CHD6) in 59% of our 97 subjects with TCC. Of these genes, we showed UTX to be altered substantially more...... frequently in tumors of low stages and grades, highlighting its potential role in the classification and diagnosis of bladder cancer. Our results provide an overview of the genetic basis of TCC and suggest that aberration of chromatin regulation might be a hallmark of bladder cancer....

  17. VIPoma with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 identified as an atypical gene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiya, Atsushi; Kato, Makoto; Shibata, Taiga; Sobajima, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    A 47-year-old man presented with persistent diarrhoea and hypokalaemia. CT revealed 4 pancreatic tumours that appeared to be VIPomas, because the patient had an elevated plasma vasoactive intestinal polypeptide level. MRI showed a low-intensity area in the pituitary suggestive of a pituitary tumour, and a parathyroid tumour was detected by ultrasonography and 99Tc-MIBI scintigraphy. Given these results, the patient was diagnosed with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) and scheduled for surgery. MEN1 is an autosomal dominant disorder associated with MEN1 mutations. Genetic testing indicated that the patient had a MEN1 gene mutation; his 2 sons had the same mutations. Most MEN1 tumours are benign, but some pancreatic and thymic tumours could become malignant. Without treatment, such tumours would result in earlier mortality. Despite its rarity, we should perform genetic testing for family members of patients with MEN1 to identify mutation carriers and improve the patients' prognosis. PMID:26564120

  18. Xerosis is associated with asthma in men independent of atopic dermatitis and filaggrin gene mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engebretsen, K A; Linneberg, Allan René; Thuesen, B H;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidermal filaggrin deficiency due to common filaggrin gene (FLG) mutations causes xerosis and strongly increases the risk of atopic dermatitis and even asthma. However, it is unknown whether xerosis independent of FLG mutations could also increase the risk of asthma. OBJECTIVE: To...... evaluate whether generalized xerosis was associated with asthma, independent of atopic dermatitis and common FLG mutations in a cross-sectional study on adult Danes. METHODS: A total of 3396 adults from the general population participated in a health examination. Lung function and serum-specific IgE levels...... association was observed between xerosis and 'allergic asthma' in men (OR 2.13; 95% CI 1.08-4.19). CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate an association between xerosis and asthma in men independent of atopic dermatitis and FLG mutations. Both facilitated allergen sensitization and secondary degradation of...

  19. Creating mutations in plant resistance genes to parasitic weed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The parasitic weed Orobanche crenata Forsk. (crenate broomrape, Scrophulariaceae) represents a major limiting factor for production of food legumes. Current management methods are not ideal. Indeed herbicide selectivity remains insufficient to control the parasite without decreasing crop yield significantly. Creating such mutant legumes, by mutagenesis has become an important tool to have resistance to broomrape. Gamma radiation from cobalt 60 source was selected as the mutagen to create such mutant plants. Seeds were exposed to the radioactive source to determine the proper dose of radioactivity for mutagenesis. A kill curve has been generated using doses exposures ranging from 0 to 200 Gy. The kill curve data was used to expose legumes seeds to enough radiation to create a survival rate of 50%. The surviving plants will be exposed to the parasitic plant Orobanche crenata and scored for resistance to infection. All phenotypic plant mutations will be logged for future reference. (author)

  20. Glucagon receptor gene mutations with hyperglucagonemiabut without the glucagonoma syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Helen C Miller; Mark Kidd; Irvin M Modlin; Patrizia Cohen; Roberto Dina; Panagiotis Drymousis; Panagiotis Vlavianos; Günter Kl?ppel; Andrea Frilling

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic neoplasms producing exclusively glucagonassociated with glucagon cell hyperplasia of the isletsand not related to hereditary endocrine syndromes havebeen recently described. They represent a novel entitywithin the panel of non-syndromic disorders associatedwith hyperglucagonemia. This case report describesa 36-year-old female with a 10 years history of nonspecificabdominal pain. No underlying cause was evidentdespite extensive diagnostic work-up. More recentlyshe was diagnosed with gall bladder stones. Abdominalultrasound, computerised tomography and magneticresonance imaging revealed no pathologic findings apartfrom cholelithiasis. Endoscopic ultrasound revealed a 5.5mm pancreatic lesion. Fine needle aspiration showedcells focally expressing chromogranin, suggestive butnot diagnostic of a low grade neuroendocrine tumor.OctreoScan? was negative. Serum glucagon was elevatedto 66 pmol/L (normal: 0-50 pmol/L). Other gut hormones,chromogranin A and chromogranin B were normal.Cholecystectomy and enucleation of the pancreatic lesionwere undertaken. Postoperatively, abdominal symptomsresolved and serum glucagon dropped to 7 pmol/L.Although H and E staining confirmed normal pancreatictissue, immunohistochemistry was initially thought to besuggestive of alpha cell hyperplasia. A count of glucagonpositive cells from 5 islets, compared to 5 islets from 5normal pancreata indicated that islet size and glucagoncell ratios were increased, however still within the widerange of normal physiological findings. Glucagon receptorgene (GCGR) sequencing revealed a heterozygous deletion,K349_G359del and 4 missense mutations. This case may potentially represent a progenitor stage of glucagon cell adenomatosis with hyperglucagonemia in the absence of glucagonoma syndrome. The identification of novel GCGR mutations suggests that these may represent the underlying cause of this condition.

  1. Identification of PSEN1 and APP Gene Mutations in Korean Patients with Early-Onset Alzheimer's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Hyun-Kyung; Na, Duk Lyul; Lee, Jae-Hong; Kim, Jong-Won; Ki, Chang-Seok

    2008-01-01

    Although mutations in three genes, amyloid precursor protein (APP), presenilin 1 (PSEN1), and presenilin 2 (PSEN2), have been identified as genetic causes of early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD), there has been a single report on a PSEN1 mutation in Koreans. In the present study, we performed a genetic analysis of six Korean patients with EOAD. Direct sequencing analysis of the APP, PSEN1 and PSEN2 genes revealed two different mutations of the PSEN1 gene (G206S and M233T) and one mutation o...

  2. Mutations in the ALK-1 gene and the phenotype of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia in two large Danish families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Brusgaard, K; Poulsen, L;

    2001-01-01

    families mutations were identified in exon 8 of the ALK-1 gene. In family 6 we found a T1193A mutation. In this family a high prevalence of PAVM and severe GI bleeding was documented, while in family 8 with a C1120T mutation no individuals with PAVM were identified and only one patient had a history of...... severe GI bleeding. No mutations in the endoglin locus were found in either family....

  3. Association of KCNJ5 gene missense mutations with aldosterone-producing adenoma and primary hyperaldosteronism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵丹

    2013-01-01

    Objective To detect the KCNJ5 gene variations in aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA) with primary hyperaldosteronism (PA) ,and to investigate the association of the KCNJ5 gene missense mutations with APA and PA.Methods A total of 46 APA tumors and their clinical characteristics were collected from Hypertension Center of the People’s Hospital of Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region,and all the tumors were confirmed by pathology.

  4. Mutation detection in the human HSP70B′ gene by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography

    OpenAIRE

    Hecker, Karl H.; Asea, Alexzander; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Green, Stacy; Tang, Dan; Calderwood, Stuart K

    2000-01-01

    Variances, particularly single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP), in the genomic sequence of individuals are the primary key to understanding gene function as it relates to differences in the susceptibility to disease, environmental influences, and therapy. In this report, the HSP70B′ gene is the target sequence for mutation detection in biopsy samples from human prostate cancer patients undergoing combined hyperthermia and radiation therapy at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, using temperature...

  5. Sequence analysis of tyrosinase gene in ocular and oculocutaneous albinism patients: introducing three novel mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Khordadpoor-Deilamani, Faravareh; Akbari, Mohammad Taghi; Karimipoor, Morteza; Javadi, Gholamreza

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Albinism is a heterogeneous genetic disorder of melanin synthesis that results in hypopigmented eyes (in patients with ocular albinism) or hair, skin, and eyes (in individuals with oculocutaneous albinism). It is associated with decreased visual acuity, nystagmus, strabismus, and photophobia. The tyrosinase gene is known to be involved in both oculocutaneous albinism and autosomal recessive ocular albinism. In this study, we aimed to screen the mutations in the TYR gene in the nonsynd...

  6. Automated DNA mutation detection using universal conditions direct sequencing: application to ten muscular dystrophy genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Bai-Lin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the most common and efficient methods for detecting mutations in genes is PCR amplification followed by direct sequencing. Until recently, the process of designing PCR assays has been to focus on individual assay parameters rather than concentrating on matching conditions for a set of assays. Primers for each individual assay were selected based on location and sequence concerns. The two primer sequences were then iteratively adjusted to make the individual assays work properly. This generally resulted in groups of assays with different annealing temperatures that required the use of multiple thermal cyclers or multiple passes in a single thermal cycler making diagnostic testing time-consuming, laborious and expensive. These factors have severely hampered diagnostic testing services, leaving many families without an answer for the exact cause of a familial genetic disease. A search of GeneTests for sequencing analysis of the entire coding sequence for genes that are known to cause muscular dystrophies returns only a small list of laboratories that perform comprehensive gene panels. The hypothesis for the study was that a complete set of universal assays can be designed to amplify and sequence any gene or family of genes using computer aided design tools. If true, this would allow automation and optimization of the mutation detection process resulting in reduced cost and increased throughput. Results An automated process has been developed for the detection of deletions, duplications/insertions and point mutations in any gene or family of genes and has been applied to ten genes known to bear mutations that cause muscular dystrophy: DMD; CAV3; CAPN3; FKRP; TRIM32; LMNA; SGCA; SGCB; SGCG; SGCD. Using this process, mutations have been found in five DMD patients and four LGMD patients (one in the FKRP gene, one in the CAV3 gene, and two likely causative heterozygous pairs of variations in the CAPN3 gene of two other

  7. A rat model of hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia carries a missense mutation in the Edaradd gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiai Hiroshi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED is a congenital disorder characterized by sparse hair, oligodontia, and inability to sweat. It is caused by mutations in any of three Eda pathway genes: ectodysplasin (Eda, Eda receptor (Edar, and Edar-associated death domain (Edaradd, which encode ligand, receptor, and intracellular adaptor molecule, respectively. The Eda signaling pathway activates NF-κB, which is central to ectodermal differentiation. Although the causative genes and the molecular pathway affecting HED have been identified, no curative treatment for HED has been established. Previously, we found a rat spontaneous mutation that caused defects in hair follicles and named it sparse-and-wavy (swh. Here, we have established the swh rat as the first rat model of HED and successfully identified the swh mutation. Results The swh/swh rat showed sparse hair, abnormal morphology of teeth, and absence of sweat glands. The ectoderm-derived glands, meibomian, preputial, and tongue glands, were absent. We mapped the swh mutation to the most telomeric part of rat Chr 7 and found a Pro153Ser missense mutation in the Edaradd gene. This mutation was located in the death domain of EDARADD, which is crucial for signal transduction and resulted in failure to activate NF-κB. Conclusions These findings suggest that swh is a loss-of-function mutation in the rat Edaradd and indicate that the swh/swh rat would be an excellent animal model of HED that could be used to investigate the pathological basis of the disease and the development of new therapies.

  8. Intellectual Ability in the Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Dystrophin Gene Mutation Location

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasic Milic V.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is the most common form of muscular dystrophy during childhood. Mutations in dystrophin (DMD gene are also recognized as a cause of cognitive impairment. We aimed to determine the association between intelligence level and mutation location in DMD genes in Serbian patients with DMD. Forty-one male patients with DMD, aged 3 to 16 years, were recruited at the Clinic for Neurology and Psychiatry for Children and Youth in Belgrade, Serbia. All patients had defined DMD gene deletions or duplications [multiplex ligation- dependent probe amplification (MLPA, polymerase chain reaction (PCR] and cognitive status assessment (Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, Brunet-Lezine scale, Vineland-Doll scale. In 37 patients with an estimated full scale intelligence quotient (FSIQ, six (16.22% had borderline intelligence (70mutations when boundaries were set at exons 30 and 45. However, FSIQ was statistically significantly associated with mutation location when we assumed their functional consequence on dystrophin isoforms and when mutations in the 5’-untranslated region (5’UTR of Dp140 (exons 45-50 were assigned to affect only Dp427 and Dp260. Mutations affecting Dp140 and Dp71/Dp40 have been associated with more frequent and more severe cognitive impairment. Finally, the same classification of mutations explained the greater proportion of FSIQ variability associated with cumulative loss of dystrophin isoforms. In conclusion, cumulative loss of dystrophin isoforms increases the risk of intellectual impairment in DMD and characterizing the genotype can define necessity of early cognitive interventions in DMD patients.

  9. Intellectual Ability in the Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Dystrophin Gene Mutation Location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milic Rasic, V; Vojinovic, D; Pesovic, J; Mijalkovic, G; Lukic, V; Mladenovic, J; Kosac, A; Novakovic, I; Maksimovic, N; Romac, S; Todorovic, S; Savic Pavicevic, D

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common form of muscular dystrophy during childhood. Mutations in dystrophin (DMD) gene are also recognized as a cause of cognitive impairment. We aimed to determine the association between intelligence level and mutation location in DMD genes in Serbian patients with DMD. Forty-one male patients with DMD, aged 3 to 16 years, were recruited at the Clinic for Neurology and Psychiatry for Children and Youth in Belgrade, Serbia. All patients had defined DMD gene deletions or duplications [multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA), polymerase chain reaction (PCR)] and cognitive status assessment (Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, Brunet-Lezine scale, Vineland-Doll scale). In 37 patients with an estimated full scale intelligence quotient (FSIQ), six (16.22%) had borderline intelligence (70mutations when boundaries were set at exons 30 and 45. However, FSIQ was statistically significantly associated with mutation location when we assumed their functional consequence on dystrophin isoforms and when mutations in the 5′-untranslated region (5′UTR) of Dp140 (exons 45–50) were assigned to affect only Dp427 and Dp260. Mutations affecting Dp140 and Dp71/Dp40 have been associated with more frequent and more severe cognitive impairment. Finally, the same classification of mutations explained the greater proportion of FSIQ variability associated with cumulative loss of dystrophin isoforms. In conclusion, cumulative loss of dystrophin isoforms increases the risk of intellectual impairment in DMD and characterizing the genotype can define necessity of early cognitive interventions in DMD patients. PMID:25937795

  10. A negative screen for mutations in calstabin 1 and 2 genes in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biagi Diogo G

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calstabins 1 and 2 bind to Ryanodine receptors regulating muscle excitation-contraction coupling. Mutations in Ryanodine receptors affecting their interaction with calstabins lead to different cardiac pathologies. Animal studies suggest the involvement of calstabins with dilated cardiomyopathy. Results We tested the hypothesis that calstabins mutations may cause dilated cardiomyopathy in humans screening 186 patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy for genetic alterations in calstabins 1 and 2 genes (FKBP12 and FKBP12.6. No missense variant was found. Five no-coding variations were found but not related to the disease. Conclusions These data corroborate other studies suggesting that mutations in FKBP12 and FKBP12.6 genes are not commonly related to cardiac diseases.

  11. A novel mutation in the mitochondrial tRNAAsn gene associated with a lethal disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a lethal mitochondrial disease in a 10-month-old child who presented with encephalomyopathy. Histochemical and electron microscopy examinations of skeletal muscle biopsy revealed abnormal mitochondria associated with a combined deficiency of complexes I and IV. After excluding mitochondrial DNA deletions and depletion, direct sequencing was used to screen for mutation in all transfer RNA (tRNA) genes. A T-to-C substitution at position 5693 in the tRNAAsn gene was found in blood and muscle. Microdissection of muscle biopsy and its analysis revealed the highest level of this mutation in cytochrome c oxidase (COX)-negative fibres. We suggest that this novel mutation would affect the anticodon loop structure of the tRNAAsn and cause a fatal mitochondrial disease

  12. A novel EDA gene mutation in a Spanish family with X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañueto, J; Zafra-Cobo, M I; Ciria, S; Unamuno, P; González-Sarmiento, R

    2011-11-01

    X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XLHED) is characterized by abnormal development of the hair, teeth, and sweat glands. It is caused by mutations in the EDA gene, which maps to the X chromosome and encodes a protein called ectodysplasin-A, a member of the tumor necrosis factor-related ligand family. Affected males typically exhibit all the typical features of HED, but heterozygous carriers may show mild to moderate clinical manifestations. We describe the case of a Spanish family in which a novel heterozygous c.733_734insGA mutation at the EDA gene was identified. It was located in exon 5 and consisted of a frame-shift mutation at codon 245, which gave rise to an abnormal protein with a premature stop codon after 35 residues. Genetic analyses in families with XLHED are useful for checking carrier status, but they also provide information for genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis. PMID:21696697

  13. Mutations of the tyrosinase gene in patients with oculocutaneous albinism from various ethnic groups in Israel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gershoni-Baruch, R. (Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa (Israel)); Rosenmann, A. (Hadassah Medical Center, Jerusalem (Israel)); Droetto, S.; Holmes, S.; Tripathi, R.K.; Spritz, R.A. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States))

    1994-04-01

    The authors have analyzed the tyrosinase (TYR) gene in 38 unrelated patients with oculocutaneous albinism (OCA), derived from several different ethnic groups of the diverse population of Israel. They detected TYR gene mutations in 23 of the 34 patients with apparent type I (i.e., tyrosinase-deficient) OCA and in none of the patients with other clinical forms of albinism. Among Moroccan Jews with type IA (i.e., tyrosinase-negative) OCA, they detected a highly predominant mutant allele containing a missense substitution, Gly47Asp (G47D). This mutation occurs on the same haplotype as in patients from the Canary Islands and Puerto Rico, suggesting that the G47D mutation in these ethnically distinct populations may stem from a common origin. 28 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  14. Mutation in the Monocarboxylate Transporter 12 Gene Affects Guanidinoacetate Excretion but Does Not Cause Glucosuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhayat, Nasser; Simonin, Alexandre; Anderegg, Manuel; Pathare, Ganesh; Lüscher, Benjamin P; Deisl, Christine; Albano, Giuseppe; Mordasini, David; Hediger, Matthias A; Surbek, Daniel V; Vogt, Bruno; Sass, Jörn Oliver; Kloeckener-Gruissem, Barbara; Fuster, Daniel G

    2016-05-01

    A heterozygous mutation (c.643C>A; p.Q215X) in the monocarboxylate transporter 12-encoding gene MCT12 (also known as SLC16A12) that mediates creatine transport was recently identified as the cause of a syndrome with juvenile cataracts, microcornea, and glucosuria in a single family. Whereas the MCT12 mutation cosegregated with the eye phenotype, poor correlation with the glucosuria phenotype did not support a pathogenic role of the mutation in the kidney. Here, we examined MCT12 in the kidney and found that it resides on basolateral membranes of proximal tubules. Patients with MCT12 mutation exhibited reduced plasma levels and increased fractional excretion of guanidinoacetate, but normal creatine levels, suggesting that MCT12 may function as a guanidinoacetate transporter in vivo However, functional studies in Xenopus oocytes revealed that MCT12 transports creatine but not its precursor, guanidinoacetate. Genetic analysis revealed a separate, undescribed heterozygous mutation (c.265G>A; p.A89T) in the sodium/glucose cotransporter 2-encoding gene SGLT2 (also known as SLC5A2) in the family that segregated with the renal glucosuria phenotype. When overexpressed in HEK293 cells, the mutant SGLT2 transporter did not efficiently translocate to the plasma membrane, and displayed greatly reduced transport activity. In summary, our data indicate that MCT12 functions as a basolateral exit pathway for creatine in the proximal tubule. Heterozygous mutation of MCT12 affects systemic levels and renal handling of guanidinoacetate, possibly through an indirect mechanism. Furthermore, our data reveal a digenic syndrome in the index family, with simultaneous MCT12 and SGLT2 mutation. Thus, glucosuria is not part of the MCT12 mutation syndrome. PMID:26376857

  15. Clinicopathological description of two cases with SQSTM1 gene mutation associated with frontotemporal dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Gabor G; van der Zee, Julie; Hort, Jakub; Kristoferitsch, Wolfgang; Leitha, Thomas; Höftberger, Romana; Ströbel, Thomas; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Matej, Radoslav

    2016-02-01

    There is a strong genetic influence on the clinicopathological phenotypes associated with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Intracellular deposition of TDP-43 is the phenotypical hallmark of a frequent subgroup of cases. Mutations in the sequestosome 1 (SQSTM1) gene have rarely been found in individuals with FTD. Here we provide a comprehensive clinicopathological description of two cases with a SQSTM1 mutation. The clinical phenotype of patient 1 (mutation p.Glu396*) was compatible with the behavioural variant (bv) of FTD. TDP-43 pathology was consistent with the features of type B of FTLD-TDP pathology. However, prominent neuronal granular cytoplasmic TDP-43 immunoreactivity and abundant oligodendroglial inclusions, proven by colocalization with the oligodendroglial-marker TPPP/p25, were also seen. The clinical phenotype of patient 2 was compatible with bvFTD associated with parkinsonism and bulbar symptoms in the later stage. Genetic testing of patient 2 identified a C9orf72 repeat expansion mutation together with a missense mutation (p.Arg212Cys) in SQSTM1. TDP-43 pathology was characterized by neuritic profiles compatible mostly with type A. In contrast to patient 1, p62 pathology was seen to a greater extent as TDP-43 immunoreactivity in neurons. Using an antibody that detects poly(GP) peptides produced via repeat associated non-ATG translation associated with expanded hexanucleotide repeat in the C9orf72 gene, we confirmed the presence of pathognomonic inclusions. The present study supports previous observations on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) that SQSTM1 mutations consistently associate with TDP-43 pathology. The co-presence of C9orf72 mutation may influence the phenotype, thus finding one FTLD (or ALS) related mutation does not exclude the presence of further influential genetic alterations. Oligodendroglial TDP-43 pathology is considerable in some forms of FTLD-TDP, thus their evaluation might be considered

  16. Ethnic disparity in 21-hydroxylase gene mutations identified in Pakistani congenital adrenal hyperplasia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jabbar Abdul

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH is a group of autosomal recessive disorders caused by defects in the steroid 21 hydroxylase gene (CYP21A2. We studied the spectrum of mutations in CYP21A2 gene in a multi-ethnic population in Pakistan to explore the genetics of CAH. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted for the identification of mutations CYP21A2 and their phenotypic associations in CAH using ARMS-PCR assay. Results Overall, 29 patients were analyzed for nine different mutations. The group consisted of two major forms of CAH including 17 salt wasters and 12 simple virilizers. There were 14 phenotypic males and 15 females representing all the major ethnic groups of Pakistan. Parental consanguinity was reported in 65% cases and was equally distributed in the major ethnic groups. Among 58 chromosomes analyzed, mutations were identified in 45 (78.6% chromosomes. The most frequent mutation was I2 splice (27% followed by Ile173Asn (26%, Arg 357 Trp (19%, Gln319stop, 16% and Leu308InsT (12%, whereas Val282Leu was not observed in this study. Homozygosity was seen in 44% and heterozygosity in 34% cases. I2 splice mutation was found to be associated with SW in the homozygous. The Ile173Asn mutation was identified in both SW and SV forms. Moreover, Arg357Trp manifested SW in compound heterozygous state. Conclusion Our study showed that CAH exists in our population with ethnic difference in the prevalence of mutations examined.

  17. Two novel missense mutations in the myostatin gene identified in Japanese patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyazato Yoshinobu

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myostatin is a negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth. Truncating mutations in the myostatin gene have been reported to result in gross muscle hypertrophy. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, the most common lethal muscle wasting disease, is a result of an absence of muscle dystrophin. Although this disorder causes a rather uniform pattern of muscle wasting, afflicted patients display phenotypic variability. We hypothesized that genetic variation in myostatin is a modifier of the DMD phenotype. Methods We analyzed 102 Japanese DMD patients for mutations in the myostatin gene. Results Two polymorphisms that are commonly observed in Western countries, p.55A>T and p.153K>R, were not observed in these Japanese patients. An uncommon polymorphism of p.164E>K was uncovered in four cases; each patient was found to be heterozygous for this polymorphism, which had the highest frequency of the polymorphism observed in the Japanese patients. Remarkably, two patients were found to be heterozygous for one of two novel missense mutations (p.95D>H and p.156L>I. One DMD patient carrying a novel missense mutation of p.95D>H was not phenotypically different from the non-carriers. The other DMD patient was found to carry both a novel mutation (p.156L>I and a known polymorphism (p.164E>K in one allele, although his phenotype was not significantly modified. Any nucleotide change creating a target site for micro RNAs was not disclosed in the 3' untranslated region. Conclusion Our results indicate that heterozygous missense mutations including two novel mutations did not produce an apparent increase in muscle strength in Japanese DMD cases, even in a patient carrying two missense mutations.

  18. Point mutations in the AML1/RUNX1 gene associated with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a clonal disorder of hematopoietic stem cells characterized by ineffective and inadequate hematopoiesis. MDS in a subset of patients arise after previous chemotherapy or radiation exposure for other malignancies. As MDS is a heterogeneous disorder, specific gene abnormalities playing a role in the myelodysplastic process have been difficult to identify. In this study, we analyzed the somatic mutations in the AML1/RUNX1 gene, which is a critical regulator of definitive hematopoiesis and the most frequent targets for translocation of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), in patients with MDS. We detected AML1 point mutations in 26 of 110 (23.6%) patients with refractory anemia with excess blasts (RAEB), RAEB in transformation (RAEBt) and AML following MDS (defined these categories as MDS/AML). Among 22 patients with radiation-related (including 14 atomic bomb survivors) and/or therapy-related MDS/AML, 11 (50%) patients had the AML1 mutations mostly in N-terminal region. In contrast, 15 of 88 (17%) patients with sporadic MDS/AML showed the AML1 mutations equally in both N-terminal and C-terminal region. The MDS/AML patients with AML1 mutations had a significantly worse prognosis than those without AML1 mutations. Most of AML1 mutants lost trans-activation potential, regardless of their DNA binding potential. These data suggested that AML1 point mutation is one of the major driving forces of MDS/AML, and these mutations may represent a distinct clinicopathologic-genetic entity. (author)

  19. Genetic and Functional Analysis of Androgen Receptor Gene Mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.T. Brüggenwirth (Hennie)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractNuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) are intermediary factors through which extracellular signals regulate expression of genes that are involved in homeostasis, development, and differentiation (Beato et al. '995, Mangelsdorf and Evans 1995). These receptors are characterized by a modular st

  20. Influence of individual radiation sensitivity on GPA gene mutation frequency in medical diagnostic X-ray workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the influence of individual radiation sensitivity on GPA gene mutation frequency and the way to adjust it. Methods: Comet assay, cytokinesis-block micronucleus plus 3AB index technique, and multiple linear regression were used to determine the influence of individual radiation sensitivity on GPA gene mutation frequency in medical diagnostic X-ray workers, and then the fitted equation of multiple linear regression was obtained. Results: There was individual difference in radiation sensitivity among medical diagnostic X-ray workers, which is a factor influencing GPA gene mutation frequency. The stronger the individual radiation sensitivity, the higher the GPA gene mutation frequency. The correlation between GPA gene mutation frequency and radiation dose was strengthened after it was adjusted by the individual radiation sensitivity. The equation of multiple linear regression for GPA gene mutation frequency was obtained by the multiple factor analysis: YNφ=24.7 x 10-6 + 0.5 x 10-6X1-99.5 x 10-6X2 + 1.7 x 10-6X3, and the correlation coefficient r=0.673. Conclusions: The relationship between GPA Nφ gene mutation frequency and cumulative dose is improved by adjustment for individual radiation sensitivity. The accumulative dose estimated by using the multiple linear regressions is approximate to the dose estimated by physical method, thus it decreases the uncertainty of estimating cumulative dose and forecasting cancer risk by using GPA gene mutation frequency

  1. Frequent mutations of genes encoding ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis pathway components in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Guangwu; Gui, Yaoting; Gao, Shengjie;

    2012-01-01

    We sequenced whole exomes of ten clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs) and performed a screen of similar to 1,100 genes in 88 additional ccRCCs, from which we discovered 12 previously unidentified genes mutated at elevated frequencies in ccRCC. Notably, we detected frequent mutations in the u...... of the hypoxia regulatory network....

  2. Lack of mutations of exon 2 of the MEN1 gene in endocrine and nonendocrine sporadic tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, S C; L.S. Nascimento; F.J. Ferreira; P.S. Mattos; L. H. Camara-Lopes; Ward, L. S.

    2001-01-01

    In addition to the mutations that underlie most cases of the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) syndrome, somatic mutations of the MEN1 gene have also been described in sporadic tumors like gastrinomas, insulinomas and bronchial carcinoid neoplasm. We examined exon 2 of this gene, where most of the mutations have been described, in 148 endocrine and nonendocrine sporadic tumors. DNA was obtained by phenol/chloroform extraction and ethanol precipitation from 92 formalin-fixed, paraffin...

  3. Eighty percent of French sport winners in Olympic, World and Europeans competitions have mutations in the hemochromatosis HFE gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermine, Olivier; Dine, Gérard; Genty, Vincent; Marquet, Laurie-Anne; Fumagalli, Gabriela; Tafflet, Muriel; Guillem, Flavia; Van Lierde, Françoise; Rousseaux-Blanchi, Marie-Philippe; Palierne, Christian; Lapostolle, Jean-Claude; Cervetti, Jean-Pierre; Frey, Alain; Jouven, Xavier; Noirez, Philippe; Toussaint, Jean-François

    2015-12-01

    The HFE gene encodes a protein involved in iron homeostasis; individuals with mutations in both alleles develop hemochromatosis. 27% of the French population is heterozygous for mutations in this gene. We found that 80% of the French athletes who won international competitions in rowing, Nordic skiing and judo display mutations in one allele of HFE, thus demonstrating the existence of a favourable phenotype linked to this heterozygosity. PMID:26416567

  4. Thrombocytopenia and erythrocytosis in mice with a mutation in the gene encoding the hemoglobin β minor chain

    OpenAIRE

    Kauppi, Maria; Hilton, Adrienne A; Metcalf, Donald; Ng, Ashley P.; Hyland, Craig D.; Collinge, Janelle E.; Kile, Benjamin T.; Hilton, Douglas J.; Alexander, Warren S.

    2011-01-01

    Diverse mutations in the genes encoding hemoglobin (Hb) have been characterized in human disease. We describe here a mutation in the mouse Hbb-b2 gene, denoted Plt12, that precisely mimics the human hemoglobin Hotel Dieu variant. The mutation results in increased affinity of Hb for oxygen and Plt12 mutant mice exhibited reduced partial pressure of O2 in the blood, accompanied by erythrocytosis characterized by elevated erythropoietin levels and splenomegaly with excess erythropoiesis. Most ho...

  5. A cancer derived mutation in the Retinoblastoma gene with a distinct defect for LXCXE dependent interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demone Jordan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The interaction between viral oncoproteins such as Simian virus 40 TAg, adenovirus E1A, and human papilloma virus E7, and the retinoblastoma protein (pRB occurs through a well characterized peptide sequence, LXCXE, on the viral protein and a well conserved groove in the pocket domain of pRB. Cellular proteins, such as histone deacetylases, also use this mechanism to interact with the retinoblastoma protein to repress transcription at cell cycle regulated genes. For these reasons this region of the pRB pocket domain is thought to play a critical role in growth suppression. Results In this study, we identify and characterize a tumor derived allele of the retinoblastoma gene (RB1 that possesses a discrete defect in its ability to interact with LXCXE motif containing proteins that compromises proliferative control. To assess the frequency of similar mutations in the RB1 gene in human cancer, we screened blood and tumor samples for similar alleles. We screened almost 700 samples and did not detect additional mutations, indicating that this class of mutation is rare. Conclusions Our work provides proof of principal that alleles encoding distinct, partial loss of function mutations in the retinoblastoma gene that specifically lose LXCXE dependent interactions, are found in human cancer.

  6. Distinct patterns of novel gene mutations in poor-prognostic stereotyped subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strefford, J C; Sutton, L-A; Baliakas, P; Agathangelidis, A; Malčíková, J; Plevova, K; Scarfó, L; Davis, Zachary James; Stalika, E; Cortese, D; Cahill, N; Pedersen, L B; di Celle, P F; Tzenou, T; Geisler, C; Panagiotidis, P; Langerak, A W; Chiorazzi, N; Pospisilova, S; Oscier, D; Davi, F; Belessi, C; Mansouri, L; Ghia, P; Stamatopoulos, K; Rosenquist, R

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed recurrent mutations of the NOTCH1, SF3B1 and BIRC3 genes in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), especially among aggressive, chemorefractory cases. Nevertheless, it is currently unknown whether their presence may differ in subsets of patients carrying stereotyped B...

  7. A new mutation in the prion protein gene: A patient with dementia and white matter changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Harten, B.; Van Gool, W.A.; Van Langen, I.M.; Deekman, J.M.; Meijerink, P.H.S.; Weinstein, H.C.

    2000-01-01

    The authors describe the clinical characteristics, MRI abnormalities, and molecular findings in a patient with a novel variant of a two-octarepeat insertion mutation in the prion protein gene. This patient presented with moderately progressive dementia of presenile onset and gait ataxia. MRI showed

  8. Merkel Cell Carcinoma: Correlation of KIT Expression with Survival and Evaluation of KIT Gene Mutational Status

    OpenAIRE

    Andea, Aleodor A.; Patel, Raj; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan; Kumar, Sanjay; DeVilliers, Patricia; Jhala, Darshana; Eltoum, Isam E.; Siegal, Gene P.

    2010-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma is one of the most aggressive primary cutaneous malignancies. Since some Merkel cell carcinomas express the receptor tyrosine kinase KIT, we aimed to evaluate the correlation of KIT expression with outcome and the presence of activating mutations in the KIT gene in Merkel cell carcinoma.

  9. Mutation screening and association analysis of six candidate genes for autism on chromosome 7q

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonora, Elena; Lamb, Janine A; Barnby, Gabrielle;

    2005-01-01

    Genetic studies have provided evidence for an autism susceptibility locus (AUTS1) on chromosome 7q. Screening for mutations in six genes mapping to 7q, CUTL1, SRPK2, SYPL, LAMB1, NRCAM and PTPRZ1 in 48 unrelated individuals with autism led to the identification of several new coding variants in t...

  10. Uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase gene mutations in Danish patients with porphyria cutanea tarda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, L; Bygum, A; Jensen, A; Brandrup, F; Thomsen, K; Hørder, Mogens; Petersen, N E

    2000-01-01

    Decreased uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (UROD) activity is a characteristic feature of the most common of the porphyrias, porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT). A subgroup of the clinically overt PCT cases is associated with mutations in the gene encoding UROD and inherited as an autosomal-dominant trait...

  11. X-linked hydrocephalus : A novel missense mutation in the L1CAM gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sztriha, L; Vos, YJ; Verlind, E; Johansen, J; Berg, B

    2002-01-01

    X-linked hydrocephalus is associated with mutations in the L1 neuronal cell adhesion molecule gene. L1 protein plays a key role in neurite outgrowth, axonal guidance, and pathfinding during the development of the nervous system. A male is described with X-linked hydrocephalus who had multiple small

  12. Targeted resequencing for analysis of clonal composition of recurrent gene mutations in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jethwa, Alexander; Hüllein, Jennifer; Stolz, Tatjana;

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent gene mutations contribute to the pathogenesis of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL). We developed a next-generation sequencing (NGS) platform to determine the genetic profile, intratumoural heterogeneity, and clonal structure of two independent CLL cohorts. TP53, SF3B1, and NOTCH1 were...

  13. Screening of GABA(A)-receptor gene mutations in primary dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, H; Lang, D; Burgunder, J-M; Kaelin-Lang, A

    2007-10-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that GABA-ergic neurotransmission plays a role in the pathogenesis of primary dystonia in humans. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that mutations in the GABRA1, GABRB3, and GABRG2 genes encoding the alpha1, beta3, and gamma subunits of the GABA(A) receptor are involved in familial primary dystonia. All exons and exon-intron boundaries of the above genes were amplified by PCR from genomic DNA in 28 patients who had primary dystonia and a positive family history but had no mutation in any other genes known to be involved in primary dystonia. The PCR products were analyzed by single strand conformation polymorphism followed by sequencing of variant conformers compared with normal controls (n = 54). We found no mutations in these genes. We did, however, find a new polymorphism, 559 + 80G>A in intron 5 of GABRA1, and we also confirmed several that were previously reported, including 315C>T in exon 3 and 588C>T in exon 5 of GABRG2, but there were no significant differences between controls and patients in the allele and genotype frequencies of these polymorphisms. In conclusion, mutations of GABRA1, GABRB3, and GABRG2 appear not to play a major role in the development of familial primary dystonia. PMID:17880575

  14. Mutations in the polyglutamine binding protein 1 gene cause X-linked mental retardation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalscheuer, VM; Freude, K; Musante, L; Jensen, LR; Yntema, HG; Gecz, J; Sefiani, A; Hoffmann, K; Moser, B; Haas, S; Gurok, U; Haesler, S; Aranda, B; Nshedjan, A; Tzschach, A; Hartmann, N; Roloff, TC; Shoichet, S; Hagens, O; Tao, J; van Bokhoven, H; Turner, G; Chelly, J; Moraine, C; Fryns, JP; Nuber, U; Hoeltzenbein, M; Scharff, C; Scherthan, H; Lenzner, S; Hamel, BCJ; Schweiger, S; Ropers, HH

    2003-01-01

    We found mutations in the gene PQBP1 in 5 of 29 families with nonsyndromic (MRX) and syndromic (MRXS) forms of X-linked mental retardation (XLMR). Clinical features in affected males include mental retardation, microcephaly, short stature, spastic paraplegia and midline defects. PQBP1 has previously

  15. FBN-1 Gene Mutation Analysis in Czech Patients with Aortic Dilatation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šímová, Jana; Mazura, Ivan; Čapek, P.; Škvor, Jiří; Dudra, Ján; Lindner, Jaroslav; Zvárová, Jana

    Prague: Czechoslovak Society for Forensic Genetics, 2008. P19. [ Forensic a 2008. 25.04.2008-26.04.2008, Prague] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00B107 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : FBN-1 gene * dilatation * mutation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  16. Mutations in the polyglutamine binding protein 1 gene cause X-linked mental retardation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalscheuer, Vera M; Freude, Kristine; Musante, Luciana;

    2003-01-01

    We found mutations in the gene PQBP1 in 5 of 29 families with nonsyndromic (MRX) and syndromic (MRXS) forms of X-linked mental retardation (XLMR). Clinical features in affected males include mental retardation, microcephaly, short stature, spastic paraplegia and midline defects. PQBP1 has...

  17. Pre-thymic somatic mutation leads to high mutant frequency at hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jett, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    While characterizing the background mutation spectrum of the Hypoxathine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene in a healthy population, an outlier with a high mutant frequency of thioguanine resistant lymphocytes was found. When studied at the age of 46, this individual had been smoking 60 cigarettes per day for 38 years. His mutant frequency was calculated at 3.6 and 4.2x10{sup {minus}4} for two sampling periods eight months apart. Sequencing analysis of the HPRT gene in his mutant thioguanine resistant T lymphocytes was done to find whether the cells had a high rate of mutation, or if the mutation was due to a single occurrence of mutation and, if so, when in the T lymphocyte development the mutation occurred. By T-cell receptor analysis it has been found that out of 35 thioguanine resistant clones there was no dominant gamma T cell receptor gene rearrangement. During my appointment in the Science & Engineering Research Semester, I found that 34 of those clones have the same base substitution of G{yields}T at cDNA position 197. Due to the consistent mutant frequency from both sampling periods and the varying T cell receptors, the high mutant frequency cannot be due to recent proliferation of a mature mutant T lymphocyte. From the TCR and DNA sequence analysis we conclude that the G{yields}T mutation must have occurred in a T lymphocyte precursor before thymic differentiation so that the thioguanine resistant clones share the same base substitution but not the same gamma T cell receptor gene.

  18. Low prevalence of CHEK2 gene mutations in multiethnic cohorts of breast cancer patients in Malaysia.

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    Suriati Mohamad

    Full Text Available CHEK2 is a protein kinase that is involved in cell-cycle checkpoint control after DNA damage. Germline mutations in CHEK2 gene have been associated with increase in breast cancer risk. The aim of this study is to identify the CHEK2 gene germline mutations among high-risk breast cancer patients and its contribution to the multiethnic population in Malaysia. We screened the entire coding region of CHEK2 gene on 59 high-risk breast cancer patients who tested negative for BRCA1/2 germline mutations from UKM Medical Centre (UKMMC, Hospital Kuala Lumpur (HKL and Hospital Putrajaya (HPJ. Sequence variants identified were screened further in case-control cohorts consisting of 878 unselected invasive breast cancer patients (180 Malays, 526 Chinese and 172 Indian and 270 healthy individuals (90 Malays, 90 Chinese and 90 Indian. By screening the entire coding region of the CHEK2 gene, two missense mutations, c.480A>G (p.I160M and c.538C>T (p.R180C were identified in two unrelated patients (3.4%. Further screening of these missense mutations on the case-control cohorts unveiled the variant p.I160M in 2/172 (1.1% Indian cases and 1/90 (1.1% Indian control, variant p.R180C in 2/526 (0.38% Chinese cases and 0/90 Chinese control, and in 2/180 (1.1% of Malay cases and 1/90 (1.1% of Malay control. The results of this study suggest that CHEK2 mutations are rare among high-risk breast cancer patients and may play a minor contributing role in breast carcinogenesis among Malaysian population.

  19. Predominance of the recurrent mutation R635X in the LAMB3 gene in European patients with Herlitz junctional epidermolysis bullosa has implications for mutation detection strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulkkinen, L; Meneguzzi, G; McGrath, J A; Xu, Y; Blanchet-Bardon, C; Ortonne, J P; Christiano, A M; Uitto, J

    1997-08-01

    Junctional forms of epidermolysis bullosa (JEB) are characterized by tissue separation at the level of the lamina lucida. We have recently disclosed specific mutations in the LAMA3, LAMB3, and LAMC2 genes encoding the subunit polypeptides of the anchoring filament protein laminin 5 in 66 families with different variants of JEB. Examination of the JEB mutation database revealed recurrence of a particular C-->T substitution at nucleotide position 1903 (exon 14) of LAMB3, resulting in the mutation R635X. The inheritance of this nonsense mutation was noted on different genetic backgrounds, suggesting that R635X is a hotspot mutation. In this study, we have performed mutation evaluation in a European cohort of 14 families with the lethal, Herlitz type of JEB (H-JEB). The families were first screened for the presence of the R635X mutation by restriction enzyme digestion of the PCR product corresponding to exon 14. Four of the probands were found to be homozygous and six were heterozygous for R635X. The remaining alleles were subjected to mutation screening by PCR amplification of individual exons of LAMB3 and LAMC2, followed by heteroduplex analysis and nucleotide sequencing. In three families (six alleles), mutations in LAMC2 were disclosed. In the remaining eight alleles, additional pathogenetic LAMB3 mutations were found. None of the patients had LAMA3 mutation. Thus, LAMB3 mutations accounted for 22 of 28 JEB alleles (79%), and a total of 14 of 22 LAMB3 alleles (64%) harbored the R635X mutation, signifying its prevalence as a predominant genetic lesion underlying H-JEB in this European cohort of patients. This recurrent mutation will facilitate screening of additional JEB patients for the purpose of prenatal testing of fetuses at risk for recurrence. PMID:9242513

  20. Spectrum of EGFR gene copy number changes and KRAS gene mutation status in Korean triple negative breast cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoonjung Kim

    Full Text Available Anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR therapy has been tried in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC patients without evaluation of molecular and clinical predictors in several randomized clinical studies. Only fewer than 20% of metastatic TNBCs showed response to anti-EGFR therapy. In order to increase the overall response rate, first step would be to classify TNBC into good or poor responders according to oncogenic mutation profiles. This study provides the molecular characteristics of TNBCs including EGFR gene copy number changes and mutation status of EGFR and KRAS gene in Korean TNBC patients. Mutation analysis for EGFR, KRAS, BRAF and TP53 from a total of 105 TNBC tissue samples was performed by direct sequencing, peptide nucleic acid-mediated PCR clamping method and real-time PCR. Copy number changes of EGFR gene were evaluated using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. Out of all 105 TNBCs, 15.2% (16/105 showed EGFR copy number changes. Among them, increased or decreased EGFR copy number was detected in 13 (5 single copy gain, 2 amplification and 4 high-copy number amplification and 3 cases (3 hemizygous deletion, respectively. The mutation frequencies of KRAS, EGFR and TP53 gene were 1.9% (G12V and G12D, 1.0% (exon 19 del and 31.4%, respectively. There was no BRAF V600E mutation found. Future studies are needed to evaluate the clinical outcomes of TNBC patients who undergo anti-EGFR therapy according to the genetic status of EGFR.

  1. GNAS mutation as an alternative mechanism of activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in gastric adenocarcinoma of the fundic gland type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Ryosuke; Saito, Tsuyoshi; Mitomi, Hiroyuki; Hidaka, Yasuhiro; Lee, Se-yong; Watanabe, Sumio; Yao, Takashi

    2014-12-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma of the fundic gland type (GAFG) is a rare variant of gastric tumor. We have recently reported the frequent accumulation of β-catenin in GAFGs and showed that approximately half of the cases studied harbored at least 1 mutation in CTNNB1/AXINs/APC, leading to the constitutive activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. However, the mechanisms of Wnt signaling activation in the remaining cases are unknown. Accumulating evidence showed that the activating mutation in GNAS promotes tumorigenesis via the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway or the ERK1/2 MAPK pathway. Therefore, we analyzed the mutations in GNAS (exons 8 and 9) and in KRAS (exon 2) in 26 GAFGs. Immunohistochemistry revealed nuclear β-catenin expression in 22 of 26 GAFGs, and 10 (38.5%) of 26 cases harbored at least 1 mutation in CTNNB1/AXINs/APC. Activating mutations in GNAS were found in 5 (19.2%) of 26 GAFGs, all of which harbored R201C mutations. Activating mutations in KRAS were found in 2 (7.7%) of 26 GAFGs, and both of these also contained GNAS activating mutations. Four of 5 cases with GNAS mutation showed nuclear β-catenin expression, and presence of GNAS mutation was associated with β-catenin nuclear expression (P = .01). Furthermore, 3 of these 4 cases did not harbor mutations in CTNNB1, APC, or AXINs, suggesting that mutations in the Wnt component genes and those in GNAS occur almost exclusively. These results suggest that GNAS mutation might occur in a small subset of GAFG as an alternative mechanism of activating the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. PMID:25288233

  2. Novel Mutations Detected in Avirulence Genes Overcoming Tomato Cf Resistance Genes in Isolates of a Japanese Population of Cladosporium fulvum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichiro Iida

    Full Text Available Leaf mold of tomato is caused by the biotrophic fungus Cladosporium fulvum which complies with the gene-for-gene system. The disease was first reported in Japan in the 1920s and has since been frequently observed. Initially only race 0 isolates were reported, but since the consecutive introduction of resistance genes Cf-2, Cf-4, Cf-5 and Cf-9 new races have evolved. Here we first determined the virulence spectrum of 133 C. fulvum isolates collected from 22 prefectures in Japan, and subsequently sequenced the avirulence (Avr genes Avr2, Avr4, Avr4E, Avr5 and Avr9 to determine the molecular basis of overcoming Cf genes. Twelve races of C. fulvum with a different virulence spectrum were identified, of which races 9, 2.9, 4.9, 4.5.9 and 4.9.11 occur only in Japan. The Avr genes in many of these races contain unique mutations not observed in races identified elsewhere in the world including (i frameshift mutations and (ii transposon insertions in Avr2, (iii point mutations in Avr4 and Avr4E, and (iv deletions of Avr4E, Avr5 and Avr9. New races have developed by selection pressure imposed by consecutive introductions of Cf-2, Cf-4, Cf-5 and Cf-9 genes in commercially grown tomato cultivars. Our study shows that molecular variations to adapt to different Cf genes in an isolated C. fulvum population in Japan are novel but overall follow similar patterns as those observed in populations from other parts of the world. Implications for breeding of more durable C. fulvum resistant varieties are discussed.

  3. Mutations in many genes affect aggressive behavior in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Zwarts Liesbeth; Edwards Alexis C; Yamamoto Akihiko; Callaerts Patrick; Mackay Trudy FC

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Aggressive behavior in animals is important for survival and reproduction. Identifying the underlying genes and environmental contexts that affect aggressive behavior is important for understanding the evolutionary forces that maintain variation for aggressive behavior in natural populations, and to develop therapeutic interventions to modulate extreme levels of aggressive behavior in humans. While the role of neurotransmitters and a few other molecules in mediating and mo...

  4. Detecting negative selection on recurrent mutations using gene genealogy

    OpenAIRE

    Ezawa, Kiyoshi; Landan, Giddy; Graur, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Background Whether or not a mutant allele in a population is under selection is an important issue in population genetics, and various neutrality tests have been invented so far to detect selection. However, detection of negative selection has been notoriously difficult, partly because negatively selected alleles are usually rare in the population and have little impact on either population dynamics or the shape of the gene genealogy. Recently, through studies of genetic disorders and genome-...

  5. Genetic and Functional Analysis of Androgen Receptor Gene Mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Brüggenwirth, Hennie

    1998-01-01

    textabstractNuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) are intermediary factors through which extracellular signals regulate expression of genes that are involved in homeostasis, development, and differentiation (Beato et al. '995, Mangelsdorf and Evans 1995). These receptors are characterized by a modular structure, with domains involved in transcription activation, DNA binding. hormone binding, and dimerization. The nuclear receptor super-family comprises three subfamilies of receptors, which might h...

  6. Comprehensive analysis of cooperative gene mutations between class I and class II in de novo acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Yuichi; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Tsujimura, Akane; Miyawaki, Shuichi; Miyazaki, Yasushi; Kuriyama, Kazutaka; Tomonaga, Masao; Naoe, Tomoki

    2009-08-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has been thought to be the consequence of two broad complementation classes of mutations: class I and class II. However, overlap-mutations between them or within the same class and the position of TP53 mutation are not fully analyzed. We comprehensively analyzed the FLT3, cKIT, N-RAS, C/EBPA, AML1, MLL, NPM1, and TP53 mutations in 144 newly diagnosed de novo AML. We found 103 of 165 identified mutations were overlapped with other mutations, and most overlap-mutations consisted of class I and class II mutations. Although overlap-mutations within the same class were found in seven patients, five of them additionally had the other class mutation. These results suggest that most overlap-mutations within the same class might be the consequence of acquiring an additional mutation after the completion both of class I and class II mutations. However, mutated genes overlapped with the same class were limited in N-RAS, TP53, MLL-PTD, and NPM1, suggesting the possibility that these irregular overlap-mutations might cooperatively participate in the development of AML. Notably, TP53 mutation was overlapped with both class I and class II mutations, and associated with morphologic multilineage dysplasia and complex karyotype. The genotype consisting of complex karyotype and TP53 mutation was an unfavorable prognostic factor in entire AML patients, indicating this genotype generates a disease entity in de novo AML. These results collectively suggest that TP53 mutation might be a functionally distinguishable class of mutation. PMID:19309322

  7. Cochlear implantation effect on deaf children with gap junction protein beta 2 gene mutation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KONG Ying; LIU Sha; WANG Su-ju; Li Shu-jing; LIANG Shuang

    2013-01-01

    Background The popularization and promotion of gene diagnosis technology makes it possible to detect deafness genes for children with congenital hearing impairment,and the proportion of gap junction protein beta 2 (GJB2) gene mutations in cochlear implant patients is 26.5% We did follow-up evaluation on auditory rehabilitation effect for all 31 deaf children with GJB2 gene mutation after cochlear implantation to provide a reference for such patients.Methods Application of “the genetic deafness gene chip detection kit” and “gene complete sequence analysis” were applied to conduct detection on common genetic deafness gene mutation hotspots of the hearing impaired children with cochlear implantation.To conduct auditory rehabilitation effect evaluation on all 31 cases of patients with GJB2 genetic deafness after 3,6 and 12 months of the operation respectively.The single factor repeated measure analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied to analysis whether there were significant difference among the results of initial consonant of a Chinese syllable recognition at 3 different stages after the operation,the results of vowel of a Chinese syllable recognition at 3 different stages after the operation,and the results of two-syllable recognition at 3 different stages after the operation.Results The 235delC is the high-incidence mutational site in 31 cases of patients with GJB2 genetic deafness,and the total detection rate is up to 90.3% (28/31).There were significant differences in the initial consonant and the vowel of a Chinese syllable recognition rate,and the two-syllable recognition rates at 3,6,and 12 months after the operation (P<0.01).Conclusion Cochlear implantation is a safe and effective measure for auditory reconstruction,enabling patients with GJB2 hereditary severe sensorineural deafness to achieve auditory speech recognition effectively.

  8. High Resolution Melting Analysis for Detecting p53 Gene Mutations in Patients with Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihong CHEN

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It has been proven that p53 gene was related to many human cancers. The mutations in p53 gene play an important role in carcinogensis and mostly happened in exon 5-8. The aim of this study is to establish a high resolution melting (HRM assay to detect p53 mutations from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, to investigate the characteristics of p53 gene mutations, and to analyze the relationship between p53 mutations and evolution regularity of pathogenesis. Methods p53 mutations in exon 5-8 were detected by HRM assay on DNA insolated from 264 NSCLC samples derived from tumor tissues and 54 control samples from pericancerous pulmonary tissues. The mutation samples by the HRM assay were confirmed by sequencing technique. Samples which were positive by HRM but wild type by sequencing were further confirmed by sub-clone and sequencing. Results No mutation was found in 54 pericancerous pulmonary samples by HRM assay. 104 of the 264 tumor tissues demonstrated mutation curves by HRM assay, 102 samples were confirmed by sequencing, including 95 point mutations and 7 frame shift mutations by insertion or deletion. The mutation rate of p53 gene was 39.4%. The mutation rate from exon 5-8 were 11.7%, 8%, 12.5% and 10.6%, respectively and there was no statistically significant difference between them (P=0.35. p53 mutations were significantly more frequent in males than that in females, but not related to the other clinicopathologic characteristics. Conclusion The results indicate that HRM is a sensitive in-tube methodology to detect for mutations in clinical samples. The results suggest that the arising p53 mutations in NSCLC may be due to spontaneous error in DNA synthesis and repair.

  9. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in Asian Indians is neither associated with iron overload nor with HFE gene mutations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ajay Duseja; Reena Das; Mohit Nanda; Ashim Das; Gurjeewan Garewal; Yogesh Chawla

    2005-01-01

    AIM: The pathogenesis of occurrence of liver inflammation and fibrosis in patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is not completely understood. Other than insulin resistance, iron abnormalities have been thought to be one of the triggering factors. Therefore, our aim was to study the role of iron abnormalities and HFE gene mutations in patients with NASH.METHODS: Thirty-one patients of NASH diagnosed on the basis of clinical examination biochemistry, ultrasonography and liver biopsy (n = 14) were included in the study. Serum iron parameters (n = 23) (iron, ferritin, total iron-binding capacity and transferrin saturation), Peris' iron staining on liver biopsies (n = 14) and HFE gene mutations (C282Y and H63D) (n = 16) were studied in these patients. The association between iron staining, necroinflammatory activity and fibrosis stage on liver biopsies was also determined.RESULTS: Elevated serum iron, ferritin and transferrin saturation above 55% were observed in 4.3% of patients.On histology, 71% of the patients had negative iron staining,21.4% had 1+ staining, 7.2% had 2+ staining and none had 3+ or 4+ staining. There was no association between the degree of iron staining and necroinflammatory activity (P = 0.55) and fibrosis stage (P = 0.09) on histology. None of the patients had C282Y HFE gene mutation and four patients (25%) were found to be heterozygotes for H63D gene mutation.CONCLUSION: Our study does not favor iron overload and HFE gene mutations as major factors in the pathogenesis of NASH in Asian Indians.

  10. Mutational analysis of hedgehog signaling pathway genes in human malignant mesothelioma.

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    Chuan Bian Lim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Hedgehog (HH signaling pathway is critical for embryonic development and adult homeostasis. Recent studies have identified regulatory roles for this pathway in certain cancers with mutations in the HH pathway genes. The extent to which mutations of the HH pathway genes are involved in the pathogenesis of malignant mesothelioma (MMe is unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Real-time PCR analysis of HH pathway genes PTCH1, GLI1 and GLI2 were performed on 7 human MMe cell lines. Exon sequencing of 13 HH pathway genes was also performed in cell lines and human MMe tumors. In silico programs were used to predict the likelihood that an amino-acid substitution would have a functional effect. GLI1, GLI2 and PTCH1 were highly expressed in MMe cells, indicative of active HH signaling. PTCH1, SMO and SUFU mutations were found in 2 of 11 MMe cell lines examined. A non-synonymous missense SUFU mutation (p.T411M was identified in LO68 cells. In silico characterization of the SUFU mutant suggested that the p.T411M mutation might alter protein function. However, we were unable to demonstrate any functional effect of this mutation on Gli activity. Deletion of exons of the PTCH1 gene was found in JU77 cells, resulting in loss of one of two extracellular loops implicated in HH ligand binding and the intracellular C-terminal domain. A 3-bp insertion (69_70insCTG in SMO, predicting an additional leucine residue in the signal peptide segment of SMO protein was also identified in LO68 cells and a MMe tumour. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We identified the first novel mutations in PTCH1, SUFU and SMO associated with MMe. Although HH pathway mutations are relatively rare in MMe, these data suggest a possible role for dysfunctional HH pathway in the pathogenesis of a subgroup of MMe and help rationalize the exploration of HH pathway inhibitors for MMe therapy.

  11. Mutation screening of melatonin-related genes in patients with autism spectrum disorders

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    Thuresson Kent

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One consistent finding in autism spectrum disorders (ASD is a decreased level of the pineal gland hormone melatonin and it has recently been demonstrated that this decrease to a large extent is due to low activity of the acetylserotonin O-methyltransferase (ASMT, the last enzyme in the melatonin synthesis pathway. Moreover, mutations in the ASMT gene have been identified, including a splice site mutation, that were associated with low ASMT activity and melatonin secretion, suggesting that the low ASMT activity observed in autism is, at least partly, due to variation within the ASMT gene. Methods In the present study, we have investigated all the genes involved in the melatonin pathway by mutation screening of AA-NAT (arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase, ASMT, MTNR1A, MTNR1B (melatonin receptor 1A and 1B and GPR50 (G protein-coupled receptor 50, encoding both synthesis enzymes and the three main receptors of melatonin, in 109 patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASD. A cohort of 188 subjects from the general population was used as a comparison group and was genotyped for the variants identified in the patient sample. Results Several rare variants were identified in patients with ASD, including the previously reported splice site mutation in ASMT (IVS5+2T>C. Of the variants affecting protein sequence, only the V124I in the MTNR1B gene was absent in our comparison group. However, mutations were found in upstream regulatory regions in three of the genes investigated, ASMT, MTNR1A, and MTNR1B. Conclusions Our report of another ASD patient carrying the splice site mutation IVS5+2T>C, in ASMT further supports an involvement of this gene in autism. Moreover, our results also suggest that other melatonin related genes might be interesting candidates for further investigation in the search for genes involved in autism spectrum disorders and related neurobehavioral phenotypes. However, further studies of the novel variants identified

  12. Two novel tyrosinase (TYR gene mutations with pathogenic impact on oculocutaneous albinism type 1 (OCA1.

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    Vadieh Ghodsinejad Kalahroudi

    Full Text Available Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA is a heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive disorders resulting from mutations of the tyrosinase (TYR gene and presents with either complete or partial absence of pigment in the skin, hair and eyes due to a defect in an enzyme involved in the production of melanin. In this study, mutations in the TYR gene of 30 unrelated Iranian OCA1 patients and 100 healthy individuals were examined using PCR-sequencing. Additionally, in order to predict the possible effects of new mutations on the structure and function of tyrosinase, these mutations were analyzed by SIFT, PolyPhen and I-Mutant 2 software. Here, two new pathogenic p.C89S and p.H180R mutations were detected in two OCA1 patients. Moreover, the R402Q and S192Y variants, which are common non-pathogenic polymorphisms, were detected in 17.5% and 35% of the patients, respectively. The outcome of this study has extended the genotypic spectrum of OCA1 patients, which paves the way for more efficient carrier detection and genetic counseling.

  13. Mutations in the human SIX3 gene in holoprosencephaly are loss of function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domené, Sabina; Roessler, Erich; El-Jaick, Kenia B; Snir, Mirit; Brown, Jamie L; Vélez, Jorge I; Bale, Sherri; Lacbawan, Felicitas; Muenke, Maximilian; Feldman, Benjamin

    2008-12-15

    Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is the most common developmental anomaly of the human forebrain; however, the genetics of this heterogeneous and etiologically complex malformation is incompletely understood. Heterozygous mutations in SIX3, a transcription factor gene expressed in the anterior forebrain and eyes during early vertebrate development, have been frequently detected in human HPE cases. However, only a few mutations have been investigated with limited functional studies that would confirm a role in HPE pathogenesis. Here, we report the development of a set of robust and sensitive assays of human SIX3 function in zebrafish and apply these to the analysis of a total of 46 distinct mutations (19 previously published and 27 novel) located throughout the entire SIX3 gene. We can now confirm that 89% of these putative deleterious mutations are significant loss-of-function alleles. Since disease-associated single point mutations in the Groucho-binding eh1-like motif decreases the function in all assays, we can also confirm that this interaction is essential for human SIX3 co-repressor activity; we infer, in turn, that this function is important in HPE causation. We also unexpectedly detected truncated versions with partial function, yet missing a SIX3-encoded homeodomain. Our data indicate that SIX3 is a frequent target in the pathogenesis of HPE and demonstrate how this can inform the genetic counseling of families. PMID:18791198

  14. Characterisation of antimicrobial resistance-associated integrons and mismatch repair gene mutations in Salmonella serotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Baowei; Zheng, Jie; Brown, Eric W; Zhao, Shaohua; Meng, Jianghong

    2009-02-01

    In this study, we examined the presence of integrons and Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1) and assessed their contribution to antimicrobial resistance as well as determining the extent of the mutator phenotype in Salmonella isolates. A total of 81 Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium isolates were examined for the presence of integrons and SGI1 and for hypermutators using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the mutator assay, respectively. An additional 336 Salmonella isolates were also used to screen for hypermutators. Fourteen S. Typhimurium isolates carried class 1 integrons, of which six were shown to possess SGI1. Five putative mutators, S. Typhimurium ST20751, S. enterica serotype Heidelberg 22396 and S. enterica serotype Enteritidis 17929, 17929N and 17929R, were identified among the 417 Salmonella isolates. Complementation analysis with the wild-type mutH, mutL, mutS and uvrD genes indicated that none of the five mutators contained defective mismatch repair (MMR) system alleles. DNA sequence analysis revealed that single point mutations resulting in aspartic acid (codon 87) substitution in the gyrA gene conferred resistance to nalidixic acid and/or other fluoroquinolone drugs (ciprofloxacin and enrofloxacin) among four isolates. Our findings indicated that integrons and SGI1 play an important role in multidrug resistance in Salmonella. The incidence of hypermutators owing to defective MMR in Salmonella appears to be rare. PMID:19013057

  15. Investigation of a PAX6 gene mutation in a Malaysian family with congenital aniridia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, P C; Lam, H H; Ghani, S A; Subrayan, V; Chua, K H

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the PAX6 gene that cause aniridia have been identified in various ethnicities but not in the Malaysian population. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the PAX6 mutation in a Malaysian family with congenital aniridia. In this study, a complete ophthalmic examination was performed on a Dusun ethnic family with aniridia. Genomic DNA was extracted from the peripheral blood of the subjects and screened for the PAX6 gene mutation using polymerase chain reaction amplification high-resolution melting curve analysis (PCR-HRM) followed by confirmation via direct DNA sequencing. A heterozygous G deletion (c.857delG) in exon 7 causing a frame shift in PAX6 was identified in all affected family members. Genotype-phenotype correlation analysis revealed congenital cataract and all affected family members showed a similar spectrum of aniridia with no phenotypic variability but with differences in severity that were age-dependent. In summary, by using a PCR-HRM approach, this study is the first to report a PAX6 mutation in a Malaysian family. This mutation is the cause of the aniridia spectra observed in this family and of congenital cataract. PMID:24737507

  16. The Role of SPINK1 Gene Mutation in Chronic Pancreatitis Development and Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurii A. Kucheryavyi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The research is aimed at the evaluation of the role of SPINK1 gene mutations in the development of different etiologic variants of chronic pacreatitis (CP. The examination of 240 CP patients and 107 healthy people, constituting the control group (CG was undertaken. All the patients underwent general and biochemical blood analysis, clinical urinalysis, standard coprological examination, immunoenzyme method of fecal elastase-1 determination, esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGC, ultrasound investigation and/or computer tomography (CT of abdominal cavity organs and genetic research on mutation N34S (AAT>AGT identification in SPINK1 gene, using the method of restriction analysis. N34S mutation was determined in 22 (9.2 % CP patients and in 3 (2.8 % CG people. The upper frequency of N34S mutation was determined in patients with toxic and idiopathic CP, which has reached 16.7 % in total and 13.3 % for homozygotes. High frequency of N34S mutation was registered in patients with complicated forms of idiopathic CP, which can increase the risk of disease complication.

  17. EFFECTS OF MUTATIONS IN THE POLYMERASE GENE OF HEPATITIS B VIRUS GENOME ON LAMIVUDINE THERAPY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩永年; 张欣欣; 陆志檬; 张东华

    2001-01-01

    Objective To explore the effects of mutations in tyrosine-methionine-aspartic acid-aspartic acid (YMDD) motif of the polymerase in the hepatitis B virus ( HBV) genome on lamivudine antiviral therapy. Methods Partial HBV DNA segment containing the YMDD motif in the P gene was obtained through amplification by polymerase chain reaction ( PCR ) from 19 chronic hepatitis B patients with serum HBV DNA positive at the 48th week treatment with lamivudine and subjected to automatic sequencing. Influences of variants with YMDD mutations on lamivudine therapy were seen by observing the dynamic changes of serum HBV DNA and ALT levels. Results Serum HBV DNA breakthrough was found in 3 out of 10 individuals with detection of the YMDD mutations at the 48th week and in 5 at the 52th week, 2 of the 5 patients accompanied by serum ALT re-elevation, whereas of 9 subjects without YMDD mutations, 2 experienced an HBV DNA breakthrough at the 48th week and 1 of them had a conversion from HBV DNA positive to negative at the 52th week. Patients with detectable HBV DNA level had a fluctuating level of serum ALT all time during the treatment. Conclusion Detection of mutations in the YMDD motif of polyrnerase gene in HBV genome during the lamivudine therapy will be helpful to monitoring its therapeutic outcomes.

  18. Characteristics of S gene mutation in patients with occult HBV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-hong CHEN

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To analyze characteristics of HBV S gene mutation in one patient with occult hepatitis B virus infection, who was positive for serum HBV DNA for long term, but negative for HBsAg in order to reveal the correlation between S gene mutation and development of OBI as well as the progression of the liver disease. Methods Four serum samples were collected at different time-points for the use of amplifying HBV S gene and performing cloning-sequencing. The representative S mutants were selected to construct recombinant vectors for phenotype analysis. Results Several S-gene mutational patterns were detected in the samples, including pre-S1 large fragment deletion, s126-127 "RPCMNCTI" insertion, sQ129N, s131-133 TSM→NST, and classical sG145R mutations. In sequential 4 samples, s131-133 TSM→NST mutation was detected in 0%, 26%, 59% and 74% of viral clones, respectively. The pre-S1 large fragment deletion was constantly found in the 4 serum samples, accounting for 26%, 17%, 15% and 21% of detected viral clones, respectively. Phenotypic analysis showed that sQ129N and s131-133 TSM → NST mutations reduced the affinity of the antibody to HBsAg and increased the secretion of virus particles. Compared with the wild-type strain, the replication capacity and surface antigen promoter Ⅱ (SPⅡ activity of large fragment-deleted (nt 3046-3177 deletion strain were decreased by 43.7% and 97.2%, respectively. In addition, sG145R-induced impairment to secretion capacity of viral particles was verified. Conclusions Clinical presentations of long-term OBI of this HBV-infected patient could be caused by multiple S-gene mutants. Some S-gene mutations influence viral phenotypic characteristics, which might closely be related to the progression of liver disease. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.03.02

  19. Regulation of APC and AXIN2 expression by intestinal tumor suppressor CDX2 in colon cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Anders Krüger; Coskun, Mehmet; Bzorek, Michael; Kristensen, Michael Holmsgaard; Danielsen, Erik Thomas; Jørgensen, Steffen; Olsen, Jørgen; Engel, Ulla; Holck, Susanne; Troelsen, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    -related genes are regulated by CDX2. The aim was to investigate the role of decreased CDX2 level on the expression of APC, AXIN2 and GSK3β in migrating colon cancer cells at the invasive front. CDX2-bound promoter and enhancer regions from APC, AXIN2 and GSK3β were analyzed for gene regulatory activity and the...... expression pattern of APC and GSK3β at the invasive front was evaluated by immunohistochemical procedures. Transfection of intestinal and non-intestinal cell lines demonstrated that CDX2 activated APC and AXIN2 promoter activities via intestinal cell-specific enhancer elements. Suppressed CDX2 expression was...... associated with endogenous downregulation of APC and AXIN2 expression in Caco-2 cells but did not affect GSK3β expression. Furthermore, elevated levels of nuclear β-catenin and reduced levels of cytoplasmic APC were correlated to a low CDX2 expression in migrating colon cancer cells in vivo. These results...

  20. Regulation of APC and AXIN2 expression by intestinal tumor suppressor CDX2 in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Anders Krüger; Coskun, Mehmet; Bzorek, Michael; Kristensen, Michael Holmsgaard; Danielsen, Erik Thomas; Jørgensen, Steffen; Olsen, Jørgen; Engel, Ulla; Holck, Susanne; Troelsen, Jesper Thorvald

    2013-06-01

    Wnt signaling is often constitutively active in colorectal cancer cells. The expression of the intestinal specific transcription factor CDX2 is found to be transiently decreased in invasive cells at the tumor/stroma interface. A recent ChIP-Seq study has indicated that several Wnt signaling-related genes are regulated by CDX2. The aim was to investigate the role of decreased CDX2 level on the expression of APC, AXIN2 and GSK3β in migrating colon cancer cells at the invasive front. CDX2-bound promoter and enhancer regions from APC, AXIN2 and GSK3β were analyzed for gene regulatory activity and the expression pattern of APC and GSK3β at the invasive front was evaluated by immunohistochemical procedures. Transfection of intestinal and non-intestinal cell lines demonstrated that CDX2 activated APC and AXIN2 promoter activities via intestinal cell-specific enhancer elements. Suppressed CDX2 expression was associated with endogenous downregulation of APC and AXIN2 expression in Caco-2 cells but did not affect GSK3β expression. Furthermore, elevated levels of nuclear β-catenin and reduced levels of cytoplasmic APC were correlated to a low CDX2 expression in migrating colon cancer cells in vivo. These results suggest that a low CDX2 level has influence on the Wnt signaling in invasive colon cancer cells possibly promoting cellular migration. PMID:23393221